Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Colts still kicking: Indy completes massive cornerback /01


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH .
76 Partly cloudy.
LOW South wind 5
58 mphtoO1 mph.
58 PAGE A4


RONICLE


www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


IN THEIR WORDS:


AW.


Long haul
Veteran finds niche in
biomedical tech
field/Page A5
EXCURSIONS:


RANDY LEE BILLINGS, SEPT. 1, 1979 DEC. 17, 2013




Soldier laid to rest


Sail away
Traveling on a budget?
Make the most of a
cruise by planning
ahead/Page All


HOMEFRONT:


Play spaces
Kid-friendly romper
rooms don't have to
lose their cool./Inside




Nominations
open for
Citrus County's
top citizen
The Citrus County
Chronicle is seeking 2013
nominees for 34th annual
Citizen of the Year. Win-
ners in the past have
been honored for every-
thing from philanthropy to
volunteerism, civil rights
work to service to coun-
try, and environmental ef-
forts to governmental
initiatives.
While all nominations
are considered, prefer-
ence is usually given to
community contributions
that are above and be-
yond the role one plays in
their day-to-day job.
Email nominations to
marnold@chronicle
online.com; or, mail to
Citizen of the Year c/o
Mike Arnold, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
by Monday, Jan. 13.


-From staff reports

LIVE UNITED
* The United Way of
Citrus County
needs your help
for its annual
fundraising
initiative. If you
can, please send a
contribution to the
United Way of
Citrus County, c/o
Gerry Mulligan,
The Chronicle,
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.


Annie's Mailbox ......A12
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ...............A12
Editorial ..................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A 12
Obituaries ..........A2, A7
Together...................A15
Veterans ........ A14


6 184578 200,711 o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Taps is played Saturday afternoon at the Florida National Cemetery for Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy Lee Billings, United States Army,
as a funeral service nears its end. From left, CW 2 Billings' father, Robert Billings of Heavener, Okla.; the soldier's wife, Ashley Billings;
and her mother, Naomi Brady, grieve through the trumpet solo. BELOW LEFT: The headstone for CW 2 Randy Lee Billings, U.S. Army, rests
near his casket Saturday as family and guests gather to pay their respects.

Family, friends, community turn out to bid goodbye to helicopterpilot


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS Dozens
turned up at local church for
the funeral of
an aviator -
killed last
month along
with five
other soldiers
in a helicop-
ter crash in
Afghanistan.
Saturday's Randy Lee
church serv- Billings
ice at Corner- U.S. Army,
stone Baptist 3rd Assault
Church for Helicopter
Chief Warrant Battalion.
Officer 2
Randy L. Billings, 34, of Heav-
ener, Okla., who died as a re-
sult of injuries sustained in a
Dec. 17 helicopter crash in
Now Bahar, Afghanistan, was


Honor Guard members from Fort Stewart, Ga., carry the casket of
CW 2 Randy Lee Billings, U.S. Army. Billings flew Black Hawk
helicopters and was killed Dec. 17 while serving with NATO
forces in Now Bahar, Afghanistan. Five of his fellow soldiers died
in the same crash.


followed by full military
graveside burial service at
Florida National Cemetery in
Bushnell. Billings and four of
the other dead were assigned


to the 3rd Assault Helicopter
Battalion, 1st Aviation Regi-
ment, 1st Combat Aviation
See Page AIO


Theyear AHEAD


New direction for tourism in county


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer


"wnat can we do to
s make you come back?" is
the question that could
define Citrus County
tourism in 2014.
County commissioner
Rebecca Bays, who chairs


the Tourist Development
Council, posed the ques-
tion at the December TDC
meeting.
While the meeting
closed out a fairly strong
calendar year in terms of
bed tax revenue, visitor-
generating events and
manatee watchers, uncer-


tainty was a recurring
theme.
The county still had not
come up with a branding
concept for tourism, its
previously adopted top
priority, and the hotel in-
dustry, as represented on
the TDC, has not been sat-
isfied with tourism pro-


motion results.
October's bed tax rev-
enue of $42,480 was up al-
most 9 percent over last
year, but is still 16 percent
below the same month in
2009. The money is gener-
ated by the 3 percent tax
on hotel rooms and tem-
porary rentals.


Parks and recreation
sports coordinator Adam
Thomas was named in-
terim director of tourism,
signaling support for the
county to continue building
on its small, but successful
sports tourism effort


Page A6


Margrette Miller: Fun-loving, kind-hearted Southern lady


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Everyone
who knew Margrette Ann
Miller knew her as Grette (pro-
nounced "Greet") even her
grandchildren.
"She never wanted to be con-
sidered old, so we didn't call her
Grandma. She was Grette," said
granddaughter Alexa Walker
A gracious Southern lady, a
kind-hearted soul, a lover of
friends, fun and good times, most
of all she was purely and simply
"Grette."
"She was herself all the time,"
said daughter Laurie Walker
"She was genuine. She was a
great lady She was sweet- she
spoke her mind, yet she was so
kind to everybody"
Grette Miller died Dec. 9 from a
rare form of brain cancer She
was 71.


"We only had one argument
that I can ever remember, and
that's saying something," Walker
said. And that was because I did
something I wasn't supposed to
do. When I was 17, 1 used her
credit card to buy a jean jacket."
As a mother, Grette gave wise
advice.
And she was always right, darn
it," Walker said. "She told me
about men and how everyone
does things you're not going to
like. The secret is to find some-
one whose faults you can live
with."OW
Every year, Grette would travel
to Seagrove Beach or Destin andSpecia to the Chronice
Walker would bring her family Margrette "Grette" Miller is pictured with her Sheltie, Wylie, in this
undated family photo. Miller died Dec. 9 from a rare form of brain
See Page A2 cancer. She was 71.


1 )


VOL. 119


151


i 4 . . m i. -- . . me. -- h


1 4 X t -4- --J -1- 4J





A2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014




Phillip Bond, 75
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Phillip
Charles Bond, age 75, of
Beverly Hills, Florida, will
be held 10:00 AM, Thurs-
day, January 9, 2014 at the
St Paul's Lutheran Church
with Pastor Mark Gabb of-
ficiating. Inurnment will
take place at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
FL. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to St
Jude's Children's Hospital,
501 St Jude Place, Mem-


phis, TN 38105 or the Make
a Wish Foundation, Gift
Processing Center, PO. Box
6062, Albert Lea, MN
56007-6662.
Mr Bond was born Octo-
ber 18, 1938 in Evanston,
IL, son of John and Lucille
(Kraft) Bond. He died De-
cember 31, 2013 in Inver-
ness, FL. Mr Bond was an
Air Force veteran and
Bronze Star recipient. He
served during the Vietnam
War, retiring after 21 years
at the rank of Master Ser-
geant. After his service in
the Air Force, he contin-
ued his career with 15
years as a Claims Repre-
sentative with the Social
Security Administration.
He was a resident of Citrus
County since 2004. He en-
joyed flying, golf, traveling
and taking cruises. Mr
Bond was a Dive Master,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


flying instructor, holding
multiple pilots license, a
lifetime member of the
VFW and a member of St
Paul's Lutheran Church,
Beverly Hills.
Mr Bond was preceded
in death by his parents,
daughter, Leilanni, and
brother, Paul. Survivors in-
clude his wife of over 12
years, Linda Bond of Bev-
erly Hills, son, Philip John
(Leslie Davis) Bond of Cape
Canaveral, daughter, Terri
Bond of Inverness step-son,
Chad (Sarah) Anderson of
Rockford, IL, step-daugh-
ter, Stephanie (Ryan) An-
derson-Finney of Phoenix,
AZ, 6 grandchildren, Barry
(Felicia) Pearce II, Jonna
Danielle Bond, Daniel
McGee, Meghan McGee,
Taylor Anderson and


Carter Anderson Finney
and 2 great grandchildren,
Landen Dan, Kinzie
Pearce. Arrangements are
under the direction of the
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Lorena
DeVoe, 90
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Lorena
Jeanette DeVoe, age 90, of
Homosassa, Florida, will
be held 10:00AM, Tuesday,
January 7,2014 at the First
United Methodist Church
of Homosassa with Pastor
Kip Younger officiating.
Lorena DeVoe was born
April 20,1923 in Lanesboro,
PA, daughter of William
and Bessie (Chase) DeVoe.


Obituaries


She passed
i hn t oase
heaven on
December
26, 2013 in ,
Lecanto,
FL. She
worked as
a Cook for Lorena
Bingham- DeVoe
ton Gen-
eral Hospital and retired in
1978. Lorena enjoyed danc-
ing, sewing, her church,
friends and lunches with
the ladies. She was a mem-
ber of the First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa.
Lorena was preceded in
death by her parents, 2
brothers and two grand-
sons. She is survived by
son, Cecil (Sally) Soules,
Binghamton, NY, 2 daugh-
ters, Patricia (William)
Turner, Dunedin, FL,


POSTSCRIPT
Continued from PageAl

from Alabama and they'd all
spend a week at the beach.
Alexa recalled one particular
trip when she was about 6 and
she kept nagging her mom to
take her down to the beach.
"Grette said, 'Let me go get
changed and I'll take you.' And
she comes out in a blue thong
bikini with her beach bag on her
shoulder and said, 'OK, let's go!'
I started crying," Alexa said. "I
told my mom, 'No, I'm not going
with you! Mom, please don't
make me go with her!'
"She was just joking, and
that's her in a nutshell," she
said. "My best memory of her
was in second grade and she
picked me up from school. We
went shopping and to Dairy
Queen for ice cream, then to the
park to feed the ducks. About six


o'clock, the principal of my sis-
ter's school called we forgot to
pick my sister up. We spent all
day having a ball and completely
forgot about my older sister
"She was a mess sometimes,
but she was the best grandma I
could ever ask for," she said.
Born in Elora, Tenn., Grette
grew up poor but clean and well-
fed; she wore dresses made from
flour-sack cloth to school. In
later years, she prided herself
on finding bargains and loved to
"squeeze a nickel until the buf-
falo bellowed."
At one time, Grette managed
an apartment complex in
Huntsville, Ala., which is where
she met Jim Miller, her husband
of 28 years.
He had rented an apartment
from her and then asked her out
She said yes, then stood him up.
He sent her flowers the next
day and asked her out again.
This time she showed up and
they started dating. They mar-


Special to the Chronicle
Margrette "Grette" Miller lived in
Crystal River on King's Bay since
2001.
ried in December 1985.
"Jim was so good to her,"
Walker said. "He spoiled her,
which she deserved."
"She actually saved my life on
numerous occasions," Miller
said. "I was wild and she


brought stability into my life.
Her wisdom kept me from mak-
ing some terrible decisions."
The Millers bought their home
in Crystal River on King's Bay in
1999 and moved into it in 2001.
"She was a good neighbor and
a good friend," said Ann Monk.
"We have a community dock that
the neighbors all went in to-
gether and paid for as a social
place, and we'd sit out there and
visit. Grette and I used to plant
flowers around there she
loved flowers, and her yard was
always so beautiful."
On her last birthday, Oct. 19,
the neighbors threw her a sur-
prise party They gathered at
Monk's house, then brought a
cake and ice cream to Grette.
"She was in bed then, and we
had to help her to the table, but
she was thrilled," Monk said.
"She was an excellent friend I
lost a very dear friend."
Grette Miller was very much a
lady She loved hot wings at


Cody's Roadhouse and chicken
salad sandwiches at the Tea-
house 650 Caf6 on Citrus Avenue.
She was an expert in hand-
woven carpets and Chinese fur-
niture and collected antique
cobalt glass.
She made the best breakfast
- pancakes with syrup made
with butter and vanilla and a bit
of cinnamon, warmed up.
She adored her Sheltie, Wylie.
She traveled all over the world,
including a month-long trip
around Tahiti in a sailboat.
Through it all, she was always
the vivacious and lovely Grette.
"At her memorial service, a
woman told me about her 93-
year-old father and how Mama
used to stop by and sit on the
front porch and talk to him when
she was out walking Wylie,"
Walker said. "That's how she
was she took time to be kind
to people."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927.


I

i


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Oak Hill Hospital

11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50), Spring Hill
352-596-6632 Hernando I 352-628-6441 Citrus
OakHillHospital.corn


Susan (Gerhard)
Schreiber, Homosassa, FL,
seven grandchildren and
nine great grandchildren.
The family would like to
express a special thank
you to Hospice of Citrus
County of the Nature Coast
for their excellent care and
kind consideration while
our mother was under
their care. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County
PO. Box 641270 Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Online
condolences maybe sent to
the family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.

More obituaries/Page A7


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LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5,2014



TATE5&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
COUNTY

Effort to bring home
POW continues
The local chapter of
Rolling Thunder is part of
the national effort to bring
home American prisoner of
war U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe
Bergdahl.
Bergdahl was taken pris-
oner in Afghanistan by the
Taliban on June 30, 2009,
and is believed to be held in
the tribal areas of Pakistan
or southern Afghanistan.
To help or for more infor-
mation, call Holden at 352-
628-6481 or email her at
Cyn2719@yahoo.com.
To sign a petition
campaign on behalf of
Bergdahl, go to www.
veteransgrapevine.com.
Comcast to make
channel change
Comcast has announced
it is launching Xfinity for In-
verness area residents
around Jan. 21. When that
occurs, the Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners meetings will be
aired on Channel 71 in-
stead of Channel 9. All
Comcast customers, re-
gardless of level of service,
can view programming on
Channel 71.
If you have questions
about the upcoming
changes to Comcast, con-
tact a Comcast representa-
tive. If you have any
questions regarding these
changes and viewing the
BOCC meetings, call Tobey
Phillips, public information
officer, at 352-527-5484.
Photographer to
speak at library
The public is welcome to
join the Lakes Library
Friends on Tuesday, Jan. 7,
for a special program fea-
turing wildlife photographer
Gary Kuhl, who will talk
about his studies of local
natural subjects.
Kuhl's works form the
majority of nearly 20 wildlife
photos recently purchased
by the Friends and on dis-
play in the Lakes Library
Community Room.
At 10:30 a.m., there will
be a brief annual meeting
and installation of officers
followed by Kuhl's presen-
tation and comments by
other photographers repre-
sented in the collection.
Lake's Region Library is
at 1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness. For information, call
Marcia at 352-726-3828.
Democrats to meet
Saturday
The Central Citrus Dem-
ocratic Club will meet at
11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 11,
at Central Ridge Library,
corner of Forest Ridge
Boulevard and Roosevelt
Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
All registered Democrats
are welcome to attend.
The speaker will be attor-
ney Glen C. Abbott, who will
discuss legal issues sur-
rounding wills and probate.
For information, email
centralcitrusdemocrats@
gmail.com.
Pregnant women
urged to get flu shot
The Florida Department
of Health in Citrus County
urges pregnant women to
receive the flu vaccination
due to the increased impact
that influenza infections are
having on pregnant women
and their babies in Florida
this year.
The Department of
Health in Citrus County rec-
ommends that all individu-
als 6 months of age and
older receive the flu vacci-
nation each year. It is espe-
cially important for pregnant
women to be vaccinated
due to the increased risk of
complications associated
with contracting the flu


while pregnant.
Check with your physician,
the Florida Department of
Health in Citrus County or
visit http://tinyurl.com/
citrusflushots to search for a
location to receive a vaccine.
-From staff reports


Vehicle crashes into church

Driver may have had medical even no injuries reported" extent of damage unknown


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -As
Andrew Smith turned the
corner of Northeast Sev-
enth Avenue in Crystal
River, he was welcomed
with an unexpected scene
- a car in the church.
"I was coming to pick up
a Sunday school book to
get ready for tomorrow's
Sunday school lesson,"
Smith said. "When I first got
here, a gentleman stopped
me and told me what hap-
pened. A lady drove her
car into the church."
After parking, he ap-
proached the Unity Church
of Christ Written in Heaven
and saw the unidentified
woman was uninjured.
"She was up walking
around and talking to
someone on the tele-
phone," he said. "I don't
know who she was talking
to, but she was talking to
someone, maybe the insur-
ance company"


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office deputies and fire rescue personnel responded to a car that crashed into Unity Church
of Christ Written in Heaven near the intersection of State Road 44 and Northeast Seventh Avenue in Crystal River.


Smith continued to ex-
plain that a witness said
the driver exited State
Road 44, went through a
fence, across property and
between a tree and a tele-
phone pole into the corner
of the church. He esti-
mated the distance traveled
to be at least 200 yards.
"It was evident that she
couldn't have been awake
during that whole time,"


he said. "She had to have
been asleep or passed out
I found out from the ambu-
lance attendant that she
had seizures and she may
have blacked out. If she
did, she had no control
over it."
Smith said the Nature
Coast Emergency Medical
Services examined the
driver, and that she left the
scene without treatment.


"I didn't see any scars,"
he said. "She looked like
she was in perfect health.
She might have been
shaken, but that's all. To-
morrow might be a differ-
ent story, though, when she
awakens.
'All I can say is that she
was blessed," he said.
Church members at the
scene said Sunday school
will still take place today


The building was unoc-
cupied at the time of the
crash and the extent of the
damage is unknown. Mem-
bers said an electrical wire
was left dangling, pews were
crushed and a large hole
remains in the northwestwall
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at352-563-5660, ext 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online, corn.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Carlos Mendana pulls ahead of older brother Jose Mendana on Saturday as the Formula 1 Powerboat demo/exhibition gets under way on
Lake Hernando. The open test session included the Mendana brothers as well as Steve Lee and six-time national champion Terry Rinker.





POWER PLAY


Fl powerboats dance on Lake Hernando during exhibition


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO
hilly temperatures did not
hamper the opportunity
to illustrate to Citrus
County what the U.S. Formula 1
Powerboat Tour can offer.
The U.S. Formula 1 Powerboat Tour
held a day of demonstration and exhibi-
tion runs Saturday to get the feel of Lake
Hernando, showcase the sport and gener-
ate support for hosting its 2014 champi-
onship weekend in September
"When Formula 1 came here last Sep-
tember to do a site visit, they fell in love
with the location," said Adam Thomas, in-
terim county tourism director "Lake Her-
nando has a natural amphitheatre with a
great open viewing. The lake is fit for this
kind of event. We just received word
that the championship would take place
Sept. 27,28 and 29."
Formula 1 powerboat racing uses tun-
nel-hull catamarans capable of both high
speed and exceptional maneuverability
The boats upwards of a thousand pounds
and are up to 17 feet long and 7 feet wide.
The boats are powered by outboard mo-
tors generating more than 400 horsepower
that can propel the craft to 100 mph in


Driver Steve Lee gets a tow from David Sei-
denstucker (left) and Doug Loyed of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission after experiencing a dead battery.
fewer than 3 seconds and to a maximum
speed of more than 135 mph.
After a temporary delay, four Florida-
based boats showcased their capabilities
for the crowd.
"Powerboat racing is a lot like the
United Nations," said announcer Stephen
Michaels. "There are 66 countries around
the world that race powerboats. The
American Powerboat Association is one of
the biggest contributors to this. This sport
- Formula 1 races all over the world.
The United States tour is a very strong
tour and we have drivers from two to three
different countries. We have drivers from
12 different states. We race in front of
crowds of 200,000 people in Quebec. We
also race live in Seattle at a sea fair that


has been going on for over 50 years and
that is in front of a couple of hundred
thousand people, including live television.
This is such an exciting sport if you have
never seen it. These guys literally fly on
the edge of disaster. The last foot of the
boat is in the water"
Six-time national champion Terry
Rinker said Citrus County would host the
only Florida race and the first race in the
Southeast region in six years.
"We're all good friends in the pits and
help each other out But it can get a little
testy on the water, but that's racing," Rinker
said. "It would be great to come back and
race in Florida again. The opportunity to
come here and put on an event for Citrus
County would be excellent."
County Commissioner Rebecca Bays
couldn't agree more.
"This is only the start of 2014 and it is
going to be an exciting year," she said. "It
is a collaboration and team effort for them
when they go out and race and a team ef-
fort for our community This is the time
that we really need to come together and
support our community.... When we think
about what this could do for our county, it
is a tremendous opportunity"
The annual U.S. Formula 1 Powerboat
Tour will start May 30 in LaPorte, Ind., and
continue at various locations in the U.S.
and Canada through September Thomas
said 16 to 20 boats will participate in the
championship race in September


I^-^-_*=* .. ....... = '' -. .. -' .5sr,,as .- -^ -Z -^.^..'l~ '.K-*^:^ "_ I ^''-~'-^"'*
'- --_. -- .-. ----- -

Terry Rinker and Steve Lee are neck and neck coming into the first turn at the Formula One Powerboat demonstration and exhibition
Saturday at Lake Hernando.


hZJ. --






A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday New experiences
will lead to self-discovery. While you
may be determined to follow your
dreams, be sure they're realistic.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Helping others will benefit you
down the line. You will learn a lot
from those working with fewer
resources.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Don't isolate yourself; loneliness will
lead to depression. Surround your-
self with close friends.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
The way you handle people today
will inspire admiration. See to any
pending paperwork.
Aries (March 21-April 19)-
New friends and partnerships are
likely to form if you get involved in a
cause or activity.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
Think before you speak today.
Thoughtless communication will get
you into trouble. You must maintain
objectivity if you want to find solutions.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Your intuition will be strong today,
so act fast to implement new ideas.
Misinterpretation is likely if you are
imprecise in your communication.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If
you choose to nitpick today, you will
meet with the same treatment from
others.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -You
stand to profit if you have the capital
on hand to make a quick investment.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
Researching real estate may be a
good idea. A lucrative long-term in-
vestment can be secured.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You
can improve your confidence through
a self-improvement initiative. Don't
avoid exercising.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
There will be many distractions
today, and if you try to do every-
thing, you will accomplish nothing.
You must make careful choices.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
You'll be feeling wild and crazy
today. Don't gamble. Impulse
spending will have frustrating con-
sequences later on. Burn off your
energy with physical activities.


ENTERTAINMENT


Phil Everly, of pioneer
rock duo, dies at 74
LOS ANGELES When sib-
lings Phil and Don Everly com-
bined their voices with songs
about yearning, angst and loss,
it changed the world.
Phil Everly, the youngest of
the Everly Brothers, who took
the high notes, died Friday from
chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease. He was 74.
It could be argued that while
Elvis Presley was the king of
rock 'n' roll, Phil and Don Everly
were its troubled princes. They
sang dark songs hidden behind
pleasing harmonies and were
perfect interpreters of the twitchy
hearts of millions of baby
boomer teens coming of age in
the 1950s and '60s.
The Everlys dealt in the entire
emotional spectrum with an au-
thenticity that appealed to proto
rockers like the Beatles and Bob
Dylan, who gladly pass the
credit for the sea changes they
made in rock to the ruggedly
handsome brothers.
In all, the brothers' career
spanned five decades, although
they performed separately from
1973 to 1983. In their heyday
between 1957 and 1962, they
had 19 top 40 hits.
The two broke up amid quar-
relling in 197, then reunited in 1983.
"I loved my brother very much,"
Don Everly wrote in a statement
to The Associated Press on Sat-
urday morning. "I always thought
I'd be the one to go first."
The inspiration attributed to
the Everlys' voices brought the
brothers together again in 2003
at the request of Simon & Gar-
funkel, a duo known to fight bitterly
as well. The resulting tour brought
a chuckle from Paul Simon in a
Rolling Stone interview.
"It was hilarious that the four
of us were doing this tour, given
our collective histories of squab-


Associated Press
The Everly Brothers, Don and Phil, perform on stage July 31,
1964. Everly, who with his brother Don formed an influential
harmony duo that touched the hearts and sparked the
imaginations of rock 'n' roll singers for decades, died Friday.
He was 74.


bling," Simon said. "And it's
amazing, because they hadn't
seen each other in about three
years. They met in the parking
lot before the first gig. They un-
packed their guitars those fa-
mous black guitars and they
opened their mouths and started
to sing. And after all these years,
it was still that sound I fell in love
with as a kid. It was still perfect."
Whaling museum holds
'Moby-Dick' marathon
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. -
The New Bedford Whaling Mu-
seum is holding its 18th annual
"Moby-Dick" Marathon.
In what has become one its
most popular events, dozens of
readers got a short slot in the
marathon where Herman Melville's
classic novel of man versus whale
is read from cover to cover with-
out breaks. The reading started
at noon Saturday and was ex-
pected to take about 25 hours.
The reading and associated
events are attended by everyone
from serious Melville scholars to
just plain folk who like the book.


Kingsford natives hunt
treasure in Nova Scotia
IRON MOUNTAIN, Mich. -
Two brothers' work to reveal the
mysteries of an island in Nova
Scotia will be featured in a History
Channel series that starts tonight.
"The Curse of Oak Island"
premieres at 10 p.m. It highlights
the work of Rick and Marty Lag-
ina and others, who spent the
summer searching the so-called
Money Pit on Canada's Oak Island.
The legend of the island
began in 1795 when curious
teenage boys began digging at
the site thinking they might find a
pirate's buried treasure. They
never did and eventually gave
up, but others followed in ensu-
ing years into the 1900s.
About 10 years ago, the Laginas
and several other investors from
the Traverse City area bought part
of the island. After some hassles,
they obtained a license that allows
them to keep 90 percent of any-
thing they find, with 10 percent
going to the Canadian government.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 5, the fifth
day of 2014. There are 360 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 5,1964, during his visit
to the Holy Land, Pope Paul VI met
with Patriarch Athenagoras I of
Constantinople in Jerusalem.
On this date:
In 1781, a British naval expedi-
tion led by BenedictArnold burned
Richmond, Va.
In 1914, auto industrialist Henry
Ford announced he was going to
pay workers $5 for an 8-hour day, as
opposed to $2.34 for a 9-hour day.
In 1925, Nellie T. Ross of
Wyoming became America's first fe-
male governor.
In 1933, construction began on
the Golden Gate Bridge. (Work was
completed four years later.)
In 1970, Joseph A. Yablonski, an
unsuccessful candidate for the
presidency of the United Mine
Workers of America, was found
murdered with his wife and daugh-
ter at their Clarksville, Pa., home.
(UMWA President Tony Boyle and
seven others were convicted of, or
pleaded guilty to, the killings.)
In 1972, President Richard Nixon
announced that he had ordered de-
velopment of the space shuttle.
Ten years ago: Foreigners arriv-
ing at U.S. airports were photographed
and had their fingerprints scanned
in the start of a government effort to
keep terrorists out of the country.
NASA released a 3-D, black-and-
white panoramic picture of the
bleak surface of Mars snapped by
the newly landed rover Spirit.
Today's Birthdays: Former Vice
President Walter F. Mondale is 86.
Actor Robert Duvall is 83. King
Juan Carlos of Spain is 76. Talk
show host Charlie Rose is 72. Ac-
tress-director Diane Keaton is 68.
Rhythm-and-blues musician
George "Funky" Brown (Kool and
the Gang) is 65. Former CIA Direc-
tor George Tenet is 61. Rock singer
Marilyn Manson is 45.
Thought for Today: "Wisdom is
divided into two parts: (a) having a
great deal to say, and (b) not saying
it." -Author unknown.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L Fecast City


Daytona Bch. 79
Fort Lauderdale 82
Fort Myers 81
Gainesville 75
Homestead 80
Jacksonville 73
Key West 80
Lakeland 80
Melbourne 80


61/37 0.00" 61/39 0.00"-
THREE DAY OUTLOOK I;ecast y
--VI1 Mi-V TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
)Lr. High. 76' Low: 58, f5
Mostly cloudy with a 30% chance of
showers.
OLW_ V. J MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
)i High 63 Low:-27
,, "' 30% chance of showers early. Windy and
^ much colder by afternoon
S w TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 48 Low: 23
^ Partly sunny and cold


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: Soulheasi winds around 10 Gulf water
knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and temperature
inland waters a light chop. Tonight: 0 ^
Southwest winds 5 to 10 knots
increasing to around 15 knots after 5 9
midnight. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland a
waters a moderate chop. n Apk
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
WiThlacoocnee at Holder 28.61 28.68 3552
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.41 38.44 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 3949 39,46 40,60
Ts3la Apopka-Floral City 40.14 40.12 42,20
Levels lopoled In tea! aoe sea 'ee Flood stage to lakes are based on 2.33-year ftiod
te mean-anialk Iood, w1ch has a "43-eeirt chace of Orieg equaled ot exceed In
aly one year Thins data is obtained Iromi lhe. Svtfwest Florda Water Managementi Dmt t
and subject o rt vision i.- . -, I 11 1m1- D,1.' I:r .- Lr-0 tr Y I G ji k 'i.
iabeia efora iy darmages a,,.:Jl ,gL1' *:I n ,-: I. F I" n' 11 I- r "..r. [.,.-..,'. r.
should contact Ihe hrd*oogcal Data Seaon at (352) 796.721

THE NATION
F lii W 11 7


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 67/43
Record /28
Normal 70/51
Mean temp. 51
Departure from mean -10
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0,0"
Total for the month 0.61"
Total for the year 0.61"
Normal for the year 0o.27
'As o 7 p m rni alWmrs
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal. 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate.
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.20


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 43.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 83%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm
Today's count: 8.4/12
Monday's count: 10.9
Tuesday's count: 7.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 63
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES ,uni5,So'",,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNINGi AFTERNOONi
01/05 SUNDAY 09:30 03:32 21:46 15:05
01/06 MONDAY 10:09 04:22 22:47 15:55
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3SUiTTW iI ... ...-.-........:546pBm
SSUN ME UISPTOMOOW _23_a-A3
S 0 () KMOUNRIM TOAY ..-....,.-............-0:28 am
Jan7 Jan15 Jan 24 Jan 30 1045 m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: LOW. There Is no bum ban.
For more Intonriaton call Florida DvMsion ol Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
r oom ,-i.i.9 ir riIiii,r, r- visit the Division of Forestry's Web sie,

WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited o two days per week hefom 10 a.m. or afler4 p.m, as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andor Sixiday.
ODD .:-d'e rrnyy ma3.ylir on "i.-dnesi3ay virii' S'itir.ia,
ai-vlY n~iai1ing ?1111 a~ VIhJI Ci:. raioalu ,rii-i imgmirngMn I -'i n~ri 'e~&; ,jrr-scti,
as vegetable gardens. fowes and shruas. can be done on any day and at any
lime..
Citrus County Utilites' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material) 352-527-7669. S'&-. ne i~ vlriTir niy ilk'., I.Hv ior r.ldvir'ai
walefing allowances.
o report r :a,jiion pl.a .ail City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321. City of Cryslal
River @ 352-795-4216exl 313, tnncrporaied Cirus Counrv 0' 352-527-7669.


TFrom mouths of rivers
cRt
Chassanowtzka" 930 am.
Crystal Rve" 7:43 a..
Wilhlacoo-hee" 4.44 a.m
HomosaSsa"" 8;23 am


TIDES
"At Kings Bay "At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
0,5ft. t013pn. O.4f l 3.45a ,m 0,2I 5;06p.nim.1 ft
2.1 tt. 8:25 p.m. 2.0 fl 2:05 am. 0.51 t 2:33p.mO.3H
2-6ft. 5A18pm. 2.8fl 11;50 a.m 02 It
l2tt 9:13pm, 11 t2:54a-m 0.211 t 3:52p.m.O2fl


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashev lle
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltitnmoire
Billings
Siminghamn
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burington, VT
Charlestan, S.C
Charleston, WV.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnalti
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvile, IN
Haimsburg
Hatiford
Houston
Indianapols
Las Vegas
Uille Rock
ILos Anooles


SAT SUN
H L Pep. H LFcst


22 -12
61 29
42 16
36 24
31 -3
71 42
32 6
27 10 .10
48 29
32 16
24 2
36 10
20 -15
51 28
46 6
35 15
31 19 .03
38 12
34 13
44 26
35 11
21 -17
70 41
38 19 .20
37 17
29 10
66 44
44 23
28 3
24 -9
66 35
36 14
63 40
47 20
69 50t


35 16 1
40 19 s
46 4 r
5t 13 r
51 23 l
45 24 pc
46 14 l
0 -9 sn
55 10 sh
30 15 s
39 27 r
39 7 Cd
35 18 sn
65 36 sh
50 2 cd
49 16 r
17 -16 sn
36 -13 I
33 -8 6san
13 -10 sn
35 15 sn
34 20 r
37 18 pc
16 -5 sn
4 -15 pe
2B .8 sn
54 29 pc
35 -7 sn
39 13 i
40 23 t
56 26 sh
28 -15 sn
57 35 s
45 12 sn
7K 64 s


SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H LFcst
Now Orileans 59 32 69 31 sh
New York City 25 8 48 25
Norfolk 43 20 61 27 r
Oklahoma City 57 37 27 8 pc
Omaha 39 16 7 -11 pc
Palm Springs 71 48 72 48 s
Philadelphia 29 6 45 22 I
Phoenix 68 48 66 40 s
Pittsburgh 37 8 40 -8 r
Portland, ME 20 -14 36 23 r
Portland, OR 42 31 47 29 s
Provideence. RI 27 -3 40 27 r
Raleigh 37 19 50 25 r
RapidaCity 25 13 .01 -3 -15 so
Reno 49 24 47 20 s
Rochester.NY 37 1 38 9 sh
Sacramenlo 68 34 65 32 s
Sail Lake CIty 33 16 11 28 12 s
San Antonio 71 46 50 26 pc
San Diego 66 56 69 51 pc
San Francisco 66 43 58 48 s
Savamnnah 51 32 63 32 si
Seatlte 44 36 48 30 s
Spoaua 36 20 28 17 pc
SI. Louis 46 27 21 -6 sn
SL Seis. Mana 28 15 .5 17 .5 l
Syracuse 30 -4 37 11 sn
Topeka 39 23 11 -9 pc
WasliAn ,1:r. J I-t 46 16 r
YESTERDAY S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
HIGH 77, SarB, CAC.
LOW '29. Prsquele, MarMe
WORLD CITIES


Louisville 43 10 39 -6 sn CTY HiNiSKY
Memphis 51 27 5T 10 CITY WSK
Milwaukee 30 13 .03 9 -16 sn Acapulco 86/75s
Minneapolis 35 9 .14 -12 -26 pc Amsterdam5041t/pc
Moble 58 28 6s 25 t Athens 59420S
Monlgomery 46 27 59 18 sh Beijing 4222/s
Nashville 46 19 5t 3 n Berlin 46t37/pc
Bermuda 6SS621cd
KEY TO CONmTION&S ccioua dr.tduie Cairo 64/51/pc
I'fail h-hazw pcKpaI cloudy; r lraln Calgary 12/-23(sn
rPlI Ijnow mix; shLmmy; sh-*owirs; Havana 82/66cd
in- wn tows-thwitdtrris ws;wIndy. Hong Kong 71/59/s
Ws02lnl14 Jerusalem 62/50Wc


Lisbon 57/50/r
London 48M3/
Madrid 51.33r
Mexico City 685O/pc
Montreal 221191pc
Moscow 30a6/pc
Paits 53/37/r
Rio 96/75As
Rome 59/53/pc
Sydney 80/68
Tokyo 4432/pc
Toronlo 3218,pc
Warsaw 4&35/pc


S4LEGAL NOTICES






Bid Notices.........................D6




Meeting Notices.................D6




dr- ) C I T R U S___cCOU N TY E



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Highlights


SSmall, Community Feel
Among Students and Faculty
, Student/Teacher Mentor Groups
> Over 90% of Our Students
Play Sports
i Thriving Fine Arts Department
Including Band, Drama and AP/
Honors Art
> Dual Enrollment Offered
Right On Our Campus
> Variety of AP/Honors
Class Offerings
> Weekly Chapel Worship

> We are thrilled to have a very
socially and culturally diverse
student body


P Small Class Size


Our students have been
admitted to every single public
college/university in the state of
Florida as well as out-of-state
colleges including:


o American University, DC
o Auburn University, AL
o Berry College, GA
SCollege of Charleston, SC
Covenant College, GA
SEmory University, GA
SErskine College, SC
Kent State, OH
New York University, NY
North Carolina
State University


SRutgers University, NJ
SSt. John's University, NY
SUniversity of Alabama
SUniversity of Georgia
SUniversity of Kentucky
SUniversity of Tennessee
U.S. Air Force
Academy, CO
U.S. Coast Guard
Academy, CT
SWheaton College, IL


SNationally Accredited Through
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools
> Our Curriculum Does Not Bind Us
To State Mandated Testing Such As
The FCAT, End-of-course, Or
Common Core Testing. Yet We
Produce AP Scholars, Dual-
enrollment And Honor Graduates
Who Get Admitted To Many
Colleges, Universities And Military
Academies


Accepting Applications NOW
for the 2014-15 school year.
Stop by the school for
enrollment application or visit
our website.


www.sevenriverscs.org


Come to an Open House and
hear all about our school,
financial assistance
opportunities, curriculum,
and take a tour.


OPEN HOUSES
February 18, at 6:30pm
February 22 at 11am
February 24 at lOam

Call to sign up: 746-5696


A Provider for
Florida's Voluntary
Pre kindergarten
Program (VPK).


for students
for students


Step Up For Students provides legislatively authorized K-12
scholarships and related support, giving economically
disadvantaged families the freedom to choose the best learning
options for their children. Almost 30% of our students receive the
Step Up scholarship.


Seven Rivers Christian School
exists in partnership with
families to shape the hearts
and minds of children
with a distinctly biblical
program of academic rigor,
artistic beauty, and athletic
competition.


Awarded $780,000 in financial assistance for the 2013-14 school year through our school's annual fund, Seven Rivers Presbyterian (our
parent church), private donors and outside financial assistance programs such as VPK and Step Up for Students.


Notable


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 AS





A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


TOURISM
Continued from PageAl

"It's a new direction,"
said Bays, reinforcing
the administrative
appointment.
And an ambitious event
held this weekend in Her-
nando may be a harbinger
of new opportunities for
bringing in visitors. If Sat-
urday's Formula 1 power-
boat demonstration
suitably impressed enough
potential sponsors, Lake
Hernando could host a na-
tional powerboat champi-
onship event in September
(See related story Page A3.)
It's an event that's been
compared to a NASCAR
race with the potential to
attract well-heeled follow-
ers. It would also cement
the role of Lake Hernando
as a county venue for
tourist-attracting water
sports events.
After the county and
chamber of commerce
cleaned up the beach and
park area, a wildly suc-
cessful dragon boat festi-
val was held there in
November. It was first of
two-part series, with the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


next Lake Hernando
Dragon Boat Festival set
for March 15.
With some of the other
biggest county events com-
ing up in the first quarter,
the TDC is expected to be
more focused this year on
what it can do to help as-
sure the success of the
Manatee Festival this
month and the Strawberry
Festival in March.
In response to Bays' con-
cerns about last year's
"last-minute" involvement
with the Manatee Festival,
Cathy Pearson, assistant
county administrator, said
Thomas would be back
this month with a 30-day
plan.
Other February events
that could bring the county
some visitors are Paddle
Florida's second annual
"Wild, Wonderful Withla-
coochee" river trip and the
50th anniversary of the
Cross Florida Barge Canal.
Beyond these busy first
few months, which include
manatee season, Thomas
pointed out there is no
shortage of tourism events
in the second quarter, es-
pecially sports related.
Scheduled events include
a three-on-three soccer


UPCOMING TOURIST DRAWS
* Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Festival March 15.
* Florida Manatee Festival Jan. 18 and 19,
downtown Crystal River.
* Paddle Florida's second annual Wild, Wonderful
Withlacoochee river trip- Feb. 16 to 21.
* 50th anniversary of the Cross Florida Barge Canal
(now the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida
Greenway)-around Feb. 27.
* Floral City Strawberry Festival March 1 and 2.


tournament, USAAA bas-
ketball and the national
horseshoe championships
in April.
In keeping with the ex-
pansion of sports tourism,
the results of the Citrus
County Sports Athletic
Complex Feasibility Study
are scheduled to be re-
leased early this year The
end result is expected to
provide a plan as to what
the county should be fo-
cusing on, what sports as-
sets it is missing or
whether it is even ready
for a sports facility
Manatees
For attracting tourists,
manatee watching is the
county's lure. Ivan Vicente,
spokesman for the Crystal
River National Wildlife


Refuge Complex reported
the last manatee survey
was done two weeks ago
and 400 were counted in
King's Bay and 186 were at
Blue Waters in Homosassa.
He said Friday's cold
front and the one coming
Monday will provide for a
higher count on Monday
when their biologist will
fly over King's Bay and the
county
Refuge tourist numbers
for November and Decem-
ber are relatively similar
to last year's, with only a
small increase for both
months this year Overall
numbers for 2013 are ex-
pected to be available next
week.
"We already know
there's been a near 20 per-
cent increase since last


The crowds inside Three
Sisters Springs are still a problem
this manatee season.
Ivan Vicente
spokesman for Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge.


year, due to a remarkable
increase in visitor num-
bers between January and
October of 2013, compared
to 2012," he said.
"The crowds inside
Three Sisters Springs are
still a problem this mana-
tee season, particularly
during the cold days," Vi-
cente said. "The USFWS
acknowledges the need for
tighter controls on the
sheer numbers of people
in Three Sisters Springs
during the winter, as well
as monitoring behavior of
visitors.
"The USFWS is cur-
rently consulting with
partners at the local and
state level on what further
management actions can
be taken to protect mana-
tees while at the same
time allowing an enjoyable


manatee experience for
visitors."
Vicente explained that
more manatees continue
to use Three Sisters
Springs each winter and
already there isn't enough
room in the existing sanc-
tuary Those that can't fit
in the sanctuary opt to use
the interior of Three Sis-
ters Springs where they
are sometimes be dis-
turbed while attempting to
rest. Although there are
other springs where man-
atees can go in King's Bay,
none offer the ideal shal-
low resting areas adja-
cently close to the springs
like Three Sisters Springs
does.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


William
Dunkle, 79
HOMOSASSA
William Leroy Dunkle,
79, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away on Wednes-
day, Jan. 1, 2014, at his
home.
A native of Rimersburg,
Pa., he was born March 12,
1934, to Harry and Doris
(McKee) Dunkle, one of
three children. Mr Dunkle
was a retired refrigeration
and air conditioning tech-
nician and was formerly
employed by Tucker Com-
pany in the Hartford,
Conn., area. He moved to
Homosassa in 1992 from
Vernon, Conn., and served
his country in the U.S.
Army during the Korean
War. Bill, as he was known
to many, was the recipient
of two Purple Hearts dur-
ing his U.S. Army service.
He loved motorcycles,
square dancing and bowl-
ing and was also very
gifted mechanically Bill
could take apart, repair
and reassemble anything.
Mr Dunkle attended the
First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa and
was a member of the Mili-
tary Order of the Purple
Heart.
He is survived by his
wife of 55 years, Shirley A.
(Murray) Dunkle of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; his sister
Patricia Wall of East Har-
ford, Conn.; and sister-in-
law Catherine Lerch
(husband Grant), Punta
Gorda, Fla. In addition to
his parents, Bill was pre-
ceded in death by his three
sons, Michael, David and
Brian Dunkle; and a sister,
Beatrice Zwick.
A memorial service of re-
membrance will be held at
the First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa at
10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 17,2014,
with the Rev Kip Younger
officiating. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family's requests
that memorial contribu-
tions be made in Bill's
memory to First United
Methodist Church of Ho-
mosassa. Wilder Funeral
Home, Homosassa, Fla.
www.wilderfuneral.com

Eileen
Evans, 78
INVERNESS
Eileen F Evans, 78, of
Inverness, Fla., died
Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, at
home under the loving
care of her
family and
Hospice of "
Citrus
C i t r u s *
County. .
Eileen
E i I e e n L
was born
Oct. 4,
1935, in
Philadel- Eileen
phia, Pa., Evans
the daugh-
ter of Godfrey and Frances
Emmert. She was a mem-
ber and past secretary of
the Citrus County Horse
Riders Association as well
as an honorary member of
the Jupiter Horseman's
Association. Eileen loved
horses, camping and fish-
ing. She was Baptist
She is survived by her
husband of 58 years, John
(Jack) Evans; children,
Guy H. Evans and wife
Malia of Indio, Calif.,
Kathy Bonner, Inverness;
and grandchildren, Guy
Evans Jr, Indio, Calif.,
Stephanie Bonner, Inver-
ness, and Livi McHorney,
San Diego, Calif.
Heinz Funeral Home,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Davis
Hicks, 73
MOUNT AIRY, N.C.
Davis Hicks, age 73, of
Mount Airy, N.C., died
Thursday, Jan. 2,2014.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and


Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in Mount
Airy, N.C.

Orville
Holton, 71
BROOKSVILLE
Orville Gene Holton, 71,
of Brooksville, died Satur-
day, Jan. 4, 2014.
Services will be at a
later date. Merritt Funeral
Home, Brooksville, is in
charge of arrangements.


Mary Keer, 86
HOMOSASSA
Mary "Marie" Keer, 86,
of Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Sunday, Dec. 22,2013,
at her home. She was born
June 3, 1927, in Newark,
N.J., to Charles and Mari-
anna (Giarratanna) Verzi
and came here five years
ago from Irvington, N.J.
She was a loving mother
and grandmother and en-
joyed spending time with
family and friends. She
was of the Catholic faith.
She was preceded in
death by her longtime
companion, Louis W
Smith; and her sister,
Josephine Vella. She is
survived by her sons,
Louis Keer and his wife
Linda, and Kenneth L.
Keer, both of Homosassa,
and Darrell Keer of Penn-
sylvania; a sister, Rose
Russomanno of New Jer-
sey; grandchildren, Jason,
Shannon and Christopher
Keer, Vincent Franchini,
Tina Hampton and
Nicholas Vitiello; and
three great-grandchildren.
A celebration of life will
be at 3 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 25, 2014, at the Strick-
land Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Peggy
Meyers, 55
CRYSTAL RIVER
Peggy L. Meyers, age 55,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Jan. 1, 2014,
at her home. Born May 12,
1958, in Berlin, Pa., to Jack
R. and Betty Jane (Varnell)
Smith, Peggy moved to Cit-
rus County in 1983 from
Somerset, Pa.
In addition to her par-
ents, Peggy was preceded
in death by her son, Alex
Meyers; and her sister,
Jackie Kalaha.
She is survived by her
children, Jeri (Michael)
Diehl, Kari (Nick) Finch,
Erin (William) Ray and
Michael Meyers; three sis-
ters, Karen (Ron) Singer,
Wendy (Randy) Keyser and
Carol (John) Kalaha; two
brothers, Paul (Sue) Smith
and Phil Smith; and six
grandchildren.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


William
Schecher, 90
INVERNESS
William Frederick
Schecher, 90, of Inverness,
FL, died peacefully and in
the Lord's arms at the Cit-
rus Health and Rehabilita-
tion Center on January 2,
2014. Bill was born in
Glendale, Long Island,
New York on January 9,
1923. Bill proudly served
in the U.S. Maritime Serv-
ice. He and his family set-
tled in North Bergen and
then Secaucus, New Jer-
sey where he owned serv-
ice stations for almost 30
years. He was a member of
the Secaucus Volunteer
Fire Department, St.
Matthews Lutheran
Church and loved the
Meadowlands. In his re-
tirement, Bill moved to In-
verness, Florida and was
an active member of the
First Lutheran Church of
Inverness. He especially
enjoyed the outdoors, fish-
ing, gardening, bird watch-
ing, and boating.
Bill was predeceased by
his loving wife, Rose in
1987, his brother, Joseph
Schecher and sister, Irene
Knopfle. Bill is survived by
his daughter, Barbara, son-
in-law, Daniel, grandchil-
dren, Kurt and Jessica, his
brother, Edwin Schecher
of Naples, FL, brother and
sister-in-law, Roland and
Marie Bellamy of Inver-
ness, beloved nieces and
nephews, dear friend,
Betty Gibson and loving
family and friends from
NewJerseyto Florida. He
also enjoyed many years of
companionship from his
late dog, Lady
A Celebration of Bill's
life will be held at First
Lutheran Church, Inver-
ness, Florida on Tuesday,
January 7, 2014 at 1 PM,
and at a later date in New
Jersey Donations in honor
of Bill's life can be made to
First Lutheran Church, In-
verness, Citrus County An-
imal Services of Inverness,
Florida and Memorial
Sloan Kettering Cancer
Center in New York City
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
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Edward
Johnson,87
DUNNELLON
Edward Carl Johnson,
87, passed away peacefully
Friday, Dec. 27,2013, in his
home in
Dunnel-
lon. With
the caring
support of
Hospice of ')
M a r i o n
County, he
was able
to enjoy a Edward
l o v i n g Johnson
Christmas
with his family
He leaves behind his
wife, Gloria "Jimmie"
Johnson, the love of his life
for 65 years; sister Mildred
Lingner; daughter Judith
Mcleod; grandson Shaun
Mcleod; granddaughter
Laurel Thompson; great-
granddaughter Savannah
Mcleod; and a loving ex-
tended family
Born and married in
Chicago, he moved to
South Florida, living on
Key Biscayne for 18 years.
He designed and built a
home in Marion County in
1973 and taught architec-
tural drafting at Citrus
High School.
His greatest joy in life
was traveling the country
with Jimmie in their motor
home, exploring all 50
states. They also cruised
the San Juan Islands off
Washington and Canada,
Lake Michigan; and the
Florida coasts and water-
ways by boat
His was a life well-lived.
You will be missed, Eddie!
The family request me-
morial donations to be
made to Hospice of Mar-
ion County
Arrangements have
been entrusted to Roberts
Funeral Home of Dunnel-
lon. Condolences may be
made to Robertsof
Dunnellon.com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's poli cy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660.



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SMemorial Service ,j
for
SEvelyn M. Moran
Tuesday, Jan. 7, 1pmr j
SShepherd of the Hills
SEpiscopal Church
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
S Lecanto, FL


Clifford
Null, 49
HOMOSASSA
Clifford Null, age 49, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.




Harold
Sistrand, 86
CITRUS SPRINGS
Harold L. Sistrand, 86, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Dec. 24, 2013, at Hospice
House of Citrus County
Hal was born April 7,
1927, in Bridgeport, Conn.
A World War II Navy vet-
eran, he is survived by his
wife, Patricia Sistrand;
brother David; sons An-
drew of Connecticut, Mark
of California and David of
Florida; stepdaughters
Catherine Violette of Con-
necticut and Patricia
Byrne of Florida; seven
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be at 10:30 a.m. Monday,
Jan. 6,2014, at First United
Methodist Church in Dun-
nellon with Pastor E. Ful-
ford, followed by
interment at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell. Donations to FUMC
building fund.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Leonard
Weisman, 98
CRYSTAL RIVER
Leonard Weisman, 98, of
Crystal River, Fla., died
Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014.
Graveside service will be
at 11 a.m. Monday, Jan. 6,
2014, at Fero Memorial
Gardens.
Arrangements are en-
trusted to Fero Funeral
Home.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Gilbert
Stanage 75
INVERNESS
GilbertAlvin Stanage 75,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Dec. 31,
2013, at Hospice of Citrus
County,
Lecanto.
He was
born
Oct. 1,
1938, in
Peach Or-
chard,
Ark., to the
late Clyde-
J. and Es- Gilbert
their Mary Stanage
(Young)
Stanage. Gilbert was a self-
employed tree surgeon,
and arrived in this area in
1981, coming from Benton
Harbor, Mich. He attended
the First Assembly of God
Church in Inverness, and
enjoyed hunting, fishing,
the outdoors and bowling.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 58 years, Janell
Stanage. Other survivors
include children Ray Stan-
age of Floral City, Fla.,
Clyde Stanage of Inver-
ness, Allen (Barbara) Stan-
age of Floral City, Fla., and
Sandy (Richard) Biastock
of Coloma, Mich.; brothers
Jerry and Terry Stanage;
sisters Eloise Therot,
Janie Brockman and Car-
olyn Hurst; 13 grandchil-
dren; and eight
great-grandchildren.
A Celebration of Life
Memorial Service is
scheduled for 11 a.m.
Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
The family will receive
friends at the funeral
Home one hour prior to
service.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.



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CRYSTAL RIVER
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Citrus KIA would like to i
recognize and congratulatesC

Mr. Joe Slater
as their

Salesperson

of the Year
for the 4th time and the
3rd straight year!
2009,2011,2012,2013
Joe has earned this honor for his outstanding
performance. He is a seven year dedicated
and loyal employee, not only to Citrus KIA,
but to all of his repeat and new customers. He is a very knowledgeable, experienced and
exciting salesman.
Joe would like to take this opportunity to thank Citrus KIA and all of his loyal customers that
have taken part and helped him achieve this honor. He would like to invite everyone to
come by and see for themselves why he believes that Citrus KIA, their staff, and their entire
top-of-the-line inventory speaks for itself.
Come by and ask for Joe and say hello!

1850 S. E Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL
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The Power to Surprse HOURS: Mon. Fri: 9:00am. 7:00pm Sat 9:00am 6:00pmo Sunday11:OOam. 4:00pm


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nation/World BRIEFS


Barbara Bush leaves
Houston hospital
HOUSTON Former first
lady Barbara Bush praised the
staff of a Texas hospital where
she spent nearly a week
being treated for pneumonia
before going home Saturday.
Jim McGrath, a spokesman
for President George H.W. Bush
and his wife, said doctors at
Houston Methodist Hospital
decided Saturday morning to
allow Barbara Bush to go
home. The 88-year-old Bush
family matriarch had been
hospitalized since Monday.
"I cannot thank the doctors
and nurses at Houston
Methodist enough for making
sure I got the best treatment
and got back to George and
our dogs as quickly as possi-
ble," Bush said. The Bushes
are well-known dog lovers
and live in Houston.
The nation's longest-mar-
ried presidential first couple
will celebrate their 69th wed-
ding anniversary Monday.
Historic freeze could
break temp records
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. The
deep freeze expected soon in
the Midwest, New England
and even the South will be one
to remember, with potential
record-low temperatures.
The frigid air will begin Sun-
day and extend into early next
week, funneled as far south
as the Gulf Coast.
It hasn't been this cold for
decades 20 years in Wash-
ington, D.C., 18 years in Mil-
waukee, 15 in Missouri -
even in the Midwest, where
bundling up is second nature.
Weather Bell meteorologist
Ryan Maue said, "If you're
under 40 (years old), you've
not seen this stuff before."
Blame it on a "polar vortex,"
as one meteorologist calls it,
a counterclockwise-rotating
pool of cold, dense air.
"It's just a large area of very
cold air that comes down, forms
over the North Pole or polar
regions... usually stays in
Canada, but this time it's going
to come all the way into the
eastern United States," said
National Weather Service me-
teorologist Phillip Schu-
macher in Sioux Falls, S.D.


Death toll in latest
Egypt clashes at 17
CAIRO -The death toll
from the latest dashes between
Islamist protesters and secu-
rity forces in Egypt has risen
to 17, a security official said
Saturday, less than two weeks
ahead of a key referendum on
an amended constitution.
In what were the deadliest
street battles in months, Cairo
and other heavily populated
residential areas on Friday
witnessed hundreds of Muslim
Brotherhood members and
their supporters throw fire-
bombs and rocks at security
forces, who responded with
water cannons and tear gas.
Health Ministry Spokesman
Mohammed Fathallah said 62
people were injured.
Al-Qaida-linked group
claims Beirut bomb
BEIRUT--An al-Qaida-
linked group claimed respon-
sibility on Saturday for a suicide
car bombing last week in a
Shiite-dominated Beirut neigh-
borhood, as its fighters fought
other rebels in neighboring Syria.
It was the first time at the
al-Qaida linked Islamic State
of Iraq and the Levant claimed
responsibility for an attack in
Lebanon, underscoring how
the ever more complex Syrian
war is increasingly spilling
over into its smaller neighbor.
At least five people were
killed in the attack.
Pope to nuns: Why
won't you answer?
VATICAN CITY-- Pope
Francis made another one of
his cold calls to wish a group
of nuns in a Spanish convent
Happy New Year. He got their
answering machine.
"What are the nuns doing
that they can't answer the
phone?" Francis asked in the
message he left, the record-
ing of which was obtained by
Spain's El Mundo newspaper.
"This is Pope Francis. I
wanted to offer you greetings
for the end of the year. Maybe
I'll try to call again later. May
God bless you," he said.
Francis has made a habit of
calling people out of the blue,
often checking in with ordinary
folk who have written him.


Boeing machinists
OK labor contract
SEATTLE The stakes
were high and the vote was
close as Boeing production
workers agreed to concede
some benefits in order to se-
cure assembly of the new
777X airplane for the Puget
Sound region.
Local officials of the Inter-
national Association of Ma-
chinists and Aerospace
Workers had urged their
30,000 members to oppose
the eight-year contract exten-
sion, arguing that the pro-
posal surrendered too much
at a time of company prof-
itability. They had opposed
taking a vote at all but were
overruled by national leaders
in the Machinists union.
The contract will freeze the
Machinists' pensions and begin
moving workers to defined-
contribution savings plans.
The issue fractured the
union and drew unusual pleas
from politicians who said the
deal was necessary to sup-
port the area's economic fu-
ture. Boeing had been
exploring the prospect of
building the 777X elsewhere.
The contract passed with a
51 percent yes vote.
Trial set in unusual
white-collar mob case
CAMDEN, N.J. In many
ways, it's your run-of-the-mill
white-collar case. But this one
has a mob twist.
The son of a reputed
Philadelphia-area Mafia boss
and six others are scheduled
to be tried starting this week on
charges including the usual
stuff racketeering. But the
government says Nicodemo
S. Scarfo and his co-defendants
used threats of harm to take over
the board of FirstPlus Financial
Group, an Irving, Texas-based
publicly traded mortgage com-
pany, and then had the company
buy shell companies they owned
so they could take out the assets.
In court filings, the government
said the conspirators plundered
$12 million in less than a year,
buying homes, weapons, am-
munition, a plane, luxury cars,
jewelry and an $850,000
yacht they named "Priceless."
-From wire reports


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A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


NATION/WORLD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Citrus County Ticket Sales
Fresh Start DONUTS in
Beverly Hills, FL 527-1996


Tickets $16 to $36 and even less with groups
(from 8 people save 12% each tickeL.. expires Jan 8)
ALSO... multi-show discounts!
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Sunday 141942014. Bradenton FI.
Sunday 1.26.2014. OCALA, Fl.
Saturday 2.1.2014 INVERNESS Fl.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Ashley Billings holds the flag that covered her husband's casket Saturday as her mother Naomi Brady comforts her. Chief Warrant Officer 2
Randy Lee Billings' casket was interred at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell following a memorial service.


ABOVE: Ashley Billings is overcome with grief following the conclusion of the
memorial service for her husband. She and her husband had been married seven years.
BELOW: Tens of thousands of men and women are buried at Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell. The address is 6502 S.W. 102nd Ave., Bushnell, and the site is open for
visitation daily, from sunrise to sunset. Holiday wreaths will remain through Jan. 20.


ABOVE: Kiersten Weaver, CW 2 Billings' sister-in-law, speaks to the crowd gathered
at Cornerstone Baptist Church in Inverness, where a memorial service took place
Saturday morning. Following the church service, another memorial was conducted at
Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. BELOW: Patriot Guard riders turned out in force
for CW 2 Billings' service, many wearing clothing honoring those who have died.


SOLDIER
Continued from Page Al

Brigade, 1st Infantry Division,
Fort Riley Kan. Billings was fly-
ing the Black Hawk helicopter
The cause of the crash is still
under investigation.
Billings' widow is the sister of
Aaron Weaver, who died almost
exactly 10 years ago in a heli-
copter crash in Iraq.
Weaver was killed Jan. 8,
2004, near Fallujah, Iraq, when
a Black Hawk medevac heli-
copter he was riding in was shot


down by rocket fire. Aaron, who
was being flown to Baghdad for
a medical checkup, left behind
a wife, Nancy, and two children.
Saturday, as the sound of
Taps wafted from a lone bu-
gler's horn, tears rolled down
the cheeks of those at the
crowded graveside ceremony
Billings' widow, Ashley
Billings, and friends and rela-
tives wept loudly following a fly-
over by helicopters and the gun
salute. Friends and relatives
also cried when a folded flag
was presented to his widow and
his father, Robert Billings, who
were seated together


Following the ceremony, the
senior Billings clutched the flag
and thanked well-wishers as
tears streamed down his cheeks.
Sheryl Brown, Billings'
mother, said, "I raised this boy
and now he is gone," as she
sobbed. The senior Billings and
Brown traveled from Oklahoma
for the funeral.
Earlier at the church, Ashley's
16-year-old sister, Kiersten
Weaver, offered an eloquent
poem she wrote after hearing
about the crash, and a light and
sometimes heart-rending eulogy
to her deceased brother-in-law
Weaver said she was thankful


Billings came into her life and
served as a second dad to her,
and that she loved him "more
than he would ever know"
The chaplain of the Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart,
Ernest Tucker officiated the
church service.
Tucker, a Vietnam War vet-
eran, choked up several times
as he spoke about Billings and
the role of chopper pilots dur-
ing combat
He spoke of Billings in the
present tense, saying he is still
with us "resting peacefully
while he awaits his resurrec-


tion to eternal life."
Paige Weaver, another of
Billings' sisters-in-law, also
read a poem in his memory
Billings' widow accepted a
posthumous Bronze Star Medal
from the president She also got
a plaque indicating her hus-
band will now become part of
the Afghanistan/Iraq Memorial
Portrait Mural based in Citrus
County The mural is a mobile
pantheon to honor those who
died in these conflicts.
The Patriot Guard Riders
and the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office provided escort from the
church to the gravesite.


A1O SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


RANDY LEE BILLINGS






































































































If you've never spent time on a
cruise ship, you might think it's
all about people dancing the
Macarena near the pool by day,
dressing up for formal dinners by
night and shopping in between.
While these are all part of
"cruise culture," as I call it,

they don't have to be part of your
experience if you don't want
them to.

I'm not into any of those things,
but I am into budget travel.
My desire to see new places is
usually hindered by a lack of
resources, so cruising has been a
good way for me to visit new
countries without spending a lot
of money


Amanda Mims
For the Chronicle
Editor's note: This is the first of a three-part series on cruising. Coming up next week: Key West, a popular
cruise ship port of call.


ve been to the Bahamas,
Mexico and Key West via
cruise ship, and I've never
once seen an on-board en-
tertainment show or done
the Electric Slide on the lido
deck. The great thing about cruis-
ing is you don't have to like those
things (but if you do, great) to enjoy
a few days or a week on the water
There are many places on a cruise
ship to get away from the crowds,
and you can have a budget-friendly


vacation while enjoying life at sea
on your own terms. Although there
are non-stop activities, social din-
ners and tons of shopping (both on-
board and off) going on, you can get
some real traveling and exploring
done if you plan right.
Making the most of your cruise
Here are some tips from me
based on my experience cruising
from Florida.


Plan ahead and research your
destinations) so you know what
you want to do and where to go be-
fore you arrive. One drawback to
cruising is that your time at any
given port of call is limited. Often,
the ship will arrive in the morning
and leave in the afternoon or ar-
rive in the afternoon and leave at
night. Guests on a cruise typically
have about half a day to spend at
See /CRUISEPage A13

KEVIN MIMS/Special to the Chronicle


Catamaran sailing is a popular activity among cruise ship guests while at port.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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0&)A 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14
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Keep watchful



eye on siblings


D ear Annie: I have
five younger
brothers who
mean everything to me.
Three of them still live
with my mother
Mom lived with an
abusive man for years.
When I was 11, she chose
this man over me and
put me in a foster home
for two years. He is now
out of the house and
away from my
precious lit-
tle ones, but
I'm afraid it's
temporary
Mom
claims she is
glad he's
gone, but I
know she
can't stand
being alone
and doesn't
have the best ANN
judgment. I I
think he'll be MAIL
back.
How can I make her
see that as much as
being alone is hard on
her, she needs to grow
up and be a mother to
her children? I called
the police and DCF and
reported this man's
crimes, but nothing hap-
pened. I wish I could get
custody of my brothers,
but there is no way I
could support so many
people.
How do I keep them


I
.1


safe? How can I make
sure my mother doesn't
invite this man back into
her house? Scared for
Them
Dear Scared: You can-
not do anything about
your mother's choices.
You can only keep an eye
on the situation, and if
this man returns, report
it immediately to the po-
lice and DCE While
there would
need to be evi-
dence orcor-
roboration of
abuse for the
authorities to
take action,
your vigilance
may make it
unpleasant
enough that
Mom will keep
this man at
E'S arm's length.
Is the boys'
BOX father in the
picture? Are
there other relatives
who would take the
boys? You are a kind and
caring sibling, but some-
times these things are
beyond your control. Do
what you can, and make
sure your brothers are
aware that you care.
They need to know
you're in their corner

Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comeast.net


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) 3:45 p.m.
No passes.
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30, 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"American Hustle" (R)
12:45,4, 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:10, 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 12:35 p.m.,
4:40 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13)
8p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)
12:15, 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)In 3D,
high frame rate. 3:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Paranormal Activity: The
Marked Ones" (R) 12:05,
2:25, 4:45, 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
12:20, 3:35, 7 p.m.
"The Secret Life of Walter
Mitty" (PG) 12:50, 4:20,
7:25 p.m. No passes.
"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R)


noon, 3:50, 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"47 Ronin" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m. No passes.
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D.
3:30, 7:20, 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"American Hustle" (R)
noon, 4, 7, 10:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
3:45, 7:30, 10:15 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 12:30, 4:15,
7:10 p.m.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13)
12:45, 10:25 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) 3:15,
6:50 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D.
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Paranormal Activity: The
Marked Ones" (R) 1:15,4:30,
7:45, 10:30 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) 1 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Let happen
6 Mistake
10 Particular thing
14 Plant disease
18 On a throne
20 Perceive
21 Ship of 1492
22 Bar legally
24 Smooth and shiny
25 PartofA.D.
26 Arab VIP
27 "The Prince
and the-"
29 Rara -
30 "20,000 Leagues" cap-
tain
32 Mend
34 Fashion name
36 Reveal
37 Chess pieces
38 Own
39 Prophet in
a whale
41 Greek god of love
43 Speed
44 Limping
45 Worker in a bar
47 Well-behaved
49 Matador
52 -and bear it
53 Tense
55 Recoil
59 Foolish
60 Eau-de-vie
62 Meat for stew
64 Convex molding
65 N.Y players
66 Shore
67 Irving or Poehler
69 Vim
71 Soon
72 Baseball stat.
73 Twelve dozen
74 Astate (Abbr.)
75 Set off
77 Dir. letters
78 Fine-tune
80 Church official
82 To be sure!
84 Cash advances
85 Plant bristle
87 School (Abbr.)
88 Show off
89 Fractional part
90 Waterfall
92 Grottoes
93 Black cuckoo
94 Man from Madrid


96 Every
97 Cook a
certain way
99 Jima
102 Doing nothing
104 Speck
105 Make inquiry
106 Costly fur
107 Strikebreaker
108 Bakery items
110 Healthy
112 Prince in a play
114 Jet
115 Underhanded
117 Go from place
to place
119 Gong
120 London's Old-
121 Tidy
123 Majestic
125 Wedding ring
126 Gypsy man
129 Court order
131 Put forth effort
132 Road division
133 That girl
136 Press
138 Unhearing
140 Get spliced
141 Grade
142 Display
143 Snake-haired Gorgon
145 Bolt
147 Mild oath
149 Prison break
151 Prison camp
152 Sated
153 Nobleman
154 Schoolbook
155 Gin flavoring
156 Shout
157 Wall St. abbr.
158 Salad plant

DOWN
1 State in India
2 Permission
3 America
4 Redding or
Skinner
5 Cyst
6 Disgrace
7 Jay of late TV
8 Form of "John"
9 Deep
10 Approximate
11 Tiny-
12 Town in
Oklahoma


13 One of the
Osmonds
14 Criticism
15 Today
16 Ticket remnant
17 Yellow gem
19 Powerhouse
23 Graceful girl
28 Salesman,
for short
31 Holiday time
33 Hotel
35 Assoc.
38 Long-eared
animal
39 Shared
40 Leaden
42 Fly
unaccompanied
44 Telescope part
45 Copper alloy
46 Regret
48 Prima donna
49 Use a stopwatch
50 Unmatched thing
51 Vegetable stew
52 Mardi-
54 Rapped
56 Ridiculous
57 Place for storage
58 Sharpened
60 Tome
61 Lock maker
63 Expanse of
grassland
66 Collided
68 Disorder
70 Enlisted man
73 Fellows
74 Noisy quarrel
75 Depot (Abbr.)
76 Scoundrel
79 "- and Peace"
80 Liquid measures
(Abbr.)
81 Deck item
83 Payable
84 City on the Thames
85 Diving duck
86 Pinna
89 Carnivals
91 Ansate cross
92 Kooky sect
95 The present
97 "When Harry
Met-..."
98 Cain's victim
100 Dwindle
101 Follow directions


103 vital
105 Having winglike parts
106 Silvery fish
107 Skidded
109 Distort
111 -Alamos
113 City in Scotland
114 Clear square
116 Measure of
distance
118 Smart or Sheffield


Loan officer
Cravat
Links peg
Saloon
Edge
Portland's state (Abbr.)
- operandi
Chewy candy
Big spoon
Specter
Things wished for


Puzzle answer is on Page A15.


Pitchers
- and void
Smoke conduit
A neighbor
in space
Wound mark
- Paulo
Annex
Merry
Dry, said of wine


2014 UFS, Dist, by Universal Uclick for UFS


A12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KEVIN MIMS/Special to the Chronicle


A Carnival Cruise Lines ship nears Key West.


CRUISE
Continued from Page All

most ports of call, so you
don't want to waste any
time once you're there.
n It's usually best to get
away from the port as
quickly as possible be-
cause ports are typically
full of vendors trying to
sell you things you don't
need. You might have to
take a taxi to reach an
area of cultural interest
or else be limited to hang-
ing out on a beach or
shopping. One of the best
experiences I have had
while on a cruise was
when we rented a Jeep in
Mexico and drove 40 miles
to see Mayan ruins. Keep
in mind that there is a
risk of not making it back
to the ship in time if you
go off on your own (that
almost happened to us).
Sometimes one of your
destinations is a small is-
land leased or owned by
the cruise line, and in that
case, bring your swim and
snorkel gear or plan to rent
a kayak.
Remember that in the
wintertime, you will have
fewer daylight hours to
spend at a port of call if
you arrive in the after-
noon. For instance, if you
arrive at 2 p.m. and the
sun sets around 5 p.m.,
you will be limited to
three daylight hours for
outdoor activities and
sightseeing, so plan ac-
cordingly
i To save time on a
morning when the ship is
at port, order room serv-
ice (this is usually free)
and avoid the long lines


for the breakfast buffet.

Saving money

The main reason I have
chosen to travel by cruise
ship is that it costs less
than traveling by airplane
and staying in hotels. For
example, my husband and
I went on a four-night
cruise to Mexico and Key
West several years ago
and our tickets cost less
than $150 each including
taxes and port fees (but
not tips or parking at the
port). So for less than
$300, we got meals, lodg-
ing for four nights and
transportation from
Miami to Mexico and
back. A similar cruise this
year cost about $450 for
both of us. Airline tickets
to a similar destination
probably would have cost
a few thousand dollars
round-trip for both of us.
Cruises can be pricey
or they can be a great way
to travel on a budget How
much you spend is up to
you. Here are some tips to
save money:
When it comes to
drinks, stick to juice, tea
and coffee. Usually, there
is no extra charge for
these beverages and they
are available most of the
day, if not 24 hours. The
extra charges for sodas
and alcoholic beverages
add up quickly Also, pack
a reusable bottle so you
don't have to buy bottled
water Guests are often al-
lowed to bring a limited
amount of sealed, un-
opened packed drinks
and food, so check with
the cruise line.
You generally don't
need a passport if your


I W |INOS


cruise starts and ends at
the same U.S. port, so you
can save money by not get-
ting one. But always check
with the cruise line to see
what documents you need
before booking your trip.
m If you have been on a
cruise already, you might
be eligible for a discount
if you book your next
cruise with the same
cruise line.
m If you are traveling
with a large party and are
booking multiple state-
rooms, call a cruise line
sales representative to
see about discounts.
Be flexible with your
travel dates if possible to
take advantage of last-
minute deals.
Bring your own snor-
keling gear If you do
some research ahead of
time, you can find out
where the best places to
snorkel are and avoid
booking a costly shore ex-
cursion. Often, you can
snorkel and swim for free


in the same places others
pay to go.
*Wi-Fi on a cruise ship
is expensive, as is cellular
voice and data service.
However, it's usually not
difficult to find a location
that offers free Wi-Fi once
you're at port and off the
ship.
Keep an eye on sales
that cruise lines advertise
online. You might be able
to snag free room up-
grades or onboard credit.
m If you live close
enough to a port (Tampa
and Port Canaveral come
to mind) and you have a
kind friend or family
member willing to drive
you there, you won't have
to pay daily parking fees
at the port, which are usu-
ally about $15 per day If
you plan to drive yourself
and your cruise is a
longer one, you might
save a bit of money by get-
ting an inexpensive rental
car for the days you arrive
and depart.


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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 A13











ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

40&8 to have breakfast today
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
today, Jan. 5, at American Legion Post 155
on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Post 166 won't meet Monday
American Legion Post 166 of Homosassa
Springs will not meet Monday
The next scheduled meeting will be
Monday, Feb. 3, at the Springs Lodge No.
378, F&AM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive in Ho-
mosassa.

Post to serve roast pork
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 will
serve a roast pork dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10. The public is
invited.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.
The post is at 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs.

All welcome at Elvis show
The public is welcome to join the
VFW Post 4337 family for an "Elvis Dinner
Show" from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 11, at
the post home, 906 State Road 44 East,
Inverness.
Lasagna, salad and dessert will be
served until 7 p.m.; the show will be from
7 to 9a.m.
Tickets are $15, reservation only, and
are available at the Canteen. Call
352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org, for
information about all post activities.

Auxiliary slates chili cookoff
Crystal River American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155 will have its annual
Chinese Auction/Chili Cook-Off on
Saturday, Jan. 11, at the post, 8565 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway
The doors will open at 11 a.m. for our
Chinese auction. Regular tickets will be $3
for 10, and tickets for Special Table items
will be $1 each. Winners will be selected at
2p.m.
The Chili Cook-Off is open to anyone
who would like to enter chili and/or corn-
bread. All entries must be at the post by
11:30 a.m. for judging. After the winners
are selected, all entries will be available
to purchase for $3 a bowl or $ 5 for all you
can eat.
This is an annual event that has been
held for more than 15 years. All profits
help support the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary

Legion post invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Post plans market, breakfast
Wall-Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will
have an outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 18.
Pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs,
sausage, orange juice and coffee are on
the menu for $5. The public is welcome.

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 21, at the
Citrus County Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, about a half-mile south of State
Road 44 on the west side of C.R. 491.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member.
To learn more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit www. citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start
at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.


becomes career

military gave me way more than I expected.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Vince Arauza, having retired in 1976 after a 23-year career in the Air Force, talks about his experience during the Cuban
Missile Crisis in 1962. Arauza, who retired with the rank of master sergeant, served in the then relatively new field of
biomedical technology. He now resides in Inverness, having retired from a second biomedical technician career, that time
in the private sector.


Local veterans finds niche in biomedical tech field


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


t wasn't planned the iiler.
way it turned out. 0di
When Vince Arauza ,,,,
joined the IU.S. Air Force '** :


in 1953 after graduating..
in 1953 after graduating


from high school in
Houston, he took a test to
see what he would be
best suited to do.
"They told me that with my score, I
qualify for anything I want," the
79- year-old Arauza said. "I told them
I'd like to be a pilot or a policeman."
But to be a pilot, he would need
more than just a high school educa-
tion, which meant he would have to
stay in the service for four more years,
something he wasn't
ready to do at the
time: "I'm doing my
four (years) and I'm
gone," he said. And
to be a policeman,
he was told he was Stationed at: I
"too small. You have Ladd
to be big and husky" Barksdale Air
That left him Base, El P.
technical school South Korea,:
but for what? and 1972; Cl
Arauza decided to
go into biomedical Jobs: Biom
repair services, a and ma
new field in the mil-
itary His choice
proved to be life-
altering; Arauza
would remain in the military until
1976, and after leaving he went into
the same field in private practice.
"The military gave me way more
than I expected," Arauza said. "But
then again, back then I never thought
I'd make it to be 80, and now I'm
almost 80."
When Arauza, whose father was a
Mexican immigrant, joined the mili-
tary service, integration for non-


whites in many parts of the service
was just getting under way, including
his chosen field. Arauza said he was
the first person with a minority back-
ground to graduate in biomedical
repair
Nice to be first, but his first posting
wasn't so nice, certainly not for a guy
born and raised in Houston: Elmen-
dorfAir Force Base in Anchorage,
Alaska.
"I had never seen snow," he said. He
would see plenty of it for the next two
years, through 1956.
Arauza was the only person in his
field in Alaska, and his field was re-
pairing the medical equipment and


Barksdale Air Force Base in Shreve-
port, La., took him near the end of his
enlistment, and like so many others
who received valuable training while
in the military Arauza decided to take
his skills to the outside world. How-
ever, after a few months the bills were
mounting, with his oldest son needing
extensive medical treatment.
So he re-enlisted, "because the re-
cruiting officer said I could have my
rank (sergeant) back."
He was then stationed at Biggs Air
Force Base in El Paso, Texas, where he
would remain for seven years, includ-
ing a tense 13 days in 1962 during the
Cuban Missile Crisis.


Name: Vince Arauza
Rank: Master sergeant
Branch: U.S. Air Force
Years: 1953-1976
Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage, Alaska, 1955;
Id Air Force Base, Fairbanks, Alaska; 1956;
r Force Base, Shreveport, La., 1957; Biggs Air Force
aso, Texas, 1957-64; Osan Air Base, Pyeongtaek,
L964-65; Dover Air Force Base, Dover, Del., 1965-70
ark Air Force Base, Angeles City, Philippines, 1971;
Tachikawa Air Base, Tachikawa, Japan
medical repair technician, responsible for the repair
maintenance of all medical equipment and also
management of medical supplies
Commendations: Commendation Medal


managing the medical supplies.
"I was always on call both years," he
said. He recalled what he was told to
do when he first arrived in Alaska: "Go
up to X-ray and get that going. That
was my first assignment I grew up with
the field."
After a year at Elmendorf, he spent
his second year in Alaska which was
not yet a state at Ladd Air Force
Base in Fairbanks. A short stint at


"We were at the
base for two straight
days, without a break,
just waiting."
Arauza spent 20
months in 1964-65
covering all of South
Korea as the only bio-
medical repair tech-
nician, then went to
Dover Air Force Base
outside of Dover, Del.
He would spend less
than a year at Clark
Air Force Base in the
Philippines, return to
Dover for a year, then
spend his final four
years at Tachikawa


Airfield in Japan, retiring from the
service in 1976 as a master sergeant
His skills were needed in the serv-
ice, something that was apparent dur-
ing his time in Korea.
"Again, I was the only one in all of
Korea," he said. "I had to be familiar
with everything."
While on duty in Japan, Arauza
was presented an Air Force
Commendation Medal.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


..:.. ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDDING

Griffin/Malanga


ENGAGED

Hitson/Poss


ENGAGED

Aubart/Jones


Ashley Gail Griffin and
James Robert Malanga
exchanged nuptial vows
on Saturday, Nov. 23,2013,
at Citrus Hills Golf&
Country Club in
Hernando. The ceremony
was officiated by family
friend Erin Wetherington.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Cheri Reed of
Crystal River The groom
is the son of Allen and
Lisa Kalansky of
Homosassa.
Rachel Reed, the
bride's aunt, of Norfolk,
Va., was the bride's maid
of honor, and the best
man was the groom's dad,
Allen Kalansky
The bride's attendants
were Michelle Malanga,
Brandy Burgard,
Katherine Reed, Lauren
Reed and Amber Krug.
The groomsmen were
Jimmy Stoltz, Ryan Zettle,
Ryan Burgard, Jason
Mitchell and Michael
Wetherington.
The ring-bearer was
Mason Zettle and the
flower girl was Kaylynn
Reed.
The bride wore an
Alfred Angelo wedding
dress. She carried a
teardrop bouquet of calla
lillies and purple
lisianthus.
Family members from
New York, New Jersey,
Texas, Virginia and
Louisiana traveled to
attend the nuptials.
A reception followed at
Citrus Hill Golf& Country
Club.
The new bride is em-
ployed at Brentwood and
the groom is the co-owner

ENGAGED

Bartley/Noyes


of Nature Coast Home
Repair & Maintenance
Inc.
The couple will reside
in Crystal River and went
on a honeymoon cruise to
Grand Cayman and
Cozumel, Mexico.


Layla Delaine Hitson
and Cody James Poss,
both of Inverness, will
exchange nuptial vows in
an afternoon ceremony
Oct. 4,2014, in Chiefland.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Timothy
James Hitson and Neshi
Mari Hitson of Citrus
County Her fiance is the
son of Donald Lee Poss
and Tammi Marie Poss of
Inverness.
A graduate of the class
of 2011 of Lecanto High
School and the Academy
of Environmental
Science, the bride-elect
works at Rapunzel's Hair
Salon. The prospective
groom is a graduate of
Citrus High School, class
of 2010, and was on the
Citrus High School
football team. He is


John and Kathy Aubart
of Hayward, Wisc., have
announced the
engagement of their
daughter, Holly Aubart,
to Steven Jones, son of
John and Guyanne Jones
of Crystal River
The couple, who both
live in Denver, plan an
evening ceremony on
Sept. 7,2014, in Denver
The bride-elect is
mobile spay and neuter
coordinator at Dumb


Friends League. Her
fiance is associated with
delivery for Beverage
Distributors.


associated with Don Poss
Roofing.
Close friends and
family members will
celebrate with a private
ceremony


Sunday's PUZZLER


Qualified participants must be at least 18 years old, and have
experienced OAB symptoms, such as a strong, sudden urge to
urinate or the need to urinate frequently for at least 6 months.
Qualified participants will receive investigational study drug
or placebo (inactive pill) and study-related care at no cost.
Compensation for time and travel may be provided.


Call
352-59-STUDY

16176 Cortez Blvd.
BrooksviUe, FL 34601
Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH
Board Certified, Family Medicine


Puzzle is on Page A12


SA I T jV= I I PEAN INTO E M I RIP P
A LO SLIPM IT--M RUST
SEATED HERA-R-NI NA ESTOP
SATINY AINNIONEMIR PAUPER
AEM FI IOR B AR E
M EN HAE JON A H E ROCS ZI P
LAME BOUNCER GOOD



ROLLS WELL N HAMLT P LANE
A N E BR A N DMY VEALL 0AV LE
N e A TG S T1ATMEY BPEP A ND 0
TR M WRIT EXR T L A NE IN DSE'E
L-O"A-N-S SETIAN A C D UN
0 UO R; T H CASC AD;
ANTI S E 0R- Y S AIU EIT VVWO
DIL D 0 e 1 MA S K A B LE C A B
0 L LS VV E L 1alA M Le TIPI A N E
NiiE K Y R 0 A M B E L L B A Li T- EY

R O a ,E- LA S H E
I R ON DEAF EWIED M AIRK SHOW
MeD UAIF L E E EGADESC A P E
U LAGEFULL EAR REA D E R
SLOE YELL NYSE C R _ESS
1-5 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


L2Z*
Katelyn Bartley and
Jonathan Noyes, both of
Homosassa, will exchange
nuptial vows in an
afternoon ceremony
Dec. 13, 2014, at The Plan-
tation on Crystal River
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Adam and
Melanie Bartley of
Homosassa.
Her fiance is the son of
Mark and Nancy Hahn of
Homosassa.
A student of elementary
education Saint Leo
University, the bride-elect
is a member of Kappa
Delta Pi. The prospective
groom is executive
meeting manager at The
Plantation on Crystal
River

FOR THE
RECORD
Dec. 16-22, 2013
Divorces
Michelle A. Cox, Inverness
vs. Brent S. Cox, Inverness
Candace Megan Brittany
Gioe Sampson, Homosassa
vs. Jeremy Lee Sampson,
Dunnellon
Katrina Leigh McMinds,
Citrus Springs vs. Robert J.
McMinds, Crystal River
Vicky R. Nix, Homosassa
vs. James R. Nix, Homosassa
Joyce D. Smith, Inverness
vs. Marshall K. Smith,
Inverness
Marriages
Harold Perkins Fish,
Hernando/Melissa Rose
Esken, Hernando
Cody James Ingalls,
Dunnellon/Jessica Nicole
Reynolds, Lecanto
William Arthur Johnson Jr.,
Beverly Hills/Danielle Marie
Owenby, Beverly Hills
Theron Michael Maynard,
Lecanto/Brittany Dionne
Debusk, Lecanto
Ryan Adam Murphy,
Netcong, N.J./Jessica Lynn
Paquin, Netcong, N.J.
Samuel Robert Piazza,
Homosassa/Gale Marie
Cantrell, Homosassa
Patrick Daniel Przybylski,
Crystal River/Deana Jasmine
Medina, Crystal River


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Meridien",
Research
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 A15


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-7954233.
American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary presidentAlice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
N American Legion Post 166,
meets at the Springs Lodge No. 378
A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call Commander Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S.
Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call
352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087,
County Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.


Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampabay
.rr.com and Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west of
U.S. 19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW
Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Com-
mander Victor Houston at 352-344-
3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post
447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call
Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-
794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV


Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans As-
sociation, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citruspur
pleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of Mil-
itary Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at


the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-
0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. on certain Saturdays at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings in 2014 are: Jan. 11, Feb.
8, March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
n U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at West
Citrus Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive. Call Wilbur B. Scott at
352-628-0639 or email sea-
capt34447@yahoo.com or Robert
Currie at 352-799-5250 or email


rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at
352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV property in
Inverness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion. Call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is
to meet the needs of wounded vet-
erans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.

This listing contains only basic
information regarding each group.
For more information about sched-
uled activities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or corrections to
community@chronicleonline.com.


VETERANS NOTES


Post to host
poker run
American Legion Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, will host a bene-
fit poker run Saturday,
Jan. 25, with proceeds
supporting Moffitt Cancer
Center Ovarian Cancer
Research and patients
and families served by
Hospice of Citrus County
A $15 entry fee per
rider will include a poker
hand, a raffle prize ticket
and a meal at the end of
the run. Registration be-
gins at 8:30 a.m. at Ameri-
can Legion Post 237 in
Beverly Hills. Kick stands
are up at 10 a.m. and the
last bike in will be at 4:30
p.m. when food will be
served.
The fourth annual
American Legion Post 237
Poker Run will encom-
pass six stops to include:
Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's,
Crystal River Eagles,


Mickey's Billiards and
Scoreboards.
The best hand will win
the poker run and all ve-
hicles are welcome to par-
ticipate. Music will be
provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auc-
tion, door prize raffles
and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information,
call 352-746-5018 or John
Roby at 352-341-5856.

Cooties to serve
roast beef dinner
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent
76 will serve a roast beef
dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy
Rooks Jr VFW Post 4252
in Hernando (3190 N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, where the heli-
copter is). The public is
invited.
Advance tickets are $7
and $7.50 at the door
Tickets can be purchased
at Post 4252. Call the post
at 352-726-3339 or Seam


Squirrel Paul Kimmerling
at 352-795-4142.

Spaces available
for Feb. 8 fair
The American Legion
Allen Rawls Auxiliary
Unit 77 will sponsor a
craft fair on Feb. 8.
Outdoor spaces and in-
door spaces are available.
To rent a space to sell
handmade crafts, call
Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Charlotte at 352-341-1803
or Linda at 352-201-0015
for more information.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The


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Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record. Visit the website at
www.clerk,.citrus.fl.us.
Villages.
The Gainesville van W
goes each weekday and W
The Villages run is made s Laminate,
when there is a need. Ti il
Veterans who need to Carpet
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Gainesville or The -o Are OrNaeb
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February 3 through March 16, 2014

No excuses this year Join the 10th Annual Fitness Challenge
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A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


VETERANS


I











SPORTS


Green Bay,
San Francisco
expect subzero
temperatures for
today's wild-card
playoff game.
/B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2
0 College football/B2
SScoreboard/B3
NO 0U TV, lottery/B3
0 NBA, NHL/B4
0*Golf/B4
0 NFL/B5


Colts complete nearly historic comeback


Down 38-10,

Indy rallies to

down Chief

Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS -The Indi-
anapolis Colts had all the Luck
- at least once the second half
started.
Andrew Luck threw three
touchdown passes after half-
time, including a 64-yarder to a
wide-open T.Y Hilton for the
go-ahead score with 4:22 left,
leading the Colts from a four-TD
deficit to an improbable 45-44
comeback victory over the


Kansas City Chiefs in a wild-
card game Saturday
Indianapolis (12-5) became
only the second team in playoff
history to win after trailing by 28
or more points, according to
STATS. The other: Buffalo over
Houston 41-38 in overtime in Jan-
uary 1993. The Colts will travel to
either Denver or New England
next weekend for the divisional
round with four straight wins.
Luck was an incredible mix
of good and bad, finishing 29 of
45 for 443 yards, the second-
highest total in franchise his-
tory for a playoff game, with
four TDs and three intercep-
tions. He also picked up a fum-
ble and ran it in for a 5-yard
score when the loose ball
bounced back to him.


"We never panicked," Luck
said. "We took it one play at a
time."
Hilton broke a franchise play-
off record with 13 catches and
224 yards, finishing with two
TDs including the winner
Kansas City (11-6) finished its
turnaround season with three
straight losses, two to the Colts
and an eighth straight postsea-
son defeat none more
See Page B4
Indianapolis Colts running back
Donald Brown runs the pall as
Kansas City Chiefs linebacker
Justin Houston looks on during
the second half Saturday in
Indianapolis.
Associated Press


pla


Associated Press
Florida senior point guard Scottie Wilbekin shoots as Richmond's Alonzo Nelson-Ododa defends during the first half Saturday in
Gainesville. The No. 12 Gators held off the visiting Spiders in a 67-58 victory.


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Michael Frazier II
got Florida going with a few 3-pointers.
His senior teammates took it from
there, rallying the 12th-ranked Gators to a
67-58 victory over Richmond on Saturday
Frazier scored 18 points, including
three huge 3s in the second half, and the
Gators won their 23rd consecutive home
game.
Florida trailed 46-42 with 7:50 to play
when Frazier drained his third shot from
behind the arc. Seniors Scottie Wilbekin,
Casey Prather and Pat Young did the rest
Wilbekin hit a nifty baseline floater,


Prather followed with his first of two
spinning layups and then Florida (11-2)
went ahead for good on Young's three-
point play Dorian Finney-Smith's
3-pointer gave the Gators some cushion
down the stretch, and they closed it out
from the free throw line barely
"There were some moments that were
pretty good," said Florida coach Billy
Donovan, who took blame for his team's
lackluster effort early
Florida missed six of eight free throws
in the final minute.
But the Spiders (10-5) were unable to
make those mistakes hurt.
Cedrick Lindsay led Richmond with 19


Florida down Richmond
points, and Kendall Anthony added 15.
Young finished with 15 points for
Florida. Prather had 12 and Wilbekin
added 10.
Florida didn't play particularly well,
shooting 26 percent from 3-point range,
turning the ball over 14 times and man-
aging just 10 assists.
"We would be great on a horse track be-
cause we play like this sometimes,"
Donovan said, holding his hands next to
his eyes. "We've got these blinders on and
they can't see left or right They can only
see directly in from of them.... They drive
SeeI. Page B3


Another


New Year's


resolution
I realize there are many New
Year's resolution articles and I
apologize ahead of time.
I actually started my resolutions
in December
even though
I did not in-
form my
wife. Basi-
cally, I am
trying to get
in better
shape and
have started
by reassess-
ing what I Dr. Ron Joseph
eat. I also DOCTOR'S
have de- ORDERS
cided to be _______
positive
about as much as possible.
My first resolution was to be pos-
itive and not feel too bad about a
Dunkin' Donut for breakfast. And
of course I positively love to eat
out with friends in Crystal River
I enjoy mullet dip at the Mullet
Hole, I love burgers at Fat Cat, the
salad and tiki hut at Crackers, the
Plantation Bar has great wings,
and The Port Hotel and Lolly-
gagers have an authentic Rueben
sandwich plus sports on TV
You probably think I am about to
tell you to stop eating these foods
that you love. Not a chance! The
key is to walk to all these restau-
rants! You can wear almost any-
thing and some people wear
almost nothing. There is now a
very wide sidewalk, when it is
open, connecting all of these eater-
ies. Your biggest hurdle is to park
the car far enough away to be able
to walk to the restaurant and back
for about a 45-minute walk.
While you walk or stroll with
your spouse, family or friends, you
can talk a little and walk a little
without texting. This is, also, an
opportunity for un-interrupted
inter-personal communication.
The stars are out, families are out
and the weather is almost perfect.
So what if it rains a bit
The calories you burn walking to
dinner are worth the dinner If you
walk from your home, you don't
have to worry about the alcohol in-
take on the way back.
Look at it this way, the calories
you burn walking a total of 45 min-
utes to and from the restaurant at
a leisurely pace is about 145 calo-
ries. If you go slightly faster at a
See Page B3


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B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


SPORTS


No. 1 Wildcats stay perfect


Oklahoma State,

Duke both upset

Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. Nick John-
son scored 24 points, Aaron Gor-
don had 18 points and 11
rebounds, and No. 1 Arizona beat
Washington 71-62 on Saturday
The Wildcats (15-0, 2-0 Pacific-
12) are off to their best start since
1931-32, when the team set a
school record with 16 wins to
open the season.
TJ. McConnell added six as-
sists, five rebounds and four
steals for Arizona.
C.J. Wilcox led Washington (9-6,
1-1) with 20 points while Perris
Blackwell had 12 points and 12
rebounds.
Arizona trailed by two points at
halftime but pulled away as the
Huskies shot 10 of 33 in the sec-
ond half, missing all seven 3-point
attempts.
No. 2 Syracuse 49,
Miami 44
SYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J. Fair
scored 15 points, including the go-
ahead basket with 4:16 to go, and
Syracuse rallied late in its Atlantic
Coast Conference debut.
Syracuse (14-0, 1-0) struggled
against Miami (8-6, 0-2), the reigning
conference champion.
Miami, which trailed by four points
at halftime, started the second half
with a 14-4 run as the Orange missed
their first nine shots. Garrius Adams,
who led Miami with nine points, and
freshman Manu Lecomte hit 3-point-
ers and Rion Brown hit a jumper from
deep in the right corner to stake the
Hurricanes to a 35-29 lead with 12:22
left.
Two free throws by Davon Reed
gave Miami a 40-35 lead with 6:11 left
before Rakeem Christmas scored
twice inside to start a 10-4 Orange
run.
No. 3 Ohio St. 84,
Nebraska 53
COLUMBUS, Ohio LaQuinton
Ross scored 11 points, including two
3-pointers as Ohio State pulled away.
Amedeo Della Valle had 15 points,
Marc Loving scored a career-high 13,
Shannon Scott also had 13 and Amir
Williams chipped in with 10 points for
Ohio State, which shot 54 percent
from the field (27 of 50) and 47 per-
cent on 3-pointers (9 of 19).
Terran Petteway scored 15 points
and Leslee Smith had 11 for the
Cornhuskers (8-6, 0-2), who have lost
20 consecutive road games to ranked
teams since beating No. 22 Texas
A&M on Feb. 23, 2008.
The Buckeyes, leading the Big Ten
in scoring defense at 55.1 points a
game, limited the Cornhuskers to 38
percent shooting from the field (21 of
56) while forcing 17 turnovers.
No. 5 Michigan St. 73,
Indiana 56
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -Gary
Harris scored 26 points to lead Michi-
gan State.
Harris had 17 points in the first half
for the Spartans (13-1,2-0 Big Ten)
and he had a 5-point play midway
through the second half.
Michigan State turned 13 Indiana
turnovers into 20 points, capitalizing
on a problem that has plagued the
Hoosiers (10-5, 0-2) all season.
They are averaging 16.4 turnovers a
game, more than anyone else in the
conference.
Branden Dawson added 13 points
for the Spartans.
Yogi Ferrell led Indiana with 17
points while Will Sheehey added 13.
Sheehey buried a 3-pointer with
8:54 left to close the gap to 50-41.
Harris hit a 3-pointer and drew a foul
from Stanford Robinson. And as Har-
ris pumped his first in front of the cel-
ebrating Spartans bench, Robinson
was hit with a technical foul. Harris
made two of the three free throws
and the Spartans were up 55-41.
Kansas St. 74,
No. 6 Oklahoma St. 71.
MANHATTAN, Kan. Marcus
Foster scored 17 points and Nino
Williams made two free throws with
5.7 seconds left for Kansas State in
the Big 12 opener for both teams.
Williams finished with 15 points,
none bigger than his two free throws
that gave the Wildcats (11-3,1-0) a
three-point lead. Marcus Smart of the
Cowboys raced up court and threw
up a running 3-point try as the final
buzzer sounded, but it clanked harm-


lessly off the rim.
Thomas Gipson added 10 points
and 11 rebounds for Kansas State,
which has won nine straight after los-
ing to the likes of Northern Colorado
and Charlotte earlier in the season.
Le'Bryan Nash scored 20 points,
Markel Brown finished with 16 and
Smart added 15 for the Cowboys
(12-2, 0-1), who were plagued by foul
trouble after already missing two of
their key players.


Associated Press
Arizona's Nick Johnson tries to shoot against the pressing defense of Washington's Desmond Simmons in
the first half Saturday in Tucson, Ariz.


Notre Dame 79,
No. 7 Duke 77
SOUTH BEND, Ind. EricAtkins
scored seven of his 19 points during
a decisive 20-4 run to lead Notre
Dame to an upset of Duke in the At-
lantic Coast Conference debut for the
Fighting Irish.
Two weeks after squandering an
eight-point lead in the final 50 sec-
onds against No. 3 Ohio State at
Madison Square Garden, the Irish
(10-4, 1-0) managed to hold on to im-
prove to 13-6 against top 10 teams at
home under Mike Brey.
The Irish were able to pull the upset
despite being without leading scorer
Jerian Grant, who was dismissed
from school for an academic violation
the day after the Ohio State loss.
It was the first loss in an ACC
opener for the Blue Devils (11-3, 0-1)
in seven seasons.
Rodney Hood led the Blue Devils
with 27 points, including making 5 of
10 from 3-point range as Duke was
12 of 28 from beyond the arc.
No. 13 Iowa St. 73,
Texas Tech 62
LUBBOCK, Texas Georges
Niang scored 17 points and Melvin
Ejim added 16 to extend Iowa State's
winning streak to a school record-
tying 13 games.
DeAndre Kane had 15 points for
the Cyclones (13-0, 1-0) in the Big 12
opener for both teams.
Jaye Crockett had 20 points and 11
rebounds and Dusty Hannahs added
16 points to lead Texas Tech (8-6, 0-1).
The Cyclones came into the game
averaging just over nine 3-pointers
but managed only five against the
Red Raiders. Texas Tech held Iowa
State 15 points below its average.
Texas Tech tied the Cyclones at 50
on a 3-pointer by Crockett at 12:33 of
the second half but the Red Raiders
never took a lead.
No. 14 Louisville 83,
Rutgers 76
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Russ Smith
scored 22 points and No. 14 Louisville
used its press and free-throw shooting
to post an 83-76 victory over Rutgers
in a foul-plagued game.
Luke Hancock added 15 points,
Terry Rozier had a career-high 14 and
Wayne Blackshear 13 as the Cardi-
nals (13-2, 2-0 American Athletic Con-
ference) forced Rutgers to commit a
season-high 19 turnovers in the con-
test that featured 62 personal fouls.
Louisville, which normally shoots
66 percent from the line, converted


41 of 46 foul shots in beating Rutgers
(7-8, 1-1) for the 12th time in 13
games. The 41 made free throws
were a season high.
SMU 74,
No. 17 UConn 65
DALLAS Nic Moore had 20
points and six assists to lead SMU in
the Mustangs' first game of the sea-
son played on campus in refurbished
Moody Coliseum.
Nick Russell added 14 points for
SMU (11-3, 1-1) in its first conference
win as a member of the American
Athletic Conference.
Ryan Boatright had 15 points for the
Huskies (11-3, 0-2), who lost their sec-
ond straight, both in conference and
both in Texas. Shabazz Napier and
Lasan Kroham had 12 points and De-
Andre Daniels added 11 for UConn,
which lost to Houston on Tuesday.
Cincinnati 69,
No. 18 Memphis 53
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Sean Kilpatrick
scored 11 of his 18 points down the
stretch and Cincinnati won its sixth
straight, while Memphis saw an end to
a three-game winning streak.
Justin Jackson finished with 13
points on 6-of-10 shooting, eight re-
bounds and a career high-matching
seven blocks for Cincinnati (13-2, 2-0
American Athletic Conference), while
Shaquille Thomas had 10 points.
Joe Jackson led Memphis (10-3,
1-1) with 13 points, but only had two in
the second half. Michael Dixon added
12 points but was 4 of 12 from the field.
Cincinnati broke open a close game
in the latter stages of the second half
as Kilpatrick began scoring and Mem-
phis was stymied with 24 percent
shooting in the final 20 minutes.
No. 23 UMass 73,
Miami (Ohio) 65
AMHERST, Mass. Chaz
Williams had 18 points and eight as-
sists, leading No. 23 Massachusetts
to a 73-65 victory over Miami of Ohio.
Maxie Esho added 15 points and
seven rebounds for the Minutemen
(12-1), who host Saint Joseph's on
Wednesday in their Atlantic-10
opener. Cady Lalanne had 12 points
and Trey Davis finished with 11.
No. 25 Missouri 69,
Long Beach State 59
COLUMBIA, Mo. Jabari Brown
scored 22 points to lead No. 25 Mis-
souri to a 69-59 victory over pesky
Long Beach State.
Earnest Ross added 16 points and
Ryan Rosburg had 11 rebounds for


the Tigers (12-1), who open South-
eastern Conference play at home
against Georgia on Wednesday.
Jordan Clarkson, who leads the SEC
with a 20-point average, had a sea-
son-low 11 points.
Virginia 62, FSU 50
TALLAHASSEE Justin Ander-
son scored 16 points and Akil Mitchell
added 11 points along with 13 re-
bounds to lead Virginia to a 62-50 win
at Florida State in the Atlantic Coast
Conference opener for both schools.
Virginia (10-4) jumped to an early
6-0 lead and never trailed as it
bounced back from an embarrassing
87-52 loss Monday night at Ten-
nessee. The Cavaliers led by as
many as 15 in the opening half and
22 in the second half.
Capitalizing on a 20-2 scoring ad-
vantage off 13 Florida State first half
turnovers, Virginia built an early
28-13 lead on its way to a 30-17
cushion at the midway break despite
losing the services of scoring leader
Joe Harris early in the game.
Florida State (9-4) went the open-
ing five minutes without a score until
Okaro White's 3-point shot from the
side. White was Florida State's lone
double-digit scorer with 15 points.
UCF 78, Temple 76
ORLANDO Isaiah Sykes had 23
points and 15 rebounds as Central
Florida earned its first American Ath-
letic Conference win in a 78-76 vic-
tory over Temple.
Eugene McCroy and Kasey Wilson
each added 18 points, and Calvin
Newell made 3 of 4 free throws in the
final 31.6 seconds for the Knights
(9-4, 1-1). Newell sank both free
throws with 16 seconds to play to
give Central Florida a 78-74 lead.
Will Cummings had a career-high
31 points for Temple (5-7, 0-2), which
dropped its second straight. Quenton
Decosey and Anthony Lee added 14
and 12, respectively.
Houston 67, USF 58
TAMPA- TaShawn Thomas
scored 13 points to lead Houston to a
67-58 victory over South Florida.
Danrad Knowles and Tione Womack
each had 12 points and Jherrod Stig-
gers finished with 11 for Houston (10-5,
2-0 American Athletic Conference).
Martino Brock led South Florida
(9-6, 0-2) with 11 points and Chris
Perry added 10.
USF failed to convert all 10 of its
3-point attempts en route to a 34-26
halftime deficit. The Bulls also com-
mitted eight turnovers and had seven
shots blocked before the break.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


College football
CAPSULES

Cotton Bowl

No. 9 Missouri 41,
No. 13 Okla. St. 31
ARLINGTON, Texas-
Henry Josey ran for 92 yards
and three touchdowns, the last
a 16-yarder with 3:08 left, and
No. 9 Missouri beat No. 13
Oklahoma State 41-31 in the
Cotton Bowl on Friday night.
The former Big 12 and Big
Eight rivals traded points on
six consecutive possessions
in the fourth quarter, until
Oklahoma State quarterback
Clint Chelf was sacked and
fumbled with a minute left.
Defensive lineman Shane
Ray picked up the ball and
rumbled 73 yards down the
sideline in front of the stunned
Cowboys bench to score.
SEC East champion Mis-
souri (12-2) matched its
school record for victories,
giving the SEC its 10th win in
the last 11 Cotton Bowls- all
against the Big 12.
Josey's go-ahead TD came
a play after James Franklin's
27-yard pass to Dorial Green-
Beckham on third-and-9.
Franklin, the Missouri quarter-
back plagued by injuries the
last two seasons, had two fum-
bles earlier in the second half
when Oklahoma State (10-3)
overcame a 10-point deficit to
tie it in just over 3 1/2 minutes.
Ray had been dragged into
the end zone by Desmond
Roland when the Oklahoma
State running back bulled
through the line for a 2-yard TD
run with 5 minutes left to give
the Cowboys their only lead of
the night. Ray hit Roland im-
mediately at the line, but could-
n't keep him from scoring.
Chelf threw for 381 yards
and two touchdowns with two
interceptions, completing 33
of 57 passes. He also ran 10
times for 48 yards, including a
23-yard run on third-and-10
only a few plays before All-
SEC defensive end Michael
Sam sacked Chelf and
knocked the ball loose.
That gave Sam 11 1/2
sacks, the most in the SEC
and matching a school record.
Orange Bowl

No. 12 Clemson 40,
No. 7 Ohio St. 35
MIAMI GARDENS Tajh
Boyd threw for 378 yards and
five touchdowns, Sammy
Watkins had a record-setting
night with 16 catches for 227
yards, and Clemson rallied to
beat Ohio State in the
Orange Bowl.
Boyd's 5-yard pass to Stan-
ton Seckinger with 6:16 left put
the Tigers (11-2) ahead to stay.
Watkins caught two touch-
down passes, plus became
Clemson's career receptions
leader and set an Orange
Bowl record for yardage.
Martavis Bryant caught two
more TD passes for the
Tigers to help the Tigers to
their first Orange Bowl victory
in 32 years.
Braxton Miller threw for 234
yards and Carlos Hyde ran for
113 more for Ohio State (12-2),
which wasted a nine-point sec-
ond-half lead. Buckeyes coach
Urban Meyer lost for the first
time in five career trips to the
Bowl Championship Series.
Compass Bowl

Vanderbilt 41,
Houston 24
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Pat-
ton Robinette threw two 50-
yard touchdown passes to
Jordan Matthews, and Van-
derbilt recovered after blowing
a 24-point lead to beat Hous-
ton 41-24 on Saturday in the
BBVA Compass Bowl.
Robinette, starting after
senior Austyn Carta-Samuels
had season-ending surgery to
repair a torn ACL in his left
knee, also had an 8-yard
scoring run as Vanderbilt built
a 24-0 lead in the first half.


After Houston (8-4) pulled
even by scoring 24 points in
the third quarter, Vanderbilt
reclaimed the lead on Brian
Kimbrow's 21-yard touch-
down run in the fourth quarter.
Vanderbilt (9-4) closed the
season with five straight wins,
adding to third-year coach
James Franklin's status as a
possible candidate for coach-
ing vacancies, including at
Penn State and with the NFL
Browns and Redskins. The
Commodores played in three
straight bowl games under
Franklin a first for the pro-
gram and completed their
first back-to-back nine-win
seasons.
From wire reports






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Colts 45, Chiefs 44
Kansas City 10 2110 3- 44
Indianapolis 7 321 14 45
First Quarter
KC-Bowe 6 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick), 8:11.
Ind-Hilton 10 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 4:34.
KC-FG Succop 19, :53.
Second Quarter
KC Avery 79 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
14:39.
KC-Sherman 5 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
13:05.
Snd-FGVinatieri 37, 9:14.
KC-Davis 4 run (Succop kick), 1:51.
Third Quarter
KC-Davis 10 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
13:39.
Ind-D.Brown 10 run (Vinatieri kick), 11:47.
Ind-D.Brown 3 passfrom Luck (Vinatieri kick), 7:32.
KC-FG Succop 42, 4:12.
Ind-Fleener 12 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick),
2:31.
Fourth Quarter
Ind-Luck 2 offensive fumble return (Vinatieri kick),
10:38.
KC-FG Succop 43, 5:36.
Ind-Hilton 64 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 4:21.


A-63,551.

First downs
Total NetYards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


KC
30
513
32-150
363
1-6
7-187
3-22
30-46-0
2-15
2-39.0
1-1
2-15
37:33


Ind
28
536
19-100
436
0-0
3-90
0-0
29-45-3
1-7
1-51.0
2-1
4-19
22:27


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kansas City, Davis 18-67, A.Smith 8-
57, Charles 3-18, Gray 2-5, McCluster 1-3. Indi-
anapolis, D.Brown 11-55, Luck 7-45, Richardson
1-0.
PASSING-Kansas City, A.Smith 30-46-0-378. Indi-
anapolis, Luck 29-45-3-443.
RECEIVING-Kansas City, Bowe 8-150, McCluster
7-52, Davis 7-33, Hemingway 2-30, Fasano 2-6,
Sherman 2-1, Avery 1-79, Jenkins 1-27. Indianapo-
lis, Hilton 13-224, Fleener 5-46, Brazill 4-54,
D.Brown 4-47, Whalen 2-26, Rogers 1-46.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.
NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44
New Orleans at Philadelphia, late
Today, Jan. 5
San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. (CBS)
San Francisco at Green Bay, 4:40 p.m. (FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 11
Green Bay, San Francisco or New Orleans at
Seattle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX)
Cincinnati or Indianpolis at New England, 8:15
p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 12
Philadelphia, Green Bay or San Francisco at Car-
olina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
Indianapolis or San Diego at Denver, 4:40 p.m.
(CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m.
(FOX)
NFL Biggest
Postseason Comebacks
The largest comebacks in NFL postseason his-
tory:
32 Buffalo vs. Houston, Jan. 3, 1993, wild card
(trailed 35-3, won 41-38, OT)
28 Indianapolis vs. Kansas City, Jan. 4, 2014,
wild card (trailed 38-10, won 45-44)
24- San Francisco vs. NY Giants, Jan. 5, 2003,
wild card (trailed 38-14, won 39-38)
20 Detroit at San Francisco, Dec. 22, 1957, di-
visional playoff (trailed 27-7, won 31-27)
18 Dallas at San Francisco, Dec. 23, 1972, di-
visional playoff (trailed 21-3, won 30-28)
18- Miami vs. Cleveland, Jan. 4, 1985, divisional
playoff (trailed 21-3, won 24-21)
18 Indianapolis vs. New England, Jan. 21,
2007, AFC championship (trailed 21-3, won 38-34)
Most Points
NFL Playoffs
73 Chicago, 1940 (73-0 beat Washington)
62 Jacksonville, 1999 (62-7 beat Miami)
59 Detroit, 1957 (59-14 beat Cleveland)
58 Philadelphia, 1995 (58-37 beat Detroit)
56 Cleveland, 1954 (56-10 beat Detroit)
56 Oakland, 1969 (56-7 beat Houston)-x
52 Dallas, 1967 (52-14 beat Cleveland)
51 San Diego, 1963 (51-10 beat Boston)-x
51 Washington, 1983 (51-7 beat L.A. Rams)
51 Buffalo, 1991 (51-3 beat L.A. Raiders)
51 Arizona, 2010 (51-45, OT beat Green Bay)
x-AFL
Super Bowls
San Francisco beat Denver 55-10 in 1990 Super
Bowl
Dallas beat Buffalo 52-17 in 1993 Super Bowl.
Bowl Glance
Saturday, Dec. 21
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Colorado State 48, Washington State 45
Las Vegas Bowl
Southern Cal 45, Fresno State 20
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Tulane 21
Monday, Dec. 23
Beef'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East Carolina 37, Ohio 20
Tuesday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State 38, Boise State 23
Thursday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14
Friday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall 31, Maryland 20
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Syracuse 21, Minnesota 17
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Washington 31, BYU 16
Saturday, Dec. 28
Pinstripe Bowl
At NewYork
Notre Dame 29, Rutgers 16
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina 39, Cincinnati 17
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Louisville 36, Miami 9
BuffaloWild Wings Bowl


Mega Money: 4 -10 -13 -19
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 winners 1,346.00
3-of-4 MB 52 $283.50
3-of-4 1,222 $36.00
2-of-4 MB 1,443 $21.00
1-of-4 MB 11,816 $2.50
2-of-4 31,828 $2.00


SCOREBOARD


For the1h record



Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


TM


CASH 3 (early)
2-2-4
CASH 3 (late)
6-1-8

PLAY 4 (early)
8-3-1-2
PLAY 4 (late)
1-0-1-9


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Toronto 16 15 .516
Boston 13 20 .394
Brooklyn 12 21 .364
Philadelphia 11 21 .344
NewYork 10 22 .313
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 25 8 .758
Atlanta 18 16 .529
Washington 14 16 .467
Charlotte 14 20 .412 1
Orlando 10 23 .303
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 26 6 .813
Chicago 14 18 .438
Detroit 14 19 .424 1
Cleveland 11 22 .333 1
Milwaukee 7 25 .219
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 26 8 .765
Houston 22 13 .629
Dallas 19 14 .576
New Orleans 15 17 .469
Memphis 14 18 .438
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Portland 26 7 .788
Oklahoma City 26 7 .788
Minnesota 16 17 .485
Denver 15 17 .469 1
Utah 11 25 .306 1
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 23 13 .639
Golden State 22 13 .629
Phoenix 19 12 .613
L.A. Lakers 14 19 .424
Sacramento 10 21 .323 1
Friday's Games
Toronto 101, Washington 88
New Orleans 95, Boston 92
Golden State 101, Atlanta 100
Houston 102, NewYork 100
L.A. Clippers 119, Dallas 112
Denver 111, Memphis 108
L.A. Lakers 110, Utah 99
Saturday's Games
Miami 110, Orlando 94
Indiana 99, New Orleans 82
Brooklyn 89, Cleveland 82
Chicago 91, Atlanta 84
Oklahoma City 115, Minnesota 111
San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 92
Milwaukee at Phoenix, late
Philadelphia at Portland, late
Charlotte at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
Memphis at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Golden State at Washington, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Miami, 6 p.m.
Boston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


Boston
Tampa B
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsburg
PhiladelpF
Washing
N.Y Ran
Carolina
New Jers
Columbu
N.Y Islar


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
42 2812 2 58124
Bay 41 2512 4 54116
43 2414 5 53112
43 1914 10 48114
43 21 17 5 47119
44 1918 7 45126
42 1620 6 38101
42 1226 4 28 74
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
h 43 3012 1 61136
)hia 42 21 17 4 46111
ton 42 2016 6 46128
gers 43 2120 2 44105
42 1716 9 43103
sey 43 1718 8 42101
is 42 1820 4 40113
nders 43 1422 7 35112


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Vanderbilt at South Carolina
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia Tech at Boston College
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) George Washington at Saint Joseph's
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Maryland at North Carolina
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Dayton at St. Louis
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Kansas at Baylor
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (FS1) USC at UCLA
4:30 p.m. (CBS) San Diego State at Kansas
5 p.m. (FS1) Oregon at Colorado
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Washington State at Arizona State
7 p.m. (FS1) Providence atVillanova
8 p.m. (ESPNU) North Carolina at Wake Forest
NBA
6 p.m. (SUN) Toronto Raptors at Miami Heat
7:30 p.m. (NBA) New York Knicks at Dallas Mavericks
BILLIARDS
3 p.m. (ESPN) Tournament of Champions (Taped)
BOATING
4 p.m. (SUN) Sailing 2013 International Federation Korea Cup
(Taped)
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Tour, Finals (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) BBVA Compass Bowl Houston vs. Vanderbilt
(Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN) GoDaddy Bowl -Arkansas State vs. Ball State
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Valero Alamo Bowl Oregon vs. Texas (Taped)
NFL PLAYOFFS
1 p.m. (CBS) AFC Wild Card San Diego Chargers at Cincinnati
Bengals
4:30 p.m. (FOX) NFC Wild Card San Francisco 49ers at Green
Bay Packers
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
9 p.m. (FS1) Semper Fi All-American Bowl: East vs. West
GOLF
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Third
Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Third
Round
HOCKEY
9 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship Bronze Medal
1 p.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship Gold Medal
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Jose Sharks at Chicago Blackhawks
OLYMPICS
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Olympic Trials Ski Jumping & Nordic
Combined (Taped)
4 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Olympic Trials Short Track Speed Skating
SOCCER
9 a.m. (FS1) FACup: Derby vs. Chelsea
11:30 a.m. (FS1) FA Cup: Manchester United vs Swansea City
TENNIS
10 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Aircel Chennai Open semifinal (Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Aircel Chennai Open semifinal (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (TENNIS) ATPAircel Chennai Open final (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Brisbane International final (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (TENNIS) Hopman Cup final (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Fantasy 5:7 -16 -17 -24 -33
5-of-5 2 winners $122,948.32
4-of-5 326 $121.50
3-of-5 11,296 $9.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 44 29 7 8 66165 121
St. Louis 41 29 7 5 63150 95
Colorado 41 2611 4 56120 104
Minnesota 44 2217 5 49106 113
Dallas 41 2014 7 47120 124
Winnipeg 44 1920 5 43118 129
Nashville 42 1818 6 42101 127
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 43 30 8 5 65142 108
San Jose 42 2610 6 58139 109
LosAngeles 42 2513 4 54110 88
Vancouver 42 2312 7 53113 101
Phoenix 41 2012 9 49123 127
Calgary 41 1421 6 34 96 128
Edmonton 44 1326 5 31112 153
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Chicago 5, New Jersey 3
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Rangers 2
Tampa Bay 2, Calgary 0
Anaheim 5, Edmonton 2
Saturday's Games
Florida 5, Nashville 4, SO
Boston 4, Winnipeg 1
Colorado 4, San Jose 3
Buffalo 2, New Jersey 1
N.Y Rangers 7, Toronto 1
Ottawa 4, Montreal 3, OT
Carolina 3, N.Y Islanders 2
St. Louis 6, Columbus 2
Detroit 5, Dallas 1
Minnesota 5, Washington 3
Philadelphia 5, Phoenix 3
Vancouver at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Nashville at Carolina, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Dallas at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Columbus at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m.



Hyundai Tournament
of Champions
Saturday
At Kapalua Resort, The Plantation Course,
Kapalua, Hawaii
Purse: $5.7 million
Yardage: 7,452, Par 73
Second Round
Zach Johnson 67-66- 133 -13
Dustin Johnson 70-66- 136 -10
MattKuchar 68-68- 136 -10
Jordan Spieth 66-70- 136 -10
WebbSimpson 66-71 -137 -9
Michael Thompson 66-71 -137 -9
Ryan Moore 67-71 138 -8
Kevin Streelman 67-71 -138 -8
BrandtSnedeker 70-69- 139 -7
Ken Duke 70-69-139 -7
Jason Dufner 67-72- 139 -7
Adam Scott 70-70-140 -6
Gary Woodland 71-70-141 -5
Harris English 70-71 141 -5


At Tempe, Ariz.
Kansas State 31, Michigan 14
Monday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Navy 24, Middle Tennessee 6
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi 25, Georgia Tech 17
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon 30, Texas 7
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas Tech 37, Arizona State 23
Tuesday, Dec. 31
AdvoCare VI00 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona 42, Boston College 19
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
UCLA 42, Virginia Tech 12
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Mississippi State 44, Rice 7
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M 52, Duke 48
Wednesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
North Texas 36, UNLV 14
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Nebraska 24, Georgia 19
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
South Carolina 34, Wisconsin 24
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
LSU 21, Iowa 14
Rose Bowl


At Pasadena, Calif.
Michigan State 24, Stanford 20
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
UCF 52, Baylor 42
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Oklahoma 45, Alabama 31
Friday, Jan. 3
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri 41, Oklahoma State 31
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Clemson 40, Ohio State 35
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt 41, Houston 24
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 18
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
At Los Angeles
American vs. National, 6 p.m. (ESPN2)
Saturday, Jan. 25
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
South vs. North, 4 p.m. (NFLN)


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 B3


Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


at then-No. 12 Connecticut.
So this was another quality
win for Florida's non-confer-
ence schedule.
Richmond, meanwhile, lost
for the first time in regulation
since Nov 23. The team's last
two losses to Wake Forest
and Ohio came in over-
time.
"If we were a bunch of sen-
iors, I'd say this might be
where we are as a team, but
we have four sophomores
who are working really hard
to get better, so we have im-
provement in our future,"
Mooney said.


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


JOSEPH
Continued from Page B1


moderate pace because you
have a starving 9-year-old with
you, you will burn off 220 calo-
ries. This is almost 1/10 of a
pound.
Another way to look at it is
that one mixed alcoholic bev-
erage is on average 150 calo-
ries. Wine and beer are 100 to
130 calories per glass. There-
fore walking to the restaurant
gives you a chance to burn
calories, exercise and avoid a
DUI.
I know it is tough to get
started but once you decide
and figure it out and walk out
the front door, it can become
part of your evening. The only
equipment needed beside a
credit card or cash is a small
L.E.D. light or your cellphone
light turned on and the phone
turned off.
Crystal River is a small and
safe community with lots of
sidewalks and friendly people.
I am starting out my New
Year's resolution with more
exercise and eating better My
other resolution this year is to
sit on Santa's lap and try to
positively get more than just
socks and underwear!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand,
shoulder and upper extremity
orthopedic surgeon at Sea-
Spine Orthopedic Institute,
and Olympic Bronze medalist,
can be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.




FLORIDA
Continued from Page B1l


the ball and there's guys
standing wide open and they
don't see them."
Wilbekin, Florida's starting
point guard, missed nine of
his first 10 shots and had one
assist and no turnovers in the
first half Donovan chal-
lenged him at the break, but
he still seemed hesitant to
shoot and had trouble finding
open teammates.
He did manage to get the
ball to Prather for some key
shots.
"To start the game off, we
were flat and we didn't have a
lot of energy," Frazier said.
"But as the game went on, I
think we did a good job of
picking it up."
The Gators need one more
home win they open South-
eastern Conference play
against South Carolina on
Wednesday night to match
the school record of 24
straight set between 2006 and
2007.
The latest victory was in
doubt midway through the
second half.
Richmond made six 3s in
the second half, including
five by Lindsay Lindsay an-
swered consecutive 3s by Fra-
zier with 12-plus minutes
remaining with a shot from
the wing. He drained another
one that put the Spiders up
41-38. Richmond was up 46-42
with 8:34 remaining, but Fra-
zier's third 3 sparked the
comeback.
Prather's second spinning
layup resulted in a three-
point play and put Florida
ahead 55-50.
The Gators carried that mo-
mentum to the other end,
ratcheting up their defensive
effort. Richmond fouled re-
peatedly in the closing min-
utes, but couldn't take
advantage of Florida's
misses.
"We came into the game
with a lot of heart," Rich-
mond coach Chris Mooney
said. "We were tough. There
were some things we could
have done better, but as far as
our effort, confidence and
toughness, that cannot be
questioned."
Florida shot 44 percent
from the field despite going 5
of 19 from behind the arc and
really handled Richmond in-
side. The Gators outre-
bounded the Spiders 44-22
and outscored them 38-20 in
the paint.
Donovan's team has won
five straight and 10 of 11 -
the only loss a buzzer-beater










Johnson takes 3-shot lead in Hawaii


Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii On the
golf course with the widest fair-
ways on the PGA Tour, Zach
Johnson believes that keeping
the ball in the short grass is key
to success. On a course that fa-
vors power players because the
par 5s can be reached in two,
Johnson didn't make birdie on
any of them Saturday
Stranger still is that he
matched the best score of the
day and had a three-shot lead in
the Tournament of Champions.
The only explanation is that
Johnson is playing some pretty
good golf.
"Am I surprised? No. It's only
two days, so it's halfway done for
me," Johnson said after his 7-
under 66 gave him a three-shot
lead. "I'm very comfortable as a
competitor One of my goals
every year is those par 5s, and


I'm a little bitter about that right
now But I'll get over it"
Defending champion Dustin
Johnson birdied half of the holes
at Kapalua for a 66 and was
three shots behind, along with
Matt Kuchar (68) and Jordan
Spieth (70).
Zach Johnson was at 13-under
133.
Dustin Johnson approaches
the Plantation Course differ-
ently He birdied all the par 5s
with his length, and only fell
back with a pair of bogeys on the
back nine when he missed short
putts. Even so, he was in good
position heading into the final
two rounds of a tournament that
ends Monday
"This golf course sets up well
for me," Dustin Johnson said. "I
can reach all the par 5s, and
there's a few short holes where
you can drive it up close to the
green. So if I chip and it and putt


Associated Press
Zach Johnson drives on the 16th tee during the second round of the
Tournament of Champions golf tournament Saturday in Kapalua, Hawaii.


it well, I'm going to shoot a good
score pretty much every time."
So what does Zach Johnson
make of that outlook?


"I would say I'm up by three
gross, and by eight or nine net,
based on that rationale," he said.
Clearly, there's more than one


way to get around a course built
on a side of the mountain on the
west end of Maui.
Kuchar had his second straight
round of 68 with some good
birdies and a few bogeys. Spieth
had said he shouldn't make too
many bogeys on this course if he
kept it in play, though he made one
on No. 7 to lose some momentum.
Even so, the 20-year-old Texan
had few complaints after his
opening two rounds of a new year
Webb Simpson and Michael
Thompson, part of a four-way tie
for the lead after the opening
round, each had a 71 and were
four shots behind.
Masters champion Adam
Scott, who can get within range
of No. 1 in the world depending
on his two weeks in Hawaii, had
a 70 and was seven shots behind.
The Australian was in dire need
to a low round to at least have
chance going into Monday


eat


Miamipulls

offcomeback

vs. Orlando

Associated Press

ORLANDO Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh
each had 20 points and
the Miami Heat rallied
to beat the Orlando
Magic 110-94 on Satur-
day night.
Rashard Lewis added
18 points and LeBron
James 15 points, eight re-
bounds and eight assists.
The Heat's win was
their eighth straight over
the Magic. It was also
Miami's 22nd consecutive
divisional victory, leaving
it just one win short of
tying Boston's NBA record
of 23 set in 1961.
Both teams played with-
out starters Saturday The
Magic were without cen-
ter Nik Vucevic, who
missed his second straight
game with a sprained left.
Heat forward Shane Bat-
tier also was out with a
sore quadriceps.
Jameer Nelson led Or-
lando with 21 points and
Tobias Harris added 17
points and 10 rebounds.
The Magic lost their
third straight.
Wade has been pacing
himself recently in back-
to-back game situations,
but started Saturday
Miami hosts Toronto on
Sunday
With Battier out, Heat
coach Erik Spoelstra
started Lewis in his
place, and got quality
minutes from him all
night. He hit three 3-
pointers, and had eight
points during a big Heat
third-quarter run.
The Magic tried to ad-
just to Vucevic's absence
by shifting Glen Davis to
center and inserting An-
drew Nicholson in to start
at power forward.
Nicholson played only
six minutes, but Davis
took advantage of Bat-
tier's absence and had a
lot of early success
inside.
The Magic clung to a 57-
54 lead early in the third
quarter before a layup by
James ignited a 19-2 Heat
run that put Miami back
in front 73-59.
The Magic never got
closer than nine in the
fourth quarter
Nets 89,
Cavaliers 82
NEW YORK-- Deron
Williams scored 21 points,
Paul Pierce added 17 while
moving past Allen Iverson


check


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward Michael Beasley draws a foul from Orlando Magic guard Victor
Oladipo as he goes up for a shot during the second half Saturday in Orlando. Miami
won the game 110-94.


into 19th place on the NBA's
career scoring list, and the
Brooklyn Nets beat the
Cleveland Cavaliers 89-82.
Andray Blatche had 12
points in his return from a
four-game absence as the
Nets won their second
straight, just their second
winning streak of the season.
They limited a Cleveland
team playing without star
guard Kyrie Irving to 37 per-
cent shooting and matched
their best defensive perform-
ance of the season.
Reggie Evans had eight
points and 11 rebounds for
the Nets while starting in
place of Kevin Garnett, who
was given a night to rest with
the Nets beginning a stretch
of five games in eight days.
Dion Waiters scored 26
points for the Cavaliers, who
played without Irving for the
second straight game be-
cause of his bruised left
knee.
Bulls 91, Hawks 84
CHICAGO Mike Dun-
leavy scored 11 of his 20
points in the fourth quarter to
help the Chicago Bulls beat
the Atlanta Hawks 91-84.
Luol Deng added 17 points
and 11 rebounds for the
Bulls, hitting two free throws
with 8.8 seconds left to seal


the win. Chicago led for most
of the way in winning for the
fifth time in seven games.
Paul Millsap and Jeff
Teague scored 16 points
apiece for the Hawks.
A 3-point attempt by Kyle
Korver that would have cut
the Bulls' lead to 84-82 with
4:16 left was overturned and
ruled a shot clock violation
upon review.
Korver extended his NBA
record of games with at least
one 3-pointer made to 103
straight when he hit the first
of his two 3-pointers with
9:59 left in the first quarter.
Thunder 115,
Timberwolves 111
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin
Durant scored 23 of his sea-
son-high 48 points in the
fourth quarter and hit the win-
ner with 4 seconds to play to
rally the Oklahoma City
Thunder from 13 points down
in a 115-111 victory over the
Minnesota Timberwolves.
Durant went 7 for 11 from
the field and hit four 3-point-
ers in the final quarter to help
the Thunder rebound from
two straight losses at home.
Kevin Love played the en-
tire second half while finish-
ing with 30 points, 14
rebounds and five assists for
the Wolves. But he missed


four free throws in the final
27 seconds to let this one
slip away. The last three
came when he was fouled
on a 3-pointer with 2.2 sec-
onds to go and the Wolves
down two.
Pacers 99,
Pelicans 82
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 24 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds to lead
four Pacers in double figures
and Indiana rallied from a
seven-point halftime deficit
for a 99-82 win over the New
Orleans Pelicans.
Lance Stephenson scored
19 points on 8-of-12 shoot-
ing, Danny Granger came
off the bench to score 13
and George Hill added 10
for Indiana.
Former Indiana University
star Eric Gordon finished with
21 points for the Pelicans after
scoring 17 in the first half.
Alexis Ajinca scored 17
points, reserve Tyreke Evans
added 12 and Anthony Davis
10 for New Orleans.
New Orleans' shooting for-
ward Ryan Anderson re-
mained in a Boston hospital
after sustaining a cervical
stinger when he collided with
the Celtics' Gerald Wallace
and fell hard to the floor Fri-
day night.


SNHL BRIEFS


Bruins 4, Jets 1
BOSTON Defenseman
Torey Krug had two goals and
an assist, and Tuukka Rask
made 36 saves on Saturday
to lead the Boston Bruins to a
4-1 victory over the Winnipeg
Jets.
Daniel Paille also scored
for Boston, which has won
five of its last seven games
heading into a three-game
California road trip.
Dustin Byfuglien scored
and Ondrej Pavelec stopped
25 shots for Winnipeg. The
Jets have lost two in a row
since bringing a three-game
winning streak into the new
year.
Byfuglien gave the Jets the
lead midway through the first
period, but Paille tied it before
the period was up on an as-
sist from Krug. The Bruins
took the lead 3 minutes into
the second when Krug
wristed one through traffic and
made it 3-1 four minutes later
when he put another wrist
shot on net and it was redi-
rected past the goalie by Jets
defenseman Jacob Trouba.
Boston made it 4-1 when
Reilly Smith swept in a re-
bound midway through the
third period.
Avalanche 4,
Sharks 3
DENVER Nathan MacK-
innon had two goals and Se-
myon Varlamov stopped 30
shots, including several big
saves down the stretch, to
help the Colorado Avalanche
hold off the San Jose Sharks
4-3 for their third straight win.
It was MacKinnon's first
two-goal game. Jamie
McGinn and Erik Johnson
also scored for the Avalanche,
who have 56 points at the
halfway point of the season,
second-most in team history
behind the 2000-01 team.
Joe Pavelski, Patrick Mar-
leau and Logan Couture had
goals for the Sharks.
Hurricanes 3,
Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Jor-
dan Staal and Brett Sutter
scored 57 seconds apart in
the second period, and the
Carolina Hurricanes beat the
New York Islanders yet again,
3-2 for their third consecutive
win.
Staal broke a tie with his
ninth goal with 6:48 left in the
second. Sutter stretched the
Carolina lead to 3-1 with 5:51
to go with the second of his
NHL career and first since his
debut on Dec. 23, 2008 a
span of 50 games.
Manny Malhotra staked the
Hurricanes to a 1-0 lead when
he scored for a third straight
game, connecting at 6:57 of
the second with his fourth goal.
Sabres 2, Devils 1
BUFFALO, N.Y Matt
Moulson and Matt D'Agostini
scored power-play goals to
lead the Buffalo Sabres past
the New Jersey Devils 2-1.
Ryan Miller made 21 saves


for the Sabres, who have won
five straight home games.
Michael Ryder scored his
13th goal of the season for
New Jersey.
The Devils took two penal-
ties in three minutes late in
the second period. New Jer-
sey forced a turnover and had
two players alone on Miller
during the first penalty, but
Miller stopped Adam Hen-
rique's shot.
Rangers 7,
Maple Leafs 1
TORONTO Dominic
Moore scored twice, Carl
Hagelin had a goal and an as-
sist, and the New York
Rangers cruised to a 7-1 vic-
tory against the Toronto
Maple Leafs.
Benoit Pouliot, Chris Krei-
der, Brad Richards and Brian
Boyle also scored for New
York, and Cam Talbot stopped
25 shots.
Joffrey Lupul scored for
Toronto, which snapped a
three-game winning streak.
Jonathan Bernier gave up five
goals on 32 shots before get-
ting the hook in favor of
James Reimer, who hadn't
played since being yanked
Dec. 21. Reimer didn't fare
much better, giving up two
goals on 18 shots.
Hagelin's deflection goal
put the Rangers up at 6:57 of
the first, and Moore made it 2-
0 exactly 9 minutes later.
Pouliot,, Kreider and Moore
again made it 5-0 in the sec-
ond period before Lupul got
the Leafs on the scoreboard.
Panthers 5,
Predators 4, SO
SUNRISE Tomas
Kopecky scored the winner in
the sixth round of a shootout,
lifting the Florida Panthers
over the Nashville Predators
5-4.
Kopecky's shot went past
Marek Mazanec high on the
glove side, improving Florida's
record in shootouts to 5-5.
Jonathan Huberdeau scored
the first goal in the shootout for
Florida. Kopecky also scored
in regulation and Marcel Goc,
Sean Bergenheim and Brad
Boyes also scored for the Pan-
thers. Tim Thomas made 38
saves in his second start after
missing eight games due to a
groin injury.
Florida won for just the sec-
ond time in six games.
Senators 4,
Canadiens 3, OT
MONTREAL- Clarke
MacArthur scored on the
power play 58 seconds into
overtime and the Ottawa Sen-
ators beat the Montreal Cana-
diens 4-3.
Erik Condra, Colin Green-
ing and Mark Stone also
scored for Ottawa, which
jumped out to a 3-1 lead in
the first period.
Daniel Briere, in his best
game with the Canadiens,
scored twice and had an as-
sist while Brian Gionta also
scored.


COLTS
Continued from Page BI

stunning than this one. The eight
straight losses broke a tie with
the Detroit Lions for the longest
playoff skid.
Alex Smith was 30 of 46 for 378
yards with four TDs and no in-
terceptions on a day he lost his
top two running backs, Jamaal
Charles and Knile Davis, and


starting receiver Donnie Avery
to injuries.
But Luck got the last word
with his jaw-dropping rally
Things appeared bleak with
Indy trailing 31-10 at halftime,
and they looked even worse
when Luck's first pass of the sec-
ond half was picked off and re-
turned to the Indy 18. Three
plays later, Smith threw a 10-
yard TD pass to Davis to make it
38-10 with 13:39 left in the third
quarter


As it turned out, Luck had
plenty of time to turn things
around. In a big way
With Indy in its no-huddle of-
fense and nothing to lose, Luck
started throwing the ball over
the field, and Donald Brown's
10-yard TD run made it 38-17.
Then, Luck converted a lost
fumble by Smith into a 3-yard
TD pass to Brown. Suddenly, it
was 38-24 and the fans who were
booing at halftime were in a
frenzy


The noise subsided briefly
after the Chiefs turned Luck's
third interception into a 42-yard
field goal, but Luck answered
with a 12-yard TD pass to cut
the deficit to 41-31 after three
quarters.
Luck was just getting started.
Eric Berry's hit jarred the ball
loose from Brown near the goal
line early in the fourth, but the
ball bounced right into Luck's
hands and he picked it up and
squirted through the middle for


to make it 41-38 with 10:38 to go.
Kansas City drove for an-
other field goal, but this time
with Kansas City linebacker
Justin Houston out of the game
with knee injury, Hilton broke
free down the middle of the
field and Luck hit him in stride
behind the secondary for the
64-yard score that made it
45-44.
All the Colts had to do then
was stop Kansas City on downs,
and kneel down three times.


B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers and the Packers are home underdogs today against the San Francisco 49ers in Green Bay, Wis.

Packers, 49ers expect to play amid subzero temperatures in Green Bay


Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. The
Green Bay Packers' playoff
game Sunday against San Fran-
cisco could be one of the coldest
in NFL history, rivaling the sub-
zero temperatures of the 1967
Ice Bowl, so fans are taking
plenty of precautions.
Temperatures at Lambeau
Field are expected to be a frigid
minus 2 degrees when the Pack-
ers and 49ers kick off at 4:40 p.m.
By the fourth quarter it'll be a
bone-chilling minus 7, with wind
chills approaching minus 30, ac-
cording to the National Weather
Service.
Temperatures at the so-called
Ice Bowl in Green Bay, the 1967
championship game in which
the Packers beat Dallas to ad-
vance to Super Bowl II, got as
cold as minus 13 degrees with a
wind chill of minus 46.
At temperatures like the ones
expected Sunday, exposed skin
can get frostbitten in minutes
and hypothermia can set in.
Players will be moving around
or huddling around giant
heaters on the sidelines, but fans
will have to take extra safety
measures, such as dressing in
layers and sipping warm drinks.


The Packers plan to pass out
70,000 hand warmers, packets
that fit inside gloves or boots and
stay warm for hours. The team
will also provide free coffee and
hot chocolate.
Kellie Kunz, a Packers fan and
homemaker from Naperville,
Ill., will be attending her first
Green Bay game Sunday She
said the opportu-
nity to see her NFC wild
team in a critical
playoff game was NO. 5 San
just too good to 49ers (
pass up. No. 4 Gi
"We'll dress Packer
warm down
jacket, long un- 0 Time: 4:4
derwear, fleece- 0 TV: FOX
lined tights," said
Kunz, who grew
up in Wisconsin. "I'm just hoping
the game is going to be so excit-
ing we won't even notice the
freezing cold."
Lambeau Field has a heating
system buried beneath the turf
to keep the field from freezing,
but it failed during the Ice Bowl,
leaving the sod hard as cement.
The system was upgraded in
1997 to include 30 miles of heat-
ing pipes, so players on Sunday
can expect softer landings.
The field should be relatively


C
-c

[1
re
s
40


clear Sunday, with no snow in
the forecast. The stands had
been filled with snow during the
week, but the team, continuing a
popular tradition, invited mem-
bers of the public to help shovel
it for $10 per hour
The 1967 game took a major
toll on players, said Ed Gruver,
the author of a book called "The
Ice Bowl: The
ard game Cold Truth About
Football's Most
FranciScO Unforgettable
12-4) at Game."
een Bay Packers coach
(8-7-1) Vince Lombardi
didn't let most of
D p.m. today, his players wear
gloves, so several,
including quar-
terback Bart
Starr, suffered varying degrees of
frostbite, Gruver said. One Cow-
boys player had respiratory
problems attributed to breathing
in so much frigid air, he added,
and Dallas quarterback Don
Meredith's calls were inarticu-
late because his lips were frozen.
"Now players wear Under Ar-
mour They have gloves; they
have these giant heaters. They'll
be OK," Gruver said. "Back then,
most of them just wore long
johns."


Improved clothing should
help the fans, too. Modern down
jackets fight the cold, and water-
proof boots and gloves keep
hands and feet dry
That's what 49ers fan Leon
Perkins of Stockton, Calif, is
counting on. The 30-year-old
truck driver goes to every 49ers
home game, and a visit to leg-
endary Lambeau was on his
bucket list. So the minute he
found out the 49ers were playing
in Green Bay he jumped online
and bought tickets.
Packers tickets can be notori-
ously hard to come by, so Perkins
was pleasantly surprised to pay
only $147 apiece for two. Ticket
sales were uncharacteristically
slow because of the forecast, and
the game didn't sell out until
midday Friday
When Perkins found out he
might be attending Ice Bowl II,
his enthusiasm was dampened
only briefly
"I'll be able to tell my kids and
grandkids I was part of that
game," said Perkins, who bought
a hunting coat and thick gloves in
preparation. "I'm just hoping my
49ers are gonna give me the op-
portunity to keep jumping up and
down and screaming and keep-
ing the adrenaline pumping."


Tedford hired as
Bucs offensive
coordinator
TAMPA- Former California
coach Jeff Tedford has been
hired as offensive coordinator
for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
New Bucs coach Lovie
Smith made the announcement
Saturday, saying Tedford has a
"successful and proven track
record as a teacher and devel-
oper of young talent."
Tedford led Cal from 2002-
12. During his long coaching
career, Tedford has worked
with six quarterbacks eventu-
ally selected in the first round
of the NFL draft, including
Aaron Rodgers.
Other notable offensive play-
ers who played for him at Cal
are running back Marshawn
Lynch and wide receiver De-
Sean Jackson.
Smith was hired as Bucs
coach Thursday, replacing
Greg Schiano. The Bucs fin-
ished last in the league in pass-
ing and total offense while
going 4-12 this season.
Titans fire Munchak
after three years
as coach
The Tennessee Titans have
fired Mike Munchak after three
seasons as head coach and 31
years combined with this fran-
chise as a player and coach.
The Titans confirmed the fir-
ing Saturday.
General manager Ruston
Webster says in a statement
that the last week was a diffi-
cult time trying to figure out
how to move the Titans for-
ward. The general manager
says tough choices resulted in
the decision to go on without
Munchak.
Munchak flew to Texas on
Friday morning to meet with
team President Tommy Smith
and Webster. They returned
late in the afternoon.
Munchak had a season left
on his contract. He was 22-26
since being hired Feb. 7,2011.
DA: No charges
after stabbing
at Broncos game
DENVER Prosecutors
have declined to file charges
against a man who was ar-
rested for allegedly stabbing
three people in a parking lot at
the Denver Broncos' stadium
after a game.
Lynn Kimbrough, a spokes-
woman for the District Attor-
ney's Office, tells The Denver
Post that prosecutors did not
think they could win a convic-
tion because no one could pos-
itively identify a suspect. The
knife was never found.
Police arrested 29-year-old
Justin Lee Manzanares after
the Dec. 12 fight over a near
fender-bender. Two others
were taken into custody but
were released.
Mathew DeHerrera, who was
one of the three people stabbed,
called it a "horrible decision" not
to prosecute Manzanares. De-
Herrera says he couldn't identify
the man in a photo lineup be-
cause he was on medications
shortly after surgery.
None of the victims suffered
life-threatening injuries.
From wire reports


Youth in spotlight for Chargers-Bengals game


Associated Press

CINCINNATI The crowd,
the intensity, the feeling that
everything was riding on every
play Pro Bowl linebacker Von-
taze Burfict was overwhelmed
by all of it at the start of his first
NFL playoff game.
The Bengals
lost in Houston AFC wild-i
19-13 last season,
when Burfict was NO. 6 Sa
a rookie and Chargers
Cincinnati didn't No. 3 Ci
do a very good Bengal
job of handling
the high-stakes 0 Time: 1:0
atmosphere. TC
"There's a dif- U TV: CBS
ferent speed to
the game," Burfict said. "It was
kind of shocking to me being in
the playoffs my first year. Man,
everything was going fast for me.
I had to adapt to it. The first time
I went out there on the field in
the playoffs, I thought, 'Man, is
everybody going faster, or am I
just moving slow?'
"I understand that now We've
got a lot of guys who understand
how the playoffs work and hope-
fully that will get us ready for
Sunday"


ce
al
I

Is
5


The Bengals (11-5) and the San
Diego Chargers (9-7) will have a
lot of young players in the playoff
spotlight at Paul Brown Stadium.
Rookie running back Giovani
Bernard gave the Bengals a new
dimension, piling up 1,209 yards
on runs and catches, the second-
most by a rookie
ard game in team history
Rookie tight end
n Diego Tyler Eifert was
; (9-7) at sixth on the team
Icinnati in receiving with
39 catches for 445
(11-5) yards. Burfict, a
3 p.m. today, second-year
player, led the
team in tackles.
Cornerback Dre
Kirkpatrick, who missed most of
his rookie season in 2012 be-
cause of injury, moved into a
starting role late in the season
because of injuries.
Kirkpatrick had a pair of in-
terceptions, one of which he re-
turned for a touchdown, during
a 34-17 win over the Ravens last
Sunday
"It was a big game," said Kirk-
patrick, who has been burned in
coverage several times this sea-


Associated Press
San Diego rookie wide receiver Keenan Allen is part of a number of
younger players making a difference for the Chargers this season.


son. "I really needed it. I haven't
made plays like that in so long. It
was a burden off my back."
Receiver Marvin Jones, a
fifth-round pick from California
in 2012, missed time during his
rookie season because of a knee
injury and developed into
Cincinnati's No. 2 receiver this
year, complementing A.J. Green.
Green finished with 11 touch-
down catches and Jones had 10,


giving the Bengals their first
pair of receivers with double-
digit TD receptions.
Jones will be reunited with
Chargers receiver Keenan
Allen, who was a close friend at
California. Allen was picked in
the third round this season and
led NFL rookies with 1,046
yards receiving, 72 catches and
eight touchdowns. When the
Bengals beat the Chargers in


San Diego 17-10 on Dec. 1, Allen
had game highs with eight
catches for 106 yards.
Jones calls Allen his little
brother The two of them did
things together off the field in
college and have stayed in close
touch in the pros.
"He hosted me on my visit and
was my mentor the whole time
there," Allen said.
Both of them like music, and
they would get together at the
team hotel and entertain before
games.
"He plays the piano," Jones
said. "Sometimes before games
he'd go on the piano and I'd sing.
I'm telling you, everything we do
is essentially the same."
Jones had three catches for
only 34 yards during Cincinnati's
playoff loss last season. He and
Allen will have big roles in this
one.
"We have had a lot of time to
talk about everything," Jones
said. "'When we are on the big
stage, maybe we'll be on the
same team? What if we play
against each other?' Stuff like
that. It's happened in his first
year in the league. It's pretty
cool to see that happen."


NFL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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^ As 2013
County


comes to an end the Citrus
Chronicle reflects what we
ave accomplished this year.


This


Year


We...


Delivered


8.5 million


newspapers


Wrote


ovei


, Published


r 5,00(
7,280


Printed over
to the Editor


)


local news


stories


local photographs


1,000


of your letters


1,500 sound off calls... and
counting
Help make possible over
400 local events
Welcomed 2.2 million visits
Chronicleonline.com


to


We are excited for what 2014
in store for our community


look forward to


brini


has
and
ging#


it to you in print and


online


everyday.
IV.


Your Neighbors at th*
COUNTY


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B6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


- L N p-
Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


.~ ~ ~ ,,.,. . . ..;


GEORGE SKENE/Orlando Sentinel
Anthony Lane Sr. visits the grave of his son on Oct. 22, 2013, in Eatonville, Fla. Anthony Lane Jr. was 16 when he was accicentally
killed by a 6-year-old in an accidental shooting.





Shot by accident


RENE STUTZMAN
Orlando Sentinel


ORLANDO


I t's not armed robbers or

warring gangs who send

the greatest percentage

of gunshot survivors to

Florida emergency rooms. It's

people who shoot someone, or

themselves, accidentally

Four out of every 10 people
who are rushed to a Florida
hospital or emergency room
with a nonfatal wound were
shot by accident, according to
hospital data collected by the
Florida Agency for Health
Care Administration and pub-
lished by the Florida Depart-
ment of Health. r
It's a far bigger problem in '. ...
Florida than elsewhere '" '.,,
double the national average ...,,.
the past three years -accord-
ing to numbers from the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.
In Orange County, it's even
worse: More than half of the
people treated for nonfatal
gunshot injuries last year
were shot accidentally
"I think it should be a call to
action, if it's higher than the
rest of the country," said Dr.
George Ralls, who as Orange
County's medical director -
oversees about 2,000 emer- .,__.
agency medical technicians
and paramedics. Mario Whitehead lies in a hospital bed at his
"This is a really high pro- was paralyzed from the waist down in an ac


portion," said Dr Judy Schaechter, researcher
and interim director of pediatrics at the Uni-
versity of Miami Miller School of Medicine.
"People don't seem to understand that this
happens."
Guns have received an enormous amount of
attention in the wake of the mass shooting at
Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown,
Conn., in which 20 first-graders and six adults
were killed by a lone gunman a year ago.
Most of the attention, though, has focused on
gun deaths, but guns hurt far more people
every year than they kill.
iME
Mario Whitehead spends much of his day in
a hospital bed near the front window of his
family's home in south Orlando. The 17-year-
old is paralyzed from the ribs down.
See Page C3


GARYW. GREEN/Orlando Sentinel
s home in Orlando, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2013. Whitehead
cidental shooting earlier in the year.


NewYear

brings

changes,

response
ith the New
Year upon us, it
is time to talk
about some changes at
the Chronicle.
One of the immediate
changes you will see is
that the frequency of
publication of our com-
munity zoned newspa-
pers will change.
Currently the Inver-
ness Pioneer, Ho-
mosassa Beacon, Crystal
River Current and Bev-
erly Hills Visitor are
each published weekly
and distributed to sub-
scribers in the respec-
tive communities via
the Chronicle.
Starting this year, we
are changing the frequency
of each to monthly
The community papers
carry very local news
and advertising that is
very specific to each of
the communities. But to
be honest, the advertis-
ing support of these sec-
tions has not been strong
in recent years, and they
were no longer support-
ing themselves.
So, starting in Janu-
ary, we will publish the
Pioneer, Beacon, Cur-
rent and Visitor during
the last full week of the
month as opposed to
each and every week.
The sections are being
redesigned and we hope
they will be healthy and
full of the same local
news and photos that we
all appreciate.
The Chronicle is basi-
cally a local news organ-
ization. While we offer
you the most important
news of the world and
nation, our focus has
and always will be the
community we serve.
The community papers
are a way for us to drill
deeper into local news
while holding costs down
by only distributing them
in the regions where the
news takes place.
When new residents
come to Citrus County,
they often tell me that
they don't like the news-
paper They are not all
that interested in local
news and events about
people they don't know
or care about. They want
to read more about things
happening in Washing-
ton, New York or the
place they came from.
A funny thing happens
as their years in Citrus
County gain in number
- people learn to un-
derstand the importance
of being informed about
what is happening in their
new home. When people
get engaged in their
community, they usually
end up subscribing to
See Page C3


Citizens harmed by county's public comment policy


"The citizen can bring
our political and govern-
ment institutions back to
life, make them responsive
and accountable, and keep
them honest. No one else
can." -John W Gardner
Fla. Sen. Joe Negron's
well-intentioned SB
50 (the "anti-shush-
ing bill") was a remarkable
and laudable effort to re-
store citizen rights to pub-


licly address their elected
officials in open meetings
in those counties where
that right was being denied
in totality. However, in some
instances Citrus County
being one the law has
been used to eliminate
meaningful public partici-
pation.
Subsequent to the pas-
sage of SB 50, the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners adopted a


revised ordinance reducing
citizen speech at public
Commission and Port Au-
thority meetings.
We once had an opportu-
nity to comment on any mo-
tion made after the board's
discussion and before its
vote. That practice, which
had been in place for
decades, has now been
eliminated. Now, as the law
has been interpreted, pub-
lic comment takes place im-


mediately after roll call.
Unless an issue is sched-
uled as a "public workshop"
or "public hearing," the
right to question or com-
ment at the time of board
discussion is denied. A citi-
zen may raise a question re-
garding the item during the
non-contextualized "open
mic" period, but it will not
be answered until the mat-
ter is discussed later in the
meeting, if at all.


Why is this important?
This is fundamentally im-
portant because without the
context of the elected offi-
cials' discussion and review
of the supporting documen-
tation, we citizens may not
be able to speak intelli-
gently to an issue regardless
of where and when it ap-
pears on the agenda.
Case in point: Following


Page C3


Theodora Rusnak
GUEST
COLUMN







Page C2- SUNDAY, JANUARY 5,2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


If you would know what nobody knows, read
what everybody reads, just one year afterwards."
Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Journals," 1834


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ai


t. Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief


'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


RESTORATION RESURRECTED




Dormant


springs project




gets new life


lorida's more than 150
documented springs
provide critical habi-
tat, immeasurable recreational
value and significant eco-
nomic benefit. Nevertheless,
the health of Florida's springs
has experienced steady and
serious decline over the past
50 years, primarily as a result
of Florida's population growth.
Given that a spring is only
as healthy as its springshed,
restoration of springsheds is
critical to reverse the decline
of the state's
springs. With T
Citrus County THE I
home to three of Homc
the state's five sprin
first-magnitude pro
springs, spring-
shed restoration OUR 01
must be a priority
In this regard, A weh
the proactive ef- water-
forts of county invest
staff and the re-
cent unanimous vote of the
Board of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC) has resur-
rected a much-needed and
long overdue restoration
project for the first-magni-
tude Homosassa springshed.
Since being recommended
more than a decade ago, the
project, known as the Ho-
mosassa Southfork Water
Quality Improvement Proj-
ect, languished until ulti-
mately being given up for
dead due to a lack of funding.
However, the BOCC's vote
to commit the $250,000 re-
maining in the county's water
quality fund to finance the
project's design and permit-
ting has breathed new life into
this long-dormant project.
By breathing new life into
the project, the county is now


S

g
je

P
C(
Ec
rq
trT


positioned to partner with the
Southwest Florida Water
ManagementDistrict(SWFWMD),
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) and the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
(FDOT) to bring the project to
its completion.
The benefits of the partner-
ship for the project when
completed are twofold:
Stormwater runoff will be
treated before being dis-
charged into Pepper Creek
and West Ho-
SE: ~mosassa Trail
SUE: will be extended
sassa behind the
shed Springs Plaza
ect. Shopping Center
to Halls River
'INION: Road, affording
two routes in
omed and out of Old
quality Homosassa.
rent. The importance
of the county hav-
ing water quality funds to
leverage water-quality im-
provement projects with
other agencies is affirmed by
the resurrection of the Ho-
mosassa Southfork Water
Quality Improvement Project.
Although the county's fund-
ing commitment to the Ho-
mosassa springshed project has
depleted the county's water-
quality fund, it will be replen-
ished by a federally mandated
stormwater MSBU that county
officials have put in place.
The resurrection of the Ho-
mosassa springshed project
coupled with the creation of
a stormwater MSBU is an en-
couraging signal that local
and state officials are, at long
last, seriously recognizing the
priceless value of Florida's
springs.


united Way of Citrus County needs your
mlIIJ l Z 1U help to reach its annual fundraising
^sti &jW goal. If you can, please send a contribution
to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Coffee talk
Isn't there a community cen-
ter, organization or church
group that is interested in hold-
ing a "current events" meeting
once a week for an hour or so? It
would be to discuss what is hap-
pening in today's world, bring-
ing in that day's Chronicle,
which would be the
focus point. 0
Be nice and wave
We recently moved
into a very nice gated
community. Most of the
neighbors are very
friendly and wave and
say hello. A couple was CAL
very welcoming and in-
vited us into their 563-
homes. There are some
- mostly the wives -
who will not even wave. I don't
know why they do not like us or
think they are better than us,
since they do not even know us.
We are not trying to become
part of their already estab-
lished, close-knit social group.
We just feel neighbors should be
courteous and wave and say
hello.


I


(


Don't look down on us
As to your Monday, Dec. 16,
article, front-page center, it
says: "We want to get out to
other people that Floral City is
not a hick town, it's not just a
quiet town to pass through, it's
not a trailer park...." I'd like to
know just what exactly is wrong
JN with a trailer park. A lot
JND of people, good people,
aw p live there and it's an af-
urr fordable place to live
D and I don't think any-
S body has (any) business
S looking down their nose
at us.
S Beautiful display
5 I'd just like to say
)579 thank you to the peo-
ple on Mary Lue who
light their house up
and let all the people come in
and see all the lights. My 2-
year-old grandson just loved it.
He was amazed. He loved the
snow and the trains and all the
lights. It was just wonderful
and I'm sorry to see that it's
not going to be around for
other children to see it. Thank
you.


A world of information


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. edito r
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member


his I learned from the In-
ternet: The World Al-
manac first appeared in
1868, and the word "World" in
its title refers not to its global
scale or reach but to its origin
as a publication of The New
York World newspaper It pro-
vided Calvin Coolidge's father
with the text of the presidential
oath of office when, in 1923, he
swore in his son, by
the light of a
kerosene lamp at
2:47 in the morning.
The U.S. govern-
ment asked that spe-
cial print runs be .
commissioned be-
cause so many G.I.s
read it during World
War II. David S
Fred MacMurray OTI
talked about the Al-
manac in an ex- VOI
change with Edward
G. Robinson in "Double Indem-
nity" The Almanac makes an
important cameo performance
in "Miracle on 34th Street"
This I learned from the latest
edition of the 2014 World Al-
manac and Book of Facts, just
now in stores and what you
might think of the Internet be-
fore there was a Web: A small-
craft advisory is prompted by a
forecast of winds between 23
and 38 mph. The circumference
of the Liberty Bell around its lip
is 12 feet 1/2 inch. William Wirt
ran for president in 1832 on the
Anti-Masonic Party ticket. The
Zip code of Crestwood, Ill., is
60445. Howie Morenz of the
Montreal Canadiens won the
Hart Memorial Trophy in 1928.
Some 5.6 percent of white
high school girls were in a phys-
ical fight on school property in
2011. A prokaryote is a single-
celled organism that doesn't
have a distinct nucleus. The
first transcontinental television
broadcast was on Sept. 4, 1951.
The island of Navassa lies be-
tween Haiti and Jamaica. Mon-
tenegro has 155 miles of rail track
This I know without looking it
up: The first World Almanac I
remember was the 1959 edition,
and I remember it only because
my father brought home the 1960
edition and threw out the 1959
number As a young boy I spent
hours with the trim little volume
filled with agate type and the
sort of worthless knowledge I
would eventually spend my life
acquiring and then sharing, re-
peatedly and remorselessly with
others in a newspaper column.


For leisure, and this I know is
pitiful, I flipped through the
book today the term would be
"surfing," though in the beach
town where I grew up that word
had a different meaning for
hours and, also pitiful, I was riv-
eted by irresistible attractions
such as its summary of the his-
tory of the Kuomintang Party or
its list of agricultural products
of many nations,
which invariably in-
cluded sugar beets. I
was a very dull boy,
S. I destined to become
V a very dull man.
. \ This I also
learned from the
newest edition of
the World Almanac:
iribman Romanesque cathe-
IER drals have con-
cealed buttresses.
DES Some 82 percent of
cellphone users
texted in 2012, up from 31 per-
cent in 2007. The Newberry Na-
tional Volcanic Monument is in
Oregon. Those who travel for
medical treatment can deduct
part of their expenses from
their federal income taxes.
France adopted the Grego-
rian calendar before Hungary
did. The coldest temperature
ever recorded in Norfolk, Va.,
was minus 3 degrees. Tom
Brady is from California. The
Library of Congress closes at
5 p.m. on Saturdays. The source
of the Tombigbee River is Pren-
tiss County, Miss. Gabon has 403
miles of rail track.
This is what I learned from
Sarah Janssen, a senior editor
of the World Almanac, in a tele-
phone conversation: Only 20
people work on the book. Some
of the editors' offices are messy
As deadline looms, the staff
works as many as 80 hours a
week. Sarah has on occasion
worked at home in her jam-
mies. This year the Almanac
added a section on marriage
and shortened the biography of
George W Bush. The staff proof-
reads the Almanac on paper.
Sometimes there is a party
when the project is completed.
This year there wasn't one.
There is no office cat.
This is more of what I found
in the newest Almanac: The
monetary unit of Papua New
Guinea is the Kina. Wilhelm
Steinitz of Austria was the
world chess champ between
1886 and 1894. Both towers of
the Century Plaza in Los Ange-
les have 44 stories. There are 12


LETTERS to the Editor


Freedom to be free
President Obama has tradi-
tionally proclaimed Jan. 16
"Religious Freedom Day" In his
message to the nation last year
in honor of this day he declared
that Americans are free to cel-
ebrate a heritage to worship,
or not worship at all, as they
please. To quote the president,
"We are a nation of Christians,
Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Sikhs
and non-believers. Our patch-
work heritage is a strength we
owe to our religious freedom."
The president's proclamation
is significant and relevant be-
cause it is inclusive and embraces
Americans of all religions and
creeds. His proclamation echoes
the principles set forth in the
Constitution by the Founding


Fathers that all men (and
women) are equal and no one
belief is favored over another
This guarantee of all reli-
gions and beliefs being equal
was established by the framers
of the Constitution, making us
a secular nation where reli-
gion is a private matter, sepa-
rated from public affairs by a
"wall" that Thomas Jefferson
so famously initiated in 1802.
To quote James Madison, fa-
ther of the Constitution, "Reli-
gion and government will both
exist in greater purity, the less
they are mixed together"

Sidney Rose
President, Nature Coast Chapter
Americans United for
Separation of Church and State


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


1-
H
(


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


commercial banks in Maine.
Heidelberg University in Tiffin,
Ohio, was founded in 1850.
Some 1.2 million people died in
a drought in Bengal in 1900.
Allan Nevins won the 1933
Pulitzer Prize for his biography
of Grover Cleveland.
Crushed stone, sand, salt,
gravel, cement and wollastonite
make up a $1.3 billion industry
in New York state. The area
code for Brown Deer, Wis., is
414. The flag of Somalia has a
very pretty shade of light blue.
Jehovah's Witnesses partici-
pate in an annual Lord's Meal
ceremony Some 3.3 percent of
males completed distance-
education programs in the
2008-09 academic year Togo has
353 miles of rail track.
This is more of what Ms.
Janssen told me: The Almanac
staff is divided about equally by
gender Many of them have
beats broad subject areas in
which they cultivate expertise
and experience and some-
times they suggest adding ele-
ments (such as: more
information this year on how
often people check their email).
Sarah can't think of anything
the group does together for fun.
But everyone who works on the
World Almanac, she says,
"thinks the work is fun."
This is more of what I found
in the 2014 Almanac: The pur-
ple finch is the state bird of
New Hampshire. Vice Presi-
dent Charles W Fairbanks was
born in Unionville Center, Ohio.
Black Americans account for 9
percent of the population of In-
diana. In a public auditorium,
the American flag should be
placed at the speaker's right as
he or she faces the audience.
The westernmost town in the 48
continuous states is La Push,
Wash. The first reliable meas-
urement of the speed of light
was made by the French physi-
cist Armand Hippolyte Louis
Fizeau. Middlebury College has
a graduation rate of 94 percent.
Denmark has 1,657 miles of rail
track.
This is what I think about the
World Almanac: I hope it never
goes away And one more thing:
Panama has 41 miles of rail
track.

David M. Shribman is execu-
tive editor of the Post-Gazette
(dshribman@post-gazette. corn,
412263-1890). Follow him on
Twvitter at ShribmanPG.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 11 may be retired, but she will return


ur Texans have now fi- school was a big deal. In addi-
nally and fully moved to tion, for her to leave the team in
Chicago. When I first be- the middle of the season went
came aware of this pending against her concepts of loyalty
move, I wrote an offbeat column But, in the end, Em chose to put
about that toddlin' town, but in it academics ahead of athletics
I left an open ques- and go ahead and
tion about how ath- move with her family
letics and academics ,& to the Chicago sub-
would impact the life urb of Geneva at the
of our 16-year-old end of the semester
granddaughter Emily in order to salvage
As a high school continuity for the
sophomore, she faced higher-level college-
a decision regarding credit courses she is
basketball and her taking and to begin
studies. In the Hous- Fred Brannen the new semester at
ton suburb of Katy, her new school.
she was a member of A SLICE In addition to play-
the starting five for OF LIFE ing high school bas-
the A-level junior ketball, while in Katy,
varsity girls' basketball team. Emily also played AAU ball as a
Junior varsity? member of one of the Katy Rebels
Yeah, but it was a high school teams. If I understand the con-
of more than 4,000 students, with cept correctly, AAU is played in
a varsity squad, two JV teams the spring and summer, so as not
and two freshman teams. Being to conflict with the schools' bas-
an age-appropriate starter on ketball seasons. The way it is or-
the top-level JV team at that ganized, she continued to play


for the same coach and with es-
sentially the same girls from be-
ginning to end; they just kept
advancing in age level. These girls
are/were not only her teammates,
but her closest friends. How could
it be otherwise? They had sup-
ported, loved and challenged each
other for the past five years while
traveling from one end of Texas
to the other to play basketball.
I can't always keep up with
modem terminology, but during
those five years she had gone
from what used the be called the
center position, but I think is
now called the 1 position, to a 4
position, which we used to call a
shooting guard. Why? Five years
ago she was the tallest girl on the
squad, but things changed. Some
of the other girls outgrew her in
height, but her speed and tenac-
ity became more valuable as her
height advantage disappeared.
No one was happy about
Emily leaving her Katy Rebels
team, especially her coach. Dur-
ing what was a touching goodbye


r i., F -
FRED BRANNEN/Special to the Chronicle
Emily Lasse, No. 11, takes a shot
from high above the fray.
for Emily, there were many hugs,
many tears and the coach paid
her a most impressive honor: He
announced that her number, No.
11, would never again be worn
by a member of any Katy Rebels
team that he coached. No. 11
would always be Emily
Worried about Emily? Not at


all. Will she be able to play bas-
ketball in the future? Absolutely
When her feet hit the hardwood
and you put a round ball in her
hands, the ability is evident. The
high school basketball coach in
Geneva, a school only about half
the size of Emily's previous high
school, has already met with Em
and invited her to work out with
his varsity squad. And, though it
is certainly iffy based on the Illi-
nois high school athletic rules
for such things, the coach indi-
cated he will file a request for an
exception to allow her to play for
whatever remains of this season.
It was certainly an honor for
her to have her number retired,
but usually when that happens it
is expected that the player will
play no more. Not so for No. 11.1
have every reason to believe it is
all just beginning.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

the Chronicle.
While the frequency of the zoned
sections will decrease, our pledge is to
continue to publish all of the local
news possible in the Chronicle.
Speaking of Chronicle readers, our
request for contributions to the United
Way's annual fundraising campaign for
Citrus County generated more than $5,000
in support Over the past month, Chron-
icle subscribers mailed in contributions
to help out the county's top nonprofit
organization. I appreciate the gen-
erosity and I know that United Way
CEO Amy Meek feels the same way
And speaking of Chronicle reader
feedback, one of my favorite responses
of the year comes from John Bregger of
Inverness. After reading my recent list
of Christmas wishes to Santa for Citrus
County, Mr Bregger could not resist:
Responding to the complaint that few, if
any, motorists use their turn signals,
Bregger proposed that a bumper sticker
be created and distributed throughout
the county It reads "Forget world peace
- visualize using your turn signal."
Nice idea.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.



COMMENT
Continued from Page Cl

the recent resignation of the county at-
torney, the commissioners decided to
promote an assistant attorney to "acting
county attorney" Due to her minimal
experience (two years experience since
law school graduation), the services of
a consulting law firm were contracted
to support her, at the contractually
guaranteed fee of $8,000 monthly/
$96,000 yearly "Special projects" or
"tasks that may take more than 10
hours of attorney time" will be billed
additionally This, by the way, is in ad-
dition to the 40 percent salary increase
the assistant-now quasi-county attorney
- received, bringing her to something
just south of a six-figure annual salary
In the past, citizens would have been
able to comment on the anticipated
expenditure of tax funds this "consulting
and oversighf't" contract represented,
as well as the wisdom of the staffing
decision that necessitated it. However
the public's right to question this use
of our tax dollars was eliminated. Since
this was not a "public workshop," nor
a "public hearing" item, we no longer
had the right to comment or question.
A second case in point was the pos-
sibility of selling the county's jail to a
private firm. This item also was listed in
a manner which pre-empted itfrom public
discussion. Had it not been for some
technical flaws in the presentation of the
question, the commissioners could have
disposed of that matter without taking
any public comment from the citizenry.
Without the opportunity to speak to
a motion, citizens have no appreciable
impact on their elected officials. When
discussing this matter with one of our
commissioners, I was told that public
comment on motions was taking up too
much time during the board's business
meeting. We would submit that elected
officials are doing the citizens' busi-
ness during those bi-weekly meetings.
This new ordinance has made a sham-
bles of a practice that our commission-
ers should have embraced with pride.
Yes, democracy can sometimes be
noisy and messy, but commissioners, as
the elected representatives of the citizens
of Citrus County, must listen to and address
the will of the people all the people,
not just some pre-selected winners.
So once again, by adopting this meas-
ure, there is no county in Florida that
has lower standards than Citrus County

Theodora C. Rusnak is president of
the Citrus County Council, a 30-year,
nonprofit consortium of HOAs, civic
clubs and environmental groups act-
ing as a local government watchdog
and advocate for the everyday citizen
and the environment.


BACK IN TIME


Originally published in the
Citrus County Chronicle

1938
Crystal River High
School's Future Farmer chap-
ter obtained five purebred
Duroc Jersey pigs this week to
improve stock already in the
fields of members of the
group. WH. Simmons, direc-
tor of agriculture in the
schools at Crystal River and
Inverness, bought the 3-


month-old pigs in Ocala for
$25, the money coming out of
the chapter fund.
The little community of
Hernando had its most distin-
guished visitor in many years
Monday when America's first
lady, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt,
wife of the president, dropped
in for lunch at the Seminole
lunch room. Mrs. Roosevelt
was accompanied by her sec-
retary, Ms. Malvina Thomp-
son, and two male


companions, who were prob-
ably Secret Service body-
guards. The party ordered a
light lunch of sandwiches.

1953
The Board of Public In-
struction took steps this week
to obtain the issuance of
$296,000 worth of bonds to fi-
nance a long-planned school
construction program. A reso-
lution asking the State Board
of Education to issue the


Forever Stamp


QAloSakitounia
123 ud~a.
Qa^nyt .4f- -


ACCIDENT
Continued from Page C1

He was wounded in an acci-
dental shooting Jan. 21 in
Willie Mays Park while play-
ing basketball with friends, in-
cluding Takim Rashad Neal,
then 17.
Witnesses told police that
Neal had pulled a black .380-
caliber handgun out of his right
pocket and was playing with it
Then "the gun just went off,
and I fell down," Mario said.
The bullet tore into his right
shoulder near his collarbone.
He felt no pain then, he
said, and feels none now
Neal was charged with car-
rying a concealed firearm,
culpable negligence and vio-
lating the state's ban on mi-
nors possessing a gun. He
pleaded no contest in July and
is awaiting sentencing.
Mario is a senior at Oak
Ridge High School. He lives
with his parents and extended
family but is capable of
bathing himself, getting
breakfast and preparing him-
self for class.
He describes himself as
"happy, well-adjusted. ... I
don't hold a grudge. I forgive
him."
There are steep costs to
providing medical care to vic-
tims such as Mario.
Florida hospitals and emer-
gency rooms last year chalked
up more than $57 million in
charges for accidental-gun-
shot survivors, according to
AHCA. The average acciden-
tal-gunshot patient admitted
to a hospital required $85,024
in care, according to the
agency, and half of that was
borne by government
providers such as Medicare
and Medicaid.


No central clearinghouse
provides accidental-gun-
injury numbers by state, so it's
impossible to say how Florida
ranks compared with others.
CDC officials would not
comment on the Orlando Sen-
tinel's findings, warning that,
unlike Florida, which uses a
direct count of each gunshot
injury treated in a hospital,
their numbers were estimates
based on data samples drawn
from 66 hospitals across the
nation.
Florida Surgeon General
John H. Armstrong also would
not comment. He is the state
official charged with oversee-
ing public health policy and
runs the agency that annually
publishes accidental-gunshot-
injury numbers.
Lisa VanderWerf-Hourigan,
director of the Florida De-
partment of Health's injury
prevention program, said
motor vehicle crashes and
falls kill far more Floridians
than gun accidents, making
them a category on which her
agency does not focus.
Marion Hammer, former
president of the National
Rifle Association and the
group's chief lobbyist in
Florida, said she was wary of
the Florida numbers because
gunshot victims sometimes lie
about how they were hurt
Data from hospitals, she
said, may be unreliable. That
was a criticism shared by oth-
ers, including Dr Jan Gar-
avaglia, chief medical
examiner for Orange and
Osceola counties.
Like Florida, many states
collect data from hospitals. In
California, which has more-
restrictive gun laws, the pro-
portion of accidental gun
injuries in 2011 29 percent
- was well below Florida's
40 percent


Illinois, which also has
tougher gun laws than Florida's,
had a higher incidence of
nonfatal gunshot accidents
that same year: 53 percent.
On a per-capita basis, Or-
ange County emergency
rooms have ranked No. 1 or 2
in Florida in the number of
nonfatal gunshot victims
treated in the state's largest
urban areas from 2007 to 2011,
according to state Health De-
partment reports.
The overwhelming majority
are taken to Orlando Regional
Medical Center, which has a
Level I trauma unit staffed by
doctors, nurses and techni-
cians specially trained to deal
with those types of injuries. It
serves trauma victims from
five counties, and that may puff
up Orange County's numbers,
said Dr John Promes, the hos-
pital's trauma-unit director
He has treated gunshot vic-
tims with wounds to "their
arms, legs, their head, their
torso, I've seen it every-
where," said Promes, who
urges gun owners to take a
safety class. "It's no different
than a seat belt. Your chance
of injury goes down dramati-
cally"
No public agency in Central
Florida not the Orange
County Sheriff's Office, the
Orlando Police Department,
local branches of the state
Health Department or the
Florida Safety Council -
routinely holds classes on gun
safety.
"Might that be a gap?"
asked Rails, Orange County's
medical director "Maybe."
Orlando police Chief Paul
Rooney blamed the high Or-
ange County numbers on the
prevalence of weapons here.
"Obviously, if you have a
higher rate of firearms in a
state or county or city, there's


bonds was adopted by the
local board Monday
A Thanksgiving dance
sponsored by the Eugene
Quinn Post, Veterans of For-
eign Wars, will be held at the
VFW Hall, Saturday night.
Mike Georgina's orchestra
will play for the dance, which
begins at 10 p.m. Charge for
admission is $1 per person.
Information for Back in
Time is supplied by the Citrus
County Historical Society




































going to be a higher rate of
nonfatal gun accidents," he
said.
But it's not clear how many
households in Orange County
and Florida have guns.
Congress has banned col-
lection of gun ownership data,
making it impossible to know
how prevalent guns are. How-
ever, surveys done by the CDC
from 2001 to 2004, before gun
research was further re-
stricted, put the number of
Florida homes with guns at
about 26 percent, lower than
the 33 percent national aver-
age.
In the years since, however,
the number of concealed-
weapons permits in Florida
has tripled since 2005 to a bit
more than 1 million. In Or-
ange County there are 53,000.
Rooney urged gun owners
to be responsible, to know at
all times where their weapons
are and to properly secure
them. Officers, he said, are
finding and seizing too many
stolen guns.
Academic researchers who
studied household gun own-
ership data recommended in
an article published in the
medical journal Pediatrics in
2005 that public health offi-
cials encourage families to
store firearms safely and that
doctors, especially pediatri-
cians, talk with parents about
that.
Florida lawmakers, how-
ever, voted in 2011 to ban doc-
tors from asking patients
about gun ownership. A court
later overturned the law
Schaechter, the University
of Miami pediatrician, is one
of several plaintiffs challeng-
ing the law in court.
"We know how to prevent
this," Schaechter said. "We
should be reducing access to
loaded firearms."


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 C3





C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


Avoid deceptive
publication
On Dec. 17, a letter about GOP
traditions appeared in the Chron-
icle It covered the proclama-
tion ending slavery, a defining
moment in Republican history
It also outlined Republican
belief in minimum government
in our lives as well as protection
of the environment. It also ref-
erenced our belief in a strong
military to protect American
lives, sovereignty and values.
These are true Republican
principles. Republicans be-
lieve that helping everyone to
prosper is a vital government
function. Republicans also be-
lieve in helping those less for-
tunate to resolve their problems.
On Dec. 22, another letter
appeared with numerous bul-
let points about Republican
beliefs. Obviously, the persons
submitting know nothing about
the Republican philosophy and
further would likely never be
interested in learning about it.
Labor unions are recognized
as a force that helped workers
gain respect in the work place.
Once, the unions accom-
plished this; however, they be-
came overpowering and tried
to force employers out of busi-
ness. This would have de-
stroyed all the workers gains.
As far as amnesty for illegal
aliens, both political parties
have failed miserably If we
need the undocumented work-
ers, Congress should have cre-
ated a pathway and made sure
only those legally admitted
could be here. Instead, both
sides have allowed the illegal
aliens to continue to enter our
country so they could be used
for political gain. We want rea-
sonable entitlements provided
where needed; not creating a
dependency that will ensure
Democrat voters.
"Obamacare" is an abomina-
tion. It was not well thought


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g u wF' CW50p 60 T16S4T. >97


HE CMEIP OUT: FLA54 PRIVES,
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THRV KNOW WHEN cCW
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PECIARlN 1HE'P"WON."
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flt WORK WE WA, poneE."
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66cuRIV COR PRIVACY?
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out and does nothing to help
the health care issue. It was
originally a bill to promote the
health insurance companies
and now has even driven them
into mass confusion.
Democrats support labor
unions that encourage work
rules that destroy the very em-
ployers the workers need for
employment. An exception is
government employee unions
that are handed whatever they
ask for by politicians who are
willing to spend freely with
other peoples' funds. Take a
look at what has happened to
Detroit and the state of Illinois.
If women want birth control,
there are two methods for that.
First is abstinence and the sec-
ond is a relatively inexpensive
medical product. Republicans
do not oppose these items. As
far as abortion is concerned, I
personally believe it should
never occur except under the
direst circumstances. Many


Republicans actually concur
with the ultraliberal view of
this issue.
Government generally fails
in almost every effort and then
has to raise taxes to pay for the
failure. Some business regula-
tion is necessary, but the fas-
cist's approach to regulation is
definitely not the way to pro-
tect the interest of our general
population.
If anyone paid any attention
to what happened in Congress
in 2013, they would know that
gridlock was caused by the De-
mocrat-controlled Senate and
our president refusing to nego-
tiate with the Republican-con-
trolled House. Had they
listened, Obama Care would
not have been such a mess.
The health insurance program
is a perfect example of Democ-
rat failure.
When people try to define a
person or group, they should
first attempt to familiarize


themselves with the person or
group. Of course, when did a
Democrat ever take time to
think of such a thing?
No doubt there will be other
responses to the previously
mentioned letters. Hopefully,
some will think before they go
on a vicious attack. If our
politicians would become
statesmen and work for the
good of the country instead of
trying to get enough votes
needed for another re-elec-
tion, our great country would
grow and prosper beyond any-
one's wildest dreams.
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa

'Santa for a Senior'
a success
On behalf of Citrus County
Support Services, I would like
to offer a heartfelt thank you to
Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ease's Rough Riders 4-H Club
and Home Instead Senior Care
for their work with the "Be a
Santa for a Senior" program.
Christmas trees with orna-
ments that contained lists of
items each senior would enjoy
were placed in local busi-
nesses. Businesses that partici-
pated included Melodies Body
Image Gym, Michael's Floor
Covering Inc., G&R Health
Mart Pharmacies (Beverly
Hills and Homosassa stores),
Mama's Kuntry Kitchen, Tay-
lor Rental (Inverness), Home
Instead Senior Care and the
Citrus County libraries. Caring
people from our community
picked an ornament from one
of the trees and purchased
items on the list.
The "Be a Santa for a Sen-
ior" program provided beauti-
ful gifts to more than 415
seniors in Citrus County this
year! The gifts were delivered
to the homes of seniors by Cit-
rus County's Support Services
staff and volunteers. It was
very rewarding to drop off the
gifts and see the joy that was
brought to someone's life.
Many seniors are alone during
the holidays, missing loved
ones and holidays of the past.
Being remembered by some-
one who took the time to shop
for them brought tears to the
eyes of the recipients. Some
seniors told us that they didn't
expect anyone to think of them
during the holidays this year
and knowing that someone went
out of his or her way just for
them made them feel special.
I would personally like to
thank everyone involved with
this program from the bottom
of my heart on behalf of Citrus
County Support Services and
the seniors we serve. Our sen-
iors are so thankful and you
brought joy to many lives.
Pat Coles
Support Services director


TO SPRING FASHION
16* Annual Key Training Center Fashion Show and Tea


4 -----


Suclday ChetClce i Enricment Center
F r a2 4 Key Training Center, Lemnto
Tickets are $30.
2-4 p.m. fuw astat, S 251

A salute to this spring's fashions and an official heads
up on the latest styles, accessories and trends from
elegant glitter to casual cruise-wear!
PRIZES FORTHE MOST..-
Beautiful Hat Ingenious Hat
"I Can't Belive You Have That On Your Head" Hat

Fashions provided by The Cotton Club and KeyThrift
Stores. Accessories Boutique by Labels.
Call 79S-SS41, Ext. 311 for more information and to purchase tickets.


community history, literacy

OUT LOUD!


7th Annual

African

merican

Read-In



Sunday, Feb. 9, 2014
2:30-4:30 PM
Listen to moving, inspirational and humorous
selections from African-American literature.
Enjoy musical entertainment & refreshments
during this celebration of history & literacy at
CF Citrus Campus. Join us out loud!
Learn More: http://facebook.com/citrusaari







T eCR &9Tii NorJ |rFi
| lf~ |mtlry l


Tickets available after December 16, 2013 l ln B
At the following outlets...
Citrus County Fair Office-Inverness 726-2993 1'
Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149
Eagle Buick- Homosassa 795-6800
Inverness Chamber of Commerce 726-2801
Advance Ticket Pricing


Cash only
One day forAdult
Two day forAdult
One day for Child (4-11)
Two day for Child (4-11)
Gate Ticket Pricing
Adults
Child (4-11)


Garden Tractors Pulling
Food & Camping Available Jr Tractor Race Every Day
3 Sleds Pulling in Covered Arena I


CinIoli
Citrus County Fair
Truck & Tractor Pull
Jai. 24- 25, 2014
Advance Registration Forms Online at
www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html
Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2993
citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com


$10.00 www.eaglebuickgmc.com
$5.00 352-795-6800


] Ci..-.iN .c.rn
..... I _)N IC I.
H:.S5"" www.chronicleonlinecom

I I 1121314
--. . . . ... ..... .... .............................................. ...s
5 67 8 9 1011
J en aa, s 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 2122 23 24 25
J S262728293031


Jan 16
Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum: Singing Tree -
Hammered Dulcimer & Bass Violin
Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
Doors open at 6:15PM
Contact Phone: 726-9814 or 201-2656

Jan 18- 9AM-5PM 19- 9AM-4PM
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
MANATEE FEST CRYSTAL RIVER
Contact Phone: 726-9814 or 201-2656

Jan 19*4PM
Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church
Light Shine: Blues From The Inside Out
Contact Phone: 527-0052

Jan 20. 10AM
George Washington Carver Community Ctr.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade
Crystal River Parade begins at
7th Ave between 3rd & 4th St leading to
Gulf To Lake Hwy to 12th Ave, to
3rd Street and ending at Copeland Park.
Contact Phone: 777-1214

Jan 24 8:30AM-2:OOPM
United Way of Citrus County
Land That Job CF, Lecanto
Contact Phone: 795-5483

Jan 24- 4PM-6PM Jan 25- 1 OAM-1 PM
Citrus County Fair
15th Annual Truck and Tractor Pull
Citrus County Fair Grounds
Entrance: $8 adults, $4 children age 4-11
Contact Phone: 726-2993

Jan 26* 2:00 pm
Friends of the Crystal River National
Wildlife Complex Annual Meeting
First United Methodist Church
Contact Phone: 352-201-0149

Feb 1 9:00 am
Citrus County Animal Services
2014 Best Friends Fest
Citrus County Auditorium
Entrance Fee: Silent Auction Item to benefit
Animal Services' Special Needs Fund
Contact Phone: 746-8401 or 746-8408


Happy

Nepw Year!




Thank you
for requesting our partnership
of over 350 community events,
fundraisers and entertainment
throughout 2013.

Nf


C C I T R UJ- S COUNTY


l www c htronicleonline.com
)O0GPPW


eds Benefit
0!!,:iouth Scholarships


ysy *'\


_^_ f' -^ *- ---










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


What stresses small-business owners the most?

Our conversations with them and the research we come across

suggest it's a lack of clarity. Well, there's no small-business crys-

tal ball at least one we are aware of but if one existed, here's

a look at what it might reveal for 2014:


HELP FROM WASHINGTON?
Look for a more conciliatory attitude
in Congress. Lawmakers' collaboration
on a budget deal in December is a sign
that they'll cooperate on issues affect-
ing small business, including tax re-
form, says Barbara Kasoff, president of
Women Impacting Public Policy a
group that advocates for women and
minorities in business. The deadlock
over the budget and government shut-
down in 2013 hurt small businesses in-
cluding federal contractors.
The safest bet? An increase in a tax
code provision that allows businesses
to deduct up-front rather than depreci-
ate the cost of equipment like vehicles,
computers and machinery Without ac-
tion by Congress, the 2014 deduction is
$25,000, down from $500,000 in 2013.
With many companies still struggling
and congressional elections in Novem-
ber, lawmakers may boost it.
REVENUE STRAINS
A tepid economic recovery will con-
tinue to frustrate small-company own-
ers, says Susan Woodward, an
economist with Sand Hill Economet-
rics in Menlo Park, Calif Small retail-
ers are struggling even as consumers
spend more. Growth in online shop-
ping and a tendency for people to pa-
tronize stores owned by big companies
(choosing Starbucks rather than the
local coffee shop, for example) will
continue to be a challenge.


Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: Ping's Tibet shop owner Ping Wu Longval, left, in Cotton Exchange shopping
center, helps local costumer Sherry Rhodes with her shopping in Wilmington, N.C.
ABOVE: Owner Johnny Blakley looks out over Buffalo Creek Farm and Creamery,
LLC Farmstead Goat Dairy in Germanton, N.C.


Small businesses shouldn't expect
goldmines from government contract-
ing. Agencies will spend carefully
Some small federal contractors re-
ported even before the $85 billion in
spending cuts in 2013 that agencies had
been cutting back. Contractors will
prospect for business with companies
to make up for budget cuts in 2013 and
to diversify their revenue streams.
A sustained surge in construction of
single-family homes could be a game


changer, Woodward says. Growth in
housing spills over to manufacturers,
retailers and other businesses.
LABOR MARKET CHALLENGES
Expect small businesses to struggle
to find skilled workers for jobs like
high-tech manufacturing. It's not a new
problem. Surveys throughout 2013, in-
cluding monthly reports from the
See Page D3


European lending lags, sign recovery weak


Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany New fig-
ures show that European banks are
lending less to companies another
sign the continent's economic upswing
remains less than robust.
The European Central Bank re-
ported Friday that loans to companies
slipped by 3.1 percent in November
from a year earlier The drop was
sharper than the previous month's 3.0
percent.
Analysts say banks can be reluctant
to lend given uncertain growth
prospects that mean increased risk
they won't be repaid. Some companies,
meanwhile, may not want to risk bor-
rowing. Others don't need credit be-
cause they are sitting on adequate
cash reserves but don't yet see a
reason to invest that cash in new pro-
duction.
The economy of the euro currency
union a bloc that grew from 17 to 18


members in the new year with Latvia's
accession expanded by only 0.1 per-
cent in the third quarter last year, with
unemployment at 12.1 percent Gov-
ernments' efforts to reduce debt by
cutting spending and raising taxes
have weighed on growth.
Analyst Howard Archer at IHS
Global Insight said the weak figures in-
creased pressure on the ECB to add
stimulus to the economy in the coming
months. He said the ECB could offer
cheap, long-term loans to banks on the
condition the money is used for lend-
ing.
Archer expects the ECB to keep its
benchmark lending rate at the current
record low of 0.25 percent "through to
2015, although it is not inconceivable
that it could trim it to 0.1 percent or
even 0.0 percent."
Lower interest rates can stimulate
growth. But the problem is the ECB's
already-low benchmark rates are not
being passed along by banks.


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Institute for
Supply Management releases its
service sector index for December,
10 a.m. Eastern; Commerce De-
partment releases factory orders
for November, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
BERLIN Germany's Federal
Labor Agency releases December
unemployment figures for Eu-
rope's biggest economy; Insurance
company Munich Re to release re-
port on the costs caused by natural
disasters in 2013.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Federal Re-
serve releases consumer credit
data for November, 3 p.m.; payroll
processor ADP releases private-
sector employment figures for
December, 8:15 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Crude falls for fourth
day in row, below $95

NEW YORK The price of oil
fell for the fourth consecutive day,
below $95 a barrel, as a rebound-
ing U.S. economy drove the dollar
higher and signs continue to
emerge that there is an ample sup-
ply of crude worldwide.
Benchmark U.S. oil for February
delivery fell 97 cents to $94.47 a
barrel in midday trading. Brent
crude, used to price international
crude processed by many U.S. re-
fineries, fell 86 cents to $106.92 a
barrel in London.
U.S. crude fell by $2.98 on Thurs-
day, the biggest one-day drop since
November of 2012. Prices have
been dropping sharply since last
Friday, when a barrel closed above
$100 for first time since October

Stocks struggle to
gain in new year
LONDON European and U.S.
stocks edged higher on Friday, re-
covering from a bad first day of the
year, while Asian markets closed
lower
In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100
rose 0.2 percent to close at 6,730.67
while Germany's DAX advanced 0.4
percent to 9,435.15. France's CAC-40
added 0.5 to 4,247.65.
China's benchmark Shanghai
Composite Index shed 1.2 percent to
2,083.14, adding to the previous day's
0.3 percent loss.
Elsewhere in Asia, Tokyo was
closed for the last day of its New
Year's break South Korea's Kospi
gave up 1.1 percent to 1,946.14 after
Hyundai Motor Co.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng tumbled
2.3 percent to 22,804.1. India's Sen-
sex shed 0.7 percent to 20,754.6.
Benchmarks in Singapore, Bangkok,
Malaysia and Jakarta also declined.
New Zealand bucked the trend to
add 0.6 percent to 5,134.97.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Ponzi


scheme
0
monies


may be


in danger

EAR BRUCE: My wife and I
read your column every
week, and we hope you can
give us some words of wisdom. In
2008, we bought some silver In
2010, we took out our original in-
vestment.
In 2011, our statements reported
that our gain was doing very well,
so we withdrew another $18,000 to
pay off our car, credit cards and
home equity I am 85 years old and
my wife is 83. We figured that was
the smart thing to do and then
there would be no money problem.
On July 30, 2013,1 received a let-
ter from a law firm stating that it
has been appointed receiver to
begin a process to compel that the
money be returned. This was a
Ponzi scheme.
I talked with the gentleman and
informed him that I did not have
the money because I used it as I
explained above.
He said he would be willing to
reduce the amount 40 percent. I
told him that my wife has an IRA
worth about $30,000, but the
$11,000 he would like to get would
reduce that by one-third.
Is there anything that says I have
to pay this as I didn't know that
this was a Ponzi scheme?
-Melvin, via email
See .Page D3










D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Community
news
Commissioner and
Chamber board member
elected secretary to
TBARTA Executive Board
At the Dec. 13, 2013, executive
meeting of Tampa Bay Area Regional
Transportation Authority (TBARTA),
Citrus County Commissioner Re-
becca Bays was elected secretary to
the Executive Board. This board is re-
sponsible for policy direction and im-
plementation. She has served on the
TBARTA Board since she was elected
to office in 2010 and is currently the
Chairman of the Legislative Commit-
tee after being appointed to that po-
sition in January of 2013.
"This is the most important time in
the history of the TPO as we work
out details to merge with Hernando
County to form the Hernando/Citrus
MPO, which will increase funding to
this area," Bays said. "We have just
been notified Citrus has received the
largest dollar amount awarded for
our FDOT Five-Year Tentative Work
Program from FY July 1, 2014,
through June 30, 2019. Over $121
million has been earmarked for proj-
ects such as for capacity improve-
ment projects on U.S. 19, U.S. 41,
and C.R. 491, transit operations, and
Suncoast 2 right-of-way acquisition."


Community
events
Jan. 21 -The Board of County
Commissioners and county staff will
host a ribbon-cutting event in celebra-
tion of the completion of Phase 4 of
County Road 486 on Tuesday, Jan. 21
at 11 a.m. This event will take place at
the northeast corner of State Road 44
and C.R. 486. Representatives from
Florida Department of Transportation,
TBARTA, engineering and contracting
firms will be present as well. This last
phase of construction for approximately
three miles on C.R. 486 started at the
beginning of 2012, with four drainage
retention areas, one new traffic signal,
and a 12-foot-wide multi-use path in-
cluded in this project. For more infor-
mation about this event, please call
Tobey Phillips at 352-586-2698.
Jan. 24 Land that Job event pre-
sented by the United Way of Citrus
County, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Col-
lege of Central Florida Campus.
Learn the dos and don't of a job in-
terview and how to navigate the
workplace. Register at CitrusUnited-
Way.org or call 352-795-5483.
Jan. 25 -The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, in cooperation with Citrus
County Audubon Society, will host a
monthly bird walk on Pepper Creek
Trail on Saturday, Jan. 25. An experi-
enced birder from Citrus County
Audubon, will lead the walk on this
trail one of 19 birding trails in Cit-
rus County that are part of the West
Section of the Great Florida Birding
and Wildlife Trail. Participants should
meet at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance to
the park's Visitor Center. The bird walk
will begin at 8 a.m. Binoculars and a
field guide are recommended. Partic-
ipation in the bird walk on Pepper Creek
is free. For more information and to
register, call 352-628-5343, ext. 1002.
Feb. 1 Best Friends Fest is pet adop-
tion extravaganza at 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Event will include pet rescues, groomers,
veterinarians, food, and a silent auction
to benefit Animal Services' Special
Needs Fund. Bring in pet food for the
needy and you'll be entered into a
drawing for a prize. Citrus County
Auditorium 3610 S. Florida Ave., In-
verness (U.S. 41 and Airport Road).
Feb. 4 Life by Chocolate. Attendees
will enjoy chocolate fountain, desserts
and drinks. Tickets will be available
for purchase at the Crystal River
branch of Raymond James or you
may purchase at Cattle Dog on the
night of the event. All dollars raised
go to the American Cancer Society,
funding research, advocacy, educa-
tion and patient services. Event is 6
pm.m to 8 p.m. at 2416 N. Heritage
Oak Path, Hernando. For more infor-
mation, call 352-795-6155.
Feb. 15 Faith Haven Christian Re-
treat Center to celebrate the legacy
of Eloise "Grandmother" Van Ness
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. This event
will introduce the public to Grand-
mother VanNess' horse, Lady, who
was donated last year to Soquili Sta-
bles. In keeping with their tradition
of giving the horses of Soquili Sta-
bles a Cherokee name, Lady is now
known as Elisi. For more information,
call Soquili Stables at 352-206-2990
or Faith Haven at 352-795-7387.


Citrus County is headed to Tallahassee!


CImIUS COUNTY
Cbmleref Cmsm.


VW diDorm E

= biduy I"srs ib
dfa %M~va w ida


Legislative Day + Pre-Evening Reception and Optional Dinner:
Wednesday and Thursday, March 19-20, 2014
* Includes round trip bus transportation to Tallahassee, including evening
reception on Wednesday and lunch on Thursday
* Optional: Join the Chamber for Dutch Treat dinner at Andrews 228
downtown (Private Dining Room; limited to 1st 50 to sign up)
* Cost: $65/person


T ii


. ii


Iuur~*uIws~


*I"
N


Legislative Day (only):
Thursday, March 20,2014
* Includes round trip bus transportation to
Tallahassee and lunch @ Governor's Club
* Cost: $65/person


Reserve online at www.citruscountvchamber.com and click on News & Events tab;
or call Ardath Prendergast or Heather Gibson at 352-726-2801.

HOTEL INFORMATION: [Hotel deadline: February 19!]
You are responsible for making your hotel reservation and costs. We have room blocks under the Chamber of Commerce at
both the Homewood Suites Tallahassee (our "headquarters" hotel) and the Hampton Inn Central (next door to the
Homewood) on Apalachee Parkway. The bus will take you to the Tallahassee Center in the morning.
SHomewood Suites ($189/night + tax) or Hampton Inn ($139/night + tax): Call 850-402-9400 and request to reserve
under the group name of "Citrus County Chamber".
a 4 Become a sponsor for Legislative Day events!
Presented by CIM us C UN. For information, call Ardath at 352-726-2801.


FORAL CI STRA RR FSTIAL



rLURAL CITY STRA!BRR'T Fa!TIVAL


, 1F P Ij,


SAVE THE DATE


uppgor :. t)in
Partners ijiut,
l llle


Go/dr
Sponsori


~d


F'LD'N. 1,0, A


-A _dtw 4Ibtwo e
an the BW1 StWdA% Jan. 1% 2014 stans at 9 &.M.Untll5 pAL AL-
ghi Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014 starts at9 .Luonl 4 pn. ''
In downtown Crystal River, FL
Waterside- Manatee Boat Tours, CIvil War Era Scow
Three Sisters Springs Open Both Days
Entertam aennt Lester Free m an &D" Band
Tho ,Blues RkdeI a nd Mel&CGIN Mum
Downtwn- AM& rfri
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FlokMaHamNwleeFstAhmi i r52-795-1349 3J


Presented b CRYSTAL 7L 4wC l"


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Cm'ut Omn Mo~~c lb


S1mm .TTbacco Fm Florda with Vh Florida Do pajrtm of Hmmtit Clrun County
.Wmlt MCrarde. Warmdtow i Cah, Ms PR ra Cwr@al IMS. 0 ,'ometomiVui
Citrusi t5 True OhdK9 10.3 .Th3 FDx .W7


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


Saturday, March 1,2014 starts at 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Sunday, March 2,2014 starts at 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Floral City Park


lM? E nrcralmi1r
ArkSCrafts
F'o .i''ly i.'-/ r rrrFt -livai! tom


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Al ,.
immo*'S





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What does SCORE do, and what does it not do?


hat does SCORE do is
an often asked ques-
tion by interested par-
ties. As we answer this frequent
question we will also explain
what SCORE does not do.
What Does Citrus County
SCORE Do?
SCORE...
Offers mentoring/counseling
services FREE of any charges.
Provides an experienced
mentor once a client signs up
for counseling.
Matches a client up with
mentor(s) with the specific
working and/or business expe-
rience about which the client
needs to know
Encourages co-mentorswhen
more than one is requested by
the client or if a client is better
served with two or more men-
tors possessing different busi-
ness backgrounds.
Provides books, booklets and
brochures on every imaginable
business topic at no cost to the
client.
Compliments its business li-
brary with comprehensive web-
site offerings on business


Dr.
Frederick
Herzog,
Ph.D.


EXPERIENCE
MATrERS


topics.
Provides On-Line Mentoring
offered by multiple Certified
Business Counselors nation-
wide for clients via the inter-
net.
Will help all clients construct
a business plan to present to
lenders for loan consideration.
Will work with an existing
business to grow its revenue
base.
Client/Mentor Relationship
SCORE National Association
promoteslong term relation-
shipsbetween client and men-
tor History and statistics
indicate this practice dramati-
cally improves new business


startup success. SCORE Citrus
Chapter offers this practice. We
have all theresources of the Na-
tional SCORE Association and
the Small Business Administra-
tion. These organizationsrepre-
sent the strongest advocates for
the American Small Business
Community.
SCORE Does NOT...
Lend money to clients di-
rectly We help clients build a
business plan which ultimately
can be submitted to lenders.
Award grants. Non-Profit
Foundations give grants for
worthy causes. The application
process for grants is highly
competitive and generally re-
served for qualified non-profits.
Write a clients' business plan.
That is the job of the motivated
client; however, mentors assist
in the process.
Do researchfor a client.
SCORE's philosophy suggests
the client should perform this
task during the mentoring
phase.SCORE understands it is
in the best interest of the client
to do the research. The experi-
ence often leads to additional


business opportunities.
Have paid consultants. We
are volunteer mentors who as-
sist entrepreneurs with proven
coaching methods for success.
Become an owner, share-
holder or partner with any
client. Our ethical code does
not allow for this arrangement
Our ethics strongly protect all
clients for best outcomes and
strict confidentiality.
Give Legal, Tax or Account-
ing advice. This adviceshould
be provided by a licensed pro-
fessional.
For Your Information
There is a long list of miscon-
ceptions of just what SCORE
does and does not do. If after
reading this you still have ques-
tions call Citrus SCORE 352-
249-1236 for more information.
Not All Clients Start
Businesses
SCORE counselors under-
stand not all clients will start a
new business. There are many
factors that come into play when
considering starting a business.
That's why we mentor clients.
Investigating business owner-


ship is complicated. However,
SCORE understands from ex-
perience, its better that a per-
son properly explores all the
options, challenges, responsi-
bilities and financial needs
with the right help and counsel.
The most dangerous aspect of
starting a business is lack of
preparation and objective guid-
ance from those with the expe-
rience. Experience Does
Matter!
How to Contact SCORE
The Citrus County SCORE of-
fice is located on the Citrus
County Campus of the College
of Central Florida. Call 352-249-
1236 for more information and
to request mentoring services.
Office hours are Tues-Wed-
Thurs from 10am-lpm. If you
call during non office hours
please leave information as to
how we can contact you for
service.

Dr. FrederickJ. Herzog, PhD
is the Immediate Past Chair-
man of SCORE Citrus. He can
be reached via email: fherzog
@tampabayrr-com.


BUSINESS NOTES


Eck completes tax update course

Christine Eck, of Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA, has
completed a two-day tax update course for tax year
2013. This course reviewed the changes pertinent to
the upcoming tax filings. Her office is located at 910 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Southsquare Plaza, in Crystal River
Chris is offering monthly accounting services and pay-
roll reporting for small businesses, as well as tax
preparation for both individuals and businesses.
She has been a Citrus County resident since 1973,
and a practicing CPA since 1991. A member of the
Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants, she
attends various seminars and other classes each year
to stay current on ever-present changes in the tax laws
and other areas of interest to Citrus County residents.
You may call Chris at 352-563-2522 for an appoint-
ment. Make a step in the right direction by taking a
professional approach to your tax and business needs.
Please visit her website, www.ChrisEck.com, for addi-
tional information.



Oak Hill names two emergency

center workers as associates of year


Oak Hill Hospital has
announced its Star Asso-
ciates of the Year for 2013.
Each month hospital as-
sociates are chosen in a
process that involves
nominations and voting
by their peers, patients,
patient families and
physicians. At the end of
the year, one of the Stars
is chosen as the Star As-
sociate of the Year
This year two members
of Oak Hill Hospital's
Emergency Care Center
were honored as the As-
sociates of the Year:
Jeff Palmer, R.N., FF/PM
(firefighter/paramedic)
and Thomas Ratcliffe,
paramedic.
Jeff began his career at
Oak Hill Hospital in May
2011. He is an R.N. in the
Emergency Care Center
where he handles com-
munity emergencies from
minor flu-like symptoms
to major heart attacks. Jeff
lives in New Port Richey
Thomas Ratcliffe, Para-
medic, joined Oak Hill
Hospital in November
2011 in the Emergency
Care Center, he serves as
a paramedic administer-
ing IVs, blood draws,
ECGs, CPR and also does
front-desk ER receiving,
supporting and assisting
physicians, nurses and
paramedics. He lives in
Brooksville.
Both gentlemen were
commended for their con-
duct in the exact same in-
cident. "I witnessed the
two standing in the mid-
dle of the intersection
helping the occupants of
crashed vehicles. A short
time after that another
vehicle collided with the
wreckers in the intersec-
tion. Prior to the impact,


Tom yelled to Jeff and ran
into the intersection to
lead him away from the
oncoming vehicle.
"Both men disappeared
to the ground as the vehi-
cle passed through to the
intersection. They barely
escaped serious injury
Jeff, visibly injured,
jumped back up and
made his way to the per-
son in the first vehicle
while Tom ran towards
the median where the
second vehicle had hit
more cars and flipped."
Both men displayed ex-
emplary bravery, concern
and compassion while
risking their lives. Jeff
continued to focus on the
safety of the injured per-
son in the first vehicle,
while Tom ran across the
street checking on those
involved in the second
wreck. Both of these men
displayed traits that any
ER would be proud of
They took charge and did
their best to secure the
scene for all in the area. It
was obvious their focus
and concern were for oth-
ers and above their own
safety In addition, Tom
Ratcliff nominated Jeff
Palmer for the same inci-
dent, saying "Jeff risked
his own life not just once
but at least three times
while rescuing an individ-
ual involved in a motor
vehicle accident"
In making the an-
nouncement Oak Hill
Hospital's Chief Operat-
ing Officer Sonia Gonza-
lez said, "Dr Thomas
Frist Sr, our founder, al-
ways believed that 'Good
people beget good peo-
ple.' People like Jeff and
Tom prove that Oak Hill
Hospital will continue the


BOCC employee earns recognition

Stephanie Stevens, a Code Compliance Officer with
the Citrus County Code Compliance Division, was pre-
sented with a plaque of appreciation from the Beverly
Hills Civic Association. Mr Jim Barrows, representing
the Beverly Hills Civic Association, presented the
plaque to the Board of County Commissioners at the
Dec. 17 regular meeting. Barrows commended
Stephens on her outstanding service to the public.
Stevens has worked as a code compliance officer for
Citrus County government since May 26, 2012, and
started with the County in 2011.


SMALL
Continued from Page Dl

National Federation of Independ-
ent Business, showed that owners
had positions they couldn't fill.
The situation may change if
employers of all sizes keep
adding jobs at the stronger pace
of the second half of 2013, says
Peter Cappelli, a professor of
human resources management at
the University of Pennsylvania's
Wharton School. A shrinking pool
of workers would force small
businesses to train new hires,
something many have been reluc-
tant to do.
Health care may become a re-
cruiting issue. Owners who say
they can't afford to buy insurance
under the health care law could
find it harder to attract top talent

FINDING CAPITAL

Companies hoping to borrow
from a bank or raise money on
the Internet may get their wish.
Rules governing how compa-
nies solicit money from individ-
ual investors online may be
completed after a long wait The
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission published them in Octo-
ber, 10 months later than
expected. Websites are already
preparing for the day when the
rules go into effect.
Banks are expected to continue
gradually increasing their lend-
ing to small businesses. At the
end of the third quarter, the Fed-
eral Deposit Insurance Corp. tal-
lied $284 billion in small business
loans, up 2 percent from a year
earlier Banks are more likely to
lend, particularly to the smallest
businesses, if Congress doesn't
get bogged down in budget battles
and the stock market remains
healthy, says Jeffrey Stibel, CEO
of the credit rating company Dun
& Bradstreet Credibility Corp.

TECHNOLOGY TRENDS

The number of small busi-
nesses that use cloud computing
is likely to keep soaring, but own-





MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

DEAR MELVIN: You are asking
an extremely interesting ques-
tion. The company has been ac-
cused of or has been determined
to be a Ponzi scheme, and you
were paid the returns that you
cited improperly to encourage
others to invest. Now efforts are
being made to recapture that im-
proper payment in order to reim-
burse people who have been
swindled. Those are the facts.
Whether or not you should
have to pay this is a whole other
matter
Since the numbers seem high
enough, I would urge you to seek
legal representation. The offer to
reduce the amount by 40 percent
is interesting because it seems to
demonstrate a weakness in the
firm's position. I think you may
have been unwise explaining to
the attorney that you had monies
and part of that would be avail-
able.
That having been said, I would
strongly urge you to talk to an at-
torney You might have to respond
and refund some of that money
but I wouldn't start out with that
proposition as a given. These
things are difficult and often re-
quire a lot of negotiation and per-
haps litigation.
DEAR BRUCE: The wife and I


Associated Press
Johnny Blakley opens a cooler containing various dairy items in the farm
store at Buffalo Creek Farm and Creamery, LLC farmstead goat dairy in


Germanton, N.C.

ers may feel some pain as cloud
providers start charging more. In
2013, 43 percent of small busi-
nesses used the cloud, storing
data and software offsite and ac-
cessing them via the Internet
That's up from 5 percent in just
three years, according to a survey
by the advocacy group National
Small Business Association.
Cloud providers are starting to
price their services like cable TV
companies, says David Rosen-
baum, president of Real-Time
Computer Services, a technology
services company in New York.
Businesses get attractive intro-
ductory offers, but they're likely
to pay much more in the future,
especially if they decide to move
their data elsewhere.
There's room for small busi-
nesses to expand into social
media in 2014. More than a quar-
ter don't use it at all, according to



have decided to refinance the
house and use the extra money to
take a long-awaited honeymoon.
My question is, how do I go about
finding a mortgage lender with a
good reputation instead of relying
on word-of-mouth?
-R.G., via email
DEAR R.G.: I think you are
making this more complicated
than it has to be. There are
dozens of good mortgage lenders
out there, and it's not hard to find
them. You might start with your
banker Ask him if he has some-
one he could recommend. It may
be that the bank is in the mort-
gage business as well. Some
banks are and some aren't
As far as the good reputation
goes, I don't think that's a prob-
lem. What the lenders are offer-
ing are interest rates, terms,
closing costs, etc. All of these
variables have to be investigated.
You should be able to take care of
this in short order, assuming that
you have a decent amount of eq-
uity in the home. Enjoy that trip.
DEAR BRUCE: My grandson is
19 and in the Marines. He re-
cently wanted to buy a car, but
was unable to because he didn't
have credit history It was an
older car ('67 Mustang), and the
bank would not loan him the
money without some collateral or
a co-signer What is the best way
for a young person to start build-
ing a good credit rating?
B.W, via email


the NSBA. Companies will get
more sophisticated in how they
use it. They're starting to use so-
cial media tools that allow them
to reach out to customers locally
- even to customers walking past
their stores, says Ramon Ray, a
journalist who runs a website
called smallbiztechnologycom.

HEALTH CARE

2014 will give business owners
a chance to understand the com-
plexities of the health care law
Insurance brokers and benefits
consultants have said it would
take a year of the law being in ef-
fect for owners to get a sense of
its impact on their profits.
Many businesses avoided the
law's requirements by renewing
their 2013 policies before the
year ended. They'll need to get up
to speed before renewing in 2014.



DEAR B.W: Your grandson is
trying to buy a 46-year-old auto-
mobile, which is definitely in the
antique class. While someone
with solid credit might be able to
get a loan, on balance, this is not
going to happen for him.
The best way for a young per-
son to start building a good credit
rating is slowly, borrowing only
when necessary Borrowing for a
more traditional car would be
one step in that direction.
If you are willing to co-sign, he
might have a shot at the '67 Mus-
tang, but frankly, I wouldn't rec-
ommend that While it's an old
automobile and there are many
around, they are not particularly
appreciating in value, and in
some cases, they're decreasing.
At 19, no one expects him to
have much credit experience,
and as a practical matter, as an
enlisted guy in the Marines, I
can't think of many essentials he
would have to finance. An auto-
mobile might be a start, but I
would suggest a newer automo-
bile (used, of course) with pay-
ments that he can handle.
Building credit is a slow process,
but it can be done, and at 19, he
shouldn't be in a hurry

Send questions to bruce
@brucewilliams.com. Questions
ofgeneral interest will be an-
swered in future columns. Owing
to the volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 D3











L To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


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and


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All


The Time


Fa: 32)53-65 ol0 re:(88 82230 1 m il*lasf0d 0rnilonie 0o Iwb0t: w crnilonie 0o

-eir -t -ial -tuatj Tads enrl -iacil S-rg At -qe


I'm a Lady, 79 yrs
Young, looking for a
gentlman in the
same age group for
friendship. If you'd
like to talk pleas e
call (352) 503-2338


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




AKC YORKSHIRE
MALE PUP very small,
health cert., shots,
(352) 489-0960


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

COFFEE SHOP
Help Needed.
To Apply e-mail:
the.cafe@aol.com

For Sale Adjustable
Electric Bed,
Like New
$250.
(352) 344-1960
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




2 FREE CHOWS
1 Red, 1 Black
Call (352) 637-1411
100+ egg cartons
holds 12 & 18 eggs.
(352) 556-1724




Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001lb,
- Grouper @ $6.001lb
- Stonecrab@ $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001

FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
GIFT SHIPPING *
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378


CAT Female long hair,
Black & white. Lost
12/24 Gulf Ave off
Rock Crusher, CR
(352) 586-8847



I1

hAl



Female Yellow Lab
approx. I year old
Lost in the vicinity of
SR 44 and 491 on
New Years Eve. She
wasn't wearing a
collar. REWARD
(352) 400-1562

License Receipt with a
new sticker on it, lost
on Croft Ave, 486
and 491 area.pls call
(502) 345-0285


Banad, enscribea
(352) 489-3706
Pair of Bifocal Glasses
w/gold wire frames.
Lost in the vicinity of
Highlands in Inverness
pls call (352) 860-0216
Short Haired Calico
Cat Last seen on
12/27 Mayflower Ave,
Inverness. Reward
352-419-6475



Female Jack Russell
Terrier, with Beverly
Hills tags found in
Homosassa 12/30
(352) 697-1558
Male Brindle colored
Dog w/ white on
Chest. Found in Inver-
ness Near Metro PCS
(352) 422-0062



Wanted young/active
female cat, good with
other cats & people.
Updated on shots,
indoor only, spayed,
declawed 341-4103


-I.^^


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.001b,
0- Grouper @ $6.001b
0, Stonecrab@ $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only_$28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Activity Assistant
Part Time 25-28 hrs.
a week. Must love
the elder population
and helping to plan,
organize, support
and lead activities.


Assisted Living
231 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl.


CNA
7a-3p & 3p-I Ip Shift
Citrus Health
and Rehab Center,
a five star skilled
nursing facility. We
offer a good salary
and work environ-
ment including medi-
cal/ dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan.
Please Appoolv in
Person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit



F/T CNA
For OB Doctor's Ofc
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877



RUN'S & LPN'S
Per Diem, All
Facilities, All Shifts
Call (352) 432-0080
or Apply Online
www.staffamerica
health.com




Professiona


Management
and Budget
Director
Announcement
#14-01
Advanced
professional/manage-
ment position re-
sponsible for plann-
ing, developing,
organizing, directing
the analysis, prepa-
ration and adminis-
tration of Citrus
County's $262.5
million operating
budget, $230 million
five year capital
improvement plan
and debt program.
Graduation from an
accredited four
year college or
university with a de-
gree in accounting,
business, public
administration or a
related field and a
minimum of (5) five
years progressively
responsible experi-
ence in governmen-
tal budgeting,
finance or adminis-
tration, including
experience in a
supervisory capac-
ity. A Certified Gov-
ernment Finance
Officer (CGFO) is
preferred. The indi-
vidual in this position
must complete and
submit annually,
The Statement of
Financial Interests.
Pay range $2,464.93
$3,698.30 B/W.
Starting pay DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
Please email a
current resume,
including salary
history, salary
requirements
and professional
references to the
Citrus County
Human Resources
Department, HR@
BOCC.CITRUS.FL.US
This job is open
until filled.
NOTE: RESUMES ARE
SUBJECT TO PUBLIC
DISCLOSURE UNDER
THE FLORIDA PUBLIC
RECORDS LAW
EOE/ADA


COFFEE SHOP
Help Needed.
To Apply e-mail:
the.cafe@aol.com

Cook, Server,
& Counter Server
Exp. Only apply
Taking Applications at
Chicken King
Hernando
2420 N Florida Hwy
NO PHONE CALLS
NEW OWNERSHIP

Country Club
Restaurant
FT Night Cook
Must be exp:
Apply at Oak Run
SR200 & 110th
Street
Ocala, FL 34481
or Call:
352-854-6557 X13
EEOC/DFWP






MANAGERS
NEEDED
FOR CITRUS, MAR-
ION LAKE & SUMTER
COUNTIES
-Competitive wages
-Bonus opportunities
-Advancement
Opportunities
-Complete Training
Package
-Health, Dental, RX,
Vision & Life benefits
available
-Meal Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Manager Shirts
SUBMIT RESUME TO:
bbqm@heritage
management.net






NOW
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
For All
Hourly Positions.
Please complete our
online application.
at:
htto://agoo.gl/bv4CU

You've Got It!


Somebody



Wants


It!


- a- =


Cii i i -0` iiliE

(352) 563-5966
www.chronicleonline.com


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624



LOCAL TOWER
SERVICE CO.
Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers
to service lights.
Electrical exp. pref,
will train. Travel req.
throughout South-
east. Cpy vehicle
and hotel provided.
Exc pay, per diem,
bonus and benefits.
Background check
and clean FL. Dr. Lic
required.
Apply in person at
Hilights Inc.
1515 White Lake Dr
Inverness
352-564-8830



Survey Party
Chief
Announcement
# 14-02
This position serves
as Survey Crew
Party Chief,
performing topo-
graphic, hydro-
graphic, boundary,
route, geodetic
surveys and County/
Civil engineering
projects. Responsi-
bilities include:
supervision of field
work performed,
collecting & record-
ing data; drafting
field notes; con-
ducts field plat
reviews; maintains
survey equipment &
inventory of survey
supplies; calculates
volumes, cuts & fills,
and horizontal sta-
tioning; and locates
new construction.
Performs additional
field and office sur-
vey related tasks as
necessary. Starting
pay $18.39 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 10,
2014 EOE/ADA.


COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
position
including weekends
shuttling potential
homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
LIVE IN ONLY
Elderly couple needs
mature lady, non-smk,
to assist house-
keeper/ manager.
Duties include care
giver assistance.
Private room and
board in lovely home
on Homosassa River.
Generous wages and
time off
Send Resume
with easily verifiable
references to:
PO Box 369
Homosassa Springs
Fl. 34447 or EMail to
jprothtwo@aol.com
FAX 352-628-5351

PT BREAKFAST
SERVER-
HOUSEKEEPER;
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
No Phone Calls
ADDIVpply In Person
614 NW Hwy 19,
BEST WESTERN




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


Opportunity for
Fulltime
Professional.

Must have book-
keeping accountingg
experience or
equivalent & profi-
cient in computers
and spreadsheets.
Able to multi-task
& communicate
well with others.
FAX RESUME TO
352-746-9033










ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

* COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
* NAILS SKIN
* MASSAGE Therapy
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


DUDLEY'S
Sunday Jan. 5th
Antlaue &
Collectible Auction
Pre: 10Oam, Auc: 1pm
500+ lots, antlq. Turn,
silver/gold jewelry
coins, china,
porcelain, check
webslte for catalog
& photos
......................
call for Info 637-9588
Dudleysauction.com
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck



Your World







CHRWONILE


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.

You can become
an expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute
Online HVAC
education in as little
as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online-Ed
ucation.com


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


If interested in any of

the following areas



Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Lecanto

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

CCITRUS COUNTY

CHRONICLE.
,www.ch.onlclonhlle.c.


row


Multi-line auto dealership


is in need of sales people


for our new and


preowned vehicles.

Join the fastest growing multi-line

dealership in Homosassa, FL.


Great Benefits .Excellent
Bonuses Earning
Available Potential

Come in and Ask for
Brett Coble or Charlie Defreese
to Schedule an Interview


Village Cadillac Toyota
2431 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 34448

352-628-5100
Equal Oppotunity Employer
OOOHIKQ


D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 D5


FRAMED DISEY PRINT
"FLATTERY" -cert.#838
of 2000-size 18"by
24"-$100.00 more info
call 352-527-9982
Harley Davidson Tee
Shirt 105 yrs. Sz. Lg.
$30. Seude Leather
Cap $40.. Never worn
352-344-0183
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING-"1979" -50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.00
352-527-9982



6 YR OLD SAMSUNG
front load dryer, like
new, never used
much, asking $300
(352) 726-6461
352-201-5113
APPLIANCES Kenmore
Refrigerator, side by
side, water and ice on
door, $300;Kenmore
glass-top range, $200;
Kenmore Microwave
$75; Whirlpool Dish-
washer $125; $600 for
all. Call 382-2743
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
HOTPOINT DRYER
Good Condition, Works
Great $50 Can Deliver
352-341-0923
OVEN
GE electric, white, self
cleaning, Flat cook
top, excellent Cond.
$125 (352) 726-9886
Refrigerator
Maytag Black S-by-S
ice/water on dr. $300;
Electric Stove, flat top,
Black $100 obo
(315) 539-5297
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398



AUCTION
Roofing Company
Liquidation,
Online Auction Only,
Bid Dec. 27 thru Jan.
14, Items Located in
Maryland & Florida.
Motley's Auction &
Realty Group,
804-232-3300,
www.motleys.com,
VAAL #16


DUDLEY'S
"A'UCTIOTT
Sunday Jan. 5th
Antlaue &
Collectible Auction
Pre: 10Oam, Auc: 1pm
500+ lots, antlq. furn,
silver/gold jewelry
coins, china,
porcelain, check
webslte for catalog
& photos
......................
call for Info 637-9588
Dudleysauction.com
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck



MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$50 OBO
352-464-0316



35" Sanyo TV
$30.
works great,
352-746-9816
J B L CENTER
SPEAKER -100 watts 6
1/2"H 18 1/2"W 5
5/8"D-$25.00 more
info.call 352-527-9982
VIDEO CASSETTE
PLAYER AC/DC.Ideal
for RV.2 way power $25
Symphonic.
352-746-4160



Chipper/Shredder
Craftsman 3" 7.5 HP,
OHV, Model #
247.776350. Strong
machine, little use.
$350 OBRO
(352) 489-2011

Furniture^^
5 pc. Dining Set
w/swivel chairs, wicker
backs, square table &
sage/brown $225.
(352) 897-4154




Look
2 "ASHLEY"
5-DRAWER DRESSER
CABINETS
BARELY USED!I
ONLY A
FEW MONTHS OLD!I
Buy both for $400 or
$225 for I
352-746-1910


I#1 Employment source Is



Iwww.chronicleonline.com


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


Cit IRONICILE


(352) 563-5966


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Your World

a4 ""9e ea


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lie. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352)637-6641


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
'AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *i
Affordable Handyman
V'FAST. 100%Guar.
*eAFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 k
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
We Do Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 01/31/14
Lic# CAC1817447



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
0 ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHEL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Remodelin



40
Pl


GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996



All Phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377


FREE -Paver
ESTIMATES'BS
GREG'S COMPLETE
UnU ~ REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
cENsEED 352-746-5200
& INSURED






Wk am hllmi mI > Md>I ! Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


KNOCK OUT

MEANING SERVICE
IDENTICAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RNLS& CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
S Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
C Washing Too

352.942.6876
Call Today for a
OOOGWRClean Tomorrow



SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
Generators Lighting Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
R 352-364-4610
1MR.
?ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
LIndependently owned & operated
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day. 7 DaYs a Week


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


DON'T LET YOUR
I DRYER START
AFIRE!
R No


AAA Miller Auto
& Tire Service
Interior/Exterior Detail & Window Tint
Oil Filter Lube
Car Oil Changes $1A99
up to 5 Qts. starting from 6
Diesel Oil & Filter Change
Special $9999 up to17Qts.
plus tax
Open 7am-7pm
(352) 527-4111
Across from Wal-Mart, Lecanto


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard Ron's Affordable
or poolorplan Handyman Services
completely new! g- All Home Repairs
c n Small Carpentry
Tnimitated,* Fencing
v "neverfenimated, Screening
Clean Dryer Vents
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Affordable & Dependable
O P E SExperience lifelong
40P A PAVESRkC 352-344-0905
S POOL AND PAVER LLC ceLL: 400-1722
Licensed 352-400-3188 Licensed Insured Lic.#37761
&l Ins..ed 352-400-3188 u Lice...ed & Insured Lic.#3 7761


[nA N OW'S tie
/ piist t time for pool
Heaters remodeling
B &Salt Systemns nr*r
Salt SyS tems Pool Refinishing
Construction
Remodel
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool Tile & Repair
I oo serving All Of Citrus County
Pool'& Spa Free Consultation
WM.s 382-4U21
K p S.4ri Jid Pool (o tmrdor, *#458326




AAA ROOFING
Call tle" /eak6ustes"J
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF!
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Litc/Ins. CCC577 H05K'
fSJTVaMM. .


- 106


CLASSIFIED


^


I r e e r i^ 3


uI POL AD AVRSIu







D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


1920's Solid Cherry
Wood 4 Poster Bed
3" shy of double bed
inc. boxsprings &
mattress, good cond.
$749. firm
(352) 795-8018
Antique Butler
3 drawers
$100
(352) 795-1929
Antique Couch & two
swivel rockers
$200. for all 3
Good condition
352-634-4329
CHEST SOLID WOOD
5 drawers/1 cedar old
well made $75. some
scratches
352-270-3909
COFFEE TABLE Wood
no glass Rectangular
Good condition $35.
352-270-3909
Dinette Set
Bamboo table w/
glass top& 4 chairs.
$100; 2 Fabric recliners
& 3 cushion sofa $175
(352) 746-0620
For Sale Adjustable
Electric Bed,
Like New
$250.
(352) 344-1960
KITCHEN FURNITURE
Expandable kitchen
table with four chairs
excellent condition.
$125.00 382-5956
Kitchen Table, with
4 chairs, beautiful
green print,
excellent cond.,
almost brand new
$550. (352) 746-1705
Leather Wing Chair,
Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $750
(352) 212-2798
LIVING ROOM SET
sofa, loveseat, 2
cocktail tables, 1 coffee
table, 2 lamps, light
rattan, like new $450
(352) 746-6848

YOU'LL P THIS!
RECLINERS Pair
matching burgundy
recliners exc cond paid
$399 each at Badcock
Perfect for superbowl
viewing $275.00
OBO 352-4654208
Swivel Accent Chair
Light Brown
Perfect cond.
$250.
(352) 726-5379
TWIN BEDS
Including mattress
and box spring. Ma-
ple wood head and
foot board. $125
(352) 419-4066
Two Tan Leather
Couches
little wear, $150. ea.
$250. for 2, Dunnellon
(352) 465-9114
White Wicker
Trundle Bed,
Steel enforced,
Great Shape
$95.
(352) 897-4198
Wooden Hutch
filled with china
and old silverware,
asking $400. obo
(352) 419-6865



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019



30 PLANTS FOR
WATER GARDEN
BLUE
FLOWERS.DON'T
KNOW THEIR NAMES
10 FOR $15 464-0316




p ..... .-*.-. -r





CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri Sat & Sun 9a-3p
488 to Ira Martin,
Rt. Ohio, Left to:
8455 N. Carousel Ter.



SPORTS JACKETS
size 42, like new.
$10 each
352-746-4160
SUIT Gray suit,size
42,hardly worn,like new
$15,waist 34,length 29
352-746-4160



5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &AC-
CESSORIES $30.
464-0316
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
$60 352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$100 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CAR COVER
(BREATHABLE) FOR
MEDIUM SIZE CAR
MALIBU ONLY $30
352-464-0316
Dining room table
and 4 chairs, light oak
$150; Nice wood
couch table, $50
(352) 795-7254
Florida Jumbo Shrimp
FRESH 15ct@ $5.00lb,
m" Grouper @ $6.00lb
Stonecrab @ $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES


NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
PORTABLE ELEC
TYPEWRITER W/CASE
& owners manual.No
longer needed.$25.Like
new 352-7464160
RUBBERMAID PATIO
BENCH/STORAGE -like
new 4ft 5in w. seat
depth 20in to back
$35.00 352-527-9982
Stone Mountain Leather
Purse Adjustable strap,
inside & outside pock-
ets, Never used
$65.352-344-0183

Medi^al

4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316


4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
UPRONLY $20
352464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352-464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352464-0316
Pride Mobility Products
Inc, Burgundy Cloth
Chair Lift. $450
586-0341.


Iznstrumens
Cable Knelson Piano
looks and works great.
Real good cond. Asking
$300. 352-795-1495



GENERAL Mission oak
rocker $150,2 antique
half round tables
$100@, 30lb. galva-
nized roofing nails
and300 count grip cap
nails $25@,6 Franklin
Mint McDonalds plates
$120 all, GE convection
toaster oven$25, Mr.
Coffee expresso maker
$10,large rolling
suitcase$10,Ryobi belt
sander $40, folding crab
trap $10, child's bike
helmet $5,SS 1 quart
thermos $5, 2 digital
coin counting money
jars $5 @, Oneida Cha-
teau stainless service
for 12 $250 352 465
6619
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILLE NEW, NEVER
USED,W/OWNERS
MANUAL.$25
352-746-4160



ELLIPTICAL
Nordic Trac Audio
Strider 990. MP3, pwr
ramp, fan, hr. monitor
little use, Exc cond,
Pd $1100, sell $500
352-489-2011
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
James Anglin
Gunsmith
12 gage pump, new in
box $259.00, ak 47
drum $150.
352-419-4800
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $350
(352) 464-2687



TWO HORSE TRAILER
2010 "Trailers USA" no
rust, all aluminum,
Removable partition.
Dropdown loading
ramp. 2 saddle trees.
Broom& Fork. Like
New. Must see to
appreciate. $8500
Firm. Les 352-249-8300


Sell or Swa


V


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369












Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


DOLLY
Meet Dolly, 6-y.o.
Bulldog/terrier mix,
wt 54 Ibs., has had
an unfortunate life,
still one of the
sweetest dogs ever.
Shows signs of ne-
glect, but amazingly
is full of love for peo-
ple, playful & very
happy, craves af-
fection and returns
it, so deserving of a
loving home. Sweet
personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


AKC YORKSHIRE
MALE PUP very small,
health cert., shots,
(352) 489-0960

Jack Russell Terriers
Mother and Father on
premise. Ready to go
Five males $200/ea
352-613-9135











RAVEN
You want sweet?
Here she is, gentle &
calm 7-month-old
Labrador mix, very
eager to please,
walks well on leash,
takes treats gently,
sits when asked, not
interested in cats.
Her family lost their
home, but she's had
a good start in life,
very loving. Needs
her own home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


ROSCO
Rosco a beautiful
pit bull/terrier mix,
black w/white
chest, very calm,
gentle & obedient,
good w/other dogs,
wonderful w/
people, very loving,
good w/cats, walks
calmly on leash, wt.
66 Ibs. A volunteer
favorite.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $550.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


Look


INY IIY my is a gorgeous
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936


WINNIE
Winnie is a small
Lab/Bulldog mix, wt
40 lbs., is 3 1/2 years
old. In her life before
the shelter lived in
a family with a child
& is know to be very
good with kids.
Described as
"amazingly sweet"
but does best
with male dogs.
Call Wanda @
352-344-5737.





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

CANOE W/ PADDLES
Water Quest by KL
Industries. Seats 3,
center cooler, sturdy,
stable, great shape
$350 (352) 897-4154

Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628

Dock Space For Rent,
Floating, Deep Canal
200 ft. from Crystal
River, (352) 257-8850

PONTOON
1990 24 ft Harris. 2005
50 HP Honda; No
trailer, $4000
(352) 634-2018

PONTOON
24 Ft., set up for fish-
ing, needs carpet, re-
built 110 HP Johnson
with TNT, new prop
HD Galv. trailer, new
tires, $3,000 726-1040

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com





FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
generator, very good
tires, Lots of storage.
$11,000. 352-263-4339


SOUTHWIND
98' V-10eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




(4) 15" X 7" CHROME
RIMS 5x5.5/139.7mm
caps & lug nuts $100
tommyb@tampabay.rr.
corn (352) 476-2652
RV Jack Knife Couch
68", in great shape
$250. obo
352-464-4388

Vehicles

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939




Chevrolet
98 Cavalier 4 dr LS
pw, dlcc, cold air,
4 cyl, auto 43,400 mi.
$3200. obo
(352) 860-1106
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CLASSIFIED



CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018

FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600

HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

LINCOLN
'99, Town Car,
white, 100,370.5 miles
$3,200.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
$1,500.
(352)489-0117




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JAN. 5th.
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $26,900
352-513-4257






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Liquidation Sale
Help Us Stay in Biz.
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van.
74K mi. good cond
extras included++
$6,000 obo
(352) 637-6216

CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306







HONDA '06
CBR 1000 RR,
Very low miles, gar kept,
Adult Owner, $4500
OBO (352) 257-8850

Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$5400. 352-513-4257


M-e
I^j^^^ NoLuti^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEATHER SMITH, LICENSE COMPLIANCE SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 5, 2014.

312-0105 SUCRN
1/09 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 09, 2014 in Room 280 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Seclion 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, January 5, 2014.


313-0105 SUCRN
City of Inverness-ITB
PUBLIC NOTICE
Project Number: #ADM 1014-01
The City of Invernesswill be accepting sealed bids until 4:00pm, Monday, January 27, 2014,
and then opened and read aloud Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 10:00am, at a public meeting
in the New City Hall Government Complex, located at 212 West Main Street., Inverness,
Florida for:
CUSTODIAL SERVICES
Custodial Services are required to clean and maintain the following City Government build-
ings: Administration, Finance, Development Services, Council Chambers, and State Offices
located in the New City Hall Government Center at 212 W. Main Street. as noted in Specs.
In your bid response, indicate the total charges (monthly and annual) during the contract pe-
riod (two year time frame). Be advised billing will be on a monthly basis and submitted to
the City of Inverness, Administration Office, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450.
Specifications for bids may be obtained at the City of Inverness, Administration Office, lo-
cated at 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida. A walk through will be scheduled for
January 16th at 10:00am. For questions and additional information, please contact Sheila
Densmore 726-2611 x 1001.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to reject any and all bids, all formalities or irregulari-
ties, and to accept any combinations of alternates as may be in the best interest of the City.
By order of the City of Inverness, Florida.
Is/ Frank DiGiovanni, City Manager
City of Inverness
Published two (2) times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 5 & 12, 2014.

314-0105 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 009-14
Code Compliance Special Master Services
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners Code Compliance Division is seek-
ing the services of a qualified attorney to serve as the Special Master pursuant to
Chapter 162, Florida Statutes and the Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Chapter
20 (Nuisance Ordinance), and the Land Development Code. The Special Master will
perform the duties of hearing officer as provided in the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances, hearing all cases assigned to him/her by Citrus County involving alleged vio-
lation of the various codes of Citrus County as they may be amended from time to
time. The Special Master shall work with County staff and be prepared to issue, in a
timely manner, findings of fact and conclusions of law consistent with the powers
granted.
Minimum Reauirements For Submitting A Proposal
Proposer shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a
responsive and responsible at the time of Proposal Submittal:
1. Proposer must be a member in good standing of the Florida Bar.
2. Proposer must have practiced in the field of local government and land use law
for at least five (5) years.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before January 21, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for January 21, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 5, 2014.


Finder -


311-0105 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly License Compliance Special Master Hearing on WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15,
2014 at 10:00 a.m. in room 166 at the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 West Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place all persons interested
are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the License Compli-
ance Special Master; however cases may abate prior to the hearing date. If you
have any questions, contact Code Compliance Division at 352-527-5350.
Citations:
S Christopher Fortenbery Citation 0126; case 143793 Engage in the business or
act in the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
Note: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the License Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.


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mB


Bid Notice




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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ner Bonus Cash


Motor Credit
ier Bonus Cash



I100
er Cash


File: CPO LOGO-VEF
1Type: ??%- ERTIFIED Pi RE-OWNED C all For Savings!
Relax, It's Covered. -
S172-poinlt Inspection b, Ford tacr,7-trained lechnicians 7 37 1
APR for 36 months T.ear 100 ,00-,ie Ford Po ertra,, \I /arran I,,erage3
1 -mnlo h1 00- e Ford Li ledI V rranl; Co.eraqe-
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
J ,: MIL u I. ,^1 i ,: I .', l',,ir -,-. .i j T ,' J 1, | I i n r I '-111.11 i-1-1, 1- ,f',j, ,l-.-' T. ]. 1 1 ,- I ]-1 : ,: 1 ] 4 :! ,.1 1 : ,1 .] l ,i :.' i l ',,] ,::-i l:,l ] -11 :,:- :,,ji .l- :,1 h l T,] ". p r. T j1 3 11 -1",1,1,:- E. 111:,14 -111 [, ] j1 i l-1 |.
di "A'
L J


2012 FORD FUSION SE 2011 FORD RANGER XLT 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID 2010 FORD FUSION SEL 2009 LINCOLN MKS
S, $17,950, $ 9r " _i.,1. e ,950 $20-ls,.'i lllir I.ij .'l950 $20ehe ,450 $20,950er "- il..
$1 7,950 $19,950 $20,950 $20,450 $20,950


2011 LINCOLN MKX 2013 FORD FISO CREW XLT 2012 FORD EDGE LTD 2011 LINCOLN MKX 2013 LINCOLN MKT
LiKe New. ,P1`6 1 3I'5,n.05 V83 G.3PR I "iIa lI.II'.'i. 1 n. 1 L ll r 1-.' :11:11:1 milrd.- I 10 ,000 M iles. .PR 1 i'iI
$25,950 $27,950 $27,950 $28,950 $30,950


Nick Nk icholas *LNCOLN
Nick
Nicholas
Crystal River Hwy.19N. Ford
www ickichI, : L i nc m <795 m737 1 'Pet Rick o
WWW.nkknichol Salesperson of the Month _______________
**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will qualify for
Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 60 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 01/09/14.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 D7


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


a


*


S


CRYSTAL
NISSAN


Rental Program


Need a new car to drive across town or across the state?
Crystal Nissan has your transportation needs handled!


RATES $
STARTING AT


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PER HALF DAY


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Monday Saturday: 9:00am 5:00pm Sunday: Closed
VALID DRIVER LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSURANCE INCLUDING DRIVE ANOTHER VEHICLE ENDORSEMENT REQUIRED.
o


D8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


at :43





Section E SUNDAY, JANUARY 5,2014



OME


RONT


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULID


The Weller and
Mason play table
from Restoration
Hardware Baby &
Child offers a modern
take on a traditional
kids' play table.


INSIDE


I .





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


o., .. ........ C, 2)0 ,7.-- M
.2637jj-282 Enter 52)037.'k Elr ais282 ik

I--.- A.jISM i, i II . IF

14 WEEPING WILLOW 4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD. 4.5 ACRE CORNER LOT BEST PRICE AROUND CUSTOM SWEETWATER!
E CEPI 3 Bedrooms/3 En Suite Baths Smart Home Installed
SHEERELEGANCE! MOVE-INREADYVL BEVERLY HILLS WITH SKYLINE DOUBLEWIDE Waterfront lot with dock and :31/2-CarGarage *Sat Waet Poo
322 wScrn Porch Formal Dining Rm 4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area 3 BR, 2 BATH W/DEN Large Carport witHardwood and ile F replai
SOpen Floor Plan Leaded Glass Door New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM 1993 Built Workshop/Outbuildings seawal with city water. 3-Zone HVAC Jacuzzi in Master
*Wood Cabinets/Island Solid Surface Counters Beautifully Maintained Many Extras Huge Kitchen w/lsland Gas Fireplace G ulf access Call for complete list of upgrades!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER& MARVIA KOROL f Updated 40 Yr. Shingles Updated HVAC ul ASTEALat $259, 0
(352) 527-7842 LLiKELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500I
Emllni 1i 5 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-853 Emil: lucybarnes remax.net l Email: sherylpots@a ol.com
www.FodLi gnoco(352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellsnlorida.corn Visual Tours: www.cryslalrivedl.com Websile: www.CrystalRlverLivlng.com
___ (32 423875 Vi T. W.C r L M.c Weirsite: www.CryslalRiverLiving corn





1862 ARROWWOOD 57 W. KENTWOOD PL. 6 FREESIA CT., SUGARMILL WOODS SUGARMILL WOODS
W Prm PecoriNeSart LOVELDRMoen RCITRUS SPRINGS REA LTV fONE *Quality Built 3/2/3 *Heated Pool, Spa, Lg Lanai *3/2/2 *Caged Pool
War DecrTiearedtc L Y Move abinRetad y Upa3BD/2B es2CG G,500 SF LIVING Gas Range and Fireplace ,3-Zone HVAC and CENTRAL VAC o Garage w/Screened Enclosure o Solid Surface Counters
1 Upre OTHen FE oolt Gan ouptres .Gen es Lan7 I N I NE So Many Special Features Beautiful Landscaping Privacy Beautiful Tile Flooring NewSod
Well Maintained in Area of Nicer Homes ,4/I IIrU LI Meticulously Maintained Light, Open & Inviting Split Plan Ist Green ofSouthem Woods
352527-7842"" ''"v "' GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961 - CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAMn
Er3 eUneuon en, he 3 52') 7-82 5U/i8 Email:g.english@remaxn I .e (352)637-6200
www.Flomidnhisiunglnlo com (352) 422-3875 wwwosellingcitruscountyhomesocom r Email: kcunningham@remaxonet
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM HERE'S HOW: ATTENTION
S #1 Buyer calls exclusive -
24/7 Ino Line e
V, A __liE 1 1) DEVELOPERS!
1862~"


637-2828 | I 63+ acres for development of
637PEIG IE 2 2 82OIAR.CTU PINSIlt ul // Heated Pool Spa,ng/La ai a rve /2-CgdPo



,,t- ^ 74 half acre homesites.
Sd 2 Buyer enters house CnCounty approved gated community
1229 RABECK AVE. 4385 N. BACALL LOOP F 7J number when in Crystal River. Zoned for low density
LOT150X335 CDIAMONDBRITECAGED POOL BEVERLY HILLS M prompted residential. Builder/owner willing
S3/2/2/Split Plan .LR Plus Family Room BEVERLY HILLS!! 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR & to work with buyer on this development.
Leaded Glass Dr NookPlusDiningm eGARAGE BLOCK HOME, IMPECCABLY MAINTAINED, l C all fr further details Perspectuse on file
Easy Care TileLam oMOVE RIGHT IN' NEWER ROOF CENTRAL HEAT/AIR, VINYL WINDOWS, 3 Buyer listens to 1 :
PAINT, FIXTURES, TILE, SPRINKLER SYSTEM, LARGE property i
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 DEN O ROIBREAKFAST NOOK I- 1 2 PO
Enml ellesiuuuon emnx e DIANNEMACDONALD (352) 212-9682 E presentation in CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
www.FlodLSlnglnloco Ema: djmfl@yahoo.com English or Spanish _-_ Email: cnadal@3remax.net 1-
RENTALS oPEN HousE suNDY111

AVAILABLE i'


iItCITRUS HILLS! 13 DOUGLAS CT. N. 6 ACRE HORSE RANCH IN
3 BEDROOM WITH OFFICE, 2.5 BATH, 2CAR GARAGE 3/2/2 Sugail Woods pool home Open the front door to PINE RIDGE PRICED RIGHT
warm and inviting living room. "he kitchen is an eat-in kitchen I RIDGE PRICED RIGHT!
| BLOCK HOME, BUILT BY SUMMERWIND, MAPLE that has been update and is a cooks' dream with lots of A wonderful home for your family, this 3 bedroom,
CABINETS WITH CORIAN COUNTERS, MANY cabinet space. The home has just been painted on the exterior 2 bath home has 6-fenced acres on the trals. Barn with
UPGRADES, FORMAL LIVING 4AND DINING ROOM, and has been updated on the interior. stalls and tack room it also includes a lare caed pool
SLARGE FAMILY ROOM OFF KITCHEN WITH BREAKFAST DI: 19 S. to left on Cypress Blvd., to left on Douglas St., to and RV carport Fireplace hue family room dinin room
sNOOK SCREEN PORCH, MOVE RIGHTIN. I tonDougast. ,toghtonDougast. N. and upda hen! Amustsee.
ELLI RONTO 352O (352)99 586-2663




SDIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 www.bomcoy.rmx.com # 1 in Clrus Cou STEVE VARNADOE 95-2441 OR 795-9661
i i : jmflah.com Certied Disressed Propery Exper mi sternore.t


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


University of Florida Extension Service marks 100 years


DR. MARNIE WARD
University of Florida/
IFAS Extension

2014 will mark the 100-year
anniversary of UF/IFAS Exten-
sion in Florida. Over the next
year, the Citrus County Exten-
sion Office will be writing a se-
ries of articles that showcase the
impact of Extension on the lives
of Floridians.
The University of Florida is a
land-grant university, estab-
lished by the Morrill Act of 1862.
The mission of the Morrill Act
was to establish colleges of agri-
culture and mechanical arts in
each state. It followed that the
Smith/Lever Act of 1914 funded


the Extension services as com-
munity educational outreach
arms of land grant universities.
Today there are UF/IFAS Ex-
tension offices in each of
Florida's 67 counties, and they
continue to disseminate univer-
sity research and educational
opportunities to the residents of
Florida.
Did you know that steam loco-
motives were once the most di-
rect method for connecting
Floridians and Extension
agents? Or that Extension agents
were instrumental in bringing
electricity and telephone serv-
ice to the rural communities in
Florida?
As early as 1911, Florida rail-


roads partnered with the Exten-
sion service to provide farm
demonstration trains, aka "Bet-
ter-Farming Specials," which
ran across 1,400 miles of track
and brought agriculture educa-
tion to the farmers and residents
of Florida. Their purpose was to
increase the amount of land
available for agricultural pur-
poses, to expand interest in
dairy operations, and to educate
urban populations about agri-
culture in Florida. Similar
trains also operated in Iowa,
Montana, Virginia and Oregon.
In the 1930s, only 8 percent of
rural Floridians had electricity
in their homes (nationally the
rate was roughly 12 percent).


The federal government in 1935
established the Rural Electrifi-
cation Administration (REA), a
credit agency that would pro-
vide loans to local governments
and farm cooperatives to extend
power lines into rural areas.
The Florida Extension service
took on the role of organizing
farmer co-ops in 1939. Agents
were faced with formidable
tasks such as mapping the indi-
vidual counties and identifying
where each potential customer
lived. Keep in mind, in the
Florida of the 1930s, many roads
were little more than tracks, and
the landscape was often chal-
lenging to navigate. Sometimes,
the most difficult task was to


convince farmers to pay the $5
fee to join the farmer's co-op.
In Citrus County, Elizabeth
Moore, the home demonstration
agent in 1938, took the lead in
sponsoring the electrification
program. She was quoted at the
time as "confident that the re-
quired number of participants
would sign up to ensure that
lines would come through Citrus
County"
Once the co-op was estab-
lished, agents had to work with
utility companies to convince
them that expanding the grid
was in their best interest, and
they used REA funds to build

See EXTENSION/Page Ell


L Brnwo Resle


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


!^S ISINCLE FAMILY HOME ll
3 BED. 2.5 BATH.
2 CAR FOXFIRE
. . i , .[ i... .. ....
countertops, SS appliances and walk-in butler pantry make this gourmet
kitchen the envy of every cook. The massive formal living area is perfect u "" H -- B'^,, Z^, DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring which SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2 CAR, FOXFIRE Beautiful custom Martinique model located in the plush community
Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath split plan home in Brentwood. Great carriesthrough to the spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting AS GOOD AS IT GETS! One-of-a-kind immaculate 4 bedroom,4 bath,2 car of Terra Vista in Citrus Hills. This home has a formal living area as
room, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and area & TWO walk-in closets, split floor plan, guest bedrooms w/direct garage plus golf cart garage. Custom pool/spa home with guest suite, well as a separate family room. Greatfor entertaining with an open
cozy nook, inside laundry room and a 2 car garage. NO monthly bath access & huge walk-in closets. A beautiful terrace garden and an situated on the best homesite in Foxfire on Skyview Golf Course. Profes- floor plan and lots of tile. Cooks will love the large walk in pantry
maintenance fee with this single family home. Access to the Citrus oversized 2 car garage with a separate golf cart entrance complete this sionally decorated, too many upgrades to mention, enjoy exclusive living with plenty of storage. Enjoy the tropical garden view from your
Hills and Terra Vista amenities too! fabulous home. in this premier courtyard home.A must see in Terra Vista. private lanai. Come and enjoythe Florida lifestyle at it's best.
M LS 704406 ........................................................................... $ 1 2 3 ,0 0 0 M LS 700959 ................................................................................ $ 4 2 2 ,9 0 0 M LS 704934 ................................................................................. $ 5 8 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 705279 ........................................................................... $ 1 9 9 ,9 0 0
DETACHED VILLA DETACHED VILLA SINGLE FAMILY HOME
3 BED. 2.5 BATH. 2 CAR. 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, 4 BED, 3 BATH, 2.5 CAR.
^HILLSIDE VILLAS BRENTWOOD VILLAS BELLAMY RIDGE
S,,., ,- ,., ,-,,,,,,,t 4 MAINTENANCE-FR' I ii il Stunningly beautiful J ." _
.. ", i:, ... .. -, IN GATED GOLF ii rnli iii Michael Angelo model .,
S I -, r ., r ,,-,2 bedroom, 2 bali more open feel. Situated ,i
garage, detached ,11, '' private, amazingly lands.
mg. I:,,,1 ,1 ,,,1 ,, 1 .....beautifully landscaped cul-de-sac lot in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. lot at the end of a cul-de-sac in Bellamy Ridge. Heated pool with
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS throughout, formal dining room with custom chair height molding, Screened entry to this villa with a spacious open floor plan, kitchen has waterfall feature. Custom designed fish pond complete with water
Come take a look at th be hme 2 h C ed I a professional window treatments throughout, custom maple cabinetry eat-in dining area and breakfast bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are fountain. Exterior stone. Brick paver driveway, entrance and pool
oversized home sittake a look at this beautiful home that iVery wes suat an in the great room, den and kitchen have under cabinet lighting & handicap equipped. The sliders to the large rear lanai offer a view of a deck. Golf cart garage. Private well for irrigation. This home is
overswhich can bhome site. Very well maitaed. 2 ber oms lus a e n, puts, gas fireplace, aquarium windowed breakfast nook gives you green expansive lawn. Plenty of roomfor a pool. Home is readyforyou to immaculate inside and out. Granite countertops. 42" staggered wood
which can be used as a third bedroom. Some of the features this ulceieveworokngte6hfrayftepplrSyiw
home has to offer are extended lanai, summer kitchen, extra storage an incredible view overlooking the 6th fairway of the popular Skyview move right in. Enjoy the Citrus Hills Country Club Membership Lifestyle kitchen cabinets. Sliding doors throughout the home allowing for
closet, surround sound and many more. Golf Course. 3 with this home. Hurry this villa value will not last long. maximum light. Custom Armstrong flooring.
M LS 704582 ........................................................................... $ 2 0 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 704750 ................................................................................ $ 3 2 4 ,9 0 0 M LS 705084 ................................................................................ $ 1 2 4 ,9 0 0 M LS 706244 ................................................................................ $ 6 9 9 ,0 0 0




aemn-6MntsorMr




BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR DETACHEDVILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS ; li:-. 1 ...i ...i.., ..i.. :,,- i:,,-,, , ...,,
Contemporary, beautiful 2/2.5/1 Townhouse in gated community of o- 6'.-- This spacious unfurnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with open floor bath 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive upscale gated
Brentwood. A spacious dining room/great room combination. All bedrooms BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME 3 BD, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR plan, large eat-in kitchen and formal dining area is perfect for community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen -great
upstairs. Half bath downstairs. Inside laundry, tile & carpet. Glass doors Unfurnished End Unit. Spacious living, great location. Enjoy Terra entertaining. Located on a corner lot and close to the Bella Vita space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended
open to screen lanai off of living room. Social membership included. Vista amenities. Fitness Center & Spa. Social membership included, screened Lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs.
#6651 ........................................................................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0 1 1 # 1149 ............................................................................................ $ 1 ,1 0 0 1 #8921 ................................................................................................... $ 13... ....... $ 1 ,1 0 0 921 ......... ...0 0 #5375 ............................................................................................ $2,300


REALTY GROUP


11


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 E3







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Farmers fight to improve image


As food becomes political issue,

owners get PR crash course


Associated Press

OKAWVILLE, ll. -Add
one more item to the list of
chores that Larry Hashei-
der has to do on his 1,700-
acre farm: defending his
business to the American
public.
There's a lot of conver-
sation about traditional
agriculture recently, and
much of it is critical. Think


genetically modified
crops, overuse of hor-
mones and antibiotics, in-
humane treatment of
animals and over-
processed foods.
This explosion of talk
about food some based
on fact, some based on fic-
tion has already trans-
formed the marketplace.

See FARMERS/Page E14


Associated Press
Dairy cows on Larry Hasheider's farm in Okawville, III. Hasheider grows soybeans, wheat and alfalfa on the farm,
nestled in the heart of Illinois corn country, where he also has 130 dairy cows, 500 beef cattle and 30,000 hogs
and even gives tours, something he says he never would have done 20 years ago. Add one more item to the list of
chores that Larry Hasheider has to do on his 1,700-acre farm: defending his business to the American public.


000HIZN


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
0 (352) 795-6633
WdWw AT Frv/ F r'mrIT. H._.. (;AT Fi A//)T FY/oF 'Imr


[ 1111HIZIN.


HERNANDO waterfront home
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, gourmet kitchen CRYSTAL RIVER 4 bedroom, 2 5 bath
w/granite counter tops, electric fireplace D/W M/H by Skyline on 4 5 acres of land
in living rm, fountain & hot tub in family Country kitchen, dining rm, family rm,
rm Canal flows into Tsala Apopka Lake wood burning fireplace, Ig master suite
chain in the Potts Wildlife Preserve i 1 ,, ;.. .., i......i #704053
7fi7nA Qen4 fi{fi n'iiii


I 7
DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath, -
M/I -t' f-r cars/workshop on HIOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H w/3
2 ,. cabinets, china bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved road,
cabinet, carpet throughout except for screen porch, workshop, shed, ceiling fans,
kitchen, baths and laundry rm Large formal dining rm & eat-in kitchen
family rm catht 1 .. irmet w/breakfast bar Immaculate inside, near
kitchenw/island -"'i.- l. bytoshopping #706376 $48,000





INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car HIOMOSASSA 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1985
..... ; .. .' ; 11; 1 mobile on 6 06 acres 12 x 24 workshop
I" w/eletric Metal roof over, updated
in great room, country kitchen appliances, fenced and x fenced, covered
and --.-rt- -ounter tops Tile floors thru rear porch, front wood decking #701071
out -'Il., $93,800 #65,000




DUNNEILON big & beautiful .1
3 bedroom, 3 bath 2007 Nobility CRYSTAL RIVER commercial
manufactured home on 2 3 acres Fully ., ;, ; ...... 1.lesale; fencing
fenced, . kitchen w/skylight, .... 5 acres totally
cathedral ., thru-out, wood burning i -',l equipment,
fireplace in living rm #704968 ,1 .mples of fence work
$118,000 __________-*'ilitn . limi 1..1____n__


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
A taste of unspoiled nature secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ,i i , i I .......
ponds, mature oak trees The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully ii i, II i ... ,, ,,,, ,, ,
positioned in a beautiful setting 1 i ,i 1 1 1 1 ..... .. .. '1 .
S I....... .... ... ... $800.OO waiting for you and your family to move right inl
,r-io+niir 5Aq 9.OOO


THE GLEN SOUTHERN STYLE GOSPEL ISLAND
G I| A 55+ community Enjoy maintenancefree PLANTATION HOME Nicely kept 3/2/2 home, spacious
ated in The Glen Custom built 4/3/2 on approx 10 ac fenced yard, shed & carport for the
GnTT A a e ni dy Cathedral wood 1,1 .k.et- carinots & UNSPOILED NATURE
Carpet and paint, fireplace Recently i ,, i om has vaulted adjacent to Homosassa/Chassahowitzka
t is in perfect condltlonl Just unpack the impeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 ., ... Roomy covered Preserve & er Creek 2 pa for a
B A R T Has and"relar lose to kill dining I I .. .. screened porch total of 19+ acre Sen ic mixture of
REALTOR R and medica fachtes $65,000 $379,000 $86,000 sawgrass and trees $59,000

Cell: (352) 220.0466 W -||
gbarth@myflorida-house.corn
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLRALY LE MOVE RIGT IN BEAUTIFULCITRUS HILLS OuTTADC WATERFRONT REliDECE
no 1 2 master suIes, apart 1 2 an (1o0 x 300+ ft), picturesque ns332 0 a a
ment Ilower level Upper lev( e ttnl ihm jroktesC corner lot with mature oak trees and ..
accessible via elevao Pol urcn etn ihm jro tesCarming lots of prrvacyl Very well maintained,
Investors Realy shutters, erit Poole, hupae brick home, first time offered, some ....
k ithen & bathrooms 190 ft $179,0inal fxtures and fieplace still in ,399
of Citrus County, Inc. seawall, b le Large d$1 gar w/workshop, thing meticulous maintained 3Pric9d
o~idylwe bsite at: wwwnmrayflorida-houseocorr waiting for! 6,000 seawall $179,000 $169,000 sane right at $399,00


BEST7 '


Realtor


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stuart has great
first year
Century
21 J.W. A
Morton
Real Estate .
Inc. is
proud to an-
nounce Re-
altor-
associate Stefan
Stefan Stu- Stuart
art, in his Century 21
first year in J.W. Morton
real estate,
has surpassed the $1 million
mark in sales. Congratula-
tions to Stefan.
EXIT agents
soar in 2013
EXIT Realty Leaders
wishes to congratulate Deb-
bie Scott for closing more
than $1 million and Mary
Gulling for closing more than
$2 million in 2013.


They are
both profes-
sional
agents who .-
brings a
wealth of
knowledge
to every E
transaction Debbie
and are al- Scott
ways corn- EXIT Realty
mitted to Leaders
providing
excellent
service ,
totheir i.-
clients. 41
Debbie F
can be
reached at
352-527- Mary
1112 and Gulling
Mary can EXIT Realty
be reached Leaders
at 352-794-
0888. You can also visit them
online at www.exitrealty
leaders.com.


r Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney |
r Realtor.', Reallor, .l
302-3179 A HOUSE 287.9022
746-6700 SOLD Name. WTI
The golden irl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


*II11!1i 1iiiii l[l[Ii m llIi ldli

Great Buyer Incentives
Interest rates are still low
Sales have increased
Inventory has decreased
Winter residents are arriving!
WE OFFER
Complementary current market analysis
Aggressive marketing strategies
High internet exposure on our listings
Local knowledge and experience
Professionalism
WE ARE...
"THE MOST DIRECT LINE BETWEEN YOU AND A BUYER"
FOR YOUR FREE MARKET ANALYSIS CALL 352-795-9123


HomeFront BRIEF


Ready for veggies?
Master gardeners plan
plant clinics for January
We are fortunate in Citrus County to
be able to vegetable garden year-round
- as long as you know what and when
to plant.
The January free Master Gardener
Plant Clinics will focus on vegetable gar-
dening and will answer questions not
only about what and when to plant, but
also how and where. The schedule is:
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8, at


Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14, at Lakes
Region Library, Inverness.
1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15, at Cit-
rus Springs Library.
1:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24, at
Coastal Region Library, Crystal River.
2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Ho-
mosassa Library.
There will be no plant clinic in Floral
City in January.
Bring samples and questions to the
free clinics.
Master gardener volunteers will be


happy to answer your gardening ques-
tions. The master gardener phone num-
bers at the extension office are
352-527-5709 or 352-527-5711.
Email MasterG1 @bocc.citrus.fl.us or
MasterG2@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
From wire reports


BR~746-9000.


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty --
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTORR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
r


522 S. JACKSON 9 N. WADSWORTH 48 S. HARRISON 521 S. MONROE
2/1/1 706595 $56,900 3/15 704088 $52,500 2/1 707029 $49,000 1 2/1/1 707140 $69,90C
3521 N. LECANTO HWY.. BEVERLY HILLS. FL 34465


-- Real Estate DIGEST


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 ES


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E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHfRt'OINICL IE
ci iifonR.iij

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Getting year-round


green grass in Fla.


Rye grass breeds can allow continuous color


during winter in central Florida, That is four to five months through the
lawns go dormant and turn brown, holiday season and the time when snow-
Warm-season summer birds and northern visitors like
turf grasses take a rest in re- to spend time in sunny Florida.
sponse to lower temperatures Those beautiful bright green
of fall and shorter hours of lawns at the entry to gated
daylight. Dormant grasses are communities such as Black Di-
alive, but do not need any fer- amond on County Road 491
tilizer during winter We do get and surrounding the homes of
one or two heavy rains each avid gardeners are cool season
winter month. Artificial irriga- rye grass overseeded from late
tion should be no more fre- September to October My
quent than once a week. friends Katie and Ray Kline of
Locally common exotic Jane Weber Pine Ridge planted their win-
species of lawn grass include JANE'S ter rye in December when the
Bahia, both Pensacola and Ar- ground had cooled consider-
gentine; Bermuda; Carpet- GARDEN ably and the fall rains had
grass; Centipede; St. ceased.
Augustine; and Zoysia. None are native to Annual rye, Lolium multiflorum, is
Florida; however, several are natural- cheaper than the so-called perennial rye
ized. All go dormant for winter seed. It is native to Southern Europe.
Typical home lawns are brown from
December through to the first of April. See JANE/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Playroom style
PAGE E8
Extension Service
PAGE E3
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E5
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Old wooden chair and a 'Remember When' about Coke


Dear John: I enjoy reading generic commercial-grade quality
your column every week. and of no specific market inter-
This chair was est. It was likely made
recently given to me. for institutional or in-
Underneath the seat is dustrial use. The
a ticket stapled which maker has no bearing
reads, "Manufactured on potential dollar
by High Point Bending ? value, leaving it at the
& Chair Co., Siler City, catch-as-catch-can
N.C., Pattern #5514, 1,' level
Finish Walnut." It is l The pretty floral still
very heavy and in good life picture is likely a
condition, print, not an original
The picture I pur- John Sikorski painting. I was not able
chased at a second- SIKORSKI'S to decipher the first
hand shop for $15. It is ATTIC name; without it, the
in excellent condition. ________name Ward is too com-
The artist's last name mon. I would say you


is Ward. I cannot make out the
first name. I would appreciate in-
formation on these two items,
such as age and value. Thank you
for your kind attention. R.P,
Dunnellon
Dear R.P: The side chair is


got your money's worth.
Dear John: I was multi-tasking
today while listening to the pro-
gram, but regarding the Coca-
Cola bottle the feller found in his
swamp across the road my ears
perked up when he mentioned


the 6-ounce bottle. Those were
the size bottles that were sold
back in my era of grade and high
school at 10 cents a pop, no pun
intended, at an across-the-street
mom-and-pop sandwich, hot dog
and ice cream store, complete
with jukebox, candy counter and
plenty of room for kids with an
extra quarter of weekly al-
lowance! Coke was sold along
with other brands of equal-size
sodas in a cooler that opened
from the top, revealing a rack of
sodas that were "hung by the
neck" in sliding slats that, when
See ATTIC/Page E7
Although it's very sturdily
made, this wooden chair is of
commercial-grade quality, and
was likely made for industrial or
institutional use. It has no
specific appeal to collectors.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

slid to the left, would be allowed to
be pulled up and out, providing a
dime had been put in the box.
Also of the era were many red Coke
machines at service stations that took
a dime. You would push down a lever
and a 6-ounce bottle could be pulled
out, and the cap removed by a hidden
"un-capper" box that saved the caps
when they fell down into it, similar in
action in how beer bottle caps are re-
moved by bartenders today
We had a Coca-Cola bottling plant
in South Glens Falls that used to be
the local high school back in pre-war
days, and checking the bottom of the
Coke bottles was "the thing to do" to
see who had the "farthest-away bot-
tle." After all, recycling was a thing
that was done back then. The Coke
man delivered the bottles, the store
sold them, took them back from itin-
erant travelers and kept the bottles
for the Coke man to take back to the



JANE
Continued from Page E6

Here in Florida and on the south-
ern coastal plain, the perennial, L.
perenne cannot tolerate the wet,
humid, hot summers, and it will die
out. It may be perennial in places
with different climates, but is not
suitable for Florida.
When overseeding, the warm-
season lawn should be freshly
mowed and clippings removed with
a bagger or raked. These can be
composted or spread around shrubs
and trees as mulch. If thatch has
built up, the lawn may need to be
dethached.
The freshly broadcast rye seed
needs to contact the soil. It germi-
nates in seven to 10 days and shows
a blush of green over the entire area
within two weeks. Before the New
Year, the Klines' lawn had sprouted
2-inch shoots. By mid-January, they
will begin to cut it every two to three
weeks.
Rye will sprout readily without
excessive irrigation. Daily sprin-
kling would cause the seed and
seedlings to rot. Farmers do not irri-
gate winter rye sown over their pas-
tures. Once the rye is up and needs
mowing, weekly irrigation is ade-


plant where they were washed, san-
itized and refilled; thus, many bot-
tles found today have "crate marks"
on the outer edges.
And then they got greedy If 6
ounces satisfies one's thirst, then 10
ounces should REALLY satisfy it,
and to make it easy for the plant en-
gineers, let's make it 12 ounces!
Another youthful "idea man" sug-
gests we package it in 16 ounces and
add some more caffeine, make happy-
looking "ifn" people jump up and down
on TV ads and so we see the reason
for our jittery 120-pound 10 year-olds.
And now I have to buy a 20-ouncerjust
to make it 400 miles up 1-95!
Enough rant. Read on about Coke
bottles and their worthiness in
today's society My ex-neighbor was
and probably still is a rabid Coke
stalwart and collector. Me, I'm a
Pepsi guy who sympathizes with
Mike Wolfe on 'American Pickers,"
but what do I know about stuff that
was tossed from our old farmhouse
more than half a century ago? -
JB.S., Internet
Dear J.B.S.: Yes, I remember the


quate if there is no rain. It has a fi-
brous and deep root system. When
the warmer soil temperatures and
the spring equinox arrive, the rye
grass will begin to die off, usually be-
fore it flowers and sets seed. The
seed would decay over the summer
here. In spring, the underlying turf
grass has started to green up, mak-
ing a smooth transition from winter
rye lawn to the warm season perma-
nent turf grass.
A 20-pound bag of annual rye costs
$30 to $40 from any of the big box
chains or local farm and feed stores.
It is prime winter forage for live-
stock from Texas across the South-
eastern states to Florida. It can grow
1 to 2 feet tall, so homeowners mow
once or twice a month.
My neighbor's dog and cat like to
chew on ryegrass blades. I often find
large patches grazed by rabbits and
gopher tortoises. Having a winter
rye lawn creates an oasis of green
grass during winter


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an
appointment, call 352-249-6899 or
contact JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


Coke machine you accurately de-
scribe. I imagine a lot of our readers
remember that era as well. Thanks
for the "Remember When."


John Sikorski has been a profes-


sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


4 E V1V ,L 9*0 C7-M 9O I7-


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


(w0 Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
A Week! Properties
NEW LISTING


S 2820 uN Crosswaiter Path '; d'a* 2ti
/( MLS 707483 $1,150,000 AI, 3842 W Northcrest Ct
Sophisticated estate home w/metropolitan VJ MLS 707480 $165,000
finishes- amazing golf course views. 3/2/2 on cul-de-sac; spacious indoor living.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036; Many NEW items in & out of home.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


.j-tltS 165 E Keller Ct
MLS 704878 $287,900
3bd/3.5ba pool home w/fabulous view of
6th Green on Oaks Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


b t t 854 N Kensington Ave
MLS 701772 $179,000
3/2/2 Split plan with huge family room and
large bedrooms.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


" ,a, > 246 W Casurina PI
MLS 706917 $79,900
Neat, clean 2/2/2 with screened
front porch.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power


r iO'* 244 W Romany Loop
MLS 704148 $275,000
Beautiful 3bd/2.5ba pool home many
upgrades & features.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


Zi. Ei 351 W Hillmoor Ln
MLS 357980 $129,000
2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by
Twisted Oaks Golf Course.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


6,ifeC1"iaf 300 E Glassboro CI 18.3B
MLS 705063 $68,500
Furnished 2bd/2.5ba Townhome; just a few
steps from community pool.


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


-,ff ^ _', '" -
fi$ ~ 541 W Ted Williams Ct
,, MLS 704863 $829,000
Elegant, luxurious, spacious...describe
this 4bd/4ba home.
Mark Casoer 352-364-1947


,Vt ~ 4792 W CusterDr
P eg"J MLS 705312 $216,000
Impeccably maintained 3/2/2,+ den,
perfectly situated on a 1-acre lot.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


ig,JLLS 1100 W Pearson St
MLS 705976 $128,500
Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with
fabulous upgraded features.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


gfe -" 156 E Glassboro Ct 13-7A
MLS 704801 $58,000
Great view from this upper 2bd/2ba condo
unit located in Citrus Hills.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer


and Associates' 2013 f7 E N= -First Time Home Seller
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl -

.h 5iS.... I Ii h i 1
v v,,v1,, vh II. ... I . ,I II I ,h ,i, I... iiih I.. I I I I,,, . .I ,, Ih ,1,, I, I ,,II, Is,, ....iii iiii m


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 E7






ES SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Kid-friendly romper rooms

don't have to lose their cool


KIM COOK
Associated Press
Outfitting a play space
for children might
consist of nothing
more than setting up
a few old furniture pieces,
plastic storage bins and
the extra TV
But some parents want
the play space to reflect
their design aesthetic.
Does the rest of the home
read more Eero Saarinen
than Superman?
More Verner Panton
than Pokemon? Is the
vibe less Nickelodeon,
more George Nelson? If
so, you'll want to try bal-
ancing kid-friendly
with cool.
Some options:


Mod mad
Lots of decor from the
'60s and '70s works well in
a play space: mod lamps,
modular furniture, pop
art, and fun, space-age
prints for wallpaper and
textiles. Hues popular
back then orange, yel-
low, teal, green, white -
add energy to furniture,
cushions and rugs.
New York-based de-
signer Amanda Nisbet
used a Roy Lichtenstein
print and a chrome-
trimmed bubble chair in
one of her children's
space projects. Victoria
Sanchez, a designer in
Washington, D.C., used

See Page EO10


LEFT: A Geo rug in pink, from Fab.com. Bold geometric
rugs provide punch and pizzazz in a modern play room
without being juvenile. Fab offers various options that
may be had in several colorways. BELOW: A Kivik sofa
and chaise combination in Isunda Gray, from Ikea
(www.ikea.com). Multipurpose pieces serve the whole
family's needs. Ikea's Kivik sectional can be reconfigured
many different ways; it's hardy, comfy and versatile for a
family room.
Associated Press






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ABOVE: A Topkapi Kilim pouf from Fab.com. With knitted, faux leather or
kilim-style upholstery, poufs are stylish, rugged and portable perfect for a
modern home play space. BELOW: A Weller and Mason play table from A
Restoration Hardware Baby & Child offers a modern take on a traditional kids'
play table. While offering functional storage and ample room to get creative,
the non-juvenile styles appeal to contemporary families who want the recre-
ational spaces to blend with the rest of the family home.
Associated Press


I^'^ ^^^ ^BI BI M ^i GRAB THOSE TOOLS SANTA DELIVERED &
*"'-l ' .-"-"-**'**'-ri o KM heagd on over!! Cute 3/2 Lake Pan home features
ENTERTAIN BY THE POOL WITH A VIEW OF THE LAKE. 3/2/2 Inverness waterfront built in 1973 living & family rm rear shed Home requires work but
with 1,779 living. NEW interior paint, NEW flooring, living & fanily rooms, boat dock, rear fencing, eoat-in kitchen, well worth the $S$ . REDUCED TO $24K!
split floor plan, lanai, plus more! MIS 705666. REDUCED $139,900. Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752. #705490. Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598.


Trill


N 1 0. -111-


wosis 11S&o


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 E9






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PLAY
Continued from Page ES

colorful Missoni fabrics to liven up a
teen lounge. (www.amandanisbet
design.com; www.victoriaathome.com).
Check out Modshopl.com and
Designpublic.com for pieces -
many of them kid-size that fit the
style.
Hip, retro-style robot, typography
and animal patterns designed by
New Yorker Nancy Wolff are at
AllModern.com.
And chocolate, tangerine or red
knitted poufs and flat weave rugs
with zingy geometric graphics are
part of the signature line at Fab.com.
For a low-key look that still fits the
aesthetic, think smooth-edged Danish
modem wood furniture. Armless up-
holstered club chairs look smart and
are perfect for lounging; find new
ones at Overstock. com and vintage
ones on Etsycom. Or take a cue from
Australian designer Anna Williams
and use mid-century credenzas for
toy storage check out Thrive
Furniture.com and OneKingsLane.
com for options at various prices.
Accent with "Mad Men"-era
posters or toy ads, and add floor pil-
lows covered in patterns drawn from
the era. Soothing hues like umber,
avocado, mustard and sky blue keep
the energy relaxed.
Industrial chic
Rooms with an industrial feel -
warehouse-grade tables and storage,
furniture and decorative elements
with a rugged look- appeal to many
kids, who sense they can let loose in
these spaces. And the style's on
trend, so it's easy to do.
Neutral color palettes mixing
whites, grays and browns work for
either gender Look for ceiling lights
caged in metal (no worries about er-
rant pillows or Nerf balls), riveted
furniture, and repurposed machine-
shop elements such as gear pieces,
tools and signage. A galvanized-iron,
locker-style dresser makes great
storage. (www.pbteen.com)
Powder-coated in crisp red or
white, Ikea's PS metal cabinet adds
a pop of color (www.ikea.com) A
magnetized blackboard fits the edgy
vibe and lets inspiration fly Make
your own inexpensively with in-
structions at TheTurquoise
Home.com.
Rugged-looking play tables offer
surfaces for messy art and often


Shoot photos of kids'
favorite toys-
close-ups,
Instagrams and
black-and-white look
cool and then
mount them in
identical frames.
offer great storage for toys and
games. (wwwrhbabyandchild.com)
Lumber, flooring and stone yards
will often give old pallets away: Lots
of ideas for making your own play or
coffee table can be found at
Home-dzone.co.za.
Exploration location
Animals, trees, and sky or earth el-
ements can inspire children to be
creative in play spaces, and many
contemporary pieces appeal to both
kids and adults. At Stardustcom,
find the Zuo Modem Phante chair, a
version of Eames' iconic, polypropy-
lene, elephant-shaped chair
A realistic, cast-resin bear's head
is fun, eclectic wall art. (www.urban
outfitters.corn)
Ocean Sole's animal sculptures
made out of scavenged flip flops
would be inspiration for indoor ad-
ventures -rhinos, giraffes and lions
come in sizes up to about 5 feet long.
(wwwthespotteddoorcom; www.
piqproducts.com)
Clouds and intergalactic silver orbs
are two of the striking mural wallpa-
pers at DesignYourWall.com. Ikea's
Vandring Spar low-pile rug features
an Impressionist version of a nature
walk, complete with grass and sandy
footprints. And a soft gray and white
wool rug silhouettes romping deer
and a leafy forest at LandofNod.com.
Other ideas:
Create inexpensive, customized
storage in a playroom by painting or
staining ready-made kitchen cabi-
nets. Metal tool carts can be side ta-
bles, as well as portable art supply
zones or storage stations for small
toy parts.
Multipurpose pieces serve the
whole family's needs. Land of Nod's
round coffee table with drawers is
user-friendly for TV watching, table
games and crafts, with no sharp cor-
ners to worry about Also from the re-
tailer, a farmhouse-style work table
with storage on the ends provides


space for teens and laptops, grown-
up tasks and art projects. Ikea's Kivik
sectional can be reconfigured a lot of
different ways; it's hardy, comfy and
versatile for a family room.
Display books face forward on
wall-mounted shelves with a lip, so
covers can be easily seen. Or
scrounge flea markets for old wooden
carpenter's tool boxes, which are
sturdy and shallow Use games as art
by displaying the boxes on floating
shelves; old game boards hung on a
wall add color and visual punch.
Shoot photos of kids' favorite
toys close-ups, Instagrams and
black-and-white look cool and
then mount them in identical
frames. Ikea has inexpensive op-
tions, and Michaels' craft stores
stock three-packs of LP frames.
When the kids set up their own
places in a few years, this will be hip
art with happy memories.


Average US rate on 30-year

mortgage at 4.53 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Av-
erage U.S. rates for fixed
mortgages edged higher
this week for the third
straight week but re-
mained low by historical
standards.
Mortgage buyer Fred-
die Mac said Thursday
that the average for the
30-year loan rose to 4.53
percent from 4.48 percent
last week. The average
for the 15-year loan in-
creased to 3.55 percent
from 3.52 percent
Mortgage rates peaked


in August at 4.6 percent
amid expectations the
Federal Reserve would
reduce its $85 billion a
month in bond purchases.
The purchases push
mortgage and other long-
term rates lower Last
month the Fed deemed
the economy strong
enough for it to reduce
the monthly purchases by
$10 billion.
Mortgage rates are
sharply higher than they
were a year ago when the
30-year fixed rate was
3.35 percent and the 15-
year was 2.65 percent.


I~~~~~ To See Visu'al mor n iwALCtu onylitns ii o~ilx


E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Big changes ahead



for gardening


A look at whatgreen thumbs can


look forward to


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
While many gardeners scan
the newly arrived seed cata-
logs to plan their next growing
season, the industry's vision-
aries are pouring talent and
resources into products and
ideas they hope will be sown
in years to come.
Evolutionary biology is just
one aspect of flora develop-
ment; plant resiliency land-
scape design and education
also are part of the creative mix.
So what are the prospects
for gardening in the year 2020
and beyond? Some responses
from the long-term thinkers:
Organics
Coach Mark Smallwood, ex-
ecutive director, Rodale Insti-


tute, Kutztown, Pa.:
"Organic gardening won't be
simply a niche market It's a $31
billion industry now and grow-
ing in double digits every year
"There will be more food
and fewer lawns. Urban food
production will be up because
a lot of open space is becom-
ing available. With all the
empty homes, you can create
parks; you can create food
production. Detroit is re-
bounding using not only open
land but creating vertical hy-
droponic food production in
abandoned industrial build-
ings."
Houseplants
Jose Smith, chief executive
officer, Costa Farms, Miami:


Green is not a color. We're
also trying to create plants so
they're more of a lifestyle a
living home decor"
Trees
Greg Ina, vice president,
The Davey Institute, Kent,
Ohio:
"We're working to quantify
the benefits of trees. People
are beginning to go beyond
the anecdotal understanding
that trees are good beyond
beautification to natural func-
tions like pollution and well-
ness.
"Another big scientific topic
is resiliency Improving early
detection. Dealing with the
invasion of exotic pests.
Building resistance to climate


"We're trying hard to bring
more color to houseplants. See CHANGES/Page E15


Associated Press
These ears of sweet-tasting, bi-color corn were grown from seed in contain-
ers inside a hobby greenhouse near Langley, Wash. The Burpee's "On Deck"
corn matured in a little more than two months.


EXTENSION
Continued from Page E3

the infrastructure: poles, labor, and
distribution lines through every for-
est, field and swamp in the state. Ac-
cess to electricity spread quickly,
and by 1942 the number of farms
with electric service more than
tripled. By the 1960s, about 98 per-
cent of all farms had electricity and
70 percent had telephone service.
Continue to follow our series of ar-
ticles about the history of Extension
and learn more about current op-
portunities in Extension at http://
citrus.ifas.ufl.edu.
Citrus County Extension links the


public with the University of
Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research,
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily community, and agricultural needs.
All programs and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted by the Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons without dis-
crimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or
affiliations, genetic information and
veteran status as protected under the
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance Act

Dr Marmie Ward is the UF/IFAS
Extension Citrus County 4-HAgent.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 Ell













To place an ad, call 563-5966

Real Estate Classfld



Clasiitdsin Print



.and


Online


All


NT The Time


Fa:132 50 -56 1 Tolur (85 85-24 1 Em il clsiids-hroilo -n~o I -d -te ww .ch*oIc o in~o


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FISHING POLE!


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DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Fleetwood
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at$499/month
John Lyons ()
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
Inverness, Jungle
Camp Area 2Br/1Ba
SW w/ 2 rms added
on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge
lot close to river. Just
$10,000, 352-400-4196
SW 2Br/2Ba in Crystal
River with screened
patio on more then 1/z
ac land. Quite area
near town. $22,500
Owner Finance possi-
ble 727-480-5512



-U
2BR/1 BA with FL Rm &
attached Laundry Rm.
w/ W & D. Comp Furn-
Ready to move in *
$9,500 obo 726-0124
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, 1BA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729

FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bdl
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356


For Sale B,

Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
Must see! Must sell!
$65,000 813-464-9858





Homosassa Adult Park
2BR/1BA. Newly
remodeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$4,800 (608) 921-5564
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





ACTIONt
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www [itsCouvi tyHom o[lilal. com
CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr.............. $800
3/2/2 Nice location 1254 sq ft.
8410 N Elkcam Blvd............ .$800
3/2/1 New listing'
6973 N Gladstone Dr .......... $875
3/2/2 Split floor plan 1515 sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
4 Shnnmrd CtS ............... $1,250
3/2.5/2 SMW pool home
2200 sq ft REDUCED
1650 W Homosassa TrIl........$500
2/1 nice duplex
7396 W Green Acres.............$700
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
1304 Cymore S (Inv).........$900
3/2/2 Lovely pool home REDUCED
5164 N Dewey Way (Her)....$700
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE


JoW MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL
Frumi.nri"1
NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Brin us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!
II LJ:1 I :,$

3/2/2 pool .................$1000
3/2/2............................ $750
3/2/2new paint/new flooring.$875
2/1,5 townhouse .........$550


2/1.5/1 .........................$650
2/2/1 ............................$700
2/2/1 ............................$650
3/2................................ $700
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggs
,Property Manager/
-Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


















Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


INVERNESS
Lovely 3/2/1
$800
BEVERLY HILLS
HUGE 2/2/1
$775
Large 2/2/1
$750
OAK VILLAGE
3/2/2 w/Lawn Care
$900
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1/1 Pool w/Pool Care
$1,100 ,




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds, garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393

INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio in
quiet area. $525/mo +
$525 Sec.352-344-0238


INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2/2 and 2/1
W/D $575 TO $675
352-422-7021

INVERNESS
Nice 2 bed. 1 bath with
refridg and stove in In-
verness. Does have
w/d hookup. $500 a
month. First and Last
months rent plus $300
security before move in.
352-201-4363 phone

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &

storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD



^^ OPFOTUNITY





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Carport, Extra
Clean. (352) 613-4459

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242


HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794

INVERNESS
2/2, modern, $600m
dishwasher, W/D,
screened back porch.
F/L/S.close to Publix,
P.O. 352-634-1141

Inverness
2bd/lba/lcg
$550. mo. first, last &
damage, immediate
occup.(352) 341-2838
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2 &
3/2/2 $825/mo &Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Lake Tsala Gardens
comp. renovated 3/2/1
scn porch, fenced yard,
city water $850
352-726-7212
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fen'd back
yrd. $875, 352-212-4873
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
Terra Vista, Furn. 3BD,
spacious Villa, w/ext.
maint. & club memb.
$1,800. 352-302-7559




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF1441X
REALTY ONE

BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785


DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(i)vahoo.com
and
debthomeson.com


Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified! I


E12 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RelEsa








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealtycom
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan
Million Dollar +
Producer!
Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com


Hoe



MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage florida room
furnished or not
Lots of upgrades
Executor now accepting
offers
502/693-7904



Duval Island
Very nice clean, turn.
starter or retire home.
2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility
room w/ shower. No
flood zone. Reduce to
$46,900 352- 678-7145



AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE



4BR/11/2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RE MWR
REALTY ONE


Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!




For Sale N1t
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Sil great values
out
there for buy-
ers!!
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office

CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245

I Buy Houses
ANY CONDITION
CASH 352-503-3245"


BETMY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments



I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515








SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


I irs o nY


Citrus County]
Homes


S= 111^^^
j[^j_1


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


eeeeeeeeeB


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002





BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
See What $9k Can Buy
8471 County Rd 614A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252




Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100


Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712



"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Home o Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fin Your Dtreain HoWm

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810









Twe


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 E13


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
ProDerties.com
"To view
my properties"







E14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014


FARMERS
Continued from Page E4

Slow to respond and
often defensive, farmers
and others in agribusiness
have for several years let
critics define the public de-
bate and influence con-
sumers. Now, the industry
is trying to push farmers
and businesses to fight
back, connecting with those
consumers through social
media and outreach that
many in agriculture have
traditionally shunned.
"We as farmers now have
another role in addition to
being farmers," Hasheider
says as he takes a break
from harvesting his corn
crop. "It's something you
have to evolve into."
In addition to corn,
Hasheider grows soybeans,
wheat and alfalfa on the
farm nestled in the heart of
Illinois corn country He
cares for 130 dairy cows,
500 beef cattle and 30,000
hogs. And now, he's giving
tours of his farm, something
he says he never would
have done 20 years ago.
"We didn't think anyone
would be interested in what
we were doing," he says.
Like a lot of other farm-
ers, Hasheider was wrong.
Take the issue of geneti-
cally modified foods.
There has been little sci-
entific evidence to prove


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


that foods grown from en-
gineered seeds are less
safe than their conven-
tional counterparts, but
consumer concerns and
fears many perpetuated
through social media and
the Internet-have forced
the issue. A campaign to
require labeling of modi-
fied ingredients on food
packages has steadily
gained attention, and
some retailers have vowed
not to sell them at all.
Makers of the engineered
seeds and the farmers and
retailers who use them
stayed largely silent even
as critics put forth a simple,
persuasive argument: Con-
sumers have a right to know
if they are eating geneti-
cally modified foods.
Modified seeds are now
used to grow almost all of
the nation's corn and soy-
bean crops, most of which
are turned into animal feed.
The Center for Science
in the Public Interest, a
well-known critic of food
companies and artificial
and unhealthy ingredients
in foods, has not opposed
genetically modified foods,
on the basis that there's no
evidence they are harmful.
Still, director Michael
Jacobson says, the issue
has taken on a life of its
own to the general public.
Companies like Mon-
santo Corp. "try to argue
back with facts, but emo-
tions often trump facts,"


Jacobson says. "They are
faced with a situation
where critics have an emo-
tional argument, a fear of
the unknown."
Perhaps no one under-
stands this dynamic better
than Robert Fraley, who
was one of the first scien-
tists to genetically modify
seeds and now is executive
vice president and chief
technology officer of Mon-
santo. He says the com-
pany was late to the public
relations game as critics
worked to vilify it, even
holding marches on city
streets to protest Mon-
santo by name.
Fraley says he has spent
"more than a few nights"
thinking about the com-
pany's image problem. He
says Monsanto always
thought of itself as the first
step in the chain and has tra-
ditionally dealt more with
farmers than consumers.
About a year ago, in an
attempt to dispel some of


the criticism, the company
started addressing critics
directly and answering
questions through social
media and consumer out-
reach. The company is
also reaching out to nutri-
tionists and doctors, peo-
ple whom consumers may
consult. Fraley is person-
ally tweeting and, like
Hasheider, he says it's
something he never would
have thought about doing
just a few years ago.
"We were just absent in
that dialogue, and there-
fore a lot of the urban leg-
ends just got amplified
without any kind of logical
balance or rebuttal," Fra-
ley says of the criticism.
At a recent conference
of meat producers, David
Wescott, director of digital
strategy at APCO World-
wide, told ranchers they
needed to do a better job
connecting with and lis-
tening to mothers, who
often communicate on so-


IAAmg8^^ Wwww.dudleysauction.com
SATURDAY, JANUR! Y18: ON-SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION:
PREVIEW: 9AM AUCTION: 10AM
S1550 E. Wesigate In., Hernando, FL 34442.
Beautiful custom home in Fairview Estates of Cit.. H.II I...ii ", .
hilltop landscaped lot, 2,233 sq. ft. living, separate i h--....
screen enclosed pool, amazing stairways w/ land;, ,,j ,, ,J..
screen gazebo, 7x19 four season sunroom with bar iI
ceiling fans, GAF Sentinel Shutters, Carrier Infinir i h- .,
purfier, Tarkett floating flooring, Conan counters, -, i i ii "
top quality items were used in the construction of this home from upgraded insulation,
paint, & flooring to the window treatments. Has deeded RV parking & hookups-only
one permitted in this high end community. You have qot to see this beautiful home!!!
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
i (1/2 mileS. ofthe Fairgrounds) MAINELY REAL ESTATE
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Upto-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Abd 667. Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


cial media about food and
make many of the house-
hold purchasing decisions.
"It's a heck of a lot more
convincing when a mom
says something than when
a brand does," says
Wescott, who says he has
worked with several major
farm and agriculture com-
panies to help them reach
out to consumers, espe-
cially moms.
Other farm groups, like
Illinois Farm Families, are
inviting moms to tour the
fields. Tim Maiers of the
Illinois Pork Producers As-
sociation says the group
has found that consumers
generally trust farmers, but
they have a lot of questions
about farming methods.
One of the moms, Amy


DEEP PRIVATE GREENBELT!
3/2/2 home with vaulted ceilings
SFresh interior paint and carpeting
SSide entry garage gives extra storage
SAC/heat replaced in 2010
SNew bottom freezer refrigerator
SLarge indoor laundry
8' pocketing sliders out to lanai
SDeep gorgeous greenbelt
#706554 $115.900


Hansmann, says that
though she remains con-
cerned about the amount
of processed foods and
chemicals in the food sup-
ply, her experiences tour-
ing conventional farms
with Illinois Farm Fami-
lies changed her thinking.
She was particularly
amazed by the big farmers'
use of technology and at-
tempts to be sustainable.
Hansmann says that be-
fore the tour, her percep-
tion from the media was
that these big farmers
were "evil capitalists" who
focused only on their busi-
nesses and not on the care
of the land or animals.
"What I found couldn't
be further from the truth,"
she says.


'rAUi.IUUb UU I Um nuIIUMi
3/2/2 home with 2221 sq ft of living
SBrand new Frieze carpeting
Interior has just been repainted
Appliances are brand new
Wood beamed octagonal ceiling
2 pantries and pass thru in kitchen
Large Florida room with tiled wet bar
Cozy corner fireplace in Great Room
#706763 $129.900


BrokerAssociate 352-270-3255 www.prefm.net


505 E. Charleston Ct --
Hernando 4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, HVAC Pine Ridge
2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of Beautiful 4/4/3 with office. Caged in ground salt
storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer water pool with spa 3981 sq. ft. of living area,
kitchen. Pristine condition. Don't miss out stainless steel appliances Wet bar, Tray ceilings,
call today! $249,900 plantation shutters, Intercom, and summer kitchen.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to Come see it today! Priced at $465,000
right on Charleston to home on right. Directions: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. to home on left.


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sql ft "New Construction"
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Medical Office
Call (727) 515-6571


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL REGENCY PARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
Wooded 161 acre tract on Gospel Island. 2BR/2BA condo with Fl rm. Laminate flooring.
$10,000 MLS#707454 |1 2car garage. $79,900 MLS#706979
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours 321302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.cornm


p'


!


I7 i. V ir .l T @ Ii resale" .i-iho -mes j.com II


I


_1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ky. city has solution


to abandoned homes


demolish them


Associated Press

COVINGTON, Ky. A
northern Kentucky city is
demolishing abandoned
homes in an effort to
eliminate blight from its
urban core.
The Kentucky Enquirer
reported that about 300
houses in Covington will
be demolished by the
time the program is
completed.
"The program's intent
is to remove blight from
the city," said Covington
Assistant City Manager
Larisa Sims. "These were
the worst of the worst."
City engineer Mike
Yeager said there's more
than $400,000 earmarked
for demolitions in the
2014 budget
The project is part of a


plan by city officials to
help rid Covington of eye-
sores and unsafe aban-
doned homes over a
five-year period.
Yeager said the homes
being demolished include
those owned by someone
who died and weren't
claimed by relatives. The
city can't find owners for
other homes that are in
such bad shape they can't
be rehabilitated.
"We've gotten a lot of
positive feedback on the
demolitions," Yeager said.
"They've been vacant for so
long, they became almost
like a dumping ground.
People would break in."
One home on East 12th
Street that will be torn
down had trash and bro-
ken plywood inside that
was ankle deep.


***Foreclosure List***
2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706156 REDUCED $57,500 705705 REDUCED $144,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Pamela Shemet 352422-2939

4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $157,900 705665 REDUCED $229,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
705223 REDUCED $77,900 705093 REDUCED $82,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 704264 3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon
REDUCED $94,900 705142 REDUCED $114,900
Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939 John Maisel 352-302-5351

LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in Brentwood Villa 3/2/2
Dunnellon 705087 $119,900 704862 REDUCED $99,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329


CHANGES
Continued from Page Ell

change. That impacts what
we plant and where we
plant trees."
Vegetables
and herbs
George Ball, chairman
and chief executive officer,
W Atlee Burpee & Co.,
Warminster, Pa.:
'All roads lead to the
garden. Almost everybody
is into gardening and veg-
etable gardening is the
focus. Flowers are almost
on the sidelines.
"Gardening feeds spin-
off hobbies like cooking.
People who grow things
tend to become amateur
cooks. If you cook at home,
look at how much money
you save.
"Gardening also impacts
health. If you go to any
clinic and talk to any dieti-
cian, the effects ofvegeta-


bles are obvious. Choosing
a diet high in vegetables
makes you a lot healthier"
"Parents of newborns
are increasingly shying
away from processed foods
and are forcing companies
such as Burpee to re-
search high-yielding, rela-
tively bland-tasting still
retaining all nutritious el-
ements soft-fruited ele-
ments.
"More than just an ac-
cent, herbs will soon oc-
cupy a more prominent
role in American home-
cooked cuisine, with far
more flavorful leaves that
will change recipes and
food for the table. We see
this happening at top-tier
restaurants in major
cities.
"Spurred by less space
and the need to protect
gardens from exploding
populations of deer, every
major home gardening
company is working on de-
veloping a portfolio of veg-
etables for cultivation on


Jackie Davis
W% American Realty & Investments
NNE 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
EAL EST..TE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com
U ~ 1 :V~Y1


* 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths
* Hardwood & tile flooring
* Dining rm, custom built-in
cabinets


CANT VILLA
* Open, bright, kitchen, Ig breakfast area
* Home office
* Gas fueled: water heater, range, dryer,
furnace


PRIVATE, TREED YARD
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths Extended lanai
SOffice/den with built-ins Premium lot w/greenbelt I
$215,000 MLS 7045931


patios and limited areas.
Plants will be smaller but
their yields higher"
Flowers
Anthony Tesselaar, pres-
ident and co-founder, An-
thony Tesselaar Plants,
Silvan, Australia:
"The gardening indus-
try has been looking at
plant size and multi-use
aspects with increasing
urbanization, and also


SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014 E15

such factors as increased
disease resistance to re-
duce the needs for pesti-
cides and other chemicals
in a closed urban
environment.
"Dwarf and clump
plants are being devel-
oped for smaller-space
gardening. There is also
work on establishing more
fastigiated (slender) trees
and shrubs."


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers
about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name,
phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be
prepared to leave a detailed message.


Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
S3/2/2 POOL Seller's Pride
shows in this updated home. Split
floor plan, light & bright! Large
master, lovely new kitchen with all
appliances (Bosch range &
dishwasher), wood cabinets.
Features porcelain tile & hardwood
flooring, double-pane windows all
with plantation shutters, utility room with storage, workbench in garage,
sprinklers, inground pool with child guard, newer A/C. Move in and enjoy this
like-new home. MLS702982 ASKING $154,500
~LOVELY
INVERNESS POOL
HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thru to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool, covered lanai.., all this & more sitting on .73acre.
Room for the whole family here. MLS 705163 ASKING $195,000
R HBI WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport
0. Hern ando Chain of Lakes, offers
partially-fenced yard in a lovely setting
with 2 docks, updated kitchen & baths, tile
flooring, inside laundry. Lower level
24x24 enclosed family room (lanai) with
air unit, sliding windows & screens.
Upper lever has its own screen porch with
beautiful views. New roof in 06. Dock has
hose bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
this waterfront bargain! MLS705088 ASKING $124,900
NEED ROOM TO ROAM AT
A MODEST PRICE?
Here is a well-cared for home that offers
2/2/carport, plus additional large room
w/bath that could be 3rd bedroom,
family room or in-law arrangement.
Large living area, eat-in kitchen, newer water system, large screen porch,
shed, decorator block in extra large under roof carport area. All sitting on
a lovely double lot. MLS 705774 ASKING $84,900
Zechariah 4:6 000H24E








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED
.1,-6 INN h i lIl6 ''' h h .1 h ll. ll-l 1 ,'" 1 F.ll llllll h lli ,
I i, ..... I iii Ii ,.d h ..... 11 I' 6lh 1 6 l .' i~ ii I" '
l~~~h~ I:1 1 -yi~ p, ',1 ,,,Ii, ,, iiI h .ll ii ,1
I,.~~~~ ~ ~ I1 .6.I ,I'ihl ii 6. I'Ih
11 1 ..6, ,' i'1,, Iiii ,i h',ii m i i.1 6 d, m'i,
I',,,,I,, I,,I, ,,,,,,, rj,, HIa" h ,
r ai: -:-4 4: ASKING $114,900
Pit Di,-,352'212 v280
r..-ii h~iln~l ii II I ji2ii ^ )i. om


* aIn -liil .. W lai iL. in" I "'P a a Vill.,

* K. il l. i. .l l .:.l .:hi
* IjI i.. P. l ,:i.:, W .:..:.la l Via-a
Mi_ =/ull/:i ASKING $75,000
Call Chatles Kellf 352 4222387


* Ba ,:iul.hjl :I a ' 1 7I'.i .a II L
* P..l..I', la h.I .J,:i l,:ii.j,...il.I.|

* _- .. i... ,, l.l.. i. '- *'I'"q

MIl'., =/:,:.: $108,900
Jeanne nt W4illaid Pickiel 352-212-3410
ItItIt cilitUscoOniUlsold corn


OLD HOMOSASSA
-.6u.1:11:1 ,| II .ll.lnn.i :...,:,,, .l Ii n

.ni ll nl. : njil 11r .1i I 1.-l Inn ,il l
M1 = ii'.ii:.') ASKING $250,000
Call Jim Moilon 352 422 2173


'. .- I _1 -111 I r i1i1 i HIII I: i l....
*a )-I.... ..i .-.. i .........

. l lj lllll~ q 1 i HI I..I i i i...I i IIII

r ii : = :( ASKING $194,900
Pit Di,- ,3521212 7280
Ia.-ila a~l nl al~ ^/girfl.i~a-jm


IEVHINlItbbU ULP lmllAIb I UUL HUM"
-, ..,ln, III;, 1. 1. II.; ji .jq
;in mn' I.i I y a I i..i I,: I rui, IP.1.h ,j h




Mi = iiii:,:;. ASKING $110,000
Call Nancy' Jenks 352 400 8072


PERFECT GETAWAY

i,,a..n I. a. II',,IlnI ..nl I b -ln ....nrn Il
l,:ill' rin n ..n, ..,i I I, la .,, II'l ,.- I: nnl n a ,ir nannnl,

n....n I'i J1 .I I'n b, .l I I J.d.. 1nd l. ,:i.l11
nJnan.I I~r~.anl'ni rr aIunnn rnl ,innJ hI .I '.1U n.J nnnnn
SELLER HAS JUST REDUCED IT TO S64,900
Call Ruth fiedetck I 352 563 6866


* UI, UBill. P'.:..:.I H n'..
* I A .: :i .,: i i. l I: i.,:. I
* iHh_ h .i.l- hl:. ''I: I III:ji .. -
* l,..hiiil ., ~B i:.il l.ia l N .:..:.Il
* NIW Vvl.i..ill-.
Mi_ =l1:lI. ,. $205,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212-3410
I:'I',I,. Cil usCounil'Sold. corn


I'" $139.,800. l..ii: .
Pi Di,352... 12 1280
ll, ?, ll a I all a g I ll l I, l aI ,, jI










RIVER LAKES MANOR BEAUTY!
,:inn. i l.n. :il Innn. h n ,il,a-, an a.j l, .ain n l r..n .nnnnr nnlni

. l l nn- 1n l Ihnn r I ,,, n I. .- l, a 1 -0

MI '.- iii:.4, ASKING $189,000
Call iVancl Jenks 352 400 8072


By' ",E, iBa J, ..ni '-.Iiih P I,,,, H,,,,,
POOL! a Ia,..iflaJ.a I 'a, ha.,a- ll1 nHla.ii,,,, P..,I
e ..,iln ll :'. b -j.n n ....... : ih I. h..'.. l .,i .....J V I. ... rji. |,,l l.,,A -.,i -.P n Tl -.*.-
.I ,ill h jm. j [:.v.. li... .....'.. ..f'. ,in ( h H.II. H m b.h.l.b .nI
a..I1 .a.in' I i .. ,ii.a.a l_...h.J nal-.al i. In.a$ . Mi'.-. /Ii.':I1:. $232,747
I-...l ,ann I f: ,,unlnii llJb $250,000 Jeanneot Il ,illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
Call Ouade Feeset 352-302 7699 zizi CitomsConiil Sold corn


mi



GREAT FAMILY AREA
a.. n....., .l all, n ll, .a i l.a.al
raa-lu al.. ha.l.l,a a-. I,-al 11 I i l... l.. al a-a. l a:.. l

l.a [.:.I I a ll .a I n66a ln, I lil i aIl -
n:nln $ .a la n j l n I nn; 1 I ll l '
Ml_ = 11iuii:1 ASKING $83,900
Call Mailiha Snjdei 476-8727 to see


_,,l. ,:ldila.ll.al- ; .I, I a la: I,,,I a,l ,l,,I -
1.:. h161,11ln _3IIW: ; nfiy i n I.). f jn~niil l hli,:il.ii-li
Ml 3 = 1111'. $139,000
Call Isaac Baylon lot details.
3526972493


l. ih.a .l ahalnn] II.-.l ha- lln. hI a.l nir-il
vvil l ll. n :in 3laln n l [..lh i piw

I In- li ,In: lin l i .i.I l,i .

$75,000 EACH
Call Jim Motion 352 422 2173


WHAI A UKHAl ULAL... U.l,UUU
_" 1.n, 1l:i 1, l.,.n:...i anna lua a in ,-

I 1,: ,l,: i Inl,: l h I :,ii ,,,,na,- a l .- 1,11 h
IVI,.i-i arl i unnl. i~ ai:ll .l:il
Mi = /uiitli GREAT BUY AT S38,000
Call Dots Minei lot apple. 422-4627


Wll M .n ,i l'_riii. l: n,:i.:l ,i inyl,: I..:..,
.i: ,:11 h:$.l hillflllill~ i I~ll ll~ l

MiL '='/h-/,1 ONLY $130,000
Call laWanda Wall 352-212 1989


* On Ihe Oaks Goll Couise
* ?.6 _' b i.....I |" 1 ..inn
* I l.i.. a ..I. l I nI I li
* '. 1. .1..I h. I h~.aI.Ib .u .

MI'., = ."ii.': $194,600
Jeanne ot I'l'llaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
ivivziz CiltusCounli Sold corn


BEAUTIFUL HOME ON POND
, I..:.' .. ll urn 111p 1 ipplilhi n i j-,
air,.I : ..:nih .l .ini r ,,ia,,l aural, Inla- I,,,,
an nal,,:in i ii Ia-nlnl~ I I~L ai a app1.n aura- ain al,:nn
. ai l. hv b l hil Im-u ..lAl '1i.ia l .I_ ,l ,11
.:.1 I_. p -i l.l.:l rlln. _'_'/'-. Ilrnli ri i ,:an.',
M135 =1:ll' ::.h $215,000
Call Sielan Sinai 352 212 0211


TRULY MOVE-IN READY HOME
alIa-a.l 1,,j ,,, l :,,,,I ,- l,,alih.:..n .:., h.-


.j.-. ..h. . H, 1. I .1 1..1 1i .h ,, ... ,1,,
rJ.:. Hlii -adai "" 'al, ll .i: ~ a.,11lh,,, ,Ila....
rii: lf--n:: ASKING $119.800
Pit D>l, ,352 212 7280
I'aai ai-lat, .,iii .2Iotdd.i ,-ore


E16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 2014