Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03347

Full Text

FSU, Miami meet in intrastate Top 10 football clash /BA


I --UNDAYJ II


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Mostly sunny,
breezy.
PAGE A4


C ITRU S C 0 NT U TY





NICwww.chronicleonline.com
^& www.chronicleonline.com


NOVEMBER 3, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 88


Turn the clocks back
Remember to move
Your clocks
^r1" ^ back one
grCC h ur.


Daylight Saving Time
ended this morning.


EXCURSIONS:


Suwannee
Take a trip down the
historic Suwannee
River/Page A15
MILITARY MATTERS:
Vet's story
U.S. Army Air Corps
veteran James Archer
recalls stories from
World War I11./Page A19


COMMENTARY:
rr.h ....


Crystal River
Gerry Mulligan writes
about the new day
dawning for the city of
Crystal River/Page Cl


TECHNOLOGY:


Tough choice
Apple's new models and
lower prices make it
tough to choose a
computer in a good
way./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


Bee keeping
Thinking about honey?
There's no shortage of
buzz about beekeeping
these days./HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ................ D5
Crossword ............... A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A10O
M ovies ..................... A16
Obituaries ........A9, A12
Veterans ........ A19



6 184578 200711 o


Duke denies port use


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The port facilities owned by
Duke Energy at its Crystal River
area power plant complex re-
ceived a lot of consideration in
the Port Citrus feasibility study


TranSystems Corp. vice presi-
dent Fred Ferrin explained pos-
sible port development scenarios
to county commissioners sit-
ting as the Citrus County PortAu-
thority- last Wednesday
Ferrin cited Duke Energy's in-
take canal and barge loading/


unloading facility, its canal's deep
draft and railroad service. The
Duke canal is 20 feet deep, com-
pared to the Cross Florida Barge
Canal at 13 feet.
The study points out that the
Duke Energy canal is currently
used for deep-water barges car-


Festival of the Arts


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
What started out to be a wet morning turned into a pleasant day at Courthouse Square as the 42nd annual
Festival of the Arts got under way Saturday. Featuring more than 100 artists displaying fine arts and crafts,
there is everything from exotic plants to sculptures, food and drink and everything in between. Festival of
the Arts is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday.


Annual event

continues today

in Inverness
The 42nd Inverness Fes-
tival of the Arts in
downtown Inverness
got off to a soggy start
Saturday, although folks still
braved the morning drizzle to
attend.
COMING UP The festi-
val contin-
Look for a list uestoday
of art show under prom-
winners and ised sunny
more photos skies and
in a future features as
edition, many as 100
artist ex-
hibitors -
gourd and glass art, lots of jew-
elry, paintings and photography,
sculpture and wood carving, as
well as musical instruments
called "canjos," made from bev-
erage cans, wood and strings,
and played like a banjo.
Hungry? Hot sausages, funnel


Sylvia Jones from The Villages admires one of the metal sculptures
Saturday from the Larry Whidden Originals booth at the 42nd annual
Festival of the Arts at Courthouse Square in Inverness.


cakes or kettle corn are available
from vendors or stop into one of
the local downtown eateries.
Don't forget to visit the School
Zone with art from Citrus


County students on display
Also, online voting continues
today for the Art Outside the
Box contest
-Nancy Kenedy/Chronicle


trying 15,000 metric ton loads of
coal to the power plants and ship-
ping out aggregates.
The study acknowledges while
Duke Energy has indicated that
the initiation of commercial
See Page A9



Sticker

shock on

insurance


New law

means

cancellation of

somepolicies

Associated Press
MIAMI Dean Griffin
liked the health insurance
he purchased for himself
and his wife three years
ago and thought he'd be
able to keep the plan even
after the federal Afford-
able Care Act took effect.
But the 64-year-old re-
cently received a letter no-
tifying him the plan was
being canceled because it
didn't cover certain bene-
fits required under the law
The Griffins, who live
near Philadelphia, pay
$770 monthly for their
soon-to-be-terminated
health care plan with a
$2,500 deductible. The
cheapest plan they found
on their state insurance
exchange was a so-called
bronze plan charging a
$1,275 monthly premium
with deductibles totaling
$12,700. It covers only
providers in Pennsylva-
nia, so the couple, who
live near Delaware, won't
be able to see doctors
they've used for more
than a decade.
"We're buying insur-
ance that we will never
use and can't possibly
ever benefit from. We're
basically passing on a
benefit to other people
who are not otherwise
able to buy basic insur-
ance," said Griffin, who is
retired from running an
information technology
company
The Griffins are among
millions of people nation-
wide who buy individual
insurance policies and
are receiving notices that
those policies are being
discontinued because
they don't meet the higher
benefit requirements of
the new law
They can buy different
policies directly from in-
surers for 2014 or sign up
for plans on state insur-
ance exchanges. While
See PageA6


Adams' home outside district; 'residence' is within


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Commissioner Scott Adams
owns a $400,000 Inverness lake-
front home with three bedrooms,
a pool, spa and 3,700 square feet
of living space.
But his residence, according to
records that determine a county
commissioner's domicile, is a
$7,200 mobile home situated on 2
acres of cattle-grazing land off
State Road 200 in Hernando.
The difference, other than value
and accommodations, is this: The
house rests outside Adams' com-
mission district while the mobile
home is within the district
State law requires county com-
missioners to live in the district
they represent. Adams said he is
following the law because he re-


I stay there part time.
I stay there sometimes.

Scott Adams
Citrus County commissioner.

sides occasionally at the mobile fined and virtually unenforceable.
home. Her office, for example, occa-
"I stay there part time," he said. sionally receives complaints from
"I stay there sometimes." residents about county commis-
Adams' homestead exemption sioners not living in their districts.
is the house on Gospel Island, Gill said she does not have the
which sits in county commission staff to investigate such claims.
District 4. He is registered to vote "Wherever they tell us they
at the 1985 mobile home on East live, they live," Gill said.
Posselt Drive, in commission Dis- A homestead exemption is not
trict 5, which he bought in 2007. necessary to have residency in
Supervisor of Elections Susan the district
Gill said the law that requires dis- Commissioner Rebecca Bays
trict residency is not easily de- has a house in Black Diamond


where she and her husband,
Mike, lived. When Mrs. Bays ran
for county commission District 4
in 2010, she rented a Floral City
home within the district.
After winning the seat in 2010,
Mike and Rebecca Bays bought a
$255,000 home on County Road
581 south of Inverness and also
within the district.
The Bayses initially filed in
2012 to move the homestead ex-
emption from Black Diamond to
the C.R. 581 house, but never
completed the paperwork,
deputy property appraiser Les
Cook said. The couple followed
through this year and the home-
stead was transferred to the
C.R. 581 house.
Commissioner Bays said the
See Page A5


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
50




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Set in stone?


Key West

considers

monument to

Diana Nyad

Associated Press
KEY WEST En-
durance swimmer Diana
Nyad may be getting her
own monument on the
Florida Keys beach where
she staggered ashore after
a 53-hour swim from Cuba.
Key West City Manager
Bob Vitas plans to discuss
possibly placing a monu-
ment to Nyad at Smathers
Beach at the city commis-
sion meeting Wednesday
Nyad staggered onto the
beach on Labor Day after
swimming more than 110
miles from Havana.
Board chairman Michael
Shields said the shape of
the monument would be up
the artist
"It's great for Key West
because it's all positive,"
said City Commissioner
Teri Johnston. "That was a
world record bringing a lot
of notoriety to the city. This
is one of the most historic
occurrences on Smathers
Beach that we'll probably
see."
Mayor Craig Cates said
Vitas was asked to look into
a possible monument, but
he doesn't know what the
city manager's recommen-
dation will be.
Cates said he supports
the idea of a monument to
Nyad's accomplishment
"It was special and will
probably never be dupli-
cated," he said. "It was
quite a feat It's worth rec-
ognizing because it brings
attention to Key West. It's


Soldier found
Associated Press
FORT KNOX, Ky A
Fort Knox soldier reported
missing after visiting his
parents in Florida has been
located in Las Vegas.
Manatee County Sheriff's
spokesman Dave Bristow
said authorities found Pfc.
Daniel Dezinno on Friday
- more than a week after
his parents reported him
missing from their Sarasota
home.


Associated Press
Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad, who recently swam from
Cuba to Key West, flexes her muscles Oct. 26 as she
rides the grand marshal float during the Fantasy Fest
Parade in Key West.
incredible."
Nyad completed the
swim from Cuba to Florida BELK
on her fifth try, becoming
the first person confirmed
to have made the swim
without a shark cage. Some
of her critics still debate,
though, whether some of
the equipment and prac-
tices she employed vio-
lated the traditions of open
water marathon swimming.
Last month, Nyad served
as grand marshal of the
city's annual Fantasy Fest
parade. The city commis-
sion also honored her days
after her swim from Cuba.
Nyad followed her Cuba- B L C
to-Florida swim with a 48-
hour swim in a pool set up
at a busy Manhattan inter-
section early last month to
benefit the victims of last
year's devastating super-
storm Sandy i


State BRIEFS


Injury declaration for oyster
industry approved
APALACHICOLA-The U.S. Small Busi-
nessAdministration has approved an economic
injury declaration Gov. Rick Scott requested for
parts of the Florida Panhandle affected by the
collapse of the commercial oyster fishery.
The News Herald reported that Franklin,
Gulf, Liberty and Wakulla counties are included
in the declaration approved Friday. Small busi-
nesses will be eligible for as much as $2 million
in low-interest loans.
The oyster shortage has been blamed on a
lack of freshwater flowing into Apalachicola
Bay. Last month, Florida filed a lawsuit accus-
ing Georgia of consuming too much fresh
water from a river system that serves three
Southeastern states.
Teen arrested in South
Florida bus stop shooting
WEST PARK -A 17-year-old boy has been
arrested in a shooting at a South Florida school
bus stop.
The Broward Sheriffs Office said the West
Park boy was attempting to shoot another boy
walking toward the bus stop Friday morning.
Authorities said four shots were fired, includ-
ing one that grazed the neck of 17-year-old
Makeda Elliott of Pembroke Park. She was


treated at a Miami trauma center and released.
The shooting happened near an elementary
school, which had not yet opened. No one else
was injured.
According to the sheriffs office, the 17-year-
old boy was taken into custody at Hallandale
High School, and he remained in custody late
Friday. Authorities said he faces charges of pre-
meditated attempted murder, felony murder and
shooting at an occupied dwelling.
Two children slain by father
remembered at school
BROOKSVILLE More than 200 people
gathered at a Tampa Bay-area school to re-
member two children who police said were
killed by their father.
Hernando County authorities said Daniel
Castrillon-Oreggo killed 7-year-old Sebastian
and 8-year-old Susana last weekend during
a planned visit, then turned the gun on him-
self. Castrillon-Oreggo's wife had recently
filed for divorce.
On Friday night, hundreds of children and
parents lit candles outside Chocachatti Ele-
mentary School in Brooksville, where the
children had been students.
Assistant Principal Cari O'Rouke said the
children were loved deeply by their family,
their friends and their teachers.
-From wire reports


in Las Vegas
Dezinno's family reported
him missing Oct 24 after the
30-year-old failed to return
to Fort Knox in central Ken-
tucky after visiting them on
Florida's west coast
Both the Florida High-
way Patrol and Georgia
Highway Patrol were
alerted about Dezinno.
Bristow said no foul play
was suspected in the disap-
pearance and the Army has
been notified of Dezinno's
whereabouts.


David W. Powers
yr ,MM.D., P.A.






(352) 726-8660
310 S. Line Ave., Inverness




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A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


STATE






Page A3 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2013



TATE0& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Massing of Colors
3 p.m. today
As part of the kick off of
Citrus County's 21 st Veter-
ans Appreciation, which runs
through Nov. 17, the Mass-
ing of the Colors ceremony
will take place at 3 p.m.
today at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.
From Main Street (State
Road 44/U.S. 41) just west of
historic downtown Inverness,
turn south on Montgomery
Avenue between the Citrus
County School District head-
quarters and Withlacoochee
Technical Institute. The
church is near the intersec-
tion of Highland Boulevard
and MontgomeryAvenue.
This year's Veterans Ap-
predation Week obser-
vances are dedicated to the
veterans of the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan.
LWV to host
environmentalist
The League of Women
Voters of Citrus County will
host environmentalist Helen
Spivey as guest speaker at
10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Nov.
12, at the Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills.
Through the decades,
Spivey has seen many
changes in Florida's natural
habitats and has a wealth of
knowledge to share. Born in
Ocala in 1928, she moved
to Crystal River in 1970.
Spivey has spent much of
her time fighting to protect
Florida's unique ecosystem.
Spivey, who has served
on the Crystal River City
Council and in the Florida
House of Representatives,
is co-chair of the board of
directors of the Save the
Manatee Club.
All interested men and
women are invited. The
LWVCC is an educational,
nonpartisan organization.
Light refreshments will be
served; bring your own soft
drinks.
For more information, call
352-746-0655.
Register now
for CUB's holiday
programs
Citrus United Basket
(CUB) is accepting registra-
tions for its Christmas Food
Program for families and
Christmas Toy Program for
children up to and including
13 years of age.
Registered names will be
cross-checked with sister
agencies, which also provide
Christmas toys, to ensure fair
distribution of toys to every
qualified child. Proof of Citrus
County residency is required.
Those who sign up will
also need:
Adults and children: So-
dcial Security card for each
member of the household.
Adults: Photo identifica-
tion to validate residency in
Citrus County.
Children: Birth certifi-
cate, immunization record or
report card to validate age
and residency in Citrus
County.
Custodians: Court docu-
mentation to validate legal
custody of child or children.
Registration is from
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
weekdays at 103 Mill Ave.,
Inverness.
For information, call 352-
344-2242.

St. Petersburg
Man extradited
from Morocco
A former St. Petersburg
physician who fled the
United States 12 years ago
after being charged with
molesting two children has
been extradited from
Morocco.


Pinellas County jail
records show 58-year-old
Rory Patrick Doyle was
booked Friday on charges
that include lascivious mo-
lestation and failing to ap-
pear in court.
-From staff and wire reports


Judge ends lawsuits against Black Diamond


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A judge has dismissed all
pending lawsuits against former
Black Diamond Ranch developer
Stan Olsen, effectively ending a
decade-long dispute between
Olsen and former golf club
members.
Circuit Court Judge Patricia
Thomas ruled Oct. 24 the statute
of limitations had run out on nu-
merous plaintiffs who had simul-


taneous lawsuits against Olsen,
Black Diamond Properties and
Black Diamond Reality.
On two other cases, Thomas
ruled the plaintiffs had not
proven their case that Olsen mis-
led them into buying worthless
equity memberships in the Black
Diamond Golf Club.
Olsen, who developed Black
Diamond in 1987 out of an old
limestone quarry and turned into
the county's first high-end gated
golf course community, sold the


golf courses and remaining as-
sets in 2011 to Colorado-based
Escalante Golf Inc. The new
owner is not part of the lawsuit.
Former property owners
claimed in the lawsuit that Olsen
tricked them into spending thou-
sands of dollars on equity mem-
berships of the golf club when, in
fact, they were only buying stock
in a not-for-profit company con-
trolled by Olsen that had the po-
tential of taking over the golf
club.


While the plaintiffs claimed
some wins along the way, their
victories were overturned on ap-
peal. The case, over 10 years, me-
andered through local, state and
federal courts.
The plaintiffs claimed Olsen
committed fraud. Thomas, in her
ruling in favor of Olsen, relied on
federal court rulings that said
there was no evidence to support
the claim that the defendants
committed fraud or acted in bad
faith.


Stone Crab Jam

Crackin'good time in

Crystal River for charity
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
rom cracking crab claws to .. 4:
boogying the night away,
Citrus County residents and
pets united together Satur-
day to support charities at the sixth
annual Stone Crab Jam in Crystal
River.
The annual event raised funds for
Kings Bay Rotary charities including
the One Rake at a Time project,
which removes Lyngbya from King's
Bay and local springs.
Stone crabs were the honored
guest at the festival; however, local
food vendors also offered a variety of
other seafood and fair favorites -
nachos, kettle corn, boiled peanuts,
turkey legs and much more.
Six bands brought everything from
rock to reggae to please the crowds' '.i,:
ears as they made their way from
three different stages scattered along
the festival route.
Boat tours escorted attendees to--Aft
some of the many highlighted areas
of King's Bay
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Ten-year-old Jason Rice gets a lesson in stone crab cracking from
dad Marshall Saturday at the sixth annual Stone Crab Jam in
downtown Crystal River. The Rice family came from Gainesville
for the event. The Stone Crab Jam is sponsored by the Rotary
Club of Crystal River-Kings Bay, which uses the proceeds in the
club's charitable funds to provide support for organizations such
as Polio Plus and One Rake at a Time, according to Rotarian
Steve Burch. It is anticipated that 10,000 people will attend the
Jam, compared to an estimated 8,000 people last year.


Five-year-old Cassidy Reheiser from Spring Hill takes a turn at
cracking a stone crab claw Saturday at the Stone Crab Jam in
Crystal River. This year marks the sixth year for the Jam and
according to the sponsor, Rotary Club of Crystal River-Kings Bay,
a record-breaking crowd is anticipated.


Jany Oakeson, a volunteer from the Pilot Club of Crystal River,
serves up some piping hot shrimp to Kathryn Selvester of Beverly
Hills at the VIP section of the Stone Crab Jam. According to the
Jam sponsor, Rotary Club of Crystal River-Kings Bay, the 600 VIP
tickets sold out well ahead of schedule at a cost of $50 each.


Become a Sheriffs Public Service Officer


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office is looking for
community-minded men
and women who have an in-
terest in becoming active
members of the agency's
Public Service Officer (PSO)
program. The CCSO will be
starting a new recruit train-
ing session in January of
2014.
The first class of Public
Service Officers began in
2002, when volunteers were
recruited to assist sworn
deputies by conducting well-
being checks and handling
minor citizen complaints,
such as vandalisms, bicycle
thefts and found property.
They also helped deputies
with traffic control at vehicle
crashes and community


events.
Since that time, the pro-
gram was expanded to in-
clude marine and judicial
services PSOs. Road PSOs
also received additional
training and were given the
ability to handle minor
traffic-crash investigations.
They were also given the au-
thority to issue certain traf-
fic citations.
The PSOs save the citi-
zens of Citrus County a sig-
nificant amount of money
each year because of the
workload they remove from
deputies.
PSOs are assigned prima-
rily during daylight hours,
seven days a week, both to
the east and west sides of the
county They are strictly vol-
unteers, not sworn law en-
forcement officers, and do


not have arrest powers.
Three PSO sergeants serve
as working supervisors.
Applicants should know
that all new PSO recruits
first attend an eight-hour
"qualification day" to test
their driving ability, com-
puter and learning skills. A
one-on-one interview with
the program director and
PSO staff follows to deter-
mine if the applicant meets
the qualifications and is
cleared to take the class.
Once approved, the appli-
cant spends a minimum of
16 ride-along hours with cer-
tified deputies and PSO
field-training officers during
day and night shifts to learn
firsthand the agency's daily
operations. Recruits then
spend two weeks (80 hours)
of mandatory classroom


training that includes radio
communications, report
writing, defensive driving,
selective traffic enforcement
and more. After mastering
these disciplines, recruits
are assigned to PSO field
training officers for addi-
tional training and instruc-
tion that may last up to three
months, depending on avail-
ability of the volunteer
Interested applicants
must be at least 25 years old,
submit an application and
medical clearance form and
pass a criminal background
check To be considered,
candidates must be physi-
cally able to meet certain
standards, such as lifting 30
pounds, have computer
skills and be able to commu-
nicate easily with the public.
After completing all train-


ing, the PSO program re-
quires members to work a
minimum of one eight-hour
shift a week
Despite the requirements,
PSO Training Sgt Charlie
Tepe says it's worth the ef-
fort "Being a PSO is one of
the most rewarding things
I've done after retirement I
know it sounds like a huge
commitment, and it is, but
the personal rewards are
immense."
To register for the PSO
program, go to the sheriff's
office website to download
an application at www.
sheriffcitrus.org. Next, click
on "Volunteers," followed by
"Volunteer Application."
Turn in the completed ap-
plication to the Sheriff's
Ridge Area Sub Station in
Beverly Hills.




A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday- You can handle more
than you think. Indulge in activities
that will help you gain insight into how
you can make life better for those
around you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Your
intentions are good, and your desire
to make a difference will bring you to
a place filled with opportunity, adven-
ture and great connections.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Good intentions may be based on
false information. Carry out your due
diligence before you get involved in
something that isn't likely to lead to
riches.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
You will not be disappointed in the re-
sults if you make significant alter-
ations at home or mount a campaign
to improve your professional position.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be
strong and stand up to anyone trying
to make decisions for you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20)-
You'll attract attention, followers and
support if you believe in your abilities
and focus on your goals.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Past
problems will resurface if you neg-
lected to handle them properly. Be
ready to do what's necessary so that
you can move forward and excel.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
Spend time with a friend or loved
one. This is a great day to form im-
portant bonds by taking part in joint
ventures. Exploring a new destination
will be enlightening.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Ex-
plore information that can help you
fare better at work. Take a pass on an
offer that is too good to be true.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Get
back to basics and enjoy life's little
pleasures.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)- Be a
participant in all that life offers today.
Do something that makes you happy.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
Travel and the opportunity to share
what you have to offer will change the
way you think.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you
juggle things around to get the most
for the least, it will pay off in the end.
Change is good, but only if you can
stay within your budget.


ENTERTAINMENT


Fans hope John
Coltrane home can
become NY museum
DIX HILLS, N.Y. Carlos
Santana and other musicians
are backing an effort to pay trib-
ute to jazz legend John
Coltrane by turning his suburban
New York home into a museum.
Coltrane lived in Dix Hills,
Long Island, for several years
until his death in 1967. The jazz
saxophonist wrote the master-
piece "A Love Supreme" in an
upstairs bedroom.
Now volunteers are trying to
raise money to renovate the di-
lapidated four-bedroom brick
ranch. They want to create a mu-
seum and learning center.
Santana, Coltrane's son Ravi
Coltrane and others attended a
fundraiser for the Coltrane
House project last month in New
York City.
The National Trust for Historic
Preservation has named the
house one of America's 11 Most
Endangered Historic Places.
Cleveland kidnap
survivor sits down
with Dr. Phil
CLEVELAND One of three
women who escaped from a
ramshackle Cleveland home
after more than a decade in cap-
tivity is about to share her story.
Michelle Knight will appear
on the "Dr. Phil" show Tuesday
and Wednesday in a taped inter-
view. She was kidnapped in
2002.
The show said Knight "de-
scribes the horrible conditions in
the house" and reveals her
physical, mental and sexual
abuse.
The show said Knight talks
about being "tied up like a fish"
and spending weeks chained
and tortured in the basement.


Associated Press
This 1964 file photo shows jazz saxophonist John Coltrane.
The year 2014 will mark the 50th anniversary of Coltrane's
completion of "A Love Supreme." Efforts are being made to
turn Coltrane's suburban New York home into a museum.


Knight, Amanda Berry and
Gina DeJesus escaped May 6
when Berry pushed out a door
and yelled for help.
Their kidnapper, Ariel Castro,
pleaded guilty and was sen-
tenced to life in prison. He
hanged himself Sept. 3, just
weeks into his sentence.
Mandela movie to
open this month in
South Africa
JOHANNESBURG The
producer of a movie about Nel-
son Mandela said he screened
some scenes and showed film
images last year to the former
South African president, describ-
ing him as amused by the elabo-
rate makeup process for the


British actor who played him.
Anant Singh, producer of
"Mandela: Long Walk to Free-
dom," recalled Saturday that
Mandela smiled and said "Is that
me?" when he saw a picture of
actor Idris Elba as an elderly
Mandela.
Singh had visited Mandela at
his home in Qunu, in South
Africa's Eastern Cape province.
Mandela, 95, has stayed in a
hospital several times since De-
cember and remains critically ill
at his Johannesburg home.
The film, based on Mandela's
autobiography, will be released
in South Africa in late November
before opening in the U.S. and
other markets.
-From wire reports


CInus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 3, the 307th
day of 2013. There are 58 days left in
the year. Daylight saving time ended
at 2 a.m. local time. Clocks go back
one hour.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 3,1992, Democrat Bill
Clinton was elected the 42nd presi-
dent of the United States, defeating
President George H.W. Bush.
On this date:
In 1936, President Franklin D.
Roosevelt won a landslide election
victory over Republican challenger
Alfred M. "Alf' Landon.
In 1957, the Soviet Union
launched Sputnik 2, the second man-
made satellite, into orbit.
In 1964, President Lyndon B.
Johnson soundly defeated Republi-
can Barry Goldwater.
In 1979, five Communist Workers
Party members were killed in a clash
with heavily armed Ku Klux Klans-
men and neo-Nazis during an anti-
Klan protest in Greensboro, N.C.
Ten years ago: Congress voted
its final approval for $87.5 billion for
U.S. military operations and aid in
Iraq and Afghanistan.
Five years ago: Hamza al-Bahlul,
a video maker for Osama bin Laden,
was sentenced at Guantanamo to life
in prison for encouraging terrorist
attacks.
One year ago: Drivers flocked to
gas stations in New Jersey ahead of
the noon start of a rationing system
aimed at easing long lines in the af-
termath of Superstorm Sandy.
Today's Birthdays: Former Mas-
sachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis
is 80. Comedian-actress Roseanne
Barr is 61. Actress Kate Capshaw is
60. Comedian Dennis Miller is 60.
Singer Adam Ant is 59. Actor Dolph
Lundgren is 56.
Thought for Today: 'You must be
true to yourself. Strong enough to be
true to yourself. Brave enough to be
strong enough to be true to yourself.
Wise enough to be brave enough, to
be strong enough to shape yourself
from what you actually are." Sylvia
Constance Ashton-Wamer, New
Zealander author and educator
(1908-1984).


WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Northeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Mostly sunny
today.


72 69 0.60 ----NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive daily
forecast by: Ig

|TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 50
Mostly sunny, breezy


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 55
Partly cloudy, breezy


--- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 56
7--mi Mostly cloudy, breezy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 74/67
Record 89/41
Normal 81/56
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.70 in.
Total for the month 0.70 in.
Total for the year 52.84 in.
Normal for the year 47.75 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.89 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 81%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 5.5/12
Monday's count: 5.0
Tuesday's count: 5.5
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/3 SUNDAY 5:34 11:48 6:02 12:16
11/4 MONDAY 5:31 11:13 6:01 -
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
e 0 ( SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:43P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:45A.M.
V 0 NOV 25 MOONRISE TODAY ...........................6:46A.M.
NOV. 3 NOV. 10 NOV. NOV.17 OV. 25 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 6:00 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:31 a/1:38 a 5:55 p/1:15 p
Crystal River" 2:52 a/10:37 a 4:16 p/10:40 p
Withlacoochee* 1:39 a/8:25 a 2:03 p/8:28 p
Homosassa** 3:41 a/12:37 a 5:05 p/12:14 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:07 a/1:18a 6:41 p/1:57 p
3:28a/l11:19 a 5:02 p/11:20 p
1:15a 9:07a 2:49 p/9:08 p
4:17 a/12:17 a 5:51 p/12:56 p


F'cast
s
pc
s
s
pc
s
sh
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature


76
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.95 29.90 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.70 38.68 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.97 39.94 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.65 40.63 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


.01 pc
pc
s
.05 s
pc
pc
s
rs
s
pc
sh
.13 pc
.06 pc
.87 s
pc
s
.01 s
s
.13 rs
s
s
pc
s
pc
s
.07 s
pc
.02 s
pc
pc
s
s
s
s
s
pc
.01 s
s
s
pc
s
s
s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 74 55 s 68 53
NewYorkCity 68 55 pc 49 35
Norfolk 72 63 .03 s 59 39
Oklahoma City 64 40 pc 67 48
Omaha 57 34 pc 60 45
Palm Springs 84 55 s 82 55
Philadelphia 69 52 s 52 33
Phoenix 89 54 pc 83 58
Pittsburgh 52 46 .03 c 43 27
Portland, ME 65 42 sh 47 24
Portland, Ore 56 51 .34 sh 50 42
Providence, R.I. 66 52 sh 48 29
Raleigh 70 55 s 61 35
Rapid City 59 27 pc 55 31
Reno 66 31 pc 50 28
Rochester, NY 51 41 .32 pc 39 24
Sacramento 76 42 s 69 42
St. Louis 55 45 s 57 44
St. Ste. Marie 39 34 .01 s 37 30
Salt Lake City 70 39 rs 46 29
San Antonio 76 53 s 73 55
San Diego 68 56 pc 66 58
San Francisco 63 50 s 64 48
Savannah 83 65 1.01 s 70 47
Seattle 58 53 .51 sh 49 39
Spokane 52 39 .30 rs 43 28
Syracuse 56 43 .04 pc 39 25
Topeka 59 39 s 61 48
Washington 72 56 s 54 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 90 Fort Pierce, Fla.
LOW 8 Leadville, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/75/pc
Amsterdam 50/43/sh
Athens 70/56/s
Beijing 61/42/s
Berlin 52/40/pc
Bermuda 77/72/sh
Cairo 82/64/c
Calgary 32/14/sn
Havana 78/72As
Hong Kong 78/72/sh
Jerusalem 77/60/pc


Lisbon 64/55/sh
London 50/40/sh
Madrid 61/47/pc
Mexico City 73/54/ts
Montreal 39/23/pc
Moscow 45/42/sh
Paris 53/49/pc
Rio 83/65/s
Rome 71/62/r
Sydney 80/54/pc
Tokyo 69/50/pc
Toronto 37/32/s
Warsaw 52/39/r


F'cast
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc


LEGAL


i^^


NOTICES


Meeting Notices

D7





S C ITRuoS u C COUNTY -



CHRpNICLE
Florida's Best CommunityN Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
* ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


YESTERDAY'S

SPR 7 I LO
2.20 57 67


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK


..Paolo




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME
Continued from Page Al

Black Diamond home is
for sale.
"I've always lived in my
district," Bays said.
Other commissioners
have also moved after
being elected to office.
Former Commissioner
J o y c e
Joyce
J Valentino
S moved in
With her
S daughter,
whose
f w h o s e
house was
within the
j j commis-
Joyce sion dis-
Valentino trict to
former which she
commissioner, w a s
elected.
Valentino lost the 2008
election to Winn Webb,
who moved from his Inver-
ness home outside the dis-
trict to a rental within the
district. Webb said he then
returned
to his
house out-
rside the
district in
2011 after
deciding
to run for
sheriff
A South
Winn Webb Florid
forer Florida
former state sena-
commissioner.
tor is urg-
ing legislation to make
residency more enforce-
able in legislative districts.
Citrus County's commis-


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Commissioner Scott Adams is registered to vote at this
mobile home in Hernando ...


Citrus County Property Appraiser's website
... but has a homestead exemption on this house in
Inverness, outside of his commission district.


sion districts, however, are
much different. Unlike the
Legislature or counties
with member-specific dis-
tricts, all five Citrus com-
missioners are elected by
voters countywide.


cause I represented the
entire county," he said. "I
don't think requiring
somebody to live some
place is going to make that
much difference anyway"


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was reported at
11:26 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 31, in the 6300 block
of W. Venable St., Crystal River.
A residential burglary was reported at
11:53 a.m. Oct. 31 in the 2300 block of S. Stan-
ley Terrace, Homosassa.
A commercial burglary was reported at
12:46 p.m. Oct. 31 in the 2700 block of N.
Florida Ave., Hemando.
A residential burglary was reported at
4:40 p.m. Oct. 31 in the 3500 block of E.
Theresa Lane, Inverness.
A vehicle burglary was reported at
9:17 p.m. Oct. 31 in the 2200 block of W. Nau-
tilus Drive, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was reported at
10:23 p.m. Oct. 31 in the 6400 block of W.
Seven Rivers Drive, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported at 10:58 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 31, in the 1800 block of W. Rut-
land Drive, Dunnellon.
A grand theft was reported at 11:20 a.m.
Oct. 31 in the 5600 block of W. Woodside
Drive, Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported at 12:03 p.m.
Oct. 31 in the 2400 block of N. Junglecamp
Road, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported at 12:11 p.m.
Oct. 31 in the 300 block of N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported at 1:51 p.m.


ON THE NET
For more information about arrests
made by the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the Public Information
link, then on Arrest Reports.
Also under Public Information on
the CCSO website, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus
County. Click on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.
For the Record reports are archived
online at www.chronicleonline.com.
Citrus County Sheriff's Office/Fire
Rescue Chief Larry Morabito said
the fire service is seeking volunteers
to serve alongside paid staff at all
stations. For information, call John
Beebe, volunteer coordinator, at
352-527-5406.

Oct. 31 in the 900 block of S. Shad Terrace,
Inverness.
A grand theft was reported at 1:57 p.m.
Oct. 31 in the 6900 block of N. Bighorn Point,
Hernando.
A petit theft was reported at 2:39 p.m.
Oct. 31 in the 2700 block of N. Florida Ave.,
Hemrnando.
*A petit theft was reported at 3:23 p.m. Oct.
31 in the 3800 block of E. Parsons Point Road,
Hemrnando.


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 AS




A6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


SHOCK
Continued from PageAl

lower-income people
could see lower costs be-
cause of government sub-
sidies, many in the middle
class may get rude awak-
enings when they access
the websites and realize
they'll have to pay signifi-
cantly more.
Those not eligible for
subsidies generally re-
ceive more comprehen-
sive coverage than they
had under their soon-to-
be-canceled policies, but
they'll have to pay a lot
more.
Because of the higher
cost, the Griffins are con-
sidering paying the federal
penalty about $100 or 1
percent of income next
year rather than buying
health insurance. They say
they are healthy and don't
typically run up large
health care costs. Dean
Griffin said that will be
cheaper because it's un-
likely they will get past the
nearly $13,000 deductible
for the coverage to kick in.
Individual health insur-
ance policies are being
canceled because the Af-
fordable Care Act requires
plans to cover certain ben-
efits, such as maternity
care, hospital visits and
mental illness. The law
also caps annual out-of-
pocket costs consumers
will pay each year
In the past, consumers
could get relatively inex-
pensive, bare-bones cover-
age, but those plans will no
longer be available. Many
consumers are frustrated
by what they call forced
upgrades as they're
pushed into plans with
coverage options they
don't necessarily want.
Ken Davis, who man-
ages a fast food restaurant
in Austin, Texas, is recov-
ering from sticker shock
after the small-business
policy offered by his em-
ployer was canceled for
the same reasons individ-
ual policies are being
discontinued.
His company pays about
$100 monthly for his basic
health plan. He said he'll


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~4V~


Associated Press
Dean and Mary Lou Griffin sit their home Friday in Chadds Ford, Pa. The Griffins are
among millions of people nationwide who buy individual insurance policies and are
receiving notices that those policies are being discontinued because they don't meet
the higher benefit requirements of the new law.


now have to pay $600
monthly for a mid-tier sil-
ver plan on the state ex-
change. The family policy
also covers his 8-year-old
son. Even though the fed-
eral government is con-
tributing a $500 subsidy he
said the $600 he's left to
pay is too high. He's con-
sidering the penalty
"I feel like they're forc-
ing me to do something
that I don't want to do or
need to do," Davis, 40, said.
Owners of canceled poli-
cies have a few options.
They can stay in the same
plan for the same price for
one more year if they have
one of the few plans that
were grandfathered in.
They can buy a similar
plan with upgraded bene-
fits that meets the new
standards likely at a sig-
nificant cost increase. Or,
if they make less than
$45,960 for a single adult
or $94,200 for a family of
four, they may qualify for
subsidies.
Just because a policy
doesn't comply with the
law doesn't mean con-
sumers will get cancella-
tion letters. They may get
notices saying existing
policies are being
amended with new bene-
fits and will come with
higher premiums. Some
states, including Virginia
and Kentucky, required in-


surers to cancel old poli-
cies and start from scratch
instead of beefing up ex-
isting ones.
It's unclear how many
individual plans are being
canceled no one agency
keeps track. But it's likely
in the millions. Insurance
industry experts estimate
that about 14 million peo-
ple, or 5 percent of the
total market for health
care coverage, buy individ-
ual policies. Most people
get coverage through jobs
and aren't affected.
Many states require in-
surers to give consumers
90 days' notice before can-
celing plans. That means
another round of cancella-
tion letters will go out in
March and again in May
Experts haven't been
able to predict how many
will pay more or less under
the new, upgraded plans.
An older policyholder with
a pre-existing condition
may find that premiums go
down, and some will qual-
ify for subsidies.
In California, about
900,000 people are ex-
pected to lose existing
plans, but about a third
will be eligible for subsi-
dies through the state ex-
change, said Anne
Gonzalez, a spokeswoman
for the exchange, called
Covered California. Most
canceled plans provided


bare-bones coverage, she
said.
"They basically had
plans that had gaping
holes in the coverage.
They would be surprised
when they get to the emer-
gency room or the doctor's
office, some of them didn't
have drug coverage or pre-
ventive care," Gonzalez
said.
About 330,000 Floridi-
ans received cancellation
notices from the state's
largest insurer, Florida
Blue. About 30,000 have
plans that were grandfa-
thered in. Florida insur-
ance officials said they're
not tracking the number of
canceled policies related
to the new law
National numbers are
similar: 130,000 cancella-
tions in Kentucky, 140,000
in Minnesota and as many
as 400,000 in Georgia, ac-
cording to officials in those
states.
Cigna has sent thou-
sands of cancellation let-
ters to U.S. policyholders
but stressed that 99 per-
cent have the option of re-
newing their 2013 policy
for one more year, com-
pany spokesman Joe
Monday said.
Cancellation letters are
being sent only to individ-
uals and families who pur-
chase their own insurance.
However, most policyhold-


.40
jo


ers in the individual mar-
ket will receive some no-
tice that their coverage
will change, said Dan
Mendelson, president of
the market analysis firm
Avalere Health.
The cancellations run
counter to one of Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
promises about his health
care overhaul: "If you like
your health care plan,
you'll be able to keep your
health care plan."
Philip Johnson, 47, of
Boise, Idaho, was shocked
when his cancellation no-
tice arrived last month. The
gift-shop owner said he'd
spent years arranging doc-
tors covered by his insurer


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LOCAL


for him, his wife and their
two college-age students.
After browsing the state
exchange, he said he
thinks he'll end up paying
lower premiums but
higher deductibles. He
said the website didn't an-
swer many of his ques-
tions, such as which
doctors take which plans.
"I was furious because I
spent a lot of time and
picked a plan that all my
doctors accepted," John-
son said. "Now I don't
know what doctors are
going to take what No one
mentioned that for the last
three years when they
talked about how this was
going to work."


4im 1


w




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEFS

Va. man visiting
for game drowns
JACKSONVILLE Author-
ities said a Virginia man visit-
ing Jacksonville for the
Georgia-Florida football game
drowned in a pond.
The Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office told The Florida Times-
Union the 31-year-old man
died Friday night after slipping
into a pond.
The man's name was not
immediately released.
According to the sheriff's of-
fice, the man was out with
friends in the city late Friday.
The group went to a restau-
rant near their hotel. It was
raining when they left the
restaurant, so they attempted
to run to the hotel.
Authorities said that's when
the man accidentally slipped
into the pond.
The sheriff's office said the
man could not swim, and he
drowned.
His friends also could not
swim, so they called the sher-
iff's office for help.
Teen's death in
standoff a suicide
ORANGE PARK State
officials have concluded that a
teenager who died after a
standoff with northeast Florida
sheriff's deputies died of a
self-inflicted gunshot wound.
The Florida Times-Union
obtained Friday the results of
a Florida Department of Law
Enforcement investigation into
the June death of 15-year-old
Hadrian Miquel Rabadan.
The teen suffered a single
gunshot wound to the head
near his Orange Park home.
Investigators said a Clay
County deputy fired a single
shot at Hadrian when he
heard a gunshot from the
teen's position behind a bush.
A gun was found by the teen.
The Duval County Medical
Examiner ruled the teen's
death a suicide. An FDLE
spokeswoman said the fatal
gunshot wound was self-
inflicted.
Deputies went to Hadrian's
house after his grandmother
reported he was making suici-
dal threats.
TSA grant update
airport scanners
MIAMI -A new grant from
the Transportation Security
Administration will help Miami
International Airport update its
baggage scanners.
Airport and Miami-Dade
County officials announced
the $101 million grant Friday.
It provides the bulk of funding
for a five-year project.
Miami-Dade County Avia-
tion Department Deputy Di-
rector Ken Pyatt told The
Miami Herald the grant is a
"big game-changer" that will
help the airport replace old
equipment with new, state-of-
the-art technology.
Some of the grant will pay
for 12 explosive-detection ma-
chines that use technology
similar to hospital CT
scanners.
Pyatt said the new ma-
chines should reduce the
number of bags that have to
be searched by hand.
The new equipment will re-
place the baggage screeners
that have been located near
airline ticket counters since
9/11.
-From wire reports


Cattle ranchers seek locally grown label


Associated Press

TRENTON Under the
"Fresh From Florida"
marketing campaign of-
fered by the state's agricul-
ture officials to stores and
consumers, people are en-
couraged to buy things that
are grown and raised in
the Sunshine State.
Alligator, tomatoes and,
of course, oranges are on
the list.
One thing isn't high-
lighted: Florida beef.
That's because, unlike
many other states, it's
nearly impossible to buy
beef that's been born,
raised, slaughtered and
processed in Florida -
even though it was the
first state to have large-
scale cattle ranches.
There are nearly 1 mil-
lion head of calves and
cattle in Florida and the
industry contributes
about $2 billion to the
state's economy Seven of
the nation's 25 largest cat-
tle ranches are in Florida,
according to the Florida
Beef Council.
Most calves are born
and raised here, but are
finished and processed in
states like Texas or Okla-
homa, as there's only one
large slaughterhouse in
Florida at the moment.
Despite ranking 10th na-
tionally in the number of
cattle, Florida ships the
majority of them -
700,000 feeder calves to
other states.
Cattle ranchers who re-
alize there's a demand for
locally grown meat have
asked agriculture officials
for a designation. But be-
fore the likely tag can be
applied, the state must
first decide what, exactly,
Florida beef is. Does the
cow have to spend its en-
tire life in Florida?
'Adding value to
Florida beef through the
'Fresh From Florida'
brand is something we are
excited about," said state
agriculture commissioner
Adam Putnam, a fifth-
generation Floridian from
a cattle-ranching family
The ranchers' quest to
be included on the "Fresh
From Florida" list is a tes-


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Associated Press
A cow eats in a feedlot Oct. 15 at Suwannee Farms in O'Brien. Some Florida cattle ranchers are seeking the
state's "Fresh From Florida" designation on cuts of beef. There are nearly I million head of calves and cattle in
Florida and the industry contributes about $2 billion to the state's economy. Florida ranks 10th nationally in the
number of cattle, with the majority, 700,000 feeder calves, shipped to other states.


tament to how popular
local food has become -
and because ranchers
know it's more sustainable
and cheaper to keep an an-
imal in state. Small farms,
farmers markets and spe-
cialty food makers have
emerged nationwide, and
Florida is no different
"It's a niche that I be-
lieve people will respond
to," said Don Quincey, a
cattle rancher
During the winter
months, it's easy to find
plenty of local veggies and
fruits here. But cattle
ranchers say that it will
take a little while for them
to bring local farm-to-fork
beef to the public.
"Let's face it. If you
went into the supermarket
and you saw 'Fresh from
Mexico,' 'Fresh from Ari-
zona' and 'Fresh from
Florida,' and you're in
Florida, which one would
you buy?" said Florida
rancher Tom Harper
Over the centuries, cat-
tle have thrived in
Florida, freely grazing the


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swampland and eating
wild oranges and scrub
brush a scenario that
would make any locavore
drool.
North America's first
cattle were brought in 1591
by Spanish explorer Juan
Ponce de Leon. At one
point in the mid-17th cen-
tury, more than 20,000 head
of Spanish cattle were
counted in a tax collectors'
census. These cattle toler-
ated the heat and were
free-ranging; known as
"Cracker Cattle," they are
leaner than other breeds
and also more ornery But
by the 1960s, the number of
Cracker Cattle had greatly
diminished because of
rapid development
Florida's heat and hu-
midity aren't conducive
for large-scale feedlots of
less hardy cattle like those
found in Midwestern
states like Texas and Okla-
homa. And with the rise of
corn-finishing cattle on


the feedlots, Florida was
out of luck while there's
lots of grass in Florida for
weaned calves, the state
doesn't grow much corn.
"We didn't have any op-
tions other than to send
our cattle west to be fed,"
said Harper, who owns a
purebred Angus breeding
operation in north-central
Florida, near Gainesville.
Quincey said he and a
few other Florida ranchers
have been able to work
around the lack of options
by building feedlots and fa-
cilities to hold a grain mix
for the cattle. He has 1,000
head of cattle he hopes
will soon get the "Fresh
From Florida" label.
Many are born and
raised on his Chiefland
ranch near Gainesville,
then weaned, precondi-
tioned and moved onto a
finishing feed operation
on the same property
"We save a lot of fuel by
not having to truck this an-


imal all over the United
States," he said, adding he
sells some cattle and ships
others for finishing out of
state.
Another hurdle for the
state's ranchers: There's
only one large slaughter-
house in Florida that can
handle 150 head a week,
and a handful of smaller
ones, like Quincey's.
Harper said a second
slaughterhouse will open
soon near Gainesville,
which is the region where
many of the state's cattle
are located. It will process
about 300 head of cattle a
week.
It would be cheaper for
farmers if they could
breed, raise, finish and
slaughter their cows in
Florida, he said.
"Just the cost to send
them out west averages
about $60-$65 a head," he
said. "If we just elimi-
nated extra freight, we
would save money"


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There's relief in sight. At our free seminar, learn about the causes and latest
treatments, including medications, nutrition and exercise. Then, picture yourself
walking, sitting and sleeping in comfort.

Free Knee & Hip Pain Seminar Having knee or hip surgery?
Wednesday, November 13, 12:30 p.m. Attend our Pre-Surgery Ortho
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6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River each month. Call 352.795.1234.

Registration is required 352.795.1234


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Suits claim Love Canal still oozing 35 years later


Associated Press
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y
- Thirty-five years after
Love Canal's oozing toxic
waste scared away a
neighborhood and became
a symbol of environmental
catastrophe, history could
be repeating itself.
New residents, attracted
by promises of cleaned-up
land and affordable
homes, say in lawsuits that
they are being sickened by
the same buried chemicals
from the disaster in the Ni-
agara Falls neighborhood
in the 1970s.
"We're stuck here. We
want to get out," said 34-
year-old Dan Reynolds,
adding that he's been
plagued by mysterious
rashes and other ailments
since he moved into the
four-bedroom home pur-
chased a decade ago for
$39,900.
His wife, Teresa, said
she's had two miscarriages
and numerous unex-
plained cysts.
"We knew it was Love
Canal, that chemicals
were here," she said. But
when she bought the
house, she said she was
swayed by assurances that
the waste was contained
and the area was safe.
Six families have sued
over the past several
months. Lawyers familiar
with the case say notice
has been given that an ad-
ditional 1,100 claims could
be coming.
The lawsuits, which
don't specify damages


sought, contend Love
Canal was never properly
remediated and danger-
ous toxins continue to
leach onto residents'
properties.
The main target of the
lawsuits, Occidental Petro-
leum Corp., which bought
the company that dumped
the chemicals and was
tasked by the state with
monitoring the site in 1995,
contends the waste is con-
tained and that state and
federal agencies back up
those findings.
"Data from sampling
over the past 25 years have
demonstrated that the con-
tainment system is operat-
ing as designed and is
protective of health, safety
and the environment,"
said a statement from
Glenn Springs Holdings,
the Occidental subsidiary
in charge of maintaining
the site.
The latest case is all too
familiar to Lois Gibbs, the
former housewife who led
the charge for the 1970s
evacuation and warned
against resettling the area.
She recently returned to
mark the 35th anniversary
of the disaster
"It was so weird to go
back and stand next to
someone who was crying
and saying the exact same
thing I said 35 years ago,"
she said.
Love Canal's notorious
history began when
Hooker Chemical Co. used
the abandoned canal from
1942 to 1953 to dump
21,800 tons of industrial


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(jIIf someone you love has died,
join us for an inter-faith remembrance
service to memorialize and celebrate
the lives of those who have gone from
our sight but not from our hearts.

This service is free and open to the
entire community.


Wednesday, November 6
2 p.m. & 6 p.m.
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
9225 W. Fishbowl Drive
Homosassa 34448



APro-apoice
a not-for-profit organization initially licensed in 1984
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
527-4600
www.HPH-Hospice.org


I!
OOOGHE1


hazardous waste.
That canal was later
capped, and homes and a
school were built on top of
it. But snow melt from an
unusually harsh winter in
1977 seeped into the
buried 16-acre canal and
forced chemical waste into
groundwater and to the
surface, oozing into yards
and basements.
Residents began com-
plaining of miscarriages,
urinary and kidney prob-
lems and mental disabili-
ties in their children.
With Love Canal getting
national attention, Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter in 1978
issued a disaster declara-
tion that eventually led to
evacuation and compensa-
tion for more than 900 fam-
ilies. The crisis also led to
federal Superfund legisla-
tion to clean up the na-
tion's abandoned waste
sites.
Although complete
streets were permanently
bulldozed around Love
Canal, those immediately
north and west of the land-
fill were refurbished fol-
lowing a $230 million
cleanup that involved cap-
ping the canal with clay, a


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plastic liner and topsoil.
Beginning in 1990, about
260 homes were given new
vinyl siding, roofs and win-
dows and resold at prices
20 percent below market
value. The neighborhood
was renamed Black Creek
Village.
In addition to Occiden-
tal, defendants include the
city of Niagara Falls and
its water board and con-
tractors enlisted by Occi-
dental to maintain and test
the site today
An attorney for the city
declined to comment on
the pending litigation.
A spokesman for the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency, while declining to
address the lawsuits,
called the area "the most
sampled piece of property
on the planet."
"The canal has not
leaked," spokesman Mike
Basile said. "The monitor-
ing and containment sys-
tem is as effective today"
as when first installed.
But Reynolds and others
say danger continues to
brew beyond the 70-acre
fenced-in containment
area, pointing to the dis-
covery of chemicals during


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The lawsuits, which don't specify
damages sought, contend
Love Canal was never properly
remediated and dangerous
toxins continue to leach onto
residents' properties.


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No one expects to get breast cancer at 24. Due to Tobey's young age at the time
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included Tobey, her family, Dr. Bennett and his team of RBOI experts, they created
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a 2011 sewer excavation
project. According to the
lawsuits, crews worsened
the contamination by
using high-powered hoses
to flush the chemicals
through the streets and
storm drains.
The state Department of
Environmental Conserva-
tion concluded the con-
tamination, 20 feet below
ground, was an isolated
pocket left over from be-
fore remediation and
hadn't recently leaked
from the canal.
The Reynoldses are un-
convinced that the con-
tainment system ever
really worked and believe
chemicals have been
spreading for years, noting


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their home is just outside
the original emergency
zone.
Around the time of the
sewer repair, waste backed
up into their basement,
they said, leaving behind
an acrid black residue that
tested positive for danger-
ous chemicals.
Gibbs said when she re-
turned recently, she was
surprised the containment
site no longer is posted
with "danger" signs and
that someone house hunt-
ing in the neighborhood
wouldn't know there are
toxins there.
"It says private prop-
erty," she said. "It's like a
gated community for
chemicals."


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N-BEIEVALE
NU BE0GJFOOWSAN


AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


NATION


I1


II Iverl IIsf




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Virginia
Clay, 92
HOMOSASSA
Virginia J. Clay, 92, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Sunday, Oct. 27,2013.
She was born in Pitts-
burgh, Pa., to Grower V
Johnson and Kathryn E.
Mentzer. Virginia was an
usher at the Pittsburgh
Symphony youth concerts
and was a member of the
Salvation Army Auxiliary
She also worked with the
Mount Lebanon Republi-
can party and taught Sun-
day school at Mount
Lebanon United Presbyte-
rian Church for 26 years.
Virginia was a voracious
reader and loved to play
golf, do crossword puzzles
and spend time with her
family and friends. She
was a member of First
Presbyterian Church in
Crystal River and will be
dearly missed by her lov-


Obituaries
ing family and friends.
Virginia is the beloved
wife of the late Donald
Clay She is survived by
her sons, Donald (Jeff)
Clay and wife Gayle,
Steven R. Clay and wife
JoAnne; daughters, Debo-
rah Grant and husband
Bowie, and Cindy Thomas
and husband Craig; eight
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Memorial services will
be at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Nov 16, 2013, at Fero Me-
morial Garden, 5891 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465, 352-746-
4646. As an expression of
sympathy, memorial con-
tributions may be made to
HPH Hospice of Hernando
County 12260 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL 34613.
Arrangements were en-
trusted to Grace Memorial
Funeral Home in Hudson,
727-863-5471, wwwgrace
funeralhomehudson.com.


Thomas
Swift, 80
CITRUS SPRINGS
Thomas R. Swift, 80, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013,
under the care of Crystal
River Health and Rehabil-
itation in Crystal River.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.
Phyllis
Russell, 62
LEESBURG
Phyllis Russell, age 62,
of Leesburg, Fla., died
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013.
Private arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in Gille-
spie, Ill.
See Page A12


OR THE HOLIDAYS!,


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PORT
Continued from Page Al
barge operations under
auspices of Port Citrus in
the near term lacks feasi-
bility, the potential for fu-
ture expansion of the
port's barge operations to
the Duke site in northwest
Citrus County exists. It rec-
ommends keeping that op-
tion open.
But the utility does not
appear to be encouraging
that option.
"Duke Energy Florida
has been working with and
responsive to the Port Au-
thority's questions regard-
ing the use of our barge
canal and rail system,"
Duke Energy spokesman
Sterling Ivy said. 'As pre-
viously indicated to the
consultant, we do not be-
lieve at this time it feasible
to use our canal or the rail
lines serving the Crystal
River Energy Complex.
"The canal is too shal-
low and narrow for large
cargo ships, and the prox-


o41
VA1


CrossF
GFfqwl
* 4rnwi


Cryital Rvtr .
Aoh*YCww Povm Plont


* 6-f"<.K S!
A ,


imity of spent nuclear fuel
rods at CR3 (Crystal River
nuclear plant) will not sup-
port cargo traffic," he said.
'Additional regulatory
requirements related to
delivered coal limit the
prospective alternate use
of our rail lines to move
cargo," he concluded.
Citrus County Commis-
sioner ScottAdams pointed
out that Alex Glenn, presi-
dent of Duke Energy
Florida, said the facilities


could not be used due to
decommissioning activities
that will take many years.
"It will never happen,"
Adams said.
But even if Port Citrus is
eventually developed
solely on the nearby Barge
Canal, Duke Energy will
be involved. The study rec-
ommends early coordina-
tion with the company as a
power distribution net-
work would have to be
developed.


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Marion County


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Google Maps
A recent study shows Duke Energy Florida's canal might
be better suited for Port Citrus than the Cross Florida
Barge Canal.


One-Of-A-Kind Gifts

From Local Artists


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 A9




AlO SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 COMMUNITY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nov. 4 to 8 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Meals include milk and juice.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, blueberry pan-
cakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety, toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal variety, toast,
grits.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, cinnamon
pancakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots.
Friday: MVP breakfast, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety,
toast, grits.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby carrots,
tangy baked beans, chilled
pineapple.
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab
N'Go turkey, oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, po-
tato smiles, chilled flavored ap-
plesauce.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, moz-
zarella maxtix, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled diced
peaches.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled pineapple.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, pepperoni pizza, PB
dippers, fresh garden salad,
sweet corn, chilled mixed fruit.
Middle school
Meals include milk and juice.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots,
grits.
Tuesday: Blueberry pan-
cakes, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,


tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, cinnamon pan-
cakes, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, fajita chicken with rice
and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled flavored apple-
sauce.
Tuesday: Hamburger slid-
ers, turkey wrap, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad, baby
carrots, potato smiles, chilled
dice peaches.
Wednesday: Chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, pepperoni
pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled applesauce.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled mixed fruit.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded
chicken sandwich, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, sweet po-
tato crosstrax, flavored
Craisins.
High school
Breakfast
Includes milk and juice.
Monday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, blueberry pan-
cakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cinnamon pancakes, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, green beans, celery,
potato roasters, chilled flavor
applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
with rice, turkey and gravy over


noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, Ital-
ian super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cucumber coins,
sweet peas, baby carrots, sea-
soned potato wedges, chilled
diced peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, baked beans, chilled
baked beans, potato roasters,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, ham
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, fresh broccoli, steamed
broccoli, baby carrots, sea-
soned potato wedges, fresh
apple, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, pizza, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, sweet corn, potato
roasters, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Grape juice,
sliced turkey breast with
gravy, mashed sweet pota-
toes, carrot coins, whole-
wheat bread with margarine,
sugar cookie, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sausage and
bean casserole, rutagabas,
garlic spinach, wheat bread
with margarine, pineapple,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked
chicken thigh with gravy,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, whole-wheat bread
with margarine, graham
crackers, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger
patty with bun and ketchup
and mustard, baked beans,
yellow corn tomato, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad,
beet and onion salad, three-
bean salad, wheat roll, citrus
fruit, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. Call Support Services at
352-527-5975.


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.44
















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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 All




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


DEATHS
Continued from PageA9

James
Colby, 65
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr James E.
Colby, 65, of Beverly Hills,
will be at 7 p.m. Monday,
Nov. 4,2013, at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory
with the Rev Ray
Favachia officiating.
Friends are invited to join
the family for food and fel-
lowship at the funeral
home from 5 to 7 p.m. Mon-
day prior to the service.
Online condolences may
be sent to the funeral
home at HooperFuneral
Home.com. Those who
wish may make memorial
donations in Mr Colby's
memory to the Path of Cit-
rus County, 27 S. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills,
FL 34465.
Mr Colby was born
April 10, 1948, in Tokyo,
Japan, and was the son of
the late Francis B and
Priscilla (Kendrick) Colby
He retired from Florida
Power as a mechanical en-
gineer after 35 years of
service. A Baptist by faith,
he was a member of the
American Society of Me-
chanical Engineers and
loved traveling and watch-
ing sports on TV
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by a great-grandson,
Eli Wyatt, in April of this
year He is survived by his
wife of 25 years, Loretta
Colby; two daughters,
Emily (Rob) Owens of At-
lanta, Ga., and Jodi (Mark)
Malmgren of Fairbanks,
Alaska; three sons,
Christopher (Amanda)
Colby of Beverly Hills,
Kirk (Wendy) Barnes of
Riverview, Fla., and Blake
(Kemberley) Barnes of
Crystal River, Fla. Mr
Colby is also survived by
10 grandchildren, Amanda
(Chris) Wyatt, Alexandria
(Alexander) Roeder, Abi-
gail Barnes, Christopher
Barnes, Alexis Smith,
Olivia Colby, Danielle
Owens, Darren Owens,
Justin Barnes and Dakota
Barnes. He also leaves be-
hind his faithful poodle,
Dilbert.
The Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funer-
als & Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.

Robert
Ponder, 73
LECANTO
Robert M. Ponder, age
73, of Lecanto, Fla., died
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, at
his home under the care of
his family Private crema-
tion will take place under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Memorial services will
be at 1 p.m. Monday, Nov 4,
2013, at the FirstAssembly
of God in Crystal River,
Fla.


John
Dalton, 70
HOMOSASSA
John Thomas Dalton,
age 70, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Oct. 31, 2013, at his
residence under the loving
care of his family and Hos-
pice of Citrus County He
was born July 11, 1943, in
Brooklyn, N.Y, the son of
Herbert and Catherine
Dalton. John was an auto-
motive mechanic and a
U.S. Army Vietnam vet-
eran. He was Catholic.
John enjoyed playing
bingo and had a love for
life. He moved to Ho-
mosassa, Fla., two years
ago from North Port, Fla.
John was predeceased
by his parents; brothers
Philip and Kevin Dalton;
son Scott Dalton; and
daughter Annemarie. Sur-
vivors include son Richard
Dalton and daughters
Roseanne Carver and
Maryann Harrison, all of
Homosassa, Fla.; brothers
Herbert and Robert Dal-
ton and sister Catherine,
all of North Port, Fla.; 11
grandchildren; four great-
grandchildren; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Visitation for Mr. Dalton
will take place at Heinz
Funeral Home from 3 until
4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 8,
2013. A military honor
service will begin at
4:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness,
Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Tina
England, 45
HOMOSASSA
Tina S. England, age 45,
of Homosassa, Fla., died
Saturday, Nov 2, 2013, at
Seven Rivers hospital. Pri-
vate cremation will take
place under the direction
of Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory in Lecanto,
Fla.

Jeffrey
Hurst, 57
DUNNELLON
Jeffrey A. Hurst, age 57,
of Dunnellon, Fla., died
Oct 13,2013.
Private services took
place under the direction
of Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory in Lecanto,
Fla.

Martha
Pettit, 98
FORMERLY OF
BEVERLY HILLS
Martha D. Pettit, 98, for-
merly of Beverly Hills,
Fla., died Monday, Oct. 28,
2013, in Atascadero, Calif.
Funeral Mass will be at
9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov 6,
2013, at Our Lady of Grace.
Interment follows at Fero
Memorial Gardens.



Mi. E. S iav
Funeral Home
With Crematory
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Cremation



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Carmen
Fuentes, 85
CITRUS SPRINGS
Carmen (Antonia)
Fuentes, 85, of Citrus
Springs, Fla., passed away
Oct 29,2013. She was born
June 13,
1928, to
Diego and
Cande-
lanria (Mar-
tinez)Ortiz-
in Maun- -
a b ot,*
Puerto i /
Rico. Car- Carmen
men was a Fuentes
nurse's
aide for 16 years in New
Britain, Conn. She was
awarded Mother of the
Year by the Puerto Rican
Society Club in New
Britain, Conn., in 1977. She
was a member of the Club
Hispano de Citrus Springs.
She loved to cook. She was
known as one of the best
Puerto Rican chefs in
town. She also loved her
garden and herbs, singing
and dancing, and being
with her family
Carmen was a beloved
wife, mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother and
sister She is survived by
her loving daughter,
Ivonne; granddaughter,
Olivia; son, Jose; four
grandchildren; and one
great-granddaughter
A memorial mass will be
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov 9,
2013, at St. John the Bap-
tist Catholic Church in
Dunnellon, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing..


Hearing Aid
Cost vs. Benefit
Comparison
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Participants
sought by Gardner
Audiology for a new
research study comparing
the value of four new
hearing aid models. Each
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and varying degrees of
technology proven to
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sound quality in difficult
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In exchange for completing
a pre and post-fitting
opinion survey, Gardner
Audiology will loan you
the hearing aids of your
choice, for a free 30 day
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exams and follow up care
free of charge.

At the end of thirty days
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Office
Locations:
Crystal River
& Inverness
352-795-5700


9 9 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. i _
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
352-795-011 licensed Funeral Director a
| 1 bwn-79aa 1 Fax: 352795_6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneral h- 0. l3


Ouida
White, 88
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ouida C. Flowers White
died at home Oct. 31, 2013.
She was born Nov 5,1924,
in San An-
tonio,
Texas, to
William
Flowers
a n d
Martha s----
M a r t h a B_ ^*
Barnes -
Flowers.4r
Mrs. White Ouida
attended White
school in
Granbury, Texas. Her fa-
ther was the foreman for a
crew that built the first
highways across the south.
As a result, the family trav-
eled during her youth, fol-
lowing her father's work.
In 1942, Ouida married
William Tittle and moved
to San Diego, Calif, where
she aided the war effort,
working at Convair, help-
ing to build B-24 bombers.
She was an entrepreneur
at heart, working in sales,
owning real estate, both
residential and commer-
cial, and pursuing her hob-
bies. She worked hard, but
also took time for fun. She
learned to scuba dive, was
an avid skier, loved visiting
Catalina Island, and took
up badminton, horseback
riding and golf.
Upon arrival in Crystal
River in 1964, she and her
second husband, Theron
White, bought a house and
developed a mobile home
park, which was destroyed
in the No Name Storm of
1993. It was Mrs. White's
wish that this property in-
cluding an Indian mound,
be preserved as a natural
site, and was therefore


turned over to the Florida
State Park system. Mrs.
White was a country girl at
heart who eventually trav-
eled the world with her
husband, seeing places she
never dreamed of visiting.
Mrs. White had an un-
forgettable spirit, determi-
nation and love of life. She
will be sorely missed.
Mrs. White is survived
by her daughter, Patricia
Buchanan and husband
Buck; step-daughter Kath-
leen Quinby and husband
Richard; grandchildren
William, Kimberly and
Aaron; and three great-
grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
Crystal River Archaeolog-
ical State Park. A memo-
rial service will be at
1 p.m. Nov 8 at the Crystal
River Archaeological
State Park (Indian
Mounds), 3400 N. Museum
Point, Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Lorraine
Taylor, 66
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lorraine Taylor, age 66,
of Crystal River, Fla., died
Saturday, Nov 2, 2013, at
Crystal River Health and
Rehab. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


Samuel
Whiting Sr., 80
HERNANDO
Samuel H. Whiting Sr.,
80, of Hernando, Fla., died
Oct 29,2013, at Citrus Me-
morial Hospital in Inver-
ness. Sam was born Dec. 4,
1932, in Glens Falls, N.Y,
the son of Herbert and
Ruth Whiting. He was a
U.S. Army veteran serving
in Korea. Sam was an ad-
vertising executive with
CBS and News America in
New York City. He moved
to Hernando in 1996 from
Willingboro, N.J. He was a
generous member and
philanthropic of the Citrus
Hills "BGA."
Sam was preceded in
death by his wife, Joan and
his son, Mark. Survivors
include his children, Deb-
orah Flacksenburg and
husband Gary of Her-
nando, Samuel H. Whiting
Jr and his wife Susan of
Coppell, Texas, John Whit-
ing of Hernando, Judith
Modica and her husband
Luigi of Kings Park, N.Y;
daughter-in-law, Debbie
Whiting of Delran, N.J.; 15
grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.



To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931

adis 4buinesdy
piort rndae
V ooidays


Wednesday, Nov. 6 9AM-1PM

at the College of Central Florida
Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., in Lecanto


More than a dozen hiring employers are

scheduled to participate including:

Bright House Networks

Citrus County Sheriff's Office US Military
Veterans are
Citrus Memorial invited to attend
Health Systems Reboot:

*Crystal River Health and Job Search
Rehabilitation Center Strategies

*and many more! for Veterans


For more information call:
352-637-2223 or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 3206 or 1683
or visit Calendar of Events at
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com


Annual Fall Job Fair

open to any Job Seeker
NO CHARGE TO PARTICIPATE.
PROFESSIONAL DRESS REQUIRED -


PRESENTED BY
WORKFORCE

CITRUS LEVY* MARION


ill


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH
E COLLEGE of Florida House Rep.
CENTRAL
FLORIDA Jimmie T. Smith


LEND



YOUR


I


I


A12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


LOCAL


t




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In midst of Syrian war, Jesus statue arises


Associated Press
BEIRUT In the midst
of a conflict rife with sectar-
ianism, a giant bronze
statue of Jesus has gone up
on a Syrian mountain, ap-
parently under cover of a
truce among three factions
in the country's civil war
Jesus stands, arms out-
stretched, on the Cherubim
mountain, overlooking a
route pilgrims took from
Constantinople to
Jerusalem in ancient times.
The statue is 40 feet tall and
stands on a base that brings
its height to 105 feet, organ-
izers of the project estimate.
That the statue made it to
Syria and went up without
incident on Oct. 14 is re-
markable. The project took
eight years and was setback
by the civil war that fol-
lowed the March 2011 up-
rising against President
BasharAssad.
Christians and other mi-
norities are all targets in the
conflict, and the statue's
safety is by no means guar-
anteed. It stands among vil-
lages where some fighters,
linked to al-Qaida, have lit-
tle sympathy for Christians.
So why put up a giant
statue of Christ in the midst
of such setbacks and so
much danger?


Because "Jesus would
have done it," organizer
Samir al-Ghadban quoted a
Christian church leader as
telling him.
The backers' success in
overcoming the obstacles
shows the complexity of
civil war, where sometimes
despite the atrocities the
warring parties can reach
short-term truces.
Al-Ghadban said that the
main armed groups in the
area Syrian government
forces, rebels and the local
militias of Sednaya, the
Christian town near the
statue site halted fire
while organizers set up the
statue, without providing
further details.
Rebels and government
forces occasionally agree to
cease-fires to allow the
movement of goods. They
typically do not admit to
having truces because that
would tacitly acknowledge
their enemies.
It took three days to raise
the statue. Photos provided
by organizers show it being
hauled in two pieces by
farm tractors, then lifted
into place by a crane.
Smaller statues of Adam
and Eve stand nearby
The project, called "I
Have Come to Save the
World," is run by the


London-based St Paul and
St. George Foundation,
which Al-Ghadban directs.
It was previously named the
Gavrilov Foundation, after
a Russian businessman,
Yuri Gavrilov
Documents filed with
Britain's Charity Commis-
sion describe it as support-
ing "deserving projects in
the field of science and ani-
mal welfare" in England
and Russia, but the com-
mission's accounts show it
spent less than 250 pounds
($400) in the last four years.
Al-Ghadban said most of
the financing came from
private donors, but did not
supply further details.
Russians have been a
driving force behind the
project not surprising
given that the Kremlin is
embattled Assad's chief ally,
and the Orthodox churches
in Russia and Syria have
close ties. Al-Ghadban, who
spoke to The Associated
Press from Moscow, is
Syrian-Russian and lives in
both countries.
Al-Ghadban said he
began the project in 2005,
hoping the statue would be
an inspiration for Syria's
Christians. He said he was
inspired by Rio de Janeiro's
towering Christ the
Redeemer statue.


He commissioned an Ar-
menian sculptor, but
progress was slow A series
of his backers died, includ-
ing Valentin Varennikov, a
general who participated in
the 1991 coup attempt
against then President
Mikhail Gorbachev He
later sought President
Vladimir Putin's backing for
the statue project
Varennikov died in 2009.
Another backer, Patri-
arch Ignatius IV, the
Lebanon-based head of the
Greek Orthodox Church of
Antioch and All the East,


died in 2012. He had do-
nated the land for the
statue, according to church
official Bishop Ghattas
Hazim.
By 2012, the statue was
ready but Syria was aflame,
causing the project's biggest
delay al-Ghadban said.
On Tuesday a militant
Muslim cleric, Sheik Omar
al-Gharba, posted a
YouTube video of himself
smashing a blue-and-white
statue of the Virgin Mary
Al-Ghadban and the pro-
ject's most important
backer, Gavrilov, weighed


canceling it
They consulted Syria's
Greek Orthodox Patriarch
John Yaziji. It was he who
told them 'Jesus would
have done it"
They began shipping the
statue from Armenia to
Lebanon. In August, while it
was en route, Gavrilov, 49,
suffered a fatal heart attack,
al-Ghadban said.
Eventually the statue
reached Syria.
"It was a miracle," al-
Ghadban said. "Nobody
who participated in this ex-
pected this to succeed."


Associated Press
Workers prepare to install a statue of Jesus Oct. 14 on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the
midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 40-foot-tall, bronze statue of Jesus has
gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three
factions Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.


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8


WORLD


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 A13










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Remember


Associated Press
Boston's Jonny Gomes
places the championship
trophy and a Red Sox
baseball jersey at the
Boston Marathon finish
line Saturday during a
pause in their World
Series victory parade in
Boston, to remember
those affected by the
Marathon bombing.


Subway vigilante
Goetz arrested on
drug charges
NEW YORK- Subway
vigilante Bernie Goetz, who
ignited a national furor over
racism and gun control after
he shot four panhandling
youths on a train in the
1980s, has been arrested
on drug charges, police said
Saturday.
Goetz was nabbed in a
sting operation in Union
Square park Friday after-
noon for selling $30 worth of
pot to an undercover officer,
police said. He asked the
woman if she wanted to get
high, then went back to his
apartment, where he has
lived for decades, and re-
turned with marijuana, au-
thorities said. He was
arrested on charges of crimi-
nal sale of marijuana.
Goetz wasn't being tar-
geted specifically; he just
happened to cross paths
with the undercover officer
assigned to crack down on
drug dealing in the park, au-
thorities said.
Goetz became a house-
hold name as the skinny, be-
spectacled white man who,
on Dec. 22,1984, rose from
his seat on the No. 2 train in
Manhattan and shot four
black teens inside a subway
car with an illegal handgun.
The teens had sharpened
screwdrivers and were ask-
ing him for $5. Goetz said it
was self-defense and the
youths intended to rob him.
Goetz was cleared of at-
tempted murder charges in
1987 and spent 250 days in
jail the same year for a
weapons conviction in the
case.
West Point hosts
first wedding
between 2 men
WEST POINT, N.Y -
Two West Point graduates
were married Saturday in
the military academy's first
wedding between two men.
Larry Choate III, class of
2009, married Daniel
Lennox, class of 2007, be-
fore about 20 guests.
Choate, 27, taught Sun-
day school at the U.S. Mili-
tary Academy's Cadet
Chapel and said he always
thought of it as the place he
would get married if he
could.
West Point hosted two
same-sex weddings of
women in late 2012, more
than a year after New York
legalized gay marriage. But
Saturday's wedding was the
first time two men wed at
West Point.
"It's maybe one more bar-
rier that's pushed over a little
bit, or maybe one more
glass ceiling that's shattered
that makes it easier for the
next couple," Choate said
Friday.
Choate and Lennox are
out of the military and wore
tuxedoes for the ceremony.
Some of their guests were in
uniform.
The pair did not know
each other as cadets but
met later through a friend.
Chaplain Cynthia
Lindenmeyer officiated the
ceremony.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gas prices give drivers whiplash


Associated Press

NEW YORK Local
gasoline prices are swing-
ing up and down ever more
drastically, a result of a na-
tional fuel system that is op-
erating with a shrinking
margin for error
Jumps of 20 cents per gal-
lon or more in a single day
are becoming more com-
mon, for example, accord-
ing to an AP analysis of
daily and weekly price
changes at 120,000 U.S.
gasoline stations tracked by
GasBuddycom. Sixty-three
times this year at least one
U.S. metro area has seen
such a change. Like the 24-
cent increase Decatur, Ill.,
drivers saw on Jan. 26, or
the 24-cent increase in Su-
perior, Wis., on April 30, and
the 28-cent increase in Hen-
derson, Ky, on Sept 19.
Not since 2008 have there
been so many 20-cent
changes. Last year those
happened 58 times. In 2011
they happened just 21
times, and in 2010 just
7 times.


11!_

Associated Press
Gas prices dropped to $3.17 Thursday at a Speedway
station in Kokomo, Ind. Gasoline prices are swinging up
and down ever more drastically, a result of a national fuel
system that is operating with a shrinking margin for error.


"There's more and more
feast or famine," says Tom
Kloza, chief oil analyst at
the Oil Price Information
Service and GasBuddycom.
The problem, analysts
say, is a fuel system increas-
ingly vulnerable to short-
term shocks. That's because
refiners try to keep stocks of
gasoline low to save money


just as other manufacturers
aim to operate on a "just-in-
time" inventory schedule.
The nation has about 26
days' worth of gasoline de-
mand in storage, compared
with 30 to 40 days' worth
during much of the 1980s
and 1990s, according to the
Energy Department Also,
there are 143 operating re-


fineries, about half the total
from 1980, so, if one has a
problem, supplies quickly
drop.
These dramatic local
price swings are happening
despite relatively stable oil
prices and a national aver-
age gasoline price that has
hovered around $3.50 per
gallon for three years. In
2008, the last time local
prices were this volatile, oil
spiked to $145 a barrel in
July then plunged below
$40 in late December as the
global financial crisis sent
energy markets reeling. The
national average gasoline
price ranged from $1.62 to
$4.11 a gallon.
When supplies are quick
to rise or fall, it means more
of what frustrates drivers:
Gasoline prices that seem
to jump around a few cents
every time they fill up, for
no rhyme or reason. This
year 57 U.S. metro areas
have averaged price
changes of at least a dime
over a week Last year just
38 cities did, and in 2011 it
was just 29 cities.


Warning signs


As LAX shooting

unfolded, father

calledpolice

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Moments
after gunfire broke out at the Los
Angeles airport, Paul Ciancia's fa-
ther called police in New Jersey,
worried about his son in L.A. The
young man had sent texts to his
family that suggested he might be in
trouble, at one point even saying
goodbye.
The call came too late. Ten min-
utes earlier, police
said, the 23-year-
old unemployed
motorcycle me-
chanic had walked 0&
into LAX, pulled
an AR-15 semi-au- s
tomatic rifle from
his duffel bag and
began firing at Paul
Transportation Se- Ciancia
curity Administra-
tion officers. When the shooting
stopped, one TSA officer was dead
and five other people were
wounded, including two more TSA
workers and the gunman himself
Ciancia's exact motives were not
clear, but he had some kind of beef
with the TSA: A note in his bag said
he would be happy if he managed
to kill just one TSA agent. "Black,
white, yellow, brown, I don't dis-
criminate," the note read, accord-
ing to a paraphrase by a law
enforcement official briefed on the
investigation. The screed also men-
tioned "fiat currency" and "NWO,"
possible references to the New
World Order, a conspiracy theory
that foresees a totalitarian one-
world government
By all accounts, Ciancia was re-
served and solitary Former class-
mates barely remember him and
even a recent roommate could say
little about the young man who
moved from New Jersey to Los An-
geles less than two years ago.
When police stopped him, Cian-


Associated Press
Transportation Security Administration employees classify the luggage
to return to passengers Saturday at Los Angeles International Airport's
Terminal 3. A gunman armed with a semi-automatic rifle opened fire at
the airport on Friday, killing a Transportation Security Administration
employee and wounding two other people.


cia also had five 30-round maga-
zines, and the bag contained "hun-
dreds of rounds in 20-round boxes,"
the official said.
Authorities identified the dead
TSA agent as Gerardo I. Hernan-
dez, 39, who became the first TSA
official in the agency's 12-year his-
tory to be killed in the line of duty
Ciancia, who was shot four times
by police, remained hospitalized
Saturday but there was no word on
his condition. He was wounded in
the mouth and the leg, authorities
said.
Allen Cummings, the police chief
in Pennsville, a small blue-collar
town near the Delaware River
where Ciancia grew up, said he's
known Ciancia's father also
named Paul for more than 20
years.
He said the father called him
around 12:30p.m. Fridayto tell him
about texts his family had received


from his son in Los Angeles.
"There was some things in there
that made his family feel he may do
harm to himself," Cummings said.
He did not mention suicide or hurt-
ing others, but he did say goodbye.
Cummings said the father also
heard from a friend that his son
may have had a gun.
The chief said he called Los An-
geles police, who sent a patrol car
to Ciancia's apartment There, two
roommates said that they had seen
him a day earlier and he had ap-
peared to be fine.
The attack at the nation's third-
busiest airport halted caused flight
delays and cancellations nation-
wide. Some Los Angeles-bound
flights that already were in the air
were diverted elsewhere.
As gunshots rang out in Terminal
3, swarms of passengers screamed,
dropped to the ground or ran for
their lives.


Pakistan slams US for drone strike


Associated Press


ISLAMABAD -The Pak-
istani government Saturday
accused the U.S. of sabotag-
ing peace talks with domes-
tic Taliban fighters by
killing their leader in a
drone strike, as the mili-
tants began the process of
choosing a successor
The rise in tension, even
though the U.S. took out
Pakistan's No. 1 enemy
shows just how complicated
the relationship between
the professed allies can be.
The two repeatedly have
clashed over issues such as
drone strikes and Pakistan's
alleged support for mili-


tants fighting U.S. troops in
neighboring Afghanistan.
The Pakistani Taliban
leader slain Friday
Hakimullah Mehsud, was a
ruthless figure known for a
deadly attack on a CIA base
in Afghanistan and a bloody
campaign that killed thou-
sands of Pakistani civilians
and security personnel.
The Pakistani army has
launched numerous opera-
tions in the country's north-
west in a failed attempt to
subdue the group, which
aims to topple Pakistan's
democratic system and im-
pose a harsh version of Is-
lamic law It also seeks an
end to the country's unpop-


ular alliance with the U.S.
Pakistan's government,
which took office in June,
has pushed peace talks with
the Taliban as the best way
to end the conflict, although
many people are skeptical a
deal is possible.
The drone strike that
killed Mehsud in the North
Waziristan tribal area came
a day before the govern-
ment was to send a three-
member delegation of
clerics to the region with a
formal invitation to start
peace talks, Interior Minis-
ter Chaudhry Nisar Ali
Khan said. It never ended
up going.
Khan called the drone at-


tack "murder" to the peace
effort, but hoped the
process could continue. He
said he warned the U.S. am-
bassador previously that
American drone strikes
should not be carried out
while Pakistan was trying to
hold peace talks and no Tal-
iban leader should be tar-
geted. The government
later summoned the U.S.
ambassador to complain.
When asked whether he
thought the U.S. was trying
to deliberately scuttle the
peace process, the minister
responded: 'Absolutely"
"The efforts have been
ambushed," the minister
said.


World BRIEFS

Zombies


Associated Press
A woman dressed as a
zombie talks on her
phone Saturday after the
Taipei Zombie Run, in
Taipei, Taiwan. The
Zombie Run is a mini-
marathon that consists of
a 3.1-mile course where
participants must run
through, dodging zombies
along the way.


Two French
journalists
killed in Mali
DAKAR, Senegal -
Gunmen abducted and
killed two French radio
journalists on assignment
in northern Mali on Satur-
day, French and Malian of-
ficials said, grabbing the
pair as they left the home
of a rebel leader.
The deaths come four
days after France rejoiced
at the release of four of its
citizens who had been
held for three years by al-
Qaida's affiliate in North
Africa.
It was not immediately
clear who had slain the
French journalists. France
launched a military inter-
vention in January in its
former colony to try and
oust the jihadists from
power in Kidal and other
towns across northern
Mali. Separatist rebels
have since returned to the
area.
French President Fran-
cois Hollande expressed
his "indignation at this odi-
ous act."
Claude Verlon and Ghis-
laine Dupont were grabbed
by several armed men in a
4x4 after they finished an
interview, officials said.
Their bodies were later
dumped a dozen miles
outside the town on the
road leading to Tinessako,
a community to the east of
Kidal.
Toronto mayor
repeats he
won't resign
TORONTO Embattled
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is
reiterating that he won't re-
sign despite mounting pres-
sure for him to step aside
after police said they had
obtained a copy of a video
that appears to show the
mayor of Canada's largest
city puffing on a crack pipe.
Ford smiled outside his
office on Saturday and
said: "No. As I told you be-
fore, I'm not resigning."
Allegations that Ford had
been caught on video
smoking crack first sur-
faced in May. Two reporters
with the Toronto Star and
one from the U.S. website
Gawker said they saw the
video but did not obtain a
copy.
Train runs over
and kills 8 in
southern India
HYDERABAD, India--A
train struck and killed eight
people in southern India on
Saturday, an official said.
The victims were cross-
ing the tracks on foot when
they were hit by the train,
said M. Kiran Kumar, the
top elected official of
Andhra Pradesh state.
The victims had gotten
off another train that they
had stopped by pulling the
emergency chain, fearing a
fire in their coach. As their
train came to a halt, they
jumped onto the adjacent
track and were struck by a
train coming from the oppo-
site direction, Kumar said.
-From wire reports









EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


river


state


park


History and culture of
Suwannee River State Park
History
In 1818, Andrew Jackson led American forces through this
area searching for Indian strongholds, believed responsible for
raiding settlers. One can find an earthworks mound built dur-
ing the Civil War to defend the railroad crossing that supplied
confederate troops. The town of Columbus, established in
1841, was also located here. This town once prospered from
river steamboat traffic carrying passengers and freight.
Earthworks
In 1863, Confederate soldiers built earthworks to protect the
railroad bridge located at what was once the town of Colum-
bus. Union troops were marching west from Jacksonville to
destroy the railroad bridge when Confederate reinforcements,
having traveled by rail across the Suwannee River, helped de-
feat and turn them back at the Battle of Olustee in February
1864.
Columbus Cemetery
The Columbus Cemetery, established in 1860 consists of 23
graves the earliest recorded in it is 1862. The stones in the
cemetery are made of various materials, including granite,
marble and metal, and are in different states of repair.
Sawmill wheel
Pieces of machinery remain which belonged to a sawmill
that operated on the Suwannee River in the 1800s.


Fall has finally arrived and, like many Floridians, I have been waiting for it for a long time.
I am one of those "leaf peepers" who likes to escape to northwestern Georgia and else-
where this time of year to see the fall foliage and enjoy the cool temperatures.
To me, it's definitely worth the long drive and time off of work, but it's not something
you can comfortably do in a weekend.


Fortunately, you don't have to
leave Florida to enjoy cool tem-
peratures or feel the crunch of
leaves under your feet on a
winding wooded trail. I got my
fall fix recently at Suwannee
River State Park in Live Oak,
which is just a little more than a


two-hour drive north of Crystal
River
I have seen a lot of Florida
state parks, and this one is now
a favorite of mine. The park is
close to the Florida-Georgia bor-
der, so the area has a definite
Georgia feel, both in its natural


Source: www.floridastateparks.org


features and culture. You'll hear
more Southern accents here,
and you'll likely catch a glimpse
of cotton fields on your drive
through Live Oak.
Suwannee River State Park,
which stretches across 1,800 acres,
is a popular destination for fam-
ily camping, paddling and hik-
ing, and it's easy to see why The
Suwannee is a world-class river,
and the park is situated along
the 170-mile Suwannee River
Wilderness Trail, which follows
the tea-colored waterway
through its many features, from
See Page A21

TOP: The Lime Sink Run and river
converge at Suwannee River
State Park in Live Oak.
LEFT: The blackwater river is
nearly 250 miles long and is a
popular destination for paddlers.
Travel feature and photos by
Amanda Mims




A16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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24 38 24 31(2009)'R'Jennifer Aniston.'PG-13' (N)'14'B c(2010)BN
50 119 Killers The Gird in the Box Killer Profile "Timothy Killer Profile "Ronald Panic 9-1-1 (In Stereo) Panic 9-1-1 (In Stereo)
W50 119 '14, V' c Krajcir"' 14' Dominique" (N)'14' 14' '14' m
** "Battleship"(2012, Science Fiction) Taylor ** "Gangster Squad" (2013, Crime Drama) *** "Heat"(1995, Crime Drama) Al Pacino,
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.J 42 4 42 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera "In To Catch a Predator To Catch a Predator To Catch a Predator
H1^ 42 41 42 Landslide; a sinkhole. "Heart Stoppers" Peril (N) "Florida 6""Florda 7" ."Georgia 1"
S 19 5 19 4 Inside the Vietnam War Inside the Green "SEAL Team Six: The Raid on Osama bin Alaska State Troopers "SEAL Team Six:
l) 109 65 109 44 53'14, L,S,V' Berets '14, L,V' Laden"(2012) Cam Gigandet. 'NR' (N)14' Osama bin Laden"
WitRJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. Sponge. Thunder ,Sam& SeeDad |Instant "Swindle"(2013)JennetteMcCurdy'NR' Chris Chris
WN 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now?
XY 44 123 Snapped: Killer Snapped: Killer Snapped: Killer Snapped: Killer Preachers of L.A. Snapped: Killer
n 340 2411 340 4 Time of Death'MA' Homeland "TheYoga I ...i- Homeland Carrie turns Masters of Sex (N)'MA' Homeland Carrie turns
340 241 34Play' 4...... the tables.'MA' the tables.'MA'
rs 3 3 3 2 3 Bar Rescue "Turtle on Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Crappy Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Drunk & Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
37 43 37 27 36 Its Back" 'PG' 'PG' Cantina" 'PG' PG' Dirty Dolls"'PG' 'PG'
'U ,,, I "Independence Day" (1996) Will Smith. Earthlings vs. ** "Oz the Great and Powerful" (2013) ** "The Oranges"
SAZ 370 271 370 BviI aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. 'PG-13' BJames Franco. (In Stereo) 'PG' B (2011) Hugh Laurie.
S4 36 1 36 NBA Basketball Washington Wizards at Miami Heat. From Heat Live! College Football Miami at Florida State.
36 31 36 the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live)
S 31 59 31 2 ***2 "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" 1989) Harrison Ford. ** "The Adjustment Bureau" (2011, Suspense) Matt "Devil's
31 59 31 26 29 ndy's hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail. Damon, Emily Blunt. Premiere.'PG-13' Adv."
tb 49 23 49 16 19 "Joe Dirt" (2001) DavidSpade.'PG-13' *** "The Hangover" (2009)'NR'(DVS) ** "Due Date" (2010)'R' (DVS)
9 3 1 9 3 3 1 ***"LoveintheAfternoon" (1957, *** "Miss Sadie Thompson"(1954, Drama) *** "Rain" (1932, Drama)JoanCrawford,
OR) 169 53 169 30 35Romance-Comedy) Audrey Hepburn. 'NR' B Rita Hayworth, Aldo Ray.'NR' BcWalter Huston, William Gargan.'NR'
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IM 50 46 50 29 30 Medium Medium Medium IMedium Medium IMedium Medium IMedium Alaskan Women Medium Medium
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350 261 350 Wood" Richard Gere. PG-13 B measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. Blanchett. (In Stereo)'R'B
i 48 33 48 3 **I "The Librarian: Curse of the Judas ** "Fast & Furious" (2009, Action) Vin Diesel, ** "Fast & Furious" (2009, Action) Vin Diesel,
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He should pursue

prenup with fiance


D ear Annie: My
wife died five
years ago. Two
years ago, I met "Lorna,"
and I recently asked her
to marry me. I feel
strongly that personal as-
sets brought into a mar-
riage should be
protected. I made this
clear to Lorna early in
our relationship and got
the impression that she
would agree to a prenup-
tial agree-
ment.
I've been
very success- s
ful finan-
cially Lorna
has few as-
sets and a lot
of debt. She
says a
prenuptial
agreement
makes her '
feel that our
marriage is of ANN
a lesser qual- MAIL
ity than my
first. I have
tried to explain to her as
gently as I can that this
isn't the case. It took my
first wife and me 20
years to acquire what we
had. It would kill me to
risk that and have to
start over when I'm 60.
Is it right for Lorna to
expect to be considered
a financial equal imme-
diately after marriage?
Am I wrong to think it
should take a reasonable
amount of time for her to
enjoy equal ownership?
After my wife passed
away, I set up trusts for
my kids in case some-
thing happened to me.
Lorna fears the finan-
cial agreement will


I
.I


make my kids think less
of her because her
daughter isn't entitled to
the same share.
I truly believe this
isn't about the money I
think Lorna is con-
cerned about how oth-
ers, especially my
children, will view our
marriage.
If I live long enough,
Lorna's teenage daugh-
ter will be given the
same inheri-
tance as my
kids, but Lorna
says that isn't
fair because
S she'll be treat-
ing my chil-
dren the same
as hers from
the start.
I've told her
that her daugh-
ter will have as
much of my
E'S heart as my
3BOX children, but
the money is
something else.
Am I treating this too
much like a business
transaction? Frazzled
in Phoenix
Dear Frazzled: Ab-
solutely not Lorna's
fears are unfounded. A
prenup is a sensible
move when you are
bringing considerable
assets into a marriage,
and there is no reason
anyone other than your
lawyer would know
about it.
Please take Lorna to
see your attorney and
set up an arrangement
that she will agree to.
Otherwise, we worry
that it is indeed only
about the money


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 6:55 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 1:10 p.m.,
3:50 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R)
1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Escape Plan" (R) 4 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.


"Last Vegas" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
1 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Outpouring
6 Wire
11 Water's edge
16 Wild
21 Previous
22 Chinese or
Japanese, e.g.
23 Spud
24 Pack animal of South
America
25 Functions
26 Deficiency
28 Modify
29 Maria
30 Newt
32 High-priced
33 Dirty, in a way
35 Business abbr.
36 Fuss (hyph.)
38 Raise the-
41 Hoarfrost
43 "-a girl!"
44 The two together
45 Jones or Temple
48 At no time
50 Work at
52 Counteract
55 Slant
57 Short swim
58 Inundated
62 Knight's title
63 Lab burner
65 Name for a
bystander
67 Fib
69 Spiny tree
70 Literary collection
71 -volente
72 War vessel,
for short
74 Dressed
76 Measure of length
77 Chess piece
79 Quarrel
81 Pilfer
83 Snare or bass
85 Poor grade
86 Cravat
88 Pool of money
90 Ump's cousin
92 Samuel -
(aka Mark Twain)
94 Burden
96 Sticky stuff
97 Succor
99 Group of players
100 Endanger
103 Payable


105 Small shoot
107 Kringle
110 Cry of contempt
111 Skedaddle
113 Leaflet
115 Call for help
117 Stubby tail
118 Rod for roasting
120 Girl
122 Clean air org.
123 Indeed!
125 Wrath
126 Fictional sleuth
Queen
128 Male cat
130 Time
132 Actuality
133 Grow older
134 Poverty-stricken
135 Certain voter (abbr.)
137 -circus
139 Destroyed
141 Nov. follower
143 Urchin
145 Obvious
147 Do in
150 Neighbor of Can.
152 Stench
154 Energy type (abbr.)
155 Dinersign
159 Auto
160 Boutique
162 Catch unawares
164 Something caustic
166 Baby food
167 Dwelling
169 Truly awful
173 Degrade
175 Arboreal animal
176 "-Pan"
177 George or T.S.
178 Bill of fare
179 Jet
180 Kind of organ
181 Tightly packed
182 Detested

DOWN
1 He ate no fat
2 Utah city
3 Felt poorly
4 Hallux
5 Gaelic
6 Star in Gemini
7 Cigar residue
8 Life story, for short
9 Fat
10 Stage direction
11 Raged


Showy performer
Elevator name
French artist
Rye fungus
Excoriate
Annex
Mathematical
proportion
Catkin
Coniferous tree
Abel's killer
Spend foolishly (with
"away")
Recipe meas.
CIA predecessor
- podrida
Charge
Wicked
Side road
Attention
Sweet potato
The "Iliad" is one
Fond du -
Japanese city
Concluding part
Lover of things French
Mean
Higher-ed scholar
Warning signal
The underworld
Recess
Stage prompt
Antiquity
Fully grown
Prohibit
Circle portion
Departed
Intelligence
Walk proudly
Jumped
Timid
Sod
Little bit
Evergreen
Makes imperfect
Inane
Insult
Norwegian
playwright
- sugar
Pasture
Before
Cold weather wear
Spanish painter
Sudden increase
Horse
Superlative suffix
Mimic
Furtiveness


Roosevelt or
Pendergrass
Sal -
Astonish
Whiskey
Office note
Pub beverage
Flop
College exam
Name in Genesis
Native of (suffix)


Slice
Semiprecious stone
Writer Ephron
Remove
Overcharge for tickets
Sticker
Fragrance
Broths
Did a lawn job
To pieces
Liking


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.


Drive recklessly
Withered
Punta del -
Wan
For one
Brownish-gray
Toy-gun projectile
Container
-Angeles
Sheep's bleat


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal UclIck for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The doctors and hospitals you need.


Over 18 doctors in Citrus County
S2 hospitals and 5 care facilities

The member benefits you want.
Doctor's office visits and hospital coverage
SPrescription drug coverage
SMaximum annual out-of-pocket protection
SPreventive coverage
SConvenient mail-order prescription coverage
SWellness programs
SEmergency coverage at home and when you travel
A$0 monthly plan premium.

Where else can you get all the benefits you want and extras you need
for a premium as low as this?

Reason enough.
Not to mention your health? It's the best reason to take good care
of yourself. Get the Humana Medicare advantage. Learn more at a
Medicare meeting in your neighborhood.

CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS
Claw Daddy's Golden Corral
1601 S.E. Hwy. 19 2605 East Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Nov. 6 2:00 PM Nov. 14 2:00 PM


i Call now.
1-800-372-2472 (TTY: 711)
8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week



U DON'T WAIT. Enrollment ends Saturday, December 7.


Humana is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. The benefit
information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments, and
restrictions may apply. Benefits and premiums may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to payyour Medicare Part B premium. A sales
person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call Humana Sales at
1-800-372-2472 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week. Applicable to Humana Gold Plus (HMO) H1036-140 plans.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 A17


Y0040_GHHHL4RHH Accepted


TMP 11/13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus High School homecoming

Citrus High School

Friday, Oct. 11,2013


Westen Kinnard and Bill Smith


Renee Kinnard, Jeff Kinnard and
Stephanie Smith


Paula Venero and Vince Venero


4ia~~ ::~~


Hannah Schmidt, Hillary Schmidt and
Jennifer Grow


Ashlynn Gatto and Alexus Cook


Cierra Nickless and Camrin Kersh


JT Michael and Michael Picaroni


Jeffrey Atkin and Gina Atkin Peytan McDow, Siearra Cook and Carly
Bogart


Heidi Kenyon and Melissa McDow


JT Reneau and Nancy Reneau


Selena Alley and Trent Rumley


Destin Cali and Jared Cleary


Austin Juse and Megan Carroll-Cruz


Photos by Logan Mosby


Sharon Smith and James Houston


AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

40&8 to have breakfast today
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. Proceeds benefit
programs of the 40&8.

Early birds get meal at legion
American Legion Post 166 will have its
Early Bird Dinner Tuesday at the
Sugarmill Woods Country Club.
Cash bar starts at 6 p.m., with dinner at
7 p.m. The post will pay for the "Early
Birds" members who paid their dues by
Sept. 30.
Price for the dinner is $15 for members.
The public is invited. The master of cere-
monies will be Robert Scott, commander

Auxiliary to serve meatloaf
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Pennon Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites
everyone to a lasagna dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 8, at the post, 10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For
more in-formation, call 352-465-4864.

Auxiliary to have bake sale
American Legion Post 237 Auxiliary,
Beverly Hills, will have a bake sale from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov 9, in front of
Beverly Hills Plaza.
For more information, call 352-746-5018.

Lodge to host vets breakfast
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando
will host a Veterans Breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. Sunday, Nov 10.
Everyone is welcome. Breakfast will in-
clude omelets, pancakes, bacon and eggs.
There will be no charge for veterans, but a
donation from other guests is appreciated.
For more information, call Frank at
352-464-2146.

Primary school to honor vets
Inverness Primary School will have its
Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday,
Nov 7, at the school cafeteria.
Citrus County veterans are invited to
participate. Students will be performing
songs in honor of veterans. Three students
in kindergarten through second grade will
be hon-ored with the Randy Aller's Pic-
ture Contest Awards for first, second, and
third places. Three third- through fifth-
grade students will earn the Randy Aller's
Essay Contest Awards for first, second and
third places. The students will share their
essays with the veterans in attendance.
After the program, the veterans will be
the celebrities of IPS as they walk down
the hallway full of children cheering, to
the Veterans Garden for refreshments.
For more information, email Mary Tyler
at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or call
352-726-2632.

CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
re-sponsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically
15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Pasta dinner to be fundraiser
A spaghetti dinner fundraiser for
Friends in Need of Dunnellon Inc. will be
held from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov 9, at
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Cost is $6. Proceeds will help purchase
supplies for the free Thanksgiving and
Christmas dinners the group offers.

VFW post plans celebration
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to a Veter-
ans Celebration at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov. 11,
at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
A picnic will follow at noon.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

New DAV chapter meets
Disabled American Veterans Chapter
No. 158, Crystal River, meets at the Crystal
River Mall. The first official meeting for
the new chapter will be at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 16.
For more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.


Special opportunities


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
U.S. Army Air Corps veteran James Archer, born in Scotland and raised in Chicago, served in Air Transport
Command from 1943 to 1945 during World War II. A 1944 photo of James Archer and crew of the C-46 transport
aircraft used to fly personnel to various locations. (Photo courtesy James Archer.)

Footproblem leads World War II veteran into service for air corps


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


Getting involved
in the armed
services during
a war can
rarely be referenced as a
pleasant experience. But
it sometimes can present
opportunities that would
never otherwise be
available.
That's what happened to James
Archer
Born in Port Glasgow, Scotland,
Archer's family moved to Chicago
when he was still a child. He was
going to school at Northwestern Uni-
versity when World War II broke out;
when he finished his schooling, he
went to enlist.
"The Marines wouldn't take me,"
Archer, now 92, recalled. "There was
something wrong with my feet. So I
joined the Army Air Corps."
And that started him on a road he
could never have anticipated.
Archer earned his wings in Novem-
ber 1943 and was sent to North Africa.
Although he flew several types of air-
craft, his primary mission was trans-
port, his main airplanes the C46 and
C47, as well as the B25 and B17. His
responsibilities were various, from
shipping supplies to U.S. bases to
flying out the wounded.
"I flew all over Europe," Archer


said. "They were great airplanes to fly,
all of them."
He also had some pretty famous
passengers namely, the Andrew
Sisters and Frank Sinatra, both visit-
ing and performing for Allied troops
overseas.
"They were nice girls, all of 'em," he
said of the Andrews Sisters, and Sina-
tra "was about 125 pounds then."
Archer transported them to several
areas between
1943 and 1945.
After leaving Name: James Arch
Northern Africa, Rank: Captain
he was stationed Branch: U.S. Army
in Naples, Italy Years: 1943-45
- "my so-called Units: Air Transpor
home base" Jobs: Piloted vario
in 1944 and flew aircraft, including 1
missions that B25 and B17; flew
could take "12 to wounded soldiers i
14 hours at a occasion, celebrity
time." visiting the troops
As for the An- Served: Originally j
drews Sisters, base in Decatur, A
known for their in North Africa and
swing and boo- Veterans Organizal
gie-woogie style Foreign Wars
of music ____-__
among their
biggest hits were "Boogie Woogie
Bugle Boy" and "Don't Sit Under the
Apple Tree" -Archer remembered
"the girls had a dirty version of every
song they ever sang."
Those are among his better memo-
ries of the war, but there were others


that weren't so pleasant. Archer re-
membered flying a transport near the
Po River Valley, which flows eastward
across northern Italy, when he spotted
six Messerschmitt Bfl109 fighters.
"I was flying at about 190 (miles an
hour), and they were coming in at
about 300," he said. The Luftwaffe
wasn't a huge threat in the final year
of the war ("Their air force was pretty
limited by that time," he said), but to a


pilot in an unarmed transport plane,
they were still extremely dangerous.
Archer called for fighter support
and a flight of four P51 Mustangs re-
sponded. They chased the German
fighters off, then one of the Mustang
pilots flew up next to Archer's craft.
"He did a barrel roll right around
my plane," Archer said. That's when
he noticed who was flying the Mustang
- one of the Tuskegee Airmen, the
squadron of black pilots in what was
then still a segregated U.S. military
The Tuskegee Airmen were the first
black pilots in U.S. Army Air Corps
history
"They had a tough time getting their
wings," Archer said.
But he was glad they did, especially
on that day over the Po River Valley
"I had some good luck flying,"
Archer said. "My time in the service
was limited, but I enjoyed it. I've been
very lucky"
He left the service at the end of the
war in Europe, and although he con-
tinued to fly until about a decade ago,
he was never anxious to go back into
the service.
"I guess it lost its zing for me," he
said, after putting in about 1,000 flying
hours.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


er
Air Corps

t Command
us transport
the C46, C47,
Supplies,
and, on
es who were

got wings at a
la.; was based
Naples, Italy
tions: Veterans of




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cooties to take trip
The Military Order of the Cootie will
have a bus trip on the Sun Cruz boat out
of New Port Richey Wednesday, Nov 13.
Tickets include casino play money,
meal voucher and boarding pass. The
bus will pick up at VFW Post 4864 on
Citrus Springs Boulevard, Leroy Rooks
Jr Post No. 4252 in Her-nando and VFW
Post 4337 in Inverness.
For more information, call Betty at
352-795-4142 or Jennie at 352-489-2955.

Post to have yard sale
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to a
yard sale at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at
the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Post donation drop-offs begin
Tuesday, Nov 12, in the pavillion.
For more information, call 352-465-
4864.

Post slates flea market
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58
will have its outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
Nov 16, at the post, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
Pancakes, French toast, scrambled
eggs, sausages, orange juice and coffee
are served for $5. Everyone is welcome.

Ladies' sale to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks
will have a yard and bake sale from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the
lodge, 7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to participate.
Those with items to sell may call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at
352-382-7614. Rental spaces are $15
each or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday,
Nov 17.
Food will be available. Proceeds from
the food booth go to help the Elks' veter-
ans committee provide for our veterans
in nursing homes.

Post to serve holiday dinner
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58
will serve a free Thanksgiving dinner
from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov 28, at
the post, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Donations will be accepted, but are
not necessary Everyone is welcome.

MOC/MOCA to serve pasta
The Military Order of the Cootie/Mili-
tary Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will
serve a pasta and meatball or sausage
dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday,
Nov 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Her-
nando (where the helicopter is).


Advance tickets, for $7, may be pur-
chased at the post. Donation at the door
will be $7.50. Music will be provided
after dinner
For more information, call Paul
Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-
795-4142 or the post at 352-726-3339.

Riders to do poker run
District 7 VFW Riders will host the
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Poker
Run on Saturday, Dec. 7. Registration
begins at 9 a.m. with the last bike out at
11 a.m. and last bike in at4 p.m.
The poker run schedule is:
Staring point and first card -
VFW Post 7122 Floral City, 8191 S.
Florida Ave. Be-gin 50/50 -10 tickets
for $5. Start the run with breakfast for a
donation.
Cost of $15 per poker hand includes
the cost of the meal at the Inglis Post.
Additional poker hands for $10. Addi-
tional meal tickets are $5.
First stop and second card -
Giovanni's, 3451 E. Louise Lane,
Hernando.
Second stop and third card -
American Legion Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
Third stop and fourth card -
Willard's Restaurant & Lounge, 3490
S.E. County Road 337, Morriston.
Fourth stop and fifth card -
Chiefland VFW Post 5625,1104 S.
Main St.
Final stop and wild card Inglis
VFW Post 8698, at 520 State Road 40 E.
Last bike in by 4 p.m. Roll the dice for a
lucky No. 7 free drink (one per poker
hand card player).
Prizes for best poker hand, second-
best hand and worst hand.
There will be music, a silent auction,
odometer poker for a prize (read your
bike odometer best hand wins) and a
50/50 drawing.
For more information, call Roger at
352-697-1826 or email shanilyl@
yahoo.com.

'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans.
The stories will be about a singular
event or moment in your military career
that stands out to you.
It can be any type of event, from some-
thing from the battlefield to a fun excur-
sion while on leave.
We also ask that you provide us with
your rank, branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit and vet-
erans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak
at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story


New veterans' pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald
A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness an-
nounces the design and availability of
this year's Citrus County Veterans Ap-
preciation Commemorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme,
"Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan
Veterans," the pin is an outline of Citrus
County superimposed with the Iraq
Campaign and the Afghanistan
Campaign service medals.
Pins are available for a donation of $3
each and may be obtained by calling the
chap-ter at 352-344-3464 or John Sea-
man at 352-860-0123. Pins are also avail-
able at the Citrus County Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto.
During Veterans Appreciation Week
activities through Nov 17, the pins will
also be available at various functions
such as the Veterans Fair on Nov 8.

Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library, 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.

Office has help for PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department offers help for veterans
who have had their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied
within the past two years are asked to
contact the office to review the case
and discuss compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans who have been
diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have been denied are
encouraged to contact the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to dis-
cuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial letter and a
copy of your compensation examination


by Gainesville. You can get a copy of
your exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical records or from
the primary care window in Lecanto.
For more information about the Cit-
rus County Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

DAV helps vets go to clinics
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made before 1 p.m.

Transitioning vets get help
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans who
have re-cently transitioned from the
military (or returning reservist from
tours of active duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that veter-
ans and their spouses call to be placed
on a list for an upcoming seminar,
which will discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more
information about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Hospice assists veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering agency
with the Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique to each
military era or war It also provides
caregiver education and a recognition
program to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-527-4600.


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A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


VETERANS


A 45Qvs^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New in rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America


ADRIAN SAINZ
Associated Press

UNION CITY, Tenn. -The gleaming
white building with curved exteriors
and a spaceship-like tower emerges
from the flat landscape of West Ten-
nessee like something out of science fic-
tion, but it's not a villain's lair or
superhero's headquarters.
It's Discovery Park of America, a new
museum, education center and tourist
attraction opening Friday in Union City,
Tenn., a town of 11,000 located a few
hours' drive from Memphis, Nashville
and St. Louis.
With exhibits about natural and re-
gional history, dinosaurs, Native Ameri-
cans, energy, transportation, science,
the military and space flight, the mu-
seum can be described as a mini-Smith-
sonian Institution.
There's an earthquake simulator, a
120-foot glass-encased observation
tower and a 50-foot metal replica of the
human body that includes a 32-foot
slide.
The 50-acre complex also boasts an
old train depot, a century-old church
and flower gardens, plus enough land
for outdoor events and future
expansion.
Union City resident Robert Kirkland,
who built a fortune with a chain of
home decor stores and smart invest-
ments, shelled out $80 million to build
the museum, Kirkland plans to keep the
exhibits fresh and unique with a $3 mil-
lion annual investment.
Museum operators and local officials
are hoping Discovery Park will attract
visitors who live within a three-hour
drive and bolster the economy in a re-
gion of rural America hit hard by job
losses, floods, droughts and a tough
economy Tenn. Gov Bill Haslam says
the state plans to include Discovery
Park in tourism marketing efforts.
High hopes are pinned to the project,
but questions remain as to whether
Union City will be able to lure hotels,
restaurants and other tourism-related
businesses to make it a complete travel
experience.
"Northwest Tennessee needs a venue,"
said Discovery Park of America CEO Jim
Rippy "East Tennessee's got Dollywood.
Nashville's got the music, Memphis has
got the music. What we're trying to do is
develop an educational vacation, a place
for children and families."
Discovery Park of America is actually
built on a cornfield. It sits near Inter-
state 55, U.S. Highway 51 and the unfin-
ished Interstate 69 corridor
It's also near an old Goodyear tire
plant, which closed in July 2011, taking
1,800 jobs with it. The lost jobs hurt the
area's economy and residents' morale,
but the future may be getting brighter
Office chair maker 9to5 Seating recently
announced it's moving manufacturing
operations from China to Union City,
adding about 500 jobs.
Locals hope Discovery Park makes




fam
PARK
ph
Continued from Page A15 like
cam
narrow stretches through tall pines mo
to wide and deep with freshwater cam
springs along the way av
Another important trail that runs gro
through the park, the 1,000-mile cili
Florida National Scenic Trail, at- ele
tracts serious hikers, but there are nee
shorter paths close to the camp- we
ground that are also excellent for I


Associated Press
Dinosaur skeletons are posed in front of a large glass wall at Discovery Park of America, a new museum and educational venue,
in Union City, Tenn. Discovery Park, which sits on 50 acres in northwest Tennessee, was scheduled to open Friday.


the region more attractive to busi-
nesses.
"It is by far the most significant attrac-
tion ever developed in our area," said
West Tennessee resident Deborah Shaw
Laman, vice president of Brooks Shaw
& Son Old Country Store at the Casey
Jones Village in Jackson, Tenn.
When visitors arrive at Discovery
Park, they are greeted by a wide parking
lot and a sidewalks leading into the Dis-
covery Center Tickets cost under $15
pre-tax for single day passes for adults,
children and seniors. Two-day passes
are less than $20.
Once inside, visitors go down an ele-
vator or escalator to a brightly-lit, three-
level atrium. The escalator itself is a
learning experience; its mechanism is
encased in glass so visitors can see how
it works.
Dinosaur skeletons are set up in the
atrium room. There are exhibits with
Native American artifacts and a room
filled with classic and historic cars, in-
cluding a limousine owned by the early
20th-century comedian WC. Fields.
The military section showcases items
from the Civil War and the two World
Wars. A large hall has a Stearman PT-17
biplane suspended in the air, a tribute to
military pilots trained at an airfield.
Other exhibits have regional ties,
such as a 20,000-gallon aquarium featur-
ing living creatures from nearby
Reelfoot Lake.




nily outings, wildlife viewing and peratur(
otography made it
RV camping is big here, and you'll still so c
ely encounter every kind of come ba
nper, from retirees in mammoth quick es
tor coaches to families in pop-up For m
npers and tents. Cabins are also http://w\
ailable for rent, and the camp- Suwann
)und has shower and bathroom fa-
ties as well as water, sewer and Aman
ctric hookups- everything that's writer a.
eded for a comfortable week or full-time
ekend of camping, ture Cot
During my stay, the cooler tem- amanda


Visitors who toured Discovery Park
before its opening commented on the at-
tention to detail. Handwriting can still
be seen in soldiers' Civil War journals,
and concise descriptions accompany ex-
hibits of old record players and photo
equipment, like a Brownie Target Six-20
Box Camera.
One intriguing feature is a theater
that simulates the violent 1811-1812
New Madrid earthquakes, which re-
formed the region's topography
A children's section includes the
"Crawlers Cove" for infants and the
"Fantasy Forrest" for toddlers. There
are plans to have concerts and other
special events on the property
The idea for a commercial-tourism
project in Union City was born 10 years
ago, when Rippy was the area's eco-
nomic development chief. The plan
called for shopping centers, a racetrack
and water parks, but it never happened.
Enter Kirkland, who worked with
Rippy to develop the Discovery Park
concept. As time passed, the plans be-
came more ambitious and expensive.
"This is one of those things that made
me feel like I had a ball of molasses that I
couldn't get unstuck from," Kirkland
joked. "It started out much lower (in
cost)."
For Kirkland, Discovery Park is, first
and foremost, an educational venue.
Any tourist dollars are a welcomed
bonus, he said.


es and Georgia-woods feel
was easy to forget I was
lose to home. I'll definitely
ck the next time I need a
cape.
ore information, visit
vw.floridastateparks.org/
eeRiver/
da Mims is a freelance
nd photographer, RVer and
e traveler based on the Na-
ast. She can be reached at
.mims@gmail. corn.


Have you been on vacation?
We want to hear about it. Contact Features Editor Logan Mosby at lmosby@chronicleonline.com to share your vacation stories.


"Surely, if they can get a few folks
going down south and get them to see an
alligator farm in Florida, we can get
them to see" Discovery Park, Kirkland
said.
With the museum ready to open, at-
tention has turned to luring more hotels
and restaurants. Right now, Union City
has a few run-of-the-mill hotels and
some fast food and chain restaurants.
"We still have a lot of work to do. We
need hotels," said Lindsay Frilling, a
member of the Obion County Joint Eco-
nomic Development Council. "We need
our community to really ramp up their
customer service skills and welcome peo-
ple to make them want to come back"
Rippy wants to invite school children
on field trips, travelers on bus tours and
companies with their business meetings
- anyone who can generate word-of-
mouth advertising. Research firm
Younger and Associates has projected
Discovery Park can expect around
150,000 visitors a year

If you go:
DISCOVERY PARK OF AMERICA:
830 Everett Blvd., Union City, Tenn.,
http://www.discoveryparkofamerica.com/
or 877-885-5455. Adults, $13.95 (two-day
pass, $19.95); children 4-12, $10.95 (ages 3 and
under free). From Memphis, about 115 miles
from Nashville, about 185 miles from St.
Louis.


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 A21


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eagles help vet


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


Special to the Chronicle
Roger Langley, right, past president of Citrus Eagles Aerie 3993 of Inverness,
presents a $500 check to Jim Carlisle. Carlisle is a World War II veteran who
previously lost his left leg and recently also lost his right leg. "The Eagles motto is
helping people," Langley said. "And it is a distinct pleasure to be able to help any
veteran, but especially a veteran of World War II."


VETERANS NOTES


Reserve for Trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, retired, will
lead the 2014 trip to Hawaii for veterans
and their families and friends from
Feb. 25 to March 14. Signups are being
taken for the annual trek, which in-
cludes visits to several islands, some
golfing and a special visit to the USS
Arizona Memorial and The National
Cemetery of the Pacific.
For more information, call McLean at
352-637-5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrr.com.

Memorial honors vets
Purple Heart recipients are sought to
be honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.

Assist USGAAuxiliary
Ex-military and retired military per-
sonnel are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and non-law
enforcement programs such as public
education, vessel safety checks, safety
patrols search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental protection.


Robert W. Baran
Army Spec. Robert W.
Baran has graduated from
basic infantry training at Fort
Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier received
training in drill and cere-
monies, weapons, map read-
ing, tactics, military courtesy,
military justice, physical fit-
ness, first aid and Army his-
tory, core values and


Wear the Auxiliary uniform with
pride and your military ribbons. Crimi-
nal back-ground check and membership
are required. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.

Air Force still wants you
The U.S. Air Force is looking for prior
enlisted men and women from all serv-
ices interested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously obtained career
fields or retraining into select career
fields.
Some of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other spe-
cialties. Enlisted career openings that
include the opportunities to retrain con-
sist of special operations positions and
unmanned aerial vehicle. Assignment
locations are based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is
associated with the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets. She teaches
free classes to combat veterans at
several locations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.


IN SERVICE

traditions. Additional training
included development of
basic combat skills and battle-
field operations and tactics,
and experiencing use of vari-
ous weapons and weapons
defenses available to the
infantry crewman.
Baran is the son of Made-
line Baran of Citrus Springs
and grandson of John Grillo of
Ocala.
He is a 2008 graduate of
Citrus High School, Inver-


ness. He earned a bachelor's
degree in 2012 from the Uni-
versity of South Florida,
Tampa.


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
com, or visit www.fl Post
155.org.
American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Call 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Loedge No. 378 A&FM,
5030 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Call Com-
mander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno
VFW Post 4864,10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Aux-
iliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State


Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus
Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil
at 352-726-0834 or Presi-
dent Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-
489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at
9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando.
Call Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-
1959. Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.


Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detach-
ment 1139 meets at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087
on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault
at 352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associ-
ation, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Mer-
chant Marine Veterans of
World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meeting dates are: Nov. 9
and Dec.14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Independ-
ence, off U.S. 41 north. Ap-
pointments are encouraged
by calling 352-400-8952.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. 2071 N. Lecanto High-
way, Lecanto. Call Charles
Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.
lawrence@servicesource.org.


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SPORTS


No. 4 Ohio
State deals
Purdue its
most lopsided
defeat in the
long series./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I NBA, NHL/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
Sports briefs/B3, B6
l College football/B4
0 NFL/B5
--" Baseball/B6


Florida's first-half blues


Associated Press
Georgia safety Josh Harvey-dlemons brings down Florida's Marcus
Roberson during a punt return in the second half Saturday in
Jacksonville. Georgia won the game 23-20.


Gators rally but can't overcome

big early hole in loss to Georgia


Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE Todd
Gurley scored twice in his first
game in more than a month,
helping Georgia beat rival
Florida 23-20 on Saturday
Gurley returned from an
ankle injury and totaled 187
yards, finding the end zone on a
5-yard run and a 73-yard recep-
tion. The Bulldogs scored on
their first four possessions, tak-
ing a 20-0 lead that looked like
it would be enough against one
of the Southeastern Confer-
ence's most anemic offenses.
But the Gators rallied, taking


advantage of a fumble, a safety
and some questionable play
calls to seize momentum in
weird, wacky and chippy game.
Florida cut it to 23-20 early in
the fourth, putting Georgia on its
heels after a failed fourth-down
run followed by a huge defen-
sive penalty But the Gators fal-
tered down the stretch.
Georgia (5-3, 4-2 SEC) won its
third in a row in the series, the
program's first three-game win-
ning streak against Florida
since 1989. This one kept the
Bulldogs in contention in the


Page B2


Busi ness handled


Associated Press
Florida State running back James Wilder Jr. celebrates after scoring a touchdown against Miami during the second quarter
Saturday in Tallahassee. At right is offensive linesman Cameron Erving. The No. 3 Seminoles defeated the No. 7 Hurricanes 41-14.
Florida State running back Devonta Freeman runs toward Miami defensive back Ladarius Gunter during the third quarter Saturday.


No. 3 Florida St. routs No. 7Miami, 41-14


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Jameis Winston
threw for 325 yards and No. 3 Florida
State rolled to a 41-14 victory against No.
7 Miami in another matchup of unde-
feated Atlantic Coast Conference rivals
that turned into a Seminoles' blowout.
Winston threw two interceptions in the
first half after throwing four in the first
seven games, but the Florida State defense
shut out the Hurricanes (7-1,3-1) in the sec-
ond half after it was 21-14 at the break
The Seminoles (8-0, 6-0) went on a 20-0
run after a skirmish broke out midway
through the third quarter The two teams
were called for offsetting personal fouls
and James Wilder Jr scored on a 5-yard
run on the next play The rout was on from
that point, not much different from Florida
State's 51-14 win at Clemson last month.


The Seminoles have handily defeated
all three Top 25 teams they played this
season. Their national championship
hopes are alive and well with Florida
being the last real challenge in the regu-
lar season.
'Just like baseball, sometimes you go out
there and strike out," Winston said. "Then
you've got to come back and bounce back"
Wilder scored on a 5-yard touchdown
run and the Seminoles were energized.
Miami's night was all but over at that point
Freeman ran for 81 yards and two
touchdowns against his hometown team
while Miami running back Duke John-
son posted 97 yards on 23 carries, before
leaving with a leg injury
Winston threw one touchdown and
Miami quarterback Stephen Morris
threw for 192 yards with two touchdowns
and two interceptions.


Lecanto


boys


move on


to state

JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
ORLANDO Last season,
the Lecanto Panther boys cross
country team was unable to ad-
vance out of their district, fin-
ishing one place out of
advancing.
In 2013, the Panthers came
back with a vengeance, winning
several regular-season meets
and earning a District 3A-7 run-
ner-up trophy on Oct. 24.
After placing sixth at Satur-
day's Region 3A-2 meet at Lake
Nona High School in Orlando,
Lecanto finds itself advancing to
the state meet for the first time
as a team in nearly a decade.
Lecanto scored 154 points for
the final state qualifying place.
Land O'Lakes took first with 66
points, followed by Sebring (134),
host Lake Nona (135), Gainesville
(141) and Matanzas (142).
Junior Sam Alford led the
Panthers with his 13th-place
finish in a 3.1-mile time of 16:49.
Michael Lindsey (19th, 17:06),


Page B4


CR's

Harris

advances

Pirates runner

comes in fourth

at regional meet
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Crystal
River senior runner Brandon
Harris didn't have James Hark-
less breathing down his neck
Saturday morning.
Instead, three Winter Park
Trinity Prep runners finished
just ahead of him at the Region
2A-2 cross country meet at Na-
ture Coast Tech High School.
Harris took fourth in the boys'
race with a 16:28.
Unfortunately, his team was
eighth with 246 points and did-
n't qualify for the state meet
Nov 9 in Tallahassee.
Scott Millson won the race
with a time of 16:18. Jesse Mill-
son was second with a 16:20 on
the rainy morning.
Harkless, of Nature Coast
was seventh with a time of
16:41. Harris upset Harkless by
one second the previous week
to earn the district title.
The top six teams and the top
15 individuals qualified for the
state meet.
Harris qualified for the state
meet as an individual.
"Pretty good (time)," said
Harris. "I would have liked to
have done better but it's not
See Page B4


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triin hard 76ers out to

Striking hard suprising3-0 start


Philly nips

Chicago

107-104


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Victor Hedman controls the puck in front of St. Louis Blues center T.J. Oshie
during the first period Saturday in Tampa.

Lightning double up Blues to take 4-2 home triumph


Associated Press

TAMPA Brett Connolly and
Valtteri Filppula scored in the
third period, lifting the Tampa Bay
Lightning to a 4-2 win over the St.
Louis Blues on Saturday night.
Connolly, playing in his second
game since being recalled from
Syracuse of the AHL, put Tampa
Bay ahead 3-2 when he redirected
Radko Gudas' shot at 8:37 of the
third. Filppula made it 4-2 with
3:59 remaining.
Alex Killorn had a goal and two
assists and Steven Stamkos also
scored for the Lightning, who have
won all five games this season
against Western Conference teams.
St. Louis got goals from Alex
Pietrangelo and Jaden Schwartz.
Stamkos scored his llth goal of
the season to give Tampa Bay a 2-1
lead 1:43 into the second during a
2-on-1. The center, who has a goal
in four consecutive games, briefly
dragged the puck before putting an
in-close shot past Jaroslav Halak.
Schwartz got St. Louis even at
2-2 from the slot 2:02 after
Stamkos' goal.
Islanders 3, Bruins 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y. -John Tavares,
Andrew MacDonald and Thomas
Vanek scored second-period goals, and
Kevin Poulin made 26 saves for his first
win of the season as the New York Is-
landers beat the Boston Bruins 3-1.
Tavares knocked a loose puck past
Bruins backup goalie Chad Johnson at
6:15 of the second for his sixth goal of
the season. The assist went to his new
left wing Vanek, who was acquired
from Buffalo last week.
After MacDonald scored his first of the
season at 13:13 to make it 2-0, and
Boston's Dougie Hamilton answered two
minutes later, Vanek scored his first with
the Islanders one-timing a perfect
cross-ice pass from Kyle Okposo past
Johnson from the left circle at 16:08.
Okposo and defenseman Travis Ha-
monic assisted on MacDonald and
Vanek's goals.
Vanek's goal was the 255th of his
NHL career and his 500th point. The
29-year-old winger also assisted on
Tavares' goal.
Rangers 5, Hurricanes 1
NEW YORK Derek Stepan scored
his first three goals of the season, and
Carl Hagelin added his first two as the
New York Rangers' had their best of-
fensive output of the season in a 5-1
win over the Carolina Hurricanes.
Henrik Lundqvist made 27 saves
and grabbed first star honors for New
York (6-7), which is on a season-high,
three-game winning streak.


Hagelin scored the Rangers' first two
goals of the game, and Stepan netted
the final three.
Andrej Sekera scored a power-play
goal with 37 seconds left in the second
period to provide the only offense for
the Hurricanes. Justin Peters made 33
saves in the loss and fell to 0-5.
Ducks 6, Sabres 3
BUFFALO, N.Y. Emerson Etem
and Corey Perry both scored two goals
to lift the Anaheim Ducks over the reel-
ing Buffalo Sabres 6-3.
Ryan Getzlaf scored and added a
pair of assists for the Ducks (11-3-1),
who recorded five straight goals after
Buffalo struck first. Sami Vatanen also
scored for Anaheim.
Cody Hodgson, Tyler Myers and Hen-
rik Tallinder scored for Buffalo, but the
Sabres (2-13-1) continued their worst
start in franchise history. The Sabres
have lost their first nine home games,
their longest stretch to open a season.
With the game tied 1-1 late in the
second period, Anaheim scored two
goals in 34 seconds. Vatanen took ad-
vantage of Matt Moulson's slow
backcheck and fired a shot past goalie
Jhonas Enroth from just inside the blue
line. Moments later, Etem lifted a re-
bound opportunity past Enroth for his
first of the night.
Penguins 3,
Blue Jackets 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio Deryk Engel-
land, Chris Kunitz and Jussi Jokinen
scored and backup Jeff Zatkoff had 19
saves in his first NHL win to lead the
Pittsburgh Penguins past the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets 3-0 for their fourth
victory in a row.
Zatkoff, 0-2 with a 5.06 goals-against
average and a .818 save percentage
coming in, made several big stops but
wasn't very busy. He's backing up
Marc-Andre Fleury while Tomas Vok-
oun recovers from preseason surgery.
Engelland scored on a rapid-fire
one-timer and Kunitz picked up his
eighth when a shot went in off a Blue
Jacket's stick in the third. Jokinen
added an empty-netter.
A crowd of 18,634, including thou-
sands of Penguins fans, cheered wildly
when it was announced that Columbus
will host the 2015 NHLAII-Star weekend.
Blackhawks 5, Jets 1
WINNIPEG, Manitoba Brandon
Bollig, Patrick Sharp and Nick Leddy
scored within a 4:55 span in the sec-
ond period to lead Chicago to a 5-1
victory over the Winnipeg Jets that ex-
tended the Blackhawks' winning streak
to three games.
Goalie Corey Crawford stopped 26


shots to pick up his eighth win of the
season and Chicago also got goals from
Niklas Hjalmarsson and Ben Smith.
Marcus Kruger had a pair of assists,
and Leddy and Bollig also picked up an
assist each for the Blackhawks, who
are 4-1-1 on the road.
Flyers 1, Devils 0
NEWARK, N.J. -After being em-
barrassed by Washington at home just
24 hours earlier, the Philadelphia Fly-
ers found a way to gut out a win on the
road, edging the New Jersey Devils
1-0 on Saturday.
Brayden Schenn deflected an An-
drej Meszaros shot past New Jersey's
Martin Brodeur in the first period and
goaltender Ray Emery made 14
saves, as last-place Philadelphia per-
haps authored its most complete effort
of the season.
The fight-filled 7-0 loss to the Capi-
tals may have just sparked a lifeless
team, as Philadelphia peppered
Brodeur, starting his season-high third
consecutive game, and dominated
long stretches of play. Brodeur finished
with 20 saves.
Capitals 3,
Panthers 2, SO
WASHINGTON, D.C. Nicklas
Backstrom scored in the first period and
added the winning goal in the shootout
to lift the Washington Capitals to a 3-2
victory over the Florida Panthers.
The Capitals won their second game
in a row without Alex Ovechkin, who is
out with an upper-body injury.
Tomas Fleishmann tied the game for
Florida on a power-play goal with 2:38
left in the third.
The Capitals also got shootout tal-
lies from Mikhail Grabovski and
Brooks Laich.
Ovechkin had 10 goals in 12 games
before he was hurt in the first period
Monday at Vancouver. Since then, the
Capitals have outscored opponents 9-2
and reached .500 (7-7).
Canucks 4,
Maple Leafs 0
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -
Roberto Luongo made 21 saves for his
second shutout of the season, leading
the Vancouver Canucks to a 4-0 victory
over the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Daniel Sedin, Zack Kassian, Chris
Higgins and Dan Hamhuis scored for
the Canucks, who rebounded from a
disappointing loss to Detroit on
Wednesday.
Henrik Sedin, who along with his
brother signed a four-year contract ex-
tension on Friday, picked up an assist
on Daniel's first-period goal to extend
his point streak to 11 games (three
goals, 10 assists).


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Rookie Michael Carter-
Williams had 26 points and
10 assists and Spencer
Hawes added 18 points and
11 rebounds as the
Philadelphia 76ers contin-
ued their stunning start to
the season, beating the
Chicago Bulls 107-104 on
Saturday night.
Pegged to be one of the
league's worst teams, the
Sixers (3-0) have opened the
season with wins over
Chicago, Washington and
two-time defending cham-
pion Miami.
Carlos Boozer led the
Bulls with 22 points and 10
rebounds and Luol Deng
had 20 points.
Still dealing with neck
soreness, Derrick Rose fin-
ished with 13 points and six
assists for Chicago.
After trailing by as many
as 18 points in the second
half, the Sixers took a 100-
99 lead with 3:29 left when
Carter-Williams picked up a
loose ball and calmly laid it
in. It was the Sixers' first
lead since 11-10.
Pacers 89,
Cavaliers 74
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George and Lance Stephen-
son combined for 43 points
and the Indiana Pacers re-
mained unbeaten in the young
season with an 89-74 victory
over the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Stephenson scored 22
points, including 10 in a 14-4
run midway through the fourth
quarter that gave the Pacers a
79-61 lead with 7:46 to play.
George, who had 21 points
and 13 rebounds, and scored
all the points in a key third-
quarter run for Indiana (3-0).
Dion Waiters scored 17
points, Kyrie Irving had 15 and
Anderson Varejao 14 for Cleve-
land (1-2), which dropped both
ends of a two-night road trip
after beginning the season with
a homecourt win.
Stephenson began the final
surge by hitting a 3-pointer
from the left side, scored on a
layup, drove the lane, then fin-
ished the run by knocking down
a 28-footer from the left side.
Pelicans 105,
Bobcats 84
NEW ORLEANS -Anthony
Davis had 25 points, eight re-
bounds and five assists to lead


New Orleans to a 105-84 vic-
tory over the Charlotte Bob-
cats, its first win changing its
nickname to Pelicans.
Tyreke Evans added 15
points, Jrue Holiday had 14
and Brian Roberts 13 for New
Orleans (1-2), which made the
name change from Hornets in
the offseason.
Ramon Sessions had 22
points and Kemba Walker
added 14 for Charlotte (1-2).
The Pelicans set a franchise
record with 18 blocked shots,
including a career high six by
Davis. Jason Smith tied a ca-
reer high with five blocks.
Mavericks 111,
Grizzlies 99
DALLAS Dirk Nowitzki
scored 24 points to lead the
Dallas Mavericks' balanced of-
fense in a 111-99 victory over
the Memphis Grizzlies.
Shawn Marion had a double-
double of 21 points and 14 re-
bounds for Dallas, while Monta
Ellis had 18 points. Jose
Calderon broke out of a shooting
slump with 15 points, Samuel
Dalembert didn't miss a shot in
scoring 14 and Vince Carter
added 11 in a reserve role.
Zach Randolph had 21
points and 14 rebounds for
Memphis.
Calderon had made just 1 of
15 shots from the field in the
first two games. Last season's
NBA leader in 3-point percent-
age had been 1 for 8 from be-
yond the arc before going 3 for
7 on Saturday.
Dallas missed its first seven
shots before Nowitzki banked in
a 3-pointer 2:20 into the game.
The Mavericks went on a 13-0
run over 2 1/2 minutes to take a
16-6 lead they never lost.
Raptors 97,
Bucks 90
MILWAUKEE Rudy Gay
had 18 points and 15rebounds,
DeMar DeRozen added 17
points, and the Toronto Rap-
tors spoiled the Milwaukee
Bucks' home opener with a
97-90 victory.
After losing a 12-point
lead, DeRozen helped
Toronto hold on down the
stretch. His step-back jumper
put the Raptors back up
89-85 with 4 minutes left.
Then after missing two
free throws, DeRozen was
fouled again after corralling
the rebound, making both
this time with 2:09 left for a
five-point lead.
O.J. Mayo had 16 points off
the bench for the Bucks, in-
cluding a 3 that tied the game
at 85 with 5:53 left.
The Raptors controlled the
paint early and outrebounded
the Bucks 60-38.


Associated Press
Chicago Bulls guard Kirk Hinrich drives against Philadelphia
76ers center Lavoy Allen in the first half Saturday in
Philadelphia. The 76ers downed the Bulls 107-104.


BLUES
Continued from Page BI

Eastern Division.
The Gators (4-4, 3-3)
have their second three-
game losing streak in
coach Will Muschamp's
three years, raising specu-
lation about his future in
Gainesville.
Muschamp fell to 0-7 in
the series. He was 0-4 as a
Georgia player between
1991 and 1994 and now
he's 0-3 as Florida. Possi-
bly making things worse
for Muschamp, he was
seen screaming back at a
fan as he left the field.
Georgia players and
coaches were celebrating
all around something
they've rarely been able to
do in this series. Florida
won 18 of 21 meetings be-
fore the Bulldogs started


their current streak.
This had significantly
less at stake than many of
those, with both unranked
teams entering the game
riding multigame losing
streaks. It was the first
time that had happened
since 1926.
Georgia, though, looked
nothing like the same team
that lost consecutive
games to Missouri and
Vanderbilt. The Bulldogs
scored on the game's open-
ing possession and then
shocked Florida when
Aaron Murray found Gur-
ley over the middle for a
73-yard catch and run. The
Bulldogs piled on from
there, making it 23-3 with a
32-yard field goal just be-
fore halftime.
Florida looked down
and out.
But Georgia helped the
Gators get back in it.
Arthur Lynch dropped


what he thought was a
screen pass near the side-
line. Officials ruled it a
lateral and a fumble.
Lynch didn't realize the
call and left the ball on
the ground. Florida's
Leon Orr scooped it up
and returned it to the 13-
yard line. Mack Brown
scored two plays later, cut-
ting Georgia's lead to
23-10.
Loucheiz Purifoy sacked
Murray in the end zone
two series later, making it
23-12. Tyler Murphy, play-
ing with a sprained right
throwing shoulder, had
two long runs on the ensu-
ing drive, the second one a
14-yard TD scamper Mur-
phy hooked up with Clay
Burton for the 2-point con-
version and it was a dif-
ferent game.
Georgia tried to reclaim
the momentum, but Gurley
failed to move the chains


on a fourth-and-1 play
Florida did little on the
next series, but Georgia
gifted the Gators more life
by having 12 men on the
field on a fourth-and-2
play
Nonetheless, Florida
floundered as it has in re-
cent weeks. Not only did
linebacker Neiron Ball re-
move his helmet on the
stop, drawing a 15-yard
penalty, but the offense
stumbled as usual.
Equally troubling for the
Gators were two missed
field goals.
Murray completed 16 of
25 passes for 258 yards and
a touchdown for Georgia.
Gurley had 100 yards rush-
ing and 87 receiving.
Murphy was 13-of-29
passing for 174 yards, and
was sacked four times.
Kelvin Taylor, making his
first career start, ran 20
times for 76 yards.


Associated Press
UF's Kelvin Taylor runs for yardage against Georgia
during the first half Saturday in Jacksonville.


B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Citrus 29, Lake Weir 0
Citrus 14 15 0 0 29
LakeWeir 0 0 0 0 0
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
C James Pouncey 17 run (run failed)
C Kevian Clark 1 run (James Pouncey run)
Second Quarter
C Nile Waters 25 run (Deion Moore run)
C Steven Knowles 14 interception return (Jason
Marsden kick)
Individual Leaders
Passing Citrus: Deion Moore 4-12-1-125; Lake
Weir: Raeqwon Munnerlyn 10-25-2-103, Tyler Rot-
stein 2-6-2-19.
Rushing Citrus: Kevian Clark 11-87, 1 TD, Tyrick
Washington 9-60, James Pouncey 8-56, 1 TD; Lake
Weir: Otis Vernon 6-26.
Receiving Citrus: Gabe Wilcox 1-52, Desmond
Franklin 1-40; Lake Weir: Colton Ambrose 4-1,
Jernie Etienne 2-36, Josue St. Fleur 2-28.
Suwannee 27,
Crystal River 7
CR 7 0 0 0 7
SHS 10 7 3 7 27
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CR T. Reynolds 80-yd reception (kick good)
SH D. Washington 6-yard run (kick good)
SH -T Ross 24-yard field goal
Second Quarter
SH -A. McAllister 88-yard interception return (kick
good)
Third Quarter
SH -T Ross 35-yard field goal
Fourth Quarter
SH E. Walker blocked punt (kick good)
Individual Leaders
Rushing -SH: D.Washington 19-74-1.
Passing-CR: C. Ryan 10-21-158-1-1; SH: R.Vick-
ers 3-7-30-0-2.
Receiving CR: T Reynolds 1-80-1; SH: D. Strick-
land 2-7.
Dunnellon 35,
Lecanto 14
DHS 2 20 7 6 35
LHS 0 0 7 7 14
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
DHS -Safety,7:15
Second Quarter
DHS- D. Sims 1 run (Z. West kick), 6:13
DHS- M. Livermoore 38 pass from Z. McKee (kick
failed), 2:56
DHS C. Brattin 10 pass from McKee (West kick),
0:42
Third Quarter
LHS J. Lucas 46 pass from T. McGee (C. Casey
kick), 8:27
DHS -Sims 10 run (West kick)
Fourth Quarter
DHS J. Williams 2 run (kick blocked), 10:44
LHS Lucas 44 pass from McGee (Casey kick),
10:25
Individual Leaders
Rushing -DHS: Sims 35-240-2; Williams 20-132-1.
LHS: D.Anderson 4-27-0; J. Nightengale 4-18-0.
Passing DHS: McKee 6-8-0-80. LHS: McGee 6-
15-1-130.
Receiving- DHS: Livermoore 1-38-1; L. Thomas 2-
21-0. LHS: Lucas 3-125-2.
Interceptions DHS: Z. Hujurat; Thomas.
Punt Blocks DHS: W. Burgess.
Penalties -DHS: 5-40. LHS: 6-46.




NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA


Tampa Bay
Toronto
Detroit
Boston
Montreal
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsburgh
N.Y Islanders
Washington
N.Y Rangers
Carolina
Columbus
New Jersey
Philadelphia


14 10 4 0 20 47
15 10 5 0 20 48
14 8 4 2 18 33
13 8 5 0 16 36
14 8 6 0 16 40
13 4 6 3 11 39
14 38 3 928
16 213 1 5 26
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38 18
Chicago 14 9 2 3 21 50 39
St. Louis 12 8 2 2 18 44 29
Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34 34
Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27 37
Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33 39
Winnipeg 15 5 8 2 12 35 45
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 15 11 3 1 23 50 39
San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24
Vancouver 16 10 5 1 21 46 41
Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48 44
LosAngeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36
Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39 47
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Washington 7, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2
Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 0
St. Louis 4, Florida 0
Minnesota 4, Montreal 3
Colorado 3, Dallas 2, OT
Detroit 4, Calgary 3
Saturday's Games
Washington 3, Florida 2, SO
Chicago 5, Winnipeg 1
Anaheim 6, Buffalo 3
Tampa Bay 4, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 1, New Jersey 0
N.Y Islanders 3, Boston 1
N.Y Rangers 5, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 3, Columbus 0
Vancouver 4, Toronto 0
Montreal at Colorado, late
Detroit at Edmonton, late
Nashville at Los Angeles, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Dallas at Ottawa, 1 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Anaheim at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.




Sprint Cup

AAA Texas 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 196.114.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 196.1.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 195.943.
4. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.837.
5. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.78.
6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.518.
7. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 195.312.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 B3


For fthl reco-rd



F= lorid LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
13 23 24 27 40
POWER BALL
17


CASH 3 (early)
7-7-7
CASH 3 (late)
9-4-7
PLAY 4 (early)
2-8-3-0
PLAY 4 (late)
8-7-5-1

FANTASY 5
10 18 22 31 32

LOTTERY
2-11-13-20-27-28
XTRA


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 4 13 31 -42
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $2,417.50
3-of-4 MB 39 $948.50
3-of-4 913 $121.00
2-of-4 MB 1,192 $65.00
1-of-4 MB 10,794 $7.50
2-of-4 29,365 $4.00


Fantasy 5:1 9 10 -29 -35
5-of-5 2 winners $115,151.82
4-of-5 309 $120.00
3-of-5 9,895 $10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
12 p.m. (FS1) Whelen Modified Tour: Thompson (Taped)
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road Reno (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500 race.
3 p.m. (FS1) Late Model Dirt: Knoxville Nationals (Taped)
4 p.m. (FS1) Late Model Dirt: Dixie Speedway (Taped)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500 race (Same-day Tape)
BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Brooklyn Nets at Orlando Magic
6 p.m. (SUN) Washington Wizards at Miami Heat
7 p.m. (NBA) Phoenix Suns at Oklahoma City Thunder
BICYCLING
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Saitama Criterium (Taped)
FOOTBALL
6 a.m. (FSNFL) Rice at North Texas (Taped)
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida vs. Georgia in Jacksonville (Taped)
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Iowa State at Kansas State (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Miami at Florida State (Taped)
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Tennessee at Missouri (Taped)
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Michigan at Michigan State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) San Diego Chargers at Washington Redskins
4 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Seattle Seahawks
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Pittsburgh Steelers at New England Patriots
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Indianapolis Colts at Houston Texans
GOLF
4:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Charles Schwab Cup
Championship, Final Round
RODEO
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
1:30 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Cup of China (Taped)
SOCCER
8 a.m. (CNBC) English Premier League: Everton vs. Tottenham
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Cardiff City vs.
Swansea City
3:30 p.m. (NBC) MLS: Eastern Conference Semifinal, Leg 1 New
York Red Bulls at Houston Dynamo
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: California at Washington
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Western Conference Semifinal, Leg 1 Real
Salt Lake at Los Angeles Galaxy
TENNIS
9 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP BNP Paribas Masters final
11:30 a.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup: Final Russia vs. Italy,
Rubber 3 (Same-day Tape)
1:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup: Final Russia vs. Italy, Rubber
4 (Same-day Tape)
3:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup: Final Russia vs. Italy, Rubber
5 (Same-day Tape)
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Running ING New York City Marathon
VOLLEYBALL
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: Florida at Texas A&M

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.171.
9.(17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 195.129.
10. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 195.03.
11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.665.
12. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.517.
13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 194.384.
14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.377.
15. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 194.161.
16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 193.805.
17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.659.
18.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 193.618.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.604.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 193.403.
21. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 193.334.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 193.126.
23. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 193.043.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.933.
25. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 192.905.
26. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 192.802.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.651.
28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 192.048.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.891.
30. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.829.
31. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.421.
32. (21)TrevorBayne, Ford, 191.347.
33. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 190.53.
34. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 189.88.
35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.321.
36. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 189.235.
37. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
40. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.

Nationwide

O'Reilly Auto Parts
Challenge Results
Saturday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles


(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200 laps, 147.1 rating,
0 points, $69,615.
2. (18) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 118.6, 0,
$54,350.
3. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 113.2, 42,
$44,450.
4. (13) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 124.6,0, $31,550.
5. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 104.2, 40,
$37,525.
6. (8) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 98, 38, $27,925.
7. (19) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 97, 37, $26,210.
8. (9) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 108.9, 36,
$25,150.
9. (16) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 99.5, 35,
$25,025.
10. (11) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 83.6, 34,
$24,075.
11. (4) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 87.5, 33, $22,300.
12. (10) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 90.6, 0, $21,750.
13. (14) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 84, 31,
$21,225.
14. (21) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 76.7, 30,
$20,800.
15. (17) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 76.6, 29,
$21,550.
16. (23) Kevin Swindell, Ford, 200, 67.9, 28,
$20,450.
17. (7) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 199, 79.2, 0,
$15,525.
18. (1)Alex Bowman, Toyota, 199, 78.5, 27, $23,600.
19. (15) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 199, 70.9, 25,
$20,075.
20. (12) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 198, 65.6, 24, $20,625.
21. (25) David Starr, Chevrolet, 198, 61.4, 0,
$19,825.
22. (26) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 198,62.6, 22,
$19,700.
23. (20) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 198, 60.1, 21, $19,550.
24. (27) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 197, 53.4, 20,
$19,425.
25. (30) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 197, 51, 19,
$19,750.
26. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 196, 91.7, 0, $13,150.
27. (34) Jeff Green, Toyota, 196, 45.7, 17, $19,025.
28. (38) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 195, 43,


I S O R S B IES-


Johnson wastes a
chance at HSBC
SHANGHAI Dustin Johnson
had a chance to run away from the
field Saturday in the HSBC Cham-
pions. But he made two double
bogeys in his 6-under 66 and saw
his lead cut in half to three shots
going into the final round of this
World Golf Championship.
Johnson ran off five straight
birdies on the front nine, and then
four straight birdies on the back
nine to lead by six shots over lan
Poulter.
Poulter made a birdie on the
18th for a 63, and Johnson hit his
drive into the water on the closing
hole for his second double bogey.
Johnson was at 18-under 198,
three clear of Poulter. Graeme
McDowell had a 64 and was four
shots behind.
Martin Kaymer set the course
record with a 62.

Couples leads
Charles Schwab
SAN FRANCISCO Fred
Couples extended his lead to five
strokes Saturday after the third
round of the Champions Tour's
season-ending Charles Schwab
Cup Championship.
Winless this season, Couples
shot a 3-under 68 to reach 15-
under 198 atTPC Harding Park.
Mark O'Meara was second after


16, $18,900.
29. (35) Bryan Silas, Ford, 194, 40, 0, $18,825.
30. (37) Joey Gase, Toyota, 190, 33, 14, $13,075.
31. (39)Travis Pastrana, Ford, accident, 175, 52.5,
13, $18,725.
32. (36)TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, 170, 34.8, 12, $18,680.
33. (28) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 166, 47.4,
11, $18,635.
34. (31) Carl Long, Dodge, electrical, 105, 35.3, 10,
$18,590.
35. (29) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, vibration, 87, 36.4, 9,
$18,522.
36. (33) Blake Koch, Toyota, handling, 79, 29.9, 8,
$11,650.
37. (22) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, clutch, 49, 44.5,
7, $17,615.
38. (32) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 6, 33.4, 6,
$11,561.
39. (40) Dexter Stacey, Ford, suspension, 5,30.8,5,
$11,445.
40. (24) Michael McDowell, Toyota, vibration, 4,28.1,
0, $11,405.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 144.520 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 4 minutes, 33 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.980 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 19 laps.
Lead Changes: 15 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Bowman 1-3; S.Hornish Jr. 4-5;
B.Keselowski 6-52; A.Dillon 53-54; B.Keselowski 55-
80; D.Hamlin 81-94; M.Kenseth 95-111; D.Hamlin
112-130; M.Kenseth 131-155; B.Keselowski 156-
170; D.Hamlin 171-176; B.Keselowski 177-178;
D.Hamlin 179-182; B.Keselowski 183; D.Hamlin 184-
185; B.Keselowski 186-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
B.Keselowski, 6 times for 106 laps; D.Hamlin, 5
times for 45 laps; M.Kenseth, 2 times for 42 laps;
A.Bowman, 1 time for 3 laps; S.Hornish Jr, 1 time for
2 laps; A.Dillon, 1 time for 2 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. A.Dillon, 1,107; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
1,101; 3. R.Smith, 1,053; 4. E.Sadler, 1,026; 5. J.AII-
gaier, 1,022; 6. B.Scott, 1,010; 7.TBayne, 1,009; 8.
B.Vickers, 970; 9. K.Larson, 945; 10. RKligerman,
924.




College football scores
EAST
Boston College 34, Virginia Tech 27
Brown 27, Penn 0
Bucknell 28, Colgate 7
CCSU 52, Wagner 17
Duquesne 21, St. Francis (Pa.) 10
Fordham 32, Holy Cross 30
Harvard 24, Dartmouth 21
Lafayette 45, Georgetown 27
Maine 19, Stony Brook 14
Marist 42, Jacksonville 35
N. Illinois 63, UMass 19
Penn St. 24, Illinois 17, OT
Princeton 53, Cornell 20
Robert Morris 24, Bryant 3
Rutgers 23, Temple 20
Sacred Heart 24, Monmouth (NJ) 21
Syracuse 13, Wake Forest 0
Yale 53, Columbia 12
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 19, Alcorn St. 18
Bethune-Cookman 38, NC Central 14
Campbell 19, Stetson 18
Charleston Southern 27, Presbyterian 16
Chattanooga 35, Appalachian St. 28
Clemson 59, Virginia 10
Coastal Carolina 50, Charlotte 25
Delaware St. 22, Howard 20
E. Kentucky 44, Tennessee St. 0
East Carolina 34, FlU 13
FAU 34, Tulane 17
Florida A&M 16, Norfolk St. 6
Furman 16, Georgia Southern 14
Gardner-Webb 51, Warner 14
Georgia 23, Florida 20
Georgia Tech 21, Pittsburgh 10
Grambling St. 47, MVSU 40
Jacksonville St. 42, Austin Peay 10
James Madison 31, Villanova 21
Liberty 17, VMI 7
Louisiana-Lafayette 49, New Mexico St. 35
Marshall 61, Southern Miss. 13
Mercer 51, Davidson 26
Middle Tennessee 24, UAB 21
Morgan St. 30, Hampton 27
NC A&T 59, Va. Lynchburg 12
North Carolina 27, NC State 19
Old Dominion 66, Rhode Island 14
Richmond 27, Albany (NY) 10
SC State 45, Savannah St. 9
South Carolina 34, Mississippi St. 16
The Citadel 28, Samford 26
UT-Martin 45, Murray St. 17
W Kentucky 44, Georgia St. 28


William & Mary 17, New Hampshire 0
MIDWEST
Akron 16, Kent St. 7
Butler 33, Dayton 30
Drake 56, Morehead St. 14
E. Illinois 56, Tennessee Tech 21
Illinois St. 13, N. Iowa 3
Kansas St. 41, Iowa St. 7
Michigan St. 29, Michigan 6
Minnesota 42, Indiana 39
Missouri St. 49, Indiana St. 7
Nebraska 27, Northwestern 24
Notre Dame 38, Navy 34
Ohio St. 56, Purdue 0
S. Illinois 34, W. Illinois 28
SE Missouri 37, Urbana 35
San Diego 58, Valparaiso 14
Wisconsin 28, Iowa 9


a 67. Defending champion Tom
Lehman had the best round of the
day, a 65, to join Bart Bryant and
Peter Senior at 9 under. Bryant
shot 70, and Senior had a 72.
Charles Schwab Cup points
leader Kenny Perry was tied for
seventh at 7 under after a 67.
Bernhard Langer, needing a vic-
tory and help to catch Perry, also
was 7 under after a 71.

Hall of Fame center
Bellamy dies at 74

ATLANTA- Walt Bellamy, the
Hall of Fame center who aver-
aged 20.1 points and 13.7 re-
bounds in 14 seasons in the NBA,
died Saturday. He was 74.
The Atlanta Hawks confirmed
the death, but didn't provide de-
tails. The Hawks said Bellamy at-
tended the team's home opener
Friday night.
The former Indiana University
star won an Olympic gold medal
in 1960 and was the first overall
pick by the Chicago Packers in
1961. He was the rookie of the
year with Chicago, averaging 31.6
points and 19.0 rebounds, and
also played for the Baltimore Bul-
lets, New York Knicks, Detroit Pis-
tons, Atlanta and New Orleans
Jazz. He played in fourAII-Star
games and was inducted into the
Hall of Fame in 1993.
From wire reports


Youngstown St. 38, South Dakota 34
SOUTHWEST
Auburn 35, Arkansas 17
Sam Houston St. 56, Stephen F. Austin 49
Texas 35, Kansas 13
UTSA 34, Tulsa 15
West Virginia 30, TCU 27, OT
FAR WEST
Air Force 42, Army 28
Arizona 33, California 28
E. Washington 55, Idaho St. 34
Montana 51, Sacramento St. 48, OT
Montana St. 35, N. Colorado 28
Portland St. 45, Weber St. 24
San Jose St. 34, UNLV 24
Texas St. 37, Idaho 21
Utah St. 47, Hawaii 10




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
Toronto
Brooklyn
NewYork
Boston


Atlanta
Charlotte
Miami
Orlando
Washington


Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Milwaukee
Cleveland


Atlantic Division
W L Pct
3 0 1.000
2 1 .667
1 1 .500
1 1 .500
0 2 .000
Southeast Division
W L Pct
1 1 .500
1 2 .333
1 2 .333
1 2 .333
0 2 .000
Central Division
W L Pct
3 0 1.000
1 1 .500
1 2 .333
1 2 .333
1 2 .333


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Houston 2 0 1.000 -
San Antonio 2 0 1.000 -
Dallas 1 1 .500 1
Memphis 1 1 .500 1
New Orleans 1 2 .333 1/
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 2 0 1.000 -
Oklahoma City 1 1 .500 1
Portland 1 1 .500 1
Denver 0 2 .000 2
Utah 0 2 .000 2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 2 0 1.000 -
L.A. Clippers 2 1 .667 1
Golden State 1 1 .500 1
Sacramento 1 1 .500 1
L.A. Lakers 1 2 .333 1/
Friday's Games
Orlando 110, New Orleans 90
Philadelphia 109, Washington 102
Charlotte 90, Cleveland 84
Milwaukee 105, Boston 98
Atlanta 102, Toronto 95
Minnesota 100, Oklahoma City 81
Houston 113, Dallas 105
Memphis 111, Detroit 108, OT
Brooklyn 101, Miami 100
Portland 113, Denver 98
Phoenix 87, Utah 84
L.A. Clippers 110, Sacramento 101
San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 85
Saturday's Games
Indiana 89, Cleveland 74
Philadelphia 107, Chicago 104
New Orleans 105, Charlotte 84
Toronto 97, Milwaukee 90
Memphis at Dallas, late
Houston at Utah, late
San Antonio at Portland, late
Sacramento at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 6 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Golden State at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.




Glantz-Culver Line
For Nov. 3
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Carolina 71 T7 (45) Atlanta
at Dallas 10/2 10 (48) Minnesota
New Orleans 3 61 (45/2) at N.Y Jets
Tennessee 3 3 (39/2) at St. Louis
Kansas City 3/2 3/2 (40) at Buffalo
atWashington Pk Pk (51) San Diego
at Oakland 2 2/2 (45) Philadelphia
atSeattle 16 /215/2 (40/2)Tampa Bay
Baltimore 3 2 (41) at Cleveland
at N. England 7 6/2 (43/2) Pittsburgh
Indy Pk 2 (44) at Houston
Tomorrow
atGreen Bay 11 10/2 (50) Chicago


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 4 Ohio St. pastes Purdue


Associated Press

No. 4 Ohio State laid another
beating on an overmatched con-
ference foe, and No. 24 Michigan
State took control of the Big
Ten's other division with a rout
of Michigan.
The Buckeyes, coming off a
49-point victory over Penn State,
crushed Purdue 56-0 in West
Lafayette, Ind. Ohio State has
won 21 straight and has been far
and away the Big Ten's most
impressive team.
The Buckeyes appear to be
cruising toward a Leaders Divi-
sion title and their first Big Ten
title game. They have a one-
game lead over Wisconsin, a
team they've already beaten,
and have games left against Illi-
nois, Indiana and Michigan.
Michigan State and the na-
tion's No. 1 defense were even
more impressive. The Spartans
pummeled their rivals 29-6 in
East Lansing, Mich., and have a
1 1/2-game lead in the Legends
Division. Michigan State plays
second-place Nebraska in two
weeks. The Huskers kept pace by
beating Northwestern 27-24 on a
last-play touchdown pass.
No. 4 Ohio State 56,
Purdue 0
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -
Doran Grant picked off Purdue's first
pass, returning it for a touchdown,
and Braxton Miller threw for 233
yards and four touchdowns as Ohio
State extended the nation's longest
winning streak to 21.
The Buckeyes (9-0, 5-0 Big Ten)
have not lost in 22 months. Coach
Urban Meyer also won his 22nd
straight game, tying a personal best
established at Florida. Ohio State
scored the most points and pro-
duced the most lopsided scoring
margin in the 56-game history of this
series. Both topped the marks set in
Ohio State's 49-0 victory in 2010.
Purdue (1-7, 0-4) lost its sixth in
a row.
Gray's interception helped the
Buckeyes take a 28-0 lead after one
quarter, and they extended it to 42-0
at the half.
No. 24 Michigan St. 29,
No. 23 Michigan 6
EAST LANSING, Mich. Shilique
Calhoun, Ed Davis and the rest of
Michigan State's defense battered
rival Michigan, and the Spartans re-
mained unbeaten in the Big Ten.
Michigan State (8-1,5-0 Big Ten)
has won five of the last six meetings
with the Wolverines, and this was
the Spartans' most lopsided win in
the series since 1967. They held
Michigan (6-2, 2-2) to minus-48
yards rushing, the worst output in
the Ann Arbor program's history.
Connor Cook threw for a touch-
down and ran for one, but this game
belonged to Michigan State's de-
fense, which solidified its spot
among the nation's best with an
overwhelming performance on a
rainy afternoon at Spartan Stadium.
Calhoun and Davis each had 2
1/2 sacks.
No. 8 Auburn 35,
Arkansas 17
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Tre
Mason rushed for 168 yards and



HARRIS
Continued from Page BI

bad. Trinity Prep ran really well.
"It was not my best race tech-
nique-wise but time-wise, it was
best.
"This is nice weather. It's a lit-
tle hard to breathe."
"He ran a gutsy race," Crystal
River coach Tim Byrne. "He ran
a good race, hung in there, didn't
fall apart. My young guys ran
well. They ran well and I'm



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1

Mackenzie Woods (30th, 17:27),
Jack Clark (53rd, 17:58) and Alex
Pich (62nd, 18:08) completed
Lecanto's scoring efforts in the
tournament.
Chase Benoist (78th, 18:30) and
Colin Spain (101st, 19:13) were the
final two Panther runners com-
peting in the regional race.
"Coming into (the meet), we
were ranked sixth and we ended


up finishing sixth," Lecanto boys
head coach Roselle Lattin said
with a smile. "It was a very com-
petitive field, with the exception
of Land O'Lakes who are un-
touchable, but from (second to
sixth place) you're only talking
about a 20-point differential.
"I think our biggest differ-
ence maker today was our No. 3
runner (Woods)," Lattin contin-


Associated Press
Ohio State wide receiver Chris Fields scores a touchdown on a catch against Purdue during the first half Saturday in West Lafayette, Ind.


four touchdowns as No. 8 Auburn
earned first-year coach Gus
Malzahn a 35-17 win in his return
to Arkansas.
Mason scored on runs of 9, 4 and
5 and 12 yards as the Tigers (8-1,
4-1 Southeastern Conference) won
their fifth in a row in Malzahn's first
game in Fayetteville since leaving
the Razorbacks as an assistant
following the 2006 season.
Auburn's Nick Marshall, returning
from a shoulder injury, accounted for
177 yards of total offense, including
an 88-yard touchdown throw to
Sammie Coates.
Jonathan Williams had 104 yards
rushing and Alex Collins added 92
on the ground for Arkansas (3-6,
0-5), which has now lost six in a row.
It's the longest losing streak for the
Razorbacks since a seven-game
stretch in 1990.
No. 9 Clemson 59,
Virginia 10
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -
Tajh Boyd threw three touchdown
passes and ran for a score and
Clemson broke the game open with
three touchdowns in the last 4:18
of the first half.
The Hampton, Va., native became
the Atlantic Coast Conference's ca-
reer leader in touchdown-making with
a 33-yard pass to Sammy Watkins to
start the scoring for the Tigers (8-1,
6-1ACC). It broke a tie at 112 TDs
with North Carolina State's Philip
Rivers. Boyd later added TD throws
of 10 yards to Roderick McDowell
and 96 yards to Watkins, and scored
on a 1-yard run 13 seconds before
halftime to make it 35-7.
Virginia (2-7, 0-5) lost its sixth in a
row and for the 15th time in its last
19 games. It also suffered its second
59-10 loss at home this season,
having lost by the same score
against No. 2 Oregon in the second


happy with their performance.
Most of them ran their best
times. I'm happy with our runs."
For the Pirates, Austin Bass
finished 64th (18:52), Adam Ben-
nett came in 70th (19:05), Gunnar
Consol crossed the line in 75th
place (19:13) and Austin Fowler
was 79th (19:23).
Region 2A-2 Results
Girls team scores: Orlando Lake
Highland Prep 41; 2. Winter Park
Trinity Prep 71; 3. Gainesville
Eastside 94; 4. Orlando Bishop
Moore 98; 5. New Port Richey Gulf


ued. "(Woods) really closed that
gap between (the second and
third runner) and did a really
good job today I'm really
thrilled for the boys, this group
of kids
deserves it."
Citrus junior Cameron Grant
competed Saturday as the lone
Hurricane boy to move ahead
from districts. Grant placed 65th
in a time of 18:12 and was unable
to advance to the state meet in-
dividually
The top 15 individuals auto-
matically qualify for the state
meet.
Lecanto sophomore Claire
Farnsworth finished as the top
female runner from Citrus
County in the race as one of only
three female runners to com-
pete at the regional event from
the county Farnsworth placed
13th to advance to state (her sec-
ond time qualifying for the meet)
with a time of 20:10.


week of the season.
No. 10 Missouri 31,
Tennessee 3
COLUMBIA, Mo. Maty Mauk
threw three touchdown passes and
ran for another, leading No. 10 Mis-
souri's dominant and resilient effort
in a 31-3 victory over Tennessee.
The Tigers (8-1,4-1 SEC) re-
sponded smartly a week after
squandering a 17-point cushion in
the fourth quarter of a double-over-
time loss to South Carolina. Andrew
Baggett banged another chip-shot
field goal attempt off the left goal-
post, eerily similar to his game-end-
ing misfire a week earlier, but
instead of heartbreak they still took a
24-3 cushion into halftime.
Missouri forced three turnovers
and committed none in Mauk's best
game in three starts in place of in-
jured James Franklin. Mauk had 114
yards on 13 carries, and threw
touchdown passes to Dorial Green-
Beckham, L'Damian Washington
and Marcus Lucas in the first half.
Franklin (shoulder sprain) warmed
up before the game.
Tennessee (4-5, 1-4) is 0-4 on the
road, all but one of them blowouts.
No. 14 S. Carolina 34,
Mississippi State 16
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
threw for four touchdowns, Mike
Davis ran for 128 yards to move past
1,000 yards this season and South
Carolina tied a school record with its
15th straight home victory.
Shaw matched his personal best
for TD throws after missing two days
of practice with a virus. Davis, the
SEC's leading rusher, had his sev-
enth game reaching the century
mark and became the team's first
1,000-yard rusher since Marcus Lat-
timore gained 1,197 yards his fresh-
man season three years ago.


105; 6. Brooksville Nature Coast
Tech 114; 7. The Villages 211; 8.
Chiefland 237; 9. Brooksville Her-
nando 257; 10. New Port Richey
Ridgewood 266; 11. Ocala Trinity
Catholic 286; 12. Alachua Santa
Fe 297; 13. Live Oak Suwannee
316.
Girls top 15 individuals: Kari
Grippo, Gulf 18:59; 2. Leigha Torino,
North Marion 19:41; 3. Rachel
Stockton, Lake Highland 20:05; 4.
Stina Rhodes, Trinity Prep 20:08; 5.
Caroline Cooper, Lake Highland
20:18; 6.Alyssa Deligio, Nature
Coast 20:27; 7. Clara Hopkins,


"I think I ran about the time I
was looking for," Farnsworth
said of her race. "A lot of girls
came out of nowhere but I still
(qualified). It was close but I
got it."
Finishing three seconds be-
hind Farnsworth was Citrus jun-
ior Alyssa Weber
Weber, who stuck close to
Farnsworth for the majority of
the race, took the final state
qualifying spot, placing 15th in a
season-best time of 20:13. She
qualifies for her third consecu-
tive state trip.
"My legs are done," Weber
said with a laugh. "I felt good
and I really tried. I'm glad I'm
going on.
"Claire did really good too,"
Weber added. "I'm thankful for
my parents and my brother for
being here to cheer me on and
I'm glad to run with Cameron
(Grant)."
Region 1A-2


South Carolina (7-2, 5-2 South-
eastern Conference) won its sev-
enth in row over the Bulldogs (4-4,
1-3) and tied the record for consecu-
tive victories at Wlliams-Brice Sta-
dium, equaling the mark set from
1978-80. The Gamecocks will get
the chance to break the record in
two weeks when they close league
play at home against Florida.
No. 18 Oklahoma St. 52,
No.15 Texas Tech 34
LUBBOCK, Texas Clint Chelf
threw for two touchdowns and a
season-high 211 yards and ran for
two more scores to lead No. 18
Oklahoma State past No. 15 Texas
Tech 52-34.
Desmond Roland ran for three
touchdowns, a week after getting
four for Tech (7-2, 4-2).
Chelf scored on a 67 yard quar-
terback draw, and was 18-for-34
passing with two interceptions.
The win keeps Oklahoma State
(7-1,4-1) in the Big 12 title hunt and
makes the road for Texas Tech (7-2,
4-2) more difficult. The Red Raiders
have lost two straight.
Davis Webb was 45 for 71 for 425
yards and a touchdown, with two in-
terceptions, for Texas Tech.
Jace Amaro finished with 174
yards and a touchdown on 15
catches for the Red Raiders.
No. 17 UCLA 45,
Colorado 23
PASADENA, Calif. Brett Hund-
ley threw two touchdown passes
and rushed for two more scores,
Devin Fuller scored three touch-
downs, and No. 17 UCLA shook off
back-to-back losses with a 45-23
victory over Colorado.
Damien Thigpen also ran for a
touchdown for the Bruins (6-2, 3-2
Pac-12), who rebounded from road
defeats at Stanford and Oregon


Montverde 20:29; 8. Magdalene
Rice, Montverde 20:30; 9. Maddison
Larabee, Lake Highland 20:31; 10.
Amber Maxwell, Wesley Chapel
20:36.
Boys team scores: 1. Winter Park
Trinity Prep 20; 2. Orlando Lake
Highland Prep 85; 3. Brooksville Na-
ture Coast Tech 136; 4. Orlando
Bishop Moore 140; 5. New Port
Richey Gulf 140; 6. The Villages
143; 7. Gainesville Eastside 167; 8.
Crystal River 246; 9. Citra North
Marion 267; 10. Alachua Santa Fe
272; 11. Dade City Pasco 276; 12.
Mount Dora 277; 13. Tavares 347;


Seven Rivers freshman Paige
Eckart placed 61st overall at Sat-
urday's event held at the Santa
Fe College campus.
Eckart finished the race in a
time of 24:21. She was the lone
Warrior cross country runner to
advance out of the district.
Region 3A-2 Results
Girls team scores: 1. Vanguard
55; 2. Seabreeze 56; 3. Mitchell
127; 4. Gainesville 132; 5. Lake
Nona 134; 6. Mainland 155; 7.
Lake Region 169; 8. Land O'Lakes
186; 9. Springstead 192; 10. East
River 227; 11. South Lake 251; 12.
Belleview 296; 13. Sebring 331
Boys teams scores: 1. Land
O'Lakes 66; 2. Sebring 134; 3.
Lake Nona 135; 4. Gainesville 141;
5. Matanzas 142; 6. Lecanto 154;
7. Vanguard 165; 8. Edgewater
171; 9. Liberty 193; 10. New
Smyrna Beach 197; 11. Belleview
249; 12. Mitchell 270; 13. Harmony


despite a sluggish start in their
homecoming game.
Fuller caught a 76-yard TD pass
for the Bruins' first score and added
a rushing TD with 3:36 to play.
Hundley passed for 273 yards and
scored on runs of 11 and 1 yards
while moving into third place on
UCLA's career total yardage list.
No. 21 N. Illinois 63,
Massachusetts 19
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Jordan
Lynch ran for 119 yards and four
touchdowns and threw for another in
just over a half to help Northern Illi-
nois stay unbeaten.
The Huskies (9-0, 5-0 Mid-Ameri-
can Conference) scored touch-
downs on their first five possessions
and six of their seven drives in the
first half. Cameron Stingily rushed
for 58 yards and a touchdown, and
Tommylee Lewis also ran one in for
Northern Illinois.
Lynch, who leads all active FBS
players in rushing yards, also com-
pleted 10 of 14 passes for 160 yards
and threw for at least one touchdown
for the 22nd consecutive game. He
played one series in the third quarter.
No. 22 Wisconsin 28,
Iowa 9
IOWA CITY, Iowa James White
ran for 132 yards and a pair of late
touchdowns as Wisconsin won its
third straight.
Joel Stave added two touchdown
passes for the Badgers (6-2, 4-1 Big
Ten), who are bowl eligible for the
12th year in a row.
Wisconsin's Pat Muldoon inter-
cepted Iowa backup C.J. Beathard at
the Hawkeyes 25 with 7:43 left, set-
ting up an 11-yard TD run by White.
White added a 2-yard touchdown
with 1:35 left for the Badgers, who
won despite a season-low 62 yards
rushing from Melvin Gordon.


14. Newberry 400; 15. Starke Brad-
ford 430.
Boys top 10 individuals: 1. Scott
Millson, Trinity Prep 16:18; 2.
Jesse Millson, Trinity Prep 16:20;
3. Charles Cook, Trinity Prep
16:23; 4. Brandon Harris, Crystal
River 16:28; 5. Tyler Skidelsky,
Lake Highland 16:33; 6. Richard
Rhodes, Trinity Prep 16:39; 7.
James Harkless, Nature Coast
Prep 16:41; 8. Paul Reggentin,
Trinity Prep 16:44; 9. Hunter
Chavis, Mount Dora 16:46; 10.
Austin Mulyck, Nature Coast
16:53.


299; 14. Leesburg 348; 15. Winter
Haven 394
Girls top 10 individuals: 1. Amber
Philpott, Springstead 18:53; 2.
Kianna Bonnet, Seabreeze 18:57;
3. Emily Kerns, Mitchell 19:19; 4.
Audrey Carpenter, Vanguard 19:25;
5. Elizabeth Murray, Seabreeze
19:37; 6. Elizabeth Mulford, Van-
guard 19:45; 7. Alyssa Bayliff,
Seabreeze 19:46; 8. Carter Page,
Gainesville 19:58; 9. Caroline
Lyden, Lake Nona 19:59; 10. Sada
Rowley, Mainland 20:00
Boys top 10 individuals: 1. Travis
Nichols, Land O'Lakes 16:05.10; 2.
Tyler Stahl, Land O'Lakes 16:05.30;
3. RogelioAraiza, Liberty 16:16; 4.
Jake Poore, Land O'Lakes 16:20;
5. Eric Foster, Sebring 16:22; 6.
Jean Carlos Peralta, Lake Nona
16:28; 7. David Rood, Vanguard
16:36; 8. Blake Lowery, Gainesville
16:39; 9. Joseph Thrailkill, Edgewa-
ter 16:41; 10. Antoine Miller, Lake


B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Dysfunctional vs. dynamic: Bucs-Seahawks


Associated Press

They came into the league to-
gether 37 years ago as expansion
teams. One of them the team
that actually owns a Super Bowl
title, the Buccaneers looks
like a new-to-the-NFL franchise.
The other, the Seahawks, looks
like a championship favorite.
On Sunday, the winless Bucca-
neers make the long journey to
Seattle, where the Seahawks are
practically unbeatable. A tall
order for anyone, especially a
team in disarray
Coach Greg Schiano, whose
job security seems to diminish
with every crisis in Tampa, likes
taking on such obstacles despite
missing three key starters: re-
ceiver Mike Williams, guard Carl
Nicks and running back Doug
Martin.
"It's certainly a big challenge,
whether you're going in short-
handed or full-handed, going
into that building," he said,
knowing Seattle has won 11
straight at home. "Their home
record is pretty impressive, es-
pecially with Russell Wilson as
quarterback. We certainly have
a big challenge that we're ex-
cited about.
"We're going out to what I
think is one of the greatest ven-
ues in sports and I can't wait for
them to raise that flag and here
we go. It's going to be nuts with
the (loud) crowd."
What might be nuttier is
Tampa Bay (0-7) knocking off
Seattle (7-1). The Seahawks' de-
fense is playing at a champi-
onship level, as physical as any
the league has seen in a while.
They lead the league in take-
aways with 21 and have a plus-9
turnover margin. At every level
of the unit is a star, from end
Michael Bennett to linebacker
Bobby Wagner to cornerback
Richard Sherman.
Dolphins 22, Bengals 20, OT
At Miami Gardens, Cameron
Wake sacked Andy Dalton for a
safety with 6:38 left in overtime,
and Miami beat Cincinnati on
Thursday night.
On third-and-10 from the 8,
Dalton retreated to the goal line
and was tackled by Wake coming
up the middle for the third over-
time safety in NFL history The
officials signaled safety, and the
call was upheld following a re-
play review
Wake had three sacks, and
Cincinnati (6-3) committed four
turnovers that might have meant
a difference of 17 points.
Mike Nugent kicked a 54-yard
field goal with 1:24 remaining in
regulation to put the Bengals
ahead, but Miami (4-4) answered
with a 50-yard drive, and Caleb
Sturgis made a 44-yard field goal
with 11 seconds left to force
overtime.
Also today, it's unbeaten
Kansas City at Buffalo, San Diego
at Washington, Indianapolis at
Houston, Pittsburgh at New Eng-
land, New Orleans at New York
Jets, Baltimore at Cleveland,
Minnesota at Dallas, Tennessee
at St. Louis, Atlanta at Carolina,
and Philadelphia at Oakland.
Monday night has Chicago at
Green Bay
Off this week are Denver (7-1),
San Francisco (6-2), Detroit (5-3),
Arizona (4-4), the New York Gi-
ants (2-6) and Jacksonville (0-8).
Tampa Bay (0-7) at Seattle (7-1)
Former teammates at North
Carolina State, Seahawks quar-


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Bucs quarterback Mike Glennon is greeted by the team mascot after a game against the Carolina Panthers on Oct. 24 in Tampa.


terback Russell Wilson and Bucs
QB Mike Glennon face off. Wilson
started for two seasons ahead of
Glennon for the Wolfpack.
"(Mike) is a guy who worked ex-
tremely hard, a guy we had so
much fun competing together and
just going to work together every
day and just trying to learn as
much as we could," Wilson said. "I
have a lot of respect for Mike. We
were roommates, some funny long
stories we've had together, and
he's just a great football player"
Kansas City (8-0) at Buffalo (3-5)
The Chiefs have a bye after
this one, then play Denver So
looking beyond the Bills, who
could be down to their fourth-
string quarterback (rookie Jeff
Tuel or newcomer Matt Flynn),
seems a possibility
No way, according to line-
backer Derrick Johnson:
"We're not satisfied. Buffalo is
a good team. We're not going to
overlook them at all. That's not
even a conversation."
In the conversation is whether
KC equals the best start in fran-
chise history The Chiefs already
are the first team to go from the
NFLs worst record the previous
season (2-14) to 8-0.
San Diego (4-3)
at Washington (2-5)
The Chargers often struggle
with cross-country trips, but they
have won at Philadelphia and
Jacksonville this season. They
haven't allowed an offensive
touchdown in 11 quarters, tying
a franchise record.
Washington needs to find a
way to get going quicker: It's
been outscored 67-20 in first
quarters. Special teams also are
a problem, but the offense has
picked up as Robert Griffin III
gets stronger following offseason
knee surgery
Indianapolis (5-2)
at Houston (2-5)
Simply put, a Colts win makes
the Texans a Lone Star long shot
to challenge in a division they've
won the past two seasons. Indy
has won nine of the past 12 in
the series and Andrew Luck has


four TD passes, with no inter-
ceptions, in going 1-1 against
Houston, where he grew up.
Although Matt Schaub has re-
covered from an ankle injury,
Case Keenum starts at quarter-
back for the Texans, who have
the top-rated pass defense but
are 28th against the run.
Chicago (4-3) at
Green Bay (5-2), Monday night
The NFLEs oldest rivalry, and
one of the most bitter, gets the
prime-time spotlight. Josh Mc-
Cown gets the start at quarter-
back with Jay Cutler (groin) out,
and he has one of the league's
hottest receivers in Alshon Jef-
fery 20 catches for 457 yards
and two TDs in the past four
games.
Chicago will need to score to
keep pace with a Green Bay of-
fense that really has hit its
stride, through the air and on
the ground. Rookie RB Eddie
Lacy has 395 yards rushing in his
past four games, tops in the
league in that span, and the
Packers are willing to grind. Of
course, with Aaron Rodgers
chucking the ball, they don't
need to do so, and Rodgers has
prospered despite having only
one familiar target, Jordy Nel-
son, in the lineup.
Pittsburgh (2-5)
at New England (6-2)
Another bitter rivalry in
which, oddly, the Steelers' best
chance might come through the
air, and New England's could be
on the ground.
Tom Brady has struggled
through the first half of the sea-
son with a group of unfamiliar
and untested receivers. So the
runners have stepped up, rank-
ing 12th in yards and producing
seven touchdowns rushing.
Brady has thrown for only nine.
Pittsburgh's vaunted ground
game ground to a halt earlier this
season, and the Steelers hope
rookie Le'Veon Bell will rekindle
it. Meanwhile, Antonio Brown
leads the AFC with 56 catches.
New Orleans (6-1)
at New York Jets (4-4)
Rex vs. Rob.


The Ryan twins bring their ag-
gressive, no-holds-barred de-
fenses into this one. Rob has
vastly improved the Saints' unit
as coordinator, and Rex's group
generally has kept New York in
contention, except for last week's
49-9 debacle in Cincinnati.
"I think we are very similar, I
don't think there's any doubt
about that" Jets head coach Rex
Ryan said. "Our personalities,
even the way we sound and
everything else.
"I'm going to do the same thing,
but don't kid yourself, we will
copy things from each other We
talk all the time and stuff. I know
one thing, I think we probably
have respect to the league as
being pretty decent on defense,
both of us. One thing I think, he's
going to be an outstanding head
coach. I think he is a great moti-
vator He gets guys to play He gets
guys to believe in themselves."
Baltimore (3-4) at
Cleveland (3-5)
It's time for the Ravens to start
acting like champions. After a
week off, they have back-to-back
AFC North games. They have
won 11 straight over the Browns,
are 12-5 coming off a bye -10-1
since 2002 and are 5-0 under
coach John Harbaugh following
a bye week.
The offense has been holding
them back, especially a puny
running game. And the Browns
ranks seventh in total defense,
allowing a league-low 4.54 yards
per play
Ravens QB Joe Flacco's 11
wins against the Browns without
losing are the most by a starter
against a single opponent since
the NFL merger in 1970.
Minnesota (1-6) at Dallas (4-4)
Both teams are smarting from
defeats, albeit totally different
kinds of losses.
The Cowboys blew a late lead
with porous, non-aggressive de-
fense in Detroit, dropping a one-
pointer Receiver Dez Bryant
berated teammates on the side-
line late in that game, but it was
an inability to cover Calvin
Johnson that hurt Dallas.


Minnesota has no one who
might catch 14 balls for 329
yards, but it has Adrian Peter-
son. The 2012 MVP has been sur-
rounded by mediocrity or worse
this season, preventing him from
breaking loose.
Maybe Sunday
Tennessee (3-4) at St Louis (3-5)
The Rams will be wearing jer-
seys worn in the 2000 Super
Bowl, when they held on to beat
the Titans. They'll need produc-
tion from backup QB Kellen
Clemens to get another win over
Tennessee. But they've found a
running game thanks to rookie
Zac Stacy, who had a career-best
134 yards rushing last game and
was third in the NFL with 344
yards rushing in October
Off a bye, the Titans face the
man who guided them to that
Super Bowl, and to a 147-126
regular-season record as coach,
JeffFisher
Atlanta (2-5) at Carolina (4-3)
Carolina's revival has been
based on Cam Newton's produc-
tivity he's beginning to per-
form the way he did as the
league's top offensive rookie in
2011. He has eight combined
touchdowns six passing and
two rushing and no turnovers
in the past three games, all wins.
The Panthers' offense ranks first
in time of possession (33:40 per
game) and tied for first with
most drives of five-plus minutes.
Atlanta can't match that be-
cause its running game has been
nonexistent and its top receivers
have been banged-up. But Harry
Douglas has emerged as a reli-
able option for Matt Ryan.
Philadelphia (3-5)
at Oakland (3-4)
Nick Foles is back in the
lineup with Michael Vick hurt
again. The second-year quarter-
back has recovered from a con-
cussion. Philadelphia has never
won in Oakland.
Oakland QB Terrelle Pryor
has won all three career home
starts. He set a record for a
touchdown run by a quarterback
last week with a 93-yarder that
set the tone against Pittsburgh.


NFL Stats CENTRAL


NFL standings


New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

Kansas City
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington
N.Y Giants

New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay

Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota

Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


Thursday's Game
Miami 22, Cincinnati 20, OT
Today's Games
Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
San Diego atWashington, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y Gi-
ants, San Francisco
Monday's Game
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 7
Washington at Minnesota, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov.10
Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville atTennessee, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y Jets, New England
Monday, Nov. 11
Miami atTampa Bay 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders


P Manning, DEN
P Rivers, SND
Dalton, CIN
Locker, TEN
Luck, IND
Roethlis., PIT
Ale. Smith, KAN
Tannehill, MIA
Manuel, BUF
Flacco, BAL


Week 8
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
333 237 2919
249 184 2132
279 183 2249
152 94 1047
224 136 1574
260 172 1930
286 169 1795
261 155 1769
150 85 985
269 160 1917


Rushers
Att Yds
J. Charles, KAN 153 635
A. Foster, HOU 121 542
Moreno, DEN 109 457
R. Mathews, SND 110 446
F. Jackson, BUF 101 425
Ridley, NWE 92 399
Jones-Drew, JAX 122 391
Pryor, OAK 53 391
B. Powell, NYJ 100 385
C.Johnson, TEN 115 366
Receivers


An. Brown, PIT
Welker, DEN
Cameron, CLE
De. Thomas, DE
And. Johnson, H
Edelman, NWE
A.. Green, CIN
Decker, DEN
Shorts III, JAX
A. Gates, SND

Doss, BAL
Benjamin, CLE
Holliday, DEN
McCluster, KAN
Edelman, NWE
An. Brown, PIT
Kerley, NYJ
Br. Tate, CIN
Hilton, IND
Reynaud, TEN


Holliday, DEN
Q. Demps, KAN
Br. Tate, CIN
K. Martin, HOU
F. Jones, PIT
D. Reed, IND
Thigpen, MIA
Todman, JAX
Reynaud, TEN
Blount, NWE


Moreno, DEN


No Yds Avg LG
56 630 11.3 45
50 555 11.1 33
49 596 12.2 53
N 48 685 14.3 78t
OU 48 584 12.2 42
48 462 9.6 44
46 734 16.0 82t
46 669 14.5 61
46 565 12.3 59
42 497 11.8 56t
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
15 267 17.8 82t
22 257 11.7 79t
20 227 11.4 81t
36 387 10.8 89t
24 256 10.7 38
13 121 9.3 44
12 108 9.0 24
11 91 8.3 29
14 110 7.9 23
18 135 7.5 35
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
11 379 34.5 105t
11 351 31.9 57
17 453 26.6 71
21 548 26.1 49
10 259 25.9 42
11 276 25.1 31
15 373 24.9 44
12 294 24.5 40
15 355 23.7 40
12 277 23.1 30
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
9 8 1 0


Welker, DEN
J. Charles, KAN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
M. Jones, CIN
Cameron, CLE
F. Jackson, BUF
Royal, SND
De. Thomas, DEN
A.. Green, CIN

M. Prater, DEN
Gostkowski, NWE
Folk, NYJ
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Vinatieri, IND
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
Suisham, PIT
Nugent, CIN


TD Brees, NOR
1 A. Rodgers, GBY
1 Romo, DAL
1 R. Wilson, SEA
1 C. Newton, CAR
0 M. Stafford, DET
0 M.Ryan,ATL
0 Cutler, CHI
0 S. Bradford, STL
0 Kaepernick, SNF
0

TD L. McCoy, PHL
1 Gore, SNF
0 M. Lynch, SEA
0 A. Peterson, MIN
0 A. Morris, WAS
0 Forte, CHI
0 Re. Bush, DET
0 D.Williams, CAR
0 D. Martin, TAM
0 Lacy, GBY
0

C. Johnson, DET
Pts Cruz, NYG
54 Garcon, WAS


9 0
8 6
8 0
7 0
6 0
6 6
6 0
6 0
5 0
Kicking
PAT FG
43-43 12-12
17-17 20-21
12-12 19-19
21-21 15-18
16-16 16-18
18-18 15-17
18-18 14-16
15-15 15-17
10-10 15-17
23-24 10-13


NFC leaders


Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
271 183 2290
249 167 2191
295 195 2216
205 125 1628
202 131 1552
338 211 2617
305 205 2223
225 146 1658
262 159 1687
198 113 1584
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
156 733 4.70
146 618 4.23
146 601 4.12
128 571 4.46
108 565 5.23
116 533 4.59
119 518 4.35
114 477 4.18
127 456 3.59
112 446 3.98
Receivers
No Yds Avg
47 821 17.5
47 677 14.4
47 512 10.9


B. Marshall, CHI 46 540 11.7
De. Jackson, PHL 45 673 15.0
D. Bryant, DAL 45 641 14.2
V Jackson,TAM 41 623 15.2
Ju. Jones, ATL 41 580 14.1
J.Graham, NOR 40 630 15.8
J. Nelson, GBY 39 649 16.6
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Hyde, GBY 10 186 18.6
Dw. Harris, DAL 15 237 15.8
Hester, CHI 9 120 13.3
G.Tate, SEA 22 237 10.8
Page, TAM 16 147 9.2
D. Johnson, PHL 11 95 8.6
Sproles, NOR 16 124 7.8
Spurlock, DET 18 128 7.1
Ginn Jr., CAR 11 76 6.9
R. Randle, NYG 17 110 6.5
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C. Patterson, MIN 18 703 39.1
Dw. Harris, DAL 13 464 35.7
Hester, CHI 21 615 29.3
D. Johnson, PHL 17 441 25.9
Cunningham, STL 12 299 24.9
Ginn Jr., CAR 11 272 24.7
Sproles, NOR 10 212 21.2
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
D. Bryant, DAL 8 0 8
J. Graham, NOR 8 0 8
Ve. Davis, SNF 7 0 7
Gore, SNF 7 7 0
Cal. Johnson, DET 7 0 7
M. Lynch, SEA 7 6 1
J. Nelson, GBY 7 0 7
A. Peterson, MIN 7 6 1
Forte, CHI 6 6 0
B. Marshall, CHI 5 0 5
Kicking
PAT FG
Crosby, GBY 23-23 17-19
Hauschka, SEA 21-21 16-17
D. Bailey, DAL 24-24 14-16
Hartley, NOR 22-22 14-18
Akers, DET 25-25 12-15
Henery,PHL 18-18 14-18
Gould, CHI 21-22 12-13
Zuerlein, STL 15-15 14-15
Feely, ARI 14-14 14-15
R Dawson, SNF 27-27 9-12


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In the Charles


Red Sox hold

"rolling rally" to

celebrate title

Associated Press

BOSTON From the Green Mon-
ster to the Charles River, the
bearded champions celebrated their
improbable journey with another fa-
miliar sight in Boston.
The World Series trophy
For the third time in 10 years, the
Red Sox carried the prize through
their city in a "rolling rally" of am-
phibious "duck boats" as thousands
of fans lined the streets and the
banks of the waterway that sepa-
rates Boston from Cambridge.
The most poignant moment oc-
curred early in Saturday's trip when
the vehicles stopped at the Boston
Marathon finish line, near where
two explosions killed three specta-
tors at the race on April 15.
Outfielder Jonny Gomes placed
the trophy on the line and he and
catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia held
Red Sox jerseys with the words
"BOSTON STRONG" and the num-
ber 617, the city's area code. A jersey
with that message hung in the Red
Sox dugout throughout the season
after the bombings.
On a mild, sunny day, noted tenor
Ronan Tynan sang "God Bless
America" and the crowd joined in.
"That was an emotional moment,"
Gomes said. "To bring the World Se-
ries trophy to the finish line, I don't
think that the story was written that
way, but I was glad to be a part of it
and put the exclamation point on it"
Before the rally began at Fenway,
manager John Farrell recalled that
the Red Sox had left after their 3-2
win over the Tampa Bay Rays the
day of the Marathon for Logan Air-
port for a road trip. Along the way,
they saw emergency vehicles re-
sponding to the explosions.
"Knowing that we were heading
out of town, that's going to bring back
a lot, and a lot of uncertainty at that
moment," Farrell said, "because no
one knew where to turn next. So we
were fortunate to be part of maybe a
little bit of a healing process."
Second baseman Dustin Pedroia
said: "We played for the whole city,
what the city went through."
Boston's climb from last place in
the AL East in 2012 to the top of the
baseball world was stunning.
But not to Pedroia, a gritty leader
of a closely knit team that won the
title with a 6-1 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals in Game 6 on


Associated rress
Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell waves beside a World Series trophy
while riding in an amphibious duck boat on the Charles River during a victory
parade celebrating the team's World Series title Saturday in Cambridge, Mass.


Wednesday night. It was the first
time the Red Sox won the Series at
home in 95 years.
"The way we started spring train-
ing, it seemed like everybody counted
us out," he said. "We always said, 'One
day closer to a parade.' It's here."
The line score from the clinching
game was still on the scoreboard on
the left-field wall as season-ticket
holders gathered for a pre-rally
ceremony
"We just wanted this group to win
so badly," general manager Ben
Cherington told the crowd, "because
we know they wanted it so badly"
Then the team boarded 25 duck
boats of many colors pink, yellow,
maroon, lime green, white and more
- normally used for tourist trips.
Some boats even had light brown
carpeting cut into the shape of
beards attached on the front.
Players still had their beards, which
some had grown all season long.
"Hopefully, we can all get together
and shave them for a good cause,"
third baseman Will Middlebrooks
said.
Some fans also were at rolling ral-
lies after the 2004 and 2007 titles.
"This maybe the best parade yet,"


said Charles Butler, 48, of Boston,
who attended his third. "It is the best
thing that could have happened to
Boston right now The bombing was
a sad time, and now we have a rea-
son to come together and celebrate."
Anna Mitkevicius, 24, of Medford,
watched from near the finish line that
she never reached on April 15. She
was stopped about one mile before
the end because of the explosions.
"It is still a very emotional experi-
ence to come down here," she said.
"I didn't know if it would be too hard
to be at the finish line, but I'm happy
I came. It felt really good to be here
when everyone is celebrating and
the mood is good."
There was a very heavy police
presence, with dogs and bullhorns.
Crowds were about 15 people
deep on both sides near the finish
line on Boylston Street. Many wore
Red Sox gear, some with foam
beards and holding signs "Papi for
Mayor," a vote for World Series MVP
David Ortiz.
Farrell said if Ortiz hadn't hit a
tying grand slam in the eighth inning
of Game 2 of the AL championship
series against the Detroit Tigers "we
might not be standing here today"


Lifeguard Class at
Bicentennial Park
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will be holding an
American Red Cross Water-
front Lifeguard Class for par-
ticipants 15 years and older.
Prerequisite will be held on
Dec. 20 at 2 p.m. Class will
go from Dec. 30 to Jan. 3,
2014 from 8:30 a.m. to
4 p.m. each day.
The purpose of this
course is to provide entry-
level lifeguard participants
with the knowledge and skills
to prevent, recognize and re-
spond to aquatic emergen-
cies and to provide care for
breathing and cardiac emer-
gencies, injuries and sudden
illnesses until emergency
medical services (EMS)
personnel take over.
This program is offered in
a blended learning (online
learning with instructor-led
skill session) format. Each
candidate must have access
to a computer to complete
the online part of the course.
Candidates must be able
to pass a prerequisite of a
550-yard swim, continu-
ously demonstrating breath
control and rhythmic breath-
ing using the front crawl and
breaststroke, tread water for
two minutes using only the
legs, and a timed swim to
include going down to a
depth of 10 feet.
Registration fee is $125,
with a $35 online fee to the
American Red Cross. The
registration deadline is
Thursday, Dec. 19.
For more information, call
352-795-1478.
Youth basketball
league forming
Hoops Link Inc. and
USSSA Basketball will be
conducting a youth basket-
ball league with play on Sat-
urdays, Nov. 9 through Dec.


21, at the Lecanto High
School gym.
Individuals and/or teams
can register. There will be in-
structional, competitive and
open divisions of play to meet
all levels of player abilities. In-
dividuals and teams can
enter at which level they pre-
fer or be placed accordingly
by staff. The cost of the
league is $50 for individuals.
For more information, call
Kevin at 352-286-4371 or
Kurt at 352-422-4884.
Group plans
annual bike/walk
Join Citrus County Right-
to-Life at its annual
Bike/Walk for Human Life at
9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at
the Inverness Trail Head of
the Withlacoochee State
Trail at 286 N. Apopka Ave.
(look for the red caboose.)
Bike or walk roundtrip from
Inverness to Floral City on
the Rails to Trails. Come ride
or walk, or be a sponsor. Par-
ticipants may determine their
own distance. Nourishment
is provided along the route.
For more information, call
Kathy at 352-563-7017.
Take a chance on
Super Bowl trip
The Lecanto Parent-
Teacher Organization is
selling 1,000 tickets for $20
each for a chance to win a
trip to the Super Bowl.
The winner will receive two
lower-level Super Bowl XLVIII
tickets for the Feb. 2 game in
East Rutherford, N.J. The
package also includes a mer-
chandise coupon, three-night
stay airfare and more. The
winning ticket will be drawn
Dec. 1 at High Octane Saloon.
Tickets are available at
several area locations. Call
352-302-3475 or email
LecantoPrimaryPTO@
hotmail.com for more info.
From staff reports


Baseball BRIEFS


Rays exercise
2014 options on
Zobrist, Escobar
ST. PETERSBURG-The
Tampa Bay Rays have exer-
cised options on Ben Zobrist
and shortstop Yunel Escobar.
Zobrist hit .275 while starting
games at four different posi-
tions and leading AL second
basemen in fielding percentage
this year. He will earn $7 million
in 2014, and the Rays hold a
$7.5 million option on him for


2015 with a $500,000 buyout.
Escobar will get $5 million
after playing in a career-high
153 games and leading major
league shortstops with a .989
fielding percentage this sea-
son. There's also a $5 million
option on Escobar for 2015.
The Rays must decide on a
$6.5 million option on out-
fielder David DeJesus by mid-
night tonight. The team has
until Monday night to decide
on a $2 million option on
pitcher Juan Oviedo.


Pirates' Rodriguez
rejoins team for
$13 million
PITTSBURGH Pirates
left-hander Wandy Rodriguez
has exercised his $13 million
player option for 2014.
The 34-year-old went 6-4
with a 3.59 ERA for Pitts-
burgh, missing the final four
months of the season with
discomfort in his left forearm.
Rodriguez attempted to come


back from the discomfort
twice only to have it return.
His deal originally included
a team option, but it became
his when the Astros traded
him in July 2012. Houston
will pay $5.5 million of next
year's salary.
Rodriguez is 11-8 since the
Pirates acquired him. If
healthy, he could provide in-
surance in the starting rota-
tion if free agent A.J. Burnett
retires or signs elsewhere.
From wire reports


$10,000 for Hole-in-One
._ Golf Clubs
*And More!0

Registration due by: October 26
Proceeds benefit "Serving Our
Savior" Food Bank for local needs.
Download application at www.sothec.org or
call (352) 527-0052 for application and information
....... CUirRNlictF E


"S.


chronicleonline.com

your news. anywhere, anytime. i


Recreation BRIEFS


, veteran


lmK e erans
.... .reso sources


::L '' :: " "
!W '' [


B6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


SPORTS


1-1f









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


GERRY MULLIGAN/Chronicle


This sunrise over King's Bay is emblematic of the revitalization taking place in Crystal River.


A NEW DAY





DAWNING ON





CRYSTAL RIVER


here are some very good things happening in Crystal River.
The quiet "other" city in Citrus County is making progress
on multiple fronts. For years, not much happened in Crystal
River while the county seat of Inverness boomed and exploited the
great "small-town America" feel of its downtown area.
There are those in Crystal River who actually refer to Inverness as
the "Emerald City" because the Chronicle has frequently praised
some of the positive steps taken to develop business and community
activities.
Now things are coming together in Crystal River, and a lot of really
good things are happening at the same time.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The composition of the city council has
changed in recent years, and the leadership of
city manager Andy Houston has provided just the
right amount of motivation to get things done.
Some real momentum can be seen in the list of
projects, the growing citizen involvement and the
business expansion being seen.
One of the big steps the city manager just
pushed through the council is that Crystal River
has hired its first event planner, a position that
Inverness put in years ago to help coordinate and
manage community activities.
Leslie Bollin, a Citrus County native and Crys-
tal River High School graduate, has taken over
the new roll and has hit the ground running. She
has deep roots in the community, and her mom is


currently the principal at Crystal River Primary
School.
Her job will be to work with the Chamber, civic
clubs, the Heritage Village merchants, the mall
and businesses throughout town to promote the
city and plan more reasons for people to shop
and visit.
The Community Redevelopment Agency's re-
furbishing of Citrus Avenue has given the old
Main Street a new shot at success. The CRA fin-
ished a streetscaping project just in time for
Laura Lou Fitzpatrick's Scarecrow Festival at
Heritage Village.
The north and south sides of Citrus Avenue
have now filled up with restaurants, shops, an-
tique stores, a wine shop and a great Irish bar


Consider some of the other things happening
in Crystal River:
A new entertainment pavilion is almost com-
plete at the Third Street Park on King's Bay This
will be the spot where the city now routinely
plans musical presentations and events. Planner
Bollin sees great opportunity for sunset festivals
along the city pier
The Petrella property on U.S. 19 and Citrus
Avenue is being purchased by the city and the
county Under county commissioner Dennis
Damato's leadership, the east side of the prop-
erty is being developed into a bicycle trailhead.
The west side of the property will be owned by


Page C3


Wait before diving into Port Citrus project


I would like to share my
thoughts with the Citrus
County Port Authority
before any movement toward
the development of a Port
Master Plan is considered.
I would also like to rec-
ommend the port authority
consider the following
course of action.
Let us wait a bit and allow
these action items to move
forward, many of which are
under our control, and then


explore potential opportu-
nities based on their outcome.
Allow the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
and Board of County Com-
missioners to complete the
paved service road around
and under the northern
portion of the newly up-
graded barge canal bridge.
Investigate, design and
permit the construction of a
regional boat ramp project
adjacent to the service road


with available funding.
The scope for this com-
munity project should be a
master plan for the entire
project which could be con-
structed in phases based on
funding.
Keep in mind, the regional
boat ramp project received
a high ranking by the BOCC
for potential future funding
from the BP Deepwater
Horizon oil spill trust, which
may be available in 2014.


We should seek addi-
tional opportunities, like
supporting the relocation of
the Coast Guard Station
from Yankeetown to the
Cross Florida Barge Canal.
Investigation of oppor-
tunities for the utilization of
the unused existing "Sun
Cruise" property and dock-
age along the north side of
the barge canal should be
conducted.
Please remember this


property carries the desig-
nation of an approved De-
velopment of Regional
Impact (DRI) under Florida
growth planning regulations.
The BOCC should con-
tinue working on bringing
central sewer and water fa-
cilities to northwest Citrus
County Potential users
could include Seven Rivers
Regional hospital, the Duke
See PageC3


Dennis Damato
GUEST
COLUMN





OPage C2- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013



PINION


"Man's life is a warfare against the malice of men."
Baltasar Gracian, "The Art of Worldly Wisdom," 1647


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
m Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
S Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT




No winners



in botched



search for



tourism chief


hen the job offer to
Robert "Bob" Marx
was withdrawn last
week following published re-
ports of discrepancies in his
r6sum6, it ended an embar-
rassing and preventable situ-
ation that reflects poorly on
both the candidate and the
process. No one covered
themselves in glory as Marx
went from first choice of the
Tourist Development Council
(TDC) for the job as tourism
executive director to rejec-
tion by county
manager Brad THE I
Thorpe.
The only re- Tourism
deeming aspect of director
the entire episode with
is that once prob-
lems with Marx's OUR 01
resume surfaced
the issue was No w
dealt with swiftly in the
and decisively
In early October, when the
TDC board met to choose a
tourism executive director,
Marx was a last-minute add
as a third finalist, and after
the three gave presentations,
Marx was chosen as the pre-
ferred candidate.
However, since the TDC
board is an advisory commit-
tee to the county commission
and thus does not have final
hiring authority, it was up to
the county to negotiate a con-
tract and present it to the
commission for approval.
During this process, Marx's
application was reviewed by
the county government per-
sonnel office and terms of an
offer were negotiated, with
plans to bring his appoint-
ment to the commission at its
Nov. 5 meeting.
However, last Sunday the
Chronicle published a story
pointing out that Marx had
apparently exaggerated cre-
dentials on his resume to
make it appear he spent a
longer time on two similar
jobs than he actually spent.
This led to another review
of his resume, confirmation
that there were inaccuracies,


Enforce muffler law
Can someone at the Chronicle
please contact Sheriff Dawsy
and the Florida Highway Patrol
and get an answer to
why the Florida vehicle
mufflers laws are not 0
being enforced?
Editor's note: If you
know of a specific viola-
tion, call the sheriff's of-
fice at 352-726-4488.


Great deals
This is in answer to CAL
the person who called in 563r
about the "Give away 63-
canes and walkers,"
about giving them to
churches and they should give
them to secondhand stores. For
this person's information, there's
a great little store that most
people don't know about. It's in
the Crystal Square shopping


and a decision by Thorpe to
withdraw the original offer
It is now up to the TDC
board to determine whether
to reconsider one of the other
two candidates or begin the
hiring process anew
Before the board decides
on hiring another candidate,
it seems prudent to step back
and rethink this position and
determine what the county
really needs to do to market
itself, including whether it re-


ally needs

SSUE:
executive
job offer
jrawn.

PINION:
winners
process.


p
-C


a tourism execu-
tive director in
addition to the
current TDC ex-
ecutive director,
who is expected
to remain with
the agency.
If the decision
is to move for-
ward with an-
other candidate,
this experience


should sensitize everyone in-
volved so that there will be
more careful scrutiny of cre-
dentials claimed by the next
applicant. Even though the
applicant was selected by a
volunteer board, funding for
the job comes from taxes, so
the candidate should receive
the same review as any other
county applicant.
As part of its evaluation of
job candidates, the county
needs to strengthen the
process it follows for the re-
view of resumes. This process
should include verification of
the length of employment in
previous jobs claimed by an
applicant.
Had this been done, both
the county and the candidate
could have been spared an
embarrassing situation that
was completely preventable.
There were no winners.
The only positive from this
experience is that it gives the
TDC an opportunity to review
its tourism marketing needs,
and it gives county govern-
ment an incentive to tighten
up its candidate review
process so that this kind of
issue is avoided in the future.

center on (U.S.) 19 and it's a liq-
uidation store and they have
walkers, canes, they even have
the portable potty chairs for the
elderly and they have a good se-
lection. It's in the plaza
JND where Farmers Furni-
^- ture is, but it's down a
FF" little further.
You made his day
This is for the lady
who paid for the gentle-
man's pumpkin pie and
S honey buns in Publix
this morning, Sunday
)579 (Oct. 20), around, oh, I
) would say probably 10,
10:30. I would like to
thank you personally. You made
his day. He came home and told
me about it and said he didn't
believe people really did that. I
know for a fact they do, but I
just wanted to thank you for
being so kind to my neighbor.


A record you don't want to break


BY KATIE TRIPP
lorida's manatees are
having a record year Un-
fortunately, the records
they are breaking are measured
in carcasses washing ashore in
our coastal communities. A
"worst ever" red tide event ear-
lier this year in southwest
Florida and a lingering unusual
mortality event in the Indian
River Lagoon on Florida's east
coast have made it a really dif-
ficult year to be a manatee.
And to those who would
argue that "we have more man-
atees, so we have more deaths,"
let me stop you right there. The
deaths we are seeing have noth-
ing to do with the size of the
manatee population. These
deaths are not natural controls
on a growing population. They
are a loud and clear signal that
our waterways are in trouble.
When the 2010 manatee mor-
tality statistics were finalized at
766, that was significant, fright-
ening, and sad several hun-
dred more deaths than had ever
been recorded in a single year,
many the result of a prolonged
cold weather event. It was re-
garded as a rare event; an
anomaly Here we are again,


Guest COLUMN


As of Oct. 29,
2013, 769 Florida
manatees had died.
Of those, 123 were
stillborn, newborn
or young calves
less than five feet
in length.
fewer than three years later,
having broken that record only
10 months into the year As of
Oct. 29,2013,769 Florida mana-
tees had died. Of those, 123
were stillborn, newborn or
young calves less than five feet
in length another record -
and 49 of these were found in
Brevard County, at the epicen-
ter of the unusual mortality
event linked to a variety of algal
blooms and loss of 47,000 acres
of seagrass since 2010.
There's little question that
human mistreatment of the In-
dian River Lagoon had a hand to
play in the disastrous cascade


that began in 2010. On the south-
west coast, during the peak of
the red tide, manatees were
dying so fast that scientists did-
n't have the time or resources to
conduct postmortem exams on
all of them before committing
them to mass graves. Red tide is
another one of those natural
events to which our species
adds fuel to the proverbial fire
with our coastal nutrient runoff
If you haven't seen and felt
the effects of red tide or the algal
blooms in the Indian River La-
goon, then this column might
not mean very much to you. Our
species has a keen ability to ig-
nore that which we don't see
ourselves. Unfortunately, until
each of us accepts that we're
part of the problem, and even
more importantly, an integral
part of the solution, there's lit-
tle hope for our canaries in the
coal mines: our manatees and
their imperiled habitat.

Katie Tripp, Ph.D, is the
director of Science &
Conservation for Save
the Manatee Club.


L LETTERS to the Editor


Ensure nuclear plant
is decommissioned
properly
Thanks to Duke Energy for
providing highly qualified rep-
resentatives of the Decommis-
sioning Transition Organization
to discuss the processes and
(the eventual) deconstruction
of the Crystal River Nuclear
Plant (CRNP). The meeting was
hosted by the Citrus County
Council at the Beverly Hills
Lions Club Oct 9, and was well
attended and informative.
Once the audience spoke, some
very informative exchanges oc-
curred. We were struck by the
seemingly lack of awareness
this council and community
has in regards to the impact
decommissioning CRNP will
have on county resources. No
discussion at this meeting fo-
cused on the business impact
of decommissioning or on our
county leadership's ability to
oversee the processes, including
enforcing state and local stan-
dards throughout this endeavor
Just how will the EDC tout
rebranding Citrus County?
"Citrus County... come to where
they are storing radioactive waste
for years and years to come."
Not a picture we endorse.
Scott Adams was in attendance
at the meeting. One might ask
where was the rest of our
county leadership was. Each
opportunity the commissioners
have to interface with the elec-
torate in regards to this Duke
Energy undertaking should be
their focus for us to believe
they really are on the job.
Duke Energy will always be
invested in Duke Energy inter-
ests. But we retired in Citrus
County as have many, and those
and all county residents expect
much more aggressive oversight
by our elected officials. We
cannot be satisfied that Duke
has our complete interests in
mind. Duke owes this county the
support we deserve to trust but
verify that Duke's progress is as
stated in going down this avenue.
For example, the cost of de-
commissioning the nuclear re-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
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and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

actor at Humboldt Bay in Cali-
fornia (only 65 Mwe), having
operated only 14 years, esca-
lated from $114 million in 1983
to in excess of $900 million
today Note that the reactor
vessel and associated casson
have yet to be extracted.
We were informed our "allot-
ment' from the decommissioning
trust fund is about $650 million.
Do the math. We speculate dol-
lars will be spent before the first
real contaminated material is
even removed from the site. The
team already has this nasty lit-
tle problem of removing the
old steam generators and reac-
tor vessel head presently
stored onsite (incidentally, not
mentioned at the meeting).
In drastic contrast to Humboldt
Bay CRNP is a 1,000-Mwe unit
in operation for 30-plus years,
and the cleanup is massive, to
say the least Yet our county lead-
ership seems complacent in
managing our interests, appear-
ing unaware and non-reactive.
Wake up Citrus! We have a big
mess. We need to make sure it
all gets cleaned up right
We were sold that CRNP
would be reliably providing
power for years to come. As cit-


izens of this county, let's not get
caught without verifying that the
processes are being managed
and overseen. The decision as-
sociated with shutting down
CRNP hardly involved the citi-
zens of Citrus County, but the
decommissioning is another
matter It is not the stakeholders
or the customer who made that
decision; however, we as citizens
expect Duke to meet its obliga-
tions as a major contributor to
this community Our county of-
ficials need to reinforce those
obligations with full accounta-
bility on our county's behalf.
Gale K. Oates
Retired & CRNP mechanical
engineer (Progress Energy)
Harry B. Oates
Retired CRNP engineering
manager (Progress Energy)
Homosassa

Columnists missed
some Oz roles
The Oct. 9 opinion piece by
Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
"Republicans from Oz" was an
inciteful (not a misspelling) bit
of fluff that most certainly had
the authors congratulating
themselves on their cleverness
over their evening cocktails.
How exhilarating it must be to
be able to publicly assassinate
the character of anyone they
choose without fear of reprisal
or retaliation of any sort
Surprisingly, they left out
several juicy roles that could
be ably filled by a trio of their
own dear liberal Democrats.
For example, Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid would be
perfect in the role of the mayor
of liberal Munchkin Land
whose residents would surely
include Mr Cohn and Ms. Clift
The role of the Wicked Witch
was, no doubt, written specifi-
cally for Rep. Nancy Pelosi.
And who else could possibly
play the title role but the
"great and powerful" Ozbama,
whose expert use of smoke and
mirrors passes for leadership.
Jim Langenmayr
Pine Ridge


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What is it that makes Chicago a toddlin town?


"Chicago, Chicago, that
toddlin' town, Chicago,
Chicago, I'll show you
around. Bet your bottom
dollar, you'll lose the blues
in Chicago...."
"Chicago," Fred
Fisher, 1922.

I 'd never given it much
thought until recently,
but why do you sup-
pose Chicago was labeled
a toddlin' town? Assuming
that toddlin' is in refer-
ence to moving unsteadily
like a toddler, a young
child learning to walk,
could it be because folks in
Chicago were thought to
imbibe too much or per-
haps because the windy
city is so windy?
We'll come back to this a
little later
Daughter No. 2 is cur-


rently in the midst of one
of those adventures that
life sometimes presents.
Becky, her husband Kurt
and their children, Emily
and Eric, are in the
process of moving from
Houston to Chicago.
I believe that it was Lewis
Grizzard who said, "Chicago
has only two seasons of the
year, the Fourth of July
and winter" My personal
opinion is that it just isn't
right for a native-born,
sixth-generation Florida
Cracker to move to Chicago.
Of course, my personal
opinions are most often of
no importance at all.
We'll come back to this a
little later, also.
Just as her mother did
each time we found it nec-
essary to move, Becky is
taking it in stride and I'm


sure that wherever they the year We allowed it. To
are, she will make a won- have made her come with
derful, loving home for her us would have been a lose-
family lose situation, and letting
There is not enough col- her stay was a win-win.
umn space to The winning
elaborate on all factors were
of our moves,. that a) she
so I'll stick to loved us for let-
the last one. At _I ting her stay
the time we I and b) once she
moved from was with her
Tallahassee to family again,
Inverness in she had missed
1982, Beth was us so terribly
a sophomore at Fred Brannen she thought we
Rickards High A SLICE were the great-
School and was LIE est guys in the
the only 10th- OF LIFE whole wide
grade student world.
in the school's elite singing Now a similar decision
ensemble. The school year faces Becky and Kurt re-
was only two months away garding Emily Em is a
from being over and Beth sophomore and a starter
had been invited to stay on her huge high school's
with a friend and finish junior varsity basketball


team. She has an invita-
tion to stay in Houston
with a teammate's family
and finish the basketball
season. I shared my "lose-
lose or win-win" opinion
with Becky, which didn't
matter at all, but in the
end, Emily's parents made
what is an even better de-
cision than the one Cheryl
and I made: They are
going to let it be Emily's
choice, one which she has
not yet made. Why would
she even hesitate to stay
and play? Something as
important to Em as basket-
ball is her grades, and she
realizes that coming into a
new school during the sec-
ond semester could create
an academic problem. It
will be interesting to see
what she does, but all of us
- her parents and her


grandparents are confi-
dent that whatever she
does, Em will be just fine.
Back to my thoughts on
what makes Chicago a tod-
dling town: I think it's
both. It's tough to walk in
gale-force winds, and I've
observed that it is hard for
folks to walk straight after
they've had one too many
I expect to have a better
idea after Cheryl and I
make our first visit to
Chicago. I'll no doubt wob-
ble in the wind, and
though I plan to remain
stalwart in the face of
strong drink, if Lewis was
right about Chicago's
weather conditions....


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

the city CRA and eventually will be sold for ap-
propriate private development. This property
has been vacant for 40 years, and now something
positive is happening.
The Cutler Spur improvement project is al-
most finished on the back side of U.S. 19. This
route has always been used by locals who want
to stay off U.S. 19. A terrific bike path has been
constructed the full length of Cutler Spur, and it
will now connect the old downtown with the
Plantation Inn. Visitors will be able to bike the
city and enjoy our beauty
A redevelopment plan has been submitted to
the CRA and city and it calls for the rebuilding of
the commercial property along King's Bay and
Citrus Avenue. These proposals on parking,
storm water and setbacks will permit the valu-
able commercial property to be redeveloped
with new shops and restaurants. And yes, the all-
important Riverwalk project will be expanded
from Cracker's Restaurant all the way around
the bay
The city of Crystal River has agreed to seek
a 30-year extension on the CRA an effort that
will continue to provide tax dollars to make im-
provements happen in the old commercial sec-
tion of Crystal River. The CRA was going to
expire in five years, but with the extension many
more projects can be completed.
One exciting aspect of the redevelopment
plan is that the Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District has expressed a keen interest
in helping the city solve its stormwater problems.
The water agency has agreed to pay for half of
the study to find solutions, and funds will in-
evitably flow to do the construction.
The Chamber of Commerce, the county Eco-
nomic Development Council and the Tourist De-
velopment Council have all agreed to create a
new welcome center on U.S. 19 on the south side
of town. Through the generosity of property
owner Diane Damron, the three groups have
agreed to create a huge welcome center com-
plete with theater to let tourists see what great
things there are to do in our community This
concept has been talked about for 20 years and
now county and chamber officials are showing
the leadership to get it done.
The expansion of the city sewer system has
slowly been working its way through the resi-
dential neighborhoods on the south side of Crys-
tal River When this final project is complete,
Crystal River will have accomplished a goal 25
years in the making almost all of the septic
tanks will have been removed.
At the same time, the county has secured
grants to expand sewer lines from County Road
44 toward Fort Island Beach to get rid of the sep-
tic tanks and inefficient treatment plants. These
two efforts will create great progress in cutting
off pollution sources.
The purchase of the Three Sisters Springs
property will be fully understood in 2014 when
the property is finally open to residents and
tourists and tens of thousands of more people
visit our community to enjoy this gorgeous new
jewel of the Nature Coast.
The new leadership at the Plantation Inn is
more actively promoting tourism and group
events at the community's top resort.
The city, Duke Energy and SWFWMD are
continuing with the plan to move Crystal River's
treated effluent from its sewer plant on C.R. 495
all the way to the Duke Energy site north of town.
This is a double victory Duke will reduce the amount
of fresh water it pumps from the aquifer for its
energy site and Crystal River will have an envi-
ronmentally friendly way to dispose of its effluent
And finally, we can't forget Art Jones and
what he has done to turn the tide toward a public
commitment to clean up King's Bay and Crystal
River Jones' efforts started under the leader-
ship of the King's Bay Rotary Club began with
a small group of volunteers raking disgusting
weeds out of the river Now forces from all over
Florida have joined the effort. Steve Lamb and
the Save Crystal River group have pumped in
time and money to use mechanical harvesters to
pull weeds from the bay Citrus County,
SWFWMD and the state of Florida have all come
to the table with money and resources to help.
Sen. Charlie Dean has taken a personal lead-
ership role in finding money and resources to
help with the effort.
It finally feels like something positive is hap-
pening to clean up the mess we have made.
There are really many great things happening
in Crystal River right now, and they seem to be
coming to a head at the same time.
Inverness is the Emerald City, and we should
all be proud of its accomplishments. But Crystal
River is about to become the "Gleaming City on
the Bay" and we should be equally as proud.
For when leaders come together and make
good things happen, the momentum that creates
makes the future brighter for everyone.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


Good and evil,
government and not
Earlier this month the Chronicle ran
two letters on seemingly different
topics but sharing an underlying lib-
ertarian "power to the plutocracy"
theme. The first, by D.I. Larson, dealt
(rather strangely) with the subject of
"Good versus evil," while the second,
by Harley Lawrence, complained
about "government inefficiency"
Larson opens by suggesting that
while we are "thrust into a battle be-
tween good and evil" some of us are
too dumb to know the difference.
Larson proceeds to prove that they are
absolutely innocent of that knowl-
edge. For example, Larson stated "if
you are envious, greedy, dimwitted or
depraved, everything looks good to
you." Larson then cites a host of very
destructive heads of state whom they
think look good to the unfortunate
preceding groups.
Larson touches on those people, and
mentions "redistribution" as an un-
mitigated evil. Larson seems to suspect
we have "redistributed" from the poor
and middle class to the rich. Larson
doesn't seem to approve, and doesn't
seem to favor ameliorating the problem.
In the end, Larson cites feeling good
when we can "accomplish something
on our own" as the measure of worth
and the source of wisdom about good
and evil. It smacks more of the moral
philosophy of Freidrich Nietzsche
or Ayn Rand than anything in the
Judeo-Christian or classical traditions.
Harley Lawrence, on the other hand,
is still beating the drums against
government inefficiency However,
he seems to be overlooking one im-
portant point about Citrus Memorial
hospital: While the county may have
built it in ancient times, the deci-
sion was made, probably following
Mr Lawrence's logic, to rely on a


PORT
Continued from Page Cl

Energy complex, the pro-
posed United States Gyp-
sum wallboard plant, the
arsenic-contaminated pri-
vate water-well properties,
and the towns of Inglis and
Yankeetown.
Inglis is working with
Mittauer Engineering on
project planning and grant
funding options for a distri-
bution system which would
connect to the Citrus
County Utility System, pro-
viding bulk water and
wastewater to Inglis and
Yankeetown.
The northwest quad-
rant of Citrus County has
been approved by the
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection for
grant funding to provide
potable drinking water due


Letters to THE EDITOR
private-sector company, the CMH
Foundation, to actually run it The
Foundation is a private, and nominally
not-for-profit corporation, though it
seems to be able to pay corporate-style
executive compensation, build a
network of health care businesses on
the hospital, and spend large sums of
money fighting the board which was
supposed to monitor some aspects of
its operation as well challenging the
constitutionality of state legislation.
The emergency room where Mr
Lawrence spent two 10-hour stints
cannot be blamed on government in-
efficiency Like the perfectly run
school buses in the libertarian utopia
from which Mr Lawrence hails, it
has been contracted out. In fact, I
seem to have heard that the prime
contractor actually subcontracted
the emergency room.
Never fear HCA is planning to buy
the place. When our governor was in
charge of that continuing criminal
enterprise it set a record for Medicare
fraud, but has been outdone by
Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline. With
more hospitals under its control,
and as a wholly owned subsidiary of
Bain Capital, perhaps it can make
another go at the record.
Curiously that highly inefficient
government operation, the British
National Health Service, costs (ac-
cording to The Economist) a whopping
$3,489 per capital. Our own highly ef-
ficient robber-baron health care sys-
tem, on the other hand, costs $8,440
per capital. The Brits on average live
only an average of 80.4 years. They are
24th among nations in life expectancy
We, with what Bob Dole called "The
best health care in the world," live
an average of 78.8 and rank 44th.
Of course, in civilized countries
health care is organized to serve the
people. In ours it is optimized for
profit maximization. In that respect


to high arsenic levels in the
contaminated groundwater
This service area also lies
in the Citrus County Five-
Year Water and Wastewater
Master Plan approved
unanimously by the BOCC.
This portion of Citrus
County is also included in
the Withlacoochee Re-
gional Water Supply Au-
thority (WRWSA) Five-Year
Water Supply Master Plan,
which is currently being
updated, with completion
due in early 2014.
The Water Supply Master
Plan includes alternative
water sources and a future
desalination plant located
at the Duke Energy complex.
The Port Authority also
needs to wait to discover
the results and potential lo-
cations for future economic
development activities per
the study currently being
conducted by the Economic
Development Council


(EDC), as northwe
County is the hor
Enterprise Zone.
We need to al
Director Brad Th
opportunity to cont
efforts to pursue
and public/privateI
and industrial invE
and future port (
ment opportunities
Port Citrus in nc
Citrus County.
In summation,
lowing component
be explored:
Recreational
nities;
Existing and p
infrastructure proj
Roadway i
ments around 1
graded barge cana
including the exte
the Suncoast Park'
The expansion
and wastewater facial
The results oft]
economic deve


we are indeed No. 1: We have the
richest doctors, lawyers, and corporate
executives in the known universe.
Pat Condray
Ozello

Constitution law of the land
In response to 'The Law of the land"
letter to the editor: This author has
a flawed argument supporting the
health care overhaul. He states that
this is law of the land, which is true,
but fails to mention that this law is
not being followed by the president
in the way it was passed.
This author did not mention that the
executive branch of our government
must follow and enforce laws as they
are passed by the legislative branch
as written. No where was there a de-
layed employer mandate for one
year for big business, nor was their a
delayed mandate for unions. In ad-
dition, there was no exemption for
Congress. These were all done by
this president against the provisions
in U.S. Constitution.
It appears President Obama picks
and chooses which laws he likes and
which he does not. This is not the
president's choice to decide.
The tea party is not the problem
in this country Our country needs
more people that believe in the writ-
ten Constitution and a government
that lives within it means. If this
sounds so radical to liberals, we are
in deep trouble as a country No one
has the right to call the Tea Party ex-
treme, when others that disagree
are the extremist Thank God for
people who care about the financial
stability and respect of our founding
document, the U.S. Constitution.
Rocco Jerome
Beverly Hills


st Citrus study, currently in progress.
ne of an These action items
should be viewed as the
low Port drivers to further study de-
orpe the velopment a Port Master
tinue his Plan.
private The BOCC, acting as the
business port authority, needs to
estments nurture a climate of private
develop- and public/private business
s around ventures that creates goods
northwest and services requiring
transportation into and out
the fol- of Citrus County by road-
:s should ways, rail and water
Knowing and under-
opportu- standing the outcomes of
the items I have outlined
proposed would truly define and de-
jects; termine the future success
mprove- of Port Citrus.
the up- I believe this is a prudent
1 bridge, course of action at this par-
*nsion of ticular time.
way;
Sof water
cities; and Dennis Damato is the
he EDC's District 1 commissioner
lopment for Citrus County


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013



Pop quiz for breakfast
Regarding an article in the
Chronicle a few weeks ago per-
taining to a courtyard breakfast
for Citrus High School: 1. What
is the total cost? 2. Has a sur-
vey been taken of the students
who do not attend the breakfast
in the cafeteria to ascertain why
they fail to appear? 3. When Mr.
Pistone was questioned if any
tax money would be used, he
replied, "None." He stated the
Food Services Department uti-
lizes surplus funds received for
diverse facilities, needs and
equipment, positions and ware-
house staff and renovations.
Also, he stated a lot of these
costs are taken off of the gen-
eral fund that runs day-to-day
operations of the school dis-
trict. 4. I'd like to know just how
this is not considered as tax
money. Also, this will require
more faculty to monitor both
the cafeteria and courtyard to
maintain discipline and to see
that the area is free of trash.
Look for clean records
The person who wrote that
Sound Off about housecleaning
people, who do you trust? If they
would sit and read the call they
put in Sound Off and stop and
think about it. If you're so con-
cerned about how you want to find
a person who is trustworthy to
come in your house, you do re-
search first. You don't wait until
they come in and they look at
every nook and cranny and cor-
ner in your house and then not
trust them. But there are ways
of finding good people; word of
mouth, some people turn bad
names in to the Better Business
Bureau. There's a lot of sources
of information. Just talking and
asking them for references and
learning a little bit so you can do
background checks on people.


COMMENTARY


Sound OFF


7 w: R 1: Mr. m el


Daj 1: The Launch


atartirng Day 2. : Anothe r Government Bailodt

Mouth, meet feet Invading coyote space Destroying property


You know, where was the Save
the Manatee Club when the
Adopt-a-Shore cleanup was taking
place? Where were they at the
Swiftmud meetings talking about
water-flow levels of these local
rivers that they seem to care so
much about? Surely they can
see that saltwater intrusion is
taking over and eventually will
kill the habitat of the manatees.
They have no interest in that.
Tough on bugs
If you want to know how you
get your love bugs off your car,
please use baby shampoo. It
does work. They say use dryer
sheets? It does not work. What
does work is baby shampoo.
Please use baby shampoo.


I read the story about that
coyote in Sugarmill Woods.
Let's capture all those coyotes
and deport them to where they
came from. Oh, wait a minute,
coyotes were here before hu-
mans. Gee, maybe we're en-
croaching into their property. If
you move to where there's
woods around you, you're going
to have wild animals. If you did-
n't want the wild animals, you
should have stayed in a city, not
moved down here and tried to
complain about the animals.
Animals were here first. I
moved here. Do I complain
about it? No. Do I have coyotes
and foxes and all kinds of ani-
mals around my house? Yes. Do
I worry about it? No. Get a life.


Berry pickers. I read the let-
ter in Saturday's paper (Oct.
19) about the berry pickers
(saying) why don't the people in
Pine Ridge leave them alone,
that they're trying to make a liv-
ing. My response to them would
be because you're trespassing
on people's property and you're
destroying their palm trees and
plants that they have around
their yard that they'd like to
keep in nature, in natural ways.
They don't want them de-
stroyed by you guys digging in
there and ripping the plants
apart to get to these berries to
earn a living. There's other jobs
out there that you could earn a
living on without destroying
other people's property.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to
THE EDITOR


Road condition
appalling
I have called North
Reynolds Avenue into the
road maintenance department
because of the condition.
This road is very rippled
from one end to the other. I
have taken a ride on this road
and can tell you that there is
something very wrong with
the surface of this road.
The reason for this letter
is because the Board of
County Commissioners cut
another $1,188,000 from
road maintenance and once
again put public safety at
risk. In years past this board
continued to underfund the
county road maintenance
department to the tune of
more than $2 million; in
total it comes to more than
$3 million. My question to
this board is: What is more
important the safety of the
citizens that drive on the
roads or all the senior citi-
zen centers it continues to
fund? County roads are a
municipal responsibility,
not senior citizen centers.
As for that petition that
was filed with the road
maintenance department
back in 1989, well, nothing
in the record shows that
one was on file to repair
that road. The records do
show that at one time that
was a gravel road. I like to
thank Joyce Hall and
Christopher Mc Pheeters
for bringing this road condi-
tion to the attention of the
Chronicle readers.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon


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TECHNOLOY3,



TECHNOLOGY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


With new models

aid price cuts,

Apple is making it

tougher for customers

to choose

in a good way.






__ I- 1-3


Better Mac screens



tempting with price cut


ANICK JESDANUN
Associated Press

CUPERTINO, Calif
The choice was simpler when I
was shopping around for a
new Mac laptop a year ago: I
could have spent $500 more
for a nicer screen and less
weight, or I could have put some of that
toward a faster processor, more storage
and more internal memory and still
have $200 left over I chose power over
style.
A MacBook Pro laptop with a high-
resolution screen measuring 13.3
inches diagonally now starts at $1,299,
or just $100 more than the heavier ver-
sion with the regular screen, the one I
ultimately bought. That's the result of a
$200 price cut in February and another
$200 cut last week.
Last week, Apple also slashed the
starting price of its 15.4-inch high-


resolution model by $200, to $1,999.
Apple also made the new laptops
faster and extended their battery life,
thanks to new, power-saving chips from
Intel Corp. and a new operating sys-
tem, Mavericks, designed to fully take
advantage of those chips. These new
Pros are the first Macs with Mavericks
built in.
Without getting too technical, Maver-
icks is better at grouping little tasks
into larger bursts, so that the processor
can stay in a low-power mode for
longer
I got more than 12.5 hours of word
processing and spreadsheet use on the
new 15-inch model and nearly nine
hours of iTunes video. Officially, Apple
promises eight hours on the 15-inch
model and nine hours on the 13-inch
one, compared with seven hours before
on both. (Streaming video doesn't fare
as well, as is typical with laptops; I got
about six hours of Hulu on the 15-inch
unit I tested.)
Apple didn't change the screens on


the high-resolution models, which the
company terms "Retina." It didn't need
to.
Video looks great, as the screen reso-
lution is more than enough for high-
definition video. But text is where I no-
ticed the most difference: Letters are
clearer and sharper, appearing the way
they would in a paperback book. On my
non-Retina MacBook Pro, I notice the
individual dots, or pixels, that are put
together to form characters. The
Retina models have four times as many
pixels as the standard models, enabling
smoother characters.
Inside, there's faster graphics tech-
nology from Intel. And Apple offers a
$2,599 15-inch model that also has an
Nvidia graphics processor for even bet-
ter performance. All of the new Retina
models have an emerging Wi-Fi tech-
nology called 802.1 lac. It promises up
to three times the speed and wider
range than before, though you need
newer Wi-Fi routers that support that
standard to get the full benefits.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil extends drop
toward $96 a barrel

LONDON -The price of oil
continued to fall on Friday as con-
cerns over high supplies offset a
report showing China's power-
hungry manufacturing sector is
strengthening.
Benchmark U.S. crude for De-
cember delivery was down 14 cents
at $96.24 a barrel by late morning in
Europe in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
The contract fell 39 cents on Thurs-
day, leaving it down 5.8 percent for
the month of October
A suggestion of stronger demand
came Friday from two reports on
Chinese manufacturing that
showed an uptick in activity
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational crude also used by
U.S. refineries, fell 26 cents to
$108.58 a barrel on the ICE
exchange in London.

Stocks muted with rise
in Chinese industry
LONDON Global markets were
muted Friday despite an uptick in
U.S. and Chinese manufacturing ac-
tivity, as investors continued to fret
that the U.S. Federal Reserve will
cut its stimulus as soon as January
Germany's DAX shed 0.3 percent
to close at 9,007.83 and France's
CAC-40 dropped 0.6 percent to
4,273.19. Britain's FTSE 100 rose
0.1 percent to 6,734.74.
Earlier, Japan's Nikkei 225, the
Asian heavyweight, fell 0.9 percent
to close at 14,201.57, weighed down
by the dollar dipping below 98 yen
and an 11 percent plunge in Sony
Corp. shares after it Thursday re-
ported a 19.3 billion yen ($196 mil-
lion) quarterly loss.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng crept up
0.2 percent while Australia's
S&P/ASX 200 shed 0.4 percent
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


Trade-off considerations when shopping:


* Mac computers are generally more expen-
sive than their Windows counterparts. You
can get a Windows laptop for a few hundred
dollars. The cheapest Mac laptop is $999. But
you get quality at that price. Comparable
Windows laptops, known as ultrabooks, cost
more than $1,000. These are slim and light,
like the Retina Pros. They also have touch
screens, which Macs lack. Some Windows
laptops also have better exteriors. The alu-
minum casing on all Mac laptops is prone to
scratches and dents, though Apple promotes
it as "highly recyclable."
* Apple will still sell a non-Retina 13-inch
MacBook Pro for $1,199, though it is discon-
tinuing the 15-inch version. The 13-inch
Retina version weighs a pound less than the
standard one, at about 3.5 pounds. It's also
thinner, at 0.71 inch rather than 0.95 inch on
the standard model. But the Retina model
lacks an Ethernet port for wired Internet
connections. It also doesn't have a drive for
CDs and DVDs. So there's less weight, but
also fewer options to plug things in.
* The Retina model gets thin and light partly


by ditching a spinning hard drive. It uses flash
storage instead, but that costs more. The base
13-inch Retina model comes with 128 giga-
bytes, or about a quarter of the 500 gigabytes
for the standard model. You can pay more to
get as much as 1 terabyte of storage on either
machine. The cheapest Retina option with that
storage is $2,299, while the cheapest standard
option is just $1,299. Keep in mind that flash
storage is faster than traditional drives. For the
15-inch model, you get 256 gigabytes to start
and can need to spend at least $2,799 for a
1-terabyte laptop.
* You can still go light for less money by sac-
rificing the better screen. A 13-inch MacBook
Air costs $1,099 and weighs less than 3
pounds. So that's a half pound and $200 off
the Retina model. Apple also has an 11-inch
MacBook Air for $999. The Airs have the
power-saving chips found in the latest
Retina Pros, so you can get a full working
day of battery life on a single charge. The
processors in the Air aren't as fast as those in
the new Pros, but I've found the Air rather
speedy much faster than my standard Pro
from last year.


SMART
MONEY


* If you want a 15-inch MacBook, you need
to get the Retina model.
* You have three choices for the 13-inch
model: $1,099 gets you the Air; $1,199 gets
you the standard Pro, with more storage but
also more weight than the Air; and $1,299
gets you the Retina Pro, which has a nicer
screen and less weight than the standard
Pro, but the same amount of storage as the
Air.


Keep an


eye on


value of


annuity

EAR BRUCE: My wife is
60 years old, and I am 59. In
addition to $300,000 in other
investments, she has around
$200,000 in a variable annuity,
which went way down in 2008, but
has since recovered. With the Dow
at 15,000, I am pleading with her to
get out of it and simply park it for
the time being.
She just resigned today from her
job at the hospital. She will have to
pay COBRA for a while until a new
position comes along. She doesn't
take my advice, but maybe she will
take yours. I used to listen to you
on WMCA
-N.N., via email
DEAR N.N.: As a former listener
on WMCA, which takes us back
more than 30 years, you and I have
been together for a long time.
Whether your wife will listen to me
is another question.
Since the variable annuity has
been around for quite some time
- you mentioned it went down in
2008, which means it has been
around for five years or more -
the likelihood is that you can get
out without any type of penalty If
you are nervous about the value
changing a substantial part of your
investment portfolio, I have no
quarrel with keeping an eye on it
See Page D4


CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON U.S. factory activity
expanded in October at the fastest pace
in 2 1/2 years, suggesting that the 16-day
partial shutdown of the government had
little effect on manufacturers.
Instead, overseas demand and
healthy U.S. auto sales appear to be
supporting factory output. The housing
recovery is also lifting the furniture
and wood products industry despite a
recent slowing in home sales.
"We've become accustomed to the
way Washington operates in the past
couple of years and assume that it will
get resolved eventually, however
painfully" said Bradley Holcomb,
head of the survey committee of the
Institute for Supply Management, a
trade group of purchasing managers


that on Friday reported a solid manu-
facturing figure for October
The ISM's manufacturing index rose
to 56.4 from 56.2 in September A read-
ing above 50 indicates growth.
Factories also expanded in Europe
this month, though at a slightly slower
pace, according to surveys in that re-
gion. Manufacturing indexes have all
picked up in China, Japan, and South
Korea.
The overseas strength is boosting de-
mand for U.S. factories. A measure of
export orders jumped to its highest
level in nearly a year and a half in Oc-
tober, the ISM report said.
"The outlook for manufacturing
looks far more constructive now than
it did over the past several months, in
light of the improving global back-
drop," said Michael Dolega, an econo-
mist at TD Economics.
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases factory or-
ders for August and September,
10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Institute for
Supply Management releases its
service sector index for October,
10 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Health and
Human Services Secretary Kath-
leen Sebelius testifies before the
Senate Finance Committee about
the health care law
BERLIN Economy Ministry
releases September industrial or-
ders figures for Germany, Europe's
biggest economy


Manufacturing expands at best pace in two years




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCORE in need of transplants for volunteer efforts


Volunteers who become
SCORE-certified small-
V business mentors are like
transplants. They come from
different parts to resettle, re-
tire and live in Citrus County
They are, often, men and
women with years of experi-
ence in a variety of business
disciplines, and they choose to
stay active. A rocking chair for
the front porch is definitely not
in their plans.
Once they settle in and ex-
plore the amenities and bene-
fits of Citrus County, they tend
to volunteer for an important
cause. Citrus County and the
transplants both benefit.

Volunteering has benefits
Social interaction, psycholog-
ical income and better health
- all can lead to a fulfilling re-
tirement experience. For active
people, longevity is often a
plus. SCORE's volunteer certi-
fied business mentors have it
all. So whether you have corpo-
rate, professional or small-busi-
ness experience, you matter!
SCORE, Citrus County and
those who will seek your help


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

EXPERIENCE
MATrERS


welcome you.
SCORE counselors know ex-
perience matters. If you are
willing to share your skills, ex-
perience and expertise, be-
come a SCORE volunteer
SCORE can be your time to
"give back" to help others in
business. Why not earn some
psychological income with a
good dose of social interaction?
Citrus County is a great place to
do that!

SCORE volunteer compensation
Everyone knows volunteers
work for free. The compensa-
tion for volunteering is often
viewed as "psychological in-
come." It's the old concept that


"man does not live by bread
alone." When a person helps
another in need, the tone of the
human feeling differs signifi-
cantly from work for financial
compensation. When you give
of yourself and what you know
from your experience, you give
a priceless gift
Social interaction is viewed
by the medical profession as
supportive of good health and
longevity When you are sought
for your advice, someone is
showing you respect and honor-
ing what you know How about
that for a positive feeling?

SCORE mentor perks and
benefits
All officers of SCORE Na-
tional Association and local
SCORE chapter member-volun-
teers have personal liability
protection against tort claims
by people dealing with SCORE
volunteers. Whether these
claims arise from counseling,
workshops or other alleged ac-
tions or inactions, counselors
are protected by the Federal
Tort Claims Act (FTCA). The
U.S. Small Business Adminis-


tration classifies and places
every SCORE mentor into a
special employee-like category
Congress, under the Small
Business Act, granted SCORE
volunteers the same protection
given to federal employees.
SCORE members are not sub-
ject to civil claims or lawsuits
from SCORE activities. These
protections include not paying
monetary claims, legal fees,
court costs and other costs inci-
dental to the defense.
This legal safeguard does
have exceptions. A SCORE
member can't intentionally
break a law More specifically,
torts committed outside of
SCORE activities, committed
with malice, intent to injure,
gross negligence and constitu-
tional torts are not covered
under this legislation.
The latter offence is an act
that violates one or more
rights protected under the
Constitution.

SCORE medical benefits
If a SCORE counselor is in-
jured while on SCORE busi-
ness, the Federal Employee


Compensation Act (FECA) of-
fers compensatory benefits.
Since SCORE volunteers are
not compensated monetarily,
FECA will cover the cost of in-
jury, disability or death at the
GS Grade Level 11. This protec-
tion extends to travel for legiti-
mate SCORE business.
Reimbursement compensation
is based on legitimate claims.
At all times, a SCORE member
must be on legitimate business
for SCORE.

Interested in SCORE?
Citrus SCORE is located on
the Citrus County campus of
the College of Central Florida.
Office hours are 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday Call 352-249-1236 for
an appointment. If calling out-
side office hours, leave your in-
formation so we can call you
back.

Dr. Frederick J. Herzog, PhD
is the Immediate Past Presi-
dent/Chairman of Citrus County
SCORE. He can be reached via
email: fherzog@tampabay.
rr.com.


FACTORY
Continued from Page Dl

U.S. factory activity has now
risen at an increasingly fast
pace for five straight months,
according to the ISM's index. In
October, a measure of new or-
ders rose slightly And a gauge
of production fell but remained
at a high level. Factories added
jobs, though more slowly than
in September
The shutdown did depress
activity at some companies that
make metal products and elec-
trical equipment And while the
survey's findings suggest
stronger output in coming
months, the most recent meas-
ures of factory production re-
main tepid.
"The strength of this hasn't
yet been reflected in actual
manufacturing output" said
Amna Asaf, an economist at
Capital Economics.
On Monday, the Federal Re-
serve said factories barely in-


Associated Press
Employees at Sheffield Platers Inc. work on the factory floor in San Diego. The Institute for Supply
Management issues its U.S. manufacturing index for October on Friday.


creased their output in Septem-
ber Automakers produced
more. But that gain was offset


by declines at companies that
make computers, furniture and
appliances.


Companies reduced demand
in September for industrial ma-
chinery, electrical equipment


and other core capital goods
that signal investment, the gov-
ernment said last week. And
August's figures for those or-
ders were revised down.
Economists pay particular at-
tention to core capital goods,
which exclude aircraft and de-
fense-related goods, because
they reflect business confi-
dence.
Analysts were also encour-
aged by a survey of companies
in the Chicago region, released
Thursday It found that the com-
panies expanded at their
fastest pace in more than two
years in October New orders
jumped, and hiring also rose.
Still, economists don't expect
manufacturing to boost eco-
nomic growth in the coming
months. Growth likely fell to a
weak annual rate between 1.5
percent and 2 percent in the
July-September quarter from a
2.5 percent pace in the April-
June period.
Most economists expect simi-
larly slow growth in the final
three months of the year


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Cii.)NNICL


D2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


BUSINESS







D3


CITRrRus COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Ferris Farms' Dudley Calfee wins
praise of agriculture commissioner


The Chamber

welcomes new

member with

ribbon-cutting
JC Penny Realty, LLC
201-694-3982
Maria R. Castro-Aversano
maria @jcpennyrealty.com


From left: Dudley Calfee, Diane Calfee, Commissioner Adam Putnam, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs.

udley Calfee of Ferris Farms was awarded the 2013 Commissioner's
Agricultural Environmental Leadership Award. This award recognizes
agricultural enterprises that demonstrate leadership in developing and
implementing innovative techniques to safeguard the environment and conserve
natural resources. Read more about Dudley Calfee and Ferris Farms' environmental
efforts at FreshfromFlorida.com and click on Ag Environmental Leadership Awards.


Publix hosts grand opening

and ribbon-cutting in Inverness

T he Chamber welcomes
'l Publix to its new location
at the Publix Shoppes at
Inverness, located at U.S. 41
and State Road 44,
.. Inverness. There was a
tremendous turnout for
the grand opening.


LAke
Hermando
FLO~RID)A


Dragon Boat4'

Festival
.lva.'

November 16,2013
c March15,2014 4b o,
1, Y Friendly EL,,, M
S Bring Blankets & Chairs sT 4'
Food Beer & Wine for sale
~Kids Zone Craft Vendors ,
BUILD A TEAM ;:*
Great fun! No Prior Experience. ',, &'
Build a team of 21. Support a Charity W "i
Train with established teams and coaches.
Fastest Growing Sport Worldwide
VkO -DLE Up, f
^k \\V* Wtluned Warr ProrFJecl /
:, -. % >-,, : :., ,
352-400-0960 "" 352-795-3149
La eeHlemeo DagnBB S


Front row, from left: Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit
Union; Jim Penny, Maria R. Castro-Aversano; Deb
Penny; Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank. Second row,
from left: Arlene Murray; Estella Penny. Third row,
from left: Sarah Fitts, First International Title;
Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Lillian Smith,
Mary Kay Cosmetics; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Joe
Aversano; Christine Finer; Carol Baker; Pat
Louque; Jim Loque; Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus
Hills; and Greg Finer.

Chamber open on
Saturday to assist
visitors through
busy season
The Chamber is supporting local
tourism with the addition of
Saturday hours (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.)
through Feb. 1, 2014. Our Saturday
customer service representative is
working out of the Crystal River
Chamber office at 28 NW U.S. 19 and
will assist visitors and callers.


Chamber events
Nov. 7 Business After Hours Mixer
hosted by the Hospice of Citrus County, 5
to 7 p.m. at 8471 W. Periwinkle Drive, Suite
C, Homosassa.
Nov. 8 Chamber Luncheon sponsored
by HPH Hospice with guest speaker Tobey
Hunter Phillips, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club, 505
E. Hartford St., Hernando.

Community news
and events
Nov. 1 to 20 Citrus United Basket/Arbor
Trail Rehab Food Drive. Please donate
canned food and boxed goods to Arbor Trail
Rehab and Skilled Nursing Center at 611
Turner Camp Road, Inverness, or call 352-
637-1130 for more information.
November Partnership Food Drive: United
Way of Citrus County, Citrus County Bless-
ings and Citrus County Senior Services.
Nov. 3 to 9 food donation request: milk in
8-ounce boxes; chicken in water, 4.5 ounces;
and any flavor Ensure. Drop off at: Apopka
Marine, Center State Bank, Church of Christ,
Clerk of Courts Inverness, Floral City Library,
Hampton's Edge Trailside Bicycle, Harvest
Food Room, Inverness Golf & Country Club,
Landmark Realty, Park Avenue, Regions
Bank, Sherri's Bliss Hair Salon, St. Paul's
Lutheran, Suncoast Schools Federal Credit
Union and West Citrus Government Center.
More information at citrusunitedway.org.


WYKETV Channel 16 or Digital 47
YouTube.com/CitrusChamberVideos
CitrusCountyChamber.com


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


HEALTH and Business Women's Alliance
FITNESS Thank You
to Our Sponsors
Frsenting5ponsor
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Tranquiitu
Advanced Urology Specialists
Citrus Memorial Health System
Genesis Women's Center Medical Spa
Tobacco Free Florida-Citrus County Health Department
5erenitq
Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute
Revive
HPH Hospice
Senior Home Care
Walgreens
Live Remote
Comfort Keepers
Genesis Women's Center Medical Spa
Cattledog Coffee Roasters Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County Jazzercize Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Citrus 95 / Fox Classic Hits 96.7
LifeSouth Community Blood Centers
Mary Kay Cosmetics (Lillian Smith)/New Concepts
Hair Salon/Walk Don't Run Travel
Nature Coast EMS New Image Med Spa
Publix Supermarkets Rodan + Fields, Dermatologists
SellAView Indoor Digital Advertising
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric, Inc.
Sweetbay Supermarket Inverness
Tally-Ho Vacations




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Job fair for veterans slated for Wednesday


We know the economy is
recovering, albeit at its
own hurry-up-slow-
down-start-again pace. The lat-
est unemployment rate for
Citrus County is 8 percent,
down from 10.1 percent the
same time last year when 5,795
here were out of work. And in
the months ahead, we expect
those numbers to improve.
So yes, that's encouraging.
But for the 4,577 among us who
are still unemployed, that good
news hasn't hit close enough to
home. And while every job
seeker is important, at this time
of year we are especially mind-
ful of those who have served
their country and put them-
selves in harms way to protect
our freedoms.
In Citrus County, we owe a
debt of gratitude to 20,085 vet-
erans. First and foremost:


Laura
Bymes

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


thank you. Recognizing your
contributions on Nov 11, Veter-
ans Day, is one way to convey
our gratitude. Another very real
way is to help veterans who
have fought our battles only to
return home to battle unem-
ployment
What do we know about vet-
eran employment? According
to therecently released US Cen-
sus Bureau's 2012 American


Community Survey, we know
that there are 6,166 veterans
age 18 to 64 with a labor force
participation rate of 63.7 per-
cent, which gives us a veteran
labor force of 3,928. In a worst-
case scenario, that means there
are 471 jobless veterans.
Veterans with the lowest un-
employment rate, at 2.3 per-
cent, are those age 55 to 64. Of
the 2,051 vets in this age group,
only 48 are out of work. The
group with the greatest number
of jobless are those 35 to 54
with 333 unemployed out of a
labor force of 1,691, for an un-
employment rate of 19.7 per-
cent. And nearly half of the 179
veterans in the labor force age
18 to 34 are unemployed.
What can we do to help?
Florida House Rep. Jimmie T
Smith came up with a good sug-
gestion: hold a job fair for


veterans. At the time Rep.
Smith, himself an Army vet-
eran, proposed the idea, we
were well under way with plans
for our annual Fall Job Fair in
partnership with the College of
Central Florida.
The job fair, open to all job
seekers, takes place Wednesday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at CF's
campus in Lecanto. With Veter-
ans Day right around the cor-
ner, however, it also seemed a
perfect time to include special
programming at the job fair for
veterans.
In addition to meeting with
more than a dozen local em-
ployers all with jobs to fill -
veterans are invited to attend
"Reboot: Job Search Strategies
for Veterans" at 8 a.m. or 10
a.m. as well as meet with Work-
force Connection veterans rep-
resentatives to learn about


veteran-friendly employers and
programs.
There is no charge to attend
the job fair or the workshop.
For more information about
the job fair and the employers
planning to attend, visit the
Calendar of Events at
www.workforceconnection
fl.com or call the Workforce
Connection One-Stop Career
Center in Inverness at 352-637-
2223, extension 3206 or 1270. To
sign up for the veterans work-
shop, call 800-434-JOBS,
extension 1416 or 4205.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is com-
munications manager for Work-
force Connection and a Florida
Certified Workforce Profes-
sional. She can be reached at
800-434-5627, ext. 1234 or
LByrnes@ Workforce
ConnectionFL. corn.


Falling inflation another headache for European bank


Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany On top of
high unemployment and sluggish
growth, the European Central Bank has
a new headache: an unexpected drop in
inflation.
Most people think lower inflation is
good news because it makes things eas-
ier to buy and usually it is. But the
current slide is just another sign of how
weak the economic recovery is in the 17
countries that use the euro.
An official report this week showed a
surprise drop in the inflation rate to 0.7
percent in September from 1.1 percent
the month before. That's well below the
ECB's stated goal of close to but below 2
percent that it considers ideal for the
economy
But the monetary authority for the eu-
rozone may be running short of tools to
deal with the problem.


TELLJ.,-TALE SIGN
The drop in inflation shows demand
is weak: people aren't able or willing to
risk spending or borrowing. Sellers can't
raise prices as much.
That remains the case in the euro-
zone, where unemployment is at a
record of 12.2 percent and the economy
only just emerged from a long recession
with anemic growth of 0.3 percent in the
second quarter The worst outcome
would be outright deflation. That's an
economic death spiral, when a chronic
fall in prices leads people to hold off
spending because they know goods will
become cheaper Europe is still some
distance from that.
Much of the downdraft comes from
countries having the most trouble from
the debt crisis. In Portugal, Ireland and
Spain, inflation has been lower than the
eurozone average and prices even
fell 1 percent in hardest-hit Greece in


September Wages fell in those countries,
too. Labor cost increases have slowed in
the eurozone as a whole, to an annual 0.9
percent in the second quarter
TIME TO CUT?
The ECB has already used up most of
its traditional medicine: lower interest
rates. Its benchmark rate what it
charges to loan to banks is at 0.5 per-
cent, the lowest since the euro was in-
troduced in 1999.
A few analysts say the ECB might trim
the benchmark rate again next week.
Howard Archer, an analyst at IHS
Global Insight, said the inflation figure
had "moved the goal posts" and that a
cut was "very much on the agenda." The
euro has fallen in the past day, a sign
some investors expect the ECB to act.
Others say the ECB is unlikely to be
prodded into action by one month's
worth of data, since its own inflation
forecast isn't due until December


NEGATIVE RATES
Besides trimming its benchmark refi-
nancing rate, the ECB could bring its
deposit rate what it pays banks on
money they keep with the ECB below
its current level of zero.
That would in theory push banks to
stop stashing money at the ECB. But it
could also backfire. Banks might simply
pass on the cost to customers in the
form of higher interest rates. And a neg-
ative rate could hurt bank profits at a
time when regulators are trying to
strengthen banks' finances.
CHEAP LOANS
The ECB could also make another
long-term offer of cheap credit to banks.
Two earlier such offers of just over 1
trillion euros helped stabilize the bank-
ing system during the debt crisis.
Yet the banks might simply use the
money to buy government bonds instead
of lending and stimulating the economy


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

as long as it's doing well. The moment it starts to sink,
you should consider getting out or deciding at what
point you will.
You didn't indicate what your wife does at the hospi-
tal, but the likelihood is that she will be able to find
some reasonable employment. You guys are in pretty
good shape with $500,000 in investments.
DEAR BRUCE: Following my uncle's death, two
war bonds came into my possession. They are valued
at $10 each, dated August and October 1945. Do they
have any value beyond the face amount? Both are se-
ries E and were issued by the war department. The in-
structions on the backs of the bonds are faded.
-VS., via email
DEAR VS.: One thing is certain: Those war bonds
stopped earning interest many decades ago. Whether
they have any value depends on a couple of things. It
may very well be that the bonds were reported lost,
stolen, destroyed or replaced and cashed in years ago.
The easiest thing to do is check with your bank.
Even though banks are not handling bonds anymore,
sometimes, if you are a decent customer, they will
make inquiries for you. The value can be easily ascer-
tained since the records are kept permanently
You say they are $10. I thought the minimum war
bond issued was $18.75, but I could be mistaken. It
should be fun to trace this down. You can also go on
the Internet and find instructions as to how to make
inquires about the bonds' value. If nothing else, they
will make an interesting wall hanging.
DEAR BRUCE: What plan would average 7 per-
cent? I am a 69-year-old lady in Georgia. I have to take
money out of my 403 this year I need to invest my
money somewhere else. My money market account
has earned less than 2 percent in four years. What do
you suggest?
-J.M., via email
DEAR J.M.: Many people are asking the same ques-
tion you are. If you are going to invest your money in
CDs and money markets, you are going to be torpe-
doed. There is pressure being exerted by the Federal


Let's Celebrate
CITRUS COUNTY RECYCLES




FREE guided tour of the three
recycling facilities in the county
Tour includes viewing the ./%
sorting process of single
stream recyclables, Registration
learning how electronics is required.
are recycled and how Call 201-0149
different types of material
are managed and how
non-recyclable items are
disposed at the landfill.
Meet at 9:45am in the
Inverness Walmart
parking lot (southeast
corner closes to Wendy's)
Hosted by
Keep Citrus County Beautiful, Ih.
(KCCB), .
Citrus County Solid Waste Division,
FDS Disposal, Inc. &
Technology Conservation Group
(TCG)
Ca U counTiLE
CHRONICLE Sy
OOGJHS -..wh nltl.onlln..com


Reserve to depress interest rates to discourage infla-
tion. This may not be good for elderly people such as
yourself, who wish to invest and hope to live on the
proceeds, unless they think outside of the box.
I realize that as soon I mention the stock market,
many people go into a frenzy The stock market goes
up and down. If you can't afford to lose money, and
that is the driving force in your investment strategy,
you are, unfortunately, condemned to get a tiny return,
and that is criminal.
On the other hand, if you go to a decent broker and
explain that you are prepared to take a degree of risk
and you take his or her suggestions on investing in
major American companies like the Wal-Marts of the
world (companies that are going to be around for a
long time), I believe there is little risk in that type of
investment. Yes, these stocks will go up and go down,
but on balance, over a period of time, they will give
you the 6 percent to 7 percent that I think is not unrea-
sonable.
DEAR BRUCE: Because of a poor credit score, my
daughter was offered a "rent to own" contract on a
home. The terms were between $2,000 and $2,500
down, not applied to rent, but applied to a down pay-
ment, and between $600 and $700 a month for rent,
with $100 per month added to the down payment It
would be a five-year lease. The mortgager would
"help" her fix her credit so that at the end of five
years, she would be able to qualify for a mortgage.
When she asked about the selling price of the home,
she was told that it is usually the appraised value of
the house. Because the terms were so vague, my hus-
band and I discouraged her from proceeding. Have
you ever heard of anything like this?
-E.P, via email
DEAR E.P: Yes, I have heard of this kind of arrange-
ment, particularly in a market where the home is not
really sellable. The $2,000 to $2,500 down tells me two
things: Either an amateur is trying to put the deal to-
gether, or someone is out to scam people. The selling
price should be a specific amount, and it should be
stated in the contract along with the amount of the
rent and the down payment
All the way around, these kinds of deals can be
done, but they are certainly not done in this casual
fashion. Your daughter can advertise for this type of


Shepherd of the Hills E


Citi

F

Chi


Tickets are $45 each (donati
2540 W. Norve]
Monday-Friday,
For more information please call, 527


episcopal Church proudly hosts
rus County

father

ristmas

|Ball
Friday, Dec. 6,2013
All proceeds for "Serving Our
SSavior" (SOS) Food Pantry
Cocktails/appetizers hour 6pm-7pm
S Dinner 7pm-8pm.
Dance & Special Events 8p.m.-lip.m.
Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center
5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
SLecanto, FL 34461-8531
Semi-Formal Attire

Cii0R.)NI(g]E
ion). Purchase at the church office,
[I Bryant Hwy CR 486
from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.
-0052,419-5489,563-5932 or 270-3391


arrangement, and I think she will probably have tak-
ers. The terms will be very specific. The vagueness of
this deal indicates that you and your husband were
wise to discourage her from proceeding.

Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


F Friends of the
Homosassa Public Library


FALL


BOOK SALE

NOVEMBER 9 & 10, 2013
Off Yulee Drive in front of
Riverworks Studio at the
Homosassa Seafood Festival

Great bargains in recycled reading!


Sale Hours
Sat: 8 am 5 pm
Sun:8 am 4 pm

For book sale information
call 352-382-2440 or
visit the library website: Friends ofthe
Homosassa
http://citruslibraries.org Public Library





j~ l Inverness .
SElks Lodge #2522 oAvaben
Presents:

"Bark in the Park"
Sunday November 10, From: Noon 4pm
Bring your 4 legged Friends! But make sure they are "leashed"!!
Spend the day under the Oaks on Beautiful Lake Hernando.
Vendors:
Tina's Gone to the Dogs aoys tor sale Sheriff's Dept K9 Unit demonstration]
Premier K-9 Dog Training Hernando Animal Clinic |low cost shots)
Citrus County Animal Services (adoptions available Beastie Biscuits n' More
SMainely Stitchers WMuti Taaend Sew What by Debbie collars & leashes
Snippet Citrus |low cost spay & neuter* Santa Paws.cOm |Xmas ecardsa
Millies Custom Storm Jackets First Impressions (personalized items


Elks Care"
,,Elks Share'


3580 East Lemon St. Hernando
, Next to Lake Hernando Boat Ramp


I H R$' K CLE


ore Inormarln
476-4556


D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


BUSINESS


X9x




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


.ax ..2 53-565 1 ol .re:(88)852230, E a0l casif0d chonclonineco I 0esit: w0ch-,ilenlnec0


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for a few good
players to fill in on Thurs
nights. Single or cou-
ples. If interested please
call 352-527-9632.


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


CITRUS SPRINGS
SUNDAY ONLY
8am to 5pm
antiques, books, col-
lectibles & lots more
1688 W Elder Lane
cnr of Santos & Elder
Housecleaning
Helper
3-4 days per wk. Call
Jessica 453-6181

INVERNESS
4rd Annual
AWANA
Benefit Yard Sale
Nov. 8 & 9 @
550 Pleasant Grove
on the East end
entering on Druid St
Come on out
and help support
this great ministry
for children.We have
everything from
furniture to knick
knacks
No Sales before
daylight.

P/T Admin Assist

With experience in MS
Office and Finacials.
Send Resume to:
4481 N Bacall Loop
Beverly Hills, Fl. 34465
PT Business; Nets $47k
from home. Christian
themed magazine.
No exp necessary- will
train. Clients are well
established in Florida.
Retiring $24,900
(828) 665-7719
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087


ILQiwk
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or mulch. U load & haul.
352-628-9624
Free Black Kitten
10 wks old
litter trained
352-212-0667
Free to good Home
Male Cat
Shimmery, Shining
Silver gray, short fur
Simply Pretty
(352) 746-1904
Jack Russell Terrier
2 yrs old, not neutered
or house trained but
has all his shots.
(352) 419-5664
Rebel is a fawn col-
ored red nose pit bull
puppy. 9 mo old. Must
have fenced yard and
lots of love.
(352) 634-1324



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.OOlb.
Stone CrabSL6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001



Gold Diamond Ring
ladies, fits on pinky
finger, center
diamond, small
diamonds on sides
REWARD 352-341-3650
Lost 9/8/13 Tnr colored,
neutered beagle. Large,
weighs 40 Ibs. Special
needs pet, he needs
medical care and medi-
cation. Please call
Donna at 352-249-3107
or 352-476-3140.
Please call if you have
seen our beloved pet


& White & Brown Pitt
Traveling together
Citrus Springs Area
(352) 897-4391
Lost Dog: White Peking-
ese (small dog) Her
name is Baby! Lost in
citrus springs near the
water fountain! Please
call 352-601-8218!!
Lost Sky Caddy
Golf GPS,
Lakeside Golf course
Parking Lot
(352) 560-0168
Lost Tiger Cat
Dark Gray, male,
22 Ibs. Name Abby
Inverness
off Mocassin Slough
(352) 637-0663










Missing female
black cat with white
chest and paws,
declawed, been mis-
sing since early Oc-
tober in
Citronelle/Cit Spgs
area off of Dunklin.
REWARD IF
FOUND!! Please Call
Bill @ 352-586-0864

White Female Pointer
lost in the
Highlands area of
Inverness, please
call (352) 400-2336



Chocolate Lab
10/30 in Leisure Acres
(352) 586-9575
Found Basset
Large dog, well kept
Off Sioux Rd.
Homosassa
(352) 364-2903
Found Picture of Little
Girl on 10/26
Date on back 1991
after car accident near
Educational Pathway
Heading North
352-621-9810


lnmla


Found beside Hwy 41 in
Floral City Iphone in
"lifeproof cover. Call
341-0064
Large Black Dog
Shiny long hair w/red
color Has been in the
581 area and is now in
Heather Wood, Inver-
ness (352) 464-4474
Male Bnrindle mix
Found on Hwy 41 in
Inverness close to
bowling alley.
(352) 212-5736



Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339

HVIsS^


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



LINDY
Please Call Mary
From Holder
(352) 746-0011



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.001lb.
Stone Crab@ff$00Ib
delivered352-897-5001



New Swing Band
Looking for Musicians
(352) 344-8122

CIemetIe
Los/Crypts


Fero Gardens available.
Lot 10 adjacent to ga-
zebo under large oak
tree.
$1300. 954-292-5995.
Fountains Mem. Park
Homosassa. Single lot
valued $4025, sell for
$2775. (352) 668-4540



SP F/T Receptionist

Needed for very
busy Insurance of-
fice. Apply in person
at: SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
Btw. 9a-12P, Mon-Fri

I-


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers

Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news
and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that
assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well
informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,
today and tomorrow.

FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...
GET THE FACTS.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


P/T Admin Assist

With experience in MS
Office and Finacials.
Send Resume to:
4481 N Bacall Loop
Beverly Hills, Fl. 34465




House Cleaning
1 day a week.
Dunnellon. Must
take pride in work,
and do a thorough
cleaning job w/out
supervision.
(352)817-4777







Tell that special
person
Hapy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966



C N As
C.N.A.s
11-7 Full Time
Join our team.
Now hiring 11-7 shift
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EE0/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

Dental
Receptionist
or Assistant
Position for motivated
professional with ref.
and exp. Established
cosmetic practice.
Fax resume to
352-795-2235

NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN
PRN positions availa-
ble for 3 pm-11 pm
and 11pm-7am
shifts. Must be a Flor-
ida- licsenced nurse.
CERTIFIED NURS-
ING ASSISTANT
Full-time position
available for
11 pm-7 am PRN
positions available
for 3 pm-11 pm and
11 pm-7 am shifts.
Must be a Florida
-certified nursing
assistant.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.
Christine Bigwood
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
ChristineBigwood@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D-44036




ICentr J


Fulltime Certified
Dental Assistant
Call 352-746-0330
Ask for Vicki

HIRING:
PT, PTA, RN, OT
Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097




Cooks & Servers
Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

SERVERS

apply for night shift
at Chicken King
2420 N Florida Hwy
Hernando, FL
NO PHONE CALLS

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced P/T
- Servers
w Cooks
e Bartender
- Hostess
e Dishwasher
CALL 352-746-6727
Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p
For Application
Appointment





CHRS.NiCHE

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time
Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer




Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time
Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer



.
." I ;, ,"-

/"" "1" 1 !'


Alarm Installation
& Service Tech
Security system &
CCTV Tech with a
minimum of 3 yrs exp.
Fax resume:
352-563-5690

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624


Exp. Bucket
Truck Operator
& Tree Climber

Must have valid DL
CDL License a plus
Call 352-344-2696


EXPERIENCED
Cabinet & Mill-
work Fabricator
Installer
No tobacco
products
Built-Rite Cabinets
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,


EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973


General
Technician
position available
at automotive
repair shop, full-
time position with
benefits.
To inquire contact
352-447-3174
between 8:30a-5p.


Now Hiring:
OTR Class A CDL
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Call today
for details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net


RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply in person
S & S Electric
2692 W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Hagpy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Multi-line dealership is in need of 4 additional


sales people. Join the fastest growing


multi-line dealership in Homosassa, FL.



Great Benefits Flexible Work Hours


Excellent Earning Potential Bonuses Available




IF YOU ARE THE BEST,


WE NEED YOU!

Come in and Ask for Brett Coble or Charlie Defreese

to Schedule an Interview.


I


Village Cadillac Toyota

2431 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 34448

352-628-5100
H Equal Oppotunity Employer


CI'~u- ii o]uI

Sfr A 'O1


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 CLASSIFIES CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS WELL
DRILLING

Must be physically
fit. Willing to work
long hours. Prior
construction exp. a
bonus. Must have
clean driving record.
No Phone Calls *
Apply in Person
After 8am
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
drug free work place

COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
positions shuttling
potential homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

LIBRARY AIDE
Announcement
#13-63

Part Time working
20 hours weekly on
a flexible schedule
providing assistance
in the Citrus County
Library system. Must
be available to
work some evenings
and Saturdays at
various branch
locations. Must
be able to lift 20
pounds on occa-
sion. Graduation
from H.SorG.E.D.
$8.70 hourly to start.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, November 8,
2013 EOE/ADA


Housecleaning
Helper

3-4 days per wk. Call
Jessica 453-6181

TOWER HAND
Starting at s$10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.




P/T Front Desk
Receptionist

BELLAVITA SPA &
FITNESS CENTER
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs

APPLY IN PERSON
2125W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando





AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


Financial

BB&T

Relationship Teller -
Seeking candidate
for our Crystal River
office with bank
sales/customer
service experience
to initiate, develop,
and manage rela-
tionships. Must have
cash handling expe-
rience & previous
sales background
preferred along with
excellent telephone
interpersonal/ com-
munication skills.

Please apply on line,
www.bbt.com.
EOE/AA/D/V, Drug
Free Workplace


PT Business; Nets $47k
from home. Christian
themed magazine.
No exp necessary- will
train. Clients are well
established in Florida.
Retiring $24,900
(828) 665-7719


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


IlI I II



130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com








COO COO CLOCK
Very old clock with deer
antlers and various ani-
mals works 199.00
352-464-1006


78 RPM Records
209 count, asset. music
& artist. $25.00
(352) 344-5283
Crank up Victrola
1920's 78 rpm
Brunswick & Victor
Portable $325. for both
(352) 344-5283
PRECIOUS MOMENTS
COOKIE JARS Five
styles to choose from.
$20 each.
Call:628-4271




SPA-N-A-BOX
Portable spa w/ cover
& chem. Seats 4; 280
Gal. Like New, Retail
value $1100, asking
$495 (352) 690-2198




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE electric 30" stove,
brand new never used,
white $450; 40 gal elec
hot water heater. Used
1 week, $150
(352) 341-4902
KENMORE
21.6 CU FT
Refrigerator
w/ ice maker,
Exc Cond $250
(352) 628-7626

MAYTAG
commercial quality
washer $150 firm
(352) 628-7818
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& DQers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER & DRYER and
dishwasher, exc.
cond., $140 each
(352) 344-8971
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore, white
Good cond.Can
deliver for fee. $100
each. Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free
Delivery/Set up. 352
263-7398


Whirlpool Dryer
works good
$110.
(352) 634-3333
WHIRLPOOL
Electric range, smooth
ceramic cook top, self
cleaning, excel.
cond, bisque, $250
352-201-0093



COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51H.
$55. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H.
$50. 527-1239.









DUDLEY'S
AUCTION

THURS. 10/31/13
3PM- HUGE TOOL
& ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, John Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1PM HUGE
collection of Furni-
ture from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal

TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9AM 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for info
Dudleysauction.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOMW

THURS. 10/31/13
3PM HUGE TOOL &
ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, John Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1pm HUGE
collection of Furni-
ture from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal

TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9am 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for info
Dudleysauction.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US415) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck










Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7


Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7


Craftsman 20" varia-
ble speed scroll saw
w/ heavyduty stand
$100 Craftsman 51/2H
Stand up air com-
pressor with hoses
$100 (352) 795-7766


MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
65.00 OBO
352-464-0316


Router Table
with 2% HP Ryobi
Router. Cast iron top
20x27. Mobile base
$200
(352) 726-5832






CASSETTE JVC Dou-
ble Cassette Deck with
Remote $40.00
353-746-5421


DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installa-
tion! CALL Now!
1-800-745-2645


SPEAKERS 2 Optimus
5 inch 2 way 70 watts
Speakers $35.00
352-746-5421






CONCRETE STEPS
4" wx21" h
$125
(352) 341-4902


Vide

CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with case Ex. Cond.
$100.00 352-746-5421

CD/DVD DRIVES 5
drives mint & ext...$25 all
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
DELL P713WALL IN
ONE PRINTER, SCAN,
fax & copier Very good
condition $40.00
352-527-1399
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
IBM 390E THINKPAD
needs OS, plus ex-
tras...$75 352-476-2652
tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com




1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $85
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
2 LEATHER STRESS-
LESS CHAIRS WITH
FOOT STOOL 2 stress-
less chair Great condi-
tion 200.00 each
352-464-1006
38" ROUND COFFEE
TABLE with lazy susan.
Maple. Nice condition.
$35. 527-1239
40" round dining table
w/blue pedestal
base...$35
352-476-2652/tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
48" Round Glass top
Dinette Set, with four
caster chairs, blue up-
holstered pads, ivory
frame, like new $90.
(352) 465-4037
BEDROOM SET
Calif King 4 poster bed
w/ Box spring, end
tabledresser & lamp.
Ivory, $450 obo
(352) 344-4178
BEDROOM SET
Fancy King bed, 2 night
stands & large dresser.
large dresser with mirror
and drawers
cherry wood $500
352-464-1006
DOUBLE RECLINERS
Loveseat La Z Boy
brand Comfortable
Good Condition $60.
352-621-0175


DOUBLE RECLINING
LEATHER LOVE SEAT
Tan leather double re-
clining ,very nice 400.00
352-464-1006
Dresser, Mirror,
Chest, Night stand,
& Lamp
$100.
(352) 746-6996






DUDLEY'S


THURS. 10/31/13
3PM- HUGETOOL&
ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, John Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1PM HUGE collec-
tion of Furniture
from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal

TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9AM 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for info
Dudleysauction.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck
GLIDER CHAIR WITH
GLIDING OTTOMEN
Dark green with
pnrint.$40
Call:(352)628-4271
HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
LOVESEAT / COUCH /
RECLINER Microfiber
(Seafoarnm green
color)with pillows.Teal
leather recliner.$250.00
Call:628-4271


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& DQers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352-447-5888




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**


* em H

BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Rght Over" Your Old OneM!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!T
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696
FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
& FAST 100% Guar.
&AFFORDABLE
I RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


CASH for
SCRAP
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire
ttaysim*



Metl flaciclngr
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
OOOGGDG 527-9599


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *

M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
mint & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144

Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672


Vera's Cleaning Serv
20 yrs of quality serv.
Flexible Scheduling
Call (352) 726-8511




Find Guaranteed,
Local A/C Sales &
Installation Pros!
800-763-7108 Air
Conditioner Sales,
Service and Installa-
tion. All pros are
pre-screened and
relentlessly
reviewed! Call now
for a no obligation
estimate!
800-763-7108
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


A ROOFING
Call te "1ak6uste"
Free Written Estimate

$10O OFF
Any Re-Roof
iMust present coupon at time contract is signed i
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 OGHkA


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570













Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971


seASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998








POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Remodeling



I'ERLING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/ins/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE /lic# 2441


All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713

Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
***352-639-1024***




NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!
344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


WVINDO V;:
GENIE.


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


N WA 0~
SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors

MIR. 352-364-4610
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
Lc #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7 Days a Week


services torn t
Complete Handyman Services
Specializing in.
SAluminum Rescreen Work,
Storm Doors, Garage Screen
Doors Window Screens,
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch







-
Wood Repairs
You Name it- I probably do it!



1 ,746-2445
Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience


GENERAL r rnFjI
Stand Alone
Generator wf S

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generacf-Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377







tctre/ence ki oo/u'iy





SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
S LICENSED & INSURED


Exposed
W Aggregate
Shotcrete $451yd
F rjE Decks Tile
FREE \_ Pavers,
ESTIMATES -'
GREO'S COMPLETE
Onti 0 REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LICENSED 352-746-5200


&DONT LET YOUR INSURED
ID NTLET YOUR


DRYER START
A FIRE!,



Flal Rae.- No


) Hidden Bon d W


KNOCK OUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352.942.6876

S Call Today for a
OOD46D Clean Tomorrow




Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
o 001 pool 01 plan
something
completely nev,
Of tlen itltwed,

never duplicated"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
LI=s 352-400-3188
& Insured tU


I -- I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HUI6X 6"X18"X 69"
high. Medium color
wood. Excellent condi-
tion. $75.... 527-1239
Phone Stand
Hand Crafted $10
Love Seat Hide a bed
Like New $175.
(352) 419-6180
RECLINER,
BLUE/GRAY Excellent
condition. $50.00
(352)257-4076
RECLINER, DARK
GREEN FABRIC Excel-
lent condition $40.00
(352)257-4076
SOFA-3-CUSHION,
multicolor fabric
88"x35" $75 476-2652
tommyb@tampabay
.rr.com for pics
SWIVEL ROCKER.
Gold fabric. Good
condition. $40.
527-1239
TV STAND
Silver/grey with 2 glass
shelves 36"wide,
24"deep,20"high.$65.00
726-2572
Very Nice Glass Top
Octagon coffee table
with matching end
table. Sugarmill
$75.
(352) 503-9344
VINTAGE ROCKING
CHAIR. Maple. 40".
Nice condition. $45.
527-1239



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



CITRUS HILLS
Sun. Nov. 3rd, 8a -4p
Moving Sale, Kit./Din.
ware, BR, LR, DR, Furn
AND MORE!
1566E Saint Charles pi
CITRUS SPRINGS
SUNDAY ONLY
8am to 5pm
antiques, books, col-
lectibles & lots more
1688 W Elder Lane
cnr of Santos & Elder
HOMOSASSA
ESTATE SALE *
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3, 9a-4p
1717 S. Dell Point
off West Dixie Land
INVERNESS
4rd Annual
AWANA
Benefit Yard Sale
Nov. 8 & 9 @
550 Pleasant Grove
on the East end
entering on Druid St
Come on out
and help support
this great ministry
for children.We have
everything from
furniture to knick
knacks
No Sales before
daylight.













MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



3/4 LENGTH MINK FUR
COAT 3/4 length mink
paw fur coat
in excellent condition
$100 Call 352-564-0212



!!!225/75R -16!
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
60.00 352 464 0316
3 HP 10" Sears Crafts-
man Table Saw
$150 or trade
8 Pc. Drum Set,
w/ yamaha electric
guitar $125. or trade
(352) 795-8863
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45.
352-628-0033
16 Bulb Tanning Bed
Cross Bow Work out
Bench, Good Cond.
$200. each
(352) 489-4362
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BALL PYTHON FE-
MALE 3' long friendly.
50 gallon aquarium,zoo
med heater & more.
$65.00, 746-0714
BOOKCASE 5-SHELF
med brn. $20 Barbecue
Gnll w/cover $30 Ruth
352-382-1000
CANON MP280
PRINTER Great condi-
tion, needs ink, black
colored, also a scan-
ner, $25 (352)465-1616
CHRISTMAS TREE
9'Artifical Blue Spruce
Tree/Lights
$75 OBO
352-249-4451
CONCERT TICKETS
sold out, Justin Moore,
11/9, St. Aug. Amp. 2
tickets, both ($20)
352-212-1596
DOLL HOUSE plywood
finished 6 room doll
house with moving
windows
Paid $400 will sacrifice
for
$100 call 352-564-0212
DVD's, CD's, VHS
Tapes & Cassettes
Best offer
(352) 201-8690
EXTENSION LADDER.


30' .Aluminum.
$80. 527-1239
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.OOlb.
Stone Crab$S6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001
GALLERY JACKET
FOR WOMEN Good
condition, reversible,
size S cheetah print,
$20 (352)465-1616
Gas Fireplace,
no vent. Incl. oak
cabinet with mantel,
raised hearth &
logs, fluted sides, etc.
$300. 352-341-3083
GENIE GARAGE
DOOR OPENER USED
WITH SENSORS &
hardware only 85.00
4640316


S
GENIE GARAGE
DOOR OPENER USED
WITH SENSORS &
hardware only 85.00
464-0316
HARLEY STOCK EX-
HAUST PIPES NEARLY
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON 100.00 obo.
352-464-0316
KIDS 8' SLIDE HEAVY
DUTY You can attach it
to your playhouse or
tree or whatever. $40
746-0714
LARGE ROOM SIZE
CARPET 12X12 PLUS
light tan or almond in
color $50.00 OBO
527-1399
Lawn Mower,
Neutron, battery
operated, $75
Transport wheelchair
(4 small wheels) $45.
(352) 220-4483
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Noritake China
Pattern is Asian
Dream, Service for 12
$200. firm
(352) 489-3264
POOL
28 ft above ground
w/pump, filter and ex-
tra supplies. Good
Wkg cond. You
remove $700 obo
(352) 746-9536
PORTABLE AIR TANK
WITH GUAGE 7 gallon
factory made $20.00
3524640316
PORTABLE AIR TANK
WITH GUAGE 7 gallon
factory made $20.00
3524640316
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden Shutters 20 x
18 Ex. Cond. $40.00
352-746-5421
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden Shutters 24 x
18 Ex. Cond. $50.00
352-746-5421
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden shutters 62 x
26 Ex cond. $95.00
352-746-5421
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF works great for
fish orjerkey only 60.00
3524640316
SMALL TRAILER
FRAME good for haul-
ing mowers, flea mar-
kets stuff. $100.
352-527-3177
TABLESAW 10"
CRAFTMAN All steel
very good quality. Cuts
& runs great. $85.00
746-0714
UTILITY TRAILER
6 x 12, $775. obo
Power washer 16H
with tanks & hoses
$600.
(352) 341-3300



4 WHEEL WALKER 4
wheel walker, big
wheels,hand brakes,
seat,basket. ex. $50.00
352-628-1783
4 WHEELED WALKER
with seat and brakes.
only 75.00
3524640316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET URONLY
20.00 352 464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET URONLY
20.00 352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
Pride Elite Traveler
Go Go Mobility
Scooter
like new, $600.
(352) 628-5553
Rascal Scooter
electric, 3 yrs. old
little use. List $6,000
Asking $750. cash
(352) 513-5583


"NEW" FLAWLESS 5
STRING RESONATOR
BANJO,30 BRACKETS
1/2 PRICE @ $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" HIGH QUALITY
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
SOLID TOP &
GROVER TUNERS,
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" KUSTOM
AMPLIFIER WITH 12"
SPEAKER, REVERB &
DISTORTION $70
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE ELECTRIC
GUITAR, AGED
MAHOGANY TOP $50
352-601-6625
"NEW" MITCHELL 12
STRING ACOUSTIC,
SOLID SITKA SPRUCE
TOP 1/2 PRICE @ $100
352-601-6625
"NEW"WHITE OSCAR
SCHMIDT ACOUSTIC
GUITAR,BEAUTIFUL
TURQUOISE TRIM
$100 352-601-6625
2 CRANK-UP light
stands for T-bars or
truss $75 both
352-476-2652/tommyb
@tamrpabay.rr.com
10'LIGHT TRUSS
w/dollies for DJ or
band...$50
352-476-2652 tomrnmyb
@tamrpabay.rr.com
TROMBONE WITH
CASE Good condition
used 1 yr. $95
Call:352-628-4271



ELECTRIC PIE MAKER
Wolfgang Puck in-
cludes pie maker
cookbook $35.
352-621-0175



AB Glider
Pro-form. $50
(352) 628-7626
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACESAVER folds up
for easy storage.AII
electronics work.Digital
readout.A steal at
185.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE (OPTIMUM)
BRAND.electron ics
calories,heart
rate,distance, only
185.00 352-464-0316



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Honda 3 wheeler. 1984
5 sp. Hi/low, new tires,
$450 obo or trade; New
26" Schwin 49 CC, Mo-
torized Bike. $450 obo
or trade(352) 447-6139
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $475
(352) 464-2687
Summit Climbing Deer
Stand, good condition
$125.00
352-419-2064


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Professional 2016 CBH
Chromatic
Harmonica.
(352) 795-3764


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369






RV COVER FITS UP
TO 33' 6" LIGHTLY
USED B REATHABLE
ONLY 85.00 464 0316


RV COVER FITS UP
TO 33' 6" LIGHTLY
USED B REATHABLE
ONLY 85.00 464 0316


New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19 -Near Mall)
352-563-2110












Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


CHARLIE
Charlie, 8-y.o.
Black/white spotted
retriever mix, neu-
tered & HW nega-
tive. Came to shel-
ter because owner
became seriously ill,
could not care for
him anymore. Beau-
tiful good dog, mild
skin problem due to
lack of care. Charlie
is now homeless due
to no fault of his
own. Easy to walk
affectionate & gen-
tle, likes other dogs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


CLASSIFIED










Citrus County
Dog Training Center
Is offering Basic Pet
Obedience & Con-
formation Classes.
STARTS NOV. 5th Call
352-212-1697 to reg.


Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009



0w -AM


MACK
Mack, 3-y.o. male
coonhound, wt45
Ibs, great watch-
dog, good w/dogs
& cats. Walks gently
on leash, loves to
run, loves car rides,
timid at first but
then trusts, totally
housebroken,
low maintenance,
beautiful coat.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.











MONROE
Monroe, a
2-year-old female
Chinese Sharpei/
Boxer mix, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebrkn. Weight
64 Ibs. Likes people,
other dogs & pup-
pies. Walks well on a
leash, is obedient.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.











SALLIE
Sallie is approx. 2
y.o., spayed
terrier/Dalmation
mix, medium size,
HW negative. Affec-
tionate & friendly,
sits on command,
loves treats, gets
along w/other dogs,
Housebrkn, would
love a yard to run in.
Sweet & joyful, call
Joanne @
352-795-1288.


TOBY
Toby, 6-y.o. black/
white terrier mix,
neutered, HW
negative, small-
to-medium size, gets
along w/dogs &
cats. Walks well on
leash, loves people
& kids. Friendly & af-
fectionate. Great
companion for an
older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $500
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


TRACE
Trace, a 2-y.o.
shepherd mix,
good w/other dogs
& cats. Heartworm
negative, appears
housebrkn, very
gentle, calm,
walks well on leash.
Affectionate &
friendly. Wt. 63 Ibs.
Very beautiful dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.




PASTURE LAND & BARN
To Rent For Horses
N. Crystal River Area
fertilzed pasture
consisting of 8 acres,
3 gates paddocks and
area for at least 2
more. Lg.metal barn
has 3 horse stalls, tack
& feed room, + stor-
age area. 24 hr. sec.
lights Sec. man lives
on property and avail.
to care for Horses if
needed, reasonable
rates. (352) 628-0508




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*t352-563-5510"*

aa-


14, ALUM BOAT
W/9.9 ENGINE, GALV
TRAIL. XLNT SHAPE.
$900. 352-256-8488
COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945
EVENRUDE 1998
17' Polar Boat, 90 hp
Salt Water Series,
Center Console $4895
352-201-2014,
352- 513-5141
Manitou Oasis
2006 Pontoon, loaded,
Suzuki,115 Hp, 4 stroke,
Road King Galv. trailer,
Exec. Cond. $12,999.
352-527-0324
Polar
1995 17' Fiberglass,
75HPyamaha motor,
good condition $4000
(352) 341-2036
TROPHY
17' 2002 CC, off shore
90H Mer ship-to-shore
radio, GPS depth
finder, tilt/trim trailer
$6,000.(352) 341-1660
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k mi. Ready to
go! MUST SEE $10,000
(352) 628-6643


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River, FL 34429


C CITRUS OL COUNT


CHROQN-ICLYE
Vwwwmchonlceonlacn


FLEETWOOD TERRY
'04, 27 ft, 12ft slide out
new awning & new
hitch, extra clean,
non smoking, extras
$9,000, 352-341-7703
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service., parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945

Vehicles

**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
352-426-4267"*
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Leelc

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest nrce


CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595
FORD
'98 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444

Meeting^^
Norltices


2005, Aveo Lt, 4 door
$6,990
352-341-0018
HYUNDAI
2004 Accent, AC,
Power Win/Doors, reli-
able, nice riding car.
Good gas mileage.
$2100 (352) 795-8986
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PLYMOUTH
'93 Acclaim, AC, new
tires & brakes, very
clean 86K mi. runs
great $3,000 obo 352
382-3900, 634-3880
TOYOTA
2000 Avalon, $2000,
leather seats, needs
minor work. Call after
5:00 pm 352-634-2054

Classic


AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. NOV. 3rd.
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Conv Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pnris-
tine, 11 k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
DATSUN
1979, 280 ZX Antique
2 Door Coupe
$5,000
(352) 257-3261





IIIIIIII
aell


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DODGE
1999, Ram 1500
ex cab, $3,998
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition
Eddie Bauer leather
$3,498.
352-341-0018

Meeting^
Notices


FORD
2004 F350, S uper Cab
dually diesel, low miles
new tires, full warranty
til 4/1/14, clean truck,
over 2k in extras, nice
cond! $15,900
(352) 564-2756

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
02 Frontier XE, 4cyl
4x2,autood, a/c, tarp
run bds, bedliner, 97k
$6000. 724-771-8504
SATURN
2009 Aura, 94,500 mi
Runs perf. Full Equip'd
$7750 (352) 302-4057




CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
leather, dvd,
$6,998
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
'02, Grand Cherokee
4 x 4, many new parts
& tow pkg., $5,000
obo (352) 726-9369
TOYOTA
1999, Rav-4
$2,899
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
'97, Camaro, convert-
able, auto, AC, 1
owner $4,400. Cry. Riv.
(727) 207-1619, Cell
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306




HONDA
02, Silverwing, 600cc,
auto trans, new front
tire, 23,159 miles,
great shape, $3,200.
obo 352-897-4108
HONDA
07 VTX 1300
motortrikeconvers.
undr-14k mi. new front
brakes, seals, springs
$16k obo 503-6177
HONDA 1988
GOLDWING TRIKE
Clean, well kept
$11,995 352-201-2014
352-513 -5141

MeetingB
NoticesH


377-1027 SUCRN
11-14 Meeting of the CCEDC, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 3, 2013.


378-1103 SUCRN
Citrus County Hospital Board Executive Session Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
Special meetings of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, No-
vember 11,2013 beginning at 6:30pm and Monday November 18, 2013 beginning
at 6:30pm in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial
Health System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida, to dis-
cuss:
* Foundation Governance Issues.
* Possible Discussion Hospital Transaction Matters.
* Other.
N 0 T I C E OF EXECUTIVE SESSION MEETING DURING MEETING
The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold an Executive Session meeting
during the November 11, 2013, November 18, 2013 and November 20, 2013 meet-
ings under the authority of Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session
will be closed to the public to allow the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees to
meet with the board's Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy
related to litigation expenditures in all pending litigations.
Present at the Executive Session will be Debbie Ressler (Trustee), Robert Priselac
(Trustee), Krista Joseph (Trustee), Mark Fallows (Trustee), William Grant General
Counsel, Bruce Blackwell, Esquire, Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry Richard, Esq., Taylor
Ford, Esq., Glenn Burhans, Esq., Bridget Smitha, Esq., Vincent Falcone, Esq., Andrew
Hand, Esq., Ashby Burks, Esq., Warren Bloom, Esq., Bruce Giles, Esq., and Court Re-
porter.
An Executive Session will be held on Monday, November 11, 2013 at 6:40pm in the
Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
An Executive Session will be held on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 6:40pm in the
Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
An Executive Session will be held on Wednesday, November 20,2013 at 5:30pm and
in the Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System
Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd, Inverness, Florida.
When the Executive Session commences the door will be closed. At the conclusion
of the Executive Session, the meeting of the Board will be reconvened and the pub-
lic is invited to rejoin.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board of-
fice at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this
Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 3, 2013

379-1103 SUCRN
11/12 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Tuesday, November 12, at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: November 3, 2013.


380-1103 SUCRN
CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF MEETING
The regular meeting of the Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority originally
advertised for Monday, November 4, 2013 has been cancelled. The next regularly
scheduled Citrus County Water & Wastewater Authority meeting will be held on
Monday, December 2, 2013 at 1:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as possible, in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room #166, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
BY: /s/ HARRY M. KILGORE, CHAIRMAN,
CITRUS COUNTY WATER & WASTEWATER AUTHORITY
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 3, 2013


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 D7




D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


FE DEALS ARE


.................F'.,!..
!Si DIilN GSiN
.... C RYSTAC4VE

:ALL'FOR SAVINGS! 1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F95.7371


NEW
so


TRe
cai
Lea


ci
rpe?


2014 FUSION
Down
1st Month payment
Due at signing


* NEW 2014 FLEX
Style & comfort for less!





NEW 2014 EXPLORER
I Fun & Comfort For Everyone.
Several Models TO Choose From!


NEW 2014 TAURUS
Luxury For Less!
Buy Or Lease Today!


NEW 2013 PF150 XL REG CAB
Auto. V6 & More for work & play


NEW 2013 F350 CREW CAB
Dually's & SRW Available!
DIESEL


NEW 2014 FOCUS
Affordable & Fun To Drive.
No Payments Til 2014
For Qualified Buyers


NEW 2014 MUSTANG COUPE
Pony Package & Rear Camera
True American Muscle Car!
Come Test Drive An Original!


NEW 2014 FLEX
Roomy & Comfortable With A
Great Ride! Come See It In
Crystal River!


ii p-E


U ~W~W


NEW 2014 FIESTA
TOO Cute For Words. You
Gotta See & Drive It
To Believe It!




NEW 2014 ESCAPE
Lease Or Buy. You Decide!
up to
1j u 2 MPG




NEW 2013 C-MAX HYBRID
Go Green With Ford!


400/0 % FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED alFrSvns
9 QFO ^ ,op ow C. Call For Savings!
Relax, It's Covered.~ Fnn i.. I
1 - *172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 3 2 7 53
months* 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage
APR for 36 months* -12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** l 3 2 7" 31

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
*Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 36 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 11/30/13. See dealerfor qualifications and complete
details. See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership.
. l,-e--l,.i .. b _


2012 FORD FOCUS SE
30,000 Miles. GP1632
$16,950


2013 FORD FLEX
With Eco Boost. GP3059A
$26,450


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GPR1244
$20,950


2010 LINCOLN MKX
Leather, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1653
$26,950


2010 LINCOLN MKZ
One owner. G3T235A
$22,950


2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT
305 V8. G3T205A
$27,950


2013 FORD ESCAPE SE
20,000 miles, sunroof. GT1691
$23,450


2011 LINCOLN MKX
29,000 Miles, leather. GP1684
$27,950


2009 LINCOLN MKS
Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1681
$24,950


2013 LINCOLN MKT
Navication Package, AWD. G4C008A
$36,950


Nick Nichola


S


LIN(C. OLN


H|Kwy. 19 0 Nicholas
Hwy.19N.Ford
Lincoln
Crystal River 795-7371 Anna Cruz '
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Salesperson of the Month,_ __0
tNot all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease Payments may vary, dealer determines price Residency restrictions apply Cash due at signing is after $750 cash back (PGM #50214) Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease end at price negotiated with dealer at
signing Take new retail deliver from dealer stock by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications and complete details Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment *No payments till 2014 is for Chase Bank and qualified buyers only Prices and payments include all
incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399 **Ford Credit Financing required Not all buyers will qualify See dealer for details Dealer is not responsible fortypographical errors pictures are for illustration purposes only
Prices and payments good through 11/08/13


r--w


Ormal River
ma--rilT I--


A-




Section E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2013


OME RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


INSIDE


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


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E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013

.I.






RUSAW BUILT BEAUTY!
Beautiful Ktchen Maple Cabinets
3/3/2 + Office Huge Screened Lanai
Large Family Room Very Tasteful Decor
4750 EL CAMINO DR. HOSTED BY KRISTIN FEE
DIRECTIONS: 491/Right on Forest Ridge/Left On
Hollow Ridge/COrestline/to El Camino
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
EInuili elliesuIIoni ielnutx neDE
www.FloI idulLislinginlo.comi


LAUREL RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG with HEATED POOL
* Golf Community Living RM & Fam. RM
* All newer Appliances Furnishings Available
* Double-sided gas fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL Lin
(352) 527-7842 1 /
(352) 422-3875


UAKWUUU VILLAUt
AFFORDABLE HOME
*2 BR, 1 BATH *1-Car Garage
* Open Floor Plan Cathedral Ceiling
* Screened Porch Living & Family Rooms
* All Appliances New CARPET I
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 i
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com





WM*



REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


14UU M. 1NHAPtLIlUKU LUUP
MEADOWCREST
LOVELY 3/2/2 CORNER LOT HOME WITH MANY
GREAT FEATURES OPEN FOR YOUR INSPECTION
TODAY. MEADOWCREST SUBDIVISION HAS SO
MUCH TO OFFERYOU. CALL FOR DETAILS:
LINDA BARNES (352) 239-4844
Email: Ibarnes@remax.net U


HOMOSASSA!
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE
HOME, WELL-MAINTAINED, 1-CAR
DETACHED GARAGE, LIVING AND FAMILY
ROOM, HEATED & COOLED FLORIDA
ROOM, NEWER CENTRAL HEAT/AIR,
GENERATOR, .50 ACRE.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 .-
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com








40 SEAGRAPE ST.
SUGARMILL WOODS I
This impeccably maintained 4/3/3 cabana pool home is
ready for a new family! Ideally located in Sugarmill on a
beautiful 1 acre golf course lot. Interior features include:
fresh paint, split plan, solid surface counter, 3 full baths,
den/office, formal dining and much more. -^ IX
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 I *JI
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com i








5384 N. ELKCAM BLVD.
Stunning 2007 Builder's showcase
award-winning home!
Priced 45% below replacement VALUE!!
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Ad Code #1043 .
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
M


Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005
mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split
bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area,
covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All
appliances, window treatments and some furnishings
are included.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net [


241N Leoo Hwy. Beel Hil 52-74 ww.IIXcmI0 ..Hy.4 neres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. HonsIs 62-70 ww.oueos~a~ ~o 0 EHy 9 rsa ivr7524


GREAT STARTER
OR RETIREMENT HOME
TOTAL OF 1,479 SQ. FT TOTAL UNDER ROOF. CHAIN-
LINKED FENCE, LARGE OAK TREES. MOVE-IN
CONDITION HOME WITH CITY WATER. WELL
INSULATED LOTS OF UPGRADES. DETACHED
GARAGEAND WORKSHOP WITH AC. Fl
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbamjmills@earthlink.net


OVER

$105 MILLION

SOLD THIS YEAR!
#1 In Citrus County
Call Us To Sell Your Home!


n





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vegetables for autumn

Fall can .


bring bounty

LEE REICH
Associated Press

How green is your
vegetable garden?
Just because sum-
mer's long gone and
frost is in the air doesn't
mean your garden has
to be a scene of tawny
colors, limp leaves and
withered stems.
My garden remains
very green, and the first
step was staying ahead
of the weeds.
Especially after mid-
summer, we gardeners
tend to ease up on weed
control, and it's then
that heat-loving annuals
like lamb's-quarters,
purslane and pigweed
start to take hold. For
me, cooler weather
brought quackgrass and
creeping Charlie
stealthily trying to
well, creep in at the
garden's edges. Regular
weeding forays through
summer and early fall LEE REICH/Associated Press
took but a few minutes An autumn vegetable garden, including endive, turnips, lettuce and Brussels sprouts. Just
because summer's gone and there's frost in the air doesn't mean your garden has to be
See AUTUMN/Page E5 a scene of tawny colors and limp leaves.


SReal Estate DIGEST


Century 21 gets
new blood
Century 21 Nature Coast
of Crystal River is pleased to
announce the addition
of Alyse Fitzpatrick to their
profes-
sional staff
of sales
agents.
Alyse
was born
and raised
in Citrus
County.
Growing Alyse
up here Fitzpatrick
has Century 21
shown her Nature Coast.
the beauty
of the Nature Coast and the
close family atmosphere this
community has to offer. Her
background in the banking
industry along with her supe-
rior knowledge of the local
markets makes her a single
point of contact for all home
buying and selling needs.
When she isn't with buyers
and sellers, you can find her
with family enjoying outdoor


activities such as boating,
camping and visiting with
other relatives.
She can be reached at
352-795-0021.

Rector team hits
new high for year
Top Performance Real
Estate
Consult-
ants is
proud to
congratu-
late Deb-
bie
Rector's
Team for
closing
more than Debbie
$10 million Rector's
in business Team
in 2013. Top
Rector Performance
Rt Real Estate
attributes Consultants.
her contin-
uous success for her 18 year
career to communication,
cutting edge marketing and
service.
Debbie Rector's Team can
be reached at 352-746-9924.


* Headshots of real estate agents and associates
submitted for the Real Estate Digest are kept on
file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is the
responsibility of the individuals submitting news
notes to ensure headshots have been sent to
the newsroom, and to advise staff of any
name changes.


S. Robert& Holly Jones AMERICAN
. *352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
R A o a yc o"Always There For You"
]1 V~ A" hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com .. -, f
EfR A 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 rUJ,E


r Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor,-, A HOUS-E Realtor M |
3023179 soLDd ae! 287-90 22 I
he ole iR746-6700 H IL
li 'oden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.I


n BANk OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
S 2BR/1 .5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch.
Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852


S388 W. SUGARMAPLE
-- I U0d,.,.6,,,6., Uap~i,,, ., alaquUo,, 80 W. HOLLYFERN
new hot water heater, new washer/dryer, new Turn key 2/2/1, roof'09, A/C'12, new paint II
duct work, new front screened porch, new in and out, wood tone floorng, tile. Beautiful
11x12 screen lanai Private backyard landscaping Come buy me today


One Half Acre Golf Course Home $129,900
Open floor plan 2/2 with a 2 car garage. Office or sitting area
off the master &a private walled area for a hottub or plants.
MLS 702790. Spacious Screened Area, Nice View.
Drive by: 486 to Essex to 390 E. Eureka Ct.
ALSO FOR SALE: MLS 703002 GOLF COURSE LOT $49,700
iD"^' ;~ ^' iD"' ; ~^' i.! ^=; "


ir-


Sl BANIK UWNIV-R.UKALLIlT, DBANK OWNED-BU&HNELL, H.
Brick home with 3,000 sq. ft of living on 10 2 story 3BR/3.5 bath on fenced 5 acres.
Acres with a view. 279,900 MLS#706285 $165,000 MLS#705895
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours 52) 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.corn "'


men


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Decor pieces bring built-in tech


New generation ofelectronics

integrates into background


KIM COOK
Associated Press

It's one thing to have a
beautiful, comfy bed. But
what if it also included a
TV screen, game console
and dimmable, color-
changing lights?
Or say you've got just
enough room in your
apartment for a credenza
or speakers, but not both.
How about one piece that
includes both and a
whole media system?
The integration of tech-
nology into home decor
has come a long way since
clunky TV screens peered
out of armoires and media
cabinets; today's super-
thin screens can come em-
bedded in the bathroom
mirror or attached to the
wall like pieces of art.
The "wallpaper" mode
on Sharp's new, high-
definition Aquos TV lets
you display photos, paint-
ings or other images as
wall art when you aren't
watching television. You


can set a clock for display
times, and the light level is
reduced to get rid of glare.
(www.sharpusa.com)
Samsung's four-door
fridge has a Wi-Fi enabled
screen that you can load
with photos, news, calen-
dar, notepad and recipes.
(www.samsung.com)
Want to stay on top of the
morning news? Seura's TV
screens embed in the bath-
room vanity mirror
Robern's embed in the
medicine cabinet. (www
seura.com; wwwrobern.
com)
TV manufacturers are
moving into OLED or-
ganic light emitting diode
- technology, which can
be linked to computers
and other tech devices. It's
thin as a pencil and able to
be curved. (www.lg.com)
As for sound systems,
Symbol Audio of Nyack,
N.Y, has a New Audio
Desk that incorporates
high-quality speakers into

See TECH/Page E14


KE f "Always There For You"
PE r,/ GAIL COOPER
00 Multimillion Dollar Realtor
v (352) 634-4346
E m m Office: (352) 382-1700
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com
16,


LOOKING FOR A SECOND HOME?
3/2/2 cul de sac home
Fresh neutral interior paint
Living room and family room
*All appliances have been replaced
30-year roof new in 1998
Vinyl enclosed Florida room
Inside laundry with closet
Home warranty for buyers
#703279 $97.300


LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION!
* Custom 3+office/2/3 Sweetwater home
Nicely elevated on .76 acre lot
* Close to shopping and Suncoast Prky
Rear Southern exposure
* Corian island kitchen -18" porcelain tile
* Dual pane windows & French doors
* Exterior & garage painted in 2012
Home warranty for the buyers
#702046 $179.000


Associated Press __________________ _
Symbol Audio's Modern Record Console has a walnut OOGSO > f ,
cabinet outfitted with a hand-built turntable, amplifier and -BES
built in wireless router. REAL ESTATE, INC. .,;r
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RivER, FL 34429 5
E-A BSIT, OFFCE: (352) 795-6633_ Realtor


E


***Foreclosure List***

4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre,
705705- $74, Clearview Estates
705705- $174,900 705702- $189,900
Tony Moudis 352-777-2927 John Maisel 352-302-5351

2/1 Stilt Home Deep Water
in Ozello Canal Front Home
705061- $74,900 705665
Steve McClory 352-422-3998 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

Move-in ready! Charming 3/2/2
4/2 mobile on over two acres! in Citrus Springs.
705223 $84,900 705093 $89,900
Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Tony Moudis 352-777-2927

3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 3/2/2 on over an acre.
704264 $114,900 705142 $119,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Steve McClory 352-422-3998

Gorgeous upgraded Desirable Brentwood Estates
3/2/2 on an acre. 3/2/2 det. villa.
705087 $129,900 704862- $119,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047

REDUCED! Beverly Hills
Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home, 3/1 Handyman's Delight.
dbl. lot. 704938 $329,900 705153 $41,550
Tnnu MAniidic 12.777.92927 John Maisel 352-302-5351


U WWWAI1XT~VCOM1V SAI1S(O~AI1XT~VCOM


AG_-=1ENT ON DUTY SEVEN D S A





BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of 3
w/rear wooden deck, rear mobile homes/buildings, center of county,
S ... "r lot, cathedral & standard 1 well, 2 septics, appointment only One
ceilings, well maintained Newer tile, carpet rented for $450/mo #703819 $106,000
& vinyl flooring #705360 $97,000
WW EX CME :SLSIAER O


DUNNELLON 2005 modular home w/
bedrooms, 2 baths, 9 ft ceilings w/crown
,, i i.,,.. i, I nced & cross fenced acres,
* I' , Tile & wood floors, dbl
paned windows, custom built in wood
entertainment center #703832 $310,000





INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
g...... ......i .
7,0,,, ....3, I, I
#704467 $93,800


HOMOSASSA beautiful family home on
6 3 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large
kitchen, family room w/fireplace, 5 x 24
barn w/8 x 24 work shop Fenced and cross
fenced 1 car garage, screened rear porch
#705104 $189,000


mobile on 6 06 acres 12 x 24 workshop w/
electric Metal roof over, updated
appliances, fenced and X fenced, covered
rear porch, front wood decking #701071
$65,000


I Z_- 0MI
DUNNELL. ',. ,,, ... HOMOSASSA 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3
3 bath2007 1. ........ .. .. skylights, absolutely beautifidul, tile floors,
2 3 acres, I'll I . i .. ,. laminate wood floors, vaulted & cathedral
skylight, i. .1 ,.,. I ....i. i, i ceilings, 3 bay window, split floor plan,
burning :, .... i. ..... '.. I Fl i la room, dbl paned
$118,000 .. i .1.. ,.. #705343 $125,000


l


See .JI IIrt ual T u @ -..i. IJ iiJ.I.I.. -IJ.i.


E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHomeFront B R I E F


GOT A NEWS TIP?


Extension slates
gardening workshops
SA free gardening workshop will be
offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and
19 at the Citrus County Extension Build-
ing, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Material hardiness zones are a critical
factor in the proper selection of sustain-
able plants. This workshop introduces
participants to criteria to consider when
selecting materials, their placement in
the landscape and potential frost protec-
tion encouraged to reduce material loss.
The average low temperature in Citrus
County is between 20 and 25 degrees
and should be considered when looking
at plants for installation in local land-
scapes. How to care for plants after dam-


AUTUMN
Continued from Page E3

much less than the effort that
firmly established weeds would
have required.
But lack of weeds alone doth not a
garden make, and it was season-
long, carefully chosen plantings that
provided the lush greenery itself.
Autumn salads begin
with spring sowings
I started planting for the present
way back in early spring. I sowed
kale seeds then which started yield-
ing tasty leaves in early summer and
will continue to do so for weeks to
come. Brussels sprouts for those
who like them would also be sown
in early spring for a harvest that be-
gins about now
If you had stopped by my garden in
late spring, you would have caught
me sowing broccoli and cabbage
seeds. It was odd to be planting these
vegetables just as they were ready for
harvest from early spring sowings.
Yes, an early spring sowing of broc-
coli can keep up steam right into fall,
but sometimes such plants peter out
by midsummer So I also start some
fresh new plants for fall harvest
Come early summer, I planted
seeds of endive and escarole, a bed
of which now stands out in the veg-
etable garden like a frothing sea of
greenery
Through summer I continued
planting, selecting vegetables that
would enjoy crisp, fall weather, then


aging frost are also topics for discussion.
SA free gardening workshop will be
offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at
the Citrus County Extension Building,
3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to plan and pre-
pare garden projects for the upcoming
milder season. Garden planning, esti-
mating cost and garden clean-outs are
important topics to consider when out-
door work is delayed. It is also a great
time of year to enjoy the outdoors with
activities like bird watching.
Creating natural buffers which attract
birds is an excellent project to consider
during this time of year.
These topics will be discussed during
this presentation.
From staff reports

sowing their seeds according to the
number of days they take to mature.
So turnips and winter radishes went
in in early August, then small
radishes a couple of weeks later
Sometime during those weeks I also
found space to sow parsley, rutaba-
gas, and autumn's most tender and
lush green, mache.
Other vegetables that contribute
to an autumn garden's vibrancy in-
clude Chinese cabbage and spinach.
All these vegetables are green, lush
through much of autumn and tasty.
All greenery is not
for eating
My last planting of the season,
around the middle of September,
was just for lushness, not for eating.
That planting was of cover crops,
which are grown solely for the good
of the soil. The cover crop I chose
was a mix of oats and field peas. I
sowed them in any beds that were
cleared of summer crops beans or
corn, for example and were not
slated to receive any of the afore-
mentioned fall vegetables.
Now, at about 8 inches high and
still growing, the oats and peas will
keep rain from washing away soil or
leaching out nutrients, shade out
any weeds trying to get a foothold,
and enrich the ground with valuable
organic matter After frigid weather
kills these plants in January or Feb-
ruary, their rotting roots will leave
behind channels for water and air
Best of all, a dense stand of cover
crops, like the rest of the greenery,
simply looks prettier than bare soil
and decrepit plants.


* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.



I0,I^f TyJB FAY 9 y -Iff 9J AF


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. IEW
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 AWeek! Properties
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


I%,- ."VU vV Drazlnuim n/I- a8 N benninglon 1,
MLS 706333 $265,000 MLS 706262 $234,!
Spacious Great Rm. plan, 4/2/3 w/pool. Beautiful 3 bdrm,2.5 bath pool home
Energy Efficient features, with all the desirable features.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


,' cff.- 't. -,',._- -"-*.i-' "4_
(- cl- 541 W Ted Williams Cl
MLS 704863 $829,000
Elegant, luxurious, spacious...just a few words
that describe this stunning 4bd/4ba home.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


'j411s 165E Keller Cl
S ;J1.:;:N $28.9UU00
3bd/3.5ba pool home has fabulous view
of the 6th Green on the Oaks Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


bf,4 303 E. Hartford St 4
4oaer MLS 342911 $57,
Lower level condo overlooking
the community pool.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2015


i t, 936W. Sun Vista Ct.
$ MLS 703389 $379,000
Luxurious 3bd/2ba home on quiet
cul-de-sac. Lots of natural light.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


C. A' 4389 S LeWoods Dr
z MLS 702204 $199,000
Spacious & updated 3/3/2 ranch home.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146

156E
Glassboio CI
13-l7A
S58 000
I ,n' 1,,,
2bd,'2ba
condo unit
located in
Citrus Hills.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


WHO SM' TRE'$ A CROWD?


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


8101N VerdinoTerr
- it/' M1. : :,,. I.. S2245UU
SCrystal River-
spacious & lovely 4/3/2 pool home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


S>t t 14 Iu, V,. ,,iuiliv, UI.
Exquisite 3bd/3ba custom home w/solar
heated pool &spa on an acre lot.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


1,0 370 E Glassboro CI 204B
MLS 703822 $67,900
Completely furnished 2bd/2.5ba
townhome great location!
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


C,5-" MLS 356404 $
Spacious 3/3/2.5 home
w/caged, heated pool.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


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| iI l III ,I III II I II I i ,I 1 1 ,, ,l1i I I I1 :1 .11 h,1,1 III I I I , i, I I I
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^^^QI]^ZE]^]ZZE1i


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E5




E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci iiko Nci


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seminoles push to


preserve Egmont Key


Island history holds special significance for tribe


PAUL Guzzo
The Tampa Tribune
EGMONT KEY To many, the scenic
isolation of this island at the mouth of
Tampa Bay evokes thoughts of paradise.
To members of the Seminole Tribe,
Egmont Key has been nothing but a place
of oppression and death.
During the Third Seminole War of the
mid-1800s, members of the tribe were im-
prisoned by U.S. soldiers, brought here by
boat and herded into pens.
Those who survived the harsh condi-
tions were moved to reservations. Those
who died were tossed into holes in the
ground without markings. Their remains
are still scattered across the island.
Now, for the first time since the last of
those prisoners sailed away from Egmont
Key, a large group of Seminoles will re-
turn as many as 75 of them to see
that their ancestors are never forgotten.
The group will dock at Egmont Key on


today for a history tour of the island, join-
ing an annual event sponsored by the
Egmont Key Alliance, then reboard for a
journey tracing a portion of the path their
ancestors took to banishment on the
reservations.
They're calling it a "Trail of Tears," the
name used by other native Americans -
the Cherokee to describe their own
relocation.
The Seminoles' final stop will be the
Panhandle village of St. Marks, south of
Tallahassee, where buses will take them
to the state capital for a twofold presen-
tation to state leaders one about their
history and one about the disintegration
of the island where they hope to see their
heritage restored.
Egmont Key is rapidly sliding into the
Gulf of Mexico.
MEN
In the days of the internment camp, the

See KEY/Page E13


Inside...


Bees, bees, bees
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Swiss musical tree stand taps an area of collector interest


DearJohnlm: Attached is a
picture of a musical ro-
tating Christmas tree
stand which came
from my husband's
grandparents.
The Swiss
mechanism plays
Christmas carols.
As nearly as we
can guess from the
length of time it
has been in our
family, it is proba-
bly from about John S
1900. The nickel SIKOI
tin plating shows AT
wear, but no rust,
and it is still quite
attractive. It is fully working,
and sounds beautiful.
"Switzerland" is stamped
into the bottom of the wood
base. Stamped into the metal
is "Swiss" followed by


"lador" or "ladoy" in cursive
letters. The electrical cord
with un-polarized plug ap-
pears to have
been added later,
and is simply to
power lights. We
Share guessing that
I' ^. originally it was
used with a natu-
ral tree lighted by
candles.
We are wonder-
ing if there is any
ikorski collector interest
[SKI'S in something like
IC this. Thanks for
any information
you can give us. -
JK, Beverly Hills
DearJ.K: There is consid-
erable interest in the an-
tiques marketplace for
musical rotating Christmas
tree stands. You are correct


about the time of production
being circa 1900. Current po-
tential dollar value is in the
$200-plus range.
Dear John: Enclosed are
pictures of four different
items. My question is, what
value do these items have?
They include a gateway
table, a Lindbergh chair, a
silk tapestry of Marshall
Fields's first building on the
Chicago River, and finally, a
handmade clock more than
100 years old from France.
Thank you for any infor-
mation you can give me
See ATTIC/Page E7
This wind-up rotating musical
stand plays Christmas carols
while holding a small Christ-
mas tree. This one is likely
from around 1900.
Special to the Chronicle


I


1





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

about these pieces. -H.F,
Inverness
Dear H.E: The gateleg
table was likely made in
the United States about
100 years ago. It appears to
be nicely refinished. Po-
tential dollar value is $150
to $300.
Lindbergh memorabilia
is a specific category of
collector interest. The
chair you have is of no in-
terest to those collectors.
There is no such piece of
furniture known as a Lind-
bergh chair Potential dol-
lar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
The picture of the tapes-
try is not clear enough for
me to help you.
The clock case appears
to be made of onyx. It was
likely manufactured dur-
ing the early 20th century


Potential dollar value is
$75 to $150.
Dear John: My uncle
passed away a few
months ago and left me
his collection of cigarette
lighters. There must be
close to fifty I have no in-
terest in keeping them
and need your advice on
the best method to sell
them.
Friends have suggested
I could sell them on eBay.
They say it is very easy to
do, but then I would have
to pack and ship them, so
it just is not what I want
to get involved with.
Please help me and thank
you for whatever advice
you can provide. TD.,
Internet
Dear T.D.: I wish you
had included a couple of
photographs or at least
some information about
what type of lighters are in
the collection. It would be
best to contact a collectors
club. On the Lighter Side


is a national association of
cigarette lighter collectors.
The website is www
otis.com. Good luck.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, P.O. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@a ol. com.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in
Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food
section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion
section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays


' iEI 746.9000
Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR 2
d d I


"BEVEL IL

Owi A.rN


I ; I[,] FLORA CITY /


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E7




E8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KELLEN HENRY
Associated Press

NEW YORK-There's no shortage of
buzz about beekeeping these days.
From environmentalists worried
about disappearing colonies to foodies
seeking locally sourced liquid gold, lots
of new beekeepers are itching to roll
down their sleeves.
With cities like New York lifting bee-
keeping bans, and with a wealth (of ne"
books, online videos and meet-ip)
groups, learning the basics is easier
than ever
But as a hobbyist beekeeper
myself, who once moved a
hive full of bees from A


Washington, D.C., to New "
York during a career change,
I can also tell you that the
sweet rewards of homemade
honey don't come without some
sticky practical challenges.
One of those, of course, is fit: i nL
the bees themselves.
"You can learn 99 percent ot bee-
keeping on YouTube, but you need to
know that when you're actually there
and you're digging into a box filled
with 50,000 stinging insects, that
you're good with that," said Chase
Emmons, managing partner and


....... ..:i! -:.-.::.i;..:..,

""" .. . '**: ;.','-:-,' :



- ...


See Page EIO


ii,


Beekeeper Kellen Henry
replaces her Feedback
Farms hive in the Bedford-
Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn. in
New York. Though New York reversed
a long-standing ban on tending to hon-
eybees in 2010. there are issues beyond
legality that potential beekeepers should
consider. Beekeeping. especially in an
urban area, requires space, time and
cooperation with the surrounding
community.
:A :.-,U1.,!: ,


'


"1


W


.A


Ile'^a




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4c^'

It,



O
4
4k'

7_


Bees clamor on thel*htoneycomb during a hive
inspection. The bees are storing honey in a
honeycomb they've sealed with wax to
save their honey for consumption over
the winter.


7


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E9


I^^^f~ ww~istristJJingsTT omW ^ ^ M




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEES
Continued from Page E8

apiary director at Brooklyn Grange,
a rooftop farm in New York that of-
fers some hands-on training at its
hives.
Whether you're creating a small
business or just planning to enjoy
your own honey, here are some real-
istic pointers on the money, space
and neighborly grace required of a
beekeeper
Location, location,
location
Where you keep your bees is an
important part of how to keep them.
A sunny, out-of-the-way spot with
good drainage is best. Scope out a lo-
cation that won't trip up unsuspect-
ing neighbors, curious pets or
repairmen.
Your hive should also be conven-
ient for frequent inspections. Re-
member you'll be carrying
equipment and removing heavy
boxes of honey at harvest time. If
you have to scale a rickety roof lad-
der to see your bees, you might be
tempted to neglect your duties.
Make sure your landlord is on
board and beekeeping is legal in
your city. Then take some time to sell
the idea to your neighbors. Emmons
recommends coming armed with a
few jars of honey to sweeten the
deal.
"The last thing you need is un-
happy neighbors," he said. "You can
catch more flies with honey"
Not just a walk
in the park
The good news is you don't have to
hire a bee sitter when you leave
town on vacation. Once the hive is
up and running, the bees are quite
self-sufficient in their daily needs.
But preventing pests and swarms, as
well as extracting honey, will re-
quire some time and even some
hard, physical work over the course
of the year
A deep hive chamber full of honey
can weigh as much as 90 pounds,
and actively managing your hive will
require lifting and maneuvering
those bulky boxes. You'll also be suit-
ing up in heavy clothing and work-


ing in the hot sun.
As a new beekeeper, you should
make time to attend a class or meet-
up group on top of your bee yard
work. You might even meet a poten-
tial partner to help you shoulder the
load.
Honey money
Before you take gold out of your
hive, you'll have to put some in. It
might cost you around $400 to get set
with wooden hive equipment, tools
and the bees themselves, though
much of your equipment can be
used for several years before being
replaced.
Shop around before ordering, and
appraise deluxe, all-in-one kits care-
fully They may be easier than buy-
ing equipment a la carte but they
often include supplies you don't re-
ally need. If you're handy, you'll also
find ample specs online for building
some of your own equipment.
When it comes to purchasing,
there's strength in numbers. Joining
a bee group is a good way to get in on
cheaper bulk orders or shipping dis-
counts, swap used equipment and
pass the hat on big purchases, like
pricey honey extracting equipment.
Scratching the itch
Using good practices and inspect-
ing the hive at appropriate times
can go a long way toward minimiz-
ing stings. But they will happen from
time to time.
Assuming you don't have a severe
allergy to apitoxin, the venom in
honey-bee stings, the worst you'll
have to endure is some local pain,
itching and swelling that's treatable
with over-the-counter medicine.
If you're afraid of bee stings, re-
member it's OK to go heavy on the
protective clothing if it encourages
you to visit the hive, especially while
you're getting used to handling the
bees. Don't let beekeeper machismo
intimidate you into doing hive in-
spections in a T-shirt if it makes you
nervous.
In general, be flexible to trying a
different approach if yours isn't
working.
"When you have 10 beekeepers in
a room, you're going to have 12 opin-
ions. Humans have been doing it for
10,000 years and there are really
strong opinions," Emmons said. "Go
with what you're comfortable with."


Associated Press
Beekeeper Kellen Henry uses a smoker to calm the bees
while conducting a hive inspection at her Feedback
Farms hive in Myrtle Village Green community garden in
the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, in New York.


| KAREN E. MORTON
Hall of Fame Centurion Membe.
E-mail: kemorton@tamnpaay rrcor
Webs ite: karenemorton cor
/(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595
FL -- iTOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163


E10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLED B


Chronicle


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cuffing
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
LECANTO
2/1 $510/mo. LG yard
352-464-3159
LECANTO
Leisure Acres
3/2 SW, water & gar-
bage inc. application
& bckgrnd req. $600.
mo. (352) 628-5990




3/2 Double wide on
1 fenced-in acre.
Peaceful area in
Heatherwood
Reduced to $51,900
(352) 302-6905
HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2 ,14 acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192
NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Stock Sequoia
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
FOR FREE PHOTOS
John Lyons 0(
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details


-I111


NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183





INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, 1 BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances incl. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565

A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/ work-
shop. /4 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 228-4282


To place an ad, call 563-5966


-v [ Classifieds


Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899

INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013





2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screem por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274

Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161

Inverness 55+ 2Br/lBa
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BRI1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237

LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incd
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171

Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500, turn. lot rent
$245. incl. trash &
water (219) 929-8909

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
7735 W. Tropical Ln.
Agent (352) 382-1000


AaIlON
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHomreRentals.comn
HOMOSASSA
117101 Clearwater Ct .......... $1,000
2/2 waterfront o le
2218 S. Saindbuirg Pt ................ $500
2/1 duplex ovollblesoo i
INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY
1304 dayiore St. (INV)......$1,100
3/2/2 pool home I block from Rails to Trals
7530 S. Duval Island (Fq ......$1,100
3/2 lakefront home with a beautiful vim
CRYSTAL RIVER
814 NE Ist Terr. .................. $550
2/1 close to shopping
9469 W. Wisconsin i ............. $650
2/2 nice 2-story condo coming soon
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
817S. Adams (BH) ................ $6715
2/15/1 newly remodeled with Flondl room
7699 N. Maltese Dr. (CS) $800
3/2/2 nice newer home 1,254 sq ft

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?



31212 $750
2/2/1 P00l $700
21211 $1100IU
3/2/2 Pool &Lawncarelncl $1100
2/1.5 Tonhouse $550
2/2/1 $700

2/2/1 $700
2/2/1 $700
2/2/1 $650

3/2 Doubleide $1,000
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggs
Property Manager/
aRealtor-Associates
352-726-9010


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Rea'l Estte



















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815


INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-8771










RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Fall Into Savings
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT S459.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-&00-955-8771

* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD






Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442 (352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Pro-
vider & Employer."


FH,!.1';t iS^'- V p






CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037


Available Now!
2 Bedrooms
Rental
Assistance
Available
Call Monday Through Friday
8am 12pm & 1pm 5pm
(352)489-1021
TDD 800-955-8771
^ This Institution is an equal
l oppounlty provider employer







CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242


Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/I, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001






CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1i car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-8771


I.i


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equip ped kit. All
util., cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming turn or unfurn
effic./cottage, all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994




BEVERLY HILLS
2 poss 3/1/1 + carport
$600. 352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2bed/bath, $675. mo.
FIRST MONTH FREE!
(352) 422-7794

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1i car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-8771





Crystal River
modern 2/2, 1500 sq.ft
on 10 acres grass
pasture w/horse barn.
5 miles from down-
town Crystal River off
of Citrus Ave. (Hwy
495 and 488) Lease
for 10 yrs & it will be
yours! Rent $1000 per
month, call Larry
Hough, Manager
352-795-2240
Homosassa-
Riverhaven
3/2/2 Pool house or
2/2/2 Waterfront Villa
$1,100. per month
Offered by Waybright
Real Estate, Inc
Call Nancy Wilson
352-422-4137
INVERNESS
3/2 Carport, $625. mo
Call (561) 248-8391
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Avail 11/22,
sunroom, fenced yard,
app'd pets w/ add'l
fees, $775/mo + sec &
1st. 352-697-2195

INVERNESS
31212
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

Rent to Own, No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 Ell





E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Country Living
on large /2 acre lot.
3 bd 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




FLORAL CITY
LAKE FRONT-
ROOMMATE
WANTED
2 BR, 1% B. NS,$450
mo, ind util sec dep
$450. 352-302-6055




CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms in house, Full
Kichen, Near Publix,
turn, one price pays all,
+ WIFI, $115wk/420.
mo.sm. $130wk/470
mo. Ig 352-563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802
INVERNESS
Room for Rent, Pry.
Bath $350., 613-9135




4 Beautiful Acres next
to lake. Well, paved
streets. Horses OK
9157 E Orange Ave
FLORAL CITY. 941-358
-6422, 941-320-0433
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

Rr&l MX
REALTY ONE

Big 2001 DW.
2 AC, $98,500
2800 SF Home, w/in
law, art 5 ac $258K
11 Acre Lakefront
Estate $750K
1500 Sa Cape Codd
acre $98,500
3 ac on Derby Oaks
w home $248K
Lots more!!!
www.crosslandrealty.c
om, 352 726 6644

Hunting/Fishing Camp
6/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room &AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me

For Sale
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352-422-6129




Lecanto 3 bedroom.
2 bath with fireplace,
sauna, and garage.
2 acres w/fruit trees,
garden ready.
352-422-7136




HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW,own lot, new carport
& screened front & back
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858






117S Lunar Terrace 2
bedroom 2 bath Florida
RM Garage & Carport
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE
Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down
352-344-9290
3/2/2 in the Highlands;
Very Clean w/ large
screened patio,& at-
tached storage shed.
Lg corner lot in great
neighborhood $89,900
352-302-0431

L.QQk
Inverness highlands 2
bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$62,000 2 car garage.
Fenced yard.
352-476-0581

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


Ho e

Rent to Own, No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



2005 MEADOWCREST
(Fox Hollow) BEAUTY.
3/2/2/2 Lg Split BR,
Cul-d-sac.See pics @
www.forsalebvowner.co
m. #23967875
Call 724-813-8624.
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R5/WRC
REALTY ONE
Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenced
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195k 352-422-7077



4BR/11 %BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
For Sale By Owner
2BR, 1 BA, Corner Lot
Located in Old
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated
kitchen, SS appl's.,
pine Hardwood firs./
tiles, roof 3 yrs. old.
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy-
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000.
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092


Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!


For Sale ,
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

For Sale %I
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


i 41 1 1 4 411111111111111111


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

WANT IT SOLD
House not selling?
Behind in
payments?
Upside down in
mortgage?
CALL ME I can help
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office

INVESTORS
1988 Manufactured
Home 3/2, 1 Acre,
Newer Roof & A/C
$47K obo Cash
352-503-3245


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
biDowell@
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments





I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.waftt
centuy21 .com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
_39-79A-SRS


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




3 BR, 31/2 BA, Condo
2100 sq. ft., Furnished,
Carport,
Citrus Hills on Hartford
$119,000.
Call 352-419-5268


CirsCu


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"


CitrusCount
Homes^^-


Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712


Time Share

Six day vacation in
Orlando, Florida!
Regularly $1,175.00.
Yours today for only
$389.00! You SAVE
67 percent. PLUS
One-week car
rental included.
Call for details.
1-800-985-1463




8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively reno-
vated including wood
and tile floors. Granite
and new roof and
kitchen. Over 2000 SF
Living area. $129,900
352-817-5875 or
miksh@earthlink.net

Vacation waterfront
property. $5k down,
$1200 month 1/1/2,
Sawgrass Landing.
$1 Ok down
$1900/mo, 2/2
condo. Casa Rio.
Lease options avail.
Call Lisa Vandeboe
352-634-0129
Owner/Broker


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


** ***** **

V' THIS OUT!


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. front-
age on golf course
$49,900. Call
352-638-0905




Streamfront Land
Bargain! 1.7 acre
wooded corner
parcel in Blue Ridge
Mtns. 390' on crystal
clear stream, Natu-
ral year-round
spring. Paved road,
municipal water,
utilities, mild
restrictions RV
friendly. Was $69,900
now, $27,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
866-952-5303, x 63

TENN. LAND BAR-
GAIN WITH FREE
BOAT SLIP! 1.70 ac-
res meadows over-
looks 140 acre Na-
ture Preserve,
streams & ponds.
Only $19,900. 6.1
acre hardwoods
Only $27,900. FREE
boat slips. Excellent
financing, little
down. Call now
1-877-888-0267,
x446










'our 0 orldl first



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KEY
Continued from Page E6

island spanned more than
580 acres. Five years ago it
was measured at about 250
acres. Today it is closer to
200 acres.
A single hurricane or a
series of strong storms
could wipe it from the
map. Time certainly will.
There are a few theories
on what is causing the ac-
celerated erosion-global
warming, a change in cur-
rents caused by construc-
tion of the Sunshine
Skyway, wake from in-
creased boat activity No
one knows for sure.
When Seminole leaders
learned of the dire cir-
cumstances, they began
lobbying for preservation
of the island. Though the
Seminoles have long
known about the Egmont
Key internment camps,
that chapter in their his-
tory took a back seat to
other tribal research.
The rapid erosion
changed the tribe's priori-
ties, and leaders toured
the island in August.
"The history of the island
is a matter of cultural mem-
ory for our people," James
Billie, chairman of the
Seminole Tribal Leaders,
says in a letter to U.S. Sec-
retary of the Interior Sally
Jewell sent after the August


tour 'And we wish that it be
preserved so that the youth
of our Tribe can visit this
place and learn how far we
have come together"
"We cannot allow the
unmarked graves to wash
away," said Willie Johns, a
Seminole Tribe historian
and member
No one sees the erosion
problem as clearly as Tom
Watson, who has worked
for the Florida Department
of Environmental Services
as an assistant park ranger
at Egmont Key for 16 years.
On a recent tour, he
pointed out a 4-foot sand
cliff with about 20 yards of
beach stretching beneath it
to the Gulf of Mexico.
Just a few weeks earlier,
the cliff wasn't there and
the beach tapered evenly
all the way to the surf.
'And in a few more
weeks, it could be further
back," Watson said.
In 2000, to slow the ero-
sion, the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers dropped
300,000 cubic yards of sand
dredged from the sur-
rounding waterways onto
the edge of the island. An
additional 700,000 cubic
yards were added in 2006,
and 1.4 million cubic yards
will be placed in 2014.
"It's just a Band-Aid,"
Watson said. "They add the
sand, and the water takes
it away All it does is slow
the inevitable."
Batteries of guns from the


j JOAuN MARTIN [1
Pr eferredc
REAL ESTATE WKW f

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefmn.net
r .i 11 .- '1 i I r 0 i I


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2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of
storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer
kitchen. Pristine condition. Don't miss out
call today! $249,900
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to
right on Charleston to home on right.


4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
Pine Ridge
Beautiful 4/4/3 with office Caged in ground salt
water pool with spa 3981 sq ft of living area,
stainless steel appliances Wet bar, Tray ceilings,
plantation shutters, Intercom, and summer kitchen
Comeseeittoday' Priced at $465,000
Directions: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. to home on left.


time of the Spanish Ameri-
can War once were located
on the southwestern side of
the island. They were a
popular stop on a walking
history tour for many of
Egmont Key's visitors.
Today the guns are in-
cluded in snorkeling ex-
cursions 100 yards
offshore, under the Gulf.
In 2009, the Corps of En-
gineers developed a plan
to install metal sheet pil-
ing below the sand to stem
the erosion more effi-
ciently, said Richard
Sanchez, president of the
Egmont Key Alliance, a
nonprofit organization
dedicated to restoring,
preserving and protecting
the natural and historical
resources on Egmont Key
The cost, though, was es-
timated at $8 million to $10
million and never moved
beyond the planning phase.
The Seminoles hope
that by spreading the word
about their history on the
island, they will add to the
voices calling for preser-
vation and garner public
sentiment.
"We're hoping the Semi-
noles are the tipping
point," Sanchez said. "We
have knocked on a lot of


doors and reached out to a
lot of congressional lead-
ers. They all agree the is-
land needs to be saved, but
no one can find the money
"Hopefully, the Semi-
noles and their history is
what helps gets something
like the sheet piling done.
It would be such a shame
to lose Egmont. So many
people treasure it."
Egmont Key has long
been a popular place to visit
for tourists and residents. It
has been home to a wildlife
preserve since 1974.
Despite its ugly past as a
prison, few places in
Florida can match its
beauty
More than 200,000 peo-
ple a year visit to hike its
lush green foliage, lie on its
picturesque beaches, soak
in the swarms of rainbow-
colored butterflies and
flocks of tropical birds,
snap photos of its esti-
mated 2,000 gopher tor-
toises, and learn its history
Much has been written
about the military's Fort
Dade, which along with
the lighthouse landed
Egmont Key a spot on the
National Register of His-
toric Places.
The U.S. military made


the fort its home from the
late 1800s through early
1900s in order to protect
Tampa Bay against the
threat of a Spanish inva-
sion that never came.
An estimated 300 mem-
bers of the military made
the island home. Brick
roads and a railroad con-
nected 70 buildings, in-
cluding ammunition
storage, suburban-style
homes, a general store and
even a bowling alley
The island is dotted with
crumbling concrete rem-
nants of the past and his-
torical markers featuring
photos of buildings long
gone.
Little was ever dis-
played or even written
about the Seminole chap-
ter, even by the Seminoles.
"It has not been a focal
point of our own research
until now," said Paul Back-
house, tribal historic
preservation officer and
museum director for the
Seminole Tribe of Florida.
Backhouse said Egmont
Key's island locale made it
a perfect spot for a holding
pen until boats could take
the Seminoles to perma-
nent reservations.
"It had to be like Alca-


_I --- III -
CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE
A taste o i 1 .i .. .i . h.i .... ,, .. .... i i ,,.i ... -. oak Elegantesta.
trees h ,.,,, I,, 1 .. 1 I s Dockyour ,
I .. i.. I S$800.000 5,916 sq. ft. home
1 ,1 ,1 ,, .... ., ,, ,,,. ...... .. ...... $ 5 4 9 ,0 0 0


GITTA fm
ARTH OUTSTANDING
B A H WATERFRONT RESIDENCE COUNTRY ESTATE PLEASANT GROVE
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REA LT O R . .. . ....... ... .vaulted tongue & groove 1,,, ii
R E LT R ,111.1,I ,1 1I1, I' I i I ," t il c lt 1 h ,h I..
kit., windows, every-thing meticulous ... i r I .... ..
|Cell maintained ..sum er kit covered patio w/pavers.
Cel2 l: -0 Pncedsooo right at 399,000! $549,900
(352) 220.0466 _______


gbarth@myflorida-hou



Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-h


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E13

traz," he said. "They could
look off the shore and see
land but could not get to it."
Boats were not allowed
near the island. And the
threat ofriptides and sharks
made the swim daunting.
Historians have esti-
mated that 300 Seminoles
were held on the island.
Among them was famed
Seminole Chief Billy
Bowlegs, who was later
taken to Oklahoma, and
the legendary Polly Parker,
who escaped the boat tak-
ing her to the reservation
after it stopped in St.
Marks, leading up to a
dozen others to safety
Some did not live to see
the ships arrive. They died
of malnutrition, dehydra-
tion, heat exhaustion, dis-
ease and infection from
ill-treated war wounds.
Through old military
records and journal entries,
five Seminole gravesites
were identified a few years
ago by researchers.
A cemetery near the
lighthouse is home to 19
graves for an eclectic
group lighthouse ten-
ders, U.S. armed forces,
and five Seminoles, only
one of whom is given a
name: "Chief Tommy"


STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT

is a true master piece mi i ) and your family to move right in!


ROOM TO ROAM!
Spectacular 3/2/2 pool h I-'-,
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i i, i , i ii ,,i door -
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S II, ,1 i h ,1 ,, ,,, i security system, updated kitchen & bath- i, i i .. i ... ... I
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ouse.com ...... $2 39,00 I $488,000


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.. ...........169 ,000
i"''","$69,000


If 6-
A
14


I
]




E14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
ABOVE: The Sharp AQUOS Ultra HD LED television features "Wallpaper
Mode," which allows a powered-off TV to display family photos, paintings or
preloaded images as museum-quality works of art. BELOW: The Symbol Audio
Desk, with high-quality speakers built into a sleek desk, available in maple,
walnut, oak or cherry.


TECH
Continued from Page E4

a slim writing desk crafted from
maple, walnut, oak or cherry
Baby boomers may remember the
family's old hi-fi system. While
iPhones and iPads can now hold the
equivalent of hundreds of Mitch
Miller albums, there are still those
among us who like the mid-century
chic of a retro-styled system. Symbol
Audio pays homage to the hi-fi with
the Modern Record Console, a wal-
nut cabinet outfitted with a hand-
built turntable, amplifier and


built-in wireless router
"The act of removing an album
from its sleeve, cleaning and placing
it on the turntable is interactive and
physical. There is an undeniable
charm to vinyl that's more than just
a fascination with the past," said
Blake Tovin, Symbol's founder.
(www.symbolaudio.com)
Designer Chris Cushingham of
Brooklyn, N.Y, crafts his own ver-
sion of the hi-fi console out of walnut
and corrugated cardboard. He'll also
make you a custom one using your
record player, audio gear and LP col-
lection. (www.cushdesignstudio.com)


See TECH/Page E15


I THE PICTURE IN THE DICTIONARY next to IT'S HAMMER TIME! Break out the tool belt
GET R DONE is this house! Bank Owned 4/2/1 & get to work. Lake Panasoffkee 1960 2/1
pool home w/ 1,702 living needing A LOT of work. w/1 078 living for ONLY $21,450. #703858.
#701659. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TECH
Continued from Page E14

Bloomfield, Ct.-based Salamander De-
signs conceals high-performance loud-
speakers in elegant cabinetry. The
Chicago model is clad in striated black
oak, evoking the prairie grass of the Mid-
west. There are versions in walnut,
American cherry and high-gloss white
lacquer (wwwsalamanderdesigns.com)
Italian designer Edoardo Carlino's
spacy-looking Hi Can canopy bed incor-
porates a theater screen, integrated PC
and game consoles, and built-in lights to
create a self-contained bedroom/play-
room. (wwwhi-can.com)
Replace ceiling, floor or table lamps
with IAV Lightspeaker's wireless fix-
tures and run your music through them.
You get lighting, surround sound and no
expensive wiring to deal with. For


rentals and vacation homes, there's an
outdoor version built into a faux rock
you could put on a patio. (www.iavlight
speakercom)
Kohler's Moxie showerhead has a
Bluetooth speaker attachment so you
can sync radio or playlists for bathing
music. Disengage the speaker and carry
it to another room, or the beach. Colors
include white, cherry red, navy and
chartreuse. (www.uskohler.com)
Ready for entertaining? Just hit
"party" on Lutron's new Homeworks sys-
tem. It sets the mood of a room with spot-
lights, dimmable overheads, music and
thermostat settings. The company offers
customized lighting options for a variety
of moods and rooms. (wwwlutron.com)
If you'd just like to disguise outlet and
vent covers, check out Trufig's marble,
wallpaper, wood or concrete flush-
mounted options, which make the con-
nection disappear into the wall.
(www.trufig.com)


Terra in Terra VEisE
& BrentwoodResale

REALTY GROUP www.Terro'ist yupscom


Associated Press
The Salamander Designs Denver model in walnut with high performance loudspeakers
in elegant cabinetry. There are versions done in American cherry and high gloss white
lacquer from the Bloomfield, Conn.-based company.


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Ri I rnrriCD -4.AA.nAA7 Qli MIII I idM U99-9.qt VIIPTnDIA PDAMIl IM .A-7 A777


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDEVILLAS
Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on lst tee of the Skyview Golf
Course Professionally decorated, built ins in living room, surround sound,
cherry cabinets with roll outs and so much more Move in ready
$289,000 MLS 701779 $275,000


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR SYIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS -
... .. .. ... DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVlEW VILLAS
Custom Nice maintenance free villa situated on a beautiful lot in Terra Vista This 3 bedroom, DETACHEDVILLA2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
6 burner 2 bath home with open floor plan, large eat-in kitchen and formal dining area is Beautiful maintenance free pool home, 2 bedrooms with a den, 2 bath, 2
Upgrade( gatherings Sit on the lanai and enjoy the use of space All neutral
custom window treatments and plantation shutters Oversized pool with waterfall h community Located close to the Bella Vita i i i i ... .. i comfortable, warm yet
and extensive landscaping on cul-de-sac homesite Golf cart garage, security interior in neutral colors Third bedroom can sophisticated atmosphere throughout Superior condition Plantation
system and much more serve as den/office Make this beautiful homeyours today shutters Maintenance free living at it s finest
ii ii $699,000 MLS 705130 $424,900 MLS 705701 $234,900 MLS 701578 $199,000

Tem -. 6 Moth orMr
Terra~~ ~ ~ ~ Vit & Brntoo Retas SoilMmesi-nlddwt letl


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013 E15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Mi = IIIIII'i $200,000
Jeanne ot l.'illaid Pickiel 352212-3410
it it i CiliusCount Sold con


I&, R I- =--FA1r:., I N C .W R H

SERVING
COUNTY W .i F "

OROE37FOR Mi A


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OWNER WANTS OFFERS
Cil Alwlu Sniild, 352 4768727
Stiv l. 1,1 =703905


TRULY SCENIC BUILDING LOTS

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ASKING $19,900 EA.
Ask lot Mallln Booth todaj! 637-4904


STATELY CRYSTAL OAKS HOME
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MIl1_. iii.)''' ASKING $90,300
JllJn, tl'itiJ???l22 2t; ii' -r Ihi.h Ihl-I hiaiu-


ROOMY INVERNESS HOME
jl ll _.... b. i l _' ,.. :|i..v phii .
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M I. "ii:. '".:.. ASKING $85,000
C'//,Ste'ii Stu t 125 212 11


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S'i Pj .ilhl MH

ML1 =/lI'ill' $75,000
Jeanne it Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
CitiusCouint'Sold. corn









THIS HOME OFFERS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
.1." ".I l,.1 .r.l. .1 ..j.... ijH... . ... ...I. .....

,. lh I.. I .)I l.. ihl ,l .l h.).. l .J ...r I ....! l. hl .. i.I..:.. I..:.. I.
i = -4 "ASKING S258.900
Pit DO,, 352212 7280
1',el hllnti ;2lpfl tdiff 4 ;.jnm


PRICE PLEASES WALLET
. 1 I h .. I '.. i r 1 ..i .I


r 1..' V I: PRICED TO SELL S68.900
PuD,,- ,352 212 7280
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* IP"I, .i :..i .l I:.l (.:. :.: lh .(.:.. l .l-h l l. l
MI1 =hIi.il,.1 $110,000
Jeanne ot l.'illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
inni CiliusCounnl Sold coin


OFFICE OR STUDY PLUS DEN



Ii: =-, 411 ASKING $39.900
Pt D, 352 212 7280
Saa ih.iini i ,2i 2t itdfi. co.mn


4 BEDROOM. 2 BATH. 2 CAR GAR.
* i,,v -li,, i i 'a..11 1i1 ,ila .i
* 1 IHill i ll i-ll il i '- a lll i


Mi i =hii- ::l ASKING $114,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


I ,7

3 BED/2 BATH HOME ZONED
GEN. COMMERCIAL
lll l 'll: I. z.ll'~ J lljl lj ,-: l.ll',:l h '! TlJ III .IN "' ll .'l
I I,,rj. -uI. ."Iuh .a '. . h. ,:i- r ..iihI .


ONLY $65.000
Call Onade Feese, 352.302 7699


COME SEE THIS


M.h i.:. I '.l II.l ,l ,i.:l.ih l h l I II Ill"I' .
JUST REDUCED TO $139,900
Ask loi Tim Donovan in Isaac Baylon


CITY LIMITS CITY WATER CITRUS SPRINGS!


'.r rr i,, l .,:.'dr .i,... :,- i i r i.:.. ,,..j I1 .. i'i 1. . f. : a A i h.li l. ,.i h ..

Mil'.- ='/ii.' .'i ASKING $79,900 MI =/1i1'.lii'i ONLY $139,900
Callt Nanc Jenks 352 400 8072 Ca/ll lnainame 0 Regan 586-0075


V ,, :, J ..) .,, III ,, d ,,,llllll l,,,l ; L r.1 .... ;l. i-i h
1 I. I) ..) ,V,, I. i,* I hn h, ll -Ilh - T
L.:.......... IN 1,.,.I h ., : h, I |] 1 1 |h |
Nl; = ;-,4 4N, $54,000
DAn id Hd Iz Cell 954 383 8/86
OFF 352 /26 6668


* \/I ,,,,:,r I''i ,i,,,,,I,,Ir,: I,,:,,,,,

I //a I ; fi P hIeI 20I1h9,p
MI_3: =10_`11 $49,500
WPilaid Pickiel 201.9871


CORNER LOT AT BAKER ST.
FLORAL CITY
_ .l., llj,:ll f le ,11 ,: ;l ;:(j~ l I llif [.f&l;
u .l., Ii l l. 6 if I(.i 1_. ,:

Mi. i ,,=iii. $17,000
Call N/Ilda Cano 352-2700202


1., 116' i I Iv : al.: i l .'1 :i .A '1II

$59,900 h: ..., a,,,:, :.
$49,000 I:a i .,..l,,h I.. .2,,,2 I ./699
Call Ouade feesei 352 302 7699


W .*:! '1
31 BEAUTIFUL ACRES ,ii,
.i .ll;n ,ll'lil 'lhl niTlil /I l 'llll'll'lll'l i (i.,:...,: 1i. '


Mi =' ,:h'i $850,000
Call Jim Moiton at 352-422-2173
to lowi this shce ol paiadise


i I H i 1,1, I I ....

ril.: ='i:..:i ASKING $88.900
Pit Dil 3522127280
I',,il h,.l,n.ll ln j i zi 2/g rtd i.jm


E16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013