Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03339

Full Text

ACC preview: Miami takes on Louisville in bied game /B1


TODAY
& next
morning


HIGH
71
LOW
54


CITRUS


Mainly morning
showers, rain
chance 80%.
PAGE A4


DECEMBER 29, 2013 Florida's Best Communityl


,C 0 U N T Y


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www.chronicleorlhrne.com !


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ZN


VOL. 119 ISSUE 144


LIVE UNITED
* The United Way of
Citrus County
needs your help
for its annual
fundraising
initiative. If you
can, please send a
contribution to the
United Way of
Citrus County, c/o
Gerry Mulligan,
The Chronicle,
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.


High stakes for jobless losing benefits


Associated Press

WESTMINSTER, Calif. The
end of unemployment checks for
more than a million people on
Saturday is driving out-of-work
Americans to consider selling
cars, moving and taking mini-
mum-wage work after already
slashing household budgets and
pawning personal possessions to
make ends meet.
Greg and Barbara Chastain of
Huntington Beach, Calif, put
their two teenagers on the school
lunch program and cut back on
dining out after losing their T-


shirt company in June following
a dispute with an investor
They've exhausted their state
unemployment benefits and now
that the federal extensions are
gone, unless they find jobs, the
couple plan to take their children
out of their high school in Janu-
ary and relocate 50 miles east
where a relative owns property
so they can save on rent.
"We could let one of our cars
go, but then you can't get to work
- it's a never-ending cycle," 43-
year-old Greg Chastain said while
accompanying his wife to an Or-
ange County employment center


He said they eventually may try
their luck in a less expensive
state like Arizona or Texas if he
can land a manufacturing job
there.
The end to the five-year pro-
gram that extended benefits for
the long-term jobless affected
1.3 million people immediately
and will affect hundreds of thou-
sands more who remain jobless
in the months ahead. Under the
program, the federal government
provided an average monthly
stipend of $1,166.
While the Obama administra-
tion and Democrats in Congress


want to continue the program, the
extensions were dropped from a
budget deal struck earlier this
month and Republican lawmak-
ers have balked at its $26 billion
annual cost
The end of the program may
prompt a drop in the nation's un-
employment rate, but not neces-
sarily for a good reason. People
out of work are required to look
for work to receive unemploy-
ment benefits. As benefits disap-
pear, some jobless will stop
looking for work out of frustration


Page A5


Kwanzaa
Community celebrates
holiday/Page A3
COMMENTARY:

4m) I V

Brutal math
Dr. Anthony Schembri
writes about how
America manufactures
mass shootings.
/Page Cl
MILITARY MATTERS:
I I;.J I


Spean Bridge
A small Scottish town is
famous for two things:
Clan Cameron and
Commandos./Page A14
BUSINESS:


Stocks
2013 was a great year
for the average investor,
but few market
strategists believe that
2014 will be anywhere
near as good./Page Dl

USA WEEKEND:








10 best
The editors of lOBest
and USA WEEKEND
asked experts and
readers to help select
the best of the year in
travel, food and fun.
/Inside
I1 11 ,] I = 114





Annie's Mailbox ...... A12
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ..............A12
Editorial ....................C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M enus .................... A15
M ovies ..................... A 12
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A15
Veterans ................A14


6 I051 12110 1I!,J I o


Year in REVIEW





Adams roars in 2013


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Commissioners Dennis Damato, left, and Scott Adams, along with the other three Citrus County
commissioners, weathered some difficult times over the past year.



Staff switches marked the year


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Several county government ca-
reers changed gears in 2013.
Within a few weeks of taking
office, a county commissioner
tried unsuccessfully to fire the
county administrator
The county administrator later
resigned, but a few weeks later
withdrew his resignation.
Going into 2014, Brad Thorpe
is still the county administrator
and still butts heads on occasion
with Commissioner ScottAdams.
But 2013 was a year when county
staff turnover frequently was re-
ported in the Chronicle.


Starting at the begin- Wesch relied too much on
ning of the year and at the outside consultants to do
top, during a February his work.
commission meeting, In May, Thorpe -
Adams questioned hired to the post in 2009
Thorpe about a canceled -gave commissioners 30
purchase order for two days' notice that he was
Ford Taurus cars. Then retiring, but agreed to
Adams said he'd lost con- Brad stay longer until his re-
fidence in Thorpe and Thorpe placement was secured.
made a motion to termi- Citrus County But in August, board
nate him. The motion administrator, members voted 3-2 to
failed, because no other allow Thorpe to with-
commissioner would second it. draw his resignation. Commis-
Two weeks later, Adams made sioners Dennis Damato and John
a motion to terminate County At- "JJ" Kenney and Commission
torney Richard Wesch, which Chairman Joe Meek supported
likewise failed for want of a sec-
ond. Adams cited his belief that See Page A5


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
From the start
Scott Adams
made it clear he
wasn't elected to
the county commission
to make friends.
Commissioner
Adams spared no one
in 2013, repeatedly and
publicly calling out fel-
low commissioners and
top county staffers.
He tried unsuc-
cessfully- to fire both
the county administra-
tor and county attorney
He filed an ethics
complaint against Com-
missioner Rebecca
Bays over her hus-
band's appointment to
a new development
board, and then
squawked when the
commission voted to
pay Bays' legal fees
after the state ethics
commission decided
not to pursue the case.
Adams accused top
county management of
malfeasance for a 2011
recycling billing error
When the state attor-
ney's office investigated
and found no wrongdo-
ing, Adams accused
State Attorney Brad
King of having a conflict
of interests and asked
that another state attor-
ney conduct the investi-
gation. King declined.
Adams has railed
against higher taxes
and the county's blam-
ing Duke Energy for its
financial woes.
See Page A5


Unprepared: World braces for retirement crisis


DAVID MCHUGH
AP business writer

A global retirement cri-
sis is bearing down on
workers of all ages.
Spawned years before
the Great Recession and
the 2008 financial melt-
down, the crisis was sig-
nificantly worsened by
those twin traumas. It will
play out for decades, and
its consequences will be
far-reaching.
Many people will be
forced to work well past
the traditional retirement
age of 65. Living standards
will fall and poverty rates
will rise for the elderly in
wealthy countries that
built safety nets for sen-
iors after World War II. In
developing countries,
people's rising expecta-
tions will be frustrated if
governments can't afford
retirement systems to re-
place the tradition of chil-
dren caring for aging
parents.
The problems are
emerging as the genera-
tion born after World War
II moves into retirement.
"The first wave of


under-prepared workers
is going to try to go into re-
tirement and will find
they can't afford to do so,"
says Norman Dreger, a
retirement specialist with
the consulting firm
Mercer in Frankfurt,
Germany
The crisis is a conver-
gence of three factors:
Countries are slash-
ing retirement benefits
and raising the age to start
collecting them. These
countries are awash in
debt since the recession
hit. And they face a demo-
graphics disaster as re-
tirees live longer and
falling birth rates mean
there will be fewer work-
ers to support them.
Companies have
eliminated traditional
pension plans that
guaranteed employees a
monthly check in
retirement.
Individuals spent
freely and failed to save
before the recession and
saw much of their wealth
disappear once it hit.
Those factors have been
documented individually
What is less understood is


their combined ferocity
and global scope.
"Most countries are not
ready to meet what is sure
to be one of the defining
challenges of the 21st cen-
tury," the Center for
Strategic and Interna-
tional Studies in Washing-
ton concludes.
Mikio Fukushima, who
is 52 and lives in Tokyo,
worries that he might
need to move somewhere
cheaper, maybe Malaysia,
after age 70 to get by com-
fortably on income from
his investments and a
public pension of just
$10,000 a year
People like Fukushima
who are fretting over their
retirement prospects
stand in contrast to many
who are already retired.
Many workers were recip-
ients of generous corpo-
rate pensions and
government benefits that
had yet to be cut.
Jean-Pierre Bigand, 66,
retired Sept. 1, in time to
enjoy all the perks of a re-
tirement system in France
that's now in peril. Bigand
lives in the countryside
outside the city of Rouen


Associated Press
Leslie Lynch posses for a photograph Dec. 23 in her home
in Glastonbury, Conn. Lynch, who lost her job last year, is
moving out of her home of 21 years because she can no
longer afford the mortgage payments.


in Normandy He has a
second home in Provence.
He's just taken a vacation
on Oleron Island off the
Atlantic coast and is plan-
ning a five-week trip to
Guadeloupe.
"Travel is our biggest
expense," he says.
UNDER SIEGE
The notion of extended,
leisurely retirements is
relatively new Germany
established the world's
first widely available state


pension system in 1889.
The United States intro-
duced Social Security in
1935. In the prosperous
years after World War II,
governments expanded
pensions. In addition,
companies began to offer
pensions that paid em-
ployees a guaranteed
amount each month in re-
tirement- so-called de-
fined-benefit pensions.
The average age at


Page A2




A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


CRISIS
Continued from PageAl

which men could retire with full
government pension benefits fell
from 64.3 years in 1949 to 62.4
years in 1999 in the relatively
wealthy countries that belong to
the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development.
"That was the Golden Age,"
Mercer consultant Dreger says.
It would not last. As the 2000s
dawned, governments and
companies looked at actuarial
tables and birth rates and real-
ized they couldn't afford the
pensions they'd promised.
The average man in 30 coun-
tries the OECD surveyed will live
19 years after retirement That's
up from 13 years in 1958, when
many countries were devising
their generous pension plans.
The OECD says the average
retirement age would have to
reach 66 or 67, from 63 now, to
"maintain control of the cost of
pensions" from longer lifespans.
Compounding the problem is
that birth rates are falling just as
the bulge of people born in de-
veloped countries after World
War II retires.
Populations are aging rapidly
as a result. The higher the per-
centage of older people, the
harder it is for a country to fi-
nance its pension system be-
cause relatively fewer younger
workers are paying taxes.
In response, governments are
raising retirement ages and
slashing benefits. In 30 high- and
middle-income OECD countries,
the average age at which men
can collect full retirement bene-
fits will rise to 64.6 in 2050, from
62.9 in 2010; for women, it will
rise from 61.8 to 64.4
In the wealthy countries it
studied, the OECD found that
the pension reforms of the 2000s
will cut retirement benefits by
an average 20 percent
Even France, where govern-
ment pensions have long been
generous, has begun modest re-
forms to reduce costs.
"France is a retirees' paradise
now," says Richard Jackson, sen-
ior fellow at the CSIS. "You're
not going to want to retire there
in 20 to 25 years."
THE FINANCIAL CRISIS
MAKES THINGS WORSE
The outlook worsened once
the global banking system went
into a panic in 2008 and tipped


NATION


the world into the worst reces-
sion since the 1930s.
Government budget deficits
swelled in Europe and the
United States. Tax revenue
shrank, and governments
pumped money into rescuing
their banks and financing unem-
ployment benefits. All that esca-
lated pressure on governments
to reduce spending on pensions.
The Great Recession threw
tens of millions out of work
worldwide. For others, pay stag-
nated, making it harder to save.
Because government retirement
benefits are based on lifetime
earnings, they'll now be lower
The Urban Institute, a Washing-
ton think tank, estimates that lost
wages and pay raises will shrink
the typical American worker's
income at age 70 by 4 percent -
an average of $2,300 a year
Leslie Lynch, 52, of Glaston-
bury, Conn., had $30,000 in her
401(k) retirement account when
she lost her $65,000-a-year job
last year at an insurance com-
pany She'd worked there 28
years. She's depleted her retire-
ment savings trying to stay afloat
"I don't believe that I will ever
retire now," she says.
Many of those facing a finan-
cial squeeze in retirement can
look to themselves for part of the
blame. They spent many years
before the Great Recession bor-
rowing and spending instead of
saving.
The National Institute on Re-
tirement Security estimates that
Americans are at least $6.8 tril-
lion short of what they need to
be saving for a comfortable re-
tirement For those 55 to 64, the
shortfall comes to $113,000 per
household.
THE ASIA CHALLENGE
In Asia, workers are facing a
different retirement worry, a
byproduct of their astonishing
economic growth.
Traditionally Chinese and Ko-
reans could expect their grown
children to care for them as they
aged. But newly prosperous
young people increasingly want
to live on their own. They also
are more likely to move to dis-
tant cities to take jobs, leaving
parents behind. Countries like
China and South Korea are at an
"awkward" stage, Jackson says:
The old ways are vanishing, but
new systems of caring for the
aged aren't yet in place.
Yoo Tae-we, 47, a South Korean
manager at a trading company
that imports semiconductor


Changing face of retirement
The elderly share of the world's population is growing, with
the rate in some countries expected to top 40 percent by
2040. As the older population grows, so will pension costs.
PEOPLE AGE 60+ AS A PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL POPULATION
2010 M 2040
5 0 %O .......................................................................................................


40 ...


1,-, 4


U.S. Japan Germany France
PUBLIC SPENDING ON PENSIONS, 2010-2050
As a percentage of GDP


40.4
............ ::........... :... .. .. .. .. .
30.4 28.8



1 16


U.K. Italy


1 6 % "1 "5-.3 "... ............................................................ ............i
14.6'F
1 4 .......................................................................................

12 De ,e -,7l'
10 ...............................................
9.3
8 77
6 ............................................................................ ..........
4.6
4 .......... ... ..... ... r ....... .... ......... .. ....... ........... I.........
2010 2020 2030 2040
NOTE: "Developed countries" refers to members of the Org
Economic Cooperation and Development. Japan data not a
SOURCES: Center for Strategic and International Studies;


components, doesn't expect his
son to support him as he and his
siblings did their parents.
"We have to prepare for our
own futures rather than depend-
ing on our children," he says.
China pays generous pensions
to civil servants and urban work-
ers. They can retire early with
full benefits at 60 for men and
50 or 55 for women. Their pen-
sions will prove to be a burden
as China ages and each retiree is
supported by contributions from
fewer workers.
The elderly are rapidly be-
coming a bigger share of China's
population because of a policy
begun in 1979 and only recently
relaxed that limited couples to
one child.
The World Bank says the cost
of those so-called legacy pen-
sions could eventually reach
twice the size of China's annual
gross domestic product: more
than $16 trillion.
China is considering raising
its retirement ages. But the


government would
resistance.
"I heard that tl
might postpone th
tirement, but I s
since I've already
most 42 years," s
hua, 59, a forn
factory worker ai
estate investor, w
apartments and t
spaces.
END OF TRA
PENSI
Corporations, t(
pension costs by e
ditional defined-
They don't want t(
of guaranteeing ei
sions. They've mo
so-called define(
plans, such as 4
United States.
shift responsibility
employees.
But people hav
ble at taking adva
plans. They don't


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

They don't contribute enough.
They dip into the accounts when
they need money
They also make bad invest-
ment choices buying stocks
when times are good and share
prices are high and bailing when
prices are low
Several countries are trying to
coax workers to save more.
Australia passed a law in 1993
that makes retirement savings
mandatory Employers must
contribute the equivalent of 9.25
percent of workers' wages to
401(k)-style retirement accounts.
In 2006, the United States en-
couraged companies to require
employees to opt out of a 401(k)
instead of choosing to opt in.
That means workers start saving
for retirement automatically if
they make no decision.


EASING THE PAIN
taly ........45.7... Rebounding stock prices and
rane 15.1 a slow rise in housing prices are
......... helping households recover
13.0 their net worth. In the United
nne11.7 States, retirement accounts hit a
........................ record $12.5 trillion the first
U.K. three months of 2013.
8.2 But Boston College's Center
for Retirement Research says
S. ............... the recovery in housing and
U 4.8 stock prices still leaves about 50
............ ........... percent of American households
2050 at risk of being unable to main-
anization for tain their standard of living in
available. retirement
------When they look into the fu-
APture, retirement experts see
more changes in government
Id likely meet pensions and longer careers
than many workers had ex-
he authorities pected:
.e age of the re- U Cuts in government pension
ure hope not, programs like Social Security
Worked for al- will likely hit most retirees but
ays Dong Lin- will probably fall hardest on the
ner Shanghai wealthy Governments are likely
nd now a real to spend more on the poorest
ho owns three among the elderly, as well as the
wo small shop oldest who will be in danger of
outliving their savings.
DITIONAL 6 Those planning to work past
65 can take some comfort know-
ONS ing they'll be healthier, overall,
oo, are cutting than older workers in years past
liminatingtra- They'll also be doing jobs that
benefit plans, aren't as physically demanding.
o bear the cost In addition, life expectancy at 65
employees' pen- now stretches well into the 80s
)ved instead to for people in the 34 OECD coun-
d-contribution tries an increase of about five
:01(k)s, in the years since the late 1950s.
These plans "My parents retired during
ty for saving to the Golden Age of retirement,"
says Mercer consultant Dreger,
e proved terri- 37. "My dad, who is 72, retired at
vintage of these 57. That's not going to happen to
always enroll, somebody in my generation."


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Page A3 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Lakes Friends to
host photographer
The public is welcome to
join the Lakes Library Friends
on Tuesday, Jan. 7, for a
program featuring wildlife
photographer Gary Kuhl,
who will talk about his stud-
ies of local natural subjects.
Kuhl's works form the
majority of nearly 20 wildlife
photos recently purchased
by the Friends and on dis-
play in the Lakes Library
Community Room.
The program will begin at
10:30 a.m. Lake's Region
Library is at 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness. For infor-
mation, call 352-726-3828.
Holiday hours for
county offices
Citrus County govern-
ment offices will be closed
Wednesday, Jan. 1 in ob-
servance of New Year's Day.
The county landfill will be
closed on Jan. 1 as well.
All libraries will be closing
at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31,
and dosed on New Year's Day
All community buildings
and parks, including Bicen-
tennial Park pool, will be
closed on New Year's Day.
The Animal Services
shelter also will be closed
for the holiday.
LifeSouth hosting
New Year's Eve drive
LifeSouth will host its an-
nual New Year's Resolution
Blood Drive from 11 a.m. to
5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, at
the Walmart Supercenter,
2461 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
To encourage participa-
tion there will be a drawing
for a 42-inch TV courtesy of
Walmart, and all donors will
be entered into a drawing
for a PlayStation 4. There
will be a drawing for a Mossy
Oak three-piece seat cover
kit and a 2.5-gallon ArmorAlII
Shop Vac, courtesy of Auto
Zone in Inverness. All donors
will also receive a thank-
you gift from LifeSouth.
Donors must be 17 or
older, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a mini-
mum of 110 pounds and be
in good health. A photo ID is
also required. To learn more
about donating blood, visit
www.lifesouth.org.

Polk City
Pilot hopes to reenact
1914's first flight
A Florida man is hoping
to reenact the nation's first
commercial flight on the
centennial of the milestone.
The Tampa Thbune reported
Kermit Weeks has recreated
the bi-wing seaplane pilot
Tony Jannus first flew over
Tampa Bay 100 years ago.
He must now get approval
from Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration officials to launch
from St. Petersburg's North
Yacht Basin on Jan. 1 and
retrace Jannus' 23-minute trek.
In 1914, passengers paid
$5 for a one-way ticket
across Tampa Bay.

Weeki Wachee
Dead diver's father
wants cave closed
Chester Spivey Jr. wants
the state to close an under-
water cave system after his
son and grandson died
there in a diving accident on
Christmas Day.
Spivey Jr. says the 300-
foot deep Eagle Nest Sink
cave in the Chassahowitzka
Wildlife Management Area
is too dangerous for diving.
Thirty-five-year-old Darrin
Spivey and his 15-year-old
son, Dillon Sanchez, were
found dead Wednesday.
The Tampa Thbune reported
at least six other divers have


died in the vast underwater
cave system since 1981.
State wildlife officials say
they have no plans to close
it. Only certified cave divers
should enter the system, of-
ficials said.
-From staff and wire reports


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
D'Adjoa Nutefewola-Avadada from Citrus Hills, above, assists speaker Lydia Valentine as she explains the candle-
lighting ceremony, which is a part of the seven days of Kwanzaa. Held for the first time in the Old Courthouse in
Inverness, Saturday's ceremony included a discussion on the history, symbology and principles of Kwanzaa prior
to traditional drum songs, dancing, food and refreshments.


SEVEN


CANDLES


Kwanzaa celebrated at old courthouse

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

INVERNESS
HE SOUND OF RHYTHMIC DRUM BEATS FILLED THE OLD COURTHOUSE AIR SATURDAY
as many congregated together for the inaugural Citrus County Kwanzaa celebration.
President of the Afro American Club of Citrus County Lillian Smith said they collaborated
with the Unity Church of Citrus County and Unitarian Universalists to bring the commemoration
- aimed at preserving the community and culture of black Americans.


"Even though Kwanzaa occurs
during the Christmas season, it is
not a religious celebration per say,"
Kathy Fleissner from Unitarian
Universalists told the congrega-
tion. "Rather it's a celebration of
African-American heritage."
Fleissner explained that Kwan-
zaa begins Dec. 26 and concludes
Jan. 1. It centers around seven
principles also known as Nguzo
Saba which represent the values
of family, community and culture
for black Americans and people of
African descent to live by. The
principals were developed by
Kwanzaa founder Dr. Maulana
Karenga based on the ideals of the
first-fruit harvests.
"Kwanzaa is the celebration of
the spirit of life and the first fruits
of that life," Rev. Marciah McCart-
ney, from Unity Church of Citrus
County, told the congregation.


"We, you, us are the first fruits of life."
The principles are unity
(umoja), self-determination (ku-
jichagulia), collective work and re-
sponsibility (ujima), cooperative
economics (ujamaa), purpose
(nia), creativity (kuumba) and
faith (imani).
Seven symbols were also dis-
played during the Kwanzaa cere-
mony to represent the seven
principles crops (mazao), mat
(mkeka), candle holder (kinara),
corn (muhindi), seven candles
(mishumaa saba), unity cup
(kikombe cha umoja) and gifts
(zawadi).
Fleissner said that one candle is
lit on each of the seven days of
Kwanzaa, with each candle colored
red, black or green to symbolize
black Americans and their struggles.
"The lighting of the seven Kwan-
zaa candles is reflected upon and


affirms our responsibilities to our
families and our society," Fleissner
said. "In celebrating Kwanzaa
today we have come together to
show our appreciation for the
African-American culture and her-
itage. I think we have also come to-
gether to emphasis how important
it is that we acknowledge and cele-
brate the incredible cultural and
ethnic diversity that interwoven
throughout American lives. My
prayer is that we keep our minds
and hearts open and welcoming to
each other and all people of good
will."
As part of the Kwanzaa tradition
can goods were collected and do-
nated to the Resource Center of
Citrus County.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline.com.


The seven symbols of Kwanzaa sit presented at the Dr. Kathy Fleissner speaks on the history, symbology
courthouse: the Crops, the Unity Cup, the Candle Holder, and principles of the Kwanzaa tradition. Kwanzaa
the Seven Candles, the Mat, the Corn and the Gifts. began Dec. 26 and will be observed through Jan. 1.




A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Managing your fi-
nances should be your priority in
the near future. Ensure that you
can cover both your personal and
business expenses.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Jump on any opportunities that
arise. Solving a problem or closing
a deal will determine how far you
will advance.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Anger must be defused peacefully.
Don't overreact. Identify what is re-
quired for progress.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Move quickly to take care of tax
breaks and other financial concerns
before the year's end.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Hit
the shops or sign up for a physical
or social activity. Concentrate on
friendships, entertainment and des-
tinations that inspire you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If
you want some motivation, visit a
location connected to an activity
you want to add to your routine.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Look to alternative traditions to help
you find a new perspective one
that will encourage you to pursue
your dreams.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Try
something new or incorporate
something you already do well into
a different milieu.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Try
something new or spend time with
people whose backgrounds are dif-
ferent from your own.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
Neglecting someone who depends
on you will cause problems. Offer-
ing kindness and empathy will en-
hance relationships.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
Share your knowledge and make
suggestions. Don't allow the inanity
of domestic chores to frustrate you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Don't let anger get the best of you.
Concentrate on what is possible.
Move forward with honesty.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Not everyone will be honest with you.
Ask direct questions to glean enough
information to make a decision.


ENTERTAINMENT


Britney Spears begins
Las Vegas residency
LAS VEGAS Britney Spears
has begun her early retirement in
Las Vegas with a show that looks
strikingly like the eye-popping
Cirque du Soleil productions
found elsewhere on the Strip.
The debut of Spears' long-
term casino gig Friday kept an
audience of about 4,500 on their
feet for about 90 minutes.
The young-for-Vegas crowd
was there for the danceable hits
and the spectacle, which in-
cluded acrobatics, a ring of fire,
confetti, a live band, frenetic cos-
tume changes and a frequently
airborne Spears.
The show's production values
are unusually high for a casino
residency, calling to mind the
golden age of music videos. Its
high-concept set pieces featured
a cadre of backup dancers who
danced in human-sized hamster
wheels and somersaulted over
the Grammy-winning star.
Spears, 32, has signed on to
perform 50 shows each in 2014
and 2015 at the Planet Holly-
wood Resort and Casino.
She cuts a different figure
from the typical Strip headliner.
Other successful Las Vegas
acts including Shania Twain,
Elton John and Celine Dion -
have generally attracted an
older audience. Judging from
Friday's show, her fans are
more likely to be found at a
casino mega-club than in front
of a slot machine.
Still, "Piece of Me" is not im-
mune to nostalgia, one of the
prime currencies in Las Vegas
entertainment. It includes sev-
eral callbacks to the 1990s and
early 2000s, including plaid
shirts tied around dancers'
waists and a recap of the skin-
tight sparkling bodysuit Spears
wore in the "Toxic" music video.


Associated Press
Britney Spears speaks to a crowd Dec. 3 after arriving at
Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino before the debut of her Las
Vegas residency "Britney: Piece of Me" in Las Vegas. Spears
began her two-year residency at Planet Hollywood Resort &
Casino on Friday.


A&E reverses decision
on 'Dynasty' patriarch
LOS ANGELES-A&E
landed in the middle of Amer-
ica's culture wars when "Duck
Dynasty" patriarch Phil Robert-
son sounded off on gays and
the Bible. The channel quickly
found there was no safe ground.
It was pilloried for allowing a man
who equated gays with hell-bound
sinners like adulterers to have a
national TV stage. Then it was
excoriated for giving him the hook.
With A&E's decision Friday to
bring Robertson back to its most-
watched show, it remains to be
seen if it can mend fences with
both sides or at least with those
viewers who hold opposing views.
The family itself, which had
threatened to withdraw if Phil
wasn't welcomed back, didn't
rush out with its own make-nice
reaction Friday. The gay-rights
group GLAAD, which had slammed
Robertson's comments to GQ
magazine, issued a critical state-
ment despite A&E's vague allu-


sion to the support of "numerous
advocacy groups" for its reversal.
A&E said it intended to air a
national public service campaign
"promoting unity, tolerance and
acceptance among all people."
The channel's interest is in
ratings and revenue, not referee-
ing social discord.
While TV ratings tend to fluctuate,
particularly during the holidays
when viewing drops, the overall
A&E audience was smaller after it
landed in "Duck" soup than before.
For the week of Dec. 16-22,
the channel averaged 1.5 million
viewers, compared to 2 million
for the week before, according to
Nielsen figures.
During the week of Dec. 17-
23 last year, a roughly compara-
ble period to the post-Robertson
flap week, the channel averaged
1.73 million viewers.
"Duck Dynasty" is the channel's
highest-rated program and set a
reality show record for cable with
nearly 12 million viewers for its
fourth-season debut this summer.
-From wire reports


City H I
Daytona Bch. 79
Fort Lauderdale 82
Fort Myers 81
Gainesville 74
Homestead 82
Jacksonville 75
Key West 82
Lakeland 79
Melbourne 80


176/59 a.00"- |Uf/U u.uu"1
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclsiv ily
P f TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
S.-High 71' Low: 540
V ,, 0 Mainly morning showers and storms, rain
,^A^.tTS9chance 80%.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
,; High:710 Low:480
*" Partly sunny

S TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
ji: ,High: 67 Low: 41
... i' Possible morning showers, rain chance
.300
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 79/65
Record /29
Normal 70/52
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean 4
PRECIPITATION* .
Saturday 0.00


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 62.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 945
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 0.27' Juniper, maple, oak
Total for the year 51.94" Today's count: 0.2/12
Normal for the year 46.09" Mna' 7.
As ol 7 p.m at Iverress Monday's count: 7.8
UV INDEX: 3 Tuesday's count: 7.2
0-2minimat 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 52
30.16 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES Nufi,.-l.v
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING i (AFTERNOONp
12/29 SUNDAY 03:10 08:13 14:13 20:45
12/30 MONDAY 04:14 09:13 15:11 21:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TM .................... 5:41 p .
0 C ) 0f r SUNRISETOMORROW 721 am.
S MOONRISE TODAY 4 10am
Jan 1 Jan 7 Jan 15 Jan 24 MOONSlTODAY 312pm.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: MODERATE. There is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777, For more
information on drought l,1rb nite visa bte Diu',-, i-I fvrE'Irr 1 v 'ib ,SI?
htlp fflame flt-dOomftcme rLa 1n1, txi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited lo two days perweek before 10 am or aher4 p m ai
followsl
EVEN addresses may water on ThUirs.-atV ar.or SLunday
ODD a'dresses may AIleir on Weanesda anor Sa.lurday,
Hanrd vaienng wini a srLi-oH cn.e cr ,,cro ',rngacn of rnon-grass areas suchr.
asveteiare gardens flower ard .--nrtbs an De 're Orinan, day and at any
lime.
Cuansi C.i"jny UIjiiJs;' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new pianiirgs may cqualily tor aOranionai
watering allowances.
To repcr Icvkaihons please call City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, Cw of Crvysal
River 0 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "Ai I.nq s Bay "-At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
ChassahOWitZka" 3553am, 07ft, 4139p,m, 0.2flt 12:D8 p.m 0.0 9:07.pmD.1 ILt
CrystalRLver- 1:50a.m 2-41 t. 3:19p.m. 1511 9:20a-m. -.0.1 it. 8:51 p.mO.8 .
Witlaccochee' 1245p.m, 3.01t, 11 :41pm. 3.41t 6:55a.m. l.01. 6:38pm.l.l -I
Hormosassa" 2:11a.m 1.5ft- 4:41 p.m. 0.6t11. 12:01 pm, 0.1 tl. 8:38 p.mO.4 ft


SUNDAY


SAT SUN SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H LFcst City H L Pep. H LFest
Albany 46 25 41 13 r NewOrleans 50 46 1.1462 46 pc
Albuquerque 46 22 42 23 pc New York City 55 36 46 29 r
Ashevllle 46 21 52 34 sh Nortolk 59 29 63 40 r
Atlanta 46 36 47 54 38 r Oklahoma City 60 32 30 14 pc
Aflentic Cty 55 23 52 29 r Omaha 58 27 7 .1 pc
Austin 62 40 60 34 1 Palm Springs 72 51 71 50 s
Baltimore 58 28 46 27 r Philadelphia 56 28 46 29 r
Siblings 46 16 31 20 fl Phoenix 67 46 69 42 s
Birmingham 46 42 .30 54 34 r Piltsburgh 51 38 40 18 r
Boise 35 15 34 17 1 Portland, ME 37 18 37 11 r
Boston 48 27 42 23 r Portland. OR 45 37 45 34 1
Buffalo 41 35 42 13 r Provkience. t 50 23 44 25 r
Burlington,VT 35 19 38 4 r Raleigh 59 25 56 36 r
Charleston, S.C. 65 34 70 45 ts Rapid City 47 12 15 13 pc
Charleston, W.V. 54 23 46 22 r Reno 49 20 47 23 pc
Charlotte 55 21 56 38 sh Rochester, NY 44 33 42 14 r
Chicago 50 33 31 -2 sn Sacramento 70 30 63 33 s
Cincinnati 51 33 45 21 r Salt Lake City 29 17 32 14 pc
Cteveland 54 39 42 17 sh San Antonio 58 46 63 35 1
Columbia, SC 55 31 26 6 pc San Diego 67 53 69 53 f
Columbus, OH 52 32 44 20 r San Francisco 63 40 58 47 s
Concord, NH 43 9 38 11 r Savannah 63 40 69 46 ts
Dallas 60 35 42 24 cd Seattle 48 42 46 38 1
Denver 59 32 37 21 pc Spokane 28 22 33 25 1
DesMoines 51 30 6 -S pc St. Louis 61 36 34 12 pc
Detrot 47 31 40 12 fl St. Ste. Made 33 30 9 -10 sn
El Paso 57 22 51 29 pc Syracuse 42 19 39 13 r
Evarnsville, IN 49 28 46 16 r Topeka 58 28 20 7 pc
Hanisburg 57 24 37 25 I Wasnminglon 57 w 47 29 r
Hartlord 49 22 39 20 r YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
Houston 60 45 65 38 pc HIOGH 85. Puta Gorda, Ra.
Indianapolis 53 31 40 15 sn yLOW- 13. tangdon. ND.
Las Vegas 60 44 61 38 pc
Uttle Rok 5033 5325 pc WORLD CITIES
Los Angeles 73 51 76 49 sSUN isbo 57144/pc
Louisville 52 31 47 22 r SU NYL Usbon S443ps
Memphis 49 34 50 32 pc CITY H/SK London 46/32/s
Milwaukee 42 25 28 -3 I Acapulco 86711s Madrid 51/33/pc
Minneapolis 47 20 .1 .16 pc Amslerdam 4839/r Mexico City 69/48/pc
Mobile 52 44 27660 43 pc Alhens 59148/r Montreal 37/21/
Montgomery 48 42 1.7957 41 r Beijing9 35/15/s Moscow 33/30/cd
Nashville 46 26 51 28 r Bein 51/42/Cd Paris 48/41r
.--rnd -1.if-/-1-


Bermuda 6&Wiur
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy;, dr-drizzle; Cir 66150/s
IrFB h-hazy; pc-parily cloiudy; r-vabi: Cagry 12/4/sn
ratsansnow mix; s-smnny; isshwers; Havana 84/68/pc
sn-snow; tsettunderstowms w-wljn#. Hong Kong 57/48/pc
WsatheCe* tl LP CSi3 Jerusalem 69/51/pc


RiO 89/rl/pc
Rome 55/46M
Sydney 69/59/pc
Tokyo 4633/$s
Toronto 39/33/cd
Warsaw 48/39(s


. F'cast City
56 ts Miami
71 ts Ocala
66 ts Orlando
49 ts Pensacola
70 ts Sarasota
47 ts Tallahassee
70 pc Tampa
58 ts Verp Beach
62 ts W. Palm Bch.


H L F'cast


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 29, the
363rd day of 2013. There are two
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 29, 1913, the first true
"cliffhanger" movie serial, "The Ad-
ventures of Kathlyn," starring Kath-
lyn Williams, premiered.
On this date:
In 1170, Thomas Becket, the
Archbishop of Canterbury, was slain
in Canterbury Cathedral by knights
loyal to King Henry II.
In 1845, Texas was admitted as
the 28th state.
In 1890, the Wounded Knee
massacre took place in South
Dakota as an estimated 300 Sioux
Indians were killed by U.S. troops
sent to disarm them.
In 1916, Grigory Rasputin, the
so-called "Mad Monk" who'd wielded
great influence with Czar Nicholas II,
was killed by a group of Russian
noblemen in St. Petersburg.
In 1940, during World War II,
Germany dropped incendiary
bombs on London, setting off what
came to be known as "The Second
Great Fire of London."
In 1972, Eastern Air Lines Flight
401, a Lockheed L-1011 Tristar,
crashed into the Florida Everglades
near Miami International Airport,
killing 101 of the 176 people aboard.
In 1975, a bomb exploded in the
main terminal of New York's La-
Guardia Airport, killing 11 people.
Five years ago: Illinois Gov. Rod
Blagojevich's lawyer responded to
impeachment charges, saying a
vague array of charges and evi-
dence did not merit removing his
client from office.
One year ago: Shocked Indians
mourned the death of a woman
who'd been gang-raped and beaten
on a bus in New Delhi nearly two
weeks earlier; six suspects were
charged with murder.
Today's birthdays: Actress Inga
Swenson is 81. Actress Mary Tyler
Moore is 77. Actor Jon Voight is 75.
Actor Ted Danson is 66. Comedian
Paula Poundstone is 54. Rock
singer Dexter Holland (The Off-
spring) is 48. Actor Jude Law is 41.
Thought for Today: "The wise
man must be wise before, not after."
- Epicharmus, Sicilian Greek
comic poet (? c.450 B.C.)


S LEGAL NOTICES







Meeting Notices


D8




m C TLSCOUNTY


CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: Southwest then northwest Gulf water
winds 15 to 20 knots. Seas 2 to 3 temperature
feet. Bay and inland waters moderate 0
chop. Isolated thunderstorms may
increase winds and seas. Tonight:
North winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feel Bay and inland waters a light falken at PApka
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.45 28.48 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.40 38.40 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.47 39.49 40,60
Tsala Apopka-Florat City 40.13 40.14 42.20
Levels reported m feel above sea ve Flood sltage for takes are based on 2.33-year flood,
ihe mean-annual flood which has a 43-peoent chance ol being equal or exceeded in
a'',..r p ,e' Th.5 dam is -.M 1ij. Io 5er 4 ,,1r. 1i Fli,.]i ',,A* h i,-l -5. ri DI r,:l
an ,, 1 S ijO],, '1.:- ,e -'4n in n i -'. 11l "I r.P D,!' :.1 rn- uIIU,"M. I.F 6&)'u S 'j itai
Lv il.li.t rr, ni, w .adii. 10 0-- .*la'r3P-d -' 7ij, a 1 1flu have any questions you
V CiJii' r. l 1 r. Dr0 S-,l ,11 .il "-: 1 I
THE NATION
0 ,' !_ I a ,: 0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A AM "likes" as of I
ADM S says most of
done under
Continued from Page Al his wife, Pai
bie Ressler,
Then there are Adams' of the Citrus
business interests, pital Board.
In July, a Citrus County posting num
garbage hauler said Adams of himself a
tried to steer his disposal events, Adar
business away from the the page to ci
county landfill to a landfill commission
the commissioner co-owns votes or opir
with state Sen. Charlie contrary to h
Dean in Sumter County Adams
Adams denied the accusa- with Comm
tion, saying that he only Meek, who v
suggested the hauler speak for much of
with his business partner, Meek lear
Charlie Dean Jr planned
Later, the city of Inver- an attempt
ness decided to begin ship- to fire
ping its garbage to Adams' t h e n -
landfill. Adams, anticipat- C o u n t y
ing the potential for the Attorney
countyto do the same thing, Richard
received an opinion from W e s c h,
an ethics commission attor- Meek said:
ney that said the county "That's ex-
could do business with t r e m e 1 y
Adams so long as it was by unfortu-
sealed bid and Adams did- nate to
n't participate in creating hear. It's ano
the bid specifications, of him attempt
Other Adams'2013 high- chaos and dis
lights: not going to
He is the only commis- into a circus
sioner with an active Face- During an
book page, which had 884 bate about w


STAFF
Continued from PageAl

Thorpe staying on, while Adams and Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays wanted to con-
tinue the process of hiring Thorpe's
replacement.
Also in August, Wesch who had
served as county administrator for five
years in addition to his role as county at-
torney since 2010 was offered the
county attorney position in Lee County,
which he took in October
Kerry Parsons, assistant county attor-
ney, replaced Wesch under the job title of
acting county attorney, with assistance
from Tallahassee law firm Nabors, Gib-
lin & Nickerson, which agreed to a one-
year contract on a lump-sum retainer of
$8,000 a month.
Several other administrative staff
changes were made.
In July, Ken Frink, one of two assis-
tant county administrators and the direc-
tor of Public Works, left for the position
of Operations, Maintenance and Con-
struction Division director with the
Southwest Florida Water Management
District.
Jeff Rogers, former county engineer,
took over the Public Works directorship.


Friday Adams
the posting is
his name by
n, or by Deb-
chairwoman
SCounty Hos-
Along with
erous photos
at community
ns often uses
riticize fellow
ers for their
lions that are
is.
often feuded
issioner Joe
vas chairman
f 2013. When
ted Adams







Joe Meek
Citrus County
commissioner.
their example
pting to cause
sruption.... I'm
let this turn
sideshow"
October de-
hether to pay


Commissioner Bays' attor-
ney fees for Adams' ethics
complaint, Adams told
Meek: "I avoid dealing
with you because you're so
bizarre sometimes."
Also in October, County
Administrator Brad
Thorpe accused Adams of
creating a hostile work en-
vironment and, by memo,
told him to stop speaking
with Thorpe's staff.
"You have repeatedly in-
sulted me and my staff on
numerous occasions both
publicly and privately,"
Thorpe wrote.
Adams responded: "If
questioning you on your
actions and practices
makes you feel it's work
place harassment, this is
not my intentions, it's my
job. Staff and myself do not
communicate at all unless
it is through your direc-
tion."
Adams ended the year
on one non-controversial
note. At his suggestion, the
county commission ap-
proved renaming a com-
munity park in Hernando
after the Alexander family
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn.


The other assistant county administra-
tor, Cathy Pearson, took on that role as a
sole responsibility, handing over her
other duty as Community Services direc-
tor to Amy Engelken, who had been the
assistant.
Public information officer Lindsay
Ubinas announced in May that she hoped
to go to work as the media relations spe-
cialist with the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office. Ubinas was later replaced at the
county by Tobey Phillips.
In October, Vince Cautero, director of
the Planning and Development Depart-
ment, left for a similar position with the
city of Cape Coral.
Jenette Collins, director of the Land
Development Division, was promoted to
the department head.
In December, in a straight switch,
Adam Thomas was moved from sports
events coordinator with the Parks and
Recreation Division to interim director
of tourism.
Thomas took over the position of Marla
Chancey, who had been the director of
the Citrus County Visitors and Conven-
tion Bureau. Chancey stepped into
Thomas' previous position of sports
events coordinator
Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.


7/C/ jitak J
,7&.. i






lase at




4^F.D DISPOSAL,
Protect our waters Protect ourplanet Protect our future


HOLIDAY SCHEDULES

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS
All Wednesday customers schedule will be as follows:
Inside the City of Crystal River, Mclntosh, Terre Vista
and Brentwood Farms you will be collected the day
following the holiday. (Dec. 26 & Jan. 2)

All the Villages of Citrus Hills will be collected on
Friday following the holiday. (Dec. 27 & Jan. 3)

Sugarmill Woods yard waste customers you will be
picked up on the Saturday following the holiday. (Dec.
28 & Jan. 4)

All other Wednesday collections will be on Monday
proceeding the holiday. (Dec. 23 & Dec. 30.) Regular
collection will resume Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014.



Holiday Special '
NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY ''

3rd MnhFE ^ ^.
With 2 Months Prepaid
(Expires 12/31/13)

699 S. Adolph Pt., Lecanto

js (35)7464617 g
www.Tdsdisposalinc.com


BENEFITS
Continued from PageAl

and will no longer be
counted as unemployed.
The trend has already
emerged in North Car-
olina, which started cut-
ting off extended benefits
in July The state's unem-
ployment rate went down
- from 8.8 percent in
June to 7.4 percent in No-
vember even though
the number of North Car-
olinians who said they
had jobs rose only slightly
in that time.
The North Carolina ev-
idence is consistent with
the theory that ending
benefits will cause some
unemployed to drop out
of the workforce, said
Michael Feroli, an econo-
mist atJP Morgan Chase.
That's what Fed chair-
man Ben Bernanke
meant when he said this
month that the end of ex-
tended benefits "will
bring the unemployment
rate down, but for ... the
wrong reason."
Some unemployed peo-
ple said the loss of bene-
fits might drive them to
take minimum wage jobs
to get by until they can
find work at their skill
level and in their field.
Richard Mattos, 59, of
Salem, Ore., has been out
of work since March,
when he was laid off as a
case manager at a social
services organization.
Without the unemploy-


ment income, Mattos said
he and his wife will have
enough money for one
month's worth of bills. Al-
most every day, he visits
employment centers run
by the state of Oregon or
Goodwill Industries Inter-
national.
"I don't know what
we're going to do," he said.
"We could end up home-
less because of this."
Since 2008, the federal
program paid out benefits
to the unemployed after
their 26 weeks of state
benefits ran out. At its
peak, the program offered
up to 73 weeks of federal
benefits which are typ-
ically offered during peri-
ods of high
unemployment to the
long-term jobless.
James Sherk, a labor
policy analyst at the con-
servative Heritage Foun-
dation, said ending the
extensions could induce
workers to take jobs they
might have overlooked
initially Extended unem-
ployment benefits can
give workers "a false
sense of how much time
they have before they
have to start broadening
their net to less-than -
ideal positions," he said,
adding that the labor mar-
ket, while not ideal, is
stronger and continues to
improve.
In November, the coun-
try's unemployment rate
fell to a five-year low of 7
percent, but is still above
the 5 percent to 6 percent
rate that would signal a


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normal job market. And
long-term unemployment
remains a problem for the
economy as nearly
4.1 million Americans
have been out of work for
six months or more.
Deborah Barrett, a 57-
year-old resident of New-
port, RI., is one of them.
She was laid off from her
management job in ac-
counting in February and
has sent out hundreds of
resumes since. She said
she doesn't know how
she'll get by without the
federal assistance.
"It's petrifying," she
said. "Unfortunately, I
don't believe my story is
very unique."
Laura Garay, 57, pawned
her jewelry, withdrew re-
tirement funds and relied
on support from friends
after losing her paralegal
job in May, the same month
she was diagnosed with
lymphoma.
Her monthly $1,700 in
unemployment covers her
house payment in West-
minster and the cost of
maintaining her health
insurance to cover a bar-
rage of exams and radia-
tion therapy
Garay said her illness
set back her job search,
but as long as she's
healthy, she'll work at just
about anything to get back
on her feet and avoid
being jobless for too long.
"You don't find a job in
two weeks, you don't find
a job in three weeks," she
said. "You find a job after
months of searching."


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Marie
Carella, 83
INVERNESS
Marie Elizabeth Carella,
83, of Inverness, died on
Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, in
the hospice unit at Citrus
Memorial hospital after a
final farewell from loving
family and her beloved
dog, Katie.
Born July 24, 1930, in
Brooklyn, N.Y, she was
the daughter of the late
Daniel James and Kather-
ine Elizabeth (Yaeger)
Kozawchuk. She gradu-
ated from Grover Cleve-
land High School in New
York city in 1949. She mar-
ried Millburn, N.J., resi-
dent Rocco Joseph
Carella, a U.S. Navy vet-
eran with a distinguished
service record, in 1954.
They lived and raised
their family in Chatham,
then Cedar Knolls, N.J.,
then retired to Jackson,
N.J.
An accomplished
needlewoman, Mrs.
Carella had a successful
business creating custom
draperies and slipcovers.
After her retirement, she
continued her needle-
work knitting and crochet-
ing lap robes, which she
donated to veterans' hos-
pitals in New Jersey, and
prayer shawls for church
members. Her fingers
were never still. Every
member of her family and
many friends have bene-
fited from her talent, being
gifted with beautiful
sweaters, scarves, socks
and afghans over the
years.
After moving to Florida
in 2006, Mrs. Carella be-
came an active member of
the Citrus Memorial Hos-
pital Auxiliary, devoting
more than 1,500 hours, and
the First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 44
years, Rocco Carella, and a
daughter-in-law, Heidi
Rita Carella (Suter).
Mrs. Carella is survived
by two sons, Michael
Rocco Carella of Freien-
wil, Switzerland, and
Daniel James Carella
(Megan) of Inverness; a
daughter, Katherine Jean
Packowski (John) of Jack-
son, New Jersey; and six
grandchildren (to whom
she was devoted), Daniel
Carella of Washington,
D.C., Brian Packowski and
Matthew Packowski, both
of Jackson, N.J., Caroline
Packowski of Hoboken,
N.J., Alexander Carella of
Freienwil, Switzerland,
and Colin Carella of
Inverness.
The service of remem-
brance will be at 10 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, at
the First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness, with
Rev James Capps officiat-
ing. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness. Mrs. Carella will be
interred with her late hus-
band at the Brigadier Gen-
eral William C. Doyle
Veterans Memorial Ceme-
tery in Wrightstown, New
Jersey
Memorial donations
made be made to Precious
Paws Rescue Inc., 13161 S.
Betty Point, Floral City, FL
34436 or Citrus County An-
imal Services, 4030 S. Air-
port Road, Inverness, FL
34450.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Donald
Quilling, 85
INVERNESS
Donald P Quilling, 85,
Inverness, Fla., died
Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2013,
at Arbor Trail Nursing, In-
verness. A Celebration of
Life Memorial Service will
begin at 2 p.m. Sunday Jan.
5, 2014, at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.

OBITUARIES


* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.
* Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


David Clark, 75
FLORAL CITY
David Dean Clark, age
75, Floral City, died
Dec. 22, 2013, under the
loving care
of his fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County
David
was born
Dec. 11,
1938, in David
Decatur, Clark
Ill., to the
late William and Alberta
(Langheldt) Clark. He
served our country in the
U.S. Navy. He was a mem-
ber of VFW Post 99 in De-
catur, Ill., and transferred
to Post 7122 of Floral City
David was an excellent
welder and sheet metal
worker He enjoyed travel-
ing, dancing and was the
owner/operator of two dif-
ferent bars in Decatur, Ill.,
the Anchor Inn, Circle C
and partner of the
Belvedere Inn. He was a
parishioner at St. An-
thony's Catholic Church in
Brooksville.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 51 years,
Linda; his son Todd D.
Clark, Florida; daughters
Kimberly Rhodes, Blue
Mound, Ill., and Deana
Clark, Delray Beach, Fla.;
his brother Frederick
Clark, Decatur, Ill.; and
grandchildren Miranda
Kay, Kara Larie, Falon
Rae, Madison Renee and
Jacob Ryan. He was pre-
ceded in death by siblings
Bill, Don, Bob, Gene, An-
abelle, Patricia and Mary
Kay
A graveside military
committal service will be
at 2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 3,
2013, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Friends are invited to join
the procession to the
cemetery at 1:15 at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory Do-
nations to honor David's
memory may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 designated
for the Hospice House in
Lecanto in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Virginia
Schmidtke, 93
INVERNESS
Mrs. Virginia L.
Schmidtke, age 93 of In-
verness, Florida, died Fri-
day, December 27, 2013 in
Inverness, FL.
She was born May 11,
1920 in Detroit, MI, daugh-
ter of Robert and Elna
(Caukins) Crooks. She
worked as a sales clerk
and moved to Inverness
from Redford Township,
MI in 1978. Mrs. Schmidtke
was Baptist by faith and at-
tended Grace Bible Fel-
lowship Church,
Inverness. She was pre-
ceded in death by her par-
ents, her husband, Otto
Thomas Schmidtke and a
daughter, Jean McCann.
Survivors include a
daughter, Lorraine Haw-
ley and a son, Thomas
Schmidtke. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com. Pri-
vate burial arrangements
will be under the direction
of the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory


Linda
Emann, 60
INVERNESS
Linda Sue Emann, age
60, Inverness, died Dec. 24,
2013, at her residence sur-
rounded
by her lov-
ing family
a n d
friends.
Linda
was born
June 2,
1953, to
the late Linda
Philibert Emann
and Eliza-
beth Elkey Her mother
later remarried and she
was raised by a loving
stepfather, Robert Hall.
Linda served our country
in the U.S. Army She was
active in many callings of
the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints in the
Lecanto ward. She en-
joyed scrapbooking and
researching on her com-
puter She and her hus-
band enjoyed traveling to
many new places.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband of 15
years, Mark Emann; her
daughter Pamela Dellich,
Inverness; grandchildren
Amber, C.J., Ethan and a
beloved niece Jennifer
Larrabee; sister Debora
Beaumont Inverness, Fla.;
stepbrother Robert Hall Jr
and stepsister Donna Hall.
She was preceded in death
by a sister, Patricia
Larrabee
A visitation is scheduled
for Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014,
from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness. A Fu-
neral Service of Remem-
brance will be at noon
Monday, Jan. 6, at the
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints in
Lecanto. The family will
greet friends at the church
from 11 a.m. until the hour
of service. Burial with mil-
itary honors will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. The fam-
ily requests memorial
donations given to either
the American Cancer Soci-
ety or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
lieu of flowers.

SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


Phillip
McCarthy, 68
INVERNESS
Phillip J. McCarthy, 68,
of Inverness, Fla., died
Saturday, Dec. 21, 2013. at
his residence. Phillip was
born June 13, 1945, in
Providence, RI., the son of
James and Helen Mc-
Carthy Phil attended the
Rhode Island School of
Design. He retired as a dis-
trict manager for Ecolab in
southern N.H. Phillip
moved to Inverness in 2005
from Holderness, N.H. He
was a loving husband, dad
and grandpa with a fun-
loving spirit. He was an
avid sportsman. He was
lucky to enjoy the benefits
of many friendships.
Phillip is survived by his
wife, Carol; son Scott Mc-
Carthy and his wife Stacey,
Inverness, Fla.; daughter
Lisa McCarthy, Inverness,
Fla.; sister-in-law Teresa
Sabol and her husband
Jack of Ankeny, Iowa; two
nephews; and two grand-
children.
Mr McCarthy's family
will receive friends from
10 a.m. to the hour of serv-
ices at the Heinz Funeral
Home on Saturday Jan. 18,
2014. Funeral services will
begin at 11 a.m. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


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Cleora
Moshier, 71
FORMERLY OF
HOMOSASSA
Cleora Moshier, for-
merly of Homosassa,
passed away peacefully at
her Pennsylvania home
early Christmas morning.
She re-
tired from -
the state of -
Florida,
serving
first for '
the Bre- -

County
Health De- Cleora
apartment Moshier
and then
the Citrus County Health
Department.
Cleora was born April 6,
1942, and was preceded in
death by her oldest son,
FF/EMT William "Billy"
Smith; her mother, Stella
Formichella; her father,
Frank Formichella Sr; and
her companion, Bob Ben-
der She is survived by a
son, John Smith of Perry,
Fla.; a daughter, Kathy
O'Quinn of Barto, Pa.; a
sister, Judy Haldeman; two
brothers, Frank
Formichella Sr and John
Formichella; four grand-
daughters, Aimee Buffing-
ton, Tiffany Zicarelli,
Janice Smith and Jessica
Kuruc; two grandsons,
John Smith and Justin
Buffington; six great
grandchildren; seven
nieces and nephews; and
numerous extended fam-
ily and friends.
There will be a celebra-
tion of her life on Thurs-
day, Jan. 2, 2014, in
Pennsylvania. A second
celebration will take place
from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 5, 2014 at Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness,
Fla.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made in her
son's name, William
"Billy" Smith, to the Na-
tional Fallen Firefighter's
Foundation, PO. Drawer
498 Emmitsburg, MD
21727, or firehero.org.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.




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Marguerite
'Peg' Papa, 80
LECANTO
Marguerite (Peg) R.
Papa, 80, of Lecanto, FL,
went to be with the Lord
and Savior on Dec. 22,2013
Peg was born May 9, 1933
in Astoria, NY, to Frank
and Marguerite R. (Gress)
Crippa. She was preceded
in death by her loving hus-
band of 56 years, Eugene J.
Papa Sr, and beloved son,
Eugene J. Papa, Jr
She is survived by 3
daughters, Lorrie (Alex)
Morton, Lecanto, FL,
Cordelia Papa (Dave),
Southwick, MA, Betty (Jim)
La Plante, Westfield, MA.
grandchildren, Mac,
Amber, and Craig Morton
of FL, Jim and Gina
Loughery and Joe and
Jenny LaPlante of MA,
seven great grandchildren,
igreat-great grandchild,
life long friend, Joan
Sabottke of New Britain,
CT, a sister-in-law Helen
Papa of Farmington, CT,
nieces, nephews and many
friends.
Peg moved from New
Britain, CT to Tolland, MA
where she and her hus-
band owned and operated
The Tolland Village Store
and she served as Tol-
land's Town Clerk. They
retired and moved to
Lecanto, FL in 1989. Her
family always came first
and she enjoyed cooking,
crocheting and playing
bingo. She was an incredi-
ble wife, mother, grand-
mother, aunt and friend
and will be terribly missed
by so many
She was a member of
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church. Burial
will be in the Tolland
Cemetery, MA, at a later
date. Heinz Funeral
Home, Inverness, Fl.



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A6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


^3


44




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Yolanda
'Fritzie'
Pickering, 76
INVERNESS
Yolanda (Fritzie or
Frieda) Pickering, Inver-
ness, Fla., fell victim of
ALS (Lou Gehrig's Dis-
ease) on
Dec. 18, d
2013, at
Citrus Me-
m or i a 1 -
hospital
after a
one-and-a-
half-year
struggle. Yolanda
Fritzie Pickering
was born
on Dec. 24, 1936, in Akron,
Ohio, to Fred and Johanna
(Bender) Grimm and she
lived in retirement for the
past 16 years in the Royal
Oaks community in Inver-
ness, where she was a lov-
ing wife, mother,
grandmother, tireless com-
munity volunteer, helpful
neighbor, green-thumb
gardener, bird watcher
and squirrel chaser. She
was known for her sense of
humor, practical jokes,
funny stories and impish
grin. She would lift the
spirits of everyone around
her
Fritzie is survived by her
loving husband of 58 years,
Gaylord Glenn Pickering;
son Jay Pickering of Seat-
tle, Wash.; daughter Jodi
Pickering of San
Clemente, Calif; two
grandchildren, Evan Pick-
ering and Lindsay Picker-
ing; younger sister
Barbara (Grimm) Francis
of Richmond, Va.; nieces
Kellie Ruse and Daria


Putzier; younger brother
Fred Grimm of Fredric,
Wis.; and her favorite
cousin Leila Alexander of
San Diego, Calif. Fritzie
was preceded in death by
her firstborn son, Michael,
in 1972 from leukemia.
Prior to living in Inver-
ness, Fritzie lived in Lodi,
Ohio, and Seminole, Fla.
Fritzie graduated from
Lodi High School in 1954
and married Glenn on
Jan. 8,1955. She was a Spe-
cial Achievement Award-
winning and beloved mail
carrier for the Largo (Fla.)
Post Office for 17 years.
Her mail customers and
co-workers were her sec-
ond family during all those
years. She was a major
blood and apheresis donor
throughout her entire life.
She was an avid reader
and tireless and all-giving
volunteer with the local li-
brary, Citrus County Elec-
tion Board and Royal Oaks
community clubhouse.
Fritzie had so many
friends in the Royal Oaks
neighborhood who en-
joyed her cooking, pranks
and made-up stories.
Fritzie and Glenn loved
to drive across the USA
and stop at our country's
national parks while trav-
eling to visit friends and
family on the West Coast,
East Coast and Midwest.
Fritzie loved to get behind
the wheel and speed
along, while seeing the
beauty of our great coun-
try Please remember


Fritzie when you enjoy na-
ture, the birds and flowers,
the touch of the wind, the
warmth of the sun, and the
falling rain, as she will live
in our hearts forever She
will be greatly missed by
all those who were
touched by her
A celebration of her life
will be held at Fort Cooper
State Park, Inverness, Fla.,
in March 2014 when the
weather is sunny and
warm, just like her Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory is assist-
ing the family
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's polIicy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
charged a base fee of
$25 plus $10 per
column inch, payable
in advance.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an ad-
ditional charge.
Larger photos, span-
ning the entire col-
umn, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in sub-
mitted material are
charged at the same
rates.


Ruth Royer, 93
VENICE
Ruth Kelley Royer, born
July 18,1920, in Baltimore,
Md., passed away peace-
fully at 93, on Dec. 17,2013,
in Venice, Fla.
Ruth



Rai u rt h oe
spent her
childhood
in London,
England.
She at-
tended the
Royal
Academy
of Dra- Ruth
matic Art Royer
in London
and was awarded a schol-
arship for her outstanding
acting ability that was pre-
sented to her by the es-
teemed actress Gertrude
Lawrence. In addition to
acting, she was an accom-
plished equestrian and
dancer Upon returning to
the United States, she met
her future husband, John
Kelley They were happily
married for 60 years until
his death in 2000. They
began their life together in
Maryland, then moved to
Pennsylvania, New Jersey
and finally settled in
Wellesley, Mass., where
they lived for more than 20
years. Upon retirement,
they moved first to East
Dennis, Mass., then to Ho-
mosassa, Fla. Ruth remar-
ried at 81, and enjoyed 11
years with Dick Royer in
Homosassa and Sarasota,
Fla., until his death in
2013.
Ruth was an avid reader,
a lover of puns, poetry and
prose. She was a painter, a
poet, a talented cook and
had a green thumb like
none other She loved
bridge with her friends,
and her golf game gave her
equal amounts of joy and
misery The family home


was filled with warmth
and laughter by her love of
family, her flair for the
dramatic, her humor and
beautiful smile. Her loss
will leave a void in our
hearts that cannot be
filled.
Ruth is survived by
three children from her
first marriage: John Kelley
(Joanne), Jim Kelley
(Hinda) and Judy Flana-
gan (Scott); six grandchil-
dren; and one
great-grandson. Her sec-
ond husband's five chil-
dren (Rick, Amy, Jeff, Patty
and Dave) were a great joy
to her
For those wishing to
honor her life, a donation
to the American Diabetes
Association in her name
would be greatly appreci-
ated. Farley Funeral
Home in Venice, Fla., is
handling the arrange-
ments. To send condo-
lences please visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.
Deaths
ELSEWHERE

Farooq
Shaikh, 65
BOLLYWOOD ACTOR
NEW DELHI Indian
actor Farooq Shaikh, the
plump, unlikely hero of
scores of Bollywood films,
has died. He was 65.
Press Trust of India re-
ported that Shaikh suf-
fered a heart attack Friday
in Dubai, where he was
visiting with his family
Shaikh's film career
began on a high note with


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the 1973
new wave
f i I m
G a r m
Hawa,"
about the
1947 parti-
tion of the
subconti-
Farooq
nent at the Shaikh
end of
British rule. His perform-
ance earned him a key
role in director Satyajit
Ray's "The Chess Players,"
about the decadence of
India's feudal classes.
Shaikh's cherubic looks
struck a chord with ordi-
nary people who tended to
identify with his man on
the street image.
Bollywood reacted sadly
to the news of Shaikh's
death, with several
celebrities tweeting their
condolences.
Noted Indian actress
Shabana Azmi, who de-
scribed herself as a close
friend, said she was still
trying to come to terms
with Shaikh's death.
"Forty years ago, he and
I started a theater group. It
was a very long associa-
tion, so it's difficult to
speak about his death,"
Azmi tweeted.
Shaikh was active in
Mumbai's theater scene,
and acted in a Hindi ver-
sion of the satirical British
comedy "Yes Minister" on
Indian television. He also
produced a popular TV
show on which he inter-
viewed Hindi film stars.
Shaikh is survived by his
wife and two daughters.
-From wire reports




A8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 A9


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Associated Press
Two women stroll along a
snow-covered path Saturday
in downtown St. Joseph,
Mich.

Boy Scouts to open
ranks to gay youth
The Boy Scouts of America
will accept openly gay youths
starting on New Year's Day,
a historic change that has
prompted the BSA to ponder
a host of potential complica-
tions ranging from policies
on tentmates and showers
to whether Scouts can
march in gay pride parades.
Yet despite their be-
prepared approach, BSA
leaders are rooting for the
change to be a non-event.
"My hope is there will be
the same effect this Jan. 1 as
the Y2K scare," said Brad
Haddock, a BSA national
executive board member who
chairs the policy implemen-
tation committee.
Some churches are drop-
ping their sponsorship of
Scout units because of the
new policy and some families
are switching to a new con-
servative alternative called
Trail Life USA. But massive
defections haven't material-
ized and most major sponsors,
including the Roman Catholic
and Mormon churches, are
maintaining ties.
Facility found for
teen on ventilator
OAKLAND, Calif.--An
attorney said a nursing home
has agreed to provide long-
term care for a 13-year-old
girl who has been declared
brain dead but whose family
maintains is still alive.
A southern California fa-
cility agreed after another
nursing home backed out,
the family's lawyer, Christo-
pher Dolan, said Friday.
Time is short for the fam-
ily, as Alameda County Su-
perior Court Judge Evelio
Grillo on Tuesday ruled that
the Children's Hospital Oak-
land may remove Jahi Mc-
Math from life support at
5 p.m. Monday unless an
appeal is filed.
Worker arraigned
in dog-dumping case
CENTRAL SLIP, N.Y. -
A Long Island animal shelter
worker who authorities say
was given two dogs to put
up for adoption but instead
dumped a 1-year-old puppy
in a commercial trash bin
and released the other into
the street earlier this week
was arraigned Saturday on
animal cruelty, abuse, aban-
donment and other charges.
Michael Papini, 30, a
kennel attendant at the
Town of Islip animal shelter,
was ordered held on $250
cash bail or $500 bond. He
was arrested Friday.
Authorities identified Pap-
ini after news outlets aired
surveillance footage showing
the driver of a black SUV pull
up to a commercial trash
bin outside a gas station in
West Islip on Monday and dump
a black plastic bag inside.
A homeless person sifting
through the trash then found
a female Maltese mix, wear-
ing a pink collar and leash,
severely matted and dirty.
The dog was taken to an
animal hospital, is healthy and
will be put up for adoption.
The SPCA also offered a


$500 reward Saturday for
information that leads to the
safe capture of a 5-year-old,
cream-colored male miniature
Poodle that Papini allegedly
let loose in a street Monday.
-From wire reports


S. Sudan: 'White Army militia marches to fight

Hopes for cease-fire dim as rebels'leader mobilizes fellow tribesmen


Associated Press

JUBA, South Sudan -
Twenty-five thousand young
men who make up a tribal
militia known as the "White
Army" are marching toward
a contested state capital in
South Sudan, an official
said Saturday, dimming
hopes for a cease-fire.
Seeking an end to the
nearly two-week crisis in
which an estimated 1,000
people have been killed,
leaders from across East
Africa announced Friday
that South Sudan had
agreed to a "cessation of
hostilities" against forces


loyal to former Vice Presi-
dent Riek Machar, accused
by the government of lead-
ing a coup attempt on Dec.
15 that erupted into spiral-
ing violence.
But Machar rejected
that, saying in an interview
with the BBC that any
cease-fire had to be nego-
tiated by delegations from
both sides. The govern-
ment in the capital, Juba,
seized on that statement to
further condemn Machar
"Dr Riek Machar has
put obstacles to this gen-
uine call by issuing pre-
conditions that a cease-fire
cannot be reached unless


a negotiation is con-
ducted," said Vice Presi-
dent James Wani Igga.
"This is complete intransi-
gence and obstinacy be-
cause the main issue now
is to stop violence."
In addition to those
killed, tens of thousands
are seeking shelters at
United Nations camps.
More fighting is ex-
pected. Most serious is the
looming battle for Bor, the
provincial capital of Jon-
glei state that briefly fell to
rebels before government
forces took it back this week,
said military spokesman
Col. Philip Aguer. Pro-


Machar forces are be-
lieved to be preparing a
fresh offensive to retake
Bor, the Jonglei state town
where three United States
military aircraft were hit
by gunfire while trying to
evacuate American citi-
zens on Dec. 21, wounding
four U.S. service members.
The estimated 25,000
youths from the Lou Nuer
sub-clan the same tribe
Machar is from are
marching on Bor, said In-
formation Minister Michael
Makuei Lueth. The "White
Army" gets its name from
the white ash fighters put
on their skin as protection


Goodnight, sun


Associated Press


A Palestinian rides a horse Saturday on Gaza Beach as the sun sets in Gaza City.


Police deployed to colleges

following student's death


Associated Press
CAIRO -Riot police moved
into Egypt's main Islamic uni-
versity on Saturday, firing tear
gas and breaking up a strike by
students that threatened to
disrupt midterms. One student
was killed in the melee, an ad-
ministration building was
torched and students fled from
exam rooms.
Police say they entered east-
ern Cairo's Al-Azhar campus,
the site of frequent clashes in
recent weeks, and deployed
around other Egyptian univer-
sities to prevent supporters of
ousted President Mohammed
Morsi from intimidating other
students trying to take the tests.
Pro-Morsi activists have
called for an exam boycott but
deny government claims that
they threatened anyone.


Students at al-Azhar, a
stronghold of Morsi supporters,
have been protesting for weeks
against his ouster and a subse-
quent state crackdown, which
this week saw his Muslim
Brotherhood group declared a
terrorist organization.
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Higher Education
Hossam Eissa said authorities
will go after those he said were
financing non-peaceful
protests on campuses, and ac-
cused the Brotherhood of
seeking to derail exams.
The government is intensifying
its crackdown on Brotherhood
and Morsi supporters ahead of
a Jan. 14-15 constitutional ref-
erendum they see as a milestone
in the transition plan Authorities
fear Morsi supporters would
seek to derail the key vote,
through protests or violence.


Health law to put

calorie info on

vending machines
Associated Press

CONCORD, N.H. Office workers in
search of snacks will be counting calories
along with their change under new labeling
regulations for vending machines included in
President Barack Obama's health care over-
haul law
Requiring calorie information to be dis-
played on roughly 5 million vending ma-
chines nationwide will help consumers make
healthier choices, says the Food and Drug
Administration, which is expected to release
final rules early next year It estimates the
cost to the vending machine industry at
$25.8 million initially and $24 million per
year after that, but says if just .02 percent of
obese adults ate 100 fewer calories a week,
the savings to the health care system would
be at least that great.
The rules will apply to about 10,800 compa-
nies that operate 20 or more machines. Nearly
three quarters of those companies have three
or fewer employees, and their profit margin
is extremely low, according to the National
Automatic Merchandising Association.
The FDA also is working on final rules for
requiring restaurant chains with more than
20 locations to post calories information,
something some cities already mandate and
some large fast-food operations have begun
doing voluntarily A 2011 study in New York
found that only one in six customers looked at
the information, but those who did generally
ordered about 100 fewer calories.


Twenty-six killed after train catches fire


Associated Press


KOTHACHERUVU,
India A fire engulfed a
coach of an express train
in southern India on Sat-
urday, killing at least 26
passengers, many of whom
became trapped and suffo-
cated after the doors failed
to open, officials said.
As the inferno and thick
black smoke raced through
the car at about 3:45 a.m.,
panicked passengers
broke the windows and
many saved themselves by
jumping from the train.
Sixty-seven passengers
were in the carriage when
the fire broke out, said rail-
ways spokesman C.S. Gupta.


The train was brought to
a halt and the burning coach
was delinked from the rest
of the cars to prevent the
fire from spreading, he said.
Firefighters put out the
blaze in the burning coach
and retrieved at least 26
bodies, including two chil-
dren, said a railway offi-
cial at the site of the fire.
More than a dozen people
were brought to hospitals
with injuries.
Accidents are common
on India's railroad net-
work, one of the world's
largest, with some 18 mil-
lion passengers daily Most
collisions and fires are
blamed on poor mainte-
nance and human error


Associated Press
A policeman inspects the damage inside a train Saturday
after an accident at Kothacheruvu, about 96 miles north
of Bangalore, India. A fire engulfed two coaches of an
express train in southern India early Saturday, killing at
least two dozen, many of whom became trapped and
suffocated after the doors failed to open, officials said.


from insects.
"He has decided to mo-
bilize the youth in the name
of his tribe," Lueth said.
The estimate of 25,000
came from intelligence in-
side the group itself, Lueth
said. Asked if the govern-
ment was monitoring the
group from the air, he said
only: "Well, ultimately we
are monitoring."
As of Saturday evening,
the youths, who are armed
with light weapons and
heavy machine guns, were
about 30 miles outside Bor,
he said, meaning they
could reach the state capi-
tal imminently


World BRIEFS

Dragon breath


Associated Press
A man breathes fire on
Saturday during the World
Fiesta street parade, an
event to usher in Visit
Malaysia Year 2014, in
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
More than 3,000 costumed
dancers took part in the
parade.

Activists: Syrian
airstrike kills 21
BEIRUT-A Syrian gov-
ernment airstrike hit a
crowded vegetable market
in a rebel-held neighborhood
of the northern city of Aleppo
on Saturday, shattering cars
and storefronts and killing at
least 21 people, activists said.
For nearly two weeks,
President BasharAssad's
warplanes and helicopters
have pounded opposition-
controlled areas of the city.
Activists say the aerial as-
sault has killed more than
400 people since Dec. 15.
Saturday's airstrike
slammed into a marketplace
in the Tariq al-Bab neigh-
borhood, the Aleppo Media
Center activist group and the
Britain-based Syrian Obser-
vatory for Human Rights said.
China abolishes
re-education camps
BEIJING State media
said China's national legis-
lature has voted to abolish
a much-criticized penal sys-
tem that allowed police to
lock up people for up to four
years without due process.
The official Xinhua News
said the standing committee
of the National People's Con-
gress on Saturday adopted
a resolution to abolish the
re-education labor system,
formalizing a November de-
cision by the ruling Chinese
Communist Party.
Xinhua says all those serv-
ing time in the camps would
be set free starting Saturday.
Elsewhere in China,
Hengyang city in southern
China has dismissed most
members of its legislature
after they were found to have
taken millions of dollars in
bribes in a massive election
fraud, a Communist Party-
run newspaper reported.
The scandal implicated
518 lawmakers in the city's
529-member legislature,
said the Hunan Daily.
People's congresses at all
levels of China are essentially
rubber-stamping bodies
that sanction decisions by
the ruling Communist Party,
but a seat on any people's
congress is still highly coveted,
because it provides status,
networking opportunities
and closeness to power.
-From wire reports


WT



p
~pq


Firemen put out
a fire inside the
Faculty of Com-
merce that was
started Saturday
after a student
was killed under
disputed circum-
stances during
clashes at al-
Azhar University
in Cairo, Egypt.
Associated Press








EI Travel & Leisure


EXCURSIONS


Miami museum has

1,200 cars, bicycles, Vespas


Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: The 1948 Ford Greased Lightning from the movie "Grease" is displayed at
the Dezer Collection Museum in North Miami. ABOVE: The 1982 Delorean "Time
Machine" from the movie "Back to the Future" is displayed. More than 1,000 cars
are on display at the 250,000-square-foot museum which features American
classics, military and electric cars, bicycles and cars featured in movies.


NORTH MIAMI


T he classic cars lined up
against an empty, vintage
gas station along a busy
street in North Miami at-
tract visitors to a much
larger space right behind it.
More than 1,000 cars are on display
at the 250,000-square-foot Miami Auto
Museum at The Dezer Collection that
includes American classics, military
and electric cars, bicycles and more.
The museum is so large that if every
passenger on three 747 airplanes
were given just one item from the mu-
seum, they could all bike, drive or
pedal their way out, said curator
Myles Kornblatt.
There are eight galleries spread
throughout two large buildings in a part
of Miami not known to showcase col-
lectibles, much less $25 million to $30
million worth of one-of-a-kind vehicles.
"We are a bit of a hidden gem," Ko-
rnblatt said.


DREAM
VACATIONS
oto0^ Contest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Jorge Ivan Vergara Salazar, who
came from Colombia to Miami on a
family vacation, recently visited the
museum and said he was surprised to
find so many rare cars under one
roof
"Everything that you see in televi-
sion, like James Bond and Indiana
Jones, those are all marvelous things.
You get astonished by the things that
are here in America," Salazar, 49, said
in Spanish while touring the museum.
Real estate developer Michael
Dezer, 72, started his massive collec-
tion as a teenager and has one of the
largest Vespa scooter collections in
the world.
"I knew it was original before I
showed up," said AJ Palmgren, a self-
proclaimed "Knight Rider" historian
who traveled from Des Moines, Iowa,
to Florida for a family vacation. He
made sure to stop at the museum on
this trip because the television series
about the talking, crime-fighting car
See Page A13


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


India
Citrus Hills residents Lenn and Karen Feutz recently took a vacation to India,
where they visited the Taj Mahal.


Suzette Laboy
Associated Press




A12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 29, 2013 C:Comcast,Citrus B:uBrght House D11:Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis FP Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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ED S 3 1 6 NewsHour WEDU Return- Call the Midwife Holiday Special (N) Masterpiece Classic Trip to a Scottish hunting As Time As Time
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-NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football (N) (In Stereo Live) N News
N 8FLA 8 News Stereo Live)'14'N
ABC 20 20 20 T o oNews World America's Funniest *** "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone"(2001) Daniel Radcliffe. News Spo Night
ABC 2 News Home Videos'PG' An orphan attends a school of witchcraft and wizardry, on 9
_ NFL Football Regional Coverage. 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) N The 36th Annual Kennedy Center Honors 10 News Paid
(B WTSPJCBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) (Live) N Entertainers receive recognition. (N) 'PG' 11pm (NJ Program
F 1 1 NFL Football Regional Coverage. The OT (N) The The Family Guy Animation FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
Si FOX 13 13 13 13 (N) (In Stereo Live) N *PG' Simpsons Simpsons '14' Dom (In Stereo) N Notice'14'
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L ABC 1 1 11 News Home Videos 'PG' An orphan attends a school of witchcraft and wizardry.
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Stop cheating,


get counseling


D earAnnie: I am a
married mother
with two children,
both in high school. But I
am in love with a man
who is not my husband
of 21 years. "Harry" is
my first love, and he
came back into my life
unexpectedly He is also
married.
Neither of us is pas-
sionate or loving toward
our spouses
anymore. We
both feel that
we are grow-
ing apart
from them. I
am waiting
for my chil-
dren to finish
high school
before I make
any final
move.
Myhus- ANN
band still AL
seems to be- MAL
lieve we can
be a happy couple, but I
don't agree. He is un-
aware of my affair, but I
can tell that he feels that
I'm growing more distant
from him every day
An additional prob-
lem, however, is that
Harry seems to go
through fits and starts


I
.I


about leaving his large
family for me. But his
marriage is based on a
lie. What should we do?
- Massachusetts
Dear Massachusetts:
Yes. You should stop
lying and cheating and
being disrespectful to
each other and to your
marriages. If you are un-
happy with your hus-
band, get counseling or
get out. But do
not rely on
Harry to "save"
you. We sus-
pect he enjoys
the affair more
than he would
a divorce, and
that you enjoy
the romance
and intrigue
more than
working on the
E'S day-to-day re-
0 sponsibilities
OX of a marriage.
You've in-
vested 21 years and have
two children. Please see
whether there is some-
thing worth salvaging,
and if so, take the energy
you are giving to Harry
and put it into your mar-
riage. You'd be surprised
what a little genuine
effort can do.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"47 Ronin" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m. No passes.
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:45 p.m. No passes.
"American Hustle" (R)
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 7:50 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13)
12:35 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
ofSmaug" (PG-13) 3:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D,
high frame rate. 12:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
12:20 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Secret Life of Walter
Mitty" (PG) 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) 2:25 p.m. No passes.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m.,
4:45 p.m. No passes.


"The Wolf of Wall Street" (R)
12 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) 12 p.m.
No passes.
"47 Ronin" (PG-13) In 3D.
3:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"American Hustle" (R)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 12:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Grudge Match" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D.
10p.m. No passes.
"The Hunger Games: Catch-
ing Fire" (PG-13) 10:30 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) In 3D. 4:50 p.m.
No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Legit
6 Farm equipment
10 Site
15 Theme park
attractions
20 Century plant
21 Like a doily
22 Of the bishop of Rome
23 Red shade
24 Mythical creature
25 Roadster
26 Accumulate
27 Sedative drug
28 Before
29 Amino-
31 Not talking
33 Plant fiber
35 Luge
36 Tangle
37 Probable
39 Spoken vote
41 Spectrum color
44 Dunce cap shape
45 -vital
48 Wool-bearing
animal
53 Cake
54 Hit
55 Trump or
Sutherland
57 Concentrate
58 Wings
59 Amphibious
creature
60 Water barrier
61 Male swine
63 "- of the d'Urbervilles"
64 Downhearted
65 Well-behaved
66 Jeans brand
68 Case
70 Soak, as flax
71 Small bird
72 Native of an Asian re-
gion
74 Best or Ferber
76 Island greeting
79 Order
81 Impostor
83 Display clearly
87 Worth
88 Uncultured one
89 Eager
91 Willow rod
92 Thickener for jellies
94 Constrict
96 Chatter
97 alia
98 Sufficiently,
archaically


100 Not at all outgoing
102 Marathon
104 Bundy or Knight
107 Make an error
109 Actress
Burstyn
110 Lab animals
111 Uncle-
114 Surrounded by
116 Ark maker
118 Youth
119 Relocate
120 Like spotted
bananas
121 Furious
123 Smartly garbed
125 Links cry
126 Light wood
127 Doctrine
128 Beak part
129 A metal
130 Journey
131 Computer part (Abbr.)
133 Victor
136 Endorse
137 Seeger or Sampras
141 Surmounting
144 Craft
145 Knock senseless in the
ring
146 Priest's vestment
149 Rhetorician
151 "Three Musketeers" au-
thor
153 Clownish
155 Work
157 Long speech
158 Last letter
159 Item for a fencer
160 Peace goddess
161 Climb
162 Badgerlike animal
163 Marsh plant
164 Gave over


DOWN
1 Amphora
2 Culture medium
3 Tardy
4 League
5 Make insane
6 Braid
7 Praise
8 Fall mo.
9 Cheyenne's state
10 Outpouring
11 Caravan animal
12 Clean-air org.
13 Punning poet
14 Word in an


ultimatum
Certain voter (Abbr.)
Aflower
Watch part
Punta del -
Pip
Duplicate
Bill and -
Stringed instrument, for
short
Official order
Bird of prey
Raucous
Hankering
Folklore creature
Type style (Abbr.)
- contender
Stalemate
Dressed
Big dog, for short
- vera
Destiny
Maple genus
Erato or Clio, e.g.
Helper (Abbr.)
- or later
Barry or Brubeck
Leaves
unmentioned
Shoe part
Obligation
Ill-mannered
Grid
Permission
Of a desert
Bill
Kind of elephant
Leg bone
Involving warships
River in France
Elec. unit
Sheltered side
Grampus
Give a nickname to
Sch. in Cambridge
Insect egg
A letter
Go wrong
Obtain
Midday
"Guys and -
Mottled
Engraving
Material for potters
High card
Soapstone
Arab VIP
Disreputable place
Get along
Poetic time of day
Shiny fabric


112 Church part
113 Edible portion
115 Performed
117 That girl
119 Anchor
120 -and file
122 Sawbones
124 Baste
125 Household
appliance
126 Pastoral


Red or India
Crested bird
Reduce
PR concern
Twangy
Howled
Kitchen items
Actor Bana
Scarlett's home
Abbr. in citations
Bouquet


Catamount
Place for a patch
Under covers
Solitary
Spawned
Work in verse
Encountered
Simian
Exist


Puzzle answer is on Page A15.


12-29 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE EXCURSIONS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 A13



Hawaii town to state: Stop sending tourists here


AUDREY McAvoY
Associated Press
KAILUA, Hawaii People from
across the world are drawn to the
coastal town of Kailua. Its white sand
beaches are among the nation's best
Some recommend the Honolulu suburb
for its laid-back vibe. And President
Barack Obama vacations there with his
family each Christmas.
But now, the neighborhood board is
asking a state tourism agency to stop en-
couraging visitors to stay overnight in
their town.
It's the latest salvo in a long-running
battle over how much tourism Kailua
wants and should allow a dispute that's
popping up around the state as more of
the increasing numbers of visitors who ar-
rive want to experience island life like a
local rather than a tourist
The board is upset about a thriving in-
dustry of bed-and-breakfast and vaca-
tion rentals that are leased out
short-term without permits. The board
says these places deplete Kailua's al-
ready limited supply of housing, inflat-
ing costs and putting homes out of reach
of those born and raised in town.
Neighbors don't like having a stream of
strangers staying next door "It doesn't
feel like a neighborhood when you don't
know the people there," board member
Lisa Marten said. "If there's any sort of
safety issue, there's no one to ask for help
because you don't know them."
Two of the three houses next to
Marten are currently vacation rentals.
Earlier this year, a large group of
renters in their 20s staying in one of the


President Barack Obama is seen through tI
as he is driven through the Kailua, Hawaii,
annual holiday vacation with his family, en
Kaneohe, Hawaii, to play golf. The first fam
vacation.

homes was "doing drugs from morning
till night," she said. Marijuana fumes
wafted into Marten's yard and she could
hear them spouting foul language.
"I would say to them, 'I've got
teenagers. I've got very young kids. I'm
trying to teach them to stay away from
drugs. You must have nieces and
nephews, please take it inside and be
discreet,"' she said. They ignored her
pleas, noting that they had medical mar-
ijuana licenses.
It's hard to pinpoint exactly how
many vacation rentals are in Kailua, but
one website, Vacation Rentals by Owner,
lists 289 vacation rental units in the


family vacation or traveling in large
groups, they decided to push back.
By a 12-2 vote, the board in Septem-
ber passed a resolution requesting that
the agency "stop promoting Kailua as a
tourist destination and alternative to
Waikiki" the bustling beachfront
neighborhood in Honolulu.
Marten said it wasn't right for one gov-
ernment agency the tourism author-
ity- to promote vacation rentals while
another the city- struggles to en-
force the law against illegal operators.
The neighborhood board doesn't have
any power to pass laws and is only an
advisory body But Ikaika Anderson,
who represents Kailua in the Honolulu
City Council, said the resolution is "an
Associated Press embarrassment" and doesn't reflect the
he tinted window of his motorcade vehicle opinion of most residents.
neighborhood where he is spending his "It's a signal to those folks who do not
route to Marine Corps Base Hawaii in live in Kailua that Kailua residents do
illy is in Hawaii for their annual holiday not welcome them," Anderson said.
Defenders of vacation rentals and
bed-and-breakfasts say they support the
town. The Hawaii Tourism Authority es- economy and provide jobs, noting
timates there may be about 500. they've helped many boutiques and
Statewide, there are between 7,000 and restaurants that have cropped up in
10,000, regulated based on different Kailua over the past decade or so to
local laws in each county. flourish.
But only a few dozen in Kailua actu- Those who operate vacation rentals
ally have permits: 35 bed-and-breakfasts and bed-and-breakfasts say renting
and 30 vacation rental units, according their homes to tourists allows them to
to Board Chairman Chuck Prentiss. The earn extra income, pay the mortgage
rest are illegal. Rules are tight on Oahu, and stay in Kailua, where housing
where the county hasn't issued new per- prices are among the state's most ex-
mits since 1990. pensive.
So when the board noticed the The median sales price of home in
tourism agency's website suggested that Kailua and neighboring Waimanalo hit
"a Kailua vacation rental can be the $794,500 last year, according to Hon-
perfect solution" for those planning a olulu Board of Realtors data.


CARS
Continued from Page All

has been his passion since the day
it first aired Sept. 26, 1982.
"It's very familiar I've studied all
of the remaining surviving original
cars," he said while standing next
to KITT, the black Pontiac Trans
Am that was featured in the popu-
lar 1980s television series.
The museum houses the largest
collection of micro cars on display,
including a Velorex made in
Czechoslovakia. Some are so small
that they could barely accommo-
date one person, yet many were
known for carrying two or three.
There's also a Duesenberg Model
X from 1927, a sedan car with a
rear windshield to shield the back-
seat passengers. It is just one of
five known to still exist.


Among the most popular gal-
leries at the museum is the Holly-
wood Cars of the Stars exhibit,
which showcases cars, submarines,
airplanes and more that were fea-
tured in movies, including the
BMW motorcycle from "Indiana
Jones and the Last Crusade," and
the Mitsubishi Eclipse from the
"Fast and the Furious" film in 2001,
which was the first car the late
Paul Walker drove in the film se-
ries.
The Batboat used in the Batman
television series that aired during
the 1960s was signed by the builder,
George Barris, and the Batmobile
(also a Barris creation) is also on
display
The museum also houses the
largest collection of everything
James Bond, including the Aston
Martin sports car he drove in
1964's "Goldfinger" and a massive
glass enclosure filled with rows of


The exterior of the Dezer
Collection Museum in
North Miami. More
than 1,000 cars are
on display at the
250,000-square-foot
museum which features
American classics,
military and electric
cars, bicycles and cars
featured in movies.
The Associated Press

If you go:
Admission is $25 for
adults and $10 for
children under 12 to see
one of the buildings or
$40/$10 to see the entire
collection. Children
younger than 5 are free.
S The museum offers
special rates for groups,
and Florida residents
are also given a
discount.

books, toy cars and figurines.
"There were no James Bond ve-
hicles that really survived the first
film, so you have to get to the sec-
ond one," Kornblatt said. And that
film was 1963's "From Russia with
Love." The boat featured in that
film with Sean Connery is "the old-
est surviving James Bond movie ve-
hicle," Kornblatt said.
Some of the items in the museum
are replicas, including the Cadillac
from "Ghostbusters." But a major-
ity of the cars at the museum are
originals.
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ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Celebrate new year with post
Tickets are available for the New Year's
Eve Dance at the American Legion Allen
Rawls Post 77. Entertainment will be
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band, playing from 8 p.m.
to midnight.
Hot and cold hors d'oeuvres will be
served all evening, as well as a continental
breakfast after midnight Coffee, tea and
soft drinks will be available. Doors will
open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. The event is
open to the public.
For more information or to order tickets
and reserve a table for six or more people,
call Alice at 352-476-7001 or Charlotte at
352-341-1803.

Post to serve pot roast
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864,10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., will serve a pot
roast beef dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday Cost is $8; children younger than
6 eat for $4.
The public is invited. Call 352-465-4864
for information.

Legion invites all to come jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Sunday, Jan. 5, at American Legion Post
155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Auxiliary slates chili cookoff
Crystal River American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155 will have its annual
Chinese Auction/Chili Cook-Off on
Saturday, Jan. 11, at the post
8565 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
The doors will open at 11 a.m. for our
Chinese auction. Regular tickets will be $3
for 10, and tickets for Special Table items
will be $1 each. Winners will be selected at
2p.m.
The Chili Cook-off is open to anyone
who would like to enter chili and/or corn-
bread. All entries must be at the post by
11:30 a.m. for judging. After the winners
are selected, all entries will be available
to purchase for $3 a bowl or $ 5 for all you
can eat.
This is an annual event that has been
held for more than 15 years. All profits
help support the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary

Come to market, breakfast
Wall-Rives Post 58 of the American
Legion, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon, will
have an outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 18.
Pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs,
sausage orange juice and coffee are on the
menu for $5.
The public is welcome.

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 21, at the
Citrus County Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, about a half mile south of State
Road 44 on the west side of CR 491.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member
To learn more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit www. citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
roast beef dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy Rooks Jr VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway State Road 200, where the
helicopter is).
The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and $7.50 at the
door Tickets can be purchased at Post
4252. Call the post at 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.


S pean Bridge

where Commandos are forged


Special the Chronicle
It took Vicki and Steve Ketzer Jr. three hours to go up Ben Nevis, the tallest mountain in the United Kingdom, and six to
get down. This photo was taken during their ascent, when they still had something left in their legs. Vicki Ketzer
stands in front of a monument dedicated to the memory of the Commandos lost during World War II.


Citrus couple's trip abroad includes visit to training ground


STEVE KETZER JR.
Special to the Chronicle


M


y wife, Vicki,
and I went to
Scotland last
summer to


take a break from the
heat in Florida.
Inverness wasn't our goal
while touring Scotland,
but was not to be missed,
as we were in the area
and the city is close to
the "Scotch Highway" -
a loop of highways where
fine Scotch is distilled,
including Glenfiddich
and Glenlivet.
Granted a royal charter in the 12th
century, Inverness was officially estab-
lished, but there is evidence it was a
settlement since at least the sixth cen-
tury, beginning with a people known
as Picts. The current population is
about 58,000.
Inverness itself is a picturesque city
in the Northern Highlands on the
banks of Moray Firth that gives way to
the North Sea. To the southwest of the
city flows the River Ness, and some 10
miles upriver, Loch Ness. Truthfully,
though, we spent most of our time in
Inverness trapped on the many traffic
circles, some of which held two or


The population of Spean Bridge, including
nearby hamlet of Achnacarry with its priv
castle, is about 1,500.

maybe three lanes (who knows?) -
wheels within wheels, spinning
quickly It was madness, as far as we
were concerned.
Traveling by train, a much safer
mode of transportation, we also spent
time in Glasgow, Ayr and Edinburgh,
where we caught the last few days of
Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the world's
largest fringe festival (arts festival)
and the first, having kicked off in 1947.
But we spent the bulk of our time in
the little town of Spean Bridge, en-
sconced beneath oak trees in a moss-
covered cabin on the banks of the


River Spean.
For most Americans, Spean Bridge
and its environs hold little signifi-
cance, but for an elite group of our
warriors, it's a regular holy land. The
village is in the Western Highlands
some 60 miles west of Inverness in the
Great Glenn, and a short drive to Fort
William and the United Kingdom's
tallest mountain, Ben Nevis.
The population of Spean Bridge,
including the nearby hamlet of
Achnacarry with its private castle, is
about 1,500. The area is thick with
trees, small pastures divided by an-
cient stone fences, lakes (lochs), rivers
and streams. Spean Bridge, although
flush with history, is famous for
two things: Clan Cameron and
Commandos.
Clan Cameron have their roots in
the middle ages, but they're probably
best known for supporting the Royal-
ists and Prince Charles Edward Stuart
(Bonnie Prince Charlie) who insti-
gated the Jacobite uprising. Their bat-
tle cry was, "Sons of hounds, come
hither and get flesh!" A reference to
their propensity to feed the flesh of
their enemies to the dogs.
Achnacarry and its private castle is
the seat of Clan Cameron, and a brief
walk away is the Clan Cameron
museum, no larger than a cottage.
The Commando connection is a bit
more recent. During World War II,
British Commandos took over
Achnacarry and the area became their
training ground. Located on the fast-
flowing River Arkaig between Lochs
Arkaig and Lochy, with forests, fields
and Ben Nevis nearby for climbing, it
was an excellent training venue for
Commandos, Loch Lochy being used
to practice opposed amphibious
landings.
Enter a select group of
Americans. In 1942, the 1st
Ranger Battalion Darby's
Rangers was activated in
Carrickfergus, North Ire-
land. The men volunteered
S from other American outfits,
Including the 1st Armored
and 34th Infantry divisions
that had gathered around
Belfast. To steal a phrase,
many were called, but few
were chosen.
S The weeding out process
S was brutal. Eventually, 500
the men were selected, a small
ate battalion, and sent to
Achnacarry to be either bro-
ken or turned into Comman-
dos by their British cousins. While
some stateside GIs were being trained
using imaginary weapons, the Com-
mandos used live fire: bullets,
grenades and explosives. According to
author and Ranger historian Robert
Black, Bren gunfire came so close, it
shattered wooden paddles in the
hands of the Commandos (Rangers) as
they made amphibious landings from
Loch Lochy
Sometimes fire came too close, as
when Ranger Donald Torbett failed to
keep his tail down in the boat and got
shot in the buttocks (his nickname


thereafter was "Butt"). In addition to
amphibious landings, the training in-
cluded climbing, rappelling, speed
marching, hand-to-hand combat, night
fighting, use of German weapons, tog-
gle bridge and rope sliding across the
River Arkaig, the latter exercise
called "The Death Slide." And, in-
deed, one Ranger drowned in the at-
tempt. The Rangers were housed in
10-man tents, lived in the mud, dined
on mutton and cold fish, and if they
wanted a bath, they were invited to
bathe in the icy river The American
upstarts not only survived, they ex-
celled, and were awarded the Com-
mando "Green Beret" on graduation,
which is where that history began.
During the course of the war, five
other Ranger battalions were formed,
and although not trained at
Achnacarry, lessons learned there
were applied. The 1st Battalion spear-
headed the Allied invasion of North
Africa at Algeria, and along with the
3rd and 4th battalions, the invasions of
Sicily and Italy The 2nd and 5th
battalions landed at Normandy, the
2nd being the famous "Boys of Point
Du Hoc."
The 6th Battalion Rangers fought in
the Philippines and are famous for lib-
erating POWs during the Cabanatuan
Raid: "The Great Raid." Merrill's Ma-
rauders fought in Burma and are con-
sidered Rangers of the first regard. A
provisional Ranger battalion, the 29th
(called the 29th because they were
drawn from the 29th Infantry Divi-
sion), was formed in England and was
the only battalion other than the 1st to
train at Achnacarry
See Page A15


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost155@gmail.co
m, or visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Aux-
iliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Call Com-
mander Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-


iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. Call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498. Call JV Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW


COMMANDOS
Continued from PageA14

Members of the 29th Rangers
went on raids with British Com-
mandos, but disbanded after 11
months and were sent back to their
original units to teach other sol-
diers Ranger tactics. From those
original 500 men, the 1st Battalion
Rangers who trained at
Achnacarry and the Spean Bridge
area grew the modern-day
Rangers, who continued to "Lead
the Way" in Korea, Vietnam,
Panama, Grenada and Somalia,
and fighting nonstop since 9/11.
Headquartered at Fort Benning,
Ga., the 75th Ranger Regiment
continues to produce the greatest
warriors in the world.
Between Spean Bridge and
Achnacarry, there is a monument
dedicated to the Commandos who
trained there, and to future Com-
mandos who died in service to the
crown. The site is scattered with


Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in


Special the Chronicle
The author's father, Steve Ketzer
Sr., was one of Darby's original 500
Rangers.

flowers and mementos left in re-
membrance of the fallen.
After visiting the monument, my
wife and I did the five-mile "Com-
mando Trail" out ofAchnacarry, a


Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Meetings are: Jan. 11, Feb. 8,
March 8, April 12 and May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 meets at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 Vet-
erans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or
email seacapt34447@
yahoo.com or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email
rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, or call Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863.


speed march used by Commandos
and Rangers as a morning warmup.
We did so well we decided to climb
Ben Nevis, and while we summited
in good time, especially for old
folks, our legs gave out on the de-
scent. We thought we'd never get off
that mountain; it took us three
hours to go up and six to get down.
Apparently, walking Rails to Trails
wasn't adequate preparation. But
we did it, so, as the Rangers would
say, "Hooah!"
Steve Ketzer, Jr is a USAF
Vietnam veteran who served at
Phan Rang, Vietnam, 1970-71. His
son, Stephen Eric, is a USN
veteran of Somalia, havingserved
aboard the USS Tarawa. His
brother, Jerry, who served in
Vietnam at the same time, was
careerArmy and retired at the
rank of lieutenant colonel. Their
father, who was wounded in
Tunisia and, between escapes,
spent more than two years as a
German POW, was one of Darby's
original 500 Rangers. Steve and his
wife, Vicki, live near Hernando.


60th ANNIVERSARY

The Langleys


Wilbur and Helen
Langley were married
Dec. 20, 1953, at First
Baptist Church,
Floral City
Their son Kelvin and
grandson Derek and his
wife, Tiara, hosted a
party with family and
friends on Friday,
Dec. 20, 2013, to
celebrate the 60th
wedding anniversary
The couple have four


sons: Wilbur Jr, Kelvin,
Darryl and Greg. Their
grandchildren are
Jayson (Mindy), Jeremy
(Vanessa), Clinton,
Derek (Tiara) and
Jacklyn (David).
They also have nine
great-grandchildren:
Austin, Dustin,
Madyson, Jeremy Jr,
Emilie, Justin, McKenzi,
Liam and Madilyn
Grace.


For the RECORD


Dec. 9-15, 2013
Divorces
Susan D. Carney, Ocala
vs. Owen D. Carney,
Hernando
Todd Stephen Cornceillie,
Homosassa vs. Billie Lee
Corneillie, Homosassa
Kay C. Pallett, Inverness
vs. Howard W. Pallett,
Hernando
Cristy D. West, Inverness
vs. John C. West III,
Hernando

Marriages
Ryan Jamal Denson,
Brooksville/Shanequa


Shaunta McKinnon,
Inverness
Cornelius Leo Fox,
Beverly Hills/Kathleen
Thompson Crider,
Beverly Hills
Danny Lee Green,
Homosassa/Bonita Carol
Kelly, Homosassa
Francis Patrick O'Neill,
Homosassa/Cindy Michelle
Gilbert, Homosassa
Daniel James Roberts,
Citrus Springs/Brittany
Michelle Touchton, Lecanto
James Brent Strange,
Sunrise/Alecia Kay Runyon,
Sunrise


Dec. 30 to Jan. 3 MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Grape juice,
sliced turkey breast with
gravy, mashed sweet
potatoes, carrot coins, sugar
cookie, slice whole-wheat
bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: New Year's
Celebration: Pork riblet with
brown gravy, Southern-style
turnip greens, Hoppin' John,
banana loaf, whole-grain
roll, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: New Year's
Day. Sites closed.


Thursday: Hamburger
patty with bun, ketchup and
mustard, baked beans,
yellow corn with tomato,
mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad,
beet and onion salad, three-
bean salad, citrus fruit,
wheat roll, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and
South Dunnellon. For
information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A12.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:1111










SPORTS


The last week of
the regular season
will finally have a
much clearer picture
for a number of NFL
teams./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0*NBA, NHL/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 College football/B6


Bucs can play role of spoilers to Saints


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS These
are nervous times for Sean Pay-
ton's New Orleans Saints.
Only a month ago they were
9-2, in contention for the NFC's
top seed and a virtual lock for
the playoffs emphasis on
virtual.
Since then, New Orleans
(10-5) has lost three of four and
now must win its regular-season
finale against Tampa Bay (4-11)
today to assure itself of a play-
off spot
Payton is trying to keep his
players focused not on the
Associated Press ground they've lost, but on what
Tampa Bay running back Bobby Rainey and the Bucs travel to New they can still accomplish.
Orleans today to take on the Saints. A Bucs victory could knock New "There is a good many of
Orleans out of playoff contention. them that understand how hard


Tampa Bay Bucs
(4-11) at New Orleans
Saints (10-5)
Time: 4:25 p.m. today.
TV: FOX.

it is to get into this position and
get a chance to win 11 games
and play in the postseason,"
Payton asserted, adding that he
doesn't see this week as one in
which players "can't value the
importance of this game."
"This would be like a playoff
game," Payton said.
The Saints can lose and still
make the playoffs as a wild
card, but only if Arizona also
loses at home to San Francisco.
On the flip side, New Orleans


still could wind up as the No. 2
seed with a first-round bye
and second-round home game
- if the Saints win and Car-
olina loses at Atlanta.
"We can be a two seed, a five
seed, a six seed, or out of the
playoffs," Saints quarterback
Drew Brees said. "There are so
many things that can happen,
but none of the good stuff hap-
pens unless we win."
The Buccaneers have lost two
straight and struggled most of
the season, and oddsmakers
have listed the Saints as nearly
two-touchdown favorites. Yet
Tampa Bay could give New Or-
leans a tougher game than
many expect
When the Bucs started 0-8,
See Page B5


Cardinals unfazed


Associated Press
Miami defensive back Deon Bush sacks Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater in the end zone for a safety during the first half of the
Russell Athletic Bowl on Saturday in Orlando.

No. 18 Louisville manhandles unranked Miami in RussellAthletic Bowl


Associated Press
ORLANDO Teddy Bridgewater
threw three touchdown passes and ran for
another score in No. 18 Louisville's 36-9
victory over Miami on Saturday night in
the Russell Athletic Bowl.
The Cardinals (12-1) spotted Miami (9-4)
an early 2-0 lead, then dominated the rest
of the way, racking up 554 total yards to
the Hurricanes' 174.
Bridgewater was 35 for 45 for career-
high 447 yards.
Louisville won its second straight bowl
game for its second 12-win season.
With Cardinals' fans chanting "Teddy!
Teddy!" at times throughout the game
Bridgewater, projected to be a top NFL
draft pick if he comes out this summer, set
a school season record with 31 touchdown
passes. The Miami native also tied the
school record with his 27th victory as
Louisville's starter
Miami, playing in its first bowl game
since 2010, hasn't had a bowl victory since


2006, losing four straight. The Hurricanes
were returning to the postseason follow-
ing a two-year, self-imposed ban during an
NCAA investigation.
They got on the scoreboard first with
the safety But was one of their few high-
lights.
A big second quarter by the Cardinals,
punctuated by Bridgewater's two touch-
down passes helped Louisville take a
22-2 lead.
The Cardinals settled for field goals
early after struggling to convert on third
downs inside Hurricanes' territory That
coincided with one of Bridgewater's top
third-down targets receiver DeVante
Parker going down on the Louisville's
second series of the night with an ankle
injury
But those fortunes changed quickly
when Parker returned in the second quar-
ter after getting his ankle attended to by
the training staff.
He immediately caught three passes on
a seven-play, 80-yard drive, including a


capping 26-yard touchdown reception.
Parker finished with nine catches for 142
yards.
Miami's next possession appeared to
have stalled near midfield, but an un-
sportsmanlike conduct penalty kept it
going and eventually set up the Hurri-
canes with second-and-goal on the 5.
Stephen Morris dropped back to pass,
but was grabbed and lost the ball as he
was slung to the ground by Cardinals de-
fensive end Marcus Smith. The loose ball
was then recovered by Louisville's Bran-
don Dunn to end the threat.
Louisville got it again with just under 2
minutes to play and drove 60 yards for an-
other touchdown, scoring on Bridgewa-
ter's 12-yard pass to Michael Harris.
The scores erased memories of a disas-
trous opening series for the Cardinals that
ended with Hurricanes safety Deon Bush
sacking Bridgewater in the end zone for a
safety
Miami managed only 83 total yards in
the first half, while Louisville had 280.


Ken McNally
CAR
CORNER


Keep up


on your


car
everyone who owns a car
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tenance is necessary to
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longevity However, it seems
like most of us don't like taking
our cars in for service it's just
one of those things that seem
like an inconvenience, like
stopping to fill up at the gas sta-
tion- you know you gotta do it.
These days with the newer
cars, it's sometimes difficult to
decide when service is due on
your vehicle. Most of us older
guys are conditioned to have the
engine oil changed every 3,000
to 5,000 miles, although some
manufacturers now recommend
every 7,500 miles. Also, some of
the owner's manuals recom-
mend that spark plugs be
changed every 100,000 miles,
which seems like a long time be-
tween changes.
Then there are all the other
maintenance items, such as tire
rotation, filters, cooling systems,
transmissions, etc. Probably
best to just follow the manufac-
turers' recommended service
intervals in the owner's manual.
Some of the more modern
cars let you know with a mes-
sage on the dash when it is due
for service by considering the
mileage or condition of the en-
gine oil. One of the more inter-
esting and important messages
or warning lights you may see is
the malfunction indicator light
(MIL), commonly known as the
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usually indicates there is some
type of malfunction reported to
the computerized engine man-
agement system which may be
from trouble with the engine or
its components.
See Page B5


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B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013

Saturday's college
basketball scores
MEN
EAST
Binghamton 67, Bryant 62
Fairfield 73, Bucknell 64
George Washington 69, Hofstra 58
Georgetown 92, FlU 57
Harvard 94, Fordham 86
Kansas St. 72, Tulane 41
Montclair St. 100, Berkeley 73
Randolph 62, NJ City 50
Southern Miss. 77, Rhode Island 64
St. John's 65, Columbia 59
St. Peter's 67, Cornell 59
Syracuse 78, Villanova 62
UConn 82, E. Washington 65
UMass 69, Providence 67, OT
VCU 69, Boston College 50
SOUTH
Alabama St. 78, Auburn-Montgomery 51
Austin 91, Rhodes 86
Charleston Southern 122, St. Andrews 40
Duke 82, E. Michigan 59
Georgia Southern 66, NC A&T 63
Kentucky 73, Louisville 66
Liberty 92, Southeastern (Fla.) 53
Memphis 75, Jackson St. 61
Richmond 67, Old Dominion 58
South Carolina 78, Akron 45
Troy 74, Belhaven 62
UNC Asheville 75, UNC Wilmington 61
UNC Greensboro 55, Virginia Tech 52
MIDWEST
Butler 66, NJIT 48
Cincinnati 74, Nebraska 59
Cleveland St. 78, Kent St. 70
Culver-Stockton 93, William Woods 81
E. Illinois 70, Tennessee St. 69
Evansville 96, Grambling St. 61
Green Bay 91, St. Francis (III.) 41
Illinois 74, III.-Chicago 60
Indiana St. 85, Belmont 73
Marquette 71, Samford 48
Michigan 88, Holy Cross 66
Michigan St. 101, New Orleans 48
Toledo 85, Coppin St. 66
Wisconsin 80, Prairie View 43
Xavier 68, Wake Forest 53
SOUTHWEST
Denver 67, Alcorn St. 49
Nebraska-Omaha 104, Cent. Arkansas 88
Sam Houston St. 82, LIU Brooklyn 78
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 74, UC Irvine 61
California 90, Furman 60
Colorado St. 86, Lamar 71
Fresno St. 104, UC Merced 43
Loyola Marymount 87, BYU 76
Montana 72, Idaho 71
San Jose St. 87, Pacifica 59
WOMEN
EAST
Columbia 87, Lehigh 80
George Washington 77, American U. 64
St. John's 72, Seton Hall 63
Towson 67, Loyola (Md.) 46
VCU 77, NJIT 72
SOUTH
Charleston Southern 84, Radford 64
Coastal Carolina 83, Longwood 53
ETSU 87, George Mason 76
Florida 67, Georgetown 65, OT
Florida St. 76, UT-Martin 53
Gardner-Webb 53, UNC Asheville 47
Georgia 82, Illinois 60
Liberty 75, Campbell 52
Northwestern St. 73, New Mexico St. 63
Richmond 87, Davidson 68
Rutgers 66, South Florida 53
South Carolina 82, Savannah St. 40
Winthrop 55, Presbyterian 50
MIDWEST
Creighton 65, Villanova 58
E. Illinois 80, Tennessee St. 70
Iowa 88, North Dakota 62
Marquette 61, Butler 59
Michigan 76, Alcorn St. 31
Purdue 109, Cent. Michigan 97
SIU-Edwardsville 68, Belmont 56
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 100, MVSU 54
Houston Baptist 99, Huston-Tillotson 48
Texas 87, Idaho 58
UCF 67, Houston 59
UTSA 79, N. Dakota St. 68
FAR WEST
BYU 90, Loyola Marymount 72
Coll. of Idaho 86, Utah St. 81
Grand Canyon 72, LIU Brooklyn 63
Portland 73, Pacific 65
Sacramento St. 84, UC Davis 78
Saint Mary's (Cal) 79, Gonzaga 78, OT
San Diego 71, Pepperdine 43
Southern Cal 89, Long Beach St. 72
UC Santa Barbara 78, Seattle 75
UCLA 96, Cal Poly 89
Utah Valley 89, New Orleans 49
TOURNAMENT
Cavalier Classic
First Round
Princeton 79, Alabama 59
Virginia 70, Coppin St. 45
Cyclone Challenge
First Round
Iowa St. 72, Holy Cross 50
William & Mary 66, Saint Louis 56
FlU Sun & Fun Classic
First Round
FlU 79, Fairleigh Dickinson 57
Miami Holiday Tournament
First Round
Miami 80, Morgan St. 42
New Mexico 56, W Carolina 37
San Diego Surf'N Slam
First Round
NC State 77, Kansas St. 60
San Diego St. 58, UC Riverside 57
Terrapin Classic
First Round
Coll. of Charleston 79, Howard 68
Maryland 110, Wofford 53
Tulane/DoubleTree Classic
First Round
Indiana St. 70, Northwestern 67
Tulane 85, Northeastern 49


Reports: Texans
considering Penn
State's O'Brien
HOUSTON The Hous-
ton Chronicle is reporting the
Texans have interviewed
Penn State's Bill O'Brien
about their vacant head
coaching job and that there
are more interviews still to be
done next week.
Houston team owner Bob


McNair told the newspaper
Saturday night: "The process
has been underway, and it
continues. The process isn't
over. We have other candi-
dates to interview next week."
The paper reported O'Brien
met with McNair and general
manager Rick Smith last
week, and also has inter-
viewed former Bears coach
Lovie Smith and interim coach
Wade Phillips.
ESPN is reporting, citing
unidentified sources, that
O'Brien is the "overwhelming
favorite" to become the Tex-
ans' coach.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Syracuse zips past Villanova


No. 18 Kentucky

slips by state rival

No. 6Louisville

Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. Trevor
Cooney scored 21 points, Tyler
Ennis had 20 and C.J. Fair added
17 Saturday, rallying No. 2 Syra-
cuse past No. 8 Villanova 78-62 in
a game between two of nine un-
beaten teams left in Division I.
Syracuse (12-0) was the third
unbeaten ranked team the Wild-
cats (11-1) had faced this season.
Villanova handed then-No. 2
Kansas its first loss of the season
a month ago in the semifinals of
the Battle 4 Atlantis and came
back the next night and defeated
No. 23 Iowa in overtime.
Villanova dropped to 13-16
against Syracuse in the Carrier
Dome, the best mark of any team
that's played 10 games under the
Orange's Teflon roof, and 4-5
since Jay Wright took over as
coach of the Wildcats in 2001.
James Bell hit a career-high six
3-pointers and matched his ca-
reer high with 25 points to lead
Villanova before fouling out with
1:42 left.
No. 18 Kentucky 73,
No. 6 Louisville 66
LEXINGTON, Ky. Kentucky
guards Andrew and Aaron Harrison
combined for 28 points, including 11
during a critical second-half stretch
with star Julius Randle sidelined by
cramps, helping the Wildcats beat
Louisville.
Randle's 17 first-half points staked
Kentucky (10-3) to a 41-36 halftime
lead before the 6-foot-9 forward went
to the locker room early in the second
with leg cramps. He returned but
cramped again and spent the rest of
the game on the bench.
The Harrison twins amply filled the
void, turning a 52-51 deficit with 11:01
remaining into a 68-58 lead with four
minutes left. Andrew Harrison and
James Young each scored 18 points
with Young adding a key 3-pointer
during the 17-6 run that helped Ken-
tucky beat its in-state archrival for the
fifth time in six meetings.
Russ Smith scored 19 points but
was just 5 of 10 from the foul line for
Louisville (11-2).
No. 4 Wisconsin 80,
Praire View A&M 43
MADISON, Wis. Sam Dekker
had 16 points and 11 rebounds for his
third career double-double as Wiscon-
sin improved to 13-0 for its best start
since the 1913-14 squad went 15-0.
Ben Brust scored 11 for the Badg-
ers in their nonconference finale.
Frank Kaminsky and Nigel Hayes
added 10 points apiece.
No. 5 Michigan St. 101,
New Orleans 48
EAST LANSING, Mich. Keith
Appling scored 16 of his career-high
tying 27 points in the first half to help
Michigan State rout New Orleans.
The Spartans (11-1) struggled for


Associated Press
Villanova's Dylan Ennis guards his brother, Syracuse's Tyler Ennis, during the second half Saturday in
Syracuse, N.Y. No. 2 Syracuse won 78-62 over No. 8 Villanova.


several minutes before taking control
with a 12-0 run midway through the
first half. They led 44-27 at halftime
and easily added to their comfortable
cushion in the second half, finishing
with their highest-scoring game since
beating Nebraska-Omaha 110-68 two
years ago.
No. 9 Duke 82,
Eastern Michigan 59
DURHAM, N.C. Jabari Parker
scored 23 points and Duke cruised
past Eastern Michigan.
Andre Dawkins added 20 points
with a season-high six 3-pointers as a
late replacement for an ill Rodney
Hood in the starting lineup. Rasheed
Sulaimon had 13 points and came up
with the key hustle play during the de-
cisive second-half run that helped the
Blue Devils (10-2) polish off their
fourth straight win.
They shot 40 percent against East-
ern Michigan's tough matchup zone
defense with 10 3-pointers, built a 47-
32 advantage on the boards and


wrapped up the pre-ACC home sched-
ule with their 101st straight nonconfer-
ence win at Cameron Indoor Stadium.
No. 15 UConn 82,
E. Washington 65
BRIDGEPORT, Conn. Shabazz
Napier had 15 points and nine assists
to lead UConn in a home game
played 80 miles from campus.
Napier led a balanced attack in
which five Huskies reached double
figures. Ryan Boatright had 14 points
and Niels Giffey, making his first start
this season, added 13 for Connecti-
cut (11-1).
Tyler Harvey scored 19 points to
lead Eastern Washington (5-6).
No. 17 Memphis 75,
Jackson State 61
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Michael Dixon
scored 14 points, Shaq Goodwin had
13 points and seven rebounds, and
Memphis never trailed.
David Pellom had 12 points with all
five of his field goals coming off


dunks from fast-breaks and re-
bounds. Joe Jackson scored 11 for
Memphis (9-2).
Julysses Nobles led Jackson State
(4-8) with 20 points, despite going 6
of 16 from the field.
No. 23 UMass 69,
Providence 67
AMHERST, Mass. Derrick Gor-
don's put-back with 1.1 seconds left
in overtime lifted 23rd-ranked Mas-
sachusetts to a 69-67 victory over
Providence.
Gordon grabbed the rebound after
a 3-point attempt by Trey Davis came
up short. The Friars' Bryce Cotton had
tied the score at 67 after connecting
from beyond the arc with 37 seconds
remaining in the extra session.
Cady Lalanne led UMass (11-1)
with 14 points and 11 rebounds with
Davis and Sampson Carter each
scoring 12 points. Senior point guard
Chaz Williams finished with 10 points
and 10 rebounds before fouling out
with 1:36 remaining in regulation.


Women's College Basketball BRIEFS


No. 22 Florida St. 76,
UT-Martin 53
TALLAHASSEE Natasha
Howard tied a career high with 26
points on Saturday and No. 22
Florida State defeated Tennessee-
Martin 76-53.
Howard was 12 of 14 from the field
to lead Florida State to 54.5 percent
shooting. Ivey Slaughter had 11
points and 13 rebounds and Morgan
Jones added 17 points for the Semi-
noles (12-1) which extended their
winning streak to eight games.
FSU completed its nonconference
schedule with only one loss for the
third time since joining the Atlantic
Coast Conference in the 1991-92
season.
The Seminoles scored 11 straight
points to go ahead 19-8 in the first
half and led by as many as 25 before
the intermission. They built their
biggest lead at 69-38 before UT-Mar-
tin scored seven straight points.
No. 8 Maryland 110,
Wofford 53
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -Alyssa
Thomas had her second triple-double
in three games and No. 8 Maryland
routed Wofford 110-53 in the Terrapin
Classic semifinals.
Thomas scored 18 points, grabbed
12 rebounds and added 10 assists for
the fourth triple-double of her career
and fifth in program history.
Shatori Walker-Kimbrough tied a
career high with 17 points, hitting four
3-pointers, to help the Terrapins (11-
1) post their highest point total of the
season in their ninth-straight victory.
Brene Moseley and Tierney Pfir-
man each added 14 points for the
Terps, which could stretch their win-
ning streak to 10 in the tournament's
championship Sunday before begin-


ning ACC play next weekend at No.
10 North Carolina.
The Terrapins' last three victories
have come by an average of 54 points.
No. 13 S. Carolina 82,
Savannah St. 40
COLUMBIA, S.C. -Tiffany
Mitchell scored 18 points and the
South Carolina defense made sure
Savannah State was no challenge in
an 82-40 rout.
Alaina Coates came off the bench
to score 17 points and grab 12 re-
bounds for the Gamecocks (12-1).
Aleighsa Welch added 14 points and
Asia Dozier had 10. Mitchell also
had seven rebounds, five steals and
four assists.
Senior reserve Jasmine Kirkland
topped Savannah State (5-7) with 19
points, one shy of her career high. No
starter had more than three points as
they combined for 10 points. Kirkland
hit 6 of 9 shots and 7 of 8 free throws.
No. 14 Iowa State 72,
Holy Cross 50
AMES, Iowa Nikki Moody
scored 14 points and had 10 assists
to lead No. 14 Iowa State over Holy
Cross 72-50.
The Cyclones (10-0) shot 47 percent
from the floor, including 11 of 32 (34
percent) from beyond the arc. Jadda
Buckley added 12 points, while Hallie
Christofferson and Nicole Blaskowski
both chipped in with 11 points.
Holy Cross (7-3) was led by
Raquel Scott's 14 points and Molly
Hourigan added 10 points.
The Crusaders scored the first six
points of the game, but Iowa State
quickly took over. Tied at 10, the Cy-
clones outscored Holy Cross 31-12
the rest of the half to take a 19-point
lead at 41-22 into the break.


No. 17 Purdue 109,
Central Michigan 97
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. Whit-
ney Bays scored 24 points to lead
No. 17 Purdue over Central Michigan
109-97.
Purdue (10-2) shot 58 percent from
the floor, including 15 of 29 (52 per-
cent) from beyond the arc. KK
Houser had 21 points and 11 boards,
Liza Clemons added 20 points on 8-
of-10 shooting, Courtney Moses had
20 (6 of 10 on 3-pointers) and April
Wilson chipped in with 16 points.
Central Michigan (4-7) was led by
Jessica Green's 24 points, while Nic-
hole DiGuilio had 21. The Chippewas
also had five in double figures.
Wilson's 3-pointer midway through
the first half gave the Boilermakers a
nine-point lead, but DiGuilio knocked
a trey down for Central with 29 sec-
onds in the half to cut Purdue's ad-
vantage to six at intermission.
No. 19 Georgia 82,
Illinois 60
ATHENS, Ga. Shacobia Bar-
bee had 17 points, eight rebounds
and six assists to lead No. 19 Geor-
gia over Illinois 82-60.
The Lady Bulldogs (12-1) took a
6540 lead with 10:06 left in the game
as Khaalidah Miller's layup capped
an 18-6 run. Georgia also used an
11-0 run in the first half to go ahead
25-15 and closed out the half on a
10-3 run to lead 38-25 at the break.
Krista Donald had 10 points and 15
rebounds and seven assists for Geor-
gia which outrebounded the Illini 51-
30. The Lady Bulldogs shot 55
percent from the field while holding
Illinois to 33.8 percent. Tiaria Griffin
had 17 points, Erika Ford scored 14
and Miller had 12.


No. 21 Iowa 88,
N. Dakota 62
IOWA CITY, Iowa Melissa Dixon
sparked a key run before halftime
and Samantha Logic heated up in the
second half as No. 21 Iowa rallied
from as many as nine down to roar
past North Dakota 88-62.
Logic, the reigning Big Ten player of
the week after a triple-double against
Drake, had six points at halftime. She
finished with a game-high 21 with
eight assists. Dixon scored 10 of her
13 points as the Hawkeyes (12-2)
closed the first half with a crushing 25-
4 run that included five of their six
first-half 3-pointers, two from Dixon.
Iowa was 9-for-25 from 3-point range.
The Bison (6-4) had led through
much of the opening half, until Iowa
started dropping 3-pointers. North
Dakota was led by Madi Buck's 19
points with Mia Loyd adding 13 and
Emily Evers 10.
Saint Mary's 79,
No. 24 Gonzaga 78, OT
MORAGA, Calif. Jackie Nared
scored 27 points and Danielle
Mauldin had 24 with 23 rebounds to
lift Saint Mary's to a 79-78 win over
No. 24 Gonzaga in the West Coast
Conference opener.
Haiden Palmer, who had a career-
high 31 points, had a couple missed
shots in the closing seconds for Gon-
zaga, the nine-time defending WCC
champion.
It was a wild ending to regulation
with Nared hitting a 3-pointer with 0.3
seconds left to give St Mary's (11-1) a
72-71 lead. But on the inbounds play,
screener Lindsay Sherbert was
fouled and she made one of two free
throws for Gonzaga (10-3).
Gonzaga had led since Palmer's
six points fueled a 12-2 run to close
the half for a 37-32 lead.


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Bowl glance
Saturday, Dec. 21
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Colorado State 48, Washington State 45
Las Vegas Bowl
Southern Cal 45, Fresno State 20
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Tulane 21
Monday, Dec. 23
Beef '0' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
East Carolina 37, Ohio 20
Tuesday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State 38, Boise State 23
Thursday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Pittsburgh 30, Bowling Green 27
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah State 21, Northern Illinois 14
Friday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall 31, Maryland 20
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Syracuse 21, Minnesota 17
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Washington 31, BYU 16
Saturday, Dec. 28
Pinstripe Bowl
At NewYork
Notre Dame 29, Rutgers 16
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina 39, Cincinnati 17
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando
Louisville 36, Miami 9
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5), late
Monday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4), 11:45 a.m.
(ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi (7-5)vs. GeorgiaTech (7-5), 3:15 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 31
AdvoCareVlOO Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5), 12:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), 2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Rice (9-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), 4 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), Noon (ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin (9-3)vs. South Carolina (10-2), 1 p.m.
(ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 7:30
p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 18
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Saturday, Jan. 25
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
South vs. North, 4 p.m. (NFLN)




Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA Football
Monday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Navy 6 6 (56) Middle Tenn.
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi 2 3 (57) GeorgiaTech
Alamo Bowl


At San Antonio
Oregon 10% 14 (67/2) Texas
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Arizona St. 111 14 (711)TexasTech
Tuesday
AdvoCareV10O Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona 7 7/2 (57/2) Boston College
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
UCLA 7/2 7 (47/2) Virginia Tech
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Mississippi St. 7 7 (50/2) Rice
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
TexasA&M 11/212 (75) Duke
Wednesday
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Georgia 9 9 (60) Nebraska
Heart of Dallas Bowl
NorthTexas 6/2 6 /2 (55/2)UNLV


SCOREBOARD


For the record



SFlorida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^0 4-4-3
CASH 3 (late)
~6-2-4


PLAY 4 (early)
4-9-5-9
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 2-8-9-4

Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 7 9 35 -36
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 1 winner 5,897.00
3-of-4 MB 24 $538.50
3-of-4 686 $56.00
2-of-4 MB 1,092 $24.50
1-of-4 MB 9,289 $2.50
2-of-4 24,011 $2.00


Fantasy 5:1 6 9 22 27
5-of-5 1 winner $235,031.15
4-of-5 387 $97.50
3-of-5 12,191 $8.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Samford at Marquette (Taped)
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas Southern at Texas Christian
3 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Savannah State at Florida
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Canisius at Notre Dame
5 p.m. (FS1) Chicago State at Creighton
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Tulsa at Maryland
7 p.m. (FS1) Georgia Tech at Charlotte
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Southern Methodist at Louisville
3 p.m. (FS1) Boston College at Providence
5 p.m. (ESPN) Cincinnati at Connecticut
NBA
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic
7 p.m. (NBA) Houston Rockets at Oklahoma City Thunder
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series: Championship (Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (NBC) Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping: Geneva (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 a.m. (ESPN2) New Era Pinstripe Bowl Notre Dame vs. Rutgers
(Same-day Tape)
5 a.m. (ESPNU) Belk Bowl Cincinnati vs. North Carolina
(Same-day Tape)
7:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Russell Athletic Bowl Louisville vs. Miami
(Taped)
9 a.m. (ESPNU) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Kansas State vs.
Michigan (Taped)
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Kansas State vs.
Michigan (Taped)
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) New York Jets at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) Carolina Panthers at Atlanta Falcons
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Buffalo Bills at New England Patriots
4:25 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at New Orleans Saints
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Philadelphia Eagles at Dallas Cowboys
HOCKEY
9 a.m. (NHL) 2014 IIHF World Junior Championship: Germany vs.
United States
7 p.m. (SUN) New York Rangers at Tampa Bay Lightning
OLYMPICS
1:30 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Olympic Trials Ski Jumping & Nordic Combined
3 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Olympic Trials Speed Skating
TENNIS
7 p.m. (TENNIS) Mubadala World Tennis Championships,
Consolation Game (Same-day Tape)
9 p.m. (TENNIS) Mubadala World Tennis Championships, Final
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Wisconsin 2 1% (51) South Carolina
Outback Bowl
At Tam pa
LSU 7 7/2 (49) Iowa
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 1% 6% (42/2) Michigan St.
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor 17/2 16/2 (69/2) UCF
Thursday
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama 14 /216 (51/2) Oklahoma
Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri Pk 1 (61) Oklahoma St.
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio St. 5 3 (68/2) Clemson
Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt 2 2/2 (54) Houston
Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Ball St. 9 8 (64) Arkansas St.
Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida St. 9/2 8 /2 (671/2) Auburn
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Carolina 8 6 (46) at Atlanta
Green Bay 3 3 (52/2) at Chicago
atTennessee 6 7/2 (44) Houston
at Pittsburgh 5/2 6/2 (44) Cleveland
at N.Y Giants 3 3 /2 (451/2) Washington
atCincinnati 4 6/2 (44) Baltimore
at Indianapolis 4 10/2 (45/2) Jacksonville
Philadelphia 2/2 7 (52/2) at Dallas
at Miami 6/2 5 /2 (41/2) N.Y Jets
at Minnesota 2 3 (51) Detroit
at N. England 7/2 7 /2 (46/2) Buffalo
atN.Orleans 12 /212 (47/2) Tampa Bay
Denver 10/2 11 (53/2) at Oakland
San Francisco +3 1 (42/2) at Arizona
atSan Diego 10 10 (45) Kansas City
at Seattle 10/2 11 (43) St. Louis


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Boston
Tampa Bay
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsburgh
Washington
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Columbus
N.Y Rangers
Carolina
N.Y Islanders
WE


Chicago
St. Louis
Colorado
Minnesota
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville


Anaheim
San Jose
Los Angeles
Vancouver
Phoenix
Calgary
Edmonton


Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts
39 26 11 2 54
38 23 11 4 50
39 23 13 3 49
40 18 13 9 45
40 19 16 5 43
41 16 18 7 39
39 14 20 5 33
38 10 24 4 24
Metropolitan Division


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts
40 27 7 6 60
36 24 7 5 53
37 23 11 3 49
40 20 15 5 45
37 19 12 6 44
40 17 18 5 39
39 17 18 4 38
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts
40 28 7 5 61
38 24 8 6 54
39 25 10 4 54
39 22 11 6 50
38 19 10 9 47
38 14 18 6 34
40 13 24 3 29


GF GA
114 81
107 89
98 85
103 111
110 116
115 134
91 127
69 109

GF GA
125 91
120 114
95 102
93 104
103 107
90 105
89 109
97 131


GF GA
152 109
128 85
108 95
92 102
110 108
109 120
89 115

GF GA
130 100
125 97
108 79
106 93
116 117
95 120
103 135


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Columbus 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Toronto 4, Buffalo 3, SO
San Jose 4, Phoenix 3, SO
Boston 5, Ottawa 0
Washington 3, N.Y Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 4, Carolina 3, OT


Chicago 7, Colorado 2
Winnipeg 6, Minnesota 4
Dallas 4, Nashville 1
Edmonton 2, Calgary 0
Saturday's Games
Montreal 2, Tampa Bay 1, SO
Ottawa 4, Boston 3
Detroit 4, Florida 3
New Jersey 2, N.Y Islanders 1
Nashville 3, Los Angeles 2
Anaheim 3, Phoenix 2, OT
Chicago at St. Louis, late
Philadelphia at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Washington at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 5p.m.
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 6 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Carolina atToronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers atTampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Winnipeg at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia atVancouver, 10 p.m.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 13 15 .464 -
Boston 13 17 .433 1
Brooklyn 10 20 .333 4
NewYork 9 21 .300 5
Philadelphia 8 20 .286 5
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 22 7 .759 -
Atlanta 17 13 .567 5/2
Washington 13 14 .481 8
Charlotte 14 17 .452 9
Orlando 9 20 .310 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 24 5 .828 -
Detroit 14 18 .438 11/2
Chicago 11 17 .393 12/2
Cleveland 10 19 .345 14
Milwaukee 6 24 .200 18/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 23 7 .767 -
Houston 21 11 .656 3
Dallas 17 13 .567 6
New Orleans 13 15 .464 9
Memphis 13 16 .448 9/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 24 5 .828 -
Oklahoma City 24 5 .828 -
Minnesota 15 15 .500 9/2
Denver 14 15 .483 10
Utah 9 23 .281 16/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 11 .645 -
Phoenix 17 11 .607 1/2
Golden State 18 13 .581 2
L.A. Lakers 13 17 .433 6/2
Sacramento 9 19 .321 9/2
Friday's Games
Orlando 109, Detroit 92
Oklahoma City 89, Charlotte 85
Toronto 95, NewYork 83
Brooklyn 104, Milwaukee 93
Minnesota 120, Washington 98
New Orleans 105, Denver 89
Utah 105, L.A. Lakers 103
Sacramento 108, Miami 103, OT
Golden State 115, Phoenix 86
Saturday's Games
Boston 103, Cleveland 100
Indiana 105, Brooklyn 91
Washington 106, Detroit 82
Toronto 115, NewYork 100
Atlanta 118, Charlotte 116, OT
Dallas 105, Chicago 83
Houston 107, New Orleans 98
Memphis 120, Denver 99
Minnesota 117, Milwaukee 95
Philadelphia at Phoenix, late
Miami at Portland, late
Utah at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Atlanta at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Utah, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS -Agreed to terms with
INF Jason Donald and OF Melky Mesa on minor
league contracts.
National League
SAN DIEGO PADRES Signed RHP Joaquin
Benoitto a two-year contract. Designated RHP Adys
Portillo for assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Suspended C An-
drew Bynum indefinitely from the team for detrimen-
tal conduct and banned him from all team activities.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS-- Signed RB Tony Fiammetta
to a two-year contract extension.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Activated WR Randall
Cobb from injured reserve.
HOUSTON TEXANS Placed TEs Garrett Gra-
ham and Brad Smelley on injured reserve. Signed
TE Phillip Supernaw and RB Chad Spann from the
practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed S Kanor-
ris Davis and DB Justin Green from the practice
squad.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Placed WR Mario
Manningham on injured reserve.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS -Assigned G Niklas Sved-
berg to Providence (AHL). Recalled D Zach Trotman
from Providence.
DALLAS STARS Assigned F Colton Sceviour
to Texas (AHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS Assigned C Riley
Sheahan to Grand Rapids (AHL).
MINNESOTA WILD Placed LWZach Parise on
injured reserve. Recalled G Johan Gustafsson from
Iowa (AHL).


NEWJERSEY DEVILS -Assigned FTim Sestito
to Albany (AHL). Activated D Bryce Salvador from
injured reserve.
ST. LOUIS BLUES Placed F Alex Steen on in-
jured reserve.
VANCOUVER CANUCKS Signed C Dane Fox
and assigned him to Erie (OHL).
American Hockey League
AHL Suspended Bridgeport RW Justin John-
son for three games for his actions in a game on
Dec. 26.
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS Signed F
Philip-Michael Devos to a professional tryout con-
tract. Released F Sean Wiles from his professional
tryout contract and returned him to Reading (AHL).
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS Reassigned C
Louis-Marc Aubry and LW Trevor Parkes to Toledo
(ECHL).
HARTFORD WOLF PACK- Assigned D Charlie
Dodero to Idaho (ECHL).
OKLAHOMA CITY BARONS Recalled F Austin
Fyten from Idaho (ECHL).


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 B3







Panthers get
balanced scoring
in victory
Behind three players in dou-
ble figures scoring, the Lecanto
boys basketball team scored a
75-66 victory over East Lake in
the Chris Nichols Holiday Clas-
sic on Saturday night.
Darius Sawyer (19 points),
Kaine McColley (18 points) and
Thomas Vilardi (16 points)
paced the Panthers offensively.
Brandon Burich added nine
points for Lecanto, now 7-6
overall.

'Canes suffer 2nd
loss of season
Despite 24 points from jun-
ior guard Desmond Franklin,
the Citrus boys basketball
team fell 74-56 to Poinciana at
Bishop Moore Catholic School
in Orlando.
Zack Saxer added 10 for Cit-
rus, who is 10-2 overall and
plays 5 p.m. Monday in the tour-
nament's third-place contest.

Friday

Hurricanes pull
out close win
over East River
Behind 19 points from senior
point guard Devin Pryor, the
Citrus boys basketball team
took a 50-46 victory over East
River in the Jim Clark Holiday
Tournament at Bishop Moore
Catholic School in Orlando.
Desmond Franklin added 17
points for the Hurricanes.

Weiand's 32 points
pace Warriors in
Bronson
The Seven Rivers Christian
School boys basketball team
got 32 points from junior guard
Cory Weiand during a 58-51
victory over Melbourne West-
shore. Weiand went 18 of 19
from the free throw line and hit
2 of 5 three-pointers.
Senior guard Adam Gage
had 24 points, 16 rebounds
and 5 assists for the Warriors,
who fell to Chiefland on Thurs-
day night.

Pirates close out
narrow victory
over Belleview
Hunter Roessler scored 17
points to push the Crystal River
boys basketball team past
Belleview 49-42.
For the Pirates, Shaun Fra-
zier added eight points.

CRHS baseball hosts
golf tournament
The Crystal River High
School baseball program is
hosting a golf tournament Jan.
11,2014 at Skyview Golf &
Country Club.
The tournament which
begins with a 12:30 p.m. shot-
gun start is a four-person
scramble with prizes for the
first, second and third-place
teams. There will also be a
silent auction, as well as clos-
est to the pin and longest drive
contests.
All proceeds will benefit the
CRHS baseball team.
Each individual is $75 and
individuals can also sponsor a
hole for $100. Four golfers and
a hole sponsor costs $350, a
$50 discount.
For more information, con-
tact Don Kidd at
donkidd18@yahoo.com or
352-212-1395.

South Florida
edges Bradley 61-57
PEORIA, III. Chris Perry
scored 18 points and Victor
Rudd added 16 to help fuel a
South Florida comeback in the
final minutes to defeat Bradley
61-57 on Saturday night.
The Bulls (9-4) trailed by five
points with less than five min-
utes left in the game before
pulling it out against a tough
Braves defense. South Florida


took the lead for good with 1:15
left on a pair of free throws by
Corey Allen Jr. Allen ended the
game with 11 points.
Walt Lemon Jr. led the
Braves (5-8) with 17 points,
while Tyshon Pickett added 16.
Lemon had an opportunity to
tie the game with 12 seconds
left when he went aggressively
to the basket for a layup. In-
stead of a basket, however, he
was charged with an offensive
foul which resulted in a change
of possession. Allen was then
purposefully fouled with 10.5
seconds left and sank both
shots to seal the victory.
From staff, wire reports




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Canadiens triumph


Lightningfall

in shootout

Associated Press

TAMPA Lars Eller
scored the lone shootout
goal, Carey Price stopped
all three shots he faced in
the tiebreaker, and the
Montreal Canadiens beat
the Tampa Bay Lightning
2-1 on Saturday night.
Eller made a couple
moves before beating Ben
Bishop on the Canadiens'
first shootout attempt
Tomas Plekanec scored
in regulation for Mon-
treal. Price stopped 23
shots through overtime.
Martin St. Louis scored
for the Lightning, who
also got 20 saves in regula-
tion and overtime from
Bishop. Tampa Bay had
its five-game winning
streak end.
Plekanec opened the
scoring, beating Bishop
with a backhander 5:15
into the second period. It
was his 169th goal, which
moved him past Shayne
Corson and Gilles Trem-
blay into sole possession
of 31st place on Montreal's
career list
St Louis tied it from the
top of the right circle on
Tampa Bay's sixth shot of
the game at 11:43 of the
second. The Lightning
captain has a goal in four
straight games and eight
points during a six-game
points streak.
Montreal had the first
six shots, including an in-
close backhander by
Daniel Briere and a shot
from the left circle from
Plekanec. Nate Thomp-
son got Tampa Bay's first
shot 11 minutes into to the
game, a backhander
stopped by Price.
The Canadiens outshot
Tampa Bay 15-9 through
two periods. The Light-
ning had nine of the 11
shots during the first 9
minutes of the third, and
14-6 overall edge in the
period.
Price made a save mid-
way through the third on
Radko Gudas' backhan-
der
Senators 4,
Bruins 3
OTTAWA- Bobby Ryan
scored at 15:25 of the third
period and the Ottawa Sena-
tors defeated the Boston Bru-
ins 4-3.
Patrick Wiercioch, Cory
Conacher and Zack Smith
also scored for the Senators.
Craig Anderson stopped 29
shots to earn the victory.
Daniel Paille, Jarome



CAR
Continued from Page R1

The MIL is found on the
instrument panel on most
automobiles and, when il-
luminated, is typically ei-
ther amber or red in color
The malfunction indicator
light usually shows the leg-
end CHECK ENGINE,
SERVICE ENGINE SOON
or a pictogram of an en-
gine. On newer vehicles,
the light usually had two
stages: steady (indicating a
minor fault such as a loose
gas cap or failing oxygen
sensor) and flashing (indi-
cating a severe fault that
could potentially damage
the catalytic converter if
left uncorrected for an ex-
tended period).
This can be scary to
some people who don't re-
ally understand what the
light means. When the MIL
comes on, it can mean any
number of things and
there is usually a fault
code related to the mal-
function that is sent to the
car's computer. This code
can be retrieved with a
scan tool and used for di-
agnosis purposes. There
are hundreds of these
codes, some are generic to


all vehicles and some spe-
cific to the brand of car
If you don't have a scan
tool which plugs into the
car's computer, the best
thing to do when the MIL
comes on is to take the car
to a dealer or repair shop
so they can diagnosis and
fix the problem, which may
be minor I have a scan
tool, which is easy to use,
and a book of problem


Associated Press
Linesman Steve Barton (59) breaks up a scuffle be-
tween Tampa Bay Lightning's Radko Gudas and
Matthew Carle (25) with Montreal Canadiens' Travis
Moen (32), Josh Gorges (26) and Lars Eller (81) during
the second period Saturday in Tampa.


Iginla and David Warsofsky
scored for the Bruins. Tuukka
Rask allowed three goals on
12 shots before being re-
placed by Chad Johnson,
who allowed one goal on 18
shots.
Both teams were missing a
number of key players, in-
cluding both captains as the
Senators were without Jason
Spezza and the Bruins were
without Zdeno Chara. Both
sat out with lower body in-
juries.
Ottawa hoped to rebound
after Friday's 5-0 loss in
Boston. The Senators got off
to a strong start and man-
aged to play well enough
through 60 minutes to hold
off the Bruins.
Red Wings 4,
Panthers 3
SUNRISE Henrik
Zetterberg scored a goal in
his first game back from in-
jury to lift the Detroit Red
Wings over the Florida Pan-
thers 4-3.
Gustav Nyquist, Brendan
Smith and Daniel Alfredsson
also scored goals for Detroit.
Jonas Gustavsson
stopped 30 shots. Pavel Dat-
syuk had two assists.
Zetterberg returned after
missing 11 games with a her-
niated disk in his back.
Zetterberg leads the Red
Wings with 31 points (12
goals, 19 assists).
Sean Bergenheim scored
two goals and Nick Bjugstad
also scored for Florida. Scott
Clemmensen made 27 saves
for the Panthers.
The Red Wings have won
three of four and beat the
Panthers for the first time in
three games this season.
The Panthers lost their
third straight game.
Devils 2,
Islanders 1
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Cory
Schneider stopped 30 shots,
and Travis Zajac scored the
go-ahead goal with 6:57 left


codes that is the size of the
old large phone books. I re-
cently had the MILs glow-
ing on two of my cars so I
was able to plug in the tool
and determine the prob-
lems. Both were minor fuel
mixture and octane issues,
which were due to the en-
gines being retuned for
performance levels. I was
able to eliminate the codes
and turn off the lights with
the scan tool.
To keep our cars operat-
ing at their peak perform-
ance level and get the best
gas mileage, we need to be
sure to check them regu-
larly, pay attention to the
warning lights we see on
the instrument panel and
have the required mainte-
nance performed as rec-
ommended.
Car joke
An angry motorist went
back to the garage where
he had purchased a very
expensive battery for his
car six months earlier He
told the garage owner:
"When I bought this bat-
tery, you told me that it
would be the last battery
my car would ever need.
Now six months later, it's
dead!" "Sorry," said the
garage owner, "I didn't
think your car would last
longer than that".
Upcoming events
Jan. 4: Cruise-in at 6
p.m. hosted by Citrus
County Cruisers at
Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Crys-
tal River
Ken McNally is the car
columnist for the Chroni-
cle. Contact him at
kenmcnally@tampabay.rr
corn or 352-341-1165.


when the puck went in off his
face as the New Jersey Dev-
ils beat the New York Is-
landers 2-1.
Zajac was credited with his
seventh goal when a shot by
Marek Zidlicky struck him
when he stood in front of the
net. Schneider earned his
first win since Nov. 30 when
he shut out Buffalo.
Adam Henrique gave the
Devils a 1-0 lead at 11:37 of
the first period, and Frans
Nielsen tied it 10:31 into the
third for the Islanders, who
played without captain John
Tavares.
Tavares sat out because of
an undisclosed lower-body
injury that ended his consec-
utive games streak at 246.
He is day to day.
Despite his absence, New
York put consistent pressure
on the Devils, particularly
early in the third.
Predators 3,
Kings 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Mike Fisher scored his sec-
ond goal of the game with
26.4 seconds left to give the
Nashville Predators a 3-2 vic-
tory over the Los Angeles
Kings.
Fisher also assisted on
Patrick Hornqvist's first-pe-
riod goal for Nashville, which
snapped a five-game losing
streak. Anze Kopitar and Jeff
Carter scored for the Kings,
who have lost two straight.
The teams combined for
three goals in the final 3:18
Fisher put Nashville ahead
2-1 with 3:18 left with a slap
shot from the high slot that
beat goalie Ben Scrivens low
to the stick side.
Carter tied it with only 36.7
seconds to go, but Fisher put
the Predators back in front 10
seconds later when his shot
from the left side just made it
over the goal line.
Hornqvist had given the
Predators a 1-0 lead with
5:18 left in the first.


Wild put ailing
Parise on IR with
bruised foot
ST. PAUL, Minn.- The
Minnesota Wild have placed
left wing Zach Parise on in-
jured reserve because of a
bruised foot.
The move was made Sat-
urday. The Wild recalled
goalie Johan Gustafsson
from Iowa of the AHL to take
Parise's spot on the active
roster, but Parise can be
taken off injured reserve at
any time.
Parise has 15 goals and
12 assists in 37 games. He
was hurt Nov. 25 at St. Louis
and held out of the next
game before returning to the
ice four days later. But the
29-year-old star has not been
the same since. He has only
four goals and one assist in
12 games since the injury.
Parise has missed the last
two games. Matt Cooke has
taken his spot on the first
line.
Blues star Alex
Steen out with
concussion
ST. LOUIS -The St.
Louis Blues placed star for-
ward Alex Steen on the in-
jured list Saturday because of
a concussion and are cau-
tiously optimistic.
General manager Doug
Armstrong said the NHL's
No. 2 goal scorer will be out
indefinitely. Armstrong an-
nounced the move, made
retroactive to Dec. 21, in a
statement before the team's
game with Chicago.
"I say indefinitely because
it could be day to day or
week to week," Armstrong
said during the morning
skate. "There's no set
timetable, but he is exercising
and we hope he has a
speedy recovery."
Steen hasn't played since
he left a game against Ed-
monton on Dec. 21 with what
the team called an "upper-
body injury." It's the second
concussion with the Blues for
Steen, who will not accom-
pany the team on a two-game
trip to Dallas and Minnesota.
"We're going to want to
take our time," Armstrong
said. "We're hoping that it's
not a long-term thing."
Steen is the Blues' leading
scorer with 24 goals and 38
points in 35 games. He has
six game-winning goals, sec-
ond most in the league.
The Blues believe Steen's
symptoms began with a hit
by Ottawa's Zack Smith on
Dec. 16. Smith was penal-
ized for an illegal check to the
head but the NHL did not re-
view the play.


SPOILERS
Continued from Page B1

four of their losses were by three
points or fewer, including a 16-14
setback to New Orleans. Tampa Bay
has since won four of its last seven.
A fifth win might be enough to per-
suade ownership that second-year
coach Greg Schiano has the pirate
ship sailing in the right direction.
"We had some tough losses early
in the year A little bit of a weird
year some of those games we al-
most invented ways to lose," Schi-
ano said. "The biggest thing is our
guys stuck together, there was no
finger-pointing. We have a great
group of guys in that locker room,
some real strong leadership.
'As a football coach, you know
that last (game) stays, that taste
stays in your mouth," Schiano
added. "So you like to have it be a
good one because it's a long offsea-
son with the bitter taste of defeat."
Here are five things to know
about Buccaneers-Saints:
The 5,000 club
Brees is closing in on his fourth
5,000-yard season. That was un-
heard of in 2007, when Brees be-
came only the second QB in NFL
history after Dan Marino in 1984
- to pass for 5,000 yards in a sea-
son. Since then he's done it again in
2011 and 2012. Brees needs 219
yards passing to do it yet again.
Production problems
The Buccaneers, who've gone 4-8
with rookie Mike Glennon at quar-
terback, are 29th in the league in
scoring, last in passing offense and
last in total offense, averaging 276.1
yards per game. They've posted
new season-low totals four of the
past five games, including 170 yards
in last week's loss at St Louis.
Protection problems
Brees has been sacked 36 times


Wizards 106,
Pistons 82
WASHINGTON John
Wall had 20 points and 11 as-
sists, Marcin Gortat added 16
points, and the Washington
Wizards routed the Detroit
Pistons 106-82.
TrevorAriza and Bradley
Beal each added 15 points for
Washington, which snapped a
three-game home losing
streak and has won four of its
last five overall.
One night after their worst
defeat of the season, a 22-
point loss at Minnesota, the
Wizards never trailed, pulling
away late in the first half en
route to their biggest win.
Greg Monroe scored 14
points and Brandon Jennings
had 13 for Detroit, which has
dropped four of five.
Celtics 103,
Cavaliers 100
BOSTON Jeff Green
and Jordan Crawford each
scored 19 points, Brandon
Bass added 15 points and
had a game-saving blocked
shot in the closing seconds,
and the Boston Celtics held
on for a 103-100 victory over
the Cleveland Cavaliers.
The Cavaliers were playing
soon after suspending center
Andrew Bynum indefinitely for
"conduct detrimental to the
team" and banning him from
all team-related activities.
Avery Bradley added 18
points and eight rebounds for
Boston, which snapped a
three-game losing streak.
Bass also had eight boards.
Kyrie Irving led the Cava-
liers with 32 points.
Raptors 115,
Knicks 100
TORONTO Kyle Lowry
had a season-best 32 points
and 11 assists, Terrence Ross
made a career-high seven 3-
pointers and the Toronto Rap-
tors beat New York for the
second straight night, topping
the short-handed Knicks 115-
100.
Lowry came within two re-
bounds of a triple-double and
Ross had 23 points as
Toronto won for the fourth
time in five games.
DeMar DeRozan added 20
points for the Raptors, who
overcame a 12-point deficit in
the second half to beat New
York 95-83 at Madison
Square Garden on Friday.
Pacers 105,
Nets 91
INDIANAPOLIS Paul
George scored 24 points and
Lance Stephenson added 23
to lead the Indiana Pacers to
a 105-91 victory over the
Brooklyn Nets.
George Hill finished with 21
points for the Pacers, who put
five players in double figures
and pulled away with a third-


this season, the most in his career
and 10 times more than in any other
season in New Orleans. In his first
four seasons in New Orleans the
most he was sacked was 20 times.
But Brees doesn't like his offensive
line being judged by sack totals.
"That's not fair Throw in all the
factors of me hanging in there try-
ing to get some balls downfield,"
Brees said. "That's on me not
throwing the ball away maybe. But
then there have been those times
where you hang onto it and you do
get the big play ... I think our guys
up front have played great."
QB pressure
The Bucs sacked Brees four
times in the first meeting and have
reasons to be confident they can
mount consistent pressure again.
Defensive tackle Gerald McCoy has
a career-best nine sacks. And with
34 sacks overall, Tampa Bay has its
highest total since 2005.
Superdome advantage
The Saints look to go 8-0 at home
for the second time in three sea-
sons. This season, New Orleans' av-
erage victory margin in the
Superdome is 17.4. Only two home
victories were by single digits. The
rest were by 18 points or more.
Packers' Cobb activated,
questionable for Bears
GREEN BAY, Wis. Packers re-
ceiver Randall Cobb has been activated
from injured reserve and has been listed
as questionable for Sunday's crucial
game against the Chicago Bears.
Cobb was the team's allotted player
on injured reserve who was designated
for return after getting hurt during a 19-
17 win Oct. 13 at Baltimore. The play-
making wideout was added to the injury
report Saturday with a knee injury.
Quarterback Aaron Rodgers (collar-
bone) is already returning Sunday and
is expected to start against the Bears in
the game to decide the NFC North title.
Coach Mike McCarthy said he gave


quarter burst.
Roy Hibbert scored 11 and
David West 10 for Indiana,
which leads the Eastern Con-
ference at 23-6. Stephenson
also had nine rebounds and
seven assists.
Paul Pierce scored 18
points, Mirza Teletovic 17,
Deron Williams 14 and Alan
Anderson 10 for the Nets,
who fell to 10-20.
Mavericks 105,
Bulls 83
CHICAGO Monta Ellis
had 22 points and the Dallas
Mavericks took control early
in coasting to a 105-83 victory
over the Chicago Bulls.
Dirk Nowitzki and Vince
Carter added 18 points apiece
for the Mavericks, who led by
as many as 32 while bounc-
ing back from a home loss to
San Antonio on Thursday.
Joakim Noah led Chicago
with 20 points and 10 re-
bounds, but the Bulls had
their modest two-game win-
ning streak snapped.
Hawks 118,
Bobcats 116, OT
ATLANTA- Paul Millsap
scored a season-high 31
points, Lou Williams scored
10 of his season-best 28
points in overtime and the At-
lanta Hawks rallied to beat the
Charlotte Bobcats 118-116.
Al Jefferson had 24 points
and a season-high 23 re-
bounds, and Gerald Hender-
son added 22 points for
Charlotte.
Playing their first game
since leading scorer and re-
bounder Al Horford suffered a
torn pectoral muscle, the
Hawks trailed by 14 after
Henderson hit a 20-foot fade-
away jumper with 4:19 left in
the third quarter.
Grizzlies 120,
Nuggets 99
MEMPHIS, Tenn.- Zach
Randolph scored 20 points
and the Memphis Grizzlies
got 62 points from their bench
in a 120-99 victory over the
Denver Nuggets.
Six Grizzlies finished in
double figures and Memphis
shot 52 percent while sending
the Nuggets to their sixth
straight loss. Ed Davis led the
reserves with 17 points, hit-
ting 6 of 8 shots, while Jerryd
Bayless finished with 15
points. Mike Conley and
James Johnson scored 14
points apiece, and Mike Miller
added 11, connecting on 3 of
5 outside the arc.
Rockets 107,
Pelicans 98
HOUSTON Dwight
Howard had 24 points and 17
rebounds, and James Harden
scored 11 of his 21 points in
the fourth quarter in the Hous-
ton Rockets' 107-98 come-
back victory over the New
Orleans Pelicans.


Cobb more work in practice Friday to
help determine whether he should be
activated.
Cobb caught 29 passes for 378 yards
and two touchdowns playing the first
five games this season for Green Bay
(7-7-1).
Vikings rule Peterson out
for Sunday's finale
MINNEAPOLIS -The Minnesota
Vikings have ruled out running back
Adrian Peterson for their final game of
the season.
The Vikings announced Saturday
they downgraded Peterson from doubt-
ful on the original injury report to out
against Detroit Sunday, when the
Vikings and Lions will play the last game
at the Metrodome.
Peterson sprained his right foot Dec.
8 at Baltimore and sat out the following
week against Philadelphia. He played
last Sunday at Cincinnati but was
mostly ineffective. Peterson acknowl-
edged afterward the injury affected his
performance. He has also been both-
ered this year by a sore groin.
Peterson finished the season with
1,266 yards rushing, the second-lowest
total of his seven years in the NFL.
Patriots sign Kanorris
Davis, Justin Green
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. The New
England Patriots signed safety Kanorris
Davis and defensive back Justin Green
from the practice squad to the 53-man
roster Saturday.
Davis, a linebacker in college at Troy,
has played two games on special teams
this season. Green, from Illinois, played
in New England's victory over Denver
on Nov. 24.
On Friday, New England released
wide receiver Austin Collie, signed run-
ning back/slot receiver Sam McGuffie to
the practice squad and released running
back Cierre Wood from the practice
squad.


NBA BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Win or go home for four NFl

Associated Press


Two NFC showdowns, one for
the North title and one for the
East crown.
A returning star quarterback
in Green Bay and, quite possibly,
a sidelined one in Dallas.
A pair of the NFL's most
heated rivalries determining
playoff spots.
Delicious.
One thing the NFL absolutely
got right in recent years was
making all Week 17 games be-
tween division teams. It's
worked again with the Eagles
visiting the Cowboys in the night
game, a little while after the
Packers and Bears settle the
score in their sector
"Wouldn't want it any other
way," Green Bay coach Mike Mc-
Carthy said. "This is what you
fight for, an opportunity to be in
the playoffs. That's what's in
front of us. Everybody's well
aware of the great history be-
tween the Green Bay Packers
and the Chicago Bears."
And McCarthy gets back
Aaron Rodgers, who missed
seven games and most of an
eighth because of a broken left
collarbone suffered against the
Bears.
"We're in it," said Rodgers,
who saw the Packers go 2-5-1
without him. "You know we have
a chance against our rivals, and
what a better way than to go
down there and get some re-
demption and host a home play-
off game?"
While Rodgers comes back,
the Cowboys will be without
Tony Romo, who damaged his
back in a tight win at Washington
last Sunday Kyle Orton will step
in as Dallas plays a winner-take-
all finale against a division op-
ponent.
"Everything we are and we
have accomplished over the last
few years, that you believe in
and you hold on to, is because of
him," said tight end Jason Wit-
ten, the franchise leader in
catches who came into the
league with Romo in 2003.
"What he creates week in and
week out, day in and day out, I
don't think you look at a couple
of plays and determine. I think
that would be foolish for any-
body to do that."
Philadelphia (9-6)
at Dallas (8-7)
Green Bay (7-7-1)
at Chicago (8-7)
The Eagles have been the
more balanced team, with a de-
fense that pretty much improved
as the season progressed, and a
sensational offense. And they
will have their quarterback:
Nick Foles leads the league with
a 118.8 rating, has 25 TDs and
two interceptions, and is
healthy
They also have LeSean McCoy,


y-New En
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo


y-lndianap
Tennesse
Jacksonvi
Houston


y-Cincinna
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


y-Denver
x-Kansas
San Diego
Oakland


Philadelph
Dallas
N.Y Giant
Washingto


x-Carolina
New Orlea
Atlanta
Tampa Ba


Chicago
Green Ba
Detroit
Minnesota

x-Seattle
x-San Fra
Arizona
St. Louis


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF R
gland 11 4 0 .733 410 3
8 7 0 .533 310 3
7 8 0 .467 270 3
6 9 0 .400 319 3
South
W L T Pct PF R
olis 10 5 0 .667 361 3
e 6 9 0 .400 346 3
lie 4 11 0 .267 237 4
2 13 0 .133 266 4
North
W L T Pct PF R
ati 10 5 0 .667 396 2
8 7 0 .533 303 3
S 7 8 0 .467 359 3
4 11 0 .267 301 3
West
W L T Pct PF R
12 3 0 .800 572 3
City 11 4 0 .733 406 2
S 8 7 0 .533 369 3
4 11 0 .267 308 4
NFC
East
W L T Pct PFE
hia 9 6 0 .600 418 3
8 7 0 .533 417 4
ts 6 9 0 .400 274 3
on 3 12 0 .200 328 4
South
W L T Pct PFE
S 11 4 0 .733 345 2
ans 10 5 0 .667 372 2
4 11 0 .267 333 4
ay 4 11 0 .267 271 3
North
W L T Pct PFE
8 7 0 .533 417 4
y 7 7 1 .500 384 4
7 8 0 .467 382 3
S 4 10 1 .300 377 4
West
W L T Pct PFE
12 3 0 .800 390 2
ncisco 11 4 0 .733 383 2
10 5 0 .667 359 3
7 8 0 .467 339 3


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday, Dec. 22
St. Louis 23, Tampa Bay 13
Indianapolis 23, Kansas City 7
Denver 37, Houston 13
Buffalo 19, Miami 0
Carolina 17, New Orleans 13
Dallas 24, Washington 23
N.Y Jets 24, Cleveland 13
Cincinnati 42, Minnesota 14
Tennessee 20, Jacksonville 16
Arizona 17, Seattle 10
N.Y Giants 23, Detroit 20, OT
San Diego 26, Oakland 13
Pittsburgh 38, Green Bay 31
New England 41, Baltimore 7
Philadelphia 54, Chicago 11
Monday, Dec. 23
San Francisco 34, Atlanta 24
Today's games
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.


VIW W. 1


Associated Press
With a win today against the St. Louis Rams, the Seattle Seahawks would clinch the NFC's No. I seed
in the upcoming NFL playoffs and hold home-field advantage until the Super Bowl.


who can become the first
Philadelphia running back to
lead the league in rushing since
Hall of Famer Steve Van Buren
in 1949.
"I don't care who's quarter-
backing, who's playing," Foles
said of the challenge on Sunday
night. "If you're not up for that, I
don't know if you'll ever be up to
play football."
Orton last started a game in
2011 with Kansas City
At Soldier Field, both teams
will be searching for a sem-
blance of defense in one of the
most meaningful meetings of the
187-game (and counting) rivalry
Chicago ranks 29th, Green Bay
26th on defense.
"Sometimes we're in the right
place, but we're just not winning
the one-on-ones or you missed a
tackle," Bears defensive coordi-
nator Mel Tucker said.
New York (7-8)
at Miami (8-7)
Baltimore (8-7)
at Cincinnati (10-5)
Cleveland (4-11)
at Pittsburgh (7-8)
Kansas City (11-4)
at San Diego (8-7)
Four teams chasing the final
AFC wild card. Who has the
edge?
Miami, because it's at home
against a team it easily handled
earlier, might be the one. But the
Jets will play hard, sensing a win
might be enough to save the job
of the coach the players adore,
Rex Ryan.
So Baltimore, with its champi-
onship pedigree, fits the role.
Except the Bengals are unde-
feated at home and still have a
shot at the No. 2 overall seed.


Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Miami, 1 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 4:25 p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
NFL playoff
scenarios
AFC
Clinched
Denver AFC West and first-round bye
New England -AFC East
Cincinnati -AFC North
Indianapolis -AFC South
Kansas City playoff spot
Denver (at Oakland)
Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC
playoffs with:
-Win or tie, OR
New England loss or tie
New England (vs. Buffalo)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win or tie, OR
Cincinnati loss or tie and Indianapolis loss or tie
Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC
playoffs with:
-Win and Denver loss
Cincinnati (vs. Baltimore)
Clinches first-round bye with:
Win and New England loss
Indianapolis (vs. Jacksonville)
Clinches first-round bye with:
-Win and New England loss and Cincinnati loss or
tie
Miami (vs. N.Y. Jets)
Clinches playoff spot with:
Win and Baltimore loss or tie, OR
-Win and San Diego win, OR
-Tie and Baltimore loss and San Diego loss or tie,
OR
Tie and Baltimore tie and San Diego tie
Baltimore (at Cincinnati)
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win and San Diego loss or tie, OR
-Win and Miami loss or tie, OR
-Tie and Miami loss and San Diego loss or tie, OR
-Tie and Miami tie and San Diego loss, OR
Miami loss and San Diego loss and Pittsburgh
loss or tie
San Diego (vs. Kansas City)
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win and Miami loss or tie and Baltimore loss or
tie, OR
-Tie and Miami loss and Baltimore loss
Pittsburgh (vs. Cleveland)
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win and Miami loss and Baltimore loss and San
Diego loss
NFC
Clinched
Seattle playoff spot
Carolina playoff spot


That leaves the Chargers, per-
haps. The Chiefs have nothing to
play for, secure in the No. 5 slot
in the AFC seedings, and San
Diego has been coming on.
Maybe the team with the least
pressure on it is Pittsburgh.
Knowing the Steelers need
those other three contenders to
lose, they might simply pay at-
tention to handling archrival
Cleveland and let things fall
however they may
Carolina (114)
atAtlanta (4-11)
Tampa Bay (4-11)
at New Orleans (10-5)
Pretty simple what can hap-
pen here. And complex.
If the Panthers win at Atlanta,
they take the NFC South, going
from a last-place tie in 2012 to
the title the Falcons won a year
ago. If Carolina, which has won
10 of 11, loses to the faltering
Falcons, New Orleans can sneak
into the top spot in the division
with a victory
"The work is not done," said
Panthers safety Mike Mitchell,
who recognizes a win earns a
bye for the wild-card round. "We
are in the playoffs, but it's not
time to relax. We can make it a
lot easier for ourselves and earn
some rest and let other teams
beat themselves up."
The Saints still can miss the
postseason, though, if they lose
and Arizona beats San Fran-
cisco. And Carolina can sink to
the sixth seed by losing while
the 49ers and Saints win.
St Louis (7-8)
at Seattle (12-3)
San Francisco (11-4)
at Arizona (10-5)
After showing vulnerability at


NFL STATISTICS
San Francisco playoff spot
Seattle (vs. St. Louis)
Clinches NFC West and home-field advantage
throughout NFC playoffs with:
-Win or tie, OR
-San Francisco loss or tie
Carolina (at Atlanta)
Clinches NFC South and a first-round bye with:
-Win or tie, OR
New Orleans loss or tie
Clinches home-field advantage throughout NFC
playoffs with:
-Win and Seattle loss and San Francisco win
Philadelphia (at Dallas)
Clinches NFC East division with:
-Win or tie
Chicago (vs. Green Bay)
Clinches NFC North with:
-Win or tie
San Francisco (at Arizona)
Clinches NFC West and first-round bye with:
-Win and Seattle loss
Clinches NFC West and home-field advantage
throughout NFC playoffs with:
-Win and Seattle loss and Carolina loss or tie
New Orleans (vs. Tampa Bay)
Clinches NFC South and first-round bye with:
-Win and Carolina loss
Clinches playoff spot with:
-Win, OR
-Tie and Arizona tie, OR
-Arizona loss
Arizona (vs. San Francisco)
Clinches playoff spot with:
Win and New Orleans loss or tie, OR
-Tie and New Orleans loss
Dallas (vs. Philadelphia)
Clinches NFC East with:
-Win
Green Bay (at Chicago)
Clinches NFC North with:
-Win
AFC leaders
Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
P. Manning, DEN 631 425 5211 51 10
R Rivers, SND 511 356 4249 29 10
Roethlisberger, PIT 553 356 4082 27 12
Dalton, CIN 550 342 4015 31 16
Ale. Smith, KAN 509 308 3313 23 8
Brady, NWE 604 366 4221 24 10
Luck, IND 533 317 3540 22 9
Tannehill, MIA 548 335 3709 23 14
Fitzpatrick, TEN 326 202 2288 14 11
Keenum, HOU 253 137 1760 9 6
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN 259 1287 4.97 46 12
Ry. Mathews, SND 261 1111 4.26 51 6
Moreno, DEN 235 1015 4.32 31 10
Chr. Johnson, TEN 252 950 3.77 30t 5
F Jackson, BUF 193 836 4.33 59 8
Spiller, BUF 182 822 4.52 77 2
Ivory, NYJ 177 814 4.60 69 3
Be.Tate, HOU 181 771 4.26 60 4
L. Bell, PIT 224 770 3.44 43 7
Jones-Drew, JAX 221 764 3.46 48 5
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
And. Johnson, HOU 103 1358 13.2 62t 5


home for the first time in two
seasons and since Russell
Wilson became the starting
quarterback by losing to Ari-
zona, Seattle needs a win or tie
to secure home-field advantage
in the NFC playoffs. It might not
be easy, because the Rams
played the Seahawks tough in
October, losing 14-9.
St. Louis has only one victory
in Seattle since 2002, when the
NFC West was formed.
With the Niners in the play-
offs, Arizona would be the more
desperate team. But San Fran-
cisco is eager to pounce if Seat-
tle stumbles and could get the
top overall conference seed if
Carolina also falls. The 49ers
have won five in a row
The Cardinals could be the
second 11-5 team, joining the
2008 Patriots, not to make the
playoffs if the Saints also win.
Denver (12-3)
at Oakland (4-11)
Buffalo (6-9)
at New England (114)
Right now, the top two seeds
in the AFC are the Broncos and
Patriots. But should Denver slip
up against the Raiders a long
shot at best New England
could grab the top spot with a
win.
Peyton Manning has 51 TD
passes, most in a season, and fig-
ures to throw a few more against
the inept Oakland defense. He
needs 266 yards passing to break
Drew Brees' single-season mark
of 5,476 set in 2011, and the
Broncos need 18 points to break
New England's single-season
mark of 589 set in 2007.
The Raiders need an llth
straight non-playoff season


Ant. Brown, PIT
Edelman, NWE
A.. Green, CIN
Ke. Wright, TEN
De. Thomas, DE
Decker, DEN
J. Gordon, CLE
Cameron, CLE
Hartline, MIA


Doss, BAL
Ant. Brown, PIT
Benjamin, CLE
McCluster, KAN
Edelman, NWE
Br. Tate, CIN
K. Martin, HOU
Holliday, DEN
Thigpen, MIA
McKelvin, BUF


Q. Demps, KAN
Jac. Jones, BAL
Holliday, DEN
Todman, JAX
K. Martin, HOU
Br. Tate, CIN
D. Reed, IND
Cribbs, NYJ
Ta. Jones, OAK
Thigpen, MIA


J. Charles, KAN
Moreno, DEN
De. Thomas, DE
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Decker, DEN
A.. Green, CIN
Welker, DEN
Ant. Brown, PIT
Cotchery, PIT
J. Gordon, CLE


Gostkowski, NW
M. Prater, DEN
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
Vinatieri, IND
D. Carpenter, BL
Suisham, PIT
Folk, NYJ
Succop, KAN
Sturgis, MIA


101 1412 14.0


96 991 10.3
94 1365 14.5
89 1029 11.6
N 86 1317 15.3
83 1261 15.2
80 1564 19.6
75 848 11.3
74 978 13.2
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
23 359 15.6
29 388 13.4
22 257 11.7
57 654 11.5
33 367 11.1
31 301 9.7
39 345 8.8
31 271 8.7
31 237 7.6
32 180 5.6
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
30 892 29.7
25 723 28.9
28 775 27.7
24 662 27.6
33 864 26.2
32 835 26.1
24 590 24.6
20 490 24.5
24 572 23.8
36 840 23.3
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
19 12 7
12 10 2
N 12 0 12
S 12 0 12
10 0 10
10 0 10
10 0 10
9 0 8
9 0 9
9 0 9
Kicking
PAT FG [
E 42-42 34-37
71-71 23-24
39-39 32-35
26-26 35-38
31-31 32-37
JF 30-30 31-34
37-37 28-30
25-25 31-33
49-49 21-26
32-32 26-34


56
44
82t
45
78t
61
95t
53
50


NFC leaders


Foles, PHL
J. McCown, CHI
A. Rodgers, GBY
Brees, NOR
R.Wilson, SEA
Romo, DAL
S. Bradford, STL
Kaepernick, SNF
C. Newton, CAR


Week 16
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
291 186
224 149
251 168
619 422
384 242
535 342
262 159
382 222
446 277


NFL


Detroit (7-8)
at Minnesota (4-10-1)
The Lions completed their
collapse from NFC North leader
to heading home before the new
year when they lost to the Giants
in overtime last weekend. QB
Matthew Stafford has an NFL-
worst 14 turnovers (including 12
interceptions) over the last six
weeks, five losses.
It's the final game in the
Metrodome. The Vikings will
move to the University of Min-
nesota's outdoor stadium for the
next two seasons while a new
stadium is being built on the site
of the Metrodome, which will be
torn down next month.


M.Ryan,ATL 611 411 4235 24
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG
L.McCoy,PHL 287 1476 5.14 57t
A. Peterson, MIN 279 1266 4.54 78t
Forte, CHI 267 1229 4.60 55
A. Morris, WAS 260 1213 4.67 45t
M. Lynch, SEA 278 1160 4.17 43
Gore, SNF 263 1114 4.24 51
Lacy, GBY 263 1112 4.23 60
D. Murray, DAL 200 1073 5.37 43
Re. Bush, DET 209 974 4.66 39
Stacy, STL 235 958 4.08 40t
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG
Garcon, WAS 107 1290 12.1 53t
B. Marshall, CHI 94 1221 13.0 44
JefferyCHI 86 1341 15.6 80t
De. Bryant, DAL 85 1134 13.3 79
Cal. Johnson, DET 84 1492 17.8 87
J.Graham, NOR 81 1144 14.1 56t
De. Jackson, PHL 79 1304 16.5 61t
Gonzalez, ATL 79 803 10.2 25
Douglas, ATL 78 1009 12.9 80t
Boldin, SNF 76 1030 13.6 43
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Sherels, MIN 19 258 13.6 86t
Hyde, GBY 23 296 12.9 93t
Ginn Jr., CAR 23 283 12.3 41
G.Tate, SEA 49 587 12.0 71
Page, TAM 23 251 10.9 52
L. James, SNF 20 206 10.3 40
Ta.Austin, STL 33 280 8.5 98t
R. Randle, NYG 29 237 8.2 32
Sproles, NOR 28 194 6.9 28
Spurlock, DET 22 145 6.6 57
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
C. Patterson, MIN 40 1342 33.6 109t
Dw. Harris, DAL 26 792 30.5 90
Hester, CHI 47 1315 28.0 80
Page, TAM 19 479 25.2 44
Hyde, GBY 21 513 24.4 70
Ginn Jr., CAR 24 564 23.5 38
J. Rodgers, ATL 25 575 23.0 34
Arenas, ARI 20 446 22.3 46
Paul, WAS 20 411 20.6 39
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
J.Graham, NOR 15 0 15 0
M. Lynch, SEA 13 11 2 0
De. Bryant, DAL 12 0 12 0
Ve. Davis, SNF 12 0 12 0
Cal. Johnson, DET 12 0 12 0
B. Marshall, CHI 11 0 11 0
A. Peterson, MIN 11 10 1 0
Fitzgerald, ARI 10 0 10 0
Lacy, GBY 10 10 0 0
L.McCoy,PHL 10 9 1 0
Kicking
PAT FG LG
Hauschka, SEA 41-41 31-33 53
Crosby, GBY 39-39 31-35 57
R Dawson, SNF 42-42 29-32 55
D. Bailey, DAL 46-46 25-27 53
Feely, ARI 35-35 28-32 52
Gould, CHI 41-42 26-29 58
Walsh, MIN 41-42 26-30 54
Gano, CAR 39-39 24-27 55
Zuerlein, STL 34-34 25-27 54
Henery, PHL 42-42 22-27 51


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 B5





Steams

to end.
Buffalo has never won in
Gillette Stadium, which opened
in 2002. But the Bills lead the
NFL in sacks, so Tom Brady
might not be all that comfortable
against a team he has beaten 21
out of 23 times.
Jacksonville (4-11)
at Indianapolis (10-5)
The Colts know they will be at
home next week in the wild-card
round, barring losses by the Pa-
triots and Cincinnati and an
Indy win that would deliver a
bye. The Colts can complete a
sweep of the AFC South for first
time since 2009, and placekicker
Adam Vinatieri needs six points
to become the seventh member
of the 2,000-point club.
The Jaguars are 4-3 since their
bye week and are trying to win a
fourth AFC South game in the
same season for the second time
in franchise history and first
time since 2005.
Washington (3-12)
at New York Giants (6-9)
Very possibly the final game in
Mike Shanahan's four-year run
as Washington coach. He's 24-40
and last season was the only
winning one for him with the
Redskins. They have lost seven
straight games and are winless
in the NFC East.
Giants coach Tom Coughlin al-
most certainly will return if he
wants to. But aside from his two
Super Bowl victories a big
aside the Giants have missed
the playoffs five times under the
league's oldest coach.
Houston (2-13)
at Tennessee (6-9)
From projected Super Bowl
contender after consecutive
AFC South titles to, uh, earning
the top overall pick in the draft.
That's how Houston's season has
gone, with 13 straight losses and
Gary Kubiak already fired as
coach.
Mike Munchak's tenure in
Tennessee also could end, espe-
cially if the Titans can't handle
the league's worst team. RB
Chris Johnson needs 50 yards to
reach 1,000 for a sixth straight
season.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


hur


a ~MSU DB excels


ai despite odds


Associated Press
Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees throws a pass as lineman Mark Harrell blocks Rutgers' Marcus Thompson
during the first half of the Pinstripe Bowl on Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York.


Notre Dame

beats Rutgers

in Pinstripe

Bowl

Associated Press

NEW YORK This
nicely sums up Tommy
Rees' Notre Dame career
The senior threw for 319
yards and no intercep-
tions in his final college
game, leading No. 25
Notre Dame to a 29-16 vic-
tory against Rutgers that
was far from pretty but ul-
timately successful and
an offensive lineman won
the MVP award.
"I was giving Tommy a
hard time," said senior
tackle Zack Martin, who
took home the award. "I
think he got snubbed a lit-
tle bit."
Rees finished four years
of football for the Fighting
Irish packed with both
memorable and forget-
table moments with a
solid performance, going
27 for 47. He has been
"The Closer," rallying
Notre Dame to victories
with late drives, and
"Turnover Tommy," mak-
ing crushing mistakes at
the most inopportune
times during his time in
South Bend, Ind.
For his finale, against
one of the worst pass de-
fenses in the nation, Rees
was mistake-free and pro-
ductive. He missed some
throws that could have


broken open the game, but,
typically, he persevered.
"I'm a Tommy Rees fan
for life," coach Brian
Kelly said.
Kyle Brindza kicked five
field goals for the Fighting
Irish (9-4), who finished
their follow-up season to
last year's run to the na-
tional championship game
a long way from the BCS -
facing a two-touchdown
underdog trying to avoid a
losing record.
Notre Dame's play was
less than inspired Kelly
said about a dozen players
were fighting a flu bug -
but the win prevented the
Irish from finishing with
eight victories for the third
time in his four seasons.
'A good season that
could have been a great
season," Kelly said.
Notre Dame's TJ Jones
scored on an 8-yard run in
the first quarter and Rut-
gers star Brandon Coleman
answered with a 14-yard
touchdown catch soon
after Tarean Folston's 3-
yard touchdown run with
3:38 in the fourth made it
26-16 and finally gave the
Irish a comfortable lead.
On the slick turf at Yan-
kee Stadium, the Pin-
stripe Bowl turned into a
field-goal kicking contest.
Brindza was 5 for 6. Kyle
Federico made 3 of 3 for
the Scarlet Knights (6-7).
The Irish dominated in
yards (494-237) and time of
possession (38:49) but
bogged down in the red
zone repeatedly
"I loved the way we were
able to stay calm and stay
within our offense and


continue to kind of monot-
onously move the ball
down the field," Rees said.
Twice Notre Dame put
together double-digit play
drives that ended in short
field goals for Brindza. A
15-play, 90-yard march that
started in the third quar-
ter and ended in the
fourth with Brindza's 25-
yarder made it 19-13 Notre
Dame with 12:46 left.
"I love the fourth quar-
ter," Brindza said. "That's
pretty much what a kicker's
job is supposed to be."
Brindza's third field goal,
a 26-yarder with 6:03 left in
the third quarter, gave
Notre Dame a 16-13 lead -
after the Irish caught a
break Brindza had missed
from 36 yards but Rutgers
was flagged for running
into the kicker to give him
a second, easier, try
"We thought we played
good red-zone defense
and we could make them
kick a few field goals and
attempt some field goals,
maybe we could block one
and then win the game in
the fourth quarter," Rut-
gers coach Kyle Flood
said. "We were kind of
poised to do that."
Notre Dame improved
to 17-6-3 at Yankee Sta-
dium, though this ballpark
in the Bronx is only a few
years old and across the
street from where the
original House that Ruth
built sat for decades.
"It's great to be in New
York," Kelly told what
was left of bowl record
crowd of 47,122 during
the postgame trophy
ceremony


Belk Bowl

North Carolina 39,
Cincinnati 17
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -The
North Carolina Tar Heels have
broken their Belk Bowl jinx.
T.J. Logan returned a kick-
off 78 yards for a touchdown,
and Ryan Switzer scored on
an 86-yard punt return to
help North Carolina beat
Cincinnati 39-17 on Saturday
for its first Belk Bowl victory
in four attempts.
Marquise Williams threw for
171 yards and a touchdown
for the Tar Heels (7-6) in their
first bowl victory since 2010.
Romar Morris scored on
two short touchdown runs
and Jack Tabb caught a
touchdown pass as the Tar
Heels (7-6) closed the sea-
son by winning six of their
final seven games under
second-year coach Larry
Fedora.
Cincinnati (9-4) was look-
ing to become the bowl's first
back-to-back champion
since Virginia did it 10 years
ago, but last year's MVP
Brandon Kay was limited to
181 yards passing and no
touchdowns.
The Tar Heels had five
sacks, including one for a
safety.
North Carolina came in
having lost its previous three
in-state Belk Bowl appear-
ances, but bolted to a 23-3
halftime lead behind a pair
of long touchdown drives led
by Williams and Logan's
nifty kickoff return.


Dennard the

linchpin of

Spartans'D

Associated Press

EAST LANSING, Mich.
- From two-star to just
plain star Darqueze
Dennard is an inspiration
to any player who feels
overlooked in the recruit-
ing process.
Dennard grew up in
Georgia, but he left South-
eastern Conference terri-
tory to play for Michigan
State. To hear him tell the
story, he didn't have much
of a choice. The Spartans
gave an opportunity to a
young man who had been
an afterthought to seem-
ingly everyone else.
Now Dennard is an All-
American and the winner
of this year's Jim Thorpe
Award, which goes to the
nation's top defensive back
He and the fourth-ranked
Spartans will take on fifth-
ranked Stanford in the
Rose Bowl on Wednesday
"Seeing it all come to-
gether, it's truly a bless-
ing," Dennard said. "My
story tells you, just keep
praying, believing. Work
hard and everything will
work out"
Dennard was a talented
high school player, but
that's no guarantee of suc-
cess at the next level.
Scoutcom gave him only
two stars in its recruiting
rankings, and so did
Rivals.com. Dennard isn't
sure what might have hap-
pened to his career if
Michigan State hadn't
signed him as part of its
2010 recruiting class. He
said his family's financial
situation would have made
it difficult for him to walk
on somewhere.
"I probably wouldn't
have played sports," he
said. "I'd probably have
been home doing who
knows what."
In the Big Ten, it didn't
take long for Dennard to


prove he belonged. He
started two games as a
freshman for a Michigan
State team that ended up
tying for the Big Ten title,
and he's only improved
since then.
Dennard intercepted
three passes in each of the
next two seasons, and four
more as a senior Now he's
part of a Michigan State
team that's ranked No. 1 in
the nation in total defense
- and will play in the
Rose Bowl for the first
time since 1988.
"He's an extremely com-
petitive young man," coach
Mark Dantonio said. "He's
a guy that wasn't a highly
recruited guy, but ex-
tremely quick, and he's got
great presence on the foot-
ball field, great ball skills,
great presence, and he
brings that to the table,
and he brings his confi-
dence to the table."
Dennard teams up with
fellow cornerback Trae
Waynes and safeties Kurtis
Drummond and Isaiah
Lewis to form the nucleus
of a bruising secondary
Michigan State is No. 1 in
the nation against the run
and No. 6 against the pass.
The Spartans like to talk
about turning the defense
into a "No-Fly Zone" -
and that was certainly evi-
dent in the Big Ten cham-
pionship game against
Ohio State.
The Buckeyes actually
rushed for 273 yards
against Michigan State's
vaunted defense, but Den-
nard and the secondary
held strong, preventing
Ohio State from big passing
plays that might have bro-
ken the game open. Brax-
ton Miller completed only
eight passes for the Buck-
eyes, and the Spartans
were able to rally in the
fourth quarter for a 34-24
win.
"Obviously there's a
domino effect. If you're not
very good on the edges,
then it's going to fall, and
you've got to take care of
the edges another way,"
Dantonio said.


Associated Press
Michigan State's Darqueze Dennard has gone from an
unheralded recruit from Georgia to one of the best
cornerbacks in college football for the Spartans.


Duke must contain Manziel to end bowl drought


Associated Press

ATLANTA Duke will
need a better result in its
second straight game
against a Heisman Trophy
winner if it is to come
away with its first bowl vic-
tory in more than 50 years.
It already has been a
memorable season for No.
22 Duke. The Blue Devils
won 10 games for the first
time and are coming off
their first appearance in
the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championship game.
On Tuesday night, they
play Johnny Manziel and
No. 20 Texas A&M in the
Chick-fil-A Bowl. This is the
first time Duke will be in
back-to-back bowl games.
Duke will be facing the
2012 Heisman winner in
Manziel after falling to
2013 Heisman winner
Jameis Winston and
Florida State in the ACC
title game.
Duke coach David Cut-
cliffe said Manziel poses a
"very unique challenge, to
say the least."
"They're extremely effi-
cient offensively and well-
coached," Cutcliffe said
Saturday "Then you throw
in his ability to create. I've
been doing this a long
time. I don't think I've ever
seen anybody ad-lib on the
field better So the things


Associated Press
No. 22 Duke will have to find a way to slow down Texas
A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel on Tuesday in the
Chick-fil-A Bowl if the Blue Devils want to end a lengthy


bowl drought
that concern you are giving
up explosive plays when
you seemingly have a play
defended."
Duke's last postseason
victory came against
Arkansas in the 1961 Cot-
ton Bowl.
According to STATS,
Duke (10-3) is the first
team in three years to play
Heisman winners in con-
secutive games. In 2010,
Louisiana State faced Al-
abama's Mark Ingram
(2009) and Auburn's Cam
Newton (2010) in two
straight games.
The Blue Devils were
overwhelmed in their 45-7
loss to Winston and Florida
State on Dec. 7. Winston
threw three touchdown


passes and ran for a score
in the runaway win.
Next up: Johnny Foot-
ball.
The bowl game could be
the end of Manziel's col-
lege career The third-year
sophomore could enter the
NFL draft.
Manziel led the South-
eastern Conference in
total yards with 3,732 pass-
ing and 686 on the ground.
He accounted for 41 touch-
downs, including 33
through the air. He im-
proved his completion
percentage and passing
yards from his Heisman-
winning season, but the
Aggies' 8-4 record helped
push him down to fifth in
this year's voting.


Manziel passed for 3,732
yards with 33 touchdowns
and led Texas A&M with
686 yards rushing and
eight TDs.
Duke cornerback Ross
Cockrell said Manziel's
mobility makes life diffi-
cult for defensive backs.
"Manziel and Winston
are obviously two great
quarterbacks," Cockrell
said Saturday "Winston is
a much bigger quarter-
back, not nearly as quick
and as fast, I think, but
very mobile.
"The thing about
Manziel that makes him
tough is when he's back
there scrambling around,
you can't really tell which
routes the receivers are
going to run. They could
run left, right, down the
field, come back up the
field. ... You have to cover
for so long, and your tech-
nique and your eyes are
going to have to be perfect"
Cutcliffe said Manziel's
creativity and ability to ex-
tend plays puts an unusual
strain on a defense.
"You're almost having to
defend two plays in one
snap," Cutcliffe said. "The
one that may be drawn up,
which is difficult enough
to defend, and then the
one when he starts ad-lib-
bing and moving in and
out of the pocket. That is


extremely taxing to your
defense."
Manziel overcame a
shoulder injury early in
the season and said this
week he needed a break
after the regular season to
overcome other injuries.
"I feel good," Manziel
said Friday "I'm healthy
We had time off, which was
nice, just to relax. Really, it
was a grind this year The
SEC was a tough grind for
us this year It went a little
different than we thought
but I was a little banged up.


It feels good to be healthy
again and ready to go. I'm
really, really eager and
ready to play, I know that"
Texas A&M coach Kevin
Sumlin said the time offal-
lowed Manziel time to re-
cover after hitting his
hand on a helmet.
"He battled through it,"
Sumlin said. "Giving him a
chance to heal up, I think
he feels really, really good
right now I liked practice
(Friday). I think he's feel-
ing better He's got a bit
more bounce."


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B6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL









C OMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Grading the county's goals for 2013


It is a tradition for the
Chronicle to publish
community goals each
year for Citrus County on
New Year's Day
In the name of accounta-
bility, we also take this time
on the last Sunday of each year
to award ourselves grades
for the goals published last
Jan. 1. Here are those goals
and grades:
Goal 1: Make Progress
Energy/Duke a partner.


Grade: C-
At the start of 2013 Duke,
the new owner of the Crys-
tal River Energy Complex,
was fighting with the county
property appraiser's office
and some local politicians
were saying dumb things
about the conflict with the
utility
The decision had been
made to close the nuclear
plant and the relationship
looked bleak.


The utility did not pay its
full property tax bill, argu-
ing that the formula used by
Property Appraiser Geoff
Greene was incorrect.
We recommended that
the property appraiser and
the county sit down with
Duke and negotiate settle-
ments. County commission
staff has taken a better po-
sition with Duke in 2013,
but the property appraiser
continues to fight.


In 2013, the property ap-
praiser lost Round 1 of his
lawsuit with Duke, and new
lawsuits have been filed
over disputed tax bills.
The county, on the other
hand, worked via the Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil to mend fences with the
utility Duke announced
late in 2013 that it would
seek permission to build a
new gas plant in Citrus
County reinvesting in the


community while it still
continued to fight the prop-
erty appraiser
Goal 2: Keep focus on
cleanup of Crystal River
Grade: B
Art Jones' One Rake at a
Time project led the effort
to clean up Crystal River
and gained steam in 2013 as
new state agencies and
politicians came on board.


HOW


AM ER


ICA


MAN U FA


CTU RE


MASS SHOOT


INGS


BY DR. ANTHONY J. SCHEMBRI SPECIAL TO THE CHRONICLE


I T STARTED WITH PHASE 1, COLUMBINE IN 1999, AND NOW NEWTOWN.
America now produces young males with dark thoughts and foul
deeds. They're coming at us faster than a speeding bullet. The
FBI counted 172 cases of mass killings between 2006 and 2011. That
does not include some large states such as Florida, for example. Poor
reporting by police agencies to the FBI also means some mass killings
were left out, while others that don't meet the standard were included.
What shall we do? The most effective way to reduce gun violence with-
out significantly curtailing Second Amendment rights is to treat the
problem as a public health issue, according to a panel of experts who
were commissioned by the American Psychological Association to
study the issue in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., massacre. One of
the newer interventions the report highlights is called behavioral
threat assessment, which is used at an increasing number of schools
and workplaces around the country

When a student or employee openly threatens others or Almost all of the public-policy discus
shows evidence of planning an attack researching it on- gun control. Fifteen hundred gun laws
line, buying supplies a behavioral assessment team gets have been passed; and of those, 39 tighi
the person help immediately whether through counseling Wow, we are doing the wrong things wit
or more intensive therapy, and monitors the progress. Was In reality gun control in a country th
the study wide enough? I don't think so. Unless there are is likely to do little to keep weapons out
drastic changes, get set for Phase 2. They are called mass evidence that demonstrates that "gun-fr
murderers those no longer able to balance themselves abiding individuals, don't work. Gun-fre
along the brink; those who arm themselves with all they can vious mass killings. But many la
carry, calmly walk into an airport, bus station, schools or counterproductive. "Guns are already 1
shopping malls and shoot until they're shot. I'm given to in schools. A school is a 'helpless-victim
bouts of logic, so in this paper I will connect some dots that "Preventing any adult at a school from 1
I hope will startle you. This is a new police challenge as killer can be stopped in time to prevent
they respond to this new crime. So, we turn to the criminal des conducted a groundbreaking
law, the catalog of human weakness. It provides a process study in 1999, and found that a com-
to fix blame on human behavior so that the action of every mon theme of mass shootings is that
man is measured against an arbitrary latitude of right and they occur in places where guns are
a longitude of wrong in exact minutes, degrees and sec- banned and killers know everyone
onds. That's not the only blame. There are a few things you will be unarmed, such as shopping
won't hear about from saturated coverage after a mass malls, airports and schools. Lott con-
shooting. Adam Lankford, an associate professor of crimi- firmed that nothing has changed to
nal justice at the University of Alabama who studies mass alter his findings. He noted that the
shootings, performed a statistical analysis of a 2010 New Aurora shooter, who killed 12 people,
York City Police Department report that attempted to en- had a choice of seven movie theaters
capsulate all "active shootings," defined as one person that were showing the Batman movie
killing others in a well-populated, confined area, between he was obsessed with. All were
1966 and 2010. The study refined the data to only include within a 20-minute drive of his home.
U.S. shootings in which two or more people were killed or The Cinemark Theater the killer ul-
injured. That resulted in a total of 185 mass shooters in- timately chose wasn't the closest, but
cluding both workplace and school shooters. "Unlike most it was the only one that posted signs
murderers and terrorists, mass shooters almost never es- saying it banned concealed handguns
cape the scene of their crimes," Lankford writes, carried by law-abiding individuals.
Mass shooters died in 48 percent of the attacks studied, All of the other theaters allowed
38 percent by their own hand and the remaining by "sui- the approximately 4 percent of Col-
cide by cop" using weapons to intentionally provoke po- orado adults who have a concealed-
lice, who are trained to shoot and kill in life-threatening
situations. See Page C3


Here's what else Lankford found in the pat-
terns of mass shooting cases:
96 percent of mass shooters were male.
An average of 3.22 victims were killed and
3.83 wounded. (Note: Though the FBI doesn't
classify someone as a mass murderer unless
he kills at least four people in one location,
Lankford classified a mass shooting as any-
thing more than two people.)
32 percent of mass shootings happened at
schools. Public, commercial locations (like
restaurants or a mall) accounted for 23 per-
cent of attacks.
For every additional person the shooter
killed, his own likelihood of dying was 1.2
times higher The number of people wounded
was not a statistically significant predictor
For every additional weapon the shooter
carried, he was 1.73 times more likely to die.
Shooters who attacked people at a fac-
tory/warehouse or at a commercial location
were more likely to die than those who carried
out an attack somewhere in the study's "other"
category of locations, which was anything NOT
classified as a factory/school/commercial
space/office.
Factory attackers were almost eight times
more likely to die.
In fact, the high point for mass killings in
the U.S. was 1929, according to criminologist
Grant Duwe of the Minnesota Department of
Corrections.
sion has focused on a debate over the need for more
have been introduced since Newtown; of those 109
ten gun restrictions while 70 loosen gun restrictions.
h greater conviction.
at already has 200 million privately owned firearms
t of the hands of offenders. There is a growing body of
ree" zones, which ban the carrying of firearms by law-
ee zones have been the most popular response to pre-
w-enforcement officials say they are actually
banned in schools. That is why the shootings happen
n zone,"' says Richard Mack, a former Arizona sheriff.
having access to a firearm eliminates any chance the
a rampage." Economists John Lott and William Lan-


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3


w^





OPage C2- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013



PINION


"Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one."
Marcus Aurelius, "Meditations," 2nd century A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
4 ^ ^ M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
... Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

HERE WE GO AGAIN



Crossed swords



won't lead to



compromise


t looked like a golden
parachute, but it felt like
a lead balloon.
In the latest step in the
dance between the boards
controlling the future of Cit-
rus Memorial hospital, the
Citrus County Hospital Board
picked up the olive branch,
only to raise it.
Here's the offer: In ex-
change for dropping lawsuits
against CEO Ryan Beaty and
the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation,
Beaty resigns THE i
and gets
$800,000 in Hospita
compensation offers to dr
and the CCHB in exchange
gets a role in CEO's re:
picking his
successor, who OUR 01
would serve ..
until the hand- Reconciliat
over of the mutual
hospital at the
completion of negotiations
with the Hospital Corpora-
tion of America.
Unfortunately, there's more
than money and power at
play, and the reasons stated
for Beaty's removal were not
sufficient or well-articulated.
While representatives from
the CCHB said they felt
Beaty's resignation was the
best way to resolve issues of
trust plaguing the dialogue,
it's disingenuous to lay that
blame at Beaty's feet, and
worth acknowledging that
compromise won't come from
a sacrifice: There won't be
peace until all parties are
willing to account for their
role in the conflict. Further-


S
a
re

S

P
ir
r


more, Beaty is not in a posi-
tion to unilaterally accept or
refuse the offer: He serves at
the pleasure of the founda-
tion board, which would have
to agree to the terms.
Despite the need to work
together toward the finaliza-
tion of terms in the sale or lease
of the hospital to health care
giant HCA, this development
seems to be yet another salvo
in the back-and-forth conflict
between the boards that has
stalemated
MSUE: progress in the
talks and
I board worked against
op lawsuits the best inter-
for hospital ests of the com-
ignation. munity.
Though the
'INION: situation is
delicate, the
n requires truth is blunt:
es pect. The community
only loses by
this war of attrition, and those
who think they stand to gain
may find themselves clutch-
ing only their fists should
they refuse to extend their
hands. Squabbling between
the boards is not good for the
morale of hospital employ-
ees, it's not good for public
perception of the hospital and
it's not good for negotiations.
The matter of the future
and future governance of the
hospital has become domi-
nated by emotion rather than
pragmatism, and we urge
both sides, in the new year, to
refocus their energies and
work toward a resolution that
benefits, first and foremost,
the community


united Way of Citrus County needs your
I mlI U help to reach its annual fundraising
^^ jij R goal. If you can, please send a contribution
to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Give them place to live
After hearing about two eld-
erly people who lost their homes
by foreclosure and now have no
affordable place to move, how
about the proceeds from the
sale of the detention center be
built for a place for them based
on income? An animal shelter
should be built with private
funds.
We love our
newspaper
As I count my bless-
ings this year, we the
citizens, one of our
greatest blessings is a
paper who lets us
sound off. Please sup- CA
port the Chronicle.
Thank you so very, very 563-(
much.
Way to go Delta
Hooray for Delta Airlines for
not allowing people to use cell
phones on the planes. People
have no concern for others and
could care less how annoying
they are to other people who
have to listen to their conversa-
tions. Ask these people what the
word "etiquette" means and
they have no idea what it is. Peo-
ple are so self-centered today
that it's sickening.


Traffic concerns
I've noticed a growing prob-
lem on Citrus Hills Rehill and
Kensington streets, of vehicles
passing other vehicles on the
double yellow line. I was wonder-
ing if a person took a photo with
their Phone, if there was a
place that they could forward
the offending license plate to.
Giving occurs
JIND year-round
OFF Every day I see in
S the Chronicle, exam-
pies and photos of
service clubs and
Christian churches giv-
ing toys, food, clothing
r and other help to the
)59 needy families and oth-
579U ers who are having a
hard time here in Cit-
rus County and else-
where in the country. And this
is not just at Christmastime,
but these wonderful folks give
time, money and love to all, all
year round.
Kansas City, here I come
Gasoline rip-off. Around the
Kansas City area, gasoline (is)
$2.77 a gallon; down here, $3-
and-something. What's the dif-
ference? What's the difference?
It's a rip-off.


Life lessons learned


wo of my main passions
in work as well as in
the rest of my life are
jazz and the Constitution, which
interact. Jazz, banned by Hitler
and Stalin, is America's great
contribution of free expression
globally, and, as Supreme Court
Justice William Brennan once
told me, "The FirstAmendment's
freedom of speech protects all
the rest of our liberties."
I've been writing
about jazz for more
than 60 years, while
getting to know many
of the musicians
personally One of
them, Ben Webster,
was Duke Ellington's
powerfully swinging
tenor saxophonist
and also a romanti- Nat F
cally tender bal- OTI
ladeer After he left
Duke to become a VOI
leader, Ben worked
the nation with his own rhythm
section. But when club owners
wouldn't pay for extra person-
nel, Ben had to depend on local
swingers if they knew how to
groove.
One night in Boston, when I
was 19 and just starting to write
on jazz, I was sitting next to Ben
at the bar in a club between
sets; the local players he had
hired couldn't match his deep,
infectious swing.
"Listen, kid," Ben suddenly
said to me, "when the rhythm
section ain't making it, go for
yourself."
That has stayed with me all
these years whether I'm ar-
guing with one of my editors, or
with a federal official threaten-
ing to get the FBI after me if I
keep trying to pierce govern-
ment secrecy
So I break free and do what I
have to do.
I also learned a valuable life
lesson from Charlie Parker, a
key icon of "modern jazz," al-
though all jazz that lasts is per-
manently contemporary
I was interviewing Bird, as he
was called, on the radio when
the conversation turned to Bela
Bartok. I'd recently been ex-
cited by a concerto of his, based
in part on the Hungarian folk
music of his youth. As I told
Bird this, he started to lecture
me.


I
Ic
l
C


"Listen," he said. "The first
time I heard a Bartok concerto,
I didn't dig it at all. Couldn't
stand it. It said nothing to me.
But a couple of months later, I
heard the same Bartok con-
certo, and it got way inside me.
That's what got me started on
writing a jazz concerto.
"So don't be misled by first
impressions," Bird warned.
"Whatever it is, open up to it
again. Otherwise,
you could be miss-
ing a lot."
I took Bird seri-
ously, not only when
it came to music, but
across the board.
Like, I'd be inter-
viewing somebody on
a very serious issue,
entoff and he wouldn't open
iER up to me. He was
new to me, so I fig-
DES ured he was hiding
something. But then
I remembered what Bird said,
so I did some more research on
the issue, went back to my
source with more knowledge-
able questions and learned
enough from him to file a story
And now that I'm 88 1/2, I've
learned something else that is
very important As my jazz articles
and books make clear, I knew
Duke Ellington for years, and
became concerned as he was
getting older and he and his or-
chestra were playing a lot of
one-nighters, covering long dis-
tances each year
On one of his few days off in
New York, he looked very beat,
and I presumptuously said to
him, "Duke, you don't have to
keep going through this. You've
written a lot of classics. You can
retire on your ASCAP income."
Duke looked hard at me, then
looked again. His tone suggested
I had lost all my marbles as he
shouted at me, "Retire? To what?"
During my octogenarian years
since then, I've become familiar
with different prescriptions for
pain relievers and other med-
ications provided by doctors I
go to. But I research and write
continuously and, very fortu-
nately, I greatly enjoy my work,
tough as it often is. I can attest
to the conclusion by some med-
ical specialists that one of the
best therapies for the problems
of aging is the satisfaction of


from jazz
working at a vocation that keeps
absorbing and invigorating you.
The late, controversial reporter
Christopher Hitchens, whom I
knew and respected, was writing
his challenging columns amid
considerable pain until the week
he died. As he liked to say, "I
live to work, and I work to live."
Me too. Were I to falter, I'm sure
I'd hear Duke Ellington saying
resoundingly, "Retire to what?"
One of the closest friends I've
had, in or out of jazz, was
Charles Mingus, the nonpareil
bassist and the most original
multidimensional jazz com-
poser since Duke Ellington.
He didn't call his music "jazz."
Too limiting Itwas "Mingus music."
"People are getting so frag-
mented," Mingus once told me,
"and part of that is that fewer
and fewer people are making a
real effort anymore to find out
who they are. Most people are
forced to do things they don't
want to most of the time, and so
they get to the point where they
no longer have any choice
about anything important, in-
cluding who they are.
"But I'm going to keep getting
through and finding out the kind
of man I am through my music."
And though he and Duke and
Bird and Ben Webster are no
longer here, Mingus keeps help-
ing me answer Duke Ellington's
song performed far less often
than his other classics "What
am I Here for?"
I'm here to keep finding out
who I am and to act on that.
Presently, that includes trying
to take the Constitution back and
encouraging a still insufficient
number of students who are
also doing this in their classes. I
will also continue to encourage
these kids to be involved in how
their schools, neighborhoods, states
and nation are being governed.
Their individual liberties
don't need the jazz pulse to
keep swinging, but I do in order
to get their attention.

Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
ofRights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow


wr14


SLETTER J>t o the Editor

Mandela's example OPINIONS INVITED cover the joy and respect of the
ceremony Several pictures are
During my 93 years of exis- 0 The opinions expressed in shown of Mandela, with a big
tence I have never observed a Chronicle editorials are the smile and friendly greeting to
more joyful world, resulting opinions of the newspapers world leaders and hundreds of
from the respect now being editorial board. people. Mandela was very humble
shown to Nelson Mandela 0 Viewpoints depicted in political people. Mandelawas veryhumble
upon his death. Thousands of cartoons, columns or letters do and promoted forgiveness. He
not necessarily represent the greeted people with a friendly
people are singing, dancing opinion of the editorial board, handshake, positive attitude
and parading. At least 100 0 Groups or individuals are and a pleasant smile. He helped
leaders of various countries invited to express their opinions people of all colors, religions,
are happily greeting leaders of in a letter to the editor, governments and background.
other countries and showing 0 Persons wishing to address the If this happiness, friendship
their respect for Mandela. Our editorial board, which meets and respect would only con-
President Barack Obama, with weekly, should call Charlie
pleasant smile and greeting, Brennan at 352-563-5660. tinue to exist, it would provide
a pleasant smile and greeting, pennaace,6560 compromise and coop-
shook the hand of President Raul All letters must be signed and peace, compromise and coop-
Castro, which I had never seen include a phone number and ration between countries and
hometown, including letters within governments. The Con-
before. He also gave a talk that sent via email. Names and gressional members, with a
waswellreceivedbyall,including hometowns will be printed; similar attitude, would solve
the foreign leaders. He stated phone numbers will not be
that we will probably never see published or given out. many of our difficult and dis-
that we will probably never see agreeablepnroblemsfor the
another leader such as Mandela 0 We reserve the right to edit agreeable problems for the
S emrletters for length, libel, fairness benefit of the American people,
He embraced Mandela for his and good taste, such as the economic situation,
effort to seek peace and jus- 0 Letters must be no longer than health differences and unem-
tice. Everybody was showing 600oo words, and writers will be ployment, and with less time
their respect for Mandela, one limited to four letters per and unpleasant discussions.
of the most outstanding lead- month. I thank Mandela for setting
ers of the 20th century SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, an example for the world and
Never before has there been 1624 N. Meadorwcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax all of us to follow
so much happiness shown to 352 563-3280, or email to
throughout the world. Even TV letters@chronicleonline.com. Roy Bradley
news and newspaper articles Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Set up by a little guy who was still wearing diapers


s the Christmas sea-
son is winding down,
I realize I have writ-
ten much more about it this
year than usual. But I gen-
erally write whatever is on
my mind, so forgive me for
one more Christmastime
story
Please go back with me
to Christmas 1978. We -
Cheryl, Beth, Becky, Fred 3
and I we were living in
Tallahassee, and it was nec-
essary for us to go through
all sorts of high jinks to sat-
isfy our desire and the de-
sires of our extended families
to share Christmas.
Doing the best we could,
we pretty much settled on
coming here to central
Florida to see the grand-
parents the weekend be-


fore Christmas. Then we
would spend Christmas
Day in Tallahassee at our
apartment with our kids,
who at that time ranged in
age from just under 2 to 11
years.
Our trip to visit relatives
usually netted us at least
one turkey dinner and
sometimes two. By Christ-
mas Day that year, with
Thanksgiving and the pre-
Christmas celebrations,
Cheryl and I had seen so
much turkey we wanted to
see no more.
She bought a beautiful
standing rib roast and pre-
pared it with potatoes, car-
rots and onions for our
Christmas Day noon meal.
It was luscious and there was
plenty left over for supper


SCHEMBRI
Continued from Page Cl

handgun permit to enter with their weapons. I went a
step further and looked for any mass shootings at gun
shows; I found none.
Weapons: Of the 143 guns possessed by the killers,
more than three-quarters were obtained legally The
arsenal included dozens of assault weapons and semi-
automatic handguns with high-capacity magazines.
The killers: More than half of the cases involved
school or workplace shootings (12 and 20, respectively);
the other 30 cases took place in locations including
shopping malls, restaurants and religious and govern-
ment buildings. Forty-four of the killers were white
males. Only one of them was a woman. The average age
of the killers was 35, though the youngest was a mere
11 years old. A majority were mentally troubled- and
many displayed signs of it before setting out to kill.
A common factor in most mass murders, said crim-
inologist Jack Levin of Northeastern University in
Boston, is revenge.
'At the most basic level," Levin said, "the revenge is
directed against family members," who are the main
victims in about 30 percent of all mass killings.
"The next most likely target is the workplace, where
an ex-worker who was fired or laid off comes back
shooting, killing the boss and co-workers."
And finally he said, there are mass killers who blame
society in general for their problems and may walk into
a mall and open fire, or target certain groups for destruc-
tion, including, occasionally, the police, because "the
police are representatives of society" Besides an embit-
tered sense of revenge, the experts said, another common
thread in these killings is access to high-powered weapons,
which is a particularly an American phenomenon.
"You need to understand how our society permits
easy access to lots of guns if you're going to understand
why these kinds of killings happen so much in the United
States as opposed to somewhere else," said David
Hemenway, a health policy professor at Harvard Uni-
versity Besides the revenge motive, mass murderers usually
share certain other psychological or behavioral char-
acteristics, the experts said. Grant Duwe, a criminologist
with the Minnesota Department of Corrections who has
written a history of mass murders in America, cited five:
The killer blames others for his problems.
He is much more likely to have a mental illness,
particularly paranoid schizophrenia, than homicide
perpetrators in general.
He is often a loner, with few friends or social
connections.
He carefully plans his attacks, taking days to
months to get ready
He is much more likely to be suicidal than a
typical killer
"Because the mass murderer considers his life no
longer worth living, he will either kill himself or force
the police to kill him," Duwe said. Duwe examined 909
cases of mass murder in America from 1900 through
1999 and found that out of 116 mass public shootings,
47 percent ended with the killer committing suicide.
That occasionally happens, said Eric Hickey, director of
forensic studies atAlliant International University in San
Diego, who has studied mass murders for several years.
"Most of these guys don't plan an exit strategy," he
said, "and if they get caught, it's not by design it's
more that they've vented and they're just out of ammo,
and so they sit down and say 'Come and get me."' Or, as
Hickey put it: "I'm not against guns, but I just think there
are lot of people who shouldn't have guns, yet they do."
No discussion about violence can occur with looking
at gun control. Let's start with the so-called "assault
weapons," more properly known as semiautomatic ri-
fles. In 2011, total firearm murders came to 8,583, ac-
cording to the FBI. During that time, the total murders
committed by rifles ALL rifles, not just semiauto-
matic rifles were 323. That's 3 percent of all murders.
Hammers and clubs kill half again as many people as
rifles. Hands and feet murder twice as many; and
knives kill five times more Americans than all rifles
combined. Medical malpractice kills more than 12
times as many people as are murdered in the U.S. each
year That's more than 300 times the number killed by
all rifles. Yet no one talks about limits on hands and feet
or hammers and knives, or doctors and hospitals. No one
does that because the good we perceive from hammers
and knives and doctors far outweigh their perceived
harm. In preparation for this article, it struck me that
what TV now does far better than ever before is push
the vulnerable closer to or beyond their brink.
Violence on television is now part of the debate.
Blame Hollywood and they blame parents. Those who
blame Hollywood don't use evidence, they use opin-
ion. Here is evidence: The National Institute of Men-
tal Health and multiple professional organizations -
including the American Medical Association, the
American Psychiatric Association and the American
Psychological Association all consider media vio-
lence exposure a risk factor for actual violence. Of
special concern has been the portrayal of violence, es-
pecially given psychologist Albert Bandura's work on
social learning and the tendency of children to imi-
tate what they see. As a result of 15 years of consis-
tently disturbing findings about the violent content of
children's programs, the Surgeon General's Scientific
Advisory Committee on Television and Social Behav-
ior was formed to assess the impact of violence on the
attitudes, values and behavior of viewers. The result-
ing Surgeon General's report and a follow-up report
by the National Institute of Mental Health identify
these major effects of seeing violence on television:
Children may become less sensitive to the pain
and suffering of others.
Children maybe more fearful ofthe world around them
Children may be more likely to behave in aggres-
sive or harmful ways toward others.
Research by psychologists L. Rowell Huesmann,


Cheryl and I thought we coming from our firstborn
were all set. Our children because Christmas Day
were happily playing with was ending without us
their loot from Santa Claus having turkey Being the
while she and I stern father
snuggled in for and strong man
a well-deserved r of the house
afternoon nap. that I was, I
The day was promptly buck-
coming to a led, and while
close when my Cheryl was
sweetheart and putting the left-
I went out to overs back into
the kitchen to- the refrigera-
gether to begin Fred Brannen tor, I called
to set out a A IC around town
meal of left- A SLICE trying to find a
over roast beef OF LIFE place that was
and scrump- open on Christ-
tious vegetables for our mas Day and still serving
brood as a pleasant at turkey
home evening meal. I found one, a Holiday
Waterworks. Tears. Inn that was no more than
Howls of displeasure! All a mile from our town-


Leonard Eron and others found that children who
watched many hours of violence on television when
they were in elementary school were more likely to be
arrested and prosecuted for criminal acts as adults.
Interestingly, being aggressive as a child did not pre-
dict watching more violent TV as a teenager, suggest-
ing that TV watching may more often be a cause
rather than a consequence of aggressive behavior
Violent video games are a more recent phenome-
non; therefore, there is less research on their effects.
However, research by psychologist Craig A. Anderson
and others shows that playing violent video games can
increase a person's aggressive thoughts, feelings and
behavior both in laboratory settings and in actual life.
In fact, a study by Anderson in 2000 suggests that vio-
lent video games may be more harmful than violent
television and movies because they are interactive,
very engrossing and require the player to identify
with the aggressor Anderson and other researches
are also looking into how violent music lyrics affect
children and adults. In a 2003 study involving college
students, Anderson found that songs with violent
lyrics increased aggression-related thoughts and emo-
tions, and this effect was directly related to the vio-
lent content of the lyrics. Listen to the rap lyrics in
Crime Mob: "Pop with a Glock and I stay wit a K (AK-
47), If you come my way, I'ma act a fool." Yes, Frank
Sinatra is gone. A typical child in the U.S. watches 28
hours of TV weekly, seeing as many as 8,000 murders
by the time he or she finishes elementary school at
age 11, and worse, the killers are depicted as getting
away with murder 75 percent of the time while show-
ing no remorse or accountability. Such TV violence so-
cialization may make children immune to brutality
and aggression, while others become fearful of living
in such a dangerous society With the research clearly
showing that watching violent TV programs can lead
to aggressive behavior, the American Psychological
Association passed a resolution in 1985 informing
broadcasters and the public of the potential dangers
that viewing violence on television can have for chil-
dren. In 1992, the APA's Task Force on Television and
Society published a report that further confirmed the
link between TV violence and aggression. How has
Hollywood responded to this? How have the people
we can't get enough of, the people we idolize, re-
sponded to this?
Remember when Janet Jackson's breast made a
"surprise guest appearance" at the Super Bowl? Hol-
lywood came to Washington and promised to do some-
thing about it. What did they do? Why hasn't the
Congress acted on this? I can answer this in one sen-
tence: Hollywood contributed $48.7 million in the
2008 campaign (Center for Responsive Politics).
A study set for publication in the December issue
of Pediatrics confirms what some of Hollywood's
sharpest critics have suspected: The level of gun vio-
lence in the top-selling PG-13 movies has been rising,
and it now exceeds that in the most popular R-rated
films. Violent encounters with guns occur, on average,
more than twice an hour in the best-sellers in both ratings
categories, according to researchers, who worked with
support from the Annenberg Public Policy Center at
the University of Pennsylvania and the Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation. In all, the researchers exam-
ined 945 movies, counting the appearances of gun vi-
olence in each five-minute segment of a sampling of
films that ranked among the top 30 at the domestic box
office from 1950 to 2012. This needs to be regulated.
For your further information, the people who regu-
late what we see on television took 2,500 free vacation
trips from the people they regulate. A spokeswoman
for the Motion Picture Association of America, which
oversees the domestic film ratings system in partner-
ship with theater owners, declined to discuss the
study Television now does far better than ever before
in pushing the vulnerable closer to or beyond their
brink. This raises the question: How will we prevent
this? Enforcement? Prevention? Trying to curb vio-
lence on television and Hollywood raises the specter
of censorship. Here is another bout of my logic: The
rules we have enacted prevent us from solving a prob-
lem. I am reminded of what former Sen. Patrick
Moynihan said about "defining deviancy down."
Police tactics will change and speed will become the
tactic as officers now must now step over bodies, delay
rendering first aid, increase the perimeter of the
event and neutralize the suspect In policing, we are
expected to prevent crimes like this. The formula for
crime is rather simple: Opportunity plus desire equals
a crime. Eliminate one and crime does not happen.
So evidence demonstrates what I believe is a new for-
mula for mass shootings:
Mental health + guns + violence on television =
mass shootings.
We are fueling the desire. So what's my point?
Phase 2 will be upon us with mass shootings occur-
ring more frequently perhaps weekly unless we
hold those who evidence demonstrates is responsible,
those who influence, accountable. Break up the formula.
We have measured the outcomes. The evidence is
clear We are doing the wrong things with greater con-
viction. We are minting a new career criminal. Vio-
lence is part of a learning pattern, and it's habit-forming.
The public demands to know what's wrong and who's
to blame. What's wrong lies in a success-proof culture.
The blame is backwards. I can't wait until we blame
cars for DUIs, pens for embezzlement and keyboards
for misspelling. So, American policing deals with the
symptoms of mass shootings as the disease goes on.
That's why there is no Nobel Prize in policing and
criminal justice. We don't solve the problem; we re-
spond to it. I wish stupidity caused pain.


Dr. Anthony J. Schembri is Sir Leon
Radzinowicz Professor of criminal law,
criminology and police science at the University
of Florida and former police commissioner and
corrections commissioner of New York City.


house. We took the young
ringleader and her two co-
conspirators there and en-
joyed a delightful
traditional turkey dinner
The end? Not quite.
While we were leaving the
restaurant, 20-month-old
Fred 3, who was just be-
ginning to talk and was
still wearing diapers un-
derneath his cute little
blue jeans, looked up at
the hotel sign and said,
"Cwismus twee!" I gently
corrected him and said,
"No son, it has a star on
top and looks a little like a
Christmas tree, but it is the
Holiday Inn sign."
For the next several
days, every time we passed
the inn, Fred 3 would say,
"Cwismus twee!" I consis-



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

There is less Lyngbya in
King's Bay today than ever
before.
It has now become very
popular to be on board
with the effort, and the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District, the
county, the city of Crystal
River and the state of
Florida have all gotten
more involved.
The grade would have
been an "A" except for the
public fight with the Save
the Manatee Club over the
use of mechanical har-
vesters to haul out the
weeds at a faster pace.
The Save Crystal River
group had a huge
fundraiser to support the
project and the Kings Bay
Rotary Club continues its
involvement. New sewer
systems and stormwater
projects are planned to
deal with some of the
sources of pollution.
Art Jones has proven that
good work is contagious.
Goal3: Govemmentneeds
to spend less. Grade: C
County government re-
duced spending, but in-
creased property taxes
because of the property
appraiser's bungled dis-
pute with Duke (See goal 1).
We were not happy that
the creation of the new
Municipal Services Bene-
fit Unit for fire services re-
sulted in higher spending.
We liked the new method
of spreading out costs via
the MSBU, but we did not
believe this was the year to
increase total spending on
fire services.
Goal 4: Expand the local
economy. Grade: C+
The closing of the nu-
clear plant and the shut-
down of major retailers at
the Crystal River Mall
were a collective kick in
the pants.
The announcement that
Duke would make the ef-
fort to build a new gas
plant here helped. But the
bigger picture is that the
Economic Development
Council has created a real-
istic view of the county's
economic shortcomings
and created a strategic plan
to correct those issues.
A strong economic team
of County Commissioner
Joe Meek, EDC Director
Don Taylor and Chamber
CEO Josh Wooten stands
poised to lead the county
forward. Duke contributed
more than $400,000 to the
EDC to fund the effort. The
real challenge in 2014 will
be to act on the recommen-
dations in the strategic plan.
Goal 5: County and cities
should work together.
Grade: with Crystal River,
A; with Inverness, D.
This goal is the tale of
two cities. The county and
Crystal River have done a
good job of working together
to solve issues in the west-
side municipality But the
county's relationship with
Inverness has gone in the
opposite direction.
In Crystal River the
county has helped expand
sewer systems, agreed to
purchase property for a
bike trailhead and offered


technical assistance on
countless projects.
In Inverness the leaders
of the county seat, angered
over an annual funding ar-
gument with Whispering
Pines Park, have pulled
the city's garbage contract
away from the county
landfill and have refused
to get on board with the
new MSBU for fire serv-
ices. More rough times are


tently corrected him. Then
finally one day, I gave up
and began the conversa-
tion when the inn came
into view with, "Look,
Fred, it's a Christmas
tree." To which my boy, gig-
gling out loud, replied,
"Dat's not a Cwismus twee,
Daddy, it's the Hodiday
Inn sign!"
I had been set up, zinged
and zapped by a little guy
less than 2 years old who
was still wearing diapers!
Touche son, touche.
And, uh, I promise, no
more Christmas stories
until next year


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


expected between Inver-
ness and the county in 2014.
Goal 6: Education and
jobs. Grade: B-
Some progress has been
made at the College of Cen-
tral Florida and Withla-
coochee Technical Institute
in Inverness in working
with the EDC to train resi-
dents for jobs. but much
more work needs to be done.
The new economic
strategic plan should help
officials look to the future
to see what is coming.
Nursing and health care
opportunities are abun-
dant. If finalized, the new
gas plant will employ up to
1,000 workers during con-
struction. Some existing
technical businesses can't
find qualified workers.
More communication
and more training will re-
sult in more jobs.
Goal 7: Sort out the hos-
pital issue. Grade: F
Another year of failure.
Another year of spending
millions of dollars in legal
fees to settle a governance
dispute that has crippled
our public hospital. When
will the agony end?
A tentative deal has been
identified, but all parties
seem to be doing what they
can to screw it up.
Goal 8: Make the YMCA
happen. Grade: B
Progress continues on
the fundraising effort to
build the county's first
YMCA. The $8 million goal
is the largest ever at-
tempted in the county and
the group is more than
halfway there. But much
work needs to be done.
Let's hope 2014 is the year
the goal is achieved and
construction can begin.
Goal 9: State and county
work together. Grade: C-
Our leaders in Tallahas-
see and Inverness don't get
along, and the lack of a
working relationship has
hurt Citrus County
State Rep. Jimmie T
Smith, R-Inverness, has
made a good effort in 2013
to work with all parties,
and state Sen. Charles
Dean, R-Inverness, has
been very helpful with the
city of Crystal River and its
efforts to clean up the
water
But the political feuds
between the county, sheriff
and senator continue and
that lack of cooperation
makes it difficult for a
small county like Citrus to
get much done.
Goal 10: The depend-
ence on drugs: Grade: C+
This is a battle that will
never be won. The drug of
choice changes over the
years, but the willingness
to abuse never seems to
stop.
The sheriff's office has
done a good job of fighting
the current scourge -
crystal meth by making
lots of well publicized
busts. But the issue of sup-
ply and demand just plays
out and more drug dealers
thrive.
The biggest impact on
the general population is
the related crimes that
drug-dependent citizens
often commit. The home
burglaries, car thefts and
other property-related of-
fenses are almost all con-
nected to drugs.


The occasional violent
offense reminds us how
deranged drug-dependent
people can become. That
makes the fight against
drugs a continued public
priority


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013



Priorities in the
wrong order
I'm calling about "JJ" Ken-
ney's thoughts on the future.
I'm an animal lover myself. I
definitely think Kenney needs to
reprioritize ... and it should be,
2, 3 and 4 should be 1, 2 and
3. The public awareness,
budget and road surfacing
should be 1, 2 and 3. Springs
initiative, along with the animal
shelter, they have to take care
of the people in the county be-
fore they start taking care of
the animals. So I think he
should reprioritize and get the
budget as 1, road resurfacing
as 2, public awareness as 3,
springs as 4; 5, the new facility
for the animals; and 6, major
projects. I hope that makes
sense to you.

Vets need attention
Commissioner Kenney has
done an awful lot for the animal
shelter and plans to build a new
one. I think that is commend-
able. However, I wish that he
would divide his time and ef-
forts between an animal shelter
and a shelter for homeless vet-
erans. I think the veterans are
worthy of his attention as well.

People first,
commissioner
Oh, the straw that just broke
the camel's back. Reading here
that this "JJ" (Kenney) wants a
new animal shelter. That's the
No. 1 item on his gift list. Well,
we need that like we need a
hole in the head. Let's take care
of some of these people we've
got real humans. Get a shel-
ter for them, a shelter for our
kids. Food for our kids and the
homeless. Forget about ani-
mals. We don't need them at
all.


Don't waste more money Use surplus trailers


This is in response to "JJ"
Kenney's, Commissioner Ken-
ney's column on his thoughts
for the future in the Dec. 22,
Sunday, paper. If your best
thought for Citrus County No. 1
is to provide a new animal shel-
ter, then you, sir, should remove
yourself from the chair and
step down from the commis-
sion. A new animal shelter
should be the last thing on that
list if on the list. Citrus
County has many, many more
pressing areas than a new ani-
mal shelter. You all have wasted
plenty of money in the past on
useless projects such as Ot-
tawa, Port Citrus, and so on
and so forth. The animal shel-
ter shouldn't be another one of
those.


I have a suggestion for the
county commissioners. When
our schools get overfull, in
many cases instead of building
additions, they use trailers -
secondhand trailers, in fact. It
seems to me, if it's appropriate
for our young ones to go to
school in them and it's a good
learning environment, Mr.
Kenny should be looking into
getting surplus trailers to ex-
pand his dog pound.
You must be kidding
Missing the boat again. This
is in response to "JJ" Kenney's
priorities and goals for 2014,
as listed in the paper on Dec.
22. I love animals, but I truly
believe the people of Citrus
County residents deserve bet-


ter. We have so many other is-
sues that need to be resolved,
such as selling the hospital, im-
proving the infrastructure and
developing businesses here. I
just can't believe that Mr. Ken-
ney wants to focus on animal
shelters as priority No. 1.
Take care of
homeless vets
Unbelievable "JJ" (Kenney);
sell the jail, build an animal
shelter. We know the animal
shelter's on your mind. Then
we've got to figure out how
much money it's going to cost
us to run it, how many veteri-
narians, how many to-go peo-
ple. How about the homeless?
How about the homeless vets?
You don't never say nothing about
vets, just the animal shelter.


COMMENTARY


S Tree of

Remembrance


Tree Locations: Crystal River, Beverly Hills,
Inverness, Homosassa, Lecanto, High Springs,
Chiefland, Lake City, Interlachen, Palatka


Hot Corner: ANIMAL SHELTER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Give Chazz a break
To "JJ" Kenny: Forget about
your dog kennel that you're try-
ing to create here. Right now do
something for the people in
your District 2. You have
strapped Chazz residents with
the highest water and sewer
rates in the county while you
enjoy the lowest in Sugarmill
Woods. Our Chazz boat ramp is
the only ramp in the county
where residents must pay to
park. You are responsible for
that also, Mr. Kenney. What
about Chazz? We need your
help over here.
Gone to the dogs
Well, folks, her we go again
in Citrus County. Our new
commission chair wants to
build an animal shelter. Can
you believe that? I thought he
was a very good VA service of-
ficer and he makes his pres-
ence known at a lot of the VA
organizations. However, now
we're putting in front of these
veterans a new animal shelter,
No. 1 on his list. We have a lot
of other things. We have un-
employment, we have veter-
ans and others living in the
woods, many, many potholes,
school problems, and, most
of all, getting people to trust
our local government. I used
to think he was a good guy,
but right now I guess I should
be hoping I was a dog or a
cat.
Not the top concern
Are you kidding me? The new
commissioner chair, "JJ" Ken-
ney, his No. 1 item on his
agenda is a new animal shel-
ter? While that may be a worth-
while cause, I do not believe
that that is the No. 1 concern
for the citizens of Citrus
County. Ridiculous.









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


- -.
r U


stock market




resolutions


Ken Sweet
Associated Press


NEW YORK
2013 was a great year for the
average investor, but few
market strategists believe that
2014 will be anywhere near as
good. The simple strategy of
buying U.S. stocks, selling
bonds and staying out of
international markets isn't
going to work as well as it has,
they say.
Some of Wall Street's biggest
money managers have come up
with a few resolutions to help
your retirement portfolio have a
good year:
Curb your expectations
Few investors expected 2013 to be as
big as it was. The Standard & Poor's
500 index is up 29 percent for the year,
its best year since 1997. Including divi-
dends, it's up 32 percent
On average, market strategists expect
2014 to be somewhat tame. Most are
looking for the S&P 500 to rise to 1,850
to 1,900 points, a gain of just 1 to 3 per-
cent.
Keep your eye on valuation
Investors bid up stock prices to


Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: A floor official and trader for Barclays works at his post on the floor of the
New York Stock Exchange in New York. ABOVE: visitors on the floor of the New
York Stock Exchange use their smartphones and tablet devices to photograph the
opening-bell ceremonies. 2013 was a great year for the average investor, but few
market strategists believe that 2014 will be anywhere near as good.


all-time highs this year, despite a
mediocre economy and corporate prof-
its that were less than spectacular
At the beginning of the year, the
price-to-earnings ratio on the S&P 500
was 13.5, meaning investors were pay-
ing roughly $13.50 for every $1 of earn-
ings in the S&P 500. Now the S&P 500's
P-E ratio is around 16.7.
While a P/E ratio of 16.7 won't set off
any alarm bells the historical aver-
age is 14.5 it is noticeably higher
than it was a year ago.
Investors have high expectations for
corporate profits next year, based on


the prices they are paying.
"It's hard to believe that this market
can go much higher from here without
some corporate earnings growth," said
Bob Doll, chief equity strategist at Nu-
veen Asset Management
Profit margins are already at record
highs, and corporations spent most of
2013 increasing their earnings by cut-
ting costs or using financial engineer-
ing tools like buying back their own
stock.
Earnings at companies in the S&P
500 grew at an 11 percent rate in 2013.
See Page D2


Websites working to nix nasty comments


Associated Press
NEW YORK Mix blatant bigotry
with poor spelling. Add a dash of ALL
CAPS. Top it off with a violent threat.
And there you have it: A recipe for the
worst of online comments, scourge of
the Internet
Blame anonymity, blame politicians,
blame human nature. But a growing
number of websites are reining in the
Wild West of online commentary Com-
panies including Google and the Huff-
ington Post are trying everything from
deploying moderators to forcing peo-
ple to use their real names in order to
restore civil discourse. Some sites,
such as Popular Science, are banning
comments altogether
The efforts put sites in a delicate po-
sition. User comments add a lively,
fresh feel to videos, stories and music.
And, of course, the longer visitors stay


to read the posts, and the more they
come back, the more a site can charge
for advertising.
What websites don't want is the kind
of off-putting nastiness that spewed
forth under a recent CNN.com article
about the Affordable Care Act
"If it were up to me, you progressive
libs destroying this country would be
hanging from the gallows for treason.
People are awakening though. If I
were you, I'd be very afraid," wrote
someone using the name "JBlaze."
YouTube, which is owned by Google,
has long been home to some of the In-
ternet's most juvenile and grammati-
cally incorrect comments. The site
caused a stir last month when it began
requiring people to log into Google
Plus to write a comment. Besides
herding users to Google's unified net-
work, the company says the move is
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON National As-
sociation of Realtors releases
pending home sales index for
November, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Standard &
Poor's releases S&P/Case-Shiller
index of home prices for October, 9
a.m.; The Conference Board re-
leases the Consumer Confidence
Index for December, 10 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Institute for Sup-
ply Management releases its manu-
facturing index for December, 10
a.m.; Commerce Department re-
leases construction spending for
November, 10 a.m.


B(Ti^^^^f 4 Itst


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
MONEY


Doing the


math to


determine


options is


best path

EAR BRUCE: I'm 63 years
old and planning on work-
ing until age 66. I have an
eight-month emergency fund. I
also have half my money in a
401(k), IRA and Roth IRA, and half
in CDs.
I would like to put my extra
money toward paying off my mort-
gage. It's the only debt I have. I am
still hearing from family members
that I shouldn't do that I plan on
staying in the house. I have about
$127,000 left on the mortgage at
4.25 percent.
Dee, via email
DEAR DEE: The question of
whether you should pay off the
mortgage or continue to invest de-
pends on your investment choices.
Simply, if you are earning in excess
of 4.25 percent and the additional
amount it costs to pay the taxes,
then you should continue the way
you are going.
On the other hand, if you are
earning substantially less than 4.25
percent, you would be better off
paying off the mortgage. That is ef-
fectively earning you 4.25 percent.
It doesn't take much thought on
this one; the way to settle it is to do
the arithmetic.
See Page D2


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Crude oil near $100
on hopes of economy

NEW YORK Oil prices inched
closer to $100 a barrel Friday, sup-
ported by a fall in applications for
unemployment benefits and expec-
tations of a decline in U.S. crude
stockpiles.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. oil for February
delivery was up 12 cents to $99.67
in electronic trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange. On
Thursday, the Nymex contract
added 33 cents to close at $99.55 a
barrel.
Data for the week ending Dec. 20
is expected to show a draw of 2.3
million barrels in crude oil stocks
and a build of 1.2 million barrels in
gasoline stocks.
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational oils, was down 2 cent at
$111.96 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange in London.


Global markets rise
as rally continues
AMSTERDAM- Global markets
surged Friday as a year-end rally
continued on good news for stocks
out of Japan and China, and the af-
terglow of a report that showed
U.S. unemployment benefit claims
are falling.
European investors appeared to
be switching preferences from
bonds to stocks, as 10-year bond
prices dipped but stock markets
made solid gains. The DAX closed
1.1 percent higher at 9,589.39.
Britain's FTSE 100 rose 0.8 per-
cent to 6,750.87. And France's CAC
jumped 1.4 percent to 4,277.65.
Tokyo's Nikkei index erased
early losses to close slightly higher
at 16,178.14, after the country's sta-
tistics bureau said prices rose 1.2
percent on an annual basis in No-
vember, the fastest rate since 2008.
-From wire reports




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hole-in-one


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Love Honda in Homosassa made one man's Christmas a little sweeter last week.
Shelton Peddle of Ocala won a tiger-eye-pearl 2013 Accord LXS two-door car after he
shot a hole-in-one 154 yards from tee No. 8 at Candler Hills Golf Club in Ocala during
the 10th annual Kinsey Lynn Bogart benefit in October. Pictured with Peddle is
customer relations Jim DeSanti, left, and vice-president Chad Halleen, right.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

DEAR BRUCE: I am an 80-year-old sin-
gle mom who had no financial help in
raising my two sons. I do not have much
in the way of available monthly retire-
ment funds, just $1,100 from Social Secu-
rity and $800 from a pension fund where I
had been employed for 20 years.
I have been able to hold on to my
house, and have finally paid off the mort-
gage and home equity loan and own it
free and clear It is appraised at about
$600,000. I'm not interested in a reverse
mortgage, which I've investigated.
My sons are not involved in my life
anymore, and even though my health is
relatively stable right now, I know that
could change at any time. I plan on stay-
ing in my home for as long as possible,
perhaps even employing a caregiver to
help me, if it is necessary But if worse
comes to worse, I may have to sell my
home to afford assisted living since I
have no savings other than my home eq-
uity My monthly income would not be
enough for assisted living.
Where could I invest the money from
the sale of my house in order for me to
do this? My children are in my trust,
which I will be changing, and I don't
trust either of them, so I will have to do
this on my own. If there is no family or
friend to administer the trust do I hire
an attorney to do it?
Lisa, via email
DEAR LISA: I am wondering why you
investigated a reverse mortgage and de-
cided you are not interested. It seems to
me that at your age it has a good deal of
merit. Because of your advanced years,
you will get a decent return, and in the
event that you wish to sell the house,
you would just pay off the reverse mort-
gage.
That having been observed, if you
choose to sell the house, I would suggest
that you consider investing the $600,000




STOCKS
Continued from Page Dl

The consensus among market strate-
gists is that profit growth will slow to
around 8 percent in 2014.
However, if the U.S. economy contin-
ues to improve, and corporate profit
margins expand, it could justify the
prices investors have been paying for
stocks.

Don't get caught up in the euphoria

Be wary if your neighbor decides to
jump head-first into the market next
year
A large number of investors have re-
mained on the sidelines for this five-
year bull market. Since the market
bottomed in March 2009, investors
pulled $430 billion out of stock funds,
according to data from Lipper, while
putting nearly $1 trillion into bond
funds.
Professional market watchers are
concerned that many individual in-
vestors, trying to play a game of catch-
up, might rush into the market with a
vengeance next year The surge of
money could cause stocks to jump if in-
vestors ignore warnings that the market
is getting overvalued.
Wall Street calls this phenomenon a
"melt-up." As you can guess, a "melt-up"
could lead to a "melt-down," as hap-
pened in the late 1990s with the dot-comn
bubble.
"I fear people, who sat out 2013, will
jump in too fast next year and get
burned," said Richard Madigan, chief
investment officer for JPMorgan Private
Bank.
Which leads us to:

Don't panic, either

Stocks cannot go higher all the time.
Bearish investors have been saying for
months that stocks are due for a pull-
back in the near future.
The S&P 500 is up 66 percent since
the stock market's last major downturn
in October 2011. It has been resilient


in a broad spectrum of substantial
American companies. Let's assume that
will give you a relatively modest return
of 6 percent; that would be $36,000 a
year income without touching principal.
At your age, tapping into principal is not
a sin to be avoided.
Since you don't trust your children
and you will need someone to look after
your affairs, you might wish to visit the
trust department of a bank or an attor-
ney specializing in those matters.
DEAR BRUCE: If bank accounts and
money market fund portfolios are in the
husband's name only, is the wife able to
take half of that money should there be
a divorce? And if the husband were to
inherit money and he keeps it is his
name only, is the wife able to touch that
money?
Theresa, via email
DEAR THERESA: Unfortunately,
there is no specific answer to any of
your questions. You have to consult a
lawyer or a tax accountant in the state
where these things are going on.
There are two essential types of dis-
tribution if a divorce takes place. One is
called "equitable distribution," which
simply means it is determined by the
court how the money should be distrib-
uted 60/40, 70/30 or evenly Under
"equal distribution," the money would
be distributed 50/50.
In some states, money kept aside is
very difficult for the other spouse to
claim, yet in other states, it would be
split right down the middle no matter
whose name it is in.
In short, you are going to have to con-
sult a professional in your state who will
need to know the specifics of the gene-
sis of the money, any prenuptial agree-
ments, etc., to make a determination.
Even then, it may be appealed.

Send questions to bruce@bruce
williams.com. Questions of general in-
terest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be provided.



through several scares this year, includ-
ing the conflict in Syria, the budget cri-
sis and near-breach of the nation's
borrowing limit in October
In their 2014 outlook, Goldman Sachs
analysts said that while the market has
been strong, they see a 67 percent
chance that stocks will decline 10 per-
cent or more in 2014, which is known as
a stock market "correction."
Goldman analysts still expect stocks
to end the year modestly higher

Cut your exposure to bonds

Fixed-income investors had a tough
year in 2013. The Barclays Aggregate
bond index, a broad composite of thou-
sands of bonds, fell 2 percent. Investors
in long-term bonds were hit even
harder, losing 14 percent of their money
since the beginning of the year, accord-
ing to comparable bond indexes.
2014 is not looking good for bond in-
vestors, either
The Federal Reserve has started to
pull back on its bond-buying economic
stimulus program. That means one of
the biggest buyers of bonds for the last
year will slowly exit the market in 2014.
The Fed's exit could send bond prices
falling.
"Bonds are hardly a place to be in
2014," Nuveen's Doll said.
That doesn't mean investors should
avoid bonds altogether, strategists say
Instead, investors should reorganize
their portfolio to focus more on bonds
that mature in relatively short periods of
time. The prices of those bonds tend to
fluctuate less than those of bonds that
take longer to mature, and are less likely
to lose value when interest rates rise, as
many expect will happen in 2014.
Madigan said that under normal cir-
cumstances he would advise investors
to hold bonds that mature in an average
of about five years. This measure is re-
ferred to as a bond's "duration."
For 2014, Madigan is advising in-
vestors to restructure their portfolio to
have an average duration of two to two-
and-a-half years.
"Long duration bonds are much more
a riskier asset than a safe asset next
year," Madigan said.


NIX
Continued from Page Dl

designed to raise the level of dis-
course in the conversations that play
out under YouTube videos.
One such video, a Cheerios com-
mercial featuring an interracial fam-
ily, met with such a barrage of racist
responses on YouTube in May that
General Mills shut down comments
on it altogether
"Starting this week, when you're
watching a video on YouTube, you'll
see comments sorted by people you
care about first," wrote YouTube
product manager Nundu Janakiram
and principal engineer Yonatan
Zunger in a blog post announcing the
changes. "If you post videos on your
channel, you also have more tools to
moderate welcome and unwelcome
conversations. This way, YouTube
comments will become conversations
that matter to you."
Anonymity has always been a
major appeal of online life. Two
decades ago, The New Yorker maga-
zine ran a cartoon with a dog sitting
in front of a computer, one paw on the
keyboard. The caption read: "On the
Internet, nobody knows you're a dog."
At its best, anonymity allows people
to speak freely without repercus-
sions. It allows whistle blowers and
protesters to espouse unpopular
opinions.
At its worst, it allows people to
spout off without repercussions. It
gives trolls and bullies license to pick
arguments, threaten and abuse.
But anonymity has been eroding in
recent years.
On the Internet many people may
know not only your name, but also
your latest musings, the songs you've
listened to, your job history, who your
friends are and even the brand of
soap you prefer
"It's not so much that our offline
lives are going online, it's that our of-
fline and online lives are more inte-
grated," says Mark Lashley, a
professor of communications at La
Salle University in Philadelphia.
Facebook, which requires people to
use their real names, played a big
part in the seismic shift
"The way the Web was developed,
it was unique in that the avatar and
the handle were always these things
people used to go by It did develop
into a Wild West situation," he says,
adding that it's no surprise that
Google and other companies are
going this route. "As more people go
online and we put more of our lives
online, we should be held account-
able for things we say"
Nearly three-quarters of teens and
young adults think people are more
likely to use discriminatory language
online or in text messages than in
face to face conversations, according
to a recent poll from The Associated


Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs
Research and MTV The poll didn't
distinguish between anonymous com-
ments and those with real identities
attached.
The Huffington Post is also clamp-
ing down on vicious comments. In ad-
dition to employing 40 human
moderators who sift through readers'
posts for racism, homophobia, hate
speech and the like, the AOL-owned
news site is also chipping away at
anonymous commenting. Previously
anyone could respond to an article
posted on the site by creating an ac-
count, without tying it to an email ad-
dress. This fall, HuffPo began
requiring people to verify their iden-
tity by connecting their accounts to
an email address, but that didn't ap-
pear to be enough and the site now
also asks commenters to log in using
a verified Facebook account.
"We are reaching a place where the
Internet is growing up," says Jimmy
Soni, managing editor of HuffPo.
"These changes represent a maturing
(online) environment."
Soni says the changes have already
made a difference in the quality of
the comments. The lack of total
anonymity, while not a failsafe
method, offers people a "gut check
moment" he says. There have been
"significantly fewer things that we
would not be able to share with our
mothers," in the HuffPo comments
section since the change, Soni says.
Newspapers are also turning to-
ward regulated comments. Of the
largest 137 U.S. newspapers those
with daily circulation above 50,000 -
nearly 49 percent ban anonymous
commenting, according to Arthur
Santana, assistant communications
professor at the University of Hous-
ton. Nearly 42 percent allow
anonymity, while 9 percent do not
have comments at all.
Curbing anonymity doesn't always
help. Plenty of people are fine attach-
ing their names and Facebook pro-
files to poorly spelled outbursts that
live on long after their fury has
passed.
In some cases, sites have gone fur-
ther Popular Science, the 141-year-
old science and technology magazine,
stopped allowing comments of any
kind on its news articles in Septem-
ber
While highlighting responses to ar-
ticles about climate change and abor-
tion, Popular Science online editor
Suzanne LaBarre announced the
change and explained in a blog post
that comments can be "bad for sci-
ence."
Because "comments sections tend
to be a grotesque reflection of the
media culture surrounding them, the
cynical work of undermining bedrock
scientific doctrine is now being done
beneath our own stories," wrote
LaBarre.
We can't wait to see the response to
this story


We need your


information
As our community grows, it becomes even more
important that we know how to keep in touch with
O n each other. The Chronicle's annual publication of
Our Home Citrus is the best and most complete
resource for all those important organizations,
clubs, hobby groups, and other ways we make
friends, share pastimes and help each other out.

If you would like your group to be listed in this publication please fill out the
following form and mail or deliver by January 3, 2014 to:

Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (must be non-profit)____. _____
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:_____________
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)

Street address:


City:


MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE:
Day of the week (every Monday, third Monday of the week)_______,
CONTACT:
Name:


Phone number:


Email address:

Please check the category which best describes your organization -


only one category, pleas


o Animals
[] Arts & Crafts
o Civic
o Computers
o Cultural and Heritage
o Education and Youth


o Food Programs
o Fraternal
] Gardening
o Hobbies
o Political
[ Recreation Groups


[ Seniors
o Service Clubs
o Special Interest
o Support Groups
o Vehicles
[ Weight Control
o Women's Clubs


I


D2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


BUSINESS








D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on Chamber
events, visit CitrusCountyChamber
.com or call 352-795-3149.
Jan. 7 Ribbon-cutting to welcome
Accu-Pro Painting/Sealing/Pressure
Washing, 4:30 p.m. at the Inverness
Chamber Office at 401 W. Tompkins
Street, Inverness.
Jan. 8 Ribbon-cutting to welcome
Patty's Barber Cuts, 4:30 p.m., 2617
W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto.
Jan. 9 Chamber Mixer hosted by
Village Cadillac Toyota, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.,
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Jan. 10- Chamber Luncheon spon-
sored by Sunflower Springs Assisted
Living Facility, networking begins at
11:30 a.m. held at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club, 505 E. Hartford St.,
Hernando. Tickets $18 members and
$22 for nonmembers; available at
CitrusCountyChamber.com or by
calling 352-795-3149. We strongly
encourage members and nonmem-
bers to register no later than Jan. 7.
Jan. 14 Ribbon-cutting to welcome
the Point 0' Woods Club, 4:30 p.m.,
9228 E. Gospel Island Road, Inverness.
Jan. 18 and 19- Florida Manatee
Festival, downtown Crystal River.

Community
events
Jan. 8 Stick A Fork In Cancer 2, 4
p.m. to 10 p.m., Beef '0' Brady's,
6738 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Tell them you're
supporting Relay, and they will do-
nate 15 percent of your bill. All dol-
lars raised go to the American
Cancer Society and fund research,
advocacy, education and patient
services. For more information, call
352-795-6155.
Jan. 11 Westend Indoor Market at
the Crystal River Mall, 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Stop by to see over 40 specialty
vendors. The Dueling Banjos will per-
form from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Jan. 16- Tobacco Free Partnership
of Citrus County meeting, 3:30 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m., Lakes Region Library
1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Call
352-527-0068 ext. 342 for more in-
formation.
Jan. 17 Friday Night Thunder at
Courthouse Square downtown Inver-
ness, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness.
Cars and trucks from all decades as-
semble to listen to music and have
fun. For more information call 352-
341-1165.
Jan. 18 Karaoke with Roger Car-
rier at the Crystal River Mall, 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Karaoke Showdown is a
free indoor event.
Jan. 18- Inverness Farmer's Mar-
ket, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Inverness
Government Center Plaza 212 W.
Main St., Inverness. Regional foods,
arts and crafts. For more information
call 352-270-8559.
Feb. 18 Business Continuity Train-
ing presented by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. This free training is
open to approximately 25 small to
midsize local businesses to discuss
the importance of developing a busi-
ness disaster plan and why your em-
ployees should have a family disaster
plan. This training is supported by
the Citrus County Economic Develop-
ment Council and the Citrus County
Chamber and lunch is sponsored by
Service Master of Citrus County. For
more information and to RSVR con-
tact Bob Wesch 352-249-2708 or
bwesch@sheriffcitrus.org.


il. .tr.J^


.'0Crystal River
,_ Rotary Cub


CTrUS Cox a v


Cash Mob hits mall

T he Chamber called in
the mob-- the Casha s h
Mob --to spread holiday
cheer this holiday season.
The Cash Mob spent more
than $2,ooo at the Crystal
River Mall, supporting its
mantra of shop local. This
event was the kick-off to the
holiday mixer sponsored by
Citrus Sports and Apparel
that announced winners
from the Crystal River and
Inverness Christmas Parades.


BHWC helps make Christmas special for seniors
T he Beverly Hills Women's Club re-
cently celebrated the season with
their annual holiday luncheon in the
home of member Joan Burnett. Katie
Lucas, Nature Coast EMS Public Infor-
mation Officer, was invited to celebrate
with the group and to accept their
Christmas presents for seniors in need
over the holidays in conjunction with
Nature Coast EMS "Stock Up for Seniors
program." Following the luncheon, the
presents were delivered to Citrus County
Resource Center, where Pat Coles, di-
rector of Support Services, and her staff
made the special deliveries. If you or your
organization would like to help seniors
in Citrus County by donating needed
items, call Katie Lucas at 352-249-
4730 or Pat Coles at 352-527-5977.


tk o al V W1AlixVaee etbti'Oak


BOAT TOURS BEER GARDEN LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LOCAL FOOD FINE ART ARTS AND CRAFTS KIDS ZONE
$4 PER PERSON, CHILDREN 12 & UNDER FREE


FloridaManateeFestival.com


- m


352-795-3149


4 r4x41.t ~I..JIL!.t~i i~U~


~iIiT~


41' I'iE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Time


Fax (52)56-565 Tll re: (88 82-2401 Eai: casifedschonilen~ne~om I wbste:ww~cro*clonlnec 0


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


1920's Solid Cherry
Wood 4 Poster Bed
3" shy of double bed
inc. boxsprings &
mattress, good cond.
$749. firm
(352) 795-8018
FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Swivel Accent Chair
Light Brown
Perfect cond.
$250.
(352) 726-5379


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389

ui \',li l lul st.

E(wi Da)

C ( .


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

L.k
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


6 Cockatiel's
with cage and
breeder box.
Free but must take all
(352) 792-4109
BOW-FLEX
Hardly used $100
Antique Butler
3 drawers
$100
(352) 795-1929
Free Firewood
Cut & Ready to Haul
(352) 746-0524


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Craba $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
COLLARD GREENS
*GIFTSHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Lost zippered Leather
Key Case Between CVS
and Hospice.
786-205-1186
Missing female pure
breed
Dalmatian. Need to find,
part of the family. Lost in
Crystal River area.
Please call Tim at
(407)694-4280.
Volunteer Fish and
Wildlife safari hat with
7 FWC pins. Lost in the
vacinity of the
Homosassa Park.
Reward Offer
(937) 935-2666


Found Cat
Gray & White
Pink Collar
Citrus Springs
(352) 465-7064


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct (a $5.001b.
Stone Crabi $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001



TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222



SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-78
Performs administra-
tive duties including
preparing letters,
documents and
memos. Must have
a working knowl-
edge of the Micro-
soft Office Suite of
Products. Must
possess a current
valid Florida driver
license. $11.09
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www
.bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 3,
2014. EOE/ADA.


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966



CASE MANAGER
Primary Care
Physican
Accountable Care
Organization (ACO)
seeking qualified
Care Manager.
Current Florida RN
lic. along with 3 plus
years experience in
hospital setting or
post accute care
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax
Resume to:
Nature Coast ACO
Attffn Patty King
352-746-3838


,

Your`orld firsi

Need a job
ora
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

C--MLE
( i


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.




Paid Weekly


If interested in any of
the following areas



Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Inglis

Homosassa

Beverly Hills


Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

C CITRUS __ ........ CO0.U. N T VY

CHRpNICLE
Swww.chrwilclonIn..com


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...for a New 2014 Honda
CR-VLX2WD
Model RM3H3EEW Come SeeWhyTheCR-VlIsThe Best
SellingCompactSUVIn America! Save WhileThey Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%.
X 60 MONTHS
j.on select new Honda models
i ..... .1 .... i.i.


Pre-Owned Vehicles!


$500 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:

Limited Powertrain Wananty"


Plus a 5"DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
SF>? Jtil l* tr r.:mll ,l- mi's| ,l.' "


See What LOVE Can Do For You I
19,2 Miles 3I ftft
Rw352.628.e"00
)sHonda.col Riverm
>veHonda.com


EM
.6.u Vl
]a-sm l,


" Sei de~Ilr toi ilelaiii "For hIigibi:e L6i'..e or retired iienitei uf lie US Vliliir.., and their spouses towards any new Honda -ii -, ,i
hidee y.hen ,ou finance or lease thru HFS. Used as a down p-.vnient ',r c,.oi:';le 0dulcII k',.'iid ihe purchase or lease of
an ne',, Hcinda LilomubIle jing 3 valid Honda APR. Honda Leaiiei-p '-ee,, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program
ViouQL HFS le'.iLJdff eRO Dueptj Signing Lease Program). Must meet :eliri :relii criteria i'ti%.rhheia b-, HFS,. An .lenie must
bp eIiie lo ln..r e rir:i p rates. See dealerfor coinlIee le .ir. PlIru; S791 Ie,.iitii, ,i0rrje .dmil 'plliorn 1.36 month closed en(
lp'" *',ii ppo.1.Oel ied C1 12? 000 rnmil per year 15 cents pei vriil iieretter. S2995 ,:,rn or ljre eQl.uit, plus taxes, tag & fees. First p.a,.inent '
L,] iiiii l4,r L 'i1(1 no Iale tevs due at signing. Any .Jealui i nsWriiei1 eriqup r, nr ai (HlBTB'1 i 1iuri ,f ." E, '11 :,iih closed end ese ..ih aIpplOVI', l ;elrit 12 000 ,11111p
pei *jr 15 Cei-Is pim1 nile IleIlerlei $i9S 9 cash ororde (cILIINtV plus Id' W, gI S le': Fis )a'.,iieni tag and lease and state fees -ue ,h '.igrinit Any ::e.ier -ri.iialle e pi iuip it iO Mddtii.,i unlcost.
3.36 iiinntli closed end one-pay lease of $S9 689 ,ith ppro'.eil Lfr(1t 0 12" 000 ri, le.r ,'Ir 15 'its er iiil thereafter. $2000 cash or idl equily;. Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees
ILue .uit igninj. .Jpiions at adlddional cost. ftCover, inlrniii Ilubriciinil p m. Se Se dliiei ilofI di.iiI All pre-owned vehicles include $2500 cash down oriade equil; Offers ."alid ih-u date of t ubIiCfliion


D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


* V. ,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


F/T CNA
For OB Doctor's Ofc
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877

Medical Biller
Immediate Opening
Busy Multi-Pysician
Practice, Experi-
enced applicants
Fax Resume to:
352-746-4748




Land Develop-
ment Director
Announcement
#13-76
Provides leadership
and direction in
Comprehensive
Planning and Zoning
and Development
Review activities
on a daily basis.
Requires Bachelor's
degree in Urban
Planning, Public
Administration or a
closely related field,
Master's degree
preferred. Ameri-
can Institute of
Certified Planners
certification pre-
ferred. Pay range
$2,366.15-$3,549.17
B/W. Starting pay
DOQ. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 3,
2014 EOE/ADA




FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.




Sales People
Needed
Village Cadillac
Toyota, Homosassa


t^ll "" "11 ,\'t


IdUI I\' 1 I d first.

E,) Da)y



CGp-i- E


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Care for Elderly or
Disabled in your home
Days or Nights. Will do
Cleaning & Cooking
25 yrs. Exp., 257-1308


Awnjjings B
SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
dn
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624




FT/PT COOK
POSITION

Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

LARGE CHURCH
in Crystal River
Needs Full time
CUSTODIAN
40 hrs. week, good
starting wage.
Abled body for light
lifting. Tables, chairs.
Reply to: Citrus
County Chronicle,
Blind Box 185 1P
1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd
Crystal Riv. F1 34428

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.

WRECKER
DRIVER

EXPERIENCED ONLY
apply. Must live In
Inverness area.
"Apply within'.
Ed's Auto Repair.
4610 S. Florida Ave
No Phone Calls

Part-time
Hep




















Senior Center
Aide
(Part time) 12:30pm
-4:30pm. Mon-Fri.)
Announcement
# 13-79
Routine work assist-
ing the Site Man-
ager with activities,
special events and
occasionally the
dining program.
Prepares room set
up and break
down. Must success-
fully pass a DOEA
Level II background
check. Graduation
from High School or
GED. Starting pay
$8.02 hourly.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, January 3,
2014. EOE/ADA.


CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lie. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


House Keeper
Light house work,
laundry, shopping &
cooking. 20 hrs/wk.
Bev. Hills, $10/hr. Call
Nessa (352) 527-2984






MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547



Financial


Opportunity for
Fulltime
Professional.

Must have book-
keeping accountingg
experience or
equivalent & profi-
cient in computers
and spreadsheets.
Able to multi-task
& communicate
well with others.
FAX RESUME TO
352-746-9033











ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

* COSMETOLOGY
* BARBERING
* NAILS SKIN
* MASSAGE Therapy
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
v FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Science W 6fto/fliy



ROOFING
Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices


www.eliteroo ing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



DOLLS
Cinderella & Bride Doll
2ft w/stands $100 ea
(352) 746-9896








YouIr' orlid tirst


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



,i, ili, ,,' '

iI 0 II


Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(352) 270-4672


CLASSIFIED



6 YR OLD SAMSUNG
front load dryer, like
new, never used
much, asking $300
(352) 726-6461
352-201-5113
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CHEST FREEZER
Working in good condi-
tion family down sized
so I'm selling for $100
OBO 352-621-9810
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



8" TABLE SAW
Craftsman, w/ medal
stand 2.5 HP,
excellent shape
$75. (352) 465-9114
Dunnellon
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$65 OBO
352-464-0316
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell
1/4"hose, gun, lance&
soap bottle $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Ryobi, 14 amps, 10"
Compound Miter Saw
w/ laiser & bag,
New in Box, pd. $189
Asking $125. obo
(352) 795-0037



HIFI SPEAKER KIT
pair GRS 8inch 85Watt
woofers, Nuance
Tweeters,Silver Wire,
Caps. $80 341-0450
JVC DVD PLAYER -
VCR COMBO
HR-XVC11B used few
hours Mom doesn't
need nice $50 341-0450
SPEAKER FOR HOME
THEATRE Black and
Silver, British MTM, Up-
Graded Internal Parts
$75 341-0450
SPEAKER FOR HOME
THEATRE CENTRE
Co-Axial SEAS 2-Way,
150Watt, Solid Oak $75
341-00450
SYLVANIA TV Good
condition, 26 inches, re-
mote included, black
colored, $30
(352)465-1616
TV HDMI VIDEO
CORDS Two 8 Foot
Wires, version 1.3 $20
341-0450



CISCO LINKSYS E1200
ROUTER *Has WPA2
Security, Wireless N,
Mac or PC, $30
341-0450
CISCO WIFI ROUTER
Linksys EA3500, N750
Smart Wi-Fi Router, 10
Months old $80
341-0450
COMPUTER MONITOR
19inch Viewsonic LCD
Widescreen, for PC or
X-BOX includes cable
$75 341-0450
DEAD ISLAND GAME *
For XBOX 360, Good
Condition, $20
341-0450


(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086


AAA ROOFING

Call the "eakh6usae)As
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof:
SMust present coupon at time contract is signed
|Lic./ns. CCC057537GRQW
l.~.mI TT


1 adjustable Twin Bed
exc.cond.$300.
Sofa & Love Seat
Matching. $150.
(352) 527-4247
3 pc. sectional,
green, w/ loungers
on each end. $150.
Love Seat $75.
All good condition
(352) 795-7126
1920's Solid Cherry
Wood 4 Poster Bed
3" shy of double bed
inc. boxsprings &
mattress, good cond.
$749. firm
(352) 795-8018
King Sealy Mattress
W/ Blue Lattice Bed
Frame. Less than 1 yr.
old. exc. cond. $500.
352-637-6108,
352-400-9631 cell
KITCHEN FURNITURE
Expandable kitchen
table with four chairs
excellent condition.
$125.00 382-5956
LOVE SEAT / LIKE
NEW LIGHT
COLORS,MUST
SELL/$50 Linda
341-2271
OAK DESK KIDS
HEIGHT 2 x 4 foot Top,
Blonde Oak, 2 Drawers
plus Book Shelf $100
341-0450

YOU'LL THIS!
RECLINERS Pair
matching burgundy re-
cliners exc cond paid
$399 each at Badcock
Perfect for superbowl
viewing $275.00 OBO
352-4654208
Slightly Used 2 Sets,
single mattress's
and box springs with
wooden headboard
$150 for all
King Size Bed, 2 dress-
ers. blonde color
$150. (352) 795-7126
Swivel Accent Chair
Light Brown
Perfect cond.
$250.
(352) 726-5379
White Wicker
Trundle Bed,
Steel enforced,
Great Shape
$95.
(352) 897-4198



30 PLANTS FOR
WATER GARDEN BlUE
FLOWERS. DON'T
KNOW THEIR NAMES
10 for $15 464-0316
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019



COAT
Red Wool 3 qtr length
coat; Made in USA
size 20-22 $50; Wool
rug 4x5 ft $50
(352) 746-9896
LEVI'S JEANS FOR
BOYS Good condition,
size 12 regular, $10
(352)465-1616
PGH STEELER
JACKET NFL
winter/removable hood
med like new cond. $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


POOL
*-'t-t .' -L 1t
GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting. Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
*Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
E 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC*
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeeK


WOMEN'S GALLERY
JACKET Good condi-
tion, reversible, chee-
tah pattern, size S, $30
(352)465-1616



2 Twin size oak beds
with storage drawers,
& mattress, dresser,
mirror & chest, excel.
cond. $250. for all
Kenmore Refrigerator
good for college,
excel cond.$45.
352 613-7429
5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &AC-
CESSORIES $30.
464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CAR COVER
(BREATHABLE) FOR
MEDIUM SIZE CAR
MALIBU ONLY $30
352-464-0316
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
4'CANDLE &
(5)4'CANDY CANES
$25.0BO 586-7222
Dining room table
and 4 chairs, light oak
$150; Nice wood
couch table, $50
(352) 795-7254
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct @ $5.00lb.
Stone Crab( $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
GENERAL Ralph Lau-
ren Navy/Gray Queen
sleeping bag
$50,Automatic BP tester
$20, RM Easiteach In-
teractive
Whiteboard-new $30,
Office Depot rolling,
folding cart $10, B&D
steamer $5 352 465
6619
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEARLY NEW FITS
1350-1450 SLIDE ON
ONLY $70 464-0316
JEEP PATRIOT SPARE
TIRE BRAND NEW
NEVER USED. $60
MIKE 586-7222
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF, works great for
fish or jerkey, only $60
352-464-0316



SHARP WIZARD OR-
GANIZER English to
Spanish, expense and
three Phone Books $15
341-0450



4 PRONGED CANE,
don't wait to FALL
DOWN before you need
one. $15
352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP.
ONLY $20
352-464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $40 for both
352-464-0316


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996



All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/ins.
-352-639-1024-


tll f, 11 [1\ tE

Y111II \11o ld l'St.
E\iy) Da)


CH~kOIcE


E
c
WH
SH
FO
$
M.
V



WH
Sele
$1


Prii
In



I


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 D7



;HILD'S MANUAL GOLF DRIVER Raw
IEELCHAIR, GOOD lings 450cc mrh 10"
IAPE, YELLOW W/ Apollo Reg lite shaft
)OTRESTS. ONLY new grip exc $25.
.85 352-464-0316 Dunnellon 465-8495
manual Wheelchair GOLF DRIVER Tour
1V/ Footrests, Great Edge Exotics XLD MRH
Shape, Only $100 10.5 senior w/HC new
352-464-0316 grip $45. Dunnellon
MOBILITY POWER 465-8495
HEEL CHAIR, Jazzy Men's Nike Golf Shoes,
act like new cond. size 8 1/2 new in the
750 pics avail via box never been worn.
Jrmoak@aft.net
352-302-4707 $25.00 phone
352 02 707352-489-4129
de Mobility Products
c, Burgundy Cloth Tandem Bike
Chair Lift. $450 used little, Shimona
586-0341. Equipped, org. $400.
price $100.
(352) 465-9114
Dunnellon


"NEW" FLAT TOP
ACOUSTIC GUITAR&
ACCESSORIES
READY TO PLAY $50
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR&
STARTER PACKAGE
W/GIGBAG&MORE
"ALL NEW" $50
352-601-6625
Cable Knelson Piano
looks and works great.
Real good cond. Asking
$300. 352-795-1495
GOT GUITAR?
ACOUSTIC OR CLAS-
SICAL GUITAR SOFT
CASE(GIGBAG) "NEW"
$15 352-601-6625



GENERAL Mission oak
rocker $150,2 antique
half round tables
$100@, 30lb. galva-
nized roofing nails
and300 count grip cap
nails $25@,6 Franklin
Mint McDonalds plates
$120 all, GE convection
toaster oven$25, Mr.
Coffee expresso maker
$10,large rolling
suitcase$10,Ryobi belt
sander $40, folding crab
trap $10, child's bike
helmet $5,SS 1 quart
thermos $5, 2 digital
coin counting money
jars $5 @, Oneida Cha-
teau stainless service
for 12 $250 352 465
6619



EXERCISE BIKE good
shape. All electronics.
only $65
352-464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316



Club Car Golf Cart
1991, Family owned
Excellent condition.
Lights, Battery 1 yr.
old, Must Sell, $1,500.
(352) 527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
For sale TaylorMade
RH RocketBallZ factory
clones. 3 9, PW, AW,
SW. TP/Dynalite
R-Shafts, PGA
SENSICORE Inserts
WINN Dri Tac Grips
$299. 352-746-4920


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
f All Home Repairs
k o Small Carpentry
fencing
SS.:reening
(lean Dryer Vents
iffodoble & Dependable
Epe.ience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


*
\-=l



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



GARAGE SALE ITEMS
MANY MANY FULL
BOX'S. $100.00 MIKE
586-7222












Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221 ma60820


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


ENI



*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


DRYER START
A FIRE!
Flat Rate.-No


HDrVen ot
1-855-DR-VE!


lt'.rc'br neerduplicard"

YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
SCOPES~
POOL AND PAVER LLC
I ns ed352-400-3188


KNOCKOUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure


352.942.6876
Call foday tor a
OOOGClean Tomorrow


GENERACE
Stand Alone --
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


b


wj


Sel r wa


llNTllTYlill


HoBe
Services^^


IPAINTIN


I POLS i~lANDPAER




D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUTTERS
Butters, a 4-y.o.
Catahoula Leopard
Dog mix, wt. 48 Ibs,
brown w/white mark-
ings, gentle, friendly,
playful, affectionate,
walks very well on
leash, rides very well
in car, appears house-
broken, gets along
w/other dogs
and people.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. Health Cert.
$300. (352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell


EDITH
Edith, 2-year-old
spayed female
Boxer/Hound/Terrier
mix, Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken, weight
49 Ibs, loving &
loveable, walks well
on leash, easily
directed, very
affectionate &
friendly. Needs
one medication.
Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.
Jack Russell Terrier
Mother and Father on
premise. Ready to go
Five males $250/ea
352-613-9135


LIZZIE
Lizzie, a sweet 1 1/2
y.o. black retriever mix
looking for a
loving forever home,
spayed and a great
medium size @ 45
Ibs. She is friendly &
playful, loves people.
A real sweetheard
and would make a
great family dog.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 1 female
Schnauzer Pups just
born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings

t pilfdlll '
I' ,l \ \IIII l St.

&iL y Day


QibNid-E


Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827


Australian Saddle
Like Brand New
Velvet, used once,
Paid$1,000.
Reduced to $840
(352) 513-5547



BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*
Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628
Dock Space For Rent,
Floating, Deep Canal
200 ft. from Crystal
River, (352) 257-8850
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com
Recreation

FLEETWOOD
1996 BOUNDER, 36 ft.
generator, very good
tires, Lots of storage.
$11,000. 352-263-4339
SOUTHWIND
98' V-10 eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534


KZ-SONIC
2014Travel Trailer,
Loaded, Brand New,
Must Sell. $14000.
Homosassa
(315) 539-5297
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, p arts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.

Accssorie
RV Jack Knife Couch
68", in great shape
$250. obo
352-464-4388



Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Leek
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
SANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939



CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2008 Taurus SEL, All
leather int., low miles,
car/tires all exc cond.
$13000 (352) 795-9181
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
'94 Towncar, 91,600 mi
excellent condition
$2,500, (352) 795-3200
352 422-7574 Cell
LINCOLN
'99, Town Car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$3,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US819& US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


FORD
'89 Bronco,
302, 4 Wheel Drive,
$2,500 obo
(352) 364-7719

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600


CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $26,900
352-513-4257




1 111111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


310-1229 SUCRN
1/8/14 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a regular meeting on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: December 29, 2013.


2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY
96, Astro, runs good,
no rust, 194k miles,
Asking $1,000.
(352) 344-8291
CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles
$2,800. 352-628-1646
CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van.
74K ml. good cond
extras included++
$6,000 obo
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306



HONDA
2008 TRX 400
mint cond, w/riding gear
and title $2800. obo
Dennis 352-267-3334
YAMAHA
2009 YFZ 450,
Race ready, call for
details $4000
(352)564-8165



BLUE OX
Motorcycle carrier
rated for 1000 Ibs.
$550. Call
(231) 445-2186
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$5800. 352-513-4257
Meeting^^
NoticesH


Informed




shoppers




get the




best deals.


1--


bt


, "
7t.. -
low w*


Informed




shoppers




read the




Chronicle.


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4


(F


,C I T RUSi '-.C 0 U N IT y


fw or m FO R ME ET

Vwww.chronicleonline.com INFO RMED. tLI


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TOYOTA C I T R U SC 0 U N T Y
1999, Rav,-4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018

CHEVY www.ch ronicleonline.com
CHEVY Lww chonicleonline.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM


/
S
SI
A g


800-584-8755 EXT.D CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD. 2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. 14358 CORTEZ BLVD.
HOMOSASSA, FL INVERNESS, FL BROOKSVILLE, FL
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm v Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm m Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00amn-4:00pm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm w Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*Must present ad at time of sale. Not everyone will qualify. With approved credit. Pictures re tor ,lusiraTion purpose, corny See dealer 'or compleTe delailis
QQQGWK2


Jeep
9 Mlnl&


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 D9




D10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


800-584-8755 EXT.10 m CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm v Saturday 9:00amn-7:3Opm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pnm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pmn Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*Must present ad at time of sale. Not everyone will quality. With approved credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. See dealer for complete details.
OOOGWK5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-_r-AN_




SSection E SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013



OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIIDE


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--- ^ M PAGE E6


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CRYSTAL RIVER 795-2441
'-,i4 IJE H I'l


LECANTO 527-7842 HOMOSASSA 628-7800
I- i r H ::: 1: ._ u : : ,r:I I


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INVERNESS 637-6200
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E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013


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274




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tips to make




your home




bid stand out


Agents in ultra-competitive D. C

marketplace share secrets ofsuccess


ELLEN GIBSON
Associated Press

More than 4 million Americans
buy a home each year, but there's no
telling how many offers are dis-
carded along the way And no one
wants to get edged out in the bid for
a dream home.
Real estate is rebounding in many
regions of the country, and buyers
can face formidable competition. Of
course, the best way to snag the
home you want is to promise the
most money But there's more to
making an offer than simply setting
and stating your price.
Here, two top real estate agents in
a perpetually competitive market-
Washington, D.C. share pointers
on crafting an offer that will out-
shine the rest:
Show them the money
The key, both said, is assuaging
the sellers' fears. They worry mainly
that the deal will fall through, so
have your financing in order before
you submit an offer Make sure the
lender checks your credit, assets
and employment status before pre-
approving your loan, and get a de-
tailed letter with the amount you are
authorized to borrow, recommends
Elizabeth Blakeslee, a Coldwell
Banker broker in the capital region.
Another way to signal you are a se-
rious buyer is by putting down a
large, good-faith deposit. A 2 percent
to 4 percent escrow deposit is com-
mon. However, Nancy Itteilag of
Long and Foster real estate, who has
been listed among the top 10 agents
in the country for sales volume by


The Wall Street Journal/REAL
Trends, tells her clients to write a
check for at least 10 percent. Within
30 days, the buyer will need to hand
over this money as part of the down-
payment anyway
"If the seller has a nice deposit in
escrow, they know the buyer is not
going to wake up and change their
mind," she says.
Eliminate surprises
The other unknown that keeps
sellers up at night is dread of re-
pairs, says Blakeslee. Most offers are
contingent on a home inspection. To
eliminate that variable, have the in-
spection done before putting in an
offer, and specify any repairs you ex-
pect the seller to make. That way
there won't be surprises later
Alternatively, buy a home war-
ranty or even request that your real
estate agent throw one in as a clos-
ing gift. That way the seller knows
that if the heating system gives out, it
will be covered.
"They don't want the buyer nit-
picking coming back with 'the ice-
maker doesn't work'," Blakeslee
says.
Another contingency in most con-
tracts is the home appraisal. If the
value of the property as assessed is
lower than the purchase price, the
buyer can back out of the deal. Most
lenders require an appraisal before
underwriting a mortgage, so unless
you are paying cash, you won't be
able to waive this condition,
Blakeslee says. However, if you are
infatuated with the house, you can


See BID/Page E5


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.



111,11 rd!:1191 -1 19F 11/1Ti' lk


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


ilj ls 330 E .Ireland C1
.'W i" rLh : J 11 in4 $305.000
Oaks GC views; 4/3/2 Pool home-plenty of
storage.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


'- i~ll* m ."... ....... -
P'v eg 3542 N Palomino Ter
7/- J MLS 706410 $429,900
Expansive 5/4/3 pool home-6 acres MOL
on horse trail.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


D7ilt 1059W Skyview Crossing Dr
MLS 705955 $237,900
Maintenance free luxury- 2/2/2 + den
with lake views.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


OwS./i$ 349 E Reehill St
MLS 704371 $199,900
Immaculate 3bd/2ba/3cg, shed & RV
parking w/full hookup.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power


Sy Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A Week! Properties
NEW LISTING


b3 tl 4161 N Longvalley Rd
t MLS 707428 $300,000
Well maintained 3/3/3 pool home w/gas
FP in fam rm.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
NEW LISTING


Ei^li, 453W Bluetlax Ct
-r"4ji MLS 707227 $129,900
Large family pool home; 4/3/2
on cul-de-sac.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


,z2 Ee- 3422 N Buckhorn Dr l 172 WDoerr Path
i- MLS 355561 $299,000 MLS 701971 $239,000
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres. 2bd/2ba Villa overlooks the 5th Green of
Bring your horses! Skyview GC.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


A'4.iLS 364 E Dakota Ct AaiS 1571 E Seattle Slew Cir
MLS 706039 $209,900 MLS 705988 $199,900
Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2 with 3/2/2 gated community in Citrus Hills.
caged pool. Near amenities.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jack Flemina 352-422-4086


M./}- IzIl 1 tnance way
MLS 702458 $179,900
3bd/2ba home with beautiful Dool.


.,a~lf $ILI 2456 N Brenlnood Cir
MLS 705457 $118,500
3/2/2 home with a perfect floor plan for the
Florida lifestyle.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947

-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer


ana Associates' 2013 *-- -First Time Home Seller
Home Buyer/Seller Study! -.l--

F.IhI III aS II, I, se. ,I I Is, .. i
LE' I1 1 "h II.. .. ..I I.. I,0, h , I I.. .. i,, .I I I ,, I .. Ih ,,- Sh ,1,, I ,, I ,S, l l I . 11 h ,,


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Massachusetts


startup wants to 1 W. Main S., Inveness
L N K *1 Iwww.landmarkinverness.com BEST-
revolutionize bikes A
LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY
]LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


Associated Press
Assaf Biderman, co-inventor of the Copenhagen Wheel and associate direc-
tor of the SENSEable City Laboratory at MIT, poses with his invention at
Superpedestrian, his venture-backed company in Cambridge, Mass. The
Copenhagen Wheel is a human/electric hybrid bicycle engine built into a
bicycle's back wheel.

Device converts bike into electric hybrid


Associated Press
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -A Massa-
chusetts startup is launching a new
device that transforms almost any
bicycle into an electric-hybrid vehi-
cle using an app on a smartphone.
The device, called the Copenhagen
Wheel, is installed as part of a rear


hub of a bike wheel and is packed
with a proprietary computer, batter-
ies and sensors that monitor how
hard a rider is pedaling and activate
an onboard motor whenever support
is needed. The device uses wireless
connectivity to communicate with


See BIKES/Page E12


E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BID
Continued from Page E3

volunteer to pay, out of
pocket, the potential dif-
ference between a low ap-
praisal amount and the
purchase price.
Peace of mind
The goal is to be as ac-
commodating as possible
without sacrificing your
family's needs. Talk to sell-
ers about furnishings or
appliances they want to
take or leave behind. Also,
give the owners plenty of
time to move. Consider al-
lowing them to stay in the
home for a month after the
settlement date at no
charge, Itteilag says, as
long as they continue to
pay utilities. As a buyer,
you don't have to make a
mortgage payment the first
month anyway
"When you have people
who have been in their
homes for 20 years, they
don't want to be pushed


out," she says. "Sometimes
you can't put a price tag on
the comfort level you've of-
fered them."
Personal
connection
Make your bid stand out
with personal touches. For
instance, write a letter to
the seller detailing why
your family fell in love
with the home and the
community During your
house tour, Blakeslee ad-
vises looking for a detail
that connects your family
with the previous occu-
pants. Perhaps they went
to the same college you
did, have the same num-
ber of children or share
your interest in ice hockey
Seize the opportunity to
explain why you are a
great match.
In addition, be sure your
real-estate agent presents
your offer in person, It-
teilag stresses. When
agents are face-to-face
with the seller, they can
read the situation clearly
and make requests that


Jackie CGaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor., Realtor
I3023179 A HOUSE 2879022
S746-6700 SOLD Name. L
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, s BEVERLY HILLS


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


are hard to put in writing.
For instance, your agent
can tell the listing agent
how much you love the
home, hinting that if there
is a stronger offer, you
would appreciate the op-
portunity to match or beat
it.
Finally, while all these
tips are helpful, it's not
your job as a buyer to think
strategically, says Itteilag.
"Find an excellent (real
estate agent) and let them
represent your interests,"
she says.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to
submit news releases about upcoming
community events.
* Write the name of the event, who spon-
sors it, when and where it will take
place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone
number to be printed in the paper.
* News releases are subject to editing.
* Call 352-563-5660 for details.


DIGEST GUIDE
* News notes submitted without
photos will not be reprinted if
the photo is provided later.
* E-mail high-resolution JPEG
(.jpg) photos to newsdesk
@chronicleon line.com, attn:
HomeFront.

| CitrusCount


7BR4.R0ASS'REATR,GRI iEIO 746B9OOOR

Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKEASSOC.,- REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR 0
11 =- z Sii 11 S"1 1


3050 W. MUSTANG


-Rnf
REALwwTY'~cK


S 15518 N. ELKCAM
3/2/2 706451 $163,000


1974 W. ALHAMBRA
3/2/2 705787 $108,000


5406 N. CROSSGATE
31213 706628 $299,000





5049 W. PINTO LOOP
F 3121/2 706941 $2929,500O





4349 W. TOMAHAWK
4/3/2 707386


iiI ia iI11]L' DIl lii'lKIh Tlfir, If FIT M dIDl
Great Buyer Incentives
Interest rates are still low
Sales have increased
Inventory has decreased
Winter residents are arriving!
WE OFFER
Complementary current market analysis
Aggressive marketing strategies
High internet exposure on our listings
Local knowledge and experience
Professionalism
WE ARE...
"THE MOST DIRECT LINE BETWEEN YOU AND A BUYER"
FOR YOUR FREE MARKET ANALYSIS CALL 352-795-9123


522 S.JACKSON 9 N. WADSWORTH 48 S. HARRISON 521 S. MONROE
2/1/1 706595 $56,900 3/1.5 704088 $52,500 2/1 707029 $49,000 2/1/1 707140 $69,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


HappyrHofl


*UllrealestatI J .JJ.LjtmyahlJITT


ri


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E5




E6 Sunday December 29, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci iIkoNiCLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The right way to divide


those perennial bulbs


Beautifulplants can flower year after year
A perennial is a plant that lives more plant to sprout tender new shoots in win-
than two years. The term is gener- ter temperatures. If left alone, the black-
ally used for ornamental flowers ened leaves will decompose naturally
and herbaceous plants. Strictly over the winter and release
speaking, it also applies to their nutrients as food for next
trees and shrubs. Gardeners season's growth. An insulating
like perennials because they layer of pine needle mulch will
last several years and do not help protect subterranean
have to be replaced every year parts from freezing.
as annual plants do. Annuals After several years, perenni-
grow from seed, flower, pro- als get bigger, often spreading by
duce seed and then die within underground roots, bulbs, rhi-
one year zomes and tubers. When clumps
Some perennial plants re- are large, the middle plants get
main evergreen, with green Jane Weber crowded and may die off Gar-
leaves throughout the winter JANE'S deners like to dig up big peren-
Others are deciduous and drop GARDEN nials and divide them into
their leaves. Frost-tender ___________ smaller clumps or individual
perennials have their leaves plants. Propagation by division
frozen and rest dormant beneath the cold is best done while the plant is dormant be-
ground. The killed leaves can be clipped fore new leaves emerge in spring.
off for a tidier look. This is not pruning
live plant parts; it will not stimulate the See JANE/Page E7


Hand-carved furniture was produced throughout Asia


Dear John: My aunt had 20 1/2 inches high and 4 feet
these oriental tables, long and is oval in shape. It is
She gave 28 1/2 inches wide.
me these tables It has six chairs or
when she lived stools that go under
with me for a the table perfectly.
while. I really did The chairs are 13
not have the heart 1 i 1/2 inches high.
to tell her I did not Two of them are
really want them; rectangular and
they are in the way four are triangular
and now that she The feet on the
has passed and I table and chairs
will not hurt her John Sikorski are claw footed.
feelings, I would SIKORSKI'S I also have two
like to sell them. ATTIC side tables. They do
I really do not ___________ not have claw feet,
know the value or but all three come
if they are Japanese or Chi- with a glass top to keep them
nese or something else. They nice. I will add two pictures.
are all hand-carved teak- Thank you for any informa-
wood, I believe, with ma- tion you can give me on how
hogany wood around the much and where I would be
carvings, able to sell them. WA.,
The center table stands at Internet


Dear WA: This type of
hand-carved furniture could
have been made in any of a
number of Asian countries.
There is no specific market
interest and generally speak-
ing, it is hard to sell except at
a recognizably affordable
price. Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have a Korean
wedding chest, purportedly
from the 16th century It is
hardwood and has no words
or markings on it. It has a
See ATlTIC/Page E14
This oval table, with chairs
designed to nestle snug
around the sides, has been
produced in many Asian
countries. There's no specific
interest from the collector
marketplace.
Special to the Chronicle


Inside...


For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E6

Dividing during the
growing season could dis-
rupt the flowering cycle.
Flowering bulbs like lily
of the Nile, Agapanthus;
amyrillis, Hippeastrum
species; tuberous day
lilies, Hemerocallis
species; iris; and solid
corms like fire lily, Crocos-
mia; Gladiolus; Liatris;
and rain lilies, Zephyran-
thes species can be dug
and divided during winter
Insert a straight garden
spade straight down about
6 inches from the plant,
all the way around the
clump. Lever the soil to


pry up the clump and
loosen the roots. Lift the
plant and gently shake off
the soil.
If clods of dirt are stuck
among the roots, dip the
clump in a tub of ambient
temperature water and
swish gently to rinse it
away without damaging
the delicate roots. Small
corms and bulbs should be
labeled the color of the
parent plant. Plant in
groups of the same color
Small bulbs may be too im-
mature to flower for a year
or two.
Agapanthus clumps will
have smaller bulblets
sprouting from the base of
the central bulb. Gently
pry them off. Replant the
little ones in groups of


Insert a straight garden spade
straight down about 6 inches
from the plant, all the way around
the clump. Lever the soil to pry
up the clump and loosen the
roots. Lift the plant and gently
shake off the soil.


three to five, about 6
inches apart. These will
grow larger and flower for
three or more years before
needing dividing again.
The shoulders of larger
Agapanthus bulbs should
be slightly above ground
level or they may not


flower Plant the biggest
Agapanthus a foot apart to
make a good foliage and
flower display that will not
need dividing for four to
five years.
The normal flower color
is blue. Up to 147 individ-
ual flowers grow in a


round globe shape at the
top of a tall, stiff, fleshy
stalk. I once counted them
out of curiosity White
flowers that appear among
a bed of blue Agapanthus
can be tagged and sepa-
rated after winter dor-
mancy sets in.
The flower stalk ranges
from 18 inches to 3 feet,
depending on age and size
of the bulb and cultivar.
They flower well in full
sun or part afternoon
shade.
Water well upon plant-
ing to settle soil among
the roots. Do not stamp on
or damage the delicate
roots.
There are several
named cultivars of Aga-
panthus developed from


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E7

the original South African
species. "Elaine" is a
smaller variety, with dark
purple-blue flowers that
prefers more shade.
"Queen Mum" is a
patented cultivar having
white flowers with purple
flushes.
Planting perennials pro-
vides years of interest and
color in Florida gardens.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


Speilzn in Ter B
& Bentoo esae
ww .T rrS t e t Gr ~o


"I .L-,


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3.5 BATH, 2-CAR, SKVIEW VILLAS MAINTENANCE-FREE IING IN GATED GOLF COMMUNITY! Meticulously maintained 2 bed
aintenance-free giving at its best. Spectacular bedroom,3.5 bath, 2-cargarage courtyard room, 2 baths, 2-car garage detached vlla on beautifully landscaped cul-de-sac lot in
mewith poo in a well respected gated commu nity offering privacy and security. Upgrades Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this vlla with a spacious open floor plan, kitchen
clude high celings, island kitchen, top-of-the-line appliances, gas stove, wood cabinets, has eat-in dining area and breakfast bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are handicap
ecurty system, craft room/den including a 4x6 safe room, formal dining room, wet bar, equipped. The spiders to the large rear lanai offer a view ofa green expansive lawn. Plenty of
oqulslte warm colored wood floors with carpeted bedrooms. The ist goes on and on. room for a pool. Home is ready for you to move right in. Enjoythe Citrus Hills Country Club
Sndscaping galore. Extra attention has been paid down to the smallest detail. Membership lifestyle with this home. Hurrythisvilla value will not last long.
LS 707323 ...................................................................................................................... $424 .900 MI S 70 1 4.................................. 124.900


-DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Professionally decorated Lantana maintenance-free home. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, plus den/
office with French door entry. Open floor plan design with ambient fighting throughout the
Some. Kitchen has Menllat cabinets with soft-closed feature & crown molding. Conan
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDA VILLAS countertops & gourmet stainless steel kitchen sink. Butler's pantry, eat-i n & formal
handed Lantana model perfectly located on ist tee Syvw G C dining s room. Great room hasspecialty builtinwithcustom arches & remote control fireplace.
'ofess onally decorated, built-ins in living room, Surround Sound, cherry cabinets w ith roll- 11 ... .. ..... 11 ir .. i ..... .. ...i
ts ana so much more. Move-in ready! i
LS 701779 .. . .. ............................................................................................................................$ 2 5 9 ,0 0 0 2 6 9. 0 0 0


I Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777






SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, WOODSIDE DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
Spectacular Cordova model loaded with upgrades, including Granite countertops in your Custom mvlla with many upgraded features including gourmet kitchen with 6-burner gas
beautiful gourmet kitchen with built-in skyight, custom window treatments and gorgeous range, stainless steel appliances, cherry cabinets, granite countertops. Upgraded hardwood
fighting fixtures. Formal dining and giving areas plus a large famly room give great spacs g for flooring, crown molding, custom master bedroom closet, custom window treatments and
entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on your extended screened lanai with Shoji hot tub. All plantation shutters. Oversized pool with waterfall and extensive landscaping on cul-de-sac
this plus a 3+ car garage with a separate golf cart entrance. PRICED TO SELL! This home is a homesite. Golf cart garage, security system and h uch more.
m ustsee. M LS 353844 .....................................................................................................$ 3 5 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 705130 ........................................................................................................................ $ 4 2 4 ,9 0 0


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Enter the foyer and be instantly captivated by the charm and tasteful refinements of this
gracious home. Beautiful 2 bedrooms plus den 2 bath, 2-car garage Hillside villa. Many
desirable upgrades such s huge mirror in formal dining room, eat-In kitchen, butler pantry,
ceramic tile and carpet throughout and so much more. Pristine condition, only lived in
seasonally. This home has arguably one of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking
prestigious Skyview Golf Course. Come and sit on the extended lanai and watch all the golf
action unfold beforeyou. M LS 706279.......................................................................... $ 25 9 ,00 0


r . ... .. .. 1 r. .. .. .. .


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR
Exceptional and fab ulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath, 2-car, 5,375 sq. ft. pool
home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island
kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened
lanai. Located on the quietest ofcul-de-sacs.
5375..... .................................................................................................. ........................ $ 2 ,3 0 0


REALTY GROUP


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
ELEGANCE! Windward model with many upgrades! This nicely appointed open floor plan
home was designed to let the Florida sunshine in.3 bedrooms,3 baths, 2-car garage. Some of
the many upgrades include Brazilian hardwood floors, cathedral ceilings, luxurious master
bath, amazing pool and jacuzzi, bonus enclosed sunroom, incredible kitchen and on a cul-de-
sac! You'll be proud to return to this elegant home w/lush landscaping & on a large corner lot.
M LS 705865 ........................................................................................................................$ 3 3 9 ,0 0 0




E8 Sunday, December 29, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Good Eggs community
dispatcher Vanessa Casey
holds an order to be picked
up by a customer in
San Francisco.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I .1


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sq ft "New Constriuction"
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Mediclcal Office
Call (727) 515-6571


PINE RIDGE
ESTATES
Elegant custom built 3/4/3 Pool

sophisticated i, festyle
$469,000


Investors Realty S
of Citrus County, Inc.
opywebsite at: wvwv.mflorida-house.com


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE,!, MOVERIGHTIN-BEAUTIFULCITRUSHILLS, OuTTANDiBC WATERFRONT RESIDE"
- no 2 master suites, apart 2a(0 Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre Tastefully ren
meant lower level Upper level 1 2 ac (160 x 300+ t), picturesque corner lot with mature oak trees and & dry(never .
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane setting with major oak trees Charming lots of privacy Very well maintained, ac| for boat
shutters, security system, updated brick home, first time offered, som ,, ,, I docks, 240 t seawall, workshop, she
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of original fixtures and fireplace tll in Updated roof, A/C, kit,windows, ever
seawall, b i just place Large det gar w/workshop, thing meticulous maintained Prict
waiting for IS,000 seawall $179,000 $169,000 sooo right at $399,000!


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E9





E10 Sunday, December 29, 2013


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate


Classifieds

> I&hL mi uL


r



INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!




FACTORY REPO
MUST SEE!, 16X80
3/2, No Hidden Fees
Incls: Deliv, Set A/C
Heat, Skirting, Steps,
Gutters, 352-795-1272
FACTORY REPO
New 2014, 28x80,
4/2 (No Hidden Fees)
Incls: Deliv, Set, A/C,
Heat, Skirting, Steps
& Gutters $67,900
WILL NOT LAST!
352-795-1272
Floral City 12x56 MH
2/br, 12 ba on 80x152
ft lot.$21,000. Fixer 'er
up. (352) 726-8873
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985

NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182


ON V ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details





2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013


3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
Inverness, Jungle
Camp Area 2Br/1Ba
SW w/ 2 rms added
on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge
lot close to river. Just
$10,000, 352-400-4196



2BR/1 BA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124
55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY 12x56
Mobile, Furnished
2BR, IBA, Carport
Scrn. Rm., Lrg. shed
Adult Park, Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
FLORAL CITY
Double wide 2 bd/
2 ba. Furnished
w/appliances. W/D A/C.
New wood laminate
floors. Shed, scrn pch,
double car port. Lot rent
$183. Asking $17.5k
314-831-1356
Homosassa 55+ Park
2BR/1BA. Newly re-
modeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$6,000 (608) 921-5564
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $550. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


www,0itrs(ouolyH ome nltiI.com
CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr.............. $800
3/2/2 Nice location 1254 sq ft
8410 N Elkcam Blvd .............$800
3/2/1 New listings
6913 N Ghldstone Dr ...........$875
3/2/2 Split floor plan 1515 sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
4 Shumard Ct S ................$1,250
3/2.5/2 SMW pool home
2200 sq ft. REDUCED
7650 W Homosassa Trl .......$500
2/1 nice duplex
7396 W Green Acres.............$700
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
1304 Claymore St (Inv).........$900
3/2/2 Lovely pool home REDUCED
5164 N Dewey Way (Her).....$700
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

3/2/2new paint/new floorinqg.$875
3/2/2 pool..................$1000
2/1.5 townhome.........$550
3/2 townhome............$750

2/1.5/1 ......................... $650
3/2 ............................... $700
2/2/1 ............................ $650

2/2/1 ............................ $850

2/2 Mobile................$575
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
'Property Manager/
'Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


mS as
(2)637-3500


TI lI "MIwM

Start The
New Year
In A New
Home!!!


INVERNESS
Lovely 3/2/1
$800
BEVERLY HILLS
HUGE 2/2/1
$775
Large 2/2/1
$750
OAK VILLAGE
3/2/2 w/Lawn Care
$900
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1/1 Pool w/Pool Care
$1,100

















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


n'Ijivit joatoo
1 & 2BR, $450-$500,
inclds. garb & water,
Senior Discount. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS
2/1, Storage Room
475 mo.+ Security
352-634-5499
SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD















C /
c,_/ EOq'teatli




YolHll 0idfirs


Need a job
iir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CWMCpwi


Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442(352)
637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgrmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Em-
ployer."








CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276



HOMOSASSA
1/1, $435. mo. 1st.
& Sec. 352-212-4981
INVERNESS
1010 Turner Camp
RD 2 bedroom. 1 bath.
2BR/1 B/NICE/
Remodeled
Carport/Screened Patio/
NewAppliances/$600moMa
x.3 person
(352) 302 3819

INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk-up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818


Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm, new
appliances Move in
$1350, 442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Carport & Fl .Rm.
screened patio, fenced
backyard. $550. Mo.
(352) 422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/carport. CHA, $535.
Mo.+ $500. Dep
352-249-6098/249-6505
INVERNESS
3/2/2, wheel chair
access. $875. mo., 1st,
last, sec. 352-726-5272
RENT TO OWN
No credit check
Inv/BevHills 3/4 bdrms
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk 828-497-2610
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802



HERNANDO
Terra Vista, Furn. 3BD,
spacious Villa, w/ext.
maint. &club memb.
$1,800. 352-302-7559





CHRONICLE
_____ Clasified,


Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/M w
REALTY ONE
BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
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Lecanto 2.3 acres
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Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
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352-527-7015
Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


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Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



Your World

4 a'9e aUeas


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


CM, pwulE




Sunday December 29, 2013 Ell


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


1.2t




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
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"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
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A VIEW TO
LOVE"
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(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
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qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


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Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
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AUTOMATED
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1E12 Sunday, December 29, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
From left, John Ibsen and Ruben Cagnie, both software engineers, and product development specialist Basak Ozer work on developmental aspects of the Copenhagen Wheel,
a human/electric hybrid bicycle engine at Superpedestrian in Cambridge, Mass.


BIKES
Continued from Page E4

the biker's smartphone to track
distance traveled and elevation
gained, share with friends the
number of calories burned and
lock the wheel remotely as soon
as the owner walks away from
the bike.
"The motor integrates itself
with the rider's motion very,
very seamlessly," said Assaf Bi-
derman, who co-invented the
device at the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology's
SENSEable City Lab, where he
is associate director "It's almost
like having a riding companion


riding together with you, making
the ride easier, simpler"
The combination of power
from the Copenhagen Wheel
and the cyclist's energy can
make an average biker move "al-
most like a Tour-de-France-level
athlete in your daily commute,"
said Biderman, who founded
Cambridge, Mass.-based Super-
pedestrian Inc. that secured an
exclusive license for the tech-
nology from MIT
The Copenhagen Wheel packs
sufficient power to propel a
rider as fast as 35 mph, but de-
velopers have put speed limits
in software to meet local speed
limits, effectively turning off the
motor once the speed
reaches 20 mph in the U.S. and


25 kph in Europe.
The concept was inspired by a
simple question: "How can we
get more people to cycle?" Bi-
derman said.
The project received funding
from the Italian ministry of the
environment and office of the
mayor of Copenhagen, a Danish
city known as one of the most bi-
cycle friendly locations in the
world and whose tourism web-
site says 55 percent of its resi-
dents bike 750,000 miles every
day
The initial 1,000 units of the
Copenhagen Wheel became
available for pre-order through
the Superpedestrian website
earlier this month. Two weeks
later, at least 810 had been sold


for $699 each, the majority of
them to customers in the U.S.
Other orders went to Europe,
Australia, Kenya, Madagascar
and elsewhere. Shipping is
scheduled for next spring.
The Copenhagen Wheel does
not replace a cyclist's existing
bicycle. Consumers get the styl-
ish hubcap-sized device already
installed on a new rear wheel
that fits their current bicycle.
They remove the current wheel
from their bike and install the
souped-up unit and they are
ready to go. The batteries are
rechargeable.
The Copenhagen Wheel seeks
to tap into a lucrative and highly
competitive market for electric
bikes, also known as e-bikes.


In a recent report, clean-tech-
nology consulting company Nav-
igant Research estimated that
worldwide revenue from elec-
tric bicycles will grow from $8.4
billion this year to $10.8 billion
in 2020, fueled in part by desire
for a viable alternative to in-
creasingly congested city roads
that makes crawling in car traf-
fic less palatable.
In the U.S., the trend is re-
flected in Census Bureau data
showing the number of bicycle
commuters rose 60 percent in
the decade ending in 2010.
"Over the past few years we've
seen a cycling renaissance
throughout the world," Bider-
man said. "People are looking
for alternatives."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'It belonged to


Average US 30-year mortgage


my grandmother' rate up slightly at 4.48 percent


Gypsy's two cents: On my daily
walks my sniffer drives me crazy in
front of the Ice Cream Doctor- so
many spots, so little time. My Dad is
so impatient.
ith this or most any busi-
ness, there are goals, ex-
pectations and, of course,
disappointments. The un-
expected, the surprises,
keep this endeavor fresh .
and fun. One surprise is
how many people come in V
wanting to sell items and -
then how many say, "It I
belonged to my 1.
grandmother."
TV programs that ex-
plore hoarding show how
some people just can't Steve]
throw anything away Our TIME
grandparents and great- TE
grandparents, or for that
matter anyone who expe-
rienced the Great Depression is
more likely to save it all because
"you might need it one day"
Many years ago, I purchased a
cabin in the Colorado mountains,
with all the contents stacked to the
ceiling. Many boxes had valuable
treasures, alongside items of no
value.
In any family many of these boxes
are passed down, sometimes un-
opened for years or decades. For a
family member to open these boxes,
it's like Christmas and great memo-
ries. Most everyone else is looking
for treasure, hopefully with care and
respect. Why grandma saved some
of "those things" may remain a mys-
tery, but discovering treasures is so
much fun.
Grandmothers seem to acquire so


E


many different items, from hand-
made presents to fine jewelry and
things they bought and put away for
a rainy day They were not raised in
a throwaway society, where disposal
is the norm. They made, maintained
and provided "hand me downs" pri-
marily clothing and shoes.
Grandmothers also
come into the shop to sell
items that are special to
them but sadly fetch no
interest from family
members. When one
grows up with these
items, they are "just ordi-
nary" and one doesn't
want it, until it's gone.
People go into antiques
Barnes shops looking for that
WILL item to remember
LL grandma.
A story from Cindy De-
Vries: "My grandmother
didn't have much (electricity and
plumbing didn't come until 1972),
and she was a survivor of the Kansas
dust bowl and Depression. Over the
years, her children and grandkids
would give her presents some
utilitarian, others were pretty
things.
"After she passed, the family went
through her things and in the back
of the closets and bottom of the
drawers were many of the gifts she
received, still new. A note told the
story: 'Too pretty to use."'
Next topic: Too much stuff. Happy
trails.

Steve Barnes owns and, along
with his shop dog Gypsy, operates
Olde Inverness Antiques.


WASHINGTON -Average
U.S. rates for fixed mortgages
crept higher this week but re-
mained low by historical
standards.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday that the
rate on the 30-year loan in-
creased to 4.48 percent from
4.47 percent last week. The
average on the 15-year fixed
loan rose to 3.52 percent from
3.51 percent
Mortgage rates peaked at
4.6 percent in August on ex-
pectations that the Federal
Reserve would reduce its $85
billion-a-month in bond pur-
chases. Those purchases
push mortgage and other
long-term rates lower and en-
courage borrowing and
spending. On Dec. 18, the Fed
finally decided the economy
was strong enough to allow it
to reduce the monthly pur-
chases by $10 billion.


Associated Press


Mortgage rates are sharply
higher than they were a year
ago when the 30-year fixed
rate was 3.35 percent and the
15-year was 2.65 percent.
The Commerce Depart-
ment reported Tuesday that
new-home sales dipped 2.1
percent in November to a
seasonally adjusted 464,000.
But stronger figures for the
previous three months sug-
gested that housing may be
regaining strength after a
summer lull.
The National Association
of Realtors said last week
that the number of people
who bought existing homes
in November fell for a third
straight month. Higher rates
and the lingering effects of
the partial government shut-
down in October may have
deterred some sales.
Still, the government said
builders broke ground on
homes at a seasonally ad-
justed annual rate of 1.09 mil-


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of submit-
ted material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive submissions, the
better chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E13


lion homes and apartments
in November That was the
fastest pace since February
2008 and was 23 percent
higher than in October
To calculate average mort-
gage rates, Freddie Mac sur-
veys lenders across the
country between Monday
and Wednesday each week.
The average doesn't include
extra fees, known as points,
which most borrowers must
pay to get the lowest rates.
One point equals 1 percent of
the loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-
year mortgage was 0.7 point.
The fee for a 15-year loan was
0.7 point
The average rate on a one-
year adjustable-rate mort-
gage slipped to 2.56 percent
from 2.57 percent last week.
The fee was 0.5 point.
The average rate on a five-
year adjustable mortgage rose
to 3 percent from 2.96 percent
The fee was 0.4 point




E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013



ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

working iron lock and key
We paid $300 for it at auc-
tion 10 years ago. What is it
worth now? J.E.,
Internet
DearJ.E.: I am sure your
chest is not 500 years old.
It appears to have been
made well into the 20th
century
Market interest is very
low for this type of chest. If
you get what you paid for it
at the auction, that would
be a lucky day If you want
to investigate it further,
Lark Mason Associates
specializes in Oriental an-
tiques. The website is
www.igavelauctions.com.
Good luck.
Dear John: My husband
and I very much enjoy
your column. My husband
has a decanter from his
family, grandparents per-
haps, that we know noth-
ing about.
We would be interested
in selling it. I have in-


BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated
2 bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry New
central A/C, carpets, interior paint, ceiling
fans w/lights Fenced yard Neat, clean,
bright airy #700983 $89,900




HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side
well maintained; fully leased @ $600/
month; roi=10 6%; all new roofs in 2001
& 2002 and central A/C units installed in
2004 2-wells, each bldg has own septic
system #703762 $396,000


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


cluded some pictures.
It is 4 inches wide and 5
inches tall. It weighs 458
grams and there is a mark
with "JD" in a small crest,
a left-facing lion in a crest,
a "WD" with a triangular
crest with three images,
then a cursive "E' in a
square. We hope you can
see it in the pictures and
would love to hear what
you think it might be
worth. -M.S., Internet
Dear M.S.: You have a
cologne bottle. It was likely
part of a gentleman's
travel kit. The top and col-
lar that attaches to the bot-
tle is made of sterling
silver
The three marks on the
collar indicate it is sterling
silver, made in Chester,
England and the letter L is
the date letter for 1911. Po-
tential dollar value is $75
to $150.
Dear John: I have an
old-looking oil painting I
would like to have some-
one look at to tell me if it is
worth anything. Can you
help? G.R., Internet
Dear G.R: Yes, I can


***Foreclosure List***

2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706156 REDUCED $57,500 705705 REDUCED $144,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939

4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $157,900 705665 REDUCED $229,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
705223 REDUCED $77,900 705093 REDUCED $82,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 704264 3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon
REDUCED $94,900 705142 REDUCED $114,900
Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939 John Maisel 352-302-5351

LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in Brentwood Villa 3/2/2
Dunnellon 705087 $119,900 704862 REDUCED $99,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329


help. Take several good
clear photographs of the
front and back. If the back-
side is covered with paper,
remove it and look for no-
tations on the canvas. If
there is an artist signature,
include a photo and cor-
rect spelling. Then I will
finish the story


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL
34478 or asksikorski@
aol.com.


IP1


Special to the Chronicle
This Korean-made chest was probably manufactured in the 20th century. The lock and
key still work.


I If/--
BEST
BLSI

Realtor


AG33ENTO DTEViEN DAYS A EEK!

I ylEF-|V ^^^BSlit
l^^^^^i H^aluml


HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home,
1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean
w/circular driveway half way between
Crystal River and Homosassa 2 lots, 2
!, 1 .1 '. screen porch Fully


BEVERLY HILLS excellent condition,
move-in condition, Pergo floors, glass
porch on back, awning to keep house cool,
decorati- -i- b beautifully
landsca .... .. ,i, of newer


What is this
thing? Is it a
decanter?
According to
antiques expert
John Sikorski,
it's a cologne
II .bottle, of the
i type that would
typically be
found in a
gentleman's
travel kit. The
markings on
the object
indicate that it
was made in
1911. It might
be worth $75
to $150.
Special to the Chronicle

"Always There For You"







I WATERFRONT .' II
I CONDO


GORGEOUS SOUTHERN WOODS VIEWS!
Custom 3/2 pool home on the golf course
SOpen views of 2 fairways
SGourmet silestone kitchen SS appliances
SAttractive stamped flagstone pool deck
SGas fireplace w/built-ins in living room
Dual paned windows
Most furniture available separately
Home warranty for the buyers
#704891 $257,000


New roof 2011 new AC/heat 2010
Private dock built in 2011
Never flooded even in "no name" storm
Some furniture available separately
SOnly 35 minutes to the Gulf
SCondo provides flood insurance thru dry wall
#706963 $235,000


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OF: (352) 795-6633


See. IiruJI' .II'.'.Jl T @ w eIal,.ihuIIJ.I.I...I..I


LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of 3
mobile homes/buildings, center of county,
1 well, 2 skeptics, appointment only One
rented for $450/mo #703819 $106,000




CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MARKET
Continued from Page E8

Pasquinelli, an attorney
who started using the serv-
ice about a year ago.
The San Francisco-
based Good Eggs is among
a new crop of startups
using technology to bolster
the market for locally pro-
duced foods that backers
say are better for consumer
health, farmworkers, live-
stock and the environment
These online marketplaces
are beginning to change
the way people buy gro-
ceries and create new mar-
kets for small farmers and
food makers.
"It's a new way of con-
necting producers with con-
sumers," said Claire
Kremen, a conservation bi-
ology professor at the Uni-
versity of California,
Berkeley "The more alter-
natives people have access
to for buying food outside
the industrial agricultural
regime, the better it can be."
The Good Eggs website
features attractive photos of
offerings such as Hachiya
persimmons, chanterelle
mushrooms, grass-fed beef
steaks, pureed baby food
and gluten-free poppy seed
baguettes. It also has pic-
tures and descriptions of
the farmers and food mak-
ers. Prices are similar to
what shoppers pay at a

*illV"flf


Good Eggs offers more varieties
of fruits and vegetables than
most supermarkets, but the
selection is limited to what can
be grown and made locally, so
you can't buy bananas in
San Francisco in December.


launched its AmazonFresh
service in San Francisco
this month. Another San
Francisco startup called
Instacart allows customers
to order groceries from
local supermarkets and de-
livers in as little as an hour
Good Eggs currently sells
food from about 400 local
producers that meet the
company's standards for
environmental sustainabil-
ity, workplace conditions
and transparent sourcing
of ingredients. Produce is
usually picked one or two
days before it's delivered.
The startup is helping
farmers such as Ryan
Casey, who runs a small or-
ganic farm that grows
more than 50 types of
fruits, vegetables and flow-
ers. His Blue House Farm
in Pescadero, about 45
miles south of San Fran-
cisco, mainly sells its pro-
duce at farmers markets
and through community
agriculture programs, but
Good Eggs makes up a
growing share of business.
"They're really good at
marketing and finding
people and connecting
people with the food,
which leaves me more
time to do the growing,"
said Casey, standing in a
field of leafy greens.
Good Eggs has attracted
enthusiastic foodies like
Shelley Mainzer, who does
nearly all her grocery shop-
ping on the website and


farmers market, and cus-
tomers can pick up their or-
ders at designated locations
or have them delivered for
$3.99 usually two days
after they're placed.
"There's this wave ofen-
trepreneurship and cre-
ativity happening in the
food world, and Good Eggs
is all about bringing that
high-quality production
right to your door," said
CEO Rob Spiro, who co-
founded the startup after
he sold his last company, a
social search service
called Aardvark, to Google
Inc. for $50 million in 2010.
Good Eggs offers more
varieties of fruits and veg-
etables than most super-
markets, but the selection is
limited to what can be
grown and made locally so
you can't buy bananas in
San Francisco in December
The service started in the
San Francisco BayArea last
year and recently launched
in New York, Los Angeles
and New Orleans. There


BANK OWNED SUGARMILL WOODS BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL
2004 3BR/2BA/3 Car garage with formal Highlands 3BR/2BA/2 Car Garage. Laminate
dining 8oice. $142,900 MLS#707187 flooring. $62,900 MLS#704181


are plans to expand into
more markets next year
The founders, Silicon
Valley engineers, say they
want to grow the market
for local food that's led to
the proliferation of farm-
ers markets and commu-
nity-supported agriculture
programs that deliver
boxes of fresh fruits and
vegetables.
"There are a lot of peo-
ple out there who want to
eat locally, who want to
support their local com-
munity, who want to sup-
port the producers who
are doing things right, but
it's just not very conven-
ient," said Chief Technol-
ogy Officer Alon Salant,
who ran a software con-
sulting firm before starting
Good Eggs with Spiro.
The company is entering
an increasingly competi-
tive market for online gro-
cery delivery Major
retailers such as Walmart
and Safeway deliver gro-
ceries and Amazon


s American -/,v BARBARA
Inves tments ... BANKS .U
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352-726-5855 ce: 52-476-3232 _
Please visit website www. barbarabanks.net
THE PERFECT HOME TO START
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THERE IS ROOM
FOR EVERYONE IN THIS
LOVELY HOME IN THE
SEVEN LAKES AREA
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thru to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool,
covered lanai.., all this & more sitting on .73acre. Room for the whole family
here. MLS 705163
Zc ASKING $195.000
Zechariah 4:6 OOOHOMB


often emails producers with
questions and comments.
After her weekly order
arrived at her downtown
San Francisco office, she
pulled out organic cauli-
flower and Romanesco
broccoli she bought from
Blue House Farm.
"I can't eat store-bought


j~~ |"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" k

S NANCY Direct:
IPONTICOS 35234,4225
...Multi-Million 555 Producer 1i 1' >:

9 e Hom fo 2014


15 BEGONIAS COURT
*Brick Paver Driveway *AIIl Remodeled
*Stainless AppI -New Paint
*Shutters *Cul-de-Sac Location
*Walk to Pod/Gym *Updated Air & Roof
$115,000 MLS#707374


167 CYPRESS BLVD. E
*Brick Exterior *Beautiful Fireplace Hardwood Floors
*Double Walk-In Closets -Huge sister Bedroom
*Upgraded Heat Pump *Corian & Granite Kitchen
.4 BR- 3 Baths- # Car Garage -Simply Gorgeous
$247,500 MLS#704000o


~~~~~~~ .... ..lll_:



il ^7$2.2.000 r 11 z -
S- C'EST SI BON!
'^ ~ 3 Bedrooms, 3 baths
^^ ^^^ n& e *- ~ Gore kitchen
SI i i i i iiFabulousli floor plan
S,- 20 S LA
D. ,. ; ._ GCEST SALUE

i^^ l^" ^^ Largedrooms, 3pi plath
34' x 36' Caged atrium
R Circular driveway
k One acre
$260,000 MLS 705501
GREAT VALUE
3 Bedrooms, 3 baths
~2,242 SFLAros
% Large rooms, split plan
30' Lanai w/caged pool
Interior laundry
One acre
$195,000 MLS 705784


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 E15

food anymore because it
just doesn't taste the
same," said Mainzer, who
works as an executive as-
sistant at a small invest-
ment bank. "You basically
remember what things are
supposed to taste like
when you eat these fresh
vegetables and fruits."


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 -
After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitmrusrealty.comn




E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IgVoll I:[OIL'AI =





1 COUNTY .I W.. Mi t, Ivres FL 3440 Cllod
FOR ,"-. iin
OE R r . OPEN
YEARS~J^ dTfJfT^ *fe *. .1 * SUNDAY ES


BEAUTIFUL
INVERNESS POOL HOME!
l..m :i ... _"0 _" A :...:..i I : I. _f :.vi....

[.nlv,:l I.n:nl M 1I = I..h/.'l
PRICED TO SELL $146,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH
IN CITRUS SPRINGS
1 I 1 .:.I nn;l I. .: i i lh l l h n. nl
l0h,11nn;l 1,11 ll I,,, .... i .:i ,,h l i;
Ml_:, =i:/:'.: $99,000
Call Isaac Baylon lot a personal lout


THIS HOME HAS IT ALL
ii :. u~ui ", 100. H i ii' iiiU'0) r i ",j

,' I I I ,,1..1rJ ,l: H 1 ,1: I I :, ,',, I ',, I, ,,,I ,
i11,~~~~~ ~~~~ I, ni,,,lii1 1, 11 .' 1, I., rl, 11 ,i~ .I .
.'.,ii r,,l i i, lh i h .li l rl,,hh .l I H ,I m l h ,I .,I
ri.: = -ii4 ASKING $258,900
Take a look and makt us an olhu
Pit D,,s 352212 17280


* A.:i Healheiwood
* J. I I,,llh M H

ML :,1 = 11:11' $67,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
CiliiusCounti'Sold. corn


_' h i '-E h IH _1 ll..l.i .l P -.:..inl F.....
* r,,l,., hII.. ...i .i I_.:l,l .] h; ,li,,,,li. Bn l~ll
I' ihi .:. "i~ I: p. i.i.:.. ll,:i.i.hi.p: Ir.,. ,:.i.ip
M_.:, =11:111h:, $49,500
Call Kaien Moti on 352212/7595
kernoilon. 'lampa/ba. i. coon


STATELY CRYSTAL OAKS HOME

h .0fn nll in&n'n j l p,.:J u F_-n'i,, lh, F:,nnJ

Ili_.-, =niii'' ASKING $90,300
C ill Ani liltl'iiJ, J22 21; ) .l, t t II iht./ t1 hi, lint


HAMPSHIRE HILLS 2.5 ACRES
* !.WR b.ilh _' .1... i 1.....I h....
* I -ll..Ji. .I.i.h.i IH H .''u .... '
* 'I ',;., Ijli r.l,.j ,, ,il .1.|
In_-, =/:n141. ONLY $227,500
Call Clhatles Kellj 352 422 2387







OUTSTANDING VALUE!


, .i I.I l I .. .l' l I I t ....I i . .i

li 'i = .. ASKING: $69,900
Conp.iaci Na.inc; Jenks tele 352 4010 80712
at el 352 ?26 6668








WONDERFUL HOME
FOR THE ACTIVE FAMILY



r ln.i : '-.4: ASKING $159,000
Ca1 Do-. Aln. 422 4627


01140 LIVEiin IN Ii iif luunuiu
B i-.lln lll lll Il; l l ll ; I nn llll lll I ilm
I.:jl-llll .:jl; lh16 6 1 p.n.jlll i.:]i lv l'lln...nl; l;v nl
Illn;: ,lvll ; l i l,, ; IIi I .11vd
Mi _:,= i:h ',1 $62,000
Call S/elan Sinait 3522120211








La 1
WHISPERING PINES VILLAS
,Irj I,, r l ,,rjii rj: rj ,i ,:1,: 1i .ii, Irj i irj i ,i. ,rJ
In .ll: rJi H i l: n . I I., ,, n, i ,l ll,,i, n n, I, , I "ii , , ',, ,
nI:I rI u i. i r : .p1: : .I,:ri i 1
III: = -1::4i: ASKING $55,900
Pit Da, 352212 280


. _" P, .I .h.)... III :H Il.n.I,]h ...
1 I ', A .:l, I:...,:.1 pin.. ,i |.,.: b .v l $ ..t l
* A ll *, . I.. ,I' I II 1 6 .1

Mi', =/I':,/ $110,000
Jeanne Oh Willaid Pickiel
i'I'i'. CiliusCounlt'Sold. com


rnm'M uua 9 UN If '1 1LUl1
I.. 1 I l. :. ........ _' 1 I . .I .. .


Ih.iI* iii*i ** hiii.m

MI'., =:":".. ASKING $125,000
Call Nancj Jenks tele 3524008072


YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED
i i ., ..... .. .. ,,' ,, ,, 1 I,, ,, ,, 1 I, '... h. i, ,
1.1-6 '1 .I h, ,' h ,.1, 6"11, ,1 -61,'d ,, ) ',,.l 6 1" '

I,.,I .i11 II: ." .lrl hl m i .1. l6 h

rin: = -4-1 ASKING $114,900
P",t D I, l352 22 7280


1 l ll. flfll'6. U46IUUL

* ... .v..l. 1 11. ,'.l li .


Mi :, = 1/0u11 .' $145,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'n'in. Cil usCounr'Sold. coan


1 n 1. I... I.. -..'..- I.ll I ...J.1 J., I....
Hn l I. . n

ONLY $83,900 ri: '-i ,
Ca ilAl'ta Snlid' 4768727


OWNER FINANCING
M .:., i,, -..l M ..l..i iI ., i I
F ; jh, l lill ;: [6i11 ::l l;l :l d I ',ll ),:1 h,,.
,1, ,:.,..: I $55,900 i,:i ,:-, :
:, ,:$49,000
hal l n -1,6 Inn .:n.nl I 769
Call Ouade Feeset 352.302/7699


i.ii -i4 nI:i ASKING $158,900
PatlDa.,352' 212 128
I I .. I.i 11n 1.1.1 1.1 11.
h ). I.. IH .. ... h .. ... .Ih ... .. l. l
j.v I) l ... )ll~l. i ..I .. .. ,,l l
h. I~ vI... I .- p I I- ...- ..I.....I h....
.)...11. .:.... ; h.ll..) ... bd I I.I h d.
rL : = -i-"J lf ASKING $158.900
P i Dill 4s,3521 212 728


31 BEAUTIFUL ACRES ,,,n
IIJIJ4 I: :l ..I ll h.ll',' h ..fl .i.] ,i d .. 'lfnh ,l


Mi. ';-.2 2$850,000
Call Jim Motion at 3524222173
io lout Ilhis slhice ol paradise


BE THE FIRST TO VIEW
THIS OPEN AND SPACIOUS HOME
I. ,.:.... I ,1n ..... I n.':'.' I, II I. '..
, . ,, .I ,... ..

,.: i: ,. n: ......... $86,900
Ruth F,-d-,,& I 3525636866


p
* 1 11 1 1 6 1 :11 ,. : : l l 1i: .n il
* I A .: I,, l .:I .n ,l I ...: .I
* _HH lI '-1.1i hn/ 'ii llh m.:.Jl

* N _vv I....].
Min = h:',:, $205,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 2123410
i:'i'i,. Cil iusCounil'So/d. corn