Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03324

Full Text

Eason's time: Pirates' diversity helps buoy hoops squad /B1

U- \U~ A


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 128


Due to production errors, the
year is incorrect on the folio
lines of today's Scene section.
The Chronicle apologizes for
the mistake.





After months of delay,
Refuge Day returns to
Three Sisters Springs
The Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge will celebrate
its 30th anniversary since its
establishment in 1983 during
Saturday's 19th annual
"Refuge Day" celebration.
The event will run from
9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Three
Sisters Springs. Admission is
free. Parking will take place at
Kings Bay Plaza with constant
free shuttles to Three Sisters
Springs starting at 9:20 a.m. and
last one returning at 3:30 p.m.
Pedestrian and bicycle access
to the property will be allowed.
This year's event will be
highlighted by IBEX Puppetry
(crafts, parade and music) and
several mermaids swimming in
the springs. There will be photo
ops to pose with the mermaids.
Bluegrass and other musi-
cians will be performing all day
and barbecue food will be
available for purchase.
The new pavilion at Three
Sisters will be opened and his-
torians will be on hand to share
some facts of the role of King's
Bay in Citrus County's history.
The boardwalk around the
springs will be opened for at-
tendees to watch the swimming
mermaids and, possibly, mana-
tees. Manatee presence inside
the springs is subject to high
tides and cool weather.
The event begins with a
Cherokee smudging ceremony.
Three Sisters Springs will host
wildlife shows/exhibits including
live raptors, a musical garden,
manatee research booths, and
endangered species puppet,
drums and kites parades. Other
family activities include manatee-
research interactive games, a
marine tide pool touch tank,
build-your-own bird kite, a giant
manatee puzzle and other
wildlife-identification activities.
Representatives from a variety
of nonprofit organizations and
local and state outdoor agencies
will be there to help promote
Citrus County's bountiful natural
resources. Some of the agen-
cies are the Florida Wildlife
Commission, Florida Park
Service, Florida PublicArchae-
ological Network, and Florida
Yards and Neighborhoods.
Visitors will also receive the
latest updates on new and up-
coming facilities at Three Sis-
ters Springs at the refuge booth,
joined by the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
personnel who will discuss the
planning process of the upcom-
ing wetlands construction in-
side the property.
For more information, call
352-563-2088.
Special to the Chronicle


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A study cautions that declining baitfish populations along Florida's saltwater coastline could
threaten a number of shoreline birds such as brown pelicans like these on King's Bay in Crystal River.
Species including reddish egrets and roseate spoonbills rely on a variety of small baitfish popula-
tions to survive.



Audubon warns



of shorebird die-off


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer

Audubon Florida and the
Pew Charitable Trusts
are sounding the alarm
about a delicate and
looming ecological imbalance
that, if left as is, could spell the
demise of some of the state's
iconic shorebirds.


The two groups, which collaborated on a
study about the important links between the
abundance of forage or prey fish and birds
such as reddish egrets and roseate spoonbills,
are also urging the state to take measures be-
fore it is too late.
"What we are saying is that we are con-
cerned the state's coastal resources espe-
cially the estuaries where a lot of the baitfish
live are under stress," said Ann Paul, who is
with Audubon Florida.
Paul said fish such as sardines, mullet and
See Page A2


Inverness celebrating the sounds of Christmas

Annualparade begins at noon Saturday; streets closing at 11 a.m.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Whatever
your favorite Christmas song
may be, it's sure to be repre-
sented at this year's "Christmas
Melodies" edition of the annual
Inverness Christmas Parade.
Beginning at noon Saturday
and concluding around 2 p.m.,
Christmas melody-themed floats,


marching bands, decked-out eques-
trian units, perky elves, dour
grinches, frosty snowmen, Mr
and Mrs. Santa Claus on a dou-
ble-decker bus and lots and lots
of Shriners will make their way
through the streets of Inverness.
Grand marshal this year is for-
mer Citrus County Tax Collector
Norine Gilstrap.
"We have about 75 entries this
year, with some new organiza-


tions as well as old standbys,"
said Jeff Inglehart, Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
special events coordinator
The parade route is the same
as in years past from Montgomery
Avenue, by Citrus High just west
of downtown, traveling east down
Main Street into town. Bring a
lawn chair and come early
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
deputies will be shutting down


the streets at 11 a.m., Inglehart
said. Look for detour signs for al-
ternate routes through town.
Prior to the parade is the an-
nual Jingle Bell 5K run and 1-
Mile Walk. Registration begins
at 10:30 a.m. at Wallace Brooks
Park in Inverness and the race
begins at 11:30 a.m.
Registration is $30 per person.
For information, call 352-637-
2475 or email info@drcsports.com.


Classifieds........C9 Community ... .C5, C6 Lottery Numbers ...B4
Comics .......... C8 Editorial ........ A12 Lottery Payouts .... B4
Crossword ........ C7 Entertainment ..... A4 Horoscope ........ A4 Movies ........... C8


Obituaries ..... A6, A7
TV Listings .......C7


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out in


House

Budget OK'd
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Battle-
fatigued and suddenly bipar-
tisan, the House voted Thursday
night to ease across-the-
board federal spending cuts
and head off future govern-
ment shutdowns, acting after
Speaker John Boehner
See Page A8


After four

days in a

coma, man

survives

flesh-eating

bacteria
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
What started as a painful
knee came close to costing a
Homosassa man his leg or
possibly his life.
"I guess I was almost a
goner, because when I came
to, my daughters were here,"
said Tom O'Brien. "They
don't live here. They live in
Arizona and Ohio. And it did-
n't even mean anything to me."
A retiree who resides in
Sugarmill Woods, O'Brien
had just come out of a four-
day medically induced
coma, during which time 14
different physicians and
dozens of medical staff at
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center fought to save his
leg, which was being destroyed
by flesh-eating bacteria from
an unknown source.
The health crisis started in
late August, as O'Brien de-
scribed it.
See Page A8




A2 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013


SHOREBIRDS
Continued from PageAl

herring flourish in estuar-
ine brackish water, but
that human activity is af-
fecting those habitats and
causing a lot of stress.
"We have to manage our
water use properly, our
fertilizer use and even
when you walk your dog,
pick up after them," she
said.
Paul said animal and
human feces all end up in
underground water or in
the rivers, which ends up
elevating nutrient levels
and causing other issues
down the line.
In a report titled "Fins
and Feathers: Why little
fish are a big deal to
Florida's coastal water-
birds," biologists exam-
ined the crucial link
between birds and the di-
verse array of small fish
that are a critical food
source.
The report warns that
declines in the popula-
tions of these fish could
threaten imperiled birds
such as brown pelicans
and black skimmers.
"In Florida, our envi-
ronment is directly linked
to our quality of life and
our economy," Julie
Wraithmell, Audubon's di-
rector of wildlife conser-
vation, said in a press
release.
"This report shows how
important baitfish are to
Florida's coastal birds, en-
vironment, communities
and economy Fisheries
policy must consider the
ecological and economic
vitality that hinges on
these smallest of fish."
According to Audubon,
few regulations limit the
amount of forage fish such
as sardines and herring
that are hauled out of
Florida's coastal waters
each year
Forage fish are used for
bait, food and commercial
products ranging from fer-
tilizer to fish meal.
The group says that in
2012, seven main types of
forage species including
sardines, scads, herrings,
ballyhoo and mullet ac-
counted for 20 percent of
all commercial catches off
Florida. Commercial fish-
ers, for example, caught
more than 9 million
pounds of mullet that year,
mostly for their eggs,
which are sold around the
world as a delicacy


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The groups' report sug-
gests fishery managers can
help conserve the state's
forage fish and its natural
resources by accounting
for the needs of predators
such as shorebirds when
setting fishing rules..
The report said bird
conservation efforts his-
torically have focused on
other threats such as habitat
loss, with less emphasis on
ensuring prey abundance
and availability With many
birds already pressured by
a steady loss of habitat,
this report reveals a new
and critical conservation
gap at a time when leaders
can act before it's too late.
While the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) has
drafted species action plans
for 60 bird species war-
ranting protection, rules
and permitting changes to
protect those species will
not be completed until
2014. The plans and rules
are slated for final adop-
tion in Spring 2015.
Audubon Florida and
Pew would like to see the
state do the following:
Account for the forage
needs of coastal waterbirds
before expanding current
forage fisheries or allowing
the development of new
forage fisheries.
Ensure sufficient abun-
dance, variety and sizes of
forage fish species to meet
the needs of coastal water-
birds and other wildlife
when setting management
limits on forage fisheries.
Identify and map for-
aging areas for nesting
coastal waterbirds and areas
subject to forage fisheries;
analyze potential overlap
of these areas and activi-
ties; and consider conser-
vation and management
options to avoid or mini-
mize potential conflicts.
Protect forage fish
habitat such as mangrove
and seagrasses, as well as
water quantity and quality
in the estuaries.
According to the report,
residents and visitors to
Florida who watch birds,
dolphins, marine turtles
and other species had an
economic impact of $4.9
billion in 2011 alone as per
state wildlife commission.
In addition, the commis-
sion found that nearly one
in five Florida residents
participate in some form
of wildlife viewing. Be-
tween 2006 and 2011, the
number of people who vis-
ited Florida to view wildlife
increased 22 percent.


Former Ray joins CCSO for Shop With A Cop


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
The 11th annual Shop With A Cop event was held Tuesday night at the Inverness Walmart. Each school
involved selected eight students who need a little extra help around the holiday season. The children are
given a meal, paired up with a law enforcement officer and then get $125 to spend on whatever they want
for themselves, family members or friends. Walmart donates $2,500 for the event, with the rest coming from
community support. Pictured, from right: Former Tampa Bay Devil Rays catcher Toby Hall, Dave Williams and
sheriff's office Commander Buddy Grant wrap presents. Hall also played for the White Sox and Dodgers
during his career, which spanned from 2000 to 2008. Hall and Williams were honorary deputies for the night.
The program, coordinated by Deputy Joe Faherty, was held in Lecanto last week and will be done in Homosassa.


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LOCAL






Page A3-FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,2013



TATE0&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


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Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Republicans slate
Christmas Social
The North Suncoast Re-
publican Club will have its
annual Christmas Social
from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 14, at Sugarmill
Woods Country Club. All
registered Republicans are
invited.
Tickets are $15 per per-
son and can be purchased
from any club officer listed
on www.nsrc-gop.com, or
call Bill Connery, president,
at 352-382-0811.
Historical walking
tour available
Beginning Friday, Dec.
20, the Citrus County His-
torical Society will provide
escorted walking tours, last-
ing approximately 90 min-
utes, of the historical
highlights of Inverness.
This tour includes moder-
ate walking levels.
Participants will learn
about the history of Inver-
ness and while experienc-
ing the small-town charm of
the area.
The tour begins at shortly
after 10:15 a.m., starting
from the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum in down-
town Inverness.
Reservations are re-
quired. The cost is $5 per
person, and $2 per child
under 16. All proceeds go
directly to the Citrus County
Historical Society.
Group size is a maximum
of eight persons per tour,
and no more than one child
younger than 16 per adult,
making for a maximum of
four children younger than
16 per tour.
Call Karl Seidman, tour
escort, at 352-344-1531.
Come out to
celebrate Kwanzaa
The public is encour-
aged to celebrate Kwanzaa
from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 28, at the Old Court-
house, 1 Courthouse
Square, Inverness. Admis-
sion is one nonperishable
food item.
For information, call Lil-
lian Smith at 352-637-3572
or Carol Bowers at 352-
270-3866.

Holiday
Health officials: Boy,
4, died of meningitis
A 4-year-old Pasco
County boy who quickly be-
came ill and died had con-
tracted bacterial meningitis,
health officials confirmed
Thursday.
Pasco County Health De-
partment spokeswoman
Deanna Krautner said tests
confirmed Amonti Saunders
had the infection.
All those who were in
contact with the child have
received antibiotics as a
precaution. The day care
center he attended was
closed on Monday for
cleaning and children who
were in contact with him
have been vaccinated.
From staff and wire reports


Man to face charges in stabbing case


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

INVERNESS A man
who last year allegedly
stabbed a woman several
times before shooting him-
self and crashing his vehi-
cle into a tree while
fleeing sheriff's deputies
has been returned to the
county to face a charge of
premeditated murder
Levi Andrew Humes, 30,
of East Haynes Lane, Inver-
ness, was arrested Wednes-
day on an active Citrus
County warrant in refer-


ence to an original
charge of attempted
first-degree murder
Humes had been in
custody in Duval
County
On Dec. 17, 2012,
Humes was re-
ported to have Levi
stabbed a 35-year-
old woman several times
at a home on Patience
Lane east of Inverness, ac-
cording to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
(CCSO. Humes reportedly
fled the scene in a white
Ford Explorer


I


I Deputies spot-
ted Humes on
Gospel Island
Road shortly after
Sthe incident.
Humes reportedly
then shot himself
and crashed the
iumes Ford into a tree.
Both Humes and
the stabbing victim were
airlifted to Ocala Regional
Medical Center, where the
victim's wounds were sta-
bilized and Humes under-
went surgery
On Dec. 27,2012, Humes
was admitted to Jack-


sonville's detention facil-
ity, where he faced an un-
related charge of armed
sexual battery, according
to jail records. According
to Duval County Court
records, Humes was sen-
tenced to 15 years for the
charge.
According to the CCSO,
Humes committed the
Duval County crime on the
Friday before the Citrus
County stabbing incident.
Duval County officials
awaited Humes' release
from Ocala Regional Med-
ical Center to arrest him


for their case.
CCSO, in turn, acquired
a warrant for its incident.
When Humes was re-
leased from jail in Duval
after sentencing, he was
served with the Citrus
County warrant and trans-
ported to Citrus.
In the Citrus County
case, Humes was charged
with premeditated mur-
der despite the fact that
the victim survived, be-
cause the attempted mur-
der was alleged to be
premeditated. No bond
was set.


Park lights up season


Fort Cooper

becomes winter

wonderland

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS
ollow the lights during
the annual Nights of
Lights event beginning
tonight and running through
Sunday, Dec. 15, at Fort
Cooper State Park.
Hours are from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
nightly Admission is a new,
unwrapped toy, a non-perish-
able food item or cash to bene-
fit Citrus United Basket.
Also, pet food donations will
be accepted for the county ani-
mal services program.
The annual event, hosted by
the Friends of Fort Cooper, fea-
tures hundreds of luminaries
that line the winding driveway
leading into the park, plus nu-
merous lights and other holi-
day decorations, turning the
park into a winter wonderland.
"Volunteers have been work-
ing on it for weeks," said Di-
anne Drye, park ranger and
event coordinator
Each night, guests can enjoy
cookies, hot apple cider, cocoa
and coffee, as well as make
their own s'mores "while sup-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
James Crink of Inverness, a volunteer with the Friends of Fort Cooper State Park, is silhouetted against
the sky and water Thursday morning as he plugs in one of the mechanical, lighted ornaments at Fort
Cooper State Park. Crink and a host of other Friends volunteers and park rangers have adorned the
park with hundreds of thousands of lights for the annual Fort Cooper State Park Night of Lights
beginning tonight. The event runs from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and will be open Friday to Sunday evening.


plies last," Drye said.
Nightly entertainment is
from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. with a
group from The Villages pre-
senting Christmas stories
tonight and Sophie Robitaille
singing traditional Christmas
songs Saturday And, of course,


Santa will be there both nights
to hear the wishes of good boys
and girls.
On Sunday, Santa takes the
night off. However, in his place
Santa look-alike Frank
Miller will entertain with his
saxophone.


Fort Cooper State Park is at
3100 S. Old Floral City Road,
Inverness. For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-0315.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-
2927 or nkennedy@chronicle
online, corn.


Man arrested for alleged threats, spitting


Victim said

he was

threatened

with ax

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

BEVERLY HILLS A
49-year-old man accused
of spitting on a state em-
ployee was arrested
Wednesday, according to a
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice report.
Lee Miller, of Beverly
Hills Boulevard, Beverly
Hills, is charged with one
count of aggravated as-
sault and one count of ag-


gravated battery on a De-
partment of Children and
Families (DCF) employee.
According to the report,
Miller was approached by
the DCF employee in an
effort to contact another
resident. After the inter-
view, the apparent victim
- the DCF employee -
tried to leave the resi-
dence when he was con-
fronted by Miller
Reportedly, Miller
began to curse at the man
and demanded he leave
the residence or he was
going to get an ax and cut
his head off.
The DCF employee told
Miller he would get in his
vehicle and leave. At that
time, Miller is said to have
blocked the path to the ve-
hicle and would not let the


man enter his ve-
hicle, the arrest re-
port stated.
Miller then
started waving his
hands and cursing ,
at the man, to the
point that he re-
portedly backed L
the employee into ee
the street.
According to the report,
the victim felt that he was
in great fear due to the
heavy traffic on the road-
way and believed that
Miller was going to push
him into the oncoming
traffic.
The report said the DCF
employee then pulled his
flashlight from his side
and demanded that Miller
back up. At that time,
Miller coughed and spit in


his face, with the
spit hitting him di-
rectly in the back
of the throat and
soaking his glasses.
The man was then
able to get to his
vehicle.
Investigators
Miller made contact with
Miller, who appeared agi-
tated and under the influ-
ence of a narcotic,
according to the report.
Miller told the deputy that
he advised the DCF em-
ployee to leave his prop-
erty and did threaten him
with an ax, but that the ax
was in his bedroom and
he never pulled it out, the
report states.
The investigator then
asked if he spit at the man
and Miller replied, "I spit


when I talk, I can't help it,"
the report states.
Miller advised that he
needed emergency med-
ical services for an earlier
incident where he broke
his hand.
He was transported to
the hospital for treatment.
Miller was arrested and
transported to the
Citrus County Detention
Facility
His bond for the aggra-
vated battery charge was
set at $5,000. Miller's
bond for the aggravated
assault charge was set at
$3,000, for a total bond of
$8,000.
Contact Chronicle re-
porterEryn Worthington at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online, com.


Readers can vote for top local stories of 2013


Chronicle

The Citrus County
Chronicle is asking
readers to vote for the
local stories they feel
have had the greatest
impact in 2013.
We have compiled a
list of nominations,
but feel free to write
in suggestions.
We are also solicit-
ing comments and
plan to publish some
of the more thoughtful
comments in our cov-
erage Dec.31,2013, of
the readers' top picks.
Vote or write in the top
5 picks and make com-
ments on any or all.
Readers can submit


multiple entry forms.

To vote:
Clip out this
coupon and circle
picks or fill in the
write-ins.
Readers may also
send in a letter or
note with the coupon
that contains their
comments.
Email marnold
@chronicleonline.
com with the top five
picks and comments.
Those who want
to vote online can visit
www.chronicle
online.com/reader
poll and fill in selec-
tions and comments
there.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Readers Top Picks 2013 J County government resignations
Check five of these or write in picks. J Jasmine Lee
J Duke Energy tax bill fight J School district drops from "A" to "B"
J County Fire MSBU J Crystal River Mall loses JC Penney and Belk
J Edward Peters takes his two young daughters J Ferris Groves receives state environment award
J CMH dispute and possible sale J Duke stops build on Levy County nuclear plants
J Sale of Seven Rivers hospital J Two mothers charged in deaths of their children
J One Rake at a Time
J The loss of Babb Adams Write ins:
J Duke Energy closing CR3_______________
J Brad Thorpe retires/unretires_______________
J Executive Director for TDC position search_____________
J Economy improves as new stores open
J Duke to build natural gas plant in Citrus Comments (send additional notes on another sheet of
J Commissioner Scott Adams' first year paper if more space needed):
J Susan Hale resigns from school board
EI Inverness/county disagreements_______________
J YMCA coming to Citrus County_______________
J Flood insurance rates expected to soar_______________
J Transportation Center opens___________
J Port Citrus feasibility study presented
J Medical Corridor on CR 491 advances Name____________
J Citrus landfill fires (include if you would like comments published)


4




A4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Step up and do your best
to get things done this year. High en-
ergy and plenty of good ideas should
help you reach your goals. Your re-
sponses will be quick, and your actions
will impress onlookers.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Push
your ideas, discuss your intentions and
show confidence in your every move.
Your enthusiasm will help to motivate
others.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Fol-
low your heart and your dreams. Cre-
ative pursuits that have been carefully
thought out will be successful. Your
ability to get things done will enhance
your popularity
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Change the things in your life that
haven't been working. Look at your op-
tions, speak up about what you want.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Net-
work, socialize and interact with your
peers today Get involved in organiza-
tions that have something to offer you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Pa-
tience, compassion and supportive dia-
logue will help you gain respect and
avoid criticism. Don't let a job you've
been asked to do get you down.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today
calls for a diversion. Take time to pursue
new activities or cherished hobbies. Put
romance at the top of your list.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- The
value of certain partnerships will de-
pend on the ideas you present. Have
alternatives ready to offer but be willing
to compromise.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Network,
join in the festivities and share your
thoughts and capabilities. Don't be
afraid to be a little different to encour-
age an enticing partnership opportunity
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Make your
move with confidence and dash. Your
intellectual appeal will be your ticket to
the spotlight.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't say
anything that you may regret. Size up
your situation and offer a kind word or
gesture.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Add a little
excitement to your life. Travel plans or
signing up for an interesting course will
lift your spirits.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Good
fortune will come through interaction
with people of different backgrounds.
Find ways to make personal improve-
ments or to indulge in a trip that will
bring you satisfaction or joy.


ENTERTAINMENT


HBO leads
TV categories with
9 Globe nominations
NEWYORK- HBO led all
television networks with nine
Golden Globe nominations on
Thursday while Netflix, which
didn't exist as an original pro-
gramming source until February,
snagged six nominations -
more than stalwarts ABC, CBS
and NBC.
Starz and Showtime also had
six nominations each.
The Golden Globes set up a
potential victory lap for the well-
regarded final season of "Break-
ing Bad," which was nominated
for best drama series and
earned Bryan Cranston a nod
for best actor. After sweeping the
drama awards earlier this year,
Showtime's "Homeland" was
shut out for the major awards.
High-profile actors in HBO
movies about music figures
earned some notice from the
Hollywood Foreign Press Asso-
ciation. Michael Douglas and
Matt Damon were both nomi-
nated for best TV movie actor for
their roles in "Behind the Cande-
labra," and Rob Lowe had a
supporting actor nod. Al Pacino
earned an acting nomination for
playing music producer Phil
Spector in an HBO film.
Netflix's political series "House
of Cards" earned a nomination
for best TV drama, while Kevin
Spacey and Robin Wright were
nominated for their acting in the
series. With the release of its in-
augural season in February,
"House of Cards" represented
Netflix's first foray into TV
programming.
Another Netflix series, "Orange
is the New Black," earned Taylor
Schilling a nomination for best
drama actress. Finally, Jason
Bateman earned a comedy nom-
ination for the Netflix remake of


Associated Press
Auction house worker Ollie Williams poses Thursday in
London with a plaster study mold of the head of Star Wars
character R2-D2. The mold, which was used for "Star Wars: A
New Hope," will be part of Bonhams' upcoming entertainment
memorabilia sale on Dec. 18. It is expected to fetch between
$9,800 and $13,000.


"Arrested Development."
Starz often finds its original
programming overlooked, but
broke through this year with its
films "Dancing on the Edge" and
"White Queen."
Sundance Channel got two
nominations for "Top of the
Lake."
Don Cheadle of "House of
Lies" will try for a second straight
Golden Globe as a TV comedy
actor, competing with Bateman,
Jim Parsons of "The Big Bang
Theory" and Andy Samberg of
"Brooklyn Nine Nine." Sentimen-
tal favorite Michael J. Fox,
whose NBC show hasn't been
doing well in the ratings, earned
an acting nomination for his
work.
The best showing for the com-
mercial broadcast networks,
which were completely shut out
of the awards given out earlier


this year, came in the best com-
edy category. There, CBS' "The
Big Bang Theory," ABC's "Mod-
ern Family," NBC's "Parks and
Recreation" and Fox's "Brooklyn
Nine Nine" will compete with last
year's winner, HBO's "Girls."
Zooey Deschanel of Fox's
"New Girl" was nominated for
best actress in a comedy, along
with last year's winner, Lena
Dunham of "Girls."
Edie Falco of "Nurse Jackie,"
Julia Louis-Dreyfus of'Veep"
were also nominated, along with
Amy Poehler of "Parks and
Recreation," who is co-hosting
the Golden Globes with Tina
Fey.
Louis-Dreyfus actually earned
two nominations one for
'Veep" and one for best actress
in a movie comedy for "Enough
Said."
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Dec. 13, the
347th day of 2013. There are 18
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 13, 2000, Democratic
presidential candidate Al Gore con-
ceded to Republican George W.
Bush, a day after the U.S. Supreme
Court shut down further recounts in
Florida.
On this date:
In 1862, Union forces led by Maj.
Gen. Ambrose Burnside launched
futile attacks against entrenched
Confederate soldiers during the
Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg;
the soundly defeated Northern
troops withdrew two days later. (It
was during this battle that Confed-
erate Gen. Robert E. Lee is said to
have remarked: "It is well that war is
so terrible, or we should grow too
fond of it.")
In 1918, President Woodrow Wil-
son arrived in France, becoming
the first chief executive to visit Eu-
rope while in office.
In 1937, the Chinese city of Nan-
jing fell to Japanese forces; what
followed was a massacre of war
prisoners, soldiers and citizens.
(China maintains as many as
300,000 people died; Japan says
the toll was far less.)
Ten years ago: Saddam Hus-
sein was captured by U.S. forces
while hiding in a hole under a farm-
house in Adwar, Iraq, near his
hometown of Tikrit.
Five years ago: Oklahoma quar-
terback Sam Bradford won the
Heisman Trophy after guiding the
highest-scoring team in major col-
lege football history to the national
championship game.
One year ago: U.N. Ambassador
Susan Rice withdrew from consider-
ation to replace outgoing Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.
Today's Birthdays: Former Sec-
retary of State George P. Shultz is
93. Actor-comedian Dick Van Dyke
is 88. Singer Ted Nugent is 65.
Thought for Today: "My theory
is to enjoy life, but the practice is
against it." Charles Lamb, Eng-
lish essayist (1775-1834).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


City


H L Pcast City


Daytona Bch. 70
Fort Lauderdale 79
Fort Myers 79
Gainesville 67
Homestead 79
Jacksonville 63
Key West 80
Lakeland 75
Melbourne 74


Today: Northeast winds 10 to 15
knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop. Tonight:
East winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters a
moderate chop.


167/56 0.00a"1 IA/NiA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK c day
forecast by: I
.... "-." ........... TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 72' Low: 56
._O- ~Mostly sunny and milder.

SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High:':i Low:65"
.-,i Partly sunny and warm.
... ............. SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: '7V Low:
A 40 clice O1 a laler in he day

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
"Ar of 7 pm al Inverness
UV INDEX:


72/61
/27
73/55
72
8
0.00"
T"
51,67"
44.73"
5


0-2minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very hiqh
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.23


DEW POINT
Thursnav at 3 p.m. 62.6
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Chenopods, nettle, palm
Today's count: 5.1/12
Saturday's count: 5.5
Sunday's count: 4.8
AIR QUALITY
Thursday observed: 38
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES .-..
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
.MORNrINGI (AFTERNOON)
12/13 FRIDAY 00:01 07:21 13:44 18:52
12/14 SATURDAY 01:04 08:14 14:30 19:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TON IGHT 5 33 pm
0 SUNRISE TOMORROW 7114 am.
0 (_ 0 MOONRISE TODAY.. .. 3.04 p.rn
MOONSETTODAY .. .. 3:47 a.m.
Dec17 Dec 25 Jan 1 Jan7
BURN CONDITIONS
Today' Fire Danger Rating is- LOW. There is no burn ban.
For mora information call Florida Division ol Forestry at (352) 754 6777 For more
,' ,, ,, i~. -... s v sit thf Division cof Foresty's Web sit
I' ,, II i I I i ,,- ., I'
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
folaws:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday andior Sunday.
ODD adtesses may water on Wednesday anrd/or Saturday.
Hand waterng with a shut-ofl nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
limre.
I .-'_, ,u ,r. T ii.-' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. e r,e ,,i p:.nq. rr, ,, qu3itV tfor additional
walenng allowances.
To report vlations, pl ease call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal
River U 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Ctrus County 4 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay 'At Mason's Creek
THURSDAY
City High Low
Chassawizka' 325 am 0 6 It 3-41 p n 0 2 I 11 2 a m 0 1 11 9:2t1 iO 2
Crystal River" 6:36a.m. 7.2 t- 6:51 p-m. 6,4 fl 12:34 p-m. 0,4ft-
Wdthlaco'chee* t2.28pm, 2.7t. 11,24pm. 3,1 fl 6,44 am, 0.4ft. 6:15p.m.1,3It
Homoassa"'" 324a.m, O.7ftL 450pm, O.,3 1- 12:09pm.-O.Oft 9:24p.mrnO,l t


H L F'cast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Verp Beach
W. Palm Bch.


Gulf water
temperature

74

Taken at Aripka


LAKE LEVELS
Location TUE WED Full
Withlacoochee at Holder Enler Enter 25.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando Enter Enter 35 52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness Enter Enter 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City Enter Enter 42.20
Lev ls reported in feet abo sea level Floodi stae to r lakes are based on 2 33-year fklo
the mean-annual lovd, whIcIh has a 43-precent cwiwce ol being equaled o e,-eeded in
any one year Ths data s gained from the Southwest Floria Waler Managemie OiDisrct
and is su~Le.I to revision, In tW event wi the Dt iri-c or '.- ..' 'i,, *, ...* ,


THE NATION
I I,:,, I ni- ', .I L1


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
THURSDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austinl
Baltimore
Billings
8irmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.V.
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus. OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indilanapoli
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


WED
H L Pep. H
23 12 .04 25
41 21 47
39 26 47
47 31 54
29 17 36
54 32 55
31 22 39
36 28 35
46 26 51
23 9 27
27 22 30
19 11 20
18 7 .01 17
57 34 58
30 21 42
50 24 51
19 -3 28
24 3 36
20 8 .13 28
44 7 37
20 11 30
22 3 01 26
4B 26 50
56 15 42
30 2 30
16 5 01 27
46 37 03 58
25 5 36
28 21 35
25 16 29
56 36 63
21 2 30
55 32 56
45 23 43
69 47 63
30 12 41
45 23 47
18 -2 28
19 1 15
56 38 60
51 35 56
38 18 48


THU
L Fost
8f1
24 fl
33 pc
42 pc
23 pc
40 Sh
30 pc
22 cd
44 pc
19 pC
15 pc
12 sn
.1 II
47 pc
32 PC
37 pc
22 cd
29 p,
26 cd
22 i
27 pc
1 PC
36 Shl
19 pC
17 pc
20 pc
37 pc
29 i
24 pC
14 pc
45 sh
27 pc
38 pc
35 i
47 p-
32 r
38 r
23 fl
7 pc
54 pc
46 pc
35 cd


KEY TO CONDmIONS: c-cludyr; dr-drtuile;
f-fair. h-haazy; pc-party cloudy r-rain;
rs=rain/mow mix; as=Umy; sh=showa r;
an smw;t thunderstorm; w-widn4
Weather CeocIl. LP@2013


WED THU
City H L Pep. H L Fost
New Orleans 55 45 65 59 od
NAwYorkCily 30 23 30 25 pc
Norfolk 40 29 46 30 pc
Oklahoma City 41 16 46 27 sh
Omaha 32 6 30 9 pc
Palm Spings 72 46 69 48 ,
Philadelphia 30 23 34 25 pc
Phoenix 74 55 67 42 pc
I',rnu..h 22 10 ,01 32 27 pc
Porland, ME 21 10 .01 26 3 pc
Portland, OR 39 25 ,09 45 35 sh
Providence. RI 27 20 30 16 pc
Raleigh 44 27 50 35 pc
Rapid City 45 10 31 15 pc
Reno 32 5 40 18 pc
Rochester. NY 18 9 .01 19 12 sn
Sacramenlo 58 27 58 35 pc
Sal Lake Cily 25 5 25 9 pc
San Antonio 55 39 58 43 sh
S-,D,'-,,., 67 47 59 48 I
=2 ,lF......,.',,, 54 38 54 46 pc
Savannah 60 39 61 50 pc
Seattle 41 31 ,19 46 41 sh
Spokarne 30 22 32 27 pc
St, Louis 40 11 38 25 r
St.Ste.Mane 17 0 ,12 6 -5 It
Syracuse 22 7 .08 22 9 fI
Topeka 48 11 39 18 i
Washington 35 28 40 30 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 89. impal. Ca.
LOW -32. Intematonl Fis, Minn.
WORLD CITIES
THU Lisbon 60/50pc
CITY HIL/SKY London 51/44Wc
Acapulco 91/771s Madrid 53130#
Amsterdam42/32/Jpc Mexico Cty6914/pc
Athens 51/41/pc Montreal l9/12tpc
Beijing 35/17/s Moscow 33130/sn
Belin 44/30/s Pens 44/26/pc
Bermuda 73'589flts Ro 801S9i/r
Cairo 53/46/r Rome 57/3&.s
Calgary 336/I Sydney 80/66c
Havana 82 ,Wpc Tokyo 60/37/s
Hong Kong 66/62Jpc Toronto 21/21/pc
Jerusalem 44/37r Warsaw 37/32Zpc


LEGAL NOTICES




Notice to the General Public..........................................A6
Fictitious Name Notices...............................................C12
Meeting Notices.............................................................C12
Lien Notices....................................................................C12
Miscellaneous Notices.................................................C12
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.................................C12
Self Storage Notices.....................................................C12
Forfeitures......................................................................C 12
Tax Deed Notices...........................................................C12


y^ C I T R UL S C 0 UI N T Y



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 A5




A6 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013

Arnold
Bestul, 89
BEVERLY HILLS
Arnold Alfred Bestul, 89,
of Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Wednesday, Dec. 11,2013, at
Avante of Inverness. A funeral
mass will be announced at
a later date. Private cre-
mation arrangements are
under the care of Strick-
land Funeral Home with
Crematory Crystal River

Ralph
Bryant, 73
DUNNELLON
Ralph G. Bryant, 73, of
Dunnellon, Fla., died Dec.
12, 2013, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County
in Lecanto. Arrangements
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.

Patricia Hill, 69
Patricia Mary Van Note
Hill passed away peace-
fully in her sleep Dec. 11,
2013, after a battle with
cancer She joins her hus-
band Don, who passed
away in
1 2003. Patti
was born
Sept. 27,
1944, in
V Hacken-
.- 1. sack, N.J.
Most of
Usher child-
Patricia hood was
Hill spent in
Kentucky and she gradu-
ated from the University of
Kentucky with a degree in
sociology She and Don
were married in 1967 and
they moved to Florida
shortly after their first
daughter Heidi was born.
Their second daughter,
Heather, was born in Bran-
don, where they lived until
they moved to Citrus
County
In addition to many
wonderful friends, she is
survived by her daughters,
Heidi Hill Drum and son-
in-law John Drum, South
Lake Tahoe, Calif, and
Heather Hutchinson and
son-in-law Stephen
Hutchinson, Crystal River;
as well as her cherished
grandchildren, Kira, Dal-
ton and Jameson. She is
also survived by her two
brothers, Peter, Jeff and
sister-in-law Dee; step-
brothers, Jeff and Michael
O'Grody; as well as many
nieces and nephews.
A celebration of life will
be 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 14, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Golf & Country
Club. The family asks that
in lieu of flowers a dona-
tion be made that will be
readily used to help oth-
ers. HPH Hospice of Cit-
rus County helped Patti
tremendously in her final
weeks and they deserve
your tax-deductible sup-
port. Please send dona-
tions to HPH Hospice,
Citrus Office, 3545 N.
Lecanto Hwy, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465-3503.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.








Professional i
Hearing Centers8
www.invernessHearing.com
726-HEAR (4327)


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931

ad is buinesdy
piort u ae
U Im6?A I -N v


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


John 'Jack'
Kennedy, 64
HOMOSASSA
John J. "Jack" Kennedy,
64, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away at home Dec.
11, 2013. He was born and
raised in Kearny, N.J., and
later lived in Illinois,
North Carolina, New
Hampshire and California
before retiring to Florida
13 years ago. He worked in
the telecommunications
industry for 25 years be-
fore retiring and enjoyed
fishing, boating, and gar-
dening during his retire-
ment years. He was a
devoted husband, father,
grandfather, brother and
uncle.
Jack was preceded in
death by his parents,
Joseph and Anne
Kennedy; and his sister,
Arlene Vanderham. He is
survived by his wife of 41
years, Priscilla Kennedy;
his sons and daughters-in-
law, Adam and Jessica
Kennedy of San Diego,
Calif, and Aaron and Eliz-
abeth Kennedy of Chicago,
Ill.; his grandsons, Dean,
Westley, and Dylan; a sis-
ter, Patricia Kent; broth-
ers, Joseph, Thomas, and
Brian Kennedy; and a
large extended family in-
cluding nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends.
A memorial gathering
will be at the family home
Dec. 14, 2013. In lieu of
flowers, donations can be
made to Hospice of Citrus
County of the Nature
Coast, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Eva 'Granny'
King, 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
Eva Loraine "Granny"
King, 90, of Crystal River,
Fla., passed away Wednes-
day morning Dec. 11, 2013,
at Cypress Cove care Cen-
ter Mrs. King was a retired
nurse, a loving mother and
grandmother She was
born July 7, 1923, in
Texarkana, Texas, and
came to Inglis 21 years ago
with her grandson,
Damien King.
She is survived by her
son, Earnest W King
(Evon) of Bernice, La.; 12
grandchildren; 31 great-
grandchildren; and three
great-great-grandchildren.
The family thanks every-
one at Cypress Cove Care
Center and Hospice of Cit-
rus County for the tender
care she received espe-
cially Liz and Roslyn.
Funeral services and
burial next to her hus-
band, Jack E. King, will
take place in West Monroe,
La., under the direction of
the Kilpatrick Funeral
Home, 318-323-9615. Local
arrangements are under
the direction of Strickland
Funeral Home, Crystal
River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Peter
Sfameni, 73
CITRUS HILLS
Peter E. Sfameni, 73, of
Citrus Hills, Fla., passed
away Monday, Dec. 9,2013,
in Tampa. He was born
Tuesday,
Feb. 20,
1940, in
Reading,
Pa., to An-
sthony and


taeGs Ai r Force ase
e s 1 ye(Cars olla)
Sfameni.



Petegcr Peter was
Sfameni a retired
colonel with the United
States Air Force, serving
for more than 24 years.


including 187 combat mis-
sions in Vietnam. He also
had flown F-111s at Ed-
wards Air Force Base, fol-
lowed by four years at
strategic command HQ
(SAC) as B-1B staff officer
and then two years at Ed-
wards AFB flight test cen-
ter Peter graduated from
Air War College class of
'79, followed by one year as
base commander of John-
ston Atoll in the Pacific.
His final assignment was
atAndrews AFB, where he
retired as the director of
Low Observables (stealth)
Technology Among his
awards are seven air
medals, the Distinguished
Flying Cross and Legion of
Merit. After his retirement
from the USAF, he was a
defense consultant in D.C.
for four years, followed by
20 years as an executive in
the defense industry Peter
moved to this area five
years ago from Dix Hills,
N.Y He was a member of
St. Scholastica Catholic
Church and was very ac-
tive in playing golf, work-
ing out in the gym, the
outdoors and traveling. He
loved living in Terra Vista
in Citrus Hills, but most of
all, he loved being sur-
rounded by wonderful
friends.
Survivors include his
wife, Gloria Sfameni of
Citrus Hills; sons, Steven
Sfameni of Nashua, N.H.,
and Frederick Tamburo of
Orlando; daughters,
Jolynn Pehlke and hus-
band Kevin of Leesburg,
Va., Kristi Sutherland and
husband, Major Justin
Sutherland of Ashburn,
Va., and Linda Anne Tam-
buro-Norrby of Kings
Park, N.Y; sisters, Rose
Waligorski of Temple, Pa.,
and Sandra Duddy of
Wyomissing, Pa.; grand-
children, Jacqueline Sfa-
meni of Manchester, N.H.,
Samantha Sfameni of
Hooksett, N.H., Jake and
Mitchell Pehlke both of
Leesburg, Va., and Peter
and Rhyan Sutherland
both of Ashburn, Va., and
Maria Noelle Norrby of
Kings Park, N.Y; former


I-1







FUNERA' I ION-





&[Egia TiO
Svg'oC rus Cu


(32 2627 wwHoerInrafomBo


spouse, Jeanette Sfameni
of Clearwater; and daugh-
ter-in-law, Sonja Sfameni
of Manchester, N.H.
Visitation, 5 to 7 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 13,2013, Fero Fu-
neral Home. Funeral
Mass, 10 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 14, 2013, at St.
Scholastica Catholic
Church, 4301 W Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto,
FL 34461. Interment with
military honors at Arling-
ton National Cemetery at a
later date. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to
the Wounded Warriors
Project, PO. Box 758517.
Topeka, KS 66675.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home, www
ferofuneralhome.com.




Anthony
Zeoli, 88
LECANTO
Anthony F Zeoli, 88,
Lecanto, Fla., died Dec. 11,
2013. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.
See DEATHS/Page A7

OBITUARIES
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in sub-
mitted material are
charged at the same
rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com, call 352-
563-5660 or fax 352-
563-3280 to submit
an obituary.


ICLA. 9. zbav
Funeral Home With Crematory
MARGARET "PEGGY"
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Service: Fri. 12:30 PM
%.%\I \L FARMER
Service: Thurs. 11:00AM
ANTHONY ZEOLI
Private Arrangements
JAMES PARRISH
Private Arrangements
726-8323


OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy permits both free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home
or society in charge of arrangements.
All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated
Press style unless a request to the contrary is made.
Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name
of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death;
place of death; date, time and place of visitation
and funeral services.
If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contribu-
tions or other information are included, this will be
designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate
provided to the sender.
A flag will be included for free for those who served
in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when
submitting a free obituary.)

SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

pa
*I I no&Ceuio


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. iA
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhie.com


1213 FRCRN


Notice to the

General Public

Pursuant to

Florida Administrative

Code 25-22.082:




Be advised that Duke Energy

Florida, Inc., with offices located at


299


North,


St.


Petersburg, FL 33701, has submit-


ted


a proposal for the construction


of a nominal 1,640 megwatts (MW)


cycle


generating unit located near Duke

Energy Florida's existing Crystal

River site in Citrus County Florida,


as a self-build


response


to the


Request for Proposals (RFP) for


Long-Term

Resources.


Power

The proposal


response to the RFP


Supply

is in


issued


on


October 8, 2013 by Duke Energy

Florida, Inc., with offices located at


299


North,


St.


Petersburg, FL 33701. The pro-

posed new facility will use high-

efficiency, combined-cycle technol-

ogy and run on natural gas.


THE FRIENDS OF FORT COOPER
PRESENT
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AT
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S. y Road
W^ sies 'orida

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:O^6;00pm TO 8:30pm _
COME JOIN US AS WE CELEBRATE THIS
WONDERFUL TIME OF YEAR
ENJOY THE PARK WITH DECORATIONS. THOUSANDS S AND
HUNDRE OF LUNARIES THAT LSHT THE WAY HE PARK.
STROLL ALqN.JG AYS AND THROU GH bIiJS TAKING IN
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(WHILE SUPPLIESLAST) AS VY LISTEN TO VE ENTER MENT OR MAKE
A S'MORE. DON FO 0 B NG THE C b OR NbCHULDREN FOg
SoMOE', oL" ME OR GNbCHILDREN FOR

S NNON PER ,.OR Y FOR
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ALL NET PROCEEDS FRO MONARY A N BE DONATED TO
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FOR ORE ISATION CALL (352) 726-0315
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OBITUARIES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page AS




Fred
Tannery, 96
DUNNELLON
Lt Col. (ret) USAR Fred
M. Tannery, 96, of Dunnel-
lon, Fla, passed away at The
Legacy Hospice House in
Ocala Dec. 10,2013. He was
born in Oconee County,
S.C., Sept 7,1917. Fred was
and was
^^*frn^^_an athlete

S awarded a
scholar-
Tship to
play foot-
ball at
Presbyte-
rian Col-
Fred lege in
Tannery Clinton,S.C.
He excelled as a varsity
running back for three years
and graduated in 1942. He
served in the United States
Army for 20 years. He was
in the North African Cam-
paign, the landing atAnzio,
Italy, and reached Munich,
Germany at the end of
World War II. He received
the Bronze Star-the third
highest award in the mili-
tary- for his service dur-
ing the war Fred retired
from active duty after 20
years of service, and then
worked for the U.S. Army
Reserves in Columbia, S.C.,
in a civil service capacity for
30 years. He retired in 1994
and was extremely proud
of his 50 years of service to
his country He moved to
Dunnellon in 2003 to reside
with his son and daughter-
in-law. He was an avid
golfer, often outscoring
those half his age. He
played his last round of 18
holes at the age of 93.
Fred was preceded in
death by his wife of 50
years, Mozelle 0. Tannery,
in 1995. He is survived by
his son, Donald E. Tannery,
and daughter in-law, Deb-
orah R. Tannery, both of
Dunnellon; granddaughter,
Denise Tannery of Panama
City; great-grandchildren,
Kirsten Patterson of Fort
Collins, Colo., Travis Pat-
terson of Panama City and
Abby Pilipick of Panama City;
great-great-grandchildren,
Cody Tannery ofMt Orab,
Ohio, Layne Pilipick of
Panama City and Lars
Pilipick of Panama City;
and sister, Mildred Wind-
horn of Blythewood, S.C.
A military funeral will be
at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15,
2013, at Greenlawn Memo-
rial Gardens, 7100 Garners
Ferry Road, Columbia, S.C.
Fred will be laid to rest
next to his loving wife. The
family will receive visitors
and friends from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, at
Dunbar Fumeral Home, 3926
Devine Street, Columbia,
S.C. Memorial contribu-
tions may be given to Hos-
pice of Marion County,
3231 S.W 34th Ave., Ocala,
FL 34474.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 A7


Retail holidays getting colder shoulders


Associated Press

NEW YORK Many Ameri-
cans are watching the annual hol-
iday spending ritual from the
sidelines this year
Money is still tight for some.
Others are fed up with commer-
cialism of the holidays. Still oth-
ers are waiting for bigger
bargains.
And people like Lark-Marie
Anton Menchini are more
thoughtful about their purchases.
The New York public relations
executive says in the past she'd
buy her children up to eight
Christmas gifts each, but this year
they're getting three apiece. The
leftover money is going toward
their college savings.
"We told them Santa is ... being
very conscious of how many gifts
he puts on his sleigh," Menchini,
36, says.
Despite an improving economy,
most workers are not seeing
meaningful wage increases. And
those who can splurge say the
brash commercialism around the
holidays many more stores are
opening for business on Thanks-
giving is a turnoff.
But perhaps the biggest factor
is that shoppers are less moti-
vated than ever by holiday sales.
Since the Great Recession, re-
tailers have been dangling more
discounts throughout the year, so
Americans have learned to hold
out for even deeper holiday sav-
ings on clothes, electronics and
more. To stay competitive and
boost sales, retailers are slashing
prices further during their
busiest season of the year, which
is cutting into their own profit
margins.


Associated Press
Shoppers rest on chairs Nov. 29 in the Fashion Show mall in Las Vegas. The National Retail Federation es-
timates that sales over the four-day 2013 holiday weekend including Thanksgiving declined 2.9 percent from
last year, marking the first drop since the group began tracking the figure in 2006.


There aren't reliable figures on
how many people plan to shop dur-
ing the holidays. But early data
points to a shift in holiday spending.
The National Retail Federa-
tion estimates sales during the
start to the official start to season
- the four-day weekend that
began on Thanksgiving Day -
dropped 2.9 percent from last
year to $57.4 billion. That would
mark the first decline in the
seven years the trade group has
tracked spending.


And during the week afterward
- which ended on Sunday -
sales fell another 2.9 percent
compared with a year ago, ac-
cording to data tracker Shopper-
Trak, which did not give dollar
amounts. Meanwhile, the number
of shoppers in stores plunged
nearly 22 percent
Black Friday used to be the of-
ficial kickoffto the buying season,
but more than a dozen chains


opened on
year


Merrill to settle with SEC for $131M


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Merrill Lynch has agreed
to pay $131.8 million to
settle U.S. civil charges
that it misled investors
about risky mortgage
bonds it sold ahead of
the 2008 financial crisis.
The Securities and
Exchange Commission
announced the settle-
ment Thursday Merrill
Lynch was accused
using misleading materi-
als to market the invest-
ments in 2006 and 2007.
The materials gave in-
vestors a false impres-
sion that the collateral
for the securities was
chosen by an independ-
ent firm, the SEC said.
Merrill neither admit-
ted nor denied the alle-
gations. But it did agree
to refrain from future vi-
olations of the securities
laws. The SEC also cen-
sured Merrill, bringing
the possibility of a stiffer
sanction if the alleged vi-
olation is repeated.
When the housing
bubble burst in 2007,
millions of home bor-
rowers defaulted on
their loans and bundles
of mortgages sold by big
banks left investors with
billions in losses.


Bank of America ac-
quired Merrill at the
height of the crisis in Sep-
tember 2008.
The SEC allegations
against Merrill involved its
marketing of pooled secu-
rities known as collateral-
ized debt obligations. Wall
Street banks sold CDOs at
the height of the housing
boom. They combine slices
of debt with varying levels
of risk.


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latest in a series of federal
actions against Wall Street
banks as the government
continues to resolve
claims over their conduct
five years after the crisis.
Goldman Sachs, JPMor-
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other big banks have been
accused of abuses in sales
of securities linked to
mortgages in the years
leading up to the crisis.


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Thanksgiving this


That didn't sit well with some
shoppers who viewed it as an en-
croachment on family time. Some
threatened to boycott stores that
opened on the holiday, while oth-
ers decided to forgo shopping al-
together
In a poll of 6,200 shoppers con-
ducted for the retail federation
prior to the start of the season, 38
percent didn't plan to shop dur-
ing the Thanksgiving weekend,
up from 34.8 percent the year
before.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BACTERIA
Continued from Page Al

"We had been on vacation for a
month. We were in Ohio, Michigan,
West Virginia and Illinois. Just golf-
ing and visiting a week at a time at
friends' houses," O'Brien said.
"We came home. We were home
one day I felt just fine. I got up the
next morning and my knee hurt me.
It was swollen and it was hot. That
day, I never left the house because I
would fall asleep, drink water and
fall asleep," O'Brien continued.
"The next day Wednesday, was a golf
day so I went golfing with this knee
that hurt me like crazy and started
to swell down my leg."
The following day, Tom O'Brien
went to his doctor, who ordered
tests. He was sent home with antibi-
otics to treat cellulitis, a similar but
less serious inflammation.
"I wasn't getting any better and my
leg was really swelling; the whole
leg," O'Brien said.
His wife, Wink, called a neighbor who
is a nurse and asked her to have a look
"She said, 'Wink, if it was my hus-
band, I'd put him in the hospital
right now,"' O'Brien recalled. "She
works at Seven Rivers, so my wife
packed me up and took me to Seven
Rivers. That's the last of my memory
for like a week."
The emergency room physician
recognized the condition as what has
come to be known as "flesh-eating
bacteria" or necrotizing fasciitis.
"They put me in a coma for four


Special to the Chronicle
Homosassa resident Tom O'Brien makes
good use of his golf cart as he recov-
ers the use of his right leg.
days and they operated on me for four
different days getting that bacteria
out of me that kept eating my leg
away," O'Brien said. "So they saved
my life there, and they saved my leg."
Dr Shaun Saint, a general surgeon,
excised all the infected tissue, a
process called debridementt," leav-
ing exposed the lower dermis. Dr
Todd Sisto, a plastic and reconstruc-
tive surgeon, then took over in saving
O'Brien's leg by covering the exposed
area with a skin graft before a new
infection could establish itself.
However, Sisto said he had to find
another hospital because of the
technical sophistication of his work.
"We tried to get into Tampa Gen-
eral burn center," O'Brien said. "We


were waiting for a bed."
Instead, Sisto moved O'Brien to
Citrus Memorial hospital in Inverness.
"He took a skin graft off my other
leg, stretched it and laid it into my
wound that goes from my hip to my
ankle," O'Brien explained. '"And
then he sprinkled it with this new
substance that he's got. Then they
sprayed it with silicone and filled
that whole wound and put a wound-
vac on it."
O'Brien went home the next day
Twice a week, he goes back to the
wound center where his bandages
are changed.
"It was the greatest feeling in the
world getting rid of my wound-vac,
next to getting out of the hospital,"
O'Brien said.
Sometime within the next year, ac-
cording to O'Brien, his doctors
promise him he can get out on the
golf course again.
Although flesh-eating bacteria is
fairly rare, people who live in
Florida should have a heightened
awareness of it, according to a re-
cent article in USA Today, because
"Florida averages 50 cases, 45 hos-
pitalizations and 16 deaths annually
most in the Gulf Coast region," ac-
cording to the Florida Department
of Health. Across the country, about
95 cases, 85 hospitalizations and 35
deaths occur each year
Symptoms include fever, swelling
and redness of skin on arms or legs,
with blood-tinged blisters, low blood
pressure and shock.
Since his surgery at the end of Au-
gust, O'Brien said has re-grown all
but about 15 percent of the skin on
his leg.


BUDGET
Continued from Page Al

unleashed a stinging at-
tack on tea party-aligned
conservative groups cam-
paigning for the mea-
sure's defeat.
The legislation, backed
bythe White House, cleared
on a vote of 332-94, with
lopsided majorities of Re-
publicans and Democrats
alike voting in favor Final
passage is expected next
week in the Senate.
The events in the
House gave a light coat-
ing of bipartisan coopera-
tion to the end of a
bruising year of divided
government- memo-
rable for a partial govern-
ment shutdown, flirtation
with an unprecedented
Treasury default and grid-
lock on immigration, gun
control and other items on
President Barack Obama's
second-term agenda.
Obama's press secre-
tary, Jay Carney, hailed
the vote, saying it "shows
Washington can and
should stop governing by
crisis and both sides can
work together to get
things done."
Minutes after the
budget action, the House
approved a broad mili-


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A8 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013


tary policy bill that aims
to curb sexual assaults,
cover combat pay for U.S.
forces and fund new air-
craft and ships. That vote,
too, was lopsided, 350-69,
sending the bill to the
Senate, which plans to
adjourn for the year next
week.
The agreement, negoti-
ated by Rep. Paul Ryan,
R-Wis., and Democratic
Sen. Patty Murray of
Washington, would set
overall spending levels
for the current budget
year and the one that be-
gins on Oct. 1, 2014. That
straightforward action
would probably eliminate
the possibility of another
government shutdown
and reduce the opportu-
nity for the periodic
brinkmanship of the kind
that has flourished in the
current three-year era of
divided government.
The measure would erase
$63 billion in across-the-
board cuts set for January
and early 2015 on domes-
tic and defense programs,
leaving about $140 billion
in reductions in place. On
the other side of the budget
ledger, it projects savings
totaling $85 billion over
the coming decade, enough
to show a deficit reduc-
tion of about $23 billion
over the 10-year period.




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AIO FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013


Detroit manager:


Pensions still at


risk in bankruptcy


Associated Press
Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr speaks Thursday
during an interview in Detroit.

Orr backs private efforts, but

says retirees need to be 'sober'


Associated Press

DETROIT The pen-
sions of Detroit city re-
tirees won't be immune to
cuts despite a private ef-
fort to raise $500 million to
help the city eventually
emerge from bankruptcy,
emergency manager
Kevyn Orr said Thursday
in an interview with The
Associated Press.
Orr, appointed by the
governor last spring to run
Detroit, said he "ab-
solutely" supports a cam-
paign to tap foundations
and wealthy people to pre-
vent the possible sale of
city-owned art and pre-
serve pensions. But he
warned that the "expecta-
tions of the retiree com-
munity should be sober"
"Let's face it: having
$500 million is better than
not having $500 million,"
Orr said. "If we can find a
way to allocate that to pen-
sions- the other creditors
might have something to
say about that ... That's a
big, big help, but even that
amount isn't going to solve
the problem."
Orr spoke to the AP nine
days after Judge Steven
Rhodes said the city is eli-
gible to fix itself in bank-
ruptcy and can cut
pensions, overriding a pro-
vision in the Michigan
Constitution. It was the
most significant decision
since the historic filing last
July and one that adds ur-
gency to the process. The
ruling gives Orr's team the
upper hand as they try to
strike deals with Wall
Street bond holders, pen-
sion funds and unions.
But Orr said he hasn't
noticed any change at the
bargaining table since that
decision. He wants to file a
remedy for $18 billion in
long-term debt by early
January, including $3.5 bil-
lion in two underfunded
pension funds.
"We're running out of
time even now.... I can't re-
ally say that the creditors'
tone has changed in any
fashion," Orr said.
"They're in very hard posi-
tions. There's no money"
U.S. District Judge Ger-
ald Rosen is leading a
group of mediators work-
ing in private with Orr's
team and the city's credi-
tors. Rosen also has
reached out to foundations
to come up with $500 mil-
lion to prevent the sale of
some art at the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts and shore up
the pensions of 23,000 re-
tirees, many of whom get
less than $20,000 a year
"I'm dealing with calcu-
lations that affect the lives
of people who don't have
choices in many cases,"
Orr said of retirees.
"You're 70, you're in your
80s or even your late 60s -
it's not like you can go back
into the labor market in
any meaningful way"
Orr declined to say
whether the pensions of
firefighters and police of-
ficers should be treated
differently in bankruptcy


than the pensions of other
rank-and-file retirees. The
public safety pension fund
is in better shape, and its
beneficiaries typically get
more.
"We would like them to
work together as a com-
mittee so they can come up
with a proposal that makes
sense," Orr said.
He said he won't be
stopped by a lack of con-
sensus among creditors.
"We would like to think
that we'll get some agreed
solutions," Orr said, "but
there's always a chance we
won't and we'll have to go
forward with a plan with-
out a sense of agreement
and see if we can get it
approved in court
nonetheless."
The president of the po-
lice union, Mark Diaz,
called Orr's comments
"very presumptuous" and
believes higher courts will
overturn Rhodes' decision
on pension protections.


Boeing/Associated Press
An artist's concept shows the 777-9X, the largest of the aerospace company's new family of 777X jetliners.
Boeing currently has more than a dozen states in competition from coast to coast offering property, billions of
dollars of tax breaks, favorable labor deals and customized employee training hoping that Boeing will choose them
to assemble its new 777X jetliner.



Boeing to move research jobs


Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. Boe-
ing announced Thursday that it is
shifting hundreds of jobs to Ala-
bama, Missouri and South Carolina
as part of a restructuring of its U.S.
research operations over the next
two years.
The Chicago-based aerospace
company said the reorganization
will result in fewer research jobs in
Washington state and California
and is being undertaken to better
meet the needs of its commercial
airplane, military and space and se-
curity units.
The announcement comes as
those same states, and several oth-
ers, are competing to assemble Boe-
ing's 777X passenger plane a
much-sought-after facility that
could generate thousands of jobs.


Boeing spokesman Daryl
Stephenson said the restructuring
of the company's research opera-
tions has been in the works for sev-
eral years and is unrelated to the
new airplane or Boeing's contract
negotiations with a Seattle area ma-
chinists union.
The research restructuring will
add 300-400 employees each in the
St Louis area, Huntsville, Ala., and
North Charleston, S.C. Research
jobs will decline by 800-1,200 in the
Seattle area and by 200-300 in
southern California, the company
said.
The restructuring is to start early
next year and be complete by 2015.
After the changes, Boeing will
still have about 4,000 employees in
its research and technology opera-
tions, but they will no longer be con-
centrated predominantly on the


West Coast. The Seattle and St.
Louis sites will have the most em-
ployees, and each site will have spe-
cific research tasks.
The Alabama site is to focus on
simulation and decision analytics
and metals and chemical technol-
ogy The southern California loca-
tion is to focus on flight sciences,
electronics and networked systems.
The St. Louis site is to conduct re-
search on systems technology, digi-
tal aviation and support technology,
and metallic and fabrication devel-
opment.
The South Carolina location is to
focus on manufacturing technology,
and the Seattle site is to focus on
the integration of manufacturing
technology.
Boeing plans to announce a deci-
sion by early next year on where it
will assemble the 777X airplane.


Report focuses on women in federal jobs


Experts

say obstacles

remain
Associated Press

WASHINGTON
Women in the federal
workforce continue to
face more obstacles than
men in reaching top posi-
tions and salaries despite
making strides over the
years, according to a gov-
ernment report released
Thursday
The U.S. Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Com-
mission said a major
challenge hindering ad-
vancement was the lack of
flexibility for women rais-


ing young children. The
report says agencies
should expand job-shar-
ing and telework policies,
offer different start and
end times for workers and
create satellite work cen-
ters that would reduce
commutes.
The report also identi-
fied a lack of mentoring
and training as key factors
limiting many women who
want to reach higher lev-
els and management
posts. Women are less
likely to be groomed for
management positions be-
cause they don't have


mentoring relationships
with officials already in
those posts, the report
found.
Women make up nearly
44 percent of the federal
workforce in 2011 but
comprise only 30 percent
of Senior Executive Serv-
ice positions, according to
EEOC figures from 2011.
Those are high-level fed-
eral managers who serve
just below presidential
appointees. Women hold
about 38 percent of GS-14
and GS-15 positions, the
top pay scales in the main
federal pay system.


The report recom-
mends that federal agen-
cies set up formal
mentoring programs and
monitor how effective
they are in increasing op-
portunities for women.
"It's fair to say that
women do fare better in
the federal workforce
compared to the private
sector based on anecdotal
evidence, studies and
data, but advancements
still need to be made,"
said David B. Grinberg,
spokesman for the
EEOC's Office of Federal
Operations.


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Money&Markets
1,840 ................................. S& P 500
.,,,:, Close: 1,775.50
Change: -6.72 (-0.4%)
1,760........ 10 DAYS .........
1,840 ................................................. .............. ............

1,7 6 0 .... .......... ........... .......... .. ......... .......

1,680 ......... ... ..................... ...

1 ,6 0 0 ... ....................................................................

1,520 "S ....0jN... ... ............NA...... .. .... b....... ..... .... D


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,324
Pvs. Volume 3,424
Advanced 1297
Declined 1777
New Highs 29
New Lows 277


NASD
1,823
1,866
1247
1301
45
47


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15845.11
7083.10
481.36
9981.81
4013.54
1782.99
1288.84
18941.71
1107.18


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


15,680 ........10 DAYS '"


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,739.43
Change: -104.10 (-0.7%)


16,400 ....... ......... ............. ... ....... ... ..................... ..
16,000fI A
15 6 0 0 ........ ......... ... ............ ....... .... ....... .......
15, 20 0 ...... .A.....
14,800 .-.-. .... V ........... -
14,400 ""J .A.N......SjN...... .......A.. ...... .......IN0 N D..


LOW
15703.79
7036.12
478.05
9925.62
3993.57
1772.28
1281.68
18832.21
1099.66


CLOSE
15739.43
7059.49
478.70
9949.57
3998.40
1775.50
1285.16
18871.87
1103.27


CHG.
-104.10
+2.02
+0.40
-41.88
-5.41
-6.72
+0.13
-46.78
+1.61


%CHG.
-0.66%
+0.03%
+0.08%
-0.42%
-0.14%
-0.38%
+0.01%
-0.25%
+0.16%


YTD
+20.11%
+33.03%
+5.65%
+17.84%
+32.42%
+24.49%
+25.94%
+25.85%
+29.89%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 6.12 5.76 ... ... A A A +25.2 +34.6 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.76 -0-- 39.00 33.89 -.06 -0.2 V V A +0.5 +4.7 25 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 36.79 -- 62.05 48.98 +.37 +0.8 V V A +30.4 +30.2 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -- 105.48 100.43 -.98 -1.0 V V A +14.9 +16.7 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 10.46 --0- 15.98 15.25 ... ... A A +31.4 +45.4 20 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 --- 13.08 11.97 +.28 +2.4 V V A +5.3 +5.9 40
CenturyLink Inc CTL 29.93 0- 42.01 30.76 +.05 +0.2 V 7 7 -21.4 -14.8 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 36.83 --0- 53.68 50.91 +.20 +0.4 7 A A +28.7 +37.2 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.39 --- 26.38 22.49 -.06 -0.3 V 7 A +42.0 +51.0 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 48.55 --0- 72.13 69.63 -.03 ... A +39.8 +42.5 20 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 62.60 -- 75.46 68.19 -.14 -0.2 V 7 A +6.9 +11.1 20 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 44.65 -0-- 61.18 48.33 -.37 -0.8 V 7 7 +4.8 +14.7 19 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 0 96.25 95.36 +1.10 +1.2 V A A +10.2 +8.7 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 11.03 -- 18.02 16.39 -.02 -0.1 V 7 7 +26.6 +46.3 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 20.26 27.50 26.54 -.04 -0.2 V 7 A +26.4 +27.1 20 0.76
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 29.86 49.52 46.32 -.41 -0.9 V A A +53.5 +47.8 15 4.50e
HIth MgmtAsc HMA 7.59 -0- 17.28 13.00 +.03 +0.2 V 7 A +39.5 +65.0 cc
Home Depot HD 60.21 --0- 82.27 78.53 -.47 -0.6 V 7 A +27.0 +28.1 21 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.98 -- 25.98 24.47 +.05 +0.2 V A A +18.7 +22.6 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 0- 215.90 173.37 -1.83 -1.0 7 7 -9.5 -7.9 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 0 34.32 33.24 -.02 -0.1 V A A +57.5 +54.6 34
Lowes Cos LOW 34.20 -- 52.08 46.89 -.42 -0.9 V 7 7 +32.0 +37.8 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 86.81 -0- 103.70 94.10 -1.16 -1.2 V 7 7 +6.7 +9.8 17 3.24f
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.28 38.98 37.22 -.39 -1.0 V 7 A +39.3 +41.2 14 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 66.39 64.86 +.26 +0.4 V A A +16.5 +20.5 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 67.75 --- 89.75 82.76 +.36 +0.4 V 7 A +19.6 +22.7 18 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 -0-- 23.10 8.55 +.07 +0.8 A 7 7 -56.6 -55.9 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0-- 21.09 16.11 ... ... -10.7 -5.6 29 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.58 --- 10.52 9.52 +.10 +1.1 V 7 A +33.5 +41.0 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 67.50 46.61 +.30 +0.6 V 7 7 +12.7 +6.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 84.57 -0- 114.72 101.38 -2.61 -2.5 V 7 7 +17.6 +21.0 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 29.71 0 43.67 42.42 -.39 -0.9 V 7 A +37.3 +41.5 28 1.20
Time Warner TWX 46.48 70.77 65.82 -.60 -0.9 V 7 +37.6 +43.4 16 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 70.63 105.76 101.00 +2.08 +2.1 7 A 7 +37.8 +36.3 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 41.50 -0- 54.31 48.13 -.36 -0.7 V 7 A +11.2 +13.8 68 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 38.33 37.45 -.24 -0.6 V A A +48.7 +51.5 1.61e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 -- 81.37 78.50 -.59 -0.7 V 7 A +15.1 +14.2 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 35.77 --0- 60.93 57.55 -.13 -0.2 A 7 A +55.5 +60.6 22 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


SU


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to
2.88 percent
Thursday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of gold
fell for the sec-
ond straight
day, and its loss
of $32.30 per
ounce was its
biggest since
Oct. 1. The price
of silver also fell,
while natural gas
and crude oil
rose.




OE

EDs


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .06 0.07 -0.01 .06
6-month T-bill .09 0.09 ... .11
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .15
2-year T-note .33 0.31 +0.02 .25
5-year T-note 1.53 1.50 +0.03 .65
10-year T-note 2.88 2.85 +0.03 1.70
30-year T-bond 3.90 3.89 +0.01 2.89


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.69 3.67 +0.02 2.48
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.12 5.12 ... 3.94
Barclays USAggregate 2.40 2.37 +0.03 1.71
Barclays US High Yield 5.58 5.58 ... 6.14
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.66 4.70 -0.04 3.62
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.75 1.72 +0.03 .94
Barclays US Corp 3.21 3.18 +0.03 2.69


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.50
Ethanol (gal) 1.83
Heating Oil (gal) 2.98
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.41
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.63
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1226.00
Silver (oz) 19.40
Platinum (oz) 1364.40
Copper (Ib) 3.33
Palladium (oz) 719.80
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.32
Coffee (Ib) 1.11
Corn (bu) 4.28
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 357.60
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.46
Soybeans (bu) 13.24
Wheat (bu) 6.23


PVS.
97.44
1.93
3.02
4.34
2.66
PVS.
1258.50
20.30
1385.20
3.33
738.10
PVS.
1.32
1.09
4.31
0.82
355.00
1.44
13.44
6.30


%CHG
+0.06

-1.36
+1.66
-0.99
%CHG
-2.58
-4.41
-1.50
+0.02
-2.48
%CHG
+0.27
+1.47
-0.70
+0.69
+0.73
+1.53
-1.51
-1.23


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 23.75 -.09 +17.9 +18.0 +12.3 +14.4
CaplncBuA m 57.20 -.24 +11.3 +11.1 +9.1 +11.9
CpWIdGrIA m 43.81 -.22 +20.0 +20.7 +10.2 +14.4
EurPacGrA m 47.63 -.32 +15.6 +16.8 +6.5 +13.6
FnlnvA m 50.81 -.11 +25.6 +25.9 +13.7 +17.7
GrthAmA m 43.95 -.07 +27.9 +28.4 +14.2 +17.8
IncAmerA m 20.16 -.08 +14.5 +14.5 +11.1 +14.6
InvCoAmA m 37.86 -.17 +27.0 +26.9 +13.5 +15.8
NewPerspA m 37.98 -.21 +21.5 +22.3 +11.2 +16.9
WAMutlnvA m 38.97 -.14 +26.7 +26.4 +15.7 +16.1
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 41.63 -.36 +20.2 +23.5 +7.6 +16.4
Stock 161.39 -.58 +34.0 +34.7 +16.7 +19.4
Fidelity Contra 99.21 -.17 +29.1 +29.1 +14.5 +18.7
LowPriStk d 48.85 -.22 +29.8 +31.3 +16.1 +22.3
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 63.20 -.22 +27.0 +27.0 +15.1 +17.6
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.36 -.01 +11.4 +11.9 +9.7 +17.0
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.10 +.02 +1.2 +2.2 +5.0 +9.5
GIBondAdv 13.06 +.02 +1.4 +2.5 +5.2 +9.8
Harbor Intllnstl 68.71 -.57 +10.6 +12.5 +6.8 +13.9
Oakmark Intl 1 25.85 -.32 +23.5 +28.5 +11.8 +20.4
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc x 31.63 -1.07 +25.0 +25.2 +14.1 +16.6
GrowStk 50.39 -.07 +33.4 +34.1 +16.2 +22.2
Vanguard 500Adml 164.42 -.57 +27.0 +27.0 +15.1 +17.6
5001lnv 164.38 -.58 +26.9 +26.8 +15.0 +17.5
MulntAdml 13.74 ... -1.5 -2.3 +4.4 +6.0
PrmcpAdml 97.16 -.39 +34.8 +34.7 +16.1 +19.2
STGradeAd 10.73 -.01 +1.1 +1.2 +2.7 +5.6
Tgtet2025 15.60 -.04 +14.8 +15.4 +9.6 +13.7
TotBdAdml 10.60 -.02 -2.0 -2.0 +3.4 +4.8
Totlntl 16.20 -.10 +10.3 +12.4 +4.5 +12.2
TotStlAdm 44.96 -.11 +27.9 +28.2 +15.2 +18.7
TotStldx 44.94 -.11 +27.8 +28.1 +15.0 +18.5
Welltn 38.67 -.12 +16.4 +16.4 +11.3 +13.9
WelltnAdm 66.80 -.21 +16.5 +16.5 +11.4 +14.0
WndsllAdm 64.74 -.21 +25.5 +25.6 +15.3 +17.1
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks fell Thursday for a third
straight day, with the sharpest
losses coming from companies
that sell toothpaste, diapers and
other consumer staples. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index is
on track for a second straight
weekly loss.


Southwest Airlines LUV
Close: $18.79A0.82 or 4.6%
The airline led a rise across the sec-
tor after a trade group said it expects
profits in the industry to jump to a re-
cord next year.

-.-_2 -


I! S 0 N D
52-week range
$10.00 l$18.98
Vol.:11.4m (1.6x avg.) PE:21.9
Mkt. Cap: $13.09 b Yield: 0.9%
lamgold lAG
Close:$3.42V-0.42 or -10.9%
With gold prices falling, the miner
suspended its dividend, which had
been providing healthy yields, to
conserve cash.
$6



3 S 0 N D
52-week range
$3.40 l I I I $12.00
Vol.:26.3m (3.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$1.29 b Yield: 7.3%
SunEdison SUNE
Close:$11.47V-1.32 or -10.3%
The solar technology company low-
ered its fourth-quarter and annual
outlook, citing soft demand and on-
going market weakness.




J S 0 N D
52-week range
$3.031-1 I le I $13.83
Vol.:36.2m (4.5x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $3.06 b Yield:...

Delta Air Lines DAL
Close:$28.21 A0.55 or 2.0%
An airline trade group forecast in-
dustry profits of $19.7 billion next
year, well above the $12.9 billion ex-
pected this year.
$30-



SS 0 N D
52-week range
$10.801 I I I $29.44
Vol.:11.5m (0.9x avg.) PE: 11.7
Mkt. Cap:$24.13 b Yield: 0.9%
Facebook FB
Close:$51.83A2.45 or 5.0%
The networking site will join the
Standard & Poor's 500, replacing the
technology company Teradyne in a
broader reshuffle.


.1'
$ 0 Ii u
52-week range
$22.67l- I I I l $54.83
Vol.:92.4m (1.2x avg.) PE: 126.4
Mkt. Cap:$97.13 b Yield:...


Associated Press
Hilton Worldwide CEO Christopher Nassetta poses in a Hilton robe Thursday on the
floor of the New York Stock Exchange after his company's IPO. Hilton Worldwide
Holdings Inc. is the world's largest hotel group, with 665,667 rooms across 90
countries and territories.




Stocks take hit for




third day in a row


Associated Press

The stock market fell to
its lowest level in a month
Thursday as investors wor-
ried that the end may be
nearing for the Federal
Reserve's support for the
economy
The Fed's stimulus ef-
forts have been a key fac-
tor in the bull market that
has pushed the Standard
& Poor's 500 index almost
25 higher percent this year.
Investors know it will end
sooner or later But the
timing, and the fallout, are
uncertain.
Until this month, stocks
had risen for eight weeks
straight The S&P 500 set a
record high as recently as
Monday But stocks posted
their biggest declines
since Nov 7 on Wednesday,
and dropped further on
Thursday Now they're on
the verge of their second
weekly loss in a row
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed down
104.10 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, at 15,739.43. The S&P
500 fell 6.72 points, or 0.4


percent, to 1,775.50. The
Nasdaq composite
dropped 5.41 points, or 0.1
percent, to 3,998.40.
The Dow is still up 20 per-
cent this year, and the Nas-
daq has risen 32 percent
"We don't think we're in
a bubble, however we do
know we're in an expen-
sive market," said Marty
Leclerc, chief investment
officer and portfolio man-
ager at Barrack Yard
Advisors.
In economic news, the
number of people seeking
unemployment benefits
rose to about where it was
before the Great Recession.
Also, U.S. shoppers
spent more money on ap-
pliances, furniture and
cars in November Spend-
ing had been muted for
months heading into the
crucial holiday shopping
period, a worrisome sign
for investors. Retail sales
rose 0.7 percent last
month, the biggest gain in
five months. October sales
were also revised higher
That's the kind of eco-
nomic data that has been


interpreted to mean that
the U.S. economy is strong
enough for the Fed reduce,
or "taper," as it's called on
Wall Street, its stimulus
program.
Social networking stocks
continued to be strong.
Facebook jumped $2.45, or
5 percent, to $51.83 after
the stock was added to the
S&P 500 index. Twitter
rose $2.99, or almost 6 per-
cent, to $55.33.
Lululemon Athletica
plunged $7.96, or almost 12
percent, to $60.39 after the
upscale yoga clothing
maker said sales will be
flat in the next quarter and
revenue for the year will
be less than it had
predicted.
Several gaffes have hurt
sales of its $100 yoga pants
and other products. In the
spring Lululemon pulled
some of its pants from
stores after complaints
that they became see-
through. Two days ago,
founder Chip Wilson
stepped aside as chair-
man, and the company
named a new CEO.


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 All




'1"Historians relate not so much what is done


Page A12 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,2013



OPINION


as what they would have believed."
Benjamin Franklin,
"Poor Richard's Almanack," 1732 1757


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


HIT AND MISS




Test scores




don't tell




whole story




of education


ne thing those who
study educational test
scores seem to agree
on it is their results can be
debated ad nauseum.
The recently published re-
sults of the 2012 Program for
International Student Assess-
ment show overall U.S. stu-
dents continuing
to stagnate in THE I
math, reading and
science while Florid
Asian students sit stude
atop the rankings keeping
in every subject, rest of t
U.S. Education
Secretary Arne OUR 01
Duncan, alarmed
by the results, said Don't
"The problem is not excite
that our 15-year- these
olds are perform-
ing worse today than before."
Assessments are tricky pro-
cedures, particularly when
scaled globally. An assess-
ment, in its simplest terms, is
the measure of someone's
ability Ability to do what, you
might ask? In this case, the
test assesses how students
use what they've learned in-
side and outside school to
solve problems.
The problem with develop-
ing a global assessment is
each of the 65 educational
systems measured have a dif-
ferent curriculum they are
teaching and a different as-
sessment tool to show how
successful that curriculum is.
They also have wide varia-
tions in budgets and facilities
and even in the level of abili-


Is
C


n
th

F
g(
eC
re


ties for the students in their
programs.
For example, Shanghai's
per-student funding at the
middle-school level is nearly
four times the national aver-
age for China. Interestingly
enough, Shanghai was at the
top of all categories. China
did not post a na-
ISUE: tionwide score;
only specific
a, U.S. areas of the coun-
its not try were meas-
Dace with ured.
ie world. Florida asked
for specific scores
'INION: and found it
scored below the
,et too international av-
d over erage in math
results. and science, but
right at the inter-
national average in reading.
We should note that Florida
has had an increased focus
on reading curriculum.
What can we take from this
assessment?
It's one measure in dozens
that educators look at when
developing curriculum.
The bottom line is the
United States spends as
much or more on education
on education than any other
country and our students
have one of the highest aver-
age years of schooling of any
other nation.
And while Shanghai's 15-
year olds may outscore other
nations in tests, we guarantee
they will line up to attend
U.S. universities for their sec-
ondary education needs.


U* united Way of Citrus County needs your
l rl IW help to reach its annual fundraising
^j fS~ ~goal. If you can, please send a contribution
to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Let's nail those slobs
Today is Nov. 25 and I'm read-
ing Sound Off. To the person "Have
litter, will travel:" I have news for
you. It's not all the people coming
down from the North. Just drive
around in some of the
un-deed-restricted areas C
and you'll see the slobs
that live there. They're
not from the North.
Please stop with the
North-South war al-
ready. Slobs are slobs
and there's nothing you
can do about it, but I
intend to. I am driving CAL
around with a pad and 5f63
pen in my car and will tJ5
copy down license plate
numbers and vehicles and re-
port them to the sheriff's office
every time I see somebody
throw something out their win-
dow. You have been warned.
A big ol' pothole
Will you send DOT to repair the
big ol' potholes that are in front
of the Family Dollar department
store? There's two big holes. I can't


I

(


drive around it because it goes
on the other side of the street
and someone's going to have,
there's going to be a big ol' acci-
dent there. It's right by the stop
signs on Highland (Boulevard)
and Save-A-Lot shopping center
JN and B&W Rexall Drugs
JND and McDonald's and
y Verizon. It's a big ol'
pothole. I'm tired of my
car falling in a hole.
Have someone repair it
for the owners that own
this development here.
0 Excellent
)579 response
)5 i I would like to thank
all firefighters and po-
lice force who responded to a
mobile home fire on Canoe Ter-
race in Apache Shores Friday
night (Nov. 22). Their timing and
response and professionalism
was unbelievably fast. To the
people who set the fire: Did you
ever think the consequences of
your actions might have taken a
human life because of your self-
ish and idiotic behavior?


Giving the gift of stories


As a young woman, Steve's
grandmother, Miriam
Wasilsky, left her small
village in what is now Lithuania
and moved to the city of Bia-
lystok, Poland, looking for work
She found a job in a dry goods
store, and to mark her new life,
asked a local pho-
tographer to take
her picture.
The photographer
liked the image so
much that he dis-
played it in his front ..-"S
window As family 1
legend goes, Steve's
grandfather, Avram
Rogowsky, passed Coki
the studio every day Steven
and gradually fell in
love with the girl in OTI
the photo. They VOI
eventually met,
agreed to be married and
moved to America where
their first child, Steve's dad
Will, was born 97 years ago this
month.
Miriam became lifelong
friends with the daughter of the
shopkeeper who gave her a job.
And just a few months ago, the
grandson of that woman con-
tacted Steve with a message: "I
was going through a batch of
family photos. I found the orig-
inal picture your grandfather
saw in that window I'll send it
to you."
And so at Thanksgiving, we
passed around the photo and
told two of Miriam's great-great-
grandchildren the story of
where it came from. Where they
came from.
Stories have always played
an essential part in family life,
especially at this time of year,
around the holidays. But it
turns out that trading tales has
a larger and more vital purpose
than filling the time between
watching football and making
dinner
Bruce Feiler, who writes the
"This Life" column for The
New York Times, examined the


e
I
CI


LETTEI

Don't be fooled
by this tune


There's music coming from
the White House. It's a haunt-
ing, almost mesmerizing bal-
lad. The lyrics herald the
coming of salvation; the utopia
that will make our nation the
envy of the planet. The music
captivates thousands, millions,
but they are not aware of or
even interested in the decep-
tive, misleading and dangerous
concepts cleverly weaved into
the lyrics.
Is the music plagiarized
from similar Pied Piper
melodies in history? Are we
hearing the lies hidden in "ex-
aggerations," "misspeaks,"
"best intentions" and other de-
ceptive phraseology? Most of
those polled think we are mis-
guided, but despite over-
whelming evidence of
repeated failures in economic
stimulus, legislation, debt, im-
migration, job creation, foreign
affairs and now health care,
33 percent of our citizens think
we are on the right track and
support our leaders. They
think our president is doing a
good job. Credit the entitle-
ments, government and union
workers. Sad.
Many brilliant letters to the
editor have been printed on
these pages. Do readers clip


scientific literature about fam-
ily cohesion psychology, soci-
ology, even neurology and
summarized his findings ear-
lier this year: "After a while, a
surprising theme emerged. The
single most important thing you
can do for your family may be
the simplest of all:
Develop a strong
family narrative."
Feiler focused on
the work of two
Emory University
*I researchers, Mar-
shall Duke and
S Robyn Fivush. In
the late '90s they in-
and terviewed 48 fami-
Roberts lies, taped their
dinner table conver-
IER stations and then
DES subjected their chil-
dren to a battery of
psychological tests.
"The more children knew
about their family's history,"
Feiler wrote, "the stronger their
sense of control over their lives,
the higher their self-esteem and
the more successfully they be-
lieved their families func-
tioned."
After 9/11, the researchers re-
turned to the families and
asked more questions. "Once
again," Duke told Feiler, "the
ones who knew more about
their families proved to be
more resilient, meaning they
could moderate the effects of
stress."
The sources of that strength
"have to do with a child's sense
of being part of a larger family"
says Duke. Or as Feiler put it,
"They know they belong to
something bigger than them-
selves."
In an essay for The Huffing-
ton Post, Duke added a critical
and fascinating point: The con-
tent of family stories is not as
important as the process of
telling them.
"In order to hear family sto-
ries," he wrote, "people need to
sit down with one another and


RS


not be distracted. Some people
have to talk and some have to
listen. The stories need to be
told over and over and the
times of sitting together need to
be multiple and occur over
many years."
We know the truth of those
words firsthand. Our six grand-
children want to hear the same
family stories "over and over"
They relish the idea that "they
belong to something bigger than
themselves."
Some years ago Steve wrote a
memoir, "My Fathers' Houses,"
which includes the story of how
his grandparents met and other
family narratives. The New
York Times review of the book
said it read like "a bedtime
story for the Robertses' grand-
kids." And they did not mean
that as a compliment
Steve's reaction was: Guilty
as charged. That's exactly
what I did. But how is that a
problem?
Now, as a teacher of young
writers at George Washington
University, Steve encourages
his students to mine their own
families for material. For one
thing, he tells them, your grand-
mother never says "no com-
ment." More seriously, he
knows that students will be en-
gaged and energized by what
they learn.
Every family has stories
worth remembering and
recording. And since every cell-
phone is now a tape recorder
and a video camera, preserving
the past is easier than ever
So a suggestion: This holiday
season, share your family sto-
ries, even the sad and scary
ones. You'll be giving the
younger generations a priceless
gift their own history Their
own identity That's a lot more
enduring than the latest Xbox.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email
at stevecokie@gmail.com.


Oto the EditorP
to^< th Editor


and forward these letters? Do
teachers clip for class discus-
sion? Are the letters sent to
our elected officials in Con-
gress? Can we express our
frustration... our anger with
our leaders? Do we tell them
we are fully aware of the bla-
tant mistakes, deceptions, and
arrogantly lawless behavior
created every day in Washing-
ton? Do we express our total
distrust?
I am not here to blame our
president. How could I? He is
totally clueless, only repeating
the talking points provided by
his minions. He has been de-
scribed as an empty suit... the
only president in our history
to believe his job is beneath
him. His resume, his legacy,
lists Bengazi sacrifice, Iran fel-
lowship, Egypt insult, NSA
spying, IRS cheating, 0MB bil-
lions wasted and broken prom-
ises to exit Afghanistan. I
could go on about extrava-
gance, disrespect, and embar-
rassing apologies, but when
new arrogant behavior sur-
faces every day, it is tiresome
duty
Listen ... the music has
stopped. The sound you are
hearing now is our Founding
Fathers turning over in their
graves.
Ted LaPorte
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspa-
per's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in po-
litical cartoons, columns or
letters do not necessarily
represent the opinion of
the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their
opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address
the editorial board, which
meets weekly, should call
Charlie Brennan at 352
563-5660.
* All letters must be signed
and include a phone num-
ber and hometown, includ-
ing letters sent via email.
Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or
given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fair-
ness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer
than 600 words, and writ-
ers will be limited to four
letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The
Editor, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to 352-563-
3280, or email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE OPINION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 A13


Letters to THE EDITOR


How Obamacare w we- wcAwe--v 0, e-.ake \N cj-k-ce. wo
will fail GAN%\4'WZ \e --23MroX--S F oG.,,
Everyone is thinking
about Obamcare being a
train wreck. You bet it is.
You cannot get through ..
the website. People left
and right are losing their
health care because of
Obamacare. Rationing
will happen. Is this right?
What business does the


government have with
telling the American peo-
ple what health care they
should have? They are
shoving that and every-
thing else down our
throats. The American
people are not happy
about that. It seems that
anything the government
wants to change turns out
bad. They have no right to
dictate to the American
people what type of health
care they should have.
What gets me is not
everyone is fighting
against Obamacare. Af-
fordable? I do not think
so. People are going to all
be working part time with
no health care. The econ-
omy is going to sink even
lower We are going to go
down as a country This is
not the America we once
knew
If everyone did not sign up
for Obamacare it would fail.
We need to stick together
on this issue. Let's take
our freedom back! This
should not be dictated by
any government What
country is this anyway?
Anna DeRose
Lecanto

Speak up
for patriots
As a combat-decorated
World War II veteran who
survived 70 missions over
enemy territory before I
was 21 years old, I cannot
find words to express my
disgust at our nation's
leaders who expect our
combat forces to risk (and
sacrifice) their lives to
help other nations rid
themselves of terrorists
under such rules and con-


editions they are subjected
to i.e. our country and
troops are required to
apologize and be sub-
jected to court martial for
the incidental (and unin-
tentioned) deaths of in-
digenous civilians while
in service to them!
I consider our policies
in this regard to be uncon-
scionable to say the least.
Had I, and the million
combat veterans of WWII
been subjected to such
unreasonable restric-
tions, America would
have lost the war
While this nation is
honoring those of us who
survived, it is dishonoring
those patriots who now
serve. Is this what those of
us who fought for (and are
now fighting for) deserve?
If what I say here
causes you to feel shame,
do something about it!
Speak up!
Capt. Ed Mitrani
DFC, 10 air medals,
four battle stars
Beverly Hills


Cleanliness comes a propaganda machine
with cost than an honest purveyor
wit ost of news. You should be


Re: "Ship being pre-
pared for a new life, "As-
sociated Press, Page A6,
Friday, Nov 29.
The Associated Press
failed to mention the bat-
tleship USS Alabama, BB60
and Submarine Drum in
Battleship Park in Mobile,
Ala. There is a small charge
to tour both vessels to pay
the people who keep
them in "ship shape."
Harry Preston
U.S. Army, retired
Beverly Hills

You should be
ashamed
With Obamacare being
the biggest story of the
year and probably next
year, your ignoring the
story will not make it go
away You claim to be a
"news" organization, but
intentionally omitting
major stories would indi-
cate that you are more of


ashamed!
David W. Martin
Homosassa

Road an eyesore
What's wrong with the
picture of the nearly com-
pleted County Road 486
extension as shown in the
Chronicle article of Nov
20 "Putting a bow on it?"
The constructors of the
highway did a beautiful
job and the residents of
Citrus County can take
pride in the grace and
charm of the symmetry
and proportion that is a
delight to the eye.
However, rather than
"putting a bow on it,"
whoever is in charge of
the aesthetics in our
county capped off this
beautiful roadway with a
dual marching column of
thorns in an array of


hideous telephone poles
running the length and
breadth of the $65 million
project Instead of a beau-
tiful panorama of rolling
hills and trees, the entire
route has been trans-
formed into a scene of ug-
liness jarring the eyes
and demonstrating an in-
sufferable lack of aes-
thetic appreciation by
those responsible for de-
signing our roadways.
The installation of a pro-
cession of Easter Island-
like guardians of poles
stands as a stark reminder
of incompetent govern-
ment officials creating an
aesthetic nightmare that
will last for generations.
Rather than a scenic and
pleasurable drive, these
columns of ugly fences de-
tract from the natural
beauty of the rolling hills
of our county and make a
mockery of the designa-
tion "Nature Coast."
The builders of C.R. 486


e
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must shudder to see their
work so disfigured and
metamorphosed from a
thing of beauty into an
array of scarecrowish-
looking ugly poles draped
with sagging wires. Route
491 has the same built-in
ugliness? A lack of aes-
thetics must be a qualifi-
cation for appointment to
government posts.
The extension of the
highway has virtually no
buildings alongside its
path and would have cre-
ated no major problem or
great expense by in-
stalling the wires under-
ground. The cost of those
towering concrete stan-
chions must have been
considerable and the dif-
ference in cost between
those and underground
wiring is not much differ-
ent especially with a
dearth of buildings, side-
walks, or roadway impedi-
ments to drive up the costs.
What a sight those who
live here and for potential
residents, travelers or busi-
nesses to take into consid-
eration when making a
decision to locate here.
Why are our govern-
ment officials so lacking
in perceiving the benefits
of an aesthetic environ-
ment? Compare this army
of poles on public roads
to the aesthetic-friendly
private roads in which de-
velopers have installed the
wires underground. There
are no more beautiful
roadways in the country
than Terra Vista, Black
Diamond and many other
private communities
throughout Citrus County
because developers recog-
nize the value of aesthetics.
Who approved this dis-
figurement that so de-
means a work of
constructive art? These
same bureaucrats would
most likely approve put-
ting curlers on Leonardo
da Vinci's "Mona Lisa?"
John J. Turi
Hernando










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Governor


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Boehner blasts critics


Speaker upset with dissension among GOP hardliners


World BRIEFS

Homeless


Associated Press
South Carolina Gov. Nikki
Haley, right, hugs her
husband, Capt. Michael
Haley, Thursday during a
South Carolina Army
National Guard home-
coming ceremony in
West Columbia, S.C.


Dog helps woman
survive in cold
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
A woman survived nearly
three nights in bitter interior
Alaska cold by burning her
snowmobile and huddling
with her small dog, Alaska
State Troopers said
Thursday.
Vivian Mayo, 57, of
Cantwell, was found at
about 1 a.m. Wednesday,
taking shelter under the
burned-out hulk of her
snowmobile and sharing
body heat with Elvis, a
small, brown dog of un-
known breed. She was se-
verely hypothermic and in
need of immediate medical
attention, troopers said.
Megan Peters, spokes-
woman for the troopers,
said the dog likely helped
Mayo preserve her body
heat.
"It really did help save
her life," Peters said. "Elvis
is a little hero."
Sentence in fatal
wreck stirs ire
HOUSTON-"Af-
fluenza," the affliction cited
by a psychologist to argue
that a North Texas teenager
from a wealthy family
should not be sent to prison
for killing four pedestrians
while driving drunk, is not a
recognized diagnosis and
should not be used to justify
bad behavior, experts said
Thursday.
Ajudge's decision to give
16-year-old Ethan Couch
10 years of probation for
the fatal accident sparked
outrage from relatives of
those killed and has led to
questions about the de-
fense strategy. A psycholo-
gist testified in Couch's trial
in a Fort Worth juvenile
court that as a result of "af-
fluenza," the boy should not
receive the maximum 20-
year prison sentence prose-
cutors were seeking.
The term "affluenza" was
popularized in the late
1990s. It has since been
used to describe a condition
in which children gener-
ally from richer families -
have a sense of entitle-
ment, are irresponsible,
make excuses for poor be-
havior, and sometimes dab-
ble in drugs and alcohol,
explained Dr. Gary Buffone,
a psychologist who does
family wealth advising.
But Buffone said the term
wasn't meant to be used as
a defense in a criminal trial
or to justify such behavior.
"The simple term would
be spoiled brat," he said.
Feds shut 52
'unsafe' bus lines
LOS ANGELES Driv-
ers at one passenger bus
company routinely worked
more than 800 miles with-
out rest. Maintenance at an-
other company was so
shoddy that one bus drove
despite glaring evidence of
brake problems.
Federal bus safety regu-
lators said Thursday they
shut down those two and
50 other motor coach com-
panies in a major nation-
wide crackdown on unsafe
outfits.
Overall, the motor coach
industry carries about 700
million passengers a year in
the U.S., roughly the same
as domestic airlines.
From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -After
years of bitter friction
within Republican circles,
House Speaker John
Boehner is lashing out
against hard-line conser-
vative and tea party groups
- the latest GOP estab-
lishment figure to join the
increasingly public battle
roiling the party
For the second day in a
row but at greater
length and with more pas-
sion the Ohio Republi-
can on Thursday lit into
groups such as Heritage
Action and Club for
Growth. Though naming
no names, he accused such
groups and others of stir-
ring up opposition on the
right to a budget bill


worked out with Democ-
rats that would replace
some across-the-board
spending cuts now in place
with longer-term savings.
"When groups come out
and criticize an agreement
that they've never seen,
you begin to wonder just
how credible those actions
are," he told reporters.
That was just hours before
the House was to vote on
the bill, which also would
raise government fees on
airline tickets, as well as
pension insurance premi-
ums on employers.
"Frankly, I just think
they've lost all credibility,"
he said of the foes.
Heritage Action was a
key force behind the "de-
fund Obamacare" effort
that swept the right earlier


this year and steamrolled
stumbling House GOP
leaders into October's gov-
ernment shutdown fiasco.
"They're pushing our
members into places
where they don't want to
be," Boehner complained
Thursday
Boehner is the latest in
a line of establishment Re-
publicans and their allies
to mount counterattacks
against tea party purists
who are pushing the party
to the right by stoking
intra-GOP battles and pri-
mary challenges against
longstanding incumbents
such as Senate Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky and Rep. Mike
Simpson of Idaho.
"Yesterday, when the
criticism was coming,


frankly I thought it was my
job and my obligation to
stand up for conservatives
here in the Congress who
want more deficit reduc-
tion," Boehner said.
Club for Growth, which
bundles contributions for
the free-market conserva-
tives it endorses and runs
ads on their behalf, is sup-
porting Simpson's primary
opponent.
Another group, the Sen-
ate Conservatives Fund
started by former GOP
Sen. and now Heritage
Foundation President Jim
DeMint, is raising money
to run ads against Mc-
Connell and Sens. Thad
Cochran, R-Miss., and Pat
Roberts, R-Kan., each of
whom is facing a tea party
primary challenge.


Sweet tooth, anyone?


Associated Press
GingerBread Lane, created by Chef Jon Lovitch, goes on display Thursday in the New York Hall of Science,
in the Queens borough of New York. The 1.5-ton, 300-square-foot village is made entirely of edible
gingerbread, royal icing, and candy, and has been acknowledged as the largest gingerbread village in the
world by the 2014 Guinness World Records.




Putin pushes back against West


Russian president casts nation as defender ofconservative values


Associated Press

MOSCOW President Vladimir
Putin cast Russia Thursday as a de-
fender of conservative values
against the "genderless and infer-
tile" Western tolerance that he said
equates good and evil.
Putin's 70-minute state-of-the-
nation address marked a determined
effort to burnish Russia's image,
which has been dented by Western
criticism of an anti-gay law which has
stoked calls for a boycott of the Win-
ter Olympics in Sochi, his pet project
Russia has insisted that a law ban-
ning "propaganda of non-traditional
relations" does not discriminate
against gays, but gay rights group say
it has given a green light to harass-


ment and intimidation.
Without directly referring to the
anti-gay law, Putin focused on up-
holding traditional family values,
which he said were the foundation
of Russia's greatness and a bulwark
against "so-called tolerance gen-
derless and infertile."
Putin's posture as a protector of
conservative values and his scathing
criticism of the West have been part
of efforts to shore up his domestic
support base of blue-collar workers,
farmers and state employees against
mounting criticism from the urban
middle class. But his speech also was
pitched to conservatives worldwide.
"Many countries today are re-
viewing moral norms and erasing
national traditions and distinctions


between nationalities and cultures,"
Putin said. "The society is now re-
quired to demonstrate not only the
sensible recognition of everyone's
right to freedom of conscience, po-
litical outlook and private life, but
also the mandatory recognition of
the equivalence of good and evil, no
matter how odd that may seem."
He argued that the "destruction of
traditional values from the top"
going on in other countries is "in-
herently undemocratic."
Without naming any specific coun-
try, he blasted "attempts to enforce
allegedly more progressive develop-
ment models" on other nations, say-
ing they have led only to "decline,
barbarity and big blood" in the Mid-
dle East and North Africa.


Scientists: Folks, meet your ancestors


Associated Press

NEW YORK -Sponges
are getting squeezed out of
a distinctive role in evolu-
tion. A new study says they
don't represent the oldest
branch of the animal fam-
ily tree after all.
The DNA research gives
the spot instead to comb
jellies, a group of gelati-
nous marine animals with
names like the sea walnut
and the sea gooseberry
All animals evolved
from a single ancestor, and
scientists want to know
more about how that hap-
pened. More than half a
billion years ago, long be-
fore humans appeared,
the first split in the tree
separated one lineage
from all other animals.
Traditionally, scientists


Associated Press
A Mnemiopsis leidyi, a species of comb jelly known as a
sea walnut. A new study published online Thursday says
comb jellies, a group of gelatinous marine animals, rep-
resent the oldest branch of the animal family tree.
have thought it was plete genetic code from a
sponges, member of this group. Sci-
The evidence in favor of entists were finally able to
comb jellies comes from compare the full DNA
deciphering the first com- codes from all the earliest


branches.
The genome of a sea
walnut, a plankton-eating
creature native to the
western Atlantic Ocean,
was reported online
Thursday in the journal
Science by Andreas Baxe-
vanis of the National
Human Genome Research
Institute with co-authors
there and elsewhere. The
work supports some ear-
lier indications that comb
jellies were the first to
branch off.
Sorting out the early
branching of the tree
could help scientists learn
what the ancestor of all an-
imals was like. But despite
decades of study and the
traditional view favoring
sponges, there is plenty of
disagreement about which
early branch came first.


Associated Press
Nicolae Mihuta, 56, origi-
nally from Bucharest,
eats a piece of bread
Thursday near his
makeshift home under an
old bridge in Pamplona,
northern Spain. Mihuta
said he was working in
Australia and Germany for
several years and now he
is trying to find work in
Spain.


Fake signer says
he hallucinated
JOHANNESBURG -
The sign language inter-
preter at Nelson Mandela's
memorial said he suffers
from schizophrenia and hal-
lucinated and saw angels
while gesturing incoherently
just 3 feet away from Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
other world leaders, outrag-
ing deaf people worldwide
who said his signs
amounted to gibberish.
South African officials
scrambled Thursday to ex-
plain how they came to hire
the man and said they were
investigating what vetting
process, if any, he underwent
for his security clearance.
Thamsanqa Jantjie added
that he was once hospital-
ized in a mental health facil-
ity for 19 months and has
been violent in the past.
NKorea executes
leader's uncle
PYONGYANG, North
Korea North Korea said
Friday that it had executed
Kim Jong Un's uncle as a
traitor for trying to seize
supreme power, a stunning
end for the leader's former
mentor.
In a sharp reversal of the
popular image of Jang
Song Thaek as a kindly
uncle guiding leader Kim
Jong Un as he consolidated
power, the North's official
Korean Central News
Agency indicated that Jang
instead saw the death of
Kim's father, Kim Jong II, in
December 2011 as an op-
portunity to challenge his
nephew and win power.
Jang had been tried and
executed, North Korea said,
for "attempting to overthrow
the state by all sorts of in-
trigues and despicable
methods with a wild ambi-
tion to grab the supreme
power of our party and
state." It called him a "traitor
to the nation for all ages"
and "worse than a dog."
Toronto reporter
sues mayor
TORONTO -A Toronto
Star reporter sued Mayor
Rob Ford on Thursday for
suggesting the journalist
was a pedophile in a recent
television interview.
Ford appeared on a Vi-
sion TV interview with former
media baron and convicted
felon Conrad Black and ac-
cused Toronto Star reporter
Daniel Dale of taking pic-
tures of little kids. Ford said
he didn't "want to say that
word but you start thinking
what this guy is all about."
Ford told reporters that
he stands by his words.
Ford's insinuation was
related to an instance when
Dale was close to the
mayor's house investigating
a plot of public land adja-
cent to Ford's home that the
mayor wanted to buy.
Dale has said he was
writing a story about the
plot so he went to take a
look at it when the mayor
emerged from his home to
confront him.
From wire reports










SPORTS


Texas A&M
QB Johnny
Manziel is trying
to become the
second player
ever to win a
second Heisman
Trophy./B6
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


*0 MLB, NHL/B3
0 NBA, NFL/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Football/B5, B6
0 High school sports/B6


Roessler's calm intelligence big for CR


Pirates boys basketball team captain

shoulders some of the load early on


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Hunter Roessler has a
unique source for the kind of
quiet leadership and exem-
plary discipline he practices.
The coach's dream is a teacher
himself, and in a field that de-
mands steadfast self-discipline:
martial arts.
Roessler, a 6-foot senior
guard/forward for Crystal River,
is a second-degree black belt
and an instructor at Schrade


Taekwondo in
Crystal River
"I try to
lead by exam-
ple," Roessler
said. "I'm not
much of a
loud person, I
just let my ac-
tions do the
talking. I've
been raised


icism positively is what I've
been taught."
Just as he's well-rounded ath-
letically- he also competes in
cross-country and track and


He's like a
jack-of-all-trades
for us ...
Steve Feldman
Crystal River boys basketball coach said
of senior team captain Hunter Roessler.


that way I've done martial arts
my whole life, and that's where
I've learned it from. Taking crit-


team-high 2.7 a
See


field, where
he won a dis-
trict champi-
onship in the
triple jump -
he's also bal-
anced on
court He's av-
eraging 10.4
points per
game and is
registering a
assists and 2.4


Citrus' Pryor tops 1,000-point mark recently


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent


Citrus senior point guard Devin
Pryor surpassed 1,000 career
points in his team's loss at Dunnel-
Ion last Friday. Pryor entered the
night seven points shy of the mark
and tied for a game-high 21 points
before fouling out late in the game.
Pryor didn't realize his accom-
plishment until head coach Tom
Densmore informed him after the
game.
"At that moment and time, after
we lost the game, the 1,000-point


Page B4


Seeing the floor


Eason doing it

allfor CR girls

basketball team
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
ast season, as her Crys-
tal River girls basket-
ball team won a district
title, it was evident Jasmyne
Eason had the talent. This
season, she's learning how to
use it.
The Pirates are off to a phe-
nomenal start, collecting victo-
ries in their first nine games -
six of those on the road (their
seventh road game of the sea-
son was Thursday night at
Gulfport Boca Ciega). And
Eason has been the driving
force in that streak, leading
her team in points per game
(14.6), rebounds (12.7) and
blocks (2.9), and is second in
steals (3.1).
Her influence was obvious in
last Friday's game at 5A-6 op-
ponent Lecanto. With the game
mired in a 4-2 festival of
missed shots and turnovers,
Eason stepped up as Crystal
River coach Jason Rodgers in-
structed his team to go to a full-
court press. Eason forced two
consecutive turnovers and con-
verted two baskets off of them,
sparking a 15-0 finish covering
the final 2:30 of the quarter
She finished with eight points
in the quarter
Asked what has led to her
overall improvement this sea-
son, Eason a junior -
replied, "It's mental more than
physical. I just love this game
so much. I'm also a lot stronger,
so I'm not afraid of going to the
basket"
Even considering such a pos-
sibility when watching the fluid
5-foot-10 forward play seems
odd. Eason has the rare ability
to dominate in nearly any
phase of the game (she's listed
as a guard, forward and center
on the Crystal River roster), but
Rodgers witnessed her lack of
confidence three years ago
during a summer tournament
in which he coached and she
played. According to Eason,


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River junior forward Jasmyne Eason is averaging double digits in points and rebounds through
Wednesday for the undefeated Pirates girls basketball team.


her eyes bulged while watching
the older competition.
"I was just kind of hiding
down the bench, hoping he
wouldn't call on me," she said.
But he did, and after a some-


what shaky start, Rodgers said
she adjusted and performed
well. That leads back to her im-
provement this season, good
enough to earn her co-captain
status.


Rodgers agreed that Eason's
mental approach to the game
has enabled her to take full
advantage of her abilities.

See Page B4


milestone was the last thing on
my mind," Pryor said. "We didn't
have one of our better games. It's
a lot easier to appreciate it now."
As a junior, Pryor notched 21.5
points a night en route to winning
the Chronicle Boys Basketball
Player of the Year award. As a
sophomore, he averaged 14.3
points a game, and is currently
averaging 21.7 points.
Rivalry tightens
From 2007-10, in the middle of

See Page B3


Girls Basketball

NOTEBOOK



Battle


for first


Citrus, CR meet

tonightfor early

lead in district

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
What happens tonight has
been anticipated since before
the season began.
Of course, this is just the first
round. At least one, very likely
two, and perhaps even three
more meetings loom.
It is Citrus vs. Crystal River,
the top two girls basketball
teams in District 5A-6, with just
one defeat (entering Thursday's
games) between the two of them.
Tonight's clash will come at
Crystal River at 7:30 p.m., with a
second round set for Jan. 17 at
Citrus. The third meeting could
very likely be in the 5A-6 tourna-
ment final in the first week of
February, and if another oc-
curred, it would be in the state
tournament's regional round.
But first things first, or as
coaches and players from both
teams insist, take 'em one game
at a time. And this first meeting
is, by all means, intriguing.
Crystal River was unbeaten
entering Thursday's game at
Gulfport Boca Ciega. What's
particularly impressive about
that nine-game streak is that
six of them were road games
(Boca Ciega was the seventh of
10 on the road).
The Pirates share the same
quick-handed defense featured
by Citrus, one that often leads
to easy baskets on the offensive
end. In last Friday's 5A-6 game
at Lecanto, Crystal River hardly
looked like a powerhouse as it
clung to a 4-2 advantage after
the game's first 5 1/2 minutes.
But in that final 2:30, the Pi-
rates put their full-court pres-
sure defense to work and
scored 15 points to take a 19-2
lead into the second quarter
Sounds good for Crystal
See Page B4


FSU's Winston piles up awards


'Noles QB takes

home Maxwell,

Camp trophies

Associated Press
LAKE BUENA VISTA Jameis
Winston walked away with another
major award Thursday night, the lat-
est national prize to put on his mantle.
He might want to save a spot for the
Heisman Trophy
The Florida State star headlined a
big night for the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference, winning the Davey O'Brien
Award as the country's top quarter-
back at the annual College Football
Awards Show at Disney
Winston also won the Walter Camp
player of the year award in a separate
announcement.
The redshirt freshman, who led the
top-ranked Seminoles to a 13-0
record and a berth in the BCS na-
tional championship game against


Auburn next month, said he contin-
ues to be humbled by every accolade
he's received in recent weeks.
"It feels good. It's an honor just to
be here," Winston said. "I'm just glad
to bring them back to Florida State."
Winston hopes to become the fourth
O'Brien Award winner in a row to
take home the Heisman in the same
year He would join current NFL
quarterbacks Cam Newton (2010) and
Robert Griffin III (2011), as well as
Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel in 2012.
Now that a sexual assault complaint
against him in Tallahassee has been
closed without charges being filed,
Winston is the overwhelming favorite
to win college football's highest honor
Saturday night in New York.
Several players shared the hard-
ware Thursday, though.
Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron
won the Maxwell Award for player of
the year, and Pittsburgh defensive
tackle Aaron Donald took home two
big prizes: the Chuck Bednarik
Award for defensive player of the
year and the Outland Trophy as most
outstanding interior lineman.


The ACC led all conferences with
four winners out of the nine awards
that were presented two for Don-
ald, one for Winston, and the Doak
Walker Award that went to Andre
Williams of Boston College as the na-
tion's best running back.
Williams joins Winston, McCarron
and Manziel among the six Heisman
finalists.
Williams became the first Doak
Walker winner from his school and
from the ACC. He is also the sixth
2,000-yard rusher to claim the honor
The Eagles senior actually missed
graduation night Thursday to be at
the announcement. When he men-
tioned that on stage, he received an
ovation from the audience.
"It's great It feels like I was being
honored as an athlete and a student at
the same time," he said. "That's sup-
posed to be the mission, so itfelt great"
Though he said this week that he
believed he had a season deserving of
his Heisman nomination, McCarron,
a fifth-year senior with three national
See Page B4




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Captain clutch Injuries prompt
collision ban


St. Louis scores

decisivegoal

for Lightning

Associated Press

TAMPA Martin St.
Louis scored in the sixth
round of the shootout, and
the Tampa Bay Lightning
beat the Detroit Red Wings
2-1 on Thursday night.
St. Louis netted the lone
shootout goal when he
beat Jonas Gustavsson to
the stick side. Detroit,
which has lost all six of it
shootouts this season,
failed this time against
Ben Bishop.
Nikita Kucherov scored
for the Lightning in regu-
lation. Kyle Quincey had
the Red Wings' only goal of
the night.
Quincey put the Red
Wings up 1-0 with his first
goal in 51 games, a re-
bound backhander from
along the goal line just
past the post at 15:04 of the
first. The defenseman also
snapped a 16-game point
drought.
Kucherov tied it when he
beat Gustavsson from the
high slot with 43.7 seconds
remaining in the second.
Gustavsson made a first-
period save on Valtteri
Filppula's in-close back-
hander
St. Louis sent a shot
wide of the net during a
short-handed breakaway
early in the second.
Bishop stopped a shot by
Daniel Alfredsson on a 2-
on-1 later in the period.
An up-tempo third pe-
riod featured nice saves by
both goalies.
Both teams had key
players sidelined by in-
juries.
Red Wings goalie Jimmy
Howard hurt a knee in
practice on Wednesday
and is scheduled to be
evaluated Friday in De-
troit. Forward Henrik
Zetterberg, on the long-
term injured list because
of a back injury is eligible
to return Dec. 28 against
Florida.
The Lightning were
without star center Steven
Stamkos, who has a goal of
returning in February
from a broken right leg.
Defenseman Victor Hed-
man will be out at least an-
other week due to a
lower-body injury
Notes: Detroit senior
vice president Jimmy De-
vellano and Chicago sen-
ior adviser Scotty
Bowman, who won three
championships as coach of
the Red Wings, were at the
game. The two Hockey
Hall of Fame members
have a combined 20 Stan-
ley Cup rings. .. Tampa
Bay RW Richard Panik
served the first game of a
two-game suspension for a
hit Tuesday on Washington
D Karl Alzner
Senators 2,
Sabres 1
OTTAWA, Ontario Craig
Anderson stopped 40 shots in
the Ottawa Senators' 2-1 win
over the Buffalo Sabres.
Bobby Ryan and Zack
Smith scored for the Senators
(13-14-6), who have earned
at least a point in four straight
games.
Tyler Ennis scored the lone
goal for the Sabres (7-23-2),
and Ryan Miller made 30
saves.


MARK
Continued from Page Bl

a 13-game winning streak for Cit-
rus over its cross-county rival,
the Hurricanes beat Crystal
River seven times by an average
margin of 26.7 points. Since
then, six contests between the
two have been decided by an av-
erage of 6.8 points. Moreover, the
Pirates enter tonight's matchup
in the CHS gym (7 p.m. tipoff)
having won two of the last four in
the series, including a 62-49 vic-
tory in their gym last January
Both teams dropped a District
5A-6 tilt last Friday Late scoring
runs by junior forward Andre
Hairston (19.2 points and 12 re-
bounds per game) and senior
point guard Willie Robinson (5.7
assists and 9.2 points per game)
helped Dunnellon (4-2 overall,


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis celebrates after scoring against the
Detroit Red Wings in a shootout Thursday in Tampa. The Lightning won the game 2-1.


This was the second of
back-to-back games between
the teams. Buffalo earned a 2-
1 shootout victory on Tuesday.
Anderson was solid in the
third with the Senators hold-
ing a 2-1 lead. He made a big
early save on Mark Pysyk,
and another on Drew Stafford
late to preserve the lead. He
was called upon yet again in
the final two minutes after
Milan Michalek took a holding
penalty.
Flyers 2,
Canadiens 1
PHILADELPHIA- Michael
Raffi and Claude Giroux
scored goals, Steve Mason
made 20 saves, and the
Philadelphia Flyers beat the
Montreal Canadiens 2-1.
Jakub Voracek had two as-
sists, and Giroux also had an
assist to help the Flyers snap
a three-game losing streak
and extend their home win-
ning streak to six games.
They were coming off a 2-3-1
trip in which they finished up
0-2-1.
Mason shut the Canadiens
out for 59 minutes before Alex
Galchenyuk scored with 55.1
seconds left to cut it to 2-1.
The Canadiens have lost
two in a row after going 9-0-1.
They followed a 6-0 loss at
home to the Los Angeles
Kings on Tuesday with an-
other offensive clunker.
The Flyers didn't show any
ill effects from a 13-day trip.
Despite a 7-2 loss at Chicago
on Wednesday, they looked
fresh from the start.
Blue Jackets 4,
Rangers 2
NEW YORK- Matt
Calvert, Artem Anisimov and
David Savard scored in the
first 11:10 and the Columbus
Blue Jackets beat the


Rangers 4-2, sending New
York to its fourth straight loss.
The Rangers, 0-3-1 on its
nine-game homestand,
closed within 3-2 in the third
period, but Ryan Johansen
pushed Columbus' lead back
to two goals with 1:32 left.
The Blue Jackets goalie
tandem of Curtis McElhinney
and Mike McKenna, who are
subbing for injured reigning
Vezina Trophy winner Sergei
Bobrovsky, stopped 32 of 34
shots.
Columbus (14-15-3) has
won two in a row.
Dominic Moore and Dan
Girardi scored for New York.
Henrik Lundqvist was pulled
after he stopped only 10 of 13
shots in the first period.
Cam Talbot relieved and
made 13 saves the rest of the
way, allowing only Johansen's
goal between his pads.
Blues 6,
Maple Leafs 3
ST. LOUIS David
Backes scored twice and
Jaden Schwartz added a goal
and two assists to lead the St.
Louis Blues over the Toronto
Maple Leafs 6-3.
St. Louis has eight of 11
overall. At 13-2-2, the Blues
tied with Boston, Pittsburgh
and Minnesota for most
home-ice wins.
Toronto lost its third in a
row.
Alexander Steen, Derek
Roy and Chris Stewart scored
for St. Louis, which has points
in its last six games against
Toronto. The teams met for
the first time since Nov. 10,
2011.
Predators 3,
Stars 1
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
David Legwand had a goal
and an assist to lead the


1-0 in 5A-6) prevail 57-51 at home
against the 'Canes (6-1, 1-1). The
Pirates, meanwhile, were over-
whelmed in the second half by
Lecanto in a 75-48 defeat.
Crystal River (2-5, 0-1) lost
three straight by an average of 31
points to complete a grueling
four-night slate last week, but has
received much-needed rest this
week as it searches for more
scoring production from its youth
while senior Ty Reynolds deals
with a nagging ankle injury
CHS took its frustration out
this week with a pair of wins
over winless South Sumter and,
for the second time this season,
Lake Weir (4-3).
Panthers meet Tigers
for district home opener
With last Friday's convincing
win over Crystal River, as well as
Citrus' loss at DHS, the Panthers
(5-3, 1-1) are back within striking
distance in the battle for the


Nashville Predators to a 3-1
victory over the Dallas Stars.
Patric Hornqvist and Paul
Gaustad also scored for
Nashville, which has won two
straight. Carter Hutton made
33 saves.
Erik Cole had the goal for
Dallas, which has lost three of
four.
Cole scored the game's
first goal at 18:07 of the open-
ing period when he took pos-
session of the puck behind
the Nashville net and skated
out front before lifting a back-
hand over Hutton's right
shoulder.
Making his second consec-
utive start, Hutton improved
his record to 6-3-1 this sea-
son.
Nashville closed out the
first period with power-play
goals from Hornqvist and Leg-
wand just 28 seconds apart.
Avalanche 4,
Jets 3, SO
WINNIPEG, Manitoba-
Matt Duchene and P.A. Par-
enteau scored in the
shootout, and the Colorado
Avalanche stopped a two-
game losing skid with a 4-3
victory over the Winnipeg
Jets.
Duchene also scored twice
and added an assist in regula-
tion. Ryan O'Reilly had a goal
and an assist for the Ava-
lanche (21-9).
Blake Wheeler scored
twice, Michael Frolik added
another goal, and Grant Clit-
some had a pair of assists for
Winnipeg (14-4-5).
Duchene gave the Ava-
lanche a 3-2 lead with his sec-
ond of the night, scored with
1.6 seconds left in the second
period. He backhanded a re-
bound into the open side of
the net as goalie Ondrej Pav-
elec tried to slide back.


highly-coveted top seed in Dis-
trict 5A-6. Tonight's home meet-
ing with Dunnellon (7:30 p.m.),
coupled with next Friday's home
contest against Citrus, could go
a long way toward deciding
Lecanto's standing in the matter
A Tiger win tonight would give
DHS an early overall advantage
heading into the holiday break if
they also get by Crystal River
next Friday
The Panthers, who handed
Hernando its second defeat of
the season with a 56-52 home
win on Tuesday, are enjoying a
56-percent field goal rate 42
percent from beyond the arc -
but have struggled with
turnovers. By comparison, DHS
is shooting 34 percent as a team,
and Hairston is the only Tiger
shooting better than 50 percent.
Jump started
While juniors Brandon Burich
(16.9 points per game) and Darius


Sawyer (15 points per game) are
leading the scoring charge for the
Panthers, head coach JeffAnder-
son sees even more capability for
his two offensive leaders. At one
point in the fourth quarter of
Lecanto's win at Crystal River,
Anderson implored Sawyer to be
more aggressive against the one-
on-one matchups he was getting.
Moments later, the left-handed
forward provided the highlight of
the evening with a scorching
dunk over a Pirate defender It
was reminiscent of a similar put-
back slam he had against Citrus
earlier this season.
"He has the motor," Anderson
said of Sawyer, "but he doesn't
know how to turn the key on. I
have to turn it on for him. I'll
turn it on quicker next time.
He's great slasher"
"(Coach Jeff Anderson's) put-
ting that killer instinct in me, be-
cause I kind of lay off


Associated Press

LAKE BUENA VISTA
- Baseball officials are
up front about this: They
want to ban home plate
collisions to guard their
investments.
Minnesota's Joe Mauer,
a former MVP and three-
time batting champion, is
less than halfway through
a $184 million, eight-year
contract. He was limited
to 75 games at catcher
this year in a concussion-
shortened season.
Buster Posey, another
MVP and batting champ,
has a $167 million, nine-
year deal. San Francisco
wants to ensure that he
doesn't have another
horrific injury like the
one that ended his 2011
season.
That's why Major
League Baseball's rules
committee voted this week
to prohibit runners from
plowing into catchers. The
rule will take effect next
season if the players' asso-
ciation agrees, and in 2015
if the union doesn't.
"It's a great change. We
protect our assets," Los
Angeles Angels general
manager Jerry Dipoto
said Thursday as the win-
ter meetings ended.
"Some of the things we've
seen happen in the re-
cent past Buster Posey,
concussions with Joe
Mauer, Yadier Molina get-
ting blown up, they are
some of the best players
in the game. They mean
so much to their team -
the financial investments
involved. And more im-
portantly, the health of
the individual."
Boston's David Ross,
Detroit's Alex Avila, Oak-
land's John Jaso and
Kansas City's Salvador
Perez all missed time be-
cause of concussions this
year
"Collisions at home
plate can significantly
alter your ability to win
games," said Andrew
Friedman, Tampa Bay's
executive vice president of
baseball operations. "I just
think athletes today are
bigger, faster, stronger, and
the catchers are in signifi-
cant danger of long-term
injuries that we can avoid.
I think the heightened
awareness to concussions
influences it quite a bit"
Eleven players who
were primarily catchers
last season are signed to
contracts running


through 2016 and beyond,
with a total of $565.45 mil-
lion in remaining guaran-
teed salary, according to
calculations by The
Associated Press.
MLB watched as the
NFL reached a $765 mil-
lion settlement last sum-
mer in a concussion-
related lawsuit by former
players, and a group of
hockey players sued the
NHL last month over
brain trauma.
"How much is it that
they're paid a lot more
than they used to be?"
said New York Mets GM
Sandy Alderson, chair-
man of the rules commit-
tee. "It's a combination of
those things. But I think
what's crystalized our
thinking is probably the
concussion issue. Try to
be proactive."
This year's winter
meetings likely will be re-
membered most for the
rules decision. There
were just six trades -
two more than during last
year's drab session in
Nashville, Tenn. As the
meetings ended, the
Chicago Cubs acquired
Justin Ruggiano from
Miami for Brian Boguse-
vic in a swap of outfield-
ers, Seattle completed its
$240 million, 10-year con-
tract with All-Star second
baseman Robinson Cano,
Boston finalized a $32
million, two-year agree-
ment with first baseman
Mike Napoli, and Wash-
ington completed a two-
year deal with outfielder
Nate McLouth.
In one-year deals pend-
ing physical, outfielder
Michael Morse agreed
with San Francisco at $6
million, right-hander
Roberto Hernandez with
Philadelphia and re-
liever Joba Chamberlain
with Detroit.
Crashes at home plate
have been a baseball tra-
dition and a staple of tele-
vision highlight shows.
Some traditionalists such
as career hits leader Pete
Rose are against a change.
But some in MLB man-
agement fear continuing
the status quo could lead
to possible liability
"I think it's always been
in a lot of people's minds
as odd that we allow colli-
sions there and we don't
really allow them at other
bases," Los Angeles
Dodgers President Stan
Kasten said. "I think it's
frankly overdue."


sometimes," Sawyer said. "But
I'm getting better"
SRCS plays host to OCA
Seven Rivers Christian
bounced back from a 73-53 dis-
trict-opening loss at Ocala St.
John Lutheran with a 62-41
romp of Hernando Christian
Academy last Friday Led by
county-leading scorer and re-
bounder Adam Gage, the War-
riors (1-3, 0-1 in District 2A-3)
take on a struggling Ocala Chris-
tian Academy a school rival of
SRHS but not a district oppo-
nent- at home tonight for a 7:30
p.m. tipoff. Seven Rivers will
also be paying attention to
tonight's result between First
Academy-Leesburg and St. John
Lutheran, which are both 1-0 in
District 2A-3 and figure to be the
Warriors' toughest district foes.
First Academy travels to
Lecanto to face Seven Rivers
next Friday


Associated Press
A person familiar with the negotiations said the Detroit
Tigers and former New York Yankees pitcher Joba
Chamberlain have agreed to terms on a one-year con-
tract. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to
The Associated Press on Thursday because the deal
hadn't been announced.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 B3




B4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 10 14 .417
Brooklyn 8 14 .364
Toronto 7 13 .350
Philadelphia 7 16 .304
NewYork 6 15 .286
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 16 6 .727
Atlanta 11 11 .500
Charlotte 10 12 .455
Washington 9 11 .450
Orlando 7 15 .318
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 19 3 .864
Detroit 10 13 .435
Chicago 8 12 .400
Cleveland 8 13 .381 1
Milwaukee 5 17 .227
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 17 4 .810
Houston 15 7 .682
Dallas 13 10 .565
New Orleans 10 10 .500
Memphis 10 11 .476
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Portland 18 4 .818
Oklahoma City 17 4 .810
Denver 13 8 .619
Minnesota 11 11 .500
Utah 5 19 .208
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 15 9 .625
Phoenix 12 9 .571
Golden State 13 10 .565
L.A. Lakers 10 11 .476
Sacramento 6 14 .300
Thursday's Games
Brooklyn 102, L.A. Clippers 93
Houston at Portland, late
Today's Games
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia atToronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT FP
Boston 31 21 8 2
Montreal 33 1911 3
Tampa Bay 31 1810 3
Detroit 33 15 9 9
Toronto 33 1614 3
Ottawa 33 1314 6
Florida 32 1017 5
Buffalo 32 723 2


CE
'tsGF GA
44 86 62
41 86 73
39 87 77
39 88 87
35 90 96
32 94 106
25 73 106
16 54 94


Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 32 21 10 1 43 98 71
Washington 31 1712 2 36 98 90
Carolina 32 1313 6 32 75 91
Columbus 32 1415 3 31 82 88
Philadelphia 32 1415 3 31 72 86
N.Y Rangers 33 1517 1 31 72 88
New Jersey 32 1214 6 30 73 82
N.Y Islanders 32 918 5 23 80 111
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 34 23 6 5 51129 93
St. Louis 30 21 6 3 45106 70
Colorado 30 21 9 0 42 87 71
Minnesota 33 1810 5 41 78 77
Dallas 30 1411 5 33 84 89
Nashville 32 1514 3 33 74 90
Winnipeg 33 1414 5 33 86 94
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 34 22 7 5 49108 87
Los Angeles 32 21 7 4 46 88 63
San Jose 31 19 6 6 44103 78
Vancouver 33 1810 5 41 88 81
Phoenix 30 17 8 5 39 97 94
Calgary 30 11 15 4 26 79 100
Edmonton 32 11 18 3 25 89 109
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 2, Detroit 1, SO
Colorado 4, Winnipeg 3, SO
Columbus 4, N.Y Rangers 2
Philadelphia 2, Montreal 1
Ottawa 2, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 6, Toronto 3
Nashville 3, Dallas 1
Carolina at Calgary, late
N.Y Islanders at Phoenix, late
Boston at Edmonton, late
Minnesota at San Jose, late
Today's Games
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton atVancouver, 9 p.m.



NFL standings


New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

y-lndianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Houston

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

x-Denver
Kansas City
San Diego


AFC
East
W L T
10 3 0
7 6 0
6 7 0
4 9 0
South
W L T
8 5 0
5 8 0
4 9 0
2 11 0
North
W L T
9 4 0
7 6 0
5 8 0
4 9 0
West
W L T
11 3 0
10 3 0
7 7 0


AWARDS
Continued from Page B1

championship rings at Ala-
bama, looked visibly taken
aback when his name was
called for the Maxwell Award.
"Super surprised," McCar-
ron said. "I don't think I'm
the best player out of those
other two guys that were
mentioned. But I can't thank
them enough. It's an honor to
be here."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^O^, ^ 0-7-8
49 CASH 3 (late)
0 4-5-2

PLAY 4 (early)
8-5-6-2
PLAY 4 (late)
3-4-1-9

FANTASY 5
10 15 16 19 22

Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 1 -10 -13 -18 -19
Powerball: 27
5-of-5 PB 2 winners $122 million
No Florida winner
5-of-5 7 winners $1 million
No Florida winners
Fantasy 5:13 -19 -22 -23 -36
5-of-5 2 winners $117,190.54
4-of-5 296 $127.50
3-of-5 9,579 $11.00


Lotto: 2
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


33-38-51 -52-53
No winner
27 $4,592.50
1,484 $76.50
24,486 $5.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Cleveland Cavaliers at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) LosAngeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) Houston Rockets at Golden State Warriors
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Iowa at Iowa State
BOXING
8 p.m. (SUN) Golden Boy: Manuel Avila vs. Jose Angel
Cota (Taped)
10 p.m. (FS1) Golden Boy: Josesito Lopez vs. MikeArnaoutis
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Division I quarterfinal Towson at
Eastern Illinois
12 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Division I quarterfinal Towson at
Eastern Illinois. (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
5 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Nelson Mandela
Championship, Third Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) Franklin Templeton Shootout, First Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) PNC Father/Son Challenge, Pro-Am
(Same-day Tape)
11:30 p.m. (GOLF) Thailand Golf Championship, Third
Round
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado College at Wisconsin
COLLEGE SOCCER
5 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Cup semifinal New Mexico vs.
Notre Dame
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Cup semifinal Maryland vs.
Virginia

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Crystal River at Citrus
7:30 p.m. Dunnellon at Lecanto
7:30 p.m. Ocala Christian Academy at Seven Rivers
GIRLS BASKETBALL
6 p.m. Ocala Christian at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. Citrus at Crystal River
7 p.m. Lecanto at Dunnellon
BOYS SOCCER
7:30 p.m. Weeki Wachee at Crystal River
GIRLS SOCCER
7 p.m. Lecanto at East Ridge
7 p.m. Crystal River at Weeki Wachee
7:30 p.m. Central at Citrus
GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING
4 p.m. Lecanto at River Ridge Dispariti Invitational
WRESTLING
3 p.m. Crystal River, Citrus at Belleview Diamondback Duals


Oakland 4 9 0
NFC
East
W L T
Philadelphia 8 5 0
Dallas 7 6 0
N.Y Giants 5 8 0
Washington 3 10 0
South
W L T
New Orleans 10 3 0
Carolina 9 4 0
Tampa Bay 4 9 0
Atlanta 3 10 0
North
W L T
Detroit 7 6 0
Chicago 7 6 0
Green Bay 6 6 1
Minnesota 3 9 1
West
W L T
x-Seattle 11 2 0
San Francisco 9 4 0
Arizona 8 5 0
St. Louis 5 8 0


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday's Gam
San Diego 27, Denver 20
Sunday's Gam
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 1 p
Washington at Atlanta, 1 p.m.


.308 264 337 San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
.615 334 301 Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
.538 357 348 New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
.385 251 334 Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
.231 279 407 N.Y Jets at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona atTennessee, 4:25 p.m.
Pct PF PA New Orleans at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
.769 343 243 Green Bay at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
.692 298 188 Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
.308 244 291 Monday's Game
.231282 362 Monday's Game
.231 282 362 Baltimore at Detroit, 8:40 p.m.
Pct PF PA Sunday, Dec. 22
.538 346 321 Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
.538 368 360 Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
.500 316 326 Denver at Houston, 1 p.m.
.500 316 326
.269 315 395 Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Pct PF PA Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.
.846 357 205 Cleveland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
.692 316 214 Minnesota atCincinnati, 1 p.m.
.615 305 257 Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
.385 289 308 Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
me Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
es Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
).m. Monday, Dec. 23
Atlanta at San Francisco, 8:40 p.m.


McCarron was sometimes
overlooked despite leading
Alabama to an 11-1 season
that left the Crimson Tide
just short of a chance to play
for its third straight national
championship. He threw for
2,676 yards and 26 touch-
downs with five intercep-
tions this season.
Now, he prepares to make
his first trip to New York for
the Heisman ceremony and
McCarron said his game plan
is simple.
Other award winners


Thursday were Michigan
State senior cornerback Dar-
queze Dennard (Jim Thorpe
Award for top defensive
back), Oregon State junior
receiver Brandin Cooks
(Biletnikoff Award for best
wide receiver), and Memphis
senior Tom Hornsey (Ray
Guy Award for top punter).
Winston wasn't the only
Florida State player to be
honored. Seminoles fresh-
man Roberto Aguayo won
the Lou Groza Award as the
nation's best place kicker


Chargers stun Broncos
DENVER Phillip Rivers outplayed
Peyton Manning and the San Diego
Chargers sprung a 27-20 upset Thurs-
day night over the Denver Broncos.
Rivers threw for 166 yards and two
scores to Keenan Allen and kept the
Chargers' offense on the field for nearly
39 minutes.
Stuck on the sideline most of the night,
Manning ended up with 289 yards and
only two touchdowns. The Broncos (11-
3) fell at home in the regular season for
the first time in 14 games.
The Chargers (7-7) snapped Denver's
10-game AFC West winning streak and
stayed in the hunt for a playoff spot.
Denver's smooth road to the AFC
West title and home-field advantage
throughout the playoffs got bumpier. The
Broncos now have as many losses as
Kansas City and New England. They
hold the tiebreaker against the Chiefs but
not the Patriots.
Pierce, Garnett help Nets
beat Rivers' Clippers
NEW YORK-Andray Blatche and
Joe Johnson each scored 21 points in
the Brooklyn Nets' 102-93 victory over
the Los Angeles Clippers on Thursday
night, making Paul Pierce and Kevin
Garnett winners in their first matchup
with Doc Rivers.
Brook Lopez had 16 points and Deron
Williams 15 for the Nets, who won their




EASON
Continued from Page BI

"Her understanding of when and
where (to go)," he said, "when do I go,
where do I go. And that's huge.
"She's also got better court
awareness."
Eason, accompanied by her ever-
present smile, deferred such acco-
lades to include her teammates.
"We're a family," she said. "We
never butt heads. I just never thought
about it (individual accomplish-
ments). My team helps."
But then again, there's that on-
court anticipation that she often ex-
hibits when making a steal, an innate




ROESSLER
Continued from Page B1

steals a night.
CRHS head coach Steve Feldman
said Roessler's "basketball I.Q." and
formidable athletic ability mean he can
play any position on the court, which
sometimes means having to go against
his strengths as the Pirates cope with a
deficit of experience and a hobbled Ty
Reynolds. It also means drawing more
attention from opponents.
"He's like a jack-of-all-trades for us
because we've had multiple issues
with multiple positions," Feldman
said.
"While Reynolds has been out with
injuries, we've had to make him our
primary ball handler, and that's not
his strong suit. He won't complain a
bit about it, but it doesn't put him in
the best position. He's much better at
cutting and slashing, at seeing the
court and finding the open spots. But
we've had such an issue with
turnovers by our guards, we've had to
ask him to bring the ball up."
Feldman said it was an easy call
naming Roessler the team's captain.
"It was a no-brainer," he said. "He
put the time in this summer and it
prepared him to have a solid senior
season. With his discipline, I think
martial arts enhances that, but he just
comes from great parents. He's got a
very good sense of inner drive to him
when it comes to doing things when
nobody's watching. He's a workout
freak. That translates to, when we're




NOTEBOOK
Continued from Page Bl

River, doesn't it? But remember, Cit-
rus has dominated girls basketball
within the county for the past few
years, winning at least 20 games three
straight times. Crystal River coach
Jason Rodgers is well aware of this,
having lost to the Hurricanes six times
in a row.
Defense has been the 'Canes' most
prominent means of overwhelming
opponents. And they have various
methods in their arsenal, using half-
court and full-court traps, zones and
man-to-man with equal tenacity Their
anticipation interrupts passing lanes
and makes their offense seem that
much more effective.


But offense has actually been Cit-
rus' greatest weakness. The 'Canes too
often miss easy shots in close to the
basket, and their free-throw shooting
remains inconsistent. And Crystal
River has several three-point threats,
a luxury Citrus lacks.
If this game comes down to a defen-
sive struggle, Citrus should have the
edge. But if Crystal River can hit from
long range with any sort of consis-
tency, the Hurricanes' grip on county
supremacy could come to a close.
Notable notes
It's been a cruel month thus far for


season-high third straight. Pierce scored
10 points off the bench in his second
game back from a broken hand.
Chris Paul scored 20 points but had
just two assists as the Clippers lost for
the first time in nine games this season
when he reaches 20.
Pierce and Garnett went 2-0 in a re-
union tour of ex-Celtics this week.
Guard accused of stealing
2 Lakers title rings
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -A security
guard at the Los Angeles Lakers' training
center has been charged with stealing
two NBA championship rings that disap-
peared last week.
El Segundo police said in a statement
Thursday that Eddie J. Monterroso has
been charged with felony grand theft and
burglary. He's accused of taking the rings
and gift cards valued at nearly $20,000.
The statement says detectives began
investigating the theft Dec. 5 and ar-
rested Monterroso outside the practice
facility Tuesday.
Police say they searched Monterroso's
Inglewood home and found the rings
from the Lakers' 2009 and 2010 champi-
onship seasons. Police could not say
who the rings belonged to.
Monterroso has not entered a plea, and
police didn't know if he has an attorney. A
phone message left at a possible home
number was not immediately returned.
From wire reports


ability to know where a pass is going,
which was on display in the win over
Lecanto. Where does that come
from?
Her answer: "I must eat some good
cereal in the morning. Or maybe I get
up on the right side of the bed."
The talk turned to their unbeaten
start, with the biggest test thus far
coming up tonight when the Pirates
host 5A-6 rival Citrus. Eason an-
swered carefully
"We play each game like it's our
last," she replied. "I'm worried about
them, but right now I'm focused on
Boca Ciega."
If the Pirates can continue that
focus, that concentration, they just
might stretch that winning streak
much further.


ready to go the first day of practice,
he's ready to go.
"I can't tell you how much of a joy
he is to coach."
Feldman said Roessler is decep-
tively tough on the boards because of
his leaping ability, and prides himself
as a defender since making defense a
point of emphasis last season when he
wanted to ensure more playing time
for himself. This year, he's committed
to being more aggressive on the offen-
sive end.
"I'm getting to the free-throw line a
lot," he said. "My ball handling's im-
proved, I think. I'm more aggressive
this year than I have been, taking
more shots."
His sharp understanding of the
game helps him with the ball.
"He's one kid that can get his own
shot," Feldman said. "If the first op-
tion's not there, he can read it and fig-
ure out where the next option is. He
sets up his defender so he can get a
good angle. This goes with him being a
very cerebral kid. He's a very smart
student"
Roessler's been playing basketball
since the fifth grade and most loves
"playing his heart out"' in front of a
loud environment. Beside his parents
and Master Jeff Schrade, he considers
his older brother Jackson a big influ-
ence.
"He's not the most vocal guy, but
some of my best captains didn't have
to be vocal, you just had to follow their
lead," Feldman said. "The way he car-
ries himself, we'd all be in better
shape around here if we followed
him."


Seven Rivers Christian. After opening
the season with four straight wins, the
Warriors lost three of four in Decem-
ber, the most damaging a 10-point de-
feat at 2A-3 rival Ocala St. John
Lutheran on Dec. 5. That made Seven
Rivers 5-3 overall but 0-1 in district
play, which features just one round or
only four total games.
The Warriors host Ocala Christian
at 6 p.m. tonight after losing by 15
points at Wildwood on Monday Their
main problem remains the same -
finding another scoring source. Alexis
Zachar and Alyssa Gage are averaging
more than 32 of Seven Rivers' 40
points a game. They also account for
16 of the team's 23 rebounds a contest,
half of its steals and all of its blocks.
Diversity remains the catch-word
for Seven Rivers for the remainder of
the regular season.
Seven Rivers may have had a bad


month thus far, but Lecanto has had
almost nothing go right all season. The
Panthers lost for the seventh time in
eight games Monday at home against
Brooksville Nature Coast after suffer-
ing two lopsided 5A-6 setbacks to Cit-
rus and Crystal River They played at
Wildwood on Thursday evening.
But at last, a glimmer of hope.
Lecanto travels to take on Dunnellon
tonight, another team in a rebuilding
stage. At present, neither team seems
to have the talent to threaten the top
two in 5A-6, but that doesn't mean
tonight's game won't be a battle.


I S P RTS B RI FS-


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE FOOTBALL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 B5



Army's Maples ready to cheer teammates


Associated Press

Raymond Maples was poised
at the start of the season to etch
his name in the Army record
books again before departing
West Point.
Instead, he's gone from back-
field threat in Army's triple op-
tion to spectator as the final
game of his senior season looms.
It's the biggest game of his col-
lege career against archrival
Navy and he'll have to watch
from the sidelines on Saturday
at Lincoln Financial Field in his
hometown of Philadelphia, won-
dering what might have been.
"It's been humbling," said
Maples, who suffered a rare ten-


don avulsion in his right leg
against Stanford in the third
game of the season and has been
out of the lineup since. "You
never anticipate getting hurt, es-
pecially me. I've never been
hurt. You learn how to appreci-
ate the small things about the
game. Even though I'm not play-
ing, I still love it.
"It's going to be a bittersweet
feeling (on Saturday). Me, per-
sonally I don't put too much im-
portance on any one game to
miss any game is kind of heart-
breaking for me."
Army (3-8) enters the game
against Navy (74) averaging 325.9
yards rushing, tops in the nation
as the Black Knights seek their


third straight rushing title, which
would be an academy first
Last season, Army rushed for
a school-record 4,438 yards,
while the 2011 squad ran for
4,158. Those mark the only two
times the team has topped 4,000
yards, and the 6-foot-i, 220-
pound Maples was an integral
part of both. He rushed for
1,215 yards in 2012 and 1,066
the previous year, becoming
just the third sophomore in
school history to eclipse 1,000
yards. He also averaged 7.3
yards per carry as a sopho-
more, breaking the Army
record for average yards per
rush by a player with at least
100 carries in a season.


Spectator wasn't what anyone
was anticipating.
"It's obviously been very frus-
trating," Army head coach Rich
Ellerson said. "It's heartbreak-
ing for him because we thought
he was going to be able to make
a run at it late in the season, but
it hasn't happened."
The chance to match former
star Mike Mayweather as the
only running back in Army his-
tory to post three 1,000-yard sea-
sons vanished on one of the
staples of the triple option a
simple pitch.
"I caught the ball and tried to
jump and it popped," said
Maples, who had 23 carries for
123 yards this season. "I thought


it would be fine, but the next day
it got extremely swollen. I didn't
think it was that bad, but when
the MRI came back the doctors
were shocked."
Maples has had plenty of com-
pany as Ellerson continues to
deal with an array of injuries.
Junior fullback Larry Dixon, the
team's second-leading rusher,
suffered a dislocated left wrist
against Western Kentucky a
month ago, joining safety Geoff
Bacon with the same injury
Senior Hayden Tippett, Army's
second-string fullback, missed
the last three games with an
ankle injury, but Ellerson is
hopeful Tippett can play against
Navy.


Jags want MJD back


Associated Press
The Jacksonville Jaguars want to resign running back Maurice Jones-Drew, as long as it is at the right price.

Jones-Drew isfranchise's second-leading rusher in team history


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The Jack-
sonville Jaguars want running
back Maurice Jones-Drew back
next season.
Jones-Drew is doing all he can to
make it happen.
He's sharing carries, playing
through injuries and complaining
about nothing. He's all in, fully com-
mitted to what's happening in Jack-
sonville under coach Gus Bradley,
general manager Dave Caldwell
and owner Shad Khan.
"I want to be here," Jones-Drew
said. "It's a fun environment. It's
different than I've ever been a part
of. It works. It takes time to build
anything. It's starting to turn around
for us, and we're starting to play
well. That's exciting."
It also might keep Jones-Drew
from testing the free-agent market.
Jones-Drew has three games re-
maining on a five-year, $31 million
contract he signed in 2009. He's
earning $4.95 million this season.
Caldwell has made it clear he
wants Jones-Drew back at the
right price. Caldwell declined to
discuss details, not wanting to tip
his hand before negotiations begin
after the season.
But some believe the Jaguars will
start with a two-year, incentive-
laden deal that could be worth up to
$10 million.


"Seeing what I've seen and been
through the business part of it, you
want to work that thing out as best as
possible," Jones-Drew said. "But
sometimes it doesn't do that We've
seen it. Look at Peyton Manning.
Who would have thought he would-
n't be playing for the Colts right now?
"It happens. Hopefully, things
work out well. And if they do, we'll
be back."
Jones-Drew sat out the entire
2012 offseason as well as training
camp and most of the preseason,
hoping to get the team to renegoti-
ate his deal. The Jaguars never
budged, even though former general
manager Gene Smith and owner
Wayne Weaver essentially promised
him a new contract in 2011.
MJD led the NFL with 1,606 yards
rushing that season. He injured his
left foot in October 2012 and missed
the final 10 games of last season.
He returned this season and has
carried 208 times for 719 yards and
five touchdowns. The Jaguars rank
last in the league in total offense
and rushing, but Caldwell believes
Jones-Drew can be a reliable run-
ner even as he creeps closer and
closer to his 30th birthday
One of the best pass-blocking
backs in the league, MJD also could
help break in a new quarterback
next season.
It's not a role he would have ex-
celled in a few years ago, but MJD's


more mature these days.
"I just want to be a leader," he
said. "Back when I was young and
doing some wild stuff, we had older
guys that would be like, All right,
calm down.' Well, now I look around
here and I'm like, All right, where
are these older guys at? Oh, I'm one
of them.' So you've kind of got to
change some things, especially with
what we've been going through."
The Jaguars (4-9) have won four
of their last five games a modest
turnaround after a winless first half
of the season that included eight
double-digit losses.
As Bradley tells it getting Jones-
Drew onboard with the team's "get
better" approach was a huge help
in the locker room, in the meeting
rooms and in the huddle.
"The cool thing was it made a lot
of sense to him," Bradley said.
It took some time, though.
Bradley recalled his first day
with the team in March. Players
were going through conditioning
tests, and Jones-Drew balked at one
of the requirements. Bradley was 12
minutes away from his first team
meeting when an assistant told him
Jones-Drew wanted to talk.
Bradley briefly considered
brushing Jones-Drew off until after
the meeting, but instead opted to let
him vent. They talked it out, and
Jones-Drew has been a model
teammate since.


Rodgers close to


return for Packers


Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Green Bay Packers quar-
terback Aaron Rodgers'
checklist for playing Sun-
day has two primary items
on it: taking the majority of
first-team snaps in practice
Friday and getting good re-
sults from a scan on his
healing left collarbone.
If both those things hap-
pen, Rodgers could be
back under center for the
first time since breaking
his collarbone Nov 4
against Chicago.
Asked after Thursday's
practice if he is holding
out hope of playing Sun-
day, Rodgers paused be-
fore replying, "Yes."
He said he'll need to get
most of the work in today's
practice after sharing
snaps with backup Matt
Flynn for the past two
days, and the team will
likely want team physician
Patrick McKenzie to exam-
ine him. Rodgers' last CT
scan was done on Dec. 3
and did not show sufficient
healing in the bone to get
him cleared to play
As of Thursday after-
noon, Rodgers said he had
not been scanned. He also
would not say whether a
scan has been scheduled.
Asked if he would be
scanned before the week
is out, Rodgers replied,
"I'm not sure about that."
But asked if that would
be the deciding factor in
whether he plays, Rodgers
replied, "I think there's
more to it than that. But I
would guess there would
have to be another scan for
me to be on the field."
With Rodgers sidelined,
the Packers have gone 1-4-1
and enter the final three
weeks of the season at 6-6-1,
a half-game back of the


NFC North leading Detroit
Lions and Chicago Bears,
both of whom are 7-6. Mc-
Carthy has said that his
team needs to win out to
make the playoffs, and the
Packers got the first of those
victories last week over the
Atlanta Falcons with Matt
Flynn at quarterback.
Rodgers indicated that
the team would make a de-
cision on his status today in
fairness to Flynn. In 2008,
after dislocating his shoul-
der the previous week,
Rodgers was listed as
doubtful going into a game
against the Falcons at Lam-
beau Field but worked out
before the game and
started, despite taking only
about 10 snaps in 11-on-ll
drills in practice all
handoffs all week.
Rodgers completed 25 of
37 passes for 313 yards
with three touchdowns
and one interception (109.4
rating) in a 27-24 loss.
"Like I said last week,
when I knew it wasn't going
to happen, it's not fair to
Matt to draw this out to the
game," Rodgers said. "Now,
that happened back in 2008
when I was doubtful, came
in Sunday and was able to
play (But) if I'm going to
play Sunday, I'm going to
need to take the majority of
the reps tomorrow"
On Tuesday, Rodgers re-
vealed on his weekly radio
show on that he experi-
enced unexpected pain in
practice last week when
trying to hand off with his
left hand or take snaps
from center That pain told
him that he wasn't going to
be ready for the Falcons.
This week, after taking
snaps with the No. 1 of-
fense both Wednesday and
Thursday, Rodgers did not
experience the same
amount of pain.


Associated Press
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers watches
from the sidelines during the fourth quarter on Nov. 28
against the Detroit Lions at Ford Field in Detroit.


UF announces 6
players transferring
GAINESVILLE Florida
coach Will Muschamp seems
to be cleaning house after the
program's first losing season
since 1979.
Muschamp announced
Thursday that six offensive
players have decided to trans-
fer. The list includes freshman
quarterback Max Staver and
three offensive linemen.
Staver, tight end Kent Tay-
lor, fullback Rhaheim Ledbet-
ter and offensive linemen
Quinteze Williams, Trevon
Young and lan Silberman are
changing schools. Silberman,
a junior from nearby Jack-
sonville, plans to play his final
season at another school
after graduating Saturday.
Their decisions came a little
more than a week after
Muschamp fired offensive co-
ordinator Brent Pease and of-
fensive line coach Tim Davis.
Muschamp said "these
young men felt it was in their
best interest to look for an op-


Football BRIEFS
portunity to play somewhere
else. We wish all of them the
best of luck."
SEC football hugely
popular on TV
NEW YORK -The South-
eastern Conference is more
popular than ever.
The average television rat-
ing for the league's games on
CBS this season was the
highest since the network
began broadcasting a prima-
rily SEC schedule in 2001.
CBS said Thursday that its
coverage averaged a 4.5 rat-
ing and 10 share, up 15 per-
cent from last year.
Large audiences for the Al-
abama-Texas A&M and Ala-
bama-Auburn games boosted
the numbers. SEC teams
have won seven straight na-
tional titles, and Auburn is
going for the eighth in a row.
Ratings represent the per-
centage of homes with televi-
sions tuned into a program, and
shares measure the percent-
age of TVs in use at the time.


Texas' Brown mum
on future amid
speculation
AUSTIN, Texas Texas
coach Mack Brown declined to
say Thursday whether the
Alamo Bowl will be his final
game, amid intense specula-
tion following another disap-
pointing season that began
with the Longhorns talking
about becoming national cham-
pionship contenders again.
"My situation has not
changed," Brown said.
Speaking to reporters for the
first time since multiple pub-
lished reports this week indi-
cated that he might step down,
Brown said he has yet to talk
with new Texas athletic director
Steve Patterson and university
President Bill Powers about
the job he has held since 1998.
Brown deflected several
other questions about his fu-
ture during a news confer-
ence in San Antonio about
Texas' bowl game against
Oregon on Dec. 30.
From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Heisman Trophy PROFILE


County bragging


rights at stake


CR, Citrus

set to meet at

Belleview duals

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent


Associated Press
Texas A&M redshirt sophomore quarterback Johnny Manziel is again a finalist for the Heisman Trophy, with a
chance to become just the second player to win the award twice.



Johnny on the spot


2012 Heisman

winner Manziel

finalist again

Associated Press

HOUSTON Johnny Manziel
isn't sure if he'll declare for the
NFL draft next month.
But if he does he's thought a lot
about his legacy and how he wants
to be remembered as one of the
best to have ever played and some-
one who made a major impact for
Texas A&M.
He's made a pretty compelling
argument for both. He's a finalist
for the Heisman Trophy again,
with a chance to join Archie Grif-
fin as the second player to win the
award twice.
"To be a college football player
in a skill position, that's what you
shoot for every year," Manziel said.
"So to get to New York and to be
one of the best players in the coun-
try and then to be that person to
win it, it's a dream come true for
anybody that's grown up playing
Pop Warner Football, that's grown


up playing middle school, high
school football."
Johnny Football is one of six
players who will attend the presen-
tation ceremony Saturday night in
New York Manziel isn't expected to
take home another Heisman after
Florida State's Jameis Winston
burst onto the scene with a spec-
tacular redshirt freshman season
much the way Manziel did last year.
Manziel became the first fresh-
man to win the Heisman in 2012
after setting numerous school and
Southeastern Conference records
while leading Texas A&M to an
11-2 record and a victory over No. 1
Alabama in its first season in the
SEC.
The Aggies were supposed to
contend for a national title in
Manziel's encore. But another
standout season by the electric
quarterback wasn't enough to over-
come a porous defense that was
among the worst in the nation. The
Aggies finished 8-4.
"This year we definitely had our
ups and downs," Manziel said. "We
didn't have a final record like we
wanted to at the beginning of the
year But just the whole season and
how it's been, it's been a ride."
That ride for Manziel started


when he was suspended for the
first half of the Aggies' season
opener against Rice for what the
school said was an "inadvertent"
violation of NCAA rules involving
signing autographs.
The quarterback was investi-
gated for allegedly accepting
money for autographs from memo-
rabilia brokers, a violation of
NCAA rules that could have led to
a much longer suspension.
He shook off his early season
drama to throw for 3,723 yards and
33 touchdowns and led the team in
rushing with 686 yards and eight
more scores. He threw more
touchdown passes, had more yards
passing, a better completion per-
centage and averaged more yards
an attempt than he did in 2012.
He's third in the nation in total
offense with 368.2 yards a game
and fourth in pass efficiency
Manziel dealt with various nag-
ging injuries this season and said
this week that he's getting better
as the Aggies have some time off
before facing Duke in the Chick-
Fil-A Bowl on Dec. 31. His thumb
injury is still bothering him the
most, but he said it isn't anything
that would keep him out of the
bowl game.


Heisman dream in reach for Winston


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Jameis Winston envi-
sioned winning the Heis-
man Trophy well before he
signed with Florida State.
He'll find out whether
his dream becomes a re-
ality on Saturday night.
The redshirt freshman
quarterback is one of six
finalists up for the most
prestigious individual
award in college football.
Winston and his high
school coach Matt Scott
were in Tuscaloosa on a
recruiting trip at Alabama
when he took a picture
with Mark Ingram's 2009
trophy He wanted to be
the first atAlabama to win
the award, at the time.


"When Ingram won it I reigning Heisman win-
was just like, 'Well, he won ner Johnny Manziel, Al-
it So, I'vegottobethenext abama's A.J. McCarron,
person from Ala- Boston College's
bama to win it," Andre Williams,
said Winston, who Northern Illinois'
pointed out that Jordan Lynch
Ingram is actually and Auburn's Tre
from Michigan Mason.
"Football is so Winston set At-
important to Ala- lantic Coast Con-
bama, so any time ference freshman
you have a na- records for the
tional achieve- Jameis most yards pass-
ment it means a Winston ing (3,820) and


lot to your state
and your family" Winston
said. "You always dream.
You've got to dream big
because if you don't
dream big, there's no use
to dream at all."
He'll be joined in New
York by Texas A&M's


touchdown passes
(38) while leading the
No. 1-ranked Seminoles to
a 13-0 record and berth in
the BCS championship
game.
Florida State and Win-
ston continued to excel
despite a sexual assault


investigation that became
public last month. The
State Attorney's Office an-
nounced that it would not
press charges against
Winston last week. How-
ever, Winston's legal prob-
lems may not be over The
accuser, her lawyer and
family have scheduled a
press conference Friday
There is no doubt about
Winston's talent. He is al-
ready being talked about
as a potential franchise
quarterback in the NFL,
even though he can't be
drafted until 2015.
"The one thing that you
don't know about a lot of
players is how well, how
quickly they're able to
read defenses," said Gil
Brandt NFL draft analyst


12 winte
placed ir
Veteran
Frederic
reins in 1
Richards
man line
pins acr(
hour eve
CRHS


At some point this week- state qua
end, county rivals Crystal Michael,
River and Citrus will tangle not comic
for the first time in several edition.
years to highlight a dual- The P
meet format in Marion ers
players,
County 152
Ten area teams will clash 15 (sect
in a robin-round dual-meet at 195 (tL
format beginning today and The df
concluding Saturday fea- with four
turning: Brooksville-Her- HoopE
nando, Inverness-Citrus, Crystal F
Crystal River, Dunnellon, champion
Lakeland-George Jenkins, 2003 enc
Ocala-West Port, Sarasota, Rocks C
The Villages, Weeki Wachee house t
and host Belleview nals, 9-2
Today's action begins at 3 with one
p.m. and Saturday's action ver mede
is expected to start at 9 a.m. Top-se
across four mats. blemish
Trophies will be awarded morning'
to the top two teams. Central s
Medals will be presented dealt him
for the top three in each Bilbyr
weight class. a team-
At Belleview, former on a bro
Hudson High football and In a m
wrestling mentor Gary Hall carved
has returned to the mats for caFred eric
the Diamond Rattlers. thedercl
"There will be some good proc
wrestling this weekend," "Thisi
Coach Hall predicted. (Bellevie
"Crystal River, Jenkins and cleared. '1
Citrus are always up there, forward I
I don't know much about while. Tt
Sarasota." our oldei
On the purpose of the to work(
first-year event, "We've got this toug
a real young team, mostly get expo
freshmen and sopho- "Kiwa
mores," Hall said. "That's ing tool f
why we're not going to IBTs added."
(individually bracketed more tha
tournaments)," admitted tonight.
Hall. "These kids need to servativE
get as many matches as they "... Bil
can." in the se
According to Citrus sec- Maybe n
ond-year mentor Jeff Wood,
the Inverness mat men Lec
were "attempting to build Lecan
momentum for Belleview" ingthis
CHS fared well at the 22nd ov
TT n A i 22nd ovw
Hermann Cup going 4-1. Kiwanis.
The 'Canes solved Dun-
nellon (54-24), Mitchell (51- Lecan
30), Belleview (52-16) and squad pc
crushed Interlachen (72-6) bouts -
before tumbling at the Senioi
hands of Lutz-Steinbrenner finished
(43-36). pins to p
The loss to Steinbrenner Matt Wh
snapped CHS' six-match shy of pl
win skein, slate at1
All season long the Hurri- "Chris
canes (8-4 overall) have first two
been led the senior 1-2 real toug
punch of Casey Bearden top-seed
and Brandon Taylor Harmony
Last weekend was no dif- Lecanto
ferent as the duo combined said. "HE
to go 10-0 with eight pins. (Crystal
Taylor dropped down to and beal
170 pounds and went 5-0 Chapel I
with three pins while Bear- place thi
den bumped up to 182 and "Matth
finished 5-0 with five pins. of being
Senior Tarique Cabanas en
at 145 and sophomores mentand(
Christopher Keene at 106 see(
and Willie Wallen at 132 nan Ertl)
each finished 4-1 with a pin before hE
apiece. pin.
Pirates primed "Over
Roberts
for Belleview work the
For its part, Crystal River won mat
(8-1 dual meets) believes it has lot of wo
the wind at their sails following get back
last weekend's encouraging strength
seventh-place finish in the namic."
crowded 30-team Brooksville- LHS nr
Kiwanis Invitational. Tuesday
It marked the ninth time in Dunnellc


rs that the Pirates had
n the Kiwanis top 10.
an Pirate skipper Craig
k, who took over the
1989-90 from Steve
son, watched his 13-
up go 26-24 with 15
)oss the two-day, 17-
nt.
S was minus 2013
alifier and senior
Allen at 132, who did
iete due to a skin con-

irates were led by two
seniors Nick Hooper at
;ond) and Andrew Bilby
third .
uo combined to go 7-2
pins.
ier's bid to become
River's first Kiwanis
n since Seth Metz in
ded when Indian
hristian's Conner All-
rimmed him in the fi-
2. Hooper finished 3-1
pin, settling for the sil-
al.
needed Bilby's lone
arrived in Saturday
s semifinals when
senior Brandon Brown
n a 9-2 upset.
returned home 4-1 with
high three pins, settling
nze medal.
neet where 10 Pirates
out at least one win,
k was encouraged with
eedings.
s just a warm-up for
ew)," Frederick de-
We've been looking
to wrestling Citrus for a
his tournament showed
r kids what they need
)n. In a tournament
h, your weaknesses
osed.
mis was a good learn-
or us," Frederick
Hooper knows a lot
in he what he showed
He was a little too con-
e.
by had one bad match
mis that happens.
low he'll listen better."
anto sits out
nto will not be compet-
veekend after finishing
erall with 29 points at

into's young 10-man
hosted seven wins in 26
all by two grapplers.
r Chris Ewing at 182
4-1 at 182 with three
lace third while senior
eat finished two wins
acing registering a 3-2
160.
(Ewing) pinned his
kids before having a
|h semifinal (losing to
led Sawyer Root of
i via a pin fall in 2:58),"
coach Scot Roberts
e came back to pin
River's Eddie) Bennis
t a good Wesley
kid (Nathan Love) to
rd.
iew had the misfortune
drawn into the tourna-
d facing the No. 2
ernando senior Bren-
. He was ahead 4-0
e suffered a defensive

all, it wasn't real good,"
noted. "The guys who
hardest in the room
ches; the rest have a
rk to do. We've got to
to what we do. The
of this field was dy-

eturns to the mats
, Dec. 17, by hosting
>n.


Area boys soccer rosters hit by injuries


DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent

Boys soccer returned to action
last week after a brief holiday
break, but the rest wasn't enough
to repair rosters.
A lot of looks
Last week brought nine games
and the ninth different lineup
for the Crystal River Pirates,
who went 1-2 during the week to
enter this week with a 2-7 record
overall in District 3A-7. Coach
Bobby Verlato has shifted play-
ers around to find the right fit for
the inexperienced team of
mostly underclassmen, and to
address injuries.
The Pirates played their best
game of the season in a 3-1 win


over Hudson on Dec. 4, shooting
and passing the ball soundly
Junior forward Gabe Charles
scored his first varsity goal in a
3-1 loss to Hernando a few days
later, a game where Verlato saw
his team play well together
Verlato believes teams the Pi-
rates already faced this year
might not recognize the team
now
"We've changed our style of
play so much that people are
starting to notice," he said.
For the record books
The 1-0 win over Nature Coast
Tech on Dec. 4 was career win
195 for Citrus Hurricanes coach
Steve Ekeli. Defenseman Jake
Thatcher deflected a Josh Mars-
den free kick from about


20 yards out in the last minute of
stoppage time.
Thatcher originally was not
going to move up on the play but
defender Sean Flaherty urged
him to, before he saw a gap right
goalpost side as Marsden's low
kick reached him and rolled off
his right foot.
"I saw an opening and I'm glad
that Josh did too," Thatcher
said.
Ekeli is up to 197 career wins
after victories on Monday and
Wednesday
The Hurricanes won both its
games last week, and now the
'Canes are nearing full strength
for their roster. Midfielder
Jonathan Kreidenweis is back
from a three-game red-card


suspension.
"We're in the ballpark, we're
no longer sitting outside in the
cheap seats," Ekeli said of his
team's play as of late.
Feeling the pain
The Lecanto Panthers should
be at the season's midway point
but two away games were can-
celed one for poor weather
and the other for a pipe bursting
under the field so coach Doug
Warren is still waiting to see his
team's full potential.
The team 1-1-2 in District
4A-4 and 1-4-2 overall is deal-
ing with injuries with about 3 to
4 players hurt, and Warren was
recently forced to play starting
goalkeeper Ryan Stevens else-


where on the field to fill a gap.
Warren said last week he's try-
ing to get everyone playing in
the positions they're meant to.
"We're playing well, we're just
not getting the goals we need,"
he added. "Once we get healthy,
our goal production should pick
up."
Stats at a glance
Through Dec. 8
Goals: 12 Joshua Marsden,
Sr, forward, Citrus 3 -Austin
Danna, Fr., midfielder/forward,
Lecanto
Assists: 6 Joshua Marsden,
Sr, forward, Citrus; 2 -Jacob
Penn, Fr., forward/midfielder,
Crystal River
Saves: 112 Kyle Kidd, Jr.,
goalkeeper, Crystal River


B6 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013


SPORTS




Section C- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,2013
0Arts & Entertainment

NTHE


SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inside:
Filled with the Christmas
spirit and ready for some
caroling? Join the Key
singers/C6


Sleeping dragons, as we
know from our childhood
literature, eventually
awaken. If they didn't,
there wouldn't be a story.
So it's hardly news that in
the second installment of
Peter Jackson's "Hobbit"
trilogy, the dragon rouses
from his slumber.


the


'esc


0

f


It


latio


What IS news: the
franchise wakes up, too.


New 'Hobbit' breathes fire into trilogy


Photos by Associated Press
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Evangeline Lilly, lan McKellen, Martin Freeman and Luke Evans, standing, are
shown in a scene from "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug."


Details:


The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug," a Warner Bros. release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion
Picture Association of America for "extended sequences of intense fantasy action violence, and
frightening images." Running time: 161 minutes.


Die-hard fans might disagree, but to many, the first
film, last year's "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Jour-
ney," took way too long to get going and then dragged
for much of its 169 minutes. "I do believe the worst is
behind us," noted Bilbo Baggins at the end of that
film, to which some of us wanted to reply: "Well, we
hope so."
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" is not much
shorter 8 minutes, to be exact but it feels brisker,
lighter, funnier The characters are more varied, more
interesting; We'll take a comic turn by the entertaining
Stephen Fry over another Ore any day There's even
an added romantic subplot.
The whole enterprise, it must be said, involves a
huge dollop of cinematic hubris. J.R.R. Tolkien's "The
Hobbit," after all, is a book of some 300 pages. With
these three films, a prequel to his "Lord of the Rings"
trilogy, Jackson devotes about two film minutes to
each page. Imagine if they did that with Tolstoy's "War
and Peace." The movie would have been 40 hours long.
On the other hand, the first "Hobbit" installment
brought in some $1 billion. So it's rather beside the
point to argue with Jackson's approach.
Happily "Smaug" is vastly better from the get-go. In-
stead of a drawn-out intro, we get right to the action,
which is of course the quest of Bilbo (Martin Freeman,
himself livelier and funnier) and the band of dwarves,
led by Thorin Oakenshield (a suitably noble Richard
Armitage) to reclaim the kingdom of Erebor, under the
Lonely Mountain, from the frightening dragon Smaug.
As always, trouble takes many forms: not only the
menacing Orcs, but giant spiders with sticky webs, too.
Then there are the elves, who come to the rescue at an
opportune time but then imprison Bilbo and his
mates. (Gandalf- the always grand Ian McKellen -
has other business, and leaves for long stretches.)
Lee Pace is fun as the campy and authoritarian
Thranduil, leader of the elves. His son Legolas (Or-
lando Bloom, back from "The Lord of the Rings") is
See Page C3









WEEKEND


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WRAP


Today

Fort Cooper State Park decorating
and celebrating this weekend
Fort Cooper State Park will be bedecked with decora-
tions, thousands of lights and hundreds of luminaries
that lighting the way through the park this weekend for
its Nights of Lights celebration.
Stroll along the walkways and enjoy free refreshments
as you listen to live entertainment or make s'mores, and
give the kids a chance to sit on Santa's lap Friday and
Saturday
Starts at sundown. Admission is a donation of
non-perishable food, a new toy for Citrus United Basket
or a donation of pet food for Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices. Fort Cooper State Park is located just off US 41,
on South Old Floral City Road, two miles south of
Inverness.
For more information, call 352-726-0315.




Saturday

Nature Coast Community
Band presents holiday concerts

The Nature Coast Community Band, with Cindy Haz-
zard, conductor, will present its "Yuletide Tapestry" con-
certs at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W Citrus Springs Blvd., and at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15, at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 W
Highland Blvd., Inverness.
All NCCB concerts are free and everyone is welcome.


Refuge Day at Three Sisters
Springs returns with shows galore

The Homosassa River RV Resort will host a Holiday
Christmas Bazaar from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 14.
Handmade crafts fashioned by by local artists and
lunch are planned ample opportunity to find that last-
minute gift for that special someone.
Homosassa River RV Resort is on West Fishbowl
Drive. Turn left of West Halls River Road, go past the na-
ture park and the resort is approximately one half-mile
on the left


We need your

information
*V1* -L -' ~As our community grows, it becomes even more
I o ur g important that we know how to keep in touch with
each other. The Chronicle's annual publication of
Our Home Citrus is the best and most complete
resource for all those important organizations,
clubs, hobby groups, and other ways we make
friends, share pastimes and help each other out.
If you would like your group to be listed in this publication please fill out the
following form and mail or deliver by January 3, 2014 to:

Citrus County Chronicle
Attention: Our Home Citrus
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

NAME OF ORGANIZATION: (must be non-profit)__________
ORGANIZATION WEB PAGE:_____________
MEETING PLACE: Specific building designation
(Elks Lodge, Resource Center, Town Restaurant, etc.)

Street address:


MEETING TIME:
MEETING DATE:
Day of the week (every Monday, third Monday of the week)________
CONTACT:
Name:


Phone number:


Email address:

Please check the category which best describes your organization -


only one category, please:

0 Animals Q
5 Arts & Crafts
o Civic []
5 Computers f
f Cultural and Heritage 5
o Education and Youth F]


Food Programs
Fraternal
Gardening
Hobbies
Political
Recreation Groups


[ Seniors
o Service Clubs
5 Special Interest
o Support Groups
E Vehicles
[ Weight Control
El Women's Clubs


'A Fairy Tale Christmas Carole'
Special to the Chroniclde
Kay Gear as Josie Midas (Marley) tells Joe Arnold as Big Bad Wolf (Scrooge) about the chains she built up in life
by seeking only money and not caring about others in the youth production of "A Fairy Tale Christmas Carole."
The play is at the Art Center Theatre in Citrus Hills this Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students and are available at the theater or by calling 352-746-7606.



Saturday

Inverness parade
set for Saturday
O1' Saint Nick will be
splitting his time between
Fort Cooper and Inverness
as makes his way down
Main Street starting at noon
on Saturday. Floats, march-
ing bands, twinkling lights
and Christmas carols will /
get you in the holiday spirit
For more details, call 352- JILL LYLES/Special to the Chronicle
7953149.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOBBIT
Continued from Page C1

talented as ever with a bow
And he has a love interest:
Tauriel, a newly invented
character, played with
spunky sweetness by Evange-
line Lilly Tauriel, it turns
out, has a soft spot for the
dwarf Kili, a rather hunky
Aidan Turner. ("He's quite
tall for a dwarf," she says.
"But no less ugly," retorts
Legolas.)
Bilbo, ever bolder, helps
the dwarves escape their
jailers in a terrific scene -
involving barrels, river
rapids, and an endless sup-
ply of Orcs that rivals a
Busby Berkeley dance num-
ber (Side note: These
dwarves are awfully
durable.) Further entertain-
ment comes in Lake-town,
led by a greedy Master (the
engaging Fry) and his under-
ling Alfrid (Ryan Gage, also
fun).
It should be noted that
Jackson has again shot his
film at 48-frames-per-second,
double the standard speed,
to make things look sharper
But this time, the fanfare is
gone; critics were not even
shown the film at the faster
speed. Jackson clearly
doesn't want the technique to
dominate the discussion.
In any case, it all comes
down to the climactic con-
frontation with the dragon;
Unfortunately, the film sags
somewhat here. It's fun to
hear Benedict Cumberbatch,
as Smaug, hurl seething epi-
thets at Bilbo, and Freeman
is at his most pluckily
adorable. Still, they really
could have shortened this
confrontation by a good 20
minutes.
But what's 20 minutes
when you're taking nine
hours to tell a story? Onward
to the third installment. Jack-
son is back on track.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2014 C3


Katrina drama Paul Walker's finest hour


JOE LEYDON
Variety movie review
LOS ANGELES -An ingeniously sim-
ple setup is cunningly exploited for maxi-
mum suspense in "Hours," a slow-building,
consistently engrossing drama set during
and immediately after the devastation
wrought on New Orleans by Hurricane
Katrina. Making a most impressive debut
as feature helmer, scripter Eric Heisserer
graduates from savvy genre fare ("Final
Destination 5") to more mainstream
moviemaking with this intense tale of a
father's desperate efforts to keep his pre-
maturely born daughter alive in a hospi-
tal abandoned after power is knocked out
by flooding.
The late Paul Walker ("Fast & Furious")
capably and compellingly rises to the de-
mands of the role of Nolan Hayes, a lov-
ing husband who races his pregnant wife
Abigail to a New Orleans hospital when
she goes into labor unexpectedly On-
screen titles announce the extent of the
couple's wrong-place/wrong-time hospital
arrival: the early hours of Aug. 29, 2005,


Associated Press
Paul Walker, left, as Nolan Hayes, and
Genesis Rodriguez as Abigail in a scene
from the film "Hours." The film stars
Walker and Rodrigeuz as a couple who
rush to a New Orleans hospital after
Rodrigeuz's character goes into early labor.
just as gale-force winds caused by Katrina
relentlessly pummel the Crescent City
Abigail dies during childbirth, but the
stunned Nolan has little time to mourn.
His newborn child is placed in a ventila-
tor, where, a doctor explains, she must re-
main for at least 48 hours. Unfortunately,


when the city's levee system fails, flood-
waters force the evacuation of the hospi-
tal. Worse still, the ventilator cannot be
moved, so Nolan must remain behind
with his daughter until help arrives.
It's a long wait.
Through effective use of actual news-
casts from the period, "Hours" under-
scores a brutal irony Katrina actually
missed New Orleans, but the levee
breaks caused flooding in 80 percent of
the city while establishing the full
measure of the threat facing Nolan and
his newborn. When the power cuts off
and backup generators fail, he must re-
peatedly crank a backup battery that
works, at best, for three minutes between
crankings, while scavenging for food and
supplies throughout the hospital.
The new father pushes himself to the
point of exhaustion and beyond in ways
that will ring true, and perhaps pro-
foundly unsettle, simpatico parents
watching the pic.
"Hours," a Film Arcade release, is rated
PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association
of America. Running time: 97 minutes.


Watercolor classes with in-
structor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m. Tues-
days, Citrus Springs Community
Center. $10. citruscountyfl.org, click
on Parks & Recreation to register.
352-465-7007.
Floral City Library classes:
Classes are at 8360 E. Orange
Ave., Floral City. 352-726-3671.
Pen and ink with oil rouging
and watercolor batiks. Instructor
Lois Owens. $20 plus some materi-
als. Beginners welcome; com-
pleted piece every week. Classes
every Saturday at Scrap and
Stamp Art Studio in Crystal River
Mall, 352-382-4911.
Lorna Jean Gallery art classes:
Learn to Draw for ages 6 to
adult. $15 for group lessons. Ages
6 to 11,4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednes-
day and 11 a.m. to noon Saturday.
Ages 12 to 18,4 p.m. to 5 p.m.


Thursday. Adult classes 11 a.m. to
noon Tuesday and Wednesday.
Watercolor Painting for Begin-
ners, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. $15 per session.
Four students per session. 352-
564-2781.
Art & craft classes for children
ages 6 to 10, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Saturday and 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Ages 11 to 16,4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. $60 per month.
Materials included. Classes limited
to eight students. 352-564-2781.
Learn to design and create
sterling silver jewelry, 1:30 p.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday in four-week in-
tervals. $140 for four weeks. Mate-
rials and use of tools included.
352-564-2781.
Voice lessons. Ages 10 to
adult, by appointment. $15 per les-
son. 352-564-2781.


Lorna Jean Gallery is at 6136 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. 352-564-2781.
Jewelry making, 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. first and third Tuesdays at Cit-
rus Springs Community Center,
1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd. In-
structor Marcia Balonis. $15. 352-
465-7007 or
citruscountyparks.com.
The Florida Artists Gallery,
historic Knight House, 8219 Or-
ange Ave., Floral City, offers art
classes. 352-344-9300. Flori-
daartistsgallery.com.
December classes:
Advanced Fearless Painting
with Acrylics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with
lunch noon to 1 p.m. Monday, Dec.
16. Instructor Susi LaForsch. Lim-
ited to four students. $55 per work-
shop; bring materials.
laforsch@tampabay.rr.com, 352-


726-8710 or 352-344-9300.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics, 1 to 3
p.m. every Friday. Instructor Con-
nie Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session.
352-400-9757 or
ConnieTown@aol.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to 3 p.m.
every Tuesday. Instructor Connie
Townsend. For beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@aol.com.
Photography Critique Session,
1 to 3 p.m., second Thursday
monthly. Instructor Larry Jordan.
Critique of images. $10 per year.
352-344-0518.
The gallery is open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sat-
urdays, and noon to 4 p.m. Tues-
days and Sundays. 352-344-9300
or floridaartistsgallery.com.


[NIL. AININN mIIN



0o&d F'L~f 8 KntrtainhAent
I D.I F- Hwy.40Stp
RA 1 A I M I T


ivicLeoa

House Bistro


p -
~


There are many places to go to "Bi
dinner in Citrus County, but only a few .
places for us to dine. The McLeod
House Bistro has come to be known as
one of those few, and has earned the top
rating as a 1 restaurant from Tnripadvisor 2
years in a row.
After 4 years of establishing a reputation r
for delicious food and a genuine desire to
please, people are beginning to travel from
surrounding areas such as Tampa, Orlando, Ocala and
the Villages to relax and indulge themselves in the pleasures
the McLeod House has to offer.
This historic home turned restaurant is located 2 blocks off of Courthouse Square in
downtown Inverness. It features outdoor seating on the deck under 100 year old oak trees as
well as an interior dining experience that is intimate and romantic. Inside or out, time slows
and tensions ease as you unwind with a glass of wine or a Sangria with your lunch or dinner.
Lunch service begins at I11I am with selections of salads, sandwiches, paninis and
flatbreads. Dinner service begins at 4 pm with entrees including fresh grouper with a key
lime buerre blanc, scallops au gratin, pork chops with warm cinnamon apples, or the filet
mignon with an exquisite sauce de vin.
End your meal with a fabulous dessert. Flourless Chocolate Torte, Pina Colada Bread
Pudding, Creme Brulee, Classic Key Lime Pie or the scrumptious Cheesecake are each worth
the splurge.
Chef Kulow is classically European trained and a past recipient of the Critic's Choice
Award, the Reader's Choice Award, as well as two Golden Spoon Awards. His philosophy of
using only the freshest, finest ingredients paired with his ability to create tantalizing meals
is earning him fans from near and far. The McLeod House Bistro is a little slice of class and
sophistication sprinkled with charm and southern hospitality.
For more information, go to www.mcleodhousebistro.com or call 352 -726-7700.
Reservations are recommended.


BIkys Cafe
I--r. 00 *F1 ,BB,
100 FF Pork Sandwich
Any Omelet I $595 FRIES&SLAW I
WIHCOUPON EXPIRES ]2/]9/] 3 | 1WIIH COUPON EXPIRES 12/24113 I
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CORNER OF HwY. 44 & NE 8TH AVE.*CRYSTAL RIVER

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BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER

* lLUNCH SPECIALS 29
p^ M-F 11-3pm Includes Soup & Potato

DINNER 2 FOR 1399
Includes 2 Sides & Dessert


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Dine In Coupon Required. Dine In Only. Coupon Required.
OnI A expire _1/31/13 E Expiren 12/31/13
2 LOCATIONS
7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa
SLS 352-628-9588
SUNDAYC LO Highway 44, Crystal River
.MONDA 352-795-9081
WHOLE BELLY CLAMS


ON THE SCENE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Connelly's


formula still


satisfies in


'Gods of Guilt'
JEFF AYERS
AP book review
"The Gods of Guilt" (Little, Brown
and Company), by Michael Connelly
Mickey Haller, the Lincoln Lawyer,
returns to tackle his most personal case
in "The Gods of Guilt."
Haller receives an urgent text that
conveys a murder, and he rushes to the
jail. The person arrested is accused in
the death of one of the women he knew
from running her escort service web-
site. He claims he's innocent, and the
woman told him if he ever needed a
lawyer, Haller was his guy Haller does-
n't want to represent someone he con-
siders an electronic pimp, but when he
learns the victim was someone he
thought he had helped free from the
world of prostitution years earlier, the
guilt of failure makes him take the case.
To make it more difficult, Haller has
recently become estranged from his
daughter due to a case where he was
able to get a guilty man freed on a tech-
nicality How can he ignore what is
morally right to defend people who are
obviously guilty? And is his new client
just another in a string of people he
represents but doesn't trust just to ap-
pease his sense of culpability?
Connelly is a master of crime fiction,
and his latest Mickey Haller book con-
tinues the trend of compelling stories
while forcing the reader to grapple with
moral ambiguities.


Associated Press


Associated Press
Christian Bale, left, as Irving Rosenfeld, Amy Adams as Sydney Prosser, and Bradley Cooper as Richie Dimaso walk down
Lexington Avenue in a scene from "American Hustle."


In Abscam rehash 'Hustle,'


'70s shine alongside characters


JESSICA HERNDON
AP movie review
Underscoring deeply con-
flicted characters, who are
on a mission to reconceive
their unsatisfying circum-
stances, has become direc-
tor David 0. Russell's sweet
spot. From his raw 1996
film, "Flirting with Disas-
ter," to last year's acclaimed
"Silver Linings Playbook,"
he effectively unravels the
disarray
In the 1970s-set con artist
tale "American Hustle,"
Russell's ability to depict an
audacious take on a bedlam
breakdown peaks, making
this his most entertaining
jaunt yet.
Loosely chronicling the
FBI investigation designed
to implicate government of-
ficials by way of bribery
known as the Abscam scan-
dal, Russell inserts this dis-
claimer at the start: "Some
of this actually happened."
The note sets the facetious
tone for the corruption smear


- six congressmen and a
senator really went down -
that riddled New York in the
late '70s and early 1980s.
Russell, who co-wrote the
script with Eric Singer ("The
International"), could have
devised an austere new-age
noir But he avoided the melo-
drama, instead heightening
the ludicrous true-crime
thread to an outrageously
savage, comical and rapid
degree. The result is a sleek
revival of the '70s, complete
with oversized glasses,
plaid suit jackets, plunging
come-hither necklines and
a rapturous soundtrack.
Some of the names from
the real operation have been
changed here, as Irving
Rosenfeld, played by Chris-
tian Bale, is based on actual
con artist Mel Weinberg, who
was forced to conspire with
the FBI to evade doing time.
The constantly effective
Bale, as the bearded Irving,
is a clever swindler who
owns a slew of dry cleaners,
sells both poached and fake


art and hooks people into
pseudo loan deals. But he's
not exclusively heartless.
His conscience ensures he
ideally wants a person to
feel satisfied, which makes
him quite lovable.
His Irving is able to
charm the smart and sassy
former stripper Sydney
Prosser (a memorably bold
and genius Amy Adams) at a
winter indoor-pool party by
identifying their mutual
love for Duke Ellington.
Sydney, who is tired of
slumming, pitches in on Irv-
ing's crooking and assumes
the perfect British blue-
blood persona for luring
clientele into the loan scam.
Before long, the two, who
take turns narrating the
story, fall madly in love.
But we soon find out Irv-
ing is married and stashes
his lady Roselyn and her
son on Long Island. His sul-
try and blunt companion,
fiercely pronounced by Jen-
nifer Lawrence, ensures
she's far from forgotten as


she threatens to unmask
Irving's scheming if he ut-
ters the word divorce.
As Irving and Sydney's
plotting gains steam, they
attract the interest of FBI
agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley
Cooper), who is thirsty for
recognition and threatens a
bust unless the couple goes
in on a plan to nail politi-
cians. But Richie, who lives
with his mother and packs
his head with rollers for
that sexy curly look, falls
victim to Sydney's deceitful
advances, as he certainly isn't
as clever as he thinks he is.
When the scheme to take
down questionable pom-
padour-donning New Jersey
mayor Carmine Polito (Je-
remy Renner) goes wrong,
things begin to unravel.
'American Hustle," a
Sony Pictures release, is
rated R by the Motion Pic-
ture Association of America
for "pervasive language in-
cluding some sexual con-
tent and brief violence."
Running time: 137 minutes.


&S oo& L Fn 8 Ent~rtazinri#&nt


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SATURDAY w/French Fries & Cole Slaw $6
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Sll"B

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
STEAK NIGHT
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FISH $l199
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Mon- Fri q
Lunch 11:30am-3:00pm
Dinner 4:30pm-8:30pm


W Saturday
Lunch 12:00pm-3:00pm
Dinner 4:30pm-8:30pm


' BangkokTfai Restaurant i r 'angllokTfai KRestaurant
Anytime lunch BUY 1 ET
or dinner BUY 1 GET
purchase of 1I
$30 or more iI 1 HALF OFF
RECEIVE II with purchase of


1$5Is OFF two beverages.
IAEE Expires 12/23/13 I I Expires 12/23/13
| lv r OF Valid on Monday only. Coupon required. Valid on Monday only Coupon required. I
*Yo!.RN!XJvISITI J L - L - -
*$25 OR MORE V iewourfuffmenu on tripadivisor.com
+__ __ oM 4025 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills l
OOOGWR9 352-746-0443


Af
-- ,... cram shpe
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a


Us


* Sundaes
* Milkshakes
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* Egg Creams


Now serving
32 flavors of
WorKing Cou
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* Smoothies
* Banana Splits
* Pints & Quarts
to go
* Pies


Weekday Specials:
Every Tues, buy one pint or quart, getl a
Second one at price
Every Wed, active teachers getl 20% off (w/ID)
Every Thurs, Seniors (65 and up) get 20% off.
Every Fri, College Student get 20% of1 (wilD)
S$1.00 off~any 1 Free Waffle Cone or
Smoothie an Waffle Bowl with Any.
Smoothie *
Expires 12/31/13: Scoop Purchase.
:Expires 12/31/13
--- -- -- --


352.527.7250
Next to 5Keet's moKenouse 4 Grill
3887 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL


kOk Tha restaurant
lutf/entic Thai food
0 claS!I


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- -


C4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2014


ON THE SCENE


1610 S. E. Paradise Circle, Crystal River
porthote I and m a rina.com


r


I 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hummel Club


12 Days of Christmas


Mission in Citrus plans special giveaway days


Special to the Chronicle
Members of the Seven Rivers Chapter M.I. Hummel Club welcomed Ted Archambault
to their Christmas meeting, where they also gathered their toys for the annual Toys
For Tots drive. Archambault is 95 years old and one of Citrus County's three Pearl
Harbor survivors. From left are: Lorraine Jerkins, Joyce Hunnicutt, Ted Archambault,
Linda Warren-Dumas, Dennis Gibson, Charlyne Woods and Lucille Frost.


Special to the Chronicle
The Mission in Citrus Homeless
Shelters are having a 12 Days of
Christmas Giveaway
The event begins at 9 a.m. today and
continues ,.,-,,
from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. daily until
Christmas at the
Crystal River lo-
cations, 2472 and
2488 N. Pennsylvani.1
Ave. This effort is to help )
those in need. Resellers or
those trying to take large loads
will be turned away
More than 600 boxes of donations
(about $75,000 worth) from national


chain stores and others were recently
picked up and items to be distributed
include Christmas gifts, food, makeup,
school supplies and more.
The Mission will add items weekly
until Christmas. Help loading or deliv-
ery can be arranged for larger items.
The Mission relies solely on dona-
.. tions and small grants. In 2013, it
K"' provided more than 18,000 bed
^^==- nights and served
.~. .j"""" ~. more than 50,000
W" meals to the
homeless and others
in need in Citrus
County
For more informa-
tion, call 352-794-3825
or 352-270-4357.


Members of the Seven River Chapter M.I. Hummel Club presented the Key Training
Center with a donation at their December meeting. From left are: Linda
Warren-Dumas, Lorraine Jerkins, Key Center Foundation Director Neale Brennan,
Joyce Hunnicutt, Charlyne Woods and Lucille Frost.


NEWS NOTE


Club plans visit to see
Charlie Brown comedy
Citrus Hills Women's Club will go to
the Art Center of Citrus County at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 19, to see "You're a Good
Man Charlie Brown," a musical comedy
based on the characters created by car-
toonist Charles M. Schulz in his comic
strip "Peanuts."
Tickets are $15 per person and all
are welcome.


To RSVP contact Julie DePinto at
jdvango@yahoo.com or 352-726-7787.
The Citrus Hills Women's Club is a so-
cial and charitable organization for the
purpose of making friends, sharing fun
events and providing service to the com-
munity Membership is open to all
women residents of the areas defined as
the former and current Villages of
Citrus Hills.
For membership information and to
request an application, call Tricia at
352-270-8909.


0I o I IrtanIA nnt


You're invited to try us. Serving a good selection of Food
SSeafood .,i Chicken Schnitzel Weekends: Salmon
Prime Rib Roast Duck Parm & More Ossobuco (Pork Shank)
YOU'RE INVITED! / .
Wed & Thm 3 PM-8'30 PM- Fr & Sat 3 PM-9'00 PM Sunday 11AM-7PM
Closed Monday & Tuesday
8370 '. Florida Ave. (IT Hwv. 41. FM oral Ci m F t
S- 344-44 43 I



... .,* i.. i*th =
We elomeyo topatae of tedeliciou
experieTnced pro'fessioalktchn stff.f^^

FRIEDFISHFRSIED F


FRIED FISH FRIED
OR CALAMARI SHRIMP
$8.00 $9.50


COMBO PLATTERS:
FRIED FISH & CALAMARI $9.50
FRIED FISH & SHRIMP $11.00 perperson
All served with coleslaw, sweet corn fritters and potato.
Other Foods
STUFFED PEPPERS w/small salad
SPAGHETTI W/MEATBALLS w/small salad
SMALL SALAD
LARGE GREEK SALAD
__0 Eat In or Carry Out Available
ARCHANGEL MICHAEL
GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
4705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, Florida
(352) 527-0766
at the CANTONIS PARISH CENTER
One complimentary glass of wine with each eat-in meal.


L| Call 352-746-1177
Leave Name, Phone Number and a Brief Message
fir Pastry-Ite ams iivailableForSale!


MON.
Fresh Fried Mullet ............$999
TUES. .
Shrimp fniedorscampi ................. 9
WED. .99
Clam Strips ....................$999
THURS. ..
S paghetti.................................... 7 99
Sp gh tt $ 7499
W ings.........................................$ 1 1
FRI. $ 9
Fried Fish F._R I......................$9 99
SAT. $ 99
Shrim p fried or scampi...............
SUN.
Wings $ 911
W ing s ....................... .............. 991

5:0 IV I -9: IV


COPNREQUIREL


IIE~IDI'S1
ITALIAN
RESTAURANT
HWY. 41 & 44 W INVERNESS
.11r --*im- 0

$500



OFF

'2 DINNERS'
AT REGULAR MENU PRICE
Must Present Coupon
S Expires 12/19/13
P.S. "YOU'LL NEVER LEAVE HUNGRY"
OPEN 7 DAYS .ETi
LUNCH & DINNER

637-1355


I'

4i


1 t ,
-t. 'UI ,ptl
SR 200 ion ihe Wilhld(ooChee Rivei
352-854 2288

Serving the Finest I

& Freshest Seafood
All You Can Eal Calfish Shrimp
SFlorida Galor Frog Legs Oyslers

And Cihrus Counly's Besl Open Flame Grilled
SThickk Juicy Sleaks Pork Chops
^ Tender Chicken Breasis
'r .. .... Come \i'ii oUl [cond lOcdlion on ihe
j j j ^qudle in Himoiki Downiown Inveinev'
a* --- ='" -- [U v UII dv 12 6 I-p1 l '2 "plll
.. .3 52-726 -2212 .


Pizzeria & Risloorante

ITALIANO
Come Try Our Daildy Specials !


Authentic
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Ir LOO Forwar,.d to
eei.g Y.o Soo..
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15i4t sE E EL.LI
352.419.6554 352.544-1234C^Cff~rT'y


-TAKE OUT ONLY! -
Large I lopping Pizza
* 1/2 Doz. Ga rlic Knots
* 2 Liteir Soda
Must present original $ 1I.[1
coupon. Not valid WITH
other offers. Expires 12/19/13 1

10/0WDE(UMT
DINING IN OR TAKE OUT
Must present original coupon.
Not valid w/other offers. Expires 12/19/13
Let Chehfs of Hapoli Cater YourSpecial vent!
GIFT CERTIFICATES
BUY $50 GET EXTRA $10
BUY $100 GET EXTRA $25
NOVEMBER 29 DECEMBER 31. 2013


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2014 CS


1:


kit^





Page C6- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Voter registration
coming up Saturday
Voter registration will be avail-
able from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at Crystal River Mall.
New area residents, new voters
and those who have moved need
to register the change. The
League of Women Voters will be
able to assist.
The League is a nonpartisan,
educational organization. For in-
formation, email lwvcc2013
@gmail.com.

CC Ukulele Club
to gather at library
Citrus County Ukulele Club will
meet at 1 p.m. Saturday at the
Coastal Region Library, 8619 W
Crystal St, Crystal River
Adults age 16 and older are
welcome.
For more information, visit
http://citruscountyukuleleclub.
wordpress.com.

CR Health & Rehab
invites all to party
Crystal River Health & Rehab
invites everyone to its second an-
nual Holly Jolly Christmas from
5 to 8 p.m. today
Santa will be on hand to visit
and receive letters, and there will
be hot dogs, music and games and
cookie crafts.
The free event will be at Crystal
River Health & Rehab, 136 N.E.
12th Ave. and State Road 44 West.
For more information, call 352 -
795-5044.

Sunday poker run to
benefit Jessie's Place
Heads & Tails Lounge, at 9211
S. Florida Ave., Floral City, will
sponsor a benefit Poker Run for
Jessie's Place on Sunday Sign in
at Heads & Tails at 10 a.m. Kick-
stands go up at 11 a.m. The bene-
fit begins at noon with $10 poker
hands.
Stops are: first, Sandtrap; sec-
ond, Mike's Friendly Pub; third,
High Octane; fourth, Pub 44; and
finally, back to Heads & Tails
Lounge for the fundraiser and
party
There will be raffles, an auc-
tion and 50/50 drawing. Barbecue
will be served for $5. The Flat
Top Steel Band will perform.
For more information, call
Chrissy at 352-642-3429.

Homeowners group
to delay meeting
Due to a scheduling conflict
with the Central Ridge Library
the quarterly meeting for Oak-
wood Village Homeowner's Asso-
ciation will not be held
Wednesday, Feb. 5.
Instead, the first quarterly
meeting will be at 1 p.m. Thurs-
day, Feb. 13, at the Central Ridge
Library
For more information, call Dee
at 352-249-7651.

All welcome at free
yoga, reiki sessions
Free yoga and reiki sessions
are offered weekly
For schedules and more infor-
mation, call Aviva (for yoga) at
352-419-7800 or Connie (for reiki)
at 352-560-7686.

Pet
SPOTLIGHT


Louise


Cruising on the creek


Wildlife park offers special Christn


Special to the Chronicle
The Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park and the
Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park will
present a Yuletide Holiday
Cruise from 5 to 8 p.m.
Saturday
Enjoy a cruise on serene


Pepper Creek with enter-
tainment by the Homosassa
Elementary Chorus and
Santa and Mrs. Claus.
Refreshments include hot
chocolate, non-alcoholic
holiday punch and cup-
cakes. Tickets must be pur-
chased in advance in the
park's office at the rear of
the Visitor Center on
U.S. 19.


nas boat trip

Tickets are $25 for adults
(12 and older) and $5 for
children (ages 5 to 11).
Cruise tickets must be pre-
sented to the ticket taker be-
fore boarding boat. There
will be door prizes.
For more information, call
352-628-5343.
Proceeds will benefit the
Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park.


Special to the Chronicle
Kwanzaa is a seven-day
festival celebrating the
African-American people,
their culture and their
history
It is a time of celebration,
community gathering and
reflection, a time of endings
and beginnings.
Kwanzaa begins Dec. 26,
the day after Christmas, and
continues until New Year's
Day, Jan. 1. The first public
celebration of Kwanzaa in


Citrus County is scheduled
for 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 28, at the Old Court-
house Museum.
The holiday of Kwanzaa
was created by Dr Maulana
Karenga in 1966, during the
period of U.S. history in
which African-Americans
were involved in struggles
for their civil rights.
This was the period of Dr
Martin Luther King Jr, the
Civil Rights Movement and
Black Power
Karenga wanted to create


a holiday that would bring
African-Americans together
in celebration of their black
culture. He was inspired by
the "first fruit" or harvest
festivals celebrated through-
out Africa.
Three local groups the
Afro-American Club of Cit-
rus County, Unity Church
and Unitarian Universalists
- have joined together to
present an informative and
fun program of this univer-
sal and ethnic celebration.
All are welcome.


Security officers collecting for kids


Special to the Chronicle
The Nuclear Security Offi-
cer Union (USPA Local 7) at
Duke Energy in Crystal
River, along with the Citrus
County Jeepers, are collect-
ing toys for needy families of
foster and abused kids.
There are 12 drop-off loca-
tions throughout Citrus
County Those who are un-
able to drop off a toy, but
who would like to help may


go online to wwwgofundme.
com/uspa-xmaskids to make
a donation. All donations
will go to families in Citrus
County
Drop off locations are: A-1
Title in Crystal River, Alikat
Fashions in Inverness, All
Small Paws Dog Grooming
in Inverness, Ameriprise Fi-
nancial in Lecanto, Caterpil-
lar Clubhouse Learning
Center in Homosassa, Citrus
Hills Dental, Color Country


Nursery in Lecanto, Holiday
Inn of Crystal River, Lecanto
Veterinary Little Shop
Around the Corner in Crys-
tal River, McPherson's
Archery in Lecanto, Ridin'
Dirty in Inverness and
Seafood Seller & Caf6 at the
Crystal River Mall.
Donations will be ac-
cepted until Sunday For
more information, call Eric
at 352-270-0803 or Heather at
352-228-3250.


Key presents Christmas carols


Special to the Chronicle
Louise, the 2-year-old hen, is one
of a dozen given to Karen
Stephenson of Inverness by a
departing snowbird last year.
Louise is a generous contributor to
the daily egg collection.


Special to the Chronicle
Lester Brock will begin
the traditional Key Carolers
program at 7 p.m. Monday
with an acapella rendition
of "The Christmas Song,"
setting the mood for a musi-
cal evening to celebrate the
holiday season.


The chorus of more than
50 key clients will follow,
presenting such favorites as
"Rudolph the Red-nosed
Reindeer," "Silver Bells"
and "Deck the Halls," with
many more carols for all to
enjoy
The program will be at the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment


Center at the Key Training
Center's Lecanto campus.
Light refreshments will be
served after the program,
with a "jolly" visitor ex-
pected to join the festivities.
The program is free to the
public.
For more information call
352-795-5541, ext. 215.


New Homosassa home


352-686-0975 or Peg at 352-
442-5574.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


NEWS NOTES

CCVC yard sale set for
Saturday in Inverness
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has yard sales Septem-
ber through May from 7 a.m. to
1 p.m. the second Saturday of the
month at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness,
south of where U.S. 41 and State
Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up
the day before (typically Friday
afternoon) and are responsible
for the security of their own items
overnight. The spots are typically
15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can
of food is appreciated. For more
information and to make reserva-
tions, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

BH Fishing Club plans
trip to St. Augustine
The Beverly Hills Fishing Club
invites the public to join in on a
December trip to historic St. Au-
gustine. Participants do not have
to be a member to attend.
The trip will be Dec. 19 and 20.
The group will stay at the Holiday
Isle Oceanfront Hotel. Activities
will include shopping on St.
George Street, trolley passes, a
show at the Limelight Theatre, a
Christmas lights tour and food
and lodging. Reservations should
be made soon.
To RSVP and for more informa-
tion, call Patricia at 352-257-9328.

Snowbirds plan dinner,
gift exchange Sunday
The American-Canadian Snow-
birds Club will have its annual
Christmas dinner/gift exchange
from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday at the
Knights of Columbus at 2389 W
County Road 486.
The menu is a stuffed roast
pork buffet. Tickets are $18 for
members and $20 for guests.
BYOB. There will be a 50/50
drawing.
If you are not a member, but
would like to join for the annual
$5 fee, call Tony at 352-341-4407.
The club also has other activities
throughout the winter Everyone
is welcome.

Bank accepting food
donations for CUB
The Cadence Bank branch in
Inverness is collecting for Citrus
United Basket (CUB) for the
holiday season.
Donations of nonperishable
food items and toys are being ac-
cepted during normal lobby hours
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Thursday and from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Friday

Learn to make jewelry
at community center
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, with Marcia Balonis, are of-
fering jewelry-making classes at
the Citrus Springs Community
Center
This class is suitable for begin-
ners and the more advanced. Stu-
dents will pick from several
different kits each time or bring
in their own beads to work on
specific patterns if they want
something more advanced.
Balonis teaches at national con-
ventions, has been published in
national magazines and has
taught in adult education centers
throughout the country
The classes are at the Citrus
Springs Community Center on the
first and third Tuesdays from
11 a.m. to 1 p. m. The price is $15.
For information call 352-
465-7007 or visit www citrus
countyparks.com.

Accordion group plans
Christmas party
Accordion Adventure meetings
will now be held on the third
Thursday of every month from
6 to 9 p.m. at the Spring Hill
United Church of Christ, 4244
Mariner Blvd.
It is an informal group of accor-
dionists and enthusiasts of all lev-
els, and invites others to attend
Christmas party on Thursday
Dec 19.
All are welcome. Coffee and
cake are provided. There is a $2
cover fee.
For information call Cathy at


Special to the Chronicle
The Farr family, volunteers and other partner families with Habitat for Humanity of Citrus
County celebrate a recent "Wall Blessing" for the Farr's Home, No. 101, in Homosassa.
Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County provides simple, decent, affordable housing to those
who have a need, ability to pay and willingness to partner. To learn more about becoming a
Habitat for Humanity homeowner, call Rose at 352-563-2744. To volunteer on construction
sites, call C.D. at 352-601-6582. Call Wendy at 352-564-2300 to volunteer at one of
Habitat's two ReStore locations Crystal River and Inverness where those with retail,
electrical, appliance, electronic, cashier or cleaning experience are needed. To help answer
the phone, do filing, copying or other office duties, call Debbie at 352-563-2744 to volunteer
in the office. For more information, visit www.habitatcc.org.



Celebrate Kwanzaa


at special observance


Public invited to Dec. 28 celebration in Inverness




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2014 C7


FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 13,2013 C: Com.ast, Citrus B:Bright House oDl: Comcast, ODunnellon&I nglis F:Oak Forest H:Holiday Heights
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m ND 1 12 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
F) R IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 'PG' PG' '14' 14'
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59 68 59 45 54 An executive has a change of heart. Jordan Bridges, Sheley Long. NR'c Ed Asner, John Newton. NR cc
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24 38 24 31 Fantasy) VanessaL. Williams. PG c All, Lamorne Morris.'NR'c has to change her ways or get cut off.'N
S** "Gracie's Choice" (2004, Docudrama) "Pastor Brown" (2009, Drama) Salli "The Preacher's Daughter" (2012, Drama)
50 119 AnneHeche,DianeLadd.(InStereo ) Richardson-Whined. nStereo) PG-13'm Andrea Bowen.(InStereo)'NR'I
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117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled
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West
S96(;2
V Q J 10 8 7
* 6 5 2
4 72


South
24
2+
4 NT
5 NT
74-


North
* 743
Y 52
* K Q J 8 3
964 4


12-13-13


East

V 94
* 10 9 7 4
* .J 10 853


South
4- A K Q J 10
V A K G 3
S A
* A K Q


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
West North
Pass 2 *
Pass 3; 4
Pass 54i.
Pass 6 *
Pass Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass


I Opening lead: V Q

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

H.L. Mencken said, '"An idealist is one who,
on noticing that a rose smells better than a
cabbage, concludes that it will also make bet-
ter soup."
Or maybe that is someone who jumps too
quickly to conclusions, which is also not a good
idea at the bridge table. In today's deal, South
is in seven spades. West leads the heart queen.
How should declarer deliberate?
North's raise to three spades promised some
points. South's plunge into seven spades was
optimistic because he knew that he could not
reach the dummy unless it contained the heart
queen or a heart shortage. It would have been
wiser to stop in six except that that would
have ruined the column!
Someone who is impulsive will win with his
heart ace, cash the diamond ace and heart
king, then ruff a heart on the board. But East
would overruff to defeat the contract.
Yes, South needs to ruff a heart and discard
his second low heart on the diamond king, but
he needs only one trump for one ruff. So, he
should start by drawing two rounds of trumps.
Then he unblocks the diamond ace, cashes the
second top heart, and ruffs a heart in the
dummy Here, his care is rewarded when East
has doubletons in both majors.
South pitches his last heart on a high dia-
mond, ruffs a diamond back to his hand, draws
West's last trump, and claims.
A broad smile is permitted from North!

^ jF0 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
A "rJ Vby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
U n sc ra m b le th e se fo u r J u m b le s ., I .,
one letter to each square, VVn i y,, ,ueli.''-
to form four ordinary words. E m
7 EI I EG,

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NJ
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CONIEM



VEDRIT E
n~~~T-"i-


AT THE HEIGHT OF HIS
SINGING CAREER,
JIM MORRIS0N WAS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your "c. c '
answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
.. I Jumbles: HARSH BRAVO SEASON FACTOR


After seeing his identical twin's new look, he
said OH, BROTHER


ACROSS
1 decologne
4 Arthur and
Li llie
8 Beaded shoe,
for short
11 Big swallow
12 Karachi
language
13 Oklahoma
town
14 Scepter
go-withs
15 Hisser, at
times
17 Swankiest
19 Ski lifts
(hyph.)
20 Mare's tidbit
21 Party girl
22 Shoulder
muscles
25 Begrudge
28 Sharp bark
29 Fencer's
weapon
31 Verbalized
33 Cogito sum
35 Grand Ole -


37 Temper
38 Brand names
40 Lustful looker
42 Tokyo, once
43 Grand
Teton st.
44 Rock band
Pink -
47 Perched
51 Non-member
53 Ore deposit
54 Formic acid
producer
55 Novelist
Bagnold
56 Receptive
57 Mekong
native
58 Rather and
Marino
59 Team's goal
DOWN
1 Franc's
replacement
2 White
vestments
3 Result


Answer to Previous Puzzle


IHINIDTU A N|N0
ACCENT EMAILS
SHOA LSDOGG IE
REAI RH'Ow
TOESSE'AL

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5 Was, to Ovid
6 Sum
7 Hotel
offerings
8 Hari
9 Smell
10 Automobiles


11 Pol. party
16 Paris priests
18 Alleviate
21 Bambi, e.g.
22 Do Easter
eggs
23 Countess'
spouse
24 Links org.
25 Agts.
26 Catch
red-handed
27 Wear out
30 Horseback
sport
32 Bonn article
34 Complies
36 Fluctuate
(hyph.)
39 Swirled
41 Precede
cautiously
(2 wds.)
43 Have -
(argue)
44 Young horse
45 Centurion's
moon
46 Beetle Bailey
dog
47 Harness part
48 Pith helmet
49 Delightful
place
50 Bear's pad
52 Forensic
science tool


12-13 ( O 2 013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: Both my
husband and I are on
our second marriages.
We have tried very hard to get
along with our exes, to no
avail. When we invite them to
go to parent-teacher confer-
ences with us or at-
tend dance and
piano recitals, it
seems to only make
matters worse. The
children saw this,
and it hurt them
greatly My hus-
band and I prom-
ised each other
that when our chil-
dren were en-
gaged, we would
talk to them to en-
sure they were not AN I
making a mistake. I MAIL
wish my parents
had done this, even
though I realize I might not
have listened.
My husband's son got en-
gaged suddenly at the age of
21 to his first girlfriend. My
husband and I thought he
was far too immature to get
married. His fiancee at the
time was extremely loud and
boorish and also inexperi-
enced in the dating world. We
spoke to our son and ex-
plained that he was young
and there are many fish in
the sea, and that even if he
were madly in love, there is
no need to rush to get
married.
Well, he told his fiancee,
and we were not invited to
the wedding. Now, neither of
them speaks to us. We tried to
get his sister to pass along
birthday greetings on our be-
half, but she said, "I don't
want to get involved."
It's been nearly six years.
We miss our son greatly How


I
L


do you suggest we proceed?
- Unhappy Parents
Dear Unhappy: Your heart
was in the right place, but
disparaging a child's in-
tended is asking for trouble.
They rarely listen and often
become defensive
and angry The best
you can do is swal-
low your pride.
Phone or send a
letter or email say-
ing you were
wrong to have in-
S terfered, that you
can see that their
S marriage was the
right choice for
them, that you are
sorry for engender-
IE'S ing ill will and that
BOX you hope they will
forgive you. Add
that you miss them,
and ask whether there is any-
thing you can do to improve
the relationship. We hope
they respond positively
DearAnnie: I am excited
for the upcoming holiday
party season, except for one
thing: Please ask your read-
ers to have respect for the
non-drinking guests at their
parties.
I am in my 30s, married
and a mom, and I don't like to
drink, but I feel pressured
every year at these parties. I
never preach about it. I sim-
ply say "no, thanks" when of-
fered. But, my response is
never respected. Instead they
say, "Oh, come on, it's a
party!" Or, 'Just have one if
you're worried about driving
home." Some become quite
aggressive in trying to get me
to indulge.
What if I were a recovering
alcoholic, deathly allergic or
drinking were against my re-


ligion? It's none of their busi-
ness. But people act as if I am
crazy for not accepting a glass
of wine. I think they are poor
hosts for pressuring me. I can
have a great time without
drinking. Dry in California
Dear Dry: People mistak-
enly think they are being
friendly by cajoling you past
the point of politeness. You
can keep saying "no, thank
you" until they give up. Or,
pour yourself some water in a
cocktail glass. A third option
is to accept a glass of wine
and hold it in your hand until
the party is over You don't
have to drink it.
DearAnnie: I could have
written the letter from "Hurt
in Florida," whose children
and grandchildren don't in-
clude her in their get-
togethers.
My daughter told me they
are "just too busy" for me.
But they somehow have time
for her dad and stepmother,
as well as her in-laws and
several friends. I haven't seen
them in more than a year We
don't talk because I don't call.
I don't understand any of it.
I just wanted to let "Florida"
know that she's not alone. I'm
hurting with her -Midwest
Grandma
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit www
creators. com.


Yesterday'sI Answer:


&/




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


Peanuts


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth

HILAfY, AGE 5 THANK YOU,
SWEETI! RBUT
MERRY IT'5 MOT
CHRISTMAS, C-HRISTMAS YET
mommy'


I MADE
IT FOR
CHRISTMAS,
50 YOU
HAV E TO
OPEN IT
NOW.
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CARTON! THIS IS SO
BEAUtFIfLX AND
CR5ATIVE ANC
WONAERFULt

ti


/ I ALSO PINTEDL IT RED
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HOOK AND ADDtE A BUNCH OF
SPARKLES AND YOU MIGHT
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ROOM mArs
TABLE. THT'
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Dilbert


MOMU COMe QUICK1
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ThR k-os~rnthL






Beetle Bailey


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury

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"Yes! I guess my prayer for a
white Christmas got put on
the fast track!"


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Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Best Man Holiday" (R) 1:35,4:35, 7:35 p.m.
"Delivery Man" (PG-13) 2 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:50, 7:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 4:30,10:35 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 3, 7, 8 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) In 3D. 11 a.m., 4,10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug"
(PG-13) In 3D, high frame rate. 11:30 a.m.,
3:30, 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 11:25 a.m., 4:45, 7:50,10:15 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching Fire" (PG-13)
11:15 a.m., 2:30, 7:15, 10:25 p.m.. No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:45,4:20,
7:05,10:05 p.m.


"Out of the Furnace" (R) 11:50 a.m., 3:45, 7:40,
10:30 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's 'A Madea Christmas'" (PG-13)
11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Delivery Man" (PG-13) 12:45, 3:50, 7:20,
10:35 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:15, 7, 10:45 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 4:10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-
13) noon, 3:40, 7:15, 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" (PG-
13) In 3D. 12:30, 4:15, 7:45, 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1,4, 7:30 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching Fire" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 3:30, 6:50, 10:25 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) 12:15,3:15,
7 p.m. No passes.


Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public L ocal RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE. M slenba s


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Previous Solution:"Cher's ... a disciplined actress and she's down-to-Earth and
cool. I can't say enough good things about her." Greg Kinnear
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-13


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Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


. ..:(32)50-565 TllFre:(88) 52230 E a0: lasi0ed croiceoni 0 cm 0bste


2 Table Lamps, Tulips
Black & Gold,
like new $100
2 Large White Swivel
Bar stools $60
(352) 503-6541
4 Back Seats for
Pontiac Transport
1998.
$30. ea. take all $100.
(352) 621-5340
67 pc. Tienshan China
Poinsettia & Ribbons
collection, beautiful!
great condition! $100.
set of lamps, $100.
(352) 795-7254
2/1 with carport &
Florida Rm. Screen pa-
tio & fenced backyrd.
Central air heat. W/D
included. $575/Mo
(352) 422-2433
Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, Little use
$375.
(202) 425-4422 cell
Bariatric Power
Wheelchair
Quickie Rhapsody
weight limit 3001bs
never used, $750. firm
(352) 637-4539 Iv msg
BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785
BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE *
Sat. 14, 8a-3p;
Sun.15, 9:30a-3p, tools
furn., toys, collectibles
94 S. Jackson Street
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 13, &Sat. 14, 8a-2p
5408 W. Corral Place
Gun safe, Sharp port-
able AC, Like new
wooden kitchen set,
outdoor Xmas decor.
and Much More...
BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday only 8a-3p
36 S. Jackson Street
Toys, left handed golf
clubs, Irg. variety items
BICYCLE RACK Holly-
wood Trunk mount. Like
new.Holds 3 bikes.
$50.00 352-465-2515
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CRYSTAL RIVER
5050 W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy
THRIFT STORE LIQUI-
DATION!!!
Everything MUST go!!!
FRI 12/13/13 & SAT
12/14/13
CRYSTAL RIVER
Multi Family Yard Sale
12/14 & 12/15, 9a-5p
Seven Rivers Apts.
10940 W. Tidewater Cr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
*TODAY*
5847 W. Pine Circle
off Rock Crusher Rd.
Christmas plus+++
20 Years Collecting
FREE ICE TEA &
CANDY CANE
Dog Stroller, like new
$40.
SmI Dog Carrier, like
new $25.
(352) 527-6975


I't. /.

FLORAL CITY
Fn-Sat
Singing Forest, Cor-
ner of East Teading &
Baker Street Lot 219


Today's

WITEK'TYS^
3 young homeless
kitties, 2 males, 1 fe-
male. Spayed and
neutered, rabies
shots, wormed,
defleaed. Friendly. I
rescued them, please
rescue me. Need to
find homes quickly.
Crystal River, Please
call 408-489-0849
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River
IC tS fl *

HERNANDO
6750 N Bighorn
Pt/Royal Coach Vil-
lage All MUST Go! Frin-
Sun 8-4
HERNANDO
Fri. Sat. 8am.-3pm
4550 E.Shorewood Dr
HOMOSASSA
2219 S Coleman Ave
Saturday Dec 14th
8:30AM to 3:00PM
BR/LR/DR furn, China
cab w/China set, misc.
HOMOSASSA
John's Back!
Fri & Sat 8-3
Huae Warehouse
Sale
Antiques, vintage
clothing, furn, oak en-
tertainment ctr, jew-
elry, collectible glass,
tools & more!
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S Tex Point
HOMOSASSA
TODAY 9a-4p, Boat
motors, dog cages
antiques, tools, china,
fish tank, kitchen items
8599 W. Kimberly Ct.
INVERNESS
(Deerwood) 2/1
SWMH, $475, 1st, last,
Sec. quite area, clean,
utility rm/screen rm, no
pets 352-746-1600
INVERNESS
Fri. 13, & Sat. 14, 9a-5p
bikes, scuba gear,
tools, vintage hats,
boots, too much to list
297 Stotler Drive
INVERNESS
Fri. 13th, 8a 2pm
5781 S. Eaton Terr.
Everything is Clean &
priced, REAL Garage
Sale prices. Lots of
Books .25 each
Inverness
Friday Only, 8a to 2p
6656 Holly Street
INVERNESS
Sat. Dec. 14, Washer,
dryer, toys, furn.
506 Tina St.
Oak Full Bedroom Set
w/dresser, end tables
exc. condition
asking $1200.
call for info
352-897-4681





FOUR STAR

OPEN HOUSE! LOOK!
Sunday 12/15 -
11am-2pm
8632 E Sora Court, Lot
59, Inverness FL, 34450
REDUCED 2BR Palm
Harbor on cul-de-sac.
Armstrong flooring, re-
modeled kitchen, &
screen porch. Club-
house & Heated Pool.
Close to Homassasa
Springs. ONLY $12,000.
Call Judy Nickerson
(352) 508-1655
**********lkli-A,


Inverness
SAT ONLY 9a to 1p
10344 S Evans Pt.
PINE RIDGE
Friday 13th, & Sat. 14th
*MOVING SALE*
Lg. Furn. & Yard Equip.
4940 W. Horseshoe Dr.
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
VERSA LADDER Versa
Ladder 12 foot standing
height.
$90.00 352-465-2515
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances- Gas/Elec.
AC Units, BBQ Grills,
Lawn Tractors &
Riding Mowers
352-270-4087

LQok

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



AKC Registered
Yellow Lab, 9 yrs old,
great w/kids, loves the
water, GREAT Family
Dog! (352) 228-4581
Free
Pitt/Terrior mix,
3 yrs. old,
Chow, 5 yrs. old
Male, can be
separated
352-697-5451,
352-476-6704
PUPPIES
Mix breed
Curr & Bull Mastiff, Fee
for Health Cert.
(352) 587-1610



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0$5.001lb.
Stone Crab(fl $ Ib
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
STRAWBERRIES
Mustard & Collards
GIFT SHIPPING*
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378



Black & White Cat
Answers to
Mister. Lost
Homosassa Trail/Kings
Ave 352-563-2982
Lost Cat
Small, white face,
with calico, female
Crystal River school
(352) 220-9496


2 Tone Gold Earring
Beall's Inverness, or
Belk Lindsey Crystal
River (352) 527-1434
LOST MALE CAT
Large, gold w/brown
spots, last seen on Dec
6th in the vicinity of
Forest Ridge and
Honeylocust. REWARD
(352) 746-1895
Lost
Pitt Bull Mix, Tan,
Last seen by
Crystal River High
School
(352) 895-5085
Lost Small Black Cat
Lecanto Area
Roslyn & Sandy Hill St.
Call (352) 556-1200
UPDATE
Large Anatolian
Shepherd Male, cream,
BIk ears & nose,
chipped,100l1bs lost on
4/26/13 in Near Duvall
Is Road Floral City,
Seen Several times in
Floral City.
REWARD OFFERED
(352) 220-2540
YORKIE
Male, 5 Ibs, Blue &
Gold w/ long legs.
Lost on Duval Island
11/23. $300 Reward
for safe return (352)
398-6774



FOUND
Sterling Silver Charm
Bracelet, in front of Belk
in Crystal River, please
call to identify
(352) 489-7214



FREE REMOVAL
Would like to thank all
of Citrus County for
your patronage in
2013. I will be fully op-
erational again start-
ing Jan 6,2014. I want
to wish you all a safe
& joyous holiday sea-
son. See you in 2014


Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.fnendsofccas.org

Adopt a
rescued Pet1








A*)J .'.11K-
.1 Win, Il,
View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adoptarescuedoet
.corn or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday, 10a 12p
PetSupermarket
(exceptions below)
Sat. 12/14
11am rmn
PETCO
Lady Lakes
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.


Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
flonda.comrn
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12prn-4pm
Greta's Touch
Grooming Floral City,
Sat 10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.



H.?P?


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Person who painted
house on Whitier Pt, in
Homosassa last Nov.
Call (727) 415-0404



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone Crabi $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001










Tell that special
person
Hagpy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


Ultrasound Tech
For OB Dr Ofc
FT/PT
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877








Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club
is now hiring
experienced
Bar Tenders
and Waitstaff.

Aoolv in person
Mon-Sat 9am-5pm
at the Grille Restau-
rant 505 E Hartford
St, Hernando FL



COOK/SERVER

Exp. Only apply
Taking Applications at
Chicken King
Hernando
2420 N Florida Hwy
NO PHONE CALLS



Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
SOUS CHEF and
LINE COOKS

Apply in Person at:
505 E Hartford St.
Mon-Sat between
2:00-5:00pm.







Appointment
Setters Wanted
Hiring Exp. Reps
Hourly + Commission
9:00am-4:00pm
Mon-Fri
Call Cale at
352-503-6888



FIREWORK
Sales Crew &
Independent Setup
Crew Needed
Start Immediately
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission,
Background check
Email Application
greenunlimited
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416


BE~~


Appointment
Setters Wanted
Hiring Exp. Reps
Hourly + Commission
9:00am-4:00pm
Mon-Fri
Call Cale at
352-503-6888



Exp. General
Maintenance
Must be flexible and
able to multi-task.
Apply Tues thru Fri
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando



P/T CHILDREN
MINISTER

First Christian
Church of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual to work with
elementary children
To Apply: email
pastorray@tampa
bay.rr.com or Call
352-344-1908
www.fccinv.com



TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.











SPRING HILL
CLASSES
LAST CLASS
OF 2013
COSMETOLOGY
December 16TH
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
FULLTIME & PARTTIME

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


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a 875 932 416
316574 -982
59 217 8 3 614 1
1447 6 5 9 312 8
6 8 3 2 4.1 75 9
75.1 3'2 6[894
439817265
268 495173


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Antique
Heavy Solid
Brass Bed
$400.
(352) 812-2329




FLORIDA ARROW-
HEADS personal collec-
tion. 25 pieces. 100.00
352-302-7451
FRAMED DISNEY
PRINT "FLATTERY"
-cert.#838 of 2000 size
18"by 24"-$100.00-
-352-527 9982
ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING "1979" -50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.00
352-527-9982


WEDGEWOOD Cream
Lavender grapevine, 5
pc setting never used
$60 352-270-3527



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Dishwasher $100
&
Washer & Dryer
$100. ea
(352) 419-5922
DISHWASHER
EXCELLENT Cond
1 1 yrs old $90
(352) 795-1692
DISHWASHER White
Whirlpool "Quiet Wash
Plus" Dishwasher.
Good condition $25.
3523449190
GE Nautilus
Portable Dishwasher
24/2 x 26, 36 H
Black, Light wooden
top, plate warmer
$250 (352) 527-9573
Maytag
Air conditioner,
portable unit
works great
$75.
(352) 628-5085
MICROWAVE NEW
MED SIZE $45.
352-3413562
Over the Range
Microwave
Whirlpool, stainless
steel, new/slightly
dented, cost $359. ask
$150.(352) 794-3252
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& DQers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
VACUUM CLEANER
Bissell Helux Deluxe -
Runs great! $40.00
352-419-5656
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER OR DRYER
$145.00 Each.
Reliable,Clean, Like
New, Excellent Working
Cond, 60 day Guar.Free
Delivery/Set up.
352-263-7398


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


C L CITRUS C C1 U II C T


CHR-wN.nICLE
^wwwmsfnc lmd flim~con


I


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 C9




CLO FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAUDER CHERRY
WOOD HOME OFFICE
Sauder computer desk
with hutch and side
desk with two file draw-
ers. Also set of 4, 72
inch high, five shelf
bookcases with 1 inch
thick shelves. Camden
Collection Series.
Sauder web site lists set
at $1459. Will sell entire
set for $295. Will sell
Desk for $100 and
bookshelves for $75
each. 352-464-7746




Air Compressor/
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. capacity
220C, Little use
$375.
(202) 425-4422 cell
BLACK & DECKER
9.6V Cordless
Dnrill/Dnriver Used Once.
Like New! $20.00
352-419-5656
Craftsman
1/ HP Bench
drill press
Excellent Cond. $60
(352) 419-5363
Delta 12" Portable
Planer, model 22-540,
on a castered 2'x2' cart
$250.cash
(352) 860-0412
Electric Welder
Lincoln 90 amps;
Cutting torch with
tanks $250; 24ft fiber-
glass extent ion ladder
$125 (352) 726-8873
Husqvarna 460
Rancher Chain Saw
1 year old w/ extra
chains, sprockets,
bars + chain
sharpener, $450.
(352) 249-7064
MACHINES TOOL
CHEST w/2 drawer cab-
inet $ 100 Tom
352-494-1214
Homosassa ph
MAKITA CHOP SAW
WORKS FINE ONLY
65.00 OBO
352-464-0316
PROFILE PROJECTOR
EP01 LPS$100Tom
(Homosassa)
352-494214 ph
SHINDAIWA BACK-
PACK BLOWER. great
condition. 65.00
352-302-7451
VERSA LADDER Versa
Ladder 12 foot standing
height.
$90.00 352-465-2515




2 SHARP SPEAKERS
10" 150 WATTS $30
352-613-0529
5 YAMAHA SPEAKERS
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $80
352-613-0529
27 INCH SYLVANIA
TV. Hardly used, ok
condition, black col-
ored, remote included,
$25 (352)465-1616
HIFI SPEAKER KIT
1pair GRS 8inch 85Watt
woofers, Nuance Tweet-
ers, Crossover Caps.
$100341-0450
HOME THEATRE CEN
TRE SPEAKER British
Mordaunt-Short 905C
MTM Upgraded $90
341-0450
HOME THEATRE CEN-
TRE SPEAKER Danish
SEAS Co-Axial
150Watt, Solid Oak $80
341-0450
KAROKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
$100 352-341-6920
Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $150
(352) 220-9787
Sony 50" LCD
Projection TV
Good condition
$350. obo
(352) 489-5079
Sound System
w/ 6 speakers
ONKYO Receiver
model TKSR 505- $150
SANSOI Cassette Deck
Technics turn table
2 spkrs $50 for all
(352) 726-8873
TV & VCR,DVD Player
RCA 28"TV, Magnavox
VCR & DVD player
$45.00 352-422-5448


TV 15 inch flat screen
with remote works fine
25.00 352-628-4447
TV HDMI CORDOne
10ft 1.3b version
$15352-341-0450
WATCH SUPER BOWL
65" Mitsubishi HD TV
$200
68" H x 59" W x 28"D
Problem free-Includes
manuals
Call 352-503-3467




DESK TOP PC
HP D220MT,
Brothers Fax Machine
with new ink cart.;
Epson CX420 Printer,
Copier, Scanner $150
for all. Plus many more
tools (352) 726-8873
HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Ethernet Clean $80
352-341-0450
JVC DVD PLAYER -
VCR COMBO
HR-XVC11B Light use,
Copies your VHS to
DVD $40 341-0450
VIEWSONIC LCD DIS
PLAY Widescreen
19inch Multimedia for
PC orX-BOX includes
cable $90 341-0450
WIFI ROUTER Save
$50 Cisco Linksys N750
Smart Wi-Fi Router $80
352-341-0450




5 PIECE PATIO SET 1
OCTAGON TABLE
WITH 4 CHAIRS AND
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529




2 adjustable Twin Beds
w/ remote, can be
used as king or sepa-
rate $300. ea. obo
Sofa & Love Seat
Matching. $150.
(352) 527-4247
2 Table Lamps, Tulips
Black & Gold,
like new $100
2 Large White Swivel
Bar stools $60
(352) 503-6541
ANTIQUE black cane
chair gold trim remova-
ble cushion call text, can
text pic. $80
352-746-0401
Brown Semi Circle
Couch w/ two
ottomans & pillows
Like New
$250.
(352) 527-4247
Clean Twin Bed
Wooden Head Board
$75. obo
(352) 628-0139
DESK KIDS HEIGHT 2
x 4 foot Top, Blonde
Oak, 2 Drawers and
Shelf, includes Chair
$100352341-0450
DINNING ROOM TABLE
Singer, dark finish,
4 chairs, leaf, $65
(352) 726-9708


DOUBLE BED SET
W/FRAME Good condi-
tion, no stains. Sits 26
inches height. Great
for guest bedroom or
childs room. $300.
Email for more info
and pics. Sugarmill
Woods area. No phone
calls please.
DoubleBedForSale@ya
hoo.com
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER White wash,
storage for movies &
Cd's
$100.00 352-422-3118
FURNITURE Brocade
style couch with
matching chair, large
brown recliner $1400,
dining room table
round with 4 matching
chairs $500, beautiful
like new!!!!! Please
call:352-341-0952
Light Oak
Curio Cabinet
Glass front & sides
46"x76", Like New
$300.(352) 628-5727 or
(423) 667-3601
Maple Dinette Set
$150
Slider chair with Stool
$100.
(352) 419-5922


LIVING ROOM SET 5
piece, good condition
100.00 352 302 7451
Oak Full Bedroom Set
w/dresser, end tables
exc. condition
asking $1200.
call for info
352-897-4681
RECLINER Red Micro-
fiber Rocker/Recliner
$50.00 352-419-5656
RECLINERS
2 matching uphol-
stered, med size, new
cond, $75/both. Crys.
River 856-655-3775
Sofa & Love Seat,
Pastel Plaid,
by Clayton Marcus,
excel, cond.
$325.
(352) 382-1587
TWIN BEDS 2
twin-beds w/nice head-
boards and box springs,
bed linens and pillows.
Also a dresser. All for
$300. Call352-422-7565
; may be seen at
Terra Vista.
TWIN BEDS 2
twin-beds w/nice head-
boards and box springs,
bed linens and pillows.
Also a dresser. All for
$300. Call352-422-7565
; may be seen at
Terra Vista.
VERY NICE THOMAS-
VILLE ARMOIRE simple
design light color $200
352-897-4154



12 CU FT steel lawn
cart new tires wheels
tubes great shape call
text can text pic $90
352-746-0401
AERATOR SPREADER
32" Craftsman fits lawn
tractors w/ pin hitch GC
call, text can text pic
352-746-0401 $85.00
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
BLACK DECKER
HEDGER NEW PARTS
Blade 22" ($40) $20
Battery 18V ($40) $20
352-270-3527
ECHO
Shred & Vac leaf
blower Model ES210
Like New $75
(352) 419-5363
SUN SHADE Craftsman
should fit most lawn
tractors call or text can
text pic $45.00
352-746-0401




BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE *
Sat. 14, 8a-3p;
Sun.15, 9:30a-3p, tools
furn., toys, collectibles
94 S. Jackson Street
BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 13, &Sat. 14, 8a-2p
5408 W. Corral Place
Gun safe, Sharp port-
able AC, Like new
wooden kitchen set,
outdoor Xmas decor
and Much More...
BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday only 8a-3p
36 S. Jackson Street
Toys, left handed golf
clubs, Irg. variety items


-I t. /1 .,, / .


CITRUS

SPRINGS
Thur-Sat 8am-4pm
Items located inside Hm
hshld, med. equip, furn.
Chnristmas items
N. Gentle Breeze loop.
CRYSTAL RIVER
5050 W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy
THRIFT STORE LIQUI-
DATION!!!
Everything MUST go!!!
FRI 12/13/13 & SAT
12/14/13
CRYSTAL RIVER
Multi Family Yard Sale
12/14 & 12/15, 9a-5p
Seven Rivers Apts.
10940 W. Tidewater Cr.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 8a -2pm, Kings
Bay Self Storaae
Over 44 tenants
participating.
Everything from baby
clothes to collectibles.
Washer, Dryers,
and Furniture
7957 W Gulf to Lake
HWY/44
352-795-0313


CRYSTAL RIVER
*TODAY*
5847 W. Pine Circle
off Rock Crusher Rd.
Christmas plus+++
20 Years Collecting
e FREE ICE TEA &
CANDY CANE
FLORAL CITY
Craft Bazaar at
Moonrise Resort,
Dec. 13, 9am-3pm
Unique hand crafted
gifts for Christmas
8801 Moonrise Lane

H. /. } r _


FLORAL CITY
Fn-Sat
Singing Forest, Cor-
ner of East Teading &
Baker Street Lot 219



HERNANDO
6750 N Bighorn
Pt/Royal Coach Vil-
lage All MUST Go! Frin-
Sun 8-4
HERNANDO
Fri. Sat. 8am.-3pm
4550 E.Shorewood Dr
off of SR200
HOMOSASSA
2219 S Coleman Ave
Saturday Dec 14th
8:30AM to 3:00PM
BR/JLR/JDR furn, China
cab w/China set, misc.

HOMOSASSA
John's Back!
Fri & Sat 8-3
Huae Warehouse
Sale
Antiques, vintage
clothing, furn, oak en-
tertainment ctr, jew-
elry, collectible glass,
tools & more!
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S Tex Point

HOMOSASSA
Riverhaven
11731 Timberlane Dr.
SATURDAY ONLY 8AM
Multi-family furniture,
books, artwork, clothing
HOMOSASSA
TODAY 9a-4p, Boat
motors, dog cages
antiques, tools, china,
fish tank, kitchen items
8599 W. Kimberly Ct.
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 7am-2pm
Hsehold, washer,
dryer, water softener,
boat, truck, fishing
children's, bdrm. furn.
5580 S Garcia Terr.
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 9am-5pm
Tools & chest, ramps
eliptical, M.A. Dolls,
and much more!!!
175 N Bobwhite Pt
INVERNESS
Fri. 13, &Sat. 14, 9a-5p
bikes, scuba gear,
tools, vintage hats,
boots, too much to list
297 Stotler Drive
INVERNESS
Fri. 13th, 8a 2pm
5781 S. Eaton Terr.
Everything is Clean &
priced, REAL Garage
Sale prices. Lots of
Books .25 each
Inverness
Friday Only, 8a to 2p
6656 Holly Street
Inverness
SAT ONLY 9a to lp
10344 S Evans Pt.
INVERNESS
Sat. & Sun. 9am-3pm
310 WILDA AVENUE
Hshold. stuff, electron-
ics, furniture & MORE
No Early Birds k
INVERNESS
Sat. Dec. 14, Washer,
dryer, toys, furn.
506 Tina St.
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 5.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help
feed veterans

ALLt _
LECANTO
5529 s. Gray Oak Ter-
race Huge Sale
Thu-Fn-Sat-Sun some-
thing for everyone. 8-4
Don't miss it
LECANTO
Friday 9am-2pm
No Early Birds
Too Many things to list.
491 Storage across
from Walmart


PINE RIDGE
5600 N Rosedale Cir.
Yard sale Fnri. 12/139-3.
PINE RIDGE
Friday 13th, & Sat. 14th
MOVING SALE*
Lg. Furn. & Yard Equip.
4940 W. Horseshoe Dr.



Pine Ridge
Woodworking
Tools &
Equipment
Wood shop
down sizing.
Fri, Sat & Sunday,
8:00 am to 4:00 pm,
5475 N. Mallows Cir.,
Pine Ridge
Estates, Beverly Hills




DUNNELLON
Fri. 13, Sat. 14,
9am-3pm
Furniture, framed
art, tools, various
household, linens,
kitchen ware,
freezer
11540 CampDrive




BLACK & GOLD 2PC
TOP Sleeveless shell,
long sleeve jacket. Med.
Lrg long blk skirt sz.
$30 513-4614
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 3 SETS SIZE 6
2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 & 5/6
$40 352-613-0529
GIRLS winter clothing
4 jeans 1 pants 5 shirts
2 pajama sets & 2
hoodies sizes vary
$50 352-613-0529
MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529




!!!225/75R -16!!!
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
$60.00 352-464-0316
5 GI --JOES WITH
STORAGE CASE
SOME CLOTHES &AC-
CESSORIES (guns)
$30. 464-0316
7.5 Tall Christmas
Tree, Frasier
Pre Lit
Clear Lights
$75. (352) 382-1891
10X 10X6 KENNEL
Chain link w/door, tin
roof. Sturdy. Some rust
on ground poles.
$175.00 OBO
352-613-4224
67 pc. Tienshan China
Poinsettia & Ribbons
collection, beautiful!
great condition! $100.
set of lamps, $100.
(352) 795-7254
26" Mongoose Bike
new tubes, excel.
cond. $90.
Stringer of 5 Bass
mounted, beautifully
displayed $100.
(352) 628-5085
Antique Singer
Sewing Machine
Pedal type
Early 1900's
$100
(352) 287-0767
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BICYCLE- 26"Boys RE-
GION lime green stand-
ard bike/helmet/vest
$85.Local delivery
352-527-0732.
BIKE BASKET BY BELL
White Clip-on
(new $30)
$15., 352-270-3527
BRASS HEADBOARD
FOR KING BED.First
$50 takes it!
352-322-1160
CAMERA
SONY cyber-shot,
w/steady shot focus.
Extra's include:
telephoto lens, high
density filter lens,
polarized filter lens,
tripod, case and battery
charger.
Like new with box
$200 352-503-2661
CANON MP280
PRINTER Great condi-
tion, needs ink, black
colored, also a scan-
ner, $25 (352)465-1616


CARPET AFGANI
8'x5' reversible 2" thick
wool Beige $100.
352-270-3527
CHILDS BIG WHEEL
Thomas the train big
wheel for 2,3 year old
20.00 352-628-4447
CHILDS TRAIN TABLE
step 2 deluxe train table
with lid like new
$35 352-628-4447
CHILDS TRAINS
Thomas the train take
and play and motorized
at least 15 for 25.00
352-628-4447
China Cabinet,
Antique, Excel. Cond.
$180
Treadmill, Sears
Excel. Cond. $70
(352) 465-7212
COACH PURSES
3 Coach bags w/
serial numbers.
$50 each
(352) 726-9472
Comforter King Set
Ralph Lauren Adiron-
dack Bear Print. Incld
Flannel Sheets. Still in
pkg. Great Gift! $150
obo (518) 802-0220
FISHER PRICE TOY
BOX Plastic nice with
toys. $50.00
352-746-0714
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.001lb.
Stone Crabi) $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001
GALLERY WOMEN'S
JACKET Reversible,
size S, hardly used,
cheetah pattern, $30
(352)465-1616
GAS GENERATOR
Power stroke, 6200
starting watts, 5000 run-
ning watts, Never Used
$500 623-760-7684
Crystal River
Gas Grill
4 burners, 2 tanks and
a Wrought Iron table
with 2 chairs
$200 total!
(352) 795-7254
GREAT FAMILY GIFT
(Two ) 5 & 10 Gallon
Aquarium w/ stands,
filters, lights, gravel, +
more, like new must
see. Asking $75. for all
(352) 564-2413, Sue
HARLEY SOFTAIL
BACK SEAT & REST
$50.00 Nick
352-697-2631
(Homosassa) ph
HARLEY STOCK
EXHAUST PIPES
NEARLY NEW FITS
1350-1450 SLIDE ON
$100 obo 352-464-0316
HOOVER FLOORMATE
hoover floormate hard
floor cleaner for
tile/wood-$25.00
352-527-9982
KEY HOLDER Hangs
on wall with Framed Mir-
ror attached. $10.00
352-419-5656
LEVI'S JEANS FOR
BOYS Good condition,
size 12 regular, $10
(352)465-1616
LUGGAGE Large Up-
ringht 29x22x11/wheels.
good condition $35.00
352-249-4451
MC HELMET NEW
RODIA Lady Rider
Black w/Roses ($70)
$45 352-270-3527
Memory Foam
Mattress, Full Size
Cost over $500
Asking $150. Like New
(352) 726-1991
MOTORCYCLE HEL-
MET NEW RODIA
"Lady Rider" NEVER
WORN $45
352-270-3527
MOTORCYCLE WIND-
SHIELD BAG Harley
brand $ 40
(Homosassa)
352-697-2531 ph
Nordictrack, C2000,
Treadmill, heavy duty
fold up $275.
Yamaha Organ, XI100
w/ stand $60 Great for
Xmas (352) 726-3421
NuWave Infra red
Oven, brand new $55.
Thu the Bible
J. Vernon McGee,
from Genesis to Reve-
lation 5 vol. $55.
(352) 860-0124
PARROT Cage for
med.to large parrot.
FIRM
$75.513-4027,
leave mess.
RUG CLEANER bissell
rug cleaner.Rug cleaner
good condition $50.00.
628-5107 phone


12-13 @ LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UClick for UFS, 2013

"You say your lawyer bandaged

your wrist?"

Adifilos-Gru -Kthn-Ba s


Sacrifice
High Speed Mobility
Scooter (Trike)
1 yr old, excel, cond.
$1,465.
(352) 249-3180
SEVYLOR CANOE
great condition, durable
lightweight blowup type
with paddle. 100.00
352-302 7451
SMALL ELECTRIC
SMOKER LITTLE
CHIEF works great for
fish orjerkey only 60.00
3524640316
Speakers,
$40.
Golf clubs
$200.
(352) 249-7064
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
T-BIRD HARDTOP
HOIST manual/pully
system $ 50
(homosassa)
352-697-2631 ph
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore 400. Like
New. $300/Set, Firm.
60 Gal. Commercial Air
Compressor $400
(352) 621-6892 aft 6pm
Washer & Dryer,
Heavy Duty, Kenmore,
like new $275.
King Bed, frame, matt
boxspring & headbrd,
good cond., $100.
352-400-0481
WILD LIFE PRINTS
Ducks & Geese,
$200. obo
Deer & Elk,$250. obo
will separate
(352) 249-7064




SHARP WIZARD
ORGANIZER English to
Spanish, expense and
three Phone Books $20
352-341-0450



4 PRONGED CANE
don't wait to FALL
DOWN before you need
one. $15.00
3524640316
4 WHEELED WALKER
with seat and brakes.
only 75.00
3524640316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER. MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET
URONLY 20.00
352-464-0316


Medical

Bariatric Power
Wheelchair
Quickie Rhapsody
weight limit 3001bs
never used, $750. firm
(352) 637-4539 Iv msg
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only 20.00 each
352-464-0316
CHILDS MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR GOOD
SHAPE YELLOW,WITH
FOOTRESTS. ONLY
85.00 352 464 0316
Heavy Duty Wheel-
chair, electric, high
back, extra support
seat, slightly used,
cost $4,300. sell $800
(352) 628-5085
Jazzy Electric
Wheel Chair,
Model 1170XL
Like new,
$700 make offer
(352) 621-5340
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316
Sacrifice
High Speed Mobility
Scooter (Trike)
1 yr. old, excel, cond.
$1,465.
(352) 249-3180




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULLY
SET-UP PLAYS AND
SOUNDS GREAT! $25
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
PLUS STYLE DEEP
BURGANDY BURST
FLAME MAPLE
TOPBLOCK INLAYS
$140 352-601-6625
"NEW" LIQUID BLACK
ELECTRIC "S.G."
STYLE GUITAR PLAYS
GREAT $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" VINTAGE LOOK
ELECTRIC GUITAR, 2
HUMBUCKINGS,
PLAYS GREAT ONLY
$50 601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR &
AMP (LIKE NEW)
W/GIGBAG,TUNER,STR
AP,CORD,STRINGS&C.D
$75 352-601-6625


2 Twin 4" FOAM (2"
memory foam, 2" foam),
covers. Clean, almost
new.
$75 both. 860-2701
10 CUBIC FOOT
CHEST FREEZER
white 10 cu ft. chest
freezer only used for a
month includes inside
basket and owners
manual 180.00 or B.O.
phone# 3524194767
Refrigerator Fngidaire
Gallery, side by side
good condition, water
and ice in door, 22.6 cu-
bic feet, 2006, $300.
352-341-2081
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529




MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE ONLY
95.00 464 0316
Miami Sun
3 Wheel Bicycle
w/ Basket
$165
(352) 812-2329
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE ALL ELEC-
TRONICS SEAT BACK
CHEWED ON BY MY
DOG 65.00 $464 0316
VERSACLIMBER
good condition
250.00
352-302 7451

Sgorting


BICYCLE RACK Holly-
wood Trunk mount. Like
new.Holds 3 bikes.
$50.00 352-465-2515
CAMO HUNTING
OUTFIT Size
Ig.,Pants,undershirt ,top
shirt,winter jacket
$45.00 352-789-5770
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Custom Golf Clubs
Built at a fraction of
pro shop cost. Builder
USGA Cert. Member
Will come to you. Call
Tom (352) 746-4920
MOUNTAIN BIKE Red
"Mt. Storm" Roadmaster
21 speed bike -$15-
3523449190


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179






Beverly Hills Area.
Will do odd jobs, run
errands, & give you a
ride to appt. Call Pete
727-418-1953






SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374






BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
iV RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
oe FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M&W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
mint & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Service Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447




Home Cleaning
Service
Call 352-875-6285
for estimate.
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


Hom
Seirwices

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning






(6




(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



Painting

'ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Polmwfidn/
Remodeing


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570





SAll hases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713







Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441





ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
**352-639-1024***


-MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
Pfi *RVTC Certified Tech
S 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service. parts. sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955








Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


EMERGENCY//


6,1fl, D .nfl.. .. ry.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 C11


WORDY G U BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Male adult is able (1) Every answer is a rhyming
1.Maeadlti pair of words (like FAT CAT

1110 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Close to a brewery product (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Theater pathway orderly lineup (1) syllables in each word.

1 @2013JUFS,Dist.CbyJUni Ucllckfor JUFS
4. Small-minded abominable snowman (2)


5. Con man aide's BBQ cooking devices (1)


6. Well-spoken hooky-playing student (2)


7. Nanas' nooks' counterparts (2)


S3INNVHO Sa I3NNKVo IL INVIUTIJ Naflld 9 STIIHO STIS 's
13a 1.lJad Tl'id nIsiv* 'HU H iV'N*g 3 NVON i
SHMSrNV


*iBS
NIKE DRIVER
Brand new Covert VRS
Driver for longer dis-
tance. Senior Shaft,
adj head & head
cover. List for $299,
asking $109 firm
352-228-1944
Want to Buy
Lead Shot for Skeet
& Trap Shooting
(352) 726-9369

utility

PORTABLE 1 TON 12V
Winch with battery $85
352-513-4614



Baby 3 in 1 Crib, high
chair, bassinet, stroller
w/ car seat, pack
-n-go & more. Cheap!
352-795-1692
KIDDIE POOL Blue
Round Plastic Kiddie
Pool. $5.00
352-419-5656



COSTUME JEWELRY
Large Zip-Lock Bag of
assorted Jewelry.
$10.00 352-419-5656
PAKISTANI/INDIAN
JEWELRY SET jewelry
set that includes a pair
of earrings and a neck-
lace $30 (352)465-1616
PAKISTANI/INDIAN
PURPLE & BLUE JEW-
ELRY SET includes
earrings & a necklace
$60 (352)465-1616


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369












Judith Lewis
Celestial Spa
Welcomes Veterans
Announcing:
Curbside service for
the disabled and
handicapped.
Therapeutic mas-
sages, hot stones,
salt scrubs, detox
treatments and
more. Visit us online
at celestial-spa.com,
call us at
(352)527-0077, Or
visit us at 9 Regina
Blvd. Beverly Hills fl.
34465
mm28221, ma60820














BABY GIRL
Baby Girl T, 6-y.o.
brindle/white terrier
mix, medium size,
weight 40 Ibs, ap-
pears housebrkn.
Came to shelter as
stray. A bit shy &
frightened but
friendly & coopera-
tive, gets along
w/other dogs &
likes people, best
without children.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BABY
Looking for a well
mannered, gentle
new family mem-
ber? Baby, a friend
to everyone she
meets, very sweet,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/other
dogs, sits, shakes,
lies down on
command. Loves to
play fetch. Appears
housebrkn. 3 years
old. Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


EDITH
Edith, 2-year-old
spayed female
Boxer/Hound/Terrier
mix, Heartworm
-negative, appears
housebroken, weight
49 Ibs, loving & lovea-
ble, walks well on
leash, easily directed,
very
affectionate & friendly.
Needs
one medication.
Call Joanne

352-795-1288
352-795-1288


FREDDIE MAC
Freddie Mac,
9-month-old
Hound/Shepherd
mix, neutered, ap-
pears housebroken,
good w/other dogs,
active, likes to play
& cool his toes in
pool, eager to
please, loves his
people friends, very
intelligent, great
family dog. UTD on
all shots.
Call Wanda @
352-344-5737.
FREE KITTYS
3 young homeless
kitties, 2 males, I fe-
male. Spayed and
neutered, rabies
shots, wormed,
defleaed. Friendly. I
rescued them, please
rescue me. Need to
find homes quickly.
Crystal River, Please
call 408-489-0849









HONCHO
Honcho, beautiful
American Bulldog
mix, neutered,
microchipped &
housebroken,
turned into shelter
because of lack of
housing. Honcho
has had a rough
time, required sur-
gery for entropion,
successfully re-
paired, owner
abandoned & left
at friend's home.
Now back at shel-
ter, desperately
needs good forever
home. 3 y.o., wt
73 Ibs, very friendly
& affectionate.
Joanne @
352-795-1288


Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. Health Cert.
$350. (352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell

ILQ4&k







New Puppy? Consider
a gift certificate for a
Puppy How 2 Class?
Call Deborah Lumley
Certified Prof Dog
Trainer at Intercept Dog
Training 352-422-1123
or hershevsleaacv.com


OZZIE
Ozzie, 3+ y.o. neu-
tered Black Mouth
Cur mix, weight
60 Ibs, beautiful
chestnut-red,
active, energetic
& friendly, good
w/children, foster
mom says he's very
devoted and loving.
UTD on shots &
microchip. Best
in yard to run.
Call Brenda @
352-746-1423.
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300. Schnauzer Pups
just born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
TALKING QUAKER
PARROT, w/mate
Pepper & Patty. incl.
Ig rod iron cage, $200.
obo (352) 419-6016




Dog Stroller, like new
$40.
SmI Dog Carrier, like
new $25.
(352) 527-6975




CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
Horses & Tack, New &
used. 352-873-6033
Diamond P Farm


Livestock

2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Must sell as pair
(352) 634-4237
PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352)-445-0381
Wanted Female llama
for Companion for a
fixed male. Cheap
(863) 843-2495




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
I bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

INVERNESS
(Deerwood) 2/1
SWMH, $475, 1st, last,
Sec. quite area, clean,
utility rm/screen rm, no
pets 352-746-1600




Dblwd. 3BR, 2BA, Split,
2 Car Carport, steel
roof, caged inground
pool, on 1 ACRE,
Castlelake, No Fees
$65,900 352-597-7353
Floral City 12x56 MH
2/br, 11 ba on 80x152
ft lot.$21,000. Fixer 'er
up. (352) 726-8873


12-13-13


352-795-7368
www.[itrlusilotyHomeRentall.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
9469 W. Wisconsin C(t......... 5650
2/2, 2-story Condo
1520 W. Jim Ln..................950
3/2/2 Beautiful Home
HOMOSASSA
3185 S. Sandpiper Ter............. $615
3/2 Cozy Home In The Meadows
11701 Clearwater 0 ..............$900
2/2 Waterfront Mobile- REDUCED
FLORAL CITY
4940 S. Tad Ter....................$100
2/1, 1220 sq. ft.
6383 S. Toimpaul Ter................ $550
1/1,786 Sq Ft In Quiet Neighborhood
CITRUS SPRINGS
6913 N. Gladstone Dr. .............$875
3/2/2 split floorplan
9045 N. Tramvis Dr...................$650
2/2 Neat Affordable Duplex


Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985

NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Homes
Modular & Stilt Homes
Factor Direct/Save
$25k off list!M
John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
foLdetails

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
into & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183




INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details






WI'SSTIF
M-Ut-1


INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 1/1 SWMH
Perfect Winter Getaway
or Year Round
Tastefully Furnished,
Pool, Clubhouse,
Boat Slips, lawn maint.
& So Much More
ONLY $8,900.
Call for Details
BY OWNER
352-419-6132




2BR 1-1/2BA DW
off Gospel Isl. Rd.,
1/3 acre Irg. scr. rm.,
laund. rm. carport
plus garage $34,000.
(352) 419-5013
Hernando 2 bedroom.
1 bath. screened room,
carport and shed. Lake
Access. Ceramic bath.
fully furnished,
no lot rent.$28,888
bahecker@msn.com for
photos or 989-539-3696
for appointment.
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
Inverness, Jungle
Camp Area 2Br/1Ba
SW w/ 2 rms added
on. CP & 2 Sheds. Lge
lot close to river. Just
$10,000, 352-400-4196




2BR/1BA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124
55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba Furnished
Fireplace, Includes
Washer/Dryer
$6,900. obo
352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, 1BA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
Newly renovated MH
in 55+ comm. 2BR/1BA
Move in Condition &
fully furnished incld
Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
Two Bedroom Mobile
Home in Lecanto Hills
RV Pk cpt, scrn room,
heat & air, $6k
352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




-ACTION-
. RENTAL MANAGEMENT
, REALTY, INC. J


for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1,100 per month;
first/last/security;
annual term. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.


Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $1,100. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000


JT 11 =1 177r,

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, All Util. Incl',d.
$575 mo + Sec.,
352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815











Rental Assist.
Available NOW!

Bedrooms 2


Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352) 447-0106
TDD ph # 1.800.955.8771
This Institution Is an equal
L Jopportunty provider & employer

CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE*
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276




CRYSTAL RIVER
Commercial bid for
rent High Traffic lo-
cation on 44 Next to
manatee Lanes, 6,000
sf Avail. Immediately
(352) 584-9496

INVERNESS
Business/warehouse
rental units. 800 SF
zoned Commercial.
400 ft off of Hwy 41
on E Arlington. Call
for into 352-726-9349





Brentwood

2/2/2/1 townhome,
full appliances
heated pool, Citrus
Hills Social Member-
ship included.
$850/mo
Pru. FL. Showcase
Prop. 352-364-1947

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/Den, Fully furn..
W/D, $850 mo Ist/sec
(352) 228-9192




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Brentwood
& Terra Vista
of Citrus Hills
Homes & Town-
homes. Furnished &
unfurnished.
Starting at $1000/
per month, social
membership
included
Six months minimum.
Terra Vista Realty
Group.Call 746-6121




Beverly Hills
2 bdrm, plus Fl Rm,
Move in $1350, Be in by
Christmas, 442-7794

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $750/Mo lst/lst+
dep 352-634-3862
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299,
352-364-2073
HERNANDO
Riverlakes Manor 2/2
fenced yard $650 mo.
Ist+Sec. 352-464-0647

INVERNESS
Golf & Country 2/2/2
$850/mo & $500 Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fend back
yrd. $850, 352-212-4873
Sugarmill Woods
Pool Home 3/2/2, s/s
appl. travertine tile,
new cabinets, Ig master
bath, NICE! $1200. mo
352-302-4057











INVERNESS
Waterfront home


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







"SUPER OPEN
HOUSE SATURDAY"
Several Homes in the
Forest View Retire-
ment Community will
host Open Houses
Saturday Dec 14
from 10AM 2PM.
Prices range from the
upper 20's to
high 50's.
Call Lorelie LeBrun,
Sales Counselor for
more information.
352-795-7799,
Forest View
960 S Suncoast,
Homosassa Fl,
near Hwy 19 and
Ozello Trail.
www.forestview
fl.com


**********




FOUR STAR

OPEN HOUSE! LOOK!
Sunday 12/15 -
11am-2pm
8632 E Sora Court, Lot
59, Inverness FL, 34450
REDUCED 2BR Palm
Harbor on cul-de-sac.
Armstrong flooring, re-
modeled kitchen, &
screen porch. Club-
house & Heated Pool.
Close to Homassasa
Springs. ONLY $12,000.
Call Judy Nickerson
(352) 508-1655
**********


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225






HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
3,200 Sf. kitchen ready
up to code, Ig. parking
lot. 1305 Hwy 486 **
(352) 584-9496






CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802






BEAUTIFUL 1/4 acre
lot in Cantebury Lakes
Estates
BARGAIN PRICED!
@9k 352-422-4785


Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


2/1 with carport &
Florida Rm. Screen pa-
tio & fenced backyrd.
Central air heat. W/D
included. $575/Mo
(352) 422-2433


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan

Million Dollar +
Producer!

Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com







For SaWe 8uP.
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290







SALSA


Great Starter Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage,
Lease or cash
$2,000 down
$748. month
877-500-9517





MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage flonrida room
with or without furniture.
New A/C upgrades
$86,000 or best offer
Estate Administrator
502/693-7904






Duval Island
Very nice clean, furn.
starter or retire home.
2/3 BR, 1 BA, Utility
room w/ shower. No
flood zone. Reduce to
$46,900 352- 678-7145






4BR/1'2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!



S= 11^I^


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856






MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

NEED LISTINGS
Sold All Of Mine

Market is good
Call me for Free
CMA

I also have some
Owner Financing
Available for buyers

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office















BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bib[owell@
netscane.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments



I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515












SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855










ci



Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor













ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty








SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view

my properties"




** 5 ACRES **
On Paved Rd w/
power. $59,900
E Shady Nook CT
Floral City
(860) 526-7876




Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688




Citrus Co. Minutes to
gulf. Series of islands
called Ozello Keys.
Middle of FL State
Preserve. Live off the
land. Food/Garden
Protein/salt water.
Sacrafice @ $44,900
727-733-0583




** BUY, SELL"
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*

Fishing Machine
14 ft., 1989, V Hull, alu-
minum, 9.9 evinrude
mtr. galv. trlr. $1,600
Inverness, Call John
(727) 639-4218
Gheenoe
16 ft, with trailer, new
tires and lights, great
for Xmas, $750.
(352) 726-3421
PONTOON
20 FT, 1994 Monarck
new VHF radio & GPS
fishfinder. Good Cond.
$5,000. (352) 527-4247
PONTOON
24ft, HT 883HP
Ev., interior redone;
With Trailer $4200 or
$3400 for boat only
(352) 476-3688
PONTOON BOAT

'08, 24' Sunchaser 824
by Smokercraft. Very
clean, needs nothing
Lots of extra's! 6x8
open front fishing
deck with 2 chrs. '07,
50 HP Yamaha 2
stroke, less then 50 hr.
'07 Road King, walk up
2 axeltrlr. $10,250
(352) 419-7766
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
"(352)527-0555"
boatsupercenter.com


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002




Owner Financing
10 Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007
Homes of Merit, $135k
Call Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
352-302-6082




Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


I et




C12 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013
RecretBfion ^^99^
VehiclesU^^


Couch out of an RV
5th Wheel
Excellent Condition
$150.
352-422-0273


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RVS,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



4 Back Seats for
Pontiac Transport
1998.
$30. ea. take all $100.
(352) 621-5340
BUICK
1985, Riviera,
Parts Car, $1,500
(352) 228-9058
Vehicles

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

ILQQlC
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-


BOSTON WHALER
15 FT. 50 Yamaha
4 Stroke, Trailer,
Loaded, Perfect Boat
$7,000. 305-619-0282
CADILLAC
1997 Deville
Concours
$2500
(352) 322-0321
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HYUNDAI
'09, Sonata Limited,
27K miles, brown, w/
tan leather inter, snrf.
full power seats, 4 cyl.
w/ alloyed wheels
$13,000. 352-746-9255




2675-0103 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2013-360
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
PAMELA D TURNLEY
W GARY TURNLEY
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be ;-j-
thereon. The .:- : -
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:


2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
JEEP
'04, Grand Cherokee,
limited, loaded, mint,
clean, white w/ blk int
$8,000 obo
305-619-0282
KIA
2011 Optima EX
loaded, leather, all
power keyless, GPS
$17,500 352-212-5555
LINCOLN
'99, Town car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$4,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

ONE OWNER
NISSAN
2008 Altima 3.5 SE, all
power, keyless, auto-
matic, high mileage,
$7,600 352-746-6394
TOYOTA
'08, Yaris, 4 DR.
Sedan, Blue, 51,500
miles,Good cond.
$9,500. (352) 527-4247



CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
MERCEDES BENZ
1978, 450 SL, Convert.
excel, cond. 84k mi.
Caledonian green
$13,000, 352-464-3187
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue. 440
eng.. all original, great
con. Best offer above
$20,000. 352-302-8265




11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Chevrolet
2003 Silverado
Pick-Up, Real Nice,
clean. Priced for quick
sale $4900 OBO
(917) 733-3644
DODGE
'00, Ram 1500, auto,
AC, reese hitch new
tran,130K mi, dpndble
$2,900.352-563-0615




CERTIFICATE NO: 11-2915
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 1
LOT 24 BLK 92 DESCR IN 0
R BKA49 PG 229
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
HABIB HASSAN JOWHAR
HAYAT
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, Sate of
Florida.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed ac-
cording to law, the prop-


Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
GMC
07 Yukon SLT, loaded,
full power, DVD, bose,
very good, 116K mi
$17,800 (352) 212-5555
GMC
'89, Jimmy,
Fair Condition
$1,200.
(352) 746-6998
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018



JEEP
2006 Wrangler X,
57,000k, many extras,
$15,500
call 352-422-5448



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VENTURA
2005 Van. Wired for
handicap lift, has
hand controls, 74K mi.
good cond $6,000
(352) 637-6216
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018



BLUE OX
Motorcycle carrier
rated for 1000 Ibs.
$750. Call
(231)445-2186
Craftsman
motorcycle jack
Excellent Cond $60
(352) 419-5363
HARLEY
'02, Road King,
23,500 mi. gar. kept,
adult driven, beautiful
$7,850 obo, 422-1866
HARLEY
Sportster 883 Black
13000 miles Nicely
equipped 1999 $3300
716/860-6715
Triumph-'79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$6500. 352-513-4257



erty described in such
certificate shall be sold to
the highest bidder on
line on January 15, 2014
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c
om.
Dated December 5, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox, Dep-
uty Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
December 13, 2013
December 20, 2013
December 27, 2013
January 3, 2014



Forf eiture


825-1220 FCRN
FORFEITURE CCSO
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FSS 705.103, the following found items will be disposed as provided by
state statue unless claimed by the owner:
1. (13) US Currency Bills
To make claim for any of the items, contact Betty Rideout, Evidence Custodian, Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office at 352-341-7425.
Sheriff Jeffrey J. Dawsy
By: Cynthia Russo, Supervisor Staff Services
Published two (2) times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 13 & 20,2013.


SeBffStorage
*mrj
819-1213 FCRN
Lien Foreclosure 12-20-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
ARVANA MINI STORAGE
5164 S. Floria Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
SALE OF CONTENTS
Pursuant to FS 83.8055 the
entire contents of the fol-
lowing storage unit(s) will


be sold in order to pay for
past due rentaladvertisi
ng and other charges
owed by these tenants.
The sale will take place 2
weeks from first publica-
tion, December 20, 2013
at 10:00am.
Dennis Johnson
Unit A-26


Shannon Johnson
Unit B-9
Kristina McMahon
Unit B-53 & B-59
Jonathan Swinimer
Unit B-63
December& 13, 2013


823-1220 FCRN
12/27 Lien Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FLA. STAT. 83.806 Notice is Hereby Given That on 12/27/13 at 11:00 a.m.
at PACK-N-STACK MINI STORAGE, 7208 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa, FL
34446,
The Miscellaneous Personal Property contents of your storage shall be sold for past
due rent and fees owed by tenant:
#7 DIANNA BOGGS, 3316 S. WESTERN AVE, CHICAGO, IL 60608
#26 TIMOTHY BAKER, 5028 S. GRAND CIR, HOMOSASSA, FL 34446
#77 KENNETH KEER, 8015 WINDHAVEN PL, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448
#87 JOHNNIE BEVERLY, 1824 E. WELCH RD, APOPKA, FL 32712
#2
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 13 & 20, 2013.


818-1213 FCRN
Cordell, Lou Ann 2013-CA-000689 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-000689
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
LOU ANN CORDELL; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LOU ANN CORDELL; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or
against the above named Defendant, who is not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
8529 N TITLEIST DR., CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434-5869
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK 396, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGES 133 THROUGH 152, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before January 7,


2013 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 13th day of August, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR
(352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 1-800-955-8771.
December 6 & 13, 2013. 888122337


821-1213 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
This is to notify the public that a copy of thie Annual Tax Return, Form 990, of the Cit-
rus Springs Civic Association Inc. is available by calling 352-465-9007, press 3, and
leave your request.
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, December 13, 2013

822-1213 FCRN
12/19 PUBLIC AUCTION
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice is hereby given that Citrus County Animal Services will offer for sale at
Public auction: one black and white, juvenile pygmy goat and one adult female,
grey pot belly pig
At the conclusion of the sale, the buyer must make full payment for thie animalss.
The buyer is also required to make immediate arrangements for transportation of
purchased animals) the same day.
AUCTION:
DATE: Thursday, December 19, 2013
TIME: 1:00pm
LOCATION: 4030 S. Airport Road
Inverness, FL 34450
PHONE: (352) 746-8400
CONTACT: Patricia Amon
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 13, 2013.


'0


CLASSIFIES


Foreclosure Sal&
Acfion Notices I


FoecoueSl


821-1213 FRCRN
2/11 Hearings/Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing, 2:00 p.m.; Regu-
lar Meeting; 4:00 p.m. and a Public Hearing, 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 11, 2014
in the Board Room of the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main Street,
Inverness, Florida.
The purpose of the Administrative Hearing is to act upon proposed student
expulsion(s). The Regular Meeting is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come before the Board. The Public Hearing is to approve the revisions of
Policy, 4.71, Participation of Home Education, private School and Virtual School Stu-
dents in Extracurricular Activities, to approve the revisions of Policy 5.80, Athletics and
the revision of Policy 8.14, Inspections.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.
/S/Sandra Himmel, Superintendent Citrus County School Board
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle, Friday, December 13, 2013.


820-1213 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name Notice
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Vuja Dae
located at 306 S. Line
Ave., Suite 102, Inverness,
FL 34452, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations of


the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness FL,
this 9 day of Dec., 2013.
/s/ J. Freedom
Owner
Published Dec. 13, 2013.


OifiofI2013sitjo!chloose from...

A ifpl r ic il 't-- "oflite.


Visit www.automaxocala.com

to view our sale prices.


I ;13 CHEVROLET MUBU1C
$i I Ss4,00 13CHEV SILVERAD j
$280S225i$2300 5O1.O


'U'."


U,


HG fllfl 41LU13 TOTA FB-S IUIUIHEUW 13 VOLKSWAGE JETflA
m-$33,800MEN:,.*g $2P4,80001!
A 1W 3,80b^, $19.990' | 2480 ^ $12,880


SHARP E, HER


These are only a lew of our specials.1


ribiI 'www.Automalocalo /1* com toI vie wthe iiiiirest!-


12 BMW 3 SERIES, PREMIUM PKG MOONROOF.............
13 CHEVROLET IMPALA, LT ...............................
13 CHEVROLET MALIBU, LT ...............................
13 CHEVROLET SONIC, LTZ, LEATHER .....................
13 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA SPORT F, LS ......................
13 CHEVROLET EQUINOX, LT MOONROOF....

13CHEVROLETSILVERADO 1500, LT CREW, V....
13 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN, LT .........................
13 CHEVROLETTAHOE, SUNROOF, DVD... .
13 CHEVROLETTRAVERSE, LT NEW BODY STYLE..........
13 CHRYSLER 300, LEATHER .............................
13CHRYSLERTOWN &COUNTRY, TOURING, LEATHER, DVD
13 DODGE CHARGER, SXT ................................
13 DODGE DURANGO, CREW, LEATHER, LOADED...........
13 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN, SXT .........................
12 DODGE JOURNEY, SXT, 6 CYL 3RD ROW................
12 FIAT 500, POP ........................................
13 FORD FOCUS, SE .....................................
13 FORD FUSION, ALL NEWBODYSTYLE ...................
13 FORD MUSTANG, MUST SEE ...........................
13 FORD ESCAPE, SEL, 20 ECOBOOST LEATHER...........
13 FORD EXPEDITION, XLT .................................
13FORD F-150,XLTV ...................................
13 FORD FLEX, SEL ......................................
13 GMC TERRAIN, SLT MOONROOF .........................
12 HONDA PILOT, EX-L. ...................................
13 HYUNDAI ACCENT, GLS, AUTO ..........................
13 HYUNDAI ELANTRA, GLS, AUTO .........................
13 HYUNDAI SANTA FE, SPORT ............................


$26,880
$12,880,,,,,,$195MO
14,880,,,,,,225 MO
$11,88O,,,,,,$179MO
$13,881,,,,,,$209 MO

$18,880,,,,,,$285 MO
,$23,480
$30,880
$30,880,,,,,,$459 MO
$23,880
$18,880,,,,,,$285 MO
,$17,880,,,,,,$269 MO
$15,980,,,,,,$239 MO
$23,880
$14,980,,,,,,$225 MO
$13,88,,,,,,$209 MO

$10,880,,,,,,$165 MO
$U12,88,,,,,,$195MO
$1 6,880,,,,,, $255MO
$16,88,,,,,,$255MO
$18,880,,,,,,$285 MO

,$25,880

,$21,880
,$20,990
$21, 55880
$24, 55880

,$11,88.,,,,,,$179 MO
$ M12,88,,,,,,$195 MO
$18,881,,,,,,$285 MO


13 HYUNDAI SONATA, GLS, AUTO..................
13 HYUNDAI TUCSON, GLS AUTO.................
13 JEEP COMPASS, SPORT .......................
13 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE, LIMITED, NAV.........
13 KIAOPTIMA LX, WHEELS ......................
13KIASORENTO, LX, V63ROW.................
13 KIASPORTAGE, LX, WHEELS ...................
13 MAZDA MAZDA3, SPORT .......................
13 MAZDA MAZDA5 .............................
13 NISSAN ALTIMA, S, ALL NEW BODY STYLE........
13 NISSAN FRONTIER, SV, CREW .................
13NISSAN JUKE ................................
13 NISSAN MAXIMA, MOONROOF..................
13 NISSAN PATHFINDER, SV ALL NEW BODY STYLE
12 NISSAN QUEST, ROOMY VAN..................
13 NISSAN ROGUE, SPECIAL EDITION, 700 MILES...
13 NISSAN SENTRA, SV 2KMILES.................
13 NISSAN VERSA, SV ............................
13 RAM 1500, LARAMIE, ONLY4KMILES............
12 TOYOTAAVALON, LEATHER, MOONROOF........
13 TOYOTAFR-S PEARLWHITE, SHARP...........
12TOYOTAIQ, 14KMILES, STYLISH................
13TOYOTA PRIUS ................................
13TOYOTAYARIS, LE ...........................
13 TOYOTA4RUNNER, SR5 .......................
13 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER, SPORT.................
13 VOLKSWAGENJETTASEDAN, SE, LEATHER.....
13VOLKSWAGENPASSAT, SE, LEATHER..........
13 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN, LOW MILES............


Auto1


....M2388,
..M2383A
...M2465.
...M2284
...M2409.
....M2414
....M2421.
...M2417.
...M2461.
....M2410.
...M2516.
...M2509.
...M2399.
....M2517.
....M2373.
,M2335B2,

....M2452.
....M2393,

...M2487.

...M2279.
...M2389.
....M2291.
...M2411
....M2376,
...M241S.
...M2254
....M2235.
...M2412.
...M2471


$13,881,,,,,,($29MO

$16,990,,,,,,$255MO
$14,880,,,,,,$225MO
,$28,880

,$14,880,,,,,,$225MO
$M18,881,,,,,,$285MO
$15,881,,,,,,O$239MO
$1N.,88 o,,,,,,$165MO
,$13,88.0 ,$209 MO
14,880,,,,,,225MO
$19,990M,,,,,,$299MO
,$14,880,..$225MO
$18,990M,,,,,,$285MO
,$22,880

$16 ,88,,,,,,$255MO
$16 ,88,,,,,,$255MO
,$14,880,,,,,,$225MO
$11,88 0,,,,,,$179MO
$33,880
,$21,880

,$19,990,,,,,,$299MO
$11 ,88o,,,,,,$165MO
$17,8810, ,$269MO
,$11,88 O,,,,,,$179MO
,$25,880
,$24,880
,$12,88O,,,,,,$195MO
,$12,88O,,,,,,$195MO
$15,881,,,,,,O$239MO


fax


*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS ARE WITH $1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS TAX, TAG, AND $495 ADMIN FEE. PAYMENTS
ARE FOR 75 MONTHS @3.49% WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


824-1213 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicle will
be sold at public sale,


Meeting^
NoFtices


'SMDA,


free of all prior liens, per Fl
Stat 713.78 at 10:00 AM
on December 27, 2013 at
Bronson Lube Inc, 555 N
Hathaway Ave, Bronson
FL 32621, phone
352-486-2100. No titles, as

Meeting
No*tices


is cash only. 98 Ford
2FTDA54U6WBA44066. In-
terested parties, contact
State Filing Service.
772-595-9555.

Meeting.


Izab


I Misc.Not


I Misc.Not


I Misc.Not


fofeclosure Sale
s
Mon Notice I


Foelsr ae


Foreclosure Sale.
Action Notices
I I