Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03301

Full Text

Getting started: Boys hoops teams ready for season /B1


Mostly cloudy
with a chance of
showers.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next
morning


NOVEMBER 19, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 104


Know your numbers


Prostate-specific antigen


test can


determine men's potential for cancer


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Dale McClellan, left, shaves his son Leon's beard earlier this month during the Movember kick-off celebration at the Old Courthouse
in Inverness. McClellan is a prostate cancer survivor.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Sitting in a local cafe, Dale McClellan
made his point Of four men sitting on one
side of the room, three of them had sur-
vived prostate cancer
"It's more prevalent than people
think," he said.
He is perhaps the most public face of
agriculture in Citrus County.
McClellan owns M&B Dairy in
Lecanto, chairs the Agricultural Alliance,
is a staunch supporter of 4-H and agri-
culture-related education and was the
2012 Southeastern Farmer of the Year
He got to be part of the coin toss at the
University of Florida homecoming game
and his dairy company is known for its in-
novative flavors to get more school kids
drinking milk.
He is active in agri-politics, the busi-


We need to start
paying attention to our
PSA. We need not wait
until the doctor
tells us.
Dale McClellan
prostate cancer survivor.
ness of keeping farmer's concerns on the
government's agenda, and is well known
in Tallahassee.
But this year, not by choice, McClellan
has become the face of men's health
awareness in Citrus County
Earlier this year McClellan, 53, was di-
agnosed with prostate cancer and about
13 weeks ago had his prostate removed.


That alone would be enough to make
him an advocate of men's health aware-
ness and especially early cancer detec-
tion, but there's more to his story
KNOW YOUR NUMBERS
"What's your PSA?" he asks. "Your ob-
ligation as a man is to know"
The number stands for prostate-
specific antigen and is a way of measur-
ing of a man's potential for prostate can-
cer The higher a man's PSA level, the
more likely it is that he could have
prostate cancer, though other factors can
be involved.
Farmers, though they don't admit it, are
numbers guys. And for McClellan the
number after a PSA test was normally
just filed in his mind with the all the
other numbers.
"We need to start paying attention to
See Page A8


Men,


we


need


to talk

Awareness

key to health
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Overheard recently...
Bob: "Say, Bill, my doc-
tor told me the other day
that I'm overdue for a
prostate exam. Have you
had one of those?"
Bill: "Sure, Bob. Ever
since I turned 50 I get
tested once a year."
Bob: "But I feel fine. I



potthere's no Kua
think my
prostate is
OK."
"That's
the prob-
lem, Bob.
W ith
prostate
cancer, Dr. Udaya
there's no Kumar
way of Homosassa
knowing urologist.
whether you have it un-
less it's diagnosed -or
the cancer begins to
spread which is why
you need to get that
exam."
Bob: "I've heard these
exams are pretty scary"
Bill: "Not so Bob!
There's a blood test, and
you've had those."
Bob: "Yeah, but isn't
there a second part?"
Bill: "That's simple, too,
Bob. The doctor, you see,
wears gloves and..."
NOOOOOOOOO!
There is no way that
conversation ever, EVER
took place. Guys don't dis-
cuss their private medical
stuff with other guys. It's
OK for women, but that
chatter is very un-guy-like.
Guys just don't talk like
that.
But they should.
That's what Blue Paper
Day is all about. That's
See Page A5


November marks month


for men's health awareness


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Emerging mustaches have
been the face of awareness for
men's health issues in Citrus
County
Thursday evening, the third
annual Movember concludes
with the mo show and finale
party
For the past month, a cross-
section of county men skipped
at least part of their daily shave.
The results scraggly stubble
or definable mo show their
participation in a growing in-
ternational effort
Women also take part by
sporting a faux mo or other
signs of support.


November has been around
for a decade worldwide, with
Citrus County getting on board
in 2011. Its purpose is to raise
awareness about prostate can-
cer and other men's health
issues.


The local Movember is cred-
ited to Dale McClellan, who
chairs the Agricultural Alliance
of Citrus County Recounting its
origin, he said back in 2011


See Page A2


Four charged with theft

of meat from markets
A.B. SIDIBE ..
Staff writer. A
Four people were ar- 1 ;-
rested Saturday after al- .
legedly orchestrating the V
theft of meat from two
county supermarkets.
According to their arrest
affidavits, they even had a Richard Janell
getaway driver. Milam Dore
Richard Lee Milam, 55, of
Inverness; Janell Lynn
Dore, 22, of Floral City;
Kelly Lynn Brosey, 45, and
Joseph Lynn Tate, 23, also of
Inverness, were arrested '-
and charged with felony
grand theft and traffic or
endeavor to traffic in stolen '
property Dore, Brosey and Kelly Joseph
See Page A7 Brosey Tate


State & Local:
Cancer survivor Bud Conklin is featured in
an ad campaign for a cancer clinic./A3


Nation: Nation & World:


Intense storms and tornadoes swept
through the Midwest on Sunday./A14


Today marks the 150th anniversary of
Lincoln's Gettysburg address./A18


staying

Healthy
weight lifestyle
S almost screenings a
right D
prostate >

Health & Life:
Leading a healthy lifestyle can prevent
nearly half of all cancer-related deaths./Cl


Classifieds.
Comics ..
5 Crossword .


.... C12
.... C ll
.... C10l


Community .......C9
Editorial ........ A16
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... Cll


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ...... C10


C ITRU S C 0 U N T Y





NICL.chronicleonline.com
^& www.chronicleonline.com


HIGH
75
LOW
60


In January, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will offer 100
free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screenings and digital
rectal exams.
* WHEN: 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014.
* PROVIDERS: Dr. Paresh G. Desa; Dr. Udaya Kumar.
* WHERE: Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center Ambulatory
Surgery Center, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
* RECIPIENTS: Screenings will be available to men over 40 who
have not had a PSA in the past 12 months.
* CONTACT: Call 352-795-1234 to register.


-------------








Take time to choose treatments


Many options open to prostate cancerpatients


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

Early diagnosis is the
best-case scenario for all
cancers, but especially so
with prostate cancer when
looking at treatment op-
tions because it might
be possible to leave the
condition alone.
"Some cases of prostate
cancer don't require treat-
ment," said Dr Marion
Chirayath of the Cancer
and Blood Disease Center
in Lecanto, speaking re-
cently to the Chronicle. "In
fact, we are recommend-
ing nowadays not all men
need to be screened for
prostate cancer I don't
know if you know the old
quote: A lot of men die
with prostate cancer, but
not of it"'
In some cases, prostate
cancer is very slow-
growing, causes no trouble
and the treatment can
cause more trouble than
the disease, Chirayath said.
This is a situation some-
times presented when
prostate cancer was discov-
ered by a PSA (prostate-
specific antigen) test, not
because the patient com-
plained of symptoms.
"If it's early stage
prostate cancer, slow
growing and the patient is
not symptomatic and is
elderly, then you may not


need to treat," Chirayath
said.
However, if the prostate
cancer is detected at an
early stage and treatment
is required, the options
are surgery or radiation,
Chirayath said.
According to the Ameri-
can Can-
c e r
Society
(ACS),
S three spe-
cialists
treat
i prostate
cancer
Dr. Marion 0 Urolo-
Chirayath gists are
medical surgeons
oncologist, who spe-
cialize in treating diseases
of the urinary system and
male reproductive system,
including the prostate.
0 Radiation oncologists
are doctors who treat can-
cer with radiation therapy
A Medical oncologists
are doctors who treat can-
cer with medicines such as
chemotherapy or en-
docrine therapy
As a medical oncologist,
Chirayath said she does
not see patients with early
stage prostate cancer, but
she sees patients whose
cancer has spread beyond
the prostate.
"The first treatment we
use is endocrine therapy,"
Chirayath said. "It is oth-


erwise known as hormonal
therapy That's sort of a
misnomer, because when
you say hormonal therapy,
patients think you are
going to give them hor-
mones. Actually, what we
are giving them is
medication that will re-
duce the production of
testosterone."
One way to reduce the
production of testosterone
is to remove the testes,
Chirayath explained. That
would be a task for a
surgeon.
"But patients just won't
consent to it," Chirayath
said. "I was in the hospital
once talking to a prostate
cancer patient and I told
him that I had never seen
a patient consent to the re-
moval of the testicles, and
the man in the next bed
said: 'Well, here's one,' so I
met one."
Using the medication
cuts down the production
of testosterone so much
it is like the testicles are
not functioning, Chirayath
explained.
If the patient becomes
resistant to endocrine
therapy, the medical on-
cologist can treat him with
chemotherapy, which Chi-
rayath said has expanded
a lot in the past few years.
"Very dramatic new
drugs have come out that
are effective even in very


resistant cases of prostate
cancer," Chirayath said. 'A
lot of the newer drugs are
more tolerable than the
older ones."
Physicians talk to their
patients to see which treat-
ment would offer the best
outcome, because, Chiray-
ath said, some treatments
have pros and cons, possi-
bly causing long-lasting
side effects, such as erec-
tile dysfunction and loss of
urinary continence.
"That's
why we
stage can-
cers, be-
cause the
treatment
is different
depending
on what
Dr. C. stage it is,"
Joseph Chirayath
Bennett said. "Is
radiation the cancer
oncologist, confined
to the prostate? Has it gone
into the lymph nodes? Has
it gone into other organs
such as bone? It most fre-
quently goes to bone before
it goes anywhere else.
When it's in the bone, you
can still treat with en-
docrine therapy and the re-
sponse is often very good,
with very good survival."
Dr C. Joseph Bennett Jr,
a radiation oncologist at
the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute in
Lecanto, highly recom-
mends radiation therapy
"Radiation for prostate
cancer is appropriate for


any patient," Bennett said.
"When you look at prostate
cancer, if it's a healthy per-
son, they can either have
surgery to remove it or they
can do the radiation. If they
are older or have health is-
sues, surgery is not very
safe. So the radiation is the
preferred option. I don't
care it you're 40 or 90, if you
have prostate cancer, it is
one of your options for
treatment"
When considering radi-
ation therapy as a treat-
ment, Bennett said the
patient should ensure that
the radiation oncologist is
board-certified and the fa-
cility is accredited by the
American College of Radi-
ology He said the Bois-
soneault Institute is the
only ACR-accredited
clinic in the county
Side effects of radiation
therapy are minimal, ac-
cording to Bennett, includ-
ing no pain.
"If you look at the tech-
niques that we now use,
patients tend to notice that
during their treatment
they have a little bit more
frequent urination," Ben-
nett said. "They may have
a little extra frequency in
their bowel movements.
But that really is it."
Radiation therapy treat-
ment takes about three
minutes daily for nine
weeks to deliver, Bennett
said.
"While they are being
treated, they can eat and
drink and do anything in


the world they want to do,"
Bennett said. "There's no
limitations on them at all.
There's no recovery period
like you would have from
surgery It's a much easier
way of treating the cancer
You don't have to go to the
operating room and have
anesthesia. It's just as ef-
fective as surgery is."
Bennett said the success
rate for radiation therapy
was in the 90 percent
range. In aggressive cases
of prostate cancer, Bennett
said, a patient could be
treated with a combina-
tion of endocrine therapy
and radiation therapy
"The radiation is toler-
ated quite well," Bennett
said. "It's just like coming
in and getting an X-ray"
The ACS recommends
newly diagnosed prostate
cancer patients give them-
selves time to absorb all
the information they have
received and question the
cancer care team.
Because several treat-
ment options are available
to men with prostate cancer,
the ACS advises them to
seek second opinions from
doctors who specialize in
different kinds of treatment
to sort through the options.
These patients will want to
weigh the benefits of each
treatment against its possi-
ble outcomes, side effects
and risks.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.


MOVEMBER
Continued from Page Al

upon returning from vacation
unshaven, someone asked if he
was getting ready for Movember
And though he'd never heard
of it, McClellan did some re-
search and saw it as good fit for
the alliance.
"I had no idea what it was at
the time," he said. "But I sent out
an email to the ag community
and now we're coming up on the


third time."
The concept caught on. He
credits Dorothy Pernu and
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center for getting it off the
ground. The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and
other community groups got in-
volved. It was held again in 2012
and is now a firm fixture on the
county's fall calendar of events.
At the ag alliance, no matter
what time of year, Movember is
mentioned at every meeting.
Members talk about the last event
or the one coming up.


"It's growing and there is al-
ways something to plan," he said.
"It's become an Agricultural Al-
liance event"
Ironically about two years after
helping get Movember started in
Citrus County, McClellan was di-
agnosed with prostate cancer
He said alliance member Ther-
essa Foster has taken the reins
and has been a tireless advocate
for the success of this year's event
"She's carried the burden," he
said. "It's getting to be something
big; it's kind of outgrowing us."
"Our shave-off was fantastic,"


Foster said about the Oct 29 kick-
off event "The tractors created a
great theme. There was a big out-
pouring of new people. It was a
great turnout, people stayed
longer than they had before."
The Movember Mo Show and
Finale Party will be from 5:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at High Octane
Saloon on U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
It's free to attend and the public
is invited. The alliance hopes
the new location will help reach
a broader audience and get
younger men involved.
Participants can strut their mo


with prizes for the best looking,
biggest, lamest and most unique.
Groups of both guys and gals can
compete for most participants
and best theme.
Foster said hot towel shaves
will be available for participants
who can't take their mo no more.
There will also be drawings and
a live auction.
And for those interested in get-
ting involved, a committee has
been formed for Movember 2014.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer
in their lifetime.

Melanoma, the most common form of cancer
for young adults is fatal if left untreated and
1 in 58 will be diagnosed during their lifetime.


Routine


screening and early detection of skin
cancer is key to treatment.


A

Asymmetry
One half unlike
the other half.

B
Border
Irregular
Scalloped or poorly
circumscribed border.

Color varied
from one area to
another: shades of tan &
brown, black, sometimes
white, red or blue.

Diameter D
larger
than 6 mm as a rule
(diameter of
pencil eraser).


Participating with: l
Medicare, BCBS,
Cigna, Humana, Aetna.



www.dermatologyonline.com

SUnCORA/T DERMATOLOGYV|

AnD SKIn SURGERY CEnTER

Lecanto Office 352-746-2200
Ocala Office 352-873-1500


A2 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


BLUE PAPER DAY 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






S Page A3-TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Poster boy? No, billboard man


ROB SNOW/Special to the Chronicle
Prostate cancer survivor Bud Conklin, of Hernando, is part of a cancer success-story campaign for the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in Lecanto. His photo
is on two billboards on State Road 44 as well as in newspaper and TV ads.

Hernando resident and cancer survivor Bud Conklin now the face ofprostate cancer'


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

You may not know Bud Con-
klin, but chances are if
you've driven west on State
Road 44 in Lecanto or east,
heading toward The Villages, you
may know that he's had prostate
cancer
Conklin is one of three cancer suc-
cess stories featured in a video series
and ad campaign for the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute. His
image and story are featured on the
billboards.
"It was surreal," Conklin said
about the first time he saw himself
from the highway
In February 2011, Conklin was di-
agnosed with prostate cancer and
went on to complete nine weeks of
radiation treatment at RBOI, 44
treatments in all.
He didn't need chemotherapy or
surgery


PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP
* A prostate cancer support group meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. the
first Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 352-527-0106.


Shortly after finishing treatment,
Dr C. Joseph Bennett, radiation on-
cologist at RBOI, asked Conklin if he
would like to share his cancer suc-
cess story, which Conklin readily
agreed to.
"Apparently a lot of guys have a
hang-up about prostate cancer,
which is an issue I don't understand,"
Conklin said.
Bennett's friend, who owns an ad
agency in Jacksonville, put together
an ad campaign with a video series,
newspaper ads and the billboard,
and Conklin was set up in a studio in
Ocala to film the video, then he was
taken to the Oklawaha River for still
photos at night.
"It was pitch dark and all I


remember were the mosquitoes that
were eating us alive and the two
alligators laying in the water staring
at me," he said.
Bennett said he chose Conklin as
the "face of prostate cancer" because
from the initial consultation, Conklin
maintained a positive attitude.
"When Bud was in the military, his
job was in the communications and
navigation field, and when we started
talking about the GPS-driven tech-
nology that we use, he loved it he
fully understood the technology of it,
and he's been someone I've used on
multiple occasions when a new pa-
tient comes in and wants to talk to
somebody who has walked down this
same path," Bennett said.


Conklin said having his face all
over the place, including newspaper
and TV ads, has been helpful as
conversation-starters with men who
may be fearful of what a prostate
cancer diagnosis means.
Bennett said many men fear acci-
dental radiation of the rectum or
bladder, and they fear being left im-
potent, but with the newest technol-
ogy, they're able to shape the
radiation beam to conform to the per-
son's anatomy so treatment is precise
and doesn't affect the rectum or
bladder
"I speak to a lot of guys about the
technology of the treatment and how
easy it is, and how successful it is-
and that it's not the end of your life,"
he said. "I'm 70 and I'm out cycling
and kayaking, and I'm a manatee
watch volunteer I don't sit at home. I
don't have time."
Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. corn.


Around the

COUNTY

WPNCC to host
Sandy Balfour
Citrus County School
Board member Sandy Bal-
four is the
guest
speaker
today for
the
Women's
Political
Network
of Citrus Sandy
County Balfour
luncheon school board
meeting member.
at La
Casa Di Norma Ristorante
in Crystal River.
Arrive by noon to place
orders for luncheon to be
served after the speaker.
Balfour, a member of the
College of Central Florida
Board of Trustees, was re-
cently appointed by Gov.
Rick Scott to the school
board. The group will also
be clipping coupons for the
military base members
have adopted.
Everyone is welcome.
Call Rosalie Matt at 352-
746-7143 for information.
Rental house
destroyed by fire
Shortly after 8 p.m. Sun-
day, Citrus County Sheriff's
Office Division of Fire Res-
cue was dispatched to a
residential structure fire at
6580 N. Sourgum Terrace
in Hernando.
The first units arrived at
8:21 p.m. to find a 640-
square-foot single family
dwelling fully involved.
Crews initiated a defensive
attack on the fire due to the
extent. The fire was quickly
extinguished.
Crews from Hernando,
Inverness, Pine Ridge and
Beverly Hills stations re-
sponded to assist. State
Fire Marshal's Office per-
sonnel responded to inves-
tigate the cause, which is
under investigation.
The owners of the resi-
dence advised it was a
rental house with a tenant
about to move in. The struc-
ture was a total loss esti-
mated at $15,500.
-From staff reports


Male stigma of confronting health issues


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Studies have shown that some
men do not pay attention to their
health.
Therefore, they tend to die at
higher rates from leading causes of
disease.
But why is that?
"Primarily, I think that they see
themselves as macho," said Dr Par-
manand Gurnani, an Inverness psy-
chiatrist. "It is their ego that makes
it difficult for them to admit, accept
and seek help for their problems."
Their macho persona is linked to
how a child is raised.
"If you grow up with the myth that
a male can fix his own problems,
then it is hard for a society to change
that myth," Gurnani said.
Testicular and prostate cancers
are both top concerns for men.
"Especially prostate cancer they
fear the most," he said. "They are


afraid of erectile dysfunction. So how does a family member per-
"Another issue these days is the suade his or her loved one to go to
time factor," Gurnani continued. "If the doctor?
a man works from 8 a.m. to "What happens is the
5 p.m. and wants to go to a spouse has to be assertive,"
doctor's appointment and Gurnani said. "Usually, the
the doctor's office is only spouse is either passive and
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., i may say it once or twice and
then that becomes an issue." then backs off from the issue.
Negative thoughts should \'4 Or what they do is become
be left at the door. aggressive, which is the
"Hope for the best, but other extreme. When they
prepare for the worst," he Parmanand are aggressive, they yell and
said. "Don't go in with nega- Gurnani scream. That will only add
tive thoughts, feelings and psychiatrist in fuel to the fire. Then the
assumptions. That is exactly Inverness. emotions on both sides are
what scares men. Go in with so high that the angle be-
an open mind and say 'I'm not going comes more of an issue than ad-
to assume anything or cross the dressing the original medical issue.
bridge before I reach it Let me go to If a person is assertive, they are firm,
the doctor and find out what the but not aggressive. They put in con-
problem is and what needs to be sequences and set limits that get the
done.' All men should be open- husband's attention to seek help."
minded and not scared of physi- Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn
cians. Don't be scared of finding out Worthington at 352-563-5660 or
what the medical issue is." eworthington@chronicleonline.com.


Zimmerman arrested after disturbance call


Associated Press

APOPKA- George Zim-
merman was charged with
assault Monday after his
girlfriend called deputies
to the home where they
were living and claimed
he pointed a shotgun at
her during an argument,
authorities said.
The girlfriend, Saman-
tha Scheibe, called 911 in
the early afternoon to say
that Zimmerman had
smashed a glass table,
threatened her with the
shotgun and ultimately


pushed her out of said at a news con-
the house, accord- ference hours
ing to an arrest re- after the arrest.
port After pushing X 6 "She was very
her out, Zimmer- concerned for her
man barricaded own safety, espe-
the door with fur- cially having the
niture and refused weapon pointed at
to leave, saying he George her and then being
would talk to po- Zimmerman pushed out,"
lice by phone, au- Lemma said.
thorities said. Lemma said Zimmer-
Deputies used a key pro- man was compliant and
vided by Scheibe to unlock unarmed when deputies
the door and they were came to the house.
able to push through the "The easiest way to de-
barricade of items, Chief scribe it is rather passive.
Deputy Dennis Lemma Clearly he's had the oppor-


tunity to encounter situa-
tions similar to this in the
past," he said of the former
neighborhood watch volun-
teer who was acquitted
earlier this year on crimi-
nal charges in the shooting
death of Trayvon Martin.
Zimmerman was charged
with domestic aggravated
assault with a weapon, do-
mestic battery and criminal
mischief His first appear-
ance was scheduled for
Tuesday afternoon. He will
be housed in a single-
person cell and guards will
check on him hourly


State &LocalBRIEFS


Trash-can fire
evacuates school
A small trash-can fire Fri-
day at Crystal River High
School caused the temporary
evacuation of the school.
However, according to
Crystal River Fire Chief Jack
Dumas, by the time fire crews
arrived the fire had been
snuffed. The fire started
around 1 p.m.
"A student lit a trash can,
but when we got there it was
already out," Dumas said.
"There was no damage, not
even smoke damage," he
added.


Dumas said the buildings
were temporally evacuated as
a precaution.
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Fire Rescue also re-
sponded to the scene.

Woman hit by truck
on Interstate 75
BUSHNELL--A 20-year-
old woman died when she
was hit by a tractor trailer as
she stood near her disabled
vehicle on Interstate 75 in
Sumter County.
The Florida Highway Patrol
said Brittany Nicole Bailey of
St. Petersburg was standing


in the outside lane of south-
bound 1-75 about 10:30 Sun-
day night.
Troopers say the driver of
the truck wasn't able to see
Bailey, who was standing on
an unlighted stretch of the
highway.
Bailey was pronounced
dead at the scene.

Professor killed
in hotel fall
HOLLYWOOD -A North-
western University medical
professor was killed Sunday
after falling from a South
Florida hotel balcony through


a lower-floor glass ceiling, po-
lice said Monday.
Hollywood police spokes-
man Lt. Osvaldo Perez identi-
fied the victim as 46-year-old
Dr. Piotr Kulesza of Chicago.
The Northwestern faculty
guide lists Kulesza as a pro-
fessor of pathology.
Police said Kulesza fell just
after midnight Sunday from a
23rd-floor balcony through the
glass ceiling at the seaside
Westin Diplomat hotel.
Perez said investigators
have so far uncovered no evi-
dence of foul play.
-From staff reports


From the

CAPITAL


Lawmakers back
gender-specific
classes
Two Miami-Dade County
lawmakers are seeking to
start a pilot program that
would lead to some
elementary-school students
being separated into
boys-only and girls-only
classes.
Rep. Manny Diaz Jr., R-
Hialeah, filed the proposal
(HB 313) last week, and his
office issued a news re-
lease Monday saying the
idea also is backed by Sen.
Anitere Flores, R-Miami.
Under the bill, students in
a limited number of districts
and schools would be sepa-
rated into boys-only and
girls-only classes in core
subject areas, while other
activities such as lunch pe-
riods and recess would re-
main coeducational.
The proposal will be con-
sidered during the 2014
legislative session and
would take effect July 1,
2014, if approved.
FDLE: No sign clerk
tried to suppress
black vote
The state is about to
close an investigation into
voter suppression com-
plaints in the small town of
Sopchoppy, and a prosecu-
tor says no charges will be
filed.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs said Monday that
there is no evidence of
voter suppression in the
municipal election where
the black incumbent
mayor lost re-election by
one vote.
The former mayor and a
black city commissioner
who also lost her re-election
bid filed complaints with the
state alleging that the white
city clerk suppressed the
black vote.
But the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
in a summary of its investi-
gation said it couldn't find
evidence that any poll
worker, election official or
city employee fraudulently
tried to influence the vote.
-From wire reports




A4 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Take greater interest in
your investments and any pending
legal or medical matter. Stay on top of
whatever situation you face that can
influence your life personally or
professionally
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Opportu-
nity knocks, and the chance to put your
skills to work for you will result in
rewards.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Look
at what's happening around you, but
think twice before you leap into action.
Stick close to home and focus on
self-improvement.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
feel obligated to pay for others' mis-
takes. Put more into your own work
and take care of financial and contrac-
tual interests.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Listen,
but don't agree to do what everyone
else wants. Make a required decision
based on your emotional needs.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You
may face emotional interference if you
share too many of your ideas and in-
tentions with others.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You may
feel the need to address issues that
are bothering you, but be prepared to
deal with disapproval.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Do your
research and base any decision re-
garding money, health or contractual
issues on facts and figures.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) A chal-
lenge is best left alone. Minor mishaps
or injury will occur if you aren't cau-
tious. Realize your potential and stick
to what you are capable of doing.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Leap into
action. There is much you can accom-
plish if you put your mind to it. Getting
involved in activities that promote your
skills will lead to an unusual proposal.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Explore
areas of interest. Don't feel you have
to take care of someone else's con-
cerns. Let your desires dictate what
you do next.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Follow
through with your plans, even if some-
one throws an emotional wrench into
the mix. It's up to you to stick to your
laurels and refuse to let anyone inter-
fere with your happiness.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Check out
different cultures and philosophies. You
will get peace of mind knowing you are
on the right track spiritually, education-
ally or emotionally Protect your assets.


ENTERTAINMENT


Emerson College to
name school after
Ron Burgundy
BOSTON It's kind of a big
deal that Emerson College is
changing the name of its school
of communication.
The college in Boston will re-
name the school for one day
only the Ron Burgundy
School of Communication on
Dec. 4 to honor the fictitious tele-
vision anchorman.
Actor Will Ferrell, in charac-
ter, is scheduled to share his
path to journalism greatness
with students. His visit will in-
clude a news conference, the re-
naming ceremony and a
screening of "Anchorman 2: The
Legend Continues." Ferrell, as
himself, will introduce the movie.
College President Lee Pelton
said Burgundy "understands the
power of media, as well as hair-
spray, firsthand."
Burgundy, known for telling
people he's "kind of a big deal,"
says he hopes to let students
know how hard it is to make it to
the top, in his words, "especially
if you don't have good hair."
New video coming
for Bob Dylan's
'Rolling Stone'
NEW YORK Bob Dylan's
"Like a Rolling Stone" is getting
its first official music video,
nearly 50 years after the song
was released.
The interactive video will pre-
miere on Dylan's website Tues-
day and marks the release of the
new 47-disc box set, 'The Com-
plete Album Collection Volume 1."
"Like a Rolling Stone" came
out in 1965 and remains one of
the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
singer-songwriter's most influen-
tial songs.
The video will allow viewers to
switch between 16 different story


Associated Press
Nancy Jones, widow of country music star George Jones, lis-
tens Monday as the Jones Boys band plays at the memorial un-
veiled at the late singer's grave in Nashville, Tenn. Nancy
Jones spoke at the monument's dedication and announced a
scholarship in her late husband's name at Middle Tennessee
State University. George Jones died April 26.


lines that mimic television chan-
nels. The actors and hosts on
each of these channels lip-sync
the lyrics to the song and view-
ers can move from one to an-
other during the song
seamlessly.
Steven Seagal
'adopts' stray dog
in Romania
BUCHAREST, Romania -
He plays the tough guy in
movies, but actor Steven Sea-
gal showed his soft side when
he "adopted" one of Bucharest's
street dogs.
The dogs have been in the
news after a 4-year-old boy was
fatally mauled by a stray in Au-
gust and Parliament passed a law
permitting Bucharest's 64,000
street dogs to be euthanized.
Seagal visited a dog shelter
south of Bucharest Sunday and
adopted a 7-month-old black
and tan puppy in the long-
distance adoption program,
which costs $18 a month. The
dog will remain at the shelter.


"I am doing the best I can to
bring awareness ... so that we
can make sure these accidents
and tragedies don't happen
again," he said in comments
broadcast Monday.
He is currently filming the
thriller "A Good Man" in
Romania.
Simon, Sondheim,
Chabon to share
stage Dec. 3
NEW YORK--It is a triple
billing for the ages, one night only:
Paul Simon, Stephen Sond-
heim and Michael Chabon.
The subject will be words and
music.
Chabon, the Pulitzer Prize-
winning novelist, will host a dis-
cussion among himself and the
two celebrated composers. An-
nounced Monday by the Mac-
Dowell Colony for artists, the
event will be held Dec. 3 at the
New Museum of Contemporary
Art in New York City.

From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Nov. 19, the
323rd day of 2013. There are 42
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 19, 1863, President
Abraham Lincoln delivered the Get-
tysburg Address as he dedicated a
national cemetery at the site of the
Civil War battlefield in Pennsylvania.
On this date:
In 1919, the Senate rejected the
Treaty of Versailles by a vote of 55
in favor, 39 against, short of the
two-thirds majority needed for
ratification.
In 1977, Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat became the first Arab
leader to visit Israel.
In 1985, President Ronald Rea-
gan and Soviet leader Mikhail S.
Gorbachev met for the first time as
they began their summit in Geneva.
In 1990, the pop duo Milli Vanilli
were stripped of their Grammy
Award because other singers had
lent their voices to the "Girl You
Know It's True" album.
Ten years ago: During his state
visit to London, President Bush urged
Europe to put aside bitter war dis-
agreements with the U.S. and work
to build democracy in Iraq or risk turn-
ing the nation over to terrorists.
Five years ago: AI-Qaida's No.
2, Ayman al-Zawahri, slurred
Barack Obama as a black Ameri-
can who does the bidding of whites
in a new Web message intended to
dent the president-elect's popularity
among Arabs and Muslims.
One year ago: With no deal in
sight to end the conflict, Israel and
Hamas continued to exchange fire;
more than three dozen Palestinians
were killed in Israeli attacks and
fighters in Gaza fired 95 rockets at
southern Israel.
Today's Birthdays: Talk show
host Larry King is 80. Talk show
host Dick Cavett is 77. Broadcast-
ing and sports mogul Ted Turner is
75. Actress Meg Ryan is 52.
Thought for Today: "My theol-
ogy, briefly, is that the universe was
dictated but not signed." Christo-
pher Morley, American author and
journalist (1890-1957).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR -1 HI LOH PR I 196r
68 0.00 I'. 7Q fi rIa p.K 176 6!


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
sh
sh
pc
sh
pc
pc
sh
sh


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Partly to mostly
cloudy with a chance of scattered
showers today.


75 64 0.00 '-- A NA NA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Ielusvedaiy
forecast by: -d

BT P y TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
S High: 75 Low: 60
Mostly cloudy with a chance of
I 1 showers.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 60
Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers.

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 61
Partly sunny with a slight chance of showers.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 80/65
Record 89/33
Normal 78/51
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +8
PRECIPITATION*
Monday trace
Total for the month 1.89 in.
Total for the year 54.03 in.
Normal for the year 48.74 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 2
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.98 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 68
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 74/,
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 0.8/12
Wednesday's count: 1.2
Thursday's count: 3.5
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/19 TUESDAY 6:17 12:04 6:41 12:29
11/20 WEDNESDAY 7:10 12:58 7:34 1:22
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
( e ~ 0 SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:34P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:58 A.M.
4 0 C ^ C. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................7:26P.M.
NOV. 25 DEC. 2 DEC. 9 DEC. 17 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 8:34 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:33 a/1:43 a 7:07 p/2:29 p
Crystal River" 3:54 a/11:51 a 5:28 p/11:40 p
Withlacoochee* 1:41 a9:39 a 3:15 p/9:28 p
Homosassa** 4:43 a/12:42 a 6:17 p/1:28 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
6:07 a/2:18 a 7:43 p/3:03 p
4:28 a/12:25 p 6:04 p/--
2:15 a/l10:13 a 3:51 p/10:03 p
5:17 a/1:17 a 6:53 p/2:02 p


F'cast
sh
pc
sh
pc
sh
pc
sh
sh
sh


Gulf water
temperature


73
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.16 29.15 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.62 38.61 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.80 39.78 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.48 40.47 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


.11 s
pc
.01 s
s
.18 s
pc
.11 s
pc
.02 s
r
.15 s
sn
.30 pc
s
s
.02 s
pc
s
pc
s
s
.31 s
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
.01 s
.13 s
ts
s
.30 s
pc
pc
pc
s
s
pc
pc
.20 s
.01 s
s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 75 61 .28 pc 68 54
NewYorkCity 65 58 .22 s 49 34
Norfolk 74 57 .03 s 53 36
Oklahoma City 67 41 pc 63 49
Omaha 55 29 pc 58 41
Palm Springs 76 53 pc 75 54
Philadelphia 67 58 .18 s 49 33
Phoenix 81 57 pc 78 59
Pittsburgh 56 43 s 42 26
Portland, ME 64 49 .29 s 43 24
Portland, Ore 55 51 .19 sh 51 33
Providence, R.I. 66 52 .46 s 49 27
Raleigh 75 61 .06 s 54 33
Rapid City 56 20 pc 58 33
Reno 54 29 r 56 39
Rochester, NY 56 40 .02 sn 39 27
Sacramento 60 40 r 61 52
St. Louis 57 42 s 53 36
St. Ste. Marie M M na c 37 30
Salt Lake City 63 36 c 54 42
San Antonio 83 62 pc 74 58
San Diego 69 56 pc 64 58
San Francisco 61 46 r 63 53
Savannah 83 69 pc 63 44
Seattle 53 49 .65 sh 47 37
Spokane 48 40 .01 rs 49 27
Syracuse 62 41 .12 pc 41 24
Topeka 61 30 pc 61 44
Washington 71 55 .15 s 50 35
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 90 Laredo, Texas LOW-1 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/78As
Amsterdam 44/39/sh
Athens 64/57/pc
Beijing 50/32/pc
Berlin 40/38/sh
Bermuda 72/65/sh
Cairo 75/58/s
Calgary 10/-2/sn
Havana 79/71/pc
Hong Kong 70/67/c
Jerusalem 66/53/pc


Lisbon 58/43/s
London 34/27/pc
Madrid 51/32/pc
Mexico City 75/53/ts
Montreal 34/28/pc
Moscow 31/29/pc
Paris 42/39/sh
Rio 84/71/s
Rome 60/53/sh
Sydney 82/55/pc
Tokyo 57/41/s
Toronto 39/25/pc
Warsaw 38/36/pc


LEGAL


=1ro


Meeting N


Miscellan


Notice to

Credit


Notices........


eous Notice



ors/Adminis


NOTICES




....................C 16


s .................C16



itration.......C16


C I T R UL S C 0 U N T Y



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
* ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Prevention keeps



the doctor away


Black men have higher risk ofprostate cancer


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

The statistics are sober-
ing, but you don't neces-
sarily have to be too
alarmed about your
chances of dying from
prostate cancer
According to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, one in
six men will be diagnosed
with the cancer in their
lifetime.
But, according to Dr
Lakshmi Padala of the
Padala Family Practice in
Lecanto, about 90 percent
of those diagnosed with
prostate cancer will never
die from it.
"We are talking about 10
percent who may actually
have moderate to serious
cancer," Padala said.
Prevention or knowing
your risk factors are key el-
ements in avoiding a posi-
tive diagnosis, said Padala.
Screenings, or tests, he
said, are important tools
to detect the cancer
According to Padala,
the common screens are:
The digital rectal
exam, which is recom-
mended yearly for males
older than 40.
A prostrate-specific
antigen (PSA) blood test,
which looks for elevated
levels of PSA, another
possible indicator of
prostate cancer PSA tests
are recommended yearly
after age 50.
Biopsies, where tis-
sue is removed from the
prostate and tested for
cancer


Padala said perhaps the
most important elements
to use as guides are the
risk factors.
He points to three key
factors:
Family history of the
cancer
Being a black male.
Padala said studies have
shown 1,600 black men in
every 100,000 get diag-
nosed with prostrate can-
cer yearly compared to
1,000 in 100,000 whites
and 700 among Asians.
"And it shows African-
Americans are more
likely to die from it and
get it at an earlier age
than other races."
Age. Padala said after
age 50, men should make
it a habit to be tested.
Padala said even
though some of the figures
seem alarming, regular
screenings and keeping
an eye on one's prostate
will usually do the trick of
surviving a bout with
cancer

The Mayo Clinic also
suggests some of the fol-
lowing dietary adjust-
ments to help prevent
prostate cancer:
Avoid fat, because
studies have shown fats
from animals were most
likely to be associated
with an increased risk of
prostate cancer Animal
products that contain fats
include meat, lard and
butter When possible, use


plant-based fats such as
olive oil rather than but-
ter Sprinkle nuts or seeds
on your salad rather than
cheese.
Increase the amount
of fruits and vegetables
you eat each day Fruits
and vegetables are full of
vitamins and nutrients
that are thought to reduce
the risk of prostate cancer
Eat fish. Fatty fish
such as salmon, sardines,
tuna and trout contain a
fatty acid called omega-3
that has been linked to a
reduced risk of prostate
cancer
Reduce the amount of
dairy products you eat
each day In studies, men
who ate the most dairy
products such as milk,
cheese and yogurt each
day had the highest risk of
prostate cancer
Drink green tea. Stud-
ies of men who drink
green tea or take green
tea extract as a supple-
ment have a reduced risk
of prostate cancer
Drink alcohol in mod-
eration, if at all. If you
choose to drink alcohol,
limit yourself to no more
than a drink or two each
day
Maintain a healthy
weight. Men with a body
mass index (BMI) of 30 or
higher are considered
obese. Being obese in-
creases your risk of
prostate cancer
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


HAVE A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Approval for
story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a reporter is
assigned. Call executive editor Mike Arnold or managing editor Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660. Be prepared to give your name, phone number and
the address of the news event.


AWARE
Continued from PageAl

what Movember is all
about.
It's about men being
honest and open (ugh!)
with their medical condi-
tions. It's time, experts and
patients say, for men to
board the awareness train
and learn what they can
about health issues spe-
cific to men, like prostate
cancer
Dr Udaya Kumar, a Ho-
mosassa urologist, said
prostate screenings spiked
in the 1980s with the intro-
duction of






cosierdthe bsln
u prostate-
-~ specific
antigen, or
PSA, test,
which
measures
the level of
Dorothy PSA in a
Pernu m a n s
Seven Rivers blood. Ele-
spokeswoman. vated lev-
els of PSA 4.0 ng/mL is
considered the baseline -
could indicate prostate
cancer
"Since the PSA was in-
troduced in the late
1980s, we saw a big surge
in the number of pa-
tients," Dr. Kumar said.
"Then it started to go
down because we have
detected many of the
prostate cancers and
treated them. There's
been a significant reduc-
tion in mortality rates in
the last 15 to 25 years. I
don't see the type of can-
cers I've seen before."
Still, Dr. Kumar ac-
knowledged prostate-
cancer awareness among
men is low
"It could be better," he
said. "More men need to
come forward to get
checked. Sometimes we
see more advanced can-
cers and many of them are
preventable."
Dorothy Pernu, spokes-
woman at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center
near Crystal River, said
attention-grabbers like
November and the Chron-
icle's Blue Paper are de-
signed to get men thinking


about subjects that could
save their lives if not
avoided.
"We know women are
the health care decision-
makers. Women do the re-
search for children as well
as the men in their lives,
and themselves," Pernu
said. "This movement is
about, 'Hello gentlemen,
take notice of your own
health because it's really
important."'
Seven Rivers teamed
with the Citrus County
Agricultural Alliance to
sponsor a local Movember
awareness project.
The Movember move-
ment started in 2003 in
Australia with a group of
friends wanting to grow
moustaches as a stunt to
bring awareness to
prostate cancer and men's
health. It's now grown to 21
countries, including the
U.S., and is considered a
focal charity for prostate
cancer awareness and
education.
Blue Paper, not coinci-
dentally, was born from
October's Pink Paper,
which raises awareness
and treatment options
for women with breast
cancer
Pink October has be-
come synonymous with
breast cancer awareness.
Both Pernu and Dr Kumar
hope Blue Paper and
November can bring that
kind of annual attention to
prostate cancer and other
men's health issues, as
well.
"I would like to see that


BLUE PAPER DAY 2013


Do you have the
right insurance coverage?

Call Your Local Team Of Experts For A Free
Analysis And Estimate!

U Home U Auto U Business

Financial Services


J ^ CENTRAL RIDGE

SWINSURERS, LLC
Ji.glRH 2535 N. Reston Terr., Hernando, FL
iNext to Village Services on 486)
352-527-0110


"We Cater to Cowards!"



Experience The Difference


HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE


I Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.

Ledgerdentistry.com


3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448

(352) 628-3443

Insurance Accepted L,.-ensr,- I'l Io,


SAIIUISF XIO
CUAIAANXEE
WIX4AUIRE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 A5

Dr. Udaya Kumar, a
Homosassa urologist,
offers these tips for
prevention and
screening for prostate
cancer:
By age 50, have a
screening annually.
Discuss PSA levels
with your doctor to
see if further tests are
necessary.
Your risk may be
higher if you have
family history of
prostate cancer.
Prostate cancer is
less likely as a man
ages into his elderly
years.
Prostate cancer is
very treatable if de-
tected early, before
the cancer has a
chance to spread.
Try to stick to exercise
and a healthy diet.

happen," Dr Kumar said.
"We could make it happen.
We need support from the
community. We can all do
our part by raising
awareness."
Pernu said she hopes to
see a day where these is-
sues aren't taboo to men.
"The younger you start
paying attention to these
things, the better off
they're going to be," she
said. "That's the whole
point of Movember It al-
lows men the opportunity
to openly talk about their
health. A thousand conver-
sations happen for every
moustache."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Marianne
Becktel, 65
HERNANDO
Marianne Becktel, 65, of
Hernando, Fla., died Sun-
day, Nov 17, 2013. Memo-
rial Mass of Remembrance
will be at 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, Nov 27, 2013, at Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church.




Edgar
Hinson, 82
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for The Honorable
Edgar Allan Hinson, age
82, of Homosassa, FL will
be held at 11:00 a.m. on
Thursday, November 21,
2013 at the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes, followed by a com-
mittal service at 2:00 p.m.
at Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell, FL. In
lieu of flowers, please con-
sider making a donation in
Ed's memory to the St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital at www.stjude.org
or by calling (800) 805-5856.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Known by his family and
friends as Ed, he was born
in Ft. Pierce, FL, on De-
cember 12, 1930, to Elton
and Ruth Nettles Hinson.
He passed away on Sun-
day, November 17, 2013 in
the loving care of his
family
Ed loved the outdoors
and had a passion for golf,
fishing, and collecting
tools. He enjoyed building
things, and included his
daughter in his projects
from a very young age. Ed
served in the U.S. Air
Force from 1950 to 1954.
He graduated from
Florida State University
with a Bachelor's Degree
in 1958, and later, in 1972,
earned a Juris Doctor from
Stetson University College
of Law. He was particu-
larly proud of his law de-
gree, since he didn't begin
law school until age 39.
After law school he
opened a law practice in
Tampa, FL, and practiced
law until he was elected
County Judge in 1978. He
served in the judicial sys-
tem as a criminal judge
and a juvenile judge for 18
years.
Ed is survived by his
wife of 53 years, Bobbie
Hinson; his daughter,
Stephanie Hinson McDan-
nold, and her husband,
Drew; his brothers, John
Hinson and Mack Hinson;
his sister, Ann Massie;
and his grandson, Colin
McDannold.


Alex
Calderwood, 47
HOTELIER
SEATTLE Alex
Calderwood, the Seattle
co-founder of the hip Ace
Hotel chain, has died in
London at age 47.
His company, Atelier
Ace, said on its website
that he passed away
Thursday but released no
information about the
cause. The statement calls
Calderwood "our teacher,
mentor, guru and most im-
portantly our dear friend."
In 1999, he and two
friends launched Seattle's
Ace Hotel in a flophouse
that formerly served mar-
itime workers. It's
renowned for its much-
imitated style, with vintage
and repurposed furniture,
record players and gue-
stroom art by Shepard
Fairey who later be-
came famous for creating
the "HOPE" poster that
came to symbolize Barack
Obama's 2008 presidential
campaign.
Ace Hotels later opened
in Portland, Ore.; New
York; Palm Springs, Calif;
and London, with others
scheduled to open late this
year or early next year in
Panama City, Panama, and
Los Angeles. Ace describes
itself on its website as "a
collection of individuals -
multiple and inclusive,
held together by an affinity
for the soulful."
"We try to do unex-
pected things from a de-
sign standpoint," Calder-
wood told The New York
Times in 2008. "We want to


Isabelle 'Betty'
Leavitt, 91
HERNANDO
Isabelle M. "Betty"
Leavitt, 91, of Hernando,
Fla., and formerly of
Wadsworth, Ohio, passed
away Nov 15, 2013, at Hos-
p i c e
House of
Citrus


year ill-
ness. Betty
was born
March 23,
1922, to Isabelle
Arthur Leavitt
and Lula
(Rood) Putt in Wadsworth.
On Aug. 8, 1940, she mar-
ried Kenneth Leavitt, who
preceded her in death on
Nov 14, 1996. Betty was
employed at the
Wadsworth Rittman Hos-
pital for 28 years where
she retired in 1980. Betty
was truly a Godsend not
only to her family but to all
she knew and cared for
Her hobbies included
needlework and reading
Jeanette Oke or her fa-
vorite book, the Bible. Her
grandchildren always
looked forward to the
Christmas ornaments she
made for them every year
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her son, Gerald
(Karen) Leavitt of Fulton,
Ohio; daughter, Sally
(Bruce) Liston of Her-
nando, with whom she
resided for the past 15
years; ten grandchildren;
20 great-grandchildren;
six great-great-
grandchildren; and her
sister, Shirley Hershey of
Wadsworth, Ohio. Preced-
ing her in death beside her
husband and parents were
her son, Richard Leavitt;
great-grandson, Christo-
pher Powers; and broth-
ers, Robert and Jackie
Putt
Funeral services will be
at 1 p.m. Nov 21, 2013, at
Moss-Feaster Funeral
Home in Largo with burial
at Serenity Gardens. Visi-
tation hours are planned
for Thursday from 12 to
1 p.m., at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers
the family requests memo-
rial donations be made to
Hospice of Citrus County
and Nature Coast 3350 W
Audubon Park Path,
Lecanto, FL 33461.
Heaven has welcomed an-
other angel. For photos
and condolences please
visit wwwmossfeaster
largo.com.

U The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660.


celebrate the everyday
with utilitarian objects."
Calderwood grew up in
Seattle's eastside suburbs.
Just out of high school, he
began managing a Seattle
clothing store called Inter-
national News. He used
material from a Boeing Co.
surplus store to create fix-
tures, desks and other
parts of a showroom, Amit
Shah, who hired him, told
The Seattle Times.
Calderwood is survived
by his parents, Thomas
and Kathleen Calderwood
of Seattle; two sisters,
Donna Roberts and Tah-
nee Ferry; and a brother,
Tim Calderwood.
-From wire reports



"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Python challenge halted


Florida won't

repeatpublic

snake hunt

nextyear

Associated Press

MIAMII A public hunt
for Burmese pythons in
Florida's Everglades
won't be repeated next
year, a Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission spokes-
woman said Monday
Instead, the state is
beefing up established
programs that train li-
censed hunters and peo-
ple who regularly work in
areas known to contain
pythons to kill or report
exotic snakes.
"Certainly our work is
not done with pythons,"
said wildlife commission
spokeswoman Carli
Segelson.
The state-sponsored
Python Challenge at-
tracted roughly 1,600
hunters in January and
February and made head-
lines worldwide. It netted
68 of the invasive snakes,
the longest measuring
more than 14 feet, but of-
ficials said the number of
pythons caught wasn't as
important as the data col-
lected during the hunt.
University of Florida re-
searchers still are analyz-
ing that data.
Segelson said the hunt
met the commission's pri-
mary goal of raising
awareness about Florida's
problem with pythons and
invasive species, and
there will not be another
python hunt next year


iD~


LEND




YOUR




EARZTM


Hearing Aid
Cost vs. Benefit
Comparison
Study

Participants
sought by Gardner
Audiology for a new
research study comparing
the value of four new
hearing aid models. Each
has a different price level
and varying degrees of
technology proven to
deliver understandable
sound quality in difficult
listening situations.

In exchange for completing
a pre and post-fitting
opinion survey, Gardner
Audiology will loan you
the hearing aids of your
choice, for a free 30 day
study. Audiologists with
advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.

At the end of thirty days
you may return your loaner
aids or purchase them at a
discount. It's your choice.


Office
Locations:
Crystal River
& Inverness
352-795-5700


_iGardnrcinei
C&MrAdMOufl 3


It's unknown how many
pythons live in Florida's
Everglades. Researchers
say the large snakes are
among the invasive
species that are eating na-
tive wildlife at an alarm-
ing rate.
State and federal
wildlife officials are ex-
ploring other ways to
manage the python popu-
lation, including radio
tracking devices, snake-
sniffing dogs and specially
designed traps patented


by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
During the Python
Challenge, experienced
hunters had more success
than the hundreds of ama-
teurs who signed up, so
the state is focusing on
honing their expertise to
harvest pythons in the
wild, Segelson said.
The state wildlife com-
mission already allows
people with special per-
mits to remove pythons
and other non-native


HOW YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED
Key votes for the week ending Nov. 15 by Voterama in Congress.


Health-Law Waivers: The House on mandate
Nov. 15 voted, 261-157, to enable graphic
individuals and families to retain product
health insurance they obtained be- Military
fore the Affordable House
Care Act took effect an atter
even if those poli- f veteran
cies do not comply sonnel
with the law's mini- public d
mum-coverage stan- "-, posed I
dards. A yes vote "'"" support
was to send HR F ? emptiol
3350 to the Senate.U GOP Ju
Rich Nugent, Yes. Rich on Nov.
Democrats' Alterna- Nugent 56-41,
tive: Voting 229- votes n
191, the House on Nov. 15 blocked a a RepuL
bid by Democrats to add certain buster
consumer protections to HR 3350 nomina
(above), including a requirement nelia T.I
that state regulators prohibit the Georget
selling of policies that discriminate fessor,
on the basis of pre-existing condi- United
tions. A yes vote was to block a di- of App(
rect vote on the Democratic motion District
on grounds it was not germane to Circuit.
the underlying bill. Nugent, Yes. was to
Asbestos Claims Disclosures: The long-sta
House on Nov. 13 voted, 221-199, to nomina
require disclosure on the Internet of Nelson
information on claims filed by victims Rubio,
of asbestos-related illnesses, in order Key Vol
to deter bogus claims. A yes vote was the wee
to send the Senate a bill (HR 982) the Ser
seen by critics as a solution in search up the*
of a problem. Nugent, Yes. military
Disclosures by Corporations: The resume
House on Nov. 13 refused, 195-226, bill to ii
to amend HR 982 (above) so that it compel
also imposes disclosure requirements House'
on companies that are defendants in
asbestos litigation. A yes vote was to


FREE OBITUARIES
m Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name
of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death;
place of death; date, time and place of visitation
and funeral services.


6L.4.. 8. !baass
Funeral Home With Crematory
LARRYDUGGAN
Serv: Tue. 1:00 PM
CHESTER SEGERS
Service: Mon. 4:00 PM
SOPHIE ROSS
Serv: Thur. Dec. 5, 3:00 PM
First United Methodist Church
of Floral City
CHARLES LOVAGLIO
Viewing: Tue. 4:00-6:00 PM
Mass: Wed. 10:00AM
Our Lady of Fatima
726-8323


Memriia Gn
I I4 I I]


Suern Our C
Be oer o H o
352~i 746-4646


te public disclosure of the geo-
al location of asbestos-laden
ts. Nugent, No.
y-Personnel Exemption: The
on Nov. 13 defeated, 197-224,
mpt by Democrats to exempt
s and active-duty military per-
who file asbestos claims from
disclosure requirements im-
by HR 982 (above). A yes vote
ted the proposed military ex-
n. Nugent, No.
idicial Filibuster: The Senate
12 failed,
to reach 60
eeded to end
iblican fill-
against the
nation of Cor-
L. Pillard, a
town law pro-
to sit on the
States Court Bill Nelson
eals for the
of Columbia
A yes vote
advance a
ailed judicial
tion. Bill
, Yes; Marco
No.
tes Ahead: In
.k of Nov. 18,
nate will take Marco
fiscal 2014 Rubio
Budget and
Debate on a House-passed
increase federal regulation of
funded pharmaceuticals. The
will debate energy measures.
2013 Thomas Reports Inc.
Call:202-667-9760.


To Place Your


M Serving Our Commur
Meeting Your Needs!



Br.w


"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931

ad 's buinesdy
pro oru ae
fo oidas


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. [S
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfunerahome.com


Obituaries


SPOT ONE?
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission urges
people to report
sightings of pythons
and other exotic
species to
888-IVE-GOT-1 or
www.ivegotl.org.

snakes from designated
wildlife management
areas. A partnership with
The Nature Conservancy
and Everglades National
Park will continue to train
people who regularly
work in areas known to
contain pythons such as
law enforcement officers,
utility workers and stu-
dents doing research to
kill or report non-native
snakes, Segelson.
The state also will reach
out to licensed hunters to
train and encourage them
to harvest pythons while
they're out in search of
other animals during
open hunting seasons on
designated lands, Segel-
son said.
Florida prohibits pos-
session or sale of the
pythons for use as pets,
and federal law bans the
importation and inter-
state sale of the species.
The wildlife commis-
sion urges people to re-
port sightings of pythons
and other exotic species
to 888-IVE-GOT-1 or
www.ivegotl.org.
People also can surren-
der exotic animals with no
questions asked as part of
the state's pet amnesty
program. Since 2006, 70
pythons have been
handed over, including
three at an amnesty event
over the weekend, Segel-
son said.


Associated Press
Bill Booth of Bradenton wears a dead Burmese python
he caught in January 2013 in the Florida Everglades as
part of the monthlong "Python Challenge." Booth's
snake measured an unofficial 11.59 feet. Florida won't
be repeating a public hunt meant to reduce the popula-
tion of invasive Burmese pythons in the Everglades.


-- Death ELSEWHERE


Serving all your cremation needs.-1


00pu


flrUNEPZALHOMES
& CREWNTORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com


I


A6 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


B9jB




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Doctor: Pathology report key

in diagnosis and treatment


M november is a monthlong awareness-raiser in November that
encourages the growth of moustaches known as a mo to
call attention to men's health issues.
Many men locally are taking part in growing their mos for this
common cause. Here is why Facebook readers are growing their mos:


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
With prostate cancer, a
pathology report is like a
roadmap to a desired or
positive ending.
Pathologists like Dr Fer-
nando Esclopis generate
them to help patients nav-
igate the sometimes-com-
plicated world of prostate
cancer diagnosis and
treatment.
Esclopis, who works at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center and also
has a private practice, said
many prostate cancer
cases are what are called
indolent, or low-grade.
"And, most people with
this low-grade type can
live with it for the rest of
their lives," Esclopis said.
"They will of course be
monitored and checked,
but the cancer normally
would not be life threaten-
ing and may require only
minimal therapy"
Esclopis said patholo-
gists rely on variable fac-
tors and a scoring system
called the Gleason Score
to help fashion a treatment
regime for patients.
Esclopis said the Glea-
son process is as follows:
The patient is biop-
sied, having tissue re-
moved from the suspected
area of either side of the
prostate. The process also
is called a core biopsy Es-
clopis said the entire sus-
pected problem area is
sampled and a number is
assigned.
Doctors use numbers 1



MEAT
Continued from PageAl

Tate have bonds of $12,000
each. Milam was released
on his own recognizance.
Citrus County Sheriff's
Deputy Chris Dearden
caught up with the four in
the Woodview Avenue
area in Lecanto and saw,
in plain view, $362 worth of
supermarket meat re-
portedly stolen from the
Sweetbay store in Inver-
ness and the Publix Super-
market on North Forest
Ridge Boulevard in
Hernando.
Dearden was in the
Woodview Avenue area
and stopped the vehicle
the four suspects were in
after getting reports about
the vehicle in connection
to a meat theft at Publix.
Deputy Todd Holloway
soon arrived on scene and
first spoke to Milam, who
Holloway said quickly ad-
mitted guilt in the thefts.
Milam reportedly told Hol-
loway the foursome first
went to Sweetbay and stole
$215 worth of meat and
proceeded to the Publix
where more meat was
stolen. Milam told investi-
gators the other three went
into the stores while he
stayed in the vehicle as the
driver
According to Holloway, a
witness at the Publix tried
to stop the trio from leav-
ing the store after the sus-
pects reportedly took the
meats, but failed. How-
ever, witnesses were able
to get a good description of
the vehicle for authorities.
According to the arrest
affidavit, Dore initially de-
nied being in the stores
after they were detained,
but changed her story and
said she only acted as a di-
version and never actually
lifted any meat
Investigators said after
viewing surveillance
footage from the stores,
Dore, Tate and Brosey can
be seen entering the stores
and leaving without paying
for any merchandise.
Tate, who is the son of
Brosey, declined to speak
to investigators.
Brosey reportedly also
initially denied being in
the stores, but changed her
story and admitted to
stealing meat. She also
said she drove the vehicle
after the Publix theft be-


cause Milam was afraid to
get caught driving.
The foursome was trans-
ported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility
where Milam was released
on his own recognizance.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


through 5 to determine
which biopsy sample looks
like normal prostate tis-
sue. "The lower the score,
the better; the higher the
score, the worse," Esclopis
said.
Because different
core samples could carry
different points of severity,
the points of the most se-
vere and points of less se-
vere are added together
(with the worst coming
first) to give a patient their
Gleason Score. The high-
est possible score is 10.
When the scores are
added together, the 2, 3
and 4 become the lowest,
or less cancerous num-
ber, on the scale, and 8 to
10 becomes the most ag-
gressive on the scale.
Seven therefore is re-
ferred to as moderately
differentiated, or inter-
mediate grade, and the
growth at this juncture
could go either way
Esclopis said the


Gleason Score is an impor-
tant barometer of the na-
ture of the prostate cancer,
but that so is the prostate-
specific antigen (PSA) test,
which is a yearly blood test
given to men starting at
age 50. PSAs are cancer-
associated agents pro-
duced by the prostate, but
Esclopis said elevated lev-
els of PSAs may not be in-
dicative of cancer, as there
are benign, or non-cancer-
ous, conditions that can
also go undiagnosed or un-
treated and cause an ele-
vated PSA.
He suggests a combina-
tion of PSAs and findings
of a rectal exam as the best
way to gain a diagnosis;
while the Gleason total
score, percentage of
prostate gland involved
and the margins complete
the pathology report.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


AUD BE 1 [o

S SI I g:





Invernes omaisli:gIlg


. lo

Ii


Visit Our New Website
For Great Specials

* Wood Carpet
*Laminate *Vinyl
*Tile Area Rug'


I www.cashcarpetandtie.cj,


6976 N Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills FL- Downtown Holder 352.489.4933


U]


Jose Beauchamp:
"I do it for the cause.
It's the only time my girl-
friend lets me grow
one."
~Michael
Pate:
"It's about
time that men
were con-
cerned about their health. This
movement is the ticket. Thanks
November Citrus County"


prevention."


SJoe Estrada:
"To billboard
how early
detection is the
best form of


Alan Spence:
"I'm a testy
cancer survivor and
going on 11 years
now I had it before
it was kool."


SUPPORTING
TOYS FOR TOTS
Please (if you are able) bring a
new and unwrapped toy All
donations will go to a needy
child IN CITRUS COUNTY'

ATM ANTIQUES & AUCTIONS PRESENTS A SPECIAL

Thanksgiving FREE
LUNCH
Weekend Auction! asoaaying
I to our
SATURDAY, NOV. 30 10Oam customers
PREVIEW: FRI, NOV. 2910.5, AND 8AM UNTIL THE AUCTION STARTS ON SATURDAY E N
480 lots of Antiques, Collectibles, Fine Art, Jewelry
and a large collection of Gold Coins, both US & Foreign
lll O __ h .... ...................


stemware as well as serving pieces a
and collector series items.
Swarovski crystal will be offered with
some just perfect for a gift! Sterling p
silver includes a fine centerpiece by Tiffany & Co that weighs over 50 troy
ounces, an impressive gift or addition to your own collection! Another great
gift item is the Esteban guitar, brand new condition and comes with an amp
and the case. Sterling flatware by Gorham and Durgin, Hummels including a
large umbrella boy & girl as well as collector plates by Hummel, DeGrazia,
Hibel, Erte and others, there is a fine selection here for all.





Only a part of the auction (235 lots) will be offered online via www.liveauctioneers.com
so there will be plenty of great deals for all, and are just in time for Christmas.
We are always buying and taking items on consignment for future
auctions, if you have items you would like to sell
please give us a call at 352-795-2061.
mAB3279 AE450AU1593
Amy Stalker, Owner/Auctioneer
kT^ Charles Fudge, Auctioneer .
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, CASH AND LOCAL CHECKS. THERE ISA BUYER'S PREMIUM OF 13%
(-3%FOR CASH) COMPLETE TERMS CAN BE FOUND ON OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.CHARLIEFUDGE.COM


Retirement Living
,A You deserve a break without giving
F 4up your independence.

t "~ ...Join Us
0 %," ,. Happy Hour: 2:00-4:00 PM
e-%.ls Mon.-Wed. & Fri
-- Light Refreshments
Specialty Drinks Entertainment
Lim- Full Kitchens
Washer & Dryer in Each Apartment
Unique All Day Dining in our
_ __ __--- I__.-.-,-Wse re nEc prmn
Restaurant
And ,o much more!

Sall352-748-0682 tolav

. Onlly 21 easy miles from downtown o .I, ,
_- Inverness and well worth a visit!

77RioGadBld9 idodFL375wwpvidenceindependence* 6. .com


BLUE PAPER DAY 2013


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7




MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Stylist Carol Condiff shaves Dale McClellan's beard.


PSA
Continued from PageAl

our PSA," he said. "We
need not wait until the
doctor tells us. I should be
able to ask a guy what his
PSA is and he won't get
angry, kind of like women
reminding each other
about breast exams."
He recalled questioning
his doctor after a PSA test.
"It was higher than I
thought it should be," he
said. But his initial con-
cerns were dismissed and
a subsequent test seemed
to affirm his fears were
unfounded.
But he felt something
was going on and per-
sisted. He was retested
and the number was up.
Eventually a biopsy was
ordered, three of 12 sam-
ples came back positive
for cancer
"My wife and I decided
that if I had cancer, we
wanted it out," he said -
and his urologist agreed.
"We decided to have it
removed."
After removing it they
determined he had three
different kinds of prostate
cancer, two of which were
very aggressive. "So we
did the right thing," he
said.
"Had I not grown that
beard three years ago, I
would have been just like
a normal guy and waited
until some doctor told
me," he said. "I could have
had prostate cancer an-
other couple of years."
Since being public about


his cancer and surgery,
McClellan said he's been
approached by other men
with questions and con-
cerns about their own
health.
He finds this encourag-
ing. "I'm trying to get the
word out," he said.
"I feel like I've inspired
some people, maybe ag-
gravated some others."
Rocky Hensley, another
prostate cancer survivor,
has had similar experi-
ences with other men, and
even women having
questions.
"It's been 10 years." he
said, "so far so good."
The Inverness banker is
an active Movember sup-
porter "Once people find
out that you've had it, the
conversation really starts,"
said Hensley "So I've
found myself becoming an
advocate of preventive
measures."
He encourages people
to ask about prostate can-
cer and for men not hesi-
tate to ask for a second
opinion.
"The awareness from it
(Movember) has grown in
the three years," he said.
"It's long overdue; it's good
for our community"
"Beyond your numbers,
it's about men's health is-
sues,' McClellan said,
"Something about men, we
just don't want to go treat
ourselves until we see
blood or feel pain.
"Men need to ask the
question, what were my re-
sults and know what they
were a year ago. Don't de-
pend on the doctor to tell
you."


Video shows near-vertical



crash of Russian plane


Associated Press

KAZAN, Russia The
grainy airport video is
dark, short and chilling.
Within five seconds, a dot
of light that Russian au-
thorities say is a Boeing
737 appears in the sky over
the tarmac and plunges to
the ground in a near-verti-
cal crash. The result is a
blinding fireball.
The video shown Mon-
day by Russian television
stations www.youtube.
com/watch?vvgGHrMJ
uxRs of Sunday night's
horrifying crash at Kazan
airport that killed all 50
people onboard raises a
host of questions, includ-
ing why the plane's sec-
ond attempt to land at
night in good weather
went so horribly wrong.
Russian investigators
combed through the incin-
erated wreckage Monday
after fire crews spent hours
extinguishing the blaze.
Experts from the NTSB,
Boeing and the FAA were
heading to the scene.
The Boeing 737 belong-
ing to Tatarstan Airlines
was making its second at-
tempt at a landing in
Kazan, 520 miles east of
Moscow, according to
Alexander Poltinin, head of


Associated Press
Firefighters and rescuers work at the crash site of a
Russian passenger airliner near Kazan, the capital of the
Tatarstan republic Sunday night. The crash killed all 50
people onboard, officials said.


the local branch of Russia's
Investigative Committee.
The traffic controller at
the Kazan airport who
contacted the plane be-
fore the crash said the
crew told him they
weren't ready to land as it
was approaching but did-
n't specify the problem.
Marat Zaripov, deputy
head of the local branch of
the Investigative Commit-
tee, initially told reporters
that his team would look
into all theories, including
a terrorist attack. But the
Investigative Committee
said in a statement later
Monday that it was now
considering three possi-
ble causes: a technical
fault, a pilot error or ad-


Brashear's
^ ww.BrashearsPhar.sm a|0 8A 0 PH ARM V
" I:^ Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 PHRn MAll Crt


471 N.Dacie Point, Lecanto................746-3420
Hwy.491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology
206W. Dampier Street, Inverness......637-2079
One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


verse weather conditions.
Poltinin said it could
take weeks to identify the
remains.
Investigators have
found both of the plane's
black boxes which
record the plane's per-
formance and the crew's
conversations but said
they were damaged.
The brief video taken by
an airport security camera
showed the plane going
down at high speed at a
nearly vertical angle and
then hitting the ground and
exploding. It was con-
firmed as authentic to The
Associated Press by the
emergency press service at
Kazan airport and other
Russian officials.


Magomed Tolboyev, a
highly decorated Russian
test pilot, said on Rossiya
television that it wasn't
immediately clear why
the crew was unable to
land on their first try in
good weather
U.S. National Trans-
portation Safety Board
spokesman Eric Weiss said
Monday that a team of
eight U.S. aviation safety
experts were heading to
Russia to assist: three
NTSB crash investigators,
a U.S. Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration investigator
and four experts from the
plane manufacturer
John Cox, an aviation
safety consultant who flew
737s for 15 years for US
Airways, said one of the
first issues investigators
will look at based on the
nearly vertical angle of
descent in the video will
be whether the plane ex-
perienced an aerody-
namic stall, which usually
occurs when a plane slows
to the point where its
wings lose lift.
"Anytime you have an
airplane that gets this ver-
tical, the immediate suspi-
cion is that it stalled," Cox
said in an interview "The
airplane hit very hard ...
it's in a lot of small pieces."


HERIGAID







AUDBELT.
IvrnessHmosasaDunelo







586-799 628000 7891ii5i59


A8 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


DUI arrest
Daniel Black, 33, of
South Altman Terrace, Lecanto,
at 2:41 a.m. Nov. 17 on a mis-
demeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, Black
failed to maintain a single lane,
was unable to maintain a
steady speed, and had an ex-
pired registration. He was
asked to perform field sobriety
tests and did poorly. Tests of his
breath showed his blood
alcohol concentration was
0.160 percent, 0.182 percent,
and 0.190 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Black was
also issued a written warning
for operating a motor vehicle
with an expired tag less than
six months, and citations for no
proof of insurance and driving
on a suspended license un-
knowingly. Bond $500.
Mathew Phillips, 24, of
North Buscetta Loop, Crystal
River, at 1:36 a.m. Nov. 18 on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, Phillips'
vehicle was spotted leaving a
lounge, then he failed to main-
tain a single lane. He was
asked to perform field sobriety
tests and did poorly. Tests of his
breath showed his blood alco-
hol concentration was 0.135
percent and 0.133 percent.
Bond $500.
Domestic
battery arrests
Andrew Hesketh, 51, of
Inverness, at 1:09 a.m. Nov. 16
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Leo White, 30, of Beverly
Hills, at 1:09 a.m. Nov. 16 on a
misdemeanor charge of do-
mestic battery. No bond.
Carol Bushell, 47, of
Dunnellon, at 8:42 p.m. Nov. 17
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Jamie Bowman, 19, of
Crystal River, at 2:01 p.m.
Nov. 18 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Other arrests
Michael Stiles, 28, of
West Chata Place, Crystal
River, at 10:47 a.m. Nov. 15 on
an active warrant for felony vio-
lation of probation stemming
from an original charge of bur-
glary to an unoccupied struc-
ture. Bond was denied.
Lloyd Slaughter, 40, of
West Cinnamon Ridge Drive,


Lecanto, at 4:05 p.m. Nov. 15
on an active Sumter County
warrant for felony violation of
probation stemming from an
original charge of using the In-
ternet to lure a child. Bond was
denied.
James Jenkins, Jr, 40, of
West Waiting Lane, Dunnellon,
at 9:54 p.m. Nov. 15 on a
charge of felony battery (com-
mitting battery with one prior
conviction for battery). Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, Jenk-
ins is accused of punching and
striking a female victim in the
head and face. Bond $2,000.
Ashley Huebsch, 22, of
East George Street, Inverness,
at 12:43 p.m. Nov. 16 on a
felony charge of aggravated
battery with use of a deadly
weapon. According to her ar-
rest affidavit, Huebsch is ac-
cused of stabbing a victim in
neck. Bond $5,000.
Merhrya Souter, 19, of
South Alita Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 7:43 p.m. Nov. 16
on a misdemeanor charge of
retail petit theft. According to
her arrest affidavit, Souter is
accused of shoplifting 31 con-
doms valued at $12.64 from
the Inverness Walmart. Bond
$250.
Jessica Pacitti, 23, of In-
verness, at 3:12 p.m. Nov. 17
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated assault with use of a
deadly weapon without intent
to kill. No bond.
Marjorie Morris, 26, of
West Windhaven Place, Ho-
mosassa, at 8:40 p.m. Nov. 17
on a misdemeanor charge of
battery. According to her arrest


affidavit, Morris, along with Joy
Schneider, is accused of get-
ting into a verbal argument with
her neighbor, then striking the
victim and pulling her hair.
Bond $500.
Joy Schneider, 25, of
West Windhaven Place, Ho-
mosassa, at 8:40 p.m. Nov. 17
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill
and a misdemeanor charge of
battery. According to her arrest
affidavit, Schneider, along with
Marjorie Morris, is accused of
getting into a verbal argument
with her neighbor, striking the
victim and pulling her hair. Dur-
ing the altercation Schneider
left briefly and returned bran-
dishing a butcher knife, and
making threats to the victim.
Bond $2,500.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 10:20 a.m. Friday,
Nov. 15, in the 1000 block of
N.E. Seventh Ave., Crystal
River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 11:40 a.m. Nov. 15
in the 5700 block of E. Jasmine
Lane, Inverness.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:33 p.m. Nov. 15 in
the 100 block of Whitewood
St., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at4:23 p.m. Nov. 15 in
the 8900 block of W. Bass Lake
Road, Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 4:39 p.m. Nov. 15 in


the 9300 block of N. Jourden
Drive, Dunnellon.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 6 p.m. Nov. 15
in the 9900 block of W. Wedge-
wood Court, Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 4:37 a.m. Saturday,
Nov. 16, in the 8500 block of W.
Mayo Drive, Crystal River.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 9:12 a.m.
Nov. 16 in the 1700 block of S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
A residential burglary was
reported at 12:09 p.m. Nov. 16
in the 1400 block of W. Japon-
ica Place, Dunnellon.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1:04 p.m. Nov. 16 in
the 4500 block of E. Lucy
Court, Hernando.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 3:03 p.m.
Nov. 16 in the 6400 block of S.
Florida Ave., Floral City.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported at
12:37 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, in the
1600 block of Oracle Drive.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:40 p.m. Nov. 15 in the
5000 block of W. Oak Park
Blvd., Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 2:52 p.m. Nov. 15 in the
7900 block of W. Briarpatch St.,
Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported


at 6:04 p.m. Nov. 15 in the
3800 block of N. Baywood
Drive, Hernando.
A grand theft was reported
at 6:18 p.m. Nov. 15 in the 700
block of S. Terri Point, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:05 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
16, in the 1200 block of W.
Tacoma St., Hernando.
SA grand theft was reported
at 2:37 p.m. Nov. 16 in the
2600 block of N. Forest Ridge
Blvd., Hernando.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:58 p.m. Nov. 16 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.


mm.W W FhM rty
iIp -u k-jW
Do Inw n.2%-No1H
ko


WbwMAWrbfttututn
Strut your Mo at the show and wini
Pries for Best Looking. iggost Lomest and
Most Unique Mo's Indviduols) and Best
Theme think costumes ond Most Pordicipo-
tion think group (TeaQms/Guys and Gals).


A petit theft was reported
at 12:41 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17,
in the 1600 block of N. U.S. 41,
Inverness.
SA grand theft was reported
at 4:26 p.m. Nov. 17 in the
1000 block of W. BucknellAve.,
Inverness.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 4:07 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15, in
the 4500 block of E. Windmill
Drive, Inverness.
A vandalism was reported
at 4:07 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15, in
the 4500 block of E. Windmill
Drive, Inverness.


Uv AuMtmn -ot TowNl Shavm
grawftiBS-oiprtw'artNOtWS
Whether you hove a 'Mo' or 'No Mo',
you'll wont to got Everyone is invited.
Bring your oucaies, family and friends.
If you're o oiker, consider 'riding blue'.
And be sure to join the offer party
featuring music by Kilroy. All proceeds
benefit Movember Citrus
Cocunty/Movember Foundation.
(SS^ EIH1 go Ili


Finally, answers to



your Medicaid and



Nursing Home questions.

Free Medicaid Information Seminar

Monday, November 25,


2:00


- 4:00 pm


Lakes Region Library

1511 Druid Road

Inverness, Florida

Please call law office to register at

1-800-823-5571

or visit our website at FLMedicaid.com


Find out the legal way to avoid being impoverished by
nursing home costs.

Learn how to save your assets, your house, car, and
way of life and still obtain long-term nursing care.

Easy to understand explanations of how Medicaid
works by elder law attorney Sean W. Scott, Esq.

New, up-to-date information for 2013 includes the most
recent federal Medicaid law changes.






SeanWScott
i




Elder Low Attorney
3233 East Bay Dri'c Largo Florida 33771
727 -539 -0181

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our
qualifications and experience. Also visit us at FLMedicaid.com.


j 21st Century Oncology


Will Now Operate

Florida Regional Cancer Center











Now, as part of the 21" Century Oncology network,
Florida Regional Cancer Center will provide state-of-the-art
cancer care with:
> An integrated network of expert physicians, including the
nation's leading oncologists
> Improved safety tools including proprietary dosage
assurance software
> Upgraded, cutting-edge technology systems to fight cancer


Must /I0\L UlE ,I
Present 1 HH LE
coupon OF GOLF ,
W|T &J_0LjFr GOE LFris P~j
WjI A\ U U iTft I AIL HJAI
$40 per person- Up to 4 Players
Offer expires December 19, 2013
I-----------------------------


I Ag-Iculturcil Alliance of Citrus County presents


LOCAL


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 A9




AIO TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


Red planet or bust


NASA

launches

Mars robotic

explorer
MARCIA DUNN
AP aerospace writer

CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASAs newest robotic ex-
plorer, Maven, rocketed to-
ward Mars on Monday on a
quest to unravel the an-
cient mystery of the red
planet's radical climate
change.
The Maven spacecraft is
due at Mars next fall fol-
lowing a journey of more
than 440 million miles.
"Hey, guys, we're going
to Mars!" Maven's princi-
pal scientist, Bruce
Jakosky of the University
of Colorado at Boulder,
told reporters after liftoff.
Jakosky and others want
to know why Mars went
from being warm and wet
during its first billion
years to cold and dry today
The early Martian atmos-
phere was thick enough to
hold water and possibly
support microbial life. But
much of that atmosphere
may have been lost to
space, eroded by the sun.
Maven set off through a
cloudy afternoon sky in its
bid to provide answers. An
unmanned Atlas V rocket
put the spacecraft on the
proper course for Mars,
and launch controllers ap-
plauded and shook hands
over the success.
"What a Monday at the
office," NASA project
manager David Mitchell
said. "Maybe I'm not show-
ing it, but I'm euphoric."
Ten years in the making,
Maven had Nov 18, 2013,
as its original launch date,


2524 Hwy. 44 West
Invernecs I


Associated Press
NASA's Maven, atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5
rocket, lifts off Monday from Cape Canaveral Air Force
Station in Cape Canaveral. The spacecraft will orbit Mars
and study the planet's upper atmosphere.


"and we hit it," Mitchell
said.
"I just want to say, 'Safe
travels, Maven. We're with
you all the way..'
Jakosky, Maven's mas-
termind, said he was anx-
ious and even shaking as
the final seconds of the
countdown ticked away
An estimated 10,000 NASA
guests gathered for the
liftoff the most exciting
one of the year from Cape
Canaveral including a
couple thousand repre-
senting the University of
Colorado.
Surviving liftoff was the
first big hurdle, Jakosky
said. The next huge mile-
stone will be Maven's in-


352-726-0405


GIST RV SALES & SERVICE
GISTRVSALES HAS LOADED UP ON
NEW 2014 TRAILERS CONSISTING OF
Heritage Glen & The Wildwood Trailers
r & Fifth Wheels
S-The Apex By Coachmen Trailers
& Rockwood A Frames.
AlII manufactured by Forest River, Inc.


Brashear's
Fwww. BrashearsPharmacy. comr n s3 P MACY
,IgllkMon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 PHARMVAC.YJ


'A'I MIAL011-iLA~llr occ asion

471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto .........746-3420
Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology |
206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness. 637-2079 |
One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


sertion into orbit around
Mars on Sept 22, 2014.
To help solve Mars' envi-
ronmental puzzle, Maven
will spend an entire Earth
year measuring atmos-
pheric gases.
This is NASAs 21st mis-
sion to Mars since the
1960s. But it's the first one
devoted to studying the
Martian upper atmosphere.
The mission costs $671
million.
Maven short for Mars
Atmosphere and Volatile
Evolution, with a capital
"N" in EvolutioN bears
eight science instruments.
The spacecraft, at 5,410
pounds, weighs as much as


0%i


Shrimp La nding

\I // -'4" WE OFFER
-.jf -- k i VACUUM-SEALED
-. TIMAHII'TUNAoAND
TILAPIA PORTIONS
Fresh Tmanding
F16 da>: .......


FIRST AMERICAN TRUST
;t(:FNTPA1 F10r,1DA 4d

5 Years
Guaranteed!
$5,000-$2,000 Minimum IR-A
$600,000 Limit per Family


APY
3 5 0 0j'40
Free interest withdrawals ofatleast $100 available. Withdrawals in excess ofthe accumulated
intereston the annuitywillbe subjectio surrender charges. Total freewithdrawal at endofstated
fimeperiodwith no surrender charges orfees.Fidefity & Guaranty Life Insurance Company.
Form No. FGL SPDA-MY-F. Rates offered are subjectio changetrythe company.
ASK,14oul RATES 1,61-shol-ter or lollgel. lern)
Regular Sm ings or IRA/401k's includin.- transfers
Ocala 671-5374 The Villages 633-7019
PPST AMEAKAN TAIM v (,,a' k..,w X
: 'h".9 bw P" .'. C~.ftft.CbM
91-jou" "k 1. a.,. -VA FE-,(
COMPLETE MAILS ARE IMPORTANT
OOOGOOM APPOINTMEM RECOMMENDED


*Iew Patients *lree Consults

S Emergency Care


2,' HERlcES,
HEROES


II,
6f ST
,BEST,
b<-%.'


352-795-1223
1815 N Suncoast Blvd. Crystal River, FL
www.rswansondental.corn


Dr. Richard C. Swanson


I RFS IONLCNEI ET PANF E


SState BRIEFS


an SUV From solar
wingtip to wingtip, it
stretches 37.5 feet, about
the length of a school bus.
A question underlying
all of NASAs Mars mis-
sions to date is whether
life could have started on
what now seems to be a
barren world.
"We don't have that an-
swer yet, and that's all part
of our quest for trying to
answer, Are we alone in
the universe?' in a much
broader sense," said John
Grunsfeld, NASAs science
mission director
Unlike the 2011-
launched Curiosity rover,
Maven will conduct its ex-
periments from orbit
around Mars.
Maven will dip as low as
78 miles above the Martian
surface, sampling the at-
mosphere. The lopsided
orbit will stretch as high as
3,864 miles.
Curiosity's odometer
reads 2.6 miles after more
than a year of roving the
red planet. An astronaut
could accomplish that dis-
tance in about a day on the
Martian surface,
Grunsfeld noted.
Grunsfeld, a former as-
tronaut, said considerable
technology is needed,
however, before humans
can fly to Mars in the
2030s, NASAs ultimate
objective.
Mars remains an intimi-
dating target even for ro-
botic craft, more than 50
years after the world's first
shot at the red planet
Fourteen of NASAs pre-
vious 20 missions to Mars
have succeeded, beginning
with the 1964-launched
Mariner 4, a Martian flyby
The U.S. hasn't logged a
Mars failure, in fact, since
the late 1990s.
That's a U.S. success
rate of 70 percent. No
other country comes close.


Body confirmed as
man from plane
MIAMI Miami-Dade po-
lice said they've confirmed
that a body found in waters
off South Florida is that of a
man who fell from a private
plane.
An autopsy Monday con-
firmed the body found in a
mangrove area Saturday
morning was that of 42-year-
old Gerardo Nales.
Investigators weren't im-
mediately releasing a cause
of death, but no evidence of
foul play has been reported.
Subtropical Storm
Melissa forms
MIAMI Subtropical
Storm Melissa has strength-
ened far from land in the
central Atlantic.
The storm's maximum
sustained winds rose Mon-
day afternoon to 60 mph.
Melissa is centered about
650 miles east-southeast of
Bermuda and is moving
northwest near 9 mph with a
turn to the north expected
early Tuesday and later
another turn to the
northeast.
Forecasters predict
Melissa could be near hurri-
cane strength by Tuesday
afternoon and is expected
to remain a large storm sys-
tem for the next several
days.
The U.S. National Hurri-
cane Center said large
swells from the storm are al-
ready affecting parts of the
Leeward Islands, Puerto
Rico, Hispaniola and the
southeastern Bahamas.


iii T CONSIDER^^^ss






ANOTC ORDINANEN



REGULATIONS AFFECTING
THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to
adopt the following by ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, A POLITICAL



SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AMENDING THE
CITRUS COUNTY FUTURE LAND USE MAP BY
REDESIGNATING; THE FUTURE LAND USE OF
Th ere s Ctu out oard of ony omssionrs(BC)prpoeston










APPROXIMATELY 8.55 ACRES FROM THE MEDIUM DENSITY
RE SIDENTIAL DISTRICT TO THE OG GENERAL COMMERCIAL
DEVELOPMENT CODE ATLAS BY REDESIGNATINGEF THE LAND
APPOROXIMATCELY O855CIRESFROM NTHEMDIUMDENITYCA
REBIVSIDENTIALTHDISTRITTEFFOTEGNRIALCOMERCIALTH
DITIT N MNIGTECITRUS COUNTY FTR LAND UE MP B
DVLPETCDATA BYREDESIGNATING THEFUU E LAND UEO
USE OF APPROXIMATELY 8.55 ACRES FROM THE MEDIUM
DENSITY RESIDENTIAL MOBILE HOMES ALLOWED DISTRICT
TO THE GENERAL COMMERCIAL DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR
APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR MODIFICATION; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
CPA/AA -13-12. Stillwell for VRI Hwy 44. LLC
The property is located in Section 3. Township 19 South. Range 18 East.
Further described as a portion of Tracts A. B. C. D. and E of Parcel 31000.
Lecanto Area. Citrus County. Florida. A complete legal description is on
file.
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will
conduct a Public Hearing on December 5. 2013 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166,
Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular item is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDC moves through the agenda. Interested parties may
appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
application.






J '- ". t* ,- l '\
"k



_;- -L LMAOI*;_" ~ I-




A copy of the proposed ordinances) and supporting materials are available
for public inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M., Monday through Friday, at the Department of Planning and
Development, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461. For
more information about this application, please contact the Geographic
Resources and Community Planning Division at (352) 527-5544.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes all testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
Administrator's Office, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at
least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida


LOTS OF CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS AND STOCKING STUFFERS
Custom-made baskets for everyone...
You choose your items, we'll make the basket!
Old-Fasioned Candy & Toys
Honey Amish Goods Candles
Gooseberry Patch Cookbooks & Calendars
Whirley-Pop Old-Fashioned Popcorn Poppers
Florida Souvenirs k
We Also Have Our Christmas Bluebell Ice Cream Flavors!
JikeUs! 639 N. CITRUS AVE. 564-0311
0Ir MON.-SAT 10AM-5PM SUN 11AM-3PM


ig


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lawyer will accept
disbarment
TALLAHASSEE -A
Florida lawyer whose firm
was handling tens of thou-
sands of foreclosure cases
at the height of the financial
crisis is ending his fight to
hold onto his law license.
An attorney representing
David Stern filed a notice
last Friday stating his client
would not appeal a recom-
mendation that Stern be
disbarred.
Stern had been accused
of misconduct and failure to
supervise non-lawyers prop-
erly. Some of the complaints
came directly from judges.
Church van
crashes, 3 dead
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS -
Two children and a woman
died when their church bus
crashed Saturday on Inter-
state 10 as they were head-
ing to Tallahassee.
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol said the bus driver lost
control after a rear tire blew
out.
Church services were
cancelled Sunday at the
Gospel of the Kingdom
Church in DeFuniak Springs.
The Northwest Florida
Daily News reported Maliya
Chrishon, 8, Micah Gold-
smith, 11 and Patricia Baker,
58, died. Goldsmith's
mother, grandmother and
baby sister were also in the
van. Her mother, Akyra Ei-
land, 30, was in critical con-
dition when she was taken to
a Bay County hospital.
-From wire reports


III




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE NATION TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 All


Iowa seeks to rein in


use of speed cameras


Associated Press
CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa
- Unmanned "speed cam-
eras" that enforce local
speed limits have become
a common roadside fea-
ture across the United
States, but few places have
embraced the devices with
the zeal of Iowa.
Across the state, cities
big and small have in-
stalled the cameras to
deter speeding and gener-
ate revenue from tickets.
The cameras now produce
more than 200,000 tickets
and $13 million in fines an-
nually, or more than $4 per
Iowa resident.
But the tactic may have
become too popular
among government and
law enforcement officials.
It's now triggering a back-
lash over civil liberties
and become an issue for
the libertarian-minded
Iowa Republican Party,
with some complaining
about out-of-control
government.
Responding to those
concerns, Republican Gov
Terry Branstad's adminis-
tration has proposed new
limits that could shut
down many of the cam-
eras, allowing temporary
use of the devices only as a
last resort to address
safety problems.
The plan has set off a
furor that reflects how
prized the cameras have
become in city halls and
for city budgets.
"How can anybody say
that they are not effective
or they are not having an
impact" on safety, said
Wayne Jerman, police
chief in Cedar Rapids,
where cameras scan a
stretch of Interstate 380 as
it curves through the city.
He said the city has seen
no traffic fatalities in that
historically dangerous
stretch and far fewer acci-
dents since the cameras
were installed three years
ago.


Associated Press
A highway sign warns motorists Nov. 12 along Interstate
380 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa that the speed limit is
enforced by cameras.


"To me and the other
chiefs," he said, "it just
seems that our arguments
aren't good enough."
At the center of the dis-
pute is Iowa Department
of Transportation Director
Paul Trombino, a
Branstad appointee who
says the rules will ensure
that safety, not money, is
the factor behind the cam-
eras' use.
"Overall, what I'm sens-
ing is that the public has a
concern. What we're trying
to do is make sure that
concern is heard and ad-
dressed," said Trombino.
The rules would allow
municipalities to ask for
permission to use speed
and red-light cameras only
after other "engineering
and enforcement solutions"
had been tried. Cities
would have to show that the
cameras are targeting "doc-
umented high-crash or
high-risk locations" and
would have to justify their
renewal every year A leg-
islative committee will re-
view the new rules before
they go into effect as early
as February
The new rules are
clearly popular among
some motorists and their
advocates.
"I think it's unusual and
it's also refreshing. I'd like
to see more state DOTs


around the country take
that stance," said Gary
Biller, president of the Na-
tional Motorists Associa-
tion, a Wisconsin-based
nonprofit that lobbies
against the cameras.
The Iowa Republican
Party, now led by backers
of the libertarian Ron
Paul, calls for abolishing
the cameras in its party
platform. State Sen. Brad
Zaun, a Republican who
has pushed to ban the
cameras for years, said
younger voters "just can't
stand these things" be-
cause of the invasion of
privacy and way the viola-
tions are issued.
"This stuff has gotten out
of control and I'm glad
people have woken up and
said we need to make
some changes," he said.
Some police chiefs ac-
cuse Trombino of acting
primarily to achieve a po-
litical goal for a Republi-
can governor who is up for
re-election next year.
Branstad has pledged to
sign a GOP-backed bill
banning the cameras, but
the Democratic-controlled
Senate has blocked such
legislation.
"He's just working for
his boss," Sioux City Police
Chief Douglas Young of
Trombino, calling him
"dead wrong" on the issue.


A 3L3-33O3 A SERVIC Gc-^ R -71


TAKE A WALK DOWN TO 3RD STREET PARK AFTER YOUR WORKOUT AND SEE THE MANATEES!


Achieve
,,,m-f ya l Optimal Health Lernre Clinic
SHimalayan Naturally -
Saft Room ocafa


ral Services


infu'sion (Vitamin C, Myers)

SChiropractic

Nutrition

Bio-Identical Hormones


* Physician Assisted Heavy Metal Detox

@ Toxibesity Weight Program

Ionic Foot Detoxification Bath

Chelation

* Pulse Electro Magnetic Field Therapy

Zyto Scanning

(Organ Stress, Allergies)



Therapeutic Sernices

Acupuncture

Therapeutic Massage

Prolotherapy

Colon Hydrotherapy

Gerards (Natural Skin Care)


* Whole Life Coaching


Himalayan Salt Room Ocala 352-23 7-4653
www.himalayansaltroomocala.com
Lemire Clinic 352-291-9459
www.lemireclinic.com
S 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Ocala, FL 34481




A12 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Hyundai to market hydrogen
vehicle next year
DETROIT For years, the joke in the auto
industry was that a mass-produced car that
runs on hydrogen was always a decade away.
That will change next year when Hyundai
starts selling a Tucson SUV powered by a hy-
drogen fuel cell. It will be the first mass-market
vehicle of its type to be sold or leased in the
United States.
"These things are now ready for prime
time," John Krafcik, Hyundai's North American
CEO, said last week. His company plans to
announce details of the new Tucson on
Wednesday at the Los Angeles Auto Show.
Even as the industry focused on battery-
powered and hybrid cars, automakers such as
Hyundai, Honda and Toyota kept up research
on fuel cells. Now they appear to have con-
quered obstacles such as high costs, safety
concerns and a lack of filling stations. These
vehicles could help the companies meet
stricter future fuel-economy standards.
Automakers have been dabbling in hydro-
gen-powered cars since the 1960s. General
Motors announced a test fleet of hydrogen-
powered Chevy Equinoxes in the mid-2000s,
and Honda leased about two-dozen FCX Clar-
ity models for $600 per month starting in 2005.
MF Global to pay
$1.21 billion restitution
WASHINGTON MF Global Inc. must pay
back $1.21 billion to ensure customers re-
cover their losses sustained when the broker-
age firm failed in 2011.
The restitution is being levied following a
complaint filed by the U.S. Commodity Futures
Trading Commission earlier this year that al-
leges MF Global unlawfully used customer
funds for the firm's needs in its final weeks.
MF Global Holdings, the New York-based
parent company, imploded in October of 2011
after making big bets on bonds issued by Eu-
ropean countries that later turned sour. When
it collapsed, more than $1 billion in customer
money was discovered to be missing. It was
later discovered that the funds were used to
pay for the company's own operations. With
$41 billion in assets, it was the eighth-largest
corporate bankruptcy in U.S. history.
US homebuilder confidence
holds steady in November
U.S. homebuilders' confidence in the hous-
ing market held steady this month, but many
are worried that another fight over the federal
budget could cause would-be buyers to put off
home purchases.
The National Association of Home
Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index
released Monday stayed at 54 this month. Oc-
tober's reading was revised one point lower
from its initial estimate.
Readings above 50 indicate more builders
view sales conditions as good, rather than poor.


Foreign holdings of US
Treasury debt up 1 percent
WASHINGTON Foreign buyers of U.S.
Treasury securities increased their holdings in
September, suggesting many shrugged off
budget battles in Washington to keep invest-
ing in U.S. debt.
Total foreign holdings rose 1 percent in
September to $5.65 trillion, the Treasury De-
partment reported Monday. That follows a
0.03 percent gain in August.
Holdings had fallen from April through July,
possibly reflecting concerns about rising inter-
est rates. In September, holding were 1.2 per-
cent below the record high of $5.72 trillion
reached in March.
Yahoo vows to encrypt all
its users' personal data
SAN FRANCISCO Yahoo is expanding
its efforts to protect its users' online activities
from prying eyes by encrypting all the commu-
nications and other information flowing into the
Internet company's data centers around the
world.
The commitment announced Monday by
Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer follows a re-
cent Washington Post report that the National
Security Agency has been hacking into the
communications lines of the data centers run
by Yahoo and Google Inc. to intercept infor-
mation about what people do and say online.
Yahoo had previously promised to encrypt
its email service by early January. Now, the
Sunnyvale, Calif., company plans to have all
data encrypted by the end of March to make it
more difficult for unauthorized parties to deci-
pher the information.
Google to pay $17 million
to settle Safari privacy case
SAN FRANCISCO Google is paying $17
million to 37 states and the District of Colum-
bia to make amends for the Internet search
leader's snooping on millions of people using
Safari Web browsers in 2011 and 2012.
The settlement announced Monday stems
from a technological loophole that enabled
Google's DoubleClick advertising network to
shadow unwitting Safari users, even though
the browser's maker, Apple Inc., prohibited the
tracking without obtaining a person's permis-
sion. By following what Safari users were
doing online, DoubleClick could gain more in-
sights about what types of ads were most
likely to appeal to different Safari users.
This is the second time that authorities in
the U.S. have cracked down on Google for its
secret shadowing of Safari users from June
2011 through mid-February of last year. The
Federal Trade Commission fined Google
$22.5 million last year. It represented the
largest penalty that the FTC had ever col-
lected for a civil violation.


-From wire reports


GRAND PRIZE


Gaylord Palms ICE

Featuring Frosty the Snowman Package

Package Includes:
One weeknight room accommodations at Gaylord Palms Resort
Tickets for four to ICE! featuring Frosty the Snowman
(includes UNLIMITED ADMISSION to ICE!)
ShrekFeast Interactive Character Meal for four
DreamWorks Character Holiday Meet & Greets
DreamWorks Themed Scavenger Hunt
Welcome Amenity
Souvenir Family Photo (one per room)


kParticipants are entered to win a $50 gift card
or prize from each store below.


HOW TO ENTER: Stop at any of these businesses listed below to receive your card. Then
take your card to each business to receive their distinctive stamp. At your last store, simply
leave your card and you are entered. Drawing will be on December 12. Winner need not be
present. No purchase necessary.


SHERff.GEHOlSE -



657 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 564-1400


F28 N.E. 4th St.
W Crystal River
FRAI(KLIN ANDERSON (352) 794-3859
GALLERY OF ART
661 N. Citrus Ave. 652 N. Citrus Ave. ,. .. '
Crystal River Crystal River Ilr
(352) 697.2702 (352) 228-4931

-low .707 N. Citrus Ave.
Ste. E
639 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River Crystal River
(352) 564-0311 13521 563-2572


'.r :


[m
631 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 564-0902

,LU ..


707 N. Citrus Ave.
Ste. A
Crystal River
(3521795-5.650'


707C N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795.6126


521 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River
(352) 794.6146


WJJ ipscje
Mez Mer [ T cjLe
631 N. Citrus Ave.
Ste. C 244 S.E. Hwy. 19
Crystal River Crystal River
(352) 795-2020 (352) 795-0743


JUST A
SCUPCAI(E
si &^


652.A N. Citrus Ave. 626 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River Crystal River
(352) 601-1556 (352) 563-2582


600 S.E. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
(352) 795.5900


9301 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River
(352) 795.5797


564 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-0956


pLXANTXON

PRO %HOP
9301 W. Fort Island Trail
Crystal River
|352)|795-7211


Sponsored by the City of Crystal River


508 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 563-2620


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Int
OTTON
(LUB


dli~N^-~VvlW wi -^W-




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


1 840 ................................. S&P 500 16,0 40" .......................;... Dow Jones industrials
- rLC Close: 1,791.53 -,, Close: 15,976.02
Change:-6.65 (-0.4%) Change: 14.32 (0.1%)
1 720........ 10 DAYS ......... 15,520 ........10 DAYS .........
1 ,8 00 ...... ............ ............."............ ............ ............. .." 16 ,0 00 ...... ........ ..... ............ ............ ............ ........ .....-... ...
1,750 .-........ .. ..
1155600.............................................................. ....

1,700
1' 5 1 "] ..... "'' ..... .. .... i.... 15 ,200 ... .." ....... .... ........ "...... ..... ......

15506 ..... .................. 14.. .. .

1 M0 ...... ........... J ............ ............ .........0 ......... .. 14 ,8 0 0 .... ....... ..... ....J ............. ............ N... ........ .........


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,110
Pvs. Volume 3,162
Advanced 1201
Declined 1884
New Highs 284
New Lows 20


NASD
1,786
1,847
936
1632
225
30


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16030.28
7245.43
507.81
10226.34
3994.97
1802.33
1314.00
19148.77
1119.98


LOW
15942.17
7169.65
504.88
10149.21
3942.85
1788.00
1299.72
18969.27
1105.22


CLOSE
15976.02
7186.53
506.84
10167.15
3949.07
1791.53
1302.20
19005.34
1107.29


CHG.
+14.32
-24.51
-0.07
-22.65
-36.90
-6.65
-9.57
-101.23
-8.91


%CHG.
+0.09%
-0.34%
-0.01%
-0.22%
-0.93%
-0.37%
-0.73%
-0.53%
-0.80%


YTD
+21.92%
+35.42%
+11.86%
+20.41%
+30.79%
+25.62%
+27.61%
+26.74%
+30.37%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -0- 5.49 5.11 -.15 -2.9 V A A +11.1 +44.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0--- 39.00 35.60 +.17 +0.5 A A A +5.6 +11.4 26 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 35.42 -0- 62.05 49.03 -.22 -0.4 V A A +30.5 +41.3 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.50 0 104.99 104.83 +.21 +0.2 A A A +19.9 +29.5 3.03e
Bank of America BAG 9.32 0 15.03 14.92 ... ... A A +28.5 +64.5 20 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -0- 13.08 11.90 -.10 -0.8 V V A +4.7 +29.6 40
CenturyLink Inc CTL 30.86 -0-- 42.01 32.19 +.09 +0.3 A V A -17.7 -8.7 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 34.04 -0- 53.56 50.79 +.39 +0.8 A V A +28.4 +43.3 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 14.17 -0- 26.38 23.22 ... ... V A +46.6 +72.4 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 47.45 0 70.17 69.50 -.50 -0.7 V A A +39.6 +49.0 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.85 -0- 75.46 71.54 -.26 -0.4 V A A +12.1 +25.1 21 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 43.50 -0- 61.18 51.64 -.11 -0.2 V A A +12.0 +27.9 21 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 0 95.49 95.45 +.18 +0.2 A A A +10.3 +13.5 10 2.52
Ford Motor F 10.65 -- 0- 18.02 16.98 -.09 -0.5 V V A +31.1 +65.3 13 0.40
Gen Electric GE 20.26 0 27.43 27.22 +.02 +0.1 A A A +29.7 +39.4 20 0.76
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 29.86 -0- 49.52 44.31 -.76 -1.7 V V A +46.9 +57.3 14 4.50e
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 7.25 -0- 17.28 13.07 -.09 -0.7 V A A +40.2 +71.1 cc
Home Depot HD 60.21 0 81.56 79.67 -.36 -0.4 V A A +28.8 +33.0 24 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0- 25.98 24.60 +.08 +0.3 A A A +19.3 +26.9 13 0.90
IBM IBM 172.57 -0-- 215.90 184.47 +1.28 +0.7 A A V -3.7 +0.6 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 20.09 0 34.07 32.80 +.29 +0.9 A V A +55.5 +57.5 33
Lowes Cos LOW 33.73 0 52.08 50.89 -.88 -1.7 V A A +43.3 +67.0 26 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 84.37 -0- 103.70 97.65 +.73 +0.8 A A A +10.7 +19.0 18 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 0 38.22 37.20 -.64 -1.7 V A A +39.3 +44.5 14 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.04 0 66.39 65.42 -.15 -0.2 V A A +17.5 +26.2 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 66.39 0 89.75 89.06 +.49 +0.6 A A A +28.7 +37.1 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 6.24 -0-- 23.10 8.71 -.32 -3.5 V A V -55.8 -45.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0-- 21.09 17.20 -.15 -0.9 V V V -4.7 +5.4 31 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.40 10.52 9.66 -.19 -1.9 V V A +35.5 +57.6 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0- 66.00 63.01 -1.38 -2.1 V A A +52.3 +10.1 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 84.00 -0- 114.72 108.91 -.44 -0.4 V A A +26.3 +30.7 21 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 28.45 0 42.75 42.44 -.11 -0.3 V A A +37.4 +51.5 28 1.20
Time Warner TWX 44.71 -0- 70.77 66.85 -.79 -1.2 V V A +39.8 +56.1 17 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 69.67 -0- 105.76 99.98 -.39 -0.4 V V V +36.4 +43.9 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 41.50 -0- 54.31 50.76 +.45 +0.9 A A A +17.3 +25.6 71 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 37.90 37.42 +.17 +0.5 A A A +48.6 +54.0 1.61e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 0 79.96 79.22 ... ... A A +16.1 +17.9 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 32.35 0 60.87 60.12 -.16 -0.3 V A A +62.4 +90.7 23 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p- Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


Ut]


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.67
percent Monday.
Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
VEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
fell on Monday
ahead of
negotiations in
Geneva meant
to curb Iran's nu
clear program.
Gold and oth-
er metals were
mostly lower,
while crops were
mixed.


OS
E222

EDr~g


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.07 ... .08
6-month T-bill .10 0.09 +0.01 .13
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .17
2-year T-note .28 0.29 -0.01 .24
5-year T-note 1.32 1.34 -0.02 .61
10-year T-note 2.67 2.71 -0.04 1.55
30-year T-bond 3.76 3.79 -0.03 2.73


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.55 3.58 -0.03 2.41
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.08 5.09 -0.01 4.00
Barclays USAggregate 2.32 2.32 ... 1.71
Barclays US High Yield 5.75 5.77 -0.02 6.82
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.65 4.67 -0.02 3.49
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.59 1.61 -0.02 .90
Barclays US Corp 3.20 3.21 -0.01 2.67


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 93.03
Ethanol (gal) 1.81
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.62
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.66
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1272.20
Silver (oz) 20.35
Platinum (oz) 1411.00
Copper (Ib) 3.15
Palladium (oz) 716.40
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.32
Coffee (Ib) 1.06
Corn (bu) 4.12
Cotton (Ib) 0.76
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 366.90
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38
Soybeans (bu) 12.88
Wheat (bu) 6.42


PVS.
93.84
1.77
2.94
3.66
2.66
PVS.
1287.30
20.72
1438.90
3.17
732.30
PVS.
1.33
1.06
4.22
0.77
378.30
1.38
12.81
6.45


%CHG
-0.86
+0.06
-0.57
-1.17
-0.03
%CHG
-1.17
-1.78
-1.94
-0.61
-2.17
%CHG
-1.12

-2.37
-1.00
+0.90
-0.22
+0.55
-0.35


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 23.97 -.04 +19.0 +23.6 +13.4 +15.2
CaplncBuA m 58.51 +.11 +13.8 +18.4 +9.9 +13.0
CpWIdGrIA m 44.40 +.12 +21.6 +29.8 +10.8 +15.8
EurPacGrA m 48.02 +37 +16.5 +25.8 +6.8 +15.2
FnlnvA m 51.08 -.20 +26.3 +33.6 +15.1 +18.6
GrthAmA m 43.89 -.27 +27.8 +35.2 +15.3 +18.4
IncAmerA m 20.47 -.01 +16.3 +20.6 +12.1 +15.2
InvCoAmA m 38.02 -.08 +27.6 +34.2 +14.8 +16.6
NewPerspA m 38.28 ... +22.5 +31.1 +12.2 +18.4
WAMutlnvA m 39.34 -.07 +27.9 +34.0 +17.3 +17.0
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 42.66 +.17 +23.2 +35.7 +8.5 +18.5
Stock 162.25 -.76 +34.7 +45.0 +18.4 +20.3
Fidelity Contra 98.68 -.80 +28.4 +35.1 +15.6 +18.7
GrowCo 122.28 -1.52 +31.2 +38.9 +18.4 +23.0
LowPriStk d 49.20 -.09 +30.8 +39.9 +17.8 +24.0
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 63.66 -.23 +27.9 +34.6 +16.8 +18.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.41 ... +13.3 +19.2 +10.7 +16.4
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.13 +.07 +1.4 +4.4 +5.1 +10.6
GIBondAdv 13.09 +.07 +1.7 +4.7 +5.4 +10.9
Harbor Intllnstl 70.97 +.13 +14.2 +25.5 +8.0 +16.8
Oakmark Intl 1 26.82 +.18 +28.1 +43.7 +13.5 +23.3
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 33.02 -.11 +26.5 +33.5 +16.3 +17.9
GrowStk 49.81 -.41 +31.8 +39.3 +17.4 +22.6
Vanguard 500Adml 165.62 -.60 +28.0 +34.6 +16.9 +18.4
5001lnv 165.59 -.61 +27.8 +34.4 +16.7 +18.3
MulntAdml 13.79 +.01 -1.4 -2.1 +4.4 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.75 ... +1.1 +1.3 +2.5 +5.4
Tgtet2025 15.77 -.02 +16.0 +21.4 +10.7 +14.8
TotBdAdml 10.69 +.02 -1.3 -1.6 +3.2 +5.6
Totlntl 16.71 +.06 +13.8 +24.2 +5.5 +14.4
TotStlAdm 45.25 -.23 +28.7 +36.1 +17.0 +19.5
TotStldx 45.23 -.23 +28.6 +35.9 +16.9 +19.3
Welltn 39.07 +.01 +17.6 +21.6 +12.4 +14.8
WelltnAdm 67.48 +.02 +17.7 +21.7 +12.4 +14.9
WndsllAdm 65.78 -.15 +27.6 +34.7 +17.2 +18.1
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks ended mixed on Mon-
day, as investors engaged in
profit-taking after the Dow
briefly topped 16,000 for the
first time and the S&P 500
traded above 1,800 for a while.
The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq
composite each finished lower.


Boeing BA
Close:$138.36A2.28 or 1.7%
A big winner during opening day at
the Dubai Airshow, the plane maker
landed $100 billion in orders, twice
that of Airbus.
1$40 ----------


1 A S O N
52-week range
$71.08 $142.00
Vol.: 8.2m (2.Ox avg.) PE: 24.6
Mkt. Cap:$103.97 b Yield: 1.4%
JinkoSolar JKS
Close:$33.30A3.80 or 12.9%
The Chinese solar company turned
in its second consecutive profitable
quarter and raised its full-year fore-
cast for shipments.
$40----------
30

I (,
"',=, $ O In
52-week range
$3.18 $34.88


Vol.:6.Om (3.5x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$727.01 m


PE:...
Yield:...


Tyson Foods TSN
Close: $29.42 A0.65 or 2.3%
Quarterly profit jumped 41 percent
and the nation's biggest meat pro-
ducer topped Wall Street revenue
projections for next year.
$?7




52-week range
$17.65 $32.40
Vol.:9.6m (2.1x avg.) PE: 15.3
Mkt. Cap:$8.3 b Yield: 0.7%
Consol Energy CNX
Close:$34.56V-1.42 or -3.9%
The shares of big coal producers fell
Monday as Citigroup forecast lower
prices for coal used to make steel.

$40 --------


-'' ,=, S O In
52-week range
$26.25 $39.23
Vol.:3.3m (1.3x avg.) PE: 111.5
Mkt. Cap:$7.91 b Yield: 1.4%
Diebold DBD
Close:$32.14A1.56 or 5.1%
KeyBanc Capital upgraded the secu-
rity services company as its turn-
around story catches a tailwind from
extensive cost cuts.
$?4



A S 0 N
52-week range
$27.59 $35.40
Vol.:2.7m (3.2x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$2.05 b Yield: 3.6%


Stocks slip


Associated Press

NEW YORK The stock market broke
through two milestones Monday before
giving up nearly all its gains late in the day
Stocks rose from the opening bell, lift-
ing the Dow Jones industrial average
above 16,000 for the first time and the
Standard & Poor's 500 index past 1,800,
two big markers in a historic bull market.
But by the end of day, both indexes had
fallen below those levels.
"The market is always a little hesitant
when it gets to round numbers," says Ed
Cowart, managing director at Eagle Asset
Management. "You don't want to be the


first guy buying at 16,000 on the Dow."
The Dow managed to eke out a gain
over Friday's close with a late push
higher, ending just 24 points shy of 16,000.
Both the Dow and the S&P 500 are on
track for their best year in a decade and
have soared more than 140 percent since
bottoming out in the Great Recession
more than four years ago.
It's not clear whether stocks have be-
come expensive yet or are just fairly
priced. One measure of value, the ratio of
stock prices to forecast earnings, is at 15
for S&P 500 companies. That is slightly
below the 15-year average of 16.2, ac-
cording to FactSet, a data provider


Despite surge, many



don't see a stock bubble


Associated Press

NEW YORK Is the
stock market due for a
pullback?
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average has surged
900 points since early Oc-
tober and crossed the
16,000-point threshold
Monday IPOs are hot
again. Small investors,
stirred from their post-re-
cession daze, are coming
back to stocks. And it's
been more than two years
since the market has had a
significant slump.
Those trends have
raised concerns of a stock
bubble. They shouldn't,
money managers say, be-
cause even with the
broader market's 26 per-
cent jump this year, stocks
aren't overpriced yet.
"Stocks are not cheap,
but that does not mean
that the stock market is ex-
pensive," says Russ Koes-
terich, chief investment
strategist with Blackrock.
The ratio of stock prices
to projected profits for
companies in the Standard
& Poor's 500 index is 15,
according to data from
FactSet. That's slightly
below the average of 16.2


over the last 15 years and
far below the peak of 25 in
late 1990s and early 2000s.
Underneath the rally,
most of the fundamentals
of this market remain
solid. Corporate profit
margins are near historic
highs and profits are ex-
pected to keep rising.
There are no signs the U.S.
economy, which is still re-
covering from the 2008 fi-
nancial crisis and Great
Recession, will slip back
into a downturn.
All that leaves investors
with conflicting feelings.
Few see the stock market
as attractive as it was at
the beginning of the year,
but fewer see an alterna-
tive where they should put
their money
Bonds are down 2.1 per-
cent this year, according to
the benchmark Barclays
U.S. Aggregate bond index.
Cash has a near-zero re-
turn in money market
funds. Gold has dropped
24 percent.
"It's hard to say stocks
are expensive when you
compare them to any other
asset class," says Brian
Hogan, director of equities
at Fidelity Investments.
"The other options are


simply not attractive."
Bubble or no, there are
some signs that stocks are
getting pricy
Individual investors
have been returning to the
market, often a sign that
stocks are reaching their
peak. Individual investors
poured $167 billion into
stock mutual funds this
year, according to data
from Lipper. In compari-
son, large institutional in-
vestors like hedge funds,
pension funds, endow-
ments and insurance com-
panies have only put in
$111 billion.
When stocks are valued
using an adjusted price-to-
earnings ratio developed
by Nobel Prize-winning
economist Robert Shiller,
they seem even more ex-
pensive. Shiller's adjusted
price-to-earnings ratio av-
erages out the S&P 500's
earnings over 10 years, to
smooth out the volatility
that comes from the booms
and busts. Using Shiller's
formula, stocks are cur-
rently trading at 24.4 times
their previous 10 years'
worth of earnings, well
above the historic average
of 16.5 going back to the
year 1881.


Money&Markets


Positively innovative.


Positively high tech.


Positively great.








































When you need prostate surgery, ask your doctor about

the robotic-assisted da Vinci* Si- surgical system. It's a

minimally invasive option, which means you'll experience

a quicker recovery, less pain and a shorter hospital

stay than traditional surgery. Seven Rivers Regional

Medical Center is proud to offer innovative technology,
personalized care and close-to-home convenience-and
Urology /.
/ /

/K



',*'fl j

.. n ..... ,












When you need prostate surgery results th, aresk your doctor aboutmazing.
the robotic-assisted da Vinci' SF surgical system. It's a

minimally invasive option, which means you'll experience

a quicker recovery, less pain and a shorter hospital

stay than traditional surgery. Seven Rivers Regional

Medical Center is proud to offer innovative technology,

personalized care and close-to-home convenience--and

prostate surgery results that are positively amazing.



Learn more at SevenRiversRegionaLcom.





Positively *SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Independent member of the medical staff


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 A13








Storms lash Midwest over weekend


Officials say

goodforecasts

saved lives

Associated Press

WASHINGTON, 111. --
When a cluster of violent
thunderstorms began
marching across the Mid-
west, forecasters were
able to draw a bright line
on a map showing where
the worst of the weather
would go.
Their uncannily accu-
rate predictions com-
bined with television and
radio warnings, text-
message alerts and storm
sirens almost certainly
saved lives as rare late-
season tornadoes dropped
out of a dark autumn sky
Although the storms
howled through 12 states
and flattened entire neigh-
borhoods within a matter
of minutes, the number of
dead stood at just eight.
By Monday, another,
more prosaic reason for
the relatively low death
toll also came to light: In
the hardest-hit town, many
families were in church.
"I don't think we had one
church damaged," said
Gary Manier, mayor of
Washington, Ill., a commu-
nity of 16,000 about 140
miles southwest of Chicago.
The tornado cut a path
about an eighth of a mile
wide from one side of Wash-
ington to the other and dam-
aged or destroyed as many
as 500 homes. The heavy


weather also battered parts
of Michigan, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Missouri, Indiana,
Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee,
West Virginia, Pennsylvania
and New York
Back in Washington,
Daniel Bennett was offici-
ating Sunday services be-
fore 600 to 700 people
when he heard an elec-
tronic warning tone. Then
another And another
"I'd say probably two
dozen phones started
going off in the service,
and everybody started
looking down," he said.
What they saw was a text
message from the National
Weather Service caution-
ing that a twister was in
the area. Bennett stopped


Our Story + Your Story =
Sunshine For Your Loved One
Our compassionate staff is ready to help.
Assisted Living just got a whole lot better.
Call us today! We want to share our story,
More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY.
Memory care Short term and long term stays



I Z SENIOR COMMUNITIES
(352) 563-0235 Asit L .... LF122
311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River www.sgwseniors.com


the service and ushered
everyone to a safe place
until the threat passed.
A day later, many towns-
people said those mes-
sages helped minimize
deaths and injuries.
"That's got to be con-
nected," Bennett said.
"The ability to get instant
information."
In Indiana, Taylor
Glenna heard emergency
sirens go off and received
an alert on his cellphone.
A friend also called to


warn him the storm was
nearly upon him.
Glenna went outside,
saw hail and heard a loud
boom. He ran to his base-
ment just in time.
On Monday, he was sur-
veying the damage on
crutches after suffering a
leg injury when the wind
knocked his home off its
foundation.
"I would say we had
pretty good warning,"
Glenna said. "We just
didn't listen to it."


Thanksgiving Menu
Roasted Turkey or Glazed Ham- Real Mashed Potatoes & Gravy
Green Bean Casserole Cornbread Stuffing Cranberry Sauce
Yams Dinner Roll Choice of Pumpkin or Apple Pie

ggMak, Y 16 Psr.S1 N95w
lMake Your Reservations Now'


Pastor Daniel Bennett of the Bethany Community Church
in Washington, Ill., bicycles Monday through devastated
neighborhoods in the town. Bennett said 600 to 700 peo-
ple were at a service at his church when the tornado hit.
2 'GRATADVNTRE


SOUTH AFRICA

$5595 w/air
Personally escorted by Gwen & Buzz
SSafari Games Drives 16 Days A Lot of Extras

ISRAEL $3,478 w/air
# 1 Tour Company in Israel
S9 Days Entrance fees to all sites listed in the itinerary
S2 cell phones with unlimited minutes to the US
k 1lq 1[]; 1;];~ IIk;n;i ~l~ l,


5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa
(352) 628-0668
www.travelauthorityfl.com
Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com


of t6


Florida
HEALTH
Citrus County


Medical appointment 352-527-0247
Dental appointment 352-249-9258
www.citruscountyhealth.org


Associated Press
An aerial view Monday shows people walking down a street where homes once stood
after a tornado hit the western Illinois town of Washington on Sunday. It was one of the
worst-hit areas after intense storms and tornadoes swept through the Midwest.


I


A14 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


NATION


CIRRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WorldBRIEFS


Associated Press
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford speaks from the council chamber Monday as councilors prepare to pass motions to limit
his official powers.



Toronto strips colorful



mayor of most powers


Boisterous Ford claims move is 'coup d'etat'and vows revenge


Associated Press
TORONTO Amid cries of
"Shame! Shame!" scandal-plagued
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was
stripped of the last of his meaning-
ful powers Monday after a heated
City Council debate in which he ar-
gued with members of the public,
charged hecklers and knocked a
councilwoman down.
Ford called the move a "coup
d'etat" and vowed an "outright war"
in the next election.
"What's happening here today is
not a democratic process, it's a dic-
tatorship process," the 44-year-old
mayor declared.
The council voted overwhelm-
ingly in favor of slashing Ford's of-
fice budget by 60 percent and
allowing his staff to move to the
deputy mayor, who now takes on


many of the mayor's former powers.
Ford now effectively has no legisla-
tive power and no longer chairs the
executive committee, although he
retains his title and ability to repre-
sent Toronto at official functions.
The debate became raucous after
Ford paced around the council
chamber and traded barbs with
members of the public. The speaker
asked security to clear the gallery
and a recess was called, but not be-
fore Ford barreled toward his de-
tractors, mowing into Councilor Pam
McConnell.
Another councilor asked Ford to
apologize. Ford said he was rushing
to the defense of his brother, Coun-
cilor Doug Ford, and accidentally
knocked McConnell down.
"I picked her up," he said. "I ran
around because I thought my brother
was getting into an altercation."


Visibly shaken after Ford ran her
over, McConnell, a petite woman in
her 60s, said she never expected the
chaos that broke out.
"This is the seat of democracy It
is not a football field. I just wasn't
ready Fortunately, the mayor's staff
was in front. They stopped me from
hitting my head against the wall. I
just need to sit down," McConnell
said.
The council does not have the au-
thority to remove Ford from office
unless he is convicted of a crime. It
is pursuing the strongest recourse
available after recent revelations of
Ford smoking crack cocaine and his
repeated outbursts of erratic
behavior
Far from being chastened, Ford
has vowed to take the council to
court and insists he will seek re-
election next year


Ex-UK minister
pleads guilty to
fudging expenses
LONDON -A former
British legislator and Cabi-
net minister is facing jail
time after pleading guilty to
making bogus expense
claims.
Denis MacShane, who
served as Europe minister
under former Prime Minister
Tony Blair, admitted Monday
to false accounting by filing
19 fake receipts for "re-
search and translation" serv-
ices between January 2005
and January 2008. The
money from those claims
was used to fund trips, such
as a jaunt to Paris to judge a
literary competition.
MacShane's admission
caps several years of
scrutiny of his expenses, fol-
lowing the 2009 scandal that
found U.K. lawmakers had
billed the public for items
such as pornographic
movies and an ornamental
duck house.


Wife of activist in
Russia urges
Australian help
CANBERRA, Australia -
The wife of an Australian
Greenpeace activist under
arrest in Russia over a
protest against oil drilling in
the Arctic has urged more in-
tervention from the Aus-
tralian government to secure
his freedom.
A Russian court on Mon-
day rejected Australian Colin
Russell's application for bail
and ordered him held in cus-
tody until Feb. 24.
His wife Christine Russell
said at Australia's Parliament
House on Tuesday she was
left disappointed by a meet-
ing with Australian Foreign
Department officials about
the amount of government
involvement the case.
She said Foreign Minister
Julie Bishop had not raised
her husband's case with her
Russian counterpart since
early October.
From wire reports


Ne, w Ye I a







Tue. Dc.3, 2'i g


TheSou Aliance Ban
Citrussping iTKniV




150EiSpini s
FoIoe inomtnadti
352-45707/35-
^^^^^s^j^^^S^^^^^i~yfcI


Should the need arise, take comfort in knowing we are
- backed by the resources of the Advanced Prostate Cancer
S Institute, conveniently located outside of The Villages.


12109 CR 103 Oxford, FL 34484 1-855-298-CURE


WORLD


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 AIS





OPage A16 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2013



PINION


"Life is like playing a violin solo in
public and learning the instrument
as one goes along."
Samuel Butler, 1835-1902


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ALL EARS




Listening



sessions get



slow start


itrus County govern-
ment deserves recogni-
tion for agreeing to
hear feedback about itself
that, quite frankly, might be
uncomfortable to hear
Staff hosted its first listen-
ing session and
ironically was ac- THE I
caused of turning a
deaf ear to citizen Citrus
input, hosting
To be fair, we sess
are really talking
about two sepa- OUR 01
rate things ad- Seeking
ministration and g
commission. The impc
staff hosting the
meetings is part of
county adminis- U The ne>
tration, which session
runs the day-to- from 5:
day operation of 6:30 p.
day, No
county services Coastal
and government Library
functions. The w. Crys
commission is an Crystal
elected body, phone 3
which sets policy 795-37
for the adminis-
tration to follow in carrying
out its business.
Complaints about not lis-
tening to citizen input, both at
public meetings and from cit-
izen advisory boards are
being directed at
commissioners.
While the first session was
not heavily attended, it is a
start. If attendance remains
sparse, another tactic may be


Nail litterbugs
I'm calling the Chronicle in ref-
erence to, I saw all these signs
around Citrus County
saying, "Littering $500 C
fine," but yet all this v
stuff is flying out of the
back of these pickup
trailers. I never have
seen anyone get a ticket
for littering. Nor is any-
thing in the paper J i
under the sheriff's of-
fice for ones fined for CAL
littering. Look at all that 5
money that Citrus U5 3-
County's losing for lit-
tering. Because if you drive
down our roads and streets,
that's all you see is littering. So
if you want revenue, start going
out and policing the area and
when you see the litter come
out, ticket them. And it's amaz-
ing, a littering ticket at $500 is
more than what a speeding
ticket would begin at. That is
unbelievable.
Thanks to kind man
I was recently on a trip to
Save-A-Lot when my bank card
disappeared. A kind man behind
me paid for my groceries and I
thank him again. God bless him
if He hasn't already and I paid
that forward and made a dona-
tion to the Citrus County Path.
Berry pickers are OK
I reside in Pine Ridge and
have a little over three acres.
Every year the saw palmetto
berry pickers ask to harvest the
berries. They have always been
courteous, polite and grateful
for the berries. They have never
destroyed my property, left a


s
C
t
sic

F
f
or
4



n
'v
t
i



3



1
)V.
dIF
,,E
sta
3E
1(


I

(


necessary to pull the desired
feedback from audience
members.
These types of feedback
sessions tend to be more use-
ful when overseen by trained
facilitators who are experi-
enced in reading
SSUE: audiences and
formulating use-
County ful discussion
own hall points that get to
ons. the heart of a
problem. Facilita-
'INION: tors also provide
fedak a neutral envi-
eedback ronment where
tant. audience mem-
bers feel more
comfortable pro-
t listening viding feedback
is set and meetings
30 to aren't taken over
n1. Thurs- by the more vocal
21,Region at members of an au-
Region
8619 dience or ham-
al St., pered by
River; high-level staff
52- members who
6. might inadver-
tently create bar-
riers to good communication.
Listening to criticism is
constructive, and if properly
done, can lead to productive
changes in policy and process
while also giving citizens bet-
ter access to county
government.
From our perspective, you
have set out on the right mis-
sion, but you may have to ad-
just your path to get there.


mess in any way, shape or form.
I can't say that for some of the
Pine Ridge residents who con-
stantly throw their trash and
beer bottles out of their
JND car windows or dump
their TVs and such
FF along my road.
Land of plenty
The Chronicle's Edito-
Srial Board's opinion on
S Monday (Nov. 4) was
I about nutrition needs
5 of local students,
)579 hunger in America, food
insecurity-you kept
using that one with-
out consistent access to ade-
quate food, one out of five kids,
21 million Americans, low-
income children, reduced-price
lunches. Frankly, I don't believe
it. ... I just don't believe that
many people are having trouble
finding food.
There's food pantries; I've
gone to them. I get food
stamps. ... I just don't believe
what you write. I don't see it. I
don't see it. Maybe in the mid-
dle of New York City in some
alleyway there's some poor peo-
ple there. I don't even believe
that.
There's so much food. People
are begging to give food away.
No say for snowbirds
I don't believe that people
that live part time in Florida
should have a right to vote down
here in Florida because they are
making decisions for year-round
residents, as it does not affect
them year around. I think they
should be allowed to vote only in
the state that they live in most
of the year.


China's soft power failure


DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
merican troops are help-
ing to restore security in
the storm-ravaged
Philippines, and to distribute
aid delivered to the island na-
tion by U.S. cargo planes and
ships. The aircraft carrier the
USS George Washington will
soon provide a staging area for
search and rescue efforts and
for medical services. The ty-
phoon that struck last week left
in its wake a human tragedy of
immense and historic propor-
tions, and a number of nations
in addition to the U.S. have
stepped up to the challenge
with humanitarian assistance
and financial aid.
Among the most generous
donor countries are Japan ($10
million) and Australia ($9.6 mil-
lion). Way down the list is China
with $100,000 provided by the
government, and another
$100,000 provided by China's
Red Cross. Since China is the
world's second largest economy
its comparatively small contri-
bution is raising questions
about why its government de-
cided to play such a minor role,
and whether China missed an
opportunity to burnish its image
as an emerging superpower
Granted, the Philippines and
China are embroiled in territo-
rial disputes in the South China
Sea, but that shouldn't deter hu-
manitarian assistance in a nat-
ural disaster of this magnitude.
China is on the way to being a
superpower, and part of being a
superpower is extending force
and assistance around the
world to demonstrate muscle
and economic might Declining


SOther VOICES


to play that role in the Philip-
pines raises questions about
China's ability and/or willing-
ness to shoulder the responsi-
bilities that come with power
In geo-political terms,
China's low profile in the after-
math of the typhoon plays right
into the Obama administra-
tion's game plan. President
Obama has made no secret of
his goal to reposition American
forces from the Atlantic to the
Pacific, and to shift focus from
a Middle East in chaos to the
emerging markets in Asia,
where a 21st century economy
is waiting to be tapped by U.S.
companies.
China is in the process of
boosting its defense budget,
which makes it even more of a
mystery why its leaders haven't
taken advantage of an opportu-
nity to showcase its growing
military capability Geographi-
cally, China has a competitive
advantage; it can reach the
stricken much faster than the
U.S. The Philippines are in its
backyard, whereas days lapsed
before the U.S. could play a
meaningful role.
It may sound petty to intro-
duce these rivalries at a time
when tens of thousands of peo-
ple have lost family members
and are without food, water,
shelter and medical supplies.
The larger point is nations that
actively engage at this critical
moment will forge relation-
ships that endure, and that will
pay off in the future. It's not too
late the rebuilding of the
areas hardest hit by Typhoon
Haiyan will take years. Maybe


China is husbanding its re-
sources, steering clear of hu-
manitarian efforts in the
immediate aftermath with a
longer-term plan for rebuilding
that would better showcase its
dynamic economy
For now, though, the situation
of the Filipino people is still so
desperate, they're likely angry
at the time it's taken to reach
them rather than feeling grate-
ful for whatever aid is getting
through. The U.S. is doing what
a superpower should do, pro-
viding troops, military assis-
tance and humanitarian relief
On Wednesday, President
Obama encouraged Americans
to go on whitehouse.gov/
typhoon for links to organiza-
tions that are working in the
Philippines and accepting
contributions.
It is puzzling that China is
doing so little to counteract
America's "soft power" at a
time when the U.S. is in the
process of ringing China with
hard power that ranges from a
renewed naval presence in the
Philippines to negotiations
with Vietnam over a potential
base in Haiphong Harbor
Along with recognizing the
enormous need of the Filipino
people, Obama understands the
geopolitical importance of win-
ning hearts and minds in a way
his Chinese counterparts evi-
dently do not.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


LETTERS to the Editor


Yes, yes, yes
to photo surveillance
The drastic difference in
basic things between Europe
and the U.S. never stops to
amaze, confuse or scare me.
Take the red light cameras.
Totally normal in Europe. No,
we don't all like them, but most
agree they stop idiots from T-
boning other drivers. But
here? What a backstage rebel-
lion, from conspiracy theories
over "making politicians rich"
to how dangerous they are.
Now here's my two cents:
I'm so completely for these
cameras you would not believe
it- and that as a decades-long
Porsche driver And I could not
care less if the fine is used to
enrich the money chest of a city
or a politician is building him-
self a golden toilet seat with it.
The only thing important is
that the money is pulled out of
the pocket of these moronic, red-
light-running killer idiots. And
the more the better And whining
about short yellow times is sick-
ening. If you can't stop for a red
light you can't stop in front of a
kid running over the road.
So turn your license in, drive
slower or stop talking, eating,
drinking or whatever distracts
you from paying attention
while driving a dangerous
weapon through society.
Michael Barth
Crystal River


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


Tea partiers
destroying America
If the tea party wants
smaller government, what part
would they keep? The mili-
tary? Corporate welfare?
What is so great about the
Second Amendment? It was


designed to ensure a "well-
ordered militia," not the drug-
store cowboys who want to be
armed to the teeth to "pro-
tect" themselves against the
"bad guys," acting like Ral-
phie from 'A Christmas
Story"
The tea party demands the
executive, legislative and ju-
dicial branches adhere to the
Constitution and all amend-
ments, yet they would sup-
port the destruction of the
balance of power. Who was
standing outside of the White
House demanding that the
President of the United
States put down the Koran
and resign?
Balancing the federal budget
during economic recovery is
unreasonable and ignorant. It
is also very, very harmful to the
country The debt is being paid
down, but the tea party is
doing everything in its power
to prevent this from happen-
ing. Regularly threatening to
stall the government for their
demands is evil.
Who else but U.S. citizens
vote?
So what if tea party mem-
bers salute the flag and sing
the national anthem? Most
Americans also do this, but
they aren't trying to destroy
the country with radical,
ultra-conservative behavior
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IF YOU LIKE YOUR
OWER PR~cPER
EL1W YQUMYOU, CN1,,11....
^_. Uh-oh,


gcoC%
cPOc(-H il


the Editor


LETTERS to


Letter of thanks
2012 was a very trouble-
some year for me. So many
unexpected medical con-
ditions I found myself
truly overwhelmed. I am
uncertain where I would
be today, if it had not been
for all persons involved.
The services, helpfulness
and kindness I received
and continue to receive
led to my recovery
In January, I handled
pork unaware of a small
laceration on my hand.
This resulted in a staph
infection. My friend,
Madeline Scoglio, took
me to Citrus Memorial
hospital. In the emer-
gency room, I was treated
by Adam Weaver
May 15,1 sought med-
ical care for a growth
near my wrist. It was sur-
gically removed. During
recovery, May 31 at
2:30 a.m., a small punc-
ture in a vein bled out.
Nature Coast Emergency
Medical Services
promptly arrived and
transported me to CMH.
This injury required 2


pints of blood to save my
life. To all blood donors, I
say thank you. Your dona-
tions are vital to everyone.
July 18,1 fell in my
bathroom and broke a
bone in my back. Because
EMS was unable to lay me
flat, I was taken to CMH
by Citrus County Fire
Services. Thank you to
the Monsignor and an
elector from Our Lady of
Fatima, who came in to
see me and pray with me.
During my hospital stay,
a scan was taken, reveal-
ing a tumor in my lung.
After my rehabilitation at
Woodlawn Terrace, I had
a biopsy done. The growth
of the tumor required 60
radiation treatments.
To date, I am cancer
free. Every day I take
time to speak my praises
for my life.
I owe it all to God, Dr
Javier, Dr Schmidt, Dr
Bennett, the staff at Robert
Boissoneault Oncology In-
stitute, radiologists West
Jones and Pete and nurs-
ing assistant Beverly
A special thanks to my


husband, Gordon Nelson,
for standing by me
through all of this, and
the loving assistance and
prayers from all my fam-
ily, neighbors and friends.
I am genuinely grateful
for everything everyone
has done for me. I want to
take this opportunity to
publicly thank all of you. I
believe a positive attitude
and humor add to a speed-
ier recovery Had I not
fallen and injured my
back, it is uncertain when
or if the tumor in my lung
would have been discov-
ered. And there are won-
derful services available to
everyone in Citrus County.
Madeline Nelson

RF worries
I would like to know
how much radio fre-
quency microwaves are
radiating through our
county now, every minute,
24/7, with the advent of
cell towers/phones, Wi-Fi
signals from homes/busi-
nesses, the new "smart"
electric meters which


have been installed, with
more being considered
for our water metering.
My concerns are more
geared toward the health
effects these frequencies
may have on our cells, if
any
I've read about the se-
curity issues, privacy con-
cerns and medical device
interference questions as
well as fire hazard prob-
lems that have been docu-
mented relating to these
new devices; however, my
main concern is with the
health effects, if any, this
continual saturation may
have on living things.
My questions are these.
Do we know how much
microwave radiation is too
much for us? Is there any-
one (in authority) measur-
ing how much we are
continually exposed to?
Should these frequencies
be considered a pollutant?
Thanks for hearing my
concerns.
D. Charles Smith
Inverness


Leave tortoises
alone
I am mostly concerned
about drivers
who run over tor-
toises in the -
middle of the
road just for fun.
We have a tor-
toise that's in
our back yard
that has a home
and I fear for
him every time CAL
he goes out. I try 563-i
to keep it away
from the road. I
do the best that I can.
Please slow down when
you see the precious ani-
mals crossing our road.
They're very beautiful and
they're not to be made a
target.
Way to go,
skeeter patrol!
I would like to say
thank you to Citrus
County Mosquito Control
for doing their job, a
great job, this year. We
haven't had any problems
in the south end of the
county with mosquitoes
and I hear the truck come
through in the evenings.
Thank you again. No
mosquitoes in our area.
Job well done.
Don't worry about
us tailgaters
To those complaining
about tailgaters: It is your
job as a driver to worry
about who is in front of
you, not to keep track of


PB'760LN BACKPACK
PB7BLNBLOWER


9 63.3cc professional-grade,
2-stroke engine
Low noise 65 dB(A)
Air volume 535 cfm
Max air speed 214 mph

BUY THE CS-400-18
SGET A FREE CHAIN SAW VALUE PACK
VALUE PACK INCLUDES: CS-94OO-1VP
L CS-400-18 Chain Saw CHAIN SAW VALUE PACK
18" Tough Chest 40.2 cc professional grade engine
S1 -Quart Bar & Chain Oil 18" bar and chain
Collectible ECHO hat : 30% reduction in starting effort
5 year consumer warranty

Based on MSRP of items sold separately. S 2 9

*While supplies last.


Citrus Equipmeni7S>F

& Repair Inc.

6659 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Crystal River (Hwy. 486, just east of Hwy. 44)
352-795-6635
www.outdoorpowerplace.com


We are pleased to announce the
opening of Nature Coast Surgical Specialists and the
appointment of Dr. Santosh Potdar, MD, FACS
(Fellow of the American College of Surgeons)
to the Sugarmill Woods Community.


SANTOSH POTDAR, MD, FACS
Board Certified in General S', i .



Dr. Potdar has extensive experience in general surgery
which also includes complex general surgery procedures
and transplantation of liver, kidney and pancreas

At Nature Coast Surgical Specialists, it is our goal to
provide our patients with the highest quality of care in
the most efficient manner. We are conveniently located
on South Suncoast Highway in Homosassa as well as the
Oak Hill Hospital Medical Office Building


:- Nature Coast
* Surgical Specialists

8367South Suncoast Boulevard
Homosassa, Florida 34446
(352) 382-0288 (Office) (352) 382-0351 (Fax)
oeo
11373 Cortez Boulevard. Suite 208
Brooksville, Florida 34613
(352) 597-0224 (Office) (352) 597-0252 (Fax)
(855) 448-9650 (Toll Free)

ACEPIN NW ATENS


OPINION


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 A17


I ss;!fm *


(


who is behind, other than
to stay out of their way if
they're passing you. Slow-
ing down or constantly
watching behind
LND you can cause an
Accident and
FF you're the one at
fault then, not
the tailgater.
Stop
dumping
oor Our recycling
5 9 bins are becom-
)57 ing people's per-
sonal trash
dumps.
Couches, broken furni-
ture, nasty rugs, stinky
household garbage is
being dumped. I've per-
sonally seen people
dumping off trailer loads
of old furniture, appli-
ances, tires and so forth.
Sometimes they will drive
on by when the see some-
one there and wait 'til you
leave and then circle back
and do their drop when
they think no one is
watching, but I've already
got their vehicle license
number called in.If you
are guilty, please stop
and get trash service or
haul (it) to the landfill.
Dogcatcher is
coming
To the people that allow
their dogs to run around
scaring people: They have
a collar. They're running
around some area in
Chamomile and Sugar
Maple in Beverly Hills. I
alerted the dogcatcher.










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Work/ BRIEFS T *J .J *^1J -
ChessDrug mixers to get tighter scrutiny

Chess Bill headed to Obama would enhance oversight ofcompounding pharmacies
jrM ,IBill headed to Obama would enhance oversight of compoundingpharmacies


Associated Press
Norway's Magnus
Carlsen plays against
reigning world chess
champion Viswanathan
Anand Monday during the
Chess World Champi-
onship match in Chennai,
India. The 43-year-old
Anand has the advantage
of playing at home in
India, where he is treated
as a super star. The 22-
year-old Carlsen is the
top Western player since
Bobby Rscher.


Photographer
shot at French
newspaper
PARIS French police
are hunting for a gunman
suspected in a shooting
Monday at a Paris newspa-
per office that gravely
wounded a photographer,
as well as three other at-
tacks around the nation's
capital.
The motive for the at-
tacks, which prompted
heightened security at
media offices and the busy
Champs-Elysees shopping
avenue, is unclear.
Authorities released
video footage of the sus-
pect. Molins said he was
wielding a pump-action
shotgun and wearing a
black vest, green shoes
with white soles, and a cap.
Argentine
president
returns to work
BUENOS AIRES, Ar-
gentina President
Cristina Fernandez finally
returned to work Monday,
meeting with Cabinet minis-
ters and recording a seven-
minute video that showed
her in good spirits six
weeks after surgery to drain
blood from inside her skull.
The video, which she
said was recorded Monday
by her daughter Florencia,
shows Fernandez wearing
a white blouse the first
time she's worn anything
other than black in public
since the death of her hus-
band, former President
Nestor Kirchner, three
years ago.
She thanked the "mil-
lions" of people who had
sent their good wishes,
from "the most humble ser-
vant to the most important
world leader," and showed
off a stuffed penguin doll
that she said a student ac-
tivist sent her.
UN chief Moon
rolls out World
Toilet Day
UNITED NATIONS -The
lack of access to a decent
toilet is no joke for a third of
the world's people, but a
matter of life and death.
Some 2.5 billion people
do not have access to ade-
quate sanitation, the United
Nations said, and more
than 1 billion practice open
defecation a problem
that contributes to countless
deaths from preventable
diseases.
"We must break the
taboos and make sanitation
for all a global development
priority," U.N. Secretary-
General Ban Ki-Moon said in
declaring Tuesday to be the
inaugural World Toilet Day.
Each year, more than
800,000 children under 5
die from diarrhea, the U.N.
said.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Con-
gress took a half step Mon-
day toward increasing
federal oversight of so-
called compounding phar-
macies that custom mix
medications in bulk, a
year after a meningitis
outbreak from contami-
nated steroid pain injec-
tions killed 64 people and
sickened hundreds more.
The Senate approved
the bill by voice vote, send-


ing it to the White House,
where President Barack
Obama is expected to sign
it into law The legislation
also creates a national sys-
tem for tracking prescrip-
tion drugs from
manufacturers to retail
pharmacies, first through
serial numbers on bottles
and later through elec-
tronic codes. The House
passed it in September
More than 750 people
were sickened by last year's
outbreak of deadly fungal


meningitis and many con-
tinue to suffer debilitating
pain and nerve damage.
The sickness was eventu-
ally traced to a now-closed
pharmacy in Framingham,
Mass., the New England
Compounding Center,
where inspectors found
mold, standing water and
other unsterile conditions.
The company shipped
more than 17,600 doses of
the implicated steroid in-
jection to 23 states.
Jurisdiction over such


large-volume com-
pounders has been murky
Pharmacies that fill indi-
vidual prescriptions from
a doctor or other health
professional are typically
regulated by state boards,
but the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration regulates
manufacturers of medi-
cines. The compromise
bill gives the FDA author-
ity to inspect and close
down large-volume com-
pounders, but it doesn't
require the pharmacies to


register with the FDA, as
manufacturers of pre-
scription drugs must do.
The bill attempts to sort
out the legal gray area that
allowed the Massachu-
setts pharmacy and simi-
lar businesses to skirt both
state and federal regula-
tions. The measure clari-
fies the FDAs authority
over high-volume com-
pounding pharmacies that
mass-produce medica-
tions, rather than fill doc-
tors' prescriptions.


Lincoln's moment


Associated Press
People visit the site of Pickett's Charge on Monday in Gettysburg, Pa. Today marks the 150th anniversary of President Abraham
Lincoln's short speech that has gone on to symbolize his presidency and explain the sacrifices made by Union and Confederate forces
during the U.S. Civil War.

Gettysburg address happened seven score and 10 years ago from today


THE GETTYSBURG
ADDRESS
Four score and seven years
ago our fathers brought forth on
this continent a new nation,
conceived in liberty, and dedi-
cated to the proposition that all
men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a
great civil war, testing whether
that nation, or any nation so
conceived and so dedicated,
can long endure. We are met
on a great battlefield of that
war We have come to dedicate
a portion of that field, as a final
resting place for those who
here gave their lives that that
nation might live. It is altogether
fitting and proper that we
should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we
can not dedicate, we can not
consecrate, we can not hallow
this ground. The brave men, liv-
ing and dead, who struggled
here, have consecrated it, far
above our poor power to add or
detract. The world will little
note, nor long remember what
we say here, but it can never
forget what they did here. It is
for us the living, rather, to be
dedicated here to the unfin-
ished work which they who
fought here have thus far so
nobly advanced. It is rather for
us to be here dedicated to the
great task remaining before us
- that from these honored
dead we take increased devo-
tion to that cause for which they
gave the last full measure of
devotion that we here highly
resolve that these dead shall
not have died in vain that
this nation, under God, shall
have a new birth of freedom-
and that government of the
people, by the people, for the
people, shall not perish from
the earth.


Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. Thou-
sands of people are heading to
a small town in southern Penn-
sylvania on Tuesday to com-
memorate a speech that for
150 years has been a source of
national identity
President Abraham Lincoln's
Gettysburg Address first de-
livered here nearly five months
after the major battle that left
tens of thousands of men
wounded, dead or missing-
will be read by a re-enactor
Tuesday to mark the
anniversary
Some visitors are honoring
both the speech and those who
fought in the battle. Tom Stack,
54, of Wilmington, Del., has an
ancestor who fought and died
at Gettysburg while serving
with the 1st Minnesota Volun-
teer Regiment.
"It was an incredible time,
with incredible individuals, on
both sides, really," Stack said.
The short oration, which be-
gins, "Four score and seven
years ago," was not immedi-
ately recognized as a towering
literary achievement. Just last
week, The Patriot-News in
nearby Harrisburg retracted a
dismissive editorial about the
speech published by its Civil
War-era predecessor, The Har-
risburgPatriot & Union. The
paper now says it regrets the
error of not seeing its "mo-
mentous importance, timeless
eloquence and lasting
significance."
The free Dedication Day
event is held annually at Sol-
diers' National Cemetery Last
year's commemoration drew
some 9,000 people.
Interior Secretary Sally Jew-
ell and James McPherson, a
leading Civil War scholar, are
the keynote speakers for the
event and Pennsylvania Gov
Tom Corbett will also deliver
remarks.


- From wire reports


Library of Congress/Associated Press
This 1905 artist's rendering from the Sherwood Lithograph Co. de-
picts President Abraham Lincoln speaking at the dedication of the
Gettysburg National Cemetery on Nov. 19, 1863. The Gettysburg
Address is unusual among great American speeches, in part be-
cause the occasion did not call for a great American speech. Lin-
coln was not giving an inaugural address, a commencement speech
or remarks in the immediate aftermath of a shocking national
tragedy. "No one was looking for him to make history," said the
Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War historian James McPherson.










SPORTS


* Florida
freshman
QB
expected
to get
another
start.
/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College basketball/B2
0 NBA/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 NHL/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Lottery, TV/B3
0 College football/B4
0 NFL/B4


Gators lose Hill, beat Jaguars


No. 16Florida

improves to 3-1

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE-No. 16 Florida lost
point guard Kasey Hill to an ankle in-
jury in a 67-53 victory against Southern
on Monday night
Hill, a freshman averaging 10 points
a game, badly sprained his left ankle
early in the second half and had to be
helped to the locker room. He did not
return.
The injury could be problematic for
Florida (3-1), which already is without
point guard Scottie Wilbekin. The sen-
ior is suspended indefinitely, but he
could return as early as next week.
The Gators had little trouble without
Hill against the Jaguars (1-4).


Casey Prather had 10 points and nine
rebounds, one of three players in dou-
ble figures, as the Gators extended
their home winning streak to 18.
Florida led by 16 at halftime and
cruised from there.
Calvin Godfrey led Southern with 18
points and nine rebounds. Trelun
Banks added 12 points.
Hill had a layup, a reverse layup, and
a runner in the lane that helped
Florida build a double-digit lead early
Prather kept getting in the lane and to
the free-throw line, and Florida even-
tually pushed the advantage to 16
points before the break
They coasted from there, far from
good enough to appease Donovan. The
coach called several timeout in the sec-
ond half and even got caught screaming
at Michael Frazier II in an emptying
arena.
Frazier scored nine points, hitting 3
of 7 shots from 3-point range.


Patric Young finished with a season-
high 12 points and six rebounds. DeVon
Walker had 10 points, and Dorian
Finney-Smith chipped in eight points
and seven rebounds before fouling out
But the story was Hill's health.
The McDonald's All-American
screamed after he rolled his ankle. The
Gators have been short-handed all sea-
son. Wilbekin, forward Dorian Finney-
Smith and center Damontre Harris
were suspended indefinitely to start the
season, and Frazier (mono), forward
Will Yeguete (knee surgery) and guard
Eli Carter (broken leg) are dealing with
illness and injuries.
Now, Hill could miss some time.
Florida forward Casey Prather,
center, is sandwiched Monday by
Southern University guards YonDarius
Johnson, left, and Trelun Banks
during the first half in Gainesville.
Associated Press


Hurricane warning


Citrs boys ~

hoops team

loaded; others 4 ",

have questions
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
As the boys' basketball sea-
son commences this week,
three schools- Crystal River,
Lecanto and Seven Rivers -
are contending with questions
about depth and experience,
while another Citrus is
loaded with proven talent and
playoff experience.
Adding to a list of un-
knowns, Pirates standout
point guard Ty Reynolds is
currently out and has an un-
certain return status with
multiple injuries (neck, an-
kles) from football. Former Pi-
rate Sam Franklin, now with
Citrus, faces a likely FHSAA
suspension after getting
ejected from a football game
for the second year in a row,
this time for throwing a punch
at a Springstead player in last -
Friday's regional quarterfinal
tilt
Without Franklin, who av-
eraged 14 points, 7.7 rebounds
and 3. 1 blocks a night for Crys-
tal River last season, the Hur-
ricanes' outlook is still one of
the brightest the program has
seen. They return four of five
starters, as well as key reserve
Javian Clark, from a team that
won the school's first district
title since the 2004-05 cam-
paign and was within three
points of Gainesville with 1:30
remaining in the regional
quarterfinals. Leading the
'Canes will be Chronicle
Player of the Year Devin
Pryor The senior point guard
is not shy about driving the
basket and playing above the
rim, and he averaged 21.5
points a game while sinking
half his 3-point attempts last
season.
"He plays all the time," CHS
head coach Tom Densmore
said of Pryor, "and he's always
looking to improve. He has
that ability that when he de- in.
cides he's going to score on a
trip, he does." Chronicle file
Densmore's group gets a big Citrus junior forward Desmond Franklin averaged 11.2 points per game last season and is one
See Page B2 of several players the Hurricanes will count on during District 5A-6 action this winter.


Lecanto


girls lift


way to


meet title
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
LECANTO Breanna John-
son didn't have a lot to say after
she finished her clean and jerk
Monday afternoon at the Lecanto
High School gym.
"It feels good," said the senior
She won the 139 pound weight
class with a
personal-best
of 135 in the
bench press
and season-
best 130
pounds in
the clean
and jerk for a total of 265 pounds.
She did 135 pounds in the clean
and jerk last year
Johnson led Lecanto's girls
weightlifting team to a tri-meet
victory over Weeki Wachee and
Crystal River Lecanto had 70
points, Weeki Wachee had 30
points and the young Crystal
River team had just seven points.
Johnson is hoping to go on a
journey that will take her to the
state tournament in Kissimmee
in February
Last year, she had the misfor-
tune to be in the same weight
class as River Ridge's Alex Li-
Calsi, who won the 139 pound
state title and is also a two-time
weightlifting national champion.
Johnson missed out on state,
but the good news for Johnson is
that LiCalsi graduated.
Lecanto won eight of the
weight classes on Monday
In the 119 pound weight class,
Lecanto's Andreanna Van Quelef
won with a 230 pound total. She
had a 105 pound bench and a 125
pound clean and jerk
Crystal River High senior
Laynee Nadal was fourth in the
weight class. She had a 100
pound bench and an 85 pound
clean and jerk for a total of 185.
Lecanto has a meet at Nature
Coast on Wednesday and will
compete at the Leesburg Invita-
tional on Friday New Port
Richey's River Ridge High, pos-
sibly the best team on the Nature
Coast, will compete there.
Lecanto coach Bob LeCours
said he is just trying to get his
team to improve by pushing them
every meet
"Everybody else is getting bet-
ter and we have to get better
See Page B3


Confident Rainey making impact with Buccaneers


Associated Press
TAMPA-Bobby Rainey is making the most of an
opportunity to prove he belongs in the NFL.
The little known running back who's playing for
his third team in less than two seasons has helped
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers win two straight follow-
ing an 0-8 start that put coach Greg Schiano's job in
jeopardy
He's averaging more than 5 yards per carry since
being plucked from the waiver wire and thrust into
the lineup because of injuries to Doug Martin and
Mike James.
The former Western Kentucky standout who en-
tered the league as an undrafted college free agent
and wound up sporting a Super Bowl ring before
appearing his first regular-season game scored the


winning touchdown in Tampa Bay's first victory
On Sunday, the 5-foot-8, 212-pounder who has
heard his entire life that he's too small to excel in a
big man's game rushed for 163 yards and scored
three TDs to pace a 41-28 rout of the Atlanta Falcons.
Rainey, released by the Baltimore Ravens and
Cleveland Browns before landing in Tampa Bay,
never doubted he could play on the game's highest
level.
"My idol is Barry Sanders. I like all the small run-
ning backs Warrick Dunn, all those type of guys.
And the one we just played (Atlanta's Jacquizz
See .Page B3
Tampa Bay running back Bobby Rainey runs
during the first half Sunday in Tampa.
Associated Press









Spartans roll late Trail Blazers win
I 7In-T iTnV' (n r^TI+rV fl/9kV


Associated Press

EAST LANSING, Mich.
- Keith Appling matched
a career high with 25
points to help No. 1 Michi-
gan State pull away to
beat Portland 82-67 on
Monday night in its first
game as a top-ranked
team in 13 years.
The Spartans (4-0)
struggled in the first half,
leading by four points
after seven lead changes
and three ties.
Travis Trice's 3-pointer
broke a tie with 12:26 left
and he followed that up
seconds later with a steal
and layup. Garry Harris
made a 3-pionter the
team's llth from behind
the arc midway through
the second half that put
Michigan State ahead by
10 points for the first time.
The Pilots (1-2) were
balanced on offense with
Kevin Bailey leading the
way with 12 points and
pesky on defense and the
boards.
No. 6 Duke 91,
UNC Asheville 55
DURHAM, N.C. Jabari
Parker had 21 points and 10
rebounds, and No. 6 Duke
beat UNC Asheville 91-55 in
the opening round of the NIT
Season Tip-Off.
Rodney Hood had 15 of his
18 points in the first half for
the Blue Devils (3-1), who
never trailed and shot 57
percent.
Duke held a 42-28 re-
bounding advantage, built a
20-point first-half lead and
coasted to its 104th straight
nonconference win at
Cameron Indoor Stadium.
Sam Hughes scored 16
points for the Bulldogs (1-3).
They shot 33 percent and
never got closer than 18
points in the second half.
UNC Asheville was beaten
soundly by its second top-10
opponent in 11 days after
being routed 89-57 by then-
No. 1 Kentucky.
Andre Dawkins had 13
points and Quinn Cook and
freshman Semi Ojeleye
added 10 apiece to help Duke
improve to 23-2 in the presea-
son NIT.
No. 9 Syracuse 56,
SF Brooklyn 50
SYRACUSE, N.Y -
Jerami Grant scored 13
points, including a tying follow



HOOPS
Continued from Page BI

boost this week from junior
forward Desmond Franklin
(11.2 points per game last
season), as he comes in
from football, and should
benefit from the perimeter
scoring of senior Mitchell
Ellis (12 points per game
last season) as well as strong
inside games from senior
Ben Janicki and junior
Desmond Simmons, the
team's only player on last
year's JV squad.
Citrus plays host to
Lecanto and new head
coach JeffAnderson on Fri-
day While introducing a
new coaching regime, the
Panthers are also replacing
six key seniors (nine total)
from last year's 17-7 squad.
Sharp-shooting guards Dar-
ius Sawyer and Thomas Vi-
lardi, as well as 6-foot-7 big
men Brandon Burich and
Ronnie Crowe, should help
on that front Burich aver-
aged a double-double last
season with 11 points and
10 rebounds per game. A
handful of sophomores
coming off a 19-1 JV season
will also help bolster the
Panthers, as will freshman
Kaine McColley
"We're really young," An-
derson said. "We've got a lot
of 10th-graders, and we've
got a ninth-grader (McCol-
ley) that's going to start for
me. Between the transition
of having a new coach and
new system, and not having
a lot of varsity experience,


it'll be a growing experi-
ence for us each and every
game."
Anderson is making de-
fense a top priority for his
Panthers, which have been
known for their high-tempo,
perimeter shooting attack
over the years.
"We felt if we could estab-
lish our defensive princi-
ples from the very first day,
that we could change the


Associated Press
Michigan State's Gary Harris puts up a layup Monday against Portland's Ryan
Nicholas during the first half in East Lansing, Mich.


with 1:43 left, and set up the
go-ahead basket by Michael
Gbinije in the final minute, as
No. 9 Syracuse held off St.
Francis Brooklyn 56-50 in an
opening-round game of the
Maui Invitational.
Syracuse (4-0), making its
first appearance in the tour-
nament since winning it in
1998, plays its next game in
Hawaii in a week against
Minnesota.
Syracuse's last nonconfer-
ence home loss was to
Cleveland State on Dec. 15,
2008.

mindset of some of these
kids that are used to run-
ning and gunning and going
as fast as they could," An-
derson said. "We want to
play some hard man-to-man
defense and be able to stop
teams and make them work
hard on possessions."
The new district reas-
signments dropped CHS
and LHS from 6Ato 5A, and
have all three public county
teams with Dunnellon in
District 5A-6. If the 'Canes
or Panthers advance from
the four-team district,
they'll appreciate not hav-
ing to face Gainesville, a
four-time state champion
which made the state semi-
finals last February or
Leesburg, a 2011 state
champion and 2012 state fi-
nalist, this time around.
With wins over Citrus,
Lecanto, Dunnellon and
Seven Rivers, the Pirates
are coming off their most
successful season in more
than a decade, but them-
selves in an all-too-familiar
rebuilding mode. Reynolds'
contributions for Crystal
River over the past three
seasons -
21.5 points
and 7.2 re-
bounds per
game last
season and
leading


running -x Ty
make for a Reynolds
gaping Ryod
hole in his
absence. Exacerbating mat-
ters, the remainder of last
season's starters are gone.
"We're of the mindset that
you don't just wait around
and hold your breath,"
CRHS head coach Steve
Feldman said. "The best
thing that's happened for
the young guys is they get
minutes. We'll be an ex-
tremely inexperienced
team this year We're going
to have to learn quickly"
The Pirates are counting
heavily on senior captain


Dajuan Coleman matched
his career high with 14 points
and Trevor Cooney added 12
for Syracuse.
Jalen Cannon led St. Fran-
cis with 16 points and An-
thony White had 10.
Miami 70, Coll. of
Charleston 54
CHARLESTON, S.C. -
James Kelly scored 18 points
to lead a hot-shooting Miami
to a 70-54 win over the Col-
lege of Charleston.
The Hurricanes (3-1) led by


Opening night
A pair of county boys
basketball teams get the
regular season started
tonight.
Citrus at Lake Weir, 7 p.m.
Forest at Lecanto, 7:30 p.m.

Hunter Roessler, a 6-foot
guard-forward, and 6-3 jun-
ior post player Carlton
Gadsen.
"Roessler shows slow but
steady improvement," Feld-
man said. "He's athletic by
our standards, and he's a
quiet leader He does ex-
actly what he needs to do,
and if everybody followed
his lead we'd be better off in
the locker room."
A trio of speedy sopho-
mores, including football
holdovers Key Hopkins and
Khyrel Harvey, could help
Crystal River compensate
some for its disadvantage in
size.
"We think we have a little
quickness that may allow us
to do a few things defen-
sively that you're not used
to seeing out of us," Feld-
man said.
The sim-
ilarly un-







Chronicle
Playersiz of the Year Adam
Gage and junior guardrriors




Corey Weiand. Elsewhere,
the team is untested after
losing three senior starters
from a year ago.r-
m e r Adam Gage



Chron"Gage is a completely
player," SRHS heYead coacham
GagJim Ervin said juof the senior
Corey Weiand. Elsewhere,



whoe the coisuntesy with 22.9after
points per game laniorst season



while also grabbing 9.8 re-
frbounds a yearnight "He hit theo.



weights a little bit and is
"Gjust a betters acll-aroundmplete
player," at this point than he
wasJim Ervinat this time last year
who led the county with 22.9
points per game last season
while also grabbing 9.8 re-
bounds a night "He hit the
weights a little bit and is
just a better all-around
player at this point than he
was at this time last year


15 at halftime, but Charleston
came out and hit the first two
shots of the second half to cut
Miami's lead to 40-29. Kelly
then hit a 3-pointer and Tonye
Jekiri hit an uncontested layup
that started a 15-6 run. By the
time Donnavan Kirk hit a run-
ner in the lane, the Hurricanes
were up 55-35 with 10 min-
utes to go.
Charleston (1-3) would cut
the lead to nine with three min-
utes left, but Manu Lecomte
hit a driving layup and the
Cougars never got closer.


We'll look for (Gage and
Weiand) to have big nights
each and every night for us
to be successful."
In District 2A-3, Ervin ex-
pects tough competition
from 2013 regional finalist
First Academy-Leesburg
and Ocala rival St John
Lutheran, which figures to
challenge Seven Rivers
with its formidable size in
the middle. His team plays
at Lecanto Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
Citrus
Head coach: Tom Densmore
Last year: 16-11; District 6A-
6 champions; lost to Gainesville
82-72 in regional quarterfinals
District: 5A-6 (Crystal River,
Dunnellon, Lecanto)
Key returnees: Devin Pryor,
Sr., G; Desmond Franklin, Jr., F;
Mitchell Ellis, Sr., G; Ben Janicki,
Sr.,F
Promising newcomers:
Desmond Simmons, Jr., F; Sam
Franklin, Jr., F (transfer from
CRHS); Zac Saxer, So., G
(transfer from SRHS)
Key losses: Randy Lynn, F;
Abe Juste, F; Kyle Presnick, G
Coach's outlook: 'The po-
tential is there," said Densmore,
who was most impressed with
his team's chemistry in the pre-
season. "But potential doesn't
mean anything. No matter how
many games we win this year,
no one's going to hand us any-
thing. We're going to have to
keep getting better and working
every day, and right now we are.
Our team understands the pos-
sibilities of this season."
Crystal River
Head coach: Steve Feldman
Last year: 11-13; lost in dis-
trict quarterfinals
District: 5A-6 (Crystal River,
Dunnellon, Lecanto)
Key returnees: Hunter
Roessler, Sr. G/F; Carlton Gad-
sen, Jr., F; Ty Reynolds, Sr., G
Promising newcomers: Key
Hopkins, So., F; Khyrel Harvey,
So., G; Shaun Frasier, So., G
Key losses: Sam Franklin, F;
Damien Westfall, F/G; Matt


Bulls extend

win streak to

fivegames

Associated Press

NEW YORK LaMar-
cus Aldridge scored 27
points, Wesley Matthews
added 24 and the Portland
Trail Blazers beat the
Brooklyn Nets 108-98 Mon-
day night for their seventh
straight victory
Damian Lillard finished
with 19 points and nine as-
sists as the Trail Blazers
withstood the Nets' blister-
ing start to win seven in a
row in the same season for
the first time since a
13-game run in December
2007.
Portland (9-2) is just a
half-game behind San An-
tonio and Indiana for the
NBAs best record. The
Blazers will try to com-
plete a perfect 4-0 road trip
Wednesday at Milwaukee.
Shaun Livingston scored
23 points for the Nets, who
stormed out to their best
first quarter of the season
and then seemed to run
out of gas against the
younger Trail Blazers.
Kevin Garnett made all six
shots in the 40-point first
period, then went 2 for 13
from there to finish with a
season-high 16 points.
Garnett and Paul Pierce
were back in the starting
lineup after missing Satur-
day's loss to the Clippers in
Los Angeles with injuries,
though Brook Lopez and
Deron Williams continued
to rest sprained left ankles.
Bulls 86,
Bobcats 81
CHICAGO Luol Deng
scored 21 points and the
Chicago Bulls overcame a


rough shooting night to beat
the Charlotte Bobcats 86-81
for their fifth straight win.
Carlos Boozer had 12
points and 17 rebounds for
Chicago, which is on its
longest winning streak since
taking eight in a row from Feb.
20-March 7, 2012. Jimmy But-
ler had 14 points and Derrick
Rose finished with 12.
Thunder 115,
Nuggets 113
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Kevin
Durant scored 38 points, Rus-
sell Westbrook had 30 points
and 12 rebounds and the
Oklahoma City Thunder ral-
lied to beat the Denver
Nuggets 115-113.
Westbrook also had seven
assists in a terrific all-around
game that helped Oklahoma
City erase a 14-point deficit in
the second half. Reggie Jack-
son added 14 points.
With the score tied at 105,
Serge Ibaka pulled down an
offensive rebound and found
Durant for a 3-pointer that put
Oklahoma City (7-3) ahead to
stay. Jeremy Lamb and Derek
Fisher each hit a pair of free
throws in the final 14 seconds
to help the Thunder hold on.
Mavericks 97,
76ers 94
DALLAS Monta Ellis
scored 24 points, including 13
in the third quarter when Dal-
las took its first lead, and the
Mavericks beat the Philadel-
phia 76ers 97-94.
Dirk Nowitzki and Shawn
Marion had 20 points apiece
for the Mavericks, who began
a stretch of seven out of nine
games in Dallas. Nowitzki had
10 rebounds, and Marion
chipped in seven.
Ellis had 19 points in the
second half and added a
game-high 10 assists and two
of Dallas' 11 blocked shots.


= Women's BasketballBRIEF =


No. 9 Baylor 79,
Rice 46
WACO, Texas Odyssey
Sims scored 33 points, outscor-
ing Rice much of the game on
her own as ninth-ranked Baylor
won 7946 on Monday night to
extend its nation's-best home
winning streak to 60 games.
Sims, the preseason AP All-

Taylor, G
Coach's outlook: "If we don't
do some basic things," said
Feldman of his inexperienced
group, "the season can get very
long, very quick. Since we're un-
dersized, we've absolutely got a
premium on not turning the ball
over and boxing out. It's not
doom and gloom around here,
but there's going to be an awfully
big learning curve, and with us
just getting the football guys
back, it's got to happen quick be-
cause live bullets are flying
around."
Lecanto
Head coach: JeffAnderson
Last year: 17-7; lost in district
semifinals
District: 5A-6 (Crystal River,
Dunnellon, Lecanto)
Key returnees: Darius
Sawyer, Jr., G; Brandon Burich,
Jr., F; Thomas Vilardi, Sr., G;
Ronnie Crowe, Sr., F
Promising newcomers:
Kaine McColley, Fr., F; Matteo
Loiero, So., G; Steven Elliot, So.,
G; Travis McGee, So., G-F
Key losses: Mikey Makros,
G; Richie Rizzolo, G; Robert
Vega, F; Geoffrey Ruiz, C; Matt
Michelet, PG
Coach's outlook: 'We're
going to be a defensive team,"
Anderson said. 'We already
knew the kids know how to play


American point guard and only
returning starter this season,
has scored at least 23 points in
all three games for the Lady
Bears (3-0).
Rice (2-2) didn't surpass
Sims' final point total until Jes-
sica Kuster's basket with 6:22
left made it 64-34. That was
just a few seconds before Sims
exited the game for good.

and that they've been taught
well for many, many years. If we
can establish a good defense,
then the basketball skills and
fundamentals will all come with
it. Our young kids are just going
to have to step in, play well, get
their minutes and learn from
their mistakes very quickly"
Seven Rivers
Head coach: Jim Ervin
Last year: 11-11; lost in dis-
trict semifinals
District: 2A-3 (Gainesville
Cornerstone, FirstAcademy-
Leesburg, Ocala Meadowbrook,
Ocala St. John Lutheran)
Key returnees: Adam Gage,
Sr., F; Cory Weiand, Jr., G
Promising newcomers:
Justin Jimenez, So., PG; Roy
Finney Sr., G; Michael Steve,
Jr.,F
Key losses: Jared Bogart, F;
John Iwaniec, G; Lance Mosher,
G; Zac Saxer, G
Coach's outlook: "Rebound-
ing is something we're going to
struggle with all year," Ervin said.
"If we can control the boards,
we'll have an opportunity to win
the game. We have two kids
(Gage and Weiand) that can put
a lot of points on the board on
many nights. I think that's going
to be our strength, being able
to shoot the ball from the
perimeter."


AA IstAnnual
1-4 GOLF SCRAMBLE
E ,i 0ld o to benefit Hospice of Citrus -1'--
Xu'tAW). AW t~tMY Lmy A and the Nature Coast I
Saturday, December 7 8:30am
(shotgun start) Registration begins at 7:15am
$60 entry
Includes golf, prizes & lunch!
"' l1111. !...c .l|.. .i.i" .i !.! i |

a j^ ^^S h,,!s c ,!!", i".ic


J Foradditional
information call
The Pro Shop
352-465-0986
-J _,/ www.eldiablogolf.com


B2 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


BASKETBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


bevellull bul-algilu




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Nov. 17, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one pointfor a 25th-place vote and last
week's ranking:
Record Pts Pry
1.Michigan St.(51) 3-0 1,608 2
2. Kansas (7) 2-0 1,523 5
3. Louisville (7) 3-0 1,511 3
4. Kentucky 3-1 1,410 1
5. Arizona 3-0 1,339 6
6. Duke 2-1 1,320 4
7. Oklahoma St. 3-0 1,198 8
8. Ohio St. 3-0 1,172 10
9. Syracuse 3-0 1,135 9
10.VCU 3-0 928 14
11. Memphis 1-0 871 13
12. Wisconsin 3-0 763 20
13. Gonzaga 3-0 710 15
14. Michigan 2-1 705 7
14.Wichita St. 4-0 705 16
16. Florida 2-1 619 11
17. Oregon 2-0 613 18
18. UConn 4-0 600 19
19. New Mexico 2-0 353 22
20. Baylor 3-0 342 23
21. Iowa St. 3-0 296 -
22. UCLA 2-0 291 24
23. Creighton 3-0 246 -
24. North Carolina 2-1 213 12
25. Marquette 2-1 144 17
Others receiving votes: Iowa 122, Indiana
109, Virginia 77, Harvard 72, Boise St. 28, Bel-
mont 18, Arizona St. 13, Villanova 11, Xavier
10, Tennessee 9, Pittsburgh 7, Colorado 6, Mis-
souri 5, Florida St. 4, Minnesota 4, Saint Louis
4, Cincinnati 3, BYU 2, Indiana St. 2, UMass 2,
George Washington 1, Notre Dame 1.
USA Today Top 25
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men's
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Nov. 17, points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a 25th-place vote and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Michigan State (22) 3-0 789 2
2. Louisville (8) 3-0 761 3
3. Kansas (2) 2-0 735 6
4. Arizona 3-0 684 5
5. Kentucky 3-1 658 1
6. Duke 2-1 630 4
7. Syracuse 3-0 601 7
8. Ohio State 3-0 597 9
9. Oklahoma State 3-0 541 12
10.VCU 3-0 443 14
11. Memphis 1-0 404 13
12. Gonzaga 3-0 381 15
13. Michigan 2-1 362 8
14. Florida 2-1 359 10
15.Wisconsin 3-0 332 19
16.Wichita State 4-0 330 16
17. Oregon 2-0 275 18
18. Connecticut 4-0 265 20
19. North Carolina 2-1 208 11
20. New Mexico 2-0 180 21
21. Baylor 3-0 131 25
22. Indiana 4-0 129 23
23. Creighton 3-0 111 -
24. UCLA 2-0 105 24
25. Iowa 4-0 74 -
Others receiving votes: Marquette 71, Iowa
State 49, Virginia 42, Boise State 21, Harvard
20, Pittsburgh 19, Georgetown 14, Notre Dame
13, Colorado 10, California 9, Tennessee 9,
Massachusetts 8, Saint Mary's 8, Belmont 5,
Missouri 5, Saint Louis 5, Arizona State 3, Vil-
lanova 2, BYU 1, Utah State 1.
Women's AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
women's college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 17,
total points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one pointfor a 25th-place vote and
last week's ranking:
Record Pts Pry
1. UConn(36) 4-0 900 1
2. Duke 3-0 864 2
3.Tennessee 4-0 796 4
4. Louisville 4-0 780 5
5. Notre Dame 3-0 740 6
6. Stanford 3-1 730 3
7. Kentucky 4-0 699 7
8. Maryland 2-1 630 8
9. Baylor 2-0 616 9
10. Oklahoma 2-1 515 11
11. Nebraska 3-0 472 15
12. North Carolina 2-1 457 12
13. Texas A&M 3-0 445 16
14.PennSt. 2-1 428 13
15. LSU 2-1 331 14
16. Colorado 2-0 316 17
17. California 2-2 298 10
18. Purdue 3-0 278 18
19. South Carolina 4-0 252 21
20. Oklahoma St. 3-0 239 20
21.Michigan St. 2-1 214 19
22. Iowa St. 2-0 171 22
23. Georgia 3-0 157 24
24. Gonzaga 2-1 104 25
25.DePaul 2-0 76 -
Others receiving votes: Iowa 38, Dayton 37,
Georgia Tech 26, Marquette 24, George Wash-
ington 16, Texas 15, Middle Tennessee 9, Van-
derbilt 8, Ohio St. 6, Florida St. 4, UCLA 3, West
Virginia 3, James Madison 1, Rutgers 1, Saint
Mary's (Cal) 1.
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 5 7 .417 -
Toronto 4 7 .364 %
Boston 4 7 .364 1
NewYork 3 6 .333 1
Brooklyn 3 7 .300 1
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 3 .700 -
Atlanta 6 4 .600 1
Charlotte 5 6 .455 21
Orlando 4 6 .400 3
Washington 2 7 .222 41
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 9 1 .900 -
Chicago 6 3 .667 2%
Cleveland 4 7 .364 5%
Detroit 3 6 .333 5%
Milwaukee 2 7 .222 6/
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 9 1 .900 -
Houston 7 4 .636 2%
Dallas 7 4 .636 2%
Memphis 5 5 .500 4
New Orleans 4 6 .400 5
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 9 2 .818 -
Oklahoma City 7 3 .700 1%
Minnesota 7 4 .636 2
Denver 4 6 .400 4/
Utah 1 11 .083 8%
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Golden State 8 3 .727 -
L.A. Clippers 7 3 .700
Phoenix 5 4 .556 2
L.A. Lakers 5 7 .417 3/
Sacramento 2 7 .222 5
Monday's Games
Portland 108, Brooklyn 98
Chicago 86, Charlotte 81
Oklahoma City 115, Denver 113
Dallas 97, Philadelphia 94
Golden State 98, Utah 87
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, late
Today
Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m.


Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
NewYork at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Sacramento, 10 p.m.



NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 3 0 .700 256 199
N.Y Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268
Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276
Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245
Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212
Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 B3


F or the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
OP 8-8-5
CASH 3 (late)
0, 0-2-3
4? '
SPLAY 4 (early)
9-2-4-0
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 6-6-1-9

FANTASY 5
1-12-16-25-29


Sunday's winning numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5:2 8 16 -28 -35
5-of-5 2 winners $90,995.38
4-of-5 230 $127.50
3-of-5 7,492 $10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
NBA BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (NBA) Oklahoma City Thunder at Golden State
Warriors (taped)
7:30 p.m. (NBA, SUN) Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Preseason NIT, Regional Final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (FS1) Vanderbilt at Butler
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Navy at Virginia
8 p.m. (ESPN) Old Spice Classic: Memphis at Oklahoma State
8:30 p.m. (FS1) Bucknell at St. John's
11 p.m. (ESPNU) Preseason NIT, Regional Final: Teams TBA
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 a.m. (ESPNU) Georgia atAuburn (taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Kent State at Ohio
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Buffalo at Miami (Ohio)
1 a.m. (ESPNU) Kent State at Ohio (same-day tape)
3 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida at South Carolina (taped)
NHL HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) Boston Bruins at Carolina Hurricanes (taped)
3 p.m. (NHL) Anaheim Ducks at Pittsburgh Penguins (taped)
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at New York Rangers
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Vancouver Canucks
SOCCER
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) FIFA World Cup Qualifying 2nd Leg:
Sweden vs. Portugal
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. National Team atAustria
3 p.m. (FS1) International Friendly: England vs. Germany
12:50 a.m. (UNI) Clasificacion de la Copa Mundial de FIFA
Intercontinental Playoff, 2nd Leg: Nueva Zelanda vs Mexico
1 a.m. (ESPN) FIFA World Cup Qualifying Intercontinental
Playoff, 2nd Leg: New Zealand vs Mexico
TENNIS
7 a.m. (TENNIS) Springfield Lasers at Philadelphia Freedoms
(taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


West
W L T Pct PF
Denver 9 1 0 .900 398
Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232
Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194
San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF
Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276
Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274
N.Y Giants 4 6 0 .400 192
Washington 3 7 0 .300 246


New Orleans
Carolina
Tampa Bay
Atlanta

Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota

Seattle
San Francisco
Arizona
St. Louis


South
W L T
8 2 0
7 3 0
2 8 0
2 8 0
North
W L T
6 4 0
6 4 0
5 5 0
2 8 0
West
W L T
10 1 0
6 4 0
6 4 0
4 6 0


Pct PF
.800 288
.700 238
.200 187
.200 214
Pct PF
.600 265
.600 282
.500 258
.200 240
Pct PF
.909 306
.600 247
.600 214
.400 224


Thursday's Game
Indianapolis 30, Tennessee 27
Sunday's Games
Chicago 23, Baltimore 20, OT
Oakland 28, Houston 23
Buffalo 37, N.Y Jets 14
Tampa Bay 41, Atlanta 28
Pittsburgh 37, Detroit 27
Philadelphia 24, Washington 16
Cincinnati 41, Cleveland 20
Arizona 27, Jacksonville 14
Miami 20, San Diego 16
Seattle 41, Minnesota 20
New Orleans 23, San Francisco 20
N.Y Giants 27, Green Bay 13
Denver 27, Kansas City 17
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
Monday's Game
Carolina 24, New England 22
Late Sunday
Broncos 27,
Chiefs 17
KansasCity 0 10 0 7- 17
Denver 10 7 7 3-27
First Quarter
Den-FG Prater 54, 12:33.
Den-J.Thomas 9 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 3:03.
Second Quarter
KC-Bowe 6 pass from A.Smith (Succop kick),
13:23.
Den-Ball 1 run (Prater kick), 9:05.
KC-FG Succop 20, 2:55.
Third Quarter
Den-Ball 8 run (Prater kick), 2:22.
Fourth Quarter
Den-FG Prater 36, 7:06.
KC-Fasano 10 pass from A.Smith (Succop
kick), 4:56.
A-77,076.


First downs
Total NetYards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns


KC
24
344
25-144
200
5-33
1-23


Den
24
427
36-104
323
3-17
1-28


Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 21-45-0 24-40-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-30 0-0
Punts 7-51.1 6-45.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 9-53 13-82
Time of Possession 30:07 29:53
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Kansas City, Charles 16-78,
A.Smith 5-52, Davis 3-13, Sherman 1-1. Den-
ver, Moreno 27-79, Ball 8-25, Manning 1-0.
PASSING-Kansas City, A.Smith 21-45-0-230.
Denver, Manning 24-40-0-323.
RECEIVING-Kansas City, McCluster 5-53,
Bowe 4-57, Fasano 4-37, McGrath 2-40, Sher-
man 2-18, Charles 2-(minus 6), Avery 1-20,
Davis 1-11. Denver, Welker 8-72, D.Thomas 5-
121, Decker 5-71, J.Thomas 3-43, Ball 3-16.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Denver, Prater 52
(WL).



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 20 14 6 0 28 64 50
Boston 20 13 6 1 27 57 37
Toronto 20 12 7 1 25 57 47
Detroit 21 9 5 7 25 54 60
Montreal 21 10 9 2 22 52 45
Ottawa 20 8 8 4 20 58 62
Florida 21 512 4 14 46 70
Buffalo 22 516 1 11 41 68
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 21 13 8 0 26 59 48
Washington 21 12 8 1 25 69 59
N.Y Rangers 20 1010 0 20 42 50
Carolina 21 8 9 4 20 40 59
New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49
N.Y Islanders 21 810 3 19 61 68
Columbus 20 710 3 17 52 57
Philadelphia 19 710 2 16 35 48
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 21 14 3 4 32 78 61
Minnesota 21 13 4 4 30 55 44
St. Louis 19 13 3 3 29 66 46
Colorado 19 14 5 0 28 59 41
Dallas 20 11 7 2 24 58 56
Winnipeg 23 1010 3 23 61 66
Nashville 20 9 9 2 20 46 63
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 23 15 6 2 32 72 59
San Jose 21 13 3 5 31 72 50
Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66
LosAngeles 21 14 6 1 29 58 46
Vancouver 22 11 8 3 25 56 58
Calgary 21 711 3 17 59 79
Edmonton 22 515 2 12 53 83
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Monday's Games
Calgary 5, Winnipeg 4, SO
Boston 4, Carolina 1
Pittsburgh 3, Anaheim 1
Today
St. Louis at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Columbus at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Florida atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Pirates remain perfect
The Crystal River girls basketball team
improved to 3-0 on the season with a
54-39 victory Monday night at home over
Williston.
Jasmyne Eason had a double-double
with a team-high 15 points and 11 re-
bounds. She also nabbed a team-high
seven steals the Pirates had 27 steals
as a team and blocked two shots.
Katelyn Hannigan and Bri Richardson
added 10 points each and Kaylen Simms
had seven rebounds and three steals.
Megan Wells dished out five assists and
Hannigan had four.
The Pirates return to action tonight at
South Sumter.

Citrus routs Hernando
Taylor Falabella and Jesse Lammer
each scored two goals as the Citrus girls
soccer team blanked Hernando on Mon-
day night at home 5-0.
Payton Wells added a goal and Lizzie
Rinaldi had three saves in goal for the
Hurricanes (2-4-2, 2-2-2).
Assists came from Malene Petersen,
Cassie Boiling, Paige Antonelli and Erin
Cagwin.
The Hurricanes are back in action
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at home against
Hudson.
MSU moves to No. I in AP
Michigan State is No. 1 in The Associ-
ated Press' college basketball poll for the
first time in 13 years.
The Spartans moved up one spot after





Penguins

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH (AP) Sidney
Crosby capped a third-period out-
burst with his 10th goal of the season,
and the Pittsburgh Penguins beat the
Anaheim Ducks 3-1 on Monday night.
Brian Gibbons scored on the first
shot of his NHL career and Brandon
Sutter chipped in his fourth goal of
the season as Pittsburgh's struggling
offense found a rhythm late against
the Pacific Division-leading Ducks.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 26
shots for Pittsburgh, which won for
only the second time in six games.
Crosby's goal was just his second in 11
games.
Ryan Getzlaf scored his llth goal
for the Ducks, who earned just one
point during a four-game East Coast
road trip. Viktor Fasth made 24 saves
but struggled in the final 20 minutes.
Gibbons took a slick backhand pass
from Evgeni Malkin to break a score-
less tie 3:56 into the third.


Continued from Page BI

exponentially," LeCours said. "(Amber)
Hopkins is showing some great strides.
I'm hoping to push some people up and
over"
Hopkins won the 169 pound class
with a 225 pound total. She had a 105
pound bench and a 120 pound clean
and jerk
This was Crystal River's first meet
"It (the meet) gives us an idea where
they are at," said Crystal River coach
Randy Owens. "I have 23 on our team.
We are young. There are 15 who are
freshmen or sophomores."
Team totals
1. Lecanto 70; 2. Week Wachee 30; 3. Crys-




RAINEY
Continued from Page BI

Rodgers), he's small, too," Rainey said.
"He told me: 'We've got to represent for
the short guys.' And I told him, 'Most
definitely We've got to stick together"'
The Bucs play at Detroit on Sunday
Rainey left Western Kentucky as the
school's career rushing leader and
began his rookie year on Baltimore's
practice squad. He was promoted to the
active roster in October 2012 but suf-
fered a season-ending knee injury be-
fore appearing in a regular-season
game for the Ravens, who went on to
win the Super Bowl.
The 26-year-old signed with Cleve-
land after being waived by Baltimore in
August. He averaged 24.5 yards on six
kickoff returns and rushed for 34 yards
on 13 carries before being released by
the Browns last month.
The Bucs signed Rainey the day after
Martin suffered a shoulder injury that
will sideline the 2012 Pro Bowl selec-
tion for the rest of the season.
The diminutive running back was
pressed into action when James went
down with a broken ankle during the
first quarter of then-winless Tampa
Bay's Monday Night Football appear-
ance against Miami.
The night before the Dolphins game,
Rainey got a call from his former col-
lege coach Willie Taggart, who's in his
first season at nearby South Florida,
which also plays its home games at Ray-
mond James Stadium.
"I told him what I tell our football
team," Taggart said. "The spotlight does
strange things to some people. Some
people show up and show out, and
some people hide in the spotlight.
You've only got one time to make a first
impression, Bobby Make them know


beating top-ranked Kentucky last week.
They took the No. 1 spot by a wide mar-
gin, receiving 51 first-place votes Monday
from the 65-member national media panel.
Kansas, which beat Duke in the other
game in the big doubleheader last week,
moved from fifth to second and received
seven first-place votes. Louisville stayed
third and drew the other seven first-place
votes.
Kentucky dropped to fourth and was fol-
lowed byArizona, Duke, Oklahoma State,
Ohio State, Syracuse and VCU.
UConn unanimous No. 1
The UConn women's basketball team
remains No. 1 in The Assodciated Press poll
after easily sweeping three Top 25 teams.
Connecticut is followed by Duke, Ten-
nessee, Louisville and Notre Dame.
Stanford fell three spots to sixth. Ken-
tucky, Maryland, Baylor and Oklahoma
round out the top 10.
Broncos handle Chiefs
DENVER Peyton Manning went vir-
tually untouched by Kansas City's sack-
happy defense Sunday night, throwing for
323 yards and a touchdown to lead the
Denver Broncos to a 27-17 victory over
the NFL's last undefeated team.
The Chiefs, who came into the game
with a league-leading 36 sacks, barely
breathed on Manning, who finished 24
for 40.
The Broncos tied Kansas City at 9-1
atop the AFC West with a rematch set in
two weeks.
-From staff and wire reports





top Ducks

Malkin did most of the work. He
skated across the blue line and then
did a 360-degree tour of the Anaheim
zone with two Ducks chasing him be-
fore finding Gibbons in the slot. The
25-year-old Gibbons beat Fasth over
the shoulder to put the Penguins in
front.
The Penguins needed just 62 sec-
onds to make it 2-0, as Sutter de-
flected a shot from the point by Olli
Maatta.
Bruins 4, Hurricanes 1
RALEIGH, N.C. Reilly Smith and
Carl Soderberg had a goal and an assist
each in the first period, and the Boston
Bruins beat the Carolina Hurricanes 4-1.
Johnny Boychuk scored midway
through the third period, and Milan Lucic
added an empty-net goal for Boston,
which has 11 points in its last seven
games (5-1-1).
Tuukka Rask stopped 23 shots for
Boston.


tal River 7.
Individual Results
101 pounds: 1. Cheyenne Adkins (L) 80-
85-165; 2. Kaitlyn O'Rourke (L) 60-75-135;
110:1. Amanda Myers (L) 85-90-175; 2.
Callese Brannen (WV) 75-85-160; 119:1.
Andreanna Van Quelef(L) 105-125-230; 3.
Laynee Nadal (CR) 100-85-185; 129:1. Erin
Moynihan (WW) 125-115-240; 2.Amanda
Caraluzzo (L) 95-105-200; 139:1. Breanna
Johnson (L) 135-130-265; 2. Sydney Hol-
stein (L) 105-115-220; 154:1. Gail Skaates
(L) 115-95-210; 2. Monique Meigs (L) 95-95-
190; 169:1. Amber Hopkins (L) 105-120-225;
4. Madison Poterscki (CR) 75-75-150; 183:1.
Samantha Parker (L) 90-110-200; 2. Abby
Fielding (L) 95-85-180 199:1. Jordan Moor-
man (WW) 80-75-155; 2. Kalena Carey (L)
70-75-145; Unl: 1. Sabrina Durbin (L) 110-
100-210; 2. Harrison Mancke (L) 95-115-210.


your name."
Rainey carried eight times for 45
yards, including a 31-yard burst, and
scored the winning TD against the Dol-
phins as the Bucs became the last team
in the NFL to win this season.
He handled a heavier workload
against the Falcons, finishing with 30
carries and scoring on runs of 43 and 3
yards, as well as a 4-yard pass reception.
"He's got a good feel, and when I say
that it's just he's a football player," Schi-
ano said.
"You go back and look at his history
at Western Kentucky, he's their all-time
everything. He doesn't lack for confi-
dence, although he's not boisterous or
full of himself," Schiano added. "He's
just knows he can play, and he's got a
good feel as far as patience and running
the football. He gives the play a chance
to develop, and that's a guy who's had a
lot of touches over his career not in
this league, but over his career"
The Bucs recommitted to running the
ball three weeks ago and have re-
sponded by posting three of their top
four rushing performances of the
season.
With 186 yards on the ground against
the Falcons, Tampa Bay now has
rushed for at least 140 yards in three


consecutive games for the first time
since 2005.
Rainey feels fortunate to be a part of
that He never doubted his ability in
Baltimore, where he played behind
Ray Rice and others, or in Cleveland,
where Trent Richardson began the sea-
son as the starter
"I don't look at it as Trent Richardson
is there or Ray Rice is there. It's com-
petition," Rainey said. "If you're in front
of me, my goal is to get in front of you,
period. That's the way the game is. I
don't get into the names because at the
end of the day it's still football ... I just
use it as motivation."


I S P RTS B RI FS


S Prep CALENDAR LIFTING


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Citrus at Lake Weir
7:30 p.m. Forest at Lecanto
GIRLS BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m. Seven Rivers at St. Francis
6 p.m. Trinity Catholic at Citrus
6 p.m. Lake Minneola at Lecanto
7 p.m. Crystal River at South Sumter


SCOREBOARD




B4 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


NFL suspends
Bucs safety
Goldson
NEW YORK Bucca-
neers safety Dashon
Goldson's helmet-to-
helmet hit has earned him
a one-game suspension
from the NFL.
NFL Vice President of
Football Operations Mer-
ton Hanks announced the
punishment Monday.
Goldson was penalized
for unnecessary rough-
ness for his hit on a de-
fenseless receiver, Roddy
White, againstAtlanta on
Sunday.
It was Goldson's third
such violation this season.
He was fined $30,000 for
hitting a defenseless
player in the head and
neck area in Week 1, then
was initially suspended for
a game for a helmet-to-
helmet hit in Week 2. That
ban was changed to a
$100,000 fine on appeal.
Goldson has the right
to appeal and is expected
to do so.
Fan's fall from
deck at stadium
caught on video
BUFFALO, N.Y.-Au-
thorities said charges are
possible after an unruly fan
fell from the third deck of
Ralph Wilson Stadium and
landed on another man
during the Buffalo Bills'
game against the New
York Jets.
The team said the man
won't be allowed back into
the stadium.
Video shows the fan
sliding down a handrail in a
seated position Sunday
before flipping backward
and falling about 30 feet
into the stands below.
Erie County sheriff's
spokeswoman Mary Mur-
ray said the fall is being in-
vestigated and charges
may be filed. Police aren't
releasing the men's names
because of the investiga-
tion and aren't commenting
on their condition, citing pri-
vacy laws. A witness said
both were conscious after
the accident.
Redskins, NFL
to discuss
ref incident
ASHBURN, Va. -
Washington Redskins
coach Mike Shanahan
said he will speak to the
NFL about an incident in
which a game official al-
legedly directed profane
words at left tackle Trent
Williams.
Shanahan said Monday
he's "disappointed" over
the incident and added:
"You just can't use that
type of language to get
your point across."
Williams said he was
called vulgar names by of-
ficial No. 81 -which
would be umpire Roy Elli-
son while the Redskins
had the ball late in the
second quarter of Sun-
day's loss to the Philadel-
phia Eagles. Other
players said they heard
the words as well.
Shanahan said some of
the linemen were wearing
microphones, which the
league can use to verify
exactly what happened.
NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello said the league is
reviewing the incident.
Injured Cutler
remains Bears'
No. 1 QB
LAKE FOREST, III. -
Chicago Bears coach
Marc Trestman said Jay
Cutler will not play this
week but remains the
team's No. 1 quarterback
despite Josh McCown's
strong play.
He also said star line-
backer Lance Briggs re-
mains "a couple of weeks
away" from returning from
a small fracture in his left
shoulder that has sidelined
him the past three games.
Chicago's next game is
at St. Louis this weekend.


Cutler's status has been
a topic of conversation in
Chicago in recent weeks
because of his expiring
contract, groin and ankle
injuries and McCown's per-
formance. But Trestman in-
sisted he's in no danger of
losing his job and remains
"the quarterback of our
football team."
-From wire reports


No distractions


No.2 FSU

unfazed by

Winstonprobe

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
second-ranked Florida
State Seminoles are in the
midst of preparation for
Idaho. That's all.
While the sexual assault
investigation of quarter-
back Jameis Winston re-
mains a cloud over the
program, the Seminoles
have begun their normal
week of practice. And
they're only talking football.
University officials re-
minded reporters Monday
that coach Jimbo Fisher
would only respond to foot-
ball-related questions dur-
ing his weekly press
conference.
"You always address
everything," Fisher said.
"Kids know what's going on
no matter what the situa-
tions are. That's an impor-
tant part of being a good
team is being able to focus
and control things that you
can control. And deal with
the other issues when it's
time to deal with them.
"I think that's part of ma-
turity As coaches, as people
in general, everybody has
that issue in life. Those are
very hard things to do."
There haven't been any
noticeable changes around
the program and Fisher in-
dicated it's business as
usual. He developed a cold
over the weekend and jok-
ingly threatened to sneeze
on reporters who broke the
football-questions-only pol-
icy Otherwise, his press
conference was typical.
Winston is scheduled to
hold his normal press con-
ference on Wednesday and
is expected to start in Sat-
urday's game against Idaho
(1-9) barring a development
in the case. He was his
usual gregarious self during
and after the game last
weekend.
"Jameis has done a very
nice job all season of not
being a redshirt freshman
as far as his mental ap-
proach to playing," Fisher
said.
Everything could change
at a moment's notice, how-
ever The outcome of the in-
vestigation could come
after the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship
game on Dec. 7 exactly
one year from the date of
the original report The un-
certainty of Winston's status


could also affect the deci-
sion-making of Heisman
Trophy voters with ballots
due after that weekend.
Voters could also drop
Florida State out of the top
two in the polls and the BCS
standings if Winston is
eventually suspended.
Winston, 19, is at the cen-
ter of a sexual assault in-
vestigation in which the
victim reported the inci-
dent from a campus dorm
on Dec. 7, 2012. University


police fielder
call and passe
the Tallahasse
apartment once
mined the i:
place off-camp
Winston's
Jansen, last v
had given offi
davits from e
that completet
my client" He
investigation
months ago.
Jansen rele


Associated Press


GAINESVILLE
Florida might have to rely
on its third-string quarter-
back for the second week
in a row
The Gators expect to
start red-shirt freshman
Skyler Mornhinweg in Sat-
urday's home game
against Georgia Southern,
a team from the FCS.
Mornhinweg made his
debut last week when
Tyler Murphy was out with
an injury to his throwing
shoulder
Murphy, who sprained
his acromioclavicular
joint, took over for original
starter Jeff Driskel in
Week 3. Murphy was un-
able to practice last week
and is unsure when he'll
return. Due to the uncer-
tainty, Florida is working
under the assumption that
Mornhinweg will start.
"If we had to play today,
yeah, that would be the
plan moving forward,"
Gators coach Will
Muschamp said Monday
"Tyler did some light
throwing yesterday, felt
comfortable. Not ready for
him to practice today We'll
see how far he progresses.
"When you have the sit-
uation that he has, discom-
fort is a huge issue in the
throwing shoulder So if he
says, 'I just don't feel com-
fortable throwing,' then
he's not going to play"
Florida (4-6) relied
heavily on its running


.. .. r. ...-. ,, .- .. -



Associated Press
Florida quarterback Skyler Mornhinweg looks for a
receiver Saturday against South Carolina in Columbia,
S.C. The Gators expect to start the freshman again in
Saturday's home game against Georgia Southern.


game during Mornhin-
weg's debut at No. 11
South Carolina last week.
The Gators rushed 41
times for 200 yards and
asked Mornhinweg to drop


back for just 13 passes. He
completed 10 of 13 for 107
yards and had an intercep-
tion in the final minutes.
Mornhinweg said he
would prefer to throw


Ohio State's Meyei

BCS 'a flawed sys
COLUMBUS, Ohio- The Bowl Champions
has been good to Urban Meyer.
He led two Florida teams to national
championships under the format in the
2006 and 2008 seasons. Each time the
Gators lost a game in the regular season,
but still played for the BCS title.
But now that he's the head coach at
Ohio State, and his unbeaten team could
be on its way to being boxed out of the
national title race, he's looking differently
at the how major college football deter-
mines which teams play for the championship.
"Without spending much time on it, because
for our team to do that, I will say this: I think it's
system," Meyer said Monday when asked aboi
There was a time, Meyer said, when the BC
need in college football. After years of criticism
hatred of the BCS, it will fall by the wayside after
son and will be replaced by a four-team playoff
Ohio State (10-0, 6-0 Big Ten) has won a na
games in a row but is ranked a distant No. 3 in
BCS rankings far behind top dogs Alabama
State and barely ahead of Baylor.
If neither Alabama nor Florida State loses be
BCS rankings on Dec. 8, the Buckeyes will be


ment Sunday expressing
SQaQs concerns that State Attor-
U LLJL ney Willie Meggs has made
tem'T "extrajudicial statements"
ite 'about the investigation
hip Series during media interviews.
Jansen accused Meggs of
f addressing a confidential
law enforcement investiga-
tion and inferring that wit-
'd V nesses have been affected
by "attorneys and
collusion."
Meggs told the Associ-
ated Press Sunday evening,
Urban "I'm not going to respond to
Meyer him." The prosecutor also
said he would request to
speak with Winston, but,
it's not fair "We can't make people talk
a flawed to us.... We can't make sus-
jut the BCS. pects talk."
S filled a The investigation be-
and outright came public last week after
er this sea- several media outlets filed
.in 2014. information requests with
tion's best 22 the Tallahassee police. The
the latest department passed the
ande lori case to Meggs' office for the
and Florida first time last week
Florida State released a
afore the last statement Wednesday say-
shut out. ing the university was
-From wire reports aware of an investigation
and noted that "there is no
I the original change in Jameis Winston's
ed it along to status."
ee Police De- Winston played Saturday
e it was deter- and completed 19 of 21
incident took passes for 277 yards and
pus. two touchdowns in the
lawyer, Tim Seminoles 59-3 victory to
week said he finish the Atlantic Coast
cials two affi- Conference regular season
eye witnesses undefeated. Florida State
ely exonerate hosts Idaho, then takes on
e believed the the Gators at Florida on
was closed Nov 30 before the ACC title
game on Dec. 7 in Char-
eased a state- lotte, N.C.


more, but was fine with
Florida's strategy
"I'm confident in my
abilities and I'm confident
in the coaches' game
plan," he said Monday
"Whatever they want to
run out there, we'll exe-
cute it and I think we'll
have a shot to win."
The Gators are opti-
mistic that Murphy could
return by Saturday or for
next week's regular-
season finale against No. 2
Florida State.
He struggled to throw
last week due to the pain
in his shoulder and was
ruled out a day or two be-
fore the game. The injury
affected his velocity and
accuracy
"It wasn't coming out
pretty," he said.
Since replacing Driskel
in Week 3, Murphy has
completed 60.5 percent of
his attempts and averaged
135.1 passing yards per
game. He has six touch-
down passes, three touch-
down runs and five
interceptions.
Florida needs to beat
Georgia Southern (6-4) and
Florida State to reach
bowl eligibility. If that does
not happen, the Gators will
sit home during the post-
season for the first time
since 1990. Their 22-year
bowl streak is the second-
longest active run in the
nation. They also are try-
ing to avoid their first los-
ing season since going
0-10-1 in 1979.


FOOTBALL


Associated Press
Florida State wide receiver Kenny Shaw is pursued by Syracuse linebacker Dyshawn
Davis after catching a pass for 20 yards Saturday in Tallahassee.


60-plus yards downed in-
side the 5-yard line.
South Carolina place-
kicker Elliott Fry is fresh-
man of the week. Auburn
center Reese Dismukes
was honored on the offen-
sive line and Mississippi's
Robert Nkemdiche on the
defensive line.
-From wire reports


QB: As many as
six Virginia St
players beat him
ETTRICK, Va. Win-
ston-Salem State's quar-
terback said he was
punched, stomped and
kicked by as many as six
Virginia State players dur-
ing a fight at last week's
CIAA championship
luncheon.
Quarterback Rudy
Johnson appeared at a
news conference Monday
at his school with cuts
above and below his
blackened right eye. He
said he also had a
headache the day of the
incident and has a sore
back and sore ribs.
Virginia State football
coach Latrell Scott said
there was a "rush to judg-
ment" after the fight left
Johnson injured and
caused Saturday's game
to be canceled.
Trojans running back
Lamont Daniel Britt has
been charged with misde-
meanor assault inflicting
serious injury in the fight
involving Johnson.
Washington
State extends
Leach's contract
SPOKANE, Wash. -
Washington State has ex-
tended the contract of
football coach Mike Leach
for two years, ensuring
he'll be at the helm
through the 2018 season.
Athletic director Bill
Moos made the an-
nouncement Monday.
Leach has led WSU to
a 5-5 record in his second
season as the Cougars
prepare for Saturday's
game against Utah in
Pullman.
That's the most wins for
the Cougars at this point
in the season since 2006.
They have two games left.
The Cougars are one
win shy of qualifying for a
bowl game. They have not
played in the postseason
since 2003.
Utah QB Wilson
out for season
SALT LAKE CITY-
Utah QB Travis Wilson will
miss the rest of the season
after the team discovered
a preexisting medical con-
dition during a concussion
diagnosis last week.
Wilson did not play in
the team's 44-21 loss to
Oregon on Saturday. He
had suffered a concussion
in a 20-19 loss to Arizona
State a week earlier.
Utes coach Kyle Whit-
tingham said an initial con-
cussion scan turned up
evidence of a preexisting
head trauma and a follow-
up angiogram confirmed it.
Whittingham did not
give further details about
the condition, but said
Monday it was not life-
threatening.
It is not known if the
condition will cut short Wil-
son's career.
SEC hands out
weekly awards
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
Vanderbilt receiver Jordan
Matthews, Alabama line-
backer C.J. Mosley and
Crimson Tide punter Cody
Mandell are the Southeast-
ern Conference players of
the week.
Matthews was named
offensive player of the
week Monday after collect-
ing 12 catches for 141
yards in the Commodores'
win over Kentucky. He be-
came the first SEC receiver
to reach 80 receptions in
two seasons.
Mosley led Alabama with
eight tackles in a win over
Mississippi State, which
managed just 197 yards.
Mandell got the special
teams honor after averag-
ing 55.0 yards on four
punts. He had two kicks of


Gators could go with Mornhinweg


at quarterback again this week


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IS





Section C TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2013


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Community
WAR residents plans
turkey dinner/C9


staying


healthy


weight


almost

right


b4O








CU


life style


screeningss





u^ hel
A l p C


w


prostate


0

4-d


Leading a healthy lifestyle by not smoking, staying a healthy weight,
eating right, keeping active and getting the appropriate screening
tests can prevent almost half of all cancer-related deaths.


male- reprdutie yse





Newcass (03: 28,9
Death (203) 2970

Stgigtet
-hyica xm Tsa
Bon scn


Tretmnt
Actvesurvillnc



-Dahta courte~sy ofat' J\Tht Can (ncer Inst ituzte


Urological cancers include can-
cers of the kidney, bladder, prostate
and the testis. Prostate cancer is
one of the most common cancers in
men. About 239,000 cases of
prostate cancer have been diag-
nosed and more than 29,000 men
have died of the disease in the U.S.
in 2013. On the other hand, testicu-
lar cancers are uncommon and
mostly a disease of young adults. In
2013, only 7,920 cases of testis can-
cers were diagnosed in the U.S.
and there were 370 deaths related
to the disease.
Since the introduction of the PSA
or prostate specific antigen blood
test to help diagnose and monitor
prostate cancer, the death rate
from prostate cancer has been
steadily declining. After the annual
death rate peaked at 39 deaths per
100,000 men in 1991-94, the mortal-
ity fell to 24 deaths per 100,000 men
in 2007. New surgical techniques
include robotic-assisted laparo-
scopic surgery that reduces blood
loss, post-operative pain and im-
proves recovery Radiation tech-
niques have also improved.
Cryoablation or freezing of the
prostate is a less frequently used
but effective treatment of prostate
cancer in selected patients and is
performed in the outpatient


UDr. Udaya
Kumar
UROLOGY
TODAY


setting. Several new drugs have
been introduced in the treatment
of advanced prostate cancer, in-
cluding the use of a vaccine that
boosts the patient's own immune
cells to attack prostate cancer cells.
The incidence and cancer-related
mortality of bladder cancer has re-
mained steady over many years. An-
nually, more than 70,000 cases are
diagnosed in the US. Smoking re-
mains the most important risk factor
for bladder cancer For patients who
have already been diagnosed with
bladder cancer, quitting smoking
may reduce the risk of recurrence of
the disease.
Finding blood in the urine is the
cardinal symptom of bladder can-
cer and should not be ignored even
if the presence of blood in the
urine is transient. The diagnosis is
made by cystoscopy or examination
of the bladder with a small lighted


tube and biopsy of the bladder Pa-
tients who have been diagnosed
with bladder cancer require
regular follow-up bladder examina-
tions every three to six months and
some may need a liquid drug in-
stilled in the bladder periodically
While most patients with bladder
cancers are treated with removal of
the tumor with cystoscope,
advanced or very aggressive
tumors may need removal of the
entire bladder
Though the overall incidence of
testis cancer is much lower when
compared to other forms of
cancer, testis cancer is the most
common form of cancer in men be-
tween the ages of 15-34 though the
condition can occur in older men,
as well.
Testis cancer usually presents as
a painless lump in the testis or a
feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.
Regular self-examination and con-
sultation with your doctor when a
lump is present longer than two
weeks can lead to early diagnosis
and excellent results from treat-
ment of testis cancer An ultra-
sound of the scrotum easily
diagnoses the condition and the
combination of surgery with radia-
tion or chemotherapy can cure
even advanced testis cancers.


NUTRITION: Eating well is important before, during and after cancer
treatment. You need the right amount of calories to maintain a good weight.
You also need enough protein to keep up your strength. Eating well may help
you feel better and have more energy.


BOARD-CERTIFIED SPINE SURGEONS SPECIALIZING IN
THE TREATMENT OF BACK AND LEG PAIN DUE TO:
* Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis
* Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis
* Spinal Fractures Due to Trauma or Osteoporosis

INVERNESS
2300 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
THE VILLAGES
785 Hwy. 466
SPRING HILL
7101 Mariner Blvd.

CALL TOLL FREE
1-855-GULFCOAST
(1.855.485.3262)
GULFCOASTSPINE.com I. FRANK BONO
44:!_______.4


A


U i" ,,JT SPINE I' IT
MINIMALLY INVASIVE SPINE SURGEONS


DR. JAMES RONZO
DR. JAMES RONZO


cancer


<
k


m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All the great benefits you expect with a PPO, but with extras
like SilverSneakers, over-the-counter medications and more

If you like your Medicare PPO plan, wait until you check out the
HumanaChoice (PPO) plan:

/ $0 monthly Plan Premium
Freedom to choose any doctor or hospital and lower out-of-pocket
costs when you use in-network providers
No referrals required for specialist visits
Prescription drug coverage
Convenient mail-order prescription coverage
Maximum annual out-of-pocket protection
Over-the-counter medication allowance
Preventive coverage
/ Vision and dental coverage
/ 24-hour nurse advice line
Wellness programs
/ Emergency coverage at home and when you travel
/ And so much more!


Get the flexibility you're looking for in your health coverage.


1 Call a licensed sales agent now.
1-800-336-6764 (TTY: 711)
8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week


Don't wait. Enrollment ends Saturday, December 7.






Humana is a Medicare Advantage PPO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in a/this Humana plan depends on contract renewal. The benefit
information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and
restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year.
You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of
persons with special needs at sales meetings call 1-800-336-6764 (TTY:711), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week. Applicable to HumanaChoice (PPO)
plan: R5826-074.


C2 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


Y0040_GHHHR4LEN Accepted


TMP 11/13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Multiple myeloma results in fatigue, weakness


several readers have
contacted me and
asked me to discuss
the topic of multiple
myeloma. Each year,
approximately 22,350
people in the United
States are diagnosed with
multiple myeloma. Multi-
ple myeloma is a disease of
the white blood cells, par-
ticularly a type of white
blood cell called a plasma
cell. Plasma cells and
other white blood cells are
part of our body's immune
or defense system, helping
to protect us from infec-
tions and disease.
These cells are pro-
duced in the bone mar-
row and when they are
mature, the plasma cells
produce antibodies,
chemicals which travel
throughout our body to as-
sist in the control and re-
moval of harmful
substances, such as bacte-
ria and other infectious
organisms. A plasma cell
will secrete an antibody
for a particular sub-
stance; therefore there
will be many different
types of plasma cells to


Dr. C.
Joseph
Bennett

NAVIGATING
C CANCER


allow the body to respond
to many different infec-
tious substances.
In multiple myeloma,
the body produces too
many plasma cells and
therefore produces a lot of
antibodies which are not
necessary When this oc-
curs, this overproduction
of plasma cells is known as
multiple myeloma.
Multiple myeloma cells
usually collect in the bone
marrow and in the outer
hard shells of the bones.
Occasionally, they will
collect in one isolated lo-
cation of bone and form a
single mass. When this oc-
curs, we call it a solitary
plasmacytoma. In most in-
stances, the collection of
myeloma cells is in multi-
ple locations, thus the


name multiple myeloma.
As the number of
myeloma cells increases,
problems are caused by
both the number of cells
and the amount of the an-
tibodies which are se-
creted. A major symptom
of the myeloma is the de-
struction and weakening
of bones which can lead
to severe pain and possi-
bly to fractures of many
different bones.
This greatly effects the
quality of a person's life
and their ability and be
active. When the bones
are destroyed, calcium, a
building block of the
bones, is released into the
bloodstream and can lead
to very high levels of cal-
cium circulating through
the body
When this occurs, it can
cause confusion, weak-
ness, fatigue, excessive
thirst, nausea and a loss
of appetite. This over-
production of a single
type of plasma cell could
also prevent the body
from making adequate
amounts of other types of
plasma cells and white


blood cells which are vital
to the defense system of
our bodies. When this oc-
curs, it places the patient
at a much greater risk of
developing an infection.
The over-production of
plasma cells can also inter-
fere with the production of
red blood cells, and can
lead to anemia which
leaves the patient feeling
weak and tired. Finally
multiple myeloma can in-
terfere with and damage
the kidneys. The excessive
antibodies and the calcium
which are released from
the damaged bones can in-
terfere with the filtering
and cleaning of the blood
which is a normal function
of the kidney
The cause of multiple
myeloma is unknown.
Most patients are diag-
nosed between the ages of
50 and 70, and African-
Americans are affected
more often than Cau-
casians. Men are also af-
fected more often than
women. Possible risk fac-
tors for myeloma include
a positive family history, a
history of exposure to


certain chemicals and ex-
posure to large amounts of
radiation to the entire
body as was encountered
in the atomic bomb explo-
sions in Japan. Myeloma is
diagnosed by obtaining a
biopsy of a suspicious mass
as well as a biopsy of the
bone marrow X-rays are
also often utilized with this
diagnosis and the meas-
urement of abnormal anti-
bodies or proteins in the
blood stream is usually
documented.
The treatment of multi-
ple myeloma is highly in-
dividualized. The extent
of the symptoms, the pa-
tient's age and the pa-
tient's health status all
play a role in deciding the
optimal treatment plan. If
a patient is asymptomatic,
treatment may be delayed
and initiated only when
symptoms begin to ap-
pear When treatment is
initiated, chemotherapy
either by mouth or by IV,
is often utilized. Occa-
sionally, more aggressive
treatment such as a bone
marrow transplant may
be recommended.


Radiation therapy is also
sometimes utilized in the
treatment of myeloma to
relieve pain in areas of
bone involvement.
Unfortunately, myeloma
is a very difficult disease to
control and completely
cure. While many patients
can live long productive
lives, the ability to eradi-
cate the disease is uncom-
mon. Many studies are
going on at this time look-
ing at various methods of
treating multiple myeloma
and hopefully these will
improve the results.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is
a board-certified radia-
tion oncologist and a
member of the Citrus
County Unit of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society Watch
"Navigating Cancer" on
WYKE TVat 7:30p.m.
Tuesday and at 10 a.m.
Thursday. Ifyou have
any suggestions for topics,
or have any questions,
contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or
email cjbennett
@rboi.com.


ung cancer is the
second most com-
mon cancer and the
leading cause of cancer
death for men and
women. Lung cancer kills
more patients in the USA
than breast cancer,
prostate cancer and colon
cancer combined.
Obviously, researchers
are focusing on how to im-
prove our odds in fighting
against this cancer We
must remember every
person is different and an
individual's odds against


YDr. Sunil
Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


surviving lung cancer de-
pend on lots of different
factors.
Recently, there was an
important cancer meeting
in the Institut Gustave


Roussy in Villejuif,
France. This was a meet-
ing of the European
Cancer Congress 2013.
The researchers re-
ported on a very new drug
which is a monoclonal an-
tibody- this is a class of
drugs which are way dif-
ferent than chemother-
apy It targets mainly
cancer cells without af-
fecting normal cells.
A new immunotherapy,
MPDL3280A (under de-
velopment by Genentech),
See GANDHIVPage C5


Beverly Hills

DENTAL CENTER


* Dentures, Partials & Bridges
* Fast Braces
*Children Welcome
*Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions
* One Visit Root Canals
-Gum Surgery -Implants
* One Hour Whitening

r ALINCLUSIVE IMPLANTS


Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A.

Senior

SCitizens


,.^^ Need A Second Opinion? ,
FREE Discount
ns ainW ihIe n (Ask For Details)
1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire S,,i,.ii)

OpenFridays746.0330 ww


I
EXAM,
X.RAYS &
CLEANING
*FMX 00210
Prophy 01110
Q Initial Oral Exams 00150
Value 215 S


B ^ Must Present
Coupon At
T ime Of Visit
I I
LBBBBJ E


Hometown service with
University Quality
Established in 1970. Inverness Surgical Association (ISA) is the
largest multispecialty surgical group in the area. ISA is home to
seven experienced and compassionate surgeons, a professional staff,
multiple examination rooms, facilities for minor outpatient care. and
offices within walking distance to Citrus Memorial Hospital. As part
of the not-for-profit Citrus Memorial Health System (CMHS), ISA's
patients have access to all CMHS facilities and services.
The surgeons at ISA are qualified to diagnose and treat a wide
variety of conditions, from skin cancer remo\ al to general surgery
and vascular surgery. Each doctor is board-certified and brings a
particular expertise to the table.


Most insurance plans accepted.
Visit CMHInvernessSurgical.com to learn more.

Call today to schedule your appointment

352-726-3646


INVERNESS SURGICAL ASSOCIATION


1(1) HLS'F 13 2.2 .3 4
C v u..M..u v e c 3 7
CMHInvernesssurgical.comlI352.726.3646S3 9 B E


At Superior Residences of Lecanto
Located at 4865 West Gulf to Lake Hwy in Lecanto
Please RSVP TO 746-5483
Dr. Waleed Elyaman will be speaking about memory meds
and their effectiveness and will close with a Q&A session.

Don't miss this opportunity to get your questions answered.
Dr Elyaman is board Certified in Family Medicine. His scope of
practice reflects his special interest in Geriatric Care and he is a
board eligible Hospice and Palliative Care Physician.

Light refreshments will be served.


SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto
MEMORY CARE


4865 West Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
(Just west of the Greek Orthodox Church on
Hwy. 44. )
352.746.5483
www.superioralf. corn
Assisted Ling Faclity License # 12256


New hope on horizon


for lung cancer battle


O00GKND


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Agri


C


cultural


Community Supports


ens


Health


Awareness


Remember those we


'ye


lost...


Celebrate the survivors...
& Hope for a cure!

1 The Agriculture Alliance of Citrus
County, fulfilling the mission of building
H relationships through community
education on the environmental and
economic benefits of sustainable
Agriculture in Citrus County.
Agriculture is an important
component of the cultural and
economic environment in Citrus
f County and its continued
vitality is beneficial for all
residents.
Agriculture creates jobs for
'those who offer many goods
H and services. To learn more
-"- '. ',visit us online at
www. KnowFarms.org


BEEF


rS, Of
%truvs county
A VoiceforAgriculture
in Citrus County


"OUCANDATI FO NICDA11UM POW
(352 6-06 StateFarm

UF UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA
IIFAS Extension


Wists Meadows Blueberry Fann
8801 r. Gji LOWe
Invernem FL 344133


HEALTH WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA. INC.


HERNANDO-CITRUS


C4 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GANDHI
Continued from Page Cl
has shown impressive re-
sults in a small group of
patients with heavily pre-
treated nonsmall-cell
lung cancer (NSCLC) who
were taking part in a
phase 1 clinical trial.
Whenever there is can-
cer, the immune system
fights against cancer Un-
fortunately, cancer cre-
ates a block against the
immune system and so
the immune system can-
not kill the cancer This
drug removes the block.
This helps the body's own
immune system to kill the
cancer In short, this drug
is not chemotherapy, but
it is an immune booster
Another investigational
agent acting on the same
pathway, nivolumab (Bris-
tol-Myers Squibb), has
also shown promising ac-
tivity in NSCLC, as well as
unprecedented response
rates in melanoma.
In his presentation, Dr
Soria noted that in the
small phase 1 study with
MPDL3280A. Dr Soria
presented efficacy results
from 53 patients with
metastatic NSCLC, about
half of whom had already
been treated with three
previous lines of therapy
The overall response rate
was 23 percent (12 of 53
patients). The surprising
aspect was that many re-
sponders continued to re-
spond even after one and
a half years. Also, smok-
ers responded better than
nonsmokers this is also
rare because it is the
other way around with
most other drugs. As you
very well know, most lung
cancers are in smokers

* So you know: The
information contained
in the Health & Life
section is not in-
tended to cover all
possible directions,
precautions, warn-
ings, drug interac-
tions, allergic actions,
or adverse effects and
is not intended to re-
place consultation
with a physician.


This is an extremely
preliminary report
and lots of research
needs to be done on
these drugs before
FDA approval.

Still, this is very
promising and
drugs like this will
help us win the war
against cancer.


and so drugs that do not
work among smokers
have limited value.
The tumors in smokers
are more complex, with
more genetic and molecu-
lar abnormalities as com-
pared with the tumors
from neversmokers. It is
possible that these tumors
in smokers present more
of a target for the acti-
vated immune system to
home in on.
This is an extremely
preliminary report and
lots of research needs to
be done on these drugs
before FDA approval.
Still, this is very promis-
ing and drugs like this
will help us win the war
against cancer
Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncolo-
gist. He is the volunteer
medical adviser of the
Citrus Unit ofAmerican
Cancer Society Write to
521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, email
sgandhi@tampabayrr
com or call 352-746-0707.


@ MASTERPIECE
DE NTAL-STU DIO
The art of optimum quality dentistry.
Always
Welcoming
Newit Patients
FRANKJ..V\S(MI.r)D], -
4805 S Suncoast] i I
S Homosassa, FL 3 J
VI 352-628-0012 ..<(iA


Buy One Get One

FREE
4-Pack o ,,..
Batteries. -.
Limit2 .


per user.


.V 1


Beltone
Iir.r.,, ,... ... .,a..-r. Expires 11/29/13


Come'^ in foprri your FREE^^
^^B* Sl 10 i~ir asi^^Ti~*p r^
HEARING EAL A and
wak utwthyor0e
herigaisth sm0dy
(o elc, o-csommdes


7ae a&adva-t4-ageo thy, se-e '6cdffer!i/


$1200 OFF *
A Pair of Beltone Promise Hearing Aids
BEST DISTANCE and NOISE CANCELLATION RATING
in the industry! Offer valid now through November 29, 2013.


for SCoverdFedralEples


Our Goal Is A

Healthier You
SNew Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


B.K. Patel, M.D.
Internal Medicine


H. Khan, M.D.
Board Certified Family Medicine


Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, P.A. Joseph Starnes, P.A.
* Geriatrics
* Family & General Medicine
* Internal Medicine
* Intensive Care (Hospital)
* Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals


Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-ll:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


WE ACCET ALL TRAD!,IiNS 9]FREEKSECOND OPINION

F www.beltonefl.com


Beltone
Helping the world hear better

0% Financing Available (WAC)


Most Health
Insurances Accepted.

All Major Credit Cards Accepted


FREE no-obligation hearing tests going on now!
Call for an appointment.


Inverness Chiefland Lecanto
3350 E Gulf to Lake Hwy, Unit 2 2471 N Young Blvd. 2708 W Woodview Lane
352.400.4249 352.356.4075 352.364.4341


INTRODUCTORY i
60 MIN. I


I Massage Session
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Located in Homosassa
and Crystal River


352.621.5100
352.564.1040


~Monday Saturday 9:00 AM- 7:00 PM
INTRODUCTORY By appointment only
SNTRO DUTR Y T I How DO YOU KEEP THESE GREAT
P~ T


Y _5 MIN.
1N I If you pre-pay for your next visit before you leave
Sessin I o you can always keep these great rates for
M passage Jes your next massage session.
e No need to book the appointment at that ti
R-io=- -" Pre-paid appointments never expire.

INTRODUCTORY I Visit Our Website www. I ; .us
90 MIN. I Gift Cards 'flvailabliz Onliniz

M assage Session .M. "


lieupuncturg

faeials

Nails
yoga


RATES?


Fr MA50585
MM20050
MM31551
C~ c-"
C' 'r - ,


I m.-


r--
I
i


I


EMMM=4


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 C5


Idol flolth

lenriebm nt catuj


W-


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Common warts can afflict face, head and neck


ommon warts can occur in the
head and neck area, including the
face.
Common warts (verrucae vulgaris) are
well known and commonly occur on the
hands, fingers, elbows, knees and bot-
toms of the feet. but they can also occur
in the head and neck area, predomi-
nantly the face.
They are growths that form as a result
of a virus infecting the top layer of the
skin. The virus is called a human papil-
lomavirus, or HPV
The virus accelerates skin growth,
causing the wart to appear There are
150 different types of HPV HPV affects
areas of the skin where there is an
opening, such as a wound or a cut from
shaving, and you may pick up the HPV
virus by touching it with your fingers


*5I Dr. Denis
Grillo
\ EAR, NOSE &
THROAT



and transmitting it to your face.
Warts grow singularly or sometimes in
clusters. They can be the same color as
your skin, or can be lighter or darker
most of them, though, are raised and
rough, and on the tops have what looks
like small seeds.
Common warts are harmless and
rarely become cancerous, typically, they


are embarrassing and rather ugly in ap-
pearance. At times, they can become ir-
ritated and bleed, such as rubbing on a
collar or nicking with shaving, and peo-
ple may misinterpret them as a cancer-
ous growth because of the bleeding.
HPV can be passed from person to
person by contact sharing personal
items such as a washcloth, towel or
razor Local spread can by caused by
picking at the lesion, thus causing it to
seed in another area adjacent to the
original wart.
Treatment for warts varies. Some of
them will spontaneously resolve par-
ticularly in children, warts will go away
in a few months. In adults, it may take
longer, sometimes up to a few years, you
my want to have them treated or re-
moved if they are painful or bleeding, or


there is some concert ht the wart could
be confused for a small cancer on the
face.
Treatment otherwise typically in-
volves putting topical medications such
as an acid preparation to dissolve it. A
freezing procedure by your doctor is
sometimes implemented using liquid ni-
trogen. Other options are removal by
surgery or use of a laser
To help prevent the spread of warts,
practice good hygiene, including fre-
quent hand and face washing, and avoid
picking at a wart. You might even want
to cover them up with a bandage.

Denis Grillo, D.0., FOCOO, is an ear,
nose and throat specialist in Crystal
River Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit
CrystalCommunityENTcom.


he disease of addiction is
often referred to as "cunning
and baffling." Cunning in how
it impacts the brain, stripping away
and replacing vital neurochemistry
that balances brain activity Cun-
ning in how it can redirect drive
states, even demoting the survival
drive far down on the list of needs.
Cunning in how those in active use
abandon or reject loving relation-
ships, care and kindness, and even
their own children.
Addiction is referred to as baf-
fling in that it would appear to be
simple to "just stop using." Baffling
in that even after years of absti-
nence, relapse can put a strangle-
hold on a person in recovery
Baffling in the ongoing internal
conversation that pleads, bargains,
rationalizes, minimizes, promotes,
excuses or terrorizes an addict into
using again. Baffling in that it can
take up to 18 months of abstinence
for the brain of an addict to return
to a pre-use state. If meth is the
drug of choice, it can take twice
that long for brain chemistry to
recuperate, if ever
Treatment of previous decades
was primarily focused on minimiz-
ing detoxification symptoms. These
programs had a standard set num-
ber of sessions, set content for
sessions, and processed clients


Yvonne
Hess
WALKING
THE WALK



without regard to their in-depth in-
dividual needs. We in the treatment
business often refer to them as "re-
covery car washes." Even today,
there are programs based on time-
frames instead of individual needs.
The car wash continues on to spit
out high "success" rates of bright
and shiny clients who make it 3
to 4 months after discharge and are
back into their addiction.
Today's treatment should ad-
dress the initial health issues of ad-
dicts and alcoholics. But it should
soon shift emphasis onto those in-
dividual needs that arise after a
person transitions from active ad-
diction into abstinence: grief, past
abuse and trauma from childhood,
shame, wreckage of relationships,
and mood disorder symptoms that
are very frequent in the first one to
two years of recovery
Education should be a vital piece
of treatment People in recovery


need a lot of assistance in building
strategies and techniques from ed-
ucation about addiction and recov-
ery processes.
They need to have information
about brain recovery, managing
moods and emotions, learning
problem solving skills, money man-
agement skills, how to develop
healthy and well boundaried rela-
tionships, how to parent in recov-
ery and how to become a health
care advocate for oneself to ensure
ongoing recovery
The cunning and baffling nature
of the disease of addiction is
unique to each addict Car washes
are only good until the arrival of
the next speck of dirt. When seek-
ing a treatment program, all are not
the same.
Every program has its strengths
and its flaws. It's important for
prospective clients to be as in-
formed about program options as
possible. Talk to program staff
about issues and needs. Ask ques-
tions about how programs develop
treatment plans and progress a
client through that plan.

Yvonne Hess, M.S., LMFT, CAP,is
director of Citrus County services
for The Centers. She can be
reached at 352-628-5020, ext 1013,
oryhess@thecenters. us.


Doctor Vitamin offers free
seminars in Homosassa

Doctor Vitamin store, at 3930 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, will host free seminars:
1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 23: "Change Your
Water, Change Your Life the Truth About
Water"
Seating is limited, call to reserve at
352-628-7036.








Accepting New Patients

















"Caring is my Profession"


GASTROENTEROLOGY



PHONE: 352-563-2450
WEBSITE: www.gastropatients.com


WBdef
P.R. rasa Mr M.D.
Board Certfied


Paul Hellstem, M.D.
Board Certffled


LR.ileddl, M.D.
BoardCa"Ofl.d
* 1tfcf f v~t^-


an*Smkm aM.
OlandruMbd. M.D.


mstbw.i A.


Board CrtfUed


Gastroenterology associates
was formed in 1985 with the
primary mission of providing
excellent gastroenterology
services to the citizens of Citrus
County. We have grown to be a
seven member physician group
providing comprehensive
gastroenterology services to our
residents.
All of us are board certified
gastroenterologists delivering
evidence based medical care
at conveniently located
adjoining medical offices and
endoscopy centers in Citrus
County: Citrus Endoscopy in
Crystal River and Suncoast
Endoscopy in Inverness. Our
centers are equipped with state
of the art video endoscopes
and we follow strict national
standards in cleaning them. We
are fortunate to have a
dedicated, and skilled nursing
staff to furnish compassionate
care to our patients.
We accept most medical
insurances including Medicare
and Medicaid. We give deep
discounts to the self pay to
make it affordable. Our goal is
to deliver superior quality of
medical care and efficient
services at affordable cost to
the residents of our community

PROCEDURES:


Colonoscopy
Aids in screening for colon
cancer and removal of early
and pre-cancerous lesions

Upper Endoscopy (EGD)
Allows evaluation for causes
of upper abdominal pain
and bleeding

Endoscopic Ultrasound
Imaging technique used to
visualize and biopsy abdominal
organs such as the pancreas
and lymph nodes,

Endoscopic Retrograde
Cholangiopancreatography
(ERCP)
Aids in evaluation and
treatment of bile duct
disease

Esophageal Manometry
For diagnosis and treatment
of motility disorders of
esophagus


OFFICE LOCATIONS:
Crystal River Office
6410 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL 34429

Inverness Office
3653 E. Forest Dr.
Inverness, FL 34453

Citrus Surgery & Endoscopy
Center
6412 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-0223

Suncoast Endoscopy Center
3621 E. Forest Dr.
Inverness, FL 34453

SATELLITE OFFICES:
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
20021 SW 111th Place
Dunnellon, FL 34432
11707 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon, FL 34432
10489 N. Florida Ave.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434


pH probe and 48-hour
Wireless pH Study (Bravo)
Allows for evaluation and
diagnosis of GERD/reflux

Capsule Endoscopy
Allows visualization of small
bowel

Colonic Stent / Esophageal
Stent
Prevents obstruction in
cases of advanced cancer

Esophageal Dilatation
(Pneumatic and Savory)
Allows improvement in
swallowing

Solesta Injection
Used to treat Fecal
Incontinence

Hemorrhoidal Banding
For treatment of difficult
hemorrhoids causing
bleeding or pain


Walking the walk of addiction can be a


lifelong struggle for those recovering


C6 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


HEALTH & LIFE


)OGN9TI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH NOTES


Cars, cookout to be
hosted for Alzheimer's
Life Care Center of Citrus County will
have a classic car show and cookout to
help find a cure for Alzheimer's disease.
Life Care personnel will be grilling at
noon Wednesday, Nov 20, with live en-
tertainment by Buster Harrelson. The
Citrus County Cruisers will display their
classic cars and Jerry Fisher from the
Gulf Coast Alzheimer's Association will
be there to answer questions and offer
education.
Lunches are $5. Life Care Center of
Citrus County will donate all proceeds
to the Gulf Coast Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association.
Life Care Center of Citrus County is at
3325 W Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto. Call
352-746-4434.

Ceremony dedicated
to children's grief
A Children's Grief Awareness Day
Candlelight Ceremony will begin at
5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, at the Chil-
dren's Remembrance Garden on the
campus of Hospice of Citrus and the Na-
ture Coast's Hospice House, 3350 W
Audubon Park Path (west of County
Road 491), Lecanto.
Observed on the third Thursday of
November each year, the Children's
Grief Awareness Day Candlelight Cere-
mony is intentionally set in the holiday
season, often a particularly difficult
time for children grieving the loss of a
loved one.
"Children who improve their ability
to deal with grief and loss issues serve
as role models for others," said Marylin
Bloom, director of Hospice of Citrus
and the Nature Coast Herry's Kids
Pediatric Services.
Hospice of Citrus and the Nature
Coast Herry's Kids Pediatric Services
provides specialized services to chil-
dren and teens with life-threatening ill-
ness and offers grief support and
therapeutic camps to young people who
have experienced a loss.


Light refreshments will be served.
Reservations are requested. For infor-
mation or to make a reservation, call
Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500. Visit Hos-
pice of Citrus and the Nature Coast on
Facebook or on the Web at www.
hospiceofcitrus.org.

Volunteer orientation
available at hospice
HPH Hospice offers new volunteer
orientation at its Team Offices from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 4 and Dec. 6. Orien-
tation will be at 3545 N. Lecanto High-
way in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in
Beverly Hills.
HPH Hospice has been serving resi-
dents in Citrus since 2005, and has pro-


vided services in Hernando and Pasco
County since 1984. Hospice volunteers
often serve patients and families at the
bedside, but they also assist in the of-
fice, help raise awareness, contribute to
educational programs, and provide
fundraising support and more.
RSVP or get more information by call-
ing Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator,
at 352-527-4600.


LifeSouth Community Blood Centers:
With summer upon us, there's a sharp
increase in the need for blood. To find a
donor center or a blood drive near you,
call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental permission,
weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be


in good health to be eligible to donate. A
photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office is at 1241
S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at 2629 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway open from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays), 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
Visit wwwlifesouth.org.
10 a.m. to 3:59 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19,
Citrus County Detention Facility, 2604
W Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto.
11 a.m. to 4:59 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov 20, Cypress Creek Academy, 2855 W
Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto.
1 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov 21, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center, 6201 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Nov. 21,
Walmart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov 22,
Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov 23,
Love Motorsports, 2021 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday Nov 24, Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550
U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
9 to 11 a.m. Monday, Nov 25, Nature
Coast EMS, 3876 W Country Hill Drive,
Lecanto.
Noon to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov 25, Wal-
mart Supercenter, 1936 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 26,
AAA Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal
River
TT -0 1 1 1


If you are apprehensive about the hol-
idays due to a death of a loved one or
friend, HPH Hospice is here to help. As
the holiday season nears, many people
feel sorrow, anguish and even dread.
See NOTES/Page C8


Brashear's
www. BrashearsPharmacy.com P A A
Mon- Fri 8:30-6 -Sat8:30-1 r PHAR VIrl
II I I ElI i l i I6L aB


471 N.Dacie Point, Lecanto......... 746-3420
206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness........637-2079
One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness

0AAA.


EEB H BI VB~^ IfEERCl/R
~MotorGuideW






'Winterize Your Boat Holiday Special
|1% nO rFF LABOR & PARTS |
1: I O/ ] ll I |on normal service) Now until Dec. 15,2013


AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR
1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
352-795-9630 o Fax 352-795-6768
aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@gmail.com


/0 MR.Aufo
/ ~INSURANCE
CALL TODAY FOR A
/ FREE QUOTE!

AUTO MOTORCYCLE BOATS
|* RVS HOME MOBILE HOME
\ FLOOD LIABILITY

S720 N.E. Highway 19, /
SCrystal River
(352) 563-1590
000^^ OGE8X ^ ^


To all my patients, I want to


illness. I truly appreciate your ya
this time.
I want you to know I am fully|
recovered and working full time
, again. I look forward to taking care
I of all your dental needs for many years to come.
Sincerely,
i Gary S. Padgett D.D.S.
CIT(RUS CARE
514 N. Lecanto Hwy.
I Citrus Memorial Alien Ridge Medical Mail
Route 491, Lecanto, FL 34461 |
SVisit us at www.citrusdental.com 23
'tm^s-^^^s-'S^^-^S^s-^^^Si^^^sf^1


The Home Outfitter
Gifts &6 Decor for the
Outdoor Enthusiast

Visit us on Saturday, November 23rd
from 5pm to 9pm
during Victorian Holiday
Free refreshments anid door prizes!

11875 Cedar St. (CR40) Dunnellon, FL
Located within the Historic Village Shops of Dunnellon
oo 352-213-4663 *www.thehomeoutfitter.com
Hours: Tues Fri lOam 5:30pm Sat lOam 2pm





COMPUTER ..:: i2_j- ]; "
DIAGNOSTIC : OIL II
Don' oMPUTER SCAN Dra old oil and refill OFF
wih the requiredMotCr
Service $ pi motor o11. Install new Not Just o I
Engine Light oil filter. Expires 11/30/13 PENNZOIL.T.1
Is On? ^^^ fe^K 11/30/13 OSvehls Ol & Fse r D-sposl Fe ex-a Notto be -mb.i e.
Is On t $4 9 9 with a ILI-e offr n smeproduc 1-_1vie

ALIGNMENT WIPER BLADES
AL GN Quality
Helps prevent early i re IIreI, wiper blades
wear with computerized $E & for streak -fr9ee9
Accuracy, plus we inspect Exire visibility Expires
steering/suspension 113131 includes 11/30/13
- -S -dehl p a aInstallation PerPar MostVeh;cles
I re sto n e" SllU-E n i\ f fy
", resTUS HWY 19 S.
C T RYSTAI. RIVER (ACROSS FROM AIRPORT PLAZA ON US 19)
I`Ftrestoneo 795-5118



N Comfort

KooporgS,

Comfort&it Soutms For iw-Homi Carm

Call Today for a Free In-Home Evaluation

5fST BEST,'
BEST (352) 726-4547 BEST/

2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL
u u .SeniorServicesCitrusCounty.com
Independently Owned & Operated Office. HH#299992888 .


r T HT F1 F L
FOR DETAILS
S i GiOo L Or c i. u B
Li'iii.-m,,


18200 Seoill Clutlihou,%c Drive,
\\'eeki \\'acllee, FL 34614
Call Liu! 352-590-7888


* C..Il O ,irnnt
* E(II Bid
M.libli.',ifh


When Experience Counts Most...
* Advanced Cataiact Suigeivy vith Piemium Lens Impla
*Eyelid Suigeiy
* Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecaie Specialists


Impotsant
paient
Is You.n


Board Certified Ophthalmologist
LAWRENCE A.SEIGEL, M.D. ALAN M.FREEDMAN, M.D.
GEORGE KAPLAN, OPTOMETRIST
ESTABLISHED 1982


221 N.E.Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526
Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com


Citrus AID Cancer Foundation donation
On Oct. 26, a Dinner/Dance Fundraiser was held at Mama's Kuntry Kafe in
Inverness to support the Citrus AID Cancer Foundation, which was founded in
2013. The fundraiser was sponsored by Lisa and Dale White, owners of
Mama's Kuntry Kafe and Arnold and Mary-Ann Virgilio, owners of Virgilio
Insurance Services. Dinner was followed by entertainment sponsored by D.J.
Saleem. All proceeds from this event were donated to the Citrus AID Cancer
Foundation. From left are: Lisa White, owner of Mama's Kuntry Kafe; Judy
Bonard, member of Citrus AID Cancer Foundation; Dr. C.J. Bennett,
Oncologist; Mary-Ann Virgilio and Arnold Virgilio, owners of Virgilio Insurance
Services. Not pictured: Dale White and D.J. Saleem.


r-ospice others noid1ay
Upcoming blood drives bereavement workshops


I


I


Lhb -j


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 C7


Join thousands of other
smokers on November 21st, the
Great American Smoke Out,
and make it your Quit Date.
Contact Elizabeth Wood at 352-
726-1731 ext. 342 for more
information on how to quit. I


6^S9
*^""E^Ocom


norioS
HEALTH
Ohilt County




C8 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C7

The hospice will host a
90-minute workshop at
2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov 20,
and again at 2 p.m. Thurs-
day, Dec. 12, The work-
shops will be at St.
Timothy's Evangelical
Lutheran Church at 1071
N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River
Participants will learn
helpful tips for coping
and facing what can be a
challenging time. The
workshops will be facili-
tated by Paul Winstead,
LMHC, and bereavement
specialist. Call 352-527-
4600 for information.

SHINE offers

aid to seniors

Medicare's Prescrip-
tion Drug Plan (Part D)
and Medicare Advantage
Plans (MA) Open Enroll-
ment Period is Oct. 15
through Dec. 7, so now is
the time for Florida sen-
iors to review their cur-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rent health care and pre-
scription drug coverage.
Florida's SHINE (Serv-
ing Health Insurance
Needs of Elders) pro-
gram, reminds Medicare
beneficiaries to carefully
evaluate their health care
needs and to seek assis-
tance in making any nec-
essary changes during
this Open Enrollment Pe-
riod. This is for Medicare
beneficiaries, and not to
be confused with the Af-
fordable Healthcare Mar-
ketplace. For
Marketplace information
and referrals, call
Florida's Elder Helpline
at 800-963-5337.
If you cannot get to one
of the SHINE locations,
or if you prefer telephone
contact, you may request
a phone appointment.
Call SHINE at the Citrus
County Resource Center
at 352-527-5956 to identify
SHINE locations in your
area or to be connected to
a SHINE counselor in
Citrus County
SHINE is a free service
of the Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs,
managed locally by Elder


Options in Gainesville.
For information, call the
Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-963-5337 or visit
wwwFloridaSHINE.org.

Diabetes month
is November

November is American
Diabetes Month, and the
health care experts at
Seven Rivers Rehab &
Wound Center are draw-
ing attention to the fact
that, every hour, seven
people across the country
lose a foot or leg to the
disease, which is the lead-
ing cause of lower-limb
amputations not caused
by accidents.
"Diabetic patients are
confronted with multiple
challenges in the healing
process. Not only is their
circulation diminished,
but they also have an im-
paired ability to sense the
earliest stages of foot in-
jury due to disease-asso-
ciated nerve damage,"
said Dr Adnan Moham-
madbhoy, D.O., board-cer-
tified surgeon and wound
center panel physician.


According to the Na-
tional Institutes of
Health, nearly one in
three people with dia-
betes ages 40 and older
have at least one area on
their feet that lacks feel-
ing. Those at greater risk
for nerve damage include
diabetics who have diffi-
culty controlling their
blood sugar, high choles-
terol, weight or blood
pressure.
Statistically, one in 20


diabetics will develop a
wound on the legs or feet
each year The risk of am-
putations can be reduced
by 45 percent to 85 per-
cent through foot care
programs that can include
risk assessment, educa-
tion, treatment of foot
problems and referrals to
specialists.
Physicians at Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound
Center recommend peo-
ple with diabetes inspect


their feet each day and
seek immediate attention
if a lower extremity
wound has increased
pain, redness or swelling,
foul wound odor, o
r a change in color or
change in amount of
drainage.
For information on the
treatment of diabetic foot
ulcers, contact Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound
Center at 1669 S.E. U.S. 19
or call 352-563-2407.


WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUPS


R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low, M.D., self-help systems
for mental health depres-
sion, obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus
Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-
5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Recovery from Food
Addiction, 7 p.m. Thursday
at St. Anne's Church, 9870 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River,
in the parish hall library. Call
Peg at 410-903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at 352-
220-1959.
AI-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
0 6 p.m. Monday at Club
Recovery, corner of County


Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.
Crystal River AFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S.
Suncoast Blvd.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.
(off Citrus Avenue), Crystal
River.
Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Beginners AI-Anon:
10 a.m. Saturday atYana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Cit-
rus Avenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics
Anonymous: If you drink,
and want to stop, call Alco-
holics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 352-621-
0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
10:30 a.m. Sunday,
10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chas-
sahowitzka Community Cen-
ter, 1 mile west of U.S. 19 on
Miss Maggie Drive, turn left,
two blocks.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the
website: www.alcoholics
forchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 352-527-2443. Free
and open to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon, 20831
Powell Road. Call the church
at 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
It Works How and Why,
noon to 1 p.m. Sunday,


Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day; 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Saturday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River.
Men's RAW (Recovery at
Work) Men's Meeting, 7 to
8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto
Church of Christ: 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.
More Will Be Revealed,
8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Memorial Health System His-
toric School House: 135 S.
Citrus Ave., Inverness.
Recovery on the River,
7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to
9 p.m. Friday and Sunday;
Lecanto Church of Christ, 797
S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.
Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, Citrus County Fam-
ily Resource Center's out-
reach center: 3848 E.
Parsons Point Road,
Hernando.
Women United Ladies
Meeting, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Citrus Memorial
Health System Historic
School House: 135 S. Citrus
Ave., Inverness.
Narcotics Anonymous is
not affiliated with any of the
meeting facilities listed. Call
the 24-hour Helpline:
352-508-1604. Information
about NA is also available at
NatureCoastNA.org.
Overeaters
Anonymous:
0 5 p.m. Tuesday at Club
Recovery, corner of County
Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.


Meridien Research is participating in a nationwide
research study evaluating the safety and
effectiveness of an investigational
product, AC1204, for those with mild
to moderate Alzheimer's disease.


Meridien*

Research


Total combined
compensation for time
and travel of up to
$1225 the patient and
caregiver may be
available.


Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH
Board Certified, Family Medicine
16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL 34601

352-59-STUDY ......


I ST. PETERSBURG .M-BO K IL R mD.KI


LUS1C
ai The

.Tumum


on the
Jazz Guitar
& Concertina

Thursday, Nov. 21
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


CS IONISE:
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRUS CoUvny HisTOmkiL SOCIETY


Eye Center


8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa


(352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123

Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


Research Program may
provide eligible participants
with study related:
-Memory Exams
-Brain CT or MRI Scan
-Lab Results
-Study Medication


I


u-mix


HEALTH & LIFE






CPage C9 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Enjoy fish, karaoke
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 will
host the duo of Robin and Mel to
lead karaoke from 5 to 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the lodge in
Hernando.
An all-you-can-eat fish fry will
be served from 5 to 7 p.m. for $9.
All are welcome.
For more information, call
352-726-2027.

Doll Club to meet
Central Florida Sugar Babes
Doll Club will meet at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at the Central Com-
munity Center, room 115. The fa-
cility is off County Road 491
behind Diamond Ridge
Convalescent Facility
Lunch will follow at the Main
Street Restaurant in Beverly
Hills. The November program
will be presented by a member
who makes teddy bears.
The club welcomes visitors. For
information, call Laurie at
352-382-2299 or Barbara at
352-344-1423.
Sugar Babes Doll Club is a
member of the United Federation
of Doll Clubs.

Car show, cookout
Life Care Center of Citrus
County will have a classic car
show and cookout to help find a
cure for Alzheimer's disease.
Life Care personnel will be
grilling at noon Wednesday, with
live entertainment by Buster
Harrelson. The Citrus County
Cruisers will display their classic
cars and Jerry Fisher from the
Gulf Coast Alzheimer's Associa-
tion will be there to answer
questions and offer education.
Lunches are $5. Life Care Cen-
ter of Citrus County will donate
all proceeds to the Gulf Coast
Chapter of the Alzheimer's
Association.
Life Care Center of Citrus
County is at 3325 W Jerwayne
Lane, Lecanto. For more
information, call 352-746-4434.

Special walk postponed
The Dash for Dementia walk
scheduled for Dec. 7 has been
postponed until March.
Sponsored by the Memory
Enhancement Center of America,
the walk was to raise money for
the center to care for patients.
For more information, call
352-726-3874.

Snowbirds flock back
The American-Canadian Snow-
birds are busy with weekly nine-
hole golf scrambles, euchre,
shuffleboard and bridge.
Members also enjoy a
dinner/gift exchange for Christ-
mas and a Valentine's Day din-
ner/dance, annual meeting and a
spring picnic.
All are welcome to join the club
to make new friends.
Call Tony at 352-341-4407 or
Jerry at 352-465-3384 for details.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE


Hobo


Special to the Chronicle
Hobo has her bags packed and is
ready to move into her new home.
She is as sweet as she looks likes
to be cuddled and sit in your lap.
She is about 6 months old, gets
along with other pets and a family
with children would be the best.
Kittens and cats are available for
adoption at the Pet Supermarket
on State Road 44 in Inverness
during regular store hours. The
Crystal River Mall adoption center
is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday,
Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Our
Floral City Adoption Center at
Greta's Touch on U.S. 41 is open
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Both
sites will be closed Nov. 28
through Dec. 1. For more
information call 352-7264700 or
go to www.preciouspaws
florida.com.


Residents plan meeting, turkey dinner


Environmentalist to speak to WAR Wednesday


Special to the Chronicle
The Withlacoochee Area Residents'
fifth annual Turkey Dinner and Quarterly
Meeting, open to the public, will be at
6 p.m. Wednesday at the Yankeetown-
Inglis Woman's Club.
Guest speaker will be Dr Robert L.
Knight, who will make a presentation on


"Unintended Consequences: The
Interconnected Lower Withlacoochee
River System."
Dr Knight is a consulting environmen-
talist in Gainesville. He is the founder
and president of Wetland Solutions Inc.,
and specializes in projects related to wet-
land and aquatic ecology, water quality,
wetlands for wastewater and stormwater


treatment, nutrient issues in springs and
environmental studies.
Dr Knight has worked on several hun-
dred wetland water quality projects in
Florida and nationwide and co-authored
the definitive book on the subject,
"Treatment Wetlands."
The woman's club is at 5 56th St.,
Yankeetown, next to the library and post
office.
For more information, call 352-
447-6152.


Good opportunities


Forum links volunteers with needed services in community


Special to the Chronicle
Learn where you can make a differ-
ence and discover your niche in com-
munity service.
The Nature Coast Volunteer Center
and Retired and
Senior Volunteer Program host a forum
for people to link up with volunteer






Singer wil
perform a
Audubon meeting

Dale Crider, Florida's environment
troubadour, has written, recorded an
performed numerous songs about Florida -
its unique wilderness and wildlife
The songs have helped bring attention to tO
plight of endangered wildlife, to their habitat
in rivers and other fragile aquatic ecosystem.
and to the natural systems that support a
life in Florida. Crider will perform at the CitrL
County Audubon Society's meeting at 7 p.n
Wednesday at the Unity Churcl
2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanti
Michele Kline, with one of hi
ambassador raptors, will also give a histoi
on the raptor and a well-being report on hi
other charges. For more information, vis
www.citruscountyaudubon.com, click c
calendar, then Dale Cride








Fundraiser for typhoon
victims continues this week
Florida Homecare Specialists' yard
and food sales at its office will continue
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Thursday
at 6099 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River


opportunities.
This is an opportunity to meet with
NCVC/RSVP staff and volunteer man-
agers throughout the county and learn
about their programs and opportuni-
ties for service.
Opportunity Links will be at 3 p.m.
Wednesday at the Central Ridge Com-
munity Center, 77 Civic Circle,


NEWS NOTE
The group is accepting orders for egg
rolls, cakes, empanadas and meat bread.
All proceeds from the sales, to be ac-
counted for and reported weekly, will be
donated to victims of the recent typhoon
in the Philippines.
Food prices are: egg rolls, $1 each; em-
panadas, $2.50 each; meat bread, $2.50
each; marble cake and chiffon cake, $15 a


Beverly Hills.
RSVP and the Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center are the engines through
which more than 60 local organizations
connect hundreds of volunteers to
service opportunities throughout
Citrus County
For more information, call 352-249-
1275, or email ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


layer; and pineapple upside-down cake,
$20 a layer
To place food orders, make donations,
or for more information, call Hazel Tan at
863-398-7573, Ryan L. Roflo at 352-613-
3677 or Michelle Roflo at 352-613-5853. In-
formation can also be provided about
making donations to the Philippine Red
Cross, UNICEF and other organizations.


Church women offer day of faith, inspiration


S Lf teppin' Out" was the theme of
the Crystal River United
SMethodist Women's first all-day
women's retreat held at the church. An
interdenominational event, it was a very
special time for women from all over the
community to come together and share in
inspirational teaching, worship and
singing.
Speaker, writer and singer Gwen Smith
led us throughout the day, with the goal,
"To encourage women to think big
thoughts about God by pointing them to
His truth and grace through stories, songs
and scripture."
As we gathered for an early breakfast
on the church patio and later entered the
sanctuary, there was an aura of purpose
surrounding us. Sitting alone on the
stage, Gwen, with guitar, set the tone for
the day saying, "We are here because God
loves us, to receive His mercy and grace
and to echo Him in our lives."
Gwen sang "Forever God is Faithful."
Quoting Psalm 84:14, she challenged us to
not get tied up in our emotions and ex-
pectations. Instead trust in the Lord. She
said that trust is not a one-time word.
It goes on and on so we can go through
decision-making highs and lows with
promises in the Bible to hold onto.
Singing the familiar hymns, "Come
Thou Fount of Every Blessing," "Our
God" and "Lost in Praise," we were di-
rected to allow the lyrics to be our heart's
praise.
During a deeply moving PowerPoint of
Isaiah 55:1 and a medley of' "Just As I
Am," 'All to Jesus" and "I Surrender All,"


Ruth
Levins

AROUND THE
COMMUNITY


we found our treasure of this day spread
before us, hearing the words that endure
forever
We learned a new word: "beautritivisit"
- beauty in the outside; nutrition on the
inside, the dream of a beautiful life and
being well in our heart's intentions and
responses.
Other inspirations flowed:
Contemplate strength and trust and
be prepared to go out into a challenging
world.
Grace meets us in the moments of
collision in our lives and helps us to walk
with God's grace.
Words to erase include: jealousy, in-
sensitivity, lies, doubts, noise, insecurity;
all of the emotional clutter that side-
swipes our faith.
God's plan is for us to be loving to-
ward Him, ourselves and others and have
it impact us with His reality personally
In pridefulness unforgiveness and
gossip, we are called out to transforma-
tion, a restoration and a reconnection to
God.
We can be well with our soul as we
praise His grace and love and surrender


unkind behaviors and receive His heal-
ing and hope.
Singing "Changing broken into beau-
tiful," a reflection of His majesty.
Grace is foundational, rooted in love.
In empty heart times, we can refuel
with His love and strength.
Hope is intentionally connecting with
the Lord (Isaiah 40:28-31).
There is no carte blanche happy
card. It is not about situations. It's about
our position, from strung-out to strength.
Limitations bring us strength when
we trust in Him for the outcome.
We wrote down our concerns and fears
and placed them on the altar, torn. After
lunch we enjoyed a worship concert in-
cluding "You Deserve the Best," "My
Strength and My Song," "Lost in Praise,"
as Gwen accompanied herself on guitar
and at the keyboard.
The concluding session was on trust.
Some of the inspirations included:
With all of our mixed bag of chal-
lenges and circumstances, we can step
out in faith and trust.
Don't miss the beautiful. Look for the
eyes of hope in a child or a friend (Psalm
96:96, 34:5, Proverbs 31:25).
It was a retreat to remember, to reflect
upon, to share and to acknowledge a re-
markable Gwen quote: "Live in the
moment; God has a plan for your love."

Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community Let her
know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




C10 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING NOVEM B ER 19, 2013 C: .Comcast Citrus B: Bright House D/I: .Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
SWSJNBC 19 19 News News Ent Access The Biggest Loser The Voice (N)'PG' Chicago Fire (N)'14' News Jay Leno
S P World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In African Americans: Lincoln at Gettysburg Frontline "Who Was Lee Harvey Oswald?" Life
F E3 P PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) c Many Rivers (N)'PG'c of Lee Harvey Oswald. (N) 'PG'
O (WIF PBS 5 5 5 41 Journal Business PBS NewsHour (N) African Americans Lincoln-Gettys Frontline (N) 'PG' TBA T. Smiley
W F NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Biggest Loser (N) The Voice The artists Chicago Fire A major News Jay Leno
NBC 8 8 8 8 8News 8 Ton. *PG' cc face elimination. 'PG' railroad accident. 'f4'
ABC 20 20 20 NeNew NWorld Jeopardy! Wheel of Marvel's Agents of The David Blaine: Real or Magic (N) (In Eyewit. Jimmy
CWNews (N)'G' Fortune S.H.yI.E.L.D (N)'PGt GodbergsN) Stereo) 14, [N News Kimmel
S WTP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News, Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! NCIS "Gut Check" (N) NCIS: Los Angeles Person of Interest "The 10 News, Letterman
( BS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Fortune (N)'G' 14' c (DVS) "Recovery" (N) Crossing"(N) 11pm (N)
T 13 1 13 13 FOX13 6:00News(N) TMZ (N) omg! Dads (N) Brooklyn New Girl Mindy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
CWT FOX 13 13 13 13 (InStereo) 'PG Insider (N) 14' Nine-Nine (N) '14' Project (In Stereo) c Hollyw'd
D WCJ ABC 1 1 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. S.H.I.E.LD. Gold David Blaine: Real or Magic (N News J. Kimmel
W N 2 Christian Today Kenneth Great Awakening H.Babers Place for Help Me Perry Life Today Purpose Great
S M" IND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Hagin Sr._ Miracles Hannah Stone for Life Awaken
ED ABC 11 News World The List Let's Ask Marvel's Agents of The David Blaine: Real or Magic (N) (In News Jimmy
ABC 11 11 11 News (N) 'PG' America S.H.I.E.L.Di (N)'PG' Goldbergs (N) Stereo)'14, I[c Kimmel
N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
M IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 'PG' 'PG' 14' 14'
W WTT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld FamFeud FamFeud Bones'14' c Bones'14'mc CopsRel. CopsRel. Seinfeld Commun
(1 1WA1 TBN 21 21 -Present The 700 Club (N)'G' Babers Paid iManna Paid Paid Studio Direct Healing Ministries
S1 King of King of Two and Two and Heartradio Album Supernatural "Bad Engagement Engagement The Arsenic Hall Show
M M OCW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Half Men Release Party Boys" (N) c '14',c
SF 1 1 Animal Citrus County Cancer Every Chamber Crook and Chase (In Cold Squad'14' Eye for an Fam Team
Ci M M FAM 16 16 16 15 Court Today Court Minute Chat Stereo)'PG' (DVS) Eye
D [WONXJ FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons Big Bang Big Bang Dads'14' Brooklyn NewGirl IMindy FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ'PG' Access
P UWVW) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Noticias Notic. Corazon Indomable Porque el Am. LoQue laVida MentirParaVivir'14' Noticias Noticiero
M EWXPXJ ION 17 Criminal Minds'14' Criminal Minds'14' Criminal Minds'14' Criminal Minds'14' Criminal Minds'14' Flashpoint'14'm
to c o So7, Stoge Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage- Storage- American American Storage Storage
S 54 48 54 25 27 WarsG Wars' WaTPG Warst G WarsPG WarsTPG WarsTG' Texas Texas Hoggers Hoggers Wars WarsPG'
A 5 6** 5"Angels & Demons" (2009, Suspense) *** "Ghost" (1990, Fantasy) Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore. A murder "Coyote Ugly"
55 64 55 Tom Hanks, Ewan McGregor. 'PG-13' B victim returns to save his beloved fiancee. 'PG-13' m (2000) Piper Perabo.
SFinding Bigfoot: Further The Blue Planet: Seas The Blue Planet: Seas The Great Barrier Reef Great Barrier Reef. (In The Blue Planet: Seas
M ) 52 35 52 19 21 Evidence'PG' of Life 'G' of Life 'G' Stereo)'PG' of Life 'G'
S 96 19 9 106 & Park: BET's Top ** "Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself" (2009, Husbands Husbands Husbands The Game TheGame
S96 19 96 10 Live (N)'PG' Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry'PG-13' '14' 14'
BRAVO 254 51 254 Vanderpump Rules Housewives/Atl. Housewives/AtI. IShahs of Sunset'14' Shahs of Sunset '14' Happens Shahs
South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Daily Show Workaholics Tosh.O B Tosh.0O Tosh.0O Tosh.O (N) Brickleberry Daily Show Colbert
CC 27 61 27 33 MA' 14' Report 14' 14' cc 14' (N) Report
i Q98 45 98 28 37 Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' *** "Die Hard" (1988, Action) Bruce Willis. A New York policeman Cops Cops
98 9B c N outwits foreign thugs in an L.A. high-rise. 'R' B Reloaded Reloaded
[B 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report American Greed Car ICar Car Car Mad Money
fC 40 29 40 41 46 Situation Crossfire Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Live AC 360 Later (N) Erin Burnett OutFront
Good- Jessie Austin & Jessie Liv& Jessie A.N.T Good- Shake It Good- A.N.T Jessie
iS 46 40 46 6 5 Charlie 'G' N Ally'G' 'G'I Maddie 'G' Farm'G' Charlie Up!'G' Charlie Farm' G' cI
P4 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) EA Skills Challenge College Basketball: Old Spice Classic SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2 34 28 34 43 49 Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Nc Olbermann (N) N
WT 95 70 95 48 Faith Sisters Daily Mass'G'c Mother Angelica Live Religious IRosary Threshold of Hope Thought lWomen
f 29 2 2 2 Ravenswood "Believe" Ravenswood (In Ravenswood (N) (In ***Yn "Up" (2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed The 700 Club (In
29 52 29 20 28 '14', Stereo)'14'm Stereo)'14'c Asner, Christopher Plummer.'PG' Stereo)'PG'
f- 1 1** "Metro" (1997, Action) Eddie Murphy, **Y "Out ofTime"(2003, Suspense) Denzel *** "Stir of Echoes" (1999) Kevin "Wes
118 170 Michael Rapaport. (In Stereo) 'R' NcWashington. (In Stereo)'PG-13cN Bacon. (In Stereo)'R' c Craven"
[FjjJ 44 37 44 32 Special Report Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O'Reilly Factor
TOii 26 56 26 -Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Chopped'G' Chopped 'G' IChopped'G' Chopped (N) 'G' Chopped'G'
(]TSD 732 112 732 -College Basketball Vanderbilt at Butler. (N) Hoops College Basketball Bucknell at St. John's. FOX Sports Live (N) (Live) c
Ij4 35 39 35 -UFC Coaching College Basketball (N) (Live)'G' IPanthers Panthers NHL Hockey: Panthers at Canucks
S 30 60 30 51 How I Met Two and Two and ** "Hall Pass" (2011) Owen Wilson. Two married men get Sons of Anarchy Tensions rise as Sons of
3 1 Half Men Half Men one week to do whatever they please. 'R' club gets out of guns. 'MA' Anarchy
LF 727 67 727 Central Lessons Big Break PGATour Big Break NFL IBig Break NFL (N) Big Break NFL Central Big Break
hu 59 68 5 4 5 "Christmas With Holly"I (2012, Drama) Sean "Pete's Christmas" (2013, Fantasy) Bruce "The Thanksgiving House" (2013, Drama)
59 68 59 45 54 Faris, Eloise Mumford. 'NR' H Dern, Zachary Gordon.'PG' c Emily Rose, JustinBruening. c
S 3 2 3 2 2 "Thunderstr" 24/7 Real Time With Bill MikeTyson: Undisputed Truth (In Eastbound REAL Sports With Boardwalk Empire
HB 302 201 302 2 2 Pacquiao Maher'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' c Bryant Gumbel 'PG' 'MA cc
hD**30 0 "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" ***)n "Moonrise Kingdom" (2012) Promised Real Time With Bill Hello Summer
303 202 303 (2012) lan McKellen.'PG-13'c Bruce Willis.'PG-13' c Land Maher'MA' c Ladies'MA Heights
[GTV] 23 57 23 42 52 Property Property HuntlIntl Hunters Income Pro perty'G' Income Property'G' Hunters IHuntlIntl House Hunters Reno
r 5 5 Modern Marvels Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Counting Counting Top Gear (N) 'PG' c American Pickers American American
51 25 51 32 42 "Wood"'PG'c 'PG' 'PG' Cars'PG' Cars 'PG'1 Dare Dare
E 24 3 2 1 Chasing Nashville Abby's Ultimate Dance Abby's Ultimate Dance Abby's Ultimate Dance Competition (Season Chasing Nashville (N)
24 38 24 31 'PG' c Competition Competition Finale) The winner is chosen. (N) 'PG' 'PG' c
Seven Deadly Sins A female sheriff uncovers "Last Hours in Suburbia" (2012, Suspense) ** "She's Too Young" (2004, Drama) Marcia
50 119 dark secrets while probing murder. Kelcie Stranahan. (In Stereo) 'NR' c Gay Harden. (In Stereo) c
f X 320 22 32 *3Y, "Biq Momma's House 2" *** "Tombstone" (1993) Kurt Russell. Doc Holliday joins *)Y "Me, Myself & Irene" (2000, Comedy) Jim
320 221 320 3 3 (2006)rvartin Lawrence.'PG-13' WyattEarp forthe OK Corral showdown.'R'c Carrey (InStereo) R'c
MNC 42 41 42 PoiiticsNation (N) Hardbaii With cnnris All in With Cunris Hayes i ne Hacnei Maddow I ne Last Word With All in With Cnnris Hayes
42 41 42 Matthews (N) c (N) Show (N) Lawrence O'Donnell
109 65 109 44 53 Life Below Zero '14' Life Below Zero '14' Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Life Below Zero (N)'14' Doomsday Preppers
109 65 109 44 53 14' (N)'14' '14'
Ii 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. ISponge. Thunder Haunted FullH'se FullH'se FullH'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
WN 103 62 103 -Too Cute! 'G' Too Cute! 'G' Neighbor Neighbor Neighbor Neighbor Neighbor Neghbor Neighbor Neighbor
XY 44_123 BGC: Miami BGC: Miami BGC: Miami BGC: Miami BGC: Miami Styled to Rock'PG'
O 340 241 34*** "Out of Sight" (1998, Crime Drama) *** "Killing Them Softly"(2012, Crime Masters of Sex Filming Homeland "A Red
340241 340 4 George Clooney (In Stereo)'R'N cDrama) Brad Pitt. (In Stereo)'R' ccthe study 'MA' Wheelbarrow"'MA'
r L 3 3 3 2 3 CrissAngel BeLIEve ''.ii-. -I BeLIEve CrissAngel BeLIEve CrissAngel BeLIEve CrissAngel BeLIEve Criss Angel BeLIEve
37 43 37 27 36 "Bullet Catch"'PG' i ,,i F.-, "Levitate Shaq"'PG' (In Stereo)'PG' (N) (In Stereo)'PG' "Levitate Shaq"'PG'
TA 37027137** "The Wedding **)i "The Village" (2004) Bryce Dallas Howard. **n "Evil Dead" (2013) Jane Levy. ** "Stealth" (2005) Josh Lucas.
370 271 370 Planner" (2001) c (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc (In Stereo)'R' cc(In Stereo)'PG-13' cc
6 31 3 Underthe Underthe Heat Live! NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Miami Heat. From the Heat Live! Inside the College Football
36 31 36 Helmet Helmet (Live) AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live) Heat
*** "Fright Night" Face Off "Swan Song" Top 20 Countdown- Face Off: Naked and Naked Vegas (N) Face Off: Naked and
31 59 31 26 29 (2011)R 14' Judges Favorites Painted'14' Painted'14'
T$ 49 23 49 16 19 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Fam.Guy Big Bang IBigBang Big Bang I Big Bang Big Bang ITrustMe Conan (N)'14' c
S 169 5 169 30 35*** "Goodbye, My Fancy" (1951, Comedy- **** "The Maltese Falcon" (1941) Humphrey *** "Mildred Pierce" (1945, Drama) Joan
169 53 169 30 35 rama) Joan Crawford. 'NR' H Bogart.'NR' c(DVS) Crawford, Ann Blyth.'NR'c (DVS)
J 5 Moonshiners (In Moonshiners (In Moonshiners: Outlaw Moonshiners (N) (In Porter Porter Moonshiners (In
] 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo)'14'c Stereo)'14'c Cuts (N)'14'N c Stereo)'14'c Ridge'14' Ridge Stereo)'14'c
TL 50 46 50 29 30 Toddlers & Tiaras Medium Medium Little People, World Little People, World Treehouse Masters Little People, World
"Man on a /"Spy Kids: AII the Time in the *** "Fahrenheit 9/11" 2004, Documentary) "Knife Fight" (2012) RobLowe. .omphoie
J 350 261 350 Ledge" World"(2011)'PG' m(In Stereo)'R' cc (In Stereo) ', N IH
S 4 3 1 3 Castle "Demons" 'PG' Castle "Cops & Robbers" Castle "Heartbreak Castle The death of a Castle "Dial M for Boston's Finest "Family
T J 48 33 48 31 34 m (DVS) (In Stereo)'PG' Hotel"'PG' ladies'man.'PG' Mayor"'PG' Matters" '14'
TD 38 58 38 33 Gumball Steven Total Gumball Uncle Adven Regular Adven Cleveland American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
[A 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Bizarre Foods Bggg Bggg Gem Hunt N)'PG' Lost Survivors'PG'
iiT 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage
L 32 49 32 34 24 Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Raymond Raymond Friends Friends King King
,iA 4 Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern
UA 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit '14 Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family
Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will & Will &
hJ 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace
WN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos ***' "The Matrix" (1999) Keanu Reeves.'R' N Mother Rules


North
4 J 2


West
4 A 8 5
Y9 74
* Q 10 8 5 4
S 4


V J2
+ J 9 7
4 A Q 1 6
Ea
4
V
2

South
K Q 6 4
V A K Q
YAKQ
+ K6
* 10 9 8 7


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
i NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 5


= Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

If you asked experts which is the best bridge
magazine, they would all answer, "The Bridge
World." Edited by Jeff Rubens (I am the associ-
ate editor), it aims mostly at experienced tour-
nament players. However, there is also
material for those trying to elevate their games
to that level.
You can bid 10 hands with your partner and
compare your results against two expert pairs.
And you can answer the eight bidding and
opening-lead problems set to an expert panel.
If you get the highest score, you win a book
prize.
This deal is from the monthly quiz entitled
"Improve Your Defense."
Look at the West and North hands. Defend-
ing against three no-trump, West leads his
fourth-highest diamond. East wins with his ace
and returns a diamond to South's king. Should
West be doing anything in particular?
The auction is straightforward. With a good,
long minor, no short suit and no thoughts of
slam, North should raise to three no-trump.
This is a position that experts take in their
stride, but less capable players do not have
down pat.
If you look at the full deal, declarer is going
to take the club finesse at trick three. It is
going to lose, and East will be wondering
whether to shift to a spade or to a heart. If he
leads the wrong suit, declarer runs for home
with three hearts, one diamond and five clubs.
West must help his partner by dropping the
diamond 10 under South's king. The unneces-
sarily high card is a suit-preference signal for
the higher-ranking major suit.
Details are at bridgeworld.com.
3ftjjTY T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
VN IM by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, You have to clean out the
garage, wash the car and
to form four ordinary words. then take the cat to the vet.

| FEHTT -E/- ,.
h Ji I
t^A --b/ ---1

2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC 'i I
All Rights Reserved 3 -
| N A LT S g , '



RAPYAL [ !,_,^

H WANT TO 00 G
__{_ | BOWLIN&G UT HE
I DEMLID I PIPNTHAW-- -


Wztz


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer r
here: (
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: HIKER DECAY KNIGHT MINGLE
Answer: The Army general who played in the tennis
tournament was HIGHLY RANKED


ACROSS
1 Elec. measure
4 Jaunty
8 Mackerel or
bass
12 Camping gear
vendor
13 Whodunit
terrier
14 Woodwind
15 Grateful
17 Lunar valley
18 Super deal
19 Fable writer
20 Little kid
22 Really big
tees
23 Hick
26 People
devourer
28 Truck mfr.
31 Adage-
spouting
detective
32 Brother's title
33 Meadow
34 Calendar
abbr.
35 Morgan Ie -


36 Polo need
37 Univ. degree
38 Descartes'
name
39 Major work
40 Golly!
41 Hairstyles
43 Meditation
guides
46 Narrow shelf
50 vera
51 Avian food
54 Burden
55 Jai -
56 Anderson
Cooper's
channel
57 Back muscles
58 Give out
sparingly
59 Mauna -


Answer to Previous Puzzle


BRT IEB EEIPER

YORE RHE IQSUT E I
R I NNST
BHIAMME|R MI [SC
-- JI RN KA O'T0-1
GIR LOIT
EV|ENTLEGEND
RINGB^ASSIOIL
REIG GIST WE R E
WREATHLED TI
APENOWE
H|OSEATOLL S
D IINEDO UlT D EES
EVIL PR|E E|IRE
LE|TIS E|A|R D|A F|T


DOWN 5 "C- la vie!"
1 Mr. 6 AAA
Kristofferson suggestion
2 Departed 7 Young boy
3 Take cover 8 Golfer's yells
4 Picasso or 9 Long-billed
Casals wader


10 By oneself
11 Assist
16 Consumed
19 Tavern fare
21 Molasses
candy
22 Checked
luggage
(hyph.)
23 Dudley
Do-Right's
org.
24 Yikes! (hyph,)
25 Stripe
27 Mom's mom
28 Unappetizing
food
29 Bill of fare
30 Low-lying
islands
36 Sits for a
portrait
38 Thing, in law
40 Suppose
42 Vintage tune
43 Liverpool
poky
44 Arm bone
45 Defeat
47 Patio cousin
48 Chromosome
part
49 Ms. Ferber
51 Thud
52 Suffix for
percent
53 Informer


11-19 ..i 2013 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for Urs

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


DearAnnie: My sister-
in-law, "Marie," has
been diagnosed as
bipolar, but doesn't take any
medication. For 25 years, it
has caused serious trouble.
Marie is a spiteful, evil, con-
trolling human
being. You can't
find a single per-
son in town with a .
kind word to say
about her Her own
daughters try to
keep their dis-
tance.
My brother is
afraid to leave her
and instead seeks
the company of
other women. He's
had many affairs AN IN
during their mar- MAIL
riage. All of the
men he works with
are aware of this and even
encourage it because they see
how awful his wife is.
As brothers, we were al-
ways close, but Marie has
managed to sever our rela-
tionship. My brother is not a
healthy man. He works extra
hours in order to stay away
from home. His latest girl-
friend is a beautiful, kind,
sweet woman. He adores her,
but is afraid of what Marie
might do. She has threatened
to destroy his life if he ever
leaves her Her threats are
real.
While we do not condone
his cheating, the family has
witnessed his painful mar-
riage. What can we do? -
Brother to Brother
Dear Brother: Marie
should not be allowing her
bipolar disease to control her
behavior It would help if
your brother could get her to
see a doctor and find a med-


I
L


ication that works for her If
she refuses and your brother
is truly afraid to leave be-
cause of her threats, this
would be considered emo-
tional abuse. Suggest that he
contact the Domestic Abuse
Helpline for Men
Sand Women
(dahmworg) at 1-
888-7HELPLINE.
r DearAnnie: My
older brother will
be 60 this year, and
he and his friends
are hosting a group
party in another
S state. His entire
family lives here,
including his son.
That means for the
IE'S majority of the
.BOX guests, attending
will include travel
and hotel ex-
penses. I am fine with that.
What I don't get is that this
event isn't offering any meals.
That means dinner is on us,
and we will have to pay for
drinks at the party I think
this is just plain wrong.
We are a small family and
very close. I have invited my
brother to numerous dinners
here over the years. I sug-
gested that we celebrate his
birthday with a family dinner
at my house, and he said,
"That is not going to happen."
I don't know what to think. -
Party Pooper, Santa Cruz
Dear Party: We are con-
fused by the words "hosting a
party" when the guests are
paying for everything.
Nonetheless, your brother
can have the party of his
choosing in the location he
prefers, and you get to decide
whether or not to attend. De-
termine how important it is
for you to be there. If your


brother would be hurt by
your absence, please go if you
can afford to do so.
DearAnnie: This is for
"Searching for Answers,"
whose wife of 11 years doesn't
want sex. She works in a pro-
fession, maintains a home,
runs five miles a day to keep
herself in shape and is rais-
ing three young kids. I'd like
to offer him my insight of 73
years, 46 of which have been
spent married to my wonder-
ful wife.
Sex is like the frosting on a
cake. It tops off a good thing.
But frosting without the cake
is not satisfying. Those who
marry in order to have an
easy source of sex should
work out some other way to
satisfy their needs. A mar-
riage where sex is the prime
motivation will become te-
dious and dull or will not last.
Marriage consists of many
things, some good, some bad.
It is living day to day in a
quiet routine. It means that
you have a close companion
with whom you can share a
sunset Think before you
throw in the towel on your
marriage and give up the
cake for the frosting. -An
Old Guy Who's Been There

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit
www creators. com.


11-19-13



52
.st
10 9 7 3
10 8 6 5 3
A3
K 3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


As 6WN A6aukMCP -1-k 1C5 T15 RHE F FIRST TIME
FIND5 I jrR "A6CIE I AEYER REAILV FELT LIKE
PWJECT.f'LL 6l' ME A T UAqMEXN 1 LKE
TFEIIN6 ,W FJEAT' L T DOlN6. L O A.- ...I
TA*WtOFF 9PEWV rTROL., 7iO La 5E W DEfg._J..


For Better or For Worse


OH LOOK, SAL! IT'S YOUR SISTER, MOM WA'Ol5 RVIN$ US N0UT
RALPN AND THE l WOTH PARENT INO ADVJCE, SO
BABY, A1Ll HERE ThIS.,THiS ,ENEIETE ,/Y '
II AY'5 BEFORE J5 A 5'WE.IREP TIM AW,
.... | LUGeAG EVEN nhOUGH ThEy
-A E' 'E JCKiE. AN LOcK! TH R Y BROU6CHT
e 1 -ONLY LIVE AN HCUR AWAY
FRCM HERE!


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser -

C [ C-,I $O IONb T14, NW
SRAIC- tCRI 5PS 1 60U6HT,


V I (K,>T-T'AE OUT FOR i\
*kE-ALTM -P SN.PKRiG
k1 fLTE~tUMAlV-THE COW
^^^--c~o A


Kit 'N' Carlyle


6PW! HAoW MANY CLORlLOS
R IF FWT'- EIG&I-TOFTP TR .-?





._ ".'\ -


Rubes


EAT
i,$V~~ GL~C0 ] oAA5AAN


Doonesbury


Big Nate


SrOOFaJ SHOOF




Arlo and Janis


*6Ar NaiS OT
Te j1R6newru tAf-
Nrl r Y6.4?eM ,


, SHUTOO.l f.AMP

A..*4Th W/


Blondie
OUR SON FINA-LLV FINLSHD-\
L-W SCHOOL, AND WE WANT '1
TO HROW A DIG SURPRISE
PARTY FO HIM 2 --'.-
-_ ,^__'---^HUGE
,4; ,,J)PRISEi/




"i,, -^" "^


14 JUST STArTED'-., IT'S 15
HI5 VEIY OWN LAGW- GONNA '
PRACTICE AND Bg. SUCH A\
M OVED INTO A jWONOERFUL
\ LOVELY NEW Surprise_,!'
HOME/ OE /" I ---


RIGHT AFTEQ 7'1 1 OH MV, HE i
PART'S OVER,./- WILL BE -
> WE PLAN ON <;' SURPRISE,
MOVING IN WiTr4 WON'T HE?!
HIM
'^ ^N ., =


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"HCoW CAN T WS FOO 0 GOOP FOR ME
%JHN4 IT TASTE SO BAP?"

Betty


Frank & Ernest


To day's MOVIES
Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Best Man Holiday" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
6:55 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D. 1:20 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.
7 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D. 1:40 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 4:15 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m.
No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M s9n tf n

"XDW BRVJYX JB XDW REZEVJCF AEET


XDHX GEN'VW FJSWC, HCI GENV


JB XE MJFNVW ENX DEU


JC."


KEA


XE REZEV JX


- KHPWB BYHIWV


Previous Solution: "The only person who has artistic control is the director, and
'director' is how you spell God in Hollywood." -Tom Clancy
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-19


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


SUDDENLY, I HAVE
A DEEP SENSE
OF FORE6ODI&NG

6*


COMICS


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 Cll


LS^




CJ.2 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 2013


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fx(3256 565 TolFe:(8)0-30 1E al0 fIw


Comm. Roofers

Exp required. Benefits.
(352)564-1242
Electric Leather
Recliner, Broyhill
6 months old, dark
brown, perfect cond.
Org. $850. Asking
$425.(352) 527-8808
FISHING POLES
6 ft Ugly Stick w/ Penn
320GR $75;6 ft Custom
Trolling Rod w/Garcia
level wine $45
(352) 726-3427
FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, 1BA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
INVERNESS
Moving Sale *
Thurs. & Fri. 8am-lpm
Tools, Furn. MISC.
3515 E. Theresa Lane
Newly renovated MH
in 55+ comm. 2BR/ IBA
Move in Condition &
fully furnished incid
Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
Queen box spring,
nearly new. Crystal
River. 212-1827


.3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
Can deliver for fee.
$100 ea. Refrigerator
white $125
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258
WASHER Kenmore &
GE DRYER. Both work
good. $75 each
(352) 726-7902



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


9 Pine Logs
Good for Lumber
(352) 436-7984
4001 N Holiday
Crystal River
FREE 14 x 65 Mobile
Home in 55+ Park
Needs some repairs
Must pass back-
ground & credit
check (352) 527-0800
FREE FIRE WOOD
Cut oak. Easy Access
You Load & Haul
Inverness
727-480-4733
FREE KITTENS
6 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free to Good Home
Male Black Lab, 2yrs,
neutered, chipped,
Great Dog. Moving
Can't take him with
me (352) 503-6965
Queen box spring,
nearly new. Crystal
River. 212-1827



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone CrabS6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 ml. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
mustard/collard
greens,squash, more
GIFT SHIPPING
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.


LUOI CAt.
Small female, Part
Manx, fluffy, brown
w/white mane, has half
tail. lost in Citrus
Springs off Deltona
pis call (352) 322-0086
Lost 2 Male Dogs
Brindle & white Pitt mix
& a White & Fawn Pitt
mix.Traveling together
Citrus Springs Area
(352) 897-4391
White American Bull
with black spots. An-
swers to Capone. Lov-
ing Family pet for 10
yrs. Lost in Citus
Springs. Needs daily
meds (352) 795-7805



Found Dog
Yellow Lab
Beverly Hills Area
Call to identify
(352) 235-0555
Found Female
Orange Tabby Cat
Light Green Colar
Seen around
Meadowpark Lane
Crystal River
(352) 794-3173
Found
White & Black
Pit Mixed
Found in Citrus Springs
(352) 302-2911
Small White Female
Dog found 11/13 on
Citrus Ave. Call
352-613-1113



FREE REMOVAL
Would like to thank all
of Citrus County for
your patronage in
2013. I will be full oper-
ational again starting
Jan 6,2014. I want to
wish you all a safe &
joyous holiday season.
See you in 2014


M=r
Nail Technicians
are now back to
ELEGANT NAILS
(Bus) 795-4403
(Cell) 287-1417


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Craba$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




AVANTE
At Inverness

LPN Full time
Positions evening
and nights

CNA- Full Time
Postions evenings
and Nights

Please Apply online
At
Avantecenters.com

CASE MANAGER

For ACO,
Large Physcian
Group PT/FT Position
Fax Resume to
352-746-3838 or
Call 352-527-0514

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com


F/Tor PIT
Certified Dental
Assistant

for fast paced
Dental Office
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email:
lynn.swanson@
rswansondental.com

FRONT DESK

F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax Resume to:
352-795-1637 or
Email: lynn.
swanson@rswanson-
dental.com

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office
based medical
practice in Inverness.
Front and back office
experience preferred.
Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

MID-LEVEL
ARNP
or
PA-C

Send CV to our
growing, fun & excit-
ing Private Practice
resume@
rocketmail.com

P/T, DIETARY
AIDE

Looking for:
Responsible
Individual with
flexible hours.
Aoolv in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

Ultra Sound Tech
4DOB,
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877





COOK

Exp. Only apply
at Chicken King
2420 N Florida Hwy
Hernando, FL
NO PHONE CALLS

FT/PT COOK
POSITION

Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person at:
Superior Residences
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

Sous Chef

Needed for casual
upscale Country
Club. Culinary skills
and kitchen
management exp
necessary. Send
resume to: careers
@citrushills.com






CHi~ NiCIE

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Salessifelp
Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time

Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop
plan and implement
sales presentations
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.



CHiRpN1CE

Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time

Seeking individual
with strong sales
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


LIC. REAL ESTATE
AGENTS

Wanted in Inverness
Dunnellon, & Ocala
Send resume to:
Inverness@
cridland.com


SALES REP.

Seeking a moti-
vated professional
with knowledge of
county geography.
Excel. benefits,
base + commission,
exp. neccesary.
Email Resume to:
ccccreception
@gmail.corn












ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough Trim Slab
Lintel Service
& Warehouse.
Full benefits, paid
holiday & vac. IEOE
APPLY AT:
ExceptIonal Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wlldwood


Comm. Roofers

Exp required. Benefits.
(352) 564-1242

Service Techs.

Part time, experi-
enced only, for busy
AC Company
Email To: aairinc@
centurylink.net




Experienced
Sewer Needed

With use of commer-
cial sewing machine.
352-503-8539

FT Auto Detailer

Aoolv in Person
Must have valid
drivers license. Must
work weekends.DFWP
CITRUS KIA
1850 Hwy 19,
Crystal River

FT/PT COOK
POSITION

Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person at:
Superior Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

HANDY MAN
General Maintenance
Carpenter work, light
plumbing, all types of
trim carpentry, Ability
to trim out sin. homes.
able to hang ceiling
fans, and window
treatments. Overall
home maintenance.
CALL AFTER 6PM
(352) 445-0646

NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone

Telemarketers
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
352-628-0187
TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










SPRING HILL
CLASSES
LAST CLASS
OF 2013
COSMETOLOGY
December 16TH
DAY & NIGHT
SCHOOL
FULLTIME & PARTTIME
BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
www.benes.edu


(727) 848-8415
(352) 263-2744
STATE APPROVED
FOR VA TRAINING




Used Sheds Must go
2-12x24, 10x16, 8x10
352-634-3935




ALL WOOD TONGUE
AND GROOVE
DRESSER great shape
for an antique $80.00
call 352-257-3870




ASHTON DRAKE
DOLLS Decorating the
Tree set. 4 dolls with
accessories. Never
used, still wrapped in
original boxes. $140.
352-586-3842




Two Person Sauna
like new
cost $3800.
will sell for $1500.
(352) 586-6302


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

REMODELING
Complete Kitchen
Appliances
$500. firm
(352) 527-8955

SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179

STOVE
Kenmore Electric
stove, white, self
cleaning, 4 yrs old,
very good cond. $165
(352) 860-2701

Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
Can deliver for fee.
$100 ea. Refrigerator
white $125
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258

WASHER Kenmore &
GE DRYER. Both work
good. $75 each
(352) 726-7902










DUDLEY'S
A'CTIOW

Thursday 11/21/13
Estate Adventure
Auction 3pm
-Session 1 outside
furniture, tools,
household, great
value lots
Session 2 6pm
Estate contents-
Christmas items,
Furniture, HUGE
Name Brand TOOLS
Mechanical-wood
working Snap-On,
Craftsman, Makita
100+pc. ALWAYS
an adventure!

Call or Web for Info
Dudleysauctlon.
corn 352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck










DUDLEY'S


Thursday 11/21/13
Estate Adventure
Auction 3pm
-Session 1 outside
furniture, tools,
household, great
value lots
Session 2 6Dm
Estate contents-
Christmas items,
Furniture, HUGE
Name Brand TOOLS
Mechanical-wood
working Snap-On,
Craftsman, Makita
100+pc. ALWAYS
an adventure!

Call or Web for Info
Dudleysauctlon.
corn 352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


Troy-Bilt 5550 watt,
never used $400;
Plainer/jointer Jet,6 in,
excellent cond $400
(352) 527-2872




47 INCH PANASONIC
PROJECTION TV 6
years old but works
great. $100, you collect.
Tel: (352)-795-5232

50" LED Toshiba TV
less than 1 yr. old
$450. firm
(352) 220-7301




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




ONE 2000LB 12 V
PORTABLE WINCH
With new 12v battery
$100. 513-4614


Furniture

2 BAR STOOLS 24"
high. white wood legs,
natural wood round
seats.$10 EACH
(904)6873866 call/text




Your World








CHRONICLE






2 GREEN MARBLE
TOP WOOD TABLES
beautiful $80.00 each in
CR. call 352-257-3870.



3 RUGS, 1 DESK WITH
CHAIR Emerlin Oriental
Style Rugs
1- 8X11 Black-DTV
1- 8X11Red-FNH
1- 4X6 Blue with Ivory
Border
Like New All 3 for 300.
1 Queen Anne Style
Desk with School House
Chair
Very good condition 65.
352-503-7449

Armour
Double Door with 2
bottom draws $40
Wood Tressel table
5'x3' $30
(352) 726-4085


good condition. Blue.
$25.00 Call
352-697-5565
Brand New
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
China Cabinet
Antique, dark wood,
glass door. $150
(352) 726-4085
CLASSIC CHAISE
LOUNGE soft wine color
clean comfy VG cond
$100 firm 352-897-4154
CONTEMPORARY EN
TERTAINMENT CEN-
TER light color laminate
with some glass $20.00.
call 352-257-3870
DINETTE 36" octagon
top, off white, 4 roller
chairs with blue
cushions, rattan style,
mint cond., $175.
(352) 586-1566
DINNING ROOM SET
complete honey oak
set, table w/ pad,
6 chairs, and china
cabinet. Like New
$500 (352) 563-5809
Dinning Room Table
Pub Style with 4 chrs.
$150; cocktail and
2 end tables. Glass w/
wood base $150
(352) 586-0566
Electric Leather
Recliner, Broyhill
6 months old, dark
brown, perfect cond.
Org. $850. Asking
$425.(352) 527-8808
ELECTRIC TWIN BEDS.
Head and feet go up
and down. One
vibrates. $100/each
(352) 422-6407
ETHAN ALLEN 4
ARMCHAIRS Antiqued
Tavern Dark Pine
Collection Very solid
$100/all 352-897-4154
FORMAL LEATHER
BLACK MAPLE CHAIR
perfect $80.00 call
352-257-3870
GLASS TABLE TOPS
48"RND&42"SQ OTH
3/8"THK NICE $50EA
OR MAKE OFFER
352-228-4517
1 HIGH END USED
FURNITURE 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEAT red-orange
color need a little clean-
ing but sturdy $25.00.
call 352-257-3870.
OFFICE CHAIR
black fabric;
armnlss;swivels;casters;manu-
al height adjust.
$10 (904)6873866
call/text
PRETTY Blue ANTIQUE
WASHSTAND 2
drawers/doors vg cond.
$100 orig handles
352-897-4154
RATTAN SOFA BED
Okay condition. Can fur-
ther describe and send
pictures by email. $50
danciml@hotmail.com
RED METAL
CHILDREN'S BUNK
BED nice shape paid
$200.00 sell for $50.00
call 352-257-3870


1 5 7 3.64 2 9 8|
398215764
642 78195 1 3
463978 15.2

.279 541386
:8 15632947
584127639
731 8.9 6425
926 4513 871


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRoNIcLE


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 013


SHELF UNIT,
5'9" Tall, 16" Deep,
30"Wide,
glass & wood,
cabinet to match $95.
(352) 563-5232
Sofa & Love
Seat Sage Green like
new. No smkg or pets
$600; 2 occasional
chairs $100
(352) 586-0566
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Good condition, five
years old. Bassett
brand color Amber.
Excellent buy $400 for
both. Call after 4pm
352-489-9683
Table lamp
30 wicker like
w/ off white shade $50
(352) 586-0566
TRADITIONAL WING
BACK CHAIR medium
rose color super nice
$25.00. call
352-257-3870



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
RAIN BARREL,
COMPUTER. compo-
ster on roller base
352-795-9664 100.00
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



INVERNESS
Moving Sale *
Thurs. & Fri. 8am-lpm
Tools, Furn. MISC.
3515 E. Theresa Lane
YANKEETOWN
High End Sale
Coastal Living Decor
Furniture Bed Curtains
Jewelry,Cloth,Shoe 7.5
Lilly PulitzerElectronics
Sew Art Craft Antique
Bird Cages, FishTanks
Fish/Boat/Golf/Bike/Phot
Special preview sale:
Thurs 11/21 12pm-3
Fri 11/22 8am, Sat 8am
6204 Harmony Lane
next to Fire Station



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945


Selling entire contents
of 3 rooms, BR, LR, DR
furniture, Kit items, &
decor. Best offer takes
it all.Call for viewing
(352) 563-0129



2 wooden puppy
& child safety gates,
31 x 33, opens to 50"
$40. Bedside comode
$20
352-382-0124
55 Gal Aquarium
Full 2 door wood base
All Accessories
2 Ig Plecostamus Fish
$300 352-628-3393
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Cannon Cameras
AE1 &AE1 Program
& T90
various lens, filters etc.
$300.
(352) 341-1879
CANON MP280
PRINTER Great condi-
tion, needs ink, black
colored, also a scan-
ner, $25 (352)465-1616
Exercise Stepper,
$75.
2 bookcases, 2 red
day care tables
$125
(352) 795-7254
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.OOlb.
Stone Crab@$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
GALLERY JACKET
FOR WOMEN Hardly
used, cheetah print,
size S, reversible, $25
(352)465-1616
GENERATOR genera-
tor for sale 1200 watt
brand new never used.
$80.00 628-5107 phone
MAPLE END TABLES
Open for lots of storage.
Heavy duty. Have 2 for
$35. 746-0714
Play Station Portable
3 games, all cords,
$80 cash, firm. PIs call
(352) 205-7973
352-220-4483
SINGER Portable
Sewing Machine
first $35.00 Take Home
(352) 795-6650
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485


TABLESAW
CRAFTSMAN 10" good
condition.
Sell $80 746-0714
Tonneau Cover,
for Ranger pick up
bed $60.
Aerator, $35
(352) 465-2709
Two Fish Tanks
w/all accessories
$50.(352) 249-7033
Two Ink Cartridges
for Lexmark Printer
$20. each
(352) 249-7033
WORD PROCESSOR
Smith/Corona, w/
monitor $150
Blue Onion pattern
porcelain dishes 12
place settings $150
(352) 382-0001



LARGE DISPLAY
CASE WITH LIGHT
missing back panel but
functional $80.00 call
352-257-3870

Medical

Heavy Duty
Wheelchair, Like New
$75. (352) 465-4691
can pick-up between
2pm 6pm



"NEW" WASHBURN
5 STRING BANJO
STARTER PAK EVE-
RYTHING YOU NEED
(MSRP $400+) $135
352-601-6625
CALLIOPE
Plays from a CD, 5 ft.
tall, very colorful,
excellent for festivals,
crafts shows, draws a
crowd quickly $300.
(352) 795-3424



GENERATOR Never
used 2005 7800 watts
troybuilt with 13500
starting watts, equipt for
home power loss.
500.00
352-726-9964
Pfaltzgraff Tea Rose
Pattern, 5 pc. place
setting for 12
assorted matching
glasses + 28 matching
accessories, $300
(352) 382-4875


-TIFi
ATEC "CASEY"
Baseball Pitching
Machine. Up to 90
MPH. Great Cond. 1
dozen baseballs $800
(352) 527-8303
BICYCLES
Pair of 26" Murry
bicycles. New tires,
cloud 9 seats. $85.00
(352) 621-3624
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Diamondback
Competition Moun-
tain Bike, 27 speeds
Avid disc brakes,
thumb shifters, Barend
rods, marzocchi
bomber front shocks.
Seat post suspension.
Computerlights, utility
bag shock pump, SPD
peddles. Only $300
firm 352-382-4245
FISHING POLE
6 ft Custom Casting
Rod w/Shakespeare
Sigma 040 $30
(352) 726-3427
FISHING POLES
6 ft Ugly Stick w/ Penn
320GR $75;6 ft Custom
Trolling Rod w/Garcia
level wine $45
(352) 726-3427
Ladie Cobra Golf clubs
4 thru. PW,
Graphite shaft $75.
(352) 388-8006
Oldie But Goodie
EZ Go, Golf Cart,
reese hitch, runs good
good battery. Work
box on back. $875.
(352) 564-2756
POOL TABLE
4X8 Leisure bay,
Oak finish, Qn legs,
w/cover,accesories.
Like new pc of furn
$1200.352-527-8303




5 x 8 enclosed
Utility Trailer. Excel.
Cond. can see at
2476 N. Treasure Point,
Hernando, $600. obo
(352) 270-8269
5x8 Endcl. Utility Trailer
can be used for 2
person sleeping
trailer, has windows
$550. (352) 228-0291


CLOTHING boys infant-
size 8 priced from .25-
$2.00 super nice in CR.
352-257-3870

Eddie Bauer DOUBLE
STROLLER works great
need a little cleaning
$60.00 call
352-257-3870

MAPLE WOOD HIGH
CHAIR good working
order $45.00 call
352-257-3870




SOFTAIL REAR
SEAT,BACKREST &
windshield pouch. $
80.00 352-697-2631


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917.Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727-424-1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com


or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



SCOTT &TINA
Nail Technicians
are now back to
ELEGANT NAILS
(Bus) 795-4403
(Cell) 287-1417


JO JO
JoJo, a 4-y.o. bull-
dog mix, brindle in
color, dropped off
at the shelter as a
stray. She is a very
happy, sweet girl,
who has been
found to have se-
vere hip dysplasia;
however, no one
has told her that.
She thinks she is just
fine. She is house-
brkn, spayed &
heartworm-neg.
She will require
medications such as
Remidyl, Tramadol,
Glucosamine/Chondroiti
n&Omega3
fatty acids (fish oil)
for the rest of her life
to keep her active.
She is a very lovely,
affectionate dog
with a beautiful
face who does not
know she has a
problem & loves life.
Hopefully there is a
compassionate
family or individual
who is willing to give
this girl a good
home, in return for
limitless devotion
from her. She
would truly bring
joy to your home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.



)O Ul 'v.* ,, I IllSt.
E'I y Da)y


CIi)NI1('E
Classifieds


1 /


/ 7


11-19 Laughingstock International Inc Dist by Universal UChick for UFS, 2013


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



AUTO DETAIL
Mobile or Drop off
Professional Great
Rates (352) 364-7636



Home Health Care
position wanted. Pro-
vide services for eld-
erly and disabled. Ref
Avail (352) 419-8387



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907

Estaes/Actionff
Services
MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
seFAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
VFAST. 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors

4MR. 352-364-4610

ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
LiC #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day 7 DaYs a Week







oormnu&> fooSfi


Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447




Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning


(.3O5) 2U-4672
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"Call 352-560-7609**


Vera's Cleaning Serv
20 yrs of quality serve.
Flexible Scheduling
Call (352) 726-8511


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
Small Carpentry
*Wno Fencing
*,P-re Screening
ute Clean Dryer Vents
fi- ^to0l, hle & Dependable
FR EE iEP.ence lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
B Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761








Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Hom

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning









(352) 270-4672

Eficeaifilgi.

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397


Paint~pews~tin s




A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




.4



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






-fi'L LING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/lns/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710

All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.comn
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
***352-639-1024***


KNOCKOUT
LEANING SERVICE
REIETIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RNAS& CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
F Washing Too

352.942.6876
Call Today toroa
t PClean Tomorrow


CASH for

SCRAP
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire

w CrstalP REeui

Metal Recycling
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
527-9599




DON'T LET YOUR
K DRYER START
I A FIRE! Z
Flat Rate. No
WVHidden Coilt .


Lawm Sprinkler

Not Wrsrkim9?

We'll Fix It







MST

'746-4451-4


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


-1iHi lst.


CHkX)NiKJ-E
,n nI I-fiIds
Ci-I~pN!


Carol's



Airport Transport
352-746-7595

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



Your World

























TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


|Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
E M or pool or plan
S something
','ii completelytey new!

..r Oftkenniniared,
L4. Q z_ nevet duplicated"fI

YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPES

POOL AND PAVER LLC
L ,ces 352-400-3188






BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
S In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
S or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
S Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
S Showroom or call

1-352-624-8827
' For a FREE In-Home Estimate!

SBATHFITTER.COM


.zep Exposed
Aggregate
Shotcrete $45/yd.
Decks 'Tile
FREE Pavers .
ESTIMATES > r<--
RDEG'S COMPLETE
UHEUG REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LICENSED352-746-5200
& INSURED521020


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakh6usten"
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
LAny Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
|Lic./lns.CCC057537GHR|


S.OIJ


GENERAL 1
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

021 4*


41Py




C14 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2013




WORDY GURDYABY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Disconcert baseball great Willie (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Slew a "billy" animal (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Scarlet spool strand for sewing (1) syllables in each word.

I 1 1 @ | | |2013UFS,Dist by Univ UcickforUFS
4. "Rocket Man" singer getting' mushy (2)


5. Star watcher's sports jackets (2)


6. Lake house electric power measurement (2)


7. Spoken clarity clash of opinions (2)

------E---------


NOIIlOLNOI(I L 3O9VLVAU 39VUL03 '9 sHaznIa suazv'9"
NItI1 NoJI3 'I I UVTIH (aa' e Ivo0 aiONs gSAVw azva T
SHaASNV


L






BRIT
Brit, Australian
Cattle Dog, about
10 y.o., very laid
back, housebroken,
alert & quiet, lies by
your feet while you
watch TV. very
good watchdog,
likes cats, needs to
be the only dog,
likes a daily walk.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363,
emailJamcbriar
@yahoo.com.





LQL




New Puppy? Consider
a gift certificate for a
Puppy How 2 Class?
Call Deborah Lumley
Certified Prof Dog
Trainer at Intercept Dog
Training 352422-1123
or hershevsleuacv.com
PUREBRED MINI-
DACHSHUNDS,
w/health cert.
8 wks old. black
& tans & dapples
males $300. females
$350. (352) 503-9750
or (352) 586-9928
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
Yellow Umbrella
Male Cockatoo
quiet, shy, 5 yrs. old
$800. Ivg msg
(352) 513-4744



4 Chinese Geese
White
3 adults, 1 juvenile
$40. (352) 697-0425
PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352)-445-0381


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$650 (352) 603-0024
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR/11/2BADWMH
$450/mo + 1st/last
(352) 364-6319



2.5 acres mol
3/2 doublewide
glamour bath eat in
kitchen pole barn off
Whitman Rd.
$109.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


-I.-
3 BR, 2BA, partially
furnished. Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500. For
Sale or Lease to own
(352) 212-4265







4 Br/2 Ba DW MH.
'2 acre in Homosassa.
Super clean, move-in
ready $59,000 Jennifer
Lehman ERA Suncoast
Realty (352) 422-1642
3/2 Double wide on
1 fenced-in acre.
Peaceful area in
Heatherwood
Reduced to $51,900
(352) 302-6905
4/2 Doublewide
on 5 acres mol
beautiful piece of
property off county
line road Springhill, Fl.
$149,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Log Home
4/3 Triplewide
on 5 acres mol
corner lot family
room w/fireplace off
cr 121 in Moriston, Fl.
Reduced to $129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Factory
Liquidation Sale
6 models to choose
from,1200 sq ft up to
2400 sq ft..$12K off!!
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext. 210
for details
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500
Singlewides From
$3,500
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/work-
shop. /4 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 2284282
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. Owner
Financed FHA/ VA
352-795-1272
INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013


2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screem por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
FLORAL CITY
12x56 Mobile,
Furnished 2 BR, 1BA,
Fireplace, in Adult
Park Lg shed Reduced
price $7,400 Lot Rent
$165 mo. 352-287-3729
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incd
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Newly renovated MH
in 55+ comm. 2BR/1IBA
Move in Condition &
fully furnished incid
Washer/Dryer $8500
(352) 419-6238
Singing Forest Floral
City SW 2BD. 2BA
CHA, furnished, scrn.
room tool shed lot
rent $183. mo $ 10,000
Cell 607-227-1630
Two Bedroom Mobile
Home in Lecanto Hills
RV Pk cpt, scrn room,
heat & air, $6k
352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $425. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR/1BAW/D, cable
& utilities incld.$600 +
F/L (352) 302-5853




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-8771



112t&


CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393










Rental Assist.

Available NOW!

^Bedroomoms^
Call A'
Recent Foreclosures Welcome
(352) 447-0106
TDD ph # 1-800-955-8771
This Instrtuton IS an equln
tL==J|oppor tunlty provider & employer


11-19-13


todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


,, rr. ,..


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/Den, fully fur-
nished. W/D, $850 mo
Ist/sec (352) 228-9192




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 34 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890
TTY
1-800-955-8771



112t&
OPPORTUNITY n^

HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo. 1st
& sec. 352-2124981




BLACK DIAMOND
POOL HOME!
$1,200/MO BOB
HEDICK COLDWELL
BANKER NEXT
GENERATION
352-634-4286


13M=

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 34 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-8771






CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HOMOSASSA SMW
2/2/2, Lg Gar, Lg FL.
Rm, Greenbelt $800.
I st/last/dep. Agent
(352) 621-3004
HOMOSASSA
WATERFRONT
8880 W. White Dog-
wood Dr. 3 bed 1-1/2
bath. Waterfront home
w/new carpet/paint/tile
on canal leading to Halls
River. 875 mo.
Ist/last/sec. Pets
w/deposit.
352400-2490
352419-2437
INVERNESS
3/2/1, sunroom,
fenced yard, app'd
pet with add'l fee,
$775/mo sec& Ist.
352-697-2195
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $750. mo + sec.
no smk/pets 726-1875

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 3524034648

INVERNESS

Country Living
on large /2 acre lot.
3 bd. 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964





2/2/1, Waterfront
Newly Remodeled
$900.mo 320-282-3061



*HERNANDO*
Retail/Restaurant *
FOR SALE OR LEASE
$1400 mo, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
(352) 464-2514 **
1305 Hwy 486




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW,
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856


Pine Ridg


Avail 11/15/2013
WOOD CABINETS,
GRANITE TOPS,
VINYL WINDOWS,
ENERGY AWARD
CALL JOE 302-0910




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Sellina


NLWW

Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me

For Sale%,,
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352422-6129
Newly renovated 2/1
with carport & Florida
Rm. Screened patio &
fenced yd. New paint
inside &out. Cash terms
$39,900 (352) 422-2433



Your World








CHRNMCLE








4/2 on 1 acre
off Hwy 44 Lecanto
family room with large
bedrooms 1600 sq ft
$84,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
Reduced $129,000
795-1520 or 634-1725



4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



crm oi
off Lake Lindsey Rd
Brooksville 4/2
1600 sq ft out building
room to roam
$129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3/2 Doublewide
off of Hwy 50
Brooksville Area
close to shopping and
schools /2 acre mol
$67,500.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 353-726-4009
Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


352-26-1515J









Buying or Selling SANDI HART
REAL ESTATE, Realtor
Let Me Work
For M oI 1 Listing and Selling
For You! Real Estate
BETTYVIs my Business
BETTY HUNT I put my heart into it!
REALTOR
352-476-9649
ERA KEY I sandra.hart@
Realty, Inc.era.com
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com ERA American
www.bettyhunts Realty
homes.com. 352-726-5855


HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW,own lot, new carport
& screened front & back /
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858
SPhyllis Strickland
CeRealtor
S NEED LISTINGS
km* Q Sold All Of Mine
117 S Lunar Terrace 2 Market is good
bedroom 2 bath Florida Call me for Free
RM Garage & Carport CMA
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE I also have some
Owner Financing Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down Available for buyers
352-344-9290
2006 3/2/2 plus dining Phyllis Strickland
room & den, acre, TROPIC SHORES
2100sq. ft under air REALTY.
Move in Condition! 352-613-3503-cell
$199,000 352419-6880- Office
352-341-0118
3/2/2 in the Highlands;
Very Clean w/ large m iS
screened patio,& at-
tached storage shed. I
Lg corner lot in great
neighborhood $89,900
352-302-0431
3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl. BETIY J.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING POWELL
Call 352-726-4009 Realtor
Nice Double Lot
3/4 Acres MOL "Your Success is my
with Lake View goal.. Making
4/2 Doublewide Friends along the
with Family Room way is my reward !"
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd. B R
Inverness Fl. BUYINGOR
$89,995. SELLING
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009 CALL ME
Totally Remodeled 352-422-6417
3/2/2,+ family room. binoweii
New Roof, AC, $75,000 po
South Highlands, ERA American
6715 E Morley St Realty & investments
(352) 560-0019 Realty &Investments

S I NEED
HOMES
4/2 Doublewide TO SELL
in Floral City off 44
near town on 14 acre
mol fenced yard
large rear deck
Floral City fl.
$89.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol DEB INFANTINE
glamour bath nice Realtor
eat in kitchen, (352) 302-8046
Floral City off us 41 Real Estate!..
$69,995. it's what I do.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009 ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
1S I =Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
FJor ute Emaildebinfantine@
Pr ae'%Iyahoo.com
Rock Crusher Area
3Br/2Ba/ICG, newly INVESTORS
renovated, including '88 3/2 MH, 1 Acre,
new, lights, fans, ap- Newer Roof, A/C
pliances, and flooring exc. tenants in place
$72,900 352-422-4533 $47K obo Cash
352-503-3245



3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009 LaWanda Watt
4/3 Triplewide Customer Service
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in is My Specialty!
Homosassa beautiful I want to work
wooded lotI want to work
$139,995. for you!
SELLER FINANCING 352-212-1989
Call 352-726-4009 iawanda.watt@
For Sale By Owner centurv21.corn
2BR, IBA, Corner Lot Century 21
Located in Old J.W. Morton
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp Real Estate, Inc.
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated q
kitchen, SS appl's., c:A',
pine Hardwood firs./ i
tiles, roof3 yrs. old. tOlIr ld fir lst
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy- Need a jill)
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000. air a
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092 qualified
Have horses or want emnloyee?
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would This area's
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol #1
with horse corals
west side of US 19 employment
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995. source!
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009 r4iiXrAE: l









TAMI SCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami~gmail.com

When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you MICHELE

The fishing is great ROSE
Call me for your new Realtor
Waterfront Home

LOOKING TO SELL ? SI l pkhaer
CALL ME TODAY I work harder
- 352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realtv. Inc.


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties com
"To view
my properties"




Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688
2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
call 352-527-2711

*** **** **

v THIS OUT!

*** **** **
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. front-
age on golf course
$49,900. Call
352-638-0905
WOODED LOT
on Lee Woods Dr.,
HOMOSASSA
has Wetlands,
$5,000.
352-621-1664



KAYAK
Current Designs
Gulf Stream, 16'10
Kevlar, yellow/white
exc. cond. $1800.
(352) 464-4955
SATURN
2013 14' KBoat inflata-
ble, 42" beam,
auto-inflator, dolly,
bimini, 55 Ib trolling mo-
tor, battery, many ex-
tras. almost new. $650
for all.352-860-2701


Newly undated 2/2/2,
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased











Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993
Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paint,all appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712



Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $45,000
Will consider a classic
or muscle cartowards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


great cond. new tires
4,500 (352) 795-1015
LINCOLN
2004 Town Car; Always
gar'd, Cream puff,
Loaded. 79kmi $10,800
Citrus Spgs 465-2372
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2008 Altima, 69K
miles, orig. owner,
$9500
(352) 212-0315
PLYMOUTH
'93 Acclaim, AC, new
tires & brakes, very
clean 86K mi. runs
great $2,000 obo 352
382-3900, 634-3880


I RA -- -- -A- 91


BiE


I r 49


Citrus County
Homes I


Wilderness
2012 Tsunami Kayak
14.5 w/rudder, carbon
fiber paddle, rf. rack
too many extras to list
$1,325, (352) 586-2625




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*
PONTOON BOAT

'08, 24'Sunchaser 824
by Smokercraft. Very
clean, needs nothing
Lots of extra's! 6x8
open front fishing
deck with 2 chrs. '07,
50 HP Yamaha 2
stroke, less then 50 hr.
'07 Road King, walk up
2axeltrlr.$ 10,250
(352) 419-7766
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation
Vehicles
AIR STREAM 1998
33ft Motor home
454 Cl Eng, 2 roof AC,
awnings all around,
7KWGen, 54kmi, A1
cond, Asking 16,900
(540) 305-9854
FLEETWOOD
MUST SEE *
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k ml. Ready to
go! $8,000
(352) 628-6643
FLEETWOOD
89 SOUTHWIND, Cl A,
28ft, 41k mi, rear bed,
all new access & tires
$7000. 352-697-5530



CARDINAL
2006, 5TH Wheel,
w/3 slides, $17,995,
Crystal River
(989) 878-0711
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Shadow Cruiser
28', 1 slide, sleeps
10, comes w/outside
kitchen, only used twice!
w/ throw in auto. satellite
$18,500.
(352) 634-4113
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



TRUCK RACK
Custom built, alumi-
num, kayak/ladder
$400
(352) 795-7766



"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

L_ klc
Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



CHEVROLET
2010 Cobalt 1 owner,
appx 34k mi. like new,
$9500. obo (352)
341-1922,697-0411
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHEVY 2010
Malibu LT, clean, 73K
mi, 4 cyl, 6 sp, auto,
avg 25 mpg. $10,800
Citrus Spgs 465-2372
CHRYSLER
2000, Sebring
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LANDROVER
'02, Freelander, 4
wheel drive 110k mi.,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 C015


Of s: ,s a
ii I
oUlCdhsumiersl ad
:.: r


ted pon a ne spaperad.
ggest hopping day of eyear an
1o0e 'tly where t ielvl go first:
*pape:ii wcordingl ong^ wi^T y
Thos-efe tive Uwi
oh 0 st effe ctive.:wAi
a lS '. F'
.as L .^y





C .6 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257

DATSUN
1979, 280 ZX Antique
2 Door Coupe
$4,400
(352) 257-3261







IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





DODGE
'00, Ram 1500, auto,
AC, reese hitch new
trans, V6, 130K miles
dependable
$3,500, 352-563-0615

Noice toreitr"


DODGE
2008, 2500,
Heavy Duty, Diesel,
$26,500
(352) 438-8026

FORD
'99 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





CHEVROLET
04 Suburban LT, 2 whl
drv., loaded, Pristine
cond. 214K mi. $3500
352-615-7566

CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999
352-341-0018

FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018

HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600

Noices o Cediosl


TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735




Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
low miles,garage kept,
Adult Owner, $6K
(352) 257-8850
HONDA
07 VTX 1300
motortrikeconvers.
undr-14k mi. new front
brakes, seals, springs
$16k obo 503-6177
SUZUKI 07 BLVD
1500cc Beautiful Bike
over $2500 in chrome,
lights etc. 29k mi Adult
owned, Runs Ex $4750
Brian 352 613 7930


528-1119 TUCRN
Bugman, Michael 2013-CP-628 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION,
FILE NO. 2013-CP-628
IN RE: ESTATE OF MICHAEL BUGMAN,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administra-
tion of this estate is pending, and the File Number are indicated above. The address
of the court is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are indicated below.
If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim or de-
mand against the decedent's estate, even if that claim is unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated, you must file your claim with the court on or before the later of a date
that is three months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or 30 days after
you receive a copy of this Notice.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their claims with the court within three months after the date
of the first publication of this Notice.
All claims not so filed will be forever barred.
Even if a claim is not barred by the limitations described above, all claims which
have not been filed will be barred two years after decedent's death.
The date of death of the decedent is September 8, 2013.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 12, 2013
/s/ MARY KAY BUGMAN
9435 E. Moccasin Slough Road, Inverness, FL 34451
/s/Adam A. Czaya, Esq., FL Bar No. 90989, Attorney for Personal Representative,
Law Office of Keith R. Taylor, PA
P.O. Box 2016, Lecanto, FL 34460, (352) 795-0404, adam@keithtaylorlaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle November 12 & 19, 2013.

529-1119 TUCRN
Bobrowski, Dolores 2013-CP-525 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No.: 2013-CP-525
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOLORES JEAN BOBROWSKI,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dolores Jean Bobrowski, deceased, whose
date of death was March 10, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 12,2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Thomas Bobrowski
184 West Joliet Road, Valparaiso, IN 46385
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Dawn Ellis My Florida Probate, PA.Florida Bar No. 091979
P.O. Box 952, Floral City, Florida 34436-0952
Telephone: (352) 726-5444 E-mail: dawn@myfloridaprobate.com
Published two times in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 12 & 19,2013.

530-1119 TUCRN
Mcdonough Beale, Margaret Joyce 2013-CP-518 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.:2013-CP-518
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGARET JOYCE
MCDONOUGH BEALE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARGARET JOYCE MCDONOUGH BEALE, de-
ceased, whose date of death was June 12,2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for
CITRUS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopak Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COpy OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 12, 2013
Personal Representative
/S/LYNELL M. MARSHALL
5435 S. Celeste Pt., Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for the estate:
/S/ ROBERTS. CHRISTENSEN, ESQ., Fla. Bar No. 0075272
P.O.Box 415, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447, 352-382-7934
352-382-7936 Fax christensenlaw@earthlink.net
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 12 & 19,2013.

531-1119 TUCRN
Groves, Nancy 2013-CP-374 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-000374

IN RE: ESTATE OF NANCY L. GROVES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of NANCY L. GROVES, whose date of death was
March 5, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion; the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF TIDS NOTICEOR30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must tile their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DE-
CEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 12, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/S/ NANCY McALLISTER
10332 SW 116th Street, Miami, Florida 33176
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/S/ GANON J. STUDENBERG, FBN 0013991, Ganon J. Studenberg P.A.
1119 Palmeto Avenue, Melbourne, Florida 32901, E-Mail: Info@StudenbergLaw.com
Published two times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 12 & 19, 2013.


532-1119 TUCRN
Cross, Judith T. 2013-CP-547 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION, File No. 2013-CP-547
IN RE: ESTATE OF JUDITH T. CROSS A/K/A
JUDITH 0. CROSS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of Judith T Cross a/k/a Judith 0 Cross, Deceased
(the Estate), is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flodda, Probate Division,
the address of which is 1 10 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of Judith T Cross a/k/a Judith 0 Cross (the Decedent), whose date of
death was February 13, 2013, and other persons having claims or demands against
the Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF


Noice to Ceit


N c t C


THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED..
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 12, 2013.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ ELIZABETH A. ALLARD
4727 East Bell Road #45-125, Phoenix, Arizona 85032
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
/s/Thomas E. Slaymaker, Florida Bar Number: 398535, Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.
2218 Highway 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453 Telephone: (352) 726-6129,
Fax: (352) 726-0223,emailservicetom@slaymakerlaw.com, legalasstl@slaymakerlaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 12 & 19, 2013.

533-1119 TUCRN
Keller, Sue G. 2013-CP-617 NTC-SA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-617
IN RE: ESTATE OF SUE G. KELLER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the Estate of SUE G. KELLER, deceased, File No. 2013-CP-617, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was August
31,2012; that the total value of the estate is $21,028.00 and that the names and ad-
dresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
LINDA SUE BURISH 2450 Turkey Ridge Road,
New Kensington, PA 15068
WALTER STEPHEN KELLER 1403 Homestead Road,
Verona, PA 15147
SARAH JANE BITSURA 2498 Turkey Ridge Road,
Apollo, PA 15613
GRETCHEN ANNE TROIANO, Individually and as Testamentary
1401 Homestead Road,
Verona, PA 15147 ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 12, 2013.
Person Giving Notice:
GRETCHEN ANNE TROIANO,
1401 Homestead Road, Verona, PA 15147
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
DONALD F. PERRIN, P.A.
By:/s/Donald F. Perrin, FL Bar No. 164338, Post Office Box 250,
Inverness, FL 34451, (352) 726- 6767, (352) 726-2586 Fax, dfplawatampabay.rr.com
November 12 & 19, 2013.


534-1119 TUCRN
Collier, David 2013-CP-500 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 2013-CP-500
Probate Division
In Re: Estate of DAVID COLLIER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DAVID COLLIER deceased, Case Number
2013-CP-500, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below.

All interested persons are required to file with this court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the clerk who shall serve a copy on the per-
sonal representative. All claims not so filed will be forever barred.
Publication of this Notice has begun on November 12, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Eileen Hustin Fox
7741 E. Allen Drive, Inverness, FL 34450
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ J. Patrick McElroy Florida Bar No.: 052712
PO Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34441, (352) 637-2303, ipmcelrov61@,hotmail.com
Published twice in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE November 12 & 19, 2013.


537-1126 TUCRN
Estate of Billy Frank Rosentratter 2013-CP-435 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2013-CP-435
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BILLY FRANK ROSENTRATTER a/k/a BILLY FRANK FORBES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BILLY FRANK ROSENTRATTER a/k/a BILLY FRANK
FORBES, deceased, whose date of death was June 21,2013, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 5520 West
Pine Circle, Crystal River, FL 34429. The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedenf s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER HIE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first pubhcation of this Notice is November 19, 2013
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ GLENNELL MUNNE
5760 S. Dede Terrace, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Marie T. Blume, Attorney for Glennell Munne, Florida Bar Number: 0493181,
blumelaw&earthlink.net, P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, Florida 34451
Phone: (352) 726-7778 Fax (352)726-7798
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 19 & 26, 2013.


541-1126 TUCRN
White, Sr., Jerry Keith 2013-CP-0691 NTC (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2013-CP-0691
IN RE: ESTATE OF JERRY KEITH WHITE, SR.,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)

TO: ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of JERRY KEITH WHITE, SR., deceased, File Number 2013-CP-0691 by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was Octo-
ber 15, 2013; that the total value of the estates lessthan $75,000.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Name Address
KRISTI LYNN LOCKWOOD 1900 Empire Blvd., #149, Webster, NY 14580-1934
JERRY KEITH WHITE, JR. P.O. Box 702, Vails Gate, NY 12584

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of SummaryAdministration must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT-
WITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFt ER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 19, 2013.
Persons Giving Notice:
KRISTI LYNN LOCKWOOD
1900 Empire Blvd., #149, Webster, NY 14580-1934
JERRY KEITH WHITE, JR.
P. 0. Box 702, Vails Gate, NY 12584
RHIANNA LYNN LOCKWOOD
4737 Redman Rd., Apt. N Brockport, NY 14420
Attorney for Person Giving Notice
SUSAN COHILL FOGAR1Y, ESQ., Florida Bar No. 0667706
408 Lake St./P. O.Box 715, Inverness, FL 34451-0715
E-mail Address: susancfogarty@gmail.com
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 19 & 26, 2013.


542-1126 TUCRN
Strass, Ashley 2013-CP-000631 NTC-SA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. : 2013-CP-000631
IN RE: ASHLEY MIREMBE STRASS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of ASHLEY MIREMBE STRASS, deceased, whose
date of death was May 7,2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division; File No.: 2013-CP-000631;the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or liquidated claims,
and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.


NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS NOVEMBER 19 2013
Petitioner
Tracey Strass
5 Mastic Court West, Homosassa, FL 34446
Attorney for Petitioner
/s/ D. Michael Lins, Esquire, Florida Bar No. 435899
LINS LAW GROUP, P.A., 14497 N. Dale Mabry Hwy., Suite 160-N Tampa, FL 33618
Ph. (813) 386-5768, Fax (813) 968-9426
Primary E-mail: mike@linslawgroup.com Secondary E-Mail: lisa@linslawgroup.com
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 19 & 26, 2013.


511-1203 TUCRN
NOTICE OF INTENT
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING
NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

Citrus County, Roda (the "County") hereby provides notice, pursuant to sectIon


197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting
non-ad valorem special assessments throughout the unincorporated and all incorpo-
rated areas of the County, for the cost of providing fire protection services and facili-
ties, stormwater services and facilities, and roadway maintenance, improvements
and associated services and facilities commencing for the Fiscal Year beginning on
October 1, 2014. The County will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to
use the uniform method of collecting such assessments authorized by section
197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hearing to be held at 2:00 p.m. on December
10, 2013 in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.
Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of
the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form
of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property subject to the
levy, are on file at the Office of the County Administrator in the Citrus County Court-
house located at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. All interested persons
are invited to attend.
In the event cny person decides to appeal any decision by the County with re-
spect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the
above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and
in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on
which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in
this proceeding should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 (352) 341-6560, TTY (352)
341-6580 at least two days before the meeting.
DATED this 22nd day of October, 2013.
By Order of: CHAIRMAN,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 12, 19, 26 & December 3, 2013.


540-1210 WCRN
BOCC NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM AD VALOREM METHOD OF COLLECTING
NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

Citrus County, Rorida (the "County") hereby provides notice, pursuant to section
197.3632 (3) (a), Florida Statues, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting
non-ad valorem special assessments to be levied within the Citrus Springs subdivision
and surrounding areas included within the Citrus Springs Water System's service terri-
tory located within the unincorporated area of the County to fund the cost of pro-
viding water line extensions commencing with the Fiscal Year beginning on October
1,2014. The County will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uni-
form method of collecting such assessments authorized by section 197.3632, Florida
Statues, at a public hearing to be held at 2:15 p.m. on December 17, 2013 in the Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. Such resolution
will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of the boundary
of the real property subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form of resolution,
which contains the legal descript on the real property subject to the levy, are on file
at the Office of the County Administrator in the Citrus County Courthouse located at
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. All interested persons are invited to at-
tend.

In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the County with re-
spect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the
above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and
in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on
which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in
this proceeding should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, TrY
(352) 341-6580 at least two days before the meeting.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 19,26, December 3, & 10,2013.


937-1205 TU/THCRN
Florida Department of Transportation District Seven
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

The Florida Department of Transportation, District Seven, invites you to participate in
the Five-Year Tentative Work Program Public Hearing for Fiscal Years July 1, 2014
through June 30, 2019. The Tentative Work Program covers the next five years of pre-
liminary engineering, right-of-way acquisition, construction, and public transportation
projects for Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas counties and includes
Florida's Turnpike Enterprise projects in these counties. This hearing is being con-
ducted pursuant to Chapter 120 and 339.135(4)(d), Florida Statutes.

The hearing will be held: Monday, December 16, 2013, 1:30 pm 3:30 pm

The hearing is being conducted as a webinar (GoToMeeting) which is a live presen-
tation delivered over the internet. Registration is required prior to joining the webinar.
Please visit the website below to register:
https://www2.aotomeetina.com/reaister/547245394

If you do not have access to a computer or the internet, remote viewing locations
are provided at each of the following locations:

Florida Dept. of Transportation, 11201 N. McKinley Dr, Tampa, FL 33612
Citrus County: Inverness Gov't Building, 212 W. Main Street, Inverness, FL 34450
Hernando County: MPO Offices, 20 N. Main St, Brooksville, FL 34601
Hillsborough County: MPO Offices, 601 E. Kennedy Blvd., 18th Floor, Tampa, FL 33601
Pasco County: West Pasco Gov't Center, 8731 Citizens Dr, New Port Richey, FL 34654
Pinellas County: MPO Offices, 310 Court Street, Clearwater, FL 33755

The department will receive verbal and written comments from organizations and
the general public at each location. Written comments not received at the public
hearing must be postmarked by December 26, 2013 to become part of the official
public hearing record. Written comments may be mailed to: Debbie Hunt, Director
of Transportation Development, Florida Department of Transportation, 11201 N. Mc-
Kinley Drive, MS 7-100, Tampa, Florida 33612-6456

Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age,
sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations
under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services
(free of charge) should contact Lori Marable, Public Involvement Coordinator, at
(813) 975-6405 or (800) 226-7220 at least seven days prior to the hearing.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 19 & December 5,2013.


537-1119 TUCRN
11/25 Special Shade Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
A special shade meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., will be held on Monday, November 25, 2013 at 5:30 P.M., in the
Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. The following item will be
on the agenda for this meeting:
1) Risk Management Discussion (pursuant to Fla. Stat. 395.0197(14).
This agenda item will not be open to the public.
November 19, 2013.


536-1210 THCRN
BOCC/COCR WASTEWATER NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM AD VALOREM METHOD OF COLLECTING
NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Area 114, as
more fully described in Resolution Number 2011-225, that the Board of County Com-
missioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the governing body of the 2011 Citrus
County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal Service Benefit Unit For Waste-
water Utility Services Area 114 is considering the adoption of a non-ad valorem as-
sessment for the provision of wastewater services and facilities commencing in fiscal
year 2014/2015 within said area and intends to use the uniform method for the levy,
collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as set forth in Section
197.3632, Florida Statutes.

The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida sitting as the gov-
erning body of the 2011 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Municipal
Service Benefit Unit For Wastewater Utility Services Area 114 will conduct a public
hearing on Tuesday, December 17, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in the Board of County Com-
missioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida to consider the adoption of a resolution authorizing their use of the
uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem assess-
ments. Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal de-
scription of the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. Copies of the pro-
posed form of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property
subject to the levy, are on file at the Office of the County Administrator in the Citrus
County Courthouse located at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. If this
method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a tax certifi-
cate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.

Interested persons may appear at the hearing to be heard regacdng the use of
the uniform method for the levy, collection and enforcement of non-ad valorem as-
sessments. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the County Com-
mission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, they will need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be made.

Any person requidng reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please use the TrY
Telephone (352) 341-6580.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle November 19, 26, December 3 & 10, 2013.


538-1119 TUCRN
11/25 Regular Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE

The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., will be held on Monday, November 25, 2013, at 5:45 P.M., in the
Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health System Ad-
ministration Building, 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida. There will also be meet-
ings of the Executive and Finance Committees held in the Board Room, beginning
at 3:30 p.m. to address general, financial and administrative matters to be presen-
ted to the Board.

Copies of the Agendas are available in the Administration office. Any person wish-
ing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter consid-
ered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is to be based.
November 19, 2013.


539-1119 TUCRN
11/25 ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in a Shade meeting for the
purpose of commencing an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION pursuant to Section
286.011(8), Florida Statutes, on Monday, November 25, 2013, at 6:45 PM, in the Board
Room, Administration Annex Building, Citrus Memorial Hospital, 502 W. Highland
Boulevard, Inverness, Florida. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION will be to
discuss global settlement issues of all pending litigation between Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation, Inc, and the Citrus County Hospital Board, a political body of the
State of Florida. Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and
subsequently commence the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION which is estimated to be
approximately one (1) hour in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT
SESSION, the meeting shall be reopened to the public.

Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows:
Joseph Brannen, Sandra Chadwick, Robert Collins, Joan Dias, Carlton Fairbanks,
DMD, David Langer, V. Reddy, M.D., Constantine Toumbis, M.D., Ryan Beaty, Chief
Executive Officer, Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., Richard Oliver, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Founda-
tion, Inc., and Court Reporter.
November 19, 2013.


N.ie o rdtr


Misc


Misc. Ntice


I Misc. Nti


Metn


Meeting

I Ntics


Metn


Misc. Ntice


M isc. N tice


I Misc. No