Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03317

Full Text

Last place battle: Jaguars, Texans square off,


TODAY "
& next
morning


HIGH
82
LOW
62


C I TR U


Morning fog
possible. Partly
sunny and warm.
PAGE A4


DECEMBER 6, 2013 Florida's Best Community


Nelson


S C 0 U N T





ONIU.
www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOL. 119 ISSUE 121





landela dies


South Africa's first blackpresidentpaved the way to racial reconciliation after 27years in prison


Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG Nelson
Mandela, who became one of the
world's most beloved statesmen and
a colossus of the 20th century when
he emerged from 27 years in prison
to negotiate an end to white minor-
ity rule in South Africa, has died. He
was 95.
South African President Jacob
Zuma made the announcement at a
news conference late Thursday, say-
ing "we've lost our greatest son."
His death closed the final chapter
in South Africa's struggle to cast off


Parades take
center stage
this weekend
Crystal River's
"Christmas Melodies"
parade begins 6 p.m.
Saturday at Citrus Av-
enue, proceeds down
U.S. 19, and ends at
Port Paradise Road.
Beverly Hills'
"Christmas in the Hills:
A Star Spangled
Christmas" parade be-
gins 10 a.m. Saturday
at N. Melbourne
Street, proceeds Bev-
erly Hills Boulevard
and ends at Civic
Circle.
Dunnellon's "A
Small Town Christ-
mas," begins at
5:30 p.m. Saturday at
Dunnellon Christian
Academy/First Baptist
Church and ends at
Blue Run Park.
The Citrus County
Airboat Alliance "Air-
boat Parade" begins
around dusk Saturday
and follows the Lake
Hernando shoreline
from the public boat
ramp to Armante's on
the north end.
The Citrus
Springs Civic Associa-
tion and Citrus Enter-
tainment Committee's
"Miracles and Memo-
ries" parade begins
1 p.m. Sunday at the
Citrus Springs Foun-
tain on Citrus Springs
Boulevard and pro-
ceeds to Wesley Jones
Park.
-From staff reports



Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Community ....... C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ........ A10O
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . . B4
Movies ........... C8
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C7


We've lost our
greatest son.
Jacob Zuma
president of South Africa.
apartheid, leaving the world with in-
delible memories of a man of aston-
ishing grace and good humor Rock
concerts celebrated his birthday Hol-
lywood stars glorified him on screen.
And his regal bearing, graying hair
and raspy voice made him instantly
recognizable across the globe.


B-Scada is housed in a serene office in
Meadowcrest, east of Crystal River.


Youngsters assist

fallen bus driver
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Three
Citrus County School District stu-
dents received a hands-on lesson
minutes after class had ended.
Crystal River Primary School
third-grade teacher Niky Wardlow


As South Africa's first black pres-
ident, the ex-boxer, lawyer and pris-
oner No. 46664 paved the way to
racial reconciliation with well-cho-
sen gestures of forgiveness. He
lunched with the prosecutor who
sent him to jail, sang the apartheid-
era Afrikaans anthem at his inaugu-
ration, and traveled hundreds of
miles to have tea with the widow of
Hendrik Verwoerd, the prime min-
ister at the time he was imprisoned.
His most memorable gesture Associated Press
came when he strode onto the field Former South African President Nelson Mandela
celebrates his birthday in 2007 with children at the
See WPage A8 Nelson Mandela Children's Fund in Johannesburg.


Heisman

hopeful

won't be

charged

Florida State

quarterback was

accused of rape
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida
State quarterback and Heis-
man Trophy candidate Jameis
Winston will not be charged
with sexually assaulting a
woman who accused him of
raping her about a year ago, a
prosecutor said Thursday
State Attorney Willie Meggs
made the announcement at a
news conference, saying the
woman's memory lapses of the
events last De-
cember were
problematic
and there was
not enough evi-
dence to win a
conviction.
The woman
told police she
had been Jameis
drinking at a Winston
bar with has led the
friends before Seminoles to a


Semiolesto aNo. 1 ranking.
the alleged as- No. 1 ranking.
sault took place at an off-cam-
pus apartment
"It's not inconsistencies, it's
lack of memory most of the
time," Meggs said of the
woman's allegations.
Winston, 19, has led the
Seminoles to a No. 1 ranking
and a shot at a national cham-
pionship if they defeat Duke
on Saturday in the ACC cham-
pionship game. As for the Heis-
man, many voters were waiting
to see whether he would be
charged before the deadline
for ballots Monday The trophy
for the nation's top player will
be awarded Dec. 14.
Meanwhile, the woman's
family has been sharply criti-
cal of the Tallahassee Police
Department, accusing the
agency of delaying the investi-
gation and discouraging her
from going forward with the
case because of the public
See Page A8


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
It has been a good year for B-Scada, a locally
based corporation with international reach in a
growing sector of the high-tech economy
The Crystal River-area company closed out its
fiscal year Oct. 31 with expected revenues of ap-
proximately $1.54 million. It will exceed fiscal
2012 revenues by approximately 45 percent.
Unaudited income before taxes is expected to
show an approximate 200 percent increase
above fiscal year 2012.
See Page A2


and her students Blake Miller,
Morgan Glaum and Jessika James
- had just completed a water
safety program at the Bicenten-
nial Park pool in Crystal River
when their memory was tested.
"We have a water safety pro-
gram that third-graders through-
out the county take part in,"
Wardlow said. "One of the things
that we do is practice water res-
cue. They learn how to rescue
someone in trouble in the water"
Their water-rescue lesson


proved valuable on land, as they
witnessed their bus driver collapse
and injure his head on concrete.
"We yelled for help and Mrs.
Wardlow came over to help the
driver," Morgan said.
"She came over to help but she
made one mistake she said,
'Someone call 911' when she was
supposed to have told someone
specific to call 911," Blake said.
Wardlow explained students
had learned that if others are
See Page A2


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Local firm has global reach


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
B-Scada Chief Executive Officer Ron DeSarrano, right, looks over a program with software
development leader Aaron Arnold Wednesday morning at the company's Crystal River-area office. The
company produces software used in a wide variety of industrial capacities around the world.

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chris Gangler/Special to the Chronicle
Superintendent Sandra "Sam" Himmel, back left, congratulated three Crystal River
Primary School's students for their quick thinking in assisting their bus driver during
an unexpected emergency. Blake Miller, front left, Morgan Glaum and
Jessika James are pictured with Himmel, Principal Donnie Brown, back center, and
school board member Ginger Bryant.


HELP
Continued from PageAl

around then they should
assign a specific person to
call 911.
"What we were teaching
them was before you at-
tempt to rescue someone
you call for help," she said.
"When you know help is
on the way, then you at-
tempt to rescue them. We
were teaching them to be
specific when they call for
help and say 'George, call
for help' or whoever but be
specific in who should call
911 and then start rescu-


ing. That was the part that
I forgot. I just yelled
'Someone call 911."'
Wardlow said it ap-
peared the driver had be-
come overheated. He
became responsive within
minutes and was able to
move himself out of the sun.
"He said he got over-
heated while reading," she
said. "It all happened so
fast. I was worried about
getting the driver out of
the sun and then what my
students were seeing.
They were getting upset."
"Who would have known
that this was going to hap-
pen," Wardlow said. 'As
scary and traumatic as it


was for them to see, they
got to see what happens
when someone is in trou-
ble and how quickly help
can come when you stick
with a plan. It prepares
them and reassures them
that they are able to save
lives in an emergency"
An ambulance arrived
shortly after However, the
driver refused treatment
and was taken home. An-
other driver escorted the
children throughout the
remainder of their trip.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


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GROWTH
Continued from Page Al

The company's name
includes an acronym for
supervisory control and
data acquisition, software
applications capable of
connecting real-time in-
dustrial data and display-
ing that information in
real time, wherever it's
needed
The company calls it
"data visualization
solutions."
Its products are used in
more than 20 countries in
a diverse range of indus-
tries and utilities includ-
ing transportation, health
care, finance, food pro-
cessing, mining, energy
distribution, energy man-
agement and environ-
mental monitoring.
B-Scada technology can
be applied to both new
and existing operations,
though it has primarily
been used as an upgrade
at facilities with older
technology.
"The software that we
write will typically go into
a factory and be there 10
to 15 years before it gets
replaced," said Patrick
Baker, B-Scada business
development manager
And about a half dozen


translation files help
overcome language
barriers.
An example is the Seoul
Metropolitan Rapid Tran-
sit Corp., a subway system
serving 2.7 million pas-
sengers a day It needed a
reliable constant data dis-
play system that could be
accessed by numerous op-
erators throughout the
system.
With a lot of its business
overseas, Baker said
much of their training is
done through the Web.
"But we build the sys-
tem to be easy to use," he
said, adding that's "defi-
nitely a competitive
advantage."
B-Scada also licenses
its technology to other
companies, including sev-
eral Fortune 500 firms.
Ron DeSarrano, chief
executive officer, ex-
plained, "there are actu-
ally two halves to our
business; companies have
found us and wanted to
use some of the bits and
chunks of what we've
made in their software
products, so we have li-
censing agreements with
other companies that are
using pieces of our system
in their system."
B-Scada expects to roll
out a new product, called
Status Enterprise, early in


the new year DeSarrano
believes it will establish
the company's position in
the market as a leading-
edge technology provider
for monitoring of live in-
dustrial and commercial
data.
He is also expecting
revenue increases for
2014 and is confident in
the company's long-term
growth and profitability
The company, which
now has 13 employees,
was founded by DeSar-
rano in Canada in 2003.
He brought it to the Crys-
tal River area as Mobi-
form Software. Its shares
started trading over the
counter in 2009. It sur-
vived the recession and
the name was changed to
B-Scada in October 2012.
"Everybody's local, we
haven't imported any-
one," said DeSarrano, de-
scribing his employees,
including one straight out
of high school.
"It's kind of surprising,
because one of my con-
cerns in coming here was
we'd have trouble finding
experienced computer
programmers they're
out there in the
community"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


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Page A3 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
AG Bondi to speak
here Dec. 18
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi will be the
keynote speaker at the
Dec. 18 Christmas lunch-
eon of the Women's Politi-
cal Network of Citrus
County. The 12:30 p.m.
luncheon will be at Citrus
Hills Country Club. The at-
torney general will give an
update on statewide issues
her office is presently
handling.
The WPNCC meets
monthly with speakers of in-
terest to inform county resi-
dents of state and local
issues of concern. The
Jan. 21 meeting will feature
Joyce Brancato, chief exec-
utive officer of Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.
She will speak about the Af-
fordable Care Act and its ef-
fect on the hospital and its
patients.
All are welcomed and en-
couraged to join WPNCC,
which meets at various
restaurants in the county.
The organization con-
nects donations for CASA
and clips and sends manu-
facturer's coupons to the
military.
Call Rosalie Matt at 352-
746-7143.
Democratic Club
meeting Dec. 17
The Crystal River Demo-
cratic Club will meet at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17 at
Oysters Restaurant, Crystal
River. Those wishing to
have dinner should arrive
by6 p.m.
The speaker will be
Marie Pettibone, president
of the League of Women
Voters of Citrus County.
All Democrats are wel-
come. For more informa-
tion, call 352-795-5384.
Saturday market
to include antiques
The Inverness Farmer's
Market and the Old Towne
Antique Fair are teaming up
for a special Holiday Market
at the Inverness Govern-
ment Center and Pine
Street on Saturday, Dec. 7.
The Antique Fair, from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m., will fea-
ture, among other things,
militaria, clocks, jewelry,
early Americana, primitives
and glass.
Shoppers can select
stocking stuffers and gifts
from craft vendors, includ-
ing goat soaps, local honey,
personalized embroidery
towels and handmade cus-
tom signs.
Other items range from
doggie treats to people
treats cookies, cupcakes,
breads, jams, jellies, pro-
duce, smoked salmon and
citrus available for shipping.
There will be handmade
jewelry, essential oils and
gift certificates available for
massages. Landscapers will
be on hand to offer advice.
Santa and Sunny Cooter
will be present and avail-
able for photos in front of a
decorated Christmas tree
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Gainesville
Man attacked by
yellow jackets
Gainesville police officers
and fire rescue crews came
to the aid of a homeless
man who was attacked by
yellow jackets.
The Gainesville Sun re-
ported 51-year-old Joseph
"Crazy Joe" Piser was
sleeping outside a vacant
building Tuesday morning
when yellow jackets began
swarming around him.
Piser, who gets around in
an electric wheelchair, was
able to crawl away and flag


down Officer Ryan Mc-
Cazzio for help.
McCazzio said Piser's
left eye was swollen shut
and his knees and wrists
were inflamed from about
15 stings.
From staff and wire reports


Stolen Floral City mailbox replaced


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

The blue mail-collection recepta-
cle stolen from the front yard of the
Floral City Post Office on Sunday or
early Monday has been replaced.
According to Postmaster Va-
lerie Plumsky, a new receptacle is
now located right next to the en-


trance to the building. The collec-
tion box was replaced Wednesday
Plumsky said officials feel the
placing of the receptacle next to
front door is the best location.
The Citrus County Sheriff Office
began investigating the case of the
missing mailbox Monday morning
after Plumsky called saying the re-
ceptacle, which used to be at a


drive-up near U.S. 41, was missing.
Officials believe the collection
box was ripped from a concrete
slab base sometime Sunday night
or early Monday morning.
Sheriff's office spokeswoman
Heather Yates said Thursday
there are no new developments in
the case.
The U.S. Postal Inspection


Service also is conducting its own
investigation. Officials in that
service are suggesting that people
who deposited mail containing
checks or credit card information
in the receptacle Sunday or early
Monday morning call the service's
Tampa office. The U.S. Postal In-
spection Service's Tampa office
number is 800-876-2455.


Help for small business


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
With guidance from the Small Business Development Center, Robert Roik owner of Top Notch Appliance Repair and Dryer Vent
Cleaning has ventured out on his own to start his own business.


Center shows budding entrepreneurs how to get things off the ground


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

Robert Roik took the leap
from steady employment to the
uncertainties of being in busi-
ness for himself. But in addi-
tion to bringing his own job
skills and experience, Roik was
able to take advantage of some
no-cost expertise.
The result has been a focused
approach to building his busi-
ness with specific marketing
strategies.
Roik opened Top Notch Ap-
pliance Repair in October, after
being an appliance repair tech-
nician for more than 29 years.
He grew up fixing things, first
cars in his father's shop, then
working after high school as ap-
prentice electrician and an ap-
prentice plumber


In 1982, he started learning
the appliance trade from the
bottom up during 10 years with
his wife's family, which owned
and operated several appliance
stores in New Hampshire.
Roik and his wife returned to
Florida in 1992. He continued
in appliance service, first in
Pinellas County, then in Citrus
County in 2004, working as a
service technician.
When starting his business,
Roik was confident he had the
skills and expertise to provide
residential repair service on
major home appliances such as
refrigerators, ranges, washers
and dryers. But he soon found
out there is more to running a
business than knowing how to
fix things.
"I have to do everything my-
self," he said. "I have to do the


EMS: Fundraising calls


aren't coming from us


Special to the Chronicle

Nature Coast EMS cautions the
public to be aware of phone calls
and mailings soliciting funds for
EMTs and paramedics.
These calls are not from Nature
Coast EMS. They are being made
on behalf of the Citrus County Pro-
fessional Paramedics and EMTs
Local 365 Union and International
Association of EMTs & Paramedics.
Nature Coast EMS is not affili-
ated with this solicitation and its
paramedics and EMTs and do not
benefit from the donations made.
Nature Coast EMS is a not-for-
profit organization and accepts do-
nations; however, it doesn't solicit
them in this manner
The EMTs and paramedics em-
ployed by Nature Coast EMS are
represented by a union, Interna-


tional Association of EMTs and
Paramedics Local 365. The union
participates with a professional
fundraising company This com-
pany calls people and asks for do-
nations on behalf of the "EMTs and
paramedics in Citrus County" The
Local 365 has the legal right to hire
marketers to raise money for its
union as a separate entity from,
and without authorization by, Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical
Services.
Nature Coast EMS does not re-
ceive any money that is contributed
to the IAEP Local 365 and is not af-
filiated with the solicitation/
fundraising efforts.
Inquiries as to the status of a so-
licitor can be made with the De-
partment of Consumer Affairs at
800-435-7352, or go the agency's
website at www.doacs.state.fl.us.


bookkeeping, make sure I order
parts, pay my bills, schedule
calls and attract more
business."
After attending a workshop
organized by Small Business
Development Center (SBDC)
and the chamber of commerce,
Roik took advantage of SBDC's
services and met with consult-
ant Mike Orlito.
"I appreciate all the help that
he has given me this past year,"
said Roik. "He's getting me to
be able to use different re-
sources to generate new
business.
"They have different people
who are knowledgeable about
the different facets of the small
business. The things Mike can't
help me with, there is some-
body there who can help."
Orlito saw Top Notch needed


a search engine optimization
analysis and an SBDC consult-
ant was able to provide Roik
with an action plan.
"While there are a number
of things we can do to assist
small business owners with
gaining market share, market-
ing strategies and search en-
gine optimization are often at
the top of their list," Orlito
said.
"It's scary to do it," Roik said
about making the leap to his
own business. "My wife and
family are very supportive.
They are helping me through
the transition from having a
steady paycheck to worrying
about meeting my expenses
and paying myself."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


Former deputies could


have faced charges


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

Two of the deputies impli-
cated in the falsification of doc-
uments who recently resigned
from the sheriff's office were
additionally recommended for
prosecution.
However, the State Attorney's
Office declined to prosecute,
citing insufficient evidence to
make a case.
Deputies Charles Schanel,
Thomas Peruche and Chad
Doyle all resigned Nov 22
rather than be fired after a Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office in-
ternal affairs investigation
revealed that the three, inde-
pendent of each other, falsified
paperwork for off-duty work
they did not perform.


Officials said Schanel, Pe-
ruche and Doyle violated
agency policy by submitting
documents for off-duty security
work that they did not do. Pe-
ruche's falsified paperwork was
uncovered before he got paid,
but Schanel and Doyle report-
edly received money for phan-
tom work.
Consequently, CCSO officials
sought to have them prosecuted
for official misconduct and
theft
However, in a letter to the
sheriff's office Nov 7, Assistant
State Attorney Mark D. Simp-
son said based on the facts pre-
sented in the cases "there are
no criminal charges applica-
ble." Simpson is the supervisor
of the office's public interest
unit.


Pilot whales swimming into deeper waters


Associated Press
EVERGLADES NA-
TIONAL PARK Pods of
35 pilot whales slowly
swam Thursday into
deeper water off Florida's


southwest coast, raising op-
timism that the strandings
of whales on Everglades
National Park beaches may
soon end on a positive note.
National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration


fisheries official Blair Mase
said midafternoon Thurs-
day that the three whale
pods were nine miles north
of their original location
and continuing to move off-
shore. They were in 18 feet


of water about six miles off-
shore, still several miles
from the 900-to-l,000 foot
depths they usually call
home, Mase said.
Mase said the total of
dead whales has reached


11, with five still unac-
counted for She said
workers were surprised
Thursday to discover that
most of the live whales had
moved out of the shallows
on their own.




A4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday You can turn a possibility
into a reality if you are receptive to new
ideas. Strive to be your best, and you
will find ways to improve your standard
of living.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Lis-
ten to what's being said, but don't rush
to follow what others do. Make your
moves based on what is most likely to
bring you the highest reward.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Focus
on looking your best. Update your
image, and you'll make an impression
that will influence what someone does
for you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Stick
close to home. Travel and communica-
tion will lead to delays and frustration.
Make alterations to the way you earn a
living. Let your passion lead the way
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Re-
evaluate your relationships with
friends, relatives and neighbors. Asso-
ciate with the people who have the
most to offer and are willing to share.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Let by-
gones be bygones and make a toast to
the present and the future. Concen-
trate on contracts; finalize and tidy up
loose ends.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Travel to
destinations that will bring you closer to
the people and things you love. Social
activities will lead to reconnecting.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Put
greater emphasis on the relationships
you have personally and professionally
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Make
some alterations at home to accommo-
date the activities you will embark on
between now and the end of the year.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your charm
and wit will put you into the spotlight.
Use whatever chance you get to im-
press and influence people you want to
spend more time with in the future.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Work dili-
gently to clear up a project that needs
to be completed with precision and de-
tail. A chance to spend quality time with
someone will spice up your love life.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Refuse to
get into a disagreement. Compromise,
and you will bypass a situation that is
getting blown out of proportion. Make
love, not war, and you will have more
fun.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) High en-
ergy will get you to the finish line in
time to move on to more entertaining
activities. Don't let jealousy stand be-
tween you and a romantic evening.


ENTERTAINMENT


Hopper painting
sells for $40.5M
NEW YORK Edward Hop-
per's "East Wind Over Wee-
hawken" has sold for
$40.5 million an auction
record for the artist.
The 1934 work depicts a
streetscape of the New Jersey
city across the Hudson River
from New York.
It had been in the collection of
the Pennsylvania Academy of
the Fine Arts.
An anonymous telephone bid-
der purchased the work at
Christie's on Thursday. The pre-
sale estimate was $22 million to
$28 million.
The painting captures the
melancholy of post-Depression
life in America. Hopper consid-
ered it one of his best works.

Judge: Fawcett
caregiver can testify
LOS ANGELES -Ajudge
says he'll allow one of Farrah
Fawcett's nurse assistants to
testify that the late actress told
her an Andy Warhol portrait
hanging in her home was owned
by Ryan O'Neal.
Superior Court Judge William
MacLaughlin ruled Thursday
that the woman can be called in
a trial over ownership of the art-
work, even though she stepped
forward with the information just
last month.
The University of Texas at
Austin is asking a jury to deter-
mine Fawcett left the school two
Warhol portraits of her, and that
O'Neal should hand over his
version.
Maribel Avila told the judge
she contacted O'Neal's lawyers
after seeing a story about the
case in the New York Post.
The school objected to allow-
ing Avila to testify since she was-
n't disclosed as a witness earlier.


Associated Press
Mexican performer Thalia poses Thursday with her new star on
the Hollywood Walk of Fame at dedication ceremonies in Los
Angeles. The singer has sold over 40 million records
worldwide and is also considered Mexico's most famous
telenovela, or soap opera, actress.


Kordell Stewart's
divorce final
ATLANTA- Former Pitts-
burgh Steeler standout Kordell
Stewart's divorce from his real-
ity show wife is final.
Fulton County Superior Court
Judge John J. Goger issued
final a decree in the divorce case
Thursday.
Stewart, who retired from the
NFL last year, filed for divorce
from Porsha Williams in March.
He claimed his marriage to
Williams was "irretrievably
broken."
Williams' lawyer Randy
Kessler said they are glad to
amicably resolve the matter. The
pair used to appear together on
Bravo's "The Real Housewives
of Atlanta."
Stewart was a sensation in
Pittsburgh in the late 1990s and
was nicknamed "Slash" for his
versatility as quarterback, run-
ning back and wide receiver.
He is a sports talk show host
in Atlanta.


Arts, culture add
$500B to GDP
WASHINGTON Creative
industries led by Hollywood ac-
count for about $504 billion, or at
least 3.2 percent of U.S. goods
and services, the government
said in its first official measure of
how the arts and culture affect
the economy.
On Thursday, the U.S. Bureau
of Economic Analysis and the
National Endowment for the Arts
will release the first-ever esti-
mates of the creative sector's
contributions to U.S. gross do-
mestic product based on 2011
data, the most recent figures
available. GDP measures the
nation's production of goods and
services.
Analysts said they used pre-
liminary numbers from 2011 and
dating back to 1998. By compar-
ison, the arts and culture sector
outpaced the U.S. travel and
tourism industry, which was 2.8
percent of GDP in 2011.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Dec. 6, the 340th
day of 2013. There are 25 days left
in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Dec. 6, 1957, America's first
attempt at putting a satellite into
orbit failed as Vanguard TV3 rose
only about four feet off a Cape
Canaveral launch pad before crash-
ing back down and exploding.
On this date:
In 1884, Army engineers com-
pleted construction of the Washing-
ton Monument by setting an
aluminum capstone atop the obelisk.
In 1907, the worst mining disaster
in U.S. history occurred as 362 men
and boys died in a coal mine explo-
sion in Monongah, West Virginia.
In 1947, Everglades National
Park in Florida was dedicated by
President Harry S. Truman.
In 1969, a free concert by The
Rolling Stones at the Altamont
Speedway in Alameda County,
Calif., was marred by the deaths of
four people, including one who was
stabbed by a Hell's Angel.
Ten years ago: A U.S. warplane in
pursuit of a "known terrorist" attacked
a village in eastern Afghanistan, mis-
takenly killing nine children.
Five years ago: President-elect
Barack Obama said in a Saturday
radio and Internet address that he'd
asked his economic team for a re-
covery plan that would save or cre-
ate more than 2 million jobs.
One year ago: Republicans
pushed right-to-work legislation
through the Michigan state House
and Senate amid raucous protests
from throngs of union supporters.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Tom
Hulce is 60. Comedian Steven
Wright is 58. Actress Janine Turner
is 51. Writer-director Judd Apatow
is 46. Writer-director Craig Brewer
is 42. Actress Colleen Haskell is 37.
Actress Lindsay Price is 37. Chris-
tian rock musician Jacob Chesnut
(Rush of Fools) is 24.
Thought for Today: "Do not wait
to strike till the iron is hot; but make
it hot by striking." -William Butler
Yeats, Irish Nobel Prize-winning
poet (1865-1939).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO 1 PR LO P iR I L
60 0.00 1 61 nn 79 5


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
pc
s

pc
s
pc
s
pc
pc
PC

PC
5
PC
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
pc
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy and warm today.


81 57 0.00 82 59 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclus vedaly
forecast by:

High: 82 Low: 62
SMorning fog possible. Partly sunny
S and warm.
SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 61
Cloudy early. Then partly sunny and warm.

S UNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 62
Partly sunny and warm.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 83/57
Record 86/26
Normal 75/47
Mean temp. 70
Departure from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 56.13 in.
Normal for the year 49.77 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 30.11 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 63
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, composites
Today's count: 3.6/12
Saturday's count: 5.6
Sunday's count: 5.6
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12/6 FRIDAY 8:29 2:15 8:58 2:43
12/7 SATURDAY 9:31 3:18 9:59 3:45


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................5:33 M.
fSUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:11 A.M.
0 7 4 0 MOONRISE TODAY...........................10:26A.M.
DEC. 17 DEC. 25 JAN. 1 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:51 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


From mouths of rivers
City High/Lov
Chassahowitzka* 7:08 a/3:19
Crystal River** 5:29 a/12:4
Withlacoochee* 3:16 a/11:1
Homosassa*** 6:18 a/2:18


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
a 8:54 p/4:06 p
1 a 7:15 p/1:28 p
6a 5:02 p/11:22p
a 8:04 p/3:05 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
8:03 a/4:12 a 9:39 p/4:53 p
6:24 a/1:34a 8:00 p/2:15 p
4:11 a/12:03 p 5:47 p/--
7:13 a/3:11 a 8:49 p/3:52 p


Gulf water
temperature


67
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.80 28.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.54 38.53 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.69 39.67 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.37 40.36 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Thursday Friday Thursday Friday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


54 27
39 24
70 56
72 65
58 50
68 38
66 48
-1 -12
77 68
24 14
50 36
61 43
54 30
81 55
73 52
65 59
40 24
63 36
63 39
72 57
65 39
34 23
48 30
8 -15
20 10
59 35
57 47
64 30
57 48
44 38
76 42
59 28
82 54
41 29
60 36
60 47
70 37
71 37
39 23
14 5
79 72
83 66
70 38 2


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 82 72 .01 ts 76 46
NewYorkCity 60 48 r 52 35
Norfolk 69 49 r 75 47
Oklahoma City 31 20 .14 c 23 8
Omaha 17 8 pc 12 -4
Palm Springs 58 40 s 59 43
Philadelphia 60 48 r 56 36
Phoenix 57 42 s 56 38
Pittsburgh 61 53 .29 rs 37 23
Portland, ME 37 24 r 48 26
Portland, Ore 32 19 c 31 15
Providence, R.I. 51 34 r 55 34
Raleigh 67 55 .03 c 78 47
Rapid City 6 -9 c -4 -12
Reno 27 18 pc 32 21
Rochester, NY 62 44 .03 sn 36 24
Sacramento 50 28 c 50 37
St. Louis 40 26 .03 sn 28 11
St. Ste. Marie 43 21 .28 sn 21 7
Salt Lake City 22 7 c 22 16
San Antonio 70 42 r 41 31
San Diego 60 52 .01 s 61 54
San Francisco 51 35 c 54 44
Savannah 82 59 pc 80 61
Seattle 34 23 pc 32 19
Spokane 18 10 pc 15 -1
Syracuse 59 38 rs 38 27
Topeka 21 15 .03 pc 20 5
Washington 69 49 r 54 39
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 88 Marco Island, Fla. LOW -34 Fraser,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 84/77/pc
Amsterdam 41/38/sh
Athens 56/42/s
Beijing 54/24/s
Berlin 35/33/sn
Bermuda 69/63/s
Cairo 69/55/s
Calgary -17/-18/pc
Havana 83/68/pc
Hong Kong 70/62/pc
Jerusalem 58/49/pc


Lisbon 59/39/s
London 42/38/sh
Madrid 52/28/s
Mexico City 72/52/pc
Montreal 34/23/sf
Moscow 25/22/sn
Paris 44/42/sh
Rio 79/68/sh
Rome 56/40/pc
Sydney 74/57/pc
Tokyo 63/40/pc
Toronto 34/27/pc
Warsaw 32/28/sn


LEGAL NOTICES




Meeting Notices.....................................C12
Lien Notices...........................................C12
Miscellaneous Notices..........................C12
Foreclosure Sale/
Action Notices.......................................C12
Self Storage Notices .............................C12


S C IT RULIS LICOUNTY



CHRpONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


c
DEC. 9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Theodore
Rodak, 93
CITRUS SPRINGS
A Funeral Mass for
Theodore J. Rodak, 93, of
Citrus Springs, formerly of
Detroit, Michigan will be
held at 10:00 a.m., Monday,
December 9, 2013 at St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church. Inter-
ment will follow at Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell, FL. The family will
receive friends from 1:00 -
5:00 p.m. on Sunday, De-
cember 8, 2013 at the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Ted passed away sud-
denly on Monday, Decem-
ber 2, 2013 in Crystal
River, FL. He was a vet-
eran of the Army Air
Corps during WW II. Ted
retired from GM Diesel,
Detroit, Michigan after 30
years of service. He was a
member of the American
Legion and an active
member of St Elizabeth
Ann Seton Parish, where
he was a member of the
choir He will be remem-
bered as a loving father
and friend, who enjoyed
family, scrabble, cards,
horseshoes and attending
plays and concerts.
He was preceded in
death by his wife of 60
years, Evelyn, and 2 broth-
ers, Stanley and John
Rodak. He is survived by 5
children, Evelyn (Robert)
Nash, Eileen Rodak,
Theodore (Kathleen)
Rodak, Eleanor Sejfula
and Thomas (Nancy)
Wakechild, 6 grandchil-
dren and three great
grandchildren.

Kathryn 'Kat'
Klein, 55
OCALA
Kathryn (Kat) L. Klein,
55, of Ocala, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Nov 21,
2013, at the MRMC.
Kathryn was born in St.
Petersburg and was a life-
long resident of Florida.
She was the purchasing
manager for the Environ-
mental Services Division
(Water Supply) for
Broward County
Kat excelled at scholarly
pursuits, achieving the de-
grees of BFA in classical
music from Florida At-
lantic University and an
MBA specializing in gov-
ernment from the Univer-
sity of Phoenix. She loved
community service, fan-
tasy literature, nature, an-
imals and science fiction.
She was an avid fan of Star
Trek and Doctor Who -
woe to the person who
would dare to match her
creative humorous wit or
challenge her in a contest
of trivia! She had an ex-
ceptional skill for music,
achieving mastery of the
classical guitar as well as
composing and conduct-
ing. She also served her
community by participat-
ing in various projects and
events organized by Circle
K (Kiwanis). Kat was an
exceptionally kind sensi-
tive person who could find
the bright side of any situ-
ation. This quality gave
great comfort to those that
loved her, even as her own
health was in decline.
Kathryn is survived by
her husband, Richard
Klein; parents, Stephen
and Carlette Max; and a
host of family and friends.
There will be a celebra-
tion of life service for
Kathryn at the Cypress
Cove Care Center on Dec.
9,2013, at2 p.m., at 700 S.E.
Eighth Ave. in Crystal
River. All are welcome to
attend and celebrate with
the family
Arrangements by
Roberts Funeral Homes,
Ocala, FL. 352-622-4141.
Sign the guest book at


www chronicleonline. corn.
Terry
Shipman, 61
HERNANDO
Terry D. Shipman, 61, of
Hernando, Fla., died
Wednesday, Dec. 4,2013, at
Citrus Memorial Hospital.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness.


Donald
Findlay, 84
CITRUS SPRINGS
Donald E. Findlay, 84, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., en-
tered peacefully into rest
Thursday, Nov 14, 2013,
surrounded by his loved
ones. Don was the eldest
of 11 children born to
Virginia
Campbell
and Leslie
George
Findlay,
Nov. 13,
1929, in
Bradford,
Pa. He
Donald attended
Findlay and grad-
uated Titusville High
School. Don enlisted into
the U.S. Air Force in 1947,
was a Korean War veteran
and served our country
proudly, retiring with 21
years of service as a mas-
ter sergeant. Don then be-
came a quality-control
inspector and retired with
Foster-Wheeler Upon re-
tirement he and his wife
leisurely traveled through-
out this beautiful country
living the American
dream. He was a dedi-
cated life member of the
Citrus Springs VFW Post
4864, and a member of
KWVA in Citrus County
Don truly enjoyed fish-
ing and was quite the an-
gler He was passionate
about birds and spent his
latter years planting and
tending to his garden. Don
loved playing poker with
his comrades. A good ol'
Western movie was guar-
anteed to make him smile.
Don was a sports enthusi-
ast and spirited Pittsburgh
Steelers fan. He adored
his grandchildren and
held the bragging rights as
a great-grandfather
Don is survived by his
wife and best friend, Carol
Seaman, to whom he was
happily married for more
than 62 years. He was
blessed with three sons,
Craig Findlay (Liz) Smith-
field, Va., Bruce Findlay
(Susan) Shelby, N.C., and
Gary Findlay (Theo) Au-
gusta, Ga.; five grandchil-
dren (Christy, Jamie, Ann,
Jessica and Justin); four
great-grandchildren; five
sisters, Faye, Sandra, Pa-
tricia, Mary and Rita; and
one special niece, Debbie
McClellan, Titusville, Pa.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; four sisters,
Joan, Arlene, Yvonne and
Nadine; and one brother,
Harley Findlay Don was
loved and respected by many
He will be deeply missed
by family and friends.
Any memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars of
the U.S., Edward W Penno
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs
FL 34430. Memorial serv-
ice will be 10 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 9,2013, at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.









F i I


Obituaries


Associated Press
ST LOUIS Fred Waters, a long-
time Associated Press photogra-
pher who covered everything from
the Korean and Vietnam wars to
construction of the Gateway Arch,
has died, his daughter said Thursday
Waters died Wednesday in Gulf
Breeze, Fla., after several years of
failing health, daughter Karen
Wiley said. He turned 86 last month.
Waters was born in Alabama in
1927. His family moved to Miami in
the 1930s and he got a job as a clerk
in the photo lab of the Miami Herald.
He was 17 when he joined the
Navy in World War II, earning a
Purple Heart on Guam. He joined
the Army after his hitch in the Navy
ended in 1946 and was trained as a
photographer, serving a tour in
Japan and earning the name "Mizu-
San," Japanese for "Mr Waters."


Waters was hired by AP in 1952.
He remained in Southeast Asia and
covered conflicts that included the
Korean War, the French-Indochina
War and Vietnam. He was wounded
in Korea, hurt in a helicopter crash
in Laos and suffered an eye injury
from a bamboo trap in South Vietnam.
During the French-Indochina War,
Waters covered the fall of North
Vietnam. He was one of the last
three newsmen to leave Hanoi be-
fore it was overrun by the Vietminh
in 1954. Under constant surveillance
and forbidden to take pictures, Wa-
ters hung his camera around his neck
and as he walked around, aimed his
body and snapped his shutter Once
his film was smuggled out of the
country, it provided the first photos
from Hanoi under Vietminh rule.
In his book, "Mizu-San," published
in 2011, Waters wrote, "Very few
people can say that they accom-


polished their life's goal before they
were 30 years old. That's what hap-
pened to me. It's been a good ride."
Waters was transferred to St Louis
in 1962 and worked there until he
retired in 1987. His photos chronicled
construction of the Gateway Arch,
presidential visits, World Series
and Stanley Cup Finals games. He
traveled with Martin Luther King
Jr and covered the upheaval after
his assassination.
Waters was inducted into the Mis-
souri Photojournalism Hall of
Fame in 2008.
Funeral services are 2 p.m. Sunday
at Bayview Memorial Park Funeral
Home in Pensacola, Fla. Waters is
survived by his wife of 54 years,
Mary Waters, daughters Karen
Wiley and Jane Taylor, both of Gulf
Breeze, and son Oscar Waters of St.
Louis; nine grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren.


Feds ponder 'silver car' rating system


to pair elderly drivers with safe vehicles


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Sil-
ver could take on a whole
new meaning when it
comes to car shopping.
With more older drivers
on the road, the federal
government is contem-
plating a "silver car" rat-
ing system that will help
identify which cars bet-
ter protect elderly driv-
ers and passengers in a
crash.
Federal highway
safety officials will in-
vestigate the possibility
of such a rating system
as part of a five-year
plan designed to reduce
the number of fatal and
injury-causing accidents
among older drivers.
The plan, released
Thursday, also called for
more research into how
technology could pre-
vent crashes or reduce
their severity One prom-
ising technology would
warn drivers when their
car has moved outside
its lane. Another would
automatically apply the
brakes when a car is des-
tined to ram the vehicle
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About one in five drivers, or 35 million,
currently are 65 or older. Last year,
some 5,560 people over the age of
65 were killed as a result of motor
vehicle crashes.


Last year, some 5,560
people over the age of 65
were killed as a result of
motor vehicle crashes, a
3 percent increase from
2011. Another 214,000 were
injured, a rise of 16 per-
cent. Aging results in in-
creased frailty, making it
harder to recover from in-
juries sustained in a crash.
The longer term trend
has been more favorable.
About one in five drivers,
or 35 million, currently are
65 or older The aging of
the 77 million baby boomer
generation those born
between 1946 and 1964 -
will add to the number of
older drivers on the road.
"Those who will reach


65 in the coming decade
are projected to drive
more miles and are ex-
pected to continue driving
later in life than previous
generations," the plan said
The National Highway
Transportation Safety Ad-
ministration plan focused
on helping them drive as
safely and as long as possible
rather than trying to re-
strict their driving access.
The plan also seeks to
increase seat belt use
among the elderly because
the consequences of being
unbelted are worse for
them. For comfort reasons,
some of those who use seat
belts don't use them ap-
propriately


The agency also released
guidelines for states to im-
prove safety for older drivers.
One of the recommenda-
tions called for in-person
renewal of driver licenses
once a person hits a cer-
tain age if a state deter-
mines there is a problem
with older driver crashes.
Another guideline called
for all states to establish
medical advisory boards that
assess the medical fitness
of individuals to drive. About
two-thirds of states have
such boards.

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gap




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


DUI arrests
Pamela Reynolds, 53, of
Southwest 100th Loop, Dun-
nellon, at 1:24 p.m. Dec. 4 on
misdemeanor charges of driv-
ing under the influence, and
driving under the influence with
damage to property of another
person According to her arrest
affidavit, Reynolds crashed into
the rear of a stopped vehicle at
the intersection of County
Road 488 and U.S. 19. She
was asked to perform field so-
briety tests and did poorly. She
refused tests of her blood alco-
hol level. Bond $1,000.
George Keen, 67, of
West Oaklawn Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:56 p.m. Dec. 4
on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
Keen was involved in an acci-
dent. He was asked to perform
field sobriety tests and did
poorly. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.209 percent
and 0.223 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Bond
$500.
Other arrests
Nichole Mandat, 25, of
East Figaro Court, Hernando,
at 11:31 a.m. Dec. 4 on an ac-
tive Hemrnando County warrant
for felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of commercial fraud.
Bond was denied.


Dante Alexander, 25, of
North Satinwood Terrace, Dun-
nellon, at 11:27 a.m. Dec. 4 on
a felony charge of burglary to
an unoccupied residence. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
Alexander is accused of break-
ing into a home in Inverness,
along with an unknown accom-
plice. Bond $5,000.
Kyle Potter, 25, of North
Spring Park Court, Ho-
mosassa, at 2:39 p.m. Dec. 4
on felony charges of grand
theft, burglary to an unoccupied
conveyance, and false verifica-
tion of ownership to a pawn
broker, along with a misde-
meanor charge of drug para-
phernalia. He was also
charged with felony violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of trafficking in
stolen property. According to
his arrest affidavit Potter is ac-
cused of burglarizing a pontoon
boat and a 1999 Ford truck and
stealing a tackle box, and tools,
valued at $300. He is also ac-
cused of stealing two brass
boat propellers valued at
$4,000 and selling them to a
metal recycling business. Bond
was denied.
Cassandra Laudicina,
26, of North East Avenue, In-
verness, at 4:50 p.m. Dec. 4 on
an active warrant for felony vio-
lation of probation stemming
from an original charge of pos-
session of a controlled sub-


stance. She was also charged
with fraudulent urine testing,
and violation of conditions for
pre-trial release. Bond was
denied.
Debra Gehrke, 52, of
Southeast 155th Street, Sum-
merfield, at 5:59 p.m. Dec. 4 on
a misdemeanor charge of retail
petit theft. According to her ar-
rest affidavit, Gehrke is ac-
cused of shoplifting
miscellaneous household
items valued at $116.84 from
the Inverness Walmart. Bond
$250.
Chester Moraniec, 48, of
Inverness, at 6:03 p.m. Dec. 4
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill.
Bond $2,000.
Robert Huntoon Jr., 31,
of North Bedstrow Boulevard,
Beverly Hills, at 8:02 p.m. Dec.
4 on a misdemeanor charge of
battery. According to his arrest
affidavit, Huntoon is accused of
consuming alcoholic bever-
ages at the victim's home then
getting into a disagreement
and hitting the victim over the
head with a chair and punching
him in the face. Bond $500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 10:46 a.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 4, in the 7600 block


of W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 11:51 a.m. Dec. 4 in
the 3900 block of S. Cedar Ter-
race, Homosassa.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 10:49 p.m. Dec. 4 in
the 200 block of Trout Ave.,
Inverness.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 1:41 p.m. Dec. 3 in the 500
block of W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 2:36 p.m. Dec. 3 in the 6800
block of S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 3:04 p.m. Dec. 3 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
A grand theft was reported
at 1:05 a.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 4, in the 600 block of
Emery St., Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:05 a.m. Wednesday, Dec.
4, in the 600 block of Emery
St., Inverness.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 9:32 a.m. Dec. 4 in
the 800 block of S.E. Eighth
Ave., Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:34 a.m. Dec. 4 in the 400
block of N. Cherry Pop Drive,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported


at 12:02 p.m. Dec. 4 in the
9000 block of N. Kathleen Ter-
race, Dunnellon.
SA grand theft was reported
at 2:15 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 3600
block of W. Educational Path,
Lecanto.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:26 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 2300
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:54 p.m. Dec. 4 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3,


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

in the 700 block of N.E. ninth
St., Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported
at 4:03 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.
4, in the 800 block of N. U.S.
41, Inverness.


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AS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


MANDELA
Continued from PageAl

before the 1995 Rugby World
Cup final in Johannesburg.
When he came on the field in
South African colors to congrat-
ulate the victorious South
African team, he brought the
overwhelmingly white crowd of
63,000 to its feet chanting "Nel-
son! Nelson! Nelson!"
For he had marched headlong
into a bastion of white Afrikan-
erdom the temple of South
African rugby and made its
followers feel they belonged in
the new South Africa.
At the same time, Mandela was
himself uneasy with the idea of
being an icon and he did not es-
cape criticism as an individual
and a politician, though much of
it was muted by his status as a
unassailable symbol of decency
and principle. As president, he
failed to craft a lasting formula
for overcoming South Africa's
biggest post-apartheid problems,
including one of the world's
widest gaps between rich and
poor In his writings, he pondered
the heavy cost to his family of his
decision to devote himself to the
struggle against apartheid.
He had been convicted of trea-
son and sentenced to life im-
prisonment in 1964 for leading a
campaign of sabotage against
the government and sent to the
notorious Robben Island prison.
It was forbidden to quote him or
publish his photo, yet he and
other jailed members of his
banned African National Con-
gress were able to smuggle out
messages of guidance to the anti-
apartheid crusade.
As time passed the "long,
lonely, wasted years," as he
termed them international


Associated Press
Nelson Mandela and his then-wife Winnie Mandela give black power salutes as they enter Soccer City
stadium Feb. 13, 1990, in the Soweto township of Johannesburg, South Africa, shortly after his release
from 27 years in prison.


awareness of apartheid grew
more acute. By the time Man-
dela turned 70 he was the
world's most famous political
prisoner Such were his mental
reserves, though, that he turned
down conditional offers of free-
dom from his apartheid jailers
and even found a way to benefit
from confinement.
"People tend to measure
themselves by external accom-
plishments, but jail allows a per-
son to focus on internal ones;
such as honesty, sincerity, sim-
plicity, humility, generosity and
an absence of variety," Mandela
said in one of the many quota-


tions displayed at the Apartheid
Museum in Johannesburg. "You
learn to look into yourself."
Thousands died, were tortured
and were imprisoned in the
decades-long struggle against
apartheid, so when Mandela
emerged from prison in 1990,
smiling and waving to the
crowds, the image became an in-
ternational icon of freedom to
rival the fall of the Berlin Wall.
South Africa's white rulers
had portrayed Mandela as the
spearhead of a communist revo-
lution and insisted that black
majority rule would usher in the
chaos and bloodshed that had


beset many other African coun-
tries as they shook off colonial
rule.
Yet since apartheid ended,
South Africa has held four par-
liamentary elections and
elected three presidents, always
peacefully, setting an example
on a continent where democracy
is still new and fragile. Its
democracy has flaws, and the
African National Congress has
struggled to deliver on promises.
It is a front runner ahead of 2014
elections, but corruption scan-
dals and other missteps have un-
dercut some of the promise of
earlier years.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

"We have confounded the
prophets of doom and achieved
a bloodless revolution. We have
restored the dignity of every
South African," Mandela said
shortly before stepping down as
president in 1999 at age 80.
Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela
was born July 18,1918, the son of
a tribal chief in Transkei, one of
the future "Bantustans," inde-
pendent republics set up by the
apartheid regime to cement the
separation of whites and blacks.
Mandela's royal upbringing
gave him a dignified bearing
that became his hallmark. Many
South Africans of all races
would later call him by his clan
name, Madiba, as a token of af-
fection and respect.
Growing up at a time when vir-
tually all of Africa was under Eu-
ropean colonial rule, Mandela
attended Methodist schools be-
fore being admitted to the black
University of Fort Hare in 1938.
He was expelled two years later
for his role in a student strike.
He moved to Johannesburg
and worked as a policeman at a
gold mine, boxed as an amateur
heavyweight and studied law
His first wife, nurse Evelyn
Mase, bore him four children. A
daughter died in infancy, a son
was killed in a car crash in 1970
and another son died of AIDS in
2005. The couple divorced in
1957 and Evelyn died in 2004.
Mandela began his rise through
the anti-apartheid movement in
1944, when he helped form the
ANC Youth League.
He organized a campaign in
1952 to encourage defiance of
laws that segregated schools, mar-
riage, housing and job opportuni-
ties. The government retaliated
by barring him from attending
gatherings and leaving Johannes-
burg, the first of many "banning"
orders he was to endure.


WINSTON
Continued from PageAl

attention it would receive.
"The victim has grave
concerns that her experi-
ence, as it unfolded in the
public eye and through so-
cial media, will discourage
other victims of rape from
coming forward and re-
porting," according to a
statement from the ac-
cuser and her family
The Associated Press
does not identify alleged
victims of sexual assault.
The alleged assault was
reported to police Dec. 7,
2012, but it wasn't until last
month before the public
had any idea Winston was
involved in a sexual as-
sault investigation. Only
Thursday did specific de-
tails of the woman's accu-
sations began to emerge.
She told police she and
friends had five to six
shots at a bar and her
"memory is very broken
from that point forward,"
according to a search war-
rant. She said she remem-
bered being in a cab with a
"non-descript" black man
and going into an apart-
ment, but she didn't re-
member where it was.
The warrant said she
tried to fight the man off,
and at some point another
man came into the room
and told him to stop. But
the two went into a bath-
room "where he com-
pleted the act."
Her next memory was of
the suspect dressing her,
putting her on a scooter
and dropping her off at a
campus intersection.
The woman told police
she initially didn't know
who assaulted her She
identified Winston, who is
black, about a month after
the alleged assault.
Meggs' office took over
the case last month and
took DNA from Winston
and the woman's boyfriend
at the time, and they inter-
viewed her Winston re-
fused to be interviewed by
police.
Meggs said DNA found
on the accuser's shorts
matched her boyfriend and
DNA on her underwear
matched Winston. Winston's
attorney, Timothy Jansen,
said Winston had consen-
sual sex with the accuser
"He's absolutely inno-
cent and I'm glad and
pleased that Willie did a
full investigation and
found the same thing that
we did," Jansen said. "He's
relieved that it's over and
now he's focused even
more on football."
The accuser's family has
been sharply critical of the
way Tallahassee police
have handled the case.
They said they pushed to
have a DNA sample taken
from Winston, only to be


told by a police detective
that it would alert Winston
and make the case public.
The family said the ac-
cuser was warned by po-
lice that Tallahassee is a
"big football town, and the
victim needs to think long
and hard before proceed-
ing against him because
she will be raked over the
coals and her life will be
made miserable."
Tallahassee police have
defended their handling of
the case and said it was
placed on inactive status in
February after police were
told the alleged victim did
not wish to prosecute the
case. The woman's attor-
ney has denied that the
woman wanted to drop the
investigation.
The alleged victim was
an FSU student but she left


school last month as media
reports of the case sur-
faced. Meggs said he be-
lieved the woman wanted
the case to move forward.
At a restaurant on cam-
pus, students high-fived one
another and did the Semi-
nole's chant and tomahawk
chop when Meggs' said no
charges would be filed.





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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,840 ................................. S& P 500
,,,:, Close: 1,785.03
Change: -7.78 (-0.4%)


Interestrates


Ut


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 2.87
percent
Thursday. Yields
affect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Oil prices edged
higher on a re-
port that the
economy grew
more than
expected in the
third quarter. The
price of natural
gas hit its high-
est level in six
months. Palla-
dium rose. Soy-
beans fell.


.ED


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .09
6-month T-bill .09 0.09 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .16
2-year T-note .30 0.29 +0.01 .24
5-year T-note 1.49 1.44 +0.05 .61
10-year T-note 2.87 2.83 +0.04 1.59
30-year T-bond 3.92 3.90 +0.02 2.78


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.70 3.69 +0.01 2.37
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.15 5.14 +0.01 3.89
Barclays USAggregate 2.41 2.37 +0.04 1.69
Barclays US High Yield 5.64 5.61 +0.03 6.38
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.71 4.65 +0.06 3.56
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.72 1.69 +0.03 .90
Barclays US Corp 3.23 3.18 +0.05 2.68


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.38
Ethanol (gal) 1.88
Heating Oil (gal) 3.05
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.13
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.71
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1233.20
Silver (oz) 19.51
Platinum (oz) 1363.50
Copper (Ib) 3.26
Palladium (oz) 736.75
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.32
Coffee (Ib) 1.05
Corn (bu) 4.23
Cotton (Ib) 0.78
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 349.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38
Soybeans (bu) 13.28
Wheat (bu) 6.38


PVS.
97.20
2.48
3.06
3.96
2.72
PVS.
1248.20
19.77
1376.00
3.27
728.60
PVS.
1.33
1.08
4.26
0.78
350.80
1.36
13.30
6.47


%CHG
+0.19
+0.60
-0.31
+4.34
-0.24
%CHG
-1.20
-1.31
-0.91
-0.31
+1.12
%CHG
-0.81
-2.23
-0.65
-0.26
-0.37
+1.85
-0.11
-1.43


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 23.85 -.07 +18.4 +19.6 +12.8 +14.7
CaplncBuA m 57.36 -.21 +11.6 +12.2 +9.3 +12.6
CpWIdGrIA m 44.02 -.10 +20.6 +22.7 +10.5 +15.6
EurPacGrA m 47.81 +.04 +16.0 +18.7 +6.6 +15.1
FnlnvA m 50.97 -.14 +26.0 +28.1 +14.2 +18.5
GrthAmA m 44.24 -.05 +28.8 +31.0 +14.7 +18.6
IncAmerA m 20.23 -.07 +14.9 +15.7 +11.4 +15.0
InvCoAmA m 37.99 -.11 +27.5 +29.1 +14.1 +16.3
NewPerspA m 38.22 -.02 +22.3 +24.7 +11.7 +18.2
WAMutlnvA m 39.11 -.16 +27.2 +28.5 +16.3 +16.3
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 41.84 -.10 +20.8 +26.1 +7.6 +18.0
Stock 162.46 -1.04 +34.8 +38.1 +17.7 +19.7
Fidelity Contra 99.62 -.15 +29.6 +31.3 +14.8 +18.9
LowPriStk d 49.20 -.22 +30.8 +34.4 +16.8 +23.2
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 63.50 -.28 +27.6 +29.4 +15.8 +17.8
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.37 -.01 +11.9 +13.9 +10.2 +17.0
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.04 +.01 +0.7 +2.1 +4.8 +9.6
GIBondAdv 13.00 +.01 +1.0 +2.4 +5.1 +9.8
Harbor Intllnstl 69.28 -.31 +11.5 +14.8 +7.1 +16.0
Oakmark Intl 1 26.11 -.12 +24.7 +31.4 +12.5 +21.9
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 32.78 -.14 +25.6 +27.9 +15.0 +16.8
GrowStk 50.42 +.04 +33.5 +35.8 +16.6 +22.5
Vanguard 500Adml 165.21 -.72 +27.6 +29.4 +15.8 +17.9
5001lnv 165.18 -.72 +27.5 +29.2 +15.7 +17.7
MulntAdml 13.73 -.01 -1.7 -2.8 +4.0 +5.7
PrmcpAdml 97.94 -.31 +35.9 +37.6 +16.6 +19.7
STGradeAd 10.74 -.01 +1.1 +1.2 +2.5 +5.6
Tgtet2025 15.66 -.04 +15.2 +16.8 +9.9 +14.3
TotBdAdml 10.60 -.01 -2.0 -2.3 +3.0 +5.0
Totlntl 16.31 -.06 +11.0 +14.9 +4.7 +14.0
TotStlAdm 45.23 -.16 +28.7 +30.8 +15.9 +19.0
TotStldx 45.21 -.15 +28.5 +30.6 +15.8 +18.8
Welltn 38.75 -.14 +16.7 +17.4 +11.7 +14.3
WelltnAdm 66.94 -.24 +16.7 +17.5 +11.8 +14.4
WndsllAdm 65.23 -.38 +26.5 +28.4 +16.2 +17.5
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,821.51
Change: -68.26 (-0.4%)


1,760. 10 DAYS '......... -: 0 DAYS
1,8 4 0 ........................ .............. ........... ............. ........... .. 16 ,4 0 0 ........... ............. ............. ...................................... 7 -
., : :g16 ,0 0 0 ........... ............. ............. ........... .............. .. l
1,760
1,6 o o ... ............... . . 15 ,6 0 0 ............... .......... ........... ...

68 ... .. .. .... .......
1,6 40 ... .... ................ ......................... ................... 14,400....... j... .. ... ... .... ........ .........


1 ,5 2 0 .... A S 0N............ S ..... ....... ..... ...... ... 1 4 4 0 0 ".. .."....... . .A ..... .......A S ...... 0......6. ....... ...


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,251
Pvs. Volume 3,538
Advanced 1046
Declined 2036
New Highs 55
New Lows 139


NASD
1,825
1,842
1161
1384
90
36


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15896.19
7192.99
488.58
10056.71
4043.71
1792.82
1299.05
19053.87
1125.60


LOW
15809.37
7145.71
483.86
10010.17
4025.26
1783.38
1292.05
18971.58
1119.75


CLOSE
15821.51
7156.51
484.41
10016.73
4033.17
1785.03
1299.05
18989.45
1122.47


%CHG.
-0.43%
-0.02%
-0.92%
-0.48%
-0.12%
-0.43%
+0.11%
-0.34%
+0.10%


YTD
+20.74%
+34.86%
+6.91%
+18.63%
+33.57%
+25.16%
+27.30%
+26.64%
+32.16%


Stocks
Stocks finished lower on Thurs-
day, as encouraging data on
jobs and economic growth roiled
investor anxiety over a possible
pullback in economic stimulus
by the Federal Reserve. Many
investors believe policymakers
could make the move in March
next year.

Walt Disney DIS
Close: $70.23A0.26 or 0.4%
The entertainment company raised
its annual dividend to 86 cents after
a third-consecutive year of record
profit and revenue.

$- (

-. C. Ii
52-week range
$48.55 $71.69
Vol.: 5.6m (0.7x avg.) PE: 20.8
Mkt. Cap:$123.41 b Yield: 1.1%
Dollar General DG
Close:$59.81 A3.44 or 6.1%
Traffic rose and shoppers spent
more per visit at the discount retailer,
which beat Wall Street expectations
this quarter.



Uo S 0 N
52-week range
$39.73 $60.25


Vol.:11.0m (4.1x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$19.35 b


PE:19.9
Yield:...


Sprint S
Close: $8.00 A0.05 or 0.6%
Nomura upgraded the wireless com-
pany, saying that it expected signifi-
cant cost reductions and some mod-
est revenue growth.
$10



4 S 0 N
52-week range
$5.49 $8.75
Vol.:18.6m (1.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$31.46 b Yield:...
Kroger KR
Close:$40.06V-1.46 or -3.5%
The grocer is spending a lot of mon-
ey to better compete, including the
acquisition of upscale food retailer
Harris Teeter.
04r



-S C. Ii
52-week range
$25.20 $43.85
Vol.:11.2m (3.1x avg.) PE: 13.3
Mkt. Cap:$20.85 b Yield: 1.6%
Apple AAPL
Close: $567.90 A2.90 or 0.5%
Carl Icahn is seeking the support of
shareholders as he pressures the iP-
hone maker to spend more of its
cash on buybacks.



S O N
52-week range
$385.10 l$575.14
Vol.:15.9m (1.3x avg.) PE: 14.3
Mkt. Cap:$510.96 b Yield: 2.1%


Sluggish retail news



pulls down stocks


Associated Press

NEW YORK -The out-
look for hiring is improv-
ing and the economy is
growing at its fastest pace
in more than a year, so
what's the bad news for
the stock market?
Stocks fell Thursday
after the government re-
ported that the number of
Americans applying for
unemployment benefits
dropped to the lowest in
nearly six years last week.
Also, the U.S. economy
grew at a 3.6 percent an-
nual rate from July
through September, the
fastest since early 2012.
Investors believe the en-
couraging signs on the
economy will push the
Federal Reserve closer to
pulling back on its $85 bil-
lion-a-month bond-buying
program. That stimulus,
which is intended to hold
down interest rates, has
been helping to power this
year's record-setting run
in the stock market.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index dropped for the
fifth time in a row, match-
ing its longest losing streak
since September
"If they do cut the bond
purchases, the knee-jerk
reaction for the market
will be to move down,"
said Chris Gaffney, a sen-


ior market strategist at
EverBank.
The S&P 500 index fell
7.78 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,785.03. The Dow Jones
industrial average fell 68.26
points, or 0.4 percent, to
15,821.51. The Nasdaq com-
posite declined 4.84 points,
or 0.1 percent at 4,033.16.
Earlier in the week,
there were strong reports
on manufacturing and con-
struction. Investors will
get more insight into how
the U.S. economy is doing
on Friday, when the gov-
ernment releases its
monthly jobs report
While few investors
think that the Fed will an-
nounce a reduction to its
bond purchases at its
meeting this month, many
believe policy makers
could make the move in
March.
Several retailers fell after
reporting disappointing re-
sults. L Brands, the owner
of Victoria's Secret Bath &
Body Works and other
stores, lost $1.07, or 1.7 per-
cent, to $62.18 after report-
ing that its sales dropped 5
percent last month.
Gaming company Elec-
tronic Arts was the biggest
decline in the S&P 500
index after Forbes re-
ported that the company
had been forced to delay
future games from one of


its developers due to ongo-
ing problems with its Bat-
tlefield 4 game. The
company's stock fell $1.33,
or 6 percent, to $21.01.
The S&P 500 index has
dipped 1.2 percent since
the start of the month and
is on course to log its first
weekly decline in nine
weeks. The loss has pared
this year's advance to
25.2 percent.
Stocks have been surg-
ing this year as the Fed's
stimulus helped keep the
economic recovery on
track and as corporations
produced record profits.
Low interest rates have
also made stocks more at-
tractive in comparison to
bonds.
The stock market may
also be sliding this month
as investors sell some of
their best-performing
holdings given the strong
returns this year, said Na-
talie Trunow, chief invest-
ment officer at Calvert
Investments, an asset man-
agement company
In government bond
trading, the yield on the
10-year Treasury note rose
to 2.87 percent from 2.83
percent Wednesday The
yield is the highest it's
been in more than two
months as traders expect
the Fed to reduce its bond
purchases.


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 0 6.00 5.90 -.08 -1.3 A A A +28.3 +52.2 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.76 -0-- 39.00 34.25 -.35 -1.0 V V A +1.6 +7.3 25 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 36.79 -0- 62.05 48.90 -.23 -0.5 V A A +30.2 +32.6 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -0- 105.48 100.72 -.78 -0.8 V V A +15.2 +17.9 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 9.77 0 15.98 15.43 -.20 -1.3 V A A +32.9 +58.1 21 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -0- 13.08 11.69 -.19 -1.6 V V V +2.8 +7.5 39
CenturyLink Inc CTL 29.93 0- 42.01 30.65 -.19 -0.6 V V V -21.7 -14.1 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 34.07 -- 0- 53.68 51.06 -.98 -1.9 V A A +29.1 +51.9 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 15.04 -0- 26.38 23.03 -.40 -1.7 V V A +45.4 +58.7 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 48.55 0 71.69 70.23 +.26 +0.4 V A A +41.1 +43.4 21 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 62.60 -0- 75.46 69.60 -.32 -0.5 V V A +9.1 +14.8 20 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 44.65 -0-- 61.18 49.45 -.07 -0.1 V V A +7.2 +15.6 20 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0- 96.00 94.13 -.54 -0.6 A A A +8.8 +11.4 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 11.03 -0- 18.02 16.74 +.12 +0.7 V A V +29.3 +50.5 13 0.40
Gen Electric GE 20.26 -0- 27.50 26.45 -.19 -0.7 V V A +26.0 +31.4 19 0.76
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 29.86 -0- 49.52 46.57 -.43 -0.9 A A A +54.4 +53.1 15 4.50e
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 7.25 -0- 17.28 13.09 -.01 -0.1 A A +40.5 +77.7 cc
Home Depot HD 60.21 -- 0- 82.27 78.54 +.14 +0.2 V A A +27.0 +24.5 21 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.50 -0- 25.98 24.26 +.52 +2.2 A A A +17.7 +23.4 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 0- 215.90 176.08 +.34 +0.2 V V V -8.1 -5.2 12 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 -- 0- 34.07 32.25 -.25 -0.8 V A A +52.8 +50.7 33
Lowes Cos LOW 34.20 -0- 52.08 46.61 -.25 -0.5 V V V +31.2 +33.5 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 86.27 -0- 103.70 95.43 -.28 -0.3 V V V +8.2 +13.3 17 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 0 38.98 38.00 -.94 -2.4 V A A +42.3 +51.3 14 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.28 0 66.39 65.23 +.30 +0.5 V A A +17.2 +21.8 16 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 67.75 -0- 89.75 83.59 -.62 -0.7 V V A +20.8 +27.9 18 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 -0-- 23.10 8.85 -.81 -8.4 V A A -55.1 -45.7 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0-- 21.09 16.38 -.07 -0.4 V V -9.3 -2.0 30 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.40 --- 10.52 9.56 -.11 -1.1 V A A +34.1 +51.2 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 67.50 49.98 -.94 -1.8 V V V +20.8 +18.7 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 84.57 -0- 114.72 102.29 -2.46 -2.3 V V V +18.6 +20.3 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 29.39 0 43.08 42.66 +.23 +0.5 V A A +38.1 +46.9 28 1.20
Time Warner TWX 45.88 -0- 70.77 65.59 +.15 +0.2 V A V +37.1 +42.6 16 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 70.29 -0- 105.76 100.08 +.13 +0.1 V V V +36.5 +38.3 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 41.50 -0- 54.31 48.91 -.46 -0.9 V V A +13.0 +17.8 69 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 37.90 36.76 -.03 -0.1 V A A +45.9 +49.1 1.61e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 -0- 81.37 79.44 -.78 -1.0 V A A +16.4 +14.4 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 33.94 -0- 60.93 56.11 -1.46 -2.5 V V A +51.6 +71.4 22 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd -Loss in last 12 months


BP pushes technical limits
to tap extreme fields
HOUSTON BP's strategy after the Deep-
water Horizon tragedy: Go deeper.
BP is leading an industry-wide push to de-
velop technology that can retrieve oil from for-
mations that are so deep under the sea floor,
and under such high pressure and tempera-
ture, that conventional equipment would melt
or be crushed by the conditions.
One BP field in the Gulf of Mexico, called
Tiber, makes the Macondo field that the Deep-
water Horizon rig was probing look like puddle
of oil. It is thought to hold 20 times the amount
of oil as Macondo and about twice as deep.
There's an extraordinary amount of oil in
similar discoveries around the world, several
of which are controlled by BP. But BP first
must figure out how to get it. New equipment,
including blowout preventers far stronger than
the one that failed on the Deepwater Horizon,
must be developed. Then BP must convince
regulators it can tap this oil safely.
At 50, new-look Mustang
still has plenty of muscle
DEARBORN, Mich. -The Ford Mustang is
still galloping at 50.
Ford Motor Co. on Thursday introduced the
2015 Mustang, a confident and aggressive riff
on the iconic pony car that first made Ameri-
cans swoon in the 1960s.
The Mustang's passionate fans are sure to
love it, but Ford will have to wait and see if it's
enough to overtake rivals and win over inter-
national buyers.
AT&T reduces fees for people
who bring own devices
NEW YORK -AT&T is joining T-Mobile in
reducing monthly fees for people who pay for
their own devices.
It's the latest break from a longstanding
practice of offering subsidies on devices to
lock customers into two-year service agree-
ments. Many customers have been forgoing


those subsidies anyway as they opt for plans
that allow frequent phone upgrades. But until
now, AT&T's and Verizon's service fees have
still factored in the costs of those subsidies,
whether the customer uses them or not.
Beginning Sunday, customers will be able
to switch to the cheaper plans if they buy or
bring their own phone. That includes paying
for the device in installments through the
frequent-upgrade Next plan. Those whose
contracts have run out also qualify.
US factory orders fall
0.9 percent in October
WASHINGTON U.S. factories received
fewer orders in October, as aircraft demand
fell and businesses cut back on computers.
The decline suggests companies were hesi-
tant to invest during the 16-day partial govern-
ment shutdown.
Factory orders dropped 0.9 percent in Octo-
ber, the Commerce Department said Thurs-
day. That followed a 1.8 percent increase in
September. A big reason for the decline in Oc-
tober was a steep drop in orders for aircraft.
States grovel before
Boeing in bid for 777X jobs
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -With Boeing the
king of U.S. aircraft manufacturing, more than
a dozen states are groveling before the throne
for a share of the riches to be made from the
next-generation 777 jetliner.
From coast to coast, states are rushing to
impress Boeing with lavish incentive packages
that offer property, labor deals and billions of
dollars in tax breaks. All this in the hopes that
the aerospace giant will select them to assem-
ble the new 777X or at least give them a
wing to construct.
The competition underscores Boeing's com-
manding bargaining position in an economy
where top-notch manufacturing jobs remain
scarce and elected officials feel obligated to
pursue every growth opportunity, no matter
how improbable.
From wire reports


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NICK NICHOLAS 0 *LNCON
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N.* Crystal River 795-07371
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM ...T.


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 A9






Page A10 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6,2013



PINION


"You can't have a country or a city or a state
that's worth a damn unless you govern
within yourself in your day-to-day life."
Lee lacocca, 1988


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


COMMON SENSE




Follow rules



of the water



when viewing



the manatees


rystal River is the only
manatee refuge where
swimmers and mana-
tees can share the water at
the same time, and U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service is edu-
cating paddlers, swimmers,
boaters and pho-
tographers on THE I1
how to co-exist
with manatee. FWS
Nonetheless, recrea
the responsibility boaters
falls on the indi-
vidual to police OUR 01
their own interac- Boaters
tions or eventu- f
ally face stricter with n
guidelines and fche
p o s s i b 1 y face-re
regulation.
Facing a 20 percent in-
crease in tourist traffic, FWS
has worked hard to get the
word out using signage, word
of mouth and instructional
videos as tools. The agency
knows it can't be everywhere
at all times to police the
tourists, so it is up to the tour
operators, guides and indi-
vidual recreationalists to
share in policing.
With more than 130,000
tourists expected to visit dur-
ing the peak season, which
runs to March 31, there will
be those who are not content
with passive observance of
manatees. Limiting the abuse
will be instrumental to
decision-makers when they
rule on changes in the com-
ing years.
In truth, they do not have
the money or resources to
manage this growing activity
FWS has been appropriately
sympathetic to the economic
impact that manatee interac-


tion has in Citrus County.
So far, the changes have
been minimal, albeit bother-
some to tourists. In March
2012, King's Bay was declared
a manatee-protection refuge
and joined a federal manatee-


SSUE:
Sputs
national
on notice.

PINION:
will need
i balance
nature or
gulation.


protection net-
work of 11
sanctuaries and 13
refuges through-
out Florida.
As part of that
designation, new
speed limits were
introduced. And
12 activities were
prohibited
throughout the
manatee refuge at
all times. These


activities include: chasing or
pursuing manatees; disturb-
ing or touching resting or
feeding manatee(s); diving
from the surface onto resting
or feeding manatees; corner-
ing or surrounding or at-
tempting to corner or
surround manatees; riding,
holding, grabbing, pinching or
attempting to ride, hold, grab
or pinch manatees; poking,
prodding or stabbing, or at-
tempting to poke, prod or stab
manatees with anything, in-
cluding hands and feet; stand-
ing on or attempting to stand
on manatees; separating a
mother and calf or attempting
to separate a mother and calf;
and giving manatees anything
to eat or drink or attempting
to give manatees anything to
eat or drink.
It's time we were serious
about following the rules.
The alternative would mean
more regulation or a poten-
tial ban of the activities.


HELP UNITED WAY
* United Way of Citrus County needs your help for its annual
fundraising goal. If you can, please send a contribution to the
United Way of Citrus County, c/o Gerry Mulligan, Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.


Great staff
Kudos to the staff of the new
Walmart on Lecanto Highway.
Can't say enough about how help-
ful they all were. They have a great
manager and a great staff and it's
wonderful to have people working
in our community who are caring
for customers.
Yuck! CO


Such a disgrace. I
would personally like to
thank the young lady
who changed her infant's
diaper in her vehicle at
the bank ... then dis-
carded it as she opened
up her driver's door and
laid it on the ground and
then left the parking lot.
What a way to go.


delayed the effectiveness of having
a community hospital to serve us
citizens, and our taxes are going
for millions to pay attorney fees.
These guys will drag it on forever.
Isn't there some way we can get
rid of these two attorneys?
Takes 40 hours


LAS


Victims of attorneys
Well, we are victims of the attor-
neys, Bill Grant and Clark Stillwell,
in trying to resolve the situation
with our hospital. All it has done is


This is to the person
complaining about the
snowbirds being back,
about how long it took
to get their commodi-
ties, that it took them
hours. Well, it takes me
hours to get mine too
- 40 hours per week.
Mandate a law


) P'/1 5Kudos, Chronicle.
5 7 Thanks for printing the
"Mandate." The fact that
that is no law, just the word "man-
date." You have to be a wordsmith
about these legislators imposing
their will on us, calling it a man-
date. A mandate is no law. There is
no forced vaccine.


Fallout from the Nuclear Option


J Harvie Wilkinson III is a
Federal circuit court
judge, appointed in 1984
by Ronald Reagan, but he's
never seen himself as a doctri-
naire conservative
trying to "storm the
barricades." After ,
Senate Democrats
recently invoked the
"nuclear option" and
voted to ban fili- .,',,
busters for most pres-
idential nominations,
he outlined the con-
sequences of that i
rash and regrettable Coki
action in The Wash- Steven
ington Post. OTI
"The question for a VOl
great nation should
often be: Will the
center hold?" the judge wrote.
That's a "quiet question," but
one that "must be posed now"
And as the Congress insists on
demonstrating, the voices an-
swering "no" are growing
louder and stronger
Both parties bear a huge
amount of blame here. Repub-
licans were totally unjustified
in using the filibuster to block
three of President Obama's em-
inently reasonable and com-
pletely qualified nominees to
the D.C. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals. They were trying in ef-
fect to overturn the results of
the last election, and their
dead-end strategy seems delib-
erately designed to push De-
mocrats to the breaking point.
Instead of showing restraint,
however, Democrats allowed
themselves to be pushed. In fact
many in their ranks particu-
larly younger lawmakers who
have never served in the minor-
ity were desperately eager for
the showdown. Their emotions
were stoked. They wanted re-
venge. And they took it.
Sure, Democrats can derive
some short-term gains. Obama
will get to place more judges on
the Federal bench and win
quicker confirmation for some
important appointments, like
Janet Yellen to head the Fed-


ie
IE
H
I1


eral Reserve. But the long-term
costs could be enormous. And
it's our bet that years from now,
many of the Democrats who
backed the change will regret
their vote.
For one thing, Re-
publicans still have
S many tools at their
disposal to delay and
derail nominations.
They can boycott
committee meetings,
force lengthy floor
debates or wreck leg-
Sislative schedules.
aand Moreover, the parti-
Roberts san fumes choking
HER Capitol Hill have
DES turned even more
-- toxic if that's
possible. Pragmatic
Republicans John McCain and
Susan Collins tried to broker a
last-minute compromise but
were brusquely brushed aside.
As a result, their ability and
willingness to seek common
ground in the future has been
badly undermined.
Obama still has an ambitious
legislative agenda for his final
three years in office: reforming
immigration, raising revenues,
revising entitlements. All of
those goals will now be harder
to achieve, not easier
"If you thought the Senate
has already ground to a near
standstill, this is like throwing
sand into the gears of an al-
ready rusty machine," Republi-
can strategist Ron Bonjean told
Bloomberg News.
The long-term costs could be
even greater Without the threat
of a filibuster to restrain them,
presidents will be freer to nom-
inate more staunchly ideologi-
cal judges. One day it will be a
Republican president making
those choices and Democrats
have just bought themselves
more hardliners like Antonin
Scalia and Clarence Thomas.
"Ideologues pose a unique
risk for courts" because they
shred "the very understandings
by which we operate," judge
Wilkinson wrote. "Taking dis-


agreements personally, believ-
ing oneself in sole and perma-
nent possession of the truth
can, in countless ways ... cor-
rode the quality of justice."
The "quality of justice" is not
the only potential victim here.
The essence of our political sys-
tem is at risk.
The core value of democracy
is not ensuring majority rule; it
is protecting minority rights.
Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan,
one of three Democrats to op-
pose the "nuclear option" made
that precise point in a powerful
floor speech after the vote.
"If a Senate majority decides
to pursue its aims unrestrained
by the rules, we will have sacri-
ficed a professed, vital princi-
ple for the sake of momentary
convenience," he warned.
Levin went on to quote Joe
Biden, who was serving in the
Senate during an earlier con-
frontation in 2005. Then the
sides were reversed. Democrats
were filibustering President
Bush's judgeship nominations
and Republicans were threat-
ening to change the rules.
"The nuclear option aban-
dons America's sense of fair
play" Biden cautioned. "It's the
one thing this country stands
for: not tilting the playing field
on the side of those who control
and own the field."
He was completely correct
about that. We have lived and
worked in countries where the
winners "those who control
and own the field" feel free
to change the rules, undermine
their opponents, and unfairly
enshrine their hold on power
That's not real democracy,
that's tyranny by another name.
Yes, the Republicans planted
the nuclear bomb. But the De-
mocrats lit the fuse. And the
fallout from that explosion will
pollute the capital for years to
come.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. corn.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Thankful for this
holiday season
Gas prices have risen 38
cents a gallon, in a week. Why?
Because they can.
Turkeys cost 20 cents a
pound more this year Cranber-
ries are 37 cents a can more.
Boxed stuffing is 26 cents a box
more. Canned corn/green
beans are 19 cents more. Jell-O
is 45 cents more. Boxed pasta
is 29 cents more. Olives are
59 cents more. Why? Because
they can.
Insurance companies can
charge anything they want for
homeowners insurance. Just
wait for your next renewal.
Even if you don't live on water,
in a flood zone, or 20 miles in-
land, prepare for a minimum
10 percent increase, up to pos-
sibly a 25 percent increase.
Why? Because they can.
Seasonal shoppers are out in
force. Just because they have a
handicapped license plate or
placard does not automatically
entitle them to park in a handi-
capped parking space. Florida
law states that the disabled
person to whom the plate/


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

placard is assigned must be in
the vehicle when occupying a


handicapped parking space.
The fine is $250/offense. The
CCSO could get Christmas
bonuses for every one of its
employees if this law was only
enforced for the next six
weeks.
But, if I can survive until
Jan. 1, 2014, I can begin to live
the high life with my 1.5 per-
cent Social Security increase!
(Not)
Dan Luce
Inverness

Thanks for support
of foundation
The Breast Cancer Support
Group of RBOI in Lecanto
wish to thank the office of Dr
Kinnard's Chiropractic group
for their generous donation to
Dr C. J. Bennett for the Citrus
Aid Cancer Foundation. We ap-
preciate your time in helping
to raise funds for this founda-
tion. Thank you again so very
much from all of us.
Judy Bonard
leader, Breast Cancer Support
Group, Lecanto
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


563-C




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hit the nail on
the head
Kudos to Jeanette Gold-
smith who recently com-
mented on Citrus County's
Strategic Plan by Citrus
County Economic Devel-
opment Council (EDC)
with Don Taylor steering
as executive director The
county can't blame the
economy, recession, and
budgets for not seeing the
rhetoric preached by busi-
ness leaders, voters and
individuals for 20 to 30
years. The article stated
key findings:
Lack of economic
growth, coupled with lack
of interest and effort to
promote economic
growth.
Lack of investment
development
Lack of skilled work-
force, and the perception
that the county is un-
friendly to business.
Lack of product (loca-
tion) to attract larger
businesses.
I am speaking as a resi-
dent since 1972. It's funny
the classified want ads
today look the same as the
classified want ads 30
years ago. For example,
the Chronicle takes up
three to four columns,
medical ads take another
four to five columns, and
general help finishes with
half a column. The county
hasn't changed or helped
to promote jobs since 1972.
If individuals don't work
for energy plants, the med-
ical profession or teach
there is a real job void in
this county I am trying to
figure out what is manu-


factured in Citrus County.
For instance, Pro-Line
Boats has moved, we no
longer have a canning
plant for crab meat and
CR 3 nuclear plant is
closed. To offset this we
have Sibex, Home Depot,
Lowes, Walmart and a host
of grocery retailers. If you
add tourism industry for
the manatees, diving, fish-
ing and the golf industry
many hotels, dive shops,
restaurants, and clothing
apparel that add to the
positives for economic
stimulus for the county, it's
still not economic growth.
I have an MBA, but can-
not find permanent em-
ployment What is
motivating the younger
high school students to fur-
ther their education and
stay in this area? Jeanette
points to agriculture/
aquaculture, energy, power
systems, environmental
sciences, light
manufacturing/assembly
marine trades, medical
services/health care, out-
door recreational equip-
ment, and high end
retirement housing
needed to attract business
and develop economic
growth in Citrus County
Duke Power's recent
donations to the EDC and
WTI are certainly a right
step to promote/attract
economic growth in Cit-
rus County, but we need
more. Duke Power as-
sesses the energy demand
for Florida that would
add jobs by new power
plants (fossil, hydro, co-
gen or nuclear) in Citrus
County How about golf
cart manufacturing, fish-


LETTERS to the Editor

ing rod and lure
manufacturing?


Bill Uffmann

Boat ramp fees
draw ire
Your paper recently
published an article
about the artifacts found
during the dredging of the
Chassahowitzka Springs.
The writer stated
wrongly that the viewing
was at the campground
boat ramp. I would like to
reiterate once again, the
boat ramp does not belong
to the campground. The
campground belongs to the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District and
the boat ramp belongs to
Citrus County residents.
The taxpayers paid for the
construction of this boat
ramp two years ago. The
Board of County Commis-
sioners hired a private
company Moore & Moore,
to run the ramp. M&M
leases the management re-
sponsibilities of the camp-
ground from the BOCC for
$100 a month. M&M
charges $7 to park a truck
and trailer in the parking
lot adjoining the ramp.
This is an injustice to the
residents of Chassahow-
itzka as well as the resi-
dents of Citrus County The
parking lot services the
ramp, not the campground.
Some of us bought
houses in Chassahowitzka


9 4(





because there was a boat
ramp nearby Those same
people bought boats
specifically designed to
use in the Chassahowitzka
River Yes, there has al-
ways been a "small" fee to
park However, previous
management exempted
residents because they
agreed it wasn't fair to
charge residents a fee to
use a ramp that they paid
for. The new management
and our BOCC refuse to
bend and accommodate
the residents with low-cost
or no-cost parking.. I have
met and discussed this
with Assistant County Ad-
ministrator Cathy Pearson
and District 2 Commis-
sioner "'JJ" Kenney
It was brought forward


at the BOCC meeting in
December 2011 where 'JJ"
Kenney turned his back on
us after promising some-
thing positive and said he
couldn't help. I suspected
this was going to happen.
I have fought for low-
cost or no-cost parking for
the residents of Chassa-
howitzka and Citrus
County I have printed out
parking fees associated
with other county ramps
around the state that
charge a fee and given
these to the BOCC and
M&M. I was showing that
all counties that deem it
necessary to charge a fee


Hernando Pool Nuphar / Willows /
Torpedograss / Tallow / Hydrilla
/Duckweed
Floral City Floating / Duckweed


give the residents of that
county an option to pur-
chase a yearly pass at a
steep discount Every-
thing falls on deaf ears.
This is the only Citrus
County-owned boat ramp
that charges a fee to park.
I am sure there is a
statute on record some-
where that says low-cost
or no-cost parking must
be made available when
tax dollars are used to
build a boat ramp.
What the BOCC and
M&M have done is unjust.
Bill Watkins
Chassahowitzka


Glyphosate / 2,4D /
Element 3A/Aquathol/
Diquat/ Super K/
Clipper/ Quest
Diquat / Clipper/ Quest


MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Hernando Pool Tussocks / Cabomba
Inverness Pool Pondweed / Tussocks
Crystal River Lyngbya


Harvesting
Harvesting
Harvesting


All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality Treated areas will be identified
with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions For
further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http //www bocc citrus fl us/
pubworks/aauatics/aauatic services htm Citrus County Division ofAquatic Services


Mon.-Sat. 9am-5pm.

Sunday 1Oam-4pm
Weather permitting Call ahead if in doubt.

Visit Us At
www.ColorCountryNursery.com
Colorcountrynursery@facebook.com


( itru,
( ui) ', Bvit


Conveniently located in
the heart of Citrus County

A Destination/

Worth the Drive!


HWY. 44 LECANTO Two Miles East Of Hwy. 491 (352) 746-6465


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning December 9, 2013

HERBICIDE TREATMENTS
Waterbodv Plant Herbicide Used
Inverness Pool Nuphar / Floating / Willows / Glyphosate / Diquat/
Torpedograss / Tallow / Hydrilla / 2,4D / Element 3A/
Paspalum / Duckweed Aquathol / Super K /
Clipper/ Quest


OPINION


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 All


mi **co il &-,










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Big cheese


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Eyes on today's jobs report


Experts hope numbers will give


Associated Press
Peter Lovis, right, owner of
The Cheese Shop in Con-
cord, Mass., and cheese
importer Francesco Gallo
roll a 400-pound wheel of
Crucolo cheese imported
from Trentino, Italy Thurs-
day as they prepare to dis-
tribute samples to a
waiting crowd. The annual
Crucolo Cheese Parade
heralds the arrival of the
largest wheel of Italian
cheese in North America.


Man released
amid questions
about abuse case
AUSTIN, Texas -A man
convicted 21 years ago of
child abuse involving sa-
tanic rituals at a day care
he ran with his wife was
freed Thursday amid ques-
tions about the evidence in
the case.
Dan Keller was released
on bond barely a week after
the release of his now ex-
wife, Fran. The couple, who
have always maintained
their innocence, hope that
appeals courts will now ex-
onerate them.
The Kellers were con-
victed and sentenced to 48
years each in 1992, after
therapists testified that they
helped three children recover
memories of satanic rituals
and sexual abuse at an
Austin preschool the couple
operated out of their home.
The only physical evi-
dence came from an emer-
gency room doctor who
testified that internal lacera-
tions on one child were evi-
dence of abuse. But in court
documents filed earlier this
year, Dr. Michael Mouw
said what he thought were
lacerations were actually
normal physiology.
That prompted prosecu-
tors in Travis County, which
includes Austin, to agree
that the case's evidence
was faulty and release the
couple on bond.
State: 17 percent
of marriages are
gay unions
SEATTLE Gay wed-
dings made up 17 percent
of marriages in Washington
this past year, the first year
gay marriages were legal in
the state, state officials re-
ported Wednesday.
About 7,071 same-sex
couples got married in
Washington between De-
cember 6, 2012, and the
most recent complete
month of data, September
2013. There were 42,408
total marriages in the state
during that time, according
to the Washington State
Department of Health.
Washington is one of 15
states plus the District of
Columbia where gay mar-
riage is legal.
Illinois governor
signs pension
overhaul into law
CHICAGO Gov. Pat
Quinn has signed landmark
legislation Thursday to re-
form Illinois' massively-
underfunded pension sys-
tem, though the new law is
certain to face threatened
lawsuits by labor unions.
The overhaul, approved
by the General Assembly
this week after years of
delay and inaction, cuts
benefits for most employ-
ees and retirees. It has a
June 1 effective date, but
could be delayed by the
legal challenges.
Illinois' $100 billion short-
fall in funding employee re-
tirement benefits is
considered the worst pen-
sion crisis in the nation.
From wire reports


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy is growing
faster, corporate profits
are rising and companies
are laying off the fewest
workers in six years.
The latest government
reports point to economic
momentum in the midst of
the critical holiday shop-
ping season.
"The momentum looks
strong," said Chris Rupkey,
chief economist at the


Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi.
Encouraging as the lat-
est figures are, hopes for a
robust finish to 2013 hinge
on strong hiring. And that
depends, in part, on what
the government's Novem-
ber jobs report shows
when it is released on
Friday
The recovery from the
Great Recession that
ended 4 1/2 years ago has
come in fits and starts. Un-
employment remains high
at 7.3 percent. And growth


clarity to economic picture


has yet to reach the accel-
eration that defined U.S.
economic recoveries for
much of the past half
century
Even Thursday's govern-
ment report that the econ-
omy grew at a robust
annual rate of 3.6 percent
from July through Septem-
ber was hardly cause for
celebration.
Nearly half the growth
came from businesses
building up their stock-
piles, a temporary factor


Excluding stockpiling, an-
nual growth last quarter
was a mere 1.9 percent.
Unless consumers step
up spending during the
holiday season, stockpiling
is likely to slow
Most economists foresee
a sharp slowdown in
growth during the October-
December quarter as busi-
nesses do less stockpiling.
Early estimates for eco-
nomic growth are at or
below an annual rate of
1.5 percent


Chilly Midwest


Associated Press
Cars drive on South Avenue Thursday as snow falls in Springfield, Mo. Most of southern Missouri is under
winter weather warnings, with up to 8 inches of snow possible by this evening.


Cold snap brings

Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. With the
wind chill falling to almost minus
40, Steve Hendershot's mind was
elsewhere Thursday as he and his
crew of roustabouts worked a well
in North Dakota's booming oil
patch.
On palm trees and beaches, in
fact.
"Sometimes you just got to
close your eyes and dream of a
warm, happy place," said Hen-
dershot, working near Souris.
"I'm doing that today"
The cold weather sweeping the
Plains wasn't cooling off work in
the oil patch, which moves for-
ward in all kinds of weather But
even hardened oilmen were tak-
ing note of the dangerous condi-
tions that were expected to keep
daily highs below zero until
Sunday
A powerful winter storm that
slammed much of the nation kept
intensifying Thursday, draping
many communities in skin-


winter weather to nation's heartland


stinging cold. The system dumped
1 to 2 feet of snow in parts of Min-
nesota and Wisconsin, forcing
school closures and temporary
power outages and delighting
skiers who hit the slopes despite
temperatures in the single digits.
The south-central U.S. braced
for the next blow, expected to
come Friday in the form of sleet
and ice that could imperil mil-
lions unaccustomed to the treach-
erous combination of moisture
and bitter cold.
In Montana, temperatures fell
as low as minus 26 in Great Falls
and minus 27 in Havre, both
records. In parts of the Rockies
and Northern Plains, wind made
those conditions feel even colder
The deep freeze, blamed on the
jet stream's move southward, was
expected to linger at least
through the weekend.
With the mercury falls this low,
the cold inflicts pain on exposed
skin almost instantly, and water
poured from a cup can freeze be-
fore hitting the ground.


Contact lenses begin sticking to
eyeballs. Cars fail to start, and
people begin longing for heavy
foods. Pets refuse to go outside.
The Red Cross urged people to
stay inside or layer up to guard
against frostbite if they must go
out. The agency also asked resi-
dents to check on neighbors, es-
pecially those who need special
assistance or live alone.
Holiday events were called off.
In Rapid City, S.D., officials con-
cluded it was too cold for ice
skating.
Oil patch workers endure by
layering up beneath fire-retar-
dant clothing and taking breaks in
small heated shacks called "dog-
houses," which are often near
rigs. Many companies also try to
hire locals with at least five years
of experience.
"If they've made it that long,
they're probably going to stick
around," said Larry Dokken, a
veteran oilman whose consulting
firm recruits workers for oil
companies.


Fast food protesters call for wage hikes


Associated Press
NEW YORK- Fast-
food workers and labor or-
ganizers marched, waved
signs and chanted in cities
across the country on
Thursday in a push for
higher wages.
Organizers said employ-
ees planned to forgo work
in 100 cities, with rallies
set for another 100 cities.
But by late afternoon, it
was unclear what the ac-
tual turnout was or how
many of the participants
were workers. At targeted
restaurants, the disrup-
tions seemed minimal or
temporary
The protests are part of
an effort that began about
a year ago and is spear-
headed by the Service Em-


Associated Press
Protesters rally for better wages Thursday at a Wendy's
restaurant in Detroit.


ployees International
Union, which has spent
millions to bankroll local
worker groups and organ-
ize publicity for the
demonstrations. Protest-
ers are calling for pay of
$15 an hour, but the figure


is seen more as a rallying
point than a near-term
possibility
At a time when there's
growing national and in-
ternational attention on
economic disparities, ad-
vocacy groups and Democ-


rats are hoping to build
public support to raise the
federal minimum wage of
$7.25. That comes to about
$15,000 a year for full-time
work.
On Thursday, crowds
gathered outside restau-
rants in cities including
Boston, Lakewood, Calif,
Phoenix, Washington, D.C.,
and Charlotte, N.C., where
protesters walked into a
Burger King but didn't
stop customers from get-
ting their food.
The push for higher pay
in fast food faces an uphill
battle. The industry com-
petes aggressively on
being able to offer low-cost
meals and companies have
warned that they would
need to raise prices if
wages were hiked.


World BRIEFS

Newborn









Associated Press
A baby palm cockatoo is
presented Thursday at
the Zoo in Prague, Czech
Republic. It is the first
palm cockatoo born in
Europe since 2010. It will
remain nameless until the
gender is known.

AI-Qaida-style
attack in Yemen's
capital kills 52
ADEN, Yemen Mili-
tants stormed the Defense
Ministry in the heart of
Yemen's capital Thursday,
killing 52 people, including
at least seven foreigners, in
a suicide car bombing and
assault by gunmen. The
brazen, al-Qaida-style at-
tack follows a rise in U.S.
drone strikes in this key
American ally in the Middle
East.
The two-stage operation
came as the defense minis-
ter was in Washington for
talks. The U.S. military in-
creased its regional alert
status after the attack and
is "fully prepared to support
our Yemeni partners," a
senior U.S. defense official
said.
At least 167 people were
wounded.
American teacher
shot dead
in Benghazi
TRIPOLI, Libya--An
American chemistry teacher
was shot to death as he
was jogging in Benghazi on
Thursday, highlighting per-
sistently tenuous security in
the eastern Libyan city
where the U.S. ambassador
was killed last year.
There were no credible
claims of responsibility, but
suspicion was likely to fall on
Islamic militants active in
Benghazi. It came five days
after al-Qaida's American
spokesman called upon
Libyans to attack U.S. inter-
ests everywhere as revenge
for U.S. special forces
snatching an al-Qaida sus-
pect off the streets of Tripoli
in October and whisking him
out of the country.
Venezuela
cracks down
on bad news
CARACAS, Venezuela
- Venezuelans have been
scrambling for dollars for
weeks, taking refuge in the
greenback as their own cur-
rency is in free fall. Rather
than address the economic
imbalances behind the boli-
var's plunge, the govern-
ment is going after the
bearers of the bad news -
it's blocking websites peo-
ple use to track exchange
rates on the black market.
Cyber-activists said the
crackdown goes to absurd
lengths, even targeting
Bitly, the popular site for
shortening Web addresses
to make it easier to send
them as links via Twitter
and other social media. For
more than two weeks, ac-
cess to the service has
been partially censored by
several Internet service
providers in Venezuela, ap-
parently because Bitly was
being used to evade blocks
put on currency-tracking
websites.
The New York company
said such restrictions have
only previously been seen
in China, which has one of
the worst records for Inter-
net freedom, and even then
not for such an extended


period. Opponents of
Venezuela's socialist gov-
ernment say the controls
are designed to obscure re-
porting of the nation's
mounting economic woes.
From wire reports









SPORTS


With sexual assault
investigation behind
him, FSU QB Jameis
Winston can focus on
Duke, Heisman./B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 NHL, NBA/B3
0 College football/B3, B6
. Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL/B4, B5
0 Golf, baseball/B5
0 Fishing, auto racing/B6


Team rests on Zachar's shoulders


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
With eight seniors gone from last year's team, Seven Rivers
Christian School senior center Alexis Zachar has had to shoulder
more of the interior load in the paint.


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Alexis Zachar took the sum-
mer off, at least from bas-
ketball. Together with
her family, she decided it
wasn't possible for her to
successfully play that
game at the next level.
Which meant concen-
trating on volleyball.
Now a senior at Seven
Rivers Christian School
and the Chronicle's AIl
reigning Player of the Za
Year in girls basketball,
Zachar has been talking to sev-
eral major institutions about a
scholarship in volleyball. And


by the way, despite taking the
summer off, her basketball
skills haven't suffered much.
Zachar was born with a lung
illness that restricts her
breathing, a problem
she believes would be-
come more restrictive
S when trying to play in
college. That makes this
S year the final season
she'll play competitive
basketball.
"This is my 12th year
xis of playing basketball,"
har Zachar said of her sum-
mer off. "You don't for-
get much."
Her statistics show just that.
In five games this season


through Tuesday, the 6-foot-3
center is averaging 16.4 points,
11.2 rebounds, 2.8 blocks and 2.0
steals a game all on a team
that is basically rebuilding after
losing eight players to gradua-
tion, one of them Zachar's older
sister, Andrea, who was also a 6-
foot-2 threat under the basket.
"It's weird being the oldest
now," Zachar said.
Her coach, Gary Dreyer, said
it in more strategic terms: "We
graduated all those players, and
with Andrea gone, a lot more of
the rebounding has fallen on
her shoulders. She's the only
senior on the team, and she's
See Page B4


Nocturnal cats


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew runs against the Houston Texans during the second quarter Thursday in
Jacksonville. For the story from the game, please see Page B4.




County rivalry resumes in district


Pirates boys hoops host

district, county rival

Lecanto tonight
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Last January, Crystal River rejuve-
nated its rivalry with Lecanto by handing
the Panthers a 71-64 overtime defeat to
mark its first win in the series in at least
a decade. The win kicked off a two-week
stretch that saw the Pirates also beat the
three other local teams Citrus, Dun-
nellon and Seven Rivers.
Three weeks after falling to CRHS,
however, Lecanto returned the favor be-
hind stout defense and solid second-half
performances from current Panthers


Darius Sawyer and Ronnie Crowe in pre-
vailing 58-47 in the Pirates' gym.
Lecanto (3-3, 0-1 in District 5A-6) re-
turns to the scene 7 p.m. tonight to square
off for the Pirates' (2-2 overall) district
opener
While senior point guard Ty Reynolds
averaged 26 points against LHS last sea-
son, he's yet to practice regularly as he
deals with a painful ankle injury, and is
game-to-game in terms of his playing sta-
tus while the Pirates navigate a stretch of
four games in as many nights.
"It hurts," said Reynolds, who's re-
cently received visits from various FCS
(Division I-AA) college football scouts in-
terested in him as a wide receiver "I've
already missed a couple games and I
rolled it (against Fivay last Saturday).
Sprinting isn't that bad, but jumping is


See Page B3


Boys hoops county leaders
Points per game
Adam Gage, SR (23.5); Devin Pryor, Cit
(19.8); Cory Weiand, SR (17.0); Brandon
Burich, Lee (15.2); Darius Sawyer, Lee (14.5);
Ty Reynolds, CR (13.0); Ben Janicki, Cit
(10.7); John Hess, CR (9.0); Tyler Pollard
(9.0); Hunter Roessler, CR (8.8); Kaine Mc-
Colley, Lee (8.2); Desmond Franklin, Cit (8.0);
Ronnie Crow, Lee (7.8); John Parry, CR (7.3).
Rebounds per game
Adam Gage, SR (11.0); Tyler Pollard,
CR (7.3); Carlton Gadsen, CR (6.0); Ty
Reynolds, CR (5.0); Darius Sawyer, Lee
(4.8); John Hess, CR (4.2); Ronnie Crowe,
Lee (3.3); Brandon Burich, Lee (3.0).
-Compiled by Sean Arnold


Experience


still to be


earned

Warriors girls

hoops receive lesson

to learnfrom
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
Seems a bit early to be talking
about a decisive game for a regular-
season district championship, but
last night's game between Seven
Rivers Christian and Ocala St John
Lutheran was likely just that
In 2A-3, there are just four teams,
with Gainesville Cornerstone and
Leesburg First Academy joining
Seven Rivers and St. John. They
will not play a round-robin format
during the regular season, which
made Thursday's contest at St John
pivotal if Seven Rivers wanted to
secure the top seed for the district
tournament These two played for
the title last season and figure to be
the top teams again this year.
"We're going in there to win,"
said Seven Rivers' coach Gary
Dreyer after Tuesday's game
against Citrus. "But regardless of
what the result is, we're not going
to change our goals, and that's to
get better every game.
"Every game gives us the oppor-
tunity to see what our weaknesses
are and to improve them. The best
way to get better is to see our
weaknesses and work on them."
And as Dreyer, who also serves
as Seven Rivers athletic director
and its softball coach, knows quite
well, finishing first in a four-school
district during the regular season
isn't as important as winning the
district tournament
On Tuesday, the Warriors suf-
fered their first loss of the season,
and it was quite decisive, with Cit-
rus shutting them out in the first
quarter in taking a 16-0 lead that
See Page B3



'Canes


zoom past


Tigers

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS One minute.
That's all that separated Citrus'
girls basketball team from posting
a second-straight opening-quarter
shutout.
Dunnellon's Sierra Oliver put in
a putback with one minute left in
the first quarter after the Tigers
had missed their first 10 shots, and
that made it 16-2 after one. By half-
time, the Hurricanes lead had
been extended to 30-7, and it was-
n't until there was 6:06 left in the
game that Dunnellon reached dou-
ble figures in points.
The final score was 50-17, mak-
ing Citrus 8-1 overall and 2-0 in 5A-
6. Dunnellon slipped to 4-6 overall,
0-2 in district play
"Dunnellon is a young team and
they're rebuilding," Citrus coach
Dave Hamilton said. "We knew
coming in we were going to be able
to try different things defensively
And we did.
"Even our reserves played well.
See Page B4




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B2 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


Y




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 19 Louisville survives OT vs. Cincy


Associated Press

CINCINNATI Teddy Bridgewater
made several great escapes to help No.
19 Louisville get to overtime, and Do-
minique Brown's 2-yard run gave the
Cardinals a 31-24 victory over Cincin-
nati on Thursday night.
Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewa-
ter passes against Cincinnati in the first
half on Thursday in Cincinnati.
Associated Press


Hot St.


Winger has 2 goals,

Lightning top

Senators 3-1

Associated Press

TAMPA-Martin St. Louis scored
two goals, Ben Bishop won his 15th
game this season, and the Tampa
Bay Lightning beat the Ottawa Sen-
ators 3-1 on Thursday night
Valtteri Filppula also scored for
the Lightning, who were coming off
consecutive shutout losses to
Columbus (1-0) and Pittsburgh (3-0).
Ondrej Palat had two assists.
Ottawa got a goal from Patrick
Wiercioch.
St. Louis beat goalie Robin
Lehner from just outside the crease
to give Tampa Bay a 2-1 advantage
13:19 into the second. The Light-
ning captain tied Jason Arnott for
91st place on the NHL points list
with 938.
Filppula's goal from the left cir-
cle made it 3-1 at 10:56 of the third.
St. Louis put the Lightning up 1-0
when he scored from in-close while
falling forward with 3:15 left in the
first.
Panthers 5, Jets 2
SUNRISE Dylan Olsen scored his
first NHL goal to help the Florida Pan-
thers beat the Winnipeg Jets 5-2.
Jimmy Hayes, Nick Bjugstad, Tomas
Fleischmann and Erik Gudbranson also
scored for the Panthers. Tim Thomas
stopped 29 shots and Scottie Upshall had
two assists. Olsen also added an assist.
Olli Jokinen and Andrew Ladd scored
for Winnipeg. Ondrej Pavelec made 21
saves.
Blues 5, Islanders 1
ST. LOUIS Derek Roy and David
Backes scored power-play goals 2:31
apart in the second period to lead the
St. Louis Blues to a 5-1 win over the
struggling New York Islanders.
St. Louis won for the sixth time in
eight games. The Islanders have lost
eight straight overall (0-6-2) and eight in
a row on the road.
Jay Bouwmeester, Magnus Paajarvi
and Brenden Morrow also scored for
the Blues, who improved to 12-1-2 at
home and tied Boston (12-3-2) for the
most home wins in the NHL. Jaroslav
Halak made 22 saves and upped his
record to 15-4-2.
Hurricanes 5, Predators 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Jeff Skinner
had a hat trick to lead the Carolina Hur-
ricanes to a 5-2 victory over the
Nashville Predators.
Skinner has five goals in his past two
games.
Justin Faulk and Riley Nash also
scored for Carolina, winners of its past
two.
Mike Fisher and Viktor Stalberg
scored for Nashville, which completed a
four-game homestand 0-3-1.
Faulk scored the game's first goal just
23 seconds after the opening faceoff
with a wrist shot from the right faceoff
dot that beat Nashville goaltender
Marek Mazanec between the pads.
Canadiens 2, Bruins 1
MONTREAL- Max Pacioretty
scored his ninth goal in the last nine
games and the Montreal Canadiens


COUNTY
Continued from Page B1

the hardest. I'm giving it therapy
and trying to work it out."
Other than Reynolds, this
year's combined Pirate roster
accounted for just one field goal
against the Panthers last season.
But since suffering a 25-point
loss to River Ridge over Thanks-
giving weekend in a turnover-
laden, two-point loss to the
Falcons and blowout of Belle-
view the team is enjoying in-
creased scoring from a few of its
first-year varsity players. Juniors
John Parry and John Hess and
freshman Tyler Pollard each
posted double-digit scoring fig-
ures against the Rattlers, and
against FHS, Hess had 17 points
while Parry added 14.
"Too many guys were standing


The comeback clinched the first
American Athletic Conference title for
Central Florida, which had a one-game
lead over Cincinnati (9-3, 6-2) heading
into the final weekend.
For the second year in a row, the Ohio
River rivals went to overtime to decide
who gets the Keg of Nails, this time for
the foreseeable future with Louisville
(11-7, 7-1) leaving for the Atlantic Coast
Conference next season.
The Cardinals won 34-31 in overtime
in the rain in Louisville last season.


Louis


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning winger Martin St. Louis celebrates his goal against the
Ottawa Senators during the second period Thursday in Tampa.


stretched their unbeaten run to nine with
a 2-1 victory over the Boston Bruins.
Tomas Plekanec also scored for Mon-
treal (18-9-3), which jumped a point
ahead of Boston (18-8-2) into first place
in the Atlantic Division although the
Bruins have two games in hand. The
Canadiens are 8-0-1 in their last nine.
Gregory Campbell scored for Boston,
which is 6-2-1 in its past nine.
Boston controlled the first and third
periods and outshot Montreal 33-27.
Canadiens goalie Carey Price was es-
pecially sharp in the final 20 minutes.
Wild 4, Blackhawks 3
ST. PAUL, Minn. Marco Scan-
della's slap shot with 1:48 left, the de-
fenseman's first goal this season, lifted
the Minnesota Wild to a 4-3 win over the
Chicago Blackhawks.
Jonas Brodin scored on a power play
with 5:39 remaining to tie the game for
the Wild, who raised their home record
to 12-3-2 and handed the Blackhawks
their first loss in their past seven road
games.
With Charlie Coyle partially screening
Corey Crawford at the edge of the
crease, Brodin wound up and sent the
puck ricocheting off Blackhawks de-
fenseman Johnny Oduya and past the
goalie's outstretched glove.
Crawford made 19 saves.
Rangers 3, Sabres 1
BUFFALO, N.Y. Henrik Lundqvist
made 27 saves to lead the New York
Rangers to a 3-1 win over the Buffalo
Sabres.
Rick Nash, Brad Richards and Mats
Zuccarello scored for New York, which
bounced back from a 5-2 loss to Win-
nipeg on Monday.
Tyler Ennis scored and Ryan Miller
made 28 saves in a loss that drops the
Sabres to 3-12-1 at the First Niagara
Center.


around watching Ty (Reynolds)
try to do something (against
Fivay)," CRHS head coach Steve
Feldman said. "We were our own
worst enemy in that game, but
the best thing that did happen is
a couple of other guys stepped
up and scored some points after
Ty went down. We've been
searching for any kind ofoffense,
so all I can hope is those guys can
build off that going forward."
Lecanto, a victim at Citrus two
weeks ago, is also trying to get its
first league win. The Panthers
have dropped two in a row to a
couple of formidable opponents
in Tampa Jefferson and Willis-
ton. Since missing the preseason
with a groin injury, junior big
man Brandon Burich is averag-
ing a team-high 15.2 points, while
junior Darius Sawyer is riding
an impressive 73 percent field-
goal rate to 14.5 points a night.
The Panthers shot 66 percent


Lundqvist, playing his first game
since signing a seven-year, $59.5 mil-
lion contract, was hardly troubled
through 40 minutes, but was outstand-
ing in the third period.
He made four quick saves in under a
minute early in the period, including
close range stops on Mark Pysyk and
Steve Ott.
He then stopped two breakaways in
as many minutes.
Maple Leafs 3, Stars 2, OT
TORONTO Trevor Smith scored at
4:18 of overtime to help the Toronto
Maple Leafs end a five-game skid with a
3-2 victory over the Dallas Stars.
The Maple Leafs won for the first time
since Nov. 23 despite being outshot for
the 10th consecutive game, this time
50-24.
Nazem Kadri scored twice for the
Leafs in his return from a one-game ab-
sence to attend his grandfather's fu-
neral. It looked as if his second goal
would stand.
But Toronto's best penalty-killer Jay
McClement took a tripping penalty late
in the third and Shawn Horcoff scored
when he tipped Kevin Connauton's shot
past Jonathan Bernier at 17:14 to tie it a
2-2.
Bernier finished with 48 saves.
Penguins 5, Sharks 1
PITTSBURGH Chris Kunitz scored
twice during a four-goal second period
and the Pittsburgh Penguins beat the
San Jose Sharks 5-1 for their fifth
straight victory.
Pascal Dupuis, Jayson Megna and
Kris Letang also scored for Pittsburgh,
which snapped San Jose's six-game
winning streak. Sidney Crosby added
three assists in his 500th career game
to push his point total to an NHL-lead-
ing42.


against Jefferson, but were un-
done by 22 turnovers, and they
were tied with Williston with 46
seconds remaining in a game
similarly plagued with costly
turnovers.
"That's just youth and not un-
derstanding where the trap's
coming from, and where they
need to pass the ball," first-year
Lecanto head coach Jeff Ander-
son said.
"We're pushing up the ball a
little faster," he added on his
team's improving offense, "but
we're still taking good shots.
We've been getting a real big
push from Darius (Sawyer) and
(freshman) Kaine McColley Be-
tween Brandon Burich and
those two, they're really carrying
the load offensively
"The boys are still learning
this man-to-man defense,
learning how to build walls and
shrink floors and apply gap


This one went to overtime on a wet, raw
night when Cincinnati's Tony Miliano
kicked a 26-yard field goal with 7 sec-
onds left.
An interference penalty in the end
zone set up Brown's 2-yard run to open
overtime.
The Bearcats wound up with a fourth-
and-14 at the 29, and Brendon Kay's
pass went off the hands of Anthony Mc-
Clung at the 6, ending Cincinnati's first
overtime game at Nippert Stadium
since 2003.


NBA BRIEFS


Knicks 113, Nets 83
NEW YORK -The Knicks
are no longer the biggest los-
ers in New York. The Brooklyn
Nets look like the real Big
Apple busts.
Carmelo Anthony had 19
points and 10 rebounds, Iman
Shumpert scored a season-
high 17 points, and the Knicks
ended a nine-game losing
streak with 113-83 romp
Thursday night in the first
meeting of the season be-
tween the city rivals.
The Knicks (4-13) snapped
a tie with the Nets (5-14) for
most losses in New York, win-
ning the game and the crowd
with a dominant second half
that had Spike Lee and the
rest of the fans wearing blue
and orange cheering perhaps
the Knicks' most complete
performance of the season.
Andrea Bargnani scored 16
before he was ejected in the
fourth quarter, Knicks fans
roaring in support of him
standing up to Kevin Garnett.
Brook Lopez had 24 points
and nine rebounds for the
Nets.


WARRIORS
Continued from Page BI

eventually led to a 54-23 tri-
umph. A loss like that pres-
ents a lot of lessons to learn.
The biggest was just the
experience of playing a
team as capable as Citrus.
The Hurricanes forced 37
turnovers, 25 of them in
the first half. Their overall
quickness led to easy bas-
kets and a lopsided win.
"It's just experience,"
Dreyer admitted. "They
need more experience in
varsity games, the speed of
the game."
By season's end, it will
be seen if the Warriors are
fast learners.
Notables
Crystal River continues
to pile up the victories,
and the Pirates are man-
aging it while on the road.
Seven of their first 10
games are away from
home, but thus far it does-
n't seem to have bothered
them their 35-point win
at North Marion on
Wednesday which made
them 8-0 provided further
proof of that. They play
their second 5A-6 game at
Lecanto tonight and then
travel to Boca Ciega in
Gulfport next Thursday
But it's their first game
at home after a five-game
road trip that should be
their biggest test. That's
next Friday, when they
host Citrus. That's right -
on Friday the 13th.
A bad home-court loss to
Ocala Trinity Catholic has-
n't kept Citrus down. The
Hurricanes responded by
winning five consecutive
games, including Tues-
day's lopsided victory at
Seven Rivers. Defense
continues to be the back-
bone of Citrus' game; as
coach Dave Hamilton ex-


coverage."
Hurricanes go on
road in district play
With just 12 total games on the
District 5A-6 schedule this regu-
lar season, and with Citrus' early
win over district and county
rival Lecanto, tonight's 7 p.m. tilt
between the Hurricanes and
Dunnellon (2-2) in the Tigers
gym should give us a revealing
glimpse into the District 5A-6 hi-
erarchy, at least until next week.
The 'Canes were off 12 days
after their 50-43 district win over
rival Lecanto. On Wednesday,
they moved to 4-0 by redressing
their worst loss from last season
- a 65-42 senior-night loss in
which Citrus head coach Tom
Densmore sat four starters for
the opening quarter to make
room for seniors with a 63-42
home victory over River Ridge.
The Knights are coached by


Clippers 101,
Grizzlies 81
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Re-
serves Darren Collison and
Jamal Crawford scored 15
points each and the Los An-
geles Clippers used a strong
second half to beat the Mem-
phis Grizzlies 101-81.
Chris Paul also had 15
points and eight assists for
the Clippers, who snapped a
two-game losing streak. Blake
Griffin added 14 points and
nine rebounds, while DeAn-
dre Jordan had 10 points and
14 boards for Los Angeles.
Kosta Koufos led Memphis
with 17 points, while Mike
Conley had 16 on 6-for-8
shooting. Quincy Pondexter
scored 15, and Zach Ran-
dolph back after missing
two games following ingrown
toenail surgery- had 12
points and 12 rebounds.
The Clippers shot 13 for
20 in the fourth quarter as
Paul and Griffin sat on the
bench, leaving the game to
the reserves.
From wire reports


plained, "In our two hours
of practice, I would say we
spend an hour and 15 min-
utes on defense."
The 7-1 Hurricanes con-
tinue to anticipate well,
stepping in to pick off
passes and speeding down
court for an easy basket. If
they start hitting jumpers
- and free throws, for that
matter with a measure
of consistency, they will in-
deed be dangerous.
Girls county
basketball leaders
Records (through Dec. 4)
Crystal River, 8-0 overall,
1-0 in 5A-6; Citrus, 7-1 over-
all, 1-0 in 5A-6; Seven
Rivers Christian, 4-1 overall,
0-0 in 2A-3; Lecanto, 1-8
overall, 0-1 in 5A-6.
Scoring
Alexis Zachar (Seven
Rivers), 16.4 points per game;
Alyssa Gage (Seven Rivers),
15.6 ppg; Jasmyne Eason
(Crystal River), 14.6 ppg;
Shenelle Toxen (Citrus), 13.0
ppg; Micah Jenkins (Citrus),
13.0 ppg.
Rebounding
Eason (CR, 12.7 rebounds
per game; Zachar (SR), 12.0
rpg; Gage (SR), 6.8 rpg; Cas-
sidy Wardlow (CR), 6.6 rpg;
Brianna Richardson (CR), 5.7
rpg.
Free-throw shooting
(minimum, 10 attempts)
Zachar (SR), 72.0 percent;
Megan Wells (CR), 69.0 per-
cent; Jenkins (C), 63.2 per-
cent; Richardson (CR), 58.3
percent; Kiersten Croyle (CR),
54.5 percent.
Assists
Katelyn Hannigan (CR), 4.1
assists per game; Wells (CR),
2.4 apg; Richardson (CR), 2.1
apg; Zachar (SR), 1.4 apg.
Steals
Gage (SR), 3.4 steals per
game; Richardson (CR), 3.3
spg; Eason (CR), 3.1 spg;
Hannigan (CR), 2.7 spg.;
Tessa Kacer (SR), 2.5 spg.


Chuck Butler, the second all-
time leading scorer in Citrus
boys hoops history
Senior Ben Janicki (10.7
points per game) and junior
Desmond Simmons had strong
defensive outings against River
Ridge, according to Densmore,
and should have their hands full
with 6-foot-3 junior forward
Andre Hairston, who is averag-
ing a double-double with 16.7
points and 10 rebounds a game
for the Tigers. Dunnellon is led
in scoring by junior Desmond
Frazier, who is posting 18.3
points per night.
Citrus, meanwhile, could get a
huge lift if either junior
Desmond Franklin, a standout
talent who is settling in from
football, or senior Mitchell Ellis,
a key to the 'Canes' successful
district title run last season, take
off offensively to complement
Pryor's scoring production.


SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 B3




B4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 8 12 .400 -
Philadelphia 7 12 .368 1
Toronto 6 11 .353 1
Brooklyn 5 14 .263 2/2
NewYork 4 13 .235 2/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 14 4 .778 -
Washington 9 9 .500 5
Atlanta 10 10 .500 5
Charlotte 8 11 .421 6/2
Orlando 6 12 .333 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 17 2 .895 -
Detroit 9 10 .474 8
Chicago 7 9 .438 8/2
Cleveland 6 12 .333 10/2
Milwaukee 3 15 .167 13/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 3 .833 -
Houston 13 7 .650 3
Dallas 12 8 .600 4
New Orleans 9 9 .500 6
Memphis 9 9 .500 6
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 16 3 .842 -
Oklahoma City 13 4 .765 2
Denver 11 7 .611 4/2
Minnesota 9 10 .474 7
Utah 4 16 .200 12/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 13 7 .650 -
Golden State 11 8 .579 1/2
Phoenix 10 9 .526 2/2
L.A. Lakers 9 9 .500 3
Sacramento 4 12 .250 7
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland 98, Denver 88
Atlanta 107, L.A. Clippers 97
Phoenix 97, Houston 88
Detroit 105, Milwaukee 98
Dallas 100, New Orleans 97
Indiana 95, Utah 86
San Antonio at Minnesota, ppd.
Portland 111, Oklahoma City 104
Thursday's Games
NewYork 113, Brooklyn 83
L.A. Clippers 101, Memphis 81
Miami at Chicago, late
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Denver at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Denver at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 10p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 30 18 9 3 39 82 63
Boston 28 18 8 2 38 76 57
Tampa Bay 28 1710 1 35 79 68
Detroit 29 14 8 7 35 81 79
Toronto 29 1511 3 33 80 79
Ottawa 29 1114 4 26 83 95
Florida 29 816 5 21 66 97
Buffalo 29 621 2 14 49 88
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 30 20 9 1 41 94 67
Washington 28 1412 2 30 83 82
N.Y Rangers 29 1514 0 30 65 72
Carolina 29 1212 5 29 66 81
Philadelphia 28 1313 2 28 63 68
New Jersey 29 11 12 6 28 64 71
Columbus 28 11 14 3 25 68 80
N.Y Islanders 29 816 5 21 75 101
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 30 20 6 4 44108 84
St. Louis 27 19 5 3 41 96 61
Minnesota 30 17 8 5 39 74 70
Colorado 25 19 6 0 38 76 52
Dallas 27 13 9 5 31 76 79
Winnipeg 30 1313 4 30 80 87
Nashville 29 1313 3 29 65 83
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 28 19 4 5 43 97 67
Anaheim 30 18 7 5 41 93 80
LosAngeles 29 18 7 4 40 76 62
Phoenix 28 16 8 4 36 92 90
Vancouver 30 1510 5 35 80 78
Calgary 27 1013 4 24 74 94
Edmonton 29 918 2 20 75 101
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Montreal 4, New Jersey 3, SO
Philadelphia 6, Detroit 3
Calgary 4, Phoenix 1
Thursday's Games
N.Y Rangers 3, Buffalo 1
Toronto 3, Dallas 2, OT
Pittsburgh 5, San Jose 1
Montreal 2, Boston 1
Tampa Bay 3, Ottawa 1
Florida 5, Winnipeg 2
St. Louis 5, N.Y Islanders 1
Carolina 5, Nashville 2
Minnesota 4, Chicago 3
Colorado at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Detroit at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Phoenix atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.


Florida at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Nashville atWashington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.



NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Houston


East
W L
9 3 1
6 6 1
5 7 1
4 8 1
South
W L
8 4 1
5 7 1
4 9 1
2 11 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
A7" ,7-1-1
4p CASH 3 (late)
4& 1 0-8-4


PLAY 4 (early)
6-3-4-4
PLAY 4 (late)
S 9-5-2-1

FANTASY 5
20 21 27 34 36


Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 6 9- 11 -31 -44
Powerball: 25
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1,000,000
No Florida winner
Fantasy 5:3 8 10 -27 -30
5-of-5 1 winner $237,282.06
4-of-5 403 $94.50
3-of-5 11,540 $9.00


Lotto: 2
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


6- 10-32-41 -46
No winner
29 $4,704.50
1,611 $72.00
34,535 $5.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (FS1) Arizona State at DePaul
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) South Carolina at Oklahoma State
10 p.m. (ESPN) Baylor vs. Kentucky
NBA
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Denver Nuggets at Boston Celtics
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at New York Knicks
BOXING
11:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Vyacheslav Glazkov vs. Garrett
Wilson (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) MAC Championship Bowling Green vs.
Northern Illinois
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) Nedbank Golf Challenge, Second Round
11:30 a.m. (GOLF) European LPGATour: Omega Dubai
Masters, Third Round (Taped)
3 p.m. (GOLF) Northwestern Mutual World Challenge,
Second Round
12 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Hong Kong Open,
Third Round
4 a.m. (GOLF) Nedbank Golf Challenge, Third Round
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) College: Massachusetts at Notre Dame
8 p.m. (NHL) NHL: Anaheim Ducks at Chicago Blackhawks
SOCCER
11:30 a.m. (ESPN2) FIFA World Cup Draw
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: NCAA College Cup
semifinal Virginia Tech vs. Florida State
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: NCAA College Cup
semifinal UCLA vs. Virginia
SKIING
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Audi Birds of Prey: Men's Super-G
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River
7 p.m. Citrus at Dunnellon
7:30 p.m. Hernando Christian at Seven Rivers
GIRLS BASKETBALL
6 p.m. Hernando Christian at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. Crystal River at Lecanto
BOYS SOCCER
7:30 p.m. Lecanto at Forest
7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Hernando
GIRLS SOCCER
7 p.m. Forest at Lecanto
7:30 p.m. Hernando at Crystal River
WRESTLING
1 p.m. Crystal River, Lecanto at Kiwanis Tournament
4 p.m. Citrus in Rob Hermann Cup Duals at Citrus


North
W L T Pct PF
Cincinnati 8 4 0 .667 292
Baltimore 6 6 0 .500 249
Pittsburgh 5 7 0 .417 263
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 231
West
W L T Pct PF
Denver 10 2 0 .833 464
Kansas City 9 3 0 .750 298
San Diego 5 7 0 .417 279
Oakland 4 8 0 .333 237
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y Giants
Washington

New Orleans
Carolina
Tampa Bay
Atlanta

Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota


Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L T
7 5 0
7 5 0
5 7 0
3 9 0
South
W L T
9 3 0
9 3 0
3 9 0
3 9 0
North
W L T
7 5 0
6 6 0
5 6 1
3 8 1
West
W L T
11 1 0
8 4 0
7 5 0
5 7 0


Pct PF
.583 329
.583 300
.417 237
.250 269

Pct PF
.750 312
.750 285
.250 217
.250 261

Pct PF
.583 326
.500 323
.458 294
.292 289

Pct PF
.917 340
.667 297
.583 275
.417 279


Today, Dec. 5
Jacksonville 27, Houston 20
Sunday, Dec. 8
Atlanta at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 1 p.m.
Buffalo atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.


N.Y Giants at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9
Dallas at Chicago, 8:40 p.m.


BASEBALL
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME- Announced
the retirement of senior vice president Bill
Haase, effective at the end of the year.
MLB PLAYERS ASSOCIATION Named
Dave Winfield special assistant to the executive
director.
American League
DETROIT TIGERS Designated SS Dixon
Machado for assignment.
MINNESOTATWINS- Agreed to terms with
RHP Phil Hughes on a three-year contract. Des-
ignated RHP Liam Hendriks for assignment.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Designated LHP
Andrew Wernerfor assignment.
SEATTLE MARINERS Agreed to terms
with UT Willie Bloomquist on a two-year con-
tract.
TEXAS RANGERS Agreed to terms with
RHPs Jose Contreras and Nate Adcock and OF
Bryan Petersen on minor league contracts.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS -Agreed to terms
with 2B Irving Falu on a minor league contract.
Traded OF Norichika Aoki to Kansas City for
LHP Will Smith.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to
terms with C Wil Nieves on a one-year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Assigned F
Henry Sims and F Carrick Felix to Canton of
NBA Development League.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLAS COWBOYS Signed RB George
Winn and TE Jameson Konz to the practice
squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Re-signed
WR Austin Collie.
TENNESSEE TITANS Signed TE Visan-
the Shiancoe.


UCF gets BCS bid with
Louisville's win over Cincy
ORLANDO No. 15 UCF qualified
for the school's first BCS bid with
Louisville's victory over Cincinnati.
The Knights wrapped up at least a share
of the first American Athletic Conference
championship last week. The league's au-
tomatic BCS bid was locked up Thursday
night when the 19th-ranked Cardinals beat
the Bearcats 31-24 in overtime.
UCF (10-1, 7-0) finishes the regular
season Saturday at SMU (5-6, 4-3),
seeking an outright league title and un-
defeated conference record.
If the Knights lose to the Mustangs, they
will tie Louisville for the conference cham-
pionship. UCF has the tiebreaker after
beating the Cardinals 38-35 in October.

Panthers complete
big rout of Hornets
The Lecanto girls soccer team de-
feated Weeki Wachee 9-0 on Thursday
night.
Stephanie Bandstra led the Panthers
with four goals, while Emma Van Cleef
and Lexi Moore each had a goal and an
assist.
For Lecanto, Hannah Herber scored
the other goal, and Ashlynne Van Cleef,
Nany Ulloa and Megan Carbone each
had an assist.
Lecanto (7-5-1) is home tonight
against Forest.
CR can't solve Milwakuee
Lutheran at home
The Crystal River boys basketball
team suffered a 72-39 loss to visiting Mil-
waukee (Wis.) Lutheran.
Hunter Roessler led the Pirates with
16 points, while Tyler Pollard chipped in
10 points.
Crystal River (2-3) hosts Lecanto
tonight.
Shootout goes
Hurricanes' way
The Citrus girls soccer team notched a
5-3 triumph over West Port on Thursday
night.
Taylor Falabella (two goals, assist),
Malene Pedersen (goal, assist) and Cas-
sidy Boiling (two goals) led the way for





'CANES
Continued from Page BI

They came in off the bench and ran
the same things the starters did. Over-
all, I'm happy with how we played."
The Hurricanes' defense was,
again, a difference-maker They did
not use the type of pressure that had
been so effective in Tuesday's rout of
Seven Rivers Christian, full-court and
half-court traps that led to 37
turnovers. They didn't have to. But
their zone defense left precious few
avenues for the Tigers to explore for
open shots.
Example: In the third quarter, Dun-
nellon scored just two points and
managed to attempt just five shots,
while turning the ball over 10 times.
For the game, the Tigers took 44 shots
from the floor, making just seven (15.9
percent), and they attempted only two
free throws. They also committed 31
turnovers.
"We're a young team," said Dunnel-
lon coach Tony Maldonado. "Our
strengths and our weaknesses are the
same thing our youth. I tell the girls
there's no magic formula, you've just
got to work hard."
Asked what Citrus had that caused
his team the most trouble, Maldonado
couldn't narrow it down.
"They have height, athleticism, or-
ganization, discipline, and the funda-
mentals," he answered. "Go ahead
and pick any one of them.



ZACHAR
Continued from Page Bl

going to have to work harder for her
points this year than last."
The Warriors haven't struggled too
severely with a new lineup that fea-
tures only three players Zachar,
Alyssa Gage and Tessa Kacer with
any real varsity experience. They won
their first four games before suffering
a 31-point loss to Citrus Tuesday
All this with only Zachar and Gage
as established offensive threats. The
remainder of the team is trying to
catch up, but as Dreyer and Zachar
would say, it's a work in progress.
And according to Zachar, that
progress is going quite well.
"The younguns have definitely ex-
ceeded my expectations," she said.
"It's just the experience that they
need now."
It's those "younguns," as Zachar de-


scribes them, who attach themselves
to her and not just at Seven Rivers.
Several of the Citrus players gave her
hugs both before and after Tuesday's
game.
'Alexis is a sweet kid, and she's easy
to love," Dreyer said. "Everyone loves
her To the younger kids in our school,
she's like a Pied Piper They're drawn
to her And she's very good with all of
them."
Zachar's good-natured demeanor
was, Dreyer said, somewhat of a detri-
ment early in her playing career As
he described it, she would play with


the Hurricanes.
Jesse Lammer, Hannah Schmidt and
Morgan Wayman each had an assist for
Citrus (5-7-2), who plays Monday at
Weeki Wachee.
Panthers girls hoops
nail down first win
The Lecanto girls basketball team, led
by DeeAnna Moehring's good all-around
performance, took a 38-29 victory over
Weeki Wachee on Thursday night.
Moehring had 14 points, 7 rebounds, 5
steals, 5 assists and 3 blocks in the win.
Panthers teammate Cheyenne Biggs
added 7 points.
Lecanto (1-8) plays tonight at home
against Crystal River.
Warriors fall in district tilt
at St. John Lutheran
Despite 24 points and 12 rebounds
from senior center Alexis Zachar, the
Seven Rivers girls basketball team took
a 56-46 loss at Ocala St. John Lutheran
on Thursday night.
For the Warriors (4-2, 0-1), Alyssa
Gage had 9 points and 9 rebounds.
Jaguars down Texans 27-20
JACKSONVILLE Chad Henne
threw two touchdown passes for the sec-
ond consecutive week, and the Jack-
sonville Jaguars used some trickery
during a 27-20 victory over the Houston
Texans on Thursday night.
Offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch di-
aled up a double pass that led to a score
and a 24-10 lead in the third quarter.
Henne threw behind the line of scrim-
mage to receiver Ace Sanders, who then
heaved a deep ball across the field to
running back Jordan Todman.
No defender was near Todman as he
camped under Sanders' throw. Rookie
D.J. Swearinger pushed Todman just as
he hauled in the 21-yard TD reception.
It was the second consecutive week a
non-quarterback threw a TD pass for
Jacksonville. Maurice Jones-Drew
tossed an 8-yard score to college team-
mate Marcedes Lewis in a 32-28 win at
Cleveland last week.
Sanders and Jones-Drew now have
as many TD passes this season as
benched Jaguars starter Blaine Gabbert.
From staff, wire reports



"We just didn't match up with
them."
Citrus had scoring runs of 15, 9 and
6 in the first half. A 14-2 third-quar-
ter streak pushed the Hurricanes' ad-
vantage to 44-9 and put all their
starters on the bench while a running
clock shortened the fourth quarter
Micah Jenkins led three 'Canes in
double figures in scoring, netting 12
points. Shally Morales and Shenelle
Toxen each finished with 10. Kayla
McMann's six points paced Dunnellon.
The victory was Citrus' sixth in a
row and, according to Hamilton, it
kept the 'Canes on the proper track.
"We're improving," he said. "We
have a goal, and that is we want to
peak in the first week in February (at
the district tournament). Until then,
we'll keep doing what we're doing,
and that is we'll play them one game
at a time."
That plan was echoed by Maldon-
ado, although he admitted the Tigers'
road may be far more treacherous.
"It's going to take a lot," he said.
"Jason (Rodgers) has done a great job
over at Crystal River, and Citrus has
always been tough.
"But our whole goal is in February
Win our first game in the district (tour-
nament) and we'll go on."
First things first, however, and Cit-
rus has a non-district game at home
against Brooksville Hernando on
Thursday before traveling to take on
unbeaten Crystal River next Friday in
what will certainly be the biggest
game of the 5A-6 season thus far.


the same good-natured temperament,
not taking full advantage of her size
and skill.
"It was sometime last year that she
discovered she could be both," he
said. "She could be a good kid and a
competitor at the same time.
"That's when she went from being
just a good player to a really good
player. She's improved so much in her
competitiveness."
To play her position in the post ef-
fectively, Zachar needs to be competi-
tive. And she knows that won't be easy,
particularly against better teams like
Citrus.
"I can't get a shot off if I can't get a
pass," she said of the game against
Citrus. "But I don't blame (the younger
players). It's just that you can't prac-
tice for playing a team like that.
"What I've learned is what to and
what not to do. I have to be ready to be
bumped around. Some schools you
have to be ready for more of that than
others."


Zachar is ready to be "bumped
around" a lot this season, her first
playing without her sister And yet her
coach believes she still could play at
the next level.
Dreyer said he had been contacted
by several college basketball coaches,
and said each time he explained to
them that Zachar had a breathing af-
fliction. They were still interested in
her, he said.
"I just wish she would play in col-
lege," he said.
She will, but in all likelihood it'll be
volleyball that she'll play


I S P RTS B RI FS-


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Johnson grabs early edge over Kuchar


Golfer has 1-shot

lead at World

Challenge

Associated Press

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. -
Zach Johnson birdied four of the
par 5s and shot a 5-under 67 to
take a one-shot lead Thursday
over Matt Kuchar in the World
Challenge.
Only five players in the elite
18-man field managed to break
par at Sherwood Country Club.
One of them was tournament
host Tiger Woods, who had a new
driver in the bag and missed only
two fairways. The problem was
his putter, including a short
birdie attempt that missed on the
last hole. He had a 71.
Kuchar hit his approach to 2
feet on the final hole for a 68.
Hunter Mahan and Bubba


Watson were at 70. They are
among seven players who have
yet to win a tournament this
year, even though everyone at
Sherwood is among the top 30 in
the world.
Nedbank Golf Challenge
SUN CITY, South Africa Eng-
land's Luke Donald topped the
Nedbank Golf Challenge leader-
board at 5 under when first-round
play was suspended for the day
because of lightning.
Donald completed 11 holes at
Gary Player Country Club.
Denmark's Thomas Bjorn and
Wales' Jamie Donaldson were 3
under. Bjorn played six holes, and
Donaldson completed 12. Defending
champion Martin Kaymer of Ger-
many was 2 under after six holes.
Sweden's Henrik Stenson, playing
for the first time since ending last sea-
son with the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup
and European Tour's Race to Dubai
titles, was 1 under after seven holes.
The European Tour is sanctioning


Associated Press
Zach Johnson, right, tees off on the second hole as Jason Day
watches during the first round of the Northwestern Mutual World
Challenge golf tournament Thursday at Sherwood Country Club in
Thousand Oaks, Calif.


the event for the first time.
Hong Kong Open
HONG KONG Ireland's David
Higgins shot a 6-under 64 to take a
one-stroke lead in the Hong Kong
Open.


Italy's Andrea Pavan was second
in the event sanctioned by the Euro-
pean and Asian tours.
Defending champion Miguel
Angel Jimenez of Spain opened with
a 70. Last year, Jimenez became
the oldest champion in European


Tour history, winning at 48 years,
318 days. He also won the event in
2005 and 2008.
John Daly had a 78. Daly is mak-
ing his third start since having sur-
gery on his right elbow in July. He
tied for 48th last month in China in
the BMW Masters and missed the
cut last week in the Alfred Dunhill
Championship in South Africa.
Dubai Ladies Masters
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -
Stacy Lewis shot a 7-under 65 on
Thursday to take a one-stroke lead
during the suspended second round
of the Dubai Ladies Masters.
The third-ranked Lewis, a three-
time winner this year on the LPGA
Tour, had a 9-under 135 total at
Emirates Golf Course in the Ladies
European Tour's season-ending
tournament.
Sweden's Pernilla Lindberg was
second after a 69. Spain's Carlota
Ciganda was 7 under after a 70, and
Thailand's Pornanong Phatlum was
another stroke back after a 70.


VP candidate?


Seattle QB Wilson's

play generating

some serious buzz

Associated Press

RENTON, Wash. Russell Wil-
son was asked Thursday if the Seat-
tle Seahawks quarterback should
be in the conversation for league
MVP
His response was 417 words, with
nearly all of them deflecting atten-
tion away from himself and onto his
teammates. Wilson mentioned Mar-
shawn Lynch, Robert Turbin, Doug
Baldwin, Golden Tate, Jermaine
Kearse, Ricardo Lockette, Sidney
Rice, Zach Miller, Luke Willson and
his entire offensive line, and barely
talked about himself.
"So give a lot of credit to those
guys. It's one of those things, it's not
just me," Wilson said. "I'm just try-
ing to facilitate the ball to the right
guy at the right time and hopefully
they catch it and hopefully they
score and hopefully they get the
first down and hopefully we win a
lot of games."
Don't expect Wilson to engage in
that discussion, even if it's slowly
becoming a legitimate question
about a situation others believe is
plausible.
Wilson is coming off arguably his
best overall game of the season. He
threw for 310 yards and three
touchdowns and ran for another 47
yards in the Seahawks' 34-7 blowout
of New Orleans. And because it
came on Monday night in front of a
national audience, and because the
Seahawks have the best record in
the NFL at 11-1, Wilson's recent
play is being highlighted.
His previous three games have
been among the best of his career
Against Atlanta, Minnesota and
New Orleans, Wilson has thrown a
combined seven touchdowns, zero
interceptions and had a quarter-
back rating of higher than 134 in all
three wins.
What was already a really good
season leading the Seahawks to the
top of the NFC has grown into
something bigger with this recent
stretch. While it seems unlikely Wil-
son could overtake the huge season
Peyton Manning is having with the
Broncos, the way Wilson is playing
has grabbed attention.
"Everybody thinks this guy's a


Associated Press
Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson rushes Monday against the
New Orleans Saints in the first half in Seattle.


freak quarterback," San Francisco
defensive coordinator Vic Fangio
said. "This guy's just a really good
quarterback who happens to be
very fast, very quick and very elu-
sive. He's not just a guy that runs
around. He's a passer, too. He can
run any offense and be a confident
quarterback."
Wilson will return this week to
San Francisco, the site of one of his
worst games as a pro quarterback.
It came in Week 7 of last season, a
13-6 49ers win, and it was before the


Seahawks had decided to open up
the entire playbook to Wilson.
He finished that game 9 of 22
passing for 122 yards, no touch-
downs and one interception. It was
one of only two games last season
where Wilson did not throw a
touchdown. It was the fewest yards
passing for Wilson in any game in
his career and his lowest passer
rating (38.7).
"I've just learned so much more
from then, the experience that I've
had," Wilson said.


Yanks flash cash


early in free agency


Associated Press

NEW YORK Brian
McCann arrived at Yankee
Stadium on Nov 19 and
was greeted on the field by
CC Sabathia and the
pitcher's kids.
McCann toured the opu-
lent clubhouse, then went
to a hotel room arranged by
the team at the $695-and-
up Mandarin Oriental
overlooking Central Park.
McCann merely had to take
an elevator downstairs for
a dinner with manager Joe
Girardi and three other
team executives at Porter
House New York, a sleek
steak restaurant in the
Time Warner Center, filled
with cherry wood floors
and leather seating.
Four days later, he had a
deal for an $85 million, five-
year contract, the start of a
new spending spree by the
Yankees that also includes
a pending $153 million,
seven-year agreement with
outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury
"When the Yankees call
you and then you go
through the process that I
went through, you leave
blown away," McCann said
Thursday during a news
conference at his new
home ballpark. "There's a
reason that they're the
New York Yankees. You
walk in here, everything's
bigger They put attention
to detail with everything.


They make you feel the
way that you want to feel."
"It was," he added, "a
perfect fit"
While the Yankees are
adding players, they ap-
pear less likely to re-sign
Robinson Cano. New York
believes it may be outbid
by the Seattle Mariners for
the All-Star second base-
man, who at first sought a
10-year deal for more than
$300 million.
"We're still talking, but
obviously we're a decent
distance apart," Yankees
managing general partner
Hal Steinbrenner said.
General manager Brian
Cashman met last month
with Jay Z, going to the of-
fice of the rap mogul who
is one of Cano's agents.
"Our club has negotiated
very hard with Robinson
Cano and has made fair of-
fers to Robinson Cano,"
Girardi said.
Himself a former Yan-
kees catcher, Girardi was
excited about upgrading
with McCann, a seven-time
All-Star who joins a line-
age that includes Bill
Dickey, Yogi Berra, Elston
Howard, Thurman Mun-
son and Jorge Posada.
"We think we have the
next great Yankee catcher
here with us," Girardi said.
Cashman went further,
calling McCann "a poten-
tial Hall of Famer"


Associated Press
The New York Yankees introduced catcher Brian
McCann, who signed a five-year, $85 million contract
with the team, on Thursday in New York.


gsoming toBsnow.

t ploe O in the flupew /
S City of Crystal River

Christmas Tree

Lighting Festival
Friday, D>eceimeber 6, 2 013
4:00 7:00 LttLe Springs Parkz
(behind cl ty H-aLL)
Get your picture or your pet's picture with
SANTA!


Bounce Houses
Horseback Rides
Tree Lighting Ceremony
Puppet Show


F-ace Painting
Live Music
Train Rides
Refreshments


Hoao tur loed e4 with a luminary a2.00 ea.
Purchase in advance or at the event from Pilot Club members

9-11 57ree
WBLP^ ^n^


I -IR oN r Hosted by The City of Crystal River and
Pilot Club of Crystal River. GRQJ


2106 era isa:lv., Ctra HiasFL 444
35-76-66


All the Latest & Greatest
Golf Equipment, GPS, Apparel,
Golf Carts, Accessories,
Gift Items, Special Pricing
& Prize Drawings
Don't Miss
This Exciting Event!
Golfapalooza has great gifts
for all the golf lovers on your list!
Our Fabulous Vendors:


Adams
Back 9 Jerky
Bagboy/Datrek
Bushnell
Callaway
Citrus Cycle
Cobra
Cleveland
Country Club Cars
19th Hole Liquors


McDonald & Barry
Nancy Lopez
Naples Bay
Neck & Back Care
Center
Nike
Ocala National
Personal Golf Fan
Pfantasy Embroidery


Saturday,

December 7, 2013

10:00am 3:00pm
Public Welcome


Ping
Sun Mountain
Tail
Taylormade
Titleist
Tour Edge
Villages of Citrus Hills
Voice Caddie
Wallaroo


SPORTS


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Back on track Texas'Brown
keeps on going


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston will not have sexual assault charges filed against him. Now the
Seminoles freshman can turn his attention to Duke in Saturday's ACC Championship game and resume his stature
as the Heisman frontrunner.


Only Duke can

keep Heisman

from Winston

Associated Press

NEW YORK The only thing
standing in the way of Jameis Win-
ston and the Heisman Trophy is the
Duke Blue Devils.
The quarterback of No. 1 Florida
State will not be charged with sexu-
ally assaulting a woman who ac-
cused him of raping her about a year
ago. State Attorney Willie Meggs
made the announcement Thursday
saying there was not enough evi-
dence to win a conviction.
Even while Winston was being in-
vestigated for sexual assault, odds-
makers had pegged him as the clear
favorite.
Now only a terrible performance
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
championship Saturday night
against No. 20 Duke will keep him
from a runaway Heisman victory
Chris Huston who runs the web-
site HeismanPunditcom said:
"He'll win very comfortably"
The deadline for the 928 Heis-
man voters to submit electronic bal-
lots is Monday Finalists will be
announced that evening and the
79th Heisman Trophy will be
awarded Saturday night in New
York City
Heisman spokesman Tim Hen-
ning said the Heisman Trophy
Trust never considered extending
the voting deadline if the case
against Winston had not been set-
tled before Monday
"The great thing about this hap-
pening today just from the pure
Heisman perspective if you're


the Heisman Trust this avoids a
whole lot of possibly messy situa-
tions," Huston said.
If the case had not been settled it
would have overwhelmed the Heis-
man proceedings and could have had
a significant impact on the voting.
"How this case affected the na-
tional title race and the Heisman
Trophy balloting is so far down the
list of what matters, it feels almost
silly to talk about," said Heisman
voter Doug Lesmerises of The
Cleveland Plain Dealer "But in try-
ing to make an informed choice for
an award that does matter to peo-
ple, the fact that a decision has
been made regarding the legal
process does allow us all to vote
with a clearer mind."
Huston said that now it's unlikely
the allegations will cost Winston
enough votes to affect the outcome.
Not long after the announcement
of no charges was made, RJ Bell of
pregame.com tweeted that the
Heisman odds for Winston im-
proved from -2000 to -3000, or a $30
bet in Las Vegas on Winston to win
would pay out $1.
Winston would be the second
freshman to win the award, and the
second straight, joining Texas
A&M's Johnny Manziel. Winston is
a redshirt freshman, as Manziel was
last year
Huston has been taking a straw
poll of Heisman voters for seven
years and he has successfully pre-
dicted the winner each year. Last
year, he correctly predicted the top-
five voter getters.
His latest straw poll was released
Tuesday and Winston had received
seven of the 10 first-place votes.
Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan
Lynch received the others and was
second. Alabama quarterbackAJ Mc-
Carron and Ohio State quarterback
Braxton Miller were tied for third.


Huston said Winston's perform-
ance would merit a large margin of
victory Winston is challenging the
major college record for passer effi-
ciency with a 192.6 rating heading
into Saturday's game. He has thrown
for 3,490 yards and 35 touchdowns,
with eight interceptions, while
rarely playing deep into the fourth
quarter because Florida State has
blown out so many opponents.
The allegations against Winston
could cost him a few votes, Huston
said.
"I don't think he'll have a land-
slide in the order of Troy Smith,"
Huston said. "It'll probably be more
like something like Rashaan
Salaam, who doubled the point
total of the No. 2 two guy (in 1994)."
Smith, the Ohio State quarter-
back, won the 2006 Heisman by the
second-largest point margin (1,662),
behind only O.J. Simpson's victory
by 1,750 points in 1968.
Voters cast ballots with first-, sec-
ond-, and third-place finishers. Three
points is awarded for a first-place
vote, two for second and one for third.
This Heisman vote could have
some similarities to 2010, when Cam
Newton won it for Auburn after an
NCAA investigation into his recruit-
ment put a cloud over him in the last
month of the season. The NCAA
cleared Newton and Auburn the
week leading into the SEC champi-
onship game, though the NCAA did
find that his father tried to get Mis-
sissippi State to pay for his son to
play there. The pay-for-play allega-
tions likely cost Newton votes, Hus-
ton said, but the quarterback's
victory was still by the 10th largest
margin (1,184) in history
"People don't want to vote for
someone who is a jerk if they can
avoid it," Huston said. "This allows
them to give a clear benefit of the
doubt" to Winston.


Coach excels

amidjob

speculation

Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Texas
coach Mack Brown has
had a running joke all
week: He is the only coach
in America playing for a
conference championship
while also shrugging off
speculation that he could
be replaced.
That perfectly sums up
the drama surrounding
Brown and a team who
have fought their way
through a topsy-turvy sea-
son of embarrassing losses
and big wins and now find
themselves on the verge of
a Big 12 title in the final
game of the regular season.
The No. 23 Longhorns
(8-3, 7-1) play at No. 9 Bay-
lor (10-1, 7-1) with at least a
share of the conference
title at stake. For either
team, a win coupled with
an Oklahoma State loss -
the Cowboys beat both in
November will earn the
victor the crown outright
For Brown and Texas
fans the bigger drama
may be what comes after
the game.
Brown's future has been
the subject of intense
speculation nearly all sea-
son. A 1-2 start with a
team that even Brown ex-
pected would contend for
a national championship
was coupled with revela-
tions that as far back as
January, some top school
officials and donors were
courting Alabama coach
Nick Saban.
Brown said this week he
hasn't talked to his team
about his job future.
"This is about these kids
and it's about this team
and I'm very unimportant
and have absolutely not
mentioned it" Brown said.
"I did not mention it after
Ole Miss, Brigham Young.


I just said, 'Let's go back to
work."'
Brown said he talked
briefly about his future
with his staff, but only in a
way to keep them focused
on the turning the season
around.
"Hey, we can all lay
down, feel sorry for our-
selves because we didn't
do our job in the first three
ballgames, or we can all go
back to work, pull this
thing in tight and pick
these kids up and be the
team that we thought we
were going to be in presea-
son," Brown said.
Brown has arguably
done one of his best coach-
ing jobs in 16 years at
Texas.
Despite a fractured fan
base some printed burnt
orange "Saban 2014" t-
shirts and even former
Longhorns Heisman Tro-
phy winner Earl Campbell
said it was time for Brown
to be fired Brown ral-
lied his team to within one
win from what would be
his third league title.
To do it, Brown fired his
defensive coordinator
after two games and team
endured season-ending in-
juries to starters at quar-
terback, running back,
linebacker and defensive
end that robbed the Long-
horns of their best players
on both sides of the ball.
After David Ash was lost
early in the season, Brown
had to turn to backup
quarterback Case McCoy,
who had spent 10 weeks of
his summer on a mission
in Peru.
Along the way, the Long-
horns pummeled arch-
rival Oklahoma and
narrowly escaped lowly
Iowa State and West Vir-
ginia on the road.
"I thought we would be
really good before the sea-
son started," Brown said.
"Then the two weeks were
just a collapse for us. Then
as we said, we were ex-
cited about starting over,
challenged by it. But this is
a good football team."


Associated Press
Texas coach Mack Brown is facing an interesting
weekend: He's trying to win a league championship at
No. 9 Baylor on Saturday while fighting off speculation he
could be fired.


Correction


,.01


Special to the Chronicle
The Rodbenders Bass Club held their monthly tournament on the Floral City pool of the
Tsala Apopka Chain of Lakes Sunday, Dec. 1. Chris Addair, above, displays an 8 pound,
4 ounce bass that proved to be the largest fish caught during the tournament. Louis
Bredice took the overall win in the event with 13 pounds, 8 ounces followed by Tom
Sarver with 8 pounds, 6 ounces while Addair finished third. The Rodbenders Bass Club
was established in the late 1970s and conducts one-day bass tournaments each
month. Tournament venues are decided upon by club members and involve lakes and
rivers in the Central Florida area. For more information on the club, contact Jack Hood,
club president, at 352-634-2061.


Stewart wins prestigious


Myers Brothers award


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Tony Stewart thought
he was making a whirlwind trip to Las
Vegas to play the role of supportive team
owner
After missing the final 15 weeks of the
season with a broken leg suffered in a
sprint car accident in August, the three-
time NASCAR champion had no official
reason to attend
Thursday's annual It
Myers Brothers
awards ceremony sitting or
So as the ceremony
was winding down, lines watch
Stewart began to alert
his pilots it was al-
most time to make the Sprint Cup driver sai
trip back to North a bi
Carolina.
Instead, he heard National Motor-
sports Press Association President
Kenny Bruce describing Stewart in his
introduction of the 2013 recipient of the
prestigious Myers Brothers Award for
contributions to the sport. He made the
long walk to the front of the ballroom
without the use of a cane as the audi-
ence of industry participants rose to
give Stewart a standing ovation.
Stewart needed assistance climbing
the stairs, but it was the only help he re-
quired as he collected his surprise
award and warned his competitors he'll
be ready for the season-opening Day-
tona 500 in February
"It was hard sitting on the sidelines
watching, but it gave me a different per-
spective that I haven't seen in years of
what we all do each week," Stewart said


in his speech. "It was a lot of fun to sit
there on the side and watch you guys do
what we do.
"But take this as your warning: I
gave you guys (15) weeks off without
me. I'll be ready for Daytona and be
back kicking your (butts) again, so you
guys enjoy it."
The Myers Brothers award was given
to Stewart for his role as owner of El-


was hard
n the side-
"hing.

Tony Stewart
d of missing time with
broken leg this season.


dora Speedway, the
half-mile dirt track
that hosted the first
national NASCAR
race on dirt in 43
years when the Truck
Series raced there in
July
"It was a lot of fun
for us," Stewart said
about the Eldora


event. "I'm aging in dog years now It
takes a lot of time and effort. You prob-
ably won't ever hear me give too many
of the promoters in NASCAR a hard
time anymore because I know what it's
like firsthand.
"To host an event takes a lot of time
and effort and work and it takes a great
staff to do that I am very fortunate and
blessed to have a good staff at Eldora
and just very surprised by this (award).
. This is very humbling, to be perfectly
honest."
The Myers Brothers Award has been
given annually since 1958. It's the sec-
ond straight year that a current Sprint
Cup Series competitor has won; four-
time champion Jeff Gordon received the
honor last season.


B6 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


SPORTS




Section C- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6,2013

0 Arts & Entertainment



NTHE


SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Inside:
Mission in Citrus plans
year's largest giveaway/C6


Floral City



Heritage Days


Floral City Heritage Council presents
Floral City Heritage Days on tonight
and Saturday
Activities begin tonight with Candles
& Carols, which features an all-you-can-
eat fish fry with night rides in a horse-
drawn wagon down the mile-long
Orange Avenue lined with luminaries.
Attendees enjoy singing carols from
the open front porches of historic
homes under the venerable century-old
oak trees.
The fish fry begins at 4 p.m. Floral
City Heritage Hall Museum and Country
Store will be open at 5 p.m.
By 5:30 p.m., Orange Avenue from Old
Floral City Road to Annie Terrace is
closed to all vehicular traffic and lumi-
naries are placed along either side of
the roadway under the century-old oak
trees.
The horse-and-wagon ride requires a


$5 ticket for all, except infants younger
than 2 years of age, who are held during
the ride.
Parking for this event is suggested on
Marvin Street, one block north, or be-
hind the Floral City Library It is recom-
mended for safety to use a flashlight to
and from parking areas.
From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7, visitors
can stroll through Florida Folk Life Day
with early Florida daily living exhibits,
demonstrations and The Blue Banner
Tour of Historic Homes. The day of fes-
tivities and education will include the
Friends of Library Heritage Book Sale,
Folk Music and Country Food.
Floral City is located at the intersec-
tion of U.S. 41 and County Road 48 in
east Citrus County
For information, visit http://floral
cityhc.org/find-us.html.
Special to the Chronicle


Heritage Days
When: Today and Saturday.
Time: Today, 4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Floral City, at the intersection of U.S. 41 and County Road 48
in east Citrus County.
Information: visit http://floralcityhc.org/find-us.html.

Chronicle file photos


'Nutcracker' performance
scheduled for Saturday

Step 'N Time School of Dance Arts will
present the eighth annual performance of
"The Nutcracker," a ballet in two acts, Satur-
day, Dec. 7, at 6 p.m. at Curtis Peterson
Auditorium, Lecanto.
Dancers from all areas of Citrus County
that range from 3 to 18 perform the ballet.
Tickets are $15 and seating is reserved.
VIP packages, including special seating,
commemorative T-shirts and entry to the pre-
show Sugar Plum Reception, are available.
Call 352-637-4663 for information and box
office.
For more information, visit wwwschof
dancearts.com or "Like" our Facebook page:
Step N' Time School of Dance Arts.
Special to the Chronicle


LISA CALDERONE / Special to the Chronicle
Dancers perform in an annual production of
"The Nutcracker" ballet presented by Step 'N
Time School of Dance Arts.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Guitar music and youth


production coming to


Art Center in December


he Art Center Theatre
will ring with music to-
morrow night when ac-
claimed fingerstyle guitarist
Richard Gilewitz presents
Acoustic Adventures, an
evening of six- and 12-string gui-
tar music and humorous stories
from Richard's travels around
the world.
The Gilewitz concert is a holi-
day tradition that always enter-
tains and amazes the audience,
so be sure to get your tickets for
a fun-filled evening.
The festivities kick off at
7 p.m. with a free wine and
cheese reception, followed by
the concert at 8 p.m. Tickets are
$20 and are available at the Art
Center box office on the campus
or by calling 352-746-7606.
Next weekend, Dec. 13 to 15,
the Art Center Academy youth
theater will present a humorous
and entertaining treatment of
Charles Dickens' beloved tale
called 'A Fairy Tale Christmas
Carole."
In this version, the Big Bad
Wolf (Ebenezer Scrooge) meets
his old business partner Josie
Midas (Marley) who turns every-
thing to gold, even as Big Bad
banters with Mother Goose.
Midas warns Big Bad he will be
visited by three ghosts: Fairy
Godmother, Old King Cole and
the Queen of Hearts.
The ghosts make Big Bad re-
alize what a scoundrel he has
been to the Charming family,
the Crachits: Prince Phillip,
Cinderella and their children,
Hansel, Gretel and Tabitha.
True to the heartwarming clas-
sic, the storybook characters help
us all to remember what the
Christmas spirit is all about


Sharon
Harris

ART
TALK


The play is presented by young
people ages 7 to 17. This is truly
an evening for both the young
and the young at heart Tickets
are $8 for adults and $5 for stu-
dents and are available through
the Art Center box office.
Tickets are also now available
for the Art Center musical com-
edy "You're a Good Man, Charlie
Brown" based on the characters
created by Charles M. Schulz in
his Peanuts comic strip. The
play runs Jan. 10 to 17.
There is also a call to artists
to deliver works for the Third
Juried Art competition on Jan. 7
and 8,10 a.m. to 2p.m. 2-D
works will be accepted in four
categories: watercolor,
acrylic/oil, photography and
mixed media. First-, second-
and third-place awards will be
presented at a Jan. 10 reception.
Sharon Harris is an artist
and former president of the Art
Center and currently serves as
the Director of the Art Center's
Academy of the Arts. For show
call the Box Office at 746-7606
or tickets or for more informa-
tion on the Camera Club or Ex-
hibitions visit wwwartcenter
ofcitruscounty org.


Despair proves amusing in 'Llewyn'


Associated Press
In an alley behind a cafe in
New York's Greenwich Vil-
lage, an unidentified stranger
knocks singer Llewyn Davis
to his knees. Within the first
10 minutes of the Coen broth-
ers' latest dark comedy, the
filmmakers acquaint us with
the curiously obscure, as vio-
lent fits are not usually asso-
ciated with folk music.
The genesis of this animos-
ity is left unanswered until
the final moments of the film,
leaving the lingering off-kilter
question: Why would anyone
beat up a folk singer? Thus,
we have the perfect onset for
this bleak and witty tale of a
striving musician.
Here the Coen brothers
pluck at the beatnik scene of
the late 1950s and early 1960s.
Helmed by long-time Coen col-
laborator T Bone Burnett, the
tunes in this film which are
performed live bear morbid
undertones that correspond
with the foremost concepts of
the story: poverty abortion, dis-
appointment and death.
As the film opens, we are
introduced to our guitar-
strumming lead, Llewyn
Davis, who is onstage in a
smoke-filled dive. He is
played to grungy, dark and
handsome perfection by the
stylish and calm Juilliard-
trained Oscar Isaac. This
marks the first time the
Miami-bred Guatemalan-born
33-year-old has anchored a
feature, and he carries it off
with infectious grace and grit.
When he sings "Hang Me, Oh
Hang Me" in these initial mo-
ments, we're both seduced
and heartbroken.
But for his character, a
deep tune isn't enough to win
over an audience. He is strug-
gling to make it as a solo
artist after his bandmate


Oscar Isaac in a scene from "Inside Llewyn Davis."


committed suicide, and his
dismal hymns fail to propel
him out of dire straits. Unable
to afford his own place, he
crashes on the couches of
friends around town. Yet he's
determined to keep his guitar
close by and not sell out.
It seems we'll have no prob-
lem feeling sorry for Llewyn.
Only the fact that he's an ego-
tistical jackass makes it impos-
sible to feel solidly empathetic
toward him. His tenacity is ad-
mirable, though painstakingly
impractical, which his married
lover, Jean, played by Carey
Mulligan, never fails to point
out The motley actress, who
also played Isaac's love inter-
est in "Drive," is deliciously
abrasive in this role as
Llewyn's best friend's wife,
who just might be carrying
Llewyn's baby
Unlike her glamorous turn
as Daisy Buchanan in Baz
Luhrmann's adaptation of
"The Great Gatsby" earlier
this year, here Mulligan is
pared down in tame turtle-
necks and blunt brown bangs.
This practical look is the per-
fect contrast to her sassy
tongue. Jean is disgusted with


Associated Press


Llewyn's casual nature and
lack of desire for the stable
suburban lifestyle, yet she's
attracted to his rough edges.
Their back-and-forth dustups
speed up the film's otherwise
drowsy pace and offer the
most intriguing, and hilari-
ous, exchanges.
Justin Timberlake, as
bearded musician Jim, who is
married to Jean, has good
comedic timing. He's convinc-
ingly quirky and naive, espe-
cially when he attempts to
record a loony track about
President Kennedy with a
straight face. And "Girls" star
Adam Driver, as the cowboy
hat-wearing folk singer Al
Cody, is a riot when adding
absurd sound effects to Jim's
soon-to-be hit.
The film is a heavy downer
and its consistent gray-hue
enhances the bleakness. But
the Coen brothers never fail
to weave in bits of saucy
irony giving way for essential
comical moments that bring
everything full-circle.
Now back to that alley beat-
down: Despite what Llewyn
goes through, it becomes
clear he deserved it.


ENnpT1NING mmTON





a MaTMH Hwy. 40 N
.-s
PbI NGLIS I N.OrudSpringsBWv
us
44 / BEVERLY S
Q4 41S Citrus Avenue B LY U SR 200


Q's Pub 44 is a newer i -
name to those familiar with _
the location. It's been just
about a year since owner
Jerry Wells "Q" took over the
12-year old Sandhill Saloon and
made it his own with the name
change and other upgrades.
Q's Pub 44 still offers a comfortable
place to meet friends and family in a laid-back atmosphere. The
bar has a clean, welcoming look, 50 pool tables, and an awesome
new patio with plenty of seating and a fire pit.
Four bartenders offer the coldest beer and wine in the Lecanto
area, including $1.00 drafts.
Entertainment includes Buzztime Trivia, poker tournaments,
and Karaoke 2 times a week. There is live entertainment on the
weekends, and an outdoor movie night is in the works.
Jerry has been in the bar/restaurant and entertainment
business for 25 years and he never meets a stranger. He plans on
making the Pub one of the best bars in Citrus County.
Q's Pub 44 is located at 3782 W. Gulf to Lake Highway at the
corner of State Road 44 and Homosassa Trail in Lecanto. For more
information call 352-513-5944. "Like us on Facebook!"


J


w W.


859 US Hwy 41, S., Inverness, FL 419-4878
-, si Wed.- Sun 11 AM 7 PM or until last customer leaves 1
-iA We accept all major credit cards Closed Mon. & Tues.



LakeSide
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Closed Monday & Tuesday
370 '. Florida Ave. (ITS Hwv. 411. Floral Ciht. FT
344-4443





MAMA SALLY'S
4.iP RESTAURANT


MONDAY
CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS...........$6"
TUESDAY
SAUSAGE & PEPPER HOAGIE.........$69
WEDNESDAY
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THURSDAY
BBQ CHICKEN & RIBS......699
FRIDAY
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SATURDAY-
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Mon.-Sat. 7am-8pm
fun 7am-vnm


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Southern Omelet T1 Steakw/Eggs 6
Flounder, Talapia, Pork Chops, $ 1 A99
Chop Sirloin or Roast Turkey 2 FOR I 2
Liver& Onions, Meatloaf, Eggplant Parmigiana, 1
Spaghetti& Meatballs, Roasted Pork $OR 9
or Country Fried Steak 2 FOR '
Fish Fry $ 99
w/French Fries & Cole Slaw$6
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FISH $119"
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Any Omelet $995
W'THCOUPON EXPIRES 12/12/13 I H COUPON EXPIRE, ]210/]3

S8Ni^,(-oJ O IAOt ~MON-SAT 6 AM 7 PM
RNER OF352-228y-.o44 SUNDAY 6 AM 2 Pmi
CORNER OF HWY. 44 & NE OTH AVE.'CRYSTAL RIVER




LfrS ILBOUT WATERFRONT DfNfN-I


=17S. LIM, gls(O igt Ps Brg manl (5) 4-50


C2 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


ON THE SCENE


OnIMf 114 MRIV -2Q Ifdmiy


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Favorite watercolorist


makes return to club


here is no question when it comes
to who is among the favorite wa-
tercolorists that visit the Citrus
Watercolor Club.
On Dec. 13, Tom Jones makes a wel-
come return as the demonstrator for the
Citrus Watercolor Club holiday lunch-
eon, to be held at the Citrus Hills Golf&
Country Club, with festivities starting at
noon.
As one of the most popular artists
among Nature Coast watercolorists,
Tom has been a frequent demonstrator,
and has presented numerous educa-
tional workshops to local artists. Tom
and his wife, Bonnie, reside in Orange
City
Both are members of the Citrus Wa-
tercolor Club. Government agencies,
corporations, environmental groups,
clubs and private collectors have com-
missioned him to expand their art col-
lections. In answer to popular demand,
he typically produces his watercolor
landscapes in a series of three or five
paintings around a specific theme.
Tom's art can be found internationally
in many private and corporate collec-
tions, including commissioned paintings
displayed in the Florida State Capital
Building, Walt Disney World Corpora-
tion, Marriott Corporation and the Omni
Corporation.
Tom's work has been featured in
many books and on magazine covers as
well as posters and brochures. Tom
shares his passion for art and love of na-
ture with students of varying skill levels
through nationwide workshops,
demonstrations, and instructional
DVDs.
"I am a storyteller," he said. "I tell sto-
ries with my paintings, of places I have
been and things I have seen. I believe
that a painting should not only tell a
story, but should have a story behind it
All my paintings do."
Tom's web site is http://wwwtomjone-
sartistcom.
On Nov 23, the Inaugural Traveling


Norm
Freyer

CITRUS
WATERCOLOR
CLUB


Exhibition of the Florida Watercolor So-
ciety (FWS) made its initial appearance
at the Appleton Museum of Art in Ocala.
Two Citrus County artists will have their
work in this exhibition. German
Boettcher, FWS, Inverness watercol-
orist, shows his painting titled "Letters
from Home" and Lynn Ferris, FWS,
NWS, outstanding artist from Beverly
Hills, exhibits her work "Gathering."
This exhibition will stand until Jan. 19.
Reserve a date on your calendar to
see watercolor works by some of the
premier artists in the State of Florida.
The Appleton Museum of Art is located
at 4333 E. Silver Springs Boulevard,
Ocala, FL 34470. For more information,
the Florida Watercolor Society web site
is wwwfloridawatercolor.org; the Apple-
ton Museum of Art at wwwappleton
museum. org; the Citrus Watercolor Club
at wwwcitruswatercolorclub.com.
Members of Citrus Watercolor Club
enjoy a "Painting of the Month" compe-
tition in October, November, January,
February, March and April. They have
opportunities to show and sell their
work, take workshops and participate in
monthly sketch/paint-outs, etc. For more
information about the meeting or to be-
come a member, call Rhonda Hancock
at 352-796-0247 or Heather Doherty 352-
873-1656, or see the CWC website at
www.citruswatercolorclub.com The Cit-
rus Watercolor Club meets at noon on
the second Friday of every month, ex-
cept July, at the First United Methodist
Church, Pleasant Grove Road, (County
Road 581), Inverness.


Springsteen manuscript


sells for hefty $197,000


Associated Press
NEW YORK Tramps like us,
baby we were born to bid.
A handwritten, working lyric sheet
for Bruce Springsteen's 1975 hit
"Born to Rufn" sold for $197,000 on
Thursday at Sotheby's.
The document used to be in the col-
lection of Springsteen's former man-
ager, Mike Appel, according to
Sotheby's. It did not reveal the iden-
tity of either the seller or the buyer, a
person bidding by telephone.
Most of the lines in this rough 1974
version, written in Long Branch, N.J.,
are apparently unpublished and un-
recorded, but the manuscript does in-
clude "a nearly perfected chorus,"
the auction house said.
The title track of Springsteen's 1975
album has revved up generations of
fans some of whom refer to them-
selves as "Tramps," like in the song.
Springsteen is known to scrawl his
songwriting stream-of-consciousness
in notebooks. His thought process,
written in blue ink on an 8 1/2-by-ll
sheet of ruled notepaper, could trig-
ger a spell-checker meltdown:
"This town'll rip the (out your)
bones from yourback/ it's a suicide
trap (rap) (it's a trap to catchthe
young) your dead unless / you get out
(we gotto) while your young so (come
on! / with) take myhand cause tramps
/ like us baby we were born to run."


There are also some notes in the
margins "Wild" and "Angels" and a
word that looks like "velocity," with
the letter "t" in Springsteen's
curlicue cursive.
'Although Springsteen is known to
have an intensive drafting process,
few manuscripts of 'Born to Run' are
available, with the present example
being one of only two identified that
include the most famous lines in the
song," Sotheby's said.
Springsteen's website describes the
"Born to Run" album as "a sheer epic
fueled by tangible energy, the notion of
escape and the romance of youth."
His "Darkness on the Edge of
Towfn" album came out three years
after "Born to Run." For much of that
interlude, Springsteen was prevented
from releasing music due to a lawsuit
involving Appel. Material from the
"Darkness" sessions may have been
influenced by the acrimonious fallout
from their business breakup.
"Darkness" was "noticeably sparer
than 'Born to Run,"' according to the
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website,
which says Springsteen described
the evolution as "a certain loss of
innocence."
"If'Born to Run' was epic cinema,
'Darkness' was brutal reality, its
characters not dreaming of idealized
escape as much as struggling
against their circumstances,"
notes Springsteen's website.


COMING
O TO CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
I SATURDAY DEC 7th


I EntIrtazinIAnt


Now serving
) 32 flaVors of
WorKing Couw
Homemade Ice Cream
Smoothies
Banana Splits
Pints & Quarts
to go
Pies


' Weekday Specials:
Every Tues, buy one pint or quart, get a
second one at % price
Every Wed, active teachers get 20%o off (w/ID)
Every Thurs, Seniors (65 and up) get 20% off.
Every Fri, College Student get 20% off (w/ID)
$1.00offany11Free Waffle Cone or'
Smoothie ay Waffle Bowl with Any:
Smoothie *
Expires 12/31/13: Scoop Purchase.
; Expires 12/31/13
------ ------


352.527.7250
Next to keet's moKehouse Grill
3887 N. Lecanto HWY.
Beverly Hills, FL


S i S...
1 Grill


SAVE WITH DAN!


ICiernstrip II ~PFj Bowl
Clamsti Bu Oor 500 OFF Cup


iBasket Dan's Famous
and two beverages New England
i Get Clam Strip |m C
Sand Fries for FREE II Clam Chowder
Dine In Coupon Required. Dine In Only. Coupon Required.
On i xpie 5 ixpies 1215/13
.45 C MI' S go;
2 LOCATIONS
7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa
i352-628-9588
CO~SE' D Highway 44, Crystal River
UNDAY.. 352-795-9081


ll .Pllp.
dal 1 iHOp
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I Serving the Finest

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isil ui o second locdio niO n ihe I
i Hiolic Downiown Inveness
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352726-2212
., Jia ^y^'S.iu


HIGHLANDS isrant
BREAKFAST P LUNCH DINNER

*|LUNCH SPECIALS 529
p M-F 11-3pm Includes Soup & Potato

DINNER 2 FOR 1399
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Open 7 Days A Week: Mon.-Sat. 7am 8pm, Slun 7am 2pm 2A 1 3030
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OOOGU9S


res. San. 8ai 8pin Closed MondaSs

Pork Burgers
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t. : f^M^^7'"^:a


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6317 kLe Hw^, (A (22^72750, )
l16^^^?f^WIT^ S^ ,


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Sundaes
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a


Us


4


I


ON THE SCENE


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 C3


od0.








WEEKEND


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WRAP


Today

Christmas Tree lighting tonight
It's time once again for the Crystal River's annual
Christmas Tree Lighting today
The ceremony will take place at Little Springs Park at
the gazebo behind City Hall from 4 to 7 p.m.
Snow flurries that the children can play in are ex-
pected. Bollin said there will be bounce houses, horse-
back rides, face painting, live music, train rides, a
puppet show, and complimentary light refreshments for
the children of cookies, punch and hot chocolate served
by the Pilot Club of Crystal River
The Pilot Club sells luminaries for $2 each to honor
loved ones that may be purchased in advance or during
the festival from Pilot members.
Santa will appear and hear the children's Christmas
wishes. Pictures with Santa of you or of your pet will be
available during the evening for purchase.



Saturday
Food trucks steering to the mall
Food Truck Wars is coming to Crystal River from noon
to 6 p.m. Saturday at the Crystal River Mall.
The event will feature more than 40 gourmet food
trucks from across the state competing for five prizes
awarded by celebrity judges the Spirit Award, Top
Sales, Delectable Desserts, Causal Cuisine and the Peo-
ple's Choice Award.
There are lots of choices from Thai and Mexican
dishes to lobster and everything in between, including
desserts. Costs run from $3 to $18, with many entrees av-
eraging between $6 and $8.
There will be a special children's area and live music.
Admission is $2. The mall is at 1801 N. U.S. 19, Crystal
River A portion of proceeds benefit Citrus County
Fallen Heroes Monument

Airboat parade set in Hemando
Citrus County Airboat Alliance will host a airboat pa-
rade Saturday on Lake Hernando. The group will meet
at 5 p.m. the Hernando Ramp and run the route of the
shore to Armante's on the north end. The group donates
to the Citrus United Basket by bringing unwrapped gifts
for underprivileged children.


Crystal River Christmas Parade
Special to the Chronilde
Crystal River will light up U.S. 19 Saturday at 6 p.m. as it kicks off its annual Christmas Parade with its
theme "Christmas Melodies" filled with lights shining on colorful floats, along with numerous marching units,
music, horses, the Crystal River Middle School Bearcat band and much more. The parade will head south
from the staging area on Citrus Avenue, ending on the corner of U. S. 19 and Port Paradise Road. About
80-plus entries will be in the parade. Candy and snacks will still be given out during the event. Santa will
appear at the end of the parade.


Beverly Hills parade set, chorus performance planned Saturday


The annual Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
will be Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. with
floats, antique cars, marching bands, fire
engines, motorcycles and plenty of marching
units to view
The parade begins down Beverly Hills Boule-
vard (from County Road 491), about one mile to
Civic Circle where the festival begins.
This year's theme is "Star Spangled Christ-
mas." The arts and crafts show will be from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the end of the parade.


The Chorus of Beverly Hills, under the direction
of Renate Williams and accompanied by Ruth
Carruthers, will present its Christmas concert at
3 p.m. Saturday in the sanctuary of the Beverly
Hills Community Church, 82 Civic Circle.
The theme of the concert is "Getting in the Mood
for Christmas" and will feature a blend of old and
new sacred and secular favorites.
Tickets for the afternoon performance are $5.
For more information, call the church office at
352-746-3620 or Volena Van Gunst at 352-746-5680.


'oo& ZF~n I8 EntrtainrAent


I"/I ""h- Will I IREEK N .HT' FRIDAY DEC. 6m
iE-r, ,,,P,, I' FeA Bely Dice Perfonlmce by SHAZADI
4ITALA *llwieBwegScsRSA.352-563-0075
41REST4IUR R ewl ihil % penih D'hi~~
HWY. 41 & 44 W.INVERNESS oI en (hiF ,olden Iork
1 2 ,AE %'taJkod 1,,5 __-

2 BAKED I .
,, ...... ....... J41-4555


mm'm m mm mj I m


I Includes Salad & Garlic Bread


I Must Present Coupon
SExpires 12/12/13 J
P.S. "YOU'LL NEVER LEAVE HUNGRY"
OPEN 7 DAYS BES'
LUNCH & DINNER
637-1355,


Green Valley's
&A.Amish Market
&.EXcELLENT
Grand Opening CHRISTMAS
G 11TS!
Dec. 14th
Cheese Curds
Trail Bologna Organic Coffee Candy
Noodles Jams & Jellies Boiled Peanuts
* Black Buggy Soups Dried Fruit 352-726-0206
3275 South FL Ave. Inverness (Across FromAirport)


MAMA'S KUNTRY KAFE
A- I" "Home of the Large Portions"
POKER NIGHT FJSH FRY
3RD SATURDAY OF THE 6.39
MONTH FROM 6-9 FRI. NIGHTS ONLY
,. ,- he hO.I trs ml Valid with coupon only.
Inverness Lions Club Not combined w/any other offer
IFT CERTIFICATES
Next to
ABC Liquor


Pizzeria & RIistorante
ITALIANO
Come Try Our Daily Specials!


- TAKE OUT ONLY! -
Large I lopping Pizza
* 1/2 Do.. Gadli K.ot,
* 2 Litiler Soda
Must present original $ 1I.[1
coupon. Not valid WITH f
other offers. Expires 12/12/13 1

10DISC0UNT
DINING IN OR TAKE OUT
Must present original coupon.
Not valid w/other offers. Expires 12/12/13
Let (hehfs of NapoliCater Yourlpecial vent!
GIFT CERTIFICATES
BUY $50 GET EXTRA $10
BUY $100 GET EXTRA $25


Dec. 6,013 OEN a *


FRIEDFISH FRIEDFU


FRIED FISH FRIED
OR CALAMARI SHRIMP
$8.00 $9.50


1LN


COMBO PLATTERS:
FRIED FISH & CALAMARI $9.50
FRIED FISH & SHRIMP $10.50per person
All served with coleslaw, sweet corn fritters and potato.
Other Foods $8.50 to $12.50
ALEX GREEK STYLE CHICKEN w/orzo, salad & dessert
LAMB SHANK w/orzo, salad & dessert
One complimentary glass of wine with each eat-in meal.
5OBEat In or Carry Out Available
ARCHANGEL MICHAEL
GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
4705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, Florida
(352) 527-0766
at the CANTONIS PARISH CENTER


|i Call 352-746-1177
Leave Name, Phone Number and a Brief Message
fi--PatryIte ms Aa iiableForSale


I- A I
BKP fm*q
48wy9 Sout
352-447-52_IB
Bmommm
F IR F. F


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I




r APage C5. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013




WEEKEND


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WRAP


Saturday

Sugarmill Chorale to present concert
The Sugarmill Chorale will present its Christmas Con-
cert at 2 p.m. Saturday at 8831 W Bradshaw St at First
United Methodist Church in Homosassa.
Tickets are $7.50 in advance or $10 at the door

Inverness Christmas Market set

The Inverness Farmer's Market and the Old Towne
Antique Fair Are teaming up for a special Holiday
Market Saturday at the Inverness Government Center
and Pine Street.
From doggie treats to people treats, check out cook-
ies, cupcakes, breads, jams, jellies, produce and the
best smoked salmon in Citrus County
Holiday photos with Santa & Sunny Cooter will also
be available in front the City's decorated 12-foot
holiday tree from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.


Sunday

Citrus Springs to host parade
The Citrus Springs Civic Association and the Citrus
Entertainment Committee will host "Miracles and Mem-
ories," a Christmas Parade Sunday on Citrus Springs
Blvd. Staging will begin at 1 p.m. at the Citrus Springs
Fountain.
The parade will feature community groups, organiza-
tions and businesses throughout Citrus County
Parade winners will be announced afterward at
Wesley Jones Park
For information, call 465-5920.

Sunday Sampler in Dunnellon

Dunnellon will welcome the Florida Cracker Cowboys
for its first Sunday Sampler performance at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday in the historic Dunnellon Depot 12061 S.
Williams St
The Florida Cracker Cowboys are Randy Tucker on
guitar, Rory Munoz on mandolin and Kit Rich on bass.
Originally from Lutz, these native Florida musicians
now reside in Tampa. They play bluegrass "with a twist"
- a dash of blues, rock and folk They say they have
been influenced by Doc Watson, Toch Brown, Pink Floyd
and Jimi Hendrix.
In their day jobs, Tucker is a professional mason and
tile setter; Munoz, a fifth-grade math and science
teacher; and Rich, a certified arborist All three com-
pose and write lyrics, so much of their performance will
be their original works.
Donation is $10 at the door and includes complimen-
tary snacks at intermission. Funds help support artists
who educate through writing and singing about Florida.
For information call 352-465-2167.
Visit www.willmclean.com for details.








Proudly Pret'c. I


Featuring

Joe Donato

& Friends

Thursday, Dec. 12
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


^SPOSORS.-
CiIE<)NoNI;LE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CRius CouvYfHisroOicAl SOCIETY


Rverdand News file photo
A young girl waves her candy cane while riding in a float during last year's Christmas Parade. This year's
event kicks off at 5:30 p.m. Saturday and will start at Dunnellon Christian Academy before heading east on
Pennsylvania Avenue. Following the parade, there will be a Christmas celebration party at Dunnellon Plaza where
Sears is located.

Dunnellon parade set for Saturday, post-celebration event to follow


Not even Dr Seuss could have
penned a better story for the
Dunnellon Christmas Parade.
With approximately a month
to plan, secure permits, entries
and iron out a route as well as
last-minute wrinkles, the Dun-
nellon Christmas Parade will
traverse through the Dunnellon
Historic District and make the
trek east along Pennsylvania Av-
enue beginning at 5:30 p.m. Sat-
urday Organizers had initially
hoped to take the parade route
along U.S. 41, but the logistics of
planning a route and establish-
ing safety measures were
too much to overcome on short
notice.
Parade lineup will start at 4 at
Dunnellon Christian Acad-
emy/First Baptist Church. Par-
ticipants who walk the 1.4-mile
parade route will exit at Blue


Run Park where a shuttle will
return them to the parade's
starting point. All floats and ve-
hicles will be rerouted through
Rainbow River Ranches back
onto County Road 484.
Because traffic along County
Road 484 will have to be
rerouted during the parade as
well as additional delays along
U.S. 41, Police Chief Joanne
Black stressed patience among
motorists.
This year's theme is 'A Small
Town Christmas," but because
the annual parade falls on the
anniversary of the Dec. 7,1941,
attack on Pearl Harbor, organiz-
ers understood the significance
of the date, which played a key
role in selecting this year's
grand marshals.
Planners of the event didn't
have to look far to add a touch of


Acoustic music, fish fry, demonstrations, Cr N 'U
historical exhibits and Country Store _" UTY
Friday, Dec. 6 5:30 to 9 p.m.
Fish Fry begins at 4 p.m.
Candles 'N' Carols at 5:30 p.m.


FloralCityHeritageCon ci.For.more0info.m


patriotic flair as well as pay
homage to veterans past,
present and future when they
choose Bob Schmidt and Clinton
Burns, both of whom served in
World War II, to serve as the
honorary dignitaries for the
Christmas parade. All told, more
than 50 entries had been re-
ceived by Monday's deadline to
register for the event
Organizers are asking specta-
tors of the parade to bring small
flags to wave throughout the
event
In addition to the "senior" pa-
rade marshals, organizers se-
lected the Dunnellon Boys &
Girls Club to serve as Junior
Parade Marshals.
For information, visit
www.dunnellonchristmas
parade.com or on Facebook at
Dunnellon Christmas Parade.


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4MITS
,N HOLIDAY EXT'DAG6 ZA
MUSIC



J Jacki Scott, Director
Sally Smith, Accompanist
Including
Holiday Song Favorites Plus
cI!ections From the Famous Handel's Messiah
Two Performances Only
December 1,2013 3:00pm
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL
December 8,2013 3:00pm
Faith Lutheran Church
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto, FL
General Admission is $10 for adults
Children 12 and under are always free
Tickets available at the door,
no need for advance reservations.
C I] .\ I1 l Thank you for supporting our scholarship program.
Plese visit tur website at www tuschoircom and "Like" us onFacebook


RESERVED SEATS ~ $15.00
VIP PACKAGES AVAILABLE* -
Box OFFICE ~ (352) 637-4663
*INCLUDES VIP SEATING, COMMEMORATIVE T-SHIRTS,
PROGRAM AD, ENTRY TO PRIVATE PRE-SHOW
"SUGAR PLUM RECEPTION" & MORE!


PLATINUM
SPONSOR:
CGIOMME


GOLD SPONSORS:

aggL -GA R
Edt,,, Ilia llAGAR GROUP


IiI'



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The OpenTable
Family Resource Center of Citrus County Table #1
What: Open House Dinner
following the Ring and Sing
When: Sunday, December 8,2013 4:00 to 6:30 p.m.
FREE hors d'oeuvres served 3:00 to 4:00.
Take out available
Where: First United Methodist Church of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness, FL
Authentic Italian Cooking
... prepared for your enjoyment
Tickets: $10 for adults, $5 for children
Door Prize Silent Auction.
Tickets are available at: Citrus County Resource Center, Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, First United Methodist
Church of Inverness, Calvary Church, and St. Timothy Lutheran Church
PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT THE WORK OF OPEN TABLE OF CITRUS COUNTY
Supplementary funds provided through Ci hIO.i'.il
Citrus County Chapter of Thrivent Financial -


-1






Page C6- FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Holiday Bazaar to
benefit CUB
A Holiday Bazaar will be held
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at
Cadence Bank, 301 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness, to benefit Citrus
United Basket.
Vendor spots are available for
$10 each.
For more information, call CUB
at 352-344-2242.

Reserve today for
Wisconsinites' lunch
Wisconsinites will gather for
their Christmas luncheon at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the
Boathouse Restaurant in Crystal
River
Snowbirds or transplants from
Wisconsin are welcome to join
the group.
Meal choices are required by
Friday Call Joyce at 352-860-1292
for reservations/information.

New Englanders to
get together Dec. 12
The New Englanders Club will
have its Christmas get-together at
5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12, at The
Plantation on Crystal River
For more information, call
Virginia at 352-527-0649.

Spend 'Day at the
Castle' with club
The GFWC Crystal River
Woman's Club Literary Group in-
vites everyone on a bus trip for a
"Day at the Castle" Solomon's
Castle, on Wednesday, Feb. 26.
Lunch will be enjoyed at the Moat
Restaurant Solomon's Castle is
the home and galleries of the fa-
mous artist and sculptor Howard
Solomon.
The cost covers transportation,
castle tour, lunch, taxes and gra-
tuities. Call JoAnn Ryan at 352-
382-1138 or Joan at 352-564-8773
to reserve a seat on the bus.

Club to offer free floral
workshop Saturday
Homosassa River Garden Club
will offer a free Christmas floral
workshop from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dec. 7, at the Homosassa
Public Library
Participants should bring a
large old towel to protect the
workspace, a clean empty tuna
can, scissors/clippers and small
seasonal decorations to personal-
ize your design. The garden club
will provide a container, fresh
greens such as holly and pine,
miniature carnations and wet
foam. All are welcome to listen
and learn or bring supplies and
create a small holiday arrange-
ment to take home.
Visit the club's website for in-
formation about meetings, events
and projects at HomosossaRiver
GardenClub.wordpress.com.


A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.


Tony


Special to the Chronicle
Tony, 8 months, is a wonderful
little purebred Chihuahua. This
sweetie is a cuddler, leash-trained,
housebroken lap dog. He is
looking for an adult home, enjoys
car rides and watching TV. No
children. A Humane Society of
Central Florida Pet Rescue Inc.
does home visits prior to
adoptions, so can only adopt to
the Citrus County area. See our
little dogs at the weekly adoption
events from 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday at Pet Supermarket,
Inverness. If you must give up your
little dog, call 352-527-9050. To
adopt or foster a Doberman
pinscher, call 352-302-9251 and
leave your name, number and
information. Short-term foster
homes are needed to save more
little dogs.


'Sale' for Mission in Citrus


December giveaway will be biggest of2013


Special to the Chronicle
The Mission in Citrus will have its
monthly community yard "sale" from
7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday
at its Crystal River location, 2488 N.
Pennsylvania Ave. This will be Mission's
largest giveaway event of the year
No resellers allowed; this to help those
in need. Resellers or those attempting to
take large loads will be turned away
Items include housewares, clothing,


makeup and more, much from
popular retailers.
Visitors will be limited on the amount
to make sure everyone may get some-
thing. There is also a 24-foot Angler
center-console boat with a 225 Suzuki
motor to be sold for the highest offer, and
a few other high-ticket items to be sold in
the same fashion.
The reduced-price items were offered
by dealers to help Mission in Citrus
during Christmas and for veterans.


The Mission relies solely on donations
and small grants. In 2012, the organiza-
tion helped more than 1,500 people with
food, shelter, toys and through the give-
aways. It provided more than 18,000 bed
nights and served more than 50,000 meals
to those in need.
Thanks to a new small grant, the Mis-
sion will resume Operation Mercy Call
using an all-terrain vehicle with pickup
bed and a large load of ready-made meals
to go into the woods and swamps to help
the homeless.
For more information and to help
Mission in Citrus, call 352-794-3825.


Top
recruiter

At a recent celebration
S' dinner held by the St.
Scholastica Knights of
Columbus Council No.
S 14485, membership
director John Mazzone
Received first place for
recruiting new members.
Mazzone competed with
more than 100 other
councils in Florida for
recruiting new members into
S the Knights of Columbus.
Mazzone has surpassed the
council's quota by at least
200 percent for five
consecutive years. He and
his wife, Pat, both volunteer
for Daystar Life Center.
Mazzone is also an usher at
St. Scholastica Church and
... was recently named Knight
of the Year. Pictured are
Charles Marinelli, district
deputy; Mazzone; Dana
Rossignol, past grand
knight; and Paul Koppie,
state deputy.

Special to the Chronicle


NEWS NOTES


Elks to sponsor
casino cruise
The West Citrus Elks
Lodge in Homosassa will
sponsor a Victory Casino
Cruise from Port Canaveral
on Wednesday, Jan 22.
The bus will leave from
the lodge on Grover Cleve-
land Boulevard. Tickets,
available from noon to
3 p.m. Monday at the lodge,
include the bus trip, casino
cruise and some free
vouchers.
Deadline to sign up is Jan.
1. Proceeds benefit HPH
Hospice.
For price and more infor-
mation, call Jean Marchese
at 352-382-1443.

County Council
to meet Wednesday
The Citrus County Coun-
cil will meet at 9 a.m.
Wednesday at the Beverly
Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
County Commissioner
Scott Adams will be guest
speaker Doors open at
8:30 a.m. for networking and
refreshments.

Suncoast Harmony
in Homosassa
The Sweet Adelines
Chorus will present "Bring
Back the Old Songs" at
3 p.m. Sunday at Homosassa
First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw
St., Homosassa.
Tickets are $8 in advance
and $10 at the door Call
Donna at 352-726-8666 for
tickets and information.

All invited to
Sunday open house
The public is invited to
Midway Animal Hospital's
open house from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Sunday Tour the fa-
cility and meet the veteri-
narians and staff.
There will be adoptions,
vendors, artists, raffles,


giveaways, free samples,
games, demonstrations by
local heroes and a bake sale
to benefit the American
Cancer Society
Bring pets along for pro-
fessional holiday pet photos.
Midway Animal Hospital
is at 1635 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
For more information,
call 352-795-7110 or visit
www.midwayanimal.com.

NARFE plans
holiday luncheon
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired
Federal Employees Associa-
tion (NARFE) will have its
annual Christmas Holiday
Luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
Monday at the Inverness
Golf and Country Club, 3150
S. Country Club Drive.
Those those who attend
are requested to bring a
new, unwrapped toy for the
Toys For Tots program.
Bruce Roggenkamp, vice
president, NARFE FL
District 6, will induct the
newly elected officers.
Music will be provided by
Richard Reyes.
For more information,
call 352-522-1923.

Sew-Ciety to meet
Monday at cannery
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at
9 a.m. Monday at the Citrus
County Canning Facility,
3405 W Southern St.,
Lecanto.
A guest educator from
Clermont Sewing and Quilt-
ing Shop will teach the con-
struction of a casserole
carrier All sewing enthusi-
asts are welcome.
An RSVP is needed for
this meeting. Call Dee at
352-527-8229.

German American
Club to meet
The German American
Club of West Central
Florida will meet at 7 p.m.


Monday at the Knights of
Columbus Hall, 2389 W
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Lecanto.
After a brief business
meeting, there will be a so-
cial hour in the spirit of the
season with Christmas
music, stollen, cookies and
more. We also collect un-
wrapped donations for the
Toys for Tots campaign.
Members are encouraged
to attend and guests are al-
ways welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-637-2042 or
352-746-7058.

Nordic sons to have
Juletrefest Dec. 15
The Sons of Norway, Sun
Viking Lodge 607, will have
a Christmas party at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15, at the
Regency Oaks Civic Associa-
tion clubhouse, 4445 Break-
water Blvd., Spring Hill.
Everyone is welcome to
join the group for Juletre-
fest and the traditional Nor-
wegian Christmas dinner
including roast pork,
mashed potatoes, mixed
vegetables, gravy, surkal,
riskrem, Norwegian cook-
ies, tea, coffee and soft
drinks. There will be a chil-
dren's program.
Cost is $15 for adults, $8
for ages 13 to 16 and chil-
dren 12 younger are free.
For reservations, call Gail
at 727-863-3145 or Sallie at
352-686-9506 by Wednesday

Mended Hearts to
have holiday party
The Citrus County Chap-
ter of Mended Hearts will
have its annual holiday
party at 10 a.m. Friday,
Dec. 13, in the Gulf Room at
the historic Citrus High
School (old red brick build-
ing). Additional parking is
available in lot 2A across
from the main entrance,
with shuttle service
available.
Members and guests are
reminded to bring some-
thing festive to eat. Also


bring unwrapped toys for
donation to charity (female
members for girls, male
members for boys).
Mended Hearts is a na-
tional nonprofit support or-
ganization that includes
heart patients, spouses,
caregivers, health profes-
sionals and others inter-
ested in helping patients
with emotional recovery
from heart disease. With 280
community-based chapters
nationwide, Mended Hearts
has 24,000 members, making
it the largest heart-related
patient support group.
Meetings are open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, call President Millie
King at 352-637-5525 or car-
diovascular services 352-
344-6416.

Thinkers welcome
Cassadaga guests
New Age Thinkers will
meet at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 14, at the Unity Church
of Citrus, 2628 W Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Guest speakers are
Richard Russell and Debra
Jordan, spiritual leaders
and healers from the Cas-
sadaga Spiritualist Camp.
The special holiday season
presentation will be
"Returning to Love."
Meetings are open to
everyone.
Visit wwwNewAge
Thinkers.org or call Donna
at 352-628-3253.

Shuffleboarders
to get together
The Beverly Hills Shuffle-
board Club will have a holi-
day get-together at 5:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 13, at Apple-
bee's in Inverness.
All members are urged to
attend. Bring an unwrapped
toy to be donated to an or-
ganization.
The group will also deco-
rate a Christmas tree begin-
ning at noon that day at the
Lake Beverly Park. Games
will begin at 1:30 p.m.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 C7


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(G 109 65 109 44 53 (2013) RobLowe '14' '14' '14' '14' '14'
Q ]J 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. ISponge. Sponge. Spoe. Sone. Korra Turtles Full H'se Full H'se FullH'se FullH'se Friends IFriends
103 62 103 -Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now?
QXYl 44 123 ** "Enough" (2002) 'PG-13' I*) "The Back-up Plan" (2010) Jennifer Lopez. ** "Enough" (2002) Jennifer Lopez.
( 340 241 340 ***4 "The Big Lebowski" (1998, Comedy) Masters of Sex "Fallout" Time of Death (Season **Y "Sinister" (2012, Horror) Ethan Hawke,
340 241 340 4 Jeff Bridges. (In Stereo)'R'N c'MA' Finale) (N)'MA' Vincent D'Onofrio. Premiere. 'R'
37 3 7 27 36 ** "Ghost Rider" (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage. **Yn "The Longest Yard" (2005, Comedy) Adam Sandier. Prisoners train ** "Ghost Rider"
37 43 37 27 36 Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13' for a football game against the guards. 'G-13' (2007) Nicolas Cage.
"Hope **Yi "A Knight's Tale" (2001) Heath Ledger. A peasant *** "Shanghai Calling" (2012) *** "Premium Rush" (2012)
1$ IJ 370 271 370 Springs" poses as a Knight for a shot at jousting glory. Daniel Henney'PG-13' Joseph Gordon-Levitt.'PG-13'
36 31 36 iCollege Basketball Future Inside the NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls. Inside the Insidethe SEC Gridiron LIVE
36 31 36 Phenoms Heat From the United Center in Chicago. Heat HEAT
31 59 31 2 ** "Haunted High" (2012, Horror) Danny WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) (In Stereo) Haven "When the Being Human'14'
31 59 31 26 29 Trejo, Charisma Carpenter.'NR' Bough Breaks" (N)
TB 49 23 49 16 19 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Fam. Guy ** "Four Christmases" (2008) 'PG-13' ** "Fred Claus" (2007) VinceVaughn.
S 19 3 19 3 3 **** "Forbidden Planet" (1956, Science ** "Blonde Venus" (1932, Drama) Marlene ***Yn "Cleopatra" (1934, Historical Drama)
169 53 169 30 35 Fiction) Walter Pidgeon.'G' c (DVS) Dietrich, Herbert Marshall.'NR' B Claudette Colbert.'NR' c
53 7 3 2 Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) Gold Rush "Ready to Bering Sea Gold (N) (In Gold Rush "Ready to
53 34 53 24 26 CG' c'G'c c'PG'c Roll" (N)'PG'm Stereo)'14'c Roll"'PG'c
TL 50 46 50 29 30 Say Yes Say Yes SayYes Say Yes Sa Yes Say Yes Say Yes SayYes Four Weddings'PG' Say Yes SayYes
.I 350 26 350 *** "DickTracy" (1990, Crime Drama) Warren *** "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" *** "Mean Girls" (2004) Lindsay "Jack"
350 261 350 Beatty (In Stereo) 'PG' c (2012) Logan Lerman.'PG-13'c Lohan.'PG-13' m
S 48 3 8 3 3 Castle "Kill the Castle "Love Me Dead" *** "Catch Me if You Can" (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio. A teenage *** "Crimson Tide"
48 33 48 31 34 Messenger"'PG' 'PG' scam artist poses as a pilot, surgeon and lawyer. 'PG-13' (1995)'R' cc
TOO 38 58 38 33 Movie Uncle Adven Teen iMAD'PG' King/Hill Cleveland American iAmerican Fam.Guy Fam.Gu
TA 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures The Dead Files'PG' The Dead Files'PG'
ij 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Pawn IPawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage
L 32 49 32 34 24 Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Andy Griffith Show Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King
S 47 3 4 171 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern
USJ 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Family Family Family Family Family Family
S 17 6 7 Will & Will& Wi& W ill & My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David My- Wedding- David
race Grace race Grace Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled Tutera: Unveiled
[WN-A) 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother IMother Mother Mother WGN News at Nine Mother IRules


West
* Q J 10 9
V 852
* J 10 9 4
*'7 6


South
1 NT
3 NT


North
* K6
V A 74
* 86532
4 Q93


12-06-13


East
A 5 4 2
S10 9 3
K7
K 8 5 4
South
* 8 7 3
V K Q J 6
* AQ
4 A J 10 2


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
West North Fast
Pass 2 NT Pass
Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4- Q


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Rex Stout, an author of detective fiction
whose most famous character is Nero Wolfe,
said, "To read of a detective's daring finesse or
ingenious stratagem is a rare joy"
Bridge players sometimes take a daring fi-
nesse that involves an ingenious stratagem.
The finesse in today's deal isn't daring, though.
The key point is how to take that finesse.
South is in three no-trump. West leads the
spade queen. How should South plan the play?
If you and your partner use two no-trump as
a transfer response, responder must start with
two clubs and rebid two no-trump to invite
game.
South starts with six top tricks: four hearts,
one diamond and one club. The spade lead is
annoying, but South must cover with dummy's
king and hope for the best. Here, East wins
with his ace and returns a spade, and the de-
fenders collect the first four tricks. Declarer
discards two diamonds from the board, but
what does he throw from his hand?
South must realize that if the club finesse is
losing, he is going down. But if it is winning, he
can take four hearts, one diamond and four
clubs. So, although it risks several undertricks,
declarer must ditch his diamond queen.
Let's assume West shifts to the diamond jack.
South wins with his ace and plays a heart to
the ace. He is in the dummy for the only time
and might need to take the club finesse three
times. The normal strategy is first to lead the
lowest card that can hold the trick, assuming
the finesse is winning.
Declarer must run the club nine. Then he fi-
nesses the club queen, plays a club to his jack,
and claims.
3 K f ;jTo THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Can they work I havethem
on C an. t Ihywr have them
one letter to each square, faster? We need to working as if
to form four ordinary words, E get this trench filled their lives
Sf ry up with water before depended on it.
BALMU the next attack. /
BA LI '-

-^_ J -- -___ _-_

TIGDI
ID ML VI1
E IkMza..


WHEN IT CAME TO
PROTECTING THFIR
CASTLE, THEY WERE --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ABATE UPPER INJURE SCREWY
I Answer: Their drive along the Mediterranean gave
them a chance to enjoy the "SEA-NERY"


12-6 (0 2P013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: My
boyfriend and I have
been together for two
years, and he moved in six
months ago. "John" is 25
years older than I am. He has
always been supportive and
helpful, but now he is dis-
playing passive-
aggressive
behavior
John was forced
into retirement
last year, and I
think he somehow
blames me. I work
full time, take care
of two teenage
boys, cook dinner
every night, do
dishes and laun-
dry, clean the bath- ANI
rooms, buy the MAIL
groceries and pay
the bills. John sweeps and
vacuums and does the yard
work, which is a godsend be-
cause I have had shoulder is-
sues that make these things
difficult for me.
But lately, John has been
pushing all of my buttons. He
throws the towel over the
shower door even though
there is a nearby towel rack.
I know it's a small thing, but
it's a daily nuisance, and he
knows it bugs me. He also
does not squeegee the
shower after he uses it, and
I'm the one who cleans it.
And he leaves the toilet seat
up but only when the toilet
is dirty, which is his way of
telling me it's time to clean it.
He leaves dishes in the sink
instead of loading the dish-
washer, even though I've
asked him to at least leave
them on the counter When
they are piled in the sink, I
have no room to prepare
dinner


1
L


I know these are tiny
things, but they add up, espe-
cially when I'm working all
day while he is watching TV
When he's upset with me, he
gives me the silent treatment,
and often it takes me days to
figure out why I know John is
depressed be-
cause of his retire-
r ment, but he is
well situated,
doesn't have to
pay any bills and
gets home-cooked
meals every day I
love him dearly,
but I am going
nuts walking on
eggshells. What
am I doing wrong?
IE'S Massachusetts
BOX Dear Massachu-
--- setts: Nothing. You
did not live with John before
his retirement and don't re-
ally know whether he was al-
ways like this. His age may
also be a factor in that he
might be less energetic and
capable than he was a year
ago. And depression could
cause him to push you away
in these subtle ways, feeling
he doesn't deserve you.
Please talk to him. Tell him
you love him, but that the cur-
rent situation is making you
worry your feelings aren't re-
ciprocated. Ask him to see his
doctor about depression. Sug-
gest he look into part-time
jobs or activities that will
keep him more active during
the day But if he makes no ef-
fort to address this, the situa-
tion is not likely to improve.
DearAnnie: I recently
missed my 10-year high
school reunion. I found out it
was held in August, and I was
never invited because I am
not on Facebook. When did


social media get so big that
people can't pick up a phone
or write a letter? Curious
Dear Curious: Social media
sites began springing up as
early as the mid-90s. Face-
book was founded in 2004,
and there are now more than
a billion users. Like it or not,
people are more apt to use
such a site for mass invita-
tions rather than pick up a
phone and make dozens of in-
dividual calls. Our readers
have let us know that when
you haven't heard about an
upcoming reunion, you
should contact others and
find out whether you are out
of the loop.
DearAnnie: I'd like to re-
spond to "Too Good of a
Cook," whose grown children
often visited for the weekend
but never offered to help
cook or contribute to the
growing grocery bills.
My mother had many sib-
lings who visited from out of
state. Her rule was, "You are
guests for one day After that
you are living here." So
everyone helped out with the
dishes, cooking, cutting grass,
doing wash and whatever
-J.E

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www.creators.com.


TOBYAN---I



VIETIN 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


WSTOMC
N rURTG


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser

W A' bOONT WE AL LA L"[ SUPPOSE WFSkOULXT :TOP 4 ,FTER ,L, (OU COULO "E.
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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


"That's Lydia's daughter. She's always
been such a smart dresser,"



0 so A o W--? T
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AMour 1WTAOU -
ABOUTp 1, LTBtI S : --- 4__.
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Big Nate


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WOW. NOT ,F-AkLLY.
THAT'S LOTS OF
A GIRLS HAVE
SHOCK. CRUSHES ON
-^ CHIAID.


-E HAPPENS
TO HAVE A C.Q.
THMNT'S OFF THE
CHARTS
? Q7


CUTENESS HEY,
QUOTIENT Ev-ERY-

SSNOW I1'
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TAw


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Best Man Holiday" (R) 1:35 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Delivery Man" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 4:20 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching Fire" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
1:30 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Out of the Furnace" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.


"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) In 3D. 4 p.m.
No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Delivery Man" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Frozen" (PG) In 3D. 1:15 p.m. No passes.
"Homefront" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Hunger Games: Catching Fire" (PG-13)
12 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
TODAY CLUE: a sjernb A


"RIGO SOISBO AIJNOH VBB FZOTH


BTMOR TW FZOX'MO GVNO V


NTWWOHOJDO. FZO GVHTJOR NIJ'F


ZVMO FZVF SHIYBOG."


- HIJVBN


HOVLVJ

Previous Solution: "You have to struggle to stay alive and be of use as long as
you can." "I'd like to die with my boots on." Daniel Berrigan
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-6


YOU'RE Tco i I!
SB~w? YJRE1E sc f&I


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


CS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


COMICS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Classifieds


CLASSIFIED


- -- --..= ,. ,=-=-_


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclon~ne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~c d


VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397
10 CUBIC FOOT
CHEST FREEZER
white 10 cu ft. chest
freezer only used for a
month includes inside
basket and owners
manual 180.00 or B.O.
phone# 352-419-4767
26" Mongoose Bike
new tubes, excel.
cond. $90.
Stringer of 5 Bass
mounted, beautifully
displayed $100.
(352) 628-5085
Antique
Heavy Solid
Brass Bed
$400.
(352) 812-2329
Basset Computer
Desk w/ top shelf, 2
drawers, solid oak,
great shape $100.
Old Singer Sewing
Machine $100
(352) 287-0767
Become an Avon Rep
Today! Free Training.
$10 to join. Call Chuck
(352) 503-4816.
Independ. Avon Rep.
CAMERA
SONY cyber-shot,
DSC-H5; 7.2 megapixel,
12x optical zoom ISO
1000, with Sony steady
shot focus. Extra's
include: 1.7Xtelphoto
lens, high density
& polarized pictures,
tripod, case and
battery charger.
Like new with box
$350 352-503-2661

CAREGIVER

Must be qualified to
work with APD Group
Home clientele.
Needed: a weekend
live-in employee to be
in an ALF in Citrus
Springs Friday
afternoon to Monday
morning. Please call
352-489-6444 or
352-270-2943

CITRUS SPRING
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm
6493 N. Glacier Terr
Washer & Dryer,
Clothes, Household
& MISC. ITEMS
CITRUS SPRINGS
SAT. ONLY 10ato 2p
Holiday Decor & More
591 W Heronsbill Ln
CITRUS SPRINGS
SATURDAY, 7th, 8A-2P
2320 W. Doral Court
Comforter King Set
Ralph Lauren Adiron-
dack Bear Print. Incld
Flannel Sheets. Still in
pkg. Great Gift! $150
obo (518) 802-0220
Couch out of an RV
5th Wheel
Excellent Condition
$150.
352-422-0273
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Family Sale
Fri. & Sat. 8 am -?
Something 4 Everyone
3190 N. Amphibian Pt.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 FAMILY
Sat. & Sun 9am
214 NE 2nd Ave
Behind Post Office
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat 9am -5pm
Super Yard Sale!!
1076 N Citrus Ave


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. Multi Fam.
Clothing, Sm. appl,
dressers, table,
chairs, and more!
9380 W Milwaukee
Ct. off Citrus Ave.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun 8am-5pm
Tools, fishing gear,
deep fryer and more
10960 Bentbow Path







CRYSTAL
RIVER
Sat Dec 7, 8AM-3PM
gas welder, wooden
bench, many tools
and household items,
furniture, clothes and
misc items.
** Ask to see
woodturned items
for Christmas *
10741 W Pinebark
Ln. 31/ miles
on Fort Island Trail
352-794-6439
CRYSTAL RIVER
TODAY*
5847 W. Pine Circle
Time to Let Go of
20 Years Collecting
w FREE ICE TEA
DOLLS, Artistic Repro-
ductions, can email
pictures. Call for appt.
(352) 634-0520
Electric Range
Maytag, 4 burner
glass top, self clean-
ing oven, Black, Good
Condition $100
(352) 220-9787
Gas Grill
4 burners, 2 tanks and
a Wrought Iron table
with 2 chairs
$200 total!
(352) 795-7254

For WSaleIl
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290
Heavy Duty Wheel-
chair, electric, high
back, extra support
seat, slightly used,
cost $4,300. sell $800
(352) 628-5085
HERNANDO
Fri. 6, & Sat. 7th, 8a-3p
2100 N. PAGE AVE.
man tools, household,
clothes & garden
HERNANDO
MOVING SALE*
Everything Must Go!
Fri. & Sat. 8am-12N
490 E. Ireland Court
Beautiful L shape, Ash-
ley couch, dining set,
period bedrm suite,
bkcase, desk, tools,
patio furniture, MORE
HERNANDO
Saturday 9:30 am
Handmade jewelry,
X-mas items, & more.
1299 N Missouri Ter
HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat 8-3
Huae Warehouse
Sale
Antiques, vintage
clothing, furn, oak
entertainment ctr,
jewelry, collectible
glass, tools & more!
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S Tex Point


Today's

Furniture Large Selec-
tion Old, New, Asian,
private, moving, good
prices, 352-586-9498
HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat. 8a-4p.
Riding lawn mowers,
outboard motors,
Fishing gear, genera-
tor, tools, household.
Lots of Good Stuff,
4795 OAKLAWN ST.

HOMOSASSA
LIONS CLUB
INDOOR YARD
SALE.
SAT. Dec 7th,
8am -1pm
Free Diabetes Screen
& Pediavision
SR 490
HOMOSASSA
WALDEN WOODS
COMMUNITY
CRAFT/BAKE SALE
Sat. Dec 7., 10 a-2p
Hand made art and
craft items, including
Goblin, tapestries,
1 mi. S. of US 19 & 98
INVERNESS
*AMAZING SALE*
Saturday Dec. 7th
Appliances, mowers,
jet ski, Lots of Goodies
929 S. Shad Terrace
INVERNESS
BIG YARD SALE
Fri. & Sat. 8-4:30.
5942 E. Calico Lane
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat, 8am-4pm
2 FAMILY SALE *
4807 E. Doeskin Loop




INVERNESS
Inverness Mobile Park
Community Yard Sale
Sat. Dec. 7, 8a-?
550 N. Independence
INVERNESS
Saturday 8am
Hsehold goods more
315 Camellia Ave
LECANTO
Saturday 8a-3p
Dresser, glider, re-
dcliner, Ent. Ctr, lamps,
Oak coffee table-
Too much to list!!
4519W HightowerLn
LECANTO
Saturday, 7th 9a-3p
antiques, xmas items
appliances & MORE
2082 S. Overview Dr.
Maytag
Air conditioner,
portable unit
works great
$75.
(352) 628-5085
Miami Sun
3 Wheel Bicycle
w/ Basket
$165
(352) 812-2329
Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $150
(352) 220-9787
P/T CHILDREN
MINISTER
First Christian
Church of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual to work with
elementary children
To Apply: email
pastorray@tampa
bay.rr.com or Call
352-344-1908
www.fccinv.com
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 6, & Sat. 7, 8a-3p
Toys, sm. girls bicycles,
furn., golf clubs, &
nice variety of things.
2373 W. Apricot Drive


Sudoku ***** 4puz.com

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3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our
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.-eU li y&352-625-7519


SFRIEE IEST
Permit And i B uumII
I Engineering Fees IRl
SUp to $200 value I '

SSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms Decks Windows' Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


INVERNESS
Saturday 9am-3pm
2542 E Newhaven St
PINE RIDGE
Saturday Only 8a-12p
HUGE SALE*
3858 W. Douglas Fir Cr.
PINE RIDGE
Sun. Dec. 8th, 8a-lp
*MULIT FAMILY SALE*
Houeshld. equestrian,
children's items MORE
2623 N. Horseback Av.
PONTOON
1990 24 ft Harris. 2005
50 HP Honda; Factor
Hard top, $5500
(352) 795-0553
PONTOON
1993 20 ft Tracker
60 Evenrude, w/tilt,
trailer. All in great
shape. Bimini, bait
well, fish finder, seats
13. $3250 352-201-8120
PONTOON
24 ft, HT, 88 HP
Ev., interior redone;
With Trailer $4200 or
$3400 for boat only
(352) 476-3688
PONTOON
24 FT Gruman, 55
Yahama, Good Con-
dition, Bimini, No
trailer, $2100 OBO
352-201-8120
PU Truck Bed Cover
for 8ft, BedTilt top
fiberglass w/ lock,
perfect condition
Asking $250.
(352) 220-9787
SNOWBIRD RE-
TREAT
Homosassa Waterfront
3 bed 1-1/2 bath home
w/new carpet/paint/tile
on canal leading to Halls
River. Private fishing.
$775 mo. 1st/last/sec.
Negotiable
352-400-2490
352-419-2437
Sugarmill Woods
ESTATE SALE
Fri. 1216, 8am- 3pm
ESTATE BLOW OUT
TODAY ONLY *
Everything Must Go.
Household, Furniture
Etc. CASH ONLY!
181 Pine Street
VERY NICE THOMAS-
VILLE ARMOIRE simple
design light color $200
352-897-4154
Washer& Dryer
Kenmore 400. Like
New. $300/Set, Firm.
60 Gal. Commercial Air
Compressor $400
(352) 621-6892 aft 6pm


WATCH SUPER BOWL
65" Mitsubishi HD TV
$200
68" H x 59" W x 28"D
Problem free-Includes
manuals
Call 352-503-3467
Whirlpool Gold 25 cf
refrig,side x side,
water/ice in doorglass
shelves.GE glass top
range.GE over range
microwave.AII in ex-
cellent
cond.White.$675 for
all. Call 352-489-1239
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances- Gas/Elec.
AC Units, BBQ Grills,
Lawn Tractors &
Riding Mowers
352-270-4087

Look
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Bull Mastador
2 yr & 4 yr.
Mom & Daughter
Loves kids & Toys
needs room to run
(352) 726-6234
Free Birds
to good home
call for info:
(352) 634-2781
Free Fire wood
You cut and remove
(352) 621-9810
Free Firewood
Cut & Split
Take all you want
(352) 564-0929
Free Firewood
You Pk up
(352) 628-5168


Free Hamsters
Black,
(352) 637-1401
FREE KITTENS
2 females, black, fluffy
(352) 436-7996
Free Kittens
5 mo. old
1 male, 1 female
Black and White
(352) 637-2030
Free
Pitt/Terrior mix,
3 yrs. old,
Chow, 5 yrs. old
Male, can be
separated
352-476-6710,
476-6704
Golden
Retriever/Choc Lab
Mix. Seven Males
Father is pedigreed
Just in time for X-mas
(352) 563-1206
TELEVISION
50 Inch Sony TV,
needs
projection bulb
352-476-0388



ALWAYS FRESH CITRUS
HARRISON GROVE
FLORAL CITY
(352) 726-1154
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone Crabi) $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
mustard/collard
greens,squash, more
GIFT SHIPPING
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.


AUlT tuat. range
striped w/ freckles.
Ans wers to Tobias.
Lost on 11/28 Brandy-
wine & Cardinal
Lecanto REWARD
352-628-0789
Lost Chihuahua,
male, golden brown,
Name "Taco"
Mini Farms Area
REWARD
(352) 489-1436
Lost Gold Chain
Late Husbands
with wedding band &
gold cross, Dunnellon
Chinese buffet park-
ing Lot (352) 489-6761


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.






Paid Weekly





OOOGiTV


Lost Keys
in Big Lots Shopping
Center Inverness
(352) 344-0379
Lost Terrier Mix
white face, brown w/
white spots on back
Lecanto area
(352) 364-3227
Yorkshire Terrier
Male, 5 Ibs, chipped,
answers to Jack. Lost
in Lecanto. Belongs to
an sick elderly women
who loves him dearly.
(352) 302-8908




Found Chihuahua,
male, Fawn color
Citrus Hills
(352) 527-6951
Found in Howard's
Flea market. Small
Female dog black
with tan legs & eye-
brows (352) 593-6857
Found Young Pitt Bull
Mason Creek area
Call to identify
(352) 628-4005





Adopt a
pescued Pet 4







as^CM Hi~'1

View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.corn or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday, 10a 12p
PetSupermarket
(exceptions below)
Sat. 12/14
11am rmn
PETCO
Lady Lakes
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness


FREE REMOVAL
Would like to thank all
of Citrus County for
your patronage in
2013. I will be fully op-
erational again start-
ing Jan 6,2014. I want
to wish you all a safe
& joyous holiday sea-
son. See you in 2014

I CAT I
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.


Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
florida.com
Crystal River Mall
Thursday-Sunday
12pm-4pm
Greta's Touch
Grooming Floral City,
Sat 10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
Low Cost
spay/neuter vouch-
ers are avail.
726-4700 for Info.




He?^


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


If interested in any of

the following areas





Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River, FL 34429


S CTRUS US wCoiUENTY_


CHPONICLE
"Iwww ronlcloonllui.com


To place an ad, call 563=5966
. ............. 7___ __ *


3 21 6 7 5 8 94-
567 4.8 9123'
984312765
6 52j93 1-4178
7.4 915 28 3 16
8 1317 4 6915,2
436 2,97 581
278154639
195 863 247


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 C9




C0O FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone Crab $6.001b
delivered 352-897-5001







TEACHER

Fulltime, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444







Office/Cashier

apply in person:
12430 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness














Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966







CAREGIVER

Must be qualified to
work with APD Group
Home clientele.
Needed: a weekend
Ive-in employee to be
in an ALF in Citrus
Springs Friday
afternoon to Monday
morning. Please call
352-489-6444 or
352-270-2943



DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
.ahoo com



Exercise
Specialist/Trainer

Assist patients with
muscular strength
and flexibility. Explain
and demonstrate in
detail stretches and
exercises assigned
by doctor. Perform
functional diagnostic
testing. 30-35-hrs. wk.
Requirements:
Knowledge of
human anatomy and
physiology a must.
Massage Therapist or
Personal Trainer
(current license not
necessary).
Forward Resume
with references to:
frontdesk@
nbccdro.com
Hourly rate discussed
at interview



FT position for
Busy Medical
Office:

Professional phone
skills, customer
service, attention to
detail, and positive.
Fax resume to
352-746-5605.


In Home
Health Care

Sat &Sun 10 hr shifts.
Private Duty in Inver-
ness home for 90 Yr
old female with
dementia. Lifting
throughout shift is
necessary. Must be
compassionate, soft
spoken, physically
capable and non
smoker. Starting
$11/hr. Apply with
credentials,
resume, references,
and background
check. Call Jeanie
(352) 637-1793
between 9am-7pm


LEAD COOK
Full Time

* Assists w/ ordering
* Inventory of Food
* Contributes team-
work
PleaeAolvwithin

Assisted Living
231 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl.


MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST

Busy medical office
looking for exp.
receptionist. Must be
familiar with billing &
able to multi task.
Fax resume to:
352-746-5784


SURGICAL
ASSISTANT

EFFICIENT &
DETAIL ORIENTED?

CHECK THIS OUT!

Progressive Oral Sur-
gery Practice looking
to add F/T experience
surgical assistant.
Benefits incl. health
insurance & pension
Mail resume to:
6129W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429


Ultrasound Tech
For OB Dr Ofc
FT/PT
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877


Restauran


Sous Chef

Needed for casual
upscale Country
Club. Culinary skills
and kitchen
management exp
necessary. Send
resume to: careers
@citrushills.com


Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
SOUS CHEF and
LINE COOKS

Apply in Person at:
505 E Hartford St.
Mon-Sat between
2:00-5:00pm.






FIREWORK
Sales Crew &
Independent Setup
Crew Needed

Start Immediately
Training avail. 4 to 5
people. Sales exp.
a plus. Commission,
Background check
Email Application
greenunlimited
@yahoo.com
352-464-1416


Trades/


SERVICE
PLUMBERS

Must have driver's
license. Apply at
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa


CITRUS MAIDS

CLEANING PERSON
Needed. PT and FT.
flexible schedule req.
for early morn. hrs. &
Sat. lic/vehicle. Exp.
a plus. Leave mes-
sage (352) 257-0925

P/T CHILDREN
MINISTER

First Christian
Church of Inverness
is looking for individ-
ual to work with
elementary children
To Apply: email
pastorray@tampa
bay.rr.com or Call
352-344-1908
www.fccinv.com
TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547

Schools/
Instruction






SPRING HILL
CLASSES
LAST CLASS
OF 2013
COSMETOLOGY
December 16TH
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
FUIML E &PARTTIME

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structures llc.com


3 HEAVY BLACK
IRONS & METAL KET-
TLE Nice decorator item
Vg Shape $60/all
352-897-4154

Antique
Heavy Solid
Brass Bed
$400.
(352) 812-2329

TABLE SOLID PECAN
(cocktail)Excellent con-
dition has removable
glass tray $100.
352-621-0175




2 MADAME ALEXAN-
DER 18" DOLLS New in
orig. boxes. 1 brunette,
1 blonde. Ong $50;$20
each. Call 527-2598.

5 new Rose Splendor
Barbie Dolls +. 4 Cauca-
sian, 1 Afnrcan/Amer.
ong $50/ now $20 each.
(352) 527-2598.

60'S DON QUIXOTE
WOODEN WALL
PLAQUE 6 ft h and 3d
great decorator item
$70 352-897-4154

DOLL CARRYING
CASES New. Great for
Madame Alexander
dolls or others. $8 each.
Call (352) 527-2598.

DOLLS, Artistic Repro-
ductions, can email
pictures. Call for appt.
(352) 634-0520

IN TIME FOR
GIFT-GIVING
new DISNEY Tinkerbell
Watch in box pink $10.
Call (352) 527-2598.

INTERESTING 70'S
KIDNEY SHAPED COF-
FEE TABLE dk color vi-
nyl type top $40
352-897-4154

NEW COLLECTIBLE
WATCH Snoopy Save
the Planet. Lg. face,
suede-like band, in box
$10. (352) 527-2598.

WEDGEWOOD
Lavender-on-Cream
grapevine dishes never
used
$30 352-270-3527




Almond Appliances
Side by side Refriger-
ator Electric Coil
Range/ Dish Washer,
Washer & Dryer Priced
as a package $800
(352) 270-4087

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

Dishwasher $100
&
Washer & Dryer
$100. ea
(352) 419-5922

Dishwasher
Elite Whirlpool, BIk
front, like new. All
cycles & manuals.
$280. Call Walter
(352) 527-3552

Dishwasher,
Whirlpool "plus"
model; all cycles
+ china, white,
excelcond. $100
(352) 228-4837


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Electric Range
Maytag, 4 burner
glass top, self clean-
ing oven, Black, Good
Condition $100
(352) 220-9787
GE SPECTRA ELEC-
TRIC RANGE Digital
Oven needs $30 Ele-
ment Four Element
Stove $90 341-0450
Maytag
Air conditioner,
portable unit
works great
$75.
(352) 628-5085
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dyers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
$100 ea
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER AND DRYER
$295.00 Reliable,Clean,
Like New, Excellent
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Delivery/Set
up. 352 263-7398
Whirlpool Gold 25 cf
refrig,side x side,
water/ice in doorglass
shelves.GE glass top
range.GE over range
microwave.AII in ex-
cellent
cond.White.$675 for
all. Call 352-489-1239





ABSOLUTE
ON-SITE
AUCTION
12940 SW 66 ST
OCALA
Information
(352) 489-3836
SAT. DEC 7th,
AUCTION starts
at 10A.M
PREVIEW 9A.M.
Too many items to
list!
10% Buyers Pre-
mium.
Auctioneer
James Tate.
AU2266/AB1641
Visa, M/C accepted







DUDLEY'S
AMUCKIN

SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12-5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41S @ hall (out) 3Dm.
(in) 6om
**Two auctions in
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12-6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00m
3101 W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00Om 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness.
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat

Call for info
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


PROFILE PROJECTOR
EP01 LP6 $100
Tom (Homosassa)
352-494-1214 phone
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $95
HANDHELD HEAVY
DUTY INVERNESS
419-5981
SHOPSMITH MARK
V-500 wall attach-
ments & wall mount
holders $350;
Hotsy Pressure Washer
Rated 2.2GPM @ 1000
Ibs, runs on kerosine
or diesel $450
(352) 621-0747




HOME THEATRE
SPEAKER British 3
Driver MTM 100W Cen-
ter, Black with Silver
Grille $100 341-0450
HOME THEATRE
SPEAKER Danish
Co-Axial 150W Center,
SEAS speaker, Solid
Oak $100 341-0450
JVC DVD PLAYER -
VCR COMBO
HR-XVC11B used few
hours,Mom doesn't
need,nice $60 341-0450
LARGE HOME
SUB-WOOFER 12inch
NHT Subwoofer, NO
Amp, 5 cubic foot Oak
Box $100 341-0450
Mitsubishi
Projection TV
63" Model -WD 62527,
w/ Extra Lamp,
Good Cond. $150
(352) 220-9787
Sony 50" LCD
Projection TV
Good condition
$350. obo
(352) 489-5079
STEREO SPEAKER
PARTS NEW, GRS
8FR-8inch 85Watt
woofer, Nuance
Tweeter, In Your Box.
$50 341-0450
SUB-WOOFER AMPLI-
FIER Home Use, 250
Watts, Adjustable Vol-
ume, Phase and Cross-
over $100 341-0450
WATCH SUPER BOWL
65" Mitsubishi HD TV
$200
68" H x 59" W x 28"D
Problem free-Includes
manuals
Call 352-503-3467




HP DESKTOP PC
a1430n Dual core 2GHz
CPU 1GB RAM 250GB
No Internet, Clean $80
341-0450
VIEWSONIC 19 INCH
LCD DISPLAY
Widescreen PC,
Game, TV use includes
cable $100 341-0450




5 PC FIREPIT OlD
CONVERSATION SET
4 5" cushioned rocker
chairs with 48"
firepit/ice keeper table
with marble-look
inserts. $400
352-527-0942
Wheel Chair
Light weight,
exc condition
$65
(352) 527-1877




4 RUSTIC DK PINE
ARMCHAIRS very
comfy and sturdy
$100/all 352-897-4154
30" BAR STOOLS 4
green wrought iron
swivel-seat bar stools
with microfiber pad-
ded seat. Rarely used.
$75 each or 4/$250.
352-527-0942
Barrel Chairs
(2) Like new, light tan
rich Brazilian leather.
Elegant style and
higher end. Value
priced @ $375/pr
(firm). In Citrus Hills
Call 560-3474
6-8pm only
DESK -KIDS HEIGHT
Large Top, Custom
Made Oak Desk with
Pencil and Side Draw-
ers $100 341-0450


Dinette Table and 4
upholstered caster
chairs. Very good
cond $125
(352) 860-0124
DINING ROOM SET
Round Pedestal Table
with 4 ladder chairs,
light colored wood. I
yr old, clean $250
(352) 746-2479
Dining Room Set
9 pc. blonde, glass
top tbl, 6 uphol. chairs
china cab. & server
very good cond.
$400. (352) 419-4265
DINNING SET
White table 73'x38'
with 8 chairs; China
closet w/ glass drs. 73"
x 42" wide. Exc Cond.
$650 (352) 341-3083
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER [BLONDE]
L48H50W18 with 19
RCA TV. $75.00
352-344-8212
ETHAN ALLEN 4
ARMCHAIRS Solid
comfy dk pine VG cond
$100/all 352-897-4154
Furniture Large Selec-
tion Old, New, Asian,
private, moving, good
prices, 352-586-9498
GUN CABINET holds
8guns/2 drawers/ dark
wood/custom made
$75.00 352-860-0759
Kitchen Hutch
cream colored, exc
condition Call for
Texted Pic $75
746-0183/422-0311
LEATHER RECLINER
large/light
butterscotch/good
condition/$100.00
352-860-0759
Light Oak
Curio Cabinet
Glass front & sides
46"x76", Like New
$300.(352) 628-5727 or
(423) 667-3601
LOVE SEAT / LIKE
NEW LIGHT
COLORS,MUST
SELL/50.00 Linda
341-2271
LOVESEAT
reclines fair, soft leather
burgandy $75
352-503-7668
Maple Dinette Set
$150
Slider chair with Stool
$100.
(352) 419-5922
Maroon Rocker/Swivel
Recliner$125.
SmI Wooden Table
w/drop leaf & 2 chairs
$50.(352) 613-3114


NIEATIUE vJD
TRUNK larger with high
gloss finish med color
$80 firm
352-897-4154
SEW MACHINE
CABINET new in
box/light colored. $95.00
352-860-0759
SIDE CHAIR Black with
gold detail, wicker, re-
movable cushion can
text pic $35.00 call or
text Ron 352-746-0401
TWIN BEDS 2
twin-beds w/nice head-
boards and box springs,
bed linens and pillows.
Also a dresser. All for
$300. Call
352-513-4516; may be
seen at Terra Vista.
VERY NICE THOMAS-
VILLE ARMOIRE simple
design light color $200
352-897-4154




91/2 x 5 TRAILER
$600
(352) 746-7357
AERATOR SPREADER
combo Craftsman tow
behind fits pin hitch can
text pic. $90 call or text
Ron 352-746-0401
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
STEEL DUMP CART
Craftsman 12 cufttow
behind, fits pin hitch can
text pic $95.00 call or
text Ron 352-7460401
SUN SHADE Craftsman
should fit many lawn
tractors in good cond.
$50.00 can text pic call,
text 352-746-0401
YARD THATCHER
Craftsman tow behind
fits pin hitch can text pic-
ture $40.00 call or text
Ron 352-746-0401




BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. DEC7th
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. DEC 7th
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat., 9am-3pm
* HUGE YARD SALE*
5484 W. Corral Place
CITRUS SPRING
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm
6493 N. Glacier Terr
Washer & Dryer,
Clothes, Household
& MISC. ITEMS
Citrus Springs
Fri & Sat 8a-4p
Indian River Canoe,
Furn., Xmas, & more
7902 N Sarazen Dr
CITRUS SPRINGS
SAT. ONLY 10a to 2p
Holiday Decor & More
591 W Heronsbill Ln
CITRUS SPRINGS
SATURDAY, 7th, 8A-2P
2320 W. Doral Court
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Family Sale
Fri. & Sat. 8 am ?
Something 4 Everyone
3190 N. Amphibian Pt.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 FAMILY
Sat. & Sun 9am
214 NE 2nd Ave
Behind Post Office
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat 9am -5pm
Super Yard Sale!!
1076 N Citrus Ave

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. Multi Fam.
Clothing, Sm. appl,
dressers, table,
chairs, and more!
9380 W Milwaukee
Ct. off Citrus Ave.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Huge Holiday Sale
Thurs. & Fri., 9A.- 4P.
334 N. Pompeo Ave.








CRYSTAL

RIVER
Sat Dec 7, 8AM-3PM
gas welder, wooden
bench, many tools
and household items,
furniture, clothes and
misc items.
** Asktosee
woodturned items
for Christmas *

10741 W Pinebark
Ln. 3%2 miles
on Fort Island Trail
352-794-6439


4na D~n~ory


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179






Mature Male Care
Giver, for Seniors and
People w/ Disability
Edward 352-419-8387


Retired Lady with 30+
years Homecare exp.
Help w/ personal care
companship Dee Dee,
352-249-4429


Transportation and/or
Asst. with shopping,
errands, appt., & air-
port runs. Lic/Ins. w/
refs. (352) 613-0078







SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518







JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
M5257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 *k*
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
& AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
& AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 12/31/13
Lic# CAC1817447




Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
**Call 352-560-7609**
RESIDENTIAL
CLEANING
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
503-9671 OR 364-1773


Hom

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


Painting

'ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
***352-639-1024***


RV Service


1 -i, teH MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
q 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
p MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
^ VRVTC Certified Tech
r/t ~352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
GREG'S MARCITE NATURE COAST RV
Florida Gem, Diamond RV service. parts. sales
Brite Marcite, FREE EST. Mobile Repair/Maint.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.















TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955








Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


12-6 @ Laughingstock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013

"I'll need a full-length photograph

with this loan application."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sat & Sun 8am-5pm
Tools, fishing gear,
deep fryer and more
10960 Bentbow Path
CRYSTAL RIVER
Thurs to Sun 8a-5p
Big Multi-Family Sale
Dishes, tools, Decor
9380 W Chata Place
CRYSTAL RIVER
TODAY *
5847 W. Pine Circle
Time to Let Go of
20 Years Collecting
FREE ICE TEA
CRYSTAL RIVER
Touch of Class Corvette
Club annual charity yard
sale. 407 NE 1st St Dec
7 8AM-1PM at Oesterle
& Co 407 NE 1st St
across from post office.
FLORAL CITY
Sat. & Sun. 8:30 4p
3 FAMILY SALE *
11390S. Istachatta Rd
Lots of Collectibles
& Antiques, including
mini horses, musical
instruments and MORE
HERNANDO
Fri & Sat 8am-4pm
Pool & ping pong
tables, Appls, Furn.
4050 E Shorewood Dr
HERNANDO
Fri 8a-4p & Sat8a-2p
Sale in the Barn-A big
one! Furn dining
room set, end tables,
pictures, lamps. ETC.
All from our 2nd
home. Very clean
and priced right.
2105 E Hercala Lane
486 & Page Ave
Follow the signs
HERNANDO
Fri. 6, & Sat. 7th, 8a-3p
2100 N. PAGE AVE.
man tools, household,
clothes & garden
HERNANDO
MOVING SALE*
Everything Must Go!
Fri. &Sat. 8am-12N
490 E. Ireland Court
Beautiful L shape, Ash-
ley couch, dining set,
period bedrm suite,
bkcase, desk, tools,
patio furniture, MORE
HERNANDO
Saturday 9:30 am
Handmade jewelry,
X-mas items, & more.
1299 N Missouri Ter



HERNANDO,
FLORIDA 34442
5237 N. Tiger Eye Dnrive
Estate Sale
Saturday December 7th
and Sunday December
8th from 9am to 4pm.
Entire household for
sale, furniture and all
household and yard
items. All items in good
shape and nearly new.
HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat 8-3
Huae Warehouse
Sale
Antiques, vintage
clothing, furn, oak
entertainment ctr,
jewelry, collectible
glass, tools & more!
Crosby Sq. Storage
6411 S Tex Point

HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat. 8a-4p.
Riding lawn mowers,
outboard motors,
Fishing gear, genera-
tor, tools, household.
Lots of Good Stuff,
4795 OAKLAWN ST.

HOMOSASSA
LIONS CLUB
INDOOR YARD
SALE.
SAT. Dec 7th,
8am -1pm
Free Diabetes Screen
& Pediavision
SR 490

HOMOSASSA
MOVING SALE
Fr 6th, Sat 7th 8a to 2p
LIKE NEW ITEMS!
11579 W Rosa Court
Gasparilla Cay at end
of Halls River Road
HOMOSASSA
WALDEN WOODS
COMMUNITY
CRAFT/BAKE SALE
Sat. Dec 7., 10 a-2p
Hand made art and
craft items, including
Goblin, tapestries,
1 mi. S. of US 19 & 98
INVERNESS
307 S. Cedarwood Way
Duck/x-mas/household
item. December 7th
from 9am-2pm

YARD SALE
INVERNESS
4604 S. Eiden Point -
Beginning 8am on 12/7.
Moving Sale, everyth-
ing must go! Dealers
welcome.
INVERNESS
6507 E. Mobile Street
MOVING SALE 12/7
lINVERNESS
8745 E Rosemont Ct.
Neighborhood Yard
Sale 5 fam hes Fn &
Sat 8:00 3:00

INVERNESS
AMAZING SALE *
Saturday Dec. 7th
Appliances, mowers,
jet ski, Lots of Goodies
929 S. Shad Terrace
INVERNESS
BIG YARD SALE
Fri. & Sat. 8-4:30.
5942 E. Calico Lane
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 8am-2pm
village, tools
401 W Inverness Blvd
INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, Dec 6 & 7
8am to 1pm
LARGE MULTI-FAMILY
YARD SALE
1307 Old Floral City Rd
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat, 8am-4pm
2 FAMILY SALE **
4807 E. Doeskin Loop
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
205 Cabot Street
Christmas & Hshold.
Items. No early birds.


INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat., 8a to Ip
610 N. Gray Fox Pt.
off Independence





INVERNESS
Inverness Mobile Park
Community Yard Sale
Sat. Dec. 7, 8a-?
550 N. Independence
INVERNESS
Saturday 8am
Hsehold goods more
315 Camellia Ave
INVERNESS
Saturday 9am-3pm
2542 E Newhaven St


Ii;NTd_
2860 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy Sat Dec 7, 8 to
4:30. Twin bedroom
set, 2 small refrigera-
tors, xmas decorations,
clothes, leather recliner,
kitchen items, misc.
LECANTO
Saturday 8a-2p
1048 N Crause Pt
LECANTO
Saturday 8a-3p
Dresser, glider, re-
cliner, Ent. Ctr, lamps,
Oak coffee table-
Too much to list!!
4519W Hightower Ln
LECANTO
Saturday, 7th 9a-3p
antiques, xmas items
appliances & MORE
2082 S. Overview Dr.
LECANTO
Thur, Fri, Sat 8am to ?
tools, shopequipment
& much morel
7240 S. Dayton Pt.
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 6, & Sat. 7, 8a-3p
Toys, sm. girls bicycles,
furn., golf clubs, &
nice variety of things.
2373 W. Apricot Drive
PINE RIDGE
Saturday Only 8a-12p
HUGE SALE*
3858 W. Douglas Fir Cr.
PINE RIDGE
Sun. Dec. 8th, 8a-1p
*MULIT FAMILY SALE*
Houeshld. equestrian,
children's items MORE
2623 N. Horseback Av.




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat 8a-5p
3 bedrooms & com-
plete household
West Woodside Cir
Alestatesales.ora

Suqarmill Woods
ESTATE SALE
Fri. 12/6, 8am- 3pm
ESTATE BLOWOUT
TODAY ONLY*
Everything Must Go.
Household, Furniture
Etc. CASH ONLY!
181 Pine Street



Mans tan leather
coat.Size 46. Made in
Argentina. $25
352-628-1783
MANS VEST mans new
black leather vest,size
extra large made in
u.s.a. $25.00
352-628-1783
SCRUBS 8 sets as
sorted color/sizes: tops
12 bottoms 14/like new
$10.00 a set
352-860-0759



MONITOR 23" flat panel
acer 4 years old good
color $80.00
3523823895



3 DOUBLE ROLLS
PREPASTED VINYL
WALLCOVERING $25
FLORAL DESIGN 165
SQ FT 419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HEARTS/BUNNIES/
MICKEY PAINT FOR
PRESENTS 419-5981
26" Mongoose Bike
new tubes, excel.
cond. $90.
Stringer of 5 Bass
mounted, beautifully
displayed $100.
(352) 628-5085
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Basset Computer
Desk w/ top shelf, 2
drawers, solid oak,
great shape $100.
Old Singer Sewing
Machine $100
(352) 287-0767
BEALLS GIFT CARD
100.00/selling for 80.00
Will verify Linda
341-2271
BEALLS GIFT CARDS
60.00 each/selling 50.00
each
Linda 341-2271
BICYCLE BASKET BY
BELL WHITE, EASY
CLIP ON, NEW- $15
352-270-3527
BLACK DECKER 18V
BATTERY Fits Cord-
less Tools/ Hedger $20
352-270-3527
BLACK DECKER
HEDGER 22" Blade re-
placement (new $40)
$20 352-270-3527
BLACK RUBBER
RIDING BOOTS $15
WOMEN SIZE 10
LIKE NEW CAN E-MAIL
PHOTO 419-5981
CAMERA
SONY cyber-shot,
DSC-H5; 7.2 megapixel,
12x optical zoom ISO
1000, with Sony steady
shot focus. Extra's
include: 1.7X telphoto
lens, high density
& polanzed pictures,
tnpod, case and
battery chargers
Like new with box
$350 352-503-2661
CHRISTMAS TREE
Brand New 7 1/2 ft white
metal with multi-colored
lights and 3 settings.$50
352-322-1160
CHRISTMAS TREE
Brand New 7 1/2 ft white
metal with multi-colored
lights and 3 settings.$50
352-322-1160
CHRISTMAS WREATH
Large outdoor
green/white lights
NEW IN BAG $25.
352-270-3909
CHRISTMAS
WREATHS (2)
in/outdoor green/white
lights NEW $20.ea
352-270-3909
COACH PURSES
3 Coach bags w/
serial numbers.


$50 each
(352) 726-9472
Comforter King Set
Ralph Lauren Adiron-
dack Bear Print. Incld
Flannel Sheets. Still in
pkg. Great Gift! $150
obo (518) 802-0220
CRAFT BEADS
Large assort, of many
different colors, sizes,
and shapes. $60.00
352-621-7586
DOG CRATE FOR BIG
DOGS Softside (nylon)
style 48"L Heavy duty
steel frame NEW $100.
352-270-3909
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.OOlb.
Stone Crab(& $6.00lb
delivered 352-897-5001


GARMIN STREET-
PILOT GPS w/remote
and accessories.
$60.00
Call 352-621-7586
Gas Grill
4 burners, 2 tanks and
a Wrought Iron table
with 2 chairs
$200 total!
(352) 795-7254
MOTORCYCLE WIND
SHIELD BAG black,
Harley brand, $25 Ph
352-697-2631
Rubbermaid Big Max
7' x 3'6" Resin Storage
Shed, 1 shelf, 2 stands,
tie downs, Lock & keys
$125. Cash
(352) 382-7435
SINGER TREADLE
SEWING MACHINE
$75.00. Located in
Floral City. Call
239-404-8589
VINTAGE PROJEC-
TION TABLE $55
ACME LITE PROJEK
GOOD CONDITION IN-
VERNESS 419-5981



FAX/COPIER TOSHIBA
DP85F + NEW DRUM
AND TONER KITS.
$250 352-585-5056




2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINER,
1 MED $295; 1 LG, $375
Both Exc Cond, Run
great 352-270-8475
Heavy Duty Wheel-
chair, electric, high
back, extra support
seat, slightly used,
cost $4,300. sell $800
(352) 628-5085
**********r
SCOOTER AND LIFT:
3 wheeled Celebrity
scooter and Haramar
lift. $1000 for both.
Call 352-270-2319
before 8 PM.



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR
TRAVEL/STUDENT
SIZE, W/GROVER
TUNERS $60
352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
PLUS STYLE DEEP
BURGANDY BURST
FLAME MAPLE
TOP,BLOCK INLAYS
$140 352-601-6625
"NEW" S.G. STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/AMRPGIGBAGTUNERST
RARPCORDAND
C.D. $90 352-601-6625



3 PIECE LAMP SET
1 floor lamp/2 table
lamps/Victorian style
set $45.00
352-860-0759
10 CUBIC FOOT
CHEST FREEZER
white 10 cu ft. chest
freezer only used for a
month includes inside
basket and owners
manual 180.00 or B.O.
phone# 352-419-4767
25 assorted size glass-
ware and extras for bar.
$25.00
352-628-1783
CUISINART ELECTRIC
ICE CREAM MAKER
new condi-$40.00 cash-
(352) 344-0686
CUISINART GRIDLER
new condition- cost
$100.00 sell $45.00
cash (352) 344-0686
CUISINART MIXER
WITH STAND new con-
dition- $45.00 cash
(352)344-0686
LARGE RUG 10x13
feet. Cocoa Swirl. Like
New. Paid $400.
$100 352-628-3507
New 8 piece place sett-
ing china pearl
china,extras $50 OBO
352-628-1783
PIE MAKER WOLF-
GANG Puck electric
makes large pie NEW !!
$35.NICE GIFT !!
352-621-0175
WEST BEND ELEC-
TRIC GRILL New condi-
tion- large covered grill
cost 90.00- sell $45.00
cash (352)-344-0686



Miami Sun
3 Wheel Bicycle
w/ Basket
$165
(352) 812-2329



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Men Ping Zing's.
Putter, irons & woods
$35; RH mens 1-2's set
of irons w/ wedge $95
(315) 466-2268

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec. 7th 9a-5p
Sun. Dec. 8th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
MOTORCYCLE
HELMET DOT Sm,
pink bl
visor $25
352-503-7668


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


ACE
Ace, 3 1/2 y.o. terrier
mix, wt. 51 Ibs,
beautiful red coat,
healthy, great
shape, good
w/other dogs, plays
in pool, very intelli-
gent, learned agility
course quickly, sits,
gives paw, lies
down on com-
mand, takes treats
gently, appears
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BAILEY
Bailey, a Chesa-
peake Bay Re-
triever/ hound mix, 2
y.o., wt. 39 Ibs.,
Heartworm
-negative,
Sits on command,
walks well on leash,
friendly & attentive.
Good w/other dogs.
Very obedient, ap-
pears housebroken.
Slim & trim.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.
Chihuahua Puppies
Very small,
19 weeks old
$300-$350
Great personalities
(352) 628-7504











GEORGIA
Georgia, 2-y.o. fe-
male Bulldog mix,
gentle, easygoing, a
bit shy, medium/
low energy, loves
adults & kids, will sit
on command, gives
paw, rolls over,
takes treats gently.
HW negative,
housebrkn,.walks
well on leash, best
as only pet.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


Leek








New Puppy? Consider
a gift certificate for a
Puppy How 2 Class?
Call Deborah Lumley
Certified Prof Dog
Trainer at Intercept Dog
Training 352-422-1123
or hershevsleaacv.com
PUREBRED MINI-
DACHSHUNDS,
w/health cert.
8 wks old. black
& tans & dapples,
males $300. females
$350. (352) 503-9750
or (352) 586-9928
Shih Poo Puppies,
2 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300. Schnauzer Pups
just born 352-795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827



PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352) -445-0381




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
F


r.



INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!




2.5 acres mol
3/2 doublewide
glamour bath eat in
kitchen pole barn off
Whitman Rd.
$109.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/2 Doublewide
on 5 acres mol
beautiful piece of
property off county
line road Springhill, Fl.
$149,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Log Home
4/3 Triplewide
on 5 acres mol
corner lot family
room w/fireplace off
cr 121 in Moriston, Fl.
Reduced to $129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Mini Farms, 2000, 3/2
DWMH on 10 Acres
Main road, cleared
and fenced. 12x16
shed and 24x36 gar-
age. 5 irrigated acres.
Great for horses or
blueberries. Asking
$124,900 352-364-2985


CLASSIFIED




NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 12 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Stock Sequoia
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at $499/month
John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183




INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details










INVERNESS
Water Front View
Big Lake Henderson
55+ Park 1/1 SWMH
Perfect Winter Getaway
or Year Round
Tastefully Furnished,
Pool, Clubhouse,
Boat Slips, lawn maint.
& So Much More
ONLY $8,900.
Call for Details
BY OWNER
352-419-6132



Hernando 2 bedroom.
1 bath. screened room,
carport and shed. Lake
Access. Ceramic bath.
fully furnished,
no lot rent.$28,888
bahecker@msn.com for
photos or 989-539-3696
for appointment.
HOMOSASSA'09 DW
MH Nice /2 Acre Lot
on Paved St, Move In
Condition 4 BR/2 BA
1 Year home warr.
Motivated Seller
Reduced $59,000.
J. Lehman, Realtor
352-422-1642



2BR/1BA with FL room
& attached Laundry
rm. w/ washer& dryer.
Comp Furn-Ready to
move in. 352-726-0124
55+ Park in Lecanto
2bd/2ba furnished
includes w/d, $7500.
obo 352-634-3984
FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, IBA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
Newly renovated MH
in 55+ comm. 2BR/1BA
Move in Condition &
fully furnished incld
Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
Two Bedroom Mobile
Home in Lecanto Hills
RV Pk cpt, scrn room,
heat & air, $6k
352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





fACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.[itrlusilouyHomeRentall.com
CRYSTAL RIVER/LECANTO
1520W Jim Ln (CR).............5950
II i l,,.1 I LI I l.

2/1 nice opts-
HERNANDO/FLORAL CITY
5164 N Dewey Way (H).......5100
3/2 mobile on 1/2 ACRE REDUCED


7530 S Duval Island (FQ.......$1,100
3/2 Beautiful lakefront
6383 S Tompaul Ter (FQ)...........$550
1/1 cozy home

HOMOSASSA
4 Shumard CI. S. (SMW)........$1,350
3/2/2 pool home
3785 S Sandpiper Ter...............$615
3/2 nice home in the Meadows
INVERNESS
1183 N Medtleanean Way..$1,100
3/2/2 Furn shed pool home
Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
HOMOSASSA
2/1, Furn. $1,100. Mo.
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $500 mo.
(352) 212-7922
or 352-212-9205
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815




CRYSTAL RIVER
NICE-
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 Unfurn.
IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-257-2276
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1%, Unfurn.$550,
Furn. $600.+ sec. clean,
quite. 828 5th Ave. NE.
727-455-8998
727-343-3965




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fort Island Trail 720 Sq
Ft office/retail $600mo
(352) 212-7922
or 352-212-9205




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2-1/2
bath.
Country Setting
Large SFH on 1 Acre,
Lg Kitchen, Family
room, Fenced Yard,
Hwy 486 First & Last
& Security. $850.
month 352-746-2197

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Fenced yard, new floor-
ing, family room, great
location, pets ok $725
monthly 845-313-3992
INVERNESS
3/2/1 & 2/2/2
$775/mo & $500 Sec
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
3/2/1, sunroom,
fenced yard, app'd
pet with add'l fee,
$775/mo sec& 1st.
352-697-2195
SNOWBIRD RE-
TREAT
Homosassa Waterfront
3 bed 1-1/2 bath home
w/new carpet/paint/tile
on canal leading to Halls
River. Private fishing.
$775 mo. lst/last/sec.
Negotiable
352-400-2490
352-419-2437











INVERNESS
Waterfront home
for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1,100 per month;
first/last/security;
annualterm. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.
Lake Panasofkee
150 ft frontage on out-
let river, 3/2 split plan
w/porch. Wooded lot
1stlastsec $790/mo
call (352) 748-6629




Executive Suite
Available, King Bed,
high speed Internet
Direct TV, whole house
access, w/d, carport
parking, secluded,
Chnstian gentleman
$125. wkly call Ray
828497-2610
HOMOSASSA
Huge Room, Furnished
util. incl'd., 621-0692




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.


This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPOTM UMT
OPPEfttUNlT


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013 C IIH


[WORDY GURDY|, .......
ffvRuJ 1 W U J iBY TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. In-vogue computer nerd (1) Every answer is a rhyming
1.In-voge ner(1)pair of words (like FAT CAT
Iand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Has to have confidence in (1) theywill fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Made-from-candle Tibetan beasts (1) syllables in each word.

I 1 02013J FS, Dist. byUniv. Ucllck for JFS
4. Less polite Henry VIII kinsman (2)


5. Plane trip minor insult (1)

I I I 1 1 1 0 i 1 1
6. Wimbledon game threat (2)

1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1
7. Abandoning drawing atlas pages (2)


ONIddVt ONIddVJS L 3gvNa tSIBNNKI 99 IHOnS IH9I' d's
OT1103H3fl INI SIV XVAX IS iSM1 I 9 1133$ JIH'It
12-6-13 SHA SNV


off Lake Lindsey Rd
Brooksville 4/2
1600 sq ft out building
room to roam
$129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2 Doublewide
off of Hwy 50
Brooksville Area
close to shopping and
schools 1/ acre mol
$67,500.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 353-726-4009
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




MEDICAL OFFICE
FOR SALE
Totally renovated
700 S.E. 5th Ter.Suite #5
Crystal River. $107K
352-422-2293









DUDLEY'S


SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12-5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41S @ hall (out) 3pm.
(in) 6Dm
..Two auctions in
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12-6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00Dpm
3101 W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00rm 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat

Call for info
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


Newly renovated 2/1
with carport & Florida
Rm. Screened patio &
fenced yd. New paint
inside &out. Cash terms
$39,900 (352) 422-2433




4/2 on 1 acre
off Hwy 44 Lecanto
family room with large
bedrooms 1600 sq ft
$84,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
Reduced $129,000
795-1520 or 634-1725




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009







DUDLEY'S
AUCTION

SIX AUCTIONS
++ Personal Property
& REAL ESTATE++
12-5 Estate Adven-
ture Auction 4000 US
41S @ hall (out) 3pm.
(in) 6Dmn
**Two auctions in
one day!** Several
estates- quality
items- furniture-tools
-Holiday gifts &
decorations.
12-6 On Site Real
Estate Home &
Contents Auction
9am 21 S Jackson St
Beverly Hills Fl 3/1.5
Home, 2 carports & 2
sheds +-furniture,
mower, tools++
12-6 Black Diamond
Golf Course ABSO-
LUTE Lot 1:00prn
3101W Bermuda
Dunes Lecanto
34461 #18 Fairway.
124x201x35x 140.
12-6 Inverness Real
Estate Home Auc-
tion 3:00prm 6065 E
Penrose St Inverness.
Fl 34452 2/2-1794
sq ft. neighborhood
home ESTATE
HOME MUST SELL!
12-7 On Site Estate
Contents Auction
10am. 303 Camilla
Inverness Entire
house & Garage
contents full
12-10 On Site Estate
Contents Auction:
9am 9615 E Oak Ct
Floral City 34436
years of accumula-
tions garage &
house +sm boat

Call for info
352-637-9588
Dudley's Auctions
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck. Maine-ly
Real Estate #381384


Home 4Finder
wwwch ronI-eno ,lindsr.com


Fwnvemes
Hoe

For Sle ;,,.ft
GOSPEL ISLAND
2BR, 2BA, OWN YOUR
OWN HOME
Let Me Help
Block Home
Move In ready $69,900
Clean as a whistle
Big Yard, Big Garage
and Carport
(352) 344-9290






SAt


Great Starter Home
701 S. Little John
Ave. Inverness
2/2 Single Family
Attached Garage,
Lease or cash
$2,000 down
$748. month
877-500-9517

Nice Double Lot
11 Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Totally Remodeled
3/2/2,+ family room.
New Roof, AC, $75,000
South Highlands,
6715 E Morley St
(352) 560-0019




4/2 Doublewide
in Floral City off 44
near town on 1/4 acre
mol fenced yard
large rear deck
Floral City fl.
$89.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009





For Sale %,
Rock Crusher Area
3Br/2Ba/1CG, newly
renovated, including
new, lights, fans, ap-
pliances, and flooring
$72,900 352-422-4533




3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
4BR/1'%2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816
For Sale By Owner
2 BR, IBA, Corner Lot,
Old Homasassa
10360 W Anchorage St
$42,000. As is
(352) 422-8092
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!




C1.2 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2013


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

NEED LISTINGS
Sold All Of Mine

Market is good
Call me for Free
CMA

I also have some
Owner Financing
Available for buyers

Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
b__[owell@
netscane.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515






DF3
Newly undated 2/2/2,
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


I S^^^ I


sm
** 5 ACRES **
On Paved Rd w/
power. $59,900
E Shady Nook CT
Floral City
(860) 526-7876




Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688
2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
call 352-527-2711




Citrus Co. Minutes to
gulf. Series of islands
called Ozello Keys.
Middle of FL State
Preserve. Live off the
land. Food/Garden
Protein/salt water.
Sacrafice @ $44,900
727-733-0583




** BUY, SELL"
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*t352-563-5510"*

Fishing Machine
14 ft., 1989, V Hull, alu-
minum, 9.9 evinrude
mtr., galv. trlr. $1,600
Inverness, Call John
(727) 639-4218
PONTOON
1990 24ft Harris. 2005
50 HP Honda; Factor
Hard top, $5500
(352) 795-0553
PONTOON
1993 20 ft Tracker
60 Evenrude, w/tilt,
trailer. All in great
shape. Bimini, bait
well, fish finder, seats
13. $3250 352-201-8120


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including washer/dryer.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $45,000
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507

Waterfron
Homes^^^


SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. DEC. 8th.
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
con. Best offer above
$20,000. 352-302-8265


24 ft, HT, 88 HP
Ev., interior redone;
With Trailer $4200 or
$3400 for boat only
(352) 476-3688
PONTOON BOAT

'08, 24' Sunchaser 824
by Smokercraft. Very
clean, needs nothing
Lots of extra's! 6x8
open front fishing
deck with 2 chrs. '07,
50 HP Yamaha 2
stroke, less then 50 hr.
'07 Road King, walk up
2 axel trlr. $10,250
(352) 419-7766
PONTOON
24 FT Gruman, 55
Yahama, Good Con-
dition, Bimini, No
trailer, $2100 OBO
352-201-8120
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



AIR STREAM 1998
33ft Motor home
454 Cl Eng, 2 roof AC,
awnings all around,
7KWGen, 54kmi, At
cond, Asking 16,900
(540) 305-9854
Couch out of an RV
5th Wheel
Excellent Condition
$150.
352-422-0273



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK
2005, 24 ft, exc cond.
Sleeps 4-5. $8200
(352) 726-6909 or
434-2955
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




FORD
2000 F250/Excurs 4
Alum 16" rims good
$200, new Pirelli
265/75/16 $130, new
General 235/85/16 $110
352-341-2962
PU Truck Bed Cover
for 8ft, BedTilt top
fiberglass w/ lock,
perfect condition
Asking $250.
(352) 220-9787

Vehicles
Wanted
"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Leek

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Pnrices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
'03, Taurus SE,
V6, loaded, great
fuel economy $4,200
obo (352) 422-1798
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
2011 Optima EX
loaded, leather, all
power keyless, GPS
$17,500 352-212-5555
LINCOLN
1994 Town Car White
with gray interior only
109k miles. Cold AC,
Working Heat Asking
1,800 OBO Peggy
352-257-0388

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
1990 Corolla
Auto, cold A/C, 67K
miles, Good Cond
$2200 (352) 341-3675




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Chevrolet
2003 Silverado
Pick-Up, Real Nice,
clean. Priced for quick
sale $4900 OBO
(917) 733-3644

DODGE
'00, Ram 1500, auto,
AC, reese hitch new
tran,130Kmi, dpndble
$2,900.352-563-0615

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT- BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





819-1213 FCRN
Lien Foreclosure 12-20-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
ARVANA MINI STORAGE
5164 S. Floria Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
SALE OF CONTENTS
Pursuant to FS 83.8055 the
entire contents of the fol-
lowing storage unit(s) will


CLASSIFIED




TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$8,300. (352) 726-3730
Cell (352) 422-0201

TOYOTA
2004 Tundra SR5
71Kmi, Red, Exc
Cond, $10,500
(352) 860-0180




CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999.
352-341-0018

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018

GMC
07 Yukon SLT, loaded,
full power, DVD, bose,
very good, 116K mi
$17,800 (352) 212-5555

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018

SelfStorage^


be sold in order to pay for
past due rentaladvertisi
ng and other charges
owed by these tenants.
The sale will take place 2
weeks from first publica-
tion, December 20, 2013
at 10:00am.
Dennis Johnson
Unit A-26


811-1206 FCRN
Fondren, Billy Ray 09-2013-CA-001164 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-2013-CA-001164
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, ORAGAINST
BILLY RAY FONDREN SR. A/K/A BILLY RAY FONDREN DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO THE UNKNOWN HEIRS.DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDIT
TORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
ORAGAINST BILLY RAY FONDREN SR. A/K/A BILLY RAY FONDREN ,DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENTADDRESS UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENTADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an actbn to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida
THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 6, BLOCK A, WHISPERING OAKS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 20
THROUGH 24, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once each week fortwo consecutive weeks in the Citrus
County Chronicle
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 16th day of October,
2013
Angela Vick, Clerk of the Court
By /s/ Dawn Nampal, As Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
PO Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance
Please contact'Mr John D Sullivan, 110 N Apopka Street, Inverness, FL 344504231,
Phone 352-341-6700, Fax 352-341-7008
November 29 & December 6, 2013 F13013146


813-1206 FCRN
Andras, Jason 09-2009-CA-005780 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-2009-CA-005780
CENTRAL MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JASON ANDRAS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JASON ANDRAS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2579 COUNTRYSIDE BLVD. APT. 305
CURRENTADDRESS CLEARWATER, FL 33761
ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD ORALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENTADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an actbn to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in
CITRUS County, Florida
LOT 18, BLOCK 190, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 108 THROUGH 115, INCLUSIVE
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication, if any on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once each weekfor two consecutive weeks in the Citrus
County Chronicle
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 16th day of October,
2013
Angela Vick, Clerk of the Court
By /s/ Vivian cancel, As Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
PO Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance
Please contact'Mr John D Sullivan, 110 N Apopka Street, Inverness, FL 344504231,
Phone 352-341-6700, Fax 352-341-7008
November 29 & December 6, 2013 F11005966


818-1213 FCRN
Cordell, Lou Ann 2013-CA-000689 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-000689
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
LOU ANN CORDELL; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LOU ANN CORDELL; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or
against the above named Defendant, who is not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last known address was:
8529 N TITLEIST DR., CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34434-5869

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK 396, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGES 133 THROUGH 152, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716, on or before January 7,
2013 or within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and
file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450, either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 13th day of August,
2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: VIVIAN CANCEL, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHEVY VAN G20
Camper Spec, Stove,
Refrig, Cold A/C, runs
great. Low miles $3000
352-628-1646

CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018

FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735





Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
Very low miles, garage
kept, Adult Owner,
$4900 (352) 257-8850

LINHAI YAMAHA
2008 Mainstreet, 300
CC, scooter, 6k miles,
Extra's & new cond.
$2500 (352) 382-3280

Triumph-79
750 Bonnieville. 10K
orig doc mi. True clas-
sic. Like new cond.First
$6500. 352-513-4257





Shannon Johnson
Unit B-9
Kristina McMahon
Unit B-53 & B-59
Jonathan Swinimer
Unit B-63
December 6 & 13, 2013


814-1206 FCRN
Public Auction 12-13
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Jeffrey J. Dawsy, Sheriff of Citrus County Florida, will, pur-
suant to the provisions of Chapter 274, FSS, sell surplus property to include vehicles
and equipment. The property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder
starting at 9:00 AM on December 13, 2013 at Weeks Auction Co., Inc., located at
4851 West Hwy 40, Ocala Florida.
Vehicles may be inspected Dec 9 -12, 2013 8:00 AM until 5:00 PM and day of auc-
tion prior to sale. All items sold "as is" and "where is". Payment must be cash or cash-
ier's check.
For further information contact Weeks Auction at 1-800-699-3356 or Mike Snider, Fleet
Maintenance Supervisor, Citrus County Sheriff's Office at 352-341-7485
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 29 & December 6, 2013.


820-1206 FCRN
12/20 Lien Sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
KNIGHTLY AUTO SERVICE
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on Fri-
day, December 20, 2013
at 8:00 AM at 61 NE HWY
19 SUITE A CRYSTAL RIVER


Meeting^^
No[7tices


FL pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat.
KNIGHTLY AUTO SERVICE
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
2007 Chrysler Sebring
VIN 1C3LC56K27N663162
1999 Chevrolet SO 10 PK
VIN 1GCCS1443X8143496
2003 Chrysler Sebring


VIN 1C3EL56R23N539344
1964 Ford Galaxy 500
VIN 4P68X121305
1941 Studebaker Com-
mander
VIN G822744
1964 Ford Country Squire
VIN 4F76C290202
1963 Studebaker Avanti
VIN R5295
Published (12/6/2013)


815-1206 FRCRN
12/10 Hearings/Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administrative Hearing, 2:00 p.m.; Regu-
lar Meeting; 4:00 p.m. and a Public Hearing, 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 10,
2013 in the Board Room of the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida.

The purpose of the Administrative Hearing is to act upon proposed student
expulsion(s). The Regular Meeting is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come before the Board. The Public Hearing is to approve the revisions of
Policy, 3.50, Public Information and Inspections of Records, to approve the revisions
of Policy 7.35, Investment of Funds and the revision of Policy 7.71, School Property,
Definitions and Custodians.

If any person decides to appeal a decision made by the Board, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting, he may need a record of the proceedings and
may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord should include testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to be based.

/S/Sandra Himmel, Superintendent Citrus County School Board
Published one time in the Citrus County Chronicle, Friday, December 6, 2013.


816-1206 FCRN
City of Inverness
PUBLIC NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT
NOTICE is hereby given by the City Council of the City of Inverness, Florida that pursuant to
Chapter 166 041 of the laws of Florida a Public Notice be given by the City Council of the
City of Inverness that an ordinance entitled
ORDINANCE NO. 2013 -697
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF INVERNESS, FLORIDA, AMENDING CHAPTER OF
THE CODE OF ORDINANCES, ENTITLED "ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES", BYAMENDING
SECTION 4-5, ENTITLED "HOURS OF SALE RESTRICTED" TO ALLOW THE SALE AND
DISPENSING OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES DAILY BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 7:00
A.M. AND 2:00 A.M. THE FOLLOWING DAY; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVID-
ING FOR INCLUSION IN THE CODE; PROVIDING FOR MODIFICATION AND, PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
will be considered for final reading and adoption by the City Council All interested parties
may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance at 5'30
PM, December 17th, 2013
Copy of the proposed ordinance will be on file with and available for inspection by the public
in the office of the City Clerk in the City Hall, 212 W Main Street, Inverness, Florida, be-
tween the hours of 8'30 AM and 4'00 PM, Monday through Friday of each week

Be advised that if any person or persons may wish to appeal a decision of the City Council
of the City of Inverness, Florida, made at this meeting, a record of the proceedings will be
needed by such person or persons and a verbatim record may be needed
This Notice is issued under my hand as the President of the City Council of the City of Inver-
ness this
3rd day of December, 2013
/s/ Deborah Davis /s/ Linda Bega
Attest Deborah Davis Linda Bega
City Clerk
President of City Council
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 6th, 2013


817-1206 FRCRN
MEETING NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, will meet in regular session in the Board of County Commissioners'
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450 on December 17, 2013 beginning at 1:00 pm to approve the sale of prop-
erty at 33 S. Desoto Street Beverly Hills, FL to Brenda Conover under the Neighbor-
hood Stabilization Program. This notice is given pursuant to Section 125.35(3), Florida
Statutes. Anyone not attending the meeting but who wishes to make comments
shall do so in writing and address same to the Department of Community Services,
Housing Services Section, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Said
comments must be received prior to 12:00 Noon on Monday, December 16, 2013.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public meeting he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
/s/ J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, December 6, 2013.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Foelsr ae


DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR
(352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 1-800-955-8771.
December 6 & 13, 2013. 888122337



812-1206 FRCRN
Mahan, Elizabeth 09-2012-CA-001608 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTYFLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-2012-CA-001608
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
VS.
ELIZABETH E. MAHAN; et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries, Devsees, Grantees, Assignees, Uenors, Creditors,
Trustees, And All Other Parties Claiming An Interest, By, Through, Under Or
Against the Estate of David P. Mahan A/K/A David P. Mahan
Last Known Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Citrus County, Florida:
LOT 9, IN BLOCK B OF POINT-O-WOODS, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 5, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE I CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff's attorney, at 7000 West
Palmetto Park Road, Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 (Phone Number: (561)
392-6391), within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before December 30, 2013 on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on November 8, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
By: /S/ VIVIAN CANCEL, As Deputy Clerk
November 29 & Decmber 6,2013. 1113-601207


898-1202 FCRN
McVeigh, Charles 2013-CA-947 Notice ofAction
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2012-CA-947
INVERMED PROPERTIES, LLC
Plaintiff,
VS.
CHARLES MCVEIGH, MONICA MCVEIGH, and
C. CATHERINE JANNARONE
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHARLES MCVEIGH
You are notified that an action to quiet title on the following property in Citrus
County, Florida:
Lots 26 and 27, Unit 6, St. Martin's Estuary Retreats Subdivision as recorded in Plat Book
14, Page 150, Official Records of Citrus County, Florida.
Property Identification No. 2995602
Street Address: 1553 South Wallace Point, Crystal River, FL 34429.
has been filed against you and you arc required to serve a copy of written defenses,
if any, to it on J. Patrick McElroy, the Plaintiffs' attorney, whose address is PO Box 1511,
Hernando, FL 34441 on or before December 16, 2013 and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs' attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
Dated OCTOBER 24, 2012.
(Court Seal)Clerk of the Court and Comptroller, Honorable ANGELA VICK
110 North Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450
By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, phone (352) 637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-995-8771.
November 15, 22, 29 & December 6, 2013.


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