Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Citrus hoops turn back Dunnellon /B1

C CIT RUS CO0U NT Y^^


CHRONICLE


www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community I Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


U S E D E)


CR(cI
SUE


VOL. 119 ISSUE 157


Beaty resigns from CMH


Boards sign hospital lease agreement


Nemzoffsettlement in the works


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Of all the
days in recent memory at Citrus
Memorial hospital, Friday was
one of the biggest:
Hospital Chief Executive
Officer Ryan Beaty said he will


resign on March 15. ,,
Two boards that have bat-
tled for four years agreed on a <
letter of intent to lease Citrus .
Memorial to Hospital Corpora-
tion of America. Afterward, the Ryan
two chairwomen and Peter Beaty
Marmerstein, president of Citrus
See Page A2 Memorial CEO.


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The Citrus County Hospital
Board agreed Friday to a settle-
ment with transaction consult-
ant Joshua Nemzoff that pays
him $700,000 to end a federal
lawsuit


The settlement is contingent i
on approval from the CCHB's
insurance carrier, hospital
board attorney Bill Grant said.
Grant said did not hear from
the insurance company Friday Joshua
about what amount it will pay Nemzoff
toward the settlement, but transaction
See Page A9 consultant.


Passion turns hobby into career


Man hooked on

radio-controlled

flying
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CITRUS SPRINGS -
Kevin Lee will gladly show
you one of his more popular
products, a radio-controlled
quad copter, known as a
"quad" just don't call it a
drone.
The owner and manager of
Lee's Hobbies has watched
with dismay as the popular
pastime of flying radio-
controlled (RC) aircraft has
been caught up in the grow-
ing notoriety of drones.
In addition to their well-
publicized war use, and
pending commercial use, the
Federal Aviation Administra-
tion has just named six pub-
lic entities around the
country to develop un-
manned aircraft research
and test sites.
Florida had submitted a
proposal, but was not
selected.
"Technology has made this
so easy to fly," Lee said, hold-
ing a Blade 350 QX. 'Anybody
can fly it first time out. It's
stable and easy to control."
Lee knows from experi-
ence the skill it takes to fly an
RC airplane. He recalled
showing up at the Pine Ridge
RC flying field, being invited
to try a buddy-control with an
experienced pilot.
"I was hooked," he said.
"I've loved it every day
since."
His passion for RC flying
led him to purchase the


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Kevin Lee of Lee's Hobbies maneuvers a Blade 350 QX quad copter recently using a radio controller.


hobby shop, where he admits
that work can be a lot of fun.
Lee said he has learned a
lot from experienced cus-
tomers and is glad to pass
that knowledge on.
In addition to quads, the
store carries RC airplanes,
helicopters, boats and cars,
and model kits by Revell. He
also stocks a large selection of
parts, paints and related tools.
"I tend to get a lot of begin-
ners and novices," he said,
"and end up spending a lot of
time with them."
He credits the quads with
getting more young people


involved with RC aircraft.
The term "quad" refers to
the battery-powered air-
craft's four rotors.
"They're real easy out of
the box," he said. "It can take
a while to learn to fly an RC
plane."
The pilot (operator) con-
trols the quad through a
See Page A2
Lee said the devices are easy
to fly and can be manipulated
to increase the difficulty
level of flight by the person
controlling the device.


Manatee count reveals near-record numbers


Special to the Chronicle
Wednesday's manatee survey by
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(FWS) found 560 manatees in
King's Bay, which is the second-
highest count ever in the bay since
the surveys began in 1983, accord-
ing the federal agency


However, biologist Joyce Kleen
reported poor visibility due to
high winds, which prevented her
from obtaining a more accurate
count, according to a statement
from the FWS.
"If conditions had been better,
the survey would have easily ex-
ceeded over 600 manatees in


King's Bay," said Kleen, a wildlife
biologist at the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge.
The survey required Kleen to
photograph all the manatee ag-
gregations and count each indi-
vidual manatee on printed
poster-sized images over a lit sur-
face. But the waters were so
murky that even the printed im-
ages couldn't reveal all the ani-
mals resting in the cloudy waters,


particularly at the King Spring.
King Spring was the location
with the highest count, with an all-
time record high of 387 manatees.
The Duke power plant dis-
charge canal had an all-time low
of two manatees, and conditions
were favorable at that location,
the FWS reported.
Manatees at the Homosassa
Blue Waters dropped significantly
See Page A2


6II!411 !1821 12 11 5


Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Crossword ........ C7


Community .......C6
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers .
Lottery Payouts .
Movies ..........


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C7


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JANUARY 11, 2014


Annual survey shows 560 sea cows


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
76
LOW
55


A few
storms,
mainly
later.
Chance
of rain
50
percent.
PAGE
A4


*I:1 IIu





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The lightweight quad is
system.


FLYING
Continued from Page Al

handheld radio transmitter
And it must be in line of
sight, with an FAA-man-
dated 400-foot altitude limit
The quad's technology in-
cludes GPS and altimeter
sensors. Lee explained this
model is self-leveling, can
hover and has a return-
home function. The latter
means that with the flip of a
switch, the quad will auto-
matically return to the spot
where it started the flight
And to avoid confusion,
the quad is designed so its
right and left always fol-
lows the pilot's right and
left. "You can't get mixed
up," he said.
With its four 8-inch rotors
spinning at 10,000 to 11,000
revolutions per minute, Lee
said safety is always a con-
cern. When operating in the
novice mode, the quad
maintains a "safe circle"
and will not operate within
30 feet of the pilot
The quad is powered by
a rechargeable lithium-ion
battery It can fly about 10



CMH
Continued from Page Al

HCA's West Florida Divi-
sion, all inked the letter of
intent.
With Beaty's resigna-
tion, the Citrus County
Hospital Board and Citrus
Memorial Health Founda-
tion reached agreement on
dismissing two lawsuits
and amending another to
remove personal liability
S of founda-
-'? tion board
a. members.
/\/ "Q Founda-
S- tion board
members
S said they
wouldn't
sign the
Sandy letter of
Chadwick intent with
foundation HCA with-
chairwoman. out a mas-
ter settlement agreement
dismissing all lawsuits ex-
cept the one now pending
with the Florida Supreme
Court.
Hospital board trustees
refused to do that without
Beaty's resignation and a
vote in determining an in-
terim CEO prior to HCA
taking control of the
hospital.
Foundation members
said they would let Beaty
decide his own future.
"It appears I'm the ob-
stacle to the lawsuits,"
Beaty said, in announcing
his resignation. "This is a



MANATEE
Continued from Page Al

since the last count, from
186 in December to only 77
on Wednesday
Most animals that were
found resting at Three Sis-
ters Springs on Monday
morning had shifted to
the King Spring on
Wednesday
"It is hard to predict on
which of the four large
springs manatees will be
found resting in King's
Bay," said Ivan Vicente,
visitor services specialist
for the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge.
"The tides were ex-
tremely low throughout


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
battery-operated and is equipped with a global positioning


A radio controller is used to fly the device.


to 12 minutes on a charge
and has a visible low-bat-
tery warning light.
The quad is set up to
carry a camera with both
still and video options
available. This capability
has also fueled the drone
comparison and privacy
concerns.
Lee sees the feature
having commercial oppor-
tunities, such as aerial real
estate photography But
under current law, RC air-
craft cannot be hired out.
So, currently, a real estate
agent would have to own


clear and evident way to
move the process along."
He will leave with two
years' severance pay-
about $670,000 accord-
ing to his contract
The same four-person
committee that reviewed
the HCA letter of intent -
two members from each
board -will review appli-
cants for Beaty's position.
The members will inter-
view finalists and then
present a single recom-
mendation to the founda-
tion, which can vote yes or
no on that
Supplicant.
Founda-
Stion mem-
bers, while
pleased to
have a set-
tlement
and letter
Debbie of intent,
Ressler praised
hospital board Beaty for
chairwoman, his offer to
end the stalemate with a
resignation.
"I respect Ryan Beaty I
respect what he's doing
here today," said board
member Joe Brannen,
whose father George co-
founded the hospital in
1957. "I'm sad for him hav-
ing to do this."
Foundation chair-
woman Sandy Chadwick
added: "I'm personally
heartbroken by this turn of
events. I defy anyone to
say there's a good business
reason for this to happen."
CCHB chairwoman


this past cold front, and
surprisingly, the King
Spring became the pre-
ferred spot," Vicente said.
The results for all of Cit-
rus County show a total of
639 manatees, which is the
third highest count ever
for the county.
The breakdown from
Wednesday's count:
King's Bay- 501 adults,
59 calves.
Crystal River None.
Salt River None.
Power plant discharge
canal two adults.
Cross Florida Barge
Canal None.
Homosassa River (Blue
Waters) 70 adults and
seven calves.
Lower Homosassa River
None.


and fly the quad and pho-
tograph their own listings.
In November, the FAA
published an extensive
"road map" for integrating
civil unmanned aircraft
into the National Airspace
System. It cites the antici-
pated expansion of com-
mercial operations in
cargo transport, communi-
cations and photography
Lee believes some type
of FAA certification will
required for RC pilots to
take on commercial jobs.
"It's next year (2014) or
two years out," he said.


Debbie Ressler said she's
had plenty of discussions
with Beaty over the years,
some positive, some not so
positive.
"I do applaud him for
taking this step," she said.
The letter of intent
opens a period of due dili-
gence on HCAs behalf. All
sides hope to have a
contract in place by
September
HCA is offering $140 mil-
lion for the 50-year lease.
After paying the hospital
debt, covering the em-
ployee pension and other
costs, the net proceeds are
estimated at $90 million.
Officials from both boards
expect to place the money
in a trust and appoint a
community-wide board to
oversee it.
The letter of intent
promises to keep the hos-
pital in Inverness for at
least 15 years and keep ob-
stetrics services in Citrus
County for at least seven
years.
HCA also promises to
keep all non-management
employees on salary for
one year
Beaty, who's headed Cit-
rus Memorial for 10 years,
said after the meeting that
offering his resignation
was difficult.
"We just need to move
on," he said. "I would have
liked to been here to the


BH woman faces



child abuse charge


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

BEVERLY HILLS A 30-year-old
woman was arrested for allegedly bruis-
ing a 4-year-old boy with her hand and a
belt, according to the Citrus -
County Sheriff's Office.
Dawn Novak was taken into
custody Thursday on one count
of child abuse without causing I
great bodily harm. Her bond was
$5,000.
According to Novak's arrest
affidavit, the child and two other
children were taken to Jessie's Da
Place an advocacy center for No
abused and neglected children. During
a medical exam, multiple bruises were
identified on the 4-year-old's body Be-
cause of the severity of the bruises, law
enforcement was contacted.


During both the medical exam and
forensic interview, the 4-year-old said
he was spanked, hit with a belt and
placed in a closet for punishment.
Reportedly, when Novak was con-
tacted she said she was the only one who
disciplined the child and he had
not been out of her supervision.
Novak said she had a male
friend but said he does not disci-
pline the child.
Novak admitted to spanking
the child, however, said she
only spanked him three times
with her hand and denied
wn using a belt, according to the
report.
She told authorities the 4-year-old re-
ceived the injuries when falling on Lego
blocks in the bathtub.
Novak was arrested and transported
to the Citrus County Detention Facility


Hernando man charged


with sexual battery


Chronicle


The girl said she told Zipperer during
each of his sexual advances that she was


A 21-year-old Hernando man was ar- not interested and that she attempted to
rested Thursday and charged with sex- push him away Zipperer, according to
ually battering a 15-year-old girl. allegations, held her arms down during
According to his arrest affi- sexual interaction and threat-
davit, Joshua Craig Zipperer is ened that she would get in trou-
accused of having sexual inter- ble if she told anyone of his
course against the girl's will sev- actions.
eral times between March and In April, a witness reportedly
May of 2013. saw Zipperer touching the girl
Late last month the girl told inappropriately
her mother and a family friend During an investigation by
that Zipperer had sexually as- Jsu sheriff's officials, Zipperer ad-
saulted her on approximately Joshua emitted to engaging in inter-
five separate occasions, engag- Zipperer course with the 15-year-old and
ing in intercourse and touching her in- said he was aware of the age of consent
appropriately due to a previous criminal charge, ac-
The sheriff's office received the re- cording to the affidavit.
port of the allegations on Dec. 27. Zipperer's bond was set at $35,000.

For the RECORD


Arrests
Richard Henry, 31, of
West Homosassa Trail, Ho-
mosassa, at 11:45 a.m. Jan. 9
on an active warrant for felony
violation of probation stem-
ming from an original charge
of carrying a concealed
weapon. Bond was denied.
Maybelle Douds, 79, of
Brittle Road, Brooksville, at
11:33 a.m. Jan. 9 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. According to her arrest
affidavit, Douds is accused of
shoplifting a sterling silver
"peace" bracelet valued at $53
from the Crystal River Bealls.
Bond $250.
Dawn Novak, 30, of Bev-
erly Hills, at 2:19 p.m. Jan. 9
on a felony charge of child
abuse without causing great
bodily harm. Bond $5,000.
Edward Muller, 54, of
North Skyflower Point,
Lecanto, at 3:40 p.m. Jan. 9
on an active warrant for mis-
demeanor charges of obtain-
ing property by means of a
worthless check. Bond $900.
Michael Wininger, 34, of
East Grapeleaf Lane, Inver-
ness, at 4:35 p.m. Jan. 9 on an
active warrant for felony viola-
tion of probation stemming
from an original charge of pos-
session of photographs con-
taining sexual performance by
a child. Bond was denied.
Corey Ross, 23, at
7:33 p.m. Jan. 9 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. According to his arrest
affidavit, Ross is accused of
shoplifting bed sheets, valued
at $181.76, from the Inverness
Walmart. Bond $250.
James Tolbert, 33, of
South Floral Oaks Circle, Flo-
ral City, at 11 p.m. Jan. 9 on a
felony charge of grand theft
and a misdemeanor charge
of resisting an officer without


violence. According to his ar-
rest affidavit Tolbert is accused
of stealing a .380 caliber
firearm that was reported
stolen on Dec. 24. The firearm
was discovered during a traffic
stop. Bond $2,500.
Gary Brown, 63, of West
Pinto Loop, Beverly Hills, at
11:03 p.m. Jan. 9 on a felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. According to
his arrest affidavit, Brown is ac-
cused of possessing two crack
cocaine rocks weighing approx-
imately .5 grams. The drugs
were discovered when a K-9
unit alerted to possible drugs in
his vehicle during a routine traf-
fic stop. Bond $2,000.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:22 a.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 9, in the 7900 block of
N. Sarazen Drive, Dunnellon.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 11:40 a.m. Jan. 9
in the 1500 block of N.
Arkansas Terrace, Hemrnando.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 3:16 p.m. Jan. 9 in
the 11700 block of E. Hawk
Lane, Floral City.
MA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 7:35 p.m. Jan. 9 in
the 1600 block of S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 12:04 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.
8, in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:16 p.m. Jan. 8 in the 8400


ON THE NET
For the Record
reports are archived
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.

block of N. Foresome Way,
Dunnellon.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:25 p.m. Jan. 8 in the 1900
block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 6:31 p.m. Jan. 8 in
the 8900 block of S. Florida
Ave., Floral City.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 9:01 p.m. Jan. 8 in
the area of N. Treefarm Av-
enue and N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported
at 10:15 a.m. Thursday, Jan.
9, in the 300 block of N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:01 p.m. Jan. 9 in
the 3800 block of E. Dawson
Drive, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:57 p.m. Jan. 9 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 6:57 p.m. Jan. 9 in
the 4900 block of W. Dingus
Court, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 7:04 p.m. Jan. 9 in the 1900
block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported
at 7:08 a.m. Wednesday, Jan.
8, in the 2000 block of N. Croft
Ave., Hernando.


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A2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


LOCAL







S Page A3 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11,2014



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
COUNTY

Irrigation scheduling
and management
Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping is of-
fering a free gardening
workshop from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14.
Irrigation scheduling and
management are essential
to successful and sustain-
able gardening. Providing
the plants with the water
they require and efficient
application of this resource
is the topic of the day.
Winter is a great time to
evaluate your existing sys-
tem with practices that in-
clude: planning water
reducing retrofits, regular
monitoring and catch can
testing to calibrate the sys-
tem. Plan to reduce unnec-
essary water consumption.
Classes are at the Citrus
County Extension Service
Building, 3650 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto.
Call Steven Davis at
352-527-5708 to confirm
participation.
Citrus County's Florida
Yards & Neighborhoods is a
public education and out-
reach program of the Uni-
versity of Florida funded by
Citrus County Utilities.
Florida-Friendly Landscap-
ing means using low main-
tenance plants and
environmentally sustainable
practices to produce a
beautiful landscape. For in-
formation about Florida-
Friendly Landscaping, visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
waterres/conservation/
conservation.htm.
Road-widening
celebration set
The Board of County
Commissioners and county
staff will host a ribbon-
cutting event in celebration
of the completion of Phase
4 of County Road 486 at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21,
at the northeast corner of
State Road 44 and
C.R. 486.
Representatives from
Florida Department of
Transportation, TBARTA,
engineering and contracting
firms will be present as well.
This last phase of con-
struction for approximately
3 miles on C.R. 486 started
at the beginning of 2012,
with four drainage retention
areas, one new traffic sig-
nal, and a 12-foot-wide
multi-use path included in
the project.
For information about this
event, call Tobey Phillips,
public information officer, at
352-586-2698.
R.R. Assembly to
view WWII movies
Today's meeting of the
Ronald Reagan Republican
Assembly will feature a pres-
entation by the president of
the Friends of the Ho-
mosassa Public Library.
There will also be a show-
ing of the first of six volumes
of the Emmy Award-winning
"Victory At Sea" documen-
tary "Design For War,
The Pacific Boils Over, Seal-
ing the Breach and Midway
is East."
The meeting will begin at
1 p.m. at 938 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19) in the South
Square Plaza. Refreshments
will be provided. CASA do-
nations are accepted.
For information, call 352-
257-5381.


Democratic club
meets this morning
The Central Citrus Dem-
ocratic Club will meet at
11 a.m. today at Central
Ridge Library, corner of
Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills.
All registered Democrats
are welcome to attend.
The speaker will be attor-
ney Glen C. Abbott, who
will discuss legal issues
surrounding wills and
probate.
For information,
email centralcitrus
democrats@gmail.com.


-From staff reports


Duke lays out decommissioning process


mystify the $1.18 billion
process of decommission-
ing CR3.
There was also informa-
tion on reducing home
electric use, Duke Energy's
role in the community, the
mariculture center and a
chance for the public to ex-
press opinions.
Halfway through the ses-
sion at the Plantation on
Crystal River, more than
100 people had checked in
along with some public of-
ficials, including state Sen.
Charlie Dean.
Duke spokeswoman
Heather Danenhower said
the open house was one of
the ways community mem-
bers had suggested the
company use for dissemi-


Open house

used to inform

thepublic
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER A
stream of residents took
the opportunity to get a
first-hand update on the
status and future of the
Crystal River area nuclear
plant, known as CR3.
Plant staff members,
company experts and rep-
resentatives from the
Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission were on hand
Thursday afternoon to de-


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce kicked off 2014 by welcoming new
and returning board members and swear-
ing in new officers.
With January dedicated to tourism and
the Manatee Festival, the chamber also
heard from interim county tourism direc-
tor Adam Thomas at its monthly luncheon
Friday at Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club.
Judge Patricia Thomas administered the
oaths for the 2014 officers. Rob Wardlow
was sworn in as chair, Rebecca Bays as
chair-elect, Bill Winkel as secretary and
Gerry Mulligan as treasurer


nating information. And
the timing followed Duke's
December submittal of its
post-shutdown decommis-
sioning plan to the NRC.
Duke Energy Crystal
River decommissioning di-
rector Terry Hobbs reiter-
ated it was an opportunity
for the public to ask ques-
tions about what he agreed
is a complex process.
The plan includes a de-
commissioning descrip-
tion, cost estimate and
schedule. It also has a
management strategy for
storing used nuclear fuel
- a large portion of the
cost and an area of public
interest.
Since there is no na-
tional repository for stor-


ing used nuclear fuel, it
will remain in storage
pools at the plant until
completion of a cask stor-
age facility in 2016. The
fuel will be kept in sealed
metal cylinders at a con-
crete structure near the
existing plant.
The fuel is expected to
be transferred from the
pools to the casks in 2019.
According to CR3 em-
ployee Jim Connor, this
would have happened any-
way If the plant had con-
tinued in operation, the
spent fuel would have
eventually gone into dry
storage after rotating
through the pools.
Nuclear security was an-
other popular topic. Plant


personnel explained a full-
time, around-the-clock,
trained armed security
force will remain in place
throughout the decommis-
sioning process. Current
estimates call for comple-
tion in 2074.
The NRC will have a
public meeting next week
to discuss the decommis-
sioning plan and oversight
process. The meeting is
scheduled for 7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 16, at the
Training Center/Emer-
gency Operations Facility,
8200 Venable St., Crystal
River
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


The News Service of Florida


TALLAHASSEE -A pair of state law-
makers announced a proposal Thursday
that would tighten the definition of resi-
dency for elected officials but almost
immediately conceded the bills might be
overhauled to exempt the Legislature.
Instead, lawmakers would be subject
to a separate joint rule that is being de-
veloped by House and Senate leaders.
The bills (HB 495 and SB 602) list 20
criteria that could be used to determine
where a candidate or official lives, rang-
ing from where the person claims a
homestead exemption to where his or
her bank statements are mailed.
"We've laid out the criteria, raised the
standard and said, 'It's not enough to just
go rent an apartment and say that's
where you live.'... Clearly I think what we
are proposing is going to be stronger than
what we have now," said House sponsor
Ray Rodrigues, R-Estero.
At the same time, the measures don't
specify what the punishment might be or
who would be responsible for enforcing
the standards.
"I believe that there are statutes that
address misfeasance, malfeasance in of-
fice that this would then fall under in the
judicial process," said Senate sponsor
Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater But Latvala
said he would "dig into" the issue more.
Constitutional issues might prevent
lawmakers from applying the law to
themselves, Latvala said. Under the


"We have an exciting year planned," said
Wardlow afterward. "Great things are
going to happen in Citrus County
Adam Thomas, who was recently ap-
pointed to the position, has a background
in professional baseball, experience in
recreational sports, tournaments and
sports tourism.
He summarized where the county is at
regarding tourism events for 2014. He ex-
plained the county ventured into sports
last year, hosting seven events, which
brought in about 9,000 visitors.
The county has 13 sports events booked
for this year, including the national horse-
shoe championships in April, plus cage
fighting, basketball and soccer
And building on last weekend's


state's constitution, each chamber "shall
be the sole judge of the qualifications,
elections, and returns of its members."
Instead, a proposal issued by Senate
President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and
House Speaker Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel, would deal with leg-
islative residency
"You're going to see a joint rule pro-
posed by the speaker and the president
in the near future that I believe will be
pretty close to this not exact, but pretty
close," Latvala said.
He brushed off any notion of uncer-
tainty about a revision.
"Trust me: I know they're going to
change the rule," he said.
Latvala said the process for that was
pushed ahead Wednesday when the Leg-
islature's top lawyers issued a five-page
memo sketching out what should legally
be called home.
The memo by House and Senate gen-
eral counsels laid out criteria based on
previous court cases and other opinions
to help determine whether elected offi-
cials can really call their residences
home.
Among the factors that could answer
the question: "the abandonment of a
prior legal residence as evidenced by
moving" or selling it; where one has reg-
istered as a voter; where one's spouse
and children live, work and attend
school; where one receives mail; and a
residence where someone claims home-
stead exemption.


Formula 1 power boat demonstration at
Lake Hernando, the county will host the
national championship race in September
"We're going to be the only venue in the
whole state, in the southeast region, with
formula racing," he said. "It will be a huge
economic impact to our county.
He said tourism continues to be a bright
spot in the sluggish economy and repre-
sents 12.3 percent of Florida's non-farm
employment.
"In Citrus County, every 86 visitors cre-
ate one new job," he said. "That's what
we're trying to focus on, bringing more
people here."
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online, com.


12 UF Shands


patients have


died of the flu


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Offi-
cials at UF Health Shands
Hospital in Gainesville
said 12 people have died of
flu there including five
younger than 40 years old.
According to a news re-
lease from the hospital,
the deaths have occurred
since October Officials
said more than 150 people
with the flu have been ad-
mitted to the hospital dur-
ing that timeframe.
Health officials said the
flu is a variant of the H1N1
virus that emerged in 2009
and has been labeled a
pandemic by the World
Health Organization.
"One of the theories is
that while we know that
the vast majority of cases
are H1N1, there is some
thought that the H1N1 has
changed," said Alachua
County Health Depart-
ment Administrator Paul
Myers said. "Clearly, there
is something that is differ-
ent about the virus that is
causing the severity in
these patients."
Several other areas
around Florida have re-
ported flu deaths in re-
cent weeks, including


Brevard County where a
woman in her 30s died on
Sunday
The Gainesville Sun re-
ported that 11 of the pa-
tients who died had not
been vaccinated against
the flu virus.
Hospital officials didn't
say how many of the 150-
plus patients with the flu
had received the vaccine.
"Given what I know
about influenza and the
protection vaccination
provides, it would not sur-
prise me if a large major-
ity were not vaccinated,"
Myers said.
A spokeswoman for
Shands told the Sun that
three of the 12 victims are
from Alachua County
The Gainesville area
has traditionally had a
comparatively lower level
of influenza because of
the Alachua school dis-
trict's FluMist vaccine
program, Myers said,
adding that it has a "com-
munity immunity" effect.
He said that last year,
13,000 children from
kindergarten to 12th
grade received the
vaccinations.
Officials said flu vac-
cines are still available.


Taking the oath


: r .


,9f
.'(


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
New Citrus County Chamber of Commerce officers are sworn in by Judge Patricia Thomas on Friday during a luncheon at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club. New officers are, from left: Bill Winkel, secretary; Gerry Mulligan, treasurer; Rebecca Bays, chairwoman-elect;
John Murphy, outgoing chairman, and Rob Wardlow, new chairman.

Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomes new officers


Locals, lawmakers



could face tougher



residency standards






A4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Keep score, ask questions
and stay on top of whatever you are try-
ing to accomplish. Misunderstandings
are apparent, and protecting your as-
sets, health and emotional fitness
should take top priority.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Sudden
changes regarding your friendships and
finances can be expected. Don't lend or
borrow unless you want to be embroiled
in an unsavory situation.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Con-
tinue to view things with curiosity in
order to attract attention. You are a
trendsetter, and this will lead to greater
popularity, as well as controversy
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Disci-
pline, understanding and tenacity will
help you excel. Take advantage of any
chance you get to do something that im-
proves your community or environment.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Take baby
steps regarding your projects. The less
attention you attract, the more you will
accomplish. Stick to the basics.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Informa-
tion you gain through a discussion or
seminar will help you make a life-
altering decision. Things will look up if
you use talents in a diverse manner.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)-You'll be
tempted to take a trip or try something
new and exciting, but be cautious. Argu-
ments or accidents will detain you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) It's a good
day to try something new. Let your cre-
ative imagination lead the way, and don't
be afraid to do things differently.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't be con-
fused by what's going on around you.
Make alterations that are more in line
with your skills. A change may not be
well-received by everyone.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Stay on top
of any matter that pertains to partner-
ships. Disillusionment is apparent, so do
your best to find solutions that please
everyone. If you play your cards right,
you'll come out a hero.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Think mat-
ters through before you act today Not
everyone will be happy with your
choices. Protect your health and do
what it takes to make the best choice.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An open
mind will help when it comes to free-
wheeling discussion. Knowing what you
want will give you an edge.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -The
way you're living may be challenged.
Focus on how you can turn something
you enjoy into a lucrative endeavor.


ENTERTAINMENT


Palin says her new
show won't be
overtly political
PASADENA, Calif. Sarah
Palin said she doesn't expect
her new outdoors television
show on the Sportsman Channel
to be political at least not
overtly so.
Given her background,
though, the 2008 Republican
vice presidential candidate said
Friday while speaking to re-
porters in Pasadena, Calif., that
some politics may seep through.
She said she's interested in pro-
moting freedom of speech and
gun owners' rights.
Her show, "Amazing America,"
premieres on the outdoors-
oriented network in April. The
show profiles personalities who
like hunting and fishing. Palin will
serve as the host, introducing
the featured personalities, and
occasionally traveling to where
they live.


Sasheer Amy
Zamata Poehler

Amy Poehler: 'SNL'
hiring choice of
Zamata 'awesome'
PASADENA, Calif.- "Satur-
day Night Live" alumna Amy
Poehler said her old show's hire
of young comic Sasheer Za-
mata is awesome.
Zamata and two new writers
were hired at NBC's longtime
comedy show last week. All are
black, with the show responding
to criticism it needed more diver-
sity in its creative staff.


Associated Press
Sarah Palin speaks June 15 during the Faith and Freedom
Coalition Road to Majority 2013 conference in Washington.
Palin says she doesn't expect her new outdoors television
show on the Sportsman Channel to be political.


Poehler takes particular pride.
She's a co-founder of New
York's Upright Citizens Brigade
Theatre, and says Zamata was
brought in as part of that improve
group's own effort to promote
diversity.
Poehler is preparing for Sun-
day's job co-hosting the Golden
Globes with Tina Fey, which she
said she's anticipating with a
mixture of excitement and
nervousness.
Miss America
pageant set for
Sept. 14 in NJ
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Miss
America is staying in Atlantic
City.
Miss America 2014 Nina
Davuluri announced Friday that
the next pageant will take place
in the New Jersey shore resort
on Sept. 14.
Preliminary competitions are
scheduled over three nights at
Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall
from Sept. 9 to 11.
Davuluri, a Syracuse, N.Y.,
native, was crowned Miss Amer-


ica in September. The pageant
originated in Atlantic City in 1921
and spent six years in Las
Vegas before returning to New
Jersey last year.
Davuluri plans to use her Miss
America scholarship to attend
medical school.
The program will be televised
byABC.
Maya Angelou
mourns death of
poet Amiri Baraka
NEW YORK Maya An-
gelou is mourning her friend
Amiri Baraka, remembering him
as a vital poet whose private
persona differed greatly from his
fiery public image.
She said by telephone on Fri-
day, "He was very kind."
Baraka and Angelou had
known each other for more than
40 years. He died Thursday in
Newark, N.J., at age 79.
Angelou was among the many
artists influenced by Baraka's
work and political and cultural
activism.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Jan. 11, the
11th day of 2014. There are 354
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 11, 1964, U.S. Surgeon
General Luther Terry issued "Smok-
ing and Health," a report by an advi-
sory committee which concluded that
"cigarette smoking contributes sub-
stantially to mortality from certain
specific diseases and to the overall
death rate."
On this date:
In 1913, the first enclosed sedan-
type automobile, a Hudson, went on
display at the 13th National Automo-
bile Show in New York.
In 1927, the creation of the Acad-
emy of Motion Picture Arts and Sci-
ences was proposed during a dinner
of Hollywood luminaries at the Am-
bassador Hotel in Los Angeles.
In 1935, aviator Amelia Earhart
began an 18-hour trip from Honolulu
to Oakland, Calif., that made her the
first person to fly solo across any part
of the Pacific Ocean.
In 1963, the Beatles' single "Please
Please Me" (B side "Ask Me Why")
was released in Britain by Parlophone.
Five years ago: In a rare Sunday
session, the Senate advanced legis-
lation that would set aside more than
2 million acres in nine states as
wilderness.
One year ago: The video game
industry, blamed by some for foster-
ing a culture of violence, defended its
practices at a White House meeting
hosted by Vice President Joe Biden
on how to prevent horrific shootings
like the Connecticut elementary
school massacre.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Rod
Taylor is 84. Actor Mitchell Ryan is
80. Actor Felix Silla is 77. Country
singer Naomi Judd is 68. Actress
Phyllis Logan (TV: "Downton Abbey")
is 58. Actress Kim Coles is 52. Actor
Jason Connery is 51. Singer Mary J.
Blige is 43. Actor Marc Blucas is 42.
Actress Amanda Peet is 42.
Thought for Today: "For thy
sake, tobacco, I/Would do anything
but die." Charles Lamb, English
essayist (1775-1834), in his 1805
poem "A Farewell to Tobacco."


Today: South then SW winds 15 to
20 knots. Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and
inland waters choppy. Tonight: West
winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 4
feet. Bay and inland waters a
moderate chop.


178/64 Tr1 | \ 3 .*"
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exduse dai
w TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
SHigh: 76 Low: 55, Fi
1!m'..--. ; Showers and a few storms, mainly later,
> :-k ' rain chance 50%
r SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
Je'. High:69 Low:45-
Partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
-p." _" High: 73 Low: 56-
..1 -Mostly cloudy, showers possible Monday
S. night
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 79/68
Record /24
Normal 70/51
Mean temp- 63
Departure from mean 3
PRECIPITATION* .
Friday 0.00,
Total for the month 0-76'
Total for the year 0.76'
Normal for the year 0.69"
'As oi 7 p-m- at Itmrnews
UV INDEX: 5
0-2minimal,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.15


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 66.9
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 93%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, maple, elm
Today's count: 5.7/12
Sunday's count: 10.5
Monday's count: 8.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday observed: 34
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES M= S-S,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
01l1l SATURDAY 02:32 08:23 13:31 19:57
01/12 SUNDAY 0324 09:11 14:17 20:45
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S e T T ... m.............5: pm.
0M WW~t TM!"laW ---------------.723 am.
0C u MOONRISITODATB .... ... 2........ :30p.m
Jan 15 Jan 24 Jan 30 Feb6 M11 IIPT ........... -3:31a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is MOD. There Is no bum ban.
For more Infornation c l Flridia D;risn of Foresiry al (352i 75A-6777 Fii m.i,,e
Infornalion on drought noniiln pI aIiPasvi Ih, Diis.n ;, Foreb'lt s veo re
hlttp: famne-ftl-ool.comwire wealhef(fltx
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei on Wednesday arnor SahLrdcuy
Hand watenng with a shut-off nozzle or micro iigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens. flowers and shAubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime
Citrus County Ublities' aistomers shouh CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. SomTe re%% planbl'.- rmay qjaity lor atddlkl3n
walenng alowances
To report violations, please call-: iy of Inverness @ 352-726.2321, Cty of Cjstal
River 0 3,52 79%421. eI 313 unircorporaTed Clirus County 0 352-527-76689.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay "At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
City High Low
Chassahowtzka" 3:01 am. 06Zlt 245p,m. 0.2 ft, 1104 a.m 0.1 ti 8:&53p.m.2 f,
Crystal ivem- 12:38 am,, 2.1 i, 218p,m. 1.3t, 8:20oa.m. 0.3f. 752pmO.9f ,
Walhlacoochee 12:16 p.m, 24 t, 11:12p.m. 2.8 ft. 6:34 a.m. -0,4 ftt 556 pm.1l 2 ft,
Homosasaa" 1.11 a.m. 12tt. 3332p.m. 0.6ft. 10:53 a.m. 0.1 fl 7:26p.mO4 t.


H L Feast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature

59

Taken at Arlpoke


LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Witnlacoochee al Holder 28.51 28.46 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.38 3836 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.42 39.40 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.09 40.08 42.20
Levels reported in feet above sea v Fl ood stage lo lakes are based on 233year food.,
the ea-annual flod whIch has a 43-procent c wc of being equated or exceeded n
any one year, This da is obtained frorn the Souttiwest FrWIJda Water Management District
and is suiec Io revison In no event l the District or the Unlted States Geological Survey
be I t l oany damage's a] isng oul Of he use ol this data II you have any questions you
should conitac1 the Hydrological Data Secorm al (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Balhrmoe
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Buitlngton, VT
Charleston, S.C.
Chareston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
CIncinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Delroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartlond
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Lo Ancieles


FRI
H L Pcp. H
34 10 .02 53
55 24 53
50 34 .48 59
49 39 .24 62
42 22 -22 63
72 64 .10O 71
36 29 34 61
43 28 48
51 44 63
42 34 .01 46
33 18 .02 58
38 21 06 50
32 14 .01 50
75 54 .11 72
56 34 .12 56
45 38 .44 64
36 27 .20 37
50 33 .09 49
42 31 .17 45
45 33 .30 43
45 32 .11 48
24 -2 04 48
70 47 11 68
41 23 53
35 23 .04 35
37 22 .03 43
63 45 62
47 35 .06 46
35 26 .05 56
32 12 .08 53
70 57 ,01 75
40 31 -13 40
61 40 66
51 36 .46 59
7f4 A7 71


SAT
L Fcst
34 r
32 pc
32 sh
39 Ts
38 ts
44 s
39 is
31 pc
36 r
30 r
38 r
32 r
32 r
48 ts
34 sh
38 ts
22 sn
30 sh
28 r
29 pc
29 sh
29 r
43 pc
25 pc
23 pc
28 0l
39 s
3O pc
32r
35 r
49 pc
27 sn
43 pc
35 s
48t Dc


FRI SAT
City H L Pep. H L Fcst
NewOireans 66 50 71 46 sh
NowYorkCity 35 30 10 58 38 r
Nodrfolk 62 34 05 74 44 S
Oklahoma City 59 38 61 37 s
Omaha 35 26 40 26 pc
Palm Sprngs 74 45 74 51 pc
PtiadelpNea 36 27 25 62 38 r
Phoenix 67 42 72 43 pc
Pitlsbugh 46 31 13 51 30 r
Portland, ME 30 3 .02 48 34 I
Portland. OR 52 48 .04 50 40 ts
Pmidance, lRI 32 14 06 56 36 r
Raleigh 45 39 21 72 41 ts
Rapid Cily 43 26 51 27 pc
Reno 56 29 54 26 pc
Rochester, NY 40 22 06 51 32 r
Sacramenlo 62 35 56 39 r
Sal Lake City 43 30 44 25 pc
San Antono 73 65 .04 75 46 s
San Diego 69 50 60 53 t
SanFrancisco 60 49 55 49 r
Savannah 73 55 09 72 47 ts
Seale 48 46 02 49 40 ts
Spokane 40 33 .02 48 31 sn
Sl. Louis 46 34 .40 46 31 pc
St SWe Mane 29 17 33 22 an
Syracuse 39 18 10 53 32 r
Topeka 41 32 48 30 pc
Washinglton 39 28 .07 61 41 ts
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
NIGH 84. Punia Gorda, Fl
LOW -13. Houoai MaBe
WORLD CITIES


*,B = ,v -. ." .SAT
Louisville 53 35 .03 51 33 ts CITy HJsKv
Memphis 59 45 .04 56 36 pc I T
Miwaukee 36 24 30 36 19 1 AoaP'ho 84f73/
Minneapolis 30 16 30 18 pc Amsterdam 48/37/s
Mobile 61 47 .01 70 40 sh Athes 624/Ws
Montgomery 53 44 03 66 38 ts Beijngl 35/19/s
NashviUe 55 45 56 33 pc Berln 46t3pc
Bermuda 66B4/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: ccloudy; dr-dczae" Cairo 6415W0s
f.fair. h-hay; pc partlyy cloud: rnrin; Calgary 35/21/cd
rs-mlrnsnow mix; ,usmy;, shushower; Havana 82/68/cd
r-sinow tsb=dhdemntfons w wldyh Hong Kong 64M59's
WSi 0Z014 Jerusalem 60148/r


Lisbon 62/j46/pc
London A48/"pc
Madrid 6O35/pc
Montreal 3028/pc
Moscow 37/33/r
Paris 48/41/pc
Rio I8975/s
Rome 57/37tf
Sydney 84f66/s
Tokyo 44/35/s
Toronio 35r3/3
Warsaw 44/37/pc


LEGAL NOTICES







Fictitious Name Notices


C12




S C I T RU S COUNTY



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Daytona Bch. 83
Fort Lauderdale 83
Fort Myers 81
Gainesville 78
Homestead 82
Jacksonville 78
Key West 81
Lakeland 80
Melbourne 84


MARINE OUTLOOK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Citrus County Ticket Sales
Fresh Start DONUTS in
Beverly Hills, FL 527-1996


LEASE NOTE: WE ARE THE SAME 24K GOLD MUS
(all the same performers and workers) as have
performed in Florida for the past 9 years.
iBRANSON STYLEIN FL kORIDAw,.
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Sunday 1-12-2014 Inverness/Lecanto
Sunday 1-19-2014 BRADENTON
Sunday 1-26-2014 OCALA, Fl.
Saturday 2-1-2014 Inverness/Lecanto
Saturday 2-8-2014 LAKELAND
Saturday 2-15-2014 BRADENTON
Sunday 2-23-2014 OCALA, Fl.
SSunday 3-2-2014 LAKELAND


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SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 A5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Claire
Cason, 79
LECANTO
Claire M. Cason, 79, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Jan. 9, 2014. She was a
member of St. Anthony's
Catholic Church. She
owned Country Girl
Beauty Salon in Lecanto.
Claire enjoyed crafts,
needlework and painting.
She is survived by her
husband, James T. Cason
of Lecanto; son, James T
Cason II of West Palm;
daughters, Jacqueline
Cason of Lecanto, and
Leah Caldi of Brooksville;
sisters, Claudette Samson
of Homosassa, and Pauline
Gobis of Englewood;
grandchildren, Sabrina
Sparkman, David Norris,
Nicholas Slack, and
Matthew Cason; cousin,
Carmen Letourneau of
Barre, Vt; nephew, Robert
Samson of Brooksville;
and niece, Simone
Bratcher of Gastonia, N.C.
Gathering in memory
will be from 11 a.m. to
noon, Wednesday, Jan. 15,
2014, at Brooksville
Chapel, with a memorial
service to follow. She will
be laid to rest at Lake
Lindsey Cemetery
Visit wwwbrewer
funeral.com to leave your
condolences. Brewer &
Sons/352-796-4991.





Geraldine
Hall, 89
INVERNESS
Geraldine E. Hall, 89, In-
verness, Fla., died Jan. 9,
2014, at Citrus Memorial
hospital. Geraldine was
born May 22, 1924, in
Hackensack, N.J., to the
late Frank
and Eve-
lyn (Hall-
stein)
Eckhardt.
S h e
proudly
served our
country in
Geraldine the U.S.
Hall Army dur-
ing World War II in the
Women's Army Corp.
Geraldine owned her own
accounting business. An
avid outdoorswoman, she
enjoyed fishing, waterski-
ing, boating and swim-
ming. She liked knitting
and crocheting. She was a
fanatical baseball fan.
Geraldine was a member
of the American Legion
Post 155 in Crystal River
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her daughters,
Christine Hall, St. Peters-
burg and Sandy Hall,
Tallahassee; three grand-
children, Michael, Kelsey
and Kevin; and two great-
grandchildren, Iris and
Mason. She was preceded
in death by her husband,
Maurice R. Hall; her son,
Richard A. Hall; and
brother, Robert Eckhardt.
A funeral tribute to
Geraldine's life will be at
12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14,
2014, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Burial will follow
with military honors at
Florida National Ceme-
tery The family with greet
friends in visitation from
11:30 a.m., until the hour of
service.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Mary
McDermott, 84
HERNANDO
Mary E. McDermott, 84,
of Hernando, Fla., died
Wednesday, Jan. 8,2014, in
Hernando. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

Randall
McGouyrk, 57
INVERNESS
Randall S. McGouyrk,


57, of Inverness, Fla., died
Friday, Jan. 10,2014, at Cit-
rus Memorial hospital,
Inverness.

Josephine
Runfola, 98
HOMOSASSA
Josephine Caroline
Runfola, 98, of Homosassa,
Fla., died Jan. 7, 2014.
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, is in charge of
arrangements.


Martha
Koenigsmark,
97
HOMOSASSA
Martha P Koenigsmark,
97, of Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living in Ho-
mosassa, Fla., passed away
Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, at
HPH Hospice at Barring-
ton Place in Lecanto.
A native of Rossville, Ga.,
she was born Dec. 7,1916,
to Thomas and Ada (Logan)
Pettitt, one of six children.
Martha moved to Ho-
mosassa 33 years ago from
Lathrup Village, Mich. Her
working years as a lifelong
homemaker also included
positions with O'Connor
Studios and National Bank
of Detroit, as well as the
days she worked in her fa-
ther's business, Pettitt's
Candy Factory of Windsor,
Ontario.
She was a member of
the Homosassa Church of
God and is survived by her
daughter, Susan Hol-
landsworth, Pleasanton,
Calif; stepdaughters, Bar-
bara Koenigsmark, Sacra-
mento, Calif, and Joy
Koenigsmark VanLeur,
Frasier, Colo.; six grand-
children; and 12 great-
grandchildren. Martha
was preceded in death by
her husband, Harry (1996)
and her five siblings,
Bessie, Lillian, Bill, Sally
and Walter
Friends will be received
from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, where a funeral
service will be held at
1:30 p.m. Entombment will
follow at Fountains Memo-
rial Park, Homosassa. In
lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial contri-
butions be made in
Martha's memory to HPH
Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, FL
34465. wwwwilderfuneral.
com.

Naomi Rising
FORMERLY OF
HOMOSASSA
A chapel service for
Naomi Rising, formerly of
Homosassa, Fla., will be at
9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 13,
2014, at Fountains Memo-
rial Park, Homosassa.
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, is in charge of
arrangements.

Death
ELSEWHERE

Franklin
McCain, 73
CIVIL RIGHTS
SIT-IN PIONEER
RALEIGH, N.C. -
Franklin McCain, who
helped spark a movement
of nonviolent sit-in
protests across the South
by occupying a segregated
Woolworth's lunch counter
in 1960, has died, his son
said Friday He was 73.
McCain died of respira-
tory complications late
Thursday, Frank McCain
of Greensboro said Friday
Franklin McCain was one
of four freshmen students
from North Carolina A&T
State University in Greens-
boro who sat down at the
local "whites only" lunch
counter on Feb. 1,1960.
"The best feeling of my
life," McCain said in a 2010
interview with The Associ-
ated Press, was "sitting on
that dumb stool."
"I felt so relieved," he
added. "I felt so at peace
and so self-accepted at
that very moment. Nothing
has ever happened to me
since then that topped that
good feeling of being clean
and fully accepted and
feeling proud of me."
The sit-in led to the for-
mation in Raleigh of the
Student Nonviolent Coor-
dinating Committee,
which became the cutting
edge of the student direct-
action civil rights move-
ment. The demonstrations
between 1960 and 1965


helped pass the 1964 Civil
Rights Act and the 1965
Voting Rights Act.
McCain graduated in
1964, became a research
chemist and sales execu-
tive, and moved to Char-
lotte. His wife of 48 years,
Bettye, died a year ago. He
served on his alma mater's
board of trustees, then
spent four years on the
governing board of the 17-
campus University of
North Carolina system.
-From wire reports


Judge orders Renoir art



returned to museum


Associated Press

ALEXANDRIA, Va. -A
federal judge on Friday
awarded ownership of a
disputed Renoir painting
to a Baltimore museum,
citing "overwhelming evi-
dence" that the painting
had been stolen from the
museum more than 60
years ago.
The judge's decision re-
jected the claims of a Vir-
ginia woman, Marcia
"Martha" Fuqua, who
maintained that she
bought the painting at a
flea market for $7, even as
others, including her own
brother, disputed her story
In making her ruling
Friday, U.S. District Judge
Leonie Brinkema did not
pass judgment of the
truthfulness of Fuqua's
story The judge said
merely that because the
museum had shown the
painting was stolen, it
didn't matter how Fuqua
acquired it she could
not legally gain possession
of stolen property even if
she acted in good faith.
Fuqua did not attend
the hearing. Her lawyer,
Wayne Biggs, declined to
comment on whether he
would appeal.
The napkin-sized paint-
ing made news in 2012
when an auction company
announced plans to sell it
on behalf of an anony-
mous woman dubbed
"Renoir girl" who said she
bought the painting at a
West Virginia flea market
in 2009 for $7. The woman
said she did not know the
painting was a Renoir
when she bought it, even
though it was held in a
frame with a "RENOIR"
panel attached.
The auction company
had expected to fetch at
least $75,000, but the auc-
tion was canceled when
the museum came forward
with long-forgotten records
showing the painting had
been stolen in 1951.
As it turned out,


Associated Press
A woman from Virginia said she stopped at a flea market in West Virginia and paid
$7 for a box of trinkets that included an original painting by French impressionist
Pierre-Auguste Renoir. A federal judge on Friday awarded the painting to a Baltimore
museum.


Fuqua's mother, who used
the name Marcia Fouquet,
was an artist who special-
ized in reproducing paint-
ings from Renoir and
other masters, and who
had extensive links to Bal-
timore's art community in
the 1950s.
In addition, Fuqua's
brother, Owen "Matt"
Fuqua, told a Washington
Post reporter that he had
seen the painting in the
family home numerous
times, well before his sis-
ter supposedly bought it in
2009, though Matt Fuqua
changed his story several
times subsequently
The FBI seized the
painting in October 2012
and has been keeping it
while the courts sorted
through the ownership
claims.
After Friday's hearing,
Matt Fuqua said he was
glad the museum is get-
ting the painting and
called his sister a liar
"I'm ecstatic because the
truth came out," he said.
He said a deposition he


gave to lawyers support-
ing his sister's version of
events was a lie.
'At the time, I was trying
to protect her," he said.
Matt Fuqua said after
the hearing that he sus-
pects somebody gave the
painting to his mother
"She was beautiful back
in the day," he said of his
mother, who died recently
"She had a lot of suitors."
Matt Fuqua said he
asked his mother many
times about the painting's
origins, but she wouldn't
say
"It was secretive, and I
wasn't very good at keep-
ing secrets," Matt Fuqua
said.
Martha Fuqua main-
tained throughout the
case that she bought the
painting at a flea market
and gave a sworn state-
ment under penalty of
perjury as part of the
court case. Her lawyer
tried to argue that the mu-
seum's claims were inad-
missible because the
documents were so old


that nobody could attest to
their accuracy
But Brinkema said the
museum's documentation
was legitimate.
"All of the evidence is
on the Baltimore mu-
seum's side. None of the
evidence is on your side,"
Brinkema told Biggs.
Anne Mannix-Brown,
spokeswoman for the Bal-
timore Museum of Art,
said the museum hopes to
have a special unveiling of
the painting some time by
the end of March. It will
be the 47th Renoir in the
museum's collection.
Renoir painted "Paysage
bords de Seine," or On the
Shore of the Seine, on a
linen napkin in 1879 on the
spot at a riverside restau-
rant for his mistress, ac-
cording to an FBI
appraisal of the work
The appraiser estimated
its value at about $22,000,
much lower than the auc-
tion house believed, in
part because the appraiser
said Renoir's paintings
have fallen out of favor


iPhone case lets you see heat


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Remem-
ber the alien with heat vi-
sion in the movie
"Predator"? You, too, can
now stalk people in the
jungle by their heat signa-
tures or check your
home insulation for leaks,
whichever is most useful
to you.
FLIR Systems Inc. is
launching its first con-
sumer product, an iPhone
jacket that contains a heat
camera. Temperature dif-
ferences show up in dif-
ferent colors on the
screen. For instance, you
can set it to show hotter
things in yellow, medium-
hot in red and cold in
purple.
The FLIR One will cost
$349, which compares
with $995 and up for
FLIR's professional ther-
mal imagers. The resolu-
tion of the thermal image
is low, but the jacket also
contains a regular, visible-
spectrum camera and
overlays the images for a
more detailed picture.
The phone can record




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Funeral Home for over 50 Years"




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C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfunera Ihome.com


video or stills of the heat
images.
WHAT YOU COULD
USE IT FOR:
Spot leaky insulation
in the house.
Detect moisture
leaks in the house. Be-
cause it loses heat
through evaporation,
water looks cold.
Beat your kids at hide-
and-seek, "Predator"-style.
Spot lurkers in the
parking lot or wildlife at
night.
Crazy party shots in
darkness.
Unique selfies. "Look
at me, I have a fever!"
Availability: The FLIR
One will launch this
spring for the iPhone 5
and 5S. It won't work with
the 5C. An Android model
will be available later this
year
The accuracy: The ther-
mal camera can detect
temperature differences
of about one-tenth of a
Fahrenheit degree, and
the temperature readout
is accurate to within
2 degrees.



YOUR INTERLOCKING
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
yil ',.: ':-;i ,--,1







SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
352-400-3188


Associated Press
The FLIR ONE thermal imager, demonstrated Thursday
at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las
Vegas, attaches to the back of an iPhone 5 or 5s and
translates heat data into color images on the phone's
screen.


6oE. ,W7U4
Funeral Home With Crematory
RUSSELL McQUILLIN
Visitation: Friday 4:00-6:00 PM
Service: Saturday 3:00 PM
ETHEL KNIGHTON
Service: Sunday 10:30 AM
Chapel
GERALDINE HALL
Service: Tuesday 12:30 PM
MARY L. LEIDECKER
Service: Friday, January 17
2:00 PM
726-8323


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs! i

Brown


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694 j
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralihome.c


Obituaries


Serving all your cremation needs,




mfloonzr
FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com


A6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


I@N%






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,880 ................................. S& P 500
.,:, Close: 1,842.37
Change: 4.24 (0.2%)
1,800 ........ 10 DAYS .........




1,856 0 0 ......... ................... ...... .............. A-........... ........
1 ,8 0 0 .... ....- ......... .... i ........ .... i .......... '......
1 ,7 50 .. ........... ............ ............. ...... ...... .
1 700 ... .....I- ........... ............ i....

t,6 50 . . . ........... . .......... ...... .. . . .
1,6 00 J..... ......,, ............ S b... ...... .. ....... q l ........... 1: -.....J


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,252
3,508
2211
876
221
11


NASD
2,096
2,165
1478
1092
182
15


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16487.65
7468.05
497.59
10373.99
4174.68
1843.15
1349.14
19675.35
1164.37


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
16.600 ..... ...................... Dow Jones industrials
1-,, .,- T Close: 16,437.05
*V Change: -7.71 (flat)
16,360 ........ 10 DAYS
1 7 ,0 0 0 ........................................ ........... ........... .............
16 ,5 0 0 .... .....::.... ..... ..... .... ..... ..... ...... .... ....... ..:
16,000 .....
15 ,500o .. ........... ....... . . .
1 5 ,0 0 0 .......... .. .... .... .... ""
14,500 J .... ......A A...........0....... ........... D"..........


LOW
16379.02
7380.77
488.72
10322.88
4142.21
1832.43
1340.39
19567.21
1154.87


CLOSE
16437.05
7466.03
493.87
10371.13
4174.66
1842.37
1349.09
19674.01
1164.53


CHG.
-7.71
+86.41
+6.49
+45.39
+18.47
+4.24
+9.07
+60.39
+6.18


%CHG.
-0.05%
+1.17%
+1.33%
+0.44%
+0.44%
+0.23%
+0.68%
+0.31%
+0.53%


YTD
-0.84%
+0.88%
+0.67%
-0.28%
-0.05%
-0.32%
+0.49%
-0.16%
+0.06%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 --0- 8.47 7.51 +.10 +1.3 A V -8.4 +55.7 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.76 -0-- 39.00 33.62 +.08 +0.2 V V -4.4 +3.2 25 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 38.20 --- 62.05 52.53 +.34 +0.7 A A -0.3 +35.3 27 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 106.83 105.20 +.27 +0.3 A A V -1.2 +27.5 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.98 0 16.93 16.77 -.06 -0.4 A A A +7.7 +47.5 22 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -0- 13.08 11.85 +.13 +1.1 A 7 A +0.7 -2.4 40
CenturyLink Inc CTL 29.93 -- 42.01 31.02 +.23 +0.7 7 A 7 -2.6 -17.3 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 40.28 -- 55.28 54.72 -.48 -0.9 A A A +5.0 +31.4 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.43 --- 26.38 22.64 +.24 +1.1 V 7 7 -2.9 +48.6 24 1.00
Disney DIS 50.18 0 76.84 75.39 +.49 +0.7 A 7 -1.3 +49.2 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -0-- 75.46 68.59 +.72 +1.1 A A 7 -0.6 +9.2 20 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 45.70 -*-- 61.18 49.13 +.53 +1.1 7 A 7 -0.1 +12.6 20 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 0 101.74 100.52 +.76 +0.8 A A 7 -0.7 +16.0 11 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.10 --- 18.02 16.07 +.23 +1.5 A 7 A +4.1 +20.6 12 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 20.68 --0- 28.09 26.96 -.26 -1.0 A 7 -3.8 +33.7 20 0.88f
HCAHoldings Inc HCA 31.64 0 51.02 51.32 +.42 +0.8 A A A +7.6 +54.0 16
HIth MgmtAsc HMA 8.76 -0- 17.28 13.34 -.06 -0.4 V A A +1.8 +46.6 cc
Home Depot HD 62.38 0 82.57 82.01 +.44 +0.5 A A 7 -0.4 +31.6 22 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 20.10 0 26.04 25.53 +.22 +0.9 A 7 -1.6 +22.2 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 -0-- 215.90 187.26 -.12 -0.1 A A -0.2 -0.6 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 34.32 32.53 +.49 +1.5 A 7 7 -1.1 +37.1 33
Lowes Cos LOW 34.43 52.08 49.68 +.93 +1.9 A A A +0.3 +41.7 24 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 89.25 -- 103.70 95.80 +.34 +0.4 7 A 7 -1.3 +8.6 17 3.24f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.28 -- 38.98 36.04 +.51 +1.4 V 7 7 -3.7 +36.7 13 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 67.67 66.15 -.35 -0.5 7 A 7 -2.0 +20.2 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 70.38 89.75 87.25 +1.23 +1.4 A A A +1.9 +25.2 19 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 0-- 23.10 7.34 -.30 -3.9 V 7 7 -19.8 -59.4 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -- 21.09 16.53 +.17 +1.0 A A A +0.1 -7.1 30 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.13 10.52 10.48 +.03 +0.3 A A A +6.0 +44.5 13 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.88 0-- 67.50 36.71 -5.86 -13.8 V 7 7 -25.1 +4.4 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.97 -0-- 114.72 98.42 +.44 +0.4 V 7 7 -5.0 +11.8 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 31.39 0 44.09 43.11 +.05 +0.1 7 A 7 -1.8 +37.9 28 1.20
Time Warner TWX 48.55 --- 70.77 66.19 -.10 -0.2 7 A 7 -5.1 +35.9 16 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 79.32 0 111.52 109.00 +.13 +0.1 A A A +1.9 +34.0 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 41.50 -0- 54.31 47.75 +.25 +0.5 V 7 7 -2.8 +15.3 67 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 39.44 38.69 -.15 -0.4 A A 7 -1.6 +53.1 1.61e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.72 -- 81.37 78.04 -.05 -0.1 V 7 7 -0.8 +16.6 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 37.43 0 62.24 60.36 -.78 -1.3 A A A +5.1 +62.1 21 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates



Elm

The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.86
percent Friday.
Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
jumped more
than $1 a bar-
rel Friday as the
U.S. economy
added fewer jobs
than expected.
Silver led gains
among met-
als. Crops were
mostly down,
but wheat edged
higher.

BS


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .06
6-month T-bill .05 0.06 -0.01 .09
52-wk T-bill .11 0.12 -0.01 .13
2-year T-note .37 0.43 -0.06 .25
5-yearT-note 1.62 1.75 -0.13 .80
10-year T-note 2.86 2.97 -0.11 1.90
30-year T-bond 3.80 3.88 -0.08 3.08

NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.60 3.69 -0.09 2.67
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.03 5.07 -0.04 4.03
Barclays USAggregate 2.50 2.51 -0.01 1.79
Barclays US High Yield 5.50 5.50 ... 5.78
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 4.56 4.53 +0.03 3.75
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.84 1.93 -0.09 1.06
Barclays US Corp 3.25 3.28 -0.03 2.72


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 92.72
Ethanol (gal) 1.97
Heating Oil (gal) 2.94
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.05
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.67
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1246.70
Silver (oz) 20.20
Platinum (oz) 1434.70
Copper (Ib) 3.39
Palladium (oz) 745.15
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.37
Coffee (Ib) 1.21
Corn (bu) 4.33
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 362.20
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.48
Soybeans (bu) 13.04
Wheat (bu) 5.69


PVS.
91.66
1.93
2.92
4.01
2.64
PVS.
1229.30
19.66
1417.70
3.35
735.60
PVS.
1.37
1.19
4.12
0.83
365.50
1.43
12.96
5.84


%CHG
+1.16
+0.36
+0.66
+1.20
+1.00
%CHG
+1.42
+2.74
+1.20
+0.98
+1.30
%CHG
+0.11
+1.09
+5.04
-0.27
-0.90
+3.89
+0.58
-2.61


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.36 +.05 -0.2 +18.7 +12.7 +14.6
CaplncBuA m 58.12 +.24 -0.7 +12.4 +9.7 +11.6
CpWIdGrIA m 45.19 +.19 -0.3 +21.7 +11.5 +14.6
EurPacGrA m 49.06 +30 0.0 +18.1 +7.9 +13.7
FnlnvA m 51.66 +.13 -0.6 +26.7 +14.4 +17.8
GrthAmA m 43.02 +.15 0.0 +29.5 +15.1 +18.2
IncAmerA m 20.58 +.08 -0.3 +15.9 +11.7 +14.4
InvCoAmA m 36.48 +.12 -0.6 +27.4 +14.2 +16.2
NewPerspA m 37.45 +.22 -0.3 +23.2 +12.4 +17.1
WAMutlnvA m 39.24 +.10 -0.5 +27.8 +16.3 +16.8
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 43.07 +.43 +0.1 +22.5 +9.4 +16.5
Stock 167.95 +.32 -0.5 +34.1 +17.2 +19.4
Fidelity Contra 96.17 +.20 0.0 +29.9 +15.6 +19.1
LowPriStk d 49.66 +.23 +0.4 +31.4 +16.8 +21.9
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 65.31 +.15 -0.3 +27.8 +15.6 +18.2
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.44 +.01 0.0 +11.5 +9.3 +14.2
IncomeA m 2.41 +.01 0.0 +11.7 +9.8 +14.8
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.13 +.04 -0.1 +1.2 +5.0 +8.6
Harbor Intllnstl 70.65 +.55 -0.5 +14.3 +8.4 +14.3
Oakmark Intl 1 26.19 +.23 -0.5 +24.5 +13.1 +21.0
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.73 +.09 -0.3 +25.3 +14.3 +17.1
GrowStk 52.65 +.16 +0.2 +34.8 +17.5 +22.2
Vanguard 500Adml 169.89 +39 -0.3 +27.8 +15.6 +18.2
5001lnv 169.89 +39 -0.3 +27.6 +15.5 +18.1
MulntAdml 13.83 +.05 +0.9 -1.0 +4.9 +4.8
PrmcpAdml 96.52 +.61 +0.8 +36.1 +16.5 +19.3
STGradeAd 10.72 +.02 +0.2 +1.3 +2.6 +5.2
Tgtet2025 15.76 +.07 +0.1 +15.7 +10.0 +13.8
TotBdAdml 10.63 +.05 +0.7 -1.0 +3.4 +4.4
Totlntl 16.63 +.13 -0.7 +11.5 +5.4 +12.2
TotStlAdm 46.64 +.14 -0.1 +29.0 +15.8 +19.1
TotStldx 46.63 +.15 -0.1 +28.9 +15.7 +19.0
Welltn 38.01 +.14 +0.2 +17.1 +11.8 +13.8
WelltnAdm 65.65 +.25 +0.2 +17.2 +11.9 +13.9
WndsllAdm 65.08 +.09 -0.2 +26.4 +15.7 +17.4
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stock indexes ended mostly
higher Friday as investors fo-
cused on new data showing the
U.S. economy added a less-
than-expected 74,000 jobs in
December. A separate report
showed the nation's unemploy-
ment rate fell last month to 6.7
percent from 7 percent.

Target TGT
Close: $62.62 V-0.72 or -1.1%
The retailer said that personal infor-
mation, including phone numbers
and email, was more extensive and
affected millions more shoppers.



0 Ii ID J
52-week range
$59.72 $73.50
Vol.: 12.9m (2.3x avg.) PE:16.8
Mkt. Cap: $39.58 b Yield: 2.7%
Abercrombie & Fitch ANF
Close: $37.19A3.98 or 12.0%
The teen retailer boosted its full-year
earnings forecast by 15 cents per
share and got an upgrade from Jan-
ney Capital Markets.
$40


o0 I1 I J
52-week range
$31.14 $55.23
Vol.:14.1m(4.0x avg.) PE:22.8
Mkt. Cap: $2.84 b Yield: 2.2%
Lennar LEN
Close: $39.19A0.77 or 2.0%
Homebuilders are up on reports this
week that show fewer owners are
underwater and inventories are ris-
ing as housing equity grows.
$40



U I L-1 J
0 hJ iD j
52-week range
$30.90 $44.40
Vol.: 5.8m (1.2x avg.) PE:18.5
Mkt. Cap: $6.39 b Yield: 0.4%
Alcoa AA
Close: $10.11 V-0.58 or -5.4%
Lower prices turned into a $2.34 bil-
lion loss and less revenue for the
aluminum maker during its final
quarter of the year.
$11



0 N D J
52-week range
$7.63 $10.90
Vol.: 74.5m (2.9x avg.) PE:37.5
Mkt. Cap:$10.81 b Yield: 1.2%
Plug Power PLUG
Close: $3.65 A0.33 or 9.9%
The fuel-cell company priced an of-
fering of 10 million shares of com-
mon stock with warrants to purchase
4 million additional shares.



0 N D J
52-week range
$0.12 $4.90
Vol.:51.2m (3.7x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $374.5 m Yield:...


Stocks rise


Investors dismiss job report


Associated Press

NEW YORK It was a
fluke.
That was the conclusion
investors reached about
the U.S. government's lat-
est jobs report, which
showed a sharp decline in
hiring last month. Stock in-
dexes ended mostly higher
after wavering for much of
the day
The gains were minus-
cule, however, and there
were a number of signs
that investors were being
cautious. Prices rose for
bonds and gold, traditional
"go-to" assets for nervous
investors. Utilities and
other kinds of low-risk,
high-dividend stocks also
rose as investors sought
safe places to park money
"We need to see more
evidence before conclud-


ing that all the other (eco-
nomic) indicators are
wrong and the jobs data is
correct," said Kate Warne,
a market strategist with
Edward Jones.
The Dow Jones Indus-
trial average fell
7.71 points, or less than
0.1 percent, to 16,437.05. If
not for a slump in Chevron,
which reported a decline
in oil and gas production
late Thursday, the index
would have risen slightly
The Standard & Poor's
500 index rose 4.24 points,
or 0.2 percent, to 1,842.37
and the Nasdaq composite
rose 18.47 points, or
0.4 percent, to 4,174.66.
The Labor Department
said that only 74,000 jobs
were added to payrolls in
December, the least in
three years and far fewer
than economists expected.


The unemployment rate
fell, but mostly because
many people stopped look-
ing for work, the govern-
ment said.
The December jobs sur-
vey stands in contrast to
weeks of reports consistent
with a steadily strengthen-
ing economy U.S. compa-
nies are selling record
levels of goods overseas;
Americans are buying
more big items like cars
and appliances and layoffs
have dwindled. As recently
as Wednesday, the payroll
processor ADP said pri-
vate businesses created
238,000 jobs in December
If the recent U.S. eco-
nomic picture were a jig-
saw puzzle, the jobs report
is the piece that didn't fit.
"The investor base was
completely shocked with
how especially weak the
numbers were," said Tom
di Galoma, who heads up
bond trading at ED&F
Man Capital.


Business B R I E FS


Massive Target breach
could have lasting effects
NEW YORK Fallout from Target's pre-
Christmas security breach is likely to affect the
company's sales and profits well into the new
year.
The company disclosed on Friday that the
massive data theft was significantly more ex-
tensive and affected millions more shoppers
than the company reported in December. As a
result of the breach, millions of Target cus-
tomers have become vulnerable to identity
theft, experts say.
The nation's second-largest discounter said
hackers stole personal information includ-
ing names, phone numbers as well as email
and mailing addresses from as many as 70
million customers as part of a data breach it
discovered last month.
Target announced on Dec. 19 that some 40
million credit and debit card accounts had
been affected by a data breach that happened
between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15 -just as the
holiday shopping season was getting into gear.
As part of that announcement, the company
said customers' names, credit and debit card
numbers, card expiration dates, debit-card
PINs and the embedded code on the magnetic
strip on the back of cards had been stolen.
According to new information gleaned from
its investigation with the Secret Service and
the Department of Justice, Target said Friday
that criminals also took non-credit card-related
data for some 70 million shoppers who could
have made purchases at Target stores
outside the late November to mid-December
timeframe.
Some overlap exists between the two data
sets, the company said Friday. That means
more than 70 million people may have had
their data stolen.
Court to rule on television
over Internet service
WASHINGTON The Supreme Court will
decide whether a startup company can offer
live television broadcasts over the Internet
without paying fees to broadcasters.
The high court agreed on Friday to hear an
appeal from television broadcast networks in
their attempt to shut down Aereo Inc., which
takes free signals from the airwaves and
sends them over the Internet to paying
subscribers.
Broadcasters have sued Aereo for copyright
infringement. The big networks have supple-
mented their advertising revenue with fees
from cable and satellite TV companies for re-
distributing their stations to subscribers. If cus-
tomers drop their pay-TV service and use
Aereo, broadcasters would lose some of that
revenue.
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled
last year Aereo did not violate the copyrights
of broadcasters with its service but a similar
service has been blocked by other judges.
Aereo claims what it is doing is legal be-
cause it has thousands of tiny antennas at its
data centers and assigns individual sub-
scribers their own antenna. According to
Aereo, that makes it akin to customers picking
up free broadcast signals with a regular an-
tenna at home.
Aereo's service starts at $8 a month and
currently covers New York, Boston, Houston
and Atlanta, among others. Subscribers get
about two dozen local over-the-air stations,
plus the Bloomberg TV financial channel.
Broadcasters have argued that the use of
individual antennas is a mere technicality


meant to circumvent copyright law and threat-
ens their ability to produce marquee sports or
awards show events, including the Academy
Awards, the Grammys and the Super Bowl.
CBS, Fox and Univision television networks
are among those that say they might end their
free broadcasts and become a subscription-
only channel like CNN, Nickelodeon and Dis-
covery if Aereo is successful.
Obama picks ex-Bank of
Israel head as No. 2 at Fed
WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama took a step Friday toward reshaping
the Federal Reserve under incoming chairman
Janet Yellen, choosing a leading expert on the
global economy to be her vice chairman.
Obama said he will nominate Stanley Fischer,
a former head of the Bank of Israel, for the No. 2
job at the Fed. He would replace Yellen, who
was confirmed this week to lead the Fed.
Fischer, a dual citizen of the United States
and Israel, was a long-time professor at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. De-
parting Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and
Mario Draghi, the current head of the Euro-
pean Central Bank, were among his students.
Obama also is nominating Lael Brainard as
a Fed governor. Brainard served as the under-
secretary for international affairs at Treasury
during Obama's first term. She left the admin-
istration recently. He also is renominating
Jerome Powell to the Fed for a second term.
All three nominations must be confirmed by
the Senate.
TSA to begin inspecting
airliner repair shops
The Transportation Security Administration
is gearing up to begin inspecting shops that
repair airplane parts all over the world.
TSA will now be able to issue security or-
ders and inspect repair stations authorized by
the Federal Aviation Administration to work on
U.S. planes. The FAA focuses on the quality of
work at repair stations. But there have been
worries that terrorists could steal a plane or
plant a bomb in one.
The main focus is on repair stations at air-
ports. Unions criticized the new rules, which
will be published Monday, as being too weak.
Unions have been pushing for tighter regula-
tion of overseas stations, where work is often
performed by non-union workers.
Industry groups say the rules mean the FAA
can lift a ban on certifying new foreign repair
stations.
Pork producers call for
more humane treatment
TULSA, Okla. The yearslong call by ani-
mal rights groups to improve conditions on
American hog farms advanced considerably
this week when two of the country's biggest
meat companies urged producers to change
how pregnant sows are housed, and one an-
nounced it wanted to stop the practice of
killing sick or injured animals by "manual blunt
force."
Tyson Foods sent new animal welfare
guidelines to its 3,000 independent hog suppli-
ers on Wednesday roughly six weeks after
gruesome video from an Oklahoma farm
showed some animals being struck with bowl-
ing balls and others being slammed onto a
concrete floor. And Smithfield Foods an-
nounced Tuesday it would ask growers to
move pregnant sows from gestation crates to
group housing by 2022.

-From wire reports


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StocksRecap


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 A7







OPage A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11,2014



PINION


"Since a politician never believes
what he says, he is surprised
when others believe him."
Charles De Gaulle,
Newsweek, Oct. 1, 1962


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ow many know the
name of Army Sgt.
Bowe Bergdahl?
If his name is unfamiliar,
you are not alone. Sadly, very
few Americans
know his name
and his plight. THE I
Bowe was taken Sgt.
prisoner in Berg(
Afghanistan by
Taliban-allied in- OUR 01
surgents June 30,
2009 and is be- Help
lived to be held Americ
somewhere in POW in
Pakistan. At the
time of his capture, he was a
private first class, but has
since been promoted to ser-
geant in absentia.
Following his capture, the
Taliban demanded $1 million
and the release of 21 Afghan
prisoners in exchange for
Bowe. If they did-
n't get it, they said, YOU CA
they would kill
him. In 2010, the 0 To obtain
Taliban de- tion call
manded a Pak- oremai
istani scientist @yahoc
convicted by a
U.S. court of attempting to
murder U.S. soldiers in
Afghanistan be released for
Bowe or he would be exe-
cuted. In late 2010, Bowe re-
portedly escaped only to be
recaptured three days later
Bowe's parents remain
hopeful since the Taliban
have not carried out their
threats to kill him and have
released five videos showing
him in captivity His parents'
hopes were further buoyed
with the receipt of a letter
from Bowe through the Red
Cross in June 2013.
Although U.S. policy is to
not negotiate with terrorists,
a senior Taliban spokesman
has offered to trade Bowe for
Taliban detainees as a step
toward possible peace talks.
While the Obama adminis-
tration has been mute on the
proposal, it could possibly be
parlayed as a good-faith
measure for broader peace
negotiations with the
Taliban.
Given the U.S. military's


Enjoyed "best of"
I just wanted to say I really
enjoyed your "Best of Sound
Off." Thank you for that little in-
sert. We appreciate it.
Thanks to bell C
ringers
Almost all the Salva-
tion Army "bell ringers"
are volunteers, most re-
cruited from area
church members.
They're out there for
more than two or more CA.
hours from late Novem- C56
ber through Christmas
Eve to raise money for
a wonderful charity. The 9 a.m.
to 7 p.m. schedule includes cold
weather. A huge "thank you"


credo of "No one left be-
hind," there would be no
shortage of volunteers willing
to risk their lives to bring
Bowe home. While the U.S.
military's techno-
logical edge and
SSUE: power projection
Bowe capability make a
gdahl. rescue feasible,
any attempt
PINION: would have to
carefully weigh
p free the inherent risk
:a's only to Bowe.
captivity. Absent negotia-
tions and a res-
cue, a citizen-based
campaign across the U.S. to
make Americans aware of
Bowe's plight and our gov-
ernment's duty to secure his
freedom is essential for cre-
ating domestic and interna-
tional pressure for his
release. For
AN HELP Bowe's loved
ones, it is also a
in a peti- source of comfort
628-6481 knowing that he is
I Cyn2719 not forgotten.
O.com. Locally, Rolling
Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 is spearheading


I

(


the awareness campaign as
part of its mission of educat-
ing the public and enlisting
support to account for all
POWs and MIAs.
Citrus Countians can help
bring Bowe home by stopping
tomorrow at the High Octane
Saloon, 1590 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, to sign a
petition urging Secretary of
State John Kerry to secure
his release before U.S. troops
withdraw from Afghanistan.
County residents are also
encouraged to call or email
Rep. Richard Nugent to
thank him for supporting the
campaign to bring Bowe
home and asking U.S. Sens.
Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio
to do likewise.
As of this date, Sgt.
Bergdahl has been held cap-
tive for four years, six
months, one week and four
days. Help bring Bowe home
by signing the petition, never
forgetting him and urging
others to do like wise.

from all of us to these dedi-
cated and caring volunteers.
57 channels
and nothing on
I'm trying to get some-
JND thing on television in-
J stead of telemarketers,
fill newscasters ... and "Sex
Sin the City," depression,
H "Freaks and Geeks" ...
S That's what you get on
Television. Can't we get
something decent on a
4 Saturday? Yeah, there's
football games, baseball
)57 games and I like them,
)579 too. But there's some
other things that could
be on to make you a little up in-
stead of so depressed and so
sex-ridden.


Politics, by the numbers


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gerry M ulligan .....................................publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
. Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


e
II
C


WASHINGTON
wo years from today Iowa
dark, brooding, enig-
matic Iowa will be en-
joying its
quadrennial mo- ,
ment as the epicen-
ter of the universe.
And in 10 months,
voters will vent their
spleens if they
still are as splenetic /
as they now claim to
be in congres-
sional elections.
Some numbers de- Georg
fine the political OTH
landscape.
In an October poll, Vol(
60 percent favored
voting out of office every con-
gressional incumbent. The poll
was taken just 11 months after
voters re-elected 90 percent of
House and 91 percent of Senate
incumbents. Democrats are
more likely to lose control of the
Senate than gain control of the
House. Ninety-three percent of
Republican House members
represent districts Mitt Romney
carried, 96 percent of Demo-
cratic members represent dis-
tricts Barack Obama carried.
Since the mid-19th-century
emergence of the current two-
party competition, no party
holding the presidency has ever
won control of the House in any
midterm election.
Larry Sabato and Kyle
Kondik of the University of Vir-
ginia Center for Politics note
that since the Civil War, the av-
erage turnout in presidential
elections has been 63 percent
and in midterms 48 percent.
The decline comes mostly from
the party holding the presi-
dency, and analyst Charlie Cook
says three crucial components
of Obama's coalition unmar-
ried women, minorities (more
than 40 percent of Obama's 2012
vote) and young people are
especially prone to skipping
midterms. In the seven
midterms since 1984, voters


under 30 averaged 13 percent of
the midterm vote, down from 19
percent during presidential
years.
Furthermore, for
S House elections much
of the Democratic
vote is inefficiently
concentrated in and
around large cities.
Obama won 80 per-
cent or more in 27 dis-
tricts; Romney did so
S in only one. That is
why in 2012, Demo-
Will cratic House candi-
ER dates got about 1.4
million more votes
"ES than Republican can-
didates, but did not
win control of the House.
Today the 30 Republican gov-
ernors four short of the all-
time GOP high of 34 in the 1920s
-represent 315 electoral votes.
Republicans have a 52 percent
majority of state legislative
seats. After the 2012 elections,
Republicans controlled the gov-
ernorships and legislatures in
25 states with 53 percent of the
nation's population; Democrats
had unified control of 13
states with 30 percent of the
population.
Since the emergence of the
Republican Party, only two
Democratic presidents,
Franklin Roosevelt and John
Kennedy, have been followed by
Democrats, and both FDR and
JFK died in office, so their suc-
cessors ran as incumbents. But
Republicans have not decisively
won a presidential election
since 1988. Since then, no Re-
publican nominee has won
more than 50.8 percent of the
vote. In the six elections 1992-
2012, Republicans averaged 211
electoral votes, Democrats 327.
Republicans lost the popular
vote in five of these elections,
and in the sixth, 2004, George W
Bush's margin was the smallest
ever for a re-election.
In 2012, Obama became the
first president since Ronald


I2014
SMRC.oA/CMI
bMt.by %/V Featwrs


~-. i~j


LETTERS to the Editor


Thanks for help
with holiday event
On behalf of the League of
Women Voters of Citrus
County, I want to thank all the
businesses, organizations and
individuals who so generously
donated goods and services to
our door prize cache for our
Holiday Mingle & Jingle event
on Dec. 10.
Special thanks to our mem-
bers who provided their time
and effort in making this a
special event. Many of the
door prizes were donated by
our board members.
We also want to acknowledge
these sponsors who provided
gifts for our event: Dennis' Au-
tomotive, Dynabody, Ferris
Groves, Fuller Nursery -
Bushnell, Green Amish Mar-
ket, Jan Hall Designs and
Snow Country Market.
A door prize was awarded
to any guest who brought an
unwrapped toy or made a
monetary donation for the
Toys for Tots drive. We col-
lected close to 50 toys and


OPINIONS INVITED
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.

close to $50 that were deliv-
ered by Kate Betsko to Mr.
Dennis Gibson, representing
the U.S. Marines.
Entertainment was pro-
vided by the New River
Strings dulcimer players as a
highlight of our party
At this event we also an-
nounced that the League of
Women Voters of Citrus
County is the recipient of a
grant from the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists desig-
nated for Voter Registration
and Education expenses for
2014 and an anonymous dona-
tion for our website develop-
ment was acknowledged.
This past year has seen our


small group grow and develop
with the purpose of encourag-
ing informed and active par-
ticipation in our government;
working to increase under-
standing of major public pol-
icy issues and influencing
public policy through educa-
tion and advocacy We look
forward to the new year with
renewed enthusiasm and
commitment to our mission.
Thank you all again for your
continued support.
Marie Pettibone, President
League of Women Voters
of Citrus County


No work
happening here
Re: Jan. 6,2014, Citrus
County Chronicle, headline on
Page A12, "Congress returns to
work."
Work? What have you been
smoking? Congress hasn't
"worked" in at least five years.
Alfred T Barnard
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Reagan to win two popular-vote
majorities, but Obama got 3.6
million fewer votes than in 2008,
a 5 percent decline. (The last re-
elected president, Bush, got 11.6
million more votes in 2004 than
in 2000.) Except for a small gain
among those 30-39, Obama lost
ground among every age cohort.
And in 2012, Republicans im-
proved the share of votes they
got in 2008 from men (in 2012
Obama became the first person
to win a presidential election
while losing the male vote by
seven points), whites, young vot-
ers and Jews. And independ-
ents: John McCain lost them
44-52 but Romney won them 50-
45. And by September 2013, in-
dependents were leaning
Republican by 18 points, above
even the 14-point advantage Re-
publicans had in 2010.
In three of the most intensely
contested states in 2012,
Florida, Virginia and Ohio,
Obama's victory margins aver-
aged 2.6 points. But even if he
had lost all three he would have
still won with 272 electoral
votes. Analyst Jeffrey Bell cal-
culates this:
"Of the 12 'battleground'
states, Obama won 11- eight of
them by a margin of more than 5
percentage points. Remarkably,
this meant that if there had been
a uniform 5 point swing toward
the Republicans in the national
popular vote margin that is,
had Romney won the popular
vote by 1.1 percentage points in-
stead of losing it by 3.9 Obama
would still have prevailed in the
Electoral College, winning 23
states and 272 electoral votes."
These numbers suggest that
the great political prizes can be
won by either party There will
be more numbers to contem-
plate by the time the 1 percent
of Americans who live in Iowa
are heard from.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost corn.


NEVER FORGET





Bring





Bowe





home


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Falls sparkle after windy deep freeze


Arctic blast

leaves icy

spectacle

Associated Press

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y
- Niagara Falls hasn't
frozen over, but it has be-
come an icy spectacle,
thanks to a blast of arctic
wind and cold that
blew around and froze the
mist on surfaces and
landscaping.
Despite the urban leg-
ends, Niagara Falls doesn't
freeze solid in the winter,
tourism officials said.
Nevertheless, "it's stun-
ning," Virginia Kuebler of
East Aurora told The Buf-
falo News while taking in
the site Thursday
A section of the Ameri-
can Falls, one of three wa-
terfalls that make up the
natural attraction, has
frozen, the newspaper re-
ported. The Niagara River
rapids and larger Horse-
shoe Falls continue to flow
unimpeded.
And it's all surrounded
by a white blanket of snow
and ice, which coats view-
ing railings and lampposts,
trees, shrubs and
boulders.


Associated Press


Freezing water sprays from Niagara Falls coats the landscape at Niagara Falls State Park on Thursday in Niagara Falls, N.Y.


It is a scene that has
been absent during the
last several winters,
which have been rela-


tively mild.
The cold even brought
the return of the "ice
bridge," an occasional


formation of ice that
stretches across the Ni-
agara River below the
falls, linking the United


States and Canada. Until from below. That ended
1912, tourists were al- when the bridge broke
lowed to walk on the apart and three tourists
bridge to look at the falls died.


Feeding moose leads to charges


Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
An Anchorage man is ac-
cused of illegally feeding
cabbage to multiple moose
on his property, according
to Alaska State Troopers.
Troopers received a tip
last month that 67-year-old
Samuel Becker had been
feeding moose. They said
they responded Jan. 4 and
determined Becker had il-
legally fed the animals the
day of their visit.
Becker was issued a
summons to appear in
court Feb. 3 to face a mis-
demeanor charge of inten-
tionally feeding game,
troopers spokeswoman
Megan Peters said Friday
The misdemeanor car-
ries a maximum penalty of
one year in jail and a
$10,000 fine, she said. State
prosecutors have not filed
charges.
Authorities say feeding
wild game like moose,
which can easily top 1,000
pounds, puts people at
great risk of injury or
worse.
"Even if they don't attack
you, your presence around
them could agitate them,
and it could make it more
dangerous for somebody
else passing by that might
not even know the moose is
standing there," Peters
said.
Contacted Thursday at
his property in a heavily
wooded neighborhood in
the city's Hillside area,
Becker declined to discuss
the case, saying he didn't
want the matter blown out
of proportion.
State wildlife biologist
Jessy Coltrane believes
moose-feeding has been an


Associated Press
A moose takes a break from eating branches of a tree Dec. 28, 2013, in east
Anchorage, Alaska. A couple walking dogs in the neighborhood drew the moose's at-
tention away from the tree.


ongoing problem in the
neighborhood, where nu-
merous moose were re-
ported loitering and
approaching people last
year
The latest case came
from a tip sent to the
Alaska Department of Fish
and Game's general email
account in December that
was forwarded to troopers.
Cases of intentionally
feeding wildlife are not un-
heard of But far more com-
mon is negligent feeding of
wildlife, such as when ani-
mals get into trash that has
been left out. With negli-
gent feeding, moose can get
into something their diges-
tive systems can't handle,
such as plastic bags, which
can kill the animals. Negli-


gent feeding can result in
$310 citations.
Coltrane said people
who intentionally feed
wildlife are probably doing
it with good intentions,
hoping to supplement the
animals' winter diets. For
some, it could be akin to
feeding birds.
"It's the same mentality,"
Coltrane said. "It just
translates into larger ani-
mals that have the poten-
tial to be dangerous when
fed."
Moose can become ag-
gressive when they've been
fed by people and expect a
handout from others, she
said.
Intentional or negligent
feeding can lead to such
aggressive behavior that


the animals have to be
shot, Coltrane said. On
Christmas Eve, for exam-
ple, a state biologist had to
kill a moose that was de-
fending its garbage stash,
charging people, Coltrane
said.
Moose aren't the only
massive animals to be in-
tentionally fed in Alaska.
In 2010, an Anchorage
man who admitted illegally
feeding bears at his remote
Yentna River cabin was
fined $20,000 after he
pleaded guilty to charges of
illegally feeding game.
Charlie Vandergaw, a re-
tired Anchorage school
teacher, has said he coex-
isted with black and grizzly
bears at his cabin property
for 20 years.


MARK SAAL/Standard-Examiner
Ken Sullivan, left, poses with his family Tuesday in
their home in Farmington, Utah. Sullivan hopes to be
one of a handful of people chosen for a one-way trip
to Mars in 2025. Pictured with him, from left, are
Kaitlyn, 12; Kaunner, 3; Tana, 6 months; and wife
Becky. Not pictured is Sullivan's oldest daughter,
Jocelyn, 13.

Utah man may leave

family to colonize Mars


MARK SAAL
Standard-Examiner

FARMINGTON, Utah
- If men are from Mars,
as the popular relation-
ship book has suggested,
Ken Sullivan just wants
to go home.
Sullivan, a Farming-
ton resident, is one of
eight Utahns who re-
cently got a bit closer to
their ultimate dream of
one day colonizing Mars.
Sullivan is one of 1,058
people worldwide, cho-
sen from a pool of more
than 200,000 applicants,
who were recently in-
formed that they passed
the initial screening
process and are in the
running to participate in
the Mars One project
(wwwmars-one.com), a
nonprofit private ven-
ture to establish a
human settlement on
Mars.
These thousand-plus
hopefuls will eventually


be whittled down to a
couple dozen folks who
will train to be among
the first four-member
crew to leave for Mars in
2025.
Sullivan first heard
about the project last
August, when he saw a
story on the Internet
about the open applica-
tion process for Mars
One.
"I became enthralled
with it," Sullivan said of
the project. "I'd always
had an interest in going
into space, like most
children, and this really
spurred that."
Born and raised in
Utah, the 38-year-old
Sullivan graduated from
Woods Cross High
School and then at-
tended Dixie State Col-
lege. He became
interested in EMS train-
ing, and eventually
moved to Salt Lake City
to work for an ambu-
lance company


Second relay race set for


Boston Marathon victims


Associated Press

BOSTON Hundreds
of runners are gearing up
for a four-week, coast-to-
coast relay race to honor
three people killed in the
Boston Marathon bomb-
ings and raise money for
260 people wounded when
twin explosions went off
near the finish line of the
world's oldest marathon.
Organizers are pushing
to raise $1 million from
this year's One Run for
Boston, which is sched-
uled to finish a week be-
fore the storied Boston
Marathon and two days be-
fore the anniversary of the
explosions. The money
will go to The One Fund, a
charity established to help
those who were injured or
significantly affected by
the bombings.
The relay race was in-


spired by the surprising
success of a similar event
last year that attracted
more than six times the
minimum 319 runners or-
ganizers said were neces-
sary for it to be successful.
It raised $91,000 nearly
five times more than or-
ganizers' goal.
The race will go through
the same 14 states as last
year The route, however,
has been pushed farther
south through Arizona and
New Mexico to avoid the
risk of ice and cold weather
during the race. The relay
is scheduled to begin
March 16 in Santa Monica,
Calif, and end April 13 on
the scenic Charles River
Esplanade, site of the
renowned Boston Pops
July 4th concert, organizer
Kate Treleaven said by
telephone from her home
near Totnes, a town in


Devon County, England.
The race is divided into
330 segments, with an av-
erage length of 10 miles.
Organizers hope runners
will keep an average pace
of 10 minutes per mile.
The speed, however, is
slower in 10 segments de-
signed to allow groups of
runners to get together -
enabling more bombing
survivors and slower run-
ners to participate, get to
know each other and even
take souvenir photos.
The final part of last
year's relay race followed
the route of the Boston
Marathon and crossed the
finish line on Boylston
Street.
About 600 runners had
signed up for the race by
Friday morning, six days
after a website debuted for
participants to register and
collect sponsorship pledges.


SETTLE
Continued from Page Al

expects to hear Monday He
said the CCHB could still
nix the settlement if the in-
surance coverage is too
low Grant said he doesn't
expect that to happen and
he thinks the insurance
company will pick up the
total settlement amount.
As part of the settle-
ment, Nemzoff will pro-
vide about 2,000 emails
that Grant had demanded
as part of a resident's pub-
lic records request.
Nemzoff, the New Hope,
Pa.-consultant, had al-
ready received about
$60,000 of his $775,000 con-
tract when the hospital
board fired him in July
over the public records
spat.
The settlement, ap-
proved by hospital board
members Thursday night,
also covers Nemzoff's
costs in a county lawsuit
brought by Robert
SchweickertJr. against the


CCHB and Nemzoff
Schweickert, repre-
sented by an attorney with
the Florida First Amend-
ment Foundation, sued to
receive emails between
Nemzoff and hospital bid-
ders, and between Nem-
zoff and the Citrus County
Chronicle.
The settlement effec-
tively ends the Schweick-
ert lawsuit because he will
receive the emails he re-
quested. The settlement
calls for the CCHB to pay
his attorney's fees, esti-
mated by Grant at $31,000.
Nemzoff said he was
pleased with the
settlement.
"I'm delighted," he said.
"I did a good job for them.
I got them some incredible
bids. The thanks I got was
getting fired."
CCHB Chairwoman
Debbie Ressler said with
the settlement the board
can now focus on the Cit-
rus Memorial transaction
with Hospital Corporation
of America (HCA).
"It's very good for the
community," she said.


Ressler said she doesn't
regret hiring Nemzoff,
whose tenure as consult-
ant lasted just three
months.
"I don't think you should
ever look back," she said.
Firing Nemzoff forced
the CCHB to hire another
transaction consultant, Trey
Crabb, whose final payout
will be about $500,000 if a
contract is signed with the
successful bidder
The hospital board
spent about $109,000 in
legal fees in the Nemzoff
case. Ressler said fighting
the Nemzoff lawsuit would
have exceeded the
$700,000 settlement.
"To litigate would have
surpassed that amount,"
she said.
Nemzoff said in his 35-
year career this was only
the second time he sued a
client for breach of con-
tract. He said he eventu-
ally received his fees in
the other case.
"I won this case hands
down," he said. "This is a
grand slam. Far as I'm con-
cerned, I won this case."


NATION/LOCAL


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 A9












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Fishing


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Medicare change proposed WFde
Fidel


Associated Press
Lance Masarik, from
Cleveland, clears his ice
fishing hole Friday on
frozen Wallace Lake in
Berea, Ohio. Warm air
and a forecast of rain will
bring relief to the chilled
state over the weekend,
but might shut down the
ice fishing until colder
weather returns.


Air Force's
drug probe grows
WASHINGTON -An Air
Force investigation into al-
leged drug use in the ranks
has expanded to include 10
officers at six bases in the
U.S. and Britain.
Air Force spokesman Lt.
Col. Brett Ashworth said
nine lieutenants and one
captain are being investi-
gated for illegal possession
of recreational drugs. He
said the case began with
the investigation of two offi-
cers at Edwards Air Force
Base in California and ex-
panded based on their con-
tacts with others.
The probe surfaced
Thursday as Defense Sec-
retary Chuck Hagel visited
F.E. Warren Air Force Base
in Wyoming to give a
planned pep talk to mem-
bers of the nuclear missile
force. Initially, officials re-
vealed that two nuclear
launch control officers in
Montana were being inves-
tigated for drug use.
$70K in Newtown
donations missing
HARTFORD, Conn.--A
charity formed after the
shooting massacre at
Sandy Hook Elementary
School has been unable to
account for more than
$70,000 it raised through
marathon running, one of its
co-founders said Friday.
Ryan Graney, of
Nashville, Tenn., said only
$30,000 of the $103,000
taken in by the 26.4.26
Foundation was used for
the organization's purpose.
That money was presented
last January by co-founder
Robbie Bruce to the non-
profit NYA, a youth sports
center in Newtown, where
the December 2012 shoot-
ing occurred.
Graney said Bruce was in
charge of the organization's
finances, but that it has cut
off contact with Bruce.
Documents detail
NJ lane closings
TRENTON, N.J. Offi-
cials squabbled over media
leaks and scrambled to
control the publicity damage
in the days after lane clos-
ings near the George
Washington Bridge caused
huge traffic jams that now
appear to have been politi-
cally orchestrated by mem-
bers of Gov. Chris Christie's
administration, documents
released Friday show.
In the documents, offi-
cials appointed by Christie
seemed more concerned
about the political fallout
than the effects of the grid-
lock in the town of Fort Lee
during four mornings in
September.
The thousands of pages
were released by a New
Jersey legislative commit-
tee investigating the scan-
dal that could haunt
Christie's expected run for
president in 2016.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON In a
move that some fear could
compromise care for
Medicare recipients, the
Obama administration is
proposing to remove spe-
cial protections that guar-
antee seniors access to a
wide selection of three
types of prescription drugs.
Advocates for patients
are sharply criticizing the
idea, but the Medicare
prescription benefit's first
administrator says greater
availability of generic


drugs nowadays may allow
for some protections to be
safely eased.
The three classes of
drugs widely used anti-
depressants, antipsychotics
and drugs that suppress the
immune system to prevent
the rejection of a trans-
planted organ have en-
joyed special "protected"
status since the launch of
the Medicare prescription
benefit in 2006.
That has meant the pri-
vate insurance plans that
deliver prescription bene-
fits to seniors and disabled


beneficiaries must cover
"all or substantially all"
medications in the class,
allowing broad access. The
plans can charge more for
costlier drugs, but they
can't just close their lists of
approved drugs, or formu-
laries, to protected
medications.
In a proposal published
Friday in the Federal Reg-
ister, the administration
called for removing pro-
tected status from antide-
pressants, antipsychotics
and immunosuppressant
drugs.


The Centers for Medi-
care and Medicaid Serv-
ices said that status is no
longer needed to guaran-
tee access, and the change
would save millions of dol-
lars for taxpayers and ben-
eficiaries alike, while
potentially helping with
the problem of improperly
prescribed antipsychotic
drugs in nursing homes.
But advocates for pa-
tients are opposed, saying
it could potentially limit
access to critically needed
medications for millions of
people.


Don't drink the water


Associated Press
West Virginia State Troopers fill water jugs Friday at the Kmart in Elkview, W.Va. Emergency crews set up
water depots at many locations around the state following a chemical spill Thursday on the Elk River that
compromised the public water supply to nine counties.

West Virginia orders company to drain chemical tanks


Associated Press

CHARLESTON, WVa.
-West Virginia authori-
ties have ordered a com-
pany to remove the
chemicals from its stor-
age tanks after a spill
contaminated the water
supply of nine counties
and forced residents to
use bottled water
Officials at the Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection ordered Free-
dom Enterprises Inc.
late Friday to start re-
moving all the chemicals
in 14 above-ground stor-
age tanks near the Elk
River within 24 hours.
The chemicals in
three of those tanks, in-
cluding one that was dis-
covering leaking
Thursday, have mostly
been removed. Within a
day, the company must
submit a plan to clean
up contaminated soil
and groundwater
The leak left the water
for 300,000 people in and


Chemical spill affects On Thursday a chemical spill caused much of Charleston to shut down The chemical, call
C miIcal spill a cts 4-methylcyclohexane methanol, is a foaming agent used in the coal preparation process I
much of Charleston harmful ifswallowed and could be harmful if inhaled


SOURCES ESRI, Fisher Scientific, American Association of Poison Control Centers


around Charleston
stained blue-green and
smelling like licorice. It
was unclear Friday how
much spilled.
Officials are working
with the company that
makes the chemical to
determine how much
can be in the water with-
out it posing harm to res-


idents, said West Vir-
ginia American Water
president Jeff McIntyre.
"We don't know that
the water's not safe. But
I can't say that it is safe,"
McIntyre said Friday
For now, there is no way
to treat the tainted water
aside from flushing the
system until it's in low


enough concentration
to be safe, a process ti
could take days.
Experts said t
chemical, even in
most concentrated for
isn't deadly Peoi
across nine county
were told not to so mu
as wash their clothes
affected water


Settlements hit by boycott campaign


Associated Press


NETIV HAGDUD, West
Bank An international
campaign to boycott Is-
raeli settlement products
has rapidly turned from a
distant nuisance into a
harsh economic reality for
Israeli farmers in the West
Bank's Jordan Valley
The export-driven in-
come of growers in the val-
ley's 21 settlements
dropped by more than
14 percent, or $29 million,
last year, largely because
Western European super-
market chains, particu-
larly those in Britain and
Scandinavia, are increas-
ingly shunning the area's
peppers, dates, grapes and
fresh herbs, settlers say
"The damage is enor-
mous," said David El-
hayani, head of the Jordan
Valley Regional Council,
which represents about


Associated Press
Cutting tools are placed on the ground Thursday while
Palestinian farmers take their morning break at an onion
field belonging to Jewish settlers just outside the west
bank Jordan valley Jewish settlement of Tomer.


7,000 settlers. "In effect,
today, we are almost not
selling to the (Western) Eu-
ropean market anymore.
Israel has played down
the impact of the cam-
paign of boycott, divest-


ment and sanctions
launched by Palestinian
activists in 2005 to pres-
sure Israel to withdraw
from occupied lands.
"By and large, it's un-
pleasant background


noise," said Israel
eign Ministry spok
Yigal Palmor, arguil
its overall effects
been negligible.
However, the lami
the Jordan Valley If
comes against the
drop of a growing
in Israel about the
math of a possible f
of U.S. Secretary of
John Kerry's latest
ating mission. Kerry
to forge agreement
outlines of an I
Palestinian peace de
spite major disagree
between the sides.
Israeli supporter
land-for-peace dea
the Palestinians
warned that Israel
face a snowballing t
- of the magnitude
brought down apart
South Africa -if it r
proposals Kerry is tc
ent in coming weeks


Cuba's former president,
Rdel Castro, attends the
inauguration of a cultural
center Wednesday in
Havana, Cuba. Castro
has made his first public
appearance in nine
months, attending the
opening of the art studio
in the Cuban capital.


Haiti marks four
years after quake
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- The Haitian government
delivered a progress report
on the eve of the fourth an-
niversary since the massive
earthquake that struck the
Caribbean nation.
Prime Minister Laurent
Lamothe led a presentation
to journalists Friday that
emphasized his govern-
ment's accomplishments.
They include a drop in
the number of people living
in settlements for people
who lost their homes in the
quake, the construction of
more than 5,000 homes
and economic growth.
Haiti's rebuilding effort
has been criticized for being
too slow to house people
displaced by the disaster,
which hit Port-au-Prince
and other cities in the south
on Jan. 12, 2010.
There were once 1.5 mil-
lion people living in the
gloomy encampments but
an international aid organi-
zation says that number is
now 146,000.


led
tis 500 reported
killed in Syria
BEIRUT -With nearly
500 people reported killed
in a week of rebel infighting,
many Syrians barricaded
themselves in their homes
Friday, while others
emerged from mosques an-
S grily accusing an al-Qaida-
linked group of hijacking
their revolution.
The rebel-on-rebel
clashes have overshadowed
the battle against President
BasharAssad and under-
score the perils for civilians
S caught in the crossfire of two
AP parallel wars.
The violence, which pits
ins fighters from a variety of Is-
hat lamic groups and main-
he stream factions against the
tse feared al-Qaida-linked Is-
its lamic State of Iraq and the
'in,
ple Levant, have spread across
ies four provinces in opposi-
ch tion-held parts of northern
in Syria.
US withdraws
diplomat in India
NEW DELHI -The
United States said Friday it
fl was withdrawing a diplomat
from India in hopes it would
end a bitter dispute that
li For- started with the arrest and
esman strip search of an Indian
ng that diplomat in New York.
have Washington's announce-
ment that it was complying
aent of with a demand from New
famers Delhi for the expulsion of the
back- U.S. official came hours after
debate Devyani Khobragade, India's
after- deputy consul general in
failure New York, left the U.S.
f State Khobragade, 39, is ac-
medi- caused of exploiting her
' wants Indian-born housekeeper
on the and nanny, allegedly having
sraeli- her work more than 100
eal de- hours a week for low pay
ements and lying about it on a visa
of a form. Khobragade has
S it maintained her innocence,
1 with
have and Indian officials have de-
could scribed her treatment as
boycott barbaric.
le that Khobragade arrived in
hieid in New Delhi on Friday, where
rebuffs she was met at the airport
o pres- by her father and a sister.
s. -From wire reports











SPORTS


* Car Corner
columnist Ken
McNally extols
the virtues of
American
cars./B5


0 College basketball/B2
0 NBA, NHL/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Tennis, golf/B4
0 College football/B4
0 High School sports/B5
0 NFL/B5, B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CR girls hoops dismisses Lecanto, 55-35


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Lecanto
looked much better Crystal
River didn't.
Odd summaries were sup-
plied by each team's coach,
particularly considering it was
the Crystal River girls basket-
ball side that came away with a
20-point victory, 55-35, Friday
at Crystal River The Pirates


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS In a key district
matchup that had the feel of a playoff at-
mosphere in the Citrus High School gym
Friday, the Hurricane boys basketball
team rose to the occasion and showed it's
worthy of the high expectations surround-
ing this year's squad.
The Hurricanes poured on 21 points in
the fourth quarter in blowing open a lead
they had held since the middle of the first


improved to 15-3 overall, 4-1 in
5A-6. Lecanto slipped to 4-14
overall, 0-5 in 5A-6.
The Panthers' DeeAnna
Moehring led all scorers with 22
points, including all 11 of her
team's fourth-quarter points.
But that couldn't offset the Pi-
rate onslaught, which num-
bered two players in double
figures in scoring, Kiersten
Croyle with 17 and Katelyn
Hannigan with 10, and two


more with nine each, Jasmyne
Eason and Megan Wells.
"We played really well
defensively," Crystal A
River coach Jason
Rodgers said. "We
gave up some shots we
probably shouldn't
have, but overall we -
played well defensively
"But offensively, we didn't ex-
ecute. We won by 20 and we
scored 55, but how many should


quarter, and, behind junior Sam Franklin's
triple-double, handed Dunnellon a con-
vincing 76-58 defeat in avenging one of its
only two losses of the season.
The victory temporarily pulls Citrus
(15-2, 4-1), which completes its regular-sea-
son district slate next Friday at Crystal
River, ahead of Dunnellon (10-6,3-1) in the
District 5A-6 standings. If both teams pre-
vail in their combined three remaining dis-
trict tilts, a coin flip will decide the top seed.
Franklin (11 points, 12 boards, 10 blocks),
serving a suspension during the teams' first


we have scored? Bottom line is,
our defense bailed us out"
That defense was cer-
) tainly the difference as
the Pirates outscored
Lecanto 19-11 in the
fourth quarter after
4 getting outscored 11-7
in the third. The Pan-
thers narrowed a 15-point
halftime deficit to 12 going into
the final period. It was the de-
fense that led to a seven-point


meeting, blocked nine shots and retrieved
10 rebounds in the second half alone. His
cousin Desmond Franklin, a do-it-all junior
who led the game with 26 points, converted
five of his own steals into four slam dunks
and a layup, helping the 'Canes find an ad-
vantage with their signature transition
style, even when the shots weren't falling.
"Our asset is our speed, so we're always
going to be at our best in those transition
circumstances," CHS head coach Tom
See Page B3


Risin to the occasion

Rising to the occasion


Page B3


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run early in the fourth and,
after two Moehring baskets,
Crystal River assured the win
by scoring nine consecutive
points to go up 50-30.
"We've been working hard
and gradually we're trying to
improve, aiming for that game
at the end of the season,"
Lecanto coach Brittany Szunko
said, referring to the 5A-6
See Page B3



Panthers


too much


for Pirates

Lecanto boys

hoops hits 7

3s in 71-34 win
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
LECANTO It's hard to be-
lieve that a basketball game
could get out of hand in the
course of 60 seconds, but that's
about how long it took for the
Lecanto boys basketball team to
effectively pull away from Crys-
tal River on Friday night.
The Panthers got a pair of un-
contested, back-breaking three-
pointers from sophomore guard
Travis McGee late in the first
half before embarking on a 14-4
run at the onset of the third
quarter to propel Lecanto to a
71-34 victory over Crystal River
in the Panthers' gym.
The triumph pushed
Lecanto's record to 9-6 overall
and 2-3 in District 5A-6, locking
up no worse than
the No. 3 seed
in the dis-
trict. Crys-
tal River
dropped to
4-11 and 0-4,
and will be
the No. 4 seed in
the district tournament which it
hosts starting Feb. 4.
The Pirates actually led 6-4,
but the Panthers ripped off a
23-2 run, which included a pair
of late 3s by Steven Elliot and
Thomas Vilardi in the first
quarter, to go up 27-8 with 4:41
left until halftime.
Crystal River, to its credit,
reeled off 10 unanswered points
- the last on a Shaun Frazier 3
-to cut Lecanto's lead to 27-18.
The Pirates, though, had two
big defensive lapses to allow a
wide-open McGee to receive
easy passes from Darius Sawyer
and knock down two three-
pointers. That gave the Panthers
a 33-18 halftime lead; after a
14-4 run fueled on long-distance
shots by Vilardi, Kaine McColley
and Brandon Burich, Lecanto
was up 47-22 and rolling.
"We've been finishing quar-
ters these last few games,"
Lecanto head coach JeffAnder-
son said. "These young kids are
learning how to do that."
Crystal River head coach
Steve Feldman was happy to
see the Pirates claw their way
back, but was less than thrilled
with the final sequence to end
the first half.


MAnT PFIFFNER/Chromnicle
Citrus senior point guard Devin Pryor shoots over Dunnellon defenders Chrisian Rosario (11) and Willie Robinson (25) Friday night at
Citrus High School. The Hurricanes improved to 15-2 overall and 4-1 in District 5A-6 with a 76-58 victory over the Tigers.

Sam Franklin notches triple double in Citrus' big victory over Dunnellon









No. 10 Florida's Prather out against Arkansas


Gator's leading

scorer has bone

bruise on knee

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE No. 10
Florida will be without leading
scorer Casey Prather at
Arkansas today
Coach Billy Donovan said Fri-
day the senior forward has a
bone bruise on his right knee.
Prather had some swelling in his
knee after Wednesday night's
win against South Carolina, and
team doctors initially thought he
might have torn cartilage. But
tests Thursday revealed no
structural damage.
Prather is averaging 17 points
a game this season and leads the
Southeastern Conference in
shooting at 62.4 percent
Point guard Scottie Wilbekin,
who left Wednesday's game with
a sprained right ankle, is ques-
tionable to play against the Ra-
zorbacks (11-3, 0-1 SEC).
Wilbekin sat out practice Thurs-
day and Friday, but is expected
to play Donovan said he's un-
likely to start, though.
Center Patric Young also
missed practice Thursday with
sore knees. Guard Michael Fra-
zier II also was limited in prac-
tice with a calf injury Young and
Frazier should be fine against


Associated Press
Florida forward Casey Prather dunks the ball through the basket Jan. 8 against South Carolina in
Gainesville. The Gators' leading scorer has a bone bruise and is out today against Arkansas.


Arkansas.
Donovan said the injuries are
just part of "the hand that we're
dealt ... We'll go in there as best
we can and do the best job we
can with what we've got. We'll


see who's available."
The Gators (12-2, 1-0) have
won six in a row and 11 of 12,
their only loss a buzzer-beater at
then-No. 12 Connecticut.
They have dealt with injuries


and adversity most of the season.
Wilbekin (five games) and Do-
rian Finney-Smith (two games)
were suspended the start the
season. Freshman guard Kasey
Hill missed four games with a


high ankle sprain. Guards Eli
Carter (leg) and Dillon Graham
(hip) are out for the season. For-
ward Will Yeguete is still recov-
ering from offseason knee
surgery, and guard DeVon
Walker has missed time with a
sprained foot.
Making Donovan's team even
thinner, forwards Damontre
Harris and Chris Walker haven't
played all season. Harris was
suspended indefinitely and then
left the team with the intention
to transfer for the second time in
three years. He has since re-
turned to school and is now try-
ing to work his way back on the
team. Walker also is enrolled,
but is waiting to gain eligibility
from the NCAA Clearinghouse.
Florida has been so decimated
by injuries and suspensions that
walk-on Jacob Kurtz, a former
team manager, has logged signif-
icant minutes this season.
Without Prather, Finney-
Smith will start against the Ra-
zorbacks, who have won 23 in a
row at home. If Wilbekin doesn't
start, Hill likely will take his
place in the lineup.
"We're going to need guys to
step up for our team," Young
said. "Casey is definitely a huge
part of our team, but it's not just
one guy who's going to be the de-
termining factor if we win or
lose. It's going to be a team and
collective effort, and if we take
care of what Coach Donovan
tells us to do, I believe we'll be
able to come out with a victory"


Extra


Nets top Heat in

double overtime

Associated Press

NEW YORK Joe Johnson
scored 32 points, Shaun Livingston
helped Brooklyn dominate the sec-
ond overtime after LeBron James
fouled out, and the Nets beat the
Miami Heat 104-95 on Friday night
for their fifth straight victory
Livingston had two baskets and
two blocked shots in the second OT,
finishing with 19 points, 11 rebounds
and five assists over 51 minutes in a
sensational effort while starting for
injured Deron Williams.
Paul Pierce scored 23 points but
missed jumpers that could have won
it at the end of regulation and the
first overtime. Still, the Nets re-
mained unbeaten in 2014, adding a
victory over the two-time defending
NBA champions to their recent wins
over Oklahoma City and Golden
State.
James had 36 points, seven re-
bounds and five assists for the Heat,
but fouled out on an offensive foul
with 36 seconds left in the first over-
time and the Heat trailing by two.
Hawks 83, Rockets 80
ATLANTA-- Kyle Korver scored 20
points, including four free throws in the
final 16 seconds, and the Atlanta Hawks
fought off Houston's late comeback to
beat the Rockets 83-80.
Paul Millsap also had 20 points for
Atlanta.
James Harden led the Rockets with 25
points. Dwight Howard had 15 points and
11 rebounds.
Houston rallied from an eight-point
deficit with 11 straight points to lead 76-73
before Korver's 3-pointer tied the game.
Following a basket by Harden, DeMarre
Carroll's 3-pointer gave Atlanta a 79-78
lead. The Hawks didn't trail again.
Pistons 114, 76ers 104
PHILADELPHIA-Josh Smith had 22
points in an outstanding all-around
game, Brandon Jennings made four 3-
pointers in the second half and the
Detroit Pistons snapped a six-game
losing streak with a 114-104 comeback
victory over the Philadelphia 76ers.
Five other players scored in double
figures for the Pistons, who averaged
just 88.8 points during their skid. Kyle
Singler and Will Bynum each had 16 off
the bench.
Thaddeus Young scored 22 points for
the Sixers, who have lost three straight
after reeling off four consecutive road
wins. Michael Carter-Williams added 21
points and Spencer Hawes finished with
16 points, 10 rebounds and six assists.
Pacers 93, Wizards 66
INDIANAPOLIS David West scored
20 points and C.J. Watson had 16, lead-
ing the Indiana Pacers to a 93-66 win
over the Washington Wizards.
Indiana (29-7) used an 11-3 run in the
third quarter to create separation from
Washington. Two field goals from West
capped off the swing, which put the Pac-
ers up 56-40.
The Wizards (16-18) stumbled at the
foul line. They finished 9 of 23 on free
throws, hitting just five of their first 14.
Timberwolves 119,
Bobcats 92
MINNEAPOLIS Nikola Pekovic


effort


Associated Press
Miami's Ray Allen drives to the basket during the first half Friday in New
York.


scored 26 points in 27 minutes, and the
Minnesota Timberwolves blew off some
steam with a 119-92 victory over the
Charlotte Bobcats.
Kevin Love had 19 points and 14 re-
bounds, Kevin Martin added 19 points
and Minnesota's bench had 20 points be-
fore Charlotte's reserves even got on the
board late in the second quarter.
Anthony Tolliver led the Bobcats with
21 points on 5-for-5 shooting from 3-point
range. The Bobcats lost for the seventh
time in eight games.
Mavericks 107, Pelicans 90
NEW ORLEANS Dirk Nowitzki
scored 24 points, Monta Ellis added 23
and the Dallas Mavericks sent the short-
handed New Orleans Pelicans to their
fourth straight loss, 107-90.
Vince Carter added 14 points and Jae
Crowder 12 for Dallas, which never
trailed. The Mavericks led by as many as
23 points in the third quarter before
cruising against a Pelicans squad minus
starting point guard Jrue Holiday and
leading scorer Ryan Anderson.
Eric Gordon scored 27 points for New
Orleans, while Anthony Davis added 21
points and 13 rebounds.
Grizzlies 104, Suns 99
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike Conley
matched his career high with 31 points,
and the Memphis Grizzlies used a


fourth-quarter burst to overtake the
Phoenix Suns for a 104-99 victory.
Zach Randolph had 20 points and 13
rebounds for Memphis, while Ed Davis
had 10 points and a career-high 17 re-
bounds, part of the Grizzlies outrebound-
ing the Suns 53-44. Mike Miller finished
with 11 points. Randolph tied his season
high in assists with seven.
Goran Dragic led the Suns with 21
points and eight assists, connecting on
six of his 10 shots. Markieff Morris came
off the Phoenix bench for 17 points.
Bulls 81, Bucks 72
MILWAUKEE Carlos Boozer had 19
points and 13 rebounds in his first game
back from a right knee injury, Mike Dun-
leavy Jr. added 18 points and the
Chicago Bulls beat the Milwaukee Bucks
81-72.
Taj Gibson added 12 points at the
Bradley Center, where a healthy sprin-
kling of Bulls fans wearing red celebrated
the team's fourth straight win.
They almost watched Chicago waste a
15-point lead. The Bucks opened the
fourth quarter with a 7-0 run to get to
within three. A long jumper from Ersan
Ilyasova (14 points) got the Bucks to
71-70 with 5:42 left.
But the Bulls hung on, even after
Boozer missed two foul shots with 3:42
left with his team up by three. The Bucks
missed their final 11 shots.


Nash's late goal lifts


Rangers over Stars


Associated Press

NEW YORK Rick
Nash snapped a tie with
1:58 left, and the New York
Rangers sent the Dallas
Stars to their fifth straight
loss, 3-2 on Friday night
Nash poked a rebound
of Chris Kreider's shot
past Stars goalie Kari
Lehtonen to give New
York its first lead of the
game.
Henrik Lundqvist made
24 saves for the Rangers,
who improved to 7-2-1 in
their past 10 games.
Ryan Garbutt and Cody
Eakin both had a goal and
assist, but the Stars re-
mained winless in 2014.
Capitals 3,
Maple Leafs 2
WASHINGTON -Joel
Ward scored the go-ahead
goal with just over 8 minutes
left in the third period, and
Alex Ovechkin added a goal
and an assist as the Wash-
ington Capitals edged the
Toronto Maple Leafs 3-2.
Nicklas Backstrom also
scored, and goalie Michal
Neuvirth made 32 saves in
his first game in seven weeks


as the Capitals won on back-
to-back nights for the fourth
time this year.
It was the fourth straight
loss for Toronto after a 3-2
victory over Detroit on Jan. 1
in the Winter Classic. James
Van Riemsdyk and Phil
Kessel each had a goal and
an assist. Kessel's goal was
his team-high 21 st for the
Maple Leafs, who have been
outscored 21-7 in the defeats.
Blue Jackets 3,
Hurricanes 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Sergei Bobrovsky made 36
saves and Cam Atkinson had
a goal and an assist to lead
the Columbus Blue Jackets
past Carolina 3-0, ending the
Hurricanes' season-best five-
game winning streak.
Boone Jenner and Brandon
Dubinsky also scored for the
Blue Jackets, who have won
three of four.
Playing his first game in
front of the home fans after
missing the first 40 games
due to shoulder surgery, off-
season free-agent acquisition
Nathan Horton contributed
with a first-period hit that led to
Jenner's goal.


Associated Press
Dallas' Alex Goligoski tries to block a pass Friday as
Stars goalie Karl Lehtonen looks on during the
second period against the New York Rangers in New
York. The Rangers won 3-2.

= Women's Basketball BRIEFS=


No. 4 Stanford 87,
Utah 61
SALT LAKE CITY-
Chiney Ogwumike had 30
points on 13-of-17 shooting
and added nine rebounds to
help No. 4 Stanford rout
Utah 87-61 on Friday night.
Amber Orrange had 14
points for the Cardinal (14-1,
3-0 Pac-12). Stanford im-
proved to 17-0 against the
Utes, shooting 57.4 percent
(35 of 61) from the field and
57.1 percent (8 of 14) from
3-point range.
Emily Potter had 16 points
and eight rebounds for the


Utes (7-7, 0-3). Michelle
Plouffe added 14 points,
eight rebounds and five
assists.
No. 23 Arizona St.
94, USC 86 OT
TEMPE, Ariz. Katie
Hempen 3-pointer with 3:34
left in overtime gave No. 23
Arizona State the lead and the
Sun Devils made it stand up
by converting 6 of 8 from the
line to hold off USC, 94-86.
Deja Mann led the Sun
Devils (13-2, 2-1 Pac 12) with
21 points.
Alexyz Vaioletama had 21
for USC (10-6, 3-1 Pac 12).


B2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 17 17 .500 -
Brooklyn 15 21 .417 3
NewYork 13 22 .371 41
Boston 13 23 .361 5
Philadelphia 12 24 .333 6
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 10 .730 -
Atlanta 20 17 .541 7
Washington 16 18 .471 9/2
Charlotte 15 22 .405 12
Orlando 10 25 .286 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 29 7 .806 -
Chicago 16 18 .471 12
Detroit 15 22 .405 14/2
Cleveland 13 23 .361 16
Milwaukee 7 28 .200 21/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 8 .778 -
Houston 23 14 .622 5/2
Dallas 21 16 .568 7/2
Memphis 16 19 .457 11/2
New Orleans 15 20 .429 12/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 27 9 .750 -
Oklahoma City 27 9 .750 -
Denver 18 17 .514 8/2
Minnesota 18 18 .500 9
Utah 12 26 .316 16
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 25 13 .658 -
Golden State 24 14 .632 1
Phoenix 21 14 .600 2/2
L.A. Lakers 14 22 .389 10
Sacramento 11 22 .333 111/
Friday's Games
Indiana 93, Washington 66
Detroit 114, Philadelphia 104
Atlanta 83, Houston 80
Minnesota 119, Charlotte 92
Memphis 104, Phoenix 99
Dallas 107, New Orleans 90
Brooklyn 104, Miami 95,20T
Chicago 81, Milwaukee 72
Cleveland 113, Utah 102
Orlando at Sacramento, late
Boston at Golden State, late
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Denver, 9 p.m.
Boston at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cleveland at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 7 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 44 2814 2 58128 98
Tampa Bay 44 2614 4 56126 106
Montreal 45 2515 5 55115 106
Detroit 44 1915 10 48115 125
Toronto 46 2120 5 47125 141
Ottawa 45 1918 8 46129 145
Florida 44 1721 6 40104 137
Buffalo 43 1226 5 29 75 120
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 45 3212 1 65147 107
Philadelphia 44 2317 4 50117 119
Washington 44 2216 6 50135 133
N.Y Rangers 46 2320 3 49114 123
Carolina 45 1917 9 47111 128
New Jersey 45 1818 9 45104 113
Columbus 44 2020 4 44120 126
N.Y Islanders 45 1622 7 39124 149
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 43 31 7 5 67160 97
Chicago 46 29 8 9 67169 127
Colorado 43 2712 4 58127 111
Minnesota 46 2417 5 53112 115
Dallas 44 2017 7 47125 135
Nashville 45 1920 6 44108 135
Winnipeg 46 1922 5 43125 139
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 46 33 8 5 71155 116
San Jose 45 2811 6 62148 115
LosAngeles 45 2713 5 59118 93
Vancouver 45 2313 9 55121 113
Phoenix 43 21 13 9 51130 131
Calgary 44 1523 6 36100 142
Edmonton 46 1427 5 33119 161
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Dallas 2
Washington 3, Toronto 2
Columbus 3, Carolina 0
N.Y Islanders at Colorado, late
Pittsburgh at Edmonton, late
St. Louis at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Boston at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 3 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Dallas, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE Suspended
San Francisco INF Marco Guzman 50 games
after testing positive for metabolites of Nan-


drolone, in violation of the Minor League Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program.
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS -Agreed to terms
with C Brett Hayes on a one-year contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES -Agreed to terms
with LHP MattThornton on a two-year contract.
Designated OF Vernon Wells for assignment.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Claimed
LHP Santos Rodriguez off waivers from the
Chicago White Sox.
NEWYORK METS Agreed to terms with
RHPs Joel Carreno and Miguel Socolovich and
INFs Brandon Allen and Anthony Seratelli on
minor league contracts.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Agreed to
terms with INF Mike Fontenot on a minor league
contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CHICAGO BULLS Signed F Cartier Mar-
tin to a 10-day contract.
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES Reassigned G Ja-
maal Franklin to FortWayne (NBADL).
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Recalled G
Lorenzo Brown from Delaware (NBADL).


SCOREBOARD


For thf r, cord


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:


Thursday's winning
numbers and payouts:
Fantasy 5:1 7 26 29 33
5-of-5 1 winner $223,631.52
4-of-5 271 $133
3-of-5 9,325 $10.50


CASH 3 (early)
1-5-3
CASH 3 (late)
0-4-1
PLAY 4 (early)
8-8-4-6
PLAY 4 (late)
3-6-3-1
FANTASY 5
6-12-18-19-33
MEGA MONEY
2-6-14-22
MEGA BALL
17
MEGA MILLIONS
8-28-36-37-57
MEGA BALL
8


Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
3 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Daytona Preseason Thunder (same-
day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis at Dayton
12 p.m. (CW) Notre Dame at Georgia Tech
12 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at Syracuse
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Iowa State at Oklahoma
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston College at Virginia Tech
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) St. Bonaventure at Massachusetts
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Arkansas
1 p.m. (FS1) Villanova at St. John's
2 p.m. (ESPN) Kansas State at Kansas
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Missouri atAuburn
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Duke at Clemson
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Rhode Island at George Washington
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Memphis at Temple
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky at Vanderbilt
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Mississippi at Mississippi State
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Virginia at North Carolina State
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Central Florida at Connecticut
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Princeton at Pennsylvania
6 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Tennessee
7 p.m. (FS1) Georgetown at Butler
8 p.m. (ESPNU) California at Oregon State
1 a.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina at Syracuse. (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Denver Nuggets
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (ESPN) Oak Ridge (Fla.) at Montverde (Fla.)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (SUN) Texas-San Antonio at Southern Mississippi
NFL PLAYOFFS
4:30 p.m. (FOX) NFC Divisional Playoff: New Orleans Saints
at Seattle Seahawks
8 p.m. (CBS) AFC Divisional Playoff: Indianapolis Colts at
New England Patriots
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Semper Fidelis All-American Bowl: East vs.
West (Taped)
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Volvo Golf Champions,
Third Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Sony Open in Hawaii, Third Round
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL, SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Philadelphia Flyers
7 p.m. (NHL) Chicago Blackhawks at Montreal Canadiens
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Harvard vs. Yale
MOTORCYCLE RACING
9:30 p.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross: Phoenix
SKATING
3 p.m. (NBC) Figure Skating U.S. Championships
8 p.m. (NBC) Figure Skating U.S. Championships
SOCCER
7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Hull City vs
Chelsea
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham
Hotspur FC vs Crystal Palace
12:30 p.m. (NBC) English Premier League: Manchester
United FC vs Swansea City AFC
5:55 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division CruzAzul
vs Club Santos Laguna
TENNIS
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Heineken Open, Final (same-day tape)
9 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP APIA International, Final (same-day tape)
11 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Hobart, Final (same-day tape)
WINTER SPORTS
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix: Slopestyle
(taped)

RADIO
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Florida at Arkansas

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS SOCCER
10 a.m. West Port at Lecanto
WRESTLING
9 a.m. Crystal River, Citrus in Combs Duals at Nature Coast


FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Signed P Brian Moor-
man to a contract extension.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Re-signed Tony
Sparano offensive line coach to a two-year
contract.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Named Gill
Byrd cornerbacks coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS Recalled G John Gib-
son from Norfolk (AHL). Sent G Frederik An-
dersen to Norfolk.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Placed F
Blake Comeau on injured reserve.
DETROIT RED WINGS Recalled C Riley
Sheahan from Grand Rapids (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Reassigned F
Filip Forsberg to Milwaukee (AHL) and F Josh
Shalla from Milwaukee to Cincinnati (ECHL).
WINNIPEG JETS -Recalleed DZach Red-
mond from St. John's (AHL).


SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLORADO RAPIDS Named Pablo Mas-
troeni special assistant to the technical director.
COLUMBUS CREW Named Pat Onstad
and Rob Maaskant assistant coaches.
FC DALLAS Named Oscar Pareja coach.
NEW YORK CITY FC Named Miles
Joseph assistant coach and David Lee head of
player recruitment.
ORLANDO CITY SC Signed M Kevin
Molino.
PORTLAND TIMBERS Signed G Andrew
Weber. Announced F Sebastian Rincon will not
return next season.
WRESTLING
USA WRESTLING Announced National
Greco-Roman coach Steve Fraser has become
chief of donor and alumni relations.
COLLEGE
ALABAMA Named Lane Kiffin offensive
coordinator.
CALIFORNIA Announced DT Viliami
Moala will enter the NFL draft.


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 B3


I S O R T B I E F -


Pirates boys soccer
blanked by Hudson
The Crystal River boys soccer team
suffered a 6-0 loss to Hudson on Friday
night.
Chris Kallenbach recorded 10 saves in
net for the Pirates.
Crystal River, 3-14 overall and 3-13 in
district, play Friday at Lecanto.
Warriors nipped on road
at Academy at the Lakes
Despite 22 points and 15 rebounds
from seniorAdam Gage, the Seven Rivers
Christian boys basketball team fell 50-45
to Academy at the Lakes on Friday night.
Cory Weiand added 17 points for the
Warriors.
On Thursday night, Seven Rivers
downed Meadowbrook Academy 59-49.
In that contest, Gage put up 29 points
and 12 rebounds and Weiand had 17
points.
Seven Rivers, 4-10 overall, play Tues-
day at First Academy of Leesburg.
Register now
for YMCA basketball
The Citrus County YMCA has extended
the deadline to register for the Winter
Basketball League until Wednesday.
Registrations are available online and
at the Y's administrative office at 3909 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
To register, call the Beverly Hills ad-
ministrative office at 352-637-0132 or
visit www.ymcasuncoast.org.





PIRATES
Continued from Page BI

tournament. "We're looking to be
more of an offensive threat.
"Tonight I think we were resilient,
and we were competitive to the end.
We didn't play real well defensively
and we had too many fouls. We got
into foul trouble real early, and we
had two starters foul out."
On a team that isn't particularly
deep, that was indeed a problem. The
Pirates made 15 of 31 free throws to
seven of 11 for Lecanto. Crystal River
also scored 15 of the final 20 points in
the game's last five minutes.
Those scoring streaks, and a de-
fense that forced 35 Lecanto
turnovers, were what separated
these two teams. Crystal River never
did trail in the game, scoring the first
six points in the contest before five
Moehring points made it a one-point




PANTHERS
Continued from Page BI

"In those last 90 seconds or less, they
came down and hit both of those shots,"
Feldman said. "Those were back-
breakers.
"We couldn't handle their bigs in-
side and when you combine that with
how hard we're battling down there
and they kicked it out and started
finding some more threes, you're like,
'OK, that's it."'
McColley, the Panthers' freshman
forward, undertook an important task
for the Panthers and succeeded by
hounding and harassing Crystal River
senior point guard Ty Reynolds into a
2-of-15 shooting night.
McColley was one of three players
in double figures for Lecanto with 12
points and added nine rebounds.
"Our ninth-grader, Kaine McColley,
he played just an unbelievable game



RISING
Continued from Page Bl

Densmore said, "whether it be off a
block, steal or long rebound."
Citrus, which had just reeled off an
impressive series of wins over Eustis,
Nature Coast and Wildwood, finished
31 for 67 from the field and tallied 11
steals. It also harassed the Tigers into
another handful of turnovers.
"We've had this game circled since
we lost to Dunnellon the first time,"
said Desmond Franklin in reference
to a 59-53 loss at DHS in early Decem-
ber. "I said after the Lecanto game
we're ready for this. We came out with
a lot of intensity, the defense played
well and we came out with a 'W"'
That intensity was on display when
multiple 'Canes, including both
Franklins and senior Devin Pryor (16
points), dove across the floor for loose
balls at different points in the contest.
"We've had a lot of examples like that
lately, where guys are just laying out,"
Densmore said. "The effort couldn't be


any better We still go through some
spurts where we're not real smart, but
the effort is unbelievable."
Densmore said Sam Franklin is a
big part of that potent energy level.
"He's running at a different speed
than everyone else right now," Dens-
more said. "He blocked one shot into
the stands, but he lightened up on the
other ones so we could get the ball.
His timing is unbelievable on those.
"I didn't show him how to do that,"
Densmore added with a laugh.
Dunnellon, a talented bunch in its
own right enjoying its best season in


Kiffin to join Alabama
as offensive coordinator
Alabama hired former Southern Califor-
nia coach Lane Kiffin on Friday as its offen-
sive coordinator and quarterbacks coach.
Kiffin replaces Doug Nussmeier, who
left Alabama for Michigan.
Kiffin spent a week in Tuscaloosa,
Ala., last month exchanging ideas with
coach Nick Saban and his staff and ob-
serving Alabama's offense.
The 38-year-old Kiffin was 28-15 in
three-plus seasons with USC. He was
fired five games into last season. He also
was head coach at Tennessee and for
the Oakland Raiders.
ESPN.com first reported Kiffin was Al-
abama's choice.
Kiffin spent six seasons (2001-06) at
USC under Pete Carroll as an assistant,
including the final two as offensive coor-
dinator. He spent one season at Ten-
nessee (2009), and went 7-6 before
leaving to replace Carroll.
Two players make
albatross in one day
The rarest shot in golf happened twice
on Friday on two tours.
Joost Luiten made an albatross on the
par-5 10Oth hole at Durban Country Club
when he holed out with a 7-iron from 248
yards in the Volvo Golf Champions in
South Africa. Later in the day, and
halfway around the world, James Hahn
holed out from 191 yards with a 6-iron on
the par-5 ninth hole at Waialae Country
Club in the Sony Open in Hawaii.
From staff, wire reports




game. After an Eason free throw, a
basket by Lecanto's Cheyenne Biggs
tied it at 7-all; it was 8-7 going into the
second period mainly because Crys-
tal River made just two of 19 first-
quarter shots.
It was much better for the Pirates
in the second. They scored the first
10 points of the quarter to go up by 11
and led 29-14 at the half, thanks to a
10-2 run to end the quarter that in-
cluded eight Panther turnovers in a
4:40 span.
Eason also had 11 rebounds, three
steals and two blocks to go with her
nine points. Hannigan collected
eight boards, three assists and three
steals, Croyle contributed five re-
bounds and four steals, and Wells fin-
ished with five rebounds and four
steals.
Moehring totaled four boards and
four steals for Lecanto, with Taylor
Mitchell grabbing nine rebounds and
Savaunghna Hopkins getting seven
boards.



being able to guard a senior the cal-
iber of Ty Reynolds who, you've got to
take your hat off to that kid, he's been
playing great basketball for four years.
"But (Kaine) went out there tonight
and really shut him down."
Burich, a junior forward for
Lecanto, led all scorers with 19 points,
and junior teammate Darius Sawyer
added 18 points.
Both Burich and Sawyer presented
matchup problems for the undersized
Pirates, with both getting to the hoop
for layups and converting a combined
12-of-17 shots from the free throw line.
Reynolds finished with eight points,
while senior teammate Hunter
Roessler led the Pirates with nine
points.
Lecanto is idle until this Friday at
Dunnellon, while the Pirates host
Central on Tuesday
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor He can be
reached at 352-564-2928 or emailed at
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com


at least five years, didn't go quietly
The Tigers outscored the 'Canes 11-6
in the latter half of the second quarter
to cut the Citrus lead to 35-31 at half-
time. A pair of buckets by senior point
guard Willie Robinson made it a two-
point game on two occasions in the
third.
As a team, Dunnellon outre-
bounded Citrus 46-32. Three Tigers -
juniors Desmond Frazier (team-high
16 points) and Andre Hairston (10
points, nine boards) and Robinson (14
points) -finished in double-figures in
scoring, and five snagged at least six
rebounds apiece.
But 4 for 20 Tiger shooting from the
field in the fourth quarter they
were 23 for 65 on the night-- foiled its
ability to make up ground late, and
with a minute remaining, the 'Canes
had their backups in.
While acknowledging Citrus' role in
the loss, second-year head coach
Travis Licht was most disappointed in
his team's self-inflicted breakdowns.
"We just played out of sync," DHS
head coach Travis Licht said. "We dug
ourselves into a hole and we didn't


play smart all night. We weren't run-
ning our offense and we weren't tak-
ing care of our defensive assignments.
If we don't do that, we're going to have
a hard time.
"Give credit to Citrus," he added.
"They played smart They played good
defense and forced some turnovers.
Some of that was our decision-
making, too."
Senior forward Ben Janicki added
11 points for the 'Canes.
Citrus is at Hernando on Monday
Dunnellon plays host to Lake Weir on
Tuesday






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stuard takes 1-shot lead at Sony


Associated Press

HONOLULU Brian Stuard
had his fourth straight round of
65 at the Sony Open. Too bad it's
only Friday
Stuard finished his second
round with a hybrid into 2 feet
for eagle. That gave him a one-
shot lead over Marc Leishman of
Australia and Hideto Tanihara
of Japan going into the weekend
at Waialae Country Club.
The fans soaking up the sun
took home some memories.
James Hahn made an alba-
tross the rarest shot in golf-
when he holed out from 191
yards on the par-5 ninth hole.
And the big attraction was hav-
ing surf champion Kelly Slater
in the gallery He was there to
watch a caddie fellow surfer
Benji Weatherley- who is on
the bag for Masters champion
Adam Scott.
Scott was three shots behind.
Sony Open
Friday, At Waialae Country Club, Honolulu
Purse: $5.6 millionYardage: 7,044, Par: 70
Second Round:
Brian Stuard 65-65-130 -10
Marc Leishman 67-64-131 -9
HidetoTanihara 66-65-131 -9
Harris English 66-66-132 -8
Jason Kokrak 66-67-133 -7
Jimmy Walker 66-67-133 -7
Adam Scott 67-66-133 -7
Chris Kirk 64-69-133 -7
Sang-Moon Bae 63-70-133 -7
Chris Stroud 68-65-133 -7
Jerry Kelly 67-67-134 -6
Boo Wee kley 67-67-134 -6
Hudson Swafford 70-64-134 -6
Greg Chalmers 68-66-134 -6
Matt Every 69-65-134 -6
Justin Leonard 68-66-134 -6


Associated Press
John Huh hits out of a bunker Friday onto the 15th green during the second round of the Sony Open in
Honolulu.


Zach Johnson
Ryan Palmer
Will Wilcox
Pat Perez
James Hahn
Brian Harman
Retief Goosen
Jason Dufner
K.J. Choi
MarkWilson


DerekTolan
Ben Martin
Brendon Todd
Ryuji Imada
Jeff Overton
Robert Allenby
Matt Kuchar
Billy Hurley III
Seung-Yul Noh
Daniel Summerhays


Ricky Barnes
John Peterson
Morgan Hoffmann
Kevin Na
John Rollins
Heath Slocum
David Hearn
Spencer Levin
Michael Putnam
Scott Verplank


Russell HenI
Stewart Cink
Steven Bowc
Stuart Apple
Tyrone Van A
Peter Malnat
Brice Garnet
Hyung-Sung
Tim Wilkinso
Paul Goydos
Tim Herron
Justin Hicks
Charlie Belja
Charles How
John Huh
Scott Brown
Eric Dugas
Chad Collins
Miguel Ange
Joe Durant
John Sender
YE.Yang
Brian Gay
Robert Streb
Brendon deJ
Toshinori Mu
William McG
Ken Duke
D.A. Points
Tommy Gain
John Daly
Charlie Wi
Kevin Foley
Briny Baird
Bo Van Pelt
Johnson Wag
Scott Piercy
Troy Merritt
Kevin Kisner
Yuta Ikeda
Frank Licklite
Daniel Chopi
Matt Bettenc
Will MacKenz
Derek Ernst
Bobby Gates
Jim Herman
Russell Knox
Masahiro Ka
Jonathan By
Jordan Spiet
Jeff Maggert
David LingmE
Alex Prugh
Danny Lee
D.H. Lee
Martin Traine


Open

ey 73-65- 138 -2
69-69- 138 -2
ditch 72-66- 138 -2
by 70-68- 138 -2
swegen 69-69-138 -2
i 69-69- 138 -2
t 67-71 138 -2
Kim 70-68- 138 -2
n 71-67 -138 -2
74-64- 138 -2
68-70 -138 -2
69-69-138 -2
n 68-70 -138 -2
vell III 71-67- 138 -2
71-67 -138 -2
71-67- 138 -2
70-68- 138 -2
71-67 -138 -2
ICarballo 68-70 -138 -2
68-71 139 -1
S72-67- 139 -1
73-66-139 -1
71-68- 139 -1
S70-69- 139 -1
Jonge 68-71 -139 -1
to 70-69- 139 -1
irt 67-72- 139 -1
68-71 139 -1
70-69-139 -1
ey 72-67- 139 -1
66-73-139 -1
69-70-139 -1
67-72-139 -1
Failed to qualify
71-69-140 E
71-69-140 E
3ner 69-71 -140 E
71-69-140 E
70-70-140 E
72-68- 140 E
72-68-140 E
er|I 73-67- 140 E
ra 74-66- 140 E
ourt 70-70- 140 E
zie 70-70-140 E
68-72-140 E
S70-70-140 E
69-71 -140 E
S68-72-140 E
wamura 72-68-140 E
rd 70-71 -141 +1
h 70-71 -141 +1
70-71 -141 +1
erth 71-70-141 +1
69-72-141 +1
73-68-141 +1
71-70-141 +1
r 72-69-141 +1


Start of the Slams


Associated Press
Novak Djokovic makes a forehand return Thursday during his match against Juan Monaco at the Kooyong Classic
ahead of the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. Djokovic is the returning champion of the
upcoming Grand Slam event.


Australian

Open begins

Monday in

Melbourne

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Aus-
tralia The Australian
Open begins Monday at
Melbourne Park, the first
Grand Slam of the year
Here are five things to
know about the tourna-
ment at Melbourne Park,
which is within minutes of
the city center and situated
along the banks of the
Yarra River:
REIGNING CHAMPI-
ONS: Welcome back Novak
Djokovic and Victoria
Azarenka. Djokovic, who
has won the last three titles
here, went on from Mel-
bourne Park to win seven
titles in nine finals in 2013
and finished the season
with a 24-match winning
streak. He lost the No. 1
ranking to Rafael Nadal on
Oct 7. Azarenka, the two-
time defending women's
champion, won two addi-
tional titles in 2013 at Doha
and Cincinnati. Azarenka
was one of only three play-
ers to beat Serena Williams
in 2013.
THE WEATHER: Al-
ways a factor it can be in-
tensely hot one day, cool
and wet the next. The tour-
nament's Extreme Heat
Policy gets invoked most
years, meaning matches
can be moved indoors, or
suspended or prolonged by
extra breaks given to
players.
To combat the weather,


the Australian Open con-
tinues to lead the way with
covered venues. Rod Laver
and Hisense arenas both
have retractable roofs. A
roof over Margaret Court
Arena, Melbourne Park's
third featured arena, is
under construction and
will be fully retractable by
next year
SHOW THEM THE
MONEY: In October, Ten-
nis Australia said it would
increase prize money by
$2.8 million to bring overall
player compensation to $31
million. In keeping with
player demands for a
larger slice of Grand Slam
revenues, all four of the
sport's major tournaments
have greatly increased
their prize money in the
past two years.
Wimbledon now offers
about $36.5 million, while
the U.S. Open increased its
purse to $34.3 million and
the French Open went up
to $29.7 million.
This year, the singles
champions in Australia
will receive $2.35 million.
WHO'S HOT, WHO'S
NOT: Serena Williams beat
Victoria Azarenka in the
Brisbane International
final a week ago to con-
tinue where she left off last
year She won 11 titles in
2013 the most by a player
on the WTA tour since Mar-
tina Hingis' 12 in 1997. She
compiled a 34-match win-
ning streak and earned
more than $12 million in
prize money She comes to
Melbourne on a 22-match
winning streak. Martina
Navratilova has predicted
Williams can equal her
total of 18 Grand Slam sin-
gles titles by winning the
Australian Open this
month, and then eclipse


Steffi Graf's 22 major titles
in the Open era. "If she can
stay healthy there is no
doubt she can go into the
20s," Navratilova said.
"The sky is the limit"
Defending Australian
Open champion Novak
Djokovic won four consecu-
tive men's titles to finish last
season, including the World
Tour Finals in London. On
the not-so-hot side is Roger
Federer The 17-time major
winner failed to reach a
Grand Slam final last year
for the first year since 2002,
certainly a poor year by his
standards. Federer lost the
Brisbane International final
last week to Lleyton Hewitt
and comes into the Aus-
tralian Open seeded sixth.
WHO'S HERE, WHO'S
NOT: Pete Sampras, a 14-
time Grand Slam winner,
will be at the tournament
for ceremonies to mark the
first of his two Australian
Open titles 20 years ago;
Six-time major winner
Boris Becker, making his
first visit to Australia in 15
years, arrives as Novak
Djokovic's new coach.
Among those missing in
Melbourne will be Nicolas
Almagro, who finished No.
13 in the rankings last year,
and No. 27 Jurgen Melzer
And definitely not Bernard
Tomic's father, John. Tomic
Sr was suspended from
Grand Slam events follow-
ing his conviction for as-
saulting his son's hitting
partner, Thomas Drouet
John Tomic did make an
appearance at the Sydney
International this week,
with the tournament's
knowledge, but purchased
his own ticket and was not
given access to the re-
stricted areas for players
and officials.


Australian Open
seeds
At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Jan. 13-26
Men
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain
2. Novak Djokovic, Serbia
3. David Ferrer, Spain
4. Andy Murray, Britain
5. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina
6. Roger Federer, Switzerland
7.Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic
8. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland
9. Richard Gasquet, France
10. Jo-WilfriedTsonga, France
11. Milos Raonic, Canada
12.Tommy Haas, Germany
13. Nicolas Almagro, Spain
14. John Isner, United States
15. MikhailYouzhny, Russia
16. Fabio Fognini, Italy
17. Kei Nishikori, Japan
18.Tommy Robredo, Spain
19. Gilles Simon, France
20. Kevin Anderson, South Africa
21. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland
22. Phillipp Kohlschreiber, Germany
23. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria
24. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia
25. Andreas Seppi, Italy
26. Gael Monfils, France
27. Feliciano Lopez, Spain
28. Benoit Paire, France
29. Vasek Pospisil, Canada
30. Jeremy Chardy, France
31. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia
32. Fernando Verdasco, Spain
Women
1. Serena Williams, United States
2. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus
3. Maria Sharapova, Russia
4. Li Na, China
5. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland
6. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic
7. Sara Errani, Italy
8. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia
9. Angelique Kerber, Germany
10. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark
11. Simona Halep, Romania
12. Roberta Vinci, Italy
13. Sloane Stephens, United States
14. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia
15. Sabine Lisicki, Germany
16. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain
17. Sam Stosur, Australia
18. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium
19. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia
20. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia
21. Sorana Cirstea, Romania
22. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia
23. ElenaVesnina, Russia
24. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia
25. Alize Cornet, France
26. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic
27. Jamie Hampton, United States
28. Flavia Pennetta, Italy
29. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia
30. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada
31. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia
32. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia


Perryman,



Feliciano to



stay at Miami



for senior years


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -
Miami linebacker Denzel
Perryman led his team in
tackles this season, re-
cently became a father
and got favorable feed-
back from the NFL com-
mittee advising players
about their draftability
And just like Al Golden,
he's sticking around.
Perryman will remain
at Miami for his senior
season, despite being pro-
jected by as a potential
third-round selection if he
came out early Other
Miami underclassmen
who flirted with forgoing
their final seasons of eligi-
bility were tight end Clive
Walford, defensive end
Anthony Chickillo and of-
fensive linemen Jon Feli-
ciano, all of whom are
staying.
'At the end of the day, it
became my decision,"
Perryman said in a tele-
phone interview Friday "I
thought long-term and did
what was best for me and
my family"
The waiting game has
been going on in earnest
at Miami for a few days.
Golden, who's entering his
fourth season as Miami's
coach, was on the radar at
Penn State his alma
mater as the Nittany
Lions were looking for a
new coach. At least two re-
cruits flipped their com-
mitments, including one
who tweeted Thursday
night that he "gotta feed
the fam" and decided to
enroll at Florida instead.
Losing Perryman,
Chickillo, Walford and Fe-
liciano would have been
difficult blows. But when
Golden announced that he
was not a candidate for
any job, the upperclass-
men decisions seemed to
start falling into place.
"That stuff at Penn
State, I wasn't paying
much mind to it," said Fe-
liciano, who was told he
could be taken between
the fourth and seventh
round of the draft. "I know
the type of person coach
Golden is and I know he
loves that school but from
being around him, I know
he has a goal right now
and his goal right now is to
win here at Miami. He al-
ways tells us how blessed
we are and how much he
loves it here at Miami."
Perryman also said
Golden's status weighed
upon him, calling the
news that Miami's staff is
remaining intact "a sigh of


USF hires Paul
Wulff as OC
TAMPA- Former
Washington State coach
Paul Wulff is the new of-
fensive coordinator at
South Florida.
Wulff joins the Bulls
after spending the past
two seasons as a senior
offensive assistant with
the San Francisco 49ers.
Wulff was head coach
at Eastern Washington
from 2008 to 2011 and
Washington State from
2008 to 2011.
Second-year USF
coach Willie Taggart an-
nounced the hiring Friday.
-From wire reports

relief."
"It was kind of stress-
ful," Perryman said. "This
year, I had a pretty decent
season. But I feel like I
can better my game and
develop more."
Perryman led Miami
with 108 tackles this sea-
son, when the Hurricanes
started 7-0 and were
ranked No. 7 before losing
four of their last six
games. Chickillo is the
team's best defensive line-
man, Walford will be
Miami's leading returning
receiver after catching 34
balls in 2013, and Feli-
ciano will be one of the
leaders of an offensive
line that is getting hit rela-
tively hard by graduation.
Walford said after the
loss to Louisville in the
Russell Athletic Bowl -
the Cardinals will become
an Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence opponent for Miami
in 2014 that he was stay-
ing. Chickillo tweeted his
news earlier this week in
an effort to quell rumors
to the contrary And Feli-
ciano said he weighed the
stay-or-go question for
about a week, the gravity
of that decision giving him
some insight in how diffi-
cult it had to be for Perry-
man as well.
"He believes in what
coach Golden's doing, just
like me," Feliciano said.
'And he understands that
staying another year, he'll
learn the game better and
it'll make him better when
he goes to the NFL next
year"
Miami has a number of
seniors expected to be se-
lected in this year's draft,
including quarterback
Stephen Morris, wide re-
ceiver Allen Hums and
punter Pat O'Donnell.


B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ercan vs. Fore cars

,erican vs. Foreign cars


hen you look at the cars
on the road today, you
see a big mix of Ameri-
can and foreign brands. Certainly
Toyota and Honda have become
dominant
players in
the auto-
motive in-
dustry and
they build
some very
good vehi-
cles, mostly
manufac-
tured in the
Ken McNally U.S. by
CAR American
CORNER workers. I
CO ~guess I'm a
bit old fash-
ioned as I still prefer the good old
American brands of cars.
Even though many of the parts
and even some of the vehicles are
made in foreign locations, the
profit goes to U.S. companies. Al-
though it may not have always
been true, today the American
manufacturers build high-quality
cars as good as, or even better
than, some of the foreign brands.
Considering the history of the
U.S. car industry, you may wonder
how it all started and why there is
such a high percentage of foreign
vehicles on our roads today The
automobile in America evolved
from the horse-drawn buggy and


initial efforts consisted of attach-
ing an engine to an existing buggy
The auto industry began in the
1890s with development of the
first automobiles powered by a
variety of technologies such as in-
ternal combustion engines,
battery-powered electric engines
and steam engines. The U.S. auto
industry rapidly evolved into the
largest in the world as a result of
the size of the domestic market
and the use of mass production.
Due to quality and economic is-
sues, the U.S. was overtaken as
the largest automobile producer
by Japan in the 1980s and subse-
quently by China in 2008.
The motor vehicle industry
began with hundreds of manufac-
turers but by the end of the 1920s,
it was dominated by three large
companies know as the Big Three
- General Motors, Ford and
Chrysler After the Great Depres-
sion and World War II, these com-
panies continued to prosper and
by 1950, the U.S. produced almost
three quarters of all automobiles
in the world. However, beginning
in the 1970s, a combination of high
oil prices and increased competi-
tion from foreign auto manufac-
turers severely affected the U.S.
companies. Prior to the 1980s,
most of the auto plants in the U.S.
were owned by domestic manu-
facturers of the Big Three, al-
though that number dropped


steadily ever since, with auto fac-
tories being established in the U.S.
by foreign-owned car companies.
In the ensuing years, the Ameri-
can car companies periodically
bounced back, but by 2008 the in-
dustry was in turmoil due to the
economic crisis caused by the
global-scale recession. As a result
and as we all know, General Motors
and Chrysler filed for bankruptcy
reorganization and were bailed
out by loans and investments from
the federal government
Over the last few years, car
sales for the U.S. companies have
continued to improve, much of
the federal government debt has
been repaid and many stock
shares held by the government
have been sold to recover the
bailout funds.
Today, when you go to car
cruise-ins and shows, you rarely
see a foreign car on display Even
though they have been around for
many years, they just don't have
same nostalgia, style or flare of
the good old American brand
cars such as the Chevys, Fords
and MOPARS that car enthusi-
asts enjoy driving and showing.
Car joke
A man sits reading his paper
when his wife enters the house.
She approaches him in a most
provocative manner and says,
"Have you ever seen a $20 bill all


crumpled up?" in a soft sweet
voice. Not knowing what to make
of this situation, he replies "No."
Smiling, she reaches into her
blouse and slowly pulls out a
crumpled $20 dollar bill. Then
stepping closer she asks in a low
voice, "Have you ever seem a fifty
all crumpled up?"
Intrigued, he answers, "Uh,
no." She gives him another little
smile and coyly reaches into the
waistband of her slacks and, ever
so slowly, removes a crumpled
$50 bill.
"Now," she says as she leans
down and whispers, "Have you ever
seen $30,000 all crumpled up?"
Totally confused and excited,
he stammers, "No-o-o-o-o."
"Well then," she whispers in his
ear, "go look in the garage..."
(Thanks Carey).
Upcoming events
Jan. 11 & 18: Cruise-in at 6 p.m.
hosted by Citrus County Cruisers
at Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River
Jan. 17: Friday Night Thunder
cruise-in at 5 p.m. in Historic
Downtown Inverness.
Jan. 24: All American Muscle
Night cruise-in at 6 p.m. atArby's
on U.S. 19 in Crystal River
Ken McNally is the car colum-
nist for the Chronicle. Contact him
at kenmcnally@tampabayrr.com
or 352-341-1165.


Band of brothers


Lecanto

seniorsprepare

forpush into

playoff
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent

As the wind blows a
light rain across the soc-
cer pitch on a recent
weeknight, a fire ignites.
Three Lecanto Panthers
goals for the win take the
chill out of the air and
bring smiles to a boys
team that hasn't smiled as
much as it hoped to this
season.
Seniors Jacob Rice,
Jon Cortalano, James
Carr and Josh Brown face
their last chance at soc-
cer glory before gradua-
tion. They've weathered
disappointment this sea-
son: three games can-
celled due to poor
playing conditions, and
injuries that have deci-
mated the team.
Among them, freshman
forward Austin D'Anna re-
mains out after injuring
his foot following four
goals to start the season.
The Panthers have strug-
gled to net goals since,
with 12 on the season
heading into the weekend.
"We haven't been able to
put anything in. It's been
our biggest plague," Rice
said.
While other teams have
a game or two left to play
before playoffs, Lecanto
had six games scheduled
after the holiday break.
Brown thinks the true
team's potential has yet to
be seen.
"I think we've gotten un-
lucky a couple of times
with games that we should
have won," he said. "I
think we have more to
offer for the end of the
season."
The statistics tell the
tale of the Panthers
four losses, three were 1-0
defeats. They played to a
pair of 1-1 draws, with half
their scoring coming in a
6-2 drubbing of East Ridge
on Nov 14.
Then came Thursday's
game against Vanguard,
which entered the night in
second place ahead of
Lecanto in District 4A-4
with a record of 13-4-2.
The Panthers trailed the
Knights early in the back-
and-forth match but ral-
lied with goals from Carr,
Rice and Cortalano.
Rice bent a free kick
from about 23 yards out
into the top left corner of
the Knights goal, with
teammates on the bench
jumping to their feet after
watching the shot hook
about three feet. Rice -
who said after the game


* :


MATT PFIFFNER/Chromnicle
Jacob Rice is one of four seniors on the Lecanto boys soccer team; the quartet all think the Panthers' best
soccer is ahead of them as the district tournament nears.


he had been practicing
the shot all week -
pointed to the bench and
said, "That one's for you,
Austin D'Anna!"
"I was thinking, 'Man,
you know what, this is
awesome!"' Cortalano
said. "District game, first


game back. We're coming
out with fire."
Carr said the team
lacked chemistry earlier
in the season but things
are coming together The
players now speak of a
brotherhood, working
together and giving every-


thing they have.
"Now we're coming
into districts with our
heads up, with momen-
tum," Carr said. "We're
heading into districts full
throttle."
Carr and Cortalano said
without hesitation their


teammates are fighters
from everything they've
gone through.
"No matter what hap-
pens, we keep going," Cor-
talano said. "We're
tenacious. We don't give
up, we keep going and
keep fighting through it"


SPORTS


depend on the number of
season-ticket renewals,
usually about 90 percent
from year to year.
TCF Bank Stadium has
7,000 fewer lower-level
seats than the Metrodome
did, so some fans were
moved to the upper deck.
Ticket prices will also
rise with the stadium
switch.
Season-ticket owners
who don't purchase seats
the next two years will
keep priority over first-time
buyers when the new
stadium opens in 2016.
From wire reports


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 B5






Byrd hired as
Bucs' defensive
backs coach
TAMPA-The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers have
hired Gill Byrd as their
cornerbacks coach.
A two-time Pro Bowl
selection during 10 sea-
sons as a player with the
San Diego Chargers,
Byrd joins the staff being
assembled by new Bucs
coach Lovie Smith.
Byrd also served under
Smith in Chicago, where
he worked in defensive
quality control in 2006.
He was the Bears' assis-
tant defensive backs
coach in 2007, then
added safeties coach to
his title from 2008 to
2012.
Byrd played for the
Chargers from 1983 to
1992. He's the team's ca-
reer interceptions leader
with 42.
Three interview
for Dolphins job
MIAMI Pittsburgh
Steelers director of football
and business administra-
tion Omar Khan is one of
three candidates who
have interviewed for the
job as general manager of
the Miami Dolphins.
The team said Friday it
also interviewed Arizona
Cardinals vice president
of player personnel
Jason Licht and Dolphins
assistant general man-
ager Brian Gaine. All are
candidates to replace Jeff
Ireland, who left Wednes-
day after six seasons.
Former Redskins offen-
sive coordinator Kyle
Shanahan and Eagles
quarterbacks coach Bill
Lazor have interviewed for
the job of offensive coordi-
nator. Both are candidates
to replace Mike Sherman,
fired Monday after two
seasons with Miami.
More candidates are
expected to be inter-
viewed for both jobs.
Texans tackle
Brown added to
Pro Bowl roster
HOUSTON Houston
Texans tackle Duane
Brown has been added
the Pro Bowl roster.
The NFL announced
Friday that the Texans'
sixth-year veteran offen-
sive lineman will replace
Philadelphia Eagles tackle
Jason Peters in the Jan.
26 game in Honolulu.
Brown joins wide re-
ceiver Andre Johnson and
defensive end J.J. Watt in
representing the Texans.
It's the sixth year in a row
that Houston has placed
at least three players in
the Pro Bowl. The team
rosters will be determined
through a draft on Jan. 22
by alumni captains Jerry
Rice and Deion Sanders.
The NFL didn't give a
reason for Peters drop-
ping out.
Vikings unveil
ticket plan for
temporary home
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
When the Minnesota
Vikings play at TCF Bank
Stadium this fall, single-
game tickets will be in
shorter supply.
The move from the
Metrodome means a
12,000-seat loss of capac-
ity. Vikings executive di-
rector of communications
JeffAnderson said Friday
that each of the 52,000
seats at TCF Bank sta-
dium is currently slotted
for a season-ticket owner.
The amount of single-
game seats available will





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Knacl for come ac s


Associated Press
New England quarterback Tom Brady and the Patriots welcome the Indianapolis Colts to Foxborough, Mass., today
for an AFC divisional playoff game.

Quarterbacks Brady, Luck have flair for dramatic victories


Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Tom
Brady has been leading successful
comebacks for more than a decade.
Andrew Luck is just getting started.
One of them should have a
chance to do that again tonight.
The New England Patriots and
Indianapolis Colts, who have over-
come big deficits this season, will
meet in the AFC divisional round.
The Colts are here with the
second-biggest comeback in NFL
postseason history They outlasted
the Kansas City Chiefs in a wild-
card game 45-44 after trailing 38-10
early in the third quarter
"It's pretty remarkable," Brady
said. "Down 28 points there in the
third quarter, they
just made a bunch of AFC wild-(
good plays and it
took them until the No. 4 Ind
very end to win." Colts (:
The Colts had No. 2 Net
other impressive Patriot
comebacks in the
regular season U Time: 8:1
beating Houston TV: CBS
after trailing by 18 in
the third quarter and
overcoming fourth-quarter deficits
to win three other games.
Easing up with a big lead on the
Patriots also can be dangerous.
They erased a 24-point halftime
deficit to beat Denver in overtime,
topped New Orleans on a touch-
down pass with 5 seconds left and
scored two touchdowns in the last
61 seconds to come from 12 points
back and beat Cleveland by one.
Brady "has definitely set the stan-
dard for success at the quarterback
position," Luck said.
The Patriots quarterback has led
them to 41 wins in games in which
they trailed or were tied in the
fourth quarter Luck has 11 of those,
the most by a quarterback in his
first two seasons since 1970.
This season, the Patriots (12-4)
are 8-4 in games decided by seven
points or fewer, while the Colts
(12-5) are 6-1 when the final margin
is six or fewer


c
1i
1

:s
L


"We've been in a lot of close
games. They've been in a lot of close
games," Brady said. "They find a
way to win them. That's how they
got to this point. Hopefully, we can
go out and be the team that goes out
on top."
Here are some things to watch for
as the Patriots try to advance to
their third straight AFC champi-
onship game:
Injuries keep coming
Each team had a starter added
this week to a long list of injuries.
Patriots linebacker Brandon
Spikes went on injured reserve
with a knee injury and Colts cor-
nerback Greg Toler went on his
team's list with a groin injury New
England already
ard game had lost for the sea-
son linebacker
ianapolis Jerod Mayo, defen-
.2-5) at sive tackles Vince
V England Wilfork and Tommy
(12-4)\ Kelly, tight end Rob
(1-4) ~Gronkowski and of-
5 p.m. today, fensive tackle Se-
bastian Vollmer
Indianapolis has
been without wide
receiver Reggie Wayne, running
back Ahmad Bradshaw, linebacker
Pat Angerer and offensive guard
Donald Thomas for much of the
season.
Running Pats
The Patriots are coming off their
best ground game of the season with
267 yards. With rain likely for their
second straight game, another solid
rushing attack would help. LeGar-
rette Blount has emerged as the top
runner after rushing for 189 yards
in the regular-season finale, a 34-20
win over Buffalo.
"I just try to be more cautious
with the football (in the rain), keep
the football secure," Blount said.
"I'm not too worried about my foot-
ing. There's nothing you can really
do about it."
Here comes Mathis
The Colts linebacker led the NFL
with a team-record 19 1/2 sacks then


added a strip-sack of Kansas City's
Alex Smith that led to a Colts fum-
ble recovery last Saturday He has
five career sacks against Brady, the
most against any quarterback not in
the Colts' division.
"He's a great player," Brady said.
"You try to put guys around him and
double team him, but he still seems
to be making all the plays. I just
know I don't have a lot of time back
there in the pocket to sort things
out."
The last time
Neither team is putting much
stock in the Patriots' 59-24 rout of
the Colts last season when Luck
threw two interceptions that were
returned for touchdowns. Both
teams have made numerous per-
sonnel changes since then, and
Luck has progressed since his
rookie season, lowering his inter-
ceptions from 18 to nine.
"He's done such a great job this
year from year one to year two in
managing the offense and managing
the game and taking care of the
football," Colts coach Chuck Pagano
said. "We had the fewest amount of
turnovers in the league this year at
14, and I know we had (four) last
week, but he does a great job of put-
ting that behind him."
Kickin' it
Two of last weekend's four play-
off games were decided by field
goals on the last play And the Colts
and Patriots have two of the NFL's
top kickers. New England's
Stephen Gostkowski led the NFL
in scoring for the second straight
season with 158 points. Adam
Vinatieri, in his eighth season with
Indianapolis after 10 with New
England, holds the NFL postsea-
son record with 49 field goals and
205 points.
Gostkowski said it doesn't matter
that he's facing his predecessor
with the Patriots.
"Unless he's trying to come block
the kick or he's going to be back
there returning it, it's just another
game," he said.


Seahawks,



Saints sequel set


Associated Press

SEATTLE After
nearly two weeks of wait-
ing, the Seattle Seahawks
finally get a chance to
prove they were worthy of
the No. 1 seed they earned
in the NFC.
After winning on the
road in the postseason last
week, the New Orleans
Saints no longer have that
stigma clouding their fran-
chise history
Less than six weeks after
Seattle made a resounding
claim to NFC supremacy
with a rout
of New Or- NFC divisi
leans, the
Seahawks NO. 6 Nei
and Saints Saints (
collide No. 1 I
again today Seahawl
in the NFC
divisional 0 Time: 4:3
playoff. m TV: FOX
Since that
Dec. 2
matchup where the Sea-
hawks all but wrapped up
home-field advantage in
the NFC playoffs with a
34-7 win, both teams have
seen some of their defini-
tions changed.
Seattle has lost some of
its home invincibility after
losing to Arizona in Week
16 to snap a 14-game home
win streak. And the Saints
are no longer seeking a
validating victory away
from New Orleans after
knocking off Philadelphia
26-24 last Saturday in the
NFC wild-card game, the
first road playoff win in
franchise history
"They're going to know
what to expect from our
crowd, they're going to
know what to expect from
us, and we're going to
know what to expect from
them," Seattle cornerback
Richard Sherman said.
"It's almost like a division
game in that sense be-
cause we've just seen each
other and you understand
what the game is going to
be and what it's going to
come down to."
There's also a bit of his-
tory on the side of the
Saints. Since 2005, No. 6
seeds are 5-2 against No. 1
seeds in the divisional
round of the postseason.
Here are some other
things to watch as Seattle
tries to advance to its sec-
ond NFC championship
game while the Saints.
More than Brees
Drew Brees is not accus-
tomed to being stifled, but
that is what Seattle did in
the first meeting. His 147
yards passing were a
season-low by nearly 100
yards. His 3.87 yards per
pass attempt was the third-
lowest of his entire career.
But New Orleans has
evolved over the past month.
They're attempting to be-
come more run dependent
and less pass reliant. The
Saints had 30 rushing at-
tempts in their final two


s
I





1
F&
3$


regular-season games, then
ran the ball 36 times for 185
yards last week vs. Philadel-
phia. Mark Ingram rushed for
97 yards against Philadel-
phia, the second highest total
in Saints postseason history.
"I was just hoping we have
another opportunity," Brees
said, "and here we are with
that opportunity."
Rediscover Russell
Russell Wilson had arguably
the best regular-season game
of his career when New Or-
leans visited in December. He
threw for 310
onal game yards and
three touch-
N Orleans downs, ran for
11-6) at another 47
Seattle yards and
ks (13-3) completed
73.3 percent
5 p.m. today. of his pass at-
tempts. For
Wilson, it
capped a
four-week stretch where his
name was thrown into the MVP
conversation.
The subsequent four
games led to concern the
Seahawks have slumped. Wil-
son's numbers dipped signifi-
cantly. He topped 200 yards
passing only once during the
stretch, had only four touch-
down passes versus three in-
terceptions and his completion
rate was below 58 percent. He
was also sacked 14 times.
Where's Jimmy?
Jimmy Graham has been
such a vital part of the Saints
offense that his disappearance
in the first matchup against
Seattle was stunning. Seattle
used a combination of line-
backer K.J. Wright and strong
safety Kam Chancellor to
shadow Graham. He finished
with just three receptions for
42 yards on nine targets.
The Saints should be better
able to counter Seattle's de-
fense against Graham this
time. Wright is out with a foot
injury, taking away Seattle's
biggest and one of its most
athletic linebackers. That
will put more pressure on
Chancellor and backup line-
backer Malcolm Smith.
"For us, it's not just going to
be one player that will take
that job on, it'll be a variety of
guys in the way that we play
our coverage and our style,"
Seattle defensive coordinator
Dan Quinn said.
Hello, Harvin
Percy Harvin might own the
award for player most written
about with least number of
snaps this season. He's been
a constant question from the
start of training camp until
now, first about his ailing hip,
then about his recovery, his
Seattle debut in Week 11 and
then about the complications
that surfaced after. But the
problems with his surgically
repaired hip have subsided to
the point that Harvin will play
today with no limitations.


Associated Press
New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees passes
under pressure from Seattle Seahawks defensive end
Michael Bennett during a game in Seattle earlier this
season, which the Seahawks won 34-7. The Saints play
the Seahawks again today in a playoff game at Seattle.


NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10
San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20
Divisional Playoffs
Today, Jan.11
New Orleans at Seattle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX)
Indianpolis at New England, 8:15 p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 12
San Francisco at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2


At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
2013 All-Pro
Team Voting
NEW YORK Results of The Associated Press
2013 NFL All-Pro balloting selected by a national panel
of 50 media members:
OFFENSE
Quarterback
Peyton Manning, Denver, 50.
x-Running Backs
LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia, 48; Jamaal Charles,
Kansas City, 47; Adrian Peterson, Minnesota, 1; Eddie
Lacy, Green Bay, 1.
y-Fullback
Mike Tolbert, Carolina, 31; Marcel Reece, Oakland,
8; Anthony Sherman, Kansas City, 5; Bruce Miller, San
Francisco, 4; John Kuhn, Green Bay, 1.
Tight End
Jimmy Graham, New Orleans, 49; Vernon Davis,
San Francisco, 1.
Wide Receivers
Calvin Johnson, Detroit, 42; Josh Gordon, Cleve-
land, 28; A.J. Green, Cincinnati, 12; Demaryius


NFL STATISTICS
Thomas, Denver, 6; Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh, 6; Bran-
don Marshall, Chicago, 5; Alshon Jeffery, Chicago, 1.
Tackles
JoeThomas, Cleveland, 28; Jason Peters, Philadelphia,
25; Joe Staley, San Francisco, 16;Tyron Smith, Dallas, 14;
Zach Strief, New Orleans, 4; Orlando Franklin, Denver, 3;
Jordan Gross, Carolina, 2; Gosder Cherilus, Indianapolis,
1; Andrew Whitworth, Cincinnati, 1; Jermaine Bushrod,
Chicago, 1; Demar Dotson, Tampa Bay, 1;TrentWilliams,
Washington, 1; Branden Albert, Kansas City, 1; Jake Long,
St. Louis, 1; Phil Loadholt, Minnesota, 1.
Guards
Louis Vasquez, Denver, 22; Evan Mathis, Philadel-
phia, 18; Jahri Evans, New Orleans, 14; Josh Sitton,
Green Bay, 13; Mike lupati, San Francisco, 12; Logan
Mankins, New England, 12; Larry Warford, Detroit, 3;
Marshal Yanda, Baltimore, 3; Andrew Whitworth,
Cincinnati, 1; Andy Levitre, Tennessee, 1.
Center
Ryan Kalil, Carolina, 26; Alex Mack, Cleveland, 9;
Jason Kelce, Philadelphia, 4; Max Unger, Seattle, 4;
Manny Ramirez, Denver, 2; John Sullivan, Minnesota,
2; Mike Pouncey, Miami, 1; Dominic Raiola, Detroit, 1;
Nick Hardwick, San Diego, 1.
Placekicker
Justin Tucker, Baltimore, 38; Matt Prater, Denver, 7;


Stephen Gostkowski, New England, 3; Steven
Hauschka, Seattle, 1; Phil Dawson, San Francisco, 1.
Kick Returner
Cordarrelle Patterson, Minnesota, 36; Dexter Mc-
Cluster, Kansas City, 8; Dwayne Harris, Dallas, 2; Devin
Hester, Chicago, 2;Trindon Holliday, Denver, 1; Antonio
Brown, Pittsburgh, 1.
DEFENSE
Ends
Robert Quinn, St. Louis, 46; J.J. Watt, Houston, 28;
Greg Hardy, Carolina, 14; Mario Williams, Buffalo, 5;
Muhammad Wilkerson, NewYorkJets, 1; Cameron Jor-
dan, New Orleans, 1; Carlos Dunlap, Cincinnati, 1;
Charles Johnson, Carolina, 1; Kyle Williams, Buffalo,
1; Chandler Jones, New England, 1.
Tackles
Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay, 28; Ndamukong Suh, De-
troit, 19; Dontari Poe, Kansas City, 13; Justin Smith,
San Francisco, 8; Jurrell Casey, Tennessee, 8; Muham-
mad Wilkerson, New York Jets, 8; Kyle Williams, Buf-
falo, 6; J.J. Watt, Houston, 3; Jason Hatcher, Dallas, 3;
Sheldon Richardson, New York Jets, 2; Brandon
Mebane, Seattle, 1; Marcell Dareus, Buffalo, 1.
Outside Linebackers
Robert Mathis, Indianapolis, 49; Lavonte David,
Tampa Bay, 22; Tamba Hali, Kansas City, 10; Ahmad


Brooks, San Francisco, 5; Vontaze Burfict, Cincinnati, 4;
Justin Houston, Kansas City, 4; Terrell Suggs, Balti-
more, 3; John Abraham, Arizona, 2; Thomas Davis,
Carolina, 1.
Inside Linebacker
Luke Kuechly, Carolina, 45; NaVorro Bowman, San
Francisco, 39; Vontaze Burfict, Cincinnati, 7; Karlos
Dansby, Arizona, 4; PatrickWillis, San Francisco, 2; Der-
rick Johnson, Kansas City, 2;Thomas Davis, Carolina, 1.
Cornerbacks
Richard Sherman, Seattle, 48; Patrick Peterson, Ari-
zona, 28; AqibTalib, New England, 8; AlterraunVerner,
Tennessee, 6; Joe Haden, Cleveland, 6; BrentGrimes,
Miami, 4.
Safeties
Earl Thomas, Seattle, 47; Eric Berry, Kansas City,
32; EricWeddle, San Diego, 10; Jairus Byrd, Buffalo, 2;
TJ. Ward, Cleveland, 2; Devin McCourty, New England,
2; Antrel Rolle, New York Giants, 2; Kam Chancellor,
Seattle, 2;Tyrann Mathieu, Arizona, 1.
Punter
Johnny Hekker, St. Louis, 23; Brandon Fields, Miami,
20; Shane Lechler, Houston, 3; Jon Ryan, Seattle, 2; Brian
Anger, Jacksonville, 1; Andy Lee, San Francisco, 1.
x-one voter selected only one running back.
y-one voter did not select a fullback.


B6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


NFL











RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FACING THE MUSIC



yWTW .wT-4 '


Associated Press
Prelates attend a Mass celebrated by Cardinal Velasio De Paolis on Wednesday at the Legion's main headquarters in
Rome. The Mass marked the opening of the Legion of Christ's General Chapter, the month-long meeting where they will
approve new constitutions and elect a new leadership.


Vatican to Legion of Christ: Reform


Associated Press
VATICAN CITY

Running the troubled Le-
I gion of Christ urged its
I priests on Wednesday to
-- elect a new leadership
worthy of authority, after
suffering for years from
shame and suspicion fol-
lowing revelations that its
founder was a pedophile.
He said the new leaders
must infuse the religious
order with a new spirit to
finish a process of reform
he said had only just begun.
Cardinal Velasio De Pao-
lis presided over a Mass
opening a month-long
meeting of Legion dele-
gates to elect a new leader-
ship and finalize new
constitutions that must be
submitted to Pope Francis
for approval. The meeting
is the culmination of a
three-year Vatican experi-
ment to try to turn the con-
gregation around after a
Holy See investigation un-
covered serious problems
in the cult-like movement.
The Legion was once
held up as a model by the
Vatican, which was


is just beginning


Legion of Christ current leader, the Rev. Sylvester Heerman, attends the Mass Wednesday
at the Legion's headquarters at the Ateneo Pontificio Regina Apostolorum, in Rome.


impressed by the orthodoxy
of its priests and its ability
to attract seminarians and
donations at a time when
vocations were on the de-
cline. But in reality, the
order's founder, the Rev
Marcial Maciel, was lead-
ing a double life, sexually
abusing his seminarians,


fathering three children
and creating a twisted sys-
tem of power that kept most
Legion priests in the dark
and infected the very life of
the order
The Legion scandal rep-
resents one of the worst to
afflict the Catholic Church
in the 20th century, an egre-


gious example of the
church's concern for the in-
stitution over victims of
sexual abuse. Despite cred-
ible reports sent to the Vati-
can starting in the 1950s
that Maciel was a pe-
dophile, drug addict and

See Page C2


Of toenails and helicopters


Not to get all TMI ("too much infor-
mation") on you, but I have this
black spot on my toenail.
When I first noticed it, my over-active,
ultra-melodramatic imagination de-
cided it was melanoma and I only had
three weeks to live.
It turned out to be blood underneath
the nail from the time I dropped some-
thing on it. The doctor diagnosed it as an
"owie" and said it would take a long
time for it to go away, that the spot
would grow out as the nail grows.
When I got home from the doctor's I
began watching it to see if I could detect
progress.
Have you ever watched your toenails
grow? If not, it's quite boring. It's like
watching snails race in super slow-mo.
Eventually, I lost interest in the
progress of the black spot on my toenail
- until recently It's moved!
Now, instead of the spot being down
by the cuticle, it's moved up a few
centimeters.
However, as fascinating as that may
be, I don't really want to talk about my
toenail. I really want to talk about my re-
covery process for my chronic control-
freakism and helicopter-parentism
disorder
Frankly, it's been a painfully slow re-
covery, probably because my case is so
severe. On a scale of one to 10,1 was
diagnosed as a 47.
Let me tell you, any mom who tries to
top me in the helicopter parenting game
(so named for parents who hover) isn't
even playing in my league.
When my now-30-year-old daughter
moved 500 miles away to Charlotte, N.C.,
10 years ago, I re-attached her umbilical
cord and tried my hardest to control her
every waking moment through mental
telepathy and email.
One time shortly after she moved, she


P


and her roommate decide(
Atlanta for a concert.
In my opinion, no one sho
to Atlanta because, as every,
everyone who ever drives to
makes it out alive. (True fac
So, I gave the umbilical c
and fired off an email sern
the perils of the road and t
staying home and saving h
not putting herself in dang
or spiritually
I remember asking, "Do
plan? Have you thought ab
would do if you got into an
Yada,yada,yada.
She replied, "I'm not 12
appreciate you treating me
Leave me alone."
Obviously, she made it b,
lotte safely, but that's onlyI
stayed vigilant for 72 hours
praying and crying and flyi
my helicopter
That's just one of the doc
53,024 examples of my tryi:
control.
At the time, I knew I was
cake and that I was wrong,
not do it. To let go of my im,
meant trusting God, which
to do, but only in theory, no


Too risky He might fail me.
Fast-forward 10 years. Somewhere,
somehow, sometime during the past
Nancy decade, I began trusting God just a tad,
re maybe even more than a tad. It hasn't
Kennedy happened all at once, but slowly I'm
gradually making progress.
I've always known that my need for
GRACE control is based in fear, and that fear
NOTES stems from not being confident that I am
loved by God. Think about it: You're
never afraid of someone you know loves
you, right?
"There is no fear in love," the Bible
d to drive to says. "But perfect love drives out fear,
because fear has to do with
)uld ever drive punishment" (1 John 4:18).
'one knows, Therefore, if Jesus has taken my pun-
o Atlanta never ishment with his death on the cross, all
t) that's left is love. So, as I rest in God's
cord a yank love for me, as well as for my children,
nonette about the fear and the need for control
he virtues of subsides.
er money and I know this now, because recently my
,er, physically daughter in Charlotte totaled her car
She's fine, but she's currently dealing
you have a with all the insurance red tape, plus
)out what you healing from her bumps and bruises and
accident?" buying a new car and I haven't even
once been tempted to rev up my helicop-
and I don't ter and take over all her decisions for
e like I am. her
In fact, I realized it's been years since
ack to Char- I've even taken my copter out of the
because I hanger
Straight, It's been slow, but I am making
ing around in progress. Perfect love is driving out my
fear


cumented
ng to be in

being a fruit-
but I couldn't
agined control
I truly wanted
t in practice.


Nancy Kennedy is the author of "Move
Over, Victoria I Know the Real Se-
cret, "Girl on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." She can be
reached at 352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via email at
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


RELIGION

BRIEFS

Pope: No 'monsignor'
for most priests

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis
has done away with the honorific
title "monsignor" for all but a few
priests, further evidence of his de-
sire for priests to be simple,
humble servants.
The Vatican's Secretary of State
sent a letter to its embassies asking
them to inform bishops' confer-
ences of the change. From now on,
the Vatican says only diocesan
priests who are "chaplains of the
Holy Father," can use the honorific,
and then only after they turn 65.
Bishops, vicars and archbishops
still get to be called "monsignor"
and Holy See officials will have the
title if their office warrants it.

Priest beaten to death
with stake, pipe

GRANTS PASS, Ore. -An au-
topsy shows a priest who was killed
on New Year's Day in the Northern
California city of Eureka was
beaten to death with a wooden
stake and a metal gutter pipe.
A coroner declined to release
further details about the beating
death of the Rev. Eric Freed be-
cause the investigation has not
concluded.
But at his arraignment, Gary Lee
Bullock was charged with murder
with a special allegation of torture.
He is also charged with burglary,
arson and auto theft. Bullock
pleaded not guilty and bail was set
at $1.2 million.

Judge: Freed Pa. priest
must report weekly

PHILADELPHIA-A judge in
Philadelphia has told a Roman
Catholic church official convicted
in a sex-abuse scandal that she al-
ready has signed an arrest warrant
that she would issue if he violates
the term of his release.
Monsignor William Lynn's convic-
tion was overturned last week and
he was released from prison on Fri-
day after serving 18 months of a
three- to six-year prison term for
felony child endangerment.
Lynn was the first U.S. church of-
ficial ever convicted in the han-
dling of abuse complaints. But a
state appeals court ruled Dec. 26
that the state's child-endangerment
law in the late 1990s did not apply
to supervisors like Lynn.
Lynn attorney Thomas Bergstrom
said Lynn is restricted to the two
floors of a rectory at St. William
Parish in northeast Philadelphia.
Lynn has to get permission to leave
for appointments with his doctor,
lawyer or to attend to anything else.
There is no school at the parish.
His diocese put up bail money
for Lynn, which has drawn
criticism.

Cohabitation up, but
'shotgun weddings' fade

WASHINGTON Living to-
gether is a growing arrangement
for America's dating couples who
become parents.
The share of unmarried couples
who opt to move in together after a
pregnancy surpassed what demog-
raphers call "shotgun marriages"
for the first time over the last
decade. That's according to a forth-
coming paper from the National
Center for Health Statistics.
About 18.1 percent of all single
women who became pregnant
opted to move in with their
boyfriends. That is compared to
5.3 percent who chose to have a
post-conception marriage.

Rodman upset when
asked about missionary

WASHINGTON -The Obama
administration is denouncing an
angry outburst by former NBA star
Dennis Rodman in North Korea.
Rodman is in North Korea for a
basketball exhibition honoring the
regime's leader, Kim Jong Un. The
former Chicago Bull didn't like
being asked during a CNN satellite
interview if he would bring up the
detention of American Kenneth
Bae. The missionary, who is in poor
health, is being held on charges of


"anti-state" crimes. Bae has been
held for more than a year
White House spokesman Jay Car-
ney told reporters he wouldn't
dignify Rodman's outburst.
From wire reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Guardian: Court shouldn't


change Ohio Amish ruling


Associated Press
TOLEDO, Ohio -A
lawyer assigned to make
medical decisions for an
11-year-old Amish girl
who later went into hiding
to avoid resuming
chemotherapy told a court
that it shouldn't overturn
a decision appointing her
as guardian even though
she wants off the case.
The guardian wants to
stop trying to force Sarah
Hershberger to undergo
chemotherapy for her
leukemia because the girl
and her parents fled their
farm in northeastern Ohio
and went into hiding
three months ago.
But she also said in a
filing this week that an
Ohio appeals court should
not grant the Hershberger
family's request to reverse
the ruling that made her
the girl's guardian.
The family decided this


past summer to halt the
cancer treatments be-
cause they feared the
chemotherapy could end
up killing the girl. Doctors
at Akron Children's Hos-
pital believe Sarah's
leukemia is treatable, but
they said in August that
she will die within a year
without chemotherapy
The guardian, Maria
Schimer, an attorney
who's also a registered
nurse, was given the
power to make medical
decisions for Sarah after
an appeals court ruling in
October said the beliefs
and convictions of the
girl's parents can't out-
weigh the rights of the
state to protect the child.
Schimer and her attor-
ney said in court docu-
ments opposing the
request to reverse the de-
cision that the Hershberg-
ers are flouting the
court's original order by


hiding their daughter
She also said the Hersh-
bergers' attempts to argue
that their constitutional
rights were violated should
not be allowed because
they didn't raise that issue
in the trial court "The par-
ents have forfeited the ar-
guments they now wish to
make," Schimer and her
attorney said.
The lawyer for Sarah's
family said in an earlier
court filing with the Ninth
District Court of Appeals
in Akron that Ohio's
guardianship statutes ap-
pear to let courts substitute
their judgment for that of
parents while ignoring the
parents' "moral and
constitutional interests."
The Hershbergers shun
many facets of modern
life. They have said they
stopped chemotherapy
not for religious reasons
but because it was making
Sarah too sick.


LEGION
Continued from Page Cl

manipulative liar, it took
until 2006 for then-Pope
Benedict XVI to bring
Maciel to justice. The
Mexican prelate died two
years later
Benedict took the Le-
gion over in 2010 and ap-
pointed De Paolis to
oversee a whole-scale re-
form, leading up to the
assembly that began
Wednesday
While the Legion in-
sists great strides have
been made decision-
making is more decen-
tralized, priests have
better training and
emails are no longer
screened De Paolis
said the reform has only
just begun.
"It has been repeatedly
stressed that the revision
of the constitutions can-
not simply be considered
a technical effort, but
should be accompanied
by a process of examina-
tion of life, of review and
of spiritual renewal for
the institute," he told
the gathering of a few


hundred priests in the
chapel of the Legion's
seminary on the outskirts
of Rome. "Thus far, we
have only completed the
process of preparation."
That assessment may
troublesome Legion
priests, for whom the
General Chapter, as the
assembly is called, was to
have represented the
end of a painful and hu-
miliating ordeal. The Le-
gion's current superior,
the Rev Sylvester Heere-
man, recently acknowl-
edged that many of his
priests are tired of the
process and just want it
to end and be told what
to do.
But after three years,
questions still remain as
to how the Legion can
even exist when its
founder was a fraud and
its core mission that
spiritual inspiration that
makes religious orders
unique remains
unclear
In his homily Thursday,
De Paolis acknowledged
that this core identity has
yet to be nailed down
and that the delegates at-
tending the meeting and
their new superiors must


find a "new spirit, a new
heart" to figure it out and
move forward in service
to the church.
"Choose those whom
you deem most worthy
and suitable for the min-
istry of authority," De
Paolis said. "For this, it is
necessary to free your
hearts from resentment,
jealousy and envy, and to
free your memory so as
not to feel burdened by
memories that blind and
cause suffering."
Legion officials have
said they hoped the
meeting would result in a
return to autonomous
government, without any
more special Vatican
oversight Francis hasn't
signaled what he might
do, other than to say De
Paolis' mandate won't be
renewed.
Legion critics, includ-
ing many of the hundreds
of priests, seminarians
and consecrated mem-
bers who have aban-
doned it in recent years,
have said De Paolis' re-
forms didn't get to the
crux of the Legion's prob-
lems and left Maciel's
lieutenants still wielding
power and influence.


Places of worship


that offer love, peace,;


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!I


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES-
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479

THE
SALVATION L-
A D I CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish
,




Hemando
CIh rchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


E Crystal
E River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pmr
Pastor John Hager I


LH Rev. Stephen Lane
Faith
Lutheran
Church (LM)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
{ ea,t From -odt..
y 9.w. rt 9;,- ths.


mCST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org

| PRIMERA IGLESIA
\n HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel96fono: (352) 341-1711










VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 AM.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PI. to 3:15 PI. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
. .catholicweb.com .:


Redemption

Christian C(hurch
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship...................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus_
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:3 0 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org


Shepherd

m of the

WHills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiithli known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truthli
of Jesus Chriti.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1lumc.org

| n n- .[ I.:. ^ -
the,,, '
of I IITimothy
'l,",'^ I 2:15 1

Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen




first Unite

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
SeniorPastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages

SundayWorship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM-Vertical Kids
10:30 AM- Traditional

WednesdayWorship
S6:00 PM-VerticalYouth


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA

Come






Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-4676


C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


First Baptist Church of
Crystal River is moving to
three services each Sunday
starting Sunday. The
8:30 a.m. service will be a
blend of traditional Christian
music with the spice of con-
temporary music and a wider
variety of instruments. The
9:45 a.m. service is the same
contemporary style that has
enjoyed incredible growth
over the past five years or so.
The 11 a.m. service will fea-
ture traditional stylings that
have kept the church on Cit-
rus Avenue popular for more
than 100 years.
Music & more
The Diggles Family, full-
time Southern Gospel record-
ing artists, will perform at
3 p.m. today at First Christian
Church of Inverness at 2018
Colonade St. in Inverness be-
hind the new RaceTrac gas
station on State Road 44. Call
the church at 352-344-1908.
The community is welcome to
attend the concert. There is
no charge for tickets. The Dig-
gles family is led by Doug
Diggles, who sings lead,
tenor, baritone, bass and
plays the piano. Christa sings,
plays the violin, viola, guitar,
classical guitar, piano, moun-
tain dulcimer and is also ar-
ranging musical pieces. Diane
Diggles brings an extra
beauty to many of the songs
by interpreting them through
sign language. She also runs
the soundboard.
The Jacob Brothers
Gospel Music Trio will per-
form at Joy Lutheran Church
at 6 p.m. today in the church
sanctuary. The Jacob Broth-
ers Bob and Mike Jacobs
and Mike Lawyer are
gospel veterans and have
been dedicated to the ministry


spreading the Gospel through
music since 1962. They have
traveled extensively and pro-
duced more than 50 albums.
For an unforgettable experi-
ence, with a program of ver-
satility in gospel music, do not
miss this event. A freewill of-
fering will be collected at this
program. Joy Lutheran
Church is on S.W. State Road
200 at 83rd Place, Ocala. Call
352-854-4509, ext. 221.
The public is invited to a
gospel concert by The Tay-
lors at the 10 a.m. service
Sunday at Rock Crusher
Road Church, 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road. The Taylors
are a brother-sister gospel
quartet from North Carolina.
They were nominated Fa-
vorite New Mixed Group of
the Year for 2013 by Singing
News Fans. The Taylors were
also nominated as a Top 10
Mixed Quartet for 2012 and
2013. Call the church office at
352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
The Rick Webb family
will perform Sunday at Her-
nando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., off U.S. 41 in Hernando.
Celebration Sounds choir &
orchestra will open the con-
cert at 5:45 p.m. The public is
invited to attend. There is no
cost. A love offering will be
collected.
"64 to Grayson" will
perform at 6 p.m. Sunday at
First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa Springs, 7030 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call
Minister Dan Wagner at
352-628- 5556.
The Chapel at the Village
Pines Campground will host
the Mast Brothers Southern
Gospel singers in concert at
1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 18.
Bring your lawn chairs and a


friend to enjoy an afternoon of
free Southern Gospel singing.
A potluck dinner will start at
noon. The Chapel is seven
miles north of Inglis on U.S.
19. Call 352-239-0415. The
AARP driver safety class is at
9 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 29,
at the Meetin' Place in the Vil-
lage Pines Campground
(seven miles north of Inglis on
U.S. 19). To continue to re-
ceive your auto insurance dis-
count for three more years,
register for this class now.
There are only 15 seats.
AARP member fee is $15.
(No driving in this class.) To
sign up, call 352-239-0415.
Unity of Citrus County
will present David Roth in
concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 21. Roth's songs have
found their way to Carnegie
Hall, the United Nations, sev-
eral Chicken Soup for the
Soul books, the Kennedy
Center, NASA's Space Shuttle
"Atlantis," Peter, Paul & Mary,
Kingston Trio CDs (and 12 of
his own), two songbooks and
countless other venues.
Everyone is welcome to at-
tend. Suggested donation is
$15. The fellowship meets at
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Call 352-746-1270
or visit www.unityofcitrus.org.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women
will host their annual Tricky
Tray on Saturday, Feb. 22, at
the Fr. James Hoge Parish
Center, 4301 W. Homosassa
Trail, Lecanto. Doors open at
10 a.m. Basket drawings
begin at 11:30 a.m. A $4 do-
nation includes basket tickets,
cookies and coffee. For
tickets, call Connie at 352-
527-2599.
The Saturday night
Gospel Jubilee takes place
the last Saturday night


monthly at First Church of
God, 5510 Jasmine Lane, In-
verness. Everyone is invited
to come to enjoy or come and
participate. Prepare a num-
ber, bring your instrument if
you have one and join in this
full-filled evening. Great
music, fun, food, fellowship
and never a charge. Call
352-344-3700.
Fun & games
The Catholic Women's
Club of Our Lady of Fatima
Church will sponsor its an-
nual Military Card Party on
Wednesday at the Our Lady
of Fatima Parish Hall, 550
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Doors
open at 11 a.m. Lunch is at
noon and games begin at 1
p.m. Entrance fee of $12 in-
cludes lunch buffet, coffee
and desserts, and many
prizes. Funds raised benefit
the Pregnancy Center and
Helping Hands. For informa-
tion and reservations, call Ann
Maccabee at 352-637-4515
or Joan Wirthman at 352-
419-6232.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a Military
Card Party on Monday,
Feb. 10. Lunch will be served
at 12:15 p.m. Card play be-
gins at 1 p.m. There will be
prizes and a raffle. Cost is
$12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. The
church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness. Reservations
are required by Feb. 6. For in-
formation or reservations, call
Dottie at 352-382-3656 or
Marilyn at 352-746-6583.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Men's Association is sponsor-
ing its annual trip to Tampa
Bay Downs for an exciting
day of thoroughbred
horseracing on Wednesday,


Feb. 12. The trip includes
round-trip bus transportation
from the church parking lot,
entry fee and reserved seat-
ing in the clubhouse, racing
form and a hot buffet lunch, all
for $45 per person. For ticket
reservations, call C. Taylor at
352-746-5584 or Lloyd
Manning at 352-489-0289.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers bingo
at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday featur-
ing regular, double and spe-
cial bingos, together with a
jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Tues-
day and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
Kitchen features "homemade"
soups and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.
The Men's Club of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church on U.S. 41 in Dunnel-
Ion play horseshoes at
9 a.m. Wednesday. Horse-
shoes are provided to anyone
needing them along with in-
structions in pitching, scoring
and court maintenance.
Women, children and persons
who have never pitched
horseshoes before are invited
to attend and share in the fun
and fellowship. Call 352-
489-5954.
Food & fellowship
Everyone is invited to a
baked ziti dinner from 5 to
7 p.m. Friday at Holy Faith
Episcopal Church, 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
Donation is $7 and $3 for
children 12 and younger.
Takeout will be available. Call
352-489-2685.
Floral City United
Methodist Church will have its
chicken and biscuit dinner
from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 18, at the church, 8478


Places of worship



that offer love, peace,



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!I


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"Rooted in Scripture, Relevantfor Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call/for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor' '
714S. Scarbor ...
Pastor Kennie Berger
S 352-302-5813


Our Lady of

Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
-Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
S9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.





US Hwy. 19
p Woo






SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM LI
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRISf
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.-' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352 ) 746-9422


0 Crystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W.Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nue
Provided


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sird., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become."


IFirst Baptist
Ckawck
of Lake, ooa.seau
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday ll:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: -, ., ,. !,,. , ,
Check us out on Facebook










road
E~tist





5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


E. Marvin St., across from the
elementary school. It is a
complete meal for $7.50. Call
352-344-1771.
The annual spaghetti
dinner put on by the United
Methodist Women of First
United Methodist Church of
Dunnellon is Saturday, Jan.
18, at the Friendship Hall of
the church at 21501 W. State
Road 40. Seatings are at
4:30 and at 5:30 p.m. Adult
tickets are $6 in advance or
$7 at the door; children 10
and younger are $3. There is
a limited number of tickets for
each seating. The dinner in-
cludes all-you-can-eat
spaghetti with meat sauce,
tossed salad, garlic bread,
dessert, and coffee or tea. For
more information or advance
tickets, call the church office
at 352-489-4026. Proceeds
from the dinner will be used
for UMW Mission projects.
The third Saturday sup-
per, a "Mexican Fiesta," will
take place from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. Jan. 18 in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes chips
and salsa, Mexican salad,
beef enchiladas, jalapeno
corn casserole, Pina Colada
cake, coffee and tea. Tickets
are $10 for adults, $5 for chil-
dren and can be purchased at
the door. Takeouts available.
Call the church at 352-
489-1260.
Special events
Reflections Church in-
vites all middle and high
school students to an "All-
Nighter" from 8 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 17, to 8 a.m. Saturday,

See NOTES/Page C4




Church
OH erar














of th
Sunday Service
1 0:with










H6p., yOU'LL FIND
V.c













Hernando FL3444
www, rumc
"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the













Sec NithPr with a
for the
Community"














CaSunday Scoorshi0A.M
C:0am MoradingSricea 11:00ice
10 :30 Pa m .Cne p r
210i N. Pra Rd.,


Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider .


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 C3





C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Jan. 18, at Cuzin Vinnie's at the
Crystal River Mall. The cost of $30
at the door includes laser tag, mini
golf, corn hole, video games, food
and more. For more information,
contact Reflections Church Youth
Pastor Taylor Swander at
tmswander1l3@gmail.com.
Congregation Beth Israel of
Ocala invites the community to a
program titled "Jews in the Civil
War," presented by Channah Zim-
merman, at 3 p.m. Sunday at First
Congregational Church, 7171 State
Road 200, Ocala. For tickets ($8),
call Judi at 352-237-8277, Sonia at
352-307-3662 or Estelle at 352-
861-2452. This program is partially
funded by the Jewish Council of
North Central Florida.
The Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists fellowship continues its
"Forgotten Film Festival" at
3 p.m. Thursday with "Hyde Park on
Hudson." President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt and his wife, Eleanor, invite
the King and Queen of England for
a weekend at their home in upstate
New York. A charming and fresh
look at true events. Starring Bill Mur-
ray and Laura Linney. Jan. 23's film
is "Rabbit Proof Fence." Australian
film about three aboriginal girls who
escape after being plucked from
their homes to be trained as domes-
tic staff and set off on a trek across
the outback. Jan. 30's film is "Ladies
in Lavender." Two sisters whose
quiet lives dramatically change
when they discover a badly injured
young foreigner washed ashore
near their coastal home in pre-war
England. Starring Judi Dench and
Maggie Smith. The Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists fellowship is
at 7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Visit www.nature
coastuu.org.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual "Tricky
Tray Fund Raiser" on Saturday,


RELIGION


Jan. 18, in the Parish Life Center,
6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and the
drawings begin at 11:30 a.m. The
event features baskets with con-
tents valued at $25 or more, raffles
and money trees. Items include a
mah jongg set, gift certificates for
golf, restaurants, supermarkets and
many more. Purchase a sheet of 25
numbered tickets for $5 for deposit
in a bag adjacent to your choice of
baskets. The blood drive sponsored
by the church and K of C Council
6168 will be onsite from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Ticket tenders will be avail-
able for those who cannot stay for
the drawing and blood donors at no
charge. Proceeds go to needed
items for the church and charitable
contributions. For Tricky Tray infor-
mation, call Bernita Becker at 352-
344-0235. The council is a Catholic
faith-based organization and pro-
vides opportunities to Catholic
women for spiritual growth, devel-
oping God-given talents, and estab-
lishing caring relationships with
others. For membership informa-
tion, call Rosalie Madigan at
352-746-2987.
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church will have its semiannual
congregational meeting at
10:45 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 26. There
will be a single worship service at
9:30 a.m. that day. The church is on
County Road 486, opposite Citrus
Hills Boulevard in Hernando. Call
352-746-7161.
A workshop titled "How do
you want to be remembered?"
will be sponsored by Brown Funeral
Home and Cremation Service at
1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28. This work-
shop will provide consumer infor-
mation regarding cremation,
funerals, and their cost factors. Ad-
vance planning of funerals, veter-
ans' benefits, and end-of-life issues
will be discussed. Due to the re-
modeling of St. Timothy Lutheran
Church's fellowship hall, the work-
shop will take place at Hampton
Inn, Crystal River, directly across
U.S. 19 from the church. The work-
shop is free. There will be refresh-


ments and door prizes. Reserva-
tions are required. Call Gail Sirak at
352-634-2021 or email ssirak778
@tampabay.rr.com. All are wel-
come; bring a friend. Call Deacon
Charlotte Downing at 352-422-7044
or Gail at 352-634-2021. This is a
Thrivent-sponsored event.
The Ladies of Faith will host
their 18th Annual Trash 'N' Treas-
ure Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday, Feb. 7 and 8, at
Faith Lutheran Church, Crystal
Glen Subdivision, Lecanto (off
County Road 490 and State Road
44). Find all kinds of "stuff" for the
kitchen, the home, the garden and
garage, clothing, shoes, books and
some jewelry, Christmas items,
new handmade quilts, and a bake
sale. Proceeds from this sale sup-
port local, state, national and inter-
national missions. This is a Thrivent
event.
The Altar and Rosary Society
of St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church will host a Chinese auction
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 8, in Father Stegeman Hall at
the corner of U.S. 41 and S.R. 40
East in Dunnellon. Drawing for the
items will begin at 1 p.m. An enve-
lope of 20 tickets is $5 and can be
purchased at the door. Also in-
cluded is a free ticket for coffee and
dessert. Food and drinks will be
available at a nominal charge. Call
Pat at 352-489-1984.
The Women's Ministry of Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, Inverness,
will host Lisa Whelchel on Saturday,
Feb. 8, 2014. Whelchel starred in
the TV show "The Facts of Life" as
the preppy and wealthy Blair
Warner. She is an actress, singer,
songwriter, author and public
speaker. In 2012, she appeared on
"Survivor" in the Philippines. She
has been a regular speaker with
Women of Faith Conference since
2009. Tickets can be purchased on-
line at www.itickets.com or at the
church office. Call Cornerstone at
352-726-7335 or email strong
foundations@hotmail.com. The
church is at 1100 W. Highland Blvd.
Community Christian Karate


Club (CCKC) offers a Citrus County
group for learning karate skills,
working on cardio, and meeting new
friends. Three different classes for
three different age groups are of-
fered: the 4- to 7-year-old class, 8-
to 12-year-old class, and the
teen/adult class. Classes take place
Tuesday evenings at New Hope
Baptist Church, 8635 W. Goodman
Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for families.
For more information, contact 5th
degree black belt instructor Greg
Gunn at 352-428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit
www.topgunnkarate.com.
A Christian Bible-based spiri-
tual recovery group meets from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Living Water Ministry Complex,
1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 352-527-2443.
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a
ministry of Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, is open from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Pro-
ceeds fund the food pantry. The
store accepts donations of house-
hold items, clothing and small
appliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Study & support
"Get in Touch With Your
Faith," a Christian information class
at Peace Lutheran Church," begins
at 6 p.m. Thursday. Pastor Terry
McKee will conduct the class for one
hour weekly, for 12 to 16 weeks, de-
pending on the questions and de-
sires of the group. Everyone is
welcome. There is no fee. To regis-
ter, call the church office at 352-489-
5881.The church is at 7201 S. U.S.
41, five miles north of Dunnellon.
The Genesis Project, an in-
depth analysis and discussion of
the text of Genesis, is conducted
from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday at Con-
gregation Beth Sholom, 102 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A class on the
Hebrew alphabet is also offered
from 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Monday.
Both classes are taught by Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot. Call 352-
643-0995.


Places of worship



that offer love, peace,



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted"!!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Engaged gay

instructor

welcomed at

Catholic school

Associated Press
SAMMAMISH, Wash. -A
part-time musical coach at a
Catholic school in Washington
state who recently announced
she is engaged to her same-sex
partner said Thursday the
school has given her a new em-
ployment agreement as an in-
dependent contractor
Eastside Catholic School in
Sammamish recently forced out
a vice principal who married
his partner
Stephanie Merrow said she
was nervous before her meet-
ing with the school's principal,
Polly Skinner, but it was "very
warm and welcoming.
"She was very nice, she
made me feel very valued,"
Merrow said, adding, "I got a
little raise."
In response to her inquiry at
the meeting, Merrow said she
was told her marital status
doesn't matter
The contract did not talk
about Catholic teachings, she
said.
School attorney Mike Patter-
son didn't immediately return a
call and email for comment.
Merrow is choreographing
this year's spring musical.
Students at Eastside Catholic
have led protests recently over
the departure of vice principal
Mark Zmuda.
The school and Zmuda have
disputed the circumstances of
his departure, with Zmuda say-
ing he was fired and the school
saying he resigned after ac-
knowledging that his marriage
violated Catholic teaching and,
subsequently, the terms of his
contract.

First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ill Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AlIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
S 6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
m www.fbchomosassa.org


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
h, [htlh ,,/t WLh lI t ,II


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
.................10:30 A.M.


-IZB



t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages- 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


F I47 Years of
F I RST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
S9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson









Hwy. 44 E @
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services .
" Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
SCasual Service
S 9:30 AM
0 5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
0 Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM 0
0 Nursery Provided U
Fellowship & Youth Group
S Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770
SPastor James Capps


I "First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIANk
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 p M. Bible Study
344-1908
QUIE'r~l


SFirst 1

Assembly


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday .A, hi Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Floral City, FL.
000GWUM


#I Floral City
united Methodist
Church 5
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.comn




Grace Bible
Church


Lc
Sunday
9:30AM.................... Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. -Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
PI.I'I 1 -0 %lil"
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
12 mi. east of U.S. 19
6382W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


i Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10OAM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon

HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church
ope



opw
Voor
M In , 1 i ,,


2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1V miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107|





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Youth orchestra enrolling
new students Tuesday
The Citrus Youth Educational Sym-
phonic Orchestra (CYESO) will be en-
rolling new students from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Cornerstone Baptist Church,
1100 W Highland Blvd., Inverness.
Students with no musical training will
begin class in musical notation, voice
and playing a recorder prior to learning
an orchestral instrument. Students with
musical training will be interviewed for
playing in the Chamber Orchestra.
For more information, visit
wwwCYESO.org and Facebook.

Area Family Care Council
to meet in Wildwood
The Area 13 Family Care Council will
meet from 10 a.m. to noon Monday at
the Wildwood Agency for Persons with
Disabilities office, 1601 W Gulf Atlantic
Highway (State Road 44). All persons in-
terested in issues of those with develop-
mental disabilities and their families
are encouraged to attend.
The group is seeking new members.
For more information, call Karen
Huscher at 352-726-1445, or email
cbettykay@aol. com.

SheriffDawsy to talk to
Pine Ridge Civic Association
Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy will
speak at the Pine Ridge Civic Associa-
tion membership meeting at 7 p.m.
Monday at the Community Center
The audience will have an opportu-
nity to ask questions. Refreshments will
be served.
On Saturday, Jan. 18, the Civic Associ-
ation will have a hot dog and bingo
night. Doors open at the community
center at 6 p.m. and the $3 fee will in-
clude hot dogs with all the trimmings,
beans, chips, coffee and dessert. All pro-
ceeds from the sale of bingo cards go to
the winners.

Beverly Hills Hadassah
to hear CMH speaker
Beverly Hills Chapter of Hadassah
will meet at 1 p.m. Monday at the
Kellner Auditorium, 102 Civic Circle in


SHARE Bridge Club
SHARE Bridge Club meets at 1 p.m.
second and fourth Mondays at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness. All levels of players are welcome.
For more information, call Julia Grissom at
352-341-0554, or Barbara Hackett at 352-
341-0149.
Point 0' Woods
Are you a card player, need a place to meet
new friends and enjoy a few hours of social
moments? Point 0' Woods Country Club, at
9228 E. Gospel Island Road, welcomes resi-
dents in the area to join us for a lively after-
noon of cards and laughter.
Duplicate bridge is played at noon Tues-
days and Fridays. Call Barbara Pofahl at 352-
341-1756 or Elaine Spangenberg at
352-860-0358.
Party bridge is played Wednesday after-
noons and Saturday nights. Call Mary Thomas
at 352-637-0045.
For more information, call President Sandra
Koonce at 352-341-1747 or membership
chairman Marilyn Pruter at 352-287-2545.
Nature Coast Bridge Club
Beginner bridge lessons are offered from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday with the Nature
Coast Bridge Club at Towne Square Mall, U.S.
19, Spring Hill. For more information, call


Beverly Hills.
Guest speaker this month is Jennifer
Springer, director of nutrition for Citrus
Memorial hospital.
Hadassah is a 100-year-old charitable
organization open to men and women of
all faiths. It supports colleges, universi-
ties, medical schools, medical research
including stem cell research, hospitals,
youth camps and infrastructure in Is-
rael and America.
For more information, call Carole at
352-270-8458 or Ellen at 352-436-4135.

Sew, serge with Sew-Ciety
Monday at cannery
Sewing friends and enthusiasts are
invited to dust off their sewing ma-
chines and sergers and make plans to
attend the January meeting of the
Florida Sewing Sew-Ciety
The meeting will be at 9 a.m. Monday
at the Citrus County Cannery, 3405 W
Southern St., Lecanto. The project for
the meeting is a useful sewing tote.
For more information, call Dee at 352-
527-8229.

BFF Society to have
dinner meeting Monday
The BFF Society Inc. will have its
dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. Monday at
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club (back
patio).
Members and guests will discuss the
club's next fundraiser, the Civil War re-
enactment to be held in Williston in
March. The group will rent chairs for
educational scholarships.
For more information and to RSVP,
call Gwen, 352-795-1520.
Community Concert Choir
rehearses each Tuesday
The Citrus Community Concert Choir
Inc. has begun rehearsals for its spring
session. The choir rehearses at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church's
Fellowship Hall, 935 S. Crystal Glen
Drive in Lecanto.
New members will be considered
until the end of January, to allow
enough rehearsal time. Prospective
members should arrive at 6:30 p.m. for a
short audition. For more information,
call 352-212-1746.


Mary Ann Dufresne at 352-592-4882
or email whimsey@atlantic.net.
Nature Coast Bridge Club has bridge
games at 12:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday and at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday at 3021 Commercial Way, south end
of Towne Square Mall, Spring Hill. Asocial
game is played at 12:30 p.m. Thursday for
those wishing to play in a non-duplicate envi-
ronment. In addition to regular games, special
ones are played periodically with more match
points up for grabs.
The club offers games for all levels of play.
Lessons for beginner to advanced players are
available. The games attract many Citrus
County players. For details and a complete
schedule of games or lessons, call Mary Ellen
at 352-596-1524, Mary Ann at 352-592-4882
orAnnabelle at 352-597-5221, or email
hillsja@gate.net. For more details and
directions, check the NCBC website at
daily-recap.com.
Free bridge lessons
Free bridge lessons are offered at the Citrus
Bridge Club in Hernando at the Nature Coast
Bank on the corner of County Road 486 and
Citrus Hills Blvd. The lessons are designed for
people wishing to learn the game, or for those
who have played before and want to learn
new "tricks." Call Daryl Drew at 321-331-8003.


NEWS


PFLAG to meet at Unity
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents, Family
and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will
meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the
Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W
Woodview Lane, Lecanto
PFLAG'S mission is to promote the
health and well-being of LGBT per-
sons, their families and friends. Meet-
ings are open to everyone and provide
an opportunity for dialog, discussion
and support, as well as education
about LGBT issues and concerns.
For more information, call Linda at
352-419-2738 or email pflag.lecanto
@gmail.com.

Anticipating standards
Common Core has become a familiar
term in the news and in our conversa-
tions and evokes many questions. The
League of Women Voters of Citrus
County has invited Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel, superintendent of schools, and
Patrick Simon, director of research
and accountability, to speak on this
subject at its next meeting at 10:15 a.m.
Tuesday
CHimmel is a Citrus
County native who is in
a state-level position of
mentoring other
Florida school district
superintendents and
serving on the Florida
High School Athletic
Sandra Association Appeals
Himmel Committee and the
to talk about Florida Labor Rela-
Common Core. tions Service.
Simon has 40 years of
experience in education and has
served 33 years as an educator in Cit-
rus County. His current responsibilities
include coordination of all national,
state and local testing. He supports


NEWS NOTES


FIRST


Cale BAPTIST


^ CHURCH

INVERNESS




Beginning January 12, 2014



NEW SERVICE



HOURS



Sunday Morning


Early Worship Traditional 8:00 A.M.*


Sunday School for all ages 9:00 A.M.


Celebration Worship Service -

Blended 10:30 A.M*


Children's Church 10:30 A.M.



550 Pleasant Grove Road,

Inverness

352-726-1252

www.fbcinverness.com

Nursery services provided
IOOOH 291 j


Sertoma
donation
A' The Inverness Sertoma
.1 Club recently presented a
check for $100 to the New
Church Without Walls in
Hernando. The church
provides spiritual teaching,
services and resources to
children and families in
Citrus County. From left
are: Pastor Dr. Douglas
Alexander, New Church
Without Walls, and Dr.
Barry Pendry, Inverness
Sertoma Club.
Special to the Chronicle


NOTES
teachers in this area as Florida transi-
tions to new standards.
The meeting is held at Central Ridge
Library in Beverly Hills. All interested
men and women are invited. The
League of Women Voters of Citrus
County is an educational, nonpartisan
organization. For more information,
email lwvcc2013@gmail.com.

Genealogical group to meet
The Citrus County Genealogical
Society will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints, 3474 W Southern St.,
Lecanto.
The title of the program is "The
Tombstone Just Said 'Wife of..'. -
Finding the Women in your Family
History" It was many years before mar-
ried women were allowed to enter into
contracts in their own name, to own or
sell property or even create a will. As a
result, women have left a small foot-
print in the traditional records pur-
sued by genealogists.
The speaker will be Jack Butler, pro-
fessional genealogist, lecturer and au-
thor, who will discuss some possible
sources of information about the
women in our family histories.
Guests are welcome to attend. For
information, call Mary Ann Machonkin
at 352-382-5515 or visit www.citrus
genealogycom.

Learn ballroom dance
Social ballroom dance classes with
June Queripel are offered Wednesdays
at the Central Citrus Community
Center, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Basics are taught at 1:30 p.m., Plus
classes are at 2:45 p.m. The one-hour
lessons are $5 each. Proceeds help
support In-Home Senior Services.


BRIDGE


FBI ~ ~ ~ -N I IB B^^~eB


Time T






Think


About


Taxes...

Don't be left out of our weekly
tax directory!
Publishes weekly, every Sunday
starting Jan. 19 April 13.
Great rates to advertise your tax preparation
services.
Call to reserves your space;
Anne 564-2931 or Darrell 564-2917
SC I T R U C 0 U N T Y '

CHk chroncleonlineom
j ^^ ~www.chronicleonline.com ww


COMMUNITY


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 CS







P age C6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Adoption fees reduced
on homeless adult cats
Adult cats are available from
the Humanitarians of Florida for
a $10 adoption fee during January
and February, thanks to an anony-
mous donor who agreed to pay
the rest of the fee so that these
felines can find homes more
quickly
All adult cats are microchipped,
current with all vaccinations, fe-
line leukemia-negative and flea-
free. There are many varieties to
choose from and they are well-
socialized. Adult cats can make
good pets because they aren't as
rambunctious as kittens, but still
have a loving, friendly nature.
Call the Humanitarians' Hardin
Haven at 352-613-1629 and see
one of the adoptable cats or kit-
tens Saturdays in the Chronicle.

All welcome at VFW
'Elvis Dinner Show'
The public is welcome to join
the VFW Post 4337 family for an
"Elvis Dinner Show" from
5 to 9 p.m. today at the post home,
906 State Road 44 East, Inverness.
Lasagna, salad and dessert will
be served until 7 p.m.; the show
will be from 7 to 9 p.m.
Tickets are $15. Call 352-344-
3495, or visit wwwvfw4337.org,
for information about all post
activities.

BH Lions to serve
pancake breakfast
The Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will have its
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. Sunday
Cost for adults is $4; and chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for $2.
This includes all-you-can-eat
pancakes, choice of bacon or
sausage or combo, orange juice
and coffee or tea.
For more information, call 352-
897-4899.

Come have laughs
at hypnosis show
Citrus Eagles 3992 will present
a special "Comedy Hypnosis
Show" starring Larry Greenberg
at 7 p.m. Sunday
Tickets are $10 in advance or
$12 at the door A lasagna dinner
will be served for a donation of
$6. The public is welcome.
The Eagles lodge is on State
Road 44 East in Inverness. For in-
formation or to purchase tickets,
call 352-344-5337.

Free Zumba class at
Unity twice weekly
Free Zumba classes for begin-
ners are offered at 11:30 a.m.
Monday and Thursdays at Unity
Church, 2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
For more information, email
miss-donna@tampabayrr.com or
call 352-628-3253.

Humanitarians OF
FLORIDA


Sassafras


Welcome, Gracie Hogue


Special to t ihe Cronicle
Citrus Memorial Health System volunteers treated the hospital's first baby of 2014 to a bundle of gifts. Volunteer Ginny Thompson
donated a handmade layette and other auxiliary members contributed toward a basketful of essential items for the family.
Jessica Sharp and Joshua Hogue welcomed Gracie Hogue into their family on Jan. 3 at 7:51 a.m. She weighed 6 pounds,
8 3/4 ounces and is the couple's second child. From left: CMH volunteer Evelyn McCain presents gifts to Joshua Hogue, Jessica
Sharpe, Gracie Hogue and her big brother, Mason Hogue, as Auxiliary President Sandi Phillips looks on.




Audubon Society to hear about life of owls


Public welcome at Wednesday meeting


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Audubon's program
slated for 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15, will
be "Rendezvous with the Raptors."
The program will be presented by
Michele Kline of HOPE Wildlife Rehabil-
itation. She will provide an up-close-and-
personal look at a trilogy of
nonreleasable nocturnal raptors: Eastern
screech owl, barred owl and great horned
owl.
These owls have been in her loving
care for many years and can never be re-
turned to the wild. Her PowerPoint
presentation will give insight into their
behaviors, eating habits, debilitating in-
juries, personalities and physical


Special to the Chronicle
Michele Kline of HOPE Wildlife
Rehabilitation shows a red-tailed hawk
at an earlier program.


differences.
Kline has been rehabbing and releas-
ing likely candidates since 1985. She
cares for an average of 60-plus birds of
different species every day
These include birds that can never be
released and those receiving flight train-
ing necessary before releasing them back
to their natural habitats.
Parents are welcome to bring their
children to the educational program.
They will enjoy seeing the birds in per-
son and learn what to do when an injured
bird is found.
Kline's presentation will help cultivate
a deeper appreciation of the wildlife
around us.
The meeting will be at Unity Church,
2628 W Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyaudubon.com.


Teachers to show spelling skills


Sponsors soughtfor 2014 contest


Special to the Chronicle
The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus is seeking sponsors for
its 2014 Central Citrus
Spell-A-Rama.


Teams of teachers from 11
elementary schools Floral
City, Citrus Springs, Crystal
River, Central Ridge, Inver-
ness, Lecanto, Pleasant Grove,
Hernando, Forest Ridge, Ho-


mosassa and Rock Crusher -
will compete for the spelling
trophy, with students, parents
and faculty cheering them on.
Levels of sponsorship range
from gift donations for door
prizes to cash donations. Call
Karen at 352-560-0019 for
more information about spon-


scoring the event.
All money collected will go
toward scholarships for gradu-
ating seniors.
The event is 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 30, at Curtis Peterson
Auditorium in Lecanto.
Doors open at 5 p.m. Admis-
sion is free. Food will be sold.


Public understanding helps support Path


Special to the Chronicle
Sassafras is a gentle adult cat
looking for her own home. She is a
lovely 2-year-old gray and white
young mom with a sweet
disposition. There are many
varieties of felines to choose from.
All adult cat adoption fees are $10
through January and February.
Drop by and enjoy the felines in
their cage-free, homestyle
environment from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin Haven on
the corner of State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of our felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shelters/f118
6.html.


ho would have ever thought that
a nonprofit would have to adver-
tise? Who would have thought it
might actually be a line item in expenses?
I didn't I would think that you open up
your services and everyone on the planet
would instantly know what you do and
why you do it, especially since our serv-
ices are free to the public.
I had a friend a long time ago who was a
salesmen. After going through an un-
pleasant experience with a car purchase,
he explained to me that good salespeople
are valuable. The work of sales is to ex-
plain the product in the right way to make
a sale. To educate the consumer
I consider this monthly article an edu-
cational piece to help the public under-
stand our work and use it to their
advantage, as well as, hopefully leading
to satisfied customers. This could be a
donor, a volunteer or a client checking
into shelter
Under our umbrella, we have six
houses in Beverly Hills that serve as our
shelter and two of them are administra-


DuWayne
Sipper

THE PATH
HOME


tive. We have a Lecanto thrift store known
for its pink flamingos and a Dunnellon
thrift store. These thrift stores support
the shelter From time to time, we have
customers who think that we are just a
thrift store, and in steps a salesperson
who educates the customer
The farm is located in Hernando and is
community supported. Here again, it
would be easy to think that The Path is a
farm program if that is the only viewpoint
you have. The farm and the stores support
the work program of the shelter and
would not exist if it were not for the
shelter


The Path shelter has been open for
more than 13 years and we belong to the
Association of Gospel Rescue Missions,
which makes us a rescue mission for peo-
ple. Although we pay minimal dues,
almost all dollars stay here in Citrus
County.
All this time, I have been careful to put
the name of The Path in front of all of our
services. The Path shelter, The Path thrift
store and The Path farm trying to help
the community understand that this is
one agency For the past two years, our
agency has been 100 percent privately
funded.
I personally want you to know that it
does not matter if you buy a couch or do-
nate one, buy some kale at the produce
stand or donate a car, you are helping
keep someone who can no longer afford a
home off Citrus County streets.

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County, a
faith-based homeless shelter Contact him
at 527-6500 or sipperd@bellsouth.net.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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31 59 31 26 29 contain the virus, contain the virus. Radha Mitchell, Vin Diesel.'NR'c
TB 49 23 49 16 19 Raymond IRaymond Raymond IRaymond BigBang Big Bang BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang ICougar IGround
T 1 5 1 0 3 *** "Walk, Don't Run" (1966, Comedy) Cary **** "it Happened One Night" (1934) *** "Arsenic and Old Lace" (1944, Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 Grant, Samantha Eggar.'NR' ccClaudette Colbert, Clark GabTe. 'NR' Cary Grant.'NR' (DVS)
S 5 4 5 2 MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (N) (In MythBusters (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In MythBusters (In Stereo)
P53 34 53 24 26 'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG' c 'PG' c Stereo)'14' c 'PG' c
(TLC) 50 46 50 29 30 Extreme |Extreme Extreme Chea. Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Sex Sent Me to the I Untold Stories of ER
r 350 26**1 3"W."(2008) Josh *** "The Rundown" (2003, Adventure) The "The Abandoned" (2006, Horror) ** "Cut" (2000, Horror) Molly
r 350 261 350 Brolin. PG-13' Rock, Seann William Scott. PG-13' Anastasia Hille. 'R' Ringwald. (In Stereo)'R' c
i 4 3 4 1 *** "Source Code" (2011, Suspense) Jake *** "The Lincoln Lawyer"(2011, Suspense) Matthew *** "The Lincoln Lawyer" (2011)
48 33 48 31 34 Gyllenhaal.'PG-13' c(DVS) McConaughey Marisa omei.'R' (DVS) Matthew McConaughey.
TD 38 58 38 33 Steven Uncle "Percy Jackson & the Olympians" King/Hill |King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Boon |Space
IAV 9 106 9 __ 44 Food Paradise'PG' Food Paradise'PG' Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
rTl 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers MostShocking Cold Justice'14' Cold Justice'14' Cold Justice'14' Most Shocking
T1 32 49 32 34 24 Kirstie Kirstie Kirstie IKirstie Kirstie Kirstie Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond IRaymond
S7** "No Strings Attached" (2011) Natalie Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern *** "Ocean's
47 32 47 17 18 Portman, Ashfon Kutcher.'R' c (DVS) Family Family Family Family Family Family Thirteen" (2007) c
Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will &
S 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace
WG 18 18 18 18 20 Bones 14' c Bones 14' c Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos WGN News at Nine Mother Rules


West
* A 10 8 4
V A K83
* J5
* 10 6 3


South
14
24-


North
4 i :3
t Q 10 6 5
A K 7 4 2
S85


01-11-14


East
QJ 952
Y 72
Q 10 9 8
4- J 4
South
* K7
V J 94
6*
* A K Q 9 7 2


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
West North East
Pass 1 Pass
Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: Y A

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

It is bad enough to go down in a partscore
contract after the defenders play well. But
then to notice that you could have made game
in a different strain really rubs salt into the
wound.
In this deal, how can East-West defeat two
clubs? And which game can be made?
South was a tad cautious when he rebid two
clubs, not three clubs. It is true that three
would have been a slight overbid, but with
such good clubs, it would have been accept-
able.
It was normal for North to pass over two
clubs. Over three clubs, though, he would have
continued with three hearts, and South would
have signed off in three no-trump with his
spade stopper Note that as the cards lie, three
no-trump is unbeatable. Even if West is psy-
chic and leads a diamond, declarer can win on
the board and play on hearts. (And, yes, on an-
other subject, some Wests would risk a takeout
double over one club, hoping that if partner
advances in diamonds, he has good length
there.)
The defense against two clubs is instructive.
When West leads his heart ace, East drops the
seven, starting a high-low (echo) with his dou-
bleton. West cashes the heart king, then leads
the heart eight, his higher remaining heart
being a suit-preference signal for spades. East
ruffs and shifts to the spade queen.
Let's assume South covers with his king.
West wins with his ace and carefully cashes the
spade 10. Now, with every side-suit trick taken,
West leads his last heart. When East ruffs with
his club jack, it effects an uppercut South
overruffs, but now West collects the sixth de-
fensive trick with his club 10.
JVy Jfle THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
^(jM LA by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, b
one letter to each square, We're so bu
to form four ordinary words. I y h e S nt Thank you for
| E | lnnin your / me.
SEPI0 out
I xpr.... _Y1


Ak A k I HOPING TO FILL TlHE 5EAT
S OF TH I P15GRACEP
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to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A: II TI 1
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Yesterday's Jumbles: STYLE
YesterdayEs|
I Answer: Lunchtir
SERVING


(Answers Monday)
VISOR IMMUNE GAMING
ne at the prison was -
G TIME


ACROSS
Bad actors
1040 info
Key point
Right now!
Unseal
Jai -
Gamblers'
mecca
Wild hyacinth
Town official
Flight stat
Sault Marie
Pupils' chores
Kernel holder
Actress
Madeline -
Gibson and
Torme
Waxed
theatrical
Mint drink
Queen's truck
Suite amenity
(2 wds.)
Emblem
*'Et tu" time


"- Given
Sunday"
Female feline
NNW opposite
Status -
More than
willing
Ring-
necked -
Carnival
attraction
Puffin cousins
Comstock
Lode st.
Gets older
Chicken wire
Tooth-pu Iler's
org.
Insinuate
DOWN
Evil
Out on
the briny
Quite a few
Reel
Kind of story
Make ripples


Answer to Previous Puzzle


NOR RAZE KG
ECM EM IR EIA
RA N IF1 G M[E T
IANI I OIEI
FADMTED II SET
||I T
RAI ANIT

K D PI E R C E
ORDORMWELAN
R R R M~E LAN
DASE[OSE URJE
S PAICE D GIAjBLE

P00 PAIL m
ALIEN SADIDLE
MLLKCOWS REND
AVE HEAKTEINI
ffEX SRTAN1D


Nerve cell
Talk on and on
Seine vistas
Margarita rim
Scrabble
piece


Sea eagle
Type in again
Merry's
opposite
Chimney
deposit
Amoebas
have one
Melville opus
Tennis ace
Bjorn -
Island near
Corsica
Thin
Frisky
Pony's gait
Mr. Ventura
Itty-bitty
Large lizard
Hummed
Mensa data
- Bernhardt
Junk email
Elisabeth of
"Soapdish"
Cartoon
shrieks
Leslie Caron
film
Idyllic spot
Crash, so to
speak
Bonfire
remains
Rural elec.
provider


1-11 0 2D314 IFS- D4sIl by Universal Uclickfor UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: I am the
manager of a small
bakery I've had the
same employee, "Sue," for the
past nine years. She is lazy
and uninvolved, and I gave
her a so-so review Much to
my surprise, Sue
was promoted to
management in an-
other facility I was
happy for her
achievement, until
I heard she was
telling others that
she was doing the
majority of my
work, including or-
dering supplies.
She added that I
was suffering from
Alzheimer's and ANI
couldn't remember MAIL
anything. None of
this is true. I think
it may have been prompted by
my less-than-stellar review
Since Sue has been pro-
moted, she has been asking
me a lot of questions about
how to do her job, because
she is clueless. She doesn't
know that I am aware of her
nasty comments. Last week,
another co-worker told me
that Sue is bullying her assis-
tant and making her do the
majority of her work. She is
already making enemies
there, and because of her
lack of supervision, the bak-
ery is becoming filthy and a
potential health hazard.
Should I keep quiet about
what I know or contact
human resources (anony-
mously) and report her mis-
conduct, as a few employees
have suggested? I am retiring
soon and don't really need
the drama. Caught in the
Middle
Dear Caught: You have


I
L


nothing to report other than
hearsay from co-workers. You
have not witnessed any of this
firsthand, and you don't know
whether it is true. The fact
that Sue calls you for help is
meaningless. Many employ-
ees rely on others
w-- hen given new re-
sponsibilities. The
negative things you
already know
about Sue were in
your review They
promoted her any-
way You can com-
S plain about the
S condition of the
bakery but Sue's
new co-workers
should be the ones
IE'S to take responsibil-
.BOX ity for complaining
to human re-
sources now
DearAnnie: I have four
adult children. I announced
to all of them that I would not
be holding Thanksgiving or
Christmas dinners at my
home and that they were wel-
come to spend the time with
their in-laws.
My oldest was hurt because
she has no in-laws to go to.
My son texted his middle sis-
ter to ask what was going on.
My middle daughter was
upset, saying I was allowing
my youngest daughter to be
the "winner" My youngest
daughter spent both days at a
local church feeding the
needy
Why was my family sepa-
rated? Because my middle
and youngest are not speak-
ing to each other When one
of them is hurt or angry, they
hurl vicious insults at each
other I feel bad about this,
but I refuse to sit at a table
with these uncaring adults


and pretend that all is well.
I had a nice TV dinner and
a slice of sweet potato pie
with whipped cream for the
holidays. The losers in this
mess are my grandchildren
and I. I take responsibility for
raising these people, but I
will not allow them to ruin
my day -June
DearJune: If your children
make your holiday celebra-
tions frustrating and stress-
ful, you do not have to
include them. But how sad
for all of you to spend these
holidays separated or alone.
Please give your children one
more chance. Explain to
them that nastiness will not
be tolerated in your home
and the first person to use an
insult of any kind will be
asked to leave. By now, they
know you mean business.
DearAnnie: I loved your
answer to "Last-Minute Host-
ess," whose stepson and his
family always show up hours
late for Thanksgiving dinner
Here's how I would respond
to those who arrive late:
"You're just in time for a
piece of pie!"
I bet they won't show up
late the next time. Fort
Myers, Fla.
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 C7






C8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014

Peanuts

/Ak.REDO 6RN) THE
AT LAST WE Q00;
MET FACE I
To FAC PILC







Pickles


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse

E W a rA E M ,C H L O K M "T e O F F f
,lC- FOR R.1p BG.G toT 5 MINLc
P^BD-WHITeSHEEPOOS RD. ,


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Beetle Bailey


YOU GET SO USED 1 'WUGH I NOTlCED ETAL
TO FOCUSING ON THE B THE STORE E BOUNCE BACI
DTAYS, THE PARTIES, HE ALREADY C-LEBRATING [ QUICKER THAN
SHOPPIrJNG, I'HAT WHEN VALETINE"IM y DAY. THE REST
IT SUDOC)NLY OF U5.
S.TOP S, rImE
SIEM5 TO
STOP WITh
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The Grizzwells


Blondie


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Mommy, you gave me too much
toast for my butter."


quickly dispelled.


Doonesbury

*^,, RW2.IUKA'

PFP OF
Th- PAP.-



Big Nate


Big Nate --


Arlo and Janis


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TEW(ETS TOO<





IRE YL L '-' /T4
S" E'.O SECON I


To day's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"American Hustle" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13) 8 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Her" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) In 3D, high frame rate. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones" (R)
1:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,


5 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"American Hustle" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Gipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and presem.t,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: sjenb- I

"OV TNRSI TSDD HINT, GPS USOVNI


RSI OUS IN JNNM OG XDOLAIJ MYRK


AV RNVG NW GPS GARS TS'US ING


XDOLAIJ." DOUUL RADDSU

Previous Solution: "I love the noise ... I love the smell. I love crazy people. I love
every single thing about New York." Lea Michele

(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-11


COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563=5966


5,! Classifieds



In Print


I and



Online


All


The Time


. .. .M.M.I*S *V* SM.*,.I


I'm a Lady, 79 yrs
Young, looking for a
gentlman in the
same age group for
friendship. If you'd
like to talk pleas e
call (352) 503-2338


*w

IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111






Cloth lift & recliner
chair.Pd $1,500 Sell
$750.00 firm.
carol.hudson@outLok.com/35
2-344-3947
(leave message).



2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
Nice condition.
MOVE-IN READY.
$46k. 527-1239
2 BED/2 BATH/1 GAR.
Nice condition!
MOVE-IN READY
$46k. 527-1239
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


CITRUS
SPRINGS
1/2 PRICE
YARD SALE
SAT. 11th 8a-lp
BOOKS, THINGS
& SNACKS
UNITARIAN Church
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41,1 mi. N. 491
Contents of 12 x 24
Storage Unit, Displays,
Cases, cabinets, glass,
toys, primitives, over
2,000 items, 1 price,
all or nothing, Call
489-8323 for Appt.
DINING ROOM BUFFET
light gray wood, 4
drawers, cupboard,
cut. board. 4'7"' L, 19"
W $65. (352) 465-1262
FLORAL CITY
2BR/1 /2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
Floral City, DW,
2bd/bal, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726
FORD CROWN VIC
LX
1994 Crown Victoria Ix
119,000 micold ac.new
tires runs good
$1900.See pictures on
Ocala craigslist
3525273498 after 3pm
Hand Made Hats
Beautiful, Yarn all
colors, 90 total, buy
& sell on ebay,
make good profit,
It's cold up North
Cash Only $180.
(352) 746-9573
INVERNESS
-SUNDAY Only-
9am to 3pm
HUGE GARAGE SALE
30 Shadow Wood Dr
Gospel Island
INVERNESS
2/2, updated, immacul.
$625. mo 317-442-1063
LECANTO
Crystal Oaks
Lg BR w/priv bath.
TV w/cable, internet
access, swimming
pool, laun & kitchen
access. All utilities.
$450/mo 352-464-1928


SHonme oFir
www.chronicleho mefinde


LECANTO
1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. inci
Non Smk, $550/mo.
352-628-3501





9ener

Medical Billing/
A/R Specialist:
Seeking FT Medical
Blller with A/R expe-
rience. Minimum 5
years. E-Cllnlcal EMR
software knowledge
helpful. Charge,
payment posting
and Insurance
follow-up required.
Detail oriented and
serious Inquires only
please.
Email resume to
hr@cmc-fl.com


Missing white female
pitbull. Lost in high-
lands area, near
Apopka and Malverne.
Her name is Babi and
she is 1 1/2 years old.
She belongs to my 7
year old daughter.
Went missing this
morning 1/9/2014
around 7:30am. Please
call 352-601-8344 if
you find her!
Stationary Bike
ProForm XP 185
IFIT Multi, never used
$100. firm cash
(352) 527-6779
Used Jazzy Power
Chairs, running or not
(352) 628-4712

WE HAVE
The Office of
Dr. Blessilda Liu
942 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy,
Hernando
352-419-8924



iderI
sr.com


Fli Yowr Drewj* Hom
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


WILDERNESS
2004 Advantage 28.5
Ft. 5th Wheel. Sleeps
six, one slide, upgraded
interior, self contained, 2
TVs, AM-FM Disc
player, new electric
brakes, good tires.
$7,500 w/reese re-
ceiver. Must see.
352-527-4968



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 young cats came to
us; very friendly but
scared, 1 black, 1
cream, need good
homes, can help with
spay / neuter expenses
352-795-8800
Chest Freezer
14 CF, works
10823 Yulee Dr
Homosassa
Free
Catahula/American
Bull Dog Mix, male,
8 months old
all shots, neutered
(352) 410-8128



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
- Grouper @ $6.001lb
w Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001


Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
Black Short Hair Male,
very slim, needs
medicine.BIk & org
collar. Lost 1/9 on
West Cove Harbor Dr/
Pelican Cove, CR
(352) 794-3687
Lost 2 Pairs of
Children's glasses. For
girl. One is red, one is
purple.
(352)419-7378
Male Yorkie, 6 Ibs,
brown & tan, Bubba,
last see on Alamo &
Flagstaff in Pine Ridge
1/5 Had on an army
jacket (352) 249-7675


Missing white female
pitbull. Lost in high-
lands area, near
Apopka and Malverne.
Her name is Babi and
she is 1 1/2 years old.
She belongs to my 7
year old daughter.
Went missing this
morning 1/9/2014
around 7:30am. Please
call 352-601-8344 if
you find her!
Silver colored money
clip. White with green
lettering. Lost in area
of Wells Fargo Bank,
CR (352) 382-7656



Denture Partial,
Found in Inverness
Parking Lot near Big
Lots/Anytime Fitness
(352) 220-4931
Prescription Glasses
found 3 weeks ago
at Hunter Springs,
Crystal River, call
to identify
(352) 795-3701


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org


Meyolng Mc.ive
female cat, good with
other cats & people.
Updated on shots,
indoor only, spayed,
declawed 341-4103

WE HAVE
The-Ofice of
Dr. Blessilda Liu
942 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy,
Hernando
352-419-8924

-I


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.OOlb,
0, Grouper @ $6.00lb
o Stonecrab@ $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001




TEACHER
Fulltime position. 40
hr certification
needed
LITTLE DISCIPLE
PRESCHOOL
352-302-2383


TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966






CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
For Overnight Shifts
Apply Online: home
Instead.com/671


CNAs
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
All Shifts
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D








Medical Billing/
A/R Specialist:
Seeking FT Medical
Blller with A/R expe-
rience. Minimum 5
years. E-Cllnlcal EMR
software knowledge
helpful. Charge,
payment posting
and Insurance
follow-up required.
Detail oriented and
serious Inquires only
please.
Email resume to
hr@ cmc-fi.com


Medical Assist-
ants Needed
With Phlebotomy
and Front Office
Skills for offices in
Dunnellon and
Inglis locations.
Fax Resume to:
352-465-7576 or
Email to: srideven@
yahoo.com









City of Bushnell
Lift Station
Maintenance
Mechanic -
Water/Wastewater
Department
The City of Bushnell
is currently accept-
ing applications for
the position of Lift
Station Maintenance
Mechanic. Salary
is based on experi-
ence and includes
an excellent
benefits package.
Applicants must
meet the following
requirements:
Ability to trouble-
shoot and repair 3
phase electrical
service and controls,
maintain pumps,
blowers, valves,
meters, control
systems, piping, and
other equipment
related to water/
/wastewater plant
and distribution/
collection systems.
A high school
diploma or GED
required, with a DEP
collection system
certification pre-
ferred or ability to
become certified
within two years.
Applicants must
possess a valid
Florida Class A or B
CDL driver's license
or become certified
in three months.
Applications are
available at Bushnell
City Hall located at
117 E Joe P Strick-
land, JR Ave.
Bushnell, Florida or
on-line at http:www.
cityofbushnellfl.com.
Applications ac-
cepted until position
filled. Questions
concerning this
position may be
directed to Kelly
Marcoux,
352-793-2591 x 114.
This position is open
until filled. The City
of Bushnell is a drug
free workplace
EOE/ADA


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


512
738
469
325
691
847
154
286
973


INTERNET
MARKETING
Wanted motived
person with Photo-
shop, social media
and html skills as well
as a knowledge of
email marketing and
online marketing.
Great opportunity
with a growing com-
pany with clients
worldwide.
Check us out here
http://Imamc.com/
company/careers/
To apply email
resume to:
Andrew@ legendary
marketlng.com




A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic
Must have valid
driver's license.
Min. 3 yrs. Exp.
Apply in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto, DFWP




PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351


987
642
53"1
718
425
369
296
17 3
18547:3
8 5',4


463
159
4 6 3|2


872
694
738
521
387
945
216


Case Manager/
Farm Manager

Fax or Email
Resume to:
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net

Security for a
Shelter

Evenings
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sipped@
bellsouth.net

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only
Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
Gerry (352) 628-0254
I__j



Local smoke-free
Tennis Club
Looking for
part-time help with
computer skills
(Word, Excel) and
great customer
service skills. Week-
end shifts available,
flexibility a plus.
Pays $7.93 hr. E-mail
resume to: tennis@
citrushills.com




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


I gJ=-- 6:
#1 Employment source is
CI I Cassifi
| www.chronicleonline.com


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Lecanto

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


C7CITRUS CUNTY1J-



ww.chmonlclonhlle.com


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 C9


CLASSIFIED







CIO SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


Financial

Tax Accountant

2 5 yrs. Business Tax
Exp. ,CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search
@gmail.com











ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

* COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
* NAILS SKIN
* MASSAGE Therapy
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.

CAFE FOR LEASE

400 SF Located in
Busy waterfront boat
tour, rental company
and artist community
RIVER SAFARIS
10823 Yulee Drive
352-628-5222





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


ANTIQUE STEAMER
TRUNK. 36" X 22" X
23" Tall. Good condition.
$100. 527-1239.



16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316
Contents of 12 x 24
Storage Unit, Displays,
Cases, cabinets, glass,
toys, primitives, over
2,000 items, 1 price,
all or nothing, Call
489-8323 for Appt.


Appliance


6 CU. FT. CHEST
FREEZER Kenmore
white 6 cu. ft. chest
freezer with basket and
owners manual 'only
used for a month$85.00
352-419-4767
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
FREEZER small chest
freezer $40.00 works
good 352-302-3771
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398



AIR COMPRESSOR
30gal, 5hp, 150 psi,
Craftsman $125;
ROTOTILLER, Honda, 4
cycle, Model #FG-110
$175 (352) 794-0296
Craftsman 10"
Bandsaw
w/stand, very good
condition $95.
352-212-1883
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$50 OBO
352-464-0316
MITER SAW
Sears, 12" compound
$100; Leaf Blower,
mulcher and vacuum
Ryoby ,like new $100
OBO (352) 794-0296
OLDER STYLE
CRAFTMAN WORK-
BENCH $40.00
352-527-1399
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $90 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
OLDER MODEL
419-5981
SCAFFOLD 4ft. and 5ft.
scaffold and braces
$20.00 set
352-302-3771


11ll f. Ili1. 1, '
)OW k iikll Ilust
EJi Daj


CHIRpNICLE
Classifieds




150 WATT JVC THEA-
TER SURROUND
SOUND SYSTEM JVC
DVD Digital Home thea-
ter system,5disc
CD,four tower
speakers,subwoofer
and midrange speakers,
remote $100.00
352-419-4767



STAINLESS SINK Dbl
basin. 33"x22"x6"
w/atchs.Ex cond.
$75 OBO.
352-637-5969



65" HDTV
$100
503-3467


#1 Fmnlovm.nt sonurceI i


FLAT SCREEN MONI- roy r
TOR 19" viewsonic flat Shredder,
screen computer moni- 6/2HP Motor,
tor good condition
$35.00 352-302-3771 Asking $225.
Spotless King Size (352) 527-1963
Simmons Beauty Rest
Mattress, box spring,
aprox. 7 or 8 yrs. old
$395. Call Ken


(352)382-5149


5 pc. Dining Set
w/swivel chairs, wicker
backs, square table &
sage/brown $225.
(352) 897-4154



2 VINTAGE CHAIRS.
Gold swivel rocker and
brown/rust fixed chair.
Nice condition. $25 for
both. 527-1239
2 VINTAGE COFFEE
TABLES. 1 round with
lazy susan. 1 rectangu-
lar. Both maple. $25 for
both. 527-1239
Antique Couch & two
swivel rockers
$200. for all 3
Good condition
352-634-4329
BOOK CASE large oak
bookcase
18x30x72 $95.00
352-621-3360
CORNER SECTIONAL
Mocha faux suede. $45.
527-1239
DINING ROOM BUFFET
light gray wood, 4
drawers, cupboard,
cut. board. 4'7"' L, 19"
W $65. (352) 465-1262
DINING TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS Solid wood
Canadel Brand. Table
30X48 with white legs.
Chairs with white legs
and backs. Great for
small dining area or
kitchen. $200 or best
offer. Phone:
352-270-3685
DOUBLE BOXSPRING
@ MATTRESS guest
room box spring used
very little, clean. $85
352-613-5240
For Sale Adjustable
Electric Bed,
Like New
$250.
(352) 344-1960
New Sofa,
excellent condition
tweed, neutral $250.
2 matching Leather
recliner chairs, brand
new, black & medium
brown $200ea. or $350
for both non smoking
home. (352) 527-1963
New Twin Bed
Frame, boxspring &
Mattress $100. firm
(352) 795-0783
OAK COFFEE TABLE.
Excellent condition.
24"x48".
$45. 527-1239
OAK ENTERTAIN-
MENT CENTER.
18"X54"X45" TALL.
Glass door/shelves.$75.
527-1239
ROCKER RECLINER
Off white fabric/oak.
Nice condition. $65.
527-1239
SLEEPER SOFA
Queen mattress. Off
white fabric. Nice condi-
tion. 78 x 36 x 32 tall.
$145. 527-1239
SOFA
brown neutral color,
excellent condition
$150. ask for Mimi
(352) 795-7285
Sofa Sleeper
3 cushion, 2 throw
pillows beige print
$100
(352) 601-7380
Two Tan Leather
Couches
little wear, $150. ea.
$250. for 2, Dunnellon
(352) 465-9114
Wooden Hutch
filled with china
and old silverware,
asking $400. obo
(352)419-6865



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
ChipperlShredder
Craftsman 3" 7.5 HP,
OHV, Model #
247.776350. Strong
machine, little use.
$250 OBRO
(352) 489-2011


HYACINTHS 30
PLANTS FOR WATER
GARDEN BLUE FLOW-
ERS 10 FOR $15
464-0316




CITRUS
SPRINGS
1/2 PRICE
YARD SALE
SAT. 11th 8a-lp
BOOKS, THINGS
& SNACKS
UNITARIAN Church
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491
CITRUS SPRINGS
Saturday 11th, 7am
Contents of House
Antiques, Paintings,
Gym equip., free wgts
70 W. Lynnhaven PI.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Thur-Fri-Sat 8am-2pm
MOVING SALE, tools,
furn, lawn eq, more.
9328 N Citrus Sps blvd
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/10, 1/ 11, 1/12 8a-4p
Hundreds of items
Under roof, rain or sun
9639 N Misty Janell Ter
Off Dunnellon Rd
HERNANDO
ESTATE SALE *
Fri. 9a-2p & Sat 9a-2p
1246 E. Liberty Street
Info & pics. at: www.
invernessantiques.com

HOMOSASSA
John's Back!
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
ESTATE SALE*
Antiques, furn., clothes
wallpaper, electric
wheelchair, jewelry,
ruby glass & More
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market,
Follow pink signs

HOMOSASSA
RV RESORT, SAT. Ith,
9a-3p, Rain date 1/18
Large Sale
Through Out Park
Formally Turtle Creek.
10200 W. Fishbowl Dr.
HOMOSASSA
Sat 1/11,8a-2p
Estate Sale, Everything
must go, Riverhaven
5090 S Stetson Pt Dr




DUNNELLON
1/09 to 1/13
MOVING furniture,
hsehold & yard items.
LAKE TROPIC ANA
18718 SW51st LANE
Sugar Mill Woods
1/10 & 1/11,8am
Entire household, some
vintage, all priced to sell
20 Cherry Palm Ct
Use GPS, no signs



MENS DRESS PANTS
Like new.
$10 OBO Linda
423-4163



3 DOUBLE ROLLS VI-
NYL WALL COVERING
$25 FLORAL DESIGN
165 SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &
ACCESSORIES $30.
464-0316
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HANDCRAFTED
HEARTS/BUNNIES/TED
DY BEARS 419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $60
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$100 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


I


CLASSIFIED



BIRD CAGES. 3 bird
cages $15 for all.
352-465-0580
CAL-HAWK ADJUSTA-
BLE CHROME
TRAILER RECEIVER-
10" drop, 2" ball, 50001b,
Ex. $60, 628-0033
COLUMBIA D44
BENCH VICE- 4-1/2"
Jaw, swivel base, 251bs,
made in USA, EX., $30.
352-628-0033
EAZ-LIFT TRAILER
HITCH RECEIVER-
2-5/8" 60001b ball,
1000# MUHC, 10,000
MGTWR, $75 628-0033
FISHING TACKLE
WANTED- vintage, new
and used, cash.
352-628-0033
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
0 Grouper @ $6.001lb
Stonecrab @ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOUR DRAWER FILE
CABINET, METAL.
Good condition. $50.
527-1239
Full Size Traffic Light
$250.
Golf Cart Top w/
brackets and folding
windshield fits all
brands $150
(315) 466-2268 cell
GAS FURNACE
Coleman, Propane
gas 66,000 BTU, very
little use $100
(608) 732-4049 cell
Hand Made Hats
Beautiful, Yarn all
colors, 90 total, buy
& sell on ebay
make good profit,
It's cold up North
Cash Only $180.
(352) 746-9573
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
LIQUOR BAR
W/STOOLS
dk wood w/black marble
top w/brass footrail
2 upholstered bar stools
exc. cond $650.obo
(352) 419-6016
MIRROR 48"x68" Mirror.
$75.00 OBO
352-212-2051
OUTBOARD MOTOR
SKAG/PROP GUARD-
stainless steel, fits 30 to
70 HP motor, $30,
352-628-0033
SCHWINN SEARCHER
WOMEN'S BIKE- com-
fort seat/handlebars, 21
spd, 26" alloy wheels,
$65.00 628-0033
SEARS MANUAL
BATTERY CHARGER-
6/2AMPs, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
SONY STEREO
EQUIPMENT $50
AM/FM, AMPLIFIER,
DUAL CASSETTE,
CABLES 419-5981
STAINLESS SINK Dbl
basin,33"x22"x6"
watch. Ex cond.
$75 OBO 352-637-5969
VINTAGE REED MFG.
HVY. DUTY BENCH
VICE- 4-1/2" jaws,
80lbs, USA, Date- 1914,
$80. 352-628-0033
WIRE SHELVING 16 IN
WIDE 87 FT LONG all
brackets included
$100.00 352-527-1399
WOMEN'S BLACK
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS $15 KNEE
HIGH LIKE NEW
LARGE 419-5981



CHROME CLOTHES
RACK FOR STORE
DISPLAY, 4 arms, ex-
cellent condition, $35,
(352) 465-1813



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS,
1 Lazy Boy $295;
1 Golden $375.
Both Excellent Cond,
352-270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
UPRONLY $20
352464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352464-0316


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Children Toys,
strollers, car seats
& cribs 352-563-5437
or 352-795-0161
Used Jazzy Power
Chairs, running or not
(352) 628-4712
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316


Cloth lift & recliner
chair.Pd $1,500 Sell
$750.00 firm.
carol.hudson@outookcorV35
2-344-3947
(leave message).
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352-464-0316



EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL SIZE
(DRED)FLAT TOP
W/GIGBAG&TUNER
$85 352-601-6625
MINI ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR "LAP STEEL"
HUMBUCKIN
PICKUP,GIGBAG &
BAR $75 352-601-6625
New Acoustic Guitar
Dark MahogonyY
W/Gigbag, Tuner,
Strings & Picks $70
352-601-6625
OSCAR SCHMIDT
DELTA KING "335"
STYLE ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC SEMI
HOLLOW,BLACK $165
352-601-6625
Scandalli Accordian
120 full base, exc.
condition, $600.
(352) 341-0299



MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sears Proform 990,
wide seat, dig. display
w/ arm exercise $125;
Marcy multi-position
exercise gym, assem-
bled, 140 Ib selective
wts, lists at $495, ask-
ing $215. Exc Cond
(352) 382-7074
Stationary Bike
ProForm XP 185
IFIT Multi, never used
$100. firm cash
(352) 527-6779



12 GAUGE SHELLS
10-Boxes, #4 shot.
$90 352-502-0722
Brushed Suede Chaps
sml upper thigh 22",
never worn $100.
(352) 637-3673
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $350
(352) 464-2687


Sell r Swa


WANTED- HARLEY
Cycles, Golf Carts or
Parts, Cash on Spot
(315) 466-2268 Cell


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


JO JO
Jo Jo, a loving,
affectionate 4-y.o.
bulldog/hound mix,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, spayed.
Special needs dog
D/T hip dysplasia for
which needs
Rimadyl or Gluco-
samine. She doesn't
know she has a
problem, however;
runs & plays like any
other dog. Is there a
compassionate
family or individual
who could give this
girl a good home,
with limitless devo-
tion from her?
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-795-1288.


AKC YORKSHIRE
MALE PUP very small,
health cert., shots,
(352) 489-0960

Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


LOlk


TINY Tiny is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936






BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


'r ~


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $550., 2/1 $450
Both with Option
(612) 226-0091

HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW 3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $560 mo. Near
Walmart & 2/2, $530
mo. 352-464-3159

LECANTO/C.R.
2/2/1, D/W com-
pletely remodeled,
Central Air/Heat,
W/D Hookup. New
Carpet/Vinyl, and
Paint, 2 screened
Satio's, store room.
650. mo. $650. dep
No Pets/Smoking
Very Nice Home
Hurrry 352-464-0999




FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272

Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Homes
55+ Community
Special!
$5K for your old home!
Many models to
choose from
Call John Lyons (d
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details

Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Exp. Help for Elderly
Care. Lgt Housekping,
dr's appt's, shopping
etc.. (352) 422-3837
LICENSED CNA,
For Errands, Shopping
Dr. Appt.'s, References
352-362-2665


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
S352-422-7279 "k*



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696


S4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
*FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
/ AFFORDABLE
e' RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR &
OMAINT. INC
Offering a FullII
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerepair.com
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover

We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning
MEEK~


W|MT il M

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards


Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


EM


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713







Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441





ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc. comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**


I MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
P O RRVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service, parts, sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.














TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


"I said,'I wanna marry your daughter
when I get some money,' and he
gave me twenty bucks."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-Nha4TJoau For 16 Years,

> I ///^ i BEAUTIFU RESULT ^MP

'W WILL&1

nI CONSTRUCTION CORP
~~ ~E.L lS


iM1 U
M-21,40-18 19

I ^2-6.7281291


Am

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Hom











WORDY GUR 1B TRICKY TRICKY KANE
1. Veto a half-dozen (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT C
E IIE III and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Cast fault on poker or chess (1) they will fit in the letter
Squares. The number afkte
definition tells you how nm
3. NASCAR Busch's or Petty's grins (1) syllables in each word.


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4. Red-hued Staten Island vessel (2)


5. Towel-dries wet tiger markings (1)


6. 007 creator Ian stitching cuffs (2)


7. Riverbed searcher's accounting books (2)

FFFF---EI1 ---


SHaUOMuI S9(I[Ha 'L 9*INNIaH 9INWt[aId '9 SdiIS SL SdIA "s
A111d AH1tH3 *' StaIIS NSAXI awvo a NV'IU 'g XIS XIN T
SHASKNV


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




FLORAL CITY
2BR/1/2BA
12x56 MH on 80x152 ft
lot.$21,000. Furnished.
Needs a little work.
(352) 726-8873
SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then /%
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512



*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, IBA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729


FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scm pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356

Floral City, DW,
2bd/lbal, Ig deck, Ig
Family Rm, Ig Shed,
lot rent $183, Furniture
Negotiable., $7500
352-726-3726


For Sale1.

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must seel Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858

FiS71



Homosassa Adult Park
2BR/iBA. Newly
remodeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$4,800 (608)921-5564


WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Dble. Wd. Needs work
$4,500.
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090






ACTION`t
RENTAL MANAGEMENT

352-795-7368
www.[ilrus[0unlyH(meRenlal.icm
CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr ...............$800
3/2/2 Nice location 1254 sq ft.
8410 N Elkcam Blvd............$800
3/2/1 New listing!
6973 N Gladstone Dr.......... $815
3/2/2 Split floor plan 1515 sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt............$500
2/1 Nice, (lean duplex
1650 W Homosassa Trl.......$500
2/1 nice duplex
7396 W Green Acres............$650
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
5164 N Dewey Way (Her)....700
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
FLORAL CITY
6383 S. Tompanl Ter.............$550
1/1 Home


2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds, garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incid water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio in
quiet area. $525/mo +
$525 Sec.352-344-0238
INVERNESS
Nice 2 bed. 1 bath with
refridg and stove in In-
verness. Does have
w/d hookup. $500 a
month. First and Last
months rent plus $300
security before move in.
352-201-4363 phone



CRYSTAL RIVER
S NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incl Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276
LECANTO
1/1 Apt. W/D, Util. inci
Non Sink, $550/mo.
352-628-3501



INVERNESS
2/2, updated, immacul.
$625. mo 317-442-1063



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, Duplex water, trash
lawn, $475. mo.+ $300
sec. 352-212-9205, or
(352) 212-7922
HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981





Your World








CHORpNIO


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 CI-I


CLASSIFIED

-E-

INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



CRYSTAL RIVER
"RENT REDUCED-
3/1 Country Home on
stilts, w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800



Beverly Hills
2bd +den, 1.Sba
family room, exc.
cond. no pets or
smokers, $700. mo.
6 Pennsylvania St
(586) 419-2041
INVERNESS
2/2, modern, $600m
dishwasher, W/D,
screened back porch.
F/L/S.close to Publix,
RP.O. 352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2413 Jungle Camp Rd.
Sm. 2/1, Cottage,
New roof/septic,
fenced in yard, handy
cap. Access, River Ac-
cess, No electric dep.
1 Small Pet Ok
$450. mo. $450. dep
Hurry! 352-464-0999
Inverness
2bd/lba/lcg
$550. mo. first, last &
damage, immediate
occup.(352) 341-2838
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2 &
3/2/2 $795/mo & Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb@6vahoo.com
and
debthompson.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EQUAL MtUSIl
CWPORiyNtT'e


LECANTO
Crystal Oaks
Lg BR w/priv bath.
TV w/cable, internet
access, swimming
pool, laun & kitchen
access. All utilities.
$450/mo 352-464-1928




BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


ULeCanoa-3acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced Great for
horses 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015
Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


Hoe

4/2
In Floral City
Has Family Room
Glamour Bath Fenced
backyard $89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on '/4 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


Nice condition!
MOVE-IN READY
$46k. 527-1239



4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009



3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2
1/4 Acre MOL
on River Oak Lane
Inverness
Glamour bath
Eat-in Kitchen
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Nice Double Lot
3/4 Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SEI IER FIIANCINGII


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


TTT n866m361*1137 ...
ij[T OVOTJ liy ~Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-Gpm Sat8am-4pm


Be = lis


1-11-14


.B8SIL


,--l


4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR/11/2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009








*
TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY !





For Sale "u *
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Homosass^M
Homes Ijl


NEW YEAR

CELEBRATION


ONE


WEEK


ONLY!






C12 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014

S=11 Citrus County^
moe

Condo for Sle I NEED
Sugarmill Woods HOMES
2/2 sq ft HOMES
35 Beech Street TO SELL
607-538-9351



itJl '.'. 1,lld Iu st.]

Lk~i) Da) A

CIIRpNICLE DEB INFANTINE
Classifie 3s Realtor
__ (352) 302-8046


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Stil great vd-
uesout
there for
buyers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward i"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watti6
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


%7 0,AYi ,aL
MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


NeedEaJ:?
#1 Employment source is
c Ii

www.chronicleonline.com


I


Ciiu Cut


- I


w, CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245

or I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*










SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855












Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




eeeoeeeeeB


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms ,Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"


BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
See What $9k Can Buy
8471 County Rd 614 A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252



Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


IaI&


CLASSIFIED



BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271



Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"

CANOE W/ PADDLES
Water Quest by KL
Industries. Seats 3,
center cooler, sturdy,
stable, great shape
$350 (352) 897-4154

Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
"(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



01 Prevost Vogue 45ft
Featherlite Motorhome
NICEST ONE in Central
FL,81kmi, 500hp/
CAT Diesel Engine.
Divorced/ Must Sell!
1 (352) 795-1272

MOBILE SUITES
5th WHEEL, custom
built 2004, 3 slides,
Easy Rider 16K hitch,
Many Xtra's. Must See
$22,000 352-897-5339

SOUTHWIND
98'V-10 eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534



Your World







CHq9NicLE


1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
may trade, very good
tires, lots of storage
I11k obo352-263-4339



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WILDERNESS
2004 Advantage 28.5
Ft. 5th Wheel. Sleeps
six, one slide, upgraded
interior, self contained, 2
TVs, AM-FM Disc
player, new electric
brakes, good tires.
$7,500 w/reese re-
ceiver. Must see.
352-5274968
WILDERNESS
24 ft, Camper
Call
(772) 260-4363 cell
to see and appreciate

Vehicles

-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
wr ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939



Buy Here/Pay Here
'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down
'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down
'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down
'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down
'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


>^1'IKY ;Lt:K
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Taurus, great
shape, 121k miles,
$2500 Firm. (352)
795-5784 or 212-3720
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD CROWN VIC
LX
1994 Crown Victoria Ix
119,000 micold ac,new
tires ,runs good
$1900.See pictures on
Ocala craigslist
3525273498 after 3pm
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

New Year Specials
'02 NIssan Sentra
4 dr, 63k mi, $5900
'02 Olds Silhouette
AWD, Premier Pack.
Leather, Loaded
65k miles, $6995
'03 Honda Element
4 Cyl, Auto, Good
Gas Mileage $6500
'04 Chevy Extra Cab
4.8 Engine, Auto,
Runs Great! $5900
'06 Dodge Ram 1500
4 Dr, Auto, 6 cyl,
x-tra Clean $6500
Gulf Breeze Auto
352-257-3894
352794-6069

TOYOTA
'05, Avalon XLS,
blue, sunroof, loaded,
23k miles, $15,000
(352) 527-7980








IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles
$2,800. 352-628-1646


CHEVY
VENTURA 2005 Van
74K ml. exc cond
extras included
$5,500 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
'06 Town & Country, LX
Loaded, 6 DR, dual AC
V6, stow seats, CD,
maintained, garaged
clean $5,500,212-9383
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018


a
DODGE
'95, Ram 1500, good
work truck, w tool box
126k mi.V8, needs
paint & TLC, $2,000
obo, 305-393-1404
DODGE
'96, Dakota, club cab,
w/shell cap, 209,188
miles. Runs good.
Many new parts.
$2,300 (352) 341-8415
DODGE RAM
2002 1500 Quad cab,
short bed, 53,850 mi,
Many Extra's! $8,950
(352) 795-1499
FORD
1994 F150
300 in-line, 6 cyl
$750. obo
(352) 422-1681
Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018


Cit ru..I.....






OUR LOWEST PRIG





OF THE YEAR ON QUALITY PREOWNED1'


1, r- S Hamstar CIt '-- S
i^^^. ^is Grilling .t

ffor Lunch

2011 KIA 2013 KIA 2012 HONDA Hot Dogs, 2013 KIA
Chips&
OPTIMA EKX FORTE CIVIC Chips& FORTE
G256669A17,695 14999 ,300 Ds 14,900
.t t 114,9 -116- .30::0 -..... --. _lI

1Citna sUSSAE WK S CAtE 1 'SUE CT, cbiuuc5tt SAVE
^ u2,500T cfl52.500ti.. sa S^2.200 Cit59 SAV499



2012 NISSAN 2009 NISSAN 2010 NISSAN 2010 KIA 2008HONDA
VERSA ALTIMA SENTRA SOUL CIVIC
P8906G907B129000

P 012,900 2,000 11,920 $11,800 11,200

AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T CLOSE CAR DEALS;-":l-
...... .. ..




1850lcI)CrvstalUi
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2010 KIA ]2012 NISSAN
PORTAGE SENTRA



^^^^SAVE ^^^^SAVE'C
So s13,5979 Bi sK15,999


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306



HONDA
1992, Helix Scooter
25k miles, good cond.
new tires, $1,500
(352) 746-7378
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4950. 352-513-4257



255-0111 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
My Kid's Closet
located at 216 Thompkins
St., Inverness, FL 34450, in
the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 9 day of Jan., 2014.
/s/ Beryl Jackson
Owner
Published Jan. 11,2014.
256-0111 SACRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-
ness under the fictitious
name of
TILE PRO CONTRACTING
located at 4130 S, Roose-
velt Pt, Homosassa, FL.,
34448, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. DATED
at Homosassa, this 8th
day of January, 2014.
/s/ William MonathOwner
and President of Monath
Homes, Inc..
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
January 11,2014.
257-0111 SACRN
FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-
ness under the fictitious
name of
GOODIES
located at 5356 Suncoast
Blvd, Homosassa, FL.,
34446, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. DATED
at Homosassa, this 7th
day of January, 2014.
/s/ Richard PowersOwner
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle
January 11,2014.


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To eligible active or retired members of the US Military & their spouses towards any
new Honda vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


eck anywhere in the world first, but

HECK WITH

HADLASTI


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ODYSSEY LX
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Model YK1F2DCEW
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0.9%A OOMLITARY
MONTHS APPRECIATION OFFER
X 60 M N THS To eligible members of the US Military & their
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
on approved credit., Pf-wn Vicnance orlease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:

Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
Seedealerforcomplelte details.


What LOVE Can Do For YouI

SRiver2628 00

DHonda.com


T~rni tI ~
mm w w


*See dealer for details, tFor eligible active or retired membersof the US Military and their spouses towards any new Honda ___i __v__i__i
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. Used as a down payment or capcost reduction toward the purchase or lease of .......
any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program .
through HFS (excludes Zero Due at Signing Lease Program). Must meet certain credit criteria established by HFS, and vehicle must ...
be eligible for new-vehicle rates. See dealer for complete details. ** Plus $790 destination charge and options. 1 36 month closed end ..
lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment,
tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. 2. 36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles
per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $999 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost.
3.36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,689 with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2000 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees
due at signing. Options at additional cost. ttCovers internal lubricant parts. See dealer for details. All pre-owned vehicles include $2500 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


C14 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014


...for a New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New 2014 Chevy:

ICRUZE LSi
STK #C14047 MSRP $19,255


S


Per Month + Tax
39 Month Lease


BW 2014 Chevy
IAULIBU LS
#04080 MSRP $22,980
bk a= aMI Ma. I


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #C14049 MSRP $25,330


a


New 2014 Chevy New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT SONIC LTSEDAN
STK #C14030 MSRP $35,535 STK #C 14131 MSRP $18,590
AIa a1Id J sAIA Amb, 1I


PsMao+t fl- PwMmh+t Tz
39MothLee 39MmthLOMse


PwM9ihltn T
39 Moeh Lase


.. _- A


New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14004 MSRP $28,120


New 2014 Chevy
CAMARO 2LS
STK 4C14094 MSRP $26,235


New 2014 Chevy
SILVERADODOBuL
STK C14044 o MSRP $34,685


New 2014 Chevy
TAHOE LS
STK #CT14041 o MSRP $45,115


PrMatht+lbi PMfah i+Ta'
39MOle Lame 39MMAnthLSm


I


2 YEARSw
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealer rfor completee details.


S I


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


08 CHEVROLET HHR
1:157. ALL PWIER
iSW~ilL~'


-a-a 3- U


06 I1NFNITImM45
.,LIHP DID,'J IrtlkF1Th",CO
S1SA9S


11 FORD EXPEDITION XLT
TVI.DD.LEATNER
S2445


08 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE
LEATH EP. 4uNr rF
WX2


IOUIVHWSILVERAOO 10UIEVY EIUINOXLS
PE6 CAB G; 1 I ,H, p ,.N kF i kI. 5
S2495 $f3S94

13 CHEVY EQUINOXLS 13 KIA OPTIMA EX
lYi]TEiSIkWlliS<.-:(S PANARAMASUNPO'fF LEATHER
ST7195 S19/95


12 FORD F150 EXCAB LARIAT
.311' LEAThiER REMOTE STUPT
S31.95


11 FORD FIESTA
1;;k
511A95
SlimS


13 HYUNDAIACCENTGS
F 4IHATCHBACK
$14,495
af.


11 DODGEDURANGO
S20AO95


PLUS MANY
MORE 10TO
CHOOSE FROM!


Do For You!.

1.0018

es.com
S12,000 miles per year, plus tax. Limited to in stock
tVs0 vi alcceori ditional cost 2. Not available with finance
4iftftl~wio.


rls


40 ^La
m^i~ageS~


SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"When I sat in the Fusion for the first "With great EcoBoost engine, I get "Compared to the
time, it was like, wow!" the power to haul my gear and i get Honda CR-V. we really
-Brandon switched from Honda Accord to Ford Fusion. great milage." like the Escape better."
-Kevin switched from Chevy truck to Ford F-150. -OIh.,a & Da. ,d vwi'led f romn
EW o Ho,,d CR-,.' to Ford Esc:ape


Find out for yourself why so many
people have switched from the
imports to Ford. See what Ford
has to offer at Nick Nicholas Ford.
And make the switch to Ford.


w


,- W


2014 FORD FIESTA

APR Plus.5m00
For 60 Ford Motor Credit
Months* Customer Bonus Cash
2014 FORD FOCUS

APR Plus 5QQi
For 60 Ford Motor Credit
Months* Customer Bonus Cash
2014 FORD FUSION

APR Plus5mmOO
For 60 Ford Motor Credit
Months* Customer Bonus Cash


Th<

Ar


2014 FORD ESCAPE
o, s2OO0
APR Or Cash
Months* Customer Cash


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00


**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 60 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 01/17/14.


LA~


w-w


w


e switch
is on to
Terica's
favorite
brand.'

'Sales numbers as of 9/30/13.


C16 SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014