Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Unknown
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03348

Full Text




i 1 .I I- '
TODAY
& next
morning


HIGH
67
LOW
59


CITRUS


COUNTY 0 N T Y


Rain likely,
cloudy with
northeast winds.
PAGE A4


"Checkany-r
where in the
wodd first, but
CHECK
WITH CHAD


35LAT.62.460


352.628.4.600


Inverness shooting puts two in hospital


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Two
men are in stable condi-
tion after an apparent rob-
bery and confrontational
shooting, according to the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.


According to Lindsay
Blair, a spokeswoman for
the sheriff's office, dis-
patch was notified of an at-
tempted robbery on East
Quail Lane in Inverness at
4:18 p.m. Monday
The news release said
the alleged victim was
given a ride to a doctor's


appointment earlier in the
day in Dade City by alleged
suspect Garry Krause, who
has not been arrested due
to injuries. The victim re-
ceived prescription med-
ications from her doctor
After the two returned to
Krause's residence on East
Quail Court, Krause de-


manded money and/or
pills from the victim be-
cause she apparently owed
him money and he said he
had paid for the pills.
The release said the ar-
gument became physical
and the victim and her son
left Krause's residence on
foot


Later, Krause, accompa-
nied by two other individ-
uals, found the victim
walking on East Quail
Lane. The two individuals
got out of Krause's car and
approached the victim.
They grabbed her purse
and attempted to snatch it
from her While holding


onto the purse, they en-
tered the vehicle and
Krause sped off.
According to the report,
the victim fell and scraped
her leg, and was report-
edly intoxicated and not
making sense. Her purse


A soldier




comes




home


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A grieving Ashley Billings, second from left, is consoled by her sister-in-law Nancy Weaver on Tuesday morning at the Ocala International Airport following the ar-
rival of the body of Billings' husband, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, who was killed when the Black Hawk helicopter he was flying crashed in
Afghanistan two weeks ago. Mrs. Weaver's husband, Aaron Weaver, was killed 10 years ago in Iraq when the helicopter he was in was shot down by rockets.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

he flag-draped casket of U.S. Army Chief Warrant
Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, came home to rest
Tuesday as his wife, Ashley a Citrus County
native wept inconsolably. Billings, who was killed
Dec. 17 in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan, was
accorded a law enforcement escort to Citrus County
from Ocala International Airport, where the remains
arrived.


The fingernails of Ashley Billings are painted bright red Tuesday. "He
always wanted me to wear red fingernail polish," Billings said of her
husband. "It was his favorite."


Ashley Billings came pre-
pared to welcome home the
remains of her late husband
- even painting her nails
the glossy bright red he
loved.
Then, she added a little
twist by adorning some of
the nails with miniature
stars and stripes.
"Let me fix my ring if you
are going to take a picture,"
she quipped to a photogra-
pher prior to the arrival.
"He always wanted me to
wear red fingernail polish.
It was his favorite."
As the casket sat on the
tarmac Tuesday, Ashley
hugged it and cried incon-
solably for several minutes.


Around her were mem-
bers of her family, a mili-
tary honor guard, members
of the Patriot Guard Riders,
the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Color Guard and
members of the Ocala Po-
lice Department, Florida
Highway Patrol and Marion
County Sheriff's Office.
Billings' casket was flown
in from Dover Air Force
Base in Delaware, and the
arrival was followed by a
brief ceremony
On the tarmac, Ashley fell
to her knees weeping while
being consoled by family
members. Her sister-in-law,
Nancy Weaver, walked over
and hugged her and walked


her to the hearse.
Nancy is the widow of
Ashley's brother, Aaron
Weaver, who died Jan. 8,
2004, near Fallujah, Iraq,
when a Black Hawk mede-
vac helicopter he was rid-
ing in was shot down by
rocket fire.
Billings, who is from
Heavener, Okla., was one of
the six soldiers killed
Dec. 17 in a helicopter
crash in Afghanistan.
Billings and four of the
others who died that day
were assigned to the 3rd As-
sault Helicopter Battalion,
1st Aviation Regiment, 1st
See Page A2


6 1814157U!800125 I5


Classifieds ........ C8
Comics .......... C7
Crossword ........ C6


Community .......C5
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers .
Lottery Payouts .
Movies ..........


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C6


Page A9


Ashley
Billings,
right, is
hugged
Tuesday
morning by
her sister
Paige
Weaver at
the Ocala
International
Airport prior
to the arrival
of Billings'
husband's
body.





A2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


Citrus

Memorial

physician

killed in

crash
Chronicle
A Citrus Memorial
hospital physician died
Monday when the vehi-
cle he was driving
slammed into a tractor-
trailer in Leesburg.
Dr Boris Todorovic, 41,
of Mount Dora, was driv-
ing a 2007 Hummer south-
bound on U.S. 441 at 6:38
p.m. when the tractor-
trailer pulled out of a
parking lot into the path of
oncoming traffic.
The Hummer collided
with the tractor-trailer in
the left lane.
Dr Todorovic practiced
at Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal and Leesburg Re-
gional Medical Center


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME
Continued from Page Al

Combat Aviation Brigade,
1st Infantry Division, Fort
Riley, Kan. The cause of
the crash is still under in-
vestigation.
Before her husband's re-
mains arrived, a somber
Ashley shared that the
love and support of her
family and the community
is what is sustaining her
during these difficult
times.
She said her husband
was on his fifth deploy-
ment in combat, flying hel-
icopters for the Army
"He was an amazing
man. He loved what he
did," Ashley said.
John Gariano was one of
the Patriot Riders who at-
tended Billings' homecom-
ing. Patriot Riders is an
organization dedicated to
attending funerals of
members of the armed
forces and first respon-
ders. Some members also
ride motorcycles.
"We are here to always
honor and pay our re-
spects," Gariano, a Viet-


7i


MAnTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Honor Guard members make their way Tuesday to the casket holding the body of Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L.
Billings as they prepare to place it into a waiting hearse. A funeral service will be held Saturday morning in Inver-
ness, and later that day, Billings' body will be interred at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell.


nam War veteran, said of
his organization. "(Randy)
made the supreme sacri-
fice for our freedom."
Billings' body was es-
corted to the Chas E.
Davis Funeral Home in


Inverness by Citrus
County Sheriff's Office of-
ficials, where it will re-
main until Saturday A
funeral service is slated


for 11 a.m. Saturday at the
Cornerstone Baptist
Church and Billings' body
will be escorted to Florida
National Cemetery in


Bushnell for interment.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. corn.


j hj'j!ji1jp'g Jp YAJ i:iJ A
BUY YUJL;f AD -YT V] IC'o
FDR /WU;!i'JdHE


0R J EVERY L .
221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-2521
14003 Lakeshore Blvd., Hudson, FL 727-868-9442
Toll Free 800-282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com


JOE and PEGGY IEUlNW0
352-302-6436 Wpp
1/4 Mile East Of Publix On Hwi '. 44
6658 \. Gulf To Lake Hwy.. Crystal River


4000 S. FL


SUNDAY, IJAN


THURSDAY, i
PREVIEW: 12PM'
goodies until wi
try to sell the
Tuesday...Check
chock full of ev
or riding lawn
houses a month
fresh items ever
SATURDAY, Ji
PREVIEW: 9AM
Ln., Hernando, I
Fairview Estate
landscaped lot,
freeform screen
w/ landscaping,
season sunroor
Shutters, Carrie
Corian counters
construction of
the window tree
end community.
SATURDAY, JA





a
THURSDAY, J1
PREVIEW: 12PM A
THURSDAY, JJ
PREVIEW: 12PM Al
Personal Property sold togethe
Dudley Lic RE BrokerI381384

BE St


Dudley's Auction & Maine-lv Real Estate

I DUDLEY'S



AUCTION
ORIDA AVE., (U.S. 41 S) INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450


UARY 5: ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLE AUCTION:
I PREVIEW: 10AM AUCTION: IPM.
An.fl.i.- & Collectible Auction Live & Online (500+ Lot L
CiIlouq). Approx. 500 Cataloged lots of finery including
Gold & Silver Jewelry, Coins, Art, China, Antique
Fuirnitire and Estate Carpets. Participate live from
horn-ie on 1st 100 lots. Outstanding Berkey & Gay
Bedroom & Desk Set, Gold & Bimetal Coins.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9:
ESTATE AND DESIGNER FURNITURE AUCTION:
PREVIEW: 12PM AUCTION BEGINS OUTSIDE @ 3PM Then inside
for a 2nd Adventure approx. 6pm. This auction will he from the
contents of a 7000 sq. ft. home of quality contents.
From Designer furniture to decorative arts and accent
pieces. This sale will offer some of the best High End decorative furniture
offered for sale at auction. Take the opportunity to view our website starting
Tuesday Jan. 7th to view some of the treasures available at this sale.
ANUARY 16: ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION:
'AUCTION BEGINS OUTSIDE @ 3PM and we work our way through the rows of
e end up inside at approximately 6pm. If we are selling estate vehicles, we
em before dark (usually around 5:30-6pm). Pics added Monday and
for more info by Tuesday evening, the week of the auction. This auction is
erything from tools to household, decorative to collectibles, and even a car
mower here and there. We empty out and pickup the estates from 10+
i. This along with our regular consignors and new consignors that bring in
y week make for 5+ hours of a GREAT TIME...Rain or Shine!
JANUARY 18: ON-SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTION:
AUCTION: O10AM 1550 E. Westgates
FL 34442. Beautiful custom hornr ',n
es of Citrus Hills. 1 acrt hiiiop
2,233 sq. ft. living, separate ci,:iorn
enclosed pool, amazing -dIJrovdv:
octagon screen gazebo, 7,19 lowr
n with bar area, full alarm, 8 ceiling fans, GAF Sentinel
3r Infinity heat pump w/purifier, Tarkett floating flooring, -
3, central vac. Only top quality items were used in the
this home from upgraded insulation, paint, & flooring to
itments. Has deeded RV parking & hookups-only one permitted in this high
You have not to see this beautiful home!!!
INUARY 18: TARGET AUCTION COLLECTIBLE DOLLS:
PREVIEW: 10AM AUCTION: 11AM We have the wife's estate of
350 + Porcelain Dolls, unique doll furniture & accessjrit:.
This estate will be the foundation for this doll adoption Evtn. [
Great auction with large quantity & varied variety of doll:.
Please check our web site for upcoming pictures as we ge I
closer to the auction. Consignments being considered tor
our Spring Doll Auction, call if you have any questions. Mark
your calendar & join us for a fun filled way to spend your
Sday. Great mother/daughter event!!!
JANUARY 23: ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION:
AUCTION BEGINS OUTSIDE @ 3PM
INUARY 30: WALK ABOUT ADVENTURE AUCTION:
ACTION BEGINS OUTSIDE @ 3PM A
er w/Dudley's Auction AB1667 12% Buyers Premium w/2% discount cash or check The Real Estate by Main ly Real Estate-Christine
AU#4239 For real estate inquires contact Chs 352344 588, Bob Bnttan 813317 007 Dimensions are approximate U
Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588
URE TO WATCH THE WESTEFORU.TO.DATEPHOTOS www.dudleysauction.com


from


L*c2


AIR CONDITIONING
N & HEATING


As we start the new year, we want to thank our
customers for their continuing business. We know then
are many choices and we are grateful that you
have chosen us to serve your air conditioning
and heating needs. We will always treat you like family
and give you the best service in town.


Iii asQ


LOCAL







S Page A3- WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1,2014



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


2014: A LOOK AHEAD


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Sylvia Jones from The Villages admires one of the metal sculptures Nov. 2 from the Larry Whidden Originals booth
at the 42nd annual Festival of the Arts at Courthouse Square in Inverness. There are more than 40 established
annual events and festivals in Inverness.



Building on successes


Invernesspreparingfor another busy year of events


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Last week
Sharon Skeele-Hogan, city of In-
verness special events director,
was already thinking about De-
cember 2014 and the projected
grand opening of the Valerie
Theatre.
Although the grand opening
date is still "on the 'ish" of De-
cember, as she called it, she still
has to be ready with events.
"At this point I have to build se-
ries events, so there will be a clas-
sical music series, jazz, rock,
regular monthly kids' movies on
Saturday mornings I have a
plethora of ideas," she said. "You
have to do multiple shows ... to be
able to pay for the entertainment."
Filling the Valerie Theatre cal-
endar keeping in mind that the
remodeling has yet to begin is
just one of the balls she has to
keep in the air. The other balls are
the more than 40 established
events and festivals.
"The idea is to tie in the major
festivals with events going on at
the Valerie Theatre," she said.
"I've been here a year and under-
stand the events and can build on
them, add micro-events to the
major festivals."


For example, the inaugural In-
verness Grand Prix was a one-day
event. In 2013, Skeele-Hogan
added a Friday night block party
and concert.
"In 2014, I'm not ready to go
three days yet, but that's my goal,"
she said. "The goal is to take it
from a local event to a regional to
a state event. It's basically eco-
nomic development and tourism."
This year's St. Patrick's Day Pa-
rade will be bigger with an ex-
panded parade route and a Celtic
rock concert on the courthouse
square. The next year might in-
clude a Leprechaun pub crawl.
"The idea is to build on our suc-
cesses," she said. "You can't do the
same thing every year."
In a time when governments are
tightening their belts and trim-
ming their budgets, Inverness is
not trimming their events. In fact,
the roster is expanding, thanks to
city event partners.
"That's been critical," Skeele-
Hogan said. "We have nine awe-
some event partners, so the events
are funded through them Nick
Nicholas Ford, Insight Credit
Union, Waste Management, Duke
Energy, Tobacco Free Florida, to
name a few"
She said another valuable re-
source comes from Citrus High


School students, staff and
administration.
"Not just for their community
service hours, but for the impact
they have," she said. "I use their
marching bands, drum and bugle
corps, BREEZ. This is their city,
and they're awesome.
Also, I get great ideas for events
from other people, people who
are pro-Inverness and who love
the fact that we have all kinds of
venues here," she said.
City Manager Frank DiGiovanni
said that high-quality events that
draw people from around the
area, around the state and from
out of state brand a city
"We are connected to fun, and
when people enjoy themselves
they tell others," he said. "We
don't 'do' events. We plan, organ-
ize and produce a culture of high-
quality activities that people
associate with Inverness. We've
found ... that to be the most effec-
tive means to market, boost busi-
ness, connect people with
business and the city itself, pro-
vide for residents, and spark new
investment. Quality draws
attention."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicle
online, corn.


Both the city of Inverness and Crystal
River have hired events directors.
Why events? As Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni said, the emphasis is
marketing, focus and name association.
"Look at it this way," he said. "We can
spend money to advertise and sell who we
are through TV ads, the newspaper,
billboards, emails and the Web, or we can
plan a high-quality event program that
pulls people to the city, gets them talking,
having fun, telling their friends in a man-
ner that translates to: "Visit Inverness." We
are a place that people discover, and return
to again and again and again."
The same goes for Crystal River.
As the cities look forward to their 2014
slate of events, here's what's on tap for the
coming year and why




Events headline


to-do list in


Crystal River


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER City
leaders have maintained
for a while that a corollary
to the street facelifts in the
downtown core of the past
couple of years is to bur-
nish and expand family-
friendly events that can
draw more people to the
area.
In 2013, the city went to
work to make that happen
by creating a position and
hiring a part-time special
events coordinator, Leslie
Bollin.
Since Bollin's arrival this
past fall, events such as the
city's annual Christmas
Tree Lighting has added a
little oomph and sparkle
causing the crowds to in-
crease several fold.
"We were lucky if we had
30 people at that event be-
fore, but this year we had at
least a minimum of 300. We
had a lot of calls and resi-
dents were really happy
about that event," said City
Manager Andy Houston.
"We do not necessarily
want to have more events; I
think the thinking is how to
make the ones we already
have get more attention
and maybe make them big-
ger," Houston added.
He said with the comple-
tion of the band shell in
King's Bay Park imminent,
either the annual Manatee
Festival, which is sched-
uled for Jan. 18-19, or some
other event will serve as its


inaugural event
Houston said he and
Bollin are fleshing out the
details of the city's events'
calendar for 2014, but the
goal is "an event every
other month and maybe a
musical event around
Fourth of July to go along
with the fireworks."
Houston said Bollin's
knowledge of social media
- Facebook, Twitter, on-
line presence, etc. has
been invaluable in putting
the city on the destinations
map.
"I imagine that is only
going to get stronger We
just want to be in the game
and create some excite-
ment about our downtown
area," he said.
Besides events, things
the city plans to do in 2014
include:
Work on an ordinance
within the next 60 days
dealing with the prohibition
of alcohol use in the canal
area at the water entrance
of Three Sisters Springs.
Finish work on the
sewer project in the Fort Is-
land Trail area.
Begin work on the re-
claimed water line that is
expected to pipe water to
the Duke Energy complex
from the spray field.
To sign in to follow the
city of Crystal River on
Facebook, go to www.face
bookcom/cityofcrystalriver;
and, on Twitter- @crystal
river FL. For information,
call 352-436-1806 or go to
www.crystaMriverfl.org.


A busy 2014 in store for Inverness


A busy 2014 in store for Inverness


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS -As front and center as events are to
the city of Inverness, they are not the only thing on the
city's 2014 agenda.
What will 2014 look like? Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni answered that question in his an-
nual State of the City address at the most recent city
council meeting.
Some of the highlights for the coming year include:
Begin to implement a fully automatic utility meter
reading system.
Complete boardwalk lighting project at Cooter
Pond linear park.
Relocate the Citrus County Sheriff's Office Com-
munity Resources office from the Inverness Govern-
ment Center (IGC) to Whispering Pines Park and the
City Events Operations Department from upstairs in


the government center to the first floor, also staff the
IGC reception area.
Find a solution to the "half-in, half-out" lot parcels
situation.
Phase II of the Wayfind sign project.
Complete the boat/kayak launch project on Big
Lake Henderson at Wallace Brooks Park.
Finalize the city's position regarding fire services.
Revisit the "controlling" sidewalk and alcohol set-
back ordinances.
Begin and complete construction of the Valerie
Theatre.
According to DiGiovanni, the city is going forward
with its theater plans regardless of whether or not it
receives grant funding.
"We've budgeted for it," he said. "We're moving for-
ward it's happening."
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at 352-
564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


STI'PHEMN LASKU/tor the Chronicle
The Manatee Festival in Crystal River attracts thousands
of visitors to the community each year. In similar fashion,
the city is looking to have several regular events and
focus on building on their notoriety.


State BRIEFS


Search continues for
missing boaters
TARPON SPRINGS -A search for two
missing boaters continues on Lake Tarpon.
The men didn't return home from a Saturday
afternoon fishing trip on the lake and family
members alerted the Pinellas County Sheriff's
Office. A search began Sunday afternoon and
continued Monday and Tuesday.
Deputies said 43-year-old Willie Ragins and
64-year-old Willie Hightower left in a boat on
Saturday afternoon. Ragins' family members
heard from him Saturday night when he told
them during a phone call he'd be home shortly.
Authorities found two coolers, a chair and a


life jacket in the water. But there hasn't been a
sign of the boat.
Deputies said citizens are also assisting in
the search. They ask anyone who finds any-
thing that may be connected to the case to
contact authorities.
Man charged with
impersonating officer
TAMPA-ATampa Bay area man is facing
charges after authorities said he used red and
blue emergency lights to stop a Tampa police
officer.
Police said 24-year-old Jonathan Charles
Stevens identified himself as a Homeland Se-
curity officer Sunday night and told the officer


that he wanted to report a reckless driver.
Police said Stevens was carrying a gun and
had a badge around his neck, but his white
Chevy Tahoe was not registered to any gov-
ernment agency. After further questioning by
the officer, Stevens reportedly admitted that he
was actually a member of law enforcement.
Stevens was arrested and charged with im-
personating a police officer, unlawful use of a
blue light and carrying a concealed firearm. He
was later released on $17,500 bail.
Bear bites woman in face
ORLANDO -A Florida woman did every-
thing she should do when confronted by a
bear but the animal still attacked her, biting


her face.
Wildlife officials released a report Tuesday
about the confrontation earlier this month be-
tween the bear and Susan Chalfant. The re-
port said the bear cut off Chalfant's escape
route, knocked her down and also swiped at
one of the two dogs she was walking.
The report said Chalfant did everything hu-
mans are advised to do when confronting a
bear. She stood her ground and raised her
arms to look bigger before backing up.
Once attacked, she fought back, trying to hit
and gouge the bear's eyes.
The responsible bear was later captured
with two cubs.
-From wire reports


I .






A4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday This year will offer numer-
ous opportunities, but discerning which
ones are right for you will be a chal-
lenge. Don't spread yourself too thin.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Seek
closure by communicating with those
who have upset you. You can make
positive changes if you clear the air.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Awk-
wardness will ensue if you allow others
to blame you. Begin this year by set-
ting the record straight. Be strong and
take a stance that reflects your own
values.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't
allow others to leave you holding the
bag. Avoid indulgent forms of entertain-
ment. Instead, relax and prepare for
the year to come. Put yourself first.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Get the
year off to a good start. Carefully plan
how to get ahead. Make use of your
talents.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Reflect
on your past, and make it your mission
to avoid repeating mistakes. Treat
other people as you wish to be treated.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Things
will go smoothly today Love is on the
rise, and you will have plenty of
choices. If you are already in a rela-
tionship, plan a romantic evening.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't be
afraid to lead. You will be admired for
your skills if you get involved in family
projects. Someone may express jeal-
ousy toward you. Ignore any negativity.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Socialize
with friends and relatives. Be candid
with your opinions, but prepare to be
accountable. If you can let go of the
past, you will have an easier time.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Deal with
any issues that have been hanging
over you. Reflect on past experiences
to avoid getting caught in a vicious
cycle.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't be
tempted by a dubious scheme. Try to
start the year on the right foot. Hold out
for better opportunities.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Overindulgence is likely to cause you
problems today Don't lend money to
friends or take on responsibilities that
aren't yours.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Begin planning for the new year. Put
your ideas on paper so that you're
ready for the future to arrive. Don't
allow personal setbacks to interfere
with your goals.


ENTERTAINMENT


'Murder, She Wrote'
star honored
LONDON Honor, She Got.
Hollywood star Angela Lans-
bury, best known as the clue-
collecting super-sleuth in the
television series "Murder, She
Wrote," has been made a Dame
of the British Empire.
The 88-year-old actress was
one of more than 1,000 people
who were recognized by Queen
Elizabeth II in the New Year's
Honors List. For the first time
since the Order of the British
Empire was founded in 1917,
most of them were women.
Actress Penelope Keith,
known to Brits as the snobbish
Margot Leadbetter in the 1970s
sitcom "The Good Life,"was also
made a dame.
Dr. Marcus Setchell, the
queen's gynecologist, who over-
saw the safe delivery of her
great-grandson Prince George,
was made a knight.
The twice-yearly royal honors
reward hundreds of people for
services to their community or
national life.

Former 'Sopranos'
actor gets parole
NEW YORK -A former "So-
pranos" actor convicted of at-
tempted burglary for his role in
the killing of an off-duty New
York City police officer has been
released on parole.
State corrections officials say
Lillo Brancato Jr. was freed
from prison at 9 a.m. Tuesday.
Ajury found Brancato guilty
on the attempted burglary
charge in 2008 but acquitted him
of murder in the death of Officer
Daniel Enchautegui. He was
sentenced to 10 years. His co-
defendant was convicted of mur-
der and sentenced to life in
prison without parole.
Brancato made his debut in


Associated Press
John McVie and Stevie Nicks perform Monday as Fleetwood
Mac takes the stage at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in
Las Vegas.


1993 in "A Bronx Tale" opposite
Robert De Niro. He played a
doomed aspiring mobster in
HBO's "The Sopranos."

Netflix tests
new price tiers
Netflix is testing new price
plans for streaming video as it
tries to lure more viewers.
Among the plans being tested
are a $6.99-a-month plan that al-
lows only one video stream to be
watched at once, and a
$9.99-a-month plan that allows
three streams at one time,
whether on a TV, tablet or
computer.
A Netflix spokesman says not
everyone will see the test prices
and they may never roll out to all
customers.
Netflix's standard $7.99-a-
month plan allows users to
watch video on up to 2 screens
at once, including TVs and mo-
bile devices. An $11.99-a-month
service allows up to four shows
at once. Netflix announced that
plan in April.


The Los Gatos, Calif.-based
company still offers a
DVD-by-mail subscription plan
starting at $7.99 a month,
though it is trying to move away
from the business in favor of de-
livering video over the Internet.
Netflix subscribers have
shown they can be fickle about
price changes. The company's
stock plummeted by more than
80 percent from highs reached
in 2011 after the company im-
posed pricing changes that trig-
gered a customer backlash.
Netflix's stock has since made
up all those declines and set a
new all-time high earlier this
month. On Tuesday, its shares
fell $1.89 to $365.10 in morning
trading.
Introducing original content,
such as the shows "House of
Cards" and "Orange is the New
Black," helped Netflix gain new
customers this year. Netflix
added 1.3 million U.S. sub-
scribers in the third quarter
and ended September with
31.1 million.
From wire reports


CIOus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Jan. 1, the
first day of 2014. There are 364
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Jan. 1,1863, PresidentAbra-
ham Lincoln signed and issued the
Emancipation Proclamation, declar-
ing that slaves in rebel states shall
be "forever free."
On this date:
In 1660, Englishman Samuel
Pepys wrote the first entry of his fa-
mous diary.
In 1939, the technology company
Hewlett-Packard was founded by
Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard in a
garage in Palo Alto, Calif.
In 1953, country singer Hank
Williams Sr., 29, was discovered
dead in the back seat of his car dur-
ing a stop in Oak Hill, W.Va., while
he was being driven to a concert
date in Canton, Ohio.
In 1984, the breakup of AT&T
took place as the telecommunica-
tions giant was divested of its 22
Bell System companies under
terms of an antitrust agreement.
Ten years ago: The University of
Southern California defeated the
University of Michigan, 28-14, in the
Rose Bowl.
Five years ago: An Israeli war-
plane dropped a 2,000-pound
bomb on the home of one of
Hamas' top five decision-makers,
instantly killing him and 18 others.
One year ago: In Maryland,
same-sex marriage became legal in
the first state south of the Mason-
Dixon Line.
Today's Birthdays: Documen-
tary maker Frederick Wiseman is
84. Rock singer-musician Country
Joe McDonald is 72. Rapper
Grandmaster Flash is 56. Actress
Dedee Pfeiffer is 50. Actor Morris
Chestnut is 45. Actor Verne Troyer
is 45. Actress Eden Riegel is 33.
Thought for Today: "The object
of a New Year is not that we should
have a new year. It is that we
should have a new soul and a new
nose; new feet, a new backbone,
new ears, and new eyes." G.K.
Chesterton, English poet-essayist
(1874-1936).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HNIgL PR AlR0 NR HIILO PR city
67/50 0.0 f7/50 O 1.0r5/59 0.001 IDayto


ona Bch. 70


Fort Lauderdale 80
Fort Myers 81
Gainesville 64
Homestead 81
Jacksonville 63
Key West 81
Lakeland 72
Melbourne 77


H L F'cast


Miami
Ocala
Ordando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


NA/NA NA NA/NA NA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK day
r W'^ TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
:800 High: 67 Low: 59
Rain likely Cloudy Northeast wind 10 mph
r Chance of precipitation 65 percent
r .T^' THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
. IjI il High:72' Low;43
iB Storms developing Cloudy Southwest wind
^^^feK' ,g'S 10-15 mph
1' FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 60" Low- 36
Partly cloudy Northeast wind 10 mph


Today: Northeast winds 10 to 15
knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop. Tonight:
East winds around 10 knots then.
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop.


Gulf water
temperature


6 5Tken at lp
TaMie at Aripska


LAKE LEVELS
Location TUE MON Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.54 28.56 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.40 38.41 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.47 39.49 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.13 40.14 42.20
L.vels reported In feet above sea level. Flood stage (or lakes are based on 2,33-year flood.
the mean-annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In
any one year. This data Is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management Oistri1ct
and Is subject to revIslion. In no event will the District or me United States Geological Survey
be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. It you have any questions you
should contact the Hydrological Data Secion at (352) 796-7211.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Tuesday 68/60
Record 83/26
Normal 70/52
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean 4
PRECIPITATION*
Tuesday
Total for the month NA
Total for the year NA
Normal for the year NA
'As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 2
0-2minimal,3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DEW POINT
Tuesday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Tuesday at 3 p.m. %
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Maple, Oak
Today's count: 6.6/12
Thursday's count: 7.2
Friday's count: 9.9
AIR QUALITY
Tuesday observed: 28
Pollutant: Particulate matter


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
01/01 WEDNESDAY 05:17 22:49 16:14 10:15
01/02 THURSDAY 06:17 23:51 17:22 11:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TOMIGH.T .................5:43 p.m
WNS T ........S.N.ISE TOMRROW -7:22 a.m.
111 MRIII1ilISE TOBAY7................ 7:16 a.m.
Jan 7 Jan15 Jan 24 Jan 30 MOMSITET AY ...................... 6:20D p.m.
BURN CONDITlIONS
Today's Frme Dange Rating is. Moderate. There Is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
inlirmatn on drorugni ,ond,bons please vsl the Ovison ol ForesrrV Wei rlis'
,hrtp" tane II ooi ccmfirleiw'ea',- 1Ddi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Smunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or rmicr irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus County Ulilties' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal
River @ 352-795-4216 exd. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay **At Mason's Creek
WEDNESDAY
City High Low
Chassaliowitzka* 6:28 a.m. 0.8 ft. 7:03 p.m. 0.2ft. 2:31 p.m. 0.0ft.
Crystal River'* 4:27 a.m. 2.7 ft. 5:32 p.m. 1.8ft. 11:46 a.m.-0.3 ft. 11:31 p.O.6 ft.
Withlaooochee* 1:21 a.m 36 ft, 2:51 p.m. 3.1ft 9:12 am. -1.2 ft 9:02p.mo.ft.
Homosassa" 4:59 a.m, 1.6 ft, 6:41 p.m. 0.7ft. 2:06 p.m. -0.2 ft-


WEDNESDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington. VT
Charleston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Col rumbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansvlle, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
HouLston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
UtLitle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


TUE WED TUE WED
H L Pep. H LFcst Ckty H L Pep. H L FCast
21 10 .01 25 11 fl NewOrleans 50 44 62 54 sh
45 25 53 27 pc New YorkCity 30 21 33 29 cd
39 30 52 33 pc Norfolk 50 37 50 41 pc
44 37 53 42 cd OklahomaCity 55 21 52 21 pc
39 25 39 30 pc Omaha 32 9 16 -1 sn
39 36 63 38 pc Palm Springs 69 44 76 51 pc
42 28 41 31 pc Philadelphia 37 26 38 30 cd
40 37 32 20 sn Phoenix 66 43 72 45 s
44 36 55 39 pc Pittsburgh 25 21 33 24 fl
29 24 37 25 f Portland, ME 10 1 20 5 pc
25 15 28 18 pc Portland, OR 43 37 01 44 38 f
21 17 .10 19 9 fl Providence, RI 27 16 30 19 cd
14 3 11 -7 pc Raleigh 50 37 54 41 pc
57 51 61 50 od RapidClty 33 16 26 9 sn
35 28 48 34 pc Reno 45 28 50 24 pc
50 37 56 38 pc Rochester, NY 24 17 19 9 fl
12 1 22 17 sn Sacramento 55 37 64 36 f
34 23 42 29 pc Salt Lake City 34 21 32 17 pc
23 18 .03 24 20 sn SanAntonio 42 37 63 39 pc
41 19 39 13 sn San Diego 66 48 67 52 pc
28 23 38 27 pc San Francisco 51 41 57 50 pc
15 1 20 5 pc Savannah 57 51 61 50 r
52 26 62 30 pc Seattle 46 44 46 40 pc
45 30 58 29 sn Spokane 32 28 36 28 f
15 5 13 -1 sn St. Louis 41 25 43 17 pc
21 15 .05 21 13 sn St Ste. Mane 12 -2 .01 1 -10 ff
53 26 60 32 pc Syracuse 25 12 02 20 9 il
37 21 45 27 pc Topeka 55 17 24 11 sn
36 24 35 28 cd Washington 46 33 44 33 pc
27 12 27 16 cd YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
48 41 62 48 r HIGH 79, Fort Lauderdale, Ra-
30 19 38 22 pc LOW .38. CrmneLake, Minn.
5539 6740pc
48 23 54 34 pc WOmL CITIES
68 44 77 48PC WED Lisbon 5950
37 24 4531pc WED Lisbn 5 0
46 24 5 31 pc CITY 'H/LISKY London 53/42/r
46 24 53 35 PC
9 3 20 13 fl Acapuco 84/75/pc Madrid 50135/r
0 -7 2 -7 cd Amsterdam 46/39/s Mexico City 66/46/cd
48 42 60 50 sh Athens 53/46/cd Montreal 12/-5/f
47 42 56 44 r Beijing 48/24/s Moscow 35128/pc
42 24 52 34 pc Berlin 41/32/cd Paris 44/39/r
nR-nu 71 /,soA. nilo IM1


ermuda 7/62/t~s
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizle; Cairo 6451/pc
f.fair, h=hau pc=partiv cloudyf r.nhi Calgary 26/15/pc
rszyaisn/ow mix; s.ummiy; shhowews; Havana 82/68As
snfsnow; tasthundentormns wfwindy. Hong Kong 66/55/s
Weaiter Ceamil. LP 0213 Jerusalem 57/44/r


Rio 91//11pc
Rome 55/37/s
Sydney 78/64/s
Tokyo 53/41/s
Toronto 24/13/sn
Warsaw 44M30/s


. V LEGAL NOTICES


II. I" I



Meeting Notices.........C11


Tax Deed Notices......C11




__ __ C TR_____ __COUNTY--- --r


CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonllne.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -32 2 2
Tnrina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 64 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


H L FPcast City


IFLOMPATEMPOWTUMES





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Domestic battery
arrests
Travis Slone, 24, of Dun-
nellon, at 4:58 p.m. Dec. 30 on
a misdemeanor charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
Other arrests
Dustin Spangler, 27, of
East Lucy Court, Hemando, at
8:22 a.m. Dec. 30 on felony
charges of grand theft and bur-
glary to an unoccupied resi-
dence. According to his arrest
affidavit, Spangler is accused
of breaking into a Hernando
home on Nov. 16, and stealing
two harmonicas and a Sam-
sung cellular telephone. Bond
$7,000.
Nichole McBride, 19, of
South Bea Avenue, Inverness,
at 8:22 a.m. Dec. 30 on felony
charges of false verification of
ownership to a pawn broker
and burglary to an unoccupied
residence, along with a misde-
meanor charge of petit theft.
According to her arrest affidavit,
McBride is accused of breaking
into a Hemando home and
stealing a violin then pawning it
at a local pawn shop. Bond
$7,500.
Lonnie Chester Jr., 60, of


Inverness, at 2:04 p.m. Dec. 30
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill. No
bond.
John Padilla, 49, of West
Otter Street, Homosassa, at
6:30 p.m. Dec. 30 on felony re-
tail theft charge. He also faces
misdemeanor charges of driv-
ing while his license was sus-
pended and attaching a tag to a
vehicle not assigned to it. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
Padilla is accused of shoplifting
four large pieces of meat, total-
ing $323.24, from the Ho-
mosassa Winn Dixie. Bond
$1,500.
Jonathan Smith, 33, of
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness, at 2:35 a.m. Dec. 31 on
felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of grand theft. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, Smith
was under house and left his
home with a family member in
reference to a dispute. Bond
was denied.
Brittany Isbell, 20, of
East Chaparral Lane, Her-
nando, at 3:29 a.m. Dec. 31 on
an active Volusia County war-


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

rant for felony violation of pro-
bation stemming from an origi-
nal charge of resisting an
officer with violence. Bond was
denied.
Jessica Anders, 30, of
East Keepsake Lane, Her-
nando, at 3:21 a.m. Dec. 31 on
misdemeanor charges of re-
sisting an officer without vio-
lence and knowingly driving
while license was suspended
or revoked. According to her ar-
rest affidavit, Anders was
stopped for having an expired
tag and the deputy notified her
that her license had been sus-
pended. After receiving cita-
tions for an expired tag and
suspended license, the deputy
informed her she could no


longer drive and needed some-
one to pick her up. The deputy
then observed her pulling out of
a gas station moments later.
When asked to exit her vehicle
during the second stop, Anders
reportedly refused to comply,
attempting to restart her vehicle
and drive away. Bond $1,000.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Thefts
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:08 p.m. Dec. 28 in the
10400 block of S. Le Baron
Drive, Homosassa.
An auto theft was reported
at 4:09 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 200
block of W. Herndon St., Her-
nando.
A petit theft was reported
at 5:38 p.m. Dec. 28 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 8:39 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 29,
in the 1200 block of N. Castle-
land Terrace, Lecanto.
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:36 p.m. Dec. 29 in the
7000 block of S. Aloysia Ave.,
Floral City.


Police: Men stole

puppies at gunpoint


Associated Press
PENSACOLA Au-
thorities in the Panhandle
say they have arrested two
19-year-old men in connec-
tion with an armed rob-
bery that included stealing
puppies at gunpoint
The Pensacola News
Journal reported on Mon-
day that the men were ar-
rested by the Escambia
County Sheriff's Office


following a Sunday morn-
ing home invasion and
robbery
According to the sher-
iff's office, the two men
are suspected of wearing
masks and holding guns as
they forced their way into
a home and demanded
residents give them vari-
ous electronics, cash and
two pit bull puppies.
No one was injured in
the robbery


00 Wood
v *Laminate
Tile /
6 Carpet
e Vinyl ,
^ ul Gr a[ spcc.3i * Area Ruu


Wfhimg You



A Happy


S& Prosperous


New Ye wlumi







Blackshears !! Aluminum


"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
t HWY. 44, CRYSTAL RIVER
795-9722
1-888-474-2269 (TOLL FREE)


Insured RR 0042388


www.blackshe


BEST

ars.com


Wishing ylonU
vm year filed ivitl N
eiv hope, neiv joy and 7655 WGulf to Lake
neiv beginnings! Hwy, Suite 4
Thank you for your patronage and Crl sta I 1
we look forward Lto working with you in the future. Floiida


From our family


at



SSUPERIOR

f RESIDENCES

of Lecanto
MEMORY CARE



to yours.



Daystay and respite programs available.

We specialize in the care for individuals with
Alzheimer's and other dementia related illnesses.

Call us today to tour Superior Residences and see how your
loved one can live the "Superior" life too.

4865 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto

352.746.5483
www.superioralf.com
Assisted Living Facility License # 12256


For the RECORD


Licensed &


DAYS
JAN. 9-14


Start for $0

JANUARY FREE

Burn up to 600 calories in 60 minutes.
Turn your New year's resolution into Real Results with Jazzercise today!
Sign up now at jazzercize.com/dancingdays
Citrus County Jazzercise
NEW LOCATION!
6604 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (Rocco's Cafe Plaza)
Crystal River (352) 634-5661
Offering 25+ classes weekly in low impact and regular formats





p
# 7
























Offer valid with 12-month or 6-month minimum registration for
new customers at participating locations. No auto-payment
registration until February. Redeem by January 14,2014.


I


LOCAL/STATE


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Jesse
Hatfield, 97
BEVERLY HILLS
Jesse Willard Hatfield,
97, went to be with his
Lord Dec. 30,2013, at Hos-
pice House of Citrus
County on the Nature
Coast,
Beverly
Hills, Fla.,
following a
long ill-
ness. He
was a na- .
tive West
Virginian, '
retiring to Jesse
Florida Hatfield
more than
30 years ago. He resided in
New Smyrna Beach for
many years, where he was
a member of the First Bap-
tist Church of New Smyrna
Beach. He later moved to
Beverly Hills, where he
has made his home with
daughter Jessie Fay and
her husband John Lowe
for the past nine years. Mr
Hatfield had a long career
in the coal mining indus-
try, retiring in January
1976. He was assistant in-
spector-at-large for the
New River-Winding Gulf
Division of the West Vir-
ginia Department of
Mines, serving 20 years
under four governors. He
received the designation
of "Distinguished West Vir-
ginian" by Gov Arch A.
Moore Jr in recognition of
his meritorious service.
He was a member of the
Masonic Lodge, No. 138,
Pineville, WV, for more
than 61 years.
He was the youngest of
12 children, born April 12,
1916, in Pea Ridge, WVa.,
to Newman Pomp and Ella
Ferrell Hatfield. Mr Hat-
field's childhood and
young adult years were
spent in Man, WVa., where
he met and married Edith
Fay Mahone. Together they
had three children. He is
preceded in death by his
parents; eight sisters;
three brothers; first wife of
46 years, Edith Fay Ma-
hone Hatfield; second wife
of 23 years, Opha Pauline
Brown Eller Hatfield; and
son, Rondal Willard Hat-
field. He is survived by
daughters, Doris Evelyn
Hughes and husband Don-


aid of Corinne, WVa., and
Jessie Fay Lowe and hus-
band John of Beverly Hills;
daughter-in-law, Joan Hat-
field of Midway, WVa.;
stepdaughter, Brenda Eller
James of New Smyrna
Beach; stepsons, Frank
Eller and wife Donna of
New Smyrna Beach and
Ross Eller and wife Karen,
Glades Springs, WVa.; six
grandchildren, Deloris
Reed and husband John,
Michelle Keen and hus-
band Tim, Winter Haven,
Ronald Lee Hatfield and
wife Debbie, Gaston, S.C.,
Jerry Wayne Hatfield and
wife Kim, Wilmington, S.C.,
Kevin Brian Lowe, San-
ford, Kara Clark and hus-
band Mark, Orlando; three
step-granddaughters; one
step-grandson; eleven
great-grandchildren; six
g r e a t g r e a t -
grandchildren; and nu-
merous nieces and
nephews. Mr Hatfield was
a man of great integrity
and humility He was well
known for his sense of
humor and desire to make
others laugh. He will re-
main beloved in the hearts
of all who knew him and
will be remembered as a
proud West Virginia
mountaineer
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests donations
be made to The Hospice
House of Citrus County on
the Nature Coast. The fam-
ily will be receiving
friends from 5 to 6 p.m.
Thursday Jan. 2,2014, with
funeral services at 6 p.m.,
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.
Entombment will be in
Sunset Memorial Gardens,
Harper Road, Beckley,
WVa., at a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Stephen
McElveen, 70
INVERNESS
Stephen P McElveen, 70,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Monday, Dec. 30,
2013, at his residence in
Inverness. He was born
April 4,1943, in Miami, to
the late Osteen and Ruby
(Smith) McElveen.
Stephen was a U.S. Army
veteran serving in Viet-
nam, and a homicide de-
tective for Miami-Dade
sheriffs department. He
arrived in this area in
2005, coming from Sunrise.
Stephen was a past Post
Commander for the VFW
Post No. 4337, Inverness,
and enjoyed watching
sports, especially the
Miami Dolphins.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 51 years, Gloria
McElveen; children, Steve
(Beverly) McElveen of At-
lanta, Ga., Sean (and com-
panion Cheryl) McElveen
of St. Petersburg, Shannon
(Beth) McElveen of Del-
tona, Lara (and fiance
Brian) of Largo; brother,
Les McElveen of Pen-
sacola; sisters, Carolyn
(Fred) Wessels of Ten-
nessee, and Marylynn
(Henry) Clay of Tavaras;
grandchildren, Alexis,
Ashley, Hailey, Samantha,
and Riley; and great-
grandson, James.
Stephen's urn will be
laid to rest at Arlington
National Cemetery Pri-
vate cremation arrange-
ments under the care of
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Linda
Mundy, 65
HOMOSASSA
Linda A. Mundy, 65, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Dec. 26,
2013, at Leesburg Regional
Medical Center, Leesburg.
A native of Detroit, Mich.,
she was born Jan. 29, 1948,
to Steve and Pauline
Marks, one of three chil-
dren. Linda moved to Ho-
mosassa 28 years ago from
Saint Clair Shores, Mich.,
and was a retired nurse's
aid technician at Citrus
Memorial Hospital, a ca-
reer that spanned 22 years
and ended in the Heart
Unit. Mrs. Mundy attended
First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River and was a
devoted member of the
Central Florida Sugar
Babes Doll Club.
She is survived by her
husband of 41 years, David
G. Mundy, Homosassa; son,
Kevin Mundy, Riverview;
daughter, Heather Mc-
Gaughey, Citrus Hills;
brothers, Dick Marks, Ann
Arbor, Mich., and Jim
Marks, Loveland, Colo.;
and two grandchildren,
Erica and Brittany
A memorial service of
remembrance will be 1
p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, 2013,
from First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River
with the Rev Jack Alwood
officiating. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family suggests
memorial contributions be
made in Linda's memory
to the Scleroderma Foun-
dation National Head-
quarters, 300 Rosewood
Dr, Suite 105, Danvers, MA
01923, wwwscleroderma.
org. wwwwilderfuneral.
com.




Gc./L e. 2Zal,
Funeral Home With Crematory
DOLORES WISE
Mass: Thurs 10:00 AM
Our Lady of Fatima
DAVID CLARK
Graveside Service: Fri 2:30 PM
Florida National Cemetery
DONALD QUELLING
Service: Sun 2:00 PM
LINDA EMANN
Visit: Sun 4:00-6:00 PM
Service: Mon 12:00 Noon Church LDS
RANDY BILLINGS
Saturday 11:00 AM Cornerstone Baptist
MAX PARTON
Service: Thurs 1:00 PM
Burial: Florida National Cemetery
726-8323


George
Wilkinson, 74
CRYSTAL RIVER
George Edwin Wilkin-
son, 74, of Crystal River,
Fla., passed away Sunday,
Dec. 29,2013, at HPH Hos-
pice Care Center in
Lecanto. He was born Feb.
22, 1939, in Winchester,
Ind., to Joseph and
Frances (Wooters) Wilkin-
son. He came to this area
40 years ago from Win-
chester, Ind. He was a re-
tired high school math
teacher also an over-the-
road truck driver George
was a member of the Plan-
tation Golf and Country
Club and he was a U.S.
Army veteran.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by a sister, Janice
Wilkinson. He is survived
by his three daughters,
Cary Witter (Mark) of
Union City, Ind., Sharon
Reed (David) of
Greenville, Ohio and Meil
Leach (Humberto) of
Lakeland; three brothers,
William Wilkinson
(Delilah) of Winchester,
Ind., Horace Wilkinson
(Betty) of Crystal River


and Hobert Wilkinson
(Judy) of Manchester, N.H.;
a sister, Jane Devine of
Gainesville; six grandchil-
dren; and one great-grand-
child.
A visitation will be 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 3,
2014, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel in
Crystal River Inurnment
will follow at the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell, with military
honors. The family sug-
gests that in lieu of flowers
those who wish may make
a memorial contribution to
HPH Hospice at 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465-3503.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's polIicy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an ad-
ditional charge.


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!





l 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
e Licensed Funeral Director
S 352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694 J
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhoe.co


You keep them cozy at home.
We'll keep them safe on the road.


SERVICES AVAILABLE:
6 Filter Replacement
b ~ '68Tune-Ups
*, Brakes
..- r, ,,, \56 Transmission Flush
'it -.o' Computer Diagnostics
"" '" s46-99 Headlight Restoration
oo" " v ...... *RainX Treatment
....... 4 9 Differential Service
a Mlob,, .:........ .. .*- Tire Rotation
1W, -19 __*-- .o Mobil 1 Synthetic
SoB. sp* ... *. ] .... .. Interstate Batteries
CVAxles
Much More

18 point visual inspection & vacuuming
complimentary with every oil change.


Mobil10
Lube Express

011 0WW


Call or stop in today.

(352) 795-2333
1050 SE Hwy. 19 Crystal River
crmobill lube.com


CITRUS COUNTY'S LARGEST
0 Selection of Clean, Pre-Owned Boats

"TmHeREE RIVERS

S!IAR I N E
S1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
(352) 563-5510 (352) 563-5512
www.threeriversmarineinc.com sales@threeriversmarineinc.com
Factory Trained Certified Mechanics .-
BUY SELL*TRADE*SERVICE /|
STORAGE BOAT SALES lf
WE NEED CLEAN (7[
USED BOATS !' z AI


-twec_ t inrn tilt
ion fan -OYAMAHA
I dlr iflS
L;--h^r-


Serving all your cremation needs.




Tjoop~r
t FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com


', ', ', : ''',, : '',,'H ^ ,/ A L X '
.::' :: :...... I.A

S-" Specializing In All Your Cremation Needs
(352) 726-2271 Inverness
61 11 FUNERALHOMES 1-888-7HOOPER(746-6737) Beverly Hills
& CREMATORY www.HooperFuneralHome.com Homosassa


P-yCRYS AL RIVER MARINE
PO EREDB i 990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
& mnnan 7 (352) 795-2597 (352) 795-2598
www.crystalrivermarine.com Email: sales@crystalrivermarine.com


A6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Blue-collar blues


tAAging
A eric



Retirement

unlikely for

some in US

EMILY WAGSTER
PETTUS
Associated Press

Tom Edwards grew up
in a family that's been cut-
ting trees and hauling tim-
ber in the Pacific
Northwest for more than a
century The Spanaway,
Wash., resident says he has
worked as a logger since
he was a kid it's just
what an able-bodied
youngster was expected to
do.
Now, at 53, with business
in a slump and little
money in savings, he's pes-
simistic about his chances
of retiring.
"It's never going to hap-
pen. By the time I reach
retirement age, there
won't be Social Security
There's not going to be any
money," Edwards said. "I'll
do like my father did: I'll
work 'til I die."
Across the U.S., such
concerns are common
among blue-collar baby
boomers the 78 million
Americans born between
1946 and 1964. Many have
jobs that provide paltry
pensions or none at all, as
many companies have
been moving toward less
generous retirement pack-
ages in the past decade.
Many boomers expect to
work the rest of their lives
because they have little
cash put away for their old
age and they worry Social
Security won't cover their
bills. Some hope to move
to jobs that are less physi-
cally demanding.
The share of U.S. work-
ers who are 55 and older is
expected to continue
growing, according to the
"The Oxford Handbook of
Retirement 2013." The
group comprised 12.4 per-
cent of the workforce in
1998. The share jumped to
18.1 percent in 2008 and is
expected to be almost
25 percent by 2018.
The book is edited by Mo
Wang, co-director of the
Human Resource Re-
search Center at the Uni-
versity of Florida's
Warrington College of
Business Administration.
In an interview, Wang said
it's a misconception that
lower-wage workers are
slackers in preparing for
retirement
"People don't have ade-
quate earnings," Wang told
The Associated Press. "It's
not because they don't
want to save. It's because
they just can't."
Many people don't save
enough for their own re-
tirement because they lack
financial literacy skills,
Wang said. Also, he said it
can be incorrect to assume
that people with lower in-
comes have more financial
concerns than people with
higher incomes. Psycho-
logically, the important
thing is the ratio of life
earnings to wealth how
much money a person
earns in a life span, com-
pared to how much of it
she gets to keep.
"Whether they have the
401(k) is not the decisive
factor in influencing how
well they live," Wang said.
"Whether they have their
own house is a big factor."
For homeowners, about
50 percent of wealth is typ-
ically tied up in the house
and other investments,
while a pension accounts
for about 25 percent and
Social Security accounts
for about 25 percent, Wang
said. For people who don't
own their homes, particu-
larly those who've worked
low-income jobs, "Social
Security is super impor-


tant," he said. "Social Se-
curity is one way to pull
them out of poverty"
People can receive full
retirement benefits from
Social Security between 65
and 67, depending on
when they were born, and
Medicare coverage at 65.
Farmers, loggers and
other agriculture workers


Associated Press
Tom Edwards poses Dec. 19 for a portrait with his hard hat and logging clothes in the
woods near Spanaway, Wash. Edwards was not cutting trees the day the photo was
taken, and work has been slow this season for him. Despite working as a logger all his
life, he is pessimistic about his chances of ever retiring, an opinion common among
blue-collar baby boomers in the United States.


often have their wealth
tied up in their homes or
work property Business
consultant Mike Salisbury
of American Falls, Idaho,
has spent more than three
decades helping farmers
plan their financial fu-
tures. He said the biggest
concern for most is succes-
sion whether any chil-
dren want the farm once a
farmer retires.
"Now, statistics pretty
well show that about two-
thirds of farm families do
not have successors inter-
ested in coming back into
the business," Salisbury
said.
Without someone to take
over the family business,
farmers look for an exit
strategy, he said. "There
are some really complex
tax ramifications for when
a farmer decides to stop
farming."
He said farmers ap-
proaching retirement
want to know how to con-
vert the equity in their
land, fixtures, buildings
and machinery into cash
without having to pay the
upper tax rates or having
to pay taxes in a lump sum
the day assets are sold.
"We like to think of our
farmers as just barely get-
ting by and dirt poor," Sal-
isbury said. "For the vast
majority of farmers today,
the ones that survived the
economic crash of the '80s,
they're probably in pretty
good shape."
People who've worked
low-wage jobs for decades,
such as 46-year-old Cather-
ine Bacon of Durant, Miss.,
say they have a tough time
envisioning an affordable
retirement, even if that
goal is decades away
Bacon worked 21 years in a
catfish processing plant,
cutting filets and hoisting
bags of fish to make sure
they weighed 15 pounds,
never earning more than
$16,000 a year To supple-


ment her income for nine
of those years, she also
worked weekends as a con-
venience store cashier
The seven-days-a-week
routine meant she rarely
saw her two oldest daugh-
ters when they were young.
The kind of retirement
many Americans envision
- travel, hobbies, leisure
time without financial
stress is just a wistful
fantasy for her
Bacon is a single mother
with two grown children
and two younger children
still living at home. Sitting
at the kitchen counter of
the double-wide trailer
she rents from one of her
sisters, she sighed.
"I haven't given up on
living," Bacon said. "It's
just, certain things I want
to do, I know I won't do
them. Traditional retire-
ment- I won't have that."
Some blue-collar work-
ers have employers who
chip in toward retirement
In Atlanta, 41-year-old
Jason Baumgartner works
as a master carpenter,
helping build luxury
homes. He said his em-
ployer contributes to a
Roth IRA for him, and he
puts in some money each
week, as well. He and his
wife have a son who's
about to turn 2, and they've
consulted a financial plan-
ner He said he wants to
save enough money to start
his own business and work
for himself rather than for
somebody else.
"I think the hours and,
you know, the labor inten-
sive stuff won't be as bad,"
Baumgartner said. "But,
still, I plan on working
until I'm 60, 75. Well, 70."
In the southern Louisi-
ana fishing village of
Lafitte, Robert Boud-
reaux's cut and callused
hands worked quickly,
spinning, looping and
threading twine that
would, when finished, be a


fishing net used by fisher-
men to trawl for shrimp in
the Gulf of Mexico. It's a
trade Boudreaux, 52, has
practiced for decades in
the small net shop he owns
- and something he may
end up doing longer than
he had anticipated.
"To plan for retirement
in today's economy is very,
very hard because people
who started planning for
retirement years ago put
money on the side in IRAs
and stuff like that, and the
way the economy is and
the interest rate is, they
don't get anything any-
more," Boudreaux said.
Boudreaux said he
opened his net shop in
1980 and has also been a
part of a family boat-
making business since
1981. He said he invested
thousands into IRAs that
today are worth very little.
It's disappointing, he said,
but the good news is that
he loves what he does and
probably wouldn't retire
even if he had the means.
"Most of the people
that's in the community -
that's fishermen, that's
small business owners -
they don't retire," he said.
"They work until they pass
on."
Associated Press writers
Stacey Plaisance in
Lafitte, La., and Johnny C
Clark in Atlanta con-
tributed to this report.


SO YOU KNOW
* Early production deadlines New Year's Eve
prevented access to stock market reports.
* U.S. markets are closed today for the holiday.


=== Business BRIEFS


Colorado readies
for pot sales
DENVER -At least 24
marijuana shops in eight
Colorado towns are scram-
bling to get ready for the
opening of the nation's first
legal pot industry.
Owners have increased
staff and inventory, set up
coffee stations and food
giveaways and hired extra
security to prepare for poten-
tial crowds and overnight
campers ready to buy up to
an ounce of pot, starting at
8 a.m. today.
Police are beefing up pa-
trols and bracing for poten-
tially rowdy crowds.
While it's been legal in
Colorado to smoke pot for
the past year, Jan. 1 repre-
sents a milestone for the
decades-old marijuana legal-
ization movement. It's the
first fully legal market for sell-
ing pot.
Colorado sales will be an
important test for whether le-
galization is a viable alterna-
tive to the drug war.

Anheuser-Busch
sued over videos
ST. LOUIS -A Montana-
based craft brewer is suing
the world's largest beer-
maker, alleging that popular
YouTube videos for Bud
Light violate its trademarked
phrase, "Hold my beer and
watch this."
Big Sky Brewing Co. sued
Anheuser-Busch this month
in U.S. District Court in Mis-
soula, Mont. The company
said it has used the slogan
since at least 2004, and has
a trademark.
At issue are three videos
on Bud Light's official
YouTube site created by
actor John Krasinski, best
known for playing Jim
Halpert on NBC's The Office,
and his business partner.
The videos debuted about a
month ago and have nearly
5 million views.
Bud Light's marketing vice
president, Rob McCarthy,
said there is no trademarked
use of the phrase.
He said other videos and
jokes use the same or simi-
lar wording.

Target reveals
gift card snafu
NEW YORK -Target is
getting hit with another lump
of coal this holiday season.
The nation's second
largest discount retailer said
than an unidentified number
of gift cards sold over the
holidays were not properly
activated.
The Minneapolis chain
said the number of cards af-
fected was less than 0.1 per-
cent of the total sold and that
it will honor the affected
cards.
Customers they can bring
faulty cards to any Target
service desk or call 800-544-
2943 for help.
The snafu comes less
than two weeks after Target
was hit with a massive data
security breach that affected
as many as 40 million debit
and credit card holders.


HP confirms
additional layoffs
PALO ALTO, Calif. Per-
sonal computer giant
Hewlett-Packard Co. has
confirmed that it expects lay-
offs at the upper end of a
range that it outlined earlier
this year, with 5,000 more
workers than originally
planned expected to lose
jobs by October 2014.
The company said in a se-
curities filing Monday that
"continued market and busi-
ness pressures" were behind
the move. The additional
cuts, on top of the 29,000
positions it planned to cut in
a May 2012 restructuring
plan, will likely boost the ac-
cumulated restructuring
charges to $4.1 billion from
$3.6 billion, it said.
Hewlett-Packard said in
March that its estimated cut-
backs could vary by as much
as 15 percent from its origi-
nal estimate. At an October
meeting with analysts, Chief
Financial Officer Cathie Les-
jak said the company
planned to end up "near the
high end" of that range.
Cost cuts have helped HP
weather revenue declines in
PCs, printing and enterprise
services. In the fiscal year
through Oct. 31, revenue fell
7 percent to $112.3 billion,
but the company posted
$5.1 billion in net profit, com-
pared with a $12.7 billion
loss a year earlier.
HP shares rose 10 cents
to $28.17 in midday trading
Tuesday.
Revlon to exit
China business
Revlon said it is leaving
China and cutting 1,100 jobs
as part of a cost-cutting
measure.
Most of the jobs cuts will
be in China. Revlon's opera-
tions there make up only
2 percent of the company's
sales, which have been
declining.
Global sales fell 1.3 per-
cent to $1.02 billion in the
nine months through Sep-
tember, compared with the
same period in 2012. Rev-
enue in Asia dropped
3.5 percent to $166.8 during
that time.
The departure will save
the makeup company
$11 million a year, Revlon
said Tuesday in a regulatory
filing with the U.S. Securities
and Exchange Commission.
Revlon expects to take a
$22 million restructuring
charge, mostly this year.
About $10 million of that
charge is for employee sev-
erance and other benefits,
and about $12 million con-
sists of product discounts
and inventory write-offs.
Besides its namesake
brand of makeup and hair
dye, Revlon also makes cos-
metics under its Almay and
SinfulColors brands.
The New York-based
company has had major ex-
ecutive changes this year,
naming a new CEO in Octo-
ber after Alan Ennis left. It
also announced a new CFO
in July.
-From wire reports


BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 A7







Page A8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1,2014



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


&i


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike A rnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member


M Mac Harris ................................ citizen m em ber
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


= LETTERS to the Editor =


A judge with a heart
On a few occasions I had the
opportunity to be an observer to
the proceedings before Judge
Richard Howard. It is my opin-
ion that we have here one of the
finest judges in this county
As I observed the cases that
came before him I found the
human side of this wonderful
man. He works through every
case and he treats everyone
who comes before him with
grace and dignity As I sat there
and listened I heard Judge
Howard ask each offender his
or her age and other questions
as to their well-being. He asked
if there were any family mem-
bers present and if so that they
stand. The judge recognized the
support the offender has in his
court room. As the proceedings
went on it seems to me that
Judge Howard really cared
about the whole family and
does everything to ease the
pain of the whole situation be-
fore him.
I sometimes wonder how he
copes with all this tragedy that
comes before him. I wonder if
the public ever realizes that
under that robe beats a heart of
a caring human being. To me,
as I looked on, I could see the
pain in his heart as he metes
out the sentences justice de-
mands. I have also noticed that
Judge Howard listens to all
sides (attorneys, prosecutors) in
a case before making his deci-
sions to be fair to the offenders
of the law In closing, I would
like to say this one thing: To
you Judge Richard A. Howard,
thank you for the dignity with
which you treat each person
who comes before your bench.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon


Thanks for making
Tree of Hope possible
Among the lights, carols, tinsel
and festivities of this busy holi-
day, a special Christmas tree
shines every night at the Key
Training Center, a gift and a re-
minder of what this season truly
brings to our community
Our thanks goes to the Bush
Homes Services, the entire Bush
family and their circle of dedi-
cated employees, customers and
friends who make possible this
30-foot beacon. It was named
Tree of Hope because of its glo-
rious message to each client at
this center for those with devel-
opmental disabilities that they
are loved, supported and are a
vital part of the circle of faith
which is especially celebrated at
Christmas time.
With more than 10,000 lights
and 300 ornaments, this tree is
also the means for Bush Homes
services to raise funds that pro-
vide year-round services to more
than 300 adults who depend on
the Key Training Center
We invite all to drive by to ex-
perience the Tree of Hope
which is located outside the Key
Center Foundation office at 5399
W Gulf-to-Lake Hwy, Lecanto.
Neale Brennan
Key Center Foundation Director

OPINIONS INVITED
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent
via email. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.


Raises the question gas so high.


A recent letter in the
Chronicle advises that
homelessness could be
mitigated if youngsters
were virtuous and if
people did not make
mistakes. Such a pos-
ture, however, prompts
the question whether
self-satisfaction and ar-
rogance can be relied
upon to offer sound ad-
vice, not to speak of
prevention.


CAL
563-(


We're not dummies
Just thought I'd call in and
say that in Mississippi it is only
$2.29 for regular gas, but here
in Citrus County they tell us how
all the refineries are having
problems and that's why our
gas prices are up. They must re-
ally think that we are stupid
here in Citrus County to pay for


Manholes too low
|ND To the lady who
JND called in about the big
flC! ol' pothole in the shop-
F ping center down by
Family Dollar store:
That's been there for a
longtime. I'm surprised
the city hasn't. I don't
know what's going on
with their road crews.
) 579 While they're fixing that
7 pothole, would you ask
them to raise those
manhole covers on (State Road)
44 there coming into Inverness?
They're so low, a motorcycle hit
one the other day and almost
lost his grip right in front of me.
Those things are too deep. They
tear up the front end of your
car. They'll break a ball joint.
That's unreal. Bring them up
level with the highway where
they should be.


S|nited Way of Citrus County needs your
mlJ mm "-Z1 U help to reach its annual fundraising
ql W goal. If you can, please send a contribution
to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


"Year's end is neither an end nor a
beginning but a going on, with all the
wisdom that experience can instill in us.
Hal Borland, "The Tomorrows Dec. 30,"
Sundial of the Seasons, 1964


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SETTING GOALS



Settling spats, fiscal



recovery underline



2014 to-do list


s has become the tradition each year, the
Chronicle produces a set of goals for our
community to collectively achieve.
In that spirit, here are our thoughts.
Settle hospital issue
Citrus Memorial hospital needs to be sold to
HCA and the two governing boards fighting over
the future of the facility need to give it a rest.
For three years the governing
boards have argued and spent $11
million on legal fees. At the same THE IS
time, morale of those working at Goals 1
the hospital suffers and patient New
services are no longer the top
priority. OUR OF
The two groups have agreed to
sell to HCA, the folks who own Oak Muc
Hill Hospital in Hernando County, accomp
but the drama continues to play 20:
out on the front page of the paper
We can only hope the foolishness
doesn't kill the HCA deal. The people of Citrus
County deserve better
Get Three Sisters open
The community came together two years ago
and raised more than $11 million to purchase
Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River The good
news is that the environmentally sensitive prop-
erty has been protected from the bulldozers of
developers. But the bad news is that the prop-
erty has still not been opened for public use.
The culprit is the federal government and its
inability to provide the funds to complete the
project.
In 2014 the feds need to figure this out or give
it up. The state of Florida appears to be willing
to take the project over and open a park on the
property if the federal government can't do the
job.
We realize the federal government has wars
to fight and other important issues to attend to.
We just wish completing the improvements to
Three Sisters Springs was higher on the prior-
ity list.
Settle Duke tax dispute
Duke, the owner of the energy site north of
Crystal River and the county's largest taxpayer,
has challenged the county property appraiser's
valuation of its property and the size of its tax
bill.
The mishandling of this issue has created a
tremendous burden on county government, the
schools and the taxpayers of the county. When
Duke only paid $19 million of its $34 million tax
bill, the other taxpayers of the county had to
pick up the difference.
County Property Appraiser GeoffGreene has
already lost Round 1 in the court dispute on the
very technical question of how to value pollu-
tion control equipment. Every county in
Florida did it one way and Citrus did it another
Greene's strategy of playing hardball with
the power company has resulted in higher tax
bills for almost everyone else. Duke is willing
to fight in court to the end, but has expressed
a willingness all along to negotiate a fair
settlement.
As we have maintained throughout 2013, the
smarter play is to bury the tough political rhet-
oric and sit down at the bargaining table and
find a fair solution. Greene needs to make that
happen in 2014.
Flood insurance flap needs solution
Sky-high flood insurance rates could have a
huge economic impact on Citrus County in
2014 and not in a good way
The federal government has slashed its sub-
sidization of flood insurance premiums, so lots
of homeowners in flood zones are seeing flood
insurance costs double and triple. Some can't
afford the increases, but without some solution
it will be very difficult to sell homes because of
the high insurance costs.
Coastal communities and flood zone areas
are going to be hit extremely hard.
Congress has ignored the problem because
40 percent of the national flood insurance poli-
cies are written in Florida. The issue doesn't
impact other states in a similar way, so politi-
cians are slow to get on board.
The Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott
will need to get involved and find those solu-
tions. Rep. Jimmie Smith and Sen. Charles
Dean need to show some leadership on the
issue.
Economic development needed
With the loss of the nuclear plant in Crystal
River, implementing a new economic redevel-
opment plant has never been more important
The county lost about 400 high-paying jobs at
the nuke plant when Duke decided to close it
down and transfer the workers to other parts
of the country. The power company gave the
county's Economic Development Council a
$400,000 grant with the intention of the council
using it to fund the preparation of a profes-
sional economic development plan.
A consultant was employed to help guide the
development of the strategic plan, and she
was brutally honest about our community's
shortcomings.
The plan is about to be presented to EDC and


$
fo
YE


h
P
1.


county leaders, and we hope it will lay out a de-
tailed path to follow
Citrus County needs to broaden its economic
base and attract new industry and jobs to the
community. There is a solid EDC team ofdirec-
tor Don Taylor, Chamber CEO Josh Wooten and
former commission chair Joe Meek involved in
the effort. We are confident that 2014 will be the
year the county makes progress.
SUE Make the YMCA happen
SUE: The effort to build Citrus County's
Dr the first YMCAneeds to happen in 2014.
'ear. The Citrus County chapter of the Y
has been busy trying to raise $8 mil-
INION: lion to make this dream a reality.
In 2014 we'd love to see busi-
I to nesses and individuals step up and
lish in make the contributions needed to
4. begin construction. The group al-
ready has in excess of $5 million
pledged toward the project
Success is within reach.
Build the Suncoast Parkway
With the state's economy improving, it is im-
portant that construction begin on the Citrus
County leg of the Suncoast Parkway The state
has been busy buying up rights-of-way this year
for the effort.
It now appears that the first phase of the Sun-
coast will proceed from the existing termination
at the county line near Sugarmill and then pro-
ceed up to State Road 44 near Lecanto. There is
state-wide discussion taking place about turn-
ing the next leg of the Suncoast in a northeast
direction toward Jacksonville.
That decision can be made in the years to
come. The next leg through Citrus needs to start
in 2014.
County/city relationships
2013 County Commission Chairman Joe
Meek said one of his key goals for last year was
to improve relations with the county's two
cities Inverness and Crystal River
Meek and the county are working much
closer with Crystal River and deserve credit
for the effort.
The same can't be said for Inverness.
In Crystal River the county has agreed to be
a partner with the city in creating a redevel-
opment plan downtown, building a Riverwalk
on King's Bay and purchasing the
Petrella property on U.S. 19. Good things are
happening.
Relations between county government and
Inverness degenerated in 2013 over funding for
Whispering Pines Park The city pulled away
from the county by contracting with the private
landfill owned by County Commissioner Scott
Adams and pulling its trash stream away from
the county facility in Lecanto. Inverness has
also refused to participate in the county's
MSBU on fire services and may decide to cre-
ate a separate fire service.
In the long run, separate government is not
less expensive for the taxpayer In 2014 we'd
like to see leaders of both Inverness and the
county overcome the ill will and find ways to
work together
Political relationships
2013 was marked by a meltdown at the county
courthouse and a continued embarrassment at
the county hospital as some of our politicians
have forgotten how to get the job done.
Just like on the national level, Citrus County
has seen a breakdown in civility where politi-
cians lash out at each other and believe brass-
knuckle confrontation is the way to get things
done.
We ask them to reconsider their methods.
We are not interested in politicians all think-
ing the same way but there is a professional
way to have disagreements on the issues and
still find resolution to the problems we collec-
tively face.
Some of our political entities are being made
laughingstocks because of the techniques some
members employ The foolishness has a broad
impact on how other businesses, governments
and individuals view us.
And we the taxpayers pay for the foolishness.
We're tired of it. Let's act like adults and try to
solve some of the many problems we face.
Water quality needs leadership
The new year could be a good one for water
quality in Citrus County. Art Jones and his band
of Rotary muckrakers have made it popular to
care about the water quality in King's Bay and
Crystal River
Suddenly everyone is getting into the act.
Sen. Dean has found state dollars to help with
the cleanup. Swiftmud has a renewed interest
in storm water projects in Crystal River and
Homosassa.
Crystal River, Swiftmud, Duke Energy and
the state have agreed to pump treated water
from the city sewer plant to help cool the tow-
ers at the power plant. This will save millions of
gallons of water being pumped each day from
the underground water supply for cooling
purposes.
There is finally momentum to get good things
done. And that's a nice way to start a new year


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Judge nixes

welfare

drug tests
Associated Press
ORLANDO A fed-
eral judge on Tuesday
struck down a Florida
law requiring applicants
for welfare benefits to
undergo mandatory
drug testing, ruling it
was unconstitutional
and shouldn't be
enforced.
U.S. District Judge
Mary Scriven's 30-page
order made permanent
an earlier, temporary
ban on the law by the
judge.
Gov Rick Scott had
backed the drug testing
of prospective welfare
recipients, arguing it
helped protect taxpay-
ers and families. He said
in a statement Tuesday
that his administration
would appeal the deci-
sion to the U.S. Court of
Appeals.


SHOOTING
Continued from Page Al

was found nearby with
multiple pills in the bottle;
however, she claimed she
was missing pills.
According to the sher-
iff's office, later in the
evening, around 7:35 p.m.,
patrol responded to
Krause's residence, where
Marshall Smith and
Jonathan Smith drove to
confront Krause about
robbing the victim earlier
in the day
The release said
Jonathan Smith stayed in
the truck during the inci-


dent; however, he stated
that his uncle, Marshall
Smith, was going to the
house to "kill" Krause.
Jonathan Smith told au-
thorities that he went along
to try to keep the peace.
Marshall Smith ap-
proached the residence
and banged on the doors,
the release said. When
Krause came to the front
door, Marshall Smith fired
several rounds through
the front screen door One
of the rounds struck
Krause in the upper leg,
according to the sheriff's
office.
Krause had armed him-
self and returned fire, strik-
ing Marshall Smith with


one round in the upper left
chest. Krause was inside
his residence behind a
screen door and Marshall
Smith was outside of the
screen door in an unen-
closed front porch when
the shootings occurred, ac-
cording to the release.
Krause was transported
to Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal and later transported to
Shands at the University of
Florida. Marshall Smith
was airlifted to Ocala Mon-


roe Regional, where he is
awaiting surgery He was
unable to be interviewed
due to his present medical
condition. Both Krause
and Marshall Smith are in
stable condition.
Both individuals in the
purse snatching denied
any involvement in the
earlier case and provided
consistent stories about
the case. An interview
with Krause was con-
ducted and he confessed


STATE/LOCAL


Are Gophers turning your yard into a

"Mound Field"? Complimentary
I m -llf Ica~in


Oa 4-


A TLT of Citrus County, Inc.

1-888-ANY-TI PS (1-.888-269-8477)
www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com
Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


J- -I


WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS GUARANTEED!

Call The Gopher Patrol to find out how.

1352-279-9444


HAPPY HOLIDAYS' !


f,, CALL NOW!
SO O N 352-639-1024
Licensed & Insured
m 0 43 IF IM G www.Eiiienoofing-inc.com
Quali ty, bnest and reasnableYmprices ...
tbefoundaino urbui ness


New Roofs
Re-Roofs
Flat
Metal I
Shingle
Tile
Repairs
Cleaning
tic. pCCC13276



I REPAIRS i
,t, ,t... -t, J,


SNEW & RE-ROOFS
Flat Metal Shingle Tile
ROOF CLEANING
FULL TRANSFERABLE WARRANTIES
10 Year Workmanship Warranty
nlSAVE SSS
5- WITH THESE COIIPONS!!!


115 oFFii P50OOFFi O1250FFi,
ILAYOVERSI SOLAR TUBE I IREROOFS i
I . .. I I ... .. ...j


Your Touchstone Energy Partner 4 11
SWITHLACOOCHEE
RIVER
ELECTRIC
COOPERATIVE, INC.



Notice to all Withlacoochee River


Electric Cooperative Members


and the General Public.


To Report An Inoperative Or Malfunctioning Street Light...

Please call your local Cooperative Office.

Press "2" for Repair Services and follow the voice prompt.

OR, you may log on to www.wrec.net and click on the

Repair Street Light button, then complete and submit the

Street Light Repair Request Form.


Addresses:


Corporate Office
14651 21st St., Dade City, FL 33523...............................352-567-5133

One Pasco Center District Office
30461 Commerce Dr., San Antonio, FL 33576................352-588-5115

Bayonet Point District Office
12013 Hays Rd., Shady Hill, FL 34610............................727-868-9465

Crystal River District Office
5330 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461..............352-795-4382

West Hernando District Office
10005 Cortez. Blvd., Weeki Wachee, FL 34613..............352-596-4000
Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


I


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 A9
to his role in the robbery
and said both individuals
were with him in the car
and snatched the purse at
his direction.
Jonathan Smith was ar-
rested for violation of pro-
bation, as he was currently
on house arrest.
Blair said Marshall
Smith will be interviewed
once he is coherent and
charges will be pending.
The case remains under
investigation.


IloSptIH lla


r












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Pictured


Associated Press
A visitor takes pictures of
the Golden Gate Bridge at
sunrise on Tuesday in San
Francisco.


Mayor: ND town
dodged a bullet
CASSELTON, N.D.--A
southeastern North Dakota
town narrowly escaped
tragedy when a train carry-
ing crude oil derailed and
exploded nearby, the mayor
said Tuesday, calling for
changes in how the fuel is
transported across the U.S.
No one was hurt in Mon-
day's derailment of the mile-
long train that sent a great
fireball and plumes of black
smoke skyward about a
mile from the small town of
Casselton. The fire had
been so intense as dark-
ness fell that investigators
couldn't get close enough to
count the number of burning
cars. The National Trans-
portation Safety Board
launched an investigation.
Most residents heeded a
recommendation to evacu-
ate their homes as strong
winds blew potentially haz-
ardous, acrid smoke toward
the town overnight, Mayor
Ed McConnell said early
Tuesday. Black soot coated
parts of Casselton.
Residents said the blasts
endured for hours after the
derailment, shaking their
homes and businesses. Of-
ficial estimates of the extent
of the blaze varied. BNSF
Railway Co. said it believed
about 20 cars caught fire
after its oil train left the
tracks about 2:10 p.m. Mon-
day. The sheriff's office said
Monday it thought 10 cars
were on fire. Officials said
the cars would be allowed
to burn out.
NTSB officials on the
scene said an investigation
would examine the train
recorder, the signal system,
the condition of the train op-
erators, train and tracks, as
well as the response to the
derailment.
West Nile Virus
killing eagles
SALT LAKE CITY-
State wildlife officials said
West Nile Virus appears to
the mystery illness that's
caused more than two
dozen bald eagles to die in
Utah this month.
The Utah Division of
Wildlife Resources said re-
sults of laboratory tests on
some of the first birds found
indicate they died from
West Nile.
Officials said 27 bald ea-
gles have died since
Dec. 1, and six others are
being treated at a wildlife
rehabilitation center.
DWR said in a statement
that it believes the eagles
ate grebes that were in-
fected with the virus.
The agency said the mi-
gration of the aquatic birds
should be over soon, so
eagle deaths should stop.
It said the birds do not
pose a risk to human health
but people should not han-
dle eagles if they find them.

-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Health law at a crossroads


Associated Press

WASHINGTON All
things good, bad and un-
predictable converge
today for President Barack
Obama's health care over-
haul as the law's major
benefits take effect, along
with an unpopular insur-
ance mandate and a risk of
more nerve-wracking dis-
ruptions to coverage.
The changes bring big
improvements for some,
including Howard Kraft of
Lincolnton, N.C.
A painful spinal prob-
lem left him unable to
work as a hotel bellman.
But he's got coverage be-
cause federal law now for-
bids insurers from turning


away people with health
problems.
"I am not one of these
people getting a
policy because I'm
being made to,"
Kraft said. "I need
one to stay alive."
What's good for -
millions like Kraft
is secured through
what other people
see as an imposi- Hov
tion: requiring vir- Kr
tually every now ha
American to get cove
covered, either
through an employer, a
government program, or
by buying a plan directly
But the biggest health
care headlines early in the
year could come from con-


tinued unpredictable con-
sequences of the adminis-
tration's messy rollout.
The consumer-
facing side of the
HealthCare.gov
website now ap-
pears to be largely
fixed with ex-
perts estimating
that 2 million peo-
ple have enrolled.
yard But on the back
aft end, insurers say
s health they are still re-
rage. ceiving thousands
of erroneous sign-
ups from the government.
That means early in the
year, patients who signed
up could go for a medica-
tion refill or turn up in
the emergency room -


only to be told there is no
record of their coverage.
One of the main worries
now is over certain
error-tainted enrollment
records that insurers call
"orphans" and "ghosts."
"Orphans" are sign-ups
that the government has a
record of, but they do not
appear in insurer systems.
Insurers say those cus-
tomers never left the gov-
ernment's "orphanage" to
"go and live" with the car-
rier they selected.
"Ghosts" are new cus-
tomers that the insurer
does have a record of,
but mysteriously the infor-
mation does not appear
in the government's
computers.


Violence precedes talks


Associated Press
Young displaced boys play Tuesday at a United Nations compound which has become home to thousands
of people displaced by the recent fighting, in the Jebel area on the outskirts of Juba, South Sudan. Anti-
government rebels took control of nearly all of the strategic city of Bor on Tuesday even as officials
announced that representatives from the government and the rebels had agreed to talks for the first time.


South Sudan rebels take most ofstrategic city ofBor


Associated Press

JUBA, South Sudan Anti-
government rebels in South
Sudan took control of nearly all of
a strategic city on Tuesday, even
as officials announced that repre-
sentatives from the government
and the rebels agreed to hold
talks for the first time.
The announcement that talks
would soon take place in neigh-
boring Ethiopia was the first po-
litical breakthrough since
ethnically based violence began
coursing through South Sudan
late on Dec. 15. The violence has
killed more than 1,000 people -
a number that is believed to be a
low estimate and has seen the
country's two most powerful eth-
nic groups fight each other
The U.S. envoy to the region,
Donald Booth, met with Presi-
dent Salva Kiir on Tuesday -
their fourth meeting in eight days
- and spoke on the phone with
the former vice president, Riek


Machar, who is accused by the
government of having tried to
carry out a coup, a charge he
denies.
Booth told reporters in Juba
that the commitment to meet by
the two sides was a "first step but
very important step" toward
achieving a cessation of hostili-
ties and substantive talks to re-
solve the underlying political
issues that could bring a halt to
the violence.
Earlier in the day, heavy fight-
ing erupted in Bor, the contested
provincial capital ofJonglei state,
which is a short drive from the
capital, Juba. Government troops
battled renegade forces loyal to
Machar including the Nuer tribal
militia known as the "White
Army," said military spokesman
Col. Philip Aguer
South Sudan's government had
been warning of a looming battle
for Bor, at one point saying 25,000
armed youths were moving to-
ward the city That number was


later lowered, but enough forces
converged Tuesday to take con-
trol of most or all of the city, said
a senior U.S. official who insisted
on anonymity
Bor is the town where gunfire
hit three U.S. military aircraft try-
ing to evacuate American citizens
on Dec 21, wounding four U.S.
service members. A pro-Machar
commander who defected from
South Sudan's military, Peter
Gadet, mobilized "elements of the
White Army" in a bid to retake the
town, according to Aguer The
White Army is so named because
of the ash fighters put on their
body to protect themselves from
insects.
The recapturing of Bor, which
is only about 75 miles from South
Sudan's capital, Juba, could give
Machar an upper hand at the ne-
gotiating table. But international
officials urged Machar not to
move his troops past Bor toward
the capital, Juba, said an interna-
tional official.


Police, troops heavy in bomb-hit Russian city


Associated Press


VOLGOGRAD, Russia-
Eerily empty buses lum-
bered through the streets,
police weighed down with
body armor warily watched
pedestrians near a fast-food
restaurant, and members of
Cossack units stood guard
at bus stops. Volgograd was
an ominous and jittery city
on Tuesday, after two sui-
cide bombings in two days
that killed 34 people.
"People are afraid it will
happen again; they're try-
ing not to go outside if they
don't have to," said 20-
year-old Yulia Kuzmina, a
student. "We get a feeling
that a war has started."
That is a worry that ex-
tends far beyond Volgograd.
Although there has been
no claim of responsibility
for the bombing of the
city's main railway station
and a trolleybus, suspicion
falls strongly on Islamist


Associated Press
A woman puts a flower outside a wreckage of a trolleybus
Tuesday in Volgograd, Russia.


insurgents, whose leader
ordered his adherents this
summer to do all they
could to derail the Winter
Olympics, which start
Feb. 7 in the Russian re-
sort city of Sochi.
Games organizers have
introduced some of the
most extensive identity
checks and security meas-


ures ever seen at an inter-
national sporting event
But even if security at the
Games is tight, many ana-
lysts suggest that the Vol-
gograd bombings show how
public transit in Sochi and
sites away from the sports
venues are vulnerable.
Police reinforcements
and Interior Ministry


troops have been sent into
Volgograd, regional police
official Andrei Pilipchuk
was quoted as telling the
Interfax news agency He
said more than 5,200 secu-
rity forces are deployed in
the city of 1 million, but did
not say how much of an in-
crease that was from nor-
mal levels.
Officers and security
guards carefully searched
the purses of young
women entering a shop-
ping center and waved
metal detectors over both
males and females.
The Cossacks guarding
some bus stops added an
unsettling note. Although
these units are officially
authorized volunteer pa-
trols, they are descendants
of the fierce horsemen who
protected the czars and
launched raids on Muslims
in the Russian Caucasus,
where the Islamist insur-
gency is now centered.


World BRIEFS

New Year


w
ts
er


-'Lu
Associated Press
Russian President
Vladimir Putin presents a
toast Tuesday during a
New Year's Eve dinner in
Khabarovsk, Russia's far
east.


Associated Press
Pope Francis holds a
monstrance Tuesday as
he celebrates a New
Year's Eve vespers
service in St. Peter's
Basilica at the Vatican.
The pope has used his
traditional year-end
prayer service of
thanksgiving to urge
people to ask
themselves: Did they
spend 2013 to further
their own interests or to
help others?

Revelers
welcome 2014
CANBERRA, Australia -
With fireworks, dancing and
late-night reverie, millions
around the world welcomed
2014 on Tuesday, gathering
for huge displays of jubila-
tion and unity as the new
year was arriving across 24
time zones.
In Australia, fireworks
sprayed from the sails of
the Sydney Opera House
and the city's harbor bridge
at midnight. Revelers in
Dubai awaited what was
supposed to be the world's
largest fireworks show.
In Ukraine, anti-
government protesters
hoped to set their own
record for the most people
to sing a national anthem at
the same time.
New Zealand bid farewell
to 2013 with fireworks
erupting from Auckland's
Sky Tower as cheering
crowds danced in the
streets of the South Pacific
island nation's largest city.
Known for glitz, glamor
and over-the-top achieve-
ments like the world's tallest
tower, Dubai hoped to
break another record by
creating the largest fire-
works show ever.
Organizers planned to
light up the city's coastline
with a flying falcon made
out of fireworks that would
move across a massive
man-made palm-shaped is-
land alongside a countdown
in fireworks.
Guinness World Record
officials will be on hand to
measure the scale of the
event.
In Tokyo, five priests at
the Zojoji temple used
ropes to swing a wooden
pole against a large bell,
sounding the first of 108
gongs to mark the new
year. Simultaneously,
"2014" lit up in white lights
on the modern Tokyo Tower
in the background.
China planned light
shows at part of the Great
Wall near Beijing and at the
Bund waterfront in Shang-
hai. The city of Wuhan in
central Hubei province
called off its fireworks show
and banned fireworks
downtown to avoid worsen-
ing its smog.
-From wire reports

Celebrate












SPORTS


Late collapse
leaves Dolphins
without plans for
January./B4



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


r0Golf/B 2
0 Tenn is/B2
Scoreboard/B3
I0 College football/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
NFL/B4


Yeldon key for No. 3 'Bama in Sugar Bowl, beyond


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS TJ. Yel-
don is a man of many yards and
few words, which so far has
suited third-ranked Alabama
quite well.
After this Thursday night's
Sugar Bowl against No. 11 Okla-
homa, though, some of the pro-
gram's leaders, namely
quarterback AJ McCarron, will
be leaving school. Then Yeldon,
whether he wants to or not, is
expected to become the face of
the Crimson Tide.
"We've got to try to get him to
talk more, step up and be in a
little more of a leadership role,"
McCarron said after the Tide's
arrival in New Orleans this


week. "But he's an unbelievable
back. He's done a lot for us in
two years."
No one's arguing with that
last part.
He gained more than 100
yards in his very first Alabama
game as a true freshman in 2012
and hasn't looked back. This
season, he inherited the start-
ing role that opened up when
Eddie Lacy turned pro, gaining
1,163 yards and scoring 13
touchdowns on 190 carries, an
average of 6.1 yards a carry
But for Alabama offensive co-
ordinator Doug Nussmeier,
those stats didn't tell the whole
story of the 6-foot-2, 218-pound
sophomore's development
"TJ. is a guy last year as he


came in had instant success
early, and one of the things that
people see when you talk about
the running back position is
they see what the player does
with the ball in his hands,"
Nussmeier said. "But there's so
much more to playing the posi-
tion. I think TJ. has really
grown in that aspect, his atten-
tion to detail and protections,
his understanding of the overall
See Page B3

Alabama running back T.J.
Yeldon (4) will likely become the
face of the Crimson Tide and is
expected to be a candidate for
next season's Heisman Trophy.
Associated Press


Grandaddy today


Associated Press
Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan leads the Cardinal into the 100th Rose Bowl against Michigan State today at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.

No. 5 Stanford, No. 4 Michigan State meet today in 1 00th Rose Bowl


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Stanford's
David Shaw and Michigan
State's Mark Dantonio have
built powerhouse teams over
the last few years, and so far
they've both stuck around when
bigger football powers with
deeper pockets came calling.
When the Spartans and Car-
dinal clash in the 100th edition
of the Rose Bowl today Danto-
nio and Shaw will demonstrate
the power of persistence in
building a winner
Shaw usually just chuckles
when he's connected with head
coaching vacancies in the NFL
or at the nation's top college
programs.
"To be honest, it's unbeliev-


ably flattering," he said Monday
"I think it's really cool."
In his own understated way,
Dantonio takes the same ap-
proach to their unpredictable
profession.
"When we came here seven
years ago, we made a statement
this is where we wanted to
come," Dantonio said. "We're
here now. We've accomplished
that goal. Now we need to figure
out, do we belong? That's an-
other opportunity, statement,
challenge."
Both coaches have turned
themselves into valuable prop-
erties by building formidable
programs and then staying at
two schools sometimes consid-
ered stepping stones instead of
destinations.


Shaw is 34-6 in three seasons
in charge at Stanford, banking
two Pac-12 titles during the re-
markable renaissance created
alongside departed coach Jim
Harbaugh. Dantonio is 63-29 at
Michigan State since 2007, win-
ning at least 11 games in three
of his last four seasons.
Such success quickly leads to
higher-profile opportunities,
and other winning coaches at
both schools have used these
jobs as springboards to big
money and power Tyrone Will-
ingham turned a moderately
successful tenure at Stanford
into the Notre Dame job in late
2001, while Nick Saban infa-
mously left Michigan State for
LSU shortly before the Spar-
tans' bowl game in late 1999.


But when Shaw and Dantonio
are asked about their own de-
sirability, both coaches play it
off with a combination of
amusement and outspoken loy-
alty to the schools that put them
in this position.
Shaw has been a part of four
straight trips to BCS bowls an
unthinkable standard just a few
years earlier at the academic
dynamo better known for Nobel
Prizes than football trophies.
Shaw isn't offended by the at-
tention he receives from other
schools, but he also has never
sounded terribly interested in
leaving his alma mater
He appeared at the top of
many Southern California fans'
See Page B3


Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher
signs new deal
TALLAHASSEE Florida
State coach Jimbo Fisher will
remain with the program
through 2018 after signing a
three-year contract extension.
Texas reportedly had interest
in Fisher replacing coach Mack
Brown. The top-ranked Semi-
noles face Auburn in the BCS
championship game Jan. 6.
Athletic director Stan Wilcox
said, "We're extremely
pleased with the direction of
our program and believe that
this new contract will assure
that coach Fisher is in place to
lead the Seminoles for a long
time to come."
Iowa State,
Michigan coach
Orr dies at 86
DES MOINES, Iowa Long-
time former basketball coach
Johnny Orr has died at 86.
His death was confirmed
Tuesday by Iowa State, where
Orr led the Cyclones to a
school-record 218 wins from
1980 until 1994.
Orr spent 29 seasons as a
Division I coach. Twelve of
them were at Michigan, where
he guided the Wolverines to
the national title game in 1976.
He spent three seasons at
Massachusetts.
He finished with a career
record of 466-346 and 10 NCAA
tournament appearances.
Jets' Rex, Idzik
show unified front
into offseason
FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -
Rex Ryan is "comfortable" with
his current contract, although
the New York Jets coach and
general manager John Idzik
would not address questions
about whether an extension is
in the works.
Ryan, who has one year left
on his deal, was retained for
next season after his job ap-
peared in jeopardy after finish-
ing 8-8 and missing the playoffs
for the third straight year. It had
been speculated that Idzik could
want to hire a coach of his
choice this offseason, but the
two presented a unified front
Tuesday at a news conference
to wrap up the season.
From wire reports


^ Going for 25th win in two years


OSU can hit

mark in Orange

Bowl vs. Clemson

Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE Ohio
State offensive lineman Corey
'S Linsley needed about a week to
get over the disappointment
SfGiven the stakes, that sounds
fair
If a play or two had been exe-
cuted a bit better, then maybe
Ohio State quarterback Braxton
Miller hands the ball off to
tC Carlos Hyde (34) during a prac-
tice session for the Orange Bowl
. ... ..on Monday in Davie. The team
will play Clemson in the Orange
Bowl on Friday.
Associated Press


Ohio State would have beaten
Michigan State for the Big Ten
title and wrapped up a spot
in the BCS national champi-
onship game. Instead, the
seventh-ranked Buckeyes (12-1)
not only tasted defeat for the
first time in 705 days, but were
knocked out of the title picture
and wound up getting invited to
the Orange Bowl.
As far as consolation prizes go,
that's not exactly a rough one.
"It really stung, obviously,"
Linsley said. "I think I can
speak for everybody on the
team when I say it really stung.
But with guys like this, with the
character we have on this team
... it doesn't take a long duration
of time to get over something
like that. We know we're going
to face bigger tests in life."
The next test awaiting Ohio
State is No. 12 Clemson (10-2),
which is back in the Orange
Bowl for the second time in


three seasons. And even though
the crystal football is out of
their reach, the Buckeyes insist
there's plenty of reasons to be
ready for Friday
There's the not-so-small mat-
ter of going out winners, which
is always a goal. A top-five rank-
ing to finish the year would
likely be within reach. On top of
all that, a victory would make
Ohio State 25-1 over Urban
Meyer's two seasons in Colum-
bus matching the winningest
two-year stretch in school his-
tory- plus make the Buckeyes'
coach 5-0 all-time in BCS games.
"Since you mention that,
that's a huge thing at Ohio
State," running back Carlos
Hyde said. "This program has
so much tradition and to be one
of the first teams to be 25-1,
that's huge here. That's defi-
nitely like history, right there."
See Page B3


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Banner year


Associated Press
Jack Nicklaus, left, talks with Tiger Woods after Woods won the Memorial golf tournament on June
3, 2012, at the Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio. Having won 14 majors in his career, 2014
is an important year for Woods, as he nears Nicklaus' record of 18 majors won.


Age, not courses,

makes this a big

year for Woods

Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii Four
years later, the words of Jack
Nicklaus resonate even louder
"If Tiger is going to pass my
record, this is a big year for him
in that regard," Nicklaus said at
the start of 2010.
Nicklaus was referring to his
record 18 majors, and the major
championship venues that fa-
vored Woods Augusta Na-
tional, Pebble Beach and St.
Andrews, all courses where he
had won before. Woods never
had a serious chance on the
back nine of any major that
year His tally remains at 14.
And that makes 2014 even
bigger
Woods is facing another fa-
vorable menu of major champi-
onship sites. He already has
won majors at Augusta, Royal
Liverpool (British Open) and
Valhalla (PGA Championship).
The U.S. Open is at Pinehurst
No. 2, were Woods was third in
1999 and runner-up in 2005.
"I'm trending in the right
way," Woods said recently "I've
finished third, second ... you get
the picture, right? OK."
A new year begins Friday at
the Tournament of Champions
at Kapalua, and while Woods is
among PGA Tour winners who
chose to sit this one out, his per-
formance in the majors this
year figures to be a major topic
of conversation over the next
eight months.
"I always think that the Mas-
ters signals a lot with Tiger,"
NBC analyst Johnny Miller said


during a conference call. "If he
doesn't win the Masters, I think
it gives a great, big 'Uh-oh,' be-
cause that course is so perfect
for his game. I'll leave it at that.
But if he wants to get off on the
right foot, I think he needs to
get off at the Masters."
There's a big difference with
Woods the last time he faced such
a tantalizing rotation of majors.
Nicklaus spoke of a "big year"
when Woods was more of a mys-
tery than ever No one had seen
Woods in more than a month
going into 2010 and didn't even
know where he was. His per-
sonal life at home, his mystique
in golf and his appeal in the cor-
porate world were crumbling in
spectacular fashion.
Now, he is No. 1 in the world.
He won five times last year
against some of the strongest
fields. He won the Vardon Trophy
for the ninth time, the PGA Tour
money title for the 10th time and
was voted PGA Tour player of the
year for the llth time.
Still, there remains an uncer-
tainty about Woods, mainly be-
cause he hasn't won a major
since 2008 and he hasn't broken
70 on the weekend of any major
since the 2011 Masters. That's a
startling statistic for a guy who
has built a reputation as golf's
greatest closer
"It's getting much harder for
Tiger because guys are not wilt-
ing on him," Miller said. "So
he's got a double whammy in
that he's not able to close as
well as he used to, and then the
guys are more heroic against
him like they never were be-
fore. ... Guys are saying, 'Yeah,
you're Tiger Woods and you're
the greatest ever, but now at
your age, I can beat you.' He
needs to do it in the majors."
Will familiar venues help?
Not necessarily
Woods forever is linked with


Augusta National because of
his record score (270) and mar-
gin of victory (12 shots) in the
1997 Masters, his back-to-back
wins (2001-02) and that magic
moment with his chip on the
16th hole that led to his playoff
win in 2005. But he has not
added to his wardrobe of green
jackets in eight years, his
longest drought in any major
Who saw that coming?
And while he is trending in the
right direction at Pinehurst
No. 2, the Donald Ross design
has gone through a restoration
project that eliminated rough
and replaced it with sandy
dunes, pine straw and wire grass.
Woods won the 2006 British
Open at Royal Liverpool when
it was firm and fiery, a links that
was more yellow than green be-
cause of a dry summer Woods
hit only one driver the entire
week. It might not be the same
course if England gets a wet
summer- and yes, it does rain
in England and players see
Hoylake green, lush and longer
Valhalla is where Woods
made what he considers the
biggest putt of his career, a
6-footer on the final hole for
birdie to force a playoff that he
won over Bob May in the PGA
Championship. It gave Woods
his third straight major in that
amazing summer of 2000.
If that seems like a long time
ago, it was. Woods will not have
seen Valhalla in 14 years when
he returns this summer
The best gauge of Woods and
his pursuit of Nicklaus is more
about him than the course he is
playing. More than St. Andrews
or Pebble Beach, more than
Hoylake or Valhalla, it's best to
consider Southern Hills. That's
the course that supposedly gave
Woods fits because of its tight,
bending, tree-lined fairways.


Come out and



support CR Open


es, it truly is a milestone
for the 10th annual Crys-
tal River Open Tennis
Tournament There are not that
many tournaments around
nowadays that can boast a
decade of
continu-
ous exis-
tence in
... Citrus

County.
In the
past, we
have had a
~couple of
them; if I
Eric van den remember
Hoogen correctly
ON TENNIS we even
___________ had one
that lasted
for two decades at Whispering
Pines Park. The organizers
would like to try to get every-
body who has ever played in one
of the past nine tournaments to
play in this 10th one, even if you
could just come and support the
cause and the participants.
Extra side activities are being
offered, like a fastest serve con-
test in which you can compare
the speed of your serve to the
ones you see on TV Please help
spread the word: you can use
your Facebook or any other so-
cial media contacts and promote
the tournament. Ultimately our
goal is to make life a little easier
for the less fortunate among us.
The more participants come to
play and watch, the more people
we can help.
The event will be held on
Feb. 8-9, at Crystal River High
School. This tournament will
offer Men's, Women's, and Mixed
doubles divisions, A,B and C.
The entry fee can be non-per-
ishable food and/or barely used
clothing and/or $20 per person
for a single event, and just an
extra $10 donation for a second
event. Each participant will be
guaranteed two matches, and
prizes will be awarded to divi-
sion champions. The organizers
would like to stress the point
that they will adjust the sched-
ule any way possible to allow
you to participate if you have
other commitments, tennis or
otherwise.
Tournament directors: Cindy
Reynolds, Sally deMontfort at
352-795-9693 or deMont@
embarqmail.com; Eric van den
Hoogen at 352-382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
Citrus Area Senior
Ladies 3.0-3.5
Tuesday League
League play will resume Jan. 7,
2014.
To play in this league, a player
must be at least 50 years of age or
older, with a 3.0/3.5 rating. The
league is always looking for players
to sub for teams. For information,
email chairwoman Willy Pouderoyen
at pouderoyen@tampabay.rr.com or
352-382-3157.


Thursday Morning
Citrus Area
Doubles League
Standings: Skyview Advantage,
46 points; Pine Ridge Mavericks,
45; Skyview, 42; Tennis Bratz, 39;
Pine Ridge Fillies, 38; Sugarmill
Oakies, 35; Bicentennial Babes, 33.
League will resume play on
Jan.9,2014.
In this league one point is
awarded per set won.
For information, contact chair-
woman Patsy Giella at patsytennis
@aol.com
Ladies on the Court
Ladies on The Court play at
8:30 a.m. Thursday at Le Grone
Park courts in Crystal River. Bring a
new can of balls and 50 cents. Two
out of three tiebreak sets are played.
For information, contact Barbara
Shook at dshook@tampabay.rr.com
or 352-795-0872.
The Friday Senior
Ladies Doubles
3.0-3.5 League
Standings: Riverhaven 25 points;
Pine Ridge, 20; Bicentennial, 13;
Meadowcrest, 10; Citrus Hills, 3.
League will resume play on
Jan.3,2014.
All players must be at least 50
years of age with a 3.0-3.5 rating.
Players cannot be both a member of
a team and a sub. For information,
contact chairwoman Linda Frankum
at 795-3861 or Ifra234@
hotmail.com.
USTA Leagues
Leagues will start playing this up-
coming weekend.
If you have any questions for in-
formation in our District 4 (south)
call or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-
572-7157 or vacocala
@gmail.com or ustaflorida.com.
Tournaments
Jan. 19-20, 2014: JCT
(Junior Circuit Tennis) Tournament
of Champions at Sugarmill
Woods/Oak Village Tennis Complex.
More information can be found on
the JCT site on facebook or contact:
Judy Jeanette at 352-232-0321 or
by e-mail jjeanette3saj@aol.com.
Jan. 25-26 2014: Simon Tofte-
gaard Memorial Junior Tennis Tour-
nament to be held at Delta Woods in
Spring Hill. For information, go to
nctf.usta.com.
March 15-16, 2014: Third annual
Vertical Spring Classic at Crystal
River High School. For more infor-
mation or to sign up please contact
one of the following people: Tourna-
ment Directors; Cindy Reynolds, AJ
Glenn at 352-697-3089 or
ajglenn03@gmail.com;
Sally deMontfort at 352-795-9693 or
deMont@embarqmail.com; Eric van
den Hoogen at 352-382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com


LocalLEADERS


HOLE-IN-ONE
On Dec. 26, Don Spears aced the 8th hole at Twisted
Oaks Golf Club. Spears used a 6 iron to score the hole-
in-one from 152 yards out. Jack Gresham and Dale
Helton witnessed the shot.
BRENTWOOD
Dec. 28, Brentwood Farms Saturday scramble results.
First -4
Jim Pearson, Bob Staker,
Mona Evans, Steve Lenard
Second -4
Art Miller, Roy DuBiou,
Jim Fitzsimmons
Third -3
Vaughn Thornton, Jennie Diaz,
Jan Lassiter, Bob Reigner
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 Don Ginnis
No. 4 Dick Emberley
CITRUS HILLS
MEN
On Dec. 18, the Citrus Hills Men's Golf Association on
the Oaks Golf Course played "Red, White and Blue."
First -29
Pete Lindley, Jerry Krause,
Paul Rosenow, George Lowell
Second -28
Rich Messina, Chuck Hanner,
Jack Hammon, Len Feutz
Third -27 (MOC)
Bob Kohm, Angelo Previte,
Rennie Anllo, Bob Fabrie
Fourth -27 (MOC)
Ron David, Jim Remler,
John Daley, Don Gatz
WOMEN
On Tuesday, Dec. 17, the Citrus Hills Ladies Golf
Association participated in a game called "Strike
Three." This was a individual net game in which at
the completion of 18 holes of golf, each player to-
taled up their best 15 holes for their total net score.
The playing field was divided into two flights and
the winners in each flight were:
Flight 1
First 49
Ruth Rosenow
Second 52
Dorothy Ammerman
Flight 2


First
Diane Halloran
Second
Kate Yazbak
Birdies:
No. 3
No. 7
No. 9


Kate Yazbak
Ruth Rosenow
Sue Burgum


No. 1 Barbara Shipman
Nos. 8 & 15 Kay Close
CITRUS SPRINGS
On Dec. 21, the Citrus Springs Men's Association
played 3 best balls.
First 185
Pete Clutter, Dave Balas,
Leon Smith, Emil Colletti
Second 192
Bob Geci, Woody Miner,
Bob Hunt, Rocky Marziani
Closest to the pins:
No. 4 Bill Curry
No. 8 Leon Smith
No. 11 Bob Hunt
No. 14 Dave Balas
No.16 Bob Hunt
On Dec. 24, the Citrus Springs Men's Association
played 2 best balls on 4's and 5's and 1 best ball
on 3's.
First 105
Harvey Jenkins, Walt Norton,
Russ Woodworth, Jerry Feher
Second 110
Rick Hancock, Bob Geci,
Woody Miner, Mike Jarman
Third 114
Dave Balas, John Lycke,
Leon Smith, Rocky Marziani
Closest to the pins:
No. 4 Mike Jarman
No. 8 Walt Norton
No. 11 Dave Balas
No. 14 Rick Hancock
No. 16 Mike Jarman
On Dec. 26, the Citrus Springs Men's Association
played birdies or better.
First 94
Pete Clutter, Glen Robertson,
Woody Miner, Leon Smith
Second 90
Rick Hancock, Walt Norton,
Jack Williamson, Barry Bullington
Closest to the pins:
No. 4 Russ Woodworth
No. 8 Bill Curry
No. 11 Rick Hancock
No. 14 Don Gonczi
No. 16 Rick Hancock
EL DIABLO
Results of the Dec. 22 "2 Person Scramble."
First 72/52
Jon & BusterThompson
Second 72/53
Dale &Wendy Rasmussen
Third 76/53
Terry & John Hrobuchak
Fourth 82/55


John & Maryanne Conroy
Fifth 84/55
Ireen Fisher & Gaby Thompson
Honorable mention:
70/60 Tony Borgia & Mark Matthews
75/57 Jon & Hattie Townsend
Closest to the pin:
No. 3 Henry McAloan
No. 6 Jon Townsend
No. 13 Ireen Fisher
No. 15 Cheryl Beaudet
This group meets every Sunday at 10 a.m. and is open
to the public. Must sign up no later than Friday.
Dec. 23, Monday 9-Hole Mixed Scramble results.
First 31/22.25
Jon Townsend, Pete Palmer,
Jerry Finner, Wendy Rasmussen
Second 31/22.75
Jim Rutherford, LarryThornburg,
Joyce Britnell, Bob Montgomery
Third 32/23.5
Dale Rasmussen, Dave Whitacre,
Hattie Townsend, Kath Parson
Fourth 32/24.5
Doc Freer, Kevin Gompers,
Mike Pombier, Mel Rutherford
Fifth 34/25.5
Bob Marino, Jim Bancroft,
Ric Dias, Debbie Marino
Closest to the pin:
No. 13 Dave Whitacre
No. 14 Jon, Pete, Jerry, Wendy
No. 15 Jon Townsend
No. 17 Jim, Larry, Joyce, Bob
Birdie points (10):
Jim, Larry, Joyce, Bob
This group meets every Monday at 2 p.m. and is open
to the public. Please sign up no later than Sunday. Call
the clubhouse at 352-465-0986.
LAKESIDE
Dec. 26, LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League
results.
Carole Seifert +11
Patsy (the leg) Delp +5
Closest to the pin:
No. 2 June Goyette
No. 8 Mary McConnell
No. 15 June Goyette
LakeSide Ladies PQL plays every Thursday morning
at LakeSide Golf & Country Club in Inverness. No dues
or membership are required. Call Jan at 352-344-9550
for details.
PLANTATION
Monday, Dec. 16, nine-hole points results.
J. Hylton +3
H. Sullivan +2
J. Cioe +2
E. Gerrits +2


E. Hogan +1
D. Stickney +1
S. Pfannenstein +1
Wednesday, Dec. 18, "18 Hole Points/ Skins"
results.
C. Clabaugh +2-Front
B. Matthews +2-Front
J. Wentzel +2-Front
B. Pridemore +2-Front
F McGuire +1-Back
Thursday, Dec. 19, nine-hole points results.
S. Pfannenstein +7
D. Patel +4
J. Coie +3
T Botilla +2
Saturday, Dec. 21, 18 Hole Points" results.
D.Taylor +9
J. Hylton +8
B. Reynolds +7
L.Cioe +5
T. Hume +3
J. Brothers, Sr +3
K. Shields +2
D. Pfannenstein +2
Sunday, Dec. 22, Mixed Group "Sunday Swingers"
Scramble results.
First
Lillian Brown, Dwight Brown,
Brenda Ferrell
Second
Vivienne Walsh, Bob Walsh,
Kim Hastings, Bob Hastings Jr.
Third
Doris Osburn, Ray Osburn,
Kathy McGillis, George McGillis
Fourth
Gail Bolle, Wayne Bolle,
Jo-Ann St. Jean, Bob St. Jean
Fifth
Trudy Smith, Ruth Zaring,
Tom Gobel
Sixth
Carolyn McNeil, Nancy Sullivan,
Ann Marie Lohr, Ed Lohr
SUGARMILL WOODS
WOMEN
On Dec. 11, the SugarmillWoods Country Club LGA
played "Low Gross/Low Net."
Flight 1
Low gross 83
Karen Taylor
Low net 72
Lorraine Dayton
2nd net 74
Karen Stacy
Flight 2
Low gross 88
Elizabeth McLeod
Low net 71


Martha Renfroe
Flight 3
Low gross 97
Sandra Hougham
Low net (tie) 72
Dyane Koskela
3rd net (tie) 77
Janice Doyle, Nancy Kiner
Flight 4
Low gross 105
Bonnie Demianczyk
Low net 71
Barbara Turska
2nd net 70
Fran Alviggi
Flight 5
Low gross 95
Mary Stassi
Low net 68
Louise Schmid
On Dec. 18, the Sugarmill Woods Country Club
played "4 person cha cha cha Best 1,2,3."
First 130
Linda Compson, Paula VanTassell,
Shirley Dalton, Mary Joy Speicher
Second 134
Bea Raymond, Pauline Boatz,
Mary Tarorick, Catherine Holden
Third 135
Joyce Engelbrecht, Sue Phillips,
Shirley Gennero, Louise Schmid
Fourth (tie) 138
Louise Bury, Karen Hall,
Sue Umrn, Chris Chmielewski,
June McSeveney, Trish Reeb,
Kay Walsh, Joan Hromnak
MEN
On Dec. 26, the SugarmillWoods Country Club Men's
Golf Association played "Best 2 of 4 + Bonus Balls."
First -30
Bill Butterworth, Jim Bodenstein,
Bill Engelbrecht, Bill Lent
Second -22
Carl Pedersen, Dave Davenport,
Ron Rosenwald, Bob Carriveau
Third -21
DickTuxbury, John Bradley,
Paul VanTassell, Lou Klingensmith
Golfers of the week:
Low gross 70
Bill Butterworth
Low net 65
Bill Butterworth
Low net Sr. 65
Stan Fleming
Closest to the pin:
Cypress No. 3 Dave Davenport
Cypress No. 6 John Raymond
Pine No. 4 John Bradley
Pine No. 7 Bob Mason


B2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


GOLF/TENNIS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Bowl glance
Thursday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14
Friday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall 31, Maryland 20
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Syracuse 21, Minnesota 17
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Washington 31, BYU 16
Saturday, Dec. 28
Pinstripe Bowl
At NewYork
Notre Dame 29, Rutgers 16
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina 39, Cincinnati 17
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando
Louisville 36, Miami 9
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Kansas State 31, Michigan 14
Monday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Navy 24, Middle Tennessee 6
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi 25, Georgia Tech 17
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon 30, Texas 7
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas Tech 37, Arizona State 23
Tuesday, Dec. 31
AdvoCare V100 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5), late
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), late
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Rice (9-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), late
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), late
Today, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4),
Noon (ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4),
Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2),
1 p.m. (ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2),
7:30 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 1 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddycom Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2),
9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)



Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA Football
Today
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Georgia 9 9 (60) Nebraska
Heart of Dallas Bowl
NorthTexas 6/ 6/ (54/)UNLV
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin 2 1/ (51) South Carolina
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
LSU 7 8 (49) Iowa
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 1/ 6/ (42/) Michigan St.
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor 17% 16% (70) UCF
Thursday
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama 14% 16 (51%) Oklahoma
Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri Pk 1 (61) Oklahoma St.
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio St. 5 3 (69) Clemson
Saturday
BBVA Corn pass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt 2 2% (54) Houston
Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.


Ball St. 9 7% (64) Arkansas St.
Monday
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida St. 9/2 8/2 (67/2) Auburn
NFL Playoffs
Saturday
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Indianapolis 1 2/2 (46/2) Kansas City
at Philadelphia 2/ 2 /2 (54/2) New Orleans
Sunday
atCincinnati 5 7 (46/2) San Diego
San Francisco 1 2/2 (48/2) atGreen Bay



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 13 15 .464 -
Boston 13 17 .433 1
Brooklyn 10 20 .333 4
NewYork 9 21 .300 5
Philadelphia 9 21 .300 5


SCOREBOARD


Foir the record


F== loida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Tuesday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
p0A,, 1-4-5
PLAY 4 (early)
B8-5-2-4
f .J All other lottery

numbers were
unavailable at
press time. Go to
Swww.flalottery.com
for the winning
numbers.

Monday's winningnumbers and payouts:

Fantasy 5:6 8 10 -12 -25
5-of-5 1 winner $226,409.43
4-of-5 506 $72.00
3-of-5 13,062 $7.50
Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Southern Methodist at Cincinnati
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Temple at Rutgers
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Gator Bowl Georgia vs. Nebraska
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Heart of Dallas Bowl North Texas vs.
UNLV
1 p.m. (ABC) Capital One Bowl South Carolina vs.
Wisconsin
1 p.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl Iowa vs. LSU
5 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl Michigan State vs. Stanford
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl Baylor vs. Central Florida
1 a.m. (ESPNU) Outback Bowl Iowa vs. LSU (Same-day
Tape)
3 a.m. (ESPNU) TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl Georgia vs.
Nebraska (Same-day Tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl -
Middle Tennessee State vs. Navy (Taped)
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
9 p.m. (ESPN2) American Family Insurance Skills
Challenge (Taped)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NBC) 2014 Winter Classic: Detroit Red Wings vs.
Toronto Maple Leafs
10 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Vancouver Canucks
OLYMPICS
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Trials-- Speed Skating: Men's
10,000m & Women's 5000m
SOCCER
7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Swansea
City vs. Manchester City
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Southampton
vs. Chelsea
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. Tottenham Hotspur
TENNIS
2 p.m. (TENNIS) WTAASB Classic, Early Rounds 5
(Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (TENNIS) WTAASB Classic, Early Rounds 6
(Same-day Tape)
6 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Brisbane International, Round of 16
(Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (TENNIS) Hopman Cup: United States vs. France
(Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Southeast Division


Miami
Atlanta
Washington
Charlotte
Orlando

Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Milwaukee
WES

San Antonio
Houston
Dallas
New Orleans
Memphis
IN


W L Pct
24 7 .774
17 14 .548
14 14 .500
14 18 .438
10 20 .333
Central Division
W L Pct
24 5 .828
14 19 .424
12 17 .414
10 20 .333
6 24 .200
STERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
24 7 .774
21 12 .636
18 13 .581
14 15 .483
13 17 .433
Northwest Division


W L Pct
Oklahoma City 25 5 .833
Portland 24 7 .774
Minnesota 15 16 .484
Denver 14 16 .467
Utah 10 24 .294
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 21 12 .636
Phoenix 19 11 .633
Golden State 19 13 .594
L.A. Lakers 13 18 .419
Sacramento 9 20 .310
Monday's Games
Washington 106, Detroit 99
Dallas 100, Minnesota 98
Chicago 95, Memphis 91
New Orleans 110, Portland 108
Miami 97, Denver 94
Utah 83, Charlotte 80
Phoenix 107, L.A. Clippers 88
Tuesday's Games
Atlanta at Boston, late
Cleveland at Indiana, late
Golden State at Orlando, late
Sacramento at Houston, late
Brooklyn at San Antonio, late
Toronto at Chicago, late
Portland at Oklahoma City, late
Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Orlando at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
NewYork at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Atlantic Division


Boston
Tampa B
Montrea
Detroit
Toronto
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsbunrg
Washing
Philadel
N.Y Rar
New Jer
Columbu
Carolina
N.Y Isla


Chicago
St. Louis
Colorad
Dallas
Minnesc
Winnipe
Nashvill


Anaheim
San Jos
Los Anc
Vancouv
Phoenix
Calgary
Edmontc


3ay


W L OT Pts GF
2611 2 54114
2312 4 50110
23 14 3 49 99
1814 9 45107
2016 5 45115
1718 7 41118
1520 5 35 95
1124 4 26 71


Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
3h 41 2911 1 59130
gton 40 2015 5 45122
phia 39 1916 4 42101
ngers 40 19 19 2 40 94
*sey 40 16 16 8 40 95
us 39 1718 4 38106
S 39 14 16 9 37 91
nders 40 1221 7 31102
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
S 42 28 7 7 63158
S 38 26 7 5 57137
o 38 2311 4 50109
38 1912 7 45112
ota 41 20 16 5 45 96
g 41 1818 5 41111
e 40 18 18 4 40 95
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
S 41 28 8 5 61131
e 39 25 8 6 56128
leles 40 2511 4 54108
ver 41 23 11 7 53111
38 1910 9 47116
39 14 19 6 34 95
tn 41 1324 4 30106


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia 4, Vancouver 3, SO
Ottawa 3, Washington 1
Chicago 1, Los Angeles 0
Nashville 6, Detroit 4
Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, late
N.Y Rangers at Florida, late
St. Louis at Minnesota, late
N.Y Islanders at Boston, late
Montreal at Carolina, late
Buffalo at Winnipeg, late
San Jose at Anaheim, late
Los Angeles at Dallas, late
Columbus at Colorado, late
Philadelphia at Calgary, late
Edmonton at Phoenix, late
Today's Games
Toronto vs. Detroit at Ann Arbor, Ml, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Nashville at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


No. 6 Baylor (11-1) vs.
No. 15 Central Florida
(11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Line: Baylor by 16 1/2.
Series Record: First meeting.
What's at stake
Both teams are playing in a BCS
bowl for the first time. Baylor has been
building toward this in its six seasons
under Art Briles after making appear-
ances in smaller bowls the previous
three years. A decided underdog, Cen-
tral Florida is trying to cap off the best
season in school history and prove it
was worthy of a BCS bowl berth.
Key matchup
Central Florida's defense against
Baylor's offense all of it. The Bears
led the nation in scoring at over 53
points per game and in total offense
with 624.5 yards, which was second-
most in FBS history by percentage
points behind Houston in 1989 and
50 more than any other team this sea-
son. What makes Baylor so good is that
it gains all those yards with a near-
equal reliance on passing and run-
ning, leaving the Knights with a tough
decision on what to try stopping.
Players to watch
Baylor: QB Bryce Petty The junior
led the nation in yards per completion
at 17.4, was second in passing effi-



TODAY
Continued from Page B1

wish lists earlier this month, but
openly laughed at the notion of moving
south.
"I don't mind it, (but) I have no de-
sires to pursue another job," said
Shaw, who has nine years of NFL
coaching experience. "I have not and
don't plan on interviewing with any-
body I think it's really nice that my
name gets batted around ... but hon-
estly, I'm looking forward to playing
this game and getting into the offsea-
son and starting to put together an-
other winning season next year"
Michigan State athletic director
Mark Hollis already has discussed a
raise with Dantonio, who has ap-
peared on speculative lists of candi-
dates for Texas' vacancy Hollis also
plans to bump the pay of Dantonio's as-
sistant coaches.
Although he claims to be flattered by
the idea of his candidacy elsewhere,
Dantonio said he's happy with the im-
pressive program he has built in East
Lansing.
The coaches share more than loyalty
Stanford and Michigan State both em-
brace hard-nosed, run-first football
with suffocating defenses led by coor-



GOING
Continued from Page B1

If Hyde needed any extra reason to
be inspired for his college finale, it's
being played about 100 miles from
Naples., where he attended high
school. But to hear him talk on Tuesday,
playing a game like this in any locale
would have been good enough for him.
"This is a BCS bowl. This is still a
huge game," Hyde said. "You don't re-
ally need too much motivation. Even
though you came up short to play for
the (national championship), you know,
this is still a huge game. Just got to get
past that last game. I'm sure we are
past that. I feel like we are. You don't
really need too much motivation."
But the chance for an eye-popping
number doesn't hurt, either
Over the past decade when teams
playing up to 14 games in a season has
become more and more commonplace
- the only programs to go 25-1 or bet-
ter in a two-year span are USC, Boise
State and TCU.
"That's a lot of wins, isn't it?," asked
Ohio State offensive lineman Jack Me-
whort, smiling.
He paused for a slight moment, as if
the number really was hitting him.



YELDON
Continued from Page B1

scheme, the blocking schemes and how
we're doing things up front to create
holes for him. He's really grown in that
way this season."
Yeldon said he placed increased em-
phasis this season on "learning the
game and understanding more of my
blocks."
He figured if he did that, the yards,
touchdowns and wins would take care
of themselves.
"I didn't really set goals," Yeldon said.
"I just came out wanting to help my
team and be a better player this year


than I was last year"
If Yeldon plays in the Sugar Bowl the
way he has most of this season, he'll
likely be among the first mentioned in
the discussion of 2014 Heisman Trophy
hopefuls.
His teammates expected that because
of his performance on the field. As for
how much Yeldon will buy into any pub-
licity campaigns to keep Heisman vot-
ers focused on him, well, that remains to
be seen.
"I don't think too much about that,"
Yeldon said.
Offensive lineman Cyrus Kouandjio
called Yeldon, "camera shy"
"All he wants to do is just dominate.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 B3


ciency at 179.2 and eighth in passing
yards per game at 320.3. He has sev-
eral talented receivers and a running
back (Lache Seastrunk) who can take
the pressure off.
Central Florida: RB Storm Johnson.
He led the American Athletic Confer-
ence in rushing with 1,015, touch-
downs with 14 and all-purpose yards
with 1,276. The Knights could use a big
game from him to help keep Baylor's
offense off the field.
Facts & figures
Baylor scored 70 or more points four
times during the regular season. It also
scored 28 points in a quarter seven
times, matching the number of times it
had in 1,137 previous games all-time.
... Central Florida finished 15th in the
BCS rankings, highest in school his-
tory, after winning the inaugural ACC
title. ... The Bears won their first Big
12 title since the conference was
formed in 1996 and their sixth confer-
ence title overall.... UCF played eight
games decided by seven points or less,
including five by three points or less.
... Baylor is known for its offense, but
its defense was sixth nationally in
yards per play allowed (4.53), seventh
in tackles for loss per game (7.9) and
first downs allowed (213). ... UCF QB
Brian Bortles was ninth nationally in
passing efficiency (163.3) and 18th in
passing yards per game (273.3).


dinators Derek Mason and Pat Nar-
duzzi two rising coaches who might
be better candidates for new jobs than
their bosses.
Shaw respects Dantonio for his han-
dling of starting middle linebacker
Max Bullough, who won't play in the
Rose Bowl after a rules violation.
Shaw thought back to his painful deci-
sion two years ago to suspend Shayne
Skov for a game after the star line-
backer was arrested.
"There's a guy that's very similar,"
Shaw said. "Your game-day leader,
your middle linebacker, the guy that
sets your defense, the guy that tells
everybody what to do. Being a head
coach, it's your responsibility Actions
like that, as a head coach, even help
you in your locker room because guys
know where the line is and they know
that nobody is bigger than the program.
"I applaud Coach Dantonio for that,
because it doesn't happen everywhere.
There are a lot of places where you get
a slap on the wrist and they bench you
for a practice, and then play you in the
game."
Dantonio said Kyler Elsworth is
likely to start at middle linebacker in
Bullough's place, but Darien Harris
also will play the position. Bullough's
replacements will keep his on-field re-
sponsibilities, including checking
down on certain plays.


"There's a lot of hours that went into
that," Mewhort continued. "So 25 wins,
when you see behind the scenes, it
wouldn't surprise you. Obviously,
we're at 24 right now and it doesn't
surprise me that we're at 24 because
of the way we've prepared and the
hours that we've put into this. To get
No. 25 would obviously be amazing. I
don't know the historical significance,
but as a Buckeye football team, we'd
be really excited about it."
There would be any number of rea-
sons for the Buckeyes to seem less
than thrilled about their bowl situa-
tion. Settling for anything but a shot at
the national title is understandably
difficult. They came to South Florida
missing some key players and with
others injured. A flu bug has ripped
through the team this week, even af-
fecting quarterback Braxton Miller on
Tuesday
Instead, they say the adversity and
disappointment with the Big Ten loss
- 34-24 to Michigan State, which
earned a Rose Bowl nod is fueling
them.
"It does make it easier when you do
have that pain inside of you to teach
young guys how to handle that," Buck-
eyes offensive coordinator Tom Her-
man said. "But at the end of the day,
we want to win them all."

That's all that's on his mind," Kouand-
jio said. "So I can see him as a Heisman
candidate."
With the emergence this season of
Kenyan Drake in the 'Bama backfield,
Yeldon has taken on somewhat of a
power back role. He takes pride in the
balance and strength he exhibits while
bulling his way through tacklers for
tough yards. But he adds: "I've got some
speed, too."
Sooners defensive tackle Chuka Ndu-
lue said he fully expects Yeldon to be the
best running back he's faced this season.
"For a guy to be that strong, you don't
expect him to be able to move side-to-
side," Ndulue said. "You need more
than one guy to bring him down on most
of the film we've watched and that's
what jumps out to me."


Kouandjio said he has often marveled
Yeldon's lateral quickness.
"That's the most remarkable thing,"
Kouandjio said. "He just runs straight
and a second later he'll be over there
and two guys are on the floor where they
thought he was going to be."
Whether Alabama can get Yeldon to
be a little less elusive off the field re-
mains to be seen, but McCarron said he
intends to stay in touch with the running
back and offer whatever advice he can.
"TJ. just kind of goes with the flow He
doesn't really tell anybody what to do or
get on to them," McCarron said. "So I'll
try to teach him as much as possible."


Fiesta Bowl CAPSULE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Miami Dolphins outside linebacker Koa Misi, center, watches during the second half Sunday against the New York
Jets in Miami Gardens. The Jets defeated the Dolphins 20-7.






Tough collapse


Setback ensures

idle January for

Miami Dolphins

Associated Press

DAVIE Cleaning out his locker
Monday, Miami Dolphins receiver
Mike Wallace briefly examined a
pair of gloves and took a whiff be-
fore tossing them in the trash.
The aroma of the Dolphins' late-
season collapse will linger, however
To make the postseason for the
first time in five years, all Miami
needed was to win one of its final
two games against the Buffalo Bills
or the New York Jets, two teams out
of the playoff chase. Instead, the
Dolphins lost to both by a combined
score of 39-7 to finish 8-8, ensuring
another idle January
"Definitely a bad feeling, one
we've got to make sure we don't feel
again," Wallace said.
The holiday-season swoon raises
questions about the future of sixth-
year general manager Jeff Ireland
and second-year coach Joe Philbin.
A midseason bullying scandal still
under NFL investigation might also
weigh in any decision by owner
Stephen Ross.
Philbin said he was already look-
ing toward 2014.
"I have a lot of faith and confi-
dence in myself and the staff and in
our players that we can make the
corrections necessary to lead this
team to play up to its potential and
consistently compete for champi-
onships," Philbin said. "That's what
I said the day I got here. I stand by
what I said the day I got here, and
I'm confident I can do that."
When asked if he had received
assurances from Ross that he would
return next season, Philbin said,
"We haven't even talked about any
of that stuff."
One option for Ross is to order
changes in Philbin's staff, starting
with offensive coordinator Mike
Sherman, whose unit ranked 27th


NFL final standings


y-New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-lndianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Houston


y-Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland


y-Denver
x-Kansas City
x-San Diego
Oakland


Philadelphia
Dallas
N.Y Giants
Washington


y-Carolina
x-New Orleans
Atlanta
Tampa Bay


y-Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota


y-Seattle
x-San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis
x-clinched playoff
y-clinched divisic

Tennessee 16, H


AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
12 4 0 .750 444
8 8 0 .500 290
8 8 0 .500 317
6 10 0 .375 339
South
W L T Pct PF
11 5 0 .688 391
7 9 0 .438 362
4 12 0 .250 247
2 14 0 .125 276
North
W L T Pct PF
11 5 0 .688 430
8 8 0 .500 379
8 8 0 .500 320
4 12 0 .250 308
West
W L T Pct PF
13 3 0 .813 606
11 5 0 .688 430
9 7 0 .563 396
4 12 0 .250 322
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
10 6 0 .625 442
8 8 0 .500 439
7 9 0 .438 294
3 13 0 .188 334
South
W L T Pct PF
12 4 0 .750 366
11 5 0 .688 414
4 12 0 .250 353
4 12 0 .250 288
North
W L T Pct PF
8 7 1 .531 417
8 8 0 .500 445
7 9 0 .438 395
5 10 1 .344 391
West
W L T Pct PF
13 3 0 .813 417
12 4 0 .750 406
10 6 0 .625 379
7 9 0 .438 348
ff spot
in
Sunday's games
douston 10


I[ A .fI d
Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill led the team's offense to just
seven points in the final two games against the Buffalo Bills and New York Jets.


in the NFL in yards. The Dolphins
scored once in their final 24
possessions.
Ross spent more than $100 mil-
lion in guaranteed money last off-
season to upgrade the roster, and
the investment delivered only slight
improvement from a 7-9 record in
2012. The Dolphins were outgained
this season by 743 yards and were
wildly inconsistent.
They had four wins over teams
that will be in the playoffs, the most
for any non-playoffteam since 2009,
according to STATS LLC. They also
lost three games to last-place teams.
They went 4-4 at home, 0-2 against
the woeful Bills and 2-4 within the
AFC East.
Philbin said his team is close to
contending for titles.
"It was Week 17, and we had an op-
portunity to get into the playoffs," he
said. "We're not there yet, but we're
close.... We're not that far away"
The Dolphins did receive one bit
of good news Monday: Receiver
Brian Hartline was diagnosed with
a torn posterior cruciate ligament
in his left knee that will not require
surgery, a person familiar with the
situation said. The person con-
firmed the diagnosis to The Associ-
ated Press on condition of


Minnesota 14, Detroit 13
Carolina 21, Atlanta 20
Pittsburgh 20, Cleveland 7
N.Y Giants 20, Washington 6
Cincinnati 34, Baltimore 17
Indianapolis 30, Jacksonville 10
N.Y Jets 20, Miami 7
Denver 34, Oakland 14
San Diego 27, Kansas City 24, OT
Seattle 27, St. Louis 9
San Francisco 23, Arizona 20
Green Bay 33, Chicago 28
New Orleans 42, Tampa Bay 17
New England 34, Buffalo 20
Philadelphia 24, Dallas 22

NFL playoff glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 4
Kansas City at Indianapolis, 4:35 p.m. (NBC)
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 8:10 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday, Jan. 5
San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. (CBS)
San Francisco at Green Bay, 4:40 p.m. (FOX)
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan.11
Green Bay, San Francisco or New Orleans at Seat-
tle, 4:35 p.m. (FOX)
Cincinnati, Indianpolis or Kansas City at New Eng-
land, 8:15 p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 12
Philadelphia, Green Bay or San Francisco at Car-
olina, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
Indianapolis, Kansas City or San Diego at Denver,
4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 19
AFC, 3 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 26
At Honolulu
TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 2
At East Rutherford, N.J.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)
AFC leaders
Week 17
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
P. Manning, DEN 659 450 5477 55 10
P. Rivers, SND 544 378 4478 32 11
Roethlisberger, PIT 584 375 4261 28 14


anonymity because the Dolphins
don't comment on injuries.
In the wake of a franchise-record
58 sacks allowed, offseason upgrades
will focus on the offensive line,
which was depleted by the bullying
scandal when tackle Jonathan Mar-
tin left the team and guard Richie In-
cognito was suspended. Neither is
expected back with Miami.
The Dolphins might be in the
market for a running back, too.
Lamar Miller scored two touch-
downs, the lowest total for a player
leading the Dolphins in rushing
since 1980.
There will also be changes on de-
fense, where the Dolphins ranked a
disappointing 21st. Pro Bowl cor-
nerback Brent Grimes, cornerback
Nolan Carroll, defensive tackles
Randy Starks and Paul Soliai, and
safety Chris Clemons become free
agents this offseason.
For the Dolphins, the offseason
began Monday Defensive end
Olivier Vernon surveyed the scene
as players quietly packed up and
slipped out of the locker room.
"Horrible, man. Miserable," Ver-
non said. "We expected to be
game-planning for a team this
weekend. I don't think anybody
was expecting this."


NFL STATISTICS
Ale. Smith, KAN 508 308 3313 23 7
Dalton, CIN 586 363 4296 33 20
Brady, NWE 628 380 4343 25 11
Luck, IND 570 343 3822 23 9
Fitzpatrick, TEN 350 217 2454 14 12
Tannehill, MIA 588 355 3913 24 17
Keenum, HOU 253 137 1760 9 6
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN 259 1287 4.97 46 12
Ry. Mathews, SND 285 1255 4.40 51 6
Chr.Johnson,TEN 279 1077 3.86 30t 6
Moreno, DEN 241 1038 4.31 31 10
Spiller, BUF 201 927 4.61 77 2
F Jackson, BUF 207 896 4.33 59 9
L. Bell, PIT 244 860 3.52 43 8
Ivory, NYJ 182 833 4.58 69 3
Jones-Drew, JAX 234 803 3.43 48 5
Ridley, NWE 178 773 4.34 29 7
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Ant. Brown, PIT 110 1499 13.6 56 8
And. Johnson, HOU 109 1407 12.9 62t 5
Edelman, NWE 105 1056 10.1 44 6
A.. Green, CIN 98 1426 14.6 82t 11
Ke.Wright, TEN 94 1079 11.5 45 2
De. Thomas, DEN 92 1430 15.5 78t 14
J. Gordon, CLE 87 1646 18.9 95t 9
Decker, DEN 87 1288 14.8 61 11
Hilton, IND 82 1083 13.2 73t 5
Cameron, CLE 80 917 11.5 53 7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Doss, BAL 23 359 15.6 82t 1
Ant. Brown, PIT 32 409 12.8 67t 1
McCluster, KAN 58 686 11.8 89t 2
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7 79t 1
Edelman, NWE 35 374 10.7 43 0
Br.Tate, CIN 36 336 9.3 43 0
K. Martin, HOU 39 345 8.8 87t 1
Holliday, DEN 32 271 8.5 81t 1
Thigpen, MIA 34 264 7.8 34 0
McKelvin, BUF 32 180 5.6 21 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Q. Demps, KAN 33 992 30.1 95t 1
Jac. Jones, BAL 31 892 28.8 77t 1
Holliday, DEN 28 775 27.7 105t 1
Todman, JAX 26 712 27.4 59 0
K. Martin, HOU 36 947 26.3 50 0
Br.Tate,CIN 35 914 26.1 71 0
D. Reed, IND 24 590 24.6 39 0
Cribbs, NYJ 20 490 24.5 42 0
Ta. Jones, OAK 26 623 24.0 41 0
Thigpen, MIA 39 878 22.5 50 0


J. Charles, KAN
De. Thomas, DEN
Moreno, DEN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Decker, DEN
A.. Green, CIN
Cotchery, PIT
F Jackson, BUF
Chr. Johnson, TEN
M.Jones, CIN

Gostkowski, NWE
M. Prater, DEN
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
Vinatieri, IND
D. Carpenter, BUF
Suisham, PIT
Folk, NYJ
Succop, KAN
Bironas, TEN


Foles, PHL
J. McCown, CHI
A. Rodgers, GBY
Brees, NOR
R.Wilson, SEA
Romo, DAL
Kaepernick, SNF
S. Bradford, STL
M. Ryan, ATL
Cutler, CHI


L. McCoy, PHL
Forte, CHI
A. Morris, WAS
A. Peterson, MIN
M. Lynch, SEA
Lacy, GBY
Gore, SNF
D. Murray, DAL
Re. Bush, DET
Stacy, STL


Garcon, WAS
B. Marshall, CHI
De. Bryant, DAL


MJD wants to



remain a Jag


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Running back Maurice
Jones-Drew wants to stick
around for the next phase
of Jacksonville's rebuild-
ing project.
Just not at a discounted
rate.
Jones-Drew made it
clear Monday that his fu-
ture with the franchise
will be a fiscal decision,
meaning his eighth season
with the Jaguars may have
been his last. Jones-Drew
likely will test free agency
before deciding whether
to return to Jacksonville.
"I would love to see it
through here, but ... it's a
monetary issue," he said.
"That's where we are now
It's not about football any-
more. That's part of the
deal, part of the game."
The NFLs leading
rusher in 2011, Jones-
Drew just played out a
five-year, $31 million con-
tract. He earned $4.95 mil-
lion in 2013.
Jones-Drew declined to
talk numbers Monday but
he sounded resigned to a
potential move.
"Hopefully I can stay
here, but that's not up to
me," he said. "It's time to
sit back with my family
and talk and see what's
best for us. I have three
kids, don't want to move
them around, but if that's
the case, then it has to be
done. We'll see. There are
some other variables."
Jones-Drew finished
with 803 yards rushing and
five touchdowns this sea-
son. He missed most of the
offseason following left
foot surgery and missed a
game and weeks of prac-
tice with a strained right
hamstring.
Critics argue that Jones-
Drew, who turns 29 in
March, has lost a step and
hasn't been the same since
gaining 1,606 yards on 343
carries in 2011. They also
insist his running style -
he welcomes contact and
gains most of his yards be-
tween the tackles will
shorten his career
Others, including Jones-
Drew, believe he will re-
turn to Pro Bowl form
once he fully recovers


Jaguars plan to
let Jones-Drew
test free agency
JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars plan
to let veteran running back
Maurice Jones-Drew test
free agency.
General manager Dave
Caldwell said Jones-Drew
has "earned the right" to test
the market in March. Cald-
well adds that the Jaguars
would decide whether to
match another team's offer.
Jones-Drew, a second-
round draft pick in 2006,
has 8,071 yards rushing
and 68 touchdowns in eight
seasons. He missed the
final 10 games last season
with a left foot injury and
played much of this season
while recovering from sur-
gery and dealing with a
strained right hamstring.
From wire reports

from his foot injury
"I still feel like I can
compete with anybody,"
Jones-Drew said. "It was
hard this (past) offseason. I
really didn't get a chance
to train. I rehabbed and I
couldn't really do anything
until March. Then we had
to do the whole walking
deal all over again. That
took a month and a half
Then we had to do the run-
ning deal. That took about
two months.
"Then I was able to start
training, but it wasn't re-
ally training when you
have to back off sometimes
because my foot would be
sore or other things would
start to hurt a little bit."
Despite those injuries,
Jones-Drew played in 15
games and continued to be
the face of the franchise.
He's a popular figure in
Jacksonville, but certainly
not replaceable.
And with the Jaguars al-
most certain to draft a quar-
terback in May, it's
conceivable that Jones-
Drew's days as the center-
piece of the offense are over
even if he sticks around.
"It would be kind of
weird not to see him over
there," fellow running
back Denard Robinson
said.


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew is
a free agent for the 2014 season, and will test free agency.


Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush F
19 12
14 0
13 10
12 0
11 0
11 0
10 0
10 9
10 6
10 0
Kicking
PAT FG
44-44 38-41
75-75 25-26
42-42 34-37
26-26 38-41
34-34 35-40
32-32 33-36
39-39 30-32
27-27 33-36
52-52 22-28
41-41 25-29


Rec Ret Pts


NFC leaders


Week 17
Quarterbacks
Att Corn
317 203
224 149
290 193
650 446
407 257
535 342
416 243
262 159
651 439
355 224
Rushers
Att Yds
314 1607
289 1339
276 1275
279 1266
301 1257
284 1178
276 1128
217 1124
223 1006
250 973
Receivers
No Yds
113 1346
100 1295
93 1233


Jeffery, CHI
J.Graham, NOR
J. Nelson, GBY
Boldin, SNF
Douglas, ATL
Cal. Johnson, DET
Gonzalez, ATL


Sherels, MIN
Dw. Harris, DAL
Hyde, GBY
GinnJr.,CAR
G.Tate, SEA
L. James, SNF
Page, TAM
T. Austin, STL
R. Randle, NYG
Sproles, NOR
Ki

C. Patterson, MIN
Dw. Harris, DAL
Hester, CHI
Page, TAM
Hyde, GBY
GinnJr.,CAR
J. Rodgers, ATL
Mi. Cox, NYG
Arenas, ARI
Paul, WAS


J.Graham, NOR
M. Lynch, SEA
De. Bryant, DAL
Ve. Davis, SNF
B. Marshall, CHI
Forte, CHI
Cal. Johnson, DET
Lacy, GBY
L. McCoy, PHL
A. Peterson, MIN


Hauschka, SEA
Crosby, GBY
P. Dawson, SNF
D. Bailey, DAL
Feely, ARI
Gould, CHI
Walsh, MIN
Gano, CAR
Henery, PHL
Zuerlein, STL


89 1421 16.0
86 1215 14.1
85 1314 15.5
85 1179 13.9
85 1067 12.6
84 1492 17.8
83 859 10.3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
22 335 15.2
20 256 12.8
24 296 12.3
26 316 12.2
51 585 11.5
23 251 10.9
23 251 10.9
33 280 8.5
29 237 8.2
29 194 6.7
ckoff Returners
No Yds Avg
43 1393 32.4
28 857 30.6
52 1442 27.7
22 548 24.9
22 531 24.1
25 595 23.8
25 575 23.0
20 436 21.8
23 493 21.4
20 411 20.6
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
16 0 16
14 12 2
13 0 13
13 0 13
12 0 12
12 9 3
12 0 12
11 11 0
11 9 2
11 10 1
Kicking
PAT FG
44-44 33-35
42-42 33-37
44-44 32-36
47-47 28-30
37-37 30-36
45-46 26-29
43-44 26-30
42-42 24-27
45-45 23-28
34-34 26-28


B4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


NFL











EDUCATION
-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0


Eryn Worthington
Staff writer


INVERNESS He is a fresh face to
Citrus County School District, but he
brings years of nationwide experience
with him.
Inverness Primary School music in-
structor Raymond Lay realized at a
young age that he had a passion for
music.
"I started singing in church choir
when I was about 10 years old," he said.
"Then I got interested in band and cho-
rus in middle school. From there I con-
tinued the two into high school. I played
trumpet and French horn; but, singing
has always been my concentration. Orig-
inally, I was going to college for Aero-
space engineering. Then I thought
about it and realized that I didn't want
to sit behind a desk. My passion was not
there."
During college is when his passion to
teach education evolved. He went to a
three-day workshop and joined The
Young Americans, a California group


that promotes music and art education.
"I moved and lived in California for
four years and toured with the group,"
Lay said. "I have been to 44 different
states, done a dinner theatre with them,
halftime show for the Super Bowl in
1998, performed in Las Vegas and much
more. It was an amazing experience
that led me into education. They go into
a school and teach children a one-hour
show in three days. Working with those
kids and seeing how the arts and music
help them express themselves was
amazing to see. It really inspired me to
do music education."
After touring with the group and com-
pleting his degree, Lay and his wife,
Dixie Lay, spent the next several years
teaching around the United States -
until two years ago.
A position opened up at Lecanto High
School for his wife and they moved to
Citrus County
Lay later received a job offer at Her-
nando Elementary School and met prin-
cipal Laura Manos, whom he followed
to Inverness Primary School.


"Mrs. Manos is an amazing woman
with an incredible vision as a princi-
pal," Lay said.
Why does he love music education?
"Reaching the kids and getting them
to see the connections between music
and their other curriculum classes -
their "ah-ha" moment is what I love
the most about teaching," he said.
"When one of my students said, 'Mr Lay
music is math,' I was like, 'You got it.'
It's those moments when they actually
get it is what I love. You don't think
about it but music connects to every-
thing. It just enhances and enriches
everything they are learning in the
classroom."
He arrives at school every morning
around 7:15 a.m. and does not stop until
he leaves in the evenings.
Lay teaches all 675 pupils in the
school -general music; singing, instru-
ments and movement/dancing.
"By the end of this year every one of
my students will have composed a piece
of music," he said. Whether it sounds
perfect or not is not the point. I'm teach-


ing them the rules, note values, where it
goes and how to put it on the staff. They
will play their pieces for me on the
piano by the end of the year It's that
whole experience that matters."
"Also, I have a handbell choir," Lay
continued. "When it all comes together
it sounds wonderful and they are so
proud of themselves for what they have
accomplished. That is what it is all
about. It's all about the kids. It's just an
amazing experience to be on this side of
it."
However, the handbell choir is in ad-
dition to his four other performing
groups- fourth-grade chorus, drum
and percussion ensemble, fifth-grade
chorus and drama.
"I rather give up my planning period
for these children to have an experi-
ence that who knows if they will ever
have that opportunity again," Lay said.
"If I can give it to them, why not?
Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext 1334,
or eworthington@chronicleonline. corn.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Inverness Primary School music instructor Raymond Lay leads students during a Veterans Day program.


I









Teachers find home visits help in the classroom


In days gone by, a knock on the door by a teacher or
school official used to mean a child was in trouble.
Not anymore, at least for parents and students at
Clay Elementary School.


Associated Press
ST LOUIS -The urban public
school is one of more than 30 in the St.
Louis area that sends teachers on home
visits several times a year Unlike home
visit programs that focus on truants and
troublemakers, or efforts aimed exclu-
sively at early childhood, the newer
wave seeks to narrow the teacher-par-
ent divide while providing glimpses at
the factors that shape student learning
before and after the school bells ring.
"I wish they had this when I had chil-
dren in school," said Elmira Warren, a
teacher's aide at Clay who has made
home visits to her students and their
parents. "I was fearful of what the
teachers thought, and of not knowing
enough."
The nonprofit HOME WORKS! pro-
gram is modeled after one in Sacra-
mento, Calif, that over the past decade
has since spread to more than 300
schools in 13 states, with active pro-
grams in Washington, Denver, Seattle
and St. Paul, Minn. Program leaders say
participation leads to better attendance,
higher test scores, greater parental in-
volvement and fewer suspensions and
expulsions, citing preliminary research
of the newer program by the University
of Missouri-St. Louis and a series of ex-
ternal reviews in Sacramento over the
past decade. Participation is voluntary,
and teachers are paid for their time.
"We've figured out a way for people to
sit down outside the regular school and
have the most important conversation
that needs to happen," said Carrie Rose,
executive director of the Parent
Teacher Home Visit Project in the Cali-
fornia capital.
The K-12 program began in 1999 as a
faith-based community effort but
quickly found support not only in the
Sacramento school district but also with
local teachers unions. The National Ed-
ucation Association has also endorsed
teacher home visits, citing a "critical
mass of research evidence" connecting
high student achievement with involved
parents.
No longer do parents only hear from
teachers when there's a problem, or
during brief school conferences that
leave little time to go beyond the sur-
face.
"She knows how much the teachers
care when she sees them at her home,"
said Mark Brown, whose 6-year-old
daughter Unafay attends Clay Elemen-
tary in north St. Louis.
A decade ago, Clay principal Donna
Owens could barely attract 25 parents to
meet their children's teachers even
once at a school with more than 320 stu-
dents, with one notable exception: the
Halloween candy giveaway A recent
HOME WORKS! event at the 191-stu-
dent school drew close to double that
number of parents.
"Our parents feel much more comfort-
able coming to the school and being a
part of it," Owens said.
The Missouri program, which began
in St. Louis but now includes several
schools 120 miles away in the college
town of Columbia, follows a template
common to the other efforts. Participat-
ing schools must agree to involve at
least half of their teachers, and the edu-
cators work in pairs to ensure safety.
Program costs are often covered by
foundation grants or borne by nonprofit
supporters such as the Flamboyan
Foundation, which paid for the program
in the District of Columbia. Rose esti-
mated the program cost at $10,000 annu-


"For some students, school and home
are two different worlds.

When you create that bridge, it
becomes cohesive."
Fourth-grade teacher
Cynthia Williams


ally for elementary schools, and $15,000
to $20,000 for high schools.
In Missouri, the first teacher visit
comes in late summer, with the second
session in the fall. While the follow-up
session focuses on academics, the initial
meeting is all about building a rapport,
said Karen Kalish, a St. Louis philan-
thropist who founded HOME WORKS!
in 2006.
"They go in as listeners and learners
the first time," she said. "Just to get (par-
ents) to start talking, to build their rela-
tionship."
Each session is followed by an invita-
tion to continue the conversation at
school over a communal meal. Busy par-
ents who can't find the time or energy
for such visits are told the school will
also provide childcare and transporta-
tion if needed. Teachers must spend at
least 30 minutes on the first visit and 45
minutes the second time, though often
those minimums are exceeded.
"We want to do whatever we can to get
them to come to school," Kalish said.
"Something happens when parents see
their kids' school for the first time."
Selling overworked teachers on the
benefits isn't always easy At Flynn Park
Elementary in the St. Louis suburb of
University City, teacher participation is
down in the program's second year, said
kindergarten teacher Debbie Kuster
Some are simply too busy outside of
school with their own families, she said.
Others work second or even third jobs.
And some teachers Kuster included
- prefer to keep their professional dis-
tance, she said.
"I'm uncomfortable going to the
house," she said. "For certain people,
they're more comfortable in their own
territory"
Those who do connect with their stu-
dents' families away from school de-
scribe a more collaborative approach to
learning, an environment of mutual re-
spect and appreciation rather than top-
down communication.
'A lot of parents were willing to share
with us," Warren said. "They saw we
were parents ourselves. They let down
their guard."
Fourth-grade teacher Cynthia
Williams said her Clay Elementary Stu-
dents learned to view her as more than
just a two-dimensional authority figure.
"For some students, school and home
are two different worlds," she said.
"When you create that bridge, it be-
comes cohesive."
Kalish said the program also fosters
parental accountability rather than a re-
liance on schools to essentially serve as
surrogate parents for six or seven hours
each day
While the Missouri program and affil-
iated efforts nationwide remain rela-
tively small, she hopes to build enough
momentum to take the effort statewide,
and envisions a broader effort that
would elevate teacher home visits
alongside such programs as Teach for
America or Parents as Teachers, which
focuses on increasing child-rearing
skills through home visits for newborns
and toddlers.


Associated Press
Elmira Warren talks with Camil Douthit, 5, a student in Warren's pre-school class at
Clay Elementary Community Education school in St. Louis. Warren is a participant in
a pilot program called Home Works that sends public school teachers into their
students' homes several times annually with the hope the home visits will boost
both student academic achievement as well as parental involvement.




iltbtiliwl
Th1i efthB aejn_] i



_ L.'.


Tickets available after December 16, 2013
At the following outlets...
Citrus County Fair Office Inverness 726-2993
Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149


Eagle Buick Homosassa
Inverness Chamber of Commerce


795-6800
726-2801


Advance Ticket Pricing


Cash only
One day for Adult
Two day for Adult
One day for Child (4-11)
Two day for Child (4-11)

Gate Ticket Pricing
Adults
Child (4-11)


$8.00
$15.00
$4.00
$7.00


$10.00
$5.00


BUICK GMI"
www.eaglebuickgmc.com
352-795-6800
Garden Tractors Pulling
Food & Camping Available
Jr. Tractor Race Every Day
3 Sleds Pulling in Covered Arena

CiTRUi COUNTiY "LE
CHRONIIIICLuEm


Calif. universities


move to ban


If


campus smoking ntrtai nt


Associated Press
SAN DIEGO -Schools
in California's public uni-
versity systems are stamp-
ing out smoking in hopes
that it will help improve
the health of students,
faculty and employees.
Both the University of
California system and
schools within the Califor-
nia State system have
taken measures to ensure
smoking will no longer be
allowed on campuses.
Some schools already en-
force no-tobacco policies,
while others plan to do so
beginning next year, join-
ing more than 1,100 col-
leges and universities
around the nation
that have gone smoke-
free.
At San Diego State Uni-
versity, workers will re-
move ashtrays from the
remaining 12 designated
smoking areas on campus


for its new rule that offi-
cially takes effect
Wednesday SDSU offi-
cials say they have cre-
ated an informational
website, smoke-
free.sdsu.edu, about its
new directive.
A similar ban has been
instituted at California
State University, Fuller-
ton.
Some students question
how the policy will be en-
forced. Officials have said
that if they see people
lighting up, they'll offer a
friendly reminder SDSU
spokesman Greg Block
said police aren't going to
be walking around cam-
pus handing out tickets.
"I'm not sure it will
work," Jin Salamack, a
junior studying graphic
design, told U-T San
Diego. "I feel like the stu-
dents who do smoke will
end up smoking all over
campus."


iEm N IfT! SATUWAY. JA 4TH
SFeaturhg Belly Dance Performance by SHAZADI
reekDlmnner& Bewrage Specals'! RSVP 352-563-0075


SAVE WITH DAN!


iIsOi 10FF BOwI
1 go .o500OFF CUP

II OFF*| Dan's Famous
SClam Strip New England
Basket II Clam Chowder
Dine In i. I,. . ,,,,,
,,n 5CL N S 'z M .0
2 LOCATIONS
7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa
lo 352-628-9588
.... Highway 44. Crystal River
.. 352-795-9081
aWHOLE BELLY CLA


L^ Aitagatlia't


f"The Place To Eat"
2494 N Heritage Oaks Path
Hernando, FL (Heritage Hills Plaza)

\ill--hd,,, ,,,ip-iin.li ii'lP''r f
lI DII
i Id. -I |- III*,I --Iri l.
UlIlkl I ', 352-513-48611


Open
Until 1pmin
Ne% Year's Day


Diww Special S


or StJlled Slellk
FI I I BI KI \ \-,. I i m II
A& )l\\ 14 Il \l


C2 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


EDUCATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r sua ITSJIln


*





CimTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Mini Pae

0Betty Debnam, Founding Editor and Editor at Large
@ 2014 U-.... I UcI,ck
from The Mini Page 2014 Universal UcIck
Fun Times Ahead!


A Kid's 2014 Calendar


Let's visit Russia!
The 22nd
Winter Olympic SochIru
Games will take zoIq qwP
place in Sochi,
Russia, from Feb. 7 through 23. The
Paralympic Games will follow in Sochi
from March 7 through 16.
Opening ceremonies for the Games
will begin at 20:14* Moscow time.
(This will be 11:14 a.m. in the U.S.
Eastern time zone.)
50 years of civil rights
In July, American citizens will
celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964,
signed by President
Lyndon Johnson. This
law requires businesses
to serve all people President
equally no matter what Lyndon
Johnson
race, color, religion or
nationality they are. It also protects
voting rights for all citizens.
* We usually use a 12-hour clock, so that
there are two 12-hour parts of our day,
a.m. and p.m. For example, 1 a.m. is one
hour after midnight, and 1 p.m. is one hour
after noon. But a 24-hour clock doesn't
start over after noon. It goes on to 13:00,
14:00, etc. So on a 12-hour clock, the
Games will begin at 8:14 p.m. Moscow time.


Meet Poochamungas
0I John Joyce and Pete Cunningham
1 are full-time firefighters in Chicago.
They are also the leaders of a rock
I band for kids called Poochamungas.
Their latest CD is called "Block
1". 7f
John and Pete met when they were
both training to be firefighters. Both
John and Pete grew up in Chicago.
John loved to read and write stories in school. Writing those stories
led to him becoming a songwriter. As a student, he was more into sports
than music, and he did not take any music lessons until he was 30, when
he started taking harmonica and guitar lessons.
Pete loved the outdoors and enjoyed hiking, biking and camping as
a kid. He took piano lessons, and his grandfather played the fiddle. He
taught elementary school before becoming a firefighter.
from The Mini Page 2014 Unlvrsl UUclick
Gus oodspots


Supersport: Luke Kuechly
INHeight: 6-3 Birthdate: 4-20-91
Weight: 235 Hometown: Cincinnati, Ohio
Luke Kuechly is a humble, mild-mannered man who
doesn't like to draw attention to himself off the football field.
But when he puts on pads and a helmet, Kuechly turns into
a prowling Carolina Panther that teammates, opponents and
fans notice.
After leading the league with 164 official tackles as a rookie last year,
the hard-hitting linebacker is racking up tackles again this fall and pacing
a tough Panthers defense.
Before the Panthers made him their first pick in the 2012 draft, Kuechly was
a three-time All-American at Boston College, credited with 532 career tackles.
Away from football, he enjoys fly fishing, his longtime hobby. But now he's
busy flying around on the field, catching and crunching his opponents.


Keep this 2014 calendar and watch for coming special events.


February

ULibrary Lovers
Month
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28

22 7f 14 "17

Super Bowl 1 "' "
XLVIII Valentine's Day Presidents Day


April 20


Easter
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30

4 /^119- QY9'22
27

National National Park
DA.R.E. Day Week Earth Day


Wars Begin


World WarI 100 years ago
World War I started in Europe on
July 18, 1914, with the assassination
of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of
Austria. The war spread to many
European countries, including
Germany, Russia, Britain and France.
The United States remained
neutral, or uninvolved,
in the war until 1917,
when Germany began
torpedoing U.S. ships
supplying materials to
Britain. In April 1917,
President Woodrow
Wilson asked Congress to
declare war on Germany
In World War I, much of the fighting
was done in the countryside from
trenches dug into the ground. Soldiers
lived among mud, rats and lice.
The war ended in June 1919 with
the signing of the Treaty of Versailles
near Paris. Nearly 30 million people
were killed or injured worldwide
during World War I.


Mini Spy...
Mini Spy carefully plans out her year both on her phone
and on her wall calendar. See if you can find:
* letter D envelope letter I fish kite
* cat snake ladder pencil umbrella
* arrow sock letter J lady's shoe dragon
* book bagel elephant bell ruler word MINI
* letter L hourglass exclamation mark


Januaiy J| 1

New Year's Day
5 M T W T F 5
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31

: 20 .. 23 30

S ~Franklin D.
Martin Luther National Pie Roosevelt
King Jr. Day Day birthday


March

Music in Our
Schools Month
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
\ 3- 9 20

Newspaper in Daylight Saving First day of
Education Week Time begins spring


This year marks anniversaries of
the beginnings of two important
world conflicts and the end of
another.

The
U.S.S.
Arizona
burns
after the
attack
on Pearl
1-1Harbor.
World War II 75 years ago
In 1939, Adolf Hitler was the
leader of Germany. On Sept. 1,
Germany invaded Poland, and two
days later, Great Britain and France
declared war on Germany.
The United States did not enter
the war until December 1941, after
the Japanese attack against the U.S.
naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.
This war took place in two main
theaters, or regions: Europe, and the
Pacific Ocean and Asia. It ended in 1945.


The Cold War 25 years ago
A historic symbol of the Cold
War*, the Berlin Wall in Germany
was a 96-mile-long barrier between
East Berlin, which was occupied and
controlled by the Soviet Union, and
West Berlin. People in East Berlin
were not allowed to leave.
President Ronald Reagan urged the
leader of the Soviet Union, Mikhail
Gorbachev, to "tear down this wall"
in 1987.
On Nov. 9,
1989, after many
demonstrations in
East Germany, the
wall's checkpoints i
were opened.
Germany was
re-unified in People stand
October 1990. atop the wall on
Nov. 10, 1989.
* The Cold War was a long period of
tension between Western countries and
the Soviet Union. It was never an actual
war with battles, but people were afraid it
might become one someday.


May

__ National Bike Month
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

1 6 12-18 26

National Teacher Children's Book
Day Week Memorial Day


Auguot ..-
National Inventors
Month
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
12- 14 19
13
Little League
Perseids meteor Baseball World National Aviation
shower Series begins Day


November 1 2

Daylight Saving
__ _LTime ends
S M T W T F S
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30


11 27,


Veterans Day Thanksgiving


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30

S 6 14 28-July 27

National
SY-YO C
\ Day Flag Day Ramadan


September Backpack
^*1 *^-^Safety
SAmerica
Month
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30

1 :,. 17- 22
<23
First day of
Labor Day Constitution Week autumn

For family members' and
friends' birthdays


Look through your newspaper for upcoming
events in your community.
Next week, The Mini Page finds out what the
space explorers Voyager 1 and 2 are discovering.


July

National Hot
_u,__ I Dog Month
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31

1 4 20

Independence National Ice
Canada Day Day Cream Day


October 510
Prevenli-n
Week
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31

13 i* 13- (C

National
School Lunch
Columbus Day Week Halloween


December
'f National Pearl
Harbor Day
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


S17- 25

24Hanukkah Chstmas
iaukh Christmas


26-Jan. 1


Kwanzaa


THE MINI PAGE STAFF: Betty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large; Lisa Tarry Managing Editor; Lucy Lien Associate Editor; Wendy Daley Artist


f-om Th @ Min ae214 Un.erIlU6.1c
3 3 TM MIGHTY
FUNNY'S ninn (ockss
All the following jokes have something in common.
Can you guess the common theme or category?

Cathy: Why are calendars so busy?
Charles: Because they have a date every ---
single day!

Casey: What is a calendar's favorite fruit?
Claude: Dates!

Cynthia: Why did the tired worker tear off part
of his calendar?
Corey: Because he wanted to take some days offi 1t

M ^^^^ f- rom TeMiage-MP-0M14 U .....-I Uh.1
TM
B jasse'" TRY 'N'
e ne 2014 Calendar TFIND
Words that remind us of upcoming and past events are hidden in the block below.
Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice.
See if you can find: ACT, BERLIN, CALENDAR, CIVIL, COLD, DAY, GAMES,
HARBOR, JOHNSON, MONTH, OLYMPICS, PARALYMPIC, PEARL, RIGHTS,
RUSSIA SOCHI, THEATER, WALL, WAR, WEEK, WINTER, YEAR.
N G Y E N O S N H O J WH LM
IPPEW H C O S F X W L W H R A R B
YEAR! L D J L RA E YA R A Z R AV
R S G I K E M L E D MA B E R
E T A V K P L T N O D I O P E
D* ... . . . . .


from The Minl Page 2014 U niersal u click

Ready Resources fi
The Mini Page provides ideas for "
websites, books or other resources that will help
you learn more about this week's topics.
On the Web:
bit.ly/leRNMTg
bit.ly/lcttVov
bit.ly/lasHS6K
At the library:
"The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain"
by Peter Sis
"DK Eyewitness Books: World War I" by Simon
Adams


The Mini Page

Book of States
The Mini Page's popular series of issues about each state is collected
here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease
of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state,
along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs
and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of
States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.


*Tht Ai~gihjA
Montana From A Io Z



-.... ---

:...-: -:-


To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make
check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini
Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call toll-
free 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com.
Please send __ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total
cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)
Name:
Address:


from The Mini Page 2014 Univrsal Uchicl

Rookie Cookie's Recipe

7 Tropical Ambrosia
You'll need:
* 1 (20-ounce) can pineapple chunks, drained -
S1 cup mango, cut into chunks
* 1 (11-ounce) can mandarin oranges, drained
S1 banana, sliced
* 1/2 cup miniature marshmallows
1 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt
1/3 cup flaked coconut
What to do:
1. Combine pineapple, mango, oranges, banana and marshmallows in a
large bowl.
2. Stir in vanilla yogurt and coconut.
3. Chill for one hour. Serves 6 to 8.
You will need an adult's help with this recipe.214

from The Mini Page 2014 UneIal U ck


... and End


C 14

National Young
Reader's Week


EDUCATION


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 C3




C4 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
F VA-


r


00


f/


/


If


As 2013 comes to an end the Citrus
County Chronicle reflects what we
have accomplished this year.


This Year We...


. Delivered 8.5 million newspapers
- Wrote over 5,000 local news stories
-v. Published 7,280 local photographs
^ Printed over 1,000 of your letters
to the Editor
a
V.* 1,500 sound off calls... and counting
SHelp make possible over
400 local events
t. Welcomed 2.2 million visits to
Chronicleonline.com
-.-.. .. . ..... % .. .-," - .^.^ r i .-.I r


* We are excited for what 2014 has
in store for our community and
look forward to bringing
it to you in print and t
R online everyday.,


Your Neighbors at the
SC I T R U S C 0 U N T Y

HIONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com
Your News Your Tw n, Your Way .
Your News, Your Toswn, Your Way.|^.,.
*. .


71
.': :I.


o .'. i
'r\


Na
'.; '!-
4
IT'


S


F

I


)OH1CS







Page C5- WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1,2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Knights plan country/
western dance
The Knights of Columbus of
Dunnellon will host a Country &
Western Dinner Dance on Jan. 11.
Music will be provided by the
Country Sunshine Band with
dancing until 10 p.m. Doors will
open at 5:30 p.m. with a Southern-
style dinner served at 6:30 p.m.
There will be a cash bar, 50/50
raffle, wine basket raffles and a
door prize.
The dinner dance will be held
at the parish hall of St John the
Baptist Catholic Church, 7525
U.S. 41 South. Tickets are $15 per
person and are available from the
Knights of Columbus or the
church office.
For reservations or more infor-
mation, call 352-489-6221.

Citrus Fishing Club
angles for members
If you like to fish with people
who like to fish, and maybe learn
to fish better, come see what the
Citrus Fishing Club is all about.
Men and women alike meet at
7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at
American Legion Post No. 155 at
6585 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Crystal River
For more information, call
Steve Tresnak at 352-445-6743 or
visit citrusfishingclub.org.

Local Bird Count
set for Saturday
The longest running Citizen
Science survey in the world,
Audubon's annual Christmas Bird
Count (CBC), is ongoing through
Sunday
Tens of thousands of volunteers
throughout North America are
participating to add a new layer
to more than a century of data.
Citrus County Audubon Society
has participated in the annual
CBCs since the 1970s. According
to CCAS President Fred Hileman,
there are more than 40 individu-
als participating on 10 teams this
year The count area is a 15-mile
diameter circle (about 175 square
miles) centered on the Crystal
River Airport.
Local birders armed with
binoculars, bird guides and
checklists will be out at dawn
Saturday to count as many birds
as possible. Teams will gather at
1 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, at
sundown to combine the data.

Reiki offered at
Homosassa Library
Reiki Gentle Touch Circle will
meet at the Homosassa Library
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 7 and 21.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, call Kristie at
352-628-5537.

AdoptA
RESCUED PET


Chewbacca


L" A
Special to the Chronicle
Chewbacca, aka Chewy, is an
adorable, active male Yorkie. He is
a very sweet boy who loves
attention. He weighs about 15
pounds, so he is larger than a very
tiny Yorkie, which would make him
a great family dog. He is between
5 and 6 years old and is friendly
with other dogs and housetrained.
Adopt A Rescued Pet Inc. does
home visits prior to adoptions, so
can only adopt to the Citrus
County area. Call 352-795-9550
and leave your name, number and
pet's name for a return call. Check
www.adoptarescuedpet.com for
more pets and the adoption
calendar with locations, dates and
times.


Fitness in Citrus


Sign up through Jan. 2

Special to the Chronicle
Are you determined to improve your
health in 2014?
Get a jump start by joining this year's
Fitness in Citrus: Community-Wide Fit-
ness Challenge. It begins Monday, Feb. 3
and runs through Sunday March 16.
Hundreds of Citrus County residents
look forward to participating in the
Fitness in Citrus challenge every year
Most say they got into it for their health


i to takepart in communitywide challenge


or to lose weight, but ended up saying
they enjoyed it most for the fun and ca-
maraderie (although they also said they
felt a lot better about themselves, many
lost weight and some even quit smoking).
Form a team: That means you and at
least one other person. Small teams
typically do best.
Each team needs to choose either the
"steps" challenge or the "minutes of ac-
tivity" challenge.
Also, choose your team's fitness level


by choosing a category "just getting
started," "getting there" or "jocks."
In the "steps" challenge, you earn
points for each 500 steps you take (you
need to wear a pedometer).
In the "minutes" challenge, you earn
points for each 10-minute block of exer-
cise, from a specified list of activities.
Want to be involved? Email fitness
challenge@tampabayrr.com and ask for
details and a registration form.
Registration closes Jan. 24.


Park awards special recognition


SUSAN STRAWBRIDGE
Special to the Chronicle
Two employees at the Department of
Environmental Protection's Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park re-
ceived special recognition for their contri-
butions during the park staff's annual
holiday party on Dec. 8.
Park Manager Kim Tennille presented the
Walt Elliot Award for public service to
Tricia Fowler, a park services specialist, and
the Russel Parks Award for Employee of the
Year to Olivia Morrison, a park ranger in the
Wildlife Care Department.
Walt Elliot Award winner Tricia Fowler "' -
coordinates the park's extensive volunteer ]
program and outreach programs. She also
coordinates several of the park's major an-
nual events, including the Celebration of
Lights, Haunted Tram Rides and Wildlife
Ranger Camps.
Russel Parks Award winner Olivia
Morrison works in the Wildlife Department
and deals with wildlife care and interpre-
tive programs, and will be the park's CPR
trainer
The Walt Elliott Public Service Award was
established in 1997 to recognize employees
who demonstrate exemplary public service
to colleagues, park visitors and the
community.
The Russel Parks Award was established
in 1990 to recognize employees that are de-
pendable and reliable, and who frequently
go unrecognized for the work they do.
Fellow employees nominate their
co-workers for these awards.
Special to the Chronicle
Susan Strawbridge is parkservices Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park employees, Tricia Fowler, left,
specialist at Ellie Schiller Homosassa and Olivia Morrison, right, accept their special awards Dec. 8 from Park Manager
Springs Wildlife State Park in Homosassa. Kim Tennille.


Get ready for some quilting


U xrMIi^SiS
& ,a

is a W. AI


KAROL KUSMAUL/Special to the Chronicle
Karol Kusmaul will teach an eight-week quilting class beginning at 7 p.m. Monday at Whispering Pines Park Community Building in
Inverness. The classes are for beginner through advanced students and are from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday. For price and to register, call
352-344-0779. Pictured are students from the fall 2013 class. From left are: Susan Monier, Elaine Calbeck, Debra Pontius, Carol
Bouldin, Anne St. Claire-Taube, Annamarie Lutz, Patricia Knees, Cena Phalin, Donna Weeks and Jennifer Jones.


Kusmaul will also teach an art
quilting class beginning at
7 p.m. Tuesday at Whispering
Pines Park Community
Building. The classes will be
from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday.
Kusmal is a retired art teacher
and will help students
complete several small art
pieces using fabrics. For price
and to register, call
352-726-3913. Pictured are
Rose Holtmeyer and Inger
Stuart getting started on their
landscape quilts. These two
were part of a small private
class in Kusmaul's
home studio.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 1, 2014 C: Co.nast, Citrus B: Bright House Doil: Conast, Dunnellons, &Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
O WS NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access Revolution '14' m Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU News JayLeno
SWorld Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Great Performances The Vienna Great Performances Tribute to pro- The Fab Four --The
f C WE PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) Nc Philharmonic performs. (N) 'G' ducer David Foster. 'G' ac Ultimate Tribute 'G'
B IWIFM PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) Great Performances (N) 'G' NOVA'PG'm IReturn World T Smiley
F L NBC 8 8 8 8 BNews Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Revolution (In Stereo) Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special News Jay Leno
NBC 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. '14', Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit'14
ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of The Middle The Modern SuperFun Nashville (In Stereo) Eyewit. Jimmy
0 CWVABC 20 20 20 News *G' G Fortune PG' Goldbergs Family Night PG' cNews Kimmel
TS CB 0 1 1 1 10 News, Evening Wheelof Jeopardy! Hawaii Five-0 "Ohuna" Criminal Minds "The CSI: Crime Scene 10 News, Letterman
O( 6CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Fortune 'G'N '14', Fallen"'14' Investigation'14' 11pm (N)
) I.,VN FOX 13 13 13 13 News Fox 13 TMZ (N) omg! Dads'14' Dads'14' Brooklyn Brooklyn FOX1310:00 News (N) News Access
S CWT FOX 13 13 13 13 special 'PG' Insider (N) Nine-Nine Nine-Nine (In Stereo) N Hollyw'd
D WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Middle Gold Mod Fam Super Nashville 'PG' News J. Kimmel
W 2 2 Christian Today JackVan Great Awakening Joseph Place for A. Sid Roth Life Today Jesse Great
FB M IND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Impe Prince'G' Miracles Wommack -It's Su Duplantis Awaken
NABC 11 1 1 News World The List Let's Ask The Middle The Modern SuperFun Nashville (In Stereo) News Jimmy
a WFTS)ABC 11 11 11 News (N)'PG' America 'PG' Goldbergs Family Night 'PG', Kimmel
m N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
6ED MR IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' '14' c 'PG '14' 14'
D WTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld FamFeud FamFeud Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Seinfeld Commun
SWAfi TBN 21 21 Present The 700 Club (N) 'G' Victor M. Child Moore Paid Paid Paid Paid Healing Ministries
S 4 King of King of Two and Two and Arrow "League of The Tomorrow People Engagement Engagement The Arsenic Hall Show
QM CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Half Men Assassins"14' "Pilot"'PG' '14',c
S1 1 Animal Citrus County Little School Your Funny Business 'PG' Cold Squad '14' m Eye for an The Comedy
i WYJFAM 16 16 16 15 Court Today Court Miracles Zone Plumber (DVS) Eye Shop
ED [WON FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang Dads'14' Dads 14' Brooklyn Brooklyn FOX35 Newsat10 TMZ'PG' Access
n MWV UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. MentirParaVivir'14' PorSiempre Lo Que laVida Me Robo (N) '14' (SS) Noticias Noticiero
M (WXPX) ION 17 Burn Notice 'PG' Burn Notice 'PG' Burn G Bun NoePG Bun NoePG Burn Notice Bu Notice Burn Notice Bu Notice 'PG'
S**Y, "The Mummy Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Dynasty 'PG' c
54a 48 54 25 27 Returns" Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
5 6 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead
55 64 55 "Prey"'MA' 'MA' cc 'MA' cc'MA' c "Infected"'MA' "Ilsolation"'MA'
i 5 5 1 1 River Monsters: River Monsters: Mermaids: The Body Found: The Extended Cut Mermaids: The New Evidence Mermaids
S52 35 52 19 21 Unhooked'PG' Unhooked'PG' Half-man, half-fish, all conjecture.'PG' Extended Cut 'PG'
r 9 ** "For Colored ***y2 "Precious" (2009, Drama) Gabourey Sidibe, **n "Tyler Perry's I Can Do BadAll By Myself" (2009,
96 19 96 Girls'"(2010)'R' c Mo'Nique, Paula Patton.'R'c Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry'PG-13'c
BRAVO 254 51 254 Matchmaker Vanderpum Rules Real Housewives Housewives/Atl. Top Chef (N '14' Top Chef'14' c
Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 'MA' Tosh.0
C 27 61 27 33 14'c '14'c '14'c '14'c '14'c '14'c '14'c '14'c '14' '14'c '14'c
,Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops
Nj 98 45 98 28 37 Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded
[ 1 43 42 43 American Greed American Greed SharkTank'PG' SharkTank'PG' SharkTank'PG' SharkTank'PG'
fC 40 29 40 41 46 Situation Crossfire Best/Worst Crimes of the Crimes of the Crimes of the Crimes of the
i 4 0 4 6 5 Good- Jessie Austin & Good- Liv & Movie (In Stereo)'PG' Jessie Good Dog With a
S46 40 46 6 5 Charlie 'G' Ally'Y7' Charlie Maddie 'G' Charlie Blog'G'
EP1 33 27 33 21 17 2014 Rose Bowl Michigan State vs. Stanford. (N) (Live) 2014 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl Baylor vs. Central Florida. From Glendale, Ariz. (N)
ESPN2 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter(N) SportsCenter (N) High School Football NFL Live cc SportsCenter (N)
TN 95 70 95 48 Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God Mass'G' Star-Bethlehem Mary Rosary Religious IVaticano Catholic Women
MO 29 52 29 20 28 **, "Alice in Wonderland" (2010, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, **, "Twilight" (2008) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up The 700 Club (In
9 5 9 2 8 MiaWasikowska.'PG' in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. Stereo)'G' N
EiX 11 ***1, "Carlito's Way" (1993) Al Pacino. *** "Out of Sight" (1998) George Clooney. *** "Intolerable Cruelty" (2003) "Quiz
L X 118 170 Premiere. (In Stereo)'R RI Premiere. (In Stereo) R' George Clooney'PG-13' Show"
T l 44 37 44 32 Special Report Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity The O'Reilly Factor
[O 26 56 26 Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Diners Diners
TS 732 112 732 UFC Reloaded cc UFC Reloaded Jon Jones faces Alfred Gustafsson. cc FOX Sports Live (N)
Ti J 35 39 35 ACC IRaising World Poker Tour World Poker Tour World Poker Tour World PokerTour World PokerTour
3 6 '30 "What Happens in Vegas"(2008, *** "Superbad" (2007) Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens *** "Superbad" (2007, Comedy)
30 60 30 51 Romance-Comedy) Cameron Diaz. 'PG-13' hope to score booze and babes at a party.'R' Jonah Hil.'R'
OLF 727 67 727 Big Break NFL Big BreaBig Break NFL Big Break NFL Big Break NFL Top 10 PGATour
Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home
5UJ 9 68 59 45 54 Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve. Improve.
o ***' "Life of Pi"(2012, Adventure) Suraj **Y2 "Ted" (2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg, Treme Colson is offered Getting On "Identity
IJ 302 201 302 2 2 Sharma, Tabu. (In Stereo) 'PG' Mila Kunis. (In Stereo)'R' a transfer.'MA' 'MA' Thief"'
Bn 30 2**0 3 "Meet the Fockers" (2004) Robert De "Gasland Part II" (2013) Josh Fox examines **Y2 "Clear History"(2013, Comedy) Larry
303 202 303 Niro. Future in-laws clash in Florida. the long-term effects of cracking. 'NR' David, Bill Hader. (In Stereo) N
(IiVD 23 57 23 42 52 Hawaii Hawaii Alaska |Alaska HGTV Dream Home Buying and Selling Hunters |Hunt lntl Island Island
A1 5 1 ancient Aliens'PG' American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers
STJ 51 54 51 32 42 'PG "Duke of Oil"'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
24 38 24 31 n Dance Moms'PG' c Dance Moms'PG' c Dance Moms (N) Dance Moms'PG' c Kim of Queens "Hillbilly Kim of Queens "Hillbilly
24 38 24 31 'PG' in Heels" 'PG' in Heels" 'PG'
,,J 50 119 "In the Dark",l Suspense) Elizabeth "House of Secrets" (2014) Bianca Lawson. "Past Obsessions" (2011, Suspense) Josie
50 119 Rohm, Sam ~ I- ii Stereo)'R I Premiere. (In Stereo)'MR'c Davis, David Millbern. (In Stereo)'NR '
n 320 22 320 3 3 ** *** "Pitch Perfect"(2012) Anna **Y "Wanderlust" (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. *** "War of the Worlds" (2005, Science
320 221320 3 3 "Rebound" Kendrick.'PG-13' cc (In Stereo) 'R' c Fiction) Tom Cruise. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m
MNC 42 41 42 oiiticsNation (N) Hardbaii witn unris All in wti unris Hayes i ne Hachei Maddow i ne Last Word witn All in wti cnris Hayes
S41 42 Matthews (N) N (N) Show (N) Lawrence O'Donnell
S 1 6 1 4 Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad '14' Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad
109 65 109 44 53 Heroin Sting"'14' "Panama'"14' "Delhi"'14' "Spain"'14' "Delhi"'14'
Ii 28 36 28 35 25 Sam& Sam& Sam& Witch FullH'se FullH'se FullH'se FullH'se FullIH'se Full H'se Friends Friends
II 103 62 103 -Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse Worse
rX 44 123 Best Ink Best Ink Best Ink'PG' Best Ink'PG'c Best Ink'PG' c Best Ink (N) 'PG' Tattoos Tattoos
30 2 3 4 House of House of House of House of House of House of Inside the NFL (N) To Be To Be Insidethe NFL (In
340 241 340 4 Lies'MA' Lies'MA' Lies'MA' Lies MA LiesMA'Lies MA' PG, L N Announced Announced Stereo) 'PG, L
***"Training Day"(2001 Crime Drama) **** "The Shawshank Redemption" (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. An innocent "Man on
I j 37 43 37 27 36 Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. (In Stereo)( R Fire"'R'
T 370 071 37 *** "At AnyPrice" **)i "The Odd Life of Timothy Green" (2012) ** "50 First Dates" (2004) Adam ** "The Brothers Grimm" (2005)
370 271 370 (2012)'R' Jennifer Garner (In Stereo) 'PG' Sandler. 'PG-13' cc Matt Damon. 'PG-13' c
S 3 Inside the Orange P1 Powerboat Series BMX Supercross World Halls of Lightning NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Vancouver
36 31 36 Bowl (N) Cup Fame Live! Canucks. (N Subject to Blackout)
Y 9 3 2 2 O The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight The Twilight
31 59 31 26 29 Zone Zone Zone one Zone Zone Z ne Zone Zone Zone Zone Zone
TR 49 23 49 16 19 *** "The Hangover" (2009) 'R' (DVS) BigBang BigBang BigBan BigBang BigBang BigBang Conan'14'cc
*** "The Thrill of It All" (1963, Romance- *** "Journey to the Center ofthe Earth" ** Y"The Lost World" (1960, Science Fiction)
169 53 169 30 35 Comedy) Doris Day.'NR'c (1959) Pat Boone.'G' c Michael Rennie. Premiere.'NR'
i 53 113o Dual Survival "Rocky Diual Survival "Misty Dual Survival Survivorman (N) (In Lone Target Safari Survivorman (In
3 4 53 24 26 Mountain High" '14' Mountain Drop"'14 "Castaways"'14'c Stereo) 'PG' Survival" (N)'PG' Stereo)'PG'c
(TL] 50 46 50 29 30 Extreme |Extreme Extreme |Extreme Extreme Cheap I'm a Living Doll Addiction |Addiction I'm a Living Doll
.T i cn 35 c6 5 i r*** "Barbershop 2: Back in Business" *** "The Rundown" (2003, Adventure) The *** "The Best Man" (1999) Taye Diggs, Nia
350 261350 (2004) Ice Cube. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'c Rock. Premiere.'PG-13' Long. Premiere. (In Stereo)H'R'
rT J 48 33 48 31 34 '"Lord of the Rings" *** '"The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" (2003, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, LivTyler. ** "Lara Croft: Tomb
48 33 48 31 34 Humans and creatures unite to battle Sauron and his army 'PG-13' c (DVS) Raider"(2001)
TC ON 38 58 38 33 G3umball |Adven JohnnyT Teen Gumball IGumball King/Hill Cleveland American |American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
fAV 9 106 9 __ 44 Bizarre Foods Bizarre Foods Bizarre Foods Sturgis Raw (N) Sturgis's Most Tasty Sturgis "Cops"
ii 25 55 25 98 55 Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Repo Repo Repo
TL 32 49 32 34 24 Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland King King Kin King Kirstie(N) The Exes Kirstie The Exes
S 477 NCIS "Pyramid"'14' c NCIS "Phoenix"'PG' NCIS"Gone"'14'm NCIS FBI Agent Fornell NCISZiva's father vis- NCIS"Shiva"'14'm
47 32 47 17 18 (DVS) N (DVS) (DVS) is targeted. 14' its. (In Stereo) '14' (DVS)
1 1 Law & Order "Under Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order "Agony" Law & Order Law & Order "Killerz"
117 69 117 the Influence"'PG' ,,,i 1 "Cherished"'14'c '14'c "Gunshow"'14' '14'c
WO A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Rules IRules Rules IRules WGN News at Nine Mother IRules


North
* A K !I 4 2
V A 5 2
* .1 1, 4
4* 5 3


** 10 9 6
West
SJ G
* A K Q 7
Q* J ,J G 4


01-Ot-14


Kti.l.
PEast
-J 1 5 :j
o 10 9 3
9 6 5 ;1 2
9 7
South
* Q 7
V K Q 8 7 4
* a
4111 A K 10 8 2


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South Ws.t North E:ast
I'ass
1 LDbl. Itcdbl. Pass
Pass I NT I)bL 2
Pass IPass 4 V Pass
??

Opening lead: A

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

I hope all of my readers have a very
happy and healthy New Year.
Yesterday, I gave the deal for which Peter
Bertheau from Sweden won the Interna-
tional Bridge Press Association Yeh Bros.
Best Bid of the Year award.
That was excellent, but I particularly ad-
mired this action by Peter Fredin, also from
Sweden. The deal was originally described
by Shane Blanchard of New York City.
Look at the South hand and the auction.
Partner's redouble shows 10 or more points
and fewer than four hearts. Doubler's one
no-trump indicates equal length in the mi-
nors. And partner's jump to four hearts
promises three-card support and opening
count. What would you do now, if anything?
Fredin paused to work out who had what.
East would surely have bid one spade over
the redouble with four, and West probably
had three spades because he would have
rescued via one spade with four. So North
rated to have five spades. (Not six, because
he would have called one spade instead of
redouble.)
If West had equal length in the minors,
his hand's distribution was surely 3-2-4-4.
Ergo, hearts were breaking 3-2. North also
had three or four diamonds, but had not
doubled two diamonds for penalty. So he
was probably weak there. Fredin deduced
that his partner's 12-plus points were
mostly in the majors. And with both of those
suits lying well, Fredin bid four no-trump,
Roman Key-Card Blackwood, followed by
six hearts.
As you can see, this was laydown; South
taking five spades, five hearts and two
clubs.


VWall2
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GOMLU E

@2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved
CLIRE



SHOECN


~Em
THILGFE
M n-'- I- I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Osie You need to
Offsides! relax! Wait Iget
NuT, er -I 'et
Numberuntil the ball ed
i72. s snapped.
'. '; ,- i ';.. .."' ^ "*,






CAUE HE KEPT ---





Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
r -"

I



H WAS CALL- FOR- B NG
OF~FIVES SO OF~TN

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: T I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: IMPEL KNACK PULLEY RELENT
I Answer: When they got caught in the downpour in
Kiev, they were in the "UK-RAIN-E"


39 Dawn
Chong
40 Coast Guard
off.
41 Ruby or
Sandra
42 "- -Tikr'
43 Family merm.
44 Size above
med.
46 Ames inst.
48 Relented
(2 wds.)
51 Undeliverable
mail
55 Like evening
gowns
56 Rusts away
57 Afternoon nap
58 Cure salmon
n__ .._


Answer to Previous Puzzle


AK RIROBWETHAT
OWE ERPEE*I OTA
DAB MEALEA NTE
ARABI C S EjRE
EBs HAY S
GsUISBAT
SuL MIW EA K
AKNPDA ERO0
LMASSNT
SEJAL AM s
A MrM F UfSION
TDA AGOG SU E
AMENERICHTNT
ROSIAKNI T YD S


L ., VI 6 Tierra del -
1 Ally opposite 7 Languageof
2 NASA Pakistan
destination Cornstalk tips
3 Afire 9 fornthe
4 Vertical 9-o
5 Row bOOk


q) 2014 UFS- Dial. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


ear Readers: Wel-
come to 2014! We
wish each of you
health and happiness. We
hope this year is better
than the last and not as
good as the next. Do your
best to make this
year special. Be
kinder. Be more
patient. Be more
tolerant. Help
someone in need.
Vow to look after
your health, work
out more, eat less
junk, give up
smoking. Turn
over that elusive
new leaf Put
more effort into ANI
your relation- M
ships, and tell the MIl
people you love
how much they mean to
you. You don't know what
tomorrow will bring. Let's
start this year off right.
Dear Annie: We always
have been encouraged to
support our local busi-
nesses. However, there
seems to be a common
trend now where the clerks
often ask for a donation to
a local charity at the end of
every transaction. I have
been solicited at the gro-
cery store, the pet store,
the movies, at fast-food
restaurants and even the
bank.
A simple "no, thank you"
isn't enough. I'm reminded
that it's a worthy cause and
made to feel guilty. Annie, I
am on a limited income
and already have deter-
mined which charities will
get whatever extra money I
have to contribute. From
now on, I am going to shop


I
L


only at those places that
appreciate my business
and say "thank you" with-
out expecting a charitable
donation on top of it. -
Tapped Out
Dear Tapped: We under-
stand how annoy-
ing this can be,
S but charities are
hurting, and this
is a relatively
harmless way of
reminding people
to donate when
they can. Of
S course, it would
S be better if the
business estab-
lishments didn't
IE'S make the patrons
feel that they are
BOX being hounded.
Asking once is
sufficient, and "no, thank
you" should be an accept-
able response. Perhaps you
could speak to someone in
management about it.
Surely you aren't the only
one who dislikes this prac-
tice.
Dear Annie: I think you
were sleeping at the switch
when you replied to "Frus-
trated," the president of a
local women's organiza-
tion. She said she had tried
every possible gambit to
get one of the members to
stop monopolizing the
meetings.
Does this organization
have a knowledgeable par-
liamentarian? Most organi-
zations use Robert's Rules
of Order as their parlia-
mentary authority, and the
bylaws should say so.
There is enough informa-
tion in Robert's to cover
the subject of disciplinary


procedures, which, among
other things, include of-
fenses occurring in a meet-
ing, breaches of order by
members in a meeting,
calling a member to order,
naming an offender and
more. The president
should confer with the par-
liamentarian. If there isn't
one, perhaps they should
consider hiring one. They
should at least have the
recommended edition of
Robert's on hand and learn
the rules. I hope this helps.
- Parliamentarian
DearAnnie: I read in
your column about so many
dysfunctional relation-
ships, adult children not
speaking to each other, sib-
lings fighting, grandpar-
ents ignored or not able to
see grandchildren, and
many other stories.
I am so blessed and
grateful for the family I
have. We take care of each
other, and someone is al-
ways there when we need
help. I am sure I don't tell
my family often enough
that I love them and appre-
ciate them. If more fami-
lies would do this, many
problems would be
avoided or even elimi-
nated. Grateful Grannie
in Casper, Wy.

Annie's Mailbox is writ-
ten by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers
column. Please email your
questions to anniesmail
box@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


ACROSS
- mignon
Fold-up
mattresses
Isis' lover
Muse of
astronomy
Regard highly
Ford fiascoes
Dernier -
Astronaut
Grissom
TV screen
London lay
Pixie
Blue or green
CSA
monogram
Santa -, Calif.
Mdse, bars
Recipe word
Fall flower
Command
to bark
Mac rivals
Mao -tung
Line of
bushes


Zilch
Stockholm
carrier
Lightened up
Held gently
Inch back
slowly
Seasoned
veteran
(2 wds.)
More recent
Raisin center
Pipe down
Gather leaves
Beer buy
War god
Forever
young
Eyetooth
Safari country
Busty
Main idea
Knights' titles
Whse.
inventory
Onassis
nickname
Peace gesture
Bride's reply
(2 wds.)
A mouse!
Weathervane
dir,


C6 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


ENTERTAINMENT





CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Beetle Bailey


we ,ET A s, IT'S MNOT TT WHY COULDN'T YOU
LITTLE O-ER, / WrEJDN"f Pr N, 1 j 5T KlNtrMYL NAOIS
WE GET EVEN MORE NECESSARY FFO TT TO my REARiKS
MANT~i FR 5HPS WITIOIUT BRI iNG-
RES5>ON5IlILITII5, M^NirAIN FRIENDSHIPS ^1FACT5 '
WE GET CAUGHT 1 F, WOUMS
U I IN OLRAND i T W NL -
OW#N ALMOST NO --
LIVES... SOCI pA
\, -1 x AiRCE. 2


The Grizzwells


Blondie


SAl NE OLD, meOLDT



CHO I f|l t J FecioI
I GLEN I JGLEH
1^EcIO'
TT _^TT~ -^r~^


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Another victim of too much
truth in advertising


Doonesbury


%tI 6 US6 IT'S HAWIRICOM9 UP WMT A
NW EAR'S RESOLUTION VJ4HEM ,iOU'RE
ALF-eY PVRFCe'"


"My dreams must be boring. I keep
sleeping right through them."


Betty


Big Nate

BELIEVE. YOU'VE ,EVEP
CAD I CAMT
PLAYM E MONOPOLY'
TT ALWAYS
SEEMCO LIKE -7
iF FAA T-OO
MANY R-ULE5 / /





Arlo and Janis


f/t1


~V~rA
AYYThW6 ,ru~i~e~


Today'sMOVIES
Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 passes.
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m. No passes. "The Wolf of Wall Street" (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D. 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
10:45 p.m. No passes. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"American Hustle" (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., "47 Ronin" (PG-13) 12 p.m. No passes.
7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. "47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D. 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. "American Hustle" (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
"Frozen" (PG) 3:30 p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes. 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m., "Anchorman 2" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:45 p.m. 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" "Frozen" (PG) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
(PG-13) 7:10 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes. "Grudge Match" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
(PG-13) In 3D, high frame rate. 12:15 p.m. No passes. "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-13)
"HungerGames: Catching Fire" (PG-13) 10:30 p.m. 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-13)
7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. In 3D. 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" (PG) 12:50 p.m., "HungerGames: Catching Fire" (PG-13) 10:30 p.m.
4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. "Walking With Dinosaurs" (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 4:45 p.m. No passes.
No passes. "Walking With Dinosaurs" (PG) In 3D. 4:50 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs" (PG) In 3D. 2:25 p.m. No No passes.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public o L Oc RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, pasi and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: s;nba i


"MXNLXGRWM VN FVNLTGM, LTOTGGTY


VN W OMNLXGM, LTRWM VN UTR'N


UVIL, LFWL'N YFM YX JWEE VL LFX


AGXNXPL."


- BTWP GVSXGN


Previous Solution: "I like to work on New Year's Eve ... laughing with fellow human
beings is a great way to start the new year." Paula Poundstone


(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-1


Peanuts


Pickles


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Frank & Ernest


COMICS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 C7










I To place an ad, call 563=5966





Classified Classifieds
In Print


and


-~ Online

All

'The Time


Fax (32 6-651Tl re 88 5-301Eal lsiiescrnceniecm Iwbie w:hoiloln~o
w.Id.s.LstMedca Retaran/ arer.0sies

Happ Nots] f~e ds Lung Opprtuntie O8963 nt72


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Sleeper Sofa
with 4 matching tables
$350. File cabinet $5.
Moving
352-249-7413
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245
Crystal River
Fri-Sat 9a-3p HUGE
Compsr, generator,
wldr, kerosene frcd air
htrchnswweedwack-
ers, leafblowers,6' &
8' almn Iddrs, tools,
autobody repair tools,
hsewares, collecta-
bles, & more.
8960 N. Cacalia Dr.
352-564-4221
Dinette Set
Bamboo table w/
glass top& 4 chairs.
$100; 2 Fabric recliners
& 3 cushion sofa $175
(352) 746-0620
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incid water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
Kitchen Table, with
4 chairs, beautiful
green print,
excellent cond.,
almost brand new
$550. (352) 746-1705


Your World

H Cfwz49e4 4i


Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $750
(352) 212-2798
RN'S & LPN'S
Per Diem, All
Facilities, All Shifts
Call (352) 432-0080
or Apply Online
www.staffamerica
health.corn
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
Twin Beds,
Dresser, 2 night stands
$250;
Dining room table
$20. Moving
352-249-7413


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, AC Units
Riding Mowers, Scrap
Metals, 352-270-4087

L.k
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


2 FREE CHOWS
1 Red, 1 Black
Call (352) 637-1411
Free Firewood
Cut & Ready to Haul
(352) 746-0524
Free
German Shepherd,
male, all shots. Must
have fenced in yard
(352) 220-7152
FREE
Horse Manure
You Haul
(352) 628-9186
Neutered Male Cat
tiger striped, black on
gray, also an all grey
adult male. both
very friendly
Call (352) 746-1904


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabi $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
*GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
CAT Female long hair,
Black & white. Lost
12/24 Gulf Ave off
Rock Crusher, CR
(352) 586-8847
Lost Yorkie,
Male, 4 Ibs.
Monroe Street
Beverly Hills Area
REWARD
One his puppies
(352) 513-4696


non r-uHaireu UalCO
Cat Last seen on
12/27 Mayflower Ave,
Inverness. Reward
352-419-6475



Female Jack Russell
Terrier, with Beverly
Hills tags found in
Homosassa 12/30
(352) 697-1558
Found
Men's Wedding Ring
Brentwood
Golf Course
Call to identify
(352) 527-9897


-UlPY


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabi $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966



CASE MANAGER
Primary Care
Physican
Accountable Care
Organization (ACO)
seeking qualified
Care Manager.
Current Florida RN
lic. along with 3 plus
years experience in
hospital setting or
post accute care
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax
Resume to:
Nature Coast ACO
Attn Patty King
352-746-3838


F/T CNA
For OB Doctor's Ofc
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877
Medical Biller
Immediate Opening
Busy Multi-Pysician
Practice, Experi-
enced applicants
Fax Resume to:
352-746-4748
RN'S & LPN'S
Per Diem, All
Facilities, All Shifts
Call (352) 432-0080
or Apply Online
www.staffamerica
health.com








MANAGERS
NEEDED
FOR CITRUS, MAR-
ION LAKE & SUMTER
COUNTIES
-Competitive wages
-Bonus opportunities
-Advancement
Opportunities
-Complete Training
Package
-Health, Dental, RX,
Vision & Life benefits
available
-Meal Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Manager Shirts
SUBMIT RESUME TO:
bbqm@heritage
management.net


*
NOW
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
For All
Hourly Positions.
Please complete our
online application.
at:
http://aoo.al/bv4CU



COMMUNITY
HOSTESS
Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
position
including weekends
shuttling potential
homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

Ll11. .1 f I %'I L.
Yitil 'flid lust.
L \ y day

CH~NO


you in



touch



with the



Nature



Coast


Our family of newspaper

reaches more than

170,000 readers in Citrus,

Marion, Sumter, Levy,

Dixie, Gilchrest, Gadsden

& Wakulla Counties.


* Citrus County Chronicle
* Homosassa Beacon
* Crystal River Current
* Williston Pioneer
* Rivedrand News
* Chiefland Citizen
* Gadsden County Times


* Central Ridge Visitor
* Inverness Pioneer
*Sumter County Times
* South Marion Citizen
* Riverland Shopper
* Tri-County Bulletin
* Wakulla News


0 Nature Coast Visitors Guide I Real Estate News

The best way to reach the
growing Nature Coast market is
through our award-winning,

growing newspapers.


CI i b kiE



1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 563-6363
www.chronicleonline.corn


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!
Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547






Opportunity for
Fulltime
Professional.
Must have book-
keeping /acounting
experience or
equivalent & profi-
cient in computers
and spreadsheets.
Able to multi-task
& communicate
well with others.
FAX RESUME TO
352-746-9033


Schools/
Instructio


Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.











DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOFW
Sunday Jan. 5th
Antlaue &
Collectible Auction
Pre: 10Oam, Auc: 1pm
500+ lots, antlq. turn,
silver/gold jewelry
coins, china,
porcelain, check
webslte for catalog
& photos
......................
call for Into 637-9588
Dudleysauction.comrn
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


U- ~J -J .f U f --r _y Ji
2 9 7 1 514386
852671934
371492568
946835172
5697148243
18432!9657
72354:6819











www.chronicleonline.comurce is
Cl m









www-ch ron icleon linecm


io b 1 III IIVVU[1 UI IIVV (X
Spre-owned sales people.

ALL CLASSES Join the fastest growing
FOR 2014
Spring Hill & multi-line dealership in
New Port Richey r
:- |C c *C Homosassa, FL.
COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
NAILS SKIN
SMASSAGE Therapy Great Benefits Excellent
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL Bonuses Earning
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty & Available Potential
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International Come in and Ask for
School of Beauty Brett Coble or Charlie Defreese
www.benes.edu Cl or are ereese
to Schedule an Interview



Village Cadillac Toyota
2431 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 34448

(727) 848-8415 352-628-5100
(352) 263-2744 Equal Oppotunity Employer
1 (866) 724-2363 000Ho
TOLL FREE*"
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING





Home Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


tt You rrw* How6

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fill in the squares so that each row. column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


C8 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6 YR OLD SAMSUNG
front load dryer, like
new, never used
much, asking $300
(352) 726-6461
352-201-5113
APPLIANCES Kenmore
Refrigerator, side by
side, water and ice on
door, $300;Kenmore
glass-top range, $200;
Kenmore Microwave
$75; Whirlpool Dish-
washer $125; $600 for
all. Call 382-2743
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
HOTPOINT DRYER
Good Condition, Works
Great $50 Can Deliver
352-341-0923
Refrigerator
Maytag Black S-by-S
ice/water on dr. $300;
Electric Stove, flat top,
Black $100 obo
(315) 539-5297
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398









DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOW
Sunday Jan. 5th
Antlaue &
Collectible Auction
Pre: 1Oam, Auc: 1pm
500+ lots, antlq. turn,
sliver/gold jewelry
coins, china,
porcelain, check
webslte for catalog
& photos
......................
call for Info 637-9588
Dudleysauction.comrn
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck




MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$50 OBO
352-464-0316
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell
1/4"hose, gun, lance&
soap bottle $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495


FumitureB


Fumiture
King Sealy Mattress
W/ Blue Lattice Bed
Frame. Less than 1 yr.
old. exc. cond. $500.
352-637-6108,
352-400-9631 cell
KITCHEN FURNITURE
Expandable kitchen
table with four chairs
excellent condition.
$125.00 382-5956
Kitchen Table, with
4 chairs, beautiful
green print,
excellent cond.,
almost brand new
$550. (352) 746-1705
Leather Wing Chair,
Blue, Brand New,
Office or Home $750
(352) 212-2798
LIVING ROOM SET
sofa, loveseat, 2
cocktail tables, 1 coffee
table, 2 lamps, light
rattan, like new $450
(352) 746-6848
LOVE SEAT Like
new,must sell.Light col-
ors.
$50 Linda 4234163
LOVESEAT Beige/gold
neutral 57" loveseat one
year old non-smoking
$100 OBO
352-4654208

YOU'LL THIS!
RECLINERS Pair
matching burgundy re-
diners exc cond paid
$399 each at Badcock
Perfect for superbowl
viewing $275.00 OBO
352-4654208
Swivel Accent Chair
Light Brown
Perfect cond.
$250.
(352) 726-5379
Twin Beds,
Dresser, 2 night stands
$250;
Dining room table
$20. Moving
352-249-7413
White Wicker
Trundle Bed,
Steel enforced,
Great Shape
$95.
(352) 897-4198



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019



30 PLANTS FOR
WATER GARDEN
BLUE
FLOWERS.DON'T
KNOW THEIR NAMES
10 FOR $15 464-0316



Crystal River
Fri-Sat 9a-3p HUGE
Compsr, generator,
wldr, kerosene frcd air
htr.chnsw.weedwackers.


Sleeper Sofa ieafblowers,6' & 8' almn
with 4 matching tables Iddrs, tools, autobody
$350. File cabinet $5. repair tools, hsewares,
Moving collectables, & more.
352-249-7413 8960 N. Cacalia Dr.
352-564-4221

Leek m
2 "ASHLEY" C in
5-DRAWER DRESSER -___
CABINETS DRESS SHIRT Bristol &
BARELY USED!!! Bull New Tag says
ONLY A 79.50/selling $25
FEW MONTHS OLD!!! Linda 423-4163
Buy both for $400 or
$225 for 1 PGH STEELER
352-746-1910 JACKET NFL C hron cl
Swinter/removable hood
2 VINTAGE CHAIRS. med like new cond. $25. ( "
Gold swivel rocker and Dunnellon 465-8495 fi .
Nice condition. $25 for Cu0assified.4
both. 527-1239
2 VINTAGE COFFEE 2 Twin size oak beds In P rin t
TABLES. 1 round with with storage drawers,
lazy susan. 1 rectangu- & mattress, dresser, Ol n
lar. Both maple. $25 for mirror & chest, excel.
both. 527-1239 cond. $250. for all & O n l in* e
Kenmore Refrigerator
1920's Solid Cherry good for college,
Wood 4 Poster Bed excel cond. $45.
3" shy of double bed 352 613-7429
inc. boxsprings & -
mattress, good cond. 5 GI -JOES WITH 1
$749. firm STORAGE CASE
(352) 795-8018 SOME CLOTHES & AC-
CESSORIES $30.
Antique Butler 464-0316
3 drawers
$100 225/75R -16
(352) 795-1929 Goodyear light truck tire
_____1__1_3 GREAT SHAPE ONLY
DESK AND CHAIR $60352-464-0316 3 6 3
computer desk 7-5 GALLON METAL
large/chair leather, set OLD FUEL CANS WITH
$75 352-860-0759 SPOUTS ALL FOR ( 55
Dinette Set- $100 464-0316
Bamboo table w/ CAR COVER
glass top& 4 chairs. (BREATHABLE) FOR
$ 100; 2 Fabric recliners MEDIUM SIZE CAR
& 3 cushion sofa $175 MALIBU ONLY $30 .....
(352) 746-0620 352464-0316


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
4'CANDLE &
(5)4'CANDY CANES
$25.0BO 586-7222
CHROME CLOTHES
RACK FOR STORE
DISPLAY, 4 arms, ex-
cellent condition, $40,
(352) 465-1813
Dining room table
and 4 chairs, light oak
$150; Nice wood
couch table, $50
(352) 795-7254
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct @ $5.001b.
Stone Crabs $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001
FOUR 2 DRAWER
METAL FILE CABI-
NETS. Good condition.
$50 for all. 527-1239
GENERAL Ralph Lau-
ren Navy/Gray Queen
sleeping bag
$50,Automatic BP tester
$20, RM Easiteach In-
teractive
Whiteboard-new $30,
Office Depot rolling,
folding cart $10, B&D
steamer $5 352 465
6619
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
352-464-0316
JEEP PATRIOT SPARE
TIRE BRAND NEW
NEVER USED. $60
MIKE 586-7222
K-CUPS TULLY'S
COFFEEHOUSE
BLEND, MED ROAST
26 K-cups. $16
Call local 228-7372
RATTAN AND GLASS
ENTRY TABLE, 27" tall,
44" wide, 18" deep, ex-
cellent condition, $75,
(352) 465-1813


RATTAN AND GLASS
ETAGERE, 74" tall, 30"
wide, 18" deep, excel-
lent condition, $95,
(352) 465-1813




4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45.
352-628-0033
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
UP.RONLY $20
352-464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85 352464-0316
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352-464-0316
Pride Mobility Products
Inc, Burgundy Cloth
Chair Lift. $450
586-0341.



"NEW" FLAT TOP
ACOUSTIC GUITAR&
ACCESSORIES
READY TO PLAY $50
352-601-6625
Cable Knelson Piano
looks and works great.
Real good cond. Asking
$300. 352-795-1495
GOT GUITAR?
ACOUSTIC OR CLAS-
SICAL GUITAR SOFT
CASE(GIGBAG) "NEW"
$15 352-601-6625


CLASSIFIED


Household

GENERAL Mission oak
rocker $150,2 antique
half round tables
$100@, 30lb. galva-
nized roofing nails
and300 count grip cap
nails $25@,6 Franklin
Mint McDonalds plates
$120 all, GE convection
toaster oven$25, Mr.
Coffee expresso maker
$10,large rolling
suitcase$10,Ryobi belt
sander $40, folding crab
trap $10, child's bike
helmet $5,SS 1 quart
thermos $5, 2 digital
coin counting money
jars $5 @, Oneida Cha-
teau stainless service
for 12 $250 352 465
6619
K-CUPS TULLY'S
COFFEEHOUSE
BLEND, MED ROAST
26 K-cups. $16.
Call local 228-7372




MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316

S ortill

2 SETS OF GOLF
CLUBS. 2 older sets in
bags and 1 caddy. $50
for all. 527-1239
Club Car Golf Cart
1991, Family owned
Excellent condition.
Lights, Battery 1 yr.
old, Must Sell, $1,500.
(352) 527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


Golf 4 Rnds W/cart @
Brooksville Country
Club. Bargain cele-
brate holiday $90.
352-503-3914
GOLF DRIVER Raw-
lings 450cc mrh 10"
Apollo Reg lite shaft
new grip exc $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
GOLF DRIVER Tour
Edge Exotics XLD MRH
10.5 senior w/HC new
grip $45. Dunnellon
465-8495
GOLF DRIVER Tour
Edge Exotics XLD mrh
10.5 Senior w/HC New
Grip $45. Dunnellon
465-8495
James Anglin
Gunsmith
12 gage pump, new in
box $259.00, ak 47
drum $150.
352-4194800

Sell or Swa


-'7' r-~


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 C9


HERMAN,


I make it a rule never to argue
about politics."

I tion Garaue[ Kitchens Bths


-0


Howwr-o





WPW our Ucr







I.,-,>1


S4b


/~
/


2#


- a '"r.


*' t. */ ^ ~l^




*.*'j/ I *Ij
-" .A ,
"PAW. .... ." 'r .
.. ,, . ,: S-tI
. .,


.f.... / j : ,.i




C C, II WG C-0-U M,- V
lt l. "-"' *. -

/~-A Hi\ / flq /wvw


M59 6CH6pMIJ

9 "ii
-56 :^ ;//


a


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Care for Elderly or
Disabled in your home
Days or Nights. Will do
Cleaning & Cooking
25 yrs. Exp., 257-1308



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279**




TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
o AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Can So Almost
Anything, Inside/Out
No job too big or small
Quality Work,
746-2347or 422-3334

Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447





Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning









(352) 270-4672






Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998





porn-
--IE TiJ




POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**






MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.






Your' urid first

Need a ji )
ar a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CFIJRNICLE


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.












TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


- - - - - - - - - -1







C10 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014




WORDY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. New Year's football game aim (1) Every answers a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. At-large Bullwinkde animal (1) lII.'" l III III t.. i., r
____________ ~squares. The number after the
|definition tells you how many
3. Add a sales levy on munchies (1) syllables in each word.

II h Z02014 UFS Dist, byUnv. Uclckfor UFS
4. Wed Hogwarts graduate Potter (2)


5. NBC late-night Jimmy's eagle claws (2)


6. Evil god for whom this month is named (2)


7. Pass catcher's false impression givers (3)


saaAIMau( s1aAiMai'i L slNVI?'SONIaH '9 SNO'IVI SNOTIV *'
II'IWM A 1IVIXI I SIVNS XI x IT SOON S00I T109 10 11
1-1-14 1SHR SKV


ThIOst Is Tol It lhG 1We're Yllf INSURED o r
lath lune8al ublilty A1D Workers' .coip!

l I coor, oi


~!


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Chronicle


GARAGE SALE ITEMS
MANY MANY FULL
BOX'S. $100.00 MIKE
586-7222


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820





Chihuahua Puppies
Very small,
19 weeks old
$300-$350
Great personalities
(352) 628-7504









DOLLY
Meet Dolly, 6-y.o.
Bulldog/terrier mix,
wt 54 lbs., has had
an unfortunate life,
still one of the
sweetest dogs ever.
Shows signs of ne-
glect, but amazingly
is full of love for peo-
ple, playful & very
happy, craves af-
fection and returns
it, so deserving of a
loving home. Sweet
personality.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Jack Russell Terriers
Mother and Father on
premise. Ready to go
Five males $200/ea
352-613-9135


RAVEN
You want sweet?
Here she is, gentle &
calm 7-month-old
Labrador mix, very
eager to please
walks well on leash,
fakes treats gently,
sits when asked, not
interested in cats.
Her family lost their
home, but she's had
a good start in life,
very loving. Needs
her own home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


ROSCO
Rosco a beautiful
pit bull/terrier mix,
black w/white
chest, very calm
gentle & obedient,
good w/other dogs,
wonderful w/
people, very loving,
good w/cats, walks
calmly on leash, wt.
66 Ibs. A volunteer
favorite.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827

Lok:


i IN i iiny is a yuiyuuus
2 yr old Staffordshire
terrier mix, extremely
obedient & intelligent,
loving & affectionate,
gets along with some
dogs, all cats, and all
people and
children.Rides well in
the car. Tiny is gor-
geous- sure to turn
heads by your side. Call
Laci @352-212-8936


WINNIE
Winnie is a small
Lab/Bulldog mix, wt
40 lbs., is 3 1/2 years
old. In her life before
the shelter lived in
a family with a child
& is know to be very
good with kids.
Described as
"amazingly sweet"
but does best
with male dogs.
Call Wanda @
352-344-5737.




Australian Saddle
Like Brand New
Velvet, used once,
Paid$1,000.
Reduced to $840
(352) 513-5547

--'-


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
r


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1, $550 mo. Near
Walmart 352-464-3159



FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incis: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
Floral City 12x56 MH
2/br, 1/2 ba on 80x152
ft lot.$21,000. Fixer 'er
up. (352) 726-8873
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985




INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


BEST
5EST4 J
Ia@N


2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
Inverness, Jungle
Camp Area 2Br/1IBa
SW w/2 rms added
on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge
lot close to river. Just
$10,000,352-400-4196




2BR/IBA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124
55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, IBA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scm pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Homosassa 55+ Park
2BR/IBA. Newly re-
modeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$6,000 (608) 921-5564
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




HOMOSASSA
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds. garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310

INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393

INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2/2 and 2/1
W/D $575 TO $675
352-422-7021

INVERNESS
2/1, Storage Room
475 mo.+ Security
352-634-5499

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD









CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE*
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incl Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242



HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
3/2/2, wheel chair
access. $875. mo., 1st,
last, sec. 352-726-5272
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2 &
3/2/2 $825/mo & Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fen'd back
yrd. $875, 352-212-4873
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CLASSIFIEDS




CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk 828-497-2610

CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


BUAL KTUNI$
OPPORTuhTm


CITRUS C(


Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015
Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Real Etate^

BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Sulte #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan

Million Dollar +
Producer!

Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com


For SaleI,,M.
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290



MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage florida room
furnished or not
Lots of upgrades
Executor now accepting
offers
502/693-7904




Duval Island
Very nice clean, turn.
starter or retire home.
2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility
room w/ shower. No
flood zone. Reduce to
$46,900 352- 678-7145


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


^EE^
lunvem


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For YouI

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.




V 'tll Illd IlISt.
Li) Da
Ci d/4 LiE


CITRUS COUNTY
For more information on how to reach CITRU1SC
Citrus County readers call i IK NLw
352-563-5592. ww.chronicleonline.com
Scarbrou., 2010


IoaooXz


)UNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816





For Sale
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


S= 11-


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CH1






Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

THE MARKET
IS GOOD

Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed

Still great vd-
uesold
there for
buyers!!

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office
















BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL










DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING!

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME

CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattd
centurv21 .com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515













SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.corn

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


tRONICLE


0-CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245







-I-





Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


eeeeeeeeeH



"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Owner Financing
10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007
Homes of Merit, $135k
Call Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
352-302-6082




BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
See What $9k Can Buy
8471 County Rd 614 A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252




Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paint,all appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712
Watrfon


Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810




BOAT TOP HEAVY
DUTY ALUMINUM
COMMERCIAL. 24 FT
LONG X 8 FT WIDE
WITH BLUE CANVAS
TOP & VINYL SIDES.
MEASURES 3-1/2 FT.
HIGH FROM YOUR
BOAT RAILS $1,900
352-628-5222 OR
INFO@RIVERSA-
FARIS.COM




Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628


mmm
P-7.7


CH-VY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2008 Taurus SEL, All
leather int., low miles,
car/tires all exc cond.
$13000 (352) 795-9181
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'94 Towncar, 91,600 mi
excellent condition
$2,500, (352) 795-3200
352 422-7574 Cell
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$3,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
$1,500.
(352) 489-0117




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JAN. 5th.
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $26,900
352-513-4257






IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018


** BUY, SELL -
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
1352-563-5510
Dock Space For Rent,
Floating, Deep Canal
200 ft. from Crystal
River, (352) 257-8850
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
generator, very good
tires, Lots of storage.
$11,000. 352-263-4339
SOUTHWIND
98' V-10eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




RV Jack Knife Couch
68", in great shape
$250. obo
352-464-4388




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
w ANY CONDITION


DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
SUGARMILL WOODS CY-
PRESS VLG PB 9 PG 86 LOT
6 BLK 107
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
RON A PRICE
Said property beinq in the
County of Citrus, STate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11 2013
December 18,2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014


CLASSIFIED




2657-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-343
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 CLL


2661-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-349
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED


FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van.
74K mi. good cond
extras included++
$6,000 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




HONDA
2008 TRX 400
mint cond, w/riding gear
and title $2800. obo
Dennis 352-267-3334




Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$5800. 352-513-4257




2654-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-335
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-3063
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 3 PB 5
PG 116 LOT 18 BLK 212
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
SILIVIA MALDONADO,
SILVIA MALDONADO
SILVIA Y MALDONADO
Said property being in the
County of itrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014

2655-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-341
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA
LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-1664
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
HALLS RIVER ESTS PB 3 PG
11 LOTS 6, 7 & BOAT SLIPS
43 & 44
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
CATHLEEN COLE,
CRYSTAL COLE,
JACQUELINE COLE,
JOHN COLE,
KIMBERLY COLE,
WARREN GEORGE COLE
III, JORDAN 0 CHASE
A/K/A JORDON 0 COLE
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 AM. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18,2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014

2656-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-342
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA
LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-7190
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011


The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4971
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 21 PB 7
PG 73 LOT4 BLK 1407
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
DESTINY BOTTINI,
CYNTHIA R JONES
Said property being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11 2013
December 18, 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014


2658-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-344
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA
LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-6345
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
BEVERLY HILLS UNREC SUB
PB 11 PG 89 LOTS 1 & 2
BLK 134 DESC AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT MOST
N'LY CRN OF LOT 36 BLK
134 SD PT BEING ON SW'LY
R/W LN TRUMAN BLVD AS
SHOWN ON SD PLAT THN
N 51DEG W ALG SW'LY
R/W LN 120FT THN S
39DEG W 85FT THN S
51 DEG E PARL TO SD R/W
120FT TO PT NW'LY LN OF
BLK 134 THN N 39DEG E
ALG NW'LY LN 85FT TO
POB BEING LOT 1 SUBJ TO
5FT WIDE UTILITY ESMT
ACROSS SW'LY & SE'LY
BDRY & COMM AT MOST
N'LY CRN OF LOT 36 BLK
134 SD PT BEING ON SW'LY
R/W LN OF TRUMAN BLVD
AS SHOWN SD PLAT THN N
51 DEG W ALG SW'LY R/W
LN 120FT THN S 39DEG W
85FT TO PBO THN CONT S
39DEG W 80FT THN S
NW'LY LN OF BLK 134 THN
N 39DEG E ALG NW'LY LN
80FT THN N 51 DEG W PARL
TO R/W LN 120FT TO POB
BEING LOT 2 BLK 134 SUBJ
TO 5FT DRAINAGE UTILITY
ESMT ACROSS NE'LY SE'LY
& SW'LY BDRY DESC IN OR
BK 1119 PGS 1208 & 1209
& OR BK 1744 PG 1763
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
BARBARA J WHEELER,
RICHARD E WHEELER
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4

2659-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-346
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA
LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-8087
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
KENSINGTON ESTS UNIT 2
PB 11 PG 66 LOT 3 BLK E
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
MARIA GRASING
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, Tate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus Coun y Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11, 2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,2014

2660-01I01 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-348
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA
LLC
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-8206
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
VILLAGES OF INVERNESS
PB 17 PG 118 LOT7 BLK3
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ANN SOMERS
LUC TIMMERMANS
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, STate of
Florida.


Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus Couny, Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11 2013
December 18, 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014


The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-9445
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
INVERNESS HGLDS SOUTH
PB 3 PG 51 LOTS 28 & 29
BLK 256
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ESTATE OF KENNETH K TAY-
LOR
Said properly being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014


2662-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-356
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-2885
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 1
LOT 18 BLK 75 DESCR IN O
R BK 389 PG 168
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
WOLFGANG GUNSER
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, Sate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11, 2013
December 18 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014

2663-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-357
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-2886
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 1
LOT 13 BLK 76 DESCR IN O
R BK A49 PG 228
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
HABIB HASSAN JOWHAR
HAYAT
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11, 2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4

2665-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-361
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MICHAEL TUFFO
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-7557
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
ROYAL COACH VLG UN-
REC SUB LOT 4BLK G DESC
IN OR BK 770 PG 1595
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
FRANK J BERLINGIERI CITI-
FINANCIAL, CITIFINCIAL
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, STate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 2013
January 1,2014

2666-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-363
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate


number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-3645
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 5
LOT 12 BLK 512 DESCR IN
OR BK 536 PG 1762
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
FRANCES JONES


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
MTAG AS CUSTODIAN MTAG CUSTODIAN FOR
FOR CAZ CREEK FLORIDA CAZ CREEK FLORIDA LLC
LLC


Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.


Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.real-
taxdeed.com.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18 2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014

2667-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-364
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA DTURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4232
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 2 BLK 673
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
JULIO LOPEZ,
MARTA LOPEZ
Said property being in the
County of itrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11, 2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4

2668-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-365
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA DTURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-3572
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 5 LOT 1
BLK 487 DESC IN OR BK
839 PG 1328
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
CATHERINE M VIOLETTE
Said property being in the
County of itrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4

2669-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-366
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA DTURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4223
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 3 BLK 673
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
DEBRA ANN NORRIS
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, STate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014

2670-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-367
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY

The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4300
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 13 PB 6
PG 98 LOT 3 BLK 919
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
SEEROJINE BALKARAN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.


Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18 2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014


Meeting^
NoticesH


Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,2014

2671-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-368
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4430
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 14
LOT 1 BLK 749 DESC IN OR
BK 825 PG 1336
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
AVIS E DUNCAN
Said property being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18 2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014

2672-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-369
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4301
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 13 PB 6
PG98 LOT 1 BLK 921
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
FLORIDA PREMIER PROP-
ERTIES LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, STate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11 2013
December 18,2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014

2673-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-370
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4201
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 11 BLK 661
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ALUMINI PARTNERS II LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, Sate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18 2013
December 25,2013
January 1,2014

2674-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-371
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-2901
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 1 PB 5
PG 89 LOT 12 BLK 82
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ALUMINI PARTNERS II LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK


Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 18, 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014
January 8, 2014


757-0101 WCRN
CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus SpringsAdvisory Council will meet on
Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at 9:00 o'clockA.M., at the Citrus Springs Community Cen-
ter, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Building "B", Citrus Springs, Florida, to conduct busi-
ness of the Citrus Springs Municipal Service Benefit Unit.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodatbion at this meeting because of a disability
or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.


Said properly beiny in the
County of Citrus, STate of By: Joan Dias, Chairwoman, CITRUS SPRINGS MSBU
Florida. Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, January 1, 2014.


2675-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-372
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4226
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 6 BLK 672 DESC
IN OR BK 538 PG 1030
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ALUMINI PARTNERS II LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4


2676-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-373
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4225
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 25 BLK 671
DESC IN OR BK 549 PG
1435
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
ALUMINI PARTNERS II LLC
Said property being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County Florida
By: Theresa S'eelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11,2013
December 18, 2013
December 25 2013
January 1,20f4


2677-0101 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-374
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-4194
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPGS UNIT 11 PB 6
PG 80 LOT 14 BLK 651
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
JULIO LOPEZ,
MARTA LOPEZ
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated November 27,
2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 11 2013
December 8, 2013
December 25, 2013
January 1,2014


2678-0108 WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-362
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
CATALINA TAX CO LLC US
BANK
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 11-9398
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF PROP-
ERTY:
INVERNESS HGLDS SOUTH
PB 3 PG 51 LOTS 89, 90 &
91 BLK 202 DESC IN OR BK
911 PG 1112

NAME IN WHICH AS-
SESSED:
LAURA H ENDARA, LAURA
HAAYEN ENDARA, LAURA
HAAYEN ENDARA REVO-
CABLE TRUST, LAURA
HAAYEN ENDARA TRUS-
TEE, LUIS C ENDARA EST
TRUSTEE, LUIS CARLOS
ENDARA SR EST
Said property being in the
County of Citrus State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-
erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line, on January 22, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated December 6, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,


10




C12 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


New 2014 Chevy


kCRUZE LSd

LSTK #C14047 MSRP $19,255


Per Month + Tax
39 Month Lease


S


a... .
' -TffTi~lWf


w 2014 Chevy
MALIBU LS
W.#C14080 MSRP $22,980


$199
Pimoffias
39 Month Lease


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #0C14049 MSRP $25,330


New 2014 Chevy New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT SONIC LTSEDAN
STK #C14030 MSRP $35,535 STK #C14131 MSRP $18,590
___ a a.IA- 1 __ a 1, I


Pogm sotrm MNhaTMx
39Monlth Lme 39MOIIUULam


^^--~ -a^
- n2FMt ~ turnS-^^ aC^-^'J


Wa --

New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14004 MSRP $28,120


a


New 2014 Chevy New 2014 Chevy
CAMARO 2LS SILVERADODOuL
STK #C14094 MSRP $26,235 STK #C104o MSRP $34,685


PwrMSnl [ +Tax PowmcaS+Tm
39MnthLase 39MANlnLeaa


OVER All Pre-Loved Certified TERK3 OR
OVERVehicles include up to:2 YRS I-STOP
Used & Certified 100,000 MILE 30,000 MILE PROGRAM
Pre-LovedVehicles WARRANTY MAINTENANCE IaNCLDiED
See dealer tar complete details


LS 1OGMCACADIA
1.1146
$19,495


(LS B3CHEVYMAUBU LI
21795


P12299
lH T~tUllr lllh U A UUl
523.495
PLUS
km


5OTOYOTASIENNA
1.2314
$67495


08 SATURN VUE LEATHER
Pl': r... ONSTAe fliI AWlL
$1214"


08FORD EXPLORERXLT
.1.] l SPiMrTTRA:



12TOYOTATACOMA
V223. CREW(ACSPIERUNNER
SMW49


08CHEVROLETHHR
1215.' ALL POVWR



lO CHEVY SILVERADO
REG CB
$127495


11 HONDAMACCOED EX COUPE
SuNRX'F
516A495


11 FORD EXPEDmONXLT
TV.N D LEATED
524A495


08 ESSAN PATHFINDER LE
LEATE 456UiNPut
SW2
1.1^T9.
12 NISSAN VERSA
12221
$12,495


13 KIA OPTIMA EX
PNCI rAMA SUNiFLiEANiiER
SWAPS


12 FORD F15OEXCAB LARIAT
111 LEATHER.rEMOTF TART
SL%49


10SMARTFORTWO 11 FORD HrESTA
i ';2. .ASSAVER l.'k
$9495 511A95
EM nt' '-<4 --^a
j. .,~'-. Ii 'i^ ^ ^

04 EEPWRANGLER 13 HYUNDAIACCENTGS
1:124 AC.AUlC. WW HARDTOP P12.10 HTCHBACK
S12w95 S1a.95


11 DODGEDURANGO
S20,9


3MAZAaCX-5
$21495


PLUS MANY
MORE TO
CHOOSE FROM!


LOVE Can Do For You!

t.341.0018

.iales.com


e Se dealer i tor details 1 All leases with $2,499 cash down tor 39 montns. :ro secuity deposil 12 000 miles per year plus tax. Limited to in stock
vehicles onlyv All iricesand!uor payVrents plus ta tag title & state tees Dealer installed options and accessories additional co.t 2 Not vai]la0lle with finance
or lease otters. Pie-owned vehicles with s2 500 casi or trade equi/ Oet ericpires on date ot publication


39 Month Lease


New 2014 Chevy
TAHOE LS
STK #CT14041 MSRP $45,115


CERTIFIED Vehicles!


495


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


SOM


Tr
w


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.. i I'; 1 ; .


-v




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


To eligible active or retired members of the US Military & their spouses towards any
new Honda vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


:anywhere in the world first, but

IECKWITH

IAD LAST"


...for a New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2014 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3EEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
ModelGE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...for a New 2014 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
Model RM3H3EEW-ComeSeeWhyTheCR-VlIsTheBest
Selling CompadSUV In America! Save WhileThey Last!


a New 2013 Honda
OUR2WD2.4.L4EX
AodelTF3H3DJW
ie While They Last!


...for a New 2014 Honda
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2EEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%YAM
X 60 MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on approved credit.


Pre-Owned Vehicles!


s500 MILITARY
APPRECIATION OFFER
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:

Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
See denlerfor complete details


What LOVE Can Do For Youl

R 352.628.4600

i.Honda.com


rIF a,


*See dealer for details. tFor eligible active or retired membersof the US Military and their spouses towards any new Honda ._ ... _ _ _ _ _
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS. Used as a down payment or capcost reduction toward the purchase or lease of .
any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program .....
through HFS (excludes Zero Due at Signing Lease Program). Must meet certain credit criteria established by HFS, and vehicle must ...
be eligible for new-vehicle rates. See dealer for complete details. * Plus $790 destination charge and options. 1.36 month closed end ..
lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment,
tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. 2.36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles
per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $999 cash or trade equity plus taxes, tag & fees, First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost.
3.36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,689 with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2000 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees
due at signing. Options at additional cost. ttCovers internal lubricant parts. See dealer for details. All pre-owned vehicles include $2500 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014 C13


WIP 109-"0 90




C14 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2014


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1


CRYSTAL'S LOWEST PRICE OF


I I I


THE YEAR
ONEV


CLEARLY MARKED


ERY


VEHICLE!


THERE IS NO NEED TO HAGGLE PRICE
Every Vehicle Has The Years' Lowest Price
THERE WILL BE NO SALESPEOPLE
OR MANAGERS ON THE PREMISES
No One Will Even Be Available To Answer Phone
These Prices Will Never Be Repeated
All Prices Will Be Honored


lw m m NWEM-
Thursday, January 2, From 9:00am To 7:00pm
FIRST COME. FIRST SERVE.


SK0 == =0Jeep
-_ _-J^ -^^- ^^^ o.:,, .f


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA, FL


2077 HIGHWAY 44 W.
INVERNESS, FL


14358 CORTEZ BLVD.
BROOKSVILLE, FL


CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


*


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


q M AWM