Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03319

Full Text

Nearly there: One more win has FSU pla


I --UNDAYJ II


q.


morning fog, then
partly could.
PAGE A4


CITRUS


DECEMBER 8, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


C OU N T Y


LIVE UNITED
United Way of
Citrus County
needs your help
for its annual
fundraising goal.
If you can, please
send a monetary
contribution to the
United Way of
Citrus County, c/o
Gerry Mulligan,
The Chronicle,
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.


MILITARY MATTERS:


Feds balk at paper applications


Associated Press
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Federal health offi-
cials, after encouraging
alternate sign-up methods
amid the fumbled rollout
of their online insurance
website, began quietly


urging counselors around
the country this week to
stop using paper applica-
tions to enroll people in
health insurance because
of concerns those applica-
tions would not be
processed in time.
Interviews with enroll-


ment counselors, insur-
ance brokers and a gov-
ernment official who
works with navigators in
Illinois reveal the latest
change in direction by the
Obama administration,
which had been encour-
aging paper applications


and other means because
of all the problems with
the federal website. Con-
sumers must sign up for
insurance under the fed-
eral health overhaul by
Dec. 23 in order for cover-
age to start in January
"We received guidance


from the feds recom-
mending that folks apply
online as opposed to
paper," said Mike Claffey,
spokesman for the Illinois
Department of Insurance.
After a conference call
See Page A12


Together
Local couple serve
together in the U.S.
Air Force./Page A19
EXCURSIONS:


--






Panama
Read the next leg of
Peter Graulich's
107-day trip around
the world./Page A15
HOMEFRONT:
Amokl


Luxurious
Sporting gifts and
games for those with
means. /HomeFront
BUSINESS:


Scrooge?
Learn to be frugal
without being
stingy./Page Dl
COMMENTARY:
What rights?
Joel
Mathis and
Ben
Boychuk,
writers off
the
RedBlue
America
columns,
debate
religious
rights and
worker's
rights in
light of the
health care
laws.
/Page Cl


Annie's Mailbox ...... A16
Classifieds ............D4
Crossword .............. A16
Editorial ................ C2
Entertainment .......... A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B4
Menus ...... A10, All
M ovies ..................... A 16
Obituaries ..........A6, A8
Together...................A22
Veterans ........ A19


6 0 18.41718 10 I o0


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Forty food trucks from as far away as southern Mexico converged Saturday on Crystal River Mall as the crowds came and lined up at the
take-out windows. Enjoying everything from chicken wraps to Vietnamese dishes, happy "foodies" abounded. These restaurants on wheels
were competing for top honors in the Spirit Award, People's Choice Award, Top Sales, Delectable Dessert and Casual Cuisine awards.

Traveling Food Truck Wars competition makes stop at Crystal River Mall

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
B aboyz. Lifes a Beach. Wako
Taco. Red Zepplin.
The mouth-watering list
goes on and on as more than 40
food trucks dominated the
Crystal River Mall's parking lot Saturday
with endless possibilities for foodies.
A meal to some Food Truck War to
others.
Food Truck Wars is a traveling restau-
rant-on-wheels competition staged
throughout the state of Florida.
'A woman named Michelle hounded
me to death on the computer to get the
Food Truck Wars to Citrus County," said
Liz Otts, owner and president of Food
Truck Crazy, the Orlando-based company
that puts on these food truck events. 'At
first I didn't know, because it is really
rural, but we are in our ninth different
city in the state of Florida. We went to Ti-
tusville, which is a little barren these
days. We had a phenomenal turnout there
and I thought we would just step out on
faith."
The Fallen Heroes Monument was the
other reason she chose Crystal River _
"We give back to the community by giv- -
ing a percentage of the proceeds to char-
ity," Otts said. "My father served 23 years David and Tasia Seijas from Lecanto are on a mission to eat a sampling of food from each
of the 40 food trucks gathered at the Crystal River Mall. These restaurants on wheels
See Page A9 competed for top honors in several categories, including the People's Choice Award.


When taking care of

mom and dad impacts

work-life balance


DEVON MERLING
Deseret News
Lynette Whiteman
never gets a break.
The 57-year-old spends
her days helping her eld-
erly neighbors continue to
live in dignity in their own
homes. In the evening, she
takes care of her own 87-
year-old mother Mildred,
who lives with Whiteman
and her husband.
The daily stresses of
caregiving can add up for
Whiteman, the executive
director of Caregiver Vol-
unteers of Central Jersey
If she gets delayed at work
or even stops for gas on
her commute, her de-
pendent and highly anx-


ious mother will call her
cellphone panicked about
when she's coming home.
Whiteman often has to de-
cline professional and so-
cial events because of her
mom's needs.
"I'm glad I'm able to do
this for my mother it's
nice to get back to inter-
generational living and
taking care of our elders
- but it's not easy," she
said. "You're never really
prepared for the switch
from being a child to
being a parent, and it's
very difficult"
Whiteman said she
finds refuge in friends,
many of whom have gone
See Page A13


Aquarium dreams for

soon-to-be-empty mall space


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Art Jones, the
man whose name has become synony-
mous with the cleanup and
restoration of King's Bay, has
something else in the offing:
starting an aquarium.
Jones is working to line up in- -
vestors and to fashion a pub-
lic/private partnership to create
a space that can "showcase
what the Nature Coast has to
offer" in marine life. rt
"And I would like to see a sit-
presi
uation where 10 percent of the Kinpc
proceeds will go back to the Rc
cleanup and restoration of
King's Bay," Jones said.
He wants to locate the aquarium
where the outgoing Belk store space is
in the Crystal River Mall.
Jones said the space is ideal for the
potential venture.


"It has a loading dock and backup
power generation capacity and it is fac-
ing Highway 19," Jones said.
He said the 62,000-square-foot space
is the perfect spot for the things he in-
tends.
---. Jones recently met with offi-
cials with the Georgia Aquarium
in Atlanta and officials at the
SFlorida Aquarium in Tampa
Sand was told they are open to
J, working with him to help make
his aquarium dreams for the
S area a reality
n He said early estimates put
Jones the cost of the finished aquar-
lident, ium at about $10 million.
s Bay Jones said he envisions a fi-
otary. nancing structure where people
will get a chance to buy stock in
the company and it will have elements
of a nonprofit, "Because I want to offer
educational classes for students and
definitely teach people about Lyngbya
See Page All


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
82
LOW
59


ONICI
L NwarSvgFr www.chronicleonline.com 11 I 12
% Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 123


Dining a la truck




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River Christmas Parade 2013


Misty Fried with the Citrus County Food Services
Association prepares for the Crystal River Christmas Pa-
rade Saturday evening with her associate, Melanie
Weaver, putting Frosty the Snowman's head on.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The Nativity float by Mount Zion Christian Church of Homosassa was part of the "Christmas Melodies"
parade in Crystal River on Saturday night. Dozens of floats, marching bands and other Christmas displays
entertained adults and children alike. As the twinkling lights went by, Santa's helpers passed out candy to
onlookers. The annual tradition helps to kick off the Christmas season. This year marks the 51st annual Crystal River
Christmas Parade. Three-year-old Teagan Mundy poses for photos before the Crystal River Christmas parade
starts Saturday night.
See more parade photos online at www.chronicleonline.com.


3 HIGH OCTANE SALOON & GRILL
Daily Drink & Entertainment Specials
S NDAY Sou Live Concert 1 PM$
SUNDAY Southern Branded Country Jam 7:30 PM VPot Roast..................... 3.95
MONDAY All Day Happy Hour $2 Wells, $2 Domestic Bottles, $1 Drafts & 49 Wings
FREE Drafts Kill the Keg Party 10 PM Flat Iron Steak v/2 sides..................... 7.95
TUESDAY (Must wear an Octane Shirt)
Bill Castner 50s & 60s Concert 7:30 PM Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell... Beef .79 .. Chicken .99
Karaoke 8 PM T All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread
WEDNESDAY Hump Day Blues w/Mighty Past Tense
$3 Jager Bombs, $1 Drafts, $2.50 Wells (Add side sld fo $1. oo) ........................8.95
All You Can Drink Liquor $15 Drafts $5 (9-12) CO
THURSDAY $2.50 Yeungling Bottles, $1 Yuengling Drafts 1 LB. PORK CHOPS
Ladies Night 9-12 Free Wells & Drafts w/potatoes & vegetable............ 9.95
FRI DAY Ladies in FREE til 10 PM & 2 for 1 Wells 9 10 PM Bonkerz comedy club 7:30 pm surf & turf (Prime Rib nShrimp) $12.95
Guys Enjoy $1 Drafts 9 10 PM Purchasethesurf &turfseethecomedyshowforfree. Prime Rib nShrimpavailable after4pm.


SATURDAY


LL 1 3pmi~i'wu "
a irex
FR E Daft Aor WellAA 'I' A O1590S.LSNCHatBv. oasa326117


2 Live Concerts 1 & 9 PM DJ 9 PM


Sloppy Joe w/chips..................... 3.95


Are Gophers turning your yard into a
"Mound Field"? ^
r"jMound Field"?Complimentary
d B Ailb. jtm Inspections


WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS GUARANTEED!

Call The Gopher Patrol to find out how.

_-__ 352-279-9444....


OCALA PLASTIC SURGERY


BREAST AUGMENTATION
TUMMY TUCK
FACELIFT
LIPOSUCTION
EYELID SURGERY
HAIR TRANSPLANT
BOTOX & INJECTABLE FILLERS
SPIDER VEINS
CHEMICAL PEELS


Co/aewr^ ev-l^zal(y/Olad ox/^%
James Rogers DMD MD Navinderdeep Nijher MD
Leonik Ahumada MD
0 MEMBER OF MEMBER Of
American Society \ American Society for
of Plastic Surgeons / .. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery |


4


ml


A2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


LOCAL






Page A3 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8,2013



TATE0& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE


Citrus County
Monthly tours
of city to begin
Beginning Friday,
Dec. 20, the Citrus County
Historical Society will pro-
vide escorted walking tours,
lasting approximately 90
minutes, of the historical
highlights of Inverness.
This tour includes moder-
ate walking levels.
Participants will learn
about the history of Inver-
ness and while experienc-
ing the small-town charm of
the area.
The tour begins at shortly
after 10:15 a.m., starting
from the Old Courthouse
Heritage Museum in down-
town Inverness.
Reservations are re-
quired. The cost is $5 per
person, and $2 per child
under 16. All proceeds go
directly to the Citrus County
Historical Society.
Tours will be held once
per month on the third
Friday of each month
through April 2014, and may
be increased in frequency
each month depending on
interest.
Group size is a maximum
of eight persons per tour,
and no more than one
child under 16 per adult,
making for a maximum of
four children younger than
16 per tour.
For reservations, call Karl
Seidman, tour escort, at
(352) 344-1531.
Dunnellon lane
closures planned
Motorists in the Dunnel-
Ion area will experience
temporary lane closures as
the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT)
and Pospiech Contracting
Inc. continue work on a
drainage improvement
and flooding prevention
project.
Motorists should antici-
pate single lane closures
on State Road 40 at the
intersection with U.S.
41 Sunday through
Thursday nights through
Dec. 19.
This temporary traffic
control plan will be in
effect during the hours of
7:30 p.m. and 7 a.m.
Workers will be on hand
to assist with directing traffic
through the construction
area.
The project began in late
October and consists of
pond excavation improve-
ments to S.R. 40-just
west of the railroad tracks
- milling and resurfacing,
and other miscellaneous
drainage improvements.
The total project cost is
$451,400. The work is
estimated to complete in
mid-January.
For more information
call Irina Lallemand at
352-427-4054.
Kwanza celebration
planned
The public is encouraged
to celebrate Kwanzaa from
2 to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 28, at the Old Court-
house, 1 Courthouse
Square, Inverness. Admis-
sion is one nonperishable
food item.
For information, call Lil-
lian Smith at 352-637-3572
or Carol Bowers at 352-
270-3866.


Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, ap-
pearances and the like for
the 2014 political campaign.
Send information to
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.


Ron Kitchen, Republi-
can for county commission
District 2, will meet the pub-
lic at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec.
12, at Burke's of Ireland,
564 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal
River.
-From staff reports


City to look at redevelopment plan


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

Crystal River's downtown rede-
velopment plan has had many
successes in its nearly 30 years of
existence, including development
of Kings Bay Park, streetscape on
Citrus Avenue and the start of the
Riverwalk project
City officials don't want the mo-
mentum to stop.
The city council on Monday will
conduct the first of two public
hearings to extend the life of the
community redevelopment dis-
trict another 30 years. The current


Council meeting
What: Crystal River City Council
meeting.
When: 7 p.m. Monday; preceded
by 6:30 p.m. CRA meeting.
Where: City Hall on U.S. 19.
On the web: www.crystalriver
fl.org


plan expires in 2018.
Council members, sitting as the
Community Redevelopment
Agency board, are also expected


to set time during their Jan. 13
meeting to discuss a draft up-
dated redevelopment plan for the
Crystal River downtown and
waterfront.
Proceeds for the redevelopment
district are raised through a por-
tion of property taxes within the
district boundaries. The district has
a balance of $713,760 and is ex-
pected to raise $418,000 this year,
according to the draft updated
community redevelopment plan.
Officials estimate the tax incre-
ment financing district would
raise about $20.5 million over the
life of the 30-year extension.


The plan offers several poten-
tial projects, including:
Finishing the Riverwalk proj-
ect and connecting access to the
Citrus Avenue downtown area.
Improve the appearance
of the U.S. 19-Citrus Avenue
intersection.
Improve access to waterfront
parks.
Provide a safe means for
users of the Cross-Town Trail to
cross U.S. 19.
The final public hearing on ex-
tending the redevelopment dis-
trict plan another 30 years is set
for Jan. 13.


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chromncle
ABOVE: Rotary volunteer Mary Aliberti said she was new to the Rotary Christmas shopping experience, but her 8-year-old teammate, Devon,
made her promise to not only join the Rotary Club, but become an annual shopping volunteer. BELOW: Nine-year-old Lilly White checked her
list twice to make sure she bought and wrapped a gift for everyone in her family. She said it was fun to buy for others.


CELEBRATING THE


Small packages, big smiles highlight annual Rotary event


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER
Christmas tunes, color-
ful bows and piles of dec-
orative wrapping paper
packed Crystal River
High School's cafeteria
Saturday.
However, what shined
brighter than the Christ-
mas spirit were the
smiles and laughter com-
ing from children who
were delighted to buy
presents for their family

"For most of the children this
is their Christmas," said Fancy
Taylor, Christmas Shopping
Spree chairman and Rotary
Club member "We find out that
they want to buy more for
their brothers and sisters than
themselves."
Approximately 85 children
from Citrus County Schools par-
ticipated in the annual county-
wide Rotary Club Christmas
Shopping Spree at Kmart in
Crystal River
"Our Kmart is amazing and so
giving to the community," Fancy
Taylor "We take the children
there every year and Kmart
gives a discount for the chil-
dren's spending. They also give
gifts to each child and have do-
nated six new bikes, which will
be given away by a drawing."
Children received $100 to-
ward their purchases from
Rotarians. Then Kmart offered
an additional 10 percent off.


Rotarians from each of the
Citrus County clubs donated
money to the underprivileged
children.
"Just to watch the joy in their
eyes when they were buying for
others was unbelievable," said
Crystal River Rotarian Carl
Flanagan. "When she finished
shopping I asked, 'What did you
buy for yourself' and she said
nothing. I told her that she had
to go back because she needed
to buy presents for herself."
Rotarians, Rotoract and stu-
dent Interact Club members ac-
companied the children on their
shopping trip.


"I can't believe I had excluded
myself from such a wonderful
experience," said Mary Aliberti,
who pledged to become a Rotar-
ian. "Some of the little things
that he said to me just touched
my heart."
After their shopping spree,
the children went to Crystal
River High School to wrap their
treasures, where Santa greeted
them.
"It is one of the most meaning-
ful things that we do in Rotary,"
said Crystal River Rotary
president Keith Taylor "We give
to a lot of organizations. But this
is hands on that provides


meaningful experiences both for
the receivers and for the kids."
Fancy Taylor couldn't agree
more.
"This is the best thing to me
about the holidays giving
back," Fancy Taylor said. "It's all
about child. If we can touch one
child and their future we have
done our job. That is what Ro-
tary is about giving back."
Sweetbay and Plantation Inn
donated cookies for the children
to eat after their pizza party
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. corn.




A4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Gear up and get
ready to make some positive alter-
ations to your life this year. Make a
move, or participate in education.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Stick to facts and figures. Believe
only what you hear personally and
can verify.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Don't give in to someone who asks
for a donation but does not supply
you with sufficient details.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Put a push on to make more money.
Sign contracts or make changes that
can up your standard of living.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Pick and choose what you do. Too
much action can lead to injury. A se-
cret may be divulged if you have
been too trusting.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You
can make a difference by altering
your lifestyle. Cut corners and lower
your overhead.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Stay
focused on what needs to be done.
Disdcipline and hard work will help
you get your place in order and your
year-end deadlines out of the way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Don't share personal information. A
problem will arise that can affect your
reputation.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
Don't let your temper ruin your day.
Stand back and take a long, hard
look at a situation.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -You'll
have plenty of exciting ideas that
should be shared with friends and
launched as soon as you can get de-
tails and work out arrangements.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You'll
have to make some adjustments at
home if you want to avoid chaos.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Look
for a bargain, but don't buy what you
cannot afford. Discussions will give
you a better idea of how to handle a
changing situation.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
Create a warm, inviting atmosphere
at home and enjoy. Improve your
love life by taking an opportunity to
indulge in talks that will bring you
closer to someone special.


ENTERTAINMENT


Not so justified:
Timberlake's snub
NEW YORK- Justin
Timberlake may have earned
seven Grammy nominations, but
he still has reason to cry himself
a river: The pop star was shut
out of the top Grammy cate-
gories album, song and
record of the year though his
comeback effort, "The 20/20 Ex-
perience," is 2013's best-selling
release.
It might seem a bit much to
call the second most nominated
act at the Grammys snubbed,
but it's only fitting after the singer
had back-to-back, multiplatinum
hits with "Suit & Tie" and "Mir-
rors," launched two successful
tours and strategically marketed
his return, as well as two film
releases.
Timberlake's nominations in-
clude best pop vocal album, pop
solo performance for "Mirrors"
and R&B song for "Pusher Love
Girl." He also shares four nomi-
nations with Jay Z who is the
Grammy leader with nine nomi-
nations for their hits "Suit &
Tie" and "Holy Grail."
Harry's South Pole
race curtailed
LONDON Organizers of an
Antarctic charity race involving
Prince Harry said Saturday they
are suspending its competitive
element because of harsh condi-
tions, but plan to continue the
journey to the South Pole.
Harry, 29, is a member of one
of three teams involving injured
soldiers that set off last week on
the 200-mile Walking with the
Wounded South Pole Challenge.
Expedition director Ed Parker
said the teams were experienc-
ing "a higher degree of stress"
than expected and will no longer
race one another but travel and
camp together.


Associated Press
Justin Timberlake performs on stage at the American Music
Awards at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live in Los Angeles.


He said the teams would now
be driven for part of the route
and then finish the final 70 miles
to the pole on foot, likely within a
week.
Harry and actors Dominic
West and Alexander Skars-
gard are on the trek with teams
from Britain, the Commonwealth
and the U.S.
Auction features
Nancy Drew author
TOLEDO, Ohio Typewrit-
ers and a desk from the home of
an author who brought a young
sleuth named Nancy Drew to life
are going up for auction.
A lifetime of keepsakes, in-
cluding autographed posters and
writing awards, belonging to
Mildred Wirt Benson are to be


sold at an auction Sunday in
Toledo, where she was a news-
paper reporter and columnist for
nearly 60 years before her death
a decade ago.
Benson wrote more than
130 books, including the 1940s
Penny Parker mystery series, but
she is best known for the Nancy
Drew books that inspired and
captivated generations of girls.
She wrote 23 of the 30 origi-
nal Nancy Drew stories using
the pseudonym Carolyn Keene.
Paid $125 per book, she never
collected any royalties.
Benson died in 2002 at
96 and left her home and
possessions to her only daugh-
ter, Peggy Wirt, who died in
January.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 8, the
342nd day of 2013. There are
23 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 8, 1941, the United
States entered World War II as
Congress declared war against
Japan, a day after the attack on
Pearl Harbor.
On this date:
In 1776, during the Revolutionary
War, Gen. George Washington's
retreating army crossed the
Delaware River from New Jersey
into Pennsylvania.
In 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed
the Catholic dogma of the Immacu-
late Conception, which holds that
Mary, the mother of Jesus, was free
of original sin from the moment of
her own conception.
In 1980, rock star John Lennon
was shot to death outside his New
York City apartment building by an
apparently deranged fan.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush signed a $400 bil-
lion Medicare overhaul bill that in-
cluded a prescription drug plan for
seniors.
Five years ago: In a startling
about-face, Khalid Sheikh Mo-
hammed told the Guantanamo war
crimes tribunal he would confess to
masterminding the Sept. 11 attacks;
four other men also abandoned
their defenses.
One year ago: Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez announced
that his cancer had returned and
that he would undergo another sur-
gery in Cuba.
Today's Birthdays: Actor-director
Maximilian Schell is 83. Actress Kim
Basinger 60. Rock musician War-
ren Cuccurullo is 57. Rock musician
Phil Collen is 56. Country singer
Marty Raybon is 54. World Bank
President Jim Yong Kim is 54. Rock
musician Marty Friedman is 51.
Actress Teri Hatcher is 49.
Thought for Today: "So long as
governments set the example of
killing their enemies, private individ-
uals will occasionally kill theirs." -
Elbert Hubbard, American author
(1856-1915).


YESTERDAY'S
2_7PR HIL
0.00 oaR 6
000 61 0n


WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
PC
pc
pc
sh
pc
fg
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Partly cloudy today.


NA NA 0.00 -- 85 63 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ixclus vedaly
forecast by:

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
)L High: 82 Low: 59
Morning fog then partly cloudy.


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 83 Low: 60
Morning fog then partly cloudy.


___ ~TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 61
i Morning fog then partly sunny,
W--sP stray shower late.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/60
Record 85/25
Normal 74/47
Mean temp. 70
Departure from mean +10
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 56.13 in.
Normal for the year 49.91 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.16 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 62
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Chenopods, nettle, palm
Today's count: 3.7/12
Monday's count: 6.0
Tuesday's count: 5.8
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/8 SUNDAY 10:29 4:16 10:55 4:42
12/9 MONDAY 11:22 5:09 11:47 5:34


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSU NSET TONIGHT.. ..........................5:33 P.M.
fSUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:12A.M.
0 7 4 0 MOONRISE TODAY.......................... 11:53 A.M.
DEC. 17 DEC. 25 JAN.1 MOONSET TODAY.......................... 11:57 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:04 a/5:10 a 10:26 p/5:42 p
Crystal River" 7:25 a/2:32 a 8:47 p/3:04 p
Withlacoochee* 5:12 a/12:20 a 6:34 p/12:52 p
Homosassa*** 8:14 a/4:09 a 9:36 p/4:41 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:16 a/6:15 a 11:16 p/6:34 p
8:37 a/3:37 a 9:37 p/3:56 p
6:24 a/1:25a 7:24 p/1:44 p
9:26 a/5:14 a 10:26 p/5:33 p


Gulf water
temperature


71
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.75 28.72 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.52 38.51 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.67 39.65 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.34 40.33 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


38 30
34 18
51 40
75 42 38
43 32 .29
31 27
43 35 .17
-13 -21
39 35
25 13 .16
42 33 .09
29 23
35 27
80 52 .32
33 29 .01
70 49 .04
21 8
28 20
29 22
70 48 .14
28 21
34 22 .01
26 21
9 -13
15 -2
26 16 trace
41 32
22 11
40 31 .01
41 34 .08
37 34
24 10
36 31
52 32
28 20
58 47 .26
28 19
29 22
17 4
1 -11
50 40 .12
51 44 .09
32 27


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 45 41 ts 56 57
NewYorkCity 41 36 .15 sn 35 34
Norfolk 48 43 .46 r 44 42
Oklahoma City 21 10 pc 24 15
Omaha 12 -4 sn 18 -1
Palm Springs 58 36 s 55 39
Philadelphia 41 36 .07 rs 35 33
Phoenix 58 37 s 55 38
Pittsburgh 30 23 sn 30 29
Portland, ME 38 28 .06 pc 33 23
Portland, Ore 30 21 pc 27 16
Providence, R.I. 41 31 .09 pc 34 28
Raleigh 70 43 .11 i 34 33
Rapid City -5 -14 sn 5 -6
Reno 29 21 .07 pc 23 4
Rochester, NY 31 27 pc 28 25
Sacramento 47 30 .43 s 44 23
St. Louis 25 11 i 26 23
St. Ste. Marie 20 11 trace c 19 17
Salt Lake City 30 17 .01 sn 19 4
San Antonio 37 29 c 50 38
San Diego 61 51 .10 pc 57 45
San Francisco 53 44 .35 s 48 36
Savannah 83 66 sh 65 58
Seattle 32 19 pc 30 20
Spokane 15 3 pc 14 3
Syracuse 33 29 c 31 28
Topeka 23 2 sn 26 9
Washington 45 37 .17 i 33 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 Marco Island, Fla.
LOW-41 Jordan, Mont.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/79/pc
Amsterdam 49/48/sh
Athens 53/37/s
Beijing 38/15/pc
Berlin 42/40/sh
Bermuda 71/66/pc
Cairo 71/48/pc
Calgary 3/-5/sf
Havana 82/69/pc
Hong Kong 69/53/c
Jerusalem 56/48/sh


Lisbon 57/40/s
London 45/44/pc
Madrid 43/27/pc
Mexico City 74/46/s
Montreal 25/19/pc
Moscow 26/14/sn
Paris 40/29/pc
Rio 80/70/ts
Rome 56/47/s
Sydney 85/61/pc
Tokyo 49/43/pc
Toronto 29/27/sn
Warsaw 29/27/sn


P LEGAL NOTICES




Florida Turnpike Enterprise............. A9

Fictitious Name Notices................... D6

Meeting Notices.................................OD6

Lien Notices....................................... D6

CITRULIS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
r Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


DEC.
DEC. 9


..Pol




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ITT


Saturday 12-14-13 3 shows local
Sunday 1-19-2014 Bradenton Fl.
Saturday 1-8-2014- Lakeland Fl.
Saturday 2-15-2014 Bradenton Fl
Sunday 3-2-2014 Lakeland Fl


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 AS




A6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013

Kathleen
Bauer, 91
OCALA
KathleenA. Bauer, 91, of
Ocala, Fla., died Friday,
Dec. 6, 2013, at the Legacy
House in Ocala, Fla. Kath-
leen was born Feb. 17,
1922, in Toledo, Ohio,
daughter of Arthur and
Ella Nash. She moved to
Ocala from Toledo in 1987.
Mrs. Bauer was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Paul R. Bauer; son,
Robert C. Prue; brother,
Donald Nash; and sisters,
Eileen Smith and Joanne
Steinbauer Survivors in-
clude her daughter, Judith
Cramer of Inverness, Fla.;
sister Pat Roggenbuck of
Texas; daughter-in-law,
Linda Prue of South Bend,
Ind.; six grandchildren,
Charles Prue, Christopher
Prue and Michelle Prue,
all of South Bend, Ind.,
Keith Cramer, Raleigh,
N.C., and Kenneth Cramer
and Craig Cramer, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; and great-
grandson, Kyler Cramer of
Homosassa, Fla.
A funeral service for
Mrs. Bauer will be at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10,
2013, at the Heinz Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends from 10 a.m.
until the hour of services.
Reverend Thomas Beaver-

Ci. E 5 avli
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
SCremation

Cremation WtcrEns& rq.
qw- I Memorial Car-

For Information and costs
call 726-8323


son will preside. Inurn-
ment will be at Memorial
Gardens in Beverly Hills,
Fla. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be given to
Legacy House, 9505 S.W
110th St, Ocala, FL 34481.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
William
Sorsby, 90
DUNNELLON
Mr William S. Sorsby, 90,
passed away Dec. 6, 2013,
in Dunnellon, Fla. He was
born May 20, 1923, in Pas-
saic, N.J. He was a retired
U.S. Army captain, and he
also served in the Navy
Seabees during World
War II.
A gathering of friends
will take place at Roberts
Funeral Homes Bruce
Chapel West 6241 S.W
State Road 200, 352-854-
2266, from 8 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 10. A grave-
side service will take place
at Good Shepherd Ceme-
tery, 5050 S.W 20th St. in
Ocala, at 10 a.m. Dec. 10.
To leave condolences:
robertsfuneralhomes. com.


Jack
Cirnigliaro, 99
BEVERLY HILLS
Jack Cirnigliaro, 99, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away Dec.4, 2013, at Citrus
Health and Rehab Center
A native of Stoney Point,
N.Y, he came to the area
in 2000 from Garden City,
N.Y Mr Cirnigliaro was a
design engineer, retiring
from Sperry and Thomp-
son Industries. His mem-
berships include Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church
and the Knights of Colum-
bus for almost 60 years
where he was 4th Degree
Knight.
Jack was preceded in
death by his wife, Anna.
Survivors include his son,
Robert Cirnigliaro of Pine
Ridge.; daughter, Carol Zy-
chowicz of Pine Ridge;
brother, Thomas
Cirnigliaro of Staten Is-
land, N.Y; six grandchil-
dren; and eight
great-grandchildren.
A funeral Mass will be at
9 a.m. Monday, Dec. 9,
2013, at Our Lady of Grace


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Catholic Church, 6 Roo-
sevelt Boulevard, Beverly
Hills, Fla. The family will
receive friends at the fu-
neral home Sunday after-
noon from 2 until 5 p.m.
Fero Funeral Home
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Tristan
Costello, 3
INVERNESS
Tristan Teal Costello, 3,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Dec. 3,2013.
He was born Aug. 13, 2010,
in Crystal River to his
mother, Talisha Gregory
Costello, and father, John
P Costello.
Tristan is preceded in
death by his paternal
grandfather, Jack Costello.
He is survived by his par-
ents; paternal grandpar-
ents, Jeremy Baylous
(Lisa), and Thomas Gre-
gory; maternal grandmoth-
ers, Bobbie Costello, Jean
Madison, Janet Graves;
sister, Amanda Lee
Costello; brother, John P
Costello III; sister, Winter


Obituaries


Rose Adams; Aunts, Deb-
bie Costello Gates (Danny),
Pat Costello Laster, Do-
lores C. Asbell (Ferrell),
Sheena Baylous, and
Sonja Woosley (Brandon);
Uncles, Bob Costello
(Carol), Stephen Costello
(Heidi), Tommy Gregory,
Austin Gregory, Michael
Gregory, Jesse Gregory;
and many more aunts, un-
cles and cousins.
Visitation will be from
11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday,
Dec. 9, 2013, when a cele-
bration of life will be at
Roberts Funeral Homes-
Downtown Chapel, 606
S.W 2nd Ave., Ocala, FL
34471. Interment will fol-
low at Woodlawn cemetery
in Ocala. Please view and
sign our online guestbook
for Tristan at: www.roberts
funeralhomes. c o m.
Arrangements are under
the care of Roberts Down-
town Chapel, 352-622-4141.


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Brow

ulca K!oli


agin


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. .
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhom


l ~ I I II






To Place Your
/"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931
'rma ioieitrfhiaucato
OOOSN




timefolacn


THE SALVATION ARMY A FRIEND IN TIMES OF NEED


Support The Salvation Army through a

LIFE INCOME PLAN
such as a
CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITY


DOING
THE MOST
GOOD


One-ife SRatesfrom.. 3 7% t 9.0



Call 1-800-758-2769 Ext. 25706
or email us at
FLAplannedgiving@uss.salvationarmy.org
For a Free Booklet or Illustration on Life Income Plans

Send to: The Salvation Army-Planned Giving Department
5631 Van Dyke Road, Lutz, FL 33558

Name DOB _____
Spouse ___________________________ DOB ______
Address
City, State, Zip Phone _____
)OOGROB Citrus Chronicle CGA ad Dec 8 2013


Serving all your cremation needs,




tI 00p"
;-- FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726&2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com




Conidrig Cenatog


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about
making arrangements? Give them
the relief they'll need during a
tough time.
We'll discuss:
* Affordable options
and savings
* Veterans benefits
* Worldwide Away-
From-Home
Protection
*And much more...
RESERVATION REQUIRED
Limited seating available.
CALLNOW!
1-352-319-6816
First time attendees only please.
*Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan


MM20050
MM31551


Crystal River or Homosassa Locations




b1* (352) 621-5100

jNew Clients Only


.---' .---~


Details Online


Buy One, Get One


WWW.


Charles Herne
Jr., infant
HOMOSASSA
Charles Lewis Herne Jr,
infant, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Dec. 5, 2013. Private cre-
mation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory Lecanto, Fla.
Daniel
Jones, 92
OCALA
Daniel Jones, age 92, of
Ocala, Fla., died Sunday,
Dec. 1, 2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in
Tennessee.

See Page A8


)X.


) &..) .


) \.


.us


I


O00GV4GI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Christmas in the Hills


84


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
John Flowers from the Citrus High School Marching Band plays the trumpet in the 2013 Christmas in the
Hills parade as the band entertains with traditional Christmas music Saturday morning. The parade was followed by
a festival featuring photos with Santa, live music, car show and horses. Five-year-old Faith Panich from
Orlando is all smiles as she poses for a photo with Santa (aka Mike Busier). : Jeff Schult with Boy Scout
Troop 452 hands out candy to toddler Kendrick Ebans during the Christmas in the Hills parade.


Christmas Eve
Family Candlelight Servi
at 7:00 pm
First Lutheran
Cburcb
1900 W. Hwy. 44
Inverness
mmill
(352)726-1637

Christmas Cantata
Sunday, December 15, 11:00 am
AWANA Children's Program
Sunday, December 22, 11:00 am
Christmas Eve Service
1c Tuesday, December 24, 6:00 pm

Grace Bible Church
KV ', Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631 ,
S 6382 W Green Acres T. ',
SHomosassa, FL 34447-1067
S1/ Miles east of US 19
^ ^ 1.ema ,l:.... 1 ,,I. -..,
.- C i ir .l


Attend

the worship

service of

your /

choiceM...


Last night for FREE Christmas Dinner Theater l
December 8th
S Doors open at 6 PM. Dinner and show 7 PM. -.j
Christmas Service, Sunday Dec 22 at 10 AM 7 A l
j Christmas Eve Candlelight and Free Dinner.
i Service starts at 5 PM. Dinner immediately after.
. Calvary Chapel Inverness, 960 S US Hwy 41
A; 352-726-1480 www.calvaryinv.com 111




Join us for an exciting Christmas Cantata
presented by CRCOG Music Ministry
Sunday, December 15th 8:30 & 11:00 am


Christmas Eve Service
Tuesday, December 24
8:00 pm Carols & Communion
Birthday Party for Jesus Kids ages 3-10


Cr^6/7T9cr ClwcC/qU/ h| I3
2180 NW 12th Avenue 795-079 www.c1ystalrivercog.com

St. Raphael Orthodox Churi h is celebrating the

Nativity of Our Lord
Tues., Dec. 24 & Wed., Dec. 25

Nativity Prayer Service
(Molieben
S *4 pm Tuesday

Nativity Vigil
6:30 pm Tuesday

Divine Liturgy
9:00 am Wednesday
All are welcome! We are located at:
1277 N. Paul Dr., Inverness
Right off Hwy. 41 N, across from Dollar General.
Call us at 201-1320 www.straphaelchurch.org


fGood Shepherd A
Lutheran Church I
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (Hwy. 486)
Hernando, FL 352-746-7161
Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth, Pastor
Sunday, December 15
8:30 a.m. Holy Communion/Children's Nativity Play
11:00 a.m. Holy Communion/Choir Concert
Tuesday, December 24, Christmas Eve
Candlelight & Communion Services 5:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, December 25, Christmas Day
Communion Service 10:00 a.m.
BidnbairfeNueyatna


'^\J(a~die?* Smemce
| | Family Holy Eucharist- 7:00pm
Caroling 10:30pm
Solemn High Eucharist- 11:00pm
Christmas Day Holy Eucharist Rite I 10:00 am
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
Your Spiritual Home!
In Historic Downtown Inverness 1 block NW of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave Inverness 726-3153 Rev. Gene Reuman, Pastor

SFirst Christian
Church Inverness .
Christmas Musical .- ,
"The Messiah King ". ..
Sun., Dec. 15, 10:15 am
Candle Lighting Service :... ^t1
(Chi1i t ;%Il Eve .
Tues., Dec. 24, 6:00pm .
_. 2018 Colonade St., Inverness www.fccinv.com .


Come Celebrate with us at








Christmas Eve
Candlelight Services
Tuesday, December 24th
Casual Service Featuring Our Children &
Youth Ministries at 6:00pm in Victory Hall
Traditional Candlelight Service
7:30pm in the Santuary

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
700 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL
352-795-3367 www.firstbaptistcr.org
O00GSZA

Don't Miss Our Annual

HJK1z C Ktma e &
Sunday, December 15,2013 "
at 5:45 pm -"
A beautiful Christmas Concert -'
by our Orchestra and
Adult Choir
The community is also invited to join us
for a special Family Christmas Eve Service
Tuesday, December 24, 2013
V: _at 7:00 pm /


First Baptist
Church of Homosassa
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
Ltwww.fbchomosassa.org
Join us for dynamic quality pi,.,i ,ini. i oi h /iiet, ;e l'l; eIIIIIII
informalfellowship, singing, quality childcare.
Sunday: 9am Sunday School (all ages)
10:30am Worship Celebration
(Choir/Special Music/Children's Svc)
6pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday 6:30pm Awana Youth Service
7pm Adult Prayer & Bible Study

Dramatic Christmas Musical
"Hark the Angels Sing"
December 15, 6:00pm
Christmas Eve Candlelight Service
December 24, 6:00 pm
"Come Grow With Us"


a TheNazarene
'kW F Place to Belong
2101 N. Florida Ave., Hernando FL
726-6144
www.hernaz.corn


OOOGUCT


LOCAL


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 A7


A.M




AS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6





John
Goldsmith, 85
WILLISTON
Mr. John D. Goldsmith,
age 85 of Williston,
Florida, died Wednesday,
December 4,2013 in Willis-
ton. He was born July 7,
1928 in Bellaire, OH, son of
the late Earl Goldsmith
and Louise (Combs) Gold-
smith Young. He was a
Navy veteran serving dur-
ing World War II and
worked as a supervisor for
Kaiser Aluminum.
He was preceded in
death by 2 brothers and a
sister Survivors include 4
children, Douglas Gold-
smith of Capt. Cook, HI, Vi-
vian Risch of Wimberley,
TX, Janie Bearth of San
Marcos, TX and Kim
Fleming (Stephen
Schaller) of Newark, OH,
step-daughter, Maria
Yuhanek of Williston, 9
grandchildren, 12 great
grandchildren and 2 great,
great grandchildren.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Margaret
'Peggy' Taylor,
83
INVERNESS
Margaret "Peggy" U.
Taylor, age 83, Inverness,
died Monday, Dec. 2, 2013.
A celebration of life serv-
ice will be at 12:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 13, 2013, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory Pri-
vate inurnment will be at
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David
Gailliot, 60
INVERNESS
David A. Gailliot, 60, of
Inverness, Fla., died
Wednesday, Dec. 4,2013, at
Hospice of Citrus County
Care Unit in Inverness.
David was born Feb. 26,
1953, in Pasadena, Calif,
the son of Joseph and Car-
rie Gailliot. He grew up in
Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.
He moved to Inverness in
1990 from Victorville,
Calif David met his wife,
Rebecca, and was married
in 1996. He was a deli man-
ager for Publix for 15 years
before retiring in 2005 to
begin a new career as an
operating unit buyer for
Seven Rivers Regional
Hospital, where he was
currently employed. David
was a spirited NASCAR
fan, enjoyed motorcycles,
and loved going fishing
with his friends.
David was preceded in
death by his twin brother,
Steven Gailliot, and his
mother, Carrie Gailliot. He
will be greatly missed by
his wife, Rebecca Gailliot;
three daughters, Sarah,
Melanie, and Melissa; fa-
ther, Joseph Gailliot; sister,
Betty (Bob) Myers; broth-
ers, Sidney Redwine,
James (Nancy) Gailliot and
Alan Gailliot; several
grandchildren; several
nieces and nephews; Kay
and Lloyd Hebert; many
friends at Seven Rivers
Regional Hospital and
Publix; and his dogs, Remy
and Lacey
Family and friends will
gather at Heinz Funeral
Home at 10 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 14, 2013. A memorial
service for Mr Gailliot will
begin at 11 a.m.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.


Tiona Kline, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
Tiona Joette Kline, 59, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
away Saturday, Nov 30,
2013. She was born Aug. 30,
1954, in Warren, Ohio, to
Anthony and Dolores
(Rufo) Zill. She and her
husband, Kris B. Kline of
Pawnee, Okla., came here
28 years ago from San
Clemente, Calif She was a
homemaker and a home
school educator She was of
the Christian faith and a
member of The Shepherd's
Chapel of Gravette, Ark.
Her father, Anthony Zill,
preceded her in death in
1997. Surviving are her
daughter, Heather Kline;
and granddaughter, Syd-
ney Bunts of Crystal River;
her son, Matthew Kline of
Orlando; her mother, Do-
lores Zill-Gannon of Ho-
mosassa; her brother, Gary
Zill of Gerard, Ohio; and
her sister, Linda Zill of
Long Beach, Calif.
In accordance with her
wishes, private arrange-
ments with no funeral
services are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory in
Crystal River. In lieu of
flowers the family re-
quests a memorial contri-
bution to HPH Hospice,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-
3503.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Carroll
Pigman, 70
OHIO
Carroll Pigman, age 70,
of Ohio, died Monday,
Dec. 2, 2013. Private cre-
mation will take place
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.

Geraldine
Taylor, 92
LADY LAKE
Geraldine Taylor, age 92,
of Lady Lake, Fla., died
Friday, Dec. 6, 2013. Local
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Burial will be in Ohio.


Ralph 'Wayne'
Parmer, 71
HOLDER
Ralph D. "Wayne"
Parmer, age 71, Holder,
died Dec. 5, 2013, at his
residence. A lifelong na-
tive Floridian, Wayne was
born in
Holder on -
March 27,
1942, to
the late
Ralph C.
and Izella
(Hudson)
Parmer.
Wayne was Ralph
a 1960 Parmer
graduate
of Citrus High School.
After graduation, he
served our country in the
U.S. Army and was em-
ployed as a long-distance
commercial truck driver
He enjoyed his family and
was an avid Steelers and
Gator football and
NASCAR fan.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his children, Ralph
Dewayne Parmer II
(Margie) and Vicky Parmer
Cavender; grandchildren
Michael Cavender
(Heather), Kristin Gullick
(Robert), Jessica Heffer-
nan, Bryan Cavender (Ste-
vie), Heather Parmer,
Daniel Cavender, Brittany
Parmer, Amanda Hille-
brand (Colton), Ralph De-
wayne Parmer III, Kelsey
Parmer, Kristen Frank
(Clayton) and Megan Mc-
Carty; great-grandchildren
Christian, Cameron,
Carter, Adrian, Elizabeth,
Kayleigh, Connor, Kar-
leigh, Avery Michael, Max-
son, David, Christian and
Anthony; his sisters Kathy
Wells (Peck) and Lorry
Billups (Jerry); numerous
nieces, nephews and ex-
tended family; as well as
lifelong friends Gayle,
Elmer, Thomas, Faye and
Jeanette. He was preceded
in death by his wife, Mary
Parmer; and his brother
Russell Hudson.
A funeral tribute and
celebration of Wayne's life
will be at 11 a.m. Thursday
Dec. 12, 2013, at the Chas.


E. Davis Funeral Home
with military honors. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from
10:30 a.m. until the hour of
service. Memorial dona-
tions are suggested in
Wayne's memory to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Death
ELSEWHERE

Stan
Tracey, 86
JAZZ GREAT
LONDON British jazz
pianist and composer Stan
Tracey, who played with
everyone from Sonny
Rollins to Charlie Watts of
the Rolling Stones in the
course of a 70 year-career,
has died at the age of 86.
Son Clark Tracey said
the musician "passed
away peacefully" on Fri-
day He had been suffering
from cancer
Born in London on
Dec. 30, 1926, Tracey took
up piano after a teenage
stint as an accordionist en-
tertaining troops during
World War II.
After service in the
Royal Air Force and time
as a musician aboard
cruise ships, Tracey per-


formed with ensembles in-
cluding the popular Ted
Heath Orchestra and
spent several years in the
1960s as resident pianist at
Ronnie Scott's storied
London jazz club. That job
allowed him to play with
the era's jazz greats, in-
cluding Stan Getz, Ben
Webster and Rollins, with
whom he performed on
the soundtrack to the 1966
Michael Caine film 'Alfie."
As well as leading his
own ensembles of various
sizes, Tracey had a stint in
the big band led by Stones
drummer Watts.
Tracey's compositions
included the enduringly
popular "Under Milk
Wood" suite based on
the lyrical radio play by
Dylan Thomas and the
Lewis Carroll-inspired
"Alice in Jazzland."
He was nominated for
the prestigious Mercury
music prize in 1993 for his
album "Portraits Plus."
An inspiration to many
younger musicians, Tracey
became known as "the
godfather of British jazz,"
and was named a Com-
mander of the Order of the
British Empire by Queen
Elizabeth II in 2008.
He released his final
album, the World War I-in-
spired "The Flying Pig,"
earlier this year
-From wire reports


SO YOU KNOW
* Aaa local obituaries are posted online at
www.chronicleonline .com.


Ge tthe B f a ts











Your local agencies for Florida Blue are right here in your community to help you understand the health care

reform law, called the Affordable Care Act.

Get informed about the new health insurance marketplace in just five easy steps!


Understand how reform works

0 Find out if you're eligible for a tax credit

O Access your health care needs

Choose a plan from a variety of options

O Get enrolled



0 Call us today and get the answers you need. We're here for you.


Florida Farm Bureau

352-344-8060


Benco Insurance Planners

352-563-0015


Your Local Agency for


F(,ndaSB~ae s




Policies have exclusions and limitations. For costs and complete details of coverage, contact your local agency. Florida Blue is the trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., an Independent
Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. 79262-1013 AgtI 78881-1013 Agt




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 A9


In the final competition of the Food Truck Wars Battle of
the Bellies at Crystal River Mall, Nathan Weatherly, left,
volunteer with the Eclectic Gift & Thrift store in the
Crystal River Mall, concedes the contest to winner
Joe Estrada, with The Fox 96.7, who continues eating his


Continued from Page Al


in the service. With it
being Pearl Harbor Day
and the Fallen Heroes
Monument being here, I
decided to do it for my fa-
ther's honor Also, I see
what the military and vet-
erans do for this country It
astonishes me that people
would give their lives to
protect ours."
Restaurants on wheels
traveled to Crystal River to
compete in five categories
- casual cuisine, delec-
table desserts, the spirit
award, top sales and the
People's Choice Award.
Food Network's Cup-
cake Wars winner and
celebrity judge Jillian
Hopke said the title can go
to any truck as long as they
follow one rule.
"In the past we have
tried some stuff and said,
'Oh, you should have en-
tered that,"' she said. "It's
a gamble to what they


WATERING FINES
Citrus County issues
citations that carry
with them a fine of
$100 for first
offenders of local
watering rules.
Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


think is their star and what
else could have been. The
biggest thing for me is not
having flavors that over-
power each other There
shouldn't be too much fla-
vor or sauce that is over-
powering. Less is more
and its better when they
balance the flavors."
Other celebrity judges
included Jim Whaples
from the Florida Restau-
rant & Lodging Associa-
tion, Israel Santiago from
Second Harvest Food
Bank, Nora Galdiano from
the American Culinary
Federation, Keith Esbin
from Bar Harbor Lobster
Corp. and Heidi Lane from
Darden/Red Lobster
Nonetheless, thousands
of attendees were at-
tracted to the Food Truck
War like bees to honey
Crystal River City Man-
ager Andy Houston said in


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Taking a break Saturday afternoon from the heat and the crowds, the Saint and Townsend families sit in the shade
while enjoying the food from some of the 40 food trucks competing in the Food Truck Wars at Crystal River Mall.


the Dec. 6 Chronicle that
this is a great thing for
Crystal River, and he gave
all the credit to mall man-
ager Melinda Bresnahan.
"We're starved for dif-
ferent things to do here,
and this is certainly differ-
ent," she said. "I'm hoping
this will get people into
the mall, too."
In addition to the food
for sale, there was a big
kids' area with games and
activities, a beer and wine
tent and entertainment all
day, including patriotic
music from the Susanne
Smith Band, dueling ban-
jos and Nashville record-
ing artist Maggie Baugh.


A P- S S
HEARINGAIgg



NREPIR g


Also, 10 mall tenants test The winner, Joe
competed in a "Battle of Estrada, won $200 to go to-
the Bellys" pie-eating con- wards his favorite charity


A portion of the pro-
ceeds was donated to the
Fallen Heroes Monument


., i ...:. ";M '';... .. ~ __.__-.__.. ._.... :'

S* SS m I



ii, 6,



S clementine ,i

j:, ,:, c rer, j i ,, t s C .'q-3 JU ,
.. ... .... .. .... -.;= <=- .. ..,'..


Wit
I, -
~*1
LI


S
i/I i.&. A -
SI ~ .~


Friday, 12/6 20% off Itzy Ritzy and Balboa Baby

Saturday, 12/7 20% off Accessories

Tuesday, 12/10 20% off Seedlings & Green Toys

Wednesday, 12/11 40% off Decor & Wall Art

Thursday, 12/12 15% off Obrien Schridde Frames

Friday, 12/13 30% off Tea Collection Apparel

Saturday. 12/14 Christmas Party at Clementine!
Meet Santa 10:30-12:.30!
FREE keepsake image with Santa
from Dimples & Daisies Photography with RSVP!
25% ENTIRE Store!

Tuesday, 12/17 25% off Any Newborn Items

Wednesday. 12/18 An Extra 15% off Sale Items

Thursday, 12/19 30% off All Books

Friday, 12/20 30% off Any Full Priced Item

Saturday, 12/21 15% off Christmas Items & Toys

( -" '"'- ;1 ft ,, i,,,,a t

521 West Fort Island Trail. Suite A
Crystal River, Florida
352-794-6146


-C- j- -
: "iilllllf ," .. .. [ .. ,' ......' . ..... ..
) -t t ,: :l ,kL ". : '"......."...... :
............................................:............ ...........................:............... ................ ~ ~ i -~ ~ i i -


1208 SUCRN

J'L NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Florida Department of Transportation is hosting a Toll Rate Rulemaking
Hearing to provide the public an opportunity to review and comment on
proposed amendments to administrative rules regarding training and
qualifications standards for toll enforcement officers, video billing,
prosecution of unpaid toll violations, and vehicle classification. The hearing
will also present and solicit comments on administrative rules regarding
express lane tolling and the proposed toll rates for the First Coast
Expressway in Duval and Clay Counties.
The hearing will be held on:
DATE: Tuesday, December 17, 2013 TIME: 6:00 p.m.
The hearing will be conducted as a webinar, which is a live presentation
over the internet that allows attendance from a personal computer.
Registration for the webinar is required. Registration and additional
information can be found at:
http://www.floridasturnpike.com/tools_tollratenotices.cfm
Site access locations are also available for those persons without computer/
internet access at the following locations:
Hillsborough County
Florida Department of Transportation
District 7 Auditorium
11201 North Malcolm McKinley Drive
Tampa, FL 33612
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status.
If you have any questions, please contact Chad Huff, Public Information Manager, at Florida's Turnpike Enterprise, 1-
800-749-7453. Anyone requiring special accommodations for the meeting under the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1991 or in need of translation should contact Carol Scott at Florida's Turnpike (407) 264-3494 at least seven calendar
days prior to the meeting. oooGoz5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dec. 9 to 13 SCHOOL MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
blueberry pancakes, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Wednesday: Half day: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety,
toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
cinnamon pancakes, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: MVP breakfast, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, hot dog, PB Dippers, fresh baby carrots,
tangy baked beans, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab' N Go turkey, oven-
baked breaded chicken, turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, potato smiles, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick,
mozzarella maxstix, Italian super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled diced peaches, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken alfredo
with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich, pep-
peroni pizza, PB dippers, fresh garden salad,
sweet corn, chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, grits, milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Blueberry pancakes, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk
and juice variety.
Wednesday: Half day: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
cinnamon pancakes, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Macaroni maxstix, fajita chicken
with rice and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed green beans, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Hamburger sliders, turkey wrap,
turkey super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh
garden salad, baby carrots, potato smiles,
chilled diced peaches, fruit juice, milk variety.


SENIOR DINING m See the week's menus for senior dining./Page All


Wednesday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick,
pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken
with ripstick, macaroi and cheese with ripstick,
Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, baked
beans, chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded chicken sand-
wich, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet
potato crosstrax, flavored Craisins, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese loco, blue-
berry pancakes, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Half day: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sausage pizza, cinnamon
pancakes, cereal variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders with rice, pizza,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super
salad with roll, PB dippers, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cucumber coins, celery sticks,
green beans, seasoned potato wedges, apple-
sauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with Spanish rice,
turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with rill, maxstix, PB dippers, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold corn salad, Mexi-
cali corn, baby carrots, sweet potato crosstrax,
chilled diced peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey wrap, pizza,
spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, ham super salad with roll, PB dip-
pers, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, baked
beans, chilled baked beans, seasoned potato
wedges, flavored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken
with rice, macaroni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, PB dippers, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli,
baby carrots, potato roasters, fresh apple,
juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken sandwich,
pizza, chicken alfredo with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, PB dippers, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, sweet peas, cucumber coins, sea-
soned potato wedges, chilled mixed fruit,
juice, milk.


Fresh NC Fraser Great *
Fir Christmas Hlolday
Trees Gift ideas

Fresh, Live
Wreaths "
Holiday Decor

Official Home Of .,
Build-A-Wreath


STRESSED OUT? STOP IN.

Our new stress fixTM body massage clinically proven to relieve feelings of stress -
combines the power of Swedish and deep tissue massage, foot reflexology, acupressure and
our new stress fixTM aroma, which is infused with organic French lavender, lavandin and
clary sage. Book your massage today and discover a beautiful way to stress less
and enjoy yourself more.

_W' Find Your Very Own

Personalized Hair Color.
FFade resistant. Essentially damage-free. Up to 96%
,\ naturally derived using plant power instead of
petrochemicals. Created with an environmental and
.. im ii social conscience you can feel good about.
S 1Offe Expr es 12/31/2013'

RECEIVE '25
IN FREE AVEDA PRODUCTS
as a New Guest Receiving Any ColorlHighlight
with Haircut Appointment at Abitar |
I Limit Offer Per New Guest




f ABITARE

DAY SPA & SALON
6630 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL 34429
Online Gift Certificates
www.aparisdayspa.com 352-563-0011


A1 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


COMMUNITY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


_ ~Dec. 9 to 13
SENIOR DINING


Monday: Barbecued pork
riblet with barbecue sauce,
green peas, mashed pota-
toes, chunky cinnamon ap-
ples, whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with
bun and mustard, coleslaw,
baked beans with tomato,
peas, graham crackers, low-
fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad,
lettuce and tomato salad,
marinated broccoli salad, two
slices whole-wheat bread
with margarine, orange, low-
fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce,
herbed mashed potatoes,
spinach, slice whole-wheat
bread with margarine, slice


SO YOU KNOW
Visit www.citrus
countyfl.org/
corn mserv/suppserv
/senprog/centers/
seniorcenters.htm.
See menus for the
week for public
schools./Page AO10
of birthday cake, low-fat milk.
Friday: Apple juice, veg-
etable soup, meatloaf sand-
wich on whole-grain bun,
ketchup, raisins, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and south Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


Sunday Brunch
Served
$15 95 11:30 AM- 2:30 PM
$%






We t82 at Plantation on Crystal River
BR G. ILL 9301W. Ft. Island Trail
C 795-4211
Iwww.plantationoncrystalriver.com rn








FIRTOMPLTETAICSAN TMPRUTAT :
$,0$20 APPOINMT RECOME


APOITMNT RCOMEDE


AQUARIUM
Continued from PageAl

and manatees," Jones said.
"This will be a great
boost for the area's econ-
omy It can be a hub for peo-
ple visiting Three Sisters
Springs and Homosassa
state park. They can spend
an extra day visiting the
aquarium. It will be great
for the area," he said.
Melinda "Millie" Bres-
nahan, the mall manager,
agreed.
"He contacted me the
day after Belk announced
they were closing. And,
you know what, I am going
for it. I say, go for it. The
space becomes available


I


Spine &


Jan. 1. I think this could
become a big tourism draw
to the area and it will help
us turn the corner," Bres-
nahan said.
She said Jones initially
contacted her about the
Sears space when that re-
tailer left the mall, but she
ended up renting part of
that space for a putt-putt
golf site.
"We are having to do
things a little different;
think outside the box a lit-
tle bit, but I think the space
will suit what he wants to
do," Bresnahan said.
She said the mall will
continue to try to attract
retailers, but adjustments
have had to be made to re-
think what other functions
the malls can provide to


We are having to do things
a little different; think outside
the box a little bit, but I think
the space will suit what he
wants to do.


keep customers coming.
"We are excited," Bres-
nahan added.
Jones is president of
Kings Bay Rotary and the
director of the One Rake at
a Time project, which has,
for the past couple of


Millie Breshnahan
manager, Crystal River Mall.
years, been removing nox-
ious filamentous algae
called Lyngbya from the
bottom of King's Bay
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Blackshears 11

MAluminumi
",f'ST/
Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 17Q Q Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 795-97l2 RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
=_-: -! ... .J-t.-_I-_H^Mf ...^...^....









iW325I W~fInt. D (i/,lere'^e
If you have been to

6.f (52 62 -3 4
another dentist and
would like a second
opinion about your
treatment, bring your
xrays and I will do a
N.,,complete evaluation
I amid develop a
treatment plan with
you that fits you
5i aind your needs.

"'1li, Cater to Cowards!'"
Ledger Dentistry
k1remy N ULger D MD.PA


(352) 628-3443
h,: l e Ir I":r-,,o,
Ledg e rd entist ry. corn


End Of The Year Model Closeouts!




ON SALE NOW


i1



U i

, M


Whatever you do in bed,
Sealy supports it


Medical Division


* ALWAYS
Free Delivery
w/purchase of mattress set
* ALWAYS
Free Heavy Duty
Bed Frame
w/purchase of mattress set
ALWAYS
Great Customer Service


NORMANDY FIRM CENTRAL FALLS CENTRAL FALLS _Sea WESTDEAN
NORNDFIR iLASSIC csm ~+AUM + PLUSH EURO-TOP PERFECT ELEMENT
TwinSe 459 QueenSet599 TwiSe$ 569 QueneSet699 TwinSet 629 QueenSet 159 TwinSet $459 QueenSe 659
Full Set 559 King Set 859 Ful Set 659 King Set $949 Full Set $119 King Set1,059 Full Set 599 King Se 899 $


ABBOTT HANNAH FARMINGTON CHAMPIONS GATE
"PILLOW TOP PLUSH PILLOW TOP
Twin Set Queen Set $349 TwSet 299 Queen Set $399 Twin Set 379 QueenSet $549 Twin Set $439 QueenSet 599 v
FuSe 99 KngSet 529 FulSe $349 KngSe $599 Fu Set U449 KngSet 149 Fu Se S 499 Kt$Se K99

OPNMON.-SAT.
WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTERED
Your Hometown Mattress Store Since 1994 / M ,I
1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 344-8882 f' J H-"
Unit A (Hwy. 486) Hernando www.WholesalesleepCenter.com M *A .
W9ENre Bryant< Hwy 344-8882fsess


SPINE CARE

YOU CAN TRUST
Learn about
the Florida


I


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 All


w




A12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


PAPER
Continued from PageAl

earlier this week with fed-
eral health officials, Illi-
nois health officials sent a
memo Thursday to their
roughly 1,600 navigators
saying there is no way to
complete marketplace en-
rollment through a paper
application. The memo,
which Claffey said was
based on guidance from
federal officials, said paper
applications should be
used only if other means
aren't available.
Federal health officials
also discussed the issue
during a conference call
Wednesday with navigators
and certified counselors in
several states.
"They've said do not use
paper applications because
they won't be able to
process them anywhere
near in time," said John
Foley, attorney and certi-
fied counselor for Legal Aid
Society of Palm Beach
County, who was on the call.
That contradicts what
federal health officials told
reporters during a national
media call this week, dur-
ing which they said there
were no problems with
paper applications.
"There is still time to do
paper applications," Julie
Bataille, communications
director for the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid
Services, told reporters on
the call Wednesday
A CMS spokesman de-
clined to comment directly
on the issue Friday when
asked whether they dis-
couraged navigators from
using paper applications.
"With the recent fixes to
the website, we are encour-
aging consumers to use
healthcare.gov since it's
the quickest way to get cov-
erage, but paper applica-
tions remain an option for
consumers and navigators
if they choose," said
spokesman Aaron Albright
In early November, Pres-
ident Barack Obama him-
self encouraged paper
applications as one of sev-
eral alternatives to the fed-
eral website.
"I just want to remind
everybody that they can
still apply for coverage by


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


phone, by mail, in person,"
Obama said on Nov. 4 in re-
marks to Affordable Care
Act supporters at a Wash-
ington hotel.
The paper application
problem comes as insur-
ance agents and brokers
are dealing with a massive
backlog of applications that
they can't process because
of problems with the fed-
eral website, including in-
complete enrollment files
sent electronically to insur-
ance companies.
Paper applications
seemed like a safe bet in
early October as agents and
navigators struggled with
online applications. Once
federal health officials re-
ceive a paper application,
they check with other fed-


eral agencies to determine
whether an applicant is el-
igible for a subsidy to help
pay for a portion of their
health coverage. But the
process, which includes
verifying incomes and im-
migration status, is taking
longer than expected.
"This timing concern is
enormous," said Jessica
Waltman, senior vice pres-
ident of government af-
fairs for the National
Association of Health
Underwriters.
Her organization, which
represents insurance bro-
kers and agents, is in daily
contact with CMS on en-
rollment issues. In several
recent conversations,
Waltman said CMS has
expressed concerns about


KNEE PAIN?


A


Attend a FREE Seminar: |




Ocala
Quality Inn
3434 SW College Rd

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


SLargo Medical Center
ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


paper applications but
stops short of saying they
can't be used.
"We've gotten concerns
from them saying, 'I don't
know about the paper ap-
plications. That's a really
slow go or I don't know if
that's the best idea,"' she
said.


Kelly Fristoe, an insur-
ance agent in Wichita
Falls, Texas, has submitted
25 paper applications
since early October and
hasn't received a response
from federal health offi-
cials yet.
'"At this time, we are not
using any paper applica-


tions," he said.
That also contradicts
what CMS told reporters
this week.
Bataille, the spokes-
woman for the federal
agency, said all paper ap-
plications received during
October have been
processed.


Facing


changes

at work?


Don't leave your Duke Energy
retirement plan behind.
With Duke Energy closing its local facility, now is
the time to re-evaluate your financial plan and
make important decisions about the money you've
invested in your future. Experienced financial advisor
Lisa Esteves, CFP, a Registered Representative of
INVEST Financial Corporation, will help you assess
your current financial situation and determine


Lisa Esteves, CFP
Financial Advisor
lisa.esteves@investfinancial.com
352.341.7263


your next move. Call today to schedule your
complimentary financial plan review.


www.capitalcitybancinvestments.com apial VCity
0 Banc Investments
INVEST Financial Corporation is not affiliated with Capital City Banc Investments. INVEST Financial Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC, and its
affiliated insurance agencies offer securities, advisory services and certain insurance products. Products are: Not FDIC Insured Not Bank Union
Guaranteed May lose value including loss of principal. 10/14- 110762
OOGJUE


L^ __www.AIIAboutBaths.com 1
Porcelain Fiberglass H
Tile Custom Colors
Acrylic Bath Systems
Chip Repairs & More


U HOST R i. RAPES


Winder's Fabric Outlet
UPHOLSTERY & DRAPERY
SUEDES SHEERS VINYL & FOAM
6027 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
352-628-0951
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-5 SATURDAY 9-3 CLOSED SUNDAY



Service2AwTR Our Services: Carpet Protector
S (M mTASE ile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7'365 R sto1e Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

RooM&$ 795.... UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
:<3nUOmS& $a1995 Have a couch anti..*
1UAIIIIIV I 1 io veseat cleaned.K[EE 1i
1HALLWAY,"sc F getachairEor
I recliner cleaned Lt
i Expires 12/31/13 ($30 Value!) Expires12/31/13
352-794-0270 .
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com


0 0 "



INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
341-0813 MONF,305
a.pptp hd SAT 9-4
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
&NSRED www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net APPOINTMEN

Is


Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!
WINDOWV

GENIE. -,
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED
352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com



"rcd &nce m oW490


quality Honesty Reasonable Prices
| www.EliteRoofing-lnc.com
i 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024
LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED


F- call- -
1-352-66-661
DrS.BHM


I W |INOS


For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.


-C IOnICLL, -,


NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CARE
Continued from Page Al

through or are experienc-
ing the same thing. She is
not alone in her struggles.
Much of the media atten-
tion on work-life balance
has focused on how to jug-
gle a career and raise chil-
dren, but similar personal
and professional sacrifices
can be required of those
who support aging family
members who can't care for
themselves.
According to a 2009 study
from AARP and the Na-
tional Alliance for Caregiv-
ing, at least 43.5 million
Americans are already pro-
viding care for someone 50
years and older, and that
number is only going to in-
crease as the population
ages. As many are finding
out, the impact that can
have on a career is enor-
mous, especially for wo-
men, who are more likely to
be caregivers. A 2010
MetLife study found leaving
the workforce early or re-
ducing hours to care for an
elderly relative costs the av-
erage woman caregiver
$324,044 in lost wages and
Social Security benefits.
"Caregiving is so physi-
cally and emotionally de-
manding, and some people
have to cut back hours or
retire early to take care of
an elderly relative," said
Laura Polacheck of AARP
of Utah. "Caregiving is a
full-time job, and if you al-
ready have full-time job,
you're left with no time at
all."
AgingAmerica
America is getting older
The Administration on
Aging projects that while
those 65 and older num-
bered 39.6 million in 2009 -
or 12.9 percent of the U.S.
population that number
is due to nearly double to
72.1 million by 2030, when
the 65 and over crowd will
make up 19 percent of the
population. And govern-
ment data show older
Americans are living longer
In 2000, a 65-year-old could
expect to live to age 83,
while in 1900 it was age 77.
Maybe it was easier when
both members of a married
couple didn't have careers,
Whiteman sometimes


thinks, as she adjusts her
schedule to take her mom
to the doctor, or picks up
her cellphone to give reas-
suring words that she will
be home from work soon.
She cares deeply about her
work, and her husband has
a successful career as a
geriatric neurologist But
after working with the eld-
erly all day, both come
home exhausted and strug-
gle to maintain the energy
to deal with her mother's
needs. "It's not for the faint
of heart," Whiteman said.
Coupled with the aging
population is the increase
in the number of women
working outside the home.
The Department of Labor
reported that, between 1996
and 2006, the number of
dual-income families in-
creased by 31 percent. Ac-
cording to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, in 2012, the
share of married, working
couples with children was
59 percent
The "average" caregiver
is a 49-year-old woman who
works outside the home,
and 74 percent of caregivers
have worked at a paying
job, according to a 2012
AARP report With the rise


Work accommodations due to caregiving
Percentage of wiang caft versm who reported making Ihe following accommodatiois


Turning down a pmofioi
Reducing work hours or
tala rg less demp ldmlo
Quillin g 3 job o iv ae a or
laPingan early reiiement
Takin a leave of absence
Aivnlaletavingeflttyor
tavg oume off rlnlthe day
Anyof these


5%
f19%
10%
17%


UESERETNEWS GRAPHIC


of dual-income families, the
issue of who is going to care
for mom and dad when they
need assistance with daily
tasks is increasingly a ques-
tion where two careers
hang in the balance.
Cali Williams Yost, a
workplace flexibility strate-
gist and author of "Tweak It:
Make What Matters to You
Happen Every Day," said
that the work-life chal-
lenges of caregiving impact
everyone in a family "We
think it's mostly women, but
there are a lot of male care-
givers," she said. "I think
one of the challenges is men
feel left out. If women are
unprepared, men feel re-
ally unprepared. Adult


'' The Savings
IAre Yours
p ^ PBecause

SThe Factory
Is Ours!


SWBLIND FACTORY

1657 W. GULF TO AKE HWY LECANT
www.72-hourmblinds.com 5-21 m 0a


caregiving is going to be-
come an everybody issue."
Double-decker
club sandwich
For many Americans in
their 40s to 60s, providing
support has already be-
come a constant in their
lives. Members of this
"sandwich generation" are
trying to balance their own
financial needs while get-
ting squeezed from both
sides as they help their kids
and their parents. A recent
report from Merrill Lynch
and Age Wave, a research
center on aging, found that
six in 10 Americans past the
age of 50 provide financial


support to family members,
with 68 percent supporting
adult children and 16 per-
cent supporting parents.
Those caregivers are
often in their 50s and 60s,
said Maddy Dychtwald, co-
founder of Age Wave, and
are often caregiving while
helping their adult chil-
dren financially and trying
to save or start their own
retirements. "It's a genera-
tional generosity," she said.
"Forget the sandwich gen-
eration this is more like
the double-decker club
generation."
And that strain can take
its toll on the emotional, so-
cial and mental health of
caregivers, which in turn
can impact their profes-
sional lives. According to
the MetLife report, care-
givers aged 18 to 39 showed
significantly higher rates of
high cholesterol, hyperten-
sion, depression and heart
disease in comparison to
non-caregivers of the same
age. Caregivers of all ages
showed increases in poor
health and higher levels of
absenteeism from work
than their counterparts.


NATION


IiAfeSh gle





Meridien Research is conducting a research study for those with Postherpetic
Neuralgia (PHN or pain which occurs after shingles) to test the safety and
effectiveness of an investigational medication, NXN-462.

Qualified participants will receive at no cost study-related:
Evaluations
Investigational Medication or Placebo
Physical Exams
Routine Lab Work


Compensation for time and travel may be available.
No medical insurance is necessary.


Meridienrp
e-earch w --,352-59-STUDY


16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601
Kelli K. Maw,MD, MPH
Board Certified, Family Medicine


Live


wth our Publx

Pharmacy Diabetes

Management System,

And you can get all this FREE:
S30-day supply of lisinopril*
S30-day supply of mefformin**
SAccess to trusted online resources
SMonthly e-newsletter with recipes, helpful tips,

Visit publix.com/diabetes today for information.

Live easier with your

P U B L I X


Feeling well. Living better.
*All strengths included. Maximum 30-day supply (60 tablets). Lisinopril-HCTZ combination products excluded.
**All strengths of generic immediate-release metformin included. Maximum 30-day supply (90 tablets).


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 A13

Caregivers also show in-
creased levels of stress -
especially women. White-
man said the increased
emotional toll of caregiving
has impacted her marriage
and social life. Every time
she thinks about going to a
movie or dinner, she has to
weigh the "huge emotional
costs" of dealing with her
mother's anxiety.
Whiteman added that in
many ways she's lucky Her
workplace is dedicated to
helping caregivers, and so
they are sympathetic to her
need for flexibility
But experts say most
workplaces haven't ad-
justed to the needs of the
growing elderly population.
And taking time away from
work can be detrimental to
your own career and finan-
cial security, Dychtwald
said. "The corporate re-
sponse has been very slow,"
she said. 'And so people are
finding they may have to
take time off or turn down a
promotion, and at that point
in your career, it's a
whammy The professional
and financial ramifications
are extraordinary"


I rTam pa I. Si nt,' Petersbur Ig : Z I '{ I B oo s ie I B radet o I La ke33 ';3 I l andFI3=


ea,


ier










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ion BRIEFS


B 85-year-old vet home from N. Korea
Dec. 7,1941


Associated Press
Smoke rises from the
battleship USS Arizona on
Dec. 7, 1941, as it
sinks during a Japanese
surprise attack on
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
Saturday marks the 72nd
anniversary of the attack
that brought the United
States into World War II.

Pearl Harbor
ceremony marks
anniversary
PEARL HARBOR,
Hawaii -About 2,500
gathered at Pearl Harbor on
Saturday to remember
those killed in the 1941
Japanese attack that
launched the U.S. into
World War II.
The crowd observed a
moment of silence at 7:55
a.m., the minute the bomb-
ing began 72 years ago.
A vintage World War II-
era airplane a 1944
North American SNJ-5B -
flew overhead to break the
silence. The Hawaii Air Na-
tional Guard has used its
fighter jets and helicopters
to perform the flyover for
many years, but federal
budget cuts prevented it
from participating this year.
About 50 survivors re-
turned to Pearl Harbor for
the ceremony.
"I come back to be with
my comrades meet the
ones who are still alive, and
we're going fast," said Del-
ton Walling, who was as-
signed to the USS
Pennsylvania at the time of
the attack.
The current U.S. Pacific
Fleet commander, Adm.
Harry B. Harris Jr., said the
U.S. remembers the warning
from those who survived.
"We remember Pearl
Harbor, we are vigilant, and
we are ready to fight tonight
and win," Harris said. "Not
only are we poised to re-
spond to the first notes of
the alarm bell, we are also
doing everything possible to
keep those alarms from
sounding in the first place."
Suffering from
Alzheimer's, Ga.
man fatally shot
CHICKAMAUGA, Ga. -
The last walk that Ronald
Westbrook took began as
early as 1 a.m. when he
slipped unnoticed from his
North Georgia home with
his two dogs.
It ended three hours later
when Westbrook, a 72-
year-old who suffered from
Alzheimer's disease,
knocked in the dark on a
stranger's door last month.
Police said a man inside
that home, 34-year-old Joe
Hendrix, got a .40-caliber
handgun, went outside to
investigate and shot West-
brook in a horrible mistake.
The unlikely collision be-
tween two strangers one
deeply confused, another
perceiving a threat illus-
trates both the difficulties
that caregivers face in
keeping loved ones with
Alzheimer's safe and the
consequences of miscalcu-
lation in a state that cele-
brates its gun culture.
Westbrook's widow strug-
gles to comprehend how she
lost her husband of 51 years
and discussed what hap-
pened in an interview in her
house this week, sitting on
her couch beside her Bible.
"I can't imagine him feel-
ing threatened by my hus-
band, that's what surprises
me," said Deanne West-
brook, 70.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO A tired
but smiling 85-year-old U.S. vet-
eran detained in North Korea for
several weeks returned home Sat-
urday to applause from support-
ers, yellow ribbons tied to trees
outside his home and the warm
embrace of his family
Merrill Newman arrived at the
San Francisco airport after turn-
ing down a ride aboard Vice Pres-
ident Joe Biden's Air Force Two in
favor of a direct flight from Bei-
jing. He emerged into the inter-
national terminal smiling,
accompanied by his son and hold-
ing the hand of his wife amid ap-
plause from supporters. He spoke
briefly to the assembled media,
declining to answer questions.
"I'm delighted to be home," he
said. "It's been a great homecom-
ing. I'm tired, but ready to be with
my family"
He also thanked the Swedish
Embassy in Pyongyang, North
Korea, and the U.S. Embassy in
Beijing for helping to secure his
release. He declined to answer
any questions and didn't discuss
his detention.
Newman was detained in late
October at the end of a 10-day trip
to North Korea, a visit that came


Associated Press
Merrill Newman, center, walks beside his wife, Lee, and his son, Jeffrey,
left, after arriving at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Newman was detained in North Korea late October at the end of a
10-day trip to North Korea, a visit that came six decades after he
oversaw a group of South Korean wartime guerrillas during the 1950-53
war. He was released from North Korea early Saturday.


six decades after he oversaw a
group of South Korean wartime
guerrillas during the 1950-53 war
Last month, Newman read from
an awkwardly worded alleged
confession that apologized for,
among other things, killing North
Koreans during the war Analysts
questioned whether the state-
ment was coerced, and former
South Korean guerrillas who had
worked with Newman and fought
behind enemy lines during the


war disputed some of the details.
North Korea cited Newman's
age and medical condition in al-
lowing him to leave the country
Barbara Ingram, a friend and
neighbor of Newman's at the sen-
ior citizen complex where they
live said residents broke into ap-
plause when news of Newman's
release was announced Friday
during lunch.
'A great cheer went up," Ingram
said. "We are all so very relieved


ON -d -0


... =: 3..~I = -
Associated Press
Icicles form Saturday in the Whiteaker neighborhood of Eugene, Ore. Forecasters expect up to 3 inches of snow
on the coast, up to 10 inches east of the Cascade Range and wind chills were forecast as low as 25 degrees
below zero.





Deep freeze



Late fall cold snap leaves a handful dead, power outages


Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. A late fall
cold snap that has gripped much of
the country is being blamed for a
handful of deaths and has forced
people to deal with frigid temper-
atures, power outages by the thou-
sands and treacherous roads.
Weather forecasters say the
power weather system has Virginia
and the Mid-Atlantic in its icy
sights next.
Temperatures in Montana and
South Dakota were more than 20
degrees below zero during the day
Saturday while much of the Mid-
west was in the teens and single
digits. Wind chill readings could
drop as low as 50 below zero in
northwestern Minnesota, weather
officials said.
Icy conditions were expected to
last through the weekend from
Texas to Ohio to Tennessee, and


Virginia officials warned residents
of a major ice storm likely to take
shape Sunday, resulting in power
outages and hazards on the roads.
In California, four people died of
hypothermia in the San Francisco
Bay area and about a half-dozen
traffic-related deaths were blamed
on the weather in several states.
More than 100,000 customers in
the Dallas area were without
power Saturday, with about 7,000 in
Oklahoma and thousands of more
in other states. Some 400 departing
flights from Dallas/Fort Worth In-
ternational Airport had been can-
celled in the morning, the airport
said. About 3,330 passengers had
stayed overnight in the terminals.
Icy, treacherous sections of In-
terstate 35 north of Dallas
were closed for hours at a time
over the last day as tractor-trailers
had trouble climbing hills,
wrecks occurred and vehicles


stalled, authorities said.
Jody Gonzalez, chief of Denton
County Emergency Services, said
about 200 people were in shelters
in the Sanger area after getting
stuck on the highway People in
that area of 1-35 were driving
through ruts in 4-inch-thick ice, he
said.
Freezing rain and sleet are likely
again Saturday night in Memphis,
Nashville and other areas of Ten-
nessee before the storm starts surg-
ing northeast.
"It looks like we're going to be
stuck with this for one, two, maybe
three days," said Memphis attorney
Sam Chafetz, who was going home
early to enjoy some bourbon-
soaked sweet potatoes left over
from Thanksgiving.
"I'm not afraid of the ice and
snow, I'm afraid of the other driv-
ers who don't know how to drive in
it," Chafetz said.


Hagel given assurances on security deal


Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan Penta-
gon chief Chuck Hagel said Satur-
day he received assurances from
Afghanistan's defense minister that
a stalled security agreement with
the United States would be signed
in "a very timely manner"
But in a highly unusual move,
Hagel chose not to meet with Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai, who is holding
up a pact that Washington and NATO
officials say is needed to plan for a
post-2014 training and counterter-


rorism mission expected to involve
thousands of troops.
Hagel said he did not think addi-
tional pressure from U.S. officials
would be helpful or persuade Karzai
to sign the bilateral security agree-
ment according to the U.S. timetable
- by the end of December Karzai
says he wants his successor to decide
after the April 5 elections.
"There is not much I could add in
a meeting with President Karzai to
what's already been said,"
Hagel said after meeting
with Defense Minister Bismillah


Khan Mohammadi.
It was not immediately clear
whether Karzai might perceive
Hagel's decision as a personal af-
front or rather a snub by an exas-
perated Americans dignitary
Hagel and other defense official
insisted that this trip was planned
largely to see troops before the hol-
idays. But the agreement was dis-
cussed at length during the meeting
with Mohammadi and Deputy Inte-
rior Minister Mohammad Ayub
Salangi, and Army Chief of Staff
Gen. Sher Mohammad Karimi.


and grateful."
Newman's detention high-
lighted the extreme sensitivity
with which Pyongyang views the
war, which ended without a for-
mal peace treaty, leaving the Ko-
rean Peninsula still technically in
a state of war The conflict is a reg-
ular focus of North Korean prop-
aganda and media, which accuse
Pyongyang's wartime enemies
Washington and Seoul of carrying
on the fighting by continuing to
push for the North's overthrow
The televised statement read
last month by Newman said he
was attempting to meet surviving
guerrilla fighters he had trained
during the conflict so he could re-
connect them with their wartime
colleagues living in South Korea
and that he had criticized the
North during his recent trip.
Members of the former South
Korean guerrilla group said in an
interview last week with The As-
sociated Press that Newman was
their adviser Some have ex-
pressed surprise that Newman
would take the risk of visiting
North Korea given his association
with their group, which is still re-
membered with keen hatred in
the North. Others were amazed
that Pyongyang still considered
Newman a threat.


I World BRIEFS


Big crowds


Associated Press
Mourners gather and sing
Saturday outside the
home of former president
and icon Nelson Mandela
in Johannesburg, South
Africa.

Massive crowds,
world leaders to
honor Mandela
JOHANNESBURG -
South Africa expects over-
whelming crowds and world
leaders to attend services
honoring late President Nel-
son Mandela, though with
the ceremonies only days
away officials acknowledged
Saturday they couldn't offer
any specifics yet.
Across the country,
South Africans already
have begun honoring Man-
dela, who died Thursday at
age 95, and officials expect
tens of thousands to partici-
pate in next week's official
services.
In their first statement
since Mandela's death, his
family said they had "lost a
great man," just as they had
when South Africa's
apartheid government im-
prisoned him for decades.
Obama: Chances
for final Iran deal
50-50 or worse
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama said
Saturday he believed the
chances for a comprehen-
sive nuclear agreement with
Iran are 50-50 or worse.
During a question-and-an-
swer session with a pro-Is-
rael audience, Obama said
he wasn't naive about the
odds for a successful
final agreement between
world powers and Iran next
year.
"If you ask me what is the
likelihood that we're able to
arrive at the end state ... I
wouldn't say that it's more
than 50-50," Obama said.
"But we have to try."
The president's remark
was somewhat startling.
Obama has tried to allay the
fears of many Israelis and
some Americans that his ad-
ministration last month prom-
ised to ease economic
pressure too much in
return for too few Iranian
concessions.
-From wire reports













EXCURSIONS


-S.-- -


... . .. . .- ...... .
"- "* .. .. .., .... f *
... -.. -. '. -... ^ JJ: -- ...*!* **

---. *: '*_.-* ...^-- ., -t^ ^ ^


Photos by Peter Graulich / Special to the Chronicle
Peter Graulich and his wife, Leslye, visited the Panama Canal during a cruise around the world.

Peter Gaulich
For the Chronicle


e arrive at Georgetown,
Grand Cayman, at 9:30 a.m.
on day three of our world
cruise. Because the water is
shallow around the island, we take a
walk into town. Most people who have
cruised the Caribbean have visited
Grand Cayman, us included.
Georgetown is a lovely city with all of
the standard Caribbean attractions -
bars, restaurants and shopping, but not
much else. We decide to stock up on es-
sentials: mixers, chips, snacks and
local wines. We head off to the local
supermarket.
Apparently we are not the only pas-
sengers that worried about the ship
running out of food. We encounter
about 400 of our shipmates in the mar-
ket loading up carts full of snacks and
wine.
We return to the pier and tender back
to the ship.


Editor's note: This is the second
installment in a series highlighting
Peter Graulich's 107-day trip around
the world.
COMING UP:
Easter Island and the Pacific Ocean
crossing.


Great, now where are we going to put
all of these essentials? Leslye finds
another place.
We have dinner with our tablemates
and end Day 3 quietly
Day 4 finds us at sea on our way to
the Panama Canal. After breakfast, we
attend a lecture by Rusty Schweickart,
an astronaut aboard Apollo 9. He spent
241 hours in space, March 3 to 13,1969.
Capt Schweickart was an excellent
speaker and kept us on the edge of our


DREAM
VACATIONS
oto0^ Contest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


seats while he walked us through the
Apollo mission. This lecture is part of
Princess Cruises "Scholarship at Sea."
This program provides a diverse group
of speakers and entertainers through-
out the cruise. I think I am going to like
this program, a lot!
We spend a relaxing day at the pool,
the buffet, snack bar and the ice cream
stand. Tonight is our first formal din-
ner I can't wait!
We arrive at the entrance to the
Panama Canal at 6 a.m. on Day 5. It is
dark, damp and dreary but the canal
looks like Times Square on a Saturday
night
We are amazed every time we transit
the canal. Besides being an engineer-
ing marvel, the canal radically changed
the international shipping business.
We enter the first of three locks that
will gradually raise the ship 85 feet and
See Page A17


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Passau, Germany

Special to the Chronicle
Dick and Ginny Fitzgerald, of Pine Ridge, visited St. Stephen's Cathedral while in
Passau, Germany, during a riverboat cruise of the Rhine, Main and Danube,
beginning in Amsterdam and ending in Vienna.


pow---.
--7- ciao




A16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 8, 2013 C:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D1/!:Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
~CC B IDA I F H 6:00 6:30 7:001 7:301 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
B WESH NBC 19 19 News News Football Night in America '14' NFL Football Carolina Panthers at New Orleans Saints. (N) Nc News
SP NewsHour WEDU Victor Return to Downton Abbey (In Celtic Woman: Home for Christmas Brit Floyd: Live at Red Rocks "The
WkDPBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus Borge Stereo)'G'B c(In Stereo) 'G' cc Dark Side Of The Moon."
B [U PBS 5 5 5 41 Keep Up Keeping Up Appearances'PG' I Masterpiece Classic'PG' (DVS) I Masterpiece Classic |Austin City Limits
Sf NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Carolina Panthers at New Orleans Saints. From the News
S L NBC 8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live) '14' 1 Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. (N) cc
B 20 2 2 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Emily finalizes Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) News Spo Night
ABC20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' PG'B herplan.PG' 'PG' ccon 9
TP S 1 0 0 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race"Amazing "Crazy" Race" The Mentalist"Green 10 News Real
(B CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)BN (Season Finale) (N) (In Stereo) B Thumb"'14' 11pm (NJ Estate
F 1 1 NFL Football Seattle Seahawks at The OT (N) The Bob's Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
FOX 13 13 13 13 San Francisco 49ers. (N) *,'PG' Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) N Notice'PG'
J WJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N 'PG' Betrayal (N)'PG' News Inside Ed.
n iE ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken CTN Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Youngren Child G' Special Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
SNNews World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Emily finalizes Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'm ccher plan.'PG' 'PG'B c
O D 1 6 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee Theatricality" (In Glee Quinn's life is for- The Office The Office We There We There
E CWm IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Stereo)'14' B ever changed. '14' 14' '14' m Yet? Yet?
E UWTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Running Man" (1987) 'R' Seinfeld Seinfeld Republic of Doyle Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IE (W TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Ministries
S 4 4 Fnriends Fnriends Two and Two and CSI: Miami "Driven" (In CSI: Miami "Free Fall" Criminal Minds "Secrets Criminal Minds
E CW 4 4 4 12 12 '14' '14' B1 Half Men Half Men Stereo) '14' '14' mc and Lies"'PG' Psychopathic killer. '14'
SF 1 1 1 Casita Big Rotary Family Healthy Your Citrus County Court ISpy'G' Eye for an Fam Team
IM3 FAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Solutions Living Eye
) CWOX FOX 13 7 7 NFL Football TheOT Simpsons IBurgers DFam. Guy IAmedcan News TMZ(N)'PG'Bc
Mn WE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AquifyAhora (SS) Jenni Rivera: Joyas Prestadas'PG, D' Sal y Pimienta'PG' Corned. Noticiero
S XPX ION 17 "Holiday Road Trip" "A Christmas Wedding Date" (2012) 'PG' "Christmas Belle" (2013) Haylie Duff. 'NR' "A Christmas Kiss"
SDuck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie and Clyde evade the Bonnie & Clyde'14,
54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty law. (N) '14, L,S,V' B L,S,V' B
S 55 64 **** "Remember the Titans"(2000, Drama) *** "HomeAlone" (1990) MacaulayCulkin.Aleft-behind *** "Home Alone"(1990,
55 64 55 Denzel Washington.'PG'B boy battles two burglars in the house.'PG' Comedy) Macaulay Culkin. PG
S 5 1 To Be Announced Finding Bifoot (In Lone Star Lone Star Call of Call- Finding Bigfoot (N) (In Call of Call-
N 52 35 52 19 21 Ste PG' n Legend Legend Wildman Wildman Stereo) PG' Wildman Wildman
S 96 9 9 "Dirty Laundry" (2006) Rockmond Dunbar. A closeted gay **2 "Funny Valentines" (1999, Drama) Alfre Woodard, T.D. Jakes Presents:
S96 19 96 man learns that he has a 10-year-old son. 'PG-13' Loretta Devine, CCH Pounder. Nc Mind, Body & Soul
RAV 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. iHousewives/AtIl. Housewives/AtIl. Thicker Than Water Housewives/AtIl. Happens Fashion
South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park
CC 27 61 27 33 '14' MA MA' 14' 'MA' MA' MA' MA' MA' 'MA' 'MA' 'MA'
*k "The Marine"(2006) John Cena. Thugs Orange County Swamp Pawn "Polticky Cops Cops Cops Cops
98 45 98 28 37 kidnapthewifeofasoldier.'NR' Choppers'PG Ricky"'PG' Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded
Nj 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC The Profit American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) Global Lessons CNN Heroes "Unreal Dream: The Michael Morton Story" CNN Heroes
ws 4 4 Austin & Jessie Austin & Liv & **** "The Little Mermaid" Dog With a Jessie Good- A.N.T. Shake It
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' 'G' Ally'G' Maddie (1989) Voices ofJodi Benson. Blog G' 'G' c Charlie Farm'G' Up! G'
SPN 33 27 33 21 17 Football Sun. SportsCenter (N) (Live) B IBCS Bowl Selection Show (N (Live) NcSportsCenter (N)
PN 34 28 34 43 49 30 for 30 BNRadio Poker 2013 Word Series of Poker Final Table. 2013 World Series of Poker Final Table.
WN 95 70 95 48 0 Divino Crossing World Over Live'PG' Sunday Night Prime Immaculate With Cardinal Dolan IGod IBookmark
a 29 2 9 20 2 "The Mistle-Tones" (2012, Musical) Tori "Holidaze" (2013, Romance) Jennie Garth, *** "Holiday in Handcuffs" (2007, Romance-
My 29 52 29 20 28 Spelling, Tia Mowry. Cameron Mathison. Premiere. Comedy) Melissa Joan Hart.
n 118 nn ***1 7"Sling Blade" (1996, Drama) Billy Bob **2 "Beloved" (1998 Historical Drama) Oprah Winfrey. Aformerslave *** "Melvin and
118170 Thornton. (In Stereo) 'R' B]is visited by a strange young woman in 1873. R' N Howard" (1980)
fN 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOXReport(N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
OD 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Restaurant Express Guy's Games Restaurant Express Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im.
S 732 112 732 College Basketball Nebraska at Creighton. Fantastic IUFC UFC Unleashed (N) UFC's Road FOX Sports Live (N)
[SNFLJ 35 39 35 __ In Magic Magic NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Houston Rockets. Magic In Magic In Magic World Poker Tour
1 ***2 "Avatar" (2009, Science Fiction) Sam "Armageddon" (1998, Science Fiction) BruceWillis, Billy Bob *2 "Armageddon"
FXJ 30 60 30 51 Worthington.'PG-13' Thornton. A hero tries to save Earth from an asteroid. 'PG-13' (1998)'PG-13'
OL 727 67 727 Central IGolf Northwestern Mutual World Challenge, Final Round. IGolf Nedbank Golf Challenge, Final Round.
Sn "Christmas in Conway" (2013, Romance) "Christmas in Conway" (2013, Romance) "Christmas in Conway" (2013, Romance)
59 68 59 45 54 Andy Garcia, Mary-Louise Parker. B Andy Garcia, Mary-Louise Parker. N Andy Garcia, Mary-Louise Parker. B
S 32 1 0 2 2 "The Apparition" **2 "Stoker" (2013, Horror) Mia Wasikowska, Treme "This City" (N) Getting On School Girl Treme "This City" (In
302 201 302 2 2 (2012)'PG013'B Nicole Kidman. (In Stereo) R' 'MA' MA Stereo)'MA'c
2 30 22 3 Boxing Joseph Agbeko vs. Identity *2 "Identity Thief" (2013) Jason Bateman. A **2 "American Reunion" (2012, Comedy)
303 202 303 Guillermo Rigondeaux. (Taped) Thief victim of identity theft fights back. Jason Biggs. (In Stereo) 'R'
HW 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters ~Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Beach lBeach Hawaii Hawaii House Hunters Reno Hunters HuntlIntl
i 51 25 51 32 42 oAmedrican Pickers N American Pickers American Pickers (N) Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie and Clyde evade the Bonnie& Clyde'14,
S) 51 25 51 32 42 'PG cc 'PG law. (N) (Part 1 of 2)'14, L,S,V'B L,S,V' c
I 24 8 24 31 "Kristin's Christmas "Christmas in the City" (2013, Drama) Ashley Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie and Clyde evade the Bonnie & Clyde'14,
24 38 24 31 Past" (2013) 'NR' Williams, Ashanti. 'NR' Bc law. (N)'14, L,S,V'm cL,S,V'mc
SEdmund Kemper: The Jim Jones: Journey Into Warren Jeffs: Fallen John Wayne Gacy: A Charles Manson A The Manson Women: A
50 119 Co-Ed Killer 14' Madness '14, V' Prophet'14, D,V' Monster in Disguise profile of Manson. Nightmare
n 30 2 32 3 3 **I "The Man With the Iron Fists" (2012) **2 "Snitch" (2013, Crime Drama) Dwayne **2 "Snow White and the Huntsman" (2012)
) 320 221 320 3 3 RZA, Cung Le. (In Stereo)'NR' B Johnson. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Bc Kristen Stewart. (In Stereo) 'NR' Bc
Caught on Camera Caught on Camera "Up Caught on Camera Slave Hunter: Freeing Slave Hunter: Freeing Lockup A former col-
42 41 42 ball!"in the Air"' "Fury" Victims Victims league gone bad.
S 19 5 0 4 53 The Real Abraham The Real George The Real Bonnie and Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers
u E 109 65 109 44 53 Lincoln'PG, V' Washington'PC' Clyde '14, V' "Frozen Justice" (N) '14' "Frozen Justice"
WitR 28 36 28 35 25 Haunted ThThunderhunder Sam& SeeDad Ilnstant "Merry Christmas, Drake & Josh" (2008) Friends Friends
WN 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
XY1 44 123 Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped: Killer Best Ink'PG' Snapped'PG'
n J 340 241 340 4i Time of Death'MA' Homeland "Good Night" Masters of Sex "Fallout" Homeland "Big Man in Masters of Sex (N)'MA' Homeland "Big Man in
340 241 340 4MA' cMA' Tehran" (N) 'MIA' Tehran"'MA'
3 3 3 2 3 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Meat Bar Rescue "Jon of the Bar Rescue "Brawlin' Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
P37 43 37 27 36 'PG PG' Sauna"'PG' Dead"'PG' Babes" (N)'PG' 'PG'
r. Z 370 27 370 ** "10 Years"(2011) ** "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle" (2003, "Unb,eakable" ,"',,, Suspense) Bruce "That's My Boy"
370 271 370 'PG-13] BAction)Cameron Diaz.'PG-13' ,iii iii, :i.-.-..i i: i (2012) Adam Sandier.
S4 3 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Detroit Pistons. From the Heat Live! Inside the Raising Sports Unlimited Saltwater Into the
36 31 36 Palace of Auburn Hills in Auburn Hills, Mich. (Live) (Live) Heat Canes Exp. Blue G'
S 31 5 31 26 *** "Batman Begins" (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine. **2 "Hulk" (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly Scientist
31 59 31 26 29 Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City's Dark Knight.'PG-13' Bruce Banner transforms into a powerful brute. PG-13
TS 49 23 49 116 119 ** "Four Christmases" (2008) 'PG-13' ** "Nothing Like the Holidays" (DVS) ** "Nothing Like the Holidays" (DVS)
16 5 16 ***3 3 "Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream ** "Susan Slept Here" (1954, Comedy) Dick ** "Bundle of Joy" (1956, Musical Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 House" (1948) Cary Grant.'NR' Powell, Debbie Reynolds. NR' B Eddie Fisher. NR' c
Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' Dude, You're Screwed Naked and Afraid (In
53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'B 'cPG' ccStereo)'PG' c
T 50 46 50 29 30 Hoard-Buried Breaking the Faith Long Island Medium ILong Island Medium Breaking the Faith Long Island Medium
Ni 3 2 3 *** "Lemony Snicket's A Series of *** The Rbie,",'i_,-,_ i.. i,,;,, Phoenix. A drifter "The Double" (2011, Action)
350 261 350 Unfortunate Events" (2004) Jim Carrey 'PG' D.ewiii a Uiaiiiiialu, ilIyIuu bader's disciple. Richard Gere. PG-13'
*** "Mission: Impossible 2" (2000, Action) **** "Saving Private Ryan" (1998, War) Tom Hanks, Edward Burns. U.S. troops Mob City
M 48 33 48 31 34 Tom Cruise. PG-13'c look for a missing comrade during Word War II.'R' 'MA'
TOON 38 58 38 33 ** "SkyHigh"(2005, Comedy)'PG' ** "Garfield's Pet Force" (2009)'G' Burgers |Burgers Fam.Guy Fam.Guy
RAV 9 54 9 44 Toy Hunter (N) 'G' Jingle Brawls (N)'G' Don't Drive Here (N) Mysteries-Museum America Declassified America Declassified
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... To 20 Funniest'14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
rMv 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs GoldGis Gold Girls IGold Girls Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Kin
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special
S)J 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14" Victims Unit'14
CSI: Miami "At Risk" (In CSI: Miami "Law & CSI: Miami "Habeas CSI: Miami "Golden ,. : i i,,,, Losing CSI: Miami "No Good
117 69 117 Stereo)'14'B c Disorder"'14'B Corpse"'14'B Parachute"'14' i.- Deed"'14'
1W181 18 118 118 120 "Get Shorty" (1995) Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother iMother Funny Home Videos Bones'14' c


Couple worked


hard for resources


D ear Annie: My
husband and I are
the youngest of
our siblings, now all in
our 50s with nearly
grown children. Despite
having the same oppor-
tunities, my husband
and I are the only ones
to have finished college,
stayed married and kept
the same jobs. As a re-
sult, we have a nice
home, two cars and col-
lege tuition
set aside for
our kids, and
can take fam-
ily vacations.
Our three
siblings
dropped out
of college,
racked up
credit card
debt, married
and divorced
multiple
times, com- ANN
promised MAIL
their health
with alcohol
and tobacco abuse and
left jobs as soon as the
work became tiresome.
They live in tenuous cir-
cumstances. We never
judge or lecture.
Lately, as the direness
of their situation has
pressed them into tough
decisions, they keep
bringing up how "lucky"
my husband and I are to
have all the security that
we do, as if we didn't
earn it or make sacri-
fices over many years to
conserve our resources.
While we are indeed
blessed, luck had little to
do with it We've been


I
.I


disciplined.
We have generously
helped our siblings
whenever the need
arose, including college
tuitions, car down-pay-
ments, emergency veteri-
nary bills and even
funeral expenses. Now it
seems they believe it
was our duty and with
the holidays coming up,
their comments are esca-
lating. This is terribly
hurtful.
My husband
is able to let
this matter
slide. But I
Need a civil re-
sponse when
our siblings ac-
cuse us of
"owing" them
because our
circumstances
are so much
"luckier" than
E'S theirs. I want to
3BOX show my kids
that I am proud
of what we
have earned and saved
without sounding unsym-
pathetic. Sad Sister in
Sacramento
Dear Sister: People
can become embittered
by their lot in life and
look to place blame on
others when they cannot
face up to their own re-
sponsibility in creating
the situation. Your chil-
dren can see the results
of this every day, so
there's no need to get
into a public argument
with your siblings. In-
stead, simply say, "We've
been fortunate" be-
cause that is also true.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Best Man Holiday" (R)
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Delivery Man" (PG-13)
2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D.
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1:55 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13)
1:25 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Out of the Furnace" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"


(PG-13) In 3D. 4 p.m.
No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Delivery Man" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 4:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D.
1:15 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching
Fire" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:15 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 the beans
6 Roofing material
11 Where ancient Greeks
assembled
16 Tale
21 Craze
22 Egyptian god
23 Hearsay
24 Standard of
perfection
25 Kind of card
26 Quartz variety
27 Profits
28 Opera by Bellini
29 Flower necklace
30 Sun-dried brick
31 Brusque
32 Kimono sash
34 Can
35 Filled with joy
38 Having rounded parts
40 Tangle
41 Once owned
42 Flow slowly
44 Cup handles
45 "Peggy Got Married"
47 Game official
49 Bound by an oath
52 Coalesce
54 Damage
56 Norway's capital
60 Exhaust
61 Humiliate
62 Feather scarves
63 MacArthur or
Fairbanks
65 Conclude
66 Stuffy
67 Burg
68 Young deer
69 Abbr. in business
70 Expert
71 Godiva
72 Teasdale the poet
73 Scrooge's cry
74 Popular destination
76 Messenger god
78 Word in a forecast
79 Extinct creature
80 Arab VIP (var.)
81 -and haw
82 Tumble
83 Unadulterated
84 Branch
85 Run of the law
88 Treaty
89 Ponder
90 City on Java


94 Song of mourning
95 Every
96 Pillar
97 Get along
98 Tolkien monster
99 Once - blue moon
100 False coin
102 Tub washing
103 Notorious king of Ju-
daea
104 Cudgel
105 OTbook
107 Forone
108 Memorize
109 Traveled on
110 Cogito-sum
111 Fortitude
113 Bill of fare
114 Appraised
115 Drink slowly
117 Cereal grass
118 -Ruth
119 Large metal
container
121 Naughty
124 Fine spray
126 Image (Prefix)
128 Arbitrator
132 Female sheep
133 Ending for lemon or lime
134 Self-satisfied
135 -Island
139 Reed or Harrison
140 Computer
enthusiast
142 Sadness
144 Saw
145 Vessel
147 Destroy by degrees
148 Harsh light
149 Laissez--
150 Gourmand
151 Doctrine
152 Bordered
153 Our 10Oth president
154 "Carmen," e.g.


DOWN
1 Grin
2 Discussion group
3 Where Agra is
4 Fib
5 Not strict
6 Food fish
7 Corporate emblem
8 Bedouin
9 Guardianship
10 Native of (Suffix)


Quarrel
British soldier
Leave unmentioned
Paul or Perlman
Fiery crime
Limited
Fuss
Bed on a train
Female demon
Antelope
Bladed tool
TV network
Get on loan
Raced
Many, many years
Mineral
Parrot of
New Zealand
Personify
Gaelic
- and downs
Pea soup
Cook a certain way
Flinch
Command
- does it!
Davenport's state
Boise's state
Cut
Weapon for a knight
Movie award
Fear
"- Free"
Like some police cars
Knowing nothing
Kite appendage
Lose brightness
Season
Wearying one
Thompson or
Lazarus
Engine sound
Risque
Do a household chore
Tooth
Shove
Brother of Moses
Verona's river
Less coarse
Simian creature
Stop
Destructive insect
Jolted
Automaton
Commerce
Played a part
Tempo
Tricky act
Clear


102 City in Maryland
103 Roll-call answer
106 The dawn
personified
107 Zeta's follower
108 September's first
Monday (2 wds.)
109 Incline
112 Child
113 Is able to
114 Liquor


Turkish inn
Morass
Regret
Sire
Cognizant
Evil spirit
Marsh plant
Remedied
Angry
Allude
Additional


Residue from smelting
Old greeting
Monster
Antlered animal
Dutch commune
Ancient
Toward the stern
Big-business VIP
Tap


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRUISE
Continued from PageA15

then exit into Gatun Lake. This lake makes up
15 miles of the 48-mile canal. We cruise the lake
slowly, watching ships of every size and every country
We pass under the Centennial Bridge which links
North America and South America.
Ten hours later, we approach the Pedro Miguel and
the Miraflores locks, which will gradually lower us 85
feet into the port of Balboa, in the Pacific Ocean.
We hang a left and head south to our next port,
Manta, Ecuador
Almost 2,000 miles into our trip, we cross the equa-
tor for the first time. In the maritime world, this is a
big deal. Long a naval tradition, most of the ship's pas-
sengers participate in the ceremony Known as polly-
wogs, the passengers crossing the equator for the first
time are presented at the Court of Neptune to be in-
ducted into the mysteries of the deep and elevated to
trustee shellback's. This is followed by an initiation
"celebration."
We arrive in Manta, Ecuador, at 6 a.m. We leave the
ship and take a bus into town. Everything is secured
by fences and barbed wire, security personnel and po-
lice officers. There is not much to do here. We visit the
National Museum and the El Paso Shopping Center,
which appears to be the local mall. I am surprised to
see security guards armed with automatic weapons in
watchtowers throughout the mall's parking lot. After a
brief visit, we return to the ship. Later, I find the rea-
son for the stop in Manta is that fuel for the ship is
very reasonable. We fill up in preparation for crossing
the Pacific Ocean. We depart Manta at 7 p.m.
Our eighth day is spent at sea. I take advantage of
the scholarship at sea program and attend an audi-
ence with Rusty Schweickart. We discussed his grow-
ing up, schooling, military career and, of course, his
space exploration.
Next in the program we meet John Maxtone-
Graham, a maritime historian who is presenting a se-
ries of lectures on early ocean liners. Today's discus-
sion is on the "Titanic." John is the perfect example of
a British gentleman, decked out in his brass button
blazer, black slacks and a perfect British accent He
covered the history of the Titanic in great detail.
Our ninth day is also spent at sea, en route to Lima,
Peru. We attend a lecture, "On the Inca Trai,l" and
another lecture by Mr Graham. We spend some time
at the pool and, of course, enjoy five or six meals.
Day 10 finds us 2,743 miles away from home and in
Callao, Peru. We hire a vehicle to take us into Lima.
We tour the city, which is very old and very Spanish.
We visit the palace, churches and monuments and
enjoy the continuing commentary from our driver
Peter Graulich loves to travel. He first left the coun-
try in 1961 for six weeks travellingEurope and the
United Kingdom with family. Since then he has visited
97 countries, every state in the United States and
every national park He has spent about 300 days on
Princess Cruise Line ships.




We want to know
Have you been on your dream vacation this past year?
Have you traveled the world or visited your favorite
destination and want to share your story?
Contact Features Editor Logan Mosby at lmosby@
chronicleonline.com for more information.


rSTEVE'S PROPANE
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY ON
9:00am-5:00pm W -* *
I3704 S. Hwy. 19, Homosassa (Next to McDonald's)

I~I



1 WHY PAY$18-$24 ? mCNG 1_
REFILLYOUR TANKSI i i i
EXCHANGE -W i I HCU
I TANKS AT 3TANK iWCTHUONLY
i STEVES! LIMIT A
WE ALSO FILL 30LB-40LB-50LB-100LB-FORKLIFTS-RV |




SPINE CARE

YOU CAN TRUST


Learn about
the Florida
Spine &
Neuro Center
and the
innovative
treatment
options
available.


I Attend a FREE Spine Seminar:

Thursday,. ec.l12,201


Ocala
Quality Inn
3434 SW College Rd.

call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.

hllni'

SLargo Medical Center "
.7A Teaching Hospital

FLORIDA SPINE & NEURO CENTER


Yo, Adrian! Rocky devotees


plan to make tribute run


Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Yo, Adrian,
Rocky devotees are gonna run
now, a grueling tribute to their
mythical champ.
Nearly 35 years after Rocky
Balboa returned for his first se-
quel, Philadelphia's favorite
adopted son has inspired city
runners to go to the distance.
Rocky's faithful followers are
set to run a 50K that will end, of
course, triumphantly atop the art
museum steps.
The fictitious fighter left as a big
a cultural imprint on the city as
any founding father, and hundreds
of runners are expected to follow
in his championship footsteps,
truly, through the streets, steps and
past the statue he showcased to the
world through six movies.
Sparked by a story on the
Philadelphia Magazine website,
Philadelphia's debut Rocky Run
kicks off at 7 a.m. Saturday, with a
start just around the corner from
the house where Balboa lived in
"Rocky II."
This is the kind of ultra-
marathon that would make Ivan
Drago flinch.
The route is set for 31 miles and
based on the inspirational montage


in the 1979 flick as Balboa trains
for his heavyweight championship
rematch with Apollo Creed. For
even diehard fans, the scene is
nothing but 2 minutes, 30 seconds
of Sylvester Stallone's character
sprinting and sweating through the
city, arms raised high and mobbed
by children that flocked to him and
followed him up those celebrated
steps.
For Philadelphia-based writer
Dan McQuade, a native and
"Rocky" fan, the underdog
boxer's disjointed route made lit-
tle sense.
"Obviously the montage isn't
meant to be taken seriously as an
actual workout; it's just a few
scenes strung together so 'Gonna
Fly Now' can play and Rocky can
finish at the top of the Art Mu-
seum steps," he wrote in mid-Sep-
tember "But, I wondered, what if
this roadwork were treated as
one actual run? How far would
Rocky go?"
He pieced the scenes together
through two viewings of the film
for the story (http://bit.ly/ljo
jnMQ), had some friends help
identify locations, and mapped
distances off a USA Track and
Field distance-measuring tool to
come up with the whopping total


Screen Valley's


ish Mark
66 66 6. I..


w...,,.,.n.,,.

%0"A"O'm ISOI"IU
S*
Sat., Dec. 14th
Door Prizes
Food & Drinks


C'hcfc Curd<
Trail Bologna
Nood lI
Black Buigg Soups


of 30.61 miles.
"This is one long run," Mc-
Quade wrote. "I don't recommend
anyone try it"
Not so fast. He may as well
have suggested hungry tourists
head to Geno's Steaks, order a
cheese steak, but hold the cheese.
Philly resident Rebecca Schae-
fer, an avid runner, read the story
and contacted McQuade the day it
was published for his blessing to
organize the run.
"I could not get it out of my
head," she said. "This has to hap-
pen."
She set up a Facebook event
page and website. Almost 400
people have committed to the
race.
There are no registration fees,
no T-shirts, or trinkets for finish-
ing. Not even greasy, fast speed is
required. Just a little love for
Rocky
Schaefer, who will wear a grey
sweatsuit with a handwritten
"Italian Stallion" on the back like
Balboa did, said if she pushed her
pace, she could finish in about
4 1/2 to 5 hours.
"It's not a real hilly or technical
route, because it's all sidewalks,
so there's nothing really too
hard," she said.


Excellelit
Christmas
Gifts!


Organic ColtAf
Jami & Jcllio
Dried Fruit


* CandN
* Beet Jerky
* Boilkd Pcantntr


-Coupon-


3275 South FL Ave., Spend $10
Inverness 7 00 Get $100 OFF
I Ac) oN, F). ,i An \ .lrI FJA[35O4wm wO FM6Eiresro 12/31/13. nOrn r custnomr.


MANAGER'S SPECIALS


Ili Hwy. 44 W. Inverness CR 486.
/ HWY.44 G F'r------ Inverness
ICHOIX1 (352) 726-1231 Iv
SK fSSy 'nicknicholasford.com xw gk "h=s
oOOGu87 NB SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 I


THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH
& CIVIL WAR TOUR
March 17-22, 2014 AA
Biloxi, Natchez, Vicksburg, Jackson $
Fully escorted motorcoach from Citrus County. Great hotels. pp
CALL FOR FULL ITINERARY! W dbl
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
TALLY-HO Hidden 352-860-2805
FA a i w.tallyhovacations.com
dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
A I U l Of l lOWNM L TIAOIM FL Seller of Travel 10131




cY9 ^r AVAILABLE
This Holiday Season give the gift of travel!
,o l Gift certificates available for cruises, tours and more.
j -No amount oo big or too small. Call
I- VL Accent Travel
S/ ,'.to purchase
Ii'?r E | -) "--^" "%' B gift they
won't return.


ky's TramvelS, Q g '" :
icska Switze;
croed Package Includes :js-


8 nights accommodations
* 2 nights Lucerne 2 nights Geneva
2 nights Zermatt 2 .-t- 1 .;-.no
* 1. I i, i 3 dinners
* I.I i ,' lerary in modern air-
... I motor coach
Services of English-speaking tour
manager throughout


Several Departure
Dates
Land only, per person
May 1,2014 $2599.00
May 8, 2014 $2599.00
Jun 12, 2014 $2649.00
July 24, 2014 $2599.00


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 -
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352527-8855



If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways

call 563-5592


"M


1


EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 A17


I


----- -i -- -- -- -- -- -s-- -




A18 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 EXCURSIONS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Renters insurance


safeguards

families, assets


FAMILY FEATURES
There are many reasons people
choose to rent over home
ownership. W 1 ,.li. .1 h,;up
for a dream home, you're
having difficulty affording one or you
simply enjoy commitment-free, hassle-
free living, renting certainly has its
perks. For those who choose to rent,
having adequate protection is a must -
and with advances in the industry, find-
ing the right coverage is easier than ever.


YOUR


DREAMS


Protecting your assets
For many looking to rent a home or
apartment, the thought of renters
insurance may seem less important
with so many ili..i 1 i i.to think
about. Though not all landlords require
it, many do, and for good reason.
"Though you never hope you have
to use it, insurance is so valuable to
the protection of your family, your
belongings, and, overall, your peace of
mind," said Kathy McDonald, senior
vice president at Assurant Specialty
Property. "Many returning to the rental
market will be pleased with how the
insurance industry has evolved, which
:11.i ..I .il,11 Q ,I ii,.. best coverage
easier than ever."

Advancements
in the industry
The conveniences brought on by
computers, tablets and smartphones
have greatly improved the services
insurance providers now offer. With
easy-to-follow websites, apps and
customer service chats, one can check
the status of a claim 24 hours a day.

Keep a home inventory
To evaluate the amount of coverage
you need and assist if you ever
need to file a claim keeping a well-
documented list of your possessions is
important. A recent survey conducted
by the National Association of
Insurance Commissioners (NAIC)
stated 59 percent of consumers do
not have a proper listing of their pos-
sessions in the event of a fire, robbery
or other loss incident.
"All renters and homeowners should
develop a home' i ... i "i said
McDonald. "Whether it is electronics,
furnishings, collectibles, jewelry or
clothing, families need to know what
they own and how much it's worth."
s Use tracking tools
Put down the pen and paper and get
out your smartphone. Many new
apps are available to properly keep
track of every item in your home.
Some even allow you to track every
belonging room-to-room with bar
codes, pictures, photos or scans of
receipts and descriptions. This helpful
tool also can create a back-up file -
just in case.
s Update your list
According to the survey, 59 percent
of those who do have a list of their
belongings admit they haven't
updated the list within the past year.
That can fail to account for many
gifts and purchases -i di.iii,,., ii..
year. Make a mental note to add to
your list after each birthday, the
holidays or other similar occasions.
s Note valuable items
Make sure you get sufficient cover-
age for expensive belongings such
as artwork or collectibles, which may
be subject to policy limits. As many
policies only cover $1,000 for
jewelry, you may need additional
coverage, considering many jewelry
items exceed that amount.
s Consider everything has value
Many items have more value than
you think. To better understand this,
consider how much it would cost to
replace every item in one load of
laundry. Sometimes, it's the little
items that add up. Jot down every-
thing clothing, shoes, kitchen
gadgets and power tools.
In-depth information on renters insur-
ance is available from providers. For
information on renters insurance from
Assurant, visit www.renterssecurity.com.


things to look for in a rental property

11,1P .0, 11" 1 -i~h h ,l l Ih. I '., I 1 .- 1 l,.1,' 11-.1l [.l l ,1 1. 11 1)'..[.l" h L 1 .j .! i h!.. 11.',I h I l l:


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


Did you know?
Through the simple act of listening to
the needs of their customers, insurance
companies are finding real solutions to
increase customer satisfaction. A recent
survey conducted by Assurant Specialty
Property revealed that many long-time
renters didn't know they could transfer
policies from one rental unit to another.
Instead of beginning a new policy each
time they move, the company advises
these renters to simply update their
address and they can keep the same
policy.


1 IIIii.jhihr'

COsi lu ,-,I L-,. juu L J. I alluld iI ',',1li t uUL
current budget.
* Safety
It's important to find out about crime occurring
in the neighborhood in which you are inter-
ested. Contact the local police department for
information and police reports on robberies
and other crimes in the area. An evaluation of
the property's safety is also essential, such as
the lock features on doors and windows and
working smoke detectors.
s Environment
Make sure your fellow residents match your
own lifestyle. For example, an older com-
munity is typically quieter, while an apartment
complex with college students may involve
some loud, late nights. Choose an area that fits
your personality and your needs.


I \ llklrlllllf>

aid d -Jll. ',',ll l mipulalul lul
your family and lifestyle. Does the
facility have a gym, an area for
walking your dog or that porch
you've always --.I.,.' I' Keep these
ideas in mind as you will likely be
living here at least one year.
* Appliances
One major deciding factor of rentals
should be the appliances that are
included with the unit. Ensure the
stove, oven and refrigerator are all
in working order. Other essential
devices, such as air conditioning,
heating, hot water heaters and, if
applicable, washer and dryer units,
should be tested beforehand.


PRI


TI










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Post plans pork loin dinner
The VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to a pork
loin dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 13, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

CCVC yard sale to be Dec. 14
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
re-sponsible for the security of their own
items overnight.
The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet
and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Legion post to host dance
Everyone is welcome at the Sunday
Nite Dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 15, at American Legion Post 347 at
the corner of County Road 466 and Rolling
Acres Road in Lady Lake.
Donation is $10 and includes snacks.
For more information, call 352-304-8672.

Legion to serve pasta dinner
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve an Italian pasta dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 20, at the post, 6585
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Everyone is welcome; donation is $7.
All profits support the many programs
of the American Legion Auxiliary
For more information, call Unit Presi-
dent Barbara Logan at 352-795-4233.

Come jam at Post 77
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 20, with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness.
For information, call 352-476-2134,
352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Post plans market, breakfast
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58
will have its outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 21. The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
On the menu are pancakes, French
toast, scrambled eggs, sausage, orange
juice and coffee for a $5 donation.

Free Christmas dinner
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58
invites the public to a free Christmas
dinner from noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 25. The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
Donations will be accepted, but are not
necessary

Celebrate new year with post
Come and enjoy New Year's Eve from
3 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills.
Tickets are $20 per person, which
includes a prime rib dinner, a band,
dancing, party favors and champagne
toast. Cash bar available.
Tickets are on sale until Dec. 25. There
will be no late sales.
For information, call 352-746-0440.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-Rives
Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.; games start
at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Post welcomes public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170
Vet Lane (County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), offers several events that
are open to the public.
Bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke-
free hall. Card bingo and grill night is at
5 p.m. Wednesday in the Canteen. Darts
are at 7 p.m. Monday and Fridays in the
Canteen.
Golf Leagues are Monday and Thursday
mornings.
For more information, call 352-746-0440.


Marriage of careers


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Tyler and Christina Austin, who both serve in the U.S. Air Force, juggle the challenges of being a married couple and their
service careers.


Local couple serve together in U.S. Air Force


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

T yler Austin knew
what he was going
to do well, sort
of. Some
clarification here is
required: Tyler was going
to enlist in the military,
which he did when he
was 17, and his first
inclination had him
leaning to the U.S. Navy,
to become a Navy diver


But that didn't last. He was about to
be married, and the thought of spend-
ing as much as six months on a ship
away from his wife was not appealing.
Also, Tyler thought there might be a
better way to realize his dreams to
travel and to get his education while in
the service.
He discussed it with his
wife-to-be, Christina.
"She was my rock," Tyler E4 Tylel
said. "She helped me make
my decision."
That decision was to
switch to the U.S. Air Force,
which did not endear him
to the Navy Still, he was
less than six months in the
service when he made his
choice. So after enlisting in until i
the Navy in December of
2009, he re-enlisted in the
Air Force in June 2010.
Three months later, Christina and
Tyler were married.
The pair, both from Inverness -
Christina, now 22, graduated from
Citrus High School, and Tyler, now 21,
was home-schooled met at the
Roller Barn in 2009, where Christina
worked.
"I was too shy to ask her out in
person," Tyler said. "So I did it on
MySpace."
Using an oft-quoted maxim, the rest
is history Tyler went through basic
training at Lackland Air Force Base in
San Antonio, Texas, from June to Au-
gust 2010, just before getting married,
then traveled to Sheppard Air Force
Base in Wichita Falls, Texas, for
90 days of technical training as a muni-
tions systems technician.
Once completed, the newlyweds set
out on a three-year "honeymoon," or,
in more accurate terminology, to


Tyler's first posting at Eielson Air
Force Base, about 26 miles southeast
of Fairbanks, Alaska.
That would hardly seem an ideal
location for a pair of Floridians, nor
would it seem a top choice on the
travel agenda, but they both knew
there were precious few such choices
available in the military And, anyway,
after spending three years there, they
both said they "loved it." In fact, de-
spite it being a snow-dominated cli-
mate where one can open the door
and find a moose grazing in the yard
(Christina said that happened often),
Tyler said he'd "buy property up there
if I could" once he's out of the military
Which leads to the second part of
this story: Christina.
"I always wanted to join," she said of
enlisting. "But I was too scared. Basic
training scared me."
Christina also didn't have the same
impetus that propelled Tyler, whose
family has been involved in the mili-
tary for more than a century Indeed,
he has one brother currently serving
with the Army and another in
the Navy
But Christina was hesitant. Finally,

r Austin and E2 Christina Austin of the U.
Years: Tyler is enlisted until 2016;
Christina's enlistment ends in 2017.
Units: Tyler is in the 5th Munitions Squadi
Christina is in the 5th Medical Squadror
s: Tyler is currently a munitions system tec
Christina is in health services manageme
oth serve at the recruiting office in Invernes
work at an information table set up at th
College of Central Florida Citrus Campus
hey ship out for Minot Air Force Base in Nor1

while living in Alaska, she made her
choice and one reason was the "fun"
her husband was having.
"He got to fly an F16," she said.
"How cool is that?"
While stationed in Fairbanks, Tyler
was re-routed for three months to
Guam and Hawaii. Of course, he com-
municated back to Christina, but the
photos he sent of beautiful warm
beaches and crystal-clear seas didn't
lift her spirits.
The final straw, however, was his
flight while stationed in Hawaii, in an
F16 fighter that had been modified to
carry two passengers for training
purposes.
"It's called an incentive flight," Tyler
explained. "If you do good work, you
qualify"
Tyler, whose rank is E4, qualified
and got his flight. Shortly thereafter,
Christina started training before en-
listing so she'd be in shape for basic


training.
There was something else, some-
thing now both have experienced, that
played a role in this scenario. While
Tyler was away, loneliness crept in to
Christina's life.
"It's much harder being a spouse,"
she said of her time alone in Alaska.
Tyler lived with that same feeling
earlier this year Christina, who
wanted to wait to join until she could
get into a field she wanted training in
notably, something related to med-
ical got a call from her recruiter
who said that a spot was available in
health service management She took
it.
"I didn't want to go in without know-
ing what my job was," she said. "But I
got my job in a couple of months."
At the time it wasn't exactly what
she wanted, but that has changed
since.
"I couldn't be happier," Christina
said. "I'm so lucky I was truly
blessed."
That's when Tyler experienced what
his wife had lived with, being without
her while she went through basic
training, also at Lackland Air Force
Base, and then tech-
nical training at Fort
S. Air Force Sam Houston, also in
San
Antonio. She re-
ron; ceived her E2 rank
n. and rejoined her hus-
hnician; band just 10 days ago.
nt. It's been an adven-
ss and ture for this couple
le since they first met at
s, the Roller Barn. They
th Dakota. have traveled, to be
sure, and they are
both working toward bachelor's de-
grees: Tyler's in computer information
systems and Christina's in psychology
Both want to use whatever they
learn in the Air Force to shape their
future lives and both want to do some
more traveling.
And they plan to do it together Tyler
originally enlisted for six years;
Christina for four
If Tyler extends his enlistment for a
year, they would leave the Air Force
within a month of each other
"We'll both stay together," Christina
said.
They're together now, working at the
Air Force Recruiting Office in Inver-
ness, under Senior Airman Latoia
Briggs. They're also working at an
information table at the College of
Central Florida Citrus Campus, then
they'll ship out this month for Minot
Air Force Base, N.D.
And, they'll go together


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans Coalition sees busy 2013


ecapping Citrus
County Veterans
Coalition's 2013:
We welcomed some new
members and some key
members fell ill and are
on the mend. Skeleton
crews keep the monthly
yard sales organized and
running, putting aside the
health risks to the three
or four people who stay
the long hours from 5 a.m.
until 3 or 4 p.m. and often
later
We have more than 150
members. Step forward.
Assist with this event that
keeps us able to remain
"Veterans Helping
Veterans."
May 25 was our Family
Fun Day We invited all
veteran organizations in
Citrus County to attend,
free of charge and use
this opportunity to recruit
new membership for
themselves in the spirit of
camaraderie. We had free
food, drink, clowns, face-
painting and live music.
You can search our video
on You Tube.
Only two groups re-
sponded. The Elks Lodge
2252 of Inverness part-
nered with us and spent
the day cooking hot dogs,
hamburgers and French
fries. The Young Marines
helped keep things mov-
ing- no task was too
small. Nevertheless, close


to 200 veterans and their
families danced, ate,
played games and had a
carefree day "on us."
Throughout the year,
the CCVC phone rings
endlessly with veterans
and their families looking
for wheelchairs, stoves
and repairs to their
homes. We continue to
connect these people with
the correct businesses,
groups or resources to
help fulfill these needs.
We even made time to at-
tend the Thanksgiving
Feeding Alliance Nov 23.
The CCVC is all volun-
teer We always need
more members. Speaking
from personal experi-
ence, because of the small
number of active mem-
bers, our families and re-
lationships suffer from
the time we spend away
from them while we dedi-
cate our time to CCVC
projects. It's easy for oth-
ers to forget this and our
phones ring day and night
at all hours.


Barbara
Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


This happens with all
groups, for all causes,
who depend on volun-
teers. Volunteer is the key
word here. We're doing
this out of the goodness of
our hearts and strong be-
lief in the cause. Be kind
to volunteers, because
there is no paycheck rid-
ing on whether we choose
to do what we're doing.
Volunteers aren't just
people with nothing bet-
ter to do, but rather, peo-
ple who have the courage
to offer their hands in a
helpful gesture. Every
volunteer should be ap-
plauded for the time and
effort extended this year
and every year Some of
us also work full-time
jobs, which many people
tend to forget. We may
give the appearance that
our volunteer work is the
only thing we do, but that
is our mark of pride and
professionalism.
When calling the fol-
lowing numbers or any
group operated by volun-


teers, please be patient.
Leave a voicemail if there
is no answer, for we'll do
our best return the call as
soon as possible.
Until now, all CCVC
calls have been referred
to the main number at
352-400-8952, but due to a
reported overload of calls
to and minutes used on
this number, please refer
to these direct numbers
also printed in our
newsletter and website:
For yard sale informa-
tion, please call Dan at
352-400-8952. The next
one is Saturday, Dec. 14.
Our Membership and
Food Bank director is
Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Our Food Bank
remains open on Tues-
days from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For general informa-
tion, call CCVC Chairman
Ray Michael at 352-212-
2754. Our treasurer is
Richard Floyd at 727-
492-0292.
For assistance in ob-
taining medical equip-
ment, repair work, getting
connected with veteran-
friendly businesses and
such, call Mike O'Brien at
352-212-3846.
For inquiries concern-
ing our website
(www.ccvcfl.org), this col-
umn or my monthly televi-
sion appearances as Anne
Black's guest on HPH


Hospice's "Every Day is a
Gift" show, aired on
WYKE46, email
Barbiel@ccvcflorg.
MEi
I come from a long line
of veterans, including my
great-uncle, who was the
first Miamian to be killed
in World War I. I've been
given honorary life mem-
bership to the American
Legion post in Miami
named after him.
My father served during
World War II as a part of
the Army's Big Red One.
The list goes on.
I've been both a Navy
enlisted and Navy officer
wife. I'm an Army widow
from the Vietnam era.
I passed an extensive
background check upon
my engagement to the
Navy officer who had a
very high-ranking secu-
rity clearance. I followed
military base rules pre-
cisely and in every way
possible, was scrutinized
as if I were the service
member himself.
I studied every book I
could get my hands on to
learn military etiquette
and protocol, resulting in
compliments from
admirals and more.
But, there is no special
DD-214 for veterans' de-
pendents. It makes no dif-
ference that I stood tall in
the reception line on the


deck of a Japanese ship
visiting Pearl Harbor and
shook hands with its cap-
tain. I represented the
U.S. Navy and the ship my
spouse was attached to. I
took my position very
seriously
It's ironic that even
with all my experience
with deployments, conver-
sations with servicemen
wearing more scrambled
eggs on their caps than
could hardly fit on that
shiny black brim, and my
steadfast patriotism, that
as someone who has not
served myself, once my
spouse became a veteran,
I was left on my own for
medical benefits and feel-
ing that all I've done,
learned and experienced
meant nothing. My per-
sonal pride remains,
regardless.
I appreciate each of you
who has emailed or
stopped me on the side-
walks and in the markets
to compliment this col-
umn. It means a great
deal to me.

Barbara L Corcoran is
the public information
officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
Inc. She maybe contacted
via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org.
More information about
this group may be found
at www. ccvcfl.org.


VETERANS NOTES


Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
rescue, maritime security
and environmental
protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uni-


form with pride and your
military ribbons. Criminal
background check and
membership are
required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice assists
veterans
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the
Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA), provides tai-
lored care for veterans
and their families.


The program is pro-
vided in private homes,
assisted living facilities
and nursing homes, and
staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to
illnesses and conditions
unique to each military
era or war It also pro-
vides caregiver education
and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and
programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call
the Citrus Team Office at
352-527-4600.


DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The Vil-
lages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-


erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-


lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915.


Do you have the right insurance coverage?
(all Your Local Team Of Experts For A Free Analysis And Estimate!
Home U Auto U Business
financial Services

CENTRAL RIDGE
jq INSURERS, LLC
R 2535 N. Reston Terr., Hernando, FL
(Next to Village Services on 486)
352-527-0110


Call about our research

study:

* Study participants may receive compensation

* All studies administered by a board certified medical doctor

* No medical insurance is necessary


Meridien %
Research


16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601


Kelli K. Maw, MD. MPH
352-59-STUDY Board Certified, Family Medicine
[-tl11"J~i/ -fl:]ll;( ]': /f; .l;/; I 1 ]1- 11111 Ji- = lo]l :,lr;[ II;Il=




COWmLIMlUTARY


Memory Screening

High Blood Pressure Screening

High Cholesterol Screening

Diabetes Screening



Meridieen*



Qesearch
Medical Qesearch Close To Home

352-597-8839

www.newstudyinfo.com i


One-Of-A-Kind Gifts


From Local Artists


Pottery
Basket Weaving
Glass Art


A20 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


VETERANS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


Georgia Military College honors


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post or group, call or email the
contact listed. Posts and
groups may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost155@gmail.co
m, or visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit
www.Post237.org or call 352-
746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little
Al Point, off Arbor Street in In-
verness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 or Auxiliary president
Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Lodge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S.
Memorial Drive, Homosassa.
Call Commander Robert Scott
at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-3339,
email vfw4252@tampabay.
rr.com and Google VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447,405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness, at the inter-
section of Independence High-
way and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duan
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498. Call JV Joan Cecil at


352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-


Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at
9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 meets at
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959. Visit www.Post
155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA)
meets at 11:30 a.m. the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly at the
Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S.
Army, retired, at 352-746-
1768, or Secretary Jim
Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call Mor-
gan Patterson at
352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at the
DAV Building, Independence


Highway and U.S. 41 North,
Inverness. Call Bob Huscher,
secretary, at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. The final meeting date for
2013 is Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Homosassa Flotilla 15-4
meets at West Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 8940 Veterans
Drive. Call Wilbur B. Scott at
352-628-0639 or email sea-
capt34447@yahoo.com or
Robert currie at 352-799-5250
or email rgcurrie@
bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness.
Visit ww.rollingthunderfl7.com,
call Archie Gooding at 352-
464-0863 or email GatorDad
0527@tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition is on the DAV
property in Inverness at the
corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Call 352-400-8952. Mem-
bers can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537.
Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, helps meet-
needs of wounded veterans.
Call Charles Lawrence at
352-527-3722, ext. 102.


Our Story + Your Story =
Sunshine For Your Loved One
Our compassionate staff is ready to help.
Assisted Living just got a whole lot better.
Call us today! We want to share our story,
More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY.
Memory care Short term and long term stays


.A


(352) 563-0235
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River


( ^ SENIOR COMMUNITIES
Assisted LIving F lty LI # 12230
www.sgwseniors.com


Special to the Chronicle
Georgia Military College Cadet Connor Dupler was selected recently as the Best
Cadet by the college president, Lt. Gen. William Caldwell. Dupler received the
President's Coin for Excellence, presented by GMC interim President Col. Fred
Van Horn, during the President's Parade on Oct. 27.


Pr OF SPECIAL NOTE

'In Their Wordse Tell your story


ltr~ The
Chronicle
features stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about a
singular event or moment in your
military career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the
battlefield to a fun excursion
while on leave. We also ask that


you provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of war
served, years served, outfit and
veterans organization affiliations.
Call C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202
or email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.
com. C.J. will put together your
stories and help set up obtaining
"then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story


The Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park
Present a Festive -HOMO__ .


Yuletide Holiday Cruise
Saturday, December 14,2013, 5:00 to 8:00 pm 1


I= .


WEIL MEET OR BEATANY COMPETITOR'S PRICE
The Savings Are Yours Because
The Factory Is Oursl
at
fAUX WOOD BUNDS, TOP TREATMENTS
HADEBUN
DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS
VD'AT WERYA
ERRA
UVERTKAIS

72 HOUR
BLIND FACTORY
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO
1(
OOOGSMO www.72-hourblinds.com 527-00121
TPX


'o-
rf


Enjoy a cruise on serene
Pepper Creek
with Entertainment by
Homosassa Elementary
Chorus &
Santa and Mrs. Claus
Refreshments include hot
chocolate, non-alcoholic holiday
punch and cupcakes
Tickets must be purchased in advance in the Park's Office
at the rear of the Visitor Center located on US 19.
Tickets are $25.00 for adults (12 and over)
and $5.00 for children (ages 5-11)
Cruise tickets MUST be presented to the ticket taker before boarding boat.
DOOR PRIZES
For more Information, call (352) 628-5343.
Proceeds benefit the Friends of Homosassa Spnngs Wildlife Park


VETERANS & IN SERVICE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 A21




A22 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 TOGETHER CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GET TOGETHER


68th ANNIVERSARY


ENGAGEMENT


Love Your Library
Planning is under way for
the fourth annual Love
Your Library Evening
fundraiser slated for 7 to
9p.m. Feb. 21 at the
Central Ridge Library
The Mardi Gras-themed
event will feature jazz,
glitzy decorations, hors
deouvres, two compli-
mentary glasses of wine, a
silent auction and over-
flowing gift baskets.
Tickets are on sale for
$25 and are available at
all five library branches
until Feb. 18.
Tickets can also be pur-
chased at the door with
either cash or check. All
checks must be made
payable to the U.S. Family
Foundation.
The Love Your Library
Evening is a fundraiser
designed to support the
Citrus County Library
System.
For more information,
visit the website at
citruslibraries.org.

Trip to gardens
The Homosassa River
Garden Club is planning a
field trip to the Sunken
Gardens in St. Petersburg
on Jan. 21.
Cost includes roundtrip
bus ride and admission to
the park.
There will be a raffle
for door prizes on the bus.
Pickup will be at the Sug-
armill Woods Plaza by
Pinch a Penny and the
bus will leave at 9 a.m.
For more information
and tickets, call Barb at
352-586-0579.

Visit the castle
The GFWC Crystal
River Woman's Club Lit-
erary Group invites
everyone on a bus trip for
a "Day at the Castle" -
Solomon's Castle, on
Wednesday, Feb. 26.
Lunch will be enjoyed at
the Moat Restaurant.
Solomon's Castle is the
home and galleries of the
famous artist and sculptor
Howard Solomon.
Cost covers transporta-


tion, castle tour, lunch,
taxes and gratuities. Call
JoAnn at 352-382-1138 or
Joan at 352-564-8773.

See Charlie Brown
Citrus Hills Women's
Club will go to the Art
Center of Citrus County at
2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19, to
see "You're a Good Man
Charlie Brown," a musi-
cal comedy based on the
characters created by car-
toonist Charles M. Schulz
in his comic strip
"Peanuts."
Tickets are $15 per per-
son and all are welcome.
To RSVP contact Julie
DePinto at jdvango@
yahoo.com or 352-
726-7787.
The club is a social and
charitable organization
for the purpose of making
friends, sharing fun
events and providing
service to the community.
Membership is open to
all women residents of
the areas defined as the
former and current
Villages of Citrus Hills.
For membership infor-
mation and application,
call Tricia at 352-270-8909.


The Buonomos

Frank and Inge
Buonomo celebrated
their 68th wedding
anniversary on
Nov 24,2013.
The couple, both World
War II veterans, were
married Nov 24,1945, in
Alexandria, Va.
They met in 1944 when
Frank returned from
overseas and was
stationed in Washington,
D.C., where Inge was
serving in the Women's
Army Corps (WACS) as a
dental hygienist.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


SlPIIILIL SLAITIE AB GIOIRIABFIAIBILIE
MIAINIIA HORlUlS RlUlMIOIRB IDIEIAIL
INIDBEIX AGATE GBAOINBS NOIWRBMIA
LEIIN ADOBEBICURTI OBI TIN
ELATIEID LOIBED KINOT HAD
EIR IoIDI EB AIRISEB S E REFI
SWORINIMTERGEDIAIRBOSLO
T IRE 2A0BA BFASDi v cU FS





ERGO METTL LE CARE ARAE


GAMR GERA DOLORADAGRE0CRAFT

12 N AS2013 UFSIDIst bH UivRsal cD ikBfoAUF


They moved to Citrus
Hills in 1984 from
Massachusetts.
They have two sons,
Gary of Hudson, N.H,
and Ron and wife Terry
of Sugar Land, Texas.
Their granddaughters
are Diane and Jennifer,
both of Hudson, N.H.
Inge is a homemaker
and Frank is a retired
engineer
They still reside in
Citrus Hills.


Provost/Ledis

Mr. and Mrs. John
Provost of Homosassa
and Dr and Mrs.
Stephen Ledis of Coral
Gables announce the
engagement of their
children, Erinn Taylor
Provost and Dr Dennis
Joel Ledis.
Both the bride and the
groom are graduates of
the University of Florida
and are proud members
of the Gator Nation.
The couple is planning
a December 2014 Thomson-Reuters
wedding in Texas, where Corporation.
the groom is a professor Following a
of mathematics at Texas honeymoon in Hawaii,
Christian University and the couple will reside in
the bride is employed by Fort Worth, Texas.

FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


I.


OAK HILL HOSPITAL HAS BEEN
RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE JOINT
COMMISSION'S TOP PERFORMERS ON
KEY QUALITY MEASURES FOR 2013







Lo\ Oak HMl


i alIHosp ta



11375 CORTEZ BLVD. SPRING HILL I 352.596.6632 HERNANDO I 352.628.6441 CITRUS



0. 0 0 0ta~co


OYSTER PERPETUAL YACHT-MASTER


GAUSEMS W
Downtown Ocala R L
on the Square ROLEX
352-732-8844

RA









SPORTS


Lecanto junior
Brandon Burich
is rounding out
his game for the
Panthers boys
basketball
team./B6
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


I _^0 Golf, college football/B2
0 NBA, NHL/B3
0 College basketball/B3
' Sports briefs/B4, B6
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 Prep sports/B6


Warm-weather Bucs welcome Bills


Associated Press
TAMPA- One has already
set the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
rookie record for
touchdown passes. Buffa
The other is on the (4) a
verge of doing the Bay Bl
same for the Buffalo
Bills. 0 Time:
Mike Glennon and today.
EJ Manuel are 0 TV: CB
friends who've
known each other
since high school and their days
as roommates during the 2007
Elite 11 competition for prep


quarterbacks.
Both grew up in Virginia be-
fore heading off to college,
where they faced one another


do Bills
t Tampa
ics (3-9)
1 p.m.
S.


as Atlantic Coast
Conference rivals.
Now, they're first-
year NFL starters
eagerly anticipating
their initial
matchup as pros
when the Bills (4-8)
visit the Bucs (3-9)
on Sunday


"I know EJ really well. Our
families know each other. It's
pretty cool to be playing against


him now at this level," said
Glennon, a third-round draft
pick out of North Carolina State
who's thrown for a Tampa Bay
rookie record 1,962 yards and
13 TDs in nine starts.
"We didn't play against each
other (in high school). I still re-
member, in the state semifinals,
we played against a school right
near him and he came to the
game just to watch me. He's a
great guy His parents are great
people," Glennon added. "It's
just neat that, through high
school, you don't know what's
going to happen, and then col-
lege we played each other, and -L.
now again in the NFL."
Manuel was Buffalo's first- Associated Press
round pick following a standout Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon knows Buffalo
Bills counterpart EJ Manuel from their days as prep stars in Virginia
See Page B2 and as opponents in the ACC.


ion


Associated Press
Florida State running back Devonta Freeman runs past Duke's David Helton in the first half of the ACC championship game Saturday in
Charlotte, N.C. The No. 1 Seminoles routed the Blue Devils 45-7 to remain undefeated at 13-0.
No. 1 Florida State routs Duke 45-7 forACC, willplay in BCS title game


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -Jameis
Winston threw three touchdown
passes and ran for a score, and
No. 1 Florida State stormed into
the BCS national championship
game with a 45-7 victory over 20th-
ranked Duke on Saturday night in
the ACC championship game.
The Heisman Trophy favorite
was 19 of 32 for 330 yards and set
FBS freshman records for TD
passes and yards passing in a sea-
Florida State quarterback Jameis
Winston looks to pass against
Duke in the first half of the ACC
championship game Saturday in
Charlotte, N.C.


son two days after prosecutors de-
cided not to press charges against
him in a sexual assault case.
Winston threw two touchdown
passes to 6-foot-5, 234-pound re-
ceiver Kelvin Benjamin and ran
for a 17-yard score to overcome
two interceptions.
Florida State's defense was
dominant, holding Duke to 239
yards and forcing three turnovers
to help the Seminoles win their
second straight ACC title.
It was Florida State's 12th
win by at least 27 points. The
Seminoles (13-0) entered as 29-
point favorites after outscoring
its opponents by an average of
43 points.


Auburn


claims


SEC title

Tigers down

Mizzou 59-42
Associated Press
ATLANTA If offense was
the only requirement, Auburn
would be a shoe-in for the BCS
championship.
Tre Mason rushed for 304
yards and four touchdowns,
leading No. 3 Auburn to a wild
59-42 victory over No. 5 Mis-
souri in a Southeastern Confer-
ence title game Saturday that
looked more like a video game.
Auburn (12-1) kept alive its
hopes of playing for the na-
tional championship, though
the Tigers would likely need ei-
ther top-ranked Florida State
or No. 2 Ohio State to lose in
their respective conference
title games, which began about
the time Auburn was wrapping
up the offensive shootout at the
Georgia Dome.
Auburn set an SEC champi-
onship game record with 677
yards, including 545 on the
ground. Mason had scoring runs
of 7, 3 and 1 yards before burst-
ing up the middle on a 13-yard
TD that clinched the victory
with 4:22 remaining. He carried
the ball a staggering 46 times,
even striking a Heisman pose
on a night when his longshot
candidacy got a huge boost.
In a game where neither team
played a lick of defense, Auburn
finally stopped Missouri (11-2)
on fourth-and-1 deep in its own
territory, setting up Mason's
final score. Chris Davis broke
up the pass, not quite as
thrilling as his 109-yard return
of a missed field goal to beat
Alabama, but another huge play
for the nation's biggest
turnaround team.
Auburn, which was 3-9 a year
ago and didn't win a game in
the SEC, claimed the title in its
first year under coach Gus
Malzahn. The Tigers didn't
even need a dramatic finish to
do it, holding Missouri score-
less in the final quarter while
Mason notched two more TDs
to break open a game that was
close most of the way


Batteries Installed' ,
oo Mo. wanra t $10#,5, -^
;A1 1 Algnment
.m. i..A.ma. CheckR NS sig95
.. . .. .,,. v .h'-.-,,,.",.,,.",,
f1-'-";-- 1;^-"----- - ^ ^ 1^---- -

BUY 3 TIRES SUV OWNERS
AND GET ONE o l. &Itierha Inui
l -u...., ,.27P & ;nW, i95,
FR EE ',M t,, I, N1&T ,Offp 0#1-,
- - - - -


- ---- -- -- aa a- -- -- -- -a -





o Check & TOP-Off All Fluids
* Check Time Presure an All 4 Tires
S27-Point Inspection
I
I
Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check TiwPressure n All4 Tires '!
27-Point InsPection I

Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! W
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere'


2219 S. Suncoast Bhlvd Homosoassa. FL 34448
31 5.628.46*00
lovehcondac.eom
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Scaes 9AM-8PM MoiL.-Fr.: 9AM-6PM S.: I11IAM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon. -Fr.: 8AM-2PM Sat.


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness. FL 34453
352.341.0018
loveclevysfales.colm
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sles -- 9AM-8PM Monr.-FrL: 9AM-6PM Sal.
Seruvce 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fri.:; 8AM-Noon Sat.


Quarterbacks Glennon, Manuel
face offfor first time aspros


corn


Hoiid


QQ G U_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________I_____________


I


Er(E




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Woods keeps pace at World Challenge


Associated Press

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. -
Tiger Woods birdied two of his
last three holes to salvage an
even-par 72 in the wind and
keep his two-shot lead over Zach
Johnson in the World Challenge
on Saturday
The score looked routine. The
third round was not.
Wind that pushed away some
light rain at the start of the


round created havoc in the
foothills of Sherwood Country
Club. Woods hit a tee shot in the
water and three-putted from
about 6 feet on a par 5. But he
finished strong and was at
ll-under 205.
Johnson also finished with
two birdies, including a 20-
footer on the 18th for a 72.
Bubba Watson three-putted
the 18th for a 69 and was four
shots behind. No one else was


closer than six shots of Woods.
Nedbank Golf Challenge
SUN CITY, South Africa Jamie
Donaldson maintained his three-
shot lead through the third round of
the Nedbank Golf Challenge, put-
ting the Welshman in sight of his
biggest career payday in his Sun
City debut.
Donaldson had six birdies and a
bogey in a 5-under 67 to stay ahead
of American Ryan Moore and Den-


mark's Thomas Bjorn. Donaldson
had a 16-under 200 total.
Moore had a 67, and Bjorn shot 67.
Dubai Ladies Masters
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -
Thailand's Pornanong Phatlum ral-
lied to win the Dubai Ladies Mas-
ters, hitting a 54-degree wedge to
2 feet on the par-5 final hole for a
birdie and a one-stroke victory
over American Stacy Lewis.
The 24-year-old Phatlum closed


with a 6-under 66 to finish at 15-
under 273 in the Ladies European
Tour's season-ending event. She
also birdied the par-4 17th at Emi-
rates Golf Course.
The third-ranked Lewis, a three-
time winner this year on the LPGA
Tour, bogeyed the par-3 15th and
closed with three pars for a 69.
She missed a 40-foot birdie putt
on No. 18.
Spain's Carlota Ciganda was third
at 7 under after a 71.


UCF's


Knights rally to

defeat SMU 17-13

Associated Press

DALLAS Blake Bortles threw
for 242 yards and ran for two touch-
downs and UCF celebrated a BCS
bid already in hand by rallying to beat
SMU 17-13 in front of just a few hun-
dred fans who braved an ice storm.
With the school's first BCS berth
secured with Louisville's win at
Cincinnati on Thursday night, the
Knights were sluggish before recov-
ering for a school-record eighth
straight win and the outright title in
the first year of the American Ath-
letic Conference.
UCF (11-1, 8-0 AAC) has both of
the 34-year-old program's 11-win
seasons in the past four years. The
Knights went 11-3 in 2010 and beat
Georgia in the Liberty Bowl.
SMU (5-7,4-4) saw its record bowl
streak end at four seasons in the
coldest home game in school his-
tory 24 degrees at kickoff.
The wintry blast that virtually shut
down the Dallas-Fort Worth area
Friday prompted officials to offer
free admission. It didn't help much,
with fewer than 1,000 fans showing
up for the game far short of the an-
nounced attendance of 12,598.
Rutgers 31, USF 6
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Chas Dodd
threw two touchdowns and Paul James
ran for two as Rutgers finally nailed
down its eighth bowl bid in nine years
with a 31-6 victory over South Florida.
The win snapped a three-game losing
slide for the Scarlet Knights (6-6, 3-5
American Athletic Conference), and it is
expected to set up a game with Notre
Dame (8-4) in the Pinstripe Bowl at Yan-
kee Stadium on Dec. 28. Bowl bids will
be announced Sunday.
James ran for 113 yards, scoring on
runs of 5 and 1 yards. Dodd threw for
179 yards, connecting on scoring
passes of 12 yards to Andre Patton and
2 yards to Michael Burton.
Marvin Kloss kicked two field goals
for South Florida (2-10, 2-6), which
ended its first season under Willie Tag-
gart with a six-game losing streak.
No. 9 Baylor 30,
No. 23 Texas 10
WACO, Texas Bryce Petty threw
touchdown passes on the first two
drives of the second half for Baylor and
the Bears won their first Big 12 title and
a Fiesta Bowl berth.
The final game in Baylor's old sta-
dium became a de facto Big 12 champi-
onship game after No. 6 Oklahoma
State lost to Oklahome just before they
kicked off in Waco.
Baylor (11-1,8-1 Big 12) had never
even had a winning record in the Big 12
before coach Art Briles arrived six years
ago. Now the Bears have their first 11-
win season and their first outright title in
any league since the 1980 Southwest
Conference title when Mike Singletary
called Floyd Casey Stadium home.
Petty threw for 287 yards, with TDs to


i snow bowl Ski racing and


..... __ Birds of Prey


Associated Press
UCF wide receiver Rannell Hall catches a pass during the first half against
SMU at Ford Stadium in Dallas. UCF won 17-13.


Antwan Goodley and Levi Norwood
after a 3-3 halftime tie.
Malcolm Brown ran for 131 yards for
Texas (8-4, 7-2).
Texas coach Mack Brown made joking
references all week about being the only
coach in America playing for a confer-
ence championship while also shrugging
off speculation that he could be replaced.
Well, the intense speculation about
Brown's future is certain to increase now.
No. 18 Oklahoma 33,
No. 6 Oklahoma State 24
STILLWATER, Okla. Blake Bell
threw a 7-yard touchdown pass to Jalen
Saunders with 19 seconds left to help
No. 18 Oklahoma spoil rival Oklahoma
State's Big 12 championship and BCS
bowl game hopes.
Bell, playing in place of an injured
Trevor Knight, led the Sooners (10-2,
7-2 Big 12) on the winning 66-yard drive
going 5 of 8 for 57 yards.
Eric Striker ended the game by recov-
ering a fumble for a touchdown for
Oklahoma.
Desmond Roland led No. 6 Okla-
homa State (10-2, 7-2) with 144 yards
rushing and accounted for three touch-
downs. The Cowboys, who were trying
to win their second Big 12 title in three
seasons, appeared to have their spot in
a BCS bowl game secured when
Roland scored on a 1-yard run with 1:46
left for a 24-20 lead.
Bell, however, had other plans. The
junior capped the drive with his touch-
down pass to Saunders in the corner of
the end zone of a frigid Boone Pickens
Stadium. The touchdown came just five
plays after Oklahoma State appeared to


once again secure the win with an inter-
ception by Justin Gilbert, but the corner-
back was unable to keep the ball from
hitting the turf.
Pac.12 Championship

No. 7 Stanford 38,
No. 11 Arizona St. 14
TEMPE, Ariz. Tyler Gaffney ran for
133 yards and scored three touchdowns
in a dominating first half, leading No. 7
Stanford back to the Rose Bowl with a
38-14 victory over No. 11 Arizona State
in the Pac-12 title game.
Stanford (11-2) raced out to a big lead
in its first game with Arizona State this
season and had its way with the Sun
Devils again early in the rematch, building
a 28-7 lead early in the second quarter.
Gaffney did most of the damage, scoring
on a 69-yard run on the Cardinal's sec-
ond play and a pair of 1-yard runs.
Stanford consistently gouged Arizona
State for big plays, racking up 517 yards
to earn a shot at repeating as Rose
Bowl champion.
Arizona State (10-3) stumbled early
for the second straight game against the
Cardinal and never really recovered to
spoil its Rose Bowl hopes.
D.J. Foster accounted for 142 total
yards and two touchdowns for the Sun
Devils, who will likely play in the Holiday
or Alamo Bowl instead of making their
first trip to Pasadena since 1997.
Kevin Hogan threw for 277 yards and
a touchdown, Ty Montgomery scored
two touchdowns and Stanford held Ari-
zona State to 311 total yards to earn a
spot in a BCS bowl for the fourth straight
season.


ast night before I
went to bed, my wife
and I were trying to
find an episode of Big Bang
Theory that we
had not seen and
stumbled upon
the World Cup
men's downhill
ski race from
Beaver Creek
called Birds of '
Prey Watching
the top 15 racers L
ski for su-
premacy is im- Dr. Ron
portant now DOC1
because the ORI
Winter Olympics
are just around
the corner in Sochi, Russia.
The downhill is the
fastest race on snow, in
which there are turns but
widely spaced with se-
verely steep angles as well
as flat portions. Speeds of
over 70 mph are achieved
on portions of the course.
While watching the race,
the announcer gave a de-
scription of each athlete as
they raced the downhill
course. Where the athlete
was from, how many times
they had been in the
Olympics and yes, how
many surgeries and in-
juries they had up until
tonight. There was not one
downhill skier without a
previous knee, back or
shoulder injury The win-
ner, in fact, had seven knee
surgeries.
Few people are aware of
the more technical ski
events but most sports en-
thusiasts are well aware of
the downhill and the
speeds achieved in this
race. Lindsay Vonn only
became well known with
her downhill triumphs.
Vonn returned last week
to racing 10 months after
major knee ligament re-
construction. Two weeks
ago before the start of the
World Cup season in
Beaver Creek, she re-tore
the ligament. After her
first race this week finish-
ing 40th, her comment to
the press was "... I made it
down," she said. "C'mon,
give me a little credit. I got
a little bit of ACL left."
Lindsay was spending
most of her reconditioning
time last week with Tiger
Woods as Vail Resorts shut
down an entire lift for the
couple. My family and I
were in Beaver Creek ski-
ing and watching the train-
ing runs for the World Cup
races. My 8-year old
daughter skiing down the
fence line adjacent to the
racecourse remarked on


r
)


how fast the girls were
going. She noted that she
wanted to ski race also.
What had her most upset
was the fact
there was no
snow in Florida.
Few people
S have heard of
M i k a e la
Shiffrin be-
cause she is not
a downhill star
She is the 2013
slalom World
Joseph Champion and
OR'S five-time World
ERS Cup winner
She graduated
from high
school last year and has
now qualified for the 2014
Winter Olympics. She has
yet to have an injury in the
slightly slower technical
event of slalom where the
gates are much more
closely positioned thus re-
ducing the speeds in what
is called the technical
events.
Bode Miller, 36 years old
and 5 time Olympic ski
medalist and downhill
specialist, returned to the
race circuit for the first
time in 20 months after mi-
crofracture surgery on his
knee. Microfracture sur-
gery is the prelude to
needing a total knee re-
placement at a very early
age. Yet Bode finished the
Birds of Prey downhill and
is looking forward to com-
peting in Sochi.
The overwhelming focus
of all of this is what are
these athletes going to look
like in the in their 40s and
50s. They work out daily
and stay in shape, but as
they age how many knee,
hip or shoulder replace-
ments are they going to
face as a result of sports
trauma? We have come to
learn of the late effects of
head trauma to NFL foot-
ball players resulting in
early onset dementia. But
in reality every sport has
injury factors that have an
immediate effect on ath-
letes' ability to perform
and long-term effects on
the lives of athletes.
Being an athlete does
have a physical price to
pay But great athletes con-
tinue to compete in spite
of career-ending injuries.
They do it with motivation,
fortitude and the desire to
stay in the game.
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand and shoulder
orthopedic surgeon at Sea-
Spine Orthopedic Insti-
tute, may be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.


BUCS
Continued from Page B1

career at Florida State,
where he faced Glennon
twice. The Seminoles
trounced N.C. State 34-0 at
home in their junior sea-
son, and Glennon overcame
a 16-0 deficit in leading the
Wolfpack to a 17-16 victory
over previously unbeaten
FSU in 2012.
"I don't think there's
much that tops that. They
were the No. 3 team in the
country at the time ... and
to come back, that was def-
initely one of my best foot-
ball experiences ever,"
Glennon said.
Manuel has thrown for
1,595 yards with nine TDs
and four interceptions in
eight games. He started
the first five of the season,
missed four because of in-
jury and returned to start
the past three. He's com-
ing off consecutive games
in which he's combined to
throw for three touch-


downs with no picks.
"My thought has been to
just get better each game.
Obviously, we've lost a lot
more games than we've
won, so that's always dis-
appointing. But for me, it's
always just get better each
game," Manuel said.
"I'm looking forward to
getting down there and
playing against Mike," the
Bills quarterback added.
Glennon, who's thrown
five interceptions in 290
passes, took over as Tampa
Bay's starter after the
team stumbled to a 0-3
start under Josh Freeman,
who was benched and sub-
sequently released.
The rookie lost five
straight before finally stop-
ping the slide with a three-
game winning streak that
created some hope for a
brighter second half of the
season.
"I think we have a lot
more similarities than
people think," Manuel
said. "We both throw the
ball well, and try to stretch
it vertically"


Sack city
At times, Tampa Bay's of-
fensive line has had difficulty
protecting Glennon. The Bills,
led by Mario Williams, lead
the NFL with 43 sacks, so it
will be interesting to see what
the Bucs try to do to help
keep their young QB on his
feet. "We'll have to run the
ball, we'll have to work our
quick game and we'll have to
take our shots when they're
there, because it's tough
against a pass rush that good.
We can't be holding the ball
all day," Glennon said.

GOLFWEEK TOU
Recruiting
Competitive
Golfers,

Save $10 on
Membership for 2014
by 12/31/13
North Central FloridaTour.
Join the Fun Today!
352-446-3446
www.amateurgolftour.net
"Where Amateurs Are Treated Like Pro's"


: PORTS & AP P A REL
IOREEIN PRINTING RMIROIDOKH

NOW LOCATED IN THE CRYSTAL RIVER MALL

'MENTION 10 FF YOUR I
THIS AD IN-STORE
I FOR IU PURCHASE I





:*~ ~ ~~? 0::* *^ ~ d^frlir oveM
(ji ~ ~~~ .1'i~os*



CORPORATE RPPRREL TEAM UIIFORIU. TENll PIRTI EIIPIIENT
TROPIIE&I NIi. LETTER IiRn JICKETI

352-564-9402
OOOGUW5


B2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Colorado knocks off No. 6 Kansas


Associated Press

BOULDER, Colo. Askia
Booker brought Colorado fans
spilling onto the court by swishing
a 30-footer at the buzzer Saturday
to lift Colorado to a 75-72 victory
over No. 6 Kansas, marking the
program's first victory over the
Jayhawks in its last 20 tries.
Colorado (9-1) squandered a
six-point lead with 1:44 left and
Kansas tied the game with a
bucket by Perry Ellis with 4 sec-
onds left. But after a timeout,
Buffs forward Xavier Johnson
got the ball to Booker, who drib-
bled a few paces past half court
- about even with where John
Elway's courtside seats were lo-
cated and launched the shot
that hit nothing but net.
The fans exploded onto the
court, straight past Elway, and
gang tackled Booker, a junior,
who is trying to lead the Buffs to
their third straight appearance
in the NCAA tournament.
No. 2 Arizona 63,
UNLV 58
TUCSON, Ariz.- T.J. McConnell
had 13 points, six assists and seven
rebounds, and made critical plays
down the stretch to help Arizona es-
cape with a victory over UNLV.
Brandon Ashley also had 13
points, and Nick Johnson and Kaleb
Tarczewski added 12 apiece for the
Wildcats. However, Johnson shot
just 4 for 15.
The Wildcats (9-0) have a shot at
moving to the top of the rankings
after No. 1 Michigan State lost to
North Carolina.
No. 4 Syracuse 93,
Binghamton 65
SYRACUSE, N.Y.- C.J. Fair
scored 19 points, Trevor Cooney
had 17 and No. 4 Syracuse hit Bing-
hamton with a long-range barrage in
a 93-65 victory.
Syracuse (9-0), which beat Indi-
ana 69-52 on Tuesday night, upped
its nonconference home winning
streak to 48 games in the Carrier
Dome and figures to move up to No.
2 next week after top-ranked Michi-
gan State and No. 3 Kentucky lost
this week.
No. 5 Ohio State 74,
Central Connecticut 56
COLUMBUS, Ohio LaQuinton
Ross scored four of his career-high
23 points in a 10-0 second-half run


Associated Press
Colorado's Tre'Shaun Fletcher, left, tangles with Kansas' Frank Mason on Saturday in Boulder, Colo.
Colorado knocked off No. 6 Kansas 75-72.


to lead Ohio State past stubborn
Central Connecticut State.
Lenzelle Smith Jr. added 17
points and Amir Williams had 11 for
the Buckeyes (8-0), who finally
pulled away midway through the
second half.
Faronte Drakeford led the Blue
Devils (2-6) with 12 points.
No. 7 Louisville 113,
La.-Lafayette 74
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Montrezl
Harrell scored 20 points to carry
Louisville past Louisiana-Lafayette.
What looked like a challenge mid-
way through the first half for the Car-
dinals (8-1) ended with them
reaching a season high for points,
helped by 38-of-62 shooting from the
field (61 percent). The Ragin' Cajuns
(6-3) rallied from an 18-9 deficit to
grab the last of several small leads at
41-39 before Louisville turned up the
intensity on both ends.
No. 8 Wisconsin 70,
Marquette 64
MADISON, Wis. Sam Dekker
had 20 points and 10 rebounds, and
Wisconsin withstood a late Mar-
quette rally to snap its two-game los-
ing streak in the intrastate rivalry.
Jamil Wilson scored 22 points, in-


eluding a 3 from the wing that had
drawn Marquette (5-4) within three.
The Badgers (10-0) are off to the
best start in 20 years.


second half to thump their city rival.
Langston Galloway led the Hawks
(4-4) with 18 points and DeAndre
Bembry had 17.


No. 11 Wichita St. 71, No. 16 Memphis 96,
Oral Roberts 58 N'western St. 76


WICHITA, Kan. Cleanthony
Early scored 16 points, Chadrick Lu-
file had 14 and No. 11 Wichita State
rallied from yet another halftime
deficit to beat Oral Roberts 71-58.
Darius Carter scored 10 of his 12
points in the second half, and Tekele
Cotton added 11 points for Wichita
State (9-0).
Shawn Glover had 22 points on 9-
of-22 shooting for Oral Roberts (5-
4). Korey Billbury had 12 points and
D.J. Jackson had 10 for the Eagles.
No. 14 Villanova 98,
St. Joseph's 68
PHILADELPHIA- James Bell
had 25 points and 14 rebounds, Jay-
Vaughn Pinkston scored 27 points,
and Villanova beat Saint Joseph to
remain unbeaten.
Darrun Hilliard scored 14 points to
help the Wildcats (9-0) win their sec-
ond game this week since joining
The AP Top 25. Pinkston and Hilliard
pounded the Hawks from inside and
out, and the Wildcats dominated the


MEMPHIS, Tenn. Shaq Good-
win scored a career-high 21 points
and Memphis shot 54 percent in de-
feating Northwestern State.
Goodwin finished 8 of 11 from the
field for Memphis (6-1). Joe Jackson
scored 18 points with five assists
and Michael Dixon Jr. had 14 points,
connecting on 6 of 9 from the field.
No. 17 Iowa St. 91,
N. Iowa 82, OT
DES MOINES, Iowa Melvin
Eim scored 20 of his 22 points in the
second half and overtime, and Iowa
State rallied from 18 points down to
beat Northern Iowa for its best start
in 10 years.
Georges Niang added a career-
high 22 points for the Cyclones
(7-0), who also snapped a 3-game
losing streak against the rival Pan-
thers (3-5).
Missouri 80,
No. 18 UCLA 71
COLUMBIA, Mo. Jabari Brown


scored 22 points and Jordan Clark-
son added 21 to help Missouri upset
UCLA.
Two free throws by Johnathan
Williams III gave Missouri (9-0) a 62-
60 lead it wouldn't relinquish with
9:30 remaining. The team trailed for
most of the first half and into the
second before Earnest Ross made a
3-pointer with 14:46 left.
Jordan Adams scored 22 points
and had 10 rebounds for UCLA (8-
1), which dropped its first road game
this season. Kyle Anderson and
Zach LaVine each added 13 points
No. 21 UMass 105,
Brigham Young 96
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. Chaz
Williams had career highs of 32
points and 15 assists, and Sampson
Carter scored 20 to help Massachu-
setts remain undefeated with a vic-
tory over Brigham Young.
Raphiael Putney added 15
points for UMass (8-0) in the third
annual Hall of Fame Holiday Show-
case, played down the street from
the basketball shrine in the town
where James Naismith invented
the sport.
Tyler Haws scored 25 points for
BYU (7-3).
No. 22 Michigan 107,
Houston Baptist 53
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -Nik
Stauskas scored 17 of his 25 points
in the first half, and Michigan over-
whelmed Houston Baptist, reaching
its highest point total in over 15
years.
The Wolverines (6-3) bounced
back from a loss at Duke with a
nearly flawless offensive show in the
first half. Michigan led 60-34 at half-
time after shooting 68 percent from
the field 10 of 16 from 3-point
range and committing only one
turnover.
The Wolverines ended up tying a
school record for 3-pointers with 16.
UCF 77, Stetson 58
ORLANDO Tristan Spurlock
had 21 points and Isaiah Sykes
added 17 as UCF held off Stetson
77-58.
The win snapped a two-game los-
ing streak for the Knights, which
were playing their first game at
home since Nov. 17.
Brandon Goodwin added 11
points and 11 rebounds off the
bench for UCF.


OT no good for TB


Scheifele scores in

OT, Jets top

Lightning 2-1

Associated Press

TAMPA Mark Scheifele scored
1:04 into overtime and the Winnipeg
Jets beat the Tampa Bay Lightning
2-1 on Saturday night.
Scheifele scored from the near
post off a nifty pass by Blake
Wheeler
Wheeler also had a goal for Win-
nipeg, which finished 4-2 on its
longest road trip of the season. The
Jets were coming off a 5-2 loss
Thursday night at Florida.
Tampa Bay got a goal from Nate
Thompson.
Thompson tied it at 1 on a shot
from the slot with just more than a
second left in the second period.
Martin St. Louis won an offensive
zone faceoff before Radko Gudas
sent a pass to Thompson, who beat
backup goalie Al Montoya. Thomp-
son hadn't scored in his previous 19
games.
Bruins 3, Penguins 2
BOSTON Zdeno Chara scored
with 13 seconds left in regulation after
David Krejci tied it late, lifting the Boston
Bruins to a 3-2 win over Pittsburgh in a
game that saw Penguins defenseman
Brooks Orpik taken from the ice on a
stretcher.
Reilly Smith also scored for the Bru-
ins, who haven't lost in regulation at
home since late October (10-0-2).
Tuukka Rask stopped 28 shots for
Boston.
Chris Kunitz and James Neal scored
power-play goals for the Penguins.
Panthers 2, Red Wings 1
DETROIT Jonathan Huberdeau's
goal early in the third period broke a tie
and the Florida Panthers beat the De-
troit Red Wings 2-1.
Jimmy Hayes also scored for Florida.
Shawn Matthias had two assists and
Tim Thomas stopped 22 shots.
Daniel Cleary scored for Detroit,
which is only 5-6-6 at home. Backup
goalie Jonas Gustavsson, making his
second consecutive start, made 35
saves. It was Gustavsson's first regula-
tion loss of the season (8-1-1).
Huberdeau gave Florida the lead at


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning left wing Ondrej Palat chases a loose puck during the
second period Saturday against the Winnipeg Jets in Tampa.


3:29 of the third period. Left wide open
in front of Gustavsson, Huberdeau put
in a backhand shot after making a move
for his seventh goal.
Devils 4, Rangers 3, OT
NEW YORK-- Eric Gelinas scored a
power-play goal 1:15 into overtime, and
the New Jersey Devils shook off the
tying goal in the closing seconds of regu-
lation to beat the New York Rangers 4-3.
Gelinas one-timed a shot, off a pass
from Patrik Elias, from above the right
circle past Henrik Lundqvist. The goal
came 13 seconds after Rangers captain
Ryan Callahan high-sticked Andy
Greene in the mouth.
Michael Ryder put the Devils ahead
3-2 with 4:04 left in regulation, but Chris
Kreider tied it on a power-play goal with
21.3 seconds left.
Martin Brodeur made 21 saves for the
Devils.
Stars 5, Flyers 1
DALLAS Tyler Seguin scored three
goals and assisted on a fourth in the sec-
ond period, leading the Dallas Stars to a
5-1 victory over the Philadelphia Flyers.
The game was tied 1-all until Seguin
came in on a 2-on-1 rush with Jamie
Benn at :39 seconds of the second pe-
riod. The Stars then scored three times in
a span of 1:02 to break the game open.
Seguin took a backhand pass from
Alex Goligoski to score from the slot at
17:03, and completed his natural hat
trick 40 seconds later. He assisted on
Valeri Nichushkin's goal at 18:05.


Maple Leafs 4,
Senators 3, SO
OTTAWA, Ontario James van
Riemsdyk and Mason Raymond scored
in the shootout, James Reimer made 47
saves and the Toronto Maple Leafs de-
feated the Ottawa Senators 4-3.
Van Riemsdyk, Phil Kessel and Jake
Gardiner scored for the Leafs.
Clarke MacArthur, Erik Condra and
Erik Karlsson scored for the Senators,
and Craig Anderson made 28 saves.
Canadiens 3, Sabres 2
MONTREAL Brandon Prust and
Tomas Plekanec each had a goal and
an assist to lead the Canadiens over the
Buffalo Sabres 3-2 and extend Mon-
treal's win streak to five games.
Alex Galchenyuk also scored for the
Canadiens. Carey Price made 23 saves
for the win.
Tyler Ennis and Zemgus Girgensons
scored for the Sabres. Jhonas Enroth
stopped 16 shots.
Capitals 5, Predators 2
WASHINGTON Braden Holtby
made 34 saves and Alex Ovechkin
scored the second of three goals by the
Washington Capitals in the first 17 min-
utes of a 5-2 victory over the Predators,
extending Nashville's losing streak to
five games.
Troy Brouwer, Karl Alzner, Nate
Schmidt and Eric Fehr also scored for
the Capitals. Ovechkin got his 22nd goal
this season and ninth on the power play,
both NHL highs.


Heat 103,
Timberwolves 82
MINNEAPOLIS LeBron
James had 21 points, eight as-
sists and 14 boards for his first
double-digit rebounding game
of the season, leading the
Miami Heat to a 103-82 victory
over the Minnesota Timber-
wolves on Saturday night.
Dwyane Wade had 19
points and five rebounds in
his return from a two-game
absence and the Heat con-
trolled the glass until garbage
time after getting hammered
on the boards by Detroit and
Chicago in consecutive
losses. James' 14 boards tied
his high in a Heat uniform.
Kevin Martin scored 19
points for the Timberwolves.
But they sorely missed Kevin
Love's presence on the glass.
Love missed the game to be
with his family following the
death of his grandmother on
Wednesday night.
Pistons 92, Bulls 75
CHICAGO Brandon Jen-
nings scored 33 points to lead
the Detroit Pistons to a 92-75
win over the short-handed
Chicago Bulls.
Kyle Singler added 12
points for Detroit (10-10), and
Andre Drummond had eight
points and 14 rebounds.
The Bulls (8-10) shot 33
percent from the floor while
playing without leading scorer
Luol Deng, who was sidelined
by tightness in his left calf. He
is averaging 26.2 points over
his last six games.
Detroit outscored Chicago
24-9 in the third quarter.
Nuggets 103,
76ers 92
PHILADELPHIA- Jordan
Hamilton hit three straight 3-
pointers late in the fourth
quarter to help the Denver
Nuggets overcome a slow
start for a 103-92 win over the
Philadelphia 76ers.
The Nuggets led by four
with 4:28 to go before Hamil-
ton, who finished with 13
points, made three 3s in a
span of 67 seconds to push
Denver's lead to 11. Nate
Robinson led the way with 20


points for the Nuggets (12-8),
who were playing their fourth
game in five nights and had
dropped their previous two.
Tony Wroten finished with
20 points for the Sixers (7-
14), who held a four-point
lead at the half. Philadelphia
has dropped 10 of 12.
Cavaliers 88,
Clippers 82
CLEVELAND Kyrie Irv-
ing, coming off the first score-
less game of his career, scored
20 points and the Cleveland
Cavaliers defeated the Los An-
geles Clippers 88-82.
Tristan Thompson added
20 points and 13 rebounds,
while Andrew Bynum added
18 points for Cleveland.
Irving, who didn't score in a
season-low 20 minutes Friday
against Atlanta, scored seven
points in the fourth quarter, in-
cluding two free throws with
15.7 seconds left to put the
game away.
Jamal Crawford scored 19
points for the Clippers, who
have lost three of four. Chris
Paul scored 13 points while
DeAndre Jordan added 12.
Warriors 108,
Grizzlies 82
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Klay
Thompson scored 30 points
and David Lee finished with
23 to help the Golden State
Warriors defeat the short-
handed Memphis Grizzlies
108-82.
Stephen Curry scored 20 of
his 22 points in the second
half, despite shooting 7 of 16
on the night as the Warriors
ended an 11-game skid
against the Grizzlies. Curry
had 15 assists, two more
Memphis' team total
Mike Miller led the Grizzlies
with 16 points, while Jon
Leuer and Zach Randolph
added 15 points each. Mike
Conley finished with 12
points, but was 4 of 12 from
the field, part of Memphis
shooting 37 percent. Kosta
Koufos had 20 points and 16
rebounds.
Memphis played without
starters Marc Gasol and Tony
Allen.
From wire reports


SNBA BRIEFS


%-t


/


SPORTS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 B3




B4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013



Scores
EAST
New Hampshire 41, Maine 27
Rutgers 31, South Florida 6
Towson 48, Fordham 28
UConn 45, Memphis 10
West Chester 28, Shepherd 7
SOUTH
Auburn 59, Missouri 42
Cumberlands 34, Carroll (Mont.) 27, OT
Jacksonville St. 31, McNeese St. 10
Lenoir-Rhyne 42, North Alabama 39
South Alabama 30, Louisiana-Lafayette 8
Southern U. 34, Jackson St. 27, 20T
MIDWEST
E. Illinois 51, Tennessee St. 10
Grand Valley St. 35, W. Texas A&M 28
Grand View 35, Morningside 0
Mount Union 62, Wesley 59
N. Dakota St. 38, Furman 7
NW Missouri St. 59, St. Cloud St. 21
North Central (11.) 41, Bethel (Minn.) 17
Wis.-Whitewater 28, Linfield 17
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 30, Texas 10
Mary Hardin-Baylor 45, St. John Fisher 23
Oklahoma 33, Oklahoma St. 24
UCF 17, SMU 13
FAR WEST
Coastal Carolina 42, Montana 35
E.Washington 41, S. Dakota St. 17
Stanford 38, Arizona St. 14



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 9 12 .429 -
Toronto 6 12 .333 1/2
Philadelphia 7 14 .333 2
Brooklyn 6 14 .300 2/2
NewYork 5 13 .278 2/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 15 5 .750 -
Atlanta 11 10 .524 4/2
Washington 9 10 .474 5/2
Charlotte 9 11 .450 6
Orlando 6 13 .316 8/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 18 2 .900 -
Detroit 10 10 .500 8
Chicago 8 10 .444 9
Cleveland 7 13 .350 11
Milwaukee 4 16 .200 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 4 .789 -
Houston 14 7 .667 2
Dallas 12 8 .600 3/2
New Orleans 9 10 .474 6
Memphis 9 10 .474 6
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 17 3 .850 -
Oklahoma City 14 4 .778 2
Denver 12 8 .600 5
Minnesota 9 11 .450 8
Utah 4 17 .190 13/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 13 8 .619 -
Golden State 12 9 .571 1
Phoenix 11 9 .550 1/2
L.A. Lakers 10 9 .526 2
Sacramento 4 13 .235 7
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 109, Washington 105, OT
Charlotte 105, Philadelphia 88
Boston 106, Denver 98
Atlanta 108, Cleveland 89
NewYork 121, Orlando 83
Houston 105, Golden State 83
Oklahoma City 109, New Orleans 95
Phoenix 106, Toronto 97
Portland 130, Utah 98
L.A. Lakers 106, Sacramento 100
Saturday's Games
Denver 103, Philadelphia 92
Cleveland 88, L.A. Clippers 82
Detroit 92, Chicago 75
Miami 103, Minnesota 82
Golden State 108, Memphis 82
Brooklyn 90, Milwaukee 82
Indiana 111, San Antonio 100
Sacramento at Utah, late
Dallas at Portland, late
Today
Boston at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Houston, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Denver at Washington, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Women's Top 25 Fared
Saturday
1. UConn (10-0) did not play. Next: at No. 2 Duke,
Tuesday, Dec. 17.
2. Duke (9-0) did not play. Next: at No. 17 Okla-
homa, Sunday.
3. Tennessee (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. Texas,
Sunday.
4. Notre Dame (8-0) beat UCLA 90-48. Next: at
Michigan, Saturday.
5. Kentucky (9-0) did not play. Next: at DePaul,
Thursday.
6. Stanford (7-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 24 Gon-
zaga, Saturday.
7. Louisville (9-1) beat Wright State 99-40. Next:
vs. Austin Peay, Saturday.
8. Maryland (8-1) did not play. Next: vs. Siena,
Monday.
9. Baylor (7-1) did not play. Next: vs. Houston Bap-
tist, Sunday, Dec. 15.
10. Penn State (5-2) did not play. Next: at George-
town, Sunday.
11. Colorado (8-0) beat Illinois 79-56. Next: vs.
Denver, Thursday.
12. South Carolina (8-0) did not play. Next: at
Charlotte, Sunday.
13. LSU (7-1) did not play. Next: at UALR, Sunday,
Dec. 15.
14. Oklahoma State (7-0) did not play. Next: vs.
South Florida, Saturday.
15. Nebraska (6-2) did not play. Next: vs. Utah
State, Sunday.
16. Purdue (5-2) did not play. Next: vs. IPFW, Sun-
day.
17. Oklahoma (5-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 2
Duke, Sunday.
18. North Carolina (7-2) vs. Charleston Southern,
Saturday.
19. Georgia (8-0) did not play. Next: at Belmont,
Thursday.
20. Iowa State (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. Cal
State Fullerton, Sunday.


21. California (6-2) beat Pacific 68-66, OT. Next:
vs. Cal State Bakersfield, Sunday, Dec. 15.
22. Syracuse (8-1) did not play. Next: vs. Temple,
Monday, Dec. 16.
23.TexasA&M (6-2) beatWashington 74-68. Next:
at No. 10 Penn State, Sunday, Dec. 15.
24. Gonzaga (6-1) did not play. Next: at Ohio
State, Sunday.
25. Iowa (10-1) beat Idaho State 95-47. Next: at
No. 20 Iowa State, Thursday.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 31 19 9 3 41 85 65
Boston 29 19 8 2 40 79 59
Detroit 31 15 9 7 37 85 82
Tampa Bay 29 1710 2 36 80 70
Toronto 30 1611 3 35 84 82
Ottawa 30 1114 5 27 86 99
Florida 30 916 5 23 68 98


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the


SFlorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
13 20- 32 45 48
POWER BALL
17


CASH 3 (early)
9-6-2
CASH 3 (late)
1-9-4

PLAY 4 (early)
3-3-9-6
PLAY 4 (late)
7-8-6-6

FANTASY 5
2-8-17-28-33

LOTTERY
8-25-31-35-43-51
XTRA
5


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 11 -12 -28
Mega Ball: 14
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 7
3-of-4 MB 48
3-of-4 1,033
2-of-4MB 1,119
1-of-4 MB 9,392
2-of-4 26,909


$882.00
$282.00
$39.00
$25.00
$3.00
$2.00


30 Fantasy 5: 6 9 25 32 34
5-of-5 2 winners $117,272.07
4-of-5 284 $133.00
0 3-of-5 9,289 $11.00
0

Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia Tech at Miami
1 p.m. (FSNFL) BB&T Classic-- George Mason vs. Oklahoma
3 p.m. (SUN) Auburn vs. Illinois
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) BB&T Classic George Washington vs. Maryland
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon at Mississippi
6 p.m. (FS1) Nebraska at Creighton
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Seton Hall at Rutgers
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Texas at Tennessee
4 p.m. (FS1) Duke at Oklahoma
NBA
6 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Detroit Pistons
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Houston Rockets
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA World Series: Viper Championship (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Buffalo Bills at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
4:25 p.m. (FOX) Seattle Seahawks at San Francisco 49ers
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Carolina Panthers at New Orleans Saints
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) BCS Selection Show
9 p.m. (ESPN) Bowl Selection Show
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) Nedbank Golf Challenge, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) Northwestern Mutual World Challenge, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) Northwestern Mutual World Challenge, Final Round
FIGURE SKATING
12 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix Final (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Fulham vs. Aston Villa
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Everton
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Women NCAA College Cup, Final: FSU vs. UCLA
SKIING
2 p.m. (NBC) Audi Birds of Prey: Men's Downhill (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) Audi Birds of Prey: Men's Giant Slalom
5 p.m. (CBS) Deer Valley Celebrity Skifest (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of
the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel,
please contact your cable provider.


Buffalo 30 622 2 14 51 91
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 31 20 10 1 41 96 70
Washington 29 1512 2 32 88 84
N.Y Rangers 30 1514 1 31 68 76
Carolina 30 1312 5 31 71 84
New Jersey 31 1213 6 30 69 77
Philadelphia 29 13 14 2 28 64 73
Columbus 29 1214 3 27 72 80
N.Y. Islanders 29 816 5 21 75 101
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 31 20 6 5 45110 87
St. Louis 28 19 6 3 41 98 66
Colorado 27 20 7 0 40 81 62
Minnesota 31 17 9 5 39 74 74
Dallas 28 14 9 5 33 81 80
Winnipeg 31 1413 4 32 82 88
Nashville 30 1314 3 29 67 88
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 32 20 7 5 45101 84
San Jose 29 19 5 5 43100 72
LosAngeles 29 18 7 4 40 76 62
Phoenix 29 16 8 5 37 94 93
Vancouver 31 16 10 5 37 83 80
Calgary 28 1014 4 24 76 97
Edmonton 30 10 18 2 22 83 103
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Anaheim 3, Chicago 2, SO
Detroit 3, New Jersey 1
Carolina 5, San Jose 3
Columbus 4, Minnesota 0
Colorado 3, Calgary 2
Vancouver 3, Phoenix 2, OT
Saturday's Games
Toronto 4, Ottawa 3, SO
Dallas 5, Philadelphia 1
Boston 3, Pittsburgh 2
Montreal 3, Buffalo 2
Florida 2, Detroit 1
Winnipeg 2, Tampa Bay 1, OT
Washington 5, Nashville 2
New Jersey 4, N.Y Rangers 3, OT
Anaheim 5, St. Louis 2
Calgary at Edmonton, late
N.Y Islanders at Los Angeles, late
Today
San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina atVancouver, 10 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


Glantz-Culver Line
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Kansas City 3 3 (44%/2) at Washington


at Baltimore 7 6
atN. England 10% 10
at N.Y Jets 3 3
atCincinnati 5%/2 6%/2
at N. Orleans 3%/2 3
at Philadelphia 2%/ 2%/2
at Pittsburgh 3%/2 3%/2
atTampa Bay 2%/ 2%/2
at Denver 12/% 12
at Arizona 7 6%/2
atSan Diego 3 3%/2
atSanFran. 2%/ 2%/2
atGreen Bay 5 3%/2


(42) Minnesota
(46%/2) Cleveland
(40) Oakland
(43%/2) Indianapolis
(46) Carolina
(52'/2) Detroit
(40%/2) Miami
(42%/2) Buffalo
(49)Tennessee
(41%/2) St. Louis
(47) N.Y Giants
(41) Seattle
(45) Atlanta


Tomorrow
at Chicago Pk Pk(48%) Dallas


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Agreed to terms with
OF Francisco Peguero on a one-year contract.
BOSTON RED SOX -Agreedto termswith RHP
Edward Mujica on a two-year contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS Agreed to terms with
RHP Chad Quails on a two-year contract.
NEWYORKYANKEES Agreed to terms with
RHP Hiroki Kuroda on a one-year contract and OF
Jacoby Ellsbury on a seven-year contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS Agreed to terms with INF
Rafael Furcal on a one-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Activated TE Dennis
Pitta from injured reserve.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS SignedTE Dominique
Jones from the practice squad. Released WR Chad
Hall.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed CB Chance
Casey, S Shelton Johnson and LB Marshall McFad-
den from the practice squad.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS-Activated LB Melvin
Ingram from the PUP list. Released LB Adrian
Robinson.
TENNESSEE TITANS -Signed WR Michael Pre-
ston from the practice squad. Released C Kevin
Matthews.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS -Reassigned G Igor Bobkov
from Utah (ECHL) to Norfolk (AHL).
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Reassigned F
Joakim Nordstrom to Rockford (AHL).
NEWYORK RANGERS Reassigned F Michael
St. Croix from Hartford (AHL) to Greenville (ECHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Reassigned G Louis
Domingue from Gwinnett (ECHL) to Portland (AHL).
COLLEGE
KANSAS- Named John Reagan offensive coor-
dinator/offensive line coach. Named Clint Bowen de-
fensive coordinator, in addition to his duties as
linebackers coach.
NEW MEXICO Announced defensive coordi-
nator/defensive backs coach Jeff Mills will not return
next season.
WISCONSIN -Announced G George Marshall
has left the men's basketball team.


Local wrestlers

compete well at

huge tournament

TONY CASTRO
Correspondent

BROOKSVILLE None of
the Citrus County's mat teams
returned home Saturday night
empty-handed following the
largest-ever Brooksville-Kiwa-
nis Invitational of all-time at
Hernando High.
The 30-team, 32nd annual Ki-
wanis Invitational was captured
for the 18th time and eighth
consecutive winter by three-
time defending Class 2A state
champion Spring Hill-Spring-
stead with 189.0 points.
As expected, three-time 2A
runner-up Lakeland-Lake Gib-
son finished runner-up with
135.5 points, edging Dade City-
Pasco (131.5).
The Spring Hill-based Eagles
led the field with six players
featuring four individual cham-
pions in four title bouts.
Crystal River met their goal of
placing in the top 10, finishing
seventh with 98.5 points.
Lecanto finished 23rd overall
with 28.5 points.
The Pirates were paced by sen-
ior and 2012 state qualifier Nick
Hooper, who placed runner-up at
152 pounds while senior Andrew
Bilby placed third at 195.
The third-seeded Hooper
opened with a 2-0 decision over


Wesley Chapel's Jon Rivera be-
fore pinning Durant's Paul Fox.
He reached the finals by edg-
ing Nature Coast Technical's
Adrian Rivera in overtime, 7-5.
In the finals he tumbled at the
hands of Indian Rocks Christ-
ian's Conner Allshouse, 9-0.
"I'm not OK with second," the
18-year-old Hooper declared.
"In the finals, my guy did a good
job of riding me out.
"This is the first time I've
placed here. I would have loved
to have done better," he added.
"No one wants to lose when you
get to the finals. I feel like I
could have been more intense."
"I placed here two years ago,"
smiled the 18-year-old Bilby "I
even went up a weight class.
This has always been a hard
tournament When I get back on
Monday I'm gonna start working
even harder on riding legs. I got
a little tentative out there today"
"There was a lot of depth
here," said the 18-year-old
Ewing, who paced the Panthers
with a 4-1 run at 182, including
three pins. "I'm pretty happy
with how I wrestled. The only
guy I lost to was a state cham-
pion from Alaska."
On the lessons learned, "I've
got to work harder in the room,"
pointed out Ewing, who captured
his first two matches before
being pinned by Harmony's
Sawyer Root in the semifinals in
2:58. He bounced back to oust
Crystal River's Eddie Bennis via
a pin in 4:42 before edging Wes-
ley Chapel's Nathan Love, 9-8,
for the third-place bronze medal.


I S O R S B IES-


Host 'Canes take
2nd in Hermann Cup
The Citrus wrestling team, led
by 5-0 records from Casey Bear-
den, Brandon Taylor and
Jonathan Loggins, grappled to a
runner-up finish Saturday night in
the seventh annual Rob Hermann
Cup at Citrus High School.
The Hurricanes finished 4-1 as
a team in the dual-meet format,
coming in behind winner George
Steinbrenner from Tampa.
Bearden, who competed at 182
pounds, was the outstanding
wrestler in the tournament among
the heavyweights (182 pounds
and up). The senior also notched
his 100th career win in his final
match of the night and ended all
five of his bouts by pinfall.
Loggins (Hwt.) and Taylor (171)
had four and three pins, respec-
tively.
For Citrus, Christopher Keene
(106) and Tarique Cabanas (145)
each went 4-1 individually with a
pin, while Austin Renaud (195)
and Bradley Wiesenauer
(195/220) had 3-1 records.


226 yards and added 86 rushing
yards with a touchdown.
The Tornadoes scored 21 points
in a second quarter to take control
of Saturday's contest.
Report: FSU, Fisher
agree to new deal
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -The
Palm Beach Post is reporting that
Florida State and coach Jimbo
Fisher have agreed to new con-
tract that will pay him about $4.1
million per year.
The top-ranked Seminoles were
playing No. 20 Duke in the Atlantic
Coast Conference championship
on Saturday night when the news-
paper reported a new deal for
Fisher, citing unidentified sources.
The deal will reportedly be for be-
tween five and seven years.
Florida State spokesman Elliott
Finebloom says the school cannot
confirm the report.
Fisher's current deal pays him
$2.75 million. The new deal would
put him among the highest paid
coaches in the country. Fisher is
43-10 in four seasons at Florida
State since taking over for Bobby
Bowden.


Trinity Christian NCAA woes over,
defeats Central Miami readies for bowl
Cathnlic 3'47


vfatil viltv *V9r
ORLANDO Isaiah Ford
rushed for two touchdowns to lead
Jacksonville Trinity Christian to a
34-7 victory over Clearwater Cen-
tral Catholic in the Florida football
Class 3A state championship
game.
Ford's touchdowns came in the
third quarter when the Conquerors
broke open a scoreless game with
27 points.
Ford needed just two carries to
break the scoring drought as he
raced for 58 yards around the left
side. The Conquerors forced a
turnover on the next drive and
needed just one play for quarter-
back Jaquez Riles to hook up
with Chris Barr for a 14-yard
touchdown and a sudden 14-0
lead.
Clearwater Central Catholic
had some nice drives in the sec-
ond half but four of them ended
with turnovers. The most costly
turnover came late in the third
quarter when quarterback Jeff
Smith fumbled and Deontai
Williams recovered it and went 63
yards the other way to extend the
Conquerors lead to 27-0.
Booker T. Washington
claims 4A State title
ORLANDO Treon Harris
threw two touchdowns passes to
lead Miami Booker T. Washington
to a 40-21 victory over Jack-
sonville Bolles in the Florida Class
4A state championship final Satur-
day night.
Booker T. Washington (14-0),
ranked No. 1 in several national
polls, won its second-straight state
championship.
Harris, who is committed to
Florida State, was 15-of-27 for


CORAL GABLES It had
been 1,082 days since Miami
players could walk outside their
locker room, hit the fields adjacent
to the school's athletic complex
and have a bowl practice.
On Saturday, that all changed.
No longer having to worry about
the anvil of an NCAA probe hang-
ing over the program and national
attention focused on conference
championship showdowns, the
Hurricanes started practicing Sat-
urday for what will be their first
bowl game since 2010. By Sun-
day night, Miami will have ac-
cepted an invite somewhere,
probably to either the Russell Ath-
letic Bowl to play Louisville or the
Chick-fil-A Bowl.
"It felt great," Miami coach Al
Golden said. "It was unbelievable.
The whole week felt great. I didn't
answer one question about the
NCAA. It was unbelievable. Got a
great recruiting group in here
today. We just took care of busi-
ness. I know they're excited about
going to the postseason and
growing and learning. You can
see it. They were giving good ef-
fort. It was hot but they gave a
good effort."
Miami self-imposed bowl bans
in 2011 and 2012 because of the
NCAA investigation, one that re-
volved around the actions of a for-
mer booster who was also running
a $930 million Ponzi scheme. If
Miami had chosen not to sit out
those postseason contests -
three in all, since the Hurricanes
also passed up a chance to play
in last year's Atlantic Coast Con-
ference championship game -
then it's possible the NCAA may
have kept the school out of this
bowl season.
From staff, wire reports


SCOREBOARD


CR, Lecanto leave



Kiwanis with medals




NATIONAL LEAGUE FOOTBALL


NFC showdowns highlight Week 14



San Fran hosts


Seattle today

Associated Press

As if the 49ers don't have
enough dislike for the Sea-
hawks, Seattle could clinch the
NFC West with a win at San
Francisco today
As if the Saints don't have
enough headaches from being
pounded by those Seahawks last
weekend, they now face another
staunch defense when Carolina
visits the Big Easy in an NFC
South showdown.
Those are the highlights on
one of the more intriguing week-
ends of NFL matchups this sea-
son. The stretch drive is
officially underway
"If this doesn't fire you up, if
this doesn't fire up the fans, then
what does?" 49ers coach Jim
Harbaugh said. "I suppose Abra-
ham Lincoln riding across the
field with a frock and a top hat,
riding a horse, waving an Amer-
ican flag. I doubt that would fire
them up, if this game doesn't fire
them up. The people that really
love football would be fired up
by this matchup."
Or by the one in the Superdome.
"It's a big game that everyone
will be watching," outstanding
Panthers linebacker Luke
Kuechly said. "It's against the
Saints a division game and a
good team. There's not a whole
lot of motivation that you need
in this game. It's Drew Brees
and the Saints on Sunday night.
We're 9-3. They're 9-3. It's going
to be an exciting game."
Week 14 began with the
Jaguars beating the Texans 27-20
on Thursday night. On Friday,
Houston fired coach Gary Ku-
biak, making defensive coordi-
nator Wade Phillips the interim
head coach for the rest of the
season.
At Jacksonville, Chad Henne
threw two touchdown passes,
Jordan Todman scored on some
trickery and Jacksonville held
on to beat Houston.
The Jaguars (4-9) won their
third straight their fourth vic-
tory in five games since a bye -
and continued to show signs of
progress under first-year coach
Gus Bradley
They also won at home for the
first time since Nov 25, 2012,
against Tennessee.
Houston (2-11) extended its
franchise-record losing streak to
11 games, a stunning stretch of
futility.
Kubiak and the Texans looked
as if they would end the streak
after a quarterback change, but
Geno Hayes intercepted Matt
Schuab's pass with 2:08 remain-
ing to seal Jacksonville's first se-
ries sweep since 2009.
Seattle (11-1)
at San Francisco (8-4)
If there's a more physical ri-
valry in the league right now,
show us. These two defenses
don't let up, and the animosity is
evident everywhere on the field
- and on the sidelines, where
Seahawks coach Pete Carroll
and Harbaugh have a long-
standing feud.
Makes for a juicy affair at Can-
dlestick in a game far more crit-
ical to San Francisco's playoff


New Engle
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Indianapo
Tennesse
Jacksonvi
Houston

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

Denver
Kansas C
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
N.Y Giant
Washingto

New Orlea
Carolina
Tampa Ba
Atlanta

Detroit
Chicago
Green Ba
Minnesota

x-Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis
x-clinchedc


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF R
and 9 3 0 .750 322 2
6 6 0 .500 252 2
5 7 0 .417 189 3
4 8 0 .333 267 3
South
W L T Pct PF R
lis 8 4 0 .667 285 2
e 5 7 0 .417 264 2
lie 4 9 0 .308 201 3
2 11 0 .154 250 3
North
W L T Pct PF R
8 4 0 .667 292 2
6 6 0 .500 249 2
S 5 7 0 .417 263 2
4 8 0 .333 231 2
West
W L T Pct PF R
10 2 0 .833 464 3
ity 9 3 0 .750 298 2
S 5 7 0 .417 279 2
4 8 0 .333 237 3
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF R
7 5 0 .583 329 3
hia 7 5 0 .583 300 2
ts 5 7 0 .417 237 2
on 3 9 0 .250 269 3
South
W L T Pct PF R
ans 9 3 0 .750 312 2
9 3 0 .750 285 1
ay 3 9 0 .250 217 2
3 9 0 .250 261 3
North
W L T Pct PF R
7 5 0 .583 326 2
6 6 0 .500 323 3
y 5 6 1 .458 294 3
S 3 8 1 .292 289 3
West
W L T Pct PF R
11 1 0 .917 340 1
cisco 8 4 0 .667 297 1
7 5 0 .583 275 2
5 7 0 .417 279 2
I playoff spot


Associated Press


San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick and the 49ers welcome their NFC West rival Seattle Seahawks today.


prospects.
"It's a new game, another Sun-
day," 49ers linebacker Patrick
Willis said. "We've talked about
it the last couple of weeks that
every game we play from here on
it out is important It's important
to where we go to get into the
playoffs. ... Once we get in, then I
feel like anything can happen."
Carolina (9-3)
at New Orleans (9-3)
Both team finished 7-9 last
year, when the Saints were in
the midst of the bounty scandal
punishments. They've been on
top of the NFC South all year,
but were caught last week when
they flopped in Seattle and the
Panthers won their eighth
straight, beating Tampa Bay
"Yeah, it is a big game," Saints
safety Malcolm Jenkins said.
"You don't really have to add
much sugar to this one."
Nor to the rematch in two
weeks.
Indianapolis (8-4)
at Cincinnati (84)
The Colts can clinch the AFC
South with a win or a Titans loss
at Denver Colts linebacker
Robert Mathis leads the NFL
with 15 1/2 sacks and needs one
to surpass Dwight Freeney (16 in
2004) for the club record.
Cincinnati is 5-0 at home for
the first time since 1988, when
the Bengals won all eight
regular-season home games and
two playoff games before falling
to San Francisco in the Super
Bowl. Andy Dalton has thrown
for 3,144 yards, joining Peyton
Manning as the only players to
throw for 3,000 yards in each of
his first three seasons.
Detroit (7-5)
at Philadelphia (7-5)
Key games for the NFC East
and North races.
The Eagles finally have fig-
ured out how to win at home,
and the Lions are 3-3 on the
road, pretty good for them.
Philadelphia's Nick Foles has 19
touchdown passes without an in-


Thursday
Jacksonville 27, Houston 20
Today
Atlanta at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Kansas City atWashington, 1 p.m.
Buffalo atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Monday
Dallas at Chicago, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 12
San Diego at Denver, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Francisco atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Tennessee, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 16
Baltimore at Detroit, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 14
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
P. Manning, DEN 480 327 4125
P. Rivers, SND 434 304 3633
Roethlisberger, PIT 461 297 3375
Brady, NWE 471 286 3267
Locker, TEN 183 111 1256
Dalton, CIN 433 266 3144
Ale. Smith, KAN 440 261 2736
Keenum, HOU 219 119 1592
Tannehill, MIA 451 280 3115


perception, one short of the
league mark Peyton Manning set
earlier this season.
Both teams are getting better
performances from their de-
fenses, and the side that pro-
duces the strongest pass rush at
the Linc will have an edge.
Dallas (7-5)
at Chicago (6-6), Monday night
At Soldier Field, regular quar-
terback Jay Cutler's absence has
not been a major hurdle because
Josh McCown has played well.
The Bears' defense is another
story, more like Lilliputians of
the Loop than Monsters of the
Midway
The Cowboys couldn't be more
unpredictable, but one thing
they can do is throw the ball.
Tony Romo (3,140 yards passing)
hit the 3,000 mark for a team-
record sixth time. He has at least
300 yards passing in all three
games against Chicago, but also
threw five interceptions against
the Bears last year
Tennessee (5-7)
at Denver (10-2)
Denver gets a playoff berth
with a win or tie or either Miami
or Baltimore losing or tying.
Kansas City is in with a win and
either Miami or Baltimore los-
ing or tying or with a tie and ei-
ther Miami or Baltimore falling.
The weather forecast is for
very chilly conditions in the Mile
High City, and Manning is no
winter wizard. Manning has an
8-11 career record when the
game-time temperature is 40 or
below
Tennessee defensive tackle
Jurrell Casey leads the AFC
players at his position with eight
sacks.
"He's an excellent player,"
Manning said of Casey
Kansas City (9-3)
at Washington (3-9)
Kansas City is the first team in
NFL history to win its first nine
games and then lose the next
three. The defense has been
weakened by injuries and has just


NFL STATISTICS

Manuel, BUF 249 145 1595 9 4
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN 219 1011 4.62 46 9
Moreno, DEN 202 842 4.17 25t 9
Ry. Mathews, SND 178 782 4.39 51 3
Chr. Johnson, TEN 205 774 3.78 30t 4
Jones-Drew, JAX 208 719 3.46 48 5
Be.Tate, HOU 165 699 4.24 60 4
Spiller, BUF 138 656 4.75 77 2
F. Jackson, BUF 152 633 4.16 59 7
Green-Ellis, CIN 176 614 3.49 25 4
R. Jennings, OAK 126 588 4.67 80t 4
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
And. Johnson, HOU 95 1277 13.4 62t 5
Ant. Brown, PIT 85 1103 13.0 47t 6
A.. Green, CIN 72 1103 15.3 82t 7
Ke.Wright, TEN 71 840 11.8 45 2
Edelman, NWE 70 711 10.2 44 4
Welker, DEN 68 717 10.5 33 9
De.Thomas, DEN 67 1061 15.8 78t 10
Shorts llI, JAX 66 777 11.8 59 3
J. Gordon, CLE 64 1249 19.5 95t 7
A. Gates, SND 64 726 11.3 56t 3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Doss, BAL 23 359 15.6 82t 1
Ant. Brown, PIT 20 255 12.8 50 0
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7 79t 1
Edelman, NWE 30 349 11.6 43 0
McCluster, KAN 47 454 9.7 89t 1
Holliday, DEN 26 250 9.6 81t 1
Hilton, IND 17 159 9.4 34 0
Thigpen, MIA 24 206 8.6 34 0
K. Martin, HOU 32 264 8.3 87t 1
Br.Tate, CIN 25 201 8.0 29 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Holliday, DEN 20 568 28.4 105t 1
Q. Demps, KAN 23 641 27.9 57 0
Todman, JAX 24 662 27.6 59 0
Jac. Jones, BAL 17 450 26.5 73 0
K. Martin, HOU 33 864 26.2 50 0
Br.Tate,CIN 24 615 25.6 71 0
Ta. Jones, OAK 16 394 24.6 41 0
D. Reed, IND 24 590 24.6 39 0
Cribbs, NYJ 20 490 24.5 42 0
Thigpen, MIA 27 658 24.4 50 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
J. Charles, KAN 11 9 2 0 66


two sacks in the past five games
after 35 sacks in the first seven.
Already out of the playoffrace
after winning the NFC East in
2012, Washington has dropped
four straight and five of six.
Chiefs coach Andy Reid already
is 3-0 against the division he
coached in for 14 years in
Philadelphia.
Cleveland (4-8)
at New England (9-3)
More woes for the Browns, who
go into Foxborough with their
quarterback situation in flux. But
WR Josh Gordon set a franchise
single-game record of 261 yards
receiving last week on 10 catches
with two TDs one game after set-
ting the previous record of 237
yards. He's the first player in
NFL history with consecutive
200-plus yards receiving games.
New England grabs the AFC
East with a victory and a Miami
loss or tie, or a tie and a Miami
defeat It gets a playoff berth with
a win and a Baltimore loss or tie,
or a tie and a Baltimore loss.
St Louis (5-7) atArizona (7-5)
The Cardinals have not won
an NFC West game (0-3) and
need to start now because they
also face the Seahawks and Nin-
ers this month. They have lost
eight straight against NFC West
foes since last year's season-
opening win over Seattle.
In contrast, the Rams have
won all three meetings with Ari-
zona under coach Jeff Fisher, in-
cluding a victory to begin the
season. In that game, St. Louis
DE Robert Quinn had three
sacks, two forced fumbles and
four QB hits. Quinn leads the
NFC and is second in the NFL
with 13 sacks. He leads the NFL
with six forced fumbles.
Miami (6-6) at Pittsburgh (5-7)
Miami must hope for better
weather than in 2007, when it
fell 3-0 in a near monsoon. The
Steelers have won each of the
past five meetings and haven't
lost to Miami at home since 1990.
Dolphins WR Mike Wallace


Moreno, DEN
De. Thomas, DEN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Welker, DEN
Cotchery, PIT
F. Jackson, BUF
Bernard, CIN
Decker, DEN
J. Gordon, CLE

Gostkowski, NWE
J.Tucker, BAL
M. Prater, DEN
Vinatieri, IND
Novak, SND
Suisham, PIT
D. Carpenter, BUF
Sturgis, MIA
Succop, KAN
Folk, NYJ


11 9
10 0 1
10 0 1
9 0
8 0
8 7
7 4
7 0
7 0
Kicking
PAT FG
34-34 28-30
22-22 29-31
59-59 15-16
23-23 26-29
30-30 23-26
25-25 24-26
26-26 23-25
25-25 23-30
34-34 20-23
16-16 25-26


NFC leaders
Week 14
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
Foles, PHL 196 124 1791
R.Wilson, SEA 305 198 2672
A. Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218
Brees, NOR 477 323 3794
J.McCown,CHI 184 120 1461
Romo, DAL 440 285 3140
S. Bradford, STL 262 159 1687
Glennon, TAM 290 182 1962
M.Ryan,ATL 490 325 3471
M. Stafford, DET 500 296 3825
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
A. Peterson, MIN 261 1208 4.63
L. McCoy, PHL 232 1088 4.69
A. Morris, WAS 206 996 4.83
Forte, CHI 214 971 4.54
M. Lynch, SEA 224 970 4.33
Re. Bush, DET 180 854 4.74
Lacy, GBY 207 822 3.97
Gore, SNF 203 821 4.04
D. Murray, DAL 142 697 4.91
Stacy, STL 160 696 4.35
Receivers
No Yds Avg
GarconWAS 84 980 11.7
B. Marshall, CHI 78 990 12.7
Cal. Johnson, DET 72 1299 18.0


spent four seasons in Pittsburgh
before signing a $60 million deal
with Miami.
Steelers coach Mike Tomlin
was fined $100,000 by the NFL
this week for interfering with a
kickoff return by Baltimore's Ja-
coby Jones on Thanksgiving
night.
Minnesota (3-8-1)
at Baltimore (6-6)
Baltimore controls the final
AFC wild-card berth and fin-
ishes off a three-game homes-
tand in which it is 2-0. With a
victory, Baltimore will improve
to 6-1 at home and have its first
three-game winning streak of
the season. The Ravens are al-
lowing 12.3 points a game at
home, second best in the NFL
behind Carolina.
2012 MVP Adrian Peterson,
who ran for 211 yards last week,
has 1,208 for this season. That's
more than 10 NFL teams, in-
cluding the Ravens.
New York Giants (5-7)
at San Diego (5-7)
Eli Manning vs. Philip Rivers,
the quarterbacks dealt for each
other on draft day in 2004. Man-
ning is 0-2 vs. the Chargers, but
one loss came when Drew Brees
was the San Diego starter
Both teams are on the fringe
of contention and the loser will
virtually be out. That New York
is still around after starting 0-6
is stunning. That San Diego still
can think about the postseason
after losing four of the past five
also is stunning.
Atlanta (3-9)
at Green Bay (5-6-1)
The Packers are 0-2-1 in the
past three at Lambeau Field, all
without Aaron Rodgers. Green
Bay has won 12 straight regular-
season games at Lambeau
played Dec. 1 or later, however
Atlanta's collapse is the most
shocking in the league as in-
juries ravaged the roster The
Falcons haven't quit, and they
beat Buffalo in Toronto last Sun-
day to snap a five-game slide.


JefferyCHI 70 1109 15.8
J. Graham, NOR 68 988 14.5
De. Bryant, DAL 68 896 13.2
Cruz, NYG 66 931 14.1
Douglas, ATL 66 906 13.7
J. Nelson, GBY 63 961 15.3
Gonzalez, ATL 62 653 10.5
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Dw. Harris, DAL 17 238 14.0
Sherels, MIN 16 209 13.1
Hyde, GBY 19 242 12.7
Ginn Jr., CAR 19 231 12.2
G.Tate, SEA 36 418 11.6
Hester, CHI 15 167 11.1
Page,TAM 20 221 11.1
T Austin, STL 32 279 8.7
R. Randle, NYG 25 210 8.4
Sproles, NOR 22 147 6.7
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C. Patterson, MIN 32 1088 34.0
Dw. Harris, DAL 22 689 31.3
Hester, CHI 36 1015 28.2
Page, TAM 15 399 26.6
Dam. Johnson, PHL 17 441 25.9
Spurlock, DET 15 338 22.5
Ginn Jr., CAR 19 418 22.0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
J.Graham, NOR 12 0 12
Cal. Johnson, DET 12 0 12
M.Lynch, SEA 11 9 2
A. Peterson, MIN 11 10 1
Ve. Davis, SNF 10 0 10
B. Marshall, CHI 9 0 9
De. Bryant, DAL 9 0 9
Fitzgerald, ARI 9 0 9
Forte, CHI 8 7 1
Gore, SNF 8 8 0
Kicking
PAT FG
Hauschka, SEA 36-36 26-27
Crosby, GBY 30-30 26-30
Walsh, MIN 31-32 22-25
Hartley, NOR 36-36 20-26
Gould, CHI 32-33 21-24
D. Bailey, DAL 36-36 19-21
Feely, ARI 27-27 22-24
R Dawson, SNF 34-34 19-22
Henery, PHL 34-34 18-23
Gano, CAR 33-33 18-20


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Refining his game


Bunrich works

harder on

both ends
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
For a 6-foot-8 forward,
Brandon Burich possesses
uncanny shooting accu-
racy and range, anywhere
from the free throw line to
beyond the arc. A mis-
match problem for oppo-
nents on offense, the
Lecanto junior is now
working to become a
stronger force on the in-
side as well as a more for-
midable defender
"I've always done well
on the offensive side,"
Burich said this week, "but
defensively I can always
get better (First-year
Lecanto head coach Jeff)
Anderson has worked on
getting me quicker on my
feet and better all-around
defensively, at being more
active, and it shows in the
games. It helps me be a
complete player"
Burich has possessed a
mix of size and shooter's
touch for years. He was
already 6-foot-2 in middle
school, which is also
when he found his knack
for perimeter shooting.
He was pulled up to var-
sity during his freshman
season, and he now leads
the Panthers with 15.2
points per game through
Thursday
His personal highlight
was sinking a pair of free
throws to beat Dunnellon
52-51 with no time on the
clock in last season's sen-
ior-night game, and Burich
tossed in 24 points during
a 75-49 win at Crystal
River on Friday
"I can go outside when a
big man is on me and take
advantage, and when a
small player is on me, I can
work down low," he said.


MATT PFIFFNERPChronice
Lecanto junior forward Brandon Burich rises up for a shot Friday between Crystal River
defenders Ty Reynolds, left, and John Hess, right. Burich, who stands 6-foot-8, is
currently working to become a better defender and develop an inside game offensively.


"I've always been on the
outside, but my down low
game has been weak.
Coach Anderson's helping
me on my low-post game."
Now, Anderson says, the
junior forward's becoming
more of an athlete, both
through his weight and
agility training and his
maturation on the court.
His development as a
player is made all the
more easier because of his
coachable attitude, ac-
cording to his head coach.
"Brandon's developing
into a scorer," Anderson
said. "He's not settling for
the jump shot like he's
often done. He's attacking


the basket and using his
size and really learning
how to post. A couple of
times he's passed up a
3-pointer when I think he
should have shot it, but
he's really bought into the
concept of our system, of
really trying to collapse
teams' defenses and get-
ting them into positions
where they have to help, to
where he can either kick it
out or take advantage of a
mismatch."
Over the summer, Burich
played a lot of travel ball
for an AAU team based out
of Clearwater It partici-
pated in tournaments from
all around the country, in-


cluding in Indianapolis
and Georgia. He says the
competition helps his game
and gives him exposure.
"The AAU game is fast-
paced, with athletes all
over the place," he said.
"So it prepares me for high
school because out there
everyone's an all-star on
their high school team. It
gives you a different
perspective."
Burich keeps up in the
classroom as well, and
hopes to play at the next
level. He recently took a
visit to a group of Patriot
League schools Buck-
nell, Holy Cross, West
Point and Lehigh in the


Fp;


northeast, and appreciates
their combination of
strong athletics and
academics.
"I could definitely see
myself playing in that
league," he said. "I don't
know what the future
holds, but it would defi-
nitely be something I'd
want to do."
Burich is an avid
Dwyane Wade and Miami
Heat fan, which makes his
senior-night feat even
more special, since it was
Wade who converted a
couple of foul shots his
20th and 21st of the contest
- to clinch Game 5 of the
2006 NBA Finals.
Burich was at the game.
"I've usually been men-
tally tough," Burich said of
his ability at the foul line,
"which helps at the free
throw line where you have
to tune out the noise."
Burich gives the most
credit for his game to his
father, Matt Burich, who's
coached his son both in
AAU ball and as an assis-
tant at Lecanto in the
past.
"It's hard as a parent
and a coach, and he's defi-
nitely done it well," the
younger Burich said. "I
couldn't ask any more of
him. He's a great parent
and coach, and he's always
trying to help me and do
the best for me."
Burich is optimistic
about the prospects for his
team, which recently im-
proved to 4-3 after the dis-
trict win at Crystal River
He understands it takes
time to absorb a new sys-
tem, but thinks his team is
up to the task.
"We could be better," he
said. "We've tended to
make young mistakes that
have hurt us. We're work-
ing hard in practice and
trying to improve our
mental toughness. I think
we're going to turn the
corner real soon and start-
ing winning some more
games."


Informed Veterans



know where to find



the resources


they need.




4p. Dehr,
Iof r :ala. ann
Jk. cam i jay he
k.h im i p c 91 in M
"i .A o i. ,qCOLp eia teek 1la
ply M.. it1 Jt a e(rrilmdd Sen. C
pop Wedr an InvernessI t
r.. , ..o s f who deeated

";a';- 'ar nmMr s R
rm",b-r, eje n a it War Jdall Tr". .
....... -, l ", feieAd ol iofra y. the sp
^.*i;';,^ ,a. Law, T., n,,T 0.'La" e^, t V<" w 1 e.l in I DI J% t I el- 10 he natin "
=,u, ,. s- Ir," P -,'mm m Jof thoe'sINArun I
^",. SS t5i iver whl~dlrufl fie-nation "s
*ho ,.W, I:I. r ound" law, ma
e. =_ ., A.,If I,. hav fed n icem-ent during;
'- *> .. ,,, -a i F.' (n f ', ance at the C,.,ap
.... [ ".:.r..- safetyd publican Club f
1- -wrf r.L .,JMficotofirm, ; focused mainri
a dd r. hri. p eyans now t
....... h *, a_.,p, doo, r la, in which allows 1
k "u,, ,5 feel thi, ir lives
Iur l m u', ,>.Ur ,ease We hav;
-.I"-,i nro.r. p.ai. ie' 1S" rat ir to uE dead
...... .. ar,-. I,,,-,tese d ,fes houLtl d duty
.w1 .L L .1 r 0- g hlt 1I provide s imf=
"; 56. wt .q i rb. si~taiy nda wcu ,1
i.iit.r-,it,it. itn-orrfedviol I
A rmk r+rpeoivat-eswmI rst gE ing el
-Xtl i i. jse ir, 2000
scYh w h the Senat
,al eectyo,
isl ic )ear


Informed



Veterans read



the Chronicle.


neHent Sa. *i.A dpm of~
trvrler end t i i cam
W- Ir11prmrA .

t^ B^- mon O uICtn beir~n ^^ ir fte9' 11."-
l,'g. s X*,'
^^ investment u. .r' 'Alutiamawse .;;
"C, ni I in la eIn,'e'Aine% riSi r The sae .
^^ rr l g -^*frdf arn'irbg]3B ll4j -x,u ". ,
rd ni sid 'Ar Wgdrjk. T -l.. L n. unI
r Cabot, brmr.ntr Labol 9O1Ji6 on "f -al .
ithe rs' m we. c.1T ehe ATV lmnw r 0te rbr"' a ,.'1
the city is rIadj, and the eli i"l' IV 1.. i nir.
^ r ^"hey, ., ,-- lel, hey, / >' l *llnl ii hi i. i .. /'
ibers adopl, ncil iembern a FIId i a
c enable a ihtI world nabil- T',1 ;' .
wilh L .LiP Leagmeni wiTHI Litllle l, 1. e ,d i ..,
tide ofthlie WhLS(nP IrnideoflheWhita inoh .erlr ..,.. .
sessionn *lan d The'('ncl's ,il'hstilid let l tn ry am "
ain the .muL, de of e"ntai" t le oul-ed eA 0- k ,
Proceeds TffseniIr' A" PM ,mioff ft'Cw En i r,1 51.
6 i0 m enm ber also ad d.c a ,,ee, "080.
Sadd ad e sched ad ,
..)r the Wni per I '
f the V' ;per rl I IL .r. ar i ii P_
;n building. *nff gmwuvo .e .
n b u il d i T I~ e d b t p p r m ,A u n s i e t Om c o mm
Id ap mawlt y i e.iJIl'LI mee' o rI nWll u ie Ild hW
couni VbL.,9c -ill hear preser 6 ,urhwl r; "' rr.'
II heam *nta srEj.nr -si Idn I e OOQO'
residE Bnan(A ,.I. irr N" 'n"m .
bi. H ho %. 1e It, rill" t 1 1i MUM 'rli -
at, 'egrL '"WeLr rgu.1L
eL hhrb i et
S repon






GET INFORMED.

C C I CITRUS ""**_COUNTY g


CHRpOCNICLE
ww.chronicleonline.com


B6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


SPORTS


DOGG97


Tennis BRIEF

Oudin on slow
road back
Usually at this point in the
offseason, pro tennis player
Melanie Oudin is putting in
at least six hours a day of
court time and fitness work.
Right now, as the 2009
U.S. Open quarterfinalist
recovers from a muscle-
damaging condition she
says
caused
her arms
to swell
"like bal-
loons,"
Oudin is r
under
doctor's
orders to Melanie
limit her- Oudin
self to
one hour a day of running.
Nothing more: no racket-
swinging, and definitely no
weightlifting.
The 22-year-old Ameri-
can is not sure when she
will be back playing tennis
and might not be on tour by
next month's Australian
Open. She knows she will
need to skip the tournament
in Auckland, New Zealand,
that begins Dec. 30.
"My arms are so weak. I
can barely carry anything. I
have no strength at all,"
Oudin said Thursday in a
telephone interview with
The Associated Press. "My
muscles are completely
ruptured in both arms. The
good thing, though, is no
other part of my body is
affected."
She said she was diag-
nosed two weeks ago
with rhabdomyolysis (rab-
doe-my-OL-uh-sis), which
may be caused by in-
tense exertion and can
lead to kidney damage.
Oudin wants other ath-
letes to know about what
happened to her so
"they'll be really careful
about overtraining."
Oudin, who is from Mari-
etta, Ga., and now is based
in Boca Raton, traces the
problem to a particularly
vigorous weights session
2 1/2 weeks ago.









C OMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Sometimes the fat cats can save your life


All of us have trouble
understanding the
future consequences
of actions we take on any
given day
Richard Nixon once
thought that Watergate was
just a building.
Bill Clinton was just try-
ing to be friendly to the new
intern; he could not see the
future.
President Obama be-
lieved his IT department


was on the job with the im-
plementation of the new
health law
It's just hard to anticipate
how not giving an issue
enough thought can come
back and make your life
miserable.
Take, for instance, my
house.
We built a house in Crys-
tal River in 2004. In the
process we heard all about
flood plains and insurance


costs and new building re-
quirements.
Back in 1993, the entire
city of Crystal River was un-
derwater when the No-
Name Storm came roaring
ashore. U.S. 19 was under-
water and most ground-
level homes and businesses
were flooded.
So we learned in 2004
that in order to build a new
home, we had to construct it
11 feet above grade. My


builder did an excellent job
of putting in concrete pil-
ings and building to all of
the new flood rules.
We felt very safe being 11
feet above the inevitable
flood waters that will come
into Crystal River some
time over the next 100
years.
When the house was com-
pleted, I looked underneath
and realized we had an en-
tire footprint of the house


that was protected from the
elements except for that
100-year flood. It was a per-
fect place to store bicycles,
kayaks, garden equipment
and the lawnmower
But my lack of insight cre-
ated a significant problem:
Even though our house is 11
feet above ground, the ac-
tual space underneath the
home is less. Heavy-duty


Associated Press
The Supreme Court has agreed to referee another dispute over President Barack Obama's health care law, whether businesses can use religious objections to
escape a requirement to cover birth control for employees. The court will consider two cases. One involves Hobby Lobby Inc., an Oklahoma City-based arts-and-
crafts chain with 13,000 full-time employees. Hobby Lobby won in the lower courts.




WHEN RIGHTS COLLIDE


REDBLUEAMERICA
McClatchy-Tribune News Service


it would accept a case in which
employers including craft-store
chain Hobby Lobby challenge
Obamacare's mandate they provide contra-
ceptive coverage as part of the health insur-
ance package they provide their workers.
The employers say the requirement vio-
lates their religious beliefs against birth
control; the Obama administration -
which already exempted churches and
church-based charities from the require-
ment isn't budging, and allies say that
the rule must stand to preserve women's
access to health care.
Which side is right? Is there middle
ground? Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk,
the RedBlueAmerica columnists, debate
the issue.


Joel Mathis


Ben Boychuk


Religious freedom is an important value, one that helped cre-
ate this country But it is not the only value, and (especially in
this case) it must be weighed against other considerations.
Three reasons Hobby Lobby and its allies should lose in the
court:
Businesses cannot go to heaven. We tend to lose sight of this
fact particularly in the post-Citizens United era but corpora-
tions are not people. Individuals within a corporation can wor-
ship and believe as they wish, and they wrestle with cosmic
notions of eternity, but Hobby Lobby itself cannot: It possesses no
soul nor conscience nor consciousness. A corporation's "freedom
of religion" is thus about as useful as its "freedom to swim." When
Hobby Lobby can enter a confessional, let's talk. Until then, we
See Page C3

The Hobby Lobby case isn't about carving out exceptions for re-
ligious people from the odious and ill-conceived Obamacare
law, or extending special religious protections to businesses. It's
about preserving fundamental, constitutional freedoms some-
thing that liberals once had no qualms about defending.
Unfortunately, the Obama administration has gone out of its way
to undermine religious liberty even as it claims to uphold the
mushy and muddled ideal of "freedom to worship." In practice,
such a "freedom" would mean confining one's religious beliefs to the
church on Sunday and with little room to live a religious or moral
life in the public sphere beyond what the government permits.
Fact is, the Supreme Court has taken a dim view of this admin-
istration's fast and loose interpretation of the First Amendment's
See PageC3


If tourism is a priority, a director is a must


In mid-2012, the county's
Tourist Development
Council devised a
strategic plan to help bring
more visitors to Citrus
County and increase
tourism as a means for eco-
nomic development. Under
the direction of county
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays, it was decided that in
order to increase the num-
ber of overnight stays, a
multitude of items would


need to be accomplished.
Increasing tourism to this
area meant updating the
logo, strengthening the
brand, moving the present
office and emphasizing
sport- and nature-based
tourism. We expect 100 mil-
lion tourists to arrive in
Florida in 2014. Seventy-
three percent of these
tourists will be seeking na-
ture-based activities. Crude
data has to be analyzed and


refined. Captured and un-
captured markets have to
be outlined.
Hiring a new director was
entertained because the
current staff had enough on
their plates. Not only would
the abovementioned tasks
need to be completed, but
also we need someone to
develop programs, enhance
relationships with other in-
dustries and grow in-house
marketing. Now, the hiring


of the director is being crit-
icized because some people
feel that there might have
been a glitch in the process.
But that is simply not true.
It is important to realize
that in order to see change,
we must make change. Very
few places in the world
have the natural resources
that we are blessed with in
this county It's not hard to
realize that tourism is what
should be driving our


county's economy For every
85 tourists we receive, one
additional job is created in
Florida. Despite our place-
ment on the map by Na-
tional Geographic and the
Discovery Channel, our an-
nual revenues from tourism
taxes are relatively flat.
Clearly, we have been static
in drawing travelers to the Dr. Paresh Desai
area. GUEST
See PageC3 COLUMN
See .Rage C3______


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3





OPage C2- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013



PINION


"Happiness is in the taste, and not in the things."
Francois de La Rochefoucauld, "Maxims," 1665


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COLLATERAL DAMAGE




State needs



to offset loss



of local dollars


he Duke Energy tax
dilemma has now hit the
county school system.
As reported in the Thurs-
day Chronicle, the county
public school system learned
that it is $5 million short of
tax dollars.
In a complex funding sce-
nario, the certified county tax
role ended up causing prob-
lems for our schools.
Earlier this year county
government was forced to
raise its millage
rate by 30 percent THE 1
to offset the loss T
of Duke tax funds. Tax issL
The school system the sc
does not have the
same flexibility to OUR OH
increase taxes
and instead will Legislatc
have to cut serv- protect
ices or convince County s
state government
to send more funds our way.
Duke Energy, the owner of
the power complex north of
Crystal River, is engaged in a
bitter fight with county prop-
erty appraiser Geoff Greene
over the proper tax value of
the utility property
The energy company main-
tained that Greene was mis-
interpreting the law and
sending the company too high
of a tax bill. The dispute
ended up in court and the
first round was won by Duke.
The court ruled that Greene
was wrong when he at-
tempted to tax the company's
pollution control equipment.
After the conflict began
about last year's $34 million
Duke tax bill, Greene turned
around and had the property
re-assessed at a much higher
rate. The company responded
by filing another lawsuit.
But it's the higher tax rate
certified by Greene that ended
up causing even more prob-
lems for the school system.
Schools are funded through
a formula of local and state
tax dollars. When local prop-
erty values increase like
Greene proposed for Duke -
the new local revenues
raised are offset by reduc-
tions in state funding.
The state has a philosophy
that all 67 Florida counties
should spend an equal
amount of tax dollars on each
student. The state controls
state and local tax rates.


When the higher Duke val-
uation was part of the new
certified tax rolls offered by
Greene, the state formula
was fooled into thinking more
local dollars were on the way
The formula automatically
reduced state funding for
Citrus.
Everyone on the local level
knew that Duke was not going
to pay the higher tax bill be-
cause the lawsuits have al-
ready been filed. But no one


ISSUE:
ie hurts
;hools.

PINION:
ors must
t Citrus
students.


knew how signifi-
cantly that would
hurt the schools.
The expensive
court case will
have to work its
way through the
judicial system
before any reso-
lution is realized.
That could take
months or years.


Our local students should
not suffer because the adult
politicians and business
leaders have created such a
mess.
The members of our state
legislative delegation Sen.
Charlie Dean and Rep. Jimmie
T. Smith need to work with
school superintendent San-
dra "Sam" Himmel to get the
state to equalize the funding.
The local school budget
needs to be made whole
while the court case works
through the system.
Gov. Scott and the leaders
at the education department
need to listen closely. The
new tax dollars certified by
Greene's tax rolls do not
exist and probably never
will.
The value of Duke's hold-
ings in Citrus will be reduced
by the shuttered nuclear
plant and the fact that the
court already ruled the pollu-
tion control equipment can
only be taxed at a very re-
duced rate.
The county school system
needs to be protected.
And a final word of advice
to Property Appraiser
Greene: Get to the bargain-
ing table and stop wasting tax
dollars on expensive law-
suits. The unintended conse-
quences of this combative
strategy are making life diffi-
cult for everyone includ-
ing the children in our
schools.


'' | united Way of Citrus County needs your
mUUAIJ -1 "t U help to reach its annual fundraising
iB 'm &fl goal. If you can, please send a contribution
-to the United Way of Citrus County,
c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


CAL563-0579

563-0579


Think before griping
I read the tirade against early Christmas
lights a week or so ago. Did it ever occur
to the person that perhaps the man or
woman that lived there had a terminal
illness and might not live through Christ-
mas? Or, worse yet, a child had a terminal
illness and maybe they just like to have the
lights up. Maybe they had a son or daughter
serving in Afghanistan or somewhere else
overseas who won't be home for the holiday.
Did it ever occur to you to think of some-
thing like that?


Enjoy

Soften worry abo
young growing up
try where every]
able to be under
government surveill
nearly all of these
never having violate
How much expectati
vidual constitutional
these young citizens
But now I am
heartened by the resi
cent (reliable) poll
by Quinnipiac Uni-
versity described in
a Nov 18 lead edito-
rial in the New York
Post
"In 2008 and 2012,
millennials -voters
between ages 18 and
30 came out in a
big way for Barack
Obama."
But now, "some-
thing's changed. The
poll has young voters
disapproving of the
by a 54 percent to 3
margin.... Only 43 pen
under-30s say the pi
honest and trustwort
trast, a majority 51
say he's not."
Moreover, "60 p
young voters disappi
way the president's
the economy Fifty-s
disapprove of Oba:
dling of health care.]
percent disapprove o
dling of foreign police
voters turn against
Obama," New YorkPo
But- and it's aver
-the millennials wer
if they approved o.
handling of the Con:
wonder how many
along with our othei
were actually taught
history Do these youi
even know that if so
states had not pres
federal government
first 10 amendments
of Rights they would
ratified the Constituti
So I'm still worrn
what kind of America
be as the current ai
millennials take ove
more specific idea, I
to see Quinnipiac
major polls) ask then
think about the worst
tack on Americans' n
mental freedoms in o
history, which is inchlu
National Defense .
tion Act (NDAA) for I
2012, signed into law
dent Obama late in 2


liberties while they last

)ut today's These young Americans In another column, Hedges
) in a coun- would, of course, have to be told tells us how low Obama will rank
body is li- by the pollsters precisely what among American presidents:
er secret is in Section 1021 of this law, "The act (also) authorizes the
ance, with which our Supreme Court has military in Title X, Subtitle D,
Americans so far shown no inclination to entitled'Counter-Terrorism,' for
*d any law review the first time in more than 200
on ofindi- I advise pollsters and any years, to carry out domestic polic-
liberty can American reading this column ing. With this bill ... the military
have? to get to the core of Section can indefinitely detain without
somewhat 1021, as revealed by Pulitzer trial any U.S. citizen deemed to
ults of a re- Prize-winning writer Chris be a terrorist or an accessory to
Hedges, a former terrorism. And suspects can be
New York Times re- shipped by the military to our
Sporter who is the offshore penal colony in Guan-
leading plaintiff in a tanamo Bay and kept there
federal lawsuit until'the end of hostilities.' (Or
against the NDAA held here.) It is a catastrophic
(Hedges v Obama). blow to civil liberties ...
What follows may "The supine and gutless
S well be startling Democratic Party, which would
news to you, too: "If have feigned outrage if George
Nat Hentoff Section 1021 stands, W Bush had put this into law,
OTHE it will mean that appears willing, once again, to
more than 150 years grant Obama a pass. But I won't
VOICES of case law in which Whathe has done is unforgivable,
the Supreme Court unconstitutional and exceed-
president repeatedly held the military ingly dangerous ..." ("Why I'm
36 percent has no jurisdiction over civil- Suing Barack Obama," Hedges,
cent of the ians will be abolished, truthdig.com, Jan. 16,2012).
resident is "It will mean citizens who are Hedges reminds the president
hy By con- charged by the government and Congress of the Fifth
percent- with 'substantially (otherwise Amendment: "No person shall
undefined) supporting' al- be ... deprived of life, liberty or
percent of Qaida, the Taliban or the nebu- property without due process of
rove of the lous category of 'associated law"
Handling forces' will be lawfully subject Now dig this if you voted for
ix percent to extraordinary rendition. Obama once or twice: "The
ma's han- "It will mean citizens seized oddest part of this legislation is
Fifty-three by the military (including in that the FBI, the CIA, the direc-
of his han- America) will languish in mili- tor of national intelligence, the
y" ("Young tary jails indefinitely, or in the Pentagon and the attorney gen-
President language of Section 1021, until eral didn't support it. (Former)
)s, Nov 18). 'the end of hostilities' in an FBI Director Robert Mueller
*y big "but" age of permanent war, (which said he feared the bill would ac-
e not asked could mean) for the rest of their tually impede the bureau's abil-
f Obama's lives" ("The Last Chance to ity to investigate terrorism
stitution. I Stop the NDAA," Hedges, because it should be harder to
of them, truthdig.com, Sept. 2). win cooperation from suspects
r students, And who knows how long that held by the military 'The possi-
t American will be. ability looms that we will lose op-
ing people Also forcefully opposing the portunities to obtain
ome of the NDAA, especially because of cooperation from the persons
assured the the military detention of U.S. in the past that we've been
to add the citizens, are: the American Civil fairly successful in gaining,' he
- the Bill Liberties Union, Amnesty In- told Congress."
Idnothave ternational, Human Rights These suspects, including
tion? First, Human Rights Watch, the American citizens, can be im-
ied about Centerfor ConstitutionalRights, prisoned by the military with-
a there will the Cato Institute (where I am a out ever having appeared
mand future senior fellow), Reason Maga- before a judge. They will be out-
r. To get a zine and the Council on Ameri- side our rule of law ... that is,
would like can-Islamic Relations. what remains of it.


(or other
i what they
t official at-
nost funda-
ur nation's
ided in the
Authoriza-
Fiscal Year
v by Presi-
011.


A federal district court judge
had issued an injunction
against NDAA, but it was over-
ruled by the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the Second Circuit,
thereby giving Barack Obama,
our present King George III, the
power to have his military ar-
rest Americans right here on
exceedingly vague grounds.


----
Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
FirstAmendment and the
Bill of Rights. He is a member
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press, and
the Cato Institute, where he is
a senior fellow


LETTER X to the Editor


Thanks for making
festival huge success
On behalf of the members of
the Homosassa Civic Club, I
wish to extend our gratitude
for the excellent coverage by
your publication of our 39th
annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts
and Seafood Festival and by
helping to make it one of the
most successful ever!
We also want to thank the
many volunteers, businesses
and community organizations
without whose help we could
not have staged such a success-
ful festival.
The generosity of the follow-
ing sponsors is acknowledged
with our thanks. With their


help, we will be able to give
substantial gifts to many de-
serving and needy individuals,
families and organizations in
our community Citrus 95.3,
96.7 Fox Classic Hits, True
Oldies 106.3, the Tampa Bay
Times, AAA Travel, Homosassa
Riverside Resort, River Sa-
faris, Fresh From Florida
(seafood), MacRae's, Dock Mas-
ters of Homosassa, Nick
Nicholas Ford, Regions Bank,
Sheldon Palmes Insurance,
Walmart of Homosassa.
Again, our deepest gratitude
and thanks.
Eleanor Macias
president, Homosassa Civic Club


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or email
to letters@chronicleonline.com.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Have a holly jolly Christmas, and stay alert for mistletoe


"Ho, ho, the mistletoe,
hung where you can see.
Somebody waits for you,
kiss her once for me. Have
a holly jolly Christmas..."
"Have a Holly Jolly
Christmas" Johnny Marks,
circa 1965.
Mistletoe?
It is parasitic
plant that attaches
to or penetrates the
branches of a tree or shrub
from which it absorbs
water and nutrients.
Yuck!
Even so, it has a major
redeeming feature. It is
customarily used as a
Christmas decoration, and
it has been documented


that as early as the 16th
century, in England, kiss-
ing under the mistletoe be-
came a recognized holiday
custom.
We are rapidly moving
into the Christmas season,
and the traditions my
Cheryl and I share are al-
ways very much a part of
the enjoyment of this time
of the year
As most of you regular
readers know, we are a
mixed marriage she is
from up north and I am a
native-born, fifth-genera-
tion cracker, so our Christ-
mases while we were growing
up were somewhat differ-
ent. We both came from
families that recognized


the main reason for the our differences before we
season is the birth of our met have merged into
Lord and Saviour, Jesus what are now ourvery own
Christ, but we family tradi-
also partici- tions. Think
pated in vari- about it. Oyster
ous versions of dressingversus
secular sea- cornbread
sonal activities, 6 dressing. Oys-
including dec- ters are sup-
orating a posed to be
Christmas tree, fried and corn-
waiting for bread dressing
Santa Claus, Fred Brannen is supposed to
and eating spe- S C be stuffed in a
cial treats and A SLICE bird. When you
scrumptious OF LIFE get married,
foods galore, you compromise.
There is no way to cata- Nope, there's not
logue all such things in a enough space to discuss
single column, but I always them all, so today, I think I
enjoy thinking about how will stick to mistletoe.


Before Cheryl and I be-
came us, I knew nothing
about mistletoe.
No matter
I was all for the kissing
part
Hanging mistletoe at the
entryway of our home was
one of things we adopted
as our very own tradition
right away We enjoyed it
personally and we have
consistently enjoyed the
giggles it has brought from
our children and now our
grandchildren when we
grab 'em and get a kiss
when they walk in the
door For more than four
decades, it has become
one of my favorite sea-
sonal chores to go out, look


for a low-hanging branch
to which a growth of
mistletoe is attached, clip
only enough for the job,
bring it home, decorate it
with ribbon and affix it to
the lintel above the door
Oops. Speaking of
mistletoe, time's a wasting
- I must go fetch this
year's sprig!
But before I leave, let
me be one of the first to
offer best wishes to you
and yours for a very merry
Christmas season, whatever
your traditions may be.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


Governor's


commitment


to job growth


showing in


the numbers
Gov. Rick Scott is delivering
on the promises he made to
Florida voters when he was
elected in 2010. Pledging to be the
"jobs governor," he's stayed true to
his mission.
The most recent statewide un-
employment figures reveal that 6.7
percent of Floridians are unem-
ployed well below the 7.3 per-
cent national average and since
Scott became governor, Florida has
created 440,900 private-sector jobs.
In addition, October was the
eighth straight month where
Florida's unemployment rate was
--- below the
national av-
S erage, and
S in the past
t two months,
| more than
..- 67,000 pri-
vate jobs
were added.
The fact that
Ron Lieberman our state is
GUEST below the
national av-
COLUMN erage for
unemploy-
ment is borderline miraculous,
given that our National Association
of Home Builders (NAHB) Chief
Economist Dr David Crowe pre-
dicted that Florida, with its mas-
sive foreclosures amid the
subprime debacle, would be one of
the last five states to recover from
the recession.
Of course, higher employment
contributes to the success of our
home building/construction indus-
try The inventory of existing homes
on the market is down by 36 percent
from November 2011, according to
the Florida Realtors. The median
price for a home in Florida is up
16.6 percent year-over-year and
Florida housing starts are up 30.7
percent this year over last.
A lot of factors come into play in
discussions about our state's eco-
nomic rebound, but having a sin-
gularly focused, pro-jobs governor
certainly has to be high on the list.


Ron Lieberman is a third-genera-
tion homebuilder and developer
He is a two-time president of the
Citrus County Builders'Associa-
tion and a former chairman of the
Citrus County Affordable Housing
Authority and the Advisory Com-
mittee to the Tampa Bay Regional
Transportation Authority


MATHIS BOYCHUK
Continued from Page Cl


should not treat a business as though it has substantially
the same rights as actual people.
Women, on the other hand, are real citizens who de-
serve to control their own health decisions. Like it or not,
we as a society have decided that health insurance will
be provided primarily by and through employers; until
that changes, that means they must conform to certain
expectations in providing that insurance. Individual
women shouldn't have to sacrifice coverage because, say,
an accountant at the home office in Oklahoma City heard
differently from his pastor
A Hobby Lobby victory edges toward giving churches
a de facto veto over secular policy decisions. It is not dif-
ficult to imagine, going forward, that many churches and
church members would claim a belief-based reason they
shouldn't be required to comply with certain laws. Which
would leave officials with a choice of running policies
past church leaders before passing them, or carving out
exemptions for every halfway controversial measure.
Civil society will not much like one set of rules for sec-
ular people and one set for religious folks; it probably
would not survive a landscape of a thousand different
types of government for a thousand different religious or-
ganizations. The Obamacare mandate should stand.


Joel Ma this (joelmmathis@gmail. corn)
is a contributing editor to Philadelphia Magazine.


Continued from Page Cl


protection of individuals' free religious exercise. For example, the
justices last year unanimously rejected the federal government's
claim that the First Amendment did not protect a church's right to
choose its own ministers.
"The Establishment Clause prevents the government from ap-
pointing ministers," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court
in Hosanna-Tabor v Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,
"and the Free Exercise Clause prevents it from interfering with the
freedom of religious groups to select their own." It shouldn't be too
difficult to extend that logic to Obamacare's employer health man-
dates.
True, women are equal citizens who deserve to control their own
health decisions. But Hobby Lobby already provided birth control
coverage for its workers. At issue is whether Hobby Lobby's owners
should be compelled to pay for workers' abortions a deeply di-
visive and moral question for mostAmericans. Hobby Lobby should
be free to decide the question as its owners see fit.
Bottom line: the Hobby Lobby case isn't about ensuring "access"
to health care, or preventing some far-fetched sectarian encroach-
ment on secular policy decisions. It is about government compul-
sion, pure and simple. The First Amendment is supposed to be a
bulwark against government encroachment on the free exercise of
religion. For that reason alone, Hobby Lobby should prevail and
the Obama administration should lose.


Ben Boychuk (bboychuk@city-journal. org)
is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute's City Journal.


TOURISM
Continued from Page Cl

We can't expect growth if
we are stagnant in this com-
petitive world. If we in-
crease our funding towards
marketing and human re-
sources, we can expect a
high return on investment
when compared to other in-
dustries. Florida's governor
is proposing to increase the
tourism budget to $75 mil-
lion, as it is the second-
largest industry in Florida.
It generated about $67.2 bil-
lion, while generating a 23
percent sales tax.
Unfortunately, the TDC's
small budget makes it ex-
tremely difficult to hire
someone with the caliber
that is desired. However, it
is trying to do so in the best
way it can.
The board did not stum-
ble in its attempt to hire a
director There are multi-
ple steps in hiring a person
at that level, but the first
step is always to interview


candidates. Once the candi-
dates have been narrowed
down, you follow by run-
ning a background check,
drug testing, and cross-
checking the references of
your top picks. If you
flipped the steps, you would
find yourself exhausting
time and resources in an in-
efficient manner There
was nothing wrong in the
way that the TDC handled
this task. Investing in
tourism is the right thing to
do. We welcome your feed-
back and the support to cre-
ate new jobs in the area as
we develop ways to expose
the natural resources our
county has to offer. The
TDC meets every second
Tuesday of each month at 9
a.m. in the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building. Please join
us with your thoughts and
comments.


Dr Paresh Desai is a
member of the Tourist
Development Council
and the Economic
Development Council.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

beams hold the floor in place and
a network of concrete supports
limit the actual walking space.
To be precise, the space avail-
able for walking underneath my
house is 5 feet, 8 inches.
I am 6 feet tall.
Hence, the problem.
My wife is 5-foot-5 and she is
kind enough not to mention the
lumps on the top of my head. She
can walk around just fine below
the house and wonders why I have
a problem.
"Why don't you just duck?" she
has suggested in a kind way
I try to duck, but sometimes my
mind is on something else and I
walk right into a beam.
We have installed reflective
tape on the beams and a network
of lights that shine on the offend-
ing lumber
But it's to no avail. I keep walk-
ing into the beams.
Also worth mentioning is that
my wife carries on a quiet cam-
paign against the neighborhood
squirrels. We have birdfeeders


around the house and squirrels
consider it an Olympic test to
climb the birdfeeders and feast.
The neighborhood cardinals are
getting skinny while the squirrels
get fat. So my darling wife has de-
veloped a squirrel relocation pro-
gram that involves taking a short
trip in her car to the county court-
house. She captures the squirrels
and then releases them at the
courthouse because she figures
everyone there is pretty squirrelly
already
I mention this because last week
I was walking under the house to
retrieve some gardening tools when
I ducked below one beam and
then walked right into another
I am not sure how long I was un-
conscious, but it was long enough.
I may have been awakened by
the blood that was dripping into
my left eye from the crack on my
noggin, or it may have been the
noise coming from my audience.
I felt a 20-pound weight on my
chest and out of my blurry right
eye it looked like I was sur-
rounded by what at first appeared
to be giant, angry animals.
OK, so I was lying on the ground
and they were not giant animals.
They were very well-fed squirrels


and they all looked angry There
were five fat squirrels and they all
had sharp-looking teeth.
They apparently thought I was
responsible for the deportation of
their friends.
The 20-pound weight on my
chest was not a heart attack; it was
my cat
Streak, the bobcat-fighting Rag-
doll, had taken occupancy on my
chest at some time after I man-
aged to knock myself out. He
clearly remembered that I feed
him every morning, and he was
going to protect his food source at
all costs.
The angry squirrels were being
held off from chewing my fingers
to the bone. They hissed. They
showed their teeth. But they did
not attack.
Streak just sat on my chest and
looked mean.
So just like Nixon, Clinton and
Obama, I did not anticipate how
bad things could get. And just like
the abovementioned trio, I had a
fat cat save my life.
--In--
Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Praise for an
honest business
I would like to say kind
recommendations and
praise for a local business.
I feel I need to express my
opinions, due to the above-
and-beyond efforts and
tremendous professionalism
this business has made,
presently and in the past
years, for my wife and
myself.
Citrus Transmission and
Automotive in Homosassa is
this business, and I am so
grateful for knowing a re-
pair service that you can not
only depend on, but trust
and feel comfortable with as
a customer
I have lived here in Citrus
for more than four decades,
and Citrus Transmission has
been here for as long as I
can remember This family-
run business has done so
much for our family; there
are not enough words of
gratitude that I can find for
my thankfulness that they
are there for me whenever I
am in a mechanical bind.
They are always honest
and up-front with their eval-
uations, they do not stick
any unnecessary parts into
your vehicle to make an
extra buck, and they will
give you honest estimates on
your vehicle's problems be-
fore getting involved. That,
to me, is very important, es-
pecially in this day and age,
where other car-repair
shops try to take advantage
of you just to increase their
profits for their own wallets.
And I have to add, if they
have a situation where other
service businesses are


needed, they will refer you
to the right people to help
rectify your problems.
Enough said. Thank you,
Citrus Transmission and Au-
tomotive, for your kindness,
expertise and dependability
over the years, and you can
guarantee, we will always
have you for any future au-
tomotive repairs.
Neil and Ann Kimball
Lecanto

Time for
compromise
While some (Democrats)
are cheering the "nuclear
option" voted on by Democ-
rats a straight-party vote,
again, just as with Obamacare
- I would like to offer an-


other perspective.
We are all (supposed to be)
Americans. It is the "we" that
is supposed to unite us, like
it did for a few short months
after Sept. 11, 2001. We are
now divided more than ever,
and it seems that whenever
Democrats don't get their way,
they whine about "compro-
mise." "We must learn to
compromise!" Yeah, right,
like they did with Obamacare
and the nuclear option.
Here is my point: In any
family, there must be civil
discourse, understanding,
mutual objectives and yes,
compromise. In our individ-
ual families, we must also
have those elements. What
the Democrats have done is
not remotely close to any of
these. What they have done


is no different than one
member of a family let's
say the father, which is more
politically correct de-
mands that, "I'm the man and
what I say goes! I'm right
and you are wrong! And if
I'm wrong, too bad, I'm still
the man and what I say goes!
Now sit down and shut up!"
That's what Democrats
are doing to the Americans
as a "family" Does anyone
really think this is best for
any family? And before I'm
called names or ignored, let
me say that I'm not a "tea
drinker" or "Kool-Aid
drinker," just a man with an
opinion. United we stand;
divided we fail and we fall.
Sam Nail
Homosassa


Letters to THE EDITOR


--.chronCO U N T Y l E *c
CHRNICLEA
^k., .,* : X.www.chronicleonline.com


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 1011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031


P29,000 QCAAj Mrtuiug!
WIN $20,000 CASH!

WHILE HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY THIS CHRISTMAS
The We Care Food Pantry, Inc. Charitable Cash Drawing
Winning ticket will be drawn on
Monday, December 16th, 2013, 11:15 am
at We Care Food Pantry, Inc. 9020 W Atlas Dr, Homosassa


www.WeCareFoodPantry.org
~YOU

would
....Win
TICKET LOCATIONS Ihis!
Regions Bank,
Homosassa
Chamber of Commerce
Cry tal Rivr & Inernts
All Capital City Banks
We Care Food Pantry
9M0 W Adtw Dr, Hwam-, 4


phone: 352-228-4921

ONLY 2,000
tickets available
and they're
S going fast


CE ONga R.i* #CH32257 FH da p A & C sume c A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL C REGwTRAON AND FINANCIAL
REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLy ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR REC- MENDAION BY THE STATE.. 0FK19





29% CQm9nMI Roat awdh
Homosassa Annual

Christmas Boat Parade


Saturday, December 21,2013
Starts @ 6:00 PM
Begins at Marker 75 by Bird Island
Ends at the Magic Manatee

Residential 1st Place Price $500
Captains Meeting at The Freezer
on December 19, 2013 @ 6:30pm
Register at The Freezer 352-628-2452
or call Ricky 352-302-5779
Please join us in the .. )
wonder of Christmas ( I i
by participating! VJ11 kV.E


r music
61 it it lf

misewm
Proudly/ Present .-


Featuring

Joe Donato

& Friends

Thursday, Dec. 12
Limited searing.
Reservation s encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427
000FMIY_


Tickets $20 p,.[,,r,
Int Idi .Appen:eri & Caili Bar
at 1912 Cami. Counn'
Courthouse, In ciiens
Doors open at 6. Ol p m.
Musi tiart_ promptlyv at pm.


Ciiio\lj4L.E
Publh Supermarkel Charities
\%ann & Mar) Robinson
Smith's Optical Serices
Jordan Engineering
Da.id Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Aend) Sridllell
Acceni Trael
Photograph) b} Rebecca PujaL-Jones
Deco Care
T. hi i -,-W.-. IT= '. ... "F iJ. ... -.. -


Suncoast Harmony
. Chorusiw.


uiooa U Ul

Songs!
Special Guest Fran Donohoe Sponsored by
On Piano with Vour Favorite CIIl )10CI.E
Sirg-along Songs',
Sunday Dec. 8, 2013 3:00 pm
First Methodist Church Homosassa
For ticket information call:
Donna-352-726-8666 Maria-352-382-0336
Advanced Ticket Sale: $8 At the Door: $10
Group of 6 or more: $7


No place to park
As they're always having arts
and craft shows, home shows, etc.,
at the National Guard Armory where
there's not enough room or parking,
why don't they have it at the mall
where there is plenty of room and
parking?
Clean up pollution
Today's Saturday, Nov. 23, and
there's a very good article in the
Chronicle about respecting the mana-
tees and how to slow down and all.
That's all well and good because
most of the citizens of Citrus County
have good common sense and re-
spect that. The problem is the mana-
tees aren't dying
UND from boat acci-
OI U dents, they're
WI dying more and
more from pollu-
tion. Look at In-
dian River
C Lagoon, But we
have people like
Sthe so-called Save
CAL the Manatee Club
9 71Q ... that they think
563-057/ they can stop
everything by
shouting and crying, "We'll go to
court," that they're not allowing the
work to be done to clean up the bay.
We don't need a dirty river or a dirty
anything. And if they would just
agree to start working with the peo-
ple that are trying real hard to do the
right thing, maybe we would get
somewhere. All they've got to do is
go down to Chazz and look at how
clean that is now.
Speed limit nonsense
For goodness sake, who in this
county set the speed limits? Single
and two-lane roads are 55 (mph).
When roads are improved and four-
laned, they set the speed limit at 35
(mph). Doesn't make much sense,
does it? The state sets the speeds at
60 or more. Our commissioners
should look into this. Check it out
and make the change.


C4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


COMMENTARY









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


M.q youc a




CAOO


Don't let money control your thoughts and feelings. Money can't buy happiness,
but it can make you miserable if you don't manage it well. Learn to be frugal
without being stingy with 10 quick tips.


Amy Peterson
FamilyShare
I admire people who embrace
frugal living. I am good at budg-
eting and saving, but I also like
to purchase items that aren't ex-
actly necessary and buy things
that last. My husband is more frugal
than I am. Sometimes the kids even
call him "Scrooge," insinuating he
can be miserly You can be frugal
without being stingy Here are 10 tips
to save money without making your-
self miserable.

Set a budget and save for an item,
even if it is something that seems ex-
travagant, like designer jeans or a
new fancy blender You'll enjoy your
purchase even more if you know you
can truly afford it.
Comparison shop for higher-
priced items. Frugal people do re-
search before purchasing. Your
favorite store might not always have


the best price. Watch for seasonal
sales and be patient. Make sure your
money stretches as far as it can.
Know when to spend. If you've
saved all year to take a family vaca-
tion, but then eat peanut butter and
worry about money the whole time,
you might not enjoy yourself. If need a
new coat, spend enough to get one
that fits well and will last several
years. There are times when paying
more will add value.
Ask yourself three questions be-
fore buying something: Do I need it?
Will I use it? Do I want it enough to
pay for it? If you can answer yes to all
three, you can feel confident in your
purchase.
Compromise. If the kids want to
go out to ice cream, but you'd like to
save money, go to the grocery store in-
stead. Making your own sundaes is
cheaper and can be more fun. If
you're creative, you don't always have
to say no.
Remember the value of family


experiences and memories. Some-
times it's hard for frugal people to pay
for hotel rooms and meals out when
they are used to pinching pennies. If
you have to travel for a family re-
union, enjoy the time spent recon-
necting and being together; don't
worry about the money side of things.
You can't put a price on time together
Pause and think If you're unsure
about buying an item, leave it on the
shelf. You can always return and get it
in a few days. If it's the last item of its
kind or size, ask the store to hold it for
you. Impulse buys can be avoided if
you curb impulsive behavior
Keep track of your receipts. This
action helps you keep track of spend-
ing and return unneeded items, or
things that aren't going to work for
you, like clothes that don't fit. I some-
times set aside things I'm not sure I
need or want so I can easily return
them.


Rage D3


Solid US job growth cuts unemployment


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The U.S. job mar-
ket is proving surprisingly resilient.
Solid job growth in November cut
the U.S. unemployment rate to 7 per-
cent, a five-year low The robust gain
suggested that the economy may have
begun to accelerate. As more employ-
ers step up hiring, more people have
money to spend to drive the economy
Employers added 203,000 jobs last
month after adding 200,000 in October,
the Labor Department said Friday No-
vember's job gain helped lower the un-
employment rate from 7.3 percent in
October The economy has added a
four-month average of 204,000 jobs
from August through November, up
sharply from 159,000 a month from
April through July
"It's hinting very very strongly that the
economy is starting to ramp up, that


growth is getting better, that businesses
are hiring," said Joel Naroff, president
of Naroff Economic Advisors.
The job growth has also fueled spec-
ulation that the Federal Reserve will
scale back its economic stimulus when
it meets later this month.
It "gives the Fed all the evidence it
needs to begin tapering its asset pur-
chases at the next ... meeting," said
Paul Ashworth, an economist at
Capital Economics.
Stock investors were heartened by
the news. The Dow Jones industrial
average surged nearly 178 points in
early afternoon trading.
The unemployment rate has fallen
nearly a full percentage point since
the Fed began buying bonds in Sep-
tember 2012 and has reached 7 per-
cent earlier than most analysts had
expected.
See Page D3


THE WEEK AHEAD

* MONDAY
BRUSSELS Finance minis-
ters from the 17 eurozone coun-
tries try to agree on setting up a
fund to pay for bank rescues in
Europe. They will also discuss
whether Greece needs to do more
spending cuts.
* WEDNESDAY
WASHINGTON Treasury re-
leases federal budget for Novem-
ber, 2 p.m.; President Barack
Obama meets with college presi-
dents and business leaders to dis-
cuss college costs; Health and
Human Services Secretary Kath-
leen Sebelius testifies before the
House Energy and Commerce
Committee about the health care
law


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil higher after
stronger jobs report

NEW YORK-The price of oil
moved higher above $97 a barrel
Friday, buoyed by stronger economic
growth and falling unemployment in
the world's largest economy
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark U.S. crude for January
delivery was up 27 cents at $97.33 a
barrel in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
On Thursday oil rose to near
$98 for the first time in five weeks
before
closing at $97.38, up 18 cents.
U.S. data showed the outlook for
hiring is improving and the econ-
omy is growing at its fastest pace in
more than a year
Brent crude, a benchmark for in-
ternational oils, was up 84 cents to
$111.82 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange in London.


Markets solid after
strong US jobs data

LONDON Global stocks rose
Friday as investors welcomed fore-
cast-busting U.S. jobs data, even
though they reinforced expectations
that the Federal Reserve will begin
to reduce its monetary stimulus this
month.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares rose 0.8 per-
cent to close at 6,551.99 while
Germany's DAX rose 1 percent to
9,172.41. The CAC-40 in France rose
0.7 percent to 4,129.37.
Earlier in Asia, Japan's Nikkei
225 stock average rose 0.8 percent
to 15,299.86 and Hong Kong's
Hang Seng added 0.1 percent to
23,743.10.
China's Shanghai Composite
dropped 0.4 percent to 2,237.11 and
Australia's S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.2
percent to 5,186.
-From wire reports



Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY





First


home is


strain on


finances

EAR BRUCE: I just pur-
chased my first home in a
nice, quiet neighborhood. It
is a very modest home with a pic-
ture-perfect white fence. I paid
$125,000 for the home.
How long do you have to live in a
home, or how much do you have to
pay on the mortgage, in order to
qualify for a refinance? Now that I
moved in, and the bills and repairs
are milking my checking account, I
am scared I won't be able to stay
above water.
G.P, via email
DEAR G..: There is no magic
time period. If the home goes up in
value, then it's possible to refi-
nance. Generally, it's going to be a
couple of years before anyone will
seriously consider you for refi-
nancing, assuming the value of the
home has increased.
What I am concerned about is
your worry that you won't be able
to stay above water on your mort-
gage, which means you paid more
than you could afford. That's the
simple reality


Let me suggest that you might
wish to consider getting a part-
time job. Even if you have to work
for minimum wage in a hamburger
joint for 25 hours a week, at $8 an


Page D3








D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber events
For more information on Chamber events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber. com or call 352-795-3149.
Dec. 19 Citrus Sports & Apparel Mixer, 5 to 7 p.m.
at the Crystal River Mall. Ugly sweater contest and
Cash Mob contest, spend $20 at the mall from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m. and bring your receipt to the mixer to enter
drawing for flat-screen television.
Jan. 18 & 19-The Florida Manatee Festival in downtown
Crystal River. FloridaManateeFestival.com.
Interested in becoming an event sponsor and advertising
your business to thousands? Call 352-795-3149.
Interested in showcasing your fine art? Call 352-795-3149.
Interested in displaying your arts and crafts? Call 352-
634-1578.


IFPDITI & APPI, L
Itli|I fPfllHItt 1 tIliffTl
35 2 564-94D2
oloiday Mixer

THURSDAY, DEC. 19
5:00 TO 7:00 PM
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL-1801 US HWY 19
ACOUSTIC MUSIC BY THE BOB HOPE BAND
FOOD & BEVERAGES PROVIDED
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
WILL ANNOUNCE PARADE WINNERS
CASH MOB
An MWy for CAah Mob mt at4p.m unt iSpnm
*gf S peno %20 at any mall store, restaurant or fchanty and
enlei to win a Nal screen television. To enter the contest,
.. .. mil thl Citrus Sports & Apparel Holiday Mixer and turn
in your receipts t he Chamber representative


UGLY CHRISTMAS
SWEATER CONTEST
Wear voui ugly tacy fldiculous holiday sweater
for a chance to win!


Member Spotlight:

Tea House 650


he Tea House 650 and Cafe is located in downtown Crystal River among the
unique shoppers of Heritage Village and is a true labor of love for owners Gail
and Norm Willden. The tea bar offers a variety of 60 top-shelf, loose-leaf teas,
a wonderful lunch menu with homemade items to include chicken pot pie, holiday
chicken salad and gluten-free soups for the healthier-minded customer. They are
also offering fresh baked scones, with new flavors such as coconut and chocolate just
in time for the holiday season. In addition to what is offered in the store, there is a
wide range of items for purchase at www.teahouse650.com including all of the teas,
wines and wonderful tea accessories and pots to help you brew that perfect cup of tea
at home. There is live music on Saturdays from late morning to early afternoon while
you enjoy your lunch and shop through all the unique gift items.


Hours:
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through
Friday.
Address:
650 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River.
Phone:
352-564-1500
teahouse650.corn


Member events
Dec. 11 Stick A Fork In Cancer, 4 p.m. to close at
Beef '0' Brady's, 6738 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River. Fifteen percent of bill will be donated to the
American Cancer Society.
Dec. 13 Moon Over the Mounds hosted by Florida
Department of Environmental Protection's Crystal
River Archaeological State Park, 8 p.m. Free, but dona-
tions welcome. Underneath the moonlit sky, join Gary
Ellis, archaeologist from Gulf Archaeology Research In-
stitute, or other experienced guides to learn more
about these impressive mounds. Refreshments will be
served before the walk and you can tour the museum
and gift shop as well. 400 N. Museum Pointe, Crystal
River. Call 352-795-3817 for more information.
Dec. 14 Market Day with Art & Treasures at Heritage
Village shops, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 657 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. For more information call 352-564-1400
or visit www.theshoppesofheritagevillage.com.

Tuesday, Dec. 10 at 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 12
at 8:00 a.m. and Friday, Dec. 13 at 1:00 p.m.
learn about what's happening with local retailers
Crystal River Mall and Specialty Gems.


I CHAMBER


CHA


01tus Co
1 0 C.-


I UEDA 830PM- HUSDY :00 A -*FIDAY1:0P


WYKETV Channel 16 or Digital 47
YouTube.com/CitrusChamberVideos
CitrusCountyChamber.com

^ t ii *'*1


CRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commirc.



eKWA)eAxebb CC(vu'ib P

Saturday, Dec. 14 at noon

Downtown Inverness


I BB'liiii


IKl mil
I:I.'11.,

m...
In.s

MEN!m


.2 60.!BP-".3a .

ILEE 53 -1.1'
CS~i-";-3S --S
LL.. .Ug J -__


|Tiej-e"' btwcLb WdockLetJ


CITRUS ColNX
I -- IL -


-': Crystal River
-%W Rotary Club


{-Co'LscUc4 (atee {-ebtLxac4


BOAT TOURS BEER GARDEN LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
LOCAL FOOD FINE ART ARTS AND CRAFTS KIDS ZONE
$4 PER PERSON, CHILDREN 12 & UNDER FREE


FloridaManateeFestival.comin


352-795-3149


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


., -


I


M%


11r 5Into u




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Parent's wish lists for college-age kids this year


ight about now, children
who have gone away for
college are returning
home for the holidays. And
while visions of sugar plums -
or PlayStations or iPad Airs -
dance in their wee little heads,
Moms and Dads know that once
winter break ends and we ring
in the New Year, it's just a
quick hop, skip and jump to
springtime graduation.
Does your soon-to-be grad
have a job lined up?
If they are like most pending
graduates, the answer is no.
The latest Accenture College
Graduate Employment Survey
reports that only 16 percent of
recent graduates had secured
employment by the time they'd
earned their degree. Moreover,
only 27 percent of those who
did have jobs actually worked
in fields related to their major
Four years ago, you were


Laura
Bymes

WORKFORCE
K ~ CONNECTION



likely grateful that your then
high school senior could wait
out the recession while earning
a college degree.
In December 2009, Citrus
County's jobless rate was 12.6
percent, there were 7,161 peo-
ple out of work and only 49,707
working. By the time we wel-
comed the New Year, the local
economy had bottomed out and
unemployment hit its all-time


high of 13.6 percent.
Thankfully, through dint of
hard work, unwavering focus
and community collaboration,
we are clawing our way out of
the doldrums. Our unemploy-
ment rate has dropped a whop-
ping 5.6 percent and there are
3,200 fewer people out of work.
If the 20 employers who at-
tended our fall job fair in
Lecanto last month are any
indication, there are jobs to be
had; the challenge for our col-
lege graduates is how to get
them.
Where do they go when they
can't find work? One third of
the graduates of 2013 said they
planned to live at home and 44
percent of grads from 2011 and
2012 moved back in and still
live with their parents.
Workforce Connection CEO
Rusty Skinner said it best: 'As
much as we'd like our kids near


us, we really want them to get a
good job and start their futures
on a strong footing."
That's why access to the re-
sources and professional sup-
port necessary to connect with
prospective employers as well
as the employability and
soft skills needed to impress
them should top every
parent's wish list for their col-
lege-age children this holiday
season.
Here's how Workforce Con-
nection can help:
We are planning a second
Hire a Grad job fair to take
place in May 2014
We are building a coalition
among other regional work-
force boards and employers to
offer on-campus college re-
cruiting
We are partnering with
local and regional employers
who are specifically interested


in hiring college graduates.
We offer a full and diverse
menu of job placement serv-
ices, programs and resources
for college graduates all free
of charge.
So Mom and Dad, while your
soon-to-be college son or
daughter is home this holiday,
tell them about Workforce Con-
nection.
Your advice and encourage-
ment coupled with our expert-
ise may not be the easiest
present to fit under the tree or
around the Menorah, but it is
the gift that keeps on giving.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is a
Florida Certified Workforce
Professional and communica-
tions manager for Workforce
Connection. You may contact
her at 352-291-9559 or
LByrnes@ Workforce
ConnectionFL. com.


ECONOMY
Continued from Page Dl

In June, Chairman Ben
Bernanke had suggested that the
Fed would end its $85 billion in
monthly bond purchases after the
unemployment rate reached 7 per-
cent. The Fed's bond purchases
have been intended to keep bor-
rowing rates low
Bernanke later backed away
from the 7 percent target He cau-
tioned that the Fed would weigh
numerous economic factors in any
decision it makes about its bond
purchases. Many economists still
think the Fed won't begin to cut
back until January or later
While the Fed weighs its options,
U.S. employers may finally be gain-
ing enough confidence in the econ-
omy, 4 1/2 years after the recession
officially ended, to ramp up hiring.
In addition to the solid job gain and
the drop in unemployment, Fri-
day's report offered other encour-
aging signs:
Higher-paying industries are
adding more jobs. Manufacturers
added 27,000 jobs, the most since
March 2012. Construction compa-
nies added 17,000. The two indus-
tries have created a combined
113,000 jobs over the past four
months.
Hourly wages are up. The aver-
age rose 4 cents in November to
$24.15. It's risen just 2 percent in
the past year But that's ahead of in-
flation: Consumer prices are up
only 0.9 percent in that time.
Employers are giving their
workers more hours: The average
work week rose to 34.5 hours from
34.4. A rule of thumb among econo-
mists is that a one-tenth hourly in-
crease in the work week is
equivalent to adding 300,000 jobs.





FRUGAL
Continued from Page Dl

Eat a small snack before you
eat out It's fun to splurge on a meal
out every once in a while.
If you have a hard time spending
money on food, eat a small snack
before you go, and then choose
your entree wisely Many dishes are
large enough to split between two


Hiring was broad-based. In ad-
dition to higher-paying industries,
retailers added 22,300 jobs, restau-
rants, bars and hotels 20,800. Edu-
cation and health care added
40,000. And after years of cutbacks,
state and local governments are
hiring again. In November, govern-
ments at all levels combined added
7,000 jobs.
Still, the report contained some
sour notes: Many Americans are
still avoiding the job market, nei-
ther working nor looking for work.
That's one reason the unemploy-
ment rate has fallen in recent
months. The percentage of adults
either working or searching for
jobs remains near a 35-year low
And America's long-term unem-
ployed are still struggling. More
than 4 million people have been
out of work for six months or
longer That figure was essentially
unchanged in November By con-
trast, the number of people who
have been unemployed for less
than six months fell last month.
Among companies that are ramp-
ing up hiring is Eat24, which han-
dles online restaurant deliveries.
Eat24, based in San Francisco, ex-
pects this month to hire 10 to 15
salespeople, mobile application de-
velopers and data analysts, on top
of its 150-person workforce.
"The economy is picking up a lit-
tle bit," said Amir Eisenstein, the
chief marketing officer "In the last
couple of years, the mobile market
has boomed."
The steady decline in unemploy-
ment, from a high of 10 percent
four years ago, is welcome news for
the White House. But Jason Fur-
man, President Barack Obama's
top economic adviser, said the
plight of the long-term unemployed
points to the need to extend emer-
gency unemployment benefits.
About 1.3 million people who've




people. I sometimes order a salad
and an appetizer, which gives
me variety without being too
expensive.
Be honest with your children.
Parents can come across as stingy
when they are just trying to be fru-
gal. I like to be honest with my
children, responding with,
"That's not in the budget this
month," when they ask for some-
thing extra. If we eat out as a fam-
ily, we might say, "Everyone's


been out of work for six months or
more will lose unemployment aid if
a 5-year-old program to provide
extra benefits expires on Dec. 28.
The Congressional Budget Office
has estimated the cost of an exten-
sion at $25 billion. Some Republi-
cans on the Hill have balked at the
cost.
But on Thursday, House GOP
leader John Boehner said he was
willing to consider extending the
program.
Friday's jobs report follows other
positive news. The economy ex-
panded at an annual rate of 3.6 per-
cent in the July-September quarter,
the fastest growth since early 2012,
though nearly half that gain came
from businesses rebuilding stock-
piles. Consumer spending grew at its
slowest pace since late 2009.
But if hiring continues at its cur-
rent pace, a virtuous cycle will start
to build: More jobs typically lead to
more pay, more spending and
faster growth.
That said, more higher-paying
jobs are needed to sustain the
economy's momentum. Roughly
half the jobs that were added in the
six months through October were
in four low-wage industries: retail;
hotels, restaurants and entertain-
ment; temp jobs; and home health
care workers.
Consumers have been willing to
spend on big-ticket items. Autos
sold in November at their best pace
in seven years, according to Auto-
data Corp. New-home sales in Oc-
tober bounced back from a summer
downturn.
But early reports on holiday
shopping have been disappointing.
The National Retail Federation
said sales during the Thanksgiving
weekend probably the most im-
portant stretch for retailers fell
for the first time since the group
began keeping track in 2006.




drinking water," up front, thus
avoiding saying no to specialty
drinks at the restaurant.

Money is a part of life, but it
doesn't need to dictate happiness.
Living within your means and
learning how to budget will give
you financial freedom. Saving and
spending are both important. Em-
brace frugal living without being
stingy by making wise decisions
about money


Gulf gets more


projects from BP


restoration fund

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Restoring the oil-stained
Gulf of Mexico coastline is critical to the Obama
administration's fight against climate change,
U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said Friday
Jewell was at a national park outside New Or-
leans to announce the latest round of projects to
help the Gulf Coast recover from the 2010 BP oil
spill. Money for 44 projects is coming from a $1
billion fund BP created after oil fouled 1,110
miles of beaches and marsh along Louisiana,
Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.
"The Gulf of Mexico watershed is a large and
diverse landscape that is critical to our nation's
culture, economy and environment" Jewell said
in prepared remarks. "Today's announcement is
an important step as we work to not only restore
the natural resources that were impacted by the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but to also build
back the resiliency of the region."
If all 44 projects are approved, about $300 mil-
lion would remain in the fund set up as a down
payment to help the Gulf
Of the new projects, 16 have been added in
Florida since a preliminary announcement last
spring, giving Florida more than $105 million
from the fund. Most of the new Florida projects
appear, from a list provided by the Interior De-
partment, to be piers, boat ramps, boardwalks
and other recreational facilities.
Money from the BP fund can be used to restore
the economies of affected areas, by tourism or
other means. Louisiana, which had the widest
expanse of oiled coast, is the only state that does
not have tourism or recreation projects in the lat-
est batch of projects. Its $340 million includes
$318.4 million to restore four barrier islands and
$22 million for fish hatcheries.
In the spring, the states and BP described
about $590 million of the proposals, including $85
million for a lodge and other improvements at
Gulf Shores Park in Alabama.
Meetings will be held across the coast to get
public comment on the 44 proposals.
Jewell took an aerial tour of the Gulf on Thurs-
day and visited the Breton and Big Branch na-
tional wildlife refuges. Big Branch is on the
north shore of Lake Pontchartrain and was not
affected by the spill. Booms quickly set around
the islands at Breton, which encompasses areas
at the mouth of the Mississippi River and a chain
of barrier islands in Chandeleur Sound, pro-
tected it from the worst of the spill, Jewell said.
"When Hurricane Katrina came along, it wiped
out about 70 percent of the whole refuge, and yet
it's critical habitat" for birds such as brown peli-
cans. terns and skimmers. Jewell said.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

hour, that is $200 a week. I am certain that money,
even after taxes, would go a long way toward taking
the pressure off. You won't have as much time to enjoy
the home, but you will be certain you won't be losing
it.
DEAR BRUCE: Is it better to close a credit card ac-
count or just simply cut up the card and forget about
it? I don't use it, so why bother having it? I think I read
before that it doesn't help your credit score to close it
and might hurt it Please explain.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: If you don't use a credit card, you
may well ask why bother having it? The answer is, the
more credit you have available, the less you have to
place on one source.
In other words, if you have five credit cards with a
$2,000 limit, you have $10,000 in credit available. If
you control your spending so you owe no more than
$5,000, you are well thought of by the credit commu-
nity
Let's assume you get rid of two cards. Now you have
only $6,000 available and you still owe $5,000. Now you
are pushing the limits of your credit, and that is not
good for your score.
If you simply close out an account, it can hurt your
credit, but that will recover, other things being equal.
If there are no costs associated with the card, such as
a monthly or yearly charge, just put it away and let it
run. It will not hurt your credit in that regard.
DEAR BRUCE: I would like to help my great-grand-
children by starting a Roth IRA for each of them (total
of four). How do I start this process? Do I need a bro-
ker, or can I just go through a banker?


DEAR D.M.: First of all, understand that you can't
start a Roth IRA for any of the children unless they
have earned the amount of money you want to con-
tribute. It doesn't necessarily mean they have to put
the money in, but if you want to put $1,000 into a
Roth, they must have earned and reported $1,000 of
income.
Do you need a broker? Not necessarily, but I would
not consider doing it without one. Your banker could
act for you. I would use a broker, but keep in mind that
each of those great-grandchildren has to earn (in a tax
year) as much as you're going to put into the Roth.
DEAR BRUCE: We bought a home in Florida five
years ago for our son to share with two of his friends,
all sharing the bills equally We did this while my son
attended college so he would not have to worry about
bills and he could get the best education. We are pay-
ing his share. He will be graduating in 2014. After that
we will sell the home.
My question is, when we sell the home, we want to
give our son the remaining money after the note is
paid. Do we have to pay any taxes? Is there something
we need to do? The leftover amount will be around
$31,000.
N.K., via email
DEAR N.K.: Your son is a very lucky fellow I am not
certain how you will have that much money leftover,
but if you choose to, you may give it to him without any
tax consequences. You say "we," so I assume that
means you and your spouse, which means you can
give your son $28,000, $14,000 apiece, one year and the
remaining $3,000 the following year Doing it this way
there are absolutely no taxes to be paid.
I am inclined to ask why you want to give this much
money to your son. Why not put the money away into a
separate account and let him earn his way? If he re-
ally needs it, you can give him all or part.


D.M., via email Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com.


Questions ofgeneral interest will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


ThU1

iaf film


Featuring

Joe Donato


& Friends

Thursday, Dec. 12
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427
)OFMIY


CiIiN IciLL
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CRus CouvTi HIsmOicAL SOCIETY


oooFmly


I ---l 1--,,----.,,,--------,-


000


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 D3




D4 SUNDAY- DECEMBER 8.2013


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa x : (3 5 2 ). . ..56 1 T l r.. ... .... .. . .......0 0....00... .. ... .


*

IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Must sell as pair
(352) 634-4237
CHRISTMAS TREE
Brand New 7 1/2 ft white
metal with multi-colored
lights and 3 settings.$50
352-322-1160
Custom Golf Clubs
Built at a fraction of
pro shop cost. Builder
USGA Cert. Member
Will come to you. Call
Tom (352) 746-4920
DISHWASHER
EXCELLENT Cond
11/2 yrs old $90
(352) 795-1692
Furniture Large Selec-
tion Old, New, Asian,
private, moving, good
prices, 352-586-9498
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
Pool Cover Retractor
15 ft wide, very good
condition. $150
352- 419-7388
860-748-1443
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flexible Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances- Gas/Elec.
AC Units, BBQ Grills,
Lawn Tractors &
Riding Mowers
352-270-4087



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Your World





CLIwakoaiaE
4 "Uw I&L











13 laying
chickens
(352) 364-6319
Bull Mastador
2 yr & 4 yr.
Mom & Daughter
Loves kids & Toys
needs room to run
(352) 726-6234
Free Birds
to good home
call for info:
(352) 634-2781
Free Fire wood
You cut and remove
(352) 621-9810
Free Firewood
You Pick up
(352) 628-5168
Free Hamsters
Black,
(352) 637-1401
FREE KITTENS
2 females, black, fluffy
(352) 436-7996
Free Kittens
5 mo. old
1 male, 1 female
Black and White
(352) 637-2030
FREE KITTENS
9 weeks, Very sweet
To good home
(352) 795-0037


I Happy N


Yorkshire Terrier
Male, 5 Ibs, chipped,
answers to Jack. Lost
in Lecanto. Belongs to
an sick elderly women
who loves him dearly.
REWARD
(651) 239-9171


Male, 5 Ibs, chipped,
answers to Jack. Lost
in Lecanto. Belongs to
an sick elderly women
who loves him dearly.
(352) 302-8908



Found Chihuahua,
male, Fawn color
Citrus Hills
(352) 527-6951
Found Young Pitt Bull
Mason Creek area
Call to identify
(352) 628-4005
Women's Leather
Jacket Found in
Park in Crystal River on
Dunklin. 352- 634-0812



FREE REMOVAL
Would like to thank all
of Citrus County for
your patronage in
2013. I will be fully op-
erational again start-
ing Jan 6,2014. I want
to wish you all a safe
& joyous holiday sea-
son. See you in 2014


-Efi.^


Free
Pitt/Terrior mix,
3 yrs. old,
Chow, 5 yrs. old
Male, can be
separated
352-476-6710,
476-6704
Free to good home
Female pit bull and
male beagle
Call for more infor
(352) 228-7354
Husky/Shepherd Mix
Blue eyes. 2/2 yr old
male, (352) 634-1285



ALWAYS FRESH CITRUS
HARRISON GROVE
FLORAL CITY
(352) 726-1154
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone CrabS $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
mustard/collard
greens,squash, more
GIFT SHIPPING
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.
352-726-6378




Adult Cat. Orange
striped w/ freckles.
Ans wers to Tobias.
Lost on 11/28 Brandy-
wine & Cardinal
Lecanto REWARD
352-628-0789
Chihuahua
black and white, male,
Rocco lost off 41 near
Sportsman Bowling
Alley (352) 419-0223
Lost Cat
Small, white face,
with calico, female
Crystal River school
(352) 220-9496
Lost Gold Chain
Late Husbands
with wedding band &
gold cross, Dunnellon
Chinese buffet park-
ing Lot (352) 489-6761
Lost Keys
in Big Lots Shopping
Center Inverness
(352) 344-0379
Lost Terrier Mix
white face, brown w/
white spots on back
Lecanto area
(352) 364-3227
Lost white gold, dia-
mond neckless in March
of 2013 in Inverness
area. Just discovered
this and if anyone found
this neckless would
greatly appreciate it you
would contact me. It
has much sentimental
value. Reward.
Contact 637-2193
YORKIE
Very small female
named Zoey. Lost 12/5
Inverness Highlands,
Calico Ln Area.
Please call 344-8518
-. A10.1qqA


tlerizedemloye

ofcrthe ricroof
Human
Resources
Associate I
Announcement
# 13-67
Responsible clerical
work processing
personnel actions,.
maintaining compu-
terized employee
records and track-
ing evaluations.
Working knowledge
of the Microsoft
Office Suite of Prod-
ucts. Human Re-
sources background
preferred. $11.09
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
13, 2013 EOE/ADA

Office/Cashier

apply in person:
12430 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness




FT/PT HAIRSTYLIST
Apply @ Nu-Yu Salon
Beverly Hills plaza
Nuyu4u@gmail.com










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR
Seeking a dynamic
RN Leader w/exp. to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Must have stable
work history, exc
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
atdon@
southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


CAREGIVER

Must be qualified to
work with APD Group
Home clientele.
Needed:a weekend
live-in employee to be
in an ALF in Citrus
Springs Friday
afternoon to Monday
morning. Please call
352-489-6444 or
352-270-2943


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.com


Exercise
Specialist/Trainer
Assist patients with
muscular strength
and flexibility. Explain
and demonstrate in
detail stretches and
exercises assigned
by doctor. Perform
functional diagnostic
testing. 30-35-hrs. wk.
Requirements:
Knowledge of
human anatomy and
physiology a must.
Massage Therapist or
Personal Trainer
(current license not
necessary).
Forward Resume
with references to:
frontdesk@
nbccdro.com
Hourly rate discussed
at interview


FT position for
Busy Medical
Office:

Professional phone
skills, customer
service, attention to
detail, and positive.
Fax resume to
352-746-5605.


In Home
Health Care
Sat & Sun 10 hr shifts.
Private Duty in Inver-
ness home for 90 Yr
old female with
dementia.Lifting
throughout shift is
necessary. Must be
compassionate, soft
spoken, physically
capable and non
smoker. Starting
$11/hr. Apply with
credentials,
resume, references,
and background
check. Call Jeanie
(352) 637-1793
between 9am-7pm


LEAD COOK
Full Time
* Assists w/ ordering
* Inventory of Food
* Contributes team-
work


Assisted Living
231 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI.

Ultrasound Tech
For OB Dr Ofc
FT/PT
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877





B COLLEGE [
CENTRAL
SFLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
CITRUS CAMPUS
Assessment
Specialist
OCALA CAMPUS
Assistant Director of
Museum Operation -
Appleton
Director Grant
Funding
Director -Purchasing
and Risk Manage-
ment (Reposted)
Faculty Computer
Information
Faculty Engineer-
ing Technology
Graphic Design/
Web and Public
Relations Appleton
Instructional Assis-
tant Science
Xcel-IT GRANT
FUNDED POSITIONS
Educational Advisor
Entrepreneurship
Outreach Specialist

A copy of transcripts
from an accredited
institution must be
submitted with the
application for
each position.
Alternatively,
send via e-mail to
hr@cf.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy
of transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


Opportunities
atCHAMPS
Software
Marketing Assistant:
Responsibilities
include Internet and
Email marketing,
database manage-
ment, Public
Relations, writing
customer case
studies, preparing
brochures by
formatting content
and graphics.
Requires an
associate degree in
marketing.
Technical Services
Sales Associate:
Responsible for de-
veloping accounts
for company's
technical services.
Provide information
to customers and
prospects on
available services
programs. Prepare
and present value
propositions to the
customers. Maintain
strong ongoing
communications
with customers.
Meet or exceed set
proposal and sales
objectives. Must be
self-motivated,
accountable and
possess sales
oriented mentality
and outgoing
personality and the
ability to interact
positively with
people.
Entry Level Software
Developers:
Selected candidates
will receive
hands-on training to
become Software
Consultants working
with Microsoft .Net.
The training is
project-based and
will engage the
trainees in actively
learning all aspects
of the tools and
project life-cycle,
quickly developing a
wide range of new
skills. Requires
Associate Degree in
Computer Science.
Above positions
require superior
written and verbal
communication skills.
Please submit
resume to:
lobs@chamos
Inc.com


Executive
Director
Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County
Bachelor's Degree
or equivalent train-
ing and experience
with qa similar
non-profit. Excellent
communication
skills. Proven
successful fundrais-
ing experience &
grant writing.
Knowledge of Citrus
County with estab-
lished relationships
to businesses and
individuals.
Administrative
experience.
Ability to work with a
Board of Directors.
Send letter of
application, resume,
3 references, and
salary expectations
to P.O. Box 907,
Lecanto, FL 34460 or
fax 352-621-4679.
NO CALLS





Sous Chef
Needed for casual
upscale Country
Club. Culinary skills
and kitchen
management exp
necessary. Send
resume to: careers
@cltrushllls.com


Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
SOUS CHEF and
LINE COOKS

Apply in Person at:
505 E Hartford St.
Mon-Sat between
2:00-5:00pm.





Appointment
Setters Wanted
Hiring Exp. Reps
Hourly + Commission
9:00am-4:00pm
Mon-Fri
Call Cale at
352-503-6888


#1 Employment source is






wc rIcIII

www.chronicleonline.com


FIREWORK
Sales Crew &
Independent Setup
Crew Needed
Start Immediately
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission,
Background check
Email Application
greenunllmlted
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416

~DAMS

HOMES

Looking for a
Career In New
Home Sales?
This is your chance!
Builder Hiring on site
agent to run our
Citrus County
Market.
Income opportunity
is endless.
License not required
To apply
Em ail: trief@adams
homes.com
Or fax resume to:
352-592-7514


.ill.'" '
ILI 1 <>,id i l ,st.
7.1.^ Li.^
L lal iiS


CWMUE
Classifieds




Light Equipment
Operator
(4 Positions Avail.)
Announcement
#13-70
Semi-skilled work in
the operation of
automotive public
works equipment
and performing
manual labor.
Graduation from HS
or GED. Must have
a valid Florida CDL
Class "A" with
endorsement "N"
combination air
brakes or be able
to obtain within 90
days of appoint-
ment. $9.50 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our webslte at www.
bocc.cltrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
13,2013. EOE/ADA.


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


S CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE
Swww.chronlconlne.com


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Person who painted
house on Whitier Pt, in
Homosassa last Nov.
Call (727) 415-0404



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct(a S5.001b.
Stone CrabS $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001




TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444




FRONT DESK
In Healthcare Office.
Full time, good com-
puter skills, excellent
phone & people
skills. Professional &
dependable. In
clude salary require-
ments & references.
Email Resume to:
keyconrtact 14
@gmail.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ID~I


a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624


Utilities
Maintenance
Worker
Announcement
#13-72

Semi-skilled manual
work assisting in the
installation, opera-
tion, repair and
maintenance of
sewer forcemains,
gravity lines, man-
holes, lift stations,
water mains, fire
hydrants, water
meters, backflow
devices, valves,
valve boxes and
other appurte-
nances related to
water and waste-
water utility opera-
tions. H.S diploma,
GED certificate or
related vocational
training. Work expe-
rience in the repair
of water/ waste-
water mains and
facilities preferred.
Must have Florida
CDL Class "B" or be
able to obtain
within one year of
employment. Start-
ing pay $8.70 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, December
13, 2013 EOE/ADA.




Lilt

Youl\ world first

Need a .jih
IIr a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Granite Fabrica-
tors Needed
Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
ADDIv in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $2500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Full bene-
fits, achievable
bonuses. Call for
details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

Top 1% Pay & CSA
Friendly Equip, Full
Benefits + Quality
Hometime, No slip
seating Take truck
home, CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-
drivers.com





Appointment
Setters Wanted
Hiring Exp. Reps
Hourly + Commission
9:00am-4:00pm
Mon-Fri
Call Cale at
352-503-6888

CITRUS MAIDS

CLEANING PERSON
Needed. PT and FT.
flexible schedule req.
for early morn. hrs. &
Sat. lic/vehicle. Exp.
a plus. Leave mes-
sage (352) 257-0925

CITRUS WELL
DRILLING

Must be physically
fit. Willing to work
long hours. Prior
construction exp. a
bonus. Must have
clean driving record.
No Phone Calls *
Applv In Person
After 8am
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
drug free work place

P/T CHILDREN
MINISTER
First Christian
Church of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual to work with
elementary children
Tn Annlvy :mail


TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.

Part-time


TAX PREPARER

Parttime, Wanted for
small Dunnellon
Office. Flexible Hours
Email Resume
to:taxtime200@
bellsouth.net





AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
LAST CLASS
OF 2013
COSMETOLOGY
December 16TH
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
FULLTIME &PARTTIME

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


BE YOUR OWN BOSS!
OWN A YOGURT,
DOLLAR, MAILBOX,
PARTY, TEEN, CLOTH-
ING, OR FITNESS
STORE. WORLDWIDE,
100% FINANCING,
OAC. FROM $55,900
COMPLETE TURNKEY
(800)385-2160
WWW.DRSS3.COM

You can become
an expert in HVAC
installation and
repair. Pinnacle
Career Institute
Online HVAC
education in as little
as 12 months.
Call us today:
1-877-651-3961 or go
online:
www.HVAC-Online-Ed
ucation.com















ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




.1UHA\V R1A(.


CLASSIFIED



1930'S PETAL SEW-
ING MACHINE Macy
Special $100.00. call
352-257-3870
Antique
Heavy Solid
Brass Bed
$400.
(352) 812-2329
TONGUE AND
GROOVE DRESSER
super nice shape, call
352-257-3870



60'S DON QUIXOTE
WOODEN WALL
PLAQUE 6 ft h and 3d
great decorator item
$70 352-897-4154
INTERESTING 70'S
KIDNEY SHAPED COF-
FEE TABLE dk color vi-
nyl type top $40
352-8974154



Almond Appliances
Side by side Refriger-
ator Electric Coil
Range/ Dish Washer,
Washer & Dryer Priced
as a package $800
(352) 270-4087
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Dishwasher $100
&
Washer & Dryer
$100. ea
(352) 419-5922
Dishwasher
Elite Whirlpool, BIk
front, like new. All
cycles & manuals.
$280. Call Walter
(352) 527-3552
DISHWASHER
EXCELLENT Cond
11/2 yrs old $90
(352) 795-1692
Dishwasher,
Whirlpool "plus"
model; all cycles
+ china, white,
excelcond. $100
(352) 228-4837
DRYER & BROKE
WASHER (Kenmore)
dryer works great. $60
for both.Stackable
746-0714
Electric Range
Maytag, 4 burner
glass top, self clean-
ing oven, Black, Good
Condition $100
(352) 220-9787
GE SPECTRA ELEC-
TRIC RANGE Digital
Oven needs $30 Ele-
ment Four Element
Stove $90 341-0450
Maytag
Air conditioner,
portable unit
works great
$75.
(352) 628-5085
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 D5


Whirlpool Gold 25 cf
refrig,side x side,
water/ice in doorglass
shelves.GE glass top
range.GE over range
microwave.AII in ex-
cellent
cond.White.$675 for
all. Call 352-489-1239




FORMAL MAPLE/
BLACK LEATHER
CHAIR perfect $45.00
call 352-257-3870









DUDLEY'S


SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12- 5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41S @ hall (out) 3rm.
(in) 6pm
**Two auctions In
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12- 6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00Dm
3101 W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00pm 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat
......................
Call for Into
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Malne-ly
Real Estate #381384


bols
in ma=-T7tsmn
12" Chop Saw. Excel-
lent condition. $65.00
352-513-5482
Craftsman
1/2 HP Bench
drill press
Excellent Cond. $60
(352) 419-5363
MACHINES TOOL
CHEST w/2 drawer cab-
inet $100 Tom
352494-1214
Homosassa ph
PROFILE PROJECTOR
EP01 LP6 $100
Tom (Homosassa)
352494-1214 phone
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $95
HANDHELD HEAVY
DUTY INVERNESS
419-5981
SHOPSMITH MARK
V-500 wall attach-
ments & wall mount
holders $350;
Hotsy Pressure Washer
Rated 2.2GPM @ 1000
Ibs, runs on kerosine
or diesel $450
(352) 621-0747



5 YAMAHA SPEAKERS
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $80
352-613-0529
HOME THEATRE
SPEAKER British 3
Driver MTM 100W Cen-
ter, Black with Silver
Grille $100 341-0450
HOME THEATRE
SPEAKER Danish
Co-Axial 150W Center,
SEAS speaker, Solid
Oak $100 341-0450


10" 150 WATTS $30
352-613-0529
JVC DVD PLAYER -
VCR COMBO
HR-XVC11B used few
hours,Mom doesn't
need,nice $60 341-0450
LARGE HOME
SUB-WOOFER 12inch
NHT Subwoofer, NO
Amp, 5 cubic foot Oak
Box $100 341-0450
Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $150
(352) 220-9787
Sony 50" LCD
Projection TV
Good condition
$350. obo
(352) 489-5079
STEREO SPEAKER
PARTS NEW, GRS
8FR-8inch 85Watt
woofer, Nuance
Tweeter, In Your Box.
$50 341-0450
SUB-WOOFER AMPLI-
FIER Home Use, 250
Watts, Adjustable Vol-
ume, Phase and Cross-
over $100 341-0450
WATCH SUPER BOWL
65" Mitsubishi HD TV
$200
68" H x 59" W x 28"D
Problem free-includes
manuals
Call 352-503-3467

Computell

HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Internet, Clean $80
341-0450


VIEWSONIC 19 INCH
LCD DISPLAY
Widescreen PC,
Game, TV use includes
cable $100 341-0450




5 PIECE PATIO SET 1
OCTAGON TABLE
WITH 4 CHAIRS &
CUSHIONS WHITE
$100 352-613-0529




4 RUSTIC DK PINE
ARMCHAIRS very
comfy and sturdy
$100/all 352-897-4154
Barrel Chairs
(2) Like new, light tan
rich Brazilian leather.
Elegant style and
higher end. Value
priced @ $375/pr
(firm). In Citrus Hills
Call 560-3474
6-8pm only
DESK KIDS HEIGHT
Large Top, Custom
Made Oak Desk with
Pencil and Side Draw-
ers $100 341-0450
DINING ROOM SET
Round Pedestal Table
with 4 ladder chairs,
light colored wood. 1
yr old, clean $250
(352) 746-2479
DINNING SET
White table 73'x38'
with 8 chairs; China
closet w/ glass drs. 73"
x 42" wide. Exc Cond.
$650 (352) 341-3083


Home oFinder
www chrnnicl'hnmefindprr.nm


.- -. '.p m o u
'Pf/M,L YAu7 1)VDAiAA, /4WAIf


I pastorray@tCaa (727) 848-8415 IRONS & METAL KET- $100 ea 12" CRAFTMANS
bay.rr.com or Cal 352) 263-2744 TLE Nice decorator item Call Homosassa BANDSAW In goodHund s f Local L
352-344-1908 STATEAPPROVED Vg Shape $60/all (678) 617-5560 condition. $75 www. chroniclehomefinder.com
www.fccinv.com FOR VA TRAINING 352-897-4154 or 352-628-3258 746-0714 i J


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Mature Male Care
Giver, for Seniors and
People w/ Disability
Edward 352-419-8387
Retired Lady with 30+
years Homecare exp.
Help w/ personal care
companship Dee Dee,
352-249-4429
Transportation and/or
Asst. with shopping,
errands, appt., & air-
port runs. Lic/Ins. w/
refs. (352) 613-0078








II SHADY VIEWl lst.






CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
3257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
1 FAST 100% Guar.
& AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
W RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447




Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning
.. ramz l.-


RESIDENTIAL
CLEANING
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 OR 364-1773


Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Poo B ildng
Rtemoeling


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570





AAll phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**


-MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
P O L RVTC Certified Tech
S 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service. Darts, sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.







L,. : -*'





TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Call tle "A/ak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF;

Any Re-Roof:
I Must present upn at time contract is signed I
Lic./ins. CCC057537 ooGROW











a.. &r.6- A *U ton MfItn
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


I DON'T LET YOUR


DRYER START
A FIRE!
Flat Rate -No
Hidden Co, t,














Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
f- lAll Home Repairs
9 Small Carpentry
9. Fencing
..' *S,:reening
(:lean Dryer Vents
,AI, doble & Dependable
Epqeence lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
L Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM




KNOCK OUT

MEANING SERVICE
IDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RE & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
S Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too


352.942.6876
S Call Today for a
Clean Tomorrow


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
S352-364-4610
(9)MR.
ELECTRIC
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S Independently owned & operated
SLic #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeeK


GENERAL ]J
Stand Alone -
Generator I

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377






Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
or pool or plan
S something
,:' completely new!
'L i Often imitated,
'M~a^'l^k' nevrfduplieated'


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COp='ES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Ins=e 352-400-3188


gg t
-sC- Exposed
'^.*M Aggregate
'._Shotcrete $451yd 1
Decks Tile/

FREE "Pavers
ESTIMATES T__
GREG'S COMPLETE
GUEGFO REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
ICNSED 352-746-5200











SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
S LICENSED & INSURED




D6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8,2013


W/FRAME Good condi-
tion, no stains. Sits 26
inches height. Great
for guest bedroom or
childs room. $300.
Email for more info
and pics. Sugarmill
Woods area. No phone
calls please.
DoubleBedForSale@ya
hoo.com
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER [BLONDE]
L48H50W18 with 19
RCA TV. $75.00
352-344-8212
ETHAN ALLEN 4
ARMCHAIRS Solid
comfy dk pine VG cond
$100/all 352-8974154
FURNITURE Brocade
style couch with
matching chair, large
brown recliner $1400,
dining room table
round with 4 matching
chairs $500, beautiful
like new!!!!! Please
call:352-341-0952
Furniture Large Selec-
tion Old, New, Asian,
private, moving, good
prices, 352-586-9498
GUN CABINET holds
8guns/2 drawers/ dark
wood/custom made
$75.00 352-860-0759
Kitchen Hutch
cream colored, exc
condition Call for
Texted Pic $75
746-0183/422-0311
LEATHER RECLINER
large/light
butterscotch/good
condition/$100.00
352-860-0759
Light Oak
Curio Cabinet
Glass front & sides
46"x76", Like New
$300.(352) 628-5727 or
(423) 667-3601
LOVESEAT
reclines fair, soft leather
burgandy $75
352-503-7668
Maple Dinette Set
$150
Slider chair with Stool
$100.
(352) 419-5922
MARBLE TOP WOOD
PEDESTAL TABLE
$75.00 call
352-257-3870
Maroon Rocker/Swivel
Recliner $125.
SmI Wooden Table
w/drop leaf & 2 chairs
$50.(352) 613-3114
NICE ANTIQUE WOOD
TRUNK larger with high
gloss finish med color
$80 firm
352-8974154
OAK WOOD ROCKING
CHAIR woven
back/seat $25
352-257-3870
RED METAL BUNK
BEDS full/twin
w/mattresses $75.00
352-257-3870
SEW MACHINE
CABINET new in
box/light colored. $95.00
352-860-0759
TWIN BEDS 2
twin-beds w/nice head-
boards and box springs,
bed linens and pillows.
Also a dresser. All for
$300. Call
352-513-4516; may be
seen at Terra Vista.
VERY NICE THOMAS-
VILLE ARMOIRE simple
design light color $200
352-8974154



9'1/2 x 5 TRAILER
$600
(352) 746-7357
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
ECHO
Shred & Vac leaf
blower Model ES210
Like New $75
(352) 419-5363


l


FREE MANURE
No shavings.Fill your
truck, trailer or buckets.
Easy access.
352-513-5400



Heath issues must sell
prized plants, some 20
yrs old. Must have
truck (352) 794-5479




LECANTO
Sun. 8th One Day Only
7am-??
MOVING SALE
Furniture, Computer,
Etc..Everything Must
Go! Cheap!
2493 N. Brentwood Cir
PINE RIDGE
Sun. Dec. 8th, 8a-Ip
*MULIT FAMILY SALE*
Houeshld. equestrian,
children's items MORE
2623 N. Horseback Av.



BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 3 SETS SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 $45 352-613-0529
GIRLS WINTER cloth-
ing 4 jeans 1 pant, 5
shirts, 2 pajama sets, 2
hoodies, sizes vary $55
352-613-0529
Mans tan leather
coat.Size 46. Made in
Argentina. $25
352-628-1783
MANS VEST mans new
black leather vest,size
extra large made in
u.s.a. $25.00
352-628-1783
MENS CLOTHING 3
CASUAL PANTS SIZE
36X30 & 2 CASUAL
SHIRTS LARGE $20
352-613-0529
SCRUBS 8 sets as-
sorted color/sizes: tops
12 bottoms 14/like new
$10.00 a set
352-860-0759



MONITOR 23" flat panel
acer4 years old good
color $80.00
3523823895



3 DOUBLE ROLLS
PREPASTED VINYL
WALLCOVERING $25
FLORAL DESIGN 165
SQ FT 419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HEARTS/BUNNIES/
MICKEY PAINT FOR
PRESENTS 419-5981
26" Mongoose Bike
new tubes, excel.
cond.$90.
Stringer of 5 Bass
mounted, beautifully
displayed $100.
(352) 628-5085
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Basset Computer
Desk w/ top shelf, 2
drawers, solid oak,
great shape $100.
Old Singer Sewing
Machine $100
(352) 287-0767
BEALLS GIFT CARD
100.00/selling for 80.00
Will verify Linda
341-2271
BEALLS GIFT CARDS
60.00 each/selling 50.00
each
Linda 341-2271
CAMERA
SONY cyber-shot,
DSC-H5; 7.2 megapixel,
12x optical zoom ISO
1000, with Sony steady
shot focus. Extra's
include: 1.7X telphoto
lens, high density
& polarized pictures,
tripod, case and
battery charger.
Like new with box
$350 352-503-2661


BLACK RUBBER
RIDING BOOTS $15
WOMEN SIZE 10
LIKE NEW CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
BULL FEEDER. Behlen
Country. 3 sections.
7"high,40"diameter lid
$95.00
352-513-5400
CAMPER TOP FOR
PICKUP 5' by 6'4",
black, screened side
windows. Great Condi-
tion.$40 (352)634-0890
CHRISTMAS TREE
Beautiful 71/2 ft tree,
used once, with multi
colored lights. $100
Char-broil grill, 4
burner w/ rotisserie
very little use. $100
(352) 564-0661
CHRISTMAS TREE
Brand New 7 1/2 ft white
metal with multi-colored
lights and 3 settings.$50
352-322-1160
COACH PURSES
3 Coach bags w/
serial numbers.
$50 each
(352) 726-9472
Comforter King Set
Ralph Lauren Adiron-
dack Bear Print. Incld
Flannel Sheets. Still in
pkg. Great Gift! $150
obo (518) 802-0220
CRAFT BEADS
Large assort, of many
different colors, sizes,
and shapes. $60.00
352-621-7586
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone Crabi $6.001lb
delivered 352-897-5001
GARMIN STREET-
PILOT GPS w/remote
and accessories.
$60.00
Call 352-621-7586
Gas Grill
4 burners, 2 tanks and
a Wrought Iron table
with 2 chairs
$200 total!
(352) 795-7254
Memory Foam
Mattress, Full Size
Cost over $500
Asking $150. Like New
(352) 726-1991
MOTORCYCLE WIND
SHIELD BAG black,
Harley brand, $25 Ph
352-697-2631
NuWave Infra red
Oven, brand new $55.
Thu the Bible
J. Vernon McGee,
from Genesis to Reve-
lation 5 vol. $55.
(352) 860-0124
OBRIEN CLUTCH
WAKE BOARD Size
9.5-12 excellent condi-
tion.$75
746-0714
Pool Cover Retractor
15 ff wide, very good
condition. $150
352- 419-7388
860-748-1443
Rubbermaid Big Max
7' x 3'6" Resin Storage
Shed, 1 shelf, 2 stands,
tie downs, Lock & keys
$125. Cash
(352) 382-7435
TOASTER OVEN, COF-
FEE MAKER & ELEC-
TRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
VINTAGE PROJEC-
TION TABLE $55
ACME LITE PROJEK
GOOD CONDITION IN-
VERNESS 419-5981



FAX/COPIER TOSHIBA
DP85F + NEW DRUM
AND TONER KITS.
$250 352-585-5056



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINER,
1 MED $295; 1 LG, $375
Both Exc Cond, Run
great 352-270-8475
Heavy Duty Wheel-
chair, electric, high
back, extra support
seat, slightly used,
cost $4,300. sell $800
(352) 628-5085


You St






Your Dr




























Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR
TRAVEL/STUDENT
SIZE, W/GROVER
TUNERS $60
352-601-6625
"NEW" GLOSS BLACK
ELECTRIC GUITAR
&GIGBAGTUNER-
STRAP&CORD+MORE
$80 601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
PLUS STYLE DEEP
BURGANDY BURST
FLAME MAPLE
TOP,BLOCK INLAYS
$140 352-601-6625
"NEW" S.G STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMPGIGBAGQTUNERST
RARCORDAND
C.D. $90 352-601-6625
HO-HO-HO "NEW" IN
BOX ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR PLAYS, SOUNDS,
LOOKS GREAT $50
601-6625




3 PIECE LAMP SET
1 floor lamp/2 table
lamps/Victorian style
set $45.00
352-860-0759
10 CUBIC FOOT
CHEST FREEZER
white 10 cu ft. chest
freezer only used for a
month includes inside
basket and owners
manual 180.00 or B.O.
phone# 352-419-4767
25 assorted size glass-
ware and extras for bar.
$25.00
352-628-1783
CUISINART ELECTRIC
ICE CREAM MAKER
new condi-$40.00 cash-
(352) 344-0686
CUISINART GRIDLER
new condition- cost
$100.00 sell $45.00
cash (352) 344-0686
CUISINART MIXER
WITH STAND new con-
dition- $45.00 cash
(352)344-0686
LARGE RUG 10 x13
feet. Cocoa Swirl. Like
New. Paid $400.
$100 352-628-3507
New 8 piece place sett-
ing china pearl
china,extras $50 OBO
352-628-1783
WEST BEND ELEC-
TRIC GRILL New condi-
tion- large covered grill
cost 90.00- sell $45.00
cash (352)-344-0686




INVERSION TABLE
Teeter "Hang Ups" In-
version Table. Excellent
Condition. $60.00
352-513-5482
Miami Sun
3 Wheel Bicycle
w/ Basket
$165
(352) 812-2329

S orting

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Custom Golf Clubs
Built at a fraction of
pro shop cost. Builder
USGA Cert. Member
Will come to you. Call
Tom (352) 746-4920
GOLF CLUBS
Men Ping Zing's.
Putter, irons & woods
$35; RH mens 1-2's set
of irons w/ wedge $95
(315) 466-2268

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec. 7th 9a-5p
Sun. Dec. 8th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




MISC. RV EQUIPMENT
Assorted items for RV.
Great condition. $50.00
352-513-5482


ACE
Ace, 3 1/2 y.o. terrier
mix, wt. 51 Ibs,
beautiful red coat,
healthy, great
shape, good
w/other dogs, plays
in pool, very intelli-
gent, learned agility
course quickly, sits,
gives paw, lies
down on com-
mand, takes treats
gently, appears
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.








BAILEY
Bailey, a Chesa-
peake Bay Re-
triever/ hound mix, 2
y.o., wt. 39 Ibs.,
Heartworm
-negative,
Sits on command,
walks well on leash,
friendly & attentive.
Good w/other dogs.
Very obedient, ap-
pears housebroken.
Slim & trim.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


Musical
Instruments]


,,- 1 *,.


I__/,, .< I-. I;




CII1()NICI(. )-i;HipC ,ON1C






(352)563m5966 1 1/


CLASSIFIED



MOTORCYCLE
HELMET DOT Sm,
pink bl
visor $25
352-503-7668




BABY CLOTHES sizes
3mths-5Toddler like new
.25-$2.00 each. call
352-257-3870
EDDIE BAUER DOU-
BLE STROLLER works
great $50.00 call
352-257-3870
MAPLE WOOD HIGH
CHAIR good/sturdy
working order $40.00.
call 352-257-3870


Sell r Swa


Very small
19 weeks old
$300-$350
Great personalities
(352) 628-7504
Dachshund Mini Long
Hair, Male Puppies
blk & cream, Champion
blood line. Health Cert.
$350. (352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell





L^k




New Puppy? Consider
a gift certificate for a
Puppy How 2 Class?
Call Deborah Lumley
Certified Prof Dog
Trainer at Intercept Dog
Training 352422-1123
or hersheysleacy.com
PUREBRED MINI-
DACHSHUNDS,
w/health cert.
8 wks old. black
& tans & dapples
males $300. females
$350. (352) 503-9750
or (352) 586-9928
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300. Schnauzer Pups
just born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827



2 Pot Belly Pigs
$50 each
Must sell as pair
(352) 634-4237
PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352)-445-0381




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**

CARIBBEAN SKIFF
'96, 15 FT. CC, 48HP
Evin. Galv. TrIr.
Much More $2,900.
Call (352) 249-7301
Fishing Machine
14 ft., 1989, V Hull, alu-
minum, 9.9 evinrude
mtr. galv. trlr. $1,600
Inverness, Call John
(727) 639-4218
G3 JON BOAT
2005 1442 14ft Jon
Boat with trailer, 2008
Yamaha 4stk 6HP
(under 10 hrs), Minn
Kota 501b thrust trolling
motor, & other accesso-
ries. Asking $2,000
(352)860-1228
KAYAK
Orange,
single person,
Good Shape
$150 352-422-4705
PONTOON
1990 24 ff Harris. 2005
50 HP Honda; Factor
Hard top, $5500
(352) 795-0553
PONTOON
1993 20 ff Tracker
60 Evenrude, w/tilt,
trailer. All in great
shape. Bimini, bait
well, fish finder, seats
13. $3250 352-201-8120
PONTOON BOAT

'08, 24'Sunchaser 824
by Smokercraft. Very
clean, needs nothing
Lots of extra's! 6x8
open front fishing
deck with 2 chrs. '07,
50 HP Yamaha 2
stroke, less then 50 hr.
'07 Road King, walk up
2 axel trlr. $10,250
(352) 419-7766


PONTOON
24 ft, HT 88 HP
Ev., interior redone;
With Trailer $4200 or
$3400 for boat only
(352) 476-3688
PONTOON
24 FT Gruman, 55
Yahama, Good Con-
dition, Bimini, No
trailer, $2100 OBO
352-201-8120
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



AIR STREAM 1998
33ft Motor home
454CIlEng, 2roofAC,
awnings all around,
7KWGen, 54kmi, A1
cond, Asking 16,900
(540) 305-9854
Couch out of an RV
5th Wheel
Excellent Condition
$150.
352-422-0273



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




FORD
2000 F250/Excurs 4
Alum 16" rims good
$200, new Pirelli
265/75/16 $130, new
General 235/85/16 $110
352-341-2962
PU Truck Bed Cover
for 8fft BedTilt top
fiberglass w/ lock,
perfect condition
Asking $250.
(352) 220-9787

Vehicles

"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
'03, Taurus SE,
V6, loaded, great
fuel economy $4,200
obo (352) 422-1798


301-1208 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly License Compliance Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, December 18,
2013 at 2:00 p.m. in room 280 at the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600 West Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place all persons interested
are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the License Compli-
ance Special Master; however cases may abate prior to the hearing date. If you
have any questions, contact Code Compliance Division at 352-527-5350.
Citations:
S Russell Policastro Citation 0120; case 141171 Engage in the business or act in
the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
S Christopher Fortenbery Citation 0126; case 143793 Engage in the business or
act in the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in Citrus
County.
* Adam Spate Citation written on 11/04/2013; case 149795 Engage in the busi-
ness or act in the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified
in Citrus County.
Note: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the License Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
HEATHER SMITH, LICENSE COMPLIANCE SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE DIVISION
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 8, 2013.


303-1208 SUCRN
12/12 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, December 12,2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, December 8, 2013.


302-1208 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name Notice
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of
Avery's Cheesecake lo-
cated at 1821 S. Suncoast
Blvd, Homosassa, Florida
34448, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State,
Division of Corporations,


Fictitious

Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED at Homosassa this
3rd day of December,
2013.
/s/ Debra Harlene Mc-
Queen, Ryan Andrew
Avery, Owners.
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. December 8 2013.


I


2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2011 Optima EX
loaded, leather, all
power keyless, GPS
$17,500352-212-5555
LINCOLN
1994 Town Car White
with gray interior only
109k miles. Cold AC,
Working Heat Asking
1,800 OBO Peggy
352-257-0388
LINCOLN
'99, Town car, white,
100,370.5 miles
$4,500.
(352) 503-9290 Patrick
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

ONE ONER
NISSAN
2008 Altima 3.5 SE, all
power, keyless, auto-
matic, high mileage,
$7,600 352-746-6394




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. DEC. 8th.
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
MERCEDES BENZ
1978, 450 SL, Convert.
excel, cond. 84k mi.
Caledonian green
$13,000, 352-464-3187
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
con. Best offer above
$20,000. 352-302-8265





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Chevrolet
2003 Silverado
Pick-Up, Real Nice,
clean. Priced for quick
sale $4900 OBO
(917) 733-3644
DODGE
'00, Ram 1500, auto,
AC, reese hitch new
tran,130K mi, dpndble
$2,900.352-563-0615
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$8,300. (352) 726-3730
Cell (352) 422-0201
TOYOTA
2004 Tundra SR5
71Kmi, Red, Exc
Cond, $10,500
(352) 860-0180



CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
GMC
07 Yukon SLT, loaded,
full power, DVD, bose,
very good, 116K ml
$17,800 (352) 212-5555
GMC
'89, Jimmy,
Fair Condition
$1,200.
(352) 746-6998
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles $3000
352-628-1646
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735



Craftsman
motorcycle jack
Excellent Cond $60
(352) 419-5363
HARLEY
'02, Road King,
23,500 mi., gar. kept,
adult driven, beautiful
$7,850 obo, 422-1866
Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
Very low miles, garage
kept, Adult Owner,
$4900 (352) 257-8850
LINHAI YAMAHA
2008 Mainstreet, 300
CC, scooter, 6k miles,
Extra's & new cond.
$2500 (352) 382-3280
Triumph-79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$6500. 352-513-4257



304-1208 SUCRN
December Sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicle/ves-
sel will be sold at public
auction, Free of all prior
liens, per FL Stat. 713.78,
on the prescribed dates at
Tropical Window Tinting,
1612 Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34448,
352-795-3456. No titles, as
is, cash only.
Sale date 12/19/2013
2003 Ford VIN#
1FTRX17W43NA07348
Sale date 12/20/2013
1991 BMW VIN#
WBAAD231XMED30178
December 8, 2013.


r1k. l


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U -H^^^^^^


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 FORD MUSTANG


2014 FORD FUSION SE





Or Customer Savings Up To
$2,000 OFF
MSRP with Ford Credit Assistance


2014 FORD ESCAPE SE

"- --. .


Or Customer Savings Up To
$2,000 OFF
MSRP with Ford Credit Assistance


1.9%
APR for 36 months*


Ogi g I FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
Relax, It's Covered.t.
* 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians
* 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage**


"- Call For Savings!
- 352-795-7371


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
"No all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing 36 months at $17 48 per month per $1,000 financed, regardless of down payment Take delivery from dealer stock by 12/14/13 See dealer for qualifications and complete details See your dealerfor limited-warranty coverage details Vehicles available varies by dealership
do'r Li!
-~ ~ cA


2012 FORD FUSION SE
One owner, 33,000 miles. GP1653
$17,950


2011 FORD RANGER XLT
Extended Cab, 17,000 miles. GP1679
$19,950


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
33,000 miles, leather sunroof. GP1712
$20,950


2010 FORD FUSION SEL
Leather, Sunroof. GP1705
$20,450


2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT 2012 FORD EDGE LTD 2011 LINCOLN MKX 2012 LINCOLN MKX
305V8. GPR1251 Navigation, 19,000 miles. GPR1258 Leather, 29,000 miles. GP1717 19,000 Miles. GP1260
$27,950 $27,950 $28,950 $29,950


2009 LINCOLN MKS
Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1681
$24,950
*'*-- -. ^ y
-



2013 LINCOLN MKT
10,000 Miles. GPR1265
$30,950


Nick Nicholas
S|Hwy. 19N.
Crystal River 7957371 Rick Petro
y mWW .HicknicholasfordliHCOlH.COm Salesperson of the Month


*0% is not available on all models See dealer for complete details Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399 **Ford Credit
Financing required Not all buyers will qualify Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors Pictures are for illustration purposes only Prices and payments good through 12/14/13


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 D7


OrsalRv




D8 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL NISSAN


TO


2014
NISSAN ALTIMA
MODEL: 13114
VIN: 175679


Aprr41 a-p mbt


$


kPER
AMO.

APR


ONE OR MORE AT THIS PRICE


LEASE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES,NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY, $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE AS-
SISTANCE AND $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.


2014
NISSAN
SENTRA


PER
0% APR
-Ig E


MODEL: 12014 ONE OR MORE AT THIS PRICI
VIN: 609406
LEASE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES,NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY, $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE AS-
SISTANCE AND $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT


2014
NISSAN
ROGUE
MODEL: 22114
VIN: 751506


s188.
0% APR
ONE OR MORE AT THIS PRICE


LEASE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES,NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY, $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE AS-
SISTANCE AND $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT


Brand New
NISSAN
FRONTIER < .
MODEL: 31014
VIN: 712881


,W
'B ^ -"


IfJUPER
0% APR
ONE OR MORE AT THIS PRICE


LEASE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES,NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY, $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE AS-
SISTANCE AND $3999 DUE AT SIGNING. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.


4 ft^
sSry


A CRYSTAL
N I SSAN


a/


0 800-584-8755 EXT. 10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
E- 937 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:00pm Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:00pm Saturday 8:00am-4:00pm Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm Saturday & Sunday-Closed
AO% IS AVAILABLE ON SELECT YEARS, MAKES AND MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFYAND $1000
CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED, PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


m
E




INSIDE


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLEI REAL ESTATE GUI DE 11


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


A Bespoke Global Big Blue
Leather Head Football by Paul
Cunningham. Each of these
handsome footballs are individu-
ally made from carefully selected
hides, and feature incredible
elements of artisanry. This special
football is handmade from a
beautiful hide of Royal Blue
leather with a light pebble grain
and stitched with red thread.
'-ii- -,t. I .


~~ -\


II'i/( ; i


I F! VAU'Ilk'^


A I


: I


3S :i V, l A 2 I [II I,,Jsl




E2SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


IJ I Z I 5 I 3 Z t j ; 4 1 0
(3 2nte
.I...... ...


SUpgraded Lg. Kitchen Beautiful Master Suite
SRelaxing Master Bath Huge Screened Lanai
'2.75 Acres/Salt Water Pool ,4 + CAR GAR.
'2 HVAC Systems Guest Suite with Sep. Entry
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Eilull ellesulloll" lelniul eleu
ww w.oiidnLisIiiigl1lo.co1111




y15,11Il-I I- k:~~ ljlll
'637.282






SIMPLY EXQUISITE VILLA
SGorgeous Entry ,Beautiful Kitchen
SSS Appliances Functional Center Island
SRelaxing Master Suite Many Updates
SFormer Model Home Elegant Decor
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
ElIMll1 elliesulloell" menlie
www.FIOlidnL isl lluO.coln


INVERNESS POOL HOME
2BR/1.5 BA HOME ON GOSPEL ISLAND TILE
FLOORING, GREAT ROOM, AND FORMAL LIVING
ROOM AND GARAGE. COMES WITH EXTRA
ADJOINING BUILDING LOT TOTAL OF 1/2 ACRE
WITH DEEDED WATER ACCESS.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 Ii
Email: barbarajmills@earthink.net


I' I Ii


I "- "- I I1
4749 N. PERRY DR.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BNA/2CG w/POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot
* Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010)
* Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures
PETER & MARVIA KOROL I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


LIUnLEL nlUUE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG with HEATED POOL
*Golf Community Living RM & Fam. RM
*All newer Appliances Furnishings Available
* Double-sided gas fireplace
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [ fl
(352) 527-7842 L i
352) 422-3875


- 1111 I,'M i11" I II
44 PINE DRIVE SMW
SWell-Maintained 3BR/2BA/2CG 2644SF Living Area
SLiving Rm /Family Rm Style, Open Floor Plan
SFormal DR& Wood Burning FP in Famn Rm
S11'x32' Enclosed Porch Overlooks Greenbelt
SRe-roof 2013 w/5Oyr Shingles, A/C Replaced 2009
SGarage Bump Out Workshop Area
SOrig Owners, Never Smoked or Had Pets in Home
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 [i
Email: Iounialley@tampabay.rr.com


1752 W. SHANELLE PATH, LECANTO
S2 BR, 2 BATH w/Den 2-Car Garage
* 2000 Built Oversized Screened Porch
* Maintenance-Free Open Floor Plan
* Social Membership Includes Terra Vista
DR Hwy 486 to Brentwood Entrance, to N Brentwood Circle, to
right on W Nicole, to end Take a leftto Shanelle Path
to right on W Shanelle Path
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 I
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com




6%?
WVM^



REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


Waterfront WoW!!! You won't find a better priced
6/3/2 with open water view anywhere. Located in front of
the head spring in Kings Bay. Two stories, two kitchens,
den, office, loft, screened lanai, wood-burning fireplace
and so much more. Exterior boasts fenced yard, seawall,
dock and pool overlooking Kings Bay.
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

U


6223 W. WESTON DR., MEADOWCREST
3/2/2, spacious & open, eat-in kitchen, screen
lanai, indoor utility rm. Heat/AC approx. 6 yrs old.
DIR.: Hwy. 44 or Hwy. 486 to Meadowcrest Dr.
Turn into Pinehurst VIg., on Weston. See sign &
home to your left.

JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
1 Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com


Spend the holidays in this home just seconds from the
river with Gulf access. Kitchen & bathrooms new
cabinets with granite, loft office, fam. & liv. rm., screen
lanai, dock with lift.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: romaxgal22@yahoo.com


I I 4 I I1 1 I
110 OAK VILLAGE BLVD., HOMOSASSA
Updated 3/2/2 home on a spacious boulevard lot in Oak
Village/Sugarmill Woods. Open floor plan with a 3 season
Florida room, galley kitchen with breakfast nook, new A/C and
new roof in 2005 & new kitchen in 2011, new tile floor in
family room 2013.
Dir.: US 98 to OR 480 (Oak Park Blvd.) to right on Oak
Village Blvd. House on le ft.
TONY VIGGIANO (352) 586-5772
TonyViggiano@gmail.com Tony Viggiano.com


242 N. Ie l Hw. Beel Hil 2-82w w.EAIo 0 US w.4 Ivres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. HonsIs 62-80 w wHIraniea~fl~o 0 EHy 1,C lRvr7524


1400 W. STAFFORD ST., CITRUS HILLS
4/4/2 Plus Office Pool & Cedar-Lined Sauna
* Open Split Floor Plan Updated Windows, Roof, A/C
* Sec. System, Central Vac All New Stainless Appliances
* Move-In Ready Detached Workshop w/Electric
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net I ,
www.sellingcitruscountyhomescom


i


352 422-3875




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average 30-year loan rate up last week


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Aver-
age U.S. rates for fixed
mortgages rose sharply this
week, making home-buying
slightly less affordable.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday the av-
erage rate on the 30-year
loan jumped to 4.46 per-
cent from 4.29 percent last
week. The average on the
15-year fixed loan in-
creased to 3.47 percent
from 3.30 percent.
Rates have risen a full
percentage point since
May after the Federal Re-
serve signaled it might
slow its bond purchases by
year's end. Rates peaked
at 4.6 percent in August.
Mortgage rates have sta-
bilized since September,
when the Fed surprised
markets by taking no ac-
tion. And rates remain low
by historical standards.
The Fed meets later this


month and could slow the
bond purchases if the
economy shows further
improvement.
The bond purchases are
designed to keep long-
term rates low
The increase in mort-
gage rates has contributed
to a slowdown in home
sales over the past two
months. But the govern-
ment reported Wednesday
that purchases of new
homes ramped up in Octo-
ber after three months of
soft sales, evidence that
the housing market is im-
proving fitfully
Sales of new homes in-
creased 25.4 percent to a
seasonally adjusted an-
nual rate of 444,000 in Oc-
tober, the largest monthly
percentage increase since
May 1980.
And in another sign of
potential economic
strength, the Commerce
Department said Thursday


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney-
Realtor.-, Realtor@ I
1 302-3179 A HOUSE. 2879022
746-67o00 SOLD Name.
The golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.

4I 4 ,


the economy grew at a 3.6
percent annual rate from
July through September,
the fastest since early 2012.
But nearly half the growth
came from a buildup in
business stockpiles, a trend
that could reverse in the
current quarter and hold
back growth.
To calculate average
mortgage rates, Freddie
Mac surveys lenders
across the country on Mon-


day through Wednesday
each week. The average
doesn't include extra fees,
known as points, which
most borrowers must pay
to get the lowest rates. One
point equals 1 percent of
the loan amount
The average fee for a 30-
year mortgage fell to 0.5
point from 0.7 point. The
fee for a 15-year loan
dropped to 0.4 point from
0.7 point.


Angelo signs on
with RE/MAX
The associates and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One are
very pleased to welcome
Charlene Angelo to their
real estate firm. Charlene
has been a Realtor for more
than 15 years and brings a
huge amount of experience
in the Citrus County area to
the RE/MAX organization.
She will be working out of
the Homosassa office of


IRE/MAX
Realty
SOne lo-
cated on
4"0 U.S. 19
S- just south
of Sug-
"' armill
Charlene Woods.
Angelo The bro-
RE/MAX
Realty One. kers of
RE/MAX
are proud to have Charlene
on their team and wish her
many years of success.


1iEI746-9000,


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 769
BROKERASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR






..UNDER CONSTRUCTlON
G5518" N. ELKCAM 5406 N. CROSSGATE
296 $369 0 3/2/2 706451 $163,000 3/2/3 706628 $299,000


1974 W. ALHAMBRA
3/2/2 705787 $108,000


87 S. LUCILLE 19 N. ADAMS
2/2/2 703454 $72,000 2/1.5 704683 $42,500


SOS E. Charleston Ct -
Hernando 4390 W Pine Ridge Blvd.
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, HVAC Pine Ridge
2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of Beautiful 4/4/3 with office Caged in ground salt
storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer water pool with spa 3981 sq ft of living area,
kitchen. Pristine condition. Don't miss out stainless steel appliances Wet bar, Tray ceilings,
call today! $249,900 plantation shutters, Intercom, and summer kitchen
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis to Come see it today! Priced at $465,000
right on Charleston to home on right. Directions: Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd. to home on left.


522 S. JACKSON 9 N. WADSWORTH I I 52 S. FILLMORE
I2/1/1 706595 $56,900 I L 3/1.5 704088 $52,500 [2/1/1 704090 $45,900J
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


SReal Estate DIGEST


BEVERLY HILLS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E3


D;ip)ii~iTjiL=




E4 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci iIN\.iClE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


What's the skinny


on macadamia nuts?


Tasty morsels originally from Down Under
Holiday season involves entertain- scribed it first in 1858. Macadamia inte-
ing and visiting friends and family grifolia is the parent species introduced
This year I decided to make to Hawaii in the late 1800s.
Macadamia nut cookies and Macadamias used for com-
chocolate covered Macadamias mercial nut production are a
as gifts. cultivated variety developed in
Macadamia is a genus con- Hawaii. They must have frost-
taining 11 species of evergreen free zones from 9b-12 and be
trees which flower and then planted in full sun in fertile,
grow hard-shelled, round nuts moist but well-drained soil.
encased in green husks quite Trees start to bear at about five
like walnuts. Originally from to seven years of age. A 10-
Australia and nearby islands of year-old tree can produce up
Sulawesi and New Caledonia, to 150 pounds of nuts in the
Macadamias were important Jane Weber shell.
in the diet of indigenous JANE'S Trees mature to around 35 to
people. 40 feet tall, with a spread of
First noted by the English GARDEN about 20 feet. Rows are
botanist Allan Cunningham in planted about 15 to 20 feet
Queensland, Australia, the name honors apart. Nuts take up to nine months to de-
Scottish physician John Macadam, 1827- velop and fall naturally from September
1865 who practiced in Australia. to January Small farmers hand-rake the
Macadam's patient Baron Ferdinand Von
Muelle, a German botanist, officially de- See JANE/Page E5


Inside...


Luxe leisure
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
Shopping apps
PAGE E12
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Reupholstering chair hasn't harmed its potential value


Dear John: Enclosed are
pictures of two chairs
that are in our family
The platform rocker
was my mother's. I
do not know how
long she had it,
however I have had
it since 1965. It had
been filled with a
straw-like sub-
stance, but I refin-
ished it and had it
reupholstered.
Is the value of it John
gone? What would SIKOI
it sell for if I wished AT
to sell it? _____
The other chair
was in the attic of an old house
we owned. It is quite small and
has only four screws in it. All
the joints are glued together,
with burlap wrapped around
them. What is its worth?


h

-i
R:


Also, I am sending pictures
and information on old books I
have. Any information you can
give me will be ap-
preciated. I would
like to know where
S to get a Bible re-
bound, too. Thank
you for your weekly
articles.
The four books
are blue with gold-
lined pages and
have "Lt. Winm.
ikorski Jones" stamped in
SKI'S them, and one has a
nc very dim script in a
_____ beautiful handwrit-
ing. One is "Robert
Burns," 1863. Second is
"Pope's Poems," 1864 and
third is "Milton's Poems,"
1865. Fourth is "Goldsmith's
Poems," 1866. The black book
is leather with gold pages, by


Sir Walter Scott, 1910. The
green book is Keats and has a
page with "Perth Academy"
on it; the larger blue book has
gold on the pages and is from
1862. I have others but know
you cannot deal with all of
them. Thank you for any help
you can give me. B.P,
Internet
Dear B.P: The platform
rocker you have was manufac-
tured in America. The time of
production was the last quar-
ter of the 19th century No, the
value has not been reduced by
refinishing it. If a piece of an-
tique furniture needs to be re-
finished, it enhances the value
and salability to have it done.
It looks like you did a good job.
Potential dollar value is $75 to
$150, with $150 being a lucky
day
Since you mention you have


more books than in the photos
you sent, it would be best to
contact the Florida Antiquar-
ian Booksellers at www.florid-
abooksellers.com. The phone
number is 727-234-7759. Good
luck.
DearJohn: I am enclosing a
picture of an item that was a
gift from a friend. It very much
looks like a soapstone vase
that you featured in the Citrus
County Chronicle on October
6. Do you think it has any dol-
lar value? Thank you for your
opinion. -ZT, Homosassa
Dear Z.T.: Yes, you are cor-
rect; the ornate vase featuring
See ATTIC/Page E12
This refinished platform rocker
was likely made in America
during the latter part of the
19th century.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

nuts and discard small, discolored
speciments or those nuts with tiny
holes bored by insects. Culls are
bagged for pig feed. Plantation
groves are mechanically
harvested.
Farmers dump the green-husked
nuts into a hopper, which strips and
ejects the husk. Then the hard-
shelled nuts roll down a chute over
steel bars an inch apart. Smaller
ones drop through and are used by
families, friends and neighbors.
Marketable nuts are laid on in-
clined 8 by 4 inch trays to air dry
for a few weeks to reduce moisture
levels from 25 percent to
1.5 percent.
The dried nuts are taken to mar-
ket, where they currently fetch $3 a
pound. Small farmers return with
free cracked shells to use as drive-
way mulch.
A widow farmer at Mark Twain's
Monkey Puzzle Tree road sign in
Ka'u, Hawaii explained her opera-
tion and gave me an hour-long tour I
had only stopped to ask about
Twain's tree. She sold me a gallon
bag of dried nuts for $3 which held 3
pounds.
Macadamias take 300 pounds
pressure to crack the 1/8 inch thick
shell. Farmers used to spread the
nuts between heavy steel plates and
drive their tractors over them. My
hostess used a lever operated, vise-
like device.
Modern processors use fast ma-
chines, so most of the nuts remain
whole or only split in half My nuts

IN 6 1


were individually nestled in a hole
in a steel bar then whacked with an
8-pound beater mallet The 3 pounds
yielded 1.5 pounds of raw, chewy
nuts.
After blanching for safety, they
were spread in a large cake pan and
roasted at 250 degrees for five min-
utes to crisp up. Whole nuts were
dipped in dark chocolate, 45 percent
cacao, and left to cool on wax paper
The irresistible half-nuts mostly got
eaten raw The pieces went into
cookies: Macadamia sandies and
chocolate chip with macadamias
rather than walnuts.
There are several companies pro-
ducing Macadamia products. Penn-
sylvania-based Hershey's owns
Mauna Loa near Hilo, Hawaii. The
interesting free factory tour is a stop
for cruise ship day-trippers on their
way to Volcanoes National Park.
Boxes of chocolate-covered nuts and
tins of roasted macadamias were the
same price at the factory as in Wal-
mart. They make souvenirs to share
during the holidays.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
ofnative plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of
the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.



-yyr 111" 9 -i7 )'I/9IT A l


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 41111W
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 AWeekl Properties
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM NEW LISTING


bi,$StA 479 W Mickey Mantle Path
MLS 703997 $385,000
Terra Vista Value, savings, elegance AND
the golf view you've always dreamed of.
Dir Hwy 486 to Terra Vista entry, follow to round about,
go Left, follow to just before back gate, Right on
Mickey Mantle, to House on Right
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING


,t7SV t 979 W Skyview Crossing Dr
MLS 707041 $189,000
Maintenance Free Villa has beautiful curb
appeal with 3 bdrm, 2 baths, 2 car garage.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
B.' -, nrs .'.h -


JAallsw 1862 N Gibson Pt
'r MLS 707001 $274,900
3/2.5/2 home- well thought out to provide
comfortable living in just under 2100sf.
Carl Manucci 352-302-9787
NEW LISTING


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
NEW LISTING





-ta"o' 1115 N Carnevale Ter
MLS 707014 $229,500
3 bdrm,2 bath updated pool home -
a great buy, great opportunity,
great location.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


4 /AiLit 3824 W Northcrest Ct
MLS 706950 $139,995
Spacious 3/2/2 in great friendly community.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


,b0 4075 N Pony Drive $l 463 W Doerr Path
'MLS 704678 $299,900 MLS 703227 $273,000
Complete remodel in 2009-fabulous 4/3.5/3 Well maintained Villa has 3bd/3ba plus
home w/wooded acreage, an office.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


675 W Doerr Palh
MLS 358289 $195,000
Customized 3bd/2ba Villa w/enlarged
garage & Florida room.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


7"iZ 1210 E Silver Thorn Lp
MLS 705707 $118,800
3/2/2 well maintained home with
community amenities/activities.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


H ID T A C


C-it?".'
.,,LiLS 1044 E McKinley St
MLS 704302 $228,990
Price Reduced for quick sale!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086






2178W Snowy Egret PI
MLS 703006 $93,900
3bd/2ba home comes with adjoining extra
lot. Near golf course.
DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478


-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


H Ir
I13
"wI... II .. I ,,, , 1 I i,,, I .. ,I I ,,, ,I Ih Ih I ,,,I ,,I ,I


Bidding Ends Tues., December 17th 1 2:00 p.m
f blhlr L A.io Ecnd fBId Fearr* -
Ofleftd Onii Excduil.ly ar RouelAuti n cor.am
3.6 Acres Commercial Lot
U.S. Hwj. 19 & N.W. 137th St., Chleland, FL
10 Acres
W. Huwy 326, Morriston, FL
10 Acres Timberland
126th Avenue, Cedar Key, FL
Beautiful Residential Lot
w/ Mobile Home
S.W. 57th Court, Cedar Keyi, FL
5 Acres Residential Lot
S.E. 66 Place, Morriston. FL
Abo Selling 17* Proprtbs Throughout FL
Many Seling Absoautel
Rowell Auctions, Inc. [
i i800-323-8388 '1mi
*HrialMHtrir-Ab 479 ABll 2- 10%BoM Pm


Alson Markham | ]1
& Steve McCllory
Realty Leaders 352-422-3998 A
[. JW I k ii: 10 1M


8801 E. CRESCO LANE, INVERNESS
DAVIS LAKE GOLF ESTATES
Spacious 1,969 sq. ft. custom home
offering a craft room and sunny
Florida room. Tastefully updated with
newer roof, kitchen, lighting, tile
flooring and more. Call for details.
MLS #706320 LIST PRICE $ 123,900
Dir: 44 West then 41 South to L on Eden, R on Old
Floral City Rd, L on Sandpiper, L on Country Club,
bear R at curve, R onto Cresco home on left.


0


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E5








Myths and truths about those antiques in your attic


ypsy's two
cents: I have
been informed
that growling is not
very polite. Evidently,
what comes natural -
isn't always correct.
My parents say I'm
just a stubborn
teenager, but I know
better Maybe that's Steve
not fair; as they do TIME
love me, I'll work on TE
it. Grrrr. E
Myth: I'll retire on
my collector plates.
Truth: If you enjoy them, con-
tinue to do so, because if it's
made as a "collector or limited
edition" it's of little value. We
have seen thousands of these


I


plates that people
have paid $20 to $50
for each, but now they
are flea market items
at $1 to $5 each.
SMyth: Buyers will
line up for grandma's
dishes.
Truth: There are
some valuable dish
Barnes sets such as Minton,
WILL Desert Rose, even Fi-
Sestaware, to name a
LL few- buttheyneedto
be in good condition.
Most others have little value,
even if in perfect condition.
Noritake (Japan) and Limoges
(France) made thousands of
beautiful patterns and are hard
to sell. If it has a gold/silver trim,


the dishwasher removes it and
washing by hand is dismissed
after one thought
Myth: If it's old, it must be
valuable.
Truth: Like relatives, this may
or may not apply to antiques.
Consider quality and quantity,
regardless of age, as a guideline
for value. A pre-Columbian arti-
fact can be worth less than a set
of Fiestaware made in the '50s.
Myth: Antiques always go up
in value.
Truth: Everything goes in cy-
cles. We hear people say, "I paid a
lot of money for that," only to find
out the market has changed. Flow
blue china used to command hun-
dreds or thousands of dollars;
now it is selling for under a $100.


I actually had someone hang up
on me after she found out that
what she paid $300 for 30 years
ago was now retailing at $100.
Myth: Never refinish furniture.
Truth: I might agree if it's
from a famous maker, rare or
even a high-quality piece. Many
pieces, even true antiques, dete-
riorate to a point where refin-
ishing is the only option.
Refinishing can make a piece
more functional and won't nec-
essarily devalue it If it is a prim-
itive piece with old blue, red or
yellow paint, it would be best to
have someone check it for value
before refinishing.
This month's story: I left South
Florida in 1977 and gave a 4-foot
ladder to my Dad, who in 1980


moved to Inverness. Living in
Colorado, I would visit Florida
occasionally and see my ladder
with either new scars or new
paint splatters.
That ladder eventually disap-
peared and I never gave it an-
other thought. Our shop opened
in 2009, and a dealer from Ocala
brought in this ladder for dis-
play purposes yes, it was
mine, and I had to buy it back for
$20. It's still in use.
Next month's topic: "It be-
longed to my grandmother."
Happy Trails.


Steve Barnes owns and, along
with his shop dog Gypsy, oper-
ates Olde Inverness Antiques


REALTY GROUP
REALTYiGIROUP


Specaii.gi er it
Brnwo Resales .


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Centei
BILL DfECKER 3.52-464-0647 SIUSAN MULLN 352F-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKIN 352.-427-3777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE
Luxury and storage! With over 3,600 square feet of gorgeously appointed living
space this home has all the options. The tall cherry cabinets, Cornan
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR countertops, SS appliances and walk-in butler pantry make this gourmetkitchen
HILLSIDE SOUTH the envy of every cook. The massiveformal living area is perfectfor entertaining
Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths, great with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring which carries through to the
room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting area & TWO walk-in closets,
Skyview golf course with breathtaking views. Oversized lanai with Split floor plan, guest bedroomsw/direct bath access& huge walk-in closets. A
lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra Vista. beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2-car garagewith a separate golf cart
MLS 702685........................................................................... $334.900 entrance comnlete thisfa ilnus homp MIS 70049 422.900


Stunningly beautiful 4/3/2.5 Michael Angelo model with custom -. M- - i.. ., i ,-1 -i ,,....... ..
changes allowing for a more open feel. Situated on a private, amazingly SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH ,r i ,,-,-
landscaped lot atthe end of a cul-de-sac in Bellamy Ridge. Heated pool ELEGANCE! Windward model with many upgrades! This nicely appointed ..-.,....,, ,.i. .. ,, .-,
with waterfall feature. Custom designed fish pond complete with water open floor plan home was designed to let the Florida sunshine in ... , i.. DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR
fountain. Exterior stone. Brick paver drive way, entrance and pool deck. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2-car garage. Some of the many upgrades include i i -- ,, ,l ,,LAKEVIEW VILLAS
Golf Cart Garage. Private well for irrigation. This home is immaculate Brazilian hardwood floors, cathedral ceilings, luxurious master bath ......-1,,,,, Nicely maintained Malibu model with great open floor plan on golf
inside and out. Granite countertops. 42" staggered wood kitchen amazing pool and Jacuzzi, bonus enclosed sunroom, incredible kitchen and 1,,,, -. ......- ..... ,11 ... . ,-1 course homesite. This home has 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can
cabinets. Sliding doors throughout the home allowing for maximum on a cul-de-sac! You'll be proud to return to this elegant home w/lush be used as a third bedroom. An outstanding home for year round or
light. Custom Armstrong flooring. MLS 706244......................$699,000 landscaping & on a large corner lot. MLS 705865.........................$339,000 7i 1 129.900 a vacation getaway. MLS 706854.......................................... $214,900
Terms 6 Moth or More


..... ... ...



DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
BRENTWOOD VILLAS Contemporary, beautiful 2/2.5/1 townhouse in gated community of This spacious unfurnished 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with open floor DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR
Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished Brentwood. A spacious dining room/great room combination. All plan, large eat-in kitchen and formal dining area is perfect for HILLSIDE VILLAS
detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2-car garage. Open floor bedrooms upstairs. Half bath downstairs. Inside laundry, tile & entertaining. Located on a corner lot and close to the Bella Vita Maintenance-free villa. Unfurnished 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2-car
plan with lots of space. Social membership is included. carpet. Glass doors open to screen lanai off of living room. Social Fitness Center & Spa. Social Membership included. garage, pool and Jacuzzi. Located on the golf course.
# 2 12 1 ................................................................................................ $ 1 ,1 0 0 m e m b e rs hip in c lu d e d # 66 5 1 ...................................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0 # 892 1 ................................................................................................ $ 1 ,3 0 0 # 5958 ................................................................................................ $ 1 ,8 0 0


E6 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No muss, no fuss plants for beginning gardeners


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A butterfly bush in New Market, Va. The butterfly bush is a pollinator-attracting, low-maintenance shrub that once
established can tolerate weather extremes and gardener neglect. It is considered invasive in certain areas, though,
so keep it from spreading by removing the spent flower heads before they can seed.






CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
A taste of unspoiled nature secluded8 + .I llll' .. h .. Illl h I l IlIl l'Il lll l .....I '
P IN E ID G E ponds, mature oak trees The 2 spacious i........ i1, .. .. hil Ill l I I I I ... .. i i ,llh ,I I, ,I .....i .
ES TA T ES positioned in a beautiful settngl .. .. I I Ii . .. I I I i I I .... ........ I
Elegant custom built 3/4/3 Pool I ...I ... I 800.000 piece waiting for you and your family to move right ml
Ir d Dactive tour $549,000
I ,,,,".,,',. I' I.,..... 1.h1h
ophisiae lietyl
$469,000 I

I T A THE GLEN SOUTHERN STYLE COUNTRY ESTATE PLEASANT GROVE
A 55+ community Enjoy maintenancefree PLANTATION HOME I 4511 sq ft est, custom
S-ated in The Glen Custom built 4/3/2 on approx 10 ac in 5 acres MOL Exceptional a
B An ...e laundry, Cathedral wood quality vaulted tongue& UNSPOILED NATURE
carpet and paint, fireplace Recently i ings, fpl, granite counters adjacent to Homosassa/Chassahowitzka
it is in perfect conditionl Just unpack the impeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 cabinetry, fao rm den/office, 2+2 car Preserve & Otter Creek 2 parcels for a
B A R T H suitcase and relax Close to shopping, dining r I total of 19+ acre Scenic mixture of
REALTOR and medical facities $65,00 $379,000 $499.900 sawgrass and trees $59,000

Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house corn _
SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAKE!!! MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS, juTSTANDIC WATERFRONT RE'iDE CE
n0 a 1 2 master suites, apart- 1 2 ac (160 x 300+ ft), picturesque Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home an a I acre
ment lower level Upper level corner lot with mature oak trees and ..
Accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane setting with major oak trees Charming lots of prvacyl Very well maintained,
iWCJ o ^ S ~a cBF c^ ^^ cTDC 20 wa E ,EC E
Investors Realty r s terms, security system, updated c docks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
kithe & bahroms 19 f o oigialfituesand fireplace still in ,Updated roof, A/C, kit, windows, every-
of Citrus County, Inc. seawaboat ftl Everything js l re thing meticulous maintained Priced
otiywebsiteat: wntfloridahousecoin walgryou $488,000 seawall $179,000 Il $169,000 sooo nght at $399,000!


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Gardening is a forgiving
pursuit. Get it wrong one
year and you can start
fresh again the next, wiser,
with lessons learned.
Study up between plant-
ing seasons. Scan the seed
catalogs for bulletproof
plants that anyone with
the blackest of thumbs can
grow
"Start small," said Claire
Watson, Wave brand man-
ager for Ball Horticultural
Co. in West Chicago, Ill.
"Whether it's a vegetable
garden or flowers, don't
give in to taking on too


0!1 American
... Realty &
-KNA Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41
Inverness, FL
352-726-5855


much, too soon. A few
small successes will give
you the confidence to ex-
pand or at least you'll
realize your limits."
Learn the rules of the
row
"The right plant for the
right place" may be a gar-
dening cliche, but it's an
accurate one. So, too, is the
caution, "Know your
(USDA plant hardiness)
zone."
"Like humans, plants
will perish without water
and food," Watson said.
"So plants that can survive
the stress of missing a few

See NO FUSS/Page Ell


BARBARA
BANKS
Realtor
cell: 352-476-3232


Please visit website www.barbarabanks.net
iil J 3/2/2 POOL Seller's Pride
shows in this updated home. Split
floor plan, light & bright! Large
master, lovely new kitchen with all
appliances (Bosch range &
dishwasher), wood cabinets.
Features porcelain tile & hardwood
flooring, double-pane windows all
with plantation shutters, utility room with storage, workbench in garage,
sprinklers, inground pool with child guard, newer A/C. Move in and enjoy this
like-new home. MLS702982 ASKING $154,500
LOVELY
INVERNESS POOL
HOME
4/3/2, offering eat-in-kitchen, pass
thin to large great room with dining
area and wood-burning fireplace,
family room, inside laundry, over-
sized master suite, possible in-law
arrangement, inground caged pool, covered lanai.. all this & more sitting on .73acre.
Room for the whole family here. MLS 705163 ASKING $195,000
w q WATERFRONT 3/2 with carport
Son Hernando Chain of Lakes, offers
parti ally-fenced yard in a lovely setting
with 2 docks, updated kitchen & o baths, tile
e flooring, inside laundry. Lower level
24x24 enclosed family room (lanai) with
air unit, sliding windows & screens.
Upper lever has its own screen porch with
beautiful views. New roof in 06. Dock has
hose bib for cleaning. Don't miss out on
this waterfront bargain!l MLS705088 ASKING $124,900
NEED ROOM TO ROAM AT
A MODEST PRICE?
Here is a well-cared for home that offers
2/2/carport, plus additional large room
w/bath that could be 3rd bedroom,
family room or in-law arrangement.
Large living area, eat-in kitchen, newer water system, large screen porch,
shed, decorator block in extra large under roof carport area. All sitting on
a lovely double lot. MLS 705774 ASKING $84,900
Zechariah 4:6 OOOGUE4


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E7




E SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 "' *
l .. i :


, dj7:
~,4'


SPORTING GIFTS


FOR THE WELL-HEELED


KIM COOK
Associated Press

"To the art of working well, a civi-
lized race would add the art of
playing well," philosopher George
Santayana said.
For those with means, pursuing
leisure can involve the finest com-
ponents. Beautiful materials and
craftwork can take these items into
the realm of art.
"The market for these high-end
sporting items is extremely frac-
tured. No one is authentically show-
casing these exceptional artisans in
a way that celebrates their superior
craftsmanship," says Pippa McAr-
dle, co-founder of Bespoke Global,
which sells custom-made home
furnishings and accessories.
So what does play y
look like. it the iI\ -
ury end oft the
spectr li Sit


Water sports
As journalist Tom Brokaw said,
"If fishing is a religion, fly fishing is
high church." Aficionados appreci-
ate the craftsmanship of Willow
Reels, started in Clarkston, Mich.,
by Chris Reister He makes classic
fly fishing reels out of aircraft-
grade aluminum, brass, and ebony
redwood, or maple burl. You can
buy the reels laser-cut with scroll,
tribal or flower motifs, or have your
own design inlaid. (wwwbespoke
global.com)
In Blue Ridge, Ga., Bill Oyster's
eponymous company makes supple
bamboo fly rods that he sells
Worldwide. Former
See


- -S
.~
N


A carved Brooks
Saddle from
Karaginther.com.
je Ginther. a leather
/artist, carves intricate,
elaborate patterns on
4 bicycle saddles and
S'/ bags. inspired by her love
/ of nature and art.


A carnival
backgammon set
from Alexandrall
design.com. Llewellyn's sets
feature unusual visuals like AAB
pheasant feathers, antlers and vintage
carnival imagery. She creates custom sets
that can be highly personalized. Bespoke game
pieces made of semi precious stones like lapis lazuli,
malachite and jasper are encased in polished brass,
and may be engraved.
Alexandra Llewellyn Design Ltd./Asso: : wr 1 i-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E9


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


Associated Press
A Bespoke Global Cole-Man raptor hood by
Ken Hooke, used in the sport of falconry. Hooke's
Cole-man is a highly stylized blocked Indian hood.
It's fully lined and has a protective sewn brace
plate on the inside. The fiery metallic red iguana
skin and calf leather make this a truly unique
piece for a male falcon.


WAIT 'TIL YOU SEE THESE AMAZING SET UP SHOP NOW! Commercial great for car
SUNSETS, waterfront home! 2/2, well-kept lot/produce stand. Many upgrades, 2 offices, ready
house in Inverness, ready for you! JUST to go when you are! 7007 S. Florida. $80,000.
$124,500. #701492. #706282. Sheila Bensinger 352-476-5403.




EIO SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013


LUXURY
Continued from Page E8

President Jimmy Carter has one.
The reel seats are hand-en-
graved, the cane is flamed to add
spring and resilience, the finish
guides are bronze and the hard-
ware is blued, an electrochemi-
cal process that protects against
rust (www.oysterbamboo.com)
And then there are boats. Nick
Schade, a designer and boat
builder in Groton, Conn., draws
inspiration from early Inuit and
Aleut designs, crafting kayaks
and canoes from a variety of
cedars, fiberglass and carbon-
Kevlar cloth. His Night Heron
kayak is in the Museum of Mod-
ern Art's permanent collection.
(www.woodenboats.com)
Plying the waters in a human-


powered vessel requires a fine
paddle; Sanborn Canoe, a Min-
nesota-based outfitter, offers
some elegant ones, with names
like Minnetonka and Gitchi
Gummi. Made of woods like
cedar, aspen and black walnut,
they're painted with striking
graphics that might leave you
wondering whether to dip them
in the water or mount them on
the wall.
Land sports
Are teams chasing balls more
your thing? Weekend
gridironers might like one of the
footballs or baseballs made by
Leather Head Sports, started by
Cooperstown, N.Y, homeboy
Paul Cunningham. Rawhide-
laced, in colors ranging from
classic tawny caramel to royal
blue and red, the balls are made
of leather from the Horween


company in Chicago.
Leather Head also makes the
Lemon Ball Baseball, inspired
by the original 19th century
lemon-peel-style ball.
Hit a home run with one of
Jamey Rouch's bats made of
pieced cherry and walnut that
comes from near his studio in
Three Rivers, Mich. (Leather
Head and Rouch: www
bespokeglobal.com)
Kara Ginther's hand-tooled
bike seats and saddle bags ele-
vate cycling to another level.


,,,, AMERICAN
*#Lou Mile Realfor ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS
g ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Cel (5 1A Beverly Hills, FL 34465
SCell: (352) 697-1685 Office: 352-746-3600


TERRA VISTA
2 bedrooms plus den, 2 baths, 2-car garage.
Well maintained and priced to sell.
Come live the dream!!
MLS 705649
$174,900


- Se V l v


Leaves, fronds, Scottish knitting
patterns and even zodiac pat-
terns have inspired her designs.
(wwwkaraginther.com)
The look and feel of California
1950s surf culture can be found
in purple heart, mahogany and
walnut beach racquet paddles,
outfitted with leather grips and
loops. (www.artemare.co)
Remote-control vehicles at the
luxury end are more like mini
versions of real cars, with qual-
ity elements like titanium
shocks, steel gears and leather
seats. Retailers offer off-road ve-
hicles, slick sports cars and
speedboats, including several
from high-end maker Traxxas
which zoom at speeds up to 100
mph. (www.trendtimes.com)
Air sports
Once the sport of kings, fal-
conry has developed a modern
following in groups like The
North American Falconers As-
sociation. Ken Hooke of Win-
nipeg, Manitoba, may be
falconry's pre-eminent crafts-
man, making hoods for the sport-
ing birds.
The hoods are placed over the
birds' heads to calm them.
Hooke makes them out of calf,
goat, and exotic skins such as os-
trich, iguana and red monitor
lizard. (wwwbespokeglobal.com;
www.falconryhoodsinternational
.com)
Table sports
Alexandra Llewellyn was in-
troduced to backgammon by her
Egyptian step-grandfather It be-
came a lifelong passion, and she
now designs eye-catching sets
with photographic images of
pheasant feathers, antlers and
vintage female portraits.
"Growing up in the country,
I've collected pheasant feathers
for years. The peacock feather
design was inspired by the
game's Persian roots, and the
carnival and nude women evoke
gambling and nightclubs in the
1920s," Llewellyn says.


For armchair speed demons, consider a
Stock Car Racing Simulator, which puts
you at realistic controls to zoom around
one of 21 legendary courses, including
the Daytona International Speedway.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

She recently made a custom
backgammon set that docu-
mented a couple's life together
"Their first date, where they
lived and their nationalities in-
spired the artwork," she says.
"The leather compartments
were embossed with hand-writ-
ten quotes from their love let-
ters, and the playing pieces were
engraved with the places they've
traveled over the years."
She also offers custom game
pieces made of malachite, rock
crystal, lapis lazuli, turquoise or
jasper, encased in brass.
(wwwalexandralldesign. com)
Hattrick backgammon sets,
popular with professional play-
ers, are offered with white, blue,
red or green leather playing
fields, marbleized acrylic playing
pieces and gold-plated case locks
at www.zontikgames.com.
Chess fans know how dismay-
ing it can be when an ongoing
game gets jostled. Hammacher
Schlemmer offers a wall-
mounted board complete with
acrylic shelves and rosewood
and boxwood pieces that will
keep the action safe for days or
weeks. (www.hammacher.com)
Foosball is for more than col-
lege pubs. High-end Italian
game-table maker Teckell offers
crystal, walnut and even 24-
karat gold in their collection.
(www.teckell.com)
Billiard Toulet has designed
the Lambert pool table, crafted of
sleek stainless steel, with a top
that slides on when play is over A
soundproofed ball return and
tournament-grade cloth are part
of the package, but you can add
an LED light set as an option.
(www.quantum-playcom)
The makers of the chess set
used by 1972 champions Boris
Spassky and Bobby Fischer also
make a range of other board
games, including Scrabble, Mo-
nopoly, Trivial Pursuit and Risk.
They'll create custom games
using exotic leathers like alliga-
tor with stingray, nickel, gold or
even diamond finishes. (www.
geoffreyparker.com)
And for armchair speed
demons, consider Stock Car
Racing Simulator, which puts
you at realistic controls to zoom
around one of 21 legendary
courses, including the Daytona
International Speedway
(wwwhammacher corn)




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO FUSS
Continued from Page E7

waterings, or can withstand poor soils and ex-
treme weather, are the ones to look for"
Some proven low-maintenance varieties
include:
Shrubs: hydrangea paniculataa "Levana"),
spiraea (japonica "Norman") and butterfly
bush (Buddleia "Miss Molly").
Perennials: Coneflowers ("Cheyenne
Sprit," "Sombrero"), hosta ("Sun and Sub-
stance") and black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia
fulgida "Goldsturm").
Bulbs, rhizomes and tubers: Canna lilies
("Whithelm Pride") and daylilies ("Lilting
Belle") can endure a wide variety of challeng-
ing conditions.
Annuals: Dragon Wing red begonia (full
sun to full shade), zinnias ("Profusion" and
"Zahara"), angelonia ("Serena," which is deer-
and rabbit-resistant) and Cool Wave pansies.
"Plant them in the fall and they'll bloom until
the snow flies," Watson said of the pansies.
"Then, they'll re-bloom to be your first pop of
color in the spring."
Succulents and cacti: agave (Parryi trun-
cata "Mescal"), sedum (Sarmentosum "Yellow
Moss") and yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora
"Texas Red").
Vegetables: Malibar spinach and okra
(Clemson "Spineless" for heat tolerance);
Brussels sprouts, garlic, leeks and parsnips
for cold hardiness. "Those veggies are so cold-


tolerant that they can be left in the garden and
allowed to freeze outright," said Robert
Polomski, an extension consumer horticultur-
ist with Clemson University. Herbs (rose-
mary), lettuce, beans and peppers also are
forgiving.
Indoor plants: The aptly named cast-
iron plant (Aspidistra elatior) and Grape ivy
(Cissus rhombifolia) display striking foliage.
The easy-care wax plant (Hoya carnosa "Var-
iegata") produces attractive flowers. "I've ac-
cidentally allowed these plants
to experience extended drought periods and
they've always come back for me," Polomski
said.
Annuals get a modest nod over perennials
for being easier to grow, Polomski said in an
email.
"Obviously, it depends upon species and
cultivars," he said, "but I'd lean toward annu-
als. They typically grow rapidly and begin
flowering in a short time."
A similar case can be made for seedlings
over seeds, Polomski said.
"With transplants, you skip the process of
germination and emergence, which can be
fraught with difficulties. Nevertheless, you
will pay more for transplants and not have the
satisfaction of starting with seeds."
Many of these plants are like athletes at a
training table. They need a robust diet to per-
form at their best, especially the annuals.
"Applying feed every 10 to 14 days accord-
ing to the plant food label will really boost
your bloom power and keep plants from get-
ting stressed," Watson said.


KAREN E. MORTON E
Hall of Far.- C ---..,-. M.,
E-maihl,'n"r:'.:U
WR::E.-=1 : e. r:
We,:
(352) 726-6668. (352) 212-7595
L jf TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 33R, 3A *Nestled u
WINDERMERE MAINTENANCE-FREE VILLA space galore with 0o
FIRST TIME OFFERED Great location with private J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE volume ceilings 0
backyard close to bike trail 2 bedrooms bati- J 1645 Wet Main Stree Inverness, FL 34450 ROOM Wood-burnini
Open eat-in kitchen lots of updates *lanai w, !. ro" with detached works
enclosed all appliances. ,,'.r.,. r ,.- ,' ,-. _: rear entrance for car
PRICED RIGHT AT $98.900. KM/HY MLS 704039. Looking


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
Peppers at Pike Place Market in Seattle. Peppers are among the most
forgiving plants in the garden.


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

a bird of paradise is hand-carved soap-
stone. It was likely made in China close
to 100 years ago. You did not include the
dimensions of the vase. If the vase is in
excellent condition, potential dollar
value depending on size is $15 to $50.
Dear John: My mom asked me to for-
ward the pictures of this quilt to you.
Can you tell me anything about it and if
it has any value? -A, Internet
Dear A.: You have a Hudson Bay
point blanket, made in England as
marked. Collectors refer to them as
point blankets. The short thin lines on
the blanket are point lines that indi-
cate size and weight.
Hudson Bay blankets are still being
made. There is a lot of information
about these high-quality blankets avail-


able on the Internet Your blanket would
likely sell in the $100 to $200 range.
Dear John: I inherited a large num-
ber of antique silver pieces about 20
years ago that have spent most of their
time in storage. I would like to know
what they are worth now and where I
could sell those I do not want to keep.
Can you help me? -M.A.B., Internet
Dear M.A.B.: Yes, I can help with
your collection of silver pieces. Take
good clear photographs. Be sure to ex-
amine each piece for maker's marks
and precious metal marks.


John Sikorski has been a professional
in the antiques business for 30 years.
He hosts a call-in radio show, Siko-
rski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, P.O. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.


Shopping apps for the holidays


Associated Press

NEW YORK Looking
to save a few bucks while
you shop for holiday gifts?
Don't hit the mall without
these shopping apps.
Many retailers, for in-
stance, will match deals you
find elsewhere, so these
apps can help you find bet-
ter prices to show the
cashier Some let you search
for coupons, while others
tell you whether you're bet-
ter off buying online in-
stead. And one keeps track
of all those promotional
fliers that do little good if
you forget them at home.


I tested more than a
dozen shopping apps in
the process getting some of
my holiday shopping done
early I narrowed the list to
five because using them all
at once can get time con-
suming. You want to beat
others to the best deals,
after all.
Unfortunately, If you pre-
fer to shop at mom and pop
stores, you won't find any
deals here. But if you don't
mind big retailers, these
apps offer a hefty selection
of deals from them. The
ones I chose are all free,
easy to use and beautifully
designed.


RetailMeNot (Avail-
able for Android, iPhone)
This app lets you search
for coupons from your fa-
vorite stores, so you can in-
stantly save 10 percent, 20
percent or even more on a
single item or your entire
shopping cart
You can scroll through
the list of hot deals on the
home page or search for a
specific store. You can add
your favorite stores to a list
to see the deals more
quickly The app uses the
phone's location informa-
tion to narrow the deals to

See APPS/Page E13


I 1 I


Gail Hargreaves
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
ExecLutIve Office Suites
New Const Iruc tlion Class "A" Office
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
Call (352) 795-7007


j~ ^'"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

I NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS352634-4225
B BMlPONTICOS Pc ._m .
Multi-Million SSS Producer 1 1: 1 L : 501 I

I ~ I


I. b 16/ YTPK55 BBLVD. t V KANIUM L N
* Brick Eterior Huge Master Bedroom 3+ Bedrooms 2 Full Baths
* Double Walk-In Closets Upgraded Heat Pump Cul-de-Sac Location Granite & Wood Kitchen
i" Beautiful Fireplace Corian & Granite Kitchen LG Appliances All New Flooring
* 4 BR- 3 Baths- 3 Car Garage SimplyGorgeous! Private Setting Pod
$247,500 MLS#704000 $172,000 MLS#704942
Take my virtual toWS It


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
3BR/2BA/2 Car garage with enclosed porch. 3BR/2BA pool1 home w/fireplace in
$69,900 MLS#704181 Connell Heights. $85,500 MLS#705675


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
After Hours 312-6714 Email: roybasstampabay.rrcom www.allcitrusrealty.corn


SIZE WILL DECEIVE YOU! UNIQUE CUSTOM SWEETWATER HOME!
2/2/2 custom home in a wooded setting 3+office/2/3 on .76 acres of privacy
SLiving area is 1824 square feet! Built in 2000 with 2436 sq. ft. of living
SSeller to install new roof prior to closing Exterior and garage painted in 2012
SPlenty of room to add a pool Corian island kitchen great task lighting
SLarge tiled family room Just minutes from Suncoast Parkway
SClose to Sugarmill Woods golf course Home warranty for the buyers
#705485 $87,500 #702046 $179,000
See.JVirtual IIIours .id Jw ^Ire .I.I..Ie IIB.I..m


Great Buyer Incentives
SInterest rates are still low
SSales have increased
SInventory has decreased
SWinter residents are arriving!
WE OFFER
SComplementary current market analysis
SAggressive marketing strategies
SHigh internet exposure on our listings
SLocal knowledge and experience
SProfessionalism
WE ARE...
"THE MOST DIRECT LINE BETWEEN YOU AND A BUYER"
FOR YOUR FREE MARKET ANALYSIS CALL 352-795-9123


LAKESi*1IDE GOLF & COUTR CiL EMIIUB
INVSTMNT PPOTUNTIE



in MF, ti


ei t
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
Scope of Project Lakeside Eaglepoint Inc. has started up
the development of 14 additional townhomes in 2007. The
scope of the sale to a new developer is: 1. The finishing
and sales of the 6-plex. This 6-plex has been bit up to the
stage that the homes are air-and waterproof and the
exterior of the homes is finished. 2. The finishing and sale
of 2 4-plexes. These have been bit up to the stage that the
slabs are poured and the infrastructure is in place (water,
electricity, sewer, phone, internet and television).
MLS #345435. $229,000


4 UNIT CONDO BUILDING IN THE BEAUTIFUL
LAKESIDE GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB
Next to the Rails to Trails bike path. All condos are
3 bedroom, 2 bath with indoor laundry room, granite
counters, tiled kitchen and baths and large covered lanai.
MLS #700654. $229,000


Cinda Ruiz 352-634-3897
Katie Spires 352-212-3673
i 34450 I


In i
Of i. . .
21, .. .


REA LN TlM Y'C


E12 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


APPS
Continued from Page Xl

the ones near you.
I'm not saying these
apps are problem-free. At
Toys R Us, the cashier
wasn't able to scan a 15
percent off coupon. Retail-
MeNot says many retailers
have outdated scanners,
but most will honor the
discount anyway That
happened at Toys R Us
after the cashier called for
a manager Getting the dis-
count took longer than ex-
pected, and some people
in line behind gave me bad
looks. But the deal was
worth it.
The app lets you see both
in-store and online deals.
After walking into a Gap
retail store, I found a
coupon that works only on-
line. So I left and went to
Gap's website. Retail-
MeNot's 35 percent off
coupon code saved me


$20.26 on a $57.89 purchase.
If you create an account,
you can browse for deals
on RetailMeNot's website.
Any coupons you save on
the website will show up
on the app. They will
delete when they expire.
One annoyance: Accord-
ing to RetailMeNot, about
a third of the coupons are
uploaded by users. Em-
ployees go through them to
make sure that they work,
but some bad ones get
through. About a month
ago, I went to Gap with a
coupon that didn't have an
expiration date. But after
the cashier called a man-
ager, I was told it expired a
week earlier RetailMeNot
says such problems are
rare. To me, the savings
from this app is worth the
small inconveniences.
Amazon and Red-
Laser (Available for An-
droid, iPhone, Windows)
Many retailers, includ-
ing Best Buy Co. Inc., Tar-
get Inc. and Toys R Us Inc.,


SJackie Davis
SAmerican Realty & Investments
INE 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL -
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.EA.L ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.conm
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS:bda om


CLASSIC & CLASSY
S3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
Office
Hardwood floors
Granite counters,
s.s. appliances
Circular driveway
STile roof
One acre
$214,900 MLS 704244
GREAT VALUE
*3 Bedrooms, 3 baths
* 2,242 S FLA
* Large rooms, split plan
*30' Lanai w/caged pool
* Interior laundry
* One acre
$195,000 MLS 705784
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths
* Split plan
*26' Screened porch
* Automatic generator
*500 Gal gas tank for
generator
* Sitting on 4 lots
$78,000 MLS 705612


are promising to match
cheaper prices you find
online, hoping you'll buy
on the spot and not wait
until you can get to Ama-
zon's website.
To take advantage of
that, install Amazon.com
Inc.'s app on your phone.
You can scan barcodes of
items in the retail store
and see how much it costs
on Amazon. If you find a
better price, show the app
to a cashier I've gotten
cashiers at Best Buy, Tar-
get and Toys R Us to knock
off as much as $10 on dif-
ferent items. The savings
can add up.
The RedLaser app,
which is owned by eBay
Inc., searches several on-
line retailers, giving you
more chances to find bet-
ter prices than if you just
searched Amazon.
RedLaser doesn't search
Amazon, so use both to
make sure you are getting
the lowest price.
Cartwheel by Target


ON THE WEB
Amazon app:
amzn.to/VOEMS6.
Cartwheel by Target
app: cartwheel.
target.com.
Flipp app:
www.flipp.com.
RedLaser app:
redlaser.com.
RetailMeNot app:
www.retailmenot.
corn/mobile.

(Available for Android,
iPhone)
I tried apps for several
retailers, but Target's was
the best. Cartwheel is easy
to use and has coupons for
everything from electron-
ics to toys to cereal.
You can search for
coupons by category as
well as "collections," such
as items to help ease a cold
or holiday decorations.
Once you find a coupon
you want to use, you tap


BE ST

***Foreclosure List***
2/2 on 4.5 acres with a huge workshop! 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods
706806 $144,900 705705 REDUCED $159,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939
4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests Deep Waterfront Canal Home
705702 REDUCED $174,900 705665 REDUCED $229,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs
705223 REDUCED $77,900 705093 REDUCED $82,900
Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939 John Maisel 352-302-5351
3/2/3 in Crystal Glen 3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon
704264 REDUCED $104,900 705142 REDUCED $114,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Pamela Shemet 352-422-2939

LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in Brentwood Villa 3/2/2
Dunnellon 705087 $129,900 704862 REDUCED $109,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
Sugarmill Woods Custom Built 2/1.5 in Beverly Hills
3/3.5/3 Pool Home
704938 REDUCED $299,900 705068 REDUCED $45,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 John Maisel 352-302-5351
2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis 2/2/1 in Connell Heights
706156 REDUCED $57,500 706630 $76,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 John Maisel 352-302-5351


the add button. Then pres-
ent the cashier with a sin-
gle barcode that has
collected all the coupons
you selected. These
coupons don't work online,
only inside Target stores.
The best part is that they
can be used on top of other
coupons you may find else-
where. That can increase
your savings a lot.
Flipp (Available for
iPhone)
I never remember to
save retailers' promotional
fliers that come in newspa-
pers, even when I come
across one that's tempting
to use. They're hard to
carry around, and they
usually end up in the trash.
The Flipp app can help.
Flipp works with retailers
and turns fliers digital.


000GUgT


Ifs



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E13

The digital version is iden-
tical to the paper one, and
you can flip through it with
a flick of your finger You
can also search by a store's
name and digitally "clip"
deals you want to save.
If there's a store you shop
at often, you can have new
fliers automatically appear
While at Macy's, I found
a flier that offered $10 off
a $25 purchase. Several
people ahead of me in line
had the coupon cut out of
the paper flier I gave the
cashier the coupon from
the Flipp app.
You can also use the app
to build a shopping list or
compare prices from dif-
ferent stores. Unfortu-
nately, there's no Android
version yet. The app just
launched in November


3 6EST7
REAL ESTATE, INC. q*ir
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 _.
0 (352) 795-6633 o
WWWvAT 'B1 rCOM VE-Mii SAT I vv()A v rmvCOM


I 1.-IV .


l


lh





E14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013





Real Estate

Classified

I ^s~itl^ &L


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!





2.5 acres mol
3/2 doublewide
glamour bath eat in
kitchen pole barn off
Whitman Rd.
$109.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

4/2 Doublewide
on 5 acres mol
beautiful piece of
property off county
line road Springhill, Fl.
$149,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Beautiful Log Home
4/3 Triplewide
on 5 acres mol
corner lot family
room w/fireplace off
cr 121 in Moriston, Fl.
Reduced to $129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985


NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182


NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181


Palm Harbor Homes
Modular & Stilt Homes
Factor Direct/Save
$25k off list!!!
John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details

Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 1/4 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807


USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183


Wate"4 ~rfron
Moble311 Forl Rent


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966

-C s'sifleds

In Print


M|ii1rt1



INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 1/1 SWMH
Perfect Winter Getaway
or Year Round
Tastefully Furnished,
Pool, Clubhouse,
Boat Slips, lawn maint.
& So Much More
ONLY $8,900.
Call for Details
BY OWNER
352-419-6132




Hernando 2 bedroom.
1 bath. screened room,
carport and shed. Lake
Access. Ceramic bath.
fully furnished,
no lot rent.$28,888
bahecker@msn.com for
photos or 989-539-3696
for appointment.
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. $45k Owner
Financed FHA/ VA
352-795-1272


-IT
2BR/1BA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124
55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba furnished
includes w/d, $7500.
obo 352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, I1BA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
Newly renovated MH
in 55+ comm. 2BR/ 1 BA
Move in Condition &
fully furnished incld
Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
Two Bedroom Mobile
Home in Lecanto Hills
RV Pk cpt, scrn room,
heat & air, $6k
352-746-4648

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


--ACnON g
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.,ilruisiouilyHomehn[ilili~iiom

CRYSTAL RIVER/LECANTO
7520 W Jim L, (CR) ..............$50
7520 W Jim Ln(R 950
) i ) ,, iii I ....

2/1 nice apts.
HERNANDO/FLORAL CITY
5164 N Dewey Way (H).......$700
3/2 mobile on 1/2 ACRE REDUCED
7530 S Duval Island (FQ.......$1,100
3/2 Beautiful lakefront
6383 S lompaul Ter (FO. $550
1/1 cozy home
HOMOSASSA
4 Shumand Ct. S. (SMW). $1,350
3/2/2 pool home
3785 S Sandpiper Ter.............. $675
3/2 nice home in ile Meadows
INVERNESS
1183 N Mediterranean Way..$I,I 00
3/2/2 Furnished pool home


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL
('.11qqIUii~ [ !q[ IK.Ed I=1;+.,z

NEED A GOOD TENANT?



3/2/2 HamptonLane......$875
2/2/1 Spruce........................$70 0
3/2/2 Pool .....................$1,000

3/2 Rembrandt.....................$725
2/2 Glassboro......................$ 65 0
2/2.5 Hartford....................$700

2/2/1 Honeylocust ...........$675
3/2 jefferson ........................ $70 0
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggs
SProperty Manager/
.Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010






Inc

333 N. Crf Avl "]l enue | '
Inverness/ F l 3445


Chassahowitzka
2/2/1, $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $1,100. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $500 mo.
(352) 212-7922
or 352-212-9205
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815

Ventura Village
Apartments
3580 E. Wood Knoll
Lane, Hernando, FL
34442(352)
637-6349

Now Accepting
Applications.
Full Handicap unit
available

Central H/A
Storage;Carpet
Laundry Facilities;
On Site Mgmt
Elderly (62+)
Handicap/Disabled
With or without
children
1 Bedroom $406;
2 Bedrooms $ 446
TDD# 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Em-
ployer."









CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
Incd Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1'%, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+ sec. clean,
quite. 828 5th Ave. NE.
727-455-8998
727-343-3965




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fort Island Trail 720 Sq
Ft office/retail $600mo
(352) 212-7922
or 352-212-9205




INVERNESS
Business/warehouse
rental units. 800 SF,
zoned Commercial.
400 ft off of Hwy 41
on E Arlington. Call
for info 352-726-9349




Brentwood

2/2/2/1 townhome,
full appliances,
heated pool, Citrus
Hills Social Member-
ship included.
$850/mo
Pru. FL. Showcase
Prop. 352-364-1947




Brentwood
& Terra Vista
of Citrus Hills
Homes & Town-
homes Furnished &
unfurnished.
Starting at $1000/
per month, social
membership
included
Six months minimum.
Terra Vista Realty
Group.Call 746-6121




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2-1/2
bath.
Country Setting
Large SFH on 1 Acre,
Lg Kitchen, Family
room, Fenced Yard,
Hwy 486 First & Last
& Security. $850.
month 352-746-2197

INVERNESS
Newer 3/2/2, fen'd bk
yrd. $875, 352-212-4873


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Fenced yard, new floor-
ing, family room, great
location, pets ok $725
monthly 845-313-3992
INVERNESS
3/2/1 & 2/2/2
$775/mo & $500 Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
3/2/1, sunroom,
fenced yard, app'd
pet with add'l fee,
$775/mo sec & 1st.
352-697-2195
SNOWBIRD RE-
TREAT
Homosassa Waterfront
3 bed 1-1/2 bath home
w/new carpet/paint/tile
on canal leading to Halls
River. Private fishing.
$775 mo. lst/last/sec.
Negotiable
352-400-2490
352-419-2437











INVERNESS
Waterfront home
for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1,100 per month;
first/last/security;
annual term. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.

Lake Panasofkee
150 ft frontage on out-
let river, 3/2 split plan
w/porch. Wooded lot
1st,last,sec $790/mo
call (352) 748-6629




Executive Suite
Available, King Bed,
high speed Internet
Direct TV, whole house
access, w/d, carport
parking, secluded,
Christian gentleman
$125. wkly call Ray
828-497-2610

HOMOSASSA
Huge Room, Furnished
util. incl.'d., 621-0692


2.5 Acres mol
off Lake Lindsey Rd
Brooksville 4/2
1600 sq ft out building
room to roam
$129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

3/2 Doublewide
off of Hwy 50
Brooksville Area
close to shopping and
schools /2 acre mol
$67,500.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 353-726-4009

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R4WM"
REALTY ONE

Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


1.^j,,.. ,


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856





MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293





Newly renovated 2/1
with carport & Florida
Rm. Screened patio &
fenced yd. New paint
inside &out. Cash terms
$39,900 (352) 422-2433


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classified!




CimTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DUDLEY'S
"AIUCT113W

SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12-5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41s @hall (out) 3pm.
(in) 6pm
**Two auctions in
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12- 6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00Qpm
3101 W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x 35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00pm 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat
Call for info
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


Happy Holidays.
Buying or Selling
Your home?
Get the Gift of a
1 YEAR
Home Warranty
Plan
Million Dollar +
Producer!
Teri Paduano, Broker
Realty Connect
(352) 212-1446
TheFLDream.com


Hoe

4/2 on 1 acre
off Hwy 44 Lecanto
family room with large
bedrooms 1600 sq ft
$84,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

For Sale',,,
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290


OR


SAIL


Great Starter Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage,
Lease or cash
$2,000 down
$748. month
877-500-9517



MUST SELL

Near Croft & Hwy 44,
3/2 garage florida room
with or without furniture.
New A/C upgrades
$86,000 or best offer
Estate Administrator
502/693-7904
Nice Double Lot
3A Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Totally Remodeled
3/2/2,+ family room.
New Roof, AC, $75,000
South Highlands,
6715 E Morley St
(352) 560-0019


Hoe






DUDLEY'S
"-A-0TI'^^^





SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12-5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41S @ hall (out) 3Dm.
(on) 6pm
**Two auctions in
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12-6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00pm
3101 W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00pm 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness.
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat
Call for info
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384





4/2 Doublewide
in Floral City off 44
near town on 14 acre
mol fenced yard
large rear deck
Floral City fl.
$89.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


Very nice starter or re-
tirement home. Block
& vinyl. 2 or 3 br, 1 Ba,
10x10 shed, fenced &
carport. Very clean &
furnished. $48,500
(352) 678-7145


Hoe

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RWM4"
REALTY ONE





3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR I/i% BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/MC
REALTY ONE

For Sale By Owner
2 BR, 1 BA, Corner Lot,
Old Homasassa
10360 W Anchorage St
$42,000. As is
(352) 422-8092
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


IAMI L;lUI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
NEED LISTINGS
Sold All Of Mine
Market is good
Call me for Free
CMA
I also have some
Owner Financing
Available for buyers
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


BEM-Y J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipoowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


cuu ony


Su armill
Woods 1


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com



eeeeeeeeeB


"Here's Your
Chance"
TO OWN
10 acres Total
$59,000
5 Acre Tracks
$30,000
Owner Financing
Call: Jack Lemieux
Cell (305) 607-7886
Realty USA INC
407-599-5002

LevyCounty^

Owner Financing
10Ac, 3br/2 ba 2007
Homes of Merit, $135k
Call Nancy Little Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders
352-302-6082




Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Tennessee Log
Cabin on 6 acres
with FREE Boat Slip!
Only $74,900 New
3BR, 2BA
log cabin shell,
lake access, nicely
wooded, level
setting. Quiet paved
road frontage.
Excellent financing.
Call now
877-888-0267, x 453


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


10 ACRE MOUNTAIN
TOP ESTATE!
Gorgeous Blue
Ridge mountain
acreage featuring
spectacular 3
state views & tower-
ing hardwoods!
Abuts U.S. National
Forest. Great build-
ing spot! U/G utilities,
paved rd frontage,
RV friendly. Priced to
sell only $69,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
866-952-5303, x 92


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"




**5 ACRES **
On Paved Rd w/
power. $59,900
E Shady Nook CT
Floral City
(860) 526-7876



Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688
2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
call 352-527-2711



Citrus Co. Minutes to
gulf. Series of islands
called Ozello Keys.
Middle of FL State
Preserve. Live off the
land. Food/Garden
Protein/salt water.
Sacrafice @ $44,900
727-733-0583


Get


Results in


the


homefront


classified!


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013 E15


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists





E16 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2013C)H


47 S. ADAMS


Mt =i6j-hh- $59,000
Call Isaac S. Baylon 352 697 2493


SERVINGCIRS' :" % i l j ,13I | 0
COUNTY ,ai, St. Inv ,n s, 3 C, ,
OVER37FOR w st

OVR3S 3521726 A Fr: MarENt
YEARS.T MAAEMN 0 AnSUNDAYs!


LOCATION PLUS CHARM PLUS VALUE
II ,,,h, ,, ,,,,,, .. I,- .h I ,,
i ..,,, .... 1.. Ih, 1.h ..' I h h,-



iII: =i:--: ASKING 228,900
i- hl",.i, -an n.a il I.u !I AI pilJ iw, tiI


CITRUS COUNTY LAND SALE
lI ,. I It k .. I j -. .....:...... IH.I I., I. .I l .
h.. .. ..[,, d ,[S, :.:., s I.:.s) $7.000
I:., I itlR .. I' _. iS.. ....[S it .7 i .....:......:1I : I.'
Ii. .i.. I, il] ,, I,,,, H ,, .0 s l I j,....
j,,, ,:,,, i ,I $99,000 :.:.,,:,
1. 1s. .l.. l..hh .. dh. H..)il. j I.J.. .h t I, "- j-l _-I
,,,,ih.:..... :.,,, ,,.:. ,,.:..,, $ 10,90 0
f lj I .ju I IjUt ii Dli d Kutaz
C.7 954.383 8786 0i 352 726 6668


-tF F7


* '* _,:,l,: v "_B F : ,,:ill,



* B.- .aalllt ljfl.a ll q,1 1 l 66i I
II,,1 1 16,: 1 ;~,: h f,:,.

M1 :3 7 :u7 1, $145,000
Jeanne it Willaid Pickiel 212 3410


VPEY NhM I MNU I5LPHN

I; _"as,:ll.- ,I : ,,' :] ,] h ]l I::, i I


MI ,-=:;:,,'ll ONLY $54,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


LOVELY 3/2/2
LOCATED IN INVERNESS
l' ill hl iir I ll:, lli .1 .1 ,i ll. l 'll r. *. H .......I ,il.f.l'rI
A l l ll 'l '.t l .i I: h i .if' l .i l l, ... 'l l. l l h l '
H, lM '..llII.Ih l..J .l 'l.= '11. ; =ll':.llhll
JUST LOWERED TO $99,000
loiraine 0 Regan 352 56 0075








LECANTO
jm; "...... 'A ,:I [ p I q[s...-.. ... : .p.L: ... ,:d ....-.
a,n-J ,.-.,, ,n-I.ll I.-1.1 Hul1..- I,,1-1 l,1 ....-. ..1 II [S.l
i. l Il[S,:j l .ih h i' i j I[ f. lhii i i ,..l .. I I I .[S
i.. Ir.,.I iii i _'I:I. -n i'i.J r.i .I Id .-
_I raI I n.-.I If. l2.. /. 2 If
11 :, = /1:11,':.1:1, $119.900
Call lawanda Watt 212 1989


I'VE HAD A FACELIFTI
A .i.,I ........-.ar.,. .,. i ,:. 4 BEDROOM. 2 BATH. 2 CAR GAR.



| l ll..j I lI..I,, .* ..:... i h i l J.lll ) hI.III *,l 1"; :lll l l il, l l M ; .i ll; "
Ma11.: i',li: $79,900 MI_ = /-:la, :x', ASKING $114,900
Mail n Booth 637 4904 Call Chailes Kelly 352-422-2387


S _" h,:,:,[s ,: Hh l~li,,l.a I,:,,,,[s,

* All.il.illali.; ni l n I:,:I

Ml 3 = llj:1, $110,000
Jeanne ot ll'llaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
iuH ci11iusconl\sold coin


* LIh I : IJil i I, I l .:. i a I
Illlpl.jf:l l Ifyl I h In l

S I 11 ...1 i11 i 1 : l. h.i
Mi = 1:h1:1')l $200,000
Jeanne ot lI'illaid Pickiel 352 212 3410
iuii ciiuscoungisold coin








WHISPERING PINES VILLAS
Il n ll.. ~ aIl. a:. lh: -l.: ll. 11.1. 1 h .1.l II....I.-,all
l,111.1.1h,1. ; ; I I_....all-Il .a:l.a1...I Ihl.1
ViVhI' Ia-I l v I ialll l I',:iii, ll i ll- IlUllalllalll
II..=.'11 .]i Ill vlW :, I : I. a llh=II tJ=h...l.-
ML = hl) l'i'i ASKING $55,900
Pal Dais t3521 212-7280
Vieiw listing.: ii,'i' c2/paldavis. corn


SPOTLESS. SPACIOUS. SHOWCASE
LI_, l111, ll pi I.; II I ilh i.,i i :ipim i Ilnipi;: .j ;;i~ipp .i l||p.|




Mi' ='i:i:hJI $225,000
Call Tiny onovan 220 0328


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY
I I I,,,-1,1 ,,,- d
{ I I I , I h III I h I, ,, -I:I ,- -I
I,, I I h 1 II,-, ,d
l, n,- I,, ,, ni ,1h lll I II ,h,- 11 111111 ,,
$95,000
Call Jim Mil ton at 3524222173 loti
I out personal toutii ol Emeiald Hills


WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT





Pit llh I 'lh' l/l'
,[ir 11, h q,,ll ,if i i' it I,, I h i i,
rh.: = I -,'I 7 $188,900


II,, h I,,,,',, I,, ii 1 . n ,, hnnln l 1,n,, I hI,, ,,,',,1 ,hllll,,,
,- ,- ,,, 1, ,, 1 n i h h i iI,-1 i .I i ,1 .. ....
iiii1111-1 ,1- ,. 1 11 ,1,, ,,I h h n-n1 i -- n ,, iii
h-,- IIi,, I,-i1 ,, In ,-,- Innl i n,,,11 ,i, In i" 11,-In I ,-,-,-"1 I,,
,, I1 h,,i~l..n n n.I ', nI,i ,,1 I i ,- 1 1
rih: 1 =-,I.rif ASKING $158,900
Pit D,,- ,352' 212 7280
[''iil ii ;inft il il il i;2t/gitdfij ,;.Jfli


FLORIDA LAKEFRONT PARADISE
1. 1, ,, -- d ... 1 ll -, '' ,h. h ,d ,,,, l l hl ,ii-
1 l- 1. 1- d- 1 I i -I h l II l l l I, I I,


N1I I.I.Il ASKING $235,000
Cjll Jim lotionn 422 213 ito see this
be.iulia l .icie.ige


* LiV:L',' ":B : ..il,1
* 1 fl I A 'Ai hti L i I. l.i ,,,,
* ,I: : I'n n i l ';ii .iir ;ii i,,,,l ill i n .iiihll~ rii

* lJ,,,, a,,il ',',l,,, ,,,,, BRING OFFER
Mt I 1/10 $110,000
Jeanne ot l'illaid Pickiel 352-212-3410
ii ii it ciiiuscounii sold coin


LUT UN FLUHAL CITY LAKIE
Nl : I j I, I .ll1 .i 11 l 1 1 .ii1,1 .I .1i 1 ll I a1

p.i 1:, i A Za,.al: -Il ho i 11 d,1.lh [.I k .l.h:
,:ilnl l"II;: li lllh ,:1 li ih i l .ill; i : il, i'l:
Ml = hiw'. ASKING $39,900
Call S/elan Suall 352 212 0211


OUTSTANDING VALUE!


III I I 111 h.. *ll alI al.-IaI I iil ..l l.. Il a.ll I .
a l h. .I. l I ll I ill
N1.M ; i a.'. ASKING $69,900
colr l I f iic 1 -mqI.':2. i 400 1.1 .;2 "t: t:v:iif


3/2 MOBILE HOME


M1 3 =1,. ` ONLY $25,400
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


o a 1 A