Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03332

Full Text

Dominant defense pushes Florida past Fresno Stato


Partly sunny. Un-
seasonably warm
and breezy.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


DECEMBER 22, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 137


Dinner, yes; business, no


Inverness
lottery ticket
worth $900K
TALLAHASSEE -A
Mega Money ticket pur-
chased in Inverness has
won $900,000.
Florida Lottery officials
say one player has
matched all four numbers
plus the Mega Ball to win
the top prize.
No tickets picked 4 of 4
numbers, but 45 tickets
won $483.50 each for
picking 3 of 4 plus the
Mega Ball number; 848
tickets won $52.50 each
for picking 3 of 4; 1,556
tickets won $19.50 each
for picking 2 of 4 plus the
Mega Ball; 10,710 won
$2.50 each for matching
one number plus the
Mega Ball; 27,723 tickets
won $2 each for picking 2
of 4; and 23,889 won a
free Quick Pick ticket for
matching the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn
Friday night were 2-3-15-
35 and the Mega Ball
was 5.
-From wire reports


HOMEFRONT:
Cozy
comfort

flair this
season to
ward off
those
winter
blues./
HomeFront

EXCURSIONS:
u '. =

i~ mJ

,- I- n


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The accusation was tossed out
with no setup or explanation.
Attorney Bill Grant had just fin-
ished telling county commission-
ers on Tuesday about a complaint
he planned to file on behalf of a
county employee when Commis-
sioner Scott Adams chimed in
something totally off the topic.
Adams said "there's a possibil-


ity" that somebody would be com-
plaining about a meeting top
county staffers had with Commis-
sioners Rebecca Bays and Joe
Meek at the Outback Steakhouse
regarding the employment status
of Marla Chancey, the former
tourism director
"I just wish all of us would be
safe so we don't cost the taxpay-
ers millions more," Adams said,
without elaborating.
According to interviews, the


only part that
Adams had cor-
rect was that
Bays and Meek -
joined high-level .
county staffers at --T
dinner
Meek, Bays
and Acting Joe
County Attorney Meek
Kerry Parsons all Citrus County
said no county commissioner.
business was dis-
cussed when they joined with
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe for dinner at Outback
Steakhouse following the Dec. 10
county commission meeting.
"I don't talk county business


with other county
commissioners,"
Meek said.
Actually, the
decision by
B* ,. Thorpe and assis-
tant county ad-
ministrator Cathy
Rebecca Pearson to trans-
Bays fer Chancey from
Citrus County tourism to parks
commissioner. and recreation
had occurred
prior to that night's dinner,
though it was announced the fol-
lowing day at a tourist develop-
ment council meeting.


Page A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge is being considered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for listing as a "wetland of
international importance."

Local wildlife refuge begins bidfor 'important' international listing


St. Pete eats
From seafood and
Italian to Asian and
Mexican, St. Petersburg
has plenty of restaurant
options./Page A13

LIVE UNITED
The United Way of
Citrus County
needs your help
for its annual
fundraising
initiative. If you
can, please send a
contribution to the
United Way of
Citrus County, c/o
Gerry Mulligan,
The Chronicle,
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.



Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A18
M ovies ..................... A 14
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A18
Veterans ........ A15


6 0 181417i8 10 I o0


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

he Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge is poised to join
an elite list ecosystems in the
world.
"The refuge is being proposed
for consideration by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service for listing as a wetland of
international importance under the


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Pat Benatar is no closer to re-
solving her Citrus County differ-
ences than she was six months
ago, when the rock singer drove
off after being paid without play-
ing a note at a charity
concert in Inverness.
The attorney for the
cardiologist who created
the concert says he is
preparing a lawsuit
against the singer for
breach of contract.
Bill Grant said re-
peated attempts to re- Bill
ceive either a refund or a attorr
rescheduled concert lawsu
from Benatar have filed
proven unsuccessful. Pat E
"They offered to return
money to people who paid for
tickets, and then they refused to
do it," Grant said. "They're not
responding to us. It's time to


G
iey
it '
ag
Bei


Ramsar Convention," said Ivan Vicente,
the refuge spokesman.
"It will not add any new regulations or
cause any of the rules to be changed, but
being on the list will give the refuge a lot
of international attention and will make
even more people to want to come here
and see what we have to offer," Vicente
said. Ramsar also does not affect land-
owner rights for wetlands management.
In 1971, at an international convention


move forward."
Benatar's manager, however,
said the check is in escrow and
Benatar wants to pay it all to the
three charities that were ex-
pected beneficiaries of Walker-
Fest 2013.
"We want to give the money to
the charities," Tom Con-
solo said Saturday "We
want to see the money go
to where it's supposed to
S go."
Benatar was the sched-
> uled headliner June 21
for WalkerFest 2013, an
annual event by Dr Den-
rant nis Walker, a Citrus
y said County cardiologist. It
will be was to benefit Habitat for
iainst Humanity, United Way of
natar. Citrus County and
Wounded Warriors.
The event was first scheduled
for the Citrus County Speedway,


Page A5


in Ramsar, Iran, participants signed a
treaty titled "The Convention on Wet-
lands of International Importance, espe-
cially as Waterfowl Habitat."
The convention recognized wetlands'
importance to communities, cultures,
governments and businesses and encour-
ages wetland conservation and wise-use
of wetlands.
See RPage A5


NASA astronauts

tackle urgent repairs


Next spacewalk

slated Tuesday

Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL Astro-
nauts removed an old space sta-
tion pump Saturday, sailing
through the first of a series of ur-
gent repair spacewalks to revive
a crippled cooling line.
The two Americans on the
crew, Rick Mastracchio and
Michael Hopkins, successfully
pulled out the ammonia pump
with a bad valve well ahead of
schedule. That task had been
planned for the next spacewalk,
originally scheduled for Monday
but now delayed until Tuesday,
Christmas Eve, because of the
need for a suit swap.
"An early Christmas," ob-


served Mission Control as Mas-
tracchio tugged the refrigerator-
size pump away from its nesting
spot.
If Mastracchio and Hopkins
keep up the quick work, two
spacewalks may be enough to
complete the installation of a
spare pump and a third space-
walk will not be needed as origi-
nally anticipated.
Several hours after Saturday's
spacewalk ended, Mission Con-
trol bumped spacewalk 2 to
Tuesday to give Mastracchio
enough time to prepare a spare
suit. His original suit was com-
promised when he inadvertently
turned on a water switch in the
air lock at the end of Saturday's
excursion. NASA officials said
Saturday night that it's unclear
whether a third spacewalk will
be needed and when it might
See Page A8


CITRUS C-_ UNT Y I-





wwwNICLchronicleonlineo
^&www. ch ron icleonlIi ne. com


HIGH
83
LOW
63


/B1


Commissioners say they meet

socially, but stay off county topics


Thinking global


Attorney says lawsuit coming

against rocker Pat Benatar


NEWS
!BRIEF




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fatal single-vehicle
accident Friday
A 50-year-old Dunnellon
woman was killed in a single-
vehicle accident late Friday
night in Marion County, ac-
cording to the Florida High-
way Patrol.
According to the accident
report, Mary Benoit, of Dun-
nellon, was driving a 2001
Honda Accord northbound on
Southwest 180th Avenue
Road when she steered off of
the roadway.
The right side of her vehicle
struck the guardrail and then
deflected back onto the road
in a northwesterly direction.
She continued northbound on
the road until she approached
a stop sign at the intersection
of State Road 40.
Reportedly, she failed to
stop at the intersection stop
sign and traveled northwest-
erly across the east and west-
bound lanes of S.R. 40. She
continued off of the roadway
and onto the north grass
shoulder.
The front of her vehicle col-
lided with the embankment
and came to a final rest off of
the roadway facing northwest.
Benoit was transported to
Ocala Regional Medical Cen-
ter, where she expired from
her injuries.
FHP continues to investi-
gate the crash.
Hospice to present
Monday matinee
HOMOSASSA- Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature
Coast will present the Monday
Movie Matinee "The Christ-
mas Blessing" at 2 p.m. Mon-
day, Dec. 23, at the Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature
Coast Wings Education Cen-
ter at 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
The movie is a sequel to
"The Christmas Shoes," where
a young doctor deals with his
past when he returns to his
hometown during the holidays.
Hospice of Citrus and the
Nature Coast's Monday
Movie Matinees are pre-
sented to the entire commu-
nity at no cost. They offer an
educational component that


benefits individuals dealing
with grief and loss in a sup-
portive environment. Discus-
sion time follows the movies,
and popcorn and snacks are
available to all.
For information or to make
reservations, call Lynn Miller
at 352-621-1500. Visit Hos-
pice of Citrus County on
Facebook or at www.hospice
ofcitrus.org.
Record number
of manatee deaths
ST. PETERSBURG-The
number of manatee deaths
has topped 800 for the first
time since such record-keep-
ing began in the 1970s, state
wildlife officials said.
According to the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Research In-
stitute in St. Petersburg, 803
manatee deaths have been
recorded this year. That's
about 16 percent of the state's
estimated population of 5,000
manatees.
Martine DeWit of the insti-
tute's Marine Mammal Pathol-
ogy Laboratory told the
Tampa Bay Times that 173 of
the dead were breeding-age
females. It's unclear what ef-
fect these deaths will have on
the endangered species'
population.
Last year, 392 manatee
deaths were recorded, which
officials consider normal.
The previous record for
manatee deaths was 766, set
in 2010 after a lengthy cold
snap. That cold snap mostly
affected younger manatees
that had not yet reached
breeding age, DeWit said.
Scientists blame a massive
bloom of red tide algae along
southwest Florida's coastline
and a mysterious ailment af-
fecting manatees in the Indian
River Lagoon for this year's
deaths.
Scores of dolphins and peli-
cans also have died in the In-
dian River Lagoon this year.
There was one highlight
among the manatee death re-
ports, officials said. This year,
71 manatees were killed by
boat, down from 81 last year
and well shy of the record 95
recorded in 2002.
-From Staff and wire reports


Local & State BRIEFS


TATIANA QUIROGA
The Villages Daily Sun
THE VILLAGES When Mar-
jorie Martin checks her mailbox,
cards and letters outnumber her
bills at least 2 to 1.
That's because The Villages resi-
dent corresponds with 70 pen pals
from around the world, she said. And
days without letters are rare.
"It's nice to get a letter instead of a
bill," Martin said.
Each day, Martin sits down at her
well-lit kitchen table and writes two
to five letters to her pen pals. Some
she handwrites; others she types on
her computer
Some pen pals she has been cor-
responding with for more than two
decades; others, for far less time.
Two of them even share her full
name.
But Martin has something in com-
mon with all 70: They love letters and
sharing their lives through them.
Martin's love affair with mail
began when she was 9 years old.
One of six siblings, she fell ill with
rheumatic fever on the last day of
third grade.
For a year and half, Martin was on
bed rest while her younger sisters
went to school and camped with
their Girl Scout troops.
Martin said she felt lonely at home
all day, while her mother tended to
the household chores.
But when Martin's aunt began to
write her letters, she finally had
something to look forward to.
Martin loved getting updates from
her aunt and knowing she was think-
ing of her, she said.
After she recovered, Martin was
interested in having a pen pal, but
didn't know how to go about finding
one.
In 1990, when Martin was much
older and her two kids had left home
as adults, she finally pursued pen
pals.
She discovered a pen pal maga-
zine and sent in a short summary
about herself, asking for pen pals.
The piece was published while
Martin was on vacation, but what
was waiting for her upon her return
astounded her: 300 letters.
Martin responded to every single
one.
Twenty-three years later, Martin
has whittled down her list to keep up


She discovered a pen
pal magazine and
sent in a short
summary about
herself, asking for
pen pals. ...
Twenty-three years
later, Martin has
whittled down her list
to keep up with
70 pen pals in
11 countries and
34 U.S. states.
with 70 pen pals in 11 countries and
34 U.S. states.
Martin and her pen pals exchange
updates both on the mundane, such
as mowing the lawn, and the senti-
mental, like a momentous occasion
or the loss of a husband.
One of Martin's pen pals, who lives
in Kent, England, included a picture
from her grandson's graduation in
her most recent letter
"I've been writing to her since he
was a tiny tot," Martin said.
The friendships between Martin
and her pen pals are just like any
others.
They listen to each other as they
pour their hearts out on paper, and
pray for each other during trying
times.
When Martin's parents died within
five weeks of each other, she re-
ceived a prayer shawl and dozens of
condolence cards from her pen pals.
Last year, Marjorie and her hus-
band, Don, moved to The Villages
from Michigan by car and left several
boxes at their other home.
A pen pal who lived a couple of
hours away from them in Michigan
picked up a few boxes and deliv-
ered them to the Martins in their
home in Florida on her way to visit
a relative.
"That's how caring and thoughtful
pen pals are," Marjorie said.
"They're a unique group."
Marjorie has met several of her
pen pals in person. They've attended


pen-pal picnics and even have
stayed at each others' homes.
But there never has been an awk-
ward moment meeting a pen pal, she
said. Marjorie already knows a pen
pal's personality through her letters.
When Marjorie met a pen pal in
Washington state after writing to her
for three years, the connection was
natural.
"We hugged, and we just picked up
where our letters left off," she said.
"It would be like you meeting a rela-
tive who lives far from you."
Marjorie said she has developed
very strong bonds with some of her
pen pals.
"There's some you put at the top of
the pile, and you write to immedi-
ately when you get their letter," she
said.
Marjorie even has corresponded
with pen pals until their death.
When two of her pen pals died,
their husbands wrote to thank Mar-
jorie for her commitment to writing.
"One husband said that (his wife)
looked forward to my letters, and I
ended up being her only pen pal in
the end," she said. "It really made
me feel like maybe I made a differ-
ence in her life."
How did Marjorie become so close
with people merely through the writ-
ten word?
When people converse on the
phone or in person, they are more
apt to think about how they want to
respond instead of listen to what is
being said, Marjorie said.
But in letters, the recipient con-
centrates on what they read, and
then what they write.
"We've become dear friends," she
said of many of her pen pals. "We ac-
tually will call each other once in a
great while, but we still prefer the
letters."
Marjorie said she has no idea how
much she has spent in postage over
the years.
But she figures the post office
needs the money, since they've lost
so much mail correspondence be-
cause of the Internet, she said.
And Marjorie has no plans to stop
giving business to the U.S. Postal
Service.
Her devotion raises the question:
Will she be a pen pal for life?
'As long as I can," Marjorie said.
"Or as long as my memory and hands
hold out"


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Villages woman still has



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A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


LOCAL/STATE


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Page A3 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Chronicle changes
hours, deadlines
for holidays
The Citrus County
Chronicle offices will be
closed Dec. 25 and Jan. 1.
Customer service phones
will be open from 7 to
10 a.m. both days.
Advertising deadlines
from Dec. 23 through Jan. 1
will be earlier than normal
on most days for classified
and retail advertising. Call
352-563-5966 (classified)
or 352-563-5592 (retail/dis-
play) for more information.
County offices
set holiday hours
Citrus County govern-
ment offices will be closed
Tuesday, Dec. 24, and
Wednesday, Dec. 25, in ob-
servance of Christmas. All
offices will be closed
Wednesday, Jan. 1, in ob-
servance of New Year's Day.
The county landfill will be
closing at 2:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Dec. 24, and will be
closed on Wednesday,
Dec. 25 and New Year's
Day.
Libraries will be closed
Dec. 24 and 25, but will re-
turn to normal business
hours on Thursday,
Dec. 26. All libraries will be
closing at 5 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 31, and closed on
New Year's Day.
All community buildings
and parks, including Bicen-
tennial Park pool, will be
closed all three days.
Animal Services will be
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 23, and will
be closed Tuesday and
Wednesday for Christmas.
The shelter will re-open at
10 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 26.
Animal Services will be
closed on Wednesday,
Jan. 1.
Don't feel like cooking
on Christmas?
These folks do
Several restaurants have
contacted the Chronicle to
advise they will be open on
Christmas. Representatives
of any restaurants not noted
in the list should email Edi-
tor Mike Arnold at marnold
@chronicleonline.com by
4 p.m. Monday. Please indi-
cate the hours you'll be
open, your telephone num-
ber and whether reserva-
tions are required.
Boat House Restau-
rant, 1935 Southeast
U.S. 19, Crystal River, 352-
564-9636. Open 6:30 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Reservations
recommended.
Hernando Hideaway
Sports Bar, 2404 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando, 586-4168.
Open noon to 2 a.m.
Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen, 6301 Riverside
Drive, Yankeetown, 352-
447-4899. Open noon to
6 p.m. Reservations
recommended.
Joe's Family Restau-
rant, 911 W. Main St., Inver-
ness, 352-726-1688. Open
6 a.m. to 9 p.m. No
reservations.
Oysters, 606 Northeast
U.S. 19, Crystal River, 352-
795-2633. Open 8 am. to4 p.m.
Reservations accepted at
noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Rustic Ranch, 104
U.S. 41, Inverness, 352-
726-7333. Open 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Reservations
recommended
Sabina's Diner, 2400
N. Florida Ave., Hernando,
637-1308. Open 6a.m. to
5 p.m. No reservations.
Samantha's Cafe,
7103 N. Carl G. Rose High-
way (State Road 200), Her-
nando. Open 7 a.m. to
4p.m.
West 82 Bar & Grill at
the Plantation on Crystal
River, 352-795-4211. Open
6 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. for


breakfast and noon to 8 p.m.
for Christmas buffet. Reser-
vations recommended.
Yanni's Restaurant,
3297 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, 352-503-6853.
Open noon to 8 p.m.
-From staff reports


For homeless, annual giveaway brings smiles


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HERNANDO Two-
year-old Derek "D.J."
MoreyJr is a normal little
boy who plays in the dirt,
pushes around his bike
and dreams about Santa
Claus.
But in reality, Santa
might not come or bring
him the bike that he would
push in the dirt, which he
calls "home."
Due to hard economic
times for his family, D.J.
has been living in the
woods with his mother Ali-
cia Alvarado and father
Derek Morey
"It means a lot," Derek
Morey said. "It's a good
program that they do and
they help out a lot. We
have been struggling after
my car accident, and me
being out of work has put
us in a bad position."
They were given an op-
portunity to breathe Satur-
day and let go of their
Christmas worries at the
annual Christmas dinner
and giveaway at Hernando
Park.
Thanks to the people
from The New Church
Without Walls, The Path
and Inverness Walmart,
men and women who live
in the woods, on the streets
or who are struggling re-
ceived bikes, blankets,
clothes, tents, food, gift
cards for Walmart, toi-
letries, a hot holiday meal
and more.
"When this first started,
all we heard was there was
no homeless in Citrus
County," said The Path ex-
ecutive director DuWayne
Sipper "I had someone
take me into the woods,
and guess what? There
were camps everywhere.
What I discovered was that
we have streets homeless,


I I I F lp m


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
: Two-year-old Derek "D.J." Morey Jr. couldn't have been happier than he was Saturday. He had received a
bicycle at the annual Christmas dinner and giveaway. Along with his parents, Alicia Alvardo and Derek Morey, he
has been living in the woods. Citrus County Sheriff's Office Deputy Roscoe Watts was one of about
a hundred volunteers who donated their time to help families in need Saturday. He carried a box of food for a lady
attending. : Daniele Camp and her daughter Katelynn Camp were among thousands of attendees who were
served a warm holiday meal at the annual Christmas dinner and giveaway.


woods homeless and then
homeless homeless."
Doug Alexander, The
New Church Without Walls
pastor, estimated that hun-
dreds of families in need
utilized some form of as-
sistance Saturday
"It means a lot to the
homeless and needy be-
cause this is their big
event," Alexander said.
"Normally, we do different
events for everybody else,
but this is the real people
that live in the woods. We
know for a fact this is their
life because we feed them


and see them walking
every day When they get
brand-new bicycles and
tents, they get a chance to
revitalize their life. The lit-
tle boy who is 2 years old
that lives in the woods,
that bike made his Christ-
mas. His parents didn't
have the money to do that.
It put a joy on their face to
see him happy"
A smile on her face is ex-
actly what 30-year-old
Amber Cooper was leaving
with.
"Once in awhile you are
doing really well in life


and everything is OK and
you don't need assistance,"
she said. "But when you
are really hurting and you
need things, it is wonder-
ful that people are out
here willing to give it to
us."
Inverness Walmart Su-
percenter store manager
Larry Gamble saw the im-
pact firsthand.
'A guy was crying when
I gave him the bike," Gam-
ble said. "He said, 'Man, I
just don't even know what
to do with this.' That is
what it is about giving.


He had probably never
had a bike."
And that was exactly the
purpose of Saturday's din-
ner and giveaway, accord-
ing to Alexander, Gamble
and Sipper
Fresh food was donated
from The Path's farm co-
operative. Dr John
Gelin's office, Pizza Hut
and Lance suppliers also
donated.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online, corn.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


.... In Inglis parade,


green more than


a Christmas color
he Inglis Recreation Committee will
hosted the 2013 Inglis Christmas Parade
and Festival on Saturday. The theme for
BA- BALLthe parade was "A Repurposed Christ-
mas." Floats that wished to be judged had to be
made of at least 50 percent recycled materials.
,.A .Above, the Gateway Council Girl Scouts Troop
18o take time out for a photo op to present their
float. At left, the Scooter Haven Country Club
warms up for the annual parade. Playing the bot-
tles is Donnie Melvyn and on the washboard is
Renee Giles.





MLK Jr. Day of Service slated for Jan. 20


Special to the Chronicle

The Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center, Retired &
Senior Volunteer Program
and the Board of County
Commissioners will pres-
ent a Day of Service in
honor of Dr Martin Luther
KingJr
Martin Luther King Jr.
Day of Service projects
will be held Monday,
Jan. 20, and Citrus County


residents are invited to
participate in honor of Dr
King's legacy Local resi-
dents are urged to join
thousands of Americans
across the country in mak-
ing the holiday 'A Day On,
Not A Day Off" by serving
others.
Martin Luther King de-
voted his life to advancing
equality, social justice, and
opportunity for all and
voiced that everyone has a


role to play making Amer-
ica what it ought to be.
Day of Service organiz-
ers are encouraging resi-
dents to gather friends,
neighbors, church groups,
clubs and civic organiza-
tions to join in supporting
the projects by registering
to volunteer
Join project participants
from 9 a.m. to noon Mon-
day, Jan. 20, at Floral City
Park, 9530 S. Parkside


Ave., Floral City, for a
cleanup day; or, from
9 a.m. to noon to create
valentines for veterans at
the Central Ridge Commu-
nity Center, 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills.
There will be a light
breakfast for all partici-
pants, and commemora-
tive T-shirts for the first 25
registered volunteers at
each event.
For more information or


to register for the event,
contact the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center at 352-
249-1275; or, via email, at
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Registration forms may
be found at www.nature
coastvolunteercenter org.
Please print, complete and
send the form back to the
Nature Coast Volunteer
Center, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court, Key No. 4,
Lecanto, FL 34461.




A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES

Birthday Make thoughtful
choices this year. If you choose the
right path, you stand to fulfill your
dreams. Planning and preparation
will be your best assets.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
A need to make sweeping changes
may shock those close to you. Your
heart will lead you in the right direction.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Children or romantic partners may
be especially needy. Don't give in
too readily if doing so will compro-
mise other commitments.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Nurture your health and general
well-being. Taking sufficient time to
rest is important.
Aries (March 21-April 19)-
Now is a good time to become bet-
ter acquainted with potential part-
ners, whether for business,
romance or friendship.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
Personal financial setbacks will
cause you stress. Make a clear
game plan for coping with fiscal un-
certainty.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Your conscious and subconscious
minds may be in conflict. Meditate
very carefully on which path to take.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
Children or friends may go to great
lengths to get your attention.
Make an effort to understand their
motivations.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Dis-
ruptions and delays will throw a
wrench in your routine. Be prepared
to go with the flow. Vigorous exer-
cise will help alleviate your stress.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You
may be irritated by friends and rela-
tives. Ignore what they have to say.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Hol-
low promises are likely. Contracts
will not turn out to be as lucrative as
projected.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Avoid the spotlight. Consider who
your true friends really are. Seek out
the information you need to advance.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
If a friend or relative is meddling in
your affairs, tell them to mind their
own business.


ENTERTAINMENT


Polish pranksters
stop tram to film
Tolkien scene
WARSAW, Poland It's al-
most like in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The
Fellowship of The Ring:" Gandalf
stands in the way of Balrog and
tells him to "go back to the shadow"
to buy time for fleeing Frodo
Baggins and his companions.
But the scene is Warsaw, not
the Mines of Moria. A Polish
prankster dressed as Gandalf
stops a city tram, which represents
Balrog, and recreates the scene
with several others dressed as
Middle-earth characters.
Tolkien's Gandalf almost died in
the confrontation, but the Warsaw
practical joker, called SAWardega,
just irritated the tram driver.
AYouTube video of the prank
posted last week has gone viral
with nearly 3 million views by
Saturday, just days before
Poland's premiere of the "The
Hobbit" film sequel.
Singer Montgomery's
restaurant to be sold
HARRODSBURG, Ky.--A
central Kentucky restaurant run
by singer Eddie Montgomery is
set to go on the auction block in
January to settle $12.7 million in
defaulted loans.
Central Bank & Trust of Lex-
ington won a judgment against
Eddie Montgomery's Steakhouse
in Harrodsburg over unpaid
loans and forced the auction, set
for Jan. 10 in Harrodsburg.
The Lexington Herald-Leader
reported the bank sued Montgomery
and his ex-wife, Tracy Nunan, in
Boyle Circuit Court earlier this year,
claiming the couple owed money
on loans related to the business.
Montgomery is half of the
country music duo Montgomery
Gentry.
The restaurant opened in late
2009 but closed in early May.


Associated Press
Beyonce performs onstage Friday on her Mrs. Carter World
Tour at the TD Garden in Boston, Mass.


Beyonce talks
album, success
NEW YORK Beyonce said
even though she worked hard
on her new album, she had her
doubts minutes before its re-
lease.
She says she wondered if
people were going to hate it.
She needn't have worried.
The singer's fifth album de-
buted at No. 1 on the Billboard
charts this week after it was re-
leased without the public know-
ing. "Beyonce" sold 617,000
units in the United States in a


ON THE NET
www.beyonce.com


week; it has sold more than
1 million albums worldwide.
The album includes 14 songs
and 17 videos. Beyonce held a
screening for the videos Satur-
day at the School of Visual Arts
in New York.
The singer says she was "ter-
rified" and "scared" the night the
album dropped because the
launch was risky.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 22, the
356th day of 2013. There are nine
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 22,1944, during the World
War II Battle of the Bulge, U.S. Brig.
Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe rejected
a German demand for surrender,
writing "Nuts!" in his official reply.
On this date:
In 1864, during the Civil War, Union
Gen. William T. Sherman said in a
message to President Abraham Lin-
coln: "I beg to present you as a
Christmas-gift the city of Savannah."
In 1910, a fire lasting more than
26 hours broke out at the Chicago
Union Stock Yards; 21 firefighters
were killed in the collapse of a burn-
ing building.
In 1937, the first, center tube of
the Lincoln Tunnel connecting New
York City and New Jersey under-
neath the Hudson River was opened
to traffic. (The north tube opened in
1945, the south tube in 1957.)
In 2001, Richard C. Reid, a pas-
senger on an American Airlines
flight from Paris to Miami, tried to ig-
nite explosives in his shoes, but was
subdued by flight attendants and
fellow passengers. (Reid is serving
a life sentence in federal prison.)
Ten years ago: A federal judge
ruled the Pentagon couldn't enforce
mandatory anthrax vaccinations for
military personnel.
Five years ago: Five Muslim im-
migrants accused of scheming to
massacre U.S. soldiers at Fort Dix
were convicted of conspiracy in
Camden, N.J.
One year ago: Egypt's Islamist-
backed constitution received a
"yes" majority in a final round of vot-
ing on a referendum that saw a low
voter turnout.
Today's birthdays: Former
World Bank Group President Paul
Wolfowitz is 70. Baseball Hall-of-
Famer Steve Carlton is 69. ABC
News anchor Diane Sawyer is 68.
Thought for Today: "Those
wearing tolerance for a label call
other views intolerable." Phyllis
McGinley, American poet and au-
thor (1905-1978).


I!/ 0.00"I i[86A u.uu
THREE DAY OUTLOOKEclu vdY
'FE --` V W- i TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
J,- High 83 Low: 63 -
_^.& Partly sunny, unseasonably warm and
breezy
l pi,".-, MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
"W High: 77 Low: 54
--mm I increasing clouds and windy. A 40%
chance of PM showers and t-storms
~ TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 48
0111i Morning showers exile. Decreasing clouds
Sbreezy arnd during colder by night.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from me
PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Total tor the month
Total for the year
Normal for the yea
'As ol 7 p m at In frs
UV INDEX:
0-2 minimal. 3-4iow
7-9 high, 10+ very
BAROMETRIC I


DATE DAY


84/68 Saturday at 3 p.m. 64.9
/24
71/53 HUMIDITY
72 Saturday at 3 p.m. 90%
ean 10 POLLEN COUNT**
0.00" Today's active pollen:
0.25" Juniper, composites
51.92" Today's count: 5.6/12
r 4551 Monday's count: 7.4
5 Tuesday's count: 6.6
,5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
high
PRESSURE Saturday observed: 54
30.11 Pollutant: Particulale matter
SOLUNAR TABLES SrS-, S,,
MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)


12/22 SUNDAY 09:36 02:38 21:27 15:01
12/23 MONDAY 10:10 03:21 22:20 15:45
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
MUNET1111111141 -5:36Dm,
Q 0 BISUNOM T0O111111111111143W 7:T9 a.m.
) W mUis T ................0:26 p.m,
M0aNSET TODAY 10 34 a m
Dec 25 Jan I Jan7 Jan15 MOS MA03a-
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There Is no bum ban.
For mre InforTnation call Forikda DvSson of Forestry at (352) 754-6777 For more
rluoiim bllk'lr ,h', (lr,-.^,,-]ll| :.,riil'llri-ilt pltt ,e 1] rl'*i i r _i v, ,Dl-' m ,-r K'^r^ rr t, ',. r.slrpr 11
]'11iC, vll ,'ne 11 i]'.- i:n 1,6,- i ,-l r2rdl r sl%,I,

WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited o two days per week before 10 a.m. or ater4 p.m., as
foflows:
EVEN addresses may water on Tthusday arn, or Sunday.
ODD 0dkdre.,s-% mIy n -1ler 2 Wclne-ija, lndc-tS Sirrf.-ivy
HAM ,ll w l fr.g WT1 A VJ-K o ru3Mle ,,f ,n-cro im.Ti'ri l ot rie-i,,aJ.F ",relIs iuch-
as vegetable gardens. ifowers and shrubs can be done on any day and at any
fime.
Gd" S County Utlies' cistomers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
ptani material 352-527-7669, S.1,'w v, ,-,i1ii, -bs y q.n.MLtv I.r ad,ti'vrai
waieing allowances.
nOrA I r-1 irimi,.:n-Fl pira3?.-aiI ly rof Inverness @ 352-726-2321.C3iyoCr .;ria,
River @ 352-79&4216 exm. 313, unincorporated Ciflrus County @ 352-527-7669.


"From mouths of rivers
City
Cha~sahowftzka" 9;39 a.m.
Crysal Rvef" 7:45 a.m.
Wihlacoochee" 4:21 a.m.
HomoarsnosaSa'" 8:25am


TIDES
"At" n ,,', v "At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
High Low
0.5ft. 10:16p.m. 0.411 2.47am. 0.2" 5;29p.m0.1 .
2.0tt. 834 .m. 1:58a.m, 0.7ft 2:40p.mO,4I
2.6tt. 528p.m. 28t 11:39a.m 02t11
1.2tt 927p.m. 1,011 2:57a.m, 021t 3:45p.mO2fl.-


Today: South winds 20 knots. Seas 2
to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters a
moderate chop to choppy. Tonight:
South winds 15 to 25 knots. Seas 2
to 5 feet. Bay and inland waters a
moderate chop to choppy.


H L Fcast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature


66
lakrn at Aripek


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wilhiacoochee at Holder 28.65 28.66 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.46 38.47 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.56 39.57 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Flrai Ciry 40.21 40.22 42.20
Levels IOpOfle in feet aove sea vo Flood s tage o lakes are based on 2 33-year flood.
the meananrnual Iood wbIh ts a 43-p "EM dwe of brg equaled Or e neeed
any ome year This data is oblainred Im the S rfiwest Forxta Water Management Distict
31"i1 :UL,'I ".t EL rp.,.;.: i Ir .i "<, --i tl"l 1 I'I_ L,'.iri.-[ :,f lh',._ Ijri ir,- !"ji : x, .'=-, -ji. jI ul u'.o .
)-A i:rl- l I,:. :. i -A4 .1 ,.H V P Ir. aIO N

THE NATION
L^ -_ -- mi -


~N~4


SAT SUN
H L Pep. H LFcst


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
BurlingtoM, VT
Charleston, S.C
Charleslon, W.V.
Chariaedoe
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbla. SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Oenver
Des Moines
Detront
E Paso
Evansvillte. IN
Harrisbuirg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
LasVegas
Ltlle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Moble
Monlgomery
Nashville


48 41
41 32
58 52
71 52
69 52
74 45
71 54
28 21
73 62
30 21
54 41
52 36
30 22
80 53
75 59
73 48
34 3O
65 59
59 40
32 29
60 57
49 33
52 35
29 12
26 21
35 34
48 36
55 44
52 36
53 39
75 61
50 36
65 40
69 46
61 46
69 60
76 67
34 27
23 18B
75 68
78 54
73 62


11 62
314 42
.23 64
70
70
46 55
71
,01 17
.05 67
.18 35
54
.97 46
28 37
80
.04 68
73
.01 33
1,1759
1t,0455
50 29
1.61 60
01 35
1.4944
32
19
,51 44
.02 51
3,1248
66
63
1,4865
2.4045
57
4,9450
69
1,1959
.74 56
.01 30
19
75
03 69
.11 60


KEY TO CONDITIOmNS ccloud, dr driu;
M-ainr hthaz pCoparltwy cloudy; rrain;
In atuiow mix; s-xurmy; iish-shoawes
sn-"snsw ts.Uhwdwstormsn wwIndy.
WeAlWrCam m l LPMOI3


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
r SUNDAY

SAT SUN
SCity H L Pep. H LFcst
NewOrleans 78 69 76 48 ts
NBw York Cily 62 51 01 69 49 sh
Norufok 73 53 79 58 pc
Okahoma Ciy 33 30 1.0230 186 pc
Omaha 25 18 16 -1 pc
Palm Sprlngs 70 44 68 49 s
Philadelphia 67 45 70 43 sh
Phoenix 59 46 62 42 s
Pittsburgh 61 56 .43 65 29 r
Portland, ME 38 33 .05 33 28 I
Portland. OR 53 41 .03 50 43 r
Providence.RI 59 39 60 38 sh
Raleigh 74 50 77 52 sh
Rapidcity 17 2 12 -9 pc
Reno 50 24 46 24 pc
Rochester.NY 54 37 .36 43 22 I
Sacramento 60 33 62 38 s
Sa IILake eCIty 33 25 08 33 24 pc
SanAntonio 75 57 -22 62 32 s
San Diego 62 50 64 52 1
San Francisco 60 48 57 48 s
Savamnnlah 81 53 80 50f
Seattte 47 42 .16 50 44 r
Spokane 28 19 34 28 sn
SI. Louis 37 33 .82 35 t3 pc
SLSle. Mane 23 17 -01 13 0 sn
Syracumse 56 47 32 59 22 f
Topeka 27 22 04 23 3 pc
'Nathinglon 722 l 72 45 ts
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH a LOW
HIGH 88. Purl. Goxdt FRa
LOW -1 FI f NO
WORLD CITIES


Lisbon 55/371pC
London 53/46/r
Madrid 4&32is
Mexico City 75/441s
Montreal 28W19/sn
Moscow 28'26sn
Paris 46/42/cd
Rio 801,71Fi
Rome 60/42/
Sydney 87175Sod
Tokyo 503/1pc
Toronlo 37/30sn
Warsaw 37/32apc


ILLEGAL NOTICES







Bid Notices.......................... D7



Miscellaneous Notices .......D7



1-) CITRUS COUNT



CHRONICLE
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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City


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


H L P'cast City


Daytona Bch. 83
Fort Lauderdale 83
Fort Myers 86
Gainesville 83
Homestead 82
Jacksonville 82
Key West 82
Lakeland 85
Melbourne 83


MARINE OUTLOOK


[*


DEW POINT


SUN
CITY WH/LSKY
AcapuloO 87f7f/
Amistelrdam 44/42/r
Athens 59/44/s
Beljing 35/1 5i/s
Brlln 42S9pc
Bermuda 69t6Bpc
Cairo 6851/s
Calgary 12/1fsn
Havana 86/69/pc
Hong Kong W60SWp
Jerusalem 62PJ44/s




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DINNER
Continued from PageAl

As for the dinner itself,
it's legal for county com-
missioners to gather at
social occasions so long
as they do not dis-
cuss business that
would be coming |
before them in the
foreseeable fu-
ture, Parsons said. VW
Commissioners t
say they often
gather with
county staffers for Ke
lunch or dinner Pars
before and after acting
board meetings, attorney
They say no no o
county business is busine
discussed and discus,
they make a point din
not to sit next to
each other
"We talk about
life. We talk about
our families,"
Meek said. "It's '
perfectly fine to
socialize with
board members, Sc
and I think it's a Ada
good thing." Citrus
Bays said noth- commit
ing inappropriate
came up during
the dinner Adams
was referring to.
"We were talk- .
ing with Kerry
She was getting
ready to fly home
to Boston. Joe was
getting ready to Dei
leave for New Dan
York," Bays said. Citrus
"It's Christmas. commit
We're talking
about the holidays."
Both commissioners
said it's absurd to think
they would violate the
Sunshine Law while


dining.
"If we really wanted to
do something shady and
behind the scenes, we
wouldn't do it at a very
public restaurant," Bays
said. "Us sitting around
having dinner after hours
socializing in a very pub-
lic place, there's
nothing to it"
Adams did not
return phone calls
for comment
Parsons said
she warns com-
S missioners about
the pitfalls of
rry gathering for pub-
sons lic meals.
county "We caution
y said them there's al-
)unty ways the appear-
ss was ance when
sed at they're out in
ner. public ... having
dinner together,"
she said. "They
are aware of what
their duties are."
Commissioner
Dennis Damato,
the senior mem-
ber of the board,
Ott said he sees noth-
ims ing wrong with
County commissioners
ssioner. eating lunch or
dinner together
so long as other
staffers are pres-
S ent and the
S conversation
j stays on personal
topics.
Still, Damato
said he avoids
inis those situations.
iato "I like to err on
County the side of cau-
ssioner. tion," he said. "I
don't make a
habit of it."
Contact Chronicle re-
porterMike Wrightat352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


LAWSUIT
Continued from Page Al

and then moved to the Citrus County
Fairgrounds as a precaution against
inclement weather
The day of the show, Benatar's
production crew arrived and deter-
mined the stage was unsafe. TMC
Productions, which Walker hired to
build the stage, made modifications
that were approved by a structural
engineer, company president Chris
Moling said.
Benatar's crew disagreed. Two
hours before the show was to begin,
Benatar received a $55,000 check
from the concert promoter and
then the tour bus drove off without
her ever getting off it.
Consolo said Benatar made the


GLOBAL
Continued from PageAl

Vicente said designation
would be a major coup for
the area and elevate its
profile to new heights.
"People who live here
already know how beauti-
ful it is here at the refuge
and all the habitats we
have, but people outside


Special to the Chronicle
Pat Benatar and husband Neil Giraldo
were to headline WalkerFest 2013 in
late June at the Citrus County Fair-
ground, near Inverness. Their crew
said the stage was unsafe.

decision to cancel the show but still
take the check because she believed
the funds were safer in an escrow


don't really know that.
With this listing, it can re-
ally put the refuge's name
out there," he said.
Vicente said the process
could take months before
officials get an answer
about the designation.
The refuge is consid-
ered one of Florida's valu-
able wetland ecosystems,
with habitats for several
endangered and threat-
ened species.


account than in Walker's hands.
"We were entitled to the money, so
we took it," Consolo said. "We want
to settle this. Dr Walker should put
the charities ahead of himself."
Consolo said there was talk of
rescheduling the concert, but no de-
tails were worked out.
"We didn't go there to screw any-
body," he said. "We went there to
play a show"
Walker sold about 1,000 tickets for
the event. Grant said any tick-
etholder who wanted a refund re-
ceived one.
"Dr Walker lost over $100,000, all
for trying to raise charity money for
the underserved and underprivi-
leged," Grant said. "He tried to do a
good thing and got stuck."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline. corn.


The 30,842 acres of
saltwater bays, estuaries,
and brackish marshes
are home to more than
50 species of reptiles
and amphibians, 25
species of mammals,
endangered manatees, sea
turtles and bald
eagles. More than 35,000
tourists visit the refuge
yearly
The bid for the designa-
tion was endorsed by vari-


ous stakeholders, includ-
ing U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson,
Florida Native Plant
Society, Citrus Audubon
Society, Withlacoochee
Area Residents Inc. and
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission, according to
officials.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Margrette
Miller, 71
CRYSTAL RIVER
Margrette Ann Miller, 71,
Crystal River, Fla., fell vic-
tim to oligodendroglioma,
a very rare form of brain
cancer, and passed away
Dec. 9, 2013, just a few
weeks after it was diag-
nosed at the Moffatt Can-
cer Center in Tampa.
Margrette, born Oct. 19,
1942, in Elora, Tenn., lived
for the last 12 years at 202
Bay Path Drive in Crystal
River, where she kept her
house and was a very ac-
tive gardener Margrette
was a sweet Christian lady
who was well liked by
everyone who ever met
her She loved walking her
Shetland sheepdog, Wylie,
around the neighborhood,
and personally knew many
people in the South Citrus
part of Crystal River She
also enjoyed sitting
around on the community
dock with her best friends,
the local neighbors. She
will be sorely missed by
everyone who knew her
Margrette was married
to Jim Miller for 28 years.
Jim was
her third
husband.
They met
in Hunts-
ville, Ala.,
in July
1985, and
they were
married in Margrette
December Miller
of that
same year
She actu-
ally saved





numeraloeas in iydh
his life on
numerous
occasions.
During
those first
16 years of
her mar-
riage to
Jim, Margrette traveled all
over the world and visited
more than 35 separate
countries. She lived for
several years in Riyadh,
Saudi Arabia, three years
in Manila, Philippines,
and two years in Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil. Margrette
travelled to six of the
seven continents and twice
on separate occasions cir-
cumnavigated the Earth.
She often said that every-
one in America should
have the opportunities to
travel and see the world as
she had, because then they
would more fully appreci-
ate the beauty and the
unique greatness of the
USA. She was an expert in
hand-woven carpets and
Chinese furniture. She
also collected antique
cobalt glass. Margrette was
the most frugal woman
that anyone who knew her
had ever met. She came
from a family of poor but
hardworking sharecrop-
pers in the hills of south
Tennessee and she was
proud to squeeze a nickel
until the buffalo bellowed.
Her first-grade school
dress was made of flour-
sack cloth, but her mother
always made sure that she
was clean and that there
was always something on
the table. As a result of her



danced national and
personal budget, believed
that America should have
no national debt and ab-
solutely believed that
everyone should work as
hard as she had worked
for whatever benefits they
received.


CIc. 2Wi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
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For Information and costs
call 726-8323


Margrette has three sur-
viving brothers, Roe, Hugh
and Edward Williams and
a sister, Saundra. Mar-
grette is survived by her
daughter, Laurie Walker;
and her son, Tommy
Schrimsher, both from her
first marriage. Margrette
also left four grandchil-
dren, Darryl, Alexa and
Jesse Walker and Taylor
Halligan.
Margrette was buried in
Cullman, Ala., on Saturday
Dec. 21, 2013. A wake will
be held at the Miller Resi-
dence at 202 Bay Path
Drive in Crystal River
from 1 until 6 p.m. Satur-
day, Dec. 28, 2013. Anyone
who knew Margrette is in-
vited to attend with their
guests and pay their re-
spects to a truly fantastic
lady
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.




Sidney
Newman, 85
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Sidney
Newman, age 85, of Bev-
erly Hills, Florida, will be
held 1:00 PM, Monday, De-
cember 23,2013 at the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes
with Rabbi Mordecai
Kamlot officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Fero
Memorial Gardens, Bev-
erly Hills. The family will
receive friends from 12:00
Noon until the time of
service, Monday at the
chapel. The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Temple Beth Shalom, PO.
Box 640024, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464-0024. Online con-
dolences may be sent to
the family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Newman was born
July 30, 1928 in Rockaway
Beach, NY, son of Louis
and Mathilda (Weiss) New-
man. He died December
20, 2013 in Beverly Hills,
FL. Mr Newman was a
Navy veteran who served
during World War II. He
worked as a General Su-
perintendent for the New
York City Housing Author-
ity and moved to Beverly
Hills from Freeport, NY in
1985. He enjoyed politics,
swimming, walking, writ-
ing, old movies and spend-
ing time with the family
Mr Newman was a mem-
ber of the Beverly Hills
Civic Association and
Union Member DC-37, NY
Mr Newman was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents, brother, Irving
Newman and sister, Helen
Mongardi. Survivors in-
clude son, Louis (Joanne)
Newman of Leesburg, FL,
step son, Alan (Loretta)
Pittides of Oceanside, NY,
2 step daughters, Joanne
Pittides of Levittown, NY
and Helen (Charlie) Ralph
of Farmingdale, NY, 5
grandchildren, Hannah
Newman and Rachel
Newman, both of Citrus
Springs and James Sheer
II, Jeremy Sheer and
Kathrin Duncan, all of
Leesburg, life long friend
and caregiver, Veronica
Newman of Beverly Hills
and niece, Rosie Balzano
of Toms River, NJ.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Donna
Watson, 66
HOMOSASSA


Willi
Lange
HOMOS
William C. L
of Homosassa
Saturday, De
Private crer
take place ui
reaction of Brc
Home and Ci
Lecanto, Fla.

Doro
'Dottie'
81
CRYSTAL
Dorothy (I
Sigh, 89, Cr3
Fla., passed a
2013, in Jacks
was born Dec


Orlando.
She was
preceded
in death
by her
husband,
golf pro
Sammy
Sigh. They
h a d
decades of
enjoyment
traveling
with their
around the
were close


g
f
fl


golfer Ben Ho
merous other
their retired
they kept the s
and Dottie use
raphy talents
letter the b
made them
team. Dottie
for her jokes,
of humor anc
She always ha
stories of th
ences that
everyone she !
Dottie had
Monetsi Unke
sonville, who
passed away
able to live th
together as sis
etsi's son's ho
ters had or
David (Nora) T
sonville. Dotti
nieces and nE
adored her. I
were her pas
later years.
them anywhE
Crystal River
to go in the ca
fectionately n
She was a faiti
of St. Bened
Church, also a
Seven Rivers
Country Club.
In honor of
nice to peoplE
Found in her p
calligraphy, "S
your heart is
She loved h(
and never re;
the loss of h
only Sammy
greatly misse(
knew her and
Arrangemei
Hardage-Gidc
Hills Funeral
sonville. w\
giddenschape


iam Donna Maria Watson
a 55 (nee Blair) passed away at
SS her home in Homosassa,
3ASSA Fla., on
,ange, age 55, F r i d a y,
a, Fla., died Dec. 20,
c. 21, 2013. 2013. She
nation will struggled In,
under the di- for years
)wn Funeral with se-
rematory in vere mi-
graine
h e a d- Donna
)thy a c h e s; Watson
' Sigh, however,
she loved her family so
9 much that she lived life to
L R I V E R the fullest even in pain.
Born in Paterson, N.J., to
)ottie) Mav George and Maria Blair on
ystal River, Dec. 19, 1947, she attended
way Nov. 26, St. Catherine's School
15,12 Sine until she graduated in
15, 1923, i grade eight. The family
then moved to Riviera
MBeach, Fla., in 1960 so that
Donna's father could work
at Pratt and Whitney She
Graduated from Riviera
Beach High School in
1965. In 1967, she received
an associate's degree from
Palm Beach Community
Dorothy College. She then went on
Sigh to Florida State Univer-
sity, where she graduated
with honors, earning her
,olf passion degree in English. In June
world. They of 1974, Donna earned her
friends with master's degree in Educa-
gan, plus nu- tion from Florida Atlantic
Golfers. In University
nent years, Donna's teaching career
scoreboards; began at Martin County
ed her callig- High School in Stuart, Fla.
to uniquely There she met her future
boards. This husband, David Lee Wat-
an unusual sn
an unusual son. They married on June
was known 23, 1973. They subse-
great sense quently moved to Ho-
d big smile. mosassa, Fla. In addition
id great, true to teaching English at Mar-
ieir experi- tin County High School,
delighted Donna also taught English
onew i in Crystal River High
one sister, School in Citrus County,
albach,Jack- and Central High School
also recently in Hernando County
They were Donna is survived and
eir last year lovingly remembered by
ters in Mon- her husband of 40 years,
me. The sis- David; and two children,
ne brother, Keri (Robert) Pell of Talla-
Reid ofJack- hassee and Matthew
ie had many (Nicole) Watson of Ho-
phews who mosassa. She was the
Her friends proud grandmother to
ssion in her Matthew and Nicole's chil-
She drove dren, Austin and Peyton.
ere around Donna is also survived
they wanted by her mother, Maria; sis-
r she had af- ter, Cathleen Blair of
amed Grady Okeechobee; brother,
hfulmember Kevin Blair (Cynthia) of
ict Catholic Palm City; nephews, Sean
a member of Blair of Palm City, Scott
s Golf and Blair (Danielle) of Port St.
S Lucie; sister-in-law, Sandy
her life, be Watson of Maryland;
e and smile, niece, Melinda and family
papers in her of Pennsylvania; and
mile though nephew, David Kirby and
Breakingg" family of West Virginia.
er husband, Donna was an avid
ally got over reader, wrote poetry and
er one and loved to travel. In 1997, she
She will be was recognized by the Na-
d by all who tional League ofAmerican
loved her Pen Women for her poem
nts by titled, "Old Cracker Home
dens Chapel in the Withlacoochee For-
Home, Jack- est" In 1971, Donna was
vw.hardage- selected as a Leader of
lhills.com. American Secondary Edu-
cation for her contribu-
tions to the advancement


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


of secondary education
and service to the commu-
nity She will be missed by
all who knew her
Services will be held at
St. Thomas the Apostle
Catholic Church, U.S. 19,
Homosassa, Fla., at 10 a.m.
Dec. 27, 2013. In lieu of
flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to
Wounded Warriors Foun-
dation, Alzheimer Associa-
tion or the ASPCA. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory is in
charge of arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Gloria
Hulse, 85
HOMOSASSA
Gloria D. Hulse, 85, of
Homosassa, died Dec. 2,
2013, at Cypress Cove Care
Center
No services are planned
at this time.

Terry White, 56
OCALA
Terry White, age 56, of
Ocala, Fla., died Saturday,
Dec. 21, 2013. Private cre-
mation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

Deaths
ELSEWHERE

Kenneth
Schechter, 83
KOREAN WAR PILOT
LOS ANGELES Ken-
neth Schechter, a Korean
War pilot who landed his
plane while blinded from
a wound, has died. He was
83.
Schechter died Dec. 11
in Fairfield, Calif, his son,
Rob Schechter, told the
Los Angeles Times. He
had prostate cancer
Schechter was a 22-year-
old Navy pilot when an
enemy shell sent frag-
ments into his eyes and
blood running down his
face during a March 22,
1952, bombing mission.
Schechter suddenly was
semi-conscious, flying a
smashed-up Skyraider at
200 mph over the Korean
coast.
"Instinctively, I pulled
back on the stick to gain al-
titude," he wrote in an ac-
count for the 2001 book,
"Chicken Soup for the Vet-
eran's Soul." "When I
came to, sometime later, I
couldn't see a thing.... I felt
for my upper lip. It was al-
most severed from the rest
of my face."
"I'm blind! For God's
sake, help me!" he cried
into his radio. "I'm blind!"
His friend and fellow
pilot, Lt j.g. Howard
Thayer, had already spotted
the plane climbing and
knew something was wrong.


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Over the next 45 min-
utes, he helped talk down
the plane. At one point,
Thayer dumped his can-
teen over his head to wash
away the blood. For a mo-
ment he saw the controls,
but then everything went
dark.
"Get me down, Howie,"
he radioed. "Get me
down."
Thayer guided the plane
toward the coast, intend-
ing for Schechter to bail
out and be picked up in
the water, but Schechter
refused. He had seen an-
other pilot drown in the
same waters after a
bailout.
"Jump out in that icy
water blind? You'd have to
be insane," Schechter said
in a 1995 Times interview
With the nearest air
base 30 miles away, and
the bleeding Schechter
slumping in the pilot's
seat, Thayer looked
around for someplace to
land even a rice paddy
He finally remembered a
rutted dirt Army landing
strip dubbed the Jersey
Bounce that had been
used by reconnaissance
planes.
As they approached,
Thayer told Schechter to
lower his wheels.
"The hell with that!"
Schechter replied. He
thought a belly landing
would be safer on the un-
even ground.
Thayer, flying a few feet
from his friend, kept up a
running commentary as
the plane came down.
"We're heading straight,"
he said. "Hundred yards to
runway You're 50 feet off
the ground. You're level.
You're OK You're over the
runway Twenty feet Kill it
a little. You're setting
down. OK, OK, OK. Cut!"
Schechter was safe. It
was his last flight before
he left the Navy months
later He was awarded the
Distinguished Flying
Cross in 1995.
The landing was retold in
the 1954 movie, "Men of the
Fighting Lady" with Dewey
Martin as Schechter and
Van Johnson as Thayer In
the Hollywood version,
though, the pilots flew jets
and the landing was on an
aircraft carrier
Schechter, who perma-
nently lost the use of his
right eye, became an in-
surance agent in the Los
Angeles area.
Thayer, who remained in
the Navy, died in 1961 while
guiding a pilot whose elec-
trical system had failed. He
was posthumously awarded
a Distinguished Flying
Cross in 2009.
In addition to his son,
Schechter is survived by
his wife, Sue; another son,
Jonathan, a daughter,
Anne Buckley, and seven
grandchildren.
-From wire reports


@gjB

LE,.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hudson River GE plant is latest loss in NY spiral


Associated Press

FORT EDWARD, N.Y. -
When General Electric moves
jobs from its capacitor plant in
this Hudson River town next
year, worker Mark Rock figures
he might have to leave, too.
About 200 jobs will head south
as soon as September when GE
sends local operations to
Florida to cut costs. While New
York has had successes in the
constant geographical tug of war
for jobs, manufacturing jobs like
these have been dwindling for
decades. People in this area
south of the Adirondack Moun-
tains are the latest to wonder
what comes next.
"The high-paying jobs that we
have now in the area are going to
shrink," said Rock, a 41-year-old
married father of two. "If I don't
find something making at least
20 bucks an hour in New York
state, then I'm skipping town."
The loss of manufacturing
jobs is a national trend, but New
York has felt the sting more than
some other states. Paul Blackley,
an economics professor at Le
Moyne College in Syracuse, said
New York state lost 42 percent of
manufacturing jobs from 1990
through 2006. Over the same pe-
riod, Florida lost 18 percent.
Blackley said there's no single
reason for New York's drop, but
business costs and an older in-
frastructure likely play a role.
"I think your tax climate, your
labor costs, your old capital are
probably three of the biggest fac-
tors, not only in this specific
move, but a lot of the moves that
you see out of New York state,"
he said.
The GE plant has sat by a nar-
row stretch of the Hudson River
in this town of 6,000 since World
War II. It makes electrical ca-
pacitors for power transmission
systems and industrial uses.
The Fort Edward facility and
a long-closed sister plant in
neighboring Hudson Falls used
PCBs in production until 1977,
and river sediment contami-
nated by discharges of the oily
substance is being dredged by
GE as part of a multi-year fed-
eral Superfund cleanup that
could cost $2 billion.
With 177 production workers
and 20 salaried employees, GE is
not the biggest employer in the
region. But the Fairfield, Conn.-
based company pays well. Pro-
duction workers here average


Associated Press
United Electrical Workers Local 332 representatives Bruce Ostrander, left, Scott Gates, center, and
Mark Rock pose Dec. 11 outside the General Electric plant where they work in Fort Edward, N.Y. GE has
been a big presence in this little upper-Hudson River town for almost 70 years, employing generations
and leaving a $2 billion mess in the river. Now GE is moving its operations to Clearwater, Ha.


$28.50 an hour, according to esti- take advantage of efficiencies of
mates cited by the United Elec- scale. GE spokeswoman Chris-
trical, Radio and Machine tine Home said their competi-
Workers Local 332. tors are in lower-cost locations.
GE officials say the plant has Village of Fort Edward Mayor
been losing money for several Matthew Traver said the loss of
years and they will move to an GE is not a knockout blow -
existing facility in Clearwater, Fort Edward still has a tissue
Fla., where the company can plant and there are manufactur-


ing jobs in the surrounding
small cities and rural areas. But
many here worry about an esti-
mated $12 million in wages dis-
appearing.
"What did we do wrong?"
asked John Weber, sitting on a
stool at his restaurant, Ye Old
Fort Diner "Did our union get


too strong? Did GE get too
greedy? What?"
GE has been accused of aban-
doning New York. But Home
noted that GE has actually cre-
ated more than 1,600 jobs in the
nearby Albany area over the
past several years, including
some 450 production jobs in
Schenectady
The company's actions illus-
trate how New York is constantly
is losing and gaining jobs. GE'S
Fort Edward announcement last
month came the same day Gov.
Andrew Cuomo announced that
the Ford Motor Co. would make
a $150 million investment at its
Buffalo Stamping Plant, creating
350 new jobs there.
New York actually added 8,180
private-sector jobs in November,
according to the latest ADP Re-
gional Employment Report,
though manufacturing jobs de-
creased by 80 in that month.
Wages have loomed large as
an issue in Fort Edward. Union
officials involved in fruitless ne-
gotiations with GE this fall to
keep the company in Fort Ed-
ward said they would have had
to reduce average wages to
around $12 an hour to hit GE's
savings target. GE disagrees but
did not provide its own figure.
Average hourly wages for
some manufacturing jobs in the
Clearwater area can be 11 per-
cent to 23 percent less than the
area around Fort Edward, ac-
cording to Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics wage data. Florida also is
a "right-to-work" state, which
means workers can't be required
to join a union as a condition of
employment. The Clearwater
jobs will not be union jobs.
Hornet said they will pay pre-
vailing wages.
"We need to improve our over-
all cost structure to be competi-
tive. Wages are only one element
of that cost structure," Home
said.
At the union headquarters near
the GE plant, where the "Keep it
Made in Fort Edward" signs lay
stacked in by the door, workers
know there are other jobs in the
area. But they worry it will be
harder to make ends meet
"This was probably the best-
paying mill in the area," said
Bruce Ostrander, a veteran tool-
and-die maker "We had a
chance, and everybody in the
area had a chance to move their
life up, to get a little bit more
comfortable."


Protect our waters Protect our planet Protect our future


HOLIDAY SCHEDULES


CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS
All Wednesday customers schedule will be as follows:
Inside the City of Crystal River, Mclntosh, Terre Vista
and Brentwood Farms you will be collected the day
following the holiday. (Dec. 26 & Jan. 2)

All the Villages of Citrus Hills will be collected on
Friday following the holiday. (Dec. 27 & Jan. 3)

Sugarmill Woods yard waste customers you will be
picked up on the Saturday following the holiday. (Dec.
28 & Jan. 4)

All other Wednesday collections will be on Monday
proceeding the holiday. (Dec. 23 & Dec. 30.) Regular
collection will resume Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014.



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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 A7


NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio, left, and Mike
Hopkins are shown Nov. 26 in a video made aboard the
Earth-orbiting International Space Station.


Associated Press
Astronaut Rick Mastracchio performs a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Saturday in this image
made from video provided by NASA. Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins ventured out of the station to try to revive a
crippled cooling line.


naut last summer, so Sat-
urday's spacewalkers had
snorkels in their suits and
water-absorbent pads in
their helmets.
To everyone's relief, the
spacewalkers remained
dry while outside. But
midway through the excur-
sion, Mastracchio's toes
were so cold that he had to
crank up the heat in his
boots. Mission Control
worried aloud whether it
was wise to extend the
spacewalk to get ahead,
given Mastracchio's dis-
comfort.
Not quite two hours
later, Mastracchio had
enough as he clutched the
old pump. When Mission
Control suggested even
more get-ahead chores, he
replied, "I'd like to stow
this old module and kind
of clean up and call it a
day" He said a couple of
things were bothering him,
not just temperature, and
declined to elaborate
when asked by Mission
Control what was wrong.
Flight controllers
obliged him. Once the old
pump was secured to a


ON THE NET
U NASA: www.nasa.gov/mission-pages/station/
main/index.html


temporary location, the
spacewalkers started gath-
ering up their tools to go in.
Adding to the excite-
ment 260 miles up, a
smoke alarm went off in
the space station as the as-
tronauts toiled outside. It
was quickly found to be a
false alarm.
The pump replacement
is a huge undertaking at-
tempted only once before,
back in 2010 on this very
unit. The two astronauts
who tackled the job three
years ago were in Mission
Control, offering guidance.
Mastracchio promised to
bring back a wire tie in-
stalled on the pump by the
previous spacewalkers.
"Oh, awesome, thanks
Rick," replied the astro-
naut in Mission Control
who put it on.
The 780-pound pump is
about the size of a double-
door refrigerator and ex-
tremely cumbersome to
handle, with plumbing full


of toxic ammonia. Any
traces of ammonia on the
spacesuits were dissipated
before the astronauts went
back inside, to avoid fur-
ther contamination.
NASAs plan initially
called for the pump to be
disconnected in the first
spacewalk, pulled out on
the second spacewalk and
a fresh spare put in, and
then all the hookups of the
new pump completed in
the third outing.
In the days following the
Dec. 11 breakdown, flight
controllers attempted in
vain to fix the bad valve
through remote command-
ing. Then they tried using
a different valve to regu-
late the temperature of the
overly cold loop, with
some success. But last
Tuesday, NASA decided
the situation was severe
enough to press ahead
with the spacewalks. Al-
though the astronauts
were safe and comfort-


able, NASA did not want to
risk another failure and a
potential loss of the entire
cooling system, needed to
radiate the heat generated
by on-board equipment
NASA delayed a deliv-
ery mission from Wallops
Island, Virginia, to accom-
modate the spacewalks.
That flight by the private
firm Orbital Sciences
Corp., which should have
occurred this past week, is


NASA
Continued from PageAl

occur, if required. A third
spacewalk had been slated
for Christmas Day before
the latest turn of events.
NASA requires a day off
between spacewalks for
astronaut rest.
The space station break-
down 10 days earlier left
one of two identical cool-
ing loops too cold and
forced the astronauts to
turn off all nonessential
equipment inside the or-
biting lab, bringing scien-
tific research to a
near-halt and leaving the
station in a vulnerable
state.
Mission Control wanted
to keep the spacewalkers
out even longer Saturday
to get even further ahead,
but a cold and uncomfort-
able Mastracchio re-
quested to go back. The
spacewalk ended after
5 1/2 hours, an hour short
on time but satisfyingly
long on content.
Earlier, Mastracchio
managed to unhook all the
ammonia fluid and electri-
cal lines on the pump with
relative ease, occasionally
releasing a flurry of frozen
ammonia flakes that
brushed against his suit A
small 0-ring floated away,
but he managed to retrieve
it.
"I got it, I got it, I got it.
Barely," Mastracchio said
as he stretched out his
hand.
"Don't let that go, that's a
stocking stuffer" Mission
Control replied.
"Don't tell my wife,"
Mastracchio said, chuck-
ling, as he put it in a small
pouch for trash.
Mastracchio, a seven-
time spacewalker, and
Hopkins, making his first,
wore extra safety gear as
they worked outside.
NASA wanted to prevent a
recurrence of the helmet
flooding that nearly
drowned an Italian astro-


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now targeted for Jan. 7.
Until Saturday, U.S.
spacewalks had been on
hold since July, when an
Italian astronaut's helmet
was flooded with water
from the cooling system of
his suit Luca Parmitano
barely got back inside alive.
Engineers traced the
problem to a device in the
suit that turned out to be
contaminated how and
why, no one yet knows.


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A10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


Congress does little of consequence, except argue


DAVID ESPO
AP special correspondent

WASHINGTON Call it
a steady diet of gridlock,
with "Green Eggs and
Ham" on the side.
Congress did not pass
White House-backed im-
migration or gun control
legislation in 2013. Or
raise the minimum wage.
Or approve many other
items on President Barack
Obama's agenda.
But tea party-inspired
House Republicans did
propel the country into a
16-day partial government
shutdown that cost
the still-recovering econ-
omy $24 billion, by one
estimate.
Congress didn't repeal
the health law known as
"Obamacare." Or endorse
construction of the pro-
posed Keystone pipeline.
Or make it harder for the
White House to put costly
new federal regulations in
place, or accomplish
dozens of other measures
on the House Republican
to-do list.
But Senate Democrats
did unilaterally arro-
gantly, Republicans said -
change century-old proce-
dures to weaken the
GOP's ability to block
confirmation of Obama's
appointees.
That, too, was part of a
tempestuous year in which
lawmakers lurched from
showdown to shutdown,
with time enough for Sen.
Ted Cruz, R-Texas, to read
from the Dr Seuss classic,
"Green Eggs and Ham," as
he held the floor around
the clock for a day to
protest the health law
"The American people
would get better govern-
ment out of Monkey Island
at the local zoo than we're
giving them today," said
Democratic Rep. John
Dingell of Michigan as the
government slid into shut-
down mode.
"This isn't some damn
game," House Speaker
John Boehner erupted in
frustration at the point of
maximum gridlock.
Except that ... baseball
had a better year under
the Capitol Dome than Re-
publicans, Democrats or
Obama.
One bill that made it
around the bases to the
president's desk specified
the size of blanks to be


Associated Press
The U.S. Capitol, with the Senate at right and the House of Representatives at far left, is seen June 17 in
Washington.


used in stamping National
Baseball Hall of Fame me-
morial coins. And a new
bridge over the Mississippi
River was named for Stan
Musial, a baseball legend
admired by Republicans
and Democrats alike.
But enough about
teamwork.
Fifth-term Sen. John
McCain of Arizona re-
ferred to some of his un-
compromising, younger
fellow Republicans as
"wacko birds."
One whom he had in
mind, Cruz, said, "I don't
trust the Republicans. I
don't trust the Democrats,
and I think a whole lot of
Americans likewise don't
trust the Republicans or
the Democrats because it
is leadership in both par-
ties that has got us into this
mess."
At year end, Senate Ma-
jority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev, opined, "Congress
is finishing this year
less popular than a
cockroach."
Among Republicans,
Reid's standing might not
be even that good.
Reid, as soft-spoken as
he is tough-willed, is
"going to be remembered
as the worst leader of the


Senate ever" if he insisted
on changing the filibuster
procedures, predicted the
famously taciturn GOP
leader, Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky Reid went
ahead anyway a few
months later, to the anger
of Republicans who pre-
dicted that Democrats
would one day regret their
action.
Cockroaches or not,
Congress' ratings began
the year at basement level,
then began boring into
bedrock below
In January, an Associ-
ated Press-GfK poll put
approval at 17 percent of
the country
By November, after
the partial shutdown, a
flirtation with an unprece-
dented U.S. Treasury de-
fault, gridlock for months
on end and insults aplenty,
it stood at 13 percent.
"Enough is enough,"
judged Barry Black, the
Senate chaplain, nine days
into the shutdown.
Evidently not.
It went on another week.
The health care law
named for Obama was a


constant theme, and a
clear and present danger,
to hear Republicans say it.
"We should not be
judged on how many new
laws we create. We ought
to be judged on how many
laws that we repeal,"
Boehner said as Republi-
cans voted for the 38th and
39th time since 2011 to re-
peal or otherwise neuter
it.
There were yet more to
come the total reached
into the 40s leading into
the first partial govern-
ment shutdown in 17
years. It was an event so
detrimental to the Repub-
licans' political health that
Boehner blamed it on out-
side tea party groups he
said were guilty of "push-
ing our members into
places where they don't
want to be."
There were moments of
cooperation, between Re-
publicans and Democrats
at least, but they were
fleeting exceptions to the
rule of gridlock.
One, at year's end, undid
a portion of widely dis-
liked across-the-board


spending cuts that had
been put in place because
of a 2011 episode of
brinkmanship.
Another, passed just be-
fore the beginning of the
school year, linked student
loan interest rates to the fi-
nancial markets, an ap-
proach the White House
and Republicans favored
as a way to save the gov-
ernment money Some lib-
eral Democrats opposed it
as a burden on future
students.
The bill prevented a
spike in loan rates as
schools opened for the
year, but rates are pre-
dicted to rise as the econ-
omy improves and the cost
of borrowing goes up.
Midway through the
113th Congress, many of
the 57 laws that have been
enacted were less than na-
tional in scope.
One changed the bound-
ary of the Buffalo Gap Na-
tional Grassland in South
Dakota to reflect the trans-
fer of land into the Min-
uteman Missile National
Historic Site.
Another conveyed land


ON THE NET
Link to Sen. Ted Cruz
reading Green Eggs
and Ham on the
Senate floor:
www.youtube.com/
watch?vo9EX2XkpPgE

to the Powell Recreation
District in Wyoming for
use as a shooting range
maintained by the Powell
Gun Club.
And the Boston Air
Route Traffic Control Cen-
ter in Nashua, N.H., was
named after an employee,
Patricia Clark, who has
worked there since it
opened 50 years ago.
If the accomplishments
were relatively minor, the
struggles were of more
consequence.
On the day the new Con-
gress convened, Jan. 3,
Boehner was elected to a
new term as speaker, his
second. But only after sur-
viving a challenge from his
most conservative GOP
members, 14 of whom de-
clined to vote for him.
It was a harbinger
Sweeping immigration
legislation backed by the
White House cleared the
Senate on a bipartisan
vote on the cusp of a long
August break.
Supporters hoped that
would build support in the
House.
The tea party had other
ideas, dominating the
summer political season
with a campaign to deny
necessary federal funding
for the government as long
as Obama's health law re-
mained in effect.
By the time lawmakers
reconvened in September,
the Senate-passed immi-
gration legislation was
moribund, the campaign to
cut off money for the
health law ascendant, and
the partial government
shutdown only a matter of
time.
Not long afterward, as
polls sagged, Dr Seuss' im-
mortal words may as well
have applied to the popu-
larity of lawmakers in-
stead of the dreaded green
eggs and ham.
"I do not like them here
or there," Cruz read. "I do
not like them ANY-
WHERE!"


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Things you didn't know about reindeer


Associated Press

HELSINKI Reindeer
are featured on Christmas
cards and in movies world-
wide this time of year, gal-
loping across the sky with
Santa's sleigh in tow
But on Europe's north-
ern fringe, the migratory
mammals are part of
everyday life all year
round as they roam the
fells of Lapland the Arc-
tic homeland of the indige-
nous Sami people of
Norway, Sweden, Finland
and northwest Russia.
Here are some interest-
ing things you might
not have known about
reindeer:
FAST AND
WANDERING
Of course reindeer can't
fly, but they can
run quickly over long
distances.
"Reindeer are fast, but
not as fast as horses," says
Jonas Vannar, a Sami rein-
deer herder from
Jokkmokk in Swedish Lap-
land. "They can easily
travel 40 to 50 kilometers
(24 to 31 miles) a day if they
have to."
The migratory animals
can roam 125 miles or
more in the spring from
their winter grazing
grounds in the forests to
reach calving grounds
high in the mountains.
"On hot summer days,
they migrate vertically ...
until they reach snow
patches where the temper-
ature is lower, then back to
the valleys, to graze during
the midnight sun," says
Vannar
WARM AND
WOOLY
Reindeer are also
uniquely adapted to sur-
vive the harsh Lapland
winters, explains Mari
Heikkila, director of
Ranua Wildlife Park in
Finland.
"The hair of the rein-
deer is hollow, so there is
air between the hairs and
also inside the hair, and


their winter coat is really
thick," Heikkila says.
That makes them super-
insulated, one reason why
Samis have always made
their winter clothes from
reindeer hides.
Reindeer also have
large hooves compared to
moose or deer When the
snow is deep, they spread
their hooves and make
them even wider to stop
themselves from sinking
in.
EYES THAT
CHANGE COLOR
Reindeer eyes change
color between summer
and winter to adapt to the
widely varying levels of
light in the high north.
"The reflection from
reindeer eyes is yellow-
green in summer ... but
deep blue in winter," says
Karl-Arne Stokkan, a pro-
fessor at the University of
Tromsoe in Norway, part
of a scientific team that
discovered earlier this
year why that is.
Due to the extremely
limited light in the far
northern winter, rein-
deer's eyes need to be
much more sensitive to
light than in summer The
blue color during the dark-
est months of the year
helps scatter more incom-
ing light and results in bet-
ter vision, says Stokkan.
TASTY AND
HEALTHY
Reindeer meat is a pop-
ular staple across Lap-
land. In Finland, demand
for the gamey, low-fat meat
outstrips the supply, so it
has to import reindeer
meat from Russia.
A reindeer cooking com-
petition is held in the
northern Finnish town of
Inari each year, where
Sami chefs pit their tradi-
tional recipes against
modern culinary arts.
Traditionally, Finnish
Sami have used all parts of
the reindeer, making
dishes such as reindeer
sausage or stuffed rein-
deer stomach. A more


Associated Press
A Sami handler in traditional clothing holds two of his herd in Saariselka, Finnish
Lapland. On Europe's northern fringe, the migratory mammals are part of everyday life
all year round as they roam the fells of Lapland the Arctic homeland of the
indigenous Sami people of Norway, Sweden, Finland and northwest Russia.


common dish is sauteed
reindeer with mashed po-
tatoes and lingonberry
jam.
At the Kaunispaan
Huippu restaurant in the
northern Finnish town of
Saariselka, the menu fea-
tures such delicacies as
smoked reindeer mousse
with blackcurrant sauce
and reindeer with Lappish
cheese.
"Our special way to cook
reindeer meat is to hot-
smoke the roast on an
open fire," says chefJorma
Lehtinen, who then fries
the meat in rosemary
butter
Reindeers are slaugh-
tered in late autumn or
early winter, but their
meat can be frozen and
used throughout the year
WHO REALLY
SAW THEM FLY?
In popular culture, eight
flying reindeer pull
Santa's sleigh as he deliv-
ers presents to children
around the world on
Christmas Eve. That sce-


nario was first described
in the 1820s by American
poet Clement Clarke
Moore.
More than 100 years
later, American writer
Robert L. May added
Rudolph with his red nose
leading the way
Some of the story is
rooted in reality as migrat-


ing reindeer herds are
usually led by a single
animal.
But there's debate on
the origins of the flying
reindeer, and some have
traced it to reindeer eating
hallucinogenic mush-
rooms. Ancient Sami
shamans, the theory goes,
would then drink filtered


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think they were seeing
their reindeer "flying."
"Mushrooms have been
used to a certain extent in
shamanic ceremonies,"
says ArjaJomppanen, a re-
searcher at Sida, the Na-
tional Museum of the
Finnish Sami in Inari.
"But drinking urine has
not been mentioned in ac-
counts of Sami traditions."
Hakan Rydving, an ex-
pert in Sami religion at
Norway's University of
Bergen, firmly rejected
the theory as a myth.
"There is no such infor-
mation at all from the
Sami world, neither about
drinking the urine of rein-
deer, nor of seeing flying
reindeer in their dreams,"
he said.
BUT THEY MUST
PAUSE TO PEE
Reindeer can't walk too
far without answering the
call of nature. In fact, they
are unable to walk and pee
at the same time, so they
have to take a bathroom
break roughly every 6
miles.
In Finnish, this distance
is known as
"poronkusema" or "rein-
deer's piss" and was
an old-fashioned descrip-
tion of distances in the
countryside.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spy program's origin detailed in new docs


Associated Press
Melissa Schamburek helps
her daughter Brynn, 2,
skate Saturday during a
Santa Skate event at the
Manitowoc County Ice
Center in Manitowoc, Wis.

Investigator
killed at party
BELLWOOD, III.--An
Illinois sheriff's investigator
was fatally shot while trying
to break up an armed rob-
bery outside a family Christ-
mas party, authorities said
Saturday.
Cuauhtemoc Estrada, 50,
died Friday night outside a
VFW hall in Bellwood, about
13 miles from downtown
Chicago.
Estrada is a former Ma-
rine who had been with the
department for more than
20 years. He worked in the
electronic monitoring unit.
Bellwood police and the
Cook County Sheriff's Of-
fice are investigating.
The Chicago Sun-Times
reported Estrada died at
Loyola University Medical
Center in suburban May-
wood and a procession of
more than a dozen vehicles
followed an ambulance with
Estrada's body from the
hospital to the county med-
ical examiner's office.
Transit, union
leaders reach pact
SAN FRANCISCO-
The threat of another trans-
portation strike in the San
Francisco Bay area re-
ceded on Saturday when
officials for the region's tran-
sit rail system and negotia-
tors for its two largest labor
unions said they had re-
solved the latest sticking
point in their months-long
negotiations and reached a
new contract.
Bay Area Rapid Transit
district and union leaders
said the four-year deal
reached early Saturday set-
tles a dispute over paid
medical leave for employ-
ees that arose last month.
Under the revised agree-
ment BART posted on its
website, workers who need
to take time off to care for
sick family members will be
allowed to decide how to
use sick days, vacation
time and other accumu-
lated paid days off to main-
tain their paychecks. They
also will have the option of
taking up to 12 days off
without pay.
Hospital: Teen shot
at Colo. school dies
LITTLETON, Colo.-A
suburban Denver high
school student who was
shot in the head by a class-
mate died Saturday after-
noon, hospital officials said
in a statement.
Claire Davis, 17, was in
critical condition after being
shot at point-blank range at
Arapahoe High School on
Dec. 13.
Karl Pierson, 18, shot
Davis, who just happened
to be sitting nearby with a
friend as Pierson, armed
with a shotgun, ammunition
strapped to his body, Molo-
tov cocktails and a ma-
chete, entered the school
and headed toward the li-
brary. Davis appeared to be
a random target, Arapahoe
County Sheriff Grayson
Robinson has said.
Pierson likely intended to
track down a librarian who
had disciplined him, but
Robinson said Pierson's ar-
senal suggested Pierson in-
tended to hurt many others
at the school.
--From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
director of national intelli-
gence on Saturday declas-
sified more documents that
show how the National Se-
curity Agency was first au-
thorized to start collecting
bulk phone and Internet
records in the hunt for al-
Qaida terrorists.
Director of National In-
telligence James Clapper
explained in a statement
Saturday that President
George W Bush first au-
thorized the spying in Oc-
tober 2001, as part of the
Terrorist Surveillance
Program, just after the
Sept 11 attacks. Bush dis-
closed the program in 2005.


Four wounded

Associated Press

NAIROBI, Kenya Gunfire
hit three U.S. military aircraft
trying to evacuate American cit-
izens in a remote region of
South Sudan that on Saturday
became a battle ground between
the country's military and rene-
gade troops, officials said. Four
U.S. service members were
wounded in the attack in the
same region where gunfire
downed a U.N. helicopter the
day before.
The U.S. military aircraft
were about to land in Bor, the
capital of the state of Jonglei
and scene of some of the nation's
worst violence over the last
week, when they were hit. The
military said the four wounded
troops were in stable condition.
The U.S. military said three
CV-22 Ospreys -the kind of air-
craft that can fly like a helicop-
ter and plane were
"participating in a mission to


The Terrorist Surveil-
lance Program which
had to be extended every
30-60 days by presidential
order eventually was re-
placed by the Foreign In-
telligence Surveillance
Act a law that requires a
secret court to OK the bulk
collection.
The disclosures are part
of the White House's cam-
paign to justify the NSA
surveillance, following
leaks to the media about
the classified programs by
former agency contractor
Edward Snowden. Presi-
dent Barack Obama hinted
Friday that he would con-
sider some changes to
NSAs bulk collection of
Americans' phone records


to address public's con-
cern about privacy His
comments came in a week
where a federal judge de-
clared NSAs collection
program "unconstitu-
tional," and a presidential
advisory panel suggested
46 changes to NSA opera-
tions. Those recommenda-
tions included forcing
NSA to go to the court for
every search of the phone
records database and
keeping that database in
the hands of a third party
- not the government.
The judge said there
was little evidence any ter-
ror plot had been thwarted
by the program, known as
Section 215 of the USA Pa-
triotAct. The panel recom-


evacuate American citizens in
Bor." A South Sudan official said
violence against civilians there
has resulted in bodies "sprin-
kled all over town."
'After receiving fire from the
ground while approaching the
site, the aircraft diverted to an
airfield outside the country and
aborted the mission," the state-
ment said. "The injured troops
are being treated for their
wounds." It was not known how
many U.S. civilians are in Bor.
After the aircraft took incom-
ing fire, they turned around and
flew to Entebbe, Uganda. From
there the service members were
flown to Nairobi, Kenya aboard
a U.S. Air Force C-17 for medical
treatment, the statement said.
An official in the region who
insisted on anonymity to share
information not made public
said the Americans did not tell
the top commander in Bor -
Gen. Peter Gadet, who defected
from the South Sudan military
this week that they were com-
ing in, which may have led to the
attack. The U.S. statements said


mended continuing the
program but seeking a
court order for each NSA
records search. Obama
said he would announce
his decisions in January
The documents released
also include legal arguments
by former national intelli-
gence directors, including
Dennis Blair's reasons to
keep NSA spying methods
secret, in an ongoing case
filed in 2006 as Shubert v
Bush and now known as
Shubert v Obama.
The Electronic Frontier
Foundation, a civil liber-
ties group that's filed a
similar lawsuit, called it "a
class action on behalf of all
Americans against the gov-
ernment, alleging a mas-


the gunfire was from unknown
forces.
South Sudan's military
spokesman, Col. Philip Aguer,
said that government troops are
not in control of Bor, so the at-
tack on the U.S. aircraft has to
be blamed on renegade soldiers.
"Bor is under the control of
the forces of Riek Machar,"
Aguer said, referring to the
ousted vice president.
The U.S. Embassy in Juba said
it has evacuated at least 450
Americans and other foreign na-
tionals from Juba this week and
had hoped to begin evacuations
from Bor. The U.S. Ospreys were
hit one day after small arms fire
downed a U.N. helicopter in the
same state.
The U.N. on Friday sent four
helicopters to extract 40 U.N.
peacekeepers from a base in
Yuai, also in Jonglei, U.N. infor-
mation officer Joe Contreras
said. One helicopter was fired
upon and executed an emer-
gency landing in Upper Nile
state, he said. No casualties oc-
curred during the incident.


Ice pellets, snow frustrate holiday travelers


Associated Press


CHICAGO A storm
with a 2,000-mile footprint
threatened to frustrate
Christmas travelers from
Texas to Nova Scotia with
a little of everything
Mother Nature has to offer,
from freezing rain, ice and
snow to flooding, thunder-
storms and possibly some
tornadoes in the South.
Some of the millions of
people hitting the roads
and airports Saturday
squeaked through before
any major weather hit but
as the afternoon wore on
some cancellations and
delays started to mount at
major aviation hubs. Fore-
casters said roads that are
passable one minute could


Associated Press
A traveler walks through Terminal 3 on Saturday at
O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. As the afternoon
wore on, cancellations and delays mounted.
become treacherous the Making it harder for
next as a cold blast on the forecasters to stay a step
backed of the storm turns ahead, the system was a
rain to ice and snow weird swirl of wintry and


spring-like weather as it
passed over areas in the
Midwest with freezing
temperatures and places
like Memphis, Tenn., where
temperatures surpassed
70 degrees on Saturday
The worst of the storm
was expected to hit Midwest
population centers Satur-
day night, giving some
travelers a window at the
start of the holiday rush to
get through airports and
along highways with little
disruption. About 350
flights had been cancelled,
nationwide, as of 5 p.m.,
according to aviation track-
ingwebsite FlightAware.com
Most of the disruptions were
affecting major hubs like
O'Hare International Air-
port in Chicago.


sive, indiscriminate, ille-
gal National Security
Agency (NSA) dragnet of
the phone calls and email
of tens of millions of ordi-
nary Americans."
Blair countered in 2009
that revealing information
sought by the plaintiffs -
including how information
was collected and whether
specific individuals were
being spied upon, and what
the programs had revealed
- could damage the hunt
for terrorists.
"To do so would obviously
disclose to our adversaries
that we know of their plans
and how we may be ob-
taining information," Blair
said. Much of his 27-page
response is redacted.


World BRIEFS

Silver tears


Associated Press
A handwritten card sits
Saturday on a wreath laid
by the main memorial
stone in memory of the
victims of the Pan Am
flight 103 bombing in the
garden of remembrance
at Dryfesdale Cemetery,
near Lockerbie, Scotland.
Pan Am flight 103 was
blown apart above the
Scottish border town on
Dec. 21, 1988. All 243
passengers, 16 crew
members and 11 people
on the ground were killed
in the bombing.

Turkish PM: Foreign
plot behind probe
ANKARA, Turkey-
Turkish Prime Minister Recep
Tayyip Erdogan threatened
to expel foreign ambassa-
dors on Saturday, blaming
them for a vast corruption
and bribery investigation
mounting against people
close to his government.
Riot police, meanwhile,
stood guard as hundreds
protested against Erdo-
gan's government.
Erdogan's accusations
come after two government
ministers' sons were ar-
rested, along with several
others including Suleyman
Asian, the CEO of state-
owned Halkbank.
In total, 24 people were
jailed pending trial, accused
of taking or fadlitating bribes,
the Dogan news agency re-
ported. Turkish media reports
say the investigation relates
to illicit money transfers to
Iran and large-scale bribery
for construction projects.
Turkish media reports said
police seized US $4.5 million
in cash stashed in shoe
boxes from Asian's home.
Attacks in Iraq kill
17, including major
BAGHDAD -A string of
attacks across Iraq killed 17
people on Saturday, includ-
ing a senior military com-
mander, a colonel and five
soldiers who all died during
a raid on an al-Qaida hide-
out, officials said.
Police officials said army
Maj. Gen Mohammed al-
Karawi, the colonel and the
five troops were killed when
they stormed the booby-
trapped hideout in Rutba in
Iraq's volatile Anbar province.
AI-Karawi, who com-
manded the Iraqi army's 7th
Division, was leading a
search operation hunting for
al-Qaida fighters in the area.
Four soldiers were wounded
in the operation, police said.
At least 369 people have
died in attacks across the
country so far this month,
according to an Associated
Press count.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
A CV-22 Osprey aircraft of the 8th Special Operations Squadron (SOS) "Black Birds" comes in for a landing
Jan. 26, 2011, during a training mission at Hurlburt Field, Fla. Gunfire hit three U.S. military CV-22 Osprey
aircraft Saturday as they were trying to evacuate American citizens in Bor, the capital of the remote region
of Jonglei state in South Sudan.



U.S. military aircraft




attacked in S. Sudan








I Travel & Leisure


EXCURSIONS


GRAB YOURSELF SOME GOOD EATS IN













A typical St. Petersburg itinerary might include seeing the Dali Museum, having a drink at the storied Vinoy hotel and
checking out nearby beaches. As in any good-sized city, the downtown and waterfront areas have plenty of restaurant
options, from seafood and Italian to Asian and Mexican.


Feature and photos by the Associated Press
TOP: The spacious outdoor seating area is showcased at Queenshead, a restaurant in the
emerging, funky Grand Central District of St. Petersburg. The restaurant's interior decor
is vaguely British, with a Union Jack and a bust of Queen Elizabeth, while the outdoor
area is Florida-style with lounges and cabanas. ABOVE: In addition to British-themed
entrees like shepherd's pie and fish and chips, Queenshead has a creative menu of small
plates like these, which offer seared scallops with brussels sprouts and pumpkin-flavored
goat cheese on house-made crackers with beets.


ST PETERSBURG



But just west of down-
town along Central
Avenue, in St. Pete's
emerging Grand Cen-
tral District, a funkier,
somewhat less grown-
up array of eateries is
bubbling up. Here,
amid a dozen antique and thrift
shops, just beyond Haslam's enor-
mous book emporium, you'll find
bars and cafes with unique themes.
The clientele ranges from hipsters
and tattooed 20-somethings to mid-
dle-aged couples and groups of
friends out for a fun evening.
One area of note begins around
23rd Street with Taco Bus, a bright-
yellow food truck that looks like an
overgrown toy, with outdoor tables
shaded by colorful umbrellas. The
menu of standard tacos and burritos
also offers items like tofu fajitas and
vegan steak strip quesadillas. At
night, the spot is brightly lit along an
otherwise dark stretch, giving the
truck, tables and line of customers a
moody look reminiscent of the lit-up
diner in Edward Hopper's
"Nighthawks" painting.
A block away, Nitally's offers
Thai-Mex cuisine reflecting the
owners' dual heritage along with
bicultural decor, like decorations


for the Mexican holiday Day of the
Dead at Halloween alongside Bud-
dhas. There are Thai dishes on the
menu, Mexican dishes and some fu-
sion dishes that combine the two
(though truth be told, panang mole
is more entertaining as a concept
than as reality).
Across the street, Beak's St. Pete
has a fun, laidback, Old-Florida vibe
complete with shell art decor and
twangy guitar music. (Beak's refers
to a parrot, in case you were won-
dering.)
The real gem here for serious
foodies, though, is a slightly more
upscale place across the street from
Beak's and Nitally's called Queen-
shead. The interior decor is vaguely
British, with a Union Jack and a
bust of Queen Elizabeth, while the
spacious outdoor seating is Florida-
style with lounges and cabanas. But
there's nothing standoffish about
these Anglophiles: If you choose to
eat at the bar, friendly bartenders
will keep you company while other
patrons recommend their favorite
dishes.
Entrees echo the British theme:
shepherd's pie, fish and chips,
bangers and mash. But the real stars
here are the creative small-plate
starters. Some work as bar snacks if


See Page A17




A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


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TRAV 9 106 9 44 Soul Food Paradise Bi Beef Paradise Monumental Myster Mysteries-Museum America Declassified America Declassified
ruTV 25 55 25 98 55 World Records Panic Panic To 20 Funniest'14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
CTVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne oRoseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs GoldGirs Gold Girls Gold Girls
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special White Collar "No Good
04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14" Deed"'PG'
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.WGNEA 118 118 18 18 20 "Deep Blue Sea"'R' Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay 'Men of Honor"R'


Go ahead and


send greetings


D earAnnie: My
partner and I
moved into our
house a year ago. So far,
we have met only one of
our neighbors. Would it
be OK to give some of the
others a Christmas card
to try to open up a line of
friendship? We are a gay
couple and don't wish to
offend anyone. -Trying
To Be a Friendly Neigh-
bor
Dear Try-
ing: It is never
inappropriate
to send holi-
day greetings
to your neigh-
bors. Those
who don't
wish to com-
municate will
not respond.
Those who do
are likely to ANI
send a card in MAI
return or at M
the very least
acknowledge you when
they see you. But keep in
mind that some people
are simply busy, go in and
out of garages, and rarely
have the opportunity to
see or chat with their
neighbors. Don't assume
it's personal.
DearAnnie: "Loving
Daughter" couldn't un-


II
LI
LE


derstand why her aunts
and uncles didn't offer
support during her
mother's illness.
Well, I have two broth-
ers. The younger one and
I are close, but my older
brother has always been
distant About 30 years
ago, he moved 750 miles
away and said he was
never coming back Both
my parents passed away
before he re-
turned to town.
I have spoken to
him once in the
past 15 years,
and he told me
he was angry
because he
thought I was
Mother's fa-
vorite.
He was re-
cently diag-
E'S nosed with a
terminal illness,
3OX and his daugh-
ter (whom I met
once 40 years ago) thinks
we should rush to his bed-
side. He is in a drug-in-
duced coma, wouldn't
know we were there and
wouldn't want us there.
We are not going, and the
daughter probably won-
ders why Siblings
Don't Have to Love
Each Other


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"American Hustle" (R)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:25
p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 5 p.m.,
10:35 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
ofSmaug" (PG-13) 3:30 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D. 12
p.m., 10p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D,
high frame rate. 12:30 p.m., 4
p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 12:25 a.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20
p.m. No passes.
"Saving Mr. Banks" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's 'A Madea
Christmas'" (PG-13) 12:50
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) 2:55 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.


"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) In 3D. 12:05 p.m., 4:50
p.m. No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inver-
ness; 637-3377
"American Hustle" (R) 12:30
p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Anchorman 2" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) 2:20 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 11:45
p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
ofSmaug" (PG-13) 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) In 3D.
11:30 a.m., 10:05 p.m.. No
passes.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 7:50
p.m. No passes.
"Walking With Dinosaurs"
(PG) In 3D. 5 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Stuffed
6 Interlock
10 Hebrew prophet
14 Getoutta here!
19 Greek
marketplace
20 Poet T.S.-
22 Starr and
Simpson
24 Peace goddess
25 Giant
26 Arboreal animal
27 Keep for later
28 Wagons
29 Malt beverages
30 operandi
32 Shot of booze
34 Conceited
35 Unbeatable foe
39 Alcove
41 Gesture of respect
43 Bit of gossip
45 Requires
47 Make into law
48 Quick--wink
51 City in Mississippi
53 Genesis name
55 Time
56 Soft mass
59 Duds
61 Use a stopwatch
62 Eye part
64 Base, in chemistry
66 Heep
68 Scandinavian
70 Swerved
72 Mason- Line
73 More elementary
75 Opera by Bellini
77 Uncanny
79 Traveled
80 Greek god of
the sun
82 Family member
84 Wonton
86 Mil. groupon
campus
88 Insults
90 Flat-topped hill
91 Frame fora
mattress
95 Canine
97 Wept
101 Spiritual leader
102 Goat antelope


of Asia
104 Regular
106 Famed magician
108 --Saxon
110 Neglectful
112 Alliance of nations
114 Verdi's "- Miller"
115 Reprimands
117 Fender spoiler
118 Bottle
120 Diplomacy
121 Kind of roast
122 Catchall abbr.
124 Costly
126 -wheel
128 Costa del-
129 Old Roman
assembly
131 Male duck
133 Rice or Gantry
135 Bomb's trigger
139 Athletics
141 Relating to sight
145 Winglike
146 Tiny openings
148 Made tractable
150 Tree trunk
151 Durable
153 Aspect
155 Bolshevik leader
157 Zoo animal
158 Word with crust
or class
159 Burn brightly
160 Battery terminal
161 --statesman
162 Encounters
163 Sword
164 Horse's gait
165 Beautify

DOWN
1 The devil
2 Like a gymnast
3 Tribal emblem
4 Schoolroom item
5 Rather or Duryea
6 Brooks or Gibson
7 Sch. type
8 "-says..."
9 Famed escape artist
10 Certain muscles, for
short
11 Doilies
12 Town in Maine
13 Flashing light


14 passim
15 Neckpiece
16 Showed again
17 Caper
18 Kind of feudal lord
21 Armistice
23 Tranquil
31 Demolished N.Y sta-
dium
33 Headband
36 Big sandwich,
for short
37 Ersatz (Abbr.)
38 Unbroken
40 Murphy or
Cochran
42 Bum
44 Kind of candle
46 Indian garment (var.)
48 Fever
49 Jessica Parker
50 Start the day
52 Inert gas
54 Stuck
56 Pale and shiny
57 "- came a
spider..."
58 Force
60 Clear the water out
63 Antitoxin
65 New Zealand bird
67 Successors
69 Discord deity
70 Inane
71 Coins
74 Parts of plants
76 Liquefy
78 salts
81 Bovine animal
83 Love god
85 Sticker
87 Was concerned
89 Ticket remnant
91 Swindling scheme
92 Rye fungus
93 Tedious
94 Like the Capitol
96 Divide in two
98 Dry, as champagne
99 Inventor Howe
100 Dance club
101 Struggle for air
103 -and dined
105 French river
107 Part of NLRB (Abbr.)
109 "'--a


Grecian Um"
111 Celebrities
113 Monte-
116 Sandal part
119 Droopy
123 Terminate
(2 wds.)
125 Engrossed
126 Turn into alcohol
127 Rigid


12-22


129 Forgive and-
130 Team spirit
132 Australian animal
134 Bawdy
135 Item of information
136 Run off to wed
137 Brownish gray
138 Summary,
for short
140 Male singer


Apartment
Deciduous tree
Memorize
Withered
"-and Aeneas"
Time periods (Abbr.)
A letter
Fishing tool
Legume


@ 2013 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










VETERANS
-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Free Christmas dinner
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58
invites the public to a free Christmas
dinner from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Donations will be accepted, but are not
necessary

Celebrate new year with post
Come and enjoy New Year's Eve from
3 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, atVFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills.
Tickets are $20 per person, which in-
cludes a prime rib dinner, a band, dancing,
party favors and champagne toast. Cash
bar available.
Tickets are on sale until Dec. 25. There
will be no late sales.
For information, call 352-746-0440.

Post invites all to come jam
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 3, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

40&8 to do breakfast Jan. 5
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Sunday, Jan. 5, at American Legion Post
155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Post to host poker run
American Legion Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway will host a benefit poker
run Saturday Jan. 25, with proceeds sup-
porting Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and patients and fami-
lies served by Hospice of Citrus County
A $15 entry fee per rider will include a
poker hand, a raffle prize ticket and a
meal at the end of the run. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills.
Kickstands are up at 10 a.m. and the last
bike in will be at 4:30 p.m. when food will
be served.
The fourth annual American Legion
Post 237 Poker Run will encompass six
stops to include: Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's, Crystal River Eagles,
Mickey's Billiards and Scoreboards.
The best hand will win the poker run
and all vehicles are welcome to partici-
pate. Music will be provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auction, door prize
raffles and a 50/50 drawing.
"We invite everyone to participate in
our event and everyone has a great time,"
Director of American Legion Riders Chap-
ter 237 and poker run chairperson John
Roby said. "This fourth annual run
proudly supports Moffitt Cancer Center
Ovarian Cancer Research and local pa-
tients and families served by Hospice of
Citrus County"
For more information, call 352-746-5018
or John Roby at 352-341-5856.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
roast beef dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy Rooks Jr VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road 200, where the
helicopter is). The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and $7.50 at the
door Tickets can be purchased at Post
4252. Call the post at 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start at
6 p.m. Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170
Vet Lane (County Road 491 behind Ca-
dence Bank), offers several events that are
open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke-
free hall. Card bingo and grill night is at
5 p.m. Wednesday in the Canteen. Darts
are at 7 p.m. Monday and Fridays in the
Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information, call 352-746-0440.


Earnin


v


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Retired Marine Col. Peter Kranker explains how his flight helmet operates. Kranker flew fighter aircraft and helicopter for
all the military branches in his 20 years of service. He resides in Citrus Hills with his wife of 48 years, Julie.


From Hueys to F-4 Phantoms, he's flown them all


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Twenty years.

Thirteen
different
aircraft.
That's what Peter Kranker, who re-
tired from the U.S. Marine Corps with
the rank of colonel, has on his resume.
He has flown all sorts of aircraft, from


helicopters to fighter jets, and in the
20 years he spent in the armed forces
- and he actually served for a time in
all of them- what he enjoyed most
were the missions he was part of, the
missions he flew.
"What I enjoyed best was as a cap-
tain, being the flight commander,"
Kranker said. "You helped plan the
flight and you flew it. You could fly
and have fun.
"Being in command wasn't fun. You
were always worrying about the
people you were in command of."
Kranker's path to what turned into a
career in the military started during
one of the more tumultuous periods
regarding the military in American
history the 1960s, with many trying
to find ways to avoid serving in the
armed forces, and a significant


portion of the nation opposing the war
being fought in Vietnam.
After graduating from Oklahoma
University in 1967, Kranker who
had been in the ROTC, or Reserve Of-
ficers Training Corps found himself
eligible to be drafted. Instead, after
talking it over with a friend, he opted
to join the U.S. Marine Air Corps.
"I didn't like the ROTC," he said.
"But I got drafted. I had never been in
any kind of aircraft at the time, but I
got accepted."
After enlisting in the Marines, he
went to Quantico, Va., for basic train-
ing, where those in his class were
asked if they
wanted to be
trained as heli-
copter pilots.
Kranker
volunteered.
He would
serve 14 months
,,,,,,,,,,_ _ in Vietnam,
originally train-
ing on Bell UH-1 Iroquois helicopters,
nicknamed Hueys. From there he
went on to pilot the CH-46 twin-rotor
Sea Knight, and that would be the
craft he would fly most often in Viet-
nam, stationed first at Phu Bai, then
aboard the USS Valley Forge and at
Marble Mountain at Da Nang Air
Base. He was also on board the USS
New Orleans before returning for
anther stint at Da Nang.
Kranker, who also trained to pilot
the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion heli-
copter, would leave Vietnam in 1969.
He would volunteer to train for fixed-
wing aircraft and, after training on T-2
Buckeye and TA-4 Skyhawk, he would
go on to fly F-4 Phantoms while sta-
tioned in Buford, S.C., and on a 13-
month tour in Japan.
His military career he would


spend time with the Army, Navy and
Air Force as well would include
stretches in England and Washington,
D.C., among several other locations.
After retiring from the Marines in
1987, Kranker flew for Eastern Air
Lines before its dissolution in 1991,
then went into private practice.
Now living in Citrus Springs,
Kranker spends some of his time talk-
ing to high school and college students
about his experiences in the military
He will talk about any of those experi-
ences, if asked about them, but he
won't offer any
"I want to honor the people who
have fallen," Kranker said. "I believe
that every day, you have to earn it, you
have to earn living that day"
Seeing death helped Kranker ap-
preciate life. He flew countless heli-
copter missions in Vietnam, often
going in at night to evacuate troops
who had been under heavy fire.
"I remember tracers (bullets) going
back and forth, and you'd wish you
were so small you could hide behind
the stick," he said. "I remember get-
ting one guy lying in the back of the
copter who'd been on an amtrak (am-
phibious tracked vehicle) that had
been attacked, and he had no face. It
had been burned off, and I remember
thinking, 'I hope he dies."'
Another incident Kranker recalled
was a young soldier lying on the floor
of his helicopter whose "legs were
gone. He was ashen white, and he
looked up at me, gave me the peace
sign, and then he died."
Like many veterans, Kranker be-
lieves the sacrifices made by soldiers
like these must never be forgotten (the
first soldier whose face had been
burned did indeed die, according to
Kranker). It is a message he will
endeavor to deliver


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




A16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


VETERANS NOTES


DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made
before 1 p.m.

DAV transport
program needs van
The Disabled American Vet-
erans Transportation Network
requests contributions from the
public to reach a goal of $20,000
for a van.
The van program goes to the
clinic in The Villages, as well as
to the VA facility in Gainesville.
This service is available to all
veterans each weekday, for
scheduled appointments, tests
and procedures.
The program uses a loaner
van, which has more than
270,000 miles on it, to transport
to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not ac-
cepted and it is requested that
any contributions be made by
check or money order made out
to: DAV Van Project-with
DAV van project also written in
the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible contri-
bution to: DAV Van Project, c/o
Joe Stephens, chairman, 2797
W Xenox Drive, Citrus Springs,
FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70,1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34450.

'In Their Words'
features local vets
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to


James Dylan
Williams
James Dylan
Williams of Crystal
S River graduated
basic military train-
ing at Lackland
AFB, San Antonio,
James Texas, on Oct. 25,
Dylan 2
Williams 2013.
U.S. Air Force He graduated
high school from
both the Academy of Environmental
Science and Crystal River High


you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
e-mail him at cjrisak2@yahoo.
com. C.J. will put together your
stories and help set up obtain-
ing "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story

Case manager aids
Citrus veterans
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has a
case manager who is available
to assist veterans to apply
for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes
Region Library 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
0 Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
0 Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To
make an appointment to meet
with the case manager, call 352-
527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers
help for veterans who have had
their post-traumatic stress dis-
order (PTSD) claim denied.


School in May 2012.
He is currently attending tech
school at Sheppard AFB, Wichita
Falls, Texas, and is part of the 509th
Maintenance Squadron.
The 509th Maintenance
Squadron provides logistics and
maintenance support capabilities
for B-2 bomber mission
operations.
After graduating tech school, he
will be stationed at Whiteman AFB,
Mo.
He is the son of Dave and
Jennifer Williams of Crystal River.


Veterans who have been de-
nied within the past two years
are asked to contact the office
to review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the Lecanto
VA Mental Health center and
have been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment
to discuss a claim, call 352-527-
5915. You will need to have
your denial letter and a copy of
your compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You can get
a copy of your exam either by
requesting it through the VA
medical records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information about
the Citrus County Veterans
Office, log onto wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department is looking
for veterans who have re-cently
transitioned from the military
(or returning reservist from
tours of active duty) to Citrus


IN SERVICE


County within the past two
years.
Veterans Services requests
that veterans and their spouses
call to be placed on a list for an
upcoming seminar, which will
discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease
transition.
The office will schedule a
seminar to discuss benefits and
solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915
to reserve a seat. For more in-
formation about the Citrus
County Veterans Office, log onto
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us/
commserv/vets.

Reserve for trip
to Hawaii in 2014
Don McLean, U.S. Navy, re-
tired, will lead the 2014 trip to
Hawaii for veterans and their
families and friends from March
11 to March 28. Signups are
being taken for the an-nual trek,
which includes visits to several
islands, some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Arizona Me-
morial and The National
Cemetery of the Pacific.
For more information, call
McLean at 352-637-5131 or
email dmclean8@tampa
bayrrcom.

Memorial honors
vets in Homosassa
Purple Heart recipients are
sought to be honored with cen-
terpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

Want to assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary?
Ex-military and retired mili-
tary personnel are needed to
assist the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and
non-law enforcement programs
such as public education, vessel
safety checks, safety patrols
search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uniform
with pride and your military
ribbons. Criminal back-ground
check and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call


Informed Veterans



know where to find



the resources


they need.




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GET INFORMED.



CHKp.QNIC.LE
ww.chronicleonline.com


917-597 6961.

Hospice has tailored
care for veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partner-
ing agency with the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA),
provides tailored care for
veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war It
also provides caregiver educa-
tion and a recognition program
to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.











Air Force looking
for prior enlisted
The U.S. Air Force is looking
for prior enlisted men and
women from all services in-ter-
ested in both direct duty assign-
ments in previously obtained
career fields or retraining into
select career fields.
Some of the careers include
aircraft electronics/mechanical
areas, cyber operation fields,
and various other specialties.
Enlisted career openings that
include the opportuni-ties to
retrain consist of special opera-
tions positions and unmanned
aerial vehicle. Assignments are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
offered for veterans
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom
is associated with the national
service organization, Yoga For
Vets. She teaches free classes to
combat veterans at several
locations and times.
Call 352-382-7397.


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DOGG97




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE EXCURSIONS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 A17



2014 travel: Sochi, Brazil, Berlin, Sarajevo


Travelers sure to visit spotlight

destinations in upcoming year


BETH J. HARPAZ
Associated Press

NEW YORK-The Olympics, the
World Cup and commemorations of
World War I, D-Day and the fall of the
Berlin Wall are some of the events that
will spotlight destinations like Sochi,
Brazil, Sarajevo, Normandy and Berlin
in 2014.
Elsewhere abroad, a potentially
game-changing high-speed rail service
has just launched linking Paris and
Barcelona. Some travelers may now
prefer the train over a plane, with the
train ride cut in half to just over six
hours between the two cities.
Back in the U.S., St. Louis marks the
250th anniversary of its Feb. 15,1764
founding with celebrations in February
including a reenactment, parties and a
music festival. Other events are planned
throughout the year
Harry Potter fans will have a new rea-
son to visit Florida next summer when
the Universal Orlando theme park
opens a new area with attractions in-
spired by the books' fictional scenes in
Diagon Alley and London. A train called
the Hogwarts Express will take visitors
back and forth between the new Potter
attractions including a restaurant
called the Leaky Cauldron and Uni-
versal's existing Wizarding World of
Harry Potter Universal also plans an
1,800-room 1960s-themed resort and
eight new restaurants at the CityWalk
dining area for 2014.
Nearby, Disney World in Lake Buena
Vista, will open a new family coaster,
the Seven Dwarfs Mine Train, in the
spring.

OLYMPICS AND WORLD CUP
The Winter Olympics, Feb. 7-23, take
place in Sochi, a Russian Black Sea re-
sort that's one of the least-known
Olympic destinations in years. The in-
door events will be held in ice arenas on
the coast, while skiing and snowboard-
ing are in the Caucasus Mountains 30
miles inland.
With its subtropical climate and lush
greenery, the coastal area of Sochi has
long been a popular destination; some
elaborate worker resorts from the Stal-
inist era remain, and new winter resorts
are under construction.
The World Cup soccer games, June
12-July 13, will be held in 12 cities in
Brazil: Belo Horizonte, Brasilia, Cua-
iaba, Curitiba, Fortaleza, Manaus, Natal,
Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro,
Salvador and Sao Paulo. The most ex-
otic destination, Manaus, a steamy city
in the Amazon jungle, may also be the
most controversial: England soccer
coach Roy Hodgson called it "the place
ideally to avoid," while the London
tabloid the Mirror called it a "crime-rid-
den hell-hole." But loads of soccer fans
are likely to travel there despite the bad
press to attend some of the tourna-
ment's top matches, including England-
Italy and Portugal-U.S. The city is also a
gateway to Amazon tourism, with Man-
aus-based operators offering boat trips
and tours into the jungle.

REMEMBERING WAR
The summer of 2014 marks a century
since World War I was triggered by the
June 28,1914 assassination of the Aus-
trian archduke Franz Ferdinand in


EATS
Continued from Page A17

you want something to an-
chor your cocktails, but
you could also make a
meal out of ordering a few
of them. These are all as
utterly scrumptious as
they sound: crispy chick-
peas dusted with smoked
paprika (way better than
bar popcorn to accom-
pany your black-and-tan);
huge, sweet seared scal-
lops with the best darn


Sarajevo, now the capital of Bosnia-
Herzegovina. Events are planned across
Europe to commemorate the centenary
- http://www. 1914.org -and some U.S.
tour operators like Road Scholar are of-
fering itineraries visiting places con-
nected to the war Famous battlefields
include Verdun, France; Gallipoli,
Turkey, and Western Belgium, where
red poppies still bloom in Flanders
Fields, a battlefield immortalized in the
famous poem: "In Flanders Fields the
poppies blow/Between the crosses, row
on row"
June 6 is the 70th anniversary of D-
Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy,
France, which marked a turning point
in defeating Hitler in World War II. Past
milestone anniversaries have drawn
veterans of the invasion, but that gener-
ation is rapidly dwindling. President
Obama, Queen Elizabeth and other
heads of state have been invited to mark
the solemn day on the Normandy coast.
Nov 9 will mark 25 years since the
Berlin Wall was breached, a powerful
moment in ending communism in East-
ern Europe and the Cold War The wall,
built in 1961, not only physically cut
East Berlin off from the West, but also
symbolized the division between West-
ern Europe and communist-controlled
Eastern bloc countries. The wall was
completely torn down in 1990, but its de-
struction began in 1989.
In the years since, reunified Berlin
has become a trendy tourism capital -
described as "poor but sexy" by its
mayor Events and exhibits are planned
to mark the 25th anniversary, including
an installation of illuminated balloons
on a 7.5-mile path where the city was
once divided.

HOMECOMING, FROZEN,
VERMEER AND HOBBITS
Scotland hosts its year-long "Home-
coming," inviting emigres and their de-
scendants to return for clan gatherings
and other events, including a reenact-
ment of the Battle of Bannockburn, an
important victory 700 years ago in the
Wars of Scottish Independence. The
Homecoming is held every four years.
In Holland, the Mauritshuis museum
reopens in June in The Hague. This
small but important museum, housed in
a 17th-century palace, is home to Ver-
meer's masterpiece, "Girl with a Pearl
Earring," which has been drawing huge
crowds at the Frick in New York follow-
ing showings in San Francisco and At-
lanta. The painting has been traveling
with "The Goldfinch" and works by
Rembrandt and other Dutch masters
while the Mauritshuis underwent a two-
year renovation.
In Norway, the Geirangerfjord will get
some additional visitors as Adventures
By Disney adds the destination to a new
itinerary inspired by the movie
"Frozen." The film's fantasy kingdom of
Arendelle was based on the fjord.
New Zealand is hoping for an in-
crease in visitors inspired by the second
movie in the "Hobbit" trilogy Tourism
connected to "The Lord of the Rings"
and "Hobbit" films has become a big
business in New Zealand, where the
movies were filmed. A survey by
Tourism New Zealand showed 13 per-
cent of international visitors earlier this
year took part in some kind of"Hobbit"-
themed tourism like visiting a film set.


brussels sprouts you ever
ate; and pumpkin-fla-
vored goat cheese on
house-made crackers.
And here's an idea worth
copying for your next at-
home party: a plate of
caprese skewers, with
cherry tomatoes, a folded
basil leaf and slivers of
mozzarella speared on a
long cocktail pick, turning
the classic caprese salad
into finger-food that's
easy to share.
For dessert, try the
sticky toffee, and don't
worry about some scary


Sunday' PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

AG0RA ELIOT BAR TS I R ENE
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ALES MUISiSNO RT VAIN
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UMOR NEEDS MENACTM
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LA R R_ S ES TIAIM ED BOL
TU GH F A C ET LENIN PANDA
U P ER F L A RIE AINOD LE ELD
MEETS EPEE TROT ADORN


Associated Press
Tourist boats are moored on the Rio Negro, the largest left tributary of the Amazon,
in Manaus, Brazil. Manaus is the most exotic of the 12 cities where the World Cup
games will be played in June in Brazil. Despite receiving some early bad press, the
steamy city is a gateway to Amazon tourism and is likely to attract loads of soccer
fans, as some of the tournament's top games will be played there.



BWe need your


information
eiiiiiiiiiiiii As our community grows, it becomes even more
important that we know how to keep in touch with
each other. The Chronicle's annual publication of
1 Our Home Citrus is the best and most complete
resource for all those important organizations,
clubs hobby groups, and other ways we make
friends share pastimes and help each other out.

If you would like your group to be listed in this publication please fill out the
following form and mail or deliver by January 3, 2014 to:

Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (must be non-profit)_________
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:_____________
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)__________

Street address:


City:-


MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE:
Day of the week (every Monday, third Monday of the week)_______.
CONTACT:
Name:

Phone number:

Email address:

Please check the category which best describes your organization -
only one category, please:


D Animals
[] Arts & Crafts
[ Civic
o Computers
o Cultural and Heritage
o Education and Youth


crunchy surprise getting
stuck in your teeth it's
as smooth and tasty as
homestyle butterscotch
pudding.


I? $ XAAVA[LABLE
This Holiday Season give the gift of travel!
&0 'N. Gift certificates available for cruises, tours and more.
No amount too big ortoo small. C
Call
I' .V y .^Accent Travel
t ,C, ( ) to purchase a
...... I ( V giftthey
L 4 won't return


o Food Progi
o Fraternal
[] Gardening
o Hobbies
o Political
o Recreation


rams


Groups


[] Seniors
o Service Clubs
o Special Interest
o Support Groups
o Vehicles
o Weight Control


El Women's Clubs


GLOBUS VACATIONS
Every journey tells a story- M V IO N S
French Sampler 2
September 14-21,2014
Fully escorted trip to France: from 9 pp
Paris, Versailles, Beaune, Avignon, Point Du Gard, Nimes,
Aix En-Provence, Grasse, Nice, Monte Carlo
Great meals and hotels. INQUIRE ABOUT THE FULL ITINERARY
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
TALLY-HO t Hidden 352-860-2805
Fe s www.tallyhovacations.com
dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
yJ, D 'L4t[ f1 i B..r' K. _. FL Seller of Travel 10131

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Becky's relStore T Lr,
c ~~. -.. 1-.-.
Come and join us for vacation inspiration
Be the first to discover 2014's must see destinations.
Come and Meet
Jennifer Reynolds from Trafalgar Tours
Jan 14,2014 3pm-5pm
RSVP required please contact 352-527-8855 or
Email beckystravelstore@earthlink.net
3557 N. Lewnnto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Cf6 (352)527-8855
Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.com


If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways

call 563-5592


12-22


C', 2013 UFS, Dist_ by Universal Uclick for UFS




A1S SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


Christmas lights, camera, action


y ou can see it from
space!" Kirby com-
.. plained about his next-
door neighbor's Christmas lawn
display In his living room, at 9 p.m.,
with the curtains drawn and the
lights off, it was as bright as day-
light The only difference was that
daylight doesn't twinkle and blink in
different colors.
"Did you see the six wise men?"
he asked.
"I thought there were only three
wise men," I said. 'And I thought
people were smaller back then.
These guys are two feet taller than I
am. I thought maybe they were the
three wise men's bodyguards."
"It started out with three until
another three went on sale right
after Christmas last year Next year
there may be nine. Who knows? And
what did you think of their camel
train?"
"Is that what that is supposed to
be? I thought they were creatures
from 'Star Wars.' I wondered what
that had to do with Christmas."
Normally, I like Christmas lights.
It gets dark so early in the winter
that it's cheery to see the outlines of
houses, the multicolored lights in
the shrubberies, a roly-poly Santa
waving at me as I drive through
town in the evening. As ever, some
people do more decorating than
others and some are more tasteful
than others but this this was what
Liberace would have done if he had
had the money
"Did you see the manger?"


Nov. 25 to Dec. 8, 2013
Divorces
Clint C. Canady Sr.,
Nathrop, Colo. vs. Julie
Garcia Canady, Inglis
Mary B. Bergdoll,
Dunnellon vs. Kenneth R.
Bergdoll, Inglis
Timothy L. Cyr, Hernando
vs. Jamie L. Cyr, Beverly Hills
Martha A. Keck, Brentwood,
Calif. vs. James M. Mayes,
Floral City
Nathan Alfred Owen,
Wildwood vs. Amber Dawn
Owen, Brooksville
William P. Reyes, Citrus
Springs vs. Lisa Maria Reyes,
Citrus Springs
Zoraida Rivera Ruane,
Dunnellon vs. James Ruane,
Dunnellon
Wayne M. Smith, Citrus
Springs vs. Patricia Smith,


Jim
Mullen

VILLAGE
IDIOT


"No, but I liked that big cutaway
of the Mall of America. You could
park a car in it What does that
represent?"
"That's the cr6che. Didn't you see
the holy family gathered around a
T-shirt display in a Gap store on
level 2B while shop clerks gathered
around to celebrate the blessed
event?"
"Well, shop clerks are kind of like
shepherds."
"Don't tell me you're buying into
this. Doesn't it bother you that Jesus,
Mary and Joseph didn't even have
electricity and we celebrate his
birthday by..."
There was an earthshaking thud. I
ran to get under a doorway, thinking
the house was about to collapse
around us. Kirby just sat there. I
yelled at him to run for cover while
he still could.
"It's not an earthquake," he said.
"It's the 'Little Drummer Boy'
segment starting up."
"That's isn't a drum, it's artillery"
"No, Barry's turned his entire
roof into a speaker Wait until you
hear 'Silent Night' It's done by a


FOR THE RECORD


Citrus Springs

Marriages
Andy Bo Dean Bath,
Beverly Hills/Marqwita
Reshay Richburgh,
Beverly Hills
Nicholas John Borozan,
Floral City/Blanche Ann
Yermal, Floral City
Ronnie James Burklew Sr.,
Trappe/Christina Marie Royer,
Trappe
Christopher Michael
Channell, Inverness/Penny
Renee Nevills, Inverness
James Grant Codling,
Inverness/Carol Denise
Blakeney, The Villages
Travis Dean Harscher,
Homosassa/Sarah Ann
Humphrey, Homosassa
Brian Edward Mason,
Crystal River/Rebecca Helen


Miller, Crystal River
Tyler Russell Parrish,
Ocala/Jacqueline Marie
Salatino, Ocala
Robert William Philpot,
Gainesville/Colleen Elizabeth
Bennett, Inverness
Nicholas Daniel Sutliff,
Inverness/Victoria Ann
Kopera, Inverness
Joey Keith Yates,
Homosass/Alexandra Rae
Rosset, Homosassa
Jeremiah Daniel Bailey,
Floral City/Jessica Lynn
McCumber, Floral City
Kelly Lynn Barberee, Citrus
Springs/Katelind Marie Riner,
Townville
David Keith Cromwell
Inverness/Ruth Marie Bristow,
Inverness
Daniel James Johnson,


marching band of life-size mechani-
cal tin soldiers."
What I had mistaken for a natural
disaster was starting to vaguely
sound like a booming pa-rum-pum-
pum-pum. From inside Kirby's
house, it sounded like one of those
cars that go by with the music blar-
ing and the windows up so all you
can hear is the DNA-splitting bass.
It was very hard to nail down any
melody
"I know this will sound as if I
don't have any Christmas spirit, but
can't you put out a hit on your neigh-
bor? Just have somebody whack
him?"
"No, because then I'll look like
the bad guy"
"People can be so judgmental."
"Especially this time of year Do
you want to sleep on the sofa?"
"Why would I sleep on the sofa?
I'm going home to get some peace
and quiet"
"I don't think so. Take a look out-
side." There was a solid line of cars
snaking slowly through his subdivi-
sion past his house at 2 miles per
hour
"That's all right; someone will let
me through."
"Really? I sat there for two hours
last night before I was able to get
out But only because some woman
who was taking pictures with her
cell phone dropped it and stopped
for two seconds to look for it"
Contact Jim Mullen at Jim
MullenBooks. corn.


Homosassa/Jennifer Marie
Williams, Homosassa
Joshua Joseph Lafayette,
Floral City/Amanda Lynn
Dabinett-Harbig, Inverness
Douglas Anthony Monck,
Inverness/Mika Robin Griess,
Inverness
Gregory Norman Nason,
Homosassa/Harriet Holman
Heywood, Homosassa
Dwight Henry Neil, Citrus
Springs/Uniece Burgos,
Inverness
Daniel Woodrow Powell,
Beverly Hills/Trisha Mae
Estes, Beverly Hills
Angel Alberto Vasquez,
Waterbury, Conn./Miriam
Perez, Citrus Springs
Jerald Francis Willert,
Inverness/Mary Elaine Towle,
Inverness


ENGAGED

Thomas/Lindsey

Mary Lauren Thomas
and Raheem L. Lindsey
will exchange nuptial
vows at 1 p.m. Jan. 4,
2014, at Gulf Beach Nine
Mile Beach.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Steve and
Teresa Townsend of
Crystal River
Her fiance is the son
of Kim Dixon of Akron,
Ohio.


73rdANNIVERSARY

The Gronauers


mMfiw
Kathryn and Donald
Gronauer will celebrate
their 73rd wedding
anniversary on
Dec. 24,2013.
The couple were
married on Christmas
Eve, Dec. 24,1940, in
Indianapolis. They re-
tired to Florida in 1985.
Donald is a U.S. Army
veteran of World War II,
having been in the


Invasion of Normandy
on day two.
They have two
children: John (Emily)
Gronauer and Janice
(Gerald) Goodwin.
They have four
grandsons and five
great-grandchildren.
The extended family
will celebrate the
special occasion with a
private dinner party


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400.
GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.
NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
Call Charlie Brennan at 563-3225.


I I'


Dec. 23-27MENUS


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced turkey
ham with raisin sauce,
mashed sweet potatoes,
Brussels sports, special
holiday dessert, whole-grain
roll with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Christmas Eve.
Sites closed.
Wednesday: Christmas
Day. Sites closed.
Thursday: Chicken parme-
san, California vegetables,
Italian flat beans, peaches,


slice whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Meatballs with
brown gravy, rice pilaf, mixed
vegetables, pears, slice white
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at
352-527-5975.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and
engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays. Call
352-563-5660 to have the form emailed.
* To submit information about engagements,
weddings, anniversaries, birth announcements
and first birthdays online, visit
www.chronicleonline.com.


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TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6_-


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NORM
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WAP:









SPORTS


USC puts on a
show to kick off
bowl season,
trouncing BCS
contenders Fresno
State./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0Rams rare favorite against Bucs
Rams rare favorite against Bucs


Tampa Bay

hits the road to

play in St. Louis
Associated Press
ST LOUIS Some of the
NFEs top teams have found the
underdog St. Louis Rams quite
the handful. Now, the Rams get
a chance to be the favorites.
Though they're winding up
their 10th consecutive season
without a winning record, the
Rams' last three wins have
come against division leaders.
They whipped the 10-win Saints
last week, humbled the Colts on
the road, doubled up on the
Bears, plus they were a whisker


away from upsetting the NFC
West-leading Seahawks.
"We've showed we can play
with great teams, and beat great
teams," said Robert
Quinn, who leads the Tamp
NFC with 15 sacks. Bucs
The Rams (6-8) have at St.
a different challenge RamI
this week- avoiding a
letdown against the U Time
Tampa Bay Bucca- toda'
neers (4-10). St. Louis
was favored by
5 1/2 points.
"Sometimes we play below
the level we're capable of,"
Quinn said. "We need to be
more consistent."
They clicked across the board
to beat New Orleans after get-
ting eliminated from postsea-
son consideration, and the
incentive now for the NFLs


pa
(


y.
FO


youngest team is matching last Apr iB'
year's win total. That 7-8-1 fin-
ish in the first year under coach d
Jeff Fisher and general man-s
ager Les Snead m
3a Bay marked them as an up-
410) and-coming franchise. h
Louis Sure, this year has
been a letdown, but it's .
not yet the time to be
1 p.m. evaluating talent for
next year "
"We're playing to a
win them," Fisher

said. "We just want to
finish up strong."
The same goes for the Bucca-
neers.
After an 0-8 start, they've won
four of six. They're trending up
despite precious little produc-
tion on offense, posting the four Associated Press
Tampa Bay quarterback Mike Glennon leads the Buccaneers into St.
See Page B5 Louis today to take on the Rams.


Gators' D notches W

No. 16Florida 66,
Fresno State 49
Associated Press
SUNRISE, Fla.
T he Florida Gators kept making
Fresno State miss, and kept
grabbing rebounds.
Eventually the Gators started
to sink some shots, too.
No. 16-ranked Florida won with de-
fense Saturday, allowing its lowest
point total of the season to beat Fresno
State 66-49.
Florida held the Bulldogs to 32-per-
cent shooting, a season-best by the
Gators. Fresno State went 4 for 17 from
3-point range, including a basket from
near midcourt at the final buzzer
"This was probably our best game
defensively from start to finish," Gators
coach Billy Donovan said. "I was happy
with the way we guarded. They weren't
able to score quickly on us. They had to
go deep into the shot clock"
Casey Prather scored 16 points for
the Gators (9-2), who had a 47-24 advan-
tage in rebounds. Prather was voted
the game's most valuable player
Fresno State (6-6) lost its third game
in a row and fell to 1-5 away from home.
"It was an honor to come in here and
compete against one of the best teams
in the country," coach Rodney Terry
said.
In the first game of the double-
header, No. 22 Massachusetts lost to
Florida State 60-55.
The Gators went 1 for 13 from 3-point
range in the first half, but thanks to
their defense, they still led 23-19. De-
fense was an area Donovan empha-
sized in practice after Florida gave up
75 points Tuesday in a win over Mem-
phis.
"We did a great job doing things
we've been trying to do in practice,"
Prather said. "We've just been trying
every day to stay hungry as possible to
get better on defense and become great
defensively"
While Fresno State missed 34 shots,
the Bulldogs had only nine offensive
rebounds. The Gators' edge on the
boards was by far their largest this
year
"We knew going in that on the glass
they're a monster to deal with," Terry
said.
Florida's Will Yeguete had five offen-
sive rebounds and a season-high 10 total.
"The most underrated guy tonight Associated Press
Florida's Will Yeguete (15) and Patric Young defend against Fresno State's Cezar Guerrero on Saturday in the first half
See Page B3 at the Orange Bowl Classic in Sunrise, Fla. Florida won 66-49.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This Christmas, a bronze better than gold


ne of my favorite author's
notes is that "a life with-
out controversy is not a
life fulfilled." I can honestly say
that this Christmas, more than
ever, I resemble that quote.
Over the past several weeks, I
have been contacted by a New
York Times contributing writer,
Amy Rosewater, who was delv-
ing into the machinations of the
International Olympic Commit-
tee (IOC) decision that resulted
recently in confirming my place-
ment as the third-place finisher
in the 1964 Winter Olympic Pairs
figure skating event with my sis-
ter The reality was that the
Olympic medal and certificate
have been hanging in my living
room for the past 50 years.
We were underdogs at the
Olympics because of our lack of
international experience and
due to the fact that we were the
runners-up at the U.S. Nation-
als, but in our favor we had
placed a surprising sixth the
year before at the World Figure
Skating Championships, our
first international competition.
In spite of this seeming minimal
experience, we shocked the


Olympic figure skating world been considered professional
with a extremely close fourth- because they signed a skating
place finish, almost taking the contract prior to the Olympics,
bronze. and their medal was
A year later, at the revoked, thus giving
1965 world champi- us the Olympic
onships, as U.S. bronze medal.
champions, we It was the age of
skated one of those amateurs only in
dream perform- .- 4r America. Avery
ances, landing the rdoBrundage, the IOC
toughest jumps and chairman, was the
doing the perfect epitome of ama-
lifts; the Russians, at Ron Joseph teurism, ruled Amer-
the same time, ican sports with an
skated like, well, DOCTOR'S iron fist and de-
people in need of ORDERS manded Olympic
oxygen. My sister and athletes be amateurs.
I finished second in the world We competed in an age when
championships behind the oxy- most Americans remained true
gen-depleted Russians and re- amateurs. However, we often
ceived the silver were competing against profes-
At that point, I decided to go to sional athletes, like the Germans,
graduate school and was fortu- who had contracts with ice shows
nate to be accepted to medical and received payment to skate.
school. They probably felt if I So since 1967, I have had
could cut an edge on ice with a hanging on my wall a bronze
skate, I could be a reasonable Olympic medal to go with the
surgeon. 1965 world championship silver
A year later, while in medical Two decades later, in 1987, the
school, my mother called and IOC voted to give the Germans'
said that the German 1964 silver medal back and noted two
Olympic silver medalist had silver medals in the record


books. No comment was made
about the status of our bronze
medal. The action was never
conveyed to the medal recipi-
ents, national Olympic commit-
tees or record books.
To take a long and really
weird story to its conclusion, the
IOC last week acknowledged the
need to clarify the record re-
garding the third-place/bronze
medal finish of my sister and I at
the 1964 Olympics. This was at
the behest of an extremely thor-
ough journalist, the aforemen-
tioned Amy Rosewater
As the proud son of immigrant
parents who struggled to come
to America, arriving at Elis Is-
land in the late 1930s and strug-
gling to pay for skating lessons
for their kids, I never doubted
for a moment what I had accom-
plished 50 years ago. My parents
had a dream of this country
They knew the need to be edu-
cated, and they knew what being
an Olympic athlete meant to
their children's future.
The IOC reaffirmed the stand-
ings and our Olympic bronze
medal hanging in the living
room. What they really did for


me was remind me that it is not
the hype of the music on the
podium or the bronze medal, but
the journey
The journey is the daily strug-
gle to live, work, study, train until
you drop and then do the whole
thing over without ever knowing
for sure if you are going to be
successful. Most important is the
journey It is the journey that
these athletes have taken in their
attempts to reach their dreams.
This Christmas, a memory and
medal from long ago have been
polished, rewrapped and placed
under the Christmas tree. I'm
truly sorry my parents are not
alive to appreciate the opportu-
nity and gift they had given us, to
be Olympic medalists and live
an athlete's life journey
Frohliche Weihnachten, Mom
and Dad, and thank you.
Merry Christmas and a
healthy happy New Year!


Ron Joseph, M.D., hand,
shoulder and upper extremity
orthopedic surgeon at Sea
Spine Orthopedic Institute, can
be reached at rbjhand@cox.net.


Associated IPress
Temple men's gymnastics junior Colton Howard, left, and sophomore Evan Eigner pause Dec. 6 after working out at the university,
in Philadelphia. In early December, Temple announced it was eliminating seven of its 24 sports, including men's gymnastics,
effective in the fall. "When I heard the news, I kind of went numb a little bit," Eigner said.



Even as football revenues rise,



colleges cutting sports to save


Associated Press

The meeting was brief. A few minutes
tops.
Temple athletic director Kevin Clark
didn't mince words. Standing inside
the football team's indoor practice fa-
cility earlier this month, Clark scanned
the crowd of dozens of student-athletes
- none of them football players and
told them the financially strapped ath-
letic department was cutting their
sport at the end of the 2013-14 aca-
demic year
There weren't a lot of details. No
lengthy question and answer session.
Sitting alongside his 16 teammates on
the men's gymnastics team, sophomore
Evan Eigner sat in stunned silence.
"When I heard the news," Eigner
said, "I kind of went numb a little bit."
Temple's announcement that it's
going from 24 sports to 17 next fall, a
move that will eventually save about $3
million to $3.5 million a year, was just
the latest in a growing line of colleges
and universities that are reshaping
overextended athletic programs by
shuttering smaller sports to help make
those that remain particularly those
designed to bring in revenue more
competitive.
To be honest, Eigner still isn't sure
what happened. He understood the
athletic department was in a tight spot
money-wise. He knew there had been
talk about changes and the threat of
cuts. It was all just white noise until
suddenly, it became only too real.
He heard the part where Clark said
the school would honor all of the schol-
arships for the affected student athletes
until they graduated. He heard the part
where Clark said the school would do
what it could to find new athletic
homes for those wishing to transfer
Eigner just didn't hear what he would
consider a sensible argument for cut-
ting a program that takes up a small
fraction of the athletic department
budget yet nets conference champi-
onships. He grew up wanting to com-
pete at Temple, where his stepfather
Fred Turoffhas been coach since 1976.
He grew up wanting to walk out of his
graduation ceremony with a degree in
hand and four years of college gymnas-
tics under his belt


Now he may get one or the other, but
not both.
A growing number of students are
finding themselves forced to choose be-
tween staying in school or competing
elsewhere after their programs are dis-
solved to help other sports deal with ge-
ographically confounding if more
lucrative conference alignments, in-
creased travel budgets and coach salaries.
Rutgers did it in 2007. Maryland fol-
lowed suit in 2012. It's not just the schools
in power conferences either Robert
Morris, which plays in the Northeastern
Conference, is trimming seven sports in
2014. Spelman College, a Division III
historically black women's college in
Atlanta, dropped intercollegiate athlet-
ics altogether this year in favor of a
health and fitness program.
While athletic departments at the Di-
vision I level aren't going anywhere,
schools that opt to downsize are faced
with thorny questions. The biggest is
the notion that athletes in one sport are
more valuable to the school and vice
versa than athletes in another
"It's a football thing and chasing the
dollars," said Turoff, who has led Tem-
ple men's gymnastics to 18 Eastern In-
tercollegiate Gymnastics League titles.
"But there's nowhere in the mission
statement of the athletic department
that its goal is to raise money It's to give
opportunity to student athletes."
It's that way across the board in col-
lege athletics, where football and men's
basketball are typically the engines that
drive the budget. Yet even with televi-
sion money pouring into power confer-
ences, the price of keeping up with the
big boys is steep.
In 2012, the cost of operating a Divi-
sion I football program rose 10.8 percent
according to the NCAA. At the same time,
revenue rose only 4.6 percent. The de-
clining profit margin if the program
is profitable at all combined with the
shifting conference affiliation land-
scape is putting some schools in a bind.
But with belt-tightening on college
campuses becoming more widespread
even as tuition levels jump at an expo-
nential rate, athletic departments are
no longer immune.
Rutgers was ahead of the curve when
it dropped six sports in 2007, most to
offset a university-wide $80.7 million


shortfall. The cuts had little long-term
effect on the health of the athletic de-
partment. Rutgers athletics spent $28.7
million more than it made in 2011, with
the school taking money from its gen-
eral fund and student fees to cover the
rest.
Meanwhile, the results on the field
have been middling at best. The Scarlet
Knights have gone a respectable 53-36
with six bowl appearances in football
since 2007 and attendance at High Point
Solutions Stadium has averaged more
than 45,000, better than it was 15 years
ago but still short of the new seating ca-
pacity of 52,454 that came with a $102
million expansion completed in 2009.
The men's basketball team continues
to struggle. The women's basketball
team, a national power at times under
C. Vivian Stringer, has seen attendance
drop by more than half since 2007-08.
Things are even more dire at Temple.
The football program, which moved from
the Mid-American Conference back to
the Big East (the remnants of which are
now called the American Athletic Con-
ference), averaged just 22,473 fans this
year at Lincoln Financial Field, an NFL
stadium that houses the Philadelphia
Eagles. A major factor is the increased
cost of travel. The AAC now spreads
from Connecticut to Texas. It's not just
the football team making those trips.
Clark maintains even with mediocre
attendance and even more miserable
results, football prevents the athletic
department from being subsidized en-
tirely by the university. Deputy athletic
director Pat Craft said the athletic de-
partment was "limping along" on a $44
million budget spread across 24 sports.
Going down to 17 will leave Temple in
line with most other AAC schools.
Not that it provides much solace to
Eigner He could explore a transfer, but
when Temple is gone there will be only
16 Division I men's gymnastics programs
remaining. Finding a landing spot will
be difficult. The Owls begin their final
season of competition on Jan. 17.
"Obviously an opportunity has been
taken away from us," he said. "We're
trying not to think about it too much if
that makes sense. We can only control
what we can control. This sport is really
who we are."
Or, as of July 1, 2014, who they were.


Recreation BRIEFS


Registration under way
for P.L.A.Y. program
Citrus County Parks and Recreation is offer-
ing a great sports opportunity for little ones who
may be too young to join the organized sports
leagues within the county. The P.L.A.Y. Pro-
gram, which is an acronym for Preparing Little
Athletes Youth Program, was created for those
children who are "ready" to play sports, but
aren't old enough.
The P.L.A.Y. programs offered in the upcom-
ing session include: soccer, which will be held at
Central Ridge District Park on Mondays or at
Homosassa Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday; and t-ball, which will be held at
Central Ridge District Park on Tuesdays or at
Bicentennial Park on Thursdays. The next ses-
sion will begin the week of Jan. 20. Boys and
girls ages 3 to 5 are encouraged to join the six-
week program.
Registration opened Monday, Dec. 16.
Please contact Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit citruscounty
parks.com for more information. For hearing-
impaired, please call 352-527-5901 (TTY) or 352-
527-7540 (voice).
Tenth annual Kids' Fishing
Clinic slated for Feb. 22
Parents, mark your calendars for the 10th annual
Kids' Fishing Clinic. Registration will open Jan. 1.
Teaching children a lifelong hobby, apprecia-
tion for our marine environment and a fun family
outing are the objectives for the Kids' Fishing
Clinic. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) and Citrus County
Parks and Recreation (CCPR) present the free
clinic for preregistered children between the
ages of 5 and 15 at 9 a.m., 10a.m., 11 a.m.,
12 p.m. and 1 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 22 at Fort
Island Trail Park. Preregistration is required by
calling Citrus County Parks and Recreation at
352-527-7540 or visiting citruscountyparks.com.
The clinic enables young people to learn the
basics of environmental stewardship, fishing
ethics, angling skills and safety. This event is a
catch-and-release activity, and all participants
must be accompanied by an adult.
Individuals or companies interested in helping
to sponsor this event or volunteer at the clinic
should call 352-527-7540.
One.day baseball camp
to be held in early January
Citrus County Parks and Recreation, in part-
nership with Lecanto High School head coach
David Logue and his coaching staff, will be
hosting a one-day baseball camp. This one-day
instructional camp will focus on the fundamen-
tals of baseball.
The camp will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Jan. 11 at Central Ridge District Park (6905 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills). Pizza and
drinks will be provided for lunch.
The camp is open to boys and girls ages 8 to
13. Save $10 by preregistering or pay $50 the
day of camp. For more information, please visit
citruscountyparks.com or call 352-527-7540.
Stingers Baseball Club
looking for competitors
Stingers Baseball Club is looking for 12U and
13U players. We are a competitive program out
to provide a higher level of play at an affordable
cost. Please call 352-302-1281, email stingers
baseballl@gmail.com or visit stingersbaseball
club.com for more information.
Stingers Baseball Club is based out of north-
east Citrus County and practices at Central
Ridge Park.
Little League signups
continue in January
Crystal River Little League Spring 2014
signups will continue in early January. To sign
your child up to play, visit the Bicentennial Park
baseball concession stand from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Jan. 6 to 10 or from 10 a.m. to noon on Jan. 11.
LHS hosting alumni
basketball game today
The third annual Lecanto Basketball Alumni
Game will take place at Lecanto High School at
2 p.m. today. Three games will be played, with
the young guns tipping off at 2 p.m., the old-
timers playing at 3 p.m. and the in-betweeners
playing at 4 p.m. All are welcome.
-From staff reports


B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Boston 36 2410 2 50100 75
TampaBay 36 2211 3 47100 86
Montreal 37 21 13 3 45 92 81
Detroit 37 16 12 9 41 94 101
Toronto 37 18 16 3 39101 106
Ottawa 38 1417 7 35106 126
Florida 37 1418 5 33 87 117
Buffalo 36 924 3 21 64 104
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Pittsburgh 38 2710 1 55121 83
Washington 36 1913 4 42115 109
New Jersey 37 1515 7 37 90 94
Philadelphia 36 16 16 4 36 89 103
Carolina 36 14 14 8 36 83 101
N.Y Rangers 36 16 18 2 34 82 100
Columbus 36 15 17 4 34 97 103
N.Y Islanders 37 1020 7 27 93 129
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Chicago 38 25 7 6 56140 105
St. Louis 34 23 7 4 50119 81
Colorado 35 2310 2 48102 83
Minnesota 37 2012 5 45 86 88
Dallas 34 17 12 5 39 99 102
Winnipeg 37 1616 5 37100 108
Nashville 35 1616 3 35 80 99
Pacific Division


Anaheim
Los Angeles
San Jose
Vancouver
Phoenix
Calgary
Edmonton


GPW L
38 26 7
37 25 8
35 21 8
38 21 11
35 19 10
36 13 17
37 1123


PtsGF GA
57124 96
54104 71
48113 88
48104 92
44110 108
32 91 115
25 95 127


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Vancouver 3, Chicago 2, SO
Anaheim 3, New Jersey 2, OT
N.Y Islanders 5, N.Y Rangers 3
Washington 4, Carolina 2
Winnipeg 5, Florida 2
Saturday's Games
Los Angeles 3, Colorado 2, SO
Pittsburgh 4, Calgary 3
Phoenix 4, Ottawa 3, OT
New Jersey 5, Washington 4, OT
Columbus 6, Philadelphia 3
Boston 4, Buffalo 1
Tampa Bay 3, Carolina 2, OT
Anaheim 5, N.Y Islanders 3
Montreal at Nashville, late
Detroit at Toronto, late
St. Louis at Edmonton, late
Dallas at San Jose, late
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Vancouver, 8 p.m.


Boston
Toronto
Brooklyr
NewYor
Philadel|

Miami
Atlanta
Washing
Charlotte
Orlando

Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
Clevelar
Milwauke


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
12 16 .429
10 14 .417
S 9 17 .346
k 8 18 .308
phia 8 19 .296
Southeast Division
W L Pct
20 6 .769
15 12 .556
gton 12 13 .480
S 13 15 .464
8 19 .296 1
Central Division
W L Pct
21 5 .808
13 16 .448
10 16 .385
id 10 16 .385
ee 5 21 .192


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 21 5 .808 -
Houston 18 10 .643 4
Dallas 15 11 .577 6
New Orleans 11 13 .458 9
Memphis 11 15 .423 10
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 21 4 .840 -
Portland 22 5 .815 -
Denver 14 11 .560 7
Minnesota 13 14 .481 9
Utah 8 22 .267 15/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 18 9 .667 -
Phoenix 15 10 .600 2
Golden State 14 13 .519 4
L.A. Lakers 13 13 .500 41
Sacramento 8 18 .308 91
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 121, Brooklyn 120, OT
Cleveland 114, Milwaukee 111, OT
Miami 122, Sacramento 103
Atlanta 118, Utah 85
Charlotte 116, Detroit 106
Indiana 114, Houston 81
Toronto 109, Dallas 108, OT
Phoenix 103, Denver 99
L.A. Lakers 104, Minnesota 91
Saturday's Games
Memphis 95, NewYork 87
Washington 106, Boston 99
Sacramento 105, Orlando 100
Houston 114, Detroit 97
Utah 88, Charlotte 85
Chicago 100, Cleveland 84
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, late
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
New Orleans at Portland, late
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, late
Denver at L.A. Clippers, late
Sunday's Games
Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.


Men's major scores
EAST
Canisius 87, Lamar 74
Coastal Carolina 65, CCSU 62
Columbia 82, Fairleigh Dickinson 59
Dartmouth 84, Longwood 64
Duquesne 95, Mass.-Lowell 77
George Washington 74, UMBC 61
Harvard 74, Vermont 68
Holy Cross 74, NJIT 55
Lehigh 69, Quinnipiac 58
Manhattan 84, Buffalo 81, OT
Monmouth (NJ) 87, Fordham 78
Northeastern 62, Milwaukee 59
Pittsburgh 73, Cal Poly 56
Providence 94, Maine 70
Saint Joseph's 88, Loyola (Md.) 77
St. Bonaventure 74, Niagara 72
St. John's 96, Youngstown St. 87
Temple 101, LIU Brooklyn 65
Villanova 88, Rider 67
SOUTH
Appalachian St. 100, Milligan 68
Boston U. 83, Maryland 77
Campbell 95, Johnson & Wales (NC) 64
ETSU 84, Austin Peay 79
Florida 66, Fresno St. 49
Florida St. 60, UMass 55
Gardner-Webb 90, Hiwassee 54
Georgia 65, W. Carolina 63
James Madison 55, Hampton 49
Kent St. 58, Coll. of Charleston 54
Kentucky 93, Belmont 80
LSU 86, UAB 63
Louisville 85, FlU 56
Lyon 55, Grambling St. 54
Miami (Ohio) 79, Tennessee St. 64
N. Kentucky 72, Navy 65
NC State 90, East Carolina 79
North Carolina 97, Davidson 85, OT


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 B3


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
O,. ~3-5-1
oCASH 3 (late)
~2-9-2


iPLAY 4 (early)
7-6-2-8
PLAY 4 (late)
.5TM5-2-2-8

Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 2 3 15 -35
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $900,000
4-of-4 None
3-of-4 MB 45 $483.50
3-of-4 848 $52.50
2-of-4 MB 1,556 $19.50
1-of-4 MB 10,710 $2.50
2-of-4 27,723 $2.00


Fantasy 5:11 -18 -23 -26 -34
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 338 $555.00
3-of-5 9,679 $20.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt Series: Portsmouth (Taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPNU) Maggie Dixon Classic St. John's vs. Texas A&M
1 p.m. (ESPN) Maggie Dixon Classic California vs. Connecticut
1 p.m. (SUN) South Carolina State at South Carolina
3 p.m. (SUN) Duke at Kentucky
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Purdue at West Virginia
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Connecticut at Washington
5 p.m. (FS1) Eastern Washington at Seton Hall
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Southern at Baylor
5:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Diamond Head Classic-- George Mason vs.
Iowa State
7 p.m. (FS1) California at Creighton
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Diamond Head Classic--Akron vs. Oregon State
11 p.m. (ESPNU) Diamond Head Classic South Carolina vs. St. Mary's
1 a.m. (ESPNU) Diamond Head Classic- Boise State vs. Hawaii
BOATING
3 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing Chandler (Taped)
BOWLING
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series: Scorpion Championship (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 a.m. (ESPNU) Gildan New Mexico Bowl Colorado State vs.
Washington State (Taped)
9 a.m. (ESPNU) R&L Carriers New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-
Lafayette vs. Tulane (Taped)
2 a.m. (ESPN2) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Buffalo vs. San
Diego State (Taped)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) Gildan New Mexico Bowl Colorado State vs.
Washington State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Buffalo Bills
1 p.m. (13 FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at St. Louis Rams
4:25 p.m. (CBS) New England Patriots at Baltimore Ravens
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Bears at Philadelphia Eagles
GOLF
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Swinging Skirts World Ladies Masters, Final
Round (Taped)
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NHL) Colorado Avalanche at Los Angeles Kings (Taped)
2 p.m. (NHL)Anaheim Ducks at New York Islanders (Taped)
RODEO
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Southampton vs.
Tottenham Hotspur
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Swansea City vs.
Everton
12 p.m. (FS1) FIFA Club World Cup final Bayern Munich vs. Raja
Casablanca (Taped)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
3:30 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament final -Wisconsin vs. Penn
State (Taped)
WINTER SPORTS
2 p.m. (NBC) U.S. Grand Prix: Ski Slopestyle and Snowboard
Halfpipe (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Old Dominion 69, UNC Wilmington 57
SE Louisiana 80, UT-Martin 76
Tulane 84, Alabama St. 66
UCF 86, Rio Grande 58
VCU 82, Virginia Tech 52
Vanderbilt 76, Georgia Tech 63
Virginia 57, N. Iowa 43
W. Kentucky 71, Murray St. 64
Wake Forest 59, UNC Greensboro 51
Wilmington (Del.) 65, Md.-Eastern Shore 62
Wofford 62, Winthrop 56
MIDWEST
Butler 68, Evansville 59
Cincinnati 69, Middle Tennessee 48
E. Michigan 81, Oakland 79, OT
Green Bay 74, Fairfield 58
IPFW 86, E. Illinois 65
Illinois 65, Missouri 64
Indiana St. 81, IUPUI 61
Kansas 86, Georgetown 64
Kansas St. 72, Gonzaga 62
S. Dakota St. 77, North Dakota 70
S. Illinois 66, Ball St. 58
Saint Louis 79, NC A&T 57
Toledo 71, Cleveland St. 67
Valparaiso 89, Southeastern (Fla.) 46
W. Michigan 92, Prairie View 53
SOUTHWEST
Charleston Southern 97, Cent. Arkansas 90, 20T
Houston 54, Rice 52
Michigan St. 92, Texas 78
North Texas 81, Wayland Baptist 77
Oral Roberts 69, Dallas Baptist 55
Stephen F Austin 83, Elmhurst 49
TCU 70, Tulsa 58
Texas St. 73, Texas-Tyler 54
Texas-Arlington 79, CS Bakersfield 75, OT
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 76, Texas Tech 62
Cal St.-Fullerton 59, Sacramento St. 51
Long Beach St. 82, Montana St.-Billings 75
Pepperdine 76, Houston Baptist 64
San Diego 67, S. Utah 52
San Jose St. 73, Westminster (Utah) 66
UC Davis 80, Air Force 74
UCIrvine 63, Denver 50
TOURNAMENT
BVI Tropical Shootout
Third Place
Jacksonville St. 72, Coppin St. 61


Glantz-Culver Line for Dec. 22
NCAA Football
Tomorrow
Beef'O'Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
East Carolina 12/2 14 (62/2) Ohio
Rose Bowl at Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford 1/2 5/2 (42/2) Michigan St.
Fiesta Bowl at Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor 17/2 16/2 (68/2) UCF
Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans
Alabama 14 /215 (511/) Oklahoma
Jan. 3
Cotton Bowl at Arlington, Texas
Missouri Pk 1 (60/2) Okla. St.
Orange Bowl at Miami
Ohio St. 5 2 /2 (681/2) Clemson
Jan. 6
BCS National Championship at Pasadena, Calif.
Florida St. 9/2 8/2 (67)Auburn
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Miami 2/ 2/2 (43) at Buffalo
at Carolina 3 3 (46/2) New Orleans
Dallas 2/2 3 (53/2) at Wash.
at St. Louis 5/2 4 (43)Tampa Bay
at Philadelphia 4 3 (55/2) Chicago
at N.Y Jets 1 1/2 (40/2) Cleveland
at Kansas City 6/2 7 (45) Indianapolis
at Cincinnati 7 8 (48) Minnesota
Denver 9/2 10 (53) at Houston
Tennessee 5/2 5 (44) at Jacksonville
atSeattle 9/2 10/2 (43/2) Arizona
at Detroit 9/2 9/2 (49) N.Y Giants
at San Diego 7/2 10 (50/2) Oakland
at Green Bay 2/ 2 /2 (441/2) Pittsburgh
at Baltimore 2 2/2 (45) New England
Tomorrow
at San Fran. 10/2 13 (45/2) Atlanta


I SORT BIEF -


Associated Press
The new logo of the Charlotte Hornets is displayed on a video
monitor Saturday during a halftime ceremony of the game be-
tween the Charlotte Bobcats and the Utah Jazz in Charlotte, N.C.
The Bobcats will change their name to the Hornets next season.

Pirates place second Jordan unveils new


in Christmas Duals
The Pirates are taking home
silver for Christmas.
Crystal River High School's
wrestlers placed second in the
Gulf Christmas Duals on Satur-
day, soundly beating county rival
Citrus High before falling to the
Clay High School Blue Devils in
the championship match.
The Pirates dominated at the
18-team meet: Michael Allan
went undefeated wrestling at 126
pounds, his best performance of
the year, while Joel Pelton (138
pounds), Eddie Bennis (182
pounds) and Carlos Sanabria
(220 pounds) all went 5-1.
On Friday, the Pirates beat
River Ridge, Fivay and Nature
Coast by scores of 53-20, 57-23
and 43-24, respectively. In Satur-
day's matches, the Pirates
notched wins of 51-28 and 45-31,
respectively, over Citrus and
Dunedin before falling 36-30 to
Clay.
The Pirates are 20-3 overall
headed into the new year, and
will return to the mat on Jan. 10.
US wins Duel in the
Pool tiebreaker
GLASGOW, Scotland In the
tightest finish yet, the United
States preserved its perfect Duel
in the Pool record on Saturday by
beating the European All-Stars in
a tiebreaker race.
Both teams were locked on
131 points after 30 events over
two days at the Tollcross Swim-
ming Centre after the U.S fought
back from 68-54 down on Friday.
In the extra final race a 200-
meter mixed medley relay Si-
mone Manuel anchored the U.S.
to victory, finishing 0.2 seconds
ahead of British swimmer
Francesca Halsall.
Eugene Godsoe, Kevin
Cordes and Claire Donahue
joined Manuel to finish in a short-
course world record time of 1
minute, 31.17 seconds. The Eu-
ropeans were timed in 1:31.37.
"I knew that with the team be-
hind my back, as excited and as
close as we were, the adrena-
line could carry me," Manuel
said.
The U.S. has won all six Duels
in the Pool, facing Australia in the
first three before taking on the
Europeans.
"That was the most exciting
meet I've been a part of," Ameri-
can Conor Dwyer said. "I think it's
a unique event. It's unlike any-
thing else we do internationally.
We take a lot of pride. It's all
about getting your hand on the
wall and not the times."
The tight finish was in contrast
to the first U.S.-Europe encounter
in Manchester in 2009 when the
Americans won 185-78.
Saturday didn't start well for
the defending champions, as the
Europeans took maximum points
from the first race.
A world record in the women's
race was set by Europe with a
time of 3:27.70 before the U.S.
men responded with a victory.




GATORS
Continued from Page BI

was Will," Donovan said. "He
was awesome."
Scottie Wilbekin had 11
points and Yeguete nine for the
Gators, who won away from
Gainesville for the third time
this season. Patric Young, who
didn't start because of a sore
knee, contributed eight points
and nine rebounds.
The Gators shot 29 percent in
the first half and 58 percent in
the second half.
"It was a tale of two halves,"
Donovan said. "We hung in
there with our defense."
Michael Frazier II, Wilbekin
and Kasey Hill each sank a 3-
pointer as Florida outscored
Fresno State 15-4 to start the
second half and open up a 15-


Hornets logos
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -The
buzz is back in Charlotte.
Bobcats owner Michael Jordan
unveiled the new brand identity
the Charlotte Hornets will use
after this season.
Jordan introduced the team's
primary new logo and word mark
- as well as eight alternatives -
during a halftime ceremony Sat-
urday night, saying 'You guys
asked and we delivered."
The primary logo features the
purple and teal formerly used by
the Charlotte Hornets from 1988-
2002 with a more aggressive-
looking hornet with piercing eyes,
a raised antennae, larger wings
and pointed stinger. In the logo is
a basketball that doubles as the
hornet's body with the Hornets
wood mark written across it.
The Bobcats officially become
the Hornets the day after their
final game this season.
"Tonight is a special night," Jor-
dan said.
The event featured former
Muggsy Bogues, Rex Chapman,
Dell Curry and Kelly Tripucka, all
former NBA players who played
for the Hornets in Charlotte, as
well as a video display with the
new logo.
Jordan received permission
from the NBA board of directors
this year to change the team's
name after New Orleans owner
Tom Benson vacated the name
in favor of the Pelicans. The Hor-
nets were located in Charlotte
from 1988-2002 before then-
owner George Shinn moved the
team to New Orleans.
On the video presentation at
halftime, the voiceover began by
saying "What once was lost has
been willed by you to be found.
The legend is our new legacy.
Get ready for the buzz to return.
Our city. Our colors. Our name.
We're all coming home."
The new images can be seen
at www.backbuzzcity.com.
The merchandise featuring the
new Hornets brand identity will
be available for purchase at the
Bobcats team store on Jan. 18.
Bobcats COO Fred Whitfield
said the team began conducting
a Harris interactive poll to seek a
name change shortly after Jor-
dan became the team's majority
owner in 2010.
Whitfield said there was an
enormous amount of time put
into the decision to change the
name, as well as the logos.
"As we looked at the old logo,
we realized we had to refresh it
but respect the legacy that was
here," Whitfield said "There's more
fierceness in the face of this Hor-
net. And they are very protective
of their territory, which is what we
want this team to be about."
The Hornets also announced
that "Hugo" will officially return to
Buzz City as the team's mascot.
"The players were beloved as
was the mascot," Whitfield said.
"So we're all thrilled to bring
Hugo back."
-From staff and wire reports



point lead. A basket by Yeguete
made it 55-35, and the margin
reached 26 with 2:40 left.
The Gators finished with 20
offensive rebounds.
"That helped us a lot, be-
cause in the first half we missed
a lot of shots and kept getting
the ball back," Yeguete said.
"That helped get us going."
Cezar Guerrero had 17 points
for Fresno State. Paul Watson
and Marvelle Harris added 10
each, but the Bulldogs' bench
totaled only four points.
None of four teams in the
doubleheader shot better than
42 percent, and players com-
plained of unforgiving rims in
the arena, which is used mostly
for hockey
"I looked at them as street-
ball rims really hard," Guer-
rero said. "You really needed a
swish to get it through the
hoop."


SCOREBOARD




B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


Buckeyes find footing late, hold off Irish


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Lenzelle
Smith Jr scored seven of
his nine points in the final
33 seconds and No. 3 Ohio
State rallied from an eight-
point deficit with 1:54 to
play to beat Notre Dame
64-61 in the BlackRock
Gotham Classic at Madi-
son Square Garden.
The Buckeyes (12-0),
who had a woeful second
half from the field, closed
the game on a 14-3 run.
Jerian Grant hit a 3-
pointer as the shot clock
was expiring to give the
Fighting Irish (8-4) a seem-
ingly comfortable 58-50
lead with 1:54 to play
But the Buckeyes turned
up the defensive intensity
and converted consecutive
steals into a 58-56 deficit
with 40 seconds to go.
No. 5 Michigan
State 92, Texas 78
AUSTIN, Texas -Adreian
Payne scored a career-high
32 points and Michigan State
dominated the final 11 minutes
of a 92-78 victory over Texas.
Michigan State used a 9-2
run to take a 52-50 lead about
halfway through the second half.
Following two quick buckets
by Jonathan Holmes, six
Spartans scored during a 14-2
run that put the game away.


No. 6 Louisville 85,
FlU 56
MIAMI Russ Smith
scored 18 points, Wayne
Blackshear added 13 and
Louisville won its sixth
straight, easing past FlU.
Smith had 12 in the first
half for the Cardinals (11-1),
who never trailed and were
rarely threatened, outside of a
couple brief early stretches
where the game was tight.
No. 8 Villanova 88,
Rider 67
VILLANOVA, Pa. Fresh-
man Josh Hart came off the
bench to score 19 points and
Villanova stayed perfect with
a rout of Rider.
One of 12 unbeaten teams
remaining in Division I, the
Wildcats (11-0) are off to their
best start since the 1961-62
team won its first 12.
No. 14 N. Carolina
97, Davidson 85 (OT)
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. Mar-
cus Paige scored 11 of his 17
points in overtime to help North
Carolina hold off Davidson.
Paige missed his first six
shots and didn't score until
the 8:17 mark of the second
half, but took over late to help
the Tar Heels (8-3) bounce
back from Wednesday's loss
to Texas.


Associated Press
Notre Dame's Demetrius Jackson loses his dribble as he
faces a double-team by Ohio State's Shannon Scott, left,
and LaQuinton Ross late in the second half Saturday in
New York. Ohio State won 64-61.


No. 15 Memphis 77,
SE Missouri State 65
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Shaq
Goodwin scored 20 points, Joe
Jackson added 16 and Mem-
phis pulled away for a win over
Southeast Missouri State.
Goodwin made 10 of 12
shots and had eight rebounds
as the Tigers (8-2) recovered
from Tuesday night's 77-75
loss to No. 16 Florida.
No. 18 Kansas 86,
Georgetown 64
LAWRENCE, Kan. Tarik
Black came off the bench to score
17 points, Joel Embiid also had
17 and Kansas bludgeoned
Georgetown in the Hoyas' first


visit to Allen Fieldhouse.
Kansas pushed its non-con-
ference home winning streak to
67 games.
No. 19 Kentucky 93,
Belmont 80
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Julius
Randle scored a career-high
29 points and led a second-
half rally that pushed Ken-
tucky past stubborn Belmont.
Kentucky trailed until the
16:21 mark of the second half
and constantly had to fight off
challenges from the Bruins (8-5).
The Wildcats finished 32 of 58
from the field (55 percent),
outrebounded the Bruins 42-
25 and made 26 of 36 free
throws.


Kansas State 72,
No. 21 Gonzaga 62
WICHITA, Kan. Thomas
Gipson scored eight of his 14
points in the game's decisive
minutes and freshman Mar-
cus Foster also had 14 points
as Kansas State outlasted
Gonzaga.
The Bulldogs entered the
game averaging 87.5 points
and had not scored fewer
than 68 this season.
Florida State 60,
No.22 Umass 55
SUNRISE, Fla. Florida
State scored the game's final
six points, including two free
throws by lan Miller with 1:06
left that put the Seminoles
ahead, and they handed Mas-
sachusetts its first defeat of
the season.
Florida State (8-3) beat a
ranked team for the second
time this season.
Illinois 65, No. 23
Missouri 64
ST. LOUIS-Tracy
Abrams scored a season-best
22 points and made two free
throws with 4.6 seconds to lift
Illinois over Missouri.
Rayvonte Rice added 14
points for Illinois (10-2), which
snapped a four-game losing
streak in the 33rd renewal of
the annual neutral-court affair.


Associated Press
Sacramento Kings guard Isaiah Thomas drives past Orlando Magic guard Jameer Nelson on Saturday during the first half in Orlando. The Kings
won 105-100.




Kings hit 12 pointers,




hold off Magic 105-100


Associated Press

ORLANDO Rudy Gay and Isaiah Thomas
each scored 23 points, Marcus Thornton
added 15, and the Sacramento Kings held off
the Orlando Magic 105-100 Saturday night.
DeMarcus Cousins added 14 points and 11
rebounds.
The Kings connected on a season-high 12 3-
pointers in the victory, helping to end a three-
game losing streak. They return home
Monday to host New Orleans.
Arron Afflalo led Orlando with 26 points in
his return to the lineup after sitting out for the
first time this season Wednesday with an ill-
ness. Tobias Harris finished with 21 points.
The Magic fell to 0-13 when opponents have
scored 100 or more points. They have lost four
of their last five, and four straight at home.
The Magic clung to a two-point lead entering
the final quarter, but were outscored 18-4 in the
first five minutes as the Kings took a 93-81 lead.
Sacramento maintained its cushion until a
3-pointer and layup by Harris got the Magic
within 98-93 with 3:25 to play
After getting a stop on the other end, Afflalo
got free on a fast break but his layup attempt
rolled off the rim.
Cousins then got a layup on the other end
and was fouled. He missed his free throw, but
was fouled again. He then made 1 of 2 free
throws to make it 101-93.
The Magic kept scrapping, and got down to
101-97 with under a minute to play
They had the ball with 55.4 seconds, but
turned it over on the inbounds play when Af-
flalo slipped near the sideline and Victor
Oladipo's pass sailed over his head and out of
bounds.
Thomas then banked in a running 12-footer
to extend the Kings' lead to six.
Kings coach Michael Malone tore into his
team's defensive effort following Friday's loss
at Miami.
He went as far as questioning their com-
mitment on that end of the floor after giving
up 70 points in the paint to the Heat.


But he also acknowledged before Satur-
day's game that it would take more practice
time before recent trade acquisitions Gay,
Quincy Acy and Aaron Gray to get comfortable
in the Kings' systems.
The trio have been active for six games
since the trade, but gotten in only one full
practice with their new teammates in that
span.
Gay, who has started all six of his games
with Sacramento, was sluggish early against
the Magic and missed his first five shots be-
fore finally getting on the board late in the
second quarter
His teammates backed him up, though,
shooting above 50 percent for the second
straight game.
The Magic never trailed in the opening 24
minutes, taking their biggest lead at 54-42 be-
fore being outscored 14-4 to end the half.
Grizzlies 95, Knicks 87
NEW YORK- Zach Randolph had 25 points
and 15 rebounds, and the Memphis Grizzlies
snapped a five-game losing streak with a 95-87 vic-
tory over the New York Knicks on Saturday.
TonyAllen added 19 points and eight boards
while providing his usual strong defense. Jerryd
Bayless scored 11 points, including two free throws
to end a Knicks flurry that had trimmed a 19-point
deficit to four in the final half-minute.
Mike Conley finished with nine points and eight
assists after missing two games with a bruised left
thigh.
Carmelo Anthony scored 30 points, while re-
serves J.R. Smith and Tim Hardaway Jr. each had
16 for the Knicks.
Jazz 88, Bobcats 85
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -Trey Burke scored 10 of
his 20 points in the fourth quarter and the Utah
Jazz snapped the Charlotte Bobcats' three-game
winning streak with an 88-85 victory Saturday night.
Burke hit a 3-pointer with 1:38 left to put his team
up by three and added a pair of free throws with 10
seconds remaining.


Gordon Hayward had 12 points and 10 rebounds
for the Jazz, who had lost three of their past four
games. Derrick Favors added 14 points.
Kemba Walker scored 20 points and Al Jefferson
had 19 for the Bobcats, who were playing their
fourth game in five nights. The victory would have
gotten the Bobcats (13-15) back to .500 on the sea-
son.
Rockets 114, Pistons 97
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Dwight Howard had
35 points and 19 rebounds, leading the short-
handed Houston Rockets to a 114-97 victory over
the Detroit Pistons.
In one of his best games since joining the Rock-
ets in the offseason, Howard dominated Andre
Drummond, Detroit's promising 20-year-old big
man, and helped Houston control the game despite
the absence of star guard James Harden, who was
out with a sprained right ankle.
The Rockets also were without Jeremy Lin, who
has been bothered by back spasms, and they lost
guard Patrick Beverley to a fractured right hand.
Josh Smith scored 19 points for the Pistons.
It was the most points Howard has scored as a
member of the Rockets. He went 13 of 18 from the
field.
Wizards 106, Celtics 99
BOSTON TrevorAriza scored 27 points and
hit a 3-pointer that capped a fourth-quarter run that
carried the Washington Wizards to a 106-99 come-
back win over the Boston Celtics on Saturday.
Trailing 92-84, Ariza started the 14-1 rally with a
jumper from the right corner. John Wall had five of
his 20 points in the surge, which was interrupted
only by a free throw by Jared Sullinger that gave
Boston a 93-91 lead with 3:39 remaining.
Then Nene tied the game with a short baseline
jumper and Wall gave the Wizards their first lead,
95-93, with a 20-footer with 2:5 to go. Marcin Gortat
then blocked Sullinger's shot and Ariza hit his 3-
pointer with 2:25 remaining to put Washington
ahead 98-93.
Boston was led byAvery Bradley with 26 points.


SPORTS


control of the game.
No. 23 Syracuse 64,
Saint Joseph's 62
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -
Brittney Sykes scored six
of her 20 points in the final
2:37, including the game-
winning layup with 3 sec-
onds to play, as the
Syracuse women slipped
past Saint Joseph's.
Rachel Coffey's
3-pointer with 3:32 to play
gave Syracuse (10-1) its
first lead, 58-57, since the
opening minute of the
second half.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Women's college
BASKETBALL

No. 6 Stanford 76,
No. 3 Tennessee 70
STANFORD, Calif.-
Amber Orrange scored on
a left-handed lay-in and
was fouled with 25.8 sec-
onds left and converted the
free throw, helping seal No. 6
Stanford's 76-70 victory
against third-ranked Ten-
nessee that handed the
Lady Vols their first loss.
Chiney Ogwumike had
32 points, a season-best
20 rebounds and three
blocks as Stanford held off
a late Tennessee rally.
No. 7 Louisville 69,
No. 11 Colorado 62
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Shoni Schimmel had a
season-high 30 points and
Bria Smith added 13 as
Louisville handed Colorado
its first loss of the season.
Lexy Kresl led Colorado
with 17 points. The loss
ended Colorado's streak of
33 straight victories in non-
conference, regular-sea-
son games.
No.13 Okla. St. 68,
Georgia Tech 60
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
Liz Donohoe scored 27
points to lead Oklahoma
State past Georgia Tech.
The Cowgirls (10-0) got
15 points from Tiffany
Bias, while Kendra Suttles
chipped in with nine points
and nine rebounds.
No. 14 N. Carolina
103, High Point 71
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Six North Carolina players
scored in double figures as
the Tar Heels used a bal-
anced attack in downing
High Point University.
The Tar Heels (11-2)
have scored 100-plus
points in three of their last
four games and will take a
12-day holiday break be-
fore playing James Madi-
son on January 2.
Rutgers 61,
No. 16 Georgia 58
PISCATAWAY, N.J. -
Kahleah Copper and Bet-
nijah Laney each scored
18 points to help Rutgers
upset Georgia.
Rutgers led 59-52 with
21 seconds left before
Shacobia Barbee hit a 3-
pointer to make it a four-
point game. After a missed
free throw by Syessence
Davis, Barbee swished an-
other 3 from the top of the
key to make it 59-58 with 7
seconds left.
Tyler Scaife hit two free
throws with 5.9 left and
Khaalidah Miller's 3-pointer
from 35-feet at the buzzer
bounced off the front rim.
No. 19 Nebraska 87,
South Dakota 53
LINCOLN, Neb. -
Jordan Hooper scored 19
points and grabbed seven
rebounds as Nebraska
rolled over South Dakota.
Nebraska opened with
an 11-0 run in the game's
first four minutes and had
a 20-point lead by half-
time. The Coyotes (7-6) hit
just 30 percent from the
field in the first half.
No. 22 Iowa 73,
Drake 51
IOWA CITY, Iowa -Ally
Disterhoft scored 17 points
and gathered nine rebounds
to pace Iowa over Drake.
Iowa (11-2) shot 46 per-
cent from the floor, but
was just 4 of 26 from be-
yond the arc. Iowa was
only up four at intermission
and maintained that margin
almost five minutes into
the second half. But the
Hawkeyes went on a 15-0
run including a trey by
Theairra Taylor to take




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


USC routs No. 21 Fresno St 45-20


Football
BRIEFS


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS South-
ern California wrapped up
its rocky season by rolling
over Fresno State in the
Las Vegas Bowl.
Cody Kessler passed for
344 yards and a bowl-record
four touchdowns in the
Trojans' 45-20 victory over
the 21st-ranked Bulldogs on
Saturday under Clay Hel-
ton, their third head coach
in less than three months.
Marqise Lee and Nelson
Agholor had two touch-
down catches apiece, Ja-
vorius Allen rushed two
more scores, and the Tro-
jans (10-4) answered every
question about their moti-
vation by dancing on the
sideline while routing a
BCS contender for the sto-


ried program's first post-
season victory since 2009.
Derek Carr passed for
just 217 yards and two TDs
in his final game at Fresno
State (11-2), which fell behind
35-6 at halftime and failed
to secure the first 12-win
season in school history
From Kessler's smooth
offense to a dynamic de-
fensive effort against
Fresno State's FBS-best
passing game, USC was
uniformly outstanding in
its only game under Helton.
The offensive coordinator
filled the one-game gap be-
tween coaches Ed Orgeron
and Steve Sarkisian on the
Trojans' coaching carousel,
but USC picked up right
where Orgeron left off after
its desultory start to the
season under Lane Kiffin.


Southern California running back Ty Isaac rushes the ball
against Fresno State on Saturday during the second quarter
of the Royal Purple Bowl in Las Vegas.
Kessler even outdid fore halftime and finishing
Carr, his fellow Bakers- 22 for 30. USC scored three
field native and friend, set- touchdowns in a nine-
ting the Las Vegas Bowl minute burst in the second
record for TD passes be- quarter, and Allen


clinched it with his second
TD run with 4:44 to play
The Trojans even put on
a show off the Strip: The
entire USC bench twice
bounced onto the field
during spontaneous group
dances after touchdowns,
displaying the excitement
and confidence so com-
mon during the Trojans'
halcyon years under Pete
Carroll.
Carr, the nation's leader
in yards passing and total
offense, became the fourth
player in NCAA history to
surpass 5,000 yards pass-
ing and 50 TD passes dur-
ing the game. But Carr
leaves Fresno State with-
out a bowl victory, never
getting the Bulldogs mov-
ing against one of the na-
tion's best pass defenses.


Lightning pull off turnaround to beat 'Canes


Associated Press

TAMPA Radko Gudas
scored 2:16 into overtime
as the Tampa Bay Lightning
beat the Carolina Hurri-
canes 3-2.
Gudas beat Justin Pe-
ters, who kept the Hurri-
canes in the game with a
number of great saves,
from the right circle dur-
ing a 3-on-1.
Victor Hedman and
Martin St. Louis also
scored for the Lightning.
Valtteri Filppula had two
assists.
Peters finished with 47
saves. Jiri Tlusty had a
pair of goals.
St. Louis re-directed
Hedman's shot during a
power play 7:56 into the
third pulled that the Light-
ning even at 2-2.
The Hurricanes went up
2-1 on Tlusty's short-
handed breakaway goal at
10:11 of the second. Car-
olina has seven short-
handed goals this season,
all coming on the road.
Tlusty put Carolina up 1-0
when he beat Ben Bishop
with a wrist shot on the
Hurricanes' first shot at
4:35 of the first Bishop had
shutout Carolina in both of
his previous games against
the Hurricanes, making 76
saves over the stretch.
Peters, who entered
winless in three games
with a 4.00 goals-against-
average against Tampa
Bay, made 15 saves before
allowing Hedman's goal
that tied it at 1 with 3:48
left in the first.
The Lightning outshot
Carolina 19-8 during the first
Peters stopped all 13
shots he faced in the sec-
ond, including a post-to-
post glove save on
Filppula's shot during a
power play late in the pe-
riod. He turned aside 16 of
17 shots during the third.




BUCS
Continued from Page B1l

lowest yardage totals of
the year the last four
games.
"Early in the year we
found ways to lose," coach
Greg Schiano said. 'Avery
strange year We've stuck
together, no finger point-
ing. They're playing for
each other"
Five things to look for in
Bucs-Rams:
Up and down
In three wins since re-
placing Sam Bradford,
quarterback Kellen
Clemens has five touch-
down passes with no inter-
ceptions and a 119.3 passer
rating. In four losses,
Clemens has two TD passes,
five interceptions and a 60.6
passer rating. The competi-
tion has a lot to do with that,
given three of the losses
came against teams with
top 10 defenses. The lone
stinker was a seven-point
loss at home and on short
rest in Week 9 to the Titans,
Fisher's old team.
No offense
Though rookie quarter-
back Mike Glennon has
nice overall numbers,
Tampa Bay's punchless at-
tack has been 1 for 10 on
third downs in the last two
games. That's putting way
too much on the defense.
The Buccaneers had 183
total yards and gave up a
season-high 33 points last


Associated Press
Carolina Hurricanes goalie Justin Peters makes a save on a shot by Tampa Bay Lightning
center Valtteri Filppula on Saturday during the first period in Tampa.


Penguins 4, Flames 3
PITTSBURGH Sidney
Crosby scored his 20th goal
of the season, helping the
Pittsburgh Penguins win a
season-high seventh straight
game with a 4-3 victory over
the Calgary Flames.
The Penguins led 4-1 late
in the second period and had
to hold off the Flames for their
10th straight win at home and
12th victory in their last 13 games.
Coyotes 4,
Senators 3 (OT)
OTTAWA, Ontario--An-
toine Vermette completed a
hat trick at 2:23 of overtime to
give the Phoenix Coyotes a 4-3
victory over the Ottawa Senators.
Vermette pounced on the
loose puck in front of goalie
Craig Anderson and pushed it
through to the back of the net
to beat his former team.
Radim Vrbata also scored to
help the Coyotes snap a
three-game losing streak.


week in a loss to the 49ers.
"I don't think it would be
fair to say it's one thing -
if it's personnel, if it's
scheme, if it's coaching, if
it's performance. There
are a lot of things that go in
to it," Schiano said of the
offensive woes. The Bucs
are last overall in offense
and last in passing offense.
On the run
Rams rookie Zac Stacy is
coming off one of his best
games, gaining 133 yards
with career highs of 28 car-
ries and a 40-yard touch-
down run. Though he
didn't start until Week 5,
Stacy has a good chance at
reaching 1,000 yards; he
needs 146 yards the final
two weeks. The Rams have
emphasized the run since
Bradford's season-ending
knee injury in Week 7 and
Clemens figures to keep
feeding the ball to Stacy
and fellow rookie Bennie
Cunningham. The passing
game could again miss dy-
namic rookie Tavon Austin,
hobbled the last two weeks
by a sprained left ankle.
Chasing QBs
Robert Quinn leads the
NFC with 15 sacks and is
coming off a huge game
against the Saints. On one
of his two sacks on Drew
Brees, Quinn also had a
forced fumble and fumble
recovery That puts a bur-
den on Buccaneers tackle
Donald Penn. If they pay
too much attention, Chris
Long, Michael Brockers
and Kendall Langford


Kings 3,
Avalanche 2 (SO)
LOS ANGELES Martin
Jones made 23 saves and
stopped all three shots in the
shootout to become the second
goalie in NHL history to win
each of his first eight games,
and the Los Angeles Kings
got goals from Jeff Carter and
Justin Williams in a 3-2 victory
over the Colorado Avalanche.
Jones has allowed just
eight goals on 234 shots while
filling in for the injured
Jonathan Quick, and has
posted shutouts against Mon-
treal, Edmonton and the New
York Islanders. The only other
goalie to win his first eight
games was Philadelphia's
Bob Froese in 1982-83.
The Kings are off to the
best start after 37 games in
franchise history at 25-8-4,
and have won nine of their
last 10 games. They are 22-1-
2 when allowing fewer than
three goals.


could capitalize. Glennon
has absorbed 31 sacks in
11 starts, including four by
the 49ers last week.
Gerald McCoy leads the
Bucs' pass rush with eight
sacks, including six in the
last six games. Linebacker
Lavonte David is the lead-
ing tackler, plus has six
sacks and five intercep-
tions. Tampa Bay has 21
interceptions, second most
in the NFL, and Clemens
noted many of them are on
tipped balls. Clemens'
strong suits are mobility
and game management.
Eyes on the ball
It's only natural for both
teams to play the "what
if?" game. What if the
Rams had scored on the
final play against Seattle?
What if they hadn't spotted
opponents so many dou-
ble-digit leads early in the
season? What if they had-
n't flopped against beat-
able Tennessee?
What if the Buccaneers
hadn't lost a tight one
against the Jets in the
opener thanks to David's
late hit? If they'd pulled
that one out, would it have
served as a springboard
instead of an omen?
"We don't look back at
that game saying, 'Oh man,
that really set our season
off to the wrong start,"'
wide receiver Vincent
Jackson said. "Obviously,
we had opportunities each
and every week after that
to get wins and we didn't
do so. It's always about the
next week."


Bruins 4, Sabres 1
BOSTON David Krejci
snapped a tie and set up
Milan Lucic's goal as the
Boston Bruins earned a split
of a two-game set with a 4-1
victory on Saturday night.
Reilly Smith had a power-
play and an empty-netter for
Boston, which won its seventh
straight at home. The Bruins
haven't lost there in regulation
since late October, going 12-
0-2 in their last 14 games.
Zemgus Girgensons scored
for the Sabres, who beat the
Bruins 4-2 in Buffalo on
Thursday night. The Sabres,
who haven't won three
straight this season, had a
two-game winning streak
broken.
Tuukka Rask, who was
rested Thursday, made 34
saves, including a pair of key
stops early in the third period.
Buffalo backup Jhonas En-
roth stopped 35 shots and
dropped to 1-7-3.


Eagles QB Foles
fined $10K for
illegal block
NEW YORK Philadel-
phia Eagles quarterback Nick
Foles was fined $10,000 by
the NFL on Friday for an illegal
peel-back block on Min-
nesota's Erin Henderson dur-
ing the Eagles' loss Sunday.
Foles went down low at


Devils 5,
Capitals 4 (OT)
WASHINGTON -Andy
Greene scored 43 seconds
into overtime, Marek Zidlicky
had two goals and the New
Jersey Devils rallied past the
Washington Capitals 5-4.
Greene knocked the re-
bound of a shot by Jaromir
Jagr past Braden Holtby for
the game-winner. Greene
also had two assists.
Jagr scored his 13th goal
and added two assists.
Dainius Zubrus had a goal and
an assist for New Jersey, which
trailed 3-1 after two periods.
Alex Ovechkin scored his
30th goal and Joel Ward had
a goal and an assist for
Washington. Jason Chimera
and Mikhail Grabovski also
scored for Washington and
Martin Erat had two assists.
Martin Brodeur made 18
saves for the Devils, who lost
in overtime to Anaheim on Fri-
day night.
Blue Jackets 6,
Flyers 3
COLUMBUS, Ohio Ryan
Johansen and R.J. Umberger
each scored two goals and
the Columbus Blue Jackets
pulled away in the third period
to beat the Philadelphia Fly-
ers 6-3.
The game came 48 hours
after the Blue Jackets led 3-0
after two periods and 4-2 with
5 minutes left in Philadelphia,
with the Flyers scoring five times
in the final period in a 5-4 win.
David Savard had a goal
and an assist and Boone Jen-
ner also scored, while Nikita
Nikitin and Corey Tropp each
had two assists for the Blue
Jackets, who said they were
humiliated by the Wednesday
collapse.
Wayne Simmonds had two
goals and Sean Couturier
also scored for the Flyers.


Henderson's knees, drawing a
penalty and negating DeSean
Jackson's 18-yard touchdown
in the second quarter.
Arizona's Marcus Benard
was fined $15,750 for rough-
ing the passer on a hit on Ten-
nessee's Ryan Fitzpatrick.
Cardinals linebacker Daryl
Washington was also docked
$5,000 for unsportsmanlike
conduct.


Grand View wins
NAIA title
ROME, Ga. Derek
Fulton threw four touch-
down passes and ran for
another score to help
Grand View win the NAIA
championship in the Iowa
school's sixth year of
football, 35-23 over the
University of the Cumber-
lands on Saturday.
Fulton, a sophomore,
completed 19 of 39
passes for 300 yards and
ran 13 times for 74 yards
as second-ranked Grand
View completed a 14-0
season at the expense of
No. 1 Cumberlands (13-1).
The game, played be-
fore a near-capacity
crowd of 5,295, was the
sixth and final NAIA
championship in Rome.
The event is moving to
Daytona Beach, Fla., for
the next three years.
Colo. State stuns
Wash. State 4845
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
Jared Roberts made a
41-yard field goal with 3
seconds left and Colorado
State overcame a 22-point
deficit to beat Washington
State 48-45 on Saturday
in the New Mexico Bowl.
It was a dramatic
comeback to open the
bowl season and came
as both quarterbacks
threw for close to 800
years combined.
Washington State
scored 35 points in the
first half, but had only 10
in the second. With the
game winding down, a
lack of a running game
forced the Cougars to
stay with their spread of-
fense and prevented
them for running down
the clock when ahead by
15 points in the fourth
quarter. Washington
State rushed for minus-
10 yards total.
N.W. Missouri
claims D-ll crown
FLORENCE, Ala. -
Trevor Adams passed for
277 yards and three
touchdowns to lead
Northwest Missouri State
to a 43-28 victory over
Lenoir-Rhyne on Satur-
day in the Division II
championship game.
The Bearcats (15-0)
won their fourth national
title to match Grand Val-
ley State for second-most
behind North Dakota
State's five. They're the
fifth team to go 15-0,
managing that feat for a
second time.
Lenoir-Rhyne (13-2)
fell short in only the one-
time NAIA champion's
second appearance in
the Division II playoffs.
-From wire reports

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sB6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 NFL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Huge clash in NFC South tops games


Saints can clinch

division by

beating Panthers

Associated Press

The Saints know all about
big games in December and
beyond.
Carolina once did, but that
was nearly a decade ago, when
few current players were with
the Panthers.
Today they meet in Charlotte
in the kind of matchup the NFL
covets around Christmas time.
New Orleans and Carolina both
are 10-4, tied for the NFC South
lead.
"We understand the impor-
tance of it," Saints quarterback
Drew Brees said.
"Obviously your No. 1 goal
every year is to win your divi-
sion, first and foremost, and we
have the opportunity to do that
this weekend. It's going to take a
great team effort and it's going to
take our best performance in
order to get it done."
A Saints victory hands them
the division crown and a first-
round playoff bye.
"You're guaranteed at least
one home game and that's al-
ways what you strive for is just to
be able to have that home-field
advantage," Brees added.
Carolina, which lost at New
Orleans two weeks ago, can't win
the division outright this week.
But it clinches a playoff spot
with a victory It also gets in if
Arizona and San Francisco lose.
"We're looking at it as, 'Why
not us?"' quarterback Cam New-
ton said. "... If we do what we
have to do, if we win this game,
we have our confirmation of
being in the playoffs."
Denver (11-3)
at Houston (2-12)
Indianapolis (9-5)
at Kansas City (11-3)
Denver swept Kansas City this
season, so the Broncos hold the
tiebreaker in the AFC West. They
should have a much easier time
staying on top of the division
against the Texans, who have lost
12 straight and will secure the
top spot in the draft with a loss
and a Washington win.
Peyton Manning has 47 TD
passes, three shy of Tom Brady's
record set six years ago. Man-
ning is in range of a slew of
records, and that's the most tan-
talizing.
If he's chomping at the bit to
demolish Houston, he's hiding it
well.
"They've had 10 games that
have been one touchdown or
less. All I know is we're facing a
good defense," Manning said,
without smirking one bit.
The Chiefs, already in the
playoffs, found tons of offense
the past two weeks, scoring 101
points. Of course, their once dy-
namic defense has been ravaged
by injuries and they don't stop
people that well.
That's not the best approach
against Andrew Luck and the
Colts, who already own the AFC
South. Luck needs 248 yards
passing to pass Cam Newton
(7,920) for the most in a quarter-
back's first two seasons.


Associated Press
Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton can stop the New Orleans Saints from clinching the NFC


South today by defeating them.

Dallas (7-7)
at Washington (3-11)
Chicago (8-6)
at Philadelphia (8-6)
New York Giants (5-9)
at Detroit (7-7)
Pittsburgh (6-8)
at Green Bay (7-6-1)
All of these games are inter-
twined.
Start with the NFC East,
where things are simpler If the
Eagles win and the Cowboys
lose, Philadelphia goes from last
place to first in one year and
clinches. Philly will know before
its prime-time kickoff what Dal-
las did in the afternoon, and a
Cowboys win renders this one
meaningless for the Eagles, who
must win at Dallas next Sunday
to take the division.
Both Philadelphia and Dallas
come off losses, with the Cow-
boys' one-pointer against Green
Bay the more painful.
Chicago has a one-game lead
on Detroit and a half-game edge
on Green Bay in the NFC North.
Should the Bears and their dy-
namic offense watch for a


shootout at the Linc outscore
the Eagles while Lions and
Packers fall, Chicago owns the
division title.
The Bears have won the past
two meetings, four of the past
five and the past two in
Philadelphia.
Green Bay, which last met
(and beat) Pittsburgh in the
Super Bowl to win the 2010 NFL
title, has won the final home
game each year since Mike Mc-
Carthy became coach in 2006.
Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger needs 85 yards
passing to reach 4,000 for the
third time in his career WR An-
tonio Brown needs five catches
to join Hines Ward as the only
Steelers with 100 in one season.
The Lions are self-destructive,
as they proved last Monday night
against Baltimore, but the Gi-
ants are the masters in that cat-
egory Eli Manning leads the
NFL with 25 interceptions and
New York was shut out last week
for the second time in 2013.
New England (10-4)
at Baltimore (8-6)


NFL STATISTICS


Miami (8-6)
at Buffalo (5-9)
Minnesota (4-9-1)
at Cincinnati (9-5)
More intertwining.
The Patriots will take their
fifth straight AFC East title and
earn a 15th playoff berth in 20
years with a victory It would be
coach Bill Belichick's llth divi-
sion title, tied with Don Shula
for the most since the 1970 AFL-
NFL merger And they surely re-
member what the Ravens did to
them twice last season, includ-
ing in the AFC championship
matchup in Foxborough.
"We've had some pretty mem-
orable games against them,"
Brady said. "You get a little bit of
a rivalry, and then you're always
paying attention to what that
team's doing. If you play a team
once every four years, you don't
pay attention too much. But
when you know you're going to
see them at some point during
the year, you always kind of fol-
low them."
Baltimore gets a playoff spot
by winning out It also has a shot


at grabbing the AFC North away
from the Bengals, who have led
the sector pretty much all sea-
son. The Ravens have gotten to
the postseason in all five previ-
ous years with John Harbaugh
as coach and Joe Flacco as
quarterback.
After seeing how the Vikings,
minus Adrian Peterson, upset
the Eagles last week, the Ben-
gals won't be complacent, espe-
cially with Peterson back in the
lineup.
Cincinnati has won all six
home games.
Miami will be in if both Balti-
more and Cincinnati lose while
the Dolphins win. Buffalo rookie
QB EJ Manuel is out, but his
backup Thad Lewis, beat Miami
earlier this season.
Arizona (9-5)
at Seattle (12-2)
Atlanta (4-10)
at San ran. (10-4), Monday
Already into the playoffs, the
Seahawks clinch the NFC West
and home-field advantage
throughout the NFC playoffs
with a win or a San Francisco
loss. Seattle has won 14 straight
at home and quarterback Rus-
sell Wilson never has lost a game
at CenturyLink Field. His 23 vic-
tories are the most for a QB in
his first two seasons.
ESPN must have been salivat-
ing when the schedule gave the
network a rematch of last sea-
son's NFC title game in the Mon-
day night finale. Then the
Falcons flopped, and the 49ers
became second banana to the
Seahawks.
This is the last game at Can-
dlestick Park. The Niners, who
get a playoff berth with a win or
an Arizona loss, move into their
new stadium in Santa Clara next
year
Oakland (4-10)
at San Diego (7-7)
While the Chargers have slim
playoff hopes remaining, Oak-
land won't make it for the llth
successive season.
Perhaps of most interest here:
Chargers rookie coach Mike
McCoy and Raiders second-year
coach Dennis Allen were coordi-
nators at Denver in 2011 and re-
main friends. They went on a
family trip together to the British
Virgin Islands last summer
Tennessee (5-9)
at Jacksonville (4-10)
Having already lost once to
the Jaguars, the Titans under-
stand another flop could be the
final step to getting coach Mike
Munchak fired. Chris Johnson
needs 140 yards rushing to be-
come the sixth player in NFL
history with at least 1,000 yards
in each of his first six seasons.
The Jaguars will honor center
Brad Meester, who is retiring
after 14 seasons, all in Jack-
sonville. He owns franchise
records for games played and
started, both at 207 and counting.
Cleveland (4-10)
at New York Jets (6-8)
Like Munchak, Jets coach Rex
Ryan might need another win or
two to save his job. They'll need to
stop Browns WR Josh Gordon,
whose 1,467 yards receiving are
the most in a single season in
Browns history as are his seven
100-yard games. Gordon could be-
come the first Browns player
since Paul Warfield in 1968 with
six straight games with a TD catch
and he's averaging an NFL-best
122.3 yards receiving per game.


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
New England 10 4 0 .714 369 3
Miami 8 6 0 .571 310 2
N.YJets 6 8 0 .429 246 3
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 300 3
South
W L T Pct PF
y-lndianapolis 9 5 0 .643 338 3
Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 326 3
Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 221 3
Houston 2 12 0 .143 253 3
North
W L T Pct PF
Cincinnati 9 5 0 .643 354 2
Baltimore 8 6 0 .571 296 2
Pittsburgh 6 8 0 .429 321 3
Cleveland 4 10 0 .286 288 3
West
W L T Pct PF
x-Denver 11 3 0 .786 535 3
x-Kansas City 11 3 0 .786 399 2
San Diego 7 7 0 .500 343 3
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 295 3
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
Philadelphia 8 6 0 .571 364 3
Dallas 7 7 0 .500 393 3
N.Y Giants 5 9 0 .357 251 3
Washington 3 11 0 .214 305 4
South
W L T Pct PF
New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 359 2
Carolina 10 4 0 .714 328 2
Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 258 3
Atlanta 4 10 0 .286 309 3
North
W L T Pct PF
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 406 3
Green Bay 7 6 1 .536 353 3
Detroit 7 7 0 .500 362 3
Minnesota 4 9 1 .321 363 4
West
W L T Pct PF
x-Seattle 12 2 0 .857 380 2
San Francisco 10 4 0 .714 349 2
Arizona 9 5 0 .643 342 2
St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 316 3
x-clinched playoff spot


y-clinched division
Thursday, Dec. 12
San Diego 27, Denver 20
Sunday, Dec.15
Minnesota 48, Philadelphia 30
Atlanta 27, Washington 26
San Francisco 33, Tampa Bay 14
Seattle 23, N.Y Giants 0
Chicago 38, Cleveland 31
Indianapolis 25, Houston 3
Buffalo 27, Jacksonville 20
Miami 24, New England 20
Kansas City 56, Oakland 31
Carolina 30, N.Y Jets 20
Arizona 37, Tennessee 34, OT
St. Louis 27, New Orleans 16
Green Bay 37, Dallas 36
Pittsburgh 30, Cincinnati 20
Monday, Dec.16
Baltimore 18, Detroit 16
Sunday, Dec. 22
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 23
Atlanta at San Francisco, 8:40 p.m.

AFC leaders
Week 15
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
P Manning, DEN 580 393 4811
P Rivers, SND 482 337 4048
Roethlisberger, PIT 525 340 3915
Ale. Smith, KAN 480 292 3160
Brady, NWE 578 352 4049
Dalton, CIN 512 315 3649
Tannehill, MIA 521 325 3627
Luck, IND 496 291 3299
J. Campbell, CLE 236 139 1597
Fitzpatrick, TEN 300 185 2107


TD Int
47 10
28 9
25 11
23 6
23 10
27 16
23 14
21 9
10 5
13 10


J. Charles, KAN
Ry. Mathews, SN
Moreno, DEN
Chr. Johnson, TE
Be. Tate, HOU
Spiller, BUF
F Jackson, BUF
Jones-Drew, JAX
Ivory, NYJ
R. Jennings, OAI


And. Johnson, H
Ant. Brown, PIT
Edelman, NWE
A.. Green, CIN
Ke. Wright, TEN
De. Thomas, DE
Cameron, CLE
Gordon, CLE
Decker, DEN
Welker, DEN


Doss, BAL
Ant. Brown, PIT
McCluster, KAN
Benjamin, CLE
Edelman, NWE
Holliday, DEN
Br. Tate, CIN
Thigpen, MIA
K. Martin, HOU
Reynaud, TEN


Q. Demps, KAN
Jac. Jones, BAL
Holliday, DEN
Todman, JAX
Br. Tate, CIN
K. Martin, HOU
D. Reed, IND
Cribbs, NYJ
Ta. Jones, OAK
F Jones, PIT



J. Charles, KAN
Moreno, DEN


Rushers
Att Yds Avg
246 1181 4.80
ID 236 1012 4.29
224 939 4.19
EN 230 860 3.74
181 771 4.26
162 745 4.60
174 725 4.17
S 208 719 3.46
157 705 4.49
K 149 679 4.56
Receivers
No Yds Avg
OU 99 1295 13.1
95 1307 13.8
89 914 10.3
87 1268 14.6
85 1007 11.8
N 78 1194 15.3
75 848 11.3
74 1467 19.8
73 1130 15.5
73 778 10.7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
23 359 15.6
27 347 12.9
54 631 11.7
22 257 11.7
32 356 11.1
26 250 9.6
29 274 9.4
28 237 8.5
34 275 8.1
18 135 7.5
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
28 846 30.2
23 662 28.8
24 676 28.2
24 662 27.6
31 832 26.8
33 864 26.2
24 590 24.6
20 490 24.5
24 572 23.8
19 447 23.5
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
18 11 7
12 10 2


LG TD
46 11
51 5
25t 10
30t 5
60 4
77 2
59 7
48 5
69 3
80t 6

LG TD
62t 5
56 8
44 6
82t 8
45 2
78t 11
53 7
95t 9
61 8
33 10

LG TD
82t 1
67t 1
89t 2
79t 1
43 0
81t 1
43 0
34 0
87t 1
35 0

LG TD
95t 1
77t 1
105t 1
59 0
71 0
50 0
39 0
42 0
41 0
42 0


De. Thomas, DEN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Welker, DEN
Ant. Brown, PIT
Cotchery, PIT
Gordon, CLE
Chr. Johnson, TEN
M.Jones, CIN


Gostkowski, NWE
J. Tucker, BAL
M. Prater, DEN
Novak, SND
Vinatieri, IND
Suisham, PIT
Folk, NYJ
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Sturgis, MIA


11
11
10
9
9
9
9
9
Kicking
PAT
37-37
25-25
67-67
37-37
29-29
32-32
22-22
48-48
29-29
32-32


NFC leaders
Week 15
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
Foles, PHL 266 165 2398
J.McCown,CHI 220 147 1809
A. Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218
R.Wilson, SEA 357 231 3077
Brees, NOR 575 392 4500
Romo, DAL 508 325 3602
S. Bradford, STL 262 159 1687
Cutler, CHI 296 189 2173
C. Newton, CAR 424 264 3049
M.Ryan,ATL 563 374 3887
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
L. McCoy, PHL 269 1343 4.99
A. Peterson, MIN 268 1221 4.56
Forte, CHI 258 1200 4.65
A. Morris, WAS 236 1125 4.77
M. Lynch, SEA 260 1089 4.19
Lacy, GBY 248 1028 4.15
Gore, SNF 242 1017 4.20
D. Murray, DAL 178 977 5.49
Re. Bush, DET 197 940 4.77
Stacy, STL 202 854 4.23
Receivers
No Yds Avg
GarconWAS 96 1146 11.9
B. Marshall, CHI 90 1185 13.2
Cal. Johnson, DET 81 1449 17.9
De. Bryant, DAL 81 1061 13.1


WAvg LG
3.3 109t
0.5 90
28.6 80
25.2 44
2.8 34
2.7 38
2.2 46
2.1 32
0.6 39


Jeffery, CHI
J. Graham, NOR
De. Jackson, PHL
Cruz, NYG
Douglas, ATL
Fitzgerald, ARI


Hyde, GBY
Sherels, MIN
GinnJr., CAR
G.Tate, SEA
Page, TAM
L. James, SNF
T. Austin, STL
R. Randle, NYG
Sproles, NOR
Spurlock, DET
Ki

C. Patterson, MIN
Dw. Harris, DAL
Hester, CHI
Page, TAM
J. Rodgers, ATL
GinnJr., CAR
Arenas, ARI
T. Austin, STL
Paul, WAS



J. Graham, NOR
M. Lynch, SEA
Ve. Davis, SNF
Cal. Johnson, DET
De. Bryant, DAL
A. Peterson, MIN
B. Marshall, CHI
Fitzgerald, ARI
Forte, CHI
De. Jackson, PHL


Hauschka, SEA
Crosby, GBY
P Dawson, SNF
Walsh, MIN
Gould, CHI
D. Bailey, DAL
Feely, ARI
Hartley, NOR
Gano, CAR
Henery, PHL


80 1265 1
76 1071 1
75 1275 1
73 998 1
73 963 1
73 823 1
Punt Returners
No Yds ,
21 280 1
18 236 1
21 263 1
46 540 1
23 251 1
18 186 1
33 280
26 214
24 164
22 145
ckoff Returners
No Yds A
36 1199 3
26 792 3
41 1172 2
19 479 2
23 525 2
23 523 2
18 400 2
18 398 2
20 411 2
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush F
14 0
13 11
12 0
12 0
11 0
11 10
10 0
10 0
9 7
9 0
Kicking
PAT FG
40-40 30-31
35-35 30-34
38-38 27-30
39-40 26-30
41-42 25-28
43-43 24-26
35-35 25-29
41-41 22-30
37-37 23-26
35-35 21-26









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Make a list, Santa we've got a lot of needs


anta is coming to town
this week, and Citrus
County has a long list
of gifts that it needs. I had a
call from the North Pole
and was asked by the
Big Guy's assistant about
coming up with some
suggestions.
Since I am never short on
suggestions, I offered Santa
the following list:
Citrus County needs a
reduction in property taxes.


We had a big jump in 2013
and that makes people
cranky and they have less
money to spend on Christ-
mas gifts. Give us a break
this year
We need the U.S. Con-
gress to figure out a solution
to the flood insurance prob-
lem for people who live in
flood zones. Hundreds of
people in Citrus County will
lose their homes this year if
Congress does not act to re-


store some level of subsidy
to federal flood insurance.
The people who will suffer
the most live in medium-
and low-cost homes where
their insurance rates could
become higher than their
mortgage payments. Santa,
help these people.
Santa, we need the turn
signals put back on our cars
and trucks. There has obvi-
ously been a large group of
burglars out stealing the


turn signals off of our cars.
How do I know this? BE-
CAUSE NO ONE USES
THEIR TURN SIGNALS.
We need a YMCA built
in Citrus County Hernando
County has a YMCA. Mar-
ion County has a YMCA.
Pasco County has two. We
need just one. Santa, if you
could help the group rais-
ing the money to build the
YMCA be successful this
year, we would really ap-


preciate it. (And Santa, for
full disclosure I am work-
ing with Jewel Lamb to
chair committee that is rais-
ing the $8 million for the Y
branch in Citrus).
Santa, we need to sell
our hospital in Inverness
because the people who are
supposed to be in charge of
running it have lost their
focus. Instead of making a


Associated Press
Despite losing his first debate with challenger Mitt Romney, President Barack Obama rebounded to win the next two debates and a second term as president.


How OBAMA


WON


AND THE GOP LOST


DO LE


OWN
C' A ,i S- C: f% A, C.; i: E 0," 2
MARK HALPERIN
and JOHN HEILEMANN

Double Down:
Game Change 2012
by Mark Halperin and
John Heilemann (Harper
Collins Publishers, 2013)
$29.95.


By Michael Francis
Chronicle book review


THE AUTHORS OF THIS BOOK WROTE A POPULAR ACCOUNT OF THE 2008 ELECTION OF
Barack Obama, "Game Change," and now have produced an interesting
and fact-filled account of the 2012 campaign. The volume is based on ex-
tensive interviews with the campaign staffs of Republican challenger and
former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Obama and with the advisers
to the other Republican primary contenders. There is, alas, relatively little information
on how the party campaign war chests were financed who gave, why and how much.


The book opens with the first pres-
idential debate, dominated by Rom-
ney, who squared off against a sitting
president who seemed uninterested
and pedantic. This event buoyed
Romney's camp and panicked
Obama's advisers and supporters.
Then the book jumps back to the
beginning of the Republican scram-
ble for the nomination. Political pun-
dits widely believed that the best
hope for the Republicans was to get
a candidate who could get votes from
the undecided and swing voters. This
suggested taking relatively moderate
stances on the economic issues at
the time when the tea party faction


was coming to dominate the party
Romney had "centrist" credentials: He
was generally conservative on eco-
nomic issues but moderate on social
matters such as health care. His
seemingly successful attempt to broaden
medical care when he was governor of
Massachusetts was, however, anath-
ema to conservative Republicans.
There were some early candidates
who had appeal to Republican con-
servatives, such as Mitch Daniels of
Indiana, but his wife apparently op-
posed his running because it would
have led to a public airing of her di-
vorce from Daniels, her marriage to
another man and then her leaving


him to come back to Daniels. The
Obama administration's onetime am-
bassador to China, John Huntsman,
initially seemed a strong candidate,
but he proved clueless about how to
present his case and didn't want his
rich father to bankroll his campaign.
Newt Gingrich's flamboyant, egocen-
tric and erratic campaign soon ru-
ined his chances, although in the
process he maligned Romney Texas
Gov Rick Perry initially seemed a good
prospect, but proved unsure of his
positions and behind the scenes was
beset by serious health problems.
See Page C3


As commission chair, my thoughts on our future


ver the past few
years, Citrus County
Board of County
Commissioners chairmen
have established the chair-
man's agenda. I feel this
should continue as I chair
the board. There is one
thing, however, I noticed
with regard to the chair-
man's agenda: The question
has never been asked if
there are items that should
be passed down from the


outgoing chair to the incom-
ing chair I feel this is vitally
important, not only to the
incoming chair, but also the
citizens of Citrus County
Commissioner Joe Meek
has stated the importance
of continuing to build rela-
tionships with the City of In-
verness and the City of
Crystal River, as well as
providing support for eco-
nomic development proj-
ects in terms of


infrastructure. I have in-
cluded these items in my
plan for this year
In preparation of my own
agenda, I have met with
staff to discuss areas of not
only my interest, but areas
they feel are important to
this community We nar-
rowed that list down to a
few keys items that we feel
would have the greatest im-
pact on our community
Over the upcoming year, I


will be working with my fel-
low commissioners and staff
on the following focus items:
1. New animal shelter
facility
2. Public awareness
3. Budget
4. Road resurfacing
5. Springs initiative
6. Major projects
A new shelter
Animal Services is an
area close to my heart and I


feel this is an issue that is
important to many citizens.
We have outgrown our cur-
rent shelter facilities and _6.
we need to provide updated I, I
and proper equipment. We
have approximately 5,600 animals come through the
shelter in a year, for which
we do not always have ade-
quate space. We have an in- JJ Kenney
credible team of volunteers GUEST
See Page C3 COLUMN
See Page C _____


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3





Page C2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013



PINION


"Once I thought that Lake Forest was the most
glamorous place in the world. Maybe it was."
F. Scott Fitzgerald, "The Crack-Up," 1945


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

WORRISOME INFRINGEMENT




Defense law



raises serious



constitutional



questions


ivil liberties are consti-
tutional restraints
placed upon govern-
ment to protect against in-
fringement of our individual
freedoms. Given that history
teaches unchecked govern-
ment powers can lead to the
erosion of individual free-
doms, civil liberties are the
cornerstone of a free society.
Since the Sept. 11, 2001, ter-
rorist attacks on our home-
land, the constant threat of
global terrorism and techno-
logical advances
in intelligence THE I,
gathering have
served to further Sectior
expand the intru- National
sive powers of the Authorize
federal govern-
ment. While in- OUR OF
tended to protect ,
us from terrorist A potentiv
attacks, it comes to our c
at a price gov-
ernment infringement on our
civil liberties.
This worrisome infringe-
ment has raised concern
across the political spectrum
that our republic's intricate
system of checks and bal-
ances, crafted to safeguard
essential liberty, is being in-
creasingly eroded for a sense
of temporary security.
A case in point is the trou-
bling language of Section
1021 of the National Defense
Authorization Act (NDAA),
signed into law by President
Obama in late 2011.
Section 1021 empowers the
military to detain until "the
end of hostilities" anyone, in-
cluding U.S. citizens, who
"substantially support" al-
Qaida, the Taliban or the neb-
ulous category of "associated
forces." Therefore, those de-
tained could be denied due
process and imprisoned in-
definitely in military jails.
In declaring Section 1021
unconstitutional in May of
2012, U.S. District Judge
Katherine B. Forrest, who
was appointed by President
Obama, acknowledged its po-
tential danger to our civil lib-


i
n


il


erties by noting that whole
categories of Americans
could be subject to seizure by
the military and secretly de-
tained indefinitely.
Placing temporary security
above essential liberty, the
Obama administration imme-
diately appealed Judge For-
rest's ruling. In July of 2013,
an appellate court ruled in
favor of the Obama adminis-
tration in spite of its admis-
sion that the plaintiffs had
raised "difficult questions."
Given the diffi-
$SUE: cult constitutional
questions raised
1021, by Section 1021's
Defense disregard for our
3tion Act. constitutionally
protected freedoms,
:INION: history warns
that once the
l danger branches of gov-
liberties, ernment sanction
an unconstitutional
power it poses a potential
danger to our civil liberties.
The most egregious exam-
ple of this potential being re-
alized occurred during World
War II. Fearful of a Japanese
attack on the U.S. West Coast
and fifth-column activity,
Japanese-American citizens
were indiscriminately
rounded up by the military
and relocated against their
will to remote detention
camps until the war's end.
With no certainty that the
U.S. Supreme Court will hear
arguments against this odif-
erous section of the NDAA,
the only recourse for safe-
guarding essential liberty
from growing government in-
fringement is for Congress to
repeal it. Those who cherish
our civil liberties, therefore,
are urged to raise this issue
with their members of Con-
gress for as U.S. Supreme
Court Justice Joseph Story
warned more than 170 years
ago, the Constitution "has
been reared for immortality
... It may, nevertheless, perish
in an hour, by the folly, or cor-
ruption, or negligence of its
only keepers, the people."


HU united Way of Citrus County needs your
U help to reach its annual fundraising
^in jaf ~goal. If you can, please send a contribution
m-um to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.



There's a button for that Work instead of study


Recently someone
called Sound Off about
getting rid of TV be-
cause he was sick and
tired of advertisements
and thought everything
on there was stupid. I
would suggest to him
that if he looks care-
fully at his TV set, he'll CA
notice there's an on
and off button and he O5
can get rid of TV by
turning it to the off position.


63-(


|ND Whoever wrote "We
JND love to see you study," I
ItE would think was a book
IJ smart who has no com-
mon sense. Probably
doesn't realize a lot of
kids go hungry quite
often, among other
04 things, and as soon as
they are old enough to
r579 go to work to eat,
)57 maybe buy clothes,
etc., they have no alter-
native but to go to work.


Is justice only fo
or years, I have been re- court, an
porting on Stephen their rec
Bright, this nation's fore- sues ran
most defender, in and out of lease
court, of Gideon v Wainwright, Prosecut
the Supreme Court's 1963 deci- enforce
sion that sought to guarantee tigate ca,
"fair trials before impartial tri- conduct
bunals in which every defen- presented
dant stands equal before the And di
law" fendant
Every defendant, fore the 1
But as president and senior Prosec
counsel of the Southern Center that no (
for Human Rights in
Atlanta, Bright
keeps demonstrat-
ing, in numerous
cases, lectures and
debates around the
country, the perva-
sive injustice expe-
rienced by too many
arrested defendants
brought before our Nat Hentoff
courts. OTHER
In the June 2013 oTER
edition of The Yale VOICES
Law Journal, Bright,
a visiting lecturer at Yale Law "On thl
School, and Sia Sanneh, a sen- overwhe]
ior fellow in residence at Yale final case
Law School, used their own ob- dants, th
servations to explain how this investiga
pillar of America's rule of law This n
has degenerated. you some,
In fact, Bright and Sanneh "These
pointed out that "the court also powers ar
discussed equality before the them in l
law in another case decided on terminin
the same day as Gideon, reiter- held byI
eating its previous statement Bordenko
that 'there can be no equal jus- "There
twice' where the kind of justice a Paul Ha
person gets 'depends on the years in
amount of money he has"' check fo
("Fifty Years of Defiance and Hayes ti
Resistance After Gideon v offer, the
Wainwright," Bright and San- repeat of
neh, The Yale Law Journal, ing aSmar
June 2013). imprison
As you follow their indict- the offer
ment of our system of justice, carried o
keep in mind whether any of the manc
these gross distortions of the "The S
law are protested or even men- the prose
tioned in state and federal po- them pa
litical campaigns by candidates take" of p
of either party or by those Is this s
who yearn to be our president. As for
Consider, for instance, the counsel
contrasting resources of de- stand e
fense lawyers and prosecutors: Bright ai
"The lawyer assigned to de- Supreme
fend a poor person usually has right in t
little or no time and few re- same da
sources to investigate the that "the
charges and mount a defense.... receive
"Prosecutors have vast re- the amou
sources and immense power in "It deter
conducting their inquests and have court
dictating outcomes in the plea counsel,
bargaining that resolves the cess to in
overwhelming majority of witnesses
cases. Governments maintain resentati
well-staffed offices specializing or perfur
in the prosecution of cases. Or wo
Prosecutors regularly appear in cases and


r those w
d many judges rely on
commendations on is-
ging from pretrial re-
to sentencing.
ors have access to law
lent agencies to inves-
ses and laboratories to
scientific tests and
expert testimony"
g this about every de-
who "stands equal be-
law":
'utors "have a power
theirr litigant has: the
ability to reward
witnesses for pro-
viding information
or testimony by
granting immunity
from prosecution,
dismissing or reduc-
ing charges, or
informing sentenc-
ing judges of
cooperation."
And "they can
place informants
in the cells of
defendants.
le other hand, in the
lming majority of crim-
es against poor defen-
e defense conducts no
tion whatsoever"
ext one may disturb
what:
e vast prosecutorial
mnd the ruthless use of
plea bargaining and de-
g sentences were up-
;he Supreme Court in
ircher v Hayes.
e, a prosecutor offered
yes a sentence of five
prison for forging a
r $88.30 and warned
hat if he rejected the
prosecutor would file
fender papers requir-
idatory sentence of life
.ment. Hayes declined
r, and the prosecutor
ut his threat, obtaining
latory life sentence.
Supreme Court upheld
ecutor's actions, calling
.rt of the '"give-and-
)lea bargaining."'
still America?
a defendant's right to
so that he or she may
equal before the law,
nd Sanneh proved the
SCourt was at least
he case it decided the
y as Gideon, arguing
kind of justice people
depends very much on
[nt of money they have.
ermines whether they
nsel, when they obtain
whether they have ac-
vestigators and expert
s, and whether the rep-
on provided is zealous
victory"
)rse. Citing previous
i the work of nonprofit


Tho can pay?
The Constitution Project,
Bright and Sanneh wrote:
"Poor people accused of
crimes, although entitled to
counsel 'within a reasonable
time' after 'the initiation of ad-
versary judicial proceedings'
may languish in jail for days,
weeks or months after arrest
without a lawyer They do not
receive the 'consultation, thor-
oughgoing investigation and
preparation' that are 'vitally im-
portant' from the outset in a case.
"As a result, they may lose
their jobs, homes, and means
of transportation, even
though the charges may later
be dismissed ...
'"An ABA (American Bar As-
sociation) report in 2004
reached 'the disturbing conclu-
sion that thousands of persons
are processed through Amer-
ica's courts every year either
with no lawyer at all or with a
lawyer who does not have the
time, resources, or in some
cases the inclination to provide
effective representation."'
And where we once were the
land of the free and the home of
the brave, "a national study in
2009 found that in misde-
meanor cases which far out-
number felonies and which
affect millions of people -
judges were encouraging de-
fendants to plead guilty without
counsel, prosecutors were talk-
ing directly with defendants
and convincing them to plead
guilty without counsel, defen-
dants were discouraged from
asking for counsel because of
application fees for a public de-
fender as high as $200, and de-
fense lawyers usually had too
many cases to provide compe-
tent representation."
Ah, but there is still some of-
ficial humanity: "Fees for coun-
sel may be waived in most
states that have them, but de-
fendants are often not told that
the fee can be waived or that
they have a right to a lawyer if
they cannot afford one."
This system must be held up
"to public examination until
governments are shamed into
providing the lawyers that are
'fundamental and essential' for
fairness and justice."
How long has it been since
government on any level in
these cases felt ashamed about
these injustices?

Nat Hentoff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the
Bill of Rights. He is a member
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press,
and the Cato Institute, where
he is a senior fellow


LETTER to the Editor


Donate Life Rose
Parade float's notes
Individuals and families
touched by organ and tissue
donation and transplantation
shine a light on us all. Like
lanterns illuminating the night
sky above or the path before
us, those who give and receive
the gift of life Light Up the
World with their compassion
and courage.
On Jan. 1,2014, at the annual
Rose Parade in Pasadena,
Calif, the Donate Life Rose


Parade Float will feature a fes-
tival of lanterns illuminating
30 riders all grateful organ
and tissue transplant recipients
- and 12 living organ donors
walking alongside to demonstrate
their ongoing vitality.
The float's trademark is a
"dedication garden" filled with
thousands of roses, each
placed in a vial carrying a
unique, personal message from
an individual, family or organi-
zation. Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is thankful to
have provided one of the many


personal messages in the dedi-
cation garden.
This New Year's, as you watch
the Rose Parade, take a moment
to recognize the Donate Life float
as a showcase of compassion,
perseverance and courage for
those who have faced adversity.
And if you have not done so al-
ready, please join America's 110
million registered donors. Learn
more at DonateLifeAmerica.org.
Joyce Brancato
CEO, Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
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I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Born to give them second birth


'And suddenly there was
with the angel a multitude
of the heavenly host prais-
ing God and saying, Glory
to God in the highest and
on earth peace, goodwill
toward men."
Luke2:13 and 14, KJV
wednesday next
will be Christmas,
the day on which
we recognize and cele-
brate the birth of our Lord
and Saviour, Jesus Christ.
It is a special day, a spe-
cial day, indeed.
Through the years, many
have tried to capsulate the


essence of this event and
though I think no one
could ever really do that, a
number of magnificent
carols, Christmas hymns,
have been the result Even
so, all too often we sing
these songs by rote, singing
only the first verse of one,
then moving on to another
song, trying to touch on as
many as possible within a
specified period of time.
This is easily under-
standable, but I believe we
miss out by doing so.
We are all familiar with
"Hark! The herald angels
sing, glory to the newborn


king ..." which was origi- Light and life to all He
nally a poem written by brings, risen with healing
Charles Wesley in His wings.
in 1739 and Mild he lays
was then set to His glory by,
music by Felix born that man
Mendelssohn ,_ no more may
in 1840. Many 'die, born to
of us have even raise the sons
memorized the of Earth, born
next several to give them
lines, but I sus- second birth."
pect that most Fred Brannen Amen and
may not know SC amen.
the song's third A SLICE Christmas is
refrain: OF LIFE a time filled
"Hail the with the won-
heavenly Prince of Peace! der of the birth of the
Hail the Sun of Righteous. Christ child. It is right that


we view him as a babe laid
in a manger, but it is even
more important that we al-
ways remember who He
was, who He is, and the gift
which is ours through His
coming.
I can make no apology if
today's writing seems like
a sermon ... it is intended
to be.
As a young man, I strug-
gled with whether or not to
pursue my career in bank-
ing or perhaps become a
minister Once I became
willing to accept the call if
that was what God wanted,
it became very clear that


He had plans for my life
other than a pulpit min-
istry Nonetheless those
plans have always in-
cluded sharing my faith ...
sharing it with family, co-
workers and friends,
friends who now include
you faithful readers.
Merry Christmas once
more to each of you, and
please remain assured that
He was born to "give them
(all of us) second birth."


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

nice hospital, they have spent$11 million
in legal fees to fight each other over
governance rules that most of us don't
understand or care about. We have a
community headache Santa and we need
your help completing the hospital sale.
M A Riverwalk on King's Bay in Crys-
tal River would be a really great gift,
Santa. The Riverwalk would help bring
tourists to the area and help our land-
locked residents have the opportunity
to enjoy the beautiful place we live in.
We need more young people. Cit-
rus County keeps losing its young peo-
ple and the rest of us are looking a little
worn around the edges. Young families
with children make us happy We like kids.
Santa, we need instructions on
how to play well with each other in the
sandbox. And no, I am not talking about
the children in kindergarten. They're
doing just fine. I'm talking about the
adults we have elected and put in charge
of important things like our county our
hospital and state government Instead
of playing well in the sandbox, some of
our leaders feel competent when they
kick sand in the faces of those they
don't agree with. In doing so, they waste
ourtime and money Santa, can you please
teach them to play nice and lead?
While this community does a good
job of collecting Christmas gifts and food
for those who are in need, what the folks
really need are jobs. Santa, can you
help us bring some more good jobs to
Citrus County? We have people who need
and want to work, but many just can't
find employment. Jobs, Santa. In fact,
we can make some of your toys for next
Christmas if you just give us a chance.
Beer, Santa. We need more beer
(Oh wait, that's my list for home. Forget
that one).
Santa, when you are here, please
sprinkle some pixie dust on all of the
parents in the school system and re-
mind them that it is their job to help
their children succeed in school. Too
many parents forget that they must read
to their children constantly (preferably
newspapers, but books are OK, too) and
constantly reinforce the important of
achieving success in school. The world
is growing more complicated, and too
many of our children are too absorbed
in their iPhones to pay attention.
And Santa, finally the woman who
wrote you to suggest that I only receive
coal for Christmas because I picked on
County Commissioner Scott Adams
and squirrels in the same column was
only kidding. I am a nice guy and I like
squirrels and Scott. Please no coal.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


Associate d ress
Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, shown here with running mate Paul Ryan, did not leave the Republican National
Convention in Tampa with momentum. Revelations about a careless remark Romney made about Americans he characterized as
simply wanting handouts from the government later helped sink his presidential bid.


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

The other dark horse was Chris Christie,
the governor of New Jersey a relative
liberal on some issues but a highly per-
suasive public speaker In this case, his
family was unenthusiastic about the
prospects of a presidential bid and he
was reluctant to jump into the race.
By the end of the often-bitter primaries,
Romney gathered enough delegates to
assure his nomination. But then the Re-
publican National Convention ran into
all sorts of problems, topped off by Clint
Eastwood's lengthy ad-lib questioning of
an empty chair and a bland acceptance
speech by the party's candidate. Christie
gave an excellent nomination speech, but
Romney did not leave Tampa with mo-
mentum. He also later shot himself in
the foot with his careless and suppos-
edly private remarks about the 47 per-
cent of the population he characterized
as simply wanting goodies from the gov-
ernment. He blamed himself for the
wording, but could never shake his
image as the voice of the rich.
Obama had his own weaknesses. The
major question that hung over the Obama
campaign was what the Republicans re-
ferred to as his failure to "bring the econ-
omy back" after the collapse late in the
Bush administration. He had promised
a recovery but the economy was contin-


uing to limp along.
The most effective anti-Romney tele-
vision ads were those that spotlighted
some of the decisions of Romney's in-
vestment firm Bain Capital. Its business
was to reinvigorate failing companies,
but that meant that sometimes plants
had to be closed, leaving the workers un-
employed. Those workers who had their
lives changed by these closings were
more than willing to tell their sad stories
to the Obama campaign advertising
agencies. The picture was an arrogant
rich guy heartlessly firing innocent
workers and looting their pension funds.
The Democratic National Convention
had its own problems. First lady Michele
Obama came across effectively and pres-
ident Bill Clinton gave an overly long but
enthusiastic nomination speech. Obama's
acceptance speech was mediocre at best,
but did not air until late in the evening
after many TV viewers had gone to bed.
Meanwhile, behind the scenes, the
Obama debate coaches hammered away
at the president. Both candidates had
multiple exhaustive rehearsals trying to
anticipate possible tough questions. Obama
admitted his poor performance in the
first debate perhaps the product of
overconfidence, but also of his tendency to
be plodding and lawyerly His "handlers"
eventually convinced him to be "short,
fast and hammy" with his answers. Most
observers felt that Obama did much bet-
ter in the final pair of debates.
Obama's campaign also benefited


from a devastating storm that hit New
Jersey The governor dropped all his
campaigning efforts for Romney to focus
on storm response efforts, and embraced
Obama warmly when he visited the state
- something that irritated the Republican
establishment and may have hurt Christie's
possible Republican nomination in 2016.
Meanwhile, Bill Clinton was captivating
crowds in Florida and elsewhere.
As the votes rolled in on election night it
soon became obvious Obama was going
to win such key states as Wisconsin and
Ohio -plus Florida. This was consistent
with the most polls, except for some of the
Republican polls which were much crit-
icized afterwards by Republican campaign
experts because they had presented such
a rosy picture going into Election Day
The book closes with a surprising and
interesting epilogue that raises questions
as to how campaign laws and procedures
might be improved. There also are candid
comments from staffers on both sides.
For political junkies, this is a must-
read. There will be other books recount-
ing the 2012 election, but it will be hard
to find one that will top this account.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill Woods
resident who taught international rela-
tions at the University ofNotre Dame
for 39 years. He also was the chair of
the political science department and
associate provost in charge of the
university's study abroad programs.


KENNEY
Continued from Page C1

and staff who work hard to
provide a safe and com-
fortable environment to
every type of animal at the
shelter I will be working
with staff to explore op-
tions to build a new animal
facility in a central loca-
tion in the county that will
provide enough space for
all kinds of animals and in-
crease the level of service
we currently provide. I look
forward to working with
our animal service staff
and volunteer teams to
create a shelter that meets
the needs of animals and
staff/volunteers, increases
the number of adoptions
each year and create new
partnerships with commu-
nity organizations to pro-
vide care for our animals.

Public awareness
I am proud to live in a
community where our cit-
izens are actively engaged
in government activities
and want to work together
with county staff to pro-
vide an outstanding level
of service. I want all citi-
zens to know who we are
and what we do. I feel it is
important to provide more
opportunities for citizens
to get information on


county happenings. I
would like to conduct pub-
lic workshops on major is-
sues so the board can hear
ideas and comments from
the public. I will be working
with staff to make changes
on the BOCC meeting
agenda so citizens can find
information easily I would
like to see more information
added to our website about
upcoming public hearings,
updates on projects and
where citizens can go to
get questions answered. I
will be working with the
administrator to have staff
give more frequent updates
to the board on projects
and issues in each depart-
ment. Additionally, is it my
intent to revisit, after the
first of the year, public
input at BOCC meetings. We
all want to see our county
grow and continue to be a
great place to live. In order
to accomplish this, we
need to work together and
share information.

The budget
Last year, we were faced
with huge budget issues
that affected every facet of
our community We met
this challenge head-on
and we were able to create
a balanced budget and still
maintain our level of serv-
ice. I would like to con-
tinue with the process
started last year in looking


If we want to continue to grow
economically and provide
proper infrastructure, we need
to be sure our existing assets
are in good condition.


at the budget early in 2014
and reviewing revenue
and expenses in each de-
partment Our Management
and Budget staff is work-
ing on creating a "user-
friendly" format for the
budget so citizens can find
information easily This
format will show detailed
information on each de-
partment and constitutional
office, including revenue
sources, expenses and
staffing information. Al-
though we are still work-
ing through issues with
Duke Energy, real estate
values, economic decline
and job opportunities, it is
my goal to continue to pro-
vide services our citizens
need and want and to keep
our county a wonderful
place to live.

Road resurfacing
program
Currently our road
resurfacing program is not
in effect. The board gave
direction for a resurfacing
program by assessments
on county-owned road-


ways only I would like for
staff to present options on
a resurfacing program, in-
cluding funding, to the
board for review I think it is
imperative to look at roads
not owned by the county
and encourage those resi-
dents to consider road as-
sessment for those
improvements. Having
driven on many of these
unimproved roads, I con-
sider it a safety-related
matter, as some of these roads
are almost impassable. If we
want to continue to grow
economically and provide
proper infrastructure, we
need to be sure our existing
assets are in good condition.

Springs initiative
There is an emphasis
from the state Legislature,
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection,
Southwest Florida Water
Management District and
Citrus County to improve
the water quality of the
springs. It is currently an
unprecedented time for
funding opportunities for


water-quality projects, and
I feel Citrus County should
take advantage of these
opportunities. By explor-
ing different funding op-
tions, we can move
forward with projects to
improve our springs. Ho-
mosassa Wetland Treat-
ment Area, a project we
have never been able to
fund, should be reconsid-
ered at this time. By creat-
ing the stormwater MSBU,
we took the first step in
utilizing available funding.

Major projects
Along with the focus
items I presented, I would
like to bring attention to
several additional projects
our county staff will be
working on over the next
several months. We are
privileged to have staff
members with the educa-
tion, training and experi-
ence to move our county
forward in a positive di-
rection. I believe it is our
responsibility as the Board
to support these projects
as they pertain to the best
interest of our citizens.
Some of the proposed
projects include the Ho-
mosassa sidewalk project,
which is moving forward.
An engineering firm has
been selected and all indi-
cations show this will be in
place by the end of 2014.
We will be looking at a


phone system for all
county buildings, a dog
park and a study of mobil-
ity fees. We will continue
to develop the County
Road 491 corridor and the
C.R. 491 Land Develop-
ment Code amendments
required. We will be con-
ducting a rate study in re-
gards to our water utilities
to move toward uniform
water rates. As we work to
develop the enterprise
zone in north Crystal
River, we need to find
ways to effectively utilize
our utility resources to
provide access ready sites
for development Also, we
will continue to work with
the city of Inverness and
the city of Crystal River
and partnering with them
to provide both recre-
ational and business op-
portunities in those cities.
I consider it an honor
and a privilege to chair the
board of county commis-
sioners in this coming year.
I know the challenges are
great, but I know we have
the people and the will to get
things done. And as I look
back on my life and I think
about this appointment all
I can think is, "not bad for
a kid from the projects out-
side Philadelphia."

JJ Kenneyis chairman
of the Citrus County
Board of Commissioners.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


Demand Congress
does its job
Organizing for Citrus is a
grass roots group of citizens
who have supported Presi-
dent Obama. We get together
to discuss the various issues
facing our country At our
most recent meeting, because
Citrus County has a Republi-
can majority, we discussed
the general distinctions be-
tween Republicans and
Democrats.
Republicans are interested
in protecting the interests of
big business. They:
Do not believe in labor
unions, are against any
amnesty for people who are in
the United States illegally, and
they want the borders secured.
Want to protect those mak-
ing $250,000 a year from paying
more taxes.
Don't want the government
to control the sale of firearms.
Are against monetary as-
sistance for the poor, whether
welfare or food stamps.
Are against "entitlements."
Want limited government
control and intervention of
people's lives with free enter-
prise to be allowed to rule.
Do not want military budg-
ets cut
Are against the latest
health care reform legislation,
which they label Obamacare.
The Democrats support
labor unions to help protect
the rights of workers and they:
Are more in favor of some
kind of amnesty for those liv-
ing in the U.S. illegally
Are part of the 90 percent of
Americans who want background
checks for gun ownership.
* Support Social Security


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


r


5gRIOQLayt pw A*I MR
9JPFC>P TO MAKE ANY KYNEY
E N ALl THE KNP ARETAKIN6
6.. 5A1FWA SELFIES? T


not as an entitlement, but as an
insurance policy that citizens
have paid into.
* Support the women's is-
sues of right to abortion and
birth control.
* Support universal health-
care for Americans.
* Want government regula-
tion of big business, to head off
another financial disaster such
as the recession from the Bush
presidency
* Want less money spent on
the military, but more money
spent for military families.
There we have it; two politi-
cal parties with huge political
differences. Despite the differ-
ences, we don't elect people to
do nothing. For our entire his-
tory of a country things have
been done when people


worked together and made
compromises. Gridlock should
not be an option for the Con-
gress. Whatever your political
beliefs, we believe it is our
duty as Americans to demand
that Congress do its job.
Vicky lozzia, Sonya Price,
Carol Silver
Crystal River
Have a merry,
blessed Christmas
As time has passed, tradi-
tions, attitudes and beliefs
have changed and, sadly, not
particularly for the better
Anna DeRose's Dec. 3 letter,
regarding usage of "Happy
Holidays" in lieu of "Merry
Christmas," undoubtedly rang
out the feelings of many who


are appreciatively aware of
the true meaning of this spe-
cial time.
As a child, gala decorations,
Santa Claus, and brightly
wrapped gifts were secondary
to the celebration and miracle
of the Jewish baby's birth in a
faraway land. Christians know
Him as the Savior and He is in-
deed the reason for the season!
Know this: God will never be
taken out of everything be-
cause He is everything.
Politically exempted, verbally
banned, or unaccepted and de-
nied means nothing to the
Almighty for He is the Creator
of even the nonbelievers.
As far as not buying "happy
holidays" items goes and being
offended because an employee
didn't say "Merry Christmas,"


,&dMdkdPPW


A C CI CITRUS COUNTY

CHRONICLE
MP Qwww.chronicleonline.com

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ie s ck&Ti tiatr PHlI I py ns
Tickets available after December 16, 2013 --j C sl RIierMiladLeca
At the following outlets...
Citrus County Fair Office. Inverness 726-2993
Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149
Eagle Buick- Homosassa 795-68004oer
Inverness Chamber of Commerce 726-2801
Advance Ticket Pricing Ee Fre M re
One day forAdult $8.00
Cash only reqesin 0 0j^Q ~ jfj^ ^
Two day for Adult $15.00 Thank you
One day for Child (4-11) $4.00
TwodayforChild(4-11) $7.00 BIC for requesting our partnership Cr ot k&
Gate Ticket Pricing BUICK r' MIro-50prnes~
Adults e c cng $10.00 www.eaglebuickgmc.com of over 350 community events, NHYa'Ee|I
Child (4.11) $5.00 352-795-6800 fundraisers and entertainment C it r oe
GardenncerFee: Pu5.0
3SledsPullinginCoveredArena throughout the year. Co
0 Bneil. J ng1
Ciio iLE
"VL "'rfadh
Citrus C*unty Fair CWunty H 0storiaSoe
Truck & Tractor Pull _-
15a1.2-25,2014 -- 6.J~'^^ I ^ V I T1<^~r'fmf~j~fB
Advance Registration Forms Online at I l
www.citruscountyfair.comOtractor.html C uit u M I n
Inverness, FL 34450.352-726-2993 www.chronicleonllne.com
citruscountyfair@embarqmail.com ,
Ja 2 -1OA* M
Tree of -ew -ea D.matinLue.

Remembrance CnatPoe771
Honoring our loved ones

Tree Locations: Crystal River, Beverly Hills,T2rr
Inverness, Homosassa, Lecanto, High Springs, ; t ,r C yF Go
Chiefland, Lake City, Interlachen, Palatka

Thank You 2013 SponsorsF-
Arbor Medical StaffingT S Ai B
Bouchard InsuranceF-
Citrus County Chronicle204BtFid .
CMS Professional StaffingCn
Crystal Automotivec BE n ei toe
Dex Im agingF d t dn te 7- 840A o* 7 6 -40
Hospicelink Cl.I"
Hospiscript ctrsp,-,rin$.eb a
Medline ....y o u tC ln
Benefitting chilren served by Hny's Kds Pediatrc Sevces 3 4 05 2 4 -t:-
OOOFSNR


FP'


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


please open your heart and
mind to the probability this
well-wisher was so instructed
by management No one cares
that tentative purchase were
left at the counter due to per-
sonal religious beliefs. How-
ever, the cashier may have been
a bit hurt by this behavior or
bewildered when wishing some-
one goodwill and happiness.
There are many too many
- who recognize Christmas
and Easter for reasons other
than what is reality I wonder
why we make such a big deal
of these two definitely reli-
gious holidays in order to go
into debt buying costly gifts
and then, to fill baskets with
unhealthy candy, junky toys,
and dyed hard-boiled eggs. Is
the fat, jovial man wearing a
red suit while flying through
the sky in a reindeer-led sleigh
or the gigantic basket-carrying
rabbit hopping door-to-door
more believable or important
than the Christ child?
As Americans, we have the
privilege and right to our be-
liefs. I believe Christmas
(Christ's Mass) is being thank-
ful for God's gift to all
mankind: His beloved Son.
Hence, I will always say "Merry
Christmas" because that is pre-
cisely what I wish for everyone,
no matter their beliefs.
After Jesus, the rest of this
commercialized "happy holi-
day" is like an extra dollop of
whipped cream on that deli-
cious piece of pie!
Merry blessed Christmas,
Ms. DeRose, and to all who know
the true happiness in these
holidays. May God bless and
protect our troubled America.
Joanie Welch
Inverness


I









TECHNOLOGY
I CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


r '.'


Wat


I,


Iq gadgets


It's tough to shop for techies. They already own everything with a plug or

rechargeable battery. But fear not, a slew of unique technology gifts have hit

the market just in time for Christmas.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises on improved
US economic growth

NEW YORK -The price of oil
edged closer to $100 a barrel Fri-
day after the U.S. government said
the economy grew at a faster rate
in the third quarter than originally
estimated.
Benchmark U.S. oil rose 28 cents
to close at $99.32. For the week, oil
rose about 3 percent, largely be-
cause of signs of improvement in
the U.S. economy The last time
oil closed above $100 a barrel was
Oct. 18.
At the gas pump, the average
price for a gallon of gasoline rose 1
cent to $3.22. That's down 3 cents
from a week and equal with the av-
erage price at this time last year
Brent crude, a benchmark used
to price international crudes used
by many U.S. refiners, rose $1.48,
or 1.3 percent, to close at $111.77.

US growth upgrade
gives stocks nice lift
PARIS News that the U.S. econ-
omy grew by more than previously
thought in the third quarter shored
up global markets Friday and sent
the main U.S. indexes up to record
highs.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares closed up
0.3 percent at 6,606.58 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 0.7 percent to
9,400.18. The CAC40 in France
ended 0.1 percent higher at 4,193.77.
China's Shanghai composite
dropped 2.0 percent to 2,181.94 on
fresh concerns of a shortage of
credit Hong Kong's Hang Seng
index also fell 0.3 percent to
22,812.18.
Elsewhere in Asia, Japan's Nikkei
index recovered some early losses
near a six-year peak at 15,837.31 as
investors welcomed the continued
weak yen, which is expected to boost
exports.
-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY


NEW YORK
H ere's a roundup of some of
the season's most offbeat
ere'wackyoandupbizarre, i'f
offerings. While these
items may seem a bit
wacky and bizarre, it's
doubtful that the tech enthusiasts in
your life own anything similar
Call Me Gloves, Hammacher
Schlemmer, $80:
These winter gloves let you wire-
lessly connect to your smartphone by
making the universal "call me" sign.
That is, by holding your thumb to your
ear, pointing your pinkie finger to-
ward your mouth and folding the rest
of your fingers in to make the shape
of a phone.
The left glove has a speaker in the
thumb and a microphone in the


pinkie. Buttons on the glove's cuff let
you answer and end calls. There also
are conductive fibers woven into the
tips of both thumbs and index fingers
so you can text and Web surf on a
smartphone or tablet without taking
the gloves off.
You'll get 12 hours of talk time out
of the battery, but you'll need more
time than that to convince onlookers
you're not crazy
Egg Minder, Quirky.com, $70:
Nobody likes a bad egg. This gadget
wirelessly connects to your smart-
phone to make sure you don't eat one.
LED lights show you which eggs in
the tray are the oldest and the app's
push notifications let you know when
you're running low, preventing a last-
See Page D4


What are they?

Photos by the Associated Press
TOP: Motorola's Scouti Wi-Fi Pet
Monitor is a gadget that lets pet
lovers keep an eye on their pets
while they're away. In addition to
viewing their furry friends remotely,
users can pan, tilt and zoom their
cameras through their smartphone,
tablet or desktop computer.
ABOVE LEFT: Egg Minder is a gadget
that wirelessly connects to your
smartphone to make sure that you
don't eat a bad egg.
ABOVE RIGHT: Pop Dongle is a
gadget that is part of an iPhone
game created by the popcorn maker.
It plugs into your iPhone's earphone
jack and at certain points during the
game it releases a buttered-popcorn
scent.


US economy expanding at 4.1 percent rate


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The U.S. economy
grew at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate
from July through September, the
fastest pace since late 2011 and signifi-
cantly higher than previously believed.
Much of the upward revision came
from stronger consumer spending.
The Commerce Department's final
look at growth in the summer was up
from a previous estimate of 3.6 per-
cent. Four-fifths of the revision came
from stronger consumer spending, pri-
marily in the area of health care.
The 4.1 percent third quarter growth
rate came after the economy ex-
panded at a 2.5 percent rate in the
second quarter Much of the accelera-
tion reflected a buildup in business
stockpiles.
Economists expect growth has
slowed to between 2 percent and 2.5
percent in the current quarter, in part


because they believe inventory growth
has slowed.
The third quarter rise in the gross
domestic product, the economy's total
output of goods and services, was the
best performance since a 4.9 percent
increase in the final three months of
2011.
Still, analysts expect that for the
year, the GDP will only expand by
around 1.7 percent, down from the 2.8
percent growth of 2012. Much of that
drop-off occurred because consumer
spending was depressed by higher
taxes that took effect last January and
the government's across-the-board
spending cuts. The Congressional
Budget Office has estimated those two
factors shaved 1.5 percentage points
from growth in 2013.
But the drag from the government is
expected to lessen in 2014. The latest
outlook for the National Association
See Page D4


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases personal in-
come and spending for November,
8:30 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Commerce
Department releases durable
goods for November, 8:30 a.m.;
Commerce Department releases
new home sales for November,
10 am.
* WEDNESDAY
Stock and bond markets are
closed for Christmas Day
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.


In divorce,

couples still

have to share
EAR BRUCE: If bank ac-
counts and money market
fund portfolios are in the
husband's name only is the wife
able to take half of that money
should there be a divorce? And if
the husband were to inherit money
and he keeps it is his name only, is
the wife able to touch that money?
Theresa, via email
DEAR THERESA: Unfortu-
nately, there is no specific answer
to any of your questions. You have
to consult a lawyer or a tax ac-
countant in the state where these
things are going on.
There are two essential types of
distribution if a divorce takes
place. One is called "equitable dis-
tribution," which simply means it
is determined by the court how the
money should be distributed -
60/40, 70/30 or evenly Under
"equal distribution," the money
would be distributed 50/50.
In some states, money kept aside
is very difficult for the other
spouse to claim, yet in other states,
it would be split right down the
middle no matter whose name it is
in.
In short, you are going to have to
consult a professional in your state
who will need to know the
specifics of the genesis of the
money, any prenuptial agreements,
etc., to make a determination.
Even then, it may be appealed.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 75, retired,
and have enjoyed the benefits of a
Roth IRA for 15 years. I work part
time as a substitute teacher for the
necessary earned income to make
annual contributions.
These investments have always
See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Big changes ahead at Workforce Connection


It may seem incongruous to
talk about change at a time
of year associated with the
celebration of tradition. Talk of
change, it seems, is better left
for the New Year But there is
so much change coming in 2014
that we need to get a jump on it,
especially when a good chunk
of that involves a change in
something to which we've be-
come accustomed.
After five years at our loca-
tion south of Inverness, we are
pulling up stakes and moving to
Lecanto. For those who are
used to the Inverness location,
or for whom the change may
seem inconvenient, consider
what the German-born writer,
Eckhart Tolle, had to say:
"Some changes look negative
on the surface but you will soon




MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

been in CDs in good years
earning 5 percent, currently 3
percent. I always choose the
longest period for the best rate,
and transfer funds at maturity
for the best available rate at that
time.
You said in a recent article
that the return should be 7 per-
cent to 8 percent annually
Please tell me, where?
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You don't say
so directly, but you must be risk
adverse. It is true there was a
time when CDs were earning 5
percent or 6 percent and they
might have been attractive, but
they most certainly are not now
At best they are a break-even
proposition, taking taxes into ac-
count
I am constantly being asked
about my remarks regarding a 7
percent annual return. At the
risk of redundancy, since so
many continue to ask, my con-
tention and my experience is
that by investing in well-run,
large American companies that
oftentimes pay dividends, and
taking into account growth, 6 per-
cent to 8 percent return is not an
unreasonable expectation.
Yes, there is a possibility of
loss, and some years you will


Laura
Byrnies

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


realize that space is being cre- n
ated in your life for something '
new to emerge." n
In the case of our one-stop, f,
we think that the "something l
new" is going to be increased a
accessibility and services for M
Citrus County's job seekers and n
employers, regardless of where
you are in the county f



lose. But over a period of time,
experience tells me that the 6
percent to 8 percent is not unre-
alistic.
You should choose well-estab-
lished companies that are here
today and in all likelihood will
be around tomorrow
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 63 years
old and planning on working
until age 66. I have an eight-
month emergency fund. I also
have half my money in a 401(k),
IRA and Roth IRA, and half in
CDs.
I would like to put my extra
money toward paying off my
mortgage. It's the only debt I
have. I am still hearing from fam-
ily members that I shouldn't do
that. I plan on staying in the
house. I have about $127,000 left
on the mortgage at 4.25 percent.
Dee, via email
DEAR DEE: The question of
whether you should pay off the
mortgage or continue to invest
depends on your investment
choices. Simply if you are earn-
ing in excess of 4.25 percent
and the additional amount it
costs to pay the taxes, then you
should continue the way you are
going.
On the other hand, if you are
earning substantially less than
4.25 percent, you would be better
off paying off the mortgage. That
is effectively earning you 4.25
percent. It doesn't take much
thought on this one; the way to


Let's be clear: this move is in roc
no way a commentary on the lab
hospitality we've enjoyed in In- thiu
erness for the past several mo
ears. Rather, we are moving to a "
nore central location, accessible cha
by public transit and convenient sor
to the College of Central sor
Florida's Citrus County campus for
as well as Withlacoochee Tech- me
nical Institute, two of our key fro
raining and education partners, we
Frank Calascione, our busi- T
ess development manager E.]
vho manages the one-stop, beg
otes that while the size of the itec
facility is about the same, the sot
layout at the new location has dui
n expanded resource area p.n
vith double the space and for
umber of computers. 683
The new one-stop will also I
feature a classroom/conference ple



settle it is to do the arithmetic.
DEAR BRUCE: I am an 80-
year-old single mom who had no
financial help in raising my two
sons. I do not have much in the
way of available monthly retire-
ment funds, just $1,100 from So-
cial Security and $800 from a
pension fund where I had been
employed for 20 years.
I have been able to hold on to
my house, and have finally paid
off the mortgage and home eq-
uity loan and own it free and
clear It is appraised at about
$600,000. I'm not interested in a
reverse mortgage, which I've in-
vestigated.
My sons are not involved in my
life anymore, and even though
my health is relatively stable
right now, I know that could
change at any time. I plan on
staying in my home for as long as
possible, perhaps even employ-
ing a caregiver to help me, if it is
necessary
But if worse comes to worse, I
may have to sell my home to af-
ford assisted living since I have
no savings other than my home
equity My monthly income
would not be enough for assisted
living.
Where could I invest the
money from the sale of my house
in order for me to do this? My
children are in my trust, which I
will be changing, and I don't trust
either of them, so I will have to
do this on my own. If there is no


im and a designated training
With computers. And some-
rig everyone can appreciate:
re parking.
It's not always easy to
range when you get used to
nothing, but we think this is
nothing everyone can look
ward to," Calascione told
. "It's an easier commute
m any part of the county, and
're easier to find."
'he current location at 1103
Inverness Blvd., will close
ginning Monday, Jan. 6; lim-
id services via our mobile re-
irce unit will be available
ring the week from 8 a.m. to 4
m. The new office will open
Thursday Jan. 9 at 8 a.m. at
3 S. Adolph Point in Lecanto.
duringg the Jan. 6-8 transition,
ase contact us at 800-434-



family or friend to administer
the trust, do I hire an attorney
do it?
Lisa, via ey
DEAR LISA: I am wonderii
why you investigated a reverse
mortgage and decided you ar
not interested. It seems to me
that at your age it has a good
deal of merit Because of you:
advanced years, you will get
decent return, and in the eve:
that you wish to sell the housE
you would just pay off the re-
verse mortgage.
That having been observed
you choose to sell the house,:
would suggest that you consic
investing the $600,000 in a br(
spectrum of substantial Amei
can companies.
Let's assume that will give
a relatively modest return of
percent; that would be $36,00
year income without touching
principal. At your age, tappin
into principal is not a sin to b
avoided.
Since you don't trust your c
dren and you will need some
to look after your affairs, you
might wish to visit the trust d
apartment of a bank or an atto:
ney specializing in those mati
Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.corn.
Questions ofgeneral interest
be answered in future column
Owing to the volume of mail,
sonal replies cannot be provi


JOBS (5627). Beginning Jan. 9,
our new local phone number
will be 352-249-3278. Of course,
you may always visit us at
wwwworkforceconnectionfl. co
m for details about free events
and workshops, programs and
services, and other information
to assist with your job search.
What other changes are in
store in 2014? Stay tuned. In the
meantime, Workforce Connec-
tion wishes you a very happy
and safe holiday See you next
year!
Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certi-
fied Workforce Professional
and communications manager
at Workforce Connection.
Please contact her at (352) 291-
9559 or (800) 434-5627, ext 1234
or lbyrnes@clm workforce, com.




rto AT&T to
mail publish
se data reports
e
,Associated Press
r WASHINGTON -
a AT&T Inc. says it will
nt publish reports on
the number of re-
e, quests for customer
information it re-
, if ceives from law en-
Sforcement agencies,
I the latest move in
der the telecommunica-
oad tions industry to-
ward fuller
disclosure amid de-
you bate over govern-
6 ment surveillance
0 a programs.
g The announcement
g Friday by the nation's
e largest telecom com-
pany came a day after
hil- rival Verizon Commu-
one nications Inc. said it
will make public the
e- legal demands it has
r- received.
ters. Dallas-based
AT&T says it will
publish a report
twice a year online.
will The first one, cover-
ns. ing requests received
per- this year, will be out
ded. early next year


Informed



shoppers



get the



best deals.


iii"


4t' :
ahr4i
y- ~5


informed


Wi


shoppers


read the


Chronicle.








Af% C I T R U S," -"n-C 0OU NlT iYn


C"poe
S. Vwww.ch ronicleonline.com


B


GETIM

INFORMED.


I


I


D2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


BUSINESS


Od )


Kop,


AV^





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


nk8- a&dw Ryff YUKYea.I!
tjy The Citrus C'ouni Chamber of Commerce
W Wishes Iou a happy and safe holiday season.
S The office will be closed Dec. 24 -25 andJan. 1.
%'--



Chamber events
For more information on Chamber events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber. corn or call 352-795-3149.
Jan. 9 Chamber mixer hosted by Village Cadillac
Toyota, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., 2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-
mosassa.
Jan. 10 Chamber luncheon sponsored by Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living Facility, networking begins at
11:30 a.m. held at Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club,
505 E. Hartford St., Hernando. Tickets available $18
members and non-members $22 online at CitrusCoun-
tyChamber.com or call 352-795-3149. We strongly en-
courage members and non-members to register no
later than Jan. 7 to secure a seat.
Jan. 18 and 19- Florida Manatee Festival, downtown
Crystal River.

Community events
Jan. 8 Stick A Fork In Cancer 2, 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.,
Beef '0' Brady's, 6738 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River. Tell them you're supporting Relay, and they
will donate 15 percent of your bill. All dollars raised go
to the American Cancer Society funding research,
advocacy, education and patient services. For more in-
formation, call 352-795-6155.
Jan. 16 Tobacco-Free Partnership of Citrus County
meeting, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Lakes Region Library
1511 Druid Road, Inverness, call 352-527-0068 ext.
342 for more information.


Sign up now for

community-wide

fitness challenge
Are you determined to improve your health
in 2014? Get a jump start by joining this
year's Fitness in Citrus: Community-Wide
Fitness Challenge. It begins on Monday, Feb. 3,
and runs through Sunday, March 16. Hundreds
of Citrus County residents look forward to
participating in the Fitness in Citrus challenge
every year. Most say they got into it for their
health or to lose weight, but ended up saying
they enjoyed it most for the fun and
camaraderie.
Form a team that means you and at least
one other person. Small teams typically do best.
Your team needs to choose either the "steps"
challenge or the "minutes of activity" challenge.
Also, choose your team's fitness level by choos-
ing a category: "just getting started," "getting
there" or "jocks."
In the "steps" challenge, you earn points for
each 500 steps you take (pedometer required).
In the "minutes" challenge, you earn points
for each 10 minutes of exercise. Act now -
registration closes Jan. 24. Email
fitnesschallenge@tampabay.rr.com to register.


Chamber welcomes

Quick Care Med


with ribbon-cutting

--- 'ff .r^ -^


ICTURED FROM LEFT: Jenee Vickers, Kiddie Kampus
Learning Center; Dan Pushee, associate member; Jeanne
Green, Inside Citrus; Chanel St. Martin; Deliverance St.
Martin; Rosemarie Sharel, PAC; Anna St. Martin; Dr.
Dacelin St. Martin; Antionette St. Martin; Sarah Crews;
Brittany Paovella; Charley Marie Cook; Deanne St. Martin; Autumn
Phillips; Sean Muffley, ARNP; Karen Fenton; Bonnie Hardiman,
associate member; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank.


Hours:
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday
through Friday; 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. weekends
Address:
659 N.W. U.S. 19,
Unit 1, Crystal River.
Phone:
352-563-0911.
Walk-in clinic and urgent care


Campers keep babies

warm from head to toe


A donation of 33 baby
blankets and nine baby
hats for new mothers and
babies of the Women's &
Family Center at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center was made possible
by the generous men and
women of the Trail Blazing
Sams RV Chapter. Trail Blaz-
ing members presenting the
donation were Linda Voyton,
Lynne Morneault and Albert
Morneault. Thea Lombardi,
RN, accepted the blankets
and hats on behalf of the
Women's & Family Center.


I 1' *f'** I
-, o ^ Crystal River
CITRUS Co;NlY ''Rotaty Club


{o'oLckcdt. 44 wciteW F:ebtex'e6


L' '..~


BOAT TOURS BEER GARDEN LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LOCAL FOOD FINE ART ARTS AND CRAFTS KIDS ZONE
$4 PER PERSON, CHILDREN 12 & UNDER FREE


FloridaManateeFestival.comn


352-795-3149


cc J 4, 'XtcGtoett fti l It t3


A' .,o -"%


-- .A


DIUMf Uaij,
a1111u$




D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


GIFTS
Continued from Page Dl

minute scramble at breakfast
time.

Plush Toast Wireless Speaker,
ThinkGeek, $40:

Speaking of breakfast, does
the person you're shopping for
like toast? I mean, really like
toast? If so, then this tablet
holder and speaker might be
right for them.
Most tablets fit and plug into
this rechargeable device. You
can listen to music that way, or
connect it to your smartphone
or iPod via Bluetooth. Its
plush exterior makes it as
cuddly as a teddy bear. It's
sure to please both day old
bread enthusiasts and small
children.

Scouti Wi-Fi Pet Monitor,
Motorola Mobility, $300:

This product, sold exclu-
sively through PetSmart, you
keep an eye on Felix or
Snoopy while you're away In
addition to viewing furry
friends remotely, users can
pan, tilt and zoom cameras
through their smartphone,
tablet or desktop computer
There's also two-way audio
to allow remote conversations
between you and your pet, in-
frared night vision, tempera-
ture monitoring and the
ability to take snapshots and
record video, just in case Fido
does something especially
cute.
Does Rover like to roam? If
so, you can connect and view
up to four cameras in multiple
rooms.

Personal Submarine,
Hammacher Schlemmer,
$2 million:

If Santa has some extra cash
he can buy this two-person
submersible that can reach
depths of 1,000 feet The sub's
transparent acrylic dome
keeps adventurers safe
and dry as they channel
Jacques Cousteau and Jules
Verne.
The sub is powered by bat-
tery packs that can supply up
to six hours of travel and a
maximum speed of three
knots. It's also equipped with
four external 150-watt quart-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


halogen lamps to light up the
underwater landscape, along
with a xenon strobe light and
RF beacon alerts to let others
know your location.
There's a bit of a learning
curve when it comes to pilot-
ing these vehicles, so training
is included.

Pop Dongle by Pop Secret,
eBay auction, price to be de-
termined:
Does the person you're
shopping for find smartphone
games a little dry? Well the
folks at Pop Secret think the
key to jazzing things up lies in
adding butter, or in this case, a
buttery smell.
The Pop Dongle is part of an
iPhone game created by the
popcorn maker It plugs into
your iPhone's earphone jack
and when you slather pieces
of popcorn with butter in the
on-screen game the dongle re-
leases a buttered-popcorn
scent
There's nothing fancy about
the game. The scent itself
hangs in the air and after a
while you can't really tell
when the dongle is releasing
it.
You won't find these in
stores. The only dongles avail-
able to the public are being
auctioned on eBay The money
goes to the Red Cross. The
first sold earlier this month
for $315. At last check, bidding
on the second was up to
$152.50 in an auction set to
close on Monday
The third will be auctioned
off in bidding that ends on
Jan. 2.

Zombie apocalypse supplies,
Larson Electronics, various
prices:

Everybody needs to be pre-
pared for the day that zombies
take over the earth, right? Lar-
son Electronics, which makes
heavy-duty and industrial
lighting, has a collection of
products designed for just
that.
Offerings include a high-in-
tensity discharge spotlight ca-
pable of reaching distances of
over 5,000 feet just what
you need to let you know
walkers are approaching.
There's also a solar-pow-
ered LED beacon for signaling
other survivors and universal
handcuff keys to help you
escape from unfriendly
members of the living


Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks at ArcelorMittal, a steel mill in Cleveland. The U.S. economy grew
at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate from July through September, the fastest pace since late 2011
and significantly higher than previously believed. Much of the upward revision came from stronger
consumer spending.


RATES
Continued from Page Dl


for Business Economics pre-
dicted growth of 2.5 percent in
2014.
Outside the volatility caused
by changes in stockpiles, many
analysts say the economy has
begun to improve in the cur-
rent quarter Steady hiring has
lowered the unemployment
rate to a five-year low of 7 per-
cent. And much of the Novem-
ber data so far have been
upbeat
Consumer spending at retail
businesses rose by the most in
five months. Factories in-
creased output for the fourth
straight month, led by a surge
in auto production. Builders
broke ground on homes at the
fastest pace in more than five
years, strong evidence that the
housing recovery is accelerat-
ing despite higher mortgage
rates. Auto sales haven't been


better since the recession
ended 4 1/2 years ago. And the
stock market is at all-time
highs.
Analysts will pay close atten-
tion to consumer spending in
the fourth quarter It drives 70
percent of economic growth.
The government signifi-
cantly boosted consumer
spending in Friday's revised
data, increasing it to a 2 per-
cent growth rate, up from just
1.4 percent in the previous es-
timate, which has been the
slowest pace since late 2009.
Economists said Friday that
the newfound strength in the
third quarter was an encourag-
ing development but the pe-
riod was still dominated by an
unsustainable buildup in in-
ventories which will act as a
drag on growth in the current
quarter
Pierre Ellis, an economist at
Decision Economics, said that
the final look at third quarter
GDP did offer hope that
growth will strengthen in com-
ing months, given the greater


strength in consumer spend-
ing.
Congress gave final approval
Wednesday to legislation that
reduces federal spending cuts
and averts the risk of another
government shutdown early
next year The prospect of less
fiscal drag next year has led
many economists to predict a
better year for the economy in
2014.
A stronger outlook for the
economy and job market
prompted the Federal Reserve
this week to begin winding
down its bond-buying program,
which was intended to lower
long-term interest rates and
encourage more borrowing
and spending.
The Fed said Wednesday
that it would begin reducing
its $85 billion-a-month in bond
purchases by $10 billion in
January Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke said that if the econ-
omy keeps improving, the
bond purchases will be
trimmed by similar amounts at
coming meetings next year


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BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print



and


Online


All


The Time


.ax ..2 53-565 1 ol ...:(88 .852230 E a0l casif0d chonclonin 0co I 0esit: w0ch-,ilenlnec0


Looking for
Companionship
Attractive Widow
Active, healthy, looking
for gentleman around
75 yrs. young send mail
to: Blind Box1850 c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
int. & ext. repairs
Southern prices!
(352)537-4144
BIG TOP AUCTION
*NEW MERCHANDISE
Monday. Dec. 23, 7pm
7300 S. Florida Ave.
BLUE OX
Motorcycle carrier
rated for 1000 Ibs.
$550. Call
(231) 445-2186
EXP ONLY
Insurance
& Billing
For Front Office
Lecanto FL, Office
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3305
FORD
'89 Bronco,
302,4 Wheel Drive,
$2,500 obo
(352)364-7719
HERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
SAT., DEC. 28th
Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bkyard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Sugarmill Woods
Fri 12/27 & Sat 12/28
9a-4p Movina Sale:
Sofa, beds, dressers,
patiohsehold items &
More!! 352-503-6331
9 Linder St, Homosassa


W
K















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966

Ci iNidlC

www.chronicleonline.com


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

L.QQEic
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



10 x13 Shed
You move
(352) 422-2927
Free Mixed
Puppies
Just In Time for
Christmas
(352) 464-0871
Free Oak Firewood
U-Haul and split
(352) 447-4411



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.00lb.
Stone Crab(if l0Ib
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
Mustard & Collards
GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
35-.792.6'378


Black & White Cat
Answers to Mister.
Lost Homosassa
Trail/Kings Ave.
REWARD
352-563-2982
Male Yorkie
approx 3 yrs. old
tan, Citrus Springs,
has collar on him
pls call (352) 476-9584
RC Plane, white,
flown from Citrus Hills
over Beverly Hills
REWARD
(352) 746-0488
White gold chain with
diamond in middle of
pendant, vintage 30's.
Lost in Inverness area
in March 2013. Just dis-
covered it missing.
Family heirloom. Great
sentimental value. If
you found it or know an-
ything about this item,
please contact me. I
am devastated. Re-
ward. 637-2193



Black Cat
Short Haired, avg. size
lost in the vicinity of
Gospel Island
call (352) 246-9991
for details
CAT
Half grown brown
tabby. Allen Ridge
area of Hwy 491.
352-563-6827
Found
Tri Color Beagle
Sugarmill Area
(352) 397-5622
Found while hiking in
Withlacoochee State
Forrest Homosassa
area- bicycle acces-
sory on North Trail
12/20/13 Cl George
(352) 382-0506
Red Nose Pit Bull
Super Friendly
Mature Dog in the
Citrus Springs Area
352-465-7064
530-864-1945

HIPIY


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct d $5.00lb.
Stone CrabD $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001



TEACHER
Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN
PRN positions availa-
ble for 3 pm-11 pm
and 11pm-7am
shifts. Must be a Flor-
ida- licsenced nurse.
CERTIFIED NURS-
ING ASSISTANT
Full-time and PRN
positions available
for3 p.m.-11 p.m.
and 11 p.m.-7 a.m.
shifts. Must be a
Florida-certified
nursing assistant.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.
Hannah Mand
352-746-4434 I
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand@
LCCA.com Visit us:
LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
45177


FT/PT HAIRSTYLIST
Apply @ Nu-Yu Salon
Beverly Hills plaza
Nuyu4u@gmail.com











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





CASE MANAGER
Primary Care
Physican
Accountable Care
Organization (ACO)
seeking qualified
Care Manager.
Current Florida RN
lic. along with 3 plus
years experience in
hospital setting or
post accute care
setting. Manage
Care experience
and Case Mgr certi-
fication preferred.
Please Fax
Resume to:
Nature Coast ACO
Attn Patty King
352-746-3838


(352) 34D-YO0@


EXP ONLY
Insurance
& Billing
For Front Office
Lecanto FL, Office
Fax Resume to:
352-746-3305



F/T HYGIENIST
F/T Dental Hygienist
needed 4 days a
wk for a busy doctor
owned practice.
Monthly incentives
available.Submit
cover letter and
resume to Fax
352-873-2002



Medical Office:
FT State
Certified/Licensed
individual for
busy practice.
Professional &
computer proficient.
Fax resume to:
352-746-5605







Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club
is now hiring
experienced
Bar Tenders
and Waitstaff.

Aoolv in person
Mon-Sat 9am-5pm
at the Grille Restau-
rant 505 E Hartford
St, Hernando FL


FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.






Social Program
Assist -
Driver Trainer
Announcement
#13-75
Responsible for
training to all new
drivers in all areas of
safe transit opera-
tions. Provides con-
tinuing training for
Transit Drivers in safe
operation of vehi-
cles and equip-
ment. Performs rou-
tine inspections of
drivers to ensure all
safety standards are
being met.. Must
successfully pass a
level II background
check. Starting pay
$11.88 hourly.
Excellent benefit
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local Li-
braries or the Hu-
man Resources De-
partment, 3600 West
Sovereign Path,
Suite 178, Lecanto,
Florida 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
27,2013 EOE/ADA.


BEt

Administrative
F/T Help
answer phones,
scheduling,
billing, purchasing
M F 7:30a to 4:30p
Email Resume to:
donsplumbinginc
@yahoo.com


COMMUNITY
HOSTESS

Seeking high-energy
professional
hostesses for
seasonal part-time
position
including weekends
shuttling potential
homeowners
around country club
community's
amenities and model
homes. Must be
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and
service oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL









Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


BEg
Exp. General
Maintenance
Must be flexible and
able to multi-task.
Aoolv Tues thru Fri
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando

EXP. ROUTE
DRIVER

must have CDL LIC.
w/air brake & tanker
endorsement
APPLY WITHIN:
at 2240 N. Skeeter
Terrace, Hernando
between 8am & 2pm
(352) 860-0195

FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


Schools/






ALL CLASSES
FOR 2014
Spring Hill &
New Port Richey

COSMETOLOGY
BARBERING
NAILS SKIN
*MAS-
SAGE
THERAPY
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
Full Time & Part Time
Full Specialty &
Instructor Training
IcS BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
1 (866) 724-2363
TOLL FREE *
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING



#1 Employment source is
9





kwvchronicleonline.cor


Chronicle f: .a


Classifieds / A;


In Print ..


& Online ;



'7.1





CIRpONICLE 0CmkoNIcLI^ 1


mra^ m an vl

M AE ft W &-M '


p II


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22,2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 CLASSIFIED CTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lie # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com







Y\u lr idd first


Need a job

o1r a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



( .1., /


DOLLS
Cinderella & Bride Doll
2ft w/stands $100 ea
(352) 746-9896

WEDGEWOOD LAV-
ENDER GRAPE ON
CREAM Classic Never
Used,5 pc setting $50
352-270-3527





APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

GOOD WASHER
Works great with 90 day
warranty, $100
Call or text Leonard @
352-364-6504

Kenmore, Refrigerator
Freezer, self defrosting
good cond. $75.
(352) 527-6975

MICROWAVE whirlpool,
confection,
used 18mo. Quit work-
ing. Call 352-726-2350.
$50 OBO

REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore side by side;
white; ice cube and
water, approximately 8
years old excellent
condition. $ 350 Call
352-422-6466

SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179

Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258

WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398





BIG TOP AUCTION
NEW MERCHANDISE
Monday. Dec. 23, 7pm
7300 S. Florida Ave.





8" TABLE SAW
Craftsman, w/ medal
stand 2.5 HP,
excellent shape
$75. (352) 465-9114
Dunnellon


6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, Little use
$375.
(202) 425-4422 cell
CHAIN SAW Polan 16"
model 2075-
$42
352-637-2499
LEAF BLOWER GAS
CRAFTMAN 210MPH
$45
352-637-2499
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
$65 OBO
352-464-0316
POWER WASHER
PARTS Campbell
1/4"hose, gun,lance &
bottle $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Ryobi, 14 amps, 10"
Compound Miter Saw
w/ laiser & bag,
New in Box, pd. $189
Asking $125. obo
(352) 795-0037



1 adjustable Twin Bed
exc. cond.$300.
Sofa & Love Seat
Matching. $150.
(352) 527-4247
2 Table Lamps, Tulips
Black & Gold,
like new $100
2 Large White Swivel
Bar stools $60
(352) 503-6541
2 VINTAGE CHAIRS.
Gold swivel rocker and
brown/rust fixed chair.
Nice condition. $25 for
both. 527-1239
2 VINTAGE COFFEE
TABLES. 1 round with
lazy susan. 1 rectangu-
lar. Both maple. $25 for
both. 527-1239
3 pc. sectional,
green, w/ loungers
on each end. $150.
Love Seat $75.
All good condition
(352) 795-7126
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER [BLONDE]
48x48x18in.25in tv. free
19in tv. $50
352-344-8212
Hand made Ceramic
Tree, 3 pieces,
stands 36" high
beautiful, $75.00
should be seen
(352) 746-2479
HQ Medium Bird Cage,
white, dome top,
32x23x63, asking
$250. (352) 726-5379
King Size Bed
Frame, Box, Mattress
w/comforter $100
Round Table, 4 chairs
Wrought iron frame
$75, 352-503-7930
KITCHEN FURNITURE
Expandable kitchen
table with four chairs
excellent condition.
$200.00 382-5956


Oak Dining Room Set,
6 Chairs & Table
36 x 60,
$165.
352-228-4279
Oak Full Bedroom Set
w/dresser, end tables
exc. condition
asking $1200.
call for info
352-897-4681
Slightly Used 2 Sets,
single mattress's
and box springs with
wooden headboard
$150 for all
King Size Bed, 2 dress-
ers, blonde color
$150. (352) 795-7126
TABLE & 4 Chairs
Tropitone. Tropical,
natural stone top ta-
ble, turquoise colored
cushion chairs. Orig
price $3000, asking
$800 352-270-8494

1OQ4k:
TWIN BEDS Wooden
twin beds for sale, with
mattresses and sheets.
$150.00 Call 352 794
3961
WICKER CHAIR Black
with gold trim, remova-
ble cushion can text pic
$50.00 352-746-0401



12 CU FT Steel Dump
trailer, pin hitch, 2 new
tires tubes & wheels can
text pic $75.00
352-746-0401
30 PLANTS FOR
WATER GARDEN BlUE
FLOWERS. DON'T
KNOW THEIR NAMES
10 for 15$ 464-0316
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
SPREADER AERATOR
fits any pin lawn tractor
hitch 32" wide $75.00
can text pic
352-746-0401
TRACTOR SUN
SHADE Craftsman de-
luxe, good shape can
text pic $35.00
352-746-0401




CHERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
SAT., DEC. 28th
Sugarmill Woods
Fri 12/27 & Sat 12/28
9a-4p Moving Sale:
Sofa, beds, dressers,
patiohsehold items &
More!l! 352-503-6331
9 Linder St, Homosassa


COAT
Red Wool 3 qtr length
coat; Made in USA
size 20-22 $50; Wool
rug 4x5 ft $50
(352) 746-9896
PGH STEELER
JACKET NFL Winter re-
movable hood, med.
like new cond $25.
Dunnellon 465-8495



(4) 15" X 7" CHROME
RIMS 5x5.5/139.7mm
caps & lug nuts $100
tommyb@tampabay.rr.
com for pics or info
2 Driveway Cleaners,
Whirlybird
20" Brand New
$200. each
352-302-8265
5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &AC-
CESSORIES $30.
464-0316
67 pc. Tienshan China
Poinsettia & Ribbons
collection, beautiful!
great condition! $100.
set of lamps, $100.
(352) 795-7254
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Beanie Baby
Collection
125 pc's, $400. for all
call for details
(352) 895-0140
BICYCLE BASKET BY
BELL White Wire
15"x10"x9"
(New$30)$10
352-270-3527
BLACK DECKER
HEDGER 22" Blade $20
18V Battery 20
352-270-3527
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct B$5.001lb.
Stone Crab( $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FOUR 2 DRAWER
METAL FILE CABI-
NETS. Good condition.
$50 for all. 527-1239
FRAMED DISNEY
PRINT -cert.#838 of
2000 size 18" by
24"-$100.00-
352-527-9982
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River
Gold Christmas Tree
Orniments all different
images, Some move
$10 each
(352) 746-9896
Hand Made
Crocheted Blanket
w/ pillow, teal color
background $150.
(352) 812-2329
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEARLY NEW FITS
1350-1450 SLIDE ON
ONLY $70 464-0316


^rin Dfr -. r y


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Drivers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


A ROOFING

Call the %" ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

:100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
[ic/in. CCC57537 GROW








AAA Miller Auto
& Tire Service
Interior/Exterior Detail & Window Tint
Oil Filter Lube
Car Oil Changes $A99
up to 5 Qts. starting from l4

Diesel Oil & Filter Change
Special $9900 uptol17Qts.
v W plus tax
S Open Mon.-Sat.
(352) 527-4111
Across from Wal-Mart, Lecanto





V~l,!.WrIr~d,.IILIIM.



Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002





TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696





Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


-E Exposed.
_A Aggregate
Shotcrete $45/yd.
Decks Tile
FREE X Pavers
ESTIMATES T'
GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG'S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LICENSED 5K1
INSUE 352-746-5200


DO& INSTLURED TYOUR

IO'T LET YOUR


HDd. entC~


I-5-DRVN


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
Small Carpentry
i i Fencing
V-J *w ) preening
[ S ^ (Clean Dryer Vents
i fforjable & Dependable
^l W Evr C ece lifelong
S 352-344-0905
I I cell: 400-1722
*ff Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
int. & ext. repairs
Southern prices!
(352)537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
ve FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447


Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


( 2O) 2IU-4O6




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

PolBulin ;


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713







Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441





ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-*352-639-1024***


P-L MAC'S MOBILE RV
5a REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
d W352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service, arts, sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


&racnq ce i'7' -oo//A





Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



ww.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
I (352)1639-1024
L LICENSED & INSURED


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
R 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC"
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned &operated
S#EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 HOurs a Day .Days a Week


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard ( KNOCK OUT
S0ipoo 1plan CLEANING SERVICE

completely new! RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
MOftenin raed, Licensed, Insured,
never du 'cared" Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST ,-
Lc o r r snTOOro

03COPES *^352,942,6876
POOL AND PAVER LLC Call Today for a
Licnsued 352-400-3188 | Clea To W


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallway is Free) only $69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $35
Must have both services on same appt, With copon

Z THURA CLEAN hc
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091







Stand Alone i
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians i
ER0015377

352-61-124


I


)I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



;ERLRMIS MANUAL
hoover floormate hard WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
floor cleaner for SHAPE, YELLOW W/
tile/wood-$25.00 FOOTRESTS. ONLY
352-527-9982 $85 352-464-0316
JB L CENTER HOSPITAL BED
SPEAKER -100 watts FOR SALE
h-6 1/2" w-18 1/2" d-5 $135.00
5/8"-$25.00-more info (352) 419-7862
call- 352-527-9982 Jazzy Electric
King Size Comforter Wheel Chair,
Set, Peach w/ flowers Model 1170XL
with all accessories, Like new,
inlcuded drapes, $700. make offer
pillow shams, & more (352) 621-5340
$35. (352) 465-1262 Manual Wheelchair
Kissing Dolls W/ Footrests, Great
$40 Shape, Only $100
M & M Collectibles 352-464-0316
$15 each MOBILITY POWER
(352) 746-9896 WHEEL CHAIR, Jazzy
*Y3fl Select, like new cond.
ISTLDXU $1750 pics avail via
lSTINGS irmoak@att.net
352-302-4707
Wheelchair
Invacare SXS Heavy
Weight Allowed, 22"
Seat, Oxyg Rack, V.G.
Cond. Ong $890
Only $279. 4 Wheel
Walker. X-Lg + wide
seat and brakes
V.G Cond. $100.
call btwn 1pm & 7pm
(352)527-4942


LARGE BIRD CAGE
Bird cage suitable for a
parrot, the cage is on
wheels and is 60 inches
high,. The cage itself is
37 inches high, 30
inches wide and 19
inches wide.
$175.00 352-419-8850
MC HELMET NEW
LADY Rider Rod ia, Me-
dium, NeverWorn $45
352-270-3527
POOL TABLE
7 ft table, like new,
with extra accessories
$150. You pick up.
Call Steve
(352) 598-4454
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING-"1979"-50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps-$100.00
352-527-9982
RUG AFGANI 8X5
100% WOOL 2" THICK
Reversible. Beige, Geo
Design $100
352-270-3527
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF, works great for
fish orjerkey, only $60
352-464-0316
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
SUNBEAM
MIXMASTER 12 speed
w/two sets of beaters
Works Great $25.00
OBO 352.249.9164



4 PRONGED CANE,
don't wait to FALL
DOWN before you need
one. $15
352-464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET URP.
ONLY $20
352-464-0316
Bariatric Power
Wheelchair
Quickie Rhapsody
weight limit 300lbs
never used, $750. firm
(352) 637-4539 Iv msg
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $40 for both
352-464-0316


"NEW" FOLK/PARLOR
SIZE ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR W/GIGBAG &
GROVER TUNERS
$65 352-601-6625
CLAVINOVA
Yamaha, like new
$550
(352) 746-3663
Hammond Chord
Organ
good condition
$200. obo
(352) 489-4813
HOHOHO, NEW
ACOUSTIC GUITAR &
STARTER PACK
W/EVERYTHING!!
$50 352-601-6625



Phonograph
Curtis. w/ FM Radio, CD
player, over 75 albums.
$50
(352) 270-8314



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACESAVER FOLDS
UP ALL ELECTRONICS
ON WHEELS ONLY
$100 464 0316
Electric Treadmill;
Cardio Glide,
Stationary Bike,
Manual Stepper.
Take all for $325
(352) 344-0424
EXERCISE BIKE good
shape. All electronics.
only $65
352-464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$95 464-0316
Pro-Form XP
Whirlwind, 280 Bike
Excerciser, 1 yr. old
$100
352-228-4279
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE, ALL ELEC-
TRONICS, SEAT BACK
CHEWED ON BY MY
DOG, $65 464-0316
RECUMBENT BIKE
Weslo, Grey/Green
Like New $75
(352) 489-9717
TREADMILL
Electric Pro Soft Plus,
Pro-form 450 "Space
Saver" just like new
$100 (352) 489-5077


Weslo Walking
Treadmill, good
condition
$175. obo
(352) 4894813



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
For sale TaylorMade
RH RocketBallZ factory
clones. 3 9, PW, AW,
SW. TP/Dynalite
R-Shafts, PGA
SENSICORE Inserts
WINN Dri Tac Grips
$299. 352-746-4920
Fresh Water Gear
Rods, Reels, Tackle
Boxes & More. Call
John (352) 422-2317
Golf Clubs
Men's McGregor,
Full set including bag
and all. $60
(352) 746-0284
GOLF DRIVER Raw
lings 450cc mrh 10*
Apollo reg lite shaft new
grip exc $25. Dunnellon
465-8495
GOLF DRIVER Tour
Edge Exotics XLD MRH
10.5 Senior w/HC new
grip $45. Dunnellon
465-8495
Medal Detector
in Case
Used once, $75.
Call John
(352) 422-2317
Recumbent Bike
Suneasy Sport AX,
Like new, w/ car bike
carrier, $875 for all.
Roadmaster Mountain
Sport 18 speed $75.
(352) 460-2188
Tandem Bike
used little, Shimona
Equipped, org. $400.
price $100.
(352) 465-9114
Dunnellon



NECKLACE SET Cus-
tom made Sworski crys-
tal and blue tanzanite
set. Never worn $75.00
352-726-1948


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED
Cancer Patient Needs
Lymphodema,
Compression Pump &
Sleeve (352) 697-2595


Earn extra income


delivering The Citrus


County Chronicle. We are


looking for dependable


people to deliver the news


on routes that are already


established. Potential


carriers must be 18 years


old, have reliable


transportation, a valid


drivers license and


automobile insurance.







Paid Weekly





000GITV


Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Regina
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820


BUTTERS
Buttffers, a 4-y.o.
Catahoula Leopard
Dog mix, wt. 48 Ibs,
brown w/white
markings, gentle,
friendly, playful, af-
fectionate, walks
very well on leash,
rides very well in car,
appears housebro-
ken, gets along
w/other dogs
and people.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


EDITH
Edith, 2-year-old
spayed female
Boxer/Hound/Terrier
mix, Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken, weight
49 Ibs, loving &
loveable, walks well
on leash, easily
directed, very
affectionate &
friendly. Needs
one medication.
Call Joanne
@352-795-1288.

FREE FEMALE RUMPY
MANX. Need loving
home for age 1-1/2
very playful orange and
white baby. Other cats
in home not accepting
her and breaks my
heart. Spayed, Neg Fel
Leuk and FIV, all shots,
very healthy. (352)
563-6343

FREE KITTYS
3 young homeless
kitties, 2 males, 1 fe-
male. Spayed and
neutered, rabies
shots, wormed,
defleaed. Friendly. I
rescued them, please
rescue me. Need to
find homes quickly.
Crystal River, Please
call 408489-0849


I B


CLASSIFIED



Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. Health Cert.
$300. (352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell
Jack Russell Terrier
Mother and Father on
premise. Ready to go
Five males $250/ea
352-613-9135








LIZZIE
Lizzie, a sweet 1 1/2
y.o. black retriever
mix looking for a
loving forever
home, spayed and
a great medium size
@ 45 Ibs. She is
friendly & playful,
loves people. A real
sweetheard and
would make a great
family dog.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300. Schnauzer Pups
just born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827



SmI Dog Carrier, like
new $25.
(352) 527-6975




BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
352-563-5510"*
Century
2001 211 WAC, 150
Yam OX-66-FI mtr, Hyd
steering, windless,
tackle ctr, GPS sounder
Bimini, cockpit cvr, VHF,
seats 7. Two axel allum.
trailer. Extra's!
$12,750 obo
352-563-5628
DOCK SPACE
For Rent, Deep water
Canal in Crystal River,
Call (352) 257-8850
MOWHAWK
14 ft. CANOE, Like
New, used twice, w/
extra paddles, bum-
bers, Misc. Items,
Pd. $900 asking $400
(352) 422-5622
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new VHF radio & GPS
fishfinder. Good Cond.
$5,000. (352) 527-4247
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
"(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

SOUTHWIND
98' V-10 eng., dual
AC, super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
low miles on tires,
good cond. $14,500
OBO 352-302-6534


CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2008 Taurus SEL, All
leather int., low miles,
car/tires all exc cond.
$13000 (352) 795-9181
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2011 Optima EX
loaded, leather, all
power keyless, GPS
$17,500 352-212-5555
LINCOLN
'94 Towncar, 91,600 mi
excellent condition
$2,500, (352) 795-3200
352 422-7574 Cell


If interested in any of

the following areas





Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills




Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River, FL 34429






CHIKjONICLE
www.chvoniel' llaa om


Toy Hauler, 18ft
2011 Forest River, Tan.
Axle, liv. quarters w/
bath, awning, TV hkup
full ramp, AC. Pd.
$18,000 Asking $11,000
Like New Ready to Go
(352) 422-5622



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



4 Back Seats for
Pontiac Transport
1998.
$30. ea. take all $100.
(352) 621-5340
1954 Chevy 6 Cylinder
Engine, 235 cu. in.,
3 speed transmission
& rear end. engine
needs rebuilt. $500.
(352) 560-3766

Vehicles

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

ILQ Q c
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


'99, Town Car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$3,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

MERCEDES
'86, 560 SEL, 164k mi
body perfect. Mi-
chelin tires all good
runs perfect, sunroof,
ready to go. $2,500.
(352) 419-9321
MITSUBSHI
'97, Mirage, 2 Door
$1,500.
(352) 489-0117
TOYOTA
'08, Yaris, 4 DR.
Sedan, Blue, 51,500
miles,Good cond.
$9,500. (352) 5274247
TOYOTA
2009 Camry SE
Red, cloth int, gd cond,
spacious, 89,400 mi
$10,500 (352) 257-9496




CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pnris-
tine, 11k $26,900
352-5134257





11111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I


1978, 450 SL, Convert.
excel, cond. 84k mi.
Caledonian green
$13,000, 352-464-3187
MUSTANG
66 COUPE, Frame on
resto., late 302
5 speed, NICE!
13,500 OBO
352-978-0658



FORD
'89 Bronco,
302, 4 Wheel Drive,
$2,500 obo
(352) 364-7719
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
GMC
07 Yukon SLT, loaded,
full power, DVD, bose,
very good, 116K mi
$17,800 (352) 212-5555
GMC
2005 Yukon SLT good
condition new tires runs
and looks good 197000
miles asking $6500.00
419-560-4362
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
'99, 4 runner White,
great cond. runs
perfect $2000 obo
352-302-8265


309-1222 SUCRN
UNITED WAY
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY IS AWARDED $17,558.00 FEDERAL FUNDS UNDER THE
EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER NATIONAL BOARD PROGRAM
The selection has been made by a National Board that is chaired by the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and
consists of representatives from American Red Cross, Catholic Charities, USA, Na-
tional Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., The Salvation Army, United Jew-
ish Communities and United Way of America. The Local Board will be charged to dis-
tribute funds, to help expand the capacity of food and shelter programs in
high-need areas around the country.
A Local Board made up of American Red Cross, Catholic Charities, Jewish Federa-
tion, Veteran's Administration, North Suncoast Ministerial Association, The Salvation
Army, Citrus County Government, Key Training Center and United Way of Citrus
County will determine how the funds awarded to Citrus County are to be distributed
among the emergency food and shelter programs run by local service agencies in
the area. The Local Board is responsible for recommending agencies to receive
these funds and any additional funds available under this phase of the program.
Under the terms of the grant from the National Board, local agencies chosen to re-
ceive funds must: 1) be private voluntary non-profits or units of government, (2) have
an accounting system, 3) practice nondiscrimination, 4) have demonstrated the ca-
pability to deliver emergency food and/or shelter programs, and 5) if they are a pri-
vate voluntary organization, they must have a voluntary board. 6) Must use the HMIS
system. Qualifying agencies are urged to apply.
Citrus County has distributed Emergency Food and Shelter funds previously with, Cit-
rus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), The Salvation Army, Annie W. Johnson Senior
Service Center, Pregnancy & Family Life Center, Daystar Life Center, Citrus County
Community Services, Nature Coast Ministries, and United Way of Citrus County par-
ticipating. These agencies were responsible for providing approximately 28,000
meals, 3,334 nights of mass shelter, 434 nights of emergency shelter, as well as rent
and/or mortgage assistance to 140 households, and utility assistance to 58 house-
holds during 2013.
Public or private voluntary agencies interested in applying for Emergency Food and
Shelter Program funds must contact Jennifer Barber at the United Way of Citrus
County at 1205 NE 5th Street, Suite A, Crystal River, FL 34429-4523, by email at
jennifer.barber@unitedway.org, or by calling 795-5483 for an application. The dead-
line for applications to be received is January 17th at 11:00 a.m.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 22,2013.


307-1222 SUCRN
BOCC Bid Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
ITB No.007-14
House Demolition & Replacement
SHIP Program RPL #2014-02

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
bid to provide residential home replacement services for a home located in
Homosassa, FL that is qualified under the SHIP Housing Rehab Program Job # RPL
2014-02.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on January 6, 2014 at 9:00 AM at 2125
S. Trivet Pt. Homosassa, FL 34448. Only those companies who are present at the
pre-bid conference will be permitted to submit a Bid in response to this solicitation.
Additional information concerning the scope of the home rehabilitation work will be
distributed at the pre-bid conference. Interested parties must attend in order to be
considered for award.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before January 15, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for January 15, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Site Visit or at the Public
Opening because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of
Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle December 22, 2013

308-1222 SUCRN
BOCC Bid Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No.006-14
Traffic Signal Emergency/Planned Repair and Installation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide emergency repair services, planned repair services, and planned in-
stallations of traffic lights, caution lights, school flashers, and roadway safety lighting
throughout Citrus County Florida.
There are approximately 75 signalized intersections and 25 flasher beacon intersec-
tions. Bidders are strongly encouraged to visit these intersection locations. These
100 locations do not include miscellaneous school crossing beacons, etc. County
personnel can be made available to any Bidder who requires assistance in visiting
the sites.
Minimum Requirements for Submitting a Bid
1. Licensed electrical contractor in the State of Florida.
2. Pre-qualfled by the Florida Department of Transportalion to perform the Services
outlined in this Invitation to Bid.
3. Have the capacity, capability and expertise to repair and install traffic signals for
Citrus County Florida under emergent and planned circumstances.
4. Have a sufficient number of traffic signal technicians who are certified
by the In ternational Municipal Sign Association (IMSA) at levels I
and II.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before January 16, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy L
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for January 16, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand side of
the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352)
527-5413.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle December 22, 2013


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22,2013 D7

Classic


JEEP
2006 Wrangler X,
57,000k, many extras,
$15,500
call 352-422-5448




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van. Wired for
handicap lift, has
hand controls, 74K mi.
good cond $6,000
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
DODGE
'02, Caravan SE,
Loaded, 7 pass. 5DR.,
auto, great MPG
CD, garaged, clean
$3,450. (352) 212-9383




HONDA
2008 TRX 400
mint cond, winding gear
and title $2800. obo
Dennis 352-267-3334
YAMAHA
2009 YFZ 450,
Race ready, call for
details $4000
(352) 564-8165




BLUE OX
Motorcycle carrier
rated for 1000 Ibs.
$550. Call
(231) 445-2186




HONDA'06
CBR 1000 RR,
Very low miles, garage
kept, Adult Owner,
$4500 (352) 257-8850
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
ong doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$5800. 352-5134257


I Bi


I Bi


I Bi




D SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 ..


HonsIdIa


To eligible active or retired members of the US Military
& their spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when
you finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


"Check anywhere in the world first, but

CHECK WITH


a


...for a New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Model TF3H3DJW
Save While They Last!


...fora New 2014 Honda
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2EEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...fora New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2014 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3EEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...for a New 2014 Honda
CR-V LX2WD
Model RM3H3EEW Come See WhyThe CR-V Is The Best
Selling Compact SUV In America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%-
X 60 MONTHS
V on select new Honda models
:y i :. i ...-|], . i .i n ..i


Pre-Owned Vehicles!


5O0 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFEW
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:

Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
iP t' F'i m e'lk rj ?! '- "lIdi'1


&rne See What LOVE Can Do For You!


,2Miles 352.628.4600

ceHonda.com


I-f_. fiE
I.lrl-WnIrm


ee dealer ioi det.as TFuo eligible a: ir.,ie or retired membersof the US Military and their spouses towards any new Honda a
..ln e ,leri )u fin.ince or lease thru HFS. Used as a down payment or capcost 'edlur.Ion toward Mie purchase or lease of
ii H.u 'e ,.n; arjionri rile using a valid Honda APR. Honda Leadership Lease. or Honda Leadership Puricl-se Planr'' ,prug .I-in
I1r)ug h HFS (eludes 2ero Dte ,it Signing Lease ProgrAn-i). Must meet certain c redii criteria established by HFS. and vehicle must
e rliible lr i,-.llelr l rates. See dealer for oriplete detai d71. *Pus $ ,n79) i i.,ri charge and nptions. 1.36 ionrli closed end
e Ise '.lrt ppi.ived Firdii 2 000 miles peryear 15 cents pIi milie thereafter. $2995 cash or tide equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First ji,..ineni
.!rig rind v1i e 1nd state fees rie ,it .icininLO An., dealer installed equipment at .1d)tonat cost 2.36 iiii,1h closed end e, se .,ill ppro.red cdrill '12.000 ilre
per yea 5 I Iil'; per wile Ileieatei S999 i:a;h or trade ,quity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees Jue !t .igniriL Any denied in.,Illed erluipirfni a adiiitral Li'
3.1,6 i rrl closed end one-pay lease of $9 689 r..iin approved ciedii 2 000 miles per year 15 cents per ileheie aiI ler $2000 cash or trade etlilty. P,..inent is plus tax. tag and lease and state fees
de tilir :JlJ OplrjI)P. id .1dolitriil cost ttCovers internal lubricant parts. See dealer for ierisd. All pro-owned vehicles include $2500 cash down or'i ide e.jqLitr, Offers '..VaIld itiru late oi puIhCitCLji
ia.atM P" .V V '" A .l l ,


M'US,


Vj-"PLJ'j 461




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ri New 2014 C evy

SCRUZELSM....
rSTK#C14047 MSRP $19, 255
.... _,


New 2014 Chevy
MALIBU LS
STK#C14080 MSRP $22,980

s199
3SMuWOk+'


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS
STK #C14049 MSRP $25,330


New 2014 Chevy New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT SONIC LT SEDAN
STK #C14030 MSRP $35,535 STK #C14131 MSRP $18,590
am,'mAb A&-m m k


PHolte+Low
3Mon la.


New 2014 Chevy
IMPALA LS
STK#C14004 MSRP $28,120

$110


New 2014 Chevy
CAMARO 2LS
STK #C14094 MSRP $26,235


New 2014 Chevy
SILVERADODOBL
STK #C14044 MSRP $34,685


New 2014 Chevy
TAHOE LS
STK #CT14041 MSRP $45,115


39 Month Is


P39Mwmo+ Toie PMs*h+Tta
39 Month 1as 39 Month Lam


OVER"WAlenlVeuide inl: 2 YEARS uPIT-STOP
Us&ed&Cetiiled 100,000 MILE 30,000 MILE PROGRAM
Pre-Loved Vehicles WARRANTYt MAINTENANCE SeeNoCLUeDeED


GM CERTIFIED Vehicles!


Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


08CHEVROLETHHR 08 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE IO SMART FORTWO IFORDFESTA 09 FORD FUSION
12157,A POW LEATHER,SUNIROOf 12224.GAsSAVER 12216 P12219
$&848 M9,7 $%4" $1%4% $"#as


SQUA9S


W0UBUKU WNIStERAWU
12215. SUNIROf .LEATHER
S1SA9S


12 TODTATACOMA
12223, CREW CAB, PRERUNN R
$23%40


n HnUNiAALUjU LWUPe
SUNROOF
Uzi. -_ -at


13 HYUNDAIAENT GS
P12249,MTCHBACK
$*M95


1SIUA UrIIMAtA
PANORMA SUNROOF, LEATHER
$19A95


12FORDF15OEXCAIARUAT
12,31. LEATHER, REMOTE START
S3o"


IIDOIDGEJKMANI
$20Wf9
PLUS
MANY
MORE TO
CHOOSE
FROM!


VE Can Do For You!

2.341.0018

Sales.com


OE2
i^ J.JLJjl^ ^^^y~ci~~i~ J


S-t See dealer for details. 1. All leases with $2,499 cash down for 39 months, zero security deposit, 12,000 miles per year, plus tax, Limited to in stock
1 vehicles only. All prices and/or payments plus tax, tag, title & state fees. Dealer installed options and accessories additional cost. 2. Not available with finance
I,, r lease offers. Pre-owned vehicles with $2,500 cash or trade equity. Offer expires on date of publication.
^ ^ --(*li-.. ^


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 D9




DIO SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


2014 FORD MUSTANG


2014 FORD FUSION SE





Or Customer Savings Up TO
2,000 OFF
MSRP with Ford Credit Assistance


Or Customer Savings Up To
$2,000 OFF
MSRP with Ford Credit Assistance


MW MW W7lo
Or Customer Savings Up To
$7,000 OFF
MSRP with Customer Saving
Incentives & Package Discounts


9 % FORDCERTIFIEDPREOWND all For Savings!
Relax, It's Covered.- C al' Fo Sa
1 9 % 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians -r 3 5- 71
APR for 36 months* 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage**
S12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** 329 5 7

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
**Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing 36 months at $17 48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment Take delivery from dealer stock by 12/24/13 See dealer for qualifications and complete details See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details Vehicles available varies by dealership

~-A) A


2012 FORD FUSION SE
One owner, 33,000 miles. GP1653
$17,950


2011 LINCOLN MKX
Like New. GP1260
$25,950


2011 FORD RANGER XLT
Extended Cab, 17,000 miles. GP1679
$19,950


2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT
305 V8. GPR1251
$27,950


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GP1712
$20,950


2012 FORD EDGE LTD
Navigation, 19,000 miles. GPR1258
$27,950


2010 FORD FUSION SEL
Leather, Sunroof. GP1705
$20,450


2011 LINCOLN MKX
Leather, 29,000 miles. GP1717
$28,950


2009 LINCOLN MKS
One owner, 34,000 miles. GP1681
$20,950


2013 LINCOLN MKT
10,000 Miles. GPR1265
$30,950


Nick Nicholas '
Hwy. 19N
Crystal River 795.7371
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


*0% is not available on all models See dealer for complete details Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399 **Ford Credit
Financing required Not all buyers will qualify Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors Pictures are for illustration purposes only Prices and payments good through 12/24/13


2014 FORD ESCAPE SE

el


Orvstal Rive
Mail I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Section E SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22,2013


OME
CI


RONT
-TRIIS C<)OIINTY CHR)RONICIF RFAL EFSTATF


1 Sikorski's
LrAttic
PAGEE6


rLj II I) II


(.1
VTjlis'



:A


A bronzed ski
motif door
kn6cker from
Pottery Barn
' gives a chalet
look to the
outside ot the
house for the
, holidays.


t -/M --' .fjii '' =
,. ":. i-
T i
'A tt
IM
1 .7 .


T
i


,. : "; .!* j
.... ...."...::EE"
4
'= I; .
a"=.;.

U "= i.. =


hI!4b


1" 1 "' ""I '
i rl iy //


VI, 1;


, I /11


k /li.."' iJI; I I'N /,


N


f t 1'IT"
!"' i
\vJ b.d


I


n ", '
!'4 i'1
- 4
|I,

kisij f




E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I:1 Z' I Z I ; 1 1
(352)63 -8"
.......... ..Enter hOuse #50os




5008 MUSTANG
* Large Estate Home Gorgeous Kitchen
, Huge Lanai w/Hot Tub Salt Water Pool
, Family RMIGRIDR Open/Bright Layout
, In-Suite Apartment wLg. Bath *4-Car Gar
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
SEnrnu elliesullon' memnox nel
ww w.F lot idLuis ling Inloc oin
I I L1 0]


74 S. HARRISON
*2BR + Bonus Rm. Family Room
* Granite Counters Updated Kitchen
* Glassed Porch Fenced Backyard
* Great Condition Inground Pool
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1 F
FinulE eIuesuElon' memniox neE
www.Flotudaluslinglnlo.coIn


3621 N. TAMARISK AVE.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2BA/N1CG 1,923 SF Under Roof
* Living RM & Fam. RM -All New Windows
* Beautifully Updated and Maintained _
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


FENCED BACKYARD!
Close to 1/2 acre of land comes with this
3/2/2. Really big screened porch under
truss roof. And what a kitchen! Lots of
counter and cabinet space. Chef's delight.
Quiet spot.
JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200 A l
Email: jenniferiStollz@remax.net
www.CirusCounlyHomes.com








BRAND NEW
ON THE MARKET!
Adorable 2/1/1 home in the city limits. Central
water. Updated tile roof too. Prime location
backs up to Our Lady of Fatima. Gleaming
terrazzo floors. Family room.
JENNIFER STOLTZ (352) 637-6200 [
Email: jenniferSlolli@iremax.nel W
www.CitrusCounlyHomes.com


E ter .ous #6 17





4.5 ACRE CORNER LOT
WITH SKYLINE DOUBLEWIDE
*3 BR, 2 BATH W/DEN Large Carport
*1993 Built *Workshop/Outbuildings
* Huge Kitchen w/lsland Gas Fireplace
* Updated 40 Yr Shingles Updated HVAC
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 *
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


ALL IHIS H IU U511 LI ILk
Privacy personified with this move-in ready 3/2 2005
mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide open floor plan w/split
bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area,
covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. Al
appliances, window treatments and some furnishings
are included.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 171
Email: cnadal@remax.net JM








CITRUS HILLS
MOVE-IN CONDITION HOME
3BR/2BA custom built home on 1/2 acre. A total of
2,790 sq. ft. under roof, Pergo and tile flooring.
Formal living room plus family room. Split plan, master
suite with garden tub.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: barbarajmi s@eartlhfink.niot i


LAST YEAR'S PRICE!
Not looking for a fixer upper? Then take a peek at this
SWEET, move-in ready home in a pristine golf course
community before it gets away! New neutral ile, fresh
paint, updated kitchen, newer appliances, 14x16
master bedroom and large screened lanai. All this on
an extremely private, greenbelt lot!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sheryIlpotts@aol.comin
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com



II ......... ..... ..




LOOK WHAT SANTA
BROUGHT YOU:
3,000 s.f. of pure luxury in this decorator perfect 3/2.5/3-car
Mar. & office waterfront home. 100 ft. of shoreline, boat lift,
-zone AC/heat, generator hook up, plantation shutters,
kitchen open to fam. rm. w/gas fireplace, huge living area
screened lanai w/BBQ & sink. Call Santa's helper
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Efmain remaxgal22@yahoo.com



r'P-T I hiiJ:


r 7
C" "II 'ft I'*" B"



CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME
A total of 3,803 sq. ft. under roof in this
custom built 3BR/2BA pool home. Tile
floors, open floor plan with formal living
room and a great room. 2-car garage,
Move-in condition. [ i
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email.h barbaraisjmi s@arthlink.net ..


242 N. LeoIw.Ieel il 2-74 w.~4XcmI11US Hy 1NIvres6760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Hon s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsiaRvr7524


3 Bedrooms/3 En Suite Baths Smart Home Installed
31/2-Car Garage Salt Water Pool
*Hardwood and Tile Fireplace
*3-Zone HVAC Jacuzzi in Master
Call for complete list of upgrades!
A STEAL at $259,900
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 I
Email: sherylpots@faol.coin ul
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiing.coin


1519 N. FOXBORO LP.
MEADOWCREST
* 2BD/2BD/2CG Villa Maintenance Free
* Large Eat-In Kitchen Plus Formal Dining
* Split Bedroom Plan Large Master BDRM
* Great Community 2 Swimming Pools
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 1
(352) 527-7842 L I
(352) 422-3875


%rr


REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
J 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


V
2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


D




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ERA agent goes
for the gold
ERAAmerican Realty &
Invest-
ments is
proud to
announce
the latest
production
level f
achieved
by an Bobbi
agent of its DiLego
Beverly ERA American
Hills office Realty.
for 2013.
Bobbi DiLego has sur-
passed the $2 million mark
in closed sales volume in
2013.
She can be reached at the
Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-746-3600.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievement of this fine real
estate professional.
RE/MAX agents
join elite ranks
The associates and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One are


pleased to announce that
Barbara Mills and Cheryl
Nadal
have quali-
fied for the
prestigious
"100 Per-
cent Club"
award
from i
RE/MAX
Interna- Barbara
tional. Mills
Both RE/MAX
Barbara Realty One.
and Cheryl
have
joined the
ranks of
some of
the top
agents in
the
RE/MAX Cheryl
system. Nadal
Barbara is RE/MAX
a Realtor Realty One.
in the In-
verness RE/MAX office and
Cheryl works out of the Crys-
tal River office. Both of these
accomplished women are
veteran Realtors in the Cit-
rus County marketplace.


Help science- play a game


Garden creates app that turns

taxonomy into a game


DAVID HUNN
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST LOUIS Step aside,
Angry Birds. The next
round of mobile games
aims to addict its players
to obscure plant taxonomy
Sounds like fun, right?
Scientists across the
globe are hoping a game
being developed by the
Missouri Botanical Gar-
den will help them search
500 years and 42 million
pages of online plant and
animal books.
The Botanical Garden's
project aims its slingshot
at the nation's premier
public natural history
database, the Biodiversity
Heritage Library
Funded by a $450,000
federal grant, the Garden
is leading a team of re-
searchers from the New
York Botanical Garden,


Cornell and Harvard uni-
versities to construct a
computer game in which
players transcribe millions
of obscure and unrecog-
nizable words from within
the collection's pages.
"It's not just playing
Angry Birds," said Martin
R. Kalfatovic, program di-
rector at the biodiversity
library "It's playing Angry
Birds for a purpose."
Computer games are al-
ready aiding in serious
tasks. They help doctors
find break-through treat-
ments, addicts kick the
habit, girlfriends get over
boyfriends and universi-
ties prevent plagiarism.
The challenge, in this
case, is simple, but vast.
When agencies such as the
Missouri Botanical Gar-
den began to scan and dig-
itize historical texts more
than a decade ago, they


didn't have the time or
money to transcribe the
works.
That leaves scientists
with an online library that
they can't search well by
keyword.
Computer software has
helped. Programs convert
photos of the scanned
words into letters a com-
puter can recognize.
But some of the litera-
ture John Evelyn's Ac-
etaria, published in 1699,
for instance is nearly
impossible for a computer
to read accurately Eve-
lyn's Fs look like Ss. He
italicizes and capitalizes
mid-sentence. Smudges
quickly turn into extra
characters.
And he uses words such
as "fettl'd" and "fantasms,"
which the computer reads
as "lettl'd" and
"EvUafms," respectively
"They're using words
that we don't even use


today," said principal in-
vestigator Trish Rose-
Sandler, who works for the
Missouri Botanical Gar-
den's Center for Biodiver-
sity Informatics.
That's not to say the Bio-
diversity Heritage Library
isn't useful. International
scientists have written
pages of testimony to the
contrary
Chris Freeland, now an
associate librarian at
Washington University,
helped start the biodiver-
sity library while working
for the Botanical Garden,
and came up with the gam-
ing idea. He says botanists
rely on literature when
identifying and describing
plants they find in the
field.
Without the texts, they
may be uncertain whether
they've come across a rare
species, or a new one,

See GAME/Page Ell


Jackie CGaffney Jason Gaffney 7
Realtor', Realtor I 1
302-3179 A HOUSE 287-90
746-6700 SOLD Nae.
The Golden Girl WEEiKS REALTY, S BEVEMRLY HILLS BLVD.


ri i9i,


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


Great Buyer Incentives
Interest rates are still low
Sales have increased
Inventory has decreased
Winter residents are arriving!
WE OFFER
Complementary current market analysis
Aggressive marketing strategies
High internet exposure on our listings
Local knowledge and experience
Professionalism
WE ARE...
"THE MOST DIRECT LINE BETWEEN YOU AND A BUYER"
FOR YOUR FREE MARKET ANALYSIS CALL 352-795-9123


Real Estate DIGEST


BJ^H~l~lf^'^ _,, --- ', ~ ~ ~ n g'H~B- ttA --


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
Atastef unspednature secluded I,,,I ,, I I I
P IN E R ID G E ponds, mature oaktrees The 2 spacious i........ iI ........ I I ii i n I ... i , I , . ..
E S TA T E S positioned in a beautiful setting 1 .. 1.. .. I.i. 1 ..... ....... "
Elegant custom built 343 Pool ,, ,.... ... 800.000 piece waiting for you and your familyto move right
1. 1.. 1 d Dractive tour $5494 000 i
i i ,,, l i,, .h l 1.... I1
sphisiae lietyl
$469,000

I T A THE GLEN SOUTHERN STYLE COUNTRY ESTATE PLEASANT GROVE
IA 55+ community Enjoy mantenancefree PLANTATION HOME I 4511 sq ft est custom
ated in The Glen Custom built 4/3/2 on approx 10 ac in 5 acres MOL Exceptional
B A R T ... laundry, Cathedral wood quality vaulted tongue UNSPOILED NATURE
carpet and paint, fireplace Recently i rigs, fpl, granite counters adjacent to Honosassa/O hassahowitzka
it is in perfect conditionl Just unpack the impeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 cabinetry, fam rm den/office, 2+2 car Preserve & Otter Creek 2 parcels for a
B A R T H suitcase and relax Cose to shopping, dining r total of 19+ acre Scenic mixture of
REALTOR and edcal faciities $65,000 $379,000 $499.900 sawgrass and trees $59,00

Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.comn _.
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE!!! MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS.. juTSTAyDiNC WATERFRONT RESIDE4CE
-no a 2 master suites, apart 1- a1 0 2 30+f ,pcueqe Enjoy this 3/3/2 poolithome an a I acre I
ment lower le vel Upper level a 10x 0+f) pcueq car ner lat with mature oak trees and ..
accessible via elevator Pool, hurcn e setting with major oak trees Charming lots of prrvacyl Very well maintained,
Investors Realty i I ters, secuty system, update n firs docks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
kitchen & bathrooms 190 f f ngafitrsand fireplace still in ,Updated roof, A/C, kit,windows, every-
of Citrus County, Inc. seawaboat fl Everything jus thing metulous maintained Pred
o websiteat: ryflorida-houseco L watgryou $488,000 seawall $179,000 $169,000 sees nght at $399,000!


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E3


7K"oTE
LAIL^^WTOY'k,`B




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mortgage firm



strikes $2B deal



with 49 states


Biggest chunk

of money will go

to Florida

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Ocwen Finan-
cial Corp. will reduce struggling bor-
rowers' loan balances by $2 billion
in an agreement with federal regu-
lators and 49 states over foreclosure
abuses.
The Consumer Financial Protec-
tion Bureau and state attorneys gen-
eral announced the deal Thursday
with the Atlanta-based company, one
of the largest U.S. mortgage ser-
vicers. The regulators said Ocwen
pushed borrowers into foreclosure
through illegal actions, such as fail-
ing to promptly and accurately
credit mortgage payments.
The company also miscalculated
interest rates and charged borrow-
ers improper fees, the regulators
said.
"We believe that Ocwen violated
federal consumer financial laws at
every stage of the mortgage servic-
ing process," CFPB Director
Richard Cordray said in a confer-
ence call with reporters. "We have
concluded that Ocwen made trou-
bled borrowers even more vulnera-
ble to foreclosure."
Under the agreement, Ocwen also
will refund a combined $125 million
to about 185,000 borrowers who had
been foreclosed upon from 2009
through 2012. It also agreed to
change the way it manages mort-
gages. The company must stop
"robo-signing" of documents, the
practice of automatically signing off
on foreclosures without a proper
review
The agreement must be approved
by a federal court in Washington.


Ocwen said in a statement it was
pleased to have reached the
settlement
The agreement "is in alignment
with the same ultimate goals that we
share with the regulators to pre-
vent foreclosures and help strug-
gling families keep their homes," the
company said.
Ocwen is the fourth-largest mort-
gage service in the country and the
biggest that isn't a bank. It special-
izes in servicing high-risk
mortgages.
Servicing companies collect pay-
ments from borrowers and handle
customer services, loan modifica-
tions and foreclosures.
Federal and state regulators have
signed agreements with a number of
large banks and mortgage process-
ing companies over foreclosure
abuses.
Ocwen's compliance with the set-
tlement will be overseen by Joseph
A. Smith Jr, the monitor for the $25
billion settlement reached in Febru-
ary 2012 between the federal gov-
ernment and the states and five
major banks -Ally Financial, Bank
of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan
Chase and Wells Fargo.
The housing crisis struck starting
in 2007, as home values sank and
millions of borrowers defaulted on
their mortgages.
The crisis brought more than 4
million foreclosures. Some mort-
gage-servicing companies had
processed foreclosures without ver-
ifying documents.
The CFPB, 49 states and the Dis-
trict of Columbia signed the agree-
ment with Ocwen. Oklahoma is the
only state that isn't participating.
The largest share of the mortgage
relief, an estimated $342 million, is
expected to go to Florida. The state's
attorney general, Pam Bondi, said
during the conference call that
Florida has the highest foreclosure
rate in the U.S.


laundry, private deck & boat dock. 5450 S Withlapopka
$89,900 #705811 Jean Cassese tel:352-201-7034


THE BANK HAS GONE BONKERS This PineRidge BRING YOUR SKILLS & DRILLS... PROJECT ALERT!
SHome won't last long at this price 3/2/2, 2001 w/1510 1996 3/2 home in Floral City view of water. In need of
Living. Side entry garage, screen porch, vaulted ceilings and repairs. Features rear attached carport, screened porch, eat
More. $119,900 #704268 in kitchen. #707203 $34,900 Tomika Spires Hanssen
Tomika Spires Hanssen tel:352-586-6598 tel:352-586-6598


E4SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Doorway color can take home from fizzle to sizzle


Associated Press

When Tracy Proctor
Williamson bought her
house in Larchmont, N.Y,
a year ago, it was "just a
kind of dark and sad-
looking building."
The front door and trim
were a depressing "yucky
cream color," says
Williamson. The town as-
sessor categorized the ar-
chitecture of the two-story
brick home simply as "old
style."
Since then, Williamson
has tried to bring the house
back to life, most notably by
boosting its mood with a
sun-kissed yellow front
door. "At first I was horri-
fied because I thought the
neighbors would hate me,"
she says. "But I like it. It
makes me feel really good."
Painting the front door a
color that packs a punch is
one of the quickest and
easiest ways to change a
house's look and help it
stand out from the rest
"It's the difference be-
tween choosing classic red
or something that has a lit-
tle bit of fuchsia in it -
something more like the
color you love," says Kate
Smith, a Newport, RI.,
color consultant.
"Just that little bit of


color can give you the lift
that makes everything look
better"
Smith whose job in-
cludes advising everyone
from paint companies to the
film industry on color
choices -says homeowners
like Williamson are making
the right move by making
bland front doors bold. As
the entryway to your home,
a front door should be an at-
tention-getter, she says.
"You want it to be the
focal point," she says. Em-
phasizing the front door
can "improve the look of
the entire house."
Smith tells people sell-
ing their homes that if they
"can't do anything else, put
some time and energy into
your front door"
The trick, however, is
getting it right; it can be a
fine line between bold,
eye-catching color and
neon that looks better on
paper than on doors or
walls.
Smith advises choosing a
front-door color that jibes
with your home's other
features, starting with the
style and color of the roof
The colors of fixed fea-
tures, such as window
grids, as well as trim and
shutters should also be
considered. So should a


home's architectural style.
Derek Fielding, who
oversees product develop-
ment for the door manu-
facturer Therma-Tru, sees
a trend toward colorful
front doors and spiced-up
entryways.
"People don't want that
cookie-cutter look that
comes with having the same
door that's on everybody
else's house," Fielding says.


Besides adding color,
homeowners are opting
for doors with different
textures, more ornamental
detail and decorative
glass, he says.
"It's all about curb ap-
peal and perceived value,"
Fielding says. "If you look
at a neighborhood and
every house has a six-
panel door that is black,
the one that is painted red


is going to pop."
Smith says the most pop-
ular front-door colors this
year among homeowners
who want to make a state-
ment are tropical blues, vi-
brant oranges, violet,
mustards and plums.
Those who want to perk
things up but stay more
subdued are choosing
blues a notch brighter than
navy, warm reds and clas-


sic grays, she says.
Williamson worried ini-
tially that painting her
door bright yellow was
going to make her house
"look like a bumblebee,"
but that in fact "the lemon
yellow is really nice," par-
ticularly on gray days.
"I just decided that if
some people don't like it, I
don't care," Williamson
says. "It makes me happy"


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 7
BROKERASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR |

4A r


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SUNDER CONSTRUCTION 1
5406 N. CROSSGATE
3/2/3 706628 $299,000


1974 W. ALHAMBRA
3/2/2 705787 $108,000


BANK OWNED-SUGARMILL WOODS BANK OWNED-INVE-RNESS, FL
2004 3BR/2BA/3 Car garage with formal Highlands 3BR/2BA/2 Car Garage. Laminate
dining & office. $142,900 MLS#707187 flooring. $62,900 MLS#704181




BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL REGENCY PARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
4BR/3BA home with over 3,000 sq. ft of living 2BR/2BA condo with Fl rm. Laminate flooring.
in Sugarmill Woods. $150,000 MLS#702836 1 car garage. $79,900 MLS#706979
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 #-
After Hours 2) 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitmrusrealty.com


I-W

522 S. JACKSON N. WADSWORTH 48 S. HARRISON 521 5. MONROE
2/1/1 706595 $56,900 3/1.5 704088 $52,500 2/1 707029 $49,000 2/1/1 707140 $69,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E5




E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
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CIk(ONICLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
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for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


In humid Florida,


mold always a threat


Be sure to seal surfaces to stop infestation


ast summer and fall were noted for Grass clippings and leaves are regu-
frequent rains and heavy morning larly blown off the stained driveway The
dews. In November, upon returning only black rubber tire tracks are from
to their Citrus Springs winter turning the tractor and lawn
home, snowbirds Myrna and mower tires too sharply Tire
Enrique found their concrete marks on the sealed drive
driveway covered in black wash off with soapy water
mold. They called me to ask for When I returned home from
advice. an eight-week trip last Novem-
Two years ago, I had reme- ber, I found fuzzy black mold in
died the same problem by huge colonies on the front con-
power washing to blast away create sidewalk, large limerock
the fungus. That had etched boulders, concrete statuary
the concrete driveway surface, and planters none of which
roughening it slightly My Jane Weber had ever been sealed. The
neighbor then helped me seal JANE'S stained, sealed driveway had
the clean driveway with an no mold. There was a faint,
opaque, penetrating water- GARDEN gray blush of mold on the col-
based stain. I mixed the white ored concrete patio pavers
base color to concoct a pleasing ivory that had been clear-sealed a year ago.
shade. The stain had to cure for three The patio pavers were promptly blasted
days before driving on it A week later, we clean, allowed to dry and given two coats
applied a second coat and let that cure
three more days. See JANE/Page E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Cabin impressions
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Armchair carving could represent Roman god Bacchus


ear John: I have a inches in height. The clos-
question about the est I could come to artist
artist of this folk art identification is was possi-


picture. Can you
tell me where I
would be able to
find more infor-
mation on the
artist and hope-
fully a value on
his paintings?if
It is a beautiful
Vietnamese folk
art painting ti-
tled "Wind Mill" John S
by Chen Wei SIKOI
Xhong. The
painting was pro- AT
fessionally
framed by Fred Reed Pic-
ture Framing Inc. of At-
lanta, Georgia in 1958. They
are still in business.
The dimensions are 27
inches in length and 26


i
1


bly Chang Wei
Zhong, born in
1937, and a grad-
uate of Tienjing
Art Institute. He
B^'. *'" has taught paint-
ing at the Tien-
jing Art
Association since
1985 and is a
member of the
korski Chinese Art As-
SKI'S sociation and
SChina Folk Art
c Association
among others.
His exhibits have been se-
lected worldwide. In 2002,
his paintings hung in the
United States embassy in
China.
I would appreciate and


information you can give
me. -B.L, Internet
Dear B.L.: I was not able
to find any track record for
the artist Chen Wei Xhong.
Lark Mason specializes in
Oriental antiques and has
made regular appearances
on the Antiques Roadshow
on PBS.
His auction company is
iGavel Auctions. The web-
site is www.igavel
auctions.com. I suggest you
contact them about your
picture. Good luck.

See ATTIC/Page E15
Purportedly an example of
Vietnamese folk art, this
piece, titled "Wind Mill,"
was done by an artist iden-
tified as Chen Wei Xhong.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E7


Average US mortgage


rate rises to 4.47 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Average U.S.
rates for fixed mortgages rose
slightly this week but remained near
historically low levels.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the rate on the 30-year
loan increased to 4.47 percent from
4.42 percent last week. The average
on the 15-year fixed loan rose to 3.51
percent from 3.43 percent.
Mortgage rates peaked at 4.6 per-
cent in August and have stabilized
since September, when the Federal
Reserve surprised markets by tak-
ing no action on starting to reduce
its $85 billion-a month bond pur-
chases. The Fed decided this week
that the outlook for the economy ap-
peared strong enough for it to re-
duce the monthly bond purchases
starting in January by $10 billion.



JANE
Continued from Page E6

of Seal-Krete sealer on consecutive
dry afternoons. The sealer went on
milky white, showing where it was
applied. It dried clear and bright-
ened the colors slightly It comes in
natural or wet look.
The mold grew because of the
high humidity frequent rains, morn-
ing dews and fog plus extra irriga-
tion to get the winter ryegrass seed
established. Mold must have mois-
ture, a rough or porous surface to
grow on, and food. Dust, pollen and
the tiniest organic debris that set-
tled on the horizontal surfaces and
in the pores of the limerock and ce-
ment were food enough for mold. To
prevent mold growing, keep sur-
faces blown clear of dust and debris,
and eliminate the source of excess
moisture. Seal surfaces so moisture
cannot penetrate.
A natural decomposer, mold re-
produces and spreads by micro-
scopic spores wafted on air
currents. Mild infestations can be
cleaned with soapy water Mold is
killed by chlorine bleach and the
color removed, but the dead mold


The purchases are designed to
keep long-term rates such as mort-
gage rates low
A government report issued
Wednesday showed that U.S.
builders broke ground on homes in
November at the fastest pace in more
than five years, strong evidence that
the housing recovery is accelerating
despite higher mortgage rates.
Data from the National Associa-
tion of Realtors released Thursday
showed the number of people who
bought existing homes last month
declined for the third straight month
as higher mortgage rates made
home-buying more expensive. In ad-
dition, the lingering impact of the
partial government shutdown in Oc-
tober may have deterred some sales.
Still, the Realtors' association proj-
ects that total U.S. home sales this
year will be 5.1 million.

remains as food for the next infesta-
tion. Wear a mask, gloves and rubber
boots when handling toxic chemi-
cals. Most outdoor molds are not
toxic, just unsightly and slippery
Myrna and Enrique came to ex-
amine my stained driveway and re-
juvenated patios. Over a bottle of
wine, we discussed the procedure to
rectify their mold problem and pre-
vent it in the future. They bought
seven gallons of driveway sealer at
the home improvement store and
had it tinted to complement their
house colors. Enrique power
washed his extra-large drive and
parking area and let it dry thor-
oughly Then the couple rolled on
one coat of penetrating stain. I vis-
ited one Saturday evening after the
Dunnellon Christmas parade to ad-
mire their driveway renovation. We
toasted the DIY project with glasses
of wine.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. corn.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


,1 4 9 79


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


1319 W Diamond Shore Loop
MLS 706998 $294,900
Pool home w/2100+sf living space;
3 Bdrms + Den.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787
NEW LISTING


5606 W Dayflower Path
MLS 707211 $199,900
Impeccable 4/3/3 w/solar heated pool.
Xeriscaped yards.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
m WiiA '


Tor..d 405278 W Yua I
Imagine this...spending next Christmas
here on this huge lanai! Let's make it
happen.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952






S 1708 W Sprinq Meadow Lp
MLS 705820 $94,900
Move-in ready, maintenance free
2/3.5/1 Townhome.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013
gilla ..* 1S 1. si..an lal


40 Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
Open 7 Days
AWeekld Properties
NEW LISTING


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
NEW LISTING
re


ljiJU$ l141 E Liberty St t -
-44 MLS 707281 $294,900 00L 1657 W Skyview Crossing Dr
Views of Oaks GC 18th fairway w/this MLS 707198 $229,900
3/2/3 pool home. 3/2 home situated on a premium homesite.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


yr~

S~4


U=-"flCa^ 2772 N Crosswater Path
MLS 702222 $995,000
Custom built home w/views of
The Ranch Course.
Jodie Holder 352-302-2036



rk ..ntBfc K --y'


S 184 E Ireland Cl
MLS 704600 $248,000
Oaks Golf Course Home-3/2/2 + office +
golf cart garage.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


810 EGillchrist C128 4B
MLS 704927 $80,000
Must see! Totally updated 2bd/2.5ba
Townhome- call today!
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


. ID T *9


-In,
JZ067 4141 W Hacienda Dr
SMLS 705887 $399,000
Nearly 6 acre equestrian estate;
3/2/2 pool home.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


Really nice 3/2/3 pool home.
Lots of "extras".
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


!AS L" M 2392 N Loma P1
/. MLS 358186 $49,500
Bright, clean, spacious rms; 2bd/2ba
mobile home in 55+ community.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


numuw uylr/illcur 012 Ui1yi alrm--
III II.llIi III II I I HI i ,I 11 lh I II II I I I ,, , ,

S 0. S - SOpe -i1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A retro-styled image of an alpine ski tram on
the cover of a throw pillow from Pottery Barn.


Cozy comfort.


Add a rustic flair this season to ward off those winter blues


KIM COOK
Associated Press
Stores are full of colorful ornaments and
sparkly decor that set the Plaid ornaments
holiday tone with glamour from Target
and panache. But there's evoke a
also decor for those who prefer to rustic cabin
welcome the season with more theme.
homespun serenity. i
Many of these items refer-
ence nature with quiet win-
try hues and rustic textures.
You can imagine fireplaces Aot e
ablaze, skis and skates at the r Associated
ready and cozy lodges set up for Press
holiday gatherings.
"We love all the adorable woodland-themed
decorations on everything from pillows and
throws to ornaments and tableware," says HGTV


Magazine's Sara Peterson.
Collections of these creatures deer, foxes,
bears and so on are available in any number of
crafted forms: bottlebrush squirrels, raccoons and
hedgehogs at Pottery Barn,
Sfaux fur and fiber owls and
I moose at West Elm.
I (wwwpotterybarn. com;
www.westelm.com)
"- ..... Plaid mitten, heart and
7 Target's Smith & Hawken
holiday collection.
^ W(www.targetcom)
W '"Advent garlands are
popular this year too. Garlands with fabric
pouches that count down to Christmas, or a string
of colorful envelopes," notes Peterson.


See Page EO10


ESSUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The ANNBRITT
collection from
Ikea includes
comfy plaid
bedding
ensembles
and chunky
knit throws.
Associated Press


I I


I I
I it


i ,,,A ji AMERICAN
Lou I ME R 1RIAITY 9 INVISTMINTS
"O ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511 N. -ecano Hwy.
-d cell: (5FLR. 34465
L Cell: (352) 697.1685 352q46-360O

FATUE ISIG


AI Antni "AMERICAN
AI M IUIiII Realto ER 1 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU' 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
220, ,3~l Q AO y o. ce:Beverly Hills, FL 34465|
Cell: (352) 220-8143 Office: 352-746-3600
10 alantoni@era.com 1


4091 N BRIDGE DR. BEVERLY HILLS
3/3/3, 2007 Custom Built H
Home. Almost 2,700 Sq Ft sa,
Living space, Beautifully
Landscaped 1.6 ac. Corner o
lot, Pine Ridge Golf Course
Community.30 x 42
Detached Garage/Craft room
with AC/Heat. Salt water pool,
Whole house generator.
Much, much more! Move in ready. MLS#706659 $364,900
2234 W BEGONIA DR. BEVERLY HILLS
3/2.5/2 2006 Built Home,
Almost 2300 sq ft living space,
Features a Large kitchen, Family
room, Office/Den, Dining room
split floor plan, Screened in pool
with Spa, All on a 1 acre lot. Move
in ready. Separate well for
irrigation. Near Pine Ridge Golf
Course. MLS#707277
$239,900


...........................


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E9




E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


COZY
Continued from Page E8

German designer Irmi
Black makes a knitted-mitten
Advent garland; small treats
can be tucked in each mitten
and the garland can be used
as an organizer after the holi-
days. Target's Threshold Rus-
tic Advent Calendar is a
veritable mini-cabin, com-
plete with tiny drawers
printed with snowflakes, trees
and seasonal patterns.
(www. etsy. c o min/shop/
irmiblack)
If you're crafty, consider
making your own garland.
Stamp kits, swatches of fabric
and felt, and a ball or two of
wool will set you on your way
(www.michaels.com;
wwwjoann.com)
A collection of wooden
trees to decorate a tabletop or
mantel can be found at Home-
goods, as well as some cozy
Fair Isle-patterned throws
with a ski chalet vibe.
(www.homegoods.com)
Fill large clear hurricanes


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


with tin jingle bells, birch
branches or white painted
twigs, or make a non-edible
version of holiday trifle with
layers of faux snow or moss
and tiny red ornaments.
Arhaus has pillar candles
in cream and dove gray that
are carved to look like cable-
knit sleeves.
Felted throw pillows em-
broidered with deer, rabbits
and other forest friends add
charm. Find chunky knit
throws here, too. (www
arhaus.com)
North Pole flannel bedding
from Garnet Hill depicts
Santa's snowy home complete
with cocoa stands, reindeer
barns and sled shops. Ikea's
Annbritt collection includes
woolly blankets, plaid cush-
ions and duvet covers in rich
reds. (www.garnethill.com;
www.ikea.com)
Or evoke the chalet vibe
with canoe and lumberjack
ornaments. The old camp
standard Stanley Thermos is
updated in green, red or ivory
- perfect for skating or sled-
ding parties. (wwwwestelm.
com)


Artist Rachel Kozlowski's
imaginative plates have found
a following beyond her
Etsycom fans; she's featured
at West Elm this season with a
collection of Dapper Animal
plates: bears with trapper
hats, owls in plaid shirts and
other whimsical designs. At
her Etsy shop, a plate features
a moose emerging from a
woodsy plaid background.
(www. etsy. c o m/shop/
RKArtwork)
If you'd like to take the
chalet theme in a more literal
direction, consider decorating
with actual skis and snow-
boards. The artwork on many
snowboards has great graphic
oomph.
Use a board as the focal
point for a mantel display,
adding ornaments or pine rope
to reference the holidays.
(www.ridesnowboards.com;
www.k2snowboarding.com)
Or consider a bronze-fin-
ished ski door knocker or a
retro-style "Ski Lift" sign, as
well as ski tourism posters
and throw pillows with 1940s-
era, ski-resort postcard art.
(wwwpotterybarn.com)


Color experts: Orchid


chosen as top hue for 2014


Associated Press

NEW YORK Orchid is growing
on us: Aversion of the purple hue is
Pantone Inc.'s color of the year for
2014.
It follows this year's pick of emer-
ald green.
Officially known as Radiant Or-
chid, the tropical shade is a color-
wheel contrast to green, said
Leatrice Eiseman, executive direc-
tor of the Pantone Color Institute,
but it's not the red that would have
been a more obvious choice. "It's a
little different, it's a little off the
beaten path, and it's not a primary
color," she explains. "It's an invita-
tion to innovation. The purple fam-
ily offers (an) opportunity to do
creative things."
And, she said, that's what pop
culture wants right now "People
associate purple with creativity
and originality and those are
very valued today We see words
like that being used to describe


technologies and products that are
seen as innovative and with an ap-
proach you haven't tried before."
Pantone sets color standards for
commercial use by design
industries.
Eiseman expects people will
take to it quickly because it's a flat-
tering color for many skin tones
and complementary neutral colors,
but it will also look like something
people haven't seen in a while.
That should work in an economy
that's uncertain not totally up,
not fully down. "This is an opportu-
nity to look at what you've already
got in your closet and add to it. It
will feel like the right amount of
change."
The runways and red carpet have
already had a few orchid moments,
and Eiseman notes it's a color that
first lady Michelle Obama often
wears. Even menswear has seen
hints of it, with Salvatore Ferrag-
amo and Ermengildo Zegna incor-
porating it into ties and trims.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GAME
Continued from Page E3

among other issues.
Before the works were compiled
online, biologists would have to
travel to the appropriate library -
sometimes across the planet-
spend thousands of dollars and pore
through books to find the first men-
tions of a particular animal or plant.
The biodiversity library has be-
come the largest and most success-
ful online natural history collection,
Freeland said, and one of the most
important tools botanists use, li-
brary director Kalfatovic added.
Still, a thorough search requires
reading each electronic page of a
given book.
But transcribing every volume in
the growing collection, Rreeland said,
is impossible. If it took three minutes
to transcribe a page, for example, re-
typing 42 million of them would take
one worker more than 1,000 years to
finish, without a vacation.
"There's no way the math works,"
Freeland said.
To solve the problem, the Botani-
cal Garden and its collaborators
made a pitch to the national Insti-
tute of Museum and Library Serv-
ices that crowd-sourcing, through
mobile or online computer games,
could solve the translation problem.
This fall, the Feds awarded them
the grant, matched by the collabora-
tors. The Garden is kicking in labor
worth $265,000.
Rose-Sandier, the Garden's prin-
cipal investigator, said she hoped to


Maura Marx, a deputy director for the
Institute of Museum and Library Services, said
managers of other large databases were already
looking to the biodiversity library as a model.


send requests for proposals to gam-
ing companies early in December
She estimates the game will launch
in May 2015.
It will almost certainly involve word
puzzles, in which players identify let-
ters in images pulled from the texts. It
will probably have an element of com-
petition points for right answers,
for instance. And it may have a simple
story line, such as bridge-building to
get animals to safety
"But who knows?" Rose-Sandier
said. "It'll be interesting to see what
the companies come up with."
There's only one non-negotiable:
The game should attract a lot of play-
ers. Because the library has no "an-
swers" to the word problems they
present to players, the collaborators
will glean correct responses based
on how often users type in the same
letters. And that means many people
have to answer each question.
Rose-Sandier say they're hoping
the game appeals to scientists who
use the library, as well as to families
waiting in the grocery store line.
"Whether or not they understand
the purpose of the task, it almost
doesn't matter," she said.
Maura Marx, a deputy director for
the Institute of Museum and Library
Services, said managers of other
large databases were already look-
ing to the biodiversity library as a


model. The project has a depth and
breadth, she said, that she hasn't
often seen come across her desk.
Researchers such as Hong Cui, at
the University of Arizona, and Jen-
nifer Hammock, with a collaborative
housed at the Smithsonian in Wash-
ington, are hopeful it works.
Cui, an associate professor, said
one of the major challenges in biol-
ogy right now was connecting genes
to physical traits, something difficult
to do without accurate text searches.
Hammock, who works for the En-
cyclopedia of Life, said the effort
could nearly double the number of
species with original text references
on their home pages.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$12 million closed by December 20, 2013.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
To Learn More
(352) 746-9924 S--


"This will be a really big deal on
our site for people who are interested
in obscure organisms," she said.
Nathan Verrill, CEO of local game
developer Megatherium Labs, is in-
terested in bidding on the project.
He imagines harnessing the 325 mil-
lion U.S. cellphone users.
But he cautions that it won't be
easy The sweets-matching Candy
Crush Saga is a billion-dollar game
for a reason: It is deceptively clever
"The secret, to me, is creating a
casual experience," he said. "If I
have a few minutes, I can play"


I "=-'- s--- ...g. ___-| 'BI ^r -":ZE--, Ia
SANTA'S SPECIAL GIFT! NEVER ENDING UPGRADES!
S3+office/2.5/3 with 3078 sq ft of living 3+office/2/3 custom built home
SPool with pavered lanai and deck 2782 sq ft of living set on 2 lots
SGranite island stainless steel NewAC/heat in 2009
SCherry cabinetry pull out drawers Pavered driveway and walkway
SElectric fireplace in the family room Dual pane windows well for yard
SOak hardwood flooring in living areas Conrian kitchen with pantry
Furniture available separately Octagonal bay design Florida room
Home warranty for the buyers Home warranty for the buyers
#704573 $329,900 #706836 $234,700
See .Virtual .IIIrs@..i re.I sIJ lIJ.II..I IIB.I..m


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of submit-
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better chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
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* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
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* Photos and stories are published as space is available. The Chronicle
cannot guarantee placement on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by
fax at 352-563-3280; or by email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY!!! J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE
Easy distance to shopping center ** SNOWBIRDS "|Bl5 1645WestMainSlreetlnvemess, FL34450
DREAM!! 2 BR, 1 BA Large kitchen appliances ,iT .f -- -,. ,.- ,.,
included Lots of storage. Large bedrooms Family ff ,l T,- -.
roomwithfireplace* LOCATIONWILLSELL THISHOME!!! I r _. ,nr._.r n,,.. "r,: -r -. .. ( -r_ ,
MLStt704463 $49,900.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 Ell





E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I::AUIII-ULLT ArruiN I IU 41L.0lZ t.UUN I KY IIuivi on a ioveiy private
acre. Every upgrade and extra lovingly added with no expense spared.
Soaring ceilings, country dormers, cook's dream kitchen with every possible
convenience. Bonus room or 4th bedroom upstairs with its own 1/2 bath.
Fabulous storage throughout, huge porch and lanai for great for entertaining.
This home will exceed your every expectation! Whole house generator too!
MLS #705002, Call today for your private tour! 352-637-3800



Chronicle
In ^III


CAROLE LISTER
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor E,
Sell: 422-4620 ...
ELRA Office: 382-1700


A"4


~2I


I 3/3/3+ uen + -amilyrm Goltcourse *3/2/2 ool
* Island kitchen Heated pool Lg eat-in kitchen New appliances
* New roof & paint New tile & carpet Family room Walk-in wet bar
#701382 $254,900 #707215 $170,000


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Executive Office Suites
New Constr auction Class "A" Office

Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Cri ystal River

Call (352) 795-7007


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
*k 1 bedroom 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

INVERNESS
(Deerwood) 2/1
SWMH, $475, 1st, last,
Sec. quite area, clean,
utility rm/screen rm, no
pets 352-746-1600




Dblwd. 3BR, 2BA, Split,
2 Car Carport, steel
roof, caged inground
pool, on 1 ACRE,
Castlelake, No Fees
$65,900 352-597-7353


Floral City 12x56 MH
2/br, 1/2 ba on 80x152
ft lot.$21,000. Fixer 'er
up. (352) 726-8873
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985

NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Homes
2014 Models are here!
$8,500 Pre-
Construction Savings
John Lyons (
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details





RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807


USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/ VA
352-795-1272
Inverness, Jungle
Camp Area 2Br/1Ba
SW w/ 2 rms added
on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge
lot close to river. Just
$10,000, 352-400-4196

-I"I

2BR/1 BA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124


55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer,
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984

Homosassa 55+ Park
2BR/1BA. Newly re-
modeled w/ new
stove & refrig. New
8x8 shed.$295 lot rent.
$6,000 (608) 921-5564

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090












.I.C
[333;N.1 Croft A1 venuIe

InvrnesFL 45

352-341-4663


S-ACTION

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
wwwC.Ol[isontyHo eRnitIa[lsltom
CITRUS SPRINGS
9869 N Angela Dr.............. $800
3/2/2 Nice locolaon 1254 sq ft
8410 N Elkcam Blvd............ $800
3/2/1 New listing!
6973 N Gkladstone Dr.......... $875
3/2/2 Spit floor plan 1515 sq ft.
HOMOSASSA
4 Shumard Ct S ............... $1,250
3/2.5/2 SMW pool home
2200 sq ft. REDUCED
7650 W Homnosassa TrI .......$500
2/1 nice duplex
3785 S Sandpiper Terr......... $675
3/2 cozy home 860 sq ft.
7396 W Green Acres............ $700
3/2 DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE
INVERNESS/HERNANDO
1304 Claynore St (lInv).$9.......00
3/2/2 Lovely pool home REDUCED
5164 N Dewey Way (Her).....$700
3/2 Nice DW mobile on 1/2 ACRE




Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $1,100. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
jcusokfor ou

3/2/2new paint/new flooring.$875
3/2/2 p00ool..................$1000
2/1.5 townhome.........$550
3/2 townhome............$750

2/1.5/1 .........................$650
3/2 ...............................$700
2/2/1 ............................$650

2/2/1 ............................$850

2/2 Mobile ................$575
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
!Property Manager/
.Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010






FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, All Util. Incl',d.
$575 mo + Sec.,
352-634-5499



SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD

GIN,


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442 (352)
637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Em-
ployer."


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


r





CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incd Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




CRYSTAL RIVER
Commercial Bldg. for
Rent High Traffic
location on 44 Next to
manatee Lanes, 6,000
sf., Avail. Immediately
352-584-9496/464-2514




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Carport, Extra
Clean. (352) 613-4459
Homosassa-
Riverhaven, Waterfront
Villa 2/2/2 $1,000 mo.
Call Nancy Wilson
352-422-4137
Waybright Real Estate




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm,
Move in $1350, Be in by
Christmas, 442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/carport. CHA, $535.
Mo.+ $500. Dep
352-249-6098/249-6505
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1+ Florida Room,
106 S. Fillmore $550.
mo. 352-422-2798
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 Spacious,
open concept.
$800/mo, 1 st+ dep
(352) 302-0229
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723




CRYSTAL RIVER
A Bit of Paradise
Studio on Lake Russo
boarding bird sanctu-
ary, large Studio, w/
cath. ceilings, priv.
dock & boat launch,
great Bass fishing, di-
rect TV, wifi., laun. rm.
all util. paid, Only $750
Ref. needed. Call
Mike (575) 613-3729
Leave message

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


SNOWBIRD
RETREAT
3 bed 1-1/2 bath home
w/new carpet/paint/tile
on canal leading to Halls
River. Private fishing.
$750 mo. 1 st/last/sec.
Negotiable
352-400-2490
352-419-2437




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
3,200 Sf. kitchen ready
up to code, Ig. parking
lot. 1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514





INVERNESS
Female Rmmate to
share 2/2/2 condopool
w/d $475/mo. first &
last req'd 352-344-2752





64 Westview, Panacea,
FL.32346 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Hardwood
floors,recently remod-
eled,2 sheds, 2 car-
ports. $60K.Off Otter
Lake Rd. 850-962-3336

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R/WMK
REALTY ONE

BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785

Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EO!u4 nOUSING
OPPO.TyJf




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.comn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


MEDICAL OFFICE
FIOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan
Million Dollar +
Producer!
Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com





For Sale ,,.1,
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290



MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage florida room
furnished or not
Lots of upgrades
Executor now accepting
offers
502/693-7904




Duval Island
Very nice clean, turn.
starter or retire home.
2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility
room w/ shower. No
flood zone. Reduce to
$46,900 352- 678-7145





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Hoe

4BR/111 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MW.
REALTY ONE


IAMII SL;UI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!





For Sale'.K
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lots of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

tS=1Hu1


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
NEED LISTINGS
Sold All Of Mine
Market is good
Call me for Free
CMA
I also have some
Owner Financing
Available for buyers
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office











BETTY J,
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments
w CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash-
352-503-3245

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

THE SNOWBIRDS
ARE COMING! **
NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattp
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.











MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855



Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifieds!


Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com






"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Owner Financing
10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007
Homes of Merit, $135k
Call Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
352-302-6082




BUSHNELL
Estate Sale
Custom Built 3/2/2 w/
40X60 2 story garage.
8471 County Rd 614A
To view & more info
(352) 569-1252




Inverness Village 55+
Comm. Unit 108. 1st fir,
2BR/2BA, new Lanai &
Lam, ceramic floors.
$49,500. Financing
Consider 352 564-4100
Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993

Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712


Hme


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E13


CirsCut


Hoe

"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists









Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor










ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty








SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Prooerties.com
"To view
my properties"



Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $18,000
obo 352-568-2810

ffm^^f
** 5 ACRES **
On Paved Rd w/
power. $59,900
E Shady Nook CT
Floral City
(860) 526-7876



Citrus Co. Minutes to
gulf. Series of islands
called Ozello Keys.
Middle of FL State
Preserve. Live off the
land. Food/Garden
Protein/salt water.
Sacrafice @ $44,900
727-733-0583




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mow, mow, mow your goat



Enthusiasts tout grazing animals as environmentally friendly form of lawn care equipment


KAREN CERNICH
Washington Missourian

LESLIE, Mo. -What do
you think of when you
think of goats petting
zoos, probably, but possibly
milk, cheese, maybe meat
(it's popular in a lot of eth-
nic dishes). But what about
land maintenance?
If you've been around
goats even a little bit,
you're aware that they will
eat almost anything- even
the bark off of a tree, if
given enough time.
Brian Gansereit, a
farmer in Leslie, describes
them as "God-given eating
machines," but he doesn't
see that ability as a bad
thing. In fact, he's creating
a service business around
it.
Beginning next spring,
Gansereit Farms Goat
Grazing will use goats and
modern portable electric
fencing to clear
vegetation from overgrown
properties.
This environmentally
friendly company will spe-


L.


* covered lanai.. ai miBs & more simir


cialize in clearing urban,
suburban and rural prop-
erties in Missouri and sur-
rounding states.
Gansereit is well aware
that many established
farmers think he's crazy,
but the use of goats to clear
overgrown areas is nothing
new There are other busi-
nesses doing the same
thing to much success in
other places around the
country
There are a number of
benefits to using goats to
clear overgrown land and
invasive species, beginning
with the fact that it is 100
percent natural and cre-
ates no pollution, said
Gansereit
Herbicides pollute the
soil and water, machinery
is loud and emits toxic
fumes and removing vege-
tation by hand is extremely
hard work.
Goats, on the other hand,
can navigate steep hills
and other areas that are
hard or impossible to reach
with heavy machinery, said
Gansereit. And they are


THERE IS ROOM
FOR EVERYONE IN
THIS LOVELY HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thru to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool,
g on .73acre. Room for the whole family


I here. MLS 705163
ASKING $195,000
Zechariah 4:6 OOOGYP,


ideal for clearing an over-
grown area that may have
hidden dangers, like cinder
blocks or old tires.
"It's going to be a bad day
if you find those the hard
way" he remarked.
But perhaps the best
thing about using goats to
clear invasive species, like
poison ivy, is that their
method eliminates the
plant growing there for
good. It won't grow back.
"The way their jaws are
and their teeth, they break
down the seed so every-
thing they're taking out that
you don't want the this-
tle and the poison ivy -
they are grinding those
seeds apart, so when they
come out the back end,
they're not replanting


them," said Gansereit.
"But there are some
plant species, like thistle,
that are going to take a cou-
ple of applications to really
get it taken care of."
Before getting into the
goat business, Gansereit
and his father, Gary, owned
the Kreig Haus hobby shop
that was located on Main
Street in Downtown Wash-
ington for several years.
Gary passed away in 2011.
Over the years, Brian
Gansereit also did other
various other kinds of
work. He served in the
Army, like his father, from
1993 to '97, and then served
in the Army National
Guard 2001-2006.
His idea to start a goat
grazing business developed


from an interest in sustain-
able agriculture and the
clean/slow food movement
evolved from having a fa-
ther with diabetes and a
wife employed as a per-
sonal trainer
"It just kind of made
sense," said Gansereit, who
has a certification in nutri-
tion consulting. "I'm one of
those kinds of people who
when they start research-
ing something, can't let it
go."
That's come full circle
with the goats.
To get some firsthand ex-
perience working with
goats, Gansereit found


work on a farm in Leslie
just minutes from his
house where they raise
Boer goats for meat
Boer goats were bred in
South Africa. They were
brought to United States in
the '80s, said Gansereit,
mainly to Texas.
"They are a little more
accustomed to a drier cli-
mate, but they've been a
very popular breed in
America."
The farm where he
works has about 30-plus
goats, and in the beginning
Gansereit couldn't tell any
of them apart Now he calls
them each by name.


'*Foreclosure List***
2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706156 REDUCED $57,500 705705 REDUCED $144,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939

4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $157,900 705665 REDUCED $229,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
705223 REDUCED $77,900 705093 REDUCED $82,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 704264 3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon
REDUCED $94,900 705142 REDUCED $114,900
Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939 John Maisel 352-302-5351

LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in Brentwood Villa 3/2/2
Dunnellon 705087 $119,900 704862 REDUCED $99,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329


THE BUILDING SITS ON A PRIME PIECE OF REAL ESTATE with a strong
traffic flow to and from the new Publix Shopping Center. Three offices
are on the first floor and both a front and back stairway lead up to a 2nd
floor office with laminate floors, newly painted. The red metal roof was
installed in '05. $275,000 MLS 707317


==American Al,,,,,, BARBARA
EI Realty& KhS,
..Investments BANKS
117 S. Hwy. 41 Realtor
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855 cel: 352-476-3232L
Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
THE PERFECT HOME TO START
THE NEW YEAR!!


E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Dear John: In a "Remember
When" moment, the mention of
the Longines watch on your
radio show bought back the
memory of the Sunday night
"Longines-Wittnauer Radio
Hour" where the tone of the
radio show was set by the men-
tal image of this high-falutin'
speaker wearing his best tuxedo,
bib and tucker telling us who
would be singing the latest aria
from what opera and, when
done, no applause from
the silent studio. And on would
come the next string quartet to
play some Beethoven, or a full
concert orchestra for a Bach
rendition of something or other


At intermission, or rather dur-
ing commercial break, this high-
toned speaker would tell us in
large, carefully crafted words
about the wonderments of the
Swiss-made accuracy of the
Longines watch and how much
respect a person owning such a
superior work of jewelry should
deserve as he majestically im-
pressed the ragged sorts as he
strode among us.
My mother, whom I now fully
suspect of being a secret 1920s
gum-chewing flapper, would ask
me "what the heck are you lis-
tening to THAT stuff for?" Poor
Ma. if you couldn't dance to it, it
wasn't worth a listen. "Eclectic"
wasn't in her vocabulary
Somewhere in my DNA, there
lurked a banjo-playing
Paderewski in her defense, it
must have come from my fa-


their's grandmother's side of the
family -J.S., LadyLake
DearJ.S.: Good letter Thanks
I imagine you have created a Re-
member When for our readers,
as well. As always, comments
relative to the radio show and
column are appreciated.
Dear John: I have a ceramic
soap dish that is about 100 years
old that came from the Tivoli
Hotel in Panama.
Made during the construction
era of the canal, it bears the logo
of the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion and is my mother's most
cherished possession from our
time in Panama, from 1970 to
1982.
About a week ago I acciden-
tally dropped it and it shattered.
I am just sick about this and I
must have it restored to its orig-
inal appearance for my mother


It does appear to be repairable
but I prefer a professional do it
rather than myself. Rebecca
Fitzsimmons at UF said you
might be able to recommend a
local place for repair/restoration
work. I hope you can help me or
steer me in the right direction.
Thank you for your time. S.G.,
Internet
Dear S.G.: Oops, a sad event,
but there is no need to worry -
it can be restored.
I suggest you contact Leak En-
terprises in Belleview They are
seasoned professional porcelain
restorers. I have had numerous


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 E15

good reports on the quality of
their work. Be patient; they are
generally busy, so it may take
some time to get it done, but the
wait will be worthwhile. The
phone number is 352-245-8862.


John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
P.O Box2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engage-
ment announcements, anniversaries, birth announcements
and first birthdays.


Specilizin in T Vs

-IB..ntwoodResal
www.err istmelt BrIpco


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS r
his lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home isthe ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD
se, retirement, or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath spit plan home in Brentwood. Great room, dining room,
ard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what you've been spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook, inside laundry room and a 2-car
)oking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoythe social life that comes garage. NO monthly maintenance fee with this single family home. Access to the Citrus Hills
hthe social mem bership! M LS 703807.......................................................$ 288 ,00 0 and Terra Vista amenities, too! M LS 704406 .............................................................. $ 123 ,000


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777
1 1 - - -- -


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE
_Luxury and storage With over 360D square feet of gorgeously appointed livng space this
home has a the options. The tall cherry cabinets, Corian countertops, SS applances and
walk in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. The massive formal
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS giving area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring which
Come take a look at this beautiful home that is situated on an oversized home site. Verywell carries through to the spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting area& TWO walk in
maintained. 2 bedrooms, plus a den, which can be used as a third bedroom. Some of the closets, spit floor plan, guest bedrooms w/ direct bath access & huge walk in closets. A
features this home sooe eextended lanaisummer kitchen, extra storage closet, beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2 car garage with a separate golf cart entrance
surr ound sound and many more. M LS704582...........................................................$2 09 ,00 0 complete this fabulous home. M LS 70 959 ................................................................ $4 22 ,90 0


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB --
Exquisite vlla 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, plus a den and pool n prestigious Terra Vsta. Ths home Absolutely gorgeous 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car expanded garage home wt spacious kitchen, SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
has many beautiful upgrades including porcelain tile floors throughout, formal dining room breakfast nook, formal dining, family room, great room and lanaioverlooking the lake. This home AS G00D AS IT GETS 0ne-of-a-klnd immaculate 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 2-car garage, Beautiful custom Martlnlque model located in the plush community of Terra Vsta in Citrus
withcustomnchar-heightmoldng, professonal wdowtreatments throughout, custom maple offers sptbedroom planwp an open floordesign.Flowng roomsdesigned for eveday vng plus golf cart garage. Custom pool/spa home with guest suite ,situated onthe best Bills. This home has a formal living area as well as a separate family room. Great for
cabinetry in the great room, den and kitchen have under-cabinet lighting & pullouts, gas &enterta g.Sit on the lanaornthe pooland enjoy thesounds from thewaterfallsnyourve homesite in Faxhre n Skyview Golf Course. Professionally decorated, too many entertaining wt an open floor plan and lots oftile. Cookswllllovethe large walk n pantry
fireplace, aquarium-windowed breakfast nook gives you an incredible 00ew overlooking the own Coer of paradise located n the Hunt Club section of Terra Vista.You wil feel the utmost of upgrades to mention. Enjoy exclusive living in this premier court yard home. A must- w plenty of storage. Enjoy the tropical garden ew from your private lana Come and enjoy
6th farwayo the popuarSkvew Go Course.M LS704750$.................................$3 24,900 luxur, peaceful & safe thsgatedcommun M[S704798 a......................................$3 79,000 see TerraVista. M LS704934$...............................................................................$589,000 theFlordahfestyleat t'sbest.MLS705279.......................................................................... 199,900
-0I *. 011" l 0- 1.1If,

Tem 6 Moth or Mor


BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
Unfurnished End Unit. Spacious living, great location. Enjoy Terra
V ista am entities. #1149................................................................... $ 1,10 0 I


REALTY GROUP


. . . .... ... I I..... - ................. ...................... g v




E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-.~l'f ; 3 %fl lf . .r.

* Ii.fiiil,.N,, I P.: ..li I lll 11H i3i.
* -i e ii. i .i i. I i: I i.i .
* i ,iii .iiII I. .iii i, i. i Mi .i II. P- I I .
* U pfl F -l:.. Pl .ill ir Iil l llll 'll Fi P
* 1 1ii i 1.. i 11.n f Ii . i t 11'.h r
Mi = /I h.h/: ASKING $179,900
Call Cha/les Kelly 352 4222387


I.G.&CCC
3255 S FianMlin Ifidacf
* :. mr.mK ; mr..,:,l. 'i :. .,:.
* : H'i ii. '..... I...i. il..m
* =ii:i'. $198,000
Jeirnne I ,ll1d PchiI j 212 J0lO
hllip 1111ll u1ifltuuralhu ldl iuf


RIVER LAKES MANOR

I...I~m i I.. h Im. i ii .upi I. 'H.
l inn. n. I h- W It n I I, i 1 ..
",,,,l. rl il- : .. 4
ASKING: $195.000
Cim /n,c JnA I ." 32 400 30 l.2 .i26 6663Si


CELINA HILLS
1^ |||,,,,,,11 Ll, ,,l i ,* , ) ,. ,.), 1| i ,i

i,,f,I | ..nl i im l I .... I 1...... 1i.1. ,l |. ifnF

M.;i =;,i,,Ii. $160,000
Call Jim Moion 4222173
to see this lovely' home








ROOMY HOME IN BEVERLY HILLS
. i. .I i... ni... hi. r1$,4.9 ....00 .0 h.I
I...... |.. ....... .. I ..hi ....... _' I . 1........ ,.. .
ksillh n ..J, I, ni l f, 1,,,1 I j I I, n,, ] i, I,
,,..d Ml.; = -h'r".i. $49,000
CillSilirSinuiii 3 22120211


KENSINGTON 4 BED 3 BATHI
lhy I ,:jll: l16.ljlll l V l h l 0 111 :Jll:
1..i.,. NIi... ii...., i.I.,.. .,...m H.I.I. 1.,.,. I, ,..lm
ONLY $162,000
Call Ouane feese, 352 302 1699


PRIVATE 60 ACRES
VVill, ,i e ,ll,:,,:, _" I,il 1 61 $" I l ,6l:, f
2 f l i .il l .i' l.jl :.i .i 1i i 161i' v l''
i .l i il, :,lll ll *-VVIIh, ; lll m .:,,j p i ll ,,111
.i p l'. l f ,i ,li l VV I\ l:W U :1
Mi = l1i,''i ASKING $215,000
Call Jim Motion 422.2173
to see this heautlul ptopetti:


IA L I CUTE. COZY AND CLEAN...

MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING Ih.. I,, 1.... I l ,. I,,,,,,,* .t *,,,, ,,",
A T IT 'S B E S T .i.h. :l.... I. l .i... l. i, l,.,,..
: .H I" ''. r ,,U ui) i.,l w mlhl ,,i n .| 1 ,1) imI II,,,,, l_,lt n .'lO: 1 n : (I.I"" h, K .iil .,I l i _.,I 6'"

I'. ...... ,I I|In | = l ii. i ,l ,Jnm $58,500.
Cill I ini iii,22 I9S9 Call Dois Mie, 352 126 6668


$119.900 WATERFRONT
ii.1 I-i'.. ..ii1. iii Iii, ... .. I, .- lll
.1.1. a' Fa, 1;; \ I" ': ll l .11
Ci ll 4l Plri,3bi 32 63J 12i3










REDUCED!
Ir Ii ,:ll I,:.III i.... 1.... .kll, .: 1h .. t". l a i.aJ. ....

n..I in i.,,,, i i,.,n ^ ijI, $ 2 5 0 .0 0 0
Cill Ou ide Fee:n" Ji2 302 '699


ROAD TO RICHES?
j..... .l h.. , ... .1 .. ,, ... h. llj
,..m.I ...m I ....1 I ,i,.i... i i..iii . i. .l.. ii..-ii .]ij .
III1.0 .h ,L d ,, h. III: II' 11,jiri ,:,. i ..I i:
I.i: l ll h h I .Ii: .i ...j r 1.V .m..i f1 .l ll.I
rill:- h'i:'. :'$149.900.
Call Mailp, Boolh 631 J9OJ


CHOICE HOME IN CHOICE LOCATION
3/2.5/2 SPLIT PLAN, POOL HOME
[hi I,,,.. h-d ,.,- ,.-:l .,,. ,h.......il, I .
i' l I d lllI : l ,-l l~ ,,,Ii,,, 1 ,,,,,-
II,.I.. l.. ... ...,li... l.,,l,,I
,,,, ,,i ,,,,,I ,,i l,, ,,, l ,ll h ,ii "i hI l ,- I -

,iii .i rl ,,. ASKINGS194,900
(all Pa, Da is 352 2121280
I'll lIsip i llliln c21palda is com


II --- -"!
ON THE OAKS GOLF COURSE
S H. IH I -1111 Hiii 1W
HHriI Hi F- iii-I-j I iviiji-
I HmIlfl t :m rl H- flljllH.II H 1-
= :ii.ir $194,600
Jeianne o, Illl,?d PicAwel 362 212 3J1
blip itit CiltrtlSCohiill solid orn






GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY
. l,. . V.il .. 1 ... I,: .l .] ......m ,.o ,:l.,.. I,!..i..
.. 'h~ ] I"" h I, m, j' m -. II... ..Itmm:m h .
.hl~l:l lhl Ii *ilii ..., ih l ii..I iiiiiiiili.- Ii..iii


I .... ll 'i=i.'.: SUPER HOME FOR
THE REASONABLE ASKING PRICE OF S139,800
Call Pal Da is 36252' 212 1280
li'. hslp g blip i 1 1 c/21paldas Loimn









I' , I ,i i. i l,,...) I.,...)., ,|,...,
P ..-.1 .,i ..u I I.'.. .~ I H~i
ii.. .-o KH niii
1'i..:.. $108,900
Jean,,e o, Iilla,d PicAel 212 3J10
blip t it it rilIIcsOIIill sold roin
" ^ m W' - ^^





BEAUTIFUL HOME-31312 WITH FAMILY ROOM & OFFICE.






CullPu Diu,i 3212I2SB23
Lieu liIif li11h 3 Ii til u21ii'lils aur
,,- a.l l, w ll- ii h itg b ip h B im c l,,ul t com1111-


I..,..d.) l.| .l I L .. 111 i. l ] ., .....] 1m1 11.11. I/.1.11_1:
rinm invmn wED iS.D
FI..... [, rj. ],.l ., .... ;p i TI .;III.F I. IlIIH II; H il.l.:
rFIlPK.m: HIP ri.i: = h:ii..i. $232,747
Jeinnm ol//lliid PAchel 3262i2 23J10
blli p iili ullu sull iuIt


CITY LIMITS CITY WATER
i11110,1, :I. .,, :(.....i m- l. ll k il.... .h m :'..
L .. H.1 ..1, K ,, i.1; .I IM -,,
f .. II'i |,.,||||~hm) ......m. :...:m ...ii ri.n ,ui ... (li :.

r -L; ='ii._'.'" ASKING $79.900
Ci/I /icnI JernA 3b2 400 SO02


SERVINGITU [- Lv IkJ l I I, i pnu L.n

COUNTY m( 1m (L'J,. ,, , [L '
lOR ,MORTO HO
OVER~~OU 37HOM**E OE
YEARS R *.* *- -. E SUNDA C.W R H

164 W. Min: St., Inverness, FL 34450 Call Today For__