Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03342

Full Text

Bragging rights: Lecanto football welcomes Dunnellon /B1


Turn the clocks back


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOL. 119 ISSUE 87


Crist to run for
job as Democrat
TALLAHASSEE -
Former Florida Republi-
can governor turned De-
mocrat Charlie Crist has
filed paperwork to run for
his old job with his new
party.
The state Division of
Elections posted the filing
on its website Friday.
Crist couldn't be immedi-
ately reached for com-
ment, but has an
announcement sched-
uled for Monday morning
in St. Petersburg.
Holiday
contests
available online
With the holiday sea-
son coming into full
swing, ChronicleOnline
has put together a
number of contests for
readers.
The submission dead-
line for two of the con-
tests Thanksgiving
Recipes and High School
Homecoming photos -
ends next week. How-
ever, four new contests
began Friday. To enter,
go to www.chronicle
online.com/content/
enter-contest and select
the contest or contests
you would like to enter.
Winners receive gift
prizes and/or publication
of their entries in the
newspaper.
You can also get to the
contest by going to www.
chronicleonline.com;
choose features tab and
select "Enter a Contest."
Here are the contests
and important dates:
Thanksgiving
Recipe submission
period closes 11:59 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 6; vot-
ing is Nov. 7 to 18. Top
five recipes printed in
Nov. 21 Food section.
Homecoming Pho-
tos submission period
closes 11:59 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 8; voting is Nov. 9 to
22. Winners receive $50
gift certificates.
Christmas Cookie
Jar submission period
closes 11:59 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 15; voting is Nov. 16
to Dec. 3. Winners
printed in special cookie
section on Dec. 12.
Christmas Orna-
ments submission pe-
riod ends Wednesday,
Dec. 4. Voting is Dec. 5 to
20. Prizes will be
awarded in three
categories.
Letters to Santa -
submission period ends
9:18 a.m. Friday, Dec. 20.
A sampling of the best let-
ters will be printed in the
Dec. 25 Chronicle.
Wacky Christmas
Photos submission
period ends 10:59 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 4. Vot-
ing is Dec. 5 to 20. Wack-
iest photo receives a
prize.


Gunman kills TSA agent


IA airport lockdown snarls US air traffic


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES A
man pulled a semi-auto-
matic rifle from a bag and
shot his way past a secu-
rity checkpoint at Los An-
geles International
Airport on Friday, killing a


TSA officer and wounding
two other people in an at-
tack that sent terrified
travelers running for
cover and disrupted
flights from coast to coast,
authorities said.
The unidentified gun-
man was wounded in a


shootout with police and
was taken into custody,
said Los Angeles police
Assistant Chief Earl
Paysinger A motive wasn't
immediately clear. A
Transportation Security
Administration union offi-
cial said the TSA officer


was killed, citing local
union officials.
A law enforcement offi-
cial said the shooting sus-
pect is Paul Ciancia, 23,
from New Jersey
Ciancia was wearing fa-
tigues and carrying a bag
containing a hand-written
note that said he "wanted
to kill TSA and pigs," the
official said, who was


'It is what it is


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A road-widening project along U.S. 41 in Floral City has made for congested traffic conditions near the
County Road 48 intersection.

Road construction interrupts business traffic in Floral City


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY
At best, it's an exercise
in patience.
At worst, the Florida
Department of Trans-
portation construction project
on U.S. 41 in Floral City has al-
ready caused at least one local
business, Connie's Kickstand, to
close and is currently causing
others to experience serious
setbacks.
The $2.8 million project,
which began in July, involves
repaving Florida Avenue (U.S.


41) between the Hernando/Cit-
rus county line and South Rip
Terrace in Floral City
Also, to improve the traffic
flow, new left-turn lanes will be
constructed from Florida Av-
enue (U.S. 41) onto Orange Av-
enue (County Road 48).
The traffic signals and poles
will also be replaced at Orange
Avenue.
According to information
from the FDOT website, the
project is more than halfway
finished, which is little consola-
tion for local businesses in the
area.
"It's definitely been an incon-


venience, both physically and fi-
nancially," said Shannon Burns,
owner of Aunt Martha's Pro-
duce Market, which sits on
U.S. 41 just north of the inter-
section. "But not just for me, but
for Floral City in general. Even
the businesses off the main road
are saying people aren't coming
because they don't want to deal
with the traffic."
Scott Mitchelltree, owner of
Reborn Auto Center at the
southeast corner of the intersec-
tion at U.S. 41 and C.R. 48, said
he estimates he's lost between


Page A5


Sheriff's office: Man was selling own pills


Billy Lee
Tedder
faces multiple
charges.


Classifieds.
Comics ...
Crossword .


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The sheriff's office's Tacti-
cal Impact Unit descended
on a Homosassa home
Thursday afternoon and ar-
rested a man on drug and
weapons charges.
Billy Lee Tedder, 52, of
South Aberdeen Terrace, is
facing four counts of sale of


..... C7
..... C6
..... C5


Community .......C4
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ..... A4


oxycodone, violation of pro-
bation and possession of a
firearm by a convicted felon.
His bond was $80,000 for the
drug charges. No bond was
allowed for the probation vi-
olation charge.
TIU Detective Aidan Mar-
shall said Tedder's arrest
was the conclusion of several
months of investigation and
surveillance.


Horoscope ........ A4


Marshall said investigators
tracked Tedder as he got a
prescription for the pills.
Tedder then began selling
the pills instead of using
them. According to Marshall,
undercover deputies were
able to purchase pills from
Tedder on four occasions,
which led the State Attor-
ney's Office to seek a warrant
See Page A5


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C6


briefed at LAX on the in-
vestigation and requested
anonymity because was
he was not authorized to
speak publicly
The TSA issued a brief
statement Friday after-
noon indicating at least
one other TSA agent was
wounded, adding that fur-
ther information would
See Page A2



Schools


noted for


stance on


bullying

ERYN
WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
The Citrus County
School District is recog-
nized for its extensive ef-
forts in trying to eliminate
bullying on campuses.
Student services direc-
tor Regina Allegretta told
school board members
Tuesday the district re-
ceived a complimentary
letter from the Florida
Department of Educa-
tion's Office of Safe
Schools for its anti-
bullying agreement.
During the summer, the
district was audited by the
Office of Safe Schools for
the 2012-13 school year
"Our office had to pro-
vide examples of docu-
mentation that support
the nine mandatory com-
pliance items," Allegretta
explained. "July 15 we re-
ceived a letter from the
Office of Safe Schools stat-
ing Citrus County was in
full compliance of all
mandatory items. I
wanted to share this be-
cause we do work hard to
meet the requirements of
the law, but more impor-
tantly to keep our chil-
dren safe."
The letter to Allegretta
also said the Office of Safe
Schools commends "...
you on your extensive out-
reach, training, promo-
tions, etc. to parents,
teachers, students (Com-
pliance Item #6). You
compiled quite a compre-
hensive list of bullying-re-
lated activities and
training going on at the
district. This should be
shared with other
districts."
Allegretta said aware-
ness and prevention are
stressed to all school par-
ticipants through train-
ings and awareness.
"We go through the bul-
lying and harassment pol-
icy that includes the
definition of bullying and
harassment, expectations
of the district and manda-
tory reporting," Allegretta
See Page A5


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C5


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Woman leads officials on wild chase


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

A high-speed chase on Hal-
loween netted two felony charges
for a Crystal River woman.
Salina Blanton, 29, is accused of
aggravated assault on a law en-
forcement officer and fleeing and
eluding law enforcement.
According to her arrest affi-
davit, dispatch alerted deputies
at approximately 6 p.m. to locate
the suspect, who was thought to


be driving a white Ford
Exhibition. A deputy
spotted the vehicle near
the intersection of Fort
Island Trail and Green
Leaf Forest Road, head-
ing toward U.S. 19, and
attempted to pull her
over Blanton turned
southbound onto U.S. 19, Bi
and drove approximately facin
20 mph on the west c
shoulder of the highway
making her intentions unclear


5aline
anto
g mul
barges


Working as a backup,
Trooper Tod Cloud of
the Florida Highway Pa-
trol, attempted to pull in
front of the vehicle to let
her know she was being
stopped. Blanton re-
sponded by abruptly
a swerving into the lane
3 where Cloud was driving
tiple and attempted to side-
s. swipe his vehicle, the ar-
rest report said.
A third deputy joined in the


pursuit near the intersection of
West Venable Street, where
Blanton had accelerated to ap-
proximately 75 mph. As the
chase ensued, Blanton drove
southbound on U.S. 19 while
swerving into northbound lanes
of traffic, and ran a red light at
Ozello Trail.
Blanton ran another light at
the intersection of Grover Cleve-
land Boulevard, then temporar-
ily swerved off the road and
entered the Wendy's parking lot


in Homosassa, where deputies
were able to box her in and
make the arrest.
A passenger in the vehicle
gave a sworn written statement
of his account of the chase.
In addition to the assault and
fleeing charges, Blanton faces a
misdemeanor charge for failure
to appear in court over an origi-
nal charge of domestic battery,
and received a citation for viola-
tion of a traffic control device.
No bond was allowed.


GUNMAN
Continued from PageAl

come from the FBI and
police.
As gunshots rang out in
Terminal 3, panicked fliers
dropped to the ground.
Those who had made it
past security fled onto the
tarmac or sought cover in-
side restaurants and
lounges.
"We just hit the deck.
Everybody in the line hit
the floor and shots just
continued," said Xavier
Savant, who was waiting in
the security line where the
shooting occurred. He de-
scribed it as a "Bam! Bam!
Bam!" burst of gunfire.
Savant said the shots
subsided and people
bolted through the metal
detectors and ran into the
terminal, eventually mak-
ing their way out to the
tarmac.
"My whole thing was to
get away from him," said
Savant, an advertising cre-
ative director who was
heading to New York with
his family for a weekend
trip.
Los Angeles Airport Po-
lice Chief Patrick Gannon
said that around 9:20 a.m.,
the gunman pulled what
he described as an "as-
sault rifle" from a bag and
began firing inside Termi-
nal 3. He then went to the
security screening area,
where he fired more shots
and went into the secure
area of the terminal, Gan-
non said.
Officers exchanged fire
with the gunman and ap-
prehended him; police be-
lieve he was the only
shooter, Gannon said. 'As
you can imagine, a large
amount of chaos took
place in this entire inci-
dent," he said.
Tim Kauffman, a
spokesman for the Ameri-
can Federation of Govern-
ment Employees in
Washington, confirmed
Friday that a Transporta-
tion Security Administra-
tion officer was killed.
Kauffman said the union's


Associated Press
Stranded passengers sit and wait with their luggage Friday at the Radisson Airport Hotel after leaving Los Angeles
International Airport. A gunman with a semi-automatic weapon shot three people, including a federal security agent,
at the Los Angeles airport Friday, police said, and a suspected gunman was in custody. Flights were disrupted
nationwide.


information comes from
their local officials in Los
Angeles.
As police searched for
other shooters, they es-
corted travelers out of the
airport. Aviation officials
stopped flights destined for
of the nation's busiest air-
ports from taking off from
other airports, causing de-
lays across the country
It was not the first shoot-
ing at LAX. On July 4,2002,
a limousine driver opened
fire at the airport's El Al
ticket counter, killing an
airline employee and a
person who was dropping
off a friend at the terminal.
Police killed the man.
Witness Brian Keech
said he heard about a
dozen gunshots from in-
side a security gate at the
terminal.
Ben Rosen was sitting at
the Starbucks in Terminal
3 eating oatmeal at about
9:20 a.m. when he heard
gunfire erupt and people
start running in all direc-
tions and others crouching


on the ground. Rosen got
on the ground and another
passenger said: "Don't
worry, we're safe."
Then, more gunshots
erupted. He grabbed his
phone and tried to lie as
flat on the ground as he
could. Police showed up
with their guns drawn,
shouting, "This is not a
drill! Hands up!"
Everyone put their
hands up and then were
led out of the airport ter-
minal to the international
terminal, Rosen said. As
they were led out they saw
broken glass from a win-
dow that looked like it'd


been shot out. Rosen left
his bag behind.
Six people were taken to
the hospital, the Los Ange-
les Fire Department said.
It's unclear whether the
gunshot victims were
among the group.
Thousands of
fliers delayed
Thousands of fliers
across the U.S. were de-
layed Friday due to the in-
cident. The prolonged
shutdown at the nation's
third largest airport was
particularly troublesome
for those hoping to head to
the East Coast or across


the Pacific Ocean.
Flights bound for Los
Angeles that had not yet
taken off were held at
their gates for hours by the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration. The so-called
ground stop was in effect
until around 4 p.m. Pacific
time. There were nearly
200 flights cancelled. Some
flights already in the air
were allowed to land at
LAX while others diverted
to nearby airports.
Gina Marie Lindsey ex-
ecutive director of Los An-
geles World Airports,
which operates the Los
Angeles airport, said at a


midday press conference
that planes were landing
at the airport at "less than
half the normal arrival
rate."
Flight tracking site
FlightAware.com said that
as of 3:30 p.m. Pacific time,
there were 195 flight can-
cellations. Another 268
flights were delayed. To
put that in perspective,
there were roughly 200
other flight cancellations
Friday nationwide, mostly
in New York and Philadel-
phia because of rain and
heavy winds.
The shooting occurred
around 9:30 a.m. local
time. Some passengers
who landed after the inci-
dent spent at least two
hours sitting on planes
parked in a remote corner
of the airport.
Even though the airport
never fully closed, travel-
ers trying to fly out were
unable to reach it because
of massive road closures.
Lindsey said it will take
"quite a deal of time" to
get operations back to nor-
mal at the airport She said
it will be a "carefully or-
chestrated logistical
ballet."
Even after police
cleared some terminals,
passengers couldn't return
until airport employees
were able to return to their
posts. Passengers were ad-
vised to wait at nearby ho-
tels until they hear more
information about flight
resumptions.
Los Angles is a major
gateway for flights to Asia,
Australia and New
Zealand. Domestically, the
largest cities served are:
San Francisco, Las Vegas,
New York, San Jose, Calif,
San Diego and Phoenix.


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Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
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Homosassa
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A2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


LOCAL!NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Page A3 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2,013



TATEM&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


It


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Kitchen files
paperwork for
candidacy
Former Crystal River
Mayor Ron Kitchen, who
lost a race for county com-
mission District 1 in 2012,
filed paperwork Friday to run
for county commission in the
District 2 race for 2014.
Kitchen, a Republican,
lists as Homosassa address
as his residence, according
to the Citrus County Super-
visor of Elections Office.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters is another Re-
publican in the campaign so
far. Incumbent John "JJ"
Kenney hasn't said whether
he will seek re-election.
Pepper pull
planned Nov. 9
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Crystal River Preserve State
Park and the Ozello Civic
Association will host a volun-
teer event Saturday, Nov. 9,
to remove Brazilian pepper
seedlings from the preserve.
Volunteers and park staff
will once again work to-
gether from 8 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. to remove the
pepper seedlings from
coastal hammocks near
Ozello. Lunch provided by
the Ozello Civic Assodciation.
Volunteers will meet at the
Ozello Civic Association,
14095W. Ozello Trail. To
register or for more informa-
tion, call Cyndy Holliday at
352-563-0450.
N.C. Republicans
to meet
The Nature Coast Repub-
lican Club will meet at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 9, with a cof-
fee social at 8:30 a.m. The
guest speaker will be state
Sen. Charlie Dean.
The meeting will be at
American Legion Post 155,
6585 Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River.
For information, call 352-
344-8786.

Brooksville
Hernando students
contract MRSA
School officials say two
Hernando High School stu-
dents have contracted the
bacterial infection known as
MRSA.
The Tampa Bay Times
reported Hernando County
school officials sent home
letters in October to notify
parents and let them know
how to take precautions.
Superintendent Lori Ro-
mano said she doesn't have
information on the condition
of the infected students.
MRSA stands for methi-
cillin-resistant Staphylococ-
cus aureus. Health officials
said it can be difficult to treat
because it is resistant to
many kinds of antibiotics.
Officials said the infection
often begins as a pimple or
boil and is most commonly
spread by having close
physical contact with an in-
fected person.

Pensacola
Shelter mistakenly
euthanizes dog
Employees of a Panhan-
dle animal shelter said a
woman's dog was mistak-
enly euthanized because of
improper paperwork.
The Pensacola News
Journal reported Cowgirl, a
Labrador retriever mix, was
euthanized Aug. 30 even
though its owner had been
in contact with the shelter
for several days.
A report by the Escambia
County Human Resources
Department said an em-
ployee noted the owner's
name and contact informa-
tion on an identification


card. But there wasn't a
note on the front of the card
that additional information
was located on the back.
The report included rec-
ommendations on how the
shelter might avoid such
mistakes in the future.
-From staff and wire reports


Getting set for park jam sessions


A.B. SIDIBE.. ....1


Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER City offi-
cials are disappointed a much-
anticipated performance stage in
the city's main event venue wasn't
ready for today's Stone Crab Jam.
But officials believe the band
shell at King's Bay Park should be
ready for bands in a matter of
weeks.
"It should be ready by late No-
vember," said Dave Burnell, the
city's public works director
Burnell said work began on the
40-foot by 18-foot structure in late
September
"The goal is to increase local
activities in a meaningful way and
promote families coming to the
park to enjoy music," Burnell
added.
Construction of the musical
venue was approved by the city
council in 2011 as part of a face-
lift for the bayside park. Other ad-
ditions include new toilets and a
canoe/kayak launch. The park is


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Robert DiMichele of Daly and Zilch-Florida Inc. grouts under the
structural columns of this new band shell in Crystal River.


the site of many of the city's spe-
cial events. The city recently
hired a special events coordinator
with the aim of bringing in and
developing more activities in and


near the downtown core.
When the facility was first sug-
gested in 2011, some area resi-
dents weren't keen on the
prospect of noise being generated


A generous act


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Logan Young displays the items he was presented in appreciation for his donation to Operation Welcome
Home.

Floral Cityfifth-grader honored for donation


BROOKE PERRY
Correspondent
Being selfless is something
many people struggle with, but for
10-year-old Logan Young, it's sec-
ond nature.
The Floral City Elementary
School fifth-grader caught the eye
of Operation Welcome Home
founder Barbara Mills last spring
when he donated money to her
cause at the county fair
Mills runs the nonprofit organi-
zation dedicated to honoring Cit-
rus County military personnel
upon their return from duty She
puts together gift baskets for them
and plans parties to recognize
their service. She had the idea to
start Operation Welcome Home
after her son returned from a tour
overseas in 2007. The program has
been growing ever since.
Mills was shocked when Young
put $10 into her fundraising jar
This was money Young's parents,
Gwen and Jon, had given to him to
spend on whatever he wanted
while at the fair Jon Young is a
U.S. Marine Corps veteran who
was medically discharged during
the first Gulf War Logan saw the
jar read "Veterans Need Your
Help" and didn't think twice.
"I said, 'Is that all your


money!?"' Mills explained. "I told
his mom I would get it out and she
said, 'No, that's how he wanted to
spend his money that's who he
is,"' Mills said. "What kid does
that? I thought, 'Is that cool, or
what?"'
This was not the first time
Logan had offered to give back.
"He's very kind-hearted," Gwen
Young said. "He gave all of his
piggy bank money to a coin jar for
school once without us knowing.
Logan might grow up to be a very
poor person, because he is per-
fectly OK with giving away every
bit of his money I've had to give
some talks about keeping a little
for himself sometimes or else the
donations will have to be for him."
When the Inverness Elks heard
about his good deed, they re-
warded him with a weeklong trip
to the Elks Youth Camp during
the Army Week of Hope in
Umatilla, which he hopes to at-
tend next year
Doing something right, at the
right time, in front of the right
people (although not intention-
ally), led to Logan being honored
at a Welcome Home party. He re-
ceived an American flag that had
flown in Afghanistan as well as a
plaque. He was surprised when
Welcome Home recognized him.


"It felt like I was in the military
and I was getting an award for
bravery" Logan said.
Logan is a Cub Scout and part
of the student safety patrol, and
has high hopes of following in his
father's footsteps and becoming a
Marine when the time comes.
"Logan has known the Marine
Corps hymn since he was 3 years
old," his father said.
While his parents have defi-
nitely helped shape Logan's per-
sonality, he has aided in their
lives, too.
"He keeps us grounded," Jon
Young said. "He looks at things ei-
ther black or white either it's
right or wrong; he does a good job
with everything and is such a joy"
Logan is already planning out
his future.
"I'd be a Marine and a part-time
engineer," he said. "I could build
some really great machines for
the military to help people all
across the world and save some
lives."
At such a young age, it is inspir-
ing to see someone wanting to
give back, Mills noted.
"He will continue doing good
things in life," she said. "Nothing
but good things are going to come
out of that. He's a little guy with a
big heart"


Boaters cautioned to watch for manatees


Associated Press

MIAMI As manatees
begin their annual mi-
gration to warmer wa-
ters, state wildlife
officials cautioning
boaters are to slow down
and watch out for these
slow-moving mammals.
The migration along


rivers, canals, bays and
coastlines is the animals'
instinctual response to
winter's approach, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commis-
sion said in a statement.
The average adult
manatee is 1,000 pounds
and 10 feet long, but may
be difficult to spot de-


spite its size.
Many seasonal mana-
tee protection speed
zone posted across the
state go into effect
Nov 15.
November is also Man-
atee Awareness Month,
and the manatee is
Florida's official state
marine mammal, the


commission added.
The FWC asked resi-
dents and visitors to re-
port sick, injured,
entangled or dead mana-
tees to wildlife officials.
Residents can also
support manatee conser-
vation efforts by purchas-
ing a manatee license
plate or decal.


by bands and litter from special
events at the park.
City officials, however, have in-
sisted that all the new facilities at
the park are there to enhance it
and to get residents interested in
venturing out to activities.
Burnell said the band shell is
being built to make sure the
acoustics will be directed away
from the homes in the immediate
vicinity and toward the bay
Earlier in the week, Burnell ad-
dressed some of the other major
projects under way in the city dur-
ing the city council's regular
meeting.
He said the sewer connection
work in the area around Fort Is-
land Trail is 50 percent done and
the goal is to have everything fin-
ished by April or May 2014.
Construction on Cutler Spur
Boulevard, said Burnell, is on
schedule with the anticipated
completion date being Jan. 1.
Contact Chronicle reporterAB.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline. com.


Special to the Chronicle
Jessica Kiblinger of Floral
City has been missing since
Oct. 15.


Sheriffs


Office


looking


for teen


runaway

Chronicle
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office wants the com-
munity to be on the lookout
for missing runaway juve-
nile Jessica Kiblinger
The 17-year-old left her
residence off Turtle Lane in
Floral City on Oct. 15. She
went to two residences in
Floral City with her
boyfriend, 20-year-old Chris
Leadingham, shortly after
she ran away They were
turned away from both
places.
Leadingham is homeless
and has been spotted near
the Cumberland Farms
store in Hernando. Foul
play is not suspected, but
her family is concerned.
Kiblinger is described as
a white female, 5 feet, 5
inches tall, weighing 140
pounds with blonde hair
and blue eyes. Her parents
said she cut her hair short
before she left Kiblinger's
information has been en-
tered into the national data-
base for missing persons. A
be-on-the-lookout (BOLO)
notice has been issued to
local and regional law en-
forcement authorities.
Anyone with information
about Jessica Kiblinger or
her whereabouts is asked to
call 911 or contact Crime
Stoppers of Citrus County
Inc. right away Text CIT-
RUS plus your tip to 274637
(CRIMES), click on
wwwcrimestopperscitrus.
com, or call 1-888-ANY-TIPS
toll-free. Tipsters maybe el-
igible to receive a cash re-
ward of up to $1,000.


Special to the Chronicle
Chris Leadingham and
Jessica Kiblinger.


4




A4 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Don't sit back when taking a
progressive position will open doors. Let
your imagination run wild and your de-
termination lead the way This is a year
to make things happen.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Stay on
top of any situation that has the potential
to run amuck. Extravagance or overin-
dulgence could interfere with your
progress. Keep it within your budget.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Look
for openings to present what you have to
offer. Following through on your prom-
ises must be your intent, or you will
damage your reputation.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Every-
one will bend to what you want, but you
must be careful to keep everything
transparent and out in the open. Keep
your record clean.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You will
have to remain focused if you intend to
do your own thing and avoid interfer-
ence. Be ready to make a change that
will throw challengers off track.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you
can dream it, you can get it right now by
using your intuition, imagination and de-
termination. The sky is the limit.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Sign up
for something with the intent to win. Your
heart is ready to explore any avenue
that promises equality. A personal gain is
based on what you have to offer.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Being
forthright and ready to take action will
show your strength and courage, mov-
ing you into a position of control.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Base what
you do next on what motivates you the
most. Refuse to take care of demands
and responsibilities that don't belong to
you. You will call the shots.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you take
part in an event that teaches you some-
thing, it will encourage you to engage in
activities with people who will enrich
your life.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your emotions
will spin out of control if you let little
things get to you. Leave your routine be-
hind and enjoy the company of someone
who is fun to be with.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will
learn something valuable if you observe
others. Attending a conference or lecture
will lead to a discussion with someone
who can help you restructure an idea.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't give in
to aggressive behavior. Set your own
strategy and move in a direction that al-
lows you to use your skills.


ENTERTAINMENT


Franco, Jonas at LAX
during shooting
LOS ANGELES LAX is the
international hub for stars in and
out of Hollywood, and a few
celebrities were among the trav-
elers caught up in the chaos fol-
lowing the deadly shooting at the
airport Friday morning.
With time on their hands, they
took to Twitter to update fans.
"At #lax Some (expletive)
shot up the place." James
Franco, who included a self-
portrait in an airplane window
seat. His publicist confirmed the
actor was a passenger on a
flight that landed Friday morning
after the shooting occurred.
"Currently waiting on the
plane in a remote parking area. I
am safe. Praying for the victims
of this shooting." Nick Jonas,
who posted moments earlier that
the flight he arrived on was set
to deplane at the terminal where
the shooting occurred.
"Otw to lax and I hear there
was a shooting at the terminal
I'm going to. No Dallas for me
this weekend, hope everyone is
ok. I hate u LAX" "Glee" star
Mark Sailing.
Police: Intruder
enters King's home
BANGOR, Maine-Authori-
ties said a man who entered the
Maine home of horror writer
Stephen King is facing charges.
Police say 29-year-old
Christopher Prince of Orono
went inside King's home in Ban-
gor on Tuesday, but was ordered
to leave by staff members.
Police said Friday the trouble
grew when Prince became com-
bative with officers who tried to
question him. Authorities ended
up arresting him on charges of
failure to submit to arrest. He
was also issued a criminal tres-
pass warning.


Associated Press
In costume, Heidi Klum attends her 14th annual Halloween
party Thursday in New York.


Actor donates
500 computers
PHILADELPHIA-Actor and
comedian Kevin Hart donated
500 computers to schools and
recreation centers in his home-
town of Philadelphia, a move
that he hopes will inspire others
to follow his lead.
"I am blessed to be in a posi-
tion that allows me to give back
to the city that made me who I
am," Hart said in a statement.
Hart attended local public
schools before embarking on an
entertainment career that in-
cludes the 2011 stand-up special
"Laugh at My Pain." He has also
hosted MTV's Video Music
Awards and "Saturday Night
Live."


Mayor Michael Nutter joined
Hart on Friday to visit four
schools that collectively received
300 laptops. The district has en-
dured severe budget cuts this
year, including the closure of
about two dozen schools.
"These computers will allow
our students to expand their
studies, explore new course ma-
terial, and prepare for college
and careers for years to come,"
Superintendent William Hite
said in a statement.
In addition, 27 city community
centers will share 200 desktop
computers, which recreation
commissioner Susan Slawson
called an "invaluable resource
for our youth."

-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Nov. 2, the
306th day of 2013. There are 59
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 2,1948, President Tru-
man surprised the experts by win-
ning a narrow upset over Republican
challenger Thomas E. Dewey.
On this date:
In 1889, North Dakota and South
Dakota became the 39th and 40th
states.
In 1947, Howard Hughes piloted
his huge wooden flying boat, the
Hughes H-4 Hercules (dubbed the
"Spruce Goose" by detractors), on its
only flight, which lasted about a
minute over Long Beach Harbor in
California.
In 1983, President Reagan signed
a bill establishing a federal holiday
on the third Monday of January in
honor of civil rights leader Martin
Luther King Jr.
Ten years ago: In Iraq, insurgents
shot down a Chinook helicopter car-
rying dozens of U.S. soldiers, killing
16.
Five years ago: Barack Obama
and John McCain uncorked massive
get-out-the-vote operations in more
than a dozen battleground states the
Sunday before Election Day.
One year ago: In the face of criti-
cism from city officials and residents,
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg
backed down and announced that
the New York City Marathon would
be canceled, with much of the city
still reeling from the impact of super-
storm Sandy.
Today's Birthdays: Actress Ste-
fanie Powers is 71. Country-rock
singer-songwriter J.D. Souther is 68.
Actress Kate Linder is 66. Actor
Peter Mullan is 54. Singer-songwriter
k.d. lang is 52. Actress Lauren Velez
is 49. Actor David Schwimmer is 47.
Rapper Nelly is 39. Prodigy (Mobb
Deep) is 39. Actor Danny Cooksey is
38.
Thought for Today: "If I have any
beliefs about immortality, it is that
certain dogs I have known will go to
heaven, and very, very few persons."
- James Thurber (1894-1961).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HIL R HI L(
82 65 0.00 85 65 0.00 84 64


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy, chance of showers and
thunderstorms early today.


83 64 0.00 86 63 0.10
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eclusveday
forecast by:

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 50
A 60% chance of morning showers and _
'-thunderstorms. Breezy. Turning cooler.
j SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 54
Mainly sunny with lower humidity. Breezy and
cool by night.
7 MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 60
Sunshine and milder.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Friday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 1


86/65
89/33
82/56
76
+7

0.00 in.
0.00 in.
52.14 in.
47.68 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 2.0/12
Sunday's count: 4.7
Monday's count: 5.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/2 SATURDAY 4:43 10:56 5:09 11:22
11/3 SUNDAY 5:34 11:48 6:02 12:16
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT ...........................6:44PM.
SSUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:44A.M.
y C_ C 4 MOONRISE TODAY ........................... 6:43A.M.
NOV. 3 NOV. 10 NOV. 17 NOV. 25 MOONSET TODAY ............................6:13 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.comfihre weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:57 a/12:58 a 6:09 p/1:33 p
Crystal River- 3:18 a/10:55 a 4:30 p/11:00 p
Withlacoochee* 1:05 a/8:43 a 2:17 p/8:48 p
Homosassa*** 4:07 a/12:32 p 5:19 p/-


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
4:31 a/1:38 a 5:55 p/1:15 p
2:52 a/10:37 a 4:16 p/10:40 p
1:39 a/8:25 a 2:03 p/8:28 p
3:41 a/12:37 a 5:05 p/12:14 p


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
s
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature


77
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.04 29.95 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.71 38.70 39.25
TsalaApopka-lInverness 39.99 39.97 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.68 40.65 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


.12 sh
s
.11 pc
.39 pc
.21 pc
s
.17 pc
pc
.15 s
sh
.03 pc
.12 sh
.15 sh
pc
.16 sh
.51 pc
.02 pc
.01 pc
.15 sh
.78 pc
.14 sh
.24 pc
s
s
pc
.02 sh
s
pc
.04 pc
.18 pc
s
pc
s
s
s
s
pc
pc
.05 pc
pc
s
.50 s
pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday


City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 77 64 .04 s 73 54
New York City 70 62 .13 pc 66 45
Norfolk 77 68 .11 pc 73 46
Oklahoma City 71 42 s 64 40
Omaha 61 40 pc 55 36
Palm Springs 85 53 s 86 57
Philadelphia 72 62 .19 pc 66 43
Phoenix 81 54 s 88 59
Pittsburgh 69 55 .19 sh 52 35
Portland, ME 69 56 .11 pc 62 39
Portland, Ore 58 44 .02 sh 53 43
Providence, R.I. 70 61 .04 pc 64 43
Raleigh 73 66 1.18 pc 70 43
Rapid City 52 38 pc 56 37
Reno 66 30 pc 69 35
Rochester, NY 65 52 .15 sh 52 31
Sacramento 76 43 pc 75 48
St. Louis 65 48 pc 55 37
St. Ste. Marie 51 41 .13 c 36 22
Salt Lake City 60 44 s 69 42
San Antonio 86 52 s 74 44
San Diego 84 56 s 72 59
San Francisco 72 51 pc 63 50
Savannah 84 68 pc 77 49
Seattle 64 53 sh 51 42
Spokane 52 32 sh 52 35
Syracuse 69 54 .32 sh 54 32
Topeka 63 39 s 56 36
Washington 73 63 .14 pc 64 44
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 McAllen, Texas LOW 12 Berthoud
Pass, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/76/ts
Amsterdam 51/48/c
Athens 71/51/s
Beijing 66/44/s
Berlin 51/47/sh
Bermuda 78/74/sh
Cairo 82/61/s
Calgary 34/27/sn
Havana 84/71/s
Hong Kong 82/72/sh
Jerusalem 75/59/pc


Lisbon 68/59/sh
London 54/43/sh
Madrid 64/50/pc
Mexico City 73/50/sh
Montreal 41/27/r
Moscow 40/37/sh
Paris 54/45/sh
Rio 77/62/s
Rome 70/61/pc
Sydney 88/50/pc
Tokyo 64/58/sh
Toronto 50/27/sh
Warsaw 50/48/c


S A LEGAL NOTICES






Meeting Notices ......................................C11


Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices ........... C11


Notice to Creditors/Administration ....... C11


- CITRULIS COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arrests
Daniel Jennings, 24, of
South Tuck Point, Inverness, at
12:05 p.m. Oct. 31 on an active
Minnesota warrant for being a
fugitive of justice. He was in-
carcerated at the Citrus County
Detention Facility at the time of
his arrest. Bond was denied.
Rocky Cantrell, 32, of
North Caesar Point, Dunnellon,
at 11:34 a.m. Oct. 31 on an ac-
tive warrant for soliciting with-
out a permit. Bond $500.
Jeffrey Ackroyd Jr., 52,
of East Monarch Court, Her-
nando, at 5:20 p.m. Oct. 31 on
an active warrant for felony vio-
lation of probation in Pasco
County stemming from original
charges of possession of
methamphetamine and pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance. Bond was denied.
Desai Nikhil, 22, of East
Boston Street, Hernando, at
8:36 p.m. Oct. 31 on misde-
meanor charges of disorderly
conduct, and resisting an offi-
cer without violence. According
to his arrest affidavit, Nikhil is
accused of kicking tires in the
parking lot of a restaurant in
Hernando. He also kicked the
door to the restaurant, yelled at
patrons and made hand mo-
tions that he had a gun. When
approached by deputies, Nikhil
ran from the scene, but was
quickly apprehended. Bond
$750.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 9:01 a.m. Oct. 30 in
the 5600 block of S. Park Hill
Way, Homosassa.



SCHOOLS
Continued from Page Al

said. "Some of the other
information provided at
these training are the
specifics of bullying -
types of bullying, how to
identify, how to respond
and how to report.
'All school personnel
must watch a mandatory
PowerPoint (presentation)
on bullying, which is com-
pleted within the first 30
days of school," she con-
tinued. "They have to sign
off that they have read the
policy Also an informa-
tional piece is presented
to parents and the commu-
nity through our Code of
Student Conduct, yearly
parent guide and calendar
and district website."
Different awareness and
prevention programs and
resources are provided
throughout the year to stu-
dents at each level ele-
mentary school, middle
school and high school.
"We have three different
ways to report an alleged
bullying incident ver-
bally, written or anony-
mous," Allegretta said.
"We encourage and em-
phasize that if they think
they see bullying, hear it or
are a victim of bullying to
tell an adult or a friend
and report it as quickly as
possible. We also empha-
size that reporting is not
tattling."
Allegretta explained to
board members that when
bullying is reported -
whether found to be sub-
stantiated or unsubstanti-
ated almost all cases
result in at least one or
more interventions.



PILLS
Continued from Page Al

for his arrest.
"It sends a message that
selling pharmaceutical
narcotics will not be toler-
ated," Marshall said.
When investigators
searched Tedder's home,
they found 12 rounds of
.22-caliber ammunition.
Marshall said Tedder was
on probation for posses-
sion of a firearm by a con-
victed felon and told
investigators the ammuni-
tion belongs to an old gun
he no longer owns.


Marshall, however, said
possession of the ammuni-
tion placed the charge, as
per statute, under the um-
brella of possession of a
firearm by a convicted
felon.
Tedder was arrested
and transported to the Cit-
rus County Detention
Facility
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


A commercial burglary
was reported at 12:11 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 30, in the 800
block of S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 11:19 a.m. Oct. 30
in the 2000 block of S. Rock
Crusher Road, Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:48 p.m. Oct. 30 in
the 2100 block of S. Coleman
Ave., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 9:01 p.m. Oct. 30 in
the 8200 block of W. Lightbody
Court, Homosassa.
Thefts
An auto theft was reported
at 11:23 a.m. Oct. 30 in the
8300 block of E. Turner Camp
Road, Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 2:27 p.m. Oct. 30 in the 600
block of E. Knightsbridge
Place, Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:21 p.m. Oct. 30 in the
10500 block of N. Ranch Hand
Ave., Dunnellon.
SA grand theft was reported
at 5:28 p.m. Oct. 30 in the 3700
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 7:51 p.m. Oct. 30 in the
100 block of N. Rooks Ave.,
Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 11:47 a.m. Oct. 30 in the
9500 block of S. ParksideAve.,
Floral City.
A vandalism was reported
at 2:20 p.m. Oct. 30 in the 7100
block of W. Dunnellon Road,
Dunnellon.


"Because it is real to
that person who is report-
ing it," she said, "we want
them to feel comfortable in
their environment."
The victim will continue
to be monitored by a
school official through
grade 12 to prevent poten-
tial retaliation.


For the RECORD


TRAFFIC
Continued from PageAl

$10,000 and $25,000 in
auto sales.
"We own two corners -
we have an auto sales lot
across the street and
when you've got semi-
trucks blocking the view
of our cars we haven't
had any traffic at all in the
last three or four weeks
and haven't sold a car be-
cause there's always
trucks parked," Mitchell-
tree said. "People can't
see our vehicles, and they
go right past"
Regis Hampton, owner
of Hampton's Edge Trail-
side Bicycles that sits east
of the intersection, said
other than a lot more dirt
being tracked into his
shop, the road construc-
tion project hasn't af-
fected his business yet
"I don't know what's
going to happen to my
parking (area) when
they're finished," he said.
"Our parking sucks
anyway"
Shannon Burns, a long-
time Floral City resident
and the current vice pres-
ident of the Floral City
Merchants Association,
said despite the inconven-
ience and the hardship to
the town's businesses,
Floral City has always
been a resilient, tight-knit
community.
"We've tried to look at it
this way: It is what it is,
and they're going to do
what they want to do and
we just need to work
around it," she said. "Our
concern is that people are
staying away from Floral
City because of the traffic.
We, the Merchants Associ-
ation, we're trying hard to
make Floral City this little
destination, and it's real
hard when we're having
these big events and


there's accidents and
roadwork. So, it's defi-
nitely been crazy"
She added that Floral
City has suffered fires and
other devastating events,
but the town has always
bounced back.
"There's some kind of


strength in this country
charm," she said. "We'll
live through this and I
know it'll be better on the
other side, but getting
through it will be an exer-
cise in patience."


The project is sched-
uled to be completed in
spring 2014.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The bottleneck at the U.S. 41 (north to south) and County Road 48 (east to west)
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A6 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013

Babb
Adams, 84
INVERNESS
The Celebration of the
Life of Dr Babb H. Adams,
age 84, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 4:00
PM, Wednesday, Novem-
ber 6, 2013 at the Corner-
stone Baptist Church with
Reverend David Henry of-
ficiating,
B and as-
sisted by
f Reverend
Greg Kell.
Interment
will follow
at 1:00 PM,
Thursday
Babb at Garden
Adams of Memo-
ries, Tampa, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 4:00 PM until 7:00 PM,
Tuesday at the church. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at www.
HooperFineralHome.com.
When family and friends
hear, look me in my good
eye, good Lord willing, kiss
me on my fuzzy cheek, don't
borrow trouble, let me tell
you a story, you can't undo
done, it works, if you work
at it, you will never go wrong
doing right, I so appreciate
what you do, where do you
go to church when you go,
and most importantly let
me introduce you to my
friend Jesus Christ, they
knew they were talking to
Babb H. Adams, more af-
fectionately known as
Preacher Preacher first and
foremost loved the Lord,
then his family, his friends,
and then everyone else he
met He never met a stranger
and had the gracious gift
of making everyone he met
feel like they were the
most important person in
the world and that they were
truly special. Preacher
strived to make God real in
the life of everyone he met
by showing them in word
and deed God's ever
abounding love. Preacher
was so happy for you to
know him, but his mission
was for you to know Jesus.
Dr Babb H. Adams preacher
of the Gospel of Jesus Christ
went to be with the Lord
Wednesday October 30,2013
in Inverness, FL. He was
born December 1, 1928 in
Cold Springs, OK, son of the
late Elmo and Mary (Babb)
Adams. Dr Adams earned a
PhD in Divinity from Stetson
University and one in Min-
istry from Luther Rice Sem-
inary His Bachelors Degree
was from the University of
Tampa. He moved to Inver-
ness from Immokalee in 1981.
Dr Adams pastored for
more than 50 years, first on
the street corners and rail-
road yards of Tampa, then
atAripeka Baptist Church,
Thonotasassa Baptist Church,
Orient Park Baptist Church,
Full Time Evangelism, First
Baptist Church of Immokalee,
First Baptist Church of In-
verness, and Cornerstone
Baptist Church. Dr Adams
was a founding member
and interim pastor of Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church,
Inverness; former Chaplain
for the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Department; and Past
President of the Florida
Baptist Convention. Hunt-
ing was his joy and pleas-
ure, and he loved to spend
time in the woods with his
best hunting buddies, his
son, and grandson.
Survivors include his wife
of 61 years, Marilyn Owens
Adams, Inverness; son: Tim
(Tina) Adams, Inverness; 2
daughters: Tempy (David)
Henry, Winter Garden, FL
and Kimberly (Jim) Bowlin,
Inverness; a brother: Rus-
sell (Maureen) Adams of
Land 0 Lakes: 6 grand-
children, Catheleen (John)
Halfmann, Caitlyn Henry,
Trae Adams, Bekkah Adams,
Kalen Adams and Karina
(Andrew) Sherwood; 2 great
grandchildren, MaeBeat-
rice Sherwood and Wynna
Sherwood; and many nieces,
nephews, and cousins.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral


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of flowers, please make
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David
DeCoster, 74
LADY LAKE
David Arthur DeCoster,
74, Lady Lake, Fla., died
Oct 29, 2013. Dr DeCoster
was born in Detroit, Mich.,
May 12, 1939, to the late
Arthur and Eleanor De-
Coster and moved to Cit-
rus County in 2001 from
Indiana,
Pa. Dr
DeCoster
S was an
adminis-
trator and
faculty
member
at various
David universi-
DeCoster ties, re-
ceiving his bachelor's and
master's degrees from the
University of Michigan
and his doctorate from the
University of Florida. He
was a member of the Phi
Kappa Phi Scholastic
Honor Society. During his
career in higher educa-
tion he co-authored four
books and contributed nu-
merous chapters and arti-
cles to other publications
and research journals. He
served as a frequent con-
sultant, speaker and ex-
ternal evaluator for
colleges, universities and
educational organizations
throughout the United
States. Dave was the re-
cipient of a number of na-
tional awards, including
the Contribution to
Knowledge Award in
recognition of research,
writing and advocacy for
the mission of postsec-
ondary education. Other
affiliations include the
American Association for
Higher Education and the
American College Person-
nel Association. His com-
munity service activities
included membership on
the board of directors for
a number of organizations
including crime deter-
rence, human rights, anti-
racism and a rape and
domestic violence shelter
Some of Dave's hobbies
and interests included
golfing, gardening and an-
tique restoration.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are two sons, David M.
DeCoster, Kennesaw, Ga.
and Douglas A. DeCoster,
Lincoln, Neb.; his daugh-
ter, Deborah E. Shrader,
Lady Lake; his brother,
Dennis A. DeCoster, En-
glewood; his sister, Denise
A. DeCoster, Hailey, Ind.;
stepchildren, Frank, Dawn
and Vicki Watson; 11
grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren. He
was preceded in death by
his wife of 21 years, Vir-
ginia L. Brown on March 3,
2007, and his sister, Dale A.
Schumaker
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Wendell
Reed, 90
FORT DODGE, IOWA
Wendell J. Reed, 90, of
Fort Dodge, Iowa, died un-
expectedly Thursday,
Oct 31, 2013, at his home.
Funeral services will be
2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2,
2013, at Tompkins Celebra-
tion Center of Friendship
Haven in Fort Dodge with
the Rev Anita Johnson of-
ficiating. Visitation will be
one hour prior to the serv-
ice. Interment and mili-
tary honors will be held in
North Lawn Cemetery
Gunderson Funeral Home
and Cremation Services of
Fort Dodge are entrusted
with arrangements.
Wendell John Reed, the
son of Robert and Edna
(Nordstrom) Reed, was
born Feb. 25, 1923, in Fort
Dodge, Iowa. He gradu-
ated from Fort Dodge Sen-
ior High and attended Fort
Dodge Junior College and
Drury College in Spring-
field, Mo. Wendell was
drafted and served in the
Army from 1943-45. He
was united in marriage to
Jane Kurtz and she pre-
ceded him in death in
1950. On Sept. 4, 1955, he
was married to Joan
Featherman. Wendell
worked for 40 years with
State Farm insurance, re-
tiring in 1986. In retire-
ment Wendell enjoyed
volunteering with Citrus
County, Florida Mediation
Services and received
statewide recognition for
his service. The couple
lived in Florida until Feb-
ruary 2013, when they
made their home at
Friendship Haven in Fort
Dodge.
Survivors include his
wife, Joan; his brothers,
Dr Jim (Ruth) Reed and
Pat (Judy) Reed, all of Fort
Dodge; his brothers-in-law,
Donald (Susan) Featherman
of Florida and Richard
(Alyce) Featherman of
Pennsylvania; and several
nieces and nephews. Pre-
ceding him in death were
his parents; his first wife,
Jane; his brothers, Roland
and Carl Reed; and his sis-
ter, Betty Manguson.
Memorials may be left to
the charitable discretion
of the family
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


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Louise
Trobaugh, 91
LECANTO
Louise L. Trobaugh, 91,
of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Oct. 31,
2013, at her home. A native
of Flint,
Mich., she
S was born
,/" \ Jan. 15,
S1922, to
Irvin and
Dorothy
(Tuttle)
O'Neal,
Louise one of
Trobaugh four chil-
dren. Louise moved here
in 1975 from Battle Creek,
Mich., and was a lifelong
homemaker and was also a
waitress in Michigan. Mrs.
Trobaugh loved all kinds
of arts and crafts and also
loved square dancing.
She is survived by her
four daughters, Emma
Eberhardt, Edna Scott and
Anna Prough, all of Lecanto
and Sharon Haswell (hus-
band Collins) of Scotland;
eight grandchildren; 19
great-grandchildren; and 14
great-great-grandchildren.
Louise was preceded in
death by her husband of
nearly 62 years, Les
Trobaugh, in 2001 and her
siblings Virginia, Doris
and Carl.
Friends will be received
from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday,
Nov 3, 2013, at Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa,
where chapel services will
be 10 a.m. Monday, Nov 4,
2013, with Pastor Dale
Wolfe officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Foun-
tains Memorial Park,
Homosassa. wwwwilder
funeral.com.

OBITUARIES
For information on
submitting an obituary,
call 352-563-5660 or
email obits@
chronicleonline.com.


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John
Garner, 77
HOMOSASSA
John N. Garner, 77, of
Homosassa, Fla., died
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013.
Memorial service of re-
membrance, 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, at
Fero Funeral Home.




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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M JAJ A .S...M..j J A s 0


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,621
Pvs. Volume 3,764
Advanced 1401
Declined 1681
New Highs 105
New Lows 22


NASD
1,898
2,100
1038
1487
94
51


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15649.40
7058.56
506.41
10040.75
3938.48
1765.67
1294.19
18804.48
1101.30


LOW
15543.25
6985.76
500.31
9964.58
3904.20
1752.70
1281.24
18653.69
1087.09


CLOSE
15615.55
7047.77
504.65
10018.15
3922.04
1761.64
1290.71
18751.36
1095.67


CHG.
+69.80
+72.59
+4.78
+8.50
+2.33
+5.10
+1.53
+39.44
-4.48


%CHG.
+0.45%
+1.04%
+0.96%
+0.09%
+0.06%
+0.29%
+0.12%
+0.21%
-0.41%


YTD
+19.17%
+32.81%
+11.38%
+18.65%
+29.89%
+23.52%
+26.49%
+25.05%
+29.00%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 --- 5.77 4.60 +.20 +4.5 A A A ... -12.7 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0- 39.00 36.24 +.04 +0.1 A A A +7.5 +9.9 27 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 34.66 -- 62.05 47.80 -.03 -0.1 A A A +27.2 +35.2 24 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 81.60 0 104.79 102.58 -1.15 -1.1 V A A +17.4 +26.0 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 8.92 -- 15.03 14.02 +.05 +0.4 V V A +20.8 +50.2 19 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 9.04 -- 13.08 12.08 -.22 -1.8 A A A +6.2 +21.2 40
CenturyLink Inc CTL 31.01 --- 42.01 33.58 -.28 -0.8 A A A -14.2 -5.7 19 2.16
Citigroup C 34.04 53.56 48.74 -.04 -0.1 V V A +23.2 +30.6 12 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 26.38 24.60 +.23 +0.9 A A A +55.3 +85.0 88 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 0 69.87 69.01 +.42 +0.6 V A A +38.6 +41.2 21 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 75.46 72.51 +.78 +1.1 A A A +13.7 +13.9 22 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 42.44 61.18 51.58 +.21 +0.4 A A A +11.9 +23.2 22 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0- 95.49 89.82 +.20 +0.2 A A A +3.8 +0.9 9 2.52
Ford Motor F 10.38 --0- 18.02 16.89 -.22 -1.3 V V A +30.4 +56.9 13 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.87 0 26.48 26.54 +.40 +1.5 A A A +26.4 +27.7 20 0.76
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 27.92 --0- 49.52 47.31 +.17 +0.4 A A A +56.8 +73.0 15 4.50e
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 7.19 -0- 17.28 12.79 -.03 -0.2 V 7 7 +37.2 +75.6 23
Home Depot HD 60.21 -- 81.56 76.99 -.90 -1.2 A A A +24.5 +29.3 23 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 25.98 24.33 -.14 -0.6 A A A +18.0 +17.3 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 -0-- 215.90 179.23 +.02 ... A -6.4 -6.0 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 --0- 34.07 32.36 -.67 -2.0 V 7 A +53.4 +58.3 33
Lowes Cos LOW 31.23 0 50.74 49.18 -.60 -1.2 V A A +38.5 +55.8 25 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 --- 103.70 97.24 +.72 +0.7 A A A +10.2 +14.7 18 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 0 36.43 35.53 +.12 +0.3 V A A +33.0 +27.3 13 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 50.42 -- 66.39 62.39 -.13 -0.2 V A A +12.1 +23.1 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 0 88.39 88.14 +3.39 +4.0 A A A +27.4 +24.7 22 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 0- 25.61 8.14 +.64 +8.5 A A 7 -58.7 -68.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0- 21.09 18.18 -.30 -1.6 V A A +0.7 +8.3 33 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 --- 10.52 9.55 -.08 -0.8 A A A +33.9 +48.9 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 68.77 58.17 +.09 +0.2 A 7 7 +40.6 -7.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 --0- 114.72 111.01 -.20 -0.2 A A A +28.7 +32.4 21 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 28.05 0 42.34 42.03 -.06 -0.1 A A A +36.1 +53.6 27 1.20
Time Warner TWX 42.61 -- 70.69 68.81 +.07 +0.1 V A A +43.9 +60.7 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 68.60 0 105.76 102.08 -.74 -0.7 A A V +39.2 +48.0 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -- 54.31 50.49 -.02 ... V A A +16.7 +17.8 71 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 37.90 36.91 +.06 +0.1 A A A +46.5 +41.0 1.57e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 -- 79.96 77.07 +.32 +0.4 A A A +13.0 +4.7 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 60.82 60.52 +1.28 +2.2 A A A +63.5 +71.4 24 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


SU


The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose to
2.62 percent Fri-
day. Yields af-
fect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
VEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude sank
below $95 per
barrel to its
lowest
settlement level
since June 21. It
was the fourth
straight day that
oil's price
dropped.
Natural gas and
gold fell as well.


OE

EDs


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .09
6-month T-bill .08 0.08 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .17
2-year T-note .31 0.31 .. .28
5-year T-note 1.37 1.33 +0.04 .74
10-year T-note 2.62 2.56 +0.06 1.73
30-year T-bond 3.70 3.64 +0.06 2.90


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.48 3.41 +0.07 2.58
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.09 5.09 ... 4.14
Barclays USAggregate 2.25 2.25 ... 1.70
Barclays US High Yield 5.64 5.69 -0.05 6.49
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.48 4.48 ... 3.54
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.56 1.51 +0.05 .99
Barclays US Corp 3.13 3.12 +0.01 2.66


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 94.61
Ethanol (gal) 1.75
Heating Oil (gal) 2.88
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.51
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.55
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1313.10
Silver (oz) 21.80
Platinum (oz) 1451.90
Copper (Ib) 3.29
Palladium (oz) 737.70
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.32
Coffee (Ib) 1.06
Corn (bu) 4.27
Cotton (Ib) 0.77
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 362.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.23
Soybeans (bu) 12.66
Wheat (bu) 6.68


PVS.
96.38
1.79
2.97
3.58
2.63
PVS.
1323.60
21.83
1448.40
3.29
736.25
PVS.
1.35
1.05
4.28
0.77
361.50
1.22
12.80
6.68


%CHG
-1.84
-1.40
-2.42
-1.90
-1.58
%CHG
-0.79
-0.13
+0.24
-0.03
+0.20
%CHG
-0.48
+0.14
-0.23
-0.78
+0.28
+1.56
-1.11
+0.04


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 23.66 +.03 +17.5 +18.6 +13.0 +13.1
CaplncBuA m 58.21 -.04 +13.2 +14.4 +9.5 +11.4
CpWIdGrIA m 43.99 -.07 +20.5 +24.0 +10.4 +13.6
EurPacGrA m 47.43 -.27 +15.1 +20.3 +6.6 +12.8
FnlnvA m 50.52 +.01 +24.9 +27.2 +15.1 +15.6
GrthAmA m 43.63 +.02 +27.0 +30.1 +15.4 +15.4
IncAmerA m 20.32 +.01 +15.4 +16.4 +11.7 +13.4
InvCoAmA m 37.60 +.14 +26.2 +27.0 +14.5 +14.0
NewPerspA m 37.72 -.09 +20.7 +25.2 +12.0 +15.4
WAMutlnvA m 38.61 +.12 +25.6 +25.5 +16.8 +14.2
Dodge & Cox Income 13.61 -.03 +0.4 +0.6 +4.2 +8.5
IntlStk 42.18 -.24 +21.8 +29.3 +8.5 +15.3
Stock 159.12 +1.12 +32.1 +34.8 +18.2 +16.6
Fidelity Contra 97.89 +.06 +27.4 +28.7 +15.8 +16.1
GrowCo 121.84 +.11 +30.7 +31.9 +18.8 +19.6
LowPriStk d 48.49 -.03 +28.9 +32.8 +17.7 +20.5
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 62.50 +.18 +25.6 +26.1 +16.6 +15.2
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA x 2.38 -.01 +11.8 +13.4 +10.4 +14.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.14 ... +1.2 +3.7 +5.0 +10.2
GIBondAdv 13.09 -.01 +1.3 +3.9 +5.2 +10.4
Harbor Intllnstl 70.29 -.50 +13.2 +20.1 +8.0 +13.5
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.57 +.09 +24.8 +25.8 +16.2 +14.5
GrowStk 49.39 +.06 +30.7 +33.1 +17.6 +19.3
Vanguard 500Adml 162.61 +.47 +25.6 +26.1 +16.6 +15.2
5001lnv 162.59 +.46 +25.5 +26.0 +16.5 +15.1
MulntAdml 13.84 ... -1.2 -0.9 +3.5 +5.6
STGradeAd 10.74 -.01 +0.9 +1.2 +2.3 +5.5
Tgtet2025 15.63 ... +15.0 +16.7 +10.7 +12.6
TotBdAdml 10.69 -.03 -1.5 -1.4 +2.8 +6.0
Totlntl 16.59 -.08 +12.9 +18.6 +5.6 +11.9
TotStlAdm 44.54 +.10 +26.7 +27.7 +17.0 +16.1
TotStldx 44.52 +.10 +26.6 +27.5 +16.8 +16.0
Welltn 38.45 +.02 +15.8 +16.2 +11.9 +13.3
WelltnAdm 66.41 +.04 +15.8 +16.3 +12.0 +13.4
WndsllAdm 64.33 +.10 +24.7 +25.2 +16.8 +14.9
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks indexes rose Friday,
sending the Standard & Poor's
500 index to its first gain in
three days. Utilities, industrial
companies and health care
stocks led the way, overshad-
owing modest losses for energy
and raw-material producers.


AIG AIG
Close:$48.28V-3.37 or -6.5%
The insurance company's property
and casualty unit paid out more in
claims than it took in during the third
quarter.
$77


45-
A S 0
52-week range
$30.64 $53.33
Vol.:51.7m (5.6x avg.) PE: 10.5
Mkt. Cap: $71.28 b Yield: 0.8%
Madison Sq. Garden MSG
Close: $58.45 V-2.07 or -3.4%
The sports, media and entertainment
company posted a 16 percent rise in
net income, but the entertainment
unit lagged.





52-week range
$40.97 $63.44


Vol.:1.lm (2.8x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $3.7 b


PE: 31.9
Yield:...


General Motors GM
Close:$37.39A0.44 or 1.2%
October sales rose 16 percent as
full-size pickup trucks rebounded
from a slow September, despite
weak Chevy Cruze sales.




S A S 0
52-week range
$23.39 $38.21
Vol.: 30.8m (1.9x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $51.75 b Yield:...
Spirit AeroSystems SPR
Close:$28.54A1.85 or 6.9%
The aircraft equipment company
sold a half-share in a joint venture of
aerospace suppliers, though terms
were not disclosed.
$3 0 ---- ---- ----




52-week range
$13.96 $29.35
Vol.:2.5m (2.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $3.44 b Yield:...
Ruth's Hospitality RUTH
Close:$12.52 A0.35 or 2.9%
A pair of insurance settlements and
strong business at its steak houses
sent third-quarter profit up close to
$3 million.
$13
12

11 A S 0
52-week range
$6.58 $13.76
Vol.:449.8k (2.4x avg.) PE: 20.9
Mkt. Cap:$446.48 m Yield: 1.3%


Stocks start month




on a positive note


Associated Press

NEW YORK The stock market
started November on a strong note as in-
vestors reacted to an expansion in U.S.
manufacturing last month.
The improvement came during what
could have been a difficult month for the
U.S. economy, with a par-
tial government shut-
down that lasted 16 days World mai
and a narrowly averted How key intern
default on the U.S. gov- mke erf
ernment's debt, which markets perform
could have rattled finan- Amsterdam
cial markets. AEX
"With what happened -- 391.92
in the last two months, -0.18% 391.2
it's amazing how strong Brussels
this market has been," BEL20
said Bob Doll, chief eq- 2
uity strategist at Nuveen W 2904.35
Asset Management. -0.54% 2888.68
The Institute for Sup- Frankfurt
ply Management re- DAX
ported that its 9033.92
manufacturing index in- 0.29%9007.83
creased to 56.4, the high-
est level since April 2011. Hong Kong
That was better than the Hang Seng
55.1 figure economists "* 23206.37
were expecting, accord- 0.19% 23249.79
ing financial data on
provider FactSet. no
The Dow Jones indus- FTSE 100
trial average rose 69.80 6731.43
points, or 0.5 percent, to 0.05% 6734.74
15,615.55. The Standard --
& Poor's 500 index rose -* Pre
5.10 points, or 0.3 per- % change Tod
cent, to 1,761.64. The
Nasdaq composite rose
2.34 points, or 0.1 percent, to 3,922.04.
Energy stocks lagged the market after
Chevron reported that its third-quarter
income fell 6 percent, missing analysts'
estimates, due to weakness in the com-
pany's oil refining business. Chevron fell


$1.95, or 1.6 percent, to $118.01.
The energy sector was also weighed
down by a drop in the price of oil. Crude
oil fell $1.77, or 1.8 percent, to $94.61 a
barrel.
The positive start to this month's trad-
ing comes after a strong October for the
stock market. The S&P 500 closed at a
record high seven times
during the month, most
kets recently on Tuesday It
a stock ended October with a
national stock gain of 4.5 percent.
ed: However, some in-
Milan vestors have expressed
FTSEMIB skepticism that stocks
-W 19351.52 can keep up this rapid
-0.97% 19164.26 pace pace heading into
Paris the last two months of the
CAC40 year
The S&P 500 is up 23
4299.89 percent so far this year,
-0.62% 4273.19 while the average annual
Sydney return on the S&P 500 is
ASXAll Ordinaries around 8 percent. Stocks
W 5420.3 are also starting to look
-0.25% 5406.5 expensive by some meas-
----- ures. Investors are pay-
Tokyo ing more than $16 for
Nikkei every $1 of earnings in
*W 14327.94 the S&P 500, the highest
-0.88% 14201.57 that ratio has been since
Zurich February 2011.
S arket Index "I don't think this mar-
i ket is cheap by any
8234.29 means," said Brad
-0.15% 8221.8 McMillan, chief invest-
ment officer for Com-
ious close monwealth Financial.
ay's close "We've been urging cau-
P tion for some time now"
In the bond market, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to
2.62 percent from 2.56 percent.
On Friday morning, the Nasdaq's op-
tions market was halted due to a techni-
cal glitch. Regular stock trading was not
affected.


Associated Press
Kirk Schneider, who owns Nate Wade Subaru in Salt Lake City, stands by a Subaru
Forester at his dealership Oct. 25. Subaru introduced the reworked Forester in the
spring. It's bigger inside and gets better gas mileage, so it appeals to baby boomers
and families as well as traditional buyers, said Schneider. It was Subaru's top-selling
vehicle last month. U.S. sales are up 50 percent this year to more than 84,000.



Compact crossover SUV



sales booming in US


TOM KRISHER
AP auto writer

DETROIT -Aging baby
boomers. Couples with
small kids. Single people
with dogs.
All three groups love
compact crossover SUVs,
utility vehicles built
mainly on small-car
frames that are among the
hottest-selling vehicles in
the U.S.
So far this year, sales of
the versatile, high-sitting
hatchbacks such as the
Honda CR-V, Ford Escape
and Toyota RAV4 are up
more than 20 percent
From 2000 through last
year, annual U.S. sales of
small crossovers quadru-
pled, from just over
405,000 to well above 1.6
million, according to LMC
Automotive, an industry
data and research firm.
Only their larger
cousins, midsize
crossovers such as the Toy-
ota Highlander and Ford
Edge, grew faster This
year, sales of small
crossovers have already
passed last year's record
total of 1,656,497.
John Felice, Ford Motor
Co.'s U.S. marketing and
sales chief, said buyers
have been moving to the
small crossovers from
other vehicles, a trend that
has accelerated in the past
three months.
"Some of the source of
that shift has come from
the car side of the busi-
ness," he said, after Ford
reported a 17 percent de-
cline in sales of its Focus
small car
Dealers and small-


crossover owners say the
vehicles are appealing for
a number of reasons:
They get better gas
mileage than big cars or
SUVs, and they're more
maneuverable and easier
to park. That appeals to
downsizing baby boomers.
They sit higher, giving
drivers a better view than
cars. They have more
room for kids in the back
seat than the compact cars
they're based on.
With a big hatch and
cargo compartment be-
hind the rear seat, there's
room for dogs, golf clubs or
bicycles.
Crossovers are gener-
ally cheaper than truck-
based SUVs or large cars,
staring around $19,000, al-
though options can jack up
the price. A loaded CR-V
can run north of $35,000.
"I just did not want to
drive a big vehicle," said
Carol Race, 66, of Winter
Haven, Fla., who traded in
a Mercury Grand Marquis
large sedan for a smaller
Ford Escape last summer
"It's so nice to have that
extra room in the garage,"
the elementary school sec-
retary said.
Gas mileage also was
important to Race. Her
Escape gets 26 mpg in
combined city-highway
driving, while the Marquis
got around 19.
Toyota started the seg-
ment with the RAV4 in
1995. The Japanese barely
compete in the red-hot
pickup market, so these
vehicles complement their
best-selling small and mid-
size cars. The Detroit au-
tomakers want to capture


new buyers as they diver-
sify their model lineups to
rely less on pickup trucks
and big SUVs for profits.
The Escape is close to
outselling Honda's CR-yV,
the long-time segment
leader, for the second time
in three years. Escape
sales have grown 14 per-
cent this year, almost twice
as fast as the CR-V Honda
sold 251,636 CR-Vs through
October; the Escape was
next at 250,543. General
Motors' Chevrolet Equinox
ranked third at 202,583,
followed by the RAV4 at
177,832.
Subaru introduced a re-
worked Forester in the
spring. It's bigger inside
than the old model, and
gets better gas mileage. It
was Subaru's top-selling
vehicle last month, and
U.S. sales are up 57 per-
cent this year to 96,953.
"We're a roomy five-
passenger car as opposed
to a four-passenger car
that you could squeeze five
passengers into," said Kirk
Schneider, who owns a
Subaru dealer in Salt Lake
City
Analysts expect the
crossovers to maintain
their popularity, although
they'll soon face new
challengers.
Jeff Schuster, senior vice
president of forecasting for
LMC, sees growth in small
crossover sales leveling off
as automakers roll out
more "multi-activity vehi-
cles," such as the Mazda 5.
Those are boxier people
haulers that sit lower to the
ground than crossovers
and in some models have
three rows of seats.


r
ia
T



























vif


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 A7






OPage A8 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2,2013



PINION


"We are more inclined to hate one
another for points on which we
differ, than to love one another for
points on which we agree."
Charles Caleb Colton, 1780-1832


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry M ulligan ....................................publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
m Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen m em ber
S Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TO DIG OR NOT TO DIG



Two sides closer to


agreement over


King's Bay harvester


t is encouraging to see the
two sides locked in a bat-
tle over how to effectively
clean up King's Bay talking to
one another
Both sides want the same
thing to restore King's Bay
to its previous glory replete
with crystal-clear water and a


sandy bottom
where healthy
aquatic vegeta-
tion can take root.
The Save the
Manatee Club
likes the idea be-
cause manatees
can feed on the
vegetation, and
Save Crystal River,


THE IS
Harvest
sits i

OUR OP
Encoura
progress


well, wants to save King's Bay
from further deterioration.
Where there is disagree-
ment is how to best clean the
bay Save Crystal River has
joined with Art Jones' One
Rake at a Time project and
has been using harvesters to
clear the bay of harmful Lyn-
gbya. An issue arose with the
larger harvester that scrapes
the bottom and stirs up ex-
cessive turbidity The Save
the Manatee Club also asserts
the harvester is essentially
dredging up healthy aquatic
vegetation in the process and
asked that the practice be
halted.
Following the complaint
earlier this year, the larger
harvester was docked until
the two sides hammered out
an agreement where Save
Crystal River would pay a
monitor to preside over the
harvester's activities. That
arrangement, however,
proved unworkable for the
Save Crystal River members
who are now seeking a per-
mit that will provide them
more latitude, especially in
the matter of excessive
turbidity
Pat Rose, who is the execu-


'Modern Family'
superfan
To the person who doesn't like
the show "Modern Family": I just
want to tell them that just to get
a look at that girl Haley
in the show. I would
watch grass grow if she C OX
was on it.

Keep in touch
Years ago when living
in a large northern city,
my mother, who was a
retired widow, received
a daily telephone call CAI
from one or another 563
lady organized by sev- 000"
eral churches that
called seniors who lived alone
and had no means of getting
out to see if all was well. It was
a cheery note and reassuring to
know someone out there was
concerned about them. Many
shut-ins or seniors have no fam-
ily living nearby.
Still looking for leash
Officer Friendly. To the deputy
that I stopped and helped out
with the two stray dogs on Bev-
erly Hills Boulevard: The return
of my leash to the substation,
like I asked, and a thank you
would have been appreciated.
Paper looks great!
Whose idea was it to give our


I


(


tive director of the Save the
Manatee Club, is certainly
within his rights to challenge
the harvester, as his organi-
zation is an interested party
However, they are not a gov-
erning body and do not have
authority over the activities
of Save Crystal River. To
think otherwise
5SUE: would be over-
S stepping their
:er still boundaries.
die. Fortunately, the
most recent dis-
'INION: cussion has
yielded some
ged by agreement. They
of talks. both agree dig-
ging into the sub-
strate would be harmful, and
the Save the Manatee Club
has said it would like to assist
Save Crystal River and One
Rake at a Time in developing
a vacuum technology that
would be more effective and
less intrusive. They also ad-
dressed longer term fixes
concerning pollution-causing
agents in the bay, such as fer-
tilizer use, septic leaching
and spring flow
On the flip side, much has
already been invested in har-
vesting. The county and state
have contributed funds. Har-
vesting has shown it can ex-
ponentially increase the
tonnage of Lyngbya removal
compared to hand raking the
slimy algal substance.
Going forward it would be
beneficial to all to allow all
three methods raking, har-
vesting and vacuuming to
take place. The faster the
muck and Lyngbya are re-
moved, the quicker the bay
can be restored.
Unfortunately, the bigger
battle looming is convincing
legislators to do something
about fertilizer and septic
tanks, or else all this work
will be for naught.


newspaper a fresh outlook? Writ-
ing those little titles above the
"News Notes" was fantastic.
Thanks a lot, I say (to) all the
people that work at the paper.
Have a great day.
J N Return statue
1ND I was just reading in
AE the Inverness Pioneer
Son Thursday, Oct. 24,
about a "Missing statue
is a tribute to a loving
pet." I am shocked and
saddened that some-
one had the audacity to
steal someone's yard
579 art. Now, I paint yard
) art and I have a couple
of pieces that are really
of my two dogs that I have. Now
this just makes me sick and I
hope and pray that the people
give back this beloved statue.
Fill in the blight
Joe Meek and the EDC would
be helpful if they concentrate
some of their efforts on filling
the vacant spots, such as the
new vacant spot in Inverness
where the Publix was, the va-
cant spot in Homosassa where
Sweetbay was, all these vacant
spots in strip malls, because
otherwise our county's going to
suffer from blight. And we would
appreciate a concerted effort in
filling these places and rejuve-
nating our community.


IRS tax-credit scandal a bad omen


Under Obamacare, the In-
ternal Revenue Service
will determine who is
eligible for health insurance
subsidies, and it will
deliver those subsi-
dies, in the form of
tax credits, to mil-
lions of individual
Americans. It's a
huge job, and a criti-
cal one, involving
hundreds of billions
of taxpayer dollars.
So it should go with-
out saying that the Byrol
subsidies go only to OTI
people who actually VOI
qualify for them. But
a new scandal within
the IRS casts serious doubt on
whether that will happen.
The scandal involves a pro-
gram known as the Earned In-
come Tax Credit. It is an
anti-poverty program in which
the government gives low-in-
come workers a tax refund
larger than their tax liability
For example, a family with a
$1,000 income tax liability
might qualify for a credit four
times that large, and receive an
Earned Income Tax Credit pay-
ment of $4,000. Another family
with no income tax liability at
all might qualify for the same
lump-sum payment. Call it a
subsidy, a refund, a transfer
payment in any case, the
family receives a check from
the feds.
The government sends out be-
tween $60 billion and $70 billion
a year in Earned Income Tax
Credit payments. Now, a new
IRS inspector general's report
shows that a huge amount of
that anywhere between 21
percent and 30 percent, de-
pending on the year has been
given out improperly to recipi-
ents who do not qualify for the
payment The inspector general
estimates that somewhere be-
tween $110 billion and $132 bil-
lion- billion, not million has
been given away in improper
Earned Income Tax Credit pay-
ments in the past decade.


I
4




1


It's long been known that the
IRS throws taxpayer dollars
away through tax credits. Pres-
ident Obama, who has sought to
-expand the Earned
SIncome Tax Credit
program, in 2009
signed an executive
order entitled "Re-
ducing Improper
Payments and Elimi-
- n nating Waste in Fed-
eral Programs" that
required the IRS to
York come up with annual
"improper payment
IER reduction targets."
DES That was four years
-- ago. It still hasn't
been done.
Don't look for it to be done
anytime soon. IRS officials told
the inspector general that the
program was too complicated to
administer correctly, and even
if it were less complicated, they
would not want rigorous en-
forcement measures to discour-
age legitimately qualified
people from applying for the
credit.
In the words of the inspector
general's report: "The IRS cited
the complexity of the Earned
Income Tax Credit program as
well as the need to balance the
reduction in improper pay-
ments while still encouraging
individuals to use the credit as
the two main reasons why re-
duction targets have not been
established."
Given that, inspector general
Russell George concluded,
"The IRS is unlikely to achieve
any significant reduction in
Earned Income Tax Credit im-
proper payments." So, look for
billions more to be wasted in
improper payments this year
And next year And so on.
This is the very same IRS that
will administer Obamacare's
subsidies and penalties. Does
anyone doubt that in coming
years the IRS will use the same
excuses complexity, a desire
not to discourage qualified re-
cipients to explain its lack of
enforcement, or perhaps re-


fusal to enforce, Obamacare's
requirements?
The process has already
begun. Back in July, the Obama
administration announced it
will not require state-run Oba-
macare exchanges to verify
whether individuals who re-
ceive subsidies for health cov-
erage are actually qualified for
those subsidies. The adminis-
tration will rely instead on an
honor system in which it ac-
cepts an applicant's word that
he or she is eligible a deci-
sion many analysts call an invi-
tation to fraud.
In September, the Republi-
can-controlled House passed a
bill to require verification for
all subsidies. This month, a
much weakened version of that
proposal became part of the
settlement of the government
shutdown. But the bottom line
is, don't expect the federal gov-
ernment to do much checking
on who is receiving subsidies.
And even a stringent verifica-
tion requirement will not work
if the IRS decides not to en-
force it for fear of discouraging
people who legitimately qualify
for Obamacare subsidies. Since
that has been the case with IRS
non-enforcement of the presi-
dent's executive order covering
improper Earned Income Tax
Credit payments, is there any
reason to believe the IRS would
not use the same rationale for
Obamacare?
Right now the public debate
over Obamacare is consumed by
news of the exchange website's
failures. It's a serious situation
that could have a long-lasting ef-
fect on the system. But at some
point the administration will fix
its technical problems. And
then the news can move on to
the next stage of Obamacare
dysfunction like a new scan-
dal with the IRS and subsidy
payments.


Byron York is chiefpolitical
correspondent for The
Washington Examiner


~---qilL'r4" t-

LETTE FR toR the: WEditor'

^^LETTER /> to the Editor


BOCC restricts
public input
Thank you for the Oct 10 edi-
torial, "Under new policy, for-
ever hold your peace" against
the recent decision of the ma-
jority Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC)
to restrict citizens from giving
public input immediately prior
to BOCC voting. Commissioner
Adams was the sole Commis-
sioner who voted against re-
stricting public input
immediately prior to BOCC
voting.
To have a truly representa-
tive county commission, there
must be open communication
between the BOCC and the citi-
zens prior to voting on what-
ever not only public hearings
and workshops. What is the
BOCC afraid of? They should
be glad that any citizens are
willing to speak to them!
After the speakers, including
myself at the Oct. 8 BOCC
meeting, opposed the ordi-
nance passed on Sept. 24, by
the majority BOCC, I remained
in the audience to observe the
behavior of the commissioners.
Yes, they did vote I do not


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

know how many times without
allowing the citizens the op-


portunity of speaking behind
the podium immediately prior
to voting. It was a regrettable
afternoon in the history of
Citrus County Commission
meetings.
It was like a ghost town, as
most of the audience was
county employees potential
speakers had left, evidently be-
cause they knew they were not
welcome to speak.
We have experienced similar
restriction of our freedom of
speech by the BOCC. In Janu-
ary 2011, the public input time
was changed on the day of the
meeting for the "Ottawa con-
nector" This confused the pub-
lic. When 3 p.m. came, we were
not allowed to speak during
the public input time and told
to wait for when it was on the
agenda, even though the rule
was that you can speak about
anything during the public
input!
Citrus County Chronicle Edi-
torial Board, again I commend
you upon your editorial as it
does back up the citizen's right
to be heard.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters
resident of Citrus County


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE OPINION SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 A9


Letters to the EDITOR


Florida-proposed
Second Amendment
Preservation Act
In 1776, the precedent that estab-
lishes the right of sovereignty was
recognized. The 13 colonies signed
the Declaration of Independence
which acknowledged that each
colony would be "free and inde-
pendent states." Then in 1781, these
sovereign states came together and
created a union under the Articles
of Confederation. These United
States formed a compact that cre-
ated the federal government with
specific, delineated and enumer-
ated powers. State sovereignty was
further strengthened by the 1783
Treaty of Paris. The king of England
acknowledged that the 13 colonies
were "sovereign and independent
nations." This is still recognized as
international law
The federal government violates
state powers and individual rights:
The Patriot Act allows a federal
agent to enter our state, write a war-
rant without a court order and
charge you with a felony if you tell
your wife/husband, lawyer or clergy;
National Defense Authorization
Act (NDAA) allows the president,
without congressional input or
oversight, to eliminate any U.S. citi-
zen's right to habeas corpus and to
a trial indefinitely, since there are
nebulous undefined terminology,
such as covered person, etc.;
Federal Restricted Buildings and
Grounds Improvement Act of 2011
severely limits our First Amend-
ment right as citizens to redress
grievances involving any federal
elected official protected by Presi-
dential Order and Secret Service.
Affordable Care Act forces citi-
zens to buy a product that they may
or may not want negatively impact-
ing many citizens because of the
exchanges, mandates, enforcement,
penalty, and private information
that will be shared with others.
Common Core State Standards, a
federal takeover of education, a
one-size-fits-all educational model
that will further dumb-down our
children, the data mining of stu-
dent's private information, the
mandates, requirements, the sex-
ual and immoral components, the
diminishing of parental rights, and
the astronomical cost that will be
paid by taxpayers.
When will enough, be enough?
We must remember that the Con-
stitution itself dictates how
changes to its contents can be
made. This process has not hap-
pened in recent history Therefore,
congressional laws and any execu-
tive orders that infringe are uncon-
stitutional and unenforceable
under Article 1, Section 8 of the
U.S. Constitution, and the Second,
Ninth and 10th Amendments.
In Alden v Maine (1999), the
Supreme Court asserted that states
retain a "residual and inviolable


YEL, SIR,WE A, VEE7N6 IN WRE FbSEMG6RS.
ON THE OTHER HAIP, TH4E FAA REA.EP ThE RUL_ S
FOR ELECTRONIC DGVICEP..,,NOW TAKE Y'0R SEAT.


sovereignty" under the Constitu-
tion. In Prinz v U.S. (1997), the
Supreme Court struck down the
Brady Bill stating: When a "Law...
violates the principle of state sover-
eignty ... it is not a Law... proper for
carrying into Execution the Com-
merce Clause, and can be consid-
ered merely an act of usurpation..'..
States have a sovereign responsi-
bility to reject unconstitutional fed-
eral laws. By passing the Florida
Second Amendment Preservation
Act, the power that our state has
will be reaffirmed to its rightful and
original place as a sovereign state
in accordance with the compact
that produced the U.S. Constitution,
while strengthening and protecting
our right to keep and bear arms
within our sovereign state.
America's hope lies in constant
prayer for our country getting in-
volved to make a difference, and
getting out the truth over, under
and around the media, which are
still ... actively suppressing news
that interferes with (their) agenda."
(Rick Scarborough)
If you believe that the U.S. Con-
stitution is worth defending and
protecting, then please join us in
this effort. Go to: http://fltac.org/
action/2nd-AmendmentV and sign
the citizen's petition and forward to
your friends and family And, if you
are interested in helping locally,
please email me at: citruscounty
citizens@gmail.com.
Our Constitution is calling you
because it needs your protection.
Will you answer?
Edna Mattos
Florida Citizens Alliance 2nd
Amendment Preservation Act
10th Amendment Center

Washing the window
"Out the Window" carried a very
appropriate title Sunday, Oct 13.
For three paragraphs, the (column)
was clear and honest. Then, in the
next paragraph, came the attack on
the tea party claiming that they be-
lieve all federal workers are lazy
In fact, the tea party was organ-
ized by Democrats, Republicans
and others who felt that out govern-


ment was letting us down.
Tea party enthusiasts wanted to
guide our government back to con-
stitutional governing. Along the
way, the Democratic Party, not
those disappointed Democrats,
chose to portray the group as vir-
tual anarchists. At the same time,
the Republican Party "establish-
ment" fears them because they
might be a threat to their control.
As a result, the tea party has be-
come the whipping boy for all of
federal government problems.
Continuing with "Out the Win-
dow," the (column) drifted from the
problem, discussing other issues,
then on the second page, another
slam at the tea-drinking third party
From what I see, all parties have
been short sighted. However, Re-
publicans have offered a number of
possible solutions, only to be
slammed by the Democrats in the
Senate and by our president.
Since the president and the sen-
ate Democrats hold the big stick,
and therefore are the big bullies, it
seems that they have a responsibil-
ity to negotiate with their weaker
members to arrive at a solution.
Since the print media and the
airwave media have the bully pul-
pit, including "Out the Window," it
is tough for the underdog to get a
message heard.
Right now the big bully is taking
many irresponsible and, in some
cases, probably illegal steps to
harm our citizens every day All
that is blamed on the tea party, but
those who are doing the deeds only
want to hurt the American people
as much as possible.
It is time for the big bullies to
take reasonable steps to solve this
impasse. We did not intend to elect
children or bullies to lead our
county
If given a fair shake, I believe the
tea party could guide us to a work-
able solution not based only on
"who will vote for me."
Before the next "Out that Win-
dow," I suggest calling in the win-
dow washers first.
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa


No solutions
Thank you, Mr. Mulli-
gan, for the great com-
mentary in Sunday's
paper (Oct. 27).
I just realized
that Scott 0I
Adams is the
Ted Cruz of Cit-
rus County. He
has no con-
structive solu-
tions and
refuses to nego-
tiate anything.
His only pur- CA
pose is to de- 5
stroy. Citrus 56P-
County's tea
party must be
so proud.
Aimed at wrong
person
You want to print how
Citrus County is the
laughingstock of the
state? Let's go into it.
How about Broward
County? Citrus County
has more helicopters and
more SUVs, gas guzzling,
which means that our
sheriff is the laughing-
stock of this county.
Don't tell me that Scott
Adams has caused all the
problems in six months
that our county commis-
sioners have created in
how many years sitting
there doing nothing but
counting on the electric
company to support their


I


(


salaries. This is complete
insanity that the Chroni-
cle has nothing more to
do than to support the
people who have caused
the problems
|ND and tear down
JND the people who
FF are trying to fix
the problems.

Enough of
Adams
I just finished
Reading Gerry
SMulligan's col-
umn in this
)579 Sunday's paper
) (Oct. 27) and I
agree with him
wholeheartedly. I think
we've had enough of
Scott Adams. Everyone
should be up in arms.
He's doing the job
Scott Adams hasn't
cost us nothing near what
these commissioners has
cost us in the past. Look
where we are. Tax and
spend. ... It's just on and
on and on that he's
brought to the people's
attention and isn't that
what his job is? He may
not go about it the proper
way to keep from getting
under people's skin, but
he's doing his job. He's
got my vote again.

U See Page A8 for
Sound Off policies.


As pr ol IIhe CiIrusI Cc'uinly Chrcinicle 1 partnership WiIh The Fesli.wl cI Ihe Ars Icc 1 hih chcc',l skldenIs
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Check ut Our Contest www.chronicleonline.com/artoutsidethebox



VOTE TODAY! A


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"'Night Life "Starry Night"


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*111 11


Hot Corner: MULLIGAN


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Lr


v E







NATION
NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Beds of boulders


Associated Press
A large excavator shovel
dumps huge limestone
boulders into the Gulf of
Mexico on Tuesday to help
rebuild an oyster reef off the
Texas coast. The $5.4 million
project will rebuild some
57 acres of reef, helping
to revitalize the fragile
Gulf marine ecosystem.

Judge clears
way for domestic
horse slaughter
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
A federal judge on Friday
cleared the way for horse
slaughterhouses to resume
operating in the U.S. as
early as next week.
U.S. District Judge Christina
Armijo in Albuquerque
threw out a lawsuit by The
Humane Society of the
United States and other ani-
mal protection groups that
alleged the Department of
Agriculture failed to conduct
proper environmental studies
when it issued permits to
Valley Meat Co. in Roswell,
N.M., and an Iowa com-
pany to slaughter horses for
human consumption.
The decision ends, for
now, a two-year battle by
Valley Meat to open its
slaughterhouse.
Name-calling spat
turns lawyer
into superhero
NASHVILLE, Tenn.--A
Tennessee defense attorney
responded to a prosecutor's
request to be referred to as
"general" and other titles with
a request of his own: Just
call me "Captain Justice."
The suggestion came in
response to a motion from
Assistant District Attorney
General Tammy Rettig in
which she asked the judge
in an aggravated burglary
case to order the defense
attorney not to refer to her
as "the government."
As alternatives, Rettig
asked that the judge order
she be referred to at trial as
"General Rettig, the Assis-
tant District Attorney Gen-
eral, Mrs. Rettig, or simply
the State of Tennessee."
"General" is a common
title for state prosecutors in
Tennessee.
Williamson County Cir-
cuit Court Judge Michael
Binkley dismissed the mo-
tion last week, but not be-
fore defense attorney Drew
Justice wrote that he wanted
the judge to grant him a mil-
itary title of his own. He sug-
gested "Captain Justice."
-From wire reports


&


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
This Nov. 26, 2008, file photo taken in the Orakzai tribal region of Pakistan shows Hakimullah Mehsud, the
leader of Pakistani Taliban faction. Intelligence officials said Friday that Mehsud was one of three people
killed in a U.S. drone strike.



Taliban leader killed



in U.S. drone strike


Associated Press
PESHAWAR, Pakistan
A U.S. drone strike Friday
killed Hakimullah
Mehsud, the leader of the
Pakistani Taliban, in a major
blow to the group that came after
the government said it had
started peace talks with the in-
surgents, according to intelli-
gence officials and militant
commanders.
Mehsud, who was on U.S. most-
wanted terrorist lists with a $5
million bounty, is believed to
have been behind a deadly sui-
cide attack at a CIA base in
Afghanistan, a failed car bomb-
ing in New York's Times Square
and other brazen assaults in Pak-
istan that killed thousands of
civilians and security forces.
The ruthless, 34-year-old com-
mander who was closely allied
with al-Qaida was widely re-
ported to have been killed in
2010 only to resurface later


But a senior U.S. intelligence
official said Friday the U.S. re-
ceived positive confirmation that
Mehsud had been killed. Two
Pakistani intelligence officials
also confirmed his death, as did
two Taliban commanders who
saw his mangled body after the
strike. A third commander said
the Taliban would likely choose
Mehsud's successor on Saturday
"If true, the death of Hakimul-
lah Mehsud will be a significant
blow to the Pakistani Taliban
(TTP), an organization that poses
a serious threat to the Pakistani
people and to Americans in Pak-
istan," said Michael Morell, a for-
mer acting CIA director who
retired in August and has cham-
pioned the drone program. His
comments came in a statement
emailed to The Associated Press.
There is increased tension be-
tween Islamabad and Washing-
ton over the drone attacks, and
Pakistan is also trying to strike a
peace deal with the Taliban.


The group's deputy leader was
killed in a drone strike in May,
and one of Mehsud's top deputies
was arrested in Afghanistan last
month.
The intelligence officials and
militant commanders said Fri-
day's drone attack that killed
Mehsud hit a compound in the
village of Dande Derpa Khel in
the North Waziristan tribal area.
Four other suspected militants
were killed, they said, including
Mehsud's cousin, uncle and one
of his guards. They did not have
the identity of the fourth victim.
At least four missiles struck just
after a vehicle in which Mehsud
was riding had entered the com-
pound, the Taliban commanders
said, adding that a senior group
of militants was discussing the
peace talks at a nearby mosque
shortly before the attack.
All the officials and the militant
commanders spoke on condition
of anonymity because they were
not authorized to talk to the media.


World BRIEFS

Don't look down





'-.







Associated Press
Alexa Scimeca and Chris
Knierim of the U.S. perform
in the pairs short program
Friday at the Cup of China
ISU 2013 Grand Prix of
Figure Skating in Beijing,
China.

Obama pledges
help for Iraq,
but no new aid
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama pledged
Friday to help combat an in-
creasingly active al-Qaida
in Iraq but stopped short of
announcing new commitments
of assistance sought by Iraqi
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.
AI-Maliki came to the Oval
Office requesting additional
aid, including weapons and
help with intelligence, to fight
insurgent violence that has
spiked in Iraq since Ameri-
can troops left in 2011.
Venezuelan
government seizes
US-owned oil rigs
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Venezuela has quietly seized
control of two oil rigs owned
by a unit of Houston-based
Superior Energy Services
after the company shut them
down because the state oil
monopoly was months be-
hind on payments.
The seizure took place
Thursday after a judge in
the state of Anzoategui, ac-
companied by four members
of the local police and na-
tional guard, entered a Su-
perior depot and ordered it
to hand over control of two
specialized rigs to an affili-
ate of PDVSA, the state-
owned oil producer.
PDVSAjustified the
equipment's expropriation,
calling it essential to the
South American nation's
development and welfare,
according to a court order
obtained by The Associated
Press. Company workers
were instructed to load the
rigs, known as snubbing
units and used to repair
damaged casing, onto
trucks to be deployed at
"critical wells" elsewhere,
according to the document.
"It was like a thief break-
ing into your house, asking
for the keys to the safe and
then expecting you to help
carry it away," Jesus Centeno,
local operations manager for
Superior in the city of Anaco,
said by phone. "Their argu-
ment was that we were
practically sabotaging
national production."
-From wire reports


Snowden: I'll talk if U.S. drops charges


Associated Press
BERLIN The U.S. refused
to show any leniency to fugitive
leaker Edward Snowden on Fri-
day, even as Secretary of State
John Kerry conceded that eaves-
dropping on allies had hap-
pened on "automatic pilot" and
went too far
Snowden made his appeal for
U.S. clemency in a letter re-
leased Friday by a German law-
maker who met with him in
Moscow In it, the 30-year-old
American asked for interna-
tional help to persuade the U.S.
to drop spying charges against
him and said he would like to
testify before the U.S. Congress
about the National Security
Agency's surveillance activities.
Snowden also indicated he
would be willing to help German
officials investigate alleged U.S.
spying in Germany, said Hans-


Christian Stroebele, a lawmaker
with the opposition Green Party
and a member of the parliamen-
tary committee that oversees
German intelligence.
Stroebele met with Snowden
for three hours on Thursday, a
week after explosive allegations
that the NSA had monitored
Chancellor Angela Merkel's cell-
phone prompted her to com-
plain personally to President
Barack Obama. The alleged
spying has produced the most
serious diplomatic tensions be-
tween the two allies since
Germany opposed the U.S.-led
invasion of Iraq in 2003.
In his one-page typed letter,
written in English and bearing
signatures that Stroebele said
were his own and Snowden's,
the American complained that
the U.S. government "continues
to treat dissent as defection, and
seeks to criminalize political


speech with felony charges that
provide no defense."
"However, speaking the truth
is not a crime," Snowden wrote.
"I am confident that with the
support of the international
community, the government of
the United States will abandon
this harmful behavior"
In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokeswoman Jen Psaki
would not respond directly to
Snowden's appeal, but said the
U.S. position "has not changed."
Snowden's appeal came as
Kerry conceded that because of
modern technology, some NSA
activities had gone too far and
were carried out without the
knowledge of Obama adminis-
tration officials.
"In some cases, some of these
actions have reached too far and
we are going to try to make sure
it doesn't happen in the future,"
Kerry said.


Associated Press
In this video frame grab provided by LifeNews via Rossia 24 TV channel,
which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP re-
porting, former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward
Snowden looks over his shoulder during a boat trip on the Moscow
River in Moscow. LifeNews said the video was shot in September 2013.


WORLD









.PORTS


0 Today's ACC clash
between No. 3 FSU
and No. 7 Miami is
college football's only
matchup of top 10
teams./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I F- 1-- 1


0 High school swimming/B2
0 NBA, sports briefs/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Women's basketball/B4
0 Football, NHL/B4
0 Auto racing/B5
0 College football/B6


CR overwhelmed by visiting Suwannee


Special team

miscues, turnovers

hurt Pirates
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Taking
the energy from its Senior
Night, Crystal River was a few
plays from potentially taking the
upset in a 27-7 football loss Fri-
day to Suwannee High School.
Coming in as the underdog
against a team that had held its
opponents to 46 points in dis-
trict play, the Pirates (3-6 over-
all, 1-5 District 5A-5) scored on


the first play of the game. Jun- from the Bulldogs (7-1, 5-1)
ior quarterback Collin Ryan throughout the first half. Trail-
connected on an 80-yard pass ing 10-7 at the end of the second
with receiver Ty quarter, the Pirates took
Reynolds to send the a gamble by letting the
home fans into a frenzy clock run down to 1 sec-
Though its defense ond and going for it on
held its ground all night, fourth down with 4 yards
two blocked kicks and a to go from the Suwannee
costly interception pre- 39-yard line.
vented the Pirates from Ryan dropped back
getting any more points and lobbed a pass down
and the quick celebra- Ty Reynolds the right sideline, but the
tion turned to CR senior WR pass was intercepted in
disappointment. caught an 80- heavy coverage by Aaron
"Two blocked punts yard TD pass. McAllister, who streaked
and a Hail Mary pass down the sideline for an
away ... that's 21 points," Crys- 88-yard touchdown return.
tal River head coach Nate Var- "I could have made a better
nadore said. read," Ryan said. "I definitely
The Pirates stayed within
arm's reach of taking the lead See Page B3


MATT PFIFFNERJChronicle
Crystal River defenders Austin Stephens, left, and Destin Dawsy,
back, bring down Suwannee running back Denzel Washington for no
gain Friday night in Crystal River.


Pouncing Tigers


Dunnellon

handles Lecanto

by 35-14 score
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Bubba Sims
and Josh Williams pummeled
and shed Lecanto defenders all
night to help stem a three-game
skid and send Dunnellon out on
a winning note. They combined
for 372 yards and three rushing
touchdowns on 55 carries,
while freshman Zach McKee
added two passing scores to lift
the Tigers to a 35-14 homecom-
ing spoiler over the Panthers
on Friday
A week after compiling 52
points and stacking 416 yards
through the air against Willis-
ton, the Panthers offense could
only muster 40 total yards in the
opening half. Its most promis-
ing play of the half a quick
slant from Travis McGee that
was converted into a 35-yard
gain by Jeremiah Lucas -
ended with a strip and recovery
by Tigers senior L.D. Thomas.
Thomas and sophomore
Zahid Hujurat each picked off
Lecanto (2-7) passes in the first
half.
Dunnellon (6-4) had turnover
problems of its own in losing all
three of its fumbles on the
night, including a pair near the
Lecanto 5-yard line. Sims
coughed up one of those, but
more than repented, as he ran
for 240 yards and two scores off
35 totes.
"It feels good," Sims said. "We
hit it hard at the end and came
out with a win."
His counterpart Williams, a
tall and shifty freshman, added
20 carries for 132 yards.
Williams turned it over once,
but also recovered a Panther
fumble.
An efficient McKee (6 for 8
passing, 80 yards, no intercep-
tions) found sophomore
Matthew Livermore and tight
end Chase Brattin for touch-
down passes of 38 and 10 yards,
respectively
Tigers senior William
Burgess blocked a Darien John-
son punt in the end zone mid-
way through the first quarter to
force a safety and give Dunnel-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Dunnellon freshman running back Josh Williams breaks through the Lecanto defense in the first quarter
of Friday night's homecoming game for the Panthers in Lecanto.


lon an early 2-0 advantage. The
Tigers led 22-0 at halftime.
Ninth-year Tigers head coach
Frank Beasley was disap-
pointed by the turnovers, but
proud of his team's overall
display
"Our kids have had a tough


three weeks," he said, noting
the three consecutive district
losses that bounced Dunnellon
from playoff contention. "They
always play hard, and I'm proud
of them for coming out and
playing hard tonight.
"(Lecanto head coach)


McKinley Rolle's done an out-
standing job over there. They've
got some good players."
Lucas ran under a couple of
deep McGee passes in the sec-
ond half for 46- and 44-yard


Page B3


Citrus


blanks


Lake


Weir

Hurricanes roll

to 29-0 district

road victory
RICHARD BURTON
Correspondent
CHANDLER The Citrus
football team had its way
with Lake Weir in a District
6A-5 matchup, but head
coach Rayburn Greene
knows his team will need to
pick up its game as its heads
into the postseason.
CHS limited Lake Weir to
159 yards
and picked
off four
passes on its
way to a 29-0
win. -
"The de- b
fense got a
shutout and
did its job, Javian
but we really Clark
struggled on led Citrus with
offense and 87 rushing
made too yards.
many mis-
takes," Greene said. "We did-
n't play very well overall and
will have a very short season
if we don't pick it up."
Citrus (8-1, 3-1) faces rival
Crystal River to close the reg-
ular season and will then
travel to District 6A-6 winner
Springstead in the opening
round of the regional playoffs
the following Friday
Against Lake Weir, Citrus
led 29-0 at halftime, but
struggled with penalties on
the offensive side of the ball
in the second half and were
kept out of the end zone over
the final 24 minutes.
"We didn't execute well
and we had very poor tech-
nique blocking on outside
running plays," said Greene,
whose team was flagged 11
times for 99 yards. "I thought
See Page1B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Swimmers in wait and see mode


Competitors at

regional meet did

not automatically

qualify for state
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Some Citrus County high
school swimmers may be
headed to the state meet after
the regional meet in Orlando.
Citrus's Jake Steel, Crystal
River's Dylan Earnheart and
Quinn Sisto, Ethan Kennedy and
Anna Lane may have qualified
for state.
The Crystal River boys were
fifth at the Region 2A-2 meet at
the Orlando International Drive
YMCA Pool on Friday night. The
Lecanto High boys were sixth.
The Crystal River girls were
not listed.
"We are happy that we fin-
ished fifth," said Crystal River
High coach Bill Wells. "Most of
our kids improved from last
week. We won't know until
(today) if someone is going to


Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River High School swimmers had a solid showing overall at Friday's Region 2A-2 swim meet at
the Orlando YMCA. The Pirate boys finished fifth as a team.


state. We swam faster than last placed seventh in the 100 breast-
week. A lot of people finished on stroke (1:07.3).
a high note." Earnheart set a school record
Sisto placed seventh in the 100 while finishing fourth in the 200
backstroke (1:02.5). He also IM (2:05.2). Earnheart, a junior,


reached the state meet last year
He also took sixth in the 100
butterfly (55.7).
Kennedy placed sixth in the
500 freestyle (5:24.2).


Lane was sixth in the 500
freestyle (5:47.4) and eighth in the
200 freestyle relay (1:54.2). Hayley
Clark, Jordan Collins and Amelia
Price were also on that team.
Blake Davis was fourth in div-
ing (254) and Kyle Butram was
seventh with a 209.
Steel of Citrus placed eighth
in the 100 breaststroke (1:07.78).
He was llth in the 200 IM
(2:14.51).
The Citrus captain thinks he
qualified for the state meet
"I feel overjoyed," Steel said.
"After I got out of the water, I
shouted 'I broke the curse.' The
curse of the time of 1:08. I was
stuck with that time for four
months. I heard from various
sources that the top eight were
going to go to state."
The state meet will be held in
Orlando on Nov. 8 at the Inter-
national Drive YMCA. The meet
starts at 9 a.m.
Jake's brother, Luke Steel, was
11th in the 500 freestyle (5:39.51).
He also placed 19th in the 200
freestyle (2:06.01).
Results for Lecanto were un-
available online and attempts to
reach coach Lecanto head
coach Matt Bouthillier were
unsuccessful.


I SOTBRES


FAU assistant
said he saw Pelini
use drugs
A Florida Atlantic assistant
coach told the school he per-
sonally witnessed former
Owls head coach Car Pelini
using marijuana last month,
and that he also witnessed
him using cocaine in the past
year.
Those claims by Matt Ed-
wards played a vital role in
the investigation that led to
Pelini's stunning resignation
earlier this week. Edwards re-
mains on the Owls' coaching
staff, working with the defen-
sive line and special teams.
Edwards' sworn affidavit
was released to The Associ-
ated Press by the university
on Friday. Edwards and Alli-
son Stewart both said they
saw Pelini smoking marijuana
in Key West on Oct. 19. In
addition, Stewart's affidavit,
also sworn, claimed that she
got a text from Pelini one day
later "admitting that he uses
drugs on occasion."
The affidavits were nota-
rized and state that they were
provided at the request of
Florida Atlantic athletic direc-
tor Patrick Chun "to assist him
with an investigation."
Pelini and defensive coor-
dinator Pete Rekstis both re-
signed Wednesday after
Chun confronted them with
information that he said was
introduced by two informants.
Chun also said both Pelini
and Rekstis acknowledged
drug use.
Edwards said he saw Rek-
stis also using marijuana and
cocaine in the past year.
No. 10 Florida
beats Florida
Southern 110-88
GAINESVILLE Casey
Prather scored 23 points, 15
in the second half, and No. 10
Florida beat Florida Southern
110-88 in an exhibition game
Friday night.
Patric Young added 19
points, and highly touted
freshman Kasey Hill chipped
in 17 for the Gators, who had
just nine players available -
only seven on scholarship -
and finished with seven scor-
ing in double figures.
Will Yeguete had 12 points,
while Rutgers transfer Eli
Carter, DeVon Walker and
walk-on Jacob Kurtz finished
with 11 each.
Florida was without three
suspended players: Scottie
Wilbekin, Dorian Finney-
Smith and Damontre Harris.
They also were without guard
Michael Frazier II, who is out
indefinitely with mono.
Kevin Capers led the Divi-
sion II Mocs with 20 points
while Dominic Lane added
19.
Jeter and Yankees
reach $12 million,
1-year deal
NEW YORK-- Derek
Jeter and the New York Yan-
kees have agreed to a $12
million, one-year contract.
The deal Friday replaces
a $9.5 million player option
for the 39-year-old short-
stop. Jeter was limited to 17
games this year after break-


ing his ankle in the 2012 AL
championship series opener
against Detroit.
Jeter hit .190 (12 for 63)
with one homer and 73 RBIs
this year, playing 13 games
at shortstop and four at des-
ignated hitter. The Yankees'
captain was on the disabled
list four times.
Johnson ties
course record,
builds 5-shot lead
SHANGHAI Dustin
Johnson made 10 birdies
and tied the course record
with a 9-under 63 to build a
five-shot lead in the HSBC
Champions.
Johnson put himself in
great position to start another
PGA Tour season with a win.
He won the Tournament of
Champions in Hawaii last
January. This World Golf
Championship is his first
tournament of the 2013-14
season.
Starting four shots behind,
Johnson overpowered She-
shan International with pure,
powerful tee shots. He
birdied six of the opening
seven holes and finished at
12-under 132.
Rory Mcllroy reached 10-
under at the turn, but strug-
gled on the back nine and
had to settle for a 72. He was
five shots behind, along with
Boo Weekley and Bubba
Watson.
Phil Mickelson had a 68
and was seven shots behind.
Couples leads
Charles Schwab
Cup Championship
SAN FRANCISCO Fred
Couples took the second-
round lead Friday in the
Charles Schwab Cup Cham-
pionship, shooting his second
straight 6-under 65 in the
Champions Tour's season-
ending event.
Winless this season, Cou-
ples had a bogey-free round
atTPC Harding Park.
First-round leader Peter
Senior bogeyed the 18th for a
69 and fall two strokes back.
Bart Bryant was third at 8
under after a 66. Bernhard
Langer was another stroke
back after a 68.
Charles Schwab Cup
points leader Kenny Perry
had a 71 to remain 3 under.
Fred Funk aced the par-3
eighth hole with a 4-iron, but
bogeyed four of his next
seven holes and finished with
his second straight 70.
Nadal, Djokovic,
Federer, Ferrer
advance in Paris
PARIS Novak Djokovic
won his 15th straight match
Friday and Roger Federer
avenged a loss last week to
Juan Martin del Potro, setting
up a semifinal match between
the two at the Paris Masters.
Djokovic beat Stanislas
Wawrinka 6-1,6-4, and
edged Del Potro 6-3, 4-6, 6-3.
Top-seeded Rafael Nadal
also moved into the semifi-
nals with a 6-4, 6-1 victory
over Richard Gasquet. Nadal
will face defending champion
David Ferrer, a 4-6, 7-5, 6-3
winner over Tomas Berdych.
-From wire reports


Magic pluck Pelicans


Orlando rolls

in home

opener 110-90

Associated Press

ORLANDO Arron Af-
flalo had 30 points and
Maurice Harkless added
20 points and eight re-
bounds as the Orlando
Magic got their first win of
the season, hammering the
New Orleans Pelicans
110-90 on Friday night
Anthony Davis led win-
less New Orleans with 26
points and 17 rebounds,
while Jrue Holiday added
17 points and five assists.
Afflalo, who had 15
points in the third quarter,
led Orlando on a 13-3 run
that he ended with a
3-pointer The guard was 4
for 5 on 3-pointers, all in
the second half, as Or-
lando built leads as big as
30 points.
76ers 109,
Wizards 102
WASHINGTON -Thad-
deus Young scored 29 points,
rookie Michael Carter-
Williams started cold and fin-
ished hot while John Wall did
just the opposite in scoring 26
points, and the Philadelphia
76ers are a surprising 2-0
after pulling away in the fourth
quarter for a 109-102 victory
over the Washington Wizards.
Evan Turner finished with
23 points, and Spencer
Hawes had 16 points and 14
rebounds for the 76ers.
Bobcats 90,
Cavaliers 84
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Kemba Walker had 23 points
and seven assists to help the
Charlotte Bobcats beat the
Cleveland Cavaliers 90-84 in
their home opener.
CJ Miles had 22 points,
and Tristan Thompson added
21 for the Cavaliers.
Timberwolves 100,
Thunder 81
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin
Love had 24 points and 12 re-
bounds and Ricky Rubio
added 14 points, 10 assists
and five steals to lead the
Minnesota Timberwolves to a
100-81 victory over the Okla-
homa City Thunder.
Kevin Durant scored 13
points on 4-for-11 shooting.


AA
EfDff lo
t.-U A,% 4A)UNX M *y ( JB


Associated Press
Orlando's Nikola Vucevic scores in front of New Orleans
Pelican Greg Stiemsma during the first half Friday in
Orlando.


Hawks 102,
Raptors 95
ATLANTA-Al Horford
scored 22 points, three other
Atlanta starters reached dou-
ble figures and the Hawks de-
feated the Toronto Raptors
102-95 to give Mike Buden-
holzer his first head coaching
victory.
The Hawks built an 18-
point lead late in the third
quarter, then held off a Rap-
tors comeback in the final pe-
riod. Jeff Teague and Kyle
Korver had 17 points apiece,
while Paul Millsap added 15.
The Raptors lost despite 31
points from DeMar DeRozan.
Bucks 105,
Celtics 98
BOSTON Zaza Pachulia
had 20 points and nine re-
bounds, making two free
throws with 44 seconds left to
give Milwaukee its first lead
since the opening basket, and
the Bucks rallied from a
22-point third-quarter deficit to
beat the Boston Celtics 105-98.
Vitor Faverani scored 12


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points with 18 rebounds for
Boston.
Rockets 113,
Mavericks 105
HOUSTON James
Harden scored 34 points and
Dwight Howard had 13 points
and 16 rebounds in the Hous-
ton Rockets' 113-105 victory
over the Dallas Mavericks.
The Mavericks scored eight
straight points, with five from
Monta Ellis, to get to 91-83
with eight minutes left. But
Dallas lost its star and mo-
mentum a couple minutes
later when Dirk Nowitzki
fouled out on Harden's fast-
break layup.


Nowitzki had 22 points to
lead the Mavericks.
Grizzlies 111,
Pistons 108, OT
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike
Conley scored 22 points, Zach
Randolph and TonyAllen
added 16 each and the Mem-
phis Grizzlies beat the Detroit
Pistons 111-108 in overtime.
Memphis outscored the Pis-
tons 11-2 to start the extra pe-
riod en route to its first victory of
the season. Marc Gasol added
15 points for Memphis and
Randolph had 10 rebounds.
Josh Smith and Rodney
Stuckey led Detroit with 19
points each.
Nets 101, Heat 100
NEW YORK- Paul Pierce
and Joe Johnson scored 19
points each, and the Brooklyn
Nets ended years of futility
against the Miami Heat and
sent the NBA champions to
their first losing streak in 10
months with a 101-100 victory.
The Heat fell to 1-2 and
have dropped consecutive
games for the first time since
Jan. 8 and 10.
The Heat got Dwyane Wade
back after he missed Wednes-
day's loss in Philadelphia, and
he scored 21 points. LeBron
James led Miami with 26.
The Nets ended a 13-game
skid against the Heat with their
first victory since March 20,
2009.
Blazers 113,
Nuggets 98
DENVER-- LaMarcus
Aldridge scored nine of his 25
points in the fourth quarter to
help the Portland Trail Blazers
hold off Denver 113-98.
Nicolas Batum and Wesley
Matthews each added 21 as
the Blazers opened up a
26-point lead late in the third
quarter, only to see the
Nuggets slice the deficit to
single digits in the fourth.
Nate Robinson came off
the bench to score 24 points,
while Ty Lawson added 21.


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November 11, 2013

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B2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Glantz-Culver line
NCAA Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Clemson 20 17/2 (56) atVirginia
VirginiaTech 6 41 (40) at Boston Col.
atToledo 28 30/2 (67) E. Michigan
N. Illinois 24 24/2 (58/2) at UMass
atAkron +2/ 1/2 (52/2) KentSt.
atRutgers 14 122 (55/2) Temple
at Penn St. 10 102 (56) Illinois
at Georgia Tech10 10/2 (53/2) Pittsburgh
at Syracuse 3 4/2 (51)Wake Forest
W. Kentucky 19 18'/2 (55'/2) at Ga. St.
at Missouri 13 10/2 (55/2) Tennessee
at Kansas St. 14 17 (52) Iowa St.
at Marshall 28 31%2 (57) Southern Miss.
atTexas A&M 452 462 (76/2) UTEP
MiddleTenn. 6 4 (62)atUAB
atTulsa 3/2 3 /2 (52/2) UTSA
at Air Force 1/2 Pk (54)Army
atTCU 14 12/2 (45) WestVirginia
Georgia-x 2/2 3 (47) Florida
Arizona 14/2 16 (67/2) at California
at Florida St. 21 21'/2 (62) Miami
Wisconsin 7 9/2 (48/2) atIowa
at Michigan St. 3/2 5 (46/2) Michigan
Ohio St. 31 32 (57/2) at Purdue
at Indiana 7 8 (66) Minnesota
at UCLA 24 28 (58) Colorado
at Notre Dame 17 15/2 (48/2) Navy
Auburn 10 8 (55) at Arkansas
at Nebraska 7 6 (59) Northwestern
at S. Alabama 2'/2 3' /2 (63'/2) Arkansas St.
at Utah St. 21 24 (52/2) Hawaii
San Jose St. 2/2 4 /2 (66/2)atUNLV
atLa.-Lafayette27 31/2 (66) New Mex. St.
Texas St. 13 10/2 (50) at Idaho
North Carolina 3 5 (57/2) at NC State
atTexas 27 27/2 (52) Kansas
atFAU 3 2/2 (47/2)Tulane
atTexasTech +2 /21 (67/2) Okla. St.
East Carolina 20 25/2 (50/2)atFlU
at Fresno St. 23 20/2 (73/2) Nevada
atS. Carolina 112 122 (52) Mississippi St.
BoiseSt. 10 7 (5912)atColo.St.
atSDSt. 17 14 (562) NewMexico
x-at Jacksonville
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Carolina 71 71 (44) Atlanta
at Dallas 102 10 (47/2) Minnesota
New Orleans 3'/2 6' /2 (45'/2) at N.Y Jets
Tennessee 3 3 (39'/2) at St. Louis
Kansas City 3/2 4 (40/2) at Buffalo
San Diego Pk 1 (51)atWashington
at Oakland 2 2/2 (45) Philadelphia
atSeattle 16 /216 (40/2)Tampa Bay
Baltimore 3 2 (41) at Cleveland
at New England7 7 (44) Pittsburgh
Indianapolis Pk 1 (44) at Houston
Monday
at Green Bay 11 10/2 (50) Chicago



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 2 0 1.000 -
Toronto 1 1 .500 1
Brooklyn 1 1 .500 1
NewYork 1 1 .500 1
Boston 0 2 .000 2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 1 1 .500 -
Charlotte 1 1 .500 -
Miami 1 2 .333 1
Orlando 1 2 .333 1
Washington 0 2 .000 1
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 2 0 1.000 -
Detroit 1 1 .500 1
Chicago 1 1 .500 1
Cleveland 1 1 .500 1
Milwaukee 1 1 .500 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Houston 2 0 1.000 -
San Antonio 1 0 1.000 1
Dallas 1 1 .500 1
Memphis 1 1 .500 1
New Orleans 0 2 .000 2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 2 0 1.000 -
Oklahoma City 1 1 .500 1
Portland 1 1 .500 1
Utah 0 1 .000 1/2
Denver 0 2 .000 2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 1 0 1.000 -
Sacramento 1 0 1.000 -
Golden State 1 1 .500 1
L.A. Clippers 1 1 .500 1
L.A. Lakers 1 1 .500 1
Friday's Games
Orlando 110, New Orleans 90
Philadelphia 109, Washington 102
Charlotte 90, Cleveland 84
Milwaukee 105, Boston 98
Atlanta 102, Toronto 95
Minnesota 100, Oklahoma City 81
Houston 113, Dallas 105
Memphis 111, Detroit 108, OT
Brooklyn 101, Miami 100
Portland 113, Denver 98
Utah at Phoenix, late
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, late
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, late
Today
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Portland, 10 p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48
Tampa Bay 13 9 4 0 18 43
Detroit 14 8 4 2 18 33
Boston 12 8 4 0 16 35
Montreal 14 8 6 0 16 40
Ottawa 13 4 6 3 11 39
Florida 13 3 8 2 8 26
Buffalo 15 212 1 5 23
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Pittsburgh 14 10 4 0 20 45
N.Y Islanders 13 5 5 3 13 42
Washington 13 6 7 0 12 41
Carolina 13 4 6 3 11 26
N.Y Rangers 12 5 7 0 10 20
Columbus 12 5 7 0 10 33
New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26
Philadelphia 12 3 9 0 6 20
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Colorado 12 11 1 0 22 38
Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45
St. Louis 11 8 1 2 18 42
Minnesota 14 7 4 3 17 34
Nashville 13 6 5 2 14 27
Dallas 13 5 6 2 12 33
Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51
Anaheim 14 10 3 1 21 44
Phoenix 14 9 3 2 20 48
Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42
LosAngeles 14 9 5 0 18 40
Calgary 13 5 6 2 12 39
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36


GA
32
33
37
22
27
43
46
43

GA
33
43
38
39
37
33
37
37


GA
18
38
25
34
37
39
40

GA
24
36
44
41
36
47
54


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 B3


For thie record


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On the AIRWAVES =


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
9 a.m. (CNBC) Formula One: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix qualifying
12 p.m. (FS1) Nationwide Series: O'ReillyAuto Parts 300
qualifying
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
qualifying (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (FS1) Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500 practice
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: O'ReillyAuto Parts
300 race
BASEBALL
8 p.m. (MLB) Arizona Fall League: Fall Stars Game
BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. (NBA, WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Philadelphia 76ers
BOXING
10 p.m. (HBO) Gennady Golovkin vs. Curtis Stevens
HORSE RACING
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Breeders' Cup World Championship
8 p.m. (NBC) 2013 Breeders' Cup
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Virginia Tech at Boston College
12 p.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Penn State
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Wisconsin at Iowa
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Army at Air Force
12:30 p.m. (SUN) Wake Forest at Syracuse
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Middle Tennessee State at UAB
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Navy at Notre Dame
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Florida vs. Georgia
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Michigan at Michigan State
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Clemson at Virginia
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) West Virginia at Texas Christian
3:30 p.m. (FS1) Iowa State at Kansas State
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Auburn atArkansas
7 p.m. (FOX) Oklahoma State at Texas Tech
7 p.m. (ESPN) Tennessee at Missouri
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Pittsburgh at Georgia Tech
7:30 p.m. (FS1) Colorado at UCLA
8 p.m. (ABC) Miami at Florida State
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas-El Paso at Texas A&M
10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Nevada at Fresno State
GOLF
4:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Charles Schwab Cup
Championship, Third Round
11 p.m. (GOLF) WGC HSBC Champions, Final Round
2 a.m. (GOLF) WGC HSBC Champions, Final Round
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Washington Capitals
7 p.m. (NHL) Carolina Hurricanes at New York Rangers
7 p.m. (SUN) St. Louis Blues at Tampa Bay Lightning
SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Newcastle
United vs. Chelsea
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Fulham vs.
Manchester United
1:30 p.m. (NBC) English Premier League: Arsenal vs.
Liverpool
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Eastern Conference Semifinal, Leg
1 Sporting Kansas City at New England Revolution
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Western Conference Semifinal,
Leg 1 Portland Timbers at Seattle Sounders FC
TENNIS
9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP BNP Paribas Masters semifinal
12 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BNP Paribas Masters semifinal
2:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup: Final Russia vs. Italy,
Rubber 1 (Same-day Tape)
4:30 p.m. (TENNIS) Federation Cup: Final Russia vs. Italy,
Rubber 2 (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR


9a.r

9a.r


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
Region 2A-2 meet
n. Crystal River at Nature Coast
Region 3A-2 meet
n. Citrus, Lecanto at Lake Nona


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
N.Y Islanders 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Washington 7, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 2
Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 0
St. Louis 4, Florida 0
Minnesota 4, Montreal 3
Colorado 3, Dallas 2, OT
Detroit 4, Calgary 3
Today
Chicago at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
Anaheim at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Boston at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB Suspended Chicago White Sox
minor league RHP Nicholas Blount (Great Falls-


Pioneer) 50 games after testing positive for an
amphetamine. Suspended Chicago Cubs minor
league SS Elliot Soto (Daytona-FSL) 50 games
after a second violation for a drug of abuse.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Exercised the 2014
contract option on LHP Jon Lester.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Sent RHP Simon
Castro outright to Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Exercised the
2014 contract option on RHP Ubaldo Jimenez,
who voided the contract. Declined the 2014 con-
tract option on OF Jason Kubel. Agreed to
terms with INF Ryan Rohlinger and RHP J.C.
Ramirez on minor league contracts.
DETROIT TIGERS Declined the 2014
contract option on RHP Jose Veras. Announced
OF MattTuiasosopo was claimed off waivers by
Arizona. Reinstated INF Danny Worth from the
60-day DL.
HOUSTON ASTROS Claimed LHP Darin
Downs off waivers from Detroit.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS- Named Brian Pold-
berg manager of Omaha (PCL), Vance Wilson
manager of NorthwestArkansas (Texas) and Dar-
ryl Kennedy manager of Wilmington (Carolina).
NEWYORKYANKEES Agreed to terms
with SS Derek Jeter on a one-year contract.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Exercised the
2014 contract options on LHP Brett Anderson
and OF Coco Crisp. Declined to exercise the
2014 contract options on C Kurt Suzuki and OF
ChrisYoung.


I S O RT B R EF


Nats' Williams describes
his style as 'aggressive'
WASHINGTON Matt Williams wants
to combine what he learned as a player
with newfangled analytics as he takes
charge of the Washington Nationals, his
first job as a manager in the majors.
"Old school is old school, and that's
great," Williams said, "but if you don't get




CR
Continued from Page BI

would like that pass back, it would
have changed the game."
The Pirates still held their heads
high after halftime, but the dagger
came when the Bulldogs' Eric Waker
blocked a Crystal River punt in the
end zone for a touchdown, with the


along with the times, bro, you better just
step aside."
Williams has been formally introduced
as Washington's manager at a news
conference Friday.
He will retain most of predecessor
Davey Johnson's staff, including bench
coach Randy Knorr and pitching coach
Steve McCatty.
From wire reports



ensuing extra point making it 27-7
with 8:49 left in the game.
Aside from the special teams mis-
cues, Crystal River held Suwannee to
171 yards rushing and just 30 passing
yards, with a fumble recovery and two
interceptions. Ryan finished with 10
completions on 21 passes for 158
yards, with a touchdown and an
interception.
The Pirates close out its season at
home this Friday against Citrus.


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River sophomore defensive back Khyrel Harvey intercepts a pass
intended for Suwannee's Daquez Strickland on Friday night at Earl Bramlett
Stadium in Crystal River.


CITRUS
Continued from Page BI

it was a pretty pathetic effort overall
and we can't do these things if we
want to go far in the playoffs.
"I was very disappointed in how we
played."
Citrus rolled up 273 yards on 41 car-
ries and got 125 yards from Deion
Moore in the win and limited Lake
Weir to 37 yards on 22 carries.
James Pouncey got Citrus on the
board first with a 17-yard scoring run
just 2:44 into the game and Javian
Clark added a 1-yard run at the
3:33 mark of the opening quarter to


push the visitors' lead to 14-0.
From there, Citrus got a pair of
quick touchdowns in the second quar-
ter, as Nile Waters scored from 25
yards out with 8:12 remaining before
halftime.
On Lake Weir's next series, Steven
Knowles picked off a pass from Tyler
Rotstein and ran it in 14 yards for an-
other score.
For the half, Citrus held Lake Weir
to minus 10 yards rushing and 16 total
yards on 22 snaps.
Clark rushed for 87 yards on 11 car-
ries to pace Citrus, while Pouncey
added 56 yards on eight tries.
Tyric Washington contributed 60
yards on nine carries for the
Hurricanes.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto's Jeremiah Lucas breaks away from Dunnellon's Bo Dewitz for a 20-yard
gain late in the second quarter Friday at Lecanto High School.


POUNCING
Continued from Page BI

touchdowns, and the Panthers im-
proved on the ground as well with 45
yards on eight carries between senior
Johah Nightengale and junior DeDe
Anderson.
Anderson had kickoff returns of 48
and 38 yards in the game, and was a
leading tackler on defense.
Lecanto junior Dmitry Growdon
blocked a PAT attempt by freshman
Zach West in the fourth quarter
"I thought we were way too one-


dimensional in the first half, and that
was our doing," Rolle said. "We came
back and were able to exploit a cou-
ple things in the second half. We def-
initely responded with a better
effort.
"I thought this game came down to
fundamentals," the third-year coach
added. "I don't think we blocked very
well at times, and I don't think we
tackled very well at times. We have to
bounce back and give these seniors
our best effort next week to get a win
for them in their last game."
Lecanto stays home for its season fi-
nale against Land O'Lakes (7-2) this
Friday


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jaguars' Blackmon suspended indefinitely


Another substance-abuse violation

for troubled wide receiver


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Jack-
sonville Jaguars receiver Justin
Blackmon has been suspended
indefinitely without pay for an-
other violation of the NFLs
substance-abuse policy
Blackmon was previously sus-
pended the first four games of
this season for violating the
policy
So this is at least his third vio-
lation in about 18 months. And
the Jaguars are acknowledging
he has a problem.
'All of us who are a part of the
Jaguars family care very deeply
about Justin and his well-being,"
general manager Dave Caldwell
said in a statement. "That said, he
must be held accountable and ac-
cept the consequences an-
nounced today by the NFL.
"His suspension will provide
him the opportunity to receive
the attention and professional
treatment necessary to overcome
his challenges, and we will sup-
port him during this time. The
Jacksonville Jaguars will evalu-
ate Justin's status once he has
successfully met the criteria to be


considered for reinstatement to
the league."
Blackmon's suspension begins
immediately Unlike his four-
game suspension, he won't be al-
lowed in the building during this
one. He will be eligible to apply
for reinstatement prior to the
start of the 2014 season.
"I want to sincerely apologize
to Mr (Shad) Khan, my team-
mates, my coaches and to the
Jaguars fans for not utilizing the
resources that I was provided to
overcome my challenges," Black-
mon said in a statement released
by his agent "I am determined to
overcome the issues that have re-
sulted in this situation, and I truly
appreciate the support that the
Jaguars and my agent have shown
me.
"I will address these matters
with the type of intensity I usually
direct toward my on-field play so
that I can be ready to be a pro-
ductive member of the team and
community next season. Again, I
am truly sorry to Mr Khan, my
teammates and coaches and to
the Jaguars fans for the impact of
my situation on the team as well
as to my family and friends and


Associated Press
Jacksonville wide receiver Justin Blackmon, left, runs past St. Louis
cornerback Janoris Jenkins after catching 67-yard pass for a
touchdown Oct. 6 in St. Louis. Blackmon was suspended indefinitely
by the league Friday for another substance-abuse violation.


those that have been there for me
during these challenging times.
Nobody is more disappointed
with all of this than me."
Since the winless Jaguars (0-8)
aren't on the hook for the rest of
Blackmon's salary this season -
they also might try to void what
remains on his rookie contract-
they could keep him on the roster
in hopes he turns his life around.
After all, the troubled receiver


has proven to be talented in two
seasons.
Blackmon has 29 receptions for
415 yards and a touchdown this
year He has 93 catches for 1,280
yards and six scores in 20 games
- all since Jacksonville traded
up to select the former Oklahoma
State star with the fifth overall
pick in the 2012 NFL draft.
Blackmon credited his four-
game suspension for his success


this season, saying he used the
time away to get in better shape.
He also acknowledged last
month that his reputation was
still a work in progress.
"I just don't really care about
people on the outside," Blackmon
said. "I don't care what they got to
say I don't really care how they
view me because they don't try to
know me. They won't ever know
me, so that's not important to me.
They can feel however they want
to feel. I don't really care about
that
"All I can do is control what I
can control, and that's showing up
here, trying to get better every
day and carrying that out there on
the field."
Blackmon has been involved in
three substance-related incidents
in three years. He was arrested
on a misdemeanor DUI charge in
Texas in 2010 after officers
caught him speeding on a subur-
ban Dallas highway The charge
was later reduced to an underage
alcohol possession charge. A lit-
tle more than a month after the
Jaguars drafted him, he was ar-
rested during a traffic stop in
Stillwater, Okla., after a breath
test allegedly showed his blood
alcohol content to be three times
the legal limit
A subsequent violation landed
him the four-game suspension.


oving forward


Win in OT

might ease

discord on

Dolphins

Associated Press

DAVIE Despite rum-
blings of dissent within the
Miami Dolphins, they man-
aged a memorable overtime
win that might save their
season.
The question now is
whether the team's first vic-
tory in 39 days will quell any
discord.
"Sometimes stuff hap-
pens in the family" coach
Joe Philbin said Friday
"Some of it is not always
great, and you have to deal
with it That's what we do."
When asked if he's satis-
fied with the Dolphins'
chemistry Philbin referred
to their 22-20 win over
Cincinnati 12 hours earlier
"I think the character of
the team was revealed," he
said.
Cameron Wake became
only the third NFL player
to end an overtime game
with a sack when he tack-
led Andy Dalton at the goal
line in the 69th minute
Thursday
The victory put the
brakes on a tailspin by
Miami (4-4) that included a
four-game losing streak
and talk of dissension be-
tween coaches and among
players, including teasing
by teammates that may
have contributed to the
abrupt departure of tackle
Jonathan Martin.
The second-year pro
from Stanford left the team
to receive help for emo-
tional issues, and it's un-
clear whether or when he's
expected back
"Our primary concern is
for the health of the indi-
vidual," Philbin said after
the game. "He has been ex-
cused with a non-football
illness. Our concern and
support are with him, and
really that's all I'm going to
say on the matter"


Associated Press
Miami defensive end Cameron Wake celebrates Thursday after sacking Cincinnati
quarterback Andy Dalton in the end zone for a safety during overtime in Miami
Gardens. The Dolphins defeated the Bengals 22-20.


On Friday, Philbin was
asked if bullying is an issue
on the team.
"We emphasize a culture
of team first, accountabil-
ity and respect for one an-
other," he said. "Any
behavior that deviates
from that is inconsistent
with the values of our
organization."
When asked if he has
seen evidence of bullying
or harassment, Philbin
said, "This is something we
take very seriously, and it
will not be tolerated."
Martin left the team
Monday That same day,
Philbin said, he told his
players in a meeting that
he had never been part of
a team where there wasn't
respect among the players
and coaches for each other
"If you don't have that in
this league, Pop Warner, in
high school or in college,
you don't have a chance,"
he said. "I believe strongly


in the men we have in the
locker room. I believe
strongly in the staff."
Given the tumult of the
week, another loss could
have devastating. Instead,
with one improbable play
-Wake's tackle -the Dol-
phins revived their flag-
ging playoff hopes.
"It's almost like a movie
moment," Wake said.
Late-game dramatics
had gone against the Dol-
phins in recent weeks.
They had chances to win in
the fourth quarter in three
consecutive games and
came up short each time.
But against Cincinnati,
they drove 50 yards in the
final 84 seconds of regula-
tion for a tying field goal,
made a stand in their own
territory in overtime to
force a punt, then won with
a sack
"We knew it was going to
be a dogfight," defensive
end Olivier Vernon said. "It


came down to the wire,
and we finally finished."
With the victory, the Dol-
phins matched their best
record at the halfway point
since 2003, which shows
how woeful the past
decade has been for the
franchise. Now Miami still
has a reasonable shot at its
first winning season in five
years and perhaps more
than that.
After two games in five
days against first-place
teams, the schedule eases
a bit. The Dolphins get a
10-day break before play-
ing on a Monday night at
winless Tampa Bay, fol-
lowed by consecutive
home games.
"We had our backs up
against the wall for a cou-
ple of weeks in a row,"
quarterback Ryan Tan-
nehill said. "We kept get-
ting pushed further back,
and finally we got out of
that hole a little bit"


UConn women unanimous No. 1


Associated Press

Geno Auriemma and his UConn
Huskies are back in a familiar place
- No. 1 in the poll.
Connecticut received all 36 votes
Friday in The Associated Press'
women's basketball poll marking the
ninth time that the Huskies are the
top team in the preseason. Five of
those years UConn went on to win the
national championship.
"I don't know that being preseason
No. 1 necessarily gets you anything
except some attention," Auriemma
said. "But it's always nice when peo-
ple want to talk about your players
and program. We like that feeling."
UConn has most of its team back
from last season's national champi-
onship run led by sophomore sensa-
tion Breanna Stewart, who won most


outstanding player of the Final Four
honors in April.
Connecticut, which also was the
preseason No. 1 in 1995, '99,2000, '01,
'03, '08, '09, and '10 opens Nov. 9
against Hartford before facing No. 3
Stanford two days later The Huskies
only trail Tennessee's 12 appearances
at No. 1 in the preseason poll.
Duke was second in the poll it's
best ranking since the Blue Devils fin-
ished at No. 1 in the final poll of 2007.
They haven't been this highly ranked
in the preseason since it was No. 1 in
the 2005 opening poll.
The Blue Devils are led by talented
guard Chelsea Grey, who is working
her way back from a dislocated
kneecap in February that ended her
season.
Stanford, led by senior Chiney Og-
wumike, was third followed by


Tennessee.
Louisville matched its best ranking
ever at No. 5. The Cardinals, who
were also No. 5 in 2009, return four
starters from last season's team that
shocked the women's basketball land-
scape by knocking off Baylor in the
NCAA tournament regional semifi-
nals before falling to UConn in the
title game.
The Cardinals will play one season
in the newAmerican Athletic Confer-
ence before bolting to the ACC next
season. Their former Big East foe
Notre Dame was sixth in the poll. The
Irish made the move to the ACC this
season.
Kentucky, Maryland, California and
Baylor rounded out the first 10.
The SEC has six teams in the Top 25
with the ACC, Big 12 and Big Ten each
having four


Lightning blank


Hurricanes 3-0


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. -Vic-
tor Hedman scored in the
second period and Steven
Stamkos added an insur-
ance goal to back Ben
Bishop's shutout in the
Tampa Bay Lightning's
3-0 victory over the Car-
olina Hurricanes on
Friday night.
Bishop (8-2) stopped 31
shots in his first shutout of
the season and second of
his career against Car-
olina. Alex Killorn added
a goal and an assist, and
Martin St. Louis had two
assists.
The Lightning have won
four of five overall and
eight of nine at Carolina.
Carolina, which lost its
fourth straight, fell to
1-3-3 at home. Justin Pe-
ters (0-4) made 29 saves.
Penguins 4,
Blue Jackets 2
PITTSBURGH Chris
Kunitz scored for the third
straight game and the Pitts-
burgh Penguins had little
trouble with the Columbus
Blue Jackets in a 4-2 win.
Brandon Sutter, Kris
Letang and Jason Megna
also scored for Pittsburgh.
Sidney Crosby recorded an
assist to push his point total
to an NHL-leading 22.
Marc-Andre Fleury made
37 saves and earned his
10th win, tops in the
league.
Capitals 7, Flyers 0
PHILADELPHIA- Joel
Ward scored three goals for
his first NHL hat trick, and
Braden Holtby coasted to a
shutout in the Washington
Capitals' 7-0 fight-filled rout
of the Philadelphia Flyers.
Jason Chimera added a
goal and three assists, and
Nicklas Backstrom and
Mikhail Grabovski each had
three points for the Capitals.
Blues 4,
Panthers 0
SUNRISE Brian Elliott
stopped 31 shots for his first
win of the season, and
Alexander Steen scored for


the sixth straight game as
the St. Louis Blues beat the
Florida Panthers 4-0.
Alex Pietrangelo, Chris
Stewart and Derek Roy
added goals, and Steen
posted his NHL-leading 12th
this season.
Jacob Markstrom made
19 saves for Florida, which
lost for the fifth time in six
games.
Islanders 5,
Senators 4, SO
OTTAWA, Ontario -
Frans Nielsen scored the
tying goal in the third period
and then netted the only goal
of the shootout as the New
York Islanders beat the Ot-
tawa Senators 5-4.
The Islanders (5-5-3) out-
shot the Senators 57-31 and
got goals from Matt Martin,
John Tavares and Pierre-
Marc Bouchard in regulation.
Erik Condra, Bobby Ryan,
Mika Zibanejad and Clarke
MacArthur scored for the
Senators (4-6-3).
Wild 4, Canadiens 3
ST. PAUL, Minn.- Jason
Pominville scored two goals,
including the game-winner
late in the third period, to
lead the Minnesota Wild
over the Montreal Canadi-
ens 4-3.
Justin Fontaine and Nino
Niederreiter also scored for
Minnesota.
Brendan Gallagher, P.K.
Subban and Brian Gionta
scored for Montreal, which
rallied from a 3-1 third-pe-
riod deficit but couldn't win
its third straight game.
Avalanche 3,
Stars 2, OT
DALLAS Paul Stastny's
second goal of the game
3:36 into overtime gave the
Colorado Avalanche and
troubled goalie Semyon Var-
lamov a 3-2 victory over the
Dallas Stars.
Stastny fired a shot from
the left circle past goalie Kari
Lehtonen to beat the Stars,
who had rallied from a 2-0
deficit. The goal was his
fourth of the season.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Martin St. Louis tries to move the puck
Friday as Carolina's Justin Faulk defends during the first
period in Raleigh, N.C.


B4 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'1.I-- - - -" .. ..
A .. -. ....................., "".... ',,.... :..,.. .:,: ... .'-:.... ","'

BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Justin 'Gator' Hise, a sophomore at Citrus High School, enjoys a victory lap with the checkered flag last weekend at the Citrus County
Speedway. Hise claimed his first feature victory in the Open Wheel Modified division just a night after the Hurricane football team suffered its
first loss of the season.


Justin 'Gator'Hise excels whilejugglingfootball racing and studies


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

It hadn't even been 24 hours
since his Citrus High School foot-
ball team competed for a district
title in Gainesville, and Justin
'Gator' Hise was coming off his
third heat win of the season in his
No. 43 Open Wheel Modified at
the Citrus County Speedway last
Saturday
"I don't want to count my chick-
ens before they hatch, but I think I
got something for 'em," the CHS
sophomore said.
Indeed, he had something, as he
went on to score his first feature
win later that night against the
likes of Shane Butler, Troy 'Bat-
man' Robinson and 13-time cham-
pion Herb Neumann Jr It was
more proof that, although the 17-
year-old has a full plate, he's up to
the challenge.
During the week, he has to fit in
shop time between football and
studies, while relying on help from
his father Steve Hise, of Hise Roof-
ing, and older brother Steven Hise
(No. 2 Open Wheel Modified) in
setting up his car With a goal to
study mechanical engineering in
Huntersville, N.C., which he hopes
will lead him into professional
racing, he maintains a 4.0 GPA,
and is just one of four sophomores
on a Hurricane varsity squad that


is enjoying its best season in
decades.
"He's a hard-working kid who
comes from a hard-working fam-
ily," Hise's head football coach
Rayburn Greene said of the mid-
dle linebacker and special teams
player "He's kind of got the blue-
collar mentality about him. He's
just a good ole boy from Inverness,
really He's country-tough, and
loves football and working out"
Hise has played football since he
was 5, and hopes to earn a scholar-
ship. But his ultimate passion is in
racing, which he considers "a way
of life." He's loved it since watch-
ing his father race a dirt track at
Ocala Speedway His first racing
experience came in a Pure Stock
event at Bronson when he was 12.
Hise got his start in the No. 72
that's now driven by Karlin Ray,
who is three points off the lead
with six feature wins this year Two
years later, Hise was in his modi-
fied, with which he also races at St
Petersburg's Showtime Speedway
and the Auburndale Speedway
"When I started in Open Wheel
Modifieds, I didn't have a lot of re-
spect from everybody being a
young kid in a big class," Hise said.
"I gained respect by finishing up in
the front, doing well, staying off of
people and being a clean driver
That's just how I am, I like to be
driven clean and I like to drive


other people clean."
Hise enjoys the power that the
OWM class brings and was first
drawn to its high car counts. Last
Saturday it only featured five cars
due to a concurrent big OWM
event in the region.
"We get 650 horsepower in this
car," he said. "We're only on an 8-
inch tire, so it's hard to get that
much power to the track on such a
little tire. When my brother started
a couple years ago, there were 25
cars here every night"
Hise's favorite part is the fans,
and he's immensely grateful for
the support he receives from fam-
ily friends and sponsors, including
Hise Roofing, Ronald J. Fagan
dentistry, Michael's Floor Covering
and Al Low Dollar Tow His car
has a sticker honoring his two
No. 1 fans, brothers Tyler and
Lane.
"They came up to me after a win
one night in Pure Stocks," recalled
Hise, who estimates their ages are
5 and 7, respectively "They said
they liked my car and my person-
ality and all, and have been fans
ever since. They won't come to the
racetrack unless I'm racing. That's
a big motivator, getting in the car
and knowing you've got someone
in the stands for you. I like to go
out there and make my family and
the fans proud and put on a show"
Hise said he's still learning


every day from drivers and teams
all over Besides his brother and
father, whom Hise hopes to finan-
cially help retire after getting a de-
gree and joining a major racing
team, he gets a big assist from
south Florida's Brian Finney of
the ARCA Racing Series.
"He gives us ideas for setups
and builds my shocks," Hise said.
"We can call him up, if the car's
pushing or tight or something, and
he'll tell us to try this or that. My
brother Stephen is very knowl-
edgeable about all this stuff. I
learn a lot from him and my dad.
I've just got to keep a level head
and keep trucking forward. I've
never been one to ever get really
down on myself, and I have great
people around me to keep me up
and motivated. I have fantastic
parents. They do everything in the
world for me."
The 'Canes (7-1) lost their first
game of the season at Gainesville
last Friday but a rematch is on the
horizon if both teams advance to
the second round of the playoffs.
As always, Hise maintains an opti-
mistic attitude about his team's
prospects.
"The next time we play them, I
believe we'll be ready" he said. 'A
loss like that is devastating, but it's
nothing to put your head down
about and not try harder the next
time."


Edwards earns pole


for AAA Texas 500


Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas
-Jimmie Johnson qual-
ified third for the
NASCAR Sprint Cup
race at Texas, one row
ahead of Matt Kenseth.
Johnson and Kenseth
are tied for the points
lead going into Sunday's
race.
Carl Edwards starts on
the pole after a qualify-
ing lap of 196.114 mph on
Friday Edwards earned
his first pole at Texas,
where he is the only
three-time Cup winner
The polesitter has won
the last two races at the
high-banked 1 1/2-mile
track.
Brad Keselowski starts
on the front row after a
fast lap of 196.100 mph,
just ahead of Johnson's
195.943 mph. Kenseth
qualified sixth.
Jeff Gordon starts
eighth, the same as he
did in April at the track
before finishing 38th be-
cause of a suspension
problem. He is third in
points, 27 behind John-
son and Kenseth.
AAA Texas 500
lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)


1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 196.114.
2.(2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 196.1.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
195.943.
4. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 195.837.
5.(18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 195.78.
6.(20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 195.518.
7. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet,
195.312.
8. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 195.171.
9.(17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 195.129.
10. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 195.03.
11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 194.665.
12. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.517.
13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
194.384.
14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 194.377.
15. (56) MartinTruex Jr, Toyota, 194.161.
16. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
193.805.
17. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.659.
18. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 193.618.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.604.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 193.403.
21. (33)Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 193.334.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 193.126.
23. (30) Parker Kligerman, Toyota,
193.043.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
192.933.
25. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 192.905.
26. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 192.802.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.651.
28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 192.048.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 191.891.
30. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet,
191.829.
31. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.421.
32. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 191.347.
33. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 190.53.
34. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 189.88.
35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.321.
36. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 189.235.
37. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner
Points.
39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner
Points.
40. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
43. (36) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, Owner Points.


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Six remaining classes
wrap up their respective
points seasons today at the
Citrus County Speedway
They are joined by a Dare
to Win event and Women's
Powder Puff, as well as Leg-
ends, Bandoleros and Hor-
nets (Beginner and New
Pro divisions).
Herb Neumann Jr
landed his first Open Wheel
Modified championship
last Saturday and, with a 24-
point lead on second place's
Dale Sanders in the Late
Model division, is poised
today to capture his 14th
overall title, and eighth
Late Model championship
since 2001. Todd Brown sits
35 points back of Neumann
at third.
Neumann, Sanders (two
heat wins) and four other
drivers each have a Late
Model feature win this sea-
son. Scott Grossenbacher,
the 2012 champ, won the
most recent feature in con-
vincing fashion on Oct 12.
Chris Allen won't need
anything special to reach
his first championship in
Modified Mini Stocks. The
Bushnell driver, who won a
points title in Bombers his
rookie season in 1992, has a
36-point advantage on his


friend Michael Lawhorn.
Allen has three feature
wins and four heat victo-
ries. Dunnellon's Clint
Foley winner of three con-
secutive titles from 2009-
2011, leads the division in
wins with nine (six features,
three heats).
Pure Stocks come in the
most competitive of all
classes in the points chase.
Floral City's Karlin Ray led
the standings from the
opener on Feb. 2 until Sept
14, when a tech disqualifi-
cation put him three points
behind James Johnston.
Ray recovered with his sev-
enth feature win the ensu-
ing week, but a crash on Oct
12, coupled with a Waller
win, pushed Waller ahead.
Since then the pair- each
with six feature wins -
have exchanged points
leads over a couple of races,
leaving Waller with a three-
point edge entering today
Kevin Stone has stood
atop the Mini-Stock stand-
ings since Feb. 16 and cur-
rently leads second place's
Jason Terry by 29 points, as
he vies for his first champi-
onship. Stone, Mark Patter-
son and Dr Shannon
Kennedy each have three
feature wins in Minis, and
Bill Ryan has two in just
five outings. Richard Kuhn
snatched his first feature


win of the year last
Saturday
In Pro Figure 8s, Pinellas
Park's Joey Catarelli is after
his second consecutive
championship and sixth
overall as a driver with a
12-point advantage over
Charlie Meyer Catarelli,
who won last year's title by
one point and finished third
in last Saturday's final
Robert Aaron Figure 8 spe-
cial in a formerAaron car, is
the only driver in the class
with two wins this year
Curtis Flanagan clinched
his fourth championship in
Street Stocks with a
retroactively declared fea-
ture win last Saturday Last
week's tech disqualification
for Floral City's Dora
Thorne gives Flanagan (11
feature wins, seven heats),
of Inverness, a 189-point
edge entering today
The Dare to Win chal-
lenge offers this year's non-
winners to exclusively
compete for a victory
Tonight's Legends and
Bandoleros races are not
part of the Florida United
Promoters Series season.
Races begin at 5:30 p.m.
Grandstand gates open at 4
p.m. and are $13 for adults,
$9 for students and seniors
and $5 for children 11 and
under (children under 42
inches are free).


AUTO RACING


4. Robert Hight, 2,375.
5. Courtney Force, 2,366.
Pro Stock
1. Jeg Coughlin, 2,512.
2. Jason Line, 2,441.
3. Mike Edwards, 2,432.
4. Shane Gray, 2,428.
5. Allen Johnson, 2,419.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Matt Smith, 2,602.
2. Michael Ray, 2,437.
3. Hector Arana, 2,400.
4. Hector Arana Jr, 2,397.
5. Eddie Krawiec, 2,377.
Formula One
Through Oct. 27
1. Sebastian Vettel, 322.
2. Fernando Alonso, 207.
3. Kimi Raikkonen, 183.
4. Lewis Hamilton, 169.
5. MarkWebber, 148.
6. Nico Rosberg, 144.
7. Romain Grosjean, 102.
8. Felipe Massa, 102.
9. Jenson Button, 60.
10. Paul di Resta, 40.


Six titles on the line



tonight at speedway


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 B5

Citrus County
Speedway schedule
KEY
SLM=Super Late Models
OWM=Open Wheel Modifieds
SP=Sportsman
MMS=Mod Mini Stocks
SS=Street Stocks
MS=Mini Stocks
Ps=Pure Stocks
HD=Hornet Division
PF8=Pro Figure-8s
F8=Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s
FUPS=Florida United Promoters Series
TBARA=Tam pa Bay Area Racing Association
DAARA=Daytona Antique Auto Racing
Association
DWARFS
S.E.C.K.S.=South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS
Nov. 2: FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD, LEGENDS,
BANDOLEROS
Nov. 9: OWM, SP, MS, PS, DWARFs, PF8
Points standings
Super Late Models
Car# Name Points
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 626
1 Dale Sanders 602
23 Todd Brown 591
123 Jon Brown 529
88 Joe Winchell 460
Open Wheel Mods
Car# Name Points
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 1,032
0 Troy Robinson 1,006
18 Shane Butler 955
2 Steven Hise 879
43 Gator Hise 675
Mod Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
33 Chris Allen 1,235
44 Michael Lawhorn 1,199
99 Leroy Moore 1,135
24 Phil Edwards 1,070
47 Richard Kuhn 1,059
Sportsman
Car# Name Points
17 Mike Bell 1,049
66 Andy Nicholls 961
114 John Buzinec 916
01 Tom Posavec 823
4 Jay Witforth 807
Street Stocks
Car# Name Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 2,198
48 Dora Throne 2,009
16 J.D.Goff 1,828
8 TimWilson 1,540
6 Phillip Robinson 1,122
Pure Stocks
Car# Name Points
3 Jason Waller 1,966
72 Karlin Ray 1,963
45 James Johnston 1,928
44 Glen Colyer 1,605
09 James Holly 1,194
Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
98 Kevin Stone 1,921
73 Jason Terry 1,892
22 Mark Patterson 1,701
11 Jerry Daniels 1,671
20 Shannon Kennedy 1,425
Pro Figure 8s
Car# Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 406
94 Charlie Meyer 394
15 William Stansbury 282
86 Justin Meyer 202
33 Pnut Higginbotham 192
Reg. Figure 8s
Car# Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 780
5 Pnut Higginbotham 766
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 760
51 Travis Nichols 664
45 James Johnston 364


Points standings
NASCAR Sprint Cup
Through Oct. 27
1. Matt Kenseth, 2,294.
2. Jimmie Johnson, 2,294.
3. Jeff Gordon, 2,267.
4. Kevin Harvick, 2,266.
5. Kyle Busch, 2,258.
6. Clint Bowyer, 2,239.
7. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,238.
8. Greg Biffle, 2,236.
9. Kurt Busch, 2,219.
10. Carl Edwards, 2,218.
NASCAR Nationwide
Through Oct. 11
1. Austin Dillon, 1,067.
2. Sam Hornish Jr., 1,059.
3. Regan Smith, 1,015.
4. Justin Allgaier, 997.
5. Elliott Sadler, 989.
6. Trevor Bayne, 976.
7. Brian Scott, 974.
8. Brian Vickers, 970.
9. Kyle Larson, 910.
10. Parker Kligerman, 893.
NASCAR Camping World Truck
Through Oct. 26
1. Matt Crafton, 707.
2. James Buescher, 656.
3. Ty Dillon, 646.
4. Jeb Burton, 639.
5. Johnny Sauter, 625.
6. Ryan Blaney, 615.
7. Miguel Paludo, 615.
8. Darrell Wallace Jr., 614.
9. Brendan Gaughan, 595.
10. Timothy Peters, 592.
IndyCar
Final
1. Scott Dixon, 577.
2. Helio Castroneves, 550.
3. Simon Pagenaud, 508.
4. Will Power, 498.
5. Marco Andretti, 484.
6. Justin Wilson, 472.
7. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 469.
8. James Hinchcliffe, 449.
9. Charlie Kimball, 427.
10. Dario Franchitti, 418.
NHRA
Through Oct. 27
Top Fuel
1. Shawn Langdon, 2,530.
2. Antron Brown, 2,428.
3. Doug Kalitta, 2,392.
4. Spencer Massey, 2,388.
5. Morgan Lucas, 2,367.
Funny Car
1. John Force, 2,581.
2. Matt Hagan, 2,429.
3. Jack Beckman, 2,410.




B6 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 COLLEGE FOOTBALL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


College football
schedule
Today, Nov. 2
EAST
Virginia Tech (6-2) at Boston College (3-4), Noon
Illinois (3-4) at Penn St. (4-3), Noon
Columbia (0-6) atYale (3-3), Noon
Bryant (4-4) at Robert Morris (3-4), Noon
Temple (1-7) at Rutgers (4-3), Noon
N. Illinois (8-0) at UMass (1-7), Noon
Penn (4-2) at Brown (4-2), 12:30 p.m.
Stony Brook (3-4) at Maine (6-2), 12:30 p.m.
Wake Forest (4-4) at Syracuse (3-4), 12:30 p.m.
Bucknell (3-4) at Colgate (3-5), 1 p.m.
Holy Cross (3-6) at Fordham (8-0), 1 p.m.
Lafayette (2-5) at Georgetown (1-7), 1 p.m.
Jacksonville (4-4) at Marist (5-3), 1 p.m.
Cornell (1-5) at Princeton (5-1), 1 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) (4-4) at Sacred Heart (7-2),
1 p.m.
CCSU (3-5) at Wagner (2-6), 1 p.m.
Dartmouth (3-3) at Harvard (5-1), 5 p.m.
St. Francis (Pa.) (3-4) at Duquesne (4-3),
6:10 p.m.
Delaware (6-2) atTowson (8-1), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Southern Miss. (0-7) at Marshall (4-3), Noon
Bethune-Cookman (7-1) at NC Central (4-4),
Noon
Mississippi St. (4-3) at South Carolina (6-2),
12:21 p.m.
North Carolina (2-5) at NC State (3-4),
12:30 p.m.
Mercer (7-1) at Davidson (0-8), 1 p.m.
Tennessee St. (7-2) at E. Kentucky (5-3), 1 p.m.
Furman (3-5) at Georgia Southern (4-3), 1 p.m.
W. Kentucky (4-4) at Georgia St. (0-8), 1 p.m.
Hampton (3-5) at Morgan St. (2-6), 1 p.m.
Va. Lynchburg (2-5) at NC A&T (4-3), 1 p.m.
Campbell (1-7) at Stetson (1-6), 1 p.m.
Middle Tennessee (4-4) at UAB (2-5), 1 p.m.
Warner(0-9)atGardner-Webb(4-4), 1:30 p.m.
New Hampshire (4-3) atWilliam & Mary (5-3),
1:30 p.m.
Howard (3-5) at Delaware St. (3-5), 2 p.m.
Florida A&M (2-6) at Norfolk St. (2-6), 2 p.m.
Rhode Island (3-6) at Old Dominion (5-3), 2 p.m.
Charleston Southern (7-2) at Presbyterian
(3-4), 2 p.m.
SC State (5-3) at Savannah St. (1-8), 2 p.m.
Samford (6-2) atThe Citadel (2-6), 2 p.m.
Murray St. (5-3) at UT-Martin (5-3), 2 p.m.
Villanova (4-4) at James Madison (5-3), 2:30 pm.
Charlotte (4-4) at Coastal Carolina (8-0), 3 p.m.
MVSU (1-7) atGrambling St. (0-8), 3 p.m.
Chattanooga (6-2) at Appalachian St. (2-6),
3:30 p.m.
Georgia (4-3)vs. Florida (4-3) at Jacksonville,
3:30 p.m.
VMI (1-7) at Liberty (4-4), 3:30 p.m.
Clemson (7-1) at Virginia (2-6), 3:30 p.m.
Albany (NY) (1-7) at Richmond (3-5), 4 p.m.
Alabama A&M (2-6) at Alcorn St. (7-2), 5 p.m.
Jacksonville St. (6-2) atAustin Peay (0-8), 5 p.m.
Tulane (6-2) at FAU (2-6), 5 p.m.
New Mexico St. (1-7) at Louisiana-Lafayette
(5-2), 5 p.m.
East Carolina (5-2) at FlU (1-6), 6 p.m.
Pittsburgh (4-3) at Georgia Tech (5-3), 7 p.m.
Alabama St. (6-2) at Kentucky (1-6), 7:30 p.m.
Arkansas St. (3-4) at South Alabama (3-4),
7:30 p.m.
Miami (7-0) at Florida St. (7-0), 8 p.m.
SE Louisiana (6-2) at McNeese St. (7-1), 8 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (5-3) at Northwestern St.
(3-5), 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Ohio St. (8-0) at Purdue (1-6), Noon
Wisconsin (5-2) at Iowa (5-3), Noon
Butler (6-3) at Dayton (6-2), 1 p.m.
Tennessee Tech (3-6) at E. Illinois (7-1), 1 p.m.
San Diego (5-3) at Valparaiso (1-7), 1 p.m.
Morehead St. (3-5) at Drake (4-4), 2 p.m.
N. Iowa (4-4) at Illinois St. (4-4), 2 p.m.
Indiana St. (1-7) at Missouri St. (3-6), 2 p.m.
Urbana (6-2) at SE Missouri (1-7), 2 p.m.
Youngstown St. (7-1) at South Dakota (4-4),
2p.m.
S. Illinois (4-4) atW. Illinois (3-6), 2 p.m.
Kent St. (2-7) at Akron (2-7), 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota (6-2) at Indiana (3-4), 3:30 p.m.
Iowa St. (1-6) at Kansas St. (3-4), 3:30 p.m.
Michigan (6-1) at Michigan St. (7-1), 3:30 p.m.
Northwestern (4-4) at Nebraska (5-2), 3:30 p.m.
Navy (4-3) at Notre Dame (6-2), 3:30 p.m.
Tennessee (4-4) at Missouri (7-1), 7 p.m.
E. Michigan (1-7) atToledo (5-3), 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
West Virginia (3-5) atTCU (3-5), 3:30 p.m.
Kansas (2-5) at Texas (5-2), 3:30 p.m.
UTSA (3-5) atTulsa (2-5), 3:30 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (6-2) vs. Stephen F Austin
(3-5) at Houston, 4 p.m.
Auburn (7-1) at Arkansas (3-5), 6 p.m.
Nicholls St. (4-4) at Lamar (3-5), 7 p.m.
Oklahoma St. (6-1) atTexasTech (7-1), 7 p.m.
UTEP (1-6) atTexas A&M (6-2), 9 p.m.
FAR WEST
Army (3-5) at Air Force (1-7), Noon
Arizona (5-2) at California (1-7), 3:30 p.m.
Montana St. (6-2) at N. Colorado (1-7), 3:40 p.m.
San Jose St. (4-3) at UNLV (5-3), 4 p.m.
Hawaii (0-7) at Utah St. (4-4), 4 p.m.
Weber St. (1-7) at Portland St. (4-4), 4:05 p.m.
Montana (6-2) at Sacramento St. (4-4), 4:05 p.m.
Texas St. (5-3) at Idaho (1-7), 5 p.m.
E.Washington (6-2) at Idaho St. (3-5), 5:05 p.m.
North Dakota (2-6) at N. Arizona (6-2), 7 p.m.
Cal Poly (3-5) at UC Davis (3-6), 7 p.m.
Colorado (3-4) at UCLA (5-2), 7:30 p.m.
Boise St. (5-3) at Colorado St. (4-4), 8 p.m.
New Mexico (2-5) at San Diego St. (3-4), 8 p.m.
Nevada (3-5) at Fresno St. (7-0), 10:30 p.m.


Make or break


Associated Press
Florida State head football coach Jimbo Fisher has a lot of respect for the talents of Miami sophomore
running back Duke Johnson (8). The No. 3 Seminoles host the No. 7 Hurricanes tonight in an ACC matchups
that could have national title implications.


No. 3 Florida St

faces No. 7Miami

in ACC matchup

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE There's one
way to stop the Florida State of-
fense from reaching its average of
52.6 points per game keep quar-
terback Jameis Winston and com-
pany on the sidelines.
That's the goal for No. 7 Miami
when the Hurricanes travel to Tal-
lahassee for a showdown with the
third-ranked Seminoles today
Most of that responsibility will
fall on the shoulders of running
back Duke Johnson and an offen-
sive line that averages 313 pounds
per lineman. Johnson is the No. 11
rusher in FBS, racking up 117.6
yards per game for the Hurricanes
(7-0, 3-0 Atlantic Coast Conference)
"What doesn't he do well?
That'd be easier," Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher said when
asked about Johnson. "We could
have a shorter conversation.
"The thing about him, he makes
big plays. He's dynamic. He gets in
space. He changes the numbers
on the scoreboard. He makes you
miss. He's very durable. He's
strong. Has got great balance. Has
got great body control. Catches the
ball out of the backfield. Blocks. I
mean, that guy is a competitor and
just a complete football player"
The only team that stayed
within 14 points of the Seminoles
(7-0, 5-0 Atlantic) was Boston Col-
lege, which featured a rugged run
game that pounded out 200 yards
on 45 carries.
That was the fourth game of the
season and before the Florida
State defensive line came to life.
The rotation ofTimmyJernigan,


Nile Lawrence-Stample, Eddie
Goldman, Jacobbi McDaniel and
Demonte McAllister began to fill
gaps, command double-teams and
eat up blocks for the Seminoles.
That has allowed linebackers Ter-
rance Smith and Telvin Smith to
run free upfield.
Cornerback Lamarcus Joyner
believes Florida State will be suc-
cessful if the front-seven wins the
line of scrimmage.
"Smash-mouth football. You
have to embrace that," Joyner
said. "If you don't, you're going to
get smashed.
"Sometimes you forget about
what this game of football is about
... At the end of the day it's about
the trenches. Whoever has the
best front-seven wins football
games. So, we kind of got away
from that and we were able to
learn. The Boston College game
was a big wake up call. We found
out from there, hey, we have to
dominate the line of scrimmage."
Five things to watch when No. 7
Miami plays at No. 3 Florida State
today:
Heisman watch
This has become a weekly affair
Florida State quarterback Jameis
Winston has averaged 311 yards
passing per game, completed 69.9
percent of his passes and thrown
for 23 touchdowns and four inter-
ceptions. His performance against
the No. 7 team in the country will
carry plenty of weight with voters
who are also watching quarter-
backs Marcus Mariota (Oregon),
Johnny Manziel (Texas A&M), A.J.
McCarron (Alabama) and Bryce
Petty (Baylor).
Morris' chance
This is Miami quarterback
Stephen Morris' last chance to beat
Florida State in the regular sea-
son. The teams could meet in the
ACC title game later this year He's


started against the Seminoles only
once and has appeared in the ri-
valry game twice, completing 27 of
46 passes for 241 yards with one
touchdown and one interception.
"We all know what this game and
this rivalry means," said Morris,
who led Miami to four straight
wins over in-state schools, three of
them coming this year with victo-
ries against Florida Atlantic,
Florida and South Florida already
Turnover happy
The Seminoles have forced
seven turnovers in the last two
games as the defense made no-
ticeable improvements. Giving
Winston and the No. 3 scoring of-
fense in the nation short fields and
extra possessions is not a recipe
for victory Morris, who has eight
interceptions in seven games, has
to be smart with his decisions
against the Joyner-led secondary
Road success
Although the pendulum in the
rivalry is clearly going Florida
State's way right now, playing in
Tallahassee hasn't always a bad
thing for Miami. The Hurricanes
are 4-2 in their last six games at
Doak Campbell Stadium, outscor-
ing the Seminoles 172-137 in those
games. And the two losses were by
three and four points, respectively
Between the pipes
A meeting between top 10 teams
that double as intra-state rivals
would typically be the perfect en-
vironment for a close, competitive
game. The Seminoles may be
heavily favored, but a one-
possession game decided by a late
field goal wouldn't be a total shock
Florida State freshman Roberto
Aguayo has made a school-record
58 consecutive kicks, including 10
field goals. He's yet to attempt a
field goal under any real pressure,
however Miami sophomore Matt
Goudis is 6 for 9 in 2013.


Big



penalty



hurts



Bulls

Associated Press

HOUSTON Penalties
hadn't been a major issue
for South Florida this sea-
son. Penalties, however,
turned into a big problem
Thursday night against
Houston and one big one
late in the fourth quarter
snowballed into the Bulls'
second straight loss.
Following a muffed punt
by Houston, South Florida
recovered at the Houston
27 with 6 minutes remain-
ing. Andre Davis was called
for offensive pass interfer-
ence on a catch that would
have put the Bulls on the 1.
On the next play, Tyus
Bowser sacked Mike
White and forced a fumble
that Jeremiah Farley re-
covered at midfield. Hous-
ton went on to score en
route to a 35-23 victory
"I thought I went up and
made a good play," Davis
said. "There was good pro-
tection, good throw The
referees obviously saw the
play differently They
called me for pass interfer-
ence, but I thought I went
up and made a good play"
John O'Korn was 22 of 27
for 263 yards and three
touchdowns for Houston.
Making his first career
start, White was 26 of 41
for 311 yards and two
touchdowns for the Bulls
(2-6, 2-2 American Athletic
Conference). Davis caught
nine passes for 134 yards,
and Mike McFarland had
two touchdowns.
"It was tough because it
was the first time all year
we played that well," South
Florida coach Willie Tag-
gart said. "It was tough on
our kids to be down like we
were in the comeback and
lose the game. It's tough. It's
tougher on our kids be-
cause they fall hard. They
practiced well, fell hard, got
in that game, and we had a
chance there at the end, but
it didn't go our way"
South Florida, which av-
eraged 5 1/2 penalties per
game for just under 58
yards a game, was penal-
ized 19 times for 170 yards.
"That's not our football
team," Taggart said. "We're
not an undisciplined foot-
ball team. That's the first
time we were at that many
penalties, so I won't say that
our football team is undis-
ciplined, but 19 penalties,
you just can't have them."
Deontay Greenberry
caught four passes for 106
yards and a touchdown,
and Kenneth Farrow had
rushing and receiving
touchdowns for Houston
(7-1, 4-0). The Cougars are
only FBS team to score in
every quarter this season.


UF, UGA vying to stay in SEC East hunt


Gators, 'Dawgs

hook up in

Jacksonville

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
winner remains in con-
tention in the Southeast-
ern Conference's Eastern
Division. The loser heads
home with a three-game
losing streak.
So the stakes are high
even though border-state
rivals Florida and Georgia
are unranked heading
into today's annual game
in Jacksonville. It's the
second time in four years
that both schools are un-
ranked by the end of Octo-
ber, but it's the first time
since 1926 that both pro-
grams enter the neutral-
site game riding
multi-game losing streaks.
Georgia (4-3, 3-2 SEC)
dropped consecutive
games against Missouri
and Vanderbilt, plummet-
ing from No. 7 in the coun-
try Florida's fall was
equally surprising. The
Gators (4-3,3-2) lost at LSU
and at Missouri by double-


digit margins, continuing
to fade after starting the
season at No. 10.
Now, they're trying to
avoid weeks of talk about
playing for pride and be-
coming bowl eligible.
"Both teams are in the
same boat," Florida quar-
terback Tyler Murphy
said. "We're both 4-3. Both
teams probably expected
to be undefeated or have a
better record coming into
this game. But both teams
still have high hopes of fin-
ishing the season off well.
"It's kinda like a one-
game playoff. If you lose,
your season's kinda done
and down in the dumps."
Both teams appeared
done two weeks ago, but
then South Carolina ral-
lied to knock off Missouri
in double overtime last
Saturday and give the
Gators and Bulldogs a
glimmer of hope.
"I think everybody got a
good little bit of juice from
that," Georgia coach Mark
Richt said. "This game is
obviously important, no
matter what the situation
is, but we still feel like
we're in the race for the
East, so it makes it a little
bit more meaningful to
everybody"


rI E


Associated Press
Florida running back Mack Brown and the Gators come
off their bye week to face Georgia today in Jacksonville.


Florida may have a little
extra motivation stemming
from the last two years.
Georgia has won two in
a row in the series, con-
verting two huge fourth-
down calls to win 24-20 in
2011 and taking advantage
of six turnovers to eke out
a 17-9 victory last year
"We have a lot of anger
from the last two years,"
cornerback Marcus Rober-
son said.
That 2012 loss prevented
Florida from winning the
East and possibly getting a
shot at the national title.
The Gators plastered the
final score in their weight


room for incentive.
Here are five things to
know about today's
matchup:
Fresh legs
Georgia will have run-
ning back Todd Gurley on
the field for the first time
in a month. Gurley, who
has rushed for 450 yards
and four touchdowns,
missed the last three
games with a sprained left
ankle. Florida, meanwhile,
has named freshman run-
ning back Kelvin Taylor
the starter following a
season-ending injury to
Matt Jones. Taylor, the son


of retired NFL standout
Fred Taylor, is averaging
6.1 yards a carry and could
ignite a lackluster offense.
Pity party
Both teams started out
with championship aspira-
tions, but have been rav-
aged by injuries. Georgia is
playing without top re-
ceiver Malcolm Mitchell,
tailback Keith Marshall
and speedy wideout Justin
Scott-Wesley Florida is far
from sympathetic, having
lost a staggering eight play-
ers for the season. The list
includes Jones, starting
quarterback Jeff Driskel,
disruptive defensive tackle
Dominique Easley, right
tackle Chaz Green and kick
returned Andre Dubose.
The Gators also will be
without starting left tackle
D.J. Humphries for several
weeks.
Woe line
The Bulldogs have done
a decent job of protecting
Murray, allowing just five
sacks since a season-
opening loss at Clemson.
The Gators, meanwhile,
have been vulnerable to
odd defensive fronts and
blitzes. Murphy was
sacked a combined 10


times in Florida's back-to-
back losses one more
than Georgia has given up
all season and could be
under more pressure.
With Humphries out, the
Gators are giving junior
college transfer Trenton
Brown his first career
start and inserting
benched right tackle Tyler
Moore back in the lineup
to protect Murphy's blind
side.
Losing end
No one needs a win
more than Florida coach
Will Muschamp, who is 0-6
in the series. He went 0-4
as a player at Georgia,
dropping all four meetings
between 1991 and 1994.
He's 0-2 with the Gators,
and all those whispers
from fans and booster
surely would get louder
with another loss.
Better after bye?
This is only the second
time in series history that
both teams had off weeks
before the annual game.
The other came in 2011.
Florida is 15-5 against the
Bulldogs following a bye
week Georgia is 4-3 against
the Gators when given two
weeks to prepare.





b 2,




RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


,'& t I-. -. y".- .'_, ---".
= -': .4.i ,'. :: -, - '- -"



, .


looking



at a_

Collection gives glimpse into Iraq's lost Jewish community

Associated Press
WASHINGTON
T he tattered Torah
scroll fragments,.....
Bibles and other
religious texts found in
a flooded Baghdad
basement 10 years ago
testify to a once-thriving i


Jewish population that's
all but disappeared
from Iraq.

Recovered from the Iraqi intelli-
gence headquarters and shipped to
the United States for years of
painstaking conservation was a liter-
ary trove of more than 2,700 books
and tens of thousands of documents
that are being digitized and put on-
line. A sample of that treasure is
being displayed for the first time this
fall at the National Archives in
Washington.
"One thing that is particularly


See Page C7


., -

twJ


graph taken from Iraqi
Documents is shown
e National Archives in
College Park. Md.


When Jesus suddenly shows up


hen it comes to serving at my
church, I have two jobs. As I've
mentioned before, I'm a com-
munion server I'm also emcee for the
monthly senior ministry events, dinners
and such. With a microphone in hand I
quiet them down, tell a few senior-
related jokes, dismiss the people at the
tables to go get their food and introduce
featured guests.
Sometimes I refill cups of iced tea or
clear plates away
Basically, I just show up and try not to
mess things up so badly that God can't
fix it.
A few weeks ago we had our first sen-
iors' event of the 2013-14 season, an Ital-
ian dinner I told the story of 82-year-old
Morris, who went to his doctor for a
physical. A week or so later, the doctor
sees Morris walking through town with
his arm around a gorgeous young
woman.
"Looking good there Morris," the doc-
tor says.
"Just taking your advice, Doc," Morris
tells him. "You said, 'Get a hot mama
and be cheerful."'
"That's not what I said," the doctor
replies. "I said you've got a heart mur-
murand to be careful!"
That's funny when you're 65, 70 or 80.
The room was packed with people,
many of whom I've known, at least by
sight, for 20-plus years. A few have lost
their spouses, which is sad.
On the one hand, they're getting out


Nancy
Kennedy


GRACE
NOTES


and socializing. On the other hand,
they're now alone, but not really be-
cause when two or more gather in Jesus'
name, especially in his house, Jesus
shows up and joins in the activities and
the table conversations.
Usually at one of these senior events
I, too, join in the conversation. However,
on that particular evening I felt like
watching, taking mental note of the go-
ings on. I noted a lot of laughter, a lot of
good-natured teasing of one another
You have to love someone and feel loved
to be able to give and take teasing.
The featured program of the evening
was a five-part harmony group, five men
who sang gospel songs.
As they sang, I watched how people
listened. There was some toe-tapping
and moving of feet, some head nodding,
some smiling. I felt removed from it all
and quite clinical, as if I should be
wearing a white lab coat and holding a
clip board, checking off boxes.


And then Jesus showed up, not that he
hadn't been there all along I just
hadn't realized he had shown up for me.
The singing group, the Journeymen,
began singing "Jesus Loves Me."
At first, my jaded, "too cool for
school" attitude got the best (or maybe
the worst) of me and I silently
snickered.
Really? 'Jesus Loves Me"?
"Yes," the men sang. "Yes, Jesus loves
me."
"Little ones to him belong." (Hmmm.
I'm little, I thought.)
"They are weak" (That's me) "but he
is strong" (Yeah, but is he strong enough
to break through my hard heart?)
"Yes, Jesus loves me." (I hear you, but
how can that be when I don't love him
like I should?)
As they sang, line by line, it was as if
Jesus himself slipped into the seat next
to me, leaned over and whispered, "This
one's for you."
I felt my frosty heart warm just a bit.
I'm a tough cookie and I keep people -
and Jesus at arm's length for the most
part, but every once in a while Jesus
shows up and I have a moment.
And then the song and the moment
ended, but not really because I'm still
thinking about it.
When Jesus shows up, he brings grace
and mercy with him. He breaks through
your strongest defenses and touches the
parts of you deep inside that you hadn't
See Page C7


S-.
or'*^
"^ *r. 'AD


pendence has enlisted a flock of
American black-bellied sheep to
graze the land behind the church.
A miniature donkey named
Bosco is serving as sheep herder
for the project, which began when
the animals arrived Sunday
From wire reports


p.-
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RELIGION

BRIEFS


Toppled monument
restored, rededicated

WASHINGTON -A stone monu-
ment of the Ten Commandments
that was vandalized last month
across from the U.S. Supreme
Court has been restored and
rededicated.
A ceremony was held Tuesday in
front of the headquarters of Faith
and Action, a Christian outreach
ministry
The Rev Rob Schenck, who
heads the organization, said the re-
stored monument is once again an-
gled so that justices arriving at the
high court can see what he called
"the most universal of all basic
ethical codes."
Congressman Joe Wilson, R-S.C.,
told the gathering that last month's
toppling of the Ten Command-
ments by two men seen by security
cameras was "gruesomely sym-
bolic" evidence that "we are in a
culture war" No arrests have been
made.

Graham broadcast
set for next week
NEW YORK- The Rev
Franklin Graham said hundreds of
thousands of Christians plan to in-
vite their friends to watch the tele-
cast of"My Hope America with
Billy Graham" a week from
Thursday
The elder Graham spent months
recording the video that will be
broadcast on the night of his
95th birthday, Nov 7.
Franklin Graham said his father
was unscripted and comes across
"like a grandfather," sharing the
gospel and inviting viewers to trust
Jesus Christ as their savior

Pastor: Huge new
house a gift from God
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -The pas-
tor of a Charlotte, N.C., church said
a large home being built for him is
a gift from God.
The Charlotte Observerreported
Elevation Church Pastor Steven
Furtick did not apologize Sunday
for the 16,000-square-foot home
under construction in an exclusive
community in neighboring Union
County
Furtick did tell members he was
sorry for any uncomfortable con-
versations they may have had
about the home.
The 19-acre property has a tax
value of $1.6 million, though a
church financial officer said
Furtick paid $325,000.
Furtick said only about 8,400
square feet of the house is heated,
with the rest consisting of base-
ment, attic, garage and porch
space. A church official said
Furtick is paying for the home with
money from book sales.

Church schools don't
want state oversight
HARRISBURG, Pa. -Advocates
for religious schools are asking
Pennsylvania lawmakers to draw a
bright line between what the state
may and may not regulate in church-
run early childhood programs.
The legislation aired at a House
Education Committee hearing
would limit the government's
reach to matters involving health
and safety, while barring state reg-
ulation of program content, staff
qualifications and training.
Proponents say the bill is an at-
tempt to head off potential clashes
between religious liberties and the
policies of the Department of
Public Welfare, which regulates
church-run preschool and similar
programs as child-care facilities.

KC church gets help
with landscaping
INDEPENDENCE, Mo. -A sub-
urban Kansas City church has de-
cided it's too expensive to hire
landscapers to get rid of unwanted
vegetation on a steep slope, so it's
bringing in someone else's flock to
do the job.
KMBC-TV reported St. Paul
United Methodist Church in Inde-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Fall activities
There will be a "Harvest
Festival" from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. today at Holy Faith
Episcopal Church in Blue
Cove, Dunnellon. Twenty
unique vendors offer cus-
tomized children's books, art-
work, handmade dulcimers,
jewelry, candy, handbags,
wearable fiber art, candles,
hand-knit items, and more.
Call the church at 352-
489-2685.
Red Level Baptist
Church will have its annual


fall festival from 5 to 7 p.m.
today. Everyone is invited to
enjoy games, hayrides, horse
rides, train rides, bounce-n-
slide, hobo stew and hotdogs.
Everything is free of charge.
The church is at 11025 W.
Dunnellon Road, Crystal
River (one mile off U.S. 19 on
County Road 488).
Holidaze Crafters of Her-
nando United Methodist
Church will sponsor their
"Fall Craft Show" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16,
featuring crafters from all over


Citrus County. HUMW will sell
home-baked goods and their
$7 cookbooks. Breakfast and
lunch available. Crafters may
still reserve a spot by calling
Robin Baker at 352-445-
1487. The church is at 2125
E. Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486),
Hernando.
Special events
Citadel of Life Cathedral
Church, 225 N. Seminole
Ave., Inverness, will host a
free clothing giveaway from
10a.m. to 1 p.m. today. The


church will give away new
and gently used clothing of
various sizes for men,
women, children and babies.
All are welcome to attend this
event. Come out and take ad-
vantage of this wonderful op-
portunity to receive free
clothing. Call Teresa Smith at
352-361-9517.
Hear worship from sev-
eral local churches and watch
dance and mime at the com-
munity night of worship at
7 p.m. Friday at Calvary
Chapel, 960 S. U.S. 41, Inver-
ness. Call 352-726-1480 or


visit www.calvaryinv.com.
Everyone is welcome at a
free "Health Fair" from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 10, at Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, 1880 N.
Trucks Ave., Hernando. The
event will feature free blood
pressure, cholesterol and dia-
betes screenings; juicing,
healthy cooking and aerobics
classes; and cancer-prevention
seminars. Physicians and
other specialists will be onsite.
Call 352-344-2008, 352-535-
7141, or 352-228-9192.
Veterans Day Sunday


will be celebrated at
10:15 a.m. Nov. 10 Oat Heritage
Baptist Church, 2 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Special speaker
is Doug Davis. Davis is a sec-
ond of three consecutive gen-
erations of combat veterans.
His father served in the Pacific
in World War II and the Ko-
rean War. His son is the third
generation; he has had three
tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Davis served his tour in the
Central Highlands of Vietnam
for almost all of 1972.

See NOTES/Page C7


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
352.422.t,535



Todd
Langdon


MM Crystal
E3 0 River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6prpm
Pastor John Hager


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIf
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.... Floral City, FL.


SFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship iili hUs"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


? Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lienny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday lOAM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Lutheran
Church(L..S.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faith lecanto.com
9&.Fa, et ,mForth..
,(9&".t 9;v-Omem~


First Bapts
Ckwck
of Lake, Roaseaaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail r, ,i...r. ... .. ,,,1' .1....I..
Check us out on Facebook


J Crystal River
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided

THE
SALVATION
A R~yCIITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS..o
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish


71i Sco v.i




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
SCKIN C FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKyXL
RIVIE y
VJNITID
N-ICTHODIT
CH U KCH H
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH



"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714S.Scarbor --
Pastor Kennie Berger
S 352-302-5813
%f Ai


Shepherd

5 of the
I Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiiith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and iniuhli
of Jesus Chirii.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


, Homosassa Springs
. SBivPJThP Al ,W'FCFrlSCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siimbd., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to I , '/I,, .' ,.'.



SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.

352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
w. Deep Woods Dr. H -


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


W sPastor

Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURcH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.


0


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA


Coe





Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-46-761


i


=NEI


C2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


RELIGION


W/est Ci Pltrus
Churc t'' 'of
Ch1rist




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Places of worship


that offer love, peace,,i


and harmony to all.


I Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor /II,
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com

F 47 Years of
I |ST Bringing Christ
FIR S to Inverness

LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 AM.
726-1637
3 Missouri Synod
s www.1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

First Baptist
Church
I of Floral City





9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
I Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available l
Swww.fbcfloralcity.orgs



08

S "The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Comnmunity
with a
Heart
for the
















4:00P.M.6:300P.M.
www~fbf Community"or
























SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 AM.
Ml$.NR

ITh

Ch urc
inth
Her
of th





SUNDAY MSSRIES:
8:00unaM.Schoo10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEI(DAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
wwwourladyofgracefl
, .catholicweb.com .:


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


SINVERNESS
d:5 CHURCH
OF GOD
14, I..,rr% l*"Ltr.
.Si1tlaI\ .%er ice%:


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\\etlnsetla N i hlhl:

I ,. ,. H III1 1
*"' elcoinle Home"
I ,. I. I l,I 1 II 1 ,I i
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Floral City
United Methodist
S Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I'-' r,,- . .hill, .- ;t



'. IlD II H,, p,,I ,






Hwy. 44 E@
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Servicesm
" Traditional 0
0 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service *
* Tapes & CD' s Available *
*Sunday School for all agesU
* 9:30 AM
* Nursery Provided U
Fellowship & Youth Group
* Sunday Evening
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org.
* Podcast: fpcinv.com *

* Church Office 637-0770 U
Pastor James Capps


'I I.f 1II Timothy
i ,," 'u 2:15


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and
play yard. 0
Pastor John Fredericksen

g PRIMERA IGLESIA
NHISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamnos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711






CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479


Hernando
CIhvrchof
TheNazareneI
4A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Praise & Worship
10:40 AM.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
S9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670






Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!

t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
wR Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
wlCommunion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

ST.cANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org




Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1% mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor

Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com




first Unite

Methodist


< Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
SeniorPastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages

SundayWorship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM-Vertical Kids
10:30 AM- Traditional

Wednesday Worship
6:00 PM-Vertical Youth


"First For Christ "...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS t
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study


i *

SSpecial
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call

Theresa
Holland at

564-2940
For Advertising
Information



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


[ Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Fing


SunayScho
9:06 m.
Suda Worship
1:0am&6: 00 6m
Wensda.osi
7:00p m

OFFistiCes(352)a726-1107


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 C3





C Page C4 -SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES


Elks group to visit
youth camp Sunday
West Citrus Elks Lodge No.
2693 will take a free bus trip to
the Florida Elks Youth Camp
on Sunday
This will be an opportunity
to see what is available for
youths and learn about the op-
eration of the camp. The trip is
open to all Elks, Ladies of the
Elks and any new or prospec-
tive members.
Check-in will be at the lodge
at 8:30 a.m.; boarding will
begin at 9 a.m., with the bus
leaving at 9:15 a.m. Upon ar-
rival at the camp, there will be
a tour with a light lunch fol-
lowing. On the return trip, the
group will visit the Eustis Elks
Lodge.
Seating must be reserved in
advance by calling Alan
Dinkelman at 352-621-5016 or
Bonnie Lee at 352-382-0211.

Pet Photos with
Santa begin Sunday
Pet Photos with Santa will be
held locally at three separate
locations in November A $10
donation will benefit patients
and families served by Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature Coast.
Pawfection Ranch will pres-
ent Pet Photos with Santa from
noon to 4 p.m. Sunday at 6420 S.
Suncoast Blvd. (across from
Howard's Flea Market) in Ho-
mosassa. Make a reservation by
calling 352-628-2828.
Barkaritaville Grooming will
present Pet Photos with Santa
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 9, at 3892 N. Lecanto Blvd.
(in the Villages Mall) in Beverly
Hills. Make a reservation by
calling 352-513-4829.
Pets Plus will present Pet
Photos with Santa from 11 a.m.
2 p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at
20373 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
(downtown) in Dunnellon. Make
a reservation by calling
352-465-1515.
For more information, call
866-642-0962.

Guided meditation
offered on Sunday
New Age Thinkers sponsors
free guided meditation work-
shops the first and third Sun-
days monthly at Unity Church.
The sessions are at 2:30 p.m.
at the church, 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto. Call Donna
at 352-628-3253 or email
miss-donna@tampabayrr.com.

Model A club to get
together Tuesday
Citrus As Model A group will
meet a 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
Floral City Lions Club on East
Orange Avenue, Floral City
For information, call Denise
Brimmage at 352-848-0810 or
visit wwwcitrusas.com.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA
Blythe


Special to the Chronicle
Blythe is a lovely calico with all
the attributes that make kittens
so adorable. She is loving, sweet
and playful and needs a new
home. Currently, kittens are $50
each and two for $90, and adult
cats are half-price. There are
many varieties of felines to
choose from. Drop by and enjoy
the felines in their cage-free,
homestyle environment from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians' Hardin
Haven on the corner of State
Road 44 and North Conant
Avenue, east of Crystal River.
Call the Haven at 352-613-1629
for adoptions, or view most of
our felines online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/fll86.html.


Building a Better Christmas


Annual effort begins to supply


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion (CCBA), in partnership with the
U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for
Tots and StoreRight Self Storage
Lecanto, hopes to brighten the
Christmas holidays for some of the
children affected by the continued


toys for Citrus


depressed economy
The goal is to assist 100 Citrus County
children with toys for Christmas. To
that end, the public is requested to help
with the Building a Better Christmas
effort for the kids.
Those who may know of anyone who
might benefit from a helping hand with
a toy(s) this holiday season, is asked to


County children

have them call Melissa Sutherland
at Air Care Heating & Cooling,
352-621-3444 or 352-464-3181 for more
information.
Assistance and sponsorship forms
are available on the Citrus County
Builders Assocation website at
www.CitrusBuilders.com, and are due
no later than Nov 27.


Commander's Challenge


Special to the Chronicle
In September, 21 Citrus County Sheriff's Office deputies beat Commander Buddy Grant's time of 4:28 on the physical training obstacle
course this past quarter for the Commander's Challenge. The challenge not only benefits United Way, but promotes physical fitness
within the Sheriff's Office. Commander Grant, along with four other local sponsors, put $10 toward any deputy who could beat his
initial time. Now, $1,200 will be given to the United Way for the Commander's Challenge for the quarter. Participants were, from left:
Det. Craig Callahan, Dep. Geoffrey Blotz, Lt. Ricky Grant, Capt. Danny Linhart, Commander Buddy Grant, Sgt. Ryan Glaze, Det. Jeremy
Laughlin, Dep. Jon Seffern Jr. and Dep. Bryan Vick.


Ready to register


Special to the Chronicle
Kathy O'Donogue, head of the League of Women Voters'
registration efforts, talks to League members and guests
recently about the upcoming voter registration from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the Crystal River Mall. The League
of Women Voters will help new area residents, new voters and
any voter who has moved and needs to register the change. The
League is a nonpartisan, educational organization. For more
information, email lwvcc2013@gmail.com.


Camera club to meet
The Citrus County Art Cen-
ter Camera Club, 2644 N. An-
napolis Ave., Hernando, at the
intersection of Route 486 and
Annapolis Avenue will meet at
7 p.m. Monday
There will be a social hour
starting at 6:30 p.m., followed
by a photo competition. The
November competition will be
"Smaller than a Dollar Bill,"
which will also include macro
photography The photo sub-
missions must be of any object
or creature whose measure-
ment is smaller than a dollar
bill.
The photos are judged by
Larry Munne and Paul
Simison. First-time visitors are
welcome.

Plant club to gather
The Citrus Native Plant
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Beverly Hills
Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills.
The guest speaker will be


Clubs can help give kids tools to achieve


ne of the best things Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County programs do
is to help kids who are having prob-
lems. One such program, Project Learn, is
supported by grants from United Way, TD
Bank and the Florida Department of
Education, and donations from the
community
C
With Project Learn, children get help
with homework and other school assign-
ments and are recognized for their
achievements, such as turning in work on
time, doing work correctly, making good
grades and even attending school on a
regular basis. We also stress the impor-
tance of being a reader and reading for
fun, as well as a way to gain information.
Our long-range goals are to create high
school graduates and young adults who
will be gainfully employed and productive
members of society Short range, we want
kids to feel success in school, to enjoy
learning, to feel pride in being prepared
to work every day and to develop good
study habits.
Donna McClimont, one of our club di-


Lane
Vick

BOYS
& GIRLS
CLUBS


rectors, recently told us how we helped a
child through Project Learn. This little
boy, Johnny, was being raised by a hard-
working grandmother who was maintain-
ing two and three jobs. He was easily
distracted in school and having a difficult
time mastering first-grade skills.
By the end of the school year, the extra
help he received at his Boys & Girls Club
caused his teacher to say if he continued
to work hard over the summer and contin-
ued to improve, she would promote him to
the next grade. The child was mentored
five days a week for 30-minute sessions
during the club's summer program. He
and his mentor studied hard.
By August, the boy was achieving well


enough that the teacher felt he could be
promoted. Of course, Johnny's story will
not stop there. We will continue to work
with him as long as he needs that extra
push.
Johnny is not alone. Not all children are
in need, but there are many who need
help in one way or another If they come
in our doors, we do our best to make their
lives better
We have proven programs that address
the dangers of drugs, alcohol and tobacco,
awareness of gangs, getting along with
others, making good decisions, eating
healthy and the value of exercise.
When you donate to the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County you are helping
Johnny and Jane and many, many more
kids. Think about us when you plan your
end-of-the-year donations. The kids need
you. Call 352-621-9225 to ask how you can
help, or visit our website at www.citrus
bgc.com.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
are partially funded by the United Way of
Citrus County, Kids Central Inc. and the
Florida Department of Education.


Colleen Werner, a biologist
with the Withlacoochee State
Forest, who will discuss herba-
ceous sandhill plants in the
Withlacoochee State Forest.
For information, email
citrusNPS@gmail.com.

Come do crafts in FC
Are you interested in learn-
ing or teaching new crafts or
working on old ones? Need an
outlet to socialize or a need to
feel like you belong to the
community?
Come
join Floral
City -
Crafters
from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
every
Tuesday in the Floral City
Community Hall beside the
library and across from
Shamrock's on Orange Avenue.
Come for a few hours or come
for the day Parking is avail-
able behind the building.
For more information, call
Christine at 352-560-7668.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


NEWS NOTES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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S My Ghost Story: My Ghost Story: Celebrity Ghost Stories Celebrity Ghost Stories The Haunting Of... (N) The Haunting Of.. (In
50 119 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera PG' (N) 'PG' 'PG' Stereo)'PG '
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0 320 221 320 3 3 Expectations" (1998) R' Renner. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' MA'c Josh Broin. (In Stereo) 'R' i
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109 65109 44 53 "Checkmate"'PG' Chase"'PG' I '14'
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103 62 103 lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life Houston Beauty 14' Iyanla, Fix My Life
44 123 "Employee-Mnth" *** "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" (2008) 'R' |*** "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" (2008) 'R'
o 340 4 34 4 *** "Stage Beauty" Homeland "The Yoga *** "KillingThem Softly" (2012) Brad Pitt. *** "Jarhead" (2005) Jake Gyllenhaal.
340 241340 4 (2004) 'R' Play"'MA' c Premiere. (In Stereo)'R' cc Marines band together during the Gulf War.
riiL 37 43 37 27 36 Ramrpage4Real Chandler Countdown to BellatorMMA: Rampagevs.Tito-Prelims From Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG'
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36 31 3 Inside the Lightning NHL Hockey St. Louis Blues at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Lightning Rays Post Inside the Stable Gators
36 31 36Lightning Live! BayTimes Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Live! Lightning Wars Preview
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169 53 169 30 35 Eastwood, Telly Savalas.'GP' c (DVS) Drama) Walter Pidgeon.'NR'cc Ryan, Tina Louise.'PG'
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48 33 48 31 34 Affleck, Rebecca Hall. 'R' c (DVS)( agent tries to stop the release of a deadly virus. (2006) Tom Cruise.'PG-13'm
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ENTERTAINMENT


West
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Vulnerable: Both
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SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

In "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are
Dead," Tom Stoppard (my favorite playwright)
pointed out: "Eternity's a terrible thought. I
mean, where's it all going to end?"
In today's deal, the trump split is terrible
and seems to end declarer's chance of making
six hearts. But he can survive. West leads the
spade queen. South wins with his ace and
cashes the heart ace to get the bad news. How
must declarer continue?
It is rare that an auction starting one of a
major two of a major ends in a slam. How-
ever, that South hand is very strong. When
South rebid three clubs, North assumed this
was a help-suit game-try and jumped to four
hearts because he had a good club holding and
a maximum aces are wonderful. South then
carefully employed Blackwood before bidding
the small slam.
It seems as though South must lose two
trump tricks. But if South can reach an ending
with the king-jack of hearts and a loser, while
West still has his last three trumps, West can be
trapped.
To achieve this ending, South must ruff
three diamonds in his hand and find West with
exactly 3-4-4-2 distribution.
At trick three, declarer plays a diamond to
dummy's ace. He continues with a diamond
ruff in his hand, the club king, a club to
dummy's ace, another diamond ruff, the spade
king, a spade ruff on the board, and, at trick 10,
the third diamond ruff.
When that passes off quietly, South leads his
last club. West must ruff and play away from
his queen-10 of hearts into South's king-jack.
Beautiful!
3 ijfJ S THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
n wJ Jby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I I"
one letter to each square, 5 .. U. 3 ,3a ".-1
to form four ordinary words. I i C ,: ,-',., ',q ,
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Yesterday's JuAnmbles:
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WHEN TH P-ERSON GIVING
THE KEYNOTE APPRE55
FAILVP TO SHOW UP, THE
AUPENCE WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
VOUCH DOUSE HECKLE SLEIGH
When he got the bill for their extravagant lob-
ster meal, he was SHELL SHOCKED


40 Drop Answer to Previous Puzzle
one's jaw
41 Figure of -
speech D ACE
43 Survey choice ENOM M HA B A A
45 Pharaoh's ANDR E% LOC KE R S
river
48 Brat'sML L Y
opposite PLANK EYEMM
51 Exit
53 French wine 0 R E
56 Appraise L ID RA F T SNA P
57 Twilight, to a EIDIGE IRRAN TR I
poet
58 Diamond SE EAM NOTE I AN
number M|AIEEE PICHE
59 Pizzeria must n M 0 H
60 Toolshed item 1 SW E iAjR SHA
61 Doessums UK ID SK INEETIUI S


62 Balance


l~qIIYMKI I Y A A I NI


17 Theater
offering
19 Similar
22 Lama
24 Sponsorship
25 Ancient
ointment
27 Naval off.
28 Estuary
29 Loop trains
30 Band job
31 NASA
counterpart
32 Snooze
36 Entered data
38 Dull clang
42 Funhouse
feature
44 Ms. Verdugo
46 Shove off
47 Park, Colo.
48 Vigoda and
Fortas
49 Scotia
50 Snowballed
51 Former
spouses
52 Mailed
54 Assist
55 Sturm -
Drang


DOWN ,IL'l'L" I I
1 Pitfall 6 Ring champ
2 Fable writer 7 L. Hubbard
3 Steel plow 8 In progress
inventor 9 Fuddy-duddy
4 Glided along 10 Grape
5 Bellow producer
11 Gear teeth


11-2 (0 2013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for urs

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: I am hurt
that my children and
grandchildren do not
include me when they have
family get-togethers. They say
they would have to clean
their houses if I came, or they
don't know when I
am available. They
expect me to call
when I want to see
them. They swear
they aren't upset
with me, but they
never initiate a
call. When I invite
them to my house,
the conversation
revolves around re-
cent outings and
get-togethers at
their homes to AN I
which I haven't MAIL
been invited.
I have taken my
grandchildren on many vaca-
tions over the years, but they
are teenagers now and too
busy They don't want to go
unless I include their friends,
which I cannot afford. I re-
cently decided not to call
them and have had no con-
tact in more than three
weeks. Should I just go on
without them in my life? -
Hurt in Florida
Dear Hurt: We agree that
their excuses seem flimsy, but
they do not need to include
you in every get-together or
outing. It's perfectly OK for
them to have these events
with just their spouses and
kids. You also know teenagers
tend to be busy and that fam-
ily obligations are not high on
their list of priorities. We
don't believe anyone is being
intentionally hurtful.
We hope you will continue
to call, email and invite them
over You don't need to take


I
L


the kids on expensive vaca-
tions, but a special few hours
with Grandma a couple of
times a year dinner at a
nice restaurant or watching
their favorite rock band to-
gether- would be lovely and
help cement the
-- bond. Think of
ways to make the
relationship
warmer, instead of
focusing on your
hurt feelings and
blaming them be-
cause you aren't
closer
DearAnnie:
SPlease tell your
older readers that
if they can no
IE'S longer afford to
.BOX maintain their
home, they should
sell it and get an
apartment or move into a sen-
ior residence, instead of try-
ing to hang on so they will
have something to leave the
kids.
I am tired of spending
every vacation at my mother-
in-law's house so my husband
can remodel, spending our
hard-earned cash because
she expects him to foot the
bill for tools and materials.
She has other children, but
they do nothing. When we
suggest she move, she says, "I
want to leave the house to my
kids when I die." Annie, the
only "kid" who will benefit is
the daughter who lives on the
property rent-free. The oth-
ers have no desire to move
back into the old homestead.
It is nothing but a financial
and physical burden. If she
really cared about her kids,
she would sell it and move
into an apartment. -Want a
Real Vacation


Dear Want: A lot depends
on what Mom's will says
about the dispensation of the
property Still, it is up to your
husband to decide whether
he wants to continue putting
in the effort We hope you will
be supportive of his decision.
It is harder for parents to
move than you might think.
Mom's reluctance to sell may
be less about her kids than it
is about her anxieties.
Dear Annie: I have a sug-
gestion for "Your Private Pool
Owner," who complained of
people assuming an open in-
vitation to swim.
When I was a child, a
neighbor used this system:
He posted a pennant when
the pool was available. Green
signaled adult supervision
would be provided, and blue
meant children had to be ac-
companied by a responsible
adult We children kept a
close eye on that flagpole all
summer long. Susan in
Baton Rouge
Dear Susan: We wish the
adults would be as conscien-
tious as the children.
Dear Readers: Don't forget
to replace the batteries in
your smoke alarms when you
set your clocks back one hour

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www. creators. com.


ACROSS
1 Little kids
5 Fishhook part
9 Pipe type
12 Smell terrible
13 vera
14 Sugarloaf
locale
15 Not in harbor
16 Wild party
18 Threshold
20 Natural
impulses
21 Sneak a look
22 Genetic
letters
23 Goddess of
the hunt
26 Like a
pittance
30 Pentagon VIP
33 "Hud" Oscar
winner
34 Indigo dye
35 Writer
Dinesen
37 Seize
39 Stockholm
carrier


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 CS

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Pass
Pass
Pass
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


IRWI NEED
/ SOME-eC
^AOCEO


Beetle Bailey


MY WORD, SALLY, DO YOU EVERY TED QWICK, RMOV
CLEAN YOCM HOUSE ANYMORE? THE FAKE TOMBSTONiES
I MEAN, LOOK AT 11-tE SIZE 5 FROM THE ,,ACYARI>
f' OF THAT COB-- AU' l'IlI B7 &EFORE GERMAL- Si
WONDERS WHAT WE
-'> n MONSTER / r JN OUR 5PAR1 A
S-Q5PIDERl {^ /r TIME. r \


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

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Blondie
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sos HOS-5 TO GO WITH MY NEW
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Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Better send in the special comic props
squad right away, chief, ... The place is
booby-trapped top to bottom. We don't
want any slip-ups like last t!me."


"C'mon, Mommy, which 'soon' is it
till we leave 'pretty' or
'not too'?"


eARMsWHe YOU see6
Mapte HApr/ Ago c anne
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Big Nate


WELL' YOU'RE A COWO'y, WELL, Ti-HEN, QON'T IF PEOPLE RUN OUT
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Today% MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
6:55 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Escape Plan" (R)4 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.


"Last Vegas" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 4:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LOCaI RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE. SFEnbSA

"IVLS K XNR NOR ND VKXV MGVNNZ


RVLF HLRKHLE PF BLHMLF, YOR KR


ICM DNH VFXKLSL CSE MCSKRCHF


HLCMNSM." XLNHXL GCHZKS

Previous Solution: "I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful
world, there are always red ants underneath." David Lynch
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-2


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth

10 LOA = j-j m wgf1:4a


Doonesbury Flashback


nM O8nOu~tYAPFPUCL4rP
HArftCHf 60Er AMPVS
rh uOp You!


Arlo and Janis


C6 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


COMICS


'HI. 7 WAT 7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

even known had been
damaged.
When Jesus shows up,
without a word, except for
maybe the words of a sim-
ple children's song, he lets
you know that he hears
your prayers, even the
ones you dare not pray
lest you be disappointed.
When Jesus shows up
and you have a moment,
even when the moment
ends, it never really ends
because you carry it with


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Life Line screenings
are offered on Saturday,
Nov. 16, at Heritage Baptist
Church, 2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills. Early detection is
the key to prevention of
stroke, diabetes and heart
disease. Appointments are
limited. Register today by
calling 888-653-6450.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church's monthly Care-
givers Support Group will
host Mary Franczak, Physi-
cal Therapist from Sever
Rivers Hospital, at noon
Tuesday Nov. 26, at the
church. This will also be the
holiday luncheon, so reser-
vations are requested. Call
Gail Sirak at 352-634-2021,
or the church office at 352-
795-5325. Caregivers Sup-
port is a Thrivent-sponsored
event held the the fourth
Tuesday monthly at the
church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. The
group is open to the commu-


you so, whenever you
start thinking you'll
never be as faithful as
you want to be, that's
when you remember
"Yes, Jesus loves me,"
and ultimately every-
thing will be OK And
you know it's true.
Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over,
Victoria -I Know the
Real Secret, "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.

nity and all are welcome. For
more information, or to sign
on as a featured speaker,
call Gail Sirak 352-634-2021,
or Deacon Charlotte Down-
ing at 352-422-7044.
U The Women's Ministry
of Cornerstone Baptist
Church, Inverness, will host
Lisa Whelchel on Saturday,
Feb. 8, 2014. Whelchel
starred in the TV show "The
Facts of Life" as the preppy
and wealthy Blair Warner.
She is an actress, singer,
songwriter, author and public
speaker. In 2012, she ap-
peared on "Survivor" in the
Philippines. She has been a
regular speaker with Women
of Faith Conference since
2009. Early bird tickets are
on sale through November.
The early bird ticket price is
$20, which includes a boxed
lunch. Tickets can be pur-
chased online at www.
itickets.com or at the church
office. Call Cornerstone at
352-726-7335 or email
strongfoundations@
hotmail.com.
The church is at 1100 W.
Highland Blvd.


LEGACY
Continued from Page Cl

touching about them, or particu-
larly interesting about them, is that
they connect to a community that
no longer lives in Iraq," said Doris
Hamburg, the National Archives'
director of preservation programs.
The exhibit of two dozen items of-
fers a rare glimpse into a Jewish
population that dates to antiquity
but dispersed after Israel was cre-
ated in 1948. But the decision to re-
turn the collection to Iraq after its
display here has raised bitter feel-
ings among Iraqi Jews in the United
States and stirred debate about
whom the materials belong to: the
country where they were found or
the people who once owned them?
Iraqi Jews consider the artifacts
part of their heritage and say a na-
tion that decades ago drove out its
Jewish citizens doesn't deserve to
recover sacred objects of an exiled
population. Some also fear there's
no constituency of Jews remaining
in Iraq to ensure the books are
maintained, especially in a country
still riven by violent conflict.
A petition circulating among Iraqi
Jews seeks to prevent the materials
from being returned and Sen.
Charles Schumer, D-N.Y, made a
similar public statement to the State
Department last week Some have
written newspaper opinion pieces
urging the items to be shared with
the exiled Jewish community and
have discussed burying torn Torah
scroll pieces, as is customary for
holy texts that are no longer usable.
"The fact is these were archives
that belonged to the Jewish com-
munity in Iraq," said Gina Wald-
man, president of Jews Indigenous
to the Middle East and North
Africa and a Libyan Jew "They
need to be returned to their right-
ful owners. They were looted from
the Jewish community and they
rightfully should be returned."
State Department officials have
expressed confidence that the Iraqi


government will make the materi-
als accessible in an educational ex-
hibit. The materials will be housed
in Iraq's national library and
archives, with the goal of helping
future generations understand the
contributions Iraqi Jews made and
the repression that they endured,
said Saad Eskander, director of the
Iraqi institution. Though an adviser
to the Minister of Tourism and An-
tiquities said there were no current
plans to exhibit the materials and
that the public and researchers
would be able to see them online,
Eskander said an exhibition would
happen either next year or 2015.
"Now, Iraqis have no problem in
accepting the fact that the Jews are
true Iraqi patriots who can live with
their culture in a multi-cultural so-
ciety," Eskander said, calling the
archive part of the country's history
and cultural heritage. He said the
country now has the ability to ade-
quately protect the materials. Two
Iraqi conservators are expected to
receive specialized training here
ahead of the collection's relocation.
The artifacts were found in May
2003 after the collapse of Saddam
Hussein's regime as American
troops searched for weapons of
mass destruction. They found the
material in the flooded basement
of the Iraqi intelligence building,
its water system damaged by an
unexploded bomb.
An intelligence official had tipped
authorities to the collection's exis-
tence, and though rumors of an an-
cient Talmud proved false, the
discovery was nonetheless remark-
able: a 16th century Bible printed in
Venice, centuries-old Torah scroll
fragments, Hebrew year calendars
and reams of school records of Jew-
ish students in Baghdad. There's
also a colorful 1930 Haggadah, or
Passover narrative, depicting a fam-
ily dining; a flood-damaged Torah
case originally covered with velvet
and metal; and school primers con-
spicuously missing pages professing
loyalty to an Iraqi king murdered in
a 1958 military coup.
'All this together gives the


impression and the feeling that we
had a rich history," said Maurice
Shohet, president of the World Or-
ganization of Jews from Iraq and a
project consultant.
The exhibit will open Nov 8.
The Iraqi Jewish heritage traces
to ancient Babylonia, predating the
Muslim communities that settled
there and surviving ever-changing
conquerors. By 1910, Jews com-
prised roughly a quarter of Bagh-
dad's population. But Nazi-inspired
riots in 1941, known as the Farhud,
left some 180 Jews dead and helped
drive out the population. In the
early 1950s, forced to relinquish cit-
izenship and stripped of their
assets, some 120,000 Jews fled.
The belongings they left were
eventually stored by Hussein's se-
cret police, presumably to help
gather intelligence on the popula-
tion, said Harold Rhode, a retired
Defense Department official who
was assigned to the Coalition Provi-
sional Authority, the U.S.-headed
agency that governed Iraq after the
invasion. He said he was stunned
that the Iraqi government found
value in the books.
National Archives representa-
tives traveled to Baghdad to inspect
the documents, which were dried
outdoors, stored in metal trunks and
shipped frozen to the United States
to be individually freeze-dried and
preserved. A team of conservators
has worked on the documents in an
archives building in College Park,
Md., while other specialists digitize
them for online use.
The collection will be returned to
Iraq next year under a 2003 agree-
ment between the National
Archives and the Coalition Provi-
sional Authority Discussions since
then have been occasionally tense.
Documents obtained by The Asso-
ciated Press through public
records requests reveal sensitive
State Department meetings with
Jewish leaders to address some of
the concerns, and requests from or-
ganizations including the Anti-
Defamation League urging the
State Department to reconsider


To place an ad, cal 563-5966
-%I%


Classifieds

In Print


and

Online

All

The Time


6 66 0M M 2,% .% f I.. *l6 0a.0-0.,0 -


Tom's Pinochle Club
Looking for a few good
players to fill in on Thurs
nights. Single or cou-
ples. If interested please
call 352-527-9632.



1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $85
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766


2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screen por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
3 HP 10" Sears Crafts-
man Table Saw
$150 or trade
8 Pc. Drum Set,
w/ yamaha electric
guitar $125. or trade
(352) 795-8863
Accordion Player
wanted for parties
and lessons. Call Ray
(352) 503-6361
BOOKCASE 5-SHELF
med brn. $20 Barbecue
Grill w/cover $30 Ruth
352-382-1000
CONCRETE STEPS
4"wx21" h
$125
(352) 341-4902


TT?^
Crank up Victrola
1920's 78 rpm
Brunswick & Victor
Portable $325. for both
(352) 344-5283
EXPERIENCED
Cabinet & Mill-
work Fabricator
Installer
No tobacco
products
Built-Rite Cabinets
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,

EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS
All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973


S
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009
FLORAL CITY
SAT ONLY 4 families
Jewelry, antiques,
guns, lots of goodies
MollyLn & Florence Ter
Fountains Mem.Park
Homosassa. Single lot
valued$4025, sell for
$2775. (352) 668-4540
HOMOSASSA
10823W. YULEE DR.
FIRST TIME SALE
9AM-2PM SAT ONLY
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648
INVERNESS
Saturday 8:00 -1:00
Household items, furni-
ture, Christmas collecti-
bles, bikes, Motorcycle
Shell, etc.
3863 E Perry St
KENMORE
21.6 CU FT
Refrigerator
w/ ice maker,
Exc Cond $250
(352) 628-7626
Manitou Oasis
2006 Pontoon, loaded,
Suzuki,115 Hp, 4 stroke,
Road King Galv. trailer,
Exec. Cond. $12,999.
352-527-0324
For Sale %f,
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352-422-6129







PINE RIDGE
Sat. 2nd, 8am 2pm
4457 W. Horseshoe Dr.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
SERVERS

apply for night shift
at Chicken King
2420 N Florida Hwy
Hernando, FL
NO PHONE CALLS
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or mulch. U load & haul.
352-628-9624
FREE
10 CHICKENS
(352) 400-9059
Free Black Kitten
10 wks old
litter trained
352-212-0667


FREE Furniture
and Misc. Items
Saturday 2, 9AM.
THE PATH, 1729W.
Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Free to good Home
Male Cat
Shimmery, Shining
Silver gray, short fur
Simply Pretty
(352) 746-1904
Free to GOOD Home,
11 month old female red
nose, staffordshire mix.
Her name is dixie, she is
very friendly, and gets
along with people and
small dogs. She's white
with light brown large
spots. 352-628-9429
leave message.
Rebel is a fawn col-
ored red nose pit bull
puppy. 9 mo old. Must
have fenced yard and
lots of love.
(352) 634-1324



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct d $5.001b.
Stone Crabai$61
delivered352-897-5001


Gold Diamond Ring
ladies, fits on pinky
finger, center
diamond, small
diamonds on sides
REWARD 352-341-3650
Large White Cat with
dark markings on
head, face & tail. Med
to long hair. Vacinity
of Wesley Jones Park
Citrus Springs.
(352) 489-1854









Missing female
black cat with white
chest and paws,
declawed, been mis-
sing since early Oc-
tober in
Citronelle/Cit Spgs
area off of Dunklin.
REWARD IF
FOUND!! Please Call
Bill @ 352-586-0864


Lost 9/8/13 Tri colored,
neutered beagle. Large,
weighs 40 Ibs. Special
needs pet, he needs
medical care and medi-
cation. Please call
Donna at 352-249-3107
or 352-476-3140.
Please call if you have
seen our beloved pet

Lost Boston Terrier
Male, black collar
Cardinal Area
Homosassa
REWARD
352-220-0240


Lost Brindle Pitt
& White & Brown Pitt
Traveling together
Citrus Springs Area
(352) 897-4391

Lost Dog: White Peking-
ese (small dog) Her
name is Baby! Lost in
citrus springs near the
water fountain! Please
call 352-601-8218!!

Lost Sky Caddy
Golf GPS,
Lakeside Golf course
Parking Lot
(352) 560-0168


1 4 9'268''7 3 5
325749168
876135294
658472319
432916587
791583426
567821943
284397651
913654872


Multi-line dealership is in need of 4 additional

sales people. Join the fastest growing

multi-line dealership in Homosassa, FL.


* Great Benefits


* Flexible Work Hours


Excellent Earning Potential Bonuses Available



IF YOU ARE THE BEST,

WE NEED YOU!

Come in and Ask for Brett Coble or Charlie Defreese

to Schedule an Interview.


Village Cadillac Toyota

2431 US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 34448

352-628-5100
.....H Equal Oppotunity Employer


RELIGION


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 C7




C8 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013

-Situations
^Hii^HWanted


Dark Gray, male,
22 Ibs. Name Abby
Inverness
off Mocassin Slough
(352) 637-0663
Plastic Boat Cover 4x4
Snap On. Flew off our
boat on Hwy 44 E be-
tween Crystal River
and Inverness.
352-476-2309 LM
White Female Pointer,
lost in the
Highlands area of
Inverness, please
call (352) 400-2336



Chocolate Lab
10/30 in Leisure Acres
(352) 586-9575
Found Basset
Large dog, well kept
Off Sioux Rd.
Homosassa
(352) 364-2903
Found beside Hwy 41 in
Floral City Iphone in
"lifeproof' cover. Call
341-0064
Found Picture of Little
Girl on 10/26
Date on back 1991
after car accident near
Educational Pathway
Heading North
352-621-9810
Large Black Dog
Shiny long hair w/red
color. Has been in the
581 area and is now in
Heather Wood, Inver-
ness (352) 464-4474



Arts & Craft Show
Saturday 11/2 9a-3p
Forrest View Estates
Club House
8975 Sugar Bush Path


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org
Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




LINDY
Please Call Mary
From Holder
(352) 746-0011


New Swing Band
Looking for Musicians
(352) 344-8122


ClremationI Estate Lot IIn
Fero Gardens available.
Lot 10 adjacent to ga-
zebo under large oak
tree.
$1300. 954-292-5995.
Fountains Mem. Park
Homosassa. Single lot
valued $4025, sell for
$2775. (352) 668-4540




F/T Receptionist

Needed for very
busy Insurance of-
fice. Apply in person
at: SHELDON PALMES
INSURANCE
8469 W Grover
Cleveland Blvd
eeandBn
Btw. 9a-12P, Mon-Fri





House Cleaning

1 day a week.
Dunnellon. Must
take pride in work,
and do a thorough
cleaning job w/out
supervision
(352) 817-4777








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Dental
Receptionist
or Assistant

Position for motivated
professional with ref.
and exp. Established
cosmetic practice.
Fax resume to
352-795-2235

Fulltime Certified
Dental Assistant

Call 352-746-0330
Ask for Vicki





Cooks & Servers

Apply Fisherman's
Restaurant
12311 E Gulf to Lake
(352) 637-5888
Closed Mon. & Tues

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced P/T
a- Servers
w Cooks
a- Bartender
w Hostess


SERVERS

apply for night shift
at Chicken King
2420 N Florida Hwy
Hernando, FL
NO PHONE CALLS






CHioNciaE

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.




Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time

Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time

Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.




Alarm Installation
& Service Tech

Security system &
CCTV Tech with a
minimum of 3 yrs exp.
Fax resume:
352-563-5690
EXPERIENCED
Cabinet & Mill-
work Fabricator
Installer

No tobacco
products
Built-Rite Cabinets
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,

EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS

All phases, Valid
Florida license req.
Pd Holidays & Vac.
Apply: 102 W. Main
St, downtown
Inverness or call
(352) 860-1973

General
Technician

position available
at automotive
repair shop, full -
time position with
benefits.
To inquire contact
352-447-3174
between 8:30a-5p.

RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS

Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply In person
S & S Electric
2692 W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon




COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
positions shuttling
potential homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing


CLASSIFIED




Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.




P/T Front Desk
Receptionist

BELLAVITA SPA &
FITNESS CENTER
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs
APPLY IN PERSON
2125W. Skyview
Crossing, Hernando




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547



V 'lll \I % l% l I St.

L\i) Day



I"( f


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Antiques

COO COO CLOCK
Very old clock with deer
antlers and various ani-
mals works 199.00
352-464-1006


..... :.:....



11 2 LaughNngStock Internatlonal IncN Dlst by Universal UCjck lor UFS' 2013

"You promised me you'd get a haircut."

I. . ...
.. . .. .


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


C C I T "RU S C O U NT5


CHRONICLE
www.chronlleonll.com


i- Ulsnwasner No phone calls, articulate, upbeat and
Drug Screen service oriented.
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP CALL 352-746-6727 required Apply at Terra Vista
Fresh 15ct $5.001b. Tue.-Sat. 2:00-4:30p for final applicant. Welcome Center, m
Stone Crab@S6.001b For Application Equal Opportunity 2400 N. Terra Vista
delivered352-897-5001 Appointment Employer Blvd., Hernando, FL


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352447-5888





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Compete Tree Service
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
(352) 344-2696


FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
v FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
o FAST 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
I RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



HOUSE CLEANING
Beverly Hills Area
Exp. & References
(352) 436-4109
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672

Vera's Cleaning Serv
20 yrs of quality serv.
Flexible Scheduling
Call (352) 726-8511



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086




Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



,ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



40 gg



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






Y1TERLING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/ins/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. comrn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024-



NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838











TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!
344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


1 91


I







t t ? A f l R A l .GEFF

WOU AU VU U ABY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. High Humpty Dumpty sitting spot (1) Every answers a rhyming
1HighHmt um t st (1 ) pair of words (like FAT CAT

|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Chief construction site lifter (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. German river region Riesling (1) syllables in each word.
c 2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for JFS
4. Dismiss a knight's apprentice (1)


5. More drenched one who owes money (2)


6. Singer Katy's fruits atop sundaes (2)


7. Actor Tatum sifting for gold (2)


ONINVd ONINXVH 'L 8312113H3 SAHasd '9 HOIO3Qa L aiiM "s
3aIibS aIai *' 3aNI H aNIH )' N LaaoIrvw TIVAm Tqt T
11-2-13 SIIASNV


78 RPM Records
209 count, asst. music
& artist. $25.00
(352) 344-5283
Crank up Victrola
1920's 78 rpm
Brunswick & Victor
Portable $325. for both
(352) 344-5283
PRECIOUS MOMENTS
COOKIE JARS Five
styles to choose from.
$20 each.
Call:628-4271



SPA-N-A-BOX
Portable spa w/ cover
& chem. Seats 4; 280
Gal. Like New, Retail
value $1100, asking
$495 (352) 690-2198



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE electric 30" stove,
brand new never used,
white $450; 40 gal elec
hot water heater. Used
1 week, $150
(352) 341-4902
KENMORE
21.6 CU FT
Refrigerator
w/ ice maker,
Exc Cond $250
(352) 628-7626
MAYTAG
commercial quality
washer $150 firm
(352) 628-7818
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER & DRYER and
dishwasher, exc.
cond., $140 each
(352) 344-8971
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore, white
Good cond.Can
deliver for fee. $100
each. Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free
Delivery/Set up. 352
263-7398
Whirlpool Dryer
works good
$110.
(352) 634-3333
WHIRLPOOL
Electric range, smooth
ceramic cook top, self
cleaning, excel.
cond, bisque, $250
352-201-0093



COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51 H.
$55. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H.
$50. 527-1239.
SAUDER CORNER
COMPUTER DESK
42x42x51H oak finish
exc.cond.$50 201-8784









DUDLEY'S
"Trrw

THURS. 10/31/13
3PM HUGE TOOL
& ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, John Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1PM HUGE
collection of Furni-
ture from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal

TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9AM 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for Into
Dudleysauctlon.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7

Craftsman 10" Table
Saw $125.00
Craftsman Radial Arm
Saw $125.00
352-419-2064 before 7

Craftsman 20" varia-
ble speed scroll saw
w/ heavyduty stand
$100 Craftsman 51'AH
Stand up air com-
pressor with hoses
$100 (352) 795-7766







DUDLEY'S

THURS. 10/31/13
3PM HUGE TOOL &
ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, john Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1pm HUGE
collection of Furni-
ture from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal
** ** ** **
TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9am 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for Into
Dudleysauctlon.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
65.00 OBO
352-464-0316

Router Table
with 2'/4 HP Ryobi
Router. Cast iron top
20x27. Mobile base
$200
(352) 726-5832





CASSETTE JVC Dou-
ble Cassette Deck with
Remote $40.00
353-746-5421

SPEAKERS 2 Optimus
5 inch 2 way 70 watts
Speakers $35.00
352-746-5421





CONCRETE STEPS
4"wx 21" h
$125
(352) 341-4902





CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with case Ex. Cond.
$100.00 352-746-5421


.,,It


Your"\orld first

Need a job
air a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHukoyICLE


Vie
CD/DVD DRIVES 5
drives int & ext...$25 all
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
DELL P713W ALL IN
ONE PRINTER, SCAN,
fax & copier Very good
condition $40.00
352-527-1399
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
IBM 390E THINKPAD
needs OS, plus ex-
tras...$75 352-476-2652
tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com



1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $85
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
2 LEATHER STRESS-
LESS CHAIRS WITH
FOOT STOOL 2 stress-
less chair Great condi-
tion 200.00 each
352-464-1006
38" ROUND COFFEE
TABLE with lazy susan.
Maple. Nice condition.
$35. 527-1239
40" round dining table
w/blue pedestal
base...$35
352-476-2652/tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
48" Round Glass top
Dinette Set, with four
caster chairs, blue up-
holstered pads, ivory
frame, like new $90.
(352) 465-4037
BEDROOM SET
Calif King 4 poster bed
w/ Box spring, end
tabledresser & lamp.
Ivory, $450 obo
(352) 344-4178
BEDROOM SET
Fancy King bed, 2 night
stands & large dresser.
large dresser with mirror
and drawers
cherry wood $500
352-464-1006
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
DOUBLE RECLINERS
Loveseat La Z Boy
brand Comfortable
Good Condition $60.
352-621-0175
DOUBLE RECLINING
LEATHER LOVE SEAT
Tan leather double re-
clining ,very nice 400.00
352-464-1006
Dresser, Mirror,
Chest, Night stand,
& Lamp
$100.
(352) 746-6996




0t
DUDLEY'S
AUCTrR

THURS. 10/31/13
3PM- HUGETOOL&
ESTATE AUCTION
Large collection of
shop & woodwork-
ing many in like new
condition inc New
Uni saw & Shopsmith,
planer, John Deer
Lawn tractor,
Furniture, Household
GREAT HALLOWEEN
SALE For kids
big & small.

SUNDAY 11/3/13
ANTIQUE & COL-
LECTIBLE AUCTION
1PM HUGE collec-
tion of Furniture
from Country to
Victorian, Crocks,
Mounts, Coins,
Jewelry, Crystal
** ** **
TUES. 11/5/13
ON SITE
ESTATE AUCTION
9AM 13400 Moon-
raker Ter Floral City.
Entire contents of
home & garage +
Portable metal car-
port w/store room &
above ground pool,
Call or Web for Into
Dudleysauctlon.com
352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck
GLASS TOP END
TABLE w/ elephant
base good cond $45.
352-465-1262
GLIDER CHAIR WITH
GLIDING OTTOMEN
Dark green with
print.$40
Call:(352)628-4271
HERNANDO
Sat. & Sun. 8am-lpm
Household, kitchen
Items, tools, brick-
a-brack, much like
new, 1424 N. Circus
Ter. (Hampton Hills)


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W HIGH END U6EDI
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
HUTCH. 36" X 18" X 69"
high. Medium color
wood. Excellent condi-
tion. $75.... 527-1239
LOVESEAT / COUCH /
RECLINER Microfiber
(Seafoam green
color)with pillows.Teal
leather recliner.$250.00
Cal11:628-4271
Phone Stand
Hand Crafted $10
Love Seat Hide a bed
Like New $175.
(352) 419-6180
RECLINER,
BLUE/GRAY Excellent
condition. $50.00
(352)257-4076
RECLINER, DARK
GREEN FABRIC Excel-
lent condition $40.00
(352)257-4076
SOFA-3-CUSHION,
multicolor fabric
88"x35" $75 476-2652
tommyb@tampabay
.rr.com for pics
SWIVEL ROCKER.
Gold fabric. Good
condition. $40.
527-1239
TV STAND
Silver/grey with 2 glass
shelves 36"wide,
24"deep,20"high.$65.00
726-2572
Very Nice Glass Top
Octagon coffee table
with matching end
table. Sugarmill
$75.
(352) 503-9344
VINTAGE ROCKING
CHAIR. Maple. 40".
Nice condition. $45.
527-1239



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
FREE FIREWOOD oak
firewood cut & dried
uhaul 746 2966
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 1, & Sat. 2, 8a-2p
SOMETHING FOR
EVERYONE!
42 S. Desoto Street
BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. NOV 2nd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd
CITRUS HILLS
FRI.& SAT. 8 A-3P.
tools, fishing, household
327 N Cherry Pop, Inv
CITRUS HILLS
Saturday 8am
Presidential Estates
Multi-home event
Follow signs SR 486
North on Annapolis.
CITRUS HILLS
Sun. Nov. 3rd, 8a -4p
Moving Sale, Kit./Din.
ware, BR, LR, DR, Furn
AND MOREl
1566E Saint Charles pi
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri. & Sat., 9A-2P
HUGE SALE Ladies
name brand clothing
sz. 10-16Tonneau
cover, for Ford Ranger
bed., & MUCH MORE
9752 Sandree Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat: Kids toys,
games. Furn, Misc
1070 N Conant Av
DUNNELLON
Friday & Saturday,
November 1 & 2, 8-2
First United
Methodist Church.
Flea market
Bake Sale & Cafe
Lots of Good Items
with Great Prices!
Jewelry, glassware
clothes, shoes, CD's
handbags, furniture.
21501 W. Hwy40

FLORAL CITY
Floral City Garden
Club Trash &
Treasure Sale,
SAT. NOV. 2. 8A-3P
Community Bdg.
8370 E. Orange Ave.


CLASSIFIED



FLORAL CITY
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2 8a-4p
Christmas lights, turnn,
antiques, No Early
Birds or Checks
8110 Skyline Lane
FLORAL CITY
SAT ONLY 4 families
Jewelry, antiques,
guns, lots of goodies
MollyLn & Florence Ter
FLORAL CITY
Sat. Nov. 2, 8am,
4 mi. south off SR41.
Quality items, tools,
chipper, household
& collectibles

FLORAL CITY
Sat. Nov. 2, 8am,
4 mi. south off SR41.
Quality items, tools,
chipper, household
& collectibles.

FLORAL CITY
Sat. Nov. 2, 8am,
4 mi. south off SR41.
Quality items, tools,
chipper, household
& collectibles.
HERNANDO
Sat 9a-2p
Tools, Household items
and more!
3681 E Squaw Valley
Drive
HOLDER
QUAL Run, Moving
Sale Fri. & Sat., 8a-3p
Hshld. items, furniture
7111 N. Grackle Pt.
HOMOSASSA
10823W. YULEE DR.
FIRST TIME SALE
9AM -2PM SAT ONLY
HOMOSASSA
ESTATE SALE *
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3, 9a-4p
1717 S. Dell Point
off West Dixie Land
HOMOSASSA
Fri 8-2p; Sat 8-12p
5214 S Frame Pt
HOMOSASSA
Fri. 1 & Sat. 2, 8a-2p
Rain or Shine
5288 S. Milia Point
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 9am-3pm
Household, pet sup-
plies, exercise eq,
furn, games, books,
movies and more!
2478 S Olympic Hill Ter
INVERNESS
GOLF & CC
SAT, Nov 2nd 8a-2p
recliner, side chair,
Good clothing, kitchen
items, xmas items, gas
edger, much more
Off Old Floral City Rd
INVERNESS
HUGE YARD SALE
Fri, Sat, Nov 1st, 2nd
9am to ?
tools, hshld, Christian
books, furn, misc.
933 Tulane Terrace
INVERNESS
Saturday 8:00 -1:00
Household items, furni-
ture, Christmas collecti-
bles, bikes, Motorcycle
Shell, etc.
3863 E Perry St
INVERNESS
SATURDAY only, Nov
2, 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.;
Multi family; proceeds
benefit educational
scholarships
5710 E Jasmine Ln
INVERNESS
The Crafty Lady
Hand Crafted
Craft Sale Nov. 1 & 2,
Over 400 items, start-
ing at $3.00 550 N.
Rooks Ave. 344-4800
INVERNESS
Thurs, Fri, Sat 9a-5m
fishing, tools, guitars
9290 E Windwood Lp
INVERNESS
Thurs, Fri, Sat. 7a to 5p
2150 N. Dee River Rd
LECANTO
Fri & Sat 8a-4p
Huge Multi-family Sale
1588 S Lecanto Hwy

LECANTO
Saturday 2nd, 9AM.
LOTS OF FURNITURE
THE PATH, 1729W.
Gulf to Lake Hwy.
S:





Fr. &*a. 9I.m-


E


SATURDAY, NOVE


Garape/
-I _le
PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 7:30-3:00.
491 to Pine Ridge Blvd.
Right on Lena, Right
6014 N. Kingwood Terr
PINE RIDGE
Sat. 2nd, 8am 2pm
4457 W. Horseshoe Dr.



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



3/4 LENGTH MINK FUR
COAT 3/4 length mink
paw fur coat
in excellent condition
$100 Call 352-564-0212
DURANGO COWBOY
BOOTS women's size 8
black exc. cond.$30
201-8784



!!! 225/75R -16 !!!
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
60.00 352 464 0316
3 HP 10" Sears Crafts-
man Table Saw
$150 or trade
8 Pc. Drum Set,
w/ yamaha electric
guitar $125. or trade
(352) 795-8863
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex., $45.
352-628-0033
16 Bulb Tanning Bed
Cross Bow Work out
Bench, Good Cond.
$200. each
(352) 489-4362
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BALL PYTHON FE-
MALE 3' long friendly.
50 gallon aquarium,zoo
med heater & more.
$65.00, 746-0714
BOOKCASE 5-SHELF
med brn. $20 Barbecue
Grill w/cover $30 Ruth
352-382-1000
CANON MP280
PRINTER Great condi-
tion, needs ink, black
colored, also a scan-
ner, $25 (352)465-1616
Ceramic Supplies,
Molds & Kiln with
accessories. $500
Call for appointment
(352) 897-4899
CHRISTMAS TREE
9'Artifical Blue Spruce
Tree/Lights
$75 OBO
352-249-4451
CONCERT TICKETS
sold out, Justin Moore,
11/9, St. Aug. Amp. 2
tickets, both ($20)
352-212-1596
DOLL HOUSE plywood
finished 6 room doll
house with moving
windows
Paid $400 will sacrifice
for
$100 call 352-564-0212
DVD's, CD's, VHS
Tapes & Cassettes
Best offer
(352) 201-8690
EXTENSION LADDER.
30' Aluminum.
$80. 527-1239
GALLERY JACKET
FOR WOMEN Good
condition, reversible,
size S cheetah print,
$20 (352)465-1616
Gas Fireplace,
no vent. Incl. oak
cabinet with mantel,
raised hearth &
logs, fluted sides, etc.
$300. 352-341-3083
GENIE GARAGE
DOOR OPENER USED
WITH SENSORS &
hardware only 85.00
4640316
GENIE GARAGE
DOOR OPENER USED
WITH SENSORS &
hardware only 85.00
464-0316
HARLEY STOCK EX-
HAUST PIPES NEARLY
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON 100.00 obo.
352-464-0316
KIDS 8' SLIDE HEAVY
DUTY You can attach it
to your playhouse or
tree or whatever. $40
746-0714


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001lb.
Stone Crab@$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001
LARGE ROOM SIZE
CARPET 12X12 PLUS
light tan or almond in
color $50.00 OBO
527-1399
Lawn Mower,
Neutron, battery
operated, $75
Transport wheelchair
(4 small wheels) $45.
(352) 220-4483
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Noritake China
Pattern is Asian
Dream, Service for 12
$200. firm
(352) 489-3264
POOL
28 ft above ground
w/pump, filter and ex-
tra supplies. Good
Wkg cond. You
remove $700 obo
(352) 746-9536
POOL TABLE Leisure
Bay. Includes accesso-
ries. $75 OBO.
Sugarmill Woods.
19lruddy@gmail.com
PORTABLE AIR TANK
WITH GUAGE 7 gallon
factory made $20.00
3524640316
PORTABLE AIR TANK
WITH GUAGE 7 gallon
factory made $20.00
3524640316
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden Shutters 20 x
18 Ex. Cond. $40.00
352-746-5421
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden Shutters 24 x
18 Ex. Cond. $50.00
352-746-5421
SHUTTERS Pair of
wooden shutters 62 x
26 Ex cond. $95.00
352-746-5421
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF works great for
fish orjerkey only 60.00
3524640316
SMALL TRAILER
FRAME good for haul-
ing mowers, flea mar-
kets stuff. $100.
352-527-3177
TABLESAW 10"
CRAFTMAN All steel
very good quality. Cuts
& runs great. $85.00
746-0714
UTILITY TRAILER
6 x 12, $775. obo
Power washer 16H
with tanks & hoses
$600.
(352) 341-3300

Medical

4 WHEEL WALKER 4
wheel walker, big
wheels,hand brakes,
seat,basket. ex. $50.00
352-628-1783
4 WHEELED WALKER
with seat and brakes.
only 75.00
3524640316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP.RONLY
20.003524640316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP.RONLY
20.00 352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
Pride Elite Traveler
Go Go Mobility
Scooter
like new, $600.
(352) 628-5553
Rascal Scooter
electric, 3 yrs. old
little use. List $6,000
Asking $750. cash
(352) 513-5583



"NEW" FLAWLESS 5
STRING RESONATOR
BANJO,30 BRACKETS
1/2 PRICE @ $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" HIGH QUALITY
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
SOLID TOP &
GROVER TUNERS,
$75 352-601-6625


EMBER 2,2013 C9



RV COVER FITS UP
TO 33' 6" LIGHTLY
USED B REATHABLE
ONLY 85.00 464 0316
RV COVER FITS UP
TO 33' 6" LIGHTLY
USED B REATHABLE
ONLY 85.00 464 0316


"NEW" KUSTOM
AMPLIFIER WITH 12"
SPEAKER, REVERB &
DISTORTION $70
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
STYLE ELECTRIC
GUITAR, AGED
MAHOGANY TOP $50
352-601-6625
"NEW" MITCHELL 12
STRING ACOUSTIC,
SOLID SITKA SPRUCE
TOP 1/2 PRICE @ $100
352-601-6625
"NEW"WHITE OSCAR
SCHMIDT ACOUSTIC
GUITARBEAUTIFUL
TURQUOISE TRIM
$100 352-601-6625
2 CRANK-UP light
stands for T-bars or
truss $75 both
352-476-2652/tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
10' LIGHT TRUSS
w/dollies for DJ or
band...$50
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
TROMBONE WITH
CASE Good condition
used 1 yr. $95
Call:352-628-4271



ELECTRIC PIE MAKER
Wolfgang Puck in-
cludes pie maker
cookbook $35.
352-621-0175



AB Glider
Pro-form. $50
(352) 628-7626
AB LOUNGER Like
New Asking $75.00
O.B.O. (352)697:2195
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACESAVER folds up
for easy storage.AII
electronics work.Digital
readout.A steal at
185.00 352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE (OPTIMUM)
BRAND.electronics
calories,heart
rate,distance, only
185.00 352-464-0316



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Honda 3 wheeler. 1984
5 sp. Hi/low, new tires,
$450 obo or trade; New
26" Schwin 49 CC, Mo-
torized Bike. $450 obo
or trade(352) 447-6139
POOL TABLE
Oak with slate top,
leather pockets, queen
ann legs, W/ all access.
Exc Cond. $475
(352) 464-2687
Summit Climbing Deer
Stand, good condition
$125.00
352-419-2064


Sell r Swa


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


CHARLIE
Charlie, 8-y.o.
Black/white spotted
retriever mix, neu-
tered & HW nega-
tive. Came to shel-
ter because owner
became seriously ill,
could not care for
him anymore. Beau-
tiful good dog, mild
skin problem due to
lack of care. Charlie
is now homeless due
to no fault of his
own. Easy to walk,
affectionate & gen-
tle, likes other dogs.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


r4.- 4


ffow~o

You IW




your Dcy-













a;.












Chronicle

Classic fieds ,

In Print

& Online


'S



c/fl-


S . "
/7 C ji,


New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19- Near Mall)
352-563-2110


/ I




CIIRpNICLEAMKONICI 42





(35s) 563-5966 /__ It


-IIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



Professional 2016 CBH
Chromatic
Harmonica.
(352) 795-3764
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




CILO SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013


SmmlB


Citrus County
Dog Training Center
Is offering Basic Pet
Obedience & Con-
formation Classes.
STARTS NOV. 5th Call
352-212-1697 to reg.

Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009

i5- "


MACK
Mack, 3-y.o. male
coonhound, wt45
Ibs, great watch-
dog, good w/dogs
& cats. Walks gently
on leash, loves to
run, loves car rides,
timid at first but
then trusts, totally
housebroken,
low maintenance,
beautiful coat.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.









MONROE
Monroe, a
2-year-old female
Chinese Sharpei/
Boxer mix, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebrkn. Weight
64 Ibs. Likes people,
other dogs & pup-
pies. Walks well on a
leash, is obedient.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.







11


SALLIE
Sallie is approx. 2
y.o., spayed
terrier/Dalmation
mix, medium size,
HW negative. Affec-
tionate & friendly,
sits on command,
loves treats, gets
along w/other dogs,
Housebrkn, would
love a yard to run in.
Sweet & joyful, call
Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings








TOBY
Toby, 6-y.o. black/
white terrier mix,
neutered, HW
negative, small-
to-medium size, gets
along w/dogs &
cats. Walks well on
leash, loves people
& kids. Friendly & af-
fectionate. Great
companion for an
older person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288



Your World

"uw V eatM 44


CHRpNICLE


Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $500
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827


TRACE
Trace, a 2-y.o.
shepherd mix,
good w/other dogs
& cats. Heartworm
negative, appears
housebrkn, very
gentle, calm,
walks well on leash.
Affectionate &
friendly. Wt. 63 Ibs.
Very beautiful dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288



PASTURE LAND & BARN
To Rent For Horses
N. Crystal River Area
fertilzed pasture
consisting of 8 acres,
3 gates paddocks and
area for at least 2
more. Lg.metal barn
has 3 horse stalls, tack
& feed room, + stor-
age area. 24 hr. sec.
lights Sec. man lives
on property and avail.
to care for Horses if
needed, reasonable
rates. (352) 628-0508




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

p


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
LECANTO
2/1 $510/mo. LG yard
352-464-3159
LECANTO
Leisure Acres
3/2 SW, water & gar-
bage inc. application
& bckgrnd req. $600.
mo. (352) 628-5990



HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2,1% acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192
NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON Y2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183


1 fenced-in acre.
Peaceful area in
Heatherwood
Reduced to $51,900
(352) 302-6905




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details



12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, 1 BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances incl. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565
A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/work-
shop. /4 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 228-4282
Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899
INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013



2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screem por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Inverness 55+ 2Br/lBa
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BR/1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500, furn. lot rent
$245. incl. trash &
water (219) 929-8909
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Buy
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





-ACTION
f RENTAL MANAGEMENT
[ REALTY, INC. ,
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHomeRentals.comn
HOMOSASSA
11101 Clearwater Ct.............$1,000
2/2 watrfontmo0le
2278 S. Sandburg Pt................$500
2/1 duplex avalable sooni
INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY
1304 Claymore St. (INV).......$1,100
3/2/2 pool home ] block rom Rals to Trals
7530 S. Duval Island (FQ......$1,100
3/2 lakeront home with a beautiful view
CRYSTAL RIVER
814 NE Ist Terr. ....................... $550
2/1 close to shopping
9469 W. Wisconsinl 0.............. $650
2/2 nice 2-story condo comingsoonI
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
87 S. Adamis (BH).....................$675
2/1 5/1 newly remodeled wit a Florma room
7699 N. Maltese Dr. (CS)..........$800
3/2/2 nice newer home 1,254 sq ft

Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
7735 W. Tropical Ln.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
3 room studio
$450/mo. No Ist/sec.
352-341-1277


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-87

71




Mj
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393
Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442 (352) 637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity Pro-
vider & Employer."







CRYSTAL RIVER
S NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incd Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/I, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-87
71








CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equip ped kit. All
util.. cable, Internet, &
cleaning provided.
$599.mo 352-586-1813


CLASSIFIEDS



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic./cottage, all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994



BEVERLY HILLS
2 poss 3/1/1 + carport
$600. 352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2bed/bath, $675. mo.
FIRST MONTH FREE!
(352) 422-7794
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-87

71



^* ..-:...%- 1.!

Crystal River
modern 2/2, 1500 sq.ft
on 10 acres grass
pasture w/horse barn.
5 miles from down-
town Crystal River off
of Citrus Ave. (Hwy
495 and 488) Lease
for 10 yrs & it will be
yours! Rent $1000 per
month, call Larry
Hough, Manager
352-795-2240
Homosassa-
Riverhaven
3/2/2 Pool house or
2/2/2 Waterfront Villa
$1,100. per month
Offered by Waybright
Real Estate, Inc
Call Nancy Wilson
352-422-4137
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Avail 11/22,
sunroom, fenced yard,
app'd pets w/ add'l
fees, $775/mo + sec &
1st. 352-697-2195
INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS
Country Living
on large /2 acre lot.
3 bd. 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964
Rent to Own, No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



FLORAL CITY
LAKE FRONT-
ROOMMATE
WANTED
2 BR, 1% B. NS,$450
mo, incd util sec dep
$450. 352-302-6055



CRYSTAL RIVER
Rooms in house, Full
Kichen, Near Publix,
furn, one price pays all,
+ WIFI, $115wk/420.
mo.sm. $130wk/470
mo. Ig 352-563-6428
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802
INVERNESS
Room for Rent, Pry.
Bath $350., 613-9135



4 Beautiful Acres next
to lake. Well, paved
streets. Horses OK
9157 E Orange Ave
FLORAL CITY. 941-358
-6422 941-320-0433


Bia 2001 DW.
2 AC, $98,500
2800 SF Home w/in
law, art 5 ac $258K
11 Acre Lakefront
Estate $750K
1500 Sa Cape Codd
acre $98,500
3 ac on Derby Oaks
w home $248K
Lots more!!!
www.crosslandreal-
ly.com, 352 726 6644
Hunting/Fishing Camp
6/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room & AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EQUAL WUlS t
ffo1UNmTY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




OPEN HOUSE
Plan for the Future-
Beautiful
Handicap Design,
Manufactured Home
Forest view, 2BR/2BA
+ Bonus Room:
Private man cave,
with maple panel-
ing & ceramic tile.
Quality stick-built
2001 SkylinerIn
newer section of
Forest Hills Comm.
OPEN HOUSE:
9141 W. Forest View
Drive, Sat. Nov. 02.,
10am-4pm
We will show you the
handicap amenities
of this home $30,000
(607) 655-1104


Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buving or Sellina


,^


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me


For PSale ,f
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352-422-6129




Lecanto 3 bedroom.
2 bath with fireplace,
sauna, and garage.
2 acres w/fruit trees,
garden ready.
352-422-7136




HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW,own lot, new carport
& screened front & back
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858






117 S Lunar Terrace 2
bedroom 2 bath Florida
RM Garage & Carport
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE
Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down
352-344-9290

3/2/2 in the Highlands;
Very Clean w/ large
screened patio,& at-
tached storage shed.
Lg corner lot in great
neighborhood $89,900
352-302-0431



Inverness highlands 2
bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$62,000 2 car garage.
Fenced yard.
352-476-0581

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Rent to Own. No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




2005 MEADOWCREST
(Fox Hollow) BEAUTY.
3/2/2/2 Lg Split BR,
Cul-d-sac.See pics @
www.forsalebvowner.c
om #23967875
Call 724-813-8624.

Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenced
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195k 352-422-7077




For Sale By Owner
2BR, IBA, Corner Lot
Located in Old
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated
kitchen, SS appl's.,
pine Hardwood firs./
tiles, roof 3 yrs. old.
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy-
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000.
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092


4BR/11/ BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816

OPEN HOUSE
Plan for the Future-
Beautiful
Handicap Design,
Manufactured Home
Forest view, 2BR/2BA
+ Bonus Room:
Private man cave,
with maple panel-
ing & ceramic tile.
Quality stick-built
2001 Skyliner In
newer section of
Forest Hills Comm.
OPEN HOUSE:
9141 W. Forest View
Drive, Sat. Nov. 02.,
10am-4pm
We will show you the
handicap amenities
of this home $30,000
(607) 655-1104


TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!





For Sale !i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

ForSale
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

S= 11^^^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351













Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

WANT IT SOLD

House not selling?
Behind in
payments?
Upside down in
mortgage?

CALL ME I can help
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward 1"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515











SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


fif _2007 Honda vTx 1300S
Very clean, low-miled bike. Bought here new.
Serviced here. Recent trike kit installed.
Only $8,995

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832



SPECIAL! THIS WEEK ONLY!
20 HP Mercury Four Stroke, Tiller Handle, ,,,i i-ll

ONLY $2,553

AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR L
1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 *Fa 352 75 67%.
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LAST WEEK FOR BOAT SHO5W PRICES

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1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


I


Citrs


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W7''l




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2,2013 CLIL


^^INVE51URS5 ^
1988 Manufactured
Home 3/2, 1 Acre,
Newer Roof & A/C
$47K obo Cash
352-503-3245












Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




3 BR, 3/2 BA, Condo
2100 sq. ft., Furnished,
Carport,
Citrus Hills on Hartford
$119,000.
Call 352-419-5268

Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993

Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively reno-
vated including wood
and tile floors. Granite
and new roof and
kitchen. Over 2000 SF
Living area. $129,900
352-817-5875 or
miksh@earthlink.net

OPEN HOUSE
SATURDAY, NOV. 2
10A-4P, 2BR, 21/2 BA
Shows like a model.
11739W. Bayshore Dr.
Dixie Shores $369.000
Call Doc 772-370-9374



till V 1 lld I]lSt.
L k se) D a) s


CHOWICLE
Classifieds


Vacation waterfront
property. $5k down,
$1200 month 1/11/2,
Sawgrass Landing.
$ 10Ok down
$1900/mo, 2/2
condo. Casa Rio.
Lease options avail.
Call Lisa Vandeboe
352-634-0129
Owner/Broker

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Propertiescom
"To view
my properties"





***-*-********

V THIS OUT!

** ***** **
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. front-
age on golf course
$49,900. Call
352-638-0905





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-


14, ALUM BOAT
W/9.9 ENGINE, GALV
TRAIL. XLNT SHAPE.
$900. 352-256-8488

COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945


EVENRUDE 1998
17' Polar Boat, 90 hp
Salt Water Series,
Center Console $4895
352-201-2014,
352- 513-5141
Manitou Oasis
2006 Pontoon, loaded,
Suzuki,115 Hp, 4 stroke,
Road King Galv. trailer,
Exec. Cond. $12,999.
352-527-0324
Polar
1995 17' Fiberglass,
75HP yamaha motor,
good condition $4000
(352) 341-2036
TROPHY
17' 2002 CC, off shore
90H Mer ship-to-shore
radio, GPS depth
finder, tilt/trim trailer
$6,000.(352) 341-1660
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 if, 50k ml. Ready to
go! MUST SEE $10,000
(352) 628-6643



DUTCHMAN
30 ft classic trailer. W/
tongue, ready for
travel. $1200
(352) 419-5028
FLEETWOOD TERRY
'04, 27 ft, 12ff slide out
new awning & new
hitch, extra clean,
non smoking, extras
$9,000,352-341-7703
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2005, Aveo Lt, 4 door
$6,990
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
98 Caravan mini
van, 7 psg. runs
great, looks good.
asking $1675.
(352) 637-2588
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595
FORD
'98 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2004 Accent, AC,
Power Win/Doors, reli-
able, nice riding car.
Good gas mileage.
$2100 (352) 795-8986
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PLYMOUTH
'93 Acclaim, AC, new
tires & brakes, very
clean 86K mi. runs
great $3,000 obo 352
382-3900, 634-3880
TOYOTA
2000 Avalon, $2000,
leather seats, needs
minor work. Call after
5:00 pm 352-634-2054


AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. NOV. 3rd.
1-800-438-8559

CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, ConvArtic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-5134257
CORVETTE
1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
DATSUN
1979, 280 ZX Antique
2 Door Coupe
$5,000
(352) 257-3261





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




FORD
1999, Expedition
Eddie Bauer leather
$3,498.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004 F350, S uper Cab
dually diesel, low miles
new tires, full warranty
til 4/1/14, clean truck,
over 2k in extras, nice
cond! $15,900
(352) 564-2756

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


AdminHfistrtion


1999, Ram 1500
ex cab, $3,998
352-341-0018
NISSAN
02 Frontier XE, 4cyl
4x2,autood, a/c, tarp
run bds, bedliner, 97k
$6000. 724-771-8504
SATURN
2009 Aura, 94,500 mi
Runs perf. Full Equip'd
$7750 (352) 302-4057



CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
leather, dvd,
$6,998
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
'02, Grand Cherokee
4 x 4, many new parts
& tow pkg., $5,000
obo (352) 726-9369
TOYOTA
1999, Rav-4
$2,899
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
'97, Camaro, convert-
able, auto, AC, 1
owner $4,400. Cry. Riv.
(727) 207-1619, Cell
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306



HONDA
02, Silverwing, 600cc,
auto trans, new front
tire, 23,159 miles,
great shape, $3,200.
obo 352-897-4108
HONDA
07 VTX 1300
motortrikeconvers.
undr-14k mi. new front
brakes, seals, springs
$16k obo 503-6177
HONDA 1988
GOLDWING TRIKE
Clean, well kept
$11,995 352-201-2014
352-513 -5141


250-1102 SACRN
Shinn Jr., John 2013-CP-428 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Case No.: 2013-CP-428
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOHN SHINN, JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of John Shinn, Jr, deceased, whose date of
death was May 29, 2013, and whose social security number is xo-oo-5739, is pending
in the Circuit Court for the Fifth Judicial Circuit, in and for Citrus County, Florida, the
address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The name and
address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
Al creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served


MatceI.o


NoicestoCrdior


ei


must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having ddms or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with the court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is October 26, 2013.
Personal Representative:
John M. Shinn, III,
10015 Havencrest Ct., Stockton, CA 95219
Attorney for Personal representative:
/s/Geoffrey E. Parmer, Florida Bar No.: 0989258
GEOFFREY FARMER, P.A.
2525 Park City Way, Tampa, FL 33609, Tel. 813-877-5555
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, October 26 & November 2, 2013.


I Ise]


Foecosr Sle;


936-1031 SA/THCRN
Davis, Pamela Sue 2012-CA-1099 NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2012-CA-1099
KEVIN JAY NAUERTZ
Plaintiff,
-vs-
ESTATE of PAMELA SUE DAVIS f/k/a
Pamela D.Carpenter, et. al.
Defendant.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure in the
above- captioned action, the Clerk of the Court will sell the property situated in Cit-
rus County, Florida, described as:
See Exhibit A
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, by electronic sale on
the website citrus.realforeclose.com at 10:00 a.m. on the 14th day of November,
2013.
Prepared by:Jonathan S. Dean, Esquire, DEAN & DEAN, LLP
230 NE 25th Avenue, Ste. 100, Ocala, Florida 34470, (352) 368-2800
EXHIBIT "A"
Legal description for File No.: 02-11004
BEGINNING AT A POINT 110 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY AND ON THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF WEST 1/2 OF NE 14 OF SE 14 OF NE 14 SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 19
SOUTH, RANGE 18, RUNNING THENCE NORTH FROM SAID POINT 40 FEET THENCE RUN-
NING WEST95 FEET TO RUSSELL ROAD, THENCE RUNNING SOUTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE
OF RUSSELL ROAD 40 FEET THENCE RUNNING EAST 95 FEETTO THE POINT OR PLACE OF
BEGINNING, BEING SHOWN ON A SALES MAP OF CRYSTALAIRE CAMPSITES AS LOT 43,
BLOCK C.
BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY AND 70 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF WEST 1/2 OF NE 14 OF SE 14 OF NE 1 4, SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH,
RANGE 18 EAST RUNNING THENCE NORTH FROM SAID POINT 40 FEET THENCE RUNN-
ING WEST 95 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE OF RUSSELL ROAD, THENCE RUNNING SOUTH,
ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID ROAD 40 FEET THENCE RUNNING EAST ALONG THE
LAND OF HAZEL SHUMAKER 95 FEET TO THE POINT OR PLACE OF BEGINNING, BEING
SHOWN ON A SALES MAP OF CRYSTALAIRE CAMPSITES AS LOT 44, BLOCK C.
LOT 45, BLOCK C, CRYSTALAIRE CAMPSITES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN SEC-
TION 3, TOWNSHIP 19SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST FURTHER DESCRIBEDAS FOLLOWS:
BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS 30 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY AND A
CONCRETE MONUMENT AND IS ON THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE
NE 14 OF THE SE 14 OF THE NE 14 OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST
RUNNING THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID BOUNDARY 40 FEET RUNNING THENCE WEST
95 FEET RUNNING THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF RUSSELL ROAD 40 FEET
THENCE RUNNING EAST ALONG THE DYER ROAD 95 FEET TO THE POINT OR PLACE OF
BEGINNING, SAID PARCEL IS SHOWN ON A SALES MAP OF *CRYSTALAIRE" CAMPSITES
AS LOT 45, BLOCK C.
AND
BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS 30 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY AND ON
THE WEST BOUNDARY OF EAST HALF OF NE QUARTER OF SE QUARTER OF NE QUARTER,
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 19SOUTH, RANGE 18, RUNNING THENCE FROM SAID POINT 95
FEET EAST ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF DYER ROAD, THENCE RUNNING NORTH ALONG
THE WEST SIDE OF JANICE ROAD 120 FEET THENCE RUNNING WEST 95 FEET THENCE
RUNNING SOUTH 120 FEET TO THE POINT OR PLACE OF BEGINNING.
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS BEING SHOWN ON A SALES MAP OF
*CRYSTALAIRE" AS LOTS NO. 13, 14 AND 15, BLOCK 'D".
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 5 & 12, 2011.


844-1102 SACRN
CCTPO MEETING NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organization
(TPO) Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and Citizens Advisory
Committee (CAC) will meet on Wednesday, November 6, 2013 in Room 280 at the
Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, to
discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization. The TAC will meet at
1:00 pm and the CAC will meet at 3:00 pm.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person dceddesto appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: /S/ Sheila Martin, Planning and Administration, TBARTA
Published one time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 2, 2013.


14wWrlw O


S MKIA, "WE JUST DON'T CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATE




... 1 1Shop from



I us| UIwww.citrusk







.I Hwv. 19,Sal River, FL 352-564-8668
condition of vehicle and mayEclude certain exotic and hi-line vehicles. See dealer for details. Deductions
~ wear and tear. and recondifoning costs. Trade vehicle value mileage deductions will be calculated at a
Rsper year. even if the actual odometer reading is less than 12.000.


Foreclosure Salw
Action Notices


Metn


Metn


Metn


1 r "Its




C12 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiih;


"Check anywhere in the world first, but


CHECK WITH


CHAD LAST'


" // ^f- ."


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


Model RM3H3CEW- ComeSeeWhyThe CR-VIsTheBest
SellingCompact SUV In America! Save WhileThey Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
MhdeTF3H3DJW Best Selling Compact
vi iV Amedca! Save While They Last!


... for a New 2013 Honda E 5S
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


$500 MILITARY
APPRECIATION OFFER'
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru H FS. See dealer for details.


ALL Pro-Owned Vehicles include:
L "im;i i ,te. .. A "
.6
Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
Sfr.f pi 1, 1 ,Ifi i .II 1I Hll -ll h i~llr,


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!
On US-19.2 Miles tic L^t n nIf
=...Suof Crysal RiWr .U. SO. U

LoveHonda.com


* iiOt6ltICc Lyaty Program provides current owners of a 2003 or newer Honda vehicle with $500 towards the Down Payment or Cap Cost Redvluon "'' "
'.C ot witst es0orpurciasea2012 or2013 Civic. C IMA, or Civic NGV through Honda Financial Services (HFS). Dealers f sta advertns niedaley.
.:.R m eyoursaoefforts. HP- E25 2012 and 2013 All Civic Loyally Incentive Program offers 500 valid only tor current owners ot 2003 or newer Honda model
^iv 4 fiP42 ,- '4 Honda CMc Competitor Conquest" program offers $500 valid for current owners of 2003 or newer Chevroiet, Dodge, Ford, GMC. Hyundai. Jeep. Nra.
Mi.sisbi,Niissan, Satun, ScidorSubar, Toyoa and Volkswagen model vehices. 1. 36 moittclosed end lease with appoved credit 11000miles per year 15 cents ^
..:.i Ieift $995cash orradeequity plus taxes, t & fees First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. 'Not a lease
I.3 mo ftoed o one-pay ease oa $9,976 with approved credit. 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2000 cash or trade equity Payment is plus tai, tag and lease and state lees due at signing. Options at additional cost tUJsed as a down
S'pa eortMr cost('educion toverd te purchase orlease of any new Honda automobile using a vaid Honda APR, Honda Leadership Lease., or Honda Leadersnip Purchase Piae. program through HFS (eldules Zero Due at Signing Lease Program] Must
* r. Iclcr itcn ena established by HFS, and vehicle must be eligible for new-vehide rates. tfCovers internal lubricant parts. See dealer for details All pie-owned vehicles include S2500 cash down or trade equity Offers valid tnruj date of publication.


..or a New 2013 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 C13


- r-


34 ,1lI


JAFs


313 Chevy
JIBU LT


W


iO


441 Up %.E ECVV
..V I. I,,1IfV
MARO Lr
Package, 20" Wheels
........................................ $31,825
..... $31,825
.UNT:...-...-.... $1,875
S- $1,.500
VOR CONQUEST:..-Si1000
--- t750
E EQUITY:......- $2500
IUSCASH: -.---... -1,


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS


New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT


New Z1 hv
SPARK LS
M SRP: ...................................................... $14,145
DEALER DISCOUNT: ........--- -$300


I IAA.


-$750


CASH OR TRADE EQUIY:-- $2,500


-la


Si


New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS


New 2014 Chevy
SILVERADO LT
DOUBLE CAB
d61IIIA~lIht


New 2014 Chevy
TAHOE LS
M SRP:.................................................... $43,025
DEALER DISCOUNT: .. "$3.525
REBATE: ..-.-.... -$1,500
LEASE LOYALTY OR CONQUEST:-..-. 1,000
USAA:. -------.-- $750
CASH OR TRADE EQUlrrY:.-... $2,500


OVER 90
Used & Certified
LPre-Loved Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY


2 YEARS OR
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE


Plus, a FREE
PIT-STOP
PROGRAM!
See dealer lbforcomplete details.


LEATHER.LOWMILES PWR' WINDOWS& LOCKS ALL POWER ONSTARt
$7,495 $8,488 $8,495 $8,498


2007 MAZDA MX-5
12230, GRAND TOURING LEATHER.
NAVLW HARD TOP
$14,495


$15,495


1OVWJETTA
TURBO DIESEL, LATERR, SUNROOF,
TOUCH-SCREEN WO, PISEAT, ALLOYS
$15,498


12 TOYOTATACOMA 10GMC TERRAIN AWD
12223 12129, SLTV6 LUTHER,
CRtEWCAB TOUCH SCREEN RADIO
$23A95 $21,488


$299495


111 VOiL LVERO MCREWCAB
P120A, 6" UFr, 20" WHEELS
W135" TIRES
$29,967


PLUS
MANY
MORETO
CHOOSE
FROM!


tjaI~LEIiY 1vj~ I


Do For You!
nnnlQ


HO ca
1^,M '-^kA


E1.


payment waiver, no security
.Must qualify for all incentives
& state fees. Dealer installed


12231
4DOOR
$5A95


1222A
GAS SIPPER. PW, PL
$99495


$10388


$17,498


UbAA*. ........................


w -


-i


lia




C14 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 FORD FUSION SE AUTO
$0 Down Payment $279/mo.
$0 First Month Payment 3 m
$0 Cash Due at Signing 0for 36 mOS
Security deposit waived. Tax, title and license fees extra. Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease
With Equipment Group 200A Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease Payments may vary, dealer determines price
Residency restrictions apply Cash due at signing is after $750 cash back (PGM #50214) Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at
lease end at price negotiated with dealer at signing Take new retail deliver from dealer stock by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications
and complete details Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment


2014 FORD ESCAPE SE FWD I'
$0 Down Payment 2 79/mo.
$0 First Month Payment 3 m
$0 Cash Due at Signing 0 36 mos.
Security deposit waived. Tax, title and license fees extra. Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease
With Equipment Group 200A Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease Payments may vary, dealer determines price
Residency restrictions apply Cash due at signing is after $1,500 cash back (PGM #50214) (up to $325 applied to 1st mo payment)
Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease end at price negotiated with dealer at signing Take new retail deliver from dealer stock
by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications and complete details Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment


2014 FORD FOCUS SE W/SYNC & SOUND
$0 Down Payment $239/mo.
$0 First Month Payment3 /m
$0 Cash Due at Signing for 36 mOS.
Security deposit waived. Tax, title and license fees extra. Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease
With Equipment Group 200A Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease Payments may vary, dealer determines price
Residency restrictions apply Cash due at signing is after $500 cash back (PGM #50214) Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at
lease end at price negotiated with dealer at signing Take new retail deliver from dealer stock by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications
and complete details Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment


2013 FORD F150 XLT
SuperCab or SuperCrew w/Luxury Pkg.
0% APR for 60 mos. Ford Credit Financing
Plus $1,750 Trade Assist
$2,250 Customer Cash (PGM #12436) + $1,500 XLT Customer Cash (PGM #12442) + $500 XLT Bonus Cash (PGM #12444) + $1,750
XLT Luxury Pkg (PGM #97270) + $1,750 Trade-In Assistance Bonus Cash (PGM #34516) which requires trade-in of 1995 or newer
vehicle or terminate lease 30 days prior to or 90 days after new redail deliver+ $1,000 Ford Credit Bonus Cash (PGM #12438) which
requires Ford Creditfinancing Not all buyer will qualify for Ford Credit financing 0% PR financing for 60 months at $16 67 per $1,000
financed regardless of down payment (PGM #20476) Not available on F-150 Raptor For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer
stock by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications and complete details


2009 FORD FOCUS SE 2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2004 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 REG CAB | 2005 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LT
High gas mileage, low price. NP591 9 The old reliable. NP5878D Lets go four wheeling. N3T247N Leather and loaded. NP5892
$9,968 $9,968 $11,968 1 $12,968 I


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BLUE OVAL CERTIFY


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00


GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
726-1231
www.nicknicholasford.com


Michelle Russo
Salesperson of the Month


Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-In Assistance Bonus
Customer Cash available to those who currently own or lease a 1998 or newer Ford/LM/Competitieve Car, Truck or SUV who trades in or have a lease expiring by Nov. 30, 2013. Model Select Vehicles Trade-in
Assistance Bonus Customer Cash (PGM#33368) (National). Offers expires Nov. 30, 2013.