Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Welcome to the ACC: FSU rips Syracuse 59-3 B


I -SUNDAJ II


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
81
LOW
65


C ITRU S C O NTY





NICwww.chronicleonline.com
^& www.chronicleonline.com


NOVEMBER 17, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 102


NASA primed for Mars mission
NASA primed for Mars mission


Launch setfor 1:28p.m.


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL NASA


Monday


hopes its newest Mars space-
craft lives up to its know-it-all
name.


The robotic explorer called
Maven is due to blast off Mon-
day on a 10-month journey to
the red planet.
There, it will orbit Mars and
study the atmosphere to try to


understand how the planet
morphed from warm and wet to
cold and dry
'A maven is a trusted expert,"
noted NASAs space science
chief, John Grunsfeld. Maven


will help scientists "build a
story of the Mars atmosphere
and help future human explor-
ers who journey to Mars."
The $671 million mission is
See PageA2


HERE THERE BE DRAGONS


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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Dragon boat teams race past hundreds of spectators and participants Saturday during the first-ever Hernando Lake Dragon Boat festival.


Dragon boat teams raid

Lake Hernandoforfestival
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO
addles up. Take it away
Suddenly, the 43-foot-long boat jerked forward
as20 paddlers synchronized their strokes.
Pushing with their legs, they leaned forward
with their bodies and dug their paddles deep into the
water with their arms. Working the core of their bodies,
water splashed their teammates behind them. However,
no one seemed to mind as their adrenaline raced and
their focus was on the finish line.
Saturday, 30 dragon boat teams invaded Lake Her-
nando for the inaugural Lake Hernando Dragon Boat


Page A8


Commission chairman edging away from disaster


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
MEADOWCREST Looking
back on his year as chairman,


County Commissioner Joe Meek
called it "a perfect storm."
The past year included a multi-
tude of issues and obstacles for the
Citrus County Board of County Com-


MORE INSIDE
Chairman Joe Meek writes a
column about his year./Cl
missioners (BOCC), Meek said
Wednesday when speaking to the
Chronicle's editorial board. His


year started with a $6.5 million
county budget deficit from the re-
duction in real estate values, de-
pendence on reserves and a need to
fund public safety Then things
worsened with Duke Energy's tax
See .Page A9


State & Local: In Their Words: Bonus space:


A kickball tournament raises funds for
the CREST School playground./A3


Gary Hille remembers the Tet Offensive
during the Vietnam War./A19


Families find more inventive uses for their
homes' extra little rooms./HomeFront


Business:
Brick-and-mortar retailers experiment
with mobile shopping apps./D1


6 14118 00711 o


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .......A16
Excursions .......A15


Editorial ......
Entertainment .
Horoscope .....


.C2
.A4
.A4


Lottery Numbers .. B3


Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... A16
Obituaries ........ A6


TV Listings ....
Together ......
Veterans ......


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PAGE A4


Several
members
from one
local
team get
into the
spirit of
things
with
facial hair
as they
pull into
the dock
after
paddling.
The event
drew
30 teams
from
across
the
state.


Meek faced series of bad breaks


Joe Meek
Citrus County
commission
chairman.


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S.A22
S.A19


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A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 STATE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Technicians work on NASA's next Mars-bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN),
Sept. 27 at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral. The robotic explorer is scheduled to blast off Monday,
Nov. 18, on a 10-month journey to the red planet to study the atmosphere in an attempt to understand how Mars
changed from warm and wet to cold and dry.


MARS
Continued from PageAl

NASAs 21st crack at
Earth's most enticing
neighbor, coming on the
heels of the Curiosity
rover, still rolling strong a
year after its grand Mar-
tian arrival.
When Maven reaches
Mars next September, it
will join three functioning
spacecraft, two U.S. and
one European. An Indian
orbiter also will be arriv-
ing about the same time.
Maven will be the 10th or-
biter to be launched to
Mars by NASA; three have
failed, testimony to the dif-
ficulty of the task.
"No other planet, other
than perhaps Earth, has
held the attention of peo-
ple around the world than
Mars," Grunsfeld said.
Early Mars had an at-
mosphere thick enough to
hold water and moist
clouds, said chief investi-
gator Bruce Jakosky of the
University of Colorado's
Laboratory for Atmos-
pheric and Space Physics
in Boulder Indeed, water


flowed once upon a time
on Mars, and microbial life
might have existed.
"But somehow that at-
mosphere changed over
time to the cold, dry envi-
ronment that we see
today," Jakosky said.
"What we don't know is
what the driver of that
change has been."
Maven short for Mars
Atmosphere and Volatile
Evolution, with a capital N
in EvolutioN is the first
spacecraft devoted en-
tirely to studying Mars'
upper atmosphere. India's
orbiter will also study the
atmosphere but go a step
further, seeking out
methane, a possible indi-
cator of life.
Scientists theorize that
some of the early atmos-
pheric water and carbon
dioxide went down into
the crust of the Martian
surface there is evi-
dence of carbonate miner-
als on Mars. Gases also
may have gone up and be-
come lost to space,
stripped away by the sun,
molecule by molecule,
Jakosky said.
Maven holds eight scien-
tific instruments to meas-


ure the upper atmosphere
for an entire Earth year -
half a Martian year The
boxy, solar-winged craft-
as long as a school bus and
as hefty as a 5,400-pound
SUV will dip as low as
78 miles above the surface
for atmospheric sampling,
and its orbit will stretch as
high as 3,864 miles.
Understanding the
makeup and dynamics of
Mars' present atmosphere
will help guide humans
more safely to the planet's
surface, especially if the
ship takes advantage of the
atmosphere for braking,
Jakosky said. NASA tar-
gets the 2030s for the first
manned expedition.
The spacecraft also
holds an antenna and
radio to serve as a commu-
nications relay for NASAs
two active Martian rovers,
Curiosity and Opportunity,
as well as the next pair of
landers to be launched in
2016 and 2020.
Maven is considered so
important that launch
preparations were al-
lowed to resume a couple
of days after the start of
the 16-day government
shutdown. Maven has one


month to launch; Earth
and Mars line up just so,
just every 26 months. So if
Maven isn't flying by mid
to late December, the
spacecraft will be
grounded until the begin-
ning of 2016.
The red planet is a noto-
riously tricky target. The
world's overall success
rate since the 1960s for a
Mars mission is less than
50 percent.
NASA has attempted the
most, 20 launches so far,
and has the best success
rate: 70 percent Russia, in
second place with 18 Mars
launches, has a dismal 14
percent success rate.
China collaborated on one
of the Russian flops. Eu-
rope and Japan have at-
tempted one Martian
mission apiece; the Euro-
pean Mars Express has
had mixed results, while
the Japanese effort fizzled.
"We're never a success
until we're at Mars and
we're taking data and get-
ting the science that these
folks envisioned back in
2003," when the idea
arose, observed NASA
project manager David
Mitchell.


F~I


Nie1


ii'
413i


1 .


1 12


Two days before the scheduled launch, an Atlas V rocket
and NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution
(MAVEN) spacecraft roll out of a hangar Saturday to the
launch pad in Cape Canaveral.


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GASTROENTEROLOGY
&WOCOAlMdS

PHONE: 352-563-2450
WEBSITE: www.gastropatients.com


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Gastroenterology associates
was formed in 1985 with the
primary mission of providing
excellent gastroenterology
services to the citizens of Citrus
County. We have grown to be a
seven member physician group
providing comprehensive
gastroenterology services to our
residents.
All of us are board certified
gastroenterologists delivering
evidence based medical care
at conveniently located
adjoining medical offices and
endoscopy centers in Citrus
County: Citrus Endoscopy in
Crystal River and Suncoast
Endoscopy in Inverness. Our
centers are equipped with state
of the art video endoscopes
and we follow strict national
standards in cleaning them. We
are fortunate to have a
dedicated, and skilled nursing
staff to furnish compassionate
care to our patients.
We accept most medical
insurances including Medicare
and Medicaid. We give deep
discounts to the self pay to
make it affordable. Our goal is
to deliver superior quality of
medical care and efficient
services at affordable cost to
the residents of our community

PROCEDURES:


Colonoscopy
Aids in screening for colon
cancer and removal of early
and pre-cancerous lesions
Upper Endoscopy (EGD)
Allows evaluation for causes
of upper abdominal pain
and bleeding
Endoscopic Ultrasound
Imaging technique used to
visualize and biopsy abdominal
organs such as the pancreas
and lymph nodes,
Endoscopic Retrograde
Cholangiopancreatography
(ERCP)
Aids in evaluation and
treatment of bile duct
disease
Esophageal Manometry
For diagnosis and treatment
of motility disorders of
esophagus


OFFICE LOCATIONS:
Crystal River Office
6410 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL 34429

Inverness Office
3653 E. Forest Dr.
Inverness, FL 34453

Citrus Surgery & Endoscopy
Center
6412 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-0223

Suncoast Endoscopy Center
3621 E. Forest Dr.
Inverness, FL 34453

SATELLITE OFFICES:
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
20021 SW 111th Place
Dunnellon, FL 34432
11707 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon, FL 34432
10489 N. Florida Ave.
Citrus Springs, FL 34434


pH probe and 48-hour
Wireless pH Study (Bravo)
Allows for evaluation and
diagnosis of GERD/reflux
Capsule Endoscopy
Allows visualization of small
bowel
Colonic Stent / Esophageal
Stent
Prevents obstruction in
cases of advanced cancer
Esophageal Dilatation
(Pneumatic and Savory)
Allows improvement in
swallowing
Solesta Injection
Used to treat Fecal
Incontinence
Hemorrhoidal Banding
For treatment of difficult
hemorrhoids causing
bleeding or pain


-- --- -- I --- I I


)OGN9TI


0=






Page A3-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2013



TATE2& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County

EMS announces
next academy
The academy is a hands-
on opportunity for commu-
nity members to see and
learn what paramedics and
EMTs do every day.
Graduates learn skills
they can use in emergen-
cies because the academy
is focused on hands-on
training, showing and
teaching the skills that an
EMS crew may use. Partici-
pants will get to practice
starting IVs, intubations
(placing a breathing tube),
defibrillations, reading heart
rhythms and doing a full
"code" on the SIMMAN
mannequin. In the final ses-
sion, participants will take
care of a simulated patient
in a mock patient care sce-
nario and have the opportu-
nity to ride along with
paramedics and EMTs and
go on actual emergencies.
The academy is free and
meets every Tuesday for
eight weeks from 6 to
9 p.m. For more information
call 352-249-4700 or, on-
line, at www.naturecoast
ems.org. Just click on
"community."
CF Citrus seeking
adjunct instructors
The College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus will
host a meet-and-greet for
potential adjunct instructors
from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 21, in Building C1 at
its Lecanto campus, 3800
S. Lecanto Highway.
The college is recruiting
part-time instructors to
teach English, speech, sci-
ence, math and digital
media.
A master's degree and at
least 18 graduate-level col-
lege credit hours in the sub-
ject area are required to
become an adjunct. Candi-
dates who hold a master's
or doctoral degree in these
subjects are encouraged to
bring unofficial college tran-
scripts to the event for
screening.
College officials will be
on hand to meet candidates
and review transcripts.
To learn more about CF,
visit www.CF.edu.
Health Department
hosting meetings
The Florida Department of
Health in Citrus County is
hosting community meetings
to get the opinions on how to
implement new programs
designed to increase the
quality of health care among
Citrus County residents.
The Health Department
oversees several different
public health areas such as
environmental services,
community health, and
chronic disease and would
like suggestions on how
these services might be
improved.
This event is open to the
public. Meeting dates are:
Monday, Nov. 18, from
5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Ho-
mosassa Library.
Tuesday, Nov. 19, from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the
Floral City Library.

West Palm
Beach

South Fla. standoff
ends peacefully
A standoff with a con-
victed felon has ended
peacefully after authorities
say a South Florida man
fired at bail bonds agents
as they tried to arrest him.
Palm Beach County
sheriffs officials say bail
bonds agents arrived at
Kenneth Burroughs' home
Friday night and were shot


at by Burroughs. The sus-
pect eventually came out of
his home and was charged
with aggravated assault
with a firearm, felon in pos-
session of a firearm, shoot-
ing within a dwelling, and
child neglect.
-From staff and wire reports


Man who fell from plane likely found


Presumed body of42-year-old Gerardo Nales discovered in mangroves


KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE Au-
thorities said Saturday that
they've likely found the body of a
Florida man who they say fell out
of a private plane, three days into
a land and sea search that in-
cluded parts of the Atlantic Ocean
near Miami.
"Even though we presume that
the body found is that of Gerardo
Nales, investigators are pending
'official identification' from the
Medical Examiner's Office," De-


tective Alvaro Zabaleta said in a
statement.
The presumed body of 42-year-
old Nales was found in an area of
mangroves around 10:30 a.m., Za-
baleta said. A day earlier, police air
and water units were scouring the
sea and had expanded their search
area because of currents and wind.
The pilot's identity has not been
released, nor has the intended
destination of the plane. Authori-
ties said there were only two peo-
ple on board.
The pilot of the Piper PA 46
called for help Thursday after-


noon, radioing "mayday, mayday,
mayday" and telling an air traffic
controller that a door was open
and a passenger had fallen from
the plane. The aircraft had just
taken off from Tamiami Executive
Airport, located south of Miami,
police said.
Federal Aviation Administra-
tion officials said the plane was
flying at about 2,000 feet, some
eight miles southeast of the
Tamiami airport.
Police said investigators have
no evidence of foul play
According to a report on the


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
YMCA of the Suncoast's executive director Joanna Castle catches a ball as Angel Carey from Nature Coast
EMS is forced out at second base early Saturday morning during a kickball tournament to raise money for
the CREST School Inclusive Playground Project.



Kicking for a goal


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

LECANTO Not handicap ac-
cessible. No shade. Ancient play-
ground.
Each of these words describes
the current recreational area that
approximately 175 Citrus Re-
sources for Exceptional Students
in Transition (CREST) students
have to play on.
CREST's Inclusive Playground
Project committee felt their men-
tally and physically challenged
students deserved a recreational
area that offered an area for fun-
centered therapy, while being
handicap accessible.
'All of our students at our
school have a disability so every-
thing is going to be handicap ac-
cessible for sensory issues that
some of our students have and a


lot of shade for those who can't be
in the sun because they are med-
ically fragile," said committee
member Kelly Daugherty
Therefore, the Playground
Project committee is hosting di-
verse fundraisers to raise funds
to offer their students a piece of
"normal life," Daugherty said.
On Saturday, 12 community
teams took Lecanto High School
baseball fields for their second
kickball tournament fundraiser
"It's an opportunity for the
players to have a great time
and a wonderful way to get the
community involved in raising
money for our playground so that
all of our students can have
equipment that they can access,"
said CREST assistant principal
Anita Moon.
Daugherty said the school re-
cently received a $25,000 grant


from Play World for a piece of
equipment. However, installation
of this equipment is costly
"So our next big thing is raising
the money to have it installed,"
she said. "We have the equipment
but all the fundraisers now are
for installation."
The much-needed new play-
ground will enable nearly half the
school to play at once.
"This means everything to our
students," Daughtery said. "It
gives them a little bit of normal
life. Some of them can't go into
the public playgrounds
because they are not handicap
accessible. But it lets them be a
kid and play"
An estimated $3,000 was raised
from the kickball tournament.
"The real winners are the stu-
dents," principal Lee Mulder said
in an email.


First-time homebuyer class this month


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Housing Services
will offer a first-time homebuyer
class to interested individuals. Par-
ticipants who attend the entire ses-
sion will receive a Certificate of
Completion that is required for the
SHIP and Neighborhood Stabiliza-
tion programs and other first-time
homebuyer assistance programs.
The class encompasses the entire
home-buying process including


preparing your credit and finances,
shopping for a home, home inspec-
tion, fair housing, available loan
products, loan pre-approval and
closing.
The class will be from 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov 23, at the
Citrus County Resource Center,
2804 W Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Call Jennifer Pollard at
352-527-7522 or Pat Wilkerson at
352-527-7526 or you may email
Jennifer.Pollard@bocc.citrus.fl.us


to register This event is sponsor
by TD Bank and Citrus Coun
Housing Services.
There is no charge to attend the
sessions, but you must reser
your seat. Lunch will be provide
by TD Bank. Child care is n
available.
Any persons who require a speci
accommodation (ADA) for accessib
ity must advise in advance and allc
at least 72 hours to provide that a
commodation. TTY 352-527-5901.


Yebsite Live ATC.Net, the pilot
almly radioed the air traffic con-
roller LiveATC.Net provides live
ir traffic-control broadcasts from
control towers and radar facilities
round the world.
"I have a door ajar and a pas-
enger that fell down. I'm six
niles from Tamiami," the pilot
aid.
"You said you've got a passen-
er that fell out of your plane?"
he air traffic controller responds.
"That's correct, sir," the pilot
aid. "He opened the back door
nd he just fell out the plane."



Hotel


wins


honor

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

A Citrus County hotel
has been acknowledged
for its service to guests
with a national corporate
award.
The Holiday Inn Ex-
press and Suites Inver-
ness/Lecanto was
recognized by InterConti-
nental Group (IHG) at a re-
cent ceremony in Las
Vegas.
The hotel and staff re-
ceived IHG's second high-
est honor, the Quality
Excellence Award.
"It's our first award ever
from IHG," said hotel man-
ager Karlene Feliciano,
who accepted the honor in
person. "We're extremely
excited."
She said they missed the
top award, which they
were aiming for, by 1.25
points. Feliciano ex-
plained getting Quality Ex-
cellence required very
high guest satisfaction
scores.
About year ago, the hotel
was ranked in the mid-
350s and is now in the top
10 percent, out of 1,800
Holiday Inns.
The annual winners
were honored at the cor-
porate conference, which
also involved classes and
learning.
There was an emphasis
on "brand journey," a cor-
porate effort to unify the
guests' experience. She
said this is to ensure
whether you stay at a Hol-
iday Inn Express in
Florida or in North
Dakota, you will get the
same service.
The four-day conference
was her first trip to Las
Vegas. She returned with a
medal symbolizing the
honor and the trophy ar-
rived a day later
And since it is a yearly
award, Feliciano and her
staff members are
focused on next year as
they head into busy winter
season.
In addition to the ongo-
ing cleaning and mainte-
nance, she noted they
have added an amenity
that guests should
appreciate.
Each room now has a
charging station for guests
carrying multiple elec-
tronic devices. The sta-
tions provide outlets,
USB ports and cellphone
holders.
"To stay competitive in
the business, you've got to
stay on top of the trends,"
said Feliciano, who views
"hospitality" as a very vi-
able local industry "Peo-
* ple are always going to
have to travel."
ed The 75-room Holiday
.ty Inn Express with 27 em-
ployees is part of in the
se Ocala-based Hotel Devel-
ve opment and Management
ed Group, which also oper-
ot ates the Quality Inn Con-
ference Center at Citrus
al Hills.
il- Contact Chronicle re-
w porter Pa t Faherty at 352-
ic- 564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.




A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Stake your claim and
pursue your dreams in the coming
months. Your destination is not as im-
portant as the journey.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Make
it your business to coordinate events
and set plans. Please the people you
love most by showing how much you
care.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Get your priorities straight and keep
your promises. Do whatever it takes to
avoid an encounter with someone in
an authoritative position.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Make plans with the older or
younger people in your life.
Activities that include the whole family
will improve relationships.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)-
Keep a smile on your face and a posi-
tive attitude. Don't worry about what
others do or say
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Find
a way to make changes to the way you
handle your cash, deal with your credi-
tors or handle the debt owed to you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Spice
things up and change them around.
Update your look or make a vow to
achieve your dreams.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Put
your attention on what matters the
most to you. A relationship will get a
pick-me-up if you are affectionate and
attentive. What you put out, you will get
in return.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't
rely on someone else to take care of
your chores. Disappointment will sur-
face and complaints will be made if
you shirk your duties.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Travel
to a place that promises to be enter-
taining. Enjoying time with friends and
relatives or meeting new people will
brighten your day and help you make
an important personal decision.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Take con-
trol of your life and change whatever is
necessary to build confidence and ob-
tain greater security
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Put
your mind at rest and your heart on the
line. Discuss your likes, dislikes and
plans for the future.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Keep
an open mind when offered sugges-
tions. Taking an overall view of a
situation and using a variety of ideas
will bring you closer to a workable
solution.


)OK


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


Hemingway film
explores illness
KEY WEST-Actress Mariel
Hemingway, cult filmmaker
John Waters and a steel-bend-
ing strongman are among stars
gathered at the Key West Film
Festival.
Hemingway screened "Run-
ning from Crazy," on Friday
night. The documentary explores
her family's history of mental ill-
ness and her efforts to escape it,
on the island where her late
grandfather Ernest Hemingway
lived during the 1930s.
She also hosted a reception at
the Ernest Hemingway Home &
Museum, where her grandfather
penned classics including "To
Have and Have Not."
Other standouts among about
35 films in the festival include "I
Am Divine," spotlighting a trans-
vestite performer and featuring
Waters; "Cubamerican," portray-
ing the Cuban exile experience,
and "Bending Steel," detailing
strongman Chris Schoeck's
physical strength and emotional
struggles.
The festival continues through
today.
MSNBC suspends
Alec Baldwin's show
LOS ANGELES Alec
Baldwin's new weekly MSNBC
talk show was
suspended for
two episodes
after the actor
was video-
taped using an
anti-gay epi-
thet against a
photographer Alec
during a New Baldwin
York street encounter.
The cable channel didn't
specify the reason it yanked Fri-
day night's "Up Late with Alec
Baldwin" from its schedule this


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
) PR HI LO PR. HI L
17 / 173 63 0.70 . j71 6


Associated Press
Actress Mariel Hemingway poses in the writing studio that
once belonged to her grandfather, Ernest Hemingway, at the
Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum in Key West. Hemingway
is among several film notables in Key West through Sunday
for the Key West Film Festival. She screened her own film,
"Running From Crazy," a documentary that explores her
family's history of mental illness and her efforts to escape it.


week and next, but the decision
came the day after the Thursday
run-in.
In a statement on MSNBC
website, Baldwin wrote that he
"did not intend to hurt or offend
anyone with my choice of words,
but clearly I have and for that
I am deeply sorry."
He said his actions came as
he tried to protect his family -
presumably from the photogra-
pher but were unacceptable
and undermine "hard-fought
rights that I vigorously support."
The video, which was posted
on TMZ, also drew a tweeted
apology from Baldwin in which
he claimed he was unaware the
term he used was offensive to
gays.
MSNBC declined further com-
ment. Baldwin's representative


said in an email Friday night
that the actor would decline to
comment.
Neighbors oppose
Hirsch's turbine
DENNING, N.Y. -Some res-
idents of a town in New York's
Catskill Mountains are trying to
stop actor Judd Hirsch from
building a 177-foot wind turbine
on his property.
Dozens of Hirsch's neighbors
in the town of Denning have
signed a petition opposing the
"Taxi" star's plan for a turbine on
his 96-acre property.
Richard Benktwitt lives in a
log house about a mile from
Hirsch. He tells The New York
Times that the turbine "would
ruin the beauty of the location."
-From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch
Fl, Lautderdale
Fort M.,"..
Gainesvile
! hl II N | ,-, I

c West
Lakeland
',. '[iiijln tii


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City
Miami
Ocala
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Pensacola
'" ,--Ir = ,! t
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Tampa
Vero Beach
W, "3jl 1,P, I-


MARINE OUTLC
5, ulrh, winds around 10 knots
Seas 2 feet. F i,, and inland waters will
have a light chop P.,iii, ro today.


HI LJ- PR HI LO PI
70 55 0 50 -- NA NA NA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK E

.. .- ..... TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING B
High: 81 Low: 65
.... -,, r,, .' i Toudy, isolated :'1
.hi .. I rain chance 20%
...... -"": .. MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 59
i 'f-,Irui sunny, 50%1 chance for PM showers

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 75 Low: 50
"'...' cloudy, isolated showers, rain chance
-_-Nor


TEMPERATURE*


" "ln'lIl' .73/61
Record 91/27
Normal 79152
Mean temp 67
I'" ,,r i. orn mean 2
PRECIPITATION*
+" Ji Ili i 0.80 in.
I .: -, h, i Il,.' M onh 169 in,
Total lor tIhe yea 53-83 in
Normal for Ihe year 48-63 in
"Ar i' rpni si w .
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 mrinicil, 3-4 low 5-6 moderlo,
7-9 migh 114 ve y iF i i h
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 :m 30.07 in


ALMANAC
DEW POINT


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
t ir[ll ,f t' ri'_. ,i] n-i r H Iii j ,
11/17 SUNDAY 434 1046 4-5 !111
11/18 MONDAY 5-24 11:37 5:49 -


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C~ SUNSET TONIGHT
(T w SUNRISE IOMORaOW
K 2 BMOONRISEt TODAY
IW 25 BL I BW-I MOONSETT TODAY


5:35 PM

5:5t PM
6SA M


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is, MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
Fc iTie intrmnias cal Frlia Diiin o Forestry a1352 754-,777 For mTore
I II II ''l I II II I j,' r titorin&, pleas^ vlsIt Ih^ 13w S ot l O!Fc ,iry's Web sale
I ,. II I I i I -l r 1 TII we irkbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn warring limnite to two (tiys pr wek. Mrer 10 a m or ate 4 n.as fralow
E'.'Efi' ,ti\'. in, water or i-i,,, ,.]r. ,i-.1-,, 'ir-,'i,
* ,. '..-.-;:.- i ., .'.1-il i ,-1-I ];'i'. lrl, -.1,'1, and/or Sa&lutni a
"1'ii ...,t', niiI .; ;r I II'f nozzle or MicrUmoN ,lt of nnjrass aeas scJL as
ve lable J4J .1- '' ,I" '1'*li .i'it... i' be done on a '11 day an a! any time
I I.l- C'"1il, I[.1 r, i. i i ,-r, ,,' 1 F -> FO E O U NSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. -- .-,,i.i' ,,, -! b( additional

T,- :.:,..-..-.- ease call; Cy ot rvefmwess 352-726-2321, Cyof
Crysa-iv er 352-795-4216ext. 313,uninoirporaed.Cii-., '. r,. 352-
527-7669


TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "Al i., Bay
Sunday
City High/Low HighLow
Chas'iafiu 4lz~d 27 a.'l 13 a 5 5S1pi I 1 i
C,-'Tliil RIiwr" 2 4ea;10 40'1 4 15|l,!0.jC-|i
Witlhr ar'tix 1235,8 28i a 02p.S'Spn
HormIGaSS;i'" 3 37 j;12'I7p 5 (U4p:-'-----


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Monday
High/Low High/Low
5,.IM Il'I 0B a 6.3! 1 |ll5.) |
32' ,11! 16 a 4 521 (l0p
i.0 a,04 3 2.39(:'8,53ti
4.10a,1.2.7a 5:4. p 2:53 p


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Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 17, the
321 st day of 2013. There are 44
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 17, 1800, Congress held
its first session in Washington in the
partially completed Capitol building.
On this date:
In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to
the English throne upon the death
of Queen Mary.
In 1869, the Suez Canal opened
in Egypt.
In 1962, Washington's Dulles In-
ternational Airport was dedicated by
President John F. Kennedy.
In 1973, President Richard Nixon
told Associated Press managing edi-
tors in Orlando: "People have got to
know whether or not their president
is a crook. Well, I'm not a crook."
Ten years ago: John Allen
Muhammad was convicted of two
counts of capital murder in the
Washington-area sniper shootings.
Five years ago: In their first
meeting since the election, Barack
Obama and former rival John Mc-
Cain met at the president-elect's
transition headquarters in Chicago,
where they pledged to work to-
gether on ways to change Wash-
ington's "bad habits."
One year ago: Workers using
jackhammers began opening the
concrete-encased grave of Pales-
tinian leader Yasser Arafat in the
West Bank so that investigators
could check for a radioactive sub-
stance, polonium-210, as part of a
probe into whether he had been
poisoned before his death in 2004.
Today's Birthdays: Sen. James
Inhofe, R-Okla., is 79. Rock musi-
cian Gerry McGee (The Ventures)
is 76. Singer Gordon Lightfoot is 75.
Singer-songwriter Bob Gaudio is
72. Movie director Martin
Scorsese is 71. Actress Lauren
Hutton is 70. Actor-director Danny
DeVito is 69.
Thought for Today: "Since oth-
ers have to tolerate my weak-
nesses, it is only fair that I should
tolerate theirs." -William Allen
White, American journalist
(1868-1944).



LEGAL NOTICES


Bid Notices................................ D12

Meeting Notices......................... D12

Lien Notices............................... D12


Gulf water Self Storage Notices...............,D12
temperature ...CITRUS_______


9 0 4- C I T R US S C O U N T Y


Thkon at Awipoks
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
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Tsala Apopka-Hernando 3855 3856 39.25
'T ,,.ApopIka-lnverness 39,74 5 40.60
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Washninylors D4 46 3^ srs 67 58
Y ESTERAlYS SNATIONAtL HIGH l. LOW
HIGH 1N6 V n Texai
LOW 10Btrlfti PassCcth
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY WLLSKY
Acupuko 87;80:s
Am1sterdam 44,38'slh
Artlens t.'49/to
8ei~tnf 41;37/s
ci!-n 48 4 1f
Bermuda 72'66.'s
Catro i25.'56'pc
Calgary 19d9,[|)
Hong Kong ,''63/pt
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Mexico Cil'
Monotreal
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Saturday at 3 pm 68
HUMIDITY
,.iLiji 1'. al 3 p-m 87%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 3.5/12
Monday's count: 3.8
Tuesday's count: 3.3
AIR QUALITY
"om "h i was good with pollutants
mainly o ,. .


LHRONICLL
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
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1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GOLD
ANY TYPE NEW OR OLD
10K14K*18K22K24K
WE BUY ALL SOLID GOLD ITEMS-
NEW, USED OR BROKEN
High School Rings up to..................$100.00
Old Mountings up to........................$150.00
Wedding Bands up to......................$200.00
Charms up to................................... $200.00
Old Watch Cases up to................... $800.00
Bracelets up to............................. $1,500.00
Necklaces up to............................ $1,500.00
Dental Gold....................... Bring in for Cash
Broken Chains...................Bring in for Cash




Bulgari, Cartier, Tiffany, David
Webb, Van Cleef & Arpels
We recognize and pay high
CASH prices by these designers.
CA$FO ANTIUE


All Diamond Engagement Rings All Diamond & Art Deco Jewelry





ALL DIAMOND & ART DECO JEWELRY ALL TYPES & SIZES


DIAMONDS
1/4 Carat Diamond up to................. $225.00
1/2 Carat Diamond up to...............$1,100.00
1 Carat Diamond up to...............$4,500.00
2 Carat Diamond up to............ $14,000.00
3 Carat Diamond up to............ $22,000.00
5 Carat Diamond up to.......... $950,000.00
We will pay you CASH for your
Diamonds with or without GIA
Certificates. If you have larger stones
than listed please bring them in for a
FREE evaluation. Remember
WE PAY MORE!
WE ALSO BUY BROKEN AND
CHIPPED DIAMONDS


We buy all types of platinum such as
mountings, Crucibles, Wire & Foil,
Screens, Thermo-coupling wire.
Bring these items in to be tested
so we can quote you an accurate
price on your items.


Silver Coins Gold Coins *Silver Coins




We Will Buy All U.S. Minted Coins


$1.00 Gold Coins (US)
$2.50 Gold Coins (US)
$3.00 Gold Coins (US)
$5.00 Gold Coins (US)
$10.00 Gold Coins (US)
$20.00 Gold Coins (US)


BRING IN FOR
BEST OFFERS!

ABSOLUTE
HIGHEST
PRICES PAID!


S3ILER3COEES
Silver Dollars (before 1936) High Prices
Half Dollars (before 1965) Paid!
Quarters (before 1965)
Dimes (before 1965) Best Offers!
Nickels (before 1938)
War Nickels (1942-1945) High Prices
Indian Head Pennies Paid!
These prices are for U.S. coins only!
We also buy Proof Sets, Commemoratives,
Mint Sets, 40% Silver Coins.


Also Buying Foreign Gold Coins. Prices are
subject to change due to fluctuations in precious
metals market.


LGENT' 1S] OLDIWATCHEi I&~'SJWOTHllAFO]Ti i UNEIN HIi


WE BUY PARTIAL OR ENTIRE INVENTORIES FOR CA$H



'* * :.* .!} : . . ": *** * V, ... : : ... ..
: .a t ^ '' ^ :.^ :._....': ...-
.. . .1 .. .
" " "v "..* y j. '3l = : = :, '. 7 ~'t ": :, *' '



We Buy any Sterling Silver Items -
NOSILVER PLATE PLEASEII :


CHECK TO SEE IF You HAVE ANY OF THESE
ITEMS WE ARE BUYING?


* Rare & Important Jewelrhy
* Diamond Bar Pins


Diamond Earrings
Hamilton Watches


Antique Bracelets R. Lalique Glass
Diamond Bow Pins Rolex Watches
Pocket Watches Diamonds from 1
Sapphire & Diamond Jewelry Antique Lockets
Patek Phillipe Watches Lladro
Ruby & Diamond Jewelry Victorian Jewelrhy
Emerald & Diamond Jewelry Cartier & Tiffany
Vacheron & Constantin Watches Gold or Silver Me
Jewelry from the 20's, 30's, & 40s* Art Deco Jewelry
Silver & Gold Boxes Railroad Watches


to 20 CTS.


Items
iesh Purses


Nicely Carved Old Cameos
R. Chaarus Statues


1. Blackthorn Estate Buyers specializes in
evaluating and buying New and Antique
jewelry. Our generations of experience
qualify us to evaluate everything from
small pieces to the finest and most valu-
able estate jewelry.
2. Blackthorn Estate Buyers has an undisput-
ed reputation. We work in compliance with
your Local and State Government.
3. Owners of rare pieces say that it is
extremely difficult to find buyers who have
the experience and knowledge to pay top
market prices most jewelry stores won't
even make you a credible offer.
4. This is an ideal opportunity to have your
valuables evaluated (especially if you
inherited them) by experts right here in this
area. Come in for a free evaluation and
cash offer NO APPOINTMENT NECES-
SARY.
5. If you are not wearing or enjoying the items
that you have, then this is a great chance
for you to convert them to CASH. This is
much better than just holding on to hard to
sell diamonds jewelry & coins.


Prices quoted are for actual watches pictured
All prices are based on condition of watch.


HOUSE AND/OR BANK CALLS AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT


Mon.
Nov. 18th
10OAM-6PM


Tues.
Nov. 19th
10OAM-6PM


Wed.
Nov. 20th
10OAM-6PM


Lots of Free Parking


SECURITY PROVIDED


e2004 BLCKTrHoRNEmETTE Brs'EP. INC. *REPRODUcISON OR USE OF TS ANNOUNCEmENT1NANY WAyTS PROTECTED UNDER FEDERAL COPYRIGHT LAWS AND ANT RE-CREAM7ON, IN WHOLE OR IN PARTBYANY MEA ELECTRONIC OR PHOTOGRAMPICBISSTRICTLYPROIRITEDAND WI E CR B M ALLYPROSECUTED 710 THE FULL RE OF RE LAW.


CONSIDER BRINGING EVERYTHING
We have surprised many people who thought their
items were not valuable enough to consider. The expert
evaluators we have gathered together offer you
a wealth of knowledge and experience. We are
accustomed to paying thousands of dollars for valuable
items. Don't miss this opportunity. Perhaps we'll help
you find a real treasure in those hidden away pieces.
There's never a charge for our consultation or service.


YOU MAY HAVE THOUSANDS OF
DOLLARS WORTH OF ITEMS
GATHERING DUST.
Almost everyone has something of value they no
longer need or want: Inherited items, jewelry that
doesn't fit your style, watches that are old or even
broken, silver pieces. Several items that might be
useless to YOU... may be considered treasures by
the collectors from our vast international network.


Plantation on Crystal River / o
9301 Fort Island Trail BlacktornT
Crystal River Estate u ers
(Corner of Hwy. 19, Across from Sweet Bay Plaza) Buyers
For Directions Only 352-795-4211 "Over 30years of experience with integrity"


FREE PARKING


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 AS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Gilbert
Brier, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Gilbert Brier, age 80,
Beverly Hills, died Nov 13,
2013, surrounded by his
family and
under the
care of
Hospice of
Citrus




Margart rBenstin
County at
the Hos-
p i c e
House in
Lecanto. Gilbert
Gilbert Brier
was born
Nov. 27, 1932, in Far Rock-
away, N.Y, to John and
Margaret (Bernstein)
Brier He was employed as
the manager for an art ma-
terial manufacturing com-
pany. Gilbert was a
member of the Elks Aerie,
Moose Lodge, Lions and
the Beverly Hills Surveil-
lance Group, as well as an
excellent square dancer
who danced at the chal-
lenge level.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 11 years,
Jeanne; his son Scott
(Susan) Brier, Newton,
Conn.; his daughter Stacey
(Thomas) Saccareca,
Calif; stepsons Joe (Lisa)
DiGorgio, Fairless Hills,
Pa., and Richard DiGorgio,
Morrisville, Pa.; step-
daughter Debra (James)
Wilson, Morrisville, Pa.;
grandchildren Ross, Clay,
Daniel, Nicole, Angela,
Richard, Marissa, Daniel,
A.J. and Michael; sisters-
in-law Cathy (Joseph)
Lisenmeier and Linda
(Thomas) Matuszewski;
and other extended family
and close friends, who will
all miss him dearly He
was preceded in death by
his first wife, Adrienne, in
1999.
The family wishes to
thank the Hospice House
staff for the loving kind-
ness and excellent care ex-
tended to Gilbert. Please
consider memorial dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or
provide a random act of
kindness to a stranger in
Gilbert's memory Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.



To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931


I I


Charles
Bilharz, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Charles Harry Bilharz,
92, of Crystal River, died
Friday, Nov 15,2013, at the
Hospice House of Citrus
County Private cremation
arrangements are under
the direction of Strickland
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory of Crystal River

Linda
Harrington, 71
YOUNGSVILLE, N.C.
Linda Sue Harrington,
71, of Youngsville, N.C.,
died Friday, Nov 8,2013, at
her daughter's house sur-
rounded by her loved ones.
She was born in Allegheny
County, Pa., to the
late Sheldon and Gladys
Corrie.
Linda is survived by her
sister, Sis Acierno and hus-
band Steve of Baden, Pa.;
a daughter, Leah Polom-
chak and husband Bill of
Youngsville, N.C.; a son,
Clayton Genter and wife
Nancy of Homosassa; four
grandchildren; and four
nieces and nephews.
An open house was held
in Youngsville on Satur-
day, Nov 9. A donation can
be made in her memory to
Hospice of Wake County
250 Hospice Circle,
Raleigh, NC 27607.
A service of Bright Fu-
neral Home & Cremation
Center, 405 S. Main St.,
Wake Forest, N.C. (919-556-
5811), wwwbrightfunerals.
com.


SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


Kimberly
Faenza, 41
GAI NESVI LLE
Kimberly Leahy Faenza,
41, of Gainesville, Fla.,
died Nov 14,2013, from in-
juries sustained in an au-
tomobile
accident. -
Kim was '
b o r n rf 1
March 26,
1972, in
P r o v i-
d e n c e ,
R.I., with
Muscular Kimberly
Dystrophy, Faenza
a weaken-
ing disease of the muscles,
but there was nothing
weak about her. After
many surgeries, and the
loss of her younger
brother, Tommy, she was
able to accomplish many
remarkable things in her
short life. She was a poster
child for the MDA telethon
and was selected as Youth
Volunteer of the Year, and
was invited to the White
House, to meet then-Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan. She
put herself through col-
lege, and came to the Uni-
versity of Florida to earn
her Masters Degree. After
graduation, she began her
career in communication
with Disney Cruise Line,
where she worked for
eight years. During this
time she met her future
husband, they married,
and eventually moved
back to Gainesville, where
she began her career with
Shands Hospital, and then
began working as the Mar-
keting and Communica-
tions Director for the
United Way of North Cen-
tral Florida.
She touched so many
lives, she was an inspira-
tion to people with disabil-
ities showing them they
can drive, date, work, be
parents, anything.
She is survived by her
husband, Claudio Faenza;
one son, Sullivan Thomas


RI.


"Sully" Faenza; and her
parents, Tom and Lois
Leahy, all of Gainesville;
father and mother-in-law,
Dennis and Doris Gaal;
brother-in-law Marco
Faenza; and sister-in-law
Daniella Faenza.
A funeral mass will be
celebrated at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 20,2013,
in the Queen of Peace
Catholic Church, 10900
S.W 24th Ave., with Father
Jeff McGowan, celebrant.
Interment will follow in
the church columbarium.
The family will receive
friends from 5 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, at
Williams-Thomas Funeral
Home Westarea, 823 N.W
143rd St. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations
should be made to an edu-
cational fund for her son,
Sully Faenza, c/o Bank of
America.
For further information:
Williams-Thomas West-
area, 352-376-7556.

Emma
LoCastro, 90
Emma D. LoCastro, age
90, died Wednesday,
Nov 13, 2013, at Hospice
House of Citrus in
Lecanto, Fla.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with crema-
tory Crystal River, Fla. A
memorial service will be
announced at a later date.

* Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material
are charged at the
same rates.



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Sophie
Ross, 84
FLORAL CITY
Sophie Ross, age 84, Flo-
ral City, died Nov 15,2013,
at Citrus
Memorial *.-
hospital. *,.,*
Sophie '
was born
Jan. 8, "i'\
1929, in
Boston, .
Mass., the
daughter Sophie
of the late Ross
Alexander
and Garifalia Jacovides.
She was a homemaker
who enjoyed gardening
and working crossword
puzzles. She was a mem-
ber of First United
Methodist Church of Flo-
ral City and active in sev-
eral ministries, including
the choir
Left to treasure her
memory are her children,
Alexander Ross, Floral
City; Joe T Ross and Gale
Ross, Hallowell, Maine;
and "Rene" Ross Lutz and
husband John,
Doylestown, Pa.; six grand-
children; and six great-
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her
husband, Joe, in 2010.
A Celebration of Life
Memorial Service will be
at 3 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5,
2013, at First United
Methodist Church of Flo-
ral City Inurnment will be
private at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.





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William
'Bill' Moff
ALLIANCE, OHIO
William "Bill" Moff, 74,
passed away Nov 14, 2013.
He was born in Atwater,
Ohio. Bill lived most of his
life in Portage County and
35 years in Florida. He
was a meat cutter for
Porky Pig, Kroger, Kash-N-
Karry, and Food Lion Gro-
cery Stores for close to 50
years.
Bill is preceded in death
by his parents, Eldon and
Etta Mae Moff; sister, El-
donna; brothers, Ernie,
Joseph, and Thomas. He is
survived by daughter, Mar-
cia (Brian) Belcastro; son,
Martin (Diane) Moff both
of Inverness.; sisters,
Juanita (Lowell) Dye of
Beloit, Ohio, Lynne (Clyde)
Simons of Canton, Mary
(Marshall) Simons of Al-
liance; brothers, Ed (Starr)
Moff of Inverness, Charles
(Kathy) Moff of Randolph;
five grandchildren; one
great-grandchild; and
many nieces and nephews.
Cremation has taken
place. At the request of the
family, there will be no
calling hours. Private bur-
ial service for the family
will be held at a later date.
Donovan Bagnoli Fu-
neral Home, 330-633-3350.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
See Page A7


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A6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6




Chester
Segers, 86
INVERNESS
Chester W Segers, 86, of
Inverness, died Friday,
Nov 15,2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County in
Inverness.
Born Feb. 13, 1927, in
Blount County, Ala., to the
late Clayton and Cotha
Mae Segers, he came here
in 1992 from Pawtucket,
R.I. Chief Segers retired
from the U.S. Navy with
more than 21 years of serv-
ice. He was awarded the
Navy Unit Citation, five
Good Conduct Medals, Na-
tional Defense Service
Medal, American Theatre
Campaign Medal, WWII
Victory Medal and Asiatic-
Pacific Campaign Medal.
Chief Segers was among
the first group to winter at
the Amundsen-Scott South
Pole Station, where he
served for 12 months. He
was a member of OAEA
(Old Antarctic Explorers).
His other memberships in-
clude the Shepherd of the
Hills Lutheran Church; In-
verness Elks Lodge No.
2522, Hernando VFW Post
4252 and the Masonic
Lodge No. 40 of Rhode Is-
land. Mr Segers also
served as chef on Presi-
dent Truman's yacht, the
USS Williamsburg. Follow-
ing his naval service, he
was employed by James
Ferreria & Sons Trucking
Company in Canton, Mass.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, Phyllis,
on March 27, 1996. Left to
cherish his memory are
his children, Michael C.
Segers and wife Cathy of
Milford, Mass., and Kath-
leen M. Johnson and hus-
band Raymond of
Pawtucket, R.I; his
brother, Jack E. Segers,
Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.; sis-
ter, Sarah A. Uptain of
Chattanooga, Tenn.; his
three grandchildren; and
his companion, Winnie
Simpers.
Funeral services for Mr


Segers will be conducted
at 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18,
from the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home of Inverness,
with the Rev Ladd Harris
officiating. Burial will be
at the Exeter National
Cemetery in Exeter, R.I.
Friends may call at the fu-
neral home on Monday
from 3 p.m. until service
time. Memorial donations
are suggested to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.
Ricky
Willis, 51
INVERNESS
RickyT. Willis, age 51, of
Inverness, Fla. died Fri-
day, Nov 15, 2013, at his
residence. There will be a
Celebration of Life for
Ricky from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Monday, Nov 18,
2013, at Liberty Park in In-
verness.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness,
Fla.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's polIicy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Death
ELSEWHERE
William
Weaver, 90
TRANSLATOR
NEW YORK William
Weaver, one of the world's
most honored and widely
read translators who
helped introduce English-
language readers to the
works of Umberto Eco,
Italo Calvino and many
other Italian writers, died
Tuesday at a retirement
home in Rhinebeck, N.Y
He was 90 and had been in
poor health for years since
suffering a stroke.
An ambulance driver in
Italy during World War II,
Weaver went on to trans-
late some of that country's
popular and influential
books, notably Eco's inter-
national best seller "The
Name of the Rose" and
Calvino's singular histori-
cal tale, "Invisible Cities."
His remarkable range of
other credits included Ori-
ana Fallaci's "A Man,"
Primo Levi's "The Mon-
key's Wrench" and Pier
Paolo Pasolini's "A Violent
Life."
He also worked on
books by Eugenio Montale,
Luigi Pirandello, Italo
Svevo and Roberto
Calasso, was a longtime
opera critic and wrote
books about opera and the
Italian actress Eleanora
Duse.
He is survived by four
nephews.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRAGONS
Continued from PageAl

Festival at Lake Hernando
Park.
Sponsored by the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, Citrus County and
High Five Dragon Boat,
the festival brought an un-
expected amount of
spectators.
'A lot of the teams are
from out of town," said Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce president and
CEO Josh Wooten. "We are
exposing them to our
beautiful lake system and
county It's exciting from
the stand point of us trying
one of this magnitude. We
think we hit a home run.
We can certainly make this
bigger and better moving
forward."
Since 2010, Homosassa
has been the site of local
dragon boat races.


"Some of the clubs came
to town and looked
around," Wooten said.
"They like the way that
you have a natural am-
phitheater set up here."
Local spirit
Club teams came from
around the state; however,
many locals competitors
showed their dragon boat
spirit also.
"Eighteen of the 30
teams here are community
teams from companies and
organizations around Cit-
rus County," said Christine
Canevari, chief race offi-
cial and director of mar-
keting for High Five
Dragon Boat production
company "Twelve club
teams that are organized
dragon boat teams trav-
eled here to compete."
Each boat held 20 pad-
dlers, 10 on each side,
along with a steersman
and a drummer The
drummer's job was to beat


the drum in sync with the
paddlers, motivating the
team to the finish line.
The steersperson stood
in the stern of the boat,
guiding the boat straight
down the race course with
a 10-foot oar
"We are a community
group called the Crystal
River Village, and we
wanted something that we
could all do together to get
to know one another better
and honor our veterans,"
said team member Nancy
Russell.
In addition to the races,
spectators enjoyed festival
activities throughout the
park and at the Inverness
Elks Lodge with food ven-
dors, arts and crafts ven-
dors, nonprofit and
commercial exhibitors
and live entertainment.
All for charity
Proceeds from the festi-
val benefit the Wounded


Warriors Project, local
charities and county-run
family programs, such as
movies in the park, Wooten
said.
"I am overwhelmed by
the support of the commu-
nity and the nonprofits,"
he said.
"I never dreamed that
we would have 30 teams
come to little old Her-
nando to do this. I am a big
believer in dragon boats
after seeing how into this
people are."
Next event
The next event will be
March 15, to benefit the
Community Food Bank.
For information, go on-
line to www.lakehernando
dragonboatcom or call the
chamber at 352-795-3149.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


COMPLETE DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT
APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Each boat was adorned with fierce dragon heads
at the front and elaborate dragon tails at the rear.
LEFT: The novice paddlers ran a straight-line course and
were assisted by experienced dragon boaters who
steered the vessels.



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AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDGING
Continued from Page Al

bill dispute, when the util-
ity refused to pay any more
than $19 million on a $36
million bill. Not long after
that, Duke announced it
would close of the Crystal
River area nuclear plant.
"I don't mean to be over-
dramatic, but the reality of
this situation is that our
community and our local
government, if we do not
do something, is facing a
real possibility of bank-
ruptcy and a real possibil-
ity of extreme financial
impacts to local govern-
ment," Meek said in de-
scribing the financial mess
he found himself in last
year "We were not going to
be able to provide services
that would be required to
citizens of the community
and we were at risk if we
did not act swiftly and
drastically of going into fi-
nancial insolvency"
As with other commis-
sion leaders, Meek began
his year with a plan target-
ing areas of focus includ-
ing the ongoing problem of
an economy dragged down
by the decline in the real
estate market High unem-
ployment and lack of a di-
versified economy added
to the obstacles. In addi-
tion, the BOCC was looking
to fund public safety and
fire rescue.
"Three days after I was
chairman is when Duke
Energy announced they


were disputing the tax bill
with Geoff Greene (county
property appraiser),"
Meek said. "That was $16
million right away that hit
us with. Short term, we
had an immediate hole in
our budget that we were
already operating in. Long
term, we had to build the
budget for the next year"
Bad got worse.
"Then we were hit with
the news of Duke Energy's
decision not to rebuild the
nuclear power plant,"
Meek said. "It meant mil-
lions of dollars less in rev-
enue, but more importantly
the loss of hundreds of
high-paying-wage jobs in
our community."
Smaller businesses in
the county also were
closing.
"So we have had a per-
fect storm, if you will, of
major issues that we were
confronting as a commu-
nity and I'm proud to sit
before you and I'm proud
of the work your local gov-
ernment has done to ad-
dress these issues," Meek
said.
The chairman's plan al-
ready called for a complete
review of revenue and ex-
pense analysis and options
to address the existing
budget shortfall as the top
priority of five targets.
"That was my focus be-
fore any of the other news
broke with regards to
Duke Energy," Meek said.
"We were using our re-
serves. We had continued
budget deficits that
needed to end so we made


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a commitment going into
the year that we were
going to end that."
Starting in January, the
BOCC went through a sev-
eral-month budget
process.
"We literally broke apart
every category in local
government," Meek said.
"We went through a de-
tailed presentation de-
partment by department
and rebuilt a budget for
this next year We built a
budget that still keeps
costs low, but maintains
services for the future."
However, the new
budget had a downside.
"But we did raise the
millage rate and we did
implement a new fire fee,"
Meek said. "While that was
a difficult decision, I be-
lieve it was the responsi-
ble decision and the right
decision to make. The re-
sult is we are now finan-
cially solvent and stable as
a community We have
stopped the bleeding."
Meek said he was proud
of the commission's work
and decisions because Cit-
rus County still has a lower
tax rate when compared to
other counties.
"With the millage rate
increase and with the new
fire fee, the average home-
owner is still paying $150
less than what they paid
three years ago in our
community and it's still an
affordable community in
which to live with a high
level of service to our resi-
dents," Meek said.
Meek's second target


was enhancing economic
development.
"We are going right now
through a detailed process
working with our Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil to finally create a very
proactive economic devel-
opment plan that ad-
dresses our situation,
creates targeted indus-
tries, looks at our inven-
tory, markets and goes out
and recruits," Meek said.
The third task was work-
ing with the cities of Inver-
ness and Crystal River to
develop partnerships and
improve relationships.
Meek said the county
made "great strides" with
Crystal River
"With regards to the city
of Inverness, we have a lot
more work to do," Meek
admitted. "We're not giv-
ing up and we're going to
try to find ways to partner
Right now, we are working
with them to look for ways
to support their parks and
recreation department.
We're not where we should
be. There's still a lot of
work to be done."
The fourth task was de-
veloping a comprehensive
and detailed long-range
plan.
"Our assistant county
administrator, Cathy Pear-
son, is taking that on,"
Meek said. "We rewrote
our Land Development
Code that changed a lot of
areas in our community
that were not as user
friendly and specific as
what they should be. It's a
much better and long-


range plan than what it
was."
The last endeavor was to
focus on a specific envi-
ronmental project within
King's Bay
"We are working closely
with Save Crystal River,
with Art Jones, with Lyng-
bya removal and cleaning
up King's Bay," Meek said.
"It's really a joint effort be-
tween the state, the county
and the city, nonprofits
and individuals in our
community spearheaded
by Art Jones and Save
Crystal River The county
is a big part of that and will
continue to be."
Meek ended his report
by saying the county is pre-


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 A9

pared for expansion.
"We faced hug chal-
lenges this past year as a
community," Meek said.
"We not only confronted
them, but I think we've im-
proved them to set this
county on a course for suc-
cess in the future. Realize,
in one year, we broke our
dependence on our largest
taxpayer, we've diversified
our revenue source from a
local government stand-
point and we've fixed the
structural deficit that has
been here. That's been a
big pill to swallow and
we've done it all in one
year and the result is our
county is now on stable fi-
nancial footing."


5-F mt C*^


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AIO SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Meals include juice and milk.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, blueberry
pancakes, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Half day:
Breakfast sausage pizza, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety, toast, grits.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, cinnamon
pancakes, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots.
Friday: MVP breakfast,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal
variety, toast, grits.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, corn
dog, PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, tangy baked beans,
chilled pineapple.
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab N'
Go (turkey), oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, po-
tato smiles, chilled flavored
applesauce.
Wednesday: Half day:
Chicken nuggets with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed green beans,
chilled peach cup.
Thursday: Thanksgiving
dinner: Turkey and gravy with
roll, Italian super salad with
roll, uncrustable PBJ, fresh
garden salad, green beans,
seasoned mashed potatoes,
sweet potato souffle, apple
crisp.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, pepperoni pizza,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
mixed fruit.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, grits, milk and
juice variety.
Tuesday: Blueberry pan-
cakes, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Half day:
Sausage and egg biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.


Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, cinnamon pan-
cakes, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, fajita chicken with
rice and ripstick, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Thanksgiving
dinner: Turkey and gravy with
roll, Italian super salad with
roll, uncrustable PBJ, fresh
garden salad, green beans,
seasoned mashed potatoes,
sweet potato souffle, apple
crisp, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Half day:
Stuffed-crust cheese pizza,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, strawberry cup, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded
chicken sandwich, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,
sweet potato crosstrax, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg


and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, blueberry pan-
cakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Half day:
Sausage and egg biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cinnamon pancakes,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, green beans,
celery, potato roasters, chilled
flavor applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Thanksgiving
dinner: Turkey and gravy,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad with
roll, pizza, garden salad,
green beans, seasoned
mashed potatoes, potato
roasters, sweet potato souffle,
apple crisp, dinner roll, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Half day:


Chicken sandwich, stuffed-
crust pizza, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
potato roasters, flavored
Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, fresh apple,
juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken
alfredo with ripstick, ham-


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baby carrots, cold corn salad,
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SENIOR DINING
Monday: Oven-fried
chicken thigh, blackeyed
peas, country vegetable med-
ley, wheat bread with mar-
garine, pineapple, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
spaghetti, tomato gravy, flat
beans, Italian bread with mar-
garine, mixed fruit, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Chicken chop
suey over steamed rice,


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CIOus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
green beans, gingered car-
rots, margarine, peaches,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, whole-grain bread with
margarine, fresh orange, ani-
mal crackers, low-fat milk.
Friday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
whole-wheat bread with mar-
garine, applesauce, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


I


OOGMJSIs




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ryan in Iowa, O'Malley in NH with all eyes on 2016


Associated Press
MANCHESTER, N.H.-
Governors get things done.
That's the message from
state leaders who are con-
sidering a White House
run as Washington slips
deeper into political
paralysis.
Ambitious governors
long have cast their ac-
complishments in contrast
to the capital's gridlock.
But three years from the
2016 election, several gov-
ernors are trying to grab
more of the national spot-
light, while Congress earns
all-time low approval
ratings.
In events Saturday
evening in two important
early voting states, Gov.
Martin O'Malley, D-Md.,
was trying to highlight that
contrast and U.S. Rep.
Paul Ryan, R-Wis., was try-
ing to fight it.
In the emerging 2016
field, governors with little
national recognition are
competing with better-
known Capitol Hill figures
burdened by the baggage
of working in Washington.
Courting voters in New
Hampshire, home of the
leadoff primary, O'Malley
planned to promote him-
self at a party dinner as
"an executive that actually
has to get something done
and lives in a reality-based
world, as opposed to the
ideology and the make be-
lieve that too many of our
members of our Congress
are living in."
"I know that's what peo-
ple across the country
want," O'Malley, a former
Baltimore mayor who's in
his second term as gover-
nor, said in an interview
with The Associated Press.
"They want leaders that
will get things done."
At about the same time
Saturday, Ryan, the 2012
Republican nominee for
vice president, was set to
be in Iowa headlining a
fundraiser for GOP
Gov Terry Branstad.
"We need a governor as
president of the United


States," Branstad recently
told theAP
Branstad has praised
Ryan, chairman of the
House Budget Committee,
as "the one guy in Wash-
ington who does have a
thoughtful plan."
But Branstad points to
only his fellow Republican
governors as examples the
nation should follow.
Branstad, if re-elected,
would have a closer look at
the GOP field than anyone,
as his party's host of
the Iowa presidential
caucuses.
Last month, days after
the partial government
shutdown ended in Wash-
ington, Branstad intro-
duced U.S. Sen. Ted
Cruz, R-Texas, as "a
bright up and coming sen-
ator" before launching
into an indictment of
the federal government
and promoting the
accomplishments of gover-
nors in Texas,


In the emerging 2016 field,
governors with little national
recognition are competing with
better-known Capitol Hill figures
burdened by the baggage
of working in Washington.


Wisconsin, Ohio and
Michigan.
In each of the states, Re-
publicans also control the
legislature.
Gov Chris Christie, R-
N.J., scored a resounding
re-election victory this
month by promoting his
success as a can-do
governor
"Under this government,
our first job is to get the job
done. And as long as I am
governor, that job will al-
ways, always be finished,"
Christie said during his
victory speech.


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Gov Scott Walker, R-
Wis., offered a similar
message in a speech to
state leaders in Washing-
ton. "Real reform happens
in the states," Walker said,
according to prepared re-
marks from the closed-
door speech.
Ryan has his own chal-
lenges as an eight-term
congressman.
Gallup found this past
week that just 9 percent of


Americans approve of
Congress' job perform-
ance, a record-low
The Pew Research Cen-
ter found in October that
just 1 in 5 surveyed said
they trust the government
in Washington to do what
is right most of the time,
while 8 in 10 said they only
sometimes or never trust
it, reflecting near record
levels of distrust.
Back in New Hamp-
shire, the Democratic
Party chairman noted that
presidential primary vot-
ers on both sides "have an
inclination to support gov-
ernors" over members of
Congress.
"Being a governor of a
midsized state is not a bad
place to start when it
comes to New Hamp-
shire," Ray Buckley he
said of O'Malley


Aides to O'Malley sug-
gest he would not seek
the Democratic nomina-
tion if Hillary Rodham
Clinton were to enter
the race. But his status as
a Washington outsider of-
fers O'Malley a unique ar-
gument in a Democratic
field whose strongest
prospective contenders
are capital insiders -
Clinton and Vice President
Joe Biden.
Gov BobbyJindal, R-La.,
hasn't ruled out running.
Gov Rick Snyder, R-Mich.,
has tried to raise his na-
tional profile as leader in
a state where unemploy-
ment has dropped more
than 6 percentage points
since he took office in
2011.
Four of the past six
presidents have been
governors.


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NATION


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 All


R^ee


ogaeA




A12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


Obama struggles to save his cherished health law


Associated Press
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama's health care law
risks coming unglued because of
his administration's bungles and
his own inflated promises.
To avoid that fate, Obama
needs breakthroughs on three
fronts: the cancellations mess,
technology troubles and a crisis
in confidence among his own
supporters.
Working in his favor are pent-
up demands for the program's
benefits and an unlikely collabo-
rator in the insurance industry
But even after Obama gets the
enrollment website working,
count on new controversies. On
the horizon is the law's potential
impact on job-based insurance.
Its mandate that larger employ-
ers offer coverage will take effect
in 2015.
For now, odds still favor the Af-
fordable Care Act's survival. But
after making it through the
Supreme Court, a presidential
election, numerous congres-
sional repeal votes and a govern-
ment shutdown, the law has yet
to win broad acceptance.
"There's been nothing normal
about this law from the start,"
said Larry Levitt, an insurance
expert with the nonpartisan
Kaiser Family Foundation.
"There's been no period of
smooth sailing."
Other government mandates
have taken root in American cul-
ture after initial resistance. It
may be a simplistic comparison,
but most people automatically
fasten their seat belts nowadays
when they get in the car Few
question government-required


Associated Press
President Barack Obama pauses Thursday while speaking about his signature health care law, in the
Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. It survived the Supreme Court, a
presidential election and numerous repeal votes in Congress, but now President Barack Obama's health
care law risks coming unglued because of his own mistakes explaining it and his administration's
bungled implementation. Obama now needs breakthroughs on three separate fronts: the cancellations
mess, technology troubles, and a crisis in confidence among his own supporters.


safety features such as air bags,
even if those add to vehicle
costs.
Levitt says the ACA may yet
have that kind of influence on
how health insurance is viewed.
"An expectation that everybody
should have health insurance is
now a topic of conversation in
families," he says.
That conversation was inter-
rupted by news that the Health-
Care.gov website didn't work and
that people with coverage were


getting cancellation notices de-
spite Obama's promise that you
can keep your insurance.
Obama maneuvered this past
week to extricate Democrats
from the cancellations fallout
The president offered a one-
year extension to more than 4.2
million people whose current in-
dividual policies are being can-
celed by insurers to make way
for more comprehensive cover-
age under the law This move by
the White House was intended to


smooth a disruption for which
his administration completely
failed to plan.
But it also invited unintended
consequences, showing how eas-
ily the law's complicated frame-
work can start to come loose.
State insurance commission-
ers warned that the president's
solution would undermine a
central goal of the law, the cre-
ation of one big insurance pool
in each state for people who
don't have access to coverage on


their jobs. Fracturing that mar-
ket could lead to higher future
premiums for people buying
coverage through the law's new
insurance exchanges, which
offer government-subsidized
private insurance.
That Obama is willing to take
such a gamble could make it
harder for him to beat back de-
mands for other changes down
the line.
On the cancellations front, the
president seems unlikely to
breakthrough. He may yet battle
to a political draw.
Obama realizes it's on him to
try to turn things around, and
quickly In the first couple of
weeks after the website debacle,
Obama played the sidelines role
of "Reassurer-in-Chief." Now
he's on the field, trying to re-
deem himself.
"I'm somebody who, if I fum-
bled the ball, I'm going to wait
until I get the next play, and then
I'm going to try to run as hard as
I can and do right by the team,"
Obama said Thursday at a news
conference.
Making sure the website is
running a lot better by the end of
the month may be his best
chance for a game-changing play
Although only 26,794 people
signed up in health plans
through the federal site the first
month of open enrollment,
993,635 applied for coverage and
were waiting to finalize deci-
sions. For many it took hours of
persistence, dealing with frozen
screens and error messages.
When states running their own
sites are included, a total of 1.5
million individuals have
applied.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Protest against


Dutch blackface


holiday tradition


Associated Press
AMSTERDAM The
Dutch equivalent of Santa
Claus arrived in the
Netherlands on Saturday
to the delight of thousands
of children. But some
adults protested vigor-
ously against one element
of the beloved tradition
they find racist: his ser-
vant in blackface makeup,
Black Pete.
In the annual Dutch Sin-
terklaas festival, St.
Nicholas arrives by steam-
boat in mid-November and
spends a month in the coun-
try with dozens of the Petes,
clown-like figures who
leave cookies, chocolate
and other treats for chil-
dren. The affair ends in a
night of gift-giving on Dec. 5.
Protesters say the Petes
- servants who wear
blackface makeup, red lip-
stick and frizzy 'Afro" wigs
- are blatant racist cari-
catures and should be
banned. But in a country
where 90 percent of the
people have European an-
cestry, a large majority
feels there is no racial in-
sult intended by Black
Pete. They say he's a posi-
tive figure of fun and that
the dissent is a sign of po-
litical correctness gone
overboard.
The debate about the
figure has gone on for
years, but it is now electri-
fying and polarizing -


Associated Press
A man holds a poster
Saturday during a
demonstration against
"Zwarte Piet" or Black
Pete, in Amsterdam,
Netherlands.
the Netherlands as never
before.
"The world is watching,
and the Netherlands has
been found wanting," anti-
Pete protester Quinsy Gario
told a group of about 300
supporters in Amsterdam,
most of whom were black.
Gario, a black artist who
has emerged as the public
face of the anti-Pete move-
ment, has been subjected
to unprintable insults and
death threats for speaking
out against the tradition.
But at Saturday's protest
he had trouble at times
being heard over support-
ers chanting his name.


'Rock Your Mocs' campaign


Native pride at

heart of event

Associated Press
ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico
- Elementary school students in
western New Mexico are wearing
their moccasins. So are students at
Northern Arizona University, Pur-
due and the University of Michigan.
On the Cherokee Nation, there's
a waiting list for Friday's moccasin-
making class. And on a military
base in Afghanistan, a soldier ties a
beaded cross around her boot to
symbolize her moccasins.
Friday was "Rock Your Mocs"
Day
Coinciding with Native American
Heritage Month in the U.S., the so-
cial media campaign started by
New Mexico student Jessica
"Jaylyn" Atsye has gone global.
The 21-year-old Laguna Pueblo
member said the idea was simple -
to set aside one day each year to
wear moccasins to celebrate the
cultures of Native Americans and
other indigenous people.
"When someone asks you, 'What
do your shoes represent?' or
'What's the story behind your


Wil




Associated Press
Participants display their moccasins Friday during the "Rock Your Mocs"
celebration at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, N.M. The
social media campaign started by Laguna Pueblo's Jessica "Jaylyn" Atsye
has gone global, with Native American and indigenous people from as far
away as New Zealand participating.


moccasins?' there can be endless
descriptions," she said. "They show
who you are. They're an identifier
They can bring unity"
Moccasins historically were the
footwear of many Native American
tribes. Though their basic construc-
tion was similar throughout the
country, the decorative elements in-


eluding beadwork, quillwork,
painted designs, fur and fringes
used on moccasins varied from one
tribe to another Indian people
often could tell each other's tribal
affiliation simply from the design of
their shoes, according to the non-
profit group Native Languages of
the Americas.


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NATION & WORLD


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 A13










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Fowl end


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Media face new tests with NSA spying


Associated Press
Bert Clouse carries a
rooster named Derek as
his wife Mary Britton
Clouse, right, holds a
rooster named Butler at
their Chicken Run Rescue
in Minneapolis. The
couple take in domestic
fowl, mostly chickens,
that are neglected,
abused and abandoned.
Urban hens often
abandoned once
egg-laying ends
DES MOINES, Iowa-
Five chickens live in artist
Alicia Rheal's backyard in
Madison, Wis., and when
they age out of laying eggs,
they may become chicken
dinner.
"We get egg-layers and
after a couple of years we
put the older girls in the
freezer and we get a newer
batch," Rheal said.
Rheal is a pragmatic
backyard chicken enthusi-
ast who likes to know
what's in her food. But oth-
ers find the fun of bringing a
slice of farm life into the city
stops when the hens be-
come infertile. Hesitant to
kill, pluck and eat a chicken,
some people abandon the
animal in a park or rural
area.
As a result, more old
hens are showing up at ani-
mal shelters, where workers
increasingly respond to re-
ports of abandoned poultry.
"The numbers are ex-
ploding. We had hoped that
the fad had peaked and
maybe we were going to
get a little bit of a break
here, but we haven't," said
Mary Britton Clouse, who
operates Chicken Run Res-
cue in Minneapolis.
A decade after
Mass. ruling, gay
marriage gains
BOSTON In the
decade since the highest
court in Massachusetts is-
sued its landmark ruling le-
galizing same-sex
marriage, 14 other states
and the District of Columbia
have legalized it, with Illi-
nois poised to become the
16th in a few days.
Such gains were consid-
ered almost impossible be-
fore Massachusetts opened
the door on Nov. 18, 2003,
with a Supreme Judicial
Court ruling that declared a
ban on gay marriages un-
constitutional. Opponents
made doomsday predictions
about how gay marriage
would damage traditional
marriage and lead to prob-
lems with children raised in
same-sex households.
SFC transit
agency calls for
union talks
San Francisco transit of-
ficials are calling for a re-
turn to the bargaining table,
saying an expensive provi-
sion was "erroneously" in-
cluded in a labor contract
that settled a union dispute
that had caused recent
strikes.
Late Friday, the contract
with San Francisco Bay
Area Rapid Transit's two
largest unions appeared to
be facing uncertainty as the
agency said that it was
seeking the renewed talks.
After a closed-door meet-
ing during the afternoon to
discuss the issue and re-
view its likely costs, BART
officials said a family med-
ical leave provision giving
its 2,300 union workers up
to six weeks of paid time off
each year would be too
expensive.
-From wire reports


Newsroom leaders across
the globe face new era
following revelations

Associated Press

MADRID -The spying revela-
tions by former National Security
Agency contractor Edward Snow-
den have made it a high-pressure,
high-stakes time to be a top media
executive.
In Britain, the editor of the
Guardian pulverized entire hard
drives of data leaked by Snowden
to keep the government from
seizing them.
In the United States, The New
York Times pointed out in a major
NSA expose this month that it
agreed to self-censorship of "some
details that officials said
could compromise intelligence
operations."


And in Spain, the El Mundo
newspaper said last week it would
turn over Snowden documents to
prosecutors inquiring whether
the privacy rights of Spaniards
had been violated.
As revelations about the stag-
gering scope of the NSAs surveil-
lance have leaked out, newsroom
leaders around the world have
been weighing ethical decisions
over how much they should reveal
about intelligence-gathering ca-
pabilities. Their decisions are
guided, in part, by media protec-
tion laws that vary widely from
country to country
"It's a new era. There are new
questions coming up and there
are no clear answers here," said
Robert Picard, a specialist on
media policy and director of re-
search at the University of Ox-
ford's Reuters Institute. "The
media are trying to navigate it and
it is not comfortable. You will get


different opinions on the deci-
sion-making in different news-
rooms and within the same
newsroom."
The huge number of Snowden
documents has generated a bar-
rage of exclusive stories in the
Guardian and The Washington
Post along with a stream of reve-
lations about the NSA surveil-
lance in countries such as France,
Germany, Spain and
Brazil. In some cases, publica-
tions that normally compete on
stories have teamed up to get the
news out
Britain's Official Secrets Act
guards against the dissemination
of confidential material, and the
government's response to the
Snowden leaks has become
stormier and stormier When
Britain's deputy national
security adviser warned that
agents would confiscate the
Guardian's hard drives containing


Associated Press
A survivor lights candles Saturday on a makeshift grave site of his father and uncle, left, on a field in Palo town,
Leyte province, central Philippines. Residents decided to bury bodies of relatives and unknown people killed
during Typhoon Haiyan on the field because they have started to decay and may pose a health risk.




Hellish search


Survivors, workers face
grim task ofsearching
for dead in aftermath

Associated Press

TACLOBAN, Philippines -John
Lajara peers under a slab of crum-
bled concrete, lifts a sodden white
teddy bear then drops it back into
the filth. He reaches again into the
rubble and pulls out a boot, a treas-
ured find in this typhoon-flattened
village.
But he's searching for something
far more precious the body of his
brother, Winston.
For those still looking for loved
ones missing since last week's
storm, their already torn-apart
lives are shot through with
a difficult question How do you
move on when there is no body to
bury?
The search for the missing -
1,179 by official count has be-
come a hellish daily activity for
some.
In Lajara's seaside village, resi-
dents estimate that about 50 of the
400 people who lived there were
killed. About half of the dead are


Typhoon Haiyan survivor John Lajara
shifts through debris to find woods
that will be used to rebuild his house
in Tacloban, Philippines.

still missing: mothers, fathers, chil-
dren and friends.
"Somehow, part of me is gone,"
Lajara said as another fruitless ex-
pedition in the rubble ended
Saturday
Lajara has carried out the rou-
tine since both he and his brother
were swept from their house by Ty-
phoon Haiyan on Nov 8. And every
day has ended so far with no an-
swers on Winston's fate.
According to the latest figures by
the Philippines' main disaster
agency, 3,633 people died and
12,487 were injured. Many of the


bodies remain tangled in piles of
debris, or are lining the road in
body bags that seep fetid liquid.
Some are believed to have been
swept out to sea.
After the initial days of chaos,
when no aid reached the more than
600,000 people rendered homeless,
an international aid effort was
gathering steam.
"We're starting to see the turning
of the corner," said John Ging, a top
U.N. humanitarian official in New
York.
He said 107,500 people have re-
ceived food assistance so far and 11
foreign and 22 domestic medical
teams are in operation.
U.S. Navy helicopters flew sor-
ties from the aircraft carrier USS
George Washington off the coast,
dropping water and food to iso-
lated communities.
The U.S. military said it will send
about 1,000 more troops along with
additional ships and aircraft to join
the aid effort.
So far, the U.S. military has
moved 190 tons of supplies and
flown nearly 200 sorties.
The focus of the aid effort is on
providing life-saving aid for those
who survived, while the search for
missing people is lower in the
government's priorities.


Army to scrap 4 weapons incinerators


Associated Press
ANNISTON, Ala. -The Pentagon
spent $10.2 billion over three
decades burning tons of deadly
nerve gas and other chemical
weapons stored in four states -
some of the agents so deadly even a
few drops can kill.
Now, with all those chemicals up
in smoke and communities freed of
a threat, the Army is in the middle of
another, $1.3 billion project: Demol-
ishing the incinerators that de-
stroyed the toxic materials.
In Alabama, Oregon, Utah and
Arkansas, crews are either tearing
apart multibillion-dollar incinera-
tors or working to draw the curtain
on a drama that began in the Cold
War, when the United States and the


former Soviet Union stockpiled mil-
lions of pounds of chemical
weapons.
Construction work continues at
two other sites where technology
other than incineration will be used
to neutralize agents chemically, ac-
cording to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
At the incinerator complex at the
Anniston Army Depot where
sarin, VX nerve gas and mustard gas
were stored about 55 miles east of
Birmingham the military this
week said it's about one-third of the
way into a $310 million program to
level a gigantic furnace that cost
$2.4 billion to build and operate.
Tim Garrett, the government site
project manager, said officials con-
sidered doing something else with


the incinerator, but the facility was
too specialized to convert for an-
other use. Also, the law originally al-
lowing chemical incineration
required demolition once the work
was done.
So teams are using large ma-
chines to knock holes in thick con-
crete walls and rip steel beams off
the building's skeleton, which was
previously decontaminated to guard
against any lingering nerve agents
or mustard gas. Metal pieces are
being recycled, and the rest will be
hauled to an ordinary landfill.
"It's the end of an era," said Gar-
rett, a civilian.
The military said the incineration
program cost $11.5 billion in all, with
the cost of tearing down the four fa-
cilities built in from the start.


Snowden files, editor Alan Rus-
bridger made the deal to have
them destroyed.
"I would rather destroy the
copy than hand it back to them or
allow the courts to freeze our re-
porting," he said in August. "I
don't think we had Snowden's
consent to hand the material
back, and I didn't want to help the
U.K. authorities know what he
had given us."
As the pressure on the
Guardian increased, the paper
turned to The New York Times
and ProPublica, a US.-based non-
profit journalism group. The de-
cision to collaborate was partly
technical, reporter James Ball
told an audience in London. But it
was also a nod to what he called
"First Amendment issues," noting
that being based in the United
States gave those working on the
story the protection of America's
press freedom laws.



S World BRIEFS

Baby bust


Associated Press
Some 15 million to 20
million Chinese parents
will be allowed to have a
second baby after the
Chinese government
announced Friday that
couples where one
partner has no siblings
can have two children.

Easing of baby
policy may not
result in boom
BEIJING -Don't expect
a new Chinese baby boom,
experts say, despite the first
easing of the country's con-
troversial one-child policy in
three decades.
Some 15 million to 20
million Chinese parents will
be allowed to have a sec-
ond child after the govern-
ment announced Friday
that couples where one
partner has no siblings can
have two children. But the
easing of the policy is so in-
cremental that demogra-
phers and policymakers are
not anticipating an influx of
newborn babies at a time
when young Chinese cou-
ples are already opting for
smaller families, driving the
country's fertility rate down
to 1.5-1.6 births per
woman.
"A baby boom can be
safely ruled out," said Wang
Feng, professor of sociol-
ogy at the University of Cal-
ifornia Irvine.
Wang noted that al-
though Chinese couples
where both parents have no
siblings have for some time
been allowed to have a
second child, many have
elected to have only one.
Bomber kills 6
ahead US talks
KABUL, Afghanistan -A
suicide car bomber tore
through the Afghan capital
Saturday, just hours after
President Hamid Karzai an-
nounced U.S. and Afghan
negotiators had agreed on a
draft deal allowing U.S.
troops to remain in the coun-
try beyond a 2014 deadline.
The suicide bomber at-
tacked security forces pro-
tecting the Loya Jirga site,
Interior Ministry
spokesman Sediq Sediqqi
said. He said the blast
killed six people and
wounded 22. Among the
dead were two security
personnel, he said.
Sediqqi said Afghan se-
curity forces had prior
knowledge of the suicide
bombing, but were unable
to stop the attack.
-From wire reports








EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


harpers


ferry


-- ~- _______


DREAM
VACATIONS
oto0^ Contest

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Dubrovnik, Croatia
Special to the Chronicle
Bill and Dee Kavouras, of Beverly Hills, took a tour of Dubrovnik, Croatia, while on
a Meditternean cruise, celebrating their 45th wedding anniversary.




A16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 17, 2013 C:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D!: Comcas Dunnellon& Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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SP NewsHour WEDU Extraordinary Women Secrets of Scotland Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" Spanish
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B News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos. From Sports News
Q L NBC 8A8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live) '14' s Authority Field at Mile High in Denver. (N) cc
S 2 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Secrecy" (N) Betrayal"... One More News Spo Night
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SND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken CTN Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
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PN 34 28 34 43 49 College Basketball College Basketball This Is Sportscenter NHRA Drag Racing NASCAR Now (N)
WT 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live PG' Sunday Night Prime G.K. Rosary Theology Roundtable God Bookmark
A 29 521 29 20 2 **8 "Jumanji"(1995, *** ,"The Incredibles"(2004, Comedy) Voices of Craig T. *** "The Incredibles" (2004, Comedy) Voices of Craig T.
29 52 29 20 28 Fantasy)'PG Nelson, Holly Hunter. 'PG' Nelson, Holly Hunter. 'PG'
r n 1 17 *** "Crimes of the Heart" (1986) Diane ** "A Love Song for Bobby Long"(2004, ** '"The Man Who Wasn't There" (2001) Billy
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fN 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
OD 26 56 26 Iron Chef America Restaurant Express Guy's Games Restaurant Express On the Rocks 'G' Restaurant: Im.
(JSj 732 112 732- College Basketball NASCAR UFC Jones Moseley UFC Presents The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
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S** "Real Steel" (2011, Action) Hugh ** "Green Lantern" (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds.A test **"Green Lantern" (2011,
X 30 60 30 51 Jackman, Evangeline Lilly'PG-13' pilot joins a band of intergalacticwarriors. PG-13' Action) Ryan Reynolds. PG-13
OL 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf OHL Classic, Final Round. Central I European PGA Tour Golf
S 5 *** "A Boyfriend for Christmas" (2004, "Catch a Christmas Star" (2013 Romance) "A Holiday Engagement" (2011, Comedy)
59 68 59 45 54 Romance-Comedy) Kelli Williams. BMShannon Elizabeth. Premiere.'NR' BJordan Bdridges, Shelley Long. 'NR' Cme
** Trouble With the Curve" Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (In Boardwalk Empire (N) Eastbound Hello Boardwalk Empire
302 201 302 2 2 (2012)ClintEastwood. Stereo) MA' MA' Ladies MA 'MA'
__ Boxing Promised Real Time With Bill ** "Promised Land" (2012, Drama) Matt "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter"
HB2 303 202 303 1Land Maher'MA' c Damon. (In Stereo)'R' B (2012) Benjamin Walker. (In Stereo)'R'
WHGTjJ 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Inl Hunters Hunt Intl Cousins Undercover Property Brothers 'G' House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl
i 51 1 3 2 Jonestown Paradise Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Axes and Ax Men "Pain in the Ax" American Jungle (N) Top Gear"American
51 25 51 32 42 Lost'PG, V'B *PG' PG' Allies"'14' (N) 14' 14'm Supercars"'PG'
i 24 38 24 31 "Dear Santa" (2011) Witches of East End "Twelve Trees of Christmas" (2013, Drama) Witches of East End Witches of East End
24 38 24 31 AmyAcker.'NR'M '14'm cMel B, CasperVan Dien.'NR'm c"Unburied" (N)'14' '14'mc
0 1 Daughter Dearest (In A Mothers Story of Killer Profile Sean Killer Profile "Israel Panic 9-1-1 (In Stereo) Panic 911 "Get Out of
UVN 50 119 Stereo) '14, V' c Murder'14'm Vincent Gillis.'PG' Keyes" (N)'14'B M the Van and Run"
i 320 221 320 3 3 ***3 3 "Courage Under Fire" (1996) Denzel *** "Die Hard2"(1990, Action) Bruce Willis, ** "Battleship" (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor
_ 320 221320 _3 _3 Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' Bc Bonnie Bedelia. (In Stereo) 'R' Bc Kitsch. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Bc
,, t 4 4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera To Catch a Predator Predator Raw: The Predator Raw: The
42 41 42 "Teens Gone Wild" "Wild Rides" Proof" (N) "Long Beach 2" Unseen Tapes Unseen Tapes
Mystery Bear of the The Whale That Ate Bigfoot: The New Evidence The mystery of Monster Monster Bigfoot: The New
W 109 65 109 44 53 Arctic'PG' Jaws'PG, V'c Bigfoot. (N) Survival Survival Evidence
WitR 28:36 28 35 25 Sam & Haunted Thunder |Sam& 2013 HALO Awards jFull H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
[W 103 62 103- Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
XY1 44 123 Snapped'PG' c Snapped'PG' c Snapped'PG' c Snapped: Killer Snapped'PG' c Snapped'PG' c
n J 340 2411 340 4 Time of Death'MA' Homeland "Gerontion" Masters of Sex "All Homeland "A Red Masters of Sex Filming Homeland "A Red
340 241 340 4 'MA' cc Together Now" 'MA' Wheelbarrow"'MA' the study'MA' Wheelbarrow"'MA'
37 7 7 3 Bar Rescue "Corking Bar Rescue "Barely Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Hole in Bar Rescue (In Stereo)
37 43 37 27 36 the Hole"'PG' Above Water' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' None" (N)'PG' 'PG'
( Z 37 7 37 "That's My Boy" (2012 ** "After the Sunset" (2004) ** "Here Comes the Boom" (2012, Comedy) ** "The Transporter"
370 271 370 Comedy) Adam Sandier. '' Bc Pierce Brosnan. 'PG-13' B Kevin James. (In Stereo) PG' B (2002) cc
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S 36 31 36 Flats Fishing ,Adv. _Look Exp. Blue'G'
3 "Hulk "3"1', Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer *** "X2:X-Men United" (2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart, Hugh ** "Godzilla" (1998)
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TS 49 23 49 16 19 *** "Knocked Up" (2007) Seth Rogen. ** "The Change-Up" (2011) 'NR' ** "TheChange-Up"(2011)'NR'
S 169 53 169 30 *** 3 "The Goodbye Girl" (1977) Richard *** "Johnny Eager" (1942, Crime Drama) *** "Johnny Aollo" (1940, Crime Drama)
169 53 169 30 35 Dreyfuss, Marsha Mason.'PG'[ RobertTaylor'NR NcTyrone Power'Nf 'N
Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Yukon Men Goose Alaska: The Last
LL 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'c Frontier'14'c Frontier Exposed (N) Frontier (N)'14' hunting season.'PG' Frontier'14'c
L 50 46 50 29130 Undercover Boss Medium |Medium Medium |Medium "Letters to Jackie: Remembering" "Letters to Jackie"
I 350 21 30 *** "Intolerable Cruelty" (2003) George ** "Step Up Revolution" (2012) *** "Team America: World Police" (2004) "Nature
U B 350 261 350 Clooney (In Stereo)'PG-13' Ryan Guzman.'PG-13' Voices of Trey Parker. (In Stereo) 'R' Calls"R'
1 48 3 4 3 1 *** "We Were Soldiers"(2002, War) Mel *** "Gran Torino" (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood. A vet- ** "The Next Three Days"
S48 33 48 31 34 Gibson, Madeleine Stowe. 'R' eran faces his longtime prejudices.'R' (DVS) (2010) Russell Crowe.
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Diary ofa Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules" "Percy Jackson & the Olympians" Burgers Fam. Guy Fain. Guy China, IL
TRA 9 54 9 44 Hot Dog Paradise'G' Fried Chicken Para Monumental Myster Mysteries-Museum America Declassified Mysteries-Museum
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TVLE 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne IRoseanne Roseanne |Roseanne Roseanne |Roseanne GoldGirls GoldGirls GoldGirs GoldGirs GoldGirls GoldGirls
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04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14
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E 117 69 117 Face"'14'B Stereo)'14'B Black"'14'B Stereo)'14'c '14'm Ground"'14'c
rWRNAj 18 118 18 18 20 *** "Wall Street" (1987)'R' Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother Bones'14' c


Proceed slowly


with stepson


D ear Annie: I have
been married to
Sarah for nine
years. We have two
young sons, both with de-
velopmental issues.
When I met Sarah, she
had an older son, "Del,"
who was in the tempo-
rary custody of her fa-
ther's cousins. The
cousins have raised the
boy since he was 6
months old.
He is now 13
and under-
stands that
our sons are
his half-
brothers. His
biological fa-
ther gets him
on occasional
weekends,
and he al- *
ways has had
regular con- ANN
tact with I
Sarah and MAIL
her parents.
The cousins are good
people. Del calls them
"Mom and Dad." But
they are in their late 50s
and not in the best of
health. Their financial
situation is also not as
good as ours. They also
have an adopted daugh-
ter who is 14. The girl
was raped by a babysit-
ter two years ago. Then,
six months later, she ac-
cused her dad of raping
her My wife believes the
girl said this for atten-
tion, and although I
agree that the dad
doesn't seem capable of
such a thing, it still wor-


II
.1


ries me.
Sarah never gave up
legal custody of Del. I re-
ally love the boy and
enjoy spending time
with him. He lives
nearby and rides his
bike to our place fre-
quently Del has asked
questions about living
with us, but Sarah says
she could never take him
away from his parents.
What is the
right thing to
do? --Con-
fused in Penn-
sylvania
Dear Con-
fused: We com-
mend you for
wanting to take
this boy, but we
suspect Sarah
feels over-
whelmed rais-
E'S ingtwo
children with
BOX developmental
issues and is
afraid to add a third
child who is entering
adolescence. Has there
been an investigation of
the alleged rape? If the
charges are unfounded,
it could indicate that the
daughter is unstable.
Examine your heart-
felt motives and then
talk to Sarah about hav-
ing Del at your home
more often and for
overnight stays. See how
he interacts with his
half-siblings and how
Sarah responds to his
presence. We also rec-
ommend you look into
family counseling.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"The Best Man Holiday" (R)
1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 6:55 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:20 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m. 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-
13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
1 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:40 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:40 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 4:15 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 7p.m. No
passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m. No
passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 "A Day at the-"
6 Yellow color
11 From Cardiff
16 Boorish
21 On the left,
on a ship
22 Ripple pattern
23 The Gem State
24 Raze
25 Etta or Jesse
26 Asimian, for short
27 Start-again button
28 Think
29 Expert
30 Club charge
31 Sunbeam
33 Kind of bear
35 Serpent
36 Flavoring plant
38 and outs
39 Soak(up)
40 Rocky hill
41 After deductions
42 Forfear that
44 Palpitate
48 Anatomical bend
51 Attack from a
hidden position
54 Chirp
55 Israel's airline
(2 wds.)
57 Breakfast item
61 Goods
62 Timbre
63 Butler in
"The Nanny"
65 Warsaw residents
66 War god
67 -Little
70 Standoffish
72 Wild ox
73 Estuary
74 River in France
75 Fleur-de- -
77 Speck of land
79 "-Told Every Little
Star"
80 Extinct bird
82 Believe it or-!
83 Military greeting
85 Leather worker
87 Sew
89 Form of jazz
90 Cushion
91 Pitched
92 Yachtsman
94 Edible mollusk
96 Marquee notice
97 See


100 -Vegas
101 Peace prize name
104 Cup handle
105 Stylish
106 Links item
107 Inquire
108 Very angry
110 Stone pillar
112 Ranch
113 San-
116 Sloping surface
118 Dagger
119 Evil spell
120 Think highly of
122 Widespread
123 Long,flat boat
124 Hurry
125 Journey
127 Draw in
129 Tiresome talker
130 Play part
133 Chicago player
135 Western Indian
136 Not talking
137 Ottava-
141 Holy cow!
142 Fragrant wood
144 Kimono sash
145 Sufficiently cooked
146 Thickness
measure
147 Stop on--
149 Desiccated
151 George or T.S.
153 Scarlett of "Gone with
the Wind"
155 Of the kidneys
156 Slowly, in music
157 Mother-of-pearl
158 Washington's
Sound
159 Put forth effort
160 -Rice Burroughs
161 Wool cloth
162 Eatat



DOWN
1 Indian prince
2 Swiftly
3 One with promise
4 Before
5 Paved ways (Abbr.)
6 Quantity
7 Social
conventions
8 Prejudice
9 Sea eagle
10 Organize anew


Lean and strong
Dutch commune
Endure
White sale item
Frankfurter
Surfeit
Certain voter (Abbr.)
Of birds
Meaning
Got some rest
Platter
Fitting
Sketched
State of
melancholy
Smooth and shiny
Curved letter
Barrier
"Perfect-"
"Essays of-"
Recovered
Short sleep
Saucer from space
Prize
Andretti or Batali
Grain-growing
region
Aim
Thirteen popes
Auspicious
beginning
(2 wds.)
Exit
Glacial ridge
Spasm
Costa del -
Regulate
Pass by
Nothing
Horse leg part
Top-notch
Greek letter
Cereal plant
- sauce
Seaman
Opp. of SSW
Upperclassman (Abbr.)
Neighbor of Brazil
Check for
weapons
Oar part
Fertile spot
Chinese "way"
Jersey
Intrinsically
(2 wds.)
Arab nation
It comes with
lobster
Perpetually


105 Black or
Eastwood
109 Skillful
111 Bring out
112 Laser printer part
114 Acquire
115 Poet's preposition
117 Permit
119 Auto
121 "Of-and Men"
123 Long-suffering


Domicile
Pool of water
Massage
Tapped a baseball
Cognizant
Manuscript
volume
Strong string
Exposed
Mary Tyler -
Insect stage


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


11-17


Entangled
Having winglike parts
Gael or Scot
Hoop
Redolence
Casino items
Deface
Letter after zeta
Ordinance
Unclose, poetically
"Ben- -"


2013 IJFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FERRY
Continued from PageA15

Harpers Ferry in a failed
attempt to initiate a wide-
spread slave uprising. On
Oct. 18, the U.S. military
captured the armory
Brown was tried for trea-
son, convicted and
hanged in Charles Town.
The armory's fire engine
and guardhouse, "John
Brown's Fort," has been
preserved and remains
an attraction for visitors.
1861-1895: The Civil
War ravaged Harpers
Ferry as the Union and
Confederacy fought for
control, and according to
the National Park Serv-
ice, the town changed
hands eight times during
those years.
Aug. 15,1906: The first
meeting of the Niagara
Movement on U.S. soil
took place in Harpers
Ferry, according to the
National Park Service.
The Niagara Movement,
led by WE.B. Dubois,
sought equal rights for
black Americans.

Places to visit:

Jefferson Rock: a for-
mation of rocks along
theAppalachian Trail in
Harpers Ferry Jefferson
visited in 1783 and fa-
mously wrote about it,
saying the "scene is worth
a voyage across the At-
lantic." The landmark is
an easy walk from St.
Peter's Roman Catholic
Church.
St. Peter's Roman
Catholic Church: Built in
1833 and altered in neo-
gothic style in 1896, ac-
cording to National Park
Service documents, the


church overlooks parts of
town and the scenic gorge
of the Shenandoah River
It is the only church
building in Harpers Ferry
that survived the Civil
War Stop in for Mass at 11
a.m. Sunday.
Harpers Ferry Na-
tional Historical Park:
Much of Harper's Ferry is
located within the park,
and preserved buildings
are open for visitors to
view Sites of interest in-
clude a boarding house, a
bookstore, a clothing
store, John Brown's Fort
and Storer College. Build-
ings are open from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. The park also
has several hiking trails
to explore.

Things to do:

Explore the town on
foot and visit shops,
restaurants, museums
and exhibits.
Stay at a bed and


breakfast, such as the
Jackson Rose Bead &
Breakfast, a circa-1775
home that was once the
headquarters of Gen.
Thomas "Stonewall"
Jackson.
Take your pick of out-
door activities, whether
it's whitewater rafting,
paddle sports, hiking or
biking. Set out on foot on
the Appalachian Trail,
which runs through
Harpers Ferry past St.
Peter's Roman Catholic
Church, or one of the
trails within the Harpers
Ferry Historical National
Park. Or get a bike on the
C&O Canal, which along
the Potomac River from
Washington, D.C. to Cum-
berland, M.D. Rentals are
available seasonally

Getting there:

Harpers Ferry is about
40 miles from Washington
National Airport. From


there,rent a car to drive to the MARC commuter rail
Harpers Ferry or take a service serve Harpers
train. Both Amtrak and Ferry


EXCURSIONS


"We Cater to Cowards!"



Experience The Difference


HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE


Mustangs fun to drive, bang for buck


A s mentioned previ-
ously, one of my
how cars is a 2007
Ford Mustang GT Califor-
nia Special. The Mustang
has been around for many
years, it is a great car for
the price and lots of fun to
drive. The original two-
seat Mustang concept car
was first shown to the
public in October of 1962
at Watkins Glen, N.Y. It
generated strong interest
in a new type sports car
image for America. That
winter, the concept car
was shown around the
country A Ford executive
stylist, who was a fan of
the World War II P-51
Mustang fighter plane, is
credited by Ford to have
suggested the name. An
alternative view was that
a Ford division market re-
search manager, a
breeder of quarter horses,
first suggested the name
based on the name of a
book he received as a gift
titled "The Mustangs." I
guess we'll never really
know who first came up
with the Mustang name.
The Mustang was ini-
tially based on the Ford
Falcon, a compact car It
was brought out five
months before the normal
start of the 1965 model
year Production started
in March 1964 and the
new car was introduced
to the public on April 17,
1964 at the New York
World's Fair. The earliest
versions, often referred to
as 1964, 1/2 models, were
VIN-coded by Ford and ti-
tled as 1965 models. The
1965 Mustang was Ford's
most successful launch
since the Model A. It cre-
ated the "pony car" class
of American automobiles
- sports car-like coupes
with long hoods and short


uled to release in 2014,
most likely as a 2015
Ken model. If you are looking
for an inexpensive fun car
McNally to drive and show, con-
sider a Mustang. There
CAR are a lot ofpre-owned,
CORNER low-mileage cars out
there at a reasonable
price.


rear decks and gave rise
to competitors such as the
Chevy Camaro, Plymouth
Barracuda, Dodge Chal-
lenger and AMC Javelin.
Mustangs grew larger
and heavier with each
model year until, in re-
sponse to the 1971-1973
models, Ford returned
the car to its original size
and concept for 1974. It
has since seen several
platform generations and
designs. Although some
other pony cars have seen
a revival, the Mustang is
the only original pony car
to remain in uninter-
rupted production over
five decades of develop-
ment and revision. It's
hard to believe that there
have been more than
8.5 million Mustangs sold
since inception, most
likely a world record for
one model car
The current generation
of the Mustang was intro-
duced in 2005 with a re-
designed exterior in 2010.
For 2011, all the Mus-
tang's engines were re-
vised with higher
horsepower and several
new transmission options.
Ford and the Mustang
Club of America are cele-
brating the Mustang's 50th
anniversary in 2014 with
big events at the same
time in Las Vegas and
Charlotte, N.C.. Rumors
are that a radically re-
designed Mustang is
tentatively being sched-


2REATA N UREI

SOUTH AFRICA

$5595 w/air
Personally escorted by Gwen & Buzz
SSafari Games Drives 16 Days A Lot of Extras

ISRAEL $3,478 w/air
# 1 Tour Company in Israel
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S2 cell phones with unlimited minutes to the US
I*ll I[*lrlq~ II [ k I!ll


5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa
(352) 628-0668
www.travelauthorityfl.com
Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com


CAR JOKE: A drunk
phoned the police to re-
port that thieves had been
in his car "They've stolen
my dashboard, the steer-
ing wheel, the brake
pedal and even the accel-
erator," he moaned. Five
minutes later the phone
at the police station rang
again. It was the same
drunk. "Sorry," he
slurred. "I just realized I
got in the back seat by
mistake."

Upcoming events
Nov 22: All American
Muscle Night cruise-in at
6p.m. atArby's on U.S. 19
in Crystal River

Ken McNally is a car
columnist for the Chroni-
cle. Contact him at ken
mcnally@tampabayrr.co
m or 352-341-1165.


Hlnd America Lne

D-Day 70th Anniversary Cruise
Auril3 May 11,2014-12iays-Italyto 1e8mark
. .... ....... ... ................ .." ;OCEA N VIEW $ 0 I j |
S......... ........ .... .. .. . CABINS FROM l pp
Transportation not included, ask about air specials and military discounts
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STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
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dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
,,UV ___ _ AS X V iO mFl FLSeller of Travel 10131

4 BkTyST 35415 a t
m't Becky's "I Stor


B! Day of Art
April 9,2014
S9 Cornme Museum
&MorseMuseum
Winter Park
Cost 55.00 per person
Lunch on your own on ParkAve.
Motorcoach and Guided tours
Cornell Museum.


Machu Picchu Bermuda Cruise from
Express Escorted Ft Lauderdale
Tour to Peru Sailing Aug 18,2014
10 nights
with Airfare Motorcoach to the
TFeaturing Urubamba pier included
Sacred Valley, Cuzco Cost from
&Machu Picchu $1252.00 per person


3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (5) 785
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352)527-8855
www,'',beckystrave'l 4 &lserIvI lice [ com [* ]I G'l'U'


I Ledger Dentistry
SJeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.

Ledgerdentistry.com


3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448

(352) 628-3443


Insurance Accepted


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GAMBING *W!a' ^JBBMrae
Call Ora @ 352.556.5200 or 1.855-335-8082 Toll Free
IP Casino Resort
Beau Rivage Resort
November 26th, December 23rd
January 12" & January 26th
Get Away for the Holidays!!!


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 A17

The restoration museum in
Harpers Ferry shows the
many layers of an old
building and how
structures change over
time. The original
structure was built around
1825 and was designed to
house a store on the lower
level and living quarters
above. It was later
converted to a hotel and
eventually housed troops
during the Civil War.
AMANDA MIMS / For the Chronicle


More
information:

Visit the Harpers Ferry
National Historical Park
website at
www.nps.gov/hafe or the
Harpers Ferry Historic
Town Foundation at
http ://historicharpers
ferrycom.


Outside cabins and Early Saver rates also ava


of th6 ," ( ,




AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


Homasassa Seafood Festival

Homosassa

Saturday, November 9,2013


Nancy Burba and Jim Ross


Deniese Woods and Paula Lackey


John Riedel and George Pringle


Cliff and Tammy Fudge


Herb and Paula Elliott


Debbie Jefferis and Terri Schaer


- ~--


Allison Lentz and Justin Lentz John and Linda Liebentritt


Portia Guinn and Hannah Snyder


Rhonda Zupen, Barb Zupen and Lauri
Zupen


Ann and Steve Krukowski


Mary Sue Woolcock, Jim Woolcock,
Richard Beldue and Gail Beldue


Joyce Oberacker and Pamela Lockwood


Steven and Cheryle Cooley


Holly Viggiano and Mary Anne Rannon


Photos by Eryn Worthington


SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Veterans'benefit seminar
The Harbor House at Ocala, 12080 S.W
Highway 484, Dunnellon, is sponsoring a
seminar about veterans aid and atten-
dance benefits.
This is a free public service to veterans
and widows of veterans provided by The
Harbor House at Ocala and Gary
Marriage, Operation Veteran Aid, Crystal
River, who will present the information at
2 p.m. Tuesday
To RSVP call 352-489-9698.

Purple Heart group to meet
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday at the Citrus
County Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend the meet-
ing and to become a Chapter 776 member
To learn more about the chapter, visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.

Come welcome home vets
A welcome home ceremony for
Sgt. William Kemp and retired Sgt. Ken
Patterson will be held Friday, Nov 22, at
the Hernando VFW Post 4252.
Dinner will be at 5 p.m. and the program
will start at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
The ceremony is planned by Operation
Welcome Home, which celebrates the
return of Citrus County veterans.
For more information, call Barbara
Mills at 352-422-6236.

Auxiliary to serve turkey
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Penno Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites
everyone to a roast turkey dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 22, at the post,
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For
more information, call 352-465-4864.

Thanksgiving dinner at post
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 will
serve a free Thanksgiving dinner from
noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov 28, at the
post, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Donations will be accepted, but are not
necessary Everyone is welcome.

MOC/MOCAto serve pasta
The Military Order of the Cootie/
Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will
serve a pasta and meatball or sausage din-
ner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov 29, at
Leroy Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,3190 N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, Hernando (where the
helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7, may be pur-
chased at the post. Donation at the door
will be $7.50.
For more information, call Paul
Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-795-
4142 or the post at 352-726-3339.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Sign up by Dec. 2 for tourney
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to partici-
pate in a golf tournament on Saturday
Dec. 14. Sign up by Dec. 2.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

CCVC plans yard sale
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where U.S.
41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight.
For more information, call 352-400-8952.

Help Santa find soldiers
Operation Welcome Home seeks infor-
mation about service men and women sta-
tioned in Afghanistan so that the group
can help send Christmas care packages.
At present, the group only knows of
three soldiers, and more organizations are
requesting names so they can help.
Call Barbara Mills at 352-442-6236.


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


Ask people
about the
Battle of
Bunker Hill
and they'll tell you it was
one of the engagements
in the American
Revolutionary War. Ask
people about the Battle
of Bunker Hill 10 and
they'll probably say
they thought there was
only one.

Unless they were with Gary Hille
during a particularly dark period in
the Vietnam War It was there that,
about 40 years after the fact, Hille
found out he had earned a Bronze
Star with Valor
Now a resident of Citrus Springs,
Hille remembers the 39 hours he
spent during a key battle associated
with the Tet Offensive, launched by
the North Vietnamese at the end of
January in 1968. Bien Hoa was an air-
base controlled by the U.S., with all
sorts of military aircraft including
attack helicopters stationed there.
Hille was part of a significant, but
small, group of Air Force personnel
who weren't fliers or those entrusted
with maintaining an aircraft's mainte-
nance. Hille was part of the 3rd Secu-
rity Police Squadron; his job was to
protect those at the air base.
"I was basically a grunt," he said,
adding he was a 25-year-old staff ser-
geant by that time. "I was part of a
group of 300, and it was a large base. I
worked strictly at night. But we had no
tactical training we were totally un-
prepared for what happened."
What happened was the Tet Offen-
sive, with large groups ofViet Cong
pushing into South Vietnam. Bien
Hoa, located about 20 miles northeast
of Saigon and one of the largest air
bases hosting U.S. aircraft, was high
on their list of targets. Three groups of
Viet Cong were assigned with taking
the base.
"I was off getting coffee," Hille re-
called, "and by the time I got to the
chow hall the rockets started coming
in about 150 or so. I called in and
asked 'Where do you want me?"'
Hille was told to take his group near
a bunker called Bunker Hill 10, origi-
nally built by the French in the '50s
that had been fortified and was part of
a string of bunkers used to protect the
base. "There were about 20 people,"
he said, "with four in the bunker I was
told to take my four men and deploy 30
to 40 yards north of Bunker Hill 10 on
a line with the fence."


A




fpI


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Gary Hille of Citrus Springs remembers the 39 hours he spent during a key battle
associated with the Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War. A young Gary
Hille in the 1960s.


S.,,ineir

'Words
RI . . . ... ..


The air base was surrounded by
three fences, with several thousand
land mines between the outer fence
and the middle one, and trip flares be-
tween middle fence and the inner one.
His area to protect was on the east
side of the base.
His group was commanded by Capt.
Reginald Maisey, but when the action
started, Hille was first back on line
and he was in command. Of the ap-
proximately 2,000 North Vietnamese
sent to attack Bien Hoa, one group -
those who were to attack to main en-
trance got lost and never made it.
The same couldn't be said of what
happened on the base's east side,
where there were about 700 of the
enemy Hille had one M60 machine
gun, a 40-millimeter grenade launcher
and each man's M-16 automatic
weapon.
All were needed. The North Viet-
namese found their way through the
minefield and attempted to knock out
the bunker, including four who tried to
flank Hille's perimeter position. In-
deed, with fire coming in constantly, it
seemed at times they were sur-
rounded.
"We counted 28 rocket hits on the
bunker after the fight," Hille said.
One rocket killed Capt. Maisey
Ammunition started to run low and
Hille sent in a request for more. The
ammo was sent, but only to the bunker
Hille got two "volunteers" to navigate
the approximately 40 yards through


the heavy fire to get the much-needed
munitions.
Once re-supplied and able to isolate
and subdue the four North Viet-
namese trying to flank his position,
Hille and his men concentrated on
taking out the rocket launchers firing
at the bunker "When they fire, they
leave a trail of sparks, and we would
spray that position with our M60," he
said.
Now commanding 20 men, Hille
would move the M60 around so the
enemy could not target it and elimi-
nate it. "We were rocketed and
mortared so much," he said. "That was
my priority keeping my guy safe.
"I got into some pretty close-
quarters action. But I always took the
notion that I wanted the other guy to
die for his country"
Hille, who struggles with post trau-
matic stress disorder and a brain dis-
order which has left him with several
lapses of memory, said that his small
unit managed to hold off several hun-
dred North Vietnamese for "... 39
hours. We were going at it tooth and
nail, constantly We killed damn near
one-third of them."
Several other awards for valor were
given for that night's action, including
one to Capt. Maisey
Hille, a native of Brook Park, Ohio,
enlisted in September, 1961, spending
four years in Zweibrucken,
Germany and a total of eight years in
the service.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


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A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only basic
information regarding each group.
For more information about sched-
uled activities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or email
the contact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or corrections to
community@chronicleonline. com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call
352-795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPost155@gmail.com, or
visit www.flPost155.org.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Call Unit President
Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall Rives
Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544,
or email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly
Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor
Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
N American Legion Post 166,
meets at the Springs Loedge No.
378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive,
Homosassa. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-
860-1629.


VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. NesbittVFW Post 10087,
County Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW Post
4864,10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190
N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando. Call
352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com and
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west of
U.S. 19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW
Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at 352-
344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call
352-447-3495.
OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post
447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis,
FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans
Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at
the intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-
419-0207.


Disabled American Veterans
Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call
Commander Lucy Godfrey at
352-794-3104.
Disabled American Veterans
Chapter No. 158, Crystal River,
meets at the Crystal River Mall. For
more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League Ladies
Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans As-
sociation, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-
344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America
(SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23
meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and
Cabane 1219 meets at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De
Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presidente


Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
(MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-382-
3847.
Citrus County Chapter of Mil-
itary Officers Association of
America (MOAA) meets at 11:30
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly at
the Olive Garden. Call President
Norm Cooney, Lt. Col. U.S. Army,
retired, at 352-746-1768, or Secre-
tary Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air Force,
retired, at 352-746-0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness.
Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Citrus
Detachment 819 meets at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly
Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462
or Bion St. Bernard at 352-
697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
meets at Denny's in Crystal River.
Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed
Guard and Merchant Marine Vet-
erans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant in


Spring Hill. The next meeting date is
Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Country
Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville,
20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50,
east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group meets at
different VFW posts throughout the
year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.rollingthunderfl7.com, call
Archie Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial Chapter
136 of the Air Force Association
meets at Ocala Regional Airport Ad-
ministration Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-
854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV property in
Inverness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encouraged by
calling 352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson at 352-
527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy at 352-
382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, developed by
nonprofit agency ServiceSource, is
to meet the needs of wounded vet-
erans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722,
ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


Riders to do poker run
District 7 VFW Riders will host the
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Poker
Run on Saturday, Dec. 7. Registration
begins at 9 a.m. with the last bike out at
11 a.m. and last bike in at4 p.m.
The poker run schedule is:
Staring point and first card -
VFW Post 7122 Floral City, 8191 S.
Florida Ave. Be-gin 50/50 -10 tickets
for $5. Start the run with breakfast for a
donation. Cost of $15 per poker hand in-
cludes the cost of the meal at the Inglis
Post Additional poker hands for $10.
Additional meal tickets are $5.
First stop and second card -


Giovanni's, 3451 E. Louise Lane,
Hernando.
Second stop and third card -
American Legion Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
Third stop and fourth card -
Willard's Restaurant & Lounge, 3490
S.E. County Road 337, Morriston.
Fourth stop and fifth card -
Chiefland VFW Post 5625,1104 S. Main.
Final stop and wild card Inglis
VFW Post 8698, at 520 State Road 40 E.
Last bike in by 4 p.m. Roll the dice for a
lucky No. 7 free drink (one per poker
hand card player).
For information, call Roger at 352-
697-1826 or email shanilyl@yahoo.com.


HIGH OCTANE SALOON & GRILL
Daily Drink & Entertainment Specials
Live Concert 1 PM$
SUNDAY Southern Branded Country Jam 7:30 PM VPot Roast ...................... 3.95
MONDAY All Day Happy Hour $2 Wells, $2 Domestic Bottles, $1 Drafts & 490 Wings
FREE Drafts Kill the Keg Party 10 PM Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides.. ................... 795
TUESDAY (Must wear an Octane Shirt)
Bill Castner 50s & 60s Concert 7:30 PM Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell... Beef .79 .. Chicken .99
Karaoke 8 PM All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread
WEDNESDAY Hump Day Blues w/Mighty Past Tense ou a a pagei aic rea
$3 Jager Bombs, $1 Drafts, $2.50 Wells (Add side sld for $1.00) .......................8.95
All You Can Drink Liquor $15 Drafts $5 (9-12) PK CO
THURSDAY $2.50 Yeungling Bottles, $1 Yuengling Drafts 1 LB. PORK CHOPS O O
Ladies Night 9-12 Free Wells & Drafts w/potatoes & vegetable............ .95
FRI DAY Ladies in FREE til 10 PM & 2 for 1 Wells 9 10 PM Bonkerz comedy club 7:30 pmsurf& turf (Prime Rib nShrimp) $12.95
R I Guys Enjoy $1 Drafts 9 10 PM Purchasethesurfa&turfseethecomedyshowforfree.PrimeRib nShrimp availableafter4pm.


SATURDAY


PEN AM MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3 AM FRIDAY SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373
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2 Live Concerts 1 & 9 PM DJ 9 PM


0 21st Century Oncology


Will Now Operate

Florida Regional Cancer Center











Now, as part of the 21st Century Oncology network,
Florida Regional Cancer Center will provide state-of-the-art
cancer care with:
> An integrated network of expert physicians, including the
nation's leading oncologists
> Improved safety tools including proprietary dosage
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Welcoming to the team
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Jayanth G. Rao, MD





Florida Cancer Center:
Beverly Hills
now 21st Century Oncology
3406 N. Lecanto Highway
Suite A
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


K!)
~i'4A
Eli


I T i
I4 vi0 iffo


At Superior Residences of Lecanto
Located at 4865 West Gulf to Lake Hwy in Lecanto
Please RSVP TO 746-5483
Dr. Waleed Elyaman will be speaking about memory meds
and their effectiveness and will close with a Q&A session.

Don't miss this opportunity to get your questions answered.
Dr. Elyaman is board Certified in Family Medicine. His scope of
practice reflects his special interest in Geriatric Care and he is a
board eligible Hospice and Palliative Care Physician.

Light refreshments will be served.


SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto
MEMORY CARE


4865 West Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
(Just west of the Greek Orthodox Church on
Hwy. 44. )
352.746.5483
www.superioralf. corn
Assisted Living Faclty License # 12256


VETERANS NOTE


Sloppy Joe w/chips......................3.95


VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tee Off for Kids


Special to the Chronicle
The fifth annual Tee Off for Kids on
Veterans Day, Nov. 11, at the Black Dia-
mond Quarry Course, benefited Kids
Central, the local nonprofit serving chil-
dren and families in crisis. Ret Lt Col.
Frank Rasbury of Ocala was Kids Cen-
tral's honored guest, joining the veter-
ans and civilians who were competing
to win.
West Ocala Marines Corps League De-
tachment 1072 and a foursome of air-
men from Patrick Air Force Base in


Cocoa Beach both received a sponsored
foursome donated by Youth and Family
Alternatives and Cory Pool at Jenkins
Auto Group.
Kids Central CEO John Cooper and
members of the Board of Directors were
joined by Florida Rep. Jimmie Smith of
the Community and Veterans Affairs
Subcommittee and U.S. Rep. Richard
Nugent during the awards ceremony In
honor of Veterans Day, all players and
guests received a golf "medal" com-
memorating the occasion and for their
participation in the event.


OR THE HOLIDAYS!,

MAKE YOUR
APPOINTMENT TODAY!


Special to the Chronicle
This foursome of
airmen from Patrick Air
Force Base in Cocoa
Beach was sponsored by
Cory Pool at Jenkins Auto
Group. Kids Central
CEO John Cooper poses
with honored guest Ret.
Lt. Col. Frank Rasbury.
This foursome
from the West Ocala Ma-
rine Corps League
Detachment 1072 was
sponsored by Youth and
Family Alternatives.


'I I


^'S"
R est

assured
with a flu shot,

publixcom/flu
Your friendly Publix pharmacist is here to help you get through this flu season.
He or she is specially trained to give you a flu shot. If you're 65 or over, be sure
to ask about a high-dose vaccine designed especially for you.
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CARPET CLEANING
TILE AND GROUT
HARDWOOD FLOORS
UPHOLSTERY
* Trained Technicians Pre-Spray


* Insured
* Drug Free
* Uniformed
* Furniture Moved


* Pre-Vacuumed
* Deodorizer optional
* Supershield optional
* Enzyme For Pets optional


Citrus County

Call 726-4646

Marion County

Call 622-5885


TD000040921


FL#CAC 1816408
AL#08158


VETERANS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 A21


.^r'^ i.... .. ....... ^ MB




A22 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


FOR THE RECORD


Oct. 14-27, 2013
Marriages
Jay Wesley Warren Jr.,
Inverness/Amanda Beth
Spellicy, Inverness
Matthew David Wendt,
Hernando/Amanda Ashley
Leblanc, Hernando
Jason Trevor Wiggins,
Beverly Hills/Cameo Lee
Harness, Beverly Hills
Larry Edward Anderson
Jr., Crystal River/Roxanne
Marie Anderson, Crystal
River
John Paul Chandler,
Hernando/Amy Marie
Wallace, Hernando
Jeffrey Robert Collom,
Homosassa/Soon Ja Leibelt,
Heidelberg, Germany
Warren Glen Davidson Jr.,
Beverly Hills/Stephanie Ann
Zannini, Beverly Hills
Michael William Emery,
Dunnellon/Gabriell Marie
Mazzi, Citrus Springs
Brandon Donald Lybarger,
Burnsville, Minn./Carol
Christine Johnston,
Burnsville, Minn.
Earl Stanley Moore III,
Crystal River/Dana Marie
Fernandez, Crystal River
Johnathon Doyle Nix,
Homosassa/Nicole Marie
Klotz, Beverly Hills
Duane Isadore Oberski,
Homosassa/Barbara Jane
Rogers, Homosassa
David George Raab,
Hernando/Tara Lee
Maynard, Hernando
Patrick Brian Sanders,
Homosassa/Kelly Alexis
Campbell, Homosassa
Michael Duane Schultz,
Hernando/Kimberley Ann
Reichbach, Hernando
Donald L. Vick, Inver-
ness/Kim Tricia LaLiberte,
Inverness
David Anthony Zell,
Crystal River/Ruby
Geraldine Zell, Crystal River


Oct. 28-Nov. 3
Divorces
Byron Jay Chadwick,
Beverly Hills vs. Sherry Ann
Chadwick, Crystal River
Marriages
Peter Carl Abrams,
Hernando/Lynne Angela
Farrell, Hernando
Anthony Antonetti, Lecanto/
Maria Gioia, Lecanto
James Jacob Dileo,
Inverness/Jessica Ellen
Jarvis, Inverness
Gary Glenn Geer,
Lakeland/Roslyn Ann
Lauben, Homosassa
Springs
Christopher Glenn Judge,
Crystal River/Misty Dawn
Oglesbee, Crystal River
Michael Anthony Kelly,
Inverness/Emma Taglinao
Bongolto, Antipolo City
Daniel James Mahar,
Chicago/Jaclyn Elizabeth
Leukhardt, Chicago
Edward Mayuric, Lecanto/
Joan Marie Holliday, Lecanto
Edward Lee Minick,
Crystal River/Michele Lynn
Laurito, Crystal River
Austin Lee Palminteri,
Lecanto/Joscyln Lorraine
Colleen Pearce, Homosassa
Natvarbhai Bholidas
Patel, Hernando/Bharti
Milesh Kumar Patel,
Hernando
Richard Allan Powers,
Inverness/Kathleen Marie
Liotta, Inverness
Benjamin Reagh,
Hernando/Katelin Cullen
Luddy, Hernando
Calvin Glen Summey,
Horseshoe Bend, Ark./
Rosalinda Manatad
Granada, Horseshoe Bend
George M. VanOrden,
Crystal River/Lynn Carol
Osetek, Crystal River
David Robert Wyman Sr.,
Beverly Hills/Christine
Elizabeth Hart, Beverly Hills


NEWS NOTE

Learn social ballroom dance
Social ballroom dance classes with June Queripel
are offered Wednesdays at the Central Citrus Com-
munity Center, 2804 Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Basics are taught at 1:30 p.m., Plus classes are at
2:45 p.m. The one-hour lessons are $5 each.
Proceeds help support In-Home Senior Services.


60TH ANNIVERSARY


The Vogts


Carol and Ted Vogt of
Beverly Hills celebrated
their 60th wedding
anniversary on a 30-day
cruise to the Hawaiian,
French Polynesian and
Marquesas islands, ross-
ing the International Date
Line and the Equator


L NS M6. -qq
They were married
Oct 10,1953, in
St. Raymond's Roman
Catholic Church, East
Rockaway, Long Island,
N.Y.
They have been
residents of Beverly Hills
for 25 years.


40TH ANNIVERSARY

The Baileys

Lyn and the Rev Gary
Bailey of Lecanto are
celebrating their 40th
wedding anniversary .
The couple were
married Nov 17,1973, in
Red Level. Gary is '
pastor of First Baptist
Church of Lecanto and
Lyn is on the
administrative staff at for 28 years.
Lecanto High School. They have a daughter,
Lyn has lived in Citrus Christa Bailey Allen, of
County for 49 years and Oviedo, and one
Gary has been here grandchild.



County offers HOPE


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Senior
Care Services has home
care services available
under the HOPE Program
(Homecare Options Pro-
vided for Everyone). Serv-
ices available include:
case management, per-
sonal care (help with
bathing and personal
grooming), respite, home-


making (light housekeep-
ing duties), emergency
alert/response button and
home-delivered meals
All of these services are
overseen by a certified
case manager who places
licensed and bonded serv-
ice providers in the home.
If you or a loved one are
in need of any of these
services, call 352-527-5930
for more information.


Cars, cookout


forAlzheimer's


Special to the Chronicle

Life Care Center of
Citrus County will have a
classic car show and
cookout to help find a
cure for Alzheimer's
disease.
Life Care personnel
will be grilling at noon
Wednesday, Nov. 20, with
live entertainment by
Buster Harrelson. The
Citrus County Cruisers
will display their classic
cars and Jerry Fisher


from the Gulf Coast
Alzheimer's Association
will be there to answer
questions and offer
education.
Lunches are $5. Life
Care Center of Citrus
County will donate all
proceeds to the Gulf
Coast Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association.
Life Care Center of
Citrus County is at 3325
W Jerwayne Lane,
Lecanto. For more infor-
mation, call 352-746-4434.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









SPORTS


The Blue
Devils shock
No. 24 Miami,
giving the falling
'Canes their
third straight
loss./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College basketball/B2
0 NBA/B2
0 NHL/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
. College football/B4
."NFL/B5
. High school soccer/B6
0 Golf/B6


One-win Bucs look for No. 2 against flailing Falcons


Associated Press
TAMPA This season hasn't un-
folded the way the Atlanta Falcons and
Tampa Bay Buccaneers envisioned.
The NFC South rivals have just three
victories between them, yet remain con-
fident they are capable of rebounding
over the remainder of their schedules.
A year after going a NFC-best 13-3
and finishing one victory shy of reach-
ing the Super Bowl, the Falcons (2-7)
have been beset with injuries. They
would be deep in the division cellar if
not for Tampa Bay's even slower start.
The Bucs (1-8) opened with eight straight
losses before becoming the last team in
the league to win last Monday night.


"Anytime you're
The Bucs and notdoingwhatyou're
Falcons will expected to do, it's a
square off at tough situation to be
1 p.m. on FOX. in. But every week,
For complete we're just trying to
TV listings get batter and trying
see Page B3. to find ways to win
games," said At-
lanta receiver Roddy White, who's been
hampered by injuries all season, in-
cluding a sore left hamstring that side-
lined him for three games.
"It's going to happen in the NFL
where you have injuries and things like
that," White added, "but you've got to
See Page B3


Buccaneers
running back
Bobby Rainey
rushes against
the Miami
Dolphins during
the second half
Monday in
Tampa. When
the Bucs face
off against the
Falcons today,
it'll be a battle
of the busts:
Two teams
struggling to find
any way to win.
Associated Press


-E k i '^ 0 *

Associated Press
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, left, throws a block to take out Syracuse cornerback Julian Whigham, allowing running
back Kermit Whitfield to score a 74-yard touchdown in the first quarter Saturday in Tallahassee, Fla





Orange crushed


A week after trouncing Wake Forest 59-3, FSUhad Syracuse seeing double


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE
Jameis Winston showed
no effects from a tumul-
tuous week during No. 2
Florida State's 59-3 win
against Syracuse on Saturday.
The redshirt quarterback com-
pleted 19-of-21 passes for 277
yards and two touchdowns as
the Seminoles rolled during
the Atlantic Coast Conference
game.
News broke Wednesday that Winston
was under investigation for an alleged
sexual assault that took place Dec. 7,
2012. The attention of college football
enthusiasts moved away from his Heis-
man Trophy campaign to the many
unanswered questions surrounding an
investigation that is nearly a year old.
On the field, it was business as usual
for the Seminoles (10-0, 8-0) on Satur-


day Syracuse (5-5, 3-3) was held score-
less until late in the fourth quarter
Florida State outgained the Orange
523-427.
"I thought he played exceptionally
well," Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher
said about Winston. "His mind was re-
ally in the game."
The Seminoles scored 28 first-quar-
ter points before the Orange recorded
28 yards of total offense and Winston
was the star The quarterback com-
pleted his first 11 attempts and looked
completely comfortable.
Florida State was up 21-0 when Win-
ston threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to
Rashad Greene with 40 seconds re-
maining in the first quarter He lobbed
a 6-yard touchdown pass to 6-foot-5 re-
ceiver Kelvin Benjamin to go up 35-0
with 11:52 left in the second quarter.
Winston's night ended at halftime and
Florida State holding a 38-0 lead
Syracuse clearly made the decision
to defend the deep ball and worry less
about underneath routes. Winston took
the easy, open throws and didn't force
the ball into tight spots.


The Florida State defense continued
to dominate and showed why it's the
No. 4 scoring defense in the FBS. The
unit allowed 68 yards on 30 plays in the
first half while the Seminoles' offense
had 374 yards on 32 plays. The Orange
managed just four first downs in the
first half while punting five times.
Syracuse quarterback Terrel Hunt
completed 10-of-18 passes for 75 yards.
Backup Drew Allen entered the game
in the third quarter and completed
5-of-9 passes for 29 yards with an
interception.
Florida State hosts Idaho next week.
Syracuse hosts Pitt.
Sean Maguire replaced Winston with
second-stringer Jacob Coker out for the
season after having knee surgery this
week. The redshirt freshman was 3-of-5
for 21 yards with a touchdown and an
interception.
The Seminoles are second in the BCS
standings and are likely three victories
away they play Idaho, Florida and
the ACC championship game in the
next three weeks from locking up a
spot in the BCS championship game.


UF drops


nailbiter


to S.C. for


fifth loss


in a row
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. Elliott
Fry kicked four field goals and
No. 11 South Carolina won its
school-record 16th straight at
home, sending banged-up
Florida to its fifth consecutive
loss with a 19-14 victory Satur-
day night.
The Gamecocks (8-2, 6-2
Southeastern Conference)
struggled to score points
against the Gators' SEC-lead-
ing defense until Fry gave
them a 16-14 lead with a 22-
yard field goal with 6:43 re-
maining.
Trailing 19-14, Gators fresh-
man quarterback Skyler Morn-
hinweg led the Gators into
South Carolina territory but
was intercepted by Jimmy
Legree to end the threat. This
is the longest losing streak for
Florida (4-6, 3-5) since drop-
ping nine straight during its 0-
10-1 season in 1979.
The Gamecocks' win kept
them in the SEC's Eastern Di-
vision race. They got a large
boost in the bid for the title
game with Auburn's last-sec-
ond, tipped-ball comeback to
defeat Georgia. The Game-
cocks still need Missouri to
lose once more.


Associated Press
Florid quarterback Skyler Morn-
hinweg hands the ball off to run-
ning back Mack Brown during
the first half Saturday at
Williams-Brice Stadium in Co-
lumbia, S.C.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Heat's E

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
LeBron James scored 30
points to help Miami beat
Charlotte 97-81 Saturday
night for the Heat's 13th
straight victory against the
Bobcats.
With Mario Chalmers
suspended, Chris Bosh
limited due to foul trouble,
Ray Allen out with the flu
and Dwyane Wade a non-
factor, James came up big
for the Heat The four-time
MVP was 13 of 18 from the
field and had seven assists
in his eighth 20-point game
this season.
Michael Beasley added
15 points for the Heat, win-
ners of six of their last
seven overall.
Kemba Walker had 22
points to lead the Bobcats,
who shot 35 percent from
the field. Jeffery Taylor
scored 14 points and has
now finished in double
digits in six of his last
seven games.
Hawks 110,
Knicks 90
NEW YORK -Jeff Teague
scored 16 points to lead eight
players in double figures, and
the Atlanta Hawks sent the
New York Knicks to a fifth
straight home loss with a 110-
90 victory Saturday night.
Paul Millsap, back in the
starting lineup, had 14 points
and 13 rebounds as the
Hawks shot 56 percent and
won for the fourth time in five
games. They avenged the
loss during that span, a 95-91
Knicks victory in Atlanta on
Wednesday.
This was at Madison
Square Garden, where New
York hasn't won since beating
Milwaukee on Oct. 30 in its
season opener, and where
the fans are getting restless.
There were noticeable
groans and boos in the arena,
along with a few "Fire Wood-
son!" chants as the Knicks fell
to 3-6.
Carmelo Anthony had 23
points and 12 rebounds for
New York. Andrea Bargnani
added 16 points and nine
boards.
Cavaliers 103,
Wizards 96
WASHINGTON Kyrie
Irving scored nine of his 41
points in overtime to help the
Cleveland Cavaliers snap a
three-game skid with a 103-
96 victory over the Washing-
ton Wizards on Saturday
night.
Irving scored seven straight
points on three possessions
in overtime to give Cleveland
the lead for good. He later
added an 18-foot jumper to
match his career high and fin-


)7-81 win over Bobcats come on strong


in second half



to beat UALR


Associated Press
The Miami Heat's LeBron James dunks Saturday as the Charlotte Bobcats' Bismack
Biyombo watches during the first half in Charlotte, N.C.


ish 14 of 28 from the floor and
4 of 7 from beyond the arc.
Earl Clark hit three key 3-
pointers in the fourth quarter
for the Cavaliers, finishing
with 11 points. Tristan Thomp-
son added 15 points and 12
rebounds, and center Andrew
Bynum made his second start
in as many years, contributing
six points and three rebounds.
John Beal scored 28 points
for Washington, Nene added
24 points and seven re-
bounds, and John Wall had
nine points and 12 assists.
Mavericks 108,
Magic 100
ORLANDO Monta Ellis
had 19 points and eight as-
sists to help the Dallas Maver-
icks hold off the Orlando
Magic for a 108-100 victory
Saturday night.
Dirk Nowitzki and DeJuan
Blair added 18 apiece for the
Mavericks, who won for the
eighth straight time in Or-
lando.
Arron Afflalo led Orlando
with 25 points and four as-
sists. Nikola Vucevic had 16
points and eight rebounds
and Jameer Nelson added
15.


Orlando trimmed a 15-point
first-half deficit to 91-87 after
Vucevic's layup with 6:58 left
in the game. The Magic had
chances to get closer, but
Vucevic missed another layup
attempt, rookie guard Victor
Oladipo committed back-to-
back turnovers and Afflalo
missed a jumper.
Shawn Marion ended Dal-
las' drought with a 3-pointer
from the corner, the Mavs first
points in nearly four minutes.
A 3 from Nowitzki stretched
the lead to 100-91 with 3:10
left and the Magic never got
closer.
Timberwolves 106,
Celtics 88
MINNEAPOLIS Kevin
Love had 23 points and 12 re-
bounds and Nikola Pekovic
had 20 points and 12 boards
to lead the Minnesota Timber-
wolves to a 106-88 victory
over the Boston Celtics on
Saturday night.
Kevin Martin scored 20 on
6-for-18 shooting and Dante
Cunningham scored 12 off the
bench to help Minnesota re-
bound from a tough loss in
Denver the previous night.
Avery Bradley scored 27


points and Vitor Faverani had
nine points and 14 rebounds
for the Celtics. But Jeff Green
went 0 for 6 from the floor and
Boston's 22 turnovers led to
28 points for the Timber-
wolves.
The Celtics have lost three
in a row following a four-game
winning streak.
Bulls 110,
Pacers 94
CHICAGO Luol Deng
scored 23 points, Derrick
Rose added 20 points and the
Chicago Bulls knocked off the
NBA's last unbeaten team
with a 110-94 win over the In-
diana Pacers.
Taj Gibson had 15 points
and eight rebounds for
Chicago (5-3), which won its
fourth straight game behind
11-of-19 shooting from 3-point
range.
Rose was 6 for 11 from be-
yond the arc in 30 minutes
after missing a game with a
sore right hamstring.
Roy Hibbert led Indiana (9-
1) with 14 points and 10 re-
bounds. Paul George, who
averaged 24.6 points per
game coming in, was held to
12 points.


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Casey Prather scored 27
points and Dorian
Finney-Smith showed
great versatility in his
Florida debut
Prather put back a
loose ball, scored on a
driving layup and capped
off a 17-4 run with a dunk
off a steal by DeVon
Walker as Florida (2-1)
woke up from a first-half
malaise. The score was
tied at 27 after a sloppy
opening half.
The Gators stepped up
the pressure after the
break, and it paid off in a
big way The Trojans (0-2)
couldn't match the pace
and had key turnovers
that enabled Florida to
turn the game into a rout.
Will Neighbour was a
lone bright spot for
Arkansas-Little Rock
with 21 points and eight
rebounds.
No. 10 Ohio St. 52,
Marquette 35
MILWAUKEE Shannon
Scott and Sam Thompson
scored 13 points apiece,
helping No. 10 Ohio State
pull away from cold-shooting
No. 17 Marquette for a 52-35
win Saturday.
Aaron Craft added 10
points for the Buckeyes (3-
0), who ended the Golden
Eagles' 27-game home win-
ning streak, second-longest
in the nation.
Ohio State slowly grabbed
control with a 12-4 run to
open the second half, which
included six points from Scott.
The 6-foot-1 guard found
gaps in Marquette's interior
defense, and then extended
the lead to 44-28 with 6:31
left on a layup on the break.
The Golden Eagles had
20 turnovers and shot just 19
percent (10 of 53).
No. 9 Syracuse 69,
Colgate 50
SYRACUSE, N.Y. C.J.
Fair scored 20 points for
Syracuse, and freshman
guard Tyler Ennis hit four 3-
pointers for 12 points.
Michael Gbinije had 11
points in 18 minutes and
Trevor Cooney scored 10 for
the Orange, who outre-
bounded Colgate 52-34, in-
cluding a 26-7 advantage on
the offensive glass. Syra-
cuse scored 30 points in the


paint and forced 21
turnovers.
Syracuse (3-0) has won
48 straight against Colgate
for a 121-45 advantage in
the longest-running series
for both teams. Colgate (0-2)
was coming off an 89-78
road loss to Wake Forest last
week in the Raiders' season
opener.
Ethan Jacobs led Colgate
with 13 points and Austin
Tillotson, a transfer from
Monmouth, finished with
nine points and four assists.
No. 16 Wichita St. 85,
Tennessee St. 71
WICHITA, Kan. Tekele
Cotton scored 18 points to
lead Wichita State to the vic-
tory.
Cotton was 6 of 8 from the
floor as Wichita State (4-0)
won its fourth game in eight
days despite trailing at half-
time for the second straight
game. Cleanthony Early had
16 points, and Nick Wiggins
scored 10 of his 12 in the
second half.
Patrick Miller had 23
points for Tennessee State
(0-4), and M.J. Rhett added
16 points and 11 rebounds.
Darius Carter and Early
each converted a three-point
play and Cotton hit his third
3-pointer to help Wichita
State open a 48-38 lead with
13:03 left in the game.
No. 25 Virginia 70,
Davidson 57
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Mike Tobey had 18 points,
and Virginia used a second-
half surge to get the win.
Tobey was 8 for 11 from
the field. Malcolm Brogdon
added 17 points and seven
rebounds for the Cavaliers,
who rallied after a tough loss
to No. 14 VCU Tuesday.
Akil Mitchell, who played
high school basketball in
Charlotte, overcame a slug-
gish first half and finished
with 11 points all in the
second half and nine re-
bounds for Virginia. Justin
Anderson added 12 re-
bounds and eight rebounds.
Virginia (2-1) broke open a
two-point game by outscor-
ing Davidson 26-12 to start
the second half. The bigger
Cavaliers outrebounded the
Wildcats 42-30.
Tyler Kalinoski had 13
points and 11 rebounds for
Davidson (0-3), which shot
just 31 percent from the field.


Brodeur leads Devils over Penguins 4-1


Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. -
Jaromir Jagr scored two
goals and Martin Brodeur
made 27 saves to lead the
New Jersey Devils to a 4-1
win over the Pittsburgh
Penguins on Saturday
night.
Andy Greene and Adam
Larsson also scored for
New Jersey, which has
won three of its past five.
Chris Kunitz scored for
Pittsburgh. The Penguins
have lost five of six. Marc-
Andre Fleury stopped 18
of 21 shots.
Despite being outshot
10-3 in the first period, it
was the Devils who went
into the first intermission
with a 1-0 lead. Greene's
second of the season
opened the scoring with
18.4 seconds left in the pe-
riod.
Rangers 1,
Canadiens 0
MONTREAL- Ryan
Callahan ended New York's
four-year-old goal drought in
Montreal and rookie Cam Tal-
bot made 22 saves for his first
NHL shutout and the Rangers
blanked the Canadiens 1-0 on
Saturday night.
Callahan scored his sixth
goal of the season for New
York, which has won eight of
its past 11 games.
Talbot, who replaced Martin
Biron as the backup goalie,


became the first Rangers
goalie to earn a shutout in
Montreal since Ed Giacomin
in a 5-0 win on Feb. 25,1967.
The Rangers outshot Mon-
treal 34-22.
The Canadiens were com-
ing off a 3-2 shootout win in
Columbus on Friday night and
spent most of the game a
step behind the Rangers, who
played the first of back-to-
back games before playing
Los Angeles at home Sunday.
Callahan broke the
Rangers' Bell Centre drought
just as a two-man advantage
ended as he tipped Brad
Richard's blast from the left
circle past Carey Price 5:25
into the second period.
Blues 4,
Hurricanes 2
ST. LOUIS--Alexander
Steen scored his league-lead-
ing 17th goal and also added
an assist to lead the St. Louis
Blues to a 4-2 win over the
Carolina Hurricanes on Satur-
day night.
Steen extended his scoring
streak to 13 games, the
longest for a Blue since Pierre
Turgeon had a 15-game
streak in 1999-2000.
The Blues won for the fifth
time in six games despite giv-
ing up two short-handed goals
on the same power play for
the first time in more than 20
years. St. Louis last allowed
that to happen on Oct. 8,


1992 against the then-Min-
nesota North Stars.
Roman Polak had a goal
and assist for St. Louis. David
Backes and T.J. Oshie also
scored for the Blues and
Brian Elliott made 18 saves.
Eric Staal and Nathan
Gerbe scored the Carolina
goals.
Maple Leafs 4,
Sabres 2
TORONTO James van
Riemsdyk scored twice and
Nikolai Kulemin got the win-
ner and the Toronto Maple
Leafs snapped a three-game
losing skid with a 4-2 win over
the Buffalo Sabres on Satur-
day night.
The Maple Leafs placed
newly acquired center Peter
Holland on their top line be-
tween Phil Kessel and van
Riemsdyk, which allowed van
Riemsdyk to move back to his
natural position at left wing.
He looked comfortable back
on the left side, scoring his
eighth and ninth goals of the
season in the first period.
At 5:45, van Riemsdyk re-
directed a Cody Franson point
shot to open the scoring.
Then at 13:35, on a power
play, van Riemsdyk re-di-
rected another Franson shot
to give Toronto a 2-0 lead.
Van Riemsdyk had been
pointless in his previous five
games, four of those at cen-
ter.


Islanders 5,
Red Wings 4 (SO)
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Kevin
Poulin stopped all three De-
troit skaters in the shootout
after coming on in relief, and
the New York Islanders out-
lasted the reeling Red Wings
in a 5-4 see-saw matchup


Saturday night.
Neither team could hold the
lead until Poulin finally shut
the door in the tiebreaker,
denying Henrik Zetterberg,
Pavel Datsyuk and Todd
Bertuzzi. The Red Wings had
tied the game 4-4 when Dat-
syuk scored his second of the
night with 42.5 seconds left in


regulation.
The Red Wings have
lost six straight games and
five in a row after regulation
- the past three in
shootouts.
Frans Nielsen scored the
only shootout goal for the Is-
landers, who had dropped five
of six.


James accounts for 30 in


No. 11 Gators


:PO R T -S -& AP P AREL
IREEIN PIRINTINU RKMIRIBIOIRY"

NOW LOCATED IN THE CRSYATL RIVER MALL

CHRISTMAS IS COMING

ORDER YOU LETTERBMAN JACKET TODAY!!


....~



CORPOUTE APPRREL TEARM UIIFORMnI. TEMll SPITI EIIIPnEIT
TROPRIEI MANI. LETTEIM JIEKETI

352-564-94D2
OOOGNXB


B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Springstead 21,
Citrus 6
CHS 0 6 0 0 6
SHS 7 14 0 0 21
Scoring summary
First Quarter
SHS -T Mahla 7 run (T Toth kick), 3:44
Second Quarter
SHS- Mahla 10 run (Toth kick), 10:29
CHS -J. Pouncey 81 kickoff return (kick fail),
10:11
SHS -J. Jeffords 11 pass from Mahla (Toth
kick), 0:09
Individual Statistics
Rushing-SHS: K. Bedford 16-74-0; Mahla 14-
52-2; D.Wright 13-30-0. CHS: D. Moore 11-47-
0; J. Clark 7-30-0; N. Waters 4-17-0.
Passing SHS: Mahla 4-7-0-43. CHS: Moore
5-14-0-39.
Receiving- SHS: L. Hannah 1-12-0; Jeffords
1-11-1;T Anderson 1-11-0. CHS: G.Wilcox 1-
15-0; Pouncey 2-12-0; J. Juse 1-9-0.
Penalties -SHS: 2-20. CHS: 8-97.




Weeki Wachee
Duals II results
Friday, Nov. 15
Round 1
Crystal River 65, Countryside 12
Venice 60, Lecanto 6
Belleview 39, Land 0' Lakes 36
Hernando 66, Central 24
Round 2
Weeki Wachee 60, Trinity Catholic 12
Gainesville wins by forfeit over Hudson
Nature CoastTechnical 54, Ridgewood 15
Citrus 51, Lake Wales 21
Round 3
Venice 74, Central 6
Hernando 41, Land 0' Lakes 36
Crystal River 62, Lecanto 18
Belleview 39, Countryside 36
Round 4
Gainesville 65, Ridgewood 18
Nature Coast Technical 54,Lake Wales 6
Weeki Wachee 33, Citrus 32
Trinity Catholic wins by forfeit over Hudson
Round 5
Land 0' Lakes 48, Lecanto 27
Crystal River 51, Belleview 15
Countryside 66, Central 12
Venice 69, Hernando 6
Round 6
Nature Coast Technical 45, Weeki Wachee 30
Citrus 72, Trinity Catholic 15
Gainesville 70, Lake Wales 0
Ridgewood wins by forfeit over Hudson
Saturday, Nov.16
Round 7
Gainesville 49, Weeki Wachee 24
Nature Coast Technical 60, Trinity Catholic 12
Citrus wins by forfeit over Hudson
Ridgewood 30, Lake Wales 24
Round 8
Venice 69, Belleview 3
Land 0' Lakes 45, Countryside 33
Citrus 59, Central 13
Hernando 48, Lecanto 18
Round 9
Nature Coast Technical 43, Citrus 33
Gainesville 69, Trinity Catholic 0
Weeki Wachee 45, Ridgewood 18
Lake Wales wins by forfeit over Hudson
Round 10
Crystal River 48, Land 0' Lakes 21
Venice 66, Countryside 15
Belleview 42, Hernando 36
Lecanto 51, Central 18
Round 11
Weeki Wachee 54, Lake Wales 12
Nature CoastTechnical wins by forfeit over Hudson
Gainesville 42, Citrus 31
Ridgewood 42, Trinity Catholic 12
Round 12
Belleview 63, Lecanto 18
Land 0' Lakes 66, Central 24
Venice 48, Crystal River 21
Hernando 48, Countryside 33
Round 13
Citrus 63, Ridgewood 12
Gainesville 39, Nature CoastTechnical 36
Weeki Wachee wins by forfeit over Hudson
Lake Wales 30, Trinity Catholic 18
Round 14
Crystal River 41, Hernando 11
Venice 69, Land 0' Lakes 9
Belleview 60, Central 21
Countryside 39, Lecanto 35
Round 15
15th place
Central wins by forfeit over Hudson
13th place
Lecanto 42, Trinity Catholic 12
11th place
Countryside 51, Lake Wales 18
9th place
Land 0' Lakes 54, Ridgewood 15
7th place
Citrus 60, Hernando 24
5th place
Belleview 45, Weeki Wachee 28
3rd place
Crystal River 40, Nature CoastTechnical 31
1st place
Gainesville 34#, Venice 34
# Denotes GHS won tiebreaker via criteria "H"
- most first points scored, 7-5.
Individual Awards:
Outstanding Wrestler- Jon Garner, Gainesville.
Weeki Wachee duals
PL TEAM W L .PCT
1. Gainesville 8 0 1.000
2. Venice 7 1 .875
3. Crystal River 7 1 .875
4. N.C.Technical 6 2 .750
5. Belleview 6 2 .750
6. WeekiWachee 5 3 .625
7. Citrus 5 3 .625
8. Hernando 4 4 .500
9. Land O' Lakes 4 4 .500
10. Ridgewood 3 5 .375
11. Countryside 3 5 .375
12. Lake Wales 2 6 .250
13. Lecanto 2 6 .000
14. Trinity Catholic 1 7 .125
15. Central 1 7 .125
16. Hudson 0 8 .000
TOTALS 64 64 .500


Ford EcoBoost 300
results
Saturday at Homestead-Miami Speedway,
Homestead, Fla.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200 laps, 120.7
rating, 0 points, $83,475.
2. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 130.7, 44,
$77,675.
3. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 128.5, 0,
$49,175.


4. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 111.1, 0,
$40,860.
5. (9) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 94.8, 39,
$40,380.
6. (4) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 121.6, 0,
$26,580.
7. (16) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 98.7, 37,
$28,980.
8. (1) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 114.1, 37,
$32,555.
9. (13) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 81.9, 35,
$26,930.
10. (15) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 77,
34, $27,080.
11. (2) Blake Koch, Toyota, 200, 81.6, 33,
$25,880.
12. (11) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 87.2, 32,
$24,330.


For the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
10 29 37 44 59
POWER BALL
10


CASH 3 (early)
6-0-1
CASH 3 (late)
1-8-6

PLAY 4 (early)
S 8-5-4-6
PLAY 4 (late)
T, 6-2-1-7

FANTASY 5
7 15 17 28-35

LOTTERY
8-19-22-29-32-38
XTRA
4


Friday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Mega Money: xx xx xx xx
Mega Ball: xx
4-of-4 MB winner $x
4-of-4 x $x
3-of-4 MB x $x
3-of-4 x $x
2-of-4 MB x $x
1-of-4 MB x $x
2-of-4 x $x


Fantasy 5:x-x-x-x-x
5-of-5 winners $x
4-of-5 x $x
3-of-5 x $x


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (NBC) Formula One: United States Grand Prix. From
Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Las Vegas (taped)
3 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Ford EcoBoost 400.
From Homestead-Miami Speedway
6:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: United States Grand Prix
(same-day tape)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series. From
Pomona, Calif. (taped)
1 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Ford EcoBoost 400.
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) 2K Sports Classic: Boston University at
Connecticut
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Indiana State at Notre Dame
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Hall of Fame Tip-Off: Belmont at North Carolina
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Michigan at Iowa State
5 p.m. (FS1) Towson atVillanova
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon State at Maryland
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Robert Morris at Kentucky
8 p.m. (ESPNU) 2K Sports Classic: Florida Atlantic at Boston
College
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m. (FS1) California at Georgetown
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Georgia Tech at Tennessee
EUROLEAGUE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (NBA) FC Barcelona at Budivelnik Kiev (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida Atlantic at Southern Mississippi (taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Syracuse at Florida State (taped)
12:30 a.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at USC
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (FOX) Atlanta Falcons at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1 p.m. (FOX) Arizona Cardinals at Jacksonville Jaguars
4 p.m. (CBS) San Diego Chargers at Miami Dolphins
4:25 p.m. (FOX) San Francisco 49ers at New Orleans Saints
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: DP World Tour Champi-
onship, final round. From Dubai, United Arab Emirates
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: OHL Classic, final round. From
Mexico
OLYMPICS
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Olympic Trials: Men's & Women's
Curling, Match 3. (If necessary)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (taped)
SKATING
4:30 p.m. (NBC) Figure skating: ISU Grand Prix: Trophee Eric
Bompard. From Paris (taped)
COLLEGE SOCCER
2 p.m. (ESPNU) ACC Tournament, final: Teams TBA. From
Boyds, Md.
10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) American Athletic Tournament, final:
Teams TBA. From Frisco, Texas (same-day tape)
TENNIS
8 a.m. (TENNIS) Davis Cup: Final: Serbia vs. Czech Republic,
Rubber 4
11 a.m. (TENNIS) Tennis Davis Cup: Final: Serbia vs. Czech
Republic, Rubber 5

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


13. (19) Ryan Reed, Ford, 200, 74.9, 31,
$23,930.
14. (17) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 78.2, 0,
$23,730.
15. (12) Drew Herring, Toyota, 200, 82.1, 29,
$24,220.
16. (18) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 92.3, 28,
$24,415.
17. (23) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 66.8, 27,
$23,405.
18. (22) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 62.4, 26,
$23,590.
19. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 93, 25,
$23,030.
20. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, 200, 58.8, 24,
$23,595.
21. (31) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 200, 52, 23,
$22,810.
22. (39) Bryan Silas, Ford, 200, 46.4, 0,
$22,700.
23. (35) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 200, 41.7, 0,
$22,565.
24. (34) Dakoda Armstrong, Toyota, 200, 48.1,
0, $22,450.
25. (36) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 199, 38, 19,
$16,790.
26. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 198, 40.7, 18,
$22,185.
27. (33) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 194, 34.7, 17,
$16,070.
28. (28) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, accident, 184,
50.6, 16, $21,955.
29. (25) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, accident, 183,
75, 15, $21,850.
30. (32) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, accident,
183, 50.2, 14, $22,040.
31. (7) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 175, 68.3, 13,
$21,930.
32. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 173, 72.2, 12,
$21,665.
33. (21) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 163, 57.8,


11, $21,460.
34. (20) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 148, 46.5, 10,
$15,395.
35. (24) Kevin Swindell, Ford, accident, 127,
54.1,9, $21,356.
36. (38) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, vibration, 102, 29.3,
8, $20,150.
37. (27) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical, 49, 37.7,
7, $14,085.
38.(37)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, vibration, 20, 31.4,
6, $19,994.
39. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 5,
30.8, 5, $13,735.
40. (26) Michael McDowell, Toyota, overheating,
5, 29.7, 0, $13,700.
Race statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 109.025 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 45 minutes, 6 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.126 seconds.
Caution Flags: 10 for 49 laps.
Lead Changes: 19 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: S.Hornish Jr. 1-4; B.Keselowski 5;
S.Hornish Jr. 6-38; K.Larson 39-48; K.Busch 49-
51; M.Kenseth 52; K.Busch 53; M.Kenseth 54-
61; K.Busch 62-65; B.Keselowski 66-82;
J.Logano 83-102; K.Busch 103-121; B.Ke-
selowski 122-125; K.Larson 126-133; J.Logano
134-150; T.Dillon 151-159; K.Larson 160-166;
K.Busch 167-168; K.Larson 169-197; B.Ke-
selowski 198-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Larson, 4 times for 54 laps; J.Logano, 2
times for 37 laps; S.Hornish Jr., 2 times for 37
laps; K.Busch, 5 times for 29 laps; B.Ke-
selowski, 4 times for 25 laps; M.Kenseth, 2
times for 9 laps; TDillon, 1 time for 9 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1.A.Dillon, 1,180; 2. S.Hornish
Jr., 1,177; 3. R.Smith, 1,108; 4. E.Sadler, 1,090;
5. J.AIIgaier, 1,090; 6. TBayne, 1,086; 7. B.Scott,
1,053; 8. K.Larson, 1,001; 9. RKligerman, 993;
10. B.Vickers, 970.


For Nov. 17
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
atTampa Bay +1 Pk (43%) Atlanta
N.Y Jets Pk 1 (41) at Buffalo
Detroit 3 21 (46/2) at Pittsburgh
at Philadelphia 3 41 (53) Washington
San Diego 1 11 (45/2) at Miami
at Chicago 3 3 (44) Baltimore
atCincinnati 6 6 (41/2) Cleveland
at Houston 7 9 (41) Oakland
Arizona 6/2 8/2 (41) at Jacksonville
at Denver 8 8 (49) Kansas City
atSeattle 13/2 12/2 (46) Minnesota
at New Orleans 3 3 (48) San Francisco
at N.Y Giants 4 4 (42) Green Bay
Tomorrow
at Carolina 2/ 2/2 (46) New England
NBA
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
atToronto 1/2 (194) Portland
Memphis 3 (192) at Sacramento
at L.A. Lakers 1/2 (205/2) Detroit
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Columbus -145 atOttawa +125
St. Louis -120 atWashington +100
at N.Y Rangers-120 Los Angeles +100
atChicago -140 San Jose +120
atVancouver -160 Dallas +140
at Minnesota -190 Winnipeg +165


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 5 6 .455 -
Toronto 4 6 .400 1
Brooklyn 3 5 .375 1
Boston 4 7 .364 1
NewYork 3 6 .333 1
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 3 .700 -
Atlanta 6 4 .600 1
Charlotte 5 5 .500 2
Orlando 4 6 .400 3
Washington 2 7 .222 4/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 9 1 .900 -
Chicago 5 3 .625 3
Detroit 3 5 .375 5
Cleveland 4 7 .364 5/2
Milwaukee 2 6 .250 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 9 1 .900 -
Houston 7 4 .636 2/2
Dallas 6 4 .600 3
Memphis 4 5 .444 4/2
New Orleans 4 6 .400 5
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 7 2 .778 -
Minnesota 7 4 .636 1
Oklahoma City 5 3 .625 1/2
Denver 4 5 .444 3
Utah 1 9 .100 6/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 6 3 .667 -
Golden State 6 3 .667 -
Phoenix 5 4 .556 1
L.A. Lakers 4 7 .364 3
Sacramento 2 6 .250 3/2
Friday's Games
Indiana 104, Milwaukee 77
Chicago 96, Toronto 80
Portland 109, Boston 96
Charlotte 86, Cleveland 80
Miami 110, Dallas 104
Atlanta 113, Philadelphia 103
Denver 117, Minnesota 113
Brooklyn 100, Phoenix 98, OT
San Antonio 91, Utah 82
Memphis 89, L.A. Lakers 86
Detroit 97, Sacramento 90
Saturday's Games
Dallas 108, Orlando 100
Cleveland 103, Washington 96, OT
Miami 97, Charlotte 81
Atlanta 110, NewYork 90
Chicago 110, Indiana 94
Minnesota 106, Boston 88
Houston 122, Denver 111
New Orleans 135, Philadelphia 98
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, late
Utah at Golden State, late
Brooklyn at L.A. Clippers, late
Sunday's Games
Portland atToronto, 1 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.


NHL standings


Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo


Pittsburgh
Washington
N.Y Rangers
Carolina
New Jersey
N.Y Islanders
Philadelphia
Columbus



Chicago
Colorado
Minnesota
St. Louis
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville


Anaheim
San Jose
Phoenix
Los Angeles
Vancouver
Calgary
Edmonton


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
20 14 6 0 28 64 50
19 12 6 1 25 53 36
20 12 7 1 25 57 47
21 9 5 7 25 54 60
21 10 9 2 22 52 45
19 8 7 4 20 57 58
20 412 4 12 42 69
22 516 1 11 41 68
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
20 12 8 0 24 56 47
20 11 8 1 23 65 58
19 10 9 0 20 42 49
19 8 7 4 20 37 51
20 7 8 5 19 42 49
21 810 3 19 61 68
19 710 2 16 35 48
19 610 3 15 48 56
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
19 13 2 4 30 71 53
18 14 4 0 28 58 37
20 12 4 4 28 53 43
17 12 2 3 27 61 40
19 10 7 2 22 56 55
21 10 9 2 22 56 59
19 8 9 2 18 39 61
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
22 15 5 2 32 71 56
20 13 2 5 31 71 45
21 14 4 3 31 73 66
20 13 6 1 27 57 46
21 11 7 3 25 55 56
19 610 3 15 52 71
21 415 2 10 49 81


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
Friday's Games
Carolina 3, Anaheim 2, SO
Montreal 3, Columbus 2, SO
Washington 4, Detroit 3, SO
Winnipeg 3, Philadelphia 2, SO
Buffalo 3, Toronto 1
Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 0
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1
Ottawa 4, Boston 2
Minnesota 3, Florida 2
San Jose 3, Edmonton 1
Saturday's Games
N.Y Islanders 5, Detroit 4, SO
Toronto 4, Buffalo 2
N.Y Rangers 1, Montreal 0
New Jersey 4, Pittsburgh 1
Phoenix 6, Tampa Bay 3
Carolina at St. Louis, late
Chicago at Nashville, late
Florida at Colorado, late
Edmonton at Calgary, late
Sunday's Games
Columbus at Ottawa, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Washington, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Vancouver, 8 p.m.


BUCS
Continued from Page B1

move past those things and you've
got to go with the guys you've got and
go out there and try to win games."
Tampa Bay has had its share of in-
juries, too. Still, there's no escaping
that until the Bucs faced the Dol-
phins, they had not played well
enough for an entire game to win.
The Bucs held fourth-quarter
leads in four of their eight setbacks,
losing each time in the final 89 sec-
onds of regulation or overtime.
They enter a rematch against the
Falcons on Sunday eager to build on
giving Seattle fits before falling in
OT two weeks ago, and finally get-
ting over the hump against Miami.
"It does feel like a weight has
been lifted," Bucs defensive tackle
Gerald McCoy said.
"We're not relaxing, but we're not
thinking about (being winless) any-
more. ... After getting a win, you get
that feeling you've always been
looking for," McCoy added. "Now,
it's kind of like: 'I need to keep feel-
ing it,' so we're going to work even
harder than we've been working to
get the first win to get the second
one, and the third one, and the
fourth one."
The Falcons have not gotten the
desired results this season, but
coach Mike Smith doesn't fault the
team's effort.
"It's very difficult when you don't
get the outcome that you want.
Everybody has high expectations
and nobody has higher expectations
than our players," Smith said.
"You can't look at it as the season
is over The season is not over," the
coach added. "Whatever your
record is, you've got to go out and
compete each and every day"
Five things to watch as the Fal-
cons try to stop their three-game
slide, and the Bucs attempt to build
on their first victory:
All on Ryan
With WR Julio Jones out for the
season, and White and RB Steven
Jackson hobbled for much of the
schedule, QB Matt Ryan has been
carrying a heavier burden than
usual for the Falcons. They are sixth
in the NFL in passing offense, but
last in rushing. Jackson returned
three weeks ago, but falling behind
early has limited opportunities to
run the ball.
Stuffing the run
The Bucs set a franchise record,
limiting the Dolphins to 2 yards
rushing. The Falcons averaged 1-
yard per carry against Tampa Bay
last month, finishing with 18 yards
on 18 attempts. Ryan stepped up to
pace an eight-point Atlanta win,
completing 20 of 26 passes for 273
yards, three touchdowns and no in-
terceptions.
Baby steps
Rookie QB Mike Glennon had his
first fourth-quarter comeback win
against Miami, leading an 80-yard
drive that put the Bucs ahead for
good with 10 minutes remaining.
Before throwing a third-quarter in-
terception, the third-round draft
pick attempted 158 consecutive
passes without a pick. He hasn't
been flashy, but he has improved
steadily in six starts.
Trick plays
Falcons defense beware. The
Bucs have scored on gadget plays
the past two games, with RB Mike
James flipping a 2-yard jump pass to
TE Tom Crabtree against the Sea-
hawks, and Glennon throwing a 1-
yard TD pass to LT Donald Penn
against the Dolphins.
Slow 'em down
The Falcons haven't won since
beating the Bucs four weeks ago.
They've been outscored 94-33 dur-
ing their skid, losing each game by a
minimum of two touchdowns.




Memphis



shuts down



sputtering



USF

Associated Press

TAMPA Jake Elliott kicked a
pair of first-half field goals, one of
them a 56-yarder that hit the cross-
bar and bounced through to help
Memphis beat sputtering South


Florida 23-10 for the Tigers' first
American Athletic Conference vic-
tory on Saturday night.
The Tigers (3-6,1-4) broke open a
close game, driving 59 yards in eight
plays to score on a 5-yard run by
Brandon Hayes that made it 13-3
with 4:09 remaining.
Dion Witty's interception and 22-
yard return set up Elliott's third field
goal of the night, and Bobby McClain
ran back an interception 37 yards for
a touchdown to turn it into a rout
USF (2-7,2-3) avoided going with-
out an offensive touchdown for the
fifth time when Mike White threw a
31-yard scoring pass to Andre Davis
with 46 seconds left.


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Canes bedeviled


Duke stuns

No. 24 Miami

48-30for

'Canes'third

straight defeat

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. -
Miami couldn't stop
Duke's running game. And
once the Blue Devils
started scoring, the 24th-
ranked Hurricanes' of-
fense couldn't keep up.
"There's enough blame
to go around in this game,"
coach Al Golden said.
The Hurricanes' free-fall
continued Saturday when
Duke beat them 48-30.
Their third straight loss
dropped them down the
ACC Coastal Division
standings and probably
out of the national rank-
ings, too.
A win would have put
Miami in control of the di-
vision and set up a re-
match with No. 2 Florida
State in the league cham-
pionship game.
Instead, it's the Blue
Devils who have the inside
track to Charlotte.
"It's really about execut-
ing, and we didn't do that
well enough," Golden said.
"Duke did."
Dallas Crawford rushed
for 115 yards and Stephen
Morris threw for 379 and
two touchdowns but the
Hurricanes (7-3, 3-3) lost
their third straight since
climbing to No. 7. They've
allowed at least 41 points
in each loss.
They could stop neither
Brandon Connette nor the
Blue Devils' ground game.
The Blue Devils rolled
up 358 yards rushing by
far, the most by a David
Cutcliffe-coached team at
either Duke or Mississippi
- against a Miami run de-
fense that gives up an av-
erage of 152.
Connette rushed for a
career-high four touch-
downs and threw for a fifth
for Duke. The change-of-
pace quarterback had
touchdown runs of 1, 2, 3
and 4 yards, and threw a
22-yard TD to Shaq Powell.
Duke (8-2, 4-2) for
years, one of the nation's
worst programs in a power
conference claimed its
sixth straight win, and it
ranks as one of the most
significant in school history
"I remember when I
first got here, the team
hadn't won a game in, like,
three years," running back
Josh Snead said. Cutcliffe
told him: "'Just believe.
Believe in the process.' We
got a lot of guys that be-
lieve in this process, and
we're here today"
Snead rushed for a ca-
reer-high 138 yards and
Powell added a back-
breaking 33-yard touch-
down run that put the Blue
Devils in complete com-


Associated Press
Duke's Jeremy Cash breaks up a pass intended for Miami's Malcolm Lewis during the first half Saturday in Durham, N.C.


mand of a wild game that
featured 1,108 total yards
and three lead changes.
Ross Martin gave Duke
the lead for good late in
the third quarter when he
banked in a 48-yard field
goal off the upright late to
make it 31-30.
No. 3 Ohio State 60,
Illinois 35
CHAMPAIGN, III. Carlos
Hyde ran for 246 yards and
four touchdowns and Braxton
Miller had another 184 yards
rushing and two scores Satur-
day to push No. 3 Ohio State
past Illinois 60-35.
But even with Hyde's offen-
sive explosion, the Buckeyes
(10-0, 6-0 Big Ten) needed a
third-quarter defensive stop
and safety to secure the win.
After trailing 28-0 in the
second quarter, Illinois (3-7,
0-6) closed to 35-21 in the
third on two Nathan Scheel-
haase touchdown passes.
Illinois had the momentum
when the Buckeyes' Ryan
Shazier sacked backup quar-
terback Reilly O'Toole in the
end zone. Illinois recovered
his fumble but the safety gave
the Buckeyes a 37-21 edge
and the ball.
No. 6 Oregon 44,
Utah 21
EUGENE, Ore. Marcus
Mariota's knee didn't matter
all that much against Utah.
Oregon's sophomore quar-
terback threw for 288 yards
and three touchdowns and
the sixth-ranked Ducks re-
bounded from last week's loss
to Stanford with a 44-21 vic-
tory over Utah on Saturday.
De'Anthony Thomas
caught a touchdown pass and
scored on an 86-yard kickoff
return for the Ducks (9-1,6-1
Pac-12). Byron Marshall ran
for two additional scores but
the Ducks were slowed on the
ground by Utah's defense,
rushing for 145 yards after av-
eraging nearly 302 yards a


game this season.
No. 7 Auburn 43,
No. 25 Georgia 38
AUBURN, Ala. Ricardo
Louis scored on a deflected
73-yard pass on fourth and 18
with 25 seconds left to lift
No. 7 Auburn to a stunning
43-38 victory over No. 25
Georgia on Saturday night.
The Tigers (10-1,6-1) had
blown a 27-7 lead but pulled
out one more huge play to
continue the biggest turn-
around in major college foot-
ball. From 3-9 last year, they
can win the SEC West with a
victory in two weeks against
No. 1 Alabama.
Auburn's Nick Marshall
heaved the ball downfield with
two defenders around Louis.
It bounced off safety Tray
Matthews and right into
Louis's hands.
No. 12 Okla. St. 38,
No. 23 Texas 13
AUSTIN, Texas Clint
Chelf ran for two touchdowns
and No. 12 Oklahoma State
stayed in the Big 12 champi-
onship chase by beating
No. 23 Texas 38-13.
Chelf also threw two scor-
ing passes as Oklahoma
State (9-1,6-1 Big 12) won in
Austin for the third straight
time. This one may renew
pressure on Texas coach
Mack Brown, who was dealt
his worst home loss in 16
seasons at a time when spec-
ulation about his job security
had just begun quieting down.
No. 14 Mich. St.
41, Nebraska 28
LINCOLN, Neb.- No. 14
Michigan State converted five
Nebraska turnovers into 24
points and took a big step to-
ward winning the Big Ten Leg-
ends Division with a 41-28
victory on Saturday.
Jeremy Langford ran 32
times for 151 yards and
scored two touchdowns, and


Keith Mumphrey caught a 27-
yard touchdown from Connor
Cook in the fourth quarter
after the Cornhuskers pulled
within six points.
The Spartans (9-1,6-0)
beat the Huskers (7-3, 4-2) for
the first time in eight all-time
meetings.
They would clinch the division
with a win at Northwestern
next week or a loss by Min-
nesota in either of its last two
games.
No. 15 UCF 39,
Temple 36
PHILADELPHIA- Shawn
Moffitt kicked a 23-yard field
goal as time expired after
Rannell Hall got behind the
Temple defense for a 64-yard
reception, and No. 15 UCF
survived a scare with a 39-36
victory Saturday.
UCF's last possession
started at its own 19, with no
timeouts. Overtime seemed likely
until Blake Bortles found Hall
deep to get to the Temple 6.
Bortles managed to get the
ball spiked with 2 seconds left
and Moffitt booted through the
game-winner to keep UCF (8-1,
5-0) in control of the American
Athletic Conference race.
Temple drops to 2-78 all-time
against Top 25 opponents.
No. 17 Wisconsin
51, Indiana 3
MADISON, Wis. James
White rushed for a career-
high 205 yards and Melvin
Gordon added 146 as No. 17
Wisconsin beat Indiana 51-3
on Saturday.
The Badgers (8-2, 5-1 Big
Ten) came in expecting a big
game on the ground against
the conference's 10th-ranked
rushing defense with the
Hoosiers (4-6, 2-4) giving up
an average of more than 217
yards a game.
Wisconsin topped that just
minutes into the second quar-
ter, had 323 yards rushing at
the half and finished with 554.


No. 22 Oklahoma
48, Iowa State 10
NORMAN, Okla. Bob
Stoops matched Barry Switzer's
record for most coaching vic-
tories at Oklahoma when the
22nd-ranked Sooners cruised
to a 48-10 victory over Iowa
State on Saturday.
Trevor Knight led the way
as Stoops recorded win No.
157 with Oklahoma (8-2, 5-2
Big 12), which closed the
game with 45 unanswered
points over the final three
quarters. The backup quar-
terback was 8 of 14 passing
for 61 yards and rushed for
123 yards and one touch-
down.
No. 19 Louisville
20, Houston 13
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Do-
minique Brown ran for a ca-
reer-high 137 yards and two
touchdowns, including the go-
ahead score in the third quar-
ter, and No. 19 Louisville held
on to beat Houston 20-13 on
Saturday night.
Listless on both sides of the
ball and trailing 13-10 at half-
time, Louisville turned to
Brown, who carried 11 times
in the third quarter for 50
yards and a touchdown run.
Brown finished with 27
carries.
The defense awakened to
hold the Cougars (7-3, 4-2
American Athletic Confer-
ence) to just 41 second-half
yards and help the Cardinals
(9-1,5-1 American Athletic
Conference) win their third
straight game and stay within
reach of first-place Central
Florida.
Louisville's Teddy Bridge-
water completed 19-of-29
passes for 209 yards but had
his streak of 21 games with a
touchdown pass end at 21.
DeVante Parker had four re-
ceptions for 72 yards, includ-
ing a 39-yarder that set up
Brown's second TD run.


Nationwide

title goes to

Dillon after

he holds off

Hornish

Keselowski

tak& checkered

at Homestead
Associated Press

HOMESTEAD, Fla.-
Austin Dillon won the
NASCAR Nationwide
Series championship,
holding off Sam Hornish
Jr in a wild season
finale Saturday
Sprint Cup regular
Brad Keselowski won
the race after moving up
10 spots in the final laps.
Dillon, driving the
famed No. 3 for his
grandfather, Richard
Childress, finished 12th.
It was good enough to
hold off Hornish by
three points. Hornish
crossed the line eighth.
"We didn't have the
car tonight at all," Dillon
said. "Probably the
worst car we had all
year But we fought. My
guys kept me positive in
the car I just knew I had
to go on that last restart.
I've been criticized for
restarts for a long time,
and that was a pretty
good one."
Hornish looked as if
he would overcome an
eight-point deficit in the
standings for much of
the 200-lap race, but a
lengthy caution late
posed problems. Hor-
nish dropped from third
to ninth on the final
restart with five laps to
go, ending his chances
at getting a title in what
could be his final race
for Penske Racing.
Keselowski got new
tires during the final
caution and used them
to weave his way
through traffic. He went
from llth to first in a
two-lap span after the
restart. And once he was
out front, no one was
catching him.
Certainly not Dillon
and Hornish, who were
on old tires.
Keselowski finished
the season with seven
victories, all in the last
10 of his 16 series starts.
Rookie Kyle Larson
finished second, fol-
lowed Kyle Busch, Matt
Kenseth and Trevor
Bayne.
There were 12 laps
under the final caution,
a lengthy delay that sur-
prised drivers and crew
chiefs. A wreck involv-
ing Regan Smith, Mike
Wallace and Jeremy
Clements brought out
the yellow flag with 17 to
go and led to an ex-
tended cleanup for oil.
"We missed it after
that late race caution,"
Hornish said. "We were
exactly where we
needed to be."


Pirates finish third in Weeki Wachee duals tournament


TONY CASTRO
Chronicle correspondent

WEEK WACHEE -All three
Citrus County wrestling programs
walked away with positive fin-
ishes at the conclusion of Satur-
day's two-day, 16-team Weeki
Wachee High Duals Tournament
Unlike last year, when the
Venice Indians went unbeaten to
capture the inaugural event, Venice
and Gainesville High tied in the
championship match at 34 all.
It took an additional 15 min-
utes to sort through the tourna-
ment tiebreakers. On criterion
"H" most first points scored in
a match the Hurricanes de-
nied the Indians a repeat, 7-5.
The Alachua County mat men,
who concluded the 40th FHSAA
2A State Finals in Lakeland in
29th place, concluded the event
8-0 while Venice, which placed
46th at 2A states, finished 7-1.
GHS' Jon Garner, at 126
pounds, was voted by the coaches
as meet's Outstanding Wrestler
Class lA-5's Crystal River en-
joyed the finest finish of any Cit-
rus County program, placing third.
Veteran mentor Craig Freder-
ick's Pirates (7-1) solved Coun-
tryside (65-12), Lecanto (62-18),
and Belleview (51-15) in Friday's
opening round.


On Saturday, CRHS crushed
Central (59-13) and Land 0'
Lakes (48-21) before falling at
the hands of Venice (48-21).
The Pirates bounced back to
humble Hernando (41-11) before
edging Nature Coast Technical
for third place, 40-31.
NCT led once after eight bouts,
22-18, following Dean Brooks'
3:42 pin over Mitchell Foster
The Pirates responded with
back-to-back-to-back forfeit nods
by frosh Dalton David at 106,
senior Kyle Butram at 113 and
frosh Austin Edwards at 120,
restoring order by building a 36-
22 cushion.
Overall, Frederick was
pleased with the Pirates' efforts,
especially with Andrew Bilby
not in uniform due to an ankle
sprain suffered Friday night
"Not having a Bilby hurt us
today," Frederick said. "He'll be
back butwe had to adjustthe lineup
today and go with two JV kids at
170 and 195. Still, third isn't bad.
"I was real proud of our fresh-
man 145-pounder (C.J. Lawson).
He pinned a good kid from Na-
ture Coast (Raivyn Alicea) to
help us win that match."
The Pirates were paced by a
pair unbeaten performers: Je-
remy Burcroff at 160 and
Michael Allan at 132.


Burcroff, who competed
mostly on the JV level last win-
ter, finished 8-0 with three pins.
"I know I could have wrestled
better," said the 17-year-old Bur-
croff. "I'm still not in the best
shape. I was lucky that I won a
couple matches by one point. I
know I have to do a better job on
takedowns.
"That's kinda tough for me be-
cause I'm 6-foot-3. I realize I
have to get faster"
Allan, who finished 0-2 in his
first state appearance last Feb-
ruary at the Jenkins Arena, opened
the season 8-0 with four pins.
In evaluating his perform-
ance, "I'd say I overachieved. My
matches weren't really close," said
the 17-year-old Allan. "There's
plenty of room for improvement.
There are a lot of things I have
to work harder on. Luckily, one
of them isn't my conditioning."
Citrus places seventh
The Citrus Hurricanes
opened with a seventh-place fin-
ish behind a 5-3 effort.
The 2A-5 Golden Hurricanes
opened the meet by drubbing
Lake Wales (51-21) before drop-
ping a heart-breaker to host
Weeki Wachee (33-32). CHS
closed Day 1 by pasting Trinity
Catholic (72-15).


On Saturday, CHS opened
with a forfeit over no-show Hud-
son, before being edged by NCT
(43-33). Gainesville handled the
Canes (42-31) before rumbling
over Ridgewood (63-12).
The 'Canes bopped Hernando
(60-24) to finish seventh.
Second-year Hurricane men-
tor Jeff Wood wasn't terribly
upset with his team's finish.
"I thought we'd end up 3-4," he
said. "When you look at it, we
wrestled tough against Nature
Coast and Gainesville, but dropped
two close matches. It was kinda
the same thing with Weeki Wachee.
"Overall, this is still a young
team, but I'm happy we had a
couple kids go undefeated."
2013 state qualifier Casey
Bearden finished 8-0 with four
pins at 170.
"I felt like I could've done bet-
ter," said 17-year-old Bearden,
who finished 1-2 at states. "I al-
ways look at it like I under-
achieved leaving room for
improvement."
Another 2013 state qualifier,
Brandon Taylor, finished 8-0
with a team-best seven pins at 182.
"For our first tournament, we
got rid of a lot of first-match jit-
ters," explained the 17-year-old
Taylor "I think this team is gonna
start picking up momentum."


Lecanto places 11th
The 2A-5 Lecanto Panthers ar-
rived shorthanded. Two of their
finest grapplers remained at
home in Jonah Nightengale and
Matthew Wheat
LHS finished 2-6 overall. The
Panthers dropped their first
four matches before crunching
Central (51-18).
Lecanto concluded the night
on a positive note by trimming
Ridgewood (54-15) for 11th place.
Senior Chris Ewing etched a
solid team-best 7-1 win-loss
mark at 182.
"For a lot of our guys, this
(tourney) was exactly what they
needed," pointed out LHS skip-
per Scot Roberts. 'A few guys
thought they were a little better
than what they are.
"The tournament provided good
matches and a bunch of guys with
their first wins at the varsity
level," he added. "I was happy
with our pool; everyone except
Central had nearly a full lineup."
On Ewing, "I saw someone
who is learning to wrestle bigger
guys. He put on 25 pounds since
last year The goal was to get
competitive matches for every-
body I told my wife, 'We didn't
hardly win, but we got good
matches in."'


B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


49ers-Saints almost best Week 11 game


Associated Press

The 49ers at the Saints, a bat-
tle for NFC supremacy
That's what the script might
have called for, except that the
Seahawks have trumped both of
them so far And nobody wants to
go to Seattle in the postseason.
So San Francisco and New Or-
leans will do everything possible
to get lined up behind Seattle
should the Seahawks stumble.
The Saints are in much better
shape in that regard because the
Niners (6-3) have to travel to the
Big Easy, one hard place to play
"You can definitely see offen-
sively they are machine-like and
really have things going and
oiled up," 49ers coach Jim Har-
baugh said. "Same defensively,
they are doing a very good job of
getting stops, getting turnovers
and creating negative plays."
After blowing out Dallas, the
Saints (7-2) know the chore will
be more difficult against the de-
fending NFC champs, who have
one of the league's most physical
and versatile defenses.
'As good as they've ever been,"
Saints quarterback Drew Brees
said. "There's an expectation
level every time you play those
guys. They're extremely disci-
plined and very talented."
Also this week, the Game of
the Year, Part I, has Denver
hosting Kansas City
Minnesota is at Seattle, Balti-
more at Chicago, Cleveland at
Cincinnati, Detroit at Pittsburgh,
Washington at Philadelphia, Oak-
land at Houston, the New York
Jets at Buffalo, Green Bay at the
New York Giants, Arizona at Jack-
sonville, San Diego at Miami, and
Atlanta at Tampa Bay
Monday night has New Eng-
land at Carolina.
Off this week are Dallas (5-5)
and St. Louis (4-6).
In Thursday night's game, In-
dianapolis once again dug itself
an early hole before climbing
out. Donald Brown ran for two
touchdowns, Andrew Luck
added another and the Colts ral-
lied yet again, this time beating
the Tennessee Titans 30-27 after
trailing 14-0 in the first quarter
Adam Vinatieri kicked three
field goals, including a 50-
yarder, and Coby Fleener had a
career-high eight catches for 107
yards to help the Colts (7-3)
bounce back quite nicely from a
38-8 home loss to St Louis.
The Titans (4-6) lost their sec-
ond straight and fifth in six
games, scoring a touchdown
with 1:54 left but failing to exe-
cute on onside kick for the sec-
ond straight game.
Kansas City (9-0) at Denver (8-1)
A game so enticing NBC got it
flexed to prime time, this one
matches teams with the best
combined winning percentage
this late in the season since the
merger
Denver, with Jack Del Rio as
interim coach while John Fox
recovers from heart surgery, is
on a record scoring pace, aver-
aging 41.2 points a game.
But Peyton Manning, who has
3,249 yards passing, the most
through nine games, and 33
touchdown passes, is plagued by
a high ankle sprain.
And the Chiefs are as stingy
as they come on defense, the
first team to allow 17 points or
fewer in each of their first nine
games since the 1977 Falcons.


Associated Press
San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid runs past cornerback Tarell Brown and Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Michael Floyd on Oct. 13 after
intercepting a pass from quarterback Carson Palmer during the first quarter of an NFL football game in San Francisco. Reid has emerged
as a play-making rookie with five takeaways, and sure hopes a concussion won't sideline him for Sunday's game at the Superdome.


They already have 36 sacks and
23 takeaways.
"We always have confidence
in our defensive backfield, no
matter who we play" cornerback
Brandon Flowers said. "We feel
we match up pretty good with them"
Minnesota (2-7) at Seattle (9-1)
The Seahawks feel the same
way, and they have an intimi-
dating defense, too. They rank
third overall and second against
the pass.
Winning at Seattle has been
impossible recently and the Sea-
hawks go for their 13th straight
home win, which would be a
franchise record.
Minnesota's best chance for
an upset is turning Adrian Pe-
terson loose. Last season, Peter-
son rushed for 182 yards on just
17 carries against the Seahawks
including runs of 74, 28 and 24
yards.
New England (7-2)
at Carolina (6-3), Monday night
A surprisingly juicy Monday
night matchup thanks to the Pan-
thers' surge. They have won five
in a row, including an impressive
10-9 victory at San Francisco last
week. They lead the league in
time of possession, a key against
Tom Brady and the Patriots.
New England comes off a bye
and has not been dominant most
of the time despite its gaudy
record. In his last game, though,
Brady had a season-best 432
yards passing and four TDs.
Baltimore (4-5) at Chicago (54)
An overtime win to break a
three-game slide was encourag-
ing for the Ravens, but they aren't
performing anything like last
season's champions. They can't
get the run game in gear and Joe
Flacco has been sacked 30 times.


Banged-up Chicago might not
have the horses to put that kind
of pressure on Flacco, and it
also is using second-string quar-
terback Josh McCown for the in-
jured Jay Cutler But McCown
has played well this year, and he
has weapons in WRs Brandon
Marshall and Alshon Jeffery,
and RB Matt Forte.
Cleveland (4-5)
at Cincinnati (6-4)
A win makes Cleveland a con-
tender for the AFC North crown
and also for a wild card. The
Browns can match their win
total from 2012; they haven't won
more than five games in a sea-
son since 2007. Their defense
has been staunch and veteran
Jason Campbell is giving them
steady quarterback play
Cincinnati has lost two
straight overtime games; no
team has done it three succes-
sive times. But the Bengals are
4-0 at home this season, outscor-
ing opponents 116-55.
Detroit (6-3) at Pittsburgh (3-6)
Winning at Chicago boosted the
Lions to sole possession of the
NFC North lead. However, this is
not a place they can be confident
of success. Detroit's last victory
in the Steel City came in 1955.
The Steelers have gone 3-2
since an 0-4 start, though their 3-
6 record is the franchise's worst
through nine games since 2006.
They need to solidify an offen-
sive line that has yielded 35 sacks.
Washington (3-6)
at Philadelphia (5-5)
Now is the time for the Red-
skins to make their run to the
playoffs. At least, that's what
they did last year, beating the
Eagles as the first of seven con-
secutive wins. Washington's run-


ning game leads the league with
5.1 yards per rush.
Philly is just behind that and
LeSean McCoy leads the NFL
with 932 yards on the ground.
Even better, Nick Foles has
thrown 16 TD passes and no in-
terceptions. And the Eagles' de-
fense has come on.
Still, their last win at home
was 11 games ago.
Oakland (3-6) at Houston (2-7)
Texans coach Gary Kubiak
will be back on the sideline after
missing one game with a mini-
stroke. It's an uplifting story for
a team in the midst of a horren-
dous season. Considered a
Super Bowl contender, Houston
has dropped seven in a row
The Raiders have a solid run-
ning attack, but their air game is a
mess as inexperienced QB Ter-
relle Pryor learns the pro game.
New York Jets (54)
at Buffalo (3-7)
The Jets are the second team
to alternate wins and losses
through nine games. Like Buf-
falo, they are using a rookie QB,
Geno Smith, but their pride and
joy is an aggressive defense.
Coach Rex Ryan campaigned to
add safety Ed Reed when the
long-time star was cut by Hous-
ton and got his wish.
The Bills have dropped nine
of their last 11 meetings with
New York and have lost five of
their last six overall this season.
Green Bay (54)
at New York Giants (3-6)
This group of New Yorkers
was beaten in its first six games,
then won three straight. Another
victory could put the Giants in
the midst of the NFC East race,
believe it or not.
Getting it will be whole lot eas-


ier against a PacKers team mtat
lost Aaron Rodgers to a broken
collarbone. Green Bay has fallen
twice without its star quarter-
back, and might need to rely
even more on a blossoming run-
ning game with third-stringer
Scott Tolzien behind center
Arizona (5-4)
at Jacksonville (1-8)
Coming off their first victory of
the season, the Jaguars have no
reason to get cocky They haven't
scored a TD at home in 2013, and
have the league's worst overall
offense.
The Cardinals have the bad
luck of being in the same divi-
sion with powerful Seattle and
San Francisco, but are holding
their own. They've never won
two games in Florida in the
same season, and their only road
victory so far has been at Tampa.
WR Larry Fitzgerald needs 94
yards receiving to reach 11,000
yards, which would make him
the youngest player (30 years, 78
days on Sunday) to reach that
milestone.
San Diego (4-5) at Miami (4-5)
The mess in Miami keeps build-
ing, and it has really plagued the
offense. The Dolphins set a fran-
chise low with 2 yards rushing in
their loss at Tampa Bay They've
netted 22 yards or less three
times this year; the line strug-
gled even when guard Richie In-
cognito and tackle Jonathan Martin
were in the lineup before the al-
leged bullying turmoil erupted.
The Chargers rank last in the
NFL with six takeaways and are
giving up 6.4 yards per play,
worst in the league. But the
Chargers lead the NFL in first
downs per game, and in third-
down efficiency at 47 percent.


NFL Stats CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF R
and 7 2 0 .778 234 1
5 4 0 .556 169 2
4 5 0 .444 193 2
3 7 0 .300 199 2
South
W L T Pct PF R
lis 7 3 0 .700 252 2
e 4 6 0 .400 227 2
2 7 0 .222 170 2
lie 1 8 0 .111 115 2
North
W L T Pct PF R
6 4 0 .600 234 1
4 5 0 .444 172 1
4 5 0 .444 188 1
S 3 6 0 .333 179 2
West
W L T Pct PF R
ity 9 0 0 1.000 215 1
8 1 0 .889 371 2
S 4 5 0 .444 212 2
3 6 0 .333 166 2
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF R
5 5 0 .500 274 2
hia 5 5 0 .500 252 2
ts 3 6 0 .333 165 2
on 3 6 0 .333 230 2
South
W L T Pct PF R
ans 7 2 0 .778 265 1
6 3 0 .667 214 1
2 7 0 .222 186 2
ay 1 8 0 .111 146 2
North
W L T Pct PF R
6 3 0 .667 238 2
5 4 0 .556 259 2
y 5 4 0 .556 245 2
S 2 7 0 .222 220 2
West
W L T Pct PF R
9 1 0 .900 265 1
cisco 6 3 0 .667 227 1
5 4 0 .556 187 1
4 6 0 .400 224 2


Thursday's game
Indianapolis 30, Tennessee 27
Today's games
Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Atlanta atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
Monday's game
New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 21
New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 24
Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Miami, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle
Monday, Nov. 25
San Francisco at Washington, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders


P. Manning, DEN
P. Rivers, SND
Roethlis., PIT
Luck, IND
Dalton, CIN
Locker, TEN
Brady, NWE
Ale. Smith, KAN
Tannehill, MIA
Schaub, HOU


Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
369 262 3249
324 232 2691
338 218 2534
311 183 2198
383 239 2861
183 111 1256
340 194 2256
315 188 1919
331 202 2206
233 150 1552


Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN 170 725 4.26 24 6
F. Jackson, BUF 129 557 4.32 59 6
Chr. Johnson, TEN 150 546 3.64 24 2
A. Foster, HOU 121 542 4.48 23 1
Ry. Mathews, SND 131 539 4.11 35 2
Moreno, DEN 123 521 4.24 25t 8
RidleyNWE 118 514 4.36 23 6
Pryor, OAK 68 504 7.41 93t 2
Spiller, BUF 110 501 4.55 61 1
Green-Ellis, CIN 140 460 3.29 25 3
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Ant. Brown, PIT 67 805 12.0 45 3
A.. Green, CIN 65 1013 15.6 82t 6
And. Johnson, HOU 62 850 13.7 62t 5
De.Thomas, DEN 55 793 14.4 78t 9
Welker, DEN 53 576 10.9 33 9
Woodhead, SND 53 408 7.7 26t 4
A. Gates, SND 52 612 11.8 56t 2
Cameron, CLE 50 600 12.0 53 6
Ke.Wright, TEN 50 580 11.6 45 1
Decker, DEN 49 721 14.7 61 3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Doss, BAL 22 355 16.1 82t 1
Ant. Brown, PIT 16 219 13.7 50 0
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7 79t 1
Edelman, NWE 26 299 11.5 43 0
Holliday, DEN 22 233 10.6 81t 1
McCluster, KAN 37 387 10.5 89t 1
Hilton, IND 15 144 9.6 34 0
Kerley,NYJ 12 108 9.0 24 0
Br.Tate, CIN 22 187 8.5 29 0
Reynaud, TEN 18 135 7.5 35 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Holliday, DEN 15 482 32.1 105t 1
Q. Demps, KAN 14 411 29.4 57 0
K. Martin, HOU 24 631 26.3 49 0
Todman, JAX 15 393 26.2 46 0
Br.Tate,CIN 21 548 26.1 71 0
D. Reed, IND 17 419 24.6 39 0
Thigpen, MIA 20 482 24.1 44 0
F. Jones, PIT 14 332 23.7 42 0
Reynaud, TEN 15 355 23.7 40 0
Blount, NWE 15 349 23.3 30 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Moreno, DEN 9 8 1 0 54


De. Thomas, DEN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Welker, DEN
J. Charles, KAN
Bernard, CIN
M. Jones, CIN
Royal, SND
Cameron, CLE
Cotchery, PIT


Gostkowski, NWE
Folk, NYJ
M. Prater, DEN
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Novak, SND
Suisham, PIT
J. Tucker, BAL
Vinatieri, IND
Nugent, CIN


9 0
9 0
9 0
8 6
7 4
7 0
7 0
6 0
6 0
Kicking
PAT
24-24 :
14-14 Z
47-47 1
23-23 1
18-18 1
23-23 1
16-16 1
18-18 1
19-19 1
27-28 1


NFC leaders
Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds
Brees, NOR 363 247 3064
A. Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218
R.Wilson, SEA 257 163 2132
Romo, DAL 370 239 2681
M. Stafford, DET 373 229 2836
M.Ryan,ATL 368 248 2614
S. Bradford, STL 262 159 1687
Cutler, CHI 265 167 1908
C. Newton, CAR 271 170 1970
Vick,PHL 141 77 1215
Rushers
Att Yds Avg
L. McCoy, PHL 193 932 4.83
M. Lynch, SEA 191 871 4.56
A. Morris, WAS 159 825 5.19
A. Peterson, MIN 173 786 4.54
Gore, SNF 162 700 4.32
Forte, CHI 157 691 4.40
Lacy, GBY 158 669 4.23
Re. Bush, DET 133 623 4.68
De. Williams, CAR 135 565 4.19
D. Murray, DAL 111 548 4.94
Receivers
No Yds Avg
Garcon, WAS 61 803 13.2
B. Marshall, CHI 60 786 13.1


De. Jackson, PHL 54 903 16.7
J. Graham, NOR 54 805 14.9
Cal. Johnson, DET 53 904 17.1
D. Bryant, DAL 52 749 14.4
Cruz, NYG 50 714 14.3
J. Nelson, GBY 49 772 15.8
JefferyCHI 47 735 15.6
Witten, DAL 47 532 11.3
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Sherels, MIN 12 196 16.3
Hyde, GBY 13 200 15.4
Dw. Harris, DAL 16 242 15.1
G.Tate, SEA 28 384 13.7
PageTAM 18 202 11.2
Ginn Jr., CAR 15 165 11.0
T. Austin, STL 30 268 8.9
Spurlock, DET 18 128 7.1
Sproles, NOR 20 142 7.1
R. Randle, NYG 20 140 7.0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C. Patterson, MIN 24 845 35.2
Dw. Harris, DAL 20 645 32.3
Hester, CHI 29 819 28.2
Dam. Johnson, PHL 17 441 25.9
Ginn Jr., CAR 13 314 24.2


J. Graham, NOR
A. Peterson, MIN
Cal. Johnson, DET
B. Marshall, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL
M. Lynch, SEA
Forte, CHI
R. Cooper, PHL
Ve. Davis, SNF
Gore, SNF


Hauschka, SEA
Crosby, GBY
D. Bailey, DAL
Hartley, NOR
Henery, PHL
Gould, CHI
Zuerlein, STL
Feely, ARI
Akers, DET
Gano, CAR


Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush
10 0
10 9
9 0
8 0
8 0
8 7
7 7
7 0
7 0
7 7
Kicking
PAT F
27-27 22-2
26-26 21-2
29-29 17-'
31-31 16-2
28-28 16-2
25-26 16-'
23-23 15-'
17-17 16-'
28-28 12-'
25-25 13-'


New Engle
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi


Cincinnati
Cleveland
Baltimore
Pittsburgh


Kansas C
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
N.Y Giant
Washingto


New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba


Detroit
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota


Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis


NFL FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boys finding their


stride as midseason


nears on the pitch


DAVID PIEKLIK
Chronicle correspondent

Tweaked lineups and
strategies highlight the
second week of boys soc-
cer, as all three teams look
to find their stride as the
season's midway mark
nears.
Change is good
He felt like he was
pounding the proverbial
square peg into a round
hole, trying to get his team
to learn a new formation.
But after a sluggish 0-2
start in district play, Citrus
Hurricanes coach Steve
Ekeli changed things up -
moving his team back
from the 4-2-3-1 to the 4-4-
2 and repositioning sev-
eral players.
The results were imme-
diate: the best scoring out-
put of the season in a 6-0
blowout of Central at
home.
"I think they're more
comfortable in this system.
We're just playing straight-
up man-to-man," Ekeli
said of the changes.
The biggest change was
that of the team's confi-
dence, with the win mov-
ing them to 2-2 overall on
the season and 1-2 in dis-
trict play
"If we can string to-
gether three victories next
week, who knows what we
can do?" Ekeli said.
Starting to click
The Crystal River Pi-
rates are in the second
year of rebuilding, with a


young team of mostly inex-
perienced players. Coach
Bobby Verlato is seeing
signs the team which is
1-4 in district play is
starting to turn the corner
In their 5-1 loss Thurs-
day against Weeki Wachee,
Verlato said the Pirates
started to come together
defensively moved the ball
better and showed they
were adjusting from a 4-3-3
to the 4-4-2 formation
they're running.
"Knowing we're a work
in progress, we're building
on it," he said. "We're get-
ting better each game."
Freshman forward
Caleb Russo scored his
first varsity goal in the loss,
and Verlato said the team's
attitude is positive.
To the east, the Lecanto
Panthers are starting to
find their stride as well.
The team improved to 1-2
overall and 1-1 in the dis-
trict with a 6-2 win Thurs-
day against East Ridge.
Coach Doug Warren cred-
ited his team with execut-
ing its game plan, adding,
"We were getting balls in
the box with people in
there."
Warren seems his team
getting comfortable and
working together
Stats at a glance
Goals: 3 Austin
D'Anna Lecanto, Fr., mid-
fielder/forward
Assists: 4 Josh Mars-
den, Citrus, Sr, forward
Saves: 53 Kyle Kidd,
Crystal River, Jr, goal
keeper


JAMES BLEVINS
Chronicle correspondent

Girls' soccer has kicked
off in Citrus County over
the past three weeks, and
local teams begin what are
anticipated to be success-
ful regular-season cam-
paigns but a few squads
are struggling early on.
Weekly recap
The Citrus Hurricanes
are currently winless
through four games. Crys-
tal River nabbed its first
win on Nov 4 against dis-
trict rival Hernando 4-1,
but fell in three other dis-
trict games to Fivay, Hud-
son and Nature Coast
Citrus opened the sea-
son with two consecutive
ties to Springstead and
Nature Coast before drop-
ping two straight games, to
county rival Lecanto 3-0 on
Nov. 4 and an 8-1 blowout
to Vanguard on Nov 5.
Lecanto has the best
record in the county so
far through six games.
The Lady Panthers
opened the season with a
tie against Plant during
the first day of the seventh
annual Wharton Invita-
tional in Tampa. Lecanto
completed the tournament
with two straight losses to
Newsome and host
Wharton.
Returning to the area,
Lecanto shutout Citrus at
Hurricane Stadium before
handling St Francis 6-1 on
the road; the Panthers
were robbed at home
against Nature Coast 1-0 in
the trailing minutes of the
game to disrupt a Panther
two-game winning streak.
Lecanto took a 4-0 shel-
lacking to former district
rival Forest on Nov 12,
dropping to 2-4-1 on the
season.
District
breakdowns
All four of Crystal
River's opening games on
the regular-season sched-
ule have been district
matchups, and the Lady
Pirates find themselves
1-3 in District 3A-7.


Citrus shares the same
district as Crystal River
The Lady 'Canes failed to
earn wins on the road
against district rival
Springstead (1-1 tie) or Na-
ture Coast (1-1 tie).
The 'Canes met up with
Fivay on the road on Nov
12 and fell 4-1, with new-
comer Malene Pedersen
scoring the only Hurri-
cane goal off a Katlyn
Marks assist.
Springstead finds itself
moved down from Class
4A-4, where it shared a dis-
trict with Lecanto last
year The Eagles were 4A-
4 district runners-up to the
Lady Panthers last season
and should be a tough
team to defeat in 3A-7 for
Citrus and Crystal River
all year
The Pirates played
Springstead at home on
Nov 12 and lost 7-1.
Junior Christina Bres-
son scored the lone Pirate
goal, her third on the sea-
son. Bresson is third in the
county for most goals
through the first three
weeks.
Lecanto sophomore
Stephanie Bandstra leads
the county with five goals,
while teammate Lexi
Moore is second with four
goals.
Injury report
Lecanto junior defender
Lauryn Cole has been
sidelined through the first
few weeks of the season
due to a knee injury
Her absence can be felt
on the field, and Lecanto
head coach Roselle Lat-
tin is hopeful she will re-
turn to play within the
week.
Cole is a dynamic back-
field defender and two-
time All-Chronicle team
member She works best
with teammates Ashlynne
Van Cleef and Nany Ulloa,
defending the Panther half
of the field.
Lecanto will also be
down junior forward Jes-
sica Allen, who re-aggra-
vated a knee injury on
Tuesday against Forest,
and is done for the season.


.... ....... "A

.IL-
Associated Press
Sean O'Hair of the United States tees off Friday on the second hole during the second day of the OHL Classic at
Mayacoba golf tournament in Quintana Roo, Mexico.



English, Karlson split lead in Mexico


Associated Press

PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico
- Harris English and Robert Karls-
son shared the lead Saturday in the
rain-delayed OHL Classic when
third-round play was suspended be-
cause of darkness.
English and Karlsson were 15
under overall with 11 holes left
English matched the lowest
round of his PGA Tour career in the
morning with a 9-under 62 on
Mayakoba Resort's El Camaleon
course. The 24-year-old former
Georgia star won the FedEx St.
Jude Classic in June for his first
PGA Tour title.
Karlsson played 36 holes Friday,
shooting 63-67. The 44-year-old
Swede, an 11-time winner on the
European Tour, tied for 10th last
weekend in the McGladrey Classic
to earn a spot in the field this
week.
Rory Sabbatini and Kevin
Stadler were 12 under Sabbatini
completed eight holes, and Stadler
played six.
Australian Masters
MELBOURNE, Australia Defend-
ing champion Adam Scott shot a 5-
under 66 Saturday to open a
four-stroke lead at the Australian Mas-
ters and close in on a second consec-
utive win Down Under.
The Masters champion and winner
of last week's Australian PGA has a
three-round total of 14-under 199 at
Royal Melbourne.
"I'm in a really good position for to-
morrow," Scott said. "I put the ball in
play and made a couple of putts for the


first time this week."
Vijay Singh shot a 63 and was in a
four-way tie for second with Aus-
tralians Matthew Griffin (69), Nick
Cullen (69) and Nathan Holman (70).
American Matt Kuchar was sixth after
a 67, five strokes behind Scott.
Singh, 50, is looking for his first tour-
nament win since 2008.
He will play in the final group with
Scott, a rare Sunday occurrence for
the Fijian veteran who has battled in-
juries over the past several years.
Jarrod Lyle, continuing his come-
back from a 20-month layoff due to
leukemia, shot 70 Saturday and was at
even par.
World Tour Championship
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -
Henrik Stenson closed in on the Euro-
pean Tour money title Saturday,
birdieing four of his last five holes for a
5-under 67 and one-shot lead after
three rounds of the season-ending
World Tour Championship.
The Swede was at 17-under 199 and
is trying to become the first player to win
the FedEx Cup and European title in the
same year.
Victor Dubuisson of France, coming
off a victory in Turkey for his first Euro-
pean Tour win, was in second place
after a 64. England's lan Poulter (66)
and Spain's Alejandro Canizares (70)
shared third place, another three shots
back.
Stinson came into the tournament
leading the Race of Dubai, although
Poulter and Justin Rose are among the
players who can still overtake him. Rose
was six shots back after a 68.
The points champion will receive $1


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million from a $3.75 million bonus pool
that counts on the final money list. In
September, Stenson won the PGA
Tour's season-ending Tour Champi-
onship in Atlanta to take the FedEx Cup
title and $10 million bonus.
After Dubuisson pulled even for the
lead, Stenson made three straight
birdies starting at the 14th hole and
sank a tap-in birdie on the 18th.
Lorena Ochoa Invitational
GUADALAJARA, Mexico Swe-
den's Anna Nordqvist and South
Korea's So Yeon Ryu each birdied the
final hole for a share of the second-
round lead with Thailand's Pornanong
Phatlum on Friday in the Lorena Ochoa
Invitational.
Nordqvist and Ryu shot 5-under 67
to match Phatlum at 9-under 135 at
Guadalajara Country Club.
Nordqvist and Ryu played in the
same group.
"I'm always really happy to play with
Anna," Ryu said. "We have so much
fun always, so I love it. We pretty much
played so well, especially on the back-
nine. We hit a really great shot and she
made every birdie putt. I was really
excited to see her, to see how she is
playing."
Nordqvist is winless on the tour
since the 2009 LPGA Tour Champi-
onship.
Phatlum, the first-round leader in the
36-player event, had a 69.
South Korea's Inbee Park was a
stroke back along with Americans Lexi
Thompson and Gerina Piller. Thomp-
son had a 64 for the best round the first
two days. Piller shot 65, and Park had
a 68.


Nov. 22-23, 2013

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B6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


SPORTS


*.









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



A lesson for the hospital from my granddaughter


We are born to trust
We spend the
rest of our lives un-
learning that instinct.
I traveled to Providence,
R.I., last weekend to cele-
brate the second birthday of
Norah, our youngest grand-
daughter
While we had not seen
her in many months, she
immediately threw herself
into our arms and trusted
us to treat her well.


We did.
But somewhere along the
way, we adults lose that
trusting instinct.
It gets beaten out of us by
life. Some people learn to
take advantage of others.
Spouses cheat, business
partners horde, and many
conclude it's a dog-eat-dog
world so you have to grab
everything you can.
The outcome is that self-
ish people think their in-


sights and needs are
greater than others. They go
searching for results where
they come out as the winner
and the person on the other
side is the loser
The current dispute at
the hospital in Inverness is
one that makes me wonder
I know most of the folks on
both sides of this dispute
and can vouch that mem-
bers of both groups believe
they are doing the good and


right thing in this fight to
the death.
The problem is they are
using our money ($10 mil-
lion in legal fees thus far) to
do the death dance.
The complication is that a
few people in the dispute
are searching for a win-lose
resolution. The ironic thing
is that almost all of those in-
volved in the dispute except
for the lawyers and admin-
istration are volunteers.


They are going through
plenty of personal misery,
public ridicule and spend-
ing countless hours in meet-
ings as volunteers.
Missing from this conflict
is just a single ounce of
trust.
Now I will admit that
once lawyers get involved in
things it's pretty difficult to
find trust. Lawyers are


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Citrus County Commission Chairman Joe Meek listens to a line of citizens in July voicing their opinions about a proposed fire services fee at a public hearing in the
Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness. Commissioners voted in favor of a new $54 fire MSBU, just one of a number of difficult decisions commissioners made this
year to solve its budget crisis, according to Meek.


As the chairman of the Board
of County Commissioners for
the past 12 months, I'd like to
take this opportunity and talk
about this past year, what we have done
and where we are headed from a local
government standpoint. I would also
like to thank my fellow board members
for the absolute honor and privilege of
being chairman this year, and for the
support I received from them. Most im-
portantly, I want thank the citizens of
Citrus County for your support and for
all you do to make this such a wonder-
ful community.
Upon being selected as the chairman of the board last year, I devel-
oped a chairman's plan, which was comprised of specific areas I
wanted to focus on to improve our community If you have been fol-
lowing the news this past year, you will know our community has faced
some of the biggest issues and obstacles ever seen.
Our local real estate market has been one of the hardest hit in the
nation and our largest taxpayer is disputing the value our property
appraiser says its facility is worth, which has resulted in the loss of
millions of dollars of revenue to local government Our largest private
employer has decided not to rebuild the nuclear power plant, mean-
ing millions of dollars less in revenue and, more importantly, the loss
of hundreds of high-wage jobs. In addition to those issues, we were al-
ready facing a falling real estate market, a growing budget deficit, high
unemployment, an undiversified economy a fire rescue system that
was underfunded and inadequate and numerous other issues that had
the potential to have a very large negative impact on our community
While trying not to be melodramatic, our community and our local
government faced issues that had the potential to bankrupt our county
and put our community in a tailspin of epic proportions. It was time
for us to take action and create a better environment for growth and
stability


IN


YEAR




THE


CHAIR


I My chairman's plan had five components:
1. Address and confront budget issues;
; 2. Continue to focus and enhance economic de-
velopment initiatives for Citrus County and work
to diversify our economy;
3. Work with the city of Inverness and Crystal
. J River to develop partnerships to improve our
c u county and city, and strengthen the relationship
between the organizations;
4. Start the process of developing a comprehen-
sive and detailed long-range plan; and
Joe Meek 5. Focus on a specific environmental project
within King's Bay
GUEST Without a doubt, the biggest issue we faced this
COLUMN year was our budget. Going into the year, we were
looking at $6.5 million in deficits because of con-
tinuing real estate valuation reductions. We had
already reduced more than $47 million from our
budget the past four years, reduced the size of local government by 25 percent and
reduced our spending by the largest amount in the history of Citrus County As part
of my chairman's plan, this year we conducted a detailed budget process starting in
January that dissected each area of county government.
As a result, we kept our costs low and ensured the services provided to citizens
were maintained. This was a difficult process, and hard decisions were made by the
Commission. A millage rate increase and a new fire rescue fee were necessary to
keep our local government financially solvent, and still be able to provide needed
services to our residents. While this was a very difficult decision, it was the respon-
sible and right one. In one year, we managed to break our dependence from our
largest taxpayer, diversify our revenue sources, and finally fix a structural budget
deficit that we had been faced with for years.
It should be noted that even with the millage rate increase and new fire fee, the av-
erage homeowner is paying more than $150 less a year than what they paid three
years ago. As a result of numerous actions taken by the county commission, our
county is now financially solvent and strong and the budget deficit has been fixed. We


See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3





OPage C2- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17,2013



PINION


"To rule is not so much a question of the heavy hand as the firm seat."
Jos6 Ortega y Gasset, "The Revolt of the Masses," 1930


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CLOSER TO HOME




Three Sisters



as state park



an idea worth



investigating


should the state of
Florida take over the
management of Three
Sister Springs and run it as a
state park?
That is the interesting pro-
posal offered last week by
county commissioner Dennis
Damato.
Three Sisters Springs was
purchased three years ago by
a coalition of government
agencies, private founda-
tions, local governments,
community groups and indi-
vidual contribu-
tors. The THE I
gorgeous springs
are tucked into The fu
57 acres ofunim- Three
proved land right Spr
smack in the
middle of the city OUR 01
of Crystal River
The property State
was rescued from manage
a developer who worth co
planned a high-
density development, and it
officially became the prop-
erty of the city of Crystal
River. The city entered into
an agreement with the fed-
eral U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service to develop and man-
age the property
Unfortunately, the well-
publicized financial problem
our federal government is ex-
periencing has had a direct
impact on Fish and Wildlife's
ability to make progress at
Three Sisters.
Michael Lusk, the popular
manager of the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge, re-
cently transferred to a new
post in Georgia. Other
staffing has been reduced
and the wildlife service does
not appear to be positioned to
move forward on funding the
project and opening it to the
public.
Damato believes the com-
munity has waited too long
for something to happen at
Three Sisters. He ap-
proached Sen. Charles Dean
and Florida DEP Secretary
Hershel Vinyard to see if
there is an interest from the
state in managing the prop-
erty as a state park.


Nothing but books
It's not bad enough that schools
have gone into the catering busi-
ness; they are now get-
ting into the medical 0
business, training peo-
ple to administer epi-
nephrine and storing
the stuff. How about ad-
ministering insulin to
diabetics or inhalers to
kids with respiratory
problems or Midol to CA
girls? Schools should be
for learning and learn- 563-
ing only.
Thanks for sacrifices
Yesterday (Nov. 2) the Lions
Club in Homosassa hosted a din-
ner and show honoring veterans.
It's great to hear the community
hasn't forgotten our veterans
and their great sacrifice.


S
t
SS
ir

P

ng
nm


I

(


State officials have told
Damato they are interested
enough to look into the possi-
bilities.
Florida already runs the
state parks at Homosassa
Springs and Weeki Wachee.
Earlier this year the state of-
ficially opened the old Silver
Springs attraction in Ocala as
a state park.
Florida's parks system is
one of the best in nation. Gov
Rick Scott and Sen. Dean
have both pledged to do
all they can to
5U protect the
SUE: state's endan-
ure of gered springs.
Sisters And Sen. Dean is
igs. the chairman of
an important
'INION: Florida Senate
committee that
park oversees state
ement spending on
isidering. springs.
And have we
mentioned that the state of
Florida actually has a budget
surplus for the first time in
many years?
Damato's concept is worthy
of investigation. If the federal
government's financial prob-
lems have stymied Fish and
Wildlife's ability to develop
the project, the city of Crystal
River has to look for other so-
lutions.
There are certainly compli-
cations with the idea. The
complex funding coalition
that raised the money to pur-
chase Three Sisters would
have to agree with a change,
and the state of Florida
would have to agree to live up
to the commitments made
during the original purchase.
Three Sisters Springs
needs to be open for public
access. If U.S. Fish and
Wildlife believes it can still
make the project work, the
agency needs to come for-
ward with the funding, per-
sonnel and plans to make it
happen.
If the commitment is not
there to develop and open
Three Sisters, the city of
Crystal River would be wise
to look at other options.


Keep pets in mind
Now that Thanksgiving is near
and food banks are in desperate
Need, consider the fam-
JND ilies of the needy with
iwp pets. Drop off some cat
Urr and dog food. Even the
poor love their pets.
JShame on
litterbugs
I flew into Tampa air-
port to stay with my
579 parents once in Inver-
)57 ness. On the way to
their home, I remarked
about how clean the
road was. There was no litter
like the roads back North were. I
was just amazed. What has hap-
pened? Look at our roads now.
What a shame. What an embar-
rassment. Shame on Citrus
County.


Don't hug him just yet


G ood-time Charlie Crist is
back.
He wants to be Florida's
governor again, and polls show
he would beat Rick Scott if the
election were held today
Big deal. Richie Incognito
would beat Scott if the election
were held today
The polls don't mean much
because Scott, although one of
the most unpopular governors
ever, is about to
spend $100 million
to get re-elected.
Anybody who thinks
Florida voters won't
get fooled again has I
been dipping into
the bath salts.
Despite a stum-
bling first term,
Scott's prospects for Carl F
2014 are much bet- O
ter than they were in T
2010. VOI
Back then he was
a political newcomer with zero
charisma, zero credentials for
public office and a ton of
money Today he's a sitting gov-
ernor with zero charisma, zero
credentials for public office
and even more money
During the last campaign,
Scott spent about $75 million of
his own dough, having made a
fortune presiding over a health
care conglomerate that perpe-
trated one of the largest
Medicare frauds since the be-
ginning of Medicare.
In a sane and sensible place,
that's a resume that would kill
a person's chances for high of-
fice. But not in Florida, the
eternal land of suckers.
This time around, Scott will
have the full backing of the Re-
publican establishment, which
basically shunned him in 2010,
and a richer war chest for at-
tacking Charlie Crist.
And Charlie definitely has
weak spots.
He is relentlessly likeable,
and oddly, that's part of the
problem. Crist so avidly wants
to be liked by every human soul
that his core policy beliefs are
difficult to define.


This isn't an uncommon trait
in politicians, but during con-
tentious and divided times vot-
ers yearn for candidates with a
clear identity For better or
worse, Scott has made his pri-
orities well known the busi-
ness community comes first,
and everybody else is a distant
second.
Crist has been criticized for
being too politically ambitious


[iaasen
IER
CES


- again, not a rare
quirk among candi-
dates. However, a
case could be made
that his impulsive
ambitions changed
the course of
Florida, and not for
the better
The fact is he
made Rick Scott
possible.
After one term as
governor, Crist left
Tallahassee to run


for the U.S. Senate in 2010.
Back then Florida's economy
was gasping, as it was nation-
wide, and Crist looked like he
was walking away from a hard
job at the worst time just to ele-
vate his career
His departure opened the
door for Scott, who rolled to the
governor's mansion on a tea
party upswell and an advertis-
ing blitz financed by his stag-
gering personal bankroll.
Meanwhile, Crist, who was
slipping in the polls, decided to
drop out of the GOP Senate pri-
mary race and run as an inde-
pendent against Marco Rubio.
It was a cockeyed strategy that
split the moderate vote, ensur-
ing Crist's own defeat as well as
that of the Democratic candi-
date, Kendrick Meek.
No one in Florida was sur-
prised last year when Crist
switched his party affiliation to
Democrat, or when he an-
nounced last week that he was
running for governor again.
Scott wasted no time launch-
ing the first wave of attack ads
against Crist portraying him as
a flip-flopper, among other
things.


Soon will come the inevitable
replays of Crist, the then-
Republican governor, hugging
President Barack Obama dur-
ing an event promoting the con-
troversial federal stimulus
package.
That brief embrace probably
cost Crist the Senate race, and
the moment was pure, impul-
sive Charlie. He probably didn't
think twice about hugging
Obama because he's a serial
hugger The man loves to be
liked.
Never mind that the stimulus
bill ended up helping pull the
economy out of its death spiral.
The Republicans want every
race to be about Obama, so
they'll pound Crist again for
standing on the same stage with
the president.
If the health care mess isn't
fixed by next year, Crist might
pay at the polls for his support
of Obama. Or he might not
Another GOP governor who
openly consorted with the pres-
ident just won a landslide re-
election. Chris Christie, who
praised Obama after Super-
storm Sandy beat a Democratic
challenger in the Democratic-
leaning state of New Jersey
His win is a reminder that
voters look for different quali-
ties in their governors, and
they'll often cross party lines.
That's how Jeb Bush won two
terms in Florida, and that's how
Crist got elected in 2006 by
lots of Democrats voting for a
Republican.
That doesn't mean they'll vote
for him next year just because
he switched to their party
Being likeable gets you only so
far People want a governor
who's tough, caring and steady
We ended up with Scott
because Charlie left the job.
He doesn't get a free pass back
to Tallahassee without some
explaining.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132.


I-m a-z .


LETTER /to the Editor


Thanks for helping
with special event
The Tera's Legacy II Poker
Run was held Saturday, Oct.
12. This was the second time
the people of Citrus and sur-
rounding counties came
through in a most generous
fashion to raise money for
Herry's Kids and Hospice of
Citrus County Herry's Kids
Pediatric Services provides
services to children with life
threatening illnesses and of-
fers grief support and thera-
peutic camps to young people
who have experienced a loss.
Herry's Kids Pediatric Serv-
ices is entirely dependent
upon donations.
Last year, the Citrus County
Chronicle wrote two articles
about Tera MacAllister (Sept.
19, 2012, and Oct. 2, 2012) and
her long battle with cancer.
Unfortunately, Tera left us in
February 2013. In her mem-
ory we came together to raise
more than $1,100 for Hospice.
It was a beautiful day for a
ride, and we had more than 50
registered riders.
The run stops, Giovanni's
Pub (Hernando), Mac's Place
(Floral City), Q's Pub 44


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

(Lecanto) and Sparrow's Tav-
ern (Citrus Springs) were all
very welcoming to our group.


Thank you so much to the fol-
lowing donors: Annie and
Rich, Carl, Croc's Bar, Diana
Wunderly, Giovanni's Pub,
Great Bay Distributers, Hos-
pice Thrift Store of Ho-
mosassa, Janet and John
Callander, Jerry, Joanne &
Craig Ingham, Sparrow's Tav-
ern, Karen Anderson, Nick
Decker Enterprises, Papa J's
Restaurant, Paula Sherlock,
Rainbow Pub, Ron's Cycle,
Steve and Chrissy Thoures,
StoreRight Self Storage, Tim
and Kelly McCallister, The
Getaway, who together do-
nated more than 50 prizes.
The Jimmy Sparks Band
helped us wrap up the
evening by donating their
time and music.
A special thanks to my
daughter, Heather Wilde, who
did a great job announcing
the prizes and encouraging
donations. The whole day was
a wonderful outpouring of
love and positive energy I
have never lived in such a
giving community as this!
Thank you Citrus County and
neighbors!


Gwen Klaiber
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dr. Babb Adams was one of the great ones


I just finished reading
one of Nancy
Kennedy's postscripts.
Her subject was longtime
pastor Dr Babb Adams,
who passed away at the
age of 84 on Oct. 30.
I would never even try to
add to one of Nancy's
works. She does a mar-
velous job of recognizing
those who were so very
special, the truly good
ones, while they were with
us, but I cannot let the
passing of this man go
without remembering how
he personally touched my
life.
Dr Babb was never my
family's pastor; we are not
Baptists, we are members
of the Church of God. But


there was never a doubt
that we were on the same
team believers who
knew beyond a shadow of
a doubt that we are saved
by the shed blood of our
lord and savior, Jesus
Christ.
He and I never got be-
yond the acquaintance
phase; our relationship
was more of a smile-and-
nod-of-the-head type.
That is, except for a par-
ticular moment during one
of the most traumatic
events of my life.
While I was sitting at my
desk in my office at the
bank, the phone rang. I an-
swered it and Cheryl
spoke to me in a way
which made me know


things were not right, ness has lost too many of
She addressed me as our young people on
Fred. Not sweetheart, not Gospel Island Road, and
darling, but based on the
Fred. She then initial report
began to. given to Cheryl
quickly, con- that afternoon
cisely, fearfully F in March 1993,
and tearfully it seemed that
explain to me Fred 3 and/or
that our 16- his girlfriend
year-old son, might be
along with his added to that
young girl- Fred Brannen number.
friend, had A SLICE Cheryl ex-
been in an au- plained that
tomobile acci- OF LIFE the first re-
dent. He had sponder had
lost control of the car, it told her "they both have a
had run off of Gospel Is- good chance of making it"
land Road and crashed and that the injured chil-
into a cypress tree. dren were still at the
Over the years, Inver- scene. I met my wife out-


side the bank and we went
immediately to the site.
The vehicle had been
crushed and the kids were
still being extracted by
EMS personnel. Once they
were out, I rode in an am-
bulance to the hospital
with son Fred and Cheryl
did the same with the
young lady
After initial medical ex-
aminations, it was deter-
mined that though they
were both seriously
banged up and the young
lady's leg was broken,
there was nothing that
appeared to be life-
threatening.
Dr Adams was not our
pastor, but he was the pas-
tor of the girl and her fam-


ily, and he arrived at the
hospital soon after we
did. As we were, he was
overjoyed at the progno-
sis, and upon hearing it
he prayed a prayer of
thanksgiving that I will al-
ways consider one of the
most profound expres-
sions of a heart to God
that I've ever heard.
Among his words he said
"... and Father, we thank
you for giving us these
children, twice."
Dr Babb was not one of
the good ones; he was one
of the great ones.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


MEEK
Continued from Page Cl

are adequately funding public safety and
have secured financial stability for years
to come. We still have a low tax rate in
comparison to other counties across the
state and our average tax bill is still lower
than the average tax bill throughout the
state. Citrus County is still an affordable
place to live with a great level of service
for our residents.
Enhancing our economy is a priority
now, more than ever, with the closing of
the nuclear power plant and the decline
of the construction industry I felt we
should be focusing on infrastructure
projects that spur investment throughout
our county and create an atmosphere
that encourages economic diversifica-
tion. Our Economic Development Coun-
cil (EDC) has undertaken a major
initiative to develop a comprehensive
and detailed strategic plan to attract new
businesses and industries. We continue
to work with the EDC to remain proactive
in creating a strong economic base in our
community As a county commission, this
past year, we have started several initia-
tives that focus on infrastructure invest-
ment and on retaining, growing and
soliciting business investment in our
county
As my chairmanship began last year,
there were several opportunities on the
horizon to strengthen relationships with
the city of Inverness and Crystal River. I
am happy to say great strides have been
made in working with Crystal River The
county partnered with the city on the Cut-
ler Spur Boulevard road improvement
project, a boardwalk project at the Acad-
emy of Environmental Sciences, and we
are currently working with the city on
multiple revitalization projects, includ-
ing funding $225,000 for cleanup efforts
in King's Bay
There still is much improvement that
needs to happen with regard to working
with the city of Inverness, but we are
making strides. We are working together
to find ways to partner with Inverness on
the many activities and recreation com-
ponents in the city, and we will continue
to strive to do better
As we look to the future, Citrus County
needs to take a more holistic approach in
our comprehensive plan that includes
tourism, economic development, land-
use planning, development standards,
transportation planning and branding of
our county Along those lines, through our
planning and development department,
the Land Development Code was rewrit-
ten and approved by the board this sum-
mer The Tourism Development Council,
the EDC, and the Chamber of Commerce
are currently developing a new concept
to be housed together to provide a greater
range of services for visitors and citizens
alike. Our assistant county administrator
is just beginning the process to develop a
strategic plan for our county that high-
lights our assets, utilizes investments
made and will guide our community for-
ward in the future.
The cleanup efforts in King's Bay were
just getting under way last year, and I felt
it was important for the county to support
those efforts in every way possible. Al-
though we have many environmental as-
sets in our community, this project
provides an opportunity for everyone -
city county, state government, nonprofit
organizations and individual citizens -
to stand together and make a difference.
We continue to work with the city of Crys-
tal River and numerous nonprofit organ-
izations to remove lyngbya from the bay
and are moving forward to address this
issue and make King's Bay a beautiful
area to visit and play in.
Starting the year, we faced huge chal-
lenges that had the potential to severely
hurt us as a county As a community, we
not only faced our obstacles in the last
year, but we have addressed them in a
way that ensures the future success of
our county and guides us forward for
years to come.
Citrus County is a wonderful commu-
nity that works tirelessly to make our-
selves better I am proud to be a part of it,
and grateful for the opportunity to work
for you. While there are still many issues
to work on, over this last year, we have
built a foundation on which to grow and
improve our county The future is bright
and now is the time to move forward.
God bless.


Joe Meek represents District 3
on the Citrus County Commission and
is the outgoing commission chairman.


IT'S BEEN SUSBFSTEED
WE POSTPONE OUP
LUNCH- WOULf APPANOEM ENT
-MEET ME 4ERE FOR
h OINAfP A


Donations needed
for new transport van
The Disabled American Veterans
Transportation Network, serving Cit-
rus County, is requesting contributions
from veterans and community organi-
zations, as well as, from private citi-
zens to reach our goal of $20,000 for a
new transport van.
While many county veterans are fa-
miliar with the van program, we now
go to the clinic in The Villages, as well
as to Gainesville. This service is avail-
able to all veterans each weekday for
scheduled appointments, tests and
procedures.
We currently have a loaner van,
(which has more than 270,000 miles on
it), that we use to transport to the Villages,
which is the reason for this fundraiser.
The van for the Villages, also leaves
from the Lecanto Community Base
Outpatient Clinic, and will pick up vet-
erans at points along the way Inverness,
Hernando, Holder, and Dunnellon.
Those interested in being transported
for an appointment need only to contact
the VA Service office at 352-527-5915 to
make a reservation for a place on the
van you must have a reservation.
This program directly helps veterans
who have served our country and who
have made sacrifices for all of us. Many
times we give donations to organizations
and never know where our monies are
being spent. Your contribution for this
new van will be a visible evidence of what
a community can do to help its veterans.
We appreciate any donation you can
make each dollar puts us closer to
our goal. We are not accepting cash do-
nations but request that any contribu-
tions be made by check or money order,
made out to: DAV Van Project with
DAVvan project also written in the memo
section of the check or money order
Mail your tax deductible contribu-
tion to: DAV Van Project, c/o Joe
Stephens, Chairman, 2797 W Xenox
Drive, Citrus Springs, FL 34433 OR
you may mail it to the DAV Chapter 70:
DAV Van Project/Treasurer, Gerald A.
Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter 70,1039
North Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34450


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

trained in the art of adver-
sarial debate and it's pretty
easy to get carried away
The same dilemma can be
seen in the county's current
conflict with the City of In-
verness. The two government
bodies are no longer going in
the same direction and the
result is going to make life
more expensive for all resi-
dents of the city and county.
A number of years ago the


Letters to THE EDITOR

Thank you for your assistance.
Joe Stephens
Chairman, DAV Van Project

Waiting on an apology
Imagine, if you will, Rebecca Bays
standing at an intersection, waiting to
cross the street, when a speeding car
driven by Richard Wesch drives through
a red light, crashing into a second ve-
hicle driven by Michael Bays. Bays sur-
vives, being only slightly injured. Law
enforcement officer ScottAdams arrives
on the scene and arrests Rebecca Bays
for reckless driving. She was, after all,
related to the second driver When the
chief prosecutor refuses to pursue the
absurd charges, Adams insists his actions
in arresting Bays were appropriate.
Folks, this is precisely the logic your
elected Commissioner Adams engaged
in when he pursued an unfounded ethics
complaint against Commissioner Bays.
While I don't know if County Attorney
Wesch drove through a red light when
he sanctioned the appointment of
Michael Bays to the enterprise zone
development board, clearly Commis-
sioner Adams was way out of line. The
solution? He owes us two things: an
apology and a check to the county to
reimburse us taxpayers for Commis-
sioner Bays' expenses. For the record,
I'm not holding my breath.
Elwood R. Harding Jr.
Beverly Hills

What's the rest of the story?
The headline in the Chronicle today
"Thorpe to Adams: Stop harassment"
prompts some observations and ques-
tions. First, since when is it harass-
ment for a setting commissioner to ask
questions about how government is
run? I was under the impression that
is what we elect them to do. Personally,
during my police chief and manager
days I encouraged the council mem-
bers to ask questions. I invited one
council member who frequently called
me names and challenged my compe-
tency to sit in on our Monday morning
staff meetings. I was fully aware he


dispute began when a group
of county commissioners
launched a campaign to
move the county seat out of
Inverness and put it in
Lecanto. Even though that
entire group of commission-
ers was later thrown out of of-
fice by the voters, the hard
feelings still prevail.
The lack of trust is so deep
that when the chairman of the
county commission recently
sent individual letters to
members of the city council
seeking a sit-down meeting
with each to discuss prob-
lems, the council members


could be a distraction and he never
hid his light under the bushel well. If
he had a thought in his mind, you
heard it I would venture to say I had
some of the most challenging councils
in the history of Citrus County I guess
the difference between me and Thorpe
is I recognized that each one was my boss
and they had every right and expecta-
tion to challenge and question. Some
administrators believe that as long as
they have at least three board members
in their corner they can do what they
want to those that don't see things their
way My interpretation of the job was
that every elected board member was
representing the citizens and I had an
obligation to each and every one of them.
It is not easy and it takes a very thick
skin but it is the professional thing to do.
I do believe that the administrator/
manager has a responsibility to oversee
conversation between elected officials
and staff Frequently staff may not have
the whole picture on something and
could give incorrect information. I would
encourage Commissioner Adams to re-
frain from talking to individual depart-
ment heads and go through the
administrator As to Thorpe's feelings
that accusations and questions are in-
sulting, I can only say "get over it"
There have been countless situations
in county government over the past
several years where as a manager I would
be very uncomfortable. There has been
questionable legal advice, actions that
some may feel violate the Sunshine Law
if not by strict definition than at least
intent, a budget and taxation situation
which was avoidable even with the Duke
tax problem as well as other challeng-
ing issues to numerous to go into.
I am perplexed by Mr Thorpe's
change of heart recently Mr Thorpe
announced his retirement a few
months ago than changed his decision
and remained on the job. Why? This is
the first time I have heard of an ad-
ministrator accusing a setting commis-
sioner of creating a hostile work
environment. One can only wonder
what the rest of the story is.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills


each rejected the request.
Without a little bit of trust,
it's pretty darn difficult to
find resolution to problems.
On the national level we
can see the "no-trust" strat-
egy at work: Our politicians
all spend their energy on
identifying evil people on the
other side of the debate be-
cause it's easier to rally the
troops when you have a com-
mon enemy
The only problem is that
once trust evaporates, find-
ing common solutions to
complex problems is almost
impossible.


Even though I might look
old and funny, granddaughter
Norah and I did not have that
problem. She trusted me to
push her on the swing and to
catch her when she jumped
off the playground equipment
I did my part It worked for
both of us.
Trust is an amazing thing.
More people should give it a
try


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013



Obamacare
report card
Using the classical defini-
tion of law, "an ordinance of
reason for the common good,
promulgated by him who has
the care of the community,"
let's see how Obamacare stacks
up. It's definitely an ordinance
or mandate; but the trouble be-
gins immediately with reason-
able. The president told us his
law would help the uninsured,
"the tens of thousands who die
every day because they don't
have access to affordable
health care." However, even
after implementation, it is esti-
mated 30 million will remain
uninsured. Proposals like tort
reform, high-risk pools, health
savings accounts, cross state
line purchase and tax breaks
were rejected without expla-
nation. In January many will
see marginal tax rates over 50
percent. The full work week of
40 hours was arbitrarily changed
to 30 hours. A huge army of 29-
hour workers was created as
employers scrambled to avoid a
huge financial expense. Today
80 percent of jobs created are
part time, further worsening
already declining middle-income
wages. Signing up for insur-
ance is problematic. Until the
recent reversal, stipends were
to be provided without any
proof of income. We'll use the
honor system and there will be
no cheating. And the IRS, that
bastion of trust, openness and
fair play will supervise sign-up
compliance and faithfully safe-
guard our confidential finan-
cial and medical information.
Are burdens distributed
fairly? Is the law being applied
exactly as written and right on
schedule? By unilateral presi-
dential decree there are over


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


2,000 waivers in place now and
the employer mandate, but not
the employee mandate, has
been postponed. Members of
the Administration, Congress
and their staffs are not subject
to the law; they are special.
Those with deeply held religious
beliefs must pay for abortion
coverage and abortion-inducing
drugs. Those who don't need
maternity coverage must pay
for it anyway "For the common
good" means unions and other
friends of the president don't
get exemptions.
The law wasn't published
(promulgated) rather "we have
to pass it to find out what's in it"
Every Democrat in Congress,
with every Republican object-
ing, passed Obamacare under
reconciliation, a legislative
process used only for budget


measures; that way debate was
severely limited. Remember
the bribery in the Cornhusker
Kickback, the Louisiana Pur-
chase and others. Senators sold
their votes and passage was as-
sured; their constituents, mil-
lions of them, received
benefits the rest of us didn't.
Keep your doctor? No. Keep
your plan? No. Save $2,500 per
year? No. Watch premiums for
a family of four increase to
$8,000? Yes, indeed. Do you
think doubling the copay and
deductible while tripling the
premium is reasonable? Let's
gouge young people, 20 per-
cent of whom are unemployed,
to pay for older people and
hope they ignore their own fi-
nancial self-interest and "take
one for the team." Otherwise
the law becomes a "train


wreck." A good, reasonable
law is a means to a desirable
end but it shouldn't restrict our
liberty Chances are good the
law will collapse but it should
never have passed in the first
place. We could have been
spared all this turmoil.
Joseph P Ryan
Homosassa

Proud Republican
I respond in kind to George
Harbin's letter of Oct. 22.
I'm a Republican and proud
of it.
Why? It's because I am con-
vinced that to flourish, democ-
racy requires an economy
driven by a free market. Mr
Harbin prefers that the gov-
ernment run it.
And it's because I am con-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



vinced that governments should
care for those who cannot care
for themselves and offer the
opportunity to succeed to those
who can. Mr Harbin wants gov-
ernment to care for everyone
"regardless of condition."
On one thing Mr Harbin and
can I agree: "We urgently need a
balance of our political ideology."
We urgently need a liberal
party that doesn't believe our
nation is a heartless, imperialist,
racist, war-mongering failure.
And a liberal media that
doesn't distort, edit or expur-
gate conservative opinions or
omit the president's gaffs.
And a president who doesn't
use nationally televised
speeches to tell American vot-
ers to stop listening to conser-
vative talk radio.
President Obama is depend-
ing on liberals to so slander the
Republican Party that Democ-
rats will sweep the field in 2014
and endow him a Democrat
majority in both the House and
Senate for his final two years.
The last time he got a two-
year free ride, we got Oba-
macare. God only knows what
else this man has up his sleeve
but it's a sure bet we conserva-
tives won't like it.
To make this nightmare go
away, conservatives need to
start getting involved in the
2014 elections. The best way to
do this is to start sitting in on
the Citrus County Republican
Executive Committee meet-
ings: 7 to (exactly) 8 p.m. the
first Monday of every month at
the Citrus County Board of Re-
altors on State Road 44.
It is self-interest that drives
capitalism and democracy...
and the outcome of elections.
John McFadden
Inverness


CIT R UK C O U N T Y F T Y


C i.co-oNICuE
www.chronicleonline.com


12


3 4 5 6 7


8 9


CiOii ijjKE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca
Deco Cafe
To BEEFIT THE CITRUS CouT HisroRicAL Socity


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Admission to Tree View:
A toy or non-perishable food item
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To purchase tickets or for more 1C
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Sunday Dec. 8, 2013 3:00 pm
First Methodist Church Homosassa
For ticket information call:
Donna-352-726-8666 Maria-352-382-0336
Advanced Ticket Sale: $8 At the Door: $10
Group of 6 or more: $7


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Thursday, Nov. 21
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
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BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Silicon


Valley


Target, Kohl's and home-shopping network QVC are among a half dozen retailers opening
technology test labs in the San Francisco area to do things like improve their websites and create
mobile shopping apps. They're setting up shop in modem spaces and competing for top
Silicon Valley talent to replicate the creativity, culture and nimbleness of online startups.


SAN FRANCISCO Software engi-
neers wearing jeans and flip flops test
the latest smartphone apps. Walls and
windows double as whiteboards
where ideas are jotted down. And a
mini basketball net is in the center of
it all.
At first glance, this workplace re-
sembles any Silicon Valley startup.
There's just one exception: Target's
trademark red bulls-eye at the en-
trance.
Target, Kohl's and home-shopping
network QVC are among a half dozen
retailers opening technology test labs
in the San Francisco area to do things
like improve their websites and create
mobile shopping apps. They're setting
up shop in modern spaces and com-
peting for top Silicon Valley talent to
replicate the creativity, culture and
nimbleness of online startups.
The goal is to stay on top oftech
trends and better compete with online
rivals like Amazon. corn that attract
shoppers with convenient ordering
and cheap prices. The labs are a shift
for retailers, which like many older
industries, have been slow to adapt to
rapidly changing technology. But re-
tailers say the labs are essential to sat-
isfy shoppers who more often are
buying on their PCs, tablets and
smartphones.
"Consumers expect immediate grat-
ification," says Lori Schafer, executive
adviser at SAS Institute, which cre-
ates software for retailers. As a result,
she says retailers need to develop
technology in weeks, instead of
months or years.
Retailers are playing catch-up after
several years of watching shoppers
gradually move from physical stores
to the Web. Online sales have grown


according to Forrester Research.
The explosion of people using
smartphones to shop has pushed
stores to move faster U.S. consumers
are now spending more than half of
their time on retailers' websites using
their smartphones and tablets, accord-
ing to the National Retail Federation,
a retail trade group.
Retailers knew they needed to fig-
ure out how to create online and mo-
bile technology to please their
shoppers. So they began looking to Sil-
icon Valley, where they hoped to tap
the talent, culture and creativity that
come from tech giants like Facebook
and Apple.
Wal-Mart, the world's largest re-
tailer, was the first to open a tech lab
in Silicon Valley Since opening Wal-
MartLabs in San Bruno in 2011, the
company has rolled out a number of
technologies that it developed there.
One of the biggest projects? Wal-
Mart rebuilt its website's search en-
gine, which launched in 2012. It can
guess a customer's intent when he or
she types a term rather than just re-
turning specific search results. A
search for "denim" yields results for
"jeans" instead of products with
"denim," for example.
Wal-Mart's mobile app also has
been a big focus at Wal-MartLabs,
which has 1,200 workers and all the
trappings of a Silicon Valley startup
including treadmill desks and ping
pong tables. For instance, Wal-Mart-
Labs developed technology that en-
ables Wal-Mart's mobile app to help
guide shoppers to products. It also
developed technology that enables
the mobile app to track customers'
See Page D4


Post office reports loss of $5 billion for year


SAM HANANEL
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The U.S. Postal
Service said Friday it lost $5 billion
over the past year, and postal officials
again urged Congress to pass legisla-
tion to help the beleaguered agency
solve its financial woes.
In a positive sign, the loss was a frac-
tion of the record $15.9 billion the
Postal Service reported losing last
year But it was still the agency's sev-
enth straight annual loss and came de-
spite its first growth in revenue since
2008.
Operating revenue rose 1.2 percent
to $66 billion, thanks to growth in the
post office's package delivery business
and higher volume in standard mail.
That was not enough to offset long-
term losses in first class mail the
post office's most profitable service -


where revenues declined by 2.4
percent.
"We've achieved some excellent re-
sults for the year in terms of innova-
tions, revenue gains and cost
reductions, but without major legisla-
tive changes, we cannot overcome the
limitations of our inflexible business
model," Postmaster General Patrick
Donahoe said.
The Postal Service has struggled for
years with declining mail volume, but
the lion's share of its financial plight
stems from a 2006 congressional re-
quirement that it make annual $5.6 bil-
lion payments to cover expected
health care costs for future retirees.
It has defaulted on three of those
payments.
Postal officials have been pressing
Congress to let the agency end
See Page D4


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON National As-
sociation of Home Builders re-
leases housing market index for
November, 10 a.m.
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases the third-quarter
employment cost index, 8:30 a.m.
* THURSDAY
WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
ment releases weekly jobless
claims, 8:30 a.m.; Labor Depart-
ment releases the Producer Price
Index for October, 8:30 a.m.; Fred-
die Mac, the mortgage company, re-
leases weekly mortgage rates,
10 a.m.; Conference Board releases
leading indicators for October,
10 a.m.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises as Yellen
defends stimulus
LONDON The price of oil
rose toward $94 a barrel Friday
after incoming Federal Reserve
chief Janet Yellen indicated that
economic stimulus will remain in
place pending further improve-
ment in the U.S. economy
Benchmark U.S. crude for Decem-
ber delivery was up 6 cents to $93.82
a barrel, late morning European
time, in electronic trading on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
Yellen, who is slated to replace
Ben Bernanke in late January, tes-
tified Thursday to the Senate
Banking Committee. She said the
U.S. economy has gained ground
but still needs the Fed's support
because unemployment remains
too high at 7.3 percent.
The Fed is buying $85 billion of
government bonds and mortgage
securities a month to keep interest
rates low


Yellen testimony
shores up markets
LONDON The mood in finan-
cial markets remained optimistic
Friday, a day after the main U.S. in-
dexes struck all-time highs following
a signal from the incoming Federal
Reserve chief that the current mas-
sive stimulus will continue for some
time yet
Janet Yellen, who is slated to re-
place Ben Bernanke as Fed chief
early next year, made clear Thurs-
day that she's prepared, if needed,
to continue the central bank's ex-
traordinary efforts to pump up the
world's No. 1 economy when she's
chairman.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares was up 0.2
percent at 6,677 while Germany's
DAX itself near record highs-
rose 0.1 percent to 9,159. The CAC40
was 0.2 percent higher at 4,292.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Solid stocks

make a solid

investment
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 68 years
old, and I was let go by the
company I worked for sev-
eral months ago. I still have a
401(k) with $164,000 in it I don't
need the money and don't plan to
use it in the near future. We don't
have a mortgage or car payments.
I would like your opinion on how
to reinvest the 401(k). My financial
guy recommends an annuity I
know from reading your columns
you're not big on them. Your
thoughts or recommendations,
please.
Rich, via email
DEAR RICH: Thank you for your
question. It's an interesting one.
I don't think it's particularly
complex.
First, you say your financial guy
recommends an annuity There are
some decent annuity products out
there. But I would not be comfort-
able tying up my money in most an-
nuities, which have a period,
measured in years, during which
the penalties are severe if you take
the money out.
Can you leave the money where
it is? How is it doing? If it's doing
well, why not leave it in the 401(k)?
If you must withdraw, that's an-
other program.
You apparently have a decent
amount of investment savvy in
order to accomplish all that you
have outlined. That being ob-
served, at 68 years old, I wouldn't
want all the money in the market-
place, but I would certainly want a
substantial portion invested in
good, solid American companies.
The Johnson & Johnsons or


Page D4


- Feature and photos
by Associated Press


TOP: Workers are seen at the Target
Technology Innovation Center office in
San Francisco. Target Corp., based in
Minneapolis is among a growing
number of old-line retailers opening
technology hubs in recent months in
high-tech colonies, particularly in
Silicon Valley and San Francisco.
ABOVE: Wal-Mart representative
demonstrates a Scan & Go mobile
application on a smartphone at a
Wal-Mart store in San Jose, Calif.
Wal-Mart is trying to make its mobile
app an indispensable tool for customers
shopping in its stores.

from 5.9 percent of the $2.64 trillion in
total retail sales in 2009 to 7.6 percent
of the $3.1 trillion in revenue last year,








D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber events
For more information on Chamber events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber. com or call 352-795-3149.
Nov. 18 Ribbon-cutting ceremony for Wendy's at
4:30 p.m., 502 W. Main Street, Inverness.
Nov. 20 Ribbon-cutting ceremony for Inverness Bicycle
& Fitness at 8:30 a.m., 130 N. Pine Ave., Inverness.
Nov. 21 Business After Hours Mixer hosted by Oliver
& Company, 5 to 7 p.m., at 1140 Sterling Road, Inverness.
Dec. 4 Chamber Luncheon hosted by the BWA,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Citrus Hills. Sponsored by
Nature Coast Bank and featuring motivational speaker
Beth Ramsey.
Dec. 5 Business After Hours Mixer hosted by Citrus
95.3 at 964 S. Crystal Glen Drive, 5 to 7 p.m.
Dec. 7 Christmas Parade in Crystal River starts at
6 p.m. in downtown Crystal River.
Dec. 9 Citrus Sports & Apparel Mixer, 5 to 7 p.m.
at the Crystal River Mall.
Dec. 14-Christmas Parade in Inverness, start at
noon in downtown Inverness.


C&.'iHas6-a'&Es t &HC2&s cCrU4&


Member Spotlight:


Pine Lodge Bed Country


Inn Bed and Breakfast


More Informadon & Floal Applications:
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
28 NW HWY 19, Crystial River
www.citruscountychiamber.com
0 6352-795-3149
Commercial entries S50 per float, per parade
Nonprofit entries $2; per 11 i per parade
Crysal River Parade Saturday, Dec. 7 at 6 PM
Start in downtown near Heritage Village
Invecrnessc Parade SaturdaM, Dc. 14 at noon
Starts in downtown near the Historic Courthouse

'TLw/e.- CLu Swd.Tnld&&~e



Community events
Nov. 21 Movember Mo Show & Finale Party, High
Octane Saloon, Homosassa, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 21 The College of Central Florida Levy Center
and the Tobacco Free Partnership of Levy County will
host a health fair Thursday, Nov. 21, from 1:30 p.m. to
4:30 p.m. at the CF Levy Center, 114 Rodgers Blvd.,
Chiefland.
Nov. 22 Abitare Paris Salon and Day Spa Guest Ap-
preciation Event 2013 where fashion and beauty ignite,
5 to 7 p.m., held at the Courtyard of Off the Cuff Bou-
tique. Music, tapas and spirits. Call 352-563-0011.
Nov. 22 and 23 Inverness Grand Prix, a unique go-
kart street race around the new courthouse in Inver-
ness. The kickoff party is Friday, Nov. 22, with rock
band Big Engine. There will be vendors, car shows and
beer and wine streetside. The race will be Nov. 23,
with many different classes of racing from kids to
adults. Warm-ups begin at 10 a.m. For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2611. For technical questions, call
352-344-1442.
Nov. 23 The Yankeetown Arts, Crafts and Seafood
Festival presents Rock around the River featuring Bill
Haley Jr. and the Comets, 2 p.m. Advance purchase
tickets $20, $25 at gate. Visit yankeetownseafood
festival.com or call 352-505-7936.
Nov. 24- Cram the Van event benefitting the Humane
Society of Citrus County, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Wal-
mart Super Center, 2461 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. The group requests: Pedigree dog food for
large breed dogs, Pedigree adult small bite dog food,
PetArmor Flea Control for large dogs, liquid laundry de-
tergent, bleach, Pine-Sol blue or purple, puppy training
pads, toilet paper and fleece blankets.
Nov. 28 First Baptist Church of Crystal River wel-
comes you to its annual community Thanksgiving din-
ner. This is a free meal offered to all who need or want
to come share Thanksgiving. A traditional Thanksgiving
dinner will be served from noon to 3 p.m. and there are
no reservations required. Please call the church office
at 352-795-3367 if you need additional information.
Nov. 30- Thanksgiving-weekend auction hosted by
ATM Antiques and Auctions. The auction will feature a
large collection of gold coins, silver coins, investment-
grade art and more. The preview begins Friday, Nov. 29.
Located in Crystal Square Plaza, 811 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. More information and some auction items
located on CharlieFudge.com or call 352-795-2061.


The Season of Giving
Nov. 24 Cram the Van event benefitting the Humane
Society of Citrus County, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Wal-
mart Super Center, 2461 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. The group requests: Pedigree dog food for
large breed dogs, Pedigree adult small bite dog food,
PetArmor Flea Control for large dogs, liquid laundry de-
tergent, bleach, Pine-Sol blue or purple, puppy training
pads, toilet paper and fleece blankets.
Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Santa's Helpers Toy Drive. Request-
ing unwrapped toys or gifts for children and teenagers.
Drop off items at Triple A Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth
Street, Crystal River.


ine Lodge Country Inn is a bed and breakfast built in the
194os. It is located in the natural setting of Inglis, Fla., in the
heart of Old Cracker town and just minutes away from Crys-
tal River. This lodge is furnished in a romantic Victorian style and
offers tranquil, private accommodations, with a variety of rooms
and country cottages. The grounds include bikes, gazebo, saltwater
pool and barbecue area.


Address:
649 Highway 40 W.,
Inglis, FL 34449
Phone:
352-447-7463
pinelodgefl.com


Owners Sergio and Josi add personal touches such as their tri-cultural breakfast to ensure
guests have an unforgettable stay. Pine Lodge is a 2013 Trip Advisor Certificate of Excel-
lence Winner and has reservations, photo gallery, owners' blog and testimonials available at
the website listed above.



Chamber welcomes new

businesses and nonprofits


Mission in Citrus founder James Sleighter (center) with
residents. Chamber ambassadors in attendance, from
left: Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Dan Pushee;
Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle
Title Insurance Agency; Tom Corcoran, Life Care
Centers; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County;
Janet Mayo, Plantation on Crystal River; Jim Ferrara,
Insight Credit Union; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keep-
ers; and Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank.

Mission in Citrus
James Sleighter, founder/executive director/president
2488 N. Pennsylvania Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-794-3825
missionincitrus.com
Homeless shelter and work program, serving primarily
veterans and their families, with a major initiative under
way called Hire the Homeless. Residents are able to pro-
vide housecleaning, lawn service and more.


Crystal River

dentist

honored with

associate

fellowship

.3 T ocal dentist
(/ LRichard
Swanson was
ihmade an asso-
S ciate fellow of Schla
Jthe American
r Academy of nation
Implant Den-
tistry. There chlabac
Share only 618 Sneighb(
dentists na- Houten II,
tionwide to tom Electro
hold this distinguished position, which managed ti
requires extensive examination of din- Wireless Sc
ical proficiency and a minimum of 300 "CEDIA,
hours of postdoctoral instruction, solutions fc
His office, located at 815 S.E. U.S. 19, a mirror or
Crystal River, can be contacted at 352- Schlabac
795-1223. Highway, IL


Chamber ambassadors Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit
Union, and Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal, hold the ribbon
for owner Kesha Underwood. Many guests attended
the ribbon-cutting, including several stylists listed at
salonsuitesbyunderwood.com.

Salon Suites by Underwood
306 S. Line Avenue
Inverness, FL 34452
352-206-6082
salonsuitesbyunderwood.com
Introducing: Salon Suites by Underwood offers an up-
scale beauty complex with individual private suites to
transform into your own personal business. Add all your
personal touches, select your product line, and profit 100oo
percent on retail. Contact us to reserve your suite.


tbach Security attends
)nal electronics conference
*h Security installs electronic systems in Citrus County and
ringg areas. The team of Paul Jordan, Jim Loos, Ken Van
and Jarey Schlabach just returned from the national Cus-
onics Design Industry Association (CEDIA) in Denver and
o complete 41 courses in topics ranging from "Tablets as
)urces" to networking instruction.
shows innovative products that help our company arrive at
br our clients," Van Houten said. "We can hide a TV behind
painting, for example."
h Security & Sound Inc. is located at 2181W. Norvell Bryant
Lecanto FL, and can be reached at 352-527-3201.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tax exemptions for nonprofit organizations


A 11 nonprofit organizations are po-
Stentially eligible for tax exemp-
.Lkions. The IRS can approve an
exemption from federal income tax and
states can permit an exemption from
statesales tax. In both cases certain cri-
terion must be met and the application
process is long and complicated. A ca-
sual or uninformed attempt with re-
spect to the application effort can easily
end in rejection by both agencies.

IRS Grants Income Tax Exemptions
IRS granting an income tax exemp-
tion is easier said than done. The appli-
cation process is complicated andtakes
a long time.The IRS back log for this ap-
proval is huge and the number of agents
is limited. There are reports IRS, in
some cases, cannot even assign an agent
to review an application for 6 months
after receipt of the exemption request.
Therefore, full approval may easily ex-
tend to a year or more. About all the
service can do quickly is send a letter
which acknowledgesreceipt of your re-
quest inside of one month.After that, the
scrutiny and waiting begins.

Filing Specifics
The formal application for a federal


I





N


income tax exemption is 2i
length. The first page is thE
asks if the organization is i
does it have an EIN, an org
ment andby laws, etc.
Pages 2 thru 12 begin thE
tions covering myriad ofs
formation. Answering the
questionsdemands candid
What is stated on the appli
be based in reality and prc
with enough facts to appro
quest. A worthy mission ar
not enough by itself

The Vetting Process
There are no short cuts 1
application. The applicant


more documentation may be required
Dr. to supplement the basic questionnaire.
Narratives will be required that
Frederick divulge any business and/orpersonal
H g relationships between the officers
Herzog, and directors.
Ph.D. Questionsare designed toferret out
facts that might indicate a direct con-
flict with IRS regulations.Nonprofit
organizers must remember exemption
IONPROFIT from federal income tax is a consider-
BRIEFS able privilege. IRS agents take it
seriously
6 pages in When the IRS receives an Application
e easiest. It for Recognition for Exemption under
incorporated, various IRS codes, the agents) review-
ganizing state- ing the documents are obligated to, ex-
amine and evaluate the application. It's
e serious sec- a vetting process. That's their job! Care-
sensitive in- ful assessment ofthe information pro-
vided in the applications vital to IRS's
disclosure, decision in the matter
ication must
videe IRS Up Close and Personal
)ve the re- IRS requires the names, addresses
ad purpose is and social security numbers for all the
officers and directors. Organizational
leaderscannot treat the organization as
a for profit shareholder owned com-
to filing this pany This means financial benefits can-
t will discover not inure to the officers or directors


from the coffers of the nonprofit.
Compensation and financial arrange-
ments with officers, directors, consult-
ants, agents and employees, if present,
is required. If the organization has a
fund raiser thearrangement with
respect to compensation must be
revealed.
Any abuse or the perception of inap-
propriate activities with respect to non
profit operations will cause IRS to deny
the exemption request.
The last pages of the application con-
tain the non profit version of a budget,
income statement and balance sheet.
Numbers found in these documents may
require substantiation and provide the
appearance of reasonableness.

The Best Advice
The best advice a group of organizers
to a new nonprofit is to get experienced
professional guidance. Allow your non
profit the success it deserves from day
one.

Dr. Frederick J Herzog, PhD LLCis
the Executive Director and Founder of
the NonProfit Resource Center in Cit-
rus County He can be reached via
email: fherzog@tampabay.rrcom


BUSINESS DIGEST


Insurance agency to offer

AARP auto insurance program

After meeting several social responsibility and busi-
ness requirements, Sheldon-Palmes Insurance is now
authorized to offer the popular insurance program in
Citrus County
The Hartford announced it is making its award-win-
ning AARP-branded auto insurance program available
through Sheldon-Palmes Insurance.
Sheldon-Palmes Insurance was chosen after satisfy-
ing a number of eligibility requirements, which in-
cluded: demonstrating a commitment to community
service; meeting a high level of business and ethical
standards; and completing a training program de-
signed to address the needs of the 50-plus population.
"For more than 25 years, the industry-leading
AARP-branded auto insurance program from The
Hartford has been extremely popular," said Jim
Flynn, vice president, The Hartford.
Much of the success of this program is due to inno-
vative product features and a commitment to truly un-
derstand and support our customers. We are thrilled
to now be able to offer these benefits through our in-


dependent agent partners."
According to research from The Hartford, the ma-
jority of AARP members prefer the advice and coun-
sel of a local agent when making decisions about their
insurance. Based on this research and strong cus-
tomer demand, The Hartford is offering the AARP
branded auto insurance program through select au-
thorized independent agents. These products were
previously only available from The Hartford by phone,
the Internet and by mail.
The AARP-branded auto insurance program is de-
signed in consultation with The Hartford Advance 50
Team, which helps to tailor products and services
specifically to the interests and needs of Boomers and
older adults. Other unique hallmarks of the program
include:
Lifetime Continuation Agreement- assures that the
customer's insurance policy will not be dropped as
long as a few simple requirements are met.
RecoverCare helps customers pay for assistance
with daily errands and responsibilities, like cooking,
cleaning, shopping, dog walking, transportation and
yard work if they are injured in an auto accident.
Standard 12-month rate protection versus the tradi-
tional six month policies offered by most companies.


Citrus Business Network

supports children's home

Rev Martin Hoffman, past executive director of
Covenant Children's Home, recently attended a meet-
ing of the Citrus Business Network where he accepted
a check for $500 on behalf of the children's home from
president Jaqui Watkins.
Members of the Citrus Business Network believe in,
and practice, giving back to the community in which
they serve. Each year a charity is chosen and sup-
ported by a 50-50 drawing at each weekly meeting.
The charity chosen for 2013 was the Covenant Chil-
dren's Home, and another donation will be made to
the home at the end of the year
Citrus Business Network meets for breakfast at 7:15
a.m. every Friday at Twisted Oaks Golf Club, 4801 N. For-
est Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills. Membership consists of
owners and associates of local businesses, with only one
representative from each business discipline. Several
categories of membership are open at this time.
For more information, call Jacqui Watkins at 352-
422-4770 or Bud Koehlinger at 352-527-9790, or visit
www.CitrusBusinessNetwork.com.


P 0 Delvr


with your new EZPay subscription


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Call Today CiR.NUS 0OU"EY E
Il ,ONIl("

h 352.563.5655 www chronicleonline.com
You will be provided a $10 Publix gift card for you to purchase the free turkey. Must be a new 12 months
EZPay customer at the rate of $11.44 per month to qualify. Your subscription cost includes applicable Florida
and local sales taxes and a separate transportation cost. You have the option to avoid transportation cost by
picking up your newspaper at our Meadowcrest distribution center each daily between 2am-5am.


Yes, I'd like to help bring shelter, warmth and
dignity to families in the Philippines in need


Namel


Address, City, State, Postal Code


Phone number Email address
Rotary Club (if applicable) District#
I learned about SheltwBox from


Please accept my tax-deductible gift of $_____
to support ShelterBox's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts.*
[ ] monthly [] one-time
O Enclosed is my check payable to ShelterBox USA.
o I prefer to make my gift by credit card.
DAMEX OVisa DMasterCard Discover
( / )
Card Number Exp.
Name on Card (please print)
Signature (required)


'Please note: Donatorm made here wAll be used to support ShelterBox' efforts in aiding families affected by the typhoon that struck the
Philippines. In the event that we raise more money than can be reasonably and efficiently spent during this deployment, any surplus funds am
used to help us prepare for and respond to other humanitarian disasters worldwide.


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 D3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


POST
Continued from Page Dl

Saturday mail delivery and reduce the
payments for retiree health benefits.
But prospects for a legislative fix are
increasingly unlikely this year
"The lack of action is simply unfair to
customers and employees and all the
stakeholders that depend on a healthy
postal service," Donahoe said.
The Postal Service also has asked for
an emergency rate hike in the cost of a
first-class stamp from 46 to 49 cents.
That request must be approved by the
independent Postal Regulatory
Commission.
Donahoe said the postal service
saved $1 billion over the past year by
consolidating 143 mail processing cen-
ters, eliminating 1,400 delivery routes
and modifying retail hours in more
than 7,000 post offices. It has also re-
duced its career workforce by 37,400
through attrition.
Fredric Rolando, president of the
National Association of Letter Carriers,




VALLEY
Continued from Page Dl

spending based on a predetermined
budget.
Wal-Mart, which is based in Ben-
tonville, Ark., says having a presence in
Silicon Valley has been invaluable in
part because it offers the company
early access to technology entrepre-
neurs. For example, two years ago, Wal-
MartLabs met the founders of a startup
called Grabble as they were in Silicon
Valley pitching their technology that
enables customers to get receipts for
their purchases by email. Wal-Mart has
since bought the startup, hired the
founders, and next year, shoppers will
be able to get the so-called e-receipts.
The company says it's so pleased
with its results at Wal-MartLabs that it
plans to open another tech office in


one of the Postal Service's largest
unions, suggested the agency would
have had an operating profit of $600
million if it did not have to pay the
congressionally mandated $5.6 billion
charge for pre-funding future retiree
health benefits. Rolando urged law-
makers to reject any bills "that focus on
slashing service and attacking postal
employees and instead focus on fixing
the pre-funding fiasco."
Earlier this week, the agency an-
nounced a lucrative deal with retail
giant Amazon to begin package deliv-
ery on Sunday While growing Internet
use has shrunk the volume of first
class mail dramatically the rise of on-
line shopping has been a boon to the
postal service's package delivery
business.
Revenue from package services rose
by $923 million, or 8 percent last year
and shipping and package services now
represent 16 percent of the agency's
revenues.
The Postal Service is an independent
agency that does not depend on tax
money for its operations but is subject
to congressional control.



nearby Sunnyvale in January It also
has smaller tech hubs elsewhere. "We
are not a retailer in Silicon Valley,"
says Neil Ashe, CEO of Wal-Mart's
global e-commerce operations. "We are
building an Internet technology com-
pany inside the largest retailer"
Teen retailer American Eagle
opened its tech center in San Francisco
in July The 10,000-square-foot location
is filled with movable desks to encour-
age spontaneous brainstorming ses-
sions among its 20 workers. The goal: to
get to know more about American
Eagle's customers.
Among its projects is an effort to con-
solidate the personal data of American
Eagle customers, including their shop-
ping history, from the company's email
campaigns and loyalty programs.
The retailer wants to gain informa-
tion that would help it better target its
marketing around a customer's buying
habits.


Remember to dress for



success when job hunting


he buzz was palpable at the an-
nual Fall Job Fair earlier this
month. A record 200 -job seek-
ers attended, as well as hiring man-
agers from 18 local businesses with
scores of jobs to fill a quick count
shows 60 separate positions, many
requiring multiple employees, plus
several employers had "other
various" positions.
Here's something else that bodes
well: most of the jobs are full- or
part-time permanent.
"This is the first time in a long time
we've seen hiring in a season that's
not for seasonal help," Bobbie Jo
Fenske, HR manager for Lowe's in
Inverness, said.
Music to our ears.
Something that was great to see, lit-
erally, were all the job-seekers who
showed up dressed to impress. Kudos
to Lenny and Scott and Chris and all
those who understand the job-fair
mantra: there are no second chances
to make a good first impression.
In fact a simple rule of thumb is to
dress as if you were going to a job in-
terview- after all, that is basically
what takes place at a job fair, hun-
dreds of micro interviews; the differ-
ence is, you'll only have a matter of
seconds to convince the employer to
spend more time with you.
It doesn't matter how impressive
your resume is if all the employer can
see is inappropriate attire. That's one
very real reason we require that those
who attend our job fairs dress profes-
sionally Also, anything less is disre-
spectful and signals you aren't a
serious job candidate.
Remember, what you do on the job
is not necessarily how you'll dress
when interviewing for it. So no,
bib overhauls don't qualify as
"professional attire."


Laura
Byrnies

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


Jonathan Delicate, our genial
mobile customer service coordinator,
offered the best example of
what it means to be indifferent
about your role as a serious job
candidate.
He told me about a recent referral
he'd made only to hear back from the
employer who asked, "What did you
send me?" Jonathan said he thought
he'd sent her a well-qualified
candidate with the exact skills and
experience needed.
That may be, he was told, but the job
candidate showed up 30 minutes late,
unshaven and wearing what appeared
to be scrubs.
And then the candidate was sur-
prised when he didn't get the job.
Don't let that happen to you. On our
website, we offer Job Fair and Inter-
view Preparation Tips, including how
to dress to impress without spending a
dime. You'll also find plenty of one-on-
one help from our placement special-
ists at our One-Stop Career Center in
Inverness.
Laura Byrnes, APR, is communica-
tions manager for Workforce Connec-
tion and a Florida Certified Workforce
Professional. She can be reached at
800434-5627, ext 1234 orLByrnes
@WorkforceConnectionFL. corn.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

Walmarts of the world are
companies that have been
around for a while and
will continue to be
around. Sure, you will go
through hiccups when the
value goes down, but you
will also experience sub-
stantial increases. These
companies also pay de-
cent dividends. I would
have no problem invest-
ing a good portion of the
$164,000 in companies
with similar track
records.
If you want absolute se-
curity, you can have it, but
at a terrific cost Unless
you are prepared to take
a certain degree of risk, in
today's world, you will be
condemned to receiving
very little return.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
relatives with special
health care needs due to
congenital defects and
mental health issues who
receive Social Security
What is the best way to
leave them some money
without affecting their
ability to receive their So-
cial Security income? I
greatly appreciate any
help you can provide to
assist me in doing this the
correct way I have been
sending them extra
money for years and
worry about them after I
am gone.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The
cold, hard facts are there
is no direct manner that I
know of in which you can
leave a substantial
amount of money to a per-
son with this kind of prob-
lem and not affect the
Social Security income.
That having been said, if
you can leave the money
to some third party who
you trust completely, per-
haps they could dole the
money out.
There are a lot of folks
who would say you would
be avoiding the law, and
that may be the case. I
will leave that up to the
individuals involved to
determine how they want
it handled. It may very
well be that the amounts
of money you have been
giving are beneath the ac-
cepted limits, which have
been increasing every
year But that would not
preclude an inheritance
from affecting their bene-
fits.
As I understand the law,
if you give money directly
to your relatives, your ac-
tion will very likely come
to the attention of the au-


thorities and could re-
duce their Social Security
income. Whether or not
you are comfortable work-
ing through a third party
is another matter
I am not necessarily
comfortable with my an-
swer, but I am addressing
the question as asked. I
will leave the morality to
you.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
two siblings who are
much older I've lived
with my mother all my
life, and when her illness
started about 10 years
ago, I was the one who
took care of her My sib-
lings never helped.
During the time I was
taking care of my mother,
I had the house trans-
ferred under Medicare's
Child Caretaker Exemp-
tion Rule. My siblings
were in agreement with
the transfer
When my mother died a
few years ago, we went to
the lawyer and learned
we didn't need to probate
the will. The house was
already in my name, and
the only other thing my
mother had was a bank
account, which had my
name on it. We filed only
for inheritance tax.
I split up the money
from the bank account,
which I had no obligation
to do. Later, my siblings
wanted to take out a mort-
gage on the house so that
I could split the money
with them. My lawyer says
I have no legal obligation
to do so.


I had my will and other
documents rewritten ear-
lier this year I have de-
cided to have my estate
given to various charities.
I was wondering what
your thoughts are.
Caregiver, via email
DEAR CAREGIVER:
My goodness! You have
certainly been generous
with your siblings, who
made no contribution to
your mother's happiness
and care during her long
illness.
The fact that the house
was transferred to your
name is not a problem.
It's yours and that's the
end of the story You split
the money that was in the
bank account, which you
had no obligation to do.
They then wanted you to
take a mortgage on the
house so you could split
the money with them. You
would have to be ready
for the funny farm to do
so. These people did
nothing and now they
want you to share the pro-
ceeds of what your
mother left behind.
I think you are wise to
give your estate to charity,
and I wouldn't feel the
least bit guilty There can
be little love between you
and your siblings, and
they have demonstrated
their inconsideration and
selfishness. I think you
have been overly gener-
ous to this point and I
wouldn't give them an-
other nickel.
DEAR BRUCE: Is it a
good idea to convert my


Saving Bonds from paper
to the TreasuryDirect
plan?
R.K., via email
DEAR RK: If I under-
stand your question cor-
rectly, you are asking
whether or not it's a good
notion to turn the actual
Savings Bond instru-


ments, which are proba-
bly on the ancient side,
back to the Treasury so
everything is on the com-
puter Absolutely! This
way you won't have to
worry about misplacing,
storing or losing them,
and anytime you need in-
formation, it will be read-


ily available.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m. Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing
to the volume of mail, per-
sonal replies cannot be
provided.


of-consumers actedpon a ne paper ad,..,!

Black Friday is theiggest hopping day of'iy year-and
Aroericaaw ex ilywhere thejwII go first:

I1 Ia paper.4;:ccorijngftdiie. bd~y.
pa e sA .. ,, . in e .. ....



&a ost effective.,wa

Fri aM aS.... \: ..


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts

xoirx Citrus County

Dxx Father


Christmas


Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office,
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486
Monday-Friday, from 8 am. until 1 p.m.
For more hfornmation please call, 527-0052,419-5489,563-5932 or 270-3391


D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


BUSINESS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


c7=1
Fa: 35)56-56 1TolFre:(88.82230 mal:casi *es 0rnclo.0 e 0m Iwesie 0w .0nclolie 0E


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




Admin. Assistant
Lighting Office/lnv.
Seeking professional
Office Assistant
PT -FT potential. Ofc
Exp required. M-F,
Resumes: careers@
esamiones.com

AUTO DETAIL
Mobile or Drop off
Professional Great
Rates (352) 364-7636
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389

L.4&4lc
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087



9 Pine Logs
Good for Lumber
(352) 436-7984
4001 N Holiday
Crystal River
FREE FIRE WOOD
Cut oak. Easy Access
You Load & Haul
Inverness
727-480-4733
FREE KITTENS
6 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
FREE
Polish Black & White
Crested Rooster
(352) 637-2674
Leave message
Free to Good Home
Male Black Lab, 2yrs,
neutered, chipped,
Great Dog. Moving
Can't take him with
me (352) 503-6965



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct (a $5.001b.
Stone Crab$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
FRESH CITRUS
@BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from hwy 41
mustard/collard
greens,squash, more
GIFT SHIPPING
8:30a-5p Closed Sun.


LOSI TGAT-
Small female, Part
Manx, fluffy, brown
w/white mane, has half
tail. lost in Citrus
Springs off Deltona
pis call (352) 322-0086
Black Lab Mix
Short hair, white chest
and feet. 70 ibs
Lost near Homosassa
Tr, Lanatana
(352) 613-6965
Lost 2 Male Dogs
Brindle & white Pitt mix
& a White & Fawn Pitt
mix.Traveling together
Citrus Springs Area
(352) 897-4391
Lost 9/8/13 Tri colored
beagle, neutered male
weighs 40 Ibs. JoJo is a
special needs pet. He
needed medical care
when he went missing.
Last seen on N. Lee
Street Beverly Hills. He
was seen in a pick up
truck with a trailer on the
back. Please if you have
seen our beloved pet
call 352 249 3107 or
3524763140


Calico Cat,
7 Ibs, Rogers St.
between Croft &
independence,
(352) 422-4844
Lost
Rottweiler
in Green Acres Area
(352) 464-0871
Man's Wedding Ring
possibly lost Inverness
McDonald's or Rm 300
at Citrus Memorial
Hospital. Married
for61 yrs. very
sentimental, please
call (352) 726-6093
Yorkie
lost in the Crystal River
Mini Farm Area
pis. call
(352) 422-1038



Found Female
Orange Tabby Cat
Light Green Colar
Seen around
Meadowpark Lane
Crystal River
(352) 794-3173
Small White Female
Dog found 11/13 on
Citrus Ave. Call
352-613-1113



FREE REMOVAL
Would like to thank all
of Citrus County for
your patronage in
2013. I will be full oper-
ational again starting
Jan 6,2014. I want to
wish you all a safe &
joyous holiday season.
See you in 2014
SCOTT &TINA
Nail Technicians
are now back to
ELEGANT NAILS
(Bus) 795-4403
(Cell) 287-1417


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Craba$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001



111f III Il l St.




Classifieds




EXECUTIVE
SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-65
Provides advanced
secretarial and ad-
ministrative work for
the Department of
Water Resources
Director. H.S
Diploma or GED
with advanced
course work in office
practices/ business
procedures. Six
year's responsible
administrative sec-
retarial experience.
Previous supervisory
experience desired.
$12.67 hourly to start
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, November
22, 2012. EOE/ADA.


SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-66
Functions as secre-
tary to the Building
Division and the
Division Director
to perform adminis-
trative responsibili-
ties. Must possess a
current valid Florida
driver license.
$11.09 hourly to
start. Excellent ben-
efits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, November
22, 2013. EOE/ADA.





Your World











ICHRpN'Il.IE


If interested in any of

the following areas



Crystal River

Citrus Springs

Inglis

Homosassa

Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

S CITRUS COUNT


CHRONICLE
V www.chrcnlceonllna.com


Tell that special
Haperson
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




AVANTE
At Inverness
LPN Full time
Positions evening
and nights

CNA- Full Time
Postions evenings
and Nights
Please Apply online
At
Avantecenters.com


C.N.A.s
11-7 Full Time
Join Our Team.
Now hiring 11-7 shift
EXC. Benefits
Apply at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp
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An EEO/AA Em-
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DENTAL
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Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@


I Happ Notep


FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax Resume to:
352-795-1637 or
Email: lynn.
swanson@rswanson-
dental.com


LEDGER DENTISTRY
IS SEEKING A
PART TIME
DENTAL
HYGIENIST

Please Call
352 364-7797 for
Instructions on how
to apply & where to
send your Resume.


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST
Wanted for office
based medical
practice in Inverness.
Front and back office
experience preferred.
Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818


Medical Practic

Looking for
Full Time Medical
Receptionist
Medical office exp
preferred.
Send resume to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meaowcrest
Blvd Blind Box1848P
Crystal River,
Fl 34429


PIT, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for:
Responsible
Individual with
flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE


F/Tor PIT
Certified Dental
Assistant
for fast paced
Dental Office
Fax Resume To:
352-795-1637 or
Email:
lynn.swanson@
rswansondental.com


CASE MANAGER
For ACO,
Large Physcian
Group PT/FT Position
Fax Resume to
352-746-3838 or
Call 352-527-0514

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF

Ultra Sound Tech
4DOB,
Fax Resume:
352-794-0877







Assfessmentpcal-
SCOLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
Assessment Special-
ist Citrus Campus
Schedule, setup,
and administer all
testing. Associate
degree required.
Three years of expe-
rience administering
various electronic
and paper-pencil
standardized and
specialized tests,
and career assess-
ments required,
or two years of
experience with a
bachelor's degree.
Review date is
11/28/13
Coordinator -
Criminal Justice -
Ocala Campus
Bachelor's degree
and three years of
experience in crimi-
nal justice required.
Review date is
11/27/13.
Faculty Engineer-
ing Technology
168 Workdays
Master's degree in
the teaching disci-
pline or Master's
degree with a
concentration in the
teaching discipline
(a minimum of 18
graduate hours
in the teaching
discipline) required.
Three years related
work experience or
a combination of
work and teaching
experience pre-
ferred. Commitment
to the college
objective of provid-
ing instruction for di-
verse student popu-
lations. Review date
is 12/09/13
Faculty Associate
Degree Nursing
220 Workdays
Master's degree in
Nursing or Master's
degree with a con-
centration in the
Nursing discipline
required. Florida
registered nurse
licensure required
(or is eligible). Re-
quires a minimum of
two years of Nursing
practice. Prefer
two years of recent
bedside clinical
experience or
teaching (medical,
surgical/ adult
health preferred) or
a combination of
work and teaching
experience. Nursing
faculty teach at
both Ocala and
Citrus campuses.
Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for diverse student
populations.
Review date is
12/12/13.
A copy of transcripts
from an accredited
institution must be
submitted with the
application for
each position.
Alternatively,
send via e-mail to
hr@cf.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College Rd,
Ocala, FL 34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


(352) 563-5966


Cl1 )pNI(lE

www.chronicleonline.com


Home Finder
www chronRcic hmefinder.com


Iwww.chronicleonline.coml


You've Got It!





Somebody






Wants


It!


(352) 563-5966

www.chronicleonline.com
640980


I I

Field Interviewer
Professional part
time work
opportunities!
The University of
Michigan Survey
Research Center
(SRC) is part of the
nation's largest
academically-
based social sci-
ence and research
organization. SRC is
seeking part-time
field interviewers in
the Citrus Co. area
to work on the
Health and Retire-
ment Study (HRS).
Requirements:
*Attend a manda-
tory training session
in Ann Arbor, Ml
mid-March
*Have good com-
puter and typing
skills using a laptop
computer
*Conduct lengthy
in-home interviews
(some phone) with
selected adults
*Work minimum of
30 hours per week
including at least
25% during evenings
and weekends
*Take physical
measurements
(such as grip
strength) and
collect biomarkers
(such as dried blood
spot collection)
*Commit to work
the entire survey
period (March to
December 2014)
*Work in a variety of
neighborhoods
including inner city
where applicable
*Have reliable trans-
portation to meet
the demands of the
assignments (A
valid driver's license
and insurance is
required when
driving)
We Offer:
*Hourly pay rate for
Citrus County, Fl
area is $11.50
*English/Spanish bi-
lingual candidates
may receive a
higher rate of our
bilingual proficiency
standards are met.
*Mileage
reimbursement for
business travel
*Paid Technical
training on how to
conduct field
interviews using
standardized tech-
niques
-Travel advance
and/or expense
reimbursement for
travel to training in
Ann Arbor, Ml
Check our website
for a full description
of the project, job
description, and to
apply online at:
recruit.isr.umich.edu
Hurry! Must apply
online by
January 15, 2014.
The University of
Michigan is an
affirmative action
equal opportunity
employer.






W



w













How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


Admin. Assistant
Lighting Office/Inv.
Seeking professional
Office Assistant
PT FT potential. Ofc
Exp required. M-F,
Resumes: careers@
esamiones.com




COOK

Exp. Only apply
at Chicken King
2420 N Florida Hwy
Hernando, FL
NO PHONE CALLS

FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person at:
Superior Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.

Sous Chef
Needed for casual
upscale Country
Club. Culinary skills
and kitchen
management exp
necessary. Send
resume to: careers
@citrushills.com


CHRpNTCLE

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time
Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


wmd

CH~pNICLE

Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time
Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Need aclOB?

#1 Employment source is








www.chronicleonline.com


CLASSIFIED



SALES REP.
Seeking a moti-
vated professional
with knowledge of
county geography.
Excel. benefits,
base + commission,
exp. neccesary.
Email Resume to:
ccccreception
@gmail.com




DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Wemrner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624







ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough, Trim. Slab,
Lintel, Service
& Warehouse.
Full benefits, paid
holiday & vac. /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wlldwood

Now Hiring:
OTR CDLA


Ney
and
Bor
day
fit
bo
1-8
.W


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Service Techs.
Part time, experi-
enced only, for busy
AC Company
Email To: aairinc@
centurylink.net


STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County
Recycling in Lecanto,
Fl. is looking for an
experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Exp. also. Full time,
Pays $13.50 per hour.
Drug Free Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume1801@
yahoo.com,
No walk-in's or
phone calls


Subcontractor
Installer

Must have own tools
& vehicle. Lic/Ins.
w/ workmans comp.
Steady work
needs to be quality
conscious &
a self-starter. Pay
perjob. Contact
DEEM CABINETS
Attn: Dave Foley
3835 S Pittsburgh
Ave. Homosassa


General^
Helpr


Help
xperienced
Sewer Needed
With use of commer-
cial sewing machine.
352-503-8539

FT/PT COOK
POSITION
Exp. is required
Fax Resume to
352-527-1290 or
Apply in Person at:
Superior Residences,
4865 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto 34461.


HANDY MAN
General Maintenance
Carpenter work, light
plumbing, all types of
trim carpentry, Ability
to trim out sm. homes.
able to hang ceiling
fans, and window
treatments. Overall
home maintenance.
CALL AFTER 6PM
(352) 445-0646

NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone
Telemarketers
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
352-628-0187

RANCH &
FARM HELP
Maintenance,
Mow, Stalls, Turnout,
Exp. w/horses a plus.
1-=1k A.- C /T PnP


AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547

BSchools
Instruction


SF
LI

CO
Dec
D:
cm1


inglisArea, r/I, cEO Fru lli
Drivers COMMUNITY 352-400-0469 P<:
HubSIESSE
w Pay Package HOSTESS In
I $2500 Sign -On TOWER HAND ch
nus! Mostly 5-10 Seeking high-energy Startina at $10.00/Hr. Schc
is out. Full bene- professional Bldg. Communication ww
ts, achievable hostesses for Towers. Travel, Good
uses. Call for seasonal part-time Pay & Benefits. OT, /
details positions shuttling 352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.
88-378-9691 or potential homeowners
henet around country club
community's
^ P- amenities and model a t i
homes. Must be Hlp
professional, outgoing
articulate, upbeat and PT CAREGIVER
service oriented. PT CAREGIVER
Apply at Terra Vista (72
Welcome Center, flexible hours (35
2400 N. Terra Vista please call STA
S Blvd., Hernando, FL 352-422-7116 FOf


RING HILL
CLASSES
AST CLASS
OF 2013
SMETOLOGY
;ember 16TH
Y & NIGHT
SCHOOL
TIME & PARTTIME
BENE'S
ternational
ool of Beauty
w.benes.edu


7) 848-8415
2) 263-2744
TE APPROVED
R VA TRAINING


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Your World


^(fW'fi4ie 44


I -( I'l-




. ii i I i-. '


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



AUTO DETAIL
Mobile or Drop off
Professional Great
Rates (352) 364-7636



B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352-447-5888



Home Health Care
position wanted. Pro-
vide services for eld-
erly and disabled. Ref
Avail (352) 419-8387


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lie.
352-584-5374


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
5-57-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696


SxeXnce wfo un




ROOFING
M 10IMIF0 IM
Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices


www.iliieroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START

A FIRE!
Flai Raie No
Hidden Costs


1-85-4DRVEN!


Kat's Kritter Kare &


(3OZ) Z/U-40/Z
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"Call 352-560-7609**

Vera's Cleaning Serv
20 yrs of quality serv.
Flexible Scheduling
Call (352) 726-8511



Find Guaranteed,
Local A/C Sales &
Installation Pros!
800-763-7108 Air
Conditioner Sales,
Service and Installa-
tion. All pros are
pre-screened and
relentlessly
reviewed! Call now
for a no obligation
estimate!
800-763-7108
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning









(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

I 1l l', ll 1 ,"1 1 1 ' .
i Ltll 'V. % I Id lIIst.



Classifieds


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

PaintingB


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971


CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570

Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135





POOL


Po6L

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636




Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


GENERAC I j
Stand Alone
Generator '

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion ]
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-1248


BATHFITTER CASH for
"One Day Bath Remodeling" S C R1 A P
In Just One Day, S H
We wil InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub Always A Fair Price
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old One!!! Steel Aluminum Cars
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!! Appliances Wire
Visit our Ocala 5 o D P W
Showroom or call
1-3S2-624-8827 Met Rcycling
For a FREE In-Home Estimate! 4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
BATHFITTER.COM 527-9599


Addan artistic touch to your existing yard KNOCK OUT
orspoolorplan CLEANING SERVICE
something RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
IR a /''' opto lo! RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP^
completely new! RENTALS O
n, 'Oftn ra Licensed, Insured,



eCOPES s 352.942.6876

POOL AND PAVER LLC Call Today for a
L .'C,%n To.y _ror
Licensed 352- 400-38 W. 0 CleangTomrrow
& insW.edessure


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






"I ERLING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/ins/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710
|All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofing- Inc.com
Lic# Cccl1327656 /Ins.
-352-639-1024-



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


Exposedte
Aggregate
Shotcrete $451yd.L
D Decks Tile
FREE RA Pavers
ESTIMATES 7i- 4
GREG'S COMPLETE
nEG 0 REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
iSED352-746-5200
& INSUED


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838











TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
Small Carpentry
S t fe Lencing
IEnst A, Screening
9 (lean Dryer Vents
&l Rpoaiorle & Depetndable
fthoe os putrice lifelong
liW 352-344-0905
I III cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*.Generators Lighting Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair N New Outlets
- Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
S MR. 352-364-4610

"ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
b c #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a DaY 7 DaYS a Week


Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


A ROOFING
Ca t 'e" Acakh6usat"J
Free Written Estimate

: 100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:
iMust present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000GHRA








Lwmi Sprioiker

Not Wrki0io9?

We'll Fix It








746-4451- -



Is




*Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


. .......a -Wmww vi __.


341P


P^IBATHRMODELINGI


riIMTLRECCINGIi~


I POOLS AND PAVERS


I CLEANING I


)I




CITRUS COUNTY (aL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 D 7


Used Sheds Must go
2-12x24 10x16, 8x10
352-634-3935




ALL WOOD TONGUE
AND GROOVE
DRESSER great shape
for an antique $80.00
call 352-257-3870






DUDLEY'S
"ACTw

3 AUCTIONS

Thursday 11/14/13
Estate & Adventure
Auction
Auction #1: 3Dm
Auction #2: 6pm Es-
tate items -Furniture
appliances, house-
hold, tools, CHRIST-
MAS galore. 700+lots

Saturday 11/16/13
Lladro & Swarovski
Auction 1Oam
Lladro "event"
figurines Collector
Society pieces,
Swarovski pcs. 150+
lots of fine figures

Sunday 11/17/13
Estate Firearms
Auction 1 pm con-
temporary & vintage
pistols, shotguns &
long rifles. Winches-
ter, Colt md11911,
Stevens, Randall
Knife, Marlin, Brown-
ing, Live & On line.

Call or Web for Into
Dudleysauctlon.
com 352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck




ASHTON DRAKE
DOLLS Decorating the
Tree set. 4 dolls with
accessories. Never
used, still wrapped in
original boxes. $140.
352-586-3842
LARGE COLLECTION
OF SNOW VILLAGE
VARIOUS PRICES
(352) 382-0001




Two Person Sauna
like new
cost $3800.
will sell for $1500.
(352) 58A-A6n3


qualinne
employee?


This area's
#1

employment

source!


Cii ~iaE






APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GOOD DRYER $100
Works great with 90
warranty Call or text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
Works great with 90 day
warranty Call or text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
KENMORE DRYER
heavy duty, super
capacity, very good
condition $100.
(352) 522-0141
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE
Kenmore Electric
stove, white, self
cleaning, 4 yrs old,
very good cond. $165
(352) 860-2701
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
Can deliver for fee.
$100 each.
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258










DUDLEY'S
AOTCTiOWi

3 AUCTIONS

Thursday 11/14/13
Estate & Adventure
Auction
Auction #1: 3Dm
Auction #2: 6pm Es-
tate items -Furniture
appliances, house-
hold, tools, CHRIST-
MAS galore. 700+lots

Saturday 11/16/13
Lladro & Swarovski
Auction 1Oam
Lladro "event"
figurines Collector
Society pieces,
Swarovski pcs. 150+
lots of fine figures

Sunday 11/17/13
Estate Firearms
Auction 1 pm con-
temporary & vintage
pistols, shotguns &
long rifles. Winches-
ter, Colt mdll1911,
Stevens, Randall
Knife, Marlin, Brown-
ing, Live & On line.

Call or Web for Info
Dudleysauctlon.
corn 352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


Public Auction
Exclusive Millwork
Inc.
December 3rd at
10am Preview:
12/02 10-5pm
3277 SE 14 Ave, Fort
Lauderdale, FI 33316
Huge Inventory of
Doors, Frames,
Accessories &
Machinery
www.moecker
auctions.com
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
$100 ref. cash
dep.15% -18%BP
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin

Public Auction
Multiple Companies
Online & Onsite
Saturday,
Nov23 at 10am
5553 Anglers Ave,
Bldg 4,
Dania Beach, Fl
33312
Vehicles, Comput-
ers, Office Furniture,
Office Equipment,
Dymo Drills, Paint
Machine, Ware-
house Items and
more!
Visit www.moecker
auctions.com
for details Moecker
Auctions (800)
840-BIDS$100 ref.
cash dep.15%
-18%BP Subj to
confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin





Generator
Troy-Bilt 5550 waft,
never used $400;
Plainer/jointer Jet,6 in,
excellent cond $400
(352) 527-2872




47 INCH PANASONIC
PROJECTION TV 6
years old but works
great. $100, you collect.
Tel: (352)-795-5232
50" LED Toshiba TV
less than 1 yr. old
$450. firm
(352) 220-7301

DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installa-
tion! CALL Now!
1-800-745-2645

KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER &
GRAPHICS $90
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
216" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $85
352-613-0529




2 Sets
6ft Sliding Glass Doors
double pane,
Like new $250.
(352) 726-8053


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




5 PIECE OUTDOOR
FURNITURE SET
WHITE $100
352-613-0529
Kitchen Chairs
2 metal tubing chairs
with padded seats,
pastel color, textured
finish. Both $30
(352) 527-1877
Lloyd Flanders Wicker
Club Chair and wicker
rocker, Linen color,
$300.
(352) 527-2491
USA made Patio
Chairs 2 adj. high
backs and 2 gliders
white powder coast
frames $225.00
(352) 5134232






3 RUGS, 1 DESK WITH
CHAIR Emerlin Oriental
Style Rugs
1- 8X11 Black-DTV
1- 8X11Red-FNH
1- 4X6 Blue with Ivory
Border
Like New All 3 for 300.
1 Queen Anne Style
Desk with School House
Chair
Very good condition 65.
352-503-7449
3Pc. Liv. Rm. Set beige
matching sofa loveset
& chair, cocktail tbie
glass $800. Jr. Din.
Room, table w/leaf,
hutch, 6 chairs,
stone washed $400.
352-423-0062,SMW,
Armour
Double Door with 2
bottom draws $40
Wood Tressel table
5'x3' $30
(352) 726-4085
ASHLEY BIG BOY
CHAIR Dark sage
green. Paid $895 sell
$100.341-1086
Brand New
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
CHAIRS 2 matching
chairs and ottoman.
Floral/tan. $99.00.
352-344-5311
China Cabinet
Antique, dark wood,
glass door. $150
(352) 726-4085
CLASSIC CHAISE
LOUNGE soft wine color
clean comfy VG cond
$100 firm 352-8974154
Den Furniture,
2 honey oak wall
units, 30" and 36"
TV cabinet built in
54" computer desk
with hutch, built in fil-
ing cabinet $800.
352-423-0062,SMW
DINETTE 36" octagon
top, off white, 4 roller
chairs with blue
cushions, rattan style,
mint cond., $250.
(352) 586-1566


aiitr
Dining Room Table
w/8 chairs
chair backs wicker,
cushion seats $275.
3 solid wood bar stools
27"' $75. (352) 513-4365
DINNING ROOM SET
complete honey oak
set, table w/ pad,
6 chairs, and china
cabinet. Like New
$500 (352) 563-5809
Dinning Room Table
Pub Style with 4 chrs.
$150; Icocktail and
2 end tables. Glass w/
wood base $150
(352) 586-0566
ELECTRIC TWIN BEDS.
Head and feet go up
and down. One
vibrates. $100/each
(352) 422-6407
ETHAN ALLEN 4
ARMCHAIRS Antiqued
Tavern Dark Pine
Collection Very solid
$100/all 352-897-4154
FORMAL LEATHER
BLACK MAPLE CHAIR
perfect $80.00 call
352-257-3870
GLASS TABLE TOPS
48"RND&42"SQ OTH
3/8"THK NICE $50EA
OR MAKE OFFER
352-2284517
w, HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
PRETTY Blue ANTIQUE
WASHSTAND 2
drawers/doors vg cond.
$100 orig handles
352-8974154
RATTAN SOFA BED
Okay condition. Can fur-
ther describe and send
pictures by email. $50
danciml@hotmail.com
RED METAL
CHILDREN'S BUNK
BED nice shape paid
$200.00 sell for $50.00
call 352-257-3870
SHELF UNIT,
5'9" Tall, 16" Deep,
30"Wide,
glass & wood,
cabinet to match $95.
(352) 563-5232
Sofa & Love
Seat Sage Green like
new. No smkg or pets
$600; 2 occasional
chairs $100
(352) 586-0566
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Good condition, five
years old. Bassett
brand color Amber.
Excellent buy $400 for
both. Call after 4pm
352-489-9683
Table lamp
30 wicker like
w/ off white shade $50
(352) 586-0566




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362




PLANTS FOR WATER
GARDENS BLUE
FLOWERS. DON'T
KNOW THE NAME 3.00
EACH 464 0316


CRYSTAL RIVER
Trash and Treasure
Sale Cry. Riv. Women's
Club Sun. Nov. 17th,
8a-2p furniture
Collectibles, clothing,
Hshold, jewelry, crafts,
Christmas, Lots morel
320 N. CITRUS AVE.

INVERNESS
Sun. Only 17th 8a-5p
HUGE 3 Family Sale
5434 S. DeDe Terr.





Crystal River
Sat & Sun 9am-3pm
Beautiful Furniture,
household items
and much more!
733 Suncoast Blvd
MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945
Selling entire contents
of 3 rooms, BR, LR, DR
furniture, Kit items, &
decor. Best offer takes
it all.Call for viewing
(352) 563-0129




2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $12
EACH 352-613-0529
3 MENS PANTS 36X30
& 2 CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 3 SETS SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 $45 352-613-0529
GIRLS winter clothing
4 jeans 1 pants 5
shirts 2 pajama sets &
2 hoodies sizes vary
$55 352-613-0529




6 'Christmas Tree
$25.00
Full Set of Men's Golf
Clubs $25.00
(352) 586-4866
55 Gal Aquarium
Full 2 door wood base
All Accessories
2 Ig Plecostamus Fish
$300 352-628-3393
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Cannon Cameras
AE1 &AE1 Program
& T90
various lens, filters etc.
$300.
(352) 341-1879
Electronic KAWAI
Organ 2 key boards,
11 pedals, 50 tonal
adj. $125 obo; blond
oval kit table w/ 4
chrs, 50x33, pedestal
$40 352-249-8970
Exercise Stepper,
$75.
2 bookcases, 2 red
day care tables
$125
(352) 795-7254
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( S5.001b.
Stone Crab $6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
GENERATOR genera-
tor for sale 1200 watt
brand new never used.
$80.00 628-5107 phone


Home made quilt Tops
5 for $100
Baby Furniture
$100.
(352) 795-7254
MAPLE END TABLES
Open for lots of storage.
Heavy duty. Have 2 for
$35. 746-0714
Play Station Portable
3 games, all cords,
$80 cash, firm. Pis call
(352) 205-7973
352-220-4483
SINGER Portable
Sewing Machine
first $35.00 Take Home
(352) 795-6650
TABLESAW
CRAFTSMAN 10" good
condition.
Sell $80 746-0714
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
Tonneau Cover,
for Ranger pick up
bed $60.
Aerator, $35
(352) 465-2709
Two Fish Tanks
w/all accessories
$50.(352) 249-7033
Two Ink Cartridges
for Lexmark Printer
$20. each
(352) 249-7033
WORD PROCESSOR
Smith/Corona, w/
monitor $150
Blue Onion pattern
porcelain dishes 12
place settings $150
(352) 382-0001




LARGE DISPLAY
CASE WITH LIGHT
missing back panel but
functional $80.00 call
352-257-3870




Back 2 Life
12 min back pain
solution-complete
pckg.$30.
(352) 344-0293
Heavy Duty
Wheelchair, Like New
$75. (352) 465-4691
can pick-up between
2pm 6pm


SCOOTER AND LIFT a
Celebrity 3-wheel
scooter and a Haramar
rear (behind the
car)lift. Both in very
good condition. $1000
for both. please call
before 8 PM
352-270-2319




"NEW" WASHBURN
5 STRING BANJO
STARTER PAK EVE-
RYTHING YOU NEED
(MSRP $400+) $135
352-601-6625
CALLIOPE
Plays from a CD, 5 ft.
tall, very colorful,
excellent for festivals,
crafts shows, draws a
crowd quickly $300.
(352) 795-3424
PIANO
Korg SP-250
Digital Piano, Full
Keyboard, $250.
(352) 382-5632


TRAVEL ELECTRIC
MINI BASS FENDER
STYLE 22"(baritone
uke.) $50 SCALE BIG
SOUND! 352-601-6625




DYSON VACUUM dc18
slim with accessories.
Asking $100 neg. Call
352-726-9009
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting, 1
Dark Green, 2 Dark
Blue $15.00 each Call
352-726-9009
GENERATOR Never
used 2005 7800 watts
troybuilt with 13500
starting watts, equipt for
home power loss.
500.00
352-726-9964
Pfaltzgraff Tea Rose
Pattern, 5 pc. place
setting for 12
assorted matching
glasses + 28 matching
accessories, $300
(352) 382-4875
Fines


TREADMILL,
Proform J6
Excellent cond.
$300. obo
(352) 628-2965




ATEC "CASEY"
Baseball Pitching
Machine. Up to 90
MPH. Great Cond. 1
dozen baseballs $800
(352) 527-8303
BICYCLES
Pair of 26" Murry
bicycles. New tires,
cloud 9 seats. $85.00
(352)621-3624






DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOTT

3 AUCTIONS

Thursday 11/14/13
Estate & Adventure
Auction
Auction #1: 3Dm
Auction #2: 6pm Es-
tate items -Furniture,
appliances, house-
hold, tools, CHRIST-
MAS galore. 700+lots

Saturday 11/16/13
Lladro & Swarovskl
Auction 10am
Lladro "event"
figurines Collector
Society pieces,
Swarovski pcs. 150+
lots of fine figures

Sunday 11/17/13
Estate Firearms
Auction 1 pm con-
temporary & vintage
pistols, shotguns &
long rifles. Winches-
ter, Colt mdl1911,
Stevens, Randall
Knife, Marlin, Brown-
ing, Live & On line.

Call or Web for Info
Dudleysauctlon.
corn 352-637-9588
4000 S Florida
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10%bp
cash/ck


utility

5 x 8 enclosed
Utility Trailer, Excel.
Cond. can see at
2476 N. Treasure Point,
Hernando, $600. obo
(352) 270-8269
5x8 Endcl. Utility Trailer
can be used for 2
person sleeping
trailer, has windows
$550. (352) 228-0291




CLOTHING boys infant -
size 8 priced from .25-
$2.00 super nice in CR.
352-257-3870
Eddie Bauer DOUBLE
STROLLER works great
need a little cleaning
$60.00 call
352-257-3870
MAPLE WOOD HIGH
CHAIR good working
order $45.00 call
352-257-3870


w



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On iv$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Diamondback
Competition Moun-
tain Bike, 27 speeds
Avid disc brakes,
thumb shifters, Barend
rods, marzocchi
bomber front shocks.
Seat post suspension.
Computerdlights, utility
bag shock pump, SPD
peddles. Only $300
firm 352-382-4245
Ladie Cobra Golf clubs
4 thru. PW,
Graphite shaft $75.
(352) 388-8006
Oldie But Goodie
EZ Go, Golf Cart,
reese hitch, runs good
good battery. Work
box on back. $875.
(352) 564-2756
POOL TABLE
4X8 Leisure bay,
Oak finish, Qn legs,
w/cover,accesories.
Like new pc of furn
$1200. 352-527-8303
PROLINE Pool Table
Simply The Best
7 ft Slate w/access
Exc. cond. Must See
$850
352-322-6464


ACE
Ace, 3 1/2 y.o. terrier
mix, wt. 51 Ibs,
beautiful red coat,
healthy, great
shape, good
w/other dogs, plays
in pool, very intelli-
gent, learned agility
course quickly, sits,
gives paw, lies
down on com-
mand, takes treats
gently, appears
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.




our world first.
Every Day



Classifieds


AXLE
Axle, a very hand-
some 2 y.o. Retriever
mix, neutered,
healthy, wt. 58 Ibs.,
Walks nicely on a
leash, is eager to
please. Good
w/other dogs, kids,
& cats. Very affec-
tionate, lively &
playful, appears
housebrkn.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


$100 each for
FLORIDA LICENSE
PLATES FROM CITRUS
COUNTY THAT BEGIN
WITH THE NUMBER 47
for years 1938,
1942,1943,1945,1947,
1948, 1949,1950,1954.
Up to $1000 for any
Florida porcelain li-
cense plate dated
1911-1917. Any
condition accepted,
so long as they are
readable. Jeff Francis
727-424-1576 email
gobucs13@aol.com
Recumbant Bicycle
long wheel base
352-795-8800
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




SCOTT &TINA
Nail Technicians
are now back to
ELEGANT NAILS
(Bus) 795-4403
(Cell) 287-1417


Selo SaB




D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 CLASSIFIEIDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BAILEY
Bailey, a Chesa-
peake Bay Re-
triever/ hound mix, 2
y.o., wt. 39 lbs.,
Heartworm
-negative,
Sits on command,
walks well on leash,
friendly & attentive.
Good w/other dogs.
Very obedient, ap-
pears housebroken.
Slim & trim.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.








JO JO
JoJo, a 4-y.o. bull-
dog mix, brindle in
color, dropped off
at the shelter as a
stray. She is a very
happy, sweet girl,
who has been
found to have se-
vere hip dysplasia;
however, no one
has told her that.
She thinks she is just
fine. She is house-
brkn, spayed &
heartworm-neg.
She will require
medications such as
Remidyl, Tramadol,
Glucosamine/Chondroiti
n & Omega 3
fatty acids (fish oil)
for the rest of her life
to keep her active.
She is a very lovely,
affectionate dog
with a beautiful
face who does not
know she has a
problem & loves life.
Hopefully there is a
compassionate
family or individual
who is willing to give
this girl a good
home, in return for
limitless devotion
from her. She
would truly bring
joy to your home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288












LOKIE
Lokie is a 3-y.o.
brown/white terrier
mix, weight 65 Ibs.
Very sweet, very
gentle. Came to
shelter because
owner could not
care for him any
more. Very gentle,
very playful ,loves
water, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
human friends.
Beautiful boy, eager
to please.
Heartworm-negative,
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682


ILQolc


Lee




New Puppy? Consider
a gift certificate for a
Puppy How 2 Class?
Call Deborah Lumley
Certified Prof Dog
Trainer at Intercept Dog
Training 352-422-1123
or hershevsleacv.com
PUREBRED MINI-
DACHSHUNDS,
w/health cert.
8 wks old. black
& tans & dapples
males $300. females
$350. (352) 503-9750
or (352) 586-9928
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827
Yellow Umbrella
Male Cockatoo
quiet, shy, 5 yrs. old
$800. Ivg msg
(352) 513-4744



PIGS FOR SALE
Berkshire & Berkshire
mixes, $40. to $100.
(352) 522-0214 or
(352) -445-0381



SATURN
2013 14' KBoat inflata-
ble, 42" beam,
auto-inflator, dolly,
bimini, 55 Ib trolling mo-
tor, battery, many ex-
tras. almost new. $650
for all.352-860-2701



Your World

%!949fl9C 444


C.'1pN1,E


CffTIffitAa



Sell tolgTe


Current Designs
Gulf Stream, 16' 10
Kevlar, yellow/white
exc. cond. $1800.
(352) 464-4955
Wilderness
2012 Tsunami Kayak
14.5 w/rudder, carbon
fiber paddle, rf. rack
too many extras to list
$1,325, (352) 586-2625




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945
PONTOON BOAT

'08, 24' Sunchaser 824
by Smokercraft. Very
clean, needs nothing
Lots of extra's! 6x8
open front fishing
deck with 2 chrs. '07,
50 HP Yamaha 2
stroke, less then 50 hr.
'07 Road King, walk up
2 axel trlr. $10,250
(352) 419-7766
SYLVAN
Bowrider, 2004, 17 ft,
115HP yamaha,
great shape, $7,000
obo (352) 341-0422
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

AIR STREAM 1998
33ft Motor home
454 Cl Eng, 2 roof AC,
awnings all around,
7KWGen, 54kmi, A1
cond, Asking 16,900
(540) 305-9854
FLEETWOOD
MUST SEE *
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k ml. Ready to
go! $8,000
(352) 628-6643
FLEETWOOD
89 SOUTHWIND, Cl A,
28ft, 41k mi, rear bed,
all new access & tires
$8200. 352-697-5530




CARDINAL
2006, 5TH Wheel,
w/3 slides, $17, 995,
Crystal River
(989) 878-0711
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Shadow Cruiser
28', 1 slide, sleeps
10, comes w/outside
kitchen, only used twice!
w/ throw in auto. satellite
$18,500.
(352) 564-6820
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



TRUCK RACK
Custom built, alumi-
num, kayak/ladder
$400
(352) 795-7766

VSehicle

"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
"352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




CHEVROLET
1997 Lumina 6 cyl auto
power windows & locks,
130,000 miles. Good
condition, no damage,
non-smoker veh. Many
new parts. $2,750.
781-454-5004
CHEVROLET
2010 Cobalt, 1 owner,
appx 34k mi. like new,
$9500. obo (352)
341-1922, 697-0411
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHEVY 2010
Malibu LT, clean, 73K
mi, 4 cyl, 6 sp, auto,
avg 25 mpg. $10,800


Citrus Spgs 465-2372
CHRYSLER
1994 Concorde. Good
clean car, runs great.
Gas gauge not working.
$1800 OBO
352-726-5712


2UUU, SebrIIIIn
Convertible, low miles
$5,488.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LANDROVER
'02, Freelander, 4
wheel drive,110k mi.,
great cond. new tires
$4,500 (352) 795-1015
LINCOLN
2004 Town Car; Always
gar'd, Cream puff,
Loaded. 79kmi $10,800
Citrus Spgs 465-2372

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2008 Altima, 69K
miles, orig. owner,
$9500
(352) 212-0315
Oldsmobile
1996 Sierra SL Station
Wagon, 6 cyl, 127k
pampered miles,
mech & body in exc
cond. A/C needs
work. $1500, 563-1327
PLYMOUTH
'93 Acclaim, AC, new
tires & brakes, very
clean 86K mi. runs
great $3,000 obo 352
382-3900, 634-3880




CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, ConvArtic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
DATSUN
1979, 280 ZX Antique
2 Door Coupe
$4,400
(352) 257-3261







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DODGE
2008,2500,
Heavy Duty, Diesel,
$26,500
(352) 438-8026
FORD
'99 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
04 Suburban LT, 2 whl
drv., loaded, Pristine
cond. 214K mi. $3500
352-615-7566
CHEVROLET
2004, Tahoe LT,
leather, sunroof,
$8,999
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition,
Eddie Bauer Edition,
leather $3,999
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
TOYOTA
1999, Ray, -4 power
windows, locks, auto-
matic transmission
$3,999.
352-341-0018




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
Touring, $6,888.
352-341-0018
FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735




Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR,
low milesgarage kept,
Adult Owner, $6K
(352) 257-8850
HONDA
07 VTX 1300
motortrike convers.
undr-14k mi. new front
brakes, seals, springs
$16k obo 503-6177
SUZUKI 07 BLVD
1500cc Beautiful Bike
over $2500 in chrome,


lights etc. 29k mi Adult
owned, Runs Ex $4750
Brian 352 613 7930


388-1124 SUCRN
12/4 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Personal Property of the following Tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental liens in
accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83-806 and
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE- DUNNELLON
#143 Jennifer Winegar;#170 Troy Suarez
Contents may include kitchen, household items, bedding, luggage, toys, games,
packed cartons, furniture, tools, clothing, trucks, cars, etc. There's no Tile for vehicles
sold at Lien Sale. Owners reserve the right to Bid on Units. Lien Sale to be held on the
premises December 4, 2013 @ 2:00 p.m. Viewing will be at the time of the sale only.
Personal Mini Storage Dunnellon, 11955 N. Florida Ave., (Hwy. 41) Dunnellon, FL 34434
(352) 489-6878
November 17 & 24, 2013.


384-1117 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has
intent to sell the vehicles)
below under FloridaStatutes
713.78.The undersigned will
sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding on the
premises where said
vehicles) have been stored
and are located at


Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
4212W Hwy 44,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
DOS: 11-28-13@8AM
2002 CHEVY
VIN#1Y1SK52872Z423834
DOS: 11-29-13@8AM
2008 BMW VIN#
4USBU33588LW75461

DOS: 12-04-13@8AM


2000 DODG
VIN#1B4GP44G3YB75711
1
Purchases must be paid for
at the time of sale, cash
only All vehicles are sold
as is and must be removed
at the time of sale. All sales
are subject to cancellation
in the event of settlement
between owner and the
obligated party.
November 17, 2013


386-1117 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH MOBILE HOME WITH ADDITION
CASE NUMBER: 135579
Description of property: AK: 1697671 and legally described as BUCKSKIN RESERVE PB 3
PG 117 LOT 28 & E1/2 OF LOT 27 BLK B
FIRST NATIONAL ACCEPTANCE CO
4824 E DOESKIN LOOP
INVERNESS, FL

On January 28,2013, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 4824 E. Doeskin Loop; In-
verness, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compli-
ance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 17,2013.




387-1117 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOME WITH ADDITION

CASE NUMBER: 135578
Description of property: AK: 1887348 and legally described as WITHLAPOPKA ISL UNIT
4D PB4 PG 135 LOT 12 BLK33
JOHN MAESKY
6011 S HICKORY DR
FLORAL CITY, FL

On January 28,2013, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 6011 S. Hickory Dr; Floral
City, FL If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Compliance
Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 17,2013.




385-1117 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, November 20, 2013 @ 9:00AM in
the Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested
are invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have ques-
tions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
An, Xiaoping
4492 N Canoe Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Benedicto, Tina Marie
9146 W Tonto Dr, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One inoperable box style van and one large four door sedan with expired
tag dated 5/2013.

Burinski, Nickolay
2529 E Earth St, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: A porch and a
shed.
Clark, James W. & Pregner, Barbara Ann
97 S Adams St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: Expired re-
model permit #201103636.

Crisp, Donald & Vianna **REPEAT VIOLATION-
8168 W Ferwerda Ct, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of junk and debris throughout the
property, household items, household garbage, metal and plastic debris, broken
wooden fencing, broken plastic buckets, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Doty, Douglas
1590 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, violations of this code may be referred to the Citus
County Code Compliance Special Master per Citrus County Code Part II, Chapter 1,
Section 1 9. To Wit: The following permits are not in compliance: 201005202: Main
building Change of Occupancy, permit is expired, fire reinspection fee due, and a
Certificate of Compliance needed. 201005484: Sprinkler system, permit is expired,
failed final inspection, fire reinspection fee is due, and final fire compliance inspec-
tion needed. 201006290: Metal roof building extension, permit is expired, failed final
fire inspection, and Change of occupancy needed or return area to permitted use.
201102105: Fire sprinkler monitoring system, permit is expired and final electrical in-
spection needed. 201205229: Site improvement, permit is expired and needs final
fire inspections. 201205230: ATF permit for 30' x 40' outside canopy, permit is expired,
reinspection fee is due, and final building and electrical inspections needed.
201205231: ATF renovation, permit is expired and final inspections needed.
Elliot, Marguerite C.
3 N Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Ely, Ronald J. **FINE APPEAL**
8048 E Julia St, Floral City, Fl 34436
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapteri 8 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Remodeled
kitchen, bath, and enclosed garage; also built a swimming pool, installed a metal
roof, did extensive electrical work on the interior of the home, and built a detached
garage.

Flanagin, Estes D. & Leanne
2760 N Rutgers Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Plastics, papers, metals, aluminum, garbage, tires,
household furniture, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unen-
closed area.
Fuller EST, Ronald L. ATTN: Cody Marshall Hett
8248 W Griffith Pond Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Gibbs, Kenneth & Danielle
11259 W Yellow Oak Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34428
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Expired permit
#200412006 mobile home replacement expired 10/2/2007
Knowles, Susan G.
1231 N Sidiki Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: The two decks
(one having a second story).

Lamon, Shirley
6345 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429


It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,


weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Lamon, Shirley
6345 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large pile of wood/metal debris from burned mobile
home.

Larimer, David
349 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: A porch with a
ramp and screen enclosure, an addition to the left side of trailer, an addition to the
back of trailer, a deck with a spa on it, a pool with a deck attached, and a shed in
the rear portion of the property.

Larimer, David
349 S Thayer Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Construction materials, paper, plastics, bottles, tarps,
household garbage, metals, aluminum, styrofoam, wood, a tub, window screens,
buckets, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Lukowski, Michael J.
310 S Jefferson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Metals, wood, plastics, aluminum, boxes, totes, card-
board, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Midstate Electric of Ocala Inc. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
8809 W Riverglen Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, violations of this code may be referred to the Citrus
County Code Compliance Special Master per Citrus County Code Part II, Chapter 1,
Section 19. To Wit: The following permits are not in compliance: 201007914: Fill, per-
mit is expired and failed compliance inspections. 201100555: Driveway apron and
parking lot, permit is expired and failed compliance inspections.

Nast, Robert J.
11 E Golden St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, garbage, tarps covering piles of items, wood,
plastics, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Nelson, Andrew C. & Romine, Gwen L. **FINE APPEAL**
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: A
porch on the front of the mobile home and a carport behind the mobile home.

O'Brien, Dan
2671 N Crede Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken furniture, broken boat
parts, car parts, car tires, metal, plastic, wood, and other miscellaneous trash and
debris.

O'Brien, Dan
2671 N Crede Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

Pate, Michael & Theresa
102 S Jeffery St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Boxes, household garbage, plastics, papers, carpet,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Ramistella, Darlene B.
10255 N Abby Dr, Citrus Springs, Fl 34434
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Ware, Angela R.
8210 W Alton Ct, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B), Special requirement for
all accessory uses. Accessory structures shall not be occupied as a residence, with
the exception of guest cottages or garage apartments. To Wit: An RV is being occu-
pied in the backyard.

NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL
MASTER CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE one (1) time, November 17, 2013.


389-1201 SUCRN
Invitation to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE

Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to CITRUS SPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL HVAC REPLACEMENT PROJ-
ECT will be received by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 PM local time,
THURSDAY 16 JANUARY, 2014 in the Purchasing Department, Citrus County School
Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4625. Immedi-
ately following all bids received will be opened and read aloud in Building 200, Pur-
chasing Department.

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.

No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.

All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.

Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at CITRUS SPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL, 150 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd, Citrus Springs, Florida, 34434, Meeting to be held in the Cafeteria
(10-100).
B. Conference will occur THURSDAY, 19 DECEMBER, 2013 at 2:00 PM.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from
VERRANDO ENGINEERING CO., INC., 1111 NE 25TH AVE, SUITE 401, OCALA, FL -
PHONE: 352-854-2664 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County
School Board in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made
upon the return of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days af-
ter the opening of Bids.

Drawings and specifications may also be obtained via disk, for ten dollars made
payable to Verrando Engineering Corp Inc., by contacting Verrando Engineering
Company Inc. via fax or email to register as a plan holder All plan holders must be
registered with Verrando Engineering Company Inc. and will be notified via email of
any future announcements or addendum which may affect bidding for this project.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, November 17, 24 & December 1,2013.


Meeti
I Notes


Metn


Metn


I Bi


I Bi


I Bid Notic




Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


OME RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICiLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


rS
-.j


141


A home office converted into
a children's homework hub in
New York. Interior designers
say families are finding more
inventive uses for their
homes' extra little rooms, op-
timistically called "bonus
rooms" by real estate agents.
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E2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENJOY THE MAGNIFICENT VIEWS
* Black Creek & St. Martins River '3/2/2 Carport
* Beautiful Sunsets Gorgeous FP in Great Room
2 Seawalls on Property Boathouse and Dock
SElevator for Easy Access Hurricane Shutters!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 P 1
1 Ennui elilesullon' lelnx nel
www.Flot idnLislunglnlo.c an


li-)A. .i,,'14W 1i1
2439 W. DEVON DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
*3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location
* Over 1,600 SF Living 2 Blocks from Park
* Large Family Rm. Shed, Fruit Trees
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 Lii
(352) 422-3875


WALK-OUT BASEMENT!
3 Bdrms/2 Bath/1i-Car Garage 1.6 Acre Lot
*New Metal Roof 12 x 10 Utility Building
*Neutral Interior 1,000 Sq. Ft. Unfinished
* Convenient to all necessities!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 IC]
Email: sherylpos@aol.coin m
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com i


AA-J 67*28--
'r ntehouse 1


13/2 Split Plan -New Heat Pump 2012
SNice Florida Room Kit. w/Lots of Stor
Great Comer Lot Shed w/Electric
Close to Shopping Really Nice Yard!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Elrnll elliesullon alelnlx neh |
CALL KRISIEH FEE 352 -52 7-7842

RARE
CABANA STYLE





40 SEAGRAPE ST.
SUGARMILL WOODS
This impeccably maintained 4/3/3 cabana pool home is
ready for a new family! Ideally located in Sugarmill on a
beautiful 1 acre golf course lot. Interior features include:
fresh paint, split plan, solid surface counter, 3 full baths
den/office, formal dining and much more.
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 I
Email: davidsivory@holmuil.com Ll


3621 N. TAMARISK AVE.
BEVERLY HILLS
*2BD/2BA/1CG -1,923 SF Under Roof
* Living RM & Fam. RM All New Windows
* Beautifully Updated and Maintained _
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [- i
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


INVERNESS POOL HOME
2BR/1.5 BA HOME ON GOSPEL ISLAND. TILE
FLOORING, GREAT ROOM, AND FORMAL LIVING
ROOM AND GARAGE. COMES WITH EXTRA
ADJOINING BUILDING LOT. TOTAL OF 1/2 ACRE
WITH DEEDED WATER ACCESS
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I l
Email barbaralimills@earthlink.notI


WA*


%
RE#441

REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
sJ 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


D


V
2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


9051 E. KINGSPORT, INVERNESS
SImmaculately Maintained In & Out!
SBuilt in 1992...But Looks Like New
- 2/2/2 With Family Room
Approx 1,701 Sq. Ft. Living
SReshingled Roof in 2008
SLight & Bright Home Come Take A Look!
DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840
Email: debrapilnyi@remax.netl
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11-1PM






OAKWOOD VILLAGE!! |
Well-maintained 2 bedroom with den/office 2 bath, 2-car
garage block home, vinyl windowed screen porch, newer
roof & central heat/air, lots of counter space & cabinets in
kitchen with breakfast nook, great room w/ formal dining
area, centrally located in county with quick access to
shopping, restaurants, golfing and fishing. I -
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com


~I I
2/2 WATERFRONT ON DEEP WATER
This 2 bedroom, 2 bath home sits on one of Crystal
River's widest and deepest canals. Jump on the boat
and head up the river to the springs or down the river
to the Gulf of Mexico. Enjoy the open great room,
screened patio, spacious kitchen. The home has two
docks and sea-walled lot and a new roof in July, 2013.
Gotta see it.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 I L
Email: Waynoe@WayneHemmerih.com


INVKNtH55 HIUHLAHUND5 3/2/1
* New Metal Roof New Kitchen and Bath
*NewNA/C Above Ground Pool
* .33 of an Acre High on a Hill Fenced Backyard
* Florida Room Shed with Electricity
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net9

LOOKING
TO BUILD??
Check out these vacant lots.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront- $125,000
Near water- $2,500 give-away price
Dunnellon Rd.- 2 lots back to back $5,000 each
State Park Rd. corner lot $12,000
PINE RIDGE
5.72 ac semi-cleared corner lot- $119,000
COMMERCIAL ACREAGE
63 acres zoned for 74 one-half ac homesites
Owner willing to listen to offers.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 I-
Email: cnadal@remax.net a



(9"


$110 MILLION

CLOSED
This Year!
#1 IN CITRUS COUNTY
Call RE/MAX To Sell Your Home!


242 N. LeoIw.Ieel il 2-74 w.~4XcmI11US Hy 1NIvres6760
8375 S. Sucos Bld. Honl s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsiaRvr7524


GREAT LOCATION 1.69 ACRES!!!
* 2 BR, 2 BATH & OFFICE Country Setting
* Updated Wood Cabinets Stone Fireplace
* Wood Flooring Updated Baths
* Large Wood Deck Storage Shed

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 if
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com i


2920 N. CAROLWOOD PT., HERNANDO
4.86 Private Wooded Acres
S4BR/2BA Manufactured Home (2000)
SLg. Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area
SSplit Floor Plan
SHardwood/Carpet
SWell-Maintained
SLots of Privacy
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmner@remax.netl




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Pat Davis
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Karen Morton
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Jeanne Pickrel
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Martha Snyder
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Quade Feeser
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Nancy Jenks
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Jeanne Pickrel
and Jim Morton;
and also its million-
dollar producers:
Ruth Frederick,
Martha Snyder
and Doris Miner.
The effort and
dedication dis-
played by each
member of the
Century 21 team in
achieving this sig-
nificant goal is to be
commended.


vy^" 4









Ruth
Frederick
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Ayres reaches new
heights with EXIT
Congratulations
to Nancy Ayres
with EXIT Realty
Leaders in Beverly
Hills, who has been
awarded the top ..,
sales agent award
for October.
Nancy has sold
$3 million in real es-
tate so far in 2013. Nancy Ayres
Give Nancy a call at EXIT Realty
352-527-1112 or Leaders.
visit her online at
www.exitrealtyleaders.com.


Jim Morton
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Doris Miner
Century 21
J.W. Morton.


Top agents
boost Century 21
Century 21 J. W. Morton Real Estate
Inc. is proud to announce its 2013 sales
production now exceeds $40 million. The
firm would like to recognize its multimillion-
dollar producers: Pat Davis, Quade
Feeser, Karen Morton, Nancy Jenks,


George Sleeman Linda Barnes
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.

Something's shaking
at RE/MAX
The associates and staff of RE/MAX
Realty One are pleased to announce the
addition of George Sleeman to their
team of Realtors in Citrus County.
George is a veteran Realtor, with nearly
30 years experience. He's a graduate of
the University of Florida and has been in-
volved with the real estate industry in Cit-
rus County since the mid-1980s. His office
is in the Central Ridge RE/MAX branch lo-
cated on County Road 491 in Lecanto.


It's been a great year for Linda Barnes
at RE/MAX Realty One. She recently qual-
ified for the 2013 multimillion-dollar club.
Linda has been a Realtor in the area
for more than 30 years. She works out of


the Crystal River RE/MAX office and
specializes in the community of Mead-
owcrest. The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One congratulate Linda
on this prestigious accomplishment.


I SiE4ffVyM0,A iL 9*4= C77-MUS 9OU^ i V


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


'-1t' --172W DoerrPath .l 364 E Dakola
S MLS701971 $239,000 MLS 706039 $214,!
2bd/2ba Villa overlooking the 5th Green of Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2 with
Skyview Golf Course. caged pool.
Dir: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entry, thru gates to first left, Dir: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, Right on Dakota to
then left again to 172. 364 on Left
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-2PM NEW LISTING


h1 i ;.'.' $1 S128.500 btLA1 4050 N Rinmqwood Circle
Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with MLS 706600 $295,000
fabulous upgraded features. Room to relax in this 3/3/2 pool home
Dir:486 Wto L on Essex, Ron Keller L on Fresno, w/summer kitchen surrounded by
RonPearson. beautiful grounds.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


1644 W Spring M11ado*
MLS 706531 $119,900
Move-in-condition 3/2 corner townhome.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


'' 333 E Hartlord St, 3-2B
MLS 706538 $69,900
Fully furnished 2/2.5/carport
two story condo.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


zJIL, tz L u;eiina bt fit,,l- bz3 t iismarK St
T"~ MLS702826 $144,900 MLS 703017 $119,000
Meticulously maintained 3bd/2ba Well maintained 3bd/2ba home w/open
pool home. floor plan.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


H ID T A C


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


. ,30g- $M$ t Knihisinbsrde ri
L. 1.1L:: ;-J S 1 41.900
Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.
Dir Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E. Reehill St/
Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St R on Kmnightsbnridge Pl.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


7 k
,7"?i 77 W Forest Oak PI
MLS 706602 $169,900
Large, open, bright 3/2/2 in nice
subdivision.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913






I 4,1Eje 5986 N Peardale Ter
MLS 703943 $184,900
Spacious, well-designed 3/2/2. Large lanai
w/pool; summer kitchen.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700






/IeK'' 2343 N Pulnam P1
MLS 357348 $84,900
Neat & clean 2bd/2ba villa in
prime location.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


num w Buywr/.Fillr maiuuyzi ...re---
'I II II l,h,i III .. .. I I I,11 I ,, I i ,I II, I , I I1 1 h1 i III I, ,.l I I ,h I i ,, h I I I I , i I, I . .I
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MyPrudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
AWOpen 7 Das rties
AWeekd Properties


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E3




E4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CimRONiCLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


While Jane travels,



garden goes to seed


It's a good thing: Plants ready for comingyear

I feel like a snowbird flying to sunny as a rose-hip tea infusion?
Florida after two months exploring of Some native Florida wildflowers are
our 50th state. The firebreak lawn still blooming, and have many dry seed-
surrounding the house was heads attached by stiff dead
over-seeded with annual rye- stems. I stripped off handfuls
grass before I left in early Sep- i of seed from blanketflower,
tember Now it is lush, bright Gaillardia pulchella; beach
green, trim and neatly mowed sunflower, Helianthus dibilis;
by my young neighbor, Mike. black-eyed susan, Rudbeckia;
The perennial evergreen and red salvia, Salvia coccinea.
"Encore" azaleas which I then scattered separate
started their fall bloom cycle in species in sunny patches along
late August are still in bloom, the wildlife buffer zone bor-
although they need the re- during the lot lines.
cently faded flowers to be Jane Weber Some seedlings had sprouted
plucked off to look their best. JANE'S in the flower beds and now
The "Knock-Out" roses are full have blooms. Although mis-
of small hips alongside sparse GARDEN placed as far as my preferred
blooms. They need snipping off design goes, I will let these an-
to encourage a last flush of roses before nuals continue flowering until winter frost
the frost causes the plants to stop flower- kills them. New seeds should not sprout
ing until warmer weather arrives next until warmer spring conditions arrive.
March. It takes 5 to 7 minutes per bush to
clip off the hips. Should I dry them to use See JANE/Page E5


Inside...


Un-office space
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Art glass vase likely imported; Rolling Stones memorabilia


DearJohn: I have obtained looking art-glass vase was made
this large heavy piece of in Europe and likely imported
art glass. It has by Century Industries
an old paper label on in Canada.
the bottom saying There is no infor-
Century Industries, mation about Century
Montreal, Quebec. producing art glass,
The person I ij. S- nor are they a name
bought it from said that is recognized in
she had it more than the art-glass collec-
30 years and it be- tor's world. It was
longed to her mother likely made within
before that. It is the past 50 years. Po-
blown glass, irides- John Sikorski tential dollar value is
cent purplish-black in SIKORSKI'S catch-as-catch-can.
color It is very thick, Dear John: This
almost a half-inch ATTIC statue was given to me
thick, and it stands in 1968 by a very good
more than 16 inches tall. friend of mine. Her husband col-
I have tried to reach Century elected some, not many, but I have
Industries, but no one has gotten never seen anything like it and
back to me. I would appreciate would like to know what it is and
anything you can tell me about where it was made.
this piece. -A W, Internet The name on the bottom as
Dear A.W: I think your good- you can see says "Baigneuse." I


have read every Sunday your ar-
ticles in HomeFront and it is
amazing what you can figure out.
The height of the figurine is 24
inches and I believe it is a
bronze statue. Anything you can
tell me about it would be greatly
appreciated. -B.G., Internet
Dear B.G.: In the photograph,
it does appear the statue of a
nude young female is made of
bronze. "Baigneuse" means
bather in French, indicating the
title of the figure.
I think it was produced in
France between World War I and
II. I will assume there are no
other marks on the statue.
Potential dollar value is in the
$500 range.
Dear John: I am a fan of your
newspaper column. I am hoping
you might be able to give me
names of individuals in our area
who could do an appraisal on a


large collection of Rolling
Stones memorabilia.
My niece has inherited this,
and her parents always told her
they would not sell it as long as
the original Rolling Stones
group was intact Now that both
her parents are deceased, the
house is my niece's to deal with
and the collection literally fills a
bedroom. Her attorney has ad-
vised that she get the collection
appraised now, before storing
for potential sale in the future
for tax purposes. I am trying to
assist her with this and hope you
might have suggestions. -K.S.,
Internet
See ATTIC/Page E6
This vase is an example of art
glass. It was likely imported
from Europe sometime during
the past 50 years.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

Evergreen clumps of
blue spiderwort, Trades-
cantia virginiana, are still
showing some tri-petaled
flowers in the mornings.
Locally spiderwort flowers
from March to November
- one of the longest wild-
flower flowering seasons.
Clusters of dry, dark seed-
heads pulled off easily and
were cast on the ground in
patches alternated with the
patches of other wildflower
seeds. Birds may eat some,
but the rest will remain
dormant then sprout next
spring.
Perennial native
greeneyes, Berlandia suba-
caulis, also had a few pretty
flowers above basal clumps


of evergreen leaves. The
leaves somewhat resemble
those of dandelion, but in a
soft-sage shade of green.
Seeds still attached were
soon gathered and scattered
in places I wanted them to
grow The inch-wide flowers
bloom butter-yellow in all
months, but more abun-
dantly from spring through
to fall. Those seeds that
have sprouted in the lawn
can dug up and the carrot-
like taproot transplanted in
designated flower beds as a
border plant
Gayfeather, or blazing
star, Liatris, a native but
deciduous perennial in
Central Florida, had flow-
ered well while I was away,
evidenced by the spikes of
fluffy seeds covering the
tall flower spikes. Seeds
were stripped off and
broadcast in the perimeter


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaff ney
Realtor-, Realtor :I@]
313023179 A HOUS 287-9022
746-6700 SOLD Name.
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


3310 N. Tamarisk .................. Beverly Hills
984 W. Colbert Ct ........ Oakwood Village
2387 W. Begonia Dr .................. Pine Ridge
388 W. Sugarmaple Dr.. Beverly Hill

3565 N. Timothy Ter .................. The Glenn
L', A : = = "]I [- ] ]" 'p


The abandoned garden took care
of itself while I was traveling.
Winter kill will open up places
for the flower seeds to grow
next spring.


buffer zone. They will take
several years to grow a
corm large enough to pro-
duce a flower spike.
I left the tall, dry stalk,
called a scape, to mark the
site of the underground


corm. The basal spiky,
grass-like leaves will soon
die off in the cooler, shorter
days of winter The scapes
show where the new un-
derground corms are lo-
cated, so I can dig up and


relocate them in mass
plantings where I can enjoy
the show of purple flowers.
Each corm is used up
growing a new plant -
roots, leaves and one flow-
ering stem each season.
The plant makes another,
bigger corm each year The
flowering season is from
late summer through to
fall, but each plant has only
one flower spike per year
Hence, gardeners need to
plant dozens to get a
longer-lasting show span-
ning the bloom season.


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty N |
BROKER ASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR 2


lowS^,,A ,, , i 5; 9


UNDER CONSTRUCTION


^^^^^^^ A ^ai~g-^. OOOGNH7
-- Gail Hargreaves....
Broker/Realtor
(352) 795-9123
www.charlottegrealty.com

I' I I '


202 N. MCGOWAN AVE.
Directions: From Crystal River go south on US Hwy. 19 to east on Venable,
left on Dunkenfeld, left on Pinebrook, left on McGowan, home on right.


I


STOP BY AND SEE THIS SPECTACULAR POOL HOME
LOCATED IN THE POPULAR SEVEN RIVERS GOLF CLUB COMMUNITY
This beautifully appointed 2007 three bedroom, two bath, three car garage home
sits on .86 acre and features huge lanai, salt water pool/spa, fireplace, tray ceilings,
gourmet kitchen, wood cabinets, and equipped with germicidal UV light/filter.
PRICE RECENTLY REDUCED TO $299,900


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E5

The abandoned garden
took care of itself while I was
traveling. Winter kill will
open up places for the flower
seeds to grow next spring.

Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. com.


I


m


I,, CTU SPRING' S


I


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear KS.: There is no one on a
local level who could appraise the
collection of Rolling Stones memo-
rabilia. I suggest you contact an auc-
tion company that specializes in
rock 'n' roll memorabilia.
Heritage Auction Company in Dal-
las, Texas, is nationally recognized
and could help you with the collec-
tion. The website is www.ha.com.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


Late mortgage payments down in Q3


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Fewer
U.S. homeowners are falling
behind on their mortgage pay-
ments, aided by rising home
values, low interest rates and
stable job gains.
The trend brought down the
national late-payment rate on
home loans in the third quarter
to a five-year low, credit re-
porting agency TransUnion
said Tuesday
The percentage of mortgage
holders at least two months be-
hind on their payments fell in
the July-September quarter to
4.09 percent from a revised 5.33
percent a year earlier, accord-


ing to the firm, whose data go
back to 1992.
The latest rate also declined
from 4.32 percent in the second
quarter
The last time the mortgage
delinquency rate was lower
was the third quarter of 2008.
Within a few years of setting
that mark, foreclosures began
to mount as home values tum-
bled from housing-boom highs,
leaving many homeowners in
negative equity owing more
on their mortgage than the
value of their home. The dy-
namic drove mortgage delin-
quencies higher, peaking at
nearly 7 percent in the fourth
quarter of 2009.


The rate of late payments on
home loans has been steadily
declining over the past five
quarters. At the same time,
U.S. home sales and prices
have been rebounding over the
past two years, while foreclo-
sures have been declining.
Moderate but stable job
gains, still-low mortgage inter-
est rates, and tight supply of
homes for sale have helped fuel
the housing rebound. That's
also made it easier for home-
owners to refinance, catch up
on payments or sell their home,
avoiding foreclosure.
Even so, the mortgage delin-
quency rate is still above the 1
to 2 percent average historical


range. That suggests that many
homeowners still are strug-
gling to make their payments.
It also reflects that many home
loans made during the housing
boom remain unpaid but have
yet to work their way through
the foreclosure process.
Loans made in the years
after the housing boom are
generally being paid on time,
so as more of the older loans
listed on banks' books as un-
paid get resolved, the overall
mortgage delinquency rate
should continue to decline,
said Tim Martin, group vice
president of U.S Housing for
TransUnion's financial serv-
ices business unit.


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E6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Enjoy the olive


that's not an olive

Fight invasive species ofshrub

by eating some of its delicious fruit


LEE REICH
Associated Press
Outside my window is a large,
rounded shrub with leafless
branches suffused in a golden haze.
That haze is actually hundreds if not
thousands of golden berries clus-
tered tightly along the thin stems.
This shrub asked nothing more
from me than planting and care in
the form of water and mulch for
only its first year in the ground.
Although not considered so years
ago when I planted it, the shrub -
known as autumn olive (Elaeagnus
umbellata) is now considered
dangerous, an invasive species. It
was brought over from Asia in the
1830s, and found the soils and cli-
mates here much to its liking. With
the help of birds, which gobble down
the fruits and subsequently eject the
seeds, autumn olive has spread far
and wide. There are dozens of wild
autumn olives within a short bicycle
ride of my garden.
Beyond its fecundity, adaptability
and that golden haze, autumn olive
offers more pluses. The berries are
preceded, in spring, by flowers that


exude a sweet perfume. The wavy
leaves are flecked with silver and
are practically white on their un-
dersides, so the whole plant is trans-
formed into a shimmering globe in
summer breezes. And the adaptabil-
ity that makes this shrub weedy also .
means it can be used to re-clothe .
ground trashed by construction proj- "
ects or mine spoils. The roots even
harbor microorganisms that convert
atmospheric nitrogen into a form ".
that plants can use, thus building
soil fertility.
But back to those golden berries:
Most autumn olive shrubs actually 4.
bear crimson berries, which by now
have been stripped from the stem.
What a sight my ducks made through
autumn, waddling over in a bee-line
every morning to gobble up fallen
and low hanging fruits from my
crimson-berried autumn olive
bushes. -2111
The fruits, if picked at the right
moment, also taste good fresh to us
humans, a feature that won autumn LEE REICH/Associated Press
olive a mention in my book, "Un- "Charlie's Golden" autumn olive is shown in New Paltz, N.Y. Autumn olive has been used to re-
common Fruits for Every Garden" clothe ground trashed by extensive construction projects or mine spoils. The roots even harbor
microorganisms that convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that plants can use, thus build-
See Page Eli ing soil fertility.





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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


R TH!NK





HOME









Space can beput

to creative uses
Associated Press
he home office, it seems, is
going the way of the fax
machine.
Interior designers say fami-
lies are finding more inventive
uses for their homes' extra little
rooms optimistically called
"bonus rooms" by real estate
agents.
With the spread of wireless Inter-
net and portables devices such as
tablets, it's common now to send
spreadsheets and emails from any
room in the house, not to mention
the nearest coffee shop. In fact,
among major home-renovation
projects, home-office improve-
ments provide the puniest return
on the investment when a home is
resold, according to Remodeling
magazine's 2013 "cost vs. value"
report.
So instead of that dust-collecting
desk, many families are seeking
creative ways to customize these al-
coves as game rooms, dressing
rooms, small theaters and more.
"I get this question a lot," says
Elizabeth Cb Marsh, an associate
interior designer at Jenkins Baer
Associates in Baltimore. "Espe-
cially in large, new-construction
homes, there are these bonus
rooms that are just there."
See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E9


ProjectNursery.com
This book wall is part of a kids' homework hub and includes a reading nook.


SPACE
Continued from Page ES

When her clients make over a
pre-existing office, she usually
recommends trying to preserve any
built-in features, such as shelving
or cabinetry If the space is large
enough, she says, one option is to
create a billiards room. Find a
small (7-foot) pool table to place in
the center of the room. If there's a


wood counter, retrofit the top with
a waterproof material such as
stone for an elegant wet bar, and if
you have the budget, install plumb-
ing for a small sink. Add barstools,
a high-top cocktail table and a pen-
dant lamp over the pool table.
A smaller office can have a sec-
ond life as a luxe dressing room, ac-
cording to Marsh. Whether you
draw inspiration from "Downton
Abbey" or certain Beverly Hills

See Page EO10


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPACE
Continued from Page E9

housewives, the first step is to install
a wall of shelving for shoes and
clothes. Keep the decor minimalist,
she advises, with a neutral paint
color, a pair of sconces, and a tufted
ottoman in the center of the room.
Add a floor mirror and a vanity, and
accessorize with vintage hatboxes, a
dress form or an antique trunk. If
the room has windows, be sure to
hang light-filtering curtains to pro-
tect your clothing.
Families with children have even
more options for converting an of-
fice space. These days, it is common
to transform a dull study into a kids'
homework hub, says Pam Ginocchio,
co-founder of the children's design
blog Project Nursery
To begin, she recommends giving
each kid a workspace: a small metal
desk in a fun color with a clip-on
lamp and a comfy swivel chair Cre-
ate a comfortable reading nook on
the floor with beanbags. Then mount
floating shelves from floor to ceiling
and display books with the covers
facing out to entice young readers.
Appoint one wall as a place for
scribbling ideas or displaying
schoolwork by applying a layer of
magnet paint and then chalkboard
paint from floor to ceiling.
Consider allowing a computer for


*I S


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Elegant custom built 3/4/3 Pool

sophisticated ifest0le
$469,000


older kids' homework, but try to ban-
ish video games and other distrac-
tions, says Project Nursery co-founder
Melissa Fluhr, who stresses the value
of a quiet, contemplative space.
If contemplative is not your family's
speed, Fluhr suggests using the bonus
room as an off-off-off-Broadway the-
ater For a kid who likes to perform
skits, play songs and choreograph
dances, build a basic plywood stage in
the corner of the room. Above that
riser, hang a rounded shower-curtain
rod and a pair of dark, tab-top cur-
tains. Hang costumes and dress-up
clothes in a cubby and store puppets,
musical instruments and other props
in a toy chest. Finish by hanging a
mirror at tyke height so children can
watch themselves rehearse, and don't
forget to add a few comfy chairs for
the audience.
If your child has another obses-
sion, turn an undersized room into
her special hangout For example, if
she is into outer space, turn it into a
mini planetarium with a dark-
painted ceiling and a night-sky pro-
jector Just be prepared to update
the theme in a year or two when
your child's interests inevitably leap
to something else.
"Having this little bonus room al-
most gives you the excuse to go
wild," Ginocchio says. "You don't
have to spend a ton of money or
think, what's going to be my return
on investment? It's a chance to have
fun."


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE
A taste of unspoiled nature seclL i i1. i ... i, i..... i1
ponds mature oak trees The 2 i.... ,i .... ... i
positioned in a beautiful setting
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ra tlvp tnllr


HomeFront BRIEFS


Use winter months ect to consider during this time (
to prepare for year. These topics will be dis-
po ci cussed during this presentation.
productive garden Learn how to have


SA free gardening workshop
will be offered from 2 to 3:30
p.m. Dec. 10 at the Citrus
County Extension Building, 3650
W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to plan
and prepare garden projects for
the upcoming milder season.
Garden planning, estimating cost
and garden clean-outs are im-
portant topics to consider when
outdoor work is delayed. It is
also a great time of year to enjoy
the outdoors with activities like
bird watching.
Creating natural buffers which
attract birds is an excellent proj-


beautiful gardens
year-round
Special to the Chronicle
We have all heard about hav-
ing a "green" thumb, but the in-
terim director for the UF-IFAS
Citrus County Extension Service
contends that the real secret to
successful gardening is to have
"brown knees" one has to get
close to the earth.
The free Master Gardener
Plant Clinics for November will
discuss what to do to have beau-
tiful, colorful yards 12 months of
the year. This is also the time to


of


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in
Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food section./
Thursday
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion section./
Saturday


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PINE RIDGE FEATURED HOMES OF THE WEEK



5454 W PIUTE DR
3230 N STIRRUP DRIVE GREAT BARN for the horses, Beautiful
A PRIVATE RETREAT with room for Home for youl Located directly behind the
everyone! This spacious 5 BR, 4 B equestrian center and on the horse trails for
luxurious pool home has room for mom, easy access to the multiple arenas in Pine
the horses and your toys. Tucked into Ridge This lovely one owner home on 2 ac
the woods behind the gate for privacy was designed for comfort and convenience
this home on almost 3 ac has it all! within the equestrian lifestyle Sit in your
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quickly at only $349,900. $329,000 MLS 706173




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fenced with multiple outbuildings. The nature as it embraces you Cook in your
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desired streets in Pine Ridge. MLS horse trails and convenience to the water
703623. Amazingly priced at only just minutes from here See it now and call
$299,000. it home MLS 704498 $389,900


EIO SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013


plant "cool-season" vegetables
and herbs. The clinic will explain
which flowers, bulbs, vegetables,
herbs and fruiting plants to add
during winter.
The remaining schedule for
November is:
1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20,
at Citrus Springs Library.
2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26, at
Homosassa Library.
These will be the final Master
Gardener Plant Clinics for 2013.
They will return in January 2014.
Can't make it to the office or a
plant clinic? Contact Citrus
County master gardeners via
email at MasterG1 @bocc.citrus.
fl.us.
Call the Extension Service at
352-527-5700.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


County to offer


class for first-time


homebuyers


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Housing
Services will offer its free
first time homebuyer
class from 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
23, at the Citrus County
Resource Center, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Participants who at-
tend the entire session
will receive a Certificate
of Completion required
for the SHIP, Neighbor-
hood Stabilization Pro-
grams, and other
first-time homebuyer as-
sistance programs.
The class encompasses
the entire home-buying
process including prepar-


ing credit and finances,
shopping for a home,
home inspection, fair
housing, available loan
products, loan pre-ap-
proval and closing. A va-
riety of industry
professionals will present
and answer questions
throughout the session.
Call Jennifer Pollard at
352-527-7522 or Pat Wilk-
erson at 352-527-7526 or
email JenniferPollard
@bocc.citrus.fl.us to reg-
ister The event is spon-
sored by TD Bank and
Citrus County Housing
Services.
Participants must re-
serve a seat Lunch will be
provided by TD Bank.
Child care is not available.


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
* Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely
publication of submitted material. The earlier
Chronicle editors receive submissions, the bet-
ter chance of notes running more than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in
advance of the event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.
* Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication
Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication
Tuesday.
* Religious events: 4 p.m. Tuesday for
publication Saturday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is
available. The Chronicle cannot guarantee
placement on color pages.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inver-
ness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280;
or by e-mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


PLANT
Continued from Page E7

(Timber Press, 2004). Au-
tumn olive fruits have
been eaten in Japan, with
whole branches lopped off
and sold on the streets
with their fruits attached.
The Japanese name for
autumn olive is aki-gumi,
meaning "autumn silver-
berry," and it refers to the
ripening period and the
silvery flecking found also
on the fruits.
Incidentally, autumn
olives are rich in lycopene,
a natural compound that
offers protection against
certain types of cancers.

Enjoy, but
don't plant
A few varieties of au-
tumn olive have been se-
lected for their dazzling
shows of fruit. One, "Bril-
liant Rose," is also my fa-


Because of its invasiveness, autumn olive should not
be planted wherever it is considered so; check to
determine whether or not it is invasive in your state.

On the other hand, if you come upon some wild
shrubs of autumn olive, enjoy the plant's beauty and,

after definitive identification, the berries. Eating
them will make some small contribution to throttling


vorite for eating, if picked
during that narrow win-
dow of time when the
berries have lost their as-
tringency but have not yet
started to shrivel. "Char-
lie's Golden" autumn olive
fruits, responsible for that
golden haze, only rarely
get sweet enough for me.
The birds evidently agree,
or more probably bypass
them because they are not
red. "Charlie's Golden,"
then, perhaps will not con-
tribute to the invasive
spread of autumn olive, yet


***Foreclosure List***-

4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests
705705 REDUCED $159,900 705702 REDUCED $174,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

Deep Waterfront Canal Move-in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres!
Home 705665 705223 REDUCED $77,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329

Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen
705093 $89,900 704264 REDUCED $104,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 John Maisel 352-302-5351

3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon LIKE NEW! 3/2/2 on one acre in
705142 $119,900 Dunnellon 705087 $129,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

Brentwood Villa 3/2/2 2/2 on 1 acre in Inglis
704862 REDUCED $109,900 706156 $63,000
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329
Sugarmill Woods Custom Built Beverly Hills 3/1 Handyman's Delight!
3/3.5/3 Pool Home 705153 $37,900
704938 REDUCED $329,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329
John Maisel 352-302-5351


2/1.5 in Beverly Hills
705068 $49,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329


2/2/1 in Connell Heights
706630 $76,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351


the plants' spread.
can provide a visual treat.
Because of its invasive-
ness, autumn olive should
not be planted wherever it
is considered so; check
with your state depart-
ment of environmental
conservation to determine
whether or not it is inva-
sive in your state.


000GOAM


On the other hand, if you
come upon some wild
shrubs of autumn olive,
enjoy the plant's beauty
and, after definitive iden-
tification, the berries. Eat-
ing them will make some
small contribution to
throttling the plants'
spread.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
o0 : (352) 795-6633


I, /l,_
' ESIT7

Realtor


CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home or 1 i i i .
Open& .. .. .
window i .. .
1 i ,,T I ;,i, w/breakfast
i ,, I i .1 inter space
#706582 $82,500


HUVIUSASSA S/W mobile home,
1 bedroom, 1 bath, neat & clean w/
circular driveway half way between
Crystal River and Homosassa 2 lots, 2
1. .1. ; screen porch Fully


" .... *.- -i&c.** '. a
HOMOSASSA nice older mobile
w/2 bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear
screened porches Newer roofover in
2010, newer appliances approximately
2 years old FULLY fenced backyard
with shed #700919 $22,500




DUNNELLON 1998 Nobility D/W M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 workshop w/electric, inside
laundry #703976 $55,000


INGLIS great fixer upper, bring your
....IiI .....",, ,
#706379 $22,900




HOMOSASSA 1980 D/W M/H
w/3bedrooms, 2 baths, carport, paved
road, screen porch, .1 I shed,
ceiling fans, formal ........ eat-in
kitchen w/breakfast bar Immaculate
inside, near by to shopping #706376


HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side-by-side
All new roofs in 2001 & 2002 and central
A/C units installed in 2004 Good
condition, 2-wells, each bldg has own


BEVERLY HILLS excellent condition,
mnove-in condition, Pergo floors, glass
porch on back, awning to keep house
cool decorative driveway, beautifully
landscaped, nice neighborhood of newer
homes #705297 $150,000


I 0 Y EVEN AYS A WEEiK


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 Ell




E12 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Builder claims drilling rights under homes


Given Florida geography, it's unclear what companyplans to do with extraction claims


DREW HARWELL
Tampa Bay Times

BRANDON When Mallory
and Zach Sinclair were looking
for their first home, they
swooned over a new townhouse
in the Brandon subdivision of
Whispering Oaks. With well-
manicured lawns, it looked fresh
and untouched, with streets
bearing pastoral names like
Spring Flowers and Summer
Clouds.
But in January, when the
young parents cracked open
their closing papers, they no-
ticed an alarming clause. Their
home builder had quietly signed
away the rights to the land be-
neath their home to its own en-
ergy company It now had free
rein deep below the surface to
drill, mine or explore.
Selling underground mineral
rights has long been big business
in the oil- and gas-rich boom-
towns of Texas, North Dakota
and beyond.
But homeowners here might
be surprised to learn that they,
too, could be part of the
prospecting. A Tampa Bay
Times analysis found that D.R.
Horton, the nation's largest
home builder, has pocketed the
rights beneath more than 2,500


Tampa Bay homesites, whether
the homeowner realizes it or
not.
It's unclear what home
builders expect to find deep be-
neath Tampa Bay's suburbs.
Homes here sit on swiss-cheese
blocks of water and limestone,
known more for sinkholes than
fuel or treasures.
But with recent advances in
drilling technologies includ-
ing hydraulic fracturing, known
as crackingg" tapping into
once-untouchable natural gas
and oil reserves, experts say
builders see the deeds as lottery
tickets: potential jackpots
buried beneath homes they can
still sell at full price.
"With the possibility of frack-
ing, as stupid as it seems to do
that in Florida, no one's taking
any chances," Tampa land use
attorney Pamela Jo Hatley said
about builders.
ME.
D.R. Horton representatives
did not respond to calls or
emails. But the builder's own
words fill stacks of deeds filed
since 2007 reserving the rights
below homesites, including
more than 400 in Tampa Bay this
year
The mineral-rights claims lie
mostly below cookie-cutter


homes and townhouses sprin-
kled across the Tampa suburbs,
but affected homesites can also
be found in every county across
the bay area, and in cities from
St. Petersburg to Spring Hill.
Signed over from the builder
to its Texas-based subsidiary,
DRH Energy, the deeds hand
eternal rights to practically any-
thing of value that it finds buried
underground, including gold,
groundwater and gemstones.
They also give the energy firm
the right to explore, study, mine,
drill, pump or install wellsites to
access any and all treasures
starting, depending on the deed,
either 30 feet or 500 feet below
ground.
Homeowners are protected
from oil derricks or any other
equipment in their front yard by
a one-page "surface waiver,"
though nothing prohibits a com-
pany from drilling horizontally
from afar
Not all homeowners are
pleased to learn they've settled
the biggest purchase of their
lives on a potential drilling zone.
Some worry underground med-
dling could lead to contamina-
tion, industrial noise or
home-destroying sinkholes. Oth-
ers just want to earn a cut of any
drilling profits themselves.


But some home buyers said
they don't even remember hear-
ing of the underground deal.
Mark McDonald, who bought a
$150,000 townhome this year in
FishHawk Ranch in eastern
Hillsborough, said he remem-
bers a thick stack of paperwork
at closing but nothing about the
mineral-rights deed.
"I'm surprised," he said, when
a Times reporter told him about
the deed. "I didn't expect that at
all."
A home buyer who learns the
land is encumbered might de-
cide to look somewhere else.
And a homeowner who agrees to
the deal could have problems
selling to someone else. Banks,
lenders and insurers have
balked at giving mortgages or in-
surance coverage to homes
where the underground rights
belong to someone else or
drilling is under way
"It could screw up a deal if
that were brought to the fore-
front," said James Ruffolo, a Re-
altor with Charles Rutenberg
Realty "Buyers want the best
deal possible, they want to own
the home outright, and that
could really rub people the
wrong way"
Florida law doesn't demand
that builders alert home buyers


that they own the rights beneath
their feet. Attorneys rarely at-
tend closings. And though title-
insurance policies and public
county records can cast light on
the deeds, Realtors say it's all
too easy to miss the fine print.
Buyers sometimes sign away
their rights knowingly, too. They
learn of the mineral-rights deed
at closing time, after they've
arranged a mortgage, prepared
to move and daydreamed about
their new kitchen. The deal is
set up, some buyers said, in a
way that makes it nearly impos-
sible to say no.
Zach Sinclair, the Whispering
Oaks homeowner, said he first
saw the mineral-rights clause
after signing nearly 70 pages of
closing forms. A former property
manager in Chicago, he said he
knows well the strategy of slip-
ping in bad news near the end of
the stack.
When he asked a builder rep-
resentative about it, he said, he
was told it was "no big deal" but
the form had to be signed.
"If I didn't sign all those pa-
pers, the deal was off, and I had
a waiting kid and a pregnant
wife who wanted to kill me. I just
had to do what I had to do and

See BUILDER/Page E13


IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
2BR/2BA unit in Regency Park. Move in 2BR/1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch.
c iodition. $53,500 MLS#705999 Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852
t A,


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3BR/2BA pool home w/fireplace in Handyman 3 BR/ 1.5 bath home on shaded lot.
Connell Heights $92,500 MLS#705675 $30,000 MLS#706478
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours Q521 32-6714 Email: roybass tampabay.rr.com www.allciTusrealty.com 4 1


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Great kitchen w/updated lighting
* Built-in wine rack, faucets and prep sink
Dual pane windows and sliders
*Extended lanai w/entertainment counter
Interior/exterior recently repainted
Deep luscious greenbelt
#704102 $199,000


NICE PRIVATE LOCATION!
2/2/2 detached villa
Trees/easement for privacy
Newer carpet and tile flooring
SSeveral appliances recently replaced
Exterior repainted in 2013
* Screened front entry for ventilation
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Carpeted lanai with updated fan
#705309 $71,900


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Call (352) 795-7007


I .. I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUILDER
Continued from Page E12

assume nothing bad was going to
happen," Sinclair said. "It was kind
of weird, and unprofessional. But
a lot of people probably went
through on robot mode and just
signed it."
MEN
At a typical closing, a homebuyer
can expect the land is theirs down
to the core. Most property law
works off a Latin doctrine, "For
whoever owns the soil, it is theirs
up to heaven and down to hell."
But everything has a price, and
since the mining booms of more
than a century ago, prospectors and
"land men" have doled out big
money for subsurface rights, a tac-
tic dramatized in the movie "There
Will Be Blood." This works in the
other direction, too: In places like
Manhattan, millions of dollars are
spent on "air rights" for highrises,
radio towers and other skyward
growth.
Florida may not seem like an ob-
vious choice for energy conglomer-
ates looking to boost their supplies.
But more than 150 oil wells are ac-
tive statewide, with massive oil
fields on both ends of the state fill-
ing more than 2 million barrels of
crude last year As oil prices have
risen in recent years, incentives to
drill have strengthened. In five
years, environmental officials have
approved 40 statewide oil drilling
permits (and denied zero).
More refined technologies have
also led drillers to expand their
horizons. Horizontal drilling, in
which long pipes can branch off
sideways from a vertical well, has
opened up long-hidden pools of fuel
beneath residential neighborhoods.
Hydrologists have pinpointed hot
spots for natural-gas cracking in
southwest Florida and the Panhan-



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on Crystal River, FL
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Property #DG694F
4 parcels 20 to 27 ac
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dle that could prove to be gold
mines. Energy companies paid
more than $20 billion last year in
natural-gas royalties alone.
Though drilling in Florida is
nothing new, the issue of energy
prospectors' invasions upon the
suburbs has recently heated up. In
August, protesters in Naples
marched outside Gov. Rick Scott's
home and set up a model oil rig to
criticize plans to drill about 1,000
feet from the nearest home, on the
edge of a Florida panther refuge.
Critics have warned that frack-
ing's forceful bursts of water, sand
and chemicals, which are used to
free deeply embedded gas and oil,
could poison or pollute soil, air
and groundwater supplies. This
year, Florida lawmakers attempted
to demand that well operators tell
the state which chemicals they use
in their cracking fluids; the bill
failed.
Debates over cracking's explosive
growth led homeowners in at least
one state to fight back against min-
eral-rights snatching. Last year,
after an outcry from homeowners
and letters from the North Carolina
Department of Justice, D.R. Horton
told state officials it would stop
stripping the drilling rights from
property deeds and offered to give
the rights back to homeowners.
But some say builders would
rather chance a potential backlash
than trade away a future payday
"It's a gamble," said Mark Stew-
art, a professor at University of
South Florida's School of Geo-
sciences. "It's something you can
reserve for yourself that might have
some future value, and it costs you
nothing."


Average 30-year mortgage


now up to 4.35 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Average
U.S. rates on fixed mortgages
rose for the second straight
week amid some signs of eco-
nomic strength. Still rates re-
main near historically low
levels.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday that the
average rate on the 30-year
loan increased to 4.35 per-
cent from 4.16 percent last
week. That's the highest level
since Sept. 19, when it was
4.50 percent. The average on
the 15-year fixed mortgage
rose to 3.35 percent from 3.27
percent. The rates, though,
are at their lowest levels in
four months.
A report from the govern-
ment last week that U.S. em-
ployers added a surprisingly
strong 204,000 jobs in Octo-
ber, despite the 16-day fed-
eral shutdown, indicated the
economy may be sturdier


than many had assumed.
Another government re-
port showed surprising
growth in the economy from
July through September,
though much of the gain
came from a buildup in com-
pany stockpiles.
Mortgage rates began
falling in September when
the Federal Reserve contin-
ued its $85-billion-a-month
bond purchases. The pur-
chases are intended to keep
long-term interest rates low
Slower hiring in previous
months had led many ana-
lysts to predict that the Fed
will maintain the current
pace of the bond purchases
into early next year, likely
keeping mortgage rates low
for the immediate future.
Some economists saw com-
ments Thursday by Fed Vice
Chair Janet Yellen, nomi-
nated by President Barack
Obama to be the next chair-
man of the central bank, as a


sign that the Fed won't move
at its next meeting in Decem-
ber to reduce the bond pur-
chases. Rather, the Fed could
delay any so-called tapering
of bond buying beyond
March, when many have pre-
dicted it would begin.
Yellen told the Senate
Banking Committee, which
is considering her nomina-
tion, that the economy has
regained ground lost to the
Great Recession but still
needs the Fed's support be-
cause unemployment re-
mains too high at
7.3 percent.
To calculate average mort-
gage rates, Freddie Mac sur-
veys lenders across the
country on Monday through
Wednesday each week. The
average doesn't include extra
fees, known as points, which
most borrowers must pay to
get the lowest rates. One
point equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.


KAREN E. MORTON H ,_
Hall of Fame Centurion Membe,
E-mail: kemorton@tampabay rrcor
Website: karenemorton cor
(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595
TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163


Natural lighting throughout this spacious 3DR, BA I .J.W. MLUK I UI L 2 ibi e d, 1... suites.... Oe Great... ro wit
custom 2400 sq. ft. living Open kitchen witJ 1 645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 2 bedroom, 2 bath suites. Open Great room with
breakfast nook appliances included Formal a -- .. --: ,:: .: fireplace Beautiful wood floors *New granite
dining Florida room Super-sized garage 1 acre P_ t .... countertops New bathrooms New Doors Move
SCentral water Move-in Ready! I rF.- _'.- rn.i .. P 1_. -.i t 'n in condition!! Beautiful location ride your golf cart
MLStt706599 $149,900 out the back door. MLS tt702891 $115,900



BEST OF THE BEST!!!' BAYMEADOWS BEAUTIFUL
,O H.LL..... -. ..E C..OMMUNI 3BR 3BA 2 Car Garage Family Room Master
., ,,, ',',',',,,,"',';:'," ,",,;" ,i, ,,'',',"',,':, ,,' ',;',,',,',, ..- BELMONT HILLS.-,GATED COMMUNITY Bedroom with Office Beautiful Master Bath
I.,lll.. ,.lll I..I...... I ..I.CEN R ............l.. ,''' Updated in 2012 Great Kitchen with Newer
"" 1 I" CENTRAL CITRUS COUNTY ,i, i'",,, ... i'. 1. Appliances Beautiful Wood Flooring Bookcase *
mm BithglasindorusoerlmokingtheFbridana tuallbacari ia Lul, )/w noImmu1 n hoin dllddll cnu"us roof Formal living and dining* Gracious Fireplace French Doors Lead to Large Screened
ith wildlife feeding at your doorstep. Owner's feeders bring the FIREPLACE in living room large bedrooms lots master suite Island kitchen large screen Lanai with Hot Tub Heat Pump/AC replaced in 2008
birds and wildlife in your backyard...truly amazing. 450 Ry of built-ins screen lanai WORKSHOP PLUS lanai with pavers on deck and driveway Lush Grapefruit, Tangerine and Orange Trees Located
storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and 2 adjoining lots! landscaping Tile roof Below replacement cost! on a Full Acre *
trulybetterthannew.LSI;t744.$324,900. MLSW706549 $47,500 MLS #705846 $298,900 MLS#t705303 $269,900

OPEN HOUSE
SU, IO,17 12-3
GOSPEL ISLAND GARDEN O EDEN 150 1oll Harbor Palith, Invernessm DIVORCE FORCESSALE
SB SURROUND S YOURi HO E h WATERFRONT HOME GOLFING COMMUNITY SWIMMING POOL MAINTENANCE FREE ** Kensington Estates **
2 BR, 2 BA Den PLUS office "Pottery Barn , ,,, ,i ,, ,, ,,,,, ,, uh .w. .. ,... , i, ,,, Only $58.58 per sq. ft OWNER SACRIFICEH! Splash into
,,,", ,,"" ..,,z, ,,.I ,, , ... ..... w ,i, .... .. . .. ,i'......i... ,, i summer in the 3700 + sq ft under roof Formal living
,,.,i,, ,.. 1, rsized G M .0 a reat Ramp RV and Boat Storage Enjoy Waterview from Super-sized FL Room. MLS #700705. and dining Massive all tiled family room adjoins
room with wood-burning fireplace* Rocking chair front $119,900. Call Karen Morton 212-7595. Updated kitchen with wood cabinets Pantry Volume
porch Large screen lanai and wood deck overlooking Directions: 44 East from Inverness, to left on Gospel Island Rd, to right on Golf Harbor Path, to ceilings Master suite opens to pool area 2-car
the lakefront Ideal for airboats or kayaks, property on left past the swimming pool. See sign. garage PLUS DETACHED WORKSHOP!! THIS HOME IS


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
Fora FREE MarketAnalysis and Marketing Plan
$10.2 million closed by Oct. 31, 2013.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
Sor visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
r'D To Learn More _
(352) 746-9924 I^--E


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E13


.16 lr





E14 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

Citrus Springs
2/1.5 on 2.5 acres,
clean, bright, quiet,
$650 (352) 603-0024
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR/1 /2BADWMH
$450/mo + 1st/last
(352) 364-6319
DUNNELLON/488
2/2, Fenced Yard,
Deck & Shed, $530/mo.
+ Pep (352) 795-6970
Hernando/C.Hills
3/2 Dbwd, 7,acre,
fenced, $625 mo.
(352)795-7813




2.5 acres mol
3/2 doublewide
glamour bath eat in
kitchen pole barn off
Whitman Rd.
$109.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
3 BR, 2BA, partially
furnished. Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500. For
Sale or Lease to own
(352) 212-4265


/2 acre in Homosassa.
Super clean, move-in
ready $59,000 Jennifer
Lehman ERA Suncoast
Realty (352) 422-1642
3/2 Double wide on
1 fenced-in acre.
Peaceful area in
Heatherwood
Reduced to $51,900
(352) 302-6905


4/2 Doublewide
on 5 acres mol
beautiful piece of
property off county
line road Springhill, Fl.
$149,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Log Home
4/3 Triplewide
on 5 acres mol
corner lot family
room w/fireplace off
cr 121 in Moriston, Fl.
Reduced to $129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181
Palm Harbor Factory
Liquidation Sale
6 models to choose
from,1200 sqftupto
2400 sq ft..$12K off!!
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext. 210
for details
Quiet area in
Lake Panasoffkee
3/2 Doublewide
on corner lot 14 acre
mol, nice storage
shed big oak tree
off CR 429
Lake Panasoffkee
Reduced to $54,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807

USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183


INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


ITI I : 10I


A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/ work-
shop. /4 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 228-4282
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. Owner
Financed FHA/ VA
352-795-1272
INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013

lI, '],"r m ', f


2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screem por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Inverness 55+ 2Br/l1Ba
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BRI Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Singing Forest Floral
City SW 2BD. 2BA
CHA, furnished, scrn.
room tool shed lot
rent $183. mo $10,000
Cell 607-227-1630
Two Bedroom Mobile
Home in Lecanto Hills
RV Pk cpt, scrn room,
heat & air, $6k
352-746-4648

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-ACTION 3
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHo0oneRentals.corn
HOMOSASSA
12390 Staidsh ................ $1,300
3/3/2 Wateront, furn & utles nl
31 Redbay 0. W (SMW .......$1,200
3/2/2, spamous
CRYSTAL RIVER
11640 ayshore Dr. .............. $1,300
2/2 Waterfront, utilles
9469 W. Wionsin ............. $650
2/2 Real Nice,2 Story Vlla, GreatArea
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
146W.Seyreria Dr. (BH) $615
2/15 Ch n I m, Corne Lot NH rFoest dg
II 48 Bridge Dr. (CS) ...............$800
3/2/2 Great Home, Has Jetted Tub
INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY
4940S. TadTerr. (FO ............. $700
2/1 Very Nice Home, QuietArea
6 ,383. Tonpaul Terr. (FQ .......$550
1/1 Coy Home
1304 Clhymore St. (INV). $1,100
3/2/2 Pol1















J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.


NEED A GOOD TENANT?



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21211 .............................$ 6 5 0
2/2/1 .............................$7 0 0
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
|Property Manager/
IRealtor-Associates
352-726-9010

Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
BEVERL HILLS
2/2/1 $600 mo
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $425. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


HOMOSASSA
1BR/1BAW/D, cable
& utilities incld.$600 +
F/L (352) 302-5853




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-8771






CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393

RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Fall Into Savings
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $459.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFl
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771

* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Monthly pest control

"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."


12r &

"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD









CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, w/Den, fully fur-
nished. W/D, $850 mo
1st/sec (352) 228-9192




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 34 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-8771






HOMOSASSA
1/1 Apt. $435. mo. 1st
& sec. 352-212-4981




BLACK DIAMOND
POOL HOME!
$1,200/MO BOB
HEDICK COLDWELL
BANKER NEXT
GENERATION
352-634-4286




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-8771






HOMOSASSA SMW
2/2/2, Lg Gar, Lg FL.
Rm, Greenbelt $800.
lst/last/dep. Agent
(352) 621-3004
INVERNESS
3/2, $775. mo
306 Hunting Lodge Dr.
352-895-0744
INVERNESS
3/2/1, sunroom,
fenced yard, app'd
pet with add'l fee,
$775/mo sec& 1st.
352-697-2195
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $750. mo + sec.
no smk/pets 726-1875

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS

Country Living
on large 1/2 acre lot.
3 bd. 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964




HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, Waterfront
Newly Remodeled
$900.mo 320-282-3061




*HERNANDO*
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR SALE OR LEASE
$1400 mo, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
** (352) 464-2514 **
1305 Hwy 486





2.5 Acres mol
off Lake Lindsey Rd
Brooksville 4/2
1600 sq ft out building
room to roam
$129,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


3/2 Doublewide
off of Hwy 50
Brooksville Area
close to shopping and
schools 1/ acre mol
$67,500.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 353-726-4009

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


':..gZ,;,',


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Open House

'Lakeside Golf &
Country Club"
Sunday Nov 17 1-4pm
1204 N Timucuan Trail
FULLY FURNISHED
"Move In Ready"
3/2 Pool Home. 2002
built home in Connell
Lake Estates.
Asking $198,000
From Hwy 41/Florida
Ave Hwy to entrance.
Left on Sabal Palm
Way, left on Timucuan
Trail. House on Left.
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston Properties, LLC





ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813)470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Avail 11/15/2013
WOOD CABINETS,
GRANITE TOPS,
VINYL WINDOWS,
ENERGY AWARD
CALL JOE 302-0910




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buying or Selling


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realty
Connect.me


For Sale ,,i
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352-422-6129
Newly renovated 2/1
with carport & Florida
Rm. Screened patio &
fenced yd. New paint
inside &out. Cash terms
$39,900 (352) 422-2433




4/2 on 1 acre
off Hwy 44 Lecanto
family room with large
bedrooms 1600 sq ft
$84,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
Reduced $129,000
795-1520 or 634-1725




4/2 Doublewide
on 1 Plus Acres, MOL
Fireplace Glamour
Bath, large walk-in
closets all bedrooms,
off US 200
in Hernando Fl.
$89,995
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


I in ideM


HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW, own lot, new carport
& screened front & back
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858




LQQkC
117 S Lunar Terrace 2
bedroom 2 bath Florida
RM Garage &8, Carport
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE
Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down
352-344-9290
2006 3/2/2 plus dining
room & den, % acre,
2100sq. ft under air
Move in Condition!
$199,000
352-341-0118
3/2/2 in the Highlands;
Very Clean w/ large
screened patio,& at-
tached storage shed.
Lg corner lot in great
neighborhood $89,900
352-302-0431
3/2 Doublewide
on 1/3 mol acre has
glamour bath and
walk-in closets off
Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, Fl.
$64,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Nice Double Lot
3A Acres MOL
with Lake View
4/2 Doublewide
with Family Room,
large bed rooms off
Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness Fl.
$89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Totally Remodeled
3/2/2,+ family room.
New Roof, AC, $75,000
South Highlands,
6715 E Morley St
(352) 560-0019



4/2 Doublewide
in Floral City off 44
near town on /4 acre
mol fenced yard
large rear deck
Floral City fl.
$89.995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009
Beautiful Floral City
3/2 doublewide
on 14 acre mol
glamour bath nice
eat in kitchen,
Floral City off us 41
$69,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009




For SaIe ,I
Rock Crusher Area
3Br/2Ba/1CG, newly
renovated, including
new, lights, fans, ap-
pliances, and flooring
$72,900 352-422-4533


4/3 Triplewide
on 2-1/2 acres in
green acres in
Homosassa beautiful
wooded lot
$139,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number
WMM"


REALTY ONE

For Sale By Owner
2BR, 1 BA, Corner Lot
Located in Old
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated
kitchen, SS appl's.,
pine Hardwood firs./
tiles, roof 3 yrs. old.
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy-
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000.
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092
Have horses or want
them? 4/3 Triplewide
with family room and
fireplace den off mas-
ter bed room would
make for great office
on 9 plus acres mol
with horse corals
west side of US 19
Homosassa, Fl.
$229,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number
ShN"

REALTY ONE




3/2
with family room
fireplace, glamour
bath quiet neighbor
hood in Homosassa.
89,995.
SELLER FINANCING
Call 352-726-4009


INVESTORS
'88 3/2 MH, 1 Acre,
Newer Roof, A/C
exc. tenants in place
$47K obo Cash
352-503-3245


Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Lawanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
centurv21 .com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Hooas


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


BEMY J

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn


Citrus County
Homes-


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515








Newly undated 2/2/2,
w/family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased





Your World








CWpN llE


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com





Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993

Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $45,000
Will consider a classic
or muscle car towards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507



Time Share

Six day vacation in
Orlando, Florida!
Regularly $1,175.00.
Yours today for only
$389.00! You SAVE
67 percent. PLUS
One-week car
rental included.
Call for details.
1-800-985-1463


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureC-oast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"




WOODED LOT
on Lee Woods Dr.,
HOMOSASSA
has Wetlands,
$5,000.
352-621-1664


CirsCony


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


V THIS OUT!


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. front-
age on golf course
$49,900. Call
352-638-0905

Crystal River Lot *
Located in Shamrock
Acres, Paraqua Circle
Beautiful 5 Acres
Asking $59,000. Make
Offer! (239) 561-9688

2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
call 352-527-2711





BACK ON MARKET!
Priced to sell!
8 beautiful acres
originally offered at
$139,900. NOW just
$39,900. Fully com-
plete community.
No time frame to
build. Call for more
info: (888)434-9611.
Gulf Atlantic Land
Sales, LLC, Broker.


North Georgia
Mountain Land Bar-
gain! 17 Acres abuts
US National Forest
only $59,900. was
$199,900. Gorgeous
mountain top sett-
ing, gentle slope,
crystal clear moun-
tain streams. Enjoy
tremendous privacy.
RV friendly. Only
one like this. Must
see. Excellent
financing. Call now
866-952-5303, x 76


TENN. LAND BAR-
GAIN WITH FREE
BOAT SLIP! 1.70 ac-
res meadows over-
looks 140 acre Na-
ture Preserve,
streams & ponds.
Only $19,900. 6.1
acre hardwoods
Only $27,900. FREE
boat slips. Excellent
financing, little
down. Call now
1-877-888-0267,
x446


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013 E15





E16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2013CH


1ill ii11111111: ASKING $68.,500
Pit D I,, 2352 212 7280
I'l.il h-ltnO ii ii ii a 2./. )i. iid ;.n


SERVING
COUNTY W,. S, Iv"e, FL 3 C Td For


OVERP37FO ME Analysis
YEARS. r] -. *iI' I*' r~ : : _suNDAY


BRING THE HORSES

LI I U.h1 .' II Inv.ii _' V lll b.: '" i,.:i 'J', .I ,

IIi HInh., I I Il.:i W .il..h IN.:i.j. |.1.,1 I N I.:i l~l~e .h l,

$149,900
Ca.ll Ruthi Fiedeick 1 352 563 6866 to see


* IBFl _' I l., Lh 1. MI I ; ,*
* fhll ,pl '' I .,11 ,.ial
* A I ,ll h,,,, l I.,- ,Jl hi ,:
Mi1 =/ii hIi'/ $200,000
Jeanne nt llillaitd Pickie/ 352212-3410
ititiu ciituscounl sold con


MOVE-IN READY
TWO BEDROOM HOME
IN BEVERLY HILLS


MI = 7 l,.,,'-. $59,900
Call lot an appointment ask lot
Isaac Baylon 352 726 6668


POOL HOME!

,:i J IIIJ Im.I..iI I hx .lu i flh m. i 3f lw .:il b j..: 6ii.

Ml /l '-t,,I' PRICED TO SELL S146,500
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


HAMPSHIRE HILLS 2.5 ACRES
* l RlH,,].l, I il, I, I_ ,,b U. -i. i
11 da II) I ; I. l ,l:I,. ,, J Vi, ,, IH F b.lfi,, I,

MII / =I.1'.I ONLY $227,500
Call Chatles Kellj 352 422 2387


r[J l in,) I .. I i- ; I. ,,,,,,,,, ;* L.iih h,,. r

Iill 1ll'lli 7ll ili]i

ASKING $24,900
C.ill Ste#in Stu.itl 352 212 0211


* LI.V_-L,' ';,IK l,,lh
I 1( 11- PH I P 1 H.i]r, ]
* 1111 i .l ii A A iI Il.i I ),)n

r iji0 A iji H., H .i I P. "iill:";

MlI.. =i ,. $110,000
Jeanne ot I'!l/atd Pickitel 2123410
ii'ii'i ci/tinsconti sold com


MOVE-IN READY, WELL MAINTAINED
.: B -l11,1l ?_i 11l olll w I ir i llh ..iI ,].il .i.].
A li i,,. l I::,I 'l II .I l i i. x 1..i.:; [ F .,l,
.h A," i,:l,l.:i ,: ,,,i _1. III/ lji,,p ,,i.:il ,:, i ,,,:i i
I w vll 6l vh.l Il lllh illl lw nill.i l illi h .n:llil
3In I ".i l hCill Appmi.,i ifiild T,),l.:iyi
Mi I =l h:])I., ASKING $69,900
Conntacl Nancy Jenks 352-400 8072
nt 352 726-6668


WA "- 7-. .: ,;....

GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY
I d 11 I
"I I I I l,. l I
I I I' Ill 1 "h- I.1.h d
I, .-I ,,, I il il ,I ,l ,h1 ,-, 1 1iii ,,,i
j. 1, f .11'. m
$95,000
Call Jim M otIon at 3524222173 lom
Sout personal tout of Emeta/d Hills


GREAT GETAWAY CRACKER HOME _______
,. ii,,i I,,,.I hI,. ,,,,, 'Iil l I_, ,,, i,,, BEAUTIFUL 2005
I'l i.,l ,l ,i"i,", ,h ,,,iii l in ,, llh, 4BR/2BA MOBILE HOME
_" .i hi -. ii, i 'll .1,6, 1 i I, li-ii' t. :i,:', fi 'iill"ll'lil
f.il ll Il 1 661 J0. ej :im' llllllll Le, '~le.
Ia|,:' ','il.' l l,,I l l .'.,ilH i l,, 'l:' h fi i ASKING $99,000

ASKING $65,000 i ,t, i,..,, ONLY $29,900
Call Matha Snidet 352 -176 8727 I1 s = ;.i'.; I _11. s = 0;i) ;'1
ask lot Ile =705780_ I .il.inpd.i W|it 352 212 1989


1 F 1.61, l,,(,, _" l(, i li 1l1,1, .
* ..... Ii l 'a' .ii b '.'I .

Mi =/ 11:11_/" $198,000
Jeanne nt l'ill/aid Pickiel 352-212 3410
iitit c/liuscounn sold con


PANTHER RIDGE FARM
ON 73 +/- ACRES

S l~llll~lll l ,:lll; h Ii l ll ,i lh .11 .II l .l ,Till
0 11 11'Al .i i, ,: i l, i l .:1 1:11:11:1 i l i


Mi / i'= .'xIl ASKING $850,000
Ca/ll Jim Mi tion to lout 422 2173


THIS HOME OFFERS
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE


,d,- ,'h, ,
l = ;,n ASKING $258,900
PJit D.nii is 352 212 1280
I'iell sting c21p.itd.iiius cm


ii' 1,, 1 : 6 S- K G, N ,' 158,, 900
Ph i ,'. 2... 2. 1 6
I.. l. h I Ih h I' 6,,', .i..l i. h ,,I. h
6 h .~,, .. ,,, , ,, I i, I, , 6 ,,,, 1... 6 1, I
rh.ii=-f,..A if ASKING $158.900
Pit Di>-4, 3521 212 7280
r..1il ii,n' i i .i.. ;2 gP1td i,, o.jm


* l_. h, 1.il.,ll il. 'h ii

* IVI,,li,.ail:-, ,: ll, l

Mt 3=170101i $49,000
Jeanne nt Wtllatd Pickite 212 3410
i'i'i'. ctlluscountL'sol/dl. corn


11;ihI ,: .iii: IF I ,:l. l, ,i l l ,


hI a 6 l,, l .,,illI lll-l
Mi 5 = /l I'-, NEWLY PRICED AT S179.000
Ask lot Matilyn Booth 63714904


GETTING BACK TO NATURE!
IlJ- i:l'HF 11:11 l W IH AI'JI'HMH IJ.- I IJIII:IH
fN ':,R lA -f ':,f PAR~ifll iipf j ':,PafUI '
f l: .iii'iii...i I| ii.i Tli"' b "iJi i'ii lv ,:b.il'i,
I',in.lI" ...n. il'. iljl'i.l.l: .ii..i i....I ';..I I:
l t l ....:il li ,i i- J iiii.j,:iln i.ii-i Vl ll
i 11.- = ii4ir'i!. GREAT BUY AT S124,900
Call DBOtis Minet .- 352-422-4627


GOSPEL ISLAND HOME
,~,i li i IlylllI 111 l. ~ I III h. _'1 1 lill ,
,i.ph h.i. I... ll .,.]i. l. i. j,, .ii -,, iii i T i,,.:
.1111Jin.. 111 hi.,li lll .. hill 1:1 l I .. |,:i l. H l..K .,
MI'.: = i7i`'.0 ASKING $68,900
Pat Davis 035221227280
I/ei' sting ii','i, c21latdaris con


POOL!
b,vi~ lli'l t. .. I, h ,,,II ', k,,ilh l, I ,,i; ll

.io i, -i(ll f.:i 1 1 -0 .vv ifl_, .:ih:l ,,d

Mi =I:1 Ic. $259,900
Call Ouade Feeset 352 302 7699


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