Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03357

Full Text


On the ball: CR's Reynolds working way back /B1


I IR IDAY


Mostly cloudy,
slight chance of
rain.
PAGE A4


RONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


U S DE

C RO IG

SUE

SALE


VOL. 119 ISSUE 156


Traffic stop leads to stolen items, fake money


Investigation lei

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Call it a patrol officer's intu-
ition, but a simple request to
search a vehicle found in a
parking lot led to the recovery
of stolen items, including a wal-
let and an iPod and also re-
vealed a torn, fake $50 bill


ids to two arrests

which eventually led to the ar-
rest of a Floral City man on
counterfeiting charges.
Anthony Lawrence Kholl-
man, 39, of E. Partridge Lane,
was initially arrested Jan. 5 on
grand theft and burglary
charges stemming from the traf-
fic stop. But after investigators
served a search warrant on his


residence, they
discovered he '
was apparently L,- .,.
making coun-
terfeit bills, ac- i,6
cording to an
arrest report.
Khollman now
faces additional Anthony
charges of pos- Khollman
session of
forged notes, forging bank bills,
making false money and dam-
aging bank bills. His bond was


set at $11,500.
Another per-
son present at
the search,
Brandy Marie
Yancey, 28, of
the same ad-
dress as Kholl-
Brandy man, also was
Yancey arrested and
charged with
grand theft after she was found
with several items from Wal-
mart, but could not show any re-


Old school, new life


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Will Hogan climbs to the top of what was part of the Booker T. Washington School in Inverness. He is in the midst of remodeling the
wooden structure.


ofhistoric Booker T Washington School


This structure is known as the Dunnellon Building. At one time the building was twice this
size, but it was cut in two many years ago.


But to others, it's part of
Citrus County heritage
and worth saving.
Today, in its third incar-
nation, the "Dunnellon
Building" that was once
part of the Booker T
Washington School now
belongs to Will Hogan,
who is giving this piece of
history some much-
needed TLC.
"The guy who had it be-
fore me had a lean-to built


on one side, and there
were gaping holes in the
roof and the floor," Hogan
said. "When they moved it
here from Dunnellon, they
lowered the roof, and it
was almost flat. I brought
it back to the original
slope."
He bought it two-and-a-
half years ago for $47,000
from a man who at one
time used it as a fitness
studio.


Currently, Hogan is put-
ting on a new tin roof,
among other renovation
work, and doing it all
himself.
Originally, the building
was part of the segregated,
all-black school that is
now Inverness Middle
School. The Dunnellon
Building is located on
Parkside Avenue, off


PageA2


ceipts for the merchandise.
Yancey reportedly confessed to
the theft of the electronic
equipment.
The chain of events began
when Deputy Chris Holloway
approached Khollman in a
parking lot, where he sat with
Yancey, another woman and a
child, and asked for what au-
thorities call a consensual
search of the vehicle.
See Page A8



Report:

Outlook

grim for

Sharon

Ex-Israeli PM

a national icon
Associated Press
JERUSALEM For-
mer Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon's health deterio-
rated sharply Thursday
and he was in "grave con-
with his -
dition" ----

family by A
his bed- A
side, the
hospital
treating
him an-
nounced.
Sharon, Ariel
who has Sharon
been in a military leader
c o m a became
since suf- controvserial
fering a politician.
stroke eight years ago, ex-
perienced a setback last
week with a decline in his
kidneys and other key
bodily organs.
The Sheba Medical
Center called his condi-
tion "grave" but gave no
further details.
Sharon, one of Israel's
most controversial and
iconic figures, suffered
the stroke at the height of
his political power
Sharon's career
stretched across most of
Israel's 65-year history
As one of Israel's most
famous generals, he was
known for bold tactics and
an occasional refusal to
obey orders.
As a politician, he be-
came known as "the bull-
dozer" contemptuous
of his critics while also ca-
pable of getting things
done.
He engineered Israel's
1982 invasion of Lebanon,
and lost his job as de-
fense minister after an
Israeli-allied Christian
militia killed hundreds of
Palestinians at refugee
camps in west Beirut,
sparking international
outrage.
Sharon managed to
slowly rehabilitate his po-
litical career For years,
he was a driving force in
the movement to build
settlements in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip,
See Page A2


Hospital boards to review proposed deal with HCA


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A tentative agreement with
Hospital Corporation of America
for a long-term deal to lease Cit-
rus Memorial hospital is on the
table today at a joint meeting of
the two hospital boards.


The Citrus County Hospital
Board on Thursday evening
agreed to sign a letter of intent
with HCA for a 50-year lease
worth an estimated $240 million,
or about $90 million net to the
community.
The Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation is expected to take up


the letter of intent during the
joint meeting today
HCA has resolved a major stick-
ing point involving its commit-
ment to maintain a hospital in
Citrus County, CCHB attorney Bill
Grant said Thursday


* WHAT: Joint meeting Citrus County Hospital Board and
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation board.
* WHEN: 3 p.m. today.
* WHERE: Citrus Memorial Health System administrative
office, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness (historic high
school building), Gulf Room on the first floor.


See Page A8


6 1845718U[!!ll! I5


Classifieds ........ C8
Comics .......... C7
Crossword ........ C6


Community .......C5
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ...........C7


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C6


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
79
LOW
61


Local man refurbishing remains


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS

To some, the
rectangular

wooden

building at the

end of Parkside

Avenue in

Inverness may

seem nothing

more than a

rundown,

dilapidated

structure that

would be better

off being torn

down.


NA^s





A2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


SCHOOL
Continued from PageAl

U.S. 41 across from the
school entrance and ath-
letic field.
In researching the
school's history dating
back to 1949, Hogan found
a sketch that shows a five-
building "campus" made
from portable wooden
buildings that were
brought in from South
Dunnellon, Hernando,
Floral City and Inverness,
plus a permanent rest-
room building.
The portables were
heated by pot-bellied
stoves.
"At one time, this build-
ing was 80 feet long, but it's
been cut in half," Hogan
said. "I don't know what
happened to the other
half."
The Dunnellon Build-
ing, the largest of the four,
was used for assemblies,
home economics classes,
proms and even fundrais-
ing boxing matches.
There's still a pencil
sharpener on one of the
window frames.
"I went there from the
inception of the school and
graduated in 1960," said
Randolph Bellamy "I re-
member having classes in
that building and there
being school plays on a
stage. I didn't know the
building still existed until
I heard through the
grapevine what (Hogan)
was doing."
After graduating and at-
tending college, Bellamy
returned to Citrus County
and taught school at Inver-
ness Middle School.
"My sister, Lucille, came
back and taught school at
Booker T," he said. "A cou-
ple of students did."
Bellamy said the most
significant piece of Booker
T history revolves around
the James family Irene
and Robert James and
their four children.
Both Irene and Robert
attended adult education
night classes and gradu-
ated in 1960. Their chil-
dren Barbara, Delores,
Clarence and Andrew -
all graduated with honors.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Will Hogan attaches the metal roof to the wooden trusses of the building.


"They were the only
whole family to ever grad-
uate from that institution
in the 18-year history of
that school," Bellamy said.
"That's significant because
during that time, not too
many mothers and fathers
went to school, not to men-
tion graduating."
Jeff Hollis also attended
Booker T Washington
School, from kindergarten
until third grade, when the
school closed in 1968 due
to desegregation.
"When I heard about
the old school building
being restored, I went over
to see it," Hollis said. "I


think it's great. I told him,
'Thank you, man, for doing
this."'
Hogan said he hasn't de-
cided what he wants to do
with the building once ren-
ovation is complete. At one
time, he thought about
using it as a nutrition and
fitness education center
He already has a raised or-
ganic garden planted on
the property He thought
about getting some ani-
mals, a few quail and some
chickens, some beehives,
and maybe putting up a
bat house for the bats that
come out at night and fly
around.


of Citrus County, Inc.
PENS


Know

Anyone Selling

Prescription

Drugs?
Visit us at
www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com
or Call 1-888-ANY-TIPS (1.888.269.8477)
L Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


Or, he might lease it to a
nonprofit group.
"It's a great building," he
said. "It has a great history,
and I want it to benefit the
community"
To contact Will Hogan,


MVIAI iMW BC.K1/unronicle


email him at willhogan
@tampabay.rrYcom or find
him on Facebook.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


SHARON
Continued from PageA1

captured areas claimed
by the Palestinians for a
future state.
First elected prime
minister in 2001, he led
a tough crackdown
against a Palestinian
uprising, a bout of vio-
lence in which more
than 3,000 Palestinians
and 1,000 Israelis were
killed. He remains re-
viled in much of the
Arab world.
But in a dramatic
about-face, Sharon led
Israel's withdrawal from
Gaza in 2005, uprooting
all soldiers and settlers
from the seaside strip
after a 38-year military
occupation.
The Gaza withdrawal
led Sharon to break
away from the hard-line
Likud Party and form
the centrist Kadima
Party His new party was
cruising toward victory
in 2006 parliamentary
elections when he suf-
fered his stroke.


CRYSTAL
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CITRUS COUNTY
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Citrus County Sheriff's Office FDS Disposal Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
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LOCAL/WORLD


0







S Page A3 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10,2014



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Speaker to discuss
Alzheimer's disease
National speaker Lori La
Bey, founder of Alzheimer's
Speaks, will be the guest
speaker at a free informa-
tional event at 4 p.m. today
at St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
The event is designed to
educate, support and build
awareness of Alzheimer's
disease and other forms of
memory loss.
For information, contact
Susan Kittel, Kingsway of
Beverly Hills, at 352-465-
6006.
Hydrant flushing
begins Monday
Citrus County Utilities Di-
vision has contracted with
R and M Service Solutions
to perform flow testing and
maintenance of the fire hy-
drants in Citrus County. The
company will begin in the
Point 0' Woods and Oak
Forest service areas on
Jan. 13 and complete the
work by Jan. 17.
Customers in the test
areas may observe minor
pressure fluctuations and/or
discolored or cloudy water.
This is a common occurrence
with hydrant flow testing. In
most instances, the condi-
tions clear up quickly How-
ever, running water through
all the faucets for a few min-
utes is recommended.
If you continue to have
discolored water after flush-
ing your faucets, call Citrus
County Utilities at 352-527-
7650.
WPNCC January
lunch meeting set
The Women's Political
Network of Citrus County
will meet for luncheon at
noon Tuesday, Jan. 21, at
the Boat House Restaurant,
1935 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River. The speaker will be
Joyce Brancato, chief exec-
utive officer of Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.
She will speak about the Af-
fordable Care Act and how
its enactment affects the
hospital and its patients.
For more information,
contact Rosalie Matt at
352-746-7143.
Scouts to honor two
Citrus County leaders
The local Boy Scouts are
going to honor two local
leaders as longtime sup-
porters of the organization.
The Gulf Ridge Council's
Withlacoochee District will
host its annual Boy Scouts
of America Dinner on
Thursday, Feb. 13, at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Coun-
try Club. The honorees will
be local banker Jack
Reynolds and retired
banker Paul Perregaux.
Both have a long history of
leadership with the Scouts.
Tables and tickets are
available to the event by
contacting District Execu-
tive Jennifer Siegert at
jsiegert@boyscouting.com
or at 352-232-0379.

St. Petersburg
FSU and its star QB
could face lawsuit
The attorney for a
woman who accused star
Florida State quarterback
Jameis Winston of sexual
assault said she will sue the
school, the Tallahassee Po-
lice Department and the
player.
Patrida Carroll said Thurs-
day she intends to file a no-
tice to sue the police
department early next week.
Under Florida law, anyone fil-
ing a lawsuit against a gov-
ernment agency must file
court paperwork six months


prior to the suit itself.
Winston's attorney said
the sex with the woman
was consensual and no
charges were filed against
Winston after Leon County
prosecutors investigated.
-From staff and wire reports


EDC adopts five-year plan

I


Goal 1:


To develop and promote a diverse


mix of appropriate sites and buildings
available for capital investment and job
creation.
Existing properties
Potential properties
Iv product


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Jeannette Goldsmith is silhouetted against a projection screen listing some of the strategic plan goals her consulting firm recommended
to the Citrus County Economic Development Council to increase business in the county. The EDC adopted the five-year plan on
Thursday.

Proposalprovides road map to attractjob-creating industries to county


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

Now that its five-year strategic plan has
been finalized, the real work begins, accord-
ing to the Economic Development Council.
The planning process began in Septem-
ber as a fast-track effort to gear Citrus
County up for economic development. The
end product was adopted by the EDC
board Thursday
As described early on, its purpose is to
provide a roadmap for attracting new job-
creating industries while retaining exist-
ing businesses. It was initiated in response
to the nuclear plant closing and the de-
cline of the construction industry
It was developed by consultant Jean-
nette Goldsmith and Don Kirkman, work-
ing with EDC Director Don Taylor More
than 100 individuals and groups were
brought into the process through inter-
views and focus groups.
"We wanted to hear from people in
county as to what their thoughts were on
economic development," Taylor said.
Goldsmith said they reviewed existing
plans and studies, including two studies on
Port Citrus, the Tourist Development


Council's strategic plan and the county's
comprehensive plan.
She said they also researched a lot eco-
nomic and demographic data on the
county and developed a list of assets and
challenges.
Goldsmith said one difficulty was the
confusion between economic development
and real estate development.
"We're focused primarily on job cre-
ation," she said. "It's not about rooftops.
The focus should be on expanding the
county tax base to support the rooftops; it's
not an either/or"
There is also a lack of leadership on the
issues of economic development, typically
a private-sector role.
One challenge she described is the lack of
a robust site and building inventory to attract
new or expanding businesses. "There are a
few things in the inventory close to being
ready to market and a few others with po-
tential," she said, "but there is a real lack of
sites and a lack of investment in sites, build-
ings and infrastructure."
The plan catalogs the available develop-
ment sites.
The county's workforce proved to be an-
other challenge. Research found a lack of


Workshop to prepare


residents for employment


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
LECANTO With the new year
comes new beginnings, and one
local nonprofit organization wants
to offer that opportunity for resi-
dents seeking employment
"We want to make sure we give
everyone in our community an op-
portunity to fill those positions,"
said United Way CEO Amy Meek.
"It tears my heart out when we
hear about people hiring from
other counties when we have
-our own unem-
ployed people
right here."
To prepare resi-
dents for employ-
A-S 1ment, the United
Way of Citrus
.... County is offering
its free second an-
Amy Meek nual Land that
United Way Job! workshop
CEO. from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 24, at the College of Central
Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
"It's not a job fair at all," Meek
said. "It's an opportunity for peo-
ple to improve their interview
skills. You sit down and go through
a mock interview with a senior-
level professional from Citrus
County and they give you that real
feedback good, bad and sugges-
tions. They will also review your
r6sum6 and explain why or why
not it might stand out on their
desk."
"Last year, we had 75 attendees
and by accident four people re-
ceived jobs that day," she said.
After breakfast, preregistered
participants move from room to
room and attend 40-minute work-
shops on the following topics: In-
terview Do's and Don'ts,


LAND THAT JOB!
WHEN:8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jan. 24.
WHERE: College of Central
Florida,3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.

Navigating the Workplace, R6-
sume Writing 101, and Social
Media for Job Seekers. They will
also conduct a mock interview
"We really want people to have
some self confidence to get out
there and land a job," Meek said.
"We want them to have resources
available to do that."
The Insight Federal Credit
Union-sponsored event gives at-
tendees an opportunity to gain fa-
miliarity with the latest in hiring
practices and skills needed.
"The world is changing and if you
haven't had an interview in the last
six months or so, you may not be fa-
miliar with the latest techniques or
what employers are looking for,"
Meek said. "Don't just assume that
you are going to nail it
"This is a great opportunity for
the brand-new future employee as
well as for someone who has had
the same job for 20 years and finds
themselves unemployed, as well
as everyone in between."
After a day of sharpening inter-
viewing skills, lunch will be
served.
The United Way has partnered
with the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, the College of Central
Florida and Workforce Connection.
Registration for the forum is re-
quested. To register, visit www.cit-
rusunitedwayorg and click on the
"Land That Job" box. Be sure to
complete the entire form so that
you are matched up as suitably as
possible with an area of employ-
ment interest.


skilled workers, particularly technical
skills and soft skills. The latter relates to
work ethic and on-the-job conduct
Other challenges were the perception of
the county as difficult to work with and the
lack of a county brand. She said there are
a lot of expectations that there will be a
quick fix to replace the Duke Energy jobs.
"That's not going to happen," she said,
adding the reality will be smaller job-
creation opportunities.
But there are assets in place, as well. She
said the county has good regional partners,
excellent small-business development op-
portunities and support for small businesses.
The plan includes 20 goals to move the
county forward and a five-year timetable
broken down into quarters. It also calls for
an overall economic-development budget
of $2.35 million.
"Economic development is an investment
It requires serious dollars and serious time,"
she said. "It's a marathon, not a sprint; it's a
long-term process that starts today"
A copy of the plan is available at
wwwcitrusedc.com.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online, com.


Playground smoking


ban moving ahead


The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE -A proposal
that could snuff out smoking in
parks where children play
moved easily through its first
Senate test on Thursday
The Senate Regulated Indus-
tries Committee backed
without opposition a
measure (SB 342) that
would allow local gov-
ernments to prohibit
smoking on public park -
land that includes chil- L
dren's areas with at least
one piece of playground
equipment. Sen.
The proposal, by Sen. Brace
Rob Bradley, R-Fleming bill sp
Island, would be an ex-
pansion of the Florida Clean In-
door Air Act, which was
approved by voters in 2002 and
prohibits smoking in most en-
closed indoor workplaces.
"This bill does not create a
blanket ban on anything,"
Bradley said after the meeting.
"It just simply gives local gov-
ernment the ability to tailor reg-
ulations to meet their needs."
No announced opposition
stepped forward during the com-
mittee meeting. However, Sen.
Nancy Detert, R-Venice, cau-
tioned that complaints will come.
"Every time we attempted a
smoking thing, like we did in the
restaurants, the first complaints
we get are from our military folks,
who say 'I fought and died, and got
shot in World War II, and I can't
have a cigarette at the VFW,"' De-
tert warned. "So be prepared to
hear from your veterans."
Veterans of Foreign Wars
posts are considered member-
ship clubs, which under state
law are exempt from the to-
bacco-free standards imposed


on restaurants and most bars.
Bradley tried to pass a broader
bill (SB 258) during the 2013 leg-
islative session that was in-
tended to restrict smoking on all
municipal or county properties,
including beaches. The measure,
which died in the Senate Com-
munity Affairs Commit-
tee, also faced opposition
in the House before its
S demise.
Bradley said this year's
"narrowly tailored" bill is
More realistic.
"I wanted to try to
craft a piece of legisla-
Rob tion that has an opportu-
iley nity for passage,"
onsor. Bradley said. "I feel
good about our
prospects in the Senate, but
there are still some concerns
from our friends in the House."
The House version (HB 309),
sponsored by Rep. Katie Ed-
wards, D-Plantation, has yet to
be scheduled to appear before
any of its planned committees.
The proposal has the support
of the Miami-Dade County
League of Cities, the Florida
League of Cities, the Florida As-
sociation of Counties, the Sierra
Club and the American Lung As-
sociation of Florida.
Bradley's proposal must still
go before the Senate Community
Affairs and Criminal Justice
committees before reaching the
full Senate.
Across the nation, numerous
municipalities and cities already
ban smoking at government
parks, including New York,
Chicago, Los Angeles, San Diego,
San Francisco, Boston, Salt Lake
City, and Albuquerque, N.M. Pe-
quannock, N.J., has banned
smoking at public parks with ball
fields or playgrounds.


d
o






A4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday-- Build a solid base in the
coming months. Focusing on what's
important to you, along with forming a
solid plan for the future, will allow you
room to coast through any excessive
situations you face this year.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Your
strong opinions will place you in a posi-
tion of leadership. Take what's yours
and don't hesitate to be aggressive.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Ques-
tion certain emotional issues before it
is too late. You must stay on top of any
situation that could alter your financial
future.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Do
something nice for someone. Your gen-
erous deed will help your reputation.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
worry about ticklish matters; take the
initiative and do whatever has to be
done to stake your claim.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) The
more you discuss your plans, the
closer you will be to achieving them.
Setting your course of action is a good
place to begin. Honesty will pay off.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Secrets
must be kept if you want to prosper.
Money matters will develop, and the in-
formation you have will require discretion.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A
change will do you good. Visit a desti-
nation that offers something unique or
could bring you in touch with someone
unusual.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Travel in
search of new people, places and in-
terests that will help you broaden your
horizons.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Rest, re-
laxation and a little pampering will be
good for you. Include someone special
in your leisure plans, and you will
make an impression. Love is high-
lighted. Enjoy the moment.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You'll face
opposition, and you should avoid situa-
tions that are demanding, overbearing,
aggressive or excessive. Protect your
home, your assets and your emotional,
financial and physical well-being.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Speak
up. Don't let anyone push you around.
Focus on your beliefs and concerns in
order to open up a way to fix an intoler-
able situation.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't
gamble with money, love or your
health. Protect what you have, making
whatever changes are necessary to
ensure your safety and happiness.


ENTERTAINMENT


OutKast to head
Coachella
LOS ANGELES Rap duo
OutKast will headline the
Coachella Valley Music and Arts
Festival in April, ending a half-
decade hiatus for one of hip-
hop's most popular and
important acts.
OutKast joins Arcade Fire and
Muse as headliners for the festi-
val that plays over two week-
ends in Indio, Calif. Other acts
scheduled include Pharrell
Williams, Beck, Queens of the
Stone Age and Lorde. The re-
united The Replacements will
also appear.
Andre "Andre 3000" Ben-
jamin and Antwan "Big Boi"
Patton came out of Atlanta with
a unique sound two decades
ago and became one of rap's
top-selling and most-lauded
acts, winning the Grammy
Award for album of the year for
double album "Speakerboxxx/
The Love Below." They haven't
released an album as OutKast
since 2006's "Idlewild."

OWN orders another
Tyler Perry series
PASADENA, Calif. Pro-
ducer Tyler Perry will soon have
a fourth series on Oprah Win-
frey's OWN network.
OWN said Thursday it has or-
dered a Perry drama, "Single
Moms Club," that will premiere
this fall. It's about a group of
mothers who create a support
group after being brought to-
gether by an incident at their
children's school.
The success of Perry's series
keyed a turnaround for OWN,
which struggled at its start. The
drama "The Haves and the Have
Nots" began its second season
last week, and the comedy
"Love Thy Neighbor" began its
second season Wednesday.


Associated Press
Actors Jonah Hill, Margot Robbie and Leonardo DiCaprio
arrive Thursday at "The Wolf Of Wall Street" UK premiere at
the Odeon Leicester Square in London.


OWN also airs the Perry com-
edy "For Better or Worse."
Bowie up for two
prizes at Brit Awards
LONDON Musical
chameleon David Bowie is
starting the year with two nomi-
nations for Britain's leading
music awards, the Brits.
Bowie, who turned 67 on
Wednesday, is up for male
British artist of the year and
album of the year, for his first re-
lease in a decade, "The Next
Day."
Electronic duo Disclosure and
rock band Bastille have four
nominations apiece for the
prizes, while drum 'n' bass quar-
tet Rudimental and singer Ellie
Goulding each have three.
World-conquering boy band One
Direction has two nominations,
for British single and British
group.
Nominees in the international
categories, announced Thurs-
day, include Drake, Eminem,
Bruno Mars, Katy Perry, Lady
Gaga, Macklemore & Ryan
Lewis and Arcade Fire.


The awards, Britain's equiva-
lent of the Grammys, will be
handed out in a concert-style
ceremony at London's 02 Arena
on Feb. 19 featuring perform-
ances by Arctic Monkeys,
Bastille and Perry.
Miley, Britney too
sexy for French TV
PARIS Miley Cyrus and
Britney Spears are too racy for
daytime French TIV.
France's broadcast watchdog
said TV channels should only
show Cyrus' video for "Wrecking
Ball" and Spears' video for
"Work B****" after 10 p.m.
The watchdog, CSA, said in
a statement Thursday that
some channels were showing
them in the daytime and without
any parental guidance
warnings.
Cyrus writhing naked around
a wrecking ball is too sexually
explicit, it said. And Spears, with
her bondage gear, shows "a
sadomachistic universe repre-
senting women in a way that
risks shocking many viewers."
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Jan. 10, the 10th
day of 2014. There are 355 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 10,1914, Utah grocer
John G. Morrison, 47, and his son
Arling, 17, were shot to death in
their Salt Lake City store; police ar-
rested labor activist Joe Hill, a mem-
ber of the Industrial Workers of the
World. Despite evidence suggesting
another man was responsible, Hill
was convicted and executed, be-
coming a martyr to America's organ-
ized labor movement.
On this date:
In 1776, Thomas Paine anony-
mously published his influential
pamphlet, "Common Sense," which
argued forAmerican independence
from British rule.
In 1861, Florida became the third
state to secede from the Union.
In 1901, the Spindletop oil field in
Beaumont, Texas, produced the
Lucas Gusher, heralding the start of
the Texas oil boom.
In 1984, the United States and
the Vatican established full diplo-
matic relations for the first time in
more than a century.
Ten years ago: North Korea said
it had shown its "nuclear deterrent"
to an unofficial U.S. delegation that
visited the disputed Yongbyon nu-
clear complex.
Five years ago: The aircraft car-
rier USS George H.W. Bush was
commissioned with its namesake, the
41 st president, and other members of
the Bush family on hand for the cere-
monies at Naval Station Norfolk.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama nominated White House
chief of staff Jack Lew to be treas-
ury secretary.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Rod
Stewart is 69. Rock singer-musician
Donald Fagen (Steely Dan) is 66.
Boxing Hall of Famer George Fore-
man is 65. Singer Pat Benatar is 61.
Thought for Today: "History
must speak for itself. A historian is
content if he has been able to shed
more light." -William L. Shirer,
American author and journalist
(1904-1993).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI/L PR N AlR N HII/L PR
65/52 0.5"'' 514g DAN,^. 65/49 0.15"1


INI I LC PRi NILo PR
65/50 0.75"| 5/51 0.20"
THREE DAY OUTLOOKExclusve daly
1M TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING i
High: 790 Low: 61,
Mostly cloudy, 20% chance of a shower

*r SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
ji l High:79 Low:58
S50 percent chance of storms Mostly cloudy
South wind 15-20 mph
1' SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High- 72' Low: 520
Mostly sunny Light wind


City H L FPcast
Daytona Bch. 79 66 sh
Fort Lauderdale 82 75 pc
Fort Myers 83 67 pc
Gainesville 77 61 sh
Homestead 83 71 pc
Jacksonville 74 62 sh
Key West 80 75 pc
Lakeland 82 64 pc
Melbourne 80 71 sh


Today: East winds around 10 knots
then. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and
inland waters a light chop. Tonight:
East winds around 5 knots then.
Seas 1 Foot. Bay and inland waters
smooth.


City
Miami
Ocala
Ordando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L F'cast


Gulf water
temperature

550

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location THU WED Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.46 28.50 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.36 38.37 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.40 39.40 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.08 40.09 42.20
Levels reported In feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood.
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In
any one year. This data Is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management ODIstrict
and Is subject to revIsion. In no event will the District or te United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrologiceal Data Seclan at (352) 796-7211.
THE NATION


'. s, DS


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 70/55
Record 85/27
Normal 70/51
Mean temp. 49
Departure from mean -11
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday Trace
Total for the month 0.61"
Total for the year 0.61"
Normal for the year NA
'As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2minimal,3-4low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.26


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 53.1
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 87%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Elm
Today's count: 8.2/12
Saturday's count: 9.7
Sunday's count: 10.5
AIR QUALITY
Thursday observed: 37
Pollutant: Particulate matter


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
01/10 FRIDAY
01/11 SATURDAY
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TO IGHT ...........................5:49 p.m.
S11 e1 P 1 SUNRISE TOMORROW 7:23 a.m.
C 0MRISlTOBAY ....................... 1:46 p.m
Jan15 Jan 24 Jan 30 Feb6 M00ISET TOWAY ........... 2:37 a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Firme Danger Rating is. MOD. There is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division ol Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
httpiAlame.fl-do f.corn/fireweatherAbd
WAT"ERIG RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 &am.orafter 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday andaor Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or rmicro irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus County Uilies' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal
River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay "At Mason's Creek
FRIDAY
City High Low
Chassalhowitzka* 2:08 am. 0.6ft. 1:44 p.m. 0.2 ft, 10:14 a.m. 0.1ft. 8:01 p.mD.2 ft.
Crystal River'* 12:57 p.m. 1.3 ft. 7:29 a.m. 0.4 ft. 7:01 p.mD.9 ft.
Withlaooochee* 11:37a.m. 2.2 ft, 10:20p.m. 2.7 ft. 5:46 a.m. -0.2 ft. 457p.ml.4ft.
Homosassa" 12:21 a.m. 1.2 ft, 2:22 p.m. 0.6ft. 9:53a.m. 0.2ft 6:33p.m0.3.ft


City
Abany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columibus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvlle, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
HouLston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
UtLile Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


THU
H L Pep. H
27 10 34
49 24 46
47 20 45
49 29 50
37 19 45
70 53 .01 70
36 25 42
40 29 40
56 27 59
41 30 .05 40
30 19 38
23 6 .03 39
23 12 30
84 34 65
54 23 52
52 21 43
24 -2 .01 37
37 23 .01 48
30 5 42
32 18 .04 46
35 21 47
26 0 29
48 41 .18 69
47 17 45
23 5 38
19 -4 37
63 31 56
37 30 .05 48
32 21 38
31 13 35
69 51 .26 71
30 11 02 42
57 39 63
36 32 1.1255
63 51 73
42 29 .02 53
43 33 .51 56
22 -9 36
20 -11 32
58 29 64
48 29 .03 62
44 32 .10 55


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY

FRI THU FRI
LFcs.t Cty H L Pep. H L FCast
30 sn New Orleans 62 41 68 59 sh
26 pc New YorkCity 32 22 41 39 i
42 r Norfolk 43 26 51 49 r
46 sh Oklahoma City 37 33 02 57 31 r
40 sn Omaha 25 8 34 21 i
43 ts Palm Springs 71 43 77 51 s
38 I Philadelphia 35 24 42 39 I
30 pc Phoenix 68 45 69 43 pc
53 pc Pittsburgh 33 18 .04 40 38 i
30 sn Portland.ME 26 10 31 26 pc
34 fl Portland, OR 47 40 -14 50 49 r
37 fl Providence, RI 31 14 39 34 fl
28 sn Raleigh 54 25 47 47 r
58 sh RapidClty 46 18 40 22 pc
44 r Reno 52 36 55 29 pc
43 r Rochester, NY 25 11 37 34 sn
34 i Sacramento 61 42 61 40 f
43 r Salt Lake City 36 27 .13 35 26 sn
36 San Antonio 89 52 73 46 ts
31r San Diego 63 58 68 52 pc
42 r San Francisco 60 52 56 49 pc
20 pc Savannah 63 38 66 59 sh
42 ts Seattle 46 42 .27 49 45 r
20 pc Spokane 36 30 .04 38 33 pc
25 i St. Louis 34 20 .07 48 35 r
34 i St.Ste.Made 19 1 30 28 1
37 pc Syracuse 25 20 35 32 sn
44 r Topeka 30 19 40 27 i
33 r Washington 41 29 42 40 i
29 fl YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
57 ts HIGH 79, WestKendall, Fla,
37 r LOW .35. Brimson, Minn.
4O pc
41 s WORLD ClIES
147 s FRI Lisbon 62/46/pc
47 pc CITY H/LISKY London 50/35/pc
47 r
33 1 Acapdioo 86/71/s Madrid 6037/pc
S Amsterdam 51/41/r Mexico City 69/46/pc
58 r Athens 62/44/1 Montreal 8/-4Hf
52 p Beijing 32/10/s Moscow 37/33/pc
48 pc Berlin 53/42/pc Paris 53/39/r


Dermuda 616/r
KEVY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr=drzle; Cairo 59/50r
f.fair, h=ha pc=partl y cludyt r.nhm i Calgary 35/171pc
rszan/mvow mix, snumny; slhhaowem; Havana 82/69/pc
osnfsow; tasthundsntomns wfwindy. Hong Kong 62/57/pc
WSl 2014 Jerusalefm 62/46/pc


Rio 8W//7/pc
Rome 5741/ipc
Sydney 75/60/pc
Tokyo 48/32/r
Toronto 21/17/s
Warsaw 46/41/pc


"A LEGAL NOTICES




Bid Notices................................................C12
Meeting Notices........................................C12
Lien Notices...............................................C12
Miscellaneous Notices.............................C12
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.... .C11, C12
Notice to Creditors/Administration .........C11


11-) CITRUS COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonllne.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
S^I POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


MARINE OUTLOOK


IFLOMPATEMPOWTUMES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I


qUll


4
- A


Av


71 J


Citrus County Ticket Sales
Fresh Start DONUTS in
Beverly Hills, FL 527-1996


. -


AD .
Y I


-d


I Oq, O6 "Sf O o '

tickets $16 to $36 and even less
ith groups of 8 or more people.
PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE THE SAME 24K GOLD MUSIC
(all the same performers and workers) as have
performed in Florida for the past 9 years.


ANSON STYL IN;FLORIDA,:j


V
r;


wI~
WI
~ ~A1
i19~ &r4


III


Ill


Sunday 1-12-2014 Inverness/Lecanto
Sunday 1-19-2014 BRADENTON
Sunday 1-26-2014 OCALA, Fl.
Saturday 2-1-2014 Inverness/Lecanto
Saturday 2-8-2014 LAKELAND
Saturday 2-15-2014 BRADENTON
Sunday 2-23-2014 OCALA, Fl.
I Sunday 3-2-2014- LAKELAND


III


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 A5


if


1 *
.' fly


Mot/* *f


l. 7 1^


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L, \\





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


James
Berger, 81
CITRUS SPRINGS
James A. Berger, 81, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Jan. 2, 2014, suddenly in
Philadelphia, Pa., due to
heart complications.
James was preceded in
death by his parents, the
late Arthur and Mary Berger
(Long). James is survived
by his wife of 51 years,
Margot; daughter, Donna
O'Brien; sons, Robert and
Keith Berger; and a grand-
daughter, Daphne Berger
A memorial service will
take place at 11 a.m. Mon-
day, Feb. 24, 2014, at Good
Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 439 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County
Road 486), Hernando, FL
34442. A light lunch will
follow Donations in re-
membrance of James may
be sent to Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, Memo-
rial Fund, 439 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Her-
nando, FL 34442 or
Alzheimer Association,
Memorial Donation, P 0.
Box 96011, Washington, DC
20090-6011.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Nellie
Forsyth, 87
INVERNESS
Nellie Mae Forsyth, 87,
Inverness, Fla., died Jan.
8,2014, surrounded by her
loving family Nellie was
born May 27, 1926, in
Youngstown, Ohio, to the
late Charles and Nellie
(Leonard) Cox. She was a
devoted wife, mother and
grandmother who will be
-m i s- s e d
Deeply by
her fam-
ily Nellie
was a
book-
keeper for
SBateman
Gordon
Nellie and Sands
Forsyth Insurance
Company for more than 25
years. Nellie enjoyed bird
watching, taking care of
her animals and was an
avid football and NASCAR
fan. She liked working
crossword puzzles.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her son, Thomas
(Penny) Forsyth, Aurora,
Colo.; her daughter, Car-
olyn (Paul) Tapperson, In-
verness; brothers, George
Franklin, Youngstown,
Ohio, Thomas Franklin,
Inverness and Charles
Cox, Greer, S.C.; four
grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; and three
great-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her husband Thomas C.
Forsyth on Dec. 5, 2013,
and her two sisters, Grace
Hoffman and Ellen Fitch.
Inurnment will be held
at a later date at Florida
National Cemetery Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory is assist-
ing the family with private
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Duane Gates, 56
INVERNESS
Duane E. Gates, 56, of
Inverness, Fla., died Mon-
day, Jan. 6, 2014, at his res-
idence. Duane was born
Nov. 17, 1957, the son of
Duane and Imogene Gates
of Tampa. He had a pas-
sion for animals and loved
to garden. At the time of
his passing Duane was
employed at Citrus
Springs Middle School,
where he was much loved
and will be greatly missed
by all.
Duane leaves behind his
best friend and loving wife
of 30 years, Brenda S. Gates.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home and Crema-
tion, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


CdAs. E. zavu
Funeral Home With Crematory
MARY ANNE DORSI
Visitation: Friday 4:00-6:00 PM
Mass: Saturday 11:00 AM
Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox
ROBERT KUSHNEREIT
Private Arrangements
ETHEL KNIGHTON
Service: Sunday 10:30 AM
Chapel
MARY L. LEIDECKER
Pending
726-8323


Cleta
Knapp, 81
HOMOSASSA
Cleta D. Knapp, 81, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Monday, Jan. 6,
2014, at
Hospice
House in
Lecanto.
A native
of Indi-
anapolis,
Ind., she
was born
Cleta July 19,
Knapp 1932, to
Glen and Agnes (Trow-
bridge) Grubaugh, one of
two children. Cleta moved
here seven years ago from
Indianapolis and was a re-
tired member of Indiana
Bell Telephone with more
than 30 years of service,
where she was employed
as a service technician
and operator
Cleta is survived by her
loving companion of eight
years, Richard E. "Dick"
Young, Homosassa; sons,
Jerry Crouch (girlfriend
Sheila), Greenfield, Ind.,
and Larry Knapp, Logans-
port, Ind.; daughters Janis
Carmer, Homosassa and
Jody Rathgeb (husband
Ronald), Jasper, Ga.;
grandchildren, Joy
Carmer, Brooke and Blake
Indof, Jeryn Crouch and
Deborah, James, Christo-
pher and Jonathan Knapp;
and great-grandchildren,
Jayden and Jordan Crouch
and Luke and Jasmine
Knapp; as well as one
sibling.
Friends will be received
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 11, 2014, Wilder
Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, where a memo-
rial service of
remembrance will take
place at 3:30 p.m. Inter-
ment will be private.
www.wilderfuneral.com.

Edith
Stewart, 92
DUBLIN, TEXAS
Edith A. Stewart, 92, of
Dublin, Texas, passed
away Friday, Jan. 3, 2014.
No services will be held.
Arrangements are by Lacy
Funeral Home.
Edith was born Aug. 27,
1921, to Maxwell and Ella
(Southwick) Shangraw.
She was born and raised
in Franklin, Mass., where
she also met and married
her husband, Herbert C.
Stewart Jr, March 28,
1942. They later retired to
Crystal River, Fla. Edith
moved to Dublin, Texas,
in 2012. She was preceded
in death by her husband
Nov 24, 1999. She was a
member of The Eastern
Star
Survivors include her
daughter, Janet E. Recke
of Colorado Springs, Colo;
son, Dr Donald C. Stewart,
DC and wife, Lois, of
Dublin, Texas; grandchil-
dren, Robyn D. White and
Daniel J. Stewart
Memorials maybe made
to Erath County Meals On
Wheels, 1306 E. Washing-
ton, Stephenville, TX
76401. Online condolences
can be made at www
lacyfuneral.com.

Raymond
Martin, 77
LECANTO
Raymond Martin, 77, of
Lecanto, Fla., died Jan. 6,
2014, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County
in Inverness. Arrange-
ments by McGan Crema-
tion Service LLC,
Hernando.


Russell Hugh
McQuillin Jr., 82 Wright, 75
INVERNESS BEVERLY HILLS


Russell Lloyd McQuillin
Jr, 82, Inverness, Fla., died
Jan. 8,2014, surrounded by
his loving family and
under the
care of
HPH Hos-
pice Care
Center in
Brooksville.
Russell
was born
July 2,
Russell 1931 in
McQuillin Jr. Momence,
Ill., to the late Russell L.
McQuillin Sr and Tessie
(Bruce) McQuillin. He
proudly served our coun-
try in the United States Air
Force. Russell was employed
as an electronic technician
for printing machines. He
enjoyed traveling, golfing
and gardening. He was an
avid Illinois basketball
and football fan and also
devoted many years as a
volunteer to the Boy Scout
troops in Illinois. His dog
"Daisy" was his special
companion. Russell en-
joyed keeping in touch
with his family and the
many friends he made
over the years with fre-
quent telephone calls and
visits.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his children, Jana
Sue (John) Donovan,
Spring Hill, Toni Lynn
(Michael) Woodard,
Grayson, Ga., and Bruce
McQuillin, Inverness; his
brother, Lester McQuillin;
sister, Sandra Morgan; 10
grandchildren; and 13
great-grandchildren. He
was preceded in death by
his wife of 62 years, Patri-
cia McQuillin, on Oct. 20,
2013, and a daughter,
Cinda Lou Fisher, in 2011.
A funeral tribute to Rus-
sell's life will be 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, Jan. 11, 2014, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home. Burial will follow at
Oak Ridge Cemetery The
family will greet friends in
visitation from 4 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 10, 2014. In
lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations to HPH
Hospice Foundation,
12107 Majestic Blvd. Hud-
son, FL 34467-2455.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Essie
Livesay, 86
LECANTO
Essie G. Livesay, 86, of
Lecanto, Fla., formerly from
Roncerverte, WVa., passed
away, Jan. 8,2014, at Citrus
Memorial hospital in In-
verness. Born Jan. 5,1928,
in Elton WVa., she was the
daughter of Elbert and
Lula Lively of Elton, WVa.
In addition to her parents,
Essie was preceded in
death by nine brothers and
sisters. She is survived by
her husband of 66 years,Jene
R. Livesay; one daughter,
Jennifer (Sam) Landrum
of Brooksville; two sons,
Michael (Linda) Livesay of
Beverly Hills and John
(Cindy) Livesay of Crystal
River; eight grandchildren;
and six great-grandchildren
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto. Services and bur-
ial will take place in WVa.,
at a later date.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto, www.
brownfuneralhome.com.


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rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhoe.com


At 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec.
28, 2013, Hugh Wright, 75,
was called home by his
Lord. Hugh Wright of Bev-
erly Hills, Fla., was born in
Bridgeboro, Ga.
Hugh leaves to cherish
his memory, two sons, Dou-
glas (Tony) and Anthony
(Hugh); one daughter-in-law,
Bea Wright; four grand-
children, Natasha Wright,
Upper Marlboro, Md., Der-
rick Wright, USMC, Camp
Pendleton, Bryan Wright,
Kettering, Md., and Tim-
meisha Garris, Temple Hills,
Md.; his mother, Effie B.
Wright, East Canton, Ohio;
two sisters, Annie Lan-
caster, East Canton, Ohio;
Phyllis Wright, Landover,
Md.; and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and other
relatives and friends.
A celebration of life
homegoing service will be
Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014, at
Mount Olive Missionary
Baptist Church, 2105 N.
Georgia Road, Crystal
River, FL 34429, Ronald
Sutton, pastor. The view-
ing will start at 10 a.m. fol-
lowed by a homegoing
service at 11 a.m. Hugh
will be laid to rest at
Florida National Ceme-
tery Services entrusted by
Sellers Funeral Home &
Cremation Services, Ocala.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy
permits both free
and paid obituaries.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-536-5660.


Nobel laureate Dale

Mortensen dies at 74


Associated Press
EVANSTON, I 111. -Nobel
laureate and longtime
Northwestern University
economics professor Dale
Mortensen has
died.
Mortensen
shared the Nobel
economics prize
with two other
Americans in
2010 for their
work explaining
how unemploy- Da
ment can remain Mort<
high despite a large num-
ber of job openings.
Mortensen died Thurs-
day at his home in Wil-
mette, Ill., said his
personal assistant and
close family friend, Sue
Triforo. He was 74.
Besides his pioneering
approaches to investigat-


ing the labor market,
Mortensen had a way of
breaking down complex
economic ideas into terms
anyone could relate to.
Mortensen was away
teaching in
Aarhus, Den-
mark, when he
found out he won
the prize. When
delivering the
news to his wife
on the phone he
said simply, "I
ile won."
ansen Such under-
statement and humility
was a prominent charac-
teristic, according to
Triforo.
Survivors include his
wife, Beverly, their son
and two daughters, and
eight grandchildren.
A public memorial will
be announced later


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -
Thomas Jones, who led
Northrop Corp. to the top
rank of aerospace compa-
nies during the Cold War
while weathering serious
scandal, has died. He was
93.
His son, Peter, told the
Los Angeles Times that
Jones died Tuesday of
pulmonary fibrosis at his
Los Angeles estate.
Jones was Northrop's
chief executive for 30
years, beginning in 1960.
He gambled on huge


projects. His technology
investments helped
Northrop win the B-2
stealth bomber contract.
But the $1 billion F-20 jet
fighter program was can-
celled without a sale after
several crashes.
During his tenure,
Jones pleaded guilty to
making illegal campaign
contributions to Richard
Nixon and the company was
hit with allegations that it
paid $30 million in bribes
to foreign officials. Northrop
also acknowledged falsi-
fying tests on nuclear
missile components.


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Obituaries


Former Northrop CEO

Thomas Jones dies at 93


A6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


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LOCAL


For the RECORD


Arrests
Lillian Sack, 18, of Beverly Hills,
at 11:06 p.m. Jan. 7 on a felony
charge of child neglect without caus-
ing great bodily harm. No bond.
Owen Sexton, 41, of East Par-
sons Point Road, Hemrnando, at 1:20
p.m. Jan. 8 on an active warrant for
felony violation of probation, stem-
ming from an original charge of pos-
session of a firearm by a convicted
felon. Bond was denied.
Charles Rackley, 53, of East
Joy Lane, Inverness, at 1:21 p.m. Jan.
8 on a felony charge of trafficking in
stolen property. According to his arrest
affidavit, Rackley, along with Cheri
Couch, is accused of returning stolen
items to Walmart, including four sets
of full sized sheets, two blankets, a
comforter, and a queen-sized quilt,
and receiving a Walmart gift card in
the amount of $328.19. Bond $5,000.
Cheri Couch, 53, of West High-
tower Lane, Lecanto, at 1:21 p.m. Jan.
8 on a felony charge of trafficking in
stolen property. According to her arrest
affidavit, Couch, along with Charles
Rackley is accused of returning stolen
items to Walmart, including four sets
of full sized sheets, two blankets, a
comforter, and a queen-sized quilt,
and receiving a Walmart gift card in
the amount of $328.19. Bond $5,000.
Ronald Glover Jr., 28, of North
ConantAvenue, Crystal River, at 2:38
p.m. Jan. 8 on an active warrant for
felony violation of probation stemming
from an original charge of possession
of a controlled substance. Bond was
denied.


Shamra Rider, 27, of South
Rainbow Point, Homosassa, at 12:01
p.m. Jan. 8 on felony charges of traf-
ficking in stolen property, false verifi-
cation of ownership to a pawnbroker,
and felony petit theft. According to her
arrest affidavit, Rider is accused of
shoplifting two Xbox wire controllers,
two Xbox 360 batteries, and two Xbox
360 charge cords from Kmart, then
selling the controllers to GameStop
for $26.80. Bond $12,000.
David Cole, 23, of South Cove
Street, Floral City, at 6:35 p.m. Jan. 8
on a felony charge of possession of a
controlled substance and a misde-
meanor charge of drug parapherna-
lia. According to his arrest affidavit,
Cole was stopped for operating a ve-
hicle without a seatbelt. A K-9 unit
alerted to possible drugs and a Dilau-
did pill (hydromorphone), along with a
glass pipe and a spoon containing a
white residue were discovered. Bond
$5,500.
Janell Dore, 22, of South Perch
Drive, Floral City, at 6:35 p.m. Jan. 8
on two misdemeanor charges of drug
paraphernalia. According to her arrest
affidavit, Dore was in a vehicle driven
by David Cole who was stopped for
operating a vehicle without a seatbelt.
A K-9 unit alerted to possible drugs
and a syringe and a pipe were dis-
covered. Bond $1,000.
Ben Padgett, 27, of North Pine
Haven Point, Crystal River, at 2:06
a.m. Jan. 9 on a felony charge of pos-
session of a controlled substance. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, Padgett
was a passenger in a vehicle stopped


for failing to yield. A K-9 unit alerted to
possible drugs and two methamphet-
amine/ecstasy pills, commonly re-
ferred to as "Molly" were discovered.
Bond $5,000.
Amy Endsley, 49, of North Pine
Haven Point, Crystal River, at 1:59
a.m. Jan. 9 on a misdemeanor charge
of drug paraphernalia. According to
her arrest affidavit, Endsley was a
passenger in a vehicle stopped for
failing to yield. A K-9 unit alerted to
possible drugs and a purple and sil-
ver in color metal pipe containing
cannabis residue was discovered.
Bond $500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A commercial burglary was re-
ported at 6:06 a.m. Wednesday, Jan.
8, in the 5500 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
SA residential burglarywas reported
at 9:07 a.m. Jan. 8 in the 3300 block of
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 10:44 a.m. Jan. 8 in the 1400
block of S. ColonialAve., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 10:56 a.m. Jan. 8 in the 9400
block of N. Elliot Way, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 4:42 p.m. Jan. 8 in the 200
block of N. Dunkenfield Ave., Crystal
River.
A residential burglary was re-
ported at 7:26 p.m. Jan. 8 in the 300
block of S. Smith Ave., Inverness.


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DEAL
Continued from Page Al

HCA, which had committed
to having an acute-care hospi-
tal in Citrus for 15 years, now
says it will commit to a hospital
in Inverness for 15 years and in
Citrus County for the life of the
lease. An acute-care hospital is
one with an emergency room
and surgery
Should HCA default on that
commitment at any time, the
hospital and its property
would revert back to the hospi-
tal board, Grant said.
HCA has also now promised
one-year employment to all
workers not just clinical
workers, Grant said.
A letter of intent is the first
formal agreement between
HCA and both boards. Once
signed by all three both the
hospital board, which owns the
hospital, and foundation,
which leases it, must sign the
letter HCA will begin sev-
eral months of due diligence of
the hospital and its properties.
Grant and foundation repre-
sentatives say they believe a
contract will be in hand before
fall.
Grant also said Thursday
that attorneys for the hospital
board and foundation are close
to an agreement on a master
settlement of lawsuits that con-
tinue to divide the two boards.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOP
Continued from Page Al

While searching the vehicle,
Holloway saw a driver's license
belonging to someone else.
When he ran a check on the li-
cense, he discovered it was de-
clared stolen, along with a wallet
and an iPod from a vehicle. The
wallet and iPod were also found
in Khollman's vehicle.
Half of a $50 counterfeit bill
was found on Khollman. The
other half was found on the
ground at the scene. A witness
told police Khollman was try-
ing to get rid of the fake money
while deputies were searching
his vehicle.
According to investigators,
Khollman admitted to break-
ing into a vehicle and stealing
items from it.
Regarding the counterfeit
bill, Khollman initially told
conflicting stories, but when
detectives went to his house
and searched, they found real
bills that were bleached and
washed, along with a printer
During questioning, Kholl-
man admitted that a real $50
bill found in his home would
have the same serial number
as the fake one found near the
scene of the initial search. He
said he used the counterfeit
money to support a drug habit,
according to his arrest
affidavit.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE PAGE


* HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT: Things can change in the blink of an eye. Imagine being all
alone in an emergency situation like the one shown above with no one to help. That's why it's
so important to have a cell phone. They act as a personal safety net in case of emergency to
keep people safe. A cell phone with a one touch emergency safety button that instantly calls
emergency medical, police, fire and rescue for free is the best one to get. That way you never
have to worry about being stuck alone.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 A9


U.S. Gov't urges citizens to


carry cell phones

Cell phones prove to be safety special deals that require no contracts,
net in case of emergency deposits or monthly service charges.
ne in case o emergency There's no question that everyone
When it comes to personal safety every- should have a cell phone for safety. But
one should have a cell phone. They can there's no real need to have one that
save your life. In the U.S. Department of plays games, takes pictures or goes on
Interiors "Safe and Secure" memo it even the Internet. It's important to make sure
urges citizens to carry them.' the phone can be preprogrammed or has
In real emergencies they provide people a one touch emergency safety button that
with a lifeline of communication if hurt, instantly calls for emergency help when
stranded or to report a crime. No matter needed.
where or what kind of emergency or du- It should also be easy-to-use with big
ress a person finds themselves under- buttons, a large display screen and big
especially if they're all alone-if they have numbers so it's easy to see. And last of all
a cell phone they can call 911 for help. the phone should be hearing aid compati-
Cell phones act as valuable lifelines in ble with an extra loud speaker that makes
health-related issues, too. At the very it easy to hear. But remember, a cell phone
least, they provide an easier way to keep can't help you unless you have one. 'Cell
in touch with family and friends. They're phones provide significant economic gains for
easy to get and consumers may even find low-income American households.


Seniors set to get easy to use cell phones free

New cell phones that keep seniors safe are being given away free to everyone who beats the 48 hour deadline
to cover just the one-time activation fee, but only those Florida area seniors who call are also getting nationwide
coverage with no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills

Big buttons, large screen and magnified text make it easy to see; extra loud speaker makes it easy to hear
and the one touch emergency safety button instantly calls emergency medical, police, fire and rescue free


FLORIDA The phone lines are ringing
off the hook.
That's because Crystal River area se-
niors who call the Toll Free Hotlines today
are getting the new easy-to-use Senior
MobileTM cell phones free.
So, if you're still risking your safety by
not having a cell phone, well now there's
no reason not to get one and the phone is
free.
The only thing residents need to do is call
the Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour
order deadline ends to cover just a one-
time activation fee to instantly be awarded
the new Senior Mobile cell phone for free.
But only those Crystal River area seniors
who do are also getting nationwide cover-
age with no long distance charges, no con-
tracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.
This is all possible because the U.S.
Gov't put a Federal Regulation in place
that makes cell phone giants transmit free
emergency calls in all 50 states, which is
why this announcement is being so widely
advertised. This allows U.S. residents to
use the new Senior Mobile cell phone as an
emergency phone to call emergency medi-
cal, police, fire and rescue for free as well
as an everyday cell phone with nationwide
coverage, no contracts, no deposits and no
monthly bills.
To get the free phones seniors need to
call the Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour
order deadline ends.
Everyone who does is being given the
new easy-to-use cell phone free just by
covering the one-time $97 activation fee
and shipping which includes assigning a
cell phone number, a SIM card loaded with
500 anytime minutes good for sixty days
which allows the Senior Mobile phone to
be used as an emergency phone as well as
your everyday cell phone, preprogramming
the one-touch E 911 Emergency Button that
gives your location to E 911 (Enhanced 911)
highly trained first responders who can
send emergency help wherever you're at,
a portable home phone charger and install-
ing the lithium long life battery so it's ready
to use right out of the box.
"It's important that seniors call right
away to get the free cell phones because
after the deadline ends the phones are no
longer free and residents will be required
to pay $199.00 for each new phone," said
David Martin, Executive Director of the
U.S. based company CompTek.
Safety research shows that 74% of Amer-
icans who own a cell phone have used it in
an emergency situation to get help when
they needed it.
Yet millions of seniors are still risking
their safety by not having one. The main
reason for this is that seniors find most cell
phones too difficult to use.
That's why the new easy-to-use Senior
Mobile cell phones are being given to se-
niors for free. It was made just for seniors
with big buttons, a large screen and magni-
fied text that make it easy to see. It's also
hearing aid compatible with an extra loud
speaker that makes it easy to hear. Plus it's
the only cell phone in the world that has the
exclusive Senior Mobile E one-touch safety
button that instantly calls emergency medi-
cal, police, fire and rescue for free.
"The Senior Mobile cell phone is perfect
for seniors because it's free and comes with
no contracts or deposits. And since it's so
easy-to-use seniors can get rid of their
home phones and save money in long dis-
tance and service charges," Martin said.
"Seniors just want to be safe or stay in
touch with family and friends, so the Senior
Mobile cell phone doesn't play games, take
pictures or go on the Internet, which makes
it among the easiest cell phones to use in
the world," said Martin.
Thousands of Crystal River area seniors
are expected to call to get the free Senior
Mobile cell phones today. So if lines are busy
keep trying, all calls will be answered. 0


* KEEPS YOU SAFE: The phone lines are ringing off the hook. That's because brand new Senior Mobile cell phones are being handed
over to Crystal River area seniors for free just by covering a simple one-time activation fee before the deadline ends. "I'm so happy we got
the phones. Now I know she'll be safe and I don't have to worry about her going out alone anymore," said Chuck G. The Senior Mobile's
exclusive large red E safety button is a real life saver in any emergency situation. It immediately sends help wherever you are by instantly
calling emergency medical, police, fire and rescue for free. "I love the fact that we can just push a button and instantly get help wherever
we're at," said Carol G.

I To get the Senior Mobile phone Free: Read the important information listed below about the Senior
Mobile cell phone. Then call the National Toll Free Hotline before the 48-hour order deadline ends.

I Who gets the Senior Mobile phones Free: All Crystal River area seniors who beat the 48-hour deadline are getting the new easy-to-use
Senior Mobile cell phones free with nationwide coverage, no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.

I What if I already have a cell phone: Even seniors who already have a cell phone are getting the Senior Mobile cell phones free. This can
save seniors money who get rid of high monthly cell phone bills and lengthy contracts associated with other cell phones. The Senior Mobile cell
phone is perfect for seniors because it's easy-to-use with big buttons, a large screen, magnified text, a loud speaker and a one-touch safety
button that instantly calls emergency help for free.

l Do I have to pay for minutes: No. Seniors who plan on using the phone just for emergencies get unlimited emergency calls for free. This
is all possible because the U.S. Gov't put a Federal Regulation in place that makes cell phone giants transmit free 911 emergency calls in all
50 states. But here's the good news. You can call family and friends too because the Senior Mobile phone comes with 500 anytime minutes
good for sixty days. After that just dial 612 on your Senior Mobile phone to reload your phone with additional minutes as an added option for
just 2C/minute and get nationwide coverage with no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills.

l Why is the activation fee so low for seniors: The U.S. based company responsible for distributing the free phones is giving every senior
who beats the deadline a discount to help cover the cost of the one-time activation. The Senior Mobile phone is perfect for seniors because
it comes with nationwide coverage, no long distance charges, no contracts, no deposits and no monthly bills. After the deadline each Senior
Mobile phone is $199, but seniors who beat the 48-hour deadline get the phones free plus a discount off the activation and cover just $97
and shipping as long as they call the National Toll Free Hotline at 1-800-313-6640 before the deadline ends.

^ How to get the phones free:
The National Toll Free Hotlines are now open. Seniors
have just 48 hours to get the free Senior Mobile cell phones
beginning at 8:30am this morning. CompTek is authorizing
6640 the giveaway of the easy-to-use cell phones to everyone
who beats the 48-hour deadline to cover just a one-time
$97 activation fee and shipping. But only those Crystal Riv-
er area seniors who call are also getting nationwide cover-
age with no long distance charges, no contracts, no depos-
its and no monthly bills.
To get the free phones begin
calling at 8:30 a.m. today

1-800-313-6640
lIII IIII11111 111111111 E580

@2014 UNIVERSAL COMMERCE P6617A OF17808R-1


CONSUMERS MAY, AT THEIR OWN EXPENSE, RETURN THE SENIOR MOBILE WITHIN 10 DAYS OF RECEIPT (OR 30 DAYS FOR NV RESIDENTS) IN LIKE-NEW CONDITION FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND A 15% RESTOCKING FEE. NO
RETURNS AFTER 10 DAYS. SCREEN IMAGES ON THE SENIOR MOBILE ARE SIMULATED. UNIVERSAL COMMERCE DBA COMPTEK IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LOST RETURNED SHIPMENTS. 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Scientists: Global warming


turning us into weather wimps


Experts say

youjustforgot

how cold it

used to be

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -We've
become weather wimps.
As the world warms, the
United States is getting
fewer bitter cold spells like
the one that gripped much
of the nation this week. So
when a deep freeze strikes,
scientists say, it seems
more unprecedented than
it really is. An Associated
Press analysis of the daily
national winter tempera-
ture shows that cold ex-
tremes have happened
about once every four
years since 1900.
Until recently
When computer models
estimated that the national
average daily temperature
for the Lower 48 states
dropped to 17.9 degrees on
Monday, it was the first
deep freeze of that magni-
tude in 17 years, according
to Greg Carbin, warning
meteorologist for the Na-
tional Oceanic and Atmos-
pheric Administration.
That stretch from Jan.
13,1997 to Monday is by
far the longest the U.S. has
gone without the national
average plunging below 18
degrees, according to a
database of daytime win-
ter temperatures starting
in January 1900.
In the past 115 years,
there have been 58 days
when the national average
temperature dropped
below 18. Carbin said those
occurrences often happen
in periods that last several
days so it makes more
sense to talk about cold
outbreaks instead of cold
days. There have been 27
distinct cold snaps.
Between 1970 and 1989,
a dozen such events oc-
curred, but there were
only two in the 1990s and
then none until Monday
"These types of events
have actually become
more infrequent than they
were in the past," said
Carbin, who works at the
Storm Prediction Center
in Norman, Okla. "This is
why there was such a big
buzz because people have
such short memories."
Said Jeff Masters, mete-
orology director of the pri-
vate firm Weather
Underground: "It's be-
come a lot harder to get
these extreme (cold) out-
breaks in a planet that's
warming."
And Monday's breathtak-
ing chill? It was merely the
55th coldest day aver-
aged for the continental
United States since 1900.
The coldest day for the
Lower 48 since 1900 as
calculated by the com-
puter models was 12 de-
grees on Christmas Eve
1983, nearly 6 degrees
chillier than Monday
The average daytime
winter temperature is
about 33 degrees, accord-
ing to Carbin's database.
There have been far
more unusually warm win-
ter days in the U.S. than
unusually cold ones.
Since Jan. 1, 2000, only
two days have ranked in
the top 100 coldest: Mon-
day and Tuesday But
there have been 13 in the
top 100 warmest winter
days, including the
warmest since 1900: Dec.
3, 2012. And that pattern is
exactly what climate sci-
entists have been saying
for years, that the world
will get more warm ex-
tremes and fewer cold
extremes.
Nine of 11 outside cli-
mate scientists and meteo-
rologists who reviewed the
data for the AP said it
showed that as the world
warms from heat-trapping
gas spewed by the burning
of fossil fuels, winters are
becoming milder. The


world is getting more
warm extremes and fewer
cold extremes, they said.
"We expect to see a
lengthening of time be-
tween cold air outbreaks
due to a warming climate,
but 17 years between out-
breaks is probably par-
tially due to an unusual


Associated Press
A person struggles to cross a street Sunday in St. Louis. Scientists say this doesn't
disprove global warming and that Americans are weather weenies who don't
remember what cold winters are like.


amount of natural vari-
ability," or luck, Masters
said in an email. "I expect
we'll go far fewer than 17
years before seeing the
next cold air outbreak of
this intensity
And the scientists dis-
miss global warming skep-
tics who claim one or two
cold days somehow dis-
proves climate change.
"When your hands are
freezing off trying to
scrape the ice off your car,
it can be all too tempting to
say, 'Where's global warm-
ing now? I could use a lit-
tle of that!' But you know
what? It's not as cold as it
used to be anymore,"
Texas Tech University cli-
mate scientist Katharine
Hayhoe said in an email.
The recent cold spell,
which was triggered by a
frigid air mass known as
the polar vortex that wan-
dered way south of nor-
mal, could also be related
to a relatively new theory
that may prove a weather
wild card, said Rutgers
University climate scien-
tist Jennifer Francis. Her
theory, which has divided
mainstream climate scien-
tists, says that melting Arc-
tic sea ice is changing
polar weather, moving the


jet stream and causing
"more weirdness."
Ryan Maue, a meteorol-
ogist with the private firm
Weather Bell Analytics
who is skeptical about
blaming global warming
for weather extremes, dis-
misses Francis' theory and
said he has concerns about
the accuracy of Carbin's
database. Maue has his
own daily U.S. average
temperature showing that
Monday was colder than
Carbin's calculations.
Still, he acknowledged
that cold nationwide tem-


*Wood
Laminate
-gM^^ Tile / r
__ 0 Carpet
-^-" Vinyl
%-uG'^t -%^ Area RI


peratures "occurred with
more regularity in the past"
Many climate scientists
say Americans are
weather weenies who for-
got what a truly cold win-
ter is like.
"I think that people's
memory about climate is
really terrible," Texas
A&M University climate
scientist Andrew Dessler
wrote in an email. "So I
think this cold event feels
more extreme than it actu-
ally is because we're just
not used to really cold win-
ters anymore."


Carmakers worry


about legal issues


for robot autos


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS The fu-
ture of driving is right
around the corner
Hydrogen- and solar-
powered vehicles are on
the streets. So are cars
that can get you through
stop-and-go traffic while
you sit back and send texts
from behind the wheel.
Cars are even using radar,
ultrasonic waves and cam-
eras to jump into the pass-
ing lane and get around
slowpokes.
Sure, all of these tech-
nologies are still in the
testing phase, but that
hasn't stopped car makers
and technology compa-
nies from showing off a
new paradigm of driving
at the International CES
gadget show this week. It's
a world in which you no
longer grip the wheel with
excitement, but instead
relax with a book or movie
as your car chauffeurs you
to your destination.
It's also a future that
won't materialize, say car-
makers, unless legislators
around the world create a
new legal framework.
One simulation at CES
by Delphi Automotive PLC,
a provider of auto parts
and technology to major
manufacturers including
Ford, GM and Volvo, shows
the possibilities. The sce-
nario, using a stationary
but souped-up Tesla Model
S, imagines "autonomous
driving lanes," much like
carpool lanes today The
company said vehicles


might someday enter these
lanes and then run on au-
topilot The feat is possible
today with a mixture of
technology that keeps cars
inside lanes and adaptive
cruise control that matches
a car's speed to the vehicle
in front of it
While in the au-
tonomous lane, the car's
window glass frosts up
and functions that had
been disabled for the
driver like video play-
ing from a mini projector
- turn on. The driver can
pursue other activities,
like surfing the Web or
even taking a nap.
When the driver's exit
nears, the car gets in-
creasingly persistent, de-
manding that the driver
take back control. First,
the video player stops.
Then a female voice in-
tones, "Place both hands
on the steering wheel and
look ahead in the driving
direction."
Finally, the seat starts
vibrating and a camera
ensures the driver is look-
ing at the road. The driver
taps a steering wheel
knob, takes control, and
drives on. The experience
is similar to airline pilots
who grab the controls for
take-off and landing but
let a computer do the rest.
"These technologies
exist now and the car-
makers assure us they're
ready to go," said Jim Tra-
vers, associate editor of
autos for Consumer Re-
ports magazine. "It's re-
ally not that far off."


Make plans to attend this unique event brought to
you in partnership with CF, Workforce Connection,
EDC, and Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.
ATTEND THIS UNIQUE WORKSHOP
Each registered participant will attend a workshop in the following:
* Do's and Don'ts of the Interview
M Navigating the workplace
y Resume writing '101'
SSocI MedCi for Job Seekersa f



E Participate in a 'mock' interview with a professional

Register today at www.citrusu nitedway.org
or call 352-795-5483
Each registered attendee will receive a ticket for breakfast and lunch.
Doors open at 8 am.T this FREE workshop is brought to you in partnership



with Workforce Connection and College of CF Citrus Campus.
We thank our United Way partners: CenterState Bank,
Publix Supermarket Charities, The Citrus County Chronicle,
Cypress Cove Care C enter, Sheldon Palmes Insurance, Sibex h IVE UNIol
in their chosen field
Register today at www.citrusunitedway.org
or call 352-795-5483


Each registate Farmed agttent Michaee wll recBays eivet p a ticket for breakfast and lunch.
CFandWorkfors open at 8 amion. JlJThis FREE workshop is brought to you in partnershipLL
with Workforce Connection and College of CF Citrus Campus.
We thank our United Way partners: CenterState Bank,
Publix Supermarket Charities, The Citrus County Chronicle,
Cypress Cove Care Center, Sheldon Palmes Insurance, Sibex, LIVE UNlrED
and State Farm agent Michael Bays and our event partners fsv in~ fB~"
CF and Workforce Connection. \jUC SlW.N JT~.


CiiROWiflf


ATSl



TO SPRING FASHION
16' Annual Key Training Center Fashion Show and Tea
* -------------------------


Sunday
February 9,2014
2-4 p.m.


ChIet Cole Life Enrichiment Center
Key Taiditng Center, Lecant
Ticket amS30.
Ifyou warhat. S25!


A salute to this spring's fashiorns and an offioal heads
up on the latest styles, accessories and trends from
elegant glitter to casual cruse-wear'

PRIZES FOR THE MOST...
Beautiful Hat Ingenious Har
'I Can't Belive You Have That On Your Head" Hal

Fashions provided by The Cotton Club arid Key Thrift
Store&. Accessories Boutique by Labels.
Call 79S-S41. ExL ,311 for more informaltor, and to purchase t.ickets.


it's COzIf Aj







Community-Wide Fitness Challenge

February 3 through March 16, 2014

No excuses this year Join the 10th Annual Fitness Challenge
* You get points for a variety of types of exercise
* Teams select the fitness level category to compete in:
"Jocks", "Getting There", or "Just Getting Started"
* Report points weekly and get helpful tips along the way

* Team registration deadline is January 24, 2014 5 p.m.

ActNOW- *,U
email fitnesschallenge@tampabay.rr com r n
and ask for details. .lVi on .1...


A10 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


NATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,880 ................................. S& P 500
: Close: 1,838.13
Change: 0.64 (flat)
1,800 ........ 10 DAYS .........


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
16,600........ ........ ........-. Dow Jones industrials
1-, / C,:,.- V Close: 16,444.76
Change: -17.98 (-0.1%)
16,360 10 DAYS .........


1 ,8 5 0 ..........:............. :............ .............:............ ......... . 1 7 ,0 0 0 .......... ............... ............ ............. :............ ............
1 8 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i J 1 6 5 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i . . . . . . - 1
1 5 0 .. ..... .......... i... . ... . . ...... ........-.-..." ..: .. I i 16 ,0 0 0 .......... i:............. ............ "............... .....". .. ....
1,750060

1,700 ........... ... ......... ...............15500... .. ..........................
176500. .............-A ..........15000
1,65 0 "" "J..... ...... .. ........... S ........... O .. .........I ... ........ 5 .... ... 15 ,5000 "' .......... -, ...... ... ....... .... ..... ......I ...... ..... 5....... 3
A,0 .. ..... ..4500...............N DJ A s 0 N D J


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,508
3,546
1623
1451
212
21


NASD
2,165
2,280
1244
1325
212
17


HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


16525.35
7397.72
487.81
10344.30
4182.74
1843.23
1344.35
19676.28
1163.86


16378.61
7320.60
483.74
10277.37
4142.70
1830.38
1332.81
19532.02
1152.16


16444.76
7379.62
487.38
10325.74
4156.19
1838.13
1340.02
19613.62
1158.35


-0.11%
+0.95%
+0.66%
+0.05%
-0.23%
+0.03%
+0.11%
+0.03%
+0.08%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 0- 8.47 7.41 -.51 -6.4 V A V -9.6 +68.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.76 -0-- 39.00 33.54 -.70 -2.0 V V V -4.6 +4.9 25 1.84f
Ametek Inc AME 38.20 -0- 62.05 52.19 +.21 +0.4 A V -0.9 +35.5 27 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 106.83 104.93 ... ... A A V -1.4 +24.6 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.98 0 16.79 16.83 +.25 +1.5 A A A +8.1 +38.6 22 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -0- 13.08 11.72 +.06 +0.5 V V V -0.4 -3.1 39
CenturyLink Inc CTL 29.93 0- 42.01 30.79 -.45 -1.4 V A V -3.3 -15.9 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 40.28 0 55.00 55.20 +.39 +0.7 A A A +5.9 +29.2 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.43 -0- 26.38 22.40 -.10 -0.4 V V V -3.9 +47.4 24 1.00
Disney DIS 50.18 0 76.84 74.90 -.32 -0.4 V A V -2.0 +49.9 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -0-- 75.46 67.87 +.02 ... V V V -1.7 +9.3 20 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 45.70 -0-- 61.18 48.60 -.45 -0.9 V A V -1.1 +13.7 19 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 -0- 101.74 99.76 -.98 -1.0 A A V -1.4 +16.6 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 12.10 -0- 18.02 15.84 +.30 +1.9 A V A +2.7 +19.4 12 0.50f
Gen Electric GE 20.68 -- 0- 28.09 27.22 +.01 ... V A V -2.9 +34.0 20 0.88f
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 31.64 0 50.94 50.90 +.35 +0.7 A A A +6.7 +59.5 16
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 8.76 -0- 17.28 13.40 -.05 -0.4 A A A +2.3 +45.9 cc
Home Depot HD 62.38 0 82.57 81.57 -.36 -0.4 V A V -0.9 +32.1 22 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 20.10 -- 0- 26.04 25.31 -.12 -0.5 V A V -2.5 +24.8 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 -0-- 215.90 187.38 -.59 -0.3 A A V -0.1 -0.6 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 -0- 34.32 32.04 -.25 -0.8 V V V -2.6 +41.7 33
Lowes Cos LOW 34.43 -0- 52.08 48.75 +.20 +0.4 V A V -1.6 +41.5 23 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 89.25 -0- 103.70 95.46 +.05 +0.1 V A V -1.6 +8.3 17 3.24f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.28 -0- 38.98 35.53 -.23 -0.6 V V V -5.0 +38.3 13 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 0 67.67 66.50 +.51 +0.8 A A V -1.5 +20.0 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 70.38 -- 0- 89.75 86.02 +.73 +0.9 A A A +0.5 +23.3 19 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 0- 23.10 7.64 +.27 +3.7 V V V -16.5 -61.2 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 --- 21.09 16.36 -.11 -0.7 V A V -1.0 -6.2 30 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 7.13 0 10.52 10.45 +.20 +2.0 A A A +5.7 +39.9 13 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.88 -0-- 67.50 42.57 -1.40 -3.2 V V V -13.2 +9.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.97 -0-- 114.72 97.98 -.19 -0.2 V V V -5.4 +12.7 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 31.39 0 44.09 43.06 -.23 -0.5 V A V -1.9 +40.6 28 1.20
Time Warner TWX 48.55 --- 70.77 66.29 -.47 -0.7 V A V -4.9 +35.4 16 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 79.32 0 111.06 108.87 -1.65 -1.5 A A A +1.7 +35.4 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 41.50 -0- 54.31 47.50 -1.00 -2.1 V V V -3.3 +17.4 67 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 39.44 38.84 +.06 +0.2 A A V -1.2 +54.0 1.61e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.72 -0- 81.37 78.09 +.26 +0.3 V V V -0.8 +16.2 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 37.43 0 60.93 61.14 +1.78 +3.0 A A A +6.4 +58.6 21 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd -Loss in last 12 months


Associated Press
A new jet plane is prepared for use at the American Airlines operations center hanger
in Grapevine, Texas. Airlines are on the largest jet-buying spree in the history of
aviation, ordering more than 8,200 new planes, with the old planes being sent to the
desert, where the dry air prevents the aluminum airframe from corroding and spare
parts can be harvested or the old jets get chopped up for scrap metal.



Airlines go on a record



new jet shopping spree


Associated Press

ROSWELL, N.M. -Capt
Paul Wannberg glides an
old Boeing 757 over the
New Mexico desert, lining
up with the runway A com-
puterized voice squawks
elevation warnings. Forty
feet. Thirty Twenty Ten.
Touchdown.
Outside the cockpit win-
dow sit nearly a hundred
airplane carcasses, per-
fectly lined up. They are
jets that nobody wants any-
more. And after 26,057
takeoffs and landings -
this 24-year-old American
Airlines plane is about to
join them.
"This is my first time
here, and it's a sad place,"
First Officer Robert Popp
tells the control tower Air-
lines used to store planes
in the desert during slow
travel months. Sometimes,
unwanted jets would be
sold to carriers in Russia
or Africa. Today, a man on
the other end of the radio
responds, "they're chop-
ping them up."
Airlines are on the
largest jet-buying spree in
the history of aviation, or-
dering more than 8,200 new
planes with manufacturers
Airbus SAS and The Boe-


ing Co. in the past five
years. There are now a
combined 24 planes rolling
off assembly lines each
week, up from 11 a decade
ago. And that rate is ex-
pected to keep climbing.
The new planes allow
the airlines to save on fuel,
now their biggest cost,
while offering passengers
more amenities some
for a fee. Passengers can
plug in to work or be en-
tertained by a seat-back
TV and fly some interna-
tional routes nonstop for
the first time. And the
commercial divisions of
Boeing and Airbus get a
steady stream of cash for
years, which is a key rea-
son investors have dou-
bled the companies' stock
price in the past year
The bulk of the planes
are going to new or
quickly-growing airlines
that serve an expanding
middle class in India and
the rest of Asia. The Inter-
national Air Transport As-
sociation expects the
number of passengers
worldwide to grow 31 per-
cent to 3.9 billion in the
next four years.
U.S. airlines are buying
as well. After suffering
through the Sept 11 terror-


ist attacks, bankruptcies
and recessions, they're
now strong enough finan-
cially to buy new jets. Do-
mestic carriers spent $11.6
billion last year on capital
improvements including
new planes up from $5.2
billion in 2010.
With the price of fuel
nearly 4 times what it was
10 years ago, airlines need
to replace aging, gas-guz-
zlers like the American
757 that Capt. Wannberg
parked in the desert in
Roswell.
The plane showed its
age. Many armrests origi-
nally came with ashtrays.
The setback pocket on
27D was hanging by its last
thread. And the window
shade at 1F wouldn't close.
American would have had
to spend $6 million to $10
million for heavy mainte-
nance checks on the air-
frame, overhauls of the
engines and other part re-
placements to keep the
plane flying.
Instead, it went to
Roswell. There, the dry air
prevents the aluminum
airframe from corroding.
Spare parts will be har-
vested from the jet; even-
tually it will be chopped
up for scrap metal.


Interestrates



lml

The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.97
percent
Thursday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
ended Thurs-
day at the low-
est level in
eight months,
as traders wor-
ried about ris-
ing crude oil sup-
plies and falling
demand. Wheat
edged higher.
Platinum rose.




BSM


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.04 -0.01 .06
6-month T-bill .06 0.07 -0.01 .09
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .13
2-year T-note .43 0.43 .24
5-year T-note 1.75 1.76 -0.01 .77
10-year T-note 2.97 2.99 -0.02 1.86
30-year T-bond 3.88 3.89 -0.01 3.06


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.69 3.72 -0.03 2.65
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.07 5.10 -0.03 4.05
Barclays USAggregate 2.51 2.46 +0.05 1.80
Barclays US High Yield 5.50 5.50 ... 5.83
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 4.53 4.51 +0.02 3.77
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.93 1.93 ... 1.04
Barclays US Corp 3.28 3.22 +0.06 2.72


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 91.66
Ethanol (gal) 1.93
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.01
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.64
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1229.30
Silver (oz) 19.66
Platinum (oz) 1417.70
Copper (Ib) 3.35
Palladium (oz) 735.60
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.37
Coffee (Ib) 1.19
Corn (bu) 4.12
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 365.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.43
Soybeans (bu) 12.96
Wheat (bu) 5.84


PVS.
92.33
1.91
2.95
4.22
2.66
PVS.
1225.30
19.52
1412.20
3.39
737.40
PVS.
1.37
1.21
4.17
0.83
356.00
1.43
13.01
5.89


%CHG
-0.73
+0.05
-0.95
-5.00
-0.52
%CHG
+0.33
+0.74
+0.39
-1.16
-0.24
%CHG
+0.02
-1.28
-1.20
-0.40
+2.67
+0.04
-0.35
-0.76


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.31 +.03 -0.5 +19.1 +12.6 +14.5
CaplncBuA m 57.88 -.02 -1.1 +12.5 +9.5 +11.5
CpWIdGrIA m 45.00 -.01 -0.7 +22.1 +11.2 +14.6
EurPacGrA m 48.76 -.20 -0.6 +18.3 +7.4 +13.6
FnlnvA m 51.53 -.01 -0.8 +27.2 +14.2 +17.8
GrthAmA m 42.87 +.01 -0.3 +30.1 +14.9 +18.1
IncAmerA m 20.50 +.02 -0.7 +15.9 +11.5 +14.4
InvCoAmA m 36.36 +.03 -0.9 +28.1 +14.0 +16.2
NewPerspA m 37.23 -.06 -0.9 +23.3 +12.1 +17.0
WAMutlnvA m 39.14 ... -0.7 +28.3 +16.1 +16.8
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.64 -.15 -0.9 +23.0 +8.8 +16.3
Stock 167.63 -.05 -0.7 +35.3 +17.1 +19.3
Fidelity Contra 95.97 +.03 -0.2 +30.4 +15.5 +19.1
LowPriStk d 49.43 -.11 -0.1 +31.7+16.6 +21.8
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 65.16 +.03 -0.5 +28.5 +15.5 +18.1
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.43 ... -0.4 +11.5 +9.1 +14.1
IncomeA m 2.40 ... -0.4 +11.7 +9.6 +14.7
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.09 ... -0.4 +1.0 +4.8 +8.5
Harbor Intllnstl 70.10 -.14 -1.3 +14.6 +7.9 +14.1
Oakmark Intl 1 25.96 -.11 -1.4 +24.8 +12.5 +20.7
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.64 +.05 -0.6 +26.0 +14.1 +17.1
GrowStk 52.49 -.03 -0.2 +35.0 +17.4 +22.1
Vanguard 500Adml 169.50 +.06 -0.5 +28.4 +15.5 +18.1
5001lnv 169.50 +.06 -0.5 +28.3 +15.4 +18.0
MulntAdml 13.78 +.01 +0.5 -1.4 +4.8 +4.8
PrmcpAdml 95.91 +.08 +0.2 +36.0 +16.2 +19.1
STGradeAd 10.70 ... 0.0 +1.1 +2.5 +5.1
Tgtet2025 15.69 +.01 -0.4 +15.9 +9.8 +13.7
TotBdAdml 10.58 +.01 +0.2 -1.6 +3.2 +4.3
Totlntl 16.50 -.02 -1.5 +12.0 +5.0 +12.1
TotStlAdm 46.50 +.03 -0.4 +29.5 +15.7 +19.0
TotStldx 46.48 +.02 -0.4 +29.3 +15.5 +18.9
Welltn 37.87 +.06 -0.2 +17.4 +11.6 +13.7
WelltnAdm 65.40 +.10 -0.2 +17.5 +11.6 +13.8
WndsllAdm 64.99 +.10 -0.4 +27.2 +15.5 +17.4
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Major stock indexes finished
mixed Thursday Investors
weighed a larger-than-expected
drop in applications for unem-
ployment aid last week against
news that Bed Bath & Beyond
and Family Dollar each cut their
earnings forecasts, while Macy's
announced job cuts.

Macy's M
Close: $55.80A3.96 or 7.6%
The retailer released an enthusiastic
outlook and said it may see $100
million in annual savings under a
company restructuring.



J(,
0 I i u j
52-week range
$36.35 $56.25
Vol.: 14.7m (3.1x avg.) PE:15.9
Mkt. Cap:$20.56 b Yield: 1.8%
Ford Motor F
Close: $15.84A0.30 or 1.9%
For the first time since restoring divi-
dends in 2012, the Detroit automak-
er increased payouts to sharehold-
ers by 25 percent.
$1"_-

1r
1u 0 N D J
52-week range
$12.10 $18.02
Vol.: 67.8m (1.6x avg.) PE: 11.2
Mkt. Cap:$61.36 b Yield: 2.5%
Alcoa AA
Close: $10.69V-0.14 or -1.3%
Following a bribery scandal involving
a subsidiary in the Kingdom of Bah-
rain, the aluminum maker will pay a
$384 million fine.
$11



0 N D J
52-week range
$7.63 $10.90
Vol.: 49.1 m(2.0x avg.) PE:39.6
Mkt. Cap:$11.43 b Yield: 1.1%
McKesson MCK
Close: $175.33A5.52 or 3.3%
Shares of the drug distributor rose to
an all-time high after it boosted its
bid for rival Celesio to about $31.97
per share.
$180
1 0m

1 ('
0 Ii IU J
52-week range
$100.70 $177.00
Vol.: 3.8m (2.2x avg.) PE:29.5
Mkt. Cap:$40.28 b Yield: 0.5%
Apple AAPL
Close: $536.52 V-6.94 or -1.3%
The CEO of the iPhone maker will
meet his counterpart at Samsung
Electronics to settle a two-year pat-
ent fight over designs.



0 N ) J
52-week range
$385.10 1$575.14
Vol.: 9.9m (0.9x avg.) PE:13.5
Mkt. Cap:$478.87 b Yield: 2.3%


Mixed close on Wall Street


Associated Press

NEW YORK The
stock market wavered for a
second day Thursday as
investors weighed disap-
pointing news from the re-
tail industry against more
positive signals on the U.S.
economy
Investors were looking
ahead to Friday's jobs re-
port, as well as the start of
corporate earnings season.
Retailers were among
the hardest hit stocks on
Thursday
Bed Bath & Beyond
plunged $9.93, or 13 per-
cent, to $69.75 and Family


Dollar fell $1.37, or 2 per-
cent, to $64.97, making
them the biggest decliners
in the S&P 500. Both com-
panies cut their earnings
forecasts following a
disappointing holiday
season.
The reports of tepid
sales disappointed in-
vestors, who have been
seeing signs for several
weeks that the U.S. econ-
omy was improving and
that shoppers were return-
ing to the malls.
It appears that the econ-
omy, while improving, still
has some weak spots.
L Brands, which owns


Bath and Body Works and
Victoria's Secret, reported
that its sales rose less than
analysts had expected.
The company also cut its
full-year outlook, echoing
Bed Bath and Beyond and
Family Dollar L Brands
fell $2.44, or 4 percent, to
$57.75.
"The consumers are
supposed to be the fuel of
this economy, and it does-
n't appear to be happen-
ing," said Ian Winer,
director of trading for
Wedbush Securities. "If
they're not spending
money at the retailers,
what's going on?"


V ^/










Time To

0

Think




About




Taxes...


Don't be left out of our weekly

tax directory!

Publishes weekly, every Sunday
starting Jan. 19 April 13.

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BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 All







Page A12 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
oMike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


OUT OF BALANCE




Homeowners



insurance rates



threaten state



economy


unshine and beaches.
No state income tax and
lower property taxes.
Affordable homes
and lower cost of
living. THE If
Not so fast. It is Florida
time to break out insur
the whitewash premium
and change a few the nation
billboards.
The National OUR 01
Association of In-
surance Commis- Premiun
sioners recently balance
released a report disaster
that finds the cost Flor
of homeowners
insurance in Florida is twice
the national level, and four
times higher than at least one
other state.
The average Florida home-
owner's policy clocks in at
$1,933.
There's more bad news: the
data is two years old.
Since these numbers were
collected, two-thirds of the
rate requests to state insur-
ance regulators last year
were for increases, despite
Florida ambling through a
relatively storm-free nine-
year period. Additionally,
some insurers have been re-
porting record profits.
Bad news for a state
economy based on home
ownership.
To be fair, Florida will prob-
ably have higher homeowner
insurance premiums. After all,
its peninsula juts into one of
the most active hurricane
zones in the world, just like a
cocky boxer daring his oppo-


Limited choices
Please print this information.
It could change your viewpoint in
a positive way. A recent
Sound Off was directed
at heavier people who cot
get food at food banks.
The remark was that
they're all so heavy and
don't look like they need
more food. Shame,
shame, shame on you )
or anyone else who
thinks with that mental- CAL
ity. You need to educate 5f6Q
yourself to know that tt
the poor and disadvan-
taged people are generally a little
larger in stature because they're
forced to eat foods that are basi-
cally carbohydrates, starchy
foods such as rice, potatoes,
bread, etc., foods that pack the
weight on. Please don't judge
people. You may be a person in
need yourself one day. Please
see them in a different light.
Simple solution
About all the discussion about
garbage along our highway: Yes,
it is a problem, but there is such
an easy solution. If everybody
who went for a walk either
walking their dog or just getting
some exercise would take a
couple of plastic bags with
them and pick up some of the
litter and if someone would just
take over a little section in their
neighborhood to clean up, the


nent to take a swing at his chin.
Homeowner insurance
originated in the 1950s as a
way to simplify
the existing prac-
;SUE: tice at the time of
home buying separate
ance policies to cover
is twice any number of
nal level, maladies, from
fire to flood. Over
'INION: the years, through
regulation and
isoutof marketplace
even for pressures, it has
r-prone become a compli-
da. cated morass of
companies, sub-
sidiaries, policies, riders and
underwriting.
Most worrisome is what the
rising rates will do to the
economy. It's not like the free
market will sort this out, be-
cause most homeowners
must carry insurance if they
have a mortgage.
Gov. Rick Scott has undone
a lot of the aggressive meas-
ures his predecessor en-
acted, including paring down
the state-run insurer, Citi-
zen's which begs the ques-
tion, can we trust insurance
companies to do what is
right? We'd like to think they
aren't taking advantage of
looser regulation to pad their
pockets with profits, yet two-
thirds of the companies are
asking for higher rates.
It's certainly a balancing
act between regulation and
private enterprise one that
appears to have tipped the
scale heavily toward private
enterprise.


problem would be solved. We
don't need to rely on our county
to pick up our own garbage that
we leave on the streets.
JND Odd priorities
Let me get this
OFF straight: The govern-
b ment can get their com-
S puters right to
Seavesdrop on everybody
in the United States
Sand all over the world
4 but they can't get them
5 right for Obamacare or
)579 unemployment so peo-
ple can get their money.
What's up with that?
Burger economics
I guess these people who
want $15 an hour for flipping
hamburgers don't understand
economics. If they got $15 an
hour, the hamburger that they
buy for lunch and their children
would go to about $10 or $12 a
hamburger. So they wouldn't re-
ally accomplish anything. If you
want more money, you need to
get a better education, go to
school, go back to school, learn
a trade, do something else and
just better yourself. That's how
you can make more money and
make $15 an hour. If the mini-
mum wage goes up that high,
everything else is going to go up
accordingly and the poor who
are affected will not be able to
make ends meet any more than
they do now.


5

rI
T
]r



'n


ri


I
r


"Moderation is a virtue only in those who
are thought to have an alternative."
Henry Kissinger


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Double standard for evil


he reporting
on China's
commemora-
tion of the 120th
birthday of Mao Ze-
dong all seemed to
come from the same
angle. Festivities
were "understated"
(AP). Events were
"scaled back"
(Reuters). The fol-
lowing headline,
which ran on the Fox
News website over


Diana West
OTHER
VOICES


the AP story, is typical: "China
marks Mao's 120th birthday
with low-key celebrations." The
story opens: "China's leaders
bowed three times before a
statue of Mao Zedong on the
120th anniversary of his birth
Thursday in carefully con-
trolled celebrations that also
sought to uphold the market-
style reforms that he would
have opposed."
Forget for now the "market-
style reforms." Only three
times? How "muted"! That, by
the way, was the word CNN
used to describe the occasion.
But there's something wrong
with this media picture. Imag-
ine if, on Adolf Hitler's upcom-
ing 125th birthday, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel were
to bow three times in front of
the Nazi mass-murderer's
statue. Would journalists con-
vey how "ambivalent" (Voice of
America's word for post-Mao
China) post-Hitler Germany
was about Hitler these days?
Hardly They would most likely
write in unconcealed horror
over the twisted but enduring
appeal of Nazism. Why are we
not equally repelled when Chi-
nese leaders bow in front of a
statue of a communist mass-
murderer? (I examine this dou-
ble standard at length in my
book, 'American Betrayal.")
The New York Times and
CNBC ran headlines wishing
"Happy Birthday, Chairman
Mao," but, again, don't expect
similar felicitations on Hitler's
birthday It's communists who
always get a pass or a yawn.
"Communist Party feeling un-
easy about Mao ahead of his
birthday celebrations," the
Washington Post reported. With
my imaginary Merkel example
in mind, the paper's update
would read: "Nazi Party feeling
uneasy about Hitler ahead of
his 125th birthday" Somehow,
though, it's hard to imagine
news editors being so blase.
Then again, there is no Nazi
Party today, and Hitler is a uni-
versal symbol of evil. Why? In
defeat, Nazi Party leader Hitler


and his slaughters
were exposed,
judged and con-
demned. Nothing of
the kind has ever
happened to commu-
nism, and in China,
of course, Mao's com-
munist Party won the
war Despite Red
China's successful
entry in recent
decades into the
world market, it re-
mains a totalitarian


dictatorship, ruled by the same
Communist Party that Mao led
and seized power with in 1949.
Also missing from the typical
retrospective is the fact that
Mao's seizure of power had cru-
cial American help. During the
FDR and Truman administra-
tions, agents and fellow travel-
ers working on behalf of Stalin
inside the federal government
and related institutions tried to
influence U.S. policy to favor
the communists over the anti-
communist leader and U.S. ally
Chiang Kai-Shek. Such influ-
ence operators, for example, in-
cluded Soviet agent Lauchlin
Currie, a top White House aide
to FDR entrusted, among other
portfolios, with China policy
Aside from the events leading
to the Korean War, these com-
munist proxies helped launch
Mao's dictatorship, which
stands out for amassing the
highest body count in history At
least 65 million people per-
ished due to this man and his
monstrous programs of collec-
tivization and "re-education."
Despite the Red Army death
squads, concentration camps
and the largest state-created
famine in history, Mao and
those who bow to him today are
somehow still spared the ash
heap of history, not to mention
the widespread contempt we
freely express for Hitler Why?
It gets worse, and danger-
ously so. The stigma of associa-
tion with Nazism remains, but
there is no stigma of association
with communism. That means
there is no stigma either at-
tached to the collectivist poli-
cies communists enacted -
policies that eliminated free-
dom and killed 100 million peo-
ple worldwide.
Consider, for example, the
current president of the Euro-
pean Union, Jose Barroso. He
led a revolutionary Maoist
party in Portugal in the 1970s.
That's long after most of the
tens of millions of Mao's victims
had perished, but no big deal.
It's impossible to imagine Bar-
roso in public life today if that


LETTERS to the


GOP's lousy resume
You have applied for a posi-
tion here, and your r6sum6 is
so unique that I wanted to
meet with you to review it
You have many years in service.
In the past five years, you
have accomplished nothing. In
the past five years, you have
successfully brought the busi-
ness to a standstill, blocking any
change. In fact at one point you
said that is your job: to block
anything new or innovative.
You refuse to be forward-
thinking. You have one "solu-
tion," and you try to apply it to
everything. (When your only
tool is a hammer, everything
else is a nail).
You are responsible for a
shutdown which cost us bil-
lions. You furloughed staff,
first saying that they would not
get their salary, and then giv-
ing them the salary for the
time that they did not work.
You look upon the people
who work for you as leeches,
sponging on the good will of
the company, always looking
for an easy way to get money
You think that you are better
than your workers, because
you have more money and pay
more taxes.
You do not have control of
the people who are supposed
to work with you. You fail to
negotiate in good faith. You
leave a meeting where you are
supposed to be negotiating,
and you immediately bad-
mouth the people who were
just in the room with you.
You think it is your way or
the highway, and that is what


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

you accuse the other side of
doing. You think you are the
only one with morality
Your staff consists of cliques
who refuse to change their be-
haviors and grandstanding for
the good of the organization.
You treat your female staff as if
we were back in the 1950s.
You have created a hostile
workplace. Instead of support-
ing your co-workers, you are
the first to jump on them with
both feet when they make what
you perceive as a mistake.


party of his had been Nazi, not
communist. Meanwhile, seven
out of 27 commissioners who
rule the European Union today
previously served in commu-
nist parties. As the rights and
laws of nation-states in Europe
come under EU central control,
we have to ask ourselves: Who
was it that won the Cold War
again?
Of course, the relentless pull
of the communist orbit isn't just
in China or Europe. Never hav-
ing been discredited a la
Nazism on the contrary, hav-
ing been advanced by armies of
agents and sympathizers deep
into our institutions commu-
nist collectivist ideas and poli-
cies march on here, too.
As Obamacare kicks in, con-
sider that nationalizing medi-
cine was one of the early
programs the Bolsheviks en-
acted on seizing power after the
Russian Revolution. Reaction
to this historical fact, of course,
is as "muted" as Mao's birthday
party We have a president
whose early mentor, Frank Mar-
shall Davis, was a notorious
communist and apologist for
Stalin and Mao, but ho hum.
Imagine, though, if Davis had
been an apologist for Hitler in-
stead. Such a piece of presiden-
tial biography wouldn't be so
easy to ignore. As Davis biogra-
pher Paul Kengor discovered,
Davis even had close associa-
tions via communist front
groups with relatives and men-
tors of Obama confidantes Va-
lerie Jarrett and David Axelrod.
Again, if these political ances-
tors of the president's brain
trust went back to the German
Bund, that would be an issue to
this day
But not communism. We only
shrug a little over the "scaled
back" Mao party in China. Does
it matter? In the Roosevelt years,
we had Lauchlin Currie in the
White House doing what he
could to shape events that would
ultimately bring Mao and the
Communist Party to power in
China. In the Obama years, we
had another top White House
aide, former communications di-
rector Anita Dunn, telling
schoolchildren that Mao was one
of her favorite philosophers.
It isn't full circle. But "am-
bivalence" and "muted" reac-
tions to these markers are still
dangerous.


Diana West blogs at
dianawestnet, and she can be
contacted via dianawest@
verizon.net. Follow her on
Twitter at #diana_ west.


Editor

You have stonewalled, sabo-
taged, and blocked the details
for the implementation of our
new program, and then you
point to it and say, "See? I told
you it wouldn't work!"
You have no creative alter-
native solutions.
Your hatred for the current
CEO is something that you
flaunt
And you want to be CEO?
(Do you recognize this person?)
Vicky lozzia
Crystal River

We've got a secret
Citrus County does not need
to pay anyone to increase
tourism. All you need to tell
tourists is: Our small cities
hold many secrets. Tourists
just love to locate a secret!
Tourists already know about
Crystal River, the manatees
and where the Gulf is located.
As we drove through the Na-
ture Coast, we only saw the
main drags.
We decided to explore and
found so many great secrets in
your small cities. Great restau-
rants along the hidden lakes
and springs, the mom and pop
businesses that are located on
secondary roads, along the bike
and horse trails and all your
nice folks. We just had to stay!
Tourists need to explore Cit-
rus County before they can
love it here and want to return
or stay
Let's just keep all this our
little secret!
C.L. Adams


Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


Thank BOCC for
Chassahowitzka
River facilities
In years past, Chairman
"JJ" Kenney and the Cit-
rus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC) realized a finan-
cial loss to the taxpayer at
the Chassahowitzka River
Campground that could
not be justified and some-
thing had to change. The
board could have termi-
nated its lease with the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District and
closed the parking lot and
campground. About two
years ago, after an assess-
ment by the Economic
Development Council,
they took the advice given
and issued a Request for
Proposal. Respondent
Moore and Moore Realty
Inc. was chosen as the
new management for the
facility
The changes since that
choice was made are
widely evident, such as
new tile, paint and fix-
tures in the heavily used
store restrooms. Security
cameras, more lights and
increased patrols have
made the area safer
Fresh paint and repairs
on the store, docks and
boathouse give the place
a new feel. Aging picnic
tables and signs have
been replaced. A remodel
of the manager's resi-
dence made the house liv-
able and enabled 24-hour
security A recycling pro-
gram has been initiated. A
small beach now exists
for easy launching of pad-
dle craft, leaving the main
ramp continuously avail-
able for launching of
motor boats.
Most importantly, the
campground has become
a place where families
can go to enjoy the out-
doors. On a recent holi-
day weekend scores of
young people were lined
up on the docks success-
fully catching fishing.
Here you can take your
family to picnic by the


water, fish off the docks
and watch the manatees
for a $5 parking fee. Here
you can entertain a fam-
ily outdoors several hours
for a boat rental fee
of $15.
Parking fees have been
charged for several years
since the parking lot was
enlarged and paved. The
current fees $5 per ve-
hicle or $7 for vehicle and
trailer were in place
before current manage-
ment began. Fees col-
lected are used to offset
cost of maintenance and
improvements and to pay
the electric repairs,
plumbing repairs, and the
sizable water, sewer, and
garbage removal costs
once paid by the county
taxpayers.
If you bicycle or walk
in, it is free. There is no
fee for using the boat
launch. This provides a
definite advantage to the
many residents living
near the boat ramp.
Years ago certain
users were allowed to
ignore the parking fee;
all are now charged
equally Free parking for
a privileged few was
never endorsed by the
BOCC because it cheats
the majority of the
county taxpayers.
A program is offered
that provides free use of
the parking lot to those
who wish to volunteer
help with maintenance
the area. It is encouraging
to see that some who may
be on a limited budget
recognize the value of the
recreational opportunity
being offered instead of
expecting special
privileges.
The area is pet-friendly
and new pet stations are
in place. Users are re-
quired to clean up after
their pets and keep them
leashed.
Current management
has sponsored special
events on the Fourth of
July, Thanksgiving and
Halloween providing live
music, hayrides and re-


freshments at no cost to
attendees. Twice funds
gleaned through a Hal-
loween raffle were do-
nated to the Humane
Society
Park use and overnight
camping has increased
significantly as a result of
the many positive
changes, and the increase
is expected to continue.
The commissioners have
suffered through numer-
ous complaints from
those few who took ad-
vantage of previous man-
agement, but they did the
right thing for the taxpay-
ers anyway Next time
you see "JJ" Kenney or
any of the commissioners,
thank them for a job well
done.
Michael, Elaine Moore
nannicf CFl:inhathl RiniiaL


uelIII, ..IIzac


Eyeso]
Floral
Floral Cityi
posed to be th
little old histo
with the tunn
trees that so r
to photograph
home to many
houses, inclu(
oldest in the
Duval House,
all, the Herita
of Floral City
preserve all o
ical values.
Now what co
We are told tha
congestion at t
tion of U.S. 41
Avenue will be
making turn la
well and good,
struction starts
months, until t
birds are here
more traffic.
Finally worn
but goes on ar
more weeks w
struction shift
South to the c
where it goes
of new and old
ment, not a co
paving job fro


~IjA~


-' '


"TLTAF( eIeWes


,.,i, ",au,, finish. As this patchwork
Homosassa goes on, the intersection
just sits half done.
re in Now recently some
City heavy erection is done by
is sup- putting up giant, ugly out-
is quipt of-proportion, out-of-
ie quiet, character, overkill traffic
)ric town
el of oak signals to replace the
any stop hardly noticed posts and
nany. It isop signals that were put up

historic not many years ago.
ding the Here the intersection
county, the sits, half finished, while
and above the traffic at times is
age Council backed up both ways on
is trying to U.S. 41, and may take the
)f its histor- light to change two or
three times before you
can make your turn.
homes along? It will be finished
at the traffic someday, but I can not
he intersec- imagine why such a
and Orange project has taken all this
Helped by time, and especially to
mes. All make it so ugly for such
but no con- a historic location. It is
s for not a toll road, express-
the snow- way or superhighway, so
bringing why make it look that
way with those giant,
k is started, ugly traffic signals?
id off for Get off repaving U.S. 41
vhile con- South and finish the
ts to U.S. 41 much-needed turn lanes
county line, at the intersection first, as
to sections we were told.
d pave-
ntinuous Bob Metz
m start to Floral City


iM T"1APiOTiVLl./A1/ARWAGe.../ASK AMNOF NY
FOUr R Wiles."


'Happy holidays'
clarified
I don't know whether
John McFadden has to-
tally misinterpreted or
deliberately distorted my
letter on holiday greetings
("Happy holidays,"
Dec. 17). My point was
that festivities around the
winter solstice preceded
the birth of Christ by hun-
dreds of years, so Chris-
tians have no exclusive
right to the celebration.


Waterbodv Plant
Inverness Pool Nuphar / Floating / Limnophilia /
Torpedograss / Hydrilla / Pondweed /
Pickerelweed / Tussocks
Hernando Pool Nuphar / Torpedograss /
Hydrilla / Duckweed


I was responding to a
letter-writer who took of-
fense at any greeting
other than "Merry Christ-
mas," and was quite will-
ing to berate the offender
for not doing it her way I
don't "dread" a "Merry
Christmas" greeting or
consider any greeting that
wishes me well as
inappropriate.
I welcome them all.
Louis Pulgrano
Citrus Hills


Herbicide Used
Glyphosate / Diquat /
2,4D /Aquathol/
Super K
Glyphosate /Aquathol/
Diquat/Super K/
Clipper/ Quest


Floral City Pool Floating / Torpedograss / Floating Glyphosate / Diquat /
Heart / Paspalum / Duckweed Clipper/ Quest /2, 4D

MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks / Cabomba
Inverness Pool Tussocks
Crystal River Lyngbya


Harvesting
Harvesting
Harvesting


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality Treated areas will be identified
wi h "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http //www bocc citrus fl us/
pubworks/aauatics/aguatic services htm Citrus County Division ofAquatic Services


" ALWAYS
Free Delivery N:NORMANDY FIRM
w/purchase of mattress set TwinSet 459 QS
*| -*****a^i"^ ^WQueen Set 599

ALWAYS FuI Set $559 King Set $859
Free Heavy Duty ,I s-
SBed Frame
w/purchase of mattress set ABBOTT

" ALWAYS Twin Set Z49 Queen Set 349
Great Customer Service Fu IISet 299 KingSet 529



WHOLE!
!YourHon
1298 E. Nor
A Unit A (Hwy.


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning January 13, 2014
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


-I -E.S.,


rFAMf)M ]E' lr


-AFT'jfHff ,TF7,TML


OPINION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 A13


i ^l ,NI












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


World BRIEFS

Recovered


Associated Press
Art Howe guides blocks
of ice Thursday from the
back of his truck to be
stored in the ice house at
the Rockywold-Deehaven
Camp in Holderness, N.H.
For mare than a century,
ice has been taken from
Squam Lake and stored in
the ice house and used
for summer residents at
the camp.


Doctors: Cutting
food stamps
could backfire
WASHINGTON Doc-
tors are warning that if Con-
gress cuts food stamps, the
federal government could
be socked with bigger
health bills.
Maybe not immediately,
doctors said, but if the poor
wind up in doctors' offices
or hospitals as a result.
Congress is working to
craft a compromise farm bill
that's certain to include food
stamp cuts. Republicans
are seeking heftier cuts
than are Democrats.
The health impact of
hunger hasn't played a
major role in the debate, but
doctors say cutting food aid
could lead to higher Medi-
caid and Medicare costs.
A new study helps illus-
trate that link.
Food banks report longer
lines at the end of the
month as families exhaust
their grocery budgets. Also,
California researchers
found that more poor peo-
ple with a dangerous dia-
betes complication are
hospitalized then, too.
Man accused of
rape pleads to
lesser charge
MARYVILLE, Mo. -Two
years and a day after a
northwest Missouri high
school freshman said she
was raped by an older
schoolmate at a party, the
girl and her mother said
they are satisfied that her
assailant has been held ac-
countable for his actions.
While the misdemeanor
child endangerment charge
to which Matthew Barnett,
19, pleaded guilty Thursday
fell well short of the felony
sexual assault count they
thought he deserved, Daisy
Coleman and her mother,
Melinda Coleman, said
they're now hoping for clo-
sure after two extremely
painful years.
"I am ready to move for-
ward," Daisy Coleman, now
16, said in a statement pro-
vided by special prosecutor
Jean Peters Baker. "To all
those who supported me, I
promise that what hap-
pened on January 8, 2012,
will not define me forever."
Barnett's plea agree-
ment, accepted Thursday
by Nodaway County Asso-
ciate Circuit Judge Glen Di-
etrich, means he won't have
to spend time in jail nor face
trial for sexual assault. It
also means Daisy who
has spoken extensively with
the media about her experi-
ence, especially since The
Kansas City Star detailed
her claims in a lengthy story
in October following a
seven-month investigation
- won't have to testify in
court and be grilled by de-
fense attorneys.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
A car uses an on ramp to the George Washington Bridge toll plaza Thursday in Fort Lee, N.J. The on ramp
was closed for three days in September 2013, snarling traffic at one of the world's busiest bridges, which
links New Jersey and New York City.


NJ Gov. Christie fires aide,


apologizes for traffic jams


Associated Press


TRENTON, N.J. Gov Chris
Christie fired one of his top aides
Thursday and apologized over
and over for his staff's "stupid"
behavior, insisting during a nearly
two-hour news conference that he
had no idea anyone around him
had engineered traffic jams as
part of a political vendetta against
a Democratic mayor
"I am embarrassed and humili-
ated by the conduct of some of the
people on my team," he said as he
addressed the widening scandal
that could cast a shadow over his
expected run for the White House
in 2016.
The famously blunt Republican
fielded dozens of questions from
reporters with uncharacteristic
patience and at times a sorrowful
tone.
Christie, who had previously as-
sured the public that his staff had
nothing to do with the lane clos-
ings in September that caused
major backups at the George
Washington Bridge, said he fired
Deputy Chief of Staff BridgetAnne
Kelly "because she lied to me"
when he demanded weeks ago
that anyone who knew anything


Associated Press
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said
he had no idea anyone around him
had engineered traffic jams as part
of a political vendetta.
about the episode come forward.
The gridlock in Fort Lee de-
layed emergency vehicles, school
buses and countless commuters
for four days.
Kelly was the latest casualty in
the scandal. Two other top
Christie appointees have re-
signed in the past few weeks.
The investigation broke wide
open on Wednesday, with the re-
lease of emails and text messages
that suggested Kelly arranged the
traffic jams to punish Fort Lee's
mayor for not endorsing Christie
for re-election.


In other developments:
The chief federal prosecutor
in New Jersey, U.S. Attorney Paul
Fishman, said he is "reviewing
the matter to determine whether
a federal law was implicated."
The Legislature is also investigat-
ing. Using public resources for
political ends can be a crime.
David Wildstein, a Christie
appointee who resigned from the
Port Authority of New York and
New Jersey after being impli-
cated in the scandal, was found in
contempt Thursday by a legisla-
tive committee after he invoked
his Fifth Amendment right
against self-incrimination and re-
fused to answer questions. The
Port Authority operates the
bridge.
Christie traveled to Fort Lee
later in the day and apologized in
person to Mayor Mark Sokolich.
The political-payback allega-
tions turned a local traffic furor
into a national issue and raised
questions about Christie's leader-
ship and integrity as he lays the
groundwork for a White House
bid. Democrats at the national
level have seized on the scandal
as more evidence that Christie is
a bully


Iraq holds off al-Qaida offensive


Suicide bomber

kills 21 people

Associated Press

BAGHDAD Iraq's gov-
ernment is holding off on
waging an all-out offensive
to retake two key cities
from al-Qaida because of
fears that civilian casual-
ties could incite Sunni
anger and push moderate
tribal leaders to side with
the extremists, analysts
and military officials said
Thursday
More violence flared in
Baghdad, where a suicide
bomber killed 21 people at
an army recruiting center
in a clear effort to demor-
alize the military


Al-Qaida-linked fight-
ers overran parts of the
cities of Fallujah and Ra-
madi in Sunni-dominated
Anbar province last week,
seizing control of police
stations and military
posts, freeing prisoners
and setting up their own
checkpoints.
The United States,
whose troops fought
bloody battles in the cities,
has ruled out sending its
troops back in, but has
been delivering missiles to
bolster Iraqi forces. It is
expediting shipments of
more American-made mis-
siles and 10 surveillance
drones, but those may not
arrive for weeks.
The U.S. invaded Iraq in
2003 and withdrew in 2011.
Both countries tried but
failed to negotiate plans to


Associated Press
A gunman aims his weapon Thursday during clashes with
Iraqi security forces in Fallujah, 40 miles west of Baghdad.


keep at least several thou-
sand U.S. forces in Iraq be-
yond the deadline to
maintain security.
Vice President Joe
Biden has spoken to Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki


twice this week, voicing
support for his govern-
ment's efforts to regain
control of the cities and
urging him to continue
talks with local, tribal and
national leaders.


Six men dead in unexplained killings


Bombings heighten Winter Olympics security concerns


Associated Press

MOSCOW Six men are
dead in a series of unex-
plained killings involving
booby-trapped bombs in
southern Russia, further
heightening security fears
ahead of next month's Win-
ter Olympics in Sochi.
Investigators were
scrambling Thursday to
find those responsible for
the six bodies found
Wednesday in four aban-
doned cars just north of
Russia's volatile Caucasus
Mountains region, where
an Islamic insurgency is
simmering.


Explosive devices had
been placed near three of
the cars, although only one
of the bombs went off and
no one was hurt. The vic-
tims had been shot, ac-
cording to investigators.
Vladimir Markin, the
spokesman for Russia's
main investigative agency,
said in a statement that no
motive had yet been found
for the killings on the out-
skirts of Pyatigorsk, the
center of a Russian admin-
istrative district created in
2010 to combat the insur-
gency In late December, a
car bomb exploded out-
side traffic police offices


there, killing three people.
Pyatigorsk is less than
200 miles by air from
Sochi, host site for the 2014
Olympics, although nearly
twice as far by road.
In an indication of Rus-
sia's unease over security
ahead of the Olympics,
Markin said Federal Secu-
rity Service officers had
joined the investigation
and classified it as a
counter-terrorist operation.
The shootings of local
residents at least a few
of them taxi drivers are
more typical of criminal
behavior, perhaps score-
settling by organized


gangs. But the use of ex-
plosives was suggestive of
the kinds of terror attacks
that take place nearly
daily in the Caucasus.
Russia is still on edge fol-
lowing two suicide bomb-
ings in late December in
Volgograd, also in southern
Russia, which killed 34
people and wounded many
more. No claim of respon-
sibility has been made for
those bombings, but they
came several months after
the leader of the Islamic in-
surgency called for attacks
aimed at undermining the
games, which run Feb. 7
to 23.


Associated Press
Royal B.C. Museum chief
executive officer Jack
Lohman points to
damage Thursday on
American bank robber Bill
Miner's gold pocket
watch during a news
conference at the Royal
B.C. Museum in Victoria,
British Columbia. Eight
gold pocket watches
dating back to the early
1900s, stolen last week,
were recovered late last
Wednesday by Port
Alberni Royal Canadian
Mounted Police. Two
suspects were arrested.


London police to
issue vest-mounted
cameras
LONDON London's
police department said it will
roll out vest-mounted video
cameras to some of the cap-
ital's 2,300 firearms officers,
hoping to help build public
confidence in the force by
allowing jurors and judges to
literally see things from an
officer's perspective.
Thursday's announce-
ment came a day after a
jury largely vindicated Lon-
don police over a fatal
shooting of a gang member
that triggered rioting across
England more than two
years ago.
Police said armed offi-
cers will begin wearing
recording devices on April
1. The number of officers
set to wear the cameras
has yet to be decided.
Police forces across the
world have been experi-
menting with portable cam-
eras as tools for
crime-fighting and police
accountability.
5.1 earthquake
sways buildings
in Havana
HAVANA- A 5.1-magni-
tude earthquake struck in
the Straits of Florida off
Cuba on Thursday, startling
office workers in medium-
rise buildings set swaying in
Havana. There was no
word of any damage or in-
juries.
The temblor occurred just
before 4 p.m. about
106 miles east of Havana,
according to the U.S. Geo-
logical Survey. The closest
city to the epicenter was
Corralillo, 17 miles to the
southwest.
The U.S. National
Weather Service said there
was no tsunami danger.
Cuba is not as known for
seismic activity as other
parts of Latin America, es-
pecially countries along the
Pacific Rim of Fire.
Blast at Japan
chemical plant
kills 5, injures 12
TOKYO -An explosion
at a chemical factory in cen-
tral Japan on Thursday
killed at least five workers
and injured 12 others, au-
thorities said.
Investigators suspect a
chemical reaction involving
hydrogen caused the blast at
metal and chemical company
Mitsubishi Materials Corp.'s
Yokkaichi plant, about 220
miles west of Tokyo.
The blast appeared to have
occurred when plant workers
were rinsing heat exchange
equipment at the silicone plant
during maintenance, accord-
ing to a Mie prefectural police
official, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity due to de-
partment rules.
Police said five workers
died. The dead and injured
were all believed to be
workers at the factory.
-From wire reports











PORTS


Lecanto
sophomore
Stephanie
Bandstra is
leading the
county in goals
scored./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
4 College basketball/B4
0 NBA, NHL/B4
SNFL/B5
O U High school sports/B5, B6
"" U Adult sports/B6


Heavier workload suits SRCS' Gage


Competitive

junior does it

allfor Warriors
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Gary Dreyer, the girls basket-
ball coach at Seven Rivers
Christian, knew what he was
getting with Alyssa Gage. His
summary: "I wish I had five or
10 more like her"
A junior, the 5-foot-9 Gage has
embraced her role this season
-which is, in basic terms, to do
everything. And that means a
lot of everything.
Gage is presently leading Cit-
rus County in scoring, averaging
15.9 points a game. She is also
among county leaders in re-


bounding (6.9) and steals (2.4),
all of which amounts to a major
reason why the Warriors are 8-7
overall, 1-1 in 2A-3.
But as well as Gage and post
standout Alexis Zachar have
performed this season, it hasn't
led to Seven Rivers dominating
opponents. Gage and Zachar
combine to average nearly 31
points a game; the rest of the
team averages nine. After Gage
and Zachar (14.8 points a game),
the team's next highest scorer is
Tessa Kacer (3.3).
"It's been challenging," Gage
said. "Realizing that we'd lost
eight seniors from last year's
team, I knew I'd have to step up
and try to lead the team. It's
been rough at times.
"You want to do as much as
you can for your team, but I get
frustrated when I feel I've let
my team down. But it is reward-
ing at the same time, because as


a leader I feel I've played a spe-
cial part on our team."
Asked what in particular
Gage brings to the Warriors,
Dreyer replied, "Strong offense,
strong defense and strong lead-
ership skills. She's an all-
around athlete.
"If she realizes certain things
are needed from her, she steps
up and does them."
Gage knew she had to fill a
huge void after the departure of
so much leadership from last
season's squad, and it's a role
she's readily accepted, but that
too has led to its share of frus-
trations something she's
See Page B3
Seven Rivers Christian junior
guard Alyssa Gage currently
leads all Citrus County scorers
with 15.9 points per contest.
MATT PFIFFNER/JChronicle


Comin alon gper
grappler



Wa heavy


w hitter


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River senior point guard Ty Reynolds is trying to regain his trademark explosiveness while battling through a nagging ankle
injury suffered at the end of the football season.

CR senior Reynolds trying to shake off injuries as postseason play looms


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
y Reynolds is used to being the guy
From his freshman through his jun-
ior season as a starter for the Crystal
River varsity basketball team, the point
guard averaged 16.2 points and 5.6 re-
bounds a night over 71 games. In his junior
year, he was a finalist for the Chronicle's
Male Basketball Player of the Year award
after posting 21.5 points and 7.2 boards per
game and surpassing 1,000 career points
- in helping lead his Pirates to their best
season in over a decade.
In this, his senior season, he's experi-
enced something new: a nagging injury
While playing safety in his team's final
football game of the season against Citrus,
Reynolds rolled his ankle late in the game.
It left his status uncertain in the early
weeks of the basketball season, as it seri-
ously hampered his ability to jump, and
was even re-aggravated during an early-
season contest.
Making things worse for Crystal River (4-
10 overall), the Pirates had little varsity ex-
perience returning outside of Reynolds,
and much of its new talent was getting a
late jump due to coming off football.
With therapy, the ankle is improving. But
Reynolds, who admits he's been more cau-
tious even tentative on the court, is


County boys
basketball leaders
Points
Adam Gage, SR 27.3; Devin Pryor, Cit
21.1; Cory Weiand, SR 20.9; Darius Sawyer,
Lee 17.3; Brandon Burich, Lee 17.1;
Desmond Franklin, Cit 15.2; Ty Reynolds,
CR 12.2; Hunter Roessler, CR 10.9; Ben
Janicki, Cit 10.1; Kaine McColley, Lee 8.5.
Rebounds
Gage 12.2; Sawyer 6.5; Burich 6.1; Crowe
5.1; K. McColley 4.8.

still getting accustomed to basketball, and
his young Pirates are still searching for of-
fense as they try to turn the corner in Jan-
uary, weeks ahead of a District 5A-6
tournament it will host in early February
On top of these challenges, the team
dealt with another couple of bad breaks
this week. Pirates head coach Steve Feld-
man is out this week while stranded in
Chicago, where extreme weather has
grounded flights, and Reynolds missed
Monday's practice to an illness.
Crystal River plays a key district tilt at
Lecanto tonight, which could decide which
team is stuck with the fourth and final seed
in the opening round of the district tourney


"We're trying to progress offensively and
defensively," Reynolds said. "But we're a
young team and a lot of guys play football.
That's what we need, to progress as a team,
and I'm sure we will. We need to go into dis-
tricts at our full peak and try to knock some
teams out."
Reynolds has dealt with a serious injury
before, though not one that lingered as in-
definitely and frustratingly In his fresh-
man year, he broke his finger and needed
surgery and screws, which are still in the
finger
After Tuesday's 47-43 loss to St. John
Lutheran, in which Reynolds led his team
with 11 points but missed from 3-point
range on some late opportunities, the sen-
ior was more disappointed in his shooting
than any injury or illness.
"Before tonight, my shot was coming
along," said Reynolds, whose rebounding,
defense and drives to the basket took the
biggest hit from the injury "I couldn't jump
in practice, so all I could do is shoot
Reynolds isn't just facing the demands of
a busy basketball schedule. He's also work-
ing on securing a football scholarship, and
remains committed in the classroom,
where he earned three As and a B last se-
mester On Jan. 20, he's slated to partici-
pate in an East-West high school football
See P Page B3


Wiesenauer keeps

churning out

pins for 'Canes
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
Borrowing from baseball, hit-
ting homers is an art form.
Citrus High School senior
Bradley "Brad" Wiesenauer is
earning a reputation as a home
run hitter
The difference is the
5-foot-11, 191-pounder produces
his "homers" on the mat.
Entering this weekend's fifth
Nature Coast Technical Duals
Tournament, Wiesenauer sits
atop of the Citrus County
wrestling circuit in pins (24).
Wiesenauer was born in Bay
City, Michigan, just outside of
Flint. His father, Paul, still re-
sides in the "Great Lakes
State."
Brad lives with his mother
Connie in Inverness. Since re-
locating from Michigan, the
Wiesenauers
have
h a v e _. *- -
called
Citrus
County
h o m yeqtW0
for nine
years.
Once he matriculated to CHS,
he recalls taking "the advice of
my cousins Cody and Josh to
join the wrestling team."
Like most endeavors, he
struggled early
"I remember that I got thrown
all over the room," recalled
Wiesenauer of his frosh mat sea-
son at the junior varsity level.
Despite the degree of diffi-
culty, he remained loyal to the
mats.
"What I like most about
wrestling is the pressure is all
on you," he said. "You don't
have to depend on anyone else
when you're on the mat."
Asked to describe his style, "I
just do what I do. I just try to
move the train," he said. "If
there's a move I'm really good
at, it's a power-half."
His progress took a detour as
a sophomore when he was
ruled academically ineligible.
Since Hurricane alumnus
Jeff Wood took over the pro-
gram last winter, one of his proj-
ects is steering Wiesenauer in
the right direction.
Last winter in his initial var-
sity season at 220 pounds,
Wiesenauer opened the post-
season on the wrong foot in the
Class 2A, District 7 Tournament
at Springstead.
Central senior Taylor
Cromwell pinned him in 2:19.
Faced with elimination,
Wiesenauer stuck NCT's Frank
Ritchie in 1:44.
In the consolation finals for

See Page B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NFL Playoffs
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10
San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 11
New Orleans at Seattle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX)
Indianpolis at New England, 8:15 p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 12
San Francisco at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 17 17 .500 -
Brooklyn 14 21 .400 31
NewYork 13 22 .371 4
Boston 13 23 .361 5
Philadelphia 12 23 .343 5/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 9 .750 -
Atlanta 19 17 .528 8
Washington 16 17 .485 9/2
Charlotte 15 21 .417 12
Orlando 10 25 .286 16/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 28 7 .800 -
Chicago 15 18 .455 12
Detroit 14 22 .389 14
Cleveland 12 23 .343 16
Milwaukee 7 27 .206 20/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 8 .778 -
Houston 23 13 .639 5
Dallas 20 16 .556 8
New Orleans 15 19 .441 12
Memphis 15 19 .441 12
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 8 .771 -
Portland 27 9 .750
Denver 17 17 .500 9/2
Minnesota 17 18 .486 10
Utah 12 25 .324 16
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 25 13 .658 -
Golden State 24 14 .632 1
Phoenix 21 13 .618 2
L.A. Lakers 14 22 .389 10
Sacramento 11 22 .333 111
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio 112, Dallas 90
Toronto 112, Detroit 91
Brooklyn 102, Golden State 98
Atlanta 97, Indiana 87
Houston 113, L.A. Lakers 99
Washington 102, New Orleans 96
Phoenix 104, Minnesota 103
Portland 110, Orlando 94
L.A. Clippers 111, Boston 105
Thursday's Games
NewYork 102, Miami 92
Oklahoma City at Denver, late
Today's Games
Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Houston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Boston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Houston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Denver, 9 p.m.
Boston at Portland, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 43 2813 2 58126 94
Tampa Bay 44 2614 4 56126 106
Montreal 45 2515 5 55115 106
Detroit 43 1914 10 48114 121
Toronto 45 21 19 5 47123 138
Ottawa 45 1918 8 46129 145
Florida 44 1721 6 40104 137
Buffalo 43 1226 5 29 75 120
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 45 3212 1 65147 107
Philadelphia 44 2317 4 50117 119
Washington 43 21 16 6 48132 131
Carolina 44 1916 9 47111 125
N.Y Rangers 45 2220 3 47111 121
New Jersey 45 1818 9 45104 113
Columbus 43 1920 4 42117 126
N.Y Islanders 45 1622 7 39124 149
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 46 29 8 9 67169 127
St. Louis 42 30 7 5 65155 97
Colorado 43 2712 4 58127 111
Minnesota 45 2317 5 51108 114
Dallas 43 2016 7 47123 132
Nashville 45 1920 6 44108 135
Winnipeg 46 1922 5 43125 139
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 46 33 8 5 71155 116
San Jose 44 2711 6 60144 114


LosAngeles 44 2613 5 57114 91
Vancouver 45 2313 9 55121 113
Phoenix 42 21 12 9 51129 127
Calgary 43 1522 6 36100 137
Edmonton 46 1427 5 33119 161
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia 3, Montreal 1
N.Y Rangers 3, Chicago 2
Colorado 4, Ottawa 3, OT
Thursday's Games
Florida 2, Buffalo 1, SO
New Jersey 1, Dallas 0
Carolina 6, Toronto 1
Washington 4, Tampa Bay 3
Anaheim 4, Nashville 3
St. Louis at Calgary, late
Minnesota at Phoenix, late
Boston at Los Angeles, late
Detroit at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Dallas at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Columbus, 7 p.m.


SCOREBOARD


For the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^,, ^_ 7-3-7
a CASH 3 (late)
6-5-5

1-7-2-8
f\ jSSSas PLAY 4 (eary)
PLAY 4 (late)
8m -9-7-1

FANTASY 5
1-7-26-29-33

Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 10 -28 -39 -47 -58
Powerball: 22
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 2 winners $1,000,000
1 Florida winner
Fantasy 5:5 8 10 -19 -34
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 349 $555.00
3-of-5 11,667 $16.00


Lotto: 3
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


24-30-35-43-51
No winner
23 $4,983.00
1,068 $89.50
23,173 $5.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (FS1) Daytona Preseason Thunder: Friday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 a.m. (ESPNU) Memphis at Louisville (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Radford at High Point
9 p.m. (ESPNU) Wright State at Valparaiso
NBA
8 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Miami Heat at Brooklyn Nets
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Sacramento Kings
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Lakers at Los Angeles
Clippers
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Lakers at Los Angeles
Clippers (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Friday Night Fights
GOLF
11 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo Golf
Champions, Second Round (Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Sony Open in Hawaii, Second
Round
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (NHL) Boston Bruins at Los Angeles Kings (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Alabama-Huntsville at Notre Dame
TENNIS
11 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Heineken Open semifinal (Same-
day Tape)
1 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Heineken Open semifinal (Same-day
Tape)
3 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP APIA International semifinal (Same-
day Tape)
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP APIA International semifinal (Same-
day Tape)
11 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Hobart semifinal (Same-day Tape)
1 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Hobart semifinal (Same-day Tape)
SKIING
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Visa Freestyle International: Freestyle
Skiing & Moguls (Taped)
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix: Slopestyle
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Crystal River at Lecanto
7 p.m. Dunnellon at Citrus
7:30 p.m. Seven Rivers at Academy at the Lakes
GIRLS BASKETBALL
6 p.m. Seven Rivers at Academy at the Lakes
7 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River
7 p.m. Citrus at Dunnellon
BOYS SOCCER
7 p.m. Crystal River at Hudson
7:30 p.m. Citrus at Nature Coast
8 p.m. Lecanto at Central
GIRLS SOCCER
6 p.m. South Sumter at Crystal River
7 p.m. Lecanto at Nature Coast
WRESTLING
11:30 a.m. Crystal River, Citrus in Combs Duals at Nature Coast


N.Y Islanders at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Boston at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Named Luis Pu-
jols manager of Frederick (Carolina); Ryan Minor
manager, Paco Figueroa field coach and Trek
Schuler athletic trainer of Delmarva (SAL); Justin
Lord pitching coach, Chris Poole athletic trainer
and Kevin Clark strength and conditioning coach
for Aberdeen (NYP); Jeff Manto minor league
hitting coordinator and Ryan Crotin minor league
strength and conditioning coordinator.
DETROIT TIGERS Signed RHPs Jhan
Marinez, Luis Marte, Eduardo Sanchez and
Drew VerHagen; LHPs Duane Below, Blaine
Hardy and Robbie Ray; Cs Craig Albernaz, Luis
Exposito, James McCann and John Murrian;
INFs Devon Travis and Danny Worth; and OFs
Ezequiel Carrera, Tyler Collins and Trevor
Crowe to minor league contracts.
HOUSTON ASTROS Named Jeff Albert
minor league hitting coordinator, Doug White
roving pitching instructor and Morgan Ensberg
minor league special assignment coach.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to terms
with RHP Jason Adam, LHP Scott Alexander,
RHP Aaron Brooks, RHP Kyle Zimmer, C Juan
Graterol, OF Jorge Bonifacio, C Adam Moore,


OF Gorkys Hernandez, RHP Sugar Ray Marn-
mon, OF Paulo Orlando, RHP Cory Wade, RHP
P.J. Walters, C Ramon Hernandez, INF Jason
Donald, INF Brandon Laird and OF Melky Mesa
on minor league contracts.
MINNESOTATWINS -Agreed to terms with
LHP Matt Hoffman, LHP Aaron Thompson,
RHP Deolis Guerra, RHP LesterOliveros, RHP
Yohan Pino, C Dan Rohlfing, INF Jason Bartlett,
INF James Beresford, INF Doug Bernier, INF
Deibinson Romero, INF Brandon Waring, OF
Jason Kubel, OF Darin Mastroianni, OF Jer-
maine Mitchell, OF Chris Rahl and OFWilkin
Ramirez on minor league contracts.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Agreed to terms with
INF Jayson Nix on a minor league contract. As-
signed OF Jerry Sands outrightto Durham (IL).
National League
MIAMI MARLINS-Signed RHP Kevin Slowey,
LHP Andrew Heaney, RHP Jesus Sanchez, LHP
Josh Spence, INF Juan Diaz, OF Matt Angle and
OF Joe Benson to minor league contracts.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Assigned G
Lorenzo Brown to Delaware (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed LB Adrian
Tracy to a reserve/future contact.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Promoted Hue
Jackson to offensive coordinator.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS- Named Hardy
Nickerson linebackers coach, Kevin O'Dea spe-
cial teams coordinator, Marcus Arroyo quarter-
backs coach, Joe Cullen defensive line coach,
Andrew Hayes-Stoker wide receivers coach,
Dave Kennedy strength and conditioning coach,
Larry Marmie senior defensive assistant coach,
M ikal Smith safeties coach, Tim Spencer running
backs coach, Ben Steele offensive quality control
and MattWiegand assistant offensive line coach.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS Named Jay
Gruden coach.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 B3


I S O R T B I E F -


Panthers now on
three-game win streak
The Lecanto girls basketball team won
its third straight contest Thursday night by
taking a 56-25 victory over Weeki Wachee.
DeeAnna Moehring led all scorers with
25 points while Panthers teammate Tay-
lor Mitchell put up 22 points.
Lecanto (4-12 overall) plays 7:30 p.m.
tonight at Crystal River.
Panthers boys make short
work of Weeki Wachee
Darius Sawyer had 12 points as the
Lecanto boys basketball team earned a
65-35 triumph over Weeki Wachee.
Panthers junior forward Brandon
Burich had 11 points and Travis McGee
added 9 points.
Lecanto coach Jeffrey Anderson was
especially proud of his team holding
Weeki Wachee to zero points in the first
quarter.
The Panthers (8-6 overall) host Crystal
River at 7 p.m. tonight.
Boys soccer victory
goes to Lecanto
Jacob Rice, Jon Cortalano and James
Carr each scored to propel the Lecanto
boys soccer team to a 3-2 victory over
Ocala Vanguard in District 4A-4 play.
The Panthers are now 3-4-2 overall
and 3-2-2 in district.
Bengals coordinator Jay
Gruden is Redskins' coach
WASHINGTON Jay Gruden said he
doesn't care about the Washington Red-
skins' tumultuous past, and he has built a
"genuine" trust with franchise player
Robert Griffin III.
Gruden was introduced Thursday as
coach of the Redskins. He signed a five-
year deal Wednesday night as the suc-
cessor to Mike Shanahan, who was fired
last week after a 3-13 season.
Gruden said he intends to call the
plays himself, and he has yet to decide
whether to keep any of the assistants
from Shanahan's staff.
Gruden praised Griffin's talent, but
added: "He's got to understand that I ex-
pect a lot from the starting quarterback."
Bucs announce hiring of
11 assistant coaches
TAMPA- The Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers have added 11 assistant coaches
to new coach Lovie Smith's staff.
The hirings include former Bucs star
Hardy Nickerson as linebackers coach and
Kevin O'Dea as special teams coordinator.





ALONG
Continued from Page BI

game at IMG Academy in Bradenton,
where players from around the south-
east are expected to attend.
Reynolds is taking his first official
college visit on Jan. 25, when he'll
travel to Jacksonville University (FCS)
for an expenses-paid weekend with
his parents.
'A couple of (Division II) schools call
and ask questions," he said. "But (JU) is



GAGE
Continued from Page BI

continually working on.
"I have to stay positive," she said.
"When you're out there, you're not
playing for yourself, you're playing for
your team."
That can add pressure when so
much is expected from her, especially
if she feels she comes up short.
"It's not exactly letting down my
team, but sometimes I feel I could
have done more," Gage said, "I feel I
could have done something differ-
ently"
According to Dreyer, there's not
much more he could expect her to do,
although he added Gage would do
anything asked of her
"If I asked her to score four more
points a game, she'd do anything she
could to get those points," he said.
"She's giving us everything we
need. I can't ask for anything more."




HITTER
Continued from Page B1

third, Cromwell solved him again -
this time in 37 seconds.
A week later in the Class 2A, Region
2 Meet, aka the "Region of Doom" at
St. Cloud, Wiesenauer was shown the
door after two bouts.
As a result, Wiesenauer finished


above .500 at 10-9 with seven pins.
In the offseason, Coach Wood got
Wiesenauer and CHS torpedo Casey
Bearden on Florida's Cadet National
Team. That summer experience has
paid dividends this winter
"Brad is continuing to progress,"
Wood noted. "He's also made the tran-
sition to 195. There isn't a lot of shoot-
ing going on at 220 or heavyweight.
"Brad is tough as hell on his feet;
he's also comfortable with throwing
guys," Wood declared. "When he's on
top, he's got a dangerous half-nelson
(pinning combination). I'd describe
Brad as a pinner If he turns you, it's


Smith was hired last week, replacing
Greg Schaino after a 4-12 finish this year..
The other staff additions Thursday were
Marcus Arroyo as quarterbacks coach,
Joe Cullen as defensive line coach, An-
drew Hayes-Stoker as wide receivers
coach, Dave Kennedy as head strength
and conditioning coach, Larry Marmie as
senior defensive assistant, Mikal Smith as
safeties coach, Tim Spencer as running
backs coach, Ben Steele as offensive
quality control and Matt Wiegand as as-
sistant offensive line coach.
Pro Football Hall of Fame
finalists revealed
CANTON, Ohio First-year nomi-
nees Derrick Brooks, Tony Dungy, Mar-
vin Harrison and Walter Jones were
among the 15 modern-era Pro Football
Hall of Fame finalists in voting an-
nounced Thursday night.
Brooks was a linebacker with Tampa
Bay; Dungy coached Tampa Bay and In-
dianapolis, leading the Colts to a Super
Bowl title in 2007; Harrison was a re-
ceiver for Indianapolis; and Jones was
an offensive tackle with Seattle.
Former New York Giants defensive
end Michael Strahan also was selected a
modern-era finalist along with defensive
end/linebacker Charles Haley, defensive
end/linebacker Kevin Greene, receiver
Andre Reed, running back Jerome Bet-
tis, receiver/returner Tim Brown, safety
John Lynch, guard Will Shields, corner-
back/safety Aeneas Williams, kicker
Morten Andersen and former San Fran-
cisco owner Edward DeBartolo Jr.
Punter Ray Guy and defensive end
Claude Humphrey were announced as
senior nominees in August.
Bae shoots 7-under
to lead Sony Open
HONOLULU Sang-Moon Bae got
off to a great start in pristine conditions
along the shores of Oahu. Chris Kirk had
an ideal finish.
They were together all Thursday
morning, playing in the same group at
the Sony Open and taking the top two
spots on the leaderboard. Bae played
bogey-free for a 7-under 63. Kirk shot 29
on the back nine at Waialae, including an
eagle on the last hole, for a 64.
They were among the early starters in
the first full-field event of the year on the
PGA Tour, and they took advantage of a
gorgeous day.
Brian Stuard and Ryan Palmer shot
65, and Retief Goosen and Harris Eng-
lish were at 66 along with Jimmy Walker,
John Daly, Hideto Tanihara, Jason
Kokrak and Daniel Summerhays.
From staff, wire reports



the school most interested right now"
When asked about his injury's po-
tential effect on his football play,
Reynolds said the extra boost of
adrenaline he naturally gets from
playing football, his first passion,
helps him cope.
"There's something about football,"
he said, "I just love the game. I want
to make it to the next level and get an
education. My first goal for college is
get a scholarship to play football and
get my education. If that doesn't work
out, I'd take a basketball scholarship
if I was able to get an offer"


Gage can play point guard, she can
play the wing, she can pound the
boards, and she is a strong defender
- which leads to her only problem:
foul trouble. The Warriors have no
one who can ably fill her position.
"She's an aggressive defender,"
Dreyer said. 'And it's hard to take ag-
gression away from a player"
So all things considered, what has
Gage done this season that has sur-
prised her coach?
"Nothing really," he said. "I haven't
been surprised. And I won't be sur-
prised if we get more points, I won't be
surprised if she does more."
That kind of description seems to
define leadership, but to Gage, that
part of her is still being developed.
"I want to be even more of a leader
and speak up when my team needs
me," she said. "I'm very competitive,
but I need to be more supportive, I
need to reach out to my team."
Her ability would allow her to lead
by example, but for Gage that won't be
enough.


over. Conversely, he doesn't win many
matches that go six minutes.
"He knows this better than any-
one," Wood continued. "It's his mind-
set If he gets scored on first, he feels
like he's done. In this sport, you can't
stress if you go to your back early in a
match mentally Brad has crumbled
when this has happened."
Following this past weekend's 3-2
slate at the 24th Springstead Invita-
tional, featuring 22nd, 23rd and
county-leading 24th pins of the sea-


son, Wiesenauer has responded with
a career-best 26-8 campaign.
"I don't set out looking for pins,"
Wiesenauer said, "It's just something I
do. I bring a certain work ethic to the
mats, plus a lot of heart."
In prepping for NCT, he'd like to ac-
knowledge his coaches "thanking
them for pushing me every day in
practice" and his teammates for
"making me what I am today"
Rather than being labeled as a
homerun hitter on the mats, Wiese-
nauer would rather be remembered
simply "as just a good person."





B4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


SPORTS


ap


a


S


m


ga


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning left wing Ondrej Palat deflects the puck past Washington Capitals goalie Philipp Grubauer for a goal during the third
period Thursday in Tampa. The Capitals won 4-3.


Fehr has two goals as Washington


Associated Press

TAMPA Eric Fehr had two
goals, including a tiebreaking
redirection with 51.5 seconds left
in the third period, as the Wash-
ington Capitals beat the Tampa
Bay Lightning 4-3 on Thursday
night.
Fehr was positioned in close
when he tipped Mike Green's
shot past Anders Lindback, help-
ing the Capitals improve to 2-3-3
over their last eight games.
Tampa Bay had pulled even at
3 on Ondrej Palat's nifty tip-in of
Matt Carle's shot at 14:30 of the
third. Martin St. Louis also as-
sisted on the goal to move past
Rick Tocchet into sole possession
of 89th place on the NHL's career
list with 953 points.
The teams switched ends mid-
way through each period due to
what was called "poor ice" in the
visitors' crease.
Washington also got goals from
Mikhail Grabovski and Marcus
Johansson. Tyler Johnson and
B.J. Crombeen had the other
goals for the Lightning.
The Capitals won the first
meeting this season 6-5 in a
shootout on Dec. 10, a game in
which Alex Ovechkin had four


goals and Nicklas Backstrom con-
tributed a goal and four assists.
Ovechkin and Backstrom both
had an assist Thursday
Washington took a 3-1 first-pe-
riod lead, keyed by power-play
goals from Grabovski and Jo-
hansson.
After Grabovski scored on a
redirection at 10:37, Johansson
made it 3-1 from in close with 12
seconds left in the first.
Crombeen stopped a personal
56-game goal drought from the
right circle to get Tampa Bay
within 3-2 at 6:45 of the second. A
potential tying goal by Palat later
in the period was disallowed
when it was ruled he kicked the
puck into the net.
Ducks 4, Predators 3
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Teemu Se-
lanne scored the go-ahead goal late
in the second period, and the Ana-
heim Ducks beat the Nashville Preda-
tors 4-3 for their fifth straight win and
15th in 16 games.
Selanne's fifth goal this season
came on the power play at 18:52 of
the second, capping a four-goal pe-
riod for the Ducks. Ryan Getzlaf also
scored two goals, and Corey Perry
added a goal. Matt Beleskey had two
assists.


beats Tampa Bay hockey team 4-3


Paul Gaustad, Craig Smith and
Rich Clune scored a goal each for
Nashville, and Matt Cullen had two
assists. But the Predators lost for only
the second time in regulation when
scoring first.
Devils 1, Stars 0
NEWARK, N.J. Cory Schneider
earned his third shutout of the season
and Michael Ryder scored his team-
leading 15th goal as the New Jersey
Devils snapped a three-game winless
streak with a 1-0 victory over the Dal-
las Stars.
Schneider finished with 26 saves in
his first victory since Dec. 28 against
the New York Islanders. Schneider's
previous shutout was also a 1-0 vic-
tory against Buffalo on Nov. 30.
Despite stellar goaltending by Kari
Lehtonen, who made 33 saves, Dal-
las dropped its fourth straight.
Ryder connected at 8:17 of the
second period on a pass from Travis
Zajac. Ryane Clowe sent the puck
behind the net and Zajac held on until
he could slip it to Ryder for his shot
from the edge of the right circle that
beat Lehtonen to his stick side.
Hurricanes 6,
Maple Leafs 1
RALEIGH, N.C. Jordan Staal


had a goal and three assists, and Jeff
Skinner extended his offensive surge
with a goal and an assist to lead the
Carolina Hurricanes to a 6-1 win over
the Toronto Maple Leafs.
John-Michael Liles, Patrick Dwyer,
Zach Boychuk and Elias Lindholm
also scored for the Hurricanes, who
won their fifth straight game. Liles
was playing against his former team
for the first time Carolina sent de-
fenseman Tim Gleason to Toronto for
Liles on Jan. 1.
Skinner's goal was his 17th in his
last 17 games, and he improved his
point streak to a career-high six
games, scoring seven goals and
adding five assists in that stretch.
Panthers 2,
Sabres 1, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y. Brad Boyes
scored in regulation and the shootout,
lifting the Florida Panthers over the
Buffalo Sabres 2-1.
Buffalo was playing its first game
under general manager Tim Murray
and special adviser Craig Patrick, in-
troduced earlier Thursday by team
President Pat LaFontaine.
Tim Thomas made 23 saves and
was perfect in the shootout for
Florida, which won on the road for the
first time since Dec. 19.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NBA BRIEF

Knicks 102,
Heat 92
NEW YORK Carmelo
Anthony scored 24 points, An-
drea Bargnani had 19, and
the New York Knicks beat the
Miami Heat 102-92 on Thurs-
day night for their season-
high third straight victory.
Raymond Felton had 13
points and 14 assists for the
Knicks, who seized control
with a 16-2 run spanning the
third and fourth quarters and
beat the Heat for the fourth
time in five meetings over the
last two seasons.
LeBron James scored 32
points for the Heat, who
played without injured starters
Mario Chalmers and Shane
Battier and didn't get much
from Chris Bosh, who was
held to six points on 3-of-10
shooting.
From wire reports

College basketball
BRIEFS

No. 24 Memphis 73,
No. 12 Louisville 67
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -Joe
Jackson and Shaq Goodwin
each scored 15 points and
No. 24 Memphis rallied late
for a 73-67 upset of No. 12
Louisville on Thursday night.
Geron Johnson added 13
points, Chris Crawford 12 and
Austin Nichols 10 as all five
starters scored in double fig-
ures to help the Tigers end a
four-game losing streak to the
defending national champi-
ons. Memphis (11-3, 2-1
American Athletic Conference)
shot 51 percent and outre-
bounded the Cardinals 37-35
in a victory that almost slipped
away in the second half.
Luke Hancock had a sea-
son-high 20 points to lead
Louisville (13-3, 2-1).
Florida State 56,
Clemson 41
CLEMSON, S.C. lan
Miller scored 15 points and
Aaron Thomas and Devin
Bookert had 10 apiece as
Florida State held Clemson to
its fewest points this season
in a 56-41 victory.
The Tigers (10-4, 1-1 At-
lantic Coast Conference)
came in as the country's top
defense in points allowed, but
it was the Seminoles (10-4,
1-1) who turned up the pres-
sure to win their fifth straight
game in the series.
South Florida 82,
Temple 75
PHILADELPHIA- Behind
23 points from Victor Rudd,
South Florida won its first
game as a member of the
American Athletic Conference
with an 82-75 victory over
Temple.
From wire reports


Irish rout Eagles; No. 18 FSU handles Miami


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. Kayla
McBride had 20 points and eight
rebounds, Taya Reimer added
15 points and second-ranked
Notre Dame made 62 percent of
its shots to beat Boston College
95-53 Thursday night, handing
the Eagles their worst loss this
season.
The Fighting Irish (2-0 At-
lantic Coast Conference) im-
proved to 14-0 for just the third
time in program history and won
their 37th straight regular-sea-
son game and 20th straight at
home.
Kristen Doherty scored 13
points to lead the Eagles (10-6, 1-
1), who snapped a seven-game
winning streak.
No. 18 FSU 68,
Miami 63
CORAL GABLES Natasha
Howard tied career-highs with 27
points and 18 rebounds for Florida
State.
The Seminoles (14-1,2-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) pushed ahead in
the second half when Howard hit a
jumper and two free throws, and
Morgan Jones sank a 3-pointer dur-
ing an 8-3 run to lead 57-50 with
8:07 remaining.
Miami (9-6, 1-1) pulled back within
two after Keyona Hayes' layup and
Krystal Saunders' 3-pointer, but
Howard countered with three free
throws and a layup to increase
Florida State's lead back to five.
Miami pulled within three, but Chee-
tah Delgado and Jones each hit free
throws to seal it.
Saunders led the Hurricanes with
16 points.


No. 3 Duke 86,
Syracuse 53
SYRACUSE, N.Y Tricia Lis-
ton had 20 points and eight re-
bounds as Duke spoiled
Syracuse's first home game in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
Elizabeth Williams added 14 points
and 11 rebounds for Duke (15-1,
2-0), whose only loss was to top-
ranked UConn 83-61 in December.
The Blue Devils have beaten four
ranked opponents this season-
California, Purdue, Oklahoma, and
Kentucky. Syracuse (11-4, 0-2)
dropped out of the poll this week
after consecutive losses to No. 23
Arizona State and North Carolina
State, now ranked No. 20.
Duke won the only previous meet-
ing between the teams, 84-40, in the
Big Four Classic in Greensboro,
N.C., in December 1995.
No. 6 Maryland 76,
Wake Forest 49
COLLEGE PARK, Md. Fresh-
man Shatori Walker-Kimbrough
scored 15 points, and Maryland
cruised to its 13th straight victory.
The Terrapins (14-1,2-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) led by 15 at half-
time and stretched the margin to 21
with 14 minutes left en route to their
16th consecutive win over the
Demon Deacons (9-6, 0-2).
Alyssa Thomas had 11 points, five
rebounds and six assists for Mary-
land, ending her run of 13 succes-
sive double-doubles.
Dearica Hamby had 20 points and
nine rebounds for the Demon Dea-
cons, who have dropped two in a
row following a five-game winning
streak.


No. 8 Tennessee 94,
Mississippi 70
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -Ariel Mas-
sengale had 23 points and a career-
high seven rebounds on a night
Tennessee topped 5 million in all-
time home attendance.
Tennessee (13-2, 2-1 Southeast-
ern Conference) also beat Missis-
sippi (9-7, 0-2) for the 25th
consecutive time.
Massengale, coming off a career-
high 28 points in a win at Georgia on
Sunday, reached 20 points in con-
secutive games for the first time in
her career.
The announced crowd of 10,382
increased Tennessee's all-time
home attendance to 5,006,586.
No. 10 S. Carolina 68,
No. 9 Kentucky 59
COLUMBIA, S.C.-Aleighsa
Welch had 16 points and 14 re-
bounds, and freshman Alaina
Coates added 10 points and 17 re-
bounds to lead South Carolina.
The Gamecocks (15-1, 3-0 South-
eastern Conference) held the SEC's
highest-scoring team 33 points
below their average. The Wildcats
shot just 32 percent and had 14
shots blocked.
Kentucky (13-3, 1-2) made five of
its first seven shots as South Car-
olina initially struggled to stop the
Wildcats inside. But the Gamecocks
quickly figured things out and led by
22 in the second half.
The Wildcats cut the lead to eight
before Coates' layup with 1:03 left
gave her a fifth double-double in 16
games.
Janee Thompson, Samarie
Walker and Azia Bishop each scored
12 points for Kentucky.


Texas A&M 52,
No. 12 LSU 48
BATON ROUGE, La. Courtney
Williams led Texas A&M with 17
points as the Aggies climbed back in
the final 40 seconds to beat LSU.
The Lady Tigers went ahead for
the first time in the second half at
36-34 with 8:19 left to play and led
until Texas A&M's Jordan Jones
made a layup to tie the game with
1:08 left to play.
Ajumper and two free throws later
put the Aggies (12-4, 2-0) up by
three with 17 seconds remaining.
LSU cut A&M's lead to one point
with 14 seconds to go after Raigyne
Moncrief scored on an assist from
Theresa Plaisance.
The Lady Tigers (12-3, 1-1)
turned the ball over on their final
possession.
Plaisance led the Lady Tigers with
16 points.
No. 13 UNC 79,
No. 20 N.C. State 70
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Freshman
Diamond DeShields scored 21
points to lead North Carolina.
Xylina McDaniel added 15 points
for the Tar Heels (13-3, 1-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference), who used a 24-
2 run late in the first half to take con-
trol after an early 10-point deficit.
UNC led 45-29 at halftime and by
double figures for most of the sec-
ond half, though the Wolfpack (14-2,
1-1) rallied to within five points three
times in the final 3 minutes only to
fall short.
Markeisha Gatling had 18 points
to lead N.C. State, which had its first
national ranking since the 2006-07
season under late Hall of Famer Kay
Yow.


The Tar Heels shot 51 percent,
with DeShields scoring 10 points
during UNC's big run.
Michigan St. 70,
No. 16 Nebraska 57
EAST LANSING, Mich.--An-
nalise Pickrel and Aerial Powers
each scored 17 points as Michigan
State opened its Big Ten Conference
home schedule with an upset of
Nebraska.
Michigan State (10-5, 2-0) never
trailed, and led by as many as 25 in
the second half. The Spartans fin-
ished the first half on an 8-0 run, led
by six straight points from Pickrel, to
go up 37-24 at halftime.
Powers had 15 rebounds in the
game while Pickrel grabbed 10. Tori
Jankoska and Becca Mills each
added 10 points.
Jordan Hooper led the Corn-
huskers (11-3, 1-1)with 21 points.
Missouri 66,
No. 25 Georgia 56
COLUMBIA, Mo. Brianna Kulas
scored 24 points and gathered 13 re-
bounds to lead Missouri in a mild
upset of No. 25 Georgia 66-56.
The teams had the same number
of field goals for the game, but Mis-
souri (13-3, 2-1 Southeastern Con-
ference) hit two more 3-pointers and
eight more free throws than Georgia
(12-4, 0-3).
Kayla McDowell added 13 points
for the Tigers, as they rebounded
from a loss to Arkansas earlier in the
week.
Georgia was led by Khaalidah
Miller's 12 points, while Krista Don-
ald added 11. The Lady Bulldogs
have lost three in a row and four of
their last five.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Road warriors


d ^, . .. .-_'.-^ , -. '. . -r ^ 3. u **! ." -. "' '-* ." ".-J .z -. : ".-
Associated Press
San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick engineered a 23-20 victory for his 49ers at Green Bay on Sunday.

Once again, San Francisco only road team favored to win


Associated Press

The oddsmakers weren't fazed by
three road teams winning in the
wild-card round. They've made two
of those winners, the Saints and
Chargers, big underdogs on Satur-
day in the divisional round.
Recent history has shown that
home field usually is meaningful in
these four games, with only one vis-
itor winning in each of the past two
seasons. Only twice since 2002,
when the current setup began, has
there been a sweep by the four
hosts, though; never have all visiting
clubs won in the divisional round.
Such numbers should make every-
one search for that one or two road
squads who might pull off another
win. We think we've found the right
one: the thawed-out 49ers (13-4).
"I haven't found anything that
makes you feel more like a man
than to go, not only beat your oppo-
nent, but you're beating their
crowd, and then, the elements, in a
playoffgame," said coach Jim Har-
baugh, whose 49ers (No. 3, AP
Pro32) won on the final play at
frigid Green Bay in the opening
round and are 2-point choices Sun-
day at Carolina (No. 4, AP Pro32).
The Panthers (12-4) had one of
their most impressive victories in a
turnaround season when they won
at San Francisco 10-9 on Nov 10.
Neither side has forgotten that de-
fensive battle in which the 49ers lost
tight end Vernon Davis and rookie
safety Eric Reid to concussions.
Plus, wide receiver Michael


Crabtree was still recovering from
a torn Achilles tendon. He's back, as
are Davis and Reid.
"More dangerous," Harbaugh
said of his team. "Michael was not
there for that game and Vernon was
out of the game early with a con-
cussion."
Dangerous and headed for the
NFC title game.
BEST BET: 49ers, 23-16
No. 7 New Orleans (plus 8)
at No. 1 Seattle, Saturday
Now that they have the first road
playoff win in franchise history can
the Saints (12-5) start a winning
streak away from New Orleans.
That's not exactly a Big Easy for
them in Seattle, where the Seahawks
routed the Saints 34-7 on Dec. 2.
Yes, the Seahawks lost their in-
vincibility at CenturyLink Field by
losing to Arizona three weeks ago.
Contrary to the widespread opinion
that it was an especially damaging
defeat, we think it helped the Sea-
hawks (13-3) recognize their vulner-
ability They won't slip up again,
although this won't be anything
close to that previous romp.
SEAHAWKS, 24-20.
No. 8 Indianapolis (plus 7 1/2)
at No. 5 New England, Saturday
The stats might not show it, the
reality does: This has been one ter-
rific year for Tom Brady
Despite almost an entirely new
crew of receivers, few of them
proven, and with his favorite tar-
gets, Wes Welker (free agent signed
by Denver) and Rob Gronkowski
(injuries) not around, Brady guided


the Patriots to a 12-4 record and yet
another AFC East crown.
The new guy in town will be An-
drew Luck, who has that same look
of stardom and indefatigability that
Brady always has worn. Luck engi-
neered that stunning comeback from
a 28-point deficit against Kansas City
last weekend. He's in his second pro
season. All Brady did was win a
Super Bowl as an NFL sophomore.
For Luck and the Colts (12-5) to
replicate that feat, they can't afford
another slow start. Even if they start
fast, though, Brady has shown this
season that he is still the master of
the rally to victory
PATRIOTS, 33-28.
No. 3 San Diego (plus 10)
at No. 2 Denver
San Diego's last road game dur-
ing the season was a Thursday night
win at Denver (13-3). That was a key
to the run the Chargers (10-7) have
staged to not only sneak off with the
final wild-card spot in the AFC, but
go into Cincinnati and win.
A repeat performance will likely
require controlling the ball to keep
Peyton Manning and the record-set-
ting Denver offense on the sideline.
It will require another huge defen-
sive performance by a team that has
stepped up on that side of the ball
in the last month.
It also might require another
meltdown (or freeze out) late in the
match by the Broncos, similar to
what happened against Baltimore a
year ago.
Won't happen.
BRONCOS, 38-30.


District showdown


at Citrus H.S.


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Dunnellon aims to wrap
up the No. 1 seed for the
District 5A-6 tournament,
hosted by Crystal River,
while Citrus looks to stay
in the hunt for the top slot
as the two meet in the CHS
gym tonight at 7 p.m.
The Hurricanes (14-2
overall, 3-1 in 5A-6), off to
their best start since 2003,
when they finished 23-2 in
the regular season, suf-
fered one of their only
losses at DHS on a 57-51
defeat back in early De-
cember This time, Tom
Densmore's group will
enjoy home-court advan-
tage and the addition of
junior power forward Sam
Franklin, who missed the
earlier contest while serv-
ing a suspension.
In Wednesday's 83-76
overtime victory versus
Nature Coast (11-5), the
'Canes enjoyed critical
contributions from senior
standout Devin Pryor (31
points), juniors Desmond
Franklin (27 points) and
Desmond Simmons, soph-
omore Zac Saxer and Sam
Franklin (16 points), who's
become an immediate
double-double threat as
well as an effective shot-
blocker It was the second
overtime win over a re-
gional power in a week for
CHS, which catapulted
past Eustis in double over-
time for a 65-62 come-
from-behind win that saw
five 'Canes in double fig-
ures last Friday
Pryor surpassed 1,000
career points in his team's
earlier game against
Dunnellon.
Wednesday, the Tigers
(10-5) bounced back from
an uncomfortably narrow
64-58 win at Seven Rivers
Christian last Friday by
notching its second victory
over Ocala Forest, by a
score of 53-37. Led by jun-
iors Andre Hairston (18.5
points and 10.8 rebounds
per game) and Desmond
Frazier (17.6 points per
game), they ran the table
in their opening district
games against Citrus
County teams, and would
hold the tiebreaker over
Citrus with a win tonight.
Under second-year head


coach Travis Licht, Dun-
nellon already has its most
wins since the 2008-09
campaign, when it fin-
ished 12-11.
Licht got his first look at
Warriors senior Adam
Gage, the 2011-12 Chroni-
cle Male Basketball Player
of the Year, in Friday's
game versus SRCS, which
is atAcademy at the Lakes
at Land O'Lakes tonight.
Gage paced all shooters
with 35 points and snagged
11 well-earned rebounds.
"Man, 14 (Gage) is
tough," said an impressed
Licht, noting his team's at-
tempts to double-cover the
stellar senior
If the 'Canes and Tigers
split their regular-season
series and prevail in their
remaining district tilts -
Dunnellon has additional
bouts with Crystal River
and Lecanto, while Citrus,
a reigning district cham-
pion, has a date with the
Pirates next Friday a
coin flip would decide the
top seed between the
schools.
Pirates, Panthers
rematch at LHS gym
Lecanto (8-6, 1-3) has an
opportunity to relegate Crystal
River (4-10, 0-3) to the fourth
seed in the Panther gym
tonight (7 p.m. tipoff). The
Panthers overwhelmed the Pi-
rates in the second half to run
away with a 7549 triumph in
the first meeting back on Dec.
6 at Crystal River. Juniors
Brandon Burich (24 points)
and Darius Sawyer (25 points)
carried the load on offense for
LHS as their team shot 70
percent from the field.
The Pirates are coming off
their third win of the season
over a one-win Belleview
squad, putting behind them a
47-43 home loss to St. John
Lutheran on Tuesday in
which they struggled to find
the basket during a decisive
late stretch.
The Pirates' struggles ex-
tend beyond the court this
week. CRHS head coach
Steve Feldman has been a
victim of the extreme weather
in Chicago that has cancelled
and delayed hundreds of
flights, causing him to miss
multiple games while stranded
in the Windy City all week.


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Citrus senior forward Ben Janicki and the Hurricanes will
try to avenge an earlier season district loss to Dunnellon
tonight when the team hosts the district-leading Tigers at
Citrus High School.


Pirates, 'Canes wrestlers visit NCT Duals


TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

With three weekends remain-
ing in the regular season, both
the Crystal River and Citrus mat
programs are expected to be in
action this weekend.
Both the Pirates (20-3) and
Golden Hurricanes (16-12) are
expected to compete beginning
this afternoon in the fifth edition
of the Nature Coast Technical
Duals in the Sharks' gymnasium.
Fifth NCT Duals Tourney
For the fifth consecutive winter,
Nature Coast Technical will host a
dual-meet tourney.
In 2010, NCT won the original
six-team affair topping Central in
the finals.
In 2011, NCT finished runner-up
behind Southwest Ranches-Arch-
bishop McCarthy's 37-34 nod.
With 12 teams in 2012, the host
Sharks finished 7-1. NCT was de-
nied again in the finals by Class
3A's Palm Harbor University, 37-28.
Last winter, the PHU Hurricanes
repeated as champions.
This year's NCT Duals is ex-


pected to include 11 teams in a two-
day, round-robin dual-meet format
featuring: Brooksville-Hernando,
Brooksville-Central, Weeki Wachee,
Wesley Chapel, Wesley Chapel-
Wiregrass Ranch, Land 0' Lakes,
Crystal River, Inverness-Citrus, Dun-
nellon, Palm Harbor University and
host NCT.
Action begins at 1:30 p.m. Friday
across four mats in the Sharks' gym-
nasium. Saturday's action begins at
10a.m.
Trophies will be awarded to the
two top teams. Two Outstanding
Wrestler awards for Best Lightweight
and Best Heavyweight will also be
presented.
Citrus: Looking
to bounce back
Citrus is coming off a lackluster
13th-place finish (tie) in the 23-team
24th annual Springstead Invitational.
The 'Canes' 10-man unit split their
38 bouts. CHS arrived minus four
starters including senior captain
Casey Bearden at 170 pounds (sick).
At the end of the two-day,
16 1/2 -hour event, the Inverness
mat men walked away with two


players: senior Brandon Taylor at
160 (third) and Bradley Wiesenauer
at 195 (fourth).
Taylor went 6-1 in the meet's
toughest bracket, featuring three pins.
Taylor's only setback arrived in
last Friday's quarterfinals against
2013 2A state placer and Spring-
stead junior Billy Swift, 10-5.
From the loser's bracket, Taylor
reeled off four straight wins. In his
wake, he toppled second-seeded
Junior Cruz of Winter Haven via pin
fall in 1:33 and tripped up third-
seeded Justin Boyle of Flagler Palm
Coast in the consolation finals, 8-5.
For his part, Wiesenauer opened
on the wrong foot being stuck by
Sickles' Nic Tyler.
From the lethal losers' bracket,
the unseeded Wiesenauer pro-
ceeded to pin his next three oppo-
nents: Wesley Chapel's Robert
Valentine (4:55), Hillsborough High's
Christian Flores (1:46) and Her-
nando's Lane Whitaker (3:39).
But in the consolation finals for
third, Tyler again pinned Wiesenauer
in 2:03.
"We went with who we had," ex-
plained second-year CHS skipper


Jeff Wood. "Five kids scored points
for us, five others didn't."
In evaluating the meet, "The top
five teams were all solid," noted
Wood. "(Springstead Invite champion)
Flagler looked like a well-oiled ma-
chine. They proved that their win two
weeks ago at Durant wasn't a fluke."
"Overall, there were several
tough teams in the building," Wood
said. "This gave us an idea of
some of teams we're gonna see
later in regionals."
"For our guys, I'd give Frodo (Tay-
lor) an "A" this weekend," described
Wood. "He wrestled above his seed.
This was a great weekend for him."
Entering the NCT Duals, the Hur-
ricanes are paced by Taylor behind
a county-best 36-2 slate.
Bearden (30-1) is expected back
while Wiesenauer arrived 26-8 be-
hind a county-leading 24 pins.
The Pirates, who last competed
during the Dec. 20-21 Gulf Duals in
New Port Richey, return to action.
CRHS, which has never com-
peted at the NCT Duals, is led by
senior Nick Hooper, junior Joel Pel-
ton and sophomore Eddie Bennis -
who have all notched 22 wins.


Lurking behind that trio are sen-
iors Carlos Sanabria (21-6) and
Michael Allan (20-2).
Lecanto remained active going
1-4 at the Lakeland-Kathleen Duals
last weekend, placing 10th out of 10
teams.
In the Polk County event, Chris
Ewing went 5-0 at 182/195 with
three pins while Nicolai Kortendick
at 152/160 went 3-2 finishing with
three pins.
"Ewing had a couple tough
matches going 5-0," detailed coach
Scot Roberts. "Wheat struggled with
kids a lot taller than him. I am very
pleased with the effort of (senior)
Nicoli Kortendick. He attended a lot
of practices over the break and he
showed tremendous improvement.
"... Everyone wrestled hard and
had competitive matches," added
Roberts. "As a coach that is exactly
what you want to see coming out of
the break and working to regionals."
On Tuesday, LHS went 1-3 at the
Dunnellon Quad Meet.
In the Marion County meet, Korte-
ndick at 152, Bryce Hickey at 145
and Matt Wheat at 160 each fin-
ished unbeaten at 3-0.


SPORTS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 B5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Goals galore


- '
,I % r


ml.


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Lecanto sophomore forward Stephanie Bandstra scored two goals in the Panthers' 4-1 victory over Crystal River on
Wednesday. Bandstra currently leads the county with 21 goals.

Panthers sophomore Bandstra having breakout season on field


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
No one in the county
is probably more
surprised by the 21
goals Lecanto sophomore
Stephanie Bandstra has
scored through Jan. 8 of the
2013-14 girls' soccer season
than Bandstra herself
"It has been really unex-
pected and really excit-
ing," Bandstra said. "When
someone told me, I was
like, 'Really?'. I didn't even
know about it."
Her current tally of goals
leads the county by five
goals over the next player
(teammate Lexi Moore)
and her three assists put
Bandstra close to the top in
that category as well.
"(My goals) pretty much
jumped out this year,"
Bandstra continued. "But I
couldn't have done it with-
out my team. It's not just
me. I don't want anyone to
think that I think I'm bet-
ter than anyone else. I try
to keep myself humble and
not gloat. I don't like that."
Lecanto head coach
Roselle Lattin does her
part to keep her Panther
forward grounded.
"She's a humble kid and
we try to keep her on the



Beverly Hills Gang
Senior Mix League
Week 16
The first half of the season ended up in a tie
with the High Hopes and Red's 4. In a one
game roll-off the Red's 4 team Captioned by
Betty Berardi, Bob Mannella, RedWrightand
Wally Malphrus beat the High Hopes Cap-
tained by Kathy Fuller, Hannelore Herbener,
KurtWittig and Clyde Hunte. Congratulations
to the Red's 4 team.
Scores: Jim Wright 172-209-224-605. Gary
Brown 211-191-178-580, Vito Porta 208-539,
Al Denton 209-514, JerryThompson 514, Jim
McDonough 513.
Splits Made: Kathy Fuller 2-7, Kurt Wittig 3-
10, RedWright2-7, Al Berardi 3-10, DotTroy-
anos 3-10, Chet Pierzgalski 5-6, Bill Johnston
3-10, Jerry Thompson 3-10(3X), Julie Na-
gengast 2-7, Fran Shidner 6-7-9-10, Jim Mc-
Donough 3-10, Jim Wright 2-4-6-7.
Beverly Hills
Senior Open League
Week 17
Congratulations to Rosie's Riveters on win-
ning the 1st half of the league. The winners
were: Rosemary Kinsey, Noemi Flores, Don
Levinson and Bill Sumner.
Bowling Scores: Bob Griggs 215-219-174-
608, Chuck Ahn 175-190-232-597, Charlie
Ahn 182-168-235-585, Marvin Chapman
203-211-171-585, Al Roque 189-209-180-
578, Gary Brown 226-194-156-576, Mike
Laurain 168-194-214-576, John Hoagland
203-183-180-566, JerryThompson 206-194-
165-565, Tom Chees 186-149-224-559, Dave
Coburn 168-200-191-559, Steve O'Connor
182-194-178-554, Richard Jacobs 228-545,


ground," Lattin said with a
smile. "She's definitely
one of the more improved
players this year and she's
done such a great job of re-
ally stepping it up."
Heading into the district
tournament on Jan. 14,
Bandstra isn't feeling any
pressure to continue scor-
ing at the same rate she
has been through the regu-
lar season. She has a more
relaxed theory on where
the goals come from.
"You just have to look
for them and (the goals)
will come. It's a teamwork
thing. I don't feel any pres-
sure." Bandstra said.
Bandstra, 16, was born
in Land 0' Lakes before
moving to Citrus County
when she was about five
years old. She started at
Lecanto in her freshman
year of high school after
attending a Catholic
school during her forma-
tive years in the county
The Panther forward
started on junior varsity
her freshman year for half
the 2012-13 season before
moving up to the varsity
squad.
"I've played soccer
pretty much my whole
life," Bandstra said. "I
have an older brother and


he played soccer so I
started playing too."
Bandstra has primarily
played soccer through the
Citrus County school sys-
tem (playing a little bit of
soccer as a kid in the
recreational leagues) and,
despite her obvious skill
set and soccer IQ, it's hard
to believe she has never
played in any of the many
competitive leagues
around Central Florida.
In regards to the Pan-
thers' chances of "three-
peating" as District 4A-4
champs this year, Bandstra
is optimistic Lecanto has a
shot while trying to do her
part as a team leader to
help the team get there.
"I want to see this team
go to districts and win,"
Bandstra said. 'And I'm re-
ally hoping we can pull
that off
"I want to bring some-
one up, not bring them
down," Bandstra contin-
ued about her efforts as a
leader on the team. "I'm
always trying to keep the
drama low In games, I like
to try and help the team
work together, and be
more friends with every-
one so we can play better
together"
Bandstra aims to be a


key part of the team's lead-
ership fabric, knitting her
teammates together into a
cohesive soccer unit, not
just a forward who can
score lots of goals.
"I'm really proud of my
team for being so strong
throughout the year,"
Bandstra said. "I couldn't
have had a better team
and I've really grown close
to them. I love my team.
They're like my second
family"
Lattin has witnessed the
blossoming of a hidden tal-
ent on her Panther team
with Bandstra and is look-
ing forward to seeing what
she can do in the years to
come.
"Stephanie has come a
long way," Lattin said. "I
think last year she had
some growing to do and I
think she took the oppor-
tunity to watch the veter-
ans around her and learn
about finishing (on scoring
chances) and she's done a
really great job at finishing
this year"
"She has this very tena-
cious attitude. Never gives
up," Lattin added. "She's
very competitive (and) has
that 'never give up' atti-
tude, which you need as a
striker"


Rich Lieval 201-529, Bill Sumner 526, Ed
Smith 518, Doug Meiklejohn 517, Walt Cle-
venger 514, Lyle Ternes 502, Craig Furrier
200-501, Brendan Dooley 210.
Splits Made: Fran Shidner9-10, DotTroyanos
3-9-10, Don Levinson 2-7, Fred Crogle 3-10,
John Schott 2-7-8, Joe Brooks 3-10, Bill
Johnston 3-10, Charlie Ahn 3-9-10, Mike
Laurain 5-6, Ed Smith 5-7, Barbara Dillon 2-
5-7, Tom Chees 3-6-7, Ray Coady 5-6, Doug
Meiklejohn 4-9, Ken Tompkins 6-7-10.
Parkview Lanes
Weekly News
MID-SEASON LEAGUES: The Women'sTrio
and the Good Times leagues have space
available for teams to join for their 2nd halves,
which began on January 2 for both. The cut-
off for joining is January 16 (the first two
weeks can be made up).
The Women's Trio bowls at 9:30 am, and will
end on April 10. The league is sanctioned,
and the cost is $13 per week.
The Good Times league bowls at 2pm, and
will end on April 17. The league is non-sanc-
tioned, and the cost is $9 per week no prize
money, just bragging rights!
League scores for the week
ending December 29:
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: Handicap: Wes
Foley 289; Brian Poisson 284; John Schott 756;
Arta Norris 720; Michelle Shirley 278,707; Lori
Ciquera 266; Dolores Rosales 698. Scratch:
Wes Foley 267; Eddie Corbitt 247; Mark Smith
247,664; Eric Glowacki 672; Brent Ciquera 664;
Lori Ciquera 224; Michelle Shirley 222;
Stephanie Flory 573; Dorine Fugere 552.
CONGRATULATIONS: Mark Smith rolled a 300
in the third game of the Monday Night Special
league on December 30. His first two games
were 198 and 268, for a 766 series. The per-


Surprises


abound for girls


hoops players


List of impact

ballers filled

with new

names

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

The second part of the
season, the post-holiday
section, is about to start-
and it won't take long to
complete, with the district
tournaments starting at
the end of this month so
now is a good time to dis-
cuss the biggest positive
surprises of the season.
Not teams, mind you,
but individuals. The
teams are readily appar-
ent: Both Citrus and Crys-
tal River were expected
to do well, but they've ac-
tually surpassed what
was anticipated. The loss
to Ocala Trinity Catholic
was the only disappoint-
ment on the Hurricanes'
schedule, while the Pi-
rates fell to Citrus, Gulf-
port Boca Ciega and
Brooksville Hernando.
But there have been
several individuals who
have taken their game to
another level, and their
teams have benefitted
because of it. Remember
- there are players who
were exceptional last
season, and they remain
so this year, such as
Seven Rivers Christian's
Alexis Zachar and Citrus'
Shenelle Toxen. There-
fore, their superb play
cannot be ranked as a
surprise.
Here's the list:
Jasmyne Eason, Crystal
River: A year ago, Eason
was a talent in the mak-
ing, it's true. This season,
it's showing up in the
numbers. She's averaging
double figures in both
points and rebounds and
is getting more than two
blocks and two steals per
game to ignite the Pirate
defense. But perhaps the
biggest testimony to her
impact came in the final
quarter of the critical
game against Citrus,
when a severe cramp
forced her to the sideline.
Her team went from
within a basket of the
Hurricanes to a double-
digit deficit.
Alyssa Gage, Seven
Rivers Christian: Sure, it
was anticipated Zachar
and Gage would have to
carry the offensive load
for the Warriors until
some other point source
could be located. That
hasn't changed, and yet
Gage's offense has been
impressive. She's averag-
ing a team-best 15.9
points per game while
adding 6.9 rebounds and
2.4 steals a contest. It's
true, Gage is getting more
chances this season but
it's equally true she's
making the most of them.
Shally Morales, Citrus:
The sophomore point
guard was part of a good
situation a season ago,
playing on a Citrus varsity


team that extended its list
of at least 20-wins-per-
season to three. But she
was playing behind a four-
year starter in Liz Lynch.
This season, she had to
step into that role. To both
her and her teammates'
credit, they haven't
missed a beat, winning 14
of 15 games thus far
Morales has displayed an
ability to hit from long
range while averaging 9.5
points per game, and she
is quick defensively, lead-
ing the team with 2.4
steals a contest.
In fact, it should be
mentioned that Citrus
started the season with
an entirely new back-
court, with junior Kier-
sten Weaver joining
Morales, and Weaver has
also played extremely
well (6.5 points per game
through 11 games).
DeeAnna Moehring,
Lecanto: Moehring is also
a sophomore starter at
Lecanto, but unlike
Morales, her position is
much more difficult.
Moehring took over the
point for the Panthers in
the season's first weeks,
forced into an unfamiliar
position by necessity
Lecanto has struggled,
just three wins in 15
games this season, with
Moehring a primary of-
fensive source she's av-
eraging 10.7 points, 4.1
rebounds, 3.3 assists and
2.1 steals per game. And
she remains upbeat, a
positive during trying
times.
Girls basketball
leaders
Note: Other than
records, numbers are per-
game averages
Scoring
Alyssa Gage (Seven
Rivers), 15.9; Alexis Zachar
(Seven Rivers), 14.8; Jas-
myne Eason (Crystal River),
13.0; Shenelle Toxen (Cit-
rus), 12.8; Micah Jenkins
(Citrus), 11.8.
Rebounding
Eason (CR), 10.7; Zachar
(SR), 8.9; Gage (SR), 6.9;
Kaylan Simms (CR), 6.1; Cas-
sidy Wardlow (CR), 4.9; Bri-
anna Richardson (CR), 4.9.
Assists
Katelyn Hannigan (CR),
3.6; DeeAnna Moehring
(Lecanto), 3.3; Wells (CR),
2.2; Richardson (CR), 2.0;
Toxen (Citrus), 1.8.
Steals
Richardson (CR), 2.6;
Eason (CR), 2.5; Hannigan
(CR), 2.5; Gage (SR), 2.4;
Shally Morales (Citrus), 2.4.
Records (through Jan. 9):
Citrus, 14-1 overall, 4-0 in
5A-6; Crystal River, 13-3
overall, 3-1 in 5A-6; Seven
Rivers Christian, 8-7 overall,
1-1 in 2A-3; Lecanto, 4-12
overall, 0-4 in 5A-6.
Free-throw shooting
(minimum, 25 attempts):
Zachar (SR), 69.9; Kiersten
Croyle (CR), 69.2; Jenkins
(Citrus), 66.7; Megan Wells
(CR), 62.8; Toxen (Citrus),
61.0.


Special to the Chronicle
The Monday Night Special league at Parkview Lanes was the venue for the last perfect
game of 2013 and the first perfect game of 2014. Mark Smith, right, rolled his 300
game on Dec. 30, and Wes Foley, left, rolled his 300 on Jan. 6. Mark's 300 was his
sixth, and Wes now has three. Both bowlers have rolled 800+ series.


fect game was Marks second at Parkview Times league bowls at 2pm.
Lanes, with his first rolled on April 19, 2000. League scores for the week
MID-SEASON LEAGUES: The Women'sTrio ending January 5:
and the Good Times leagues have space MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: Handicap: Mark
available forteams to join fortheir 2nd halves. Smith 311,799; Wes Foley 300; Dennis Iver-
Both leagues bowl on Thursdays, the son 794; Stacy Christopher 274,754; Lori Ci-
Women'sTrio bowls at 9:30 am and the Good quera 266,763. Scratch: Mark Smith 300,766;


Wes Foley 278,702; Eric Glowacki 708; K C
Cridland 241,624; Lori Ciquera 224,637.
GOOD TIME BOWLERS: Handicap: Ray
Johnson 246,671; Larry Golicz 237,616;
Janet Murray 238,674; Alice Bahrs 219;
Diane Collier 612. Scratch: Alan Murray
186,471; Ray Johnson 185,488; Janet Mur-


ray 209,587; Diane Collier 168,471.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS: Handicap: Robert
Corbeil 289,767; Lyle Ternes 282; Mike
Calcagni 781; Kathy Calcagni 265; Thia
Williams 717; Phyllis Ternes 257,717; Pat
Combs 725. Scratch: Lyle Ternes 233; Gary
Brown 231,596; Murphy Combs 603; Kathy
Calcagni 202,498; Phyllis Ternes 163; Ellen
Bowman 476.
SANDY OAKS: Handicap: Larry Benefiel
233,601 ;Tony Stanley 227,602; Karen Bene-
fiel 147,348; Joy Davis 221,602. Scratch: Bob
Iverson 210,575; Jeff Hyde 191; Jim McQuil-
lan 546; Karen Benefiel 147,348; Marlene
Hyde 126,346.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handicap: Wes Foley
260,662; Ken Brown 245,648; Barbara Mur-
ray 248; Debbie Mills 239,667; June Williams
677. Scratch: Wes Foley 258,656; Ted
Rafanan 220,574; Michelle Shirley 211,587;
Myla Wexler 201,522.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Lori & Stacy, 88
pins over her average, and Dennis Iverson,
119 pins over his average.
Citrus Springs
Horseshoe Club
Jan 5 results
Won all three games Barry Sperber, Sam
Gonzalez, Lance Potter
High Series- Barry Sperber 223, Sam Gonza-
lez 217, Lance Potter214, Janet McFarland 213
High Game Janet McFarland 82, Barry
Sperber 81, Sam Gonzalez 81
Scores are based on a handicap system so
all skill levels can compete.
The Club provides the horseshoes. Stop by
on any Tuesday or Saturday morning at 9
a.m. at the old Community Center on Route
39 in Citrus Springs. Call Joe Warburton,
352-489-7537, for information about the Club.


Adult sports NEWS


B6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


SPORTS


** < A ", .. *,






Section C FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014

0 Arts & Entertainment



NTHE


SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inside:
Eckerd program promotes
anti-drug lifestyle/C5


Associated Press

A supersized riff on the
acclaimed BBC series
of the same name,
"Walking With Di-
nosaurs" takes re-
warding advantage of
a much bigger budget and
state-of-the-art technology to
bring its impressive collec-
tion of Cretaceous creatures
to vivid life.
But while the walking
part's pretty impressive, the
talking part not so much.
Apparently convinced that
the film's young target audi-
ence wouldn't be sufficiently
engaged by those remarkably
lifelike main characters and
a colorful prehistoric parrot
(voiced by John Leguizamo)
serving as narrator, the pow-
ers that be saw fit to add
needless dialogue.
Given that the dinosaurs'
mouths don't move while the
voice cast delivers some truly
throwaway lines, it's safe to
assume that the overlay was
added after the fact, espe-
cially considering the evident
care and detail that went into
the other renderings.
While the end result often


Associated Press
A mature Pachyrhinosaurus (top) named Patchi and (above) a
Pachyrhinosaurus named Patchi, left, appears with his older
brother Scowler are shown in a scene from the film, "Walking
With Dinosaurs."


finds those visual and audio
elements butting heads with
each other, the heavily mar-
keted Twentieth Century Fox
release should still unearth
some impressive holiday
numbers.
The six-part series that in-
spired the movie (not to men-
tion a successful live arena
spectacular) originally aired
on the BBC in 1999 and was
ultimately seen by 700 million
viewers globally
Recruited to exploit the
brand for theatrical con-


sumption were co-directors
Barry Cook ("Mulafn") and
Neil Nightingale, creative di-
rector of BBC Earth, whose
different sensibilities would
seem ideal for a movie that
attempts to graft the series'
documentary style onto a
more traditional animated
feature format.
Bookended by very brief
modern-day, live-action se-
quences, the proceedings
waste little time in going back
some 70 million years to tell
the coming-of-age story of


Patchi (voiced byJustin
Long), an underdog of a
young Pachyrhinosaurus
who's shown the ropes by the
flighty Alex (Leguizamo).
Along his trek to adulthood,
Patchi crosses paths with var-
ious prehistoric predators, in-
cluding the fearsome
Gorgosauraus, as well as lock-
ing horns with his older
brother and the eventual
leader of the herd, Scowler
(Skyler Stone), and experi-
encing love at first sight cour-
tesy of the fetching Juniper
(Tiya Sircar).
Although the plotting, cred-
ited to screenwriter John
Collee ("Happy Feet," "Mas-
ter and Commander"), fol-
lows a safely predictable
course, the visual element,
employing the cutting-edge
3D Fusion Camera System
used by James Cameron for
"Avatar," delivers the strik-
ingly dimensional dino goods
set against actual backdrops
in Alaska and New Zealand.
It's that forced, unneces-
sary and largely unfunny dia-
logue save for Leguizamo's
spirited way with words -
that comes up distractingly
flat.


Jeri
Augustine

SPOTLIGHT
ON
THEATER




Resolve


to become


much more


involved in


new year

Now that the ball
has dropped, deco-
rations have been
packed away and
Santa has returned to the
North Pole, it is time to
look forward to the contin-
uation of the community
theater season.
Playing now at the Art Center
Theater is "You're A Good
Man, Charlie Brown," the show
chosen for this year's traditional
winter musical. Based on the
"Peanuts" cartoon, the show fea-
tures the musical and comedic an-
tics of the Charlie Brown gang,
with adults in the roles of the
children.
Ocala Civic Theatre offers "I Do!
I Do! I Do! I Do!," a musical look at
marriage based on the original
Broadway hit "I Do" I Do!" that
starred the late actors Mary Martin
and Robert Preston.
This new musical version was
written by the creators of the origi-
nal show It runs from Jan. 9 to
Jan. 19. Following immediately for
three performances is "Night and
Day, A Tribute to Gershwin and
Porter," a musical fundraiser for
Ocala Civic Theater, with matinee
and evening shows on Jan. 26 and a
matinee on the 27.
The Melon Patch Theater in
Leesburg features "Six Dance Les-
sons In Six Weeks," an adult com-
edy/drama with music and dancing
from Jan. 17 through Feb. 2. Start-
ing on Jan. 19, and continuing
through Jan. 26 at Stage West in
Spring Hill, is "Forbidden Broad-
way's Greatest Hits," an irreverent
musical satire revolving around ac-
tors and songwriters.
Notice a recurring theme all of
these shows? Music seems to be
the favorite theme for the start of
the winter season. Isn't musical
theater a soothing mode of enter-
tainment during these short days
and long dark nights?
So if you haven't made your New
Year's resolutions yet, why not re-
solve to attend more live commu-
nity theater productions?
If you already have made your
resolutions, then why not add one
more to the list, more community
theater productions.
These are resolutions you can
enjoy keeping. Music and comedy
can chase away the winter blues.

Jeri Augustine is a longtime par-
ticipant in local community theater
as actor, producer and director


Musical comedy, art classes and more planned at Art Center


anuary at the Art Center
kicks off with Charles
Schulz's "Peanuts," comic
strip characters coming alive
on the Art Center Theatre stage
in "You're a Good Man, Charlie
Brown." The musical comedy
starts its run this weekend and
will be shown on weekends
through Jan. 19. The Art Center
of Citrus County is located at
2644 N. Annapolis Ave. on
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), in Citrus
Hills, Hernando.
Charlie Brown can't seem to
win the heart of the Little Red-
Haired Girl, nor his friend
Lucy, who has a big crush on
the piano-playing Schroeder


(,


Meanwhile, Snoopya
daydream as the rest
lie's friends battle wi
school, baseball and
standings, before the
nally come to realize
makes them truly ha]
Brady Lay is Charlie
Sharon Vetter is the Li


Haired girl, Sandy Mosley is Lucy,
Gary Ammerman is Schroeder,
Sharon Chris Venable is Snoopy and Tom
Ha-rris Venable is Linus.
Directed by Tim Stuart and
Musical Director Dixie Lay, this
ART play is sure to bring laughter
TALK and joy to everyone's heart.
Show times for Fridays and Sat-
urdays are 7:30 p.m. and Sun-
day matinees are at 2 p.m.
and Linus Tickets are $19 and available at
t of Char- the Art Center Box Office
ith kites, between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.
misunder- weekdays.
y all fi- In the galleries, the third
what Juried Art Competition will be
ppy on display through March. The
e Brown, competition features award-
ittle Red- winning works in watercolor,


acrylic/oil, photography and
mixed media. Also, various art
groups in portraiture, painting
and photography have regular
meetings. For information on
meeting times and topics, visit
the website.
Registration for the Art Acad-
emy is now open for adults and
youths. Adult classes will begin
Jan. 20 through April 7, and in-
clude 'Acrylics with a Brush"
and "Figure Drawing." The
drawing class will be held 10:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, and
the acrylic class will be held
from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday. Class
size is limited to 15 students.
Young people from 7 to 17
years may enroll in the youth


drama class, which is held
every Tuesday and Thursday,
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., begin-
ning Feb. 11, and runs through
the weekend of June 1. Class
size is limited to 30 students.
Academy semester fees are $35
for the first class and/or youth
and $25 for the second class
and/or sibling.
Sharon Harris is an artist and
former president of the Art
Center and currently serves as
the Director of the Academy of
the Arts. For tickets call the
Box Office at 746-7606 or for
more information on activities
visit www.artcenterofcitrus
countyorg.


11 '- '^ -,,2 ^,._ ar, '" 3 "-** _<,b'. --'. d -'"* .-l
*~~~~ :E''^ <' ,,- -, --*^-
... ..(. ,ll -,'


Dinosaurs rule the earth in this big-budget

3-D feature update of the late '90s TV show





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Mitty' Ben Stiller's strong dramatic turn


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Marketed as Ben
Stiller's bend toward drama, "The Se-
cret Life of Walter Mitty" finds the actor,
who also directed the feature, seem-
ingly exuding superhuman strength
while jumping between buildings and
battling his nemesis as they surf as-
phalt.
The lampoon-like scenarios seem far
too fanciful when attempting to take
Stiller seriously But these are just the
narratives the title character weaves in
his mind. In reality Walter Mitty, played
by a poised and sincere Stiller, is an in-
secure photo editor with an affinity for
daydreaming.
Adapted from a short story of the
same name, which was written by James
Thurber and was published in 1939 in
The New Yorker, the outlandish scenes
in "Mitty" bring the most memorable el-
ement of the original tale -reality
bending to the forefront. Thurber's
sarcastic narrative found Walter Mitty at
odds with his bickering wife and escap-
ing his humdrum life by daydreaming
he was a war hero, surgeon and sharp
shooter The first rendering of "Mitty,"
which maintained Thurber's comedic
tone, was realized on film in 1947. It
starred Danny Kaye, who this time, bat-
tled with an overbearing mother
Written by Steven Conrad, the con-
temporary rendition, in which Jim
Carey was originally supposed to star,
sees the real world altered with such
wild inflection that it's hard to digest
Visual techniques like interspersing the
text of the opening credits into Walter's


i


Associated Press
Ben Stiller in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty." This is Stiller's fifth time directing,
but it's his boldest move toward establishing his career behind the camera.


surroundings, prove to be the most in-
novative and clever effect of the picture.
Luckily, the CGI-marred moments flood
only the first 30 minutes of the film, al-
lowing for a loaded, inspiring experi-
ence familiar to other serious Conrad
works like "The Pursuit of Happyness."
In the new "Mitty," Stiller's Walter


works at Life magazine, which is transi-
tioning from print to digital. A bril-
liantly vexing Adam Scott plays Ted
Hendricks, the ringleader of a band of
executives who've come to supervise
the completion of the last issue and fire
a large chunk of the magazine's staff.
In this take, the women aren't nags.


Shirley MacLaine, who plays Stiller's
mother, Edna, and Kathryn Hahn, who
plays his sister, Odessa, are quite pleas-
ant and supportive. It's Ted who acts as
the villain. He takes to bullying Walter,
who must pin down the negative image
for the final issue's cover Walter consis-
tently spaces out, especially when he's
fantasizing about his co-worker, Cheryl
(played sweetly by Kristen Wiig).
Unable to locate the image, which
was shot by a long-standing Life maga-
zine photographer, Sean O'Connell (an
explorer superbly pronounced by Sean
Penn), Walter heads to Greenland
where he hopes to find Sean and his
coveted shot Once there, Walter jumps
out of a helicopter only to be nearly
eaten by a shark when landing in the
ocean. It's such a heart-pounding expe-
rience that even Walter wonders if what
he just endured was real. But, alas, Wal-
ter's finally having actual adventures, as
his capacity for taking risks increases.
In the midst of more action Walter
skateboards down a hill in Iceland and
escapes an erupting volcano he re-
ceives recurring calls from an eHar-
mony customer service rep (a facetious
Patton Oswalt), who is determined to
help Walter make his dull online dating
profile more appealing.
As we watch Walter's world open up,
we follow his journey across alluring lo-
cations like the Himalayas. When we fi-
nally meet Sean, who is perched on a
mountain waiting for the perfect shot,
he speaks to Walter's evolution as he
tells him he sometimes prefers to savor
his personal moments instead of being
distracted by his camera.


oc frtaNOTIONS



FbodL~~~~ r~ Sfatiotn


MAMA'S MAM
KUNTRY
KAFE
Mom and Pop restaurants are
the backbone of culinary America,
and Mama's Kuntry Kafe in
Inverness fits right into that category
with its good home cooking and
friendly, family atmosphere. It's
breakfast in the morning with Mama and
Karaoke in the evening with Papa. .. "
The establishment is family owned and
operated and, in fact, opening such an eatery was the dream of owners Dale
White and Lisa White for more than 14 years before Mama's opened four
years ago.
The biggest draw is the "homemade" style food served in large portions
at reasonable prices. Entrees run from $4.00 to $7.00. Freshly brewed Sweet
Tea is always available and there are daily specials for desserts.
"Some things I won't compromise on, and that includes the quality of
the food we serve," White said.
Located at 1787 W. Main Street in Inverness, the restaurant is open
Monday through Thursday from 6:00 am to 2:00 pm; Fridays 6:00 am to 10:00
pm; Saturday 6:00 am to 2:00 pm; and Sunday 7:00 am to 9:00 pm.
Entertainment is provided Friday and Sunday nights.
For more information, call 341-6262.


/-.-JA


SAVEWITHDAN!


1i Oin $10FFBowl"
I FFIor500 OFF CUP
I i U ll |Dan's Famous
Clam Strip New England
I Basket | Clam Chowder
Dine In Coupon Required. Dine In Only. Coupon Required.
nEx /pires 1/1 5/14 C T/1
2 LOCATIONS
7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa
352-628-9588
SUACLOSED Highway 44, Crystal River
MONDAY 352-795-9081



f, ul ,tl
\ ^ -i^- dlI'i~iiipln
S.R. 200 on the Wilhild(ooc hee Riv\ei
352-854-2288

Serving the Finest .J

& Freshest Seafood
All You Can Eal Calfish Shrimp
i Florida Galor Frog Legs Oysters

, And Citrus County's Best Open Flame Grilled
Thick juicy Sleaks Pork Chops
^^ *Tender Chicken Breasls
j -_H ;-* ___ come r t~iloe\visit o[ w nd lI(dlionionInhef
i. qude in Hmi :i Downlown Inveiness
iF- uodav -un .id
fc_^ *a~g"^' 352-726-2212 .


~40O 41:10 C w I .


S,'MAMA SALLY'S
S RESTAURANT
^Kb K^^


MONDAY
CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS...........$6"
TUESDAY
SAUSAGE & PEPPER HOAGIE.........6
WEDNESDAY
STUFFED PEPPERS................$69
THURSDAY
BBQ CHICKEN & RIBS.,,99
FRIDAY
FISH FRY............. ...................... s 99
SATURDAY-
CHICKEN WINGS
Mon.-Sat. 7am-8pm


SHRIM P FULLPOUND 1/2 POUND
ANYWA $15199 $1099
ANY WAY 13 I v
2 + 2 + 2 or $499 Country Fried $-99I
Southern Omelet i' Steak w/Eggs %p
Flounder, Talapia, Pork Chops, $ A99
Chop SirloinorRoastTurkey s' 2 FOR I 1
Uiver& Onions, Meatloaf, EggplantParmigiana, 6 9
Spaghetti & Meatballs, Roasted Pork . I $1
or Country Fried SteakI 2 FOR'
Fish Fry $ 99
w/French Fries & Cole Slaw
nBRAICACr AMuVrnMd


Seringtreushlty' Brest Kept Diinn a relaxed



atopee ihotsadn srie


Pr 1
I..:


_____ ww- -qr- -111 -1111%^^*^
MTr.Ty OurP
Aoamri) Wi rmnning J
PRIME RIB g
CRAB STUFFED SHRIMP
\ iil idlr h1)%it fili ,1 uu .l)tiill~srt.silllriflll.'ii ui l
Ito ie all iuir iltomenui tr call .352-4h65-59 I11.
I 1 211 N. FIoinkLIA\c.. i H\\ \. 411. (liI[,I SpiIl'sI, l,2
MNile South of Dbuilicloll
i- ,' 1,, .", I ,,, . ..',,",,,,,',............... I ,,


A


"HTi Plat To Eat"
2494 N. Heritage Oaks Path
Hernando, FE

352-513-48 0 )
5.11 -.]111n-.,ilnnS nl 5 "11d .1 .]II Pill
tllinawliln 1. l:r I 1orI r , 111.1) I;I

Dinner Specials
FRIDAY
Appetizer-Stultked Mushrooms
Entree-Lamnb Shanks or
Crab Stuffed Haddock
SATURDAY
\ppetizer-Ch(ihkken Alfredo Flathread
Entree-Prime Rib or
Fish Athenian or
Grilled Octopus
dull Bu kli, iiihli c" Dim,', lh',,ii


HIGHLANDS Restaurant
BREAKFAST LU NCR DINNER_
i $529
LUNCH SPECIALS$29
Iiw M-F 11-3pm Includes Soup & Potato

DINNER 2 FOR 1399
Includes 2 Sides & Dessert


FISH FRYI EVERYDAY! 49
Cole Slaw and French Fries
Open 7 Days A Week:Mon.-Sat. 7am-8pm, Sun 7am-2pm FL1
3066 S. Florida Ave. Inverness, FL 344503413 03IU0 Ov


A


C2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


ON THE SCENE











WEEKEND


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WRAP


Today

Woodview Coffee House
hosting dulcimer virtuoso
Bing Futch,
composer and J
mountain dul-
cimer player,
will entertain
listeners at
Lecanto's Unity
Church Fellow-
ship Hall today
Doors open at
6:30 p.m.; Futch
will perform at
8 p.m. Admis-
sion $7. For
more informa-
tion, call 52-
726-9814 or visit
woodview
coffeehouse Special to the Chronicle
.org. The hall is Woodview Coffee House will play
at 2628 Wood- host to dulcimer player Bing Futch
view Lane, tonight. Admission is $7. For more
Lecanto. information, call 352-726-9814 or
visit woodviewcoffeehouse.org.


Saturday

Think you're a whiz at critter
trivia? You might get skunked
The Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park will host a Wildlife Jeopardy program on
skunks in the park's garden pavilion from noon to
12:30 p.m. Saturday
The Wildlife Jeopardy program is an educational
program for all ages. Volunteer Barbara Cairns will
use a "Jeopardy"-style format to present information.
Regular admission fees apply, but there's no addi-
tional charge to test your knowledge or get
skunked trying, www.floridastateparks.org.

Banjos squaring off at the mall
The Crystal River Mall's Music at the Mall pro-
gram presents The Dueling Banjos from 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. Saturday Admission is free; for more
information, call 352-795-2585. The mall is at
1801 N.W U.S. 19.


Sunday

Father and son explore
history through music
Bassoonist Arnold Irchai will lead an exploration of
Russian culture through the music-making of father
and son on 3 p.m. Sunday Pianist Mark Irchai will join
his father on stage for this special collaborative per-
formance. Admission is $15. The museum is at 4333 E.
Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala. 352-351-1606.

Wednesday

Rendezvous with raptors
with Audubon Society
Citrus County Audubon's program slated for 7 p.m.
Wednesday will be "Rendezvous with the Raptors."
The program will be presented by Michele Kline of
HOPE Wildlife Rehabilitation. She will provide an up-
close-and-personal look at a trilogy of nonreleasable
nocturnal raptors: The eastern screech owl, barred
owl and great homed owl.
The meeting will be at Unity Church, 2628
W Woodview Lane, Lecanto. For more information,
visit www.citruscountyaudubon.com.


ON TAP: MORE UPCOMING ENTERTAINMENT


Theater
"Rescuing Max," based
on the book "Max City Dog," by
Glenn Munyan of Dunnellon.
7 p.m. Jan. 17; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Jan. 18; and 2 p.m. Jan. 19at
Dunnellon Historic Depot,
12061 Williams Street. $10;
$5 for students under age 18.
Proceeds benefit Herry's Kids.
352-465-1515 or
rescuingmax.com.
Art Classes
Photo Walk Workshop
through downtown Crystal
River at sunset. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. Jan. 14 at Franklin An-
derson Gallery of Arts, 659 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
$45. All welcome. Bring digital
or film camera and a tripod.
352-697-2702 or kmanderson
04@tampabay.rr.com.
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight House,
8219 Orange Ave., Floral City,
offers art classes. 352-344-
9300. Floridaartistsgallery.com.
Wire-wrapped Cabochon
(pendant) Class, 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Jan. 18. Instructor Lynda
Ryan. Students will produce
wire-wrapped semiprecious
gemstone pendant. Bring flat-
nose and round-nose pliers
and flush/close cutters. $45
includes materials. 352-344-


9300. Class size limited.
Gelatin Art Class for Be-
ginners, 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 20. Instructor
Bonnie Peterson. Participants
will learn about gelatin as an
art form, then create gelatin
flowers. $45 includes materi-
als. Bring insulated lunch bag
and small ice pack. Limited to
six students. 352-344-9300.
Beginner Watercolor,
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 16, 23 and 30. Instructor
Jude Caborn. Students will
learn basic watercolor tech-
niques. $20 per session. Stu-
dents should supply
materials. 352-344-9300.
Museums
Olde Mill House Gallery
& Printing Museum "Pulp to
Print" workshops, 9 a.m. to
noon Jan. 25 at 10466 W.
Yulee Drive, Old Homosassa.
Instructors are master printer
Jim Anderson. $60 per three-
hour class. Lunch available in
Museum Cafe from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. 352-628-9411.
geminigraphics30@
yahoo.com.
Music
Music at the Museum
concert series in the Old
Courthouse in downtown In-
verness. Jazz concerts $25


each; acoustic concerts $10.
Social hour begins at 6 p.m.,
music at 7 p.m. 352-341-6427
or csociety@tampabay.rr.com.
Jan. 16 Singing Tree
ft. Ray Belanger and Lloyd
Goldstein.
Juniper, celtic folk duo,
and opening act New River
Strings, 1 p.m. Jan. 18, 10466
Yulee Ave., Homosassa. $7.
352-628-1081.
Dance
Spirit of Citrus Dances.
All dances 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
at Kellner Auditorium Jewish
Center, 92 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills, unless otherwise
indicted, socdancer.org.
Social ballroom dancing
held second and fourth Satur-
days monthly. Doors open at
6:45 p.m. Complimentary
dance lesson at 7 p.m. Gen-
eral dancing from 7:30 to
10 p.m. Admission $6 for
members and $9 for non-
members. Ice and coffee pro-
vided. Sodas and bottled
water may be purchased. Call
Barb or Jack at 352-344-1383
or JoAnn at 352-746-4274.
Special Interest
"How to Publish Your
Own Book," and "Writing
Your Memoirs," both feat.
author/publisher Claudine


Dervaes, 2 p.m. and 2 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Scrap and
Stamp Art Studio in the Crys-
tal River Mall, 1801 U.S. 19,
Crystal River. $15 each or
$25 for both; registration
required. 352-795-0317.
Forgotten Film
Festival, hosted by Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalists
fellowship. All films at 3 p.m.
at 7633 U.S. 41, Citrus
Springs. naturecoastuu.org.
Jan. 16-"HydeParkon
Hudson." President Franklin
D. Roosevelt and his wife in-
vite the King and Queen of
England for a weekend at


their home in upstate New
York.
Farmers' Markets
Inverness Farmers'
Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, summer hours are 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., first and third
Saturday, Inverness Govern-
ment Center parking lot.
352-726-2611.
Herry's Market Day, 8
a.m. to noon, last Saturday of
the month at Hospice Thrift
Shoppe, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa (behind


Wendy's, east of U.S. 19).
Herry's Market Day is offering
free vendor space. Space is
limited. 352-527-2020.
Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Market,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday
at Lake Beverly Park. Vendor
spaces $5. bhcivicassocia-
tion.com. 352-746-2657.
Market Day with Art &
Treasures, an outdoor event
with plants, produce, arts,
crafts, collectibles and more,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Sat-
urdays on the grounds of Her-
itage Village, 657 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. 352-564-1400.


AGRUFFS TAP & GRILLE
E 12084 S. Williams St., Dunnellon (Old Dinner Bell Restaurant)
,nd B &352-465-2881 www.gruffsgrill.com
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4Dm-9Dm, Fri. & Sat. 4Dm-10Dm, Sun. 12 Dm-9Dm. Lounge hours extended daily.


MONDAY Expires 1/20/14
20% Off Seniors Discount Seniors 55
and over.
THURSDAY
Buy 1 Get 1 Free Cocktails
SATURDAY
Free Appetizer w /2 dinner purchases.
EVERYDAY
Kids Eat Free 10 years and under. 1 Kids meal
with 1 adult dinner.
Text "Gruffs" to 49798 for VIP Offers


I


IN IEINING NtrtaOrNt



&'#od o .n n nteir t a~in tnt


FRIED FISH FRIED
OR CALAMARI SHRIMP
s8.00 $11.50


2 -r-t .. 10FOOTBALL
SDrafts i Your BiSUNDAYS!
'$10 Buckets II ....ill 1 8 TVS TO VIEW-
&, o- ---, - -INCLUD PTIE
^Slk l I I .
^osecial^Wtg"!n B niiim





C4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


COMMUNITY


Knights on the road


Council cleans up its

adopted highway area

Special to the Chronicle
The St. Scholastica Knights of
Columbus Council 14485 collected seven
bags of trash along County Road 491 re-
cently
"It's a shame that people litter the way
they do; they complain about county
taxes, but think nothing about throwing
trash out the car window," Steve Amann,
community director for the council, said.
'"Although many organizations, clubs,
businesses and schools volunteer their
time, it still costs the county money to
pick up the trash that's collected, provide
bags, gloves, vests, training and insurance
to the volunteers."
The council has been participating in
the Adopt-a-Highway program for four
years. The program gives local citizens an
opportunity to help keep the roads and
highways clean and attractive throughout
the county
Who can join?
Any interested group of people can
volunteer to keep a section of the road-
way, at least two miles long, clear of litter
with regular cleanup.
If a new group is forming, the mem-
bers should meet, choose a coordinator
and select the roadways that they are in-
terested in adopting.
Group coordinators are chosen by
the group to be the contact person be-
tween the county and the organization.


Special to the Chronicle
Participating in the Adopt-a-Highway program are, from left, Ron Kornatowski, public
relations chairman; Steve Amann, community director; James Bobay, church director;
Jerry Krause, deputy grand knight, Gerald Reiter and Charles Kowalski, family director.
To be a part of the Adopt-a-Highway Program, contact Solid Waste Management at
352-527-7670.


What is involved?
The volunteer organizations promise
to clean the road at least four times a
year for two years.
The Solid Waste Management Divi-
sion provides safety training notes, bright
orange vests and gloves for volunteers to
wear


It also provides safety signs to be
used during cleanup activities.
The county puts up a sign designat-
ing the roadway as adopted and naming
the group that has promised to keep the
roadside clean.
The county provides Workers
Compensation insurance.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NEWS NOTES

IR-RU to present
dinner, comedy show
The IR-RU Family Social Club
will have a Dinner and Comedy
Show on Saturday
The menu will be cherry-glazed
pork tenderloin, roasted sweet
potatoes with apples, salad and
French bread. There will be a
limit of 60 dinners available for
members and guests. Price is $9
per person or $16 per couple.
Dinner tickets are available from
the bartenders at the club. Din-
ner will be served from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. only
The Comedy Show starts at
8 p.m. and features Vince Taylor
(seen on BET College Tour), Alan
Newcombe (semi-finalist in
Florida's Funniest Comedians)
and Will Hagaman (seen in Im-
provs nationwide and Bonkerz
Comedy Clubs). Tickets are not
necessary for the show
The IR-RU Family Social Club
is at 922 U.S. 41 South, Inverness,
and can be reached at 352-637-
5118. Guests are always welcome.

Barbershoppers sought
for county group
The Citrus County Chapter
"Chorus of the Highlands" of the
Barbershop Harmony Society
seeks men to join the group,
which has been in the area for
more than 28 years.
The chorus meets at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in Inverness.
Call 352-382-0336 for more
information.


NEWS NOTES


Bonsai Club to
meet in Inverness
Buttonwood Bonsai
Club will meet at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at the Key
Training Center, 130
Heights St., Inverness.
The club has scheduled
a critique and session on
native bald cypress, led
by member Darwin
Mounsey, who is a collec-
tor, trainer and grower of
bald cypress.
For more information,
call President Sherry
Collier at 352-860 2150.

Knights to have
dinner, dance
The Knights of Colum-
bus Council No. 14485 will
host a Seminarian Dinner
and Dance at 5 p.m.
Saturday at the St.
Scholastica parish hall,
4301 W Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto.
The main course will be
chicken cordon bleu. Ma-
gician Brian LaPalme will
perform his famous magic


tricks with music by
Allen O'Neal. A donation
of $13 is required or two
for $25.
For tickets and more in-
formation, Jim at 352-
726-7535.

Hadassah to
gather in BH
Beverly Hills Chapter
of Hadassah will meet at
1 p.m. Monday at the Kell-
ner Auditorium, 102 Civic
Circle in Beverly Hills.
Guest speaker this
month is Jennifer
Springer, director of nu-
trition for Citrus
Memorial hospital.
Hadassah is a 100-year-
old charitable organiza-
tion open to men and
women of all faiths. It
supports colleges, univer-
sities, medical schools,
medical research includ-
ing stem cell research,
hospitals, youth camps
and infrastructure in Is-
rael and America.
For more information,
call Carole at 352-270-8458
or Ellen at 352-436-4135.


BFFs to have
dinner meeting
The BFF Society Inc.
will have its dinner meet-
ing at 5:30 p.m. Monday at
Seven Rivers Golf &
Country Club (back patio).
Members and guests
will discuss the club's
next fundraiser, the Civil
War re-enactment to be
held in March.
For more information
and to RSVP, call Gwen,
352-795-1520.

All welcome at
VFW Elvis show
The public is welcome
to join the VFW Post 4337
family for an "Elvis Din-
ner Show" from 5 to 9
p.m. Saturday Jan. 11, at
the post home, 906 State
Road 44 East, Inverness.
Lasagna, salad and
dessert will be served
until 7 p.m.; the show will
be from 7 to 9 a.m.
Tickets are $15, reser-
vation only
Call 352-344-3495.


Westend Market
on tap Jan. 11, 25
Westend Farmers Mar-
ket and Arts and Crafts
Westend Market will be
held at the Crystal River
Mall from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 11 and 25,
rain or shine.
The Westend Farmers
Market will be the second
Saturday each month.
The market offers an-
tiques, arts and crafts, as
well as new and used
merchandise.
Arts and Crafts Westend
Market will be the fourth
Saturday each month.
Artists and craftsmen
from around Citrus
County sell their hand-
made works of art.
At the markets, more
than 40 vendors share
their specialty items with
entertainment, mini golf
and more. All vendors
must register with the
mall office, pay the ven-
dor fee of $10 and supply
their own setups.
For more information,
call 352-795-2585.


Come dance at
Moose Lodge
Crystal River Moose
Lodge 2013 has dances
from 7 to 10 p.m. Monday


at the lodge, 1855
S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
All-you-can-eat
spaghetti is served.
For more information,
call 352-795-7030.


f'oo& k~n 8 Entrtainrn&nt


v'I Mr. Wang's
CHINESE RESTAURANT
SAME CHEF FOR 18 YEARS
EARLYBIRDSPECIALS300530S PM u ------ -
DINE IN OR CARRY OUT| 40( O %B
FULLLIQUOR BAR I U
OPEN7DAYSAWEEK I
Mon -Sun 11AM-IOPM I OFF: 1 jy
sPliaza (Bch~nAH.,e ilTotal Purchase wilii\
Homosassa Srings Dine in mortake out. 9
STel.: (52) 62- Drink specials excluded 1 0
Fax: (552) 6lS-9 6 Expires 1/31/14____


Two Complete
Dinners


(Over 20 entrees to choose from)

for on99


Open 7 DaysAWeek6 a.m. -8 p.m.
nU' rim A"7A AAIL *ilfifniA


Wednesday & Thursday Steak Night
10 oz.
Ribeye Steak
Complete Dinner

for only $865


R9R-


You're invited to try us. Serving a good selection of Food
* Seafood* i .. Chicken Schnitzel. Weekends: Salmon
Prime Rib Roast Duck Parm & More Ossobuco (Pork Shank)
S... YOU'RE INVITED!
Wed & Thurs 3 PM-8'30 PM Fri & Sat 3 PM-9'00 PM Sunday 11 AM-7 PM
Closed Monday & Tuesday
7f0 '. Florida Ave. (ITs Hwv. 41 Flnral City. FT
-,- 344-4443


Golden Fork ',
.1n iard if.I


,0-1 1


llfilifili A0
Speciall' Dishes
* 1 ,al *'(hiie k,,
Sfeq/bod


I .', ........ ..... ....i. .
,.~~~~~~~~~ I.I ,....,,., J f 'f )


MAMA'S KUNTRY KAFE
"Home of the Large Portions"
POKER NIGHT FJSH FRY
BA- 'S&I *** **11 WIII ^---- --- --- ---
2ND SATURDAY OF THE : $O.
MONTH FROM 6-9 *FRI. NIGHTS ONLY
^ .,-i"(-III~i" It,,? I Valid with coupon only.
Inverness Lions Club Not combined/any other offer
JI.-IFT CERTIFICATES
Next to
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Pizzeria & Ristorante

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OPEN 7 DAYS 6;?r
LUNCH & DINNER.,
637-1355


MARKET DAY
WITH ART TEASURES


Saturday, Z. J*4 9:00 a.m.
Jan. nth ," till 3:00 p.m.
** ... <&4

Local Produce, Plants, Pantry, Artistic Talent &
Vintage Collectibles on the 2nd Saturday of Each Month


on the Grounds of Heritage Village, 657 N. Citrus Ave.
in theyot Historic Downtown Crystal Hiver
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w l







Page C5- FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Mended Hearts to
meet in Inverness
The Citrus County Chapter of
Mended Hearts will meet at
10 a.m. today in the Gulf Room at
the Historic Citrus High School,
Inverness.
Speaker will be Dr Russell
Lewandowski, a chiropractic
physician, who will speak on top-
ics relating to cardiovascular ill-
ness. He is an associate of Dr
Cheryl McFarland-Bryant.
Members planning to attend
CPR training are reminded to
register The training will be Feb.
14 at Nature Coast EMS. Register
with Millie or Sharon; slots for 30
attendees have been reserved.
All meetings are open to the
public. For more information, call
Millie King at 352-637-5525.

FC Garden Club
to begin new year
The first meeting of the new
year for the Floral City Garden
Club will be today at the Floral
City Community Building at 8370
E. Orange Ave.
The social time will be from
9:30 to 10 a.m. All meetings are
open to the public.
For more information, call club
president Lona Basset at 352-
560-3879.

Enjoy roast pork
dinner with VFW post
VFW Edward W Penno Post
4864 will serve a roast pork din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. today The
public is invited.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4.
For more information, call 352-
465-4864. The post is at 10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.

Lions'cards, auction
help eye care projects
The Inverness Lions Club will
have a Texas Hold 'em and Black-
jack Night from 6 to 9 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 11, at Mama's Kuntry
Kafe, Inverness.
There will be a Chinese auction
at the end of the night for prizes.
Event proceeds benefit commu-
nity eye care projects. Donation is
$10.
For information, call Bob at
352-422-2224.

Pine Ridge Association
to fill 3 vacancies
The Pine Ridge Association
will take nominations through
Jan. 31 to fill three vacancies on
the Board of Directors for April
2014.
Applications and resume
format are available at the Pine
Ridge office.
The deadline to
submit a resume and application
is 4:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31.
For more information, call the
Pine Ridge Property office at
352-746-0899.


A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.


Carmel


Special to the Chronicle
Carmel is a 3-year-old Maltese and
Yorkie mix, with long nonshedding
tan hair. Also for adoption are
adorable little 1-year-old females
- tan and white with tan spots -
each looking for forever homes. All
are housebroken, crate-trained and
learning to walk on leashes. Meet
the pups at the pet adoption from
10 a.m. to noon Saturday at Pet
Supermarket, Inverness, with A
Humane Society of Central Florida
Pet Rescue Inc. Foster parents al-
ways needed. If you must give up a
little dog, call 352-527-9050. Visit
www.PetFinder.com ZIP code
34465 or www.AHumaneSociety
PetRescue.com.


Hi Five for families


Program helps students stay Above the Influence


Special to the Chronicle
Eckerd's Hi Five Program recently had
a family night at Lecanto Middle School
for the sixth-grade students and parents.
Deputy Todd Farnham from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office provided an in-
formative session on the dangers of syn-
thetic drugs, and youths participated in
an 'Above the Influence" activity called
"Be It," in which they were given the task
of creating there own positive anti-drug
slogan.
Families also participated in activities
which further help students transfer the


skills learned in the classroom curricu-
lum into the home and community
Through local business and community
members, most families left with goodies
as well.
Eckerd's school-based prevention serv-
ices in Citrus County are provided to mid-
dle school students through a proven
model called Eckerd Hi-Five, which com-
bines character education with
evidence-based substance abuse and
violence-prevention interventions.
The Eckerd Hi-Five curriculum is
taught in classroom settings and deliv-
ered through weekly sessions which in-


Sof illegal drugs

elude role playing, modeling, thematic art
projects, conflict resolution games and
recreational activities.
Students in need of more intensive in-
terventions receive additional assistance
through group mentoring and participa-
tion in meaningful community service
projects. In addition, classroom activities
are enhanced through these family work-
shops held four times a year
For more information, or to find out
how to help, call Aileen David, Early
Intervention and Prevention coordinator,
at 352-584-6500.


50-year mark


Crystal Court No. 48,
Order of the Amaranth,
had its Official Visit from
the Grand Royal Matron
and Grand Royal Patron.
Special presentations
were made to Honored
Lady Ethel Winn on
achieving her 50-year
membership and being a
charter member of Crystal
Court. Honored Lady
Georgetta Doland was also
presented her 50-year pin
and certificate. From left
are: Honored Lady Judy
Barnes, Grand Royal
Matron; Honored Lady
Ethel Winn; Honored Lady
Georgetta Doland;
Honored Lady Carol Allen,
Royal Matron; Sir Knight
Barry Allen, Royal Patron;
and Sir Knight Gerald Lee,
Grand Royal Patron.

Special to the Chronicle


Have some class, save some money


AARP slates several Safe Driving courses


Special to the Chronicle
Any insurance company doing business
in Florida must give a discount to those
completing an AARP Safe Driving course,
open to everyone age 50 and older
Contact your agent for discount
amounts. Update yourself to earn a dis-
count and learn about newly enacted
motor vehicle and traffic laws.
Crystal River, Homosassa,
Homosassa Springs
Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and
15,1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library,


8619 W Crystal St., Crystal River Call Lou
Harmin at 352-564-0933.
Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and
19,1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal River Call Lou
Harmin at 352-564-0933.
Inverness, Hernando, Floral City
Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 21 and
22, 9 a.m. to noon, Citrus Memorial
Health System Auditorium. Call Don
Slough at 352-344-4003.
Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and
19,9 a.m. to noon, Inverness Elks Lodge,
3580 Lemon St., Hernando. Call Bob


Dicker at 352-527-2366
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and
15, 9 a.m. to noon, Brown Funeral Home,
5430 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Call Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731.
Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24,
10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Library,
425 W Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Joe Turck at 352-628-6764.
Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 26
and 27, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge
Library, 425 W Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly
Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764.
Course fee is $15 for AARP members;
$20 for all others.


New AARP Smart Driver Class on tap for Inglis


Special to the Chronicle
AARP will offer the new
one-day Smart Driver Class
beginning at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 29, at Vil-


lage Pines Campground,
8053 S.E. 140th Lane,
Inglis.
This is a completely new
six-hour class. Refresh
driving skills and learn


new rules of the road.
Learn research-based driv-
ing strategies for safety
There are no tests to
pass. An automobile insur-
ance discount is available


for seniors age 55 and
older.
Participants should bring
a sack lunch. Registration
is required by calling Linda
at 352-493-1742.


Service awards presented


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Commission presented service awards to employees at the regular board meeting in December. From left are:
Brad Ferguson, heavy equipment operator (30 years); Scott Adams, commissioner; Donald Cretty, auto parts manager (25 years);
Joe Meek, commissioner; Reagan Batterson, customer services specialist (five years); Dennis Damato, commissioner; Shannon
Budd, systems administrator (15 years); Rebecca Bays, commissioner; and John "JJ" Kenney, commissioner.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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North 01-10-14
4 Q 10 7 2
S8 5 4
AG
9 7 4 2
West East
S-- K J 3
V J 9 7 3 V Q 10 6 2
9 7 5 4 2 10 8 3
Q J 10 8 6 5 3
South
SA 9 8 6 5 4
V AK
KQJ
SAK
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
2 % Pass 2 Pass
2 & Pass .I Pass
6 4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 Q

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Alyson Stoner, an actress, dancer and singer,
said, "I want to learn how to play an instrument.
I want to break a world record. I'm just a very
determined, motivated type of person."
If one wants to be the best at anything, it re-
quires a lot of time and effort. But, occasionally,
one can tie a world record without that much
sweat as in this deal.
How should South play in six spades after
West leads the club queen to declarer's ace?
When North raised to three spades, that
promised some values. (Four spades would have
been weaker than three spades.) Then South bid
what he hoped he could make.
With the side suits solid, the only po-
tential problem is in the trump suit. An unlucky
careless declarer would cash the ace and finish
down one. A lucky careless declarer would play
a diamond to dummy's ace and call for the
spade queen. Here, that works, but would be un-
successful when West has all three missing
trumps.
The more thoughtful player works out how to
overcome a 3-0 break either way round. He
might lead a low spade toward dummy's queen.
But since he may get an overtrick when East has
the singleton king, South leads a diamond to
dummy's ace, then calls for the spade two. When
East plays the three, declarer covers with his
four, here winning the trick and tying one first-
round-of-trumps world record.
Finally, if East discards on the trump, South
wins with his ace and leads back toward
dummy's queen.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LESTY

@2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved
ROSIV



NUMMIE |



MAGGIN E
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

How long
have you Fiettn
had kitchen en
duty? years.
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LUNCHTIME AT THE
PRISON WAS---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: t"tt111
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: PRONE THIRD RADISH BAFFLE
I Answer: Feeding the hawks, vultures and owls at the
zoo was sometimes FOR THE BIRDS


ACROSS
Neither mate
Demolish
Cold War org.
Pinnacle
Sultan's
cousin
Perfume label
word
Rajah's spouse
Imaginary
fruit?
Swooned
Itty-bitty map
Bungle
Formic acid
producer
Jocular
nickname
Drill through
Bobby of
the NHL
Campus
building
Flair
Podium
Finish last
Ending for
depart


Left a blank
Roof part
Outback
jumper
Buddy
UFO pilot
Ready to ride
Jerseys
(2 wds.)
Pull apart
Broad st.
Kind of wave
No future -
Whammy
Baja Ms.
Nonverbal OK
DOWN
Rose Bowl org.
Old Dodge
model
- in (curbed)
Send
elsewhere
In the
course of
Sharp turn
Luxury fur


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HOYILE WIHIEY

BOSTON R OIT ATE
T U SKED LIP

AN A H E R N O RM
H AY S TU OHIO
STOA EMS MI NID
SNAG AT NED
ROA R Ll IEER
PB p IXJELISlTE
JAWOHL PETITE
SLIDIEISARIENAS
ITY[JR Y{LfrJT A


Follett and
Howard
Concert
proceeds
Roman
sculpture
Kennel sound


Want more puzzles?
Check oul the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OuillDriver Books.corn


- nous
Crushed
grapes
Goals
Down for
the count
Tax shelters
Faucet defect
Cattle mover
Primitive
weapon
"Fatha" Hines
Low-fat spread
Bridal notice
word
Mr. Spock's
father
Mild oath
Seashells
Astronaut
Buzz -
Macaroni, e.g.
Asian nurse
Dwell
Holly tree
Flatten a fly
Letterman
rival
Oklahoma
town
Banned bug
spray
Above, to
Tennyson


0 2014 UIFS- DsIl by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: My rela-
tionship with my
mother has always
been challenging. When she
could no longer grab me by
the hair and shake my head,
she adopted inappropriate
behavior with my boyfriends,
called me stupid,
worshipped my
brothers and sister-
in-law over me,
and much more.
The final straw
came in a tele-
phone conversa-
tion. My mother
said she was tired
from being out the
other day with a
friend. She asked,
"Do all old people AN
get tired when they MAI
go out?" I didn't
want to compare her with my
father, who works hard and
had visited me earlier that
week. I replied, 'All old peo-
ple age differently" My
mother then commenced
some heavy and deliberate
sighing that lasted the re-
mainder of the call while I
tried to make conversation. I
politely said goodbye.
When it was time for me to
make my annual call to her, I
picked up the phone and
started to dial but hung up
before reaching the last num-
ber I have not called my
mother since. That was three
years ago. My mother is now
83. I do not believe I am hold-
ing a grudge, although that
has been suggested to me. I
am just so hurt and ashamed
that my own mother would
reject me the way she has.
When is it OK to say enough?
- Don't Miss Her
Dear Don't The final straw
was a phone call where Mom


L


mostly sighed? And after
three years, you are still
angry We recognize that Mom
mistreated you when you
were younger, but you spoke
to her only once a year. It's
not a grudge so much as an
inability to deal with Mom's
behavior, and it
remains unre-
solved, which
mostly hurts you.
Ask yourself how
you would feel if
Mom died without
any further con-
tact. If that both-
ers you even
S slightly, please
talk to a profes-
sional and find a
IE'S way to work
.BOX through this, what-
ever the outcome.
Dear Annie: My wife and I
have been married for 15
years. It seems that if I don't
initiate sex, we never have
any I have told her what I
would like, but she shows no
interest She just lies there
and neither moves nor makes
a sound. I don't know
whether I am giving her any
pleasure.
I have discussed my con-
cerns with her and have
asked what she would like in
the bedroom, but she always
says, "Everything is fine. I
like what we do."
I am frustrated. I really
love my wife and don't want
to end the relationship, but I
have been having thoughts
about finding another lover
who will fulfill my needs in
the bedroom. Please help.
Not Sure What To Do
Dear Not Sure: Your wife
may feel inhibited about sex,
which is why she is silent in
the bedroom and won't dis-


cuss her preferences. It's also
possible that she doesn't
enjoy sex, for physical or
emotional reasons, and has
no interest in working at it.
Instead of talking about likes
and dislikes, tell her that her
stoic reaction to sex saddens
you and that it is threatening
the stability of your marriage.
Ask her to go with you to see
a marriage counselor or a
professional sex therapist.
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Working Hard,"
who futilely complained to
her boss and human re-
sources about a fellow em-
ployee who isn't doing his
share of the work.
Everywhere I have ever
worked, there are people
who do more than asked and
people who do so little it's
maddening. I have come to
the realization that complain-
ing about lazy co-workers is a
waste of time. Management
would rather put up with a
poor employee than admit
they made a mistake in hiring
or promoting that person in
the first place. WC.

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254 To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


C6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT






CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts

HIE1 7i4 WORLD
~lAK~ft(II14TTII61N)
A LITTLE ffiKJKAfT
N;UN JEW LIN-P5 NO CHE
C MIZES
ME IN MY/
VEN CLE&
DO156r5E




Pickles


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


N) 'OU T~lt k i R( rAA> M3Ef cj KT po r4U (l-e-T
AMK aiCS5 1 M ORo DOF I x C P\, 1^60' NEM CULE.N S M I I--,

LIST


-- IOAAA(.CU AT -


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"...An end to hunger? An end to disease?
And peace an earth? Seriously, pal, if you
can't think of anything realistic, may I
suggest the default wishes of wealth
beyond your wildest dreams, scores of
beautiful women and immortality?"


Doonesbury


Big Nate

SO MRS. GODiFREY'S
NOT GOJmG TO YELL
AT ANYONE ANYMORE,
-UHT I'LL 500N
CHANGE THAT!

IA r lo a n+40U > 1n






Arlo and Janis


GOMiREY NOT YELLING
AT US S A &OOBD
TAIN&: WHY tE5ss
IT UP'
TEMY T14[S 1J S J
GObFREY WE'e
TALK., ABOUT y
-r '.3 ---a 'rT-ri


IT'S. uP TO US To
BE AGAISL' ANYTIHIIN6
SHE'5 FOR! IF SHE
GETS HER WAY. THE
TERROfL5TS WINW
^-^__71--


I'M YT'r w E
WORRIED THAT H,'S
THAT /CAVR, YIN1
HE'5 A CUP OF
A LiO'ST CHOCOLATE
MAKING 1EPU16.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


To0y MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"American Hustle" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13) 8 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Her" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-
13) 1:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-
13) In 3D, high frame rate. 4 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones" (R)
1:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.


"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R) 1 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7
p.m. No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"American Hustle" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-13)
In 3D. 3:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Lone Survivor" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public LOCal RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
TODAY'S CLUE: s fnbid


"E GAZY LMY WAEDY ... E GAZY LMY


DKYGG. E GAZY BXRNF VYAVGY.


E GAZY YZYXF DEWHGY LMEWH RPAIL


WYS FAXJ."


- GYR KEBMYGY


Previous Solution: "I am militant about drugs.
You want to do 'em, you're out of my life." Sarah Michelle Gellar
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-10


COMICS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014 C7






C8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014



C ri cle Ii [h


CLASSIFIEDS



To


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tinme


* 00 .. 0 0 0 .0 -0


I'm a Lady, 79 yrs
Young, looking for a
gentlman in the
same age group for
friendship. If you'd
like to talk pleas e
call (352) 503-2338


-4*


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




Youurorld first

Need a jid)
iir u
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHLtONiLE
(_ _


CHAIR RECLINERS,
1 Lazy Boy $295;
1 Golden $375.
Both Excellent Cond,
352-270-8475
Beverly Hills
2bd +den, 1.5ba
family room, exc.
cond. no pets or
smokers, $700. mo.
6 Pennsylvania St
(586) 419-2041


CHEVY
VENTURA 2005 Van
74K mi. exc cond
extras included
$5,500 obo
(352) 637-6216
CITRUS
SPRINGS
INDOOR SALE
FRI. 10th 8a-2p
SAT. 11th 8a-1p
BOOKS, THINGS,
& SNACKS
UNITARIAN Church
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491
CITRUS SPRINGS
Saturday 11th, 7am
Contents of House
Antiques, Paintings,
Gym equip., free wgts
70 W. Lynnhaven PI.
DODGE
'96, Dakota, club cab,
w/shell cap, 209,188
miles. Runs good.
Many new parts.
$2,300 (352) 341-8415
HOMOSASSA
Huge Sale W/Open
House. House 4 Sale.
Fri. & Sat. 9A.-?.
5389 S. Memorial.
South 19 Village to
Memorial.
HOMOSASSA
John's Back!
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
ESTATE SALE*
Antiques, furn., clothes
wallpaper, electric
wheelchair, jewelry,
ruby glass & More
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market,
Follow pink signs
HOMOSASSA
RV RESORT
SAT. 11th 9a-3p,
Large Sale
Through Out Park
Formally Turtle Creek.
10200 W. Fishbowl Dr.
HONDA
1992, Helix Scooter
25k miles, good cond.
new tires, $1,500.
(352) 746-7378
MOBILE SUITES
5th WHEEL, custom
built 2004, 3 slides,
Easy Rider 16K hitch,
Many Xtra's. Must See
$22,000 352-897-5339


12 GAUGE SHELLS
10-Boxes, #4 shot.
$90 352-502-0722
NEW FENDER NEW-
PORTER WITH
FENDER
GIGBAG&TUNERAVG
STORE PRICE $289
MY PRICE $165
352-601-6625
OSCAR SCHMIDT
DELTA KING "335"
STYLE ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC SEMI
HOLLOW,BLACK $165
352-601-6625
RECUMBENT BIKE
Sears Proform 990,
wide seat, dig. display
w/ arm exercise $125;
Marcy multi-position
exercise gym, assem-
bled, 140 Ib selective
wts, lists at $495, ask-
ing $215. Exc Cond
(352) 382-7074
Sofa Sleeper
3 cushion, 2 throw
pillows beige print
$100
(352) 601-7380
Sugar Mill Woods
1/10& 1/11,8am
Entire household, some
vintage, all priced to sell
20 Cherry Palm Ct
Use GPS, no signs
TOYOTA
'05, Avalon XLS,
blue, sunroof, loaded,
23k miles, $15,000
(352) 527-7980



LICENSED CNA,
For Errands, Shopping
Dr. Appt.'s, References
352-362-2665



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 young cats came to
us; very friendly but
scared, 1 black, 1
cream, need good
homes, can help with
spay / neuter expenses
352-795-8800


FREE Papillion,
Male, special needs
1 year old, 41bs
(352) 726-9516



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
t Grouper @ $6.001lb
SStonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
GIFT SHIPPING *
8:30a-5p Closed Sun
352-726-6378



Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
Lost 2 Pairs of
Children's glasses. For
girl. One is red, one is
purple.
(352)419-7378
Male Yorkie, 6 Ibs,
brown & tan, Bubba,
last see on Alamo &
Flagstaff in Pine Ridge
1/5 Had on an army
jacket (352) 249-7675
Silver colored money
clip. White with green
lettering. Lost in area
of Wells Fargo Bank,
CR (352) 382-7656



Denture Partial,
Found in Inverness
Parking Lot near Big
Lots/Anytime Fitness
(352) 220-4931
Prescription Glasses
found 3 weeks ago
at Hunter Springs,
Crystal River, call
to identify
(352) 795-3701


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org


PET ADOPTION
Saturday, 10a-12
PET
SUPERMARKET
Inverness
(352) 527-9050 to
rehome small dogs
www.ahumanesocie
typetrescue.com




)k n .111 l [list.
Lk~i) Da)


Classifieds
Citip&IE


*** **
Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
florida.com
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12pm4pm
Floral City Adoption
Center 7358 S. Flor-
idaAve Sat10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.



Adopt a
rescued Pet 1,






at
1 r. [fe ALl .-^ '
View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adoptarescuedpet
.corn or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday, 10a 12p
PetSupermarket
(exceptions below)
Sat. 2/1
9am 3pm
Best Friends Fest
Citrus Cnty Aud.
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness


CAT
ADOPTIONS









COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home style
environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


emyountgaocMive
female cat, good with
other cats & people.
Updated on shots,
indoor only, spayed,
declawed 341-4103


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


987
324
561
756
143
892
215
479
638


213
865
479
931
728
654
34.6
3" 41-6

182
597


Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.00lb,
w, Grouper @ $6.00lb
e, Stonecrab@ $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001




TEACHER
Fulltime position. 40
hr certification
needed
LITTLE DISCIPLE
PRESCHOOL
352-302-2383


Need a:B
I #1 Employment source is


www.chronicleonline.com


SHome *Finder
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


PintYour b w t o....

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.(ch roniclehiomefinder.com


If interested in any of

the following areas



Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Lecanto

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

S CITRUS COUNTY

CHRIQNICLE
Vw.chronlcleonlina.com


456i
971
823
284
569
317
798
635
142


TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only_$28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
For Overnight Shifts
Apply Online: home
Instead.com/671

CNAs
We are expanding
our Nursing Services
All Shifts
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEC/AA
Employer M/F/V/D




City of Bushnell
Lift Station
Maintenance
Mechanic -
Water/Wastewater
Department
The City of Bushnell
is currently accept-
ing applications for
the position of Lift
Station Maintenance
Mechanic. Salary
is based on experi-
ence and includes
an excellent
benefits package.
Applicants must
meet the following
requirements:
Ability to trouble-
shoot and repair 3
phase electrical
service and controls,
maintain pumps,
blowers, valves,
meters, control
systems, piping, and
other equipment
related to water/
/wastewater plant
and distribution/
collection systems.
A high school
diploma or GED
required, with a DEP
collection system
certification pre-
ferred or ability to
become certified
within two years.
Applicants must
possess a valid
Florida Class A or B
CDL driver's license
or become certified
in three months.
Applications are
available at Bushnell
City Hall located at
117 E Joe P Strick-
land, JR Ave.
Bushnell, Florida or
on-line at http:www.
cityofbushnellfl.com.
Applications ac-
cepted until position
filled. Questions
concerning this
position may be
directed to Kelly
Marcoux,
352-793-2591 x 114.
This position is open
until filled. The City
of Bushnell is a drug
free workplace
EOE/ADA

INTERNET
MARKETING
Wanted motived
person with Photo-
shop, social media
and html skills as well
as a knowledge of
email marketing and
online marketing.
Great opportunity
with a growing com-
pany with clients
worldwide.
Check us out here
http://lmgmc.com/
companv/careers/
To apply email
resume to:
Andrew@ legendary
marketlng.com


I Anoncme


IAnouncm e







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cook, Server,
& Counter Server
Exp. Only apply
Taking Applications at
Chicken King
Hernando
2420 N Florida Hwy
NO PHONE CALLS
NEW OWNERSHIP




A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic

Must have valid
driver's license.
Min. 3 yrs. Exp.
Apply in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto, DFWP




Case Manager/
Farm Manager

Fax or Email
Resume to:
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT

LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

Security for a
Shelter

Evenings
Fax or email resume
352-489-8505
sipperd@
bellsouth.net

TELEMARKETERS
Experienced Only

Non-selling position
setting Appts. only!
Daily & wkly. Bonuses
1099 Position
Gerry (352) 628-0254



Your World

4 94, le a,,e,





CHrONicLE








Local smoke-free
Tennis Club

Looking for
part-time help with
computer skills
(Word, Excel) and
great customer
service skills. Week-
end shifts available,
flexibility a plus.
Pays $7.93 hr. E-mail
resume to: tennis@
citrushills.com




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


Financial

Opportunity for
Fulltime
Professional.

Must have book-
keeping accountingg
experience or
equivalent & profi-
cient in computers
and spreadsheets.
Able to multi-task
& communicate
well with others.
FAX RESUME TO
352-746-9033

Tax Accountant

2 5 yrs. Business Tax
Exp. CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search
@gmail.com









ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

* COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
* NAILS SKIN
* MASSAGE Therapy
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
*TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.
CAFE FOR LEASE

400 SF Located in
Busy waterfront boat
tour, rental company
and artist community
RIVER SAFARIS
10823 Yulee Drive
352-628-5222



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
613.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
SA local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structureslic.com


16 ONE QUART OLD
OIL CANS MUST TAKE
ALL. ONLY 75.00
3524640316




6 CU. FT. CHEST
FREEZER Kenmore
white 6 cu. ft. chest
freezer with basket and
owners manual 'only
used for a month$85.00
352-4194767
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
FREEZER small chest
freezer $40.00 works
good 352-302-3771
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398




AIR COMPRESSOR
30 gal, 5hp, 150 psi,
Craftsman $125;
ROTOTILLER, Honda, 4
cycle, Model #FG-110
$175 (352) 794-0296
Craftsman 10"
Bandsaw
w/stand, very good
condition $95.
352-212-1883
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$50 OBO
352464-0316
MITER SAW
Sears, 12" compound
$100; Leaf Blower,
mulcher and vacuum
Ryobylike new $100
OBO (352) 794-0296
OLDER STYLE
CRAFTMAN WORK-
BENCH $40.00
352-527-1399
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $90 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
OLDER MODEL
419-5981
SCAFFOLD 4ft. and 5ft.
scaffold and braces
$20.00 set
352-302-3771




150 WATT JVC THEA-
TER SURROUND
SOUND SYSTEM JVC
DVD Digital Home thea-
ter system,5disc
CD,four tower
speakers,subwoofer
and midrange speakers,
remote $100.00
352-4194767




FLAT SCREEN MONI-
TOR 19" viewsonic flat
screen computer moni-
tor
$35.00 352-302-3771
Spotless King Size
Simmons Beauty Rest
Mattress, box spring,
aprox. 7 or 8 yrs. old
$395. Call Ken
(352) 382-5149


..fl'


YourI'\\ od first

Need a ih)
ir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CiWipMICLE


5 pc. Dining Set
w/swivel chairs, wicker
backs, square table &
sage/brown $225.
(352) 897-4154


Fumiture

Antique Couch & two
swivel rockers
$200. for all 3
Good condition
352-634-4329
BOOK CASE large oak
bookcase
18x30x72 $95.00
352-621-3360
Dinette Set
Bamboo table w/
glass top& 4 chairs.
$100; 2 Fabric recliners
& 3 cushion sofa $175
(352) 746-0620
DINING TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS Solid wood
Canadel Brand. Table
30X48 with white legs.
Chairs with white legs
and backs. Great for
small dining area or
kitchen. $200 or best
offer. Phone:
352-270-3685
DOUBLE BOXSPRING
@ MATTRESS guest
room box spring used
very little, clean. $85
352-613-5240
For Sale Adjustable
Electric Bed,
Like New
$250.
(352) 344-1960
Kitchen Table, with
4 chairs, beautiful
green print,
excellent cond.,
almost brand new
$550. (352) 746-1705
Leather Wing Chair,
Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $750
(352) 212-2798
New Sofa,
excellent condition
tweed, neutral $250.
2 matching Leather
recliner chairs, brand
new, black & medium
brown $200ea. or $350
for both non smoking
home. (352) 527-1963
New Twin Bed
Frame, boxspring &
Mattress $100. firm
(352) 795-0783
SOFA
brown neutral color,
excellent condition
$150. ask for Mimi
(352) 795-7285
Sofa Sleeper
3 cushion, 2 throw
pillows beige print
$100
(352) 601-7380
Two Tan Leather
Couches
little wear, $150. ea.
$250. for 2, Dunnellon
(352) 465-9114
Wooden Hutch
filled with china
and old silverware,
asking $400. obo
(352) 419-6865




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
ChipperlShredder
Craftsman 3", 7.5 HP,
OHV, Model #
247.776350. Strong
machine, little use.
$250 OBRO
(352)489-2011
Troy bilt Chipper/
Shredder,
6/2HP Motor,
good condition
Asking $225.
(352) 527-1963




HYACINTHS 30
PLANTS FOR WATER
GARDEN BLUE FLOW-
ERS 10 FOR $15
464-0316




CITRUS
SPRINGS
INDOOR SALE
FRI. 10th 8a-2p
SAT. 11th 8a-1p
BOOKS, THINGS,
& SNACKS
UNITARIAN Church
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS SPRINGS
Saturday 11th, 7am
Contents of House
Antiques, Paintings,
Gym equip., free wgts
70 W. Lynnhaven PI.

CITRUS SPRINGS
Thur-Fri-Sat 8am-2pm
MOVING SALE, tools,
furn, lawn eq, more.
9328 N Citrus Sps blvd

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/10, 1/11, 1/128a-4p
Hundreds of items
Under roof, rain or sun
9639 N Misty Janell Ter
Off Dunnellon Rd

HERNANDO
ESTATE SALE *
Fri. 9a-2p & Sat 9a-2p
1246 E. Liberty Street
Info & pics. at: www.
invernessantiques.com

HERNANDO
Fri. &Sat., 9am-3pm
Wildlife Prints, water-
ford Glassware,
Beanie & TY Babies,
Golf Clubs,
MUCH MUCH MORE.
121 E. Glassboro Ct.

HOMOSASSA
Huge Sale W/Open
House. House 4 Sale.
Fri. & Sat. 9A.-?.
5389 S. Memorial.
South 19 Village to
Memorial.

HOMOSASSA
John's Back!
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
ESTATE SALE*
Antiques, furn., clothes
wallpaper, electric
wheelchair, jewelry,
ruby glass & More
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S. Tex Point.,
Across from How-
ards Flea Market,
Follow pink signs

HOMOSASSA
RV RESORT, SAT. 11th,
9a-3p, Rain date 1/18
Large Sale
Through Out Park
Formally Turtle Creek.
10200 W. Fishbowl Dr.

HOMOSASSA
Sat 1/11,8a-2p
Estate Sale, Everything
must go, Riverhaven
5090 S Stetson Pt Dr

INVERNESS
ANNUAL TRASH.
TREASURE & BAKE
SALE
Fri. Jan 10 8am 2pm.
Sat. Jan 11 8am 12p
First Presbyterian
206 Washington Ave.
All proceeds go to
charities.

INVERNESS
ESTATE SALE
Thurs. Fri. Sat 1/9
thru 1/11. 8am- 3pm
AMERICAN TRADING
POST Has been hired
to help liquidate the
**Estate at
6316 E Penrose*
off S. Apopka, Entire
Home contents must
go! Furn, hshld,
tools, etc...
CASH ONLY!

INVERNESS
MOVING SALE *
Starting Thursday,
Until Gone,
Golf clubs, household
9290 E Windwood Lp.



MUST SELL
. r-'c -1 -4
MORRISTON
MOVING SALE
Jan 10, 11, 12,
8:30am to 6pmr
Antiques Galorel I
tankless water heater
and MUCH MORE!!!
12851 SE 77TH ST





INVERNESS
ESTATE SALE
Thurs. Fri. Sat 1/9
thru 1111. 8am- 3Dm
AMERICAN TRADING
POST Has been hired
to help liquidate the
**Estate at
6316 E Penrose*
off S. Apopka, Entire
Home contents must
go! Furn, hshid,
tools, etc...
CASH ONLY!


DUNNELLON
1/09 to 1/13
MOVING furniture,
hsehold & yard items.
LAKE TROPIC ANA
18718 SW51st LANE
Sugar Mill Woods
1/10& 1/11,8am
Entire household, some
vintage, all priced to sell
20 Cherry Palm Ct
Use GPS, no signs




3 DOUBLE ROLLS VI-
NYL WALL COVERING
$25 FLORAL DESIGN
165 SQ FT E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &
ACCESSORIES $30.
464-0316
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HANDCRAFTED
HEARTS/BUNNIES/TED
DY BEARS 419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $60
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$100 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGES. 3 bird
cages $15 for all.
352-465-0580
CAL-HAWKADJUSTA-
BLE CHROME
TRAILER RECEIVER-
10" drop, 2" ball, 50001lb,
Ex. $60, 628-0033
COLUMBIA D44
BENCH VICE- 4-1/2"
Jaw, swivel base, 25lbs,
made in USA, EX., $30.
352-628-0033
EAZ-LIFT TRAILER
HITCH RECEIVER-
2-5/8" 60001b ball,
1000# MUHC, 10,000
MGTWR, $75 628-0033
FISHING TACKLE
WANTED- vintage, new
and used, cash.
352-628-0033
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
or Grouper @ $6.001lb
Stonecrab @ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
Full Size Traffic Light
$250.
Golf Cart Top w/
brackets and folding
windshield fits all
brands $150
(315) 466-2268 cell
GAS FURNACE
Coleman, Propane
gas 66,000 BTU, very
little use $100
(608) 732-4049 cell
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
LIQUOR BAR
W/STOOLS
dk wood w/black marble
top w/brass footrail
2 upholstered bar stools
exc. cond $650.obo
(352) 419-6016
MIRROR 48"x68" Mirror.
$75.00 OBO
352-212-2051
OUTBOARD MOTOR
SKAG/PROP GUARD-
stainless steel, fits 30 to
70 HP motor, $30,
352-628-0033
SCHWINN SEARCHER
WOMEN'S BIKE- com-
fort seat/handlebars, 21
spd, 26" alloy wheels,
$65.00 628-0033
SEARS MANUAL
BATTERY CHARGER-
6/2AMPs, Ex., $20.
352-628-0033
SONY STEREO
EQUIPMENT $50
AM/FM, AMPLIFIER,
DUAL CASSETTE,
CABLES 419-5981
VINTAGE REED MFG.
HVY. DUTY BENCH
VICE- 4-1/2" jaws,
80lbs, USA, Date- 1914,
$80. 352-628-0033
WIRE SHELVING 16 IN
WIDE 87 FT LONG all
brackets included
$100.00 352-527-1399
WOMEN'S BLACK
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS $15 KNEE
HIGH LIKE NEW
LARGE 419-5981


FRIDAY,JANUARY 10, 2014 C9


I I I


"It's hard to believe you've never
put up wallpaper before."


MCedica


2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS,
1 Lazy Boy $295;
1 Golden $375.
Both Excellent Cond,
352-270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
URONLY $20
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352-464-0316




EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL SIZE
(DRED)FLAT TOP
W/GIGBAG&TUNER
$85 352-601-6625
MINI ELECTRIC GUI-
TAR "LAP STEEL"
HUMBUCKIN
PICKUPGIGBAG &
BAR $75 352-601-6625
New Acoustic Guitar
Dark MahogonyY
W/Gigbag, Tuner,
Strings & Picks $70
352-601-6625
OSCAR SCHMIDT
DELTA KING "335"
STYLE ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC SEMI
HOLLOW,BLACK $165
352-601-6625
Scandalli Accordian
120 full base, exc.
condition, $600.
(352) 341-0299




RECUMBENT BIKE
Sears Proform 990,
wide seat, dig. display
w/ arm exercise $125;
Marcy multi-position
exercise gym, assem-
bled, 140 Ib selective
wts, lists at $495, ask-
ing $215. Exc Cond
(352) 382-7074


MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316




12 GAUGE SHELLS
10-Boxes, # 4 shot.
$90 352-502-0722
Brushed Suede Chaps
sml upper thigh 22",
never worn $100.
(352) 637-3673
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $350
(352) 464-2687


Sell or Swa


*J

IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Children Toys,
strollers, car seats
& cribs 352-563-5437
or 352-795-0161
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED- HARLEY
Cycles, Golf Carts or
Parts, Cash on Spot
(315) 466-2268 Cell


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820





AKC YORKSHIRE
MALE PUP very small,
health cert., shots,
(352) 489-0960


JO JO
Jo Jo, a loving,
affectionate 4-y.o.
bulldog/hound mix,
HW-negative,
housebrkn, spayed.
Special needs dog
D/T hip dysplasia for
which needs
Rimadyl or Gluco-
samine. She doesn't
know she has a
problem, however;
runs & plays like any
other dog. Is there a
compassionate
family or individual
who could give this
girl a good home,
with limitless devo-
tion from her?
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682 or
352-795-1288.


~rw~na frn~kwt


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



EXP. Help for Elderly
Care. Lgt Housekping,
dr's appt's, shopping
etc.. (352) 422-3837
LICENSED CNA,
For Errands, Shopping
Dr. Appt.'s, References
352-362-2665




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518














JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
*k 352-422-7279 -k-k



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696


4X8 STACK
delivered & stacked
$80. (352) 201-0912
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
*eFAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
e RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
p--l---lq
I NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR &
S MAINT INC
Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
homerepaircom I
Lic. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Visa/MC/Discover

We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning



ti


Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

JLl = 1, 11 H [l L

- tll 'V 'I d i llSt.




CHRpONicLE
Classifieds




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards


Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
S- RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
4 NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
p f l 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
GREG'S emMARCITE E I

G-R-EG,', MAR|T #1 Employment source is
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 www.chronicleonline.com


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.














TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
CLAYPOOL'S Tree Serv.
Now Proudly Serving
Citrus Co. Lic/Ins. Free
Est. Competitive Rates
352-201-7313
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


HERMAN"
@ Laughlngstoc International Inc DISl by Universal UCJ ck or UFS 2014


1-10






C LO FRIDAY,JANUARY 10, 2014

WORDY GURDY

D y BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. JFK portrayer Rob's archery gear (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
[and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Corruption-free admissions head (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Cunningly astute overly modest one (1) syllables in each word.
S112014UFS,Dist byUniv UcickforUFS
4. Cheats "Producers" director Mel (1)


5. Cause harm to Fred's dancing partner (2)


6. At-no-charge crisscross framework (2)


7. N.Y. ad avenue's Hyatt Hotels competitors (3)


SNOSS0IIv SNOSIVW 'L 3IoLLVI SIIv0H9 '9 a30NI 3M20NI "s
SNOOfi 8sI00 RflIMd UMIIHS NV3a V INvI SXOS SA M O SaA I
1-10-14 SIAKSNV


Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827

Leekl


TINY Tiny is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

L


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1r bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
HERNANDO
RENT TO OWN, Very
clean DW 3/2 New
carpet, shed, fenced,
$695.mo 352-419-1744
LECANTOIC.R.
2/2/1, D/W com-
pletely remodeled,
Central Air/Heat,
W/D Hookup. New
Carpet/Vinyl, and
Paint, 2 screened
Satio's, store room.
650. mo. $650. dep
No Pets/Smoking
Very Nice Home
Hurrry 352-464-0999



FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Fleetwood
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at$499/month
John Lyons ()
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details



SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then V
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512



*55+ Park in Lecanto*
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984


FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, 1BA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356

For Sale %1-0

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must seel Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858





Homososso Adult Park
2BR/IBA. Newly
remodeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$4,800 (608)921-5564
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




S-AcTION-r
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
w il.iruvsCouvlyHiiRole i.en co m
CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr............... $800
3/2/2 Nice location 1254 sq ft.
8410 N Elkcam Blvd.............$800
3/2/1 New listing'
6913 N Gladstone Dr........... $875
3/2/2 Splitfloor plan 1515 sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt.............$500
2/1 Nice, (lean duplex
1650 W Homosassa Trl.......500
2/1 nice duplex
1396 W Green Acres............$650
3/2 DW mobileon 1/2ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
5164 N Dewey Way (Her).....$00
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
FLORAL CITY
6383 S. Tompaul Ter.............$550
1/1 Home
Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

-1
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds, garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310







Rental Assist.
Available NOW!

^Bedrooms^
Call Monday
8.00am
Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352) 447-0106
TDD ph # 1.800-955-8771
This Institution IS an equal
S opportunty provider & employer
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio in
quiet area. $525/mo +
$525 Sec.352-344-0238
INVERNESS
Nice 2 bed. 1 bath with
refridg and stove in In-
verness. Does have
w/d hookup. $500 a
month. First and Last
months rent plus $300
security before move in.
352-201-4363 phone


Lwii
CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Carport, Extra
Clean. (352) 613-4459
INVERNESS
2/2, updated, immacul.
$625. mo 317-442-1063



HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



CRYSTAL RIVER
"RENT REDUCED-
3/1 Country Home on
stilts,w/fenced yard.
$565 + Utilities.
Call 920-922-6800


KIMffin=uFIT!
Beverly Hills
2bd+den, 1.5ba
family room, exc.
cond. no pets or
smokers, $700. mo.
6 Pennsylvania St
(586) 419-2041
INVERNESS
2/2, modern, $600m
dishwasher, W/D,
screened back porch.
F/US.close to Publix,
P.O. 352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2413 Jungle Camp Rd.
Sm. 2/1, Cottage,
New roof/septic,
fenced in yard, handy
cap. Access, River Ac-
cess, No electric dep.
1 Small Pet Ok
$450. mo. $450. dep
Hurry! 352-464-0999
Inverness
2bd/1 ba/lcg
$550. mo. first, last &
damage, immediate
occup.(352) 341-2838
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2 &
3/2/2 $795/mo & Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Highlands, 3/2/2
$700 mo + dep.
(352) 422-6978
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

Ul stt


DEB
THOMPSON
"One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(a)vahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785
Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. "Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
t^t

: -" -"!,d.t r '.Hi ;


CLASSIFIEDS



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuyers
100o% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


Real Estate is MY
Business!
Buying or Selling?
CONTACT
Teri Paduano
Broker/Owner
Realty Connect!


15+ Years Exp.
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




home, above ground Condo for Sale
pool. Fenced, Appli- Sugarmill Woods
dances, Kindness Terr. 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.r,
off Grover Clev, $42K 35 Beech Street
As is. 352-419-8816 607-538-9351
I~II
E ti- ll 1--ild Jt.t
I L. -,, L",L,,


PFor Sale CIRpNICLE BIYJ
S Cl-ssifi,,e BETTY J.
HOMOSASSAPO E
4/2 BLOCK HOME, Cir cot POWELL
MOTHER IN LAW APT. Realtor
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, H Realtor
lots of privacy $65,000"ur Success s my
(305) 619-0282, Cell g M Success gs y
____________goal. Making
Friends along the
Bway is my reward"

-in BUYING OR


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Stil great vd-
uesout
there for
buyers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell


Your World






CHiKoNILE


#1 Employment source is


www.chrieonline.com


-
-jug*-
~b. r~
-taa 0~sanuI!Y!
wilt


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers

Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news
and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that
assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well
informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,
today and tomorrow.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...

GET THE FACTS.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


O101XHJ


CITRUS COUNTY


CHIUONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Scarboroum 2010


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'W CHEAPA^
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245
U I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245*

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattd
centurv21 .com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855








[I




Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com



eeeeeeeeeH


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
Mini Farms ,Silver
Leaf Rd, Dunnellon
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$39,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002


="


omiirw orld first


Need a jil)

or a

qualified
employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!


CHRpNICLE
_______
( mu~. -Iui.iiijif


BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
See What $9k Can Buy
8471 County Rd 614 A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252





Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100

Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paint,all appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


BUYING HOMES
In Need of TLC, Fair
Pricing, Fast Closings
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271





Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**

CANOE W/ PADDLES
Water Quest by KL
Industries. Seats 3,
center cooler, sturdy,
stable, great shape
$350 (352) 897-4154

Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628

Dock Space For Rent,
Floating, Deep Canal
200 ft. from Crystal
River, (352) 257-8850

PONTOON
1990 24 ft Harris. 2005
50 HP Honda; No
trailer, $4000
(352) 634-2018

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com





01 Prevost Vogue 45ft
Featherlite Motorhome
NICEST ONE in Central
FL,81kmi, 500hp/
CAT Diesel Engine.
Divorced/ Must Sell!
1 (352) 795-1272

FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
may trade, very good
tires, lots of storage
11 k obo352-263-4339

MOBILE SUITES
5th WHEEL, custom
built 2004, 3 slides,
Easy Rider 16K hitch,
Many Xtra's. Must See
$22,000 352-897-5339

SOUTHWIND
98' V-10 eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WILDERNESS
24 ft, Camper
Call
(772) 260-4363 cell
to see and appreciate




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Lo~k

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w ANYCV OlNDITIOIN


AFFORDABLE
Autos & Trucks
'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

Buy Here/Pay Here

'03 Dodge Stratus
$795 Down

'02 Ford Taurus
$750 Down

'00 Chrysler 300
$875 Down

'99 Ford Escort
$595 Down

'98 Chev Cavalier
$695 Down

CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2000 Taurus, great
shape, 121k miles,
$2500 Firm. (352)
795-5784 or 212-3720
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

New Year Specials

02 Nissan Sentra
4 dr, 63k mi, $5900
'02 Olds Silhouette
AWD, Premier Pack.
Leather, Loaded
65k miles, $6995
'03 Honda Element
4 Cyl, Auto, Good
Gas Mileage $6500
'04 Chevy Extra Cab
4.8 Engine, Auto,
Runs Great! $5900
'06 Dodge Ram 1500
4 Dr, Auto, 6 cyl,
x-tra Clean $6500
Gulf Breeze Auto
352-257-3894
352794-6069

NISSAN
97 Maxima SE, mint
cond. all pwr. sun-roof
alloy whls, velour, 124k
mi.$2750.352-586-8931
TOYOTA
'05, Avalon XLS,
blue, sunroof, loaded,
23k miles, $15,000
(352) 527-7980








11i.t-.11.i111


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DODGE
'95, Ram 1500, good
work truck, w tool box
126k mi.V8 needs
paint & TLC, $2,000
obo, 305-393-1404
DODGE
'96, Dakota, club cab,
w/shell cap, 209,188
miles. Runs good.
Many new parts.
$2,300 (352) 341-8415


2002 1500 Quad cab,
short bed, 53,850 mi,
Many Extra's! $8,950
(352) 795-1499

FORD
1994 F150
300 in-line, 6 cyl
$750. obo
(352) 422-1681


Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018


CLASSIFIED




HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

TOYOTA
1999, Rav, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C. runs
great. Low miles
$2,800. 352-628-1646



CHEVY
VENTURA 2005 Van
74K mi. exc cond
extras included
$5,500 obo
(352) 637-6216




844-0110 FCRN


FRIDAY,JANUARY 10, 2014 CIA


CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van.
74K mi. good cond
extras included++
$6,000 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
'06 Town & Country, LX
Loaded, 6 DR, dual AC
V6, stow seats, CD,
maintained, garaged
clean $5,500,212-9383
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




HONDA
1992, Helix Scooter
25k miles, good cond.
new tires, $1,500
(352) 746-7378
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$4950. 352-513-4257

Noicesto 'eilor.
Adinistaf


Kowalsky, Leonard E. 2013-CP-654 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-654
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEONARD E. KOWALSKY
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Leonard E. Kowalsky a/k/a Leonard Earl
Kowalski, deceased, whose date of death was October 1, 2013, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 3, 2014.
Personal Representative:
/s/Gary Kowalsky
16 Harris Street, Petaluma, California 94952
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John A. Nelson, Florida Bar Number: 0727032, Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.,
2218 Highway 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453, Phone 352-726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223,
emailservicejohn@slaymakerlaw.com, Secondary: legalasst3@slaymakerlaw.com
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 3 & 10, 2014.


F S l:


839-0110 FCRN
Hulsebus, Gaylord R. 09-2013-CA-001226 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.09-2013-CA-001226
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC;
Plaintiff,
vs.
GAYLORD R. HULSEBUS, DECEASED, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES, WHETHERSAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIMAN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, BENEFICIARI ES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST GAYLORD R.
HULSEBUS, DECEASED and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GAYLORD R. HULSE BUS

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 8709 N. ZAVAL AVE. DUNNELLON
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid
Defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an actbn to foreclose a mortgage on the folbwing
described property:
PARCEL 17, MINI FARMS UNIT 16, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION,
FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 IN SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH ,
RANGE 17 EAST. SUBJECT TO A 25 FOOT EASEMENT ALONG THE
SOUTH AND WEST BOUNDARIES THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on the attorney for the Plaintiff, Morales Law Group, PA., whose address is
14750 NW 77th Court, Suite 303, Miami Lakes, FL 33016, and the file original with the Clerk
within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before February 3, 2014. If
you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Fore-
closure Complaint.
Dated: December 11, 2013
ANGELAVICK
(Seal) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By/s/Vivian Cancel, Deputy
Clerk
January 3& 10, 2014


841-0110 FCRN
Ducharme, Kenneth 2013 CA001207A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTYFLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013 CA 001207 A
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
VS.
KENNETH DUCHARME; et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Kenneth Ducharme
Unknown Spouse of Jenneth Ducharme
Last Known Residence: 7135 W Sunfire Loop, Crystal River, Fl 34428
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following prop-
erty in Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 6, BLOCK A, OF THE OAKS, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION FURTHER DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 12,
BLOCK B, A.J. SWANSON'S SUNSHINE PARK, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 80, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH
89'52'57" EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID A.J. SWANSON'S SUNSHINE
PARK, A DISTANCE OF 550 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 89'52'57" EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 0'02' WEST 99.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 8955' WEST 100 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 0'02' EAST 99.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on ALDRIDGE I CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff's attorney, at 1615 South Congress Av-
enue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days
of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before February 3, 2014 on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition

Dated on December 11, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
[COURT SEAL]
By: /s/ Dawn Nampel, As Deputy Clerk
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle January 3 & 10, 2014. 1175-3557B


842-0110 FCRN
Walsh, Peggy L. 09-2013-CA-000553 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
NO.: 09-2013-CA-000553
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO
BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES WMABS 2006-HE1 TRUST,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, ORAGAINST,
PEGGY L. WALSH A/K/A PEGGY BLANKENSHIP WALSH, DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
GEORGENA SUE KINCAID A/K/A GEORGENA S. KINCAID, AS AN HEIR OF THE ES-
TATE OF PEGGY L. WALSH A/K/A PEGGY BLANKENSHIP WALSH

Last Known Address: 1645 S Wilcox St Apt 1S, Bloomington, IN 47401-2919
Current Address: Unknown

ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS

Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 2, COLONY ESTATES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 10757 E CARR LN, INVERNESS, FL 34450-6347
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either
before January 8, 2014 service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 14th day of November, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
[COURT SEAL]
By: /s/ VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk


Foecour ei orclsre al,
Action ^^ Notce ctin Ntics


-See the Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Ad-
ministrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450,
(352) 641-67000, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. To file re-
sponse please contact Citrus County Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, FL
34450, Tel: (352) 341-6400; Fax: (352) 341-6413.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 3 & 10, 2014 EF-11-90027


843-0110 FCRN
Walsh, Peggy L. 09-2013-CA-000553 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
NO.: 09-2013-CA-000553

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO
BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES WMABS 2006-HE1 TRUST,
Plaintiff,

vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST,
PEGGY L. WALSH A/K/A PEGGY BLANKENSHIP WALSH, DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST, PEGGY L. WALSH A/K/A PEGGY BLANKENSHIP WALSH, DECEASED
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown

ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Cit-
rus County, Florida:

LOT 2, COLONY ESTATES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 10757 E CARR LN, INVERNESS, FL 34450-6347
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either
before February 3, 2014 service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of December, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
[COURT SEAL]
By: /s/ VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
*See the Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Ad-
ministrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450,
(352) 641-67000, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Tofile re-
sponse please contact Citrus County Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, FL
34450, Tel: (352) 341-6400; Fax: (352) 341-6413.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 3 & 10, 2014
11-90027


845-0110 FCRN
Gonyea,Cecil 09-2013-CA-000523 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
09-2013-CA-000523
JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST CECIL A.
GONYEA A/K/A CECIL ANNA GONYEA F/K/A CECIL A.
LAZETTE, DECEASED.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JAMES ALLEN SWESEY A/K/A JAMES A. SWESEY, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF
CECIL A. GONYEA A/K/A CECIL ANNA GONYEA F/K/A CECIL A. LAZETTE,
DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:12205 E Outer Springer Loop Road, Palmer, Ak 99645
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
THERESAANN SCHEALL, ASAN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF CECILA. GONYEA A/K/A
CECIL ANNA GONYEA F/K/A CECIL A. LAZETTE, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1591 N. Arkansas Terrace, Hernando, FL 34442
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to forecbse a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida:
LOT 19 BLOCK H, HERNANDO CITY HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 111 AND 112, PUB-
LIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDAAND
LOT 20, BLOCK H HERNANDO CITY HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 111 AND 112, PUB-
LIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1988 FLEETCRAFT MOBILE HOME
LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN#
FL1FL4212A
AND FL1FL4212B
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition.
This note shall be published once each week fortwo consecutive weeks in the Citrus
County Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 14th day of October,
2013.
[COURT SEAL]
Angela Vick, Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ VIVIAN CANCEL, As Deputy Clerk
Ronald RWolfe &Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
*See Americans with Disabilities Act-
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact:Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street,
Inverness, FL 34450-4231, Phone:352-341-6700 Fax: 352-341-7008
January 3 & 10, 2014
F13000656


846-0110 FCRN
Miller, Sean M. 2013-CA-000746 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000764
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
v.
SEAN M. MILLER AIK/A SEAN MURPHY MILLER, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
SEAN M. MILLER A/K/A SEAN MURPHY MILLER, and all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants.
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
9295 North Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, Florida 34434

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida, to-wit:

LOT 12, BLOCK 192, OF CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 133 THROUGH 152, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Robert M. Coplen, Esquire, Robert M. Coplen, PA., 10225 Ulmerton Road,
Suite 5A, Largo, FL 33771, on or before February 3, 2014, or within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at
110 N Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 19th day of November, 2013.
Angela Vivk, Clerk of the Court
(SEAL) By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citus County Chronicle, January 3 & 10, 2014.


847-0110 FCRN
Nichol, RodneyA. 2013-CA-0001276A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2013-CA-0001276 A


SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
v.

RODNEYA. NICHOL, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
RODNEY A. NICHOL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RODNEY A. NICHOL and DENISE
NICHOL, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named
Defendantss, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claim-
ants.
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
13000 South Istachatta Road, Floral City, FL 34436.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida, to-wit:

THE NORTH % OF LOT 1, OF FLORAL ACRES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION BE-
ING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THE NORTH 1/ OF THE FOL-
LOWING: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH 1/ OF THE NE
/4 OF THE SW /4 OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE N 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 29 SECONDS W, ALONG


Foreclosure S
Aclion Nofic7e'so I


FoelsueSl


Foelsr al.







C12 FRIDAY,JANUARY 10, 2014

0 1W orclsu eSale Il
Wmlui "ill njfc ActionHiJ .i-f No ces ~ uui

THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF
41.83 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 39,
THENCE N 1 DEGREE 45 MINUTES 54 SECONDS E, ALONG SAID WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 332.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE N 1 DEGREE 45 MINUTES 54 SECONDS E, ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 236.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE
OF A CURVE, CONCAVE EASTERLY, HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 6 DEGREES 31
MINUTES 33 SECONDS AND A RADIUS OF 851.48 FEET, THENCE NORTHEASTERLY
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE AND ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DIS-
TANCE OF 96.98 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NORTH 1/2 OF THE
NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 (CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID POINTS BE-
ING N 5 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 38 SECONDS E 96.93 FEET), THENCE N 89 DEGREES
07 MINUTES 04 SECONDS W, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 262.03
FEET, THENCE S 1 DEGREE 57
MINUTES 16 SECONDS W 332.77 FEET, THENCE S 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS E 257.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Robert M. Coplen, Esquire, Robert M. Coplen, P.A., 10225 Ulmerton Road,
Suite 5A, Largo, FL 33771, on or before February 3, 2014, or within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at
110 N Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 12th day of Dece,ber, 2013.
Angela Vivk, Clerk of the Court
(SEAL) By:/s/Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times in the Citus County Chronicle, January 3 & 10, 2014.


858-0117 FCRN
Murphy, Andrew H. 09-2013-CA-001040 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-2013-CA-001040
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDREW H. MURPHY, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUS-
TEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, ANDREW
H. MURPHY ALSO KNOWN AS ANDREW H.A. MURPHY, DECEASED
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida:
THE MEADOWS LOT 127 COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2
OF THE WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWN-
SHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; GO THENCE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST AND ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE AFORESAID
WEST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 30 FEET;THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 48 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 531.66FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 19MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 80 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES19 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 80 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES34 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE
POINT OFBEGINNING.
A/K/A 6544 W SWALLOW LN HOMOSASSA FL 34448-7322
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with
this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of December, 2014.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court
Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450,
(352) 641-67000, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than seven days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. To file
response please contact Citrus County Clerk of Court, 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness,
FL 34450, Tel: (352) 341-6400; Fax: (352) 341-6413.
January 10 & 17, 2014 016889F01


860-0103 FCRN
NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) announces the follow-


CLASSIFIED




ing public meeting to which all interested persons are invited:
Channels A & G Tidal Tributary Pilot Study Public Meeting. Informational meeting on
a pilot study between the Tampa Bay Estuary Program and the Southwest Florida
Water Management District on how tides affect the habitats of the creeks and
canals in Channels A & G and how it will affect the operations of the water control
structures on these waterways.
DATE/TIME: Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014; 6-7:30 p.m.
PLACE: Town-n-Country Regional Library, 7606 Paula Dr, Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33616
A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may contact: Nancy.Norton watermatters.org
;1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (813) 985-7481, x2203
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 3, 2014. #EXE0296


863-0110 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has
intent to sell the vehicles)
below under FloridaStatutes
713.78.The undersigned will
sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding on the
premises where said
vehicles) have been stored
and are located at


Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
4212W Hwy 44,
Lecanto, FL 34461
DOS:01-21-14@8AM
1996 FORD VIN#
1FMDU32X4TZA06607
2000 DODG
VIN#1B7KF2361YJ124819
DOS:01-23-14@8AM
1988 OLDS VIN#
1G3HN54C6JW353475
DOS:01-24-14@8AM
2005 GULS


VIN#1GBE5U1E44F52030
1
Purchases must be paid for
at the time of sale, cash
only All vehicles are sold
as is and must be removed
at the time of sale. All sales
are subject to cancellation
in the event of settlement
between owner and the
obligated party.
January 10, 2014


861-0110 FCRN
Lien Foreclosure-1-27 Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the following vehicles will be sold at public auction pursu-
ant to F.S. 713.585 on the sale dates at the locations below at 9:00 a.m. to satisfy la-
bor and storage charges. 1992 Jeep 1J4FJ58S8NL218116 Total Lien: $938.10 Sale
Date:01/27/2014 Location:Demarcorp.com, Inc 4288 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy Lecanto,
FL 34461 352-249-3147 Pursuant to F.S. 713.585 the cash amount per vehicle would
be sufficient to redeem that vehicle from the lienor Any interested party has a right
to a hearing prior to the sale by filing a demand for the hearing with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court in Citrus and mailing copies of the same to all owners and lienors. The
owner/lienholder has a right to recover possession of the vehicle by posting bond
pursuant to F.S. 559.917 and if sold any proceeds remaining from the sale will be de-
posited with the Clerk of Circuit Court for disposition.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 10, 2014


856-0110 FRCRN
1/14 Hearings/Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing, 2:00 p.m.; Regu-
lar Meeting, 4:00 p.m. and a Public Hearing, 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, January 14,2014
in the Board Room of the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main Street,
Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Administrative Meeting is to act upon proposed student
expulsion(s). The Regular Meeting is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come before the Board. The Public Hearing is to approve the revisions to
Policy 4.72, Homeless Students; Policy 5.321, Bullying and Harassment; Policy 5.621
Student Medications and Policy 6.61 HIV, AIDS, or Other Communicable Diseases,
Bloodborne Pathogens and Environmental Hazards.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

/S/Sandra Himmel, Superintendent Citrus County School Board
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle, Friday, January 10,2014.

857-0110 FCRN
01/23 Meeting Citrus County Library System
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Special Library Advisory Board will hold their regular Meeting at
Homosassa Public Library
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
Homosassa, Fl 34446
ANY PERSON DESIRING FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS MEETING MAY CON-
TACT THE LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD RECORDING SECRETARY AT THE CITRUS COUNTY
LIBRARY SYSTEM, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 425 W. ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, BEVERLY
HILLS, FLORIDA 34465. TELEPHONE (352) 746-9077
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 111 WEST MAIN STREET, THIRD FLOOR, INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450,
(352) 341-6560, AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TrY TELEPHONE (352) 249-1292.
/s/ JOE MEEK


a-ticesI Not!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION OF THE
GOVERNING BODY WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING WILL
NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE MAY NEED TO PRO-
VIDE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD IN-
CLUDES TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
(SECTION 286.0101, FLORIDA STATUES)
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 10, 2014.


862-0110 FCRN
City of Crystal River Public Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River, Florida that a
PUBLIC HEARING will be held to consider, on Second Reading, the following pro-
posed Ordinances at 7:00 p.m., on Monday, January 13, 2014 in the Council Cham-
bers at City Hall, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida. These Ordinances, in their
entirety, may be inspected at the office of the City Clerk during regular working
hours.
Ordinance No. 13-0-14, Modfvina the Conmmunityv Redevelopment Plan to pro-
vide for an Extended Term on First Reading
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 2. AR-
TICLE IV SECTIONS 2-65 OF THE CRYSTAL RIVER CODE OF ORDINANCES, "THE COMMU-
NITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY" OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, TO EXTEND THE TERM
OF THE CRA DISTRICT, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT, PRO-
VIDING FOR CODIFICATION; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE
Ordinance No. 13-0-15, Land Development Code (LDC) Amendments Related
to Development Aareements, 2014
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE LAND DE-
VELOPMENT CODE, ADDING CHAPTER 14, TO INCLUDE LANGUAGE FOR DEVELOPMENT
AGREEMENTS; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
ings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105 Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City Manager's
Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two (2)
days before the meeting.
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 10, 2013


859-0110 FRCRN
City of Inverness-ITB
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE DPW 2014-01
ADVERTISEMENT FOR RENOVATION OF ROOF
The City of Inverness, Citrus County, Florida will receive sealed proposals from Qualified
Contractors for the complete removal and replacement of the entire existing roof system on
the Public Works Maintenance Facility Building located at 820 Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. Project requirements also include removal of all unwanted materials from the job site
and installation of a new 24 gauge double lock roof system, or equal, per manufacturer's
specifications complete with all accessories and all flashing required for a water tight in-
stallation. Bids are to be delivered to the City Clerk, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness, Florida.
Bids will be received until 10:00 am on January 24. 2014. and will be opened at 10:15
a.m. in a public meeting at the Inverness Government Center at 212 W. Main Street, Inver-
ness.
The work consists of, but is not necessarily limited to: The furnishing of all materials, sup-
plies, tools, equipment, labor and other services necessary for the prompt and timely com-
pletion of all repairs and aspects of this project.
On bids in excess of $100,000, proposals must be accompanied by:
1. A bid bond in the amount of at least five percent (5%) of the total bid price.
Bid bond may be in the form of a bank cashier's check or by a bid
bond from an insurance cardier licensed to do business in the State of Fblorida. Bid
bond and cashier's check will
be made payable to the City of Inverness.
2. A Payment and Performance Bond, in a form satisfactory to the CityAttorney,
in the amount of one hundred percent (100%) of the total bid price,
will be required from the successful bidder.
3. On bids under $100,000 but over $50,000, Payment and Performance Bonds will not be
required unless specified in separate instructions. However, a 5% bid bond
will be re quired.
4. On bids under $50,000, Bid Bonds or Payment and Performance Bonds will
not be re quired unless specified in separate instructions.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formalities and reject any and all bids,
to waive any technical defects and to accept any bid which represents the best offer to
the City of Inverness, all as may be in the best interest of the City
Complete set of contract documents, including proposal forms and specifications are avail-
able through the Public Works Department at the City of Inverness, 212 W. Main Street, In-
verness, Florida 34450, between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, Monday through Friday,
holidays excluded.
Bidders may inspect the work site by contacting Scott McCulloch, Project Manager at (352)
726-2611 x. 1500 for an appointment, same days and hours as above.
Is/ Frank DiGiovanni, City Manager
City of Inverness
Published two (2) times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 10 & 17, 2014.


NEW YEAR

CELEBRATION


ONE


WEEK


ONLY!


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