Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03326

Full Text

Heisman: FSU's Jameis Winston takes trophy in rout /Bl


TODAY
& next
morning


HIGH
70
LOW
37


C I TR U


50% chance for
mainly morning
showers.
PAGE A4


DECEMBER 15, 2013 Florida's Best Community,


S C 0 U N T Y^^





ONICLE
L www.chronicleonline.com
q Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


SPECIAL SECTION:


Duke submits gas plant proposal


Senior Care
Don't miss the Senior
Care Guide in Sunday's
Chronic/e./Inside
MILITARY MATTERS:


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
In addition to its "self-
build" option, Duke En-
ergy is evaluating six
other responses to its re-
quest for proposals for the
company's next power
plant
The company issued a
request for proposals


(RFP) in October to sup-
ply approximately 1,640
megawatts of generating
capacity beginning in
2018.
They would compete
with Duke's self-build
proposal consisting of a
highly-efficient, com-
bined-cycle, natural gas
unit to be located in Cit-
rus County


While the RFP de-
scribed Duke's next
planned generating unit
as a natural gas unit in
Citrus County, it stated the
company would consider
alternatives.
The RFP allowed for
"creative responses which
employ innovative or in-
ventive technologies or
processes." And off-site


existing power generation
that meets the require-
ments could be used in-
stead of a new plant.
The deadline for pro-
posals was Dec. 9. Duke
confirmed it submitted its
self-build proposal for the
plant to be constructed
near its existing Crystal
River area site in Citrus
County


"In addition to the Duke
Energy self-build pro-
posal, we are reviewing
and evaluating six respon-
sive bids offering a range
of generation up to
1,640 megawatts seven
total responses," said
Duke spokesman Sterling
Ivy


PageA2


Secret runs
During World War II,
Ron O'Hara was on a
special mission to drop
spies into occupied
territory./Page A17
EXCURSIONS:


Holy way
Traveler Barry Schwartz
writes about The Way of
St. James pilgrimage
route./Page A13
HOMEFRONT:
Flip itAY
A reality
TV show
based in
Las Vegas
gears up
for a new
season of
house
flipping.
/Page E8

COMMENTARY:

EARLY

VOTE

SITE


Voting issues
Carl Hiaasen writes
about voting./Page A3

LIVE UNITED
The United Way of
Citrus County
needs your help
for its annual
fundraising
initiative. If you
can, please send a
contribution to the
United Way of
Citrus County, c/o
Gerry Mulligan,
The Chronicle,
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.

11 1 I.]1111=41
Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................ D6
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A23
M ovies ..................... A 14
Obituaries .......A.......A10O
Together ........A25, A26
Veterans ........ A17


6 18411.8200711o


Sounds

of music

onparade

in Inverness

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS
Christmas spirit
and melodies
paraded down
the streets of
Inverness before
the onset of liquid sunshine
tried to damper the
festivity
Approximately 90 per-
cent of the annual Inver-
ness Christmas Parade's
"Christmas Melodies" edi-
tion entertained thousands
without a drop of rain.
"This is a Christmas tra-
dition for our family," said
John Pappenberg. "Every
year, we come to the Inver-
ness Christmas Parade to
watch all of the decorated
floats. Then after the pa-
rade, we enjoy a little egg
nog at home with the family
while watching Christmas
movies."
As the parade kicked off
with the customary fanfare
from the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, attendees
rose to their feet as the
American flag waved past
"That is one thing that I
love about Citrus County -
residents are proud to be a
See Page All1


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus (aka John and Rosemarie Pruett) bring up the end of the Inverness Christmas
Parade on Saturday in their long-established double-decker sled just as the rain sprinkles started. From
antique cars to marching bands to Sunny the Cooter, young and old alike joined in the holiday spirit.
Special to the Chronicle
Sponsored by the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and the City of Inverness, 82 floats, walkers
and entertainers followed the lead of Grand Marshal Norine Gilstrap, former Citrus County tax collector.


CMHS future: Peace talks, or more fighting?


Hospital boards hope to

find common ground


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The future of Citrus Memorial
Health System and its CEO -
are on the line Monday night
when two competing boards meet
to either forge an agreement or
continue in search of one.
At stake is a proposed non-
binding letter of intent with Hos-
pital Corporation of America on
a 50-year lease worth an esti-
mated net $90 million to the
community


Transaction
consultants
hired by the Cit-
rus County Hos-
pital Board were
meeting with
HCA representa-


Ryan Beaty
CEO of Citrus
Memorial
Health System.


tives Friday in hopes of ironing
out issues that Citrus Memorial
officials say are vital to an
agreement.
Specifically, members of both
the CCHB and Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation say they want
Citrus Memorial to remain an


acute-care hospi- -
tal for the length
of the lease. And '
they want HCA to V
commit to pro-
viding obstetric -
services in Citrus
County for the
entire lease as Sandy
well, whether Chadwick
that occurs at chairwoman of
the hospital or Citrus
a standalone Memorial
center. Health
HCA has Foundation.
pledged only to
keep Citrus Memorial an acute
care hospital in Inverness for five
to seven years. And it promised to
keep unidentified "core" services
in place for five years.


An HCA corpo-
rate representa- *
tive is expected
to attend Mon-
day's meeting. -
The issues,
however, do not
stop with the let-
ter of intent. Debbie
,, ,. Debbie
Also continu- Ressler
ing to loom are chairwoman of
lawsuits between Citrus County
the CCHB, which Hospital Board.
owns the hospi-
tal, and foundation, which cur-
rently holds the lease. Both
boards must sign off on the letter
of intent with HCA.
Foundation members say they


See Page A2


Perennial favorite


"13o




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C M EHS WHAT: Joint meeting of the Citrus County Hospital
C w in Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation.
Continued from PageAl U WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday.


want three of the four re-
maining lawsuits dropped
before they will sign the
letter of intent. That would
leave only the 2011 chal-
lenge to a state law giving
CCHB trustees oversight
of the hospital; that case is
pending with the Florida
Supreme Court.
Trustees last week of-
fered to drop two lawsuits
in exchange for Citrus Me-
morial Chief Executive Of-
ficer Ryan Beaty's
resignation. Trustees, at
CCHB attorney Bill
Grant's recommendation,
said the foundation could
give Beaty severance
equal to two years plus
three months salary-
about $800,000 if he
leaves by Jan. 31.
Foundation chair-
woman Sandy Chadwick
said the call for Beaty's
resignation is a terrible
idea.
"I cannot imagine any
possible businessperson
that would recommend
losing the CEO during del-
icate negotiations," she
said. "This is completely
off the radar as far as I'm
concerned."
The foundation has
$1.4 million set aside for
severances for Beaty and
top administrators should
they be forced to leave
with a change of owner-
ship. That severance
agreement is the subject of
one of the lawsuits that
trustees are willing to drop
with Beaty's resignation.
CCHB chairwoman Deb-
bie Ressler said Beaty's
resignation is what is
needed if the foundation
wants to settle two
lawsuits.
Asked to explain the
logic in letting Beaty go
just months before a final
agreement with HCA,
Ressler replied: "What's
the logic in not?"
Ressler and Grant say
it's common to hire an in-
terim transition executive
when businesses are about
to be sold.
As part of the Beaty


* WHERE: Historic brick schoolhouse next to Citrus
Memorial hospital, Inverness.


offer, the CCHB says it
wants equal say with the
foundation in hiring that
executive. Grant estimated
Friday that the executive's
pay would be about
$30,000 a month.
Chadwick said she op-
poses CCHB trustees hav-
ing a vote in hiring a
successor to Beaty, if it
comes to that.
Beaty said Friday that
he heard from several
foundation members after
they learned of the resig-
nation offer in Thursday's
Chronicle. Beaty said


several members offered
him support, but he de-
clined to discuss the issue
in detail until the founda-
tion board meets Monday
afternoon.
Beaty acknowledged
that his resignation could
help settle longstanding
disputes between the
foundation and hospital
board.
"That board hates my
guts and they want me to
leave," he said of the
CCHB. "I don't want to be
the obstacle to make this
thing go away"


PROPOSAL
Continued from Page Al

"We anticipate having a short list of
proposals by March 2014 and will select
the most cost-effective way to meet our
customers' future energy needs."
The gas plant would cost an estimated
$1.24 billion and is expected to be oper-
ational in 2018. In addition to the con-
struction work, it would create
approximately 60 full-time jobs.
While that process moves forward, a
24-mile natural gas pipeline has been
proposed to run from Marion County,
across Citrus, terminating near the
Crystal River Energy Complex, just
north of Crystal River in northwestern
Citrus County
Sabal Trail project
It is part of the Sabal Trail project, a
465-mile interstate natural gas pipeline


project by the Florida Power & Light
Company
The 36-inch diameter pipeline will
originate in Alabama and end in Osce-
ola County just south of Orlando. As pro-
posed, it will pass through Levy, Marion
and Sumter counties. The main line will
run just east of Citrus. An above-ground
compressor station is planned for Dun-
nellon.
The proposed Citrus connection will
be a 24-inch-diameter pipeline capable
of supporting a future natural gas power
plant. It will run from the Dunnellon
station, across the Withlacoochee River
into Citrus County
Open house Wednesday
Sabal Trail representatives are con-
ducting a public open house about the
project from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Dec. 18, at Citrus Springs Middle School,
150 W Citrus Springs Blvd.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


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A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


LOCAL






S Page A3-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15,2013



TATE2& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Energy assistance __|||B__*_lII1_

event scheduled


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Housing
Services will accept en-
ergy assistance applica-
tions on a walk-in basis for
one day only at The
Catholic Charities Com-
munity Outreach Center in
Homosassa.
From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 13, low-
income Citrus County res-
idents may visit the
Catholic Charities center,
located at 9020 W Atlas
Drive, to apply All appli-
cants must be checked in
by 1 p.m. to be considered.
Ordinarily applications for
the Low-Income Home
Energy Assistance Pro-
gram (LIHEAP) are ac-
cepted by appointment
only, due to the demand.
LIHEAP helps low-
income families with
home heating and cooling
costs. LIHEAP is funded
by the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Serv-
ices through the Florida
Department of Economic
Opportunity, and has been
established to help quali-
fying low-income home-
owners and renters pay for
a portion of their primary
heating/cooling costs. LI-
HEAP is not designed to
pay a household's total en-


The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of fund-
raisers, meetings, appear-
ances and the like for the 2014
political campaign. Send infor-
mation to mwright@chroni-
cleonline.com.


ergy costs, but to provide
supplemental assistance.
LIHEAP provides two
types of assistance: crisis
and regular Households
may apply for crisis assis-
tance once a year and can
receive up to $600. House-
holds must be delinquent
in paying their utility bill,
received a shut-off notice,
be without power, or re-
quire a deposit in order to
qualify for crisis.
Households may also
apply for regular assis-
tance once a year for a cur-
rent bill. The benefit range
is $150 to $300 per house-
hold depending on family
size and income. If the
household has received
this assistance in the past
year, it is not eligible for
regular assistance.
Eligibility for participa-
tion in LIHEAP is estab-
lished according to the
federal income guidelines
and must be at or below
150 percent of poverty
level. Maximum annual in-
come for a household of
one is $17,235, two persons
is $23,635, three persons is
$29,295 and four persons is
$35,325.
For more information
please email heidi.
blanchette@bocc.citrus.fl.
us or call 352-527-7520.


Ron Kitchen, Republican
for Citrus County Commission
District 2, will speak at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 19, at the
meeting of the Central Ridge
Republican Club, 1 Civic Cir-
cle, Beverly Hills.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
TOP: Refuge Day at Three Sisters Springs in Crystal River brought many kayakers and paddle boarders from as
far away as Destin to observe the manatees and join the landlubbers in learning more about our local wildlife.
ABOVE LEFT: Close to 20 education booths were set up at the event. ABOVE RIGHT: Ivan Vincente, visitor
services specialist with the Florida Wildlife Commission, welcomes guests.





Refuge Day



at Three Sisters Springs


Citrus County
Restaurants to be
open Christmas
The Chronicle is compiling a
list of restaurants that will be
open Christmas Day. Repre-
sentatives of restaurants can
contact Rita Cammarata in the
news department between
8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. week-
days at 352-563-5660.
The deadline to call to be in-
cluded in the list is Wednes-
day, Dec. 18.
Please indicate the hours
you'll be open, your telephone
number and whether reserva-
tions are required.
Boat House Restaurant,
1935 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River, 352-564-9636. Open
6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reserva-
tions recommended.
Ike's Old Florida Kitchen,
6301 Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town, 352-447-4899. Open
noon to 6 p.m. Reservations
recommended.
Joe's Family Restaurant,
911 W. Main St., Inverness,
726-1688. Open 6a.m. to
9 p.m. No reservations
Samantha's Cafe, 7103 N.
Car G. Rose (SR 200), Her-
nando. Open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Yanni's Restaurant, 3297
S. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-


mosassa, 352-503-6853.
Open noon to 8 p.m.
Attorney general to
speak Dec. 18
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi will be the keynote
speaker at the Wednesday,
Dec. 18, Christmas luncheon
of the Women's Political Net-
work of Citrus County. The
12:30 p.m. luncheon will take
place at Citrus Hills Country
Club. The attorney general will
give and update on statewide
issues her office is presently
handling.
The WPNCC meets
monthly with speakers of inter-
est to inform county residents of
state and local issues of con-
cern. The Jan. 21 meeting will
feature Joyce Brancato, chief
executive officer of Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Cen-
ter. She will speak about the Af-
fordable Care Act and its effect
on the hospital and its patients.
All are welcomed and en-
couraged to join WPNCC,
which meets at various restau-
rants in the county.
The organization connects
donations for CASA and clips
and sends manufacturer's
coupons to the military.
For information, call Rosalie
Matt at 352-746-7143.
-From staff reports


The recent government shutdown did not dampen one of
Citrus County's cherished celebrations Refuge Day.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

I t may have been delayed
two months, but the Crystal
SRiver National Wildlife
SRefuge was determined to
Celebrate its 30th anniver-
sary the 19th annual Refuge
Day celebration Saturday at Three
Sisters Springs.
"Crystal River was established
in 1983 as a manatee refuge and
protection site," Ivan Vicente, visi-
tor specialist at Crystal River
Wildlife Refuge, said. "We are here
to celebrate that there are more
and more land and water wildlife
being protected.
"Refuge Day is part of the
Refuge Improvement Act of 1996
and we showcase refuges and what
they are for generations of Amer-
ica to enjoy We open doors to the
general public to help them under-
stand it is everyone's land and
water"
There was plenty to do for the
nature-hearted attendees, includ-
ing the opening of the new pavilion
where historians shared facts of
the role of Kings Bay in Citrus
County's history
"Refuge Day is a great opportunity


"Refuge Day is a great
opportunity to bring the
community together and
it's a day full of fun for
families outdoors in
Citrus County."

Ivan Vicente
visitor specialist at
Crystal River I \i 11t.: Refuge


to bring the community together
and it's a day full of fun for families
outdoors in Citrus County," Vicente
said. "We want to see Refuge Day
be an every day thing and daily
here at Three Sisters Springs.
Today is just a little sample of what
we will have on a daily basis once
we open the property to the gen-
eral public."
Numerous families spent the day
learning about the refuge and
about Florida nature and wildlife
by visiting the 28 agency partner
booths and walking the wooden
boardwalk along the springs. Rep-
resentatives from nonprofit organ-
izations and local and state
outdoor agencies were on hand to


promote Citrus County's bountiful
natural resources.
"This is fantastic opportunity for
my children to learn more about
the beauties of the county that we
live in," said Citrus County resi-
dent Peyton Manning.
"We came as an educational ex-
perience and are leaving with a
lasting memory," she continued.
Visitors enjoyed food, live enter-
tainment, educational demonstra-
tions, crafts and a photo
opportunity with mermaids.
Three Sisters Springs hosted
wildlife exhibits such as live rap-
tors, a musical garden, manatee re-
search booths, endangered species
puppets, drums and kites parade.
The inhabitants of the water did
not seem to mind their friends vis-
iting as they rested in the depths of
the springs.
"Thanks to the sanctuary, this is
the reason why we have over 550
manatees here," Vicente said. "If
we did not have sanctuaries we
would not have a refuge. It is only
in this area can manatees rest
undisturbed, which guarantees the
manatees will come back."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


Readers vote for top local stories of 2013


Chronicle

The Citrus Chroni-
cle is asking readers
to vote for the local
stories they feel have
had the greatest im-
pact in 2013.
We have compiled a
list of nominations,
but feel free to write
in suggestions.
We are also solicit-
ing comments and
plan to publish some
of the more thought-
ful comments in our
coverage Dec. 31,
2013, of the readers'
top picks.
Vote or write in the
top 5 picks and make
comments on any or
all. Readers can sub-


mit multiple entry
forms.

To vote:
Clip out this
coupon and circle
picks or fill in the
write-ins.
Readers may also
send in a letter or
note with the coupon
that contains their
comments.
Email marnold
@chronicleonline.co
m with top 5 picks and
comments.
Those who want
to vote online can
visit www.chroni-
cleonline.com/reader-
poll and fill in
selections and com-
ments there.


Readers Top Picks 2013
Check five of these or write in picks.
J Duke Energy tax bill fight
J County Fire MSBU
J Edward Peters takes his two young daughters
J CMH dispute and possible sale
J Sale of Seven Rivers Hospital
J One Rake at a Time
J The loss of Babb Adams
J Duke Energy closing CR3
J Brad Thorpe retires/unretires
J Executive Director for TDC position search
J Economy improves as new stores open
J Duke to build natural gas plant in Citrus
J Commissioner Scott Adams' first year
J Susan Hale resigns from School Board
J Inverness/county disagreements
J YMCA coming to Citrus County
J Flood insurance rates expected to soar
J Transportation Center opens
J Port Citrus feasibility study presented
J Medical Corridor on CR 491 advances
J Citrus Landfill fires


Q County government resignations
Q Jasmine Lee
Q School district drops from ''A" to "B"
a Crystal River Mall loses JC Penney and Belk
F-i PareiQ 1',rmjI Q rao ievea, QLdfe eiviuiillieiiI. d~dIU


LJ .T l'l'l kUl'UVCS ICCClVCS SdLt; CIIVII'UIIIII II dWdl'U
2 Duke stops build on Levy County nuclear plants
Two mothers charged in deaths of their children

Write ins:



Comments (send additional notes on another sheet of
paper if more space needed):


Name
(include if you would like comments published)
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COUNTY




A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday You must take respon-
sibility for your actions and make some
long overdue changes in the coming
months. It wouldn't hurt to try new
things and visit new places.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Make a point to visit destinations that
promise excitement and adventure.
Trips or projects that you've been con-
sidering should be further explored.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Completing projects in a timely manner
will be key to your peace of mind
today. Avoid anyone holding you back.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
You'll need to keep a close watch over
your wallet today. Spend less and get
more by taking the time to look for
bargains.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
You'll face opposition and argumenta-
tive individuals who will try to
manipulate your emotions.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
slack off when action is the order of the
day. Physical activity will motivate you
to get cracking when it comes to your
professional affairs as well.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's a
good day to update your look or ex-
pand your interests. Get involved in
something that will give you more
options.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Try to
address a troublesome situation before
you take action. Once you find a solu-
tion, you will have no trouble following
through.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't
question someone in a position of au-
thority. Listen carefully and assess the
situation before making a decision that
could prove costly.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Welcome
any change or challenge that comes
your way You are up for any competi-
tion you face, and Lady Luck is in your
corner.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't
let emotional issues spin out of control.
Be careful what you say, or you may
have regrets.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You
should closely examine some personal
problems and discuss your concerns
with the people affected by them.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Ajoint
financial deal could have underlying
problems. Don't take a risk when you
can do better acting independently.
Conservative steps will keep you out of
trouble.


ENTERTAINMENT


Kardashian files for
divorce from Odom
After months of speculation,
Khloe Kardashian is ending her
four-year marriage to Lamar
Odom.
The reality TV star filed for di-
vorce Friday in Los Angeles
County Superior Court, citing ir-
reconcilable differences. She
also wants her last name re-
stored to Kardashian from Kar-
dashian Odom.
The filing comes days after
Odom pleaded no contest on
Monday to a misdemeanor
drunken driving charge.
The 34-year-old athlete was
arrested last August after his
Mercedes-Benz SUV was seen
weaving on an LA freeway.
The 6-foot-10-inch power for-
ward has been out of the NBA
since going unsigned as a free
agent after a miserable season
last year.
Kardashian, 29, is best known
for starring with her sisters Kim
and Kourtney, and her mother,
Kris Jenner, in the long-running
reality TV series "Keeping Up
With the Kardashians."

Cyrus, Macklemore
perform a ball
Miley Cyrus headlined the
annual Jingle Ball concert at
Madison Square Garden, per-
forming her hits "Wrecking Ball"
and "We Can't Stop."
Lindsay Lohan introduced
the singer Friday night, saying
she loves that Cyrus is being
"herself."
Wild child Cyrus sang onstage
in a shimmery red ensemble re-
sembling a Christmas ornament.
Other performers included Se-
lena Gomez, Enrique Iglesias
and Robin Thicke, who asked
the crowd: "I wonder who Miley
Cyrus will twerk on tonight?"
Ariana Grande shined as she


Associated Press
Khloe Kardashian Odom and Lamar Odom attend an E!
Network upfront event at Gotham Hall in New York.
After months of speculation, Kardashian is ending her
four-year marriage to Odom.


belted songs such as "The Way'
and "Honeymoon Avenue" in
Mariah Carey form. Girl group
Fifth Harmony also impressed
vocally, while Macklemore &
Ryan Lewis and Pitbull ignited
the crowd during their high
energy sets.
Paramore, Jason Derulo,
Fall Out Boy and Austin Ma-
hone also performed.
LA to offer reward
in director's death
Los Angeles officials are of-
fering a $75,000 reward in the
fatal home-invasion shooting of
a director on the reality TV show
"America's Next Top Model."
Councilman Jose Huizar in-
troduced the motion Friday in an
effort to spur leads in the Nov. 27
killing of 42-year-old James
Marcus Howe.
Police say a man posing as a
solicitor knocked on Howe's
door in the Eagle Rock neigh-


borhood at 10:55 a.m. and tried
to force his way inside.
A fight ensued, and another
man pulled out a handgun,
opening fire.
Police are looking for two men
in their late teens or early 20s
and a woman. They were driving
a Ford Mustang.
Trial set for friend
of '127 Hours' figure
A trial date has been set for a
Denver woman accused of
striking her boyfriend, Aron
Ralston, whose self-amputation
ordeal inspired the movie
"127 Hours."
Court records show a Denver
County judge on Friday set a
Feb. 19 jury trial for Vita Shan-
non on charges including as-
sault and disturbing the peace.
She's accused of striking
Ralston during an argument
Sunday.
-From wire reports


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 15, the
349th day of 2013. There are 16
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 15, 1938, groundbreak-
ing for the Jefferson Memorial took
place in Washington, D.C., with
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
taking part in the ceremony.
On this date:
In 1791, the Bill of Rights went
into effect following ratification by
Virginia.
In 1890, Sioux Indian Chief Sit-
ting Bull and 11 other tribe mem-
bers were killed in Grand River,
S.D., during a confrontation with In-
dian police.
In 2001, the Leaning Tower of
Pisa, Italy, was reopened to the
public after a $27 million realign-
ment that had dragged on for over
a decade.
Ten years ago: The late Sen.
Strom Thurmond's family acknowl-
edged Essie Mae Washington-
Williams' claim that she was his
illegitimate mixed-race daughter.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush wrapped up a
whirlwind trip to Iraq and
Afghanistan; an Iraqi reporter
hurled two shoes at Bush, an inci-
dent the president called "a bizarre
moment."
One year ago: A day after the
massacre at Sandy Hook Elemen-
tary School in Newtown, Conn., in-
vestigators worked to understand
what led 20-year-old gunman Adam
Lanza to slaughter 26 children and
adults after also killing his mother
and before taking his own life.
Today's Birthdays: Actor-
comedian Tim Conway is 80. Actor
Don Johnson is 64. Actress Melanie
Chartoff is 63. Movie director Julie
Taymor is 61. Movie director Alex
Cox is 59. Actor Justin Ross is 59.
Rock musician Paul Simonon (The
Clash) is 58. Actress Helen Slater is
50. Actress Michelle Dockery (TV:
"Downton Abbey") is 32.
Thought for Today: "The drama
of life begins with a wail and ends
with a sigh." Minna Antrim,
American writer (1856-1950).


City H 1
Daytona Bch. 72
Fort Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 80
Gainesville 66
Homestead 84
Jacksonville 65
Key West 83
Lakeland 74
Melbourne 79


L Feast City
47 sh Miami
63 ts Ocala
54 sh Orlando
35 ts Pensacola
64 ts Sarasota
35 ts Tallahassee
69 sh Tampa
45 sh Verp Beach
52 sh W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


178/55 0.10"i
THREE DAY OUTLOOK e tly
W*^ TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
J High: 70- Low: 37
l. 50% chance for mainly morning showers
vB NNW wind 10- 20 mph
f T ^f9MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
7 "' ". High: 65o Low:36

New .. Mostly sunny
/"--,, NNEwind8 16 mph______


- W -TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 40
.,. ..' Mostly sunny
1 NNE wind 6- 12 mph


DfW POINT


I .......... 81/64 ........
Saturday Saturday at 3 p.m. 6
Record /28 63.0
Normal 72/55 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 63 Saturday at 3 p.m. 84%
Departure from mean -1 POLLEN COUNT**
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00" Today's active pollen:
Total for the month T" Composites, palm, juniper
Total for the year 51.67" Today's count: 2.0/12
Normal for the year 44.89" Mnas c
*As oi 7 pm a Inverness Monday's count: 5.2
UV INDEX: 3 Tuesday's count: 5.5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
7.9 high. 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 38
30.06 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES hn-
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/15 SUNDAY 04:36 1026 15:33 22
12/16 MONDAY 05:28 22:48 16.20 22:50
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SU SET TINUGHT .........................5:33 p.m .
SISITOOI ............15 am
0 MOONRISE TODAY 4 325 m
Dec 17 Dec 25 Jan 1 Jan 7 MOOET TOAmY 535anm
BURN CONDITIONS
Today' Fire Danger Rating Is: Moderate. There Is no burn ban.
For more information cal Florida Division of Forestry al (352) 754-6777. For more
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
htlpJ ,lame.fl-dof.comfltre weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andor SLnday-
ODD aJdresses may waler on Wednesday andor Saturday
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as veqeiate gardens flowers and shrubs, can be done an any day and at any
time.
Cnrus CJruny Uiltes'custlomers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may quality for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness 0 352-726-2321, Cry of Crysal
River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "At Kings Bay "At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
ChassahoWtka 4:51a.m. 0,7tt. 5;14p.m. 0.211. 12:51p.m. 0.1 fl. 1O:23p.r1. ft.
Crystal Rver'" 2:48-a.m 23 t 4:01p.m. 1-5ft-:1011a.m. .0ft. 9:45p.mO.Aft
Witlacochee' 1203 a.m. 32ft 1:39p.m. 2-911, 8:02 am, -0.6 4ft. 7:35p.m.1A I,
Hornossass"' 3:9a.m 1.31t. 5:38p.m. 0-7 ft. 12:46 p.m. *-O.1 ft. 9:40 p.mO.4 ft.


Today: NNW winds around 10-20
knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and
inland waters a moderate chop.
Tonight: North winds around 20
knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and
inland waters choppy.


H L F'cast
84 64 ts
70 36 ts
75 50 sh
57 39 pc
75 50 sh
58 34 pc
74 46 sh
82 53 sh
83 60 ts


Gulf water
temperature


6 9Taken t Alp
Taken at Aripoka


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.50 28.56 25.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.43 38.45 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.55 39.57 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.23 40.25 42.20
Levels reported inm feet above a evel. ood stage for takes are based Won 2 33-year flood
TV in-.aar-n aj IOdwM whC hras a 43I'3p.e'T ;harce o0 D*.ny ted of oe eice?*d! i
ar., mea, T',s data -St Gair ,m', IM'In I" 5u[r, __ Fr.:iWa are, .*at-- agemen] DL-H.-l
a"ad 'S .uDg.CI to m-c, n Im r Ho e I m e C. iilTd ;.i [tr nJl.w SiaIt' GI S.:,'.I S P.,-,
M abfiT 1r, anATIagsO aiiq lu 0 IN O Tr,1 11 vcj n e au
Should ConaMi ithe ,BCoiogital Dar 0 I"A at 1352 i 'Z I I

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

SAT SUN SAT SUN
City H L Pep. H LFcst City H L Pep. H LFcst
Albany 13 7 .02 30 11 I NewOrleans 71 62 12 54 37 pc
Albuquerque 46 27 45 26 pc New York City 34 25 .15 43 20 r
Asheville 41 35 85 41 26 pc Norfolk 51 33 .06 53 33 pc
Atants 57 47 .48 48 32 f Oklahoma City 42 31 55 30 s
AllanticCity 43 25 .05 46 22 pc Omaha 22 16 29 18 pc
Austin 51 45 02 57 35 s Palm Spings 73 46 73 52 s
Baltimomre 38 30 .03 39 23 pc Philadelphia 33 29 .01 42 23 pc
$ilings 42 24 44 29 pc Phoenix 69 41 72 44 s
Birmingham 57 47 .71 44 29 pc Pittsburgh 34 29 .33 28 14 f1
Soise 34 20 36 22 1 Portand, ME 14 3 30 5 1
Boston 20 11 .01 40 14 ts Portland. OR 42 38 47 36 r
Buffalo 16 12 .16 24 10 11l Providence. Rt 25 14 .01 43 18 ISis
Burlington, VT 9 -2 20 3 sn Raight 47 38 .53 55 29 pc
Charleston, S.C. 71 47 .47 62 38 sh Rapid City 45 12 50 27 pc
Charleston, W.V. 47 31 .16 34 24 pc Reno 39 12 39 15 pc
Charlotte 49 39 .93 50 29 pc Rochester, NY 16 9 .17 23 11 1I
Chicago 31 29 .24 17 4 pc Sacramento 60 30 61 36 s
Cincinnati 39 33 .48 27 17 sn SalL LakeCily 36 16 34 19 f
Cleveland 32 26 .36 25 12 sn San Antonro 62 42 .01 61 33 s
Columbia. SC 33 26 39 32 23 pc San Diego 72 47 70 56 s
COlumbus, OH 37 31 .55 26 13 sn San Francisco 61 39 58 48 6
Concerd, NH 13 2 28 4 sn Savannah 72 51 .08 62 38 sh
Dallas 47 39 55 36 s Seatlle 46 42 49 42 r
Denver 43 21 55 26 pc Spokane 38 30 .02 38 29 1
DesMoines 25 20 22 12 cd St. Louis 35 31 .55 30 24 pc
Detrolt 22 19 .33 24 8 II St. Ste. Made 6 -7 11 -4 II
ElPaso 55 34 51 30 s Syracuse 14 8 .10 26 13 sn
Evansville, IN 38 35 .75 29 21 pc Topeka 33 25 .01 45 25 pc
Hanisburg 32 28 .15 35 18 pc Washington 42 35 .01 41 27 pc
Hartford 22 13 03 35 13 1 YESTIERDAYSNATIONALHIQH&LOW
Houston 58 45 .04 56 38 s HIGH B7. Pota Gord. R&a.
Indianapolis 33 29 .47 19 10 pc LOW -23. Sarana Lake. N,Y
LasVegas 59 42 61 41 s
UtleRock 4337 .504531 pc WORLD CITIES
Los Angeles 74 43 81 52 sSUN Lisbon 6242/
Louisville 42 35 .52 31 23 cd SUN H..Kv Lsondon 53/42/pc
Memphis 45 40 1.2941 32 pc London 53/42/pc
Milwaukee 29 26 10 15 2 pc Acapulco 87/75/s Madrid 57/26/pc
Minneapolis 16 10 08 6 -1 cd Amsterdam 46/42/s Mexico City75/50/pc
Mobile 76 52 53 33 pc Athens 55/41/s Monilreal 6/4/pc
Montgomery 61 48 65 49 31 pc Beijing 39/21/s Moscow 28/12/pc
Nashville 50 40 .56 37 27 pc Bedin 3733/s Pads 48/41/pc


Bermuda W6j2Jpc
KEY TO CONDMONS c.cloudyv dtribzie Caro 55/44r
I.fak hhatr, pe-paft y cloudy ua Ain; Calgary 443Q0/pc
ri-ralnisnow mix; S-sunny: sh-shuwer; Havana 84/8/s
sn-isnow; ls-thiudertonnr w-.wlndy. Hong Kong 71/601pc
Welter Central. LP 02013 Jerusalem 44133/r


RiO 82/691pc
Rome 55/371s
Sydney 75/62/r
Tokyo 5039Ws
Toronto 22/1J0/sn
Warsaw 37/33/pc


LEGAL NOTICES






B id N otices......................D9



Meeting Notices..............D9



jl-- C I T R ULIS. C O UIN T Y


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
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$13.00 per year.
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


TEUIIERATR IE*


ALMANAC




SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A5


40 A Message

from

MSheriff

-SHERIFF Jeff Dawsn
JEFFREY J. DAWSY



A VERY SUCCESSFUL YEAR
Since implementing the Intelligence Led Policing (ILP) concept in mid-2010,
we have seen amazing decreases in crime in Citrus County. The changes have
been so significant that I felt compelled to review this valuable method of
policing yet again.
In years past, despite our best efforts at fighting crime, we were reactive.
We were fighting crime -that had already happened. A crime, or series of
crimes, would occur in a certain area and we would methodically send all our
resources to that particular area to keep the crimes) from happening again. If
we were successful, and more often than not we were, we would celebrate a
brief victory before discovering that those crimes were now happening in
another area of the county. By concentrating our resources in one area, the
people committing crimes would move to another location.
And so the vicious cycle continued.
Until we implemented ILP
After attending the Southern Police Institute, Capt. Justin Ferrara and Lt.
Ricky Grant educated me and my senior staff about a new way to police. This
new way heavily relied on crime analysis and crime intelligence to prevent crime
from happening.
ILP is essentially a paradigm shift within this agency. It is letting go of the
"old way of doing business," like having expectations of high arrest numbers or
traffic citations. Instead, we embrace the tools right here in front of us -
feedback from the community and the information we get on a daily basis to
produce solid intelligence that leads us to "the bad guys."
It is a well known fact that a large percentage of crime is done by those who
have committed crimes before. With ILP, we focus most of our attention on
active and repeat offenders. We do this through extensive interviews with
offenders, analysis of reported crimes (along with calls for service), surveillance
of suspects, and tips or leads from the community. In my 17 years as your
Sheriff, this approach has led to the greatest reduction in crime I've ever seen.
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
(before ILP) (began implementing (1st full year ILP, (Continued Year-to-date
ILP) Phase 1) implementing ILP) (Phase II)
Residential
Burglary 472 588 549 472 392
(thefts from homes)
Commercial
Burglary 148 102 92 96 80
(thefts from businesses]
Conveyance
Burglary 304 366 260 222 118
(thefts from vehicles)
Auto Theft 68 52 51 64 41
(stealing of vehicles]
The chart above includes just some of the crimes that we track as an agency
on a daily basis. As you can see, every single category has significantly
decreased since 2009, the year before we began implementing this new way of
policing. Since 2009, commercial burglaries are down 35%, while conveyance
burglaries are down 27%. These successes can truly be attributed to ILP.
In 2013 we continued to implement ILP Strategies, tweaking those that
worked and making significant changes to those that did not. For 2014 I expect
this agency to continue to adapt these strategies to best meet the needs of the
community and our carefully-mapped-out objectives. I will certainly keep you
posted as to our progress.
Until then, Happy Holidays everybody. I hope you enjoy some special time
with your family and friends during this special time of year.

JOIN US IN JANUARY FOR:
*CCSO Citizens'Academy
Firefighter I & II Classes
Public Service Officer Training
*Tweet the Beat '
For more information visit: www.sheriffcitrus.org
Also find us on: I" @ a @Sheriffcitrus


",ar




A6SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


1 SUBEH I N5 20 EB I


WITH A


r16


There will be a lot of happy
kids this Christmas thanks
to CCSO's very successful
Shop with a Cop program.


Thes,, C Fill cF
desj riic-I i, liji.h ,1i.1
relat l,-,r .I I-V-[ '-- 1[li c-
kids .mi, l F l,,-i" --
Couri, F r
(law ,, , i , i ,,,,,,i 1
control i, ii, ,1 ,


LOCK IT OR LOSE IT


*hI\
Burglarize
Vehtices were
leftUnlocked a V i

Unsecured Vs. Secured
Vehicle Burglaries
2012 vs. 2013

2012
BM* Year to
U Date 2013


UNSECURED


TOTAL % UNSECURED
TOTAL % UNSECURED


)OOSG




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ii BI TH BADGE 31


What would

your number one

safety tip be for

citizens over

the holidays?

1. "Lock up your prescription
medication when children
or company are
visiting your
home."
Sergeant Scott R. Farmer
School Resource Officer-West District H a

2. "Criminals act on
opportunities that can be
created by us. Forgetting to
lock your car and residence
can set you up to become
an easy victim.
Stay vigilant with
your security."
Sergeant Ryan T. Glaze
West Operations

3. "Always hide the gifts in
such a place so as not to
cause injury to the
snoopers, like don't
hide them under
the lawn mower!"
Detective Corey Davidson
Internal Affairs Division

4. "Always make sure there is
enough water in the stand for
a live Christmas
tree. Never let
your tree get dry
and brittle."
Linda Fritz
Receptionist

5. "Being a smart party host or
guest should include being
sensible about alcoholic
drinks. More than half of all
traffic fatalities are alcohol-
related. Use designated
drivers, people who
do not drink, to drive 1 -
other guests home
after a holiday party." J
Dwane Gannon
911 Dispatch


6. "If a fire develops
in your oven, keep
the oven door
closed."
Chief Jim Goodworth
Fire Rescue

7. "Don't put your
vacation plans or
plans to leave
home on social
media."
Deputy Connary Reynolds

8. "Use flameless
candles instead
of regular candles."
Deputy Michele Tewell


What is the most challenging issue
facing your department today?
CSFR faces many of the same challenges as
other fire departments, including meeting federal
and state regulations, budgetary constraints, and
growing service demands. CSFR is challenged by
having a large geographic area that is covered by a
dwindling number of volunteer firefighters.

Does your department have a formal,
long-range strategic plan?
Yes, CSFR has developed a five year strategic
plan which evaluated our current practices through


analysis of our goals, objec-
tives, and historical response
data. This research was used
to determine the level of
service that CSFR can be
expected to deliver in the
next five years. Our five year
plan will be reviewed annu-
ally for applicable updates as
the needs and service levels
of the community change.
Our strategic plan consists
of recommendations for
improvements in various
areas within the department,
ranging from service and pro-
gram enhancements to facil-
ity improvements.

What challenges
do you see facing the
fire service today?
The uncertainty of the
economy continues to be the
biggest challenge facing the
fire service today. Many
departments across the
nation have had to lay off
firefighters, close stations,
and decrease services to
their citizens. We are very
fortunate that this has not
been the case for our depart-
ment.


MEET THE CHIEF


GETTING TO KNOW


lim Goodworth

Fire Chief

Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue



What do you look for in a new recruit?
Honesty, integrity, low drama, caring, compas-
sion for others and loyalty all come to mind. When
recruits come to us, often they are certified fire-
fighters. They have proven the technical skills nec-
essary for the job and we can teach them to
become great technicians, but we cannot teach
them the intangibles of good character.

How do you view training?
Firefighters work in a fast paced, high pressure
environment. With that being said, we often do
not have the luxury of time, or the presence of


mind to make slow deliberate
decisions. Therefore, in those
times, we rely on our foun-
dation and training. It is
through our constant training
that we engrain behavior that
is intended to save our lives
and the lives of others.
Training is one of the most
important things we do!

What's the future for
the fire service as you
see it?
I believe that the fire service
will continue its proactive
approach to advocate fire-
fighter safety. We need to con-
stantly find a way to embrace
our traditions, value our his-
tory, but not be held back
because of it. The increased
threats to homeland security,
brought to light by the tragic
event of 9/11, forever changed
the scope of services provided.
Our mission is no longer just
about fire suppression. Fire
services will be called upon to
handle many types of emergen-
cies. When I stop and reflect
upon the state of Citrus Sheriff
Fire Rescue, I am very con-
fident about the future.


"It is through our constant training

that we engrain behavior that is intended

to save our lives and the lives of others."

JIM GOODWORTH
Fire Chief for Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue


9. "Keep a list with all of the
important phone numbers you
or a baby sitter would need in
case of an emergency.
Include the police and fire
department, your pediatrician
and the National Poison Help
Line, 1-800-222-1222.
Laminating the list will
prevent it from
being torn or
damaged by
accidental spills."
Captain Danny Linhart
West Operations

10."Count your candles as you
light them so you
blow out the same
number of candles
that you lit."
Heather Yates
Media Relations Manager


.. .......


o ,,.. 9 04- -
59 4 "'' _...-


JIM
GOODWORTH
FIRE CHIEF
FOR CITRUS SHERIFF
FIRE RESCUE

FIRE SERVICE TENURE:
30 years, started with
Citrus County EMS
in August 1983

CAREER JOURNEY:
I have served my entire career
working in public safety for the citi-
zens of Citrus County. Upon gradu-
ating high school, I immediately
enrolled in EMT school. I began my
career in 1983 working as an EMT
for Citrus County EMS. During my
tenure there, I held the positions of
Field Training Officer, Training
Director and Battalion Chief. I
worked my way up thru the ranks to
become the EMS Operations Chief
for Nature Coast EMS. In 2006, I
was hired as the Deputy Fire Chief
for Citrus County Fire Rescue. In
October 2013, I had the honor and
privilege of being appointed the Fire
Chief for Citrus Sheriff Fire Rescue.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1BEHI'NDTHE BADGE I


Tweet the Beat


Buckle your seat belt
and get ready to roll out.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office is taking the Here's hoi
community on a virtual ride-along. Join CCSO for their for the rid
new initiative called Tweet The Beat. We had great Log onto Tw
success with our launch in December. handle: @Sher
People folio
What is it? questions and
Throughout the evening we will use Twitter to share throughout the
pictures and text of what emergency calls are happening
with law enforcement and fire rescue. We might be riding Why parti
with a patrol deputy or a firefighter. CCSO's next Tweet The Citrus C
The Beat is set for Wednesday, January 15th from 5 media to get"
p.m. until 10 p.m. beyond, about


~2iZ~Y~


w to go along
e
itter and follow the CCSO using tl-[ T. irrii
iffCitrus.
wing @SheriffCitrus will be able to ask
interact with the deputy or firefighter
ride-along.
cipate?
countyy Sheriff's Office wants to use social
the message out to our community, and
law enforcement and fire rescue work and


1w 14JIlI. Itw-
tiietigliteis ace m i the
performance of their
jobs. We want to connect with our community and give
you information in the most effective, efficient manner
possible.
Tweet The Beat is the latest in a series of
initiatives Sheriff Jeff Dawsy has rolled out following
through with his pledge to partner with the community
through the use of technology.


NEXT TWEET THE BEAT: Wednesday, January 15th 5-10pm
Follow along: @SheriffCitrus


When parking your vehicle to go shopping,
remember where you parked it!
Always park .
in a well lit
and well
traveled area. -
Do not park in a remote dark area.



When you return to yourvehicle,
scan underneath and
the interior of your car
to be sure no one is hiding inside.
Checkto see if you are being followed.


Have your


keys in hand V/ T
when approaching
your vehicle.
You will be ready to unlockthe door and will not be
delayed by fumbling and looking foryour keys.


SWhen storing items
purchased
at the stores, J -

out of sight.
The best place is in J
locked trunk. 4
1^-3



jVRA





Do not leave your purse,
wallet, or cellular
telephone in plain view.


Carry only the


W credit
cards
you
need and /
i/
avoid carrying large
amounts of cash.






If you are purchasing
toys for small children,
be sure that they
are safe.
You will be surprised what a small child
can swallow or what can injure them.


Evicting a Tenant


We receive hundreds of calls
each year regarding evictions and
the legal eviction process. The
1: sheriff's office cannot give legal
advice as to how to go about this
process or what forms are needed.
If you have questions about this
process you can search "Florida
eviction process" online or consult
someone that is legally trained.
However, the sheriff's office
completes the
final step of
the process;
this is the Writ
of Possession. U ,P.l -
The sheriff's ii
office is only |
involved with V!f p
this step of _-.._
the process
and only after a judge signs an
order directing the Writ of
Possession to be issued.
Writs of Possession in
residential cases involve a two-
part process. The sheriff's civil
S office receives the Writ of
Possession along with the fee
typically from the clerk or a private
S attorney and it is entered into our
civil process system. The writ is
then provided to the deputy who


contacts the plaintiff and arranges a
time to complete the eviction. The
deputy makes "service" by posting
the writ to the residence. The
tenants) have 24 hours to vacate
the premises from the time of the
posting.
Once at least 24 hours have
passed the deputy meets the plaintiff
at the residence, removes the
tenants) from the residence and
.then searches
the house to
make sure it
is safe and
.that no
anim als,
children, etc.
S were left by
the tenantss.
The deputy
will stand by for up to 30 minutes
and any additional paid time to
maintain the peace while the
plaintiff has the locks changed and
removes any remaining personnel
items to or near the property line.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office
will post Writs of Possession only
during normal business hours/days.
If ordered by the court the execution
may take place after hours, on
Saturday, or a holiday.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS LIQUORS
3898 N. Lecanto Hwy. (Hwy. 491), Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-7723

LOWEST PRICES!
Prices Good Through December 21, 2013


AIII~


4W"


91 qw
Smirnoff 800...................1799
Captain Morgan.............. 19"99
Johnnie Walker Red....... $2999
Tanqueray Gin................ 2999
Ketel One 80................... 3599


Select Vodka
'15.99 ,tax
-10.00 mail in rebate
$599
1.75 L


....$15.00 Mail in Rebate on 3 btls.
....$35.00 Mail in Rebate on 6 btls.
....$50.00 Mail in Rebate on 8 btls.
Mix & Match
All Plus Tax
1.75L


c Calypso Rum
$13.99 tax
-5.00 mail in rebate

$891.795L


Bacardi White/Gold [I Evan William's E
$1999 $1999
+ tax 4 + tax
S I 1.75 L L I I 9 1.75L
Mail In Rebate I.J |Mail In Rebate
$3.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl. $3.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl.
$15.00 mail-in-rebate on 3 btls. Jw $7.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls.
$40.00 mail-in-rebate on 6 btls. $12.00 mail-in-rebate on 3 btls.


Pinnacle Vodka
$i1199
$9+ tax
1 75 L
Mail In Rebate
$5.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl.
$12.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls.
$21.00 mail-in-rebate on 3 btls.


I
'3
I


Vikingfjord EPIC Vod
$ 6 90 16.996+tax
+ tax -10.00 mail ir
Mail In Rebate99
$10.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl.
$25.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls. 1.75 L


ka


i rebate


U

I--v


* St. Brendan's Irish Cream Pearl Vodka
1n r.99 tat $ 4 99 tax
-8.00 mail in rebate
Mail In Rebate 175L
S9 $5.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl.
$12.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls.
1.75L $20.00 mail-in-rebate on 3 btls.


lack Cli
$17
-4.


uny Scotch Grey Goose 80
.99 n rebate Belvedere 80
00 mail in rebate
%"COW- I tax
1.75L J I$ 91.795L
13"L-."4993


0i


'~ r


K>
fln
ELVIXI


Sobieski Vodka 80 Stoli 80 Ruskova Vodka@
SFris Vodka ff Absolut 80 Seagrams 7
..9 18 2 99' V 99
1I5 1. 75L 2 1 ,.Lf17


Dewars Cutty Sark Famous Grouse Glenlivet
Dear ) A IFireball Glenfiddich

$yj~' 99 $ s99
ft +tax l 39i 2 69 99
1.75L"a1.5 + tax


Ballantines E&J Brandy VS Early Times
John Barr Red Scotch Margaritaville Tequila ZCanadian Mist

$ a 99 I 199 17991
21 +. taxL 1 19 1.7 x LI 17 1


SDon Q Rum
Ron Rico Sliver
91499
+ tax t-w
.^ *4 1.75 L^ j


Admiral Nelson's R
$1499
*d +tax
*^ 1.75L
Mail In Rebate
$5.00 mail-In-rebate on 1 btl.
$10.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls.


Jameson Irish Whiskey
Buffalo Trace R

?$ 99t
r~l ^^.+tax |
391- .^ t 175L ^-


Malibu Coconut
Black Heart Rum Spice
S19 99
Of + tax


Cruzan White/Gold
$I7" x
$5.00 mail-in-rebate on 1 btl.
$12.00 mail-in-rebate on 2 btls. i,
$21.00 mail-in-rebate on 3 btls.


Kentucky Gentleman
Lauder's Scotch



Appleton Rum
Special/White -

$ 9
2 1H 1.75 L -l


,u m Crown Royal Jack Daniels Canadian Hunter
S Jagermeister, 99 R&R

S38.7 S36+ ta5 39


Baileys Irish Cream Ron Abuelo Rum I
Bombay Sapphire Gin Canadian Club E
Ai
$33 +tax +tax8
175, L 8 1 .75L


F
2


Quintessa...................14599 Woodbridge.......... $999 in n
Cakebread Cab.................$7999 Taylor.............99....... ........$999 Heineken
Cakebread Merlot...........$7999 Frontera..............................$899 Stella Artois
Ramey Chard................ $5099 Beringer White Zin.........$999 Co n
Far Niente Chard...............$5999 Sutter Home........................ orona
Twomey Pinot Noir............ $4699 Barefoot...............................99 Samuel Adai
All 750 ml. + tax All 1.5L + tax


Miller Lite k
S13C99 oors Light
Sac Bottles or Cans
1$ $1 99 T
ITS + ax 17 + tax ^B|
12 pack 24 pack


!Jim Beam F !:E&JXO| :CcntJcRu:Sega'Gi

+ ^ tax I: I +! *^tax 1 ^ +[" \ I B +tax _--I
3I V DY 1.75IL 11 DA S 1.75L 13 DA SP 1.75AL -1 DAY SPECAL:
-------------------------------JL- - - - - - --__ ___JL- - - - - - --__ ___J L- - - - - - --^^ ^^^^


tebel Yell 3
:ra Brooks

+ tax
1.75 L


I


I


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__j


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A9


I


i




AIO SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


Obituaries


Gerald
Bernier, 82
HERNANDO
Gerald G. Bernier, age
82, of Hernando, Fla.,
passed away Dec. 11, 2013,
at his home under the lov-
ing care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County
He was born March 4,
1931, in Sherbrooke, On-
tario, to Rene and Annette
(Guilmette) Bernier.
Gerald moved to Citrus
County 17 years ago from
Pine Island, Fla. He was
self-employed in the Lawn
Care business and an
Army veteran. Gerald was
a member of the American
Legion Post 155 of Crystal
River and he was Catholic.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by his wife, Kay; son,
Guy; and sister, Jean. Ger-
ald is survived by his
daughter, Diane L.
Branch; son, David
Bernier; three grandchil-
dren; five great-grandchil-
dren; several nieces and
nephews, cousins and
many friends.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Charlotte
Clemo, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
Mrs. C. Charlotte Clemo,
age 79 of Beverly Hills,
Florida, died Friday, De-
cember 13, 2013 in Inver-
ness, FL. She was born
July 31,1934 in Dodgeville,
WI, daughter of Franklin
and Anna (Moyer) Camp-
bell. She worked as a cus-
tomer service
representative for Land's
End and moved to Beverly
Hills from Wisconsin in
1988. Mrs. Clemo was a
member of the Beverly
Hills Surveillance detail
and Crystal River United
Methodist Church.
She was preceded in
death by her parents and
daughter, Camy Nelson
(2012). Survivors include
her husband of 62 years,
Richard J. Clemo, son,
Rick Clemo, 2 brothers,
Donald "Dick" and Jack, 3
sisters, Alice, Judy and
Sandy, 3 grandchildren,
Chad, Adam and Travis
Spurley and 2 great grand-
children, Sam and Max
Spurley
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory

Thelma
Miller, 86
DUNNELLON
Thelma M. Miller, 86, of
Dunnellon, Fla., died Fri-
day, Dec. 13, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.









:1Jd=I]* I [ I II I :. @l I






To Place Your
/ "In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior


Closing time for placing
ad is 4 business days
prior to run date.
There are advanced deadlines
for holidays.


Ana Danois, 92
WESTCHESTER, PA.
Ana Ellen Danois, 92,
formerly of Inverness,
died Dec. 11, 2013, in
Westchester, Pa. Born in
Puerto Rico on July 9,
1921, she was the daughter
of the late Nemencio
Falero and Quintina (Bir-
riel) Falero and moved to
Florida in 1975 from Jam-
ica N.Y She was a member
of the First Spanish
Church of Inverness.
Survivors include her
children, David Danois of
Plainfield, N.J., and Sixto
Danois Jr. of Inverness;
three sisters, Mirian, Rita
and Carmen Falero; and
many grandchildren and
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
her husband, Sixto Danois
Sr, in 1983; and her daugh-
ter, Damaris Danois Flud,
in 2002.
Funeral services will be
conducted at2 p.m. Thurs-
day, Dec. 19, from Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
the Rev David Pinero offi-
ciating. Burial will follow
in Oak Ridge Cemetery
Friends may call at the fu-
neral home Thursday from
1 p.m. until the hour of
service.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.


Emma
LoCastro, 90
On Nov 13, 2013, Emma
D. LoCastro, 90, gracefully
passed away at Hospice
House of
Citrus
County in*
Lecanto
s u r
rounded
by her lov-
ing family Emma
She was LoCastro
preceded
in death by her husband,
Frank Jos. LoCastro in
2003. Left to celebrate her
life are her children, Gem
Gibney and husband
Bryan, F, Joseph LoCas-
tro, Linda LoCastro,
Sheila DiMarino, Maria
DiMichele; six grandchil-
dren; and 10 great-grand-
children; sisters, Mary
Dennison, Christina
Farnsworth and Adeline
Stark.
A Mass will be at St.
Benedict's Catholic
Church in Crystal River at
10 a.m. Monday, Dec. 16,
2013, followed by inter-
ment at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in
Bushnell. The family is
grateful for the tender and
gentle care she received at
Hospice House Lecanto.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily asks that a donation be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County in Emma's name.
Strickland Funeral Home
is assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. IL
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralheom


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you


James
Parrish, 57
INVERNESS
James L. Parrish, 57, of
Inverness, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Dec. 10,
2013, under the care of
HPH Hos-
pice in
Lecanto.
He was
b o r nK
Jan. 28, *i
1956, in
Cam-
bridge, ,
Ohio, to James
the late Parrish
Kenneth
D. and Mary J. (Cakmis)
Parrish. James arrived in
this area in 1984, coming
from Cambridge, and was
founder and previous
owner of Top Gun Lawn
Care of Citrus County He
enjoyed camping, riding
ATV's, and the outdoors.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 25 years, Kim
Parrish. Other survivors
include children Brandon
J.(Ciara) Parrish of Sum-
merfield, Fla., and Britney
Parrish of Inverness; son
David (Stacey) Smith of In-
verness; brothers Kenneth
D., John R. and Robert W
Parrish, and grand-daugh-
ters Destany and Megan
Smith. He was preceded in
death by brother Thomas
K. Parrish.
In lieu of flowers, the
family has established a
memorial fund in Jim's
name. Please visit: www
youcaring.com/jimparrish
if you would like to send a
donation. Private crema-
tion arrangements under
the care of Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.



C6.EL . 4
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation \.' i F I
--- .i,..,,..ii <., -

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


SATURDAY


FRE D~Mn~riaft or Wel
Wihte.ueaeofayma


Cristie
Wagner, 45
Cristie Lynn Wagner,
passed away Dec. 7, 2013.
Cris was born Sept. 30,
1968, in Michigan to Shel-
don and Jeannette Frank.
After grad-
uating .
from Pin-
conning -
High she -
relocated
to Florida
where she
met and
married Cristie
her hus- Wagner
band Zola
Wagn e r
while working at Winn-
Dixie.
Cris will be welcomed in
heaven by many loved
ones, including her
mother, Jeanette Frank.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Zola Wagner; daugh-
ter, Krystalyn Wagner;
and niece and daughter
in heart, Breanna
Dristiliaris.
She was a dear friend to
many, and this last year of
life was spent simply en-
joying life to the fullest
and loving without limits.
We will miss her every day
but we find comfort know-
ing that she is always with
us. She always loved sit-
ting on the porch with her
coffee and now she has the
most beautiful view
Condolences may be ex-
pressed online at www
macdonaldfuneral. com.

SO YOU KNOW
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)


Jeffrey 'JB'
Warner, 39
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jeffrey "JB" Warner, 39,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
Dec. 10, 2013, at the Citrus
Memorial
hospital in
Inverness.
He was
born n
Aug. 11,
1974, in
Lima,




joyeddrag raign
Ohio, to
John and Jeffrey
D o n n a Warner
(Ferguson)
Warner. He came here 20
years ago from Wa-
pakoneta, Ohio. He was an
electrician, an Oldsmobile
enthusiast. He was nick-
named "Olds Man," he en-
joyed drag racing and
music. JB was of the Pen-
tecostal faith.
He is survived by his
parents John and Donna
Warner of Locust Grove,
Ga.; his son, Brandon Jef-
frey Warner of Crystal
River; his fiance, Tina
Rouille of Crystal River; a
stepdaughter, Kristin
Rouille of Crystal River; a
brother, John Warner II
(Gina) of McDonough, Ga.;
his maternal grandmother,
Lucille Ferguson of Sid-
ney, Ohio; three nephews,
John III, Carson, and
Caden Warner; and many
close friends.
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 6 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at
the Strickland Fubneral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, where a memorial
service will be conducted
at 6 p.m., with Pastor James
Sleighter officiating.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


Sloppy Joe w/chips..................... 3.95


F W. .r:.:.u *LLLtL----- a


- "1" l ii O EL IL'I| amzu a


OPEN I AM MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3 AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373


Celebration of Lights

Dec. 19 through Dec. 24 & Dec. 26,2013 5:30-9:00 p.m.
"'Le ,__ at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
PHOMOSPSSP Wildlife State Park
rIM MM Sponsored by the Friends of
WILDLIFE PRRM Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park, Inc.
SFeaturing
MSA Sebastian's Winter Wonderland
M C Synchronized Light and Sound Show
MWIUFE PARK in the Garden of the Springs presented by
Sebastian Hawes and hosted by Joe Dube
Refreshments at the Miss-L-Toe Cafe


Thurs., Dec. 19

Fri., Dec. 20


Sat., Dec. 21


Sun., Dec. 22

Mon., Dec. 23


Tues., Dec. 24


Thurs., Dec. 26


Cajun Christmas
featuring Cajun Dave, sponsored by Neon Leon's
Hearts to Hands Deaf Choir
performs in the Garden of Springs
sponsored by Walmart
Visit Santa and Mrs. Claus
with performances by Sophie Robitaille,
sponsored by Sunbelt Rentals
Visit Santa and Mrs. Claus
sponsored by Sunbelt Rentals
A Country Christmas
featuring Nashville's Brittany Bolger
sponsored by McDonalds
Christmas Eve
with Nature Coast Community Church's
Candlelight Christmas
After Christmas Party
hosted by Joe Dube with special performances by Elvis
(Billy Lindsey), sponsored by Citrus County Corvette Club


Suggested Donations: $3.00 for adults; $1.00 for children ages 6-12;
children 5 and under are free.
Transportation by tram provided from US 19 Visitor Center


HIGH OCTANE SALOON & GRILL
Daily Drink & Entertainment Specials
Live Concert 1 PMI
SUNDAY Southern Branded Country Jam 7:30 PM VPot Roast ...................... .3.95
MONDAY All Day Happy Hour $2 Wells, $2 Domestic Bottles, $1 Drafts & 49 Wings
FREE Drafts Kill the Keg Party 10 PM Flat Iron Steak v,/2 sides..................... 7.95
TUESDAY (Must wear an Octane Shirt)
Bill Castner 50s & 60s Concert 7:30 PM Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell... Beef .79 .. Chicken .99
Karaoke 8 PMI All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread
WEDNESDAY Hump Day Blues w/Mighty Past Tense $ c
$3 Jager Bombs, $1 Drafts, $2.50 Wells (Add side salad for $1.00)........................ 8.95
All You Can Drink Liquor $15- Drafts $5 (9-12) PORK HP
THURSDAY $2.50 Youngling Bottles, 1 Yuengling Drafts 1 LB. PORK CHOPS -
Ladies Night 9-12 Free Wells & Drafts w/potatoes & vegetable............ .95
FIDAy Ladies in FREE til 10 PM & 2 for 1 Wells 9 10 PM Bonkerz comedy club 7:30 Inpmsurf & turf (Prime Rib n Shrimp) $12.95
RI A Guys Enjoy $1 Drafts 9 10 PM Purchase the surfEturfseethecomedyshowforfree.PrimeRib nShrimp availableafter4pm.


2 Live Concerts 1 & 9 PM DJ 9 PM


Vaion, r.onrgla_ rc mn- esol.- ,pn xie 1/11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


i


0 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PARADE
Continued from Page Al

citizen of the United
States," said Malcolm
Montgomery "Without our
service men and women
fighting for our country we
wouldn't be able to enjoy
such a wonderful parade
like today in peace."
Elected officials, local
organizations and busi-
nesses promenaded east
on State Road 44 from
Pizza Hut to Highland
Boulevard.
From antique cars to
marching bands to Sunny
the Cooter, young and old
alike joined in the holiday
spirit. Ronald McDonald
and Frosty the Snowman
also made appearances,
much to the delight of
many children.
Sponsored by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce and the City of In-
verness, 82 floats, walkers
and entertainers followed
the lead of Grand Marshal
Norine Gilstrap former
Citrus County tax collector


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
One of Santa's helpers passes by and watches as children line up to receive Christmas
necklaces from parade participant LIFT at the Inverness Christmas parade Saturday.


While festively be-
decked paraders passed
by and exchanged friendly
waves with the crowd,
echoes of Christmas
wishes and caroling was
heard.
"Merry Christmas,"
shouted back 3-year-old


MaKenzie Johnson.
And Santa and Mrs.
Claus thought they had es-
caped any form of liquid
condensation by coming to
Florida. However, just as
they were to make their
grand entrance on the
double-decker bus, the


skies opened up.
But that didn't stop them
from wishing everyone a
Merry Christmas.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or email eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


It rained on the Inverness Christmas parade Saturday.
Just as the last couple of floats were getting ready to
enter the parade, the sprinkles started and those who
had umbrellas brought them out.





eAB 13


LOCAL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 All










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Brrrr!


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Sheriff: Gunman planned to hurt more


Associated Press
A statue of Abraham
Lincoln wears a cape of
snow Satruday at Carle
Park in Urbana, III. A
late-autumn storm dumped
more than half a foot of
snow on parts of central
Illinois overnight.

Snowstorm begins
trek into Northeast
HARRISBURG, Pa.--A
fast-moving storm expected
to drop a foot of snow or
more in the Northeast over
the weekend moved into
the region Saturday as
road crews went on high
alert and airlines began
canceling flights.
Utilities braced for power
outages, airports prepared
for delays and local officials
readied for slick roads while
shoppers headed out to
stores to tackle gift lists
during a shorter-than-nor-
mal holiday shopping
season.
The National Weather
Service has said 6 to 12
inches of snow was ex-
pected in New England,
with as much as 14 inches
possible along the Maine
coast. Areas north and west
of New York City and cen-
tral Pennsylvania could get
8 inches or more.
About half a foot was
forecast in parts of Ohio,
where snow began falling
overnight.
Airlines have canceled
about 940 flights because
of the storm, mostly in the
Northeast and Midwest. Al-
most 350 flights into and
out of Newark, N.J., have
been canceled, and 172 at
Chicago's O'Hare airport
have been called off. Ex-
pressJet and United have
canceled the most flights so
far.
Teacher disciplined
for Santa remark
RIO RANCHO, N.M. -
A New Mexico high school
teacher has been disci-
plined after a parent says
the man told his black son
that Santa Claus is white.
Officials at the school in
Rio Rancho, about 15 miles
north of Albuquerque, an-
nounced Friday that the
teacher recently was disci-
plined for his comments to
the student, but they de-
clined to say how, KOB-TV
reported.
The move came after
students at Cleveland High
School were told they could
come to class dressed as
Santa, an elf or a reindeer.
Michael Rougier said his
ninth-grade son, Christo-
pher, arrived wearing a
Santa hat and beard, and
the teacher asked the boy:
"Don't you know Santa
Claus is white? Why are
you wearing that?"
The teacher's name was
not released, and attempts
by The Associated Press to
reach school officials Satur-
day were unsuccessful.
Michael Rougier said the
teacher's comments en-
raged him.
"There's no room for that
in the classroom," he said.
"Whether this teacher felt
Christopher may have been
wearing this out of context,
there's no room for it.
There's just no room for it."
The incident happened
the same week that Fox
News Channel's Megyn
Kelly said on the air that
both Santa Claus and
Jesus were white. Her com-
ments drew national atten-
tion and prompted a slew of
heated comments on blogs
and social media sites.
-From wire reports


18-year-old had

shotgun, machete,

incendiary devices

Associated Press
CENTENNIAL, Colo. -An 18-
year-old who wounded a fellow
student before killing himself at a
suburban Denver school had en-
tered the building with a shotgun,
a machete and three incendiary


devices in his backpack and had
ammunition strapped to his body,
authorities said Saturday
Arapahoe County Sheriff
Grayson Robinson said Karl Pier-
son likely was motived by retalia-
tion against a faculty member -
probably a librarian at the school
- when he opened fire Friday at
Arapahoe High School. Robinson
said it appears the librarian
was the initial target but that
Pierson planned to hurt multiple
people.
Robinson said at a news confer-
ence that the teen bought the


pump-action shotgun legally
Dec. 6 at a local store.
Anyone older than 18 is allowed
to buy a shotgun in Colorado; only
those over 21 can legally buy a
handgun.
Also Saturday Robinson identi-
fied the wounded student as 17-
year-old Claire Esther Davis.
Robinson said Davis was seated
with a friend near the door Pier-
son used to enter the school when
Pierson shot her at point-blank
range.
Davis wasn't a specific, in-
tended target, the sheriff said.


_..-

Associated Press
A makeshift memorial with crosses for the victims of the Sandy Hook massacre stands outside a home in
Newtown, Conn., Saturday, marking the one-year anniversary of the shootings.





One year later



Bells toll in Newtown for school shooting victims


Associated Press
NEWTOWN, Conn. Bells
tolled 26 times to honor the chil-
dren and educators killed one year
ago in a shooting rampage at Sandy
Hook Elementary School as local
churches held memorial services
and the country marked the an-
niversary with events including a
White House moment of silence.
With snow falling and homes
decorated with Christmas lights,
Newtown looked every bit the clas-
sic New England town, with a cof-
fee shop and general store doing
steady business. But reminders of
the private grief were everywhere.
"God bless the families," read a
sign posted at one house in the
green and white colors of the
Sandy Hook school, and a church
posted that it was "open for
prayer"
Ryan Knaggs, a chef who lives in
Newtown, said that as the bells
tolled he thought of two young vic-
tims who played soccer with his 7-
year-old daughter


"The echo of the bells, knowing
some of the children personally,
you feel the exactitude with each
bell ... the exactitude of the loss
and the grief," Knaggs said.
The bells rang 26 times at St.
Rose of Lima church in Newtown
beginning at 9:30 a.m. the mo-
ment the gunman shot his way into
the school on Dec. 14, 2012 and
names of the victims were read
over a loudspeaker Connecticut's
governor had asked for bells to ring
across Connecticut and directed
that flags be lowered to half-staff.
In Washington, the president and
first lady Michelle Obama lit 26 vo-
tive candles set up on a table in the
White House Map Room one
each for the 20 children and six ed-
ucators.
In his weekly radio address re-
leased hours earlier, Obama said
the nation hasn't done enough to
make its communities safer by
keeping dangerous people from
getting guns and healing troubled
minds. Gun restrictions backed by
the president in response to the


shooting faced stiff opposition and
ultimately stalled in the Democrat-
controlled Senate.
"We have to do more to keep
dangerous people from getting
their hands on a gun so easily We
have to do more to heal troubled
minds. We have to do everything
we can to protect our children from
harm and make them feel loved,
and valued, and cared for," Obama
said.
Anniversary observances were
held around the country including
in Tucson, Ariz., where former con-
gresswoman Gabrielle Giffords
and her husband were planting a
yellow rose bush in a memorial
garden created after the 2011
shooting that nearly killed her Gif-
fords' husband, Mark Kelly said it
is important to pause and support
families of the Newtown victims.
In Denver, a day after a student
critically wounded a classmate and
killed himself at Colorado's Arapa-
hoe High School, more than 200
people gathered to sing and offer
prayers for Newtown.


Mandela makes final journey home in SAfrica


Associated Press
QUNU, South Africa Nelson
Mandela came home Saturday
A hearse carrying Mandela's body
drove into his hometown in rural
South Africa ahead of burial Sunday,
returning the country's peacemaker
to the place where he had always
wanted to die.
It was here in Qunu that Mandela
roamed the hills and tended live-
stock as a youth, absorbing lessons
about discipline and consensus from
traditional chiefs. From here he em-
barked on a journey the "long
walk to freedom" as he put it that
thrust him to the forefront of black
South Africans' struggle for equal
rights that resonated around the
world.
As motorcyclists in uniform and ar-
mored personnel carriers escorted
the vehicle carrying Mandela's casket
to the family compound, people lining


Motorcycles escort a hen
the casket of former So
President Nelson Mandel
Waterkloof Air Base on t
of Pretoria, South Africa,

the route sang, applaud
some cases, wept
The vehicle carrying
casket, covered with a n


arrived at the family compound
-. under cloudy skies at 4 p.m. It was
accompanied by an enormous con-
j voy of police, military and other ve-
hicles, and a military helicopter
hovered overhead.
According to Xhosa tribal tradi-
tion, Mandela was honored as a
leader by placing a leopard skin on
the coffin, replacing the flag.
Mandela's journey started Satur-
day with pomp and ceremony at an
air base in the capital before being
flown aboard a military plane to this
Associated Press simple village in the wide-open
arse carrying spaces of eastern South Africa.
south African At the Mthatha airport Mandela's
a en route to casket was welcomed by a military
the outskirts guard and placed in a convoy for the
Saturday. 20 mile voyage toward Qunu.
Residents and people who had
dled and, in traveled for hours thronged a road
leading to Qunu, singing and danc-
SMandela's ing as Mandela T-shirts were
national flag, handed out.


"She is an innocent young lady,
and she was an innocent victim of
an evil act of violence,"
Robinson said. Davis remained
hospitalized Saturday in critical
condition.
Robinson said Pierson bought
ammunition Friday and went to
the school armed with multiple
rounds.
The sheriff believes the teen in-
tended to harm many more peo-
ple but ended up killing himself
less than two minutes after enter-
ing the school because he knew a
sheriff's deputy was closing in.


I World BRIEFS

Crackdown


Associated Press
The moon rises Saturday
night over a Pro-European
Union rally in the
Independence Square in
Kiev, Ukraine. The
opposition has called for
a vast turnout to a rally
on Sunday.

Crackdown leads
to Ukraine probe
KIEV, Ukraine Ukrain-
ian authorities on Saturday
attempted to appease anti-
government protesters who
have been demonstrating in
the center of the capital for
weeks by opening investi-
gations against four top offi-
cials over the violent
break-up of a small rally last
month.
But opposition leaders
dismissed the move as a
half-measure and around
100,000 protesters turned
out singing the national an-
them in Kiev central square
to demand that the presi-
dent and the government
resign.
The brutal police raid in
the early hours of Nov. 30
galvanized the pro-Western
protests sparked by Presi-
dent Viktor Yanukovych's
decision to back away from
signing a key integration
treaty with the European
Union, and instead turned
toward Russia. Since that
day's violence, protesters
have also been demanding
Yanukovych's ouster and
early elections.
2 Peacekeepers
killed in Mali
DAKAR, Senegal -A
bombing killed at least two
U.N. peacekeepers in Mali
and seriously wounded sev-
eral others in the troubled
northern city of Kidal, U.N.
officials said Saturday.
A car packed with explo-
sives detonated in front of a
bank guarded by the
peacekeepers, an intelli-
gence official in northern
Mali said. The explosion
blew open the doors of
houses in the area.
The official, who spoke
on condition of anonymity
because he wasn't author-
ized to speak to the media,
said the fatalities were two
Senegalese peacekeepers.
Abdallah Ag Ibrahim, a
resident of Kidal, said the
bank crumbled, a U.N. ar-
mored personnel car caught
fire, and a nearby school
was in flames. He said he
saw four people who were
either dead or injured.
Kidal, located about
1,000 miles northeast of
Mali's capital, is where an
ethnic Tuareg rebellion
began in late 2011.
French Foreign Minister
Laurent Fabius condemned
"the cowardly attack," which
came just before Sunday's
second round of legislative
elections, meant to restore
constitutional order in Mali.
-From wire reports


I







I Travel & Leisure


EXCURSIONS


Special to me unronicie
TOP: Astorga is a town in the province of Le6n, northern Spain. It lies 27 miles
southwest of the provincial capital of Le6n. ABOVE: Santa Maria de Le6n Cathedral,
also called The House of Light or the Pulchra Leonina, is situated in the city of Le6n
in northwestern Spain.


p



Barry Schwartz
For the Chronicle

The Camino de Santiago, or Way of St. James, follows a
Christian Pilgrimage route that is more than 1,000 years old.
The Apostle James is the patron saint of Spain. Christian stories
state that after his martyrdom in the Holy Land, his followers
carried his body back beyond the Pillars of Hercules (the Strait
of Gibraltar) and his body was buried where the cathedral in
Santiago stands now.
Around the year 800, a hermit living in the Galicia region of Spain had a vi-
sion in which he saw the ancient tomb. The local bishop eventually built a vil-
lage on the site that was named Santiago. Pilgrims started to journey to
Santiago to earn an indulgence, which frees a person from the penance due
for sins. This legend also was used as a rallying cry as the Catholics in Spain
battled to drive the Moors from their 1,000-year control of the land. So many
pilgrims journeyed across Europe for this pilgrimage that many facilities were
developed along the route.
The modern pilgrim, or perigrino, has many reasons for doing this walk
today religious, spiritual, cultural and sport. A compoestela, or certificate of
completion, is issued to the pilgrim who presents a credential that has been
stamped at each town along the way, if they walk the last 100 kilometers or
cycle the last 200 kilometers.
My college roommates from 40-plus years ago, Phil Dunetz, from Boca
Raton and Allan Estroff, from Denver, and I decided after watching the Martin
Sheen movie "The Way" to ride mountain bicycles 465 miles from Pamplona in
See Page A15


Q~yh~~o a




A14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 15, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus S.B: Bright House D:Comcas Dunnellon& Inglis F: Oak Forest H:. Holiday Heights
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Accept their


gifts with grace


D earAnnie: For
the past few years
at Christmas, my
husband and I have do-
nated to an animal shel-
ter instead of receiving
or giving gifts. It makes
our giving complete to
give to others in need.
We generally cele-
brate Christmas with my
stepdaughter and her
family at their home a
few hours
away We tell
them in ad-
vance that we
will be donat-
ing to an ani-
mal shelter
and ask that
they also
consider it.
Last year,
there were
gifts from
them to us ANN
under the MI
tree. Mean- MAIL
while, we
brought nothing and felt
terrible. They don't
seem to understand
when we tell them the
only gift we need is a do-
nation to an animal shel-
ter Is there a way for us
to feel more gracious
about receiving their
gifts when we brought
nothing for them?
Should we bring gifts
this year? I realize they


are giving us a "hint" to
do so, but our hearts
aren't in it. Grinch in
Arizona
Dear Grinch: They
aren't giving you hints.
You prefer donations,
but they do not, and you
don't get to tell them
what to give you. Bring a
card, preferably from
the animal shelter, say-
ing a donation has been
made in their
honor That's
your gift to
them, and it's
lovely
DearAnnie:
I am replying
to "Frus-
trated," the
gentleman who
has been mar-
ried for 27
years. I, too,
IE'S have been mar-
ried for 27
years. In the
beginning, sex
was white hot. After a
while, it became pleas-
urable, but not the cen-
ter of our relationship.
Then I developed
prostate cancer We stud-
ied all of the options and
chose prostatectomy
Now I can't "perform"
anymore.
But our marriage is
much stronger Count
your blessings.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Best Man Holiday" (R)
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Delivery Man" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 5p.m.,
8p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 11:10 a.m.,
1:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D.
4:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)3 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)In 3D.
11 a.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)In 3D,
high frame rate. 11:30 a.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Homefront" (R) 11:25 a.m.,
2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m.,
2:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13)
11:15 a.m., 1:45 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Out of the Furnace" (R)
11:50 a.m., 3:45 p.m.,


7:40 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's 'A Madea
Christmas'" (PG-13)
11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:45 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Delivery Man" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D.
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13) 12p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug" (PG-13)In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


DOWN
1 French
impressionist painter
6 Pro-
10 Escape
15 Mil. rank
18 Likeness
19 Fit in
21 Deadly
22 Miss a step
24 Malignant spirit
25 City in Portugal
26 Chassis
27 Indian queen
28 Word with middle or
mental
29 King's seat
31 Extend to
33 Fall
35 Impudent talk
37 River in France
38 Small songbird
39 Shake
40 Wrinkled fruit
42 Ointment
43 Theater part
44 Bold
46 Inane
47 Destroy with fire
48 Road division
52 Prompt
53 Kind of lily
54 Gumshoe
56 Vast expanse
57 Overturn
58 Constitutional
59 F. Fitzgerald
60 Fertile spot in a desert
62 River sediment
63 Dry gully
65 Male swan
66 In an abrupt
manner
67 Chem. or biol., e.g.
68 Poetic time of day
69 George Bernard-
71 Kind of onion
73 Abbr. in footnotes (2
wds.)
75 Japanese
statesman
76 To any degree
(2 wds.)
77 Statute
78 Spheres
82 Something of value


84 Yield by treaty
85 Imprison
86 Whitney or
Wallach
87 Gaius Caesar
90 Monk's title
91 Mended
93 Level
94 Make very worried
95 Seething
97 Swerve
98 Fad
99 Roadhouse
100 Followed orders
102 Explosion
104 Itineraries
105 "- and the Tramp"
107 Fine and liberal
108 Urge
109 Whigs'opponents
110 Hit song from
yesteryear
112 Speedy
113 Pleasure trip
114 Make less severe
117 Transparent
118 God of war
119 Egg portion
123 Alter
124 Greek epic
125 Stiletto
127 Animal enclosure
128 Chinese secret society
129 Jockey
131 Come to be
133 and kicking
135 Glut
136 Brilliance
137 Pleasing to hear
138 Discussion group
139 Household god
140 Compositions
for two
141 Fashion name
142 An alloy



ACROSS
1 Golden-touch king
2 Last letter
3 Calls
4 Sense of self
5 Portable shelter
6 Rest
7 With no others


Ripped
Insect
Rub out
Coniferous tree
The Beehive State
Water barrier
Babar the -
Cheese-filled
pastry
Magnificent
Little bit
Dull
Big ape
Landing place
Go after
relentlessly
A deadly sin
Haul
Go quickly
Autumn
Vain gait
Peel
Smooth and
lustrous
Fat
Portray
Aviator Earhart
Parlor
Shapeless mass
Helper (Abbr.)
Young or Simon
Effortless
Charlotte -
Root vegetable
Frown
Period of time
Penned
Climbed
Woody's son
Wrongly
Relating to bone
Cried like a crow
Possessed
World
Avid
Animal habitation
Bitter
Tell
Conflagrations
Building locales
Japanese sport
Salad plant
Hoosegow
Skeleton part
Country
Enemies


"Stop!," at sea
Like punch drinks
Eagle's nest
Unit of computer info
Maize
Pestered
Covered in crumbs
Wanton look
Awaken
Not as senior


Entreaty
Bull's-eye
Fall behind
Plays at love
Mick of the Stones
Behaves
Sandbank
- Clara
Anti-slip device
- Polo


Think
River wall
Bell sound
Doing nothing
Sandwich store, for short
Knocks
Hospital area (Abbr.)
Mire
Dead lang.


Puzzle answer is on Page A19.


12-15


2013 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAMINO
Continued from Page A13


eastern Spain at the foot
of the Pyrenees to Santi-
ago near the western edge
of Spain. We met in
Madrid, took a train to
Pamplona and then as-
sembled our rental bicy-
cles. As you can see from
the elevation profile of
the route, we had several
mountain ranges to climb
as we crossed Spain.

Days 1 to 4: Pamplona
to Burgos 137 miles
We walked many of the
streets that you see in July
when they do the running
of the bulls. Traveling
through the small towns of
the Spanish countryside
is very different than the
tourist circuit of Madrid
to Barcelona. Everytime
we looked lost, someone
helped us and very
quickly we learned that
when you come upon an-
other pilgrim you say
"Buen Camino" for have a
good walk. As we left Pam-
plona, we tested our legs
on a 900-foot rise. At first,
we stayed in dormitory-
style hostels. After a few
days of not sleeping well
in the larger dormitories,
we decide to stay in small,
inexpensive hostels. After
four days of riding, we
stayed in Burgos for our
first rest day

Days 5 to 8: Burgos
to Astorga 136 miles
Our next major hill had
a 12 percent grade and
the downhill was scary at
18 percent It was easy to
find places to take breaks
along the trail with a cof-
fee con leche, a snack or
beer We spent a second
rest day in Leon, another
town with a historic past,
Roman walls and an
800-year-old cathedral.

Days 9 to 11 Astorga
to O'Cebreiro 80 miles
As we left Astorga, we
had averaged 30 miles
each day on our bikes. On
Day 10 of riding, one of my
friends woke up in severe
pain from an infection. We
decided, since we were in
an isolated mountain vil-
lage, to hire a taxi to get
him to a hospital in the
next town. After some
treatment, the doctors said
he could rest in Madrid
and then continue with
some sightseeing that does
not involve the bicycle.
The next day, I caught
up with some my British
friends, and we rode to-
gether up the longest and
steepest climb of the
Camino, O'Cebreiro Pass.
Just off the summit we
found a farm that an eld-
erly couple had turned


Special to the Chronicle
LEFT: Barry Schwartz travels on Camino trail during a biking expedition. RIGHT: Schwartz's route is shown.


into a cozy, small hotel.
Two Aussies joined us and
we had an amazing fam-
ily-style meal with lots of
wine.

Days 12 to 14 O'Cebreiro
to Santiago de Compostela
-102 miles
Kim, a Korean rocket
scientist and Omar, a
Basque bus driver, joined
our growing group of rid-
ers. They are staying in
pilgrim dormitories with
many bunk beds and lots
of snorers. The next day,
our riding family contin-
ues to grow as Anders and
Christian, two young
Basque men, joined us.
We cycled for miles down
a quiet country lane with
an impossibly green land-
scape that felt like it was
untouched for hundreds
of years.
This last stretch of the
Camino is in Galicia and
is known for its rain. It did
not disappoint. It rained


the whole day, and not
just a drizzle, but a down-
pour!
Finally, the sun came
out. We received our
Camino completion cer-
tificates and we attended
the pilgrims mass in the
cathedral. A nun with a
beautiful voice sang. At
the end of the service,
they burned incense in a
giant container and
started swinging it around
the church. This dates
back to when pilgrims


brought disease. The in-
cense was to cover the
odor from all the dirty
clothes and bodies. Most
of us after riding for two
weeks, or walking 40
days, did not smell any
better than the pilgrims
from long ago.

Back to Madrid
I returned to my
Madrid hotel on Puerta
del Sol, (much like Times
Square in NYC) and
there were throngs of


S


SPEND TIME WITH YOUR
FAMILY THIS CHRISTMAS
NOT IN THE KITCHEN

CHRISTMAS DAY BUFFET
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 25
1 2pr.1-8pr.1
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1: .. 11l' i .1. i. i '- : 1 I I f H DIP
ENTPE LS *: ; ';.* '..: i;.rmo Is 1: ^
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Sl.-. : i I ", : l ,; : ,: . ':. Ii 0;; OES, CRANBERRY SAUCE
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people, two different
groups demonstrating and
dozens of buskers working
the crowd. The pickpock-
ets must have been having


a field day I met Allan
and Phil in Madrid for
one more dinner together
My only goal for my last
night in Spain was to find
a place showing NFL foot-
ball. Mission accom-
plished!
Had shepard's pie while
watching the Broncos beat
Washington at a sports
bar
People were incredibly
nice everywhere in Spain,
the trip exceeded my ex-
pectations, but I was
ready to be home.

Barry Schwartz and his
wife, Bette, live at the end
of Ozello Trail with their
mountain-climbing dog,
Rowdy. They are retired
teachers who now split
their time between 0
zello and the Colorado
Mountains. Email him at
schwartzbb@gmail.com.


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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A15


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A16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


Food Truck Wars battles it out in Crystal River


Crystal River Mall

Saturday, December 7,2013


Linda and Malcolm Holmes, Jan and Dan
Atwood


Vesto Meakins, Allison Meakins, Phoebe
Passafiume, Parker Passafiume


Steve and Eileen Finley


Abigail Hago, Annabelle Ty, Lukas Hago


Tiffany and Mitch Anderson


Randy and Aileen David


Gail Wilson and Linda Byrd Jen and Ryan Downs


Kay and Rob Wolf


Scott and Debroah Breeland


Cindy and Doug Hinton


Beverly and Marty Kusy


Carol and Kevin McGuigan


Donna and Nick Nichols


Allison Rockefeller and Amanda
Rockefeller


Photos by Eryn Worthington


SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










E RANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Legion post to host dance
Everyone is welcome at the Sunday Nite
Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. today at American
Legion Post 347 at the corner of County
Road 466 and Rolling Acres Road in Lady
Lake.
Donation is $10 and includes snacks.
For more information, call 352-304-8672.

Legion to serve pasta dinner
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve an Italian pasta dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 20, at the post, 6585
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Everyone is welcome; donation is $7.
All profits support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary For more
information, call Unit President Barbara
Logan at 352-795-4233.

Post invites all to come jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 20, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Post plans market, breakfast
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 will
have its outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 21.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausage, orange
juice and coffee for a $5 donation.

All welcome at free dinner
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 in-
vites the public to a free Christmas dinner
from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday Dec. 25.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Donations will be accepted, but are not
necessary

Celebrate new year with post
Come and enjoy New Year's Eve from
3 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, atVFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills.
Tickets are $20 per person, which in-
cludes a prime rib dinner, a band, dancing,
party favors and champagne toast. Cash
bar available.
Tickets are on sale until Dec. 25. There
will be no late sales.
For information, call 352-746-0440.

Post to host poker run
American Legion Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, will host a benefit poker
run Saturday, Jan. 25, with proceeds sup-
porting Moffitt Cancer Center Ovarian
Cancer Research and patients and fami-
lies served by Hospice of Citrus County
A $15 entry fee per rider will include a
poker hand, a raffle prize ticket and a
meal at the end of the run. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m. at American Legion
Post 237 in Beverly Hills. Kick stands are
up at 10 a.m. and the last bike in will be at
4:30 p.m. when food will be served.
The fourth annual American Legion
Post 237 Poker Run will encompass six
stops to include: Inglis Amvets, IRRU So-
cial Club, Giovanni's, Crystal River Eagles,
Mickey's Billiards and Scoreboards.
The best hand will win the poker run
and all vehicles are welcome to partici-
pate. Music will be provided by The Joes.
There will be a silent auction, door prize
raffles and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information, call 352-746-5018
or John Roby at 352-341-5856.

Cooties to serve roast beef
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76
will serve a roast beef din-
ner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. f
Friday, Jan. 31, at Leroy
Rooks Jr VFW Post 4252
in Hernando (3190 N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, State Road
200, where the helicopter is).
The public is invited.
Advance tickets are $7 and |
$7.50 at the door. Tickets
can be purchased at Post
4252. Call the post at 352-
726-3339 or Seam Squirrel
Paul Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start
at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.


Secret suppliers


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
World War II survivor Ron O'Hara and his wife, Marcia, explain Ron's typical mission of parachuting spys and equipment to
various locations over France from 1943 to 1945. O'Hara was the tail gunner for the "Flying Rumor," a B-24 aircraft which
was part of the 801st Bombardment Group, later re-designated as the 492nd Bombardment Group. The mission was
code-named "Carpetbaggers" by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower and was made available to the public through the
Freedom of Information Act in the 1970s.


World War II veteran drops people, not bombs


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


Call it the luck of
the lot: When
Ron O'Hara
enlisted in the
U.S. Army Air Corps after
graduating from
Westview High School in
Pittsburgh in 1943, the
lots fell and the one he
got said he would go to
Laredo, Texas, and learn
how to be a belly gunner
on a bomber

"His best friend became a pilot,"
Ron's wife, Marcia, said, "and (Ron)
ended up in gunnery school."
The twists in what would be Ron's
fate were not over Not yet. Now an 88-
year-old resident of Hernando, he
would be assigned to a B-24 bomber
unit stationed in England. Problem is,
the B-24s in this unit had no belly
guns. So Ron switched, becoming a
rear gunner
One other thing about the
801st/492nd Air Group, which was
where Ron was assigned: This bomber
group did not drop bombs.
For more than 30 years, few people
knew anything about the missions the
801st!492nd flew It wasn't until the
late 1970s, according to Marcia, that
the information was declassified.
This group worked directly with the
Office of Strategic Services, the OSS
- a precursor of the CIA. Their mis-
sion was to drop people and material,
not bombs, into German-occupied ter-
ritory Operating from Harrington Air
Base in England, the group code-
named "Carpetbaggers" by Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, head of Allied
Forces in Western Europe flew a
total of 3,000 sorties, mostly at night,
dropping agents and supply canisters
to awaiting agents on the ground.
"The whole time he was in England,
he was with the OSS, which became
the CIA," Marcia said for Ron, who
suffers from Alzheimer's disease and
has memory lapses. "They dropped
spies to the Free French, called the
Marquis."
The spies who were flown in were
all referred to as "Joes" and the place
they parachuted from in the modified
B-24 Liberators, formerly the bomb
bay, was nicknamed the "Joe Hole."
Ron O'Hara flew 50 missions over
occupied territory between 1943 and
1945, twice the number normal
bomber crews were required to fly
before getting rotated out
And Ron's plane, the "Flying


Ron O'Hara is seen in front, second from left, in this picture with his squadron.
His flight jacket hangs in the Carpetbagger and Northants Aviation Museum in
Harrington, Northamptonshire, England. O'Hara flew classified Office of Strategic
Services missions in World War II. The OSS was the precursor to the CIA.


Rumor," was fired upon. A lot.
"The 'Flying Rumor' was shot at but
was never shot down," Marcia said.
And Ron shot back at the ground bat-
teries trying to shoot his plane down.
The 801st!492nd group's planes
were painted black for their low-level
night missions over enemy-occupied
territory
Those missions continued until
France was finally liberated by the Al-
lies in late 1944, with a total of 553
OSS agents dropped during that time,
most of them French but also some
Belgians, according to records. Those
records also show 26 aircraft went
missing in action, with 197 crewmen
killed.
Ron's tour of duty in Europe, how-
ever, did not end with the retaking of
France. His squadron was reassigned
to Brindisi, Italy, and he stayed there
until rotating back to New Jersey,
where he was discharged in 1946.
His time with the military was not
over Ron worked with the Pennsylva-
nia Railroad until 1949, when the
Pennsylvania Air National Guard was
formed in Pittsburgh. A chief master
sergeant, he became a munitions
expert, working with, among others,


the F4 Phantoms and F16 Flying
Falcons.
O'Hara would remain in that posi-
tion until 1985. But it wasn't until the
release of information in the late
1970s regarding what his unit did dur-
ing World War II that reunions of the
Carpetbaggers could be scheduled,
starting a few years later
And that's when the French began
to honor those who flew such mis-
sions, including O'Hara.
In 1987, O'Hara was presented with
the Croix de Guerre with Palm, a War
Cross Medal.
Part of the wording in the citation
reads, "These flights assured, under
conditions rendered perilous by aerial
combat and very vigilant enemy
ground forces, numerous deliveries by
parachute of arms and supplies which
greatly aided the Free French forces."
O'Hara was also able to meet during
a trip to France in 1994 some of the
freedom fighters his plane parachuted
into enemy territory, and he was actu-
ally able to discover their real names.
The honors came late, more than 40
years after the war had ended, honor-
ing what he and his comrades had
done a final twist of fate.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


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;- Tl




A1S SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


VETERANS & IN SERVICE

IN SERVICE


Javier L. Boswell
Air Force Airman 1st Class
Javier L. Boswell graduated
from basic military training at
Joint Base San Antonio-Lack-
land, San Antonio, Texas.
The air-
man com-
pleted an
intensive,
eight-week
program that
included
training in
military disci-
JavierL. line and
Boswell studies, Air
U.S. Air Force Force core
values,
physical fit-
ness and basic warfare princi-
ples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Boswell is the son of Lynn
and Eduardo Boswell of
Homosassa. He is a 2010
graduate of Clover High
School, York, S.C.

Joshua R. Varnadoe
Army Reserve 2nd Lt.
Joshua R. Varnadoe has


VETERANS
NOTE

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), offers
several events that are
open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m.
Sunday in the smoke-
free hall. Card bingo and
grill night is at 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the Can-
teen. Darts are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Fridays in
the Canteen.
Golf Leagues are
Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.


graduated from Officer Candi-
date School (OCS) at Fort
Benning, Columbus, Ga., and
was commissioned as a sec-
ond lieutenant in the
U.S. Army.
During the 12 weeks of
training, the officer candidate
received "basic soldiering" in-
struction in leadership, profes-
sional ethics, soldier team
development, combined arms
tactics, weapons defense,
combat water survival, squad
drill, intelligence, field training
exercises, day and night land
navigation, confidence obsta-
cle course, common-core
tasks, communications, staff
and general military subjects,
and physical fitness tests
which include three-, four-
and five-mile runs, and foot
marches between 5-12 miles
carrying rucksacks.
The candidate is tested on
leadership skills and team
work abilities required of a
commissioned officer.
Students learned to utilize
acquired skills to function in
"leader and follower" positions
in squad- and platoon-sized
elements, and evaluated in
various leadership garrison
positions while in a stressful
and demanding field
environment.


Varnadoe is the son of Pam
and Jerry Varnadoe of Crystal
River.
He is a 2003 graduate of
Crystal River High School. He
earned a bachelor's degree in
2008 from the University of
North Florida, Jacksonville.

Robert W. Baran
Army 2nd Lt. Robert W.
Baran has graduated from Of-
ficer Candidate School (OCS)
at Fort Benning, Columbus,
Ga., and was commissioned
as a second lieutenant in the
U.S. Army.
During the 12 weeks of
training, the officer candidate
received "basic soldiering" in-
struction in leadership, profes-
sional ethics, soldier team
development, combined arms
tactics, weapons defense,
combat water survival, squad
drill, intelligence, field training
exercises, day and night land
navigation, confidence obsta-
cle course, common-core
tasks, communications, staff
and general military subjects,
and physical fitness tests
which include three-, four-
and five-mile runs, and foot
marches between five to 12
miles carrying rucksacks.
The candidate is tested on
leadership skills and team


work abilities required of a
commissioned officer. Stu-
dents learned to utilize ac-
quired skills to function in
"leader and follower" positions
in squad- and platoon-sized
elements, and evaluated in
various leadership garrison
positions while in a stressful
and demanding field
environment.
Baran is the son of Made-
line Baran of Citrus Springs.
He is a 2008 graduate of
Citrus High School,
Inverness.
He earned a bachelor's de-
gree in 2012 from the Univer-
sity of South Florida, Tampa.


Daniel J. Hackney
Air Force Airman Daniel J.
Hackney graduated from
basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland,
San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the


Community
College of
the Air
Force.
Hackney
is the son of
John
Hackney of
Daniel J. Crystal
Hackney River.
U.S. Air Force He is a
2007
graduate of Withlacoochee
Technical Institute, Lecanto.

Brooks W. Lawson
Air Force Airman 1st Class
Brooks W. Lawson graduated
from basic military training at
Joint Base San Antonio-Lack-
land, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air


Force core
values,
physical fit-
ness, and
basic war-
fare princi-
ples and
skills.
Airmen
who com-
plete basic
training earn


NEW LOCATION:
S-6824> i lfTo Lakie Hwy.
~Crystal River 9

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e hntal Care Dr Mic


KflI

if
Brooks W.
Lawson
U.S. Air Force


four credits toward an associ-
ate in applied science de-
gree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Lawson is the son of
Sonya and Eli Lawson of
Harmony.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Crystal River High School.


Nathan A. Parent
Army Pfc. Nathan A.
Parent has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, and
received instruction and
practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons,
chemical warfare and
bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training
exercises.
Parent is the son of Fran
Parent of Homosassa.
He is a 2006 graduate of
New Bedford High School.


hael Welch, DMD & Associates Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD


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ACURA( aHwunDf Qm,,-a V0kwageHln

352,637,2223 1.800,746,9950 1103 E. Inverness Blvd., Inverness, FL 34452
OOGX5Q


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE VETERANS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A19


VETERANS NOTES


DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

DAV transport
needs new van
The Disabled American
Veterans Transportation
Network requests contri-
butions from the public to
reach a goal of $20,000 for
a van.
The van program goes
to the clinic in The Vil-
lages, as well as to the VA
facility in Gainesville.
This service is available
to all veterans each week-
day, for scheduled ap-
pointments, tests and
procedures.
The program uses a
loaner van, which has
more than 270,000 miles
on it, to transport to The
Villages, which is the rea-
son for this fundraiser
Cash donations are not
accepted and it is re-
quested that any contribu-
tions be made by check or
money order made out to:
DAV Van Project with
DAV van project also writ-
ten in the memo section.
Mail a tax-deductible
contribution to: DAV Van
Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL
34433, or mail it to the
DAV Chapter 70: DAV Van
Project/Treasurer, Gerald
A. Shonk, DAV Chapter
70,1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34450.


Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inver-
ness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to


2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

Reserve now for
trip to Hawaii
Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, will lead the 2014
trip to Hawaii for veter-
ans and their families and
friends from March 11 to
March 28. Signups are
being taken for the an-
nual trek, which includes
visits to several islands,
some golfing and a spe-
cial visit to the USS Ari-
zona Memorial and The
National Cemetery of the
Pacific.
Call McLean at 352-637-
5131 or email dmclean8@
tampabayrrcom.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.


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REMIND C LeLLA s TH se S A



LADU YE WAR PRSS NTOI S


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A20 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


. Am


Methodist 1352 726-1 1,39,s
S Church
Cantata by the HUMC choir
at the 10am service on December 22
Directed by Darryl Fornier
Christmas Eve Candlelight Service
at 6pm. Wemiweaoaduwtt althe
I~otw ane to w*e sli-udti third
Pastor Jerry Carris thikomawayfromskow.

St. Raphael Orthodox Clihurt hi is celebrating the

Nativity of Our Lord
Tues., Dec.24 & Wed., Dec. 25

Nativity Prayer Service
(Molieben
c 4 pm Tuesday

Nativity Vigil
6:30 pm Tuesday

Divine Liturgy
9:00 am Wednesday

All are welcome! We are located at:
1277 N. Paul Dr., Inverness
Right off Hwy. 41 N, across from Dollar General.
Call us at 201-1320 www.straphaelchurch.org I


Christmas Cantata
Sunday, December 15, 11:00 am
AWANA Children's Program
Sunday, December 22, 11:00 am
Christmas Eve Service
S Tuesday, December 24, 6:00 pm

-IGrace Bible Church
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
6382 W. Green Acres T.
VS Homosassa, FL 34447-1067
S /2 Miles east of US 19
,.,,.1: _,1,,.', i i. -_ ,



Don't Miss Our Annual

HfeKz CkW &e
Sunday, December 15, 2013 'i
at 5:45 pm "" "
A beautiful Christmas Concert
by our Orchestra and
Adult Choir
The community is also invited to join us
for a special Family Christmas Eve Service
Tuesday, December 24, 2013
at 7:00 pm /


Crmjfle/cr Chrc~ej/'i1(D 3
2180 NW 12th Avenue 795-3079 *ww.crystalrivercog.com










COME AND REJOICE WITH US!
Dec. 15 Choir Program
"Nine Lessons & Carols"
10:30 a.m. service
Dec. 24 Christmas Eve
Candlelight Communion
Service 7:00 P.M.

First Presbyterian Church
Of Crystal River
1501 S.E. Hwy 19
Celebrating our 130th year


The Birth of Jesus: Matthew 1:18-25

Now this is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother -,. .
Mary was betrothed to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was _..
found with child through the Holy Spirit. Joseph her husband, since he was
a righteous man, yet unwilling to expose her to shame, decided to divorce
her quietly. Such was his intention when, behold, the angel of the Lord
appeared to him in a dream and said, "Joseph, son of David, do not be -
afraid to take Mary your wife into your home. For it is through the Holy g, /
Spirit that this child has been conceived in her. She will bear a son and you ,^
are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins." All --
this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet:

"Behold, the virgin shall be with child and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel",

which means "God is with us." When Joseph awoke, he did as the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took his wife
into his home. He had no relations with her until she bore a son, and he named him Jesus.




COMEHOM'ORCH AS

Ro anCahoic aishso i trs ou ty ioces ofSt. etesbug


INVERNESS
Our Lady of Fatima
550 US Hwy 41 S. 352 726-1670
Penance Service
Monday, December 16th at 7:00 pm
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 5:30 pm and 10:00 pm
Choral Presentation: 4:30 pm & 9:30 pm
Christmas Day 8:00 am & 10:00 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
December 31 vigil Mass at 5:30 pm
January 1 at 8:00 am and 10:00 am
httl://home.catholicweb.com/LadvofFatima
LECANTO
St Scholastica
4301 W Homosassa Trail
One mile south of Hwy 44
352 746-9422
Confession Times:
December 19th and 20th
(9:00 am ll:00am)
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 4:00 & 6:00 pm
Choral Presentation 11:15 pm
Followed by 12:00 Midnight Mass
Christmas Day Mass at 9:00 and 11:30 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Tuesday, December 31st, 4:00 pm Vigil Mass
Wednesday, January 1st at 9:00 am and 11:30 am
www.stscholastica.org


BEVERLYHILLS
Our Lady of Grace
6 Roosevelt Blvd (One block east of SR 491)
352 746-2144
Confessions on Saturdays 2:30 pm 3:15 pm
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 4:00 pm Church
4:15 pm Parish Life Center
7:00 pm (Spanish)
10:00 pm Church
Christmas Day 10:30 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Tuesday, December 31st at 4:00 pm
Wednesday, January 1 at 10:00 am
www.ourladyofgracefl.catholicweb.com

CITRUS SPRINGS
St Elizabeth Ann Seton
1401 W Country Club Blvd 352 489-4889
Advent Confessions
Thursday, Dec. 19th after 8:30 am Mass and
at 4:00 pm & 7:00 pm
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 4:30 & 10:00 pm
(Carols before 10 pm Mass)
Christmas Day 8:30 & 11:00 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Tuesday, December 31 at 4:30 pm
Wednesday, January 1st at 8:30 am & 11:00 am
http://stelizabethcitrussprings.parishesonline.com


CRYSTAL RIVER
St Benedict
455 S Suncoast Blvd, US 19 at Ozello Rd
352 795-4479
Confessions Thursday, December 12th
9:00 am 11:00 am and 6:30 pm until last
confession heard
Saturday, December 14 and 21
3:30 pm-4:30 pm
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 4:00 pm with Bishop Lynch
Christmas Eve 9:00 pm
(Carols prior to Mass)
Christmas Day 8:30 am & 10:30 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Tuesday, December 31st at 7:00 pm
Wednesday, January 1st at 8:00 am
www.stbenedictcrystalriver.org
HOMOSASSA
St Thomas the Apostle
7040 S Suncoast Blvd
Serving Southwest Citrus County
352 628-7000
Confessions: December 13 & 20
11:00 am 12:00 noon
Christmas Masses
Christmas Eve 4:30 pm
Christmas Day 8:00 & 10:30 am
Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
Tuesday, December 31st at 4:30 pm
Wednesday, January 1st at 9:00 am
stthomashomosassa.com


1 11- W e P roul*y S u pt P op eJ h n P a l11ath oi c S ow.pI


Join us for an exciting Christmas Cantata
presented by CRCOG Music Ministry
Sunday, December 15th 8:30 & 11:00 am


Christmas Eve Service
Tuesday, December 24
8:00 pm Carols & Communion
Birthday Party for Jesus Kids ages 3-10


1 H nardo

-Z TheNazarene
A Place to eiag
2101 N. Florida Ave., Hernando FL
726-6144
www.hernaz.com


0OG3UCT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Service starts
SChristmas Service at 5pm.
Dinner
Sunday Dec 22 *10am immediately
S n mediafter. A '
SChristmas Eve
Candlelight & Free Dinner
'. Calvary Chapel Inverness, 960 S US Hwy 41
352-726-1480 www.calvaryinv.com





6jd4eci6&t Sece^
| Family Holy Eucharist 7:00pm
Caroling 10:30pm
Solemn High Eucharist- 11:00pm
Christmas Day Holy Eucharist Rite I 10:00 am
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
Your Spiritual Home!
In Historic Downtown Inverness 1 block NW of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave Inverness 726-3153 Rev. Gene Reuman, Pastor


Christmas Eve
Family Candlelight Servic
at 7:000pm
First Lutberan
Cburcb
1900 W. Hwy. 44
Inverness
(352)726-1637


First Christian
Church Inverness .
Christmas Musical
"The Messiah King"
Sun., Dec. 15, 10:15 am
Candle Lighting Service .
Ch] i I/lid Eve i
Tues., Dec. 24, 6:00pm
2018 Colonade St., Inverness www.fccinv.com .



FAITH BAPTIST
CHURCH
Pastor Dr. (hC,' OOwens
6918 S SpartanAve Hornmosassa
352-628-4793
www.comeandseefbc.org

Come Join Us for
Candlelight Service:
Sun., Dec. 22 at 6:00 PM

Regular Services:
Sunday:
Sunday School 9:30 AM. Morning Worship 10:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM:
Kid's & Youth Programs K4-12th Grade Adult Bible Study
Nursery provided for all services


" Floral City United Methodist "
Christmas Eve
3 ('andllligiiht,,rice%
1884 I'hit'ch
4Ipi n4it h choir
7 & 9 pin1
,/ I jhl, d i ) II i j Iitt









11111i \V. Hi8hl4n-a Blvd., Inverness
352-272-1771-7335 \\\\\\.ccinerness.or
CRNERSONE

BAPTIST CHRC

(uris finas Eve Service
December 24th a1115:00
1100 W \. Hi211and BIl d.. In~ erness-,
352-726-7335 i i e, 1%,j;.: ess r '2


Celebrate
the Joys of
Christmas




Sun., Dec. 22
Caroling to the Homebound
Tues., Dec. 24
Christmas Eve
6:00 PM Family Service
8:00 PM Candlelight
Communion Service
Sunday, Dec. 29
One Service 10:00 AM




Hwy. 44 E. @
Washington Ave., Inverness
Church Office 637-0770
Pastor: James A. Capps


Homosassa First United

S Methodist Church

8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448


Christmas Eve Services

Tuesday, December 24th

Candlelight Services
5:00 pm
Candlelight Communion Services
7:00 pm

Everyone Bccoming a Disciple of Christ
Rev. Kip Younger, Senior Pastor
Learn More: 352-628-4083 www.iumnc.org


r n4- ^ i r I


..' 1 1 t r\ t. l, ( I, W.i Dr LD :,r tL,.o
t r'\ 't.l, ( ,IL ]' diil'JiI' h',iD
1 i\\ 44 Iju t [ I ',r 4"-l
527-3325
Come and Worship!
| ; c/ '7/, r/ c,1,,11 J..
c;/"7/,.,. ,7f cM,,. :fni


I hea, /ejoI


(2e,{e6tvirGfmJ
0,'.-
Tues., Dec. 24th
7:00 P.M.
Candlelight,
Holy Communion Service
eeeeeeeeeeeeee
Wed., Dec. 25th
10:00 A.M.
Christmas Day Festival
Worship Service
Website: www.faithlecanto.com


TSt. Timothy Lutheran Church ELcA
Christmas Eve Services
^ l l4:30 pm Christmas Musical Offering
followed by: -'
5:00 pm Family Candlelight Service
S with Holy Communion
1 11" i 7:00 pm Christmas Musical Offering a /
followed by:
7:30 pm Festival Service with Candlelight
and Holy Communion
No Christmas Day Services

1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor 795-5325



al Good Shepherd J l
Lutheran Church M
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (Hwy. 486)
Hernando, FL 352-746-7161
Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth, Pastor
Sunday, December 15
8:30 a.m. Holy Communion/Children's Nativity Play
11:00 a.m. Holy Communion/Choir Concert
Tuesday, December 24, Christmas Eve
Candlelight & Communion Services 5:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, December 25, Christmas Day
Communion Service 10:00 a.m.



Fr-' *N7z (S/ie (:/ezfe (3ffj/''i

1:- SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS Sj

: : EPISCOPAL CHURCH ':
.53, "




UE CHRISTMAS EVE CHRISTMAS DAY
: 10:30 PM 9:00 PM
All r r 0


-H 2540 W. Noji'ell BGi 5 Hw ICR 4861
......... Lecanto. FboIi ca
3 -352-52 70052
: : HAVE A BLESSED CHRISTMAS FROM THE CHURCH ON THE HILL C:
-. v'U '^U '^U '^U *^-*n'n'n'niBi* *^* *n'n'BiBiBi* *n-n'BiBiBiBi*f^


Come Celebrate with us at





iim~ii/kfkdct


Christmas Eve
Candlelight Services
Tuesday, December 24th
Casual Service Featuring Our Children &
Youth Ministries at 6:00pm in Victory Hall
Traditional Candlelight Service
7:30pm in the Santuary
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
700 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL
352-795-3367 www.firstbaptistcr.org
000GSZA


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A21




A22 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


VETERANS NOTES


Memorial honors
local veterans
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with
their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.

Assist Coast
GuardAuxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental pro-
tection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-
form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
back-ground check and
membership are re-
quired. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
corn, or call 917-597-6961.


Hospice assists
sick veterans
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.

Air Force still
wants you
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted
men and women from all
services interested in
both direct duty assign-


ments in previously ob-
tained career fields or re-
training into select career
fields.
Some of the careers in-
clude aircraft electron-
ics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields,
and various other special-
ties. Enlisted career
openings that include the
opportunities to retrain
consist of special opera-
tions positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes
available for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with
the national service or-
ganization, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes
to combat veterans at sev-
eral locations and times.
For more information,
call Sandstrom at
352-382-7397.


'In Their Words' Office has help for
highlights vets vets with PTSD


The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military
career that stands out
to you.
It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave.
We also ask that you
provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization af-
filiations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com.
C.J. will put together
your stories and help set
up obtaining "then" and
"now" photos to publish
with your story


The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your


exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information,
log on to wwwbocc. citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.

Transitioning
vets can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
Call 352-527-5915 to re-
serve a seat at the next
seminar


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A picture's worth a thousand kilobytes


his morning my computer
told me it was out of
memory, that it couldn't
save one more byte until I
deleted some files. Did I men-
tion that my machine's got a ton
of memory? There's no way I
could have used all that mem-
ory in only a single lifetime.
Where did it all go?
I remember having a discus-
sion years ago with a business
owner who was having a hard
time deciding whether he
should buy a computer with 10
or 20 megabytes, because the
difference was thousands of
dollars. The cheapest iPhone
has 1,600 times that much mem-
ory and it can make phone calls
and run '"Angry Birds," so I
thought the memory problem
had been solved.
For years, I've been adding


buy someday If you've got a
camera, you might as well use
Jim it; it's not as if you have to
spend money developing pic-
Mullen tures anymore. You simply post
Them to Facebook or email
S VILLAGE them to friends. Who needs
IDIOT physical pictures of the grand-
II T kids? Just pass your phone
around.
When people aren't talking or
family photos and vacation pic- texting on their cell phones,
tures to my hard drive without they're taking pictures with
a problem. It never complained them. Imagine how many pic-
when I would upload 300 pho- tures were taken just today, just
tos of the Thanksgiving Day pa- by teenagers. The recent spate
rade. It never said I was getting of news stories on the 50th an-
close to running out when it au- niversary of the Kennedy assas-
tomatically started sucking pic- sination tells an unintended
tures off my smart phone story about the thing that has
pictures I shoot through the car changed the most in 50 years.
window, pictures of funny There is one, count it, one
bumper stickers, pictures of blurry, fuzzy, long-range, almost
things in stores I might want to accidental film of that crime.


Imagine how many videos of it
there would be if cell phones
had existed then. A hundred? A
thousand?
It used to be rare to see a
shot of a tornado on the nightly
news, or cars sliding down an
icy highway during a winter
storm. Now we expect not just
to see one video of a disaster,
but lots of them. If something
weird or unusual happens,
someone with a phone will be
sure to record it. Photographs
aren't just for weddings, vaca-
tions, babies and birthdays any
more.
There are millions of people
out there that take pictures of
the food on their plates before
they eat it. You could flip
through a photograph album of
families in the days of film and
rarely see a picture of the fam-


ily pet. How many pictures and
videos of cats and dogs are out
there now?
But when I first started tak-
ing digital pictures, they would
take up 300 to 700KB of mem-
ory The pictures I take with my
new tablet take up 2.6MB of
memory four or five times as
much memory per picture.
Sure, they're better, but one of
them couldn't have fit on one of
those 3 1/2-inch floppy discs.
Even if it's a photo with half
my finger over the lens, I hate
to throw a picture away I'm
storing them in the cloud now
to give my desktop room. But I
don't like it. What if they lose
my picture of last night's
dinner?

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. corn.


Dec. 16to 20 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, blueberry
pancakes, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety, toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, cinnamon pancakes,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: HALF DAY: MVP
breakfast, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety, toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, corn
dog minis, PB dippers, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese, Goldie's Grab N Go
PBJ, turkey super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh


baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, chicken nuggets
with ripstick, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, flavored
Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Cheese pizza, Uncrustable
PBJ grape, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet peas, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: HALF DAY: Moz-
zarella maxstix, hot dog, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, peach cup, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, grits, milk and
juice variety.
Tuesday: Blueberry pan-
cakes, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Half day:
Sausage and egg biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,


I


juice and milk variety.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: HALF DAY: Break-
fast egg and cheese wrap,
cinnamon pancakes, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Barbecued pork
sandwich, corn dog minis, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
seasoned potato wedges,
chilled flavored applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken with rice, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick,
turkey super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, flavored Craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Stuffed crust
cheese pizza, Goldie's Grab
N Go turkey, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce,
milk variety.
Thursday: HALF DAY: Hot
dog, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled applesauce,


fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: HALF DAY: Ham-
burger, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, peach cup, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, blueberry pan-
cakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Half day:
Sausage and egg biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Breakfast egg and cheese
wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: HALF DAY: Break-
fast sausage pizza, cinnamon
pancakes, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-


burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken super salad with
roll, PB dippers, yogurt parfait
plate, baby carrots, green
beans, celery sticks, potato
roasters, chilled flavored ap-
plesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken
with rice, maxsitx, turkey,
gravy and noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, PB dippers, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
cucumber coins, sweet peas,
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, chilled diced
peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
spaghetti with ripstick, pizza,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, turkey super salad with
roll, PB dippers, yogurt parfait
plate, baby carrots, baked
beans, chilled baked beans,
potato roasters, flavored
Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: HALF DAY:
Chicken sandwich, moz-
zarella maxstix, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, po-
tato roasters, peach cup,
juice, milk.
Friday: HALF DAY: Ham-
burger, stuffed crust cheese
pizza, fresh baby carrots,


sweet corn, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled applesauce,
juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Oven-fried
chicken thigh, black-eyed
peas, country vegetable med-
ley, pineapple, slice wheat
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
spaghetti, tomato gravy, flat
beans, mixed fruit, slice Italian
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Chicken chop
suey over steamed rice,
green beans, gingered car-
rots, margarine cup, peaches,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, whole-grain bread with
margarine, fresh orange, ani-
mal crackers, low-fat milk.
Friday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
applesauce, whole-wheat
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call
352-527-5975.


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 A23




A24 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only basic
information regarding each group.
For more information about sched-
uled activities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or corrections to
community@chronicleonline. com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost1l55@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call Com-
mander Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary presidentAlice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
N American Legion Post 166,
meets at the Springs Lodge No. 378
A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call Commander Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. Call
352-860-1629.


VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087,
County Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864,10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call
352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west of
U.S. 19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW
Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post
447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence


Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call
Commander Lucy Godfrey at
352-794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-
2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De


NEWS NOTES


Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citruspur
pleheart.org or call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter of Mil-
itary Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at
11:30 a.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the Olive Garden. Call
President Norm Cooney, Lt. Col.
U.S. Army, retired, at 352-746-1768,
or Secretary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S.
Air Force, retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,


20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 meets at
West Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call Wilbur B.
Scott at 352-628-0639 or email
seacapt34447@yahoo.com, or
Robert currie at 352-799-5250 or
email rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV property in
Inverness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is
to meet the needs of wounded vet-
erans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


40&8 to have
breakfast Jan. 5
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. the first Sunday
each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids'
(8 and younger) meals.
Specialty drinks available
for $1.
The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit pro-
grams of the 40&8.

Elks to sponsor
casino cruise
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge in Homosassa will
sponsor a Victory Casino
Cruise from Port
Canaveral on Wednesday,
Jan. 22.
The bus will leave from
the lodge on Grover
Cleveland Boulevard.
Tickets, available from
noon to 3 p.m. Monday at
the lodge, include the bus
trip, casino cruise and
some free vouchers.
Deadline to sign up is
Jan. 1. Proceeds benefit
HPH Hospice.
For price and more in-
formation, call Jean
Marchese at 352-382-1443.

Garden club
plans field trip
The Homosassa River
Garden Club is planning a
field trip to the Sunken
Gardens in St. Petersburg
on Jan. 21.
Cost includes roundtrip
bus ride and admission to
the park. There will be a
raffle for door prizes on
the bus.
Pickup will be at the
Sugarmill Woods Plaza by
Pinch A Penny, with the
bus leaving at 9 a.m.
For more information
and tickets, call Barb at
352-586-0579.

Spend a 'Day
at the Castle'
The GFWC Crystal
River Woman's Club Lit-
erary Group invites
everyone on a bus trip for
a "Day at the Castle" -
Solomon's Castle, on
Wednesday, Feb. 26.
Lunch will be enjoyed
at the Moat Restaurant.
Solomon's Castle is the
home and galleries of the
famous artist and sculptor
Howard Solomon.
The cost covers trans-
portation, castle tour,
lunch, taxes and
gratuities. Call JoAnn
Ryan at 352-382-1138 or
Joan at 352-564-8773
to reserve a seat on the
bus.


Love Your Library
tickets on sale
Planning is under way
for the fourth annual
Love Your Library
Evening fundraiser slated
for7to 9p.m. Feb.21 at
the Central Ridge Library
The Mardi Gras-themed
event will feature jazz,
glitzy decorations, hors
deouvres, two compli-
mentary glasses of wine, a
silent auction and over-
flowing gift baskets.
Tickets are on sale for
$25 and are available at
all five library branches
until Feb. 18.
Tickets can also be pur-
chased at the door with
either cash or check. All
checks must be made
payable to the U.S. Family
Foundation.
The Love Your Library
Evening is a fundraiser
designed to support the
Citrus County Library
System.
For more information,
visit citruslibraries.org.


Key presents
Christmas Carols
Lester Brock will begin
the traditional Key Carol-
ers program at 7 p.m.
Monday with an a capella
rendition of "The Christ-
mas Song," setting the
mood for a musical
evening for the season.
The chorus of more
than 50 key clients will
follow, presenting such fa-
vorites as "Rudolph the
Red-nosed Reindeer,"
"Silver Bells" and "Deck
the Halls," with many
more carols for all to
enjoy
The program will be at
the Chet Cole Life Enrich-
ment Center at the Key
Training Center's Lecanto
campus. Light refresh-
ments will be served after
the program, with a
"jolly" visitor expected to
join the festivities.
The program is free to
the public. For additional
information call 352-795-
5541, ext. 215.


e RKJl .U 0 L ....... ................. .vi i- ... ......
COMPLETE DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT D
oooGX2o APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED -L
















flauiFw


Learn to play the
harmonica
The Citrus County Har-
monica Club jams from 5
to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
Heads & Tails Lounge, 1.5
miles south of Floral City
on U.S. 41. Beginners are
welcome. Harmonicas are
available for $5.
A free group lesson in-
corporating the Harmon-
ica Exercise for Lung
Program (HELP) devel-
oped by Dr John
Schaman will be offered.
If you ever wanted to


learn to play harmonica,
here's your chance.
Breathe better, live
longer, have more fun.
The Citrus County Har-
monica Club has no dues,
no officers and no mem-
bership list.
For information, call
Bruce at 202-669-1797.

Lodge plans party
for local children
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge 2693 will host its
annual free Children's
Christmas Party from


11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 21, at the lodge on
Grover Cleveland
Blvd. east of U.S. 19,
Homosassa.
The party is open to the
public and all children in
the community age 10 and
younger are invited.
Santa will be there with a
toy for all kids. There will
be some surprise enter-
tainment, games and
everyone who comes will
enjoy lunch compliments
of the lodge.
Call 352-503-2010 after
1 p.m. for more
information.


VETERANS & COMMUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR THE RECORD


Dec. 11-24, 2013
Divorces
Gina Marie Bass, Ocala vs.
Michael Lee Bass, Beverly Hills
Debra J. Hamilton, Homosassa
vs. David W Hamilton, Inverness
Deborah R. Ledsome, Crystal
River vs. Brian F. Ledsome,
Homosassa
Dina Adelberg, Crystal River vs.
Richard Adelberg, Crystal River
Haley Freeman, Crystal River vs.
Brandon Freeman, Crystal River
Gary Hopp, Homosassa vs Robyn
Serrecchio, Homosassa
Marlene Cheryl Huber, Dunnellon
vs. William Bert Mack, Brooksville
John E. Lee, Lake Panasoffkee
vs. Barabara Lee, Lecanto
Shannon Lea Thomas, Inverness
vs. Robert Wayne Thomas II,
Hernando
Beverly Bryant Tidwell, Crystal
River vs. Frederick Wiley Tidwell Jr.,
Williston
Marriages
Mark Alan Adams,
Homosassa/Leah Michelle
Holloway, Homosassa
Christian Joel Aponte, Beverly


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in Florida are a matter of public record, available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office. Call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
FORMS AVAILABLE
* Forms are available for wedding and engagement announcements, anniversaries, birth
announcements and first birthdays. Call 352-563-5660 for copies.


Hills/Julie La Vaughn Marie Sivia,
Beverly Hills
Harry Vern Beeler, Dunnellon/
Janice Sherrard Beeler, Dunnellon
Sean Michael Donnelly,
Inverness/Joanna Luba Kozevski,
Inverness
Steven Richard Finley,
Homosassa/Eileen Marie Prive,
Homosassa
Jason Alvin Forsberg,
Summerfield/Patricia Jean Sears,
Floral City
Robert James Hamilton, Beverly
Hills/Shawn Lenore Dennison,
Beverly Hills
John Ludwig Hopkins Jr.,
Inverness/Melinda Blaine Lewis,
Inverness
BrettAllan Edward Muller, Crystal


River/Jennell Lauren Wilson,
Crystal River
Douglas Paul Robinett,
Inverness/Maria Lynn Lindall,
Inverness
Christopher Ronald Erik James
Strain, Inverness/Kimberly Lee
Brown, Inverness
Craig Lymon Thomas, Crystal
River/Deanna Doris Hensman,
Crystal River
Mark James Thomas,
Inverness/Lita Ellen Thomas,
Inverness
Marcus Richard Varn,
Inverness/Danielle Lynn Sandvick,
Inverness
Johnathan Lee Vickers, Crystal
River/Misty Summers Rowsey,
Crystal River


Norman Vreeland Jr., Inverness/
Kristine Elizabeth Sweet, Inverness
Craig Robert Auclair,
Yankeetown/Tiffany Kristen Goode,
Yankeetown
Nathan Scott Barnes, Citrus
Springs/Angela Diane Cole, Citrus
Springs
Spenser Lee Buddenbohm,
Lecanto/Ashley Arlene Termini,
Lecanto
Kevin Daniel Callahan, Citrus
Springs/Rollamarie Callahan, Citrus
Springs
Michael Edward Carter,
Lecanto/Heather Lynn McGuire,
Lecanto
Brian Jeffrey Daniel, Beverly
Hills/Kristen Michelle McCauley,
Beverly Hills


Thomas James Doherty, Crystal
River/Jennifer Lynn Depue,
Crystal River
Patrick Stephen Doyle, Beverly
Hills / Elizabeth Kate Perrell,
Beverly Hills
Paul Shurtleff Hoyt, Crystal
River/Maryann Theresa Krane,
Crystal River
Jerry Mike Long, Inverness/
Diane Marie Johnson, Inverness
James Robert Malanga Jr.,
Crystal River/Ashley Gail Griffin,
Crystal River
Alan James Maloney,
Homosassa/Cynthia Amor Dizon,
Homosassa
Ashton Timothy Wayne Neuhart,
Dunnellon/Kaitlyn Marie Fellin,
Homosassa
Matthew Steven Taylor, Beverly
Hills/Angelica Nardone, Beverly Hills
Emil William Vitale, Elmwood
Park/Susan Jane Stoveken,
Elmwood Park
Rickey Joseph White, Citrus
Springs/Lori Ann Loa, Citrus Springs
Jerry Dale Yant, Crystal
River/Marcy Lynn Fleck,
Crystal River


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planning to build a new interstate natural gas pipeline.

The project, called the Sabal Trail Project will deliver
approximately 1 billion cubic feet per day of clean burning
natural gas beginning in May of 2017. The Project will include:
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diameter mainline natural gas pipeline that originates in
Tallapoosa County, Alabamrna and ends at an interconnection
with Florida Southeast Connection's proposed project in
Osceola County, Florida:
* Construction of approximately 14 miles of 36-inch-diamrneter
natural gas pipeline extending fromrn a proposed compressor
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Transmission's existing natural gas pipeline in Orange
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A26 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 TOGETHER CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WEDDING


66th ANNIVERSARY


Reichel/McMurray


The Wellses


Jennifer Nicole Reichel and James
Robert McMurray exchanged nuptial
vows at 4 p.m. Oct 17, 2013, in Tierra
Verde.
Jen Sosnicki officiated at the
ceremony
The bride is the daughter of Susan
and James Reichel of Orlando. The
groom is the son of Patricia and Robert
McMurray of Beverly Hills.
Given in marriage by her father, the
bride was attended by her sister, maid
of honor Jessica Reichel, of Gainesville.
Bridesmaids were Meredith Holliman
and Beth Gardner, friends of bride and
groom.
Minka Costa, niece of groom, was
flower girl and ring-bearers were Marco
and Mateo Costa, the groom's nephews.
Eric Costa, brother of groom, of
Onekema, Mich., stood by as the best
man. Groomsmen were Stephen Lofaro
of Orlando, a friend of groom and bride,
and Scott Costa of Lowell, Mass.,
brother of groom.
The groom's brother David Costa, of
Lowell, Mass., served as usher
A reception followed the wedding at
Tampa Bay Watch in Tierra Verde.
Following a honeymoon trip to
Cozumel, Mexico, and the Grand Cay-
man Islands, the couple are at home in


r


Beverly Hills.
A graduate of the College of Central
Florida physical therapist assistant
program, the bride works with TLC
Rehab Inc. Her husband, who earned
his bachelor's degree in human
performance at the University of
Central Florida, is also associated with
TLC Rehab Inc.


John H. Wells Sr and Lena Mae
Fryar Wells celebrated their 66th
wedding anniversary Dec. 13,2013, at
Chili's restaurant for lunch.
They met in Crystal River in 1947.
From time to time, Lena came to
Crystal River from Hawthorne with
her mother to visit her aunt. John Sr
was born in Ozello and grew up in
Crystal River
It was on one of Lena's visits that


they met and began dating.
They were married on Dec. 13,1947,
and made Crystal River their home.
The couple have two children,
Sharon Lee of Crystal River and John
Jr of Perry; two grandchildren, Tracy
Lawhon of Sneads Ferry, N.C., and
Travis Wells of Inverness; and three
great-grandchildren, Randy Leigh of
Sneads Ferry, N.C., and Tyson and
Camden Wells of Inverness.


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SPORTS


Texas football coach
Mack Brown announces
his resignation effective at
the end of the season./B4



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College football/B2, B4
0 Local sports/B2
P Scoreboard/B3
,k0 Sports briefs/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
{ U NBA, NHL, golf/B4
0 College basketball/B5
0 NFL/B6


Bucs seek signature win against 49ers


Tampa Bay

plays host to San
Francisco today
Associated Press
TAMPA The San Francisco
49ers have won three straight
games and are beginning to
play like a team capable of
making another run to the
Super Bowl.
That also makes the defending
NFC champions the type of team
the improving Buccaneers need
to knock off to prove their sec-
ond-half turnaround isn't a fluke.
Not that star cornerback Dar-
relle Revis and his teammates
necessarily believe the Bucs
(4-9), who've won four of five fol-
lowing an 0-8 start, need a sig-


nature win to validate their
progress.
"It would be special if we win
because they're one of the top
teams in the NFL.
But at the same time, San Frai
a win is a win," the 49ers (9
three-time All-Pro Tampa
said. Bucs (
The streaking Bucs
49ers (9-4) are corn- Time: 1
ing off an emotional today.
19-17 victory over TV:FOX.
Seattle, a win that
stopped the Sea-
hawks from clinching the NFC
West title.
Three teams Tampa Bay has
beaten had losing records at the
time. The fourth, Detroit, leads
its division but has been reeling
lately and is 7-6.
Linebacker Patrick Willis is
not concerned about a Niners
letdown.
"We understand every game


is important to us. We under-
stand that last week was a very
big game, a rivalry game, but
this week is just as important,"
Willis said.
nicisco "Our guys are pro-
M4) at fessionals, they know
I Bay what's at stake,"
4-9) 49ers coach Jim Har-
baugh said.
p.m. "This game is the
biggest game on the
schedule. This is a
must-win game ... by
any means necessary
The first thing is the preparation.
See Page B3
Tampa Bay Buccaneers running
back Bobby Rainey has been a
pleasant surprise for the team
after both Doug Martin and
Mike James went down with
season-ending injuries.
Associated Press


Tomahawk


Florida St. QBJameis Winston wins Heisman
Associated Press
NEW YORK- Jameis Win-
ston left voters no choice but to
give him the Heisman Trophy
The Florida State quarter- ,
back became the second
straight freshman to win the
Heisman on Saturday night,
earning college football's most
prestigious individual award,, I
with a performance so spec-
tacular and dominant that
even a criminal investigation,.BL. H
couldn't derail his candidacy
"I cannot explain the feel-
ing that I have inside right
now," Winston said. "I'm so
overwhelmed. It's awesome."
When his name was an-
nounced, he popped from his
seat and quickly made his way
to his mom and dad for hugs
and kisses. He smiled and
laughed through most of his
acceptance speech, but got a
little choked up when he
talked about his parents.
"When you see your mom V
and your dad and they've been
struggling through this whole
process it was nice to see a
smile on their faces," he said.
Winston received 668 first-
place votes and 2,205 points.
He finished 1,501 points
ahead of Alabama quarter-
back AJ McCarron for the sev-
enth-largest margin of victory
in Heisman history, despite
being left off 115 of the 900
ballots that were returned.
Northern Illinois quarter-
back Jordan Lynch was third,
followed by Boston College's
Andre Williams, Texas A&M's
Johnny Manziel and Auburn's
Tre Mason.
Manziel was the first fresh-
man to win the Heisman, and
was trying to join Ohio State's
Archie Griffin as a two-time
winner Instead, Winston
See Page B3
Florida State quarterback
Jameis Winston poses with
the Heisman Trophy after
winning the award on
Saturday in New York.
Associated Press


chop


Trophy by a landslide
--N*I 9- I I


Harris


ready to


lead Tigers

Former Frostproof

football coach hired

at Dunnellon
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
One down, two to go.
Dunnellon High School became
the first of three area schools (Cit-
rus and Lecanto) to fill its coach-
ing vacancy in football, as it
officially tabbed 39-year-old Price
Harris as the program's third head
coach in 18 years last Monday
For the last four seasons, Harris
was the head coach at Frostproof,
where he led the Bulldogs to the
playoffs his last three seasons and
posted a four-year record of 24-21.
He was let go after a 7-4 campaign
that ended with a 38-37 four-over-
time loss at Melbourne Central
Catholic in the Class 3A regional
quarterfinals.
The hiring comes three weeks
after Frank Beasley announced
his decision to step aside after
nine seasons without a losing
record and a pair of district cham-
pionships (2009 and 2010).
Harris is friends with Beasley,
and was particularly drawn to the
school's winning tradition, which
includes back-to-back Class 2A
state championships in 1978-1979
and, more recently, a Class 3A state
semifinals appearance under
Perry Brown in 2003. The Tigers
return most of their top contribu-
tors from 2013, including leading
tacklers Zahid Hujurat and Cole
Fagan as well as all of the team's
offensive talent.
"When they offered it to me,"
said Harris, a 1993 graduate of
Madison County High School, "I
actually had a few other inter-
views I was invited to do, but I did-
n't want to be anywhere other than
Dunnellon. Coach Beasley has a
lot of praise for the players and
coaching staff, and I've known
Coach Beasley long enough to
know that when he has a lot of
praise for those guys, then he's got
some good young men and coaches
surrounding him.
"To me, that's a great place and a
See Page B3


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wenger, Consol enjoy Jingle Bell 5K run


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

INVERNESS The Jingle
Bell 5K meant a time for recent
cross country standouts to visit
the old haunts.
Former Citrus High School
standout Tim Wenger and former
Crystal River High School stand-
out Clarissa Consol enjoyed run-
ning the Jingle Bell 5K race,
which includes running in front
of the Christmas Parade crowd.
Joe Carnegie of Ocala won the
race with a time of 16:33.
Wenger was second overall
with a 16:41 time. He competed at
the state meet four times in high
school. He is now running cross


country and track at the Univer-
sity of West Florida in Pensacola.
This year, he nearly qualified for
national competition.
"It was really fun," Wenger
said. "I had a good time. It brings
back good memories. I have
never won it
"I had a great season in cross
country I was close to qualifying
for nationals. I came back here
for the holidays."
Consol found she loved cross
country during her senior year
in high school. Now, she is com-
peting on the Stetson University
cross country team. She finished
25th with a time of 21:45.
"I just did this for a training
run," Consol said. "I ran a half


marathon last Saturday in Or-
lando. This is the only race I can
run in my home county all year
"I loved it (her time at Stet-
son). I feel like I am in better
shape and I will crush it during
the track season."
The winning woman, Cindy
Carver, was eighth overall with a
time of 19:21. She won the female
title for the second straight year
Crystal River's Thom Neal
was the men's masters winner
He was third overall with a time
of 18:00.
Crystal River's Deirdre Byrne
was the female master's winner
She had a time of 22:10 and was
29th overall.
Bob Brockett, 59, ran with his


wife Claudia. He was 35th with a
time of 23:11.
"I do 5Ks because I am slow at
it," said Brockett. "Perfect con-
ditions. A little warm. I had to
take my shirt off. Good race,
good conditions."
Current Citrus High School
cross country standout Alyssa
Weber finished 20th with a 21:31
time.
"I had a good time," she said.
"I wanted to see where I was at
before track season. It was hot
for December I enjoyed it be-
cause it's the holidays."
There were about 285 signed
up for the race on a pleasant but
overcast day
"The Jingle Bell 5K run con-


tinues to be one of our more suc-
cessful events," said race direc-
tor Chris Moling. "It gives our
runners a chance to do some-
thing that is not very common -
that's to run down the middle of
Main Street. We have thousands
of spectators literally on either
side of the road. They get to see
friends, family members, people
they don't know cheering them.
It's a real pump to the runners.
"We added a one-mile walk. It
gives a lot of people who can't do
the run a chance to enjoy the
walk. We are enjoying a great
day, weather-wise. There's no
rain and no cold. We are pushing
the same numbers we had last
year, so we are doing good."


Navy thumps Army


-
-. H


Associated Press
Navy cornerback Brendon Clements intercepts a pass intended for Army wide
receiver Chevaughn Lawrence during the first half Saturday in Philadelphia.

Midshipmen, Cadets battle snow in 34-7 result


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Keenan Reynolds ran
through steady snow and
swirling wind into the
NCAA record book, help-
ing Navy beatArmy 34-7 on
Saturday for its 12th con-
secutive win in the series.
Reynolds scored on
touchdown runs of 47
yards, 11 yards and 1 yard.
The sophomore has 29
rushing touchdowns,
breaking the single-season
mark for a quarterback
previously held by Ricky
Dobbs (Navy, 2009) and
Collin Klein (Kansas State,
2011), both of whom had 27.
Reynolds ran 30 times
for 136 yards on a frozen,
snow-covered field. He
also caught a 2-point con-
version pass on a trick
play following his second
touchdown.
Navy (8-4) won the Com-
mander-In-Chief's Trophy
for the second consecutive
season and ninth time in
11 years. The trophy is
awarded to the service
academy with the most vic-
tories in games between
Navy, Army and Air Force.
The Midshipmen
haven't lost to Army since
2001 and lead the series
58-49-7. Navy's 12-game
run is the longest in the
history of the rivalry that
began in 1890.
Army (3-9) fumbled five
times and was intercepted
once in its fifth straight de-
feat Embattled coach Rich
Ellerson fell to 0-5 against
the Midshipmen and 20-41
overall since taking the job
in December 2008.
On the other sideline,
Ken Niumatalolo became
the second coach in Navy
history to start his coach-


Army quarterback A.J. Schurr fumbles the ball during the
first half Saturday against Navy in Philadelphia.


ing career 6-0 against
Army, matching Paul
Johnson (2002-07).
The Midshipmen will
conclude their season in
the Armed Forces Bowl
against Middle Tennessee
State on Dec. 30.
The snow that was fore-
cast in the morning hours
began during the pregame
pageantry that makes this
game a one-of-a-kind
spectacle. The snow, along
with the freezing temper-
atures, created an uncom-
fortable setting for those
in the packed stadium.
Many of them left after
the first half, which ended
with Navy up 17-0.
Making his first college
start, Army quarterback
A.J. Schurr lost the handle
on the wet football with
his arm cocked to throw
Teammate Larry Dixon
recovered, but the 20-yard
loss doomed the Black
Knights to end their first
possession with a punt.
Schurr fumbled on the
next drive, too, and this
time Navy recovered at its
own 38.
Quinton Singleton
promptly burst through a
hole in the middle and ran
58 yards to the Army 4, set-


ting up a field goal for a 3-0
lead late in the first quarter
Angel Santiago came in
at quarterback for the
Black Knights at just
about the same time the
intensity of the snow in-
creased. On fourth-and-3
at the Navy 33, Terry
Baggett lost three yards.
Midway through the sec-
ond period, Noah
Copeland ran 39 yards for a
touchdown to make it 10-0.
With 2:38 left in the half,
Reynolds gingerly picked
his way through the Army
defense on his record-
tying touchdown run.
In the third quarter, the
snow turned to rain and
Santiago did his best to
make a game of it. After
throwing a 29-yard pass to
Xavier Moss, the junior
quarterback scored on a
4-yard run to get the Black
Knights to 17-7.
Reynolds answered
with an 11-play drive that
produced a field goal.
Army then failed to con-
vert a fourth-and-3 from
its own 42, a futile gamble
that all but assured the
Black Knights another
frustrating loss against
their far more successful
service academy rivals.


Lifeguard Class
at Bicentennial
Park Pool
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will hold an Ameri-
can Red Cross Waterfront
Lifeguard Class for partici-
pants 15 years and older. Pre-
requisite is on Dec. 20 at 2
p.m. The class will go from
Dec. 30, 2013 to Jan. 3, 2014,
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The purpose of this course
is to provide entry-level life-
guard participants with the
knowledge and skills to pre-
vent, recognize and respond
to aquatic emergencies and to
provide care for breathing and
cardiac emergencies, injuries
and sudden illnesses until
emergency medical services
(EMS) personnel take over.
This program is offered in a
blended learning (online
learning with instructor-led
skill session) formats. Candi-
dates must have access to a
computer to complete the on-
line part of the course.
Candidates must be able to
pass a prerequisite of a 550-
yard swim, continuously
demonstrating breath control
and rhythmic breathing using
the front crawl and breast-
stroke, tread water for two min-
utes using only the legs, and a
timed swim to include going
down to a depth of 10 feet.
Registration fee is $125,
with a $35 online fee to the
American Red Cross. Regis-
tration deadline is Thursday,
Dec. 19.
Register in person at Bicen-
tennial Park Pool, 8145 W.
Bicentennial Park Dr, Crystal
River.
For more information, con-
tact the pool at 352-795-1478.
P.L.A.Y. Program
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is offering a great
sports opportunity for your lit-
tle one, who may be too
young to join the organized
sports leagues within the
county. The P.L.A.Y. Program,
which is an acronym for
Preparing Little Athletes Youth
Program, was created for
those children who are ready
to play sports, but just aren't
old enough.
The P.L.A.Y. programs of-
fered in the upcoming session
include:
Soccer, which will be held
at Central Ridge District Park
on Monday or at Homosassa
Area Recreational Park on
Wednesday.
T-ball will be held at Central
Ridge District Park on Tues-
days or at Bicentennial Park
on Thursday.
The next session will begin
the week of Jan. 20, 2014.
Boys and girls, ages 3-5, are
encouraged to join the six-
week program. After enroll-
ment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt.
Registration opens on Mon-
day, Dec. 16, 2013, and spots
fill up fast. Please contact
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
for more information.
All programs and activities
offered by the Division of
Parks and Recreation are
available to all persons with-
out regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or na-
tional origin. For persons with
disabilities requiring special
accommodations, please con-
tact our office five days prior
to the program so that proper
consideration may be given to
the request. For hearing im-
paired please contact 352-
527-5901 (TTY) or
352-527-7540 (Voice).
Tenth Annual
Kids' Fishing Clinic
Parents mark your calendar


Sports BRIEFS
for the 10th Annual Kids Fish-
ing Clinic. Registration will
open on Jan. 1,2014.
Teaching children a lifelong
hobby, appreciation for our
marine environment and a fun
family outing are the objec-
tives for the Kids' Fishing
Clinic.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
(CCPR) present the free
event for pre-registered chil-
dren between the ages of 5
and 15 on Saturday, Feb. 22,
2014 at 9 a.m., 10a.m., 11
a.m., 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. The
clinic will be held at the Fort
Island Trail Park.
Because space is limited,
pre-registration is required by
calling Citrus County Parks
and Recreation at 352-527-
7540 or visiting our website
www.citruscountyparks.com.
This free clinic enables
young people to learn the ba-
sics of environmental stew-
ardship, fishing ethics, angling
skills and safety. In addition,
environmental displays will
provide participants with a
unique chance to experience
Florida's marine life firsthand.
The main objective is to cre-
ate responsible marine re-
source stewards by teaching
children about the vulnerabil-
ity of Florida's marine ecosys-
tems. This event is a
catch-and-release activity,
and all participants must be
accompanied by an adult.
Individuals or companies
interested in helping to spon-
sor this event or volunteer at
the clinic should contact Cit-
rus County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540.
Baseball camp
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation in partnership with
Lecanto High School head
coach David Logue and
coaching staff, will be hosting
a one-day baseball camp.
This one-day instructional
camp will focus on the funda-
mentals of baseball.
The camp will be held on
Jan. 11,2014, at Central
Ridge District Park (6905 N.
Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills,
Fl.) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Pizza and drinks will be
provided for lunch.
The camp is open to boys
and girls ages 8-13.
Save $10 by pre-registering
or pay $50 the day of camp.
For more information
please visit www.citruscounty
parks.com or contact Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
at 352-527-7540.
Stingers
Baseball Club
Stingers Baseball Club is
looking for 12U & 13U Play-
ers. We are a competitive pro-
gram out to provide a higher
level of play at an affordable
cost.
Please email stingersbase-
ball 1 @gmail.com or visit the
website (www.
stingersbaseballclub.com) for
more information.
CRHS baseball
holding golf
tournament
The Crystal River High
School baseball program is
hosting a golf tournament
Jan. 11,2014 at Skyview Golf
& Country Club.
The tournament which
begins with a 12:30 p.m. shot-
gun start is a four-person
scramble with prizes for the
first, second and third-place
teams. There will also be a
silent auction, as well as clos-
est to the pin and longest
drive contests.
All proceeds will benefit the
CRHS baseball team.
Each individual is $75 and
individuals can also sponsor a


hole for $100. Four golfers
and a hole sponsor costs
$350, a $50 discount.
For more information, con-
tact Don Kidd at
donkidd18@yahoo.com or
352-212-1395.
LHS hosting alumni
basketball game
The Third Annual Lecanto
Basketball Alumni Game will
take place at Lecanto High
School at 2 p.m. on Dec. 22.
If you are interested in play-
ing, please call 352-362-0011.
The fee to play is $25 per
player, which includes a jer-
sey and your name in the pro-
gram.
Fishing club invites
new members
The Trout and Redfish Club
of Homosassa is looking for
new members for the upcom-
ing year.
Members fish for trout and
redfish only. All tournaments
are held the second Friday of
the month with weigh-in at 3
p.m. Live or cut bait is not al-
lowed; artificial only.
There are no meeting or
social event requirements,
only an opportunity to fish
competitively and meet a
good group of fishermen.
For more information, call
Bob at 352-382-5045 or 352-
220-2199.
YMCA leagues to
begin Jan. 13
The Citrus County YMCA's
Youth Basketball League, for
ages 6 to 14, is a nine-week
season that includes eight
games each Saturday at the
Key Training Center's Chet
Cole Enrichment Center.
The league will practice
once a week and will begin
the week of Jan. 13. Registra-
tion and Skills Assessment
will be at 5 p.m. Jan. 9 at the
Chet Cole Enrichment Center,
1125 N. Van Norwick Road,
Lecanto.
The Junior Basketball
League, for ages 3-5, will con-
sist of an eight-week season
with a scrimmage at the end
of each practice. All practices
will take place at the Key
Training Center's Chet Cole
Enrichment Center. Deadline
to register for the Junior
League is Jan. 16.
For more information or to
register, call 352-637-0132 or
visit www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Miami Central
defeats Armwood
ORLANDO Dalvin Cook
rushed for 223 yards and four
touchdowns to lead Miami
Central to a 52-7 victory over
SeffnerArmwood in the
Florida Class 6A state football
championship game.
It was the second straight
championship for Miami Cen-
tral (13-1) and its third title in
four seasons.
Cook, one of the nation's
top-rated athletes, got Central
on the board midway through
the first quarter with a 37-yard
touchdown run and would add
scores of 6, 80 and 5 to close
out his high school career.
The Rockets jumped out to
a 21-0 lead midway through
the second quarter after Da-
Vante Phillips hauled in a 19-
yard touchdown pass from
Keith Reed.
From staff, wire reports

CALLING ALL
SENIOR GOLFERS!
Save S10 on
Membership
for 2014 by
Dec. 31, 2013
Join the Fun Today!
North Central Florida Tour
y' 352-446-3446
www.senioramateurgolftour.net
"Where Amateurs Are Treated like Pro's"


B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Bowl Glance
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 21
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Washington State (6-6) vs. Colorado State (7-6),
2 p.m. (ESPN)
Las Vegas Bowl
Fresno State (11-1) vs. Southern Cal (9-4), 3:30
p.m. (ABC)
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Buffalo (8-4) vs. San Diego State (7-5), 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Tulane (7-5) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 23
Beef '0' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ohio (7-5) vs. East Carolina (9-3), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State (6-6) vs. Boise State (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Bowling Green (10-3) vs. Pittsburgh (6-6), 6 p.m.
(ESPN)
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Utah State (8-5), 9:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (8-4)vs. Syracuse (6-6), 6 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
BYU (8-4) vs. Washington (8-4), 9:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 28
Pinstripe Bowl
At NewYork
Notre Dame (8-4)vs. Rutgers (6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati (9-3)vs. North Carolina (6-6), 3:20 p.m.
(ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5), 10:15 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (7-4), 11:45 a.m.
(ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi (7-5)vs. GeorgiaTech (7-5), 3:15 p.m.
(ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 31
AdvoCare VI00 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5), 12:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), 2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Rice (9-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), 4 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), Noon (ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Wisconsin (9-3)vs. South Carolina (10-2), 1 p.m.
(ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1), 5 p.m.
(ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 7:30
p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2), 9 p.m.
(ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 11 14 .440 -
Toronto 9 13 .409 %
Brooklyn 8 15 .348 2
NewYork 7 16 .304 3
Philadelphia 7 18 .280 4
Southeast Division


W L Pct GB
Miami 17 6 .739 -
Atlanta 12 12 .500 51
Charlotte 10 14 .417 71
Washington 9 13 .409 71
Orlando 7 16 .304 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 20 3 .870 -
Detroit 11 13 .458 91
Chicago 9 13 .409 10/2
Cleveland 9 14 .391 11
Milwaukee 5 18 .217 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 18 4 .818 -
Houston 16 8 .667 3
Dallas 13 10 .565 5/2
New Orleans 11 10 .524 61
Memphis 10 12 .455 8
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 20 4 .833 -
Oklahoma City 18 4 .818 1


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 B3


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^0 9-4-5
CASH 3 (late)
6-4-6

PLAY 4 (early)
0-6-8-4
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 2-4-1-2

Because of early dead-
lines. Fantasy 5, Lottery
and Powerball numbers
were unavailable at press
time. Please go to
www.flalottery.com for
the winning numbers.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 12 -32 -38 -42
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,193.50
3-of-4 MB 43 $365.00
3-of-4 825 $56.50
2-of-4 MB 1,117 $27.50
1-of-4 MB 11,318 $2.50
2-of-4 23,927 $2.00


Fantasy 5:6 30 32 34 35
5-of-5 2 winners $125,477.15
4-of-5 354 $114.00
3-of-5 9,645 $11.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On theAIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
3:30 a.m. (FS1) FIA World Endurance Championship: Bahrain. (Taped)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (FS1) St. John's vs. Syracuse
2:30 p.m. (FS1) La Salle atVillanova
4:30 p.m. (FS1) Chicago State at DePaul
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Western Michigan at Missouri
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Oklahoma City Thunder
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series: Chameleon Championship (Taped)
FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (6 CBS) New England Patriots at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco 49ers at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
4 p.m. (CBS) New York Jets at Carolina Panthers
4:25 p.m. (FOX) Green Bay Packers at Dallas Cowboys
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Cincinnati Bengals at Pittsburgh Steelers
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) Franklin Templeton Shootout, Final Round
2 p.m. (NBC) Franklin Templeton Shootout, Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PNC Father/Son Challenge, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (NBC) PNC Father/Son Challenge, Final Round (Taped)
HOCKEY
5 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Detroit Red Wings
FISHING
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) Toyota Texas Bass Classic (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Aston Villa vs.
Manchester United
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs.
Liverpool
3 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA College Cup final: Teams TBA

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Heisman Finalist Voting
Finalist voting for the 2013 Heisman Trophy, with first-, second- and third-place votes and total points
(voting on 3-2-1 basis):
Player 1st 2nd 3rd Total
Jameis Winston, Florida St. 668 84 33 2,205
AJ McCarron, Alabama 79 162 143 704
Jordan Lynch, N. Illinois 40 149 140 558
Andre Williams, Boston College 29 127 129 470
Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M 30 103 125 421
Tre Mason, Auburn 31 121 69 404


Denver 13 9 .591 6
Minnesota 11 12 .478 8/2
Utah 6 19 .240 14/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 16 9 .640 -
Phoenix 13 9 .591 1/
Golden State 13 11 .542 21
L.A. Lakers 11 12 .478 4
Sacramento 6 15 .286 8
Friday's Games
Cleveland 109, Orlando 100
Indiana 99, Charlotte 94
Toronto 108, Philadelphia 100
Boston 90, NewYork 86
Atlanta 101, Washington 99, OT
Detroit 103, Brooklyn 99
Oklahoma City 122, L.A. Lakers 97
New Orleans 104, Memphis 98
Chicago 91, Milwaukee 90
San Antonio 117, Minnesota 110
Phoenix 116, Sacramento 107
Utah 103, Denver 93
Houston 116, Golden State 112
Saturday's Games
L.A. Clippers 113, Washington 97
L.A. Lakers 88, Charlotte 85
Miami 114, Cleveland 107
New York 111, Atlanta 106
Toronto 99, Chicago 77
Portland 139, Philadelphia 105
Milwaukee at Dallas, late
San Antonio at Utah, late
Today's Games
Houston at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 6 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 32 22 8 2 46 90 64
Montreal 34 2011 3 43 87 73
Tampa Bay 32 1811 3 39 87 80
Detroit 34 1510 9 39 89 91
Toronto 34 1714 3 37 97 99
Ottawa 34 1315 6 32 96 111


Florida 33 11 17 5 27 76 108
Buffalo 33 723 3 17 55 96
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 34 2310 1 47105 74
Washington 32 1712 3 37100 93
Carolina 34 1413 7 35 79 94
Columbus 33 1415 4 32 85 92
New Jersey 34 1315 6 32 78 85
Philadelphia 32 14 15 3 31 72 86
N.Y Rangers 33 1517 1 31 72 88
N.Y Islanders 34 919 6 24 83 118
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 35 23 7 5 51132 100
St. Louis 31 22 6 3 47110 73
Colorado 30 21 9 0 42 87 71
Minnesota 34 1811 5 41 79 80
Dallas 31 1511 5 35 90 93
Nashville 33 1614 3 35 77 92
Winnipeg 34 14 15 5 33 90 100
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 34 22 7 5 49108 87
Los Angeles 33 22 7 4 48 93 65
San Jose 33 20 7 6 46108 82
Vancouver 34 19 10 5 43 92 81
Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41104 100
Calgary 32 13 15 4 30 83 102
Edmonton 34 1120 3 25 91 117
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Florida 3, Washington 2, SO
Pittsburgh 3, New Jersey 2
Vancouver 4, Edmonton 0
Saturday's Games
Calgary 2, Buffalo 1, OT
Los Angeles 5, Ottawa 2
Dallas 6, Winnipeg 4
Toronto 7, Chicago 3
Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 1
New Jersey 3, Tampa Bay 0
Montreal 1, N.Y Islanders 0, OT
St. Louis 4, Columbus 3, OT
Nashville 3, San Jose 2
Carolina 3, Phoenix 1
Minnesota at Colorado, late
Boston at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 3 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Calgary at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Columbus, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m.


I SORT BIEF -


'Canes win Brinkley
Shootout game
Behind 25 points from game
MVP Desmond Franklin, the Cit-
rus boys hoops team took a 61-
57 victory over West Port in the
Mike Brinkley Shootout at North
Marion High School on Saturday.
Devin Pryor had 14 for the Hur-
ricanes, who closed out the game
when Mitchell Ellis got an offen-
sive rebound and got the ball to
Franklin, who was fouled.
With seven second left and
holding a two-point lead, Franklin
made both free throws to ice the
game.
Citrus (8-1 overall) plays Friday
at Lecanto.
Panthers avenge
loss to Williston
The Lecanto boys basketball
team got two 30-point perform-
ances en route to a 82-61 victory
at Williston on Saturday night.
Brandon Burich (33 points) and
Darius Sawyer (31 points) carried
the Panthers offensively, while
freshman Kaine McColley added
10 points.
Lecanto shot 50 percent (6 of
12) on three-pointers and shot 65
percent from the field overall.
Lecanto (6-3) hosts Citrus on
Friday.
Late Friday

Warriors stymie
visiting OCA
Behind 32 points from Adam



HARRIS
Continued from Page BI

good football job and great foot-
ball town."
DHS athletic director Bruce
Wentz said the school received
50 applications and interviewed
11 candidates, and was im-
pressed with Harris' reputation
and his grasp of Xs and Os. He
said they expect Harris to teach
either physical education or so-
cial studies, starting in the up-
coming second semester It's not
known whether he'll also coach
boys' weightlifting, a position
often handled by head football
coaches.
"Everybody we talked to said
he was a great guy and that he
definitely knows his X's and
0's," Wentz said. "We definitely
did our research, and it all
came back very positive.
"We really liked that he



BUCS
Continued from Page BI

You've got to put yourself in a
position to earn that. And, our
guys will be committed and pro-
fessional about doing that."
Something to watch as the
49ers seek their fourth straight
win and the Bucs try to build
on their recent success:
Glennon's progress
Bucs rookie quarterback
Mike Glennon has struggled
his past two starts, throwing
three interceptions and losing




HEISMAN
Continued from Page BI

made it two freshman winners
in the 79-year history of the
Heisman. He also became the
youngest winner at 23 days short
of 20.
The 19-year-old also was in-
vestigated last month for a year-
old sexual assault complaint,
but no charges were filed and
the case was closed four days
before Heisman votes were due.
"People trusted me and saw
us play," Winston said.
Winston is the nation's top-
rated passer and has led the top-
ranked Seminoles to a spot in
the BCS championship game
against No. 2 Auburn on Jan. 6,
his birthday The former five-
star recruit from Bessemer, Ala.,
made college football look easy
from his very first game. On
Labor Day night, on national tel-
evision, Winston went 25 for 27
for 356 yards and four touch-
downs in a victory at Pittsburgh.
It was a brilliant debut that


lived up to the offseason hype,
when Winston wowed Florida
State fans in the Seminoles'
spring football game and on the
baseball diamond as a hard-
throwing reliever and clutch-
hitting outfielder He had
already earned the nickname
Famous Jameis before he ever
played a college football game.
And he quickly became one of
the most beloved Seminoles
since Charlie Ward, the 1993
Heisman winner
Winston is the third Semi-
noles quarterback to win the


Gage and 26 by Cory Weiand,
the Seven Rivers boys basketball
team took a 60-27 victory over
Ocala Christian Academy.
Gage, a senior swingman, also
added 9 rebounds for the War-
riors (2-3 overall).
Panthers blank foe
East Ridge
Stephanie Bandstra had two
goals and an assist during the
Lecanto girls soccer team's 4-0
victory over East Ridge.
For the Panthers, Danielle Van
Quelef and Hannah Herber each
scored a goal, while Lexi Moore
had two assists
According to head coach
Roselle Lattin, Sisi Flournoy,
Danyelle Ulloa, Ashlynne Van
Cleef and Kendall Stark played
good defense in front of keeper
Megan Houpt for the shutout.
Lecanto (8-7-1 overall, 3-4 dis-
trict) plays Tuesday at home
against West Port.
Gage's big night
helps SRCS snag win
With 23 points and 10 re-
bounds, junior guard Alyssa
Gage helped the Seven Rivers
girls basketball team to a 51-10
home victory over Ocala Chris-
tian Academy.
Alexis Zachar (13 points) and
Tessa Kacer (8 points) also con-
tributed to the victory.
Seven Rivers (6-3) played at
Mount Dora Bible on Saturday.
From staff reports


coached at a small rural school,
which is kind of what we are,
and that he's been in the play-
offs the last three years."
Harris, who's coached in
Florida all but one year, when
he was at Georgia's Valdosta
High School, has spent time as
an offensive and defensive co-
ordinator in the past, and said
he'll incorporate a 4-3 defense
and a spread offense.
"I appreciate (Wentz's) kind
words," he said. "I've been
blessed to be around some great
coaches that have given me a
good idea of X's and 0's, and
how to attack people and how to
defend people. Hopefully, we'll
be able to execute. Sometimes
we make this game a lot more
complicated than it really is,
and it really just comes down to
blocking and tackling. Whoever
does those better is usually the
winner at the end of the game.
"I'm just proud to be the head
coach at Dunnellon."


a fumble. Last week, Tampa
Bay forced five turnovers dur-
ing a rout of Buffalo, but the
sputtering Bucs offense pro-
duced only two field goals off
the miscues.
Stopping Gore
Tampa Bay's first priority is
to stop the run. The 49ers are
sixth in the NFL in rushing,
and Frank Gore is within 69
yards of reaching 1,000 for the
seventh time.
"I'll openly say it: Frank
Gore is our focal point," McCoy
said. "If you can slow that guy
down then we can start worry-
ing about everything else."


award, along with Chris Weinke
in 2000.
Winston and Florida State
were cruising toward an unde-
feated season when news broke
of an unresolved sexual assault
complaint against him made to
the Tallahassee Police Depart-
ment last December
The dormant case was
handed over to the state attor-
ney's office for a full investiga-
tion. A female student at Florida
State accused Winston of rape.
Winston's attorney said the sex
was consensual.
During three weeks of uncer-
tainty, Winston continued to play
sensationally, especially in
Florida State's big games against
Clemson and Miami, while other
contenders stumbled or failed to
distinguish themselves. If voters
were looking to Manziel or Mc-
Carron or Lynch or Williams or
even Marcus Mariota of Oregon
to give them a good alternative to
Winston, it didn't happen. Mason
made a late surge and ended up
in New York because of the lack
of serious challengers to Winston.
The Heisman Trust mission
statement says: "The Heisman


Memorial Trophy annually rec-
ognizes the outstanding college
football player whose perform-
ance best exhibits the pursuit of
excellence with integrity."
It's a statement that has put
the Heisman in awkward situa-
tions before. In 2010, Cam New-
ton played the season under the
cloud of an NCAA investigation.
He had also had legal troubles
while in college. But like Win-
ston, there was no doubt he was
the best player and he won the
award.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Brown resigns as Texas head coach


Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Mack
Brown united and revived a di-
vided and dormant Texas foot-
ball program and coached the
Longhorns to their first undis-
puted national title in 36 years.
Now after four seasons with at
least four losses, Brown is step-
ping down to make way for the
next coach to try to push the Long-
horns back into the nation's elite.
Texas announced Saturday
night that Brown, who won the
2005 national championship, is
retiring after 16 seasons, with
his final game to be the Dec. 30
Alamo Bowl against Oregon.
In a statement released by the
school Saturday night, Brown ac-
knowledged it was time for a
change after a 30-20 record and
18-17 mark in the Big 12 over the


last four seasons. Texas is 8-4 this
season and lost the Big 12 title to
Baylor in the final game of the
regular season.
The announcement came after
a week of intense speculation
about the 62-year-old coach's fu-
ture and a flurry of reports he
was considering stepping down.
"It's been a wonderful ride.
Now, the program is again being
pulled in different directions,
and I think the time is right for a
change," Brown said. "I love the
University of Texas, all of its
supporters, the great fans and
everyone that played and
coached here ... It is the best
coaching job and the premier
football program in America.
"I sincerely want to get back to
the top and that's why I'm step-
ping down after the bowl game. I
hope with some new energy we


can get this thing rolling again,"
Brown said.
Brown led the Longhorns
through a run of dominance
from 2001-2009 when the Texas
went 101-16, won two Big 12 ti-
tles and twice played for the na-
tional championship.
He has 158 victories at Texas,
No. 2 behind the late Darrell
Royal, who won 167 in 20 sea-
sons with the Longhorns. Brown
is 244-121-1 overall in 29 years as
a head coach.
The school scheduled a news
conference Sunday for Brown,
and to discuss a search for his
replacement to take over after
the Alamo Bowl in San Antonio.
Brown' only losing season at
Texas was in 2010, when the
Longhorns fell to 5-7 after play-
ing for the 2009 season national
championship.


Associated Press
Texas coach Mack Brown stepped down as coach and that the
Alamo Bowl against Oregon on Dec. 30 will be his last game with
the Longhorns, the school announced Saturday.


Lightning fizzle Heatcooloff


New Jersey blanks

Tampa Bay 3-0

Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. Dainius Zubrus
scored two goals in the third period
and Martin Brodeur made 33 saves,
leading the New Jersey Devils past
the Tampa Bay Lightning 3-0 on Sat-
urday night.
Brodeur earned his third shutout
of the season and 124th of his career
Jaromir Jagr assisted on both
goals to raise his assist total to 1,024.
Damien Brunner's seventh goal
had broken the scoreless tie in the
second period.
Jagr skated behind the net and
passed to Zubrus on doorstep of
the crease for the goal at 6:44 of the
period.
Then at 9:36, Jagr put a backhand
shot on goal and Zubrus was there
to knock in the rebound for his sev-
enth goal and a 3-0 advantage.
Penguins 4, Red Wings 1
DETROIT-- Evgeni Malkin had a
goal and two assists before hurting his
left leg early in the third period of the
Pittsburgh Penguins'4-1 win over the
Detroit Red Wings.
NHL scoring leader Sidney Crosby
also scored two goals to help the Pen-
guins win.
Malkin got tangled up with Detroit's
Luke Glendening, lost his balance and his
left skate took the brunt of collision with
the boards behind Pittsburgh's net. The
Russian forward slowly got up and kept
his left skate in the air as he was helped
off the ice. He was called for holding on
the play, but couldn't serve the penalty
because he was being evaluated.
Olli Maatta had Pittsburgh's other
goal and Jeff Zatkoff made 28 saves.
Niklas Kronwall gave Detroit a 1-0
lead at 6:09 of the first.
Maple Leafs 7,
Blackhawks 3
TORONTO Joffrey Lupul and
Peter Holland each scored twice to help
the Toronto Maple Leafs end a three-
game losing streak with a 7-3 win over
the Chicago Blackhawks.
Mason Raymond added four assists
for the Leafs.
Tied 1-1 after the first period, Toronto
outscored Chicago 4-1 in the second to
pull ahead for its first win in regulation
time since Nov. 19, a 5-2 victory over
the New York Islanders.
The victory also snapped an eight-
game losing streak to Chicago going
back to February 2003.
Canadiens 1,
Islanders 0, OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Max Pacioretty
scored 1:51 into overtime and Carey
Price made 21 saves for his 21st NHL


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing J.T. Brown passes the puck past the New
Jersey Devils' Eric Gelinas during the first period Saturday in Newark, N.J.


shutout as the Montreal Canadiens beat
the New York Islanders 1-0.
Pacioretty took a short feed in front
from David Desharnais and shoved a
shot past Evgeni Nabokov for his 12th
goal. Nabokov stopped 24 shots and
was the hard-luck loser as he came
back from injury.
It was Price's second shutout this
season for the Canadiens, who
snapped a two-game skid and improved
to 10-2-1 in their last 13. They have
scored only two goals in the past three
games.
New York (9-19-6) returned from a 1-
4 trip and lost for the 12th time in 13
games (1-9-3). The Islanders are 0-16-4
when they score fewer than three goals.
Stars 6, Jets 4
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -Tyler
Seguin and Jamie Benn each scored
two goals and Sergei Gonchar had four
assists and the Dallas Stars beat the
Winnipeg Jets 6-4.
The victory halted a two-game losing
skid for the Stars, who only have four
wins in their past 10 games.
Dallas rookie Valeri Nichushkin also
scored a goal and center Colton Sce-
viour scored his first NHL goal.
Kari Lehtonen, playing his 200th
game for the Stars and 404th career
NHL game, stopped 34 of the 38 shots
he faced.
Blake Wheeler had a pair of goals,
Matt Halischuk also scored and Olli
Jokinen added a goal and assist for
Winnipeg, which is winless in its past six
home games.
The Jets' previous victory at MTS
Centre was Nov. 15 in a 3-2 shootout
against Philadelphia.
Kings 5, Senators 2
OTTAWA-- Anze Kopitar scored
twice to lead the Los Angeles Kings to
their sixth straight victory, 5-2 over the
Ottawa Senators.
Jeff Carter, Dwight King and Jarret
Stoll also scored to help the Kings im-
prove to 22-7-4. Rookie Martin Jones


extended his winning streak to five
games, stopping 37 shots.
Joe Corvo and Erik Karlsson scored
for the Senators. Craig Anderson was
pulled after allowing two goals on four
shots in 4:18. Robin Lehner finished the
game, allowing three goals on 22 shots.
Los Angeles has outscored oppo-
nents 21-7 during its winning streak.
Flames 2, Sabres 1, OT
BUFFALO, N.Y. Paul Byron and
Matt Stajan scored as the Calgary
Flames started a five-game road trip
with a 2-1 overtime win over the Buffalo
Sabres.
Karri Ramo made 26 saves for the
Flames, who have won their last three
road games.
Matt Moulson scored for the Sabres,
while Jhonas Enroth made 24 saves in
the loss.
Stajan's overtime winner came just 42
seconds into the period, as his wrist
shot beat Enroth to the goalie's left.
Byron had two points against the team
that drafted him in 2007.
Blues 4,
Blue Jackets 3, OT
COLUMBUS, Ohio David Backes
scored 22 seconds into overtime on a
breakaway and the St. Louis Blues ral-
lied from a two-goal deficit to beat the
Columbus Blue Jackets 4-3.
Vladimir Tarasenko scored twice and
Chris Stewart tied it with 6:27 remaining
in regulation for St. Louis, which entered
tied for the fewest regulation losses in
the league with six and have now won
three straight and four of five. Brenden
Morrow added two assists and Jaroslav
Halak made 30 saves for the Blues.
On the winner, Columbus lost the
puck at its blue line. Backes took it,
fended off Fedor Tyutin on a delayed
penalty call then deked Mike McKenna
and calmly scored with a high shot.
Tyutin, Artem Anisimov and Ryan Jo-
hansen scored for Columbus, which
came out flying to take a 3-1 lead after
the first period.


Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron James
scored 25 points against
his former team, leading
the Miami Heat to a 114-
107 victory over the Cleve-
land Cavaliers on
Saturday night
Dwyane Wade added 24
points and Chris Bosh had
22 for the Heat, who
squandered a 19-point
third-quarter lead and ral-
lied from a two-point
deficit with eight unan-
swered points late in the
fourth quarter
Ray Allen's two free
throws with 2:16 remain-
ing capped the run and put
the Heat ahead 106-100.
Mario Chalmers' corner 3-
pointer with 1:36 left in-
creased the lead to
109-101.
Kyrie Irving scored 19
points for the Cavaliers,
who played the second
half without coach Mike
Brown. He was ejected
late in the second quarter
after he stormed onto the
court looking for a foul on
Shane Battier's block of
Alonzo Gee's layup.
Clippers 113,
Wizards 97
WASHINGTON Chris
Paul had 38 points and 12 as-
sists, and the Los Angeles
Clippers shared the ball impec-
cably Saturday night as they
wrapped up a tougher-than-it-
should've-been East Coast
road trip with a 113-97 win over
the Washington Wizards.
The Clippers never trailed
and had assists on 27 of their
39 field goals, including 16 of
21 in the first half. They shot 56
percent to finish 4-3 on a trip
that included six Eastern Con-
ference teams, leaving them 6-
6 on the season against the
pedestrian East and 10-3
against the mighty West.
Paul went 11 for 14 from
the field, including 5 for 7 from
3-point range, and made all
11 of his free throws. Jamal
Crawford played the fifth man
instead of the sixth man, mak-
ing his first start since April 9,
2012, and finished with 17
points. Blake Griffin added 16
points and nine rebounds.
Lakers 88,
Bobcats 85
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Kobe Bryant scored a sea-
son-high 21 points and the
Los Angeles Lakers defeated
the Charlotte Bobcats 88-85


for their first win since Bryant
returned from a torn Achilles
tendon four games ago.
Bryant was 8 of 15 from the
field and hit two free throws
with 37 seconds left in the
game to put the Lakers ahead
for good.
Pau Gasol and Jordan Hill
had 15 points apiece for the
Lakers and Nick Young had
13 points off the bench.
Kemba Walker had 24
points and eight assists for
the slumping Bobcats, who
have lost three straight games
and five of their last seven.
The Bobcats led by as
many as six in the fourth
quarter, but the Lakers
chipped away. Charlotte had
a chance to tie the game in
the final seconds but Ben
Gordon missed a 3-pointer.
Knicks 111,
Hawks 106
NEW YORK -Carmelo
Anthony scored 35 points, An-
drea Bargnani added 23 and
the New York Knicks pulled
away in the fourth quarter to
beat the Atlanta Hawks 111-
106 on Saturday night.
Pablo Prigioni had a sea-
son-high 11 points and was a
spark in the decisive 11-0 run
midway through the final pe-
riod as the Knicks finished
strong one night after a
fourth-quarter flop cost them
in a loss at Boston.
Lou Williams scored a sea-
son-high 27 points in his best
game since returning from
knee surgery.
Paul Millsap scored 18 but
fouled out, and Al Horford fin-
ished with 17.
Raptors 99,
Bulls 77
CHICAGO Kyle Lowry
scored 16 points, Jonas
Valancius added 15 points
and 11 rebounds, and the
Toronto Raptors beat the
Chicago Bulls 99-77.
DeMar DeRozan scored 15
and Amir Johnson added 14
points and eight rebounds to
help the Raptors earn their
second win in as many nights
after dropping six of seven.
They led by 16 early in the
third, and pulled away in the
fourth after the gap dwindled
to four, sending the Bulls to
their 10th loss in 13 games.
Luol Deng led Chicago with
17 points and Mike Dunleavy
Jr. scored 14. Joakim Noah
added 10 points and 12 re-
bounds, while Jimmy Butler
scored 11.


van der Walt wins Mandela Championship


Associated Press

DURBAN, South Africa
- Dawie van der Walt shot
a 4-under 66 on Saturday
to win the Nelson Mandela
Championship by two
shots, giving the tourna-
ment a South African vic-
tory in a week when the
country bids farewell to its
former president.
Van der Walt finished
with a three-round total of
15-under 195 in the rain-
shortened event. It was his
second European Tour
victory
England's Matthew
Baldwin and Spain's Jorge
Campillo shot 68 to tie for
second.
Even before the rain dis-
rupted the first two days,


organizers had changed
the schedule ensure the
tournament didn't run
over into Sunday out of re-
spect for the state funeral
of Mandela, the South
African anti-apartheid
leader who died last week.
Franklin Templeton
Shootout
NAPLES Matt Kuchar
and Harris English took a
four-stroke lead in the
Franklin Templeton Shootout,
playing the back nine in
9-under 27 in the better-ball
round for a 12-under 60.
Kuchar and English were
20 under the Ritz-Carlton Golf
Resort's Tiburon course. They
opened with a 64 on Friday in
modified alternate-shot play.


Associated Press
Matt Kuchar reacts after missing a putt on the 18th hole
during the second round of Franklin Templeton Shootout
golf tournament Saturday at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples.
The team event ends Sunday a 61.
with a scramble. The teams of lan Poulter-
Retief Goosen and Fredrik Lee Westwood and Charles
Jacobson were second after Howell Ill-Justin Leonard


were tied for third at 13 under.
Poulter and Westwood shot
61, and Howell and Leonard
had a 67.
Father/Son
Challenge
ORLANDO Stewart Cink
and son Connor birdied three
of the last five holes for an
11-under 61 and a one-stroke
lead in the Father/Son
Challenge.
Stewart Cink made an
8-foot birdie putt on the final
at Grande Lakes in the
scramble event.
Steve and Sam Elkington
were second.
Jack and Gary Nicklaus
shot 63. The 73-year-old Jack
Nickaus made a 10-foot birdie
putt at No. 18.


Defending champions
Davis Love III and son Dru
were another shot back after
a 64, tied with Vijay and Qass
Singh, Hale and Steve Irwin
and David Duval and stepson
Dean Karavites.
Thailand Golf
Championship
CHONBURI, Thailand -
Spain's Sergio Garcia opened
a four-stroke lead in the Asian
Tour's Thailand Golf Champi-
onship, birdieing the final two
holes for his second straight
7-under 65.
Garcia had an 18-under
198 total atAmata Spring.
Sweden's Henrik Stenson
and with India's Anirban Lahiri
were tied for second. Stenson
shot 65, and Lahiri 67.


B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


SPORTS


IV59 lf-.VIU I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Saturday's college
basketball scores
Men


N. Arizona 85, Texas-Arlington 65
Oregon 113, Portland St. 78
Sacramento St. 99, UC Irvine 94
San Francisco 76, Boise St. 70
Santa Clara 64, Utah Valley 61
Seattle 74, Montana St. 63
Stanford 73, Gonzaga 45
Utah 82, BYU 74, 20T
Wyoming 71, Ball St. 51
TOURNAMENT
Clarion Warhawk Classic
Third Place
Louisiana-Monroe 92, Alcorn St. 54
EXHIBITION
Augustana (SD) 86, Minn. St. (Mankato) 82
Milligan 83, St. Catherine U. 76


UNC drops


EAST
Bryant 90, Navy 80, OT
Colgate 69, Albany (NY) 60
Dartmouth 76, Jacksonville St. 46
Fordham 79, Howard 60
Monmouth (NJ) 74, Binghamton 46
Pittsburgh 91,Youngstown St. 73
Princeton 81, Penn St. 79, OT
Rider 79, Wagner 58
Robert Morris 67, Duquesne 63
Rutgers 89, UNC Greensboro 72
St. Bonaventure 102, lona 89
St. Francis (NY) 67, Canisius 51
St. Peter's 83, Seton Hall 80, OT
UMass 80, N. Illinois 54
SOUTH
Clemson 71, Furman 35
East Carolina 84, NC A&T 71
Florida Gulf Coast 83, Samford 51
Gardner-Webb 106, Clearwater Christian 54
Georgia 84, Lipscomb 75
Georgia St. 79, Old Dominion 73
James Madison 84, High Point 69
Longwood 99, Bluefield St. 73
Louisville 79, W. Kentucky 63
Maryland 66, FAU 62
Mississippi 72, Middle Tennessee 63
NC State 82, Detroit 79
New Orleans 101, Champion Baptist 38
North Carolina 82, Kentucky 77
Northwestern St. 116, Louisiana College 76
Richmond 71, Coppin St. 49
Southern Miss. 96, St. Catherine U. 60
MIDWEST
Akron 84, Bethune-Cookman 56
Arizona 72, Michigan 70
Butler 76, Purdue 70
Indiana St. 74, UMKC 63
Jackson St. 57, Evansville 51
Marquette 86, IUPUI50
Michigan St. 67, Oakland 63
N. Iowa 77, VCU 68
Nebraska 79, Arkansas St. 67
Notre Dame 79, Indiana 72
Ohio 72, Alabama A&M 47
S. Dakota St. 85, Belmont 72
Toledo 77, Sam Houston St. 61
Valparaiso 80, Loyola Marymount 73
Wichita St. 70, Tennessee 61
Wisconsin 86, E. Kentucky 61
SOUTHWEST
Incarnate Word 83, McMurry 56
Oklahoma 101, Tulsa 91
Oklahoma St. 70, Louisiana Tech 55
Texas A&M 73, McNeese St. 60
FAR WEST
Air Force 62, UC Riverside 52
Arizona St. 97, Grambling St. 55
California 67, Fresno St. 56
N. Arizona 63, Grand Canyon 61
Nebraska-Omaha 82, Nevada 80
Saint Mary's (Cal) 82, Boise St. 74
Washington 85, Idaho St. 66
Women
EAST
Catholic 68, Washington (Md.) 55
Colgate 68, Robert Morris 61
Drexel 62, St. John's 55
George Washington 75, Morgan St. 60
James Madison 79, Prairie View 50
LIU Brooklyn 67, Monmouth (NJ) 52
Marist 76, Boston U. 65
Rhode Island 63, Vermont 50
Rider 66, Binghamton 63, OT
St. Elizabeth 81, Old Westbury 72
St. Rose 76, American International 72
Staten Island at CCNY ppd.
West Virginia 82, Marshall 51
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 69, Murray St. 62
Alice Lloyd 83, Ohio Christian 62
Berry 77, Covenant 58
Bryan 92, Hiwassee 60
Carson-Newman 80, Lenoir-Rhyne 77
Catawba 81, Tusculum 71
Chattanooga 86, UNC-Greensboro 53
Clemson 88, SC State 46
Cumberland (Tenn.) 69, Talladega 54
Cumberlands 67, Union (Ky.) 54
Delta St. 61, Christian Brothers 53
Elon 71, Samford 61
Freed-Hardeman 86, Faulkner 63
Gardner-Webb 68, Wofford 57
Lee 81, Bethel (Tenn.) 76
Louisiana-Lafayette 71, New Orleans 42
Louisville 108, Austin Peay 53
Maryland 93, Delaware St. 44
North Carolina 100, Charleston Southern 49
Pikeville 86, Berea 60
Richmond 80, Coll. of Charleston 73
Tennessee 103, Troy 64
Union (Tenn.) 82, North Alabama 75
Winthrop 79, High Point 72
MIDWEST
Adrian 62, Albion 56
Aquinas 95, Northwestern Ohio 89, 20T
Augsburg 62, St. Scholastica 48
Aurora 67, Edgewood 65
Baker 83, Graceland 71
Benedictine (III.) 64, Lakeland 50
Carroll (Wis.) 59, Ripon 57
Concordia (Mich.) 90, Marygrove 62
Concordia (Moor.) 90, Hamline 56
Concordia (St.P) 57, Wayne (Neb.) 54
Davenport 84, Madonna 63
IPFW 96, SIU-Edwardsville 71
Malone 89, Northwood (Mich.) 77
Marantha Baptist 53, Northland 48
Marian (Wis.) 58, Concordia (III.) 56
Michigan Tech 78, Hillsdale 75, OT
Milwaukee Engineering 84, Dominican (III.) 67
Minn. Duluth 70, Minot St. 68
M inn. St. (Moorhead) 77, Minn.-Crookston 60
N. Michigan 71, Findlay 66
Nebraska 63, Creighton 38
North Dakota 88, N. Dakota St. 83
Northern St. (SD) 66, Bemidji St. 53
Northwestern 90, Loyola of Chicago 57
Notre Dame 86, Michigan 64
Ohio 70, Notre Dame (Ohio) 52
Olivet 99, Alma 51
Siena Heights 83, Lawrence Tech 62
St. Cloud St. 100, Mary 80
St. Thomas (Minn.) 60, St. Benedict 36
Upper Iowa 78, Sioux Falls 75
Walsh 76, Lake Superior St. 69
Wayne (Mich.) 68, Lake Erie 48
Winona St. 81, SW Minnesota St. 59
Wis. Lutheran 60, Rockford 45
Wis.-River Falls 73, Viterbo 55
Wis.-Superior 82, Bethany Lutheran 60
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma St. 75, South Florida 56
Tulsa 81, Abilene Christian 61
FAR WEST
Colorado St. 67, S. Dakota Tech 47
Fresno St. 76, Portland 67
Loyola Marymount 71, UNLV 67


entuc


Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -Marcus
Paige scored 21 of his 23 points in
the second half and James
Michael McAdoo had 20 points,
helping No. 18 North Carolina
beat No. 11 Kentucky 82-77 on
Saturday
J.P Tokoto added 15 points for
the Tar Heels (7-2), who grinded
out yet another marquee noncon-
ference victory in a first month of
the season filled with wild swings.
UNC shot 57 percent after half-
time and scored 20 points off
turnovers to finally wrestle con-
trol of a foul-filled game away
from the Wildcats (8-3).
It wasn't always pretty for the
Tar Heels, from 19 missed free
throws to seeing the Wildcats
swat away seven of their shots.
Yet they managed to add another
big name to their early wins
against then-No. 1 Michigan State
and then-No. 3 Louisville all
coming while top scorer PJ. Hair-
ston and Leslie McDonald sit out
due to NCAA eligibility concerns.
No. 1 Arizona 72,
Michigan 70
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Nick John-
son made six free throws over the
final 25 seconds, and No. 1 Arizona
held on for a 72-70 victory over Michi-
gan on Saturday after rallying from an
11-point deficit in the second half.
The Wolverines (6-4) led by one
when Johnson drew a foul on a drive
with 24.6 seconds left. He made both
free throws, and Michigan's Nik
Stauskas missed at the other end.
After a tie-up, the possession arrow
gave the Wildcats (11-0) the ball with
9.5 seconds remaining.
Johnson pushed the lead to three
with two more free throws, and Ari-
zona fouled Spike Albrecht at the
other end. Albrecht made only one of
two free throws, and after two more
free throws by Johnson made it
71-67, Albrecht made a 3-pointer with
2 seconds left. Arizona's Gabe York
added a free throw to end the scoring.
Brandon Ashley scored 18 points
for Arizona.
Glenn Robinson III had 20 points
for Michigan, while Caris LeVert
added 15 points.
No. 4 Wisconsin 86,
E. Kentucky 61
MADISON, Wis. Ben Brust
scored 20 points to lead four Wiscon-
sin players in double figures.
Freshman reserve Nigel Hayes
scored a career-high 17 points for the
Badgers (12-0), who are off to the
best start to a season since 1915-16
when they started 12-0 and finished
20-1. Sam Dekker added 16 points,
while Frank Kaminsky shrugged off a
right foot injury that hampered him
this week to add 13.
Glenn Cosey scored 21 points to
lead the Colonels (7-4), while Or-
lando Williams added 13.
Wisconsin, which averages 21 free
throws a game, went 25 of 33 from
the free throw line led by Hayes
going 13 of 17. The Badgers finished


9 of 15 from beyond the 3-point line
with Brust making five, two short of
his school record.
No. 5 Michigan St. 67,
Oakland 63
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Keith
Appling scored 18 of his 21 points in
the second half and Adreian Payne
had 20 points and 10 rebounds to
lead Michigan State.
Branden Dawson added 16 points
and 13 rebounds for the shorthanded
Spartans (8-1), who were rusty early
and turnover-prone after a 10-day
break.
Michigan State played without
leading scorer Gary Harris, who is
still nursing an ankle injury. The Spar-
tans were also without big men Matt
Costello (mononucleosis) and Kenny
Kaminski (academic suspension).
Duke Mondy, the nation's leader in
steals, had 24 points and seven
swipes for the Golden Grizzlies (2-9)
in their home game played at the
Palace of Auburn Hills. Travis Bader
has 18 points and was 4 for 14 from
3-point range for Oakland, winless in
12 games in the series.
Michigan State got all but 10 of its
points from Appling, Payne and Daw-
son and only had five players score.
But a 41-32 edge in rebounds gave
the Spartans just enough to bounce
back from the 79-65 loss to North
Carolina that knocked them out of the
No. 1 spot in the poll.
No. 6 Louisville 79,
W. Kentucky 63
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Russ Smith


had 14 points and 10 assists and
Louisville shot 69 percent from the
field in the second half.
With starting point guard Chris
Jones sidelined at least a game with
a sprained right wrist, the Cardinals
(9-1) got numerous backcourt contri-
butions to beat their in-state rival for
the fifth straight time. Freshman Terry
Rozier grabbed a team-high 10 re-
bounds starting in Jones' place while
reserve Tim Henderson added career
highs of 12 points on four 3-pointers
and four assists.
Their efforts helped Louisville pad
a 31-28 halftime lead as the Cardi-
nals made 13 of their first 21 attempts
from the field after the break to build
a 63-44 lead with 6:02 left. They shot
18 of 26 in the second half.
Louisville held the Hilltoppers (5-4)
scoreless for nearly 6 minutes.
T.J. Price's 22 points led WKU,
which shot just 36 percent and was
outscored 36-14 inside.
No. 7 Oklahoma St. 70,
Louisiana Tech 55
OKLAHOMA CITY Le'Bryan
Nash had 22 points and 10 rebounds
as Oklahoma State overcame a
sluggish start.
Marcus Smart scored three points
in the first half and finished with 13
for the Cowboys (9-1), who had not
played a game in more than a week.
Smart added five rebounds and
five assists, but the Big 12 Confer-
ence's leading scorer watched as
Nash did the bulk of the scoring
against Louisiana Tech (8-3).
Markel Brown scored 13 points


for the Cowboys and Kamari Murphy
had 10.
Chris Anderson scored 14 points
and Alex Hamilton added 12 for
Louisiana Tech, which held Okla-
homa State scoreless over the first
4 minutes of the game. But the Bull-
dogs couldn't get any closer after
pulling within 49-42 in the second half
in Chesapeake EnergyArena, home
of the Oklahoma City Thunder.
No. 12 Wichita St. 70,
Tennessee 61
WICHITA, Kan. Tekele Cotton
scored all 19 of his points in the sec-
ond half and Wichita State is off to
the best start in school history.
Darius Carter had 11 points and 14
rebounds and Cleanthony Early
added 13 points for the Shockers
(10-0).
Jordan McRae scored 26 points for
Tennessee (6-3), which shot 16 of 47
(34 percent) over the final 35 minutes.
The game was played before
14,356 in the downtown Intrust Bank
Arena.
A 3-pointer by Cotton started a 7-0
run that gave Wichita State a 58-49
lead with 4:47 remaining.
No. 13 Kansas 80,
New Mexico 63
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Perry Ellis
scored 21 points, Joel Embiid added
a career-high 18 and No. 13 Kansas
pulled away in the second half to beat
New Mexico 80-63 and end a
frustrating two-game skid.
Andrew Wiggins, who dealt with
foul trouble much of the night, added
11 points for the Jayhawks (7-3), who
led 39-38 at halftime but used two
big runs over the final 20 minutes to
blow it open.
It was the Jayhawks' ninth straight
win at the Sprint Center, including
their run to last year's Big 12 tourna-
ment title. After dropping games at
Colorado and Florida, the win also
kept Kansas from losing three straight
non-conference games for the first
time since the 1982-83 season.
Cameron Bairstow and Kendall
Williams had 24 points apiece for the
Lobos (7-2).
No. 22 UMass 80,
N. Illinois 54
AMHERST, Mass. Cady
Lalanne scored 16 points to lead
UMass.
Chaz Williams, coming off career
highs of 32 points and 15 assists
against Brigham Young on Dec. 7,
had 12 points and seven assists for
the Minutemen (9-0), who are off to
the program's best start since the
1995-96 team started 26-0.
Raphiael Putney added 13 points
- including three 3-pointers in an
early 11-0 run and Maxie Esho
had 12 points and seven rebounds
for the Minutemen.
Dontel Highsmith led the Huskies
(3-5) with 10 points.
UMass Freshman reserves Clyde
Santee scored the first 13 points of his
college career all in a span of 5:34.
The 54 points were the fewest
allowed by UMass this season.


No. 4 Irish women easily stop Michigan


Associated Press

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -
Loyd Jewell scored 20
points, Natalie Achonwa
had 18 points and nine re-
bounds and No. 4 Notre
Dame cruised to an 86-64
victory over Michigan on
Saturday night.
Michaela Mabrey added
14 points for the Fighting
Irish (9-0), who led 47-23 at
halftime. The Irish shot 59
percent from the floor and
forced 19 turnovers, in-
cluding 13 in the decisive
first half.
Reserve guard Shannon
Smith scored 23 points for
Michigan (7-4), which had
won six of seven. Cyesha
Goree had 15 points and
seven rebounds, and Siera
Thompson finished with
10 points.
Michigan shot 52 per-
cent (15 for 29) in the sec-
ond half
No. 3 Tenn. 103,
Troy 64
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Is-
abelle Harrison, Cierra Bur-
dick and Nia Moore had
double-doubles as No. 3 Ten-
nessee used its height ad-
vantage remained unbeaten
with a 103-64 victory over
Troy.
Tennessee (9-0) outre-
bounded Troy 74-29 and was
only two rebounds away from
the school single-game
record set in February 1988.


Six of Tennessee's 10 play-
ers are listed as 6-foot-2 or
taller. Troy (4-5) has nobody
taller than 6-1.
Harrison had 13 points and
12 rebounds despite sitting
out most of the second half.
Moore had 10 points and 13
rebounds, career highs in
both categories.
No. 6 Stanford 73,
No. 23 Gonzaga 45
STANFORD, Calif. -
Chiney Ogwumike had 19
points and seven rebounds
and No. 6 Stanford cele-
brated Hall of Fame coach
Tara VanDerveer's 900th vic-
tory a few weeks later back at
home, beating 23rd-ranked
Gonzaga 73-45.
Ogwumike shot 8 for 16
and in the first game at
Maples Pavilion since Van-
Derveer won her 900th game
against Florida Gulf Coast on
Nov. 27 in Puerto Vallarta,
Mexico. VanDerveer became
the fifth Division I coach to
join the 900 club, and was
honored after the game for
her accomplishment in an on-
court ceremony.
No. 7 L'ville 108,
Austin Peay 53
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Shoni
Schimmel scored 24 points,
Cortnee Walton had 13 and
No. 7 Louisville's high-powered
offense was too much for
Austin Peay in a 108-53 victory.


Sara Hammond added 12
points to help Louisville (10-1)
win its third straight game.
Ranked sixth nationally in field
goal shooting at 49 percent,
the Cardinals shot 52 percent
against the Lady Govs.
Austin Peay missed 11 of
its first 15 attempts from the
field and shot 30 percent
overall.
Kristen Stainback led
Austin Peay (3-6) with 14
points and Jennifer
Nwokocha had eight.
No. 8 Maryland 93,
Delaware State 44
TOWSON, Md.-Alyssa
Thomas shook off early foul
trouble to finish with 18 points
and 10 rebounds, helping No.
8 Maryland rout Delaware
State 93-44 for its eighth
straight victory.
Thomas was on the bench
after picking up a pair of early
fouls when Maryland (10-1)
finished the first half on a 21-
6 run, extending a 24-16
lead. Seven different Terra-
pins scored during the burst,
led by five points from Tier-
ney Pfirman.
Raven Bankston led
Delaware State (3-5) with 22
points.
No. 14 Okla. St 75,
S. Florida 56
OKLAHOMA CITY Liz
Donohoe scored 18 points
and pulled down eight


rebounds as the No. 14 Okla-
homa State women topped
South Florida 75-56 in the All-
College Classic at Chesa-
peake Energy Arena.
Donohoe scored five points
in an early 9-0 run which gave
OSU a 16-7 lead with 13:55
left in the first half and the
Bulls would never get closer
than six again. Oklahoma
State, which has now started
each of the last four seasons
8-0, twice led by as many as
23 points in the second half.
No. 15 UNC 100,
C. Southern 49
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Xylina McDaniel scored 15
points to lead a balanced at-
tack that had five players
score in double figures for
No. 15 North Carolina in a
100-49 romp past Charleston
Southern.
Three players have 14
points for the Tar Heels (8-2),
Stephanie Mavunga, who
had 11 rebounds, Alisha Gray
and N'Dea Bryant, a career-
high for the sophomore re-
serve. Diamond DeShields
added 10 to go with a career-
high seven assists.
Erin Bratcher had 14
points and DJ Fowler 12 for
the Buccaneers (3-4), who
were held to 27 percent
shooting and committed 31
turnovers.
North Carolina shot a blis-
tering 58 percent despite


coming off a 10-day break for
finals, and in the second half
cranked up the defense to
match. Charleston Southern
trailed 49-30 at the break but
was out-scored 51-19 in the
second half. UNC had 25
steals, 16 from players off the
bench, and blocked 11 shots.
No. 19 Nebraska
63, Creighton 38
LINCOLN, Neb. Emily
Cady scored 14 points and
Jordan Hooper added 15 re-
bounds as No. 19 Nebraska
downed Creighton 63-38.
The Huskers led at the half
by eight points (35-27) and
went on a 10-0 run after the
break to stretch the lead to
18. Creighton did not score
for the first six minutes of the
second half, missing 12 at-
tempts until Sammy Jensen
made a 3-pointer.
Hailie Sample scored 13
points for Nebraska (8-2) and
Brandi Jeffery came off the
bench to shoot a perfect 4-4
from the floor and make both
her free throws for a total of
11 points.
The Bluejays (4-5) took 31
shots from behind the 3-point
arc, making seven, and shot
just 23.1 percent from the
field. The team held its
largest lead four minutes into
the first half at 10-7. Alyssa
Kamphaus and Marissa Jan-
ning led Creighton with eight
points each.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 B5


Associated Press
North Carolina's Marcus Paige dribbles as Kentucky's Aaron Harrison
defends during the first half Saturday in Chapel Hill, N.C. The No. 18 Tar
Heels won 82-77 over the No. 11 Wildcats.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eagles might prefer to be outside


Associated Press

The Eagles can be as-
sured of one warming
thought as they head to
Minneapolis this week-
end: There won't be 6
inches of snow on the field.
Nope, the game will be
indoors.
Not that Philadelphia
would mind playing in in-
clement weather after its
34-20 victory over Detroit
in blizzard-like conditions
last Sunday Seems odd,
doesn't it, that the team at
a disadvantage in wintry
weather in this matchup
hails from Minnesota.
"I don't think we need to
take our rain gear," offen-
sive coordinator Pat Shur-
mur said.
No, as long as the Eagles
bring LeSean McCoy, De-
Sean Jackson and Nick
Foles on offense, operating
behind that suddenly pow-
erful line, they should be
in good shape in the
Metrodome or on the tun-
dra outside.
"Yeah, I wonder, they've
put up some numbers on
snow," Vikings coach
Leslie Frazier said, noting
McCoy's franchise-record
217 yards rushing against
the Lions. "For a back to
be able to run like against
Detroit, I think they have a
pretty good front, it's
pretty impressive. Now
you get him on a fast track,
you wonder is that a good
thing or a bad thing? We'll
have to find a way to slow
him down."
Minnesota's star run-
ning back Adrian Peter-
son, the 2012 league MVP
has a sprained right foot.
The Vikings (3-9-1) have an
even bigger challenge if he
can't go against the ever-
improving Philly defense.
The Eagles (8-5) have
won five of their last six
against Minnesota and
they are 5-1 on the road
this season. They've also
won their last five outings
to move to the top of the
NFC East.
Week 15 began with an
upset as San Diego han-
dled Denver 27-20.
Philip Rivers threw for
two scores to rookie
Keenan Allen and kept the
Chargers' offense on the
field for nearly 39 minutes.
Stuck on the sideline
most of the night, Peyton
Manning ended up with
289 yards and only two
touchdowns. The Broncos
(11-3) fell at home in the
regular season for the first
time in 14 games.
The Chargers (7-7)
snapped Denver's 10-game
AFC West winning streak
and stayed in the hunt for
a playoff spot
On Monday night, Balti-
more is at Detroit.
Green Bay (6-6-1)
at Dallas (7-6)
Both teams are in their
division races, the Packers
in the NFC North, the
Cowboys in the NFC East,
but have only slight shots
at a wild card. Green Bay


rS",W


Associated Press
Philadelphia wide receiver DeSean Jackson and the Eagles are on a five-game winning streak heading into today's contest at Minnesota.


has struggled since quar-
terback Aaron Rodgers
broke his left collarbone,
but is hopeful he can get
them to the top when he
returns. He is out Sunday
Green Bay hasn't beaten
Dallas on the road since
1989. The Packers lost the
last nine games at Texas
Stadium, including seven
straight from 1993-96,
three in playoff games.
Cincinnati (9-4)
at Pittsburgh (5-8)
Bengals linebacker
James Harrison returns to
where he helped the Steel-
ers win two Super Bowls.
He's a part-time player
now, however, on a strong
Cincinnati defense.
Cincinnati can clinch
the AFC North with a win
and a Baltimore loss to De-
troit. The Bengals also
earn a third straight play-
off berth with a win and
Miami losing to New
England.
The Steelers have lost
two straight and would be
eliminated from playoff
contention with a loss and
a win by either Miami or
Baltimore.
Baltimore (7-6) at Detroit
(7-6), Monday night
Huge game on both
sides.
Baltimore controls the
AFC's second wild card
right now and has won a
season-high three straight,
all at home. But the
Ravens have lost three
straight on the road and
five of six this season.
The Lions have lost
three of four, blowing
fourth-quarter leads in
each game. The offense
has not scored in the
fourth quarter of Detroit's
last three defeats.


New England (10-3)
at Miami (7-6)
New England never
seems to run out of mira-
cles, and with a win will
have the top seed in the
AFC while clinching the
East for fifth successive
season. The Patriots have
beaten the Dolphins seven
consecutive times, includ-
ing three wins in Miami.
Only eight current Miami
players have beaten New
England while wearing a
Dolphins uniform.
Ryan Tannehill has
been sacked 47 times, and
NFL high and a Dolphins
record. But they have won
three of their last four
Kansas City (10-3)
at Oakland (4-9)
Suddenly, the Chiefs are
in position to win the AFC
West with Denver's stum-
ble, but still need more
help. Regardless, they get
a postseason berth if ei-
ther Miami or Baltimore
doesn't win and would be
the fourth team to make
the playoffs after losing at
least 14 times the previ-
ous year
Kansas City has won
eight of the last 10 in
Oakland.
An odd stat: The
Raiders are the first team
with four 100-yard rushers
in a game (Terrelle Pryor,
Darren McFadden,
Rashad Jennings, Marcel
Reece) since Kansas City
had five in 1978.
New York Jets (6-7)
at Carolina (9-4)
After being routed by
New Orleans to stop their
eight-game winning
streak, the Panthers look
to re-establish their play-
off credentials in what
could be a strong defen-


sive match. Carolina has
the league's best rushing
defense, with the Jets just
behind.
The Panthers get a play-
off spot by winning and
having Arizona, San Fran-
cisco and Dallas all not
win, or the Cardinals,
49ers and Eagles not win.
New York remains on
the periphery of the AFC
wild-card race.
New Orleans (10-3)
at St Louis (5-8)
If the Saints win, they
are in the playoffs. There
are four other scenarios in
which they can advance,
but they can't clinch the
NFC South this week.
The Rams are elimi-
nated from playoff con-
tention and assured of a
10th consecutive season
without a winning record.
But coach Jeff Fisher is 4-
0 against the Saints.
"Last time we went, we
got whooped, no bones
about it," Saints quarter-
back Drew Brees said of a
31-21 loss in 2011. "And we
all remember that, the
guys that were here, and
we know it's going to take
a much better perform-
ance on our part this time
around in order to get
a win."
Seattle (11-2)
at New York Giants (5-8)
Seattle has looked like
the league's best team for
a while, but stumbled in a
grudge match at San Fran-
cisco last week. The Sea-
hawks are 5-2 on the road
and have never won six
games away from Seattle
in a season.
They will own the NFC
West and a first-round bye
with a victory and a San
Francisco loss or tie.


Should the Niners and
Saints fall while the Sea-
hawks beat the Giants,
Seattle clinches home-
field advantage through-
out NFC playoffs.
New York must find a
way to protect Eli Man-
ning, who has been sacked
a career-high 32 times and
faces a fierce and angry
defense.
Chicago (7-6)
at Cleveland (4-9)
Jay Cutler is back at
quarterback for the Bears,
which might not be all that
good considering how well
backup Josh McCown
played. They are averag-
ing 28.3 points per game,
their highest total since
the 1985 Super Bowl
championship team. But
the once-proud defense
ranks 27th and is dead last
against the run.
Cleveland, still smarting
from blowing a win at New
England, has a particu-
larly dangerous weapon in
the passing game in Josh
Gordon. His 774 yards re-
ceiving in the last four
games are the most for a
four-game stretch in
league history Gordon
leads the NFL with 1,400
yards and he's done it in 11
games after serving a
two-game suspension.
Arizona (8-5)
at Tennessee (5-8)
Still in the thick of the
wild-card chase, the Cardi-
nals head to Music City
having won five of six. Two
of their stars have been
hit: WR Larry Fitzgerald
has five TDs in the past
four games, and LB John
Abraham had three sacks,
a forced fumble and a
safety last week. Abraham
has 11 sacks and four


forced fumbles in the past
seven games.
Titans RB Chris John-
son (49) needs one TD
rushing to join Earl Camp-
bell (73) and Eddie George
(64) as the third back in
club history with 50.
Washington (3-10)
at Atlanta (3-10)
Kirk Cousins gets the
call at quarterback as
coach Mike Shanahan
benches Robert Griffin III
for what Shanahan says is
in RG3's best interest
health-wise. Both of these
teams made the playoffs a
year ago by winning divi-
sions. Look at them now
Houston (2-11)
at Indianapolis (8-5)
The Colts already have
secured the AFC South,
not a big chore consider-
ing its weakness. They
have tons of issues to work
out, though, including far
too many slow starts. Indi-
anapolis has been
outscored 92-46 in the first
quarter this season.
Wade Phillips returns to
the interim coaching role
after Gary Kubiak was
fired. The Texans have lost
11 straight overall, and
have never won in Indy
Buffalo (4-9)
at Jacksonville (4-9)
Soon to be eliminated
from playoff contention for
an almost unfathomable
14th straight season, the
Bills at least are secure in
their choice at quarter-
back. First-round pick EJ
Manuel is their future.
Jacksonville, despite
winning four of its last five
games and three in a row,
can't feel so sure after 2011
first-rounder Blaine Gab-
bert has flopped.


NFL STATISTICS


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
and 10 3 0 .769 349 2
7 6 0 .538 286 2
6 7 0 .462 226 3
4 9 0 .308 273 3
South
W L T Pct PF
Polis 8 5 0 .615 313 3
e 5 8 0 .385 292 3
lie 4 9 0 .308 201 3
2 11 0 .154 250 3
North
W L T Pct PF
9 4 0 .692 334 2
7 6 0 .538 278 2
S 5 8 0 .385 291 3
4 9 0 .308 257 3
West
W L T Pct PF
11 3 0 .786 535 3
ity 10 3 0 .769 343 2
1 7 7 0 .500 343 3
4 9 0 .308 264 3
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
hia 8 5 0 .615 334 3
7 6 0 .538 357 3
ts 5 8 0 .385 251 3
wn 3 10 0 .231 279 4
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 10 3 0 .769 343 2
9 4 0 .692 298 1
ay 4 9 0 .308 244 2
3 10 0 .231 282 3
North
W L T Pct PF
7 6 0 .538 346 3
7 6 0 .538 368 3
y 6 6 1 .500 316 3
S 3 9 1 .269 315 3
West
W L T Pct PF
11 2 0 .846 357 2
cisco 9 4 0 .692 316 2
8 5 0 .615 305 2
5 8 0 .385 289 3
I playoff spot


y-clinched division
Thursday's Game
San Diego 27, Denver 20
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona atTennessee, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Detroit, 8:40 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 22
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 23
Atlanta at San Francisco, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 15
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
P Manning, DEN 580 393 4811
P Rivers, SND 482 337 4048
Roethlisberger, PIT 500 320 3724
Brady, NWE 523 318 3685
J. Campbell, CLE 197 116 1324
Dalton, CIN 468 290 3419
LockerTEN 183 111 1256
Ale. Smith, KAN 460 275 2873
Luck, IND 464 272 3119
Tannehill, MIA 484 300 3315


J. Charles, KAN
Ry. Mathews, SND
Moreno, DEN
Chr. Johnson, TEN
Jones-Drew, JAX
Be. Tate, HOU
Spiller, BUF
Green-Ellis, CIN
F Jackson, BUF
Ivory, NYJ


Rushers
AUt Yds Avg
238 1161 4.88
236 1012 4.29
224 939 4.19
217 820 3.78
208 719 3.46
165 699 4.24
149 678 4.55
193 662 3.43
157 645 4.11
146 639 4.38


Receivers
No Yds Avg
And. Johnson, HOU 95 1277 13.4
Ant. Brown, PIT 90 1241 13.8
De. Thomas, DEN 78 1194 15.3
A..Green,CIN 78 1175 15.1
Edelman, NWE 76 775 10.2
Decker, DEN 73 1130 15.5
Ke.WrightTEN 73 857 11.7
Welker, DEN 73 778 10.7
Cameron, CLE 72 825 11.5
Gordon, CLE 71 1400 19.7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Doss, BAL 23 359 15.6
McCluster, KAN 54 631 11.7
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7
Edelman, NWE 32 356 11.1
Ant. Brown, PIT 25 269 10.8
Holliday, DEN 26 250 9.6
Br.Tate,CIN 29 274 9.4
Hilton, IND 17 159 9.4
Thigpen, MIA 26 228 8.8
K. Martin, HOU 32 264 8.3
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
Q. Demps, KAN 25 764 30.6
Jac. Jones, BAL 21 602 28.7
Holliday, DEN 24 676 28.2
Todman, JAX 24 662 27.6
K. Martin, HOU 33 864 26.2
Br.Tate, CIN 27 701 26.0
D. Reed, IND 24 590 24.6
Cribbs, NYJ 20 490 24.5
Thigpen, MIA 31 740 23.9
F Jones, PIT 18 427 23.7
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
J. Charles, KAN 13 10 3
Moreno, DEN 12 10 2


De. Thomas, DEN
Ju.Thomas, DEN
Welker, DEN
Cotchery, PIT
Decker, DEN
Gordon, CLE
A..Green,CIN
F Jackson, BUF

M. Prater, DEN
Gostkowski, NWE
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
Vinatieri, IND
Folk, NYJ
Sturgis, MIA
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Suisham, PIT


11 0 1
11 0 1
10 0 1
9 0
8 0
8 0
8 0
8 7
Kicking
PAT FG
67-67 20-21
35-35 30-32
37-37 28-31
25-25 29-31
27-27 26-30
20-20 28-29
29-29 25-33
40-40 21-25
26-26 25-27
29-29 24-26


NFC leaders
Week 15
Quarterbacks
AUt Comn Yds
Foles, PHL 218 135 1970
J.McCown,CHI 220 147 1809
A. Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218
Brees, NOR 519 353 4107
R.Wilson, SEA 330 213 2871
Romo, DAL 460 296 3244
S. Bradford, STL 262 159 1687
M.Ryan,ATL 525 345 3677
Cutler, CHI 265 167 1908
M. Stafford, DET 525 306 3976
Rushers
AUt Yds Avg
L. McCoy, PHL 261 1305 5.00
A. Peterson, MIN 268 1221 4.56
Forte, CHI 234 1073 4.59
M. Lynch, SEA 244 1042 4.27
A. Morris, WAS 218 1027 4.71
Gore, SNF 220 931 4.23
Lacy, GBY 227 887 3.91
Re. Bush, DET 180 854 4.74
D. Murray, DAL 160 843 5.27
Stacy, STL 174 721 4.14
Receivers
No Yds Avg
GarconWAS 89 1017 11.4
B. Marshall, CHI 84 1090 13.0
Cal. Johnson, DET 75 1351 18.0
JefferyCHI 75 1193 15.9


J. Graham, NOR
Cruz, NYG
De. Bryant, DAL
Douglas, ATL
J. Nelson, GBY
Boldin, SNF

Dw. Harris, DAL
GinnJr., CAR
Sherels, MIN
Hyde, GBY
G.Tate, SEA
Page, TAM
T. Austin, STL
R. Randle, NYG
Sproles, NOR
Spurlock, DET


74 1046 14.1
71 973 13.7
70 908 13.0
68 926 13.6
67 1046 15.6
67 915 13.7
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
17 238 14.0
20 263 13.2
17 223 13.1
20 254 12.7
39 467 12.0
22 242 11.0
33 280 8.5
25 210 8.4
24 164 6.8
22 145 6.6


Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C. Patterson, MIN 36 1199 33.3
Dw. Harris, DAL 26 792 30.5
Hester, CHI 38 1067 28.1
Dam. Johnson, PHL 17 441 25.9


GinnJr., CAR
J. Rodgers, ATL
T. Austin, STL
Paul, WAS


J. Graham, NOR
Cal. Johnson, DET
M. Lynch, SEA
Ve. Davis, SNF
A. Peterson, MIN
De. Bryant, DAL
Fitzgerald, ARI
B. Marshall, CHI
Forte, CHI
Gore, SNF

Hauschka, SEA
Crosby, GBY
Gould, CHI
Walsh, MIN
P Dawson, SNF
Hartley, NOR
D. Bailey, DAL
Feely, ARI
Gano, CAR
Zuerlein, STL


21 491 23
20 447 22
18 398 22
20 411 20
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Re
14 0 1
12 0 1
12 10
11 0 1
11 10
10 0 1
10 0 1
9 0
9 7
8 8
Kicking
PAT FG
38-38 27-28
31-31 29-33
36-37 24-27
33-34 24-27
35-35 23-26
40-40 21-27
40-40 19-21
31-31 22-26
34-34 20-23
29-29 20-22


New EngIl
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

y-lndianap
Tennesse
Jacksonvi
Houston

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

x-Denver
Kansas C
San Diego
Oakland


Philadelph
Dallas
N.Y Giant
Washingto

New Orlea
Carolina
Tampa Ba
Atlanta

Detroit
Chicago
Green Ba
Minnesota

x-Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis
x-clinchec


B6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


NFL









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Squirrels beware: We're serious about our birds


he bump on my head
is no longer tender to
the touch; my blurry
vision is gone.
The funny thing in the
newspaper column-writing
business is that you never
know what will strike a
chord with readers. Last
week I talked about knock-
ing myself out after walking
into a wooden beam under-
neath my house.
In truth, no one was too


interested in the fact that I
knocked myself silly But
the feedback on the squir-
rels eating our birdseed
was over the top.
I had more than 25 phone
calls and emails about how
to keep squirrels out of our
bird feeder
That's more feedback
than I ever get on tax in-
creases, hospital controver-
sies or national health care
programs.


Everyone has opinion
about how to fight squirrels
and protect birds.
I will ignore the one well-
intentioned reader who
said he captures his pesky
birdseed-eating squirrels
and then goes over to the
lake and gives them swim-
ming lessons. Funny thing,
he noted, was that none of
the squirrels ever success-
fully complete the swim les-
sons. Hmm.


Most of the feedback was
of a more positive nature.
One kind reader of 32 years
delivered a 20-pound bag of
birdseed to the Chronicle's
front desk with a note that
said our local squirrels
don't like the brand.
My birds appreciate hav-
ing a Thanksgiving celebra-
tion of their own.
Other readers offered
elaborate birdfeeder de-
signs that slow the squirrels


down from their quest for
new tastes.
Happy squirrel fighter
Walter Winn of Pine Ridge
sent in a recommendation
for something called
"Squirrel Buster Plus" from
a Canadian company Winn
said the company actually
offers a lifetime guarantee
for its device.
His Pine Ridge squirrels


PageC3


EARLY



VOTE



SITE
........ ~ imiiii-Ai i ~ .,, :


: : --" .. "


Early
Voting
Site


Chronicle file
Gov. Scott's attack on the voting rolls now includes a directive saying election officials shouldn't "solicit" the return of absentee ballots to any location except
the supervisor's office. Several counties, including Citrus, allow people to turn in absentee ballots at early voting sites or secure drop-off boxes. It's meant as a
convenience to those who are elderly, disabled or have limited transportation.





SCOTT'S CRUSADE:




SHRINK THE VOTE


Gov. Rick Scott's latest purge of
Florida's voter rolls is lurching
forward, despite the skepticism
and outright opposition of many county
elections supervisors.
True to his "tea party" roots, Scott dreams of the days when most voters
were cranky, middle-aged white people, his core constituency Up for re-
election next year, the governor fears a high voter turnout, because that would
mean lots of Hispanics and blacks standing in line to cast ballots.
They tend to vote Democrat, a grim prospect for a Republican who isn't
exactly beloved in his own party
Scott's first voter purge was a debacle. Initiated ahead of the 2012 elections,
the idea was to thwart President Barack Obama and other Democratic can-
didates by reducing the number of Hispanic and foreign-born voters.
Screening drivers' licenses, the Division of Elections produced a list of
about 182,000 possible non-citizens who were registered to vote. Unfortunately, the
list proved worthless because the data was outdated or flat-out wrong.
County officials were left exasperated and angry
Scott'fs vote-whitening hit squad then reduced the list of targets to 2,600,
and finally to a measly 198 before bagging the whole project.
To the dismay of Scott and Republican leaders, Obama carried Florida.
This information wasn't available on Election Day, or for several days after-
wards, because Florida was the last state in the country to count all its votes.
Thank God it no longer mattered.


Carl Hiaasen
OTHER
VOICES


More than 8.4 million Floridians
went to the polls, and long lines
overwhelmed some election offices
late into the night. These delays
could have been avoided if Scott and
the GOP-controlled Legislature had
agreed in advance to increase the
number of early voting sites, as
many county supervisors had
requested.
But Republicans don't like early
voting because it raises the total
turnout They prefer a smaller, more
manageable electorate.
The new Florida purge will use a
data program from U.S. Department
of Homeland Security called the
Systematic Alien Verification for
Entitlements, or SAVE. Election of-
ficials are supposed to compare
voter rolls to a list of legal non-
citizens who are qualified to receive
certain benefits.
A federal court ruled that Florida
was allowed to use the SAVE list,
even though Homeland Security of-
ficials raised doubts about its relia-
bility as a means of identifying
non-citizens.
See Page C3


Over five years, graduation rate up nearly 15 percent


ith pride and en-
thusiasm I re-
sponded to the
recent release of the 2013
graduation rate and
dropout rate data from the
Florida Department of Ed-
ucation (FDOE). Improve-
ment and achievement by
students in our district are
directly related to the hard
work and commitment of all
of our staff. In a desire to ac-
knowledge these efforts and


successes, I may have con-
fused some about the details
and rigorous requirements
related to the graduation
rate. While we continue to
strive for 100 percent of our
students graduating, we are
realistic in acknowledging
that some students may
need more than four years
to earn a diploma and oth-
ers may have alternative
pathways, such as a special
diploma for our students


who have significant cogni-
tive disabilities.
The information that fol-
lows is intended to help our
school and community part-
ners understand our efforts
and our accomplishments:
FDOE has released both
the graduation and dropout
data for the 2012-13 school
year The results are evi-
dence of the tremendous,
coordinated efforts of
teachers, support staff and


administrators who make a
daily commitment to stu-
dent achievement. And
while not all of the results
are where we would like
them be, we are proud of
the recognition our district
continues to earn for out-
standing academic
progress.
Graduation rate: The def-
inition of a student who
counts toward the Federal
Uniform Graduation Rate


has changed in recent
years, and we have in-
cluded the new qualifica-
tions below
To be considered a grad-
uate, a student must:
meet cohort graduation
requirements within four
years;
not be seeking a Spe-
cial Diploma designation;
not be seeking a GED
See Page 03


Sandra 'Sam' Himmel
GUEST
COLUMN


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Fra .," H.I.. r
Photo 1. D.
Read,
F'.1 t.





OPage C2- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15,2013



PINION


"Purity / is obscurity."
Ogden Nash,
"Verses from 1929 On,"
1959


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
r Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris...................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


HELPING THE HOMELESS




Response




a reflection




on society


es, there are homeless
people who choose to
panhandle and live in
the woods.
To believe this cookie-cutter
stereotype is the norm, how-
ever, is to be naive to reality.
The circumstances that be-
fall individuals and lead to
homelessness are vast. If we
as a community as a soci-
ety choose to help those
who can be helped, we are all
better for the effort.
In Citrus County there are
a handful of or-
ganizations and
individuals mak- THE I
ing a difference
and helping to Homek
address home-
lessness. OUR 01
However, there Failure to
is not a central- a broad
ized strategy comp
being coordi- the pr
nated by a lead
agency to get to
the heart of the multifaceted
causes of, and solutions to,
homelessness.
Despite countless conver-
sations and considerations
toward that end, years con-
tinue to pass and the need for
a coordinated approach is no
closer
The Path of Citrus County
- one organization working
to assist the homeless re-
cently participated in a survey
of 105 rescue missions in North
America. The results should
be a wake-up call to cynics.
Of 22 people at the 24-person-
capacity shelter at the time of
the October survey, 59 percent
had never been homeless be-
fore and another 18 percent
had only been homeless once
before. Thirty-two percent
had been homeless fewer
than three months, with 23
percent having been home-
less for more than a year
"I think there is some mis-
understanding as to who we
are taking care of," said
Duwayne Sipper, founder


esc

P
0

1C
C
to
I s
"Ol


and director of The Path.
"Our people have been dis-
placed by life circumstances;
they did not choose to be
homeless."
Unfortunately, it's often
easier for people to generalize.
Of those from The Path par-
ticipating in the survey, 41
percent had some college
with 9 percent having bache-
lor's degrees and 5 percent
with associate degrees. About
one-third of them were in the
26 to 35 age group and 27 per-
cent in the 46-to-
65 age group.
5SUE: Seventy-three
ssness percent were
ssness. male and 27 per-
cent were female.
'INION: While not spec-
develop ified in the sur-
strategy vey, common
)unds causes for home-
)blem. lessness include
post-traumatic
stress disorder
and a host of mental health
issues; there are victims of
abuse, victims of the economy
and those dependent on
drugs and alcohol.
In viewing each category
independently, it's apparent
that avenues for help can and
do exist. There's just a lack of
orchestration.
With a lead agency, utiliza-
tion of sources for help -
ranging from jobs training
and placement, to drug rehab
centers, to mental health fa-
cilities to abuse shelters -
can be maximized.
The big question is: Who
could fill that orchestration
role. Possibilities range from
county government to the
United Way to Catholic Char-
ities and beyond.
While we'll never see the
eradication of homelessness,
avenues exist to help a signif-
icant percentage who at
some point of time could
benefit from society's assis-
tance instead of society's
scorn.


BU united Way of Citrus County needs your
I .jm j'U1 ^ help to reach its annual fundraising
Rinyi k ~goal. If you can, please send a contribution
to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Personal reckoning
Today, Dec. 1, while listening to
a sermon, the minister mentioned
the Lord is coming and you have
to be ready. He is coming. The man
sitting in back of me
said, "Good, that's great, 0
terrific. I hope He comes
next weekend because
my relatives are com-
ing. Nothing personal."
Carnival Day
Refuge Day at Three
Sisters Springs. Doesn't CAL
refuge mean seeking quiet
or safety away from 563-
something? Having pup-
pet shows, musical day,
barbecue lunches, parades?
How is that a refuge? That's not
going out in the wilderness.
Sounds like a circus carnival.


I


A 'Frugal' farewell
What happened to "Frugal?" I
look for that every Sunday and it
hasn't been in the paper for a
very long time. I really miss it.
Are you not ever going
JND to have it come back?
Editor's note: We
OFF miss it, too. Sara Noel,
5 author of "Frugal Living,"
S retired her column earlier
L this year. If you still need
Sour fix of frugality, she
maintains a website at
S www.frugalvillage.com.


0579 Asperger support
I see that there are a
large number of support
groups. Does anyone know of one
for adult Asperger syndrome? If
one exists, please list a phone
number or person to contact.


Young

In the May 2013 issue of Teen
Ink, a magazine I read reg-
ularly, Brooklyn teenager
Isheta Khanom writes of "Being
Muslim:"
"People are afraid of me.
Why are they afraid of me, you
might ask?...
"I'm a Muslim girl who was
born and raised in Brooklyn.
I'm turning 16 and
starting my junior
year in the fall. My
parents are from
Bangladesh. So,
that's pretty much
mybio.
"But there's a lot
hiding behind that bio.
"The first thing
people see is the Nat F
Muslim part of me. 0T
Some of the stereo-
types include that I VOI
don't speak English,
(don't) know how to dress like
an American,' am a terrorist..."
But Isheta's proud of who she
is and doesn't hide it: "I'm a prac-
ticing Muslim. I pray five times
a day, stick to the rules, fast when
it's time, and wear my hijab."
The hijab, Isheta says, is "oth-
erwise known as a headscarf or
veil, and of course, the deroga-
tory terms, like towel head, dia-
per head, turban, and whatnot
"Whatever it's called, it has a
very important place in my life."
Later, she adds, "I can do all
thatbecause ofthe freedom granted
by the First Amendment...
"People think that the ideals
presented in Islam are very dif-
ferent from American ideals.
Actually, they aren't. And let me
tell you something else. Muslims
are all different races. They
have different backgrounds but
share the same book and abide
by its rules. And isn't that true
for Americans too?...
'And it hurts me to see that
even those in my (Brooklyn)
community, who are so diverse,
are prejudiced against me. Me,
my religion, my hijab. And those
are all my choices. The choices
I made because I had the freedom.
"You can see that I am not
doing anything to hurt people...
"Making the right choice is
not only about us, it's about
everyone. The way someone
thinks and the choices they
make are so important.
"Who knows what the future
holds? I already made my
choice. Now it's your turn."
In New York, regarded by
tourists worldwide as the most
sophisticated of American
cities, Isheta is far from alone
in feeling under suspicion be-
cause of her religion. The Asso-
ciated Press won a Pulitzer
Prize last year for covering the



4"4LPffSPOVV* -


girl

New York Pol
alliance with t
tracking Mus
just for being
systematically
sermons, hung
other public p
colleges anc
people as part
to prevent te


lentoff
IER
CES


('A
for
spY
jelz
PrE
201
I
ual
mo
wh
evi
lini
An
eve
aw


dence that has
This happe
nation herald
ration of Inde
Furthermore
Police Commi,,
Kelly, champ
Michael Bloor
to proudly assE
police were w(
His law?
These outcas
experienced b
and other inm
brought me ba
hood in Bosto
up in the earl;
There, Jev
from Eastern
parents, wer
some descend
ican Revolut
Henry Brooks
of John Quin
"furtive Ysa,
snarling a wei
Jew makes me
"Boston Boy,"
And I, like c
in the ghetto, 1
it could be he
alone after da:
ghetto, if we d
wise looked
other Bostoni
if we appeared
spring of the k
A national r
many Boston
ghetto at the
Charles E. (
priest of the SI
Flower in R(
and America's
popular anti-
published a n
Justice, sold
each Mass,
else in town.
It seemed to
ish kids might
having some


braver than I

ice Department's knocked out by young avengers
he CIA in secretly of Christ's death soon after So-
slims essentially cial Justice was read and dis-
Muslims: "Police cussed by eager families.
y listened in on Like one evening, after a
g out at cafes and storm, walking a couple of
)laces, infiltrated blocks from my home, I slipped
I photographed and fell on the ice. Looking up,
t of a broad effort I was encircled by six or seven
terrorist attacks" boys, maybe 15 or 16 years old.
P wins Pulitzer "You hurt yourself, kid?"
stories on NYPD someone asked.
ying," Deepti Ha- Then came the real question:
a, The Associated "You Jewish, kid?"
ess, April 17, I instantly became falsely ir-
12). ritated. "What do you mean,
)ig this: "Individ- Jewish? I'm Greek. I just fin-
s and groups were ished work at the drugstore in
nitored even Grove Hall."
en there was no "He's a Hebe," snarled one of
dence they were them. "Say something in Greek."
ked to terrorism." At Boston Latin School, we'd
d we have not been reading "The Odyssey" in
en been made the original Greek, and I gave
are of any evi- my interrogator the first para-
s been revealed, graph in the language of the
ned in the same original.
ed by the Decla- "Sounds Greek to me," one of
pendence? the gang snorted, so they walked
-e, New York City off, leaving me on the ground.
ssioner Raymond Another time, I didn't think fast
ioned by Mayor enough and lost some front teeth.
mnberg, continued The anti-Semitism was so
ert that he and his tangible that, in the main part
ell within the law of Boston, there were stores I
wouldn't go into. They didn't
st lives, as suspects, look like they took Jews. And I
y Isheta Khanom shared my parents' joy when,
nocent Muslims, for the first time in Boston his-
ck to my own boy- tory, a Jew was elected to the
on, where I grew City Council.
y 1940s. So, I feel a kinship with
vish immigrants Isheta from Brooklyn. She's
Europe, like my being even truer to herself than
e described by I was when I was a Greek. She
ants of the Amer- still wears her hijab when she
ion such as feels it should be worn. She
Adams, grandson prays five times a day I don't
icy Adams as pray at all, but, like her, I have
ac or Jacob ... the First Amendment at hand
rd Yiddish ... The when needed.
creep" (my book, How many American kids
Paul Dry Books). can say the First Amendment is
otherr Jewish boys part of their regular vocabulary?
earned early that New York will soon have a
hazardous to walk new police commissioner
rk, in or out of the under a new mayor, Bill de Bla-
iressed or other- sio, who has criticized a num-
different from ber of Raymond Kelly's
ans especially suspensions of the Constitution.
d to be Jewish off- De Blasio, with whom I dis-
:illers of Christ. agree on many other issues,
radio favorite for should have Isheta present
ians outside my when he takes the oath of office,
time was Father and ask her to say a few words
oughlin, parish about the nature of being an
hrine of the Little American.
loyal Oak, Mich.,
Most beguilingly
Semite. He also Nat Hentoff is a nationally
newspaper, Social renowned authority on the
Sunday before FirstAmendment and the
and everywhere Bill ofRights. He is a member
of the Reporters Committee
Sme that we Jew- for Freedom of the Press,
be more at risk of and the Cato Institute, where
of our teeth he is a senior fellow


"TIUAT THdiR Jog."


LETTER Z to the Editor


Don't get discouraged
Dear Dan,
Please do not let someone
who dislikes our president
cause you to stop playing bridge.
Find other partners and just
consider the source. It doesn't
matter whether they are Democ-
rats or Republicans. There are
good people in both parties. I
found that to be true when I
was president of the Sugarmill
Woods Democratic Club.
For instance, when I had to
take an unruly man to court,
the gentleman who called me
up to say he would accompany


me so I would not be alone in
this difficult situation was the
president of the Republican Club.
Only recently, Messrs.
Harley Lawrence and John
McFarland, Republican writers,
were good enough to introduce
me to some other writers who
might be able to help edit my
book.
So don't get discouraged.
You never know who will come
forward to help you find some
other players. Good luck!
Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or email
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Some things, including Christmas memories, are priceless


without question,
Christmas 1965 ranks
as my all-time favorite.
Why? It was during the 1965
Christmas season that my
Cheryl and I both came to re-
alize we would not only share
that one, but every coming
Christmas for the rest of our
lives.
Yes, 1965 is at the top of the
heap, but I remember all of the
Christmases of my life with
much fondness. As they began
to come along, it was always
enjoyable, exciting and exas-
perating to find just the right
gifts for our children. And, for
each of them, there always had
to be a stocking filled with
candy and small toys. Nowa-
days, it is also customary for us
to have stockings for the


spouses of our children and
for all of our grandchildren.


event from yesteryear flashed
by in living color My best


Today, my mind has re- guess is that it was 1951.
treated to memo- William and I both
ries of earlier had Hopalong Cas-
Christmas, those sidy suits waiting
days when I was for us under the
the kid waiting for . tree, not only the
Santa Claus to black denim outfits
make his visit. and black cowboy
Bicycles. hats, but the whole
Electric trains. shebang. We had
Things our par- boots as well as
ents could not re- Fred Brannen genuine imitation
ally afford, but with A SLICE leather holsters
the help of credit at filled with faux
the local Western OF LIFE pearl handled six
Auto store, Santa shooters. Two little
always seemed to bring exactly boys with cap pistols. Yippee
what my good brother William ki-yo ki-yay!
and I were longing to have. I have no idea what Santa
As I was letting my mind had to pay for those duds, but a
run wild and free, one special few years ago in an antique


shop I saw the suit alone, not
including boots or guns, just
the outfit and the hat. The re-
tailer was asking $800. You
might think, too bad you don't
still have yours, you could
make a nifty profit. Yeah,
you're right; nonetheless, I
have no doubt that I would de-
cline to sell.
Some things, including
Christmas memories, are
priceless.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist

Fred Brannen in his
Hopalong Cassidy suit,
Christmas 1951.
FRED BRANNEN/Special to the Chronicle


Letter to THE EDITOR


Honor among thieves?
It seemed to me the Chronicle's
editorial advising Geoffrey Greene
to negotiate out of court with Duke
was understandable if naive.
Last year when Duke reduced
its taxes significantly there was no
warning. And I've heard from Mr
Greene himself that his efforts last
year to discuss issues with Progress/
Duke proved futile. From what I
recall, he indicated such meetings
were a day late, a dollar short, and
normally with individuals who
had neither the authority nor the
inclination to make decisions.
It was hardly surprising that Duke
won on the issue of challenging a
law undervaluing pollution control
equipment. However, while a long
shot, the issue of a full valuation of
Duke property in the county seems
worth trying at least until it
renders all of it useless.


The trouble is, Duke has proven
able, thanks to our mentally and
morally depraved state government,
to keep money rolling into its cof-
fers while destroying its capacity
to produce electricity and there-
fore the value of its property
For many years Florida public
utilities (to use the term loosely)
have been able to gouge customers
for funds nominally to develop
capacity to produce more electric-
ity with less pollution. Repairs for
CR3 would have cost $18 million
if done by professionals, but done
in house they didn't work and the
facility is being taken down. How-
ever, to justify ripping off
ratepayers, Duke blew smoke for
years about two apparently myth-
ical plants in Levy County Although
the plants are in limbo, the cor-
porate welfare keeps coming. An
added justification currently is
the cost of securing the defunct


CR3. It did get an $800 million
from an insurance company for
destroying CR3, but apparently
that will go mainly for executive
compensation. Little enough
showed up in my dividends on my
Duke stock.
As long as most of you folks
keep electing partisans of the
plutocracy to the state govern-
ment, Duke can keep on reducing
production and pocketing huge
sums of money Charlie Dean and
Jimmie Smith will make sure it
keeps coming.
But something really scary is
going on. The Koch brothers, no-
torious champions of the Party of
the Plutocracy, have been bom-
barding me with attacks on Char-
lie Dean! Is there no honor
among thieves?
Pat Condray
Ozello


VOTE
Continued from Page Cl

The point man for the
Voter Purge II is once again
Secretary of State Ken Det-
zner, a Scott appointee, who
calls it "Project Integrity"
Seriously
Detzner recently finished
a short statewide tour of
county elections offices,
where he tried to stir up en-
thusiasm for the purge.
There was none.
The most intense grilling
came from Susan Bucher,
supervisor of elections for
Palm Beach County, the site
of repeated ballot fiascos
going back to Bush-Gore in
2000. A Democrat serving in
a nonpartisan position,
Bucher questioned Detzner
and his staff about the ac-
curacy of the SAVE list.
"Where does that data
come from; how often is it
updated every 10 years
or every 10 minutes?" she
asked, adding: "I have a lot
of concern that the people
we got the database from
are saying this is not com-
prehensive and definitive."
Picky, picky, picky
Detzner replied that
SAVE was the best database
available, and the voter
screening "will be done
correctly"
He said he didn't know
how often the information
was updated to show
changes in immigration sta-
tus. When asked how soon
counties would be supplied
with lists of potential non-
citizens on the rolls, he said
he didn't know
He couldn't even say
which agencies in Tallahas-
see were receiving the data
from Homeland Security


But, hey, he's the secretary
of state. Why should he be
bothered with such pid-
dling details?
If Detzner's mission was
to inspire confidence in the
purging process, it back-
fired. The only worse strat-
egy would have been for
Scott himself to show up
and try to explain it.
The governor's attack on
the voting rolls took a new
tack two weeks ago when
Detzner issued a "direc-
tive" saying election offi-
cials shouldn't "solicit" the
return of absentee ballots
to any location except the
supervisor's office.
Several counties allow
people to turn in absentee
ballots at early voting sites
or secure drop-off boxes.
It's meant as a convenience
to those who are elderly,
disabled or have limited
transportation.
Detzner says he's only en-
forcing the law
To county elections offi-
cials, it's just more of the
same meddling, more time
and taxpayerresources wasted
on a continuing political
crusade to shrink the vote.
It self-destructed the first
time, and the same thing
will happen again.
Those long lines at the
polls in South Florida last
year weren't packed with il-
legal voters, as Scott would
perhaps like to believe. They
were the people his own
party has turned its back on.
And, try as he might, he
can't make them go away


Carl Hiaasen is a columnist
for the Miami Herald.
Contact him at The Miami
Herald, 3511 N. W.91 Ave.,
Doral FL 33172 or chiaasen
@miamiherald. com.


RATE
Continued from Page Cl

diploma; and
U not be enrolled in an adult-educa-
tion program.
District results: Each one of Citrus
County's high schools increased the
number of students who graduated. The
state's average for 2013 was 75.6 per-
cent. Citrus County improved from
77.97 percent in 2012 to 80.06 percent in
2013, ranking the district 13th out of 67
counties in Florida. The chart at right
shows the remarkable growth of our dis-
trict's graduation rate over the past five
years, increasing 14.2 percent.
School results: Each of the district's
three high schools improved, with
Lecanto High School making the great-
est gains, increasing from 85.5 percent
in 2012 to 90.1 percent in 2013. Citrus
High School improved from 82.08 per-
cent to 82.16 percent, and Crystal River
improved from 76.12 percent to
76.68 percent in 2013. The average grad-
uation rate for all three high schools is
83.5 percent in 2013 compared to 81.8
percent in 2012.
The graduation rate measures the
percentage of students who graduate
within four years of their first enroll-
ment in ninth grade. The rate is calcu-
lated for a cohort of students on the
same schedule to graduate, taking into


account those who enter or exit the
group. The federal graduation rate is
used in calculating high school grades
and allows for comparison among
states.
Because Florida is known for having
some of the most rigorous graduation
requirements in the country, it is worth
noting that as we compare our gradua-
tion rates to those of other states, we re-
main aware that in some states,
students who are considered standard
diploma candidates would not meet
Florida's requirements for graduation.
Dropout rate: The dropout rate is
based on all students in grades nine
through 12 for the 2012-2013 school year
A dropout is defined as a student who
withdraws from school for any of sev-
eral reasons without transferring to an-
other school or home education
program. The state of Florida's average
dropout rate is 2 percent.
District results: Citrus County's
dropout rate did increase slightly from
1.4 percent to 1.7 percent in 2013. Citrus
High School increased slightly from the
previous year with a 1.1 percent
dropout rate. Crystal River High School
increased 1.2 percent in 2012 to 3 per-
cent in 2013. Lecanto High School de-
creased its rate from 1.1 percent to
.9 percent in 2013.


Sandra Himmel is superintendent
of the Citrus County School District.


Citrus County Graduation

Rate: 2008 to 2013*


78% 80 1
6%689%
65 9%


2008-09


2009-10


2010-11


2011-12


* Data from Cypress Creek Prison is included in the district graduation rate.
* Horizon School and Citrus Virtual School data is part of the district rate even though those centers no longer
exist. Students enrolled at these sites between 2009 and 2013 make up part of the 2013 cohort.

Citrus County Dropout

Rate: 2008 to 2013

1 7%
14% 1-4%1-
1 2% l2%


2008 09


2009 10


2010-11


2011-12


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

have eaten through the
parts of the "Squirrel
Buster Plus," but the com-
pany keeps sending him
replacement parts free of
charge.
They are obviously truly
committed to the cause.
Reader Joan Blasi noted
that the main purpose in a
squirrel's life is to "be
fruitful and multiply," so
protecting birdseed is an
uphill battle. She sug-
gested safflower seed be-
cause the squirrels don't
like the taste. The only


problem is that some birds
also don't like it
To further combat her
local squirrels, she "began
using suet cakes laced
with hot pepper which the
squirrels find distasteful."
I am also not a fan of hot
pepper
Reader Ken Everts of
Crystal River has pur-
chased so many different
contraptions to fight his
squirrels that he com-
plains his backyard
looks like a scene from the
old TV show "Sanford and
Son."
His dogs have grown
tired of chasing squirrels,
but he has realized some
relief


Reader Ken Everts of Crystal

River has purchased so many

different contraptions to

fight his squirrels that he

complains his backyard

looks like a scene from the old

TV show "Sanford and Son."


"The real wipe out of the
squirrel population is ac-
tually due to a Cooper's
hawk who makes an an-
nual appearance and car-
ries off the squirrels over
the course of several


weeks," wrote Everts. "I
assume he eats them, but if
not, perhaps he drops
them off at your house to
replenish your inventory"
I have noticed a
Cooper's hawk occasion-


ally flying over my house,
but Sheriff Jeff Dawsy's
helicopter keeps chasing
him away Every since we
wrote an editorial against
the MSBU for fire serv-
ices, the sheriff's helicop-
ter swings by my house on
a daily basis. They are
probably looking to see if
our squirrel strategies
might violate some impor-
tant county ordinance.
Collectively, we may not
be able to bring harmony
to Citrus Memorial hospi-
tal. We may not be able at-
tract more industry to the
community and provide
higher-paying jobs. And
we may not be able to get
Commissioner Scott


Adams to stop talking
about his landfill at every
county commission
meeting.
But we can work to-
gether to stop the squirrel
population from eating
our birdseed!
We will combine our in-
telligence, experience and
bird-loving expertise to re-
alize success.
Sometimes you have to
start with the small stuff,
and all the other problems
will work themselves out.


Gerry Mulligan is
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


2012-13


2012-13


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


DAY in need of a van
The Disabled American Veter-
ans transportation network is
in need of $20,000 for a van.
The van program takes veter-
ans to the VA facilities in
Gainesville and The Villages.
They presently are using a
loaner van to transport them to
The Villages; it has over
270,000 miles on it. Maybe it
would be appropriate for all the
VFW posts in Citrus County to
run fundraisers for this project
through bake sales, flea mar-
kets, raffles, plant sales, din-
ners, etc. Every penny counts
and this is a truly worthy
cause.
Missing hearing aid
I'm calling for an 82-year-old
vet (who) has lost his hearing
aid in the Homosassa area.
Looking for someone to donate
a pair. He cannot have them re-
placed for over four months
through the VA. Number is 352-
634-3975. If anyone has an
extra pair they could donate,
that could help him to hear a
little bit until he can get his re-
placed. He does have busted
eardrums.
Danger when dark
The new Cutler Spur roadway.
While exiting the new, improved
Cutler Spur roadway onto Fort
Island Trail, the highway de-
partment has greatly enlarged
the left-hand turning area onto
Fort Island Trail, which is fine.
However, after dark, this
widened roadway becomes a
hazard when making a left turn
off of Fort Island Trail. Could
you possibly edge this widened
turning area with a white strip
to indicate the edge of the
roadway and keep the driver in
the center of his turn? It is very
dark in this area.


F ..ITS UE% R SxiAsMO A..PEOPLE.
ARE. VRUSTMWE>. .. KILUOS OP
AMERICAWWE SEEN mT"Ab REALLY
lOn% 1nK ...%E FUM6LEIu TH 1-L
ZiUT WRE ZAI 6 7..q j


Who subsidizes wages?
The minimum wage is now
$7.25 an hour, which equates
to $14,500 a year. That is
below the poverty level. These
people are eligible for subsi-
dized housing, food stamps,
Medicaid and whatever other
benefits. If the minimum
(wage) were raised to a decent
level, these companies would
have to pay more money, but
the taxpayer wouldn't have to
pay for all these other subsidies.
It's about time these people had
their dignity and pride and got
a decent living wage. This isn't
right to exist on starvation wages
in a country as rich as ours.


...VP&BSEE% Fm" SO m... PEOPLrE
I ARERUS&RMEP... ILLUO OF |
| WEC6 WE SE' WIm n REALLNR I
I WOKG WE ... %E FUMBLEDtS ITAU.
I r BUT WRE KW^Kl 24/7... I


Ease off kids
I'm calling regarding the Core
program that the school is work-
ing with right now. I believe that
these small children are being
pushed way too hard. They're
being taught one thing and then
the next day something else and
they're not absorbing properly,
from what I have seen. Many
parents are upset about this. And
did you know that there was a
"Don't send your child to school
on Monday" if you didn't agree
with the Core program? Why didn't
Citrus County know about that and
let people know? I really think that
this should be studied further.
Not all kids are college-bound.


All about Christmas
I'm calling in regards to Anna
DeRose's letter to Christmas,
"Call Christmas by its name."
Kudos back at you, Mrs. DeRose.
Mrs. DeRose, I think it's wonder-
ful that you wrote that and I
couldn't agree more. I feel the
very same way. And I won't buy
anything either that says "Happy
holidays" and when people wish
me "Happy holidays," I wish them
a "Merry Christmas" back. So,
Merry Christmas to you and
Merry Christmas to all because
Christ is in Christmas and that's
what it's all about. God bless
you, Anna DeRose, and every-
one have a Merry Christmas.


Save plastic tubs
Don't throw away plastic con-
tainers with lids on large sour
cream, cottage cheese, yogurt
and whipped topping. Rinse
them and put them in the dish-
washer with regular loads.
Churches and organizations
that have lunch and dinner
functions use them for leftovers
so people can take them home.
They are also great freezer con-
tainers. Take a very small piece
of paper and write out what is
in the container, then Scotch
tape it on the lid.
Washer angels
The last two months have
been horrific for me, the latest
being my washer breaking down.
I called Home Depot for some
help to see if I could buy possi-
bly one that was scratched,
damaged or whatever, and
talked to Chris Lawson, who
told me he'd get back to me,
having a Mike Danville call me
back an hour later only to tell
me, where do I live? What's my
address? And an hour later a
couple hours later at the most
- I had a brand-new washer
sitting in my kitchen totally
connected, taking away the old
wash machine. Unbelievable.
Thank you, thank you, Chris
Lawson, Mike Danville, the two
guys who delivered it, and espe-
cially Home Depot. You are
awesome. Thank you.
Darkness and lights
All I can say is shame on you.
I am a senior citizen on fixed in-
come and you took my solar lights
from my driveway. Shame on
you. Don't you know it's a sin to
steal? Don't you believe in the
Commandments? And probably
you won't even read this in the
news because you probably
don't even know how to read.


CITRUS COUNTY
CHKON"ICLE

www.chronicleonline.com

123467

IDec Mbe8 9 1011121314
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
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$ 29,000 Qt~ rat~in. U 1 S

WHILE HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY THIS CHRISTMAS .'TL1l S Saturday
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see SANTA before he takes off on his trip from the North Pole!!!o C tee
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*Pete's Pier BSTE E
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C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


N7









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Chevy trucks line the lot of a dealer in Murrysville, Pa. Many local auto dealerships are overflowing with sedans, trucks and
SUVs, so there are deals to be had. Most dealers have abundant supplies of 2013 models, and 2014s are arriving as
automakers keep their factories humming. Since dealers pay interest on money borrowed to buy the cars, they're probably
anxious to sell them by the end of the year.



year end shaping up to be prime




car-buying time


If the spirit of giving or of treating yourself has inspired you to buy a car this
holiday season, you're in luck. Many local auto dealerships are overflowing with
sedans, trucks and SUVs, so there are deals to be had.


Tom Krisher
Associated Press

DETROIT
Most dealers have abundant
supplies of 2013 models,
and 2014s are arriving as
automakers keep facto-
ries humming. Since deal-
ers pay interest on money
borrowed to buy the cars, they're prob-
ably anxious to sell them soon.
"We have a lot of inventory right
now," said Tammy Darvish, vice presi-
dent of a 21-dealer group in the Wash-
ington, D.C., metro area that sells
Toyota, Ford, Kia, Chrysler, Volkswagen
and other makes.
The December holiday season nor-
mally is a good time to buy as dealers
clear out old models and sales people
feel pressure to meet year-end targets.
Some sales ran early this year as au-
tomakers tried to get a piece of the
Black Friday retail holiday
Normally you can get 5 to 6 percent
off the sticker price when dealing, but
that could rise to 8 or 10 percent this
month, said Alec Gutierrez, senior ana-
lyst for Kelley Blue Book. That means,
for instance, you can get roughly $1,880
to $2,351 off a 2014 Chevy Malibu 1LT
with a sticker price of $23,510.
Consumers have been in the spirit of
buying cars for the past three years.
U.S. sales are expected to reach 15.6
million this year, compared to just 10.4
million in 2009. And the latest retail


sales figures from the government
show that steady hiring and rising
household wealth are encouraging
more big-ticket purchases.
CARS TO LOOKAT
The bargains, dealers say, depend a
lot on what car, SUV or truck you want
to buy The best deals now are in the
small and midsize car segments.
Toyota, for instance, is offering $1,750
cash back on the midsize Camry in the
Washington area, and competitors are
following, Darvish said. That's before
trying to make a deal. "I'm seeing some
incentives that I have not seen as high
as they are," Darvish said.
Ford dealers nationwide have about
a 90-day supply of Fusion midsize cars,
while other manufacturers' dealers
have 75-80 days of midsize car inven-
tory, Gutierrez said.
There also are some good deals on
pickup trucks as Ford, which has the
oldest big truck in the market, offers
discounts and forces other automakers
to follow, Gutierrez said. Ford is offer-
ing up to $8,500 off a 2013 Ford F-150
XLT Super Cab with a sticker price of
around $30,000.
Don't completely ignore some of the
hotter segments, such as small
crossover SUVs like the Honda CR-V
and Ford Escape, Gutierrez said. But
some SUVs, such as the Jeep Grand
Cherokee, aren't selling at much of a
discount Darvish said.
Luxury car dealers advertise heavily


for the holidays and offer good lease
deals. Lexus, with ads that feature
giant red bows on car rooftops, is offer-
ing to lease an ES sedan for $359 per
month for 27 months with $3,200 down.
MORE DISCOUNTS COMING
As tempting as it might be to have a
gift car sitting in the driveway Christ-
mas morning, Gutierrez says the last
weekend of the year is typically when
prices are the lowest.
"Everybody wants to hit whatever in-
ternal targets they have," said Scott
Fink, CEO of a small chain of Hyundai,
Mazda and Chevrolet dealers in
Florida's Tampa Bay area. "The ulti-
mate winners are the consumers."
In addition to the high inventory there
are other factors in consumers' favor: In-
terest rates are low and used-car values
are still close to record highs, making
trade-ins worth more money
Also, automakers still are offering
sweet lease deals, with leases running
at about 25 percent of sales, near a
record high, Gutierrez said. Electric
car lease deals are especially good, he
said. Some dealers are offering the
electric Nissan Leaf for $199 per month
for 36 months with $2,000 down.
If you wait until next year you run
some risks. Interest rates may rise and
trade-in values are likely to drop a bit,
Gutierrez said.
"You're not leaving a ton of money on
the table" by waiting, he said. "But re-
ally there's no time like the present."


Toyota set to enter settlement negotiations


Associated Press
SANTA ANA, Calif. -After a four-
year legal battle, Toyota is entering
settlement talks on hundreds of law-
suits that allege sudden unintended
acceleration problems with its vehi-
cles led to deaths and injuries.
A motion filed late Thursday in U.S.
District Court in Santa Ana indicated
both sides would begin an "intensive
settlement process" next month.
The Japanese automaker, which has
recalled millions of cars since 2009
over the issue, agreed to the negotia-
tions to make resolving the cases more
efficient, spokeswoman Carly
Schaffner told The Associated Press
on Friday
"We continue to stand behind the
safety and quality of our vehicles," she
said.
Lead plaintiffs' attorneys Elizabeth
Cabraser, Todd Walburg and Mark


Robinson Jr did not return calls
seeking comment.
The settlement negotiations come
less than two months after an Okla-
homa jury awarded a total of $3 mil-
lion in damages to the injured driver
of a 2005 Camry and to the family of a
passenger who was killed.
The ruling was significant because
Toyota had won all previous unin-
tended acceleration cases that went to
trial. It was also the first case where
attorneys for plaintiffs argued that the
car's electronics in this case the
software connected to the Camry's
electronic throttle-control system -
were the cause of the unintended ac-
celeration.
At the time, legal experts said the
Oklahoma verdict might cause Toyota
to consider a broad settlement of the
remaining cases. Until that case,
See Page D4


THE WEEKAHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases revised third-quar-
ter productivity data, 8:30 a.m.;
Federal Reserve releases indus-
trial production for November,
9:15 a.m. HSBC releases prelimi-
nary China purchasing managers'
index for December
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; National
Association of Realtors releases
existing home sales for November,
10 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the mortgage
company, releases weekly
mortgage rates, 10 a.m.; Confer-
ence Board releases leading
indicators for November,
10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil prices down as
Libya plans output

NEW YORK-The price of oil
slid to around $97 a barrel Friday on
the possibility of new supplies from
Libya and expectations the
Federal Reserve will cut its
stimulus program.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for January
delivery was down 49 cents to $97.01
a barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
The contract rose 6 cents on Thurs-
day to settle at $97.50.
Oil prices were also under pres-
sure from expectations that the Fed
could decide next week to reduce its
$85 billion monthly bond purchases
meant to stimulate the economy
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational oils, was down 30 cents
to $108.08 a barrel on the ICE
exchange in London.

Stocks tentative
amid stimulus fears

LONDON World stock markets
were tentative Friday as investors
prepared for the U.S. Federal Re-
serve's decision next week on
whether to reduce its monetary
stimulus.
In Europe, London's FTSE 100
shed 0.1 percent to 6,439.96 and
France's CAC 40 lost 0.2 percent to
4,059.71. Germany's DAX dropped
0.1 percent to 9,006.46.
Asia's heavyweight market bench-
mark, Tokyo's Nikkei 225, rose 0.4
percent to 15,403.11 and Hong Kong,
Taiwan and Sydney also rose.
Shanghai and Seoul declined.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 0.1
percent to 23,245.96. Taiwan's Taiex
added 0.2 percent to 8,376.44 and
Sydney's S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.7
percent to 5,098.4. China's bench-
mark Shanghai Composite Index
shed 0.3 percent to 2,196.07.
-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Former wife


should be

included

in bequest

EAR BRUCE: My brother
left my son money when he
passed away, to be received
after his wife's death. It was stated
to be for 'John and Mary Jones"
(false names). Since then, my son
has divorced and his ex-wife has
taken back her maiden name.
When my son's aunt dies, will he
still have to split the money with
his ex-wife?
-Jackie, via email
DEAR JACKIE: Technically, I
think the fact that the ex-wife took
back her maiden name has nothing
to do with anything. When the aunt
dies, the money should be split be-
tween the two.
If there's a substantial amount of
money, you might wish to consult
an attorney to see exactly where
you stand legally If it's just a little
bit of money, why not split it and
get it over with?
DEAR BRUCE: We have several
timeshares that we don't use any-
more. Who or what resource can
help us to dispose of them swiftly,
legally and without any further ob-
ligations for maintenance fees? We
have already spent more than $575
on local attorneys, to no avail. We
are in dire need of reaching a reso-
lution; any help you could provide


us would be greatly appreciated.
-M.J., via email
DEAR MJ.: You have a problem
that many people have. The time-
share company insists upon you
paying its fees. You, on the other
See Page D4






D2 Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association

D Builders Connection





DECEMBGovernor Scott stays true to job-focused mission




Governor Scott stays true to job-focused mission


RON LIEBERMAN
President, Florida Home
Builders Association

Gov. Rick Scott is delivering
on the promises he made to
Florida voters when he was
elected in 2010. Pledging to be
the "Jobs Governor," he's stayed
true to his mission.
The most recent statewide
unemployment figures reveal
that 6.7 percent of Floridians
are unemployed well below
the 7.3 percent national aver-
age and since Scott became
governor, Florida has created
440,900 private-sector jobs.


In addition, '
October was the
eighth straight
month where
Florida's unem- i
ployment rate
was below the
national aver-
age and in the Ron
past two Lieberman
months, more FHBA
than 67,000 pri- president.
vate jobs were
added. The fact that our state is
below the national average for
unemployment is borderline
miraculous, given that our Na-
tional Association of Home


Builders (NAHB) Chief Econo-
mist Dr David Crowe predicted
Florida, with its massive fore-
closures amid the subprime de-
bacle, would be one of the last
five states to recover from the
recession.
Of course, higher employ-
ment contributes to the success
of our home building/construc-
tion industry The inventory of
existing homes on the market is
down by 36 percent from No-
vember 2011, according to the
Florida Realtors. The median
price for a home in Florida is
up 16.6 percent year-over-year
and Florida housing starts are


up 30.7 percent this year over
last.
A lot of factors come into play
in discussions about our state's
economic rebound but having a
singularly focused, pro-jobs
governor certainly has to be
high on the list.
Ron Lieberman is a third-gen-
eration home builder and devel-
oper He is a two-time President
of the Citrus County Builders
Association and a former chair-
man of the Citrus CountyAfford-
able HousingAuthority and the
Advisory Committee to the
Tampa Bay Regional
Transportation Authority


Building a Better Christmas


Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776, Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) presented a $100 donation to the Citrus County
Builders Association (CCBA) annual Building a Better Christmas program. The program, which is affiliated with the U.S. Marine
Corps Toys for Tots Foundation, provides gifts to local underprivileged children. From left are: Larry Tropf; Lee Helscel; Phil Pasay;
Chapter 776 Commander Bud Allen; CCBA Executive Officer Donna Bidlack; Curt Ebitz; Kenneth Patterson; and Richard Hunt,
MOPH Department of Florida Commander.


2013 Haunted Maze thanks from

CCBA Member Porter's Locksmithing


John and Dusty Porter of Porter's Locksmithing stand with
Jennifer Campbell, executive director of CUB. The food
bank received donations of cash and food dropped off by
attendees of the Porters' 14th annual "Nightmare on Pine
Bluff Street" haunted Halloween maze and graveyard.


Schlabach Security

attends custom

electronics design

conference in Colo. I/.


Four members of the
Schlabach Security and
Sound Inc. team recently
returned from Denver,
Colo., for the annual Cus-
tom Electronics Design
Industry Association
(CEDIA) conference and
expo. The five-day event
featured continuing edu-
cation classes and a
trade show exploding
with brand-new technol-
ogy for today's homes
and lifestyles. Schlabach
installs electronic sys-
tems throughout Citrus
County, Marion County
and many other sur-
rounding Counties and
along the West Coast of
Florida.
Jarey Schlabach, presi-
dent of Schlabach Secu-
rity and Sound, was
amazed at how clear the
new 4K High Definition
TV images could be.
"The picture is fantastic.
There are four times as


many pixels as today's
1080P High DefTV, or
four times sharper"
Jarey stated.
The show attendees
were Paul Jordan, Jim
Loos, Ken Van Houten II,
and Jarey Schlabach. A
total of 41 courses were
completed by the team,
ranging from Whole
House Control, System
Technician training,
Project Management,
Project Design Software,
Networking and IT Serv-
ices, Smartphones and
Tablets as wireless
sources, Customer Rela-
tions, and specialty train-
ing on individual product
brands. The results of
CEDIA University and
Certification are knowl-
edge, productivity, and
competence in project
performance.
Ken Van Houten II, is a
key installation techni-
cian for Schlabach, and


ur 14th annual "Nightmare on
Pine Bluff Street" haunted
Halloween maze and grave-
yard was enjoyed by more than 572
people this year during the two
nights it was open Saturday
Oct. 26, and Halloween, Oct. 31.
John and Dusty Porter would like
to thank the following people for
helping with the set-up and being
"scare-actors" who made this a suc-
cessful event for "The Nightmare on
Pine Bluff Street:" Curtis and Dawn
Peters; Jim, Marcie and Jimmy
Bruno; and Jeff, Sarah and Brooke
Bruno. With their help, it was a scary
and fun haunted maze and graveyard
walkthrough, and we scared young
and old alike.
New additions this year were a
new zombie prop and a guy in a elec-
tric chair, which were sponsored by
Porter's Locksmithing.


A special thanks for the "special
scare-actors:" Curtis Peters as
"Count Dracula;" Dusty Porter as the
"decapitated head;" Brooke and Sara
Bruno as the "drop window scares;"
and Dawn Peters, Jimmy Bruno and
Jeff Bruno as the "Specters in the
Maze" and graveyard.
Donations to the Citrus United
(food) Basket were accepted. We
want to thank all the people who put
cash donations into the jar, totaling
$353. Also, approximately 107 pounds
of food items were donated.
Thanks once again, for everyone
that came to our Haunted Maze and
Graveyard.
Everyone who came enjoyed them-
selves, and the "scare-actors" en-
joyed scaring them.
We look forward to seeing you all
again next year
-John and Dusty Porter


t


~#1


-J
L ~'


The Schlabach Team had the opportunity to dine inside of the bank vault of The
Broker Restaurant, in the 100-year-old Denver National Bank building. From left
are Jarey Schlabach, Jim Loos, Ken Van Houten II and Paul Jordan.


enthusiastically de-
clared, "CEDIA shows in-
novative products that
help our company arrive
at solutions for our
clients. We can hide a TV
behind a mirror or paint-
ing, for example."
Schlabach brings this
knowledge back to Citrus
County and guides their
clients through the selec-
tion process to bring
great audio and video
systems to entertain the


whole family
"We find simple ways
to bring great sound to
rooms. SONOS is one of
the innovative products
where we can add a
sound bar and create sur-
round sound without ex-
tensive pre-wiring.",
added Jim Loos, from
Schlabach's sales team.
Paul Jordan, technical
designer and scheduler
for Schlabach, liked the
classes that help the


team hone its systems.
"We want to satisfy our
clients day after day and
year after year," Jordan
said. "We have to install
systems that are robust
and repeatable. Schla-
bach is known for consis-
tency and reliability We
cannot vary from that."
Schlabach's website,
www.sssonline.biz, has
many fresh ideas to make
your home more
enjoyable.


*CCBA will hold its first
General Membership
Meeting of 2014 from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 23. GMMs
are open to all. $10 per
person includes
networking and lunch. For
more information, contact
the CCBA office at 352-
746-9028 or register to
attend at www.Citrus
Builders.com.
* The 2014 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing will
be Saturday, Feb. 22, at
the Inverness Golf &
Country Club, in partner-
ship with the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Player registration and
sponsorship is now open
online at www.Citrus
Builders.corn or in person
at the Citrus County
Builders Association,
1196 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461. For
questions and registration
form requests, please call
352-746-9028.
* The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment sponsored by Ex-
clusive Platinum Sponsor
FDS Disposal Inc., Weigh
In Sponsor Florian Ma-
sonry and Heart Sponsor
Sodium Fishing Gear -
will be April 26 and 27 at
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort with a portion of
the proceeds to benefit
the Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple
Heart. Sponsorships are
open now and official reg-
istration is expected to
open by November of this
year. For more informa-
tion, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028
*Save the Date!! CCBA is
the planning stages of a
brand new event to be
held in 2014! The inaugu-
ral Construction Industry
Building Olympics will be
Saturday, Dec. 6, 2014.
For more information and
sponsorship opportuni-
ties, call Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028 or email
donnab@citrusbuilders.c
om to be added to the
email list for updates on
this exciting new event.


BANQUET HALL
* The Citrus County
Builders Association has
a Banquet Hall available
to rent, for weddings,
receptions, anniversary
parties, graduation
celebrations, club
meetings, etc. and it's
open to the public. The
building provides free
Internet access.
* Please feel free to come
and look at the hall
during regular business
hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday to Thursday.
* The office is atl 196
S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461,
centrally located a
short drive south of
State Road 44.
* For more information,
visit the website at www.
citrusbuilders.com or call
Donna Bidlack at 352-
A 746-9028.


Gov. Rick Scott








D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber events
For more information on Chamber events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com or call 352-795-3149.
Dec. 19 Citrus Sports & Apparel Mixer, 5 to 7 p.m.
at the Crystal River Mall. Ugly sweater contest and
Cash Mob contest, spend $20 at the mall from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m. and bring your receipt to the mixer to enter a
drawing for a flatscreen television.
Jan. 18 & 19-The Florida Manatee Festival in downtown
Crystal River. FloridaManateeFestival.com.
Interested in becoming an event sponsor and advertising
your business to thousands? Call 352-795-3149.
Interested in showcasing your fine art? Call 352-795-3149.
Interested in displaying your arts and crafts? Call 352-
634-1578.



IPli 17 Z APPAIIL
*I*CIR FlIMtlH i I 49 IK21 T
35S2-564-9402

oli4ay Mixer

THURSDAY, DEC. 19
5:00 TO 7:00 PM
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL-1801 US HWY 19
ACOUSTIC MUSIC BY THE BOB HOPE BAND
FOOD & BEVERAGES PROVIDED
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
WILL ANNOUNCE PARADE WINNERS
CASH MOB
Awfr ely for Ch Mob ev want t 4p.m. iuntiSpnLm.
._ Spena $20 at any mall store, restaurant or charity and
nte to win a flat screen television. To enter the contest
-.....7 L I ") =Vi- li le Citrus Sports & Apparel Holiday Mixer and turn
In your receipt to the Chamnbei representative.


Member Spoftlight:

Humane Society of Citrus County


I


he Humane Society of Citrus County has made it its mission to find loving, for-
ever homes for each and every pet who becomes part of their rescue family. Help-
ing Citrus County pets with services such as matching pets with the right pet
parents and the commitment to remain a no-kill sanctuary. All animals that come to the
Humane Society are spayed or neutered and given the appropriate shots and medications,
preparing them for adoption. This nonprofit organization is operated by a core group
of volunteers who provide care to approximately 35 dogs and cats at any given time.
This animal welfare organization took shape in 1978 and opened its current location
in 2oo006. They offer the public numerous opportunities to either donate or get involved.
Donations are accepted online and by mail. You can get involved by helping collect
needed supplies, volunteering to help care for the animals and assisting with office work.


Rmm


Adoption hours:
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday through
Saturday.
Address:
751 S. Smith Ave.,
Inverness.
Phone:
350-341-2222.
humanesocietycitrus. corn


Member churches
Places of worship for this holiday season.


Archangel Michael
Greek Orthodox
Church
4705 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0766
First Presbyterian
Church
1501 S.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-2259
Christmas Eve Service
at 7p.m.
Seven Rivers
Presbyterian
Church
4221W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-6200
Saturday worship at 6 p.m.
and Sundayworship at lo a.m.
Christmas Eve services at
3 p.m., 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Special Holiday Evening
with the Florida Philhar-
monic Symphony and Seven
Rivers Chorale at 7 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dec. 21. Tickets $20
for adults; children 12 and
under $5.


Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal
Church
2450 Norvell Bryant
Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-0052
Saturday worship at 5 p.m.
Sunday Rite I at 8 a.m. and
Rite II at 10:30 a.m.
Christmas Eve service at
10:30 p.m.; Christmas Day
service at 9 a.m.
Unity Church of
Citrus County
2628 W. Woodview Lane
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-746-1270
Sunday service at 10:30 a.m.
Christmas Eve service 6
p.m.
Gulf to Lake Church
1454 N. Gulf Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-8077
Sunday worship at 9 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Salvation Army
712 S. School Ave.
Lecanto. FL 34460
352-513-4960


Nature Coast EMS members attend

international trauma life support

conference, rural health care summit


Jane Bedford, RN,CCP, and Mary Ann Kolar, D.O. From left: Brian Bentley, Nature Coast EMS
community paramedic; Lee Bosley, Nature Coast EMS paramedic; Jane Bedford, RN, CCP, Nature Coast
EMS education director; Dr. John Armstrong, Florida surgeon general and secretary of health; Jerri Regan,
student services coordinator, Nature Coast EMS; and Dr. Darwin Ang, medical director of Trauma Services,
Ocala Regional Medical Center.
N ature Coast EMS Education Director Jane Bedford, RN, CCP, and Mary Ann Kolar, D.O., medical director,
recently attended the International Trauma Life Support Conference (1TLS), representing Florida as voting
delegates for the annual meeting in Vancouver, B.C. 1TLS is a global organization dedicated to preventing death and
disability from trauma through education and emergency trauma care. Some of this year's conference sessions in-
cluded education on emergency airway management, ophthalmic emergencies, spinal immobilization and trau-
matic brain injuries.
Nature Coast EMS team members also recently attended the 20th annual Florida Rural Health Association
Educational Summit in Gainesville, Fla. This year's focus was "setting the health care table: politics and economics"
and was attended by more than 155 health care and related professionals. The conference hosted the state surgeon
general's Symposium on Rural Obesity. Team members attended a series of medical educational sessions including
collaboration of rural EMS and hospitals for trauma care and emerging technologies, community paramedicine and
Affordable Care Act impacts on rural Florida and the national level.


Seven Rivers offers support group for stroke survivors, caregivers and families
t ]- different Strokes for Different encourages individuals with similar meeting, clinical experts discuss The support group is held the third 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
i Folks" is a support group for experiences and challenges to learn specific health topics related to Thursday of each month from 10:30 River. For more information, call
stroke survivors, caregivers and more about recovery, rehabilitation stroke recovery and provide take- a.m. to 12 p.m. at Seven Rivers Re- 352-795-1234 or visit SevenRivers
family members. The support group and a healthier lifestyle. At each home materials for further learning, gional Medical Center, located at Regional.com.


CrRuS CouNmY


,Crystal River
'IWRotary Club


{-Co~l~cxc4 tCA7/1e. tZeXaA


BOAT TOURS BEER GARDEN LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LOCAL FOOD FINE ART ARTS AND CRAFTS KIDS ZONE
$4 PER PERSON, CHILDREN 12 & UNDER FREE


FloridaManateeFestival.comn


352-795-3149


vi (i. lt. Vt TM %O i


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


UGLY CHRISTMAS
SWEATER CONTEST
Wear your ugly, tacky, ddicuIous holiday sweater
for a chance to wini


'-* 1**
ASL


~*1.-


rnv~--~i
."- .--


k!r


(C i 'iJ I ,]


^A0 P.Iv


famlanaUa
S I li n e S




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nonprofit success depends on its volunteers


he success of a nonprofit
organization depends
upon the contributions of
highly motivated volunteers.
Their efforts empower the or-
ganization by providing guid-
ance and growth through
leadership. Volunteers can
reach into many corners of op-
portunity This capacity exists
because of a lifetime of experi-
ence. Along with experience
that matters come wisdom and
maturity. A balanced volunteer
board of directors adds a mix of
different perspectives, leading
to good decisions and credibil-
ity Losing productive volun-
teers, however may cause
slowdown, loss of direction or
worse.

Losing volunteers
When seasoned advocates
leave a nonprofit organization,
for whatever reason, the risk is
potential loss of forward mo-
mentum. Stated goals come up
short. Initiatives lose steam.


I


Some good program
Ofthersp aTre vwate


Retirees have experience, time
Dr and often want to make a con-
tribution. They are accustomed
Frederick to playing a significant role in an
organization. They understand
Herzog, and believe in good causes and
PhD are unafraid to make commit-
ments. These important
strengths sustain the organiza-
tion in good and not-so-good
IONPROFIT times. The foregoing traits are
BRIEFS character assets that always
make the difference between
ms just stop. great and mediocre volunteer
rl rdonm anr contributions.


become ineffective. The solu-
tion to avoid this situation is to
implement an ongoing recruit-
ment program for volunteers.
Here is some of the latest infor-
mation relative to the process
of adding and maintaining vol-
unteers.

Sources of volunteers
One of the best sources for
volunteers is retired people.
Recruiting a professional who
is retired has multiple benefits.


Attracting the volunteer
The best advertising is by at-
traction and good example.
Successful nonprofits tend to
attract motivated volunteers.
Success breeds success. The
motivated volunteer wants to
associate with others who have
made important strides in mov-
ing the organization forward.
Winners like being with win-
ners. Boomers arriving into re-
tirement today represent a


ready force that can help non-
profits attain their vision and
purpose.
A program for volunteer re-
cruitment should be ongoing.
Keep in mind, retirees want
and need flexibility for their
contribution of time and expe-
rience. They understand com-
mitment and don't back away
from it. They may also ap-
proach challenges within their
own time frame. Personality
types and learning styles all
play a role with respect to how
the volunteers perform.

Citrus County volunteer
inventory
Citrus County demographics
reveal the following: It has
140,000-plus residents, of which
almost 40 percent are 65 years
or older A simple calculation
indicates that to be close to
55,000 available volunteers. Lo-
cated in this group of seniors
are transplants from different
areas, educations, work and


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

side, have no interest in the timeshares, and the
reality is it's just about impossible to sell them.
The companies advertising that they will
sell timeshares all want money up front I
wouldn't even consider that kind of an
arrangement.
Other things being equal, I would simply stop
paying. That may be a problem and the time-
share company may come after you. I can't de-
termine what it will do. On the other hand, it's
possible that you could simply say that you are
agreeable to returning the timeshares to the
company, and maybe it will take that route.
You might want to see if there's a charity that
would accept the timeshares to offer as prizes
in a raffle. However, charities oftentimes are
hip to the fact that timeshares have little value
and will refuse to accept them.
I know I haven't told you anything you proba-
bly haven't figured out for yourself, but unfortu-
nately, the used timeshare market is very, very
soft. You could, of course, offer to make a settle-
ment with the timeshare company in other
words, offer a certain amount of cash up front
in exchange for a release from your obligation.
DEAR BRUCE: If you are married, should
you file together or separately? We have no
children and have been married for one year
Our combined income is $50,000. Our mortgage
is $125,000, and we have no other debts.
G.P, via email
DEAR G.P: This is a no-brainer With your in-
come and no children, I can see absolutely no
reason for you guys to file separately You would


just be paying more taxes for no reason. I would
file immediately for the next tax year as mar-
ried and filing jointly
DEAR BRUCE: A few years ago, when your
broadcast was available in the Seattle area, I
heard you mention your first radio job applica-
tions. You applied something like 2,000 or 3,000
times, or some huge number, and somebody fi-
nally relented and gave you a chance.
Could you help me set the record straight and
let me know exactly how many times you ap-
plied, and the method of application -phone
calls or letters and why they relented? I find
this remarkable and inspiring for anybody look-
ing for a job today
-D.H., via email
DEAR D.H.: I remember very well what I had
to do before I actually got anywhere. That was
with WMCA, a radio station in New York, in the
late 1970s.
I called WMCA somewhere in the neighbor-
hood of 3,000 times. Two or three times a day,
every single day In addition, I sent them well
over 500 letters over a four-year period. They
told me I wore them down.
Some people said I would tick them off. But I
thought, how can I be any worse off than I am
now? They weren't hiring me or answering my
letters. All I can do is keep after them.
Fortunately they gave me a shot at Sunday af-
ternoons, which is the toilet in the radio busi-
ness. I managed to hang in there, and they
offered me a full-time job not that many months
later In any event, that's the story

Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions ofgeneral interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be provided.


TOYOTA
Continued from Page Dl

Toyota had been riding the
momentum from several tri-
als where juries found it was
not liable.
Toyota has blamed drivers,
stuck accelerators or floor
mats that trapped the gas
pedal for the sudden unin-
tended acceleration claims
that led to the big recalls of
Camrys and other vehicles. It
has repeatedly denied its ve-
hicles are flawed.
No recalls have been issued
related to problems with on-
board electronics. In the Okla-
homa case, Toyota attorneys
theorized that the driver mis-
takenly pumped the gas pedal
instead of the brake when her
Camry ran through an inter-
section and slammed into an
embankment
Sean Kane, president of
Massachusetts-based Safety
Research & Strategies, said
the Oklahoma verdict likely
moved Toyota to the negotiat-
ing table because it targeted
electronics.
"Nobody did until that case
and they got hammered and
they got hammered in a con-
servative venue," said Kane,


who researches consumer
safety in motor vehicles and
has been closely following
the Toyota litigation.
Experts in electronic
source code and other indus-
try insiders are buzzing about
the verdict, he added.
"The evidence that came
out in that trial has attracted
global attention that is re-
markable," he said.
Toyota previously agreed to
pay more than $1 billion to
resolve hundreds of lawsuits
claiming that owners if its
cars suffered economic losses
because of the recalls. But
that settlement did not in-
clude those suing over wrong-
ful death and injuries.
Hundreds more of those law-
suits remain and many have
been consolidated in state
and federal courts in Califor-
nia.
Also in October, Toyota won
a California state court case
in which plaintiffs argued the
automaker was liable for the
death of a woman whose 2006
Camry crashed because the
company hadn't installed a
system that could override
the accelerator The woman's
family was seeking $20 mil-
lion in damages.
Toyota also won a federal
case in New York in 2011.


SWe need your
"information


ik I: As our community grows, it becomes even more
If Hom wollk important that we know how to keep in touch with
each other. The Chronicle's annual publication of
21M Our Home Citrus is the best and most complete
resource for all those important organizations,
clubs, hobby groups, and other ways we make
friends, share pastimes and help each other out.

If you would like your group to be listed in this publication please fill out the
following form and mail or deliver by January 3, 2014 to:

Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (must be non-profit)__________
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:_____________
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)

Street address:


MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE:
Day of the week (every Monday, third Monday of the week)________
CONTACT:
Name:


Phone number:


Email address:

Please check the category which best describes your organization -


only one category, please:


0 Animals Q
[] Arts & Crafts []
[] Civic []
5 Computers 5
5 Cultural and Heritage 5
o Education and Youth ]


Food Programs
Fraternal
Gardening
Hobbies
Political
Recreation Groups


[ Seniors
o Service Clubs
[] Special Interest
o Support Groups
E Vehicles
[ Weight Control
El Women's Clubs


ihll_ kai
TU Ks & fthi Pull


Tickets available after December 16, 2013
At the following outlets...
Citrus County Fair Office Inverness 726-2993
Crystal River Chamber of Commerce 795-3149


Eagle Buick Homosassa
Inverness Chamber of Commerce


795-6800
726-2801


Advance Ticket Pricing


Cash only
One day for Adult
Two day for Adult
One day for Child (4-11)
Two day for Child (4-11)


Gate Ticket Pricing


Adults


$8.00
$15.00
$4.00
$7.00


$10.00


Child (4-11) $5.00


BUICK MC
www.eaglebuickgmc.com
352-795-6800
Garden Tractors Pulling
Food & Camping Available
Jr. Tractor Race Every Day
3 Sleds Pulling in Covered Arena
/tC I"TWOU** .. OUT1 'V"
CHP\QNICIM
CMOWAI~


professional experience. Citrus
County is one of the oldest
counties in the country, and
also boasts close to 26,000 veter-
ans in the population mix.
There will always be a por-
tion of the demographic num-
bers that will not be available
to do volunteer work. But, in
any case, 55,000 is not a small
number Reduce this total by
half and it becomes 27,500. Di-
vide 700 Citrus County nonprof-
its into that number and the
result is around 40 people per
each nonprofit. Most nonprofit
boards only need six members
to operate successfully Now
that these facts are known, the
only challenge left is to start a
recruitment program to secure
organizational longevity

Dr Frederick JHerzog, PhD
is the Founder and Executive
Director of the NonProfit Re-
source Center He can be
reached via email: Therzog
@tampabay.rrcom.


D4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


BUSINESS


N.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ireland faces more austerity as bailout era ends


SHAWN POGATCHNIK
Associated Press
DUBLIN -Ireland's three-year
bailout ordeal ends this weekend, a vic-
tory in its battle against bankruptcy But
while the government is ready to fi-
nance itself without aid, the Irish can't
yet escape what has become Europe's
longest-running austerity program.
The Irish faced ruin in 2010, when the
runaway cost of a bank-bailout program
begun two years earlier destroyed the
country's ability to borrow at affordable
rates. To the rescue came fellow Euro-
pean nations and the International
Monetary Fund with a three-year loan
package worth $93 billion.
The last of those funds arrived in Ire-
land's state coffers this week. On Sun-
day, Prime Minister Enda Kenny will
address the nation on live TV to salute
the financial rebound that has eluded
the eurozone's other bailout recipients
Greece, Portugal and Cyprus.
Unlike them, Ireland has repaired its
fiscal reputation by exceeding a series
of deficit-cutting targets and avoiding
both labor unrest and protracted reces-
sion. That surprisingly strong perform-
ance has already allowed Ireland since
mid-2012 to resume limited auctions of
long-term bonds at affordable rates, an
essential prerequisite to life without an
EU-IMF safety net.
Ireland's treasury also has built up
more than 20 billion euros in reserves
that, should disaster strike again, would
permit the state to pay its bills through
2014 without any immediate need for aid.
International confidence that Ireland
can resume financing its debt repay-
ments on its own means that the yields
- the effective interest rates on Irish
10-year bonds today have fallen to
below 3.5 percent from 2011 highs ex-
ceeding 15 percent. That's lower than
Spain, which has received emergency
support for its banks but avoided a full-
fledged bailout, and Italy, which contin-
ues to finance one of the eurozone's
worst per-capita debts.
The most obvious evidence of re-
newed confidence at home is all the
"sold" signs suddenly appearing in
Dublin, home to nearly a third of the
country's 4.6 million residents and the
epicenter of a property bubble that
burst with disastrous effect in 2008.
Property prices had slumped more than
50 percent in the five years since as
credit crumbled, banks drowned in
toxic assets and hundreds of thousands
became trapped in negative equity, but
the market is finally stirring again.
Ireland still faces a mountain to climb
to achieve its key goal of reducing its an-
nual deficits back below 3 percent of


;[lI l t I


* iaiM 1 1111,1ttt 1ll


Associated Press
A general view of the customs house building and the River Liffey in the centre of Dublin, Ireland, is shown. On Sunday, Ireland
officially ends its reliance on a $93 billion loan program that European governments and the International Monetary Fund
provided in 2010 to save the Irish from national bankruptcy. Ireland's finance chief says the country's exit from its international
bailout this week should be celebrated as a eurozone triumph, but won't mean an end to austerity for the debt-battered Irish.


gross domestic product, the limit sup-
posed to be observed by all 17 nations
using the euro currency
Ireland recorded a European Union
record deficit of 32 percent in 2010, the
year that the bill for sustaining the
country's six domestic banks grew so
large that Ireland's own credit ratings
crumbled.
But since coming to power in early
2011, Kenny's government has reformed
banking regulation, negotiated with the
European Union to spread out bank-
debt repayments over several decades,
and imposed tens of billions in annual
cuts and new taxes targeting every sec-
tor of society
As part of its reform agenda, EU and
IMF chiefs ordered Ireland to impose
new charges and limits on the state old-
age pension system, on welfare pay for
the young, and to introduce a new prop-
erty tax in line with international prac-
tice. A much-debated water tax is still in
the pipeline for next year
Ireland's major economic think tank,
the Economic and Social Research In-
stitute, estimated in a report this week


that five straight years of cuts dating to
the early days of the 2008 banking crisis
have pruned most workers' take-home
pay by about 12 percent, while those
best off have lost more than 15 percent
of their incomes.
Ireland's deficits have marched
steadily downward from 8.2 percent last
year to an expected 7.3 percent this year
Finance Minister Michael Noonan says
Ireland hopes to post a 4.8 percent deficit
in 2014, then 2.9 percent in 2015. But he
said Ireland would keep pruning to get its
later deficits down to the eurozone's fu-
ture rule of below 0.5 percent of GDP
"This isn't the end of the road," Noo-
nan said of the bailout exit "This is a
very significant milestone on the road,
and it gives us an opportunity to pause
and reflect for a very short period.
"But we must continue with the same
types of policies, because the deficit is
too high," Noonan told a Dublin press
conference. "It has to be brought down
below 3 percent, and then it has to be
brought into balance in subsequent
years. The debt is too high and we have
to have strategies to make the debt even


more sustainable than it is now"
Ireland's national debt is projected to
reach 206 billion euros this year, repre-
senting 124 percent of annual GDP Ire-
land hopes to reduce that debt-to-GDP
ratio, a key measure of a country's abil-
ity to pay its bills, in 2014 by growing the
size of its economy 2 percent.
Such predictions are particularly dif-
ficult for Ireland because its growth
prospects are dictated by demand from
its two chief trading partners, the
United States and Britain. Nearly 1,000
export-focused multinational compa-
nies based in Ireland account for
around a fifth of the country's entire
GDP Those companies increasingly are
hiring again, and Ireland's unemploy-
ment rate has declined from a two-
decade high of 15.1 percent to today's
rate of 12.5 percent.
Noonan said Ireland must pursue
around $3.4 billion in cuts next year and
more of the same in 2015. However, it
might ease income-tax bands, particu-
larly for single workers, who are taxed
at a rate of 41 percent on income more
than $45,000.


Informed



shoppers



get the



best deals.


informed


shoppers


read the


Chronicle.








A#'%C I T R U S '-.CO U N T



Vwww.chronicleonline.com


I'



























GET

INFORMED.


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 DS


_ -- -mil N-




D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


1. ChroniceH


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds :


Looking for
Companionship
Attractive Widow
Active, healthy, looking
for gentleman around
75 yrs. young send mail
to: Blind Box1850 c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429



Your World

%O9aOi9e 444


C. Ir I Eri,. ,


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


Attention: Sheila
Castellon or relatives
Manatee Storage
has several boxes of
personal items that
will be discarded after
January 31st, 2014.
No balance due on
the account.
Call 352-563-6669




POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636
Wheelchair
Invacare SXS Heavy
Weight Allowed, 22"
Seat, Oxyg Rack, V.G.
Cond. Orig $890
Only $310.4 Wheel
Walker. X-Lg + wide
seat and brakes
V.G Cond. $100. call
btwn 1pm & 7pm
(352)527-4942


STump( rnaing cneap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Two Large Rooms for
Rent $125. wk. call
Ray 828-497-2610




$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


AKC Registered
Yellow Lab, 9 yrs old,
great w/kids, loves the
water, GREAT Family
Dog! (352) 228-4581
Catus 9ff tall Hurry still
growing, Young
maple tree.You dig
both(352) 746-0284
Free
Pitt/Terrior mix,
3 yrs. old,
Chow, 5 yrs. old
Male, can be
separated
352-697-5451,
352-476-6704
FREE
Tortoise Cat, Female
Spayed, all shots,
chip, good with kids
house trained.
(352) 621-1953



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001lb.
Stone Crabi $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 ml. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
Mustard & Collards
GIFT SHIPPING *
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.


Found Ford Ignition
Key
Walmart Inverness
Parking Lot
(352) 637-0526


Attention: Sheila
Castellon or relatives
Manatee Storage
has several boxes of
personal items that
will be discarded after
January 31st, 2014.
No balance due on
the account.
Call 352-563-6669

W


DOG GROOMING
WORKSHOP
"BYOD" Bring Your
Own DOG! $50.
Sat. January 11th
11am to 4pm
offered at the Acad-
emy of Animal Arts,
Largo, FL Academy
ofanimalarts.com
866-517-9546

BEi^


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Person who painted
house on Whitier Pt, in
Homosassa last Nov.
Call (727) 415-0404



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabi $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001



FT/PT HAIRSTYLIST
Apply @ Nu-Yu Salon
Beverly Hills plaza
Nuyu4u@gmail.com










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




PRN Receptionist

Join an Exciting
Team!
Nights, Weekends,
& some Holidays
Multi-phone system
and data entry skills
preferred Dependa-
bility a must.

Apply at:
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA Em-
ploye, rM/F/V/D


Hap Nts


Healthcare

You can have it all.

Life balance. Competitive salary.
Bar-setting benefits.
Due to the continuous growth in the Citrus
and Hernando County areas, Amedisys
Home Health is currently seeking the
following professionals to join our team:

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
REGISTERED NURSE
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE

For more information, contact
Amanda Sifford at (866) 887-3051 or
amandasifford@amedisys.com


Ultrasound Tech
For OB Dr Ofc
FT/PT
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877





Architectural
Draftsperson
Local homebuilding
leader is seeking an
individual with relevant
experience or a recent
graduate from a
technical college
or university for an
Architectural Drafting
role on our Design
Team. Key Responsi-
bilities include revising
architectural plans
as marked and
thoroughly coordinate
all sheets that are
affected by any
changes; developing
construction docu-
ments for permitting
and starts, and
develop site drawings
noting house location
on lot.
Job Requirements:
Knowledge of residen-
tial plans and
construction drawings,
proficiency with Auto-
CAD Architectural
Desktop 2006, work
well with a sense of
urgency, team player
with a service oriented
mindset, detail
oriented with a high
level of organization
and problem solving
abilities.
Email your resume
to chire@
citrushills.com





Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club
is now hiring
experienced
Bar Tenders
and Waitstaff.

Apply v in person
Mon-Sat 9am-5pm
at the Grille Restau-
rant 505 E Hartford
St, Hernando FL


COOKISERVER
Exp. Only apply
Taking Applications at
Chicken King
Hernando
2420 N Florida Hwy
NO PHONE CALLS


FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
SOUS CHEF and
LINE COOKS

Apply in Person at:
505 E Hartford St.
Mon-Sat between
2:00-5:00pm.





FIREWORK
Sales Crew &
Independent Setup
Crew Needed
Start Immediately
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission,
Background check
Email Application
greenunllmlted
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Wemrner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Grounds
Maintenance
Technician I
Announcement
#13-74
Manual and techni-
cal work involving
grounds mainte-
nance. Fertilizes,
mows and performs
pond maintenance.
Must have at least
five years' experi-
ence in a related
field. Current valid
Florida Driver
License required.
$9.50 hourly to start,
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
20, 2013 EOE/ADA

Subcontractor
Installer

Must have own tools
& vehicle. Lic/Ins.
w/ workmans comp.
Steady work needs
to be quality
conscious & a self
-starter. Pay per job.
Contact
DEEM CABINETS
Attn: Dave Foley
(352) 628-3122




Public Works
Supervisor

The Town of Inglis is
accepting applica-
tions for a Public
Works Supervisor.
The applicant must
have the ability to
exercise judgement
with regard to the
management of the
daily operations in
the Public Works
Department. The
applicant must pos-
sess skill in annual
budget prepara-
tion, with emphasis
on long range plan-
ning. Solid leader-
ship capabilities are
required in order to
properly supervise a
wide range of
diverse employees.
The applicant must
also boast expertise
in public relations,
as they will be deal-
ing directly with
public complaints.
This position is
accountable for
supervising and
coordinating the
operations of the
Public Works staff,
including but not
limited to the follow-
ing activities: repair
and maintenance
of all streets and
walkways, buildings,
and grounds, in
conjunction with the
Water Plant Opera-
tor. The Public Works
Supervisor receives
direction from and is
held accountable
to, the Town
Commission.
Qualifications: High
School Diploma with
(5) five years work
related experience,
knowledge of engi-
neering principals,
as applied to
municipal activities,
such as electrical,
water and building
structure of environ-
mental studies, and
their application
and impact on
public works; and of
OSHA requirement
as applied to
municipal water
plant, maintenance
shop and Town
buildings. Current
certification as a
"Water Plant Opera-
tor", with high level
of knowledge of
RO/Green Sand
water plant facility
operations is
desired. Knowledge
of Town streets and
water lines is
desirable but not
required of all appli-
cants in order to
apply. Experience in
heavy equipment is
preferred but not
required in order to
apply. Current valid
Florida's Drivers Li-
cense is required.
Applications may
be picked up at the
Inglis Town Hall
135 Hwy 40 West
Inglis, Fl 34449.
Inglis is an Equal
Opportunity Em-
ployer; Veterans
are encouraged to
apply. Closing Date:
January 6, 2014
Noon


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATEAPPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Home Finder

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


fti Your treAJ4W HOm&

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chroniclehomefinder.com

7-572


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Inglis

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

S CITRUS COUNT


CHRONICLE
Swww.chronllonline.omm


I


Bcto
CAREGIVER
Seeking a priv. duty
caregiver, with exp.
inside a facility setting
in Lecanto, compas-
sionate & experienced
working with Alzheimer
patients. Must pass
a level 2 BG check.
321-303-0346

Exp. General
Maintenance
Must be flexible and
able to multi-task.
Apply vTues thru Fri
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando

FTI/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person
at: Superior
Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.


GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Announcement
#13-73
Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Heavy lifting,
pushing, bending,
climbing and reaching
required. Ability to
work outdoors in
hot/cold temperatures
under noisy condi-
tions. Current valid
Florida Driver License
required. $8.02 hourly
to start, Excellent ben-
efits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMIT-
TED ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
20, 2013 EOE/ADA


P/T CHILDREN
MINISTER
First Christian
Church of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual to work with
elementary children
To Apply: email
pastorray@tampa
bay.rr.com or Call
352-344-1908
www.fccinv.com

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.

Part-time


TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flexible Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net





AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
LAST CLASS
OF 2013
COSMETOLOGY
December 16TH
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
FULL-TIME & PARTTIME
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




SUNDAY DFCFMBRF 1 201 R D7


Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.
You can become
an expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute
Online HVAC
education in as little
as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online-Ed
ucation.com



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Antique
Heavy Solid
Brass Bed
$400.
(352) 812-2329

110 11 ()li ve
Your world first.
Every Day


C aNssifieds
Classifieds


WEDGEWOOD Cream
Lavender grapevine, 5
pc setting never used
$60 352-270-3527



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DISHWASHER
EXCELLENT Cond
11/2 yrs old $90
(352) 795-1692
DISHWASHER White
Whirlpool "Quiet Wash
Plus" Dishwasher.
Good condition $25.
3523449190
GE Nautilus
Portable Dishwasher
24/2 x 26, 36 H
Black, Light wooden
top, plate warmer
$250 (352) 527-9573
Maytag
Air conditioner,
portable unit
works great
$75.
(352) 628-5085
MICROWAVE NEW
MED SIZE $45.
352-3413562
Over the Range
Microwave
Whirlpool, stainless
steel, new/slightly
dented, cost $359. ask
$150.(352) 794-3252
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Working Cond, 60
day Guar.Free Del/Set
up. 352-263-7398
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each.
ReliableClean, Like
New, Excellent Working
Cond, 60 day Guar.Free
Delivery/Set up.
352-263-7398



SAUDER CHERRY
WOOD HOME OFFICE
Sauder computer desk
with hutch and side
desk with two file draw-
ers. Also set of 4, 72
inch high, five shelf
bookcases with 1 inch
thick shelves. Camden
Collection Series.
Sauder web site lists set
at $1459. Will sell entire
set for $295. Will sell
Desk for $100 and
bookshelves for $75
each. 352-464-7746


Classifieds


C .i...pN.CkNIE I






(352) 563-5966


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Beverly Hills Area.
Will do odd jobs, run
errands, & give you a
ride to appt. Call Pete
727-418-1953
Transportation and/or
Asst. with shopping,
errands, appt., & air-
port runs. Lie/Ins. w/
refs. (352) 613-0078



i SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


Classified


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838

Electrical

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352422-7279 k**k
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696
TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$80. (352) 344-2696



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


GENERAC A
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric. LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac -Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


$1e OF.N*ER


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447


r* 66:

NOW OPEN!

AAA Miller Auto
& Tire Service
m Oil Filter Lube
Oil Changes
starting 99

Open Mon.-Sat.
(352) 527-4111
Across from Wal-Mart, Lecanto


Home Cleaning
Service
Call 352-875-6285
for estimate.

Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


RESIDENTIAL
CLEANING
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 OR 364-1773




Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


MII11MIIII,
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


PL


GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Remodeling

All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofin_- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
***352-639-1024***


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


~lJuun vicn~LJuiMivu DgUnif r~yrrr orUiMLIo

Y[ U IUUNl~ tERLUCKNGBRll/ lICK PA'lVER 5'bl l
SCOFrES
SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 2-403188
8, in..sed 352400.3188


NATURE COAST RV
RV service, Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


3 Rooms Carpet Cleaned

(Hallwayis Free) only 69


Get Dryer and Dryer Vent

Cleaned for $3 5
Must have both services on same appt. With coupon.

O THURA CLEAN INC
Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Services

352-503-2091





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting. Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
^ 352-364-4610
MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated.
Lic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7Days aWeeK





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
-* Small Carpentry
Fencing
M 0 Screening
Clean Dryer Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
I Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


FREE IPaers,
ESTIMATES
EGG'S COMPLETE
Until 0 REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LENS352-746-5200

& INSURED


AAA ROOFING
Call the "/eak6ustje"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:,
Must present coupon at time contract is signed i
I ir- /InC & 7o;5'7 000GR7W1


7 e 13M 1GRM1e
bf "







Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


CLASSIFIEDS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I re Srvc3


I DRYER VENT CHANING
ME.T.1 I L" I


F


I I


UI POL AD AVRSIJA




D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 DECLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, Little use
$375.
(202) 425-4422 cell
Delta 12" Portable
Planer, model 22-540,
on a castered 2'x2' cart
$250.cash
(352) 860-0412
Electric Welder
Lincoln 90 amps;
Cufftting torch with
tanks $250; 24ft fiber-
glass extent ion ladder
$125 (352) 726-8873
Husqvarna 460
Rancher Chain Saw
1 year old w/ extra
chains, sprockets,
bars + chain
sharpener, $450.
(352) 249-7064
MACHINES TOOL
CHEST w/2 drawer cab-
inet $100 Tom
352-494-1214
Homosassa ph
PROFILE PROJECTOR
EP01 LPS$100Tom
(Homosassa)
352494214 ph
VERSA LADDER Versa
Ladder 12 foot standing
height.
$90.00 352-465-2515




2 SHARP SPEAKERS
10" 150 WATTS $30
352-613-0529
5 YAMAHA SPEAKERS
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $80
352-613-0529
HIFI SPEAKER KIT
1pairGRS 8inch 85Watt
woofers, Nuance Tweet-
ers, Crossover Caps.
$100 341-0450
HOME THEATRE CEN-
TRE SPEAKER British
Mordaunt-Short 905C
MTM Upgraded $90
341-0450
HOME THEATRE CEN-
TRE SPEAKER Danish
SEAS Co-Axial
150Watt, Solid Oak $80
341-0450
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
$100 352-341-6920
Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $150
(352) 220-9787
Sound System
w/ 6 speakers
ONKYO Receiver
model TKSR 505- $150
SANSOI Cassette Deck
Technics turn table
2 spkrs $50 for all
(352) 726-8873
TV 15 inch flat screen
with remote works fine
25.00 352-628-4447
TV HDMI CORD One
10ft 1.3b version
$15 352-341-0450
WATCH SUPER BOWL
65" Mitsubishi HD TV
$200
68" H x 59" W x 28"D
Problem free-Includes
manuals
Call 352-503-3467

Computers,"


DESK TOP PC
HP D220MT,
Brothers Fax Machine
with new ink cart.;
Epson CX420 Printer,
Copier, Scanner $150
for all. Plus many more
tools (352) 726-8873
HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Ethernet Clean $80
352-341-0450
JVC DVD PLAYER -
VCR COMBO
HR-XVC11B Light use,
Copies your VHS to
DVD $40 341-0450
VIEWSONIC LCD DIS-
PLAY Widescreen
19inch Multimedia for
PC or X-BOX includes
cable $90 341-0450
WIFI ROUTER Save
$50 Cisco Linksys N750
Smart Wi-Fi Router $80
352-341-0450




5 PIECE PATIO SET 1
OCTAGON TABLE
WITH 4 CHAIRS AND
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529




2 adjustable Twin Beds
w/ remote, can be
used as king or sepa-
rate $300. ea. obo
Sofa & Love Seat
Matching. $150.
(352) 527-4247
2 Table Lamps, Tulips
Black & Gold,
like new $100
2 Large White Swivel
Bar stools $60
(352) 503-6541
ANTIQUE black cane
chair gold trim remova-
ble cushion call text, can
text pic. $80
352-746-0401
Brown Semi Circle
Couch w/ two
ottomans & pillows
Like New
$250.
(352) 527-4247
Clean Twin Bed
Wooden Head Board
$75. obo
(352) 628-0139
DESK -KIDS HEIGHT 2
x 4 foot Top, Blonde
Oak, 2 Drawers and
Shelf, includes Chair
$100352341-0450
DINNING ROOM TABLE


Singer, dark finish.
4 chairs, leaf, $65
(352) 726-9708
DINNING SET
White table 73'x38'
with 8 chairs; China
closet w/ glass drs. 73"
x 42" wide. Exc Cond.
$650 (352) 341-3083
..SMm


DOUBLE BED SET
W/FRAME Good condi-
tion, no stains. Sits 26
inches height. Great
for guest bedroom or
childs room. $300.
Email for more info
and pics. Sugarmill
Woods area. No phone
calls please.
DoubleBedForSale@ya
hoo.com


FURNITURE Brocade
style couch with
matching chair, large
brown recliner $1400,
dining room table
round with 4 matching
chairs $500, beautiful
like new!!!!! Please
call:352-341-0952
Oak Full Bedroom Set
w/dresser, end tables
exc. condition
asking $1200.
call for info
352-897-4681
RECLINERS
2 matching uphol-
stered, med size, new
cond, $75/both. Crys.
River 856-655-3775
Sofa & Love Seat,
Pastel Plaid,
by Clayton Marcus,
excel, cond.
$325.
(352) 382-1587
TWIN BEDS 2
twin-beds w/nice head-
boards and box springs,
bed linens and pillows.
Also a dresser. All for
$300. Call352-422-7565
; may be seen at
Terra Vista.
VERY NICE THOMAS-
VILLE ARMOIRE simple
design light color $200
352-8974154



12 CU FT steel lawn
cart new tires wheels
tubes great shape call
text can text pic $90
352-746-0401
20 PLANTS FOR
WATER GARDEN blUE
FLOWERS.DONT
KNOW THEIR NAMES
$2/ech or $10 464-0316
AERATOR SPREADER
32" Craftsman fits lawn
tractors w/ pin hitch GC
call, text can text pic
352-746-0401 $85.00
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
BLACK DECKER
HEDGER NEW PARTS
Blade 22" ($40) $20
Battery 18V ($40) $20
352-270-3527
SUN SHADE Craftsman
should fit most lawn
tractors call or text can
text pic $45.00
352-746-0401




FLORAL CITY
LARGE SALE
Sat& Sun 8am-4pm
Hsehold items, turn,
clothes, boat, misc.
10790 E Trails End Rd



BLACK & GOLD 2PC
TOP Sleeveless shell,
long sleeve jacket. Med.
Lrg long blk skirt sz.
$30 513-4614
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 3 SETS SIZE 6
2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 & 5/6
$40 352-613-0529
GIRLS winter clothing
4 jeans 1 pants 5 shirts
2 pajama sets & 2
hoodies sizes vary
$50 352-613-0529
MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529



5 GI -JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &AC-
CESSORIES $30.
464-0316
7.5 Tall Christmas
Tree, Frasier
Pre Lit
Clear Lights
$75. (352) 382-1891
10X 10X 6 KENNEL
Chain link w/door, tin
roof. Sturdy. Some rust
on ground poles.
$175.00 OBO
352-6134224
67 pc. Tienshan China
Poinsettia & Ribbons
collection, beautiful!
great condition! $100.
set of lamps, $100.
(352) 795-7254
26" Mongoose Bike
new tubes, excel.
cond.$90.
Stringer of 5 Bass
mounted, beautifully
displayed $100.
(352) 628-5085
ANTIQUE SINGER
SEW MACHINE In
wood case, great
condition.
$99 746-0714
Antique Singer
Sewing Machine
Pedal type
Early 1900's
$100
(352) 287-0767
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Beanie Baby
Collection
125 pc's, $400. for all
call for details
(352) 895-0140
BIKE BASKET BY BELL
White Clip-on
(new $30)
$15., 352-270-3527
CAMERA
SONY cyber-shot,
w/ steady shot focus.
Extra's include:
telephoto lens, high
density filter lens,
polarized filter lens,
tripod, case and battery
chargers
Like new with box
$200 352-503-2661
CARPET AFGANI
8'x5' reversible 2" thick
wool Beige $100.
352-270-3527
CHILDS BIG WHEEL
Thomas the train big
wheel for 2,3 year old
20.00 352-6284447


CHILDS TRAIN TABLE
step 2 deluxe train table
with lid like new
$35 352-628-4447
CHILDS TRAINS
Thomas the train take
and play and motorized
at least 15 for 25.00
352-6284447
China Cabinet,
Antique, Excel. Cond.
$180
Treadmill, Sears
Excel. Cond. $70
(352) 465-7212
Comforter King Set
Ralph Lauren Adiron-
dack Bear Print. Incld
Flannel Sheets. Still in
pkg. Great Gift! $150
obo (518) 802-0220
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River


Gas Grill
4 burners, 2 tanks and
a Wrought Iron table
with 2 chairs
$200 total!
(352) 795-7254

GREAT FAMILY GIFT
(Two) 5 & 10 Gallon
Aquarium w/ stands,
filters, lights, gravel, +
more, like new must
see. Asking $75. for all
(352) 564-2413, Sue



LISTINGS


LJtr\tjt= bIr(U Uft'jt
Bird cage suitable for a
parrot, the cage is on
wheels and is 60 inches
high,. The cage itself is
37 inches high, 30
inches wide and 19
inches wide.
$175.00 352419-8850


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabs $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001
HARLEY SOFTAIL
BACK SEAT & REST
$50.00 Nick
352-697-2631
(Homosassa) ph
JEWELRY ARMOIRE
Mahogany, 40 inches
tall. Nice can e-mail
pics. 513-4027
Ladies Bicycle purple,
Mongoose Like New
$75.
Kenmore, Refrigerator
Freezer, self defrosting
good cond. $100.
(352) 527-6975
MC HELMET NEW
RODIA Lady Rider
Black w/Roses ($70)
$45 352-270-3527
Memory Foam
Mattress, Full Size
Cost over $500
Asking $150. Like New
(352) 726-1991
MOTORCYCLE HEL-
MET NEW RODIA
"Lady Rider" NEVER
WORN $45
352-270-3527
MOTORCYCLE WIND-
SHIELD BAG Harley
brand $ 40
(Homosassa)
352-697-2531 ph


Nordictrack, C2000,
Treadmill, heavy duty
fold up $275.
Yamaha Organ, X100
w/ stand $60 Great for
Xmas (352) 726-3421
NuWave Infra red
Oven, brand new $55.
Thu the Bible
J. Vernon McGee,
from Genesis to Reve-
lation 5 vol. $55.
(352) 860-0124
POOL TABLE
7 ft table, like new,
with extra accessories
$150. You pick up.
Call Steve
(352) 598-4454
Sacrifice
High Speed Mobility
Scooter (Trike)
1 yr. old, excel, cond.
$1,465.
(352) 249-3180
SMALL BIRD CAGE
Cage is 17" long, 13"
wide and 23" high. has
2 food trays. $50.00
352419-8850
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF, works great for
fish orjerkey, only $60
352464-0316
Speakers,
$40.
Golf clubs
$200.
(352) 249-7064


Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
T-BIRD HARDTOP
HOIST manual/pully
system $ 50
(homosassa)
352-697-2631 ph
TOY BOX FISHER
PRICE, nice, plastic, in
excellent condition
w/toys
$50 746-0714
WAKE BOARD
OBRIEN CLUTCH In
excellent condition.
Men's size 9.5-12. $85
746-0714
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore 400. Like
New. $300/Set, Firm.
60 Gal. Commercial Air
Compressor $400
(352) 621-6892 aft 6pm
Washer & Dryer,
Heavy Duty, Kenmore,
like new $275.
King Bed, frame, matt
boxspring & headbrd,
good cond., $100.
352-400-0481
WILD LIFE PRINTS
Ducks & Geese,
$200. obo
Deer & Elk,$250. obo
will separate
(352) 249-7064


SHARP WIZARD
ORGANIZER English to
Spanish, expense and
three Phone Books $20
352-341-0450





4 PRONGED CANE,
don't wait to FALL
DOWN before you need
one. $15
352-464-0316

4 WHEELED WALKER
w/ seat & brakes.
Only $75
352-464-0316

Bariatric Power
Wheelchair
Quickie Rhapsody
weight limit 300lbs
never used, $750. firm
(352) 6374539 Iv msg

CHILDS MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
$85352-464-0316

Heavy Duty Wheel-
chair, electric, high
back, extra support
seat, slightly used,
cost $4,300. sell $800
(352) 628-5085


j .azzy OUCfric^
Wheel Chair,
Model 1170XL
Like new,
$700. make offer
(352) 621-5340
Manual Wheelchair
W/ Footrests, Great
Shape, Only $100
352464-0316
Sacrifice
High Speed Mobility
Scooter (Trike)
1 yr. old, excel, cond.
$1,465.
(352) 249-3180
Wheelchair
Invacare SXS Heavy
Weight Allowed, 22"
Seat, Oxyg Rack, V.G.
Cond. Orig $890
Only $310.4 Wheel
Walker. X-Lg + wide
seat and brakes
V.G Cond. $100. call
btwn 1pm & 7pm
(352)527-4942




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULLY
SET-UP PLAYS AND
SOUNDS GREAT! $25
352-601-6625
"NEW" LIQUID BLACK
ELECTRIC "S.G."
STYLE GUITAR PLAYS
GREAT $75
352-601-6625


Yamaha, like new
CLAVINOVA
Yamaha, like new
$550
(352) 746-3663
CLAVINOVA
Yamaha. like new
$550
(352) 746-3663
ELECTRIC GUITAR &
AMP (LIKE NEW)
W/GIGBAG,TUNER,STR
AP,CORD,STRINGS&C.D
S$75 352-601-6625


Household

2 Twin 4" FOAM (2"
memory foam, 2" foam),
covers. Clean, almost
new.
$75 both. 860-2701
10 CUBIC FOOT
CHEST FREEZER
white 10 cu ft. chest
freezer only used for a
month includes inside
basket and owners
manual 180.00 or B.O.
phone# 352-419-4767
Refrigerator Frigidaire
Gallery, side by side
good condition, water
and ice in door, 22.6 cu-
bic feet, 2006, $300.
352-341-2081
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529


Z 4l -


0008XH2


CITRUS COUNTY


For more information on how to reach II?

Citrus County readers call C IJ t p IL

352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 D9


MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE ONLY
95.00 464 0316
Miami Sun
3 Wheel Bicycle
w/ Basket
$165
(352) 812-2329
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE, ALL ELEC-
TRONICS, SEAT BACK
CHEWED ON BY MY
DOG, $65 464-0316
VERSACLIMBER
good condition
250.00
352-302 7451




BICYCLE RACK Holly-
wood Trunk mount. Like
new.Holds 3 bikes.
$50.00 352-465-2515
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Golf Clubs
Men's McGregor,
Full set, including bag
and all. $60
(352) 746-0284
KAYAK, WILDERNESS
TARPON 14'2012 New,
used 2 times, rudder
and paddle included,
rigged for fishing
Paid $1250.00, asking
$900.00
352-503-7922
MOUNTAIN BIKE Red
"Mt. Storm" Roadmaster
21 speed bike -$15-
352 344 9190
NIKE DRIVER
Brand new Covert VRS
Driver for longer dis-
tance. Senior Shaft,
adj head & head
cover. List for $299,
asking $109 firm
352-228-1944
Recumbent Bike
Suneasy Sport AX,
Like new, w/ car bike
carrier, $1,100 for all.
Roadmaster Mountain
Sport 18 speed $150.
(352) 460-2188
Want to Buy
Lead Shot for Skeet
& Trap Shooting
(352) 726-9369




Baby 3 in 1 Crib, high
chair, bassinet, stroller
w/ car seat, pack
-n-go & more. Cheap!
352-795-1692


Sell r Swa


*w



Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369













Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa .com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Reglna
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221 ma60820














BABY GIRL
Baby Girl T, 6-y.o.
brindle/white terrier
mix, medium size,
weight 40 Ibs, ap-
pears housebrkn.
Came to shelter as
stray. A bit shy &
frightened but
friendly & coopera-
tive, gets along
w/other dogs &
likes people, best
without children.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.











BABY
Looking for a well
mannered, gentle
new family mem-
ber? Baby, a friend
to everyone she
meets, very sweet,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/other
dogs, sits, shakes,
lies down on
command. Loves to
play fetch. Appears
housebrkn. 3 years
old. Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


Jac ~ un inion.
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. Health Cert.
$350. (352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell
--


EDITH
Edith, 2-year-old
spayed female
Boxer/Hound/Terrier
mix, Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken, weight
49 Ibs, loving & lovea-
ble, walks well on
leash, easily directed,
very
affectionate & friendly.
Needs
one medication.
Call Joanne
@

352-795-1288


FREE KITTYS
3 young homeless
kitties, 2 males, 1 fe-
male. Spayed and
neutered, rabies
shots, wormed,
defleaed. Friendly. I
rescued them, please
rescue me. Need to
find homes quickly.
Crystal River, Please
call 408-489-0849










HONCHO
Honcho, beautiful
American Bulldog
mix, neutered,
microchipped &
housebroken,
turned into shelter
because of lack of
housing. Honcho
has had a rough
time, required sur-
gery for entropion,
successfully re-
paired, owner
abandoned & left
at friend's home.
Now back at shel-
ter, desperately
needs good forever
home. 3 y.o., wt
73 Ibs, very friendly
& affectionate.
Joanne @
352-795-1288


Ira


OZZIE
Ozzie, 3+ y.o. neu-
tered Black Mouth
Cur mix, weight
60 Ibs, beautiful
chestnut-red,
active, energetic
& friendly, good
w/children, foster
mom says he's very
devoted and loving.
UTD on shots &
microchip. Best
in yard to run.
Call Brenda @
352-746-1423.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300. Schnauzer Pups
just born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
TALKING QUAKER
PARROT, w/mate
Pepper & Patty. incl.
Ig rod iron cage, $200.
obo (352) 419-6016




Dog Stroller, like new
$40.
SmI Dog Carrier, like
new $25.
(352) 527-6975




2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Must sell as pair
(352) 634-4237
PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352)-445-0381
Wanted Female llama
for Companion for a
fixed male. Cheap
(863) 843-2495




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510*

Gheenoe
16 ft, with trailer, new
tires and lights, great
for Xmas, $750.
(352) 726-3421
MOWHAWK
14 ft. CANOE, Like
New, used twice, w/
extra paddles, bum-
bers, Misc. Items,
Pd. $900 asking $400
(352) 422-5622
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new VHF radio & GPS
fishfinder. Good Cond.
$5,000. (352) 527-4247
PONTOON
24 ft, HT 88 HP
Ev., interior redone;
With Trailer $4200 or
$3400 for boat only
(352) 476-3688
PONTOON
15 FT Playboy 25 HP
Johnson, runs good,
Bimini topno trlr, floor
weak $1500 obo; 352-
201-8120, 860-0513
PONTOON
15 FT Playboy 25 HP
Johnson, runs good,
Bimini topno trlr, floor
weak $1500 obo; 352-
201-8120, 860-0513
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com


Couch out of an RV
5th Wheel
Excellent Condition
$150.
352-422-0273
Toy Hauler, 18ft
2011 Forest River, Tan.
Axle, liv. quarters w/
bath, awning, TV hkup
full ramp, AC. Pd.
$18,000 Asking $11,000
Like New Ready to Go
(352) 422-5622



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



4 Back Seats for
Pontiac Transport
1998.
$30. ea. take all $100.
(352) 621-5340
BUICK
1985, Riviera,
Parts Car, $1,500
(352) 228-9058


-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


L4 Ikr

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




BOSTON WHALER
15 FT. 50 Yamaha
4 Stroke, Trailer,
Loaded, Perfect Boat
$7,000. 305-619-0282
CADILLAC
1997 Deville
Concours
$2500
(352) 322-0321
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
'09, Sonata Limited,
27K miles, brown, w/
tan leather inter, snrt.
full power seats, 4 cyl.
w/ alloyed wheels
$13,000. 352-746-9255

JEEP
'04, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, mint,
clean, white w/ blk int
$8,000 obo
305-619-0282
KIA
2011 Optima EX
loaded, leather, all
power keyless, GPS
$17,500352-212-5555
LINCOLN
'99, Town car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$4,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
'08, Yaris, 4 DR.
Sedan, Blue, 51,500
miles,Good cond.
$9,500. (352) 527-4247




CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
con. Best offer above
$20,000. 352-302-8265





1 111111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Chevrolet
2003 Silverado
Pick-Up, Real Nice,
clean. Priced for quick
sale $4900 OBO
(917) 733-3644
DODGE
'00, Ram 1500. auto.
AC, reese hitch new
tran,130K mi dpndble
$2,900.352-563-0615

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CHEVROLEFT ^ TY l
2004, Tahoe LT, 1999, Rav, -4 power
leather, sunroof, windows, locks, auto-
$8,999. matic transmission
352-341-0018 $3,999.
____ 352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
GMC JEEP
GMC l2006 Wrangler X,
07 Yukon SLT, loaded, 57,000k, many extras,
full power, DVD, bose, $15,500
very good, 116K ml call 352422 5448
$17,800 (352) 212-5555 call 352-422-5448
GMC
'89, Jimmy,
Fair Condltion
$1,200.
(352) 746-6998 CHEVY
HODA 2003 Venture Van,
HONDA 7 pass. and priced to
2007, Element, sell. Call 352-628-4600
Hard to find, For appointment
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600 CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van. Wired for
handicap lift, has
f1 Employmet e hand controls, 74K mi.
good cond $6,000
www.chronicleonine.corm (352) 637-6216

-Meetin
Notices Notices


CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018




BLUE OX
Motorcycle carrier
rated for 1000 Ibs.
$750. Call
(231) 445-2186
Craftsman
motorcycle jack
Excellent Cond $60
(352) 419-5363
HARLEY
'02, Road King,
23,500 mi., gar. kept,
adult driven, beautiful
$7,850 obo, 422-1866
HARLEY
Sportster 883 Black
13000 miles Nicely
equipped 1999 $3300
716/860-6715
Triumph-79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$6500. 352-513-4257


306-1215 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.

Adams, Kathy M. Revels; Revels, Romean; Mansfield Davis, Susan L.;
and Revels, Kenneth Malcolm
638 S Fairlane Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, appliances, furniture, clothing,
household items, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.

Agosto, Mario & Evelyn
9693 N Sandree Dr, Citrus Springs, Fl 34434
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One inoperable pickup truck with deflated tires and one 4 door dark colored
car with no visible tag or decal.
Bouchard, Lisa
9386 N Elliot Way, Citrus Springs, Fl 34434
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junkdebris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosedbuildings; except for
junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for no
more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in
receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully es-
tablished and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary
landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on
the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken household furniture, appli-
ances, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Canary, Amy Nicholle Anderson & Thomas R.
2809 N Page Ave, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The van that is backed in on the property.

Canary, Amy Nicholle Anderson & Thomas R.
2809 N Page Ave, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Canary, Amy Nicholle Anderson & Thomas R.
2809 N Page Ave, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Refrigerator, glass, shelves, wood, mattress, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Edstrom, Susan E.
2455 S Stonebrook Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Edstrom, Susan E.
2455 S Stonebrook Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: There are saw horses and lumber by front porch, din-
ing room table in front yard, living room furniture on front porch, blankets and quilts
on lawn, and miscellaneous junk and debris throughout the yard.
Fratino, Connie
2820 E Mars St, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Harbour Portfolio VI LP
60 S Harrison St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household furniture, appliances, mattresses, boxes,
totes, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Hooker, Patricia Lynn
8663 E Hooker PI, Floral City, Fl 34436
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Paint buckets, mattresses, appliances, tires, and large
amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Hunt, Marc
9 S Desoto St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, household items, and household garbage.
JP Morgan Chase Bank National Association
3732 W Douglasfir Cir Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Expired permit
#200613510 for an in ground pool. Permit expired on 6/13/2007 with no final inspec-
tion completed.
Karen Lee Kramer Trust
5 W Lemon St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Enclosure of a
screen room.

Lively, Gregory Leon
5529 S Withlapopka Dr, Floral City, Fl 34436
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Remodel of
existing shed.

Lori Ann Investments LLC
1470 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or


structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: Permits
needed for electrical in a storage shed, outdoor lighting, aluminum roof over an
existing deck and alterations to the front entry and A/C duct work.

Madrigal, Rene J.
4735 E Liza Knowlton Dr, Inverness, Fl 34452
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Mansfield Davis, Susan L.
678 S Fairlane Ter, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, appliances, furniture, clothing,
household items, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Menezes, April
986 N Lyle Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: No permits ob-
tained for a complete garage enclosure to include
two windows and a door.

Merrill, Tina
6420 W Folger Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Special requirement for
all accessory uses. Accessory structures shall not be occupied as a residence, with
the exception of guest cottages or garage apartments. To Wit: An RV is being occu-
pied in the side yard.
Merrill, Tina
6420 W Folger Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: There is a trailer full of 30 to 40 bags of trash, there are
also some bags of trash in and around the yard, old lumber in front of and around
the house, and miscellaneous junk and debris throughout the yard.
Moore, Marcella
4510 N Custer Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, clothing, mattresses, toilets, and miscellane-
ous junk.
Moore, Marcella
4510 N Custer Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Nationstar Mortgage LLC
911 N Hollywood Cir, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Piscopio Properties 2 LLC
719 S Otis Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to ob-
tain change of use/occupancy permit.

Pyles, Amanda S.
2386 S Hull Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: There are 2
sheds in the backyard and a large extension has been built on to the back of the
mobile home and no permits were ever applied for.
Resinger, Bridget M.
5360 W Caraway PI, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Lumber in and around yard is broken and rotting, old
carpet in side yard, broken remains of an A/C unit, and miscellaneous junk and de-
bris throughout the yard.
Silverman, Arnold Alan
22 Beverly Hills Blvd, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Sparks, Judy Dell Dunn & Ronald K.
4 S Tyler St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Suntrust Bank
5792 S Rovan Pt, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Thibault, William C.
6937 W Arter St, Crystal River, Fl 34429
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: No permit for
newly installed mobile home siding and replacement front window.
Wolfe, Cheryl Ann
321 S Jefferson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tree debris, wood, tarps, debris in the back of a truck,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)
341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE

Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 15, 2013.


305-1215 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River, Florida that
certain Workshops and one Executive Session have been scheduled. The dates, lo-
cations and times are listed below:

Executive Session Community Room 12/18/13 @ 12:25 p.m.
Coastal Region Library Closed Session
This will be a brief closed session for only Councilmembers and pertinent City Staff.
2014 Goals Community Room 12/18/13 @ 12:30 p.m.
Workshop Coastal Region Library Public Welcomed
This will be an opportunity for Council to review a list of projects submitted by the
City Manager and to add or remove any projects as they deem appropriate.

Floodplain Council Chambers/City Hall 1/10/14 @ 12:30
Workshop Public Welcomed
Council will review issues related to the upcoming Floodplain Ordinance and en-
gage in discussion.

Water Quality Council Chambers/City Hall 1/22/14 @ 12:30 p.m.
Workshop Public Welcomed
Council will review issues surrounding the water quality here in Crystal River and dis-
cuss ways that it can be improved.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at these meetings because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City
Manager's Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428, (352) 795-4216, at
least two (2) days before the meeting.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 15, 2013.


Metn


Metn


Metn


I Bi NotceB


I Bi NotceB


I Bi




D10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


1 9 I FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
Relax, It's Covered.t
9 % 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians
APR ffor 36 months* 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage**
APRr fo 36 mon 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage**


: Call For Savings!

-- 352-795-7371


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
No all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing 36 months at $17 48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment Take delivery from dealer stock by 12/24/13 See dealer for qualifications and complete details See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details Vehicles available varies by dealership


2012 FORD FUSION SE
One owner, 33,000 miles. GP1653
$17,950


2011 LINCOLN MKX
Like New. GP1260
$25,950


2011 FORD RANGER XLT
Extended Cab, 17,000 miles. GP1679
$19,950


2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT
305 V8. GPR1251
$27,950


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GP1712
$20,950


2012 FORD EDGE LTD
Navigation, 19,000 miles. GPR1258
$27,950


2010 FORD FUSION SEL
Leather, Sunroof. GP1705
$20,450


2011 LINCOLN MKX
Leather, 29,000 miles. GP1717
$28,950


2009 LINCOLN MKS
One owner, 34,000 miles. GP1681
$20,950


2013 LINCOLN MKT
10,000 Miles. GPR1265
$30,950


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


*0% is not available on all models See dealer for complete details Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399 **Ford Credit
Financing required Not all buyers will qualify Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors Pictures are for illustration purposes only Prices and payments good through 12/24/13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OrsalRv




INSIDE


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUI DE 11


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


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E2~~~~~~~~~~~ SUNDAY~ DEEBE05,21-C2111~wY L)CROIL
~: *~'"63~ 6 ~'~2 5) LINE OPEN HOUSESNA 0PM


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2 637 6382282)
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PETE hoARIAieir 6^ 1332tle -- SHBV^ ?5
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W352) 527-7M8 4 ,9 0 1J !1 TODR 35-7-56A;",PLMR(5)21-61 -j "l?^ ^
5368 RED RIBBON 1332 S. BROOKFIELD DR. LAUREL RIDGE SPACIOUS HOME 861 N. SPEND-A-BDUCK DR. CUSTOM SWEETWATER!
AGED POOL 3/2.5/2 Split Plan LECANTO 2 BR, 2 BATH W/OFFICE 2-Car Garage w/Screen CLEARVIEW ESTATES .3 Bedrooms/3 EnSuite Bahs .Smart Home Installed
SUpdated Shingles Gorgeous Lot 3BD/2BA/2CG Bult in 2003 On Nice Private Lot 'Ling & Family RM HVAC Updated 2012 3BR/3BA/2CG '312Car Garage Salt Water Pool
Open Floor Plan RV Cover/Park Boat Nearly 1500 SF Bea dutifully Decorated/Maintained 1ardrooE Zao nge HA a T Fireplace
Screen Front Ent. Garden Tub & Shower Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows 1999 Sq. F. Living 8-Person SPA Living &w/Breakfastmily Rm. oneJacuzzi in Master
Kitchen forekfs Nokonpee lit f pgads
Attractive Yard E ra Updated Appliances Community PaOOL Lg. Lanai & Pool Area Al STE L at $269,u 0 ae S
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 Well-Maintained A S a1
E2PETER & MARIA KOROL K E LL SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 -
E-nl e.i-euon i, leu., (352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Emmail: sherylpos@anel.com
Ewww.FIlomtidu le.xo oieln (352) 422-3875 Emaih A kellyg ddnrdselslrid.cm Emilenpalnerrenx.l Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com
I3~ z 328I Ia 52)an 1 1 1,NOLNESNA 02 2417 INFO LINE
W 'II1 dL 511 llOI l
OPEN HOUSE SUDA lO-241PMN




2689 GARDENIA DRIVE 5989 N. ORCHIS TEN. 1709 N. LOMBARDO AVENUE CAMBRIDGE GREENS
& H SPLASH! -A MUST SEE! PINE RIDGE TIMBERLANE ESTATES T2.5 on I A Wood Lamnat Foorng
GPOOL& HOToTUB C NHEWs 3 Appliances REALTY ONE -a 2/25l l Acre Wofd Lamrathe Fhorirlg e
Gorgeous Cab/Granite f Large Dining Area 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living Spacious 3BRJ2BAJ2CG a 20ax28SreenedEnclosure Large Eat-InKitchen
=3/2/XtraLg. Garage Screened Porch/Garden .2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath K4/7 H FO INE Offtccenw/eat-in-Area
Lg. onarge r Po rchOOKU S Office or Den Many Extras ppOffice/Den Formal Dining Room T Large Maste weed Tub + Dual Slnks
Open Floor Plan Larger Lo HOOKUP Master Suite w/13x9 Sitting Area Securty Sys r tem + Buit-InSafe Large Snhed 12 X 16
24/ 7 SUTO 2 7RE 1+ ACRE Nicely Landscaped
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER& MARIA KOROL Freshly Painted Inside CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
EN ellUeso ,e x el (352 52 8 LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 [ (352) 637-6200
CriW W W. lot IdLISIIrse1111 3 428 37-2828 Email: lenialm:er@remax.iet Ema.kcuinghla@remax.nit
A A FAMIN OM1] OPEN HOUSE SUNDAYT113PM-230P HERE'S HO1: 3W :
"..',637.282 1 Buyer calls exclusive
... ._ __ 24/7 Info Line
637.2828 L 1

NEAR AO ': A2 Buyer enters house
20 ELMHURST POINT COME A TAKE A PEAK of this 4/3/2 number when ALL THIS FOR SO LITTLE 3/2 1700+ SQ. FT MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
S315 X 220 LOT POOL & WATERFALL home located in the Beautiful Community of Cambridge promptedPrivacy personified wit this move-in ready 3/2 2005 River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
SFireplace Frt. & Bk. Screened Porches Greens of Citrus Hills. This one was built in 2008 and boasts 13 mobile on 2.3 acres. Wide op en floor plan w/split gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
3/2/2 Fenced Granite Counters 2,406 square feet of living space. bedrooms, island kitchen and lots of living area, storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
GasRane Generator DIRECTIONS: From 486 to South on Citrus Hills Blvd to covered back deck, two sheds & detached carport. All screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
Gas Range a a g torSr to t on C i d t 3 Buyer listens to appliances, window trtments and some furnishings pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 pleftonae Hartford&reet, torighton hanceWay g property are included. M for your private showing and fall in love.
-, -1 14111 RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663 presentation in
SEVE:l eAeullo 79-4,1O lie9 e www.ronmcevoy.remax. cor rCHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
www.Foil:dstlesligllo.cornm Certi ied Distressed Property Expert English or Spanish Email: cnadal@remax.net Email: cnadal@remax.net
RENTALS h

.. ... .....'"."'".
AVAILABLE Etrh
FAMIL Visit ,,
AFFORDABLE FAMILY HOME W WA.oC8itiuS.Com GREAT HOME....9051 E. KINGSPORT, INVERNESS
HEAR SCHOOLS GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD ,, mIacullaintained In & Out!
Freshly painted 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in nice family This 2 bedroom, 2 bath home has a spacious kitchen t Looks Like New
neighborhood near Rock Crusher school. Den, private with lots of cabinets, sunny living room, enclosed patio, 2/2/2 With Family Room
office, fenced backyard, garage and storage building. and party deck. This home has a private backyard, a .*Approx 1,701 Sq. Ft. Living
Newer roof and full appliance package including one-car garage and workshop. Conveniently located in Reshingled Roof in 2008
washer & dryer. a quiet rural neighborhood. #CoFny *Light & Bright Home Come l"-
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 # I in Citrus DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net Email. Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com Email: debrapilny@reman nel

:11M TTNff 1; 1 1i I 1 :1 1 i IMUAG Iif*M~


E2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Geistfeld tops
again at Citrus Hills
Karis Geistfeld has been
named the top sales agent for
November
at the Vil-
lages of
Citrus
Hills. This
is the sixth
time this
year that
she has
Karis
been so Geistfeld
recognized. Villages of
The Wel- Citrus Hills.
come Cen-
ter for the Villages of Citrus
Hills is located at 2400 N.
Terra Vista Boulevard in Cit-
rus Hills. More information is
available at
www.CitrusHills.com.


tal River.
They were
named the
top listing
agents for
November.
Tami and
Tyler are a
dynamic
real estate
team with
more than
10 years of
combined
experience
in Citrus
County real
estate.
Call them
at 352-794-
0888 or visit
them online


-. Gary and .
Karen Bax-
ley, Inver-
qj J ness office,
S have sur- ".6
71,passed the
$4 million |
mark in
rami Scott closed sales Gary
EXIT Realty volume for Baxley
Leaders. 2013. ERAAmerican
You can Realty.
reach either of them at the In-
verness office of by calling


Tyler Vaughn
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


at www.exitrealtyleaders.com


cnrt agenis
EXIT agents soar continue to shine
in November con t si.n o ,


Congratulations to Tami
Scott and Tyler Vaughn with
EXIT Realty Leaders in Crys-


Karen
Baxley
ERAAmerican
Realty.


McCrave
ERAAmeric,
Realty.


352-726-5855.
Meanwhile, local ERA


agent Vincent McCrave
has surpassed the $1 mil-
lion mark in closed sales
volume in 2013.
Vincent can also be
reached at the Inverness
office by calling 352-
726-5855.
ERAAmerican Realty
Sis once again proud
an to recognize the
achievements of
these fine real estate
professionals.


I


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty RE O
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR 0
r d V


I-I Amrclllt llUdnrdealty Ot
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
levels achieved its agents.


'Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney L
Realtor.-, Realtor
302 3179 A HOUSF 2879022
746-67o00 SOLD Name. L
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, s BEVERLY HILLS


3050 W. MUSTANG


I 35518 N. ELKCAM
3/2/2 706451 $163,000


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


-7


*ii~li3 [! I ii L] IIIIm KIm| liIHii Ia In

Great Buyer Incentives
Interest rates are still low
Sales have increased
Inventory has decreased
Winter residents are arriving!
WE OFFER
Complementary current market analysis
Aggressive marketing strategies
High internet exposure on our listings
Local knowledge and experience
Professionalism
WE ARE...
"THE MOST DIRECT LINE BETWEEN YOU AND A BUYER"
FOR YOUR FREE MARKET ANALYSIS CALL 352-795-9123


1974 W. ALHAMBRA
S3/2/2 705787 $108,000


HOOISS


522 S. JACKSON 9 N. WADSWORTH 52 S. FILLMORE
2/1/1 706595 $56,9003/1.5 704088 $52,500 F 2/1/1 704090 $45,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS,


d UNDER CONSTRUCTION
5406 N. CROSSGATE
3/2/3 706628 $299,000


521S.MOI
2/1/1 707140 $
FL 34465


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E3


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle wel-
comes tips from read-
ers about breaking
news. Call the news-
room at 352-563-
5660, and be
prepared to give your
name, phone number,
and the address of
the news event.
* To submit story ideas
for feature sections,
call 563-5660 and ask
for Logan Mosby.


Hapyroiiayf


weeliralJ.JIIJJ.II .IJ.JJ.Ljm .comllJ


I III




E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
Ci iIq~NiCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Time to make plans



for winter weather

Bulbs of flowers can be easily moved4 stored
all brings shorter days that trigger around Thanksgiving. Many plants in my
many plants to go dormant for the garden had frozen leaves. The crinum lily
cooler winter months. Locally, the Amaryllis and Agapanthus leaves turned
Withalachoochee River sepa- black and rotted off. These
rates Citrus County from Levy IIIIbulbs will now take a rest over
and Marion counties and winter and sprout new leaves
marks the boundary between in March after the last frost.
cold zones 9, warmer to the Late winter (around Febru-
south, and 8 to the north. ary) is an ideal time to divide
The difference between clumps of these hardy bulbs
zones is an average winter tem- before leaves emerge.
perature of 10 degrees. Each In autumn, deciduous plants
zone is further divided into a naturally lose their leaves.
cooler northern part A and a 1 Often various species have col-
warmer southern part B. There Jane Weber orful fall foliage. Crape myrtle
is an average difference of 5 JANE'S leaves may turn red or yellow
degrees between 9A and 9B in Red maple turns burgundy
Citrus County Away from the GARDEN red. River birch turns yellow
moderating influence of a before the leaves turn brown
river, lake or body of water, the difference and fall off to litter the ground with a
between 9A and 8B is also an average of layer of insulating organic material. Even
5 degrees, the longleaf pines shed older, orange
Zone 8B had a brief frost early last No-
vember and two more frosty mornings See JANE/Page EO10


Inside...


A W
Flipping Vegas
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Armchair carving could represent Roman god Bacchus


ear John: I am hop-
ing you have some
information regard-


ing the chair in
the attached
photos. It was a
gift from a friend
who had no
knowledge of its
history only that
they had re-
ceived it from an
old friend years
ago. There are
no markings of
any kind on the
underside or
back.


Interestingly,


John Si
SIKOR
ATI


any information, either
Thank you so much for
your help. I am looking for-
ward to hearing
from you. -J. C,
Internet
DearJ.C.: Your
armchair was
.' made in Amer-
A ica. The time of
production is
late 19th to early
20th century The
figural carved
korski crest rail is ei-
SKI'S other Bacchus or
Sthe North Wind.
I Both were popu-
lar themes used


one of my neighbors has a by furniti
chair of the same wood and the Unite
face carving. The style of and Euro
the seat and arms is larger lar value
and more masculine. She Dear Ji
has not been able to find statues th


ire companies in
d States, England
pe. Potential dol-
is $75 to $150.
Ohn: I have some
at I am interested


in getting an appraisal on. I
was referred to you through
the University of Florida
Fine Arts division. Can you
tell what they are worth? -
G.McB., Internet
Dear G.McB.: I think your
figures were produced in
China. The male and fe-
male figures are probably
depicting wise men or per-
haps sages. They appear to
be made of a composite ma-
terial in molds, not hand-
carved ivory There is no
specific collector interest.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: We have a
Moviegraph Projector,
16mm, Model E-946, manu-
factured by Keystone Man-
ufacturing Company of
Boston, Mass. We think it is
approximately 65 years old.


It runs and the bulb is
good. It has five
silent movies with it:
"Hopalong Cassidy Heart of
the West #563"; '"Andy
Panda Nutty Pine Cabin
#475," "Mighty Mouse
Down with Cats #778";
"Our Gang Tire Trouble
#6712-C"; and "Charlie
Chaplin the Window
Washer #6704-C." We would
See ATlTIC/Page E6
This armchair was likely
made in American
sometime in the late 19th
or early 20th century. The
figural carving on the back
represents either the
Roman god Bacchus, or the
North Wind. Both were
popular motifs for furniture
makers of that era.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Looking for hardy?


Consider Hackberry


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details. Include a contact name and phone number. Call 563-5660 for details.



-4,,7 4 9TArd^ffi y^^ -AV,11 I9ORII 0 T Ai


I ___ / IgT a bi^ -
LEE REICH/Associated Press
The corky ridges of the hackberry's bark have a subtle beauty, with crisp
areas of light and shadow evocative of photographs of the lunar landscape.


Sturdy, solid choice often overlooked


LEE REICH
Associated Press

With many trees and shrubs now
bereft of leaves and flowers, more
subtle aspects of the landscape
come into focus. A tree that many
people hardly notice captures my
full attention specifically, its bark.
Hackberry bark will not stop you
in your tracks as does the dramatic,


shiny red, peeling bark ofpaperbark
maple or the ghostly white bark of
lacebark pine. Hackberry bark pos-
sesses a subtle beauty, subtle even in
a subtle landscape. You have to rec-
ognize the bark, then stop and really
look at it.
Hackberry bark is at its best on a
clear wintry day when no leafy


See HACKBERRY/Page E7


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7
(352) 527-1820 AWe
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM




-0ijtfA 1048 W Lake Valley Ct
MLS 705655 $340,000
REDUCED & ready to sell! 3/2/2
enhanced with upgrades.

Landing, L on Wisper, L on Lake Valley
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


'rI"w 782 E Keller Ct
MLS 700636 $289,000
Fully furnished 3bd/2ba pool home
overlooking the golf course.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


Y Prudential
NDas Florida Showcase
Daekys Properties
eld Properties


364 E Dakota Ct
MLS 706039 $209,900
Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2
with caged pool.
Dir 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, Right on Dakota
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
NEW LISTING


gl|j 1jI 0 flUllOUl o U01
.I-. ::l, .I S55.900
Clean, mostly furnished, move in ready, 2
bdrm, 1.5 bath home with new roof in 2010.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086

M- oor--


,.,ill' 222 E Joplin CI 544 E Dakola CI
MLS 705515 $269,900 MLS 705742 $309,000
3bd/3ba pool home has beautiful view of Beautiful & Spacious4/4/2 on
6th Fairway of the Oaks Golf Course. Meadows Golf Course.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


1.1 I L Lu-K 5747 N Pecan Way
MLS 703408 $299,000 MLS 702757 $274,500
3/3/3 plus an office w/heated pool 3/3/3, office, pool home w/huge
on the golf course, detached garage.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Brian Murray 352-212-5913
.- -


'l ` 3652 W Blossom Dr
MLS 705861 $292,000
Beautifully maintained 3/3/3w/pool.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power


T\- t
}tfl11 2456 N Brentwood Cir
MLS 705457 $118,500
3/2/2 home with a perfect floor plan for
the Florida lifestyle.
-jl- 111` ~ ~ .. -CJ -1GA


r
,, :.: A ^ -li -



HltlL 5 5O9NFresno Ave
MLS 704188 $229,900
Don't miss this one...beautiful 3/2/3 pool
home with so many extras.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501






...-5 1PO 1'IQ 1575 W Swee Oaks Ct
MLS 705172 $139,900
Come & live a dream lifestyle in this 3bd/
2.5ba townhome, all at an affordable price!
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787


*Repeat Home Buyer
-First Time Home Buyer


and Associates' 2013 701. BEI -.First Time Home Seller
Home Buyer/Seller Studyl .-^

I. Ihh i III .Fl rI dhII e o III I I
[[, I1 ,, h I .. ..I I.. I,0, h i . il .I I I ,, I .. Ih ,,- Sh ,I h- ,, I ,S, l l I . ii h l,


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E5




E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013



ATTIC
Continued from Page E4


like any information you
can give us on value and
prospective buyers. TC.,
Internet
Dear T.C.: Movie cam-
eras like the one you have
were manufactured in
large quantities. Currently
there is very little interest.
Potential dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.
To investigate interest in
your movies, contact Ted
Hake Auctions. The web-
site is www.hakes.com.
Dear John: I was won-
dering about the age and
the value of this clamp. -
F, Internet


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dear E: I will assume
you have examined the
wood clamp for maker's
marks and found none.I
think it was made in Amer-
ica sometime during the
mid to late 19th century
Potential dollar value is
$15 to $30. As a decorative
wall-mounted objet d'art,
value is catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


000GWTH ^

REAL ESTATE, INC.
r 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
o.: (352) 795-6633
WWW AIT FXRFT COM F-n AIT F(-)AIV FRF COM


IGENT j 1 E2 SEVENIDAYSA EEK


CRYSTAL RIVER ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac Has pool &
,, 1 X jI II . .. ,
#359466 $104,900





BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage w/opener, w/rear wooden
deck, rear fenced, on corner lot, cathedral
& standard ceilings, well maintained
Newer tile, carpet & vinyl flooring
#705360 S97.000


I I
CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home or . 1 i .
O pen & .. 1 .1 .... ....... ... i ,
w indow ,,, i 1,h ,. .I. 1 I,, 1 ',I V,',
b..,765 ,$2
#706582 $82,500


SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, roof does not leak, 4 bedroom, 2
bath, private well & septic, no appliances
or outside A/C unit On 0 40 acres
#702483 $29.900


INGLIS great fixer upper, bring your
tools & imagination 1 bedroom, 1 bath w/
detached garage workshop corner lot,
convenient location On 0 76 acres fenced
#706379 $22,900


HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
garage home on 0 46 acres w/additional 2
waterfront lots go with this house Has
extra carport, screen porch & shed Has
well and central water #706017 $99,900
EIzf .--


INGLIS 2001 Skyline w/3 bedrooms,
2 baths newly remodeled, on 2 lots BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated
(2 acres), cathedral ceilings, inside 2 bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry
S1. 1.. 1 1 t . T 1; ;. .... new central A/C, carpets, interior paint,
ci ...... .... .. .. ... ceiling fans w/lights Fenced yard eat,
I --ii"..1 ,s iiclean, bright, & airy #700983 $89,900


Special to the Chronicle
This wooden clamp likely dates from the late 19th century. It's probably not worth much, but it might serve as a nice
conversation piece.


PINE RIDGE
ESTATES







GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR

Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflordla-house.com




Investors Realty S.i P
of Citrus County, Inc.
i tiwb at:www yflorida-houseco


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY
no 1 2 master suites, apart
ment lower level Upper level
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane
shutters, security system, updated
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of
seawall, bo i jus
waiting for, f466,000


mpeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 fam rm den/office, 2+2 car Preserve & tter Creek i parcels or a
'Itotal of 19+ acre Scenic mixture of
$379,000 $499,900 Isawgrass and trees $59,000





CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE! MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS uTST DNC WATERFRONT REDESCE
1u Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool homen an acre
12 at(60 x300+ wt),a auresqu
corner lot with mature oak trees and
sting with major oak trees Charming l o b V w maintained,
brick home, first time offered, some ,, docks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
original fixtures and fireplace still in Updated roof, A/C, kit, windows, every
place Large det gar w/workshop, thig meticulous maintained Priced
seawall $179,000 $169,000 sooo rightat $399,000!


BEST


Realtor




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HACKBERRY
Continued from Page E5

canopy obstructs the sun, and
when the sun is low enough to
glance sideways off the gray
bark's arranged ridges. Take a
look at the way the bark's corky
ridges create crisp areas of light
and shadow evocative of those
sharp, achromatic photographs
of the lunar landscape.
Hackberry, although native
throughout much of the U.S., is
not all that common a tree. Pock-
ets exist here and there, often
near waterways.
Hackberry's appeal
goes beyond bark
Hackberry is also worth atten-
tion in other seasons. It bears a


delectable fruit that tastes like a
date. Unfortunately, the fruit is
only the size of a large pea and
much of it is pit. Still it's worth a
nibble.
Birds also appreciate the
fruits. Birds that feed on hack-
berries include cedar waxwings,
mockingbirds, American robins,
bluebirds, yellow-bellied sap-
suckers, northern flickers and
quail. The berries continue to
hang from the branches well
into winter They are among the
preferred winter foods for wild
turkeys.
Elm-ish qualities
In many respects, hackberry is
similar to the American elm, to
which it is related. Although nei-
ther plant has colorful flowers in
the spring or blazing foliage in
autumn, both these bottomland
trees tolerate diverse soil condi-


tions. Hackberry tolerates even
a greater range of environmen-
tal conditions than does the elm,
laughing off drought, pollution
and wind. Both trees also are
easy to transplant, and grow
rapidly
The quality for which the
American elm is most loved, and
which hackberry also possesses,
is form. Both grow to become
large, vase-shaped trees, majes-
tic on their own or divine when
planted in rows on either side of
an avenue, over which their
upper branches meet to form a
natural cathedral.
Pests? Not to worry
American elm gets Dutch elm
disease, which has decimated
the species as a landscape plant.
Hackberry, besides having at-
tractive bark and tasty fruits, is
immune to Dutch elm disease.


Hackberry is prone to a cou-
ple of diseases, notably nipple-
gall on the leaves and witches'
broom on branches and twigs.
These afflictions cause some
disfigurement, but not the death
of the plant.
I'm not suggesting planting
hackberries now in the way
American elms were planted in
the 19th century, up and down
every street and in every park.
Such planting, especially if it
were just a single hackberry va-
riety Windy City or Prairie
Pride, for instance would in-
vite disaster A disease that
found fertile ground could run
rampant and denude the
landscape.
I do suggest that you keep an
eye out for hackberry trees, es-
pecially now, and admire them.
And, occasionally, plant one.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E7


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical
professionals contribute
their expertise to columns
in Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education sec-
tion./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week
from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec-
tion./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Religion sec-
tion./Saturdays


REALTY GROUP
REALTY GROUP


Seilizingl Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
*2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
&_ BrentwoodResales (352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

w Sw.Tr3 a tR uBILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777





DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
This expanded and upgraded Martinique model in Terra Vista is listed as a 312 but can
e. asily be converted into a 4/2. Pocket doors open to bedroom#2,24x11 roomwLth 2 huge DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
ar customized closets. Bedroom #3 was extended 5 feet and features Bahamian shutters & This home comes with all the luxuries you'd expect from this gated community. 2 Beautiful immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage Villa in
is tray ceilings. Master bath features a shower and a large soaking tub. Bahamian shutters bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2-car garage, high ceilings, enclosed lanai with hot Brentwood. Open great room, a sunny enclosed lanai. Guest
a grace the living area and a gas fireplace warms it during the cooler nights. Bath #2 tub, plantation shutters, triple slider. Your backyard overlooks the water fountain bathroom is accessible to both guest bedrooms. Minutes to golf
c features a customized glass enclosed shower. Tile throughout the living area and and it backs up to the park. This home has been built with lust the right amount of course, pool, sauna, hot tub, exercise room at Brentwood recreation
0 upgraded cabinets and granite counter tops in kitchen. MLS 707132........... $249,500 space, not too big and certainly, nottoo small MLS 707118......................$304,900 center. M LS 707172...........................................................................................$129,900


i --1.0,.,1....
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB
Thislovely Terra Vista32homeisthe ideal place for anyoccasion whether seasonal DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD breakfastnook, formal d g, family room, greatroom and lanai overlookg thelake.Th home
use, retirement or full time living From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large Coee oo beautul home that is stated on an oversized home se. Very well Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath sl plan home Brenwood. Great room, dag room offers a spt bedroom plan with an open floor design. Flowg rooms designed for everyday ving
yardtoformaldiningareaidealforyourgatheringsthishomehaswhatyou'vebeen maintained. 2 bedrooms, plus a den, which can be used as a third bedroom. Some of the spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook, inside laundry room and a 2-car & entertaining. Sit on the lanai orn the pool and enjoy thesounds from thewaterfalls your ry
lookingfor.Letothersmaintaintheexteriorwhileyouenoythesociallifethatcomes features this home has to offer are extended lanai,summer kchen, extra storage closet, garage. N monthly maintenance fee wh this sgle family home. Access to the Crus Hlls own corner of parade located the Hunt Club section of Terra Vsta. You wll feel the utmost of
with~ MLS 70387$288,000 surround sou nd and many more. MLS 7052...........................................................$209,000 and Terra Vista amene s, too! MLS 701 406 .................................... ..... $123,000 luxury, peaceful & safe in th gated community. MLS 70479 .......................................$379,000



TOWNHOME, 2BED,
":', -:-' :i2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
Contemporary, beautiful
2/2.5/1 townhouse in
gated community of
J .. Brentwood. A spacious
dining room/great room
combination. All bedrooms
i -- upstairs. Half-bath down-
EXCETIONL AN FABLOUSstairs. Inside laundry, tile &
dsr b d hi edomplu den bah2cr 535sq ftpoo home in the DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS ;--. screen lanai..off of living
exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen DETACHED VILLA, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished detached room. Social membership
- great space for entertaining. Enloy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened Nice 3 bedroom home in the gated Community of Terra Vista. Open floor plan backs up to villa 2 bedrooms 2 baths and 2 car garage. Open floor plan with lots of | .- included #6651 ....$1,000
lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. i5375.... .......................... $2,300 privatee preserve area. Social Club Membershp included. 1231 .................................$1,300 space. Social membership is included. #2121........................................$1,100 "_-- '




E8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L -, :4a^^


ANDREA DOMANICK
Ln' v 'Ejns S/ z/


r"^r


I


6:


4,
A


A,



SL .


n A&E'\ "Flippit \eas'Li."
j dn(le(I [hollle$ :"o-s tile
Lj. \ VJ,. Iley Iet a second
hlijltte in the litldt ,,'rejl
e,tjte I [I\ %eItor Sto.tt nt ie\
jnl hi t I inte'rit 'rlde -.iter \\i re. Alle
A iiitle.\ JIJ.\ 't lonst'e-, "id the
Xin:te\.\ t 111ti* '%.$ti11n` jld oAten-
\iljtile lberi,:,fjIitIes li t\e led the
rejl.its TX $t -'_It'I t:, betoit le olne 'it
A& E', i i,.: p l piiLwr s1h,. ,\ L er the
f .iii '$e i : k t'iir 'e .i% '''i
FLIP Page E10


Scott and Amie Yancey. from A&E's
"Flipping Vegas." check on progress
of one of their remodeling projects
during a taping of their show.
CHRISTOPHER D;VARGAS TI- i_: .-., -,


__ S


VEGAS HOUSE FLIPPING

SHOW GEARS UP FOR

IL aCI NEXT SEASON




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I -
I -.


.1
-.
I,
/-

Iat~~


"THI HOUSES
THAT ARE
THI WORST
TO BUY ARE
THI ONES WE
SAVI FOR TVm


SCOTTYANCEY
" c m_ y


*N i-I.

% -.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E9




E10 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


FLIP
Continued from Page E8

The Las Vegas Sun visited the
couple onsite during a flip in the
city's Summerlin community,
where they were filming their
upcoming fifth season.
Sun: Since you first started
doing the show, when the hous-
ing market had just tanked, how
has its recovery since then af-
fected whatyou do?
Scott Yancey: We were origi-
nally in land development, and I
would commute to Central Cali-
fornia. In about 2007, when
things officially tanked, we were
going to move down to our house
in Cabo and take a few years
until the market came back. But
what ended up happening is we
sold our house and were about to
leave, and I overheard someone
say that you can buy a house in
Vegas for $36,000 that would rent
for $900 a month. So we ended
up buying houses for $36,000 to
$42,000, when no one else was
doing it
There was such a huge supply
vs. demand, we were killing it.
And then, years later, people got
into it, and the supply and de-
mand changed. And it got a little
more difficult to go after houses.
But we've been doing it enough
and finding properties so many
different ways that we still were
able to get a good amount of
volume.
Now it's changed again. Now
there's excess inventory, and the


days on the market are taking
longer
What do you do to compete
now that the market is more
crowded? Is it just a question of
lowering prices?
Amie Yancey: I believe "nice"
sells, even though Scott fights me
on it
I put extra finishes and
touches on them that I mean,
nobody in this neighborhood, un-
less they were keeping the house
or was a homeowner improving
it, would have added a double-
stacked cabinet (like I did to this
house today)...
To me, I want the buyer to
have an experience when they
walk through that door and be
like, "I could stay here for life.
It's perfect. Somebody put a lot
of love and extra care into this
house."
I mean, I feel like I'm giving
birth to each of them. I know
Scott has timelines to turn them
around fast, and we butt heads.
He sees the bottom line, and I
fall in love with the transforma-
tion. I can't stop myself; I really
need rehab for designers.
How does flipping houses in
Las Vegas compare to other
cities?
S.Y: Everybody loves Vegas,
and there are a lot of pluses to
being here, but the market has
gotten tighter now for people to
buy homes.
Other cities, like Detroit or At-
lanta, or places like Florida and
Kansas, it could be said that they
have better opportunities in
those places. But do they have


the entertainment, the dining,
the weather that we have here?
So you should pay a little more to
be here.
Tell me about some of the
worst houses you've flipped.
A.Y: The one we're doing
today we call renters from hell.
They had like 20 people living
in the house. It had cock-
roaches. The cabinet doors
were falling off, there was trash
everywhere.
S.Y: The houses that are the
worst to buy are the ones we
save for TV because we know
there's a great storyline with it
and the after will look that much
more fun. So we typically pick
the ones that are the most
effed up.
A.Y: Which is easy to find in
this market because a lot of peo-
ple got burned bad.
S.Y: They get mad at the bank,
and they trash it. It's usually the
former owners.
What's the biggest thing view-
ers might not understand about
what you do what are the
misconceptions?
S.Y: What the people see is us
stressed in a house on an
episode. What they don't see is
us doing five others at the same
time.
A.Y: The main thing is that in
TV land, they speed everything
up. They think, "Oh, wow, it's a
breeze. They come in, and it's
done." It takes a long time to put
them together, to pick out the fit
and finish and work on the
quality They only see a glimpse
of it.


JANE
Continued from Page E4

needles in October The leaves
of native vine Virginia creeper
turn a spectacular scarlet red
in fall. Oakleaf Hydrangea
leaves turn from dark green to
burgundy as the days grow
shorter and cooler
Liatris is a native wildflower
that has a tall stalk covered in
dense, small, purple flowers
once a year in late summer or
early fall between August and
October Each growing season,
the basal clump of stiff, grass-
like leaves stores energy in an
underground corm, a solid
bulb-like swelling at the stem
base. The original plant dies
off by winter The leaves wither
and decay by December The
flower scape tall, stiff, brown
and dry marks the location
of the subterranean corm.
If there are still seeds at-
tached, scatter them nearby, as
conditions are perfect there for
the parent to flower Liatris
seeds can be broadcast directly
in a sunny location and left to
sprout naturally in spring. It
takes several years for a liatris
seedling to get big enough to
flower Soil must be sandy and
well-drained.
To enjoy the Liatris flower-
ing season, gardeners should
plant groups of five to nine
corms in a cluster 4 to 6 inches
apart. After flowering, seeds
develop with a fluffy parachute


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

to help them disperse on the
wind. You can easily strip off
the seeds to store in a paper
bag or envelope over winter in
an unheated garage or shed.
To harvest liatris corms, find
the tell-tale scape and insert a
straight garden spade about 6
inches from the base. Plunge it
6 inches deep and lever the
sandy earth so the corm
emerges. There should be no
green leaves and little or no
roots.
Shake off the sand and let
the corms dry Transport them
in a shallow cardboard tray or
box. Plant liatris as soon as
possible in a sunny, well-
drained location. Plant in
groups for a good flower dis-
play next season.
Dry corms can be stored in a
dark, frost-free but cool loca-
tion. Corms must be planted by
the end of January before the
time and temperature when
they would sprout naturally in
nature.
Liatris is a good nectar plant
for smaller Florida butterflies.
A bag of Liatris corms makes a
unique holiday gift for avid
Florida gardeners.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thou-
sands ofnative plants. Visitors
are welcome to herDunnel-
lon, Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sql ft "New Construction'
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Medical Office
Call (727) 515-6571


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL REGENCY PARK CONDO-INVERNESS, FL
4BR/3BA home with over 3,000 sq. ft of living in 2BR/2BA condo with Fl rm. Laminate flooring.
Sugarmill Woods. $150,000 MLS#702836 1 cargarage $19,900 MLS#706979
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours (3523 2-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com '


AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Fran Perez7
41 511N LI- ni,,H..,y B .- I 1H,11.. FL344 5 I:'.'h
F R V Office: 352-746-3600 1,2r ( I3 1 5
= ,:,,(352) 586-8885







TURN KEY HORSE FARM. Gated, tree-lined circular driveway. Divided by
two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely expanded ranch home set up as mother/
daughter. Expansion built in 2006 with its own garage & 1200 sq.ft living
space. Main home built in 1989 could use some updating but very clean, 5
bdrms 3 baths & 2-car garage. Relax on lanai overlooking caged solar-
heated pool. Gorgeous view of 4 stall barn & separate tack & feed rooms.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Aluminum trees set to sparkle


Kitschy holiday

classics are now

collector's items

MEG JONES
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

MADISON, Wis. Lucy Van Pelt
coveted one in the Peanuts Christ-
mas special. So did apparently a
million people who bought an Ever-
gleam to turn their living room into
a space-age winter wonderland.
Like a TV antenna's wad of tinfoil
magically coming to life, aluminum
Christmas trees sparkled and
glowed in living rooms and front
windows during their heyday in the
1960s and '70s. No need to traipse
out to a tree lot and wrestle one
home tied to the car roof. No nee-
dles littering the carpet. No need to
worry about the family dog drinking
out of the stand.
Then, like any fad, they wore out
their yuletide welcome and were
forgotten in attics, tossed out in the
trash or sold at garage sales for
50 cents.
Now, they're hip again in a retro
"Mad Men" way And sought after
Some aluminum Christmas trees are
selling for $1,000 on eBay, the Mil-
waukee Journal Sentinel reported.
Tapping into nostalgia for a time
when Christmas trees looked as sil-
very and shiny as an astronaut, the
Wisconsin Historical Society Mu-
seum opened an exhibit Nov 26 fea-
turing 20 Wisconsin-made
aluminum trees.
Billed as the largest public exhi-
bition of Evergleam aluminum
Christmas trees, the exhibit will in-
clude rare 2-foot tabletop trees, a se-
lection of 4-, 6- and 8-foot aluminum
trees, accessories such as rotating
tree stands and multicolored light
wheels, as well as advertising and
packaging. The exhibit also includes
trees in gold, green and even pink -
the holy grail of Evergleams. Be-
cause few people bought pink trees,
few were made, which now makes
them very rare and valuable.
"I'm pretty sure this is the largest


See TREES/Page E13


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Wisconsin Historic
Society Museum
assistant Kylie Her-
nandez works on
setting up some
22 vintage Ever-
gleam aluminum
Christmas trees at
the museum in
Madison, Wis. The
Wisconsin Historic
Society Museum
on the Capitol
Square is opening
an exhibit of
what's being billed
as the largest pub-
lic exhibit of Ever-
gleam aluminum
Christmas trees.
The museum will
display the trees,
including a rare
pink tree, as well
as accessories like
revolving tree
stands and light
wheels, original
packaging and
advertising.
MIKE DE SISTI/
Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


City mulls demolition costs



Officials say destroying vacant or run-down homes sometimes the only realistic option


JAY M. YOUNG
Evansville Courier
& Press

EVANSVILLE, Ind. -
There's nothing subtle
about a demolition.
But no other piece of the
solution to Evansville's va-
cant housing problem re-
quires residents to make
such a nuanced and
thoughtful evaluation of
risk versus reward in the
expenditure of public
money
That's because local tax-
payers are footing the bill
for demolitions in a
roundabout way
Demolitions are paid for
out of the city's roughly $12
million annual allotment
of riverboat money, but in
most cases the property
owner doesn't reimburse.
The lost money can't be
called a direct loss to tax-
payers because it comes
from a gaming-funded rev-
enue source.
But while a 1995 City
Council resolution states
riverboat money cannot be
used to fund local govern-


ment operating expenses,
the cash source does pay
for capital fund expendi-
tures. Every dollar spent
for demolition without re-
imbursement is a dollar
that could have been spent
elsewhere.
"You could buy a police
car with it. You could pave
a road with it. You could
buy a greens mower for the
(city-owned) golf course.
There's all kinds of pur-
chases you could do," City
Controller Russ Lloyd Jr
told the Evansville Courier
& Press. "If that money's
spent and then not reim-
bursed, then it's just gone."
The amount lost isn't
chump change.
The city budgeted $1
million for demolitions
last year, from which it
drew money to tear down
157 structures. The Evans-
ville-Vanderburgh County
Building Commission sent
out $874,749 in bills. The
paper flow with contrac-
tors is slow enough that
some of those billings
could represent 2011
demolitions.


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The key number is
$22,380 the amount ac-
tually reimbursed to the
riverboat fund by property
owners whose houses
were demolished.
"It's pretty low," Build-
ing Commissioner Ben
Miller acknowledged.
But Miller argues that
the lost riverboat money is
well spent.
"I think the neighbors of
those houses would
agree," he said. "Demoli-
tion of unsafe structures
raises property values in
the neighborhood and
makes for a better life in
the neighborhood. It's
going to reduce crime, and
police and fire runs."
And, after all, demoli-
tion is a capital fund ex-
penditure, too.
"It attaches to the cost of
the land to make the land
available for reuse," Lloyd
said.
One thing is certain:
These are not nice houses.
Before a house gets to
the point of demolition,
Building Commission offi-
cials must persuade a
judge in an administrative
code enforcement hearing
that it is downright unsafe.
They must prove it meets
at least one of six criteria,
including that it consti-
tutes a health or fire
hazard.
The hearing officer may
also rule in favor of a prop-
erty owner who contests a
raze order, or he may
amend a demolition order
to a repair order if the
owner presents a plausible
redevelopment plan and a
performance bond. Raze
orders granted by the
hearing officer can be ap-
pealed in a separate hous-
ing court that meets once
monthly under the aus-


pices of Vanderburgh
County Superior Court.
For the emotionally in-
vested property owner, the
realization that a house
should come down is like a
dagger to the heart.
Phyllis Yarber's father
built the house at 716 Tay-
lor Ave. in 1919. There is a
certain poignancy in the
way she contemplates its
end.
"I was born in that
house," said Yarber, 73. "I
really thought I'd die
there."
Yarber did everything
she could to stay in the
home, even spending
years there without air
conditioning and heat.
Eventually, she moved out.
The place is a mess today
"I can't go by the house. I
can't even go on the
street," she said. "It hurts
too bad."
Yarber, who now lives in
an Evansville apartment,
isn't trying to sell the
property
"I wouldn't want some-
one at this point to buy it
except to tear it down," she
said. "I would really love
to see it torn down and if I
could afford it, that's ex-
actly what I would do."
When an individual
fights the judgment that
his property must come
down, the result nearly al-
ways leaves a bad taste in
someone's mouth.
Evansville attorney
Terry White represented a
man who spent four years
fighting demolition of sev-
eral houses he owned
side-by-side.
White said his client
persuaded a judge not to
allow Building Commis-
sion officials into his
houses, but he acknowl-
edged that the agency


eventually succeeded in
getting the houses demol-
ished because of exterior
problems. He said his
client ran out of money
and could not, in the end,
repair the houses as he
had intended.
Miller, not surprisingly,
had a somewhat less char-
itable take on it.
"The neighborhood
around (White's client's)
houses was very glad the
property was down," he
said.
Demolitions cost taxpay-
ers in other ways, too.
If a property owner
doesn't pay three consecu-
tive seasonal installments
of county property taxes,
his property goes to tax
sale. Under state law, un-
paid bills are converted to
liens on the property in vi-
olation. It is a common oc-
currence with bills for
demolitions, given that
demolition costs often
amount to more than what
a house was worth before
it was torn down.
City and county officials
are well aware that any-
one who wants to buy a
property at tax sale must
pay at least the minimum
bid necessary to recoup
taxes. And that figure in-
cludes local government-
imposed liens applied to
tax bills.
So the Building Com-
mission typically does not
attempt to collect on the
fines and administrative
fees associated with dem-
olition costs. The supposi-
tion is that the fines and
fees would go unpaid and
would be converted to
liens on properties that
are, in all likelihood,
headed to tax sale.
Saddling a property with
extra liens under those


circumstances would only
make it harder to sell at
tax sale, Miller said. It's
hard enough already to
find buyers for vacant lots,
especially those in Evans-
ville's inner-city
"You want to get it in the
hands of someone who will
at least mow the grass,"
Miller said.
If a house fails to find a
buyer at tax sale, it goes to
a Vanderburgh County
Commissioners auction,
where properties often
sell for bottom-dollar
prices. Unpaid govern-
ment liens are "expunged"
- removed. The county
auditor's office pegs this
year's losses in property
tax revenue from auc-
tioned properties, late
payment penalties for
those taxes and obliter-
ated liens at $2 million.
That money would have
gone to the county's taxing
units municipal govern-
ments, schools and li-
braries as paid taxes.
A raze order does not
stop a property from being
sold at tax sale or at auc-
tion, and most savvy buyers
take the time to inquire
about such things before
raising their hands to make
bids. The raze orders are
recorded and are picked
up on title searches.
"We do our best to notify
the potential buyers of
that," Miller said.
"We're looking at it from
the perspective of, 'It's an
unsafe building, and it
meets the code require-
ments that it needs to
come down.' We've deter-
mined that it's one of the
most unsafe buildings in
our categories, so we're
taking it down. We don't

See COSTS/Page E13


E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TREES
Continued from Page Ell

collection of Evergleams
since a 1960s Christmas
tree show," said curatorJoe
Kapler, who hasn't seen a
pink Evergleam come on
the market since 2005.
Manufactured by Mani-
towoc-based Aluminum
Specialty Co., which made
housewares and toys, Ever-
gleam trees were designed
to be light enough for
women to lift boxes con-
taining the stand, a wood
pole covered in aluminum
foil, 90 to 100 branches in
paper sleeves and a colored
light wheel. Adorned with
the phrase "Aluminum For
Lasting Beauty," the pack-
age proclaimed them the
"safety tree" because they
were nonflammable.
Maybe it's odd that a
state with a ready supply of
the real deal Wisconsin
is sixth nationally with
950,000 evergreens cut and
sold each year would be
the leader in tannenbaums
so fake they make no pre-
tense of resembling any-
thing that grows in nature.
But that's what happened.


A Chicago company
came up with the idea and
began manufacturing alu-
minum trees in 1958. How-
ever, Aluminum Specialty
already had lots of big cus-
tomers, such as Sears,
Woolworth's and Mont-
gomery Ward, and when
the Manitowoc firm
started production in 1959,
it quickly became the in-
dustry standard. Plus the
Chicago company charged
$75 for a 4-foot tree. Ever-
gleams flew off the shelves
at 10 and 25 bucks a pop.
Aluminum Specialty
"experimented with all
kinds of new products
every year, and it just ex-
ploded," said Kapler.
"They were kind of like the
Coca-Cola of aluminum
Christmas trees."
Jerry Waak was working
for Aluminum Specialty in
1959 when the company's
engineering department
came up with a working
model, which was displayed
at that year's New York toy
show The response was
good and the Manitowoc
firm went out on a limb,
quickly ramping up produc-
tion of Evergleams, sched-
uling round-the-clock shifts
and filling a new 100,000-


square-foot warehouse with
aluminum trees.
"From the first year to the
second year, sales in-
creased four times. People,
once they see it, they were
like, 'Hey, we want one of
those, too,"' said Waak, 83,
who still lives in Manitowoc.
"Originally we thought if we
did three years, we'd get our
money back"
Demand stayed strong
and over a dozen years Alu-
minum Specialty churned
out more than a million
Evergleams. They were rel-
atively easy to put together,
taking 10 to 15 minutes, be-
cause branches could be
stuck in any hole on the
base. In fact, the boughs of
finely cut foil were derived
from tiny strips of metal
called chaff dropped by
World War II planes to
scramble enemy radar
Like any fad, aluminum
trees ran their course, and
Aluminum Specialty
stopped making them in
the early '70s. In the last
decade, surely fueled in
part by the enduring affec-
tion for 'A Charlie Brown


Christmas," they've be-
come cool again.
Because of the state con-
nection, the Wisconsin
Historical Society began
collecting them in 2004
and put together a small
display at its museum on
Madison's Capitol square
in 2005. The last exhibit
was four years ago. This is
the first time 20 of the
trees will be displayed.
"We've been collecting
trees over the years be-
cause it's a unique Wiscon-
sin story and they're really
popular People love to see
them," said exhibit de-
signer Doug Griffin.
Waak, who spent 25
years with Aluminum Spe-
cialty before it closed in
the late '90s, donated a few
items from his personal
collection for this year's
exhibit He's flabbergasted
to see something that sold
for $10 half a century ago
now in a museum.
"If you would have said
that to us back in 1959,"
Waak said, "we would have
said 'You don't know what
you're talking about!"'


COSTS
Continued from Page E12

really even look at who
owns it."
The Building Commis-
sion tears down proper-
ties owned by local
government, too but it
doesn't seek reimburse-
ment, Miller said, because
those bills would only be
absorbed by taxpayers.
On one such property
recently, code enforcers
were forced to again
judge risk versus reward
in the expenditure of
public money
The Building Commis-
sion sought and obtained
a raze order on a dilapi-
dated county-owned
structure at 600 E. Mary-
land St. The building,
which was inspected by
Courier & Press re-
porters before its demoli-
tion last summer, was an
eyesore.


A large, uncovered
opening facing Garvin
Street revealed a haphaz-
ard collection of dis-
carded appliances, boxes
and debris spilling into
the street. Junk teetered
precariously in lapsed in-
sulation over the first
floor, threatening to fall
through. A strong, un-
pleasant odor emanated
from within.
A door covering the
structure's opening was
at one time intact, neigh-
bors said, but it came off.
The Building Commis-
sion's raze order was in
the pipeline at the time.
That's not unusual. Bid-
ding out the work, signing
a contract, and process-
ing purchase orders and
invoices takes months.
The dilapidated
county-owned structure
finally came down in mid-
July weeks before it
was due to be sold at auc-
tion. As an empty lot, it
fetched $3,100.


324 Camellia, Inverness
Sit on the porch of this impressive
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Inverness and walk to the hospital,
college, schools, shopping and
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caged pool surrounded by lush
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$249,900 MLS# 704204

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6758 W Stonewall Pt.,
Homosassa
Affordable Luxury here! Enjoy
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on a private lot near shopping and the
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7724 W Glendale Ct., Dunnellon
$139,900
Don't just drive by; call for an
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MLS # 704339


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2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706156 REDUCED $57,500 705705 REDUCED $144,900
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4/2/2 Poo001, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $157,900 705665 REDUCED $229,900
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Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
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FEATURED HOMES OF THE WEEK


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E13





E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds

Li ~ ~ 111*<~'?-r~ti~ ; ^. -^ & .


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 5635966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







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INVERNESS
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Floral City 12x56 MH
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ft lot.$21,000. Fixer 'er
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Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
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Great for horses or
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6 models to choose
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800-622-2832 ext. 210
for details


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NICE HOME
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Fenced yard, 1500
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INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
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car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 1/1 SWMH
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or Year Round
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BY OWNER
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2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013
Hernando 2 bedroom.
1 bath. screened room,
carport and shed. Lake
Access. Ceramic bath.
fully furnished,
no lot rent.$28,888
bahecker@msn.com for
photos or 989-539-3696
for appointment.
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
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Camp Area 2Br/1 Ba
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lot close to river. Just
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2BR/1BA with FL room
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rm. w/ washer& dryer.
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55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
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$6,900. obo
352-634-3984


FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, IBA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
Newly renovated MH
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Move in Condition &
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Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
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Results in
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PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?
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3/2/2....................... $750
2/2/1........................ $700
2/1................$500
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CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
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(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, All Util. Incl',d.
$575 mo + Sec.,
352-634-5499


CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $500 mo.
(352) 212-7922
or 352-212-9205

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815

SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD




.1


Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442(352)
637-6349
Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available
Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Em-
ployer.


iJ. ,M:& l-'&f






CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1'%, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+ sec. clean,
quiet. 828 5th Ave. NE.
Apt. # 1. 727-455-8998
727-343-3965





CRYSTAL RIVER
Commercial bid for
rent High Traffic lo-
cation on 44 Next to
manatee Lanes, 6,000
sf Avail. Immediately
(352) 584-9496


INVERNESS
Business/warehouse
rental units. 800 SF,
zoned Commercial.
400 ft off of Hwy 41
on E Arlington. Call
for info 352-726-9349





Brentwood

2/21/2I townhome,
full appliances,
heated pool, Citrus
Hills Social Member-
ship included.
$850/mo
Pru. FL. Showcase
Prop. 352-364-1947

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Carport, Extra
Clean. (352) 613-4459

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/Den, Fully turn..
W/D, $850 mo 1st/sec
(352) 228-9192


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!





INVERNESS
2/1, W/D Hk -up, No
Pets, $550 mo. + Util.
(352) 220-4818




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


Brentwood
& Terra Vista
of Citrus Hills
Homes & Town-
homes. Furnished &
unfurnished.
Starting at $1000/
per month, social
membership
included
Six months minimum.
Terra Vista Realty
Group.Call 746-6121




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm,
Move in $1350, Be in by
Christmas, 442-7794
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $750/Mo 1st/lst+
dep 352-634-3862
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront, 3/2 $895.
212-2051,220-2447
HERNANDO
Riverlakes Manor 2/2
fenced yard $650 mo.
Sst+Sec. 352-464-0647
INVERNESS
3/2/2 1st. mo. Free Of-
fice pool, '07, $850.mo
lnfo@rickybobs.com
352-613-5818
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands,
Close to Downtown
Immaculate, No Pets,
(352) 400-5723
INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2
$850/mo & $500 Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fen'd back
yrd. $850, 352-212-4873
Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Waterfront home
for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1,100 per month;
first/last/security;
annual term. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.




HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
3,200 Sf. kitchen ready
up to code, Ig. parking
lot. 1305 Hwy 486
(352) 584-9496




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802

Two Large Rooms for
Rent $125. wk. call
Ray 828-497-2610




64 Westview, Panacea,
FL.32346 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Hardwood
floors,recently remod-
eled,2 sheds, 2 car
ports. $60K.Off Otter
Lake Rd. 850-962-3336

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFL4R(
REALTY ONE

BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785

Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


AUCTION:
1/9/2014- 10 OAM
@ 302 N 7th St.
Orlando, FL.
Business Property for
vehicle Repair on
.34acres
w/warehouse
Sharon Sullivan:
954-740-2421
Visit: www.irs
auctions.GOV













4 Woodmill Ct.
Homosassa, FL 34446
Gene Beghtel 260-241-3393


Next Generation Realty
155 Douglas St., Homosassa FI. =




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856












MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293



2/1 with carport &
Florida Rm. Screen pa-
tio & fenced backyrd.
Central air heat. W/D
included. $575/Mo
(352) 422-2433


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan
Million Dollar +
Producer!
Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com




ForSale'
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290


VO1


SALE
G HmOI

Great Starter Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage,
Lease or cash
$2,000 down
$748. month
877-500-9517


MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage florida room
furnished or not
Lots of upgrades
Executor now accepting
offers
502/693-7904



Duval Island
Very nice clean, turn.
starter or retire home.
2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility
room w/ shower. No
flood zone. Reduce to
$46,900 352- 678-7145


Beverly ill


IAMI SIL;U I I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


jsvmrf


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/Mh"
REALTY ONE




4BR/1/% BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RMNC
REALTY ONE


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
NEED LISTINGS
Sold All Of Mine
Market is good
Call me for Free
CMA
I also have some
Owner Financing
Available for buyers
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office











BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bpowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments
W CHEAP
PROPERTY
2/1.5/1 Beverly Hills
nice neighborhood
**$28,900. Cash**
352-503-3245

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


E1












MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

















SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855









Ed
Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


eeeeeeeeeB


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Owner Financing
10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007
Homes of Merit, $135k
Call Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
352-302-6082




Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993

Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.corn
"To view
my properties"




BUYING HOMES
In Need Of TLC
Nature Coast Homes
(352) 513-4271



** 5 ACRES **
On Paved Rd w/
power. $59,900
E Shady Nook CT
Floral City
(860) 526-7876



Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688



Citrus Co. Minutes to
gulf. Series of islands
called Ozello Keys.
Middle of FL State
Preserve. Live off the
land. Food/Garden
Protein/salt water.
Sacrafice @ $44,900
727-733-0583


Get Results


In The Homefront


Classifieds!


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013 E15




E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2013


-:l|.n' Ih,'-' i.I,' n .. ,lh -.J ,l .I l n i n. nlq VI l
.. I I lln ,n .. h,.n .. u h i l ...iI ln. I
0 n' I I 1 II n .." n I', i n l bIn I ,a11 I...J,:I,
MIln. =hul:i.: ASKING $110,000
Ci" 11 iri r'JernA 362 Ji0 0/2. uf Jb.2 2Y 666S


SSERVING 0.
' CITRUS 'ESI&~fl f^
COUNTY HOME
FOR
OVER 37 I N
1EAR W.me Ma* SUiNDA Ss

Elmailf:f J info~city l fl www ^1itruscountycentury^ l.co


PICTURE PRETTY .' 30 ACRES IN GATED RURAL COMMUNITY
......... ,,,,, *,, ....,,, ... ... 1 CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT WITH PERIMETER HORSE TRAIL COUNTRY LIVING WITH CITY CONVENIENCES
S 11 n. l., l ,.n .... B L O W O U T S A L E i, i,,,,), I.:., i ,,, :.,,Ii, I I: rn Tr ii,, i il ,,i, i r,,,, ,, iiu
... I,,',,, I,. ,,m,II I ,',,l..I r.,l,,.,',,Ih ., ,' I H ^Il,, I1" .l ll.....lll'l U ] : '. *b ,.il l 1!. 1ll ,:l,:.lu: I "l",', .'" ..:... .:.1^ :n '.'u ..:.'l .' R I : n' n 1^' :',!' ) I,: lf l. r.. .f ll '.. ,:h i ,:] I ,:lj M: ,-: 1:11.. 1 b l'l '.
i~1 ,,, 1. t I .:... t j.... I..l..: jq V.:..V l.: b i iH IIh.'
nh ,I,,', ,n. .....nl l,, ., n, nn h. :.l l iII h.lJl m ii / I' I I'I...';: I~rr ,I.I- II.. Inr .nn-r-n.I ir,l. -. I 1 ..,.n n'nn. ,-arJ, Inl, ',.a:lr-n nl-3r a.ijl'
1.1F,,. r..rrrrr-rr Y r..rrr-arr
111 ,-,.,- IH,-.,I1,Hll*I i-h-, 11,-hr Ir.irMi.'ar-'" .. ..,I n r ri rr-r i.r.nrlnriI Iar- i a' .: I .l r,,hl n:...i ..II. r .. h:... ..Iarr rr m'. lirri ij j i li. '.
rih =-|:.|i- ASKING $68,900 Ml'. =i:i:i :ii GREAT BUY S419.000 rhi.: =1 -.:.. $255,000 Ml.- =/imi "in. $124,500
Pit D, ,352' 212 7280 and looking lot olleis Cii Jm Il,.t.jm 4222173 EXTRA ACRE AVAILABLE FOR S 11000
I'ra,,i iritan. ,i,,,i /22 t idi,,.m Call Ouade Feeset 352302 7699 tNuo thr p-it-in .commutiii Call Dois Minet 352 344- 1515








* On The Oaks Goll Course 4 BEDROOM MOBILE IN LECANTO ZELLNER
J h. 'ail pool I,,:n' II iiii iir.r1l iurrrrr, n'nni, l I n' Ii aInini ,1 aril]Lnln,:i ,i r r r $67,000 $78,000 1
* _:LIlI Lr.arrI I ,ir. a air- Ihr.III i I I rlrlnr .: .nnnrli ,ani, l.L i i.an, rnn. i ; ...'n II I ,1 i .a ni IIn.r n I 'nl r-nI.M' ii rrn r an $ 6 7 ,0 0 n i ,0 0
* .i'i' id(: In.:n' ii.n r 'u r'h i n-i _rLr.ini I.ii.ar nirulih Iaiir rr.a. 'niri n im.,:l W -i i, V ''i runrii irl.air ri 1"r"J i~ jh I ..nn ir- ,:Pair .r ilir-ri iii: rlr..r- i.r. VVI~ir ..rn nn. r i H m. ai ,ili
M Ii = 1:i.Ii:i/' $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 .i:i irr in a,,.i in. i : i.iir.ai,:J .m i- 1 iai. r.rr 'l. a i. r.r li .:ani iir. i i:.i.. i i :.r:il.:.n I.:.. ii, i..:.'.r ..i iNVi 3Ti
Jeanne o 1 illatd Pickie/ 352 212 34110 Mi_ = ii/i:.i6h $69,900 ri,, ri-,,:,iv .ir-i 1i,. i,:, 1 1 i.,i $10,900 i:.ii l ir. :,i ,6i,:,'" ., i.,i,',:,.,i
iitit ciliuscountisold comn Call Stefan Stuat! at 352-212-0211 Ruth fiedeick 1 352.5636866 Mati Patsons 352:634 1273


* ~. ,i ....... . ill I' 11-1 H .I.. .
I_.l~.,fi .I ir I v:, .: , '. 11. I .:l,,,f i ,,,,
* .aI .l lll_ I h.a i ...a.' ii-i.li. i II i 'I .III_ F
* lI1HII, Hill I M fMV fR HI'
MI :, =71:n,':l:Ui:, $232,747
Jeanne ot LI'illaid Pickiel 3522123410
iiuii CiliusCouni Soldcon,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PERFECT FOR RETIREE OR SNOWBIRD

.h l .. I .' ,I ~ I...h. I d.. h I ,

' i, I II.. 6.. I, I I , I I II lh I, h l l ,- , h-
,, I ,- I II', i.. I I I, ,,I .: I .h l ,M I I I
ri: = ii' ASKING $45,900
Pit Dl,352'212 1280
r..-ii hi;,n(/ii I j i 221i #td~r .i ,;.jm


MOVE-IN CONDITION
AND AFFORDABLE
Ih ,, 1, ,N ,II N, *,IIN, ,,I I ,I I,
r, I r*hII, I Ih,''''I N ',l I, .11, ,NI ,, II I,.

l; i:,.i ASKING $68,900
Pat Dails 1352212/2 1280
I'ie, listing .11c2/patdai s corn


I ..:., .. .. -. ? '
PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB
I -i,: i. l 1 i.,n, n h. :,in, .i n-..
ir1. .:.a raIn n .l .irI an.nn h. nll'i. nnn r.:., iri


Mli.-. =iii:. .:. ASKING $125.000
Call Nanci Jenks 352.400 8072


CITRUS HILLS
POOL HOME-GOLF COURSE
I,, l ir .lJ;h hl '., l l, I r,1 ,ll ,:,,l nnrI Ih,I- :

IJl.l l :., :,11 ,,:.I[ M I_ _3 = 1l:l :':l, :
PRICED RIGHT AT $224.900
Call Ouade Feesei 352302 7699


I. V_ -1-.. _;=A
MAINTENANCE-FREE
LIVING AT IT'S BEST!
'pF. I c, PA wi..l .111 i ,,il, IiI .iail


Mi = /ImI hII.
laWanda Watll 212 1989


* A o. 1 ,l h.. .:..:.I I. .
* _H I- .,:.l J, In 'III:....:.v.:
::. l,,, .:.:. 16 11 ld.n.,d il n.j; .:I l
* NVV ;ii,,i,
Mi .=iih:i :''. $205,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
It',I',I. CitiusCountr'Sold. corn


$64,900

k id~l s i. ilii:i ll III n~ I 6 l .) ,:il h :l l I I,: I b 1,11,:l :
h i. f nn irlinl I.ri.J. i.rn.-.rr-.r. I.i .:n 1 rir.:l:


-.a.l In i. il Irl .al Mn'n lI IiM G = i *.'
Mai}' Paisons 352634.1273


ON 73 +/- ACRES
li lll n 3 IJn...r i lln I ,ll II I. I l lr lllr In
m611. ill; p~.a;'Irin- .airri inin nv- i v.I II'
i'mlh l airh I n ,:n-.l Il.:.I. 111 n In-
. i in.1 11,1Jn1: i n-n -n i l,: J i -h 1 11 h .:1 1 : .i.: i

Mi = h/i'.:I ASKING $850,000
Call Jim Motion to lout 422 2113


n~~~~~~~~~~~ hh, .IIh ,,ql .i,,I., .. ...........
11 11 1 111 ,, ,,II h l h, I lll


ASKING $199.900
Cii AIt it Sni di' 352 476 8727
i4 ti, l.ii 703905


. IIII_. I I IIII I I. II I I I .I.. : ..I l l r.l. r l.r. I
lhl .,,I,,.11, ,,ii ,11 ,h lh I iii. h h l- h l



r ii: -i:ii ASKING $68,900
Pit Di, ,352 212 7280
'4.in h.itni ai ,l a,2 fttdi.i m