Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03341


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Duke Energys tax stance has costly fallout for countyPATFAHERTY Staff writerDuke Energy Floridas tax dispute dominated local news as 2013 started and remained the countys most significant issue as the year continued. The current and future impact of the companys tax stance was amplified as Duke retired the Crystal River nuclear plant, put the brakes on the proposed Levy County nuclear plant and increased customer rates for 2014. This past year also marked the one-year anniversary of the merger between Duke Energy Corp. and Progress Energy Inc., creating the nations largest electric power holding company with international assets. In Florida, Progress Energy became Duke Energy Florida. The dispute with the countys largest taxpayer has affected local government budgets, generated substantial legal costs and put a cloud over future county revenue as another tax year became part of the issue. Dukes action would eventually trigger a 31percent hike in the 2013-14 property tax rates. The change occurred because of the November 2012 decision by the utility to pay $19.3million of the $36million in taxes Citrus County officials claimed it owed. Duke made its tax payment based on its own appraisal of $1.2billion compared to the countys assessment of $2.3 billion. Initial negotiations in January were fruitless Medicaid growth means 5M without coverage Associated PressHARRISBURG, Pa. About 5 million people will be without health care next year that they would have gotten simply if they lived somewhere else in America. They make up a coverage gap in President Barack Obamas signature health care law created by the domino effects of last years Supreme Court ruling and states subsequent policy decisions. The court effectively left it up to states to decide whether to open Medicaid, the federalstate program for the poor and disabled, to more people, primarily poor working adults without children. A total of twenty-five Soldiers remains to return todayThe remains of U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, will arrive this morning at Ocala International Airport for eventual burial, exactly two weeks after his death in a crash in Afghanistan. Billings, who was from Heavener, Okla., was one of six soldiers killed Dec. 17 in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan, but has ties to a local family that lost another member in a similar crash nearly a decade ago. Billings widow, Ashley, is the sister of Aaron Weaver, who died Jan. 8, 2004, near Fallujah, Iraq, when a Black Hawk medevac helicopter he was riding in was shot down by rocket fire. Weaver, who was being flown to Baghdad for a medical checkup, left a wife and two children. Billings was flying a Black Hawk. Ashley Billings, 31 a Citrus High School graduate had been married to Billings for nearly seven years, according to her father, Floral City resident and longtime Chronicle employee Mike Weaver. The couple has no children. Billings and four others who died that day were assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Charles Davis of Chas Davis Funeral Home in Inverness said Billings body will arrive at the airport, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., at 10:15a.m. by charter and will be met by the Patriot Riders. The body will then be transported via escort from the Marion and Citrus county sheriffs offices on State Road 200 to the funeral home. Funeral services for Billings are scheduled for 11a.m. Jan.4 at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd. Davis said after the service, Billings body will be escorted to the National Cemetery in Bushnell. INSIDE DECEMBER 31, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 146 50 CITRUS COUNTYCleaning house: Buccaneers fire coach, GM /B1 HEALTH & LIFE:Take your vitamin Dr. Denis Grillo writes about the importance of Vitamin D in a healthy diet./Page C1www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Classifieds......................C8 Comics..........................C7 Community....................C5 Crossword......................C6 Editorial........................A10 Entertainment................A4 Horoscope......................A4 Lottery Numbers............B3 Lottery Payouts..............B3 Movies............................C7 Obituaries......................A6 TV Listings......................C6 NEWS BRIEF HIGH70LOW52Mostly cloudy and cool. A few sprinkles.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines, cer tain content stocks, lottery numbers and some sports coverage will not appear in Wednesdays edition. Due to the Chronicles holida y production schedule, the deadline to submit obituaries for publication on New Years Day is noon today. Duke in the news See DUKE/ Page A7 Randy Lee Billingskilled Dec. 17 in Afghanistan. Remembering those who left us in 2013 ChronicleAs with every year that passes, Citrus County says goodbye to many of its citizens, each one having somehow contributed to the fabric of the community, from physicians, pastors and community volunteers to bankers, cattlemen, county natives and those whose smiles lit up a room even a beloved sheriffs office K-9. Although we cant print everyones name and contribution, here are some of the people of Citrus County who died during 2013: Janet Masaoy, age 76, died Jan.25. Described as a warm, welcoming, unassuming, pit bull and an unlikely warrior, as founder of Citizens Opposed to the Suncoast Tollway, Janet fought tirelessly against the Suncoast tollway extension refusing to call it a parkway. Joan Graves, age 84, died Feb.17. As a child, Joan grew up at the then-Orange Hotel (now Crown Court) in Inverness, worked for the Clerk of Courts Office and spent her life documenting Citrus County with her camera as a freelance photographer for the Chronicleand The Tampa Tribune, including the night she went with then-Sheriff B.R. Quinn on a raid of an illegal moonshine still. Joan took photos as Quinn broke every jar, jug and bottle. Karyn Langer, age 59, died Feb.21. Karyn was a school social worker in Citrus County and was known for her great parties and sing-alongs, her vim, vigor and vitality until Huntingtons disease took it away. Kevin Coward, age 44, died March13. Kevin was the music man of Inverness Primary School, bringing life and enthusiasm to each of the schools nearly 700 students. One of his favorite methods of calling the roll in class: instead of saying, Here, when he called the students names, he would have them sing their favorite food macaroni and cheese! or creamed corn! His death after a brief, sudden illness shocked the community. Keith Barco, age 71, died March15. A Citrus County native and cattleman, Keith was known as a quiet, stoic man who worked hard and who was passionate about agriculture, land and cattle. At the time of his death, Keith was president of the Citrus County Cattlemens Association. He was a longtime supporter of 4-H and FFA youth programs and a longtime member of First Baptist Church of Floral City. State joins care gap Year inREVIEW Year inREVIEW See LEFT/ Page A6 See CARE/ Page A2 MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle fileFallout from the tax dispute between Duke Energy Florida and Citrus County has continued to affect nearly all facets of life in the county during the past year. GAP IN HEALTH COVERAGE A list of the states not e xpanding Medicaid under the 2010 federal health care law and the number of residents who will fall in to a health care gap between the current Medicaid eligibility guidelines of their state and the tax credits available under the law to help people pay for private insurance. TOTAL 4,831,590 Alabama 191,320 Alaska 17,290 Florida 763,890 Georgia 409,350 Idaho 54,780 Indiana 181,930 Kansas 77,920 Louisiana 242,150 Maine 24,390 Mississippi 137,800 Missouri 193,420 Montana 40,140 Nebraska 32,570 New Hampshire 26,190 North Carolina 318,710 Oklahoma 144,480 Pennsylvania 281,290 South Carolina 194,330 South Dakota 25,480 Tennessee 161,650 Texas 1,046,430 Utah 57,850 Virginia 190,840 Wisconsin 0 Wyoming 17,390 Note: Wisconsin dec lined to expand Medicaid but is effectively eliminating its gap by pursuing its own partial expansion.Source: Kaiser Family Foundation From staff reports Fix proves too costly; nuclear plant retiredPATFAHERTY Staff writerCitrus Countys nuclear power era officially ended Feb.5, 2013, when Duke Energy announced it would retire the Crystal River nuclear plant. The plant known as CR3 started operating in 1977, but has been off line since 2009, when a separation occurred in the concrete in one of the walls of the containment building. According to documents filed with the Public Service Commission, the damage took place in October2009 while workers were creating an opening in the structure for replacing two steam generators. The plant had been shut down for refueling and maintenance when the damage occurred. In March 2011, during the final stages of returning the unit to service, a second separation occurred in a different wall and the company stopped work. And while no work was being performed, a third separation occurred in July2011. The status of CR3 affected a range of issues, including the amount Progress Energy could collect from customers, the cost of replacement power, a rate case, and an $835million insurance settlement. There was also a growing resentment by power customers and some state lawmakers over the practice of utilities billing nuclear construction costs in advance. For Progress Energy, advance billing would pay for a $617million planned upgrade to CR3 and looming costs for the proposed $19billion to $24billionnuclear plant in Levy County. Last January, Duke Energy, which had merged with Progress Energy, began showingSee PLANT/ Page A7 MORE INSIDE Duke Ener gy has taken some steps to benefit the local economy. / Page A7 Janet Masaoydied Jan. 25. Kevin Cowarddied March 13.

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states declined. That leaves 4.8 million people in those states without the health care coverage that their peers elsewhere are getting through the expansion of Medicaid, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation estimate. More than one-fifth of them live in Texas alone, Kaisers analysis found. Among those in the gap is Cheryl Jones, a 61-yearold part-time home-care worker from Erie, Pa., who makes do without health insurance by splitting in half pills for high blood pressure, which she gets from a friend, not a pharmacist. Shed also like to visit a dentist to fix her broken partial dentures. A new pair of glasses might be nice, too. There are a lot of us who need medical help now, she said. I need new glasses, I need to go to a dentist, I need my medicine. ... Think about us working poor. We pay our taxes. The Medicaid expansion was supposed to work hand-in-hand with tax credits subsidizing private insurance for people with slightly higher incomes, two keys to the laws broader aim of extending health insurance to 30 million more people. As an enticement for states to expand Medicaid, the federal government promises to pay nearly all of the cost. Without the expansion, the law is unable to help people who are below the income threshold where tax credits start kicking in, about $11,500 for working adults. On Wednesday, 24 states and Washington, D.C., will extend Medicaid to more than 4 million adults who would otherwise fall into the same gap as Jones. Access to the care theyll get is similar to what people get with private insurance, said Joan Alker, executive director of Georgetown Universitys Center for Children and Families. A 25th state, Michigan, plans to expand in April. Wisconsin effectively eliminated its own gap without using the more generous federal contribution. Politics is apparent in states expansion decisions. Of those that joined it, all but five supported Obama in last years election. Of those that declined, most are more conservative states in the South, Midwest and northern Rocky Mountains that voted against Obama. One outlier is Pennsylvania, a moderate industrial belt state that supported Obama twice. Gov. Tom Corbett, a Republican who sued unsuccessfully as attorney general to overturn the health care law, instead plans to ask the federal government to approve an alternative to a Medicaid expansion. He wants to use the laws generous Medicaid dollars to cover the same population through private insurance companies while stripping down existing benefits under Medicaid, a target of conservatives criticism. With no guarantee of federal approval, hundreds of thousands of Penn sylvanians Kaiser estimates 281,000 could be stuck in the gap until at least 2015. Corbett doesnt apologize for not expanding eligibility right away. Rather, administration officials say they want to put themselves in a better position to create a successful, affordable program. Our goal is to absolutely get this plan approved so that every uninsured Pennsylvanian has health care options, said a senior Corbett aide, Todd Shamash. Corbetts office declined to make him available for an interview. In the meantime, the un insured who fall into this new Medicaid gap are selective about seeking care. Their health care needs dont go away just because theyre uninsured, Alker said, and what theyre missing out on is consistent primary and preventive care. Shelagh Collins of Pittsburgh can get primary care at a federally funded community health center nearby, but she cant afford more specialized treatment for her joint aches and pains that limit her ability to do certain jobs, she said. After she fell and hurt her hip in the spring, she couldnt pay for an MRI, she said. A friends loan of $200 covered a month of physical therapy, but it didnt make the pain disappear. Collins, 56, used to be a high-level administrative assistant at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Now she gets by on occasional secretarial temporary work and unemployment compensation checks and is trying to protect a 401(k) retirement account of $21,000 that she said makes her ineligible for Pennsylvanias current Medicaid program. But the job market is brutal, temp work is scarce and her unemployment compensation checks are at an end, she said. I have never gone through anything like this in my life, Collins said. Lori Miller would like to see a doctor for the headaches, blackouts and weakness that has made it hard for the Punxsutawney seamstress to pursue more work. The 34-year-old wonders what happened to the physically fit woman who used to walk, run or bicycle every day, and she wonders if shes still suffering from a painful bicycle accident two years ago for which she never sought treatment. Living on about $7,000 a year, she cant afford to see a doctor, Miller said. I want to feel like thats an option to me, she said, without worrying about, Do I have enough dollars to do that? A2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE NATION 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000GW0N Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000GNLI Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000GTXT HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life Dont Drink And Drive This patrol car This patrol car was hit by a was hit by a drunk driver. drunk driver. 726-4488 www.sheriffcitrus.org Call a taxi, friend or family member to come and get you! 000GXPN SHERIFF J EFFREY J. D AWSY CAREContinued from Page A1 Associated PressShelagh Collins talks about Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett before she goes to a job-search appointment Monday in Forest Hills, Pa., a suburb of Pittsburgh. Collins gets by on occasional secretarial temp work and unemployment compensation checks, but she cant afford specialized treatment for her various health conditions that limit her ability to do certain jobs. On Thursday, about half the states will expand Medicaid eligibility to more of the working poor under the federal health care law. But Pennsylvania and 24 other states arent expanding Medicaid, and the Kaiser Family Foundation estimates nearly 5million Americans will fall into a coverage gap because of it.

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Around theSTATE Citrus CountyWildlife park to host bird walk The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, in cooperation with Citrus County Audubon Society, will host on Wednesday a First Day Bird Walk on Pepper Creek Trail. There is no charge for the walk, which will start at 8 a.m. An experienced birder from Citrus County Audubon will lead the walk on this trail one of 19 birding trails in Citrus County that are part of the West Section of the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail. Participants should meet at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance to the parks Visitor Center. The bird walk will begin at 8. Binoculars and a field guide are recommended. GOP assembly to view WWII moviesThe Saturday,Jan.11, meeting of the Ronald Reagan RepublicanAssembly will feature a presentation by the president of the Friends of the Homosassa Public Library. There will also be a showing of the first of six volumes of the Emmy Award-winning Victory At Sea documentary. The meeting will begin at 1p.m. at 938 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.19) in the South Square Plaza. Refreshments will be provided. CASA donations are accepted. For information, call 352257-5381.Holiday hours for county offices setCitrus County government offices will be closed Wednesday, Jan. 1, in observance of New Years Day. The county landfill will be closed on Wednesday, Jan. 1, as well. All libraries will be closing at 5p.m. Tuesday, Dec.31, and will be closed on New Years Day. All community buildings and parks, including Bicentennial Park pool, will be closed on New Years Day. The Animal Services shelter also will be closed for the holiday.Water/wastewater board to meetRolling Oaks Utilities general rate case will be discussed at the next meeting of the Citrus County Water and Wastewater Authority, 1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6, in Room 166 at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. The authority is a board of appointees that provides for the regulation of private water, bulk water and wastewater utilities in the unincorporated areas of Citrus County. For information, call 352-419-6520 or visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/ commissioners/advboards/ wwa/wwa.htm.OrlandoZimmerman trial top state story for 2013The murder trial of George Zimmerman in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin is Floridas story of the year. Florida newspaper and broadcast editors picked the trial in which Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges as the states top story of 2013. The Zimmerman trial tackled two of the thorniest issues confronting America: race and gun control. Trailing the Zimmerman trial in the editors picks was the Florida Legislatures refusal to expand the states Medicaid program. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE ChronicleThe Chronicleinvited readers to vote for the top local stories for 2013, and for the most part they agreed with our selections; however, a strong write-in campaign launched the story of wounded Marine Lance Cpl. Josh Whites recovery into their top 10. The Duke tax issue and Scott Adams first year as commissioner received the most votes by readers. The following is a list of those top stories with some reader comments: Josh White Just last December, White, who was recovering from injuries sustained in August 2012 during an improvised explosive device attack while on patrol in Afghanistan, visited Citrus County for an emotional homecoming. In April 2013, he visited the White House after being welcomed by President Barack Obama before setting off on a four-day Soldier Ride bicycle trek from Washington, D.C., to Annapolis, Md. White has been getting more acclimated to his new prosthetics and has tested them on the ski slopes of Breckenridge, Colo., and climbed an ice wall. His family expects him to return to Citrus County early next year.I have known him (Josh White) and his Mom since he was in primary school. He is such an inspiration to his family, Citrus County, and especially to his brothers and sisters in service to our country. Mary Schlumberger One Rake at a Time Someone like Art Jones is making impact in this county to clean our water we so desperately need while no one else is even making an attempt. I hope this becomes the event to make people aware of our resources the water we need and the wildlife we so depend on. Clifford Wiggins Duke Energy tax bill fight and CMH dispute/sale I dont understand why the Duke Energy/property appraiser and CMH board disputes are not negotiated and settled. Ren RenfroAlso receiving votes were: Commissioner Scott Adams first year. Duke Energy closes CR3 nuclear plant. Duke to build natural gas plant. Ed Peters taking daughters from guardians. Duke stops construction plans for Levy nuke plants. Search for executive director of Tourism Development Council. Special to the ChronicleOn April 17, Crystal River native and U.S. Marine Josh White was one of 50 wounded warriors who was first welcomed by President Barack Obama at the White House and then did a four-day Soldier Ride bicycle trek from Washington, D.C., to Annapolis, Md. Readers have their say Locals weigh in on what they considered the top county stories for 2013 Josh White walks with his younger brother, Matthew White, 11. MATTREINIG Hernando Today BROOKSVILLE A sergeant and a deputy with the Hernando County Sheriffs Office resigned and were charged with felony grand theft after two criminal investigations found they stole money from separate accounts, including one established for the widow of a captain killed in the line of duty. Sgt. Joseph Reid, 41, was charged with grand theft of more than $300 and less than $20,000; and Deputy Michael Glatfelter, 51, was charged with third-degree grand theft and third-degree organized scheme to defraud. Confronted with the allegations Thursday, Reid and Glatfelter immediately resigned from the sheriffs office. Prosecutors subsequently leveled the criminal charges. The joint investigation by the sheriffs and local state attorneys offices also found that newly-promoted vice and narcotics unit Capt. Tom Garcia was aware Reid stole at least $1,500 in vice-issued money, and that Garcia used his own money to cover up Reids theft. Garcia was not charged with a crime or disciplined by sheriffs investigators. He is on paid administrative leave, Hernando Sheriff Al Nienhuis said at a news conference Friday. The sheriffs investigation concluded Reid used the vice-issued currency for personal use as far back as June 2011, and records include log books with entries for suspicious purchases. Another investigation found Glatfelter, treasurer of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 164 from 2006-10, stole a total of $8,300 for personal items ranging from tobacco to electronics to groceries. The most blatant transaction came one year after Glatfelter stepped down as treasurer, investigators reported, when he took $1,100 from the Scott Bierwiler Memorial Fund. That fund was established to help the widow, two daughters, and son of Capt. Scott Bierwiler, who died Feb. 19, 2009, at age 42 in a head-on collision with a Nature Coast High School student. Today I have the very, very distasteful task of releasing some details into two separate criminal investigations, Nienhuis told reporters at Fridays news conference. This betrayal of trust has left me angry; its left me frustrated, but most of all its made me disappointed. Reid and Glatfelter turned themselves in at Citrus County Jail on Friday morning. Both deputies have arrested inmates now held at Hernando County Jail and thus were booked in Citrus for their own protection, sheriffs officials said. Nienhuis said monies entrusted to Glatfelter in the Scott Bierwiler Memorial Fund are nearly depleted, and he thinks, because the state attorneys office is involved, restitution will be sought in the case. Why that money wasnt given to (Bierwilers widow), I dont know, Nienhuis said. Well do everything we can to make sure that money goes to the right place. The arrested deputies personnel records indicate they had a combined 57 commendations and only one written reprimand against Glatfelter in 2008 for failing to complete a fatality crash report. Thank you for the opportunity to serve this county and the people who live here, Glatfelter wrote in a resignation letter he submitted Thursday. He made $58,492 annually and had been with the sheriffs office since 1989, records show. He was a member of the Livestock and Crisis Response teams. Reid signed a resignation letter stating he will receive about 172 hours of accrued pay at his current annual salary of $55,841 in exchange for a complete and unconditional waiver of all rights and remedies. He began working at the sheriffs office in 2001. He was a patrol officer, vice detective, and sergeant with the vice and narcotics unit. Both men, if convicted of the criminal charges, face up to five years in prison and $5,000 in fines, Nienhuis said. Meanwhile, the sheriff said, his office must deal with damaged trust among citizens already weary of, and not surprised by, corruption in law enforcement. Two Hernando deputies arrested Men are being held in Citrus County; fears for safety at Hernando facility Special to the ChronicleHernando County Sheriff Al Nienhuis announces the arrests at a news conference on Friday.

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Birthday You will feel a sense of wanderlust this year. You will not always make the best decisions, but you will learn from your mistakes. Update your skills if you want to make professional advancements. Idleness is your enemy. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You will have extra discipline today, so you should be off to a good start. Make careful plans, and network with people who can be helpful. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Make a point of being social, and you will have a chance to meet someone who will help you reach your goals. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take a moment to re-examine your strategy before you head down the wrong path. Although you will have great stamina, your tendency will be to overdo things. Aries (March 21-April 19) Prepare to enjoy a spectacular event. Take the time to make everything perfect. Its best to approach the new year with optimism. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You may feel vulnerable, but a change in attitude is all that is needed. Think carefully about what you want and need. Gemini (May 21-June 20) This will be a memorable time. Opportunities will be vast. You should be able to pick and choose from an array of options. Cancer (June 21-July 22) You are prepared to enjoy the wonder of life. Although you face changes, this year promises to reward you for all your hard work and tough sacrifices. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Nothing can get in the way of having fun. Its time to cut loose and celebrate the past and the future. Things are beginning to heat up in your life, so enjoy the sizzle. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Its best to take a rest today. Overdoing it will lead to setbacks. Dont be misled by others. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) A shrewd change will help you follow your dreams. Make a New Years resolution that you will be able to uphold. Its a busy time, and you should be at your best. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Acknowledging that you are reaching the end of a cycle will prepare you for the future. Make an effort to focus on your finances. Dont repeat the cash flow crises youve experienced in the past. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Youll be able to charm others with ease. Attending events may lead to opportunities for romance. The new year will be a time of reinvention. Invest in your goals with an open mind. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, Dec. 31, the 365th and final day of 2013. Todays Highlight in History: On Dec. 31, 1879, Thomas Edison first publicly demonstrated his electric incandescent light in Menlo Park, N.J. On this date: In 1909, the Manhattan Bridge, spanning the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn, was officially opened to vehicular traffic. In 1942, Frank Sinatra opened a singing engagement at New Yorks Paramount Theater. In 1946, President Harry S. Truman officially proclaimed the end of hostilities in World War II. In 1993, Brandon Teena, a 21year-old female-born transgender, was slain along with two other people at a farmhouse near Humboldt, Neb. (Convicted murderer John Lotter is on Nebraskas death row; codefendant Thomas Nissen is serving a life sentence. The case inspired the 1999 movie Boys Dont Cry.) Ten years ago: A car bomb ripped through a crowded restaurant hosting a New Years Eve party in Baghdad, Iraq, killing eight Iraqis. Five years ago: A woman gave birth aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 59 while en route from Amsterdam to Boston. One year ago: Seven NFL coaches and five general managers were fired in a flurry of sackings the day after the regular season ended. Todays Birthdays: Actor Sir Anthony Hopkins is 76. Actor Tim Considine (TV: My Three Sons) is 73. Actor Sir Ben Kingsley is 70. Actor Tim Matheson is 66. Actor James Remar is 60. Actress Bebe Neuwirth is 55. Actor Val Kilmer is 54. Actor Don Diamont is 51. Actress Gong Li is 48. Actor Lance Reddick is 44. Rapper PSY (Park Jae-sang) is 36. Olympic gold medal gymnast Gabby Douglas is 18. Thought for Today: Drop the last year into the silent limbo of the past. Let it go, for it was imperfect, and thank God that it can go. Brooks Atkinson, American drama critic (1894-1984).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Todays active pollen: Juniper, maple, oak Todays count: 9.1/12 Wednesdays count: 7.7 Thursdays count: 6.7 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Pair of old Broadway favorites on top of box office in 2013NEW YORK Broadways highest-grossing show in 2013 wasnt a new strutting musical or a bawdy one or even one with a big star. The crown goes to a regal but gray-maned performer The Lion King, now in its 16th year. And another veteran turned heads when Wicked recorded Broadways highest singleweek gross ever. End-of-year-data from the Broadway League released Monday shows that the old-timers are going just fine. The 10-year-old Wicked earned a staggering $3.2 million over nine performances for the week ending Sunday. Its the first time a show has ever crossed the $3 million mark in a single week. Another pro, The Lion King, ruled all other shows during the entire calendar year, ending with nearly $97 million, despite the fact that there are five bigger theaters on Broadway.Vegas New Years Eve about big names, bigger bashesLAS VEGAS Sin City is set to ring in 2014 with big-name concerts, celebrity-hosted parties and an eight-minute rooftop fireworks display billed as the nations largest. Pop star Bruno Mars is christening the Cosmopolitans new Chelsea Ballroom, JohnLegend is performing at Aria, and Maroon 5 is playing at Mandalay Bay. Other casinos are touting pricey nightclub bashes hosted by reality-TV and music celebrities, including the original celebutante, Paris Hilton. More than 330,000 tourists are expected to count down the end of the year as law enforcement officers keep the peace and casino bosses watch profits roll in. With New Years Eve falling on a Tuesday, casinos are offering up special New Years Eve Eve events on Monday.Roberts thanks girlfriend following rare illnessLOS ANGELES Robin Roberts thanked her longtime girlfriend, Amber Laign, in a year-end post published Sunday on the ABC News anchors Facebook page. The message, which follows Roberts battle with a life-threatening illness, is the first time the Good Morning America anchor has publicly acknowledged her 10-year, same-sex relationship with Laign, a massage therapist from the San Francisco Bay Area. Roberts post was confirmed by ABC News spokeswoman Heather Riley Sunday was the anniversary of Roberts 100-day milestone following a bone marrow transplant in September 2012 for treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare blood and bone marrow disease. In May, Grand Central Publishing announced Roberts, one of the most popular figures in morning TV news, will write a memoir about her battle with MDS and the life lessons she continues to gather following her return to GMA last February. From wire reports Associated PressThe Minskoff Theatre and the marquee for The Lion King are seen Jan. 19, 2012, in New York. Broadways highest grossing show in 2013 was The Lion King, now in its 16th year. Elton John and Tim Rices The Lion King ruled all other shows during the entire calendar year, ending with $96,983,838. A4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 000GT1P in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . C10 Notice to Creditors/ Administration . . . . . . . . C10 Robin Roberts

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A5 000H18D

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The Rev. James Hoge, age 96, died March16. Back when only about a dozen Catholics lived in Citrus County, the Rev. Hoge came to establish a church. Six parishes and a Catholic school later, the influence of the man known to many simply as Father touched multiple thousands of Catholics, as well as nonCatholics, countywide. Joe Silvestro, age 87, died March26. Founder of Joes Deli in Inverness and local baseball umpire, Joe loved four things: his family, music, Little League and Frank Sinatra. Before moving to Florida from New York, Joe was a grocery man by day and a drummer at night, on call with Doc Severinsens band on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. He also played drums for television commercials. Glenn Kilgus, age 81, died April11. Glenn, together with his wife, Rose, both survivors of heart disease, worked tirelessly to support the American Heart Association and cardiac research. Locally they supported the Cattle Barons Ball and Citrus Memorial hospitals Heart Ball. Dr. Arnelle EslavaFernandez, age 55, died April15. Arnelle was known as a tough but loving, dedicated physician who demanded the best care for her patients. A native of the Philippines, education was important to her and she sent a lot of money to her family in the Philippines, putting many nieces and nephews through college. The Rev. Dr. Bob Blackburn, age 72, died May3. The former pastor of First United Methodist Church in Inverness in the 1990s, Dr. Bob was known for his beautiful tenor voice. He formed and directed the Liberty Choir, which became known for large-scale, theatrical productions, Easter cantatas and patriotic extravaganzas that packed the house. Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalez, age 83, died May26. Together with his friend the late Pete DeRosa, Dr. Gonzalez founded Seven Rivers Community Hospital. He was: hospital chief of staff, chairman of the hospitals governing board, medical director at Crystal River Geriatric Center, staff physician at Key Training Center and president of the Crystal River Rotary Club. He loved fishing, boating, scuba diving and hunting. He had his private pilot license and enjoyed flying even from Crystal River to Inverness to check on his patients. Kane, age 12, died June1. Kane, a retired German shepherd K-9 officer for the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, was involved in more than 1,500 drug searches leading to 459 arrests. He made numerous appearances at schools and community events with his partner, sheriffs Sgt. Ryan Glaze. Betty Fowler, age none of your business, died June29. Wife of former county commissioner Jim Fowler, Betty was known for her infectious laughter and love of people and good times. Jaime Collazo, age 70, died July4. Nicknamed Mr. C by his boxing students, the lifelong boxer dreamed of opening his own old school boxing gym. He attained his dream earlier this year when he opened Lake Side Boxing in Hernando on May 1, and on June 3 he broke his neck while riding his scooter to the gym; he died July 4 from complications after surgery. Janet Gonter, age 79, died July20. In 2003, Janet was named one of Citrus Countys 10 Most Admired Women most admired for making a difference. One of the places she made a difference was at the Key Training Center, where she worked as the dietary manager. She also began what is now called Miss Janets Lunch, a community picnic on the grounds of her church, the Church of Christ in Floral City, which still meets every Wednesday at 11 a.m. Bob England, age 90, died July29. A longtime Inverness banker and World War II and Korean War veteran, retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Robert England was named the 1988ChronicleCitizen of the Year. He was a founding director of Hospice of Citrus County, the United Way of Citrus County and Inverness Elks Lodge, a past director of CASA, Florida Sheriffs Association and the Citrus County Fair, as well as being involved with the American Heart Association, to name just a few of the organizations to which he lent his time. Georgeanna Phelps, age 78, died Aug.12. A community activist whose motto was Do the right thing, Georgeanna formed Spring Busters, the volunteer organization that worked tirelessly to clean up and clear out the clogged-up Bluebird Springs and neglected park in Homosassa, and also helped found the We Care Food Pantry. She was also an avid Democrat and was known for her staunch opposition to the Freezer, the tiki bar that was added on to the Cedar Key Fish House in Old Homosassa. Bill Hoppy Hoppert, age 86, died Aug.14. A past vice president on the board of directors for the Citrus County Fair Association, Bill loved everything about the fair and the fairgrounds. He was an incredible craftsman he could make anything out of wood. As a longtime member of the Citrus Model Railroad Club at the fairgrounds, his handiwork is on display at the clubhouse in the Otto Allen building. Personable, good-natured, friendly, light-hearted, Bill always looked on the bright side of life, and with the gift of gab, he always had a story to tell. Nancy Sullivan, age 76, died Sept.23. Although her real job was office manager at Citrus Title in Inverness, Nancy was best known as everyones best friend and a person who was an excellent listener and keeper of secrets. For 30 years she was the go-to person for anyone with any question about land title and property history. Tom Corcoran, age 45, died Sept.27. The marketing manager at Life Care Center, Tom loved a good practical joke, loved his family, loved the people he worked with and for. He was a Chamber of Commerce ambassador and the Chamber sunshine person. You liked him the moment you met him. Dr. Robert Bedell, age 72, died Oct.15. As the Citrus County medical director of HPH Hospice, Dr. Bedell was known as a dedicated, caring, compassionate doctor. He owned homes in Citrus County and Vero Beach, spending Mondays through Thursdays here and traveling to Vero on the weekends. He died in a traffic accident south of Floral City. The Rev. Dr. Babb Adams, age 84, died Oct.30. Preacher loved and served the people of Inverness for more than 30 years 21 years as pastor of First Baptist Church in Inverness and then as interim pastor and integral member of Cornerstone Baptist Church. He was known for his quiet, kind manner and great stories. Ouida White, age 88, died Oct.31. Noted for her love of and for the Crystal River Archaeological State Park, she was its oldest and possibly its longest-serving volunteer. Mattie Mae Pipgras, age 99, died Nov.23. The first Miss Citrus County, Inverness native Miss Mattie loved Citrus County, especially Inverness. She was a Cub Scout den mother, Inverness Womans Club officer, a sponsor of the Little Womans Club and the Inverness Junior Womans Club. She served in the PTA, was a charter member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, a former member of the Inverness Golf and Country Club and a member of First United Methodist Church in Inverness for more than 90 years. Her second husband, George Pipgras, was a pitcher for the Yankees back when Babe Ruth played. Sandra Ackley, 70INVERNESSSandra E. Ackley, 70, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Sunday, Dec.29, 2013, at her residence. She was born March30, 1943, in Morristown, N.J., to the late Carlton and Marion (Pettey) Wood. Sandra arrived in this area in 2005 coming from Stanhope, N.J., and was owner of Sandys Clean Sweep Cleaning Service. She loved cooking and enjoyed Dunkin Donuts with her coffee. Sandra held memberships in the Order of the Eastern Star, Pearl Chapter 79, in Dover, N.J.; and the American Legion Post No.0225, Floral City. Sandra is survived by her loving husband of 28 years, Ronald M. Ackley; daughter, Robin (Abraham) Ghaebreal of Wharton, N.J.; stepdaughter, Lorinda Ackley of Inverness; brother, Carlton Wood; sisters, Dorothy Loard and Carol Behre; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Private cremation arrangements under the care of Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Dolores Wise, 90INVERNESSDolores M. Wise, 90, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Friday, Dec.27, 2013, at Hospice of Citrus County. She was born May30, 1923, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to the late Paul and Caroline (Eberling) Bergin. Dolores arrived in this area in 1981 coming from Long Island, N.Y. She was a devoted homemaker, and a member of Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness. Dolores enjoyed story writing, and was a talented seamstress, having made all of her daughters wedding and bridal party dresses. She also earned two assistant nursing degrees. She is survived by her loving husband of 70 years, George J. Wise; one son, George Mickey Wise Jr. of Long Island; daughters, Carol (Mike) Stewart of Long Island, Ginny (Bob) Joseph of Long Island, Patty (Matthew) Van Bourgondien of Connecticut, Dotti (Tom) Christensen, Inverness; brother, Paul G. (Carol) Bergin of Connecticut; 14 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by sisters, Frances and Jean Bergin. The family will be receiving friends at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness, at 9a.m. Thursday, Jan.2, 2014, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. Burial will occur at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, following the Mass. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Randy Billings, 34MANHATTAN, KAN.Chief Warrant Officer 2, Randy Lee Billings, U.S. Army, 34, Manhattan, Kan., died Dec. 17, 2013, in a helicopter crash while serving with NATO forces in Now Bahar, Afghan istan. Five of his fellow soldiers died in the same crash. He was born Sept.1, 1979, in Poteau, Okla., and served our country proudly for more than 16 years. He was assigned to the U.S. Army, 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion from Fort Riley, Kan., and served two deployments in Afghanistan and two in Iraq. Left to cherish his memory is his wife, Ashley Weaver Billings, Manhattan, Kan.; his father, Robert Billings and mother, Sheryl Brown, both of Heavener, Okla.; and all of his family and friends across the world. Family, friends, and military personnel will celebrate his life at 11a.m. Saturday, Jan.4, 2014, at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Fla. Military honors and burial will follow at Florida National Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the church prior to services. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory of Inverness, is serving the family. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Randys memory may be directed to Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Lester Everest, 97CRYSTAL RIVERLester James Everest, 97, of Crystal River, died Monday, Dec.30, 2013, at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center. Strickland Funeral Home with crematory of Crystal River is assisting the family with private arrangements. Carl Garrand, 82INVERNESSCarl W. Garrand, 82, of Inverness, Fla., died Dec.28, 2013, under the care of Hospice of Citrus County in Inverness. Arrangements are by McGan Cremation Service LLC, Hernando.Nancy Wood, 80FLORAL CITYNancy A. Wood, 80, Floral City, Fla., died Sunday, Dec.29, 2013, at Citrus Memorial hospital. Private cremation arrangements are by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Max Parton, 84FLORAL CITYMax Wayne Parton, 84, Floral City, Fla., passed away Dec.29, 2013, in Arbor Trail Health & Rehab Center. A native of Decatur, Ill., he was born July15, 1929, to the late Wayne C. and Delta (Cole) Parton and came to this area from there in 1986. He retired from the Parton & Wene Construction Company after 31 years and served our country during the Korean War in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the Floral City United Methodist Church, VFW Post 7122, Floral City, and American Legion Post 105 in Decatur, Ill. Max was a master wood worker and a die hard Chicago Cubs fan. Survivors include his wife, Suzanne (nee) Bottrell Parton; two children, Louise (Mike) Barnes, Floral City; Jeanne (Steve) Bainbridge, Decatur, Ill.; his sister, Charlotte Anderson, Sullivan, Ill.; two grandchildren, Joe Bainbridge, and Brad Bainbridge and wife Judy; and sister-in-law, Sherill Parton. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Gene and Ronnie Parton. The celebration of life service will be conducted at 1p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, 2014, from the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home of Inverness, with Pastor Mary Gestrich officiating. Burial with military honors will follow at Florida National Cemetery. Calling hours will be 12 p.m., until the hour of service. In lieu of flowers, memorials are requested to VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City, FL 34436. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. A6TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, 000GTX2 Contact Anne Farrior 564-2931 000GTFM Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhome.com FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000GX1N 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000GRX8 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000GR6H60 Serving all of Citrus County (352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com Serving all your cremation needs. 000GS4D AUDIOLOGY Crystal River Inverness Call For A Free Consultation (352) 795-5700 Our Patients Are Super Hearos Conquer Your Hearing Loss! DOLORES WISE Mass: Thurs 10:00AM Our Lady of Fatima DAVID CLARK Graveside Service: Fri 2:30 PM Florida National Cemetery DONALD QUILLING Service: Sun 2:00 PM LINDA EMANN Service: Mon 12:00 Noon LDS Church-Lecanto MAX PARTON Service: Thurs 1:00 PM Burial: Florida National Cemetery000GUDWWith CrematoryFuneral Home 726-8323 SO YOU KNOW Early production deadlines today mean the submission deadline for obituaries is noon today. Email obits@ chronicleonline.com. FREE OBITUARIES Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated Press style unless a request to the contrary is made. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are charged a base fee of $25 plus $10 per column inch, payable in advance. Max Parton Dolores Wise Randy Lee Billings Sandra Ackley Obituaries LEFTContinued from Page A1 Joe Silvestrodied March 26. Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalezdied May 26. Betty Fowlerdied June 29. Dr. Robert Bedelldied Oct. 15. Mattie Mae Pipgrasdied Nov. 23.

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DUI arrests Joseph Niciforo, 71, of South Skyline Drive, Inverness, at 8:13 p.m. Dec. 28 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Niciforo is accused of failing to maintain a single lane on Old Floral City Road. He was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.095percent and 0.099percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500. Joseph Humble, 66, of South Istachatta Road, Floral City at 11:56 p.m. Dec. 28 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Humble was involved in a car accident. He was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.157percent and 0.158percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500.Domestic battery arrests Melissa Larkins, 55, of Homosassa, at 4:34p.m. Dec.28 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Kevin Lapuma, 38, of Hernando, at 9:15a.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. He was also charged with felony grand theft and burglary to an unoccupied structure. No bond. Cassandra Paquette, 31, of Homosassa, at 9:10p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Kristina Juliano, 34, of Hernando, at 9:54p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. William Grimes III, 46, of Hernando, at 9:54p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond.Other arrests Marcus Blackwell, 36, of Old Dixie Way, Forest Park, Ga., at 7:29p.m. Dec.27 on an active Carroll County, Ga., warrant for violation of probation stemming from an original charge of forgery. According to his arrest affidavit, Blackwell is charged as a fugitive from justice. Bond was denied. Emmitt Carter, 55, of South Scarboro Avenue, Lecanto, at 9:32a.m. Dec.28 on an active warrant for two counts of felony aggravated battery with use of a deadly weapon. Bond $10,000. Shawn Peck, 39, of West Sugarberry Lane, Beverly Hills, at 12:59p.m. Dec.28 on a misdemeanor charge of drug paraphernalia. According to his arrest affidavit Peck is accused of having a glass pipe containing meth residue in his possession. Bond $500. Jose Mayol, 20, of Claymore Street, Inverness, at 6:30p.m. Dec.28 on a felony charge of fleeing or eluding law enforcement and a misdemeanor charge of driving while license was suspended or revoked due to financial responsibility. According to his arrest affidavit, Mayol is accused of driving an ATV four-wheeler at a high rate of speed. When a deputy tried to stop him, Mayol refused to pull over and instead attempted to elude the deputy. He was also issued citations for running a stop sign and driving an ATV on a roadway. Bond $5,500. Cleveland White, 37, of Crystal River, at 8:59p.m. Dec.28 on a felony charge of aggravated battery on a pregnant victim. No bond. Jonathon Argerenon, 35, of Forrest Avenue, Cantonment, at 10:50p.m. Dec.28 on an active warrant for felony violation of probation, stemming from original charges of feeing and eluding an officer and driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Argerenon was transported to the Citrus County Detention Facility from Escambia County. Bond was denied. Michael Burns III, 18, of North Page Avenue, Hernando, at 1:28a.m. Dec.29 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance and a misdemeanor charge of drug paraphernalia. According to his arrest affidavit, deputies responded to a complaint about a loud party that Burns was attending. He was found to be in possession of ecstasy and a plastic straw with visible residue. Bond $2,500. William Mannix, 72, of West Lexington Drive, Crystal River, at 9:04p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of an accident with property damage. According to his arrest affidavit he was involved in a car accident and stopped briefly, but then left without providing information or rendering aid to injured passengers. Bond $250. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A commercial burglary was reported at 9:42a.m. Friday, Dec.27, in the 6300 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 12:44p.m. Dec.27 in the 20 block of N. Edinburgh Drive, Inverness. A residential burglary was reported at 10:04a.m. Saturday, Dec.28, in the 5600 block of W. Knoxville Lane, Dunnellon. A vehicle burglary was reported at 2:42p.m. Dec.28 in the 5000 block of S. Felix Point, Homosassa. A commercial burglary was reported at 7:09a.m. Sunday, Dec.29, in the 900 block of E. Ray St., Hernando. A vehicle burglary was reported at 11:54p.m. Dec.29 in the 600 block of S.E. First Court, Crystal River.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 9:37a.m. Friday, Dec.27, in the 5500 block of W. Meadow St., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 10:42a.m. Dec.27 in the 300 block of N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. A petit theft was reported at 2:28p.m. Dec.27 in the 2000 block of N. Cedarhouse Terrace, Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 2:45p.m. Dec.27 in the 8300 block of E. Orange Ave., Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 2:46p.m. Dec.27 in the 3000 block of E. Murray St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 3:28p.m. Dec.27 in the 200 block of S. Elmhurst Point, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 5:23p.m. Dec.27 in the 7600 block of W. Fern Place, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 5:55p.m. Dec.27 in the 7700 block of E. Pine Lake Lane, Floral City. A grand theft was reported at 6:43p.m. Dec.27 in the 6300 block of E. Mobile St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 7:24p.m. Dec.27 in the 1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 7:44a.m. Saturday, Dec.28, in the 5300 block of E. Live Oak Lane, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 10:51a.m. Dec.28 in the 9600 block of W. Cleveland Lane, Crystal River. and Duke filed a lawsuit against property appraiser Geoffrey Greene over assessment of pollution control equipment installed in 2009. Greene said he had assessed the equipment at 60percent of its cost, while the company wanted it assessed at salvage value, 10percent. But with that issue still fresh, Alex Glenn, the companys Florida president, sent local officials a letter stating its 2013 property taxes will be the same or less than it paid for 2012. Glenn also warned if company decided to permanently shelve the nuclear plant, the tax payment could cut another $6million to $9million. In March, the county agreed to put $350,000 into the issue, with money going for legal fees and costs associated with the Duke appraisal. By then, the county and the school board had already put about $175,000 each into the tax dispute. Subsequently, the judge handling the case denied Citrus County government and the school board from joining the suit on Greenes behalf. As county budget season started in June, Greene presented a worst-case scenario to give county officials a realistic revenue outlook since Duke represented 24percent of the countys taxable property. Outside appraisers brought in to assist the county concluded Duke had significantly undervalued its tangible property at the energy complex. A hearing on the disputes was set for early September. Greenes case had a setback in November when a judge ruled the appraiser could not challenge a state law that allows Duke to treat $1.3billion worth of pollution-control equipment as salvage. Circuit Court Judge T. Michael Johnson also said a 1967 state law clearly allows power companies to assess pollution-control equipment as salvage, which drops its taxable value by about $900million. At that point, Greene said he would ask the judge to direct both parties into mediation. Greene said a recent full appraisal of the Duke property showed about $1.3billion in unreported or under reported assets. Greene said his attorneys will ask Johnson to set the 2012 and 2013 values based on the newer report. Greene also said his consultants are re-evaluating the Duke property to remove the salvage equipments full value. By that time the property appraisers office had spent about $471,000 in legal fees defending the Duke lawsuit. Also in November, as expected, Duke filed a legal challenge to the property tax assessment of the Crystal River Energy Complex for the 2013 tax year. The company also filed a second lawsuit appealing the assessment of 75 parcels of Duke Energy property in Citrus County outside the energy complex. Earlier that week, Duke had made a good-faith payment of $22.3million on its 2013 property taxes, which is about $37.5million less than county officials say the company owes. The lawsuit for 2012 is expected to take place in Orlando in May and last 12 to 15 days. PATFAHERTY Staff writerIn the wake of its tax dispute with Citrus County, retiring the Crystal River area nuclear plant and dropping the proposed Levy County nuclear plant, Duke Energy has taken some steps to benefit the local economy. In September Duke announced plans to build a natural gas generation plant in Citrus County, an option that has been discussed since February. Using a self-build option, the company responded to its own request for proposals. There were seven responses, which are still being evaluated. A short list is expected to be released in March. The plant will supply approximately 1,640mega watts, compared to the 860megawatts of the Crystal River nuclear plant, and is expected to be operational in 2018. The gas plant would cost an estimated $1.24 billion and would create approximately 60 full-time jobs in addition to construction work. While that process moves forward, a 24-inch, 24-mile natural gas pipeline has been proposed to run from Marion County, across Citrus, terminating near the Crystal River Energy Complex in northwest Citrus County. It is part of the proposed Sabal Trail project, a 474mile, 36-inch diameter pipeline to bring natural gas from Alabama into Central Florida. In August, the Duke Energy Foundation announced that it would contribute almost half a million dollars to the Economic Development Council, Chamber of Commerce and CLM Workforce Development Board. The EDC would get $444,000 to support a three-year initiative to develop and implement a five-year plan to retain and expand businesses in Citrus County. The chamber would get $50,000 to promote tourism as a major economic engine. Workforce would receive $10,000 to offer professional development and training opportunities. In September, Alex Glenn, president of Duke Energy Florida, presented a check for $50,000 to the Kings Bay Rotary Charitable Foundation to help with the continuing Kings Bay cleanup. In October, Duke Energy Florida gave $100,000 grants to both the College of Central Florida and Withlacoochee Technical Institute for programs teaching high-demand job skills. Earlier in the year, the Duke Energy Foundation announced it would contribute $20,000 to the Citrus County Education Foundation. The grant was to fund continued instruction in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) courses and provide transition assistance for students seeking to enter theworkforce.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A7 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000GSMO 000GQMF Dukes economic offense Year inREVIEW DUKEContinued from Page A1 signs of moving on, rather than attempting to fix CR3. Financial analysts suggested it was unlikely Duke would repair the plant. And an independent review estimated the cost to repair CR3 at approximately $1.49billion, with a worst-case scenario of $3.43 billion with a 96month schedule. On Feb.5, Duke announced it would retire CR3 and was reviewing alternatives to replace the lost power. At the time, CR3 had approximately 600 full-time employees, 200 long-term contract workers and another 400 short-term contract workers. And customers had invested about $1.3billion in CR3 through the states advanced nuclear funding provision.Workers affectedThe first of layoffs related to CR3 was announced April1. As of June, Duke reported 97 employees were leaving the company and approximately 350 employees had been identified to remain onsite to work on the transition toward decommissioning. Over time, that number shrink. Nearly 200 employees were redeployed to other positions with Duke or had job offers pending with the company. By November, the onsite workforce was down to about 300 workers, a number that Duke acknowledged will become smaller over time. Early this month, Duke submitted its decommissioning plan for CR3 to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The estimated decommissioning cost is $1.18billion and the selected option is expected to be completed in 2074. Duke is responsible for about 98percent of costs and has maintained a designated trust fund. Currently, no additional charges will be required from Florida customers to supplement the trust fund, though it is subject to annual review. About 275 employees remain at the plant in addition to security personnel. Additional contract workers will be brought in as needed. Throughout the decommissioning process, plant management and staffing levels will adjust to reflect the transition. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. PLANTContinued from Page A1 For theRECORD

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A8TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GZM6

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,600 1,680 1,760 1,840 1,920 D JASON 1,760 1,820 1,880 S&P 500Close: 1,841.07 Change: -0.33 (flat) 10 DAYS 14,500 15,000 15,500 16,000 16,500 17,000 D JASON 15,720 16,140 16,560 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 16,504.29 Change: 25.88 (0.2%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1524 Declined1571 New Highs188 New Lows54 Vol. (in mil.)2,237 Pvs. Volume2,011 1,317 1,217 1222 1345 157 13 NYSE NASD DOW 16504.3516476.8716504.29+25.88+0.16%+25.95% DOW Trans.7364.357335.177351.20-0.88-0.01%+38.52% DOW Util.490.09487.51489.28+1.34+0.27%+7.99% NYSE Comp.10361.3710344.2810357.84+4.61+0.04%+22.67% NASDAQ4158.734142.184154.20-2.39-0.06%+37.58% S&P5001842.471838.771841.07-0.33-0.02%+29.09% S&P4001339.961334.921338.21+1.91+0.14%+31.14% Wilshire 500019633.9819594.7819623.46-0.16...%+30.87% Russell 20001162.601158.851160.59-0.39-0.04%+36.64% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7608.13 8.18+.06 +0.7sss+77.8+85.4dd... AT&T Inc T32.76439.00 35.20+.02 +0.1sss+4.4+9.9261.84f Ametek Inc AME36.86762.05 52.52+.07 +0.1sss+39.8+41.2270.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD83.940106.60 105.36-.68 -0.6tss+20.5+23.53.03e Bank of America BAC10.98015.98 15.54-.13 -0.8tts+33.9+36.9210.04 Capital City Bank CCBG10.12713.08 11.90-.06 -0.5tts+4.7+5.940... CenturyLink Inc CTL29.93242.01 31.96-.05 -0.2tss-18.3-12.3dd2.16 Citigroup C38.65953.68 51.92-.34 -0.7tts+31.2+33.2130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH15.43826.38 23.31-.04 -0.2tts+47.2+54.5cc1.00 Disney DIS48.80074.78 76.23+1.88 +2.5sss+53.1+51.8220.86f Duke Energy DUK62.60675.46 69.11+.16 +0.2sts+8.3+13.1203.12 EPR Properties EPR45.00361.18 49.57-.10 -0.2tts+7.5+14.1203.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.700101.74 100.31-1.20 -1.2tss+15.9+19.7112.52 Ford Motor F12.10618.02 15.28-.02 -0.1ttt+18.0+23.0120.40 Gen Electric GE20.26027.96 27.89+.06 +0.2sss+32.9+38.3210.88f HCAHoldings Inc HCA29.86949.52 47.19+.72 +1.5sss+56.4+51.9152.00e Hlth Mgmt Asc HMA8.76617.28 13.09+.04 +0.3sts+40.5+44.8cc... Home Depot HD60.33082.27 81.94+.30 +0.4sss+32.5+36.2221.56 Intel Corp INTC20.10025.98 25.85+.25 +1.0sss+25.4+29.2140.90 IBM IBM172.574215.90 186.41+1.33 +0.7sss-2.7-2.0133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ20.09934.32 32.46-.16 -0.5tts+53.8+55.233... Lowes Cos LOW34.43952.08 49.25+.42 +0.9sss+38.7+40.9230.72 McDonalds Corp MCD86.817103.70 97.01+.10 +0.1sss+10.0+12.7183.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.28938.98 37.29... ...rts+39.6+41.9141.12 Motorola Solutions MSI53.28067.61 67.25-.08 -0.1tss+20.8+24.8171.24 NextEra Energy NEE67.75889.75 85.05+.35 +0.4sss+22.9+26.2192.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP6.24223.10 9.00-.01 -0.1tts-54.3-53.8dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62421.09 16.77+.04 +0.2sst-7.1-3.1300.80 Regions Fncl RF6.88910.52 9.84+.01 +0.1sss+38.0+42.1120.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.88467.50 47.70+1.54 +3.3stt+15.3+17.5dd... Smucker, JM SJM84.577114.72 103.65+.47 +0.5stt+20.2+23.2202.32 Texas Instru TXN30.30043.83 43.90+.23 +0.5sss+42.1+45.5291.20 Time Warner TWX46.73070.77 69.67+.03 ...rss+45.7+49.3171.15 UniFirst Corp UNF72.410108.27 106.75+.16 +0.2sss+45.6+46.3180.15 Verizon Comm VZ41.50654.31 49.15-.02 ...rts+13.6+17.9692.12 Vodafone Group VOD24.42039.29 39.01-.24 -0.6tss+54.9+61.91.61e WalMart Strs WMT67.37981.37 78.63+.16 +0.2sts+15.2+17.8151.88 Walgreen Co WAG36.34960.93 57.84+.41 +0.7sts+56.3+60.4201.26 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposed reducing reimbursements for the diagnostic service by roughly 49 percent. Retail sales for the brand have jumped 15 percent through November and the carmaker expects to remain North Americas top seller. The tire maker called off its sale to Indias Apollo Tyres, unraveling a $2.2 billion deal announced just over six months ago. Frozen was No. 2 at the box office, earning $28.9 million last weekend and $248.4 million domestically after six weeks. After hitting record highs Thursday, the micro-blogging site has plunged, giving up $7 billion in market capitalization. Stock indexes were little changed Monday, cruising toward a quiet end to what has been a boisterous year. Barring a big drop on Tuesday, the Standard & Poors 500 index is set to record its best annual performance since a 31 percent surge in 1997. 20 40 60 $80 OD N TwitterTWTR Close: $60.51 -3.24 or -5.1% $38.80$74.73 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 55.1m (4.9x avg.) $32.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 60 70 $80 OD N Walt DisneyDIS Close: $76.23 1.88 or 2.5% $48.80$76.54 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 8.5m (1.3x avg.) $133.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 22.6 1.1% 20 25 30 $35 OD N Cooper Tire & RubberCTB Close: $24.20 1.24 or 5.4% $20.55$34.80 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 6.5m (3.3x avg.) $1.58 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 6.5 1.7% 15 16 17 $18 OD N Ford MotorF Close: $15.28 -0.02 or -0.1% $12.10$18.02 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 32.8m (0.8x avg.) $59.19 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.8 2.6% 20 25 30 $35 OD N Myriad GeneticsMYGN Close: $20.79 -3.35 or -13.9% $20.02$38.27 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 10.6m (4.2x avg.) $1.55 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.0 ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.97 percent Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.060.06....01 6-month T-bill.090.08+0.01.09 52-wk T-bill.110.11....13 2-year T-note.380.40-0.02.25 5-year T-note1.711.74-0.03.71 10-year T-note2.973.00-0.031.70 30-year T-bond3.903.94-0.042.87 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.713.75-0.042.48 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.135.14-0.014.10 Barclays USAggregate2.502.50...1.73 Barclays US High Yield5.675.66+0.016.10 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.574.59-0.023.62 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.881.89-0.01.97 Barclays US Corp3.283.28...2.68 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil fell for the first time in four days, dropping back below $100 per barrel. Gold also fell, as the precious metal closes out its first down year since 2000.Crude Oil (bbl)99.29100.32-1.03+8.1 Ethanol (gal)1.941.96-0.36-11.6 Heating Oil (gal)3.083.12-1.50+1.1 Natural Gas (mm btu)4.434.41+1.34+32.1 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.792.82-1.01-0.9 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1203.101216.10-0.90-28.2 Silver (oz) 19.5820.01-2.16-35.1 Platinum (oz)1364.001376.00-0.87-11.4 Copper (lb) 3.423.47+0.01-6.1 Palladium (oz)709.90711.05-0.16+1.0 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.341.34+0.41+3.5 Coffee (lb) 1.151.16-1.42-20.2 Corn (bu) 4.244.28-0.94-39.4 Cotton (lb) 0.850.84+0.64+12.7 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)365.20368.30-0.84-2.3 Orange Juice (lb)1.381.37+1.10+19.1 Soybeans (bu)13.2813.32-0.24-6.4 Wheat (bu) 6.016.09-1.40-22.8 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 24.36+.02 +21.4+22.6+13.0+14.7 CapIncBuAm 58.48+.11 +14.8+15.5+9.7+11.7 CpWldGrIAm 45.24+.07 +24.6+25.9+11.2+14.4 EurPacGrAm 49.03+.14 +20.1+21.1+7.4+13.5 FnInvAm 51.77-.01 +31.0+33.0+14.6+18.3 GrthAmAm 42.81... +33.2+35.4+15.2+18.4 IncAmerAm 20.63+.03 +18.1+19.1+11.8+14.4 InvCoAmAm 36.59... +32.0+33.9+14.5+16.3 NewPerspAm 37.45+.05 +26.4+28.0+12.2+17.0 WAMutInvAm 39.28-.02 +31.4+33.2+16.6+16.7 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.97+.13 +26.1+27.6+8.8+16.7 Stock 168.11-.05 +39.9+42.3+17.9+19.8 Fidelity Contra 95.66-.08 +33.5+35.8+15.7+18.9 LowPriStk d 49.39+.13 +34.1+35.9+16.7+22.1 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 65.22-.01 +31.8+34.0+16.0+18.1 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.42... +14.2+14.7+10.1+15.6 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 13.11... +2.0+2.4+4.9+9.1 GlBondAdv 13.06-.01 +2.2+2.6+5.2+9.3 Harbor IntlInstl 70.89+.25 +16.6+18.0+7.8+14.3 Oakmark Intl I 26.34+.05 +29.4+30.4+12.9+21.1 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 32.76+.01 +29.4+31.4+14.6+17.2 GrowStk 52.27-.01 +38.4+41.2+17.6+22.5 Vanguard 500Adml 169.68-.02 +31.8+34.0+16.0+18.2 500Inv 169.68-.02 +31.6+33.9+15.8+18.0 MuIntAdml 13.71... -1.6-1.5+4.5+5.2 PrmcpAdml 95.46+.12 +39.5+41.4+16.5+19.5 STGradeAd 10.71+.01 +1.2+1.2+2.6+5.4 Tgtet2025 15.72+.02 +17.9+19.1+10.1+13.9 TotBdAdml 10.58+.02 -2.0-2.1+3.3+4.4 TotIntl 16.71+.08 +14.8+15.9+5.2+12.2 TotStIAdm 46.50... +33.0+35.3+16.0+19.2 TotStIdx 46.49+.01 +32.8+35.1+15.9+19.0 Welltn 37.89+.03 +19.5+20.4+11.9+13.8 WelltnAdm 65.44+.06 +19.6+20.5+12.0+13.9 WndsIIAdm 64.92-.01 +30.2+32.1+16.1+17.4 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates Associated PressNEW YORK The stock market ended a quiet Monday mostly where it began as investors shut their books for what has been an extraordinary year on Wall Street. Traders had little corporate or economic news to work through. The bond market was quiet as well. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note continued to hover near 3 percent. The Dow Jones industrial average moved less than 30 points the entire day, the narrowest range for the index since February 2007. Approximately 2.3 billion shares changed hands on the New York Stock Exchange, 40 percent less than average. The Dow ended the day up 25.88 points, or 0.2 percent, to 16,504.29. The very narrow range reflects that theres not a lot of news out there and a lot of investors positions are closed for the year, said Alec Young, chief global strategist with S&P Capital IQ. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell less than a point to 1,841.07 and the technology-heavy Nasdaq composite fell 2.39 points, or 0.1 percent, to 4,154.20. Walt Disney rose $1.88, or 3 percent, to $76.23, the most in the S&P 500. Analysts at Guggenhiem Securities upgraded Disneys stock to a buy from a hold on Friday. With just one trading day left in the year, 2013 is looking to be a memorable one for investors. The S&P 500 is up 29.1 percent so far, on pace for its best year since 1997. The Dow is up 26 percent, the most since 1996. With 2013 in the books, investors have turned their attention to the beginning of 2014. Few expect next year to be as good to investors as 2013 was. After a year like this, people start to think a 30 percent-plus year is normal, said Ron Florance, deputy chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank. We need to be realistic going into next year. The next big piece of news investors will have to work through will be the December jobs report, which will be released Jan. 10. There is also corporate earnings season, which will start in the second half of January. Corporate earnings will be important, particularly since this upcoming season will encompass the closely watched holiday shopping period. The market is rallying on the idea that economic growth is picking up globally and in the U.S., so investors need to see those expectations matched, Young said. Bond yields continue to tread water around the 3 percent level. The yield on the U.S. 10-year note fell to 2.98 percent Monday from 3 percent Friday. The market is expected to be a holding pattern until next week, once all the mid-week holiday disruptions are over, Florance said. Little movement seen in end-of-year trading BusinessBRIEFS Signed contracts to buy US homes level offThe number of Americans who signed contracts to buy existing homes in November was essentially unchanged from October, suggesting sales are stabilizing after several months of declines. The National Association of Realtors said Monday that its seasonally adjusted pending home sales index ticked up to 101.7 from 101.5 in October. The October figure was revised lower from an initial reading of 102.1. Higher mortgage rates and strong price gains over the past two years have slowed sales. The pending home sales index had fallen for five straight months before November. And completed sales of existing homes fell for three straight months, the Realtors said earlier this month.Sales of Ford brand vehicles to top 2.4M in 2013Ford said 2013 North American sales of cars and trucks bearing its namesake brand will top 2.4 million, making Ford again the topselling U.S. brand over Toyota. The automaker said it will sell more than 600,000 passenger cars this year, the most since 2000, with the strongest demand coming from the West and Southeast. Ford said it has seen double-digit sales growth across all segments cars, trucks and utility vehicles. Growth has been led by demand for the Ford Fiesta small car, Ford Fusion midsize sedan, C-Max hybrid and the Ford Escape SUV.Cooper Tire ends buyout agreement with ApolloCooper Tire & Rubber Co. is calling off its sale to Indias Apollo Tyres, unraveling a $2.2 billion deal announced just over six months ago. Cooper said financing is no longer available and it continues to claim, as it has for months, that Apollo breached the terms of the agreement. Apollo said after the announcement Monday, which it called disappointing, that it may pursue legal remedies.Hertz adopts poison pill measure ...PARK RIDGE, N.J. Rental car company Hertz said Monday that it has adopted a oneyear shareholder rights plan because of unusual and substantial activity it its shares. Shares of Hertz Global Holdings Inc. rose 16 cents to close at $25.91 on Monday, and gained 89 cents, or 3.4 percent, to $26.80 in aftermarket trading. The stock has risen 59 percent this year. Hertz said the plan, often referred to as a poison pill, will take effect if a person or group acquires a 10 percent stake in the company, or if a passive institutional investor acquired a 15 percent stake. Such moves allow existing shareholders to acquire more stock at a discounted rate and are typically used to discourage a hostile takeover. They are designed to thwart anyone who buys a big chunk of its stock without board approval. Hertz said that the plan was not adopted in response to a specific takeover bid or proposal to acquire control of the company. The Park Ridge, N.J., company would not comment further on the move. Its largest shareholder is investment firm Wellington Management. As of Sept. 30, Wellington owned a 9.2 percent stake, according to FactSet.... While Netflix ends poison pill 2 years earlyLOS GATOS, Calif. Netflix said its ending a move meant to help ward off hostile takeovers almost two years early. The online video company adopted the shareholder rights plan, also known as a poison pill, in November 2012 after activist investor Carl Icahn disclosed a stake of almost 10 percent in the company. The poison pill was scheduled to expire in November 2015, but the company terminated it effective Monday. According to FactSet, Icahn now owns a 4.5 percent stake in Netflix Inc. Netflix stock fell 51 cents to close at $366.99 on Monday. The Los Gatos, Calif.based companys shares have nearly quadrupled in value this year.Cracker Barrel says it wont sell to Sardar BiglariLEBANON, Tenn. Cracker Barrel says it wont consider selling itself, rejecting a push from its biggest shareholder. The company said Monday that it will continue pursuing its own business strategies. Last week shareholder Sardar Biglari said he was willing to make a bid for the company and urged it to consider selling itself. Biglari, through his investment firm Biglari Holdings, owns nearly 20 percent of Cracker Barrel Old Country Store Inc.s shares. He has tried and failed multiple times to win a seat on the board. Shareholders also recently rejected his proposal for a $20-per-share special dividend. Shares of Cracker Barrel lost $1.06 to $110.20 on Monday. The stock is up 72 percent in 2013.Warren Buffetts firm acquiring Phillips 66 unitOMAHA, Neb. Warren Buffetts company has agreed to trade roughly $1.4 billion of its stock in Phillips 66 for one of the refiners chemical businesses. Houston-based Phillips 66 said Monday that Berkshire Hathaway will give up about 19 million of its 27.2 million Phillips 66 shares to acquire a business that makes additives that help crude oil flow through pipelines. The exact number of shares will be determined by the price of the Houston-based companys stock when the deal closes. Thats expected to happen in the first half of 2014. Buffett said the business Berkshire is acquiring delivers consistently strong financial performance. He said Berkshires Ohio-based specialty chemical maker, Lubrizol, will oversee the units strategic direction. Phillips 66s stock closed at $74.72 on Monday.NY court monitor: Apple obstructing antitrust workNEW YORK A Washington lawyer monitoring Apple Inc. after a New York judges antitrust finding says the company is obstructing his work. Attorney Michael Bromwich said in a document filed Monday in Manhattan federal court that hes been largely cut off from top executives at Apple. He said he was told by an Apple director after his mid-October appointment that executives would never get over the case and that they were extremely angry. A judge said in August that Apple had conspired to raise electronic book prices. Apple has complained that the monitors work will cause a loss of market share growth and interfere with developing and marketing new products. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment Monday.Holiday shutdown unsettles coal mine workersFARMERSVILLE, Ill. The shutdown of a coal mine just days before Christmas has left nearly 200 workers in central Illinois out of work. The Crown III mine just south of Springfield closed on December 20. Its operators had warned of the closure in October, because a major customer, Archer Daniels Midland Company, didnt renew a contract. But the workers learned only days earlier that they wouldnt receive an extension of basic health insurance as they had hoped. Theyre now scrambling to replace jobs that often paid more than $60,000 a year in a state with one of the nations highest unemployment rates. United Mine Workers of America officials said the closure was as confusing as a tornado. The mines owner, Springfield Coal Co., didnt return messages seeking comment. From wire reports

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OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 An open door to terroristsI hope the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners attempt to make a wise decision regarding the proposed sale of the Citrus County Detention Center to any private enterprise. There is a probability of serious consequences. If the detention center is owned by a private commercial prison corporation, Citrus County loses any and all control of the use of the facility. It must first be understood that the facility is a minimumsecurity facility for the purpose of housing criminals who are not a high risk. High-risk inmates are housed in state or federal prisons, where some of those prisons are designed as maximum-security prisons. The Citrus County Detention Facility is not designed for that type of inmate. If the facility is privately owned, the new owner can contract with any government law enforcement organization to house their prisoners. This will occur for sure since the private corporation operating the detention facility is in the business to make a profit. The use of the prison facilities will go to the bidder who offers the most monies to house inmates they are responsible for. A possible and most probable scenario would be: The federal government has detained an individual or individuals who are alleged to have conspired to perform a terrorist act in the U.S. They need to be housed and hidden somewhere prior to going to trial. So the feds determine that a nondescript location would be Citrus County. This time period could be within a year or two. There is no doubt that the location where these alleged terrorists are being held will not be kept secret for very long. The terrorist organization that these folks are associated with will either want to free them, or more likely, take revenge on those who are housing these wonderful folks. Citrus County is now open to some form of attack by this terrorist group. A private corporation owning and operating a detention can and will contract with anyone in order to make the big bucks. All I can do is hope that the BOCC is intelligent enough not to follow through on the sale of the detention facility, if for no other reason than to keep our county out of the international spotlight and take the safety of our citizens into account. I am sure that the county budget is on their minds, but selling the county jail is not the way to resolve that issue.Dan Groner LecantoOversight of NSA lacking Usually, I do not agree with Cal Thomas columns, but his piece on 2013 being the year of Big Brother found me nodding my head in concurrence. While I have previously written of my objections to the Patriot Act and other government actions that give NSA (and others) seemingly free rein, growing concern that the Fourth Amendment is not being trampled isnt assuaged with the responses of government officials, especially the president. There must be real constraints placed on these programs. He knows this. So does Congress, who is also remiss in effective oversight of this activity. Judge Richard Leon is perfectly right in his recent opinion about its constitutionality, but it will be the Supreme Court who will ultimately decide. Their decision will become the presidents legacy. Wayne Logsdon Hernando We live with artificial boundaries in space and time. The Danube pays no mind to borders; it runs through 10 countries, while the Amazon runs through six and the Nile through five. The 20th century arguably didnt begin until 1914 and plausibly can be thought of having ended in 1989. Then again, the 19th century probably began shortly before noon on July 14, 1789, and ended shortly before 11 a.m. on July 28, 1914, while the 16th century may have lasted from 1450 to 1640. Which is why its possible to argue that 2013 wont end today. Its almost certainly going to extend into January and beyond. This is no parlor trick, though it bears a strong resemblance to one. But if you stretch the definition of a year from a line of 365 days (or, every four years, 366) into an arc of events, then you will see that the tributaries of politics and the rivers of history do not confine themselves to the neat contrivances of the calendar, nor to the enduring rhythms of the Earths passage around the sun. The year 2013 wasnt so great that any of us is eager to extend it, but in truth the struggles set in motion in this year will not be resolved by tonight, and the questions prompted throughout this year will not be answered by the time the Duke-Texas A&M game in Atlantas Georgia Dome is completed. Theyll press on, through the national college football championship game a week later and beyond. There are two predominant reasons. This is the first year of a two-year Congress and many of the pieces of legislation begun this year will, as a matter of course that has happened 112 times in the past, slop over to the new year. This is thoroughly unremarkable. So, too, is the notion that larger movements in politics the slide to the right of the Republicans and to the left of the Democrats, for example, and the tug-of-war between those who want to expand government and those who want to constrain it do not respect the changing of the calendar. They are the mainstreams of history and they flow on. This years budget negotiations and the series of short-term agreements underlined both the tensions in our current politics and the limits of our political system. On the surface, these discussions were about this program and that, about this tax and that entitlement, and also about the level of military spending. These issues come and go (though the tax and entitlement questions will come and go with increasing frequency as the decade wears on and demographic factors bear down), but they are proxies for a far bigger issue. They are part of a classic confrontation between those who have an expansive view of the virtue and value of state spending and those who believe a vigorous, activist state is an intrusion on the natural order and a departure from our national character. We have had these debates before. This very conversation raged near the start of the last century, and the Progressives won. It raged after the onset of the Great Depression, and the New Dealers won. It raged after the end of the Eisenhower years, and the New FrontierGreat Society visionaries and dreamers won. It raged again during the Jimmy Carter administration, and the Reaganites won. These acolytes of Ronald Reagan held sway for about a generation, for in another example of how events conspire to defy the usual borders, it is quite possible to argue that Reaganite views controlled Washington, even the Carter White House, in the last two years of the Georgians presidency, seeped into the Bill Clinton years and prevailed through the first six years of the George W. Bush years. Then the Reagan impulse petered out. It remained part of the catechism of conservatism, of course, but was unrequited. The last years of the Bush 43 administration bore a great resemblance, if not precisely in the level of spending and in the size of the deficit then surely in the philosophy of governance, to the early years of the Obama administration. Members of the Bush and Obama administrations will deny this emphatically, but a quarter century from now you will see that historians will agree with me and not with them. There are other great unresolveds. One is the definition of our parties, both philosophically and geographically. The Democratic Solid South has been replaced by a Republican version, and the parties no longer have conservative and liberal wings. We now have a liberal party and a conservative party. The question remains whether a system so constituted but surely not so designed can long endure. Another of the great unresolveds is whether health care is a national right to be enforced by Washington, much the way free access to the ballot box and equal protection of the laws the one unresolved a half century ago, the other a century and a half ago are now beyond debate. One side believes fervently that it is, and that the march of history will lead us to a national concurrence, the way Medicare went from controversial to consensual. The other believes just as fervently that Obamacare is a dangerous departure from the American system, a restriction of freedom at odds with our history. These two vantage points seem incompatible, but then again so did the two titanic forces the Roosevelt insistence that the New Deal was an inevitable extension of historical forces and the conservative argument that it threatened the American character that went to battle during the Great Depression. It is interesting to note that as early as May 7, 1933, well before the end of his first Hundred Days, FDR was arguing that the country was facing a crisis that required a practical rather than a philosophical response. That situation in that crisis did not call for any complicated consideration of economic panaceas or fancy plans, he said in his second Fireside Chat. We were faced by a condition and not a theory. The greatest unresolved of them all: Is our situation at the end of 2013 the result of a condition or a theory? On that rests everything else.David M. Shribman is executive editor of the Post-Gazette (dshribman@post-gazette.com, 412-263-1890). Follow him on Twitter at ShribmanPG. The pessismist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.William Arthur Ward, 1921-1994 An era ends, an era begins CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief ITS CLEARLY WORKING Kings Bay efforts have clean record One Rake at a Time is 100,000 steps closer in its efforts to clean up Kings Bay and rid it of the scourge of Lyngbya, thanks to a grant awarded by the Department of Environmental Protection. It was recently announced that $100,000 is now flowing through the city of Crystal River and the work will continue to aid in the Cedar Cove restoration project that was started this past summer. Work hand-raking Lyngbya will continue until June 2014, or until the money is exhausted, according to the terms of the grant. Lyngbya, a freshwater and saltwater algae, can grow into thick mats that clog the spring vents of Kings Bay and reduce water flow. It can destroy healthy native grasses that serve as a food supply and shelter for native animals and can be toxic to manatees who eat it because of the lack of food (native grasses) in Kings Bay. Loss of oxygen in the water due to Lyngbya overgrowth reduces abundance of native animals, affecting both recreational and commercial fishing as well as ecosystem biodiversity. In an effort to help stem the tide of Lyngbya, Southwest Florida Water Management District officials have identified good beneficial growth areas where the Lyngbya was removed this spring. Metal cages are being designed to protect the eel grass beds from being over-grazed by the manatees. Planting will begin in spring of 2014 and be monitored and maintained to study the increases in fish habitat, water clarity and quality. This is a promising program and builds off what others are doing to restore the Kings Bay area waters. Its an exciting prospect if it works out and replanted eelgrass can take hold and flourish in the bay. It could help eradicate the Lyngbya in the area and provide a healthier habitat for man and manatee alike. But more importantly, it is just one more example of how one group of volunteers, and enthusiasts, can come together and affect real change in their community. THE ISSUE:Eel grass planting.OUR OPINION:Water projects to build on each others successes. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com Commercialization not always a bad thingMr. Editor, would you do me a favor and explain to the general public and I mean especially the adults if we didnt celebrate the holidays, Christmas, New Years, Easter, Valentines Day, where would the businesspeople be? How much would we buy? And then where would the government get its taxes from? Put that in the paper and wake some of these people up.Keep those car headlights on at nightI cant express enough how important it is for people to put their headlights on in the dark. Its 6:11 on a Tuesday evening, pitch black, and a dark SUV is coming down (U.S.) 19, going south, with no lights on at all. Thanks for returned walletMy daughter and grandson was visiting me from Maryland and I hurt myself on a treadmill and my daughter went to Walmart and bought a lot of things bandages and tape and stuff and came on home and helped me. And her husband had called to say, Where is your wallet? And she said, I guess I had it here, and he says, No, you dont. Someone from Walmart returned the wallet and they called her husband and then her husband called her. And we would just like to thank that person and we are very, very grateful because she had a lot of credit cards and just everything in there and money and so forth. Get thee to a punneryThat Foundation: Beaty stays, in the paper, in the Chronicle today (Dec. 18), ended with at loggerheads. It should have ended with lawyer heads.Keep critters out of coldOK, people, its that time of year again. Its cold out there and if I see your animal being unattended in this cold weather, I will be calling Animal Control. I speak to them on a weekly basis regarding animals and so far every call that I have placed has been a correct call. You people that have animals, they need homes. Its cold out there. The frost is cold and it stays cold all night long So wise up, get smart and get your dog in the house or youll be facing the Animal Control people. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE David ShribmanOTHER VOICES United Way of Citrus County needs your help to reach its annual fundraising goal. If you can, please send a contribution to the United Way of Citrus County, c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. LETTERSto the Editor

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Not helping the publicTuesdays paper (Dec. 17) about the man writing in about the medical marijuana the fact that Pam Bondi, which she, Pam Bondi, along with Charlie Dean and Jimmie T. Smith, are all in it together: Theyre not trying to help the public at all.Lazy deliveryIm calling the Sound Off in reference to the Fortunate for mail delivery person. I, too, am on the same matter of this person that complained about getting his mail at 4 or 4:30. I also receive my mail after 4:30 and its not one person. When I called the post office, they have two drivers two. They have two male drivers doing the one route, two in the place of one. So you mean to tell me that lady did it all by herself but they need two employees to cover the one? That sounds like laziness to me.Whats the lottery take?I would like to see in black and white from the state of Florida, all the money thats taken in from lottery, how much is paid out to Lotto and how much that remains all goes to schools, to see where all the moneys going. Its very simple. Id like to see their books, black and white. Print it in the newspaper; intake and outtake, period. Will you print it?Editors note: Youd think this would be easy, wouldnt you? Well, think again. It was easy to find the education payout: $1.41 billion in 2012-13, and $26 billion to education over the life of the lottery. We, however, could not find a total payout to lottery winners. If someone knows that, please call it in and cite the source.Dont ignore POW causeThis thank you is to all the Chamber of Commerce members at the mixer Dec. 19 at the Crystal River Mall who signed the petition to free our one American POW, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, still held in an Afghani prison since 2009. This is also to thank the other people that I have gotten in contact with who have signed the petition as well. The Chronicle story on Nov. 29 is the only news item local news media have carried. He did escape for three days in December 2011 but (was) recaptured and, for sure, tortured a lot more. Secretary of State John Kerry needs to stop giving back other countries spies and terrorists; he is doing very little to bring Bowe home alive. Go on Facebook, Bring Bowe Bergdahl Home, to learn more.Whats with the dog?Could somebody explain to me the deputy dog truck? Ive lived in Citrus County since 1970 and have never seen one before. Very interesting. I was behind one coming home from work and I saw the dog. They had the dog out and on the leash running in and out of different properties and one man was on a roller-scooter, like. Whats the purpose of the dog? Were they looking for someone? Its every interesting. Id like to know what it is.Grown-up supervision neededIts about time both sides of the hospital boards start acting as adults. HCA has offered a substantial amount of money to bail this hospital out so the citizens still have medical care without going out of county and all the employees can still enjoy working where they have continued to stay during this battle. What makes these boards think they have the right to demand anything? They have not managed it properly for years. The lawsuits are of no concern to HCA and should not have anything to do with the lease. Mr. Grant and Mr. Stillwell should not jeopardize this lease. The citizens deserve better than a bunch of adults acting like children fighting on a playground.Beautiful performanceAs a Christmas treat, my parents took me to the Yuletide Tapestry program presented by the Nature Coast Community Band on Sunday (Dec. 15) at Cornerstone Baptist Church and it was simply marvelous. The band was amazing so talented and professional. The singers voices were beautiful, both the soloists and the singers in the band itself. The narrator almost stole the show with her lovely British accent telling the history of the songs being played and sung. Her jokes were especially delightful. What a sense of humor. Carols very funny! Such a wonderful performance by the NCCB made for a very special Christmastime afternoon spent with my parents, a memory that I will always treasure. Hiaasen a racistIt amazes me how Carl Hiaasen can make racial slurs against white people with such impunity. Carl Hiaasens column on Dec. 15 about Gov. Scotts crusade to shrink the vote states that Scotts primary supporters are cranky, middle-aged white people. Apparently we have come to a point in this country where whites can be classified as cranky by this sophomoric journalist with no protest. This attack on whites is not only racist and a prime example of stereotyping, it is shameful and outrageous. Why is it now somehow acceptable to label any voting bloc as cranky or any other derogatory term? In my opinion, Hiaasen would not have made my high school debating team, not for the content of his thought, but for his racist, mean-spirited, hateful mindset. It would seem that attacking the merits of white people has become an acceptable phenomenon. I realize, of course, that if this letter appears in the Chronicle, I will be labeled a cranky, middle-aged white guy. Regardless of the merits of Mr. Hiaasens journalistic efforts, I would expect his columns to exclude unacceptable verbiage regarding any group of people. It may well be he has simply become entrapped in the pervasive mind set that permeates the country regarding the perception of whites, but he and those like him must pull themselves out of it before it consumes them and they lose what credibility they have left. If Mr. Hiaasen still thinks that it is hip or somehow in vogue to make such classifications of folks, he is sadly mistaken and should be taken to task. Racism, slurs and generic profiling are not acceptable from any source, especially from those who are expected to shape debate, not create division. A written apology is in order to all those he has offended. Robert E. Marino Citrus SpringsWhats fair?Regarding the letter from Organizing for Citrus, there are so many untrue statements, and others that just defy logic. Addressing them in order of how they appear, here is the assessment of a man who spent 40 years in a union, worked in the defense industry and served his country willingly. Labor unions are not hated by the Republicans; they support laws that do not give unfair advantage to unions. The Democrats always are squealing about fair, but only when it is those that oppose their agenda. Notice that the unions were the first ones waivered from Obamacare, and GM and Chrysler were bailed out and ownership given to the UAW while the private investor lost his share. Amnesty for those who have broken a law by crossing our border? When does violation of the laws of this country get rewarded? Should I not then be able to defraud the government of tax dollars? By the securing of our borders, which are tremendously porous, we may just prevent a nuclear device from being smuggled in. Paying taxes should be an obligation of every citizen, not just those who are successful. Study the habits of the rich and you will find out the work long hours and forsake many things. Many are business owners who create jobs. Maybe it should be the law that only those who pay property or income tax are eligible to vote? That would be fair to those that contribute. Welfare and food stamps should be used for temporary situations; they should not be a way of life. Nowhere have I seen where any Republican wants to end Social Security; instead, the fairness equation plays a part in this. If most people who work their entire lives would get back the money they paid in plus interest, they would be able to retire in comfort. The Social Security fund has been drained, given to the many who have paid little or nothing into it. What is fair about that? Free enterprise and freedom over all is what made this country great. By over-regulation and taxation you kill jobs and the desire to succeed. Under todays laws, Henry Fords invention would be labeled a hazard, as would most of Thomas Edisons. Microsoft, Apple, Dell, Facebook, and many others are an example of free enterprise. Think of the number of jobs they have created! The military budget benefits not only the military, but all of society. Fuel efficient aircraft, aerodynamics, GPS, satellite communi cations, four wheel drive, and laser technology are all products of the military-industrial complex. Most have no grasp of how much our everyday lives have benefitted from monies spent in these areas. The last item is so laughable it is referred to as Obamacare. Never in history has such a poorly thought-out piece of legislation been rammed through using tactics that were never meant for this kind of thing. We are witnessing a train wreck that is of immense proportions. But if the Democrats want to be proud of it, that is a very revealing look into their mindset.Mike Dragoun LecantoOPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A11 Alistair Co, MD Alex Villacastin, MD Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD Maria Villacastin, ARNP Shiela Villacastin, ARNP Alexander Villacastin, ARNP Lawrence Stawkowski PA 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y 000GWKL Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave. 489-2486 000GZ0T LETTERSto the Editor SOUND OFFCALL563-0579

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Skating Associated PressKylie Moffat, 14, a member of the Johnstown Figure Skating Club, practices her moves Monday during a public skate at Planet Ice in Johnstown, Pa. Life support extended for brain dead girlOAKLAND, Calif. A California judge has ordered a 13-year-old girl declared brain dead to be kept on life support until Jan. 7. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo on Monday ordered Childrens Hospital Oakland to maintain Jahi McMath on a ventilator past a 5 p.m. time set in a previous ruling. The family wants to continue life support, saying there is hope for recovery. Doctors at Childrens Hospital and an independent pediatric neurologist from Stanford University have concluded the girl is brain dead. Jahi underwent a tonsillectomy at the hospital on Dec. 9 to treat sleep apnea and other issues. After she awoke from the operation, her family said, she started bleeding heavily and went into cardiac arrest. She was declared brain dead three days later.Feds announces test sites for drone aircraftLAS VEGAS The Federal Aviation Administration has chosen six states to develop test sites for drones, a critical next step for the unmanned aircrafts march into U.S. skies. The FAA announced Monday the sites will be based in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. Drones have been mainly used by the military, but governments, businesses, farmers and others are making plans to join the market. Many universities are starting or expanding drone programs. The FAA does not allow commercial use of drones, but it is working to develop operational guidelines by the end of 2015. Officials concede it may take longer.Ariz. woman accused of trying to poison childrenCASA GRANDE, Ariz. An Arizona woman is accused of trying to poison her four children, including one who died, and of stabbing her former husband, all on Christmas. Casa Grande police said 35-year-old Connie Villa was arrested Sunday on suspicion of one count of firstdegree murder and four counts of attempted murder. According to police, the ex-husband called 911 after he was stabbed when he went to Villas residence. Officers found the body of 13year-old Aniarael Macias, and Villa with stab wounds believed to have been self-inflicted. Autopsy and toxicology results are pending on the girl, believed to have been poisoned. The three other children are in good condition and are now with their fathers family. Its not immediately known whether Villa has an attorney. A possible motive hasnt been disclosed. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Festival Associated PressA Nepalese Gurung community woman in traditional attire smiles Monday as she dances during Tamu Loshar in Katmandu, Nepal. Tamu Loshar is the New Year of the Gurung community, an indigenous community who also call themselves Tamu. Judge orders man lashed for accusing wifeRIYADH, Saudi Arabia A Saudi news website said a judge in the city of Mecca ordered a man to be lashed 20 times for accusing his spouse of not being a virgin when they married. Al-Sharq Online reported Monday that the Yemeni man was sentenced to be flogged in one session for not providing evidence to back up the accusation. The website said the wife went to court to prove her honor and reputation.No foul play in death of WWII Polish leaderWARSAW, Poland A Polish investigation has found no evidence of foul play in the plane crash that killed Gen. Wladyslaw Sikorski, Polands leader in exile, in 1943. Sikorski was serving in that role in London during World War II when he died in a mysterious plane crash just after takeoff from Gibraltar. A British investigation blamed the crash on a blocked rudder, but Sikorskis dispute with Soviet leader Joseph Stalin that year led to speculation of an assassination.Israel frees prisoners despite protestJERUSALEM Israel has begun releasing more than two dozen Palestinian prisoners convicted in deadly attacks against Israelis. Todays early morning release is part of a U.S.brokered package to restart Mideast peace talks. The prisoners are expected to receive a heros welcome upon their return home. In Israel, though, there is great anger and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has faced protests from relatives of the victims over the move. Under a formula drawn up by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Israel agreed last summer to release a total of 104 long-serving Palestinian prisoners in order to restart peace talks with the Palestinians. World BRIEFS From wire reports Another attack Associated PressExperts and police officers examine a site of a trolleybus explosion Monday in Volgograd, Russia. A bomb blast tore through the trolleybus, killing at least 14 people a day after a suicide bombing that killed 17 at the citys main railway station. Russia bombings kill 31, raise concern on Olympics Associated PressMOSCOW Two suicide bombings in as many days have killed 31 people and raised concerns that Islamic militants have begun a terrorist campaign in Russia that could stretch into the Sochi Olympics in February. Russian and international Olympic officials insisted the site of the games, protected by layers of security, is completely safe. The attacks in Volgograd, about 400 miles from Sochi, reflected the Kremlins inability to uproot Islamist insurgents in the Caucasus who have vowed to derail the games, the pet project of President Vladimir Putin. No one has claimed responsibility for Sundays blast at the Volgograd railway station or Mondays bus explosion in the city, but they came only months after Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov threatened new attacks on civilian targets in Russia, including the Olympics. In addition to the dead, the bombings wounded 104 people, according to Russias Health Ministry. As of late Monday, 58 remained hospitalized, many in grave condition. Suicide bombings have rocked Russia for years, but the insurgents seeking to create an Islamic state have largely confined their attacks to the North Caucasus region in recent years. The blasts in Volgograd signaled that militants want to show their reach outside their native region. Matthew Clements, an analyst at Janes, said Caucasus militants could be targeting major transportation hubs like Volgograd to embarrass the Kremlin and discourage attendance at the Feb. 7-23 Olympics. The attack demonstrates the militants capability to strike at soft targets such as transport infrastructure outside of their usual area of operations in the North Caucasus, he said in a note. Although the very strict security measures which will be in place at the Sochi Games will make it difficult to undertake a successful attack against the main Olympic venues, public transport infrastructure in Sochi and the surrounding Krasnodar territory will face an elevated risk of attack. Security at Russias railway stations and airports has been tightened after a male suicide bomber hit Moscows Domodedovo Airport in January 2011, killing 37 people and injuring more than 180. Two bombings on the Moscow subway in March 2010 by female suicide bombers killed 40 people and wounded more than 120. Umarov, who had claimed responsibility for the 2010 and 2011 bombings, ordered a halt to attacks on civilian targets during the mass demonstrations against Putin in the winter of 2011-12. He reversed that order in July, urging his men to do their utmost to derail the Sochi Olympics, which he described as satanic dances on the bones of our ancestors. Aware of the threat, the Sochi organizers have introduced some of the most extensive identity checks and sweeping security measures ever seen at an international sports event. Congress letting 55 tax breaks expire at year end Associated PressWASHINGTON In an almost annual ritual, Congress is letting a package of 55 popular tax breaks expire at the end of the year, creating uncertainty once again for millions of individuals and businesses. Lawmakers let these tax breaks lapse almost every year, even though they save businesses and individuals billions of dollars. And almost every year, Congress eventually renews them, retroactively, so taxpayers can claim them by the time they file their tax returns. No harm, no foul, right? After all, taxpayers filing returns in the spring wont be hurt because the tax breaks were in effect for 2013. Taxpayers wont be hit until 2015, when they file tax returns for next year. Not so far. Trade groups and tax experts complain that Congress is making it impossible for businesses and individuals to plan for the future. What if lawmakers dont renew the tax break you depend on? Or what if they change it and youre no longer eligible? Its a totally ridiculous way to run our tax system, said Rachelle Bernstein, vice president and tax counsel for the National Retail Federation. Its impossible to plan when every year this happens, but yet business has gotten used to that. Some of the tax breaks are big, including billions in credits for companies that invest in research and development, generous exemptions for financial institutions doing business overseas, and several breaks that let businesses write off capital investments faster. Others are more obscure, the benefits targeted to film producers, race track owners, makers of electric motorcycles and teachers who buy classroom supplies with their own money. A deduction for state and local sales taxes benefits people who live in the nine states without state income taxes. Smaller tax breaks benefit college students and commuters who use public transportation. The annual practice of letting these tax breaks expire is a symptom a divided, dysfunctional Congress that struggles to pass routine legislation, said Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a senior Democrat on the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee. Its not fair, its very hard, its very difficult for a business person, a company, to plan, not just for the short term but to do longterm planning, Lewis said. Its shameful. With Congress on vacation until January, there is no chance the tax breaks will be renewed before they expire. Home electricity use in US falling Associated PressNEW YORK The average amount of electricity consumed in U.S. homes has fallen to levels last seen more than a decade ago, back when the smartest device in peoples pockets was a Palm pilot and anyone talking about a tablet was probably an archaeologist or a preacher. Because of more energyefficient housing, appliances and gadgets, power usage is on track to decline in 2013 for the third year in a row, to 10,819 kilowatthours per household, according to the Energy Information Administration. Thats the lowest level since 2001, when households averaged 10,535 kwh. And the drop has occurred even though our lives are more electrified. Heres a look at what has changed since the last time consumption was so low.Better homesIn the early 2000s, as energy prices rose, more states adopted or toughened building codes to force builders to better seal homes so heat or air-conditioned air doesnt seep out so fast. That means newer homes waste less energy.Better gadgetsCentral air conditioners, refrigerators, dishwashers, water heaters, washing machines and dryers have gotten more efficient. The move to mobile also is helping. Desktop computers with big CRT monitors are being replaced with laptops, tablet computers and smart phones, and these mobile devices are specifically designed to sip power to prolong battery life.On the other hand...We are using more devices, and that is offsetting what would otherwise be a more dramatic reduction in power consumption. DVRs spin at all hours of the day, often under more than one television in a home. Game consoles are getting more sophisticated to process better graphics and connect with other players, and therefore use more power. Twin bombingsA pair of deadly terrorist attacks struck the Russian city of Volgograd on Sunday and Monday. AP RUSSIA UKRAINE BEL. TURKEY Black Sea Moscow 200 km 200 mi Sochi Deadly bombingsVolgograd VolgogradSOURCE: ESRI

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College basketball/ B2 NBA, NHL/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Sports briefs/ B3 Lottery, TV/B3 College football/B4 UCF faces a tall task when it meets Baylor in Fiesta Bowl./B4 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Associated PressBest Game: Oddly, a 27-24 overtime loss at Seattle on Nov. 3, a game that dropped them to 0-8 and in which the Bucs blew a 21-0 lead. Played well enough early against team with NFCs best record that it instilled confidence that brighter days were ahead then won four of next five games. Worst Game: An embarrassing nationally televised 31-13 Thursday night loss at home to the Carolina Panthers on Oct. 24. Offense didnt get into the end zone until the closing minutes, and the putrid performance against a division rival raised conjecture about whether embattled coach Greg Schiano would hold his job through the end of the season. Best Play: Linebacker Mason Fosters fourthquarter interception and entertaining 85-yard return for a touchdown against Drew Brees and the New Orleans Saints in Week 2. The Bucs took a shortlived 14-13 lead only to lose on a last-second field goal. Worst Play: Linebacker Lavonte David set the tone for a long year with a late hit on Jets quarterback Geno Smith with time running out in the season opener. The 15-yard penalty moved New York to win 18-17 on a long, last-second field goal. Biggest Surprise: Benching and subsequent release of quarterback Josh Freeman. A 4,000-yard passer in 2012, when the Bucs had a top 10 offense, Freeman got off to a slow start and was benched after just three games. He was replaced by rookie Mike Glennon. Biggest Disappointment: Despite making strides on defense following the acquisition of cornerback Darrelle Revis and safety Dashon Goldson, the unit contributed to the teams slow start by failing to hold leads in the final two minutes of three of the teams first four games. Whats Next: Schiano and general manager Mark Dominik were fired Monday, meaning the first order of business will be finding replacements, who will have some important decisions to make including whether Glennon is the teams quarterback of the future.Best and worst of Buccaneers season Associated PressTampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano pauses on the sidelines Dec. 22 during the second quarter against the St. Louis Rams in St. Louis. Schiano and general manager Mark Dominik were fired Monday, a day after finishing the season with a 4-12 record. Bucs fire coach Greg Schiano, GM Mark Dominik after 4-12 season Associated PressTAMPA Greg Schiano believes he changed the Tampa Buccaneers for the better, though not enough to save his job. The embattled Bucs coach was fired Monday after two losing years extended the franchises playoff drought to six seasons. General manager Mark Dominik was also ousted, ending an unsuccessful five-year stint that produced flashes of hope but far more disappointment than ownership felt was acceptable. The results over the past two years have not lived up to our standards and we believe the time has come to find a new direction, Bucs co-chairman Bryan Glazer said in a brief statement released a day after a season-ending 42-17 loss to the New Orleans dropped Schianos record to 11-21. Mark has been a valued member of our organization for two decades and we respect the passion he showed for the Buccaneers during his time here, Glazer added. We thank Greg for his hard work and effort the past two seasons, but we feel these moves are necessary in order to achieve our goals. In typical Bucs fashion, the reclusive owners of the team announced the third coaching change in five years with a one paragraph statement and did not schedule a news conference to discuss the situation. Schiano had three years and $9 million remaining on his contract. Schiano thanked the Glazer family for the opportunity to coach the Bucs, and also expressed gratitude to his players, coaching staff and fans. His biggest regret simply was not winning enough games to reflect the progress he feels the Bucs made under him. I think were leaving behind a football team that is better than when we got here, Schiano told reporters at a hotel Tebow joins SEC Network Former Florida quarterback still pursuing NFL career Associated PressATLANTA Tim Tebow has his next football job talking about the sport on TV. The Heisman Trophy winner has been hired as a college football analyst for the new SEC Network in a return to his Florida glory days, but he still hopes to play quarterback in the NFL. Tebow will appear on SEC Nation, a pregame show that will travel to a different campus each week after the channel launches in August. The multiyear deal will not preclude him from continuing to pursue playing opportunities in the NFL, ESPN, which runs the network, said in a statement Monday. Tebow did not play in the league in 2013 after he was cut by the Patriots in August. In the span of just over one season, he went from a national sensation who led the Denver Broncos to the playoffs, to a backup, to out of the NFL. While I continue to pursue my dream of playing quarterback in the NFL, this is an amazing opportunity to be part of the unparalleled passion of college football and the SEC, Tebow said in a statement released by ESPN. ESPN senior vice president Justin Connolly called Tebow an SEC icon with a national fan base and broad appeal. Tebow will make his ESPN debut during pregame coverage of the BCS championship Jan. 6. After winning the 2007 Heisman and two national championships for the Gators in the SEC, Tebow became one of the biggest stories in the NFL in his second season. He went 7-1 in his first eight starts in 2011 then threw an 80-yard touchdown pass on the first play of overtime to give the Broncos a 29-23 playoff win over the Pittsburgh Steelers. But he was still dogged by doubts about his passing ability, and Denver traded him that offseason to the New York Jets after acquiring Peyton Manning. He languished on the bench while coach Rex Ryan ignored fans calls for Tebow to replace a struggling Mark Sanchez. Tebow threw just eight passes, ran only 32 times and was cut last April 29. For six weeks no team wanted him until the Patriots signed him to a low-risk, twoyear contract with no guaranteed money. Tim Tebow See FIRED/ Page B3 No. 1 FSU concludes final practice at home Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The top-ranked Florida State Seminoles held their final workout on campus Monday in preparation to face No. 2 Auburn in the BCS championship game. Coach Jimbo Fisher was ready to play weeks ago. Florida State didnt need a four-week break after the Seminoles won the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game. The roster was healthy and the program had completed its first undefeated regular season since 1999. The Seminoles outscored their last nine opponents by a combined score of 484-79. They were the epitome of a team on a roll. I would have been tickled to death to play the very next week after we played Duke, we were playing so well, Fisher said. When you have those delays, the key is getting that timing and rhythm back. But the key is you cant be ready too quick. Youve got to time that thing up to hopefully hit it right in stride. I like where were at right now. Hopefully those last three to four practices out there I think well really be honed in. Thats kind of where you want to be. Fisher gave the team a week off during exams before returning for five sessions of mostly fundamental work. The team took time off for a holiday break then returned for five practices ending Monday. Today is a travel day before a final five workouts leading up to the championship game Jan. 6. The Seminoles began heavy Auburn preparation after returning from the holiday break. Its kind of hard because you get the first five and then you know you have a break to go home, Florida State receiver Kelvin Benjamin said. A Florida States Jameis Winston scrambles Dec. 7 as Dukes Kelby Brown defends in the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship game in Charlotte, N.C. The No. 1-ranked Seminoles held their final workout on campus Monday before flying to California to face No. 2 Auburn in the BCS championship game.Associated Press See FSU/ Page B3

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B2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Butler scores 26 as Bulls beat Grizzlies 95-91 Associated PressMEMPHIS, Tenn. Jimmy Butler scored 14 of his 26 points in the third quarter, Carlos Boozer added 21 points and 10 rebounds, and the Chicago Bulls defeated the Memphis Grizzlies 95-91 on Monday night. Butler shot 6 for 10 from the field, including 2 of 3 on 3-pointers, and 12 of 14 at the foul line in a team-high 41 minutes. Chicago was 6 for 15 from 3-point range. D.J. Augustin had 10 points off the bench for the Bulls, including eight in the fourth period as Memphis tried to make a late run. Mike Conley finished with 26 points, nine assists, six rebounds and six steals to lead the Grizzlies. James Johnson scored 13 points, all in the second half, and grabbed 10 rebounds before fouling out with 4:10 left.Wizards 106, Pistons 99AUBURN HILLS, Mich. John Wall scored 29 points and the Washington Wizards became the latest team to rally past Detroit in the fourth quarter, beating the Pistons 106-99. Washington trailed 87-78 before starting the final period with a 17-4 run. The Pistons never went back ahead. Brandon Jennings had 15 points and 14 assists for Detroit, which has lost five of six. Trevor Ariza scored 15 points for the Wizards, who also beat Detroit 106-82 on Saturday in Washington. Bradley Beal scored 11 of his 13 points in the second half for Washington. It was another frustrating loss for Detroit, outscored 28-12 in the fourth quarter. The Pistons have also blown comfortable fourthquarter leads at home against Portland and Charlotte during the latter part of December.Mavericks 100, Timberwolves 98MINNEAPOLIS Shawn Marion scored 32 points and hit two huge 3-pointers in the fourth quarter to help the Dallas Mavericks withstand a furious second-half charge from the Minnesota Timberwolves in a 100-98 victory. Dirk Nowitzki had 16 points for the Mavericks, who led by 19 late in the first half before the Wolves came back. Kevin Love had 36 points, 11 rebounds and four assists, and his 3-pointer 90 seconds into the fourth quarter gave the Wolves an 86-85 lead. They led 90-87 midway through the period, but Marion hit two 3-pointers during a 10-0 run to put the Mavericks back in front.Pelicans 110, Trail Blazers 108NEW ORLEANS Tyreke Evans hit a pull-up jumper from 17 feet with 1.2 seconds left and the New Orleans Pelicans beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-108. Evans big basket came right after Portlands Damian Lillard, who has hit several game-winners this season, made a contested 3-pointer to tie the score at 108. New Orleans, which won its fourth in a row at home, never trailed in the second half but never led by more than five in the final 10 minutes. Jrue Holiday scored 15 of his season-high 31 points in the fourth quarter and tied a season high with 13 assists for the Pelicans. Anthony Davis added 27 points, 12 rebounds and five blocks. Evans had 20 points. Associated PressChicagos Joakim Noah, right, defends Monday against Memphis Zach Randolph in the first half in Memphis, Tenn. UConn remains No. 1 in AP PollWith a light week because of the holiday, there wasnt much change in The Associated Press womens poll. UConn continued its unanimous run atop the Top 25 on Monday after opening up American Athletic Conference play with a victory over Cincinnati. Notre Dame remained second after surviving a tough game at Oregon State. Duke, Stanford and Tennessee rounded out the first five. The Lady Vols are followed by Kentucky, Louisville, Maryland, Baylor and North Carolina. The only loss by a ranked team was Gonzaga falling in overtime to Saint Marys in the WCC opener. The Zags fell out of the poll. See Page B3 for complete poll.No. 24 ASU 63, No. 20 Syracuse 60TEMPE, Ariz. Kelsey Moos scored 15 points and grabbed 12 rebounds as No. 24 Arizona State held on to defeat No. 20 Syracuse 63-60 Monday night. Moos had 10 points in the second half. Her layup gave the Sun Devils a 6160 lead with 1:31 remaining. On Syracuses next possession, Moos fouled Briana Day, but Day missed both free throws. The teams then traded turnovers before Adrianne Thomas hit two free throws for the Sun Devils to cap the scoring. Rachel Coffey missed a 3-pointer for Syracuse as time expired. Arizona State (11-1) has a ten-game winning streak. Joy Burke scored 14 points with 10 rebounds. Day finished with seven points and 12 rebounds for Syracuse (11-2). Brianna Butler scored 25 points, including a trio of 3-pointers to lead the Orange.From wire reports WBB BRIEFS Raanta, Saad lead Blackhawks past Kings 1-0 Associated PressCHICAGO Antti Raanta made 26 saves in his first NHL shutout and Brandon Saad scored as the Chicago Blackhawks beat Los Angeles 1-0 on Monday night and sent the Kings to their first threegame losing streak in a year. With Blackhawks No. 1 goalie Corey Crawford nearing a return from a lower-body injury, Raanta improved to 10-1-3 while bouncing back from one of his worst performances. He allowed two late goals in Chicagos 6-5 shootout loss at St. Louis on Saturday. Los Angeles Martin Jones made 29 saves in his second straight loss after beginning his career with eight consecutive wins, tying the NHL record.Senators 3, Capitals 1OTTAWA, Ontario Kyle Turris goal helped the Ottawa Senators beat the Washington Capitals 3-1 and earn their first winning streak in 51 days. Ottawa has won three straight at home for the first time this season. Mika Zibanejad and Clarke MacArthur, with an empty-net goal, also scored for Ottawa (17-18-7). Craig Anderson stopped 34 shots. Joel Ward scored the lone goal for the Capitals (20-155), who have lost back-toback games.Predators 6, Red Wings 4NASHVILLE, Tenn. Colin Wilson had two goals and an assist, and Mike Fisher scored a goal and helped set up two others in the Nashville Predators 6-4 victory over the Detroit Red Wings. Fisher has three goals and three assists in Nashvilles past two games. Craig Smith, Nick Spaling, and Roman Josi also scored. Justin Abdelkader, Pavel Datsyuk, Drew Miller, and Patrick Eaves scored for the Red Wings, who have lost two of three. Associated PressChicago Blackhawks left wing Brandon Saad (20) scores past Los Angeles Kings goalie Martin Jones (31) Monday, as Matt Greene (2), Mike Richards (10) and Bryan Bickell (29) are near during the first period in Chicago. Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Reserves Aaron Thomas scored 19 points and Ian Miller 15 as Florida State defeated Charleston Southern 67-59 Monday night in its final nonconference game of the season. With Thomas and Miller leading the way, the Seminoles bench outscored the Charleston Southern bench by a 42-19 margin. Thomas scored 14 of his points in the second half to help the Seminoles (9-3) stay ahead of the pesky visitors, who closed to within 61-56 with 1:20 left before Boris Bojanovskys dunk gave Florida State a bit of breathing room at 63-56 with 51 seconds left. Sophomore point guard Devon Bookert aided the Seminoles with a careerhigh nine assists and a team-best seven rebounds. Paul Gombwer and Arlon Harper each scored 11 points to lead Charleston Southern (5-7), which took 29 of its 50 shots from beyond the 3-point arc. Florida State takes a modest four-game winning streak into its ACC opener Saturday.No. 6 Okla. St. 92, Robert Morris 66STILLWATER, Okla. Phil Forte scored 20 points and No. 6 Oklahoma State looked sharp after a nine-day break, beating Robert Morris 92-66. Markel Brown added 18 points for Oklahoma State (12-1) in the Cowboys final tuneup before opening Big 12 Conference play on Saturday at Kansas State. Oklahoma State will enter 2014 with its highest ranking in The Associated Press poll since February 2005, when the Cowboys were also No. 6. Karvel Anderson scored 16 points for Robert Morris (5-9), which is 2-8 on the road this season.No. 9 Baylor 81, Oral Roberts 55WACO, Texas Taurean Prince scored 10 of his 16 points in the go-ahead run for No. 9 Baylor as the Bears overcame a slow start to beat Oral Roberts 81-55. Baylor (11-1) fell behind 7-0 while missing its first six shots before finally scoring nearly 6 minutes into the game. Shawn Glover had 22 points to lead Oral Roberts (6-7), which has lost four of five games. Cory Jefferson had 17 points for Baylor, while Isaiah Austin had 15 points and Rico Gathers had 10 points and 10 rebounds.No. 16 Kansas 93, Toledo 83LAWRENCE, Kan. Perry Ellis had 21 points and 11 rebounds, Naadir Tharpe added a career-high 20 points and No. 16 Kansas beat Toledo 93-83 for the Rockets first loss of the season. Andrew Wiggins also had 20 points and fellow freshman Joel Embiid had 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Jayhawks (9-3), who built a 16-point lead early in the second half. Toledo (12-1) made one final charge, using some hot outside shooting and sloppiness on the part of Kansas to get within 81-73 on a 3-pointer by Julius Brown with 3:23 left in the game.No. 24 Gonzaga 69, San Francisco 41SPOKANE, Wash. Drew Barham scored 15 points, all on 3-pointers, as short-handed No. 24 Gonzaga beat San Francisco 69-41. Przemek Karnowski added 11 points for Gonzaga (12-2, 2-0 West Coast), whose top three scorers are battling injuries. David Stockton and Kevin Pangos finished with 10 points each. Avry Holmes led coldshooting San Francisco (8-6, 1-1) with 16 points. The Dons made just 26 percent of their shots, to 43 percent for the Zags. Gonzaga has won 20 straight conference games spanning three seasons.Miami 71, Loyola (MD) 48CORAL GABLES Rion Brown scored 17 points to lead Miami to a 71-48 win over Loyola. The Hurricanes never trailed and increased a 23-point lead at halftime to 60-30 on Browns third 3-pointer with 9:26 remaining in the second half. Brown shot 4 of 6 from behind the arc and had nine rebounds. Donnavan Kirk scored 12 points and James Kelly finished with 11 points for Miami (8-5). Tonye Jekiri was Miamis fourth double-figure scorer with 10 points. Miami held Loyolas Dylon Cormier, the nations fourth leading scorer to 11 points. Cormier entered Mondays game averaging 24.1 pointsper-game. Eric Laster scored 13 points to lead the Greyhounds (5-6). Arizona No. 1 for 4th straight weekArizona and Syracuse lead the same top five teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll for the fourth straight week. The Wildcats (13-0) saw their lead in first-place votes change for the first time Monday. They received 60 No. 1 votes from the 65-member national media panel, three less than they got the last three weeks. Syracuse (12-0), which beat previously unbeaten Villanova on Saturday, were No. 1 on the other five ballots. The three Big Ten schools Ohio State, Wisconsin and Michigan State remained third through fifth. Louisville, which lost at Kentucky on Saturday, dropped from sixth to No. 14 while Villanova fell three places to 11th with the loss at Syracuse. See Page B3 for complete poll.From wire reports Associated PressToledo guard Rian Pearson, left, and Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins get tangled over a loose ball Monday during the first half in Lawrence, Kan.

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE lot of guys tend to do this, Oh, Ill just get through these five practices then go home on break. But, really, coach Fisher has been preaching to us, telling you, Dont lose the practices. Go out there and have fun and go hard every day. Fisher doesnt want to lose the rhythm the team built over the course of three months. The schedule turned choppy simply from the bowl schedule. Normalcy usually doesnt return the week of the bowl as teams have media responsibilities and a variety of other planned appearances organized by the bowl committee. Fisher said that wont be the case in Pasadena. The good thing, theres not many in this game, Fisher said. Theres only two nights we have to go somewhere. This is not as much of the bowl situation that you have at other bowls sometimes. Its kind of like more of a business-like trip. A couple things will be fun, but its not as many things. Hopefully those distractions will keep it down. Fisher said the schedule will be similar to what the team is on in Tallahassee. The media responsibilities are not extremely different, except for Media Day on Jan. 4 that includes the entire team. There is also a team dinner Jan. 3. The coach wants the players to have a unique experience with several players making their first trip to California, but he constantly preaches the primary reason for playing inside the Rose Bowl with college football observers watching across the world. California, thats going to be crazy. I cant wait, Florida State cornerback P.J. Williams said. Were just ready to get up there and be able to have fun and get ready for this game and being able to perform in a big game. No, I dont think (its hard to focus). Were here all day every day doing the same thing. Working hard and going at it. The coaches make sure our heads stay right. ... We know its still a business trip. near the teams training facility. It was quite an honor and I enjoyed every day of it, the coach added. We didnt get it done. I accept responsibility for that. Word of the firing broke less than 30 minutes after the team closed the locker room, where players were sorting through equipment and belongings before scattering for the offseason. They met with the coaching and medical staff for exit interviews and physicals. They had not been informed of the dismissals before media was allowed into the room. Many, including Pro Bowl defensive tackle Gerald McCoy, had hoped Schiano would keep his job. Its tough for the players to see your coaches go. You never want to see anybody get fired, McCoy said after the announcement. Me personally, I havent had any consistency in my career. Third head coach, going on my fifth year and three head coaches. Add up everybody, itll be six d-line coaches. The Bucs went 7-9 in their first season under Schiano, collapsing after a 6-4 start that had the team in playoff contention. After trading for three-time All-Pro cornerback Darrelle Revis and signing safety Dashon Goldson in free agency to bolster a porous defense, the team entered training camp this season with heightened expectations. But a messy split with former quarterback Josh Freeman, an outbreak of MRSA infections in the locker room and reports that Schiano was losing the support of players tiring of his rules and coaching style dogged the team during an 0-8 start that put the coachs job in jeopardy. Despite having a rookie quarterback and finishing with 16 players on injured reserve, including running back Doug Martin and receiver Mike Williams, the Bucs went 4-4 over the second half of the season. That hardly seemed like progress, though, because the offense got progressively worse and finished last in the NFL in passing and total yardage. Still, players seemed impressed with the way Schiano held the team together, insisting right up until the end that the coach never lost the locker room. In times like that you see a lot of guys crumble, a lot of guys break. You never saw a different attitude with him, McCoy said. ... Hes the most consistent thing in the building, I will give him that. Schiano was hired in January 2012, leaving Rutgers to take over a team that ended its final 10 games under Raheem Morris on a 10-game losing streak. He inherited one the NFLs worst defenses, but also a young quarterback in Freeman, who won 10 games in his first full season as a starter and became the franchises first 4,000-yard passer in Schianos first year in Tampa Bay. But Freemans relationship with Schiano soured when the Bucs dropped five of the final six games of 2012, with Freemans inconsistency contributing to the slide. The fifth-year quarterback was benched and subsequently released after an 0-3 start this season, replaced by rookie Mike Glennon, a third-round draft pick who went 4-9 in 13 starts. The Bucs have not made the playoffs since 2007 under former coach Jon Gruden. They havent won a postseason game since their 2002 run that produced the franchises only Super Bowl title. Part of the blame for the poor performance rests with Dominik, who was named general manager in 2009 the year Morris was promoted from defensive coordinator to replace Gruden. Dominik survived Morris firing after a 4-12 finish two years ago. But in the end, a spotty draft record, the mishandling of Freemans situation, and the teams 28-52 mark during a five-season tenure as GM became impossible to overlook. Schiano said whoever follows him as coach will take over a good team. Im proud of the culture we developed here, Schiano said. On the field, I think were closer than people think. FIREDContinued from Page B1 FSUContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12 p.m. (FS1) St. John's at Xavier 1 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio State at Purdue 1 p.m. (ESPNU) Duke at Elon 2:30 p.m. (FS1) Seton Hall at Providence 3 p.m. (ESPN2) Indiana at Illinois 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Eastern Michigan at Syracuse 3 p.m. (SUN) George Washington at Kansas State 5 p.m. (ESPN2) Louisville at Central Florida 5 p.m. (ESPNU) UNC-Wilmington at North Carolina 5 p.m. (FS1) DePaul at Georgetown 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Memphis at South Florida 7:30 p.m. (FS1) Villanova at Butler 9 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Houston 10 p.m. (FS1) Marquette at Creighton NBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. (FSNFL) Golden State Warriors at Orlando Magic COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 a.m. (ESPNU) National University Holiday Bowl: Arizona State vs. Texas Tech (taped) 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) AdvoCare V100 Bowl: Arizona vs. Boston College 2 p.m. (CBS) Hyundai Sun Bowl: UCLA vs. Virginia Tech 4 p.m. (ESPN) AutoZone Liberty Bowl: Mississippi State vs. Rice 8 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: Duke vs. Texas A&M 2 a.m. (ESPN2) AdvoCare V100 Bowl: Arizona vs. Boston College (same-day tape) 4 a.m. (ESPN2) AutoZone Liberty Bowl: Mississippi State vs. Rice (same-day tape) HOCKEY 7:30 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship: Slovakia vs. Czech Republic 11:30 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship: United States vs. Canada (same-day tape) 1 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game 4 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game OLYMPICS 6 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Trials Speed Skating: Long Track Men's & Women's 1500m TENNIS 2 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA ASB Classic, Early Rounds 3 (sameday tape) 4 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA ASB Classic, Early Rounds 4 (sameday tape) 8 p.m. (TENNIS) Hopman Cup: France vs. Czech Republic (taped) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS No local events scheduled. The AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Arizona (60)13-01,6201 2. Syracuse (5)12-01,5502 3. Ohio St.13-01,4623 4. Wisconsin13-01,4084 5. Michigan St.11-11,3645 6. Oklahoma St.11-11,2787 7. Duke10-21,1449 8. Wichita St.13-01,06710 9. Baylor10-11,01311 10. Oregon12-098712 11. Villanova11-19438 12. Florida10-291513 13. Iowa St.11-086914 14. Louisville11-28126 15. Kentucky10-375318 16. Kansas8-366616 17. UConn11-164715 18. Memphis9-262517 19. North Carolina9-341319 20. Colorado11-237321 21. San Diego St.10-137120 22. Iowa11-225822 23. UMass11-116023 24. Gonzaga11-27824 25. Missouri11-17625 Others receiving votes: Illinois 57, Texas 40, George Washington 37, Oklahoma 36, Toledo 32, Florida St. 24, UCLA 19, Harvard 10, Michigan 7, Creighton 5, Kansas St. 3, Pittsburgh 2, LSU 1.USA Today Top 25The top 25 teams in the USA Today mens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: RecordPtsPvs 1. Arizona (30)13-07981 2. Syracuse (1)12-07622 3. Ohio State (1)13-07413 4. Michigan State11-16825 5. Wisconsin13-06776 6. Oklahoma State11-16057 7. Wichita State13-05888 8. Duke10-25689 9. Oregon12-053010 10. Louisville11-25154 11. Baylor10-142912 12. Iowa State11-042013 13. Florida10-241314 14. Villanova11-139211 15. UConn11-134015 16. Kentucky10-331918 17. Kansas8-331416 18. Memphis9-226817 19. North Carolina9-318419 19. San Diego State10-118420 21. Gonzaga11-214521 22. UMass11-113722 23. Iowa11-211323 24. Colorado11-29224 25. Missouri11-15125 Others receiving votes: Creighton 29, Pittsburgh 22, UCLA 20, George Washington 17, Oklahoma 16, Texas 9, Toledo 8, Florida State 4, Michigan 4, Illinois 2, New Mexico 1, Saint Louis 1.Womens AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press womens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. UConn (36)13-09001 2. Notre Dame11-08412 3. Duke12-18223 4. Stanford11-18084 5. Tennessee11-17365 6. Kentucky12-17176 7. Louisville13-16957 8. Maryland12-16488 9. Baylor10-16269 10. North Carolina11-251510 11. Oklahoma St.11-051111 12. Colorado10-147212 13. South Carolina12-146213 14. Iowa St.11-044714 15. Penn St.9-334115 16. LSU9-230816 17. Purdue9-229917 18. Nebraska10-227818 19. Georgia12-122819 20. Syracuse11-121320 21. Florida St.12-118722 22. Iowa12-218021 23. California8-311623 24. Arizona St.10-19125 25. Oklahoma9-46525 Others receiving votes: Arkansas 49, San Diego 33, NC State 27, Indiana 23, Georgia Tech 8, Rutgers 8, West Virginia 8, Gonzaga 7, Saint Josephs 7, Texas 7, Middle Tennessee 6, Saint Marys (Cal) 5, UTEP 4, DePaul 2.NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB Toronto1315.464 Boston1317.4331 Brooklyn1020.3334 Philadelphia921.3005 New York921.3005 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami 237.767 Atlanta 1714.5486 Washington1414.5008 Charlotte1418.43810 Orlando1020.33313 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana 245.828 Detroit 1419.42412 Chicago1217.41412 Cleveland1020.33314 Milwaukee624.20018 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio247.774 Houston2112.6364 Dallas 1813.5816 New Orleans1415.4839 Memphis1317.43310 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City255.833 Portland247.7741 Minnesota1516.48410 Denver 1415.48310 Utah 1024.29417 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers2111.656 Phoenix1811.6211 Golden State1913.5942 L.A. Lakers1318.4197 Sacramento920.31010 Mondays Games Washington 106, Detroit 99 Dallas 100, Minnesota 98 Chicago 95, Memphis 91 New Orleans 110, Portland 108 Utah 83, Charlotte 80 Miami at Denver, late Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, late Todays Games Atlanta at Boston, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indiana, 3 p.m. Golden State at Orlando, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 9 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.AP Pro32 NFL Power RankingsThe Associated Press Pro32 NFL Power Rankings, as voted by a 12-member panel, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 30, total points based on 32 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 32nd-place vote, and previous ranking: WLTPtsPvs 1. Seattle Seahawks (8)13303801 2. Denver Broncos (4)13303722 3. San Francisco 49ers12403563 4. Carolina Panthers12403464 5. N.E. Patriots12403445 6. Cincinnati Bengals11503106 7. New Orleans Saints11503059 8. Indianapolis Colts11502998 9. Kansas City Chiefs11502947 10. Philadelphia Eagles106028111 11. Green Bay Packers87125917 12. Arizona Cardinals106025810 13. San Diego Chargers97024912 14. Pittsburgh Steelers88021818 15. Chicago Bears88020514 16. Baltimore Ravens88020213 17. Dallas Cowboys88019216 18. New York Jets88018321 19. Miami Dolphins88017115 20. St. Louis Rams79015519 21. New York Giants79014224 22. Detroit Lions79013820 23. Tennessee Titans79012223 24. Buffalo Bills610011422 25. Minnesota Vikings51019327 26. Atlanta Falcons41208025 27. Tampa Bay Bucs41206926 28. Cleveland Browns41206529 29. Jacksonville Jaguars41206028 30. Oakland Raiders41203230 31. Wash. Redskins31302931 32. Houston Texans21401332NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston39261125411481 Tampa Bay39231245011093 Montreal4023143499989 Detroit 411814945107117 Toronto 412016545115118 Ottawa 421718741118135 Florida 40152053595128 Buffalo 39112442671110 Metropolitan Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh41291115913094 Washington402015545122119 Philadelphia38181644097107 N.Y. Rangers40191924094108 New Jersey40161684095102 Columbus391718438106112 Carolina39141693791114 N.Y. Islanders401221731102135 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago42287763158115 St. Louis3826755713792 Colorado38231145010997 Dallas 381912745112111 Minnesota41201654596107 Winnipeg411818541111121 Nashville40181844095119 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim41288561131103 San Jose3925865612898 Los Angeles40251145410880 Vancouver40231165210893 Phoenix381910947116117 Calgary 39141963495122 Edmonton411324430106139 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Ottawa 3, Washington 1 Chicago 1, Los Angeles 0 Nashville 6, Detroit 4 Philadelphia at Vancouver, late Todays Games Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 1 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Minnesota, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 8 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Calgary, 9 p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Wednesdays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Ann Arbor, MI, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 4 9 10 11 13 5-of-55 winners$38,278.36 4-of-5441$69.50 3-of-510,935$7.50 CASH 3 (early) 6 8 8 CASH 3 (late) 0 2 5 PLAY 4 (early) 4 9 1 2 PLAY 4 (late) 7 7 8 6 FANTASY 5 6 8 10 12 25TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 B3 Hurricanes take third in Orlando hoops tourneyThe Citrus boys basketball team routed The Masters Academy 65-40 Monday to finish third at the Jim Clark Holiday Classic at Bishop Moore High School in Orlando. Ben Janicki paced the Hurricanes with 15 points. Desmond Franklin added 12 points and Devin Pryor chipped in 11 points on his way to all-tournament team honors. The Hurricanes (11-2) are back in action Friday at home against Eustis with a 3 p.m. varsity start.Redskins fire Shanahan after 3-13 seasonASHBURN, Va. The Washington Redskins have fired coach Mike Shanahan after a 3-13 season. Shanahan was dismissed Monday after meeting with team owner Dan Snyder. Shanahan went 24-40 in four years in Washington, but his greater failure was an inability to restore order and professionalism to a franchise that has often been in disarray for the last two decades. The Redskins finished last in the NFC East in three of Shanahans four seasons. The outlier was 2012, when a sevengame winning streak at the end of the regular season won the team its first division title since 1999. Shanahan had one year remaining on his five-year, $35 million contract. Snyder will now be seeking his eighth head coach for his 16th season as an NFL owner.Lions fire coach Jim Schwartz after 5 seasonsALLEN PARK, Mich. The Detroit Lions have fired coach Jim Schwartz. The Lions made the move Monday, one day after they ended their lateseason slide with a loss at Minnesota. Detroit flopped to a 7-9 record this year after a 6-3 record start put the franchise in a position to win a division title for the first time since 1993. Schwartz was 29-51 over five seasons, including a 10-6 mark in 2011 that lifted the Lions to their only postseason appearance this century. The former Tennessee Titans defensive coordinator was hired in 2009 when Detroit was coming off the NFLs first 0-16 season. Schwartz had the team going in the right direction during his first three seasons before it took a step back the next two years.Minnesota Vikings fire coach Leslie FrazierMINNEAPOLIS The Minnesota Vikings have fired coach Leslie Frazier a day after they wrapped up a 5-10-1 season. The Vikings made the playoffs last year but struggled in 2013, unable to find stability at quarterback. Frazier went 21-33-1 in three-plus seasons. The firing was announced Monday morning.Doctors give no prognosis for Michael SchumacherGRENOBLE, France Doctors offered a grim assessment of Michael Schumachers head injuries Monday, providing no prognosis for the Formula One driving great after his skiing accident in the French Alps. Schumacher has been placed in a medically induced coma to relieve pressure on his brain, which suffered bruising and bleeding when the retired seventime world champion fell and struck a rock Sunday while skiing during a family vacation. We cannot predict the future for Michael Schumacher, Dr. Jean-Francois Payen, the doctor in charge of Grenoble University Hospitals intensive care unit, said at a news conference. Schumacher earned universal admiration for his uncommon driving talent, which led to a record 91 race wins. From staff and wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS Mark Dominik

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B4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOLLEGEFOOTBALL Oregon crushes Texas in Browns finale Longhorns start search for new coach Associated PressSAN ANTONIO Quarterback Marcus Mariota had 386 total yards and No. 10 Oregon returned two interceptions for touchdowns, spoiling Texas coach Mack Browns farewell with a runaway 30-7 victory in the Alamo Bowl on Monday night. The BCS-snubbed Ducks (11-2) dominated throughout even though their famously high-powered offense scored just one touchdown, when Josh Huff turned a short pass from Mariota into a spectacular 16-yard sprint to the end zone. Brown received warm goodbyes from a sellout crowd in what was practically a home game for Texas (8-5). Even the school marching band spelled his name at halftime. But the blowout was a final reminder of why Brown is resigning after 16 seasons at Texas, which he led to a national championship in 2005 but couldnt reverse a sharp decline in recent years. Walking off the field for the last time, Brown flashed the Hook em Horns hand signal to the scattered remaining Texas fans who stuck around to the end of another humbling loss this season. Mariota led all rushers with 133 yards on 15 carries, making sure Oregon eased the sting of not playing in a BCS bowl for the first time in five years. He was 18 of 26 for 253 yards passing in his Heisman Trophy campaign tuneup for 2014, having announced earlier this month that he was coming back for his junior season. Yet even Mariota was outscored by Oregons defense and so was Texas, for that matter. Oregons first touchdown came on the third play of the game when safety Avery Patterson intercepted an overthrown pass by Texas quarterback Case McCoy and returned it 37 yards to the end zone. McCoy later bookended a dismal performance in his final game with another pick-six, this one returned 38 yards by linebacker Derrick Malone that sent waves of burnt orange-clad fans streaming for the exits. McCoy scored on a 1-yard rush in the first quarter for Texas only touchdown. He finished 8 of 17 for 48 yards and was pulled at times in the second half for freshman Tyrone Swoopes. Running back Malcolm Brown was the lone offensive constant for Texas, finishing with 130 yards on 26 carries. Far from the uplifting send-off Texas wanted for Brown, the school now shifts its focus to finding a replacement. New Texas athletic director Steve Patterson said before kickoff that he wants a successor by Jan. 15. Patterson said coaches interested in the job have come forward but wouldnt discuss potential candidates. Theres interest thats sincere, and theres interest thats Help me find a better contract, Patterson said. Whoever Texas hires shouldnt expect patience from a fanbase that grew accustomed to winning under Brown, and then became restless as the Longhorns slid from perennial BCS contention. Brown arrived in 1998 and went 128-27 by the end of 2009, when the Longhorns lost to Alabama in its second BCS title game in five years. He goes out, however, 30-21 in his final four seasons. Texas could do a lot worse than look to Oregon for how to pull off a coaching transition. Although first-year coach Mark Helfrich couldnt get the Ducks to a BCS bowl as Chip Kelly did in each of his four seasons, Oregon still finished with a fourth consecutive year of 11 or more victories. This was the Ducks third consecutive bowl win. Associated PressOregon quarterback Marcus Mariota slips past Texas Caleb Bluiett during the first quarter Monday in the Valero Alamo Bowl in San Antonio. The Ducks defeated the Longhorns 30-7 in the final game for Texas head coach Mack Brown. A tall order for UCF Navy wins Armed Forces Bowl Associated PressFORT WORTH, Texas Keenan Reynolds ran for 86 yards with two more touchdowns and Navy won for only the second time its last seven bowl games, beating Middle Tennessee State 24-6 in the Armed Forces Bowl on Monday. Reynolds had a 3-yard score to cap the opening drive for Navy (9-4) and added a 1-yarder in the fourth quarter. Already with the NCAA record for touchdowns rushing by a quarterback, Reynolds upped his total to 31 to match Colorado State running back Kapri Bibbs, also a sophomore, for the national lead this season. Middle Tennessee (8-5) was held to a season low in points. The Blue Raiders finished the regular season with a five-game winning streak, averaging nearly 43 points a game in that stretch since a 34-7 loss on Oct. 12 at North Texas, about 40 miles away from the TCU campus where the bowl was played. Reynolds finished the season with 1,346 yards rushing leading the triple option offense. Navy won its fifth straight. Ole Miss beats Georgia Tech at Music City Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. Bo Wallace ran for two touchdowns and threw for another score and Mississippi beat Georgia Tech 25-17 Monday in the Music City Bowl for the Rebels second straight bowl victory under coach Hugh Freeze. The junior quarterback and Tennessee native made up for his three turnovers in the Egg Bowl overtime loss by throwing for 256 yards and running for 86 more, giving him the school record for total yards in a season and most completions in a season, topping Eli Manning for both. Ole Miss (8-5) now has won six straight bowls and 10 of the last 11 in making up for the lone loss in that stretch in the 2000 Music City Bowl. Georgia Tech (7-6) has lost eight of nine bowls. The Yellow Jackets scored 10 points in the fourth quarter as they tried to rally before a safety with 4:22 left ended their last chance. Yellow Jackets lineman Adam Gotsis blocked a 32-yard field goal attempt by Andrew Ritter giving Georgia Tech the ball at their own 20 with 4:36 left trailing 23-17. But Georgia Tech lost 5 yards on the first play, then Vad Lee flipped the ball to Corey Dennis on a reverse with the receiver apparently looking to throw when he fumbled under pressure. Right tackle Ray Beno covered up the ball in the end zone for the safety. Ole Miss then chewed up the clock before finally punting back to Georgia Tech with 37 seconds left. Senquez Golson intercepted Lee on the next play to seal the victory for the Rebels in the bowl, sponsored by Franklin American Mortgage Company. With a month to prepare, Ole Miss shut down the nations fourthbest rushing offense. Georgia Tech came in averaging 311.7 yards per game, and the Rebels smothered the Yellow Jackets, holding them to just 151 yards on the ground. Ole Miss held the ball for nearly 33 minutes and had a 477-298 edge in total offense. Ole Miss had a 23-7 lead when the Yellow Jackets scored 10 straight points. Harrison Butker capped a 64-yard drive with a 38-yard field goal in the opening seconds of the fourth quarter, then D.J. White intercepted a Wallace pass intended for Donte Moncrief. On the next play, Lee found Darren Waller for a 72-yard catch-and-run for a TD with 13:25 left. Ole Miss led 13-7 after an interesting first half where both teams opened the game driving for touchdowns with some special teams miscues. Wallace capped the opening possession for Ole Miss with a 17-yard run for a touchdown, and he connected with Moncrief on a 28-yard TD catch where the receiver went down the right sideline and then held the ball out at the pylon for the score in the second quarter. But Gotsis also blocked the extra point, keeping Ole Miss lead at 13-7. Ritter also missed a 29-yard field goal later in the quarter that was so low it bounced off the crossbar. Associated PressGeorgia Tech quarterback Vad Lee is brought down Monday by Mississippi defenders Issac Gross, bottom, and Robert Nkemdiche, top, in the Music City Bowl in Nashville, Tenn. Knights hoping to provide speed bump to Bears Associated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Central Florida mostly contained Louisvilles Tommy Bridgewater, faced the pass-happy offenses in Conference USA last season, dealt with the up-tempo chaos of June Jones SMU Mustangs. The Knights have never seen anything like what theyll face in the Fiesta Bowl on New Years Day. Waiting for them in the desert is No. 6 Baylor, a team that plays like its stuck on fast forward and this season piled up more yards than every team but one in FBS history. Baylor is their own kind of monster, Knights linebacker Terrance Plummer said on Monday. Monster is a good way to describe it, at least to the teams who have tried getting in the Bears way. Using a balanced attacked designed by coach Art Briles, Baylor (11-1) was an unstoppable force all season, leading the nation with 53.3 points per game. The Bears scored at least 70 points four times their first six games and were held under 30 once, to Oklahoma State in their only loss of the season. Baylor put up video-game numbers of total offense, averaging 624.5 yards per game, second alltime in FBS history to Houston (624.9) in 1989 and 51 more than the next-closest team this season. The Bears had their biggest game against West Virginia on Oct. 5, setting Big 12 records with 864 total yards and 73 points in a blowout victory. Perhaps the closest thing Central Florida (11-1) saw to Baylor this season was South Carolina, which averaged 170 fewer yards and nearly 20 fewer points. The Knights lost to the Gamecocks 28-25 on Sept. 28 They have a very explosive offense, Central Florida coach George OLeary said. I dont think anybody is going to stop them. I think you have to slow them down and get off the field. Thats the big thing when you play Baylor. The problem is trying to figure out what to stop. With most high-scoring, yardsamassing teams, the focal part of the offense is usually a strong passing or running game. Find a way to stop that one aspect and youll have a pretty good shot at beating them. Baylor is equally good at passing and running. During the regular season, the Bears were fifth nationally with 359 yards passing and 12th with 262 yards rushing. Bryce Petty was one of the most prolific quarterbacks in the country and has a large cache of explosive receivers. Preventing teams from ganging up on him is running back Lache Seastrunk, who ran for 106 yards per game. And this is nothing new for a Briles-led team. While at Houston, he led the first team in FCS history to have a 300-yard receiver and 200-yard rusher in the same game. The thing is, theyre such a fastpaced team, but theyre a fastpaced team with a running game and you dont see that nowadays because everyone wants to pass the ball, Plummer said. Theyre so well-tempoed, so well-paced and thats the challenge, trying to get lined up, trying to make plays in the open field because theyre so fast in what they do. We just have to focus as a team and make sure we know our assignments. Between Baylors proclivity for putting up big numbers and Central Floridas rise from a smaller conference well, at least one not the size and stature of the Big 12 the Knights are decided underdogs. Baylor is favored by 16 1/2 points, the biggest spread in any of the 35 bowl games, and some predictions have them winning by four touchdowns or more. But the Knights arent exactly slouches on the defensive side of the ball. Central Florida finished 19th nationally in total defense, allowing 346 yards per game, and was one of the few teams to slow down Bridgewater during the early part of the season, when he seemingly could do no wrong. The Knights are positionally sound, rarely miss assignments and have a defensive-minded coach in OLeary. They do a great job schematically defensively, Briles said. They dont get themselves out of position with alignment. Theyre productive in how they approach the game. Were just playing a wellcoached football team. Are they good enough to slow down the Bears? Well find out on New Years Day. Associated PressUniversity of Central Florida linebacker Terrance Plummer takes questions Monday during the Fiesta Bowl media day in Scottsdale, Ariz. Central Florida will face Baylor on Jan. 1, 2014, in the Fiesta Bowl.

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HEALTH& LIFE Section CTUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Inside:Friends of the Library plan annual meetings/C5 Vitamin D is an important component for healthy skin, bone and general good health. Most everybody is familiar that vitamin D is made in the body by the skin and can make about 1,000 units of vitamin D with just a few minutes of sun exposure. A 30-minute exposure to the sun can produce upwards to 2,000 international units. The vitamin D that is made in the skin is metabolized in the liver and undergoes another metabolic step in the kidneys and becomes a steroid hormone-like product called Calcitrol. Besides being a corner stone in helping bone growth, other tissues that benefit include brain, cartilage, colon, hair, skin, kidneys, liver, pancreas, thyroid and there is even some recent evidence to suggest that it helps fight sinus and allergy issues. During the industrial revolution of the 20th century, people spent less time outside. The air was much dirtier and it also drastically cut out the amount of sunlight coming through and people had the aged-old disease call rickets which affected bone density. Believe it or not, rickets is making a comeback and it is because our kids are spending too much time indoors playing video games, but that is another article in itself. Besides sun exposure, there are some foods that are naturally high in content of vitamin D and that includes fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel, fish liver oil also and eggs, cheese, beef and of course, we are all familiar with the fortified milk that we drink as a good source of vitamin D. Just like anything else, vitamin D is a good thing, but too much of it can be a bad thing. There are some tests and research that suggest that elevated levels of vitamin D could lead to hardening of the arteries. Calcification in the blood vessels makes the blood vessels smaller and unable to constrict and accommodate for various levels of blood pressure. This can result in damage to the heart as well as the kidneys. One must be wise and balance this issue. For example, 10 to 15 minutes of sun exposure daily is ideal to obtain vitamin D and eating good foods may be adequate and you may not need to take any supplemental vitamin D. Green, leafy produce also is an excellent source of vitamin D. Estimated required vitamin D per day is about 400 international units. A cup of milk provides about 100 international units. Egg is a little bit lower; and fish, like salmon and tuna, are about two or three times that, depending on the amount you eat. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit Crystal CommunityENT.com. Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT 000GIG1

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Q:I was told by my dentist that I needed gum surgery to expose more tooth. She was making me a crown and something happened while she was drilling that necessitated this surgery. I am a little leery about having this done, and wondered if you had any idea what it is all about. Also, is there any other way around it. Thank you. A: The first thing I would like to say to all the readers of this column is that I am always happy to answer your questions. I just want you to know that you can ask these questions of your dentist, as well. As a dentist myself, I prefer patients ask me any questions they have on their mind. The question you have may seem silly to you but in reality you know the old saying the only foolish questions are the ones not asked. Most of us dentists try to explain everything we do so the patient can understand what is going on. Some of us may use fancy words that can confuse a patient. If that is the case, simply ask your dentist to put it in laymans terms. I bet they will be happy to. On to your questions. What you are describing is called a crown lengthening procedure. It is typically done by a periodontist, but can be done by an oral surgeon and even a general dentist, as long as they are comfortable with it. The crown lengthening procedure is most commonly used when there is either extensive decay or a fracture that extends too far down the root. When the decay or fracture is at the same level as the bone (or close to it), it is very difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the dentist to get a good impression of the tooth in the process of making a crown. The surgeon will usually remove some of the bone and gum tissue surrounding the tooth in order to reestablish ideal conditions at a place lower down on the tooth. Thats it. It is a very straightforward and predictable procedure. It involves minimal or no pain and needs about six weeks of healing before the dentist can continue his or her work. My suggestion to you is to have the procedure done. Your dentist is recommending this for a very specific reason. The end result will be much more favorable with the procedure than without it. Congratultions to your dentist. There are too many dentists who would just proceed as usual and not even mention the situation or things that can be done to make it better. You asked if there were any other options. The only other option is to not do the procedure and for the dentist to try his or her best to get a good impression to make the crown. I personally offer this option to a patient when I feel I might get a good impression leaving things as is, explaining that I will do my best and that not doing the procedure can back fire. There are times that you can get the impression the way you want it, but the patient reports a feeling of fullness around the gums or complains of feeling like something is stuck there but they can not get it out. The reason for this is that you have the bone, the tooth, the crown and the gums all in one spot. This is not the way it is supposed to be, and the patient can sometimes feel that. If this is the case the procedure can always be done as an afterthought. Please remember that the ideal way to handle this is to have the procedure first and complete the crown afterwards. I hope this helped. Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@Masterpiece DentalStudio.com.C2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000H05D New Years Day brings new resolutions Tomorrow is New Years Day. It brings new hope, new expectations and new resolutions. New Years Day has always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly, looking forward to the coming year. It is time to learn from past mistakes and try to correct them. This year I am going to suggest some New Years resolutions, which can help improve health and cut down the risk of cancer. 1. Lose weight: Obesity accounts for one in seven cancers in the United States and it also increases the risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks, etc. Obesity is calculated by Body Mass Index or BMI and try to keep it below 25. 2. Watch diet: Try to eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Servings are small size, e.g., one small apple may make one serving. Limit intake of red meat and processed meat. Choose whole grains over processed (refined). 3. Exercise: As per the American Cancer Society, engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, above usual activities, on five or more days of the week. I suggest that 45 to 60 minutes of intense physical activity are preferable. This helps as follows: Helps control weight. Maintains healthy bones, muscles and joints. Reduces the risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes. Promotes psychological well-being. Reduces the risk of death from heart disease. 4. Smoking: Smoking is the commonest cause of cancer. It causes many cancers, including lung, oral cavity (mouth), pharynx and larynx (throat), esophagus, bladder, stomach, cervix, kidney and pancreas, and acute myeloid leukemia. It also damages the lungs and heart. Therefore, all smokers should try this year to quit smoking. If you are a nonsmoker, avoid secondhand smoke. 5. Alcohol: If you do not drink alcohol, do not start it for health benefits. If you drink regularly, drink no more than one drink per day for women or two per day for men. 6. Screening: In general, the earlier we detect cancer, the more curable it is. For women, regular mammograms and Pap smears are very important. There is some controversy about screening PSA in men. Both men and women should get a colonoscopy after the age of 50. If you are a smoker or you quit smoking recently (less than the past 15 to 20 years), recent recommendations suggest screening spiral low dose CT scan of the lungs once a year. Please make a resolution that you will follow all current screening guidelines for cancer. These are some of the suggestions for New Years resolutions. Some are easy and some may not be easy. All of these help improve health and cut down the risk of cancer. Please consider them.Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tam pabay.rr.com or call 352-7460707. Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES Crown lengthening common with tooth decay Get moving as new year begins If youre like millions of other Americans, getting in shape is near the top of your New Years resolution list. There is a good reason for it to be there. Staying physically active is one way to reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, and improve your overall sense of well-being. But far too many Americans are dragging their feet when it comes to exercise. According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of US adults dont get the recommended amount of physical activity. Thats at least 30 minutes of moderate activity, five or more days a week. Fitting fitness into your day can be tough when youre juggling work, family and other priorities. The key is to make getting that activity one of your priorities. Schedule it on your home or work calendar, just as you do other appointments, and commit to keeping that appointment with yourself. Its that important. Your health is worth it. Getting out of bed early to work out increases your chances that you will actually stick with a plan. If you wait until after work or later in the day, chances are other things will creep up and get in the way of your workout time. But you dont have to join a gym to get a good workout. Walking is one of the easiest ways to stay active and healthy. If the weather puts you off exercising outside, check out our local shopping mall, it is a great place to walk when the weather turns bad. It also helps to sneak extra activity into your daily routine. Seek out the farthest parking spot rather than the closest; carry your own groceries to the car; rake your leaves instead of using a blower; do some leg lifts or sit-ups while you watch TV. Once youve committed to being active, you need to find ways to stay motivated, too. Seeing the progress youre making can help push you on. It is also important to find an activity you like to do so that being active doesnt feel like a chore. Go for a walk one day, a bike ride another; dust off those roller skates the next. Boredom is a surefire way to derail even your best laid plans. Finding a workout buddy can help banish boredom, too. Having someone to talk to while you exercise makes the time pass more quickly. And committing to meet a friend for a workout raises the odds that you really will work out. Finally, get the whole family involved in physical activity. Walk together after dinner, or toss a ball in the back yard. Not only does this get you out and active as a family, it begins to instill the importance of a healthy lifestyle for your kids. And thats a New Years resolution worth sticking to.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER HEALTH NOTES Donating blood a New Years traditionLike that resolution to lose weight, or the kiss at midnight, New Years Eve is filled with traditions, and for many Citrus residents donating blood on the last day of the year is one way to celebrate. LifeSouth will host its annual New Years Resolution Blood Drive, from 11a.m. to 5p.m. today, Dec. 31, at the Walmart Supercenter, 2461 E. Gulf-toLake Highway in Inverness. This is always one of our largest and most fun blood drives of the year, said LifeSouths Pam Egnot. We get people who donate every year at this drive. We even have some multi-generation family donors. To encourage residents to join in the fun, there will be a drawing for a 42-inch LCD TV courtesy of Walmart, and all donors will be entered into a drawing for a Play Station 4. There will be a drawing for a Mossy Oak three-piece seat cover kit and a 2.5-gallon ArmorAll Shop Vac, courtesy of Auto Zone in Inverness. All donors will also receive a thank you gift from LifeSouth. The LifeSouth staff will bring a picnic to the parking lot, grilling hot dogs and hamburgers and offering chips and soft drinks. Donors must be 17 or older, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health. A photo ID is also required. To learn more about donating blood, visit www.lifesouth.org.Hospice volunteer orientation readyHPH Hospice offers new volunteer orientation at its Team Offices from 9a.m. to 4p.m. Jan. 8 and 10. Orientation will be at the HPH offices at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH Hospice has been serving residents of the Nature Coast since 1984. Hospice volunteers often serve patients and families at the bedside, but they also assist in the office, help raise awareness, contribute to educational programs, and provide fundraising support and more. RSVP or get more information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600.Resolve to be fit, healthy in new yearThe Florida Department of Health in Citrus County is offering a free seminar from 10 to 11:30a.m. Jan.22 at the Vital Statistics Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. The workshop New Year, New You will cover nutrition facts, how to read food labels, tips for working exercise into your busy day, and healthy eating through gardening. The Florida Department of Health is working with the YMCA and the Citrus County Master Gardeners to present educational topics to help people get on the right path to living a healthy lifestyle. We are excited about working with our community partners to kick off a healthy New Year, said Carol Burke, senior public health nutritionist supervisor for the Florida Department of Health Citrus County. This free seminar will be a fun, informative way to help people get motivated for 2014. The New Year, New You seminar is free to the public and no registration is required. For information, call Sabrina Yeatman at 352-527-0068, ext.242.Blood drives set for upcoming weekLifeSouth Community Blood Centers: With summer upon us, theres a sharp increase in the need for blood. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30a.m. to 5p.m. weekdays (7p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30a.m. to 2p.m. Saturdays and 10a.m. to 2p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 2629 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, open from 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. weekdays, (6:30p.m. Wednesdays), 8a.m. to 1:30p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 12 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.1, Subway, 6748 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Crystal River. 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, Citrus County Solid Waste, 230 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State Road 44), Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Jan.3, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan.4, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, 4150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. 12 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan.5, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 1 to 4 p.m. Monday, Jan.6, Citrus County Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday, Jan.6, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.7, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. 2 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.7, Cypress Cove Care Center, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River. 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, Rock Crusher Elementary School, 814 S. Rock Crusher Road, Homosassa.Health center board to meetThe George A. Dame Community Health Center Board Meetings are at 3p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first-floor conference room. See NOTES/ Page C4

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HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 C3 Photo courtesy of Getty Images Home ModificationsLiving at home longer may mean renovating a home to make it more accessible. This can include such things as installing ramps to bypass stairs, building a bedroom on the main floor, placing grab bars in the shower, changing the height of kitchen countertops or making a bathroom safer and more accessible. Before you make home modifications, you should evaluate your current and future needs by going through your home room by room and answering a series of questions to highlight where changes might be made. Several checklists are available to help you conduct this review. The National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modifica tions is a good place to start. Go to the centers website at http://www.homemods.org and click on the link to the Safety Checklist and Assessment Instrument. Getting HelpKeeping a house running smoothly requires a lot of hard work. If you are no longer able to keep up with the demands, you may need to hire someone to do laundry, buy groceries, run errands, clean the house or perform any necessary repairs. Those who are unable to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), such as getting in and out of bed, walking, bathing, dressing, and eating, can often continue to stay at home with outside help. There are a number of services that can be brought in to assist with ADLs and other personal care. You can hire some one, such as a personal care aide or home health aide, to help you out a few hours a day or around the clock. Some health care services can be provided at home by trained professionals, such as occupa tional therapists, social workers or home health nurses. Check with your insurance or health service to see what kind of coverage is available, although you may have to cover some of these costs out of pocket. If very specific conditions are met, Medicare will help pay for all or a portion of home health care. TransportationDeclining health often causes a decline in independence and mobility. Many seniors lose the ability to drive or simply feel uncomfortable behind the wheel at night. Investigate transporta tion options in your area so you can maintain an active social life, get medical care and shop for necessities. You might find family members willing to take you to the grocery store, friends who will drive you to social events, nearby bus routes, reduced fare taxis or senior transportation services funded by a local not-for-profit. Staying in your home should not mean being cut off from community activities you enjoy. Finding new ways to get around, even after you are no longer driving, may allow you to stay engaged and active. FAMILY FEATURES Most people prefer to stay in their home or apartment for as long as possible. The best way to make this a reality is to plan ahead of time to make the amenities in your home as safe and accessible as possible. It can be hard to imagine that tasks around the house that were once done with ease can one day pose a challenge. Anticipating the chal lenge and planning accordingly may allow you to remain in your home for an extended period of time. Often, with some minor modifications, your home can be adapted to help you stay as long as possible even with some loss of mobility.

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Alzheimers AssociationFlorida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-6884537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz.org/living_with_alzheimers message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. First Tuesday, 11a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-683-9009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-for-profit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. RBOI Prostate Cancer Support Group: 11:30a.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, 522 N. Lecanto Highway. Call 352527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext.213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-5274389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352726-1551, ext.6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352-229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962 or 352-5272348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness.C4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE 000GS5B 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS Reiki speakers to speakReiki practioners Rick and Connie Leiser will be guest speakers at the Time Out From Cancer monthly dinner at 6p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, at Clawdaddys restaurant, 1601 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The American Cancer Society describes Reiki as based on the belief that spiritual energy can be channeled through a Reiki practitioner to heal the patients spirit. This is thought to help release the bodys natural healing powers. Reiki is most often given as a hands-on experience. The word Reiki comes from Japanese terms that translate as universal life energy. Reiki is said to promote relaxation, decrease stress and anxiety, and increase a persons general sense of well-being. This group is a monthly meeting of cancer survivors and we invite you to join us to share your inspiration and strength. Complimentary finger food is sponsored by Hometown Values and delicious items are available off of the dinner menu. Anyone is welcome to attend, but we ask that you RSVP to Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or Cancer Navigator Wendy Hall at 527-0106 by Jan.6. CASA in need of donationsCitrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA) needs donation of household goods for its domestic violence shelter for women and children: hair clips, hair brushes, toilet paper, paper towels, size 5 diapers, hand soap, shampoo, conditioner, facial tissues and liquid highefficiency (HE) laundry soap. Drop off donations at CASAs outreach center, 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Donations of grocery and gas cards are always welcome. Call 352-344-8111.County offers care servicesCitrus County Senior Care Services has home care services available under the HOPE Program (Homecare Options Provided for Everyone). Services available include: Case management Personal care (help with bathing and personal grooming) Respite Homemaking (light housekeeping duties) Emergency alert/response button Home-delivered meals All of these services are overseen by a certified case manager who places licensed and bonded service providers in the home. If you or a loved one are in need of any of these services, call 352-527-5930 for more information and a cost quote. SHINE program offers helpFlorida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352-527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Alzheimers caregiver support group, 2 p.m. the last Thursday monthly at Highland Terrace ALF, 700 Medical Court E., Inverness, facilitated by Debbie OLeary, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-860-2525. Respite care available. Time Out From Cancer, cancer survivors meeting 6 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Clawdaddys restaurant 1601 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River, sponsored by Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI). Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group, 2:30p.m. first and third Thursday monthly at Sunshine Gardens Crystal River, 311 N.E. Fourth Ave., facilitated by Debbie Selsavage, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-563-0235 or email administration@sgseniors.com. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11a.m. the first Saturday monthly at First Baptist Church of Hernando, 3790 E. Parsons Point Road, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call Shana at 352-637-2030 or 352-422-2123. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352-596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. RBOI has begun a monthly survivor group with inspirational guests and strength based topics. Any cancer survivors and family are welcome to attend. There is no cost to attend. For information, email Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Alzheimers Association-Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group, 6 to 7:30p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low, M.D., self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-5635182. Together We Grow NarAnon Family Group 6:45p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888-947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410-903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.food addicts.org. 7 to 8:30p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S.19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352-220-1959. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.41. 6 p.m. Mondays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Crystal River AFG: 8p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Lecanto AFG: 8p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Stepping Stones: 10a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncinter group.com. 10:30a.m. Sundays, 10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chassahowitzka Community Center, 1mile west of U.S.19 on Miss Maggie Drive, turn left, two blocks. AC Group, 7p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352-637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholics forchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: It Works How and Why, noon to 1p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Mens RAW (Recovery at Work) Mens Meeting, 7 to 8p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8p.m. Monday; 8 to 9p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Women United Ladies Meeting, 6:30 to 7:30p.m. Thursday Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352-508-1604. Information about NA is also available at NatureCoastNA.org. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Tuesdays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352-3448111 to sign up. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. Gulf to Lake Celebrate Recovery Fridays at Crystal River United Methodist Church on County Road 495. Dinner ($3) at 6p.m.; large group at 7p.m.; small groups at 8p.m. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. WEEKLY SUPPORT MEETINGS SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS NOTESContinued from Page C2

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Native Plant Society meeting set for Jan. 7The Citrus County Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 7, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Dr. Walter Kingsley Taylor, author of Florida gardening books, will be guest speaker. His Guide to Florida Wildflowers is a standard book for anyone who ventures out to look at wildflowers in our community. His new book, Florida Wildflowers A Comprehensive Guide, will be available at the meeting. The public is welcome. Email citrusNPS@gmail.com for more information.Women plan Bunco Bash at BH Lions ClubThe Citrus Hills Womens Club will have a Bunco Bash at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. Tickets are $15. The public is welcome. For more information and tickets, call Janet Haight at 352-527-2639. For membership information, call 352-270-8909.Jazz Society to host monthly open jamThe Citrus Jazz Society will host its monthly open jam session from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center (formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall) in Homosassa Springs. This session will honor drummer Tony Mancaruso, president of the Citrus Jazz Society, who died on Dec. 6. A $7 donation at the door for nonmembers is requested. Bring your own refreshments. Musicians interested in playing are welcome to call Roy Hoskins at 352-382-1875. Learn about painting at free workshopChristopher Satchell will offer a Painting ASAP Workshop free to the public at 5 p.m. Monday at the Coastal Region Library, Crystal River. The instruction will focus on such topics as: How to select a reputable contractor painting contractors must be licensed, have proof of insurance and provide work history with references. How to select affordable, quality materials depending on condition of the structure and budget allocated. Advance preparation what the homeowner must do to get ready for a contractor and what contractor must do to get the structure ready. The workshop will also look at the pros and cons of the do-ityourself, or DIY, alternative. There will be a raffle for a free house pressure cleaning. For more information, call 352-464-1397. COMMUNITYPage C5TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious PawsADOPTABLE Kitties Special to the ChronicleYoung adult felines in a variety of colors, each with a distinct personality, are all ready to move into a loving home of their own. All are well socialized, most like to be with other pets, including dogs. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The Floral City Adoption Center at Gretas Touch on U.S. 41 is open Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The mall site will reopen Thursday, Jan. 2; the Floral City site will reopen on Saturday, Jan. 4. For more information, call 352-726-4700 or go to www. preciouspawsflorida.com NEWS NOTES Special to the ChronicleEveryone is invited to join the Friends of the Library for its annual meetings scheduled for January. The Friends of the Lakes Region Library will host its annual meeting at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Jan. 7, at the library in Inverness. Prize-winning nature photographer Gary Kuhl will discuss his collection Citrus County: Where the Wild Things Are. The Friends of the Homosassa Library will host its meeting at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8 at the Homosassa Library. Captain Jon Semmes of Singing River Tours will provide a special musical presentation. The Friends of the Coastal Region Library will meet at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, at the Crystal River library. A presentation titled Presidents and First Ladies: FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt will be given by William Parker and Mercita Sue Wills. The Friends of the Central Ridge Library will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16, at the library in Beverly Hills. Candace Booth will offer her special presentation, Walking Back in Time with Dessie. For more information about Citrus County Libraries, visit the website at citruslibraries.org. Special to the ChronicleFlorida is a mandated state and any insurance company doing business in Florida must give a discount to those completing an AARP Safe Driving Course, open to everyone age 50 and older. Contact your agent for discount amounts. Update yourself to earn a discount and learn about newly enacted motor vehicle and traffic laws. Course fee is $15 for AARP members; $20 for all others. Call the listed instructor to register: Crystal River, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and 15, 1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and 19, 1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Inverness, Hernando, Floral City Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 21 and 22, 9 a.m. to noon, Citrus Memorial Health System Auditorium. Call Don Slough at 352-344-4003. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and 19, 9 a.m. to noon, Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580 Lemon St., Hernando. Call Bob Dicker at 352-527-2366 Beverly Hills, Lecanto, Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and 15, 9 a.m. to noon, Brown Funeral Home, 5430 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731. Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764. Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 26 and 27, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764. Citrus County Parks & Recreations fifth annual holiday show Miracle on 34th Street Musical, at Citrus Springs Community Center, was a smash hit. Starring the popular New Dawn Singers and featuring the glitz and glamour of the great white way of Broadway, the company of dancers and singers kept us spellbound with set after set. With Radio City Music Hall signs adorning the stage and a toy store set, the sixmember cast quickly set the holiday mood in their elegant period winter wonderland costumes with their opening act, Its the Most Wonderful Time of the Year, dancing and singing Rockettes style. From Eustis, this family of performers captured our sincere admiration. Grandmother, grandfather, father and mother, then children from generation to generation the troupe maintains the legacy begun by their parents. Time and again we were invited to sing along to the many time-honored Christmas favorites. A Holly Jolly Christmas was featured and Frosty, the Snowman garnered a solo. We marveled at the quick costume changes as the group began Walking in a Winter Wonderland, pretending to build a snowman and huddling together, trying to keep warm as they sang Let it Snow. Memories of our own Christmas gatherings of family and friends refreshed our dreams and hopes. Next, the players took us on a trip to the faraway North Pole to Santas workshop as the group performed a spirited Cool Yule dance in their red and white peppermint-striped costumes, with Mr. and Mrs. Santa nearby. We are Santas Elves and Jolly Old St. Nicholas, a jazzy routine of Santa Man by an energized Santa was followed by Up on the Rooftop and a Santa Claus parade of dancers spelling out Santa in bold letters. After Mr. and Mrs. Santa performed a holiday favorite, Baby, Its Cold Outside, an exuberant Santa danced across the stage. Slowing the pace a bit, a romantic couple sang Christmas Time was Meant to Bring Us Love. A little boy made a dramatic reading to Santa, giving us a broader perspective of the customs and traditions of Christmas around the world. International offerings included Feliz Navidad and Christmas in Killarney. The cast joined hands and invited us to sing Let There be Peace on Earth with them. Next, Home for the holidays was featured and the telling of the real story of Christmas the birth of Jesus with Go Tell it on the Mountain, Amen, Amen and Go Where I Send Thee. Intermission featured The Big Apple Sweets and Treats Shoppe with ice cream, cookies, popcorn, hot chocolate and coffee for sale. The second half of the show featured Broadway hits including Christmas in the Street, with players dressed in all white with plaid sashes. Songs included Need a Little Christmas, a Rockettes favorite, and Snow from the movie White Christmas. Toy soldiers marched around to Toyland. The all-American Another Opening, Another Show set featured a fabulous array of tunes from Oklahoma, My Fair Lady, South Pacific, Mary Poppins and more. The closing set had the cast replete in red and white velvet, ringing Christmas bells and singing traditional Christmas carols. The crowd gave the cast a standing ovation as we joined them in singing We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Many individuals and businesses contributed to the staging of the show, for which planning and coordination begin each February. The Friends of the Citrus County Parks & Recreation Foundation is being formed with memberships at $5 a year. For more information, call 352-465-7007. Billy Lindsey as Elvis is coming up March 7. Call 352-465-7007 for reservations.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY Discover Friends of the Library Annual meetings scheduled for January; special presentations planned Miracle another smash with Citrus audience AARP slates Safe Driving Courses Home dedicationLisa Radford addresses volunteers, donors and other partner families at her recent home dedication with Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County. Radford is the proud new homeowner of Habitat Home No. 96, located in Crystal River. Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County provides simple, decent, affordable housing to those who have a need, ability to pay and willingness to partner. To learn more about becoming a Habitat for Humanity homeowner, call Rose at 352-563-2744. To volunteer at construction sites, call C.D. at 352-601-6582. Call Wendy at 352-564-2300 to volunteer at one of Habitats two ReStore locations, Crystal River and Inverness, where those with retail, electrical, appliance, electronic, cashier or cleaning experience are needed. If your interest is answering the phone, filing, copying or other office duties, call Debbie at 352-563-2744 to volunteer in the office. For more information, visit the website at www.habitatcc.org.Special to the Chronicle

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C6TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.This week we are looking at the 2013 International Bridge Press Association awards. The Yeh Bros. Best Bid of the Year was given to Peter Bertheau from Sweden. The journalist prize went to Micke Melander from Sweden. Bertheau had the North hand, playing in the 2012 World Mind Sports Games (formerly World Team Olympiad) final against Poland in Lille, France. (This event took place too late for inclusion in that years awards.) South opened two hearts, which showed a six-card suit and 10-13 high-card points. West overcalled four diamonds, Leaping Michaels, indicating at least 5-5 in spades and diamonds. Bertheau now set out to try to buy the contract at any level. He responded only four hearts. East jumped to five spades to invite a slam, but West was not interested, having a weaker hand in high-card terms than normal for Leaping Michaels. Bertheau continued his plan with six hearts. And when East took a safety-bid with six spades (it seemed that both sides had a double fit), Bertheau moved on to seven hearts. Certain that this was a sacrifice, East doubled. But the contract was laydown for plus 2,470. At the other table, North-South had a misunderstanding, eventually stopping in six hearts. East sacrificed in six spades, doubled and down one. This gave Sweden 20 international match points en route to the title. The Swedish Bridge Federation website called this Bertheauvenly music. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 P o liti cs N a ti on (N)H ar db a ll With Ch r i s Matthews (N) All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (N) Th e R ac h e l M a dd ow Show (N) Th e L as t W or d With Lawrence ODonnell All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Jinxed Sponge.TurtlesRabbidsSanjaySam & HauntedThunderSee DadInstantTeenNick Top 10 (N) (OWN) 103 62 103 The Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, Nots (OXY) 44 123 American Sweethearts (1996) Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (2002) When Harry Met Sally (1989) (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Jay Z Made in America (2013) (In Stereo) NR The Rolling Stones: Sweet Summer Sun Hyde Park 2013 PG Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic (2013) NR F... Nick Cannon The comics view of the world. MA, L (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops Cops Cops PG Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops PG Cops PG Cops (STARZ) 370 271 370 10 Years (2011) PG-13 Finding Nemo (2003, Comedy) Voices of Albert Brooks. (In Stereo) G Charlies Angels: Full Throttle (2003, Action) Cameron Diaz. PG-13 Think Like a Man (2012) (SUN) 36 31 36 UFC Insider Icons of Coaching World Poker Tour: Season 11 Raising Canes The List: SEC Icons of Coaching DrivenBMX Supercross World Cup 2012 XTERRA World Championship (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35Jailhouse Viva Las Vegas (1964) Elvis Presley. NR Thats Entertainment! (1974) Fred Astaire. Clips from 1928-58 MGM musicals. G Thats Entertainment, Part 2 (1976) G (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Moonshiners Tickle bootlegs at night. Moonshiners Blue Moonshine Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts Rival Shiners Moonshiners (N) (In Stereo) Backyard Oil: After the Gush (N) Moonshiners (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30HoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHere Comes HoneyHoneyHoney (TMC) 350 261 350 John Dies at the End (2012) Chase Williamson. (In Stereo) R The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (2011) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 Storage 24 (2012) Noel Clarke. (In Stereo) R Ward (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Librarian: Curs Transformers (2007) Shia LaBeouf. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. PG-13 (DVS) Bostons Finest No More Bullets Marshal Law: Texas Bostons Finest (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularRegularAdvenUncle RegularKing/HillClevelandAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 106 9 44Tastiest PlacesTastiest PlacesSturgis PG Sturgis Raw PGSturgis Raw PGSturgis Raw PG (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55PawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnStorageStorage (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24GriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKirstieThe Exes (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Time Bomb CSI: Miami About Face CSI: Miami Dead Ringer CSI: Miami Rest in Pieces CSI: Miami Law & Disorder CSI: Miami Habeas Corpse (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineMotherRules Dear Annie: Three months ago, I attended the funeral of a friend and former co-worker, Renee. I went in, signed the book, gave my condolences to her husband and was speaking to some friends. At that point, another co-worker came up to me and said I should sit in the back of the mortuary because Renee wouldnt want me there. I was stunned. Shortly after, Renees daughterin-law approached me and said, Thank you for coming and being a friend to Renee. Of course, by then I was crying and decided to leave. When I spoke with another friend later, she told me she thought Renee was jealous of me. I cannot understand why. Renee had a lovely family, a wonderful husband and a new home. I know that many times when I enter a room, most people dont really welcome me. I am tolerated by those with whom I have worked, and even my friends are like this. I have learned to accept it. But this funeral still upsets me. Should they have called me the day before and told me not to come? By the way, I still have not received a thank you for the memorial I gave to the family. Stunned in Nebraska Dear Stunned: Were not sure what happened at the funeral. One person made you feel unwelcome, but the daughter-in-law thanked you for coming. While we can understand your discomfort, you seem to value one persons opinion over the rest. However, there is another issue here. You claim that most people merely tolerate your presence. Why would you think that? Are you behaving in a way that attracts negative attention? Is it possible you are oversensitive and misread others reactions? Please talk to those friends you trust and ask for their honest opinion about you. No one should go through life believing they are not worth liking. Figure it out and then work on changing it. If you need to seek therapy to accomplish this, please do so. Dear Annie: I am a breast cancer survivor and want to donate my hair. My hairdresser told me that while dyed hair is OK, totally bleached-out hair is not. Also, my hair is more than 5 percent gray, so Locks of Love wont use it. Do you know of any organization that will? Anita Dear Anita: We have good news. According to Pantene Beautiful Lengths (pantene. com/beautifullengths), it takes at least eight to 15 ponytails to make a wig. For a realistic-looking wig with consistent color, all of these ponytails must be dyed the same shade, but gray hair, as well as some chemically treated or permanently colored hair, does not absorb dye at the same rate as other types. However, some gray hair is usable. Try the World of Wigs Corinne Fund at worldofwigs.com. Also, Locks of Love (locksoflove.org) now accepts gray hair donations, as does Wigs for Kids (wigs forkids.org), both of which use the hair to offset costs. Dear Annie: I hope its not too late to reply to Uncomfortable Daughter-in-Law, whose mother-in-law wants to be called Mom. The writer should explain that she has a very special relationship with her own mother and wouldnt want to call her mother-in-law by the same name. However, it is important that she have a name just for her, to recognize how special she is. Perhaps it could be Mama Smith or Mama S. or some other term of endearment that means something to the two of them. Because of numerous grandparents, my daughterin-law devised the name Cookie Grandma to distinguish me from the other grandmas in her childrens lives. (A cookie is one of my favorite desserts.) It works, and it is a sweet and respectful way of dealing with this. Arcadia, Calif.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmail box@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) DOUSE RANCH POUNCE CHOOSE Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The new prison had its PROS AND CONS Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. PIMLE CANKK LEPYUL TENERL Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Print your answer here: TUESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 31, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessA Toast to 2013! A look back at 2013. (N)New Years NewsDaly # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Live From Lincoln Center (N) (In Stereo) G ReturnDownton Frontline Gospels; Christianity and Roman Empire. PG (DVS) % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Live From Lincoln Center (N) GReturnFrontline PG (DVS) ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.A Toast to 2013! A look back at 2013. (N) (In Stereo) New Years Eve With Carson Daly NewsNew Years ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! G Wheel of Fortune New Years Rockin Eve Presents the 30 Greatest Women in Music (N) D,L,S Dick Clarks Primetime New Years Eyewit. News Dick Clarks (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G NCIS Hit and Run PG (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles Parley Person of Interest (In Stereo) PG 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Dads Brooklyn Nine-Nine New Girl Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) New Years Eve Live (N) D,L 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.The 30 Greatest Women in Music Dick Clark NewsDick 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles Help Me Hannah Perry Stone New Years Eve Winterfest from Liberty University < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America New Years Rockin Eve Presents the 30 Greatest Women in Music (N) D,L,S Dick Clarks Primetime New Years NewsDick Clarks @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit The Office The Office PG Family Guy Family Guy F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudBones Bones Cops Rel.Cops Rel.SeinfeldCommun H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PresentThe 700 Club (N) GBabersPaidMannaPaidPaidStudio Direct HealingMinistries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men iHeartradio Music Festival, Night 2 Performers include Justin Timberlake. D,LEngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute Chamber Chat Crook and Chase (In Stereo) PG Cold Squad (DVS) Eye for an EyeThe Comedy Shop S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangDads BrooklynNew GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10New Years Eve Live (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Premios Juventud 2013 Dcimo ao del evento con los premios.Feliz 2014! (N) (En Vivo) (SS) (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Chupacabra The Walking Dead Secrets The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Nebraska (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21Madagascar (In Stereo) PG North America No Place to Hide PG North America Revealed PG Africa Kalahari (In Stereo) G Africa Savannah (In Stereo) G North America Revealed PG (BET) 96 19 96 Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG New Years Eve 2013 (N) PG (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Real HousewivesHousewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Shahs of Sunset (CC) 27 61 27 33Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Grumpy Old Men (1993, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Ann-Margret. PG-13 Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportMarijuana: IndustryMarijuana USAMexicos Drug WarMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46SituationCrossfireErin Burnett OutFrontBest/ Worst New Years Eve Live With Anderson Cooper and Kathy Griffin (N) (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Good Luck Jessie: NYC Christmas G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G Austin & Ally G Up (2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed Asner. PG WALL-E (2008, Adventure) Voices of Ben Burtt. (In Stereo) G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17College Football FootballCollege Football Chick-fil-A Bowl -Duke vs. Texas A&M. From Atlanta. (N) SportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49College BasketballCollege Basketball College Basketball Connecticut at Houston.SportCtrOlber. (EWTN) 95 70 95 48Vespers Daily Mass G Mother Angelica LiveReligiousBlessingRosaryChristmas ConcertWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore. PG Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971, Fantasy) Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson. G The 700 Club (In Stereo) G (FLIX) 118 170 Heathers (1989, Comedy) Winona Ryder. (In Stereo) R The Frighteners (1996, Suspense) Michael J. Fox. (In Stereo) R Halloween: Resurrection (2002) Jamie Lee Curtis.Phantoms R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFox News: Our StoryThe Five All-American New Year Holiday celebration from New York. (N) (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Chopped Chopped G Chopped G Chopped G DinersDiners (FS1) 732 112 732 College BasketballHoopsCollege Basketball Villanova at Butler. (N)HoopsCollege Basketball Marquette at Creighton. (FSNFL) 35 39 35 NBA Basketball MagicUFC Ultimate Knockouts 9 (N) Hot StoveUFCWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Avatar (2009, Science Fiction) Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. PG-13Battle: Los Ang (GOLF) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf Presidents Cup, Day Four.Golf PNC Father/Son Challenge, First Day. Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (2008, Drama) Henry Winkler. Let It Snow (2013) Candace Cameron Bure. An executive has a change of heart. Debbie Macombers Trading Christmas (2011) Tom Cavanagh. (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) Nicholas Hoult. (In Stereo) PG-13 Warm Bodies (2013) Nicholas Hoult. PG-13 Lone Survivor 24/7 Red Wings/Maple Leafs: Road Treme Colson is offered a transfer. MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Dark Shadows (2012, Comedy) Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13 True Blood (In Stereo) MA True Blood The Sun MA True Blood Eric is irate. MA True Blood At Last MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Hunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHunters (HIST) 51 54 51 32 42RestorationRestorationCounting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG RestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Hope Floats (1998, Romance) Sandra Bullock. Premiere. PG-13 Georgia Rule (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan. R A Walk to Remember (2002, Romance) Shane West. PG (LMN) 50 119 The Perfect Assistant (2008, Drama) Rachel Hunter. (In Stereo) NR Jodi Arias: Dirty Little Secret (2013) Tania Raymonde. (In Stereo) NR Jodi Arias: Beyond the Headlines Beyond the Headlines: Officer (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Argo (2012, Historical Drama) Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo) R New Years Eve (2011) Halle Berry, Jessica Biel. (In Stereo) PG-13 WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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COMICSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 C7 Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Ronin (PG-13) 12:30 p.m. No passes. Ronin (PG-13) In 3D. 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes. American Hustle (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Anchorman 2 (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Frozen (PG) 7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. Grudge Match (PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:45 p.m. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) 3:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) In 3D, high frame rate. 12:15 p.m. No passes. Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (PG) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Walking With Dinosaurs (PG) 2:25 p.m. No passes. Walking With Dinosaurs (PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m., 4:45 p.m. No passes. The Wolf of Wall Street (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Ronin (PG-13) 12 p.m. No passes. Ronin (PG-13) In 3D. 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. American Hustle (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Anchorman 2 (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Frozen (PG) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Grudge Match (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO X RXTH EI OIDT IV VHO BHZDA HWH ... RZJMPXVM OXEP UHRRIO PJLZV GHXVMA XA Z MDHZE OZB EI AEZDE EPH VHO BHZD. NZJRZ NIJVCAEIVHPrevious Solution: Novels give you the matrix of emotions, give you the flavor of a time in a way formal history cannot. Doris Lessing (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-31

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C8TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000GT1J 000GT1N 2 VINTAGE COFFEE TABLES. 1 round with lazy susan. 1 rectangular. Both maple. $25 for both. 527-1239 1920s Solid Cherry Wood 4 Poster Bed 3 shy of double bed inc. boxsprings & mattress, good cond. $749. firm (352) 795-8018 Antique Butler 3 drawers $100 (352) 795-1929 DESKAND CHAIR computer desk large/chair leather. set $75 352-860-0759 King Sealy Mattress W/ Blue Lattice Bed Frame. Less than 1 yr. old. exc. cond. $500. 352-637-6108, 352-400-9631 cell KITCHEN FURNITURE Expandable kitchen table with four chairs excellent condition. $125.00 382-5956 LIVING ROOM SET sofa, loveseat, 2 cocktail tables, 1 coffee table, 2 lamps, light rattan, like new $450 (352) 746-6848 LOVE SEAT/ LIKE NEW LIGHT COLORS,MUST SELL/$50 Linda 341-2271 LOVE SEATLike new,must sell.Light colors. $50 Linda 423-4163 LOVESEATBeige/gold neutral 57 loveseat one year old non-smoking $100 OBO 352-4654208 Moving, Sleeper Sofa with 4 matching Nightstands$350. File cabinet $5. 352-249-7413 Moving,Twin Beds $250,Dining room table $20. 352-249-7413 OAK DESK -KIDS HEIGHT2 x 4 foot Top, Blonde Oak, 2 Drawers plus Book Shelf $100 341-0450 RECLINERS Pair matching burgundy recliners exc cond paid $399 each at Badcock Perfect for superbowl viewing $275.00 OBO 352-4654208 HIFI SPEAKER KIT 1pair GRS 8inch 85Watt woofers, Nuance Tweeters,Silver Wire, Caps. $80 341-0450 JVC DVD PLAYERVCR COMBO HR-XVC11B used few hours Mom doesnt need nice $50 341-0450 SPEAKER FOR HOME THEATRE Black and Silver, British MTM, UpGraded Internal Parts $75 341-0450 SPEAKER FOR HOME THEATRE CENTRE Co-Axial SEAS 2-Way, 150Watt, Solid Oak $75 341-00450 SYLVANIATV Good condition, 26 inches, remote included, black colored, $30 (352)465-1616 TV HDMI VIDEO CORDS Two 8 Foot Wires, version 1.3 $20 341-0450 CISCO LINKSYS E1200 ROUTER *Has WPA2 Security, Wireless N, Mac or PC, $30 341-0450 CISCO WIFI ROUTER Linksys EA3500, N750 Smart Wi-Fi Router, 10 Months old $80 341-0450 COMPUTER MONITOR 19inch Viewsonic LCD Widescreen, for PC or X-BOX includes cable $75 341-0450 DEAD ISLAND GAME For XBOX 360, Good Condition, $20 341-0450 2 ASHLEY 5-DRAWER DRESSER CABINETS BARELY USED!!! ONLY A FEW MONTHS OLD!!! Buy both for $400 or $225 for 1 352-746-1910 2 VINTAGE CHAIRS. Gold swivel rocker and brown/rust fixed chair. Nice condition. $25 for both. 527-1239 6 YR OLD SAMSUNG front load dryer like new, never used much, asking $300 (352) 726-6461 352-201-5113 APPLIANCES Kenmore Refrigerator, side by side, water and ice on door, $300;Kenmore glass-top range, $200; Kenmore Microwave $75; Whirlpool Dishwasher $125; $600 for all. Call 382-2743 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CHESTFREEZER Working in good condition family down sized so Im selling for $100 OBO 352-621-9810 Refrigerator Maytag Black S-by-S ice/water on dr. $300; Electric Stove, flat top, Black $100 obo (315) 539-5297 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 WASHER OR DRYER $145.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Cond, 60 day Guar.Free Del/Set up. 352-263-7398 DUDLEYS AUCTION Sunday Jan. 5th Antique & Collectible Auction Pre: 10am, Auc: 1pm 500+ lots, antiq. furn, silver/gold jewelry coins, china, porcelain, check website for catalog & photos ********************** call for info 637-9588 Dudleysauction.com 4000 S Florida (US41S) Inverness Ab1667 10%bp cash/ck MAKITACHOPSAW WORKS FINE ONLY $65 OBO 352-464-0316 POWER WASHER PARTS Campbell 1/4hose, gun, lance& soap bottle $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds ALL CLASSES FOR 2014 Spring Hill & New Port Richey COSMETOLOGY BARBERING NAILS SKIN MASSAGE TherapyDAY & NIGHT SCHOOLFull Time & Part Time Full Specialty & Instructor Training BENES International School of Beauty www .benes.edu (727) 848-8415 (352) 263-2744 1 (866) 724-2363 TOLL FREE STATE APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING Become an Avon Rep Today! Free Training. $10 to join. Call Chuck (352) 503-4816. Independ. Avon Rep. DUDLEYS AUCTION Sunday Jan. 5th Antique & Collectible Auction Pre: 10am, Auc: 1pm 500+ lots, antiq. furn, silver/gold jewelry coins, china, porcelain, check website for catalog & photos ********************** call for info 637-9588 D udleysauction.com 4000 S Florida (US41S) Inverness Ab1667 10%bp cash/ck LARGE CHURCHin Crystal River Needs Full timeCUSTODIAN40 hrs. week, good starting wage. Abled body for light lifting. Tables, chairs. Reply to: Citrus County Chronicle, Blind Box 1851P 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd Crystal Riv. Fl 34428 TOWER HANDStarting at $10.00/Hr Bldg. Communication Towers. Travel, Good Pay & Benefits. OT, 352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri. WRECKER DRIVEREXPERIENCED ONL Y apply. Must live in Inverness area. **Apply within** Eds Auto Repair. 4610 S. Florida Ave No Phone Calls MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 Opportunity for Fulltime Professional.Must have bookkeeping /acounting experienceor equivalent & proficient in computers and spreadsheets. Able to multi-task & communicate well with others. FAX RESUME TO 352-746-9033 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 TEACHERFulltime, Exp. Req. CDA Preferred TADPOLES EARLYLEARNING (352) 560-4222 CASE MANAGERPrimary Care Physican Accountable Care Organization (ACO) seeking qualifed Care Manager. Current Florida RN lic. along with 3 plus years experience in hospital setting or post accute care setting. Manage Care experience and Case Mgr certification prefered. Please Fax Resume to: Nature Coast ACO Attn Patty King 352-746-3838 F/T CNAFor OB Doctors Ofc Fax Resume: 352-794-0877 Medical BillerImmediate Opening Busy Multi-Pysician Practice, Experienced applicants Fax Resume to: 352-746-4748 COMMUNITY HOSTESSSeeking high-energy professional hostesses for seasonal part-time position including weekends shuttling potential homeowners around country club communitys amenities and model homes. Must be professional, outgoing articulate, upbeat and service oriented. Apply at Terra Vista Welcome Center, 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL FREE Horse Manure You Haul (352) 628-9186 Neutered Male Cat tiger striped, black on gray, very friendly Call (352) 746-1904 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FRESH CITRUS @BELLAMY GROVELocated 1.5 mi. E. on Eden Dr. from hwy 41 STRAWBERRIES COLLARD GREENS GIFT SHIPPING 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Black & White Cat Answers to Mister. Lost Homosassa Trail/KingsAve. REWARD 352-563-2982 Lost Yorkie, Male, 4 lbs. Monroe Street Beverly Hills Area REWARD One his puppies (352) 513-4696 Lost zippered Leather Key Case Between CVS and Hospice. 786-205-1186 Missing female pure breed Dalmatian. Need to find, part of the family. Lost in Crystal River area. Please call Tim at (407)694-4280. Short Haired Calico Cat Last seen on 12/27 Mayflower Ave, Inverness. Reward 352-419-6475 Volunteer Fish and Wildlife safari hat with 7 FWC pins. Lost in the vacinity of the Homosassa Park. Reward Offer (937) 935-2666 Found Cat Gray & White Pink Collar Citrus Springs (352) 465-7064 Found Mens Wedding Ring Brentwood Golf Course Call to identify (352) 527-9897 PRAYER TO ST JUDEMay the Sacred Heart Of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and praised throughout theworld now and forever, Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us, St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 7 days and your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude for your help. FEB Todays New Ads Can So Almost Anything, Inside/Out No job too big or small Quality Work, 746-2347or 422-3334 Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Jack Russell Terriers Mother and Father on premise. Ready to go Five males $200/ea 352-613-9135 JamesAnglin Gunsmith 12 gage pump, new in box $259.00, ak 47 drum $150. 352-419-4800 LIVING ROOM SET sofa, loveseat, 2 cocktail tables, 1 coffee table, 2 lamps, light rattan, like new $450 (352) 746-6848 Moving, Sleeper Sofa with 4 matching Nightstands$350. File cabinet $5. 352-249-7413 Moving,Twin Beds $250,Dining room table $20. 352-249-7413 Refrigerator Maytag Black S-by-S ice/water on dr $300; Electric Stove, flat top, Black $100 obo (315) 539-5297 TINYTiny is a gorgeous 2 yr old Staffordshire terrier mix, extremely obedient & intelligent, loving & affectionate, gets along with some dogs, all cats, and all people and children.Rides well in the car.Tiny is gorgeous-sure to turn heads by your side. Call Laci @352-212-8936 WASHER OR DRYER $145.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Cond, 60 day Guar.Free Del/Set up. 352-263-7398 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 Free Firewood Cut & Ready to Haul (352) 746-0524 Free German Shepherd, male, all shots. Must have fenced in yard (352) 220-7152 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads 2 ASHLEY 5-DRAWER DRESSER CABINETS BARELY USED!!! ONLY A FEW MONTHS OLD!!! Buy both for $400 or $225 for 1 352-746-1910 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 Antique Butler 3 drawers $100 (352) 795-1929 APPLIANCES Kenmore Refrigerator, side by side, water and ice on door, $300;Kenmore glass-top range, $200; Kenmore Microwave $75; Whirlpool Dishwasher $125; $600 for all. Call 382-2743 BOATTOPHEAVY DUTYALUMINUM COMMERCIAL. 24 FT LONG X 8 FTWIDE WITH BLUE CANVAS TOP& VINYLSIDES. MEASURES 3-1/2 FT. HIGH FROM YOUR BOATRAILS $1,900 352-628-5222 OR INFO@RIVERSAFARIS.COM COMMUNITY HOSTESSSeeking high-energy professional hostesses for seasonal part-time position including weekends shuttling potential homeowners around country club communitys amenities and model homes. Must be professional, outgoing articulate, upbeat and service oriented. Apply at Terra Vista Welcome Center, 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the

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TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000H0T2 000GR866575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 000GRQW ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed 000GRXPwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 12/13/13LIC#CC1327656 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000GWQR Stand Alone Generator CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000GWR6RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP HANDYMAN 000GZTFRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelongLicensed & Insured Lic.#37761352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000H05F Copes Pool & Pavers One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000H0LZ AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRAcross from Wal-Mart, LecantoAAA Miller Auto & Tire Service Open 7am-7pm(352) 527-4111Interior/Exterior Detail & Window Tint Oil Filter LubeCar Oil Changesstarting from up to 5 Qts.$1499Diesel Oil & Filter Change Specialplus tax up to 17 Qts.$9999 000H1DV PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000GAEA 000GZID WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tr ee Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic. # 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Carols Airport T ransport 352-746-7595 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 GREGS MARCITE Florida Gem, Diamond Brite Marcite, FREE EST. 746-5200 Lic.#C2636 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Design/Installation Weed*Clean*Mulch We plant year round lisc/ins 352-465-3086 A1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service -New Systems Starting @ $3400. Res//Com (352) 400 -8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 12/31/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 **ABOVEALL** M & W INTERIORS Handyman services Northern Quality Southern prices! (352) 537-4144 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Can So Almost Anything, Inside/Out No job too big or small Quality Work, 746-2347or 422-3334 Pressure Washing, Roof Coating, Drive ways & any Handyman Service Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579352-257-0078 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 TREE SERVICE Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked $80. (352) 344-2696 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Care for Elderly or Disabled in your home Days or Nights. Will do Cleaning & Cooking 25 yrs. Exp., 257-1308 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com 000GT1M FACTORYREPO New 2014, 28x80, 4/2 (No Hidden Fees) Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C, Heat, Skirting, Steps & Gutters $67,900 WILLNOT LAST! 352-795-1272 NEVER LIVED IN REPO!2013, 28x56, 3/2 Their loss is your gain! Delivered & set up with AC, steps & skirting. Use your old trade-only $487.46/ mo. W.A.C. Call 352-621-9182 NICE HOME ON ACREFenced yard, 1500 sq. ft., 3/2 home in new cond. with 2 x6 construction. New appliances, carpet, paint, new decks & tile flooring. I can finance. $3,500. dwn $394.80/mo. P & I W.A.C. We have land & home pkgs $59,900 to $69,900 352-621-9181 HOMOSASSA2/1, $550 mo. Near Walmart 352-464-3159 FACTORYREPO MUST SEE!, 16X80 3/2, No Hidden Fees Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C Heat, Skirting, Steps, Gutters, 352-795-1272 Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2 DWMH on 10 Acres Main road, cleared and fenced. 12x16 shed and 24x36 garage. 5 irrigated acres. Great for horses or blueberries. Asking $124,900 352-364-2985 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Australian Saddle Like Brand New Velvet, used once, Paid$1,000. Reduced to $840 (352) 513-5547 BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 1 bedroom, 1 bath @$395 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! ROSCORosco, a beautiful pit bull/terrier mix, black w/white chest, very calm, gentle & obedient, good w/other dogs, wonderful w/ people, very loving, good w/cats, walks calmly on leash, wt. 66 lbs. A volunteer favorite. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Shih Poo Puppies, 2 males, 1 female Schnauzer Pups just born 352-795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $450. Beverly Hills, FL. (352) 270-8827 TINYTiny is a gorgeous 2 yr old Staffordshire terrier mix, extremely obedient & intelligent, loving & affectionate, gets along with some dogs, all cats, and all people and children.Rides well in the car.Tiny is gorgeous-sure to turn heads by your side. Call Laci @352-212-8936 WINNIEWinnie is a small Lab/Bulldog mix, wt 40 lbs., is 3 1/2 years old. In her life before the shelter lived in a family with a child & is know to be very good with kids. Described as amazingly sweet but does best with male dogs. Call Wanda @ 352-344-5737. BUTTERSButters, a 4-y.o. Catahoula Leopard Dog mix, wt. 48 lbs, brown w/white markings, gentle, friendly, playful, affectionate, walks very well on leash, rides very well in car, appears housebroken, gets along w/other dogs and people. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. DOLLYMeet Dolly, 6-y.o. Bulldog/terrier mix, wt 54 lbs., has had an unfortunate life, still one of the sweetest dogs ever. Shows signs of neglect, but amazingly is full of love for people, playful & very happy, craves affection and returns it, so deserving of a loving home. Sweet personality. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Jack Russell Terriers Mother and Father on premise. Ready to go Five males $200/ea 352-613-9135 RAVENYou want sweet? Here she is, gentle & calm 7-month-old Labrador mix, very eager to please, walks well on leash, takes treats gently, sits when asked, not interested in cats. Her family lost their home, but shes had a good start in life, very loving. Needs her own home. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the GOLF DRIVER Tour Edge Exotics XLD MRH 10.5 senior w/HC new grip $45. Dunnellon 465-8495 GOLF DRIVER Tour Edge Exotics XLD mrh 10.5 Senior w/HC New Grip $45. Dunnellon 465-8495 JamesAnglin Gunsmith 12 gage pump, new in box $259.00, ak 47 drum $150. 352-419-4800 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 GARAGE SALE ITEMS MANYMANYFULL BOXS. $100.00 MIKE 586-7222 Judith Lewis Celestial SpaWelcomes Veterans Announcing: Curbside service for the disabled and handicapped. Therapeutic massages, hot stones, salt scrubs, detox treatments and more. Visit us online atcelestial spa.com call us at (352)527-0077, Or visit us at 9 Regina Blvd. Beverly Hills fl. 34465 mm28221, ma60820 NEW FLAT TOP ACOUSTIC GUITAR& ACCESSORIES READYTO PLAY$50 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR& STARTER PACKAGE W/GIGBAG&MORE ALLNEW $50 352-601-6625 Cable Knelson Piano looks and works great. Real good cond. Asking $300. 352-795-1495 GOTGUITAR? ACOUSTIC OR CLASSICALGUITAR SOFT CASE(GIGBAG) NEW $15 352-601-6625 GENERALMission oak rocker $150,2 antique half round tables $100@, 30lb. galvanized roofing nails and300 count grip cap nails $25@,6 Franklin Mint McDonalds plates $120 all, GE convection toaster oven$25, Mr. Coffee expresso maker $10,large rolling suitcase$10,Ryobi belt sander $40, folding crab trap $10, childs bike helmet $5,SS 1 quart thermos $5, 2 digital coin counting money jars $5 @, Oneida Chateau stainless service for 12 $250 352 465 6619 K-CUPS-TULLYS COFFEEHOUSE BLEND, MED ROAST 26 K-cups. $16. Call local 228-7372 EXERCISE BIKE good shape.All electronics. only $65 352-464 0316 MANUALTREADMILL DIGITALREADOUT, FOLDS UPFOR EASY STORAGE, ONLY $95 464-0316 2 SETS OF GOLF CLUBS. 2 older sets in bags and 1 caddy. $50 for all. 527-1239 Club Car Golf Cart 1991, Family owned Excellent condition. Lights, Battery 1 yr. old, Must Sell, $1,500. (352) 527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Golf 4 Rnds W/cart @ Brooksville Country Club. Bargain celebrate holiday $90. 352-503-3914 GOLF DRIVER Rawlings 450cc mrh 10* Apollo Reg lite shaft new grip exc $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 GENERALRalph Lauren Navy/Gray Queen sleeping bag $50,Automatic BPtester $20, RM Easiteach Interactive Whiteboard-new $30, Office Depot rolling, folding cart $10, B&D steamer $5 352 465 6619 HARLEYSTOCK EXHAUSTPIPES NEARLYNEW FITS 1350-1450 SLIDE ON ONLY$70 464-0316 JEEPPATRIOTSPARE TIRE BRAND NEW NEVER USED. $60 MIKE 586-7222 K-CUPS-TULLYS COFFEEHOUSE BLEND, MED ROAST 26 K-cups. $16 Call local 228-7372 RATTANAND GLASS ENTRYTABLE, 27 tall, 44 wide, 18 deep, excellent condition, $75, (352) 465-1813 RATTANAND GLASS ETAGERE, 74 tall, 30 wide, 18 deep, excellent condition, $95, (352) 465-1813 SMALLELECTRIC SMOKER LITTLE CHIEF, works great for fish or jerkey, only $60 352-464-0316 SHARPWIZARD ORGANIZER English to Spanish, expense and three Phone Books $15 341-0450 4 PRONGED CANE, dont wait to FALL DOWN before you need one. $15 352-464-0316 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $45. 352-628-0033 4 WHEELED WALKER w/ seat & brakes. Only $75 352-464-0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER. MAKES ITEASIERTO GETUP. ONLY$20 352-464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER both have adjustable legs only $40 for both 352-464-0316 CHILDS MANUAL WHEELCHAIR, GOOD SHAPE,YELLOW W/ FOOTRESTS. ONLY $85 352-464-0316 Manual Wheelchair W/ Footrests, Great Shape, Only $100 352-464-0316 MOBILITY POWER WHEEL CHAIR, J azzy Select, like new cond. $1750 pics avail via jr moak@att.net 352-302-4707 Pride Mobility Products Inc, Burgundy Cloth Chair Lift. $450 586-0341. SwivelAccent Chair Light Brown Perfect cond. $250. (352) 726-5379 White Wicker Trundle Bed, Steel enforced, Great Shape $95. (352) 897-4198 30 PLANTS FOR WATER GARDEN BlUE FLOWERS. DONT KNOWTHEIR NAMES 10 for $15 464-03I6 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 DRESS SHIRTBristol & Bull New Tag says 79.50/selling $25 Linda 423-4163 LEVIS JEANS FOR BOYS Good condition, size 12 regular, $10 (352)465-1616 PGH STEELER JACKETNFL winter/removable hood med like new cond. $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 WOMENS GALLERY JACKET Good condition, reversible, cheetah pattern, size S, $30 (352)465-1616 2 Twin size oak beds with storage drawers & mattress, dresser mirror & chest, excel. cond. $250. for all Kenmore Refrigerator good for college, excel cond. $45. 352 613-7429 5 GI -JOES WITH STORAGE CASE SOME CLOTHES & ACCESSORIES $30. 464-0316 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CAR COVER (BREATHABLE) FOR MEDIUM SIZE CAR MALIBU ONLY$30 352-464-0316 CHRISTMAS LIGHTS 4CANDLE & (5)4CANDYCANES $25.0BO 586-7222 CHROME CLOTHES RACK FOR STORE DISPLAY, 4 arms, excellent condition, $40, (352) 465-1813 Dining room table and 4 chairs, light oak $150; Nice wood couch table, $50 (352) 795-7254 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FOUR 2 DRAWER METALFILE CABINETS. Good condition. $50 for all. 527-1239

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C10TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 581-1231 TUCRN 1/10/14 CMHS/CCHB JOINT MEETING PUBLIC NOTICE A special joint meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., and the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will be held on Friday, January 10, 2014 at 3:00 P.M. in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss hospital transaction matters. This notice informs and notifies the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. will be active participants at the joint meeting and may conduct business and vote. Copies of the Agendas are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE December 31, 2013. 582-1231 TUCRN 1/3/14 CMHS Board of Directors Workshop/Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE A WORKSHOP of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board of Directors will be held on Friday, January 3, 2014 at 12:00 noon in the Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The workshop will be held in order to discuss financial matters. The Citrus Memorial Foundation Board of Directors will also hold a SPECIAL MEETING on Friday, January 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm, in the Board Room for the discussion of strategic planning matters (pursuant to Fla.Stat.395.3035(4). This agenda item will not be open to the public. Copies of the Agendas are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE December 31, 2013. 576-1231 TUCRN Estate of Mark J. Meyer 2013-CP-728 NTC-SA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2013-CP-728 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARK J. MEYER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHEABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Ancillary Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of MARK J. MEYER, deceased, File Number 2013-CP-728, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL34450; that the decedents date of death was March 23, 2013; that the total value of the estate is $4,334.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Melissa Michelle Meyer 125 Montauk Blvd, East Hampton, NY11937 ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THETIME PERIODS SETFORTHTN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMSAND DEMANDS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGANYOTHERAPPLICABLETIME PERIOD, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTERTHE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is December 24, 2013. Person Giving Notice: /s/ BRENDAMACPHERSON a/k/a BRENDAMARIE MACPHERSON 70 Springs Fireplace Rd. East Hampton, NY11937 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ Marie T. Blume Attorney, Florida Bar Number: 0493181, P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, Florida 34451 Phone: (352) 726-7778 Fax (352)726-7798, blumelaw@earthlink.net Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st, 2013. 577-1231 TUCRN OSteen Shirley A. 13CP-656 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.13-CP-656 IN RE:ESTATE OF SHIRLEYA. OSTEEN Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of SHIRLEYA. OSTEEN deceased, whose date of death was August 31, 2013;File Number 13CP-656 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North ApopkaAvenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYSAFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OFACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedenf s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER HIE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pubhcation of this Notice is December 24th, 2013 Signed on December 16, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ SHANNON LEIGH BUTLER, 2810 Knights Station Road, Lakeland Florida 33810 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. Mark Fore,Florida Bar No. 106836, GRAYROBINSON, P.A. One Lake Morton Dr., PO Box 3 Lakeland, Florida 33802-0003,Telephone (863)284-2200 Email: mark.fore@gray-robinson.com, Secondary Email: susan.rain@gray-robinson.com Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st, 2013 578-1231 TUCRN Melaas, Donald K. 2013 CP -514 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.2013-CP-514 IN RE: ESTATE OF DONALD K. MELAAS a/k/a DONALD KEITH MELAAS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DONALD K. MELAAS a/k/a DONALD KEITH MELAAS, deceased, whose date of death was September 28, 2013; is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedenf s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER HIE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is December 24th, 2013 Personal Representatives: BRUCEA. MELAAS 3901 Montecito Drive #2002, Denton, Texas 76210 LINDAL. CRON P.O.Box 495, Gordonsville, VA22942 Attorney for Personal Representatives: /s/ CATHERINE F.ACKERMAN, Florida Bar Number: 698773 500 NE 8th Avenue, Ocala, FL34470,Telephone: (352) 629-8800, Fax: (352) 867-5111, E-Mail: catherinefackerman@gmail.com, Secondary E-Mail: officeackerman@gmail.com Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st 2013 000GT1O CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHEVYVENTURA2005 Van. 74K mi. good cond extras included++ $6,000 obo (352) 637-6216 CHRYSLER2006, Town & Country Touring, $6,888. 352-341-0018 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 HONDA2008 TRX 400 mint cond, w/riding gear and title $2800. obo Dennis 352-267-3334 YAMAHA2009 YFZ 450, Race ready, call for details $4000 (352) 564-8165 BLUE OX Motorcycle carrier rated for 1000 lbs. $550. Call (231) 445-2186 Triumph-750 Bonnieville. 10K orig doc mi. True classic. Like new cond. First $5800. 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $26,900 352-513-4257 Liquidation SaleLay Away Until Taxes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2004, Tahoe LT, leather, sunroof, $8,999. 352-341-0018 FORD1999, Expedition, Eddie Bauer Edition, leather $3,999 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 TOYOTA1999, Rav, -4 power windows, locks, automatic transmission $3,999. 352-341-0018 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Liquidation SaleLay Away Until Taxes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 MITSUBSHI, Mirage, 2 Door $1,500. (352) 489-0117 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $18,000 obo 352-568-2810 BOATTOPHEAVY DUTYALUMINUM COMMERCIAL. 24 FT LONG X 8 FTWIDE WITH BLUE CANVAS TOP& VINYLSIDES. MEASURES 3-1/2 FT. HIGH FROM YOUR BOATRAILS $1,900 352-628-5222 OR INFO@RIVERSAFARIS.COM ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** Century2001 211 WAC, 150 Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd steering, windless, tackle ctr, GPS sounder Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF, seats 7. Two axel allum. trailer. Extras! $12,750 obo 352-563-5628 Dock Space For Rent, Floating, Deep Canal 200 ft. from Crystal River, (352) 257-8850 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com FLEETWOOD1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft. generator, very good tires, Lots of storage. $11,000. 352-263-4339 SOUTHWIND98 V-10 eng., dual AC, super slide, drivers door, hydr. levelers, low miles on tires, good cond. $14,500 OBO 352-302-6534 KZ-SONIC2014TravelTrailer, Loaded, Brand New, Must Sell. $14000. Homosassa (315) 539-5297 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. RV Jack Knife Couch 68, in great shape $250. obo 352-464-4388 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Liquidation SaleLay A way Until T axes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 WE B UY ALL A UT OS with or without titles ANY CONDITION Cindy (813) 505-6939 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLER2000, Sebring Convertible, low miles $5,488. 352-341-0018 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2008 Taurus SEL, All leather int., low miles, car/tires all exc cond. $13000 (352) 795-9181 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 LINCOLN Towncar, 91,600 mi excellent condition $2,500, (352) 795-3200 352 422-7574 Cell LINCOLN, Town Car, white, 100,370.5 miles $3,500. (352) 503-9290 Patrick CHEAP PROPERTY2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills nice neighborhood **$28,900. Cash** 352-503-3245 MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Heres Your ChanceTO OWN 10 acres Total $59,000 5 Acre Tracks $30,000 Owner Financing Call: Jack Lemieux Cell (305) 607-7886 Realty USA INC 407-599-5002 Owner Financing 10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007 Homes of Merit, $135k Call Nancy Little Lewis Exit Realty Leaders 352-302-6082 BUSHNELL Estate Sale Custom Built 3/2/2 w/ 40X60 2 story garage. See What $9k Can Buy 8471 County Rd 614 A To view & more info (352) 569-1252 Inverness Village 55+ Comm. Unit 108. 1st flr, 2BR/2BA, new Lanai & Lam, ceramic floors. $49,500. Financing Consider 352 564-4100 Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including washer/dryer. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 Your High-Tech Citrus County RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view my properties TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKINGTO SELL? CALLMETODAY! HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAWAPT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lots of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorTHE MARKETIS GOODThinking of selling? Now is the time to get listedStill great values out there for buyers!!Phyllis Strickland TROPIC SHORES REALTY. 352-613-3503-cell 352-419-6880-Office BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda WattTHE SNOWBIRDS ARE COMING! ** NOW IS A GREA T TIME T O LIST YOUR HOME CALLLAWANDA FORAFREE, NO OBLIGATION MARKETANALYSIS! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. BEAUTIFUL1/4 acre lot in Cantebury Lakes Estates BARGAIN PRICED! @9k 352-422-4785 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. ATTN Homebuyers 100% financing avail. Government Program. You do not need perfect credit. Call or email to get qualified. Ph: (813) 470-8313 rickgbf@gmail.com Rick Kedzierski lic. loan originator.NLMS #267854, FL#9096 NLMS ID 76856 MEDICAL OFFICE FOR SALE Totally renovated 700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5 Crystal River. $107K 352-422-2293 Happy Holidays.Buying or Selling Your home? Get the Gift of a 1 YEAR Home W arranty Plan Million Dollar + Producer! Teri Paduano, Broker Realty Connect (352) 212-1446TheFLDream.com GOSPEL ISLAND 2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR OWN HOME Let Me Help Block Home Move In ready $69,900 Clean as a whistle Big Yard, Big Garage and Carport (352) 344-9290 Near Croft & Hwy 44, 3/2 garage florida room furnished or not Lots of upgrades Executor now accepting offers 502/693-7904 Duval Island Very nice clean, furn. starter or retire home. 2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility room w/ shower. No flood zone. Reduce to $46,900 352-678-7145 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 HOMOSASSA1/1, $435. mo. 1st. & Sec. 352-212-4981 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Beverly Hills2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new appliances Move in $1350, 442-7794 INVERNESS3/2/2, Highlands, Close to Downtown Immaculate, No Pets, (352) 400-5723 INVERNESS3/2/2, wheel chair access. $875. mo., 1st, last, sec. 352-726-5272 INVERNESSGolf & Country 2/2/2 & 3/2/2 $825/mo & Sec (352) 895-0744 INVERNESSNewer 3/2/2, fend back yrd. $875, 352-212-4873 RENT T O OWN No credit check Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM Sugarmill WoodsPool Home 3/2/2, s/s appl. travertine tile, new cabinets, lg master bath, NICE! $1200. mo 352-302-4057 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CITRUS SPRINGSWhole House Access $125/wk 828-497-2610 CRYSTALRIVERShare My Home $85/wk. includes elect, sat. dish 352-228-1802 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Floral City 12x56 MH 2/br, 1 ba on 80x152 ft lot.$21,000. Fixer er up. (352) 726-8873 RENTERS WANTEDWhy rent when you can own? We can put you in your own home. Credit problems o.k. As low as $2,000. down& only $105/ wk. Call for more info & locations. Call 352-621-3807 USED HOMES/ REPOSDoublewides From $8,500. Singlewides From $3,500. New inventory daily We buy used homes (352) 621-9183 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 2BR 1-1/2BA DW off Gospel Isl. Rd., 1/3 acre lrg. scr. rm., laund. rm. carport plus garage $34,000. (352) 419-5013 HERNANDO 3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres Renovated-ready to move in. $45k Owner Financed FHA/ VA 352-795-1272 Inverness Jungle Camp Area 2Br/1Ba SW w/ 2 rms added on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge lot close to river. Just $10,000,352-400-4196 2BR/1BA with FL room & attached Laundry rm. w/ washer& dryer. Comp Furn-Ready to move in. 352-726-0124 55+ Park in Lecanto 2bd/2ba Furnished Fireplace, Includes Washer/Dryer, $6,900. obo 352-634-3984 FLORALCITY12x56 Mobile, Furnished 2BR, 1BA, Carport Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed Adult Park, Reduced price $7,400 Lot Rent $165 mo.352-287-3729 FLORALCITY Double wide 2 bd/ 2 ba. Furnished w/appliances. W/D A/C. New wood laminate floors. Shed, scrn pch, double car port. Lot rent $183.Asking $17.5k 314-831-1356 Homosassa 55+ Park 2BR/1BA. Newly remodeled w/ new stove & refrig.New 8x8 shed.$295 lot rent. $6,000 (608) 921-5564 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 Chassahowitzka2/2/1, $600. mo.HOMOSASSA2/1, Furn. $550. Mo. Agent (352) 382-1000 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 HOMOSASSA1 & 2BR, $450-$500 inclds. garb & water, Senior Discount. 352628-7300 or 697-0310 INVERNESS2 bedroom. 2/2 and 2/1 W/D $575 TO $675 352-422-7021 INVERNESS2/1, Storage Room 475 mo.+ Security 352-634-5499 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-257-2276

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Duke Energys tax stance has costly fallout for countyPATFAHERTY Staff writerDuke Energy Floridas tax dispute dominated local news as 2013 started and remained the countys most significant issue as the year continued. The current and future impact of the companys tax stance was amplified as Duke retired the Crystal River nuclear plant, put the brakes on the proposed Levy County nuclear plant and increased customer rates for 2014. This past year also marked the one-year anniversary of the merger between Duke Energy Corp. and Progress Energy Inc., creating the nations largest electric power holding company with international assets. In Florida, Progress Energy became Duke Energy Florida. The dispute with the countys largest taxpayer has affected local government budgets, generated substantial legal costs and put a cloud over future county revenue as another tax year became part of the issue. Dukes action would eventually trigger a 31percent hike in the 2013-14 property tax rates. The change occurred because of the November 2012 decision by the utility to pay $19.3million of the $36million in taxes Citrus County officials claimed it owed. Duke made its tax payment based on its own appraisal of $1.2billion compared to the countys assessment of $2.3 billion. Initial negotiations in January were fruitless Medicaid growth means 5M without coverage Associated PressHARRISBURG, Pa. About 5 million people will be without health care next year that they would have gotten simply if they lived somewhere else in America. They make up a coverage gap in President Barack Obamas signature health care law created by the domino effects of last years Supreme Court ruling and states subsequent policy decisions. The court effectively left it up to states to decide whether to open Medicaid, the federalstate program for the poor and disabled, to more people, primarily poor working adults without children. A total of twenty-five Soldiers remains to return todayThe remains of U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, will arrive this morning at Ocala International Airport for eventual burial, exactly two weeks after his death in a crash in Afghanistan. Billings, who was from Heavener, Okla., was one of six soldiers killed Dec. 17 in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan, but has ties to a local family that lost another member in a similar crash nearly a decade ago. Billings widow, Ashley, is the sister of Aaron Weaver, who died Jan. 8, 2004, near Fallujah, Iraq, when a Black Hawk medevac helicopter he was riding in was shot down by rocket fire. Weaver, who was being flown to Baghdad for a medical checkup, left a wife and two children. Billings was flying a Black Hawk. Ashley Billings, 31 a Citrus High School graduate had been married to Billings for nearly seven years, according to her father, Floral City resident and longtime Chronicle employee Mike Weaver. The couple has no children. Billings and four others who died that day were assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Charles Davis of Chas Davis Funeral Home in Inverness said Billings body will arrive at the airport, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., at 10:15a.m. by charter and will be met by the Patriot Riders. The body will then be transported via escort from the Marion and Citrus county sheriffs offices on State Road 200 to the funeral home. Funeral services for Billings are scheduled for 11a.m. Jan.4 at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd. Davis said after the service, Billings body will be escorted to the National Cemetery in Bushnell. INSIDE DECEMBER 31, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 146 50 CITRUS COUNTYCleaning house: Buccaneers fire coach, GM /B1 HEALTH & LIFE:Take your vitamin Dr. Denis Grillo writes about the importance of Vitamin D in a healthy diet./Page C1www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Classifieds......................C8 Comics..........................C7 Community....................C5 Crossword......................C6 Editorial........................A10 Entertainment................A4 Horoscope......................A4 Lottery Numbers............B3 Lottery Payouts..............B3 Movies............................C7 Obituaries......................A6 TV Listings......................C6 NEWS BRIEF HIGH70LOW52Mostly cloudy and cool. A few sprinkles.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY SO YOU KNOW Due to early deadlines, certain content stocks lottery numbers and some sports coverage will not appear in Wednesdays edition. Due to the Chronicles holida y production sc hedule, the deadline to submit obituaries for publication on New Years Day is noon today. Duke in the news See DUKE/ Page A7 Randy Lee Billingskilled Dec. 17 in Afghanistan. Remembering those who left us in 2013 ChronicleAs with every year that passes, Citrus County says goodbye to many of its citizens, each one having somehow contributed to the fabric of the community, from physicians, pastors and community volunteers to bankers, cattlemen, county natives and those whose smiles lit up a room even a beloved sheriffs office K-9. Although we cant print everyones name and contribution, here are some of the people of Citrus County who died during 2013: Janet Masaoy, age 76, died Jan.25. Described as a warm, welcoming, unassuming, pit bull and an unlikely warrior, as founder of Citizens Opposed to the Suncoast Tollway, Janet fought tirelessly against the Suncoast tollway extension refusing to call it a parkway. Joan Graves, age 84, died Feb.17. As a child, Joan grew up at the then-Orange Hotel (now Crown Court) in Inverness, worked for the Clerk of Courts Office and spent her life documenting Citrus County with her camera as a freelance photographer for the Chronicleand The Tampa Tribune, including the night she went with then-Sheriff B.R. Quinn on a raid of an illegal moonshine still. Joan took photos as Quinn broke every jar, jug and bottle. Karyn Langer, age 59, died Feb.21. Karyn was a school social worker in Citrus County and was known for her great parties and sing-alongs, her vim, vigor and vitality until Huntingtons disease took it away. Kevin Coward, age 44, died March13. Kevin was the music man of Inverness Primary School, bringing life and enthusiasm to each of the schools nearly 700 students. One of his favorite methods of calling the roll in class: instead of saying, Here, when he called the students names, he would have them sing their favorite food macaroni and cheese! or creamed corn! His death after a brief, sudden illness shocked the community. Keith Barco, age 71, died March15. A Citrus County native and cattleman, Keith was known as a quiet, stoic man who worked hard and who was passionate about agriculture, land and cattle. At the time of his death, Keith was president of the Citrus County Cattlemens Association. He was a longtime supporter of 4-H and FFA youth programs and a longtime member of First Baptist Church of Floral City. State joins care gap Year inREVIEW Year inREVIEW See LEFT/ Page A6 See CARE/ Page A2 MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle fileFallout from the tax dispute between Duke Energy Florida and Citrus County has continued to affect nearly all facets of life in the county during the past year. GAP IN HEALTH COVERAGE A list of the states not expanding Medicaid under the 2010 f ederal health care law and the number of residents who will fall in to a health care gap between the current Medicaid eligibility guidelines of their state and the tax credits available under the law to help people pay for private insurance. TOTAL 4,831,590 Alabama 191,320 Alaska 17,290 Florida 763,890 Georgia 409,350 Idaho 54,780 Indiana 181,930 Kansas 77,920 Louisiana 242,150 Maine 24,390 Mississippi 137,800 Missouri 193,420 Montana 40,140 Nebraska 32,570 New Hampshire 26,190 North Carolina 318,710 Oklahoma 144,480 Pennsylvania 281,290 South Carolina 194,330 South Dakota 25,480 Tennessee 161,650 Texas 1,046,430 Utah 57,850 Virginia 190,840 Wisconsin 0 Wyoming 17,390 Note: Wisconsin dec lined to e xpand Medicaid but is effectively eliminating its gap by pursuing its own partial expansion.Source: Kaiser Family Foundation From staff reports Fix proves too costly; nuclear plant retiredPATFAHERTY Staff writerCitrus Countys nuclear power era officially ended Feb.5, 2013, when Duke Energy announced it would retire the Crystal River nuclear plant. The plant known as CR3 started operating in 1977, but has been off line since 2009, when a separation occurred in the concrete in one of the walls of the containment building. According to documents filed with the Public Service Commission, the damage took place in October2009 while workers were creating an opening in the structure for replacing two steam generators. The plant had been shut down for refueling and maintenance when the damage occurred. In March 2011, during the final stages of returning the unit to service, a second separation occurred in a different wall and the company stopped work. And while no work was being performed, a third separation occurred in July2011. The status of CR3 affected a range of issues, including the amount Progress Energy could collect from customers, the cost of replacement power, a rate case, and an $835million insurance settlement. There was also a growing resentment by power customers and some state lawmakers over the practice of utilities billing nuclear construction costs in advance. For Progress Energy, advance billing would pay for a $617million planned upgrade to CR3 and looming costs for the proposed $19billion to $24billionnuclear plant in Levy County. Last January, Duke Energy, which had merged with Progress Energy, began showingSee PLANT/ Page A7 MORE INSIDE Duke Energ y has taken some steps to benefit the local economy. / Page A7 Janet Masaoydied Jan. 25. Kevin Cowarddied March 13.

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states declined. That leaves 4.8 million people in those states without the health care coverage that their peers elsewhere are getting through the expansion of Medicaid, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation estimate. More than one-fifth of them live in Texas alone, Kaisers analysis found. Among those in the gap is Cheryl Jones, a 61-yearold part-time home-care worker from Erie, Pa., who makes do without health insurance by splitting in half pills for high blood pressure, which she gets from a friend, not a pharmacist. Shed also like to visit a dentist to fix her broken partial dentures. A new pair of glasses might be nice, too. There are a lot of us who need medical help now, she said. I need new glasses, I need to go to a dentist, I need my medicine. ... Think about us working poor. We pay our taxes. The Medicaid expansion was supposed to work hand-in-hand with tax credits subsidizing private insurance for people with slightly higher incomes, two keys to the laws broader aim of extending health insurance to 30 million more people. As an enticement for states to expand Medicaid, the federal government promises to pay nearly all of the cost. Without the expansion, the law is unable to help people who are below the income threshold where tax credits start kicking in, about $11,500 for working adults. On Wednesday, 24 states and Washington, D.C., will extend Medicaid to more than 4 million adults who would otherwise fall into the same gap as Jones. Access to the care theyll get is similar to what people get with private insurance, said Joan Alker, executive director of Georgetown Universitys Center for Children and Families. A 25th state, Michigan, plans to expand in April. Wisconsin effectively eliminated its own gap without using the more generous federal contribution. Politics is apparent in states expansion decisions. Of those that joined it, all but five supported Obama in last years election. Of those that declined, most are more conservative states in the South, Midwest and northern Rocky Mountains that voted against Obama. One outlier is Pennsylvania, a moderate industrial belt state that supported Obama twice. Gov. Tom Corbett, a Republican who sued unsuccessfully as attorney general to overturn the health care law, instead plans to ask the federal government to approve an alternative to a Medicaid expansion. He wants to use the laws generous Medicaid dollars to cover the same population through private insurance companies while stripping down existing benefits under Medicaid, a target of conservatives criticism. With no guarantee of federal approval, hundreds of thousands of Penn sylvanians Kaiser estimates 281,000 could be stuck in the gap until at least 2015. Corbett doesnt apologize for not expanding eligibility right away. Rather, administration officials say they want to put themselves in a better position to create a successful, affordable program. Our goal is to absolutely get this plan approved so that every uninsured Pennsylvanian has health care options, said a senior Corbett aide, Todd Shamash. Corbetts office declined to make him available for an interview. In the meantime, the un insured who fall into this new Medicaid gap are selective about seeking care. Their health care needs dont go away just because theyre uninsured, Alker said, and what theyre missing out on is consistent primary and preventive care. Shelagh Collins of Pittsburgh can get primary care at a federally funded community health center nearby, but she cant afford more specialized treatment for her joint aches and pains that limit her ability to do certain jobs, she said. After she fell and hurt her hip in the spring, she couldnt pay for an MRI, she said. A friends loan of $200 covered a month of physical therapy, but it didnt make the pain disappear. Collins, 56, used to be a high-level administrative assistant at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Now she gets by on occasional secretarial temporary work and unemployment compensation checks and is trying to protect a 401(k) retirement account of $21,000 that she said makes her ineligible for Pennsylvanias current Medicaid program. But the job market is brutal, temp work is scarce and her unemployment compensation checks are at an end, she said. I have never gone through anything like this in my life, Collins said. Lori Miller would like to see a doctor for the headaches, blackouts and weakness that has made it hard for the Punxsutawney seamstress to pursue more work. The 34-year-old wonders what happened to the physically fit woman who used to walk, run or bicycle every day, and she wonders if shes still suffering from a painful bicycle accident two years ago for which she never sought treatment. Living on about $7,000 a year, she cant afford to see a doctor, Miller said. I want to feel like thats an option to me, she said, without worrying about, Do I have enough dollars to do that? A2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE NATION 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000GW0N Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000GNLI Professional Hearing Centers www.InvernessHearing.com 726-HEAR (4327) 000GTXT HEAR BETTER NOW, GUARANTEED! 4 Year Warranty FREE Batteries 4 Life Dont Drink And Drive This patrol car This patrol car was hit by a was hit by a drunk driver. drunk driver. 726-4488 www.sheriffcitrus.org Call a taxi, friend or family member to come and get you! 000GXPN SHERIFF J EFFREY J. D AWSY CAREContinued from Page A1 Associated PressShelagh Collins talks about Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett before she goes to a job-search appointment Monday in Forest Hills, Pa., a suburb of Pittsburgh. Collins gets by on occasional secretarial temp work and unemployment compensation checks, but she cant afford specialized treatment for her various health conditions that limit her ability to do certain jobs. On Thursday, about half the states will expand Medicaid eligibility to more of the working poor under the federal health care law. But Pennsylvania and 24 other states arent expanding Medicaid, and the Kaiser Family Foundation estimates nearly 5million Americans will fall into a coverage gap because of it.

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Around theSTATE Citrus CountyWildlife park to host bird walk The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, in cooperation with Citrus County Audubon Society, will host on Wednesday a First Day Bird Walk on Pepper Creek Trail. There is no charge for the walk, which will start at 8 a.m. An experienced birder from Citrus County Audubon will lead the walk on this trail one of 19 birding trails in Citrus County that are part of the West Section of the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail. Participants should meet at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance to the parks Visitor Center. The bird walk will begin at 8. Binoculars and a field guide are recommended. GOP assembly to view WWII moviesThe Saturday,Jan.11, meeting of the Ronald Reagan RepublicanAssembly will feature a presentation by the president of the Friends of the Homosassa Public Library. There will also be a showing of the first of six volumes of the Emmy Award-winning Victory At Sea documentary. The meeting will begin at 1p.m. at 938 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.19) in the South Square Plaza. Refreshments will be provided. CASA donations are accepted. For information, call 352257-5381.Holiday hours for county offices setCitrus County government offices will be closed Wednesday, Jan. 1, in observance of New Years Day. The county landfill will be closed on Wednesday, Jan. 1, as well. All libraries will be closing at 5p.m. Tuesday, Dec.31, and will be closed on New Years Day. All community buildings and parks, including Bicentennial Park pool, will be closed on New Years Day. The Animal Services shelter also will be closed for the holiday.Water/wastewater board to meetRolling Oaks Utilities general rate case will be discussed at the next meeting of the Citrus County Water and Wastewater Authority, 1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6, in Room 166 at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. The authority is a board of appointees that provides for the regulation of private water, bulk water and wastewater utilities in the unincorporated areas of Citrus County. For information, call 352-419-6520 or visit www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/ commissioners/advboards/ wwa/wwa.htm.OrlandoZimmerman trial top state story for 2013The murder trial of George Zimmerman in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin is Floridas story of the year. Florida newspaper and broadcast editors picked the trial in which Zimmerman was acquitted of all charges as the states top story of 2013. The Zimmerman trial tackled two of the thorniest issues confronting America: race and gun control. Trailing the Zimmerman trial in the editors picks was the Florida Legislatures refusal to expand the states Medicaid program. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE ChronicleThe Chronicleinvited readers to vote for the top local stories for 2013, and for the most part they agreed with our selections; however, a strong write-in campaign launched the story of wounded Marine Lance Cpl. Josh Whites recovery into their top 10. The Duke tax issue and Scott Adams first year as commissioner received the most votes by readers. The following is a list of those top stories with some reader comments: Josh White Just last December, White, who was recovering from injuries sustained in August 2012 during an improvised explosive device attack while on patrol in Afghanistan, visited Citrus County for an emotional homecoming. In April 2013, he visited the White House after being welcomed by President Barack Obama before setting off on a four-day Soldier Ride bicycle trek from Washington, D.C., to Annapolis, Md. White has been getting more acclimated to his new prosthetics and has tested them on the ski slopes of Breckenridge, Colo., and climbed an ice wall. His family expects him to return to Citrus County early next year.I have known him (Josh White) and his Mom since he was in primary school. He is such an inspiration to his family, Citrus County, and especially to his brothers and sisters in service to our country. Mary Schlumberger One Rake at a Time Someone like Art Jones is making impact in this county to clean our water we so desperately need while no one else is even making an attempt. I hope this becomes the event to make people aware of our resources the water we need and the wildlife we so depend on. Clifford Wiggins Duke Energy tax bill fight and CMH dispute/sale I dont understand why the Duke Energy/property appraiser and CMH board disputes are not negotiated and settled. Ren RenfroAlso receiving votes were: Commissioner Scott Adams first year. Duke Energy closes CR3 nuclear plant. Duke to build natural gas plant. Ed Peters taking daughters from guardians. Duke stops construction plans for Levy nuke plants. Search for executive director of Tourism Development Council. Special to the ChronicleOn April 17, Crystal River native and U.S. Marine Josh White was one of 50 wounded warriors who was first welcomed by President Barack Obama at the White House and then did a four-day Soldier Ride bicycle trek from Washington, D.C., to Annapolis, Md. Readers have their say Locals weigh in on what they considered the top county stories for 2013 Josh White walks with his younger brother, Matthew White, 11. MATTREINIG Hernando Today BROOKSVILLE A sergeant and a deputy with the Hernando County Sheriffs Office resigned and were charged with felony grand theft after two criminal investigations found they stole money from separate accounts, including one established for the widow of a captain killed in the line of duty. Sgt. Joseph Reid, 41, was charged with grand theft of more than $300 and less than $20,000; and Deputy Michael Glatfelter, 51, was charged with third-degree grand theft and third-degree organized scheme to defraud. Confronted with the allegations Thursday, Reid and Glatfelter immediately resigned from the sheriffs office. Prosecutors subsequently leveled the criminal charges. The joint investigation by the sheriffs and local state attorneys offices also found that newly-promoted vice and narcotics unit Capt. Tom Garcia was aware Reid stole at least $1,500 in vice-issued money, and that Garcia used his own money to cover up Reids theft. Garcia was not charged with a crime or disciplined by sheriffs investigators. He is on paid administrative leave, Hernando Sheriff Al Nienhuis said at a news conference Friday. The sheriffs investigation concluded Reid used the vice-issued currency for personal use as far back as June 2011, and records include log books with entries for suspicious purchases. Another investigation found Glatfelter, treasurer of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 164 from 2006-10, stole a total of $8,300 for personal items ranging from tobacco to electronics to groceries. The most blatant transaction came one year after Glatfelter stepped down as treasurer, investigators reported, when he took $1,100 from the Scott Bierwiler Memorial Fund. That fund was established to help the widow, two daughters, and son of Capt. Scott Bierwiler, who died Feb. 19, 2009, at age 42 in a head-on collision with a Nature Coast High School student. Today I have the very, very distasteful task of releasing some details into two separate criminal investigations, Nienhuis told reporters at Fridays news conference. This betrayal of trust has left me angry; its left me frustrated, but most of all its made me disappointed. Reid and Glatfelter turned themselves in at Citrus County Jail on Friday morning. Both deputies have arrested inmates now held at Hernando County Jail and thus were booked in Citrus for their own protection, sheriffs officials said. Nienhuis said monies entrusted to Glatfelter in the Scott Bierwiler Memorial Fund are nearly depleted, and he thinks, because the state attorneys office is involved, restitution will be sought in the case. Why that money wasnt given to (Bierwilers widow), I dont know, Nienhuis said. Well do everything we can to make sure that money goes to the right place. The arrested deputies personnel records indicate they had a combined 57 commendations and only one written reprimand against Glatfelter in 2008 for failing to complete a fatality crash report. Thank you for the opportunity to serve this county and the people who live here, Glatfelter wrote in a resignation letter he submitted Thursday. He made $58,492 annually and had been with the sheriffs office since 1989, records show. He was a member of the Livestock and Crisis Response teams. Reid signed a resignation letter stating he will receive about 172 hours of accrued pay at his current annual salary of $55,841 in exchange for a complete and unconditional waiver of all rights and remedies. He began working at the sheriffs office in 2001. He was a patrol officer, vice detective, and sergeant with the vice and narcotics unit. Both men, if convicted of the criminal charges, face up to five years in prison and $5,000 in fines, Nienhuis said. Meanwhile, the sheriff said, his office must deal with damaged trust among citizens already weary of, and not surprised by, corruption in law enforcement. Two Hernando deputies arrested Men are being held in Citrus County; fears for safety at Hernando facility Special to the ChronicleHernando County Sheriff Al Nienhuis announces the arrests at a news conference on Friday.

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Birthday You will feel a sense of wanderlust this year. You will not always make the best decisions, but you will learn from your mistakes. Update your skills if you want to make professional advancements. Idleness is your enemy. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You will have extra discipline today, so you should be off to a good start. Make careful plans, and network with people who can be helpful. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Make a point of being social, and you will have a chance to meet someone who will help you reach your goals. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Take a moment to re-examine your strategy before you head down the wrong path. Although you will have great stamina, your tendency will be to overdo things. Aries (March 21-April 19) Prepare to enjoy a spectacular event. Take the time to make everything perfect. Its best to approach the new year with optimism. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You may feel vulnerable, but a change in attitude is all that is needed. Think carefully about what you want and need. Gemini (May 21-June 20) This will be a memorable time. Opportunities will be vast. You should be able to pick and choose from an array of options. Cancer (June 21-July 22) You are prepared to enjoy the wonder of life. Although you face changes, this year promises to reward you for all your hard work and tough sacrifices. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Nothing can get in the way of having fun. Its time to cut loose and celebrate the past and the future. Things are beginning to heat up in your life, so enjoy the sizzle. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Its best to take a rest today. Overdoing it will lead to setbacks. Dont be misled by others. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) A shrewd change will help you follow your dreams. Make a New Years resolution that you will be able to uphold. Its a busy time, and you should be at your best. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Acknowledging that you are reaching the end of a cycle will prepare you for the future. Make an effort to focus on your finances. Dont repeat the cash flow crises youve experienced in the past. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Youll be able to charm others with ease. Attending events may lead to opportunities for romance. The new year will be a time of reinvention. Invest in your goals with an open mind. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, Dec. 31, the 365th and final day of 2013. Todays Highlight in History: On Dec. 31, 1879, Thomas Edison first publicly demonstrated his electric incandescent light in Menlo Park, N.J. On this date: In 1909, the Manhattan Bridge, spanning the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn, was officially opened to vehicular traffic. In 1942, Frank Sinatra opened a singing engagement at New Yorks Paramount Theater. In 1946, President Harry S. Truman officially proclaimed the end of hostilities in World War II. In 1993, Brandon Teena, a 21year-old female-born transgender, was slain along with two other people at a farmhouse near Humboldt, Neb. (Convicted murderer John Lotter is on Nebraskas death row; codefendant Thomas Nissen is serving a life sentence. The case inspired the 1999 movie Boys Dont Cry.) Ten years ago: A car bomb ripped through a crowded restaurant hosting a New Years Eve party in Baghdad, Iraq, killing eight Iraqis. Five years ago: A woman gave birth aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 59 while en route from Amsterdam to Boston. One year ago: Seven NFL coaches and five general managers were fired in a flurry of sackings the day after the regular season ended. Todays Birthdays: Actor Sir Anthony Hopkins is 76. Actor Tim Considine (TV: My Three Sons) is 73. Actor Sir Ben Kingsley is 70. Actor Tim Matheson is 66. Actor James Remar is 60. Actress Bebe Neuwirth is 55. Actor Val Kilmer is 54. Actor Don Diamont is 51. Actress Gong Li is 48. Actor Lance Reddick is 44. Rapper PSY (Park Jae-sang) is 36. Olympic gold medal gymnast Gabby Douglas is 18. Thought for Today: Drop the last year into the silent limbo of the past. Let it go, for it was imperfect, and thank God that it can go. Brooks Atkinson, American drama critic (1894-1984).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Todays active pollen: Juniper, maple, oak Todays count: 9.1/12 Wednesdays count: 7.7 Thursdays count: 6.7 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Pair of old Broadway favorites on top of box office in 2013NEW YORK Broadways highest-grossing show in 2013 wasnt a new strutting musical or a bawdy one or even one with a big star. The crown goes to a regal but gray-maned performer The Lion King, now in its 16th year. And another veteran turned heads when Wicked recorded Broadways highest singleweek gross ever. End-of-year-data from the Broadway League released Monday shows that the old-timers are going just fine. The 10-year-old Wicked earned a staggering $3.2 million over nine performances for the week ending Sunday. Its the first time a show has ever crossed the $3 million mark in a single week. Another pro, The Lion King, ruled all other shows during the entire calendar year, ending with nearly $97 million, despite the fact that there are five bigger theaters on Broadway.Vegas New Years Eve about big names, bigger bashesLAS VEGAS Sin City is set to ring in 2014 with big-name concerts, celebrity-hosted parties and an eight-minute rooftop fireworks display billed as the nations largest. Pop star Bruno Mars is christening the Cosmopolitans new Chelsea Ballroom, JohnLegend is performing at Aria, and Maroon 5 is playing at Mandalay Bay. Other casinos are touting pricey nightclub bashes hosted by reality-TV and music celebrities, including the original celebutante, Paris Hilton. More than 330,000 tourists are expected to count down the end of the year as law enforcement officers keep the peace and casino bosses watch profits roll in. With New Years Eve falling on a Tuesday, casinos are offering up special New Years Eve Eve events on Monday.Roberts thanks girlfriend following rare illnessLOS ANGELES Robin Roberts thanked her longtime girlfriend, Amber Laign, in a year-end post published Sunday on the ABC News anchors Facebook page. The message, which follows Roberts battle with a life-threatening illness, is the first time the Good Morning America anchor has publicly acknowledged her 10-year, same-sex relationship with Laign, a massage therapist from the San Francisco Bay Area. Roberts post was confirmed by ABC News spokeswoman Heather Riley Sunday was the anniversary of Roberts 100-day milestone following a bone marrow transplant in September 2012 for treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare blood and bone marrow disease. In May, Grand Central Publishing announced Roberts, one of the most popular figures in morning TV news, will write a memoir about her battle with MDS and the life lessons she continues to gather following her return to GMA last February. From wire reports Associated PressThe Minskoff Theatre and the marquee for The Lion King are seen Jan. 19, 2012, in New York. Broadways highest grossing show in 2013 was The Lion King, now in its 16th year. Elton John and Tim Rices The Lion King ruled all other shows during the entire calendar year, ending with $96,983,838. A4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 000GT1P in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . C10 Notice to Creditors/ Administration . . . . . . . . C10 Robin Roberts

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The Rev. James Hoge, age 96, died March16. Back when only about a dozen Catholics lived in Citrus County, the Rev. Hoge came to establish a church. Six parishes and a Catholic school later, the influence of the man known to many simply as Father touched multiple thousands of Catholics, as well as nonCatholics, countywide. Joe Silvestro, age 87, died March26. Founder of Joes Deli in Inverness and local baseball umpire, Joe loved four things: his family, music, Little League and Frank Sinatra. Before moving to Florida from New York, Joe was a grocery man by day and a drummer at night, on call with Doc Severinsens band on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. He also played drums for television commercials. Glenn Kilgus, age 81, died April11. Glenn, together with his wife, Rose, both survivors of heart disease, worked tirelessly to support the American Heart Association and cardiac research. Locally they supported the Cattle Barons Ball and Citrus Memorial hospitals Heart Ball. Dr. Arnelle EslavaFernandez, age 55, died April15. Arnelle was known as a tough but loving, dedicated physician who demanded the best care for her patients. A native of the Philippines, education was important to her and she sent a lot of money to her family in the Philippines, putting many nieces and nephews through college. The Rev. Dr. Bob Blackburn, age 72, died May3. The former pastor of First United Methodist Church in Inverness in the 1990s, Dr. Bob was known for his beautiful tenor voice. He formed and directed the Liberty Choir, which became known for large-scale, theatrical productions, Easter cantatas and patriotic extravaganzas that packed the house. Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalez, age 83, died May26. Together with his friend the late Pete DeRosa, Dr. Gonzalez founded Seven Rivers Community Hospital. He was: hospital chief of staff, chairman of the hospitals governing board, medical director at Crystal River Geriatric Center, staff physician at Key Training Center and president of the Crystal River Rotary Club. He loved fishing, boating, scuba diving and hunting. He had his private pilot license and enjoyed flying even from Crystal River to Inverness to check on his patients. Kane, age 12, died June1. Kane, a retired German shepherd K-9 officer for the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, was involved in more than 1,500 drug searches leading to 459 arrests. He made numerous appearances at schools and community events with his partner, sheriffs Sgt. Ryan Glaze. Betty Fowler, age none of your business, died June29. Wife of former county commissioner Jim Fowler, Betty was known for her infectious laughter and love of people and good times. Jaime Collazo, age 70, died July4. Nicknamed Mr. C by his boxing students, the lifelong boxer dreamed of opening his own old school boxing gym. He attained his dream earlier this year when he opened Lake Side Boxing in Hernando on May 1, and on June 3 he broke his neck while riding his scooter to the gym; he died July 4 from complications after surgery. Janet Gonter, age 79, died July20. In 2003, Janet was named one of Citrus Countys 10 Most Admired Women most admired for making a difference. One of the places she made a difference was at the Key Training Center, where she worked as the dietary manager. She also began what is now called Miss Janets Lunch, a community picnic on the grounds of her church, the Church of Christ in Floral City, which still meets every Wednesday at 11 a.m. Bob England, age 90, died July29. A longtime Inverness banker and World War II and Korean War veteran, retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Robert England was named the 1988ChronicleCitizen of the Year. He was a founding director of Hospice of Citrus County, the United Way of Citrus County and Inverness Elks Lodge, a past director of CASA, Florida Sheriffs Association and the Citrus County Fair, as well as being involved with the American Heart Association, to name just a few of the organizations to which he lent his time. Georgeanna Phelps, age 78, died Aug.12. A community activist whose motto was Do the right thing, Georgeanna formed Spring Busters, the volunteer organization that worked tirelessly to clean up and clear out the clogged-up Bluebird Springs and neglected park in Homosassa, and also helped found the We Care Food Pantry. She was also an avid Democrat and was known for her staunch opposition to the Freezer, the tiki bar that was added on to the Cedar Key Fish House in Old Homosassa. Bill Hoppy Hoppert, age 86, died Aug.14. A past vice president on the board of directors for the Citrus County Fair Association, Bill loved everything about the fair and the fairgrounds. He was an incredible craftsman he could make anything out of wood. As a longtime member of the Citrus Model Railroad Club at the fairgrounds, his handiwork is on display at the clubhouse in the Otto Allen building. Personable, good-natured, friendly, light-hearted, Bill always looked on the bright side of life, and with the gift of gab, he always had a story to tell. Nancy Sullivan, age 76, died Sept.23. Although her real job was office manager at Citrus Title in Inverness, Nancy was best known as everyones best friend and a person who was an excellent listener and keeper of secrets. For 30 years she was the go-to person for anyone with any question about land title and property history. Tom Corcoran, age 45, died Sept.27. The marketing manager at Life Care Center, Tom loved a good practical joke, loved his family, loved the people he worked with and for. He was a Chamber of Commerce ambassador and the Chamber sunshine person. You liked him the moment you met him. Dr. Robert Bedell, age 72, died Oct.15. As the Citrus County medical director of HPH Hospice, Dr. Bedell was known as a dedicated, caring, compassionate doctor. He owned homes in Citrus County and Vero Beach, spending Mondays through Thursdays here and traveling to Vero on the weekends. He died in a traffic accident south of Floral City. The Rev. Dr. Babb Adams, age 84, died Oct.30. Preacher loved and served the people of Inverness for more than 30 years 21 years as pastor of First Baptist Church in Inverness and then as interim pastor and integral member of Cornerstone Baptist Church. He was known for his quiet, kind manner and great stories. Ouida White, age 88, died Oct.31. Noted for her love of and for the Crystal River Archaeological State Park, she was its oldest and possibly its longest-serving volunteer. Mattie Mae Pipgras, age 99, died Nov.23. The first Miss Citrus County, Inverness native Miss Mattie loved Citrus County, especially Inverness. She was a Cub Scout den mother, Inverness Womans Club officer, a sponsor of the Little Womans Club and the Inverness Junior Womans Club. She served in the PTA, was a charter member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, a former member of the Inverness Golf and Country Club and a member of First United Methodist Church in Inverness for more than 90 years. Her second husband, George Pipgras, was a pitcher for the Yankees back when Babe Ruth played. Sandra Ackley, 70INVERNESSSandra E. Ackley, 70, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Sunday, Dec.29, 2013, at her residence. She was born March30, 1943, in Morristown, N.J., to the late Carlton and Marion (Pettey) Wood. Sandra arrived in this area in 2005 coming from Stanhope, N.J., and was owner of Sandys Clean Sweep Cleaning Service. She loved cooking and enjoyed Dunkin Donuts with her coffee. Sandra held memberships in the Order of the Eastern Star, Pearl Chapter 79, in Dover, N.J.; and the American Legion Post No.0225, Floral City. Sandra is survived by her loving husband of 28 years, Ronald M. Ackley; daughter, Robin (Abraham) Ghaebreal of Wharton, N.J.; stepdaughter, Lorinda Ackley of Inverness; brother, Carlton Wood; sisters, Dorothy Loard and Carol Behre; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Private cremation arrangements under the care of Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Dolores Wise, 90INVERNESSDolores M. Wise, 90, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Friday, Dec.27, 2013, at Hospice of Citrus County. She was born May30, 1923, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to the late Paul and Caroline (Eberling) Bergin. Dolores arrived in this area in 1981 coming from Long Island, N.Y. She was a devoted homemaker, and a member of Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness. Dolores enjoyed story writing, and was a talented seamstress, having made all of her daughters wedding and bridal party dresses. She also earned two assistant nursing degrees. She is survived by her loving husband of 70 years, George J. Wise; one son, George Mickey Wise Jr. of Long Island; daughters, Carol (Mike) Stewart of Long Island, Ginny (Bob) Joseph of Long Island, Patty (Matthew) Van Bourgondien of Connecticut, Dotti (Tom) Christensen, Inverness; brother, Paul G. (Carol) Bergin of Connecticut; 14 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by sisters, Frances and Jean Bergin. The family will be receiving friends at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness, at 9a.m. Thursday, Jan.2, 2014, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church. Burial will occur at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, following the Mass. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Randy Billings, 34MANHATTAN, KAN.Chief Warrant Officer 2, Randy Lee Billings, U.S. Army, 34, Manhattan, Kan., died Dec. 17, 2013, in a helicopter crash while serving with NATO forces in Now Bahar, Afghan istan. Five of his fellow soldiers died in the same crash. He was born Sept.1, 1979, in Poteau, Okla., and served our country proudly for more than 16 years. He was assigned to the U.S. Army, 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion from Fort Riley, Kan., and served two deployments in Afghanistan and two in Iraq. Left to cherish his memory is his wife, Ashley Weaver Billings, Manhattan, Kan.; his father, Robert Billings and mother, Sheryl Brown, both of Heavener, Okla.; and all of his family and friends across the world. Family, friends, and military personnel will celebrate his life at 11a.m. Saturday, Jan.4, 2014, at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Fla. Military honors and burial will follow at Florida National Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the church prior to services. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory of Inverness, is serving the family. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Randys memory may be directed to Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Lester Everest, 97CRYSTAL RIVERLester James Everest, 97, of Crystal River, died Monday, Dec.30, 2013, at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center. Strickland Funeral Home with crematory of Crystal River is assisting the family with private arrangements. Carl Garrand, 82INVERNESSCarl W. Garrand, 82, of Inverness, Fla., died Dec.28, 2013, under the care of Hospice of Citrus County in Inverness. Arrangements are by McGan Cremation Service LLC, Hernando.Nancy Wood, 80FLORAL CITYNancy A. Wood, 80, Floral City, Fla., died Sunday, Dec.29, 2013, at Citrus Memorial hospital. Private cremation arrangements are by Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Max Parton, 84FLORAL CITYMax Wayne Parton, 84, Floral City, Fla., passed away Dec.29, 2013, in Arbor Trail Health & Rehab Center. A native of Decatur, Ill., he was born July15, 1929, to the late Wayne C. and Delta (Cole) Parton and came to this area from there in 1986. He retired from the Parton & Wene Construction Company after 31 years and served our country during the Korean War in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the Floral City United Methodist Church, VFW Post 7122, Floral City, and American Legion Post 105 in Decatur, Ill. Max was a master wood worker and a die hard Chicago Cubs fan. Survivors include his wife, Suzanne (nee) Bottrell Parton; two children, Louise (Mike) Barnes, Floral City; Jeanne (Steve) Bainbridge, Decatur, Ill.; his sister, Charlotte Anderson, Sullivan, Ill.; two grandchildren, Joe Bainbridge, and Brad Bainbridge and wife Judy; and sister-in-law, Sherill Parton. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Gene and Ronnie Parton. The celebration of life service will be conducted at 1p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, 2014, from the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home of Inverness, with Pastor Mary Gestrich officiating. Burial with military honors will follow at Florida National Cemetery. Calling hours will be 12 p.m., until the hour of service. In lieu of flowers, memorials are requested to VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City, FL 34436. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. A6TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, 000GTX2 Contact Anne Farrior 564-2931 000GTFM Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhome.com FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000GX1N 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000GRX8 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000GR6H60 Serving all of Citrus County (352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com Serving all your cremation needs. 000GS4D AUDIOLOGY Crystal River Inverness Call For A Free Consultation (352) 795-5700 Our Patients Are Super Hearos Conquer Your Hearing Loss! DOLORES WISE Mass: Thurs 10:00AM Our Lady of Fatima DAVID CLARK Graveside Service: Fri 2:30 PM Florida National Cemetery DONALD QUILLING Service: Sun 2:00 PM LINDA EMANN Service: Mon 12:00 Noon LDS Church-Lecanto MAX PARTON Service: Thurs 1:00 PM Burial: Florida National Cemetery000GUDWWith CrematoryFuneral Home 726-8323 SO YOU KNOW Early production deadlines today mean the submission deadline for obituaries is noon today. Email obits@ chronicleonline.com. FREE OBITUARIES Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits both free and paid obituaries. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of arrangements. All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated Press style unless a request to the contrary is made. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are charged a base fee of $25 plus $10 per column inch, payable in advance. Max Parton Dolores Wise Randy Lee Billings Sandra Ackley Obituaries LEFTContinued from Page A1 Joe Silvestrodied March 26. Dr. Carlos F. Gonzalezdied May 26. Betty Fowlerdied June 29. Dr. Robert Bedelldied Oct. 15. Mattie Mae Pipgrasdied Nov. 23.

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DUI arrests Joseph Niciforo, 71, of South Skyline Drive, Inverness, at 8:13 p.m. Dec. 28 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Niciforo is accused of failing to maintain a single lane on Old Floral City Road. He was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.095percent and 0.099percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500. Joseph Humble, 66, of South Istachatta Road, Floral City at 11:56 p.m. Dec. 28 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Humble was involved in a car accident. He was asked to perform field sobriety tests and did poorly. Tests of his breath showed his blood alcohol concentration was 0.157percent and 0.158percent. The legal limit is 0.08 percent. Bond $500.Domestic battery arrests Melissa Larkins, 55, of Homosassa, at 4:34p.m. Dec.28 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Kevin Lapuma, 38, of Hernando, at 9:15a.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. He was also charged with felony grand theft and burglary to an unoccupied structure. No bond. Cassandra Paquette, 31, of Homosassa, at 9:10p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. Kristina Juliano, 34, of Hernando, at 9:54p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond. William Grimes III, 46, of Hernando, at 9:54p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond.Other arrests Marcus Blackwell, 36, of Old Dixie Way, Forest Park, Ga., at 7:29p.m. Dec.27 on an active Carroll County, Ga., warrant for violation of probation stemming from an original charge of forgery. According to his arrest affidavit, Blackwell is charged as a fugitive from justice. Bond was denied. Emmitt Carter, 55, of South Scarboro Avenue, Lecanto, at 9:32a.m. Dec.28 on an active warrant for two counts of felony aggravated battery with use of a deadly weapon. Bond $10,000. Shawn Peck, 39, of West Sugarberry Lane, Beverly Hills, at 12:59p.m. Dec.28 on a misdemeanor charge of drug paraphernalia. According to his arrest affidavit Peck is accused of having a glass pipe containing meth residue in his possession. Bond $500. Jose Mayol, 20, of Claymore Street, Inverness, at 6:30p.m. Dec.28 on a felony charge of fleeing or eluding law enforcement and a misdemeanor charge of driving while license was suspended or revoked due to financial responsibility. According to his arrest affidavit, Mayol is accused of driving an ATV four-wheeler at a high rate of speed. When a deputy tried to stop him, Mayol refused to pull over and instead attempted to elude the deputy. He was also issued citations for running a stop sign and driving an ATV on a roadway. Bond $5,500. Cleveland White, 37, of Crystal River, at 8:59p.m. Dec.28 on a felony charge of aggravated battery on a pregnant victim. No bond. Jonathon Argerenon, 35, of Forrest Avenue, Cantonment, at 10:50p.m. Dec.28 on an active warrant for felony violation of probation, stemming from original charges of feeing and eluding an officer and driving under the influence. According to his arrest affidavit, Argerenon was transported to the Citrus County Detention Facility from Escambia County. Bond was denied. Michael Burns III, 18, of North Page Avenue, Hernando, at 1:28a.m. Dec.29 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance and a misdemeanor charge of drug paraphernalia. According to his arrest affidavit, deputies responded to a complaint about a loud party that Burns was attending. He was found to be in possession of ecstasy and a plastic straw with visible residue. Bond $2,500. William Mannix, 72, of West Lexington Drive, Crystal River, at 9:04p.m. Dec.29 on a misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of an accident with property damage. According to his arrest affidavit he was involved in a car accident and stopped briefly, but then left without providing information or rendering aid to injured passengers. Bond $250. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A commercial burglary was reported at 9:42a.m. Friday, Dec.27, in the 6300 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 12:44p.m. Dec.27 in the 20 block of N. Edinburgh Drive, Inverness. A residential burglary was reported at 10:04a.m. Saturday, Dec.28, in the 5600 block of W. Knoxville Lane, Dunnellon. A vehicle burglary was reported at 2:42p.m. Dec.28 in the 5000 block of S. Felix Point, Homosassa. A commercial burglary was reported at 7:09a.m. Sunday, Dec.29, in the 900 block of E. Ray St., Hernando. A vehicle burglary was reported at 11:54p.m. Dec.29 in the 600 block of S.E. First Court, Crystal River.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 9:37a.m. Friday, Dec.27, in the 5500 block of W. Meadow St., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 10:42a.m. Dec.27 in the 300 block of N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. A petit theft was reported at 2:28p.m. Dec.27 in the 2000 block of N. Cedarhouse Terrace, Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 2:45p.m. Dec.27 in the 8300 block of E. Orange Ave., Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 2:46p.m. Dec.27 in the 3000 block of E. Murray St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 3:28p.m. Dec.27 in the 200 block of S. Elmhurst Point, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 5:23p.m. Dec.27 in the 7600 block of W. Fern Place, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 5:55p.m. Dec.27 in the 7700 block of E. Pine Lake Lane, Floral City. A grand theft was reported at 6:43p.m. Dec.27 in the 6300 block of E. Mobile St., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 7:24p.m. Dec.27 in the 1800 block of N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River. A grand theft was reported at 7:44a.m. Saturday, Dec.28, in the 5300 block of E. Live Oak Lane, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 10:51a.m. Dec.28 in the 9600 block of W. Cleveland Lane, Crystal River. and Duke filed a lawsuit against property appraiser Geoffrey Greene over assessment of pollution control equipment installed in 2009. Greene said he had assessed the equipment at 60percent of its cost, while the company wanted it assessed at salvage value, 10percent. But with that issue still fresh, Alex Glenn, the companys Florida president, sent local officials a letter stating its 2013 property taxes will be the same or less than it paid for 2012. Glenn also warned if company decided to permanently shelve the nuclear plant, the tax payment could cut another $6million to $9million. In March, the county agreed to put $350,000 into the issue, with money going for legal fees and costs associated with the Duke appraisal. By then, the county and the school board had already put about $175,000 each into the tax dispute. Subsequently, the judge handling the case denied Citrus County government and the school board from joining the suit on Greenes behalf. As county budget season started in June, Greene presented a worst-case scenario to give county officials a realistic revenue outlook since Duke represented 24percent of the countys taxable property. Outside appraisers brought in to assist the county concluded Duke had significantly undervalued its tangible property at the energy complex. A hearing on the disputes was set for early September. Greenes case had a setback in November when a judge ruled the appraiser could not challenge a state law that allows Duke to treat $1.3billion worth of pollution-control equipment as salvage. Circuit Court Judge T. Michael Johnson also said a 1967 state law clearly allows power companies to assess pollution-control equipment as salvage, which drops its taxable value by about $900million. At that point, Greene said he would ask the judge to direct both parties into mediation. Greene said a recent full appraisal of the Duke property showed about $1.3billion in unreported or under reported assets. Greene said his attorneys will ask Johnson to set the 2012 and 2013 values based on the newer report. Greene also said his consultants are re-evaluating the Duke property to remove the salvage equipments full value. By that time the property appraisers office had spent about $471,000 in legal fees defending the Duke lawsuit. Also in November, as expected, Duke filed a legal challenge to the property tax assessment of the Crystal River Energy Complex for the 2013 tax year. The company also filed a second lawsuit appealing the assessment of 75 parcels of Duke Energy property in Citrus County outside the energy complex. Earlier that week, Duke had made a good-faith payment of $22.3million on its 2013 property taxes, which is about $37.5million less than county officials say the company owes. The lawsuit for 2012 is expected to take place in Orlando in May and last 12 to 15 days. PATFAHERTY Staff writerIn the wake of its tax dispute with Citrus County, retiring the Crystal River area nuclear plant and dropping the proposed Levy County nuclear plant, Duke Energy has taken some steps to benefit the local economy. In September Duke announced plans to build a natural gas generation plant in Citrus County, an option that has been discussed since February. Using a self-build option, the company responded to its own request for proposals. There were seven responses, which are still being evaluated. A short list is expected to be released in March. The plant will supply approximately 1,640mega watts, compared to the 860megawatts of the Crystal River nuclear plant, and is expected to be operational in 2018. The gas plant would cost an estimated $1.24 billion and would create approximately 60 full-time jobs in addition to construction work. While that process moves forward, a 24-inch, 24-mile natural gas pipeline has been proposed to run from Marion County, across Citrus, terminating near the Crystal River Energy Complex in northwest Citrus County. It is part of the proposed Sabal Trail project, a 474mile, 36-inch diameter pipeline to bring natural gas from Alabama into Central Florida. In August, the Duke Energy Foundation announced that it would contribute almost half a million dollars to the Economic Development Council, Chamber of Commerce and CLM Workforce Development Board. The EDC would get $444,000 to support a three-year initiative to develop and implement a five-year plan to retain and expand businesses in Citrus County. The chamber would get $50,000 to promote tourism as a major economic engine. Workforce would receive $10,000 to offer professional development and training opportunities. In September, Alex Glenn, president of Duke Energy Florida, presented a check for $50,000 to the Kings Bay Rotary Charitable Foundation to help with the continuing Kings Bay cleanup. In October, Duke Energy Florida gave $100,000 grants to both the College of Central Florida and Withlacoochee Technical Institute for programs teaching high-demand job skills. Earlier in the year, the Duke Energy Foundation announced it would contribute $20,000 to the Citrus County Education Foundation. The grant was to fund continued instruction in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) courses and provide transition assistance for students seeking to enter theworkforce.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A7 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000GSMO 000GQMF Dukes economic offense Year inREVIEW DUKEContinued from Page A1 signs of moving on, rather than attempting to fix CR3. Financial analysts suggested it was unlikely Duke would repair the plant. And an independent review estimated the cost to repair CR3 at approximately $1.49billion, with a worst-case scenario of $3.43 billion with a 96month schedule. On Feb.5, Duke announced it would retire CR3 and was reviewing alternatives to replace the lost power. At the time, CR3 had approximately 600 full-time employees, 200 long-term contract workers and another 400 short-term contract workers. And customers had invested about $1.3billion in CR3 through the states advanced nuclear funding provision.Workers affectedThe first of layoffs related to CR3 was announced April1. As of June, Duke reported 97 employees were leaving the company and approximately 350 employees had been identified to remain onsite to work on the transition toward decommissioning. Over time, that number shrink. Nearly 200 employees were redeployed to other positions with Duke or had job offers pending with the company. By November, the onsite workforce was down to about 300 workers, a number that Duke acknowledged will become smaller over time. Early this month, Duke submitted its decommissioning plan for CR3 to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The estimated decommissioning cost is $1.18billion and the selected option is expected to be completed in 2074. Duke is responsible for about 98percent of costs and has maintained a designated trust fund. Currently, no additional charges will be required from Florida customers to supplement the trust fund, though it is subject to annual review. About 275 employees remain at the plant in addition to security personnel. Additional contract workers will be brought in as needed. Throughout the decommissioning process, plant management and staffing levels will adjust to reflect the transition. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. PLANTContinued from Page A1 For theRECORD

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A8TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GZM6

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,600 1,680 1,760 1,840 1,920 D JASON 1,760 1,820 1,880 S&P 500Close: 1,841.07 Change: -0.33 (flat) 10 DAYS 14,500 15,000 15,500 16,000 16,500 17,000 D JASON 15,720 16,140 16,560 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 16,504.29 Change: 25.88 (0.2%) 10 DAYSAdvanced1524 Declined1571 New Highs188 New Lows54 Vol. (in mil.)2,237 Pvs. Volume2,011 1,317 1,217 1222 1345 157 13 NYSE NASD DOW 16504.3516476.8716504.29+25.88+0.16%+25.95% DOW Trans.7364.357335.177351.20-0.88-0.01%+38.52% DOW Util.490.09487.51489.28+1.34+0.27%+7.99% NYSE Comp.10361.3710344.2810357.84+4.61+0.04%+22.67% NASDAQ4158.734142.184154.20-2.39-0.06%+37.58% S&P5001842.471838.771841.07-0.33-0.02%+29.09% S&P4001339.961334.921338.21+1.91+0.14%+31.14% Wilshire 500019633.9819594.7819623.46-0.16...%+30.87% Russell 20001162.601158.851160.59-0.39-0.04%+36.64% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7608.13 8.18+.06 +0.7sss+77.8+85.4dd... AT&T Inc T32.76439.00 35.20+.02 +0.1sss+4.4+9.9261.84f Ametek Inc AME36.86762.05 52.52+.07 +0.1sss+39.8+41.2270.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD83.940106.60 105.36-.68 -0.6tss+20.5+23.53.03e Bank of America BAC10.98015.98 15.54-.13 -0.8tts+33.9+36.9210.04 Capital City Bank CCBG10.12713.08 11.90-.06 -0.5tts+4.7+5.940... CenturyLink Inc CTL29.93242.01 31.96-.05 -0.2tss-18.3-12.3dd2.16 Citigroup C38.65953.68 51.92-.34 -0.7tts+31.2+33.2130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH15.43826.38 23.31-.04 -0.2tts+47.2+54.5cc1.00 Disney DIS48.80074.78 76.23+1.88 +2.5sss+53.1+51.8220.86f Duke Energy DUK62.60675.46 69.11+.16 +0.2sts+8.3+13.1203.12 EPR Properties EPR45.00361.18 49.57-.10 -0.2tts+7.5+14.1203.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.700101.74 100.31-1.20 -1.2tss+15.9+19.7112.52 Ford Motor F12.10618.02 15.28-.02 -0.1ttt+18.0+23.0120.40 Gen Electric GE20.26027.96 27.89+.06 +0.2sss+32.9+38.3210.88f HCAHoldings Inc HCA29.86949.52 47.19+.72 +1.5sss+56.4+51.9152.00e Hlth Mgmt Asc HMA8.76617.28 13.09+.04 +0.3sts+40.5+44.8cc... Home Depot HD60.33082.27 81.94+.30 +0.4sss+32.5+36.2221.56 Intel Corp INTC20.10025.98 25.85+.25 +1.0sss+25.4+29.2140.90 IBM IBM172.574215.90 186.41+1.33 +0.7sss-2.7-2.0133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ20.09934.32 32.46-.16 -0.5tts+53.8+55.233... Lowes Cos LOW34.43952.08 49.25+.42 +0.9sss+38.7+40.9230.72 McDonalds Corp MCD86.817103.70 97.01+.10 +0.1sss+10.0+12.7183.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.28938.98 37.29... ...rts+39.6+41.9141.12 Motorola Solutions MSI53.28067.61 67.25-.08 -0.1tss+20.8+24.8171.24 NextEra Energy NEE67.75889.75 85.05+.35 +0.4sss+22.9+26.2192.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP6.24223.10 9.00-.01 -0.1tts-54.3-53.8dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62421.09 16.77+.04 +0.2sst-7.1-3.1300.80 Regions Fncl RF6.88910.52 9.84+.01 +0.1sss+38.0+42.1120.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.88467.50 47.70+1.54 +3.3stt+15.3+17.5dd... Smucker, JM SJM84.577114.72 103.65+.47 +0.5stt+20.2+23.2202.32 Texas Instru TXN30.30043.83 43.90+.23 +0.5sss+42.1+45.5291.20 Time Warner TWX46.73070.77 69.67+.03 ...rss+45.7+49.3171.15 UniFirst Corp UNF72.410108.27 106.75+.16 +0.2sss+45.6+46.3180.15 Verizon Comm VZ41.50654.31 49.15-.02 ...rts+13.6+17.9692.12 Vodafone Group VOD24.42039.29 39.01-.24 -0.6tss+54.9+61.91.61e WalMart Strs WMT67.37981.37 78.63+.16 +0.2sts+15.2+17.8151.88 Walgreen Co WAG36.34960.93 57.84+.41 +0.7sts+56.3+60.4201.26 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposed reducing reimbursements for the diagnostic service by roughly 49 percent. Retail sales for the brand have jumped 15 percent through November and the carmaker expects to remain North Americas top seller. The tire maker called off its sale to Indias Apollo Tyres, unraveling a $2.2 billion deal announced just over six months ago. Frozen was No. 2 at the box office, earning $28.9 million last weekend and $248.4 million domestically after six weeks. After hitting record highs Thursday, the micro-blogging site has plunged, giving up $7 billion in market capitalization. Stock indexes were little changed Monday, cruising toward a quiet end to what has been a boisterous year. Barring a big drop on Tuesday, the Standard & Poors 500 index is set to record its best annual performance since a 31 percent surge in 1997. 20 40 60 $80 OD N TwitterTWTR Close: $60.51 -3.24 or -5.1% $38.80$74.73 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 55.1m (4.9x avg.) $32.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 60 70 $80 OD N Walt DisneyDIS Close: $76.23 1.88 or 2.5% $48.80$76.54 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 8.5m (1.3x avg.) $133.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 22.6 1.1% 20 25 30 $35 OD N Cooper Tire & RubberCTB Close: $24.20 1.24 or 5.4% $20.55$34.80 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 6.5m (3.3x avg.) $1.58 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 6.5 1.7% 15 16 17 $18 OD N Ford MotorF Close: $15.28 -0.02 or -0.1% $12.10$18.02 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 32.8m (0.8x avg.) $59.19 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.8 2.6% 20 25 30 $35 OD N Myriad GeneticsMYGN Close: $20.79 -3.35 or -13.9% $20.02$38.27 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 10.6m (4.2x avg.) $1.55 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.0 ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.97 percent Monday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.060.06....01 6-month T-bill.090.08+0.01.09 52-wk T-bill.110.11....13 2-year T-note.380.40-0.02.25 5-year T-note1.711.74-0.03.71 10-year T-note2.973.00-0.031.70 30-year T-bond3.903.94-0.042.87 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.713.75-0.042.48 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.135.14-0.014.10 Barclays USAggregate2.502.50...1.73 Barclays US High Yield5.675.66+0.016.10 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.574.59-0.023.62 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.881.89-0.01.97 Barclays US Corp3.283.28...2.68 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil fell for the first time in four days, dropping back below $100 per barrel. Gold also fell, as the precious metal closes out its first down year since 2000.Crude Oil (bbl)99.29100.32-1.03+8.1 Ethanol (gal)1.941.96-0.36-11.6 Heating Oil (gal)3.083.12-1.50+1.1 Natural Gas (mm btu)4.434.41+1.34+32.1 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.792.82-1.01-0.9 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1203.101216.10-0.90-28.2 Silver (oz) 19.5820.01-2.16-35.1 Platinum (oz)1364.001376.00-0.87-11.4 Copper (lb) 3.423.47+0.01-6.1 Palladium (oz)709.90711.05-0.16+1.0 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.341.34+0.41+3.5 Coffee (lb) 1.151.16-1.42-20.2 Corn (bu) 4.244.28-0.94-39.4 Cotton (lb) 0.850.84+0.64+12.7 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)365.20368.30-0.84-2.3 Orange Juice (lb)1.381.37+1.10+19.1 Soybeans (bu)13.2813.32-0.24-6.4 Wheat (bu) 6.016.09-1.40-22.8 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 24.36+.02 +21.4+22.6+13.0+14.7 CapIncBuAm 58.48+.11 +14.8+15.5+9.7+11.7 CpWldGrIAm 45.24+.07 +24.6+25.9+11.2+14.4 EurPacGrAm 49.03+.14 +20.1+21.1+7.4+13.5 FnInvAm 51.77-.01 +31.0+33.0+14.6+18.3 GrthAmAm 42.81... +33.2+35.4+15.2+18.4 IncAmerAm 20.63+.03 +18.1+19.1+11.8+14.4 InvCoAmAm 36.59... +32.0+33.9+14.5+16.3 NewPerspAm 37.45+.05 +26.4+28.0+12.2+17.0 WAMutInvAm 39.28-.02 +31.4+33.2+16.6+16.7 Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.97+.13 +26.1+27.6+8.8+16.7 Stock 168.11-.05 +39.9+42.3+17.9+19.8 Fidelity Contra 95.66-.08 +33.5+35.8+15.7+18.9 LowPriStk d 49.39+.13 +34.1+35.9+16.7+22.1 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 65.22-.01 +31.8+34.0+16.0+18.1 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.42... +14.2+14.7+10.1+15.6 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 13.11... +2.0+2.4+4.9+9.1 GlBondAdv 13.06-.01 +2.2+2.6+5.2+9.3 Harbor IntlInstl 70.89+.25 +16.6+18.0+7.8+14.3 Oakmark Intl I 26.34+.05 +29.4+30.4+12.9+21.1 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 32.76+.01 +29.4+31.4+14.6+17.2 GrowStk 52.27-.01 +38.4+41.2+17.6+22.5 Vanguard 500Adml 169.68-.02 +31.8+34.0+16.0+18.2 500Inv 169.68-.02 +31.6+33.9+15.8+18.0 MuIntAdml 13.71... -1.6-1.5+4.5+5.2 PrmcpAdml 95.46+.12 +39.5+41.4+16.5+19.5 STGradeAd 10.71+.01 +1.2+1.2+2.6+5.4 Tgtet2025 15.72+.02 +17.9+19.1+10.1+13.9 TotBdAdml 10.58+.02 -2.0-2.1+3.3+4.4 TotIntl 16.71+.08 +14.8+15.9+5.2+12.2 TotStIAdm 46.50... +33.0+35.3+16.0+19.2 TotStIdx 46.49+.01 +32.8+35.1+15.9+19.0 Welltn 37.89+.03 +19.5+20.4+11.9+13.8 WelltnAdm 65.44+.06 +19.6+20.5+12.0+13.9 WndsIIAdm 64.92-.01 +30.2+32.1+16.1+17.4 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates Associated PressNEW YORK The stock market ended a quiet Monday mostly where it began as investors shut their books for what has been an extraordinary year on Wall Street. Traders had little corporate or economic news to work through. The bond market was quiet as well. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note continued to hover near 3 percent. The Dow Jones industrial average moved less than 30 points the entire day, the narrowest range for the index since February 2007. Approximately 2.3 billion shares changed hands on the New York Stock Exchange, 40 percent less than average. The Dow ended the day up 25.88 points, or 0.2 percent, to 16,504.29. The very narrow range reflects that theres not a lot of news out there and a lot of investors positions are closed for the year, said Alec Young, chief global strategist with S&P Capital IQ. The Standard & Poors 500 index fell less than a point to 1,841.07 and the technology-heavy Nasdaq composite fell 2.39 points, or 0.1 percent, to 4,154.20. Walt Disney rose $1.88, or 3 percent, to $76.23, the most in the S&P 500. Analysts at Guggenhiem Securities upgraded Disneys stock to a buy from a hold on Friday. With just one trading day left in the year, 2013 is looking to be a memorable one for investors. The S&P 500 is up 29.1 percent so far, on pace for its best year since 1997. The Dow is up 26 percent, the most since 1996. With 2013 in the books, investors have turned their attention to the beginning of 2014. Few expect next year to be as good to investors as 2013 was. After a year like this, people start to think a 30 percent-plus year is normal, said Ron Florance, deputy chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank. We need to be realistic going into next year. The next big piece of news investors will have to work through will be the December jobs report, which will be released Jan. 10. There is also corporate earnings season, which will start in the second half of January. Corporate earnings will be important, particularly since this upcoming season will encompass the closely watched holiday shopping period. The market is rallying on the idea that economic growth is picking up globally and in the U.S., so investors need to see those expectations matched, Young said. Bond yields continue to tread water around the 3 percent level. The yield on the U.S. 10-year note fell to 2.98 percent Monday from 3 percent Friday. The market is expected to be a holding pattern until next week, once all the mid-week holiday disruptions are over, Florance said. Little movement seen in end-of-year trading BusinessBRIEFS Signed contracts to buy US homes level offThe number of Americans who signed contracts to buy existing homes in November was essentially unchanged from October, suggesting sales are stabilizing after several months of declines. The National Association of Realtors said Monday that its seasonally adjusted pending home sales index ticked up to 101.7 from 101.5 in October. The October figure was revised lower from an initial reading of 102.1. Higher mortgage rates and strong price gains over the past two years have slowed sales. The pending home sales index had fallen for five straight months before November. And completed sales of existing homes fell for three straight months, the Realtors said earlier this month.Sales of Ford brand vehicles to top 2.4M in 2013Ford said 2013 North American sales of cars and trucks bearing its namesake brand will top 2.4 million, making Ford again the topselling U.S. brand over Toyota. The automaker said it will sell more than 600,000 passenger cars this year, the most since 2000, with the strongest demand coming from the West and Southeast. Ford said it has seen double-digit sales growth across all segments cars, trucks and utility vehicles. Growth has been led by demand for the Ford Fiesta small car, Ford Fusion midsize sedan, C-Max hybrid and the Ford Escape SUV.Cooper Tire ends buyout agreement with ApolloCooper Tire & Rubber Co. is calling off its sale to Indias Apollo Tyres, unraveling a $2.2 billion deal announced just over six months ago. Cooper said financing is no longer available and it continues to claim, as it has for months, that Apollo breached the terms of the agreement. Apollo said after the announcement Monday, which it called disappointing, that it may pursue legal remedies.Hertz adopts poison pill measure ...PARK RIDGE, N.J. Rental car company Hertz said Monday that it has adopted a oneyear shareholder rights plan because of unusual and substantial activity it its shares. Shares of Hertz Global Holdings Inc. rose 16 cents to close at $25.91 on Monday, and gained 89 cents, or 3.4 percent, to $26.80 in aftermarket trading. The stock has risen 59 percent this year. Hertz said the plan, often referred to as a poison pill, will take effect if a person or group acquires a 10 percent stake in the company, or if a passive institutional investor acquired a 15 percent stake. Such moves allow existing shareholders to acquire more stock at a discounted rate and are typically used to discourage a hostile takeover. They are designed to thwart anyone who buys a big chunk of its stock without board approval. Hertz said that the plan was not adopted in response to a specific takeover bid or proposal to acquire control of the company. The Park Ridge, N.J., company would not comment further on the move. Its largest shareholder is investment firm Wellington Management. As of Sept. 30, Wellington owned a 9.2 percent stake, according to FactSet.... While Netflix ends poison pill 2 years earlyLOS GATOS, Calif. Netflix said its ending a move meant to help ward off hostile takeovers almost two years early. The online video company adopted the shareholder rights plan, also known as a poison pill, in November 2012 after activist investor Carl Icahn disclosed a stake of almost 10 percent in the company. The poison pill was scheduled to expire in November 2015, but the company terminated it effective Monday. According to FactSet, Icahn now owns a 4.5 percent stake in Netflix Inc. Netflix stock fell 51 cents to close at $366.99 on Monday. The Los Gatos, Calif.based companys shares have nearly quadrupled in value this year.Cracker Barrel says it wont sell to Sardar BiglariLEBANON, Tenn. Cracker Barrel says it wont consider selling itself, rejecting a push from its biggest shareholder. The company said Monday that it will continue pursuing its own business strategies. Last week shareholder Sardar Biglari said he was willing to make a bid for the company and urged it to consider selling itself. Biglari, through his investment firm Biglari Holdings, owns nearly 20 percent of Cracker Barrel Old Country Store Inc.s shares. He has tried and failed multiple times to win a seat on the board. Shareholders also recently rejected his proposal for a $20-per-share special dividend. Shares of Cracker Barrel lost $1.06 to $110.20 on Monday. The stock is up 72 percent in 2013.Warren Buffetts firm acquiring Phillips 66 unitOMAHA, Neb. Warren Buffetts company has agreed to trade roughly $1.4 billion of its stock in Phillips 66 for one of the refiners chemical businesses. Houston-based Phillips 66 said Monday that Berkshire Hathaway will give up about 19 million of its 27.2 million Phillips 66 shares to acquire a business that makes additives that help crude oil flow through pipelines. The exact number of shares will be determined by the price of the Houston-based companys stock when the deal closes. Thats expected to happen in the first half of 2014. Buffett said the business Berkshire is acquiring delivers consistently strong financial performance. He said Berkshires Ohio-based specialty chemical maker, Lubrizol, will oversee the units strategic direction. Phillips 66s stock closed at $74.72 on Monday.NY court monitor: Apple obstructing antitrust workNEW YORK A Washington lawyer monitoring Apple Inc. after a New York judges antitrust finding says the company is obstructing his work. Attorney Michael Bromwich said in a document filed Monday in Manhattan federal court that hes been largely cut off from top executives at Apple. He said he was told by an Apple director after his mid-October appointment that executives would never get over the case and that they were extremely angry. A judge said in August that Apple had conspired to raise electronic book prices. Apple has complained that the monitors work will cause a loss of market share growth and interfere with developing and marketing new products. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment Monday.Holiday shutdown unsettles coal mine workersFARMERSVILLE, Ill. The shutdown of a coal mine just days before Christmas has left nearly 200 workers in central Illinois out of work. The Crown III mine just south of Springfield closed on December 20. Its operators had warned of the closure in October, because a major customer, Archer Daniels Midland Company, didnt renew a contract. But the workers learned only days earlier that they wouldnt receive an extension of basic health insurance as they had hoped. Theyre now scrambling to replace jobs that often paid more than $60,000 a year in a state with one of the nations highest unemployment rates. United Mine Workers of America officials said the closure was as confusing as a tornado. The mines owner, Springfield Coal Co., didnt return messages seeking comment. From wire reports

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OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 An open door to terroristsI hope the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners attempt to make a wise decision regarding the proposed sale of the Citrus County Detention Center to any private enterprise. There is a probability of serious consequences. If the detention center is owned by a private commercial prison corporation, Citrus County loses any and all control of the use of the facility. It must first be understood that the facility is a minimumsecurity facility for the purpose of housing criminals who are not a high risk. High-risk inmates are housed in state or federal prisons, where some of those prisons are designed as maximum-security prisons. The Citrus County Detention Facility is not designed for that type of inmate. If the facility is privately owned, the new owner can contract with any government law enforcement organization to house their prisoners. This will occur for sure since the private corporation operating the detention facility is in the business to make a profit. The use of the prison facilities will go to the bidder who offers the most monies to house inmates they are responsible for. A possible and most probable scenario would be: The federal government has detained an individual or individuals who are alleged to have conspired to perform a terrorist act in the U.S. They need to be housed and hidden somewhere prior to going to trial. So the feds determine that a nondescript location would be Citrus County. This time period could be within a year or two. There is no doubt that the location where these alleged terrorists are being held will not be kept secret for very long. The terrorist organization that these folks are associated with will either want to free them, or more likely, take revenge on those who are housing these wonderful folks. Citrus County is now open to some form of attack by this terrorist group. A private corporation owning and operating a detention can and will contract with anyone in order to make the big bucks. All I can do is hope that the BOCC is intelligent enough not to follow through on the sale of the detention facility, if for no other reason than to keep our county out of the international spotlight and take the safety of our citizens into account. I am sure that the county budget is on their minds, but selling the county jail is not the way to resolve that issue.Dan Groner LecantoOversight of NSA lacking Usually, I do not agree with Cal Thomas columns, but his piece on 2013 being the year of Big Brother found me nodding my head in concurrence. While I have previously written of my objections to the Patriot Act and other government actions that give NSA (and others) seemingly free rein, growing concern that the Fourth Amendment is not being trampled isnt assuaged with the responses of government officials, especially the president. There must be real constraints placed on these programs. He knows this. So does Congress, who is also remiss in effective oversight of this activity. Judge Richard Leon is perfectly right in his recent opinion about its constitutionality, but it will be the Supreme Court who will ultimately decide. Their decision will become the presidents legacy. Wayne Logsdon Hernando We live with artificial boundaries in space and time. The Danube pays no mind to borders; it runs through 10 countries, while the Amazon runs through six and the Nile through five. The 20th century arguably didnt begin until 1914 and plausibly can be thought of having ended in 1989. Then again, the 19th century probably began shortly before noon on July 14, 1789, and ended shortly before 11 a.m. on July 28, 1914, while the 16th century may have lasted from 1450 to 1640. Which is why its possible to argue that 2013 wont end today. Its almost certainly going to extend into January and beyond. This is no parlor trick, though it bears a strong resemblance to one. But if you stretch the definition of a year from a line of 365 days (or, every four years, 366) into an arc of events, then you will see that the tributaries of politics and the rivers of history do not confine themselves to the neat contrivances of the calendar, nor to the enduring rhythms of the Earths passage around the sun. The year 2013 wasnt so great that any of us is eager to extend it, but in truth the struggles set in motion in this year will not be resolved by tonight, and the questions prompted throughout this year will not be answered by the time the Duke-Texas A&M game in Atlantas Georgia Dome is completed. Theyll press on, through the national college football championship game a week later and beyond. There are two predominant reasons. This is the first year of a two-year Congress and many of the pieces of legislation begun this year will, as a matter of course that has happened 112 times in the past, slop over to the new year. This is thoroughly unremarkable. So, too, is the notion that larger movements in politics the slide to the right of the Republicans and to the left of the Democrats, for example, and the tug-of-war between those who want to expand government and those who want to constrain it do not respect the changing of the calendar. They are the mainstreams of history and they flow on. This years budget negotiations and the series of short-term agreements underlined both the tensions in our current politics and the limits of our political system. On the surface, these discussions were about this program and that, about this tax and that entitlement, and also about the level of military spending. These issues come and go (though the tax and entitlement questions will come and go with increasing frequency as the decade wears on and demographic factors bear down), but they are proxies for a far bigger issue. They are part of a classic confrontation between those who have an expansive view of the virtue and value of state spending and those who believe a vigorous, activist state is an intrusion on the natural order and a departure from our national character. We have had these debates before. This very conversation raged near the start of the last century, and the Progressives won. It raged after the onset of the Great Depression, and the New Dealers won. It raged after the end of the Eisenhower years, and the New FrontierGreat Society visionaries and dreamers won. It raged again during the Jimmy Carter administration, and the Reaganites won. These acolytes of Ronald Reagan held sway for about a generation, for in another example of how events conspire to defy the usual borders, it is quite possible to argue that Reaganite views controlled Washington, even the Carter White House, in the last two years of the Georgians presidency, seeped into the Bill Clinton years and prevailed through the first six years of the George W. Bush years. Then the Reagan impulse petered out. It remained part of the catechism of conservatism, of course, but was unrequited. The last years of the Bush 43 administration bore a great resemblance, if not precisely in the level of spending and in the size of the deficit then surely in the philosophy of governance, to the early years of the Obama administration. Members of the Bush and Obama administrations will deny this emphatically, but a quarter century from now you will see that historians will agree with me and not with them. There are other great unresolveds. One is the definition of our parties, both philosophically and geographically. The Democratic Solid South has been replaced by a Republican version, and the parties no longer have conservative and liberal wings. We now have a liberal party and a conservative party. The question remains whether a system so constituted but surely not so designed can long endure. Another of the great unresolveds is whether health care is a national right to be enforced by Washington, much the way free access to the ballot box and equal protection of the laws the one unresolved a half century ago, the other a century and a half ago are now beyond debate. One side believes fervently that it is, and that the march of history will lead us to a national concurrence, the way Medicare went from controversial to consensual. The other believes just as fervently that Obamacare is a dangerous departure from the American system, a restriction of freedom at odds with our history. These two vantage points seem incompatible, but then again so did the two titanic forces the Roosevelt insistence that the New Deal was an inevitable extension of historical forces and the conservative argument that it threatened the American character that went to battle during the Great Depression. It is interesting to note that as early as May 7, 1933, well before the end of his first Hundred Days, FDR was arguing that the country was facing a crisis that required a practical rather than a philosophical response. That situation in that crisis did not call for any complicated consideration of economic panaceas or fancy plans, he said in his second Fireside Chat. We were faced by a condition and not a theory. The greatest unresolved of them all: Is our situation at the end of 2013 the result of a condition or a theory? On that rests everything else.David M. Shribman is executive editor of the Post-Gazette (dshribman@post-gazette.com, 412-263-1890). Follow him on Twitter at ShribmanPG. The pessismist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.William Arthur Ward, 1921-1994 An era ends, an era begins CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief ITS CLEARLY WORKING Kings Bay efforts have clean record One Rake at a Time is 100,000 steps closer in its efforts to clean up Kings Bay and rid it of the scourge of Lyngbya, thanks to a grant awarded by the Department of Environmental Protection. It was recently announced that $100,000 is now flowing through the city of Crystal River and the work will continue to aid in the Cedar Cove restoration project that was started this past summer. Work hand-raking Lyngbya will continue until June 2014, or until the money is exhausted, according to the terms of the grant. Lyngbya, a freshwater and saltwater algae, can grow into thick mats that clog the spring vents of Kings Bay and reduce water flow. It can destroy healthy native grasses that serve as a food supply and shelter for native animals and can be toxic to manatees who eat it because of the lack of food (native grasses) in Kings Bay. Loss of oxygen in the water due to Lyngbya overgrowth reduces abundance of native animals, affecting both recreational and commercial fishing as well as ecosystem biodiversity. In an effort to help stem the tide of Lyngbya, Southwest Florida Water Management District officials have identified good beneficial growth areas where the Lyngbya was removed this spring. Metal cages are being designed to protect the eel grass beds from being over-grazed by the manatees. Planting will begin in spring of 2014 and be monitored and maintained to study the increases in fish habitat, water clarity and quality. This is a promising program and builds off what others are doing to restore the Kings Bay area waters. Its an exciting prospect if it works out and replanted eelgrass can take hold and flourish in the bay. It could help eradicate the Lyngbya in the area and provide a healthier habitat for man and manatee alike. But more importantly, it is just one more example of how one group of volunteers, and enthusiasts, can come together and affect real change in their community. THE ISSUE:Eel grass planting.OUR OPINION:Water projects to build on each others successes. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com Commercialization not always a bad thingMr. Editor, would you do me a favor and explain to the general public and I mean especially the adults if we didnt celebrate the holidays, Christmas, New Years, Easter, Valentines Day, where would the businesspeople be? How much would we buy? And then where would the government get its taxes from? Put that in the paper and wake some of these people up.Keep those car headlights on at nightI cant express enough how important it is for people to put their headlights on in the dark. Its 6:11 on a Tuesday evening, pitch black, and a dark SUV is coming down (U.S.) 19, going south, with no lights on at all. Thanks for returned walletMy daughter and grandson was visiting me from Maryland and I hurt myself on a treadmill and my daughter went to Walmart and bought a lot of things bandages and tape and stuff and came on home and helped me. And her husband had called to say, Where is your wallet? And she said, I guess I had it here, and he says, No, you dont. Someone from Walmart returned the wallet and they called her husband and then her husband called her. And we would just like to thank that person and we are very, very grateful because she had a lot of credit cards and just everything in there and money and so forth. Get thee to a punneryThat Foundation: Beaty stays, in the paper, in the Chronicle today (Dec. 18), ended with at loggerheads. It should have ended with lawyer heads.Keep critters out of coldOK, people, its that time of year again. Its cold out there and if I see your animal being unattended in this cold weather, I will be calling Animal Control. I speak to them on a weekly basis regarding animals and so far every call that I have placed has been a correct call. You people that have animals, they need homes. Its cold out there. The frost is cold and it stays cold all night long So wise up, get smart and get your dog in the house or youll be facing the Animal Control people. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE David ShribmanOTHER VOICES United Way of Citrus County needs your help to reach its annual fundraising goal. If you can, please send a contribution to the United Way of Citrus County, c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. LETTERSto the Editor

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Not helping the publicTuesdays paper (Dec. 17) about the man writing in about the medical marijuana the fact that Pam Bondi, which she, Pam Bondi, along with Charlie Dean and Jimmie T. Smith, are all in it together: Theyre not trying to help the public at all.Lazy deliveryIm calling the Sound Off in reference to the Fortunate for mail delivery person. I, too, am on the same matter of this person that complained about getting his mail at 4 or 4:30. I also receive my mail after 4:30 and its not one person. When I called the post office, they have two drivers two. They have two male drivers doing the one route, two in the place of one. So you mean to tell me that lady did it all by herself but they need two employees to cover the one? That sounds like laziness to me.Whats the lottery take?I would like to see in black and white from the state of Florida, all the money thats taken in from lottery, how much is paid out to Lotto and how much that remains all goes to schools, to see where all the moneys going. Its very simple. Id like to see their books, black and white. Print it in the newspaper; intake and outtake, period. Will you print it?Editors note: Youd think this would be easy, wouldnt you? Well, think again. It was easy to find the education payout: $1.41 billion in 2012-13, and $26 billion to education over the life of the lottery. We, however, could not find a total payout to lottery winners. If someone knows that, please call it in and cite the source.Dont ignore POW causeThis thank you is to all the Chamber of Commerce members at the mixer Dec. 19 at the Crystal River Mall who signed the petition to free our one American POW, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, still held in an Afghani prison since 2009. This is also to thank the other people that I have gotten in contact with who have signed the petition as well. The Chronicle story on Nov. 29 is the only news item local news media have carried. He did escape for three days in December 2011 but (was) recaptured and, for sure, tortured a lot more. Secretary of State John Kerry needs to stop giving back other countries spies and terrorists; he is doing very little to bring Bowe home alive. Go on Facebook, Bring Bowe Bergdahl Home, to learn more.Whats with the dog?Could somebody explain to me the deputy dog truck? Ive lived in Citrus County since 1970 and have never seen one before. Very interesting. I was behind one coming home from work and I saw the dog. They had the dog out and on the leash running in and out of different properties and one man was on a roller-scooter, like. Whats the purpose of the dog? Were they looking for someone? Its every interesting. Id like to know what it is.Grown-up supervision neededIts about time both sides of the hospital boards start acting as adults. HCA has offered a substantial amount of money to bail this hospital out so the citizens still have medical care without going out of county and all the employees can still enjoy working where they have continued to stay during this battle. What makes these boards think they have the right to demand anything? They have not managed it properly for years. The lawsuits are of no concern to HCA and should not have anything to do with the lease. Mr. Grant and Mr. Stillwell should not jeopardize this lease. The citizens deserve better than a bunch of adults acting like children fighting on a playground.Beautiful performanceAs a Christmas treat, my parents took me to the Yuletide Tapestry program presented by the Nature Coast Community Band on Sunday (Dec. 15) at Cornerstone Baptist Church and it was simply marvelous. The band was amazing so talented and professional. The singers voices were beautiful, both the soloists and the singers in the band itself. The narrator almost stole the show with her lovely British accent telling the history of the songs being played and sung. Her jokes were especially delightful. What a sense of humor. Carols very funny! Such a wonderful performance by the NCCB made for a very special Christmastime afternoon spent with my parents, a memory that I will always treasure. Hiaasen a racistIt amazes me how Carl Hiaasen can make racial slurs against white people with such impunity. Carl Hiaasens column on Dec. 15 about Gov. Scotts crusade to shrink the vote states that Scotts primary supporters are cranky, middle-aged white people. Apparently we have come to a point in this country where whites can be classified as cranky by this sophomoric journalist with no protest. This attack on whites is not only racist and a prime example of stereotyping, it is shameful and outrageous. Why is it now somehow acceptable to label any voting bloc as cranky or any other derogatory term? In my opinion, Hiaasen would not have made my high school debating team, not for the content of his thought, but for his racist, mean-spirited, hateful mindset. It would seem that attacking the merits of white people has become an acceptable phenomenon. I realize, of course, that if this letter appears in the Chronicle, I will be labeled a cranky, middle-aged white guy. Regardless of the merits of Mr. Hiaasens journalistic efforts, I would expect his columns to exclude unacceptable verbiage regarding any group of people. It may well be he has simply become entrapped in the pervasive mind set that permeates the country regarding the perception of whites, but he and those like him must pull themselves out of it before it consumes them and they lose what credibility they have left. If Mr. Hiaasen still thinks that it is hip or somehow in vogue to make such classifications of folks, he is sadly mistaken and should be taken to task. Racism, slurs and generic profiling are not acceptable from any source, especially from those who are expected to shape debate, not create division. A written apology is in order to all those he has offended. Robert E. Marino Citrus SpringsWhats fair?Regarding the letter from Organizing for Citrus, there are so many untrue statements, and others that just defy logic. Addressing them in order of how they appear, here is the assessment of a man who spent 40 years in a union, worked in the defense industry and served his country willingly. Labor unions are not hated by the Republicans; they support laws that do not give unfair advantage to unions. The Democrats always are squealing about fair, but only when it is those that oppose their agenda. Notice that the unions were the first ones waivered from Obamacare, and GM and Chrysler were bailed out and ownership given to the UAW while the private investor lost his share. Amnesty for those who have broken a law by crossing our border? When does violation of the laws of this country get rewarded? Should I not then be able to defraud the government of tax dollars? By the securing of our borders, which are tremendously porous, we may just prevent a nuclear device from being smuggled in. Paying taxes should be an obligation of every citizen, not just those who are successful. Study the habits of the rich and you will find out the work long hours and forsake many things. Many are business owners who create jobs. Maybe it should be the law that only those who pay property or income tax are eligible to vote? That would be fair to those that contribute. Welfare and food stamps should be used for temporary situations; they should not be a way of life. Nowhere have I seen where any Republican wants to end Social Security; instead, the fairness equation plays a part in this. If most people who work their entire lives would get back the money they paid in plus interest, they would be able to retire in comfort. The Social Security fund has been drained, given to the many who have paid little or nothing into it. What is fair about that? Free enterprise and freedom over all is what made this country great. By over-regulation and taxation you kill jobs and the desire to succeed. Under todays laws, Henry Fords invention would be labeled a hazard, as would most of Thomas Edisons. Microsoft, Apple, Dell, Facebook, and many others are an example of free enterprise. Think of the number of jobs they have created! The military budget benefits not only the military, but all of society. Fuel efficient aircraft, aerodynamics, GPS, satellite communi cations, four wheel drive, and laser technology are all products of the military-industrial complex. Most have no grasp of how much our everyday lives have benefitted from monies spent in these areas. The last item is so laughable it is referred to as Obamacare. Never in history has such a poorly thought-out piece of legislation been rammed through using tactics that were never meant for this kind of thing. We are witnessing a train wreck that is of immense proportions. But if the Democrats want to be proud of it, that is a very revealing look into their mindset.Mike Dragoun LecantoOPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 A11 Alistair Co, MD Alex Villacastin, MD Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD Maria Villacastin, ARNP Shiela Villacastin, ARNP Alexander Villacastin, ARNP Lawrence Stawkowski PA 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y 3 L o c a t i o n s i n C i t r u s C o u n t y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y M o d e r n M e d i c i n e t h e O l d F a s h i o n e d W a y 000GWKL Inverness 3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N Florida Ave. 489-2486 000GZ0T LETTERSto the Editor SOUND OFFCALL563-0579

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Skating Associated PressKylie Moffat, 14, a member of the Johnstown Figure Skating Club, practices her moves Monday during a public skate at Planet Ice in Johnstown, Pa. Life support extended for brain dead girlOAKLAND, Calif. A California judge has ordered a 13-year-old girl declared brain dead to be kept on life support until Jan. 7. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo on Monday ordered Childrens Hospital Oakland to maintain Jahi McMath on a ventilator past a 5 p.m. time set in a previous ruling. The family wants to continue life support, saying there is hope for recovery. Doctors at Childrens Hospital and an independent pediatric neurologist from Stanford University have concluded the girl is brain dead. Jahi underwent a tonsillectomy at the hospital on Dec. 9 to treat sleep apnea and other issues. After she awoke from the operation, her family said, she started bleeding heavily and went into cardiac arrest. She was declared brain dead three days later.Feds announces test sites for drone aircraftLAS VEGAS The Federal Aviation Administration has chosen six states to develop test sites for drones, a critical next step for the unmanned aircrafts march into U.S. skies. The FAA announced Monday the sites will be based in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. Drones have been mainly used by the military, but governments, businesses, farmers and others are making plans to join the market. Many universities are starting or expanding drone programs. The FAA does not allow commercial use of drones, but it is working to develop operational guidelines by the end of 2015. Officials concede it may take longer.Ariz. woman accused of trying to poison childrenCASA GRANDE, Ariz. An Arizona woman is accused of trying to poison her four children, including one who died, and of stabbing her former husband, all on Christmas. Casa Grande police said 35-year-old Connie Villa was arrested Sunday on suspicion of one count of firstdegree murder and four counts of attempted murder. According to police, the ex-husband called 911 after he was stabbed when he went to Villas residence. Officers found the body of 13year-old Aniarael Macias, and Villa with stab wounds believed to have been self-inflicted. Autopsy and toxicology results are pending on the girl, believed to have been poisoned. The three other children are in good condition and are now with their fathers family. Its not immediately known whether Villa has an attorney. A possible motive hasnt been disclosed. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Festival Associated PressA Nepalese Gurung community woman in traditional attire smiles Monday as she dances during Tamu Loshar in Katmandu, Nepal. Tamu Loshar is the New Year of the Gurung community, an indigenous community who also call themselves Tamu. Judge orders man lashed for accusing wifeRIYADH, Saudi Arabia A Saudi news website said a judge in the city of Mecca ordered a man to be lashed 20 times for accusing his spouse of not being a virgin when they married. Al-Sharq Online reported Monday that the Yemeni man was sentenced to be flogged in one session for not providing evidence to back up the accusation. The website said the wife went to court to prove her honor and reputation.No foul play in death of WWII Polish leaderWARSAW, Poland A Polish investigation has found no evidence of foul play in the plane crash that killed Gen. Wladyslaw Sikorski, Polands leader in exile, in 1943. Sikorski was serving in that role in London during World War II when he died in a mysterious plane crash just after takeoff from Gibraltar. A British investigation blamed the crash on a blocked rudder, but Sikorskis dispute with Soviet leader Joseph Stalin that year led to speculation of an assassination.Israel frees prisoners despite protestJERUSALEM Israel has begun releasing more than two dozen Palestinian prisoners convicted in deadly attacks against Israelis. Todays early morning release is part of a U.S.brokered package to restart Mideast peace talks. The prisoners are expected to receive a heros welcome upon their return home. In Israel, though, there is great anger and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has faced protests from relatives of the victims over the move. Under a formula drawn up by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Israel agreed last summer to release a total of 104 long-serving Palestinian prisoners in order to restart peace talks with the Palestinians. World BRIEFS From wire reports Another attack Associated PressExperts and police officers examine a site of a trolleybus explosion Monday in Volgograd, Russia. A bomb blast tore through the trolleybus, killing at least 14 people a day after a suicide bombing that killed 17 at the citys main railway station. Russia bombings kill 31, raise concern on Olympics Associated PressMOSCOW Two suicide bombings in as many days have killed 31 people and raised concerns that Islamic militants have begun a terrorist campaign in Russia that could stretch into the Sochi Olympics in February. Russian and international Olympic officials insisted the site of the games, protected by layers of security, is completely safe. The attacks in Volgograd, about 400 miles from Sochi, reflected the Kremlins inability to uproot Islamist insurgents in the Caucasus who have vowed to derail the games, the pet project of President Vladimir Putin. No one has claimed responsibility for Sundays blast at the Volgograd railway station or Mondays bus explosion in the city, but they came only months after Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov threatened new attacks on civilian targets in Russia, including the Olympics. In addition to the dead, the bombings wounded 104 people, according to Russias Health Ministry. As of late Monday, 58 remained hospitalized, many in grave condition. Suicide bombings have rocked Russia for years, but the insurgents seeking to create an Islamic state have largely confined their attacks to the North Caucasus region in recent years. The blasts in Volgograd signaled that militants want to show their reach outside their native region. Matthew Clements, an analyst at Janes, said Caucasus militants could be targeting major transportation hubs like Volgograd to embarrass the Kremlin and discourage attendance at the Feb. 7-23 Olympics. The attack demonstrates the militants capability to strike at soft targets such as transport infrastructure outside of their usual area of operations in the North Caucasus, he said in a note. Although the very strict security measures which will be in place at the Sochi Games will make it difficult to undertake a successful attack against the main Olympic venues, public transport infrastructure in Sochi and the surrounding Krasnodar territory will face an elevated risk of attack. Security at Russias railway stations and airports has been tightened after a male suicide bomber hit Moscows Domodedovo Airport in January 2011, killing 37 people and injuring more than 180. Two bombings on the Moscow subway in March 2010 by female suicide bombers killed 40 people and wounded more than 120. Umarov, who had claimed responsibility for the 2010 and 2011 bombings, ordered a halt to attacks on civilian targets during the mass demonstrations against Putin in the winter of 2011-12. He reversed that order in July, urging his men to do their utmost to derail the Sochi Olympics, which he described as satanic dances on the bones of our ancestors. Aware of the threat, the Sochi organizers have introduced some of the most extensive identity checks and sweeping security measures ever seen at an international sports event. Congress letting 55 tax breaks expire at year end Associated PressWASHINGTON In an almost annual ritual, Congress is letting a package of 55 popular tax breaks expire at the end of the year, creating uncertainty once again for millions of individuals and businesses. Lawmakers let these tax breaks lapse almost every year, even though they save businesses and individuals billions of dollars. And almost every year, Congress eventually renews them, retroactively, so taxpayers can claim them by the time they file their tax returns. No harm, no foul, right? After all, taxpayers filing returns in the spring wont be hurt because the tax breaks were in effect for 2013. Taxpayers wont be hit until 2015, when they file tax returns for next year. Not so far. Trade groups and tax experts complain that Congress is making it impossible for businesses and individuals to plan for the future. What if lawmakers dont renew the tax break you depend on? Or what if they change it and youre no longer eligible? Its a totally ridiculous way to run our tax system, said Rachelle Bernstein, vice president and tax counsel for the National Retail Federation. Its impossible to plan when every year this happens, but yet business has gotten used to that. Some of the tax breaks are big, including billions in credits for companies that invest in research and development, generous exemptions for financial institutions doing business overseas, and several breaks that let businesses write off capital investments faster. Others are more obscure, the benefits targeted to film producers, race track owners, makers of electric motorcycles and teachers who buy classroom supplies with their own money. A deduction for state and local sales taxes benefits people who live in the nine states without state income taxes. Smaller tax breaks benefit college students and commuters who use public transportation. The annual practice of letting these tax breaks expire is a symptom a divided, dysfunctional Congress that struggles to pass routine legislation, said Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a senior Democrat on the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee. Its not fair, its very hard, its very difficult for a business person, a company, to plan, not just for the short term but to do longterm planning, Lewis said. Its shameful. With Congress on vacation until January, there is no chance the tax breaks will be renewed before they expire. Home electricity use in US falling Associated PressNEW YORK The average amount of electricity consumed in U.S. homes has fallen to levels last seen more than a decade ago, back when the smartest device in peoples pockets was a Palm pilot and anyone talking about a tablet was probably an archaeologist or a preacher. Because of more energyefficient housing, appliances and gadgets, power usage is on track to decline in 2013 for the third year in a row, to 10,819 kilowatthours per household, according to the Energy Information Administration. Thats the lowest level since 2001, when households averaged 10,535 kwh. And the drop has occurred even though our lives are more electrified. Heres a look at what has changed since the last time consumption was so low.Better homesIn the early 2000s, as energy prices rose, more states adopted or toughened building codes to force builders to better seal homes so heat or air-conditioned air doesnt seep out so fast. That means newer homes waste less energy.Better gadgetsCentral air conditioners, refrigerators, dishwashers, water heaters, washing machines and dryers have gotten more efficient. The move to mobile also is helping. Desktop computers with big CRT monitors are being replaced with laptops, tablet computers and smart phones, and these mobile devices are specifically designed to sip power to prolong battery life.On the other hand...We are using more devices, and that is offsetting what would otherwise be a more dramatic reduction in power consumption. DVRs spin at all hours of the day, often under more than one television in a home. Game consoles are getting more sophisticated to process better graphics and connect with other players, and therefore use more power. Twin bombingsA pair of deadly terrorist attacks struck the Russian city of Volgograd on Sunday and Monday. AP RUSSIA UKRAINE BEL. TURKEY Black Sea Moscow 200 km 200 mi Sochi Deadly bombingsVolgograd VolgogradSOURCE: ESRI

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College basketball/ B2 NBA, NHL/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Sports briefs/ B3 Lottery, TV/B3 College football/B4 UCF faces a tall task when it meets Baylor in Fiesta Bowl./B4 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Associated PressBest Game: Oddly, a 27-24 overtime loss at Seattle on Nov. 3, a game that dropped them to 0-8 and in which the Bucs blew a 21-0 lead. Played well enough early against team with NFCs best record that it instilled confidence that brighter days were ahead then won four of next five games. Worst Game: An embarrassing nationally televised 31-13 Thursday night loss at home to the Carolina Panthers on Oct. 24. Offense didnt get into the end zone until the closing minutes, and the putrid performance against a division rival raised conjecture about whether embattled coach Greg Schiano would hold his job through the end of the season. Best Play: Linebacker Mason Fosters fourthquarter interception and entertaining 85-yard return for a touchdown against Drew Brees and the New Orleans Saints in Week 2. The Bucs took a shortlived 14-13 lead only to lose on a last-second field goal. Worst Play: Linebacker Lavonte David set the tone for a long year with a late hit on Jets quarterback Geno Smith with time running out in the season opener. The 15-yard penalty moved New York to win 18-17 on a long, last-second field goal. Biggest Surprise: Benching and subsequent release of quarterback Josh Freeman. A 4,000-yard passer in 2012, when the Bucs had a top 10 offense, Freeman got off to a slow start and was benched after just three games. He was replaced by rookie Mike Glennon. Biggest Disappointment: Despite making strides on defense following the acquisition of cornerback Darrelle Revis and safety Dashon Goldson, the unit contributed to the teams slow start by failing to hold leads in the final two minutes of three of the teams first four games. Whats Next: Schiano and general manager Mark Dominik were fired Monday, meaning the first order of business will be finding replacements, who will have some important decisions to make including whether Glennon is the teams quarterback of the future.Best and worst of Buccaneers season Associated PressTampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Greg Schiano pauses on the sidelines Dec. 22 during the second quarter against the St. Louis Rams in St. Louis. Schiano and general manager Mark Dominik were fired Monday, a day after finishing the season with a 4-12 record. Bucs fire coach Greg Schiano, GM Mark Dominik after 4-12 season Associated PressTAMPA Greg Schiano believes he changed the Tampa Buccaneers for the better, though not enough to save his job. The embattled Bucs coach was fired Monday after two losing years extended the franchises playoff drought to six seasons. General manager Mark Dominik was also ousted, ending an unsuccessful five-year stint that produced flashes of hope but far more disappointment than ownership felt was acceptable. The results over the past two years have not lived up to our standards and we believe the time has come to find a new direction, Bucs co-chairman Bryan Glazer said in a brief statement released a day after a season-ending 42-17 loss to the New Orleans dropped Schianos record to 11-21. Mark has been a valued member of our organization for two decades and we respect the passion he showed for the Buccaneers during his time here, Glazer added. We thank Greg for his hard work and effort the past two seasons, but we feel these moves are necessary in order to achieve our goals. In typical Bucs fashion, the reclusive owners of the team announced the third coaching change in five years with a one paragraph statement and did not schedule a news conference to discuss the situation. Schiano had three years and $9 million remaining on his contract. Schiano thanked the Glazer family for the opportunity to coach the Bucs, and also expressed gratitude to his players, coaching staff and fans. His biggest regret simply was not winning enough games to reflect the progress he feels the Bucs made under him. I think were leaving behind a football team that is better than when we got here, Schiano told reporters at a hotel Tebow joins SEC Network Former Florida quarterback still pursuing NFL career Associated PressATLANTA Tim Tebow has his next football job talking about the sport on TV. The Heisman Trophy winner has been hired as a college football analyst for the new SEC Network in a return to his Florida glory days, but he still hopes to play quarterback in the NFL. Tebow will appear on SEC Nation, a pregame show that will travel to a different campus each week after the channel launches in August. The multiyear deal will not preclude him from continuing to pursue playing opportunities in the NFL, ESPN, which runs the network, said in a statement Monday. Tebow did not play in the league in 2013 after he was cut by the Patriots in August. In the span of just over one season, he went from a national sensation who led the Denver Broncos to the playoffs, to a backup, to out of the NFL. While I continue to pursue my dream of playing quarterback in the NFL, this is an amazing opportunity to be part of the unparalleled passion of college football and the SEC, Tebow said in a statement released by ESPN. ESPN senior vice president Justin Connolly called Tebow an SEC icon with a national fan base and broad appeal. Tebow will make his ESPN debut during pregame coverage of the BCS championship Jan. 6. After winning the 2007 Heisman and two national championships for the Gators in the SEC, Tebow became one of the biggest stories in the NFL in his second season. He went 7-1 in his first eight starts in 2011 then threw an 80-yard touchdown pass on the first play of overtime to give the Broncos a 29-23 playoff win over the Pittsburgh Steelers. But he was still dogged by doubts about his passing ability, and Denver traded him that offseason to the New York Jets after acquiring Peyton Manning. He languished on the bench while coach Rex Ryan ignored fans calls for Tebow to replace a struggling Mark Sanchez. Tebow threw just eight passes, ran only 32 times and was cut last April 29. For six weeks no team wanted him until the Patriots signed him to a low-risk, twoyear contract with no guaranteed money. Tim Tebow See FIRED/ Page B3 No. 1 FSU concludes final practice at home Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The top-ranked Florida State Seminoles held their final workout on campus Monday in preparation to face No. 2 Auburn in the BCS championship game. Coach Jimbo Fisher was ready to play weeks ago. Florida State didnt need a four-week break after the Seminoles won the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game. The roster was healthy and the program had completed its first undefeated regular season since 1999. The Seminoles outscored their last nine opponents by a combined score of 484-79. They were the epitome of a team on a roll. I would have been tickled to death to play the very next week after we played Duke, we were playing so well, Fisher said. When you have those delays, the key is getting that timing and rhythm back. But the key is you cant be ready too quick. Youve got to time that thing up to hopefully hit it right in stride. I like where were at right now. Hopefully those last three to four practices out there I think well really be honed in. Thats kind of where you want to be. Fisher gave the team a week off during exams before returning for five sessions of mostly fundamental work. The team took time off for a holiday break then returned for five practices ending Monday. Today is a travel day before a final five workouts leading up to the championship game Jan. 6. The Seminoles began heavy Auburn preparation after returning from the holiday break. Its kind of hard because you get the first five and then you know you have a break to go home, Florida State receiver Kelvin Benjamin said. A Florida States Jameis Winston scrambles Dec. 7 as Dukes Kelby Brown defends in the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship game in Charlotte, N.C. The No. 1-ranked Seminoles held their final workout on campus Monday before flying to California to face No. 2 Auburn in the BCS championship game.Associated Press See FSU/ Page B3

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B2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Butler scores 26 as Bulls beat Grizzlies 95-91 Associated PressMEMPHIS, Tenn. Jimmy Butler scored 14 of his 26 points in the third quarter, Carlos Boozer added 21 points and 10 rebounds, and the Chicago Bulls defeated the Memphis Grizzlies 95-91 on Monday night. Butler shot 6 for 10 from the field, including 2 of 3 on 3-pointers, and 12 of 14 at the foul line in a team-high 41 minutes. Chicago was 6 for 15 from 3-point range. D.J. Augustin had 10 points off the bench for the Bulls, including eight in the fourth period as Memphis tried to make a late run. Mike Conley finished with 26 points, nine assists, six rebounds and six steals to lead the Grizzlies. James Johnson scored 13 points, all in the second half, and grabbed 10 rebounds before fouling out with 4:10 left.Wizards 106, Pistons 99AUBURN HILLS, Mich. John Wall scored 29 points and the Washington Wizards became the latest team to rally past Detroit in the fourth quarter, beating the Pistons 106-99. Washington trailed 87-78 before starting the final period with a 17-4 run. The Pistons never went back ahead. Brandon Jennings had 15 points and 14 assists for Detroit, which has lost five of six. Trevor Ariza scored 15 points for the Wizards, who also beat Detroit 106-82 on Saturday in Washington. Bradley Beal scored 11 of his 13 points in the second half for Washington. It was another frustrating loss for Detroit, outscored 28-12 in the fourth quarter. The Pistons have also blown comfortable fourthquarter leads at home against Portland and Charlotte during the latter part of December.Mavericks 100, Timberwolves 98MINNEAPOLIS Shawn Marion scored 32 points and hit two huge 3-pointers in the fourth quarter to help the Dallas Mavericks withstand a furious second-half charge from the Minnesota Timberwolves in a 100-98 victory. Dirk Nowitzki had 16 points for the Mavericks, who led by 19 late in the first half before the Wolves came back. Kevin Love had 36 points, 11 rebounds and four assists, and his 3-pointer 90 seconds into the fourth quarter gave the Wolves an 86-85 lead. They led 90-87 midway through the period, but Marion hit two 3-pointers during a 10-0 run to put the Mavericks back in front.Pelicans 110, Trail Blazers 108NEW ORLEANS Tyreke Evans hit a pull-up jumper from 17 feet with 1.2 seconds left and the New Orleans Pelicans beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-108. Evans big basket came right after Portlands Damian Lillard, who has hit several game-winners this season, made a contested 3-pointer to tie the score at 108. New Orleans, which won its fourth in a row at home, never trailed in the second half but never led by more than five in the final 10 minutes. Jrue Holiday scored 15 of his season-high 31 points in the fourth quarter and tied a season high with 13 assists for the Pelicans. Anthony Davis added 27 points, 12 rebounds and five blocks. Evans had 20 points. Associated PressChicagos Joakim Noah, right, defends Monday against Memphis Zach Randolph in the first half in Memphis, Tenn. UConn remains No. 1 in AP PollWith a light week because of the holiday, there wasnt much change in The Associated Press womens poll. UConn continued its unanimous run atop the Top 25 on Monday after opening up American Athletic Conference play with a victory over Cincinnati. Notre Dame remained second after surviving a tough game at Oregon State. Duke, Stanford and Tennessee rounded out the first five. The Lady Vols are followed by Kentucky, Louisville, Maryland, Baylor and North Carolina. The only loss by a ranked team was Gonzaga falling in overtime to Saint Marys in the WCC opener. The Zags fell out of the poll. See Page B3 for complete poll.No. 24 ASU 63, No. 20 Syracuse 60TEMPE, Ariz. Kelsey Moos scored 15 points and grabbed 12 rebounds as No. 24 Arizona State held on to defeat No. 20 Syracuse 63-60 Monday night. Moos had 10 points in the second half. Her layup gave the Sun Devils a 6160 lead with 1:31 remaining. On Syracuses next possession, Moos fouled Briana Day, but Day missed both free throws. The teams then traded turnovers before Adrianne Thomas hit two free throws for the Sun Devils to cap the scoring. Rachel Coffey missed a 3-pointer for Syracuse as time expired. Arizona State (11-1) has a ten-game winning streak. Joy Burke scored 14 points with 10 rebounds. Day finished with seven points and 12 rebounds for Syracuse (11-2). Brianna Butler scored 25 points, including a trio of 3-pointers to lead the Orange.From wire reports WBB BRIEFS Raanta, Saad lead Blackhawks past Kings 1-0 Associated PressCHICAGO Antti Raanta made 26 saves in his first NHL shutout and Brandon Saad scored as the Chicago Blackhawks beat Los Angeles 1-0 on Monday night and sent the Kings to their first threegame losing streak in a year. With Blackhawks No. 1 goalie Corey Crawford nearing a return from a lower-body injury, Raanta improved to 10-1-3 while bouncing back from one of his worst performances. He allowed two late goals in Chicagos 6-5 shootout loss at St. Louis on Saturday. Los Angeles Martin Jones made 29 saves in his second straight loss after beginning his career with eight consecutive wins, tying the NHL record.Senators 3, Capitals 1OTTAWA, Ontario Kyle Turris goal helped the Ottawa Senators beat the Washington Capitals 3-1 and earn their first winning streak in 51 days. Ottawa has won three straight at home for the first time this season. Mika Zibanejad and Clarke MacArthur, with an empty-net goal, also scored for Ottawa (17-18-7). Craig Anderson stopped 34 shots. Joel Ward scored the lone goal for the Capitals (20-155), who have lost back-toback games.Predators 6, Red Wings 4NASHVILLE, Tenn. Colin Wilson had two goals and an assist, and Mike Fisher scored a goal and helped set up two others in the Nashville Predators 6-4 victory over the Detroit Red Wings. Fisher has three goals and three assists in Nashvilles past two games. Craig Smith, Nick Spaling, and Roman Josi also scored. Justin Abdelkader, Pavel Datsyuk, Drew Miller, and Patrick Eaves scored for the Red Wings, who have lost two of three. Associated PressChicago Blackhawks left wing Brandon Saad (20) scores past Los Angeles Kings goalie Martin Jones (31) Monday, as Matt Greene (2), Mike Richards (10) and Bryan Bickell (29) are near during the first period in Chicago. Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Reserves Aaron Thomas scored 19 points and Ian Miller 15 as Florida State defeated Charleston Southern 67-59 Monday night in its final nonconference game of the season. With Thomas and Miller leading the way, the Seminoles bench outscored the Charleston Southern bench by a 42-19 margin. Thomas scored 14 of his points in the second half to help the Seminoles (9-3) stay ahead of the pesky visitors, who closed to within 61-56 with 1:20 left before Boris Bojanovskys dunk gave Florida State a bit of breathing room at 63-56 with 51 seconds left. Sophomore point guard Devon Bookert aided the Seminoles with a careerhigh nine assists and a team-best seven rebounds. Paul Gombwer and Arlon Harper each scored 11 points to lead Charleston Southern (5-7), which took 29 of its 50 shots from beyond the 3-point arc. Florida State takes a modest four-game winning streak into its ACC opener Saturday.No. 6 Okla. St. 92, Robert Morris 66STILLWATER, Okla. Phil Forte scored 20 points and No. 6 Oklahoma State looked sharp after a nine-day break, beating Robert Morris 92-66. Markel Brown added 18 points for Oklahoma State (12-1) in the Cowboys final tuneup before opening Big 12 Conference play on Saturday at Kansas State. Oklahoma State will enter 2014 with its highest ranking in The Associated Press poll since February 2005, when the Cowboys were also No. 6. Karvel Anderson scored 16 points for Robert Morris (5-9), which is 2-8 on the road this season.No. 9 Baylor 81, Oral Roberts 55WACO, Texas Taurean Prince scored 10 of his 16 points in the go-ahead run for No. 9 Baylor as the Bears overcame a slow start to beat Oral Roberts 81-55. Baylor (11-1) fell behind 7-0 while missing its first six shots before finally scoring nearly 6 minutes into the game. Shawn Glover had 22 points to lead Oral Roberts (6-7), which has lost four of five games. Cory Jefferson had 17 points for Baylor, while Isaiah Austin had 15 points and Rico Gathers had 10 points and 10 rebounds.No. 16 Kansas 93, Toledo 83LAWRENCE, Kan. Perry Ellis had 21 points and 11 rebounds, Naadir Tharpe added a career-high 20 points and No. 16 Kansas beat Toledo 93-83 for the Rockets first loss of the season. Andrew Wiggins also had 20 points and fellow freshman Joel Embiid had 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Jayhawks (9-3), who built a 16-point lead early in the second half. Toledo (12-1) made one final charge, using some hot outside shooting and sloppiness on the part of Kansas to get within 81-73 on a 3-pointer by Julius Brown with 3:23 left in the game.No. 24 Gonzaga 69, San Francisco 41SPOKANE, Wash. Drew Barham scored 15 points, all on 3-pointers, as short-handed No. 24 Gonzaga beat San Francisco 69-41. Przemek Karnowski added 11 points for Gonzaga (12-2, 2-0 West Coast), whose top three scorers are battling injuries. David Stockton and Kevin Pangos finished with 10 points each. Avry Holmes led coldshooting San Francisco (8-6, 1-1) with 16 points. The Dons made just 26 percent of their shots, to 43 percent for the Zags. Gonzaga has won 20 straight conference games spanning three seasons.Miami 71, Loyola (MD) 48CORAL GABLES Rion Brown scored 17 points to lead Miami to a 71-48 win over Loyola. The Hurricanes never trailed and increased a 23-point lead at halftime to 60-30 on Browns third 3-pointer with 9:26 remaining in the second half. Brown shot 4 of 6 from behind the arc and had nine rebounds. Donnavan Kirk scored 12 points and James Kelly finished with 11 points for Miami (8-5). Tonye Jekiri was Miamis fourth double-figure scorer with 10 points. Miami held Loyolas Dylon Cormier, the nations fourth leading scorer to 11 points. Cormier entered Mondays game averaging 24.1 pointsper-game. Eric Laster scored 13 points to lead the Greyhounds (5-6). Arizona No. 1 for 4th straight weekArizona and Syracuse lead the same top five teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll for the fourth straight week. The Wildcats (13-0) saw their lead in first-place votes change for the first time Monday. They received 60 No. 1 votes from the 65-member national media panel, three less than they got the last three weeks. Syracuse (12-0), which beat previously unbeaten Villanova on Saturday, were No. 1 on the other five ballots. The three Big Ten schools Ohio State, Wisconsin and Michigan State remained third through fifth. Louisville, which lost at Kentucky on Saturday, dropped from sixth to No. 14 while Villanova fell three places to 11th with the loss at Syracuse. See Page B3 for complete poll.From wire reports Associated PressToledo guard Rian Pearson, left, and Kansas guard Andrew Wiggins get tangled over a loose ball Monday during the first half in Lawrence, Kan.

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE lot of guys tend to do this, Oh, Ill just get through these five practices then go home on break. But, really, coach Fisher has been preaching to us, telling you, Dont lose the practices. Go out there and have fun and go hard every day. Fisher doesnt want to lose the rhythm the team built over the course of three months. The schedule turned choppy simply from the bowl schedule. Normalcy usually doesnt return the week of the bowl as teams have media responsibilities and a variety of other planned appearances organized by the bowl committee. Fisher said that wont be the case in Pasadena. The good thing, theres not many in this game, Fisher said. Theres only two nights we have to go somewhere. This is not as much of the bowl situation that you have at other bowls sometimes. Its kind of like more of a business-like trip. A couple things will be fun, but its not as many things. Hopefully those distractions will keep it down. Fisher said the schedule will be similar to what the team is on in Tallahassee. The media responsibilities are not extremely different, except for Media Day on Jan. 4 that includes the entire team. There is also a team dinner Jan. 3. The coach wants the players to have a unique experience with several players making their first trip to California, but he constantly preaches the primary reason for playing inside the Rose Bowl with college football observers watching across the world. California, thats going to be crazy. I cant wait, Florida State cornerback P.J. Williams said. Were just ready to get up there and be able to have fun and get ready for this game and being able to perform in a big game. No, I dont think (its hard to focus). Were here all day every day doing the same thing. Working hard and going at it. The coaches make sure our heads stay right. ... We know its still a business trip. near the teams training facility. It was quite an honor and I enjoyed every day of it, the coach added. We didnt get it done. I accept responsibility for that. Word of the firing broke less than 30 minutes after the team closed the locker room, where players were sorting through equipment and belongings before scattering for the offseason. They met with the coaching and medical staff for exit interviews and physicals. They had not been informed of the dismissals before media was allowed into the room. Many, including Pro Bowl defensive tackle Gerald McCoy, had hoped Schiano would keep his job. Its tough for the players to see your coaches go. You never want to see anybody get fired, McCoy said after the announcement. Me personally, I havent had any consistency in my career. Third head coach, going on my fifth year and three head coaches. Add up everybody, itll be six d-line coaches. The Bucs went 7-9 in their first season under Schiano, collapsing after a 6-4 start that had the team in playoff contention. After trading for three-time All-Pro cornerback Darrelle Revis and signing safety Dashon Goldson in free agency to bolster a porous defense, the team entered training camp this season with heightened expectations. But a messy split with former quarterback Josh Freeman, an outbreak of MRSA infections in the locker room and reports that Schiano was losing the support of players tiring of his rules and coaching style dogged the team during an 0-8 start that put the coachs job in jeopardy. Despite having a rookie quarterback and finishing with 16 players on injured reserve, including running back Doug Martin and receiver Mike Williams, the Bucs went 4-4 over the second half of the season. That hardly seemed like progress, though, because the offense got progressively worse and finished last in the NFL in passing and total yardage. Still, players seemed impressed with the way Schiano held the team together, insisting right up until the end that the coach never lost the locker room. In times like that you see a lot of guys crumble, a lot of guys break. You never saw a different attitude with him, McCoy said. ... Hes the most consistent thing in the building, I will give him that. Schiano was hired in January 2012, leaving Rutgers to take over a team that ended its final 10 games under Raheem Morris on a 10-game losing streak. He inherited one the NFLs worst defenses, but also a young quarterback in Freeman, who won 10 games in his first full season as a starter and became the franchises first 4,000-yard passer in Schianos first year in Tampa Bay. But Freemans relationship with Schiano soured when the Bucs dropped five of the final six games of 2012, with Freemans inconsistency contributing to the slide. The fifth-year quarterback was benched and subsequently released after an 0-3 start this season, replaced by rookie Mike Glennon, a third-round draft pick who went 4-9 in 13 starts. The Bucs have not made the playoffs since 2007 under former coach Jon Gruden. They havent won a postseason game since their 2002 run that produced the franchises only Super Bowl title. Part of the blame for the poor performance rests with Dominik, who was named general manager in 2009 the year Morris was promoted from defensive coordinator to replace Gruden. Dominik survived Morris firing after a 4-12 finish two years ago. But in the end, a spotty draft record, the mishandling of Freemans situation, and the teams 28-52 mark during a five-season tenure as GM became impossible to overlook. Schiano said whoever follows him as coach will take over a good team. Im proud of the culture we developed here, Schiano said. On the field, I think were closer than people think. FIREDContinued from Page B1 FSUContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12 p.m. (FS1) St. John's at Xavier 1 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio State at Purdue 1 p.m. (ESPNU) Duke at Elon 2:30 p.m. (FS1) Seton Hall at Providence 3 p.m. (ESPN2) Indiana at Illinois 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Eastern Michigan at Syracuse 3 p.m. (SUN) George Washington at Kansas State 5 p.m. (ESPN2) Louisville at Central Florida 5 p.m. (ESPNU) UNC-Wilmington at North Carolina 5 p.m. (FS1) DePaul at Georgetown 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Memphis at South Florida 7:30 p.m. (FS1) Villanova at Butler 9 p.m. (ESPN2) Connecticut at Houston 10 p.m. (FS1) Marquette at Creighton NBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. (FSNFL) Golden State Warriors at Orlando Magic COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 a.m. (ESPNU) National University Holiday Bowl: Arizona State vs. Texas Tech (taped) 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) AdvoCare V100 Bowl: Arizona vs. Boston College 2 p.m. (CBS) Hyundai Sun Bowl: UCLA vs. Virginia Tech 4 p.m. (ESPN) AutoZone Liberty Bowl: Mississippi State vs. Rice 8 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: Duke vs. Texas A&M 2 a.m. (ESPN2) AdvoCare V100 Bowl: Arizona vs. Boston College (same-day tape) 4 a.m. (ESPN2) AutoZone Liberty Bowl: Mississippi State vs. Rice (same-day tape) HOCKEY 7:30 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship: Slovakia vs. Czech Republic 11:30 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship: United States vs. Canada (same-day tape) 1 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game 4 p.m. (NBCSPT) NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game OLYMPICS 6 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Trials Speed Skating: Long Track Men's & Women's 1500m TENNIS 2 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA ASB Classic, Early Rounds 3 (sameday tape) 4 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA ASB Classic, Early Rounds 4 (sameday tape) 8 p.m. (TENNIS) Hopman Cup: France vs. Czech Republic (taped) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS No local events scheduled. The AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Arizona (60)13-01,6201 2. Syracuse (5)12-01,5502 3. Ohio St.13-01,4623 4. Wisconsin13-01,4084 5. Michigan St.11-11,3645 6. Oklahoma St.11-11,2787 7. Duke10-21,1449 8. Wichita St.13-01,06710 9. Baylor10-11,01311 10. Oregon12-098712 11. Villanova11-19438 12. Florida10-291513 13. Iowa St.11-086914 14. Louisville11-28126 15. Kentucky10-375318 16. Kansas8-366616 17. UConn11-164715 18. Memphis9-262517 19. North Carolina9-341319 20. Colorado11-237321 21. San Diego St.10-137120 22. Iowa11-225822 23. UMass11-116023 24. Gonzaga11-27824 25. Missouri11-17625 Others receiving votes: Illinois 57, Texas 40, George Washington 37, Oklahoma 36, Toledo 32, Florida St. 24, UCLA 19, Harvard 10, Michigan 7, Creighton 5, Kansas St. 3, Pittsburgh 2, LSU 1.USA Today Top 25The top 25 teams in the USA Today mens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: RecordPtsPvs 1. Arizona (30)13-07981 2. Syracuse (1)12-07622 3. Ohio State (1)13-07413 4. Michigan State11-16825 5. Wisconsin13-06776 6. Oklahoma State11-16057 7. Wichita State13-05888 8. Duke10-25689 9. Oregon12-053010 10. Louisville11-25154 11. Baylor10-142912 12. Iowa State11-042013 13. Florida10-241314 14. Villanova11-139211 15. UConn11-134015 16. Kentucky10-331918 17. Kansas8-331416 18. Memphis9-226817 19. North Carolina9-318419 19. San Diego State10-118420 21. Gonzaga11-214521 22. UMass11-113722 23. Iowa11-211323 24. Colorado11-29224 25. Missouri11-15125 Others receiving votes: Creighton 29, Pittsburgh 22, UCLA 20, George Washington 17, Oklahoma 16, Texas 9, Toledo 8, Florida State 4, Michigan 4, Illinois 2, New Mexico 1, Saint Louis 1.Womens AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press womens college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. UConn (36)13-09001 2. Notre Dame11-08412 3. Duke12-18223 4. Stanford11-18084 5. Tennessee11-17365 6. Kentucky12-17176 7. Louisville13-16957 8. Maryland12-16488 9. Baylor10-16269 10. North Carolina11-251510 11. Oklahoma St.11-051111 12. Colorado10-147212 13. South Carolina12-146213 14. Iowa St.11-044714 15. Penn St.9-334115 16. LSU9-230816 17. Purdue9-229917 18. Nebraska10-227818 19. Georgia12-122819 20. Syracuse11-121320 21. Florida St.12-118722 22. Iowa12-218021 23. California8-311623 24. Arizona St.10-19125 25. Oklahoma9-46525 Others receiving votes: Arkansas 49, San Diego 33, NC State 27, Indiana 23, Georgia Tech 8, Rutgers 8, West Virginia 8, Gonzaga 7, Saint Josephs 7, Texas 7, Middle Tennessee 6, Saint Marys (Cal) 5, UTEP 4, DePaul 2.NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB Toronto1315.464 Boston1317.4331 Brooklyn1020.3334 Philadelphia921.3005 New York921.3005 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami 237.767 Atlanta 1714.5486 Washington1414.5008 Charlotte1418.43810 Orlando1020.33313 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana 245.828 Detroit 1419.42412 Chicago1217.41412 Cleveland1020.33314 Milwaukee624.20018 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio247.774 Houston2112.6364 Dallas 1813.5816 New Orleans1415.4839 Memphis1317.43310 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City255.833 Portland247.7741 Minnesota1516.48410 Denver 1415.48310 Utah 1024.29417 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers2111.656 Phoenix1811.6211 Golden State1913.5942 L.A. Lakers1318.4197 Sacramento920.31010 Mondays Games Washington 106, Detroit 99 Dallas 100, Minnesota 98 Chicago 95, Memphis 91 New Orleans 110, Portland 108 Utah 83, Charlotte 80 Miami at Denver, late Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, late Todays Games Atlanta at Boston, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indiana, 3 p.m. Golden State at Orlando, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at San Antonio, 7 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 9 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.AP Pro32 NFL Power RankingsThe Associated Press Pro32 NFL Power Rankings, as voted by a 12-member panel, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 30, total points based on 32 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 32nd-place vote, and previous ranking: WLTPtsPvs 1. Seattle Seahawks (8)13303801 2. Denver Broncos (4)13303722 3. San Francisco 49ers12403563 4. Carolina Panthers12403464 5. N.E. Patriots12403445 6. Cincinnati Bengals11503106 7. New Orleans Saints11503059 8. Indianapolis Colts11502998 9. Kansas City Chiefs11502947 10. Philadelphia Eagles106028111 11. Green Bay Packers87125917 12. Arizona Cardinals106025810 13. San Diego Chargers97024912 14. Pittsburgh Steelers88021818 15. Chicago Bears88020514 16. Baltimore Ravens88020213 17. Dallas Cowboys88019216 18. New York Jets88018321 19. Miami Dolphins88017115 20. St. Louis Rams79015519 21. New York Giants79014224 22. Detroit Lions79013820 23. Tennessee Titans79012223 24. Buffalo Bills610011422 25. Minnesota Vikings51019327 26. Atlanta Falcons41208025 27. Tampa Bay Bucs41206926 28. Cleveland Browns41206529 29. Jacksonville Jaguars41206028 30. Oakland Raiders41203230 31. Wash. Redskins31302931 32. Houston Texans21401332NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Boston39261125411481 Tampa Bay39231245011093 Montreal4023143499989 Detroit 411814945107117 Toronto 412016545115118 Ottawa 421718741118135 Florida 40152053595128 Buffalo 39112442671110 Metropolitan Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh41291115913094 Washington402015545122119 Philadelphia38181644097107 N.Y. Rangers40191924094108 New Jersey40161684095102 Columbus391718438106112 Carolina39141693791114 N.Y. Islanders401221731102135 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago42287763158115 St. Louis3826755713792 Colorado38231145010997 Dallas 381912745112111 Minnesota41201654596107 Winnipeg411818541111121 Nashville40181844095119 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim41288561131103 San Jose3925865612898 Los Angeles40251145410880 Vancouver40231165210893 Phoenix381910947116117 Calgary 39141963495122 Edmonton411324430106139 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Ottawa 3, Washington 1 Chicago 1, Los Angeles 0 Nashville 6, Detroit 4 Philadelphia at Vancouver, late Todays Games Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 1 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Minnesota, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 8 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Calgary, 9 p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Wednesdays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Ann Arbor, MI, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 4 9 10 11 13 5-of-55 winners$38,278.36 4-of-5441$69.50 3-of-510,935$7.50 CASH 3 (early) 6 8 8 CASH 3 (late) 0 2 5 PLAY 4 (early) 4 9 1 2 PLAY 4 (late) 7 7 8 6 FANTASY 5 6 8 10 12 25TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 B3 Hurricanes take third in Orlando hoops tourneyThe Citrus boys basketball team routed The Masters Academy 65-40 Monday to finish third at the Jim Clark Holiday Classic at Bishop Moore High School in Orlando. Ben Janicki paced the Hurricanes with 15 points. Desmond Franklin added 12 points and Devin Pryor chipped in 11 points on his way to all-tournament team honors. The Hurricanes (11-2) are back in action Friday at home against Eustis with a 3 p.m. varsity start.Redskins fire Shanahan after 3-13 seasonASHBURN, Va. The Washington Redskins have fired coach Mike Shanahan after a 3-13 season. Shanahan was dismissed Monday after meeting with team owner Dan Snyder. Shanahan went 24-40 in four years in Washington, but his greater failure was an inability to restore order and professionalism to a franchise that has often been in disarray for the last two decades. The Redskins finished last in the NFC East in three of Shanahans four seasons. The outlier was 2012, when a sevengame winning streak at the end of the regular season won the team its first division title since 1999. Shanahan had one year remaining on his five-year, $35 million contract. Snyder will now be seeking his eighth head coach for his 16th season as an NFL owner.Lions fire coach Jim Schwartz after 5 seasonsALLEN PARK, Mich. The Detroit Lions have fired coach Jim Schwartz. The Lions made the move Monday, one day after they ended their lateseason slide with a loss at Minnesota. Detroit flopped to a 7-9 record this year after a 6-3 record start put the franchise in a position to win a division title for the first time since 1993. Schwartz was 29-51 over five seasons, including a 10-6 mark in 2011 that lifted the Lions to their only postseason appearance this century. The former Tennessee Titans defensive coordinator was hired in 2009 when Detroit was coming off the NFLs first 0-16 season. Schwartz had the team going in the right direction during his first three seasons before it took a step back the next two years.Minnesota Vikings fire coach Leslie FrazierMINNEAPOLIS The Minnesota Vikings have fired coach Leslie Frazier a day after they wrapped up a 5-10-1 season. The Vikings made the playoffs last year but struggled in 2013, unable to find stability at quarterback. Frazier went 21-33-1 in three-plus seasons. The firing was announced Monday morning.Doctors give no prognosis for Michael SchumacherGRENOBLE, France Doctors offered a grim assessment of Michael Schumachers head injuries Monday, providing no prognosis for the Formula One driving great after his skiing accident in the French Alps. Schumacher has been placed in a medically induced coma to relieve pressure on his brain, which suffered bruising and bleeding when the retired seventime world champion fell and struck a rock Sunday while skiing during a family vacation. We cannot predict the future for Michael Schumacher, Dr. Jean-Francois Payen, the doctor in charge of Grenoble University Hospitals intensive care unit, said at a news conference. Schumacher earned universal admiration for his uncommon driving talent, which led to a record 91 race wins. From staff and wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS Mark Dominik

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B4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOLLEGEFOOTBALL Oregon crushes Texas in Browns finale Longhorns start search for new coach Associated PressSAN ANTONIO Quarterback Marcus Mariota had 386 total yards and No. 10 Oregon returned two interceptions for touchdowns, spoiling Texas coach Mack Browns farewell with a runaway 30-7 victory in the Alamo Bowl on Monday night. The BCS-snubbed Ducks (11-2) dominated throughout even though their famously high-powered offense scored just one touchdown, when Josh Huff turned a short pass from Mariota into a spectacular 16-yard sprint to the end zone. Brown received warm goodbyes from a sellout crowd in what was practically a home game for Texas (8-5). Even the school marching band spelled his name at halftime. But the blowout was a final reminder of why Brown is resigning after 16 seasons at Texas, which he led to a national championship in 2005 but couldnt reverse a sharp decline in recent years. Walking off the field for the last time, Brown flashed the Hook em Horns hand signal to the scattered remaining Texas fans who stuck around to the end of another humbling loss this season. Mariota led all rushers with 133 yards on 15 carries, making sure Oregon eased the sting of not playing in a BCS bowl for the first time in five years. He was 18 of 26 for 253 yards passing in his Heisman Trophy campaign tuneup for 2014, having announced earlier this month that he was coming back for his junior season. Yet even Mariota was outscored by Oregons defense and so was Texas, for that matter. Oregons first touchdown came on the third play of the game when safety Avery Patterson intercepted an overthrown pass by Texas quarterback Case McCoy and returned it 37 yards to the end zone. McCoy later bookended a dismal performance in his final game with another pick-six, this one returned 38 yards by linebacker Derrick Malone that sent waves of burnt orange-clad fans streaming for the exits. McCoy scored on a 1-yard rush in the first quarter for Texas only touchdown. He finished 8 of 17 for 48 yards and was pulled at times in the second half for freshman Tyrone Swoopes. Running back Malcolm Brown was the lone offensive constant for Texas, finishing with 130 yards on 26 carries. Far from the uplifting send-off Texas wanted for Brown, the school now shifts its focus to finding a replacement. New Texas athletic director Steve Patterson said before kickoff that he wants a successor by Jan. 15. Patterson said coaches interested in the job have come forward but wouldnt discuss potential candidates. Theres interest thats sincere, and theres interest thats Help me find a better contract, Patterson said. Whoever Texas hires shouldnt expect patience from a fanbase that grew accustomed to winning under Brown, and then became restless as the Longhorns slid from perennial BCS contention. Brown arrived in 1998 and went 128-27 by the end of 2009, when the Longhorns lost to Alabama in its second BCS title game in five years. He goes out, however, 30-21 in his final four seasons. Texas could do a lot worse than look to Oregon for how to pull off a coaching transition. Although first-year coach Mark Helfrich couldnt get the Ducks to a BCS bowl as Chip Kelly did in each of his four seasons, Oregon still finished with a fourth consecutive year of 11 or more victories. This was the Ducks third consecutive bowl win. Associated PressOregon quarterback Marcus Mariota slips past Texas Caleb Bluiett during the first quarter Monday in the Valero Alamo Bowl in San Antonio. The Ducks defeated the Longhorns 30-7 in the final game for Texas head coach Mack Brown. A tall order for UCF Navy wins Armed Forces Bowl Associated PressFORT WORTH, Texas Keenan Reynolds ran for 86 yards with two more touchdowns and Navy won for only the second time its last seven bowl games, beating Middle Tennessee State 24-6 in the Armed Forces Bowl on Monday. Reynolds had a 3-yard score to cap the opening drive for Navy (9-4) and added a 1-yarder in the fourth quarter. Already with the NCAA record for touchdowns rushing by a quarterback, Reynolds upped his total to 31 to match Colorado State running back Kapri Bibbs, also a sophomore, for the national lead this season. Middle Tennessee (8-5) was held to a season low in points. The Blue Raiders finished the regular season with a five-game winning streak, averaging nearly 43 points a game in that stretch since a 34-7 loss on Oct. 12 at North Texas, about 40 miles away from the TCU campus where the bowl was played. Reynolds finished the season with 1,346 yards rushing leading the triple option offense. Navy won its fifth straight. Ole Miss beats Georgia Tech at Music City Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. Bo Wallace ran for two touchdowns and threw for another score and Mississippi beat Georgia Tech 25-17 Monday in the Music City Bowl for the Rebels second straight bowl victory under coach Hugh Freeze. The junior quarterback and Tennessee native made up for his three turnovers in the Egg Bowl overtime loss by throwing for 256 yards and running for 86 more, giving him the school record for total yards in a season and most completions in a season, topping Eli Manning for both. Ole Miss (8-5) now has won six straight bowls and 10 of the last 11 in making up for the lone loss in that stretch in the 2000 Music City Bowl. Georgia Tech (7-6) has lost eight of nine bowls. The Yellow Jackets scored 10 points in the fourth quarter as they tried to rally before a safety with 4:22 left ended their last chance. Yellow Jackets lineman Adam Gotsis blocked a 32-yard field goal attempt by Andrew Ritter giving Georgia Tech the ball at their own 20 with 4:36 left trailing 23-17. But Georgia Tech lost 5 yards on the first play, then Vad Lee flipped the ball to Corey Dennis on a reverse with the receiver apparently looking to throw when he fumbled under pressure. Right tackle Ray Beno covered up the ball in the end zone for the safety. Ole Miss then chewed up the clock before finally punting back to Georgia Tech with 37 seconds left. Senquez Golson intercepted Lee on the next play to seal the victory for the Rebels in the bowl, sponsored by Franklin American Mortgage Company. With a month to prepare, Ole Miss shut down the nations fourthbest rushing offense. Georgia Tech came in averaging 311.7 yards per game, and the Rebels smothered the Yellow Jackets, holding them to just 151 yards on the ground. Ole Miss held the ball for nearly 33 minutes and had a 477-298 edge in total offense. Ole Miss had a 23-7 lead when the Yellow Jackets scored 10 straight points. Harrison Butker capped a 64-yard drive with a 38-yard field goal in the opening seconds of the fourth quarter, then D.J. White intercepted a Wallace pass intended for Donte Moncrief. On the next play, Lee found Darren Waller for a 72-yard catch-and-run for a TD with 13:25 left. Ole Miss led 13-7 after an interesting first half where both teams opened the game driving for touchdowns with some special teams miscues. Wallace capped the opening possession for Ole Miss with a 17-yard run for a touchdown, and he connected with Moncrief on a 28-yard TD catch where the receiver went down the right sideline and then held the ball out at the pylon for the score in the second quarter. But Gotsis also blocked the extra point, keeping Ole Miss lead at 13-7. Ritter also missed a 29-yard field goal later in the quarter that was so low it bounced off the crossbar. Associated PressGeorgia Tech quarterback Vad Lee is brought down Monday by Mississippi defenders Issac Gross, bottom, and Robert Nkemdiche, top, in the Music City Bowl in Nashville, Tenn. Knights hoping to provide speed bump to Bears Associated PressSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Central Florida mostly contained Louisvilles Tommy Bridgewater, faced the pass-happy offenses in Conference USA last season, dealt with the up-tempo chaos of June Jones SMU Mustangs. The Knights have never seen anything like what theyll face in the Fiesta Bowl on New Years Day. Waiting for them in the desert is No. 6 Baylor, a team that plays like its stuck on fast forward and this season piled up more yards than every team but one in FBS history. Baylor is their own kind of monster, Knights linebacker Terrance Plummer said on Monday. Monster is a good way to describe it, at least to the teams who have tried getting in the Bears way. Using a balanced attacked designed by coach Art Briles, Baylor (11-1) was an unstoppable force all season, leading the nation with 53.3 points per game. The Bears scored at least 70 points four times their first six games and were held under 30 once, to Oklahoma State in their only loss of the season. Baylor put up video-game numbers of total offense, averaging 624.5 yards per game, second alltime in FBS history to Houston (624.9) in 1989 and 51 more than the next-closest team this season. The Bears had their biggest game against West Virginia on Oct. 5, setting Big 12 records with 864 total yards and 73 points in a blowout victory. Perhaps the closest thing Central Florida (11-1) saw to Baylor this season was South Carolina, which averaged 170 fewer yards and nearly 20 fewer points. The Knights lost to the Gamecocks 28-25 on Sept. 28 They have a very explosive offense, Central Florida coach George OLeary said. I dont think anybody is going to stop them. I think you have to slow them down and get off the field. Thats the big thing when you play Baylor. The problem is trying to figure out what to stop. With most high-scoring, yardsamassing teams, the focal part of the offense is usually a strong passing or running game. Find a way to stop that one aspect and youll have a pretty good shot at beating them. Baylor is equally good at passing and running. During the regular season, the Bears were fifth nationally with 359 yards passing and 12th with 262 yards rushing. Bryce Petty was one of the most prolific quarterbacks in the country and has a large cache of explosive receivers. Preventing teams from ganging up on him is running back Lache Seastrunk, who ran for 106 yards per game. And this is nothing new for a Briles-led team. While at Houston, he led the first team in FCS history to have a 300-yard receiver and 200-yard rusher in the same game. The thing is, theyre such a fastpaced team, but theyre a fastpaced team with a running game and you dont see that nowadays because everyone wants to pass the ball, Plummer said. Theyre so well-tempoed, so well-paced and thats the challenge, trying to get lined up, trying to make plays in the open field because theyre so fast in what they do. We just have to focus as a team and make sure we know our assignments. Between Baylors proclivity for putting up big numbers and Central Floridas rise from a smaller conference well, at least one not the size and stature of the Big 12 the Knights are decided underdogs. Baylor is favored by 16 1/2 points, the biggest spread in any of the 35 bowl games, and some predictions have them winning by four touchdowns or more. But the Knights arent exactly slouches on the defensive side of the ball. Central Florida finished 19th nationally in total defense, allowing 346 yards per game, and was one of the few teams to slow down Bridgewater during the early part of the season, when he seemingly could do no wrong. The Knights are positionally sound, rarely miss assignments and have a defensive-minded coach in OLeary. They do a great job schematically defensively, Briles said. They dont get themselves out of position with alignment. Theyre productive in how they approach the game. Were just playing a wellcoached football team. Are they good enough to slow down the Bears? Well find out on New Years Day. Associated PressUniversity of Central Florida linebacker Terrance Plummer takes questions Monday during the Fiesta Bowl media day in Scottsdale, Ariz. Central Florida will face Baylor on Jan. 1, 2014, in the Fiesta Bowl.

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HEALTH& LIFE Section CTUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Inside:Friends of the Library plan annual meetings/C5 Vitamin D is an important component for healthy skin, bone and general good health. Most everybody is familiar that vitamin D is made in the body by the skin and can make about 1,000 units of vitamin D with just a few minutes of sun exposure. A 30-minute exposure to the sun can produce upwards to 2,000 international units. The vitamin D that is made in the skin is metabolized in the liver and undergoes another metabolic step in the kidneys and becomes a steroid hormone-like product called Calcitrol. Besides being a corner stone in helping bone growth, other tissues that benefit include brain, cartilage, colon, hair, skin, kidneys, liver, pancreas, thyroid and there is even some recent evidence to suggest that it helps fight sinus and allergy issues. During the industrial revolution of the 20th century, people spent less time outside. The air was much dirtier and it also drastically cut out the amount of sunlight coming through and people had the aged-old disease call rickets which affected bone density. Believe it or not, rickets is making a comeback and it is because our kids are spending too much time indoors playing video games, but that is another article in itself. Besides sun exposure, there are some foods that are naturally high in content of vitamin D and that includes fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel, fish liver oil also and eggs, cheese, beef and of course, we are all familiar with the fortified milk that we drink as a good source of vitamin D. Just like anything else, vitamin D is a good thing, but too much of it can be a bad thing. There are some tests and research that suggest that elevated levels of vitamin D could lead to hardening of the arteries. Calcification in the blood vessels makes the blood vessels smaller and unable to constrict and accommodate for various levels of blood pressure. This can result in damage to the heart as well as the kidneys. One must be wise and balance this issue. For example, 10 to 15 minutes of sun exposure daily is ideal to obtain vitamin D and eating good foods may be adequate and you may not need to take any supplemental vitamin D. Green, leafy produce also is an excellent source of vitamin D. Estimated required vitamin D per day is about 400 international units. A cup of milk provides about 100 international units. Egg is a little bit lower; and fish, like salmon and tuna, are about two or three times that, depending on the amount you eat. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit Crystal CommunityENT.com. Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT 000GIG1

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Q:I was told by my dentist that I needed gum surgery to expose more tooth. She was making me a crown and something happened while she was drilling that necessitated this surgery. I am a little leery about having this done, and wondered if you had any idea what it is all about. Also, is there any other way around it. Thank you. A: The first thing I would like to say to all the readers of this column is that I am always happy to answer your questions. I just want you to know that you can ask these questions of your dentist, as well. As a dentist myself, I prefer patients ask me any questions they have on their mind. The question you have may seem silly to you but in reality you know the old saying the only foolish questions are the ones not asked. Most of us dentists try to explain everything we do so the patient can understand what is going on. Some of us may use fancy words that can confuse a patient. If that is the case, simply ask your dentist to put it in laymans terms. I bet they will be happy to. On to your questions. What you are describing is called a crown lengthening procedure. It is typically done by a periodontist, but can be done by an oral surgeon and even a general dentist, as long as they are comfortable with it. The crown lengthening procedure is most commonly used when there is either extensive decay or a fracture that extends too far down the root. When the decay or fracture is at the same level as the bone (or close to it), it is very difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the dentist to get a good impression of the tooth in the process of making a crown. The surgeon will usually remove some of the bone and gum tissue surrounding the tooth in order to reestablish ideal conditions at a place lower down on the tooth. Thats it. It is a very straightforward and predictable procedure. It involves minimal or no pain and needs about six weeks of healing before the dentist can continue his or her work. My suggestion to you is to have the procedure done. Your dentist is recommending this for a very specific reason. The end result will be much more favorable with the procedure than without it. Congratultions to your dentist. There are too many dentists who would just proceed as usual and not even mention the situation or things that can be done to make it better. You asked if there were any other options. The only other option is to not do the procedure and for the dentist to try his or her best to get a good impression to make the crown. I personally offer this option to a patient when I feel I might get a good impression leaving things as is, explaining that I will do my best and that not doing the procedure can back fire. There are times that you can get the impression the way you want it, but the patient reports a feeling of fullness around the gums or complains of feeling like something is stuck there but they can not get it out. The reason for this is that you have the bone, the tooth, the crown and the gums all in one spot. This is not the way it is supposed to be, and the patient can sometimes feel that. If this is the case the procedure can always be done as an afterthought. Please remember that the ideal way to handle this is to have the procedure first and complete the crown afterwards. I hope this helped. Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@Masterpiece DentalStudio.com.C2TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000H05D New Years Day brings new resolutions Tomorrow is New Years Day. It brings new hope, new expectations and new resolutions. New Years Day has always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly, looking forward to the coming year. It is time to learn from past mistakes and try to correct them. This year I am going to suggest some New Years resolutions, which can help improve health and cut down the risk of cancer. 1. Lose weight: Obesity accounts for one in seven cancers in the United States and it also increases the risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks, etc. Obesity is calculated by Body Mass Index or BMI and try to keep it below 25. 2. Watch diet: Try to eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Servings are small size, e.g., one small apple may make one serving. Limit intake of red meat and processed meat. Choose whole grains over processed (refined). 3. Exercise: As per the American Cancer Society, engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, above usual activities, on five or more days of the week. I suggest that 45 to 60 minutes of intense physical activity are preferable. This helps as follows: Helps control weight. Maintains healthy bones, muscles and joints. Reduces the risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes. Promotes psychological well-being. Reduces the risk of death from heart disease. 4. Smoking: Smoking is the commonest cause of cancer. It causes many cancers, including lung, oral cavity (mouth), pharynx and larynx (throat), esophagus, bladder, stomach, cervix, kidney and pancreas, and acute myeloid leukemia. It also damages the lungs and heart. Therefore, all smokers should try this year to quit smoking. If you are a nonsmoker, avoid secondhand smoke. 5. Alcohol: If you do not drink alcohol, do not start it for health benefits. If you drink regularly, drink no more than one drink per day for women or two per day for men. 6. Screening: In general, the earlier we detect cancer, the more curable it is. For women, regular mammograms and Pap smears are very important. There is some controversy about screening PSA in men. Both men and women should get a colonoscopy after the age of 50. If you are a smoker or you quit smoking recently (less than the past 15 to 20 years), recent recommendations suggest screening spiral low dose CT scan of the lungs once a year. Please make a resolution that you will follow all current screening guidelines for cancer. These are some of the suggestions for New Years resolutions. Some are easy and some may not be easy. All of these help improve health and cut down the risk of cancer. Please consider them.Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tam pabay.rr.com or call 352-7460707. Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES Crown lengthening common with tooth decay Get moving as new year begins If youre like millions of other Americans, getting in shape is near the top of your New Years resolution list. There is a good reason for it to be there. Staying physically active is one way to reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, and improve your overall sense of well-being. But far too many Americans are dragging their feet when it comes to exercise. According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than half of US adults dont get the recommended amount of physical activity. Thats at least 30 minutes of moderate activity, five or more days a week. Fitting fitness into your day can be tough when youre juggling work, family and other priorities. The key is to make getting that activity one of your priorities. Schedule it on your home or work calendar, just as you do other appointments, and commit to keeping that appointment with yourself. Its that important. Your health is worth it. Getting out of bed early to work out increases your chances that you will actually stick with a plan. If you wait until after work or later in the day, chances are other things will creep up and get in the way of your workout time. But you dont have to join a gym to get a good workout. Walking is one of the easiest ways to stay active and healthy. If the weather puts you off exercising outside, check out our local shopping mall, it is a great place to walk when the weather turns bad. It also helps to sneak extra activity into your daily routine. Seek out the farthest parking spot rather than the closest; carry your own groceries to the car; rake your leaves instead of using a blower; do some leg lifts or sit-ups while you watch TV. Once youve committed to being active, you need to find ways to stay motivated, too. Seeing the progress youre making can help push you on. It is also important to find an activity you like to do so that being active doesnt feel like a chore. Go for a walk one day, a bike ride another; dust off those roller skates the next. Boredom is a surefire way to derail even your best laid plans. Finding a workout buddy can help banish boredom, too. Having someone to talk to while you exercise makes the time pass more quickly. And committing to meet a friend for a workout raises the odds that you really will work out. Finally, get the whole family involved in physical activity. Walk together after dinner, or toss a ball in the back yard. Not only does this get you out and active as a family, it begins to instill the importance of a healthy lifestyle for your kids. And thats a New Years resolution worth sticking to.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER HEALTH NOTES Donating blood a New Years traditionLike that resolution to lose weight, or the kiss at midnight, New Years Eve is filled with traditions, and for many Citrus residents donating blood on the last day of the year is one way to celebrate. LifeSouth will host its annual New Years Resolution Blood Drive, from 11a.m. to 5p.m. today, Dec. 31, at the Walmart Supercenter, 2461 E. Gulf-toLake Highway in Inverness. This is always one of our largest and most fun blood drives of the year, said LifeSouths Pam Egnot. We get people who donate every year at this drive. We even have some multi-generation family donors. To encourage residents to join in the fun, there will be a drawing for a 42-inch LCD TV courtesy of Walmart, and all donors will be entered into a drawing for a Play Station 4. There will be a drawing for a Mossy Oak three-piece seat cover kit and a 2.5-gallon ArmorAll Shop Vac, courtesy of Auto Zone in Inverness. All donors will also receive a thank you gift from LifeSouth. The LifeSouth staff will bring a picnic to the parking lot, grilling hot dogs and hamburgers and offering chips and soft drinks. Donors must be 17 or older, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health. A photo ID is also required. To learn more about donating blood, visit www.lifesouth.org.Hospice volunteer orientation readyHPH Hospice offers new volunteer orientation at its Team Offices from 9a.m. to 4p.m. Jan. 8 and 10. Orientation will be at the HPH offices at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH Hospice has been serving residents of the Nature Coast since 1984. Hospice volunteers often serve patients and families at the bedside, but they also assist in the office, help raise awareness, contribute to educational programs, and provide fundraising support and more. RSVP or get more information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600.Resolve to be fit, healthy in new yearThe Florida Department of Health in Citrus County is offering a free seminar from 10 to 11:30a.m. Jan.22 at the Vital Statistics Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. The workshop New Year, New You will cover nutrition facts, how to read food labels, tips for working exercise into your busy day, and healthy eating through gardening. The Florida Department of Health is working with the YMCA and the Citrus County Master Gardeners to present educational topics to help people get on the right path to living a healthy lifestyle. We are excited about working with our community partners to kick off a healthy New Year, said Carol Burke, senior public health nutritionist supervisor for the Florida Department of Health Citrus County. This free seminar will be a fun, informative way to help people get motivated for 2014. The New Year, New You seminar is free to the public and no registration is required. For information, call Sabrina Yeatman at 352-527-0068, ext.242.Blood drives set for upcoming weekLifeSouth Community Blood Centers: With summer upon us, theres a sharp increase in the need for blood. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30a.m. to 5p.m. weekdays (7p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30a.m. to 2p.m. Saturdays and 10a.m. to 2p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 2629 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, open from 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. weekdays, (6:30p.m. Wednesdays), 8a.m. to 1:30p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 12 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.1, Subway, 6748 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Crystal River. 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, Citrus County Solid Waste, 230 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State Road 44), Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan.2, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Jan.3, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan.4, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, 4150 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. 12 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan.5, Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. 1 to 4 p.m. Monday, Jan.6, Citrus County Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday, Jan.6, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.7, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. 2 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.7, Cypress Cove Care Center, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River. 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, Rock Crusher Elementary School, 814 S. Rock Crusher Road, Homosassa.Health center board to meetThe George A. Dame Community Health Center Board Meetings are at 3p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first-floor conference room. See NOTES/ Page C4

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HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 C3 Photo courtesy of Getty Images Home ModificationsLiving at home longer may mean renovating a home to make it more accessible. This can include such things as installing ramps to bypass stairs, building a bedroom on the main floor, placing grab bars in the shower, changing the height of kitchen countertops or making a bathroom safer and more accessible. Before you make home modifications, you should evaluate your current and future needs by going through your home room by room and answering a series of questions to highlight where changes might be made. Several checklists are available to help you conduct this review. The National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modifica tions is a good place to start. Go to the centers website at http://www.homemods.org and click on the link to the Safety Checklist and Assessment Instrument. Getting HelpKeeping a house running smoothly requires a lot of hard work. If you are no longer able to keep up with the demands, you may need to hire someone to do laundry, buy groceries, run errands, clean the house or perform any necessary repairs. Those who are unable to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), such as getting in and out of bed, walking, bathing, dressing, and eating, can often continue to stay at home with outside help. There are a number of services that can be brought in to assist with ADLs and other personal care. You can hire some one, such as a personal care aide or home health aide, to help you out a few hours a day or around the clock. Some health care services can be provided at home by trained professionals, such as occupa tional therapists, social workers or home health nurses. Check with your insurance or health service to see what kind of coverage is available, although you may have to cover some of these costs out of pocket. If very specific conditions are met, Medicare will help pay for all or a portion of home health care. TransportationDeclining health often causes a decline in independence and mobility. Many seniors lose the ability to drive or simply feel uncomfortable behind the wheel at night. Investigate transporta tion options in your area so you can maintain an active social life, get medical care and shop for necessities. You might find family members willing to take you to the grocery store, friends who will drive you to social events, nearby bus routes, reduced fare taxis or senior transportation services funded by a local not-for-profit. Staying in your home should not mean being cut off from community activities you enjoy. Finding new ways to get around, even after you are no longer driving, may allow you to stay engaged and active. FAMILY FEATURES Most people prefer to stay in their home or apartment for as long as possible. The best way to make this a reality is to plan ahead of time to make the amenities in your home as safe and accessible as possible. It can be hard to imagine that tasks around the house that were once done with ease can one day pose a challenge. Anticipating the chal lenge and planning accordingly may allow you to remain in your home for an extended period of time. Often, with some minor modifications, your home can be adapted to help you stay as long as possible even with some loss of mobility.

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Alzheimers AssociationFlorida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-6884537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz.org/living_with_alzheimers message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. First Tuesday, 11a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-683-9009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-for-profit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. RBOI Prostate Cancer Support Group: 11:30a.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, 522 N. Lecanto Highway. Call 352527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext.213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-5274389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352726-1551, ext.6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352-229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962 or 352-5272348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness.C4TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE 000GS5B 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS Reiki speakers to speakReiki practioners Rick and Connie Leiser will be guest speakers at the Time Out From Cancer monthly dinner at 6p.m. Wednesday, Jan.8, at Clawdaddys restaurant, 1601 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The American Cancer Society describes Reiki as based on the belief that spiritual energy can be channeled through a Reiki practitioner to heal the patients spirit. This is thought to help release the bodys natural healing powers. Reiki is most often given as a hands-on experience. The word Reiki comes from Japanese terms that translate as universal life energy. Reiki is said to promote relaxation, decrease stress and anxiety, and increase a persons general sense of well-being. This group is a monthly meeting of cancer survivors and we invite you to join us to share your inspiration and strength. Complimentary finger food is sponsored by Hometown Values and delicious items are available off of the dinner menu. Anyone is welcome to attend, but we ask that you RSVP to Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or Cancer Navigator Wendy Hall at 527-0106 by Jan.6. CASA in need of donationsCitrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA) needs donation of household goods for its domestic violence shelter for women and children: hair clips, hair brushes, toilet paper, paper towels, size 5 diapers, hand soap, shampoo, conditioner, facial tissues and liquid highefficiency (HE) laundry soap. Drop off donations at CASAs outreach center, 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Donations of grocery and gas cards are always welcome. Call 352-344-8111.County offers care servicesCitrus County Senior Care Services has home care services available under the HOPE Program (Homecare Options Provided for Everyone). Services available include: Case management Personal care (help with bathing and personal grooming) Respite Homemaking (light housekeeping duties) Emergency alert/response button Home-delivered meals All of these services are overseen by a certified case manager who places licensed and bonded service providers in the home. If you or a loved one are in need of any of these services, call 352-527-5930 for more information and a cost quote. SHINE program offers helpFlorida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352-527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Alzheimers caregiver support group, 2 p.m. the last Thursday monthly at Highland Terrace ALF, 700 Medical Court E., Inverness, facilitated by Debbie OLeary, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-860-2525. Respite care available. Time Out From Cancer, cancer survivors meeting 6 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at Clawdaddys restaurant 1601 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River, sponsored by Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI). Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group, 4:30 to 5:30p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group, 2:30p.m. first and third Thursday monthly at Sunshine Gardens Crystal River, 311 N.E. Fourth Ave., facilitated by Debbie Selsavage, a group leader trained by the Alzheimers Family Organization. Call 352-563-0235 or email administration@sgseniors.com. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11a.m. the first Saturday monthly at First Baptist Church of Hernando, 3790 E. Parsons Point Road, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call Shana at 352-637-2030 or 352-422-2123. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352-596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. RBOI has begun a monthly survivor group with inspirational guests and strength based topics. Any cancer survivors and family are welcome to attend. There is no cost to attend. For information, email Tommie Brown at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.com or call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106. Alzheimers Association-Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group, 6 to 7:30p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low, M.D., self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-5635182. Together We Grow NarAnon Family Group 6:45p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888-947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410-903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.food addicts.org. 7 to 8:30p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S.19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352-220-1959. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.41. 6 p.m. Mondays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Crystal River AFG: 8p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Lecanto AFG: 8p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Stepping Stones: 10a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncinter group.com. 10:30a.m. Sundays, 10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chassahowitzka Community Center, 1mile west of U.S.19 on Miss Maggie Drive, turn left, two blocks. AC Group, 7p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352-637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholics forchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: It Works How and Why, noon to 1p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Mens RAW (Recovery at Work) Mens Meeting, 7 to 8p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8p.m. Monday; 8 to 9p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Women United Ladies Meeting, 6:30 to 7:30p.m. Thursday Citrus Memorial Health System Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352-508-1604. Information about NA is also available at NatureCoastNA.org. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Tuesdays at Club Recovery, corner of County Road 486 and Anvil Terrace, Hernando. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352-3448111 to sign up. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. Gulf to Lake Celebrate Recovery Fridays at Crystal River United Methodist Church on County Road 495. Dinner ($3) at 6p.m.; large group at 7p.m.; small groups at 8p.m. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. WEEKLY SUPPORT MEETINGS SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS NOTESContinued from Page C2

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Submit information at least two weeks before the ev ent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in In verness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an ev ent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Native Plant Society meeting set for Jan. 7The Citrus County Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 7, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Dr. Walter Kingsley Taylor, author of Florida gardening books, will be guest speaker. His Guide to Florida Wildflowers is a standard book for anyone who ventures out to look at wildflowers in our community. His new book, Florida Wildflowers A Comprehensive Guide, will be available at the meeting. The public is welcome. Email citrusNPS@gmail.com for more information.Women plan Bunco Bash at BH Lions ClubThe Citrus Hills Womens Club will have a Bunco Bash at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. Tickets are $15. The public is welcome. For more information and tickets, call Janet Haight at 352-527-2639. For membership information, call 352-270-8909.Jazz Society to host monthly open jamThe Citrus Jazz Society will host its monthly open jam session from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center (formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall) in Homosassa Springs. This session will honor drummer Tony Mancaruso, president of the Citrus Jazz Society, who died on Dec. 6. A $7 donation at the door for nonmembers is requested. Bring your own refreshments. Musicians interested in playing are welcome to call Roy Hoskins at 352-382-1875. Learn about painting at free workshopChristopher Satchell will offer a Painting ASAP Workshop free to the public at 5 p.m. Monday at the Coastal Region Library, Crystal River. The instruction will focus on such topics as: How to select a reputable contractor painting contractors must be licensed, have proof of insurance and provide work history with references. How to select affordable, quality materials depending on condition of the structure and budget allocated. Advance preparation what the homeowner must do to get ready for a contractor and what contractor must do to get the structure ready. The workshop will also look at the pros and cons of the do-ityourself, or DIY, alternative. There will be a raffle for a free house pressure cleaning. For more information, call 352-464-1397. COMMUNITYPage C5TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious PawsADOPTABLE Kitties Special to the ChronicleYoung adult felines in a variety of colors, each with a distinct personality, are all ready to move into a loving home of their own. All are well socialized, most like to be with other pets, including dogs. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The Floral City Adoption Center at Gretas Touch on U.S. 41 is open Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The mall site will reopen Thursday, Jan. 2; the Floral City site will reopen on Saturday, Jan. 4. For more information, call 352-726-4700 or go to www. preciouspawsflorida.com NEWS NOTES Special to the ChronicleEveryone is invited to join the Friends of the Library for its annual meetings scheduled for January. The Friends of the Lakes Region Library will host its annual meeting at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Jan. 7, at the library in Inverness. Prize-winning nature photographer Gary Kuhl will discuss his collection Citrus County: Where the Wild Things Are. The Friends of the Homosassa Library will host its meeting at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8 at the Homosassa Library. Captain Jon Semmes of Singing River Tours will provide a special musical presentation. The Friends of the Coastal Region Library will meet at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, at the Crystal River library. A presentation titled Presidents and First Ladies: FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt will be given by William Parker and Mercita Sue Wills. The Friends of the Central Ridge Library will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16, at the library in Beverly Hills. Candace Booth will offer her special presentation, Walking Back in Time with Dessie. For more information about Citrus County Libraries, visit the website at citruslibraries.org. Special to the ChronicleFlorida is a mandated state and any insurance company doing business in Florida must give a discount to those completing an AARP Safe Driving Course, open to everyone age 50 and older. Contact your agent for discount amounts. Update yourself to earn a discount and learn about newly enacted motor vehicle and traffic laws. Course fee is $15 for AARP members; $20 for all others. Call the listed instructor to register: Crystal River, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and 15, 1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and 19, 1 to 4 p.m., Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Inverness, Hernando, Floral City Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 21 and 22, 9 a.m. to noon, Citrus Memorial Health System Auditorium. Call Don Slough at 352-344-4003. Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 18 and 19, 9 a.m. to noon, Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580 Lemon St., Hernando. Call Bob Dicker at 352-527-2366 Beverly Hills, Lecanto, Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 14 and 15, 9 a.m. to noon, Brown Funeral Home, 5430 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731. Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764. Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 26 and 27, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills. Call Joe Turck at 352-628-6764. Citrus County Parks & Recreations fifth annual holiday show Miracle on 34th Street Musical, at Citrus Springs Community Center, was a smash hit. Starring the popular New Dawn Singers and featuring the glitz and glamour of the great white way of Broadway, the company of dancers and singers kept us spellbound with set after set. With Radio City Music Hall signs adorning the stage and a toy store set, the sixmember cast quickly set the holiday mood in their elegant period winter wonderland costumes with their opening act, Its the Most Wonderful Time of the Year, dancing and singing Rockettes style. From Eustis, this family of performers captured our sincere admiration. Grandmother, grandfather, father and mother, then children from generation to generation the troupe maintains the legacy begun by their parents. Time and again we were invited to sing along to the many time-honored Christmas favorites. A Holly Jolly Christmas was featured and Frosty, the Snowman garnered a solo. We marveled at the quick costume changes as the group began Walking in a Winter Wonderland, pretending to build a snowman and huddling together, trying to keep warm as they sang Let it Snow. Memories of our own Christmas gatherings of family and friends refreshed our dreams and hopes. Next, the players took us on a trip to the faraway North Pole to Santas workshop as the group performed a spirited Cool Yule dance in their red and white peppermint-striped costumes, with Mr. and Mrs. Santa nearby. We are Santas Elves and Jolly Old St. Nicholas, a jazzy routine of Santa Man by an energized Santa was followed by Up on the Rooftop and a Santa Claus parade of dancers spelling out Santa in bold letters. After Mr. and Mrs. Santa performed a holiday favorite, Baby, Its Cold Outside, an exuberant Santa danced across the stage. Slowing the pace a bit, a romantic couple sang Christmas Time was Meant to Bring Us Love. A little boy made a dramatic reading to Santa, giving us a broader perspective of the customs and traditions of Christmas around the world. International offerings included Feliz Navidad and Christmas in Killarney. The cast joined hands and invited us to sing Let There be Peace on Earth with them. Next, Home for the holidays was featured and the telling of the real story of Christmas the birth of Jesus with Go Tell it on the Mountain, Amen, Amen and Go Where I Send Thee. Intermission featured The Big Apple Sweets and Treats Shoppe with ice cream, cookies, popcorn, hot chocolate and coffee for sale. The second half of the show featured Broadway hits including Christmas in the Street, with players dressed in all white with plaid sashes. Songs included Need a Little Christmas, a Rockettes favorite, and Snow from the movie White Christmas. Toy soldiers marched around to Toyland. The all-American Another Opening, Another Show set featured a fabulous array of tunes from Oklahoma, My Fair Lady, South Pacific, Mary Poppins and more. The closing set had the cast replete in red and white velvet, ringing Christmas bells and singing traditional Christmas carols. The crowd gave the cast a standing ovation as we joined them in singing We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Many individuals and businesses contributed to the staging of the show, for which planning and coordination begin each February. The Friends of the Citrus County Parks & Recreation Foundation is being formed with memberships at $5 a year. For more information, call 352-465-7007. Billy Lindsey as Elvis is coming up March 7. Call 352-465-7007 for reservations.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY Discover Friends of the Library Annual meetings scheduled for January; special presentations planned Miracle another smash with Citrus audience AARP slates Safe Driving Courses Home dedicationLisa Radford addresses volunteers, donors and other partner families at her recent home dedication with Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County. Radford is the proud new homeowner of Habitat Home No. 96, located in Crystal River. Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County provides simple, decent, affordable housing to those who have a need, ability to pay and willingness to partner. To learn more about becoming a Habitat for Humanity homeowner, call Rose at 352-563-2744. To volunteer at construction sites, call C.D. at 352-601-6582. Call Wendy at 352-564-2300 to volunteer at one of Habitats two ReStore locations, Crystal River and Inverness, where those with retail, electrical, appliance, electronic, cashier or cleaning experience are needed. If your interest is answering the phone, filing, copying or other office duties, call Debbie at 352-563-2744 to volunteer in the office. For more information, visit the website at www.habitatcc.org.Special to the Chronicle

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C6TUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.This week we are looking at the 2013 International Bridge Press Association awards. The Yeh Bros. Best Bid of the Year was given to Peter Bertheau from Sweden. The journalist prize went to Micke Melander from Sweden. Bertheau had the North hand, playing in the 2012 World Mind Sports Games (formerly World Team Olympiad) final against Poland in Lille, France. (This event took place too late for inclusion in that years awards.) South opened two hearts, which showed a six-card suit and 10-13 high-card points. West overcalled four diamonds, Leaping Michaels, indicating at least 5-5 in spades and diamonds. Bertheau now set out to try to buy the contract at any level. He responded only four hearts. East jumped to five spades to invite a slam, but West was not interested, having a weaker hand in high-card terms than normal for Leaping Michaels. Bertheau continued his plan with six hearts. And when East took a safety-bid with six spades (it seemed that both sides had a double fit), Bertheau moved on to seven hearts. Certain that this was a sacrifice, East doubled. But the contract was laydown for plus 2,470. At the other table, North-South had a misunderstanding, eventually stopping in six hearts. East sacrificed in six spades, doubled and down one. This gave Sweden 20 international match points en route to the title. The Swedish Bridge Federation website called this Bertheauvenly music. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 P o liti cs N a ti on (N)H ar db a ll With Ch r i s Matthews (N) All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (N) Th e R ac h e l M a dd ow Show (N) Th e L as t W or d With Lawrence ODonnell All I n With Ch r i s H ayes (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us The 80s: The Decade That Made Us (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Jinxed Sponge.TurtlesRabbidsSanjaySam & HauntedThunderSee DadInstantTeenNick Top 10 (N) (OWN) 103 62 103 The Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, NotsThe Haves, Nots (OXY) 44 123 American Sweethearts (1996) Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (2002) When Harry Met Sally (1989) (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Jay Z Made in America (2013) (In Stereo) NR The Rolling Stones: Sweet Summer Sun Hyde Park 2013 PG Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic (2013) NR F... Nick Cannon The comics view of the world. MA, L (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops Cops Cops PG Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops PG Cops PG Cops (STARZ) 370 271 370 10 Years (2011) PG-13 Finding Nemo (2003, Comedy) Voices of Albert Brooks. (In Stereo) G Charlies Angels: Full Throttle (2003, Action) Cameron Diaz. PG-13 Think Like a Man (2012) (SUN) 36 31 36 UFC Insider Icons of Coaching World Poker Tour: Season 11 Raising Canes The List: SEC Icons of Coaching DrivenBMX Supercross World Cup 2012 XTERRA World Championship (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19SeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyFam. GuyFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35Jailhouse Viva Las Vegas (1964) Elvis Presley. NR Thats Entertainment! (1974) Fred Astaire. Clips from 1928-58 MGM musicals. G Thats Entertainment, Part 2 (1976) G (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Moonshiners Tickle bootlegs at night. Moonshiners Blue Moonshine Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts Rival Shiners Moonshiners (N) (In Stereo) Backyard Oil: After the Gush (N) Moonshiners (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30HoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHoneyHere Comes HoneyHoneyHoney (TMC) 350 261 350 John Dies at the End (2012) Chase Williamson. (In Stereo) R The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (2011) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 Storage 24 (2012) Noel Clarke. (In Stereo) R Ward (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Librarian: Curs Transformers (2007) Shia LaBeouf. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. PG-13 (DVS) Bostons Finest No More Bullets Marshal Law: Texas Bostons Finest (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularRegularAdvenUncle RegularKing/HillClevelandAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 106 9 44Tastiest PlacesTastiest PlacesSturgis PG Sturgis Raw PGSturgis Raw PGSturgis Raw PG (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55PawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnStorageStorage (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24GriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithGriffithRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKirstieThe Exes (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Time Bomb CSI: Miami About Face CSI: Miami Dead Ringer CSI: Miami Rest in Pieces CSI: Miami Law & Disorder CSI: Miami Habeas Corpse (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineMotherRules Dear Annie: Three months ago, I attended the funeral of a friend and former co-worker, Renee. I went in, signed the book, gave my condolences to her husband and was speaking to some friends. At that point, another co-worker came up to me and said I should sit in the back of the mortuary because Renee wouldnt want me there. I was stunned. Shortly after, Renees daughterin-law approached me and said, Thank you for coming and being a friend to Renee. Of course, by then I was crying and decided to leave. When I spoke with another friend later, she told me she thought Renee was jealous of me. I cannot understand why. Renee had a lovely family, a wonderful husband and a new home. I know that many times when I enter a room, most people dont really welcome me. I am tolerated by those with whom I have worked, and even my friends are like this. I have learned to accept it. But this funeral still upsets me. Should they have called me the day before and told me not to come? By the way, I still have not received a thank you for the memorial I gave to the family. Stunned in Nebraska Dear Stunned: Were not sure what happened at the funeral. One person made you feel unwelcome, but the daughter-in-law thanked you for coming. While we can understand your discomfort, you seem to value one persons opinion over the rest. However, there is another issue here. You claim that most people merely tolerate your presence. Why would you think that? Are you behaving in a way that attracts negative attention? Is it possible you are oversensitive and misread others reactions? Please talk to those friends you trust and ask for their honest opinion about you. No one should go through life believing they are not worth liking. Figure it out and then work on changing it. If you need to seek therapy to accomplish this, please do so. Dear Annie: I am a breast cancer survivor and want to donate my hair. My hairdresser told me that while dyed hair is OK, totally bleached-out hair is not. Also, my hair is more than 5 percent gray, so Locks of Love wont use it. Do you know of any organization that will? Anita Dear Anita: We have good news. According to Pantene Beautiful Lengths (pantene. com/beautifullengths), it takes at least eight to 15 ponytails to make a wig. For a realistic-looking wig with consistent color, all of these ponytails must be dyed the same shade, but gray hair, as well as some chemically treated or permanently colored hair, does not absorb dye at the same rate as other types. However, some gray hair is usable. Try the World of Wigs Corinne Fund at worldofwigs.com. Also, Locks of Love (locksoflove.org) now accepts gray hair donations, as does Wigs for Kids (wigs forkids.org), both of which use the hair to offset costs. Dear Annie: I hope its not too late to reply to Uncomfortable Daughter-in-Law, whose mother-in-law wants to be called Mom. The writer should explain that she has a very special relationship with her own mother and wouldnt want to call her mother-in-law by the same name. However, it is important that she have a name just for her, to recognize how special she is. Perhaps it could be Mama Smith or Mama S. or some other term of endearment that means something to the two of them. Because of numerous grandparents, my daughterin-law devised the name Cookie Grandma to distinguish me from the other grandmas in her childrens lives. (A cookie is one of my favorite desserts.) It works, and it is a sweet and respectful way of dealing with this. Arcadia, Calif.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmail box@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) DOUSE RANCH POUNCE CHOOSE Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The new prison had its PROS AND CONS Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. PIMLE CANKK LEPYUL TENERL Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Print your answer here: TUESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 31, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessA Toast to 2013! A look back at 2013. (N)New Years NewsDaly # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Live From Lincoln Center (N) (In Stereo) G ReturnDownton Frontline Gospels; Christianity and Roman Empire. PG (DVS) % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Live From Lincoln Center (N) GReturnFrontline PG (DVS) ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.A Toast to 2013! A look back at 2013. (N) (In Stereo) New Years Eve With Carson Daly NewsNew Years ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! G Wheel of Fortune New Years Rockin Eve Presents the 30 Greatest Women in Music (N) D,L,S Dick Clarks Primetime New Years Eyewit. News Dick Clarks (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G NCIS Hit and Run PG (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles Parley Person of Interest (In Stereo) PG 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Dads Brooklyn Nine-Nine New Girl Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) New Years Eve Live (N) D,L 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.The 30 Greatest Women in Music Dick Clark NewsDick 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles Help Me Hannah Perry Stone New Years Eve Winterfest from Liberty University < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America New Years Rockin Eve Presents the 30 Greatest Women in Music (N) D,L,S Dick Clarks Primetime New Years NewsDick Clarks @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit The Office The Office PG Family Guy Family Guy F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudBones Bones Cops Rel.Cops Rel.SeinfeldCommun H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PresentThe 700 Club (N) GBabersPaidMannaPaidPaidStudio Direct HealingMinistries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men iHeartradio Music Festival, Night 2 Performers include Justin Timberlake. D,LEngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute Chamber Chat Crook and Chase (In Stereo) PG Cold Squad (DVS) Eye for an EyeThe Comedy Shop S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangDads BrooklynNew GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10New Years Eve Live (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Premios Juventud 2013 Dcimo ao del evento con los premios.Feliz 2014! (N) (En Vivo) (SS) (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds PGCriminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Chupacabra The Walking Dead Secrets The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Nebraska (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21Madagascar (In Stereo) PG North America No Place to Hide PG North America Revealed PG Africa Kalahari (In Stereo) G Africa Savannah (In Stereo) G North America Revealed PG (BET) 96 19 96 Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG Top 100 Videos of 2013 (N) PG New Years Eve 2013 (N) PG (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Real HousewivesHousewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Housewives/Atl.Shahs of Sunset (CC) 27 61 27 33Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Grumpy Old Men (1993, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Ann-Margret. PG-13 Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportMarijuana: IndustryMarijuana USAMexicos Drug WarMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46SituationCrossfireErin Burnett OutFrontBest/ Worst New Years Eve Live With Anderson Cooper and Kathy Griffin (N) (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Good Luck Jessie: NYC Christmas G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G Austin & Ally G Up (2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed Asner. PG WALL-E (2008, Adventure) Voices of Ben Burtt. (In Stereo) G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17College Football FootballCollege Football Chick-fil-A Bowl -Duke vs. Texas A&M. From Atlanta. (N) SportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49College BasketballCollege Basketball College Basketball Connecticut at Houston.SportCtrOlber. (EWTN) 95 70 95 48Vespers Daily Mass G Mother Angelica LiveReligiousBlessingRosaryChristmas ConcertWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore. PG Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971, Fantasy) Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson. G The 700 Club (In Stereo) G (FLIX) 118 170 Heathers (1989, Comedy) Winona Ryder. (In Stereo) R The Frighteners (1996, Suspense) Michael J. Fox. (In Stereo) R Halloween: Resurrection (2002) Jamie Lee Curtis.Phantoms R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFox News: Our StoryThe Five All-American New Year Holiday celebration from New York. (N) (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Chopped Chopped G Chopped G Chopped G DinersDiners (FS1) 732 112 732 College BasketballHoopsCollege Basketball Villanova at Butler. (N)HoopsCollege Basketball Marquette at Creighton. (FSNFL) 35 39 35 NBA Basketball MagicUFC Ultimate Knockouts 9 (N) Hot StoveUFCWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Avatar (2009, Science Fiction) Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. PG-13Battle: Los Ang (GOLF) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf Presidents Cup, Day Four.Golf PNC Father/Son Challenge, First Day. Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (2008, Drama) Henry Winkler. Let It Snow (2013) Candace Cameron Bure. An executive has a change of heart. Debbie Macombers Trading Christmas (2011) Tom Cavanagh. (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) Nicholas Hoult. (In Stereo) PG-13 Warm Bodies (2013) Nicholas Hoult. PG-13 Lone Survivor 24/7 Red Wings/Maple Leafs: Road Treme Colson is offered a transfer. MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Dark Shadows (2012, Comedy) Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13 True Blood (In Stereo) MA True Blood The Sun MA True Blood Eric is irate. MA True Blood At Last MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Hunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlHunt IntlHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHuntersHunters (HIST) 51 54 51 32 42RestorationRestorationCounting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG RestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Hope Floats (1998, Romance) Sandra Bullock. Premiere. PG-13 Georgia Rule (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan. R A Walk to Remember (2002, Romance) Shane West. PG (LMN) 50 119 The Perfect Assistant (2008, Drama) Rachel Hunter. (In Stereo) NR Jodi Arias: Dirty Little Secret (2013) Tania Raymonde. (In Stereo) NR Jodi Arias: Beyond the Headlines Beyond the Headlines: Officer (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R Argo (2012, Historical Drama) Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin. (In Stereo) R New Years Eve (2011) Halle Berry, Jessica Biel. (In Stereo) PG-13 WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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COMICSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, DECEMBER31, 2013 C7 Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Ronin (PG-13) 12:30 p.m. No passes. Ronin (PG-13) In 3D. 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes. American Hustle (R) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. Anchorman 2 (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Frozen (PG) 7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes. Grudge Match (PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:45 p.m. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) 3:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) In 3D, high frame rate. 12:15 p.m. No passes. Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (PG) 12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Walking With Dinosaurs (PG) 2:25 p.m. No passes. Walking With Dinosaurs (PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m., 4:45 p.m. No passes. The Wolf of Wall Street (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Ronin (PG-13) 12 p.m. No passes. Ronin (PG-13) In 3D. 3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes. American Hustle (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. Anchorman 2 (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Frozen (PG) 12:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Grudge Match (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (PG-13) 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO X RXTH EI OIDT IV VHO BHZDA HWH ... RZJMPXVM OXEP UHRRIO PJLZV GHXVMA XA Z MDHZE OZB EI AEZDE EPH VHO BHZD. NZJRZ NIJVCAEIVHPrevious Solution: Novels give you the matrix of emotions, give you the flavor of a time in a way formal history cannot. Doris Lessing (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-31

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C8TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000GT1J 000GT1N 2 VINTAGE COFFEE TABLES. 1 round with lazy susan. 1 rectangular. Both maple. $25 for both. 527-1239 1920s Solid Cherry Wood 4 Poster Bed 3 shy of double bed inc. boxsprings & mattress, good cond. $749. firm (352) 795-8018 Antique Butler 3 drawers $100 (352) 795-1929 DESKAND CHAIR computer desk large/chair leather. set $75 352-860-0759 King Sealy Mattress W/ Blue Lattice Bed Frame. Less than 1 yr. old. exc. cond. $500. 352-637-6108, 352-400-9631 cell KITCHEN FURNITURE Expandable kitchen table with four chairs excellent condition. $125.00 382-5956 LIVING ROOM SET sofa, loveseat, 2 cocktail tables, 1 coffee table, 2 lamps, light rattan, like new $450 (352) 746-6848 LOVE SEAT/ LIKE NEW LIGHT COLORS,MUST SELL/$50 Linda 341-2271 LOVE SEATLike new,must sell.Light colors. $50 Linda 423-4163 LOVESEATBeige/gold neutral 57 loveseat one year old non-smoking $100 OBO 352-4654208 Moving, Sleeper Sofa with 4 matching Nightstands$350. File cabinet $5. 352-249-7413 Moving,Twin Beds $250,Dining room table $20. 352-249-7413 OAK DESK -KIDS HEIGHT2 x 4 foot Top, Blonde Oak, 2 Drawers plus Book Shelf $100 341-0450 RECLINERS Pair matching burgundy recliners exc cond paid $399 each at Badcock Perfect for superbowl viewing $275.00 OBO 352-4654208 HIFI SPEAKER KIT 1pair GRS 8inch 85Watt woofers, Nuance Tweeters,Silver Wire, Caps. $80 341-0450 JVC DVD PLAYERVCR COMBO HR-XVC11B used few hours Mom doesnt need nice $50 341-0450 SPEAKER FOR HOME THEATRE Black and Silver, British MTM, UpGraded Internal Parts $75 341-0450 SPEAKER FOR HOME THEATRE CENTRE Co-Axial SEAS 2-Way, 150Watt, Solid Oak $75 341-00450 SYLVANIATV Good condition, 26 inches, remote included, black colored, $30 (352)465-1616 TV HDMI VIDEO CORDS Two 8 Foot Wires, version 1.3 $20 341-0450 CISCO LINKSYS E1200 ROUTER *Has WPA2 Security, Wireless N, Mac or PC, $30 341-0450 CISCO WIFI ROUTER Linksys EA3500, N750 Smart Wi-Fi Router, 10 Months old $80 341-0450 COMPUTER MONITOR 19inch Viewsonic LCD Widescreen, for PC or X-BOX includes cable $75 341-0450 DEAD ISLAND GAME For XBOX 360, Good Condition, $20 341-0450 2 ASHLEY 5-DRAWER DRESSER CABINETS BARELY USED!!! ONLY A FEW MONTHS OLD!!! Buy both for $400 or $225 for 1 352-746-1910 2 VINTAGE CHAIRS. Gold swivel rocker and brown/rust fixed chair. Nice condition. $25 for both. 527-1239 6 YR OLD SAMSUNG front load dryer, like new, never used much, asking $300 (352) 726-6461 352-201-5113 APPLIANCES Kenmore Refrigerator, side by side, water and ice on door, $300;Kenmore glass-top range, $200; Kenmore Microwave $75; Whirlpool Dishwasher $125; $600 for all. Call 382-2743 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CHESTFREEZER Working in good condition family down sized so Im selling for $100 OBO 352-621-9810 Refrigerator Maytag Black S-by-S ice/water on dr. $300; Electric Stove, flat top, Black $100 obo (315) 539-5297 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 WASHER OR DRYER $145.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Cond, 60 day Guar.Free Del/Set up. 352-263-7398 DUDLEYS AUCTION Sunday Jan. 5th Antique & Collectible Auction Pre: 10am, Auc: 1pm 500+ lots, antiq. furn, silver/gold jewelry coins, china, porcelain, check website for catalog & photos ********************** call for info 637-9588 Dudleysauction.com 4000 S Florida (US41S) Inverness Ab1667 10%bp cash/ck MAKITACHOPSAW WORKS FINE ONLY $65 OBO 352-464-0316 POWER WASHER PARTS Campbell 1/4hose, gun, lance& soap bottle $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds ALL CLASSES FOR 2014 Spring Hill & New Port Richey COSMETOLOGY BARBERING NAILS SKIN MASSAGE TherapyDAY & NIGHT SCHOOLFull Time & Part Time Full Specialty & Instructor Training BENES International School of Beauty www .benes.edu (727) 848-8415 (352) 263-2744 1 (866) 724-2363 TOLL FREE STATE APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING Become an Avon Rep Today! Free Training. $10 to join. Call Chuck (352) 503-4816. Independ. Avon Rep. DUDLEYS AUCTION Sunday Jan. 5th Antique & Collectible Auction Pre: 10am, Auc: 1pm 500+ lots, antiq. furn, silver/gold jewelry coins, china, porcelain, check website for catalog & photos ********************** call for info 637-9588 Dudleysauction.com 4000 S Florida (US41S) Inverness Ab1667 10%bp cash/ck LARGE CHURCHin Crystal River Needs Full timeCUSTODIAN40 hrs. week, good starting wage. Abled body for light lifting. Tables, chairs. Reply to: Citrus County Chronicle, Blind Box 1851P 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd Crystal Riv. Fl 34428 TOWER HANDStarting at $10.00/Hr Bldg. Communication Towers. Travel, Good Pay & Benefits. OT, 352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri. WRECKER DRIVEREXPERIENCED ONL Y apply. Must live in Inverness area. **Apply within** Eds Auto Repair. 4610 S. Florida Ave No Phone Calls MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 Opportunity for Fulltime Professional.Must have bookkeeping /acounting experienceor equivalent & proficient in computers and spreadsheets. Able to multi-task & communicate well with others. FAX RESUME TO 352-746-9033 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 TEACHERFulltime, Exp. Req. CDA Preferred TADPOLES EARLYLEARNING (352) 560-4222 CASE MANAGERPrimary Care Physican Accountable Care Organization (ACO) seeking qualifed Care Manager. Current Florida RN lic. along with 3 plus years experience in hospital setting or post accute care setting. Manage Care experience and Case Mgr certification prefered. Please Fax Resume to: Nature Coast ACO Attn Patty King 352-746-3838 F/T CNAFor OB Doctors Ofc Fax Resume: 352-794-0877 Medical BillerImmediate Opening Busy Multi-Pysician Practice, Experienced applicants Fax Resume to: 352-746-4748 COMMUNITY HOSTESSSeeking high-energy professional hostesses for seasonal part-time position including weekends shuttling potential homeowners around country club communitys amenities and model homes. Must be professional, outgoing articulate, upbeat and service oriented. Apply at Terra Vista Welcome Center, 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL FREE Horse Manure You Haul (352) 628-9186 Neutered Male Cat tiger striped, black on gray, very friendly Call (352) 746-1904 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FRESH CITRUS @BELLAMY GROVELocated 1.5 mi. E. on Eden Dr. from hwy 41 STRAWBERRIES COLLARD GREENS GIFT SHIPPING 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Black & White Cat Answers to Mister. Lost Homosassa Trail/KingsAve. REWARD 352-563-2982 Lost Yorkie, Male, 4 lbs. Monroe Street Beverly Hills Area REWARD One his puppies (352) 513-4696 Lost zippered Leather Key Case Between CVS and Hospice. 786-205-1186 Missing female pure breed Dalmatian. Need to find, part of the family. Lost in Crystal River area. Please call Tim at (407)694-4280. Short Haired Calico Cat Last seen on 12/27 Mayflower Ave, Inverness. Reward 352-419-6475 Volunteer Fish and Wildlife safari hat with 7 FWC pins. Lost in the vacinity of the Homosassa Park. Reward Offer (937) 935-2666 Found Cat Gray & White Pink Collar Citrus Springs (352) 465-7064 Found Mens Wedding Ring Brentwood Golf Course Call to identify (352) 527-9897 PRAYER TO ST JUDEMay the Sacred Heart Of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and praised throughout theworld now and forever, Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us, St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 7 days and your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude for your help. FEB Todays New Ads Can So Almost Anything, Inside/Out No job too big or small Quality Work, 746-2347or 422-3334 Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Jack Russell Terriers Mother and Father on premise. Ready to go Five males $200/ea 352-613-9135 JamesAnglin Gunsmith 12 gage pump, new in box $259.00, ak 47 drum $150. 352-419-4800 LIVING ROOM SET sofa, loveseat, 2 cocktail tables, 1 coffee table, 2 lamps, light rattan, like new $450 (352) 746-6848 Moving, Sleeper Sofa with 4 matching Nightstands$350. File cabinet $5. 352-249-7413 Moving,Twin Beds $250,Dining room table $20. 352-249-7413 Refrigerator Maytag Black S-by-S ice/water on dr $300; Electric Stove, flat top, Black $100 obo (315) 539-5297 TINYTiny is a gorgeous 2 yr old Staffordshire terrier mix, extremely obedient & intelligent, loving & affectionate, gets along with some dogs, all cats, and all people and children.Rides well in the car.Tiny is gorgeous-sure to turn heads by your side. Call Laci @352-212-8936 WASHER OR DRYER $145.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, Excellent Working Cond, 60 day Guar.Free Del/Set up. 352-263-7398 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 Free Firewood Cut & Ready to Haul (352) 746-0524 Free German Shepherd, male, all shots. Must have fenced in yard (352) 220-7152 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads 2 ASHLEY 5-DRAWER DRESSER CABINETS BARELY USED!!! ONLY A FEW MONTHS OLD!!! Buy both for $400 or $225 for 1 352-746-1910 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 Antique Butler 3 drawers $100 (352) 795-1929 APPLIANCES Kenmore Refrigerator, side by side, water and ice on door, $300;Kenmore glass-top range, $200; Kenmore Microwave $75; Whirlpool Dishwasher $125; $600 for all. Call 382-2743 BOATTOPHEAVY DUTYALUMINUM COMMERCIAL. 24 FT LONG X 8 FTWIDE WITH BLUE CANVAS TOP& VINYLSIDES. MEASURES 3-1/2 FT. HIGH FROM YOUR BOATRAILS $1,900 352-628-5222 OR INFO@RIVERSAFARIS.COM COMMUNITY HOSTESSSeeking high-energy professional hostesses for seasonal part-time position including weekends shuttling potential homeowners around country club communitys amenities and model homes. Must be professional, outgoing articulate, upbeat and service oriented. Apply at Terra Vista Welcome Center, 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, FL www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the

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TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000H0T2 000GR866575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 000GRQW ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed 000GRXPwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 12/13/13LIC#CC1327656 ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000GWQR Stand Alone Generator CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000GWR6RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP HANDYMAN 000GZTFRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelongLicensed & Insured Lic.#37761352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000H05F Copes Pool & Pavers One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000H0LZ AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRAcross from Wal-Mart, LecantoAAA Miller Auto & Tire Service Open 7am-7pm(352) 527-4111Interior/Exterior Detail & Window Tint Oil Filter LubeCar Oil Changesstarting from up to 5 Qts.$1499Diesel Oil & Filter Change Specialplus tax up to 17 Qts.$9999 000H1DV PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000GAEA 000GZID WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tr ee Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic. # 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Carols Airport T ransport 352-746-7595 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 GREGS MARCITE Florida Gem, Diamond Brite Marcite, FREE EST. 746-5200 Lic.#C2636 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Design/Installation Weed*Clean*Mulch We plant year round lisc/ins 352-465-3086 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service -New Systems Starting @ $3400. Res//Com (352) 400 -8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 12/31/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 **ABOVEALL** M & W INTERIORS Handyman services Northern Quality Southern prices! (352) 537-4144 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Can So Almost Anything, Inside/Out No job too big or small Quality Work, 746-2347or 422-3334 Pressure Washing, Roof Coating, Drive ways & any Handyman Service Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579352-257-0078 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 TREE SERVICE Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked $80. (352) 344-2696 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Care for Elderly or Disabled in your home Days or Nights. Will do Cleaning & Cooking 25 yrs. Exp., 257-1308 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com 000GT1M FACTORYREPO New 2014, 28x80, 4/2 (No Hidden Fees) Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C, Heat, Skirting, Steps & Gutters $67,900 WILLNOT LAST! 352-795-1272 NEVER LIVED IN REPO!2013, 28x56, 3/2 Their loss is your gain! Delivered & set up with AC, steps & skirting. Use your old trade-only $487.46/ mo. W.A.C. Call 352-621-9182 NICE HOME ON ACREFenced yard, 1500 sq. ft., 3/2 home in new cond. with 2 x6 construction. New appliances, carpet, paint, new decks & tile flooring. I can finance. $3,500. dwn $394.80/mo. P & I W.A.C. We have land & home pkgs $59,900 to $69,900 352-621-9181 HOMOSASSA2/1, $550 mo. Near Walmart 352-464-3159 FACTORYREPO MUST SEE!, 16X80 3/2, No Hidden Fees Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C Heat, Skirting, Steps, Gutters, 352-795-1272 Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2 DWMH on 10 Acres Main road, cleared and fenced. 12x16 shed and 24x36 garage. 5 irrigated acres. Great for horses or blueberries. Asking $124,900 352-364-2985 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Australian Saddle Like Brand New Velvet, used once, Paid$1,000. Reduced to $840 (352) 513-5547 BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 1 bedroom, 1 bath @$395 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! ROSCORosco, a beautiful pit bull/terrier mix, black w/white chest, very calm, gentle & obedient, good w/other dogs, wonderful w/ people, very loving, good w/cats, walks calmly on leash, wt. 66 lbs. A volunteer favorite. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Shih Poo Puppies, 2 males, 1 female Schnauzer Pups just born 352-795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $450. Beverly Hills, FL. (352) 270-8827 TINYTiny is a gorgeous 2 yr old Staffordshire terrier mix, extremely obedient & intelligent, loving & affectionate, gets along with some dogs, all cats, and all people and children.Rides well in the car.Tiny is gorgeous-sure to turn heads by your side. Call Laci @352-212-8936 WINNIEWinnie is a small Lab/Bulldog mix, wt 40 lbs., is 3 1/2 years old. In her life before the shelter lived in a family with a child & is know to be very good with kids. Described as amazingly sweet but does best with male dogs. Call Wanda @ 352-344-5737. BUTTERSButters, a 4-y.o. Catahoula Leopard Dog mix, wt. 48 lbs, brown w/white markings, gentle, friendly, playful, affectionate, walks very well on leash, rides very well in car, appears housebroken, gets along w/other dogs and people. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. DOLLYMeet Dolly, 6-y.o. Bulldog/terrier mix, wt 54 lbs., has had an unfortunate life, still one of the sweetest dogs ever. Shows signs of neglect, but amazingly is full of love for people, playful & very happy, craves affection and returns it, so deserving of a loving home. Sweet personality. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Jack Russell Terriers Mother and Father on premise. Ready to go Five males $200/ea 352-613-9135 RAVENYou want sweet? Here she is, gentle & calm 7-month-old Labrador mix, very eager to please, walks well on leash, takes treats gently, sits when asked, not interested in cats. Her family lost their home, but shes had a good start in life, very loving. Needs her own home. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the GOLF DRIVER Tour Edge Exotics XLD MRH 10.5 senior w/HC new grip $45. Dunnellon 465-8495 GOLF DRIVER Tour Edge Exotics XLD mrh 10.5 Senior w/HC New Grip $45. Dunnellon 465-8495 JamesAnglin Gunsmith 12 gage pump, new in box $259.00, ak 47 drum $150. 352-419-4800 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 GARAGE SALE ITEMS MANYMANYFULL BOXS. $100.00 MIKE 586-7222 Judith Lewis Celestial SpaWelcomes Veterans Announcing: Curbside service for the disabled and handicapped. Therapeutic massages, hot stones, salt scrubs, detox treatments and more. Visit us online atcelestial spa.com call us at (352)527-0077, Or visit us at 9 Regina Blvd. Beverly Hills fl. 34465 mm28221, ma60820 NEW FLAT TOP ACOUSTIC GUITAR& ACCESSORIES READYTO PLAY$50 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR& STARTER PACKAGE W/GIGBAG&MORE ALLNEW $50 352-601-6625 Cable Knelson Piano looks and works great. Real good cond. Asking $300. 352-795-1495 GOTGUITAR? ACOUSTIC OR CLASSICALGUITAR SOFT CASE(GIGBAG) NEW $15 352-601-6625 GENERALMission oak rocker $150,2 antique half round tables $100@, 30lb. galvanized roofing nails and300 count grip cap nails $25@,6 Franklin Mint McDonalds plates $120 all, GE convection toaster oven$25, Mr. Coffee expresso maker $10,large rolling suitcase$10,Ryobi belt sander $40, folding crab trap $10, childs bike helmet $5,SS 1 quart thermos $5, 2 digital coin counting money jars $5 @, Oneida Chateau stainless service for 12 $250 352 465 6619 K-CUPS-TULLYS COFFEEHOUSE BLEND, MED ROAST 26 K-cups. $16. Call local 228-7372 EXERCISE BIKE good shape.All electronics. only $65 352-464 0316 MANUALTREADMILL DIGITALREADOUT, FOLDS UPFOR EASY STORAGE, ONLY $95 464-0316 2 SETS OF GOLF CLUBS. 2 older sets in bags and 1 caddy. $50 for all. 527-1239 Club Car Golf Cart 1991, Family owned Excellent condition. Lights, Battery 1 yr. old, Must Sell, $1,500. (352) 527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Golf 4 Rnds W/cart @ Brooksville Country Club. Bargain celebrate holiday $90. 352-503-3914 GOLF DRIVER Rawlings 450cc mrh 10* Apollo Reg lite shaft new grip exc $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 GENERALRalph Lauren Navy/Gray Queen sleeping bag $50,Automatic BPtester $20, RM Easiteach Interactive Whiteboard-new $30, Office Depot rolling, folding cart $10, B&D steamer $5 352 465 6619 HARLEYSTOCK EXHAUSTPIPES NEARLYNEW FITS 1350-1450 SLIDE ON ONLY$70 464-0316 JEEPPATRIOTSPARE TIRE BRAND NEW NEVER USED. $60 MIKE 586-7222 K-CUPS-TULLYS COFFEEHOUSE BLEND, MED ROAST 26 K-cups. $16 Call local 228-7372 RATTANAND GLASS ENTRYTABLE, 27 tall, 44 wide, 18 deep, excellent condition, $75, (352) 465-1813 RATTANAND GLASS ETAGERE, 74 tall, 30 wide, 18 deep, excellent condition, $95, (352) 465-1813 SMALLELECTRIC SMOKER LITTLE CHIEF, works great for fish or jerkey, only $60 352-464-0316 SHARPWIZARD ORGANIZER English to Spanish, expense and three Phone Books $15 341-0450 4 PRONGED CANE, dont wait to FALL DOWN before you need one. $15 352-464-0316 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex., $45. 352-628-0033 4 WHEELED WALKER w/ seat & brakes. Only $75 352-464-0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER. MAKES ITEASIERTO GETUP. ONLY$20 352-464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER both have adjustable legs only $40 for both 352-464-0316 CHILDS MANUAL WHEELCHAIR, GOOD SHAPE,YELLOW W/ FOOTRESTS. ONLY $85 352-464-0316 Manual Wheelchair W/ Footrests, Great Shape, Only $100 352-464-0316 MOBILITY POWER WHEEL CHAIR, J azzy Select, like new cond. $1750 pics avail via jr moak@att.net 352-302-4707 Pride Mobility Products Inc, Burgundy Cloth Chair Lift. $450 586-0341. SwivelAccent Chair Light Brown Perfect cond. $250. (352) 726-5379 White Wicker Trundle Bed, Steel enforced, Great Shape $95. (352) 897-4198 30 PLANTS FOR WATER GARDEN BlUE FLOWERS. DONT KNOWTHEIR NAMES 10 for $15 464-03I6 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 DRESS SHIRTBristol & Bull New Tag says 79.50/selling $25 Linda 423-4163 LEVIS JEANS FOR BOYS Good condition, size 12 regular, $10 (352)465-1616 PGH STEELER JACKETNFL winter/removable hood med like new cond. $25. Dunnellon 465-8495 WOMENS GALLERY JACKET Good condition, reversible, cheetah pattern, size S, $30 (352)465-1616 2 Twin size oak beds with storage drawers & mattress, dresser mirror & chest, excel. cond. $250. for all Kenmore Refrigerator good for college, excel cond. $45. 352 613-7429 5 GI -JOES WITH STORAGE CASE SOME CLOTHES & ACCESSORIES $30. 464-0316 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CAR COVER (BREATHABLE) FOR MEDIUM SIZE CAR MALIBU ONLY$30 352-464-0316 CHRISTMAS LIGHTS 4CANDLE & (5)4CANDYCANES $25.0BO 586-7222 CHROME CLOTHES RACK FOR STORE DISPLAY, 4 arms, excellent condition, $40, (352) 465-1813 Dining room table and 4 chairs, light oak $150; Nice wood couch table, $50 (352) 795-7254 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@ $6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 FOUR 2 DRAWER METALFILE CABINETS. Good condition. $50 for all. 527-1239

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C10TUESDAY,DECEMBER31,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 581-1231 TUCRN 1/10/14 CMHS/CCHB JOINT MEETING PUBLIC NOTICE A special joint meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., and the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will be held on Friday, January 10, 2014 at 3:00 P.M., in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss hospital transaction matters. This notice informs and notifies the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. will be active participants at the joint meeting and may conduct business and vote. Copies of the Agendas are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE December 31, 2013. 582-1231 TUCRN 1/3/14 CMHS Board of Directors Workshop/Meeting PUBLIC NOTICE A WORKSHOP of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board of Directors will be held on Friday, January 3, 2014 at 12:00 noon in the Board Room located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The workshop will be held in order to discuss financial matters. The Citrus Memorial Foundation Board of Directors will also hold a SPECIAL MEETING on Friday, January 3, 2014, at 1:00 pm, in the Board Room for the discussion of strategic planning matters (pursuant to Fla.Stat.395.3035(4). This agenda item will not be open to the public. Copies of the Agendas are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE December 31, 2013. 576-1231 TUCRN Estate of Mark J. Meyer 2013-CP-728 NTC-SA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2013-CP-728 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARK J. MEYER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHEABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Ancillary Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of MARK J. MEYER, deceased, File Number 2013-CP-728, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL34450; that the decedents date of death was March 23, 2013; that the total value of the estate is $4,334.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Melissa Michelle Meyer 125 Montauk Blvd, East Hampton, NY11937 ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THETIME PERIODS SETFORTHTN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMSAND DEMANDS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDINGANYOTHERAPPLICABLETIME PERIOD, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTERTHE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is December 24, 2013. Person Giving Notice: /s/ BRENDAMACPHERSON a/k/a BRENDAMARIE MACPHERSON 70 Springs Fireplace Rd. East Hampton, NY11937 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ Marie T. Blume Attorney, Florida Bar Number: 0493181, P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, Florida 34451 Phone: (352) 726-7778 Fax (352)726-7798, blumelaw@earthlink.net Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st, 2013. 577-1231 TUCRN OSteen Shirley A. 13CP-656 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.13-CP-656 IN RE:ESTATE OF SHIRLEYA. OSTEEN Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of SHIRLEYA. OSTEEN deceased, whose date of death was August 31, 2013;File Number 13CP-656 is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North ApopkaAvenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYSAFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OFACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedenf s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER HIE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first pubhcation of this Notice is December 24th, 2013 Signed on December 16, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ SHANNON LEIGH BUTLER, 2810 Knights Station Road, Lakeland Florida 33810 Attorney for Personal Representative: R. Mark Fore,Florida Bar No. 106836, GRAYROBINSON, P.A. One Lake Morton Dr., PO Box 3 Lakeland, Florida 33802-0003,Telephone (863)284-2200 Email: mark.fore@gray-robinson.com, Secondary Email: susan.rain@gray-robinson.com Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st, 2013 578-1231 TUCRN Melaas, Donald K. 2013 CP -514 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION File No.2013-CP-514 IN RE: ESTATE OF DONALD K. MELAAS a/k/a DONALD KEITH MELAAS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DONALD K. MELAAS a/k/a DONALD KEITH MELAAS, deceased, whose date of death was September 28, 2013; is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedenf s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER HIE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is December 24th, 2013 Personal Representatives: BRUCEA. MELAAS 3901 Montecito Drive #2002, Denton, Texas 76210 LINDAL. CRON P.O.Box 495, Gordonsville, VA22942 Attorney for Personal Representatives: /s/ CATHERINE F.ACKERMAN, Florida Bar Number: 698773 500 NE 8th Avenue, Ocala, FL34470,Telephone: (352) 629-8800, Fax: (352) 867-5111, E-Mail: catherinefackerman@gmail.com, Secondary E-Mail: officeackerman@gmail.com Published in the CITRUS COUNTYCHRONICLE, December 24th & 31st 2013 000GT1O CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHEVYVENTURA2005 Van. 74K mi. good cond extras included++ $6,000 obo (352) 637-6216 CHRYSLER2006, Town & Country Touring, $6,888. 352-341-0018 CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs Call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 HONDA2008 TRX 400 mint cond, w/riding gear and title $2800. obo Dennis 352-267-3334 YAMAHA2009 YFZ 450, Race ready, call for details $4000 (352) 564-8165 BLUE OX Motorcycle carrier rated for 1000 lbs. $550. Call (231) 445-2186 Triumph-750 Bonnieville. 10K orig doc mi. True classic. Like new cond. First $5800. 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $26,900 352-513-4257 Liquidation SaleLay Away Until Taxes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2004, Tahoe LT, leather, sunroof, $8,999. 352-341-0018 FORD1999, Expedition, Eddie Bauer Edition, leather $3,999 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 TOYOTA1999, Rav, -4 power windows, locks, automatic transmission $3,999. 352-341-0018 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Liquidation SaleLay Away Until Taxes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 MITSUBSHI, Mirage, 2 Door $1,500. (352) 489-0117 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN. 5th. 1-800-438-8559 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com Lake Pananosoffke Ready for home, septic, pwr, carport, 2 sheds & fenced bk yard $18,000 obo 352-568-2810 BOATTOPHEAVY DUTYALUMINUM COMMERCIAL. 24 FT LONG X 8 FTWIDE WITH BLUE CANVAS TOP& VINYLSIDES. MEASURES 3-1/2 FT. HIGH FROM YOUR BOATRAILS $1,900 352-628-5222 OR INFO@RIVERSAFARIS.COM ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** Century2001 211 WAC, 150 Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd steering, windless, tackle ctr, GPS sounder Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF, seats 7. Two axel allum. trailer. Extras! $12,750 obo 352-563-5628 Dock Space For Rent, Floating, Deep Canal 200 ft. from Crystal River, (352) 257-8850 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com FLEETWOOD1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft. generator, very good tires, Lots of storage. $11,000. 352-263-4339 SOUTHWIND98 V-10 eng., dual AC, super slide, drivers door, hydr. levelers, low miles on tires, good cond. $14,500 OBO 352-302-6534 KZ-SONIC2014TravelTrailer, Loaded, Brand New, Must Sell. $14000. Homosassa (315) 539-5297 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. RV Jack Knife Couch 68, in great shape $250. obo 352-464-4388 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Liquidation SaleLay A way Until T axes RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 WE B UY ALL A UT OS with or without titles ANY CONDITION Cindy (813) 505-6939 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLER2000, Sebring Convertible, low miles $5,488. 352-341-0018 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2008 Taurus SEL, All leather int., low miles, car/tires all exc cond. $13000 (352) 795-9181 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 LINCOLN Towncar, 91,600 mi excellent condition $2,500, (352) 795-3200 352 422-7574 Cell LINCOLN, Town Car, white, 100,370.5 miles $3,500. (352) 503-9290 Patrick CHEAP PROPERTY2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills nice neighborhood **$28,900. Cash** 352-503-3245 MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Heres Your ChanceTO OWN 10 acres Total $59,000 5 Acre Tracks $30,000 Owner Financing Call: Jack Lemieux Cell (305) 607-7886 Realty USA INC 407-599-5002 Owner Financing 10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007 Homes of Merit, $135k Call Nancy Little Lewis Exit Realty Leaders 352-302-6082 BUSHNELL Estate Sale Custom Built 3/2/2 w/ 40X60 2 story garage. See What $9k Can Buy 8471 County Rd 614 A To view & more info (352) 569-1252 Inverness Village 55+ Comm. Unit 108. 1st flr, 2BR/2BA, new Lanai & Lam, ceramic floors. $49,500. Financing Consider 352 564-4100 Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including washer/dryer. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 Your High-Tech Citrus County RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view my properties TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKINGTO SELL? CALLMETODAY! HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAWAPT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lots of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorTHE MARKETIS GOODThinking of selling? Now is the time to get listedStill great values out there for buyers!!Phyllis Strickland TROPIC SHORES REALTY. 352-613-3503-cell 352-419-6880-Office BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda WattTHE SNOWBIRDS ARE COMING! ** NOW IS A GREA T TIME T O LIST YOUR HOME CALLLAWANDA FORAFREE, NO OBLIGATION MARKETANALYSIS! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. BEAUTIFUL1/4 acre lot in Cantebury Lakes Estates BARGAIN PRICED! @9k 352-422-4785 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. ATTN Homebuyers 100% financing avail. Government Program. You do not need perfect credit. Call or email to get qualified. Ph: (813) 470-8313 rickgbf@gmail.com Rick Kedzierski lic. loan originator.NLMS #267854, FL#9096 NLMS ID 76856 MEDICAL OFFICE FOR SALE Totally renovated 700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5 Crystal River. $107K 352-422-2293 Happy Holidays.Buying or Selling Your home? Get the Gift of a 1 YEAR Home W arranty Plan Million Dollar + Producer! Teri Paduano, Broker Realty Connect (352) 212-1446TheFLDream.com GOSPEL ISLAND 2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR OWN HOME Let Me Help Block Home Move In ready $69,900 Clean as a whistle Big Yard, Big Garage and Carport (352) 344-9290 Near Croft & Hwy 44, 3/2 garage florida room furnished or not Lots of upgrades Executor now accepting offers 502/693-7904 Duval Island Very nice clean, furn. starter or retire home. 2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility room w/ shower. No flood zone. Reduce to $46,900 352-678-7145 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 HOMOSASSA1/1, $435. mo. 1st. & Sec. 352-212-4981 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Beverly Hills2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new appliances Move in $1350, 442-7794 INVERNESS3/2/2, Highlands, Close to Downtown Immaculate, No Pets, (352) 400-5723 INVERNESS3/2/2, wheel chair access. $875. mo., 1st, last, sec. 352-726-5272 INVERNESSGolf & Country 2/2/2 & 3/2/2 $825/mo & Sec (352) 895-0744 INVERNESSNewer 3/2/2, fend back yrd. $875, 352-212-4873 RENT T O OWN No credit check Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM Sugarmill WoodsPool Home 3/2/2, s/s appl. travertine tile, new cabinets, lg master bath, NICE! $1200. mo 352-302-4057 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 CITRUS SPRINGSWhole House Access $125/wk 828-497-2610 CRYSTALRIVERShare My Home $85/wk. includes elect, sat. dish 352-228-1802 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Floral City 12x56 MH 2/br, 1 ba on 80x152 ft lot.$21,000. Fixer er up. (352) 726-8873 RENTERS WANTEDWhy rent when you can own? We can put you in your own home. Credit problems o.k. As low as $2,000. down& only $105/ wk. Call for more info & locations. Call 352-621-3807 USED HOMES/ REPOSDoublewides From $8,500. Singlewides From $3,500. New inventory daily We buy used homes (352) 621-9183 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 2BR 1-1/2BA DW off Gospel Isl. Rd., 1/3 acre lrg. scr. rm., laund. rm. carport plus garage $34,000. (352) 419-5013 HERNANDO 3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres Renovated-ready to move in. $45k Owner Financed FHA/ VA 352-795-1272 Inverness Jungle Camp Area 2Br/1Ba SW w/ 2 rms added on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge lot close to river. Just $10,000,352-400-4196 2BR/1BA with FL room & attached Laundry rm. w/ washer& dryer. Comp Furn-Ready to move in. 352-726-0124 55+ Park in Lecanto 2bd/2ba Furnished Fireplace, Includes Washer/Dryer, $6,900. obo 352-634-3984 FLORALCITY12x56 Mobile, Furnished 2BR, 1BA, Carport Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed Adult Park, Reduced price $7,400 Lot Rent $165 mo.352-287-3729 FLORALCITY Double wide 2 bd/ 2 ba. Furnished w/appliances. W/D A/C. New wood laminate floors. Shed, scrn pch, double car port. Lot rent $183.Asking $17.5k 314-831-1356 Homosassa 55+ Park 2BR/1BA. Newly remodeled w/ new stove & refrig.New 8x8 shed.$295 lot rent. $6,000 (608) 921-5564 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 Chassahowitzka2/2/1, $600. mo.HOMOSASSA2/1, Furn. $550. Mo. Agent (352) 382-1000 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 HOMOSASSA1 & 2BR, $450-$500 inclds. garb & water, Senior Discount. 352628-7300 or 697-0310 INVERNESS2 bedroom. 2/2 and 2/1 W/D $575 TO $675 352-422-7021 INVERNESS2/1, Storage Room 475 mo.+ Security 352-634-5499 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-257-2276

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