Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03292

Full Text

On the podium: Local swimmer 8th at state /B1
[: m I. a ]t_ d . -:_ . .


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 95


EXCURSIONS:


flal
-^J m


Holiday
Spend Veterans Day at
local events./Page A15
LOCAL NEWS:


Meet vets
Stop by Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park for free on Monday
to meet two young
veterans./Page A5
USE WEEKEND:
" aE-1. "q


Thanks
For Veterans Day, USA
WEEKEND and the USO
share six ways every
American can support
our troops, fallen heroes
and courageous military
families./Inside
HOMEFRONT:
Belly up
Bars can be stylish as
well as functional.
/HomeFront

COMMENTARY:


Iran analysis
Columnist Michael
Francis review a book
about Iran./Page Cl
BUSINESS:
Chapter 9
Lawyers wrapping case
in Detroit bankruptcy
trial./Page Dl



6 1841578112007 o


See food, arts


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Wanda Eineman of Spring Hill, center left, and friend Terry Ovsianik of Brooksville look over some
of the many choices of seafood at Florida Cracker Seafood's stand Saturday afternoon during the 39th
annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts & Seafood Festival. The Homosassa Civic Club sponsors the event that is
expected to attract tens of thousands to the quiet fishing community. BELOW: Joe and Marie Maldonado
of Dade City share a lobster, mussel and shrimp platter from one of the 20 food vendors at the festival.

Festival continues

today in Homosassa
ERYN WORTHINGTON ".
Staff writer

Mahi-mahi rice. Bacon- Ji
wrapped scallops. Crab I.,
fritters.
Seafood delicacies Satur- i
day along with blue skies and ideal ,
weather- no doubt contributed to the .-'
droves of people who descended on Old ,y "
Homosassa for the first day of the 39th / !
annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts &
Seafood Festival.
"One of the nice things about the sec-
ond weekend of November is that we
haven't had rain at the seafood festival '.
in 17 years," said Homosassa Civic Club
member Dan Macias. "For some reason,
it has been like this every year"
With 100 crafters, 90 artists and 20
See Page A13


CCHB balks at funding

new hospital equipment


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Imagine being a Citrus Me-
morial hospital patient stuck in
the emergency room ward for
hours on end because there isn't
a bed with the proper equip-
ment available.
It isn't a stretch for some peo-
ple who, on Friday, found them-
selves in that exact situation -
waiting to be admitted as pa-
tients but unable to move into a
permanent room.
"I don't have a bed for them,"
chief nursing officer Linda Mc-
Carthy said. "They're in a hold-
ing pattern."
McCarthy and hospital


Classifieds ....... D6
Crossword ....... A16
Excursions .......A15


Ryan
Beaty
CEO of Citrus
Memorial
says needs
can't be
ignored.


Bob
Priselac
CCHB trustee
wonders if
HCAcan
help with
equipment.


Chief Executive Officer
Ryan Beaty say the problem is
a lack of telemetry monitors,
See Page All


Editorial ......
Entertainment .
Horoscope .....


.C2
.A4
S. .A4


Power


plant


fire


minor

Separate blaze
in Floral City
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
A Duke Energy assess-
ment team was on site
Saturday to investigate
the cause of a fire at the
Crystal River Energy
Complex.
The company reported
Friday night that a fire oc-
curred at 6:25 p.m. in the
building that houses Crys-
tal River Unit 1, the oldest
coal unit at the complex.
No one was injured and
power to customers was
not disrupted. The fire
was extinguished by ap-
proximately 7:15 p.m., ac-
cording to Duke
spokeswoman Heather
Danenhower
"Our on-site Emergency
Response Coordinators
were the first respon-
ders," she said. "They
were able to use our high
pressure fire suppression
system to immediately
start fighting the fire."
They also called for off-
site support and were
joined by fire crews from
Derosa, Crystal River,
Connell Heights, Ho-
mosassa, Pine Ridge and
Kensington.
Citrus County Division
of Fire Rescue Battalion
Chief L.J. White reported
that upon arrival they
were advised there was a
fire inside the plant that
appeared to be out. The
crews assisted in a search
for any possible spread.
'As a precautionary
measure, we had a roving
fire watch to ensure it did
not rekindle and no major
See Page AO10


Chassahowitzka artifacts

on display Wednesday


Chronicle
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District and an ar-
chaeological research group will
display some of the historical
items pulled out of the Chassa-
howitzka River's springs area
during a major cleanup this past
summer
The display will open at 10 a.m.
Wednesday near the site where
they were recovered, at the boat
launch in Chassahowitzka.
Amid the muck sucked out of
the bottom of the river were some
important examples of human ac-
tivity near those spring vents over
the course of several millennia.


Lottery Numbers .. B3


Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... A16
Obituaries A6, A7, A10


Items found stretched from the
Paleo-Indian and archaic to the
20th century
A complete clay pot was found
and, according to an official with
Southeastern Archaeological Re-
search Inc.'s (SEARCH) Jack-
sonville office, it looks like it was
made in the Woodland period,
between 500 B.C. and 600 A.D.
SEARCH worked in tandem with
the water district to identify
items of archaeological value.
Archaeologists also found a
Suwannee point, or spear-type
point, used during the Paleo-
Indian period 10,000 years ago. A
Bolen point from the Archaic
See Page A5


TV Listings .
Together ...
Veterans ...


... A16
.... A22
... A19


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORKING TOGETHER TO LEASE
CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

WILL PROVE TO BE THE RIGHT PRESCRIPTION


V

V

V

V


V

V


BENEFITS TO LEASING TO HCA:
Approximately $90 million will go directly to
our community through the creation of a new
charitable trust.
100 percent of the net proceeds from the lease
will benefit residents of Citrus County.
Hospital bonds will be funded and pensions
will be secured.
A lease cannot be challenged in court -
freeing us from lengthy court battles and legal
fees.
Citrus County will retain long-term ownership
of the hospital.
HCA will pay $2 million in property taxes to
our community.


V A lease will reduce the hospital tax millage
that Citrus County homeowners/residents pay
now. Taxes will go down.


Thank you, Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, for unanimously voting to lease
Citrus Memorial Hospital to HCA. Leasing is the best option and provides the
most benefit to our community. Leasing Citrus Memorial Hospital will bring
financial stability and first-class health care to Citrus County.


BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES.


A2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013






S Page A3-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 0, 20130



TATE2& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





CR set to buy vacant lot


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The city appears poised
to close the deal on the
purchase of the empty lot
at the corner of Citrus
Avenue and U.S. 19. The
purchase price is
$251,700.
The city council in its ca-
pacity as the Community
Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) board voted Aug. 26
to authorize the CRA Ad-
ministrator/City Manager
Andy Houston to accept an
offer to sell from Jennifer
Petrella, the owner of the



Around the

STATE

Citrus County

County offices
closed Monday
Citrus County govern-
ment offices will be closed
Monday in observance of
Veterans Day.
The county landfill will be
open from 8 a.m. to
2:30 p.m.
Libraries will be closed
on Monday, but will return
to normal business hours
on Tuesday.
All community buildings
and parks will be closed. Bi-
centennial Pool will be open
normal business hours.
Animal Services will be
closed.
Hernando boat ramp
to close for festival
The Hernando Beach
Public Boat Ramp and pub-
lic parking will be closed
from 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15,
until 11 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 16, for the Dragon
Boat Race and Festival. For
information, call the Citrus
County Parks & Recreation
Department at 352-
527-7540.
LWV to host
environmentalist
The League of Women
Voters of Citrus County will
host environmentalist Helen
Spivey as guest speaker at
10:15 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 12, at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills.
Through the decades,
Spivey has seen many
changes in Florida's natural
habitats and has a wealth
of knowledge to share.
Born in Ocala in 1928, she
moved to Crystal River in
1970.
Spivey, who has served
on the Crystal River City
Council and in the Florida
House of Representatives,
is co-chair of the board of
directors of the Save the
Manatee Club.
All interested men and
women are invited. The
LWVCC is an educational,
nonpartisan organization.
Light refreshments will be
served; bring your own soft
drinks.
For more information, call
352-746-0655.
Also, the League of
Women Voters will have a
voter-registration drive from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 16, at the Crystal River
Mall.
For more information,
email lwvcc2013@gmail.
com.

Jacksonville
Board moving to
change school name
The Duval County
School Board is moving to
change the name of a high
school named after the first
Grand Wizard of the Ku
Klux Klan.
The Florida Times-Union
reported that board mem-
bers voted unanimously Fri-
day to start a process that
could rename Nathan B.
Forrest High School.


-From staff and wire reports I


property, to purchase the
western portion of the va-
cant parcel.
According to city offi-
cials, work has been ongo-
ing to get the required
documentation in place
for the actual closing of the
sale.
While a formal date for
the closing has not been
set, the closing is expected
in the next 30 days.
Houston is seeking
$2,000 to spend on closing
costs.
The CRA board also will
consider modifying the
Community Redevelop-
ment Plan to provide for


IF YOU GO
* WHAT: Crystal River CRA and City Council
meetings.
* WHEN: Tuesday. CRA, 6:30 p.m.; council, 7 p.m.
* WHERE: Council chambers, City Hall, 123 N.W.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* CONTACT: 352-795-4216 or visit crystalriverfl.org.


an extended term.
At the regular council
meeting, council members
will:
Consider approval of a
resolution requesting the
transfer of ownership of a
portion of County Road
495 from Citrus County to


the city of Crystal River
That portion is from U.S.19
to Turkey Oak Drive and
the city will take responsi-
bility for the maintenance
of the road.
Consider approval of a
modified Southwest
Florida Water Manage-


ment District Reclaimed
Water Project grant fund-
ing agreement for total
project sum up to
$6,228,712.
Consider a contract
award for construction of
reclaimed-water line to
Duke Energy Power Gen-
eration Complex to Wad-
dell Plantation Inc.
(doing business as Royal
American Construction
Group) for a cost of
$5,342,116.86.
Consider an award
of contract in the amount
of $512,880.68 to Pave-
Rite Inc. for replacement
of water mains and ap-


prove additional funds of
up to $49,119.32 in con-
tingency or supplemen-
tal work pursuant to the
Community Develop-
ment Block Grant.
Consider approval of a
change in scope of serv-
ices to the sewer construc-
tion contract with Royal
American for the DSC
Sewer Extension Project
(Area 114) to provide for an
increased level of road
paving in the amount of
$257,264.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Volunteers fight the spread



of Brazilian pepper plant


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

OZELLO Samantha Stronk joined 20
-"volunteers Saturday in eradicating an ag-
gressive and invasive plant in Citrus County.
"I came in from out of town and my
friend Jamie (Letendre) asked if I would
help out. I thought, sure, why not," she
said.
The Crystal River Preserve State Park
(CRPSP) and the Ozello Civic Association
hosted the 18th Pepper Pull in Ozello to re-
.. ** move the Brazilian pepper, which domi-
.. nates landscapes, conservation and
recreational areas.
,. 40 The odd-numbered-leafed, exotic plant-
which is in the poison ivy family was in-
troduced to Citrus County by a family in the
1840s who thought the plant was attractive.
However, the Brazilian pepper proved to
be invasive and deadly to other vegetation.
Now with the help of local residents,
CRPSP has been fighting the spread of
',:* .Brazilian pepper since 2005, said park bi-
' - ologist Keith Morin.
To date, nearly 116,500 recorded pepper
plants have been removed.
Volunteers split into three groups and
*" traveled to dense locations to pull up the
infant plants. Morin said after an adult
plant is pulled, it leaves behind seeds that
mature into new plants.
"I am trying to help everyone keep con-
trol of the invasive plant," said volunteer
Karl Schulz. "I have been doing this before
and I am trying to make sure we all keep
ahead of what is going on around here. The
plants are very aggressive, and if you look
around, it is all over the place."
By traveling to thick areas near Ozello,
volunteers gently pulled up the aggressive
plant and placed them in garbage bags.
"You have to pull gently or the roots will
break and grow again," Morin said. 'Also, you
can't leave the plant on the ground either, or
it will continue to grow Either hang the plant
in a tree to dry out or place in a garbage bag."
ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle After the pull, volunteers regrouped at
Samantha Stronk was one of 20 volunteers who helped pull Brazilian pepper from the the Ozello Civic Association for lunch and
Crystal River Preserve and Ozello on Saturday. conversation.





United Way seeks help in gas card contest


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Through an easy click of
the mouse, a nonprofit or-
ganization is seeking your
help.
United Way of Citrus
County has the opportu-
nity to win $5,000 in free
Citgo gas cards that would
assist students in the
Learn to Earn program.
The program provides
financial assistance for
daycare, transportation,


-.A I
Amy Meek
United Way of
Citrus County
CEO.


tuition,
testing and
more for
individu-
als seeking
to better
their lives
by achiev-
ing their
General
E d u c a -
tional De-
velopment


(GED) degree.
By simply voting online
daily at fuelinggood.com
for United Way of Citrus
County, the organization
has an opportunity to win
free gas cards, freeing up
dollars to support other
charitable programs in


HOW TO VOTE
1. Go to fuelinggood.com.
2. Click on "Participate."
3. Log in with an email address. The first time you have to sign up.
4. Click the submit button.
5. Go to the second drop-down box.
6. Scroll through or type in United Way of Citrus County. A picture will appear
below of a local GED student graduating.
7. Click the red thumbs-up to vote.
8. Repeat steps one through seven in 24 hours.


Citrus County
"That can help offset
child care costs, tuition,
testing and so much
more," said United Way of
Citrus County CEO Amy
Meek. "Wouldn't it be great
to take the money that we
would be using for gas
cards and transfer it to
these other programs
to help others earn bigger
incomes and brighter
futures?"
Meek said United Way of
Citrus County is applying
for out-of-county grants for
funds to be brought back
into the community so that
they are not relying solely
on citizens.
"While I was research-
ing different grants to


apply for, I came across the of Citgo gas cards would be
Citgo Fueling Good grant," huge for our efforts."
she said. "What is really Through a lengthy
awesome about process, United
this grant is that if Way of Citrus
we win, we win County's applica-
$5,000 in gas tion was accepted
cards. We don't get under the educa-
a big check; we tion and social in-
get $5,000 in gas vestment category
cards. Why that is for the Fueling
so great is be- Good grant.
cause that helps Cindi Fein "WhatAmyhadto
us with our pro- United Way of do to get us to qual-
gram at WTI Citrus County ify was to go in
(Withlacoochee public relations under one of these
Technical Insti- spokeswoman. four categories-
tute) or any other adult stu- education and social in-
dents that are going back to vestment, energy assis-
school. That is one of the tance and conservation,
biggest hurdles trans- environmental protection
portation. Infusing that and restoration or health
program with $5,000 worth and well being," said Cindi


Fein, public relations
spokeswoman. "We talked
about how we are trying to
make that change at the
cause of the problem so
that we can get our people
educated with a GED and
move them forward."
Nationwide, there are
218 competitors in the ed-
ucation and social invest-
ment category Regionally,
they are competing against
77 other qualifiers.
"We have been doing a
lot of asking for giving
because it is campaign
time," Fein said. "This is
really just advocating for
us it's free and only a
click of a button. There is
nothing invested other
than you saying, 'Yes, I
care about our commu-
nity and I want to make
that vote.' Plus, don't
worry about spam mail. I
have been clicking every
day for two weeks and
have not received one
piece of spam mail."
Voting is allowed once
every 24 hours and ends
Dec. 1.
For more information,
contact the United Way of
Citrus County at 352-795-
LIVE (5483).




A4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Choose the direction you
want to go, and turn your ideas into
tangible possibilities. Take action in-
stead of waiting for someone else to
beat you to it. Simple, precise moves
and cost-effective decisions will be
your ticket to a better future. Accept-
ance and ready adaptation will improve
the outcome.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) A day off
will do you good. Whether you read a
good book or get out with friends or
loved ones, the time spent will encour-
age you to be more productive.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You'll
be torn between what you want and
what you can do. Be realistic and re-
frain from showing anger if you want to
avoid discord.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Con-
sistency will play a role in the outcome
of a touchy situation. Look for an un-
usual solution to a problem, and you
will realize that you have something
special to offer.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Keep
your emotions tucked away and your
ears tuned in to what others do and say
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Have
your game plan ready to go, and you
won't lose a beat when it comes to
gaining success and recognition.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't let
changes made by others disturb you. If
you follow through with your plans, you
will find ways to move forward, alone
or with someone you encounter along
the way.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Partner-
ships will make a difference in the way
you move forward. Keep your emo-
tions hidden until you are positive
about your feelings.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Re-
evaluate your current position and your
reputation. You may want to make a cou-
ple of personal changes that enhance
your popularity as well as your confidence.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Sharing
is required today, bringing results that
are far beyond your expectations.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Look over
your investments or calculate your as-
sets and liabilities.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Maintain
your schedule by clearing up unfin-
ished business.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Consider
your situation and the people involved
in your life. Make tough choices that
will ease some of the problems you've
been facing.


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
PC
pc
sh
sh

sh
PC
pc
PC
pc
sh
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City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
sh
pc
sh
pc
sh
pc
sh
sh
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Gulf water
temperature


74
Taken at Aripeka


Fictitio0


Meetin;


Miscell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


Eagles kick off three
nights in New York
NEW YORK Few sur-
prises, if any, are left at an Ea-
gles concert: The vintage music
sounds are digitally crystal clear;
the band members' voices re-
main strong through the long,
high notes and harmonies. And
it's hard to find a bad song on
the set list.
The thrill isn't gone, mind you,
just some of their grunge from
the '70s.
The Eagles offered up
"Peaceful Easy Feeling" and a
string of other hits Friday night at
Madison Square Garden, the
first of three concerts in New
York as part of their "History of
the Eagles" tour. It coincides with
this year's release of the docu-
mentary of the same name,
which premiered at the Sun-
dance Film Festival and is now
out on DVD.
With Don Henley, Glenn
Frey, Joe Walsh, Timothy B.
Schmit and others, the band
played through a series of rock
classics and staples of radio
when vinyl ruled: "Take It Easy,"
"Take It To The Limit," "The Long
Run," "I Can't Tell You Why,"
"Tequila Sunrise" and, of course,
"Hotel California" in all its guitar-
heavy glory.
Forty years on, it is hard to get
past the Eagles extensive and
well-known catalog with words
etched into our brains through
endless airplay. Frey took note
of the band's age when it came
time for intermission: "Guys our
age gotta go to the bathroom."
Hopefully, the band will elimi-
nate the cheesy video that ac-
companied their road song
"Already Gone," as it featured
Frey on a weird, cartoon-like
journey in a convertible that felt
too light for the song's message.
The more rocking songs of


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR I-HI LO PR L
NA NA 54 0 7Q .J n nn j76 5.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy
today.


79 55 -0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusvedaiy
forecast by: Ig
............ .....TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 62
Partly sunny

__ .Wo MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 84 Low: 63
,mom-1 ~Partly sunny

r-..-- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 52
Partly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/57
Record 91/39
Normal 80/54
Mean temp. 69
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.70 in.
Total for the year 52.84 in.
Normal for the year 48.21 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.12 in.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
11/10 SUNDAY 11:44 5:31 5:57
11/11 MONDAY 12:08 6:21 12:33 6:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT. ...........................5:39 P.M .
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:51 A.M.
4 y MOONRISE TODAY ...........................1:12P.M.
NOV. 10 NOV. 17 NOV. 25 DEC. 2 MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:01 A.M .

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:29 a/6:31 a ---/7:17 p
Crystal River" 8:50 a/3:53 a 10:32 p/4:39 p
Withlacoochee* 6:37 a/1:41 a 8:19 p/2:27 p
Homosassa*** 9:39 a/5:30 a 11:21 p/6:16 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:11 a/7:52 a 12:01 p/8:26 p
10:22 a/5:14 a 11:28 p/5:48 p
8:09 a/3:02 a 9:15 p/3:36 p
11:11 a/6:51 a -- 7:25 p


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.60 29.55 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.66 38.65 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.89 39.86 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.58 40.56 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


)RECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY -


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


43 26
67 34
56 26
60 40
51 29
71 54 .03
54 29
46 34
61 43
56 34
47 35
51 37
43 33
65 38
63 28
60 26
58 45
61 32
59 34
64 32
60 37
43 31
70 56
65 32
59 43
58 37
74 46
64 41
52 28
47 28
70 53
61 41
65 45 trace
73 48
63 46
71 57
64 35
62 44
55 46
46 39
74 44
70 40
61 31


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 72 49 pc 75 56
NewYorkCity 50 38 pc 56 40
Norfolk 59 37 s 67 43
Oklahoma City 68 46 pc 65 50
Omaha 61 40 pc 55 36
Palm Springs 81 50 s 87 56
Philadelphia 52 35 pc 56 37
Phoenix 85 58 s 87 60
Pittsburgh 57 28 pc 47 30
Portland, ME 46 32 sh 51 32
Portland, Ore 49 42 pc 58 45
Providence, R.I. 46 29 pc 55 33
Raleigh 59 30 s 70 37
Rapid City 50 38 pc 53 24
Reno 70 31 s 69 36
Rochester, NY 49 33 .02 sh 50 35
Sacramento 74 43 s 73 46
St. Louis 69 49 pc 53 38
St. Ste. Marie 41 33 .44 pc 40 31
Salt Lake City 62 35 s 64 44
San Antonio 71 56 .10 s 76 56
San Diego 74 52 s 72 56
San Francisco 65 48 pc 65 49
Savannah 72 42 pc 74 49
Seattle 52 41 trace sh 54 46
Spokane 44 31 sh 47 36
Syracuse 48 36 .01 sh 50 35
Topeka 68 35 s 58 44
Washington 56 34 s 60 39
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 86 Marathon, Fla. LOW 11 Cut Bank,
Mont.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/81/pc
Amsterdam 48/40/sh
Athens 69/60/pc
Beijing 42/31/s
Berlin 40/35/sh
Bermuda 71/67/pc
Cairo 79/60/pc
Calgary 14/12/sn
Havana 84/73As
Hong Kong 78/67/sh
Jerusalem 75/58/s


Lisbon 64/51/pc
London 41/34/pc
Madrid 61/40/pc
Mexico City 70/52/sh
Montreal 45/30/r
Moscow 43/40/c
Paris 47/36/pc
Rio 82/70/pc
Rome 64/44/r
Sydney 64/58/sh
Tokyo 64/44/sh
Toronto 46/37/sh
Warsaw 44/35/sh


Associated Press
The Eagles, from left, Timothy B. Schmit, Bernie Leadon, Glenn
Frey and Joe Walsh, perform Friday at Madison Square Garden
in New York.


the two-hour set came courtesy
of Walsh, the guitarist whose di-
verse career spawned the
thumping "Rocky Mountain Way"
and the riff-grinding "Funk #49."
Plus, he brought along the an-
them "Life's Been Good" and "In
The City," a song connected to
New York through its use in the
gang film "The Warriors."
Those tracks, along with
rapid-fire FM hits like "Life In The
Fast Lane," provided enough
balance to ensure the 28-song
set list didn't end up entirely
easygoing and mellow.
The Eagles played Saturday
and again on Monday in New
York before performing about 10
more shows around the country
and wrapping up in California.
Larry King returns
to the radio
NEW YORK- If you've
missed the musings of Larry
King, you're in luck he's com-
ing to radio in the form of
minute-long, daily reports start-
ing on Veterans Day.
The former CNN host will be
featured on more than 50 sta-
tions owned by Cumulus across
the nation. AARP will also fea-
ture it on its website, along with


additional audio.
This will mark King's return to
radio after six decades, accord-
ing to a statement released Sat-
urday by his rep and AARP.
The 79-year-old King was a
staple on CNN with "Larry King
Live" for years, interviewing lumi-
naries ranging from celebrities to
politicians, until he left the net-
work 2010.
Judge rejects DMX's
bankruptcy filing
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -A
federal judge in New York has
tossed rapper DMX's bank-
ruptcy filing, making him fair
game for creditors.
The Journal News reported
that a bankruptcy judge in White
Plains dismissed the 42-year-old
rapper's July 29 Chapter 11 filing
on Friday.
The hip-hop star's real name
is Earl Simmons. The judge's
move means he could lose his
possessions including his share
in a home in suburban Mount
Kisco.
Simmons' biggest debt is $1.3
million in child support owed to
some of the 10 children he has
fathered.
-From wire reports


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Nov. 10, the
314th day of 2013. There are 51
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 10, 1938, Kate Smith first
sang Irving Berlin's "God Bless
America" on her CBS radio program.
On this date:
In 1871, journalist-explorer Henry
M. Stanley found Scottish mission-
ary David Livingstone, who had not
been heard from for years, near
Lake Tanganyika in central Africa.
In 1951, customer-dialed long-
distance telephone service began
as Mayor M. Leslie Denning of En-
glewood, N.J., called Alameda,
Calif., Mayor Frank Osborne with-
out operator assistance.
In 1975, the ore-hauling ship SS
Edmund Fitzgerald and its crew of
29 mysteriously sank during a
storm in Lake Superior with the loss
of all on board.
Ten years ago: Federal regula-
tors allowed customers to switch
home phone numbers to their cell
phones.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush and his wife,
Laura, welcomed Barack and
Michelle Obama to the White House
for a nearly two-hour visit; the presi-
dent and president-elect conferred
in the Oval Office, while the current
and future first ladies talked in the
White House residence.
One year ago: U.S. officials dis-
closed that the scandal that brought
down CIA Director David Petraeus
started when harassing emails sent
by his biographer and paramour,
Paula Broadwell, to another woman
came to the attention of the FBI.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Rus-
sell Johnson is 89. Country singer
Donna Fargo is 72. Lyricist Tim
Rice is 69. Rock singer-musician
Greg Lake (Emerson, Lake and
Palmer) is 66.
Thought for Today: "Let the world
know you as you are, not as you think
you should be, because sooner or
later, if you are posing, you will forget
the pose, and then where are you?" -
Fanny Brice, American actress and
singer (1891-1951).



LEGAL NOTICES





us Name Notices.............D8


g Notices............................D8


laneous Notices................ D8


C I T R U S C O0 UI N T Y



CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Who's in charge:
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Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
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Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
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Report a news tip:
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To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
r Phone 352-563-6363
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FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 61
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 56%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, composites, chenopods
Today's count: 4.5/12
Monday's count: 4.7
Tuesday's count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wildlife park to honor veterans


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
While Veterans Day is special at
all Florida State Parks, veterans will
be especially honored at Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park.
According to park volunteer Jo
"Mama Jo" LeCount, two area veter-
ans are being recognized for their
service.
"We want people to come by and
say thank you," said LeCount. "It is
the least we can do to recognize our
veterans and their service."
Trevor Joyce, 25, served in the
U.S. Army He is now disabled from
a non-service-related injury He
uses a wheelchair and nonverbal
communication.
The park is also recognizing his
nurse, Air Force veteran Matt Wal-
ters, 23.


ARTIFACTS
Continued from PageAl

period, between the Paleo-
Indian and Woodland peri-
ods, also was recovered.
0


We're both
very excited about
meeting a lot of
people.
Matt Walters
Air Force veteran.

Both live in northern Hernando
County and were visiting the park
when they met LeCount, who asked
if they were veterans and gave them
a special tour
They are now regular park
visitors.
"We like to go there once or twice
a month," said Walters, noting the
park is completely wheelchair ac-
cessible. He added that Joyce, who
lives and works a small farm, gets


Pieces of a Spanish ma-
jolica plate from the 17th
century were found, as
well.
Carbon dating has yet to
be done on another one of
the big finds a pair of
wooden paddles, found


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around very well.
"We're both very excited about
meeting a lot of people," he said.
The two will be at the park to greet
visitors from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission to the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park and all state
parks will be free Monday in honor
of Veterans Day
LeCount said the park is also or-
ganizing a special community serv-
ice project for soldiers in
Afghanistan.
Items are being collected for gift
boxes to be sent to the soldiers in
time for Christmas.
Items such as dry packaged food,
individually wrapped hard candies,
drink mixes to add to water and
baby wipes can dropped off at the
park office.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


well preserved under or- such as Sun Crest, which
ganic matter was introduced in 1938.
The team also found sev- Every item of impor-
eral vintage bottles of soda, tance found was trans-


Special to the Chronicle
U.S. Air Force veteran Matt Walters, left, and U.S. Army
veteran Trevor Joyce will be recognized for their service
Monday at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park.

ported to Tallahassee to be people, they are often
catalogued. Since archae- brought back to where
logical finds are consid- they were removed for dis-
ered the property of the play and/or storage.


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A6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013





Clinton
Beard, 90
BEVERLY HILLS
A Celebration of Life for
Mr Clinton Lamont Beard,
age 90, of Beverly Hills,
Florida, will be held
2:00 PM,
Sunday,
November
17, 2013 at
the Seven
Rivers
Presbyte-
r iana
Church,
Lecanto, Clinton
FL. Inurn- Beard
ment will
take place at 2:00 PM,
Monday, November 18,
2013 at Florida National
Cemetery with Full Mili-
tary Honors. Online con-
dolences may be sent to
the family at www.Hooper-
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Beard was born
June 11, 1923 in Antigo,
WI, son of Ralph and
Mable (Gage) Beard. He
died November 5, 2013 in
Beverly Hills, FL. Mr
Beard was an Army vet-
eran serving with the 8th
Air Force in the WWII Eu-
ropean Theater and flew
on 33 missions as a B17
Ball Turret Gunner He re-
tired from I.TT, where he
worked as a Ceramic Engi-
neer He moved to Beverly
Hills, Florida from Planta-
tion in 1995. He was an
avid sports fan and en-
joyed watching the Pack-
ers and the Dolphins. He
loved spending time with
his family, traveling and
boating. Mr Beard was a
member of the Pine Ridge







l ~ I I It
Crmaio

Cente


Civic Association, Mason
and Eastern Star, Wiscon-
sin, Life Group and a life
member of the 8th Air
Force Historical Society
He was Presbyterian by
faith; a member of the
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church and Bible Study
Group.
Mr Beard was preceded
in death by his parents, his
first wife, Myrtha M. Tal-
bert Beard (1979), son,
Keven L. Beard (2006), step
daughter, Cynthia S. Cobb
and brother and sister-in-
law, L.C. and Marquette
Vaughan. Survivors in-
clude his wife of 34 years,
Nancy Beard of Beverly
Hills, FL, 2 daughters, Cal-
lie M. (Rev Dana) Fields
and Lisa (Kenneth) Kiker,
2 sons, Brian W (Laura)
Thomas and William H.
Thomas III, daughter-in-
law, Richelle Thomas, 17
grandchildren, Jacob (Jen-
nifer) Fields, Daemon
(Heather) Fields, Curtis
(Karolyn) Fields, Jonathan
Fields, Daniel Fields,
Brian Thomas II, Morgan
Thomas, Cassidy Thomas,
Caitlin Thomas, Courtney
Thomas, Christopher
Thomas, Caleb Thomas,
William Thomas, IV,
Phillip Thomas, Matthew
Thomas, Larissa Cobb and
Michael Cobb and 11 great
grandchildren, Austin,
Cody, Kaylie, Jaeden,
Colin, Travis, Sebastian,
Lauren, John, Stephanie
and Noah.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior
564-2931


Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory




William
Bronne, 90
HOMOSASSA
William A. Bronne, age
90, Homosassa, died
Oct. 14,2013. A celebration
of life memorial service
will be at 1 p.m. Friday,
Nov 15, 2013, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory followed by
military honors at Florida
National Cemetery

Kathleen
Colin, 67
OCALA
Kathleen Colin, age 67,
of Ocala, Fla., died Thurs-
day, Nov 7, 2013. Private
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.


Your life. Your legacy.
Join us for a i
FREE seminar
on planning
your funeral
and cemetery
arrangements
in advance.
* Creative cremation and traditional burial iii. Ir,;,-
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* Learn about Transportation and Relocation
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Veteran's Benefits Learn the 10 Important Facts
that every Veteran needs to know.
Learn the .1 ir ,. of prearranging

Tues., Nov. 12, 2013 11 am
(Seating is limited)
The Boathouse Restaurant
1935 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River
CALL NOW -.. ,,Q
eon sponsored V
to reserve your space. \'0 ~, ^
352.746.4646 (,Digni,)y


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ernest
James, 81
INVERNESS
Ernest Edward James,
age 81, Inverness, died
Nov. 7,
under the
loving care
of his fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County
Ernest Ernest
was born James
March 29,
1932, in Bath, Maine, to the
late Ernest C. and Melva
(Bixby) James. He served
our country in the U.S.
Army during the Korean
conflict. Ernest was an
iron worker for Iron Work-
ers Local No. 292 in Michi-
gan for more than 35 years.
He was a member of the
Masonic Lodge and a


Obituaries


Shriner A devoted family
man, he also enjoyed
woodworking and stained
glass art.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 58 years,
Rose Marie James; sons
Michael (Denise) James,
Inverness, and Robert
(Carey) James, New Buf-
falo, Mich.; his daughter
Terri Lee (Pat) Logan, In-
verness; his siblings Kevin
James, Bill James and Va-
lerie Hincley, all of Wis-
casset, Maine; Frances
Cray, Richmond, Maine,
and Mamie Chapman,
Dresden, Maine; six
grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren. He
was preceded in death by
brothers Frank and
George; and a sister, lona.
A graveside memorial
service with military hon-
ors will be at 2:30 p.m.







1 il


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Meeting Your Needs!

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i t oer yhrs e wis hen mst e xeinqprenis he enjoys iime with his


Monday, Nov 18, 2013, at
the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Friends are invited to join
the procession to the
cemetery at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home at
1:15 p.m. Memorial dona-
tions in Ernest's memory
are suggested to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Oren Davis, 74
INVERNESS
Oren S. Davis, age 74, of
Inverness, Fla., died Fri-
day, Nov 8, 2013. Private
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
See Page A7

C&i.E.
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation .rl
V lN M i u l Cari '

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from PageA6

August
Johnson, 96
LECANTO
August Raoul Johnson,
age 96, of Lecanto, Fla.,
passed away Nov. 6, 2013,
at his home. Born Nov 27,
1916, in Georgetown,
Conn., to August Astrid
and Olga (Sjorgren) John-
son, Raoul was a retired
maintenance supervisor
for the Board of Education
in Wilton, Conn. He moved
to Citrus County in 1980
from Georgetown, Conn.
Raoul was a past Cubmas-
ter in Georgetown and
member of the Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church in
Hernando, Fla.
He is survived by his
wife, Virginia P Johnson of
Lecanto, Fla.; three chil-
dren, Alan Raul Johnson
of Brookfield, Conn., Ivan
James Johnson of South-
bury, Conn., and Elin Vir-
ginia Perate of
Gilbertsville, Pa.; one sis-
ter, Hermina Mayer of
Ridgefield, Conn.; three
brothers, Lawrence John-
son of Ridgefield, Conn.,
Sam Johnson of Wilton,
Conn., and Ray Johnson of
Georgetown, Conn.; four
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
Family will receive
friends from noon until
service time at2 p.m. Mon-
day, Nov 11, 2013, at the
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando, Fla.
Private cremation will fol-
low under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, me-
morial donations can be
made to the charity of your
choice.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.


Chad
Johnson, 74
Chad Johnson passed
away at the age of 74 on
Nov. 3, 2013. He was the
first in his family to earn a
high
h i g h
school
diploma
and later
earned his
college de-
gree. He
had a pas- --
sion for
learning C
which he Chad
Johnson
passed on
to his chil-
dren and grandchildren.
He loved music, sports,
and traveling. His hobbies
included: gardening, pho-
tography and amateur
radio, (W4CJ). As a lifelong
ham operator, he received
the DXCC Honor Roll
Award for working 350-
plus different countries.
He proudly served his
country in the U.S. Navy
for 20 years and continued
his service to the country
as a civilian working for
Naval Intelligence for 12
years. He was a member of
the NCVA. Throughout his
life, Chad forged many
close friendships which
continue from high school
to the present.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 53 years, Judith
Johnson; his children,
Stephen Johnson (Karen),
Jennifer Banta (Jeff), and
Timothy Johnson (Cassy);
grandchildren, Chris,
Katie, Erich and Craig;
brother, Mack Johnson;
and man's best friend and
love, Tessa; and nieces;
nephews; and extended
family members.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to
American Cancer Society
or the National
Alzheimer's Association.
Click Funeral Home and
Cremations, 9020 Middle-
brook Pike, Knoxville, TN
37923 is serving the John-
son family
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.


Andrew
Karaffa Jr., 82
LECANTO
Andrew E. Karaffa Jr,
82, of Lecanto, Fla., died
Wednes-




Wd n e t s aaf r
day, Nov. 6,
2013, at his
residence.
A funeral
Mass for
M r .. c
Karaffa
will be at
St. Bene- Andrew
d i c t 'Is KaraffaiJr.
Catholic
Church, Crystal River,
10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15,
2013.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell.
Arrangements by Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronieleonline. com.

Marion
Maher, 90
SPRING HILL
Marion Maher, age 90, of
Spring Hill, Fla., died
Thursday Nov. 7,2013. Pri-
vate arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Services and burial will be
in Massachusetts.

Helen
Young, 86
LECANTO
Helen T Young, 86, of
Lecanto, Fla., died Mon-
day, Oct. 7, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Crystal River, Fla.
A memorial service will
take place at 11 a.m. Tues-
day, Nov. 12, 2013, at Good
Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando. In-
terment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Fla. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, Fla.

OBITUARY
DEADLINES
0 Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Ashley
Russ Jr., 84
INGLIS
Ashley R. Russ Jr, 84, of
Inglis, Fla., passed away
Tuesday, Nov 5,2013, at his
residence. The memorial
service will be 2 p.m.
Thursday, Nov 14, 2013, at
First Baptist Church of In-
glis with Rev. Bobby
Thompson officiating. The
family will receive friends
immediately following the
memorial service.
Mr. Russ was born


Oct. 15,
1929, in St.
Peters-
burg. He
was the
son ofAsh-
ley R. Russ ,
Sr and
B e s s i e Ashley
Mae Hill Russ Jr.
R u s s .
After serv-
ing in the United States
Navy, Mr Russ worked as a
linesman for GTE locally
and in Canada. He enjoyed
fishing, bird watching, and
spending time with friends
and family
Survivors include his
daughter and son-in-law,
Kathryn and Jeff Hurley of


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 A7

Bainbridge, Ga.; his grand-
daughter, Kayla Hurley;
good friend, Sylvia
Onofrio; and many nieces
and nephews. He was pre-
ceded in death by both of
his parents, three siblings
and wife, Lavina Bejcek
Russ of Inglis.
Expressions of Sympa-
thy can be made online at
robertsofdunnellon.com.

See Page AO10


SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


CITRUS MEMORIAL


PRESENTS

Perspectives

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AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013

CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety, toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, cinnamon
pancakes, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: MVP breakfast,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal
variety, toast, grits, juice and
milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Macaroni and
cheese, Goldie's Grab 'n Go
(PBJ), turkey super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, chicken nuggets
with ripstick, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, flavored
Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
oven-baked breaded chicken,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Blueberry pan-
cakes, MVP breakfast, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-


mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, cinnamon pan-
cakes, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken with rice, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick,
turkey super salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, fresh garden
salad, baby carrots, steamed
green beans, flavored Crai-
sins, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Stuffed-crust,
cheese pizza, Goldie's Grab
'n Go (turkey), PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken nuggets with ripstick,
Italian super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hamburger,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,
sweet corn, chilled pineapple,
fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco, blueberry pan-
cakes, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and


COMMUNITY


toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cinnamon pancakes,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Veterans Day
holiday.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds
with Spanish rice, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, Mexicali corn,
baby carrots, sweet potato
crosstrax, chilled diced
peaches juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, baked beans,
chilled baked beans, sea-
soned potato wedges, fla-
vored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, potato roasters,
fresh apple, juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, pizza, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian
super salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, cucumber coins, sweet
peas, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled peach cup,
juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Veterans Day


TheFctryIsOus






DAPERY SHDS .UIR


Nov. 12 to 15 MENUS


holiday. All sites closed.
Tuesday: Frankfurter and
bun with mustard, baked
beans with tomato, peas,
coleslaw, graham crackers,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad,


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lettuce and tomato salad,
marinated broccoli salad,
whole-wheat bread with mar-
garine, orange, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
whole-wheat bread, birthday
cake, low-fat milk.
Friday: Apple juice, veg-


Lisa Esteves, CFP
Financial Advisor
lisa.esteves@investfinancial.com
352.341.7263


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

etable soup, meatloaf sand-
wich on whole-grain bun with
ketchup, raisins, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For more informa-
tion, call Support Services at
352-527-5975.


Facing


changes

at work?


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UT Banc Investments

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 A9


x


Thanks to all our sponsors and the people
who attended our event.

A special Thanks to Steve Pritchard, our production manager, and to
all our volunteers: Save Crystal River, Inc. Board Members, King's
Bay Rotary Club, Crystal Employees and the Friends of Save
Crystal River, Inc.
"Our Crazy on Country event would not have been possible
without the dedication of each"
-JUSTIN LAMB AND WES ANTILL


TITLE SPONSOR -
Crystal Automotive Group

PRESENTING SPONSORS -
Yuengling
Biologic Therapies
Sibex

PLATINUM SPONSORS -
D.A.B. Constructors, Inc.
Citrus County Chronicle
Jewel and Steve Lamb

GOLD SPONSORS -
Ferman Motor Car Company
Harley Davidson of New Port Richey
Sheldon Palmes Insurance, Inc./
Lollygaggers
Mike Bays -State Farm Insurance Agent
Crystal Community E.N.T.
Denis and Silvia Grillo
Plantation Inn
Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc.
Ross Hammock Ranch
U.S. Family Foundation, Inc.
Nature Coast Financial

SILVER SPONSORS -
Fat Cat Grill
Goldiggers and Gunslingers
VanNess and VanNess, PA
Nichols Lumber
High Octane Saloon & Grill
Social Media Designs
Suncoast Obstetrics & Gynecology PA
Cody's Roadhouse
Harley Davidson of Crystal River/Ocala
Suncoast Dermatology And
Skin Surgery Center


so


Homosassa Marine
Ajax Construction
Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute
Spires Contracting Corp.
Advanced Urology Specialists
Tolle & Fitzpatrick Families
Bar G Enterprises (BG)
United Devemopment Systems
Gardners Concrete
Bud Sasada Painting
Tidwell Brothers Paving, Inc.
Don Poss Roofing, Inc.

- RESERVED BRONZE SPONSORS -
BB&T Bank
Clark Stillwell, Attorney at Law
Gulf to Lake Sales
Allen Site Development
Ira Fialko, D.O., P.A.
Premier Pharmacy Labs, Inc.
Bo Strickland
Citrus County Sheriff Department
Black Diamond Ranch
Black Diamond Ranch Residents
Bob and Phyllis Mercer
Steve and Julie Pritchard
Eddie and Joan Gerritts
Citrus Sports & Apparel

CONTRIBUTIONS -
Rock Crusher Canyon LLC
Flatwoods Forest Products, inc.
Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC
CAR Financial Services
Ted Williams Museum
Candy and Frank Fusick
Dixie M. Hollins
Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow and Cash, PA


Received

$98,000 from

the proceeds

of this event.


AM PvCA


-' : Jl




AIO SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


FIRE
Continued from Page Al

changes were observed
over night," Danenhower
said. Due to early dark-
ness, efforts to assess the
damage were started Sat-
urday morning.
Danenhower said the
fossil leadership team
and site personnel will
conduct a full assessment
to determine the extent of
the damage. About a half-
dozen people are on the
assessment team. Once
the assessment is com-
plete, which may take sev-
eral days, they will
develop a schedule for the
repair plan. The timeline
for the repair and deter-
mining the cost of the
damage is not yet known.
She confirmed CR1 is
shut down; units 2,4 and 5
remain operational and
CR3, the nuclear plant
was not involved.
"We do anticipate any
impact to customer's elec-
tric service," she said.
A transformer fire at
the energy complex on
Jan. 16, 2011, caused ex-
tensive damage to Crystal
River Units 1 and 2. There


were no injuries. The in-
cident was investigated
and the damage repaired.
Danenhower said there
is no connection between
that fire and this one.
There was another fire
at the coal plant side of
the energy complex on
April 3, 2011. Oil soaked
insulation was blamed.
There were no injuries
and the age of the plants
was not considered an
issue. Unit 1 was built in
1966 and Unit 2 in 1969.
In recent years, envi-
ronmental groups have
targeted the two plants for
emissions and in 2004 the
Department of Environ-
mental Protection de-
clared them a major
source of hazardous air
pollutants. Their retire-
ment is scheduled for late
this decade as part of


Duke Energy's recent set-
tlement agreement.
Floral City fire
County firefighters did
not have to return to the
energy complex Saturday
but they were out early at
a structure fire in Floral
City Units from Floral
City, Inverness, Kensing-
ton, Beverly Hills, Pine
Ridge and Connell
Heights responded to a
fire at a two-story home.
Due to a lack of hy-
drants water was sup-
plied by tanker No one
was injured, but house
and contents at 10747 E.
Flounder Drive were a
total loss. Damage is esti-
mated at $130,000.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.


Obituaries


DEATHS
Continued from PageA7

Jimmie
Knight, 95
FORT MYERS
Jimmie A. Knight, 95, of
Fort Myers, Fla., passed
away Nov 8,2013. She was
born Feb. 22,1918, in Web-
ster County, Miss. She was
one of 11 children born to
G.W and Lula B. Shaffer
In 1947, Jimmie and
family moved to Floral
City, Fla., where she lived
in the Knight family home.
She was an active member
of the Floral City Baptist
Church, teaching Sunday
school and working in the


nursery.
After 20
years, she
retired
from the
Citrus
County
School sys-
tem as
cafeteria
manager
at Floral


k "
1 :**

Jimmie
Knight


City School. In 1986, she
moved to Fort Myers, Fla.
While living there, she
faithfully supported the
Buckingham Presbyterian
Church. Jimmie loved to
"work in the yard" and her
azaleas and poinsettias
were admired by many
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Jont
A. Knight Jr; infant daugh-


ter, Doris Reid; grandson,
Greg Schol; and seven of
her siblings. She is sur-
vived by two daughters:
Hattie Lou Smith (Sam),
Fort Myers, Fla., and Janet
K. Schol (Ron),
Gainesville, Fla.; two sis-
ters: Eva Peshek and Bob-
bie Shaffer; one brother,
James Shaffer; four grand-
sons: Sam W Smith Jr,
Mark Smith, Victor Smith
and Dean Schol; and eight
great-grandchildren.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Bucking-
ham Presbyterian Church,
or Hope Hospice Lehigh.
Arrangements in care of
Anderson Patterson Fu-
neral Services, Lehigh
Acres, Fla. www.anderson
patterson.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CCHB
Continued from Page Al
the bedside machines that
keep track of a patient's
heart rate, pulse and other
vital signs.
Citrus Memorial
planned to replace 40 aged
telemetry monitors and
buy 16 new ones. The pur-
chase, however, is on per-
manent hold because the
Citrus County Hospital
Board refused to pre-
approve any new capital
purchases at the hospital.
CCHB trustees said they
saw no reason to buy new
equipment costing tens of
thousands of dollars when
they are close to signing a
letter of intent on a 50-year
lease with Hospital Corpo-
ration of America. A final
contract could be in place
by summer 2014, they said.
Signatures on the letter
of intent are expected by
mid-December Once that
happens, the CCHB says it
will immediately release
$2 million to the hospital
for operational needs.


CCHB trustee Krista
Joseph said unless the
equipment requests are
necessary to save lives, the
hospital should wait for
HCA to take control.
"We don't want to waste
the taxpayers' money on
buying something when
some other company is
going to come in," she said.
Beaty said the flaw with
that reasoning is HCA will
expect Citrus Memorial to
continue operating as
normal.
Plus, he said, nothing
with HCA is yet in writing.
"We just can't live on
promises and sit here
doing nothing," Beaty said.
Beaty said the hospital
cannot afford to buy new
equipment without the
CCHB paying for it. The
CCHB budgets $1 million
annually to the hospital for
capital purchases.
In a process set up two
years ago, a committee of
McCarthy, CCHB chair-
woman Debbie Ressler
and Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation board
chairwoman Sandy Chad-
wick meet to agree before-


* WHAT: Joint meeting of the Citrus County Hospital
Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation.
* WHEN: 5 p.m. Monday.
* WHERE: Hospital administrative building, in
historic school house next to Citrus Memorial,
Inverness.


hand on the hospital's an-
nual capital project list.
The hospital then buys
the equipment and is re-
imbursed by the CCHB
after providing receipts of
purchases, Beaty said.
That worked well in
2012. In 2013, McCarthy
said she tried to set up by
email several meetings
with Ressler to discuss
proposed projects, includ-
ing the telemetry units, but
Ressler was unresponsive.
Ressler, who did not re-
turn phone calls seeking
comment for this story,
told a reporter a few
weeks ago that she was
waiting for McCarthy to
call her to schedule a
meeting.
In September, at the
close of the 2012-13 fiscal
year, the hospital pre-
sented Ressler with a list
of nearly $900,000 in pro-


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posed capital items, in-
cluding the telemetry
beds. The letter sought
only support, not funding.
Ressler told foundation
members last month that
she took the list to the hos-
pital board, which de-
clined to back the projects.
Beaty and McCarthy
said the items involve
areas directly related to
patient care, including:
Retinal surgery equip-
ment, $278,655. McCarthy
said an eye surgeon is
planning to see patients at
Citrus Memorial every Fri-
day He now performs reti-
nal surgery in Gainesville
and The Villages and his
patients include Citrus


residents. McCarthy said
the equipment would
allow Citrus County pa-
tients to receive retinal
surgical care in the county
Intravenous pumps,
$119,564. McCarthy said
the 272 pumps were pur-
chased in 2007 for $1.2 mil-
lion. The manufacturer is
recalling the pumps and
offering newer pumps at a
discounted rate.
Obstetric labor and
delivery beds, two for
$27,014. McCarthy said the
beds are worn and need
replacement.
McCarthy said the hospi-
tal wouldn't be asking for
these items if it didn't need
them for patient care.
"It's not like we're going
out and buying desks," she
said. "We can't just let the
place fall apart."
CCHB trustee Bob
Priselac said he plans to
recommend that HCA pur-
chase critical capital


equipment at the signing
of the letter of intent and
simply subtract that
amount from the purchase
price. If for some reason
the lease falls through, the
hospital would repay HCA.
Priselac said he hopes
the issue comes up during
a special joint meeting of
the two boards at 5 p.m.
Monday in the Citrus Me-
morial administrative
building next to the
hospital.
From a business stand-
point, Priselac said it
makes little sense to invest
in capital equipment just
prior to a transaction. He
also said, however, that ur-
gent needs shouldn't wait.
"In general, capital, I'm
resistant," he said. "If
there's a critical need, we
need to at least take a look
at it"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
@chronicleonline. corn.


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Talks over Iran's disputed nuke program hit a snag


Associated Press
GENEVA Talks on a
deal to temporarily curb
Iran's nuclear program
ran into trouble Saturday
when France questioned
whether the proposal went
far enough, casting doubt
an agreement could be
reached during the cur-
rent round of negotiations.
Chances of bridging all
differences diminished as
the day went on.
A Western diplomat in
Geneva for the talks told
The Associated Press it
appeared that a new
round of negotiations
would be needed to agree
on all points of a startup
deal meant to lead to a
comprehensive agreement
ensuring that Tehran's nu-
clear work remains
peaceful.
He said preparations
were being made by both
sides for an announce-
ment later in the day of a
new meeting within a few
weeks. He said earlier that
the French were holding
out for conditions on the
Iranians tougher than
those agreed to by the U.S.
and France's other negoti-
ating partners, diminish-
ing hopes of a done deal
Saturday
Comments by Iranian
Foreign Minister Moham-
mad Javad Zarif increased
skepticism that the two
sides would agree on the
full contours of a first-step
deal at the current negoti-
ating round.
"There are differences,"
Zarif told Iranian state TV,
adding that if open ques-
tions remained after Sat-
urday, the talks would
reconvene within a week
to 10 days.
But the current talks in
Geneva were still under-
way late Saturday, with
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry, EU foreign
policy chief Catherine
Ashton, and foreign minis-
ters from Britain, France,
Germany and Russia
meeting with one another,
and some with Zarif. Chi-
nese Deputy Foreign Min-
ister Baodong Li also


arrived Friday evening.
The foreign ministers of
the seven delegations dis-
cussing Iran convened a
meeting late Saturday
night, and the Iranian offi-
cials were not included.
French Foreign Minister
Laurent Fabius spoke of
"several points that ...
we're not satisfied with
compared to the initial
text," telling France-Inter
Radio his nation does not
want to be part of a "con
game."
He did not specify, but
his comments suggested
France thought a final
draft of any first-step deal
was too favorable to Iran,
echoing concerns raised
by Israel and several
prominent U.S. legislators.
The French position was
confirmed by another
Western diplomat
Both gave no specifics
and demanded anonymity
because they were not
authorized to comment
about the diplomatic
maneuvering.


Iranian state TV strongly
criticized the French posi-
tion, calling France "Is-
rael's representatives at
the talks.
Iran's IRNA news
agency cited Iranian Pres-
ident Hassan Rouhani as
urging world powers to
reach a deal.
"I hope the parties nego-
tiating with Iran in the 5+1
group use the exceptional
opportunity that the Iran-
ian nation has provided to
the West and the interna-
tional community so that
we achieve a positive re-
sult in a reasonable time,"
IRNA quoted Rouhani as
telling a Japanese foreign
minister visiting Tehran
Saturday evening.
Rouhani said sanctions
and threats don't benefit
anyone.
Iran "has insisted that
threats and sanctions have
not resolved any problem
and further complicate the
path forward, and believes
that the only solution is
talks on the basis of re-


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dence," IRNA quoted him
as saying.
Optimism about an in-
terim agreement had been
high when the talks were
extended for a third day
on Saturday and raised to
a ministerial level.
Fabius cited differences
over Iran's Arak reactor
southeast of Tehran, which
could produce enough plu-
tonium for several nuclear
weapons a year once it
goes online.
He also said there was
disagreement over efforts
to limit Iran's uranium en-
richment to levels that
would require substantial
further enriching before
they could be used as the
fissile core of a nuclear
weapon.
French Foreign Ministry
spokesman Romain Nadal
pointed to "rather large
cohesion" among the nego-
tiators and said France
wanted "the international
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"There have been years
of talks that have led to
nothing," Nadal said, al-
luding to the need for
tough terms on Iran.
Iran, which denies any
interest in nuclear
weapons, currently runs
more than 10,000 cen-
trifuges that have created
tons of fuel-grade material
that can be further en-
riched to arm nuclear war-
heads.
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pounds of higher-enriched
uranium in a form that can
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Experts say 550 pounds
of that 20 percent-
enriched uranium are
needed to produce a single
warhead.
Iran said it expects
Arak, the plutonium pro-
ducing reactor, to be com-
pleted and go online
sometime next year
It would need additional
facilities to reprocess the
plutonium into weapons-
grade material, and the
U.N's nuclear agency mon-
itoring Iran's atomic activ-
ities says it has seen no
evidence of such a project.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FESTIVAL
Continued from Page Al

food vendors, the annual
festival was expected to at-
tract approximately 30,000
visitors to the little fishing
town under the big oak
trees.
"The hometown atmos-
phere and the fact it is a
family-friendly environ-
ment attracts people every
year to the seafood festi-
val," Dan Macias said.
"Families can take their
time enjoying their day
and then kick back and
have a delicious dinner
when it is over."
George Pringle, from
Ontario, Canada, said he
plans a trip every year
during the Homosassa
Seafood Festival to visit
his friend John Riedel
from Homosassa.
"We enjoy the food, and
the wives like the shop-
ping," he said.
Hosted by the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club,
crafters and artists with
original works and hand-
crafted items lured the
wondering eyes into their
booths before shoppers
fell victims to the aromas
filling the air
Nonetheless, customers
in the food court looked
like children in an amuse-
ment park with all of the
diverse food varieties -
shrimp skewers, clam
chowder, fried green toma-
toes, funnel cakes, barbe-
cue sandwiches and more.
"We even have gluten-
free offerings," said club
president Eleanor Math-
ias. "Even though it was
chilly this morning, we
also have our CREST (Cit-
rus Resource for Excep-
tional Student Transition)
coffee and doughnuts for
early risers."
Many vendors were anx-
ious for customers as well
as the juried art show and
craft exhibition, held in
conjunction with the
seafood festival.
Eighty artists from
around the country are
vying for the "best in
show" title and $1,200
prize.


The non-judged section
will include goods such as
folk art, beadwork, soaps,
candles, shell crafts, drift-
wood, crocheted items and
pine baskets.
Some of the vendors
came from far away First-
time vendor Sheron Davis
traveled from Decatur, Ga.,
to bring her Earth Spirit
Art and Glass to the
festival.
"I enjoy doing the festi-
vals; however, I had heard
how nice the Homosassa
Seafood Festival was and
thought I would try it this
year," she said.
The festival continues
today from 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.


"On Saturdays, people
are like 'oh my' with the
parking, but Sunday is like
a leisurely day," Eleanor
Mathias said. "In fact, last
year on Sunday was the
best Sunday we have ever
had. Hopefully, this year
will even better than that."
Guests are asked to
make a $2 donation, which
benefits local groups such
as Homosassa Elementary
School, the Boy Scouts,
Nature Coast Young
Marines, Homosassa River
Alliance, CREST School,
Children's Christmas Out-
reach, Civil Air Patrol, the
Environmental Science
Academy and the Marine
Science Station. It's a


* WHAT: Homosassa
Arts, Crafts & Seafood
Festival.
WHERE:
Homosassa Civic
Club, 5530 S. Mason
Creek Road,
Homosassa.
WHEN: 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. today.
COST: $2 donation,
children are free. No
dogs allowed.

family-friendly festival,
but four-legged relatives
have to stay home.
For more information,
visit homosassaseafood-
festival.org.


MAITHEW BECK/Chronicle
Seafood isn't the only attraction at the 39th annual
Homosassa Seafood Festival. Ninety artists and 100
crafters have their wares on display, like this blown-glass
artwork by Rich Fizer Glass, viewed by Julie Ledbetter and
her son Gabriel, 6 months, from Wesley Chapel.


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Christened


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World War II Doolittle


'* Raiders make final toast


Associated Press
Susan Ford Bales,
daughter of former
President Gerald R. Ford,
right, and president of
Newport News Shipbuild-
ing, Matt Mulherin, cheer
Saturday after Bales
christened the Navy's
newest nuclear powered
aircraft carrier USS Ger-
ald R. Ford at Newport
News Shipbuilding in
Newport News, Va. The
Ford class represents the
first new aircraft carrier
design in more than 40
years.


Man causes panic
with loaded gun
at airport
LOS ANGELES -An ar-
riving passenger has been
arrested on suspicion of
brandishing a weapon in
the baggage claim area of
Los Angeles International
Airport's Terminal 3, caus-
ing momentary panic before
authorities determined his
handgun was unloaded.
Terminal 3 was the site of
a deadly gun attack last
week that left a Transporta-
tion Security Administration
officer dead and three oth-
ers wounded.
Airport police Sgt. Karla
Ortiz said the man either
took out the gun or a gun
carrying case around 9 p.m.
Friday. At least one witness
who saw the act notified au-
thorities and the bomb
squad was called in to
search his bag.
The man had declared
his weapon and cleared se-
curity before getting on his
flight to LAX. Ortiz said his
offense was showing off a
weapon in a public area.
Jury finds Utah
doctor guilty in
wife's death
PROVO, Utah--Ajury
has found a Utah doctor
guilty of murder in the death
of his heavily drugged wife
in a bathtub.
Prosecutors argued Mar-
tin MacNeill knocked out
Michele MacNeill with drugs
after cosmetic surgery, then
helped her into the tub and
held her head underwater.
One man who served time
with the doctor said MacNeill
acknowledged doing that in
2007. The three-week trial
featured a mistress whom
prosecutors argued was
MacNeill's motive for getting
rid of his wife.
Gypsy Willis has testified
that she had a 15-month af-
fair with the doctor at the
time of Michele MacNeill's
death and that she was
hired as a nanny and given
a marriage proposal shortly
afterward. But Willis said
she ended the affair years
ago, and she doesn't know
anything about the death.
Hawaii senator:
Gay marriage will
easily pass
HONOLULU -The
head of Hawaii's Senate ju-
diciary committee said he
expects an amended bill le-
galizing gay marriage to
pass easily in the Senate,
with no changes to the
measure passed by the
House after two grueling
floor sessions and a lengthy
public hearing.
Hawaii state Sen. Clay-
ton Hee told reporters on
Saturday that after confer-
ring with the Senate's presi-
dent and majority leader as
well as a staff attorney, he
will recommend to Senate
Democrats that they pass
the bill during their Tuesday
floor session.
-From wire reports


Associated Press

DAYTON, Ohio The
last of the Doolittle
Raiders, all in their 90's,
offered a final toast Satur-
day to their fallen com-
rades, as they pondered
their place in history after
a day of fanfare about their
1942 attack on Japan.
"May they rest in
peace," Lt. Col. Richard
Cole, 98, said before the
three Raiders present
sipped an 1896 cognac
from specially engraved
silver goblets. The cognac
was saved for the occasion
after being passed down
from their late com-
mander, Lt. Gen. James
"Jimmy" Dolittle, who was
born in 1896.
In a ceremony Saturday


evening at the National
Museum of the U.S. Air
Force near Dayton, Ohio,
hundreds of people in-
cluding family members
of deceased Raiders
watched as the three
Raiders each called out
"here" as a historian read
the names of all 80 of the
original airmen.
A B-25 bomber flyover
helped cap an afternoon
memorial tribute in which
a wreath was placed at the
Doolittle Raider monu-
ment outside the National
Museum of the U.S. Air
Force near Dayton. Mu-
seum officials estimated
some 10,000 people turned
out for Veterans Day week-
end events honoring the
1942 mission credited with
rallying American morale


and throwing the Japanese
off balance.
Acting Air Force Secre-
tary Eric Fanning said
America was at a low point
after the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor and other
Axis successes, before
"these 80 men who showed
the nation that we were
nowhere near defeat" He
noted that all volunteered
for a mission with high risks
throughout, from the
launch of B-25 bombers
from a carrier at sea, the at-
tack on Tokyo, and lack of
fuel to reach safe bases.
Only four of the 80 are
still alive. The Raiders
said, at the time, they
didn't realize their mission
would be considered an
important event in turning
the war's tide.


Associated Press
Three of the four surviving members of the 1942 Tokyo
raid led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, left to right, David
Thatcher, Edward Saylor and Richard Cole, pose next to
a monument marking the raid Saturday outside the
National Museum for the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.
The fourth surviving member, Robert Hite, was
unable to travel to the ceremonies.


Typhoon slams Philippines


Associated Press
Tacloban city, in the Leyte province, central Philippines, was devastated by powerful Typhoon Haiyan.


Deaths could reach 10,000


Associated Press

TACLOBAN, Philip-
pines The death toll
from one of the
strongest storms on
record that ravaged the
central Philippine city
of Tacloban could reach
10,000 people, officials
said Sunday after the
extent of massive devas-
tation became apparent
and horrified residents
spoke of storm surges as
high as trees.
Regional police chief
Elmer Soria said he was
briefed by Leyte provin-
cial Gov. Dominic Petilla
late Saturday and told
there were about 10,000
deaths in the province,
mostly by drowning and
from collapsed buildings.
The governor's figure
was based on reports
from village officials in
areas where Typhoon
Haiyan slammed Friday.
Tacloban city admin-
istrator Tecson Lim said
that the death toll in the
city alone "could go up
to 10,000." Tacloban is


the Leyte provincial
capital of 200,000 people
and the biggest city on
Leyte Island.
About 300-400 bodies
have already been re-
covered, Lim said. A
mass burial was
planned Sunday in Palo
town near Tacloban.
The typhoon barreled
through six central
Philippine islands on
Friday, wiping away
buildings and leveling
seaside homes with fe-
rocious winds of 147
miles per hour and gusts
of 170 mph. By those
measurements, Haiyan
would be comparable to
a strong Category 4 hur-
ricane in the U.S., and
nearly in the top cate-
gory, a 5.
It weakened Sunday to
101 mph with stronger
gusts as it approached
central and northern
Vietnam where authori-
ties evacuated more than
500,000 people.
"The rescue opera-
tion is ongoing. We ex-
pect a very high number


Residents seek shelter with their belongings.
Residents seek shelter with their belongings.


of fatalities as well as in-
jured," Interior Secre-
tary Mar Roxas said
after visiting Tacloban
on Saturday 'All sys-
tems, all vestiges of
modern living com-
munications, power,
water all are down.
Media is down, so there
is no way to communi-
cate with the people in a
mass sort of way"
President Benigno
Aquino III said the ca-
sualties "will be sub-
stantially more" than
the official count of 151
- but gave no figure or
estimate. He said the
government's priority
was to restore power
and communications in


isolated areas to allow
for the delivery of relief
and medical assistance
to victims.
The U.S. and other gov-
ernments and agencies
were mounting a major
relief effort "because of
the magnitude of the dis-
aster," said Philippine
Red Cross chairman
Richard Gordon.
Even by the standards
of the Philippines,
which is buffeted by
many natural calamities
- about 20 typhoons a
year, earthquakes and
volcanic eruptions -
the latest disaster
shocked the impover-
ished nation of 96 mil-
lion people.


New trial


sought


for 1944


execution

Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C.-Sup-
porters of a 14-year-old
black boy executed in 1944
for killing two white girls
are asking a South Car-
olina judge to take the
unheard-of move of grant-
ing him a new trial in
hopes he will be cleared of
the charges.
George Stinney was con-
victed on a shaky confes-
sion in a segregated
society that wanted re-
venge for the beating
deaths of two girls, ages 11
and 7, according to the
lawsuit filed last month on
Stinney's behalf in Claren-
don County
The request for a new
trial has an uphill climb.
The judge may refuse to
hear it at all, since the
punishment was already
carried out. Also, South
Carolina has strict rules
for introducing new evi-
dence after a trial is com-
plete, requiring the
information to have been
impossible to discover be-
fore the trial and likely to
change the results, said
Kenneth Gaines, a profes-
sor at the University of
South Carolina's law
school.
"I think it's a longshot, but
I admire the lawyer for try-
ing it," Gaines said, adding
that he's not aware of any
other executed inmates in
the state being granted a
new trial posthumously
The request for a new
trial is largely symbolic,
but Stinney's supporters
say they would prefer ex-
oneration to a pardon.
Stinney's case intersects
some long-running dis-
putes in the American
legal system the death
penalty and race. At 14,
he's the youngest person
executed in the United
States in past 100 years.
He was electrocuted just
84 days after the girls were
killed in March 1944.


World BRIEFS


Olympic torch
begins first-ever
spacewalk
MOSCOW The Sochi
Olympic torch has started its
first spacewalk.
NASA Live TV showed
Russian cosmonauts Oleg
Kotov and Sergei Ryazanskiy
carrying the unlit Olympic
torch, bobbing weightlessly at
the end of a tether in a dark-
ness dotted by stars, outside
the International Space Sta-
tion on Saturday.
The torch was launched


into space from the Russian-
operated Baikonur cosmod-
rome in Kazakhstan on
Thursday morning. It will re-
turn to Earth with a three-man
crew on Monday.
The torch will not burn
aboard the space outpost be-
cause lighting it would con-
sume precious oxygen and
pose a threat to the crew.
The Olympic torch was
taken aboard the U.S. space
shuttle Atlantis in 1996 for the
Atlanta Summer Olympics, but
this is the first it time it has been
taken outside a spacecraft.


Associated Press
Cosmonauts take the Sochi
Olympic torch on a
spacewalk Saturday.


Bombings kill five
around Baghdad
BAGHDAD Officials in
Iraq said a series of attacks
on soldiers and government
employees have killed five
people around the capital,
Baghdad.
Police officials say the
deadliest of Saturday's at-
tacks took place shortly after
sunset when a roadside bomb
struck an army patrol in the
town ofJurfal-Shkakr, killing
three soldiers and wounding
two.


The town, about 30 miles
south of Baghdad, is a former
insurgent stronghold. Attacks
on Iraqi security forces and
nearby Shiite areas have
been launched there in the
past.
In Baghdad, police said two
government employees were
killed in separate attacks by
bombs attached to their cars.
Hospital officials confirmed
the casualty figures. All officials
spoke on condition of
anonymity as they weren't au-
thorized to speak to journalists.
-From wire reports








EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


IAl 3SDA03


Inverness hosts Veterans Day,
11th Hour Memorial Service

The 21st annual Veterans Day Parade and 11th
Hour Memorial Service will be held in the city of
Inverness on Monday, Nov. 11. The grand marshal
for the parade is Afghanistan veteran
Capt. Lesley A. Caron, Commander, 690th
Military Police Company, Florida Army National
Guard, stationed in Crystal River.
Honorary marshals for the parade are Iraq and
Afghanistan veterans and their families.


Veterans Day Parade details:


Lineup, location: Staging for parade partici-
pants will be between 8:30 a.m. and
9:30 a.m. at the Citrus High School parking
lot. Parade participants should enter the
staging area from Highland Boulevard.
Parade marshals will direct parade partici-
pants to their assigned march serial loca-
tion. There is no entry fee. For the safety of
parade spectators and participants, the
throwing of candy or any objects along the
parade route is strictly prohibited.


- Chronicle file photos Time, route: The Veterans Day Parade will


begin at 10 a.m. The parade will proceed
from the Citrus High School parking lot
along West Main Street (State Road 44) to
North Pine Avenue to Courthouse Square,
pass by the reviewing area on the north side
of the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum and
terminate in the county courthouse parking
lot on Martin Luther King Jr Avenue. Fol-
lowing the parade, Citrus County Transit
will provide a shuttle service to transport
participants from the parade's termination
point to the staging area.
See Page A17


BIMF
:!:::.K s F"11 6




A16 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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46 40 46 6 5 Dwayne"The Rock" Johnson. Charlie Maddie Ally'G' Up! 'G' G' Blog G' Charlie Up! 'G' Farm G'
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31 59 31 26 29 R' Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger. R'c man is a supernatural agent of vengeance. 'PG-13 Vegas
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Next move must


be son's decision


D ear Annie: A year
ago, I had an argu-
ment, mostly via
text, with my 37-year-old
son. He was threatening
to leave his bride of two
weeks. I tried to get him
to understand that he
had made a serious com-
mitment and shouldn't
throw it away so easily
Unfortunately, things es-
calated to include more
personal feel-
ings on both
sides.
Despite a
rocky first
year, he re-
cently cele-
brated his
first anniver-
sary How-
ever, since the
disagree-
ment, he has
refused to
speak to me. I ANN
emailed, MAIL
texted and
called, apolo-
gizing and begging him to
talk this out I acknowl-
edged his birthday and
Christmas with gifts, but
received no response. I
then ceased attempts to
contact him for several
months, hoping to give
him some space. Still
nothing.
My daughter-in-law
and I have maintained a
fairly close relationship,
and she frequently en-
courages my son to con-
tact me, as have some of
his friends and even my
ex-husband. It hasn't


II
.1


helped.
My heart is broken,
which he knows. I realize
I hurt him with some of
the things I said, but my
pain is deep, as well. I
am open to whatever he
needs to make this better,
but he will not take even
the smallest step to rec-
oncile. No one under-
stands why he is acting
like this. What else can I
do to fix it? I
miss my son. -
S Shattered Mom
in Michigan
Dear Mom:
Your son's will-
ingness to trash
his marriage
after two weeks
and his inabil-
ity to work
through your
argument indi-
cate that he is
E'S emotionally im-
3BOX mature and
prone to rash
decisions. We
suggest you send a letter
or email simply saying
you are deeply remorse-
ful for the things you said
and for hurting him, and
that your door will al-
ways be open in the hope
that he can someday for-
give you. Don't argue that
he hurt you, too. Don't
claim you spoke in the
heat of the moment
Don't beg to talk to him.
You've done what you
can. The next move is his.
He may come around
when everyone stops
pressuring him.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Bad Grandpa" (R)
12:15 p.m., 5:30 p.m.,
7:55 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:35 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
6:55 p.m.
"The Counselor" (R)
12:50 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:05 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:25 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"Last Vegas" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-
13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m. 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World" (PG-
13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m.,


3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Bad Grandpa" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Ender's Game" (PG-13)
1 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Free Birds" (PG) 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Free Birds" (PG) In 3D.
1:40 p.m. No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 4:15 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Thor: The Dark World"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:45 p.m.,
10p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 salts
6 Titan in Greek myth
11 Deadly
16 Daily routine
21 Jeweled
headband
22 Water slide
23 Hippodrome
24 Roundup
25 Rather heavy
26 Satisfaction
28 Sluggish
29 Broke a fast
30 Town
31 Orchestra's place
32 Toned down
34 Maria
35 DEA officer,
for short
37 Serv. branch
38 Declines
40 Tex- -
41 Directed
42 Edgar-
Burroughs
44 Purplish red
46 Peal
49 Comment
52 Cook in an oven
53 Unmatched
55 Sartor
59 Strike with wonder
60 Hold sway
61 Deter
64 Feel about in
the dark
65 Mention
66 Legal wrong
67 Road marker
68 Mongrel
70 Easy it
71 Manning of
football
72 Dilettantish
73 Earthbound bird
74 Mutineer
76 Lanka
77 Active
79 Dessert option
80 Goatee location
82 Greece's sea
84 Yikes!
85 By and starts
86 Try
87 Secular
88 Biting fly
90 Moonfish
91 Annoy


92 Temporarily lost
95 Pasha
96 Sleeper's sound
98 Prince in opera
100 noire
101 Dir. letters
102 Poles
104 Schoolyard game
105 Drescheror
Lebowitz
106 Gaunt
107 Poker stake
108 Molar
110 Sounded a bell
112 Forest
113 Kind of door or cellar
114 Anger
116 Shoe part
117 Portable shelter
118 Cotton trousers
119 Court order
121 Bet
124 Film spool
125 Bedtime wear,
for short
128 -Vegas
130 Light lunch
131 Guys
132 Relate
136 Ump's cry
137 "Mysterious
Island" author
139 Fish paddle
140 Flagpole
141 Fib
142 Layered rock
144 Fabricate
147 Retinue
149 Wyoming range
150 Come to be
151 Red dye
152 Aquatic mammal
153 Exhausted
154 Shingle material
155 Perspire
156 Like a grogshop

DOWN
1 Hawke or Allen
2 Statue by
Michelangelo
3 More secure
4 Scrap
5 Spring time
6 Charge
7 Plant bristle
8 Body organ
9 ABA member
10 A flowing out


Overfeed
Branch
Abound
Per -
The second of two
Framework
Paul or Perlman
Standard of
perfection
Effrontery
Was too fond
Cloud -
Male deer
Go out
Fad
Stop sleeping
Paving or
stepping
Wrath
Grain for brewing
Append
Pestering one
Bind with a band
Sped
Post or Blunt
Object of devotion (2
wds.)
Inter
Respectable
He's out of control (2
wds.)
Musical drama
Varnish ingredient
Mil. group on
campus
Farm implement
Idleness
Massage
Neptune's spear
- Cat
Fact
Gather
Moreno or
Hayworth
Peril
Rental agreement
Emissary (abbr.)
Water main
Mister, in Munich
Hodges of
baseball
Drew a blank
Bakery items
Sailboat
Repair
Musical section
Judges
Cereal grass
Go aimlessly


Italy's shape
Cook's creation
Insects
He's 007
With lance in hand
That girl
Moo
Unwanted plant
That girl
Long river
Hypnotic states


Penny
Landing surface
Movie-set lighter
Essays of -
Be angry about
Mails
Minty drink
Utter
Trap
Shriver or Sharapova
The cream


Metric measure
Suspicious
Blowhole
Town in
Oklahoma
Erato, e.g.
Quite a lot
"Born in the -
Pull
Weep
Western Indian


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


11-10


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Caron grand marshal of parade


Capt Lesley Caron will serve as grand
marshal for the Veterans Day Parade
and keynote speaker for the llth Hour
Memorial Service following the parade
on Monday in Inverness.
Caron began her military career in
the Florida Army National Guard in
2001 as an enlisted military police sol-
dier She attended basic combat training
at Fort Jackson, S.C., in 2002 and ad-
vanced individual training at Fort
Leonard Wood, Mo., in 2003.
Capt. Caron began her military serv-
ice with the 690th Military Police Com-
pany as an enlisted soldier and
deployed with the 690th Military Police
Company in support of Operation En-
during Freedom from 2004 to 2006.
Shortly after returning from
Afghanistan, she enrolled in the Re-
serve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
in Daytona Beach, Fla., and received
her commission as second lieutenant in
May 2009.
Caron currently serves as command-
ing officer of the 690th Military Police
Company in Crystal River
In civilian life, she is employed with


Lesley
Caron
PARADE
MARSHAL


Target Corporation as
a group leader in Lake
City
Caron holds a bache-
lor's of science in avia-
tion management from
Embry Riddle Aero-
nautical University
Caron's military dec-
orations include the
Joint Meritorious Serv-
ice Medal (with 3
Bronze Oak Leafs),
Army Commendation
Medal (with 2 Bronze


Oak Leafs), Navy Achievement Medal,
The Army Reserve Components
Achievement Medal, Army Good Con-
duct Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak Leafs),
Afghanistan Campaign Medal (w Cam-
paign Stars), Global War on Terrorism
Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal
(with "M" Device), Army Service Medal,
National Service Medal, Army Reserve
Component Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak
Leafs), National Defense Medal, Ger-
man Armed Forces Proficiency Badge,
Meritorious Unit Citation and the Florida
Governor's Meritorious Unit Citation.


Planned events following parade:


llth Hour Memorial Service: An llth
Hour Memorial Service honoring our
nation's veterans who fell in battle and
who have departed the ranks of their
comrades-in-arms will be held at the
north side of the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum following completion of
the parade. Keystone speaker is Veter-
ans Day Parade Grand Marshal Capt.
LesleyA. Caron, Commander, 690th Mil-
itary Police Company, Florida Army Na-
tional Guard. The Lecanto Middle
School band will provide a patriotic
prelude prior to the ceremony The
Crystal River NJROTC Color Guard will
parade the colors and the Crystal River
High School Chorus will sing the na-
tional anthem and a choral salute to vet-


DETAILS
Continued from Page A15
Parade certificates: Cer-
tificates will be awarded
to parade participants in
the following categories:
Best Veterans Service Or-
ganization; Best Veterans
Service Organization
Color Guard; Best Veter-
ans Service Auxiliary;
Best Veterans Service
Auxiliary Color Guard;
Best Junior Military
Group; Best Junior Mili-
tary Color Guard; Best
Community Organization;
Best Theme; Judges
Choice, Most Patriotic
Entry; and Best High
School Band.
Parade parking: Parking
will be reserved in the lot


erans. Fred Daniels, past chairman of
Veterans Appreciation Week, will pres-
ent a POW/MIA "Unseen Guest" tribute.
The Nature Coast Young Marines will
conduct a fallen heroes tribute. The Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars Post 4252 Honor
Guard will conclude the memorial serv-
ice with a rifle salute followed by the
playing of taps.
Luncheon reception:
The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
4337 and its Ladies Auxiliary will host a
luncheon reception immediately follow-
ing the llth Hour Memorial Service for
veteran service organization command-
ers, dignitaries and their guests. Post
4337 is on State Road 44 East, Inverness.


located adjacent to Martin
Luther King Jr Avenue
and Courthouse Square
for vehicles picking up
parade participants at the
end of the parade route
and for memorial-service
participants and guests.
Parade spectators may
view the parade along the
route. Spectator parking
is available at the follow-
ing locations.
Public parking lot,
North Pine Avenue and
Dampier Street.
Public parking lot,
North Pine Avenue and
West Main Street.
Public parking lot,
North Seminole Avenue
and Tompkins Street.
Courthouse Annex
parking lot off North
Apopka Avenue.
County Courthouse
parking lot, as available.


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 A17


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AS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


Citrus County EDC hosts annual barbecue


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SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










YE-TERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* For information
about purchasing
a 2013 Citrus
County Veterans
Appreciation Pin,
see Page A21.


VETERANS NOTES

Lodge to host breakfast
Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando
will host a Veterans Breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. today
Everyone is welcome. Breakfast will in-
clude omelets, pancakes, bacon and eggs.
There will be no charge for veterans, but a
donation from other guests is appreciated.
For more information, call 352-464-2146.

Stage Stand honors for vets
Everyone is welcome join the
Homosassa River Garden Club at 9:30 a.m.
Monday at Stage Stand Cemetery
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189 will con-
duct a ceremony to honor the veterans of
many wars that are buried at Stage Stand
Cemetery
Following the ceremony, flags will be
placed on the veterans' graves.

Post plans vets' celebration
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs invites everyone to a
Veterans Celebration at 11 a.m. Monday at
the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
A picnic will follow at noon.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Eagles to pay tribute to vets
Inverness Eagles 3992 will conduct a
memorial tribute to veterans from 3 to
7 p.m. Monday at the lodge, State Road 44
east in Inverness.

Cooties to take boat trip
The Military Order of the Cootie will
have a bus trip on the Sun Cruz boat out of
New Port Richey Wednesday
Tickets include casino play money, meal
voucher and boarding pass. The bus will
pick up at VFW Post 4864 on Citrus
Springs Boulevard, Leroy Rooks Jr Post
No. 4252 in Her-nando and VFW Post 4337
in Inverness.
For more information, call Betty at 352-
795-4142 or Jennie at 352-489-2955.

Auxiliary to serve chicken
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a fried chicken dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 15, at the Post home,
6585 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
All members and the public are wel-
come. The dinner is a donation of $7.
All profit from the dinner goes to sup-
port the many programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary
For information call Unit President
Barbara Logan at 352-795-4233.

Fish in the fryer for post
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Penno Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites
everyone to a fried fish dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov 15, at the post, 10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For
more information, call 352-465-4864.

Post to have yard sale
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 in Cit-
rus Springs invites everyone to a yard sale
at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the post,
10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Post donation drop-offs begin Tuesday,
Nov 12, in the pavillion.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

New DAV chapter meets
Disabled American Veterans Chapter
No. 158, Crystal River, meets at the Crystal
River Mall. The first official meeting for
the new chapter will be at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 16.
For more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.

Post slates meal, market
American Legion Wall-Rives Post 58 will
have its outdoor flea market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at
the post, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs,
sausages, orange juice and coffee are
served for $5. Everyone is welcome.

Elks Ladies' sale to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will
have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the lodge, 7890 W
Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to participate.
Those with items to sell may call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at
352-382-7614.
Rental spaces are $15 each or two for
$25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov 17.
Food will be available. Proceeds from
the food booth go to help the Elks' veter-
ans committee provide for our veterans in
nursing homes.


top lanes


JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News
U.S. Army veteran Bob Schmidt looks through old photos taken during his 30-year career. Schmidt served in the
Army Air Corps in World War II before entering the Army shortly after the end of the war. His career in the military also
included serving during the Korean and Vietnam wars.


Dunnellon World War II veteran serves 30 years


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News


B


ob Schmidt
was training,
because he
knew the


United States was at war
The then-18-year-old
and recent high school
graduate knew his
number would eventually
be called.
And sure enough, it was, in Decem-
ber 1942, one year after the Japanese
attack on Pearl Harbor By then,
Schmidt was 19, working for Piggly
Wiggly in a suburb just outside of St.
Louis, Mo.
"I remember going to the creamery
to pick up butter," said Schmidt "The
gentleman who ran it he also hap-
pened to be head of the Draft Board,
had asked me if I wanted to come
work for him. I told him I'd like to, but
I better stay where I am at, because
I didn't know when my number
would be called. Three weeks
later, I got my notice I
needed to report for a
physical."
So Schmidt, one of
two World War II vet-
erans selected to
serve as the grand
marshall of the
Dunnellon Christ-
mas Parade on
Dec. 7, began his
30-year career in
the U.S. armed
forces.
Schmidt re-
ported to Scott
Field, Ill., and
trained with many
other men his age.
As time passed, he
watched several men
from his hometown
shipped off to Africa, a
place to which he didn't ex-
actly yearn to be shipped. So,
he volunteered for the Army
Air Corps.
He had become fascinated with avi-
ation as a youth and had aspirations of
becoming a pilot. Shortly after volun-
teering for the Army Air Corps, he was
sent to Wichita Falls, Texas, where he
trained to fly


But his dreams of becoming a pilot
would be short lived, despite making it
toward the end of the training.
Schmidt washed out, but stayed close
to aviation. He requested a transfer
and was sent to Amarillo, Texas,
where he learned the mechanical side
of aircraft and began working on
B-17s.
Schmidt spent the better part of
World War II as instructor, training
those coming into the Army Air Corps
how to correct problems.
"We'd get a new batch of them, get
them trained and ship them out," he
said, noting during his three years in
the Army Air Corps he remained state-
side. "We were all so young 19, 20,
21 we were anxious, anxious to be a
part of it."
Schmidt received his honorable dis-
charge from the Army Air Corps on
Nov 19, 1945, months after both the
Japanese and Germans offered their
conditional surrenders.
Schmidt re-entered the workforce,
taking his old job at Piggly Wiggly
"I didn't like it much," he said of his
old job. "Things had changed so
much."


Special to the Chronicle
Bob Schmidt trained to become a
paratrooper with the 88th Airborne
Infantry Division.


Yearning for the military life, he
again tried to enter the Army Air
Corps in hopes of becoming a pilot,
but he was turned down. So he turned
to the regular Army, where he'd re-
main until 1972, when he retired.
Throughout his career in the Army,
Schmidt said he held several different
positions. He even asked for a transfer
to the airborne infantry, where he
trained as a paratrooper with the 88th
Airborne Division.
Schmidt nearly earned his jump
wings, but washed out prior to the
final jump because of an ankle injury
he sustained on an earlier jump.
"One jump away" he lamented.
"One jump."
Despite being in the service for two
more wars in Korea and Vietnam -
he never served overseas.
"I was blessed, I guess you could say,
not to have been part of that," he said.
Schmidt said he's proud of the
young men and women who are
serving the country, no matter their
branch.
Asked what advice he'd give them or
anyone who was considering entering
the military "I'd shake their hand, tell
them thank you and wish them luck."
If he was still young today as he was
in 1942, he said without a doubt he'd
enlist in the Army all over again.
"Today's soldiers earn what,
$1,500 a month, meals and
free board?" he asked.
"When I was in, we got
paid $21 a month and
part of that money went
home to my wife. I did-
n't smoke or drink and
I didn't play poker
"I don't regret my
service. I have a lot
of fond memories of
time in the Army,
and I saw a lot of the
country"
As part of the
"World's Greatest
Generation," Schmidt
said he and the mil-
lions of other Americans
were simply doing what
their country asked them
to do.
Schmidt is firm in his belief
America would be better off if
every male of age 18 was required
to serve two years in the military
"I think you'd see a lot different
country than what we have today," he
said. "I have to bite my tongue a lot,
but I think it should be a requirement
for the men in our country to serve
their country"


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




A20 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


November time to remember military families


resident Woodrow Wilson first
proclaimed Nov. 11 as Armistice
Day in 1919. Then, Rep. Edward
Rees of Kansas presented Congress
with a bill establishing the holiday and
President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed
the bill into law on May 26,1954.
Congress chose to amend this act just
a few days later, on June 1,1954, replac-
ing "Armistice" with "Veterans" and
now we call the date Veterans Day
The difference: Veterans Day is when
we celebrate the service of all U.S. mili-
tary veterans, while on Memorial Day,
we remember the men and women who
died while serving.
I'd also like to recognize the families
of these service members all year long;
the mothers, fathers, wives, husbands,
significant others, children and more
who also feel the strain of military life
and who, in many cases, find one de-
ployment running directly into the next,
with little or no time in between. A six-
week separation easily becomes a two-
year departure.
It is not a role for the faint of heart
Those who stay behind must be strong
enough to take command of situations,
only to relinquish this role to the
service member upon their return.
Many spouses find themselves diving
into projects around the home. It be-
comes bearable as they make a mess of


JBarbara
Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


the house to accomplish goals, then
spend the last two days before the re-
turn date scurrying around to clean and
make the place spotless, with a remod-
eled room or re-upholstered sofa as the
end result of a massive burst of energy
Instead of dreading what appliance
was going to break as soon as the ship
crossed the horizon (my spouse was in
the Navy), we began turning the situa-
tion around into an opportunity to have
a dependents' get-together or to help
with one another's projects. It's all in
the perspective, but when you get right
down to it, nothing could change the
fact that our loved ones were not there
in person.
These days, software allows "live"
video and audio streaming from some-
thing as simple as a laptop to bring fam-
ilies together and ease the burden just a
little.
Mail was the thing most looked


forward to and I'd send it daily Some-
times I'd send more than one letter a
day I've been told by many people on
active duty, retired or discharged, that
the link to home was very important.
If you have a loved one abroad, send
those letters and photos. If you don't,
please contact one of the many organi-
zations that collect letters for service
members who may not have families or
may not get as much mail, and let them
know their work is worth a lot to us
"stateside."
November begins the holiday season,
which is when these messages are
needed even more. This month is the
ideal time to give our thanks to those
who are fighting for our freedoms, from
the front lines of battle to the duty be-
hind a desk. Every position is integral to
the operation and every assignment is
critically important
At the CCVC, we help veterans in
need get the repairs done, put food on
the table, build ramps and more. We
still need more members. Allow your-
self the personal satisfaction in knowing
you helped someone who, like you,
served their country and now has a
need they cannot meet on their own. It
feels great to see that smile of thanks
and you know you've been a part of it
Veterans who are business owners are
asked to please contact us and see what


your company can do to help ease the
burden of our warriors. Discounts you
provide in cost or materials are tax de-
ductible, as we are a nonprofit
organization.
Other veterans can call to ask about
joining our forces, whether it be merely
matching a veteran-owned business to a
veteran in need, or if you have skills to
share, we need you. Our membership
dues are just $10 for an entire year,
meetings are on the fourth Thursday of
the month at 10 a.m., excluding holi-
days. We're at 1039 N. Paul Drive in In-
verness (corner of Independence Drive
and U. S. 41).
Veterans and non-veterans have been
generous in keeping our Food Bank ac-
tively functioning from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday, excluding holidays. Thanks to
you, we've helped more than 500 veter-
ans and their families in the past year
We'll be at veteran-related functions
this month, including the Feeding Al-
liance event held prior to Thanksgiving.
Visit our website at www.ccvcfl.org or
call 352-400-8952 for more information.
Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition Inc. She maybe
contacted via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may be
found at www.ccvcfl.org.


IN SERVICE


VETERANS NOTES


William R. Johnson
Air Force Airman William R.
Johnson graduated from
basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland,
San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included
training in
military disci-
Wpline and
studies, Air
Force core
values,
physical fit-
ness and
William R. basia
Johnson basic war-
U.S. Air Force fare princi-
ples and
skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits to-
ward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Johnson earned distinction
as an honor graduate.
He is the son of William
Johnson of Hobbs, N.M., and
Connie Johnson of Crystal
River.


The airman is a 2007 grad-
uate of Crystal River High
School.

Heather
M. Giddens
Army Pvt. Heather M. Gid-
dens has graduated from
basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history, tra-
dition and core values, physi-
cal fitness, and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and
ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map read-
ing, field tactics, military cour-
tesy, military justice system,
basic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Giddens is the daughter of
Michele Bunts of Crystal
River and granddaughter of
Warren Bunts of Homosassa.
She is a 2001 graduate of
Crystal River High School.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

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aT






000PAPPOINTMENTS ARECIMOMMENDED
APOITMNT RCOMEDE


Purple Heart
group to convene
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH)
will meet at 1 p.m.,
Tuesday, Nov 19, at the
Citrus County Builders
Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491),
Lecanto.
All combat-wounded
veterans and parents, lin-
eal descendants, spouses
and siblings of living or
deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to
attend the meeting and to
become a Chapter 776
member
To learn more about
the chapter, visit www.
citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.


Thanksgiving
dinner on tap
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58 will serve a
free Thanksgiving dinner
from noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Nov 28, at the
post, 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.
Donations will be ac-
cepted, but are not neces-
sary All are welcome.

Free veterans'
benefit seminar
The Harbor House at
Ocala, 12080 S.W High-
way 484, Dunnellon, will
have a seminar for infor-
mation regarding veter-
ans aid and attendance
benefits at 2 p.m. Nov 19.
This is a free public


service to veterans and
widows of veterans pro-
vided by The Harbor
House at Ocala and Gary
Marriage, Operation Vet-
eran Aid, Crystal River,.
RSVP by calling
352-489-9698.

MOC/MOCA to
serve pasta
The Military Order of
the Cootie/Military Order
of the Cootie Auxiliary
will serve a pasta and
meatball or sausage din-
ner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov 29, at Leroy
Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hernando
(where the helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7,
may be purchased at the
post. Donation at the


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door will be $7.50. Music
will be provided.
For more information,
call 352-795-4142 or the
post at 352-726-3339.

Sign up by Dec. 2
for golf tourney
VFW Edward W Penno
Post 4864 in Citrus
Springs invites everyone
to participate in a golf
tournament on Saturday,
Dec. 14. Sign up by
Monday, Dec. 2.
For more information,
call 352-465-4864.




LEND



YOUR



EARZT


Hearing Aid
Cost vs. Benefit
Comparison
Study

Participants
sought by Gardner
Audiology for a new
research study comparing
the value of four new
hearing aid models. Each
has a different price level
and varying degrees of
technology proven to
deliver understandable
sound quality in difficult
listening situations.

In exchange for completing
a pre and post-fitting
opinion survey, Gardner
Audiology will loan you
the hearing aids of your
choice, for a free 30 day
study. Audiologists with
advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.

At the end of thirty days
you may return your loaner
aids or purchase them at a
discount. It's your choice.

Office
Locations:
Crystal River
& Inverness
352-795-5700


SGardner
00WAWd~ogy13


VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30
a.m. the first Sunday each month at
American Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.

Riders to do poker run
District 7 VFW Riders will host the
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Poker
Run on Saturday, Dec. 7. Registration
begins at 9 a.m. with the last bike out at
11 a.m. and last bike in at4 p.m.
The poker run schedule is:
Staring point and first card -
VFW Post 7122 Floral City, 8191 S.
Florida Ave. Begin 50/50 -10 tickets for
$5. Start the run with breakfast for a do-
nation. Cost of $15 per poker hand in-
cludes the cost of the meal at the Inglis
Post. Additional poker hands for $10.
Additional meal tickets are $5.
First stop and second card Gio-
vanni's, 3451 E. Louise Lane, Hernando.
Second stop and third card -
American Legion Post 237, 4077 N.
Lecanto Highway Beverly Hills.
Third stop and fourth card -
Willard's Restaurant & Lounge, 3490
S.E. County Road 337, Morriston.
Fourth stop and fifth card -
Chiefland VFW Post 5625,1104 S. Main
St.
Final stop and wild card Inglis
VFW Post 8698, at 520 State Road 40 E.
Last bike in by 4 p.m. Roll the dice for a
lucky No. 7 free drink (one per poker
hand card player). Prizes for best poker
hand, second-best hand and worst hand.
There will be music, a silent auction,
odometer poker for a prize (read your
bike odometer best hand wins) and a
50/50 drawing.
For more information, call Roger at
352-697-1826 or email shanilyl@
yahoo.com.

New veterans' pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald
A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness an-
nounces the design and availability of
this year's Citrus County Veterans Ap-
preciation Commemorative Pin.
In keeping with this year's theme,
"Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan
Veterans," the pin is an outline of Citrus
County superimposed with the Iraq
Campaign and the Afghanistan
Campaign service medals.
Pins are available for a donation of $3
each and may be obtained by calling the
chap-ter at 352-344-3464 or John
Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also
available at the Citrus County Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto.


CCVC slates yard sale
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Satur-
day of the month Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day
before (typically Friday afternoon) and
are responsible for the security of their
own items overnight. The spots are typi-
cally 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

DAV offers rides to clinics
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made before 1 p.m.

Transport service needs van
The Disabled American Veterans
Transportation Network is requesting
contributions from veterans, private
citizens and community organizations to
reach a goal of $20,000 to purchase a
new van.
The van program goes to the clinic in
The Villages, as well as to the VA facility
in Gainesville. This service is available
to all veterans each weekday, for sched-
uled appointments, tests and other
procedures.
The program uses a loaner van, which
has more than 270,000 miles on it, to
transport to The Villages, which is the
reason for this fundraiser.
Cash donations are not accepted and
it is requested that any contributions be
made by check or money order made
out to: DAV Van Project with DAV van
project also written in the memo
section.
Mail a tax-deductible contribution to:
DAV Van Project, c/o Joe Stephens,
chairman, 2797 W Xenox Drive, Citrus
Springs, FL 34433, or mail it to the DAV
Chapter 70: DAV Van Project/Treasurer,
Gerald A. Shonk, DAV Florida Chapter
70,1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
FL 34450.

Memorial honors vets
Purple Heart recipients are sought to
be honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.


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GET INFORMED.

C% CITRUS COUNTY 0U-T


icleonlne.com
Vwww.chronicleonline.com


VETERANS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 A21


OOGG97




A22 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


FOR THE RECORD


Oct. 14-27, 2013
Divorces
Jeffery H. Bishop, Crystal
River vs. Annamarie B.
Bishop, Inverness
Anesia Carter vs. John
Carter, Lecanto
Daniel T. Johns, Livingston,
Texas vs. Jennifer M. Johns,
Dunnellon
Kevin Stone, Inverness vs.
Bridget Stone, Inverness
James T. Swisher,
Homosassa vs. Dottie L.
Swisher, Homosassa
Melissa Elizabeth Thomas,
Crystal River vs. Anthony
Shawn Thomas, Crystal River
Christina Valdivia,
Inverness vs. Raymond
Valdivia, Inverness
Jeffery H. Bishop, Crystal
River vs. Annamarie B.
Bishop, Inverness
Janet Marie Cyr-Holm,
Inverness vs. Michael James
Holm, Inverness
Lois Ann Gage,
Homosassa vs. Timm Arthur
Gage, Homosassa
Alex Groot, Citrus Springs
vs. Tara A. Lees Groot,
Beverly Hills
Michael A. Imparato, Crys-
tal River vs. Ann D.
Thornburg, Leesburg
Deborah R. Ledsome,
Crystal River vs. Brian F.
Ledsome, Homosassa
Michael G. McConnell,
Beverly Hills vs. Debra A.
McConnell, Beverly Hills
Barron P. Millet, Crystal
River vs. Kandace L. Millet,
Crystal River
Philip James Sapp,
Homosassa vs. Courtney
Jean Sapp, Dunnellon

FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and
marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a
matter of public
record, available from
each county's Clerk of
the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-
6400 or visit
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
More marriage
listings from Oct. 14
to 27 will be listed in
the Nov. 17 Chronicle.


Marriages
Kregg Steven Atchison,
Inverness/Angel Marie
Townsend, Inverness
Michael James Barlow,
Lake Panasoffkee/Joanna
Grace Cassels, Lake
Panasoffkee
Donald Beachy Beckett,
Homosassa/Sue Carol
Fowler, Homosassa
Anthony John Caponigro,
Inverness/Maria Helen
Goldman, Inverness
James Michael Eno,
Inverness/Erica Lee Holm,
Inverness
Roberto Enrique Galan,
Beverly Hills/Reina Marina
Molina, Beverly Hills
Howard Gilbert, Crystal
River/Lois Martha Wallace,
Crystal River
John William Hylemon,
Floral City/Minerva Perez,
Hernando
Robert Ervin Jones,
Inverness/Michelle Rene
Ball, Inverness
James Robert McMurray,
Beverly Hills/Jennifer Nicole
Reichel, Beverly Hills
Elwin Leroy Mosier,
Homosassa/Carol Isabelle
Thompson, Homosassa
William Walter Pettis,
Lecanto/Teresa Ann Scheall,
Lecanto
Bruce Proud, Citrus
Springs/Patricia Eileen
Farmer, Citrus Springs
Gregory David Vitale-
Molloy, Beverly Hills/
Emily Clara Wright,
Beverly Hills


WEDDING


Kofmehl/Seymour

Kayla Kofmehl and ---K,
Chase Seymour
exchanged nuptial vows
Nov 9,2013.
The bride is the
daughter of Kelly and
Candy Kofmehl of
Lecanto.
The groom is the son of
Mike and Sharon Sey- ,.
mour of Crystal River

NEW ARRIVAL

Makenzie Kathryn Cousins


Rocky and Tara Cousins
of Dunnellon announce
the birth of a daughter,
Makenzie Kathryn
Cousins, at 10:18 a.m.
Oct 11, 2013, at UF
Shands Hospital. The
baby weighed 6 pounds,
10.3 ounces and was
19 inches long.
She was welcomed by
big sister Jaydin Janie,
age 18 months.
Maternal grandparents


are Kathryn Golds of
Hernando and Kenneth
Karsten of Leesburg.
Paternal grandparents
are Doug and Janie
Cousins of Williston.
Great-grandparents are
Mary and Edward
Sinkewicz of Lecanto and
Helen and Charles
Karsten of New Paltz,
N.Y


WEDDING


Hoover/Grillo


April Hoover and Mike
Grillo were married
Oct 13, 2013, in St.
Augustine at the White
Room.
The bride is the
daughter of Bill and
Cindy Hoover
The groom is the son of
Dr Denis and Silvia
Grillo.
Given in marriage by
Alice Hippe, the bride
wore a lace gown and
carried a bouquet of
orchids. Her maid of
honor was Felicia
Thompson.
The best man was the
groom's brother, Lt.
Chris Grillo.
The groom is a 2004
graduate of Crystal River
High School. He
graduated from
University of Florida in
2006 with a degree in
economics. He is
employed by
Multi-Chem, a division of


y

Halliburton.
The bride is a 2005
graduate of Pace High
School. She graduated
from University of South
Florida in 2009 with a
degree in finance. She is
employed at Chemung
Canal Trust Co.
The couple live in
Elmira, N.Y


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TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









SPORTS


Vanderbilt
beat Florida for
the first time in ILIM
Gainesville W
since 1945 on
Saturday./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


3 0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
TV, lottery/B3
Basketball, hockey/B4
College football/B5
NFL/B6


Lecanto's Cohee claims 8th in state


Panthers freshman swimmer earns

medal in girls 100-yard butterfly


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Lecanto freshman Lindsey
Cohee added another remark-
able result to her ever-growing
list of swimming accomplish-
ments Saturday at Sailfish Park
in Stuart as she earned a


FHSAA Class 2A state medal in
the 100 yard butterfly by placing
eighth.
Cohee came into the meet
seeded eighth in the 100 fly and
that's exactly what she placed,
setting a school record in the
preliminary round with a time
of 58.15 that tied her for third


place. A time of 58.77 was good
enough to earn Cohee her state
medal in the finals.
She qualified in the 200 indi-
vidual medley as well, placing
17th (seeded 20th) in another
school record time of 2:14.74 in
the prelims.
"It was a great meet and Gavn
(Russ) and Lindsey worked very
hard to get here," Lecanto head
coach Matt Bouthillier said.
"Lindsey is the hardest working
swimmer that we have on the


Lecanto swim team. She's a very
talented young lady and she's
(only) a freshman and she's al-
ready here at the state meet.
"She finished eighth in the
100 fly so that makes her an all-
state swimmer," Bouthillier
continued. "And she's only going
to continue to get better as she
works harder on her technique.
"She loves the sport and it's
really going to be a pleasure to
watch her improve over the
next few years."


First step taken


Associated Press
Florida State defensive back Jalen Ramsey, top, jumps into the arms of teammate Nate Andrews after Andrews ran back an interception
for a touchdown against Wake Forest during the first half Saturday in Winston-Salem, N.C. The Seminoles clinched a spot in the ACC
championship game with a 59-3 victory over the Demon Deacons.

No. 3 Florida State clinches ACC Championship game berth with big win


Associated Press
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -No. 3
Florida State finally discovered a
defense that can cool off Jameis
Winston and the Seminoles' high-
powered offense.
Its own.
Florida State tied a school
record with six interceptions, re-
turned turnovers for touchdowns
on consecutive plays and gave the
offense short fields throughout a
59-3 rout of Wake Forest on Satur-
day that clinched a spot in the At-
lantic Coast Conference title game.
Nate Andrews took an intercep-
tion 56 yards for a touchdown one
play before Jalen Ramsey returned
a fumble 23 yards for another
score, keeping the yardage down
but pumping the point total way up.
"For us to be a great team, both
(offense and defense) have got to be
clicking," Winston said. "When
they're getting turnovers and scor-
ing touchdowns just like that,
sometimes it is hard (to stay in a
rhythm) but obviously, I've got to do
a better job of commanding the
team and leading us."
The Seminoles (9-0, 7-0) claimed


the inside track to a BCS title game
berth with No. 2 Oregon's loss
Thursday They kept firm grasp of
it by forcing seven turnovers and
breaking the stadium record of 56
points they set in 1994.
"Everything's falling into place
now," defensive end Mario Ed-
wards Jr said, "like (coach Jimbo
Fisher) said it would."
Winston threw two touchdown
passes while leading an offense that
gained just 296 total yards well
off its ACC-leading average of 549.
Fisher said the offense "on the
day did not play as well" but that
was largely because the defense
and special teams put up the points
and regularly gave the Seminoles
short fields.
Florida State held Wake Forest
(4-6, 2-5) to 166 total yards and
turned those turnovers into five
See Page B2
Florida State linebacker Christian
Jones forces a fumble as he hits
Wake Forest quarterback Tanner
Price in the first half Saturday in
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Associated Press


Lecanto's Gavn Russ, a diver,
qualified to compete at the
state meet for the first time,
placing 15th overall.
Russ won a 2013 district title
and placed third in the region
on his way to his first state
meet trip.
"Gavn's been the district
champion for the last two years
and he's been working hard to
make it to states," Bouthillier
said of his swimmer. '"And he
See Page B3



Cross


country


comes to


a close

CR's Harris

highest state

placer at 27th
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
TALLAHASSEE Bran-
don Harris would have liked
a little higher finish at the
Class 2A state cross country
meet but he
found the
right place to
finish his
high school
career
Harris was
27th with a
time of 16:42.
It was his Brandon
second trip Harris
to state and CR senior
he qualified came in 27th.
as an indi-
vidual for the race Saturday
at Apalachee Regional Park.
The course was hilly but
well-designed and most run-
ners liked the course.
"It was hard," said Harris.
"The course wasn't very hard
but breathing and everything
was hard. It was cold."
The Lecanto boys finished
18th in Class 3A with 470
points. Samuel Alford was
89th with a time of 17:16.
The Panther boys were the
only Citrus County team to
qualify for the state meet.
Lecanto sophomore Claire
Farnsworth was 40th with an
exceptional time of 19:41.
"Claire has been training
with the boys," said Lecanto
girls coach Dan Epstein. "I
have to give coach Roselle
Lattin the credit This is her
best time ever
"You couldn't ask for bet-
ter conditions or a better
course. This is like gold.
They put some work into this
course. It's a perfect venue
for cross country I think the
races went off on time.
Everything went well."
Citrus junior Alyssa Weber
made her third visit to state.
She finished 91st with a
20:41. She was coming back
from an injury
She and Farnsworth quali-
fied as individuals.


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352.341.0018
loveclevysaaes.coznx
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-FrL ; 9AM 6PM Sal.
Service 8AM-5PM Motn.-Fri.: SAM-Noon Sat.


----I


OOOGISW I




B2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013

Standings

Co-ed Kickball
W L T
Head Shot 8 2 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Head Shots win kickball title


Special to the Chronicle


Citrus Winers 7 3 0 Playoff Gamel: Head
Kickin' Nutz 7 3 0 Shots 9, Average Joes 1
Average Joes 3 6 1 Playoff Game2: Kickin'
Convictions 3 7 0 Nutz 9, Citrus Whiners 2
Championship Game:
Misfits 1 8 1 Head Shots 5, Kickin' Nutz 2
Men's flag football Congratulations to the
SL T 2013 Kickball champion
Head Shots. Head Shots
Tie Dye 2 0 0 were led by leadoff man
Green 2 0 0 Donnie Howard going 5 for
Blue 1 0 0 5 with 3 RBIs and 4 runs
Orange 1 1 o scored during the playoffs.
Pink 0 1 0 Manager Jeremy Sexton
was pleased with the way
Blak 0 2 0 his team performed in the
Red 0 2 0 postseason.
Men's softball "We got off to a fast start
in the first game and that
W L T momentum carried us
McPherson's Archery 2 0 0 over to the championship
Lecanto Vet Hospital 2 0 0 game where we capped off
Ace Home Hardware 1 1 0 a fantastic season with a
Advance Fitness 1 1 0 win," Sexton said.
Ol'GuysW/Help 1 1 Also leading the way
was shortstop Tim Ham-
Curry Roofing 1 1 0 merle with 3 RBIs and
R.C Lawn Care 0 2 0 starting pitcher Tom
The Machine 0 2 0 Mimnogh with a 1.49 ERA


Special to the Chronicle
Head Shots won the 2013 Citrus County Parks &
Recreation Co-ed Kickball championship.


Visit Parks & Recre-
ation's website at www
citruscountyparks.com for
the next available adult
season.
Men's Flag Football
Tie Dye Team 25, Pink
Team 0
Green Team 33, Black
Team 25


Orange Team 20, Red
Team 14
Game 3 was the game of
the night. With both teams
looking for their first win of the
season, it was a battle to the
end. Red Team's QB Ryan
Maloney drove them down
the field on their first posses-
sion for a touchdown. But


they couldn't contain Or-
ange's high flying offense. QB
Reis Foster threw for two
touchdowns and led Orange
to victory on their last posses-
sion throwing a touchdown to
Steve Kusnierz. Derrick Craw-
ford also played a big role in
the win, catching 8 of 9 balls
thrown his way.
Men's Softball
McPherson's Archery 22,
R.C Lawn Care 18
Lecanto Vet Hospital 22,
The Machine 2
What an exciting night to
kick of the 2013 fall softball
season! McPherson's Archery
was led by an offensive attack
with four home runs and 22
runs batted in. Ryan Pearson
spearheaded the attack going
3-for-4 with a three-run home
run and five RBIs. Dave Mel-
choire added a walk-off three-
run homerun to put
McPherson's Archery in the
win column.
Advance Fitness 17, R.C


Lawn Care 4
McPherson's Archery 39,
The Machine 2
Ace Hardware 18, Curry
Roofing 6
Lecanto Vet Hospital 25, 01'
Guys w/Help 16
The Vet Hospital got off to a
hot start scoring eight runs in
the first inning of work. The
stars of the night for the Vet
Hospital were Bobby Hall and
Kevin Lanier, who each drove
in four runs and went a com-
bined 7 for 8. Lecanto Vet Hos-
pital is off to great start in this
young season, holding teams
to 18 runs in two games.
Men's Basketball
The season begins Nov.
13.
If you are an individual
adult looking for a sport to
play and do not have a team,
please call Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 and
we will refer you the man-
agers in each league you are
interested in.


Family affair at CRHS


Associated Press
The 9th Annual Fall Fest Tournament is literally a family affair. From left are husband and
wife David and Sally deMontfort, their son Brian deMontfort with his wife Kim deMontfort,
husband and wife Jim and Vicki Lavoie, son Chris Lavoie and his fiancee Cecily Buck.


ERIC VAN DEN
HOOGEN
Correspondent

In the months leading
up to the 9th annual Fall
Fest Tournament at Crys-
tal High School, it's men-
tioned many times that, for
the organizers and players,
this tournament feels like
a family gathering.
There were 24 teams
participating, several hus-
band and wife combina-
tions, moms and
daughters, neighbors and
high school alumni -just
one happy and competi-
tive tennis family
Several players have
supported this tournament
and the Crystal River
Open in January for all its
nine years running; actu-
ally, it will be the 10th an-
nual Crystal River Open
on Jan. 25 and 26, 2014.
A simple thank you does
not suffice to express the
appreciation for this sup-
port. Everybody involved
with the organization of
these tournaments feels
privileged to be a part of it
because of the people that
play in it. There is one vol-
unteer that has been there
all these years, so a special
thank you goes out to Sally
deMontfort.



FSU
Continued from Page Bl

TDs and a field goal.
Winston was 17 of 28 for
159 yards in two-plus quar-
ters with an 18-yard TD to
Kelvin Benjamin and a 2-
yarder to Chad Abram that
made it 42-0 at halftime.
James Wilder Jr and De-
vonta Freeman had early
scoring runs 50 seconds
apart. The Seminoles, 35-
point favorites, scored
their first three touch-
downs in a 5:05 span of the
first quarter
Chad Hedlund's 23-yard
field goal with 9:07 left
helped the Demon Dea-
cons avoid being shut out
for the second straight
week and for the third
time in four meetings with
Florida State.
Kermit Whitfield re-
turned the ensuing kickoff
97 yards for the TD that
gave the Seminoles the
BB&T Field scoring
record.


She'll be your friend for-
ever for a pumpkin muffin
and a hot tea.
The results for the first
day were:
Women's first round: Anne
Finnin/Judy Jeanette def.
Vicky Lavoie/Cecily Buck, 6-4,
6-2; Lisa Steed/Linda Martin
def. Micki Brown/Sally
deMontfort, 6-1, 7-6; Jane
Wilson/Rhonda Lane def.
Noreen Vicente/Andrea
Vicente, 6-2, 6-3; Anna
Mirra/Kim Knudsen def.
Veronica Williams/Maddie
Lewis, 6-1, 6-1.
Men's first round: Brian
deMontfort/Chris Lavoie def.
Nicholas Pais/Coty Willey, 6-0,
6-0; Mike Brown/Donny
Simmons def. Ron Risane/
Mike Walker, 6-0, 6-0; Dave
deMontfort/Jim Lavoie def.
Wayne SteedN/Vinnie Tremante,
6-3, 6-2; Erik Lawson/Chris
Nyholm def. Andy Belskie/
Barney Hess, 3-6, 6-4,10-8.
Mixed first round: Kim de-
Montfort/Brian deMontfort def.
Maddie Lewis/Coty Willey,
3-6,6-1, 10-4; Lisa Steed/
Wayne Steed def. Veronica
Williams/Nicholas Pais, 6-1,
6-2; Jane Wilson/Randy
Robins def. Linda Martin/Vinnie
Tremante, 1-6,7-6,10-4; Anna
Mirra/Mike Walker def. Leslie
Sherry/Marcial Irizarry, 6-0, 6-1.
Women's second round
(East): Anne Finnin/Judy


Wake Forest's first two
quarterbacks, Tanner
Price and Tyler Cameron,
combined for six comple-
tions and 66 yards passing.
Price threw three inter-
ceptions on four attempts
before he was pulled. The
first two were returned
into the red zone and An-
drews took the third back
for a score.
"Today," coach Jim
Grobe said, "was just a
comedy of errors."
In matching the team
record of six interceptions
set against Louisville in
1991, Florida State proved
there was no Hurricane
hangover for these Semi-
noles after routing rival
Miami 41-14 last week.
Now the challenge the
rest of the way might be to
avoid boredom: Boston
College is the only team to
either hang within 14
points of the Seminoles or
score more than 17 points
against them. Nobody has
held them to fewer than 41
points, either


Jeanette def. Lisa Steed
/Linda Martin, 6-3, 6-3; Anna
Mirra/Kim Knudsen def. Jane
Wilson/Rhonda Lane,
7-5, 6-2.
Women's second round
(West): Micki Brown/Sally
deMontfort def. Vicky Lavoie/
Cecily Buck, 2-6, 6-1, 6-4;
Veronica Williams/Maddie
Lewis def. Noreen Vicente/
Andrea Vicente, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Men's second round (East):
Brian deMontfort/
Chris Lavoie def. Mike
Brown/Donny Simmons, 6-1,
6-3; Erik Lawson/Chris
Nyholm def. Dave deMontfort/
Jim Lavoie, 6-3, 6-3.
Men's second round
(West): Ron Risane/Mike
Walker def. Nicholas
Pais/Coty Willey, 6-4, 6-4;
Andy Belskie/Barney Hess
def. Wayne SteedN/Vinnie
Tremante, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Mixed second round (East):
Kim deMontfort/Brian
deMontfort def. Lisa Steed/
Wayne Steed, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4;
Anna Mirra/Mike Walker def.
Jane Wilson/Randy Robins,
6-0,6-1.
Mixed Second round
(West): Maddie Lewis/Coty
Willey def. Veronica
Williams/Nicholas Pais, 6-1,
6-0; Linda Martin/Vinnie
Tremante def. Leslie Sherry/
Marcial Irizarry, 6-2, 6-1.


The real sports



are grandparents

ith Veterans Day health issues that prevent other way to get exercise
tomorrow and them from partaking in and spend time with your
with two sons sports and more fully en- grandkids. As with hiking,
who are currently in the joying their role as grand- set a reasonable goal.
military and with one out, parent-in-chief. Leave your competitive
I wanted to start this arti- I have often written personality, don't push too
cle with a about "walk a hard but hard enough to
heartfelt thank little, talk a lit- reach the goal. Make sure
you to all of you tle" and that is to show your pride in the
who have most applica- kid's achievement. With
served this na- ble to keeping my 8 year-old daughter,
tion. Many are both grandpar- bribery helps.
you are now ents and their Near your door is a
grandparents. grandchildren body of water that is just
I was re- healthy, in- waiting for your kayak and
minded of the volved and grandkids. My daughter
dozens of pa- talking to each with the above-mentioned
tients I have Dr. Ron Joseph other, bribery has been kayaking
seen lately who DOCTOR'S Start all of and paddle boarding with
are veterans ORDERS this with what me since age 3. Now at 8,
with stories ___________ you, as a grand- she wants to do it with me
and histories of parent, are in her own kayak. My
their service, but are seen physically capable of 3-year-old granddaughter
only as patients. Many are doing. The first time is the was so upset at seeing her
grandparents caring for most difficult. Turn off the 8 year-old aunt go, she
their grandchildren. Most TV and get out the front couldn't wait to go along.
have never dreamed of door, regardless of any In all of these grandpar-
nor planned of again be- physical impairment. Get ent adventures, safety is of
coming parents a second started by taking a walk or prime importance. Ride on
time around, hike within everyone's ca- trails and not the highway
Across the United abilities. and helmets and life vests
States, almost 7.8 million There are loads of or flotation gear are always
children are living in paved trails of sufficient the way to go. These items
homes where grandpar- duration that accommo- are easily obtained at the
ents are the householders, date wheelchairs, walkers local thrift stores.
with more than 5.8 million or canes. Make sure the There is no greater way
children living in grand- kids can do it as well. The to share intimate time with
parents' homes. This is a secret is to keep it fun: no your grandchildren than
30 percent increase on an forced marches, through sporting adven-
old 2000 statistic and is Kids do like to carry tures. They have your undi-
even greater now In the part of the gear Also, stop vided attention so you can
great majority of these for a snack or a picnic if it talk to one another, undis-
homes, grandparents are is a real hike. A good way tracted by cellphones -
the householder and nei- to engage the younger hik- both yours and theirs.
their parent is in the home. ers and increase interest Today is the first day of
Most importantly I have is by observing the flow- your new sporting adven-
seen many of these baby ers, insects, wildlife or ture and don't take no for
boomers bringing their talking about your hikes an answer from the grand-
grandchildren along to in basic training with the kids. No matter what age
the grandparent's office drill sergeant yelling. As they are, bribe them.
visits. Aside from evaluat- everyone gets used to the Ron Joseph, M.D., a
ing their hand, shoulder, hike, it can result in a con- hand and shoulder ortho-
upper extremity and back ditioning program for all. pedic surgeon at Sea-
pain issues, many grand- Riding a bike is a skill Spine Orthopedic
parents in the parental that is never forgotten or Institute, maybe reached
role complain of other so they say A bike is an- atrbjhand@cox.net

Send your photos
If you have any photos of your recreational sporting events, youth or adult,
please submit them through email to sports@chronicleonline.com. Photos
must be high resolution and accompanied by information describing the event.


I ** ** *


Presents
The 3rd An
Never Forge
I MileWa
Registration at 7am Ra
9:00 am November
Historic Courthouse
The race will precede the Ani
Day Parade. Stay for the parad
$25 per entry all p
go to Sgt. Dennis
Flanagan Found
For registration and
more information ,'iiit
www.NeverForget5K.cr om
or call
Marissa Balderas 620-41
Dennis Flanagan 697-1'


**


nual

et5K/
ilk


ace at 9am
11,2013
, Inverness
iual Veteran's
e after the race.
proceeds
James
nation





815


RECREATIONAL SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Citrus 50,
Crystal River 6
CIT 14 15 14 7 50
CR 0 0 6 0 6
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CHS G. Wilcox 26 pass from D. Moore (J. Mars-
den kick), 8:20
CHS S. Franklin 81 pass from Moore (Marsden
kick), 1:25
Second Quarter
CHS-J.Juse 12 pass from Moore (Marsden kick),
9:20
CHS -Safety, 2:56
CHS J. Vineyard 1 run (kick blocked), 0:25
Third Quarter
CR K. Hopkins 27 pass from C. Ryan (kick
blocked), 11:44
CHS-Wilcox 10 pass from Moore (Marsden kick),
8:05
CHS -T. Washington 3 run (Marsden kick), 4:09
Fourth Quarter
CHS -Washington 3 run (Marsden kick), 1:30
Individual Statistics
Rushing -CHS: Washington 14-114-2; Moore 5-
57-0; N. Waters 8-35-0; J. Clark 8-35-0; B. Whaley 6-
27-0. CR:T Reynolds 2-12-0.
Passing -CHS: Moore 7-11-0-171. CR: Ryan 7-13-
1-75.
Receiving CHS: S. Franklin 2-81-1; Wilcox 2-36-
2. CR: Reynolds 3-48-0; Hopkins 1-27-1.
Interceptions CHS: Wilcox.
Penalties -CHS: 5-50. CR: 3-31.

Land 0' Lakes 38,
Lecanto 35

LOL 21 14 0 0 3 38
LEC 0 14 14 7 0 35
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
LOL -Tandy 54-yard pass from Pensyl (kick good)
LOL Heaney 63-yard pass from Pensyl (kick good)
LOL Heaney 4-yard pass from Pensyl (kick good)
Second Quarter
LOL Salmon 2-yard interception return (kick good)
LEC- McGee 20-yard passfrom Anderson (kickfailed)
LOL -Tandy 42-yard pass from Pensyl (kick good)
LEC Nightengale 51-yard run (two-point try good)
Third Quarter
LEC McGee 3-yard run (kick good)
LEC -Lucas 17-yard pass from McGee (kick good)
Fourth Quarter
LEC Nightengale 1-yard run (kick good)
Overtime
LOL Dowler 21-yard field goal
Individual Leaders
Rushing LOL: L. Scroggins 13-74; LEC: J. Night-
engale 40-16-2.
Passing LOL : J. Pensyl 14-21-1-288; LEC: T.
McGee 9-21-2-103.
Receiving- LOL: L. Heaney 7-130-2; LEC: M. McK-
ibbon 3-32, J. Lucas 2-20-1.




Major scores
EAST
Colgate 28, Lafayette 24
Dartmouth 34, Cornell 6
Fordham 23, Bucknell 21
Harvard 34, Columbia 0
Lehigh 34, Holy Cross 20
Maine 33, Albany (NY) 27
Monmouth (NJ) 23, Wagner 6
Navy 42, Hawaii 28
New Hampshire 33, James Madison 17
Princeton 38, Penn 26
Richmond 39, Stony Brook 31
Robert Morris 54, CCSU 21
Sacred Heart 10, Duquesne 0
St. Francis (Pa.) 23, Bryant 20
Villanova 45, Rhode Island 0
W. Kentucky 21, Army 17
William & Mary 24, Delaware 10
Yale 24, Brown 17
SOUTH
Auburn 55, Tennessee 23
Charleston Southern 31, Coastal Carolina 26
Chattanooga 20, Wofford 10
Duke 38, NC State 20
E. Illinois 37, Murray St. 17
East Carolina 58, Tulsa 24
Florida St. 59, Wake Forest 3
Furman 35, Samford 17
Georgia 45, Appalachian St. 6
Georgia Southern 35, W. Carolina 19
Hampton 29, NC Central 21
Howard 42, Savannah St. 14
Jackson St. 26, Alabama A&M 20
Jacksonville St. 68, E. Kentucky 10
Liberty 35, Presbyterian 14
MVSU 20, Texas Southern 17
Marist 55, Campbell 28
Marshall 56, UAB 14
Memphis 21, UT-Martin 6
Mercer 45, Jacksonville 42
MiddleTennessee 48, FlU 0
Mississippi 34, Arkansas 24
Missouri 48, Kentucky 17
Morgan St. 24, NC A&T 23
Norfolk St. 27, Bethune-Cookman 24
North Carolina 45, Virginia 14
Northwestern St. 37, Lamar 28
SC State 25, Florida A&M 21
San Diego 56, Morehead St. 3
Southern U. 31, Alabama St. 28
Stetson 26, Davidson 13
Syracuse 20, Maryland 3
Tennessee St. 31, Austin Peay 6
The Citadel 35, Elon 10
VMI 27, Gardner-Webb 9
Vanderbilt 34, Florida 17
Wesley 35, Charlotte 28
MIDWEST
Butler 72, Valparaiso 12
Cincinnati 28, SMU 25
Drake 36, Dayton 10
E. Michigan 35, W Michigan 32, OT
Indiana 52, Illinois 35
Iowa 38, Purdue 14
Minnesota 24, Penn St. 10
Missouri St. 37, S. Illinois 27
Montana 31, South Dakota 27
N. Dakota St. 28, Illinois St. 10
N. Iowa 22, Youngstown St. 20
Nebraska 17, Michigan 13
North Dakota 24, N. Colorado 21
S. Dakota St. 29, Indiana St. 0
TCU 21, Iowa St. 17
Tennessee Tech 41, SE Missouri 16
Wisconsin 27, BYU 17
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 45, Grambling St. 42
Kansas St. 49, Texas Tech 26
McNeese St. 69, Stephen F Austin 38
North Texas 41, UTEP 7
Oklahoma St. 42, Kansas 6
Sam Houston St. 49, Nicholls St. 24
Texas A&M 51, Mississippi St. 41
UTSA 10, Tulane 7


FAR WEST
Arizona St. 20, Utah 19
Boston College 48, New Mexico St. 34
Colorado St. 38, Nevada 17
E. Washington 54, Montana St. 29
Old Dominion 59, Idaho 38
Portland St. 38, Idaho St. 31
S. Utah 27, Weber St. 21
Southern Cal 62, California 28

No. 3 FSU. 59,
Wake Forest 3
Florida St. 21 21 10 7- 59
Wake Forest 0 0 0 3- 3
First Quarter
FSU-Wilder 5 run (Aguayo kick), 7:15.
FSU-Freeman 1 run (Aguayo kick), 6:25.
FSU-Benjamin 18 pass from Winston (Aguayo
kick), 2:10.
Second Quarter
FSU-Andrews 56 interception return (Aguayo kick),
14:15.
FSU-Ramsey 23 fumble return (Aguayo kick),
13:56.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 B3


For fithie rfcoWd



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On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Advocare 500 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAuto Club Finals (Same-day Tape)
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Advocare 500 race (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Men's: Northern Kentucky at Kentucky
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's: Duke at California
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Florida (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Wake Forest (Taped)
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Notre Dame at Pittsburgh (Taped)
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Nebraska at Michigan (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Cincinnati Bengals at Baltimore Ravens
1 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Lions at Chicago Bears
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Denver Broncos at San Diego Chargers
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Dallas Cowboys at New Orleans Saints
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Turkish Open, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: McGladrey Classic, Final Round
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at New York Rangers
MOTORCYCLE RACING
8 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: Valencia
RUGBY
12 p.m. (FS1) United States vs. New Zealand (Taped)
FIGURE SKATING
1:30 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: NHK Trophy (Taped)
SOCCER
7 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Tottenham vs. Newcastle
United
9 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Sunderland vs.
Manchester City
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Manchester United vs.
Arsenal
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: American Athletic Tournament
final: Teams TBA
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: SEC Tournament final: Teams TBA
2 p.m. (FS1) Women's College: Big East Tournament final: Teams TBA
3:30 p.m. (NBC) Women's: United States vs. Brazil
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA
4:30 p.m. (FS1) Women's College: Big 12 Tournament final: Teams TBA
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Portland Timbers at Real Salt Lake. Western
Conference Final, Leg 1
TENNIS
7 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Doubles Semifinal
9 a.m. (ESPN2) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Semifinal
1 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Doubles Semifinal
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Semifinal
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Semifinal (Same-
day Tape)
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Barclays World Tour Finals, Second Semifinal
(Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


SCorrections


In Saturday's paper in an article entitled Long time coming for
Lecanto boys, the last time the Panthers boys cross country team
made the state meet was actually 2006. It was the final year of a four-
year run of Lecanto making state meet appearances.

In a Saturday article entitled Despite rally, Panthers fall in overtime,
Ardante Anderson was incorrectly identified.

The Chronicle regrets the errors.


FSU-Abram 2 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick),
:11.
Third Quarter
FSU-K.Williams 5 run (Aguayo kick), 12:03.
FSU-FG Aguayo 42, 8:24.
Fourth Quarter
Wake-FG Hedlund 23, 9:07.
FSU-Whitfield 97 kickoff return (Aguayo kick), 8:52.
A-30,865.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


FSU
19
34-89
207
22-39-1
123
6-38.8


Wake
8
40-103
63
7-25-6
26
9-41.0


3-1 1-1
5-40 10-100
28:58 31:02


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida St., Wilder 6-49, K.Williams 12-
49, Freeman 6-11, Greene 1-9, Winston 3-4,
R.Green 3-(minus 2), Maguire 1-(minus 7), Coker 2-
(minus 24). Wake Forest, J.Harris 15-66, Gibson 16-
35, Wilhite 5-8, Team 1-(minus 1), Cameron
3-(minus 5).
PASSING-Florida St., Winston 17-28-1-159, Coker
4-9-0-37, Maguire 1-2-0-11. Wake Forest, Cameron
5-19-3-63, Price 1-4-3-3, P.Thompson 1-2-0-(minus
3).
RECEIVING-Florida St., Greene 5-47, O'Leary 3-
37, K.Williams 3-21, C.Green 2-24, Benjamin 2-23,
Abram 2-18, Broxsie 1-12, C.Jones 1-11, Wilson 1-
11, Shaw 1-4, Freeman 1-(minus 1). Wake Forest,


Tyr.Harris 2-0, Armstrong 1-20, Gibson 1-16,
Thomas-Jackson 1-14, Crump 1-10, Ragland 1-3.

Virginia Tech 42,
No. 14 Miami 24
VirginiaTech 14 14 7 7- 42
Miami 7 710 0-24
First Quarter
Mia-Coley 81 pass from Morris (Goudis kick),
11:35.
VT-Edmunds 10 run (Journell kick), 7:37.
VT-Edmunds 2 run (Journell kick), 5:12.
Second Quarter
VT-Edmunds 4 run (Journell kick), 13:01.
Mia-D.Crawford 2 run (Goudis kick), 8:30.
VT-Stanford 32 pass from Thomas (A.Jones kick),
2:58.
Third Quarter
Mia-FG Goudis 49, 6:02.
VT-Knowles recovered fumble in end zone (Jour-
nell kick), 2:35.
Mia-Humrns 84 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 1:31.
Fourth Quarter
VT-Edmunds 1 run (Journell kick), 11:32.


A-49,267.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
ReturnYards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost


VT
26
47-183
366
25-31-0
5
5-41.6
2-0


Mia
12
24-28
324
16-29-0
39
5-55.2
3-2


Penalties-Yards 11-71 2-10
Time of Possession 39:30 20:30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Virginia Tech, Edmunds 14-74, Cole-
man 22-68, Thomas 10-42, Team 1-(minus 1).
Miami, D.Crawford 10-37, Edwards 7-13, Hagens 1-
3, Morris 5-(minus 11), Team 1-(minus 14).
PASSING-Virginia Tech, Thomas 25-31-0-366.
Miami, Morris 16-29-0-324.
RECEIVING-Virginia Tech, Stanford 7-107, Byrn 6-
105, Coles 3-68, Knowles 2-25, Coleman 2-18, Ed-
munds 2-17, Cline 2-8, Rogers 1-18. Miami, Walford
5-23, Humrns 4-142, D.Crawford 3-41, Waters 2-18,
Coley 1-81, M.Lewis 1-19.

No. 19 UCF 19,
Houston 14
Houston 0 0 7 7- 14
UCF 0 6 7 6- 19
Second Quarter
UCF-FG Moffitt 45, 8:38.
UCF-FG Moffitt 40, 2:12.
Third Quarter
Hou-O'Korn 24 run (Bullard kick), 7:59.
UCF-Stanback 15 run (Moffitt kick), 2:25.
Fourth Quarter
UCF-Stanback 38 run (pass failed), 10:23.
Hou-Beadle 12 pass from O'Korn (Bullard kick),


4:04.
A-44,665.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Hou
23
29-136
231
24-46-2
16
5-45.6


UCF
24
45-188
210
17-24-1
19
2-41.5


1-0 2-2
8-72 2-16
24:47 35:13


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Houston, Farrow 8-57, O'Korn 13-56,
R.Jackson 5-12, Beadle 1-10, Spencer 1-1, Brooks
1-0. UCF, S.Johnson 28-127, Stanback 9-74, Team
2-(minus 3), Bortles 6-(minus 10).
PASSING-Houston, O'Korn 24-46-2-231. UCF,
Bortles 17-24-1-210.
RECEIVING-Houston, Greenberry 8-94, Farrow 3-
25, R.Jackson 3-9, Beadle 2-32, Maxwell 2-21,
Spencer 2-13, A.Johnson 2-10, Ayers 1-20, Ambles
1-7. UCF, Godfrey 5-67, Perriman 5-60, Hall 3-43,
Reese 2-22, Worton 1-10, S.Johnson 1-8.
Vanderbilt 34, UF 17
Vanderbilt 10 7 7 10- 34
Florida 0 3 7 7- 17
First Quarter
Van-FG Spear 31, 7:56.
Van-Seymour 10 run (Spear kick), :03.
Second Quarter
Van-Robinette 5 run (Spear kick), 9:22.
Fla-FG Phillips 23, 1:47.
Third Quarter
Van-Seymour 2 run (Spear kick), 12:47.
Fla-Kel.Taylor 4 run (Hardin kick), 7:16.
Fourth Quarter
Van-Seymour 1 run (Spear kick), 14:54.
Fla-Fulwood 11 pass from Murphy (Hardin kick),
7:40.
Van-FG Spear 31, :45.
A-88,004.
Van Fla
First downs 12 26
Rushes-yards 44-126 34-39
Passing 57 305
Comp-Att-lnt 6-12-0 30-46-3
Return Yards 86 24
Punts-Avg. 5-45.2 2-40.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-1
Penalties-Yards 8-57 11-84
Time of Possession 29:00 29:05
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Vanderbilt, Seymour 24-62, Kimbrow
11-38, Robinette 9-26. Florida, Kel.Taylor 14-47,
M.Brown 10-32, Showers 1-4, Murphy 9-(minus44).
PASSING-Vanderbilt, Robinette 6-12-0-57. Florida,
Murphy 30-46-3-305.
RECEIVING-Vanderbilt, Matthews 5-45, Pruitt 1-
12. Florida, Dunbar 6-77, T.Burton 6-74, Fulwood 3-
33, Patton 3-17, Showers 2-21, Kel.Taylor 2-21,
Ch.Thompson 2-13, M.Brown 2-12, Robinson 2-12,
Westbrook 1-17, Pittman 1-8.




Sprint Cup

AdvoCare 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 139.222 mph.
2.(11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 139.023.
3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 138.942.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 138.851.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 138.627.
6. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 138.595.
7. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 138.52.
8. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 138.446.
9. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 138.297.
10. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 138.069.
11. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 138.053.
12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 137.968.
13. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 137.736.
14. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 137.704.
15. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 137.652.
16. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 137.41.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 137.237.
18. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 137.195.
19. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 137.153.
20. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 136.971.
21. (43)AricAlmirola, Ford, 136.945.
22. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 136.69.
23. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 136.679.
24. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 136.096.
25. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 136.008.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 135.962.
27. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 135.947.
28. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 135.793.
29. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 135.716.
30. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 135.578.
31. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 135.399.
32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 135.379.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 135.323.
34. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 135.277.
35. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 135.11.
36. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 134.862.
37. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
38. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (33)Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 4 3 .571 -
Toronto 3 4 .429 1
Boston 3 4 .429 1
NewYork 2 3 .400 1
Brooklyn 2 4 .333 1/
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 4 3 .571 -




STATE
Continued from Page B1


was really happy to be here
today and he was pleased with
how well he did."
Dylan Earnheart of Crystal
River competed in the 200 IM,
his second time qualifying for
the state meet Earnheart placed
22nd last year as a sophomore.
After placing fourth at region-


Atlanta
Charlotte
Orlando
Washington


Indiana
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit
Chicago


3 3 .500
3 3 .500
3 4 .429
2 3 .400
Central Division
W L Pct
7 0 1.000
3 4 .429
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
2 3 .400


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 5 1 .833
Houston 4 3 .571
Dallas 4 3 .571
New Orleans 3 3 .500
Memphis 3 3 .500
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 4 1 .800
Minnesota 4 2 .667
Portland 3 2 .600
Denver 1 4 .200
Utah 0 7 .000
Pacific Division
W L Pct
Phoenix 4 2 .667
L.A. Clippers 4 3 .571
Golden State 4 3 .571
L.A. Lakers 3 4 .429
Sacramento 1 4 .200
Friday's Games
Boston 91, Orlando 89
Philadelphia 94, Cleveland 79
Indiana 91, Toronto 84
Washington 112, Brooklyn 108, OT
NewYork 101, Charlotte 91
Oklahoma City 119, Detroit 110
Chicago 97, Utah 73
Minnesota 116, Dallas 108
New Orleans 96, L.A. Lakers 85
San Antonio 76, Golden State 74
Phoenix 114, Denver 103
Portland 104, Sacramento 91
Saturday's Games
Toronto 115, Utah 91
Indiana 96, Brooklyn 91
Cleveland 127, Philadelphia 125,20T
Boston 111, Miami 110
Atlanta 104, Orlando 94
L.A. Clippers 107, Houston 94
Memphis 108, Golden State 90
Dallas 91, Milwaukee 83
Portland at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
San Antonio at New York, 12 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
TampaBay 16 12 4 0 24 54 39
Toronto 17 11 6 0 22 51 40
Detroit 18 9 5 4 22 45 48
Boston 16 10 5 1 21 45 30
Ottawa 17 7 6 4 18 53 51
Montreal 17 8 8 1 17 44 38
Florida 17 310 4 10 34 60
Buffalo 19 315 1 7 33 61
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 17 11 6 0 22 50 40
Washington 17 9 7 1 19 56 48
N.Y Rangers 16 8 8 0 16 35 43
Carolina 17 6 7 4 16 32 48
N.Y Islanders 17 6 8 3 15 49 56
New Jersey 16 4 7 5 13 30 44
Columbus 16 610 0 12 41 46
Philadelphia 16 510 1 11 26 44
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 15 13 2 0 26 50 27
Chicago 17 11 2 4 26 61 45
St. Louis 15 11 2 2 24 52 34
Minnesota 18 10 4 4 24 48 40
Nashville 16 8 6 2 18 37 49
Dallas 17 8 7 2 18 46 52
Winnipeg 18 7 9 2 16 45 51
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 18 14 3 1 29 63 44
Phoenix 18 12 4 2 26 60 56
San Jose 16 10 2 4 24 59 36
Vancouver 18 11 5 2 24 52 46
LosAngeles 16 10 6 0 20 45 40
Calgary 17 6 9 2 14 47 61
Edmonton 18 412 2 10 44 70
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Toronto 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0
Colorado 4, Calgary 2
Anaheim 6, Buffalo 2
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 3, Carolina 2, SO
Phoenix 4, Washington 3, SO
Philadelphia 4, Edmonton 2
Ottawa 3, Florida 2
Boston 3, Toronto 1
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2, OT
Columbus 5, N.Y Islanders 2
St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago 5, Dallas 2
Vancouver at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
N.Y Islanders at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Nashville at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Washington at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 1 p.m.




Glantz-Culver Line
For Nov. 10
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
atTennessee 13/2 12/2 (41) Jacksonville
at Green Bay 9 1 (47) Philadelphia
at Pittsburgh 31 3 (431/2) Buffalo
at N.Y Giants 6/2 7 (43/2) Oakland
at Indianapolis 12 9/2 (44) St. Louis
Seattle 6/2 5 (44/2) at Atlanta
Cincinnati 2/2 1/2 (44) at Baltimore
at Chicago +2/2 Pk (52/2) Detroit
atSan Fran. 6/2 6 (43) Carolina
atArizona 1 2/2 (41) Houston
Denver 7 7 (58) at San Diego
at N.Orleans 6/2 6/2 (54) Dallas
Monday
Miami 3/ 2/2 (41)atTampa Bay


als in a school record time of
2:05.21, Earnheart didn't make it
into the top 16 in the 200 meter
IM (2:06.19) on Saturday to ad-
vance out of the prelims and
ended up placing 19th overall.
"He was seeded 19th and
ended up finishing 19th," Crys-
tal River head coach Bill Wells
said of Earnheart "We're happy
with the season and he's got a
lot of work to do over the offsea-
son, but he's looking forward to
a great senior year"


SCOREBOARD









Hawks clip Magic Lightning strike
S^^ *' I sTN ^ ^^^^


Associated Press

ATLANTA -Jeff Teague had 19
points and 13 assists, Paul Millsap
scored 18 points with 11 rebounds
and the Atlanta Hawks beat the Or-
lando Magic 104-94 on Saturday
night.
Arron Afflalo finished with 21
points for Orlando, which has
dropped 15 straight on the road dat-
ing to last March 4.
Mike Scott had 17 points in a re-
serve role and Al Horford scored 15
and Kyle Korver added 14 for At-
lanta.
Korver made a 3 in his 79th con-
secutive game to surpass Dennis
Scott and tie Michael Adams for
second place on the NBA career
list. After Korver hit a 3 on a fast
break late in the fourth, Teague's
fastbreak layup made it 97-88 with
1:41 remaining.
The Hawks have won nine
straight over the Magic at Philips
Arena.
Celtics 111, Heat 110
MIAMI Jeff Green hit a 3-pointer at
the buzzer to lift the Boston Celtics to a
111-110 victory over the Miami Heat.
Gerald Wallace's pass found Green
in the corner, where he unleashed a
shot over the outstretched hands of Le-
Bron James. The shot was confirmed
after a video review, giving the Celtics
their third consecutive win.
Wallace hit a layup with 1.6 seconds
remaining and fouled Dwayne Wade
with 0.6 seconds remaining. Wade
missed the first free throw and deliber-
ately bounced the second attempt off
the backboard.
Green finished with 24 points and
was 5 of 8 on 3-pointers. Avery Bradley
scored 17 points and Jordan Crawford
added 15 for the Celtics.
James led Miami with 25 points and
10 assists. Chris Bosh had 20 points
and Wade finished with 18.
Clippers 107, Rockets 94
HOUSTON Blake Griffin and J.J.
Redick scored 22 points each to rally
the Los Angeles Clippers to a 107-94
win over the Houston Rockets.
Jamal Crawford had 16 points, Chris
Paul added 14 points and 13 assists
and DeAndre Jordan had 12 points and
18 rebounds for the Clippers. Griffin
also had seven rebounds and Redick
shot 8 for 15 from the field.
Dwight Howard had 21 points and
eight rebounds for the Rockets, but was
just 5 for 11 on free throws. Chandler
Parsons added 23 points and eight re-
bounds, while Patrick Beverley scored
19 points.
James Harden, who was a game-
time decision with a bruised left foot,
had 12 points on 4-for-15 shooting.
Cavaliers 127,
76ers 125, 20T
CLEVELAND Kyrie Irving scored a
season-high 39 points and hit the
game-winning layup with 0.6 seconds
remaining in the second overtime to lift
the Cleveland Cavaliers a 127-125 win
over the Philadelphia 76ers.
After rookie Michael Carter-Williams'
3-pointer Irving tied the game with 11.3
seconds remaining, the Cavaliers called
timeout. Irving, who missed potential
game-winning shots at the end of regu-
lation and the first overtime, took the in-
bounds pass, avoided a double team
near the top of the key, drove the lane
and scored on a left-handed lay-in.
Philadelphia called timeout, but
Carter-Williams' inbounds pass went out
of bounds.
Thaddeus Young's lay-in with 5.5
seconds remaining tied the game in
regulation and Evan Turner's baseline


Associated Press
Orlando Magic shooting guard Arron Afflalo drives against the Atlanta
Hawks in the second half Saturday in Atlanta. Atlanta won 104-94.


drive tied it with 8.7 seconds left in the
first overtime.
Turner led the Sixers with 31 points
and Young had 29.
Mavericks 91, Bucks 83
MILWAUKEE Monta Ellis got the
best of his former team, shaking off
boos from the crowd while contributing
18 points and five assists as the Dallas
Mavericks held off the Milwaukee Bucks
91-83.
Dirk Nowitzki had 16 points and
Shawn Marion added 14 for the Maver-
icks, who blew a big first-half lead with
sloppy offensive play but managed to
hang on in the fourth quarter.
O.J. Mayo had 28 points and Caron
Butler added 19 for the Bucks, who
were playing their second straight game
without forward Larry Sanders. Mayo
also was facing his former team.
Grizzlies 108, Warriors 90
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Zach Randolph
had 23 points and 11 rebounds, six
Memphis players reached double fig-
ures and the Grizzlies defeated the
Golden State Warriors 108-90.
Mike Conley added 20 points and six
assists, Marc Gasol had 18 points and
Memphis won its 10th straight over the
Warriors. Mike Miller finished with 15
points, connecting on all but one of his
five shots outside the 3-point arc.
Stephen Curry, who returned after
missing Friday night's loss at San Anto-
nio with a bruised left ankle, led the
Warriors with 22 points. Andre Iguodala
had 19 points, hitting 8 of 10 shots.
David Lee finished with 13 points and
nine rebounds before fouling out in the
fourth quarter.
Klay Thompson scored 10 of his 12


points in the third quarter for the Warriors.
Memphis dominated the inside game
all night with a 54-18 advantage in the
paint, outrebounding the Warriors 44-33.
Pacers 96, Nets 91
NEW YORK- Paul George scored
24 points and the Indiana Pacers im-
proved the NBA's only undefeated
record and the best start in franchise
history to 7-0 by beating the Brooklyn
Nets 96-91.
David West added 18 points and hit
the clinching free throws for the Pacers,
who had won their first six games in
1970-71, when they played in the ABA.
They have the longest winning streak to
open an NBA season since both the
Lakers and New Orleans were 8-0 in
2010-11, according to STATS.
Roy Hibbert finished with 15 points
and 11 rebounds, and Lance Stephen-
son also scored 15 points.
Deron Williams and Joe Johnson
each had 17 points for the Nets, who
fell to 2-4 and lost at home for the first
time this season. Brook Lopez scored
16 and Paul Pierce had 15.
Raptors 115, Jazz 91
TORONTO Tyler Hansbrough
scored a season-high 23 points, DeMar
DeRozan added 18 and the Toronto
Raptors snapped a seven-game home
losing streak against Utah, routing the
winless Jazz 115-91.
Jonas Valanciunas scored 14 points
and Rudy Gay had 11 as the Raptors
earned their first home victory over the
Jazz since Dec. 22, 2004.
Raptors guard Kyle Lowry sprained
his right ankle on the final play of the
first half and did not return. He finished
with nine points.


Associated Press

DETROIT -Teddy Pur-
cell's goal at 3:51 of over-
time gave the Tampa Bay
Lightning a 3-2 win over
the Detroit Red Wings on
Saturday night
Ryan Malone and
Steven Stamkos also
scored for Tampa Bay,
which got its first win over
Detroit since Jan. 12,1994.
Ben Bishop stopped 25
shots.
Henrik Zetterberg
scored both goals for De-
troit, which lost its fifth
straight at home. Jimmy
Howard made 31 saves.
Purcell got his fifth goal,
from the slot, after a
turnover by Kyle Quincey
behind the Detroit net.
Zetterberg tied the game
with 4:12 left in the third
on a slap shot from the
right circle for his second
of the game and 10th goal
of the season.
Senators 3,
Panthers 2
OTTAWA-- Kyle Turris
had a goal and an assist to
help the Ottawa Senators
beat Florida 3-2, spoiling
Peter Horachek's debut as
the Panthers' coach.
Horachek was promoted
from the team's American
Hockey League affiliate in
San Antonio on Friday after
the club fired Kevin Dineen
and assistant coaches Gord
Murphy and Craig Ramsay.
The Panthers have lost eight
in a row to fall to 3-10-4.
Flyers 4, Oilers 2
PHILADELPHIA-
Philadelphia captain Claude
Giroux ended his 21-game
goal drought and Jay Rose-
hill, Scott Hartnell and Vinny
Lecavalier also scored in a
win over Edmonton.
David Perron and Taylor
Hall scored for the Oilers.
Philadelphia's win was its
first at home since Oct. 24
against the New York Rangers
and ended a stretch of 175:22
without a goal at home.
Bruins 3, Maple
Leafs 1
BOSTON Patrice Berg-
eron scored a power-play
goal early in the third period
and Tuukka Rask stopped 33
shots, lifting the Boston Bru-
ins to a 3-1 win over Toronto
in the teams' first meeting
since their playoff series last
spring.
Bergeron also added an
empty-netter with 22 seconds
to play, and Zdeno Chara also
had a power-play goal for
Boston. The Bruins won for
only the third time in seven
games.
Joffrey Lupul scored for the
Maple Leafs, who lost for just
the second time in six games.
Wild 3,
Hurricanes 2, SO
RALEIGH, N.C. -Jason
Pominville scored a goal in
regulation and the game-win-
ner in the shootout to lift the


Minnesota Wild over the Car-
olina Hurricanes 3-2.
Justin Fontaine got the
tying goal midway through the
second period and Josh
Harding made 27 saves for
Minnesota, which won for the
seventh time in nine games.
Blue Jackets 5,
Islanders 2
COLUMBUS, Ohio Ryan
Johansen and Brandon Dubin-
sky each had a goal and two
assists, and the Columbus
Blue Jackets beat the New
York Islanders 5-2 to snap a
five-game losing streak.
Cam Atkinson and R.J.
Umberger also scored for the
Blue Jackets, who pulled
away with three goals in the
third period. James Wis-
niewski added an empty-net
goal and an assist.
Blackhawks 5,
Stars 2
DALLAS Marian Hossa
scored two goals and the
Chicago Blackhawks de-
feated the Dallas Stars 5-2.
Patrick Sharp assisted on
the first four goals for
Chicago.
Patrick Kane added a
power-play goal and Niklas
Hjalmarsson had a short-
handed empty-net goal and
Jonathan Toews also scored
for Chicago.
The Blackhawks used two
short passes across the ice,
from Sharp and Andrew Shaw
across the ice to Kane, to set
up the game-winning shot at
18:15 of the second period.
Against Chicago's penalty-
killing unit, which ranked last
in the NHL, Dallas failed to
score on six power plays. The
Stars are 0 for 24 at home
this season.
Hossa evened the score 1-
1 in the first period after Cody
Eakin had scored for Dallas.
Toews scored midway
through the second period,
after a goal by Tyler Seguin.
Blues 2,
Penguins 1
ST. LOUIS Kevin Shat-
tenkirk's first goal of the sea-
son midway through the third
period sent the St. Louis
Blues to a 2-1 victory over the
Pittsburgh Penguins.
Ryan Reaves also scored
for St. Louis and Jaroslav
Halak stopped 19 shots as
the Blues won for the 11th
time in 15 games to start the
season. It's the first time
they've done that since 2003-
04, also the best start in fran-
chise history.
It was St. Louis' first regula-
tion victory against the Pen-
guins since a 4-1 win Dec. 19,
2006, in Pittsburgh.
Jussi Jokinen scored and
Marc-Andre Fleury made 30
saves for the Penguins, who
have dropped two straight
after a four-game winning
streak. The 20 shots were a
season low for Pittsburgh.


College basketball: No. 3 Louisville opens with win


Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. Presea-
son All-America Russ Smith
had 21 points and five assists
and No. 3 Louisville outscored
College of Charleston 22-3 over
the final 6:41 on Saturday to
pull away to a 70-48 victory in
the first game of its national
championship defense.
Smith's new backcourtmate
Chris Jones, last season's junior
college player of the year, added
12 points and five assists.
Charleston trailed 48-45 after
freshman Canyon Barry's hit a
17-footer with 6:55 to play Then
Smith asserted himself, hitting
two free throws and driving to
find forwards Montrezl Harrell
and Wayne Blackshear for easy
baskets that gave the Cardinals
a 54-45 lead with 5:05 left.
Charleston scored again with
2:42 remaining, making it 61-47
and ending a 13-0 Louisville run.
No. 11 Ohio St. 89,
Morgan St. 50
COLUMBUS, Ohio Shannon
Scott scored a career-high 16 points
and LaQuinton Ross, also starting
for the first time as a junior, had 14
points and a personal-best 11 re-
bounds for Ohio State.
Lenzelle Smith Jr. led the way


with 18 points and spurred a first-
half spurt for the Buckeyes, who im-
proved to 93-18 in home openers
and 89-22 in season debuts.
Justin Black had 13 points, lan
Chiles 12 and Anthony Hubbard 11
for Morgan State, which was meet-
ing the Buckeyes for the first time.
Sam Thompson added 14 points
and freshman Marc Loving had 10
for Ohio State. Scott had seven as-
sists to go with his 16 points, while
Ross registered his first career dou-
ble-double.
No. 15 Gonzaga 100,
Bryant 76
SPOKANE, Wash. Sam Dower
had 21 points and a career-high 17 re-
bounds to lead Gonzaga past Bryant
in the season opener for both teams.
The 6-foot-9 senior, making his
eighth start for the Bulldogs, shot 8
of 13 from the field and posted his
second career double-double.
Gerard Coleman, a transfer from
Providence, scored 15 points for
Gonzaga before a sellout crowd of
6,000 at the McCarthey Athletic
Center. Junior guards Gary Bell Jr.
and Kevin Pangos added 14 apiece,
and Przemek Karnowski had 10
points despite playing only 12 min-
utes due to foul trouble.


No. 16 Wichita St. 93,
Emporia St. 50
WICHITA, Kan. Cleanthony
Early scored 21 points and Ron
Baker added 17 to lead Wichita
State in its first game since its Final
Four appearance.
The Shockers cruised in their sea-
son opener against Emporia State,
an NCAA Division II team playing for
the second consecutive day, by
shooting 51.7 percent and attempt-
ing 22 more free throws than the
Hornets.
Baker was 7 of 9 from the field, in-
cluding 2 of 3 from 3-point range,
while adding six assists. Fred Van-
Vleet had 12 points and six assists
for Wichita State.
Women

No. 1 UConn 89,
Hartford 34
HARTFORD, Conn. Moriah
Jefferson scored a career-high 17
points and top-ranked Connecticut
began the defense of its eighth na-
tional title with an 89-34 rout of in-
state rival Hartford on Saturday.
The sophomore guard, who also
had five assists, led a balanced of-
fensive that saw four players reach
double figures.
Center Stefanie Dolson had 16


points and six rebounds. Breanna
Stewart added 14 points and
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis chipped
in 12 for the Huskies.
No. 3 Stanford 83,
Boston College 71
BOSTON -Amber Orrange had
19 points, 10 assists and nine re-
bounds, just missing a triple-double
for Stanford in a season-opening win
against Boston College.
Chiney Ogwumike led with 30
points and 14 rebounds and Bonnie
Samuelson scored 15 for the Cardi-
nal, who gave coach Tara Van-
Derveer her 895th career victory.
Kristen Doherty had 16 points and
Shayra Brown scored 10 for the
Eagles.
No. 5 Louisville 101,
Loyola Chicago 54
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Bria Smith
scored 16 points and Louisville
routed Loyola Chicago in the first
round of the Preseason WNIT, spoil-
ing the debut of Ramblers coach Sh-
eryl Swoopes.
Sara Hammond, one of six
Louisville players to score in double
figures, had 11 points and 11 re-
bounds in the season opener for
both teams. Tia Gibbs, who missed
last season with a hip injury, added


13 points.
No. 6 Notre Dame 99,
UNC Wilmington 50
SOUTH BEND, Ind.- Jewell
Loyd and Michaela Mabrey scored
19 points each Saturday to lead
Notre Dame to a victory over UNC
Wilmington.
Despite playing without injured
senior forward Natalie Achonwa,
Notre Dame dominated the boards,
outrebounding UNCW 52-24. Fresh-
man forward Taya Reimer led with 12
rebounds, followed by Loyd with 11.
No. 10 Baylor 110,
Grambling State 55
WACO, Texas Odyssey Sims
had 28 points to lead five Baylor
players in double-figure scoring and
the 10Oth-ranked Lady Bears cruised
to a season-opening victory over
Grambling State in their first game
without Brittney Griner.
Mariah Chandler added 14
points while freshman Nina Davis
and Kristina Higgins both had 11
for Baylor, which had the game's
first 16 points before Grambling (0-
1) finally scored nearly 5 minutes
into the game.
The Lady Bears extended their
nation's-best home winning streak to
58 in a row.


111 uVef-llllte


B4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hokies dance past 'Canes


No. 14Miami

loses; No. 19

UCF holds on

Associated Press

MIAMI GARDENS -
Trey Edmunds ran for four
touchdowns, the first three
of them set up by Miami
special-teams miscues, and
Virginia Tech knocked off
the 14th-ranked Hurricanes
42-24 on Saturday night
Edmunds had scoring
runs of 10, 2, 4 and 1 yards
for the Hokies (7-3, 4-2 At-
lantic Coast Conference).
Logan Thomas completed
25 of 31 passes for 366
yards, giving him consecu-
tive games of 300 yards or
more for the first time in
his Virginia Tech career
Stephen Morris com-
pleted 16 of 29 passes for
324 yards for Miami (7-2,
3-2), which lost its second
straight Morris had an 81-
yard touchdown pass to
Stacy Coley and an 84-
yarder to Allen Hums, but
the Hurricanes were still
outgained 549-352.
Virginia Tech held
Miami to 28 rushing yards.
The Hokies had 26 first
downs to Miami's 12.
The win turns the ACC's
Coastal Division into a
muddled mess.
No. 19 UCF 19,
Houston 14
ORLANDO William
Stanback scored two touch-
downs and No. 19 UCF held
off a late Houston threat to
win 19-14 and keep first place
in the American Athletic Con-
ference all to itself.
Storm Johnson added 127
yards rushing for UCF (7-1,4-
0), which has the inside track
to the league's automatic
BCS bid, with victories
against the Cougars and
Louisville.
The Cougars drove to the
UCF 10 in the final minute,
but came up empty on back-
to-back passes from John
O'Korn into the end zone. The
first went off star receiver De-
ontay Greenberry's finger tips
and the second sailed high.
O'Korn had a touchdown
pass and two interceptions for
the Cougars (7-2, 4-1).
The Knights had three give-
aways and lost receiver Bre-
shad Perriman to a targeting
hit early in the fourth quarter,
but rallied to preserve the win.
No. 1 Alabama 38,
No. 10 LSU 17
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -AJ
McCarron threw three touch-
down passes, T.J. Yeldon ran
for 133 yards and two scores
and No. 1 Alabama over-
whelmed No. 10 LSU 38-17.
The Crimson Tide (9-0, 6-0
Southeastern Conference)
turned to power football to
take control of a game that
was tied early in the third
quarter. Yeldon carried 18
times in the second half, 25
overall, after catching the
game-winning touchdown
pass in last season's meeting
with the Tigers (7-3, 3-3).


Associated Press
Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas shakes off a tackle by Miami defensive lineman Shayon Green during the
first half Saturday in Miami Gardens.


Alabama scored the final
21 points to brush aside its
first challenge since Game 2
against Texas A&M.
McCarron was a workman-
like 14-of-20 passing for 179
yards, letting Yeldon, Kenyan
Drake and their blockers as-
sert control.
Zach Mettenberger com-
pleted 16 of 23 passes for
241 yards and a touchdown
but was also sacked four
times.
It was the most points Ala-
bama has scored against
LSU since a 41-12 victory in
1947.
No. 11 Tex. A&M 51,
Miss. St. 41
COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Johnny Manziel
threw for 446 yards and tied a
career-high with five touch-
down passes to lead Texas
A&M to a win in what could be
the Heisman Trophy winner's
last home game.
The crowd chanted "One
more year! One more year!"
late in the game for Manziel,
who is eligible for the draft
after this season. Whether he
comes back remains to be
seen, but he went into the
stands to celebrate with the
student section when the
game was over.
Mississippi State cut the
lead to 10 points early in the
fourth quarter, but Manziel
threw his fifth touchdown pass
to make it 44-27 for A&M (8-2,
4-2 Southeastern Confer-
ence). The defense grabbed
an interception and Ben
Malena's 2-yard TD run ex-
tended the lead to 51-27.
Manziel set a school career
record for total yards with
9,040 and a single-season
record with 31 touchdown
passes. He became just the
second A&M quarterback to
run for 2,000 yards in a career
and has 3,313 yards passing
this year to become the first
Aggie with two 3,000-yard
passing seasons.


No. 7 Auburn 55,
Tennessee 23
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -Nick
Marshall gained 214 of
Auburn's 444 yards rushing
and the Tigers scored on a
punt return and kickoff return
against Tennessee.
Marshall ran for two touch-
downs on just 14 carries and
threw for a third score. Tre
Mason rushed for 117 yards
and three touchdowns as
Auburn (9-1,5-1 SEC) earned
its sixth straight victory and
averaged 8.4 yards per carry.
Chris Davis put Auburn
ahead for good and broke a
13-13 tie in the second quar-
ter with an 85-yard punt re-
turn, Auburn's longest since
1970 and third-longest ever.
Corey Grant returned the sec-
ond-half kickoff 90 yards for
another Auburn touchdown.
Auburn won while attempt-
ing just seven passes all day.
The Tigers had thrown just
nine passes last week in a 35-
17 victory over Arkansas.
No. 9 Missouri 48,
Kentucky 17
LEXINGTON, Ky. Maty
Mauk threw five touchdown
passes, four to Dorial Green-
Beckham, and No. 9 Missouri
cruised past Kentucky.
Making his fourth consecu-
tive start in place of the injured
James Franklin, the Tigers'
redshirt freshman completed
17 of 28 attempts for 203
yards and took full advantage
of 6-foot-6 sophomore Green-
Beckham, whose TD recep-
tions set a school record.
Mauk added a 6-yard scor-
ing pass to Henry Josey, who
also rushed for two TDs, in-
cluding an 86-yarder.
Missouri (9-1,5-1 South-
eastern Conference) allowed
Kentucky (2-7, 0-5) two touch-
downs in the third quarter but
the Mauk-to-Green-Beckham
connection answered both
scores with TDs.
The victory helped the


Tigers stay a half-game
ahead of idle South Carolina
(5-2) atop the East division
heading into their second bye
and gave coach Gary Pinkel
his fourth nine-win season in
13 years with Missouri.
No. 15 Okla. St. 42,
Kansas 6
STILLWATER, Okla. -
Clint Chelf completed 19 of 37
passes for 265 yards and
three touchdowns to lead No.
15 Oklahoma State to a 42-6
victory over Kansas Saturday.
Desmond Roland added 44
yards and a touchdown on 16
rushes for the Cowboys (8-1,
5-1 Big 12), who won their
fifth straight game. Roland
also had a 19-yard reception
for a score early in the second
quarter that gave OSU a 21-0
lead.
Montell Cozart threw for 58
yards while rushing for 55 on
18 carries for Kansas (2-7, 0-
6), which lost its sixth in a row.
Tony Pierson returned from a
three-game absence due to a
concussion and gained 87
yards on six rushes.
No. 21
Wisconsin 27,
BYU 17
MADISON, Wis. James
White ran for two touchdowns
and caught a pass for another
score, and Wisconsin stalled
BYU's fast-paced offense.
White finished with 147
yards rushing, while Chris
Borland looked just fine com-
ing back from a hamstring in-
jury in flying around the field
for 13 tackles and two sacks
for the Badgers (7-2).
Kyle Van Noy went step-
for-step with Borland in a
matchup of star linebackers
with eight tackles and an in-
terception for BYU (6-3).
Taysom Hill threw two touch-
down passes to Cody Hoff-
man, but the dual-treat
quarterback was held in
check by Wisconsin pressure.


No. 23
Arizona St. 20,
Utah 19
SALT LAKE CITY-- Taylor
Kelly ran for a touchdown and
threw for another in the fourth
quarter and Arizona State came
from behind to beat Utah.
Sun Devils All-America de-
fensive tackle Will Sutton
sealed the victory with an in-
terception at the line of scrim-
mage with 1:01 left at the
Utah 25.
Stifled by Utah's aggressive
defense for most of three
quarters, Kelly helped keep
the Sun Devils (7-2, 5-1 Pac-
12) in the driver's seat for the
Pac-12 South title.
Kelly finished 19-for-31
passing for 144 yards and
Marion Grice rushed 20 times
for 136 yards. Grice busted
through the Utah line and
rumbled 38 yards to set up
Kelly's 14-yard touchdown
pass to Richard Smith with
2:37 to play to make it 20-19.
Utah's Trevor Reilly sacked
Kelly on the 2-point conver-
sion attempt.
Kansas St. 49,
No. 25
Texas Tech 26
LUBBOCK, Texas Jake
Waters and Daniel Sams
each ran for two touchdowns
to lead Kansas State past
Texas Tech.
Sams' TDs came on a 1-
yard rush and a 5-yarder, and
Waters scored from 1 yard
and 13 yards.
Waters threw a 20-yard
touchdown to Tramaine
Thompson. John Hubert, who
scored on a 63-yard run early
in the game, finished with 157
yards on 23 carries to lead
the Wildcats.
Ty Zimmerman scored a
43-yard touchdown after inter-
cepting a pass from Texas
Tech backup quarterback
Baker Mayfield early in the
fourth quarter.


SPORTS


Vandy beats Florida 34-17, snaps series streak


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida's in-
jury-riddled season has reached
a new low and it likely will end
without a bowl trip.
Tyler Murphy's four turnovers
led to three touchdowns, helping
Vanderbilt embarrass Florida 34-
17 Saturday for the program's
first win in Gainesville since 1945.
The Commodores snapped a
22-game losing streak in the lop-
sided series and moved a step
closer to becoming bowl eligible
for the third consecutive season
under coach James Franklin.
Franklin also notched another
signature win, giving Vanderbilt
victories over Southeastern Con-
ference powerhouses Georgia
and Florida in the same season
for the first time in school history
"The difference in the game
was turnovers," Franklin said.
"Our defense was able to get
turnovers. If you look at it statis-
tically, it doesn't make a whole
lot of sense. But because of the
turnovers ... our offense was in
short field a lot of times, and that
was the difference of the game."


Murphy was Vandy's MVP
The Commodores (5-4, 2-4)
scored after each of Murphy's
three interceptions, building a
24-3 lead after getting the ball in-
side the 22-yard line three times.
Vanderbilt finished with 12 first
downs and 187 yards. Florida
had 26 first downs and 353 yards.
Once ranked, Florida has its
second four-game losing streak
in coach Will Muschamp's three
seasons, fueling more specula-
tion about his future in
Gainesville.
"I certainly don't like the
product we are putting on the
field, and that's my responsibil-
ity," Muschamp said. "I take full
credit for that. When it's good,
it's good. When it's not good, it's
not good and it hasn't been
good. And that's on me.
"I'm not asking for anybody to
be happy I'm not asking anybody
to give a pass. This is the real
deal. This is the University of
Florida. My expectation I'll
guarantee is as high or higher
than anyone sitting in those
stands. There's nobody more let
down or hurt or competitive-


Associated Press
Vanderbilt running back Jerron Seymour scores a touchdown with
Florida linebacker Michael Taylor hanging on to him during the second
half Saturday in Gainesville. Vanderbilt defeated Florida 34-17.


edge dented a little bit by this.
So it's on me. We'll get it turned.
I can assure you that"
Murphy completed 28 of 45
passes for a career-high 297
yards. But his three intercep-
tions he also lost a fumble -
were key
"I didn't play well," Murphy


said. "I mean, when you throw
three interceptions, you put the
defense in a bind, you kill your
momentum offensively I've got
to play better"
He overthrew Quinton Dun-
bar in the first quarter, a pass
Andre Hall picked and returned
to the Florida 10-yard line. Jer-


ron Seymour scored on the next
play, breaking five tackles on the
run and putting the Com-
modores ahead 10-0.
It was a big boost for a team
that had been outscored 85-24 in
the first quarter in its previous
eight games.
It also was just the start of
Florida's failures.
Two drives later, Murphy un-
derthew a pass as he was getting
hit. Kenny Ladler picked it off
and returned it to the Florida 22.
Quarterback Patton Robinette,
making his second start in place
ofAustyn Carta-Samuels, scram-
bled for a 5-yard score four plays
later to make it 17-0.
Florida finally got on the board,
but only after a chorus of boos.
The Gators had first-and-goal
inside the 1 when Murphy
checked to an option play to
the short side of the field. Mur-
phy pitched to Kelvin Taylor,
who fumbled out of bounds for
a 5-yard loss. The offense never
recovered, and Solomon Pat-
ton's third-down drop at the
goal line left Florida to kick a
field goal.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 BS



Kirk,


Baird



co-lead

Associated Press

ST SIMONS ISLAND,
Ga. Chris Kirk and
Briny Baird each made
birdie on the 18th hole
Saturday to separate
themselves from the
pack at Sea Island.
But not by much.
Kirk holed a 25-foot
putt for a 2-under 68.
Baird followed him with
an 8-foot birdie putt for a
67. They were tied for the
lead going into the last
round, a shot ahead of
Kevin Stadler, Brian Gay
and John Senden. Twelve
players were separated
by four shots going into
Sunday, a group that in-
cludes Matt Kuchar and
Webb Simpson.
Baird is playing his
365th event on the PGA
Tour without ever win-
ning. The top eight play-
ers on the leaderboard
have combined for seven
career wins, and that in-
cludes Gay's four wins.
The winner Sunday
gets an exemption to the
Masters.
Rinker leads
Legends Tour
PALM HARBOR Lau-
rie Rinker had two back-
nine eagles and finished
with a 6-under 67 on Satur-
day to take a three-stroke
lead after the first round of
the Legends Tour Open.
Rinker had a 9-foot
eagle putt on the par-5
10th and a 20-footer on the
par-5 15th.
Trish Johnson, Lorie
Kane and Nancy Scranton
were tied for second at 70
in the season-ending event
on Innisbrook Resort's Is-
land Course.
Higa, Ichinose,
Oyama tied at
Mizuno Classic
SHIMA, Japan -
Japan's Mamiko Higa, Yuki
Ichinose and Shiho Oyama
shared the second-round
lead Saturday in the Mizuno
Classic, the final tourna-
ment in the LPGA Tour's
five-event Asian swing.
Higa and Ichinose shot
6-under 66 to match
Oyama at 8 under at Kin-
tetsu Kashikojima in the
event also sanctioned by
the Japan LPGA Tour.
Oyama, the first-round
leader, had her second
straight 68.
American Brittany Linci-
come and Japan's Asako
Fujimoto were a stroke
back. Lincicome had a 68,
and Fujimoto shot 67.
Defending champion
Stacy Lewis was 5 under
after a 68. The American
overcame a seven-stroke
deficit in the final round last
year, birdieing the last
three holes for a 64 and a
one-shot victory. She's the
top-ranked player in the
field at No. 3 and has three
victories this year.




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Assistants take over for NFL squads


Del Rio, Phillips

back in head

coaching roles

Associated Press

Jack Del Rio and Wade
Phillips know all about the
stress of being head coaches,
about the thrills and the
disappointments.
Both veteran defensive coor-
dinators have been thrust into
the top spot again because of ill-
nesses to John Fox in Denver
and Gary Kubiak in Houston.
Del Rio was appointed interim
coach in Denver to replace Fox,
who had heart surgery Monday
Del Rio was the head coach of
the Jaguars from 2003-11 before
joining the Broncos.
Phillips is stepping in for Ku-
biak, who collapsed on the side-
line at halftime of last Sunday
night's game against the Indi-
anapolis Colts and was hospital-
ized for what was described as a
"mini-stroke."
Phillips was the head coach of
the Dallas Cowboys from 2007
until midway through the 2010
season, compiling a 34-22 record.
He also was head coach of the
Buffalo Bills from 1998-2000,
going 29-19 and leading the team
to two playoff appearances.
Del Rio will try to keep the
Broncos (7-1) winning when they
visit San Diego today, with an
AFC West showdown against un-
beaten Kansas City coming up a
week later
"We believe we have a good
football team," Del Rio said.
"We're on a mission. We're on a
mission to carry on and continue
what coach Fox has going with
this football team. We all want to
make him proud."
For Phillips, his job is to end the
Texans' six-game losing streak
when they travel to Arizona.
"It was certainly shocking
what happened in the ballgame
and the aftermath of that,"
Phillips said about Kubiak's col-
lapse. "We're certainly glad that
he's getting better We've had
kind of an upside-down season.
Generally, things haven't been
going our way very well. This
was another example of that."
The Texans players were glad
to see Kubiak at practice on
Thursday
"To actually see him and hear
him talk to us, that means every-
thing," left tackle Duane Brown
said. "You can hear all about
somebody doing well ... but see-
ing them out and about and
walking around, that means
everything to us."
Vikings 34, Redskins 27
At Minneapolis, Adrian Peter-
son ran for 75 yards and two
scores, and Minnesota stopped
Washington at the 4 in the final
seconds to hold on for a victory
Thursday night.
Christian Ponder went 17 for
21 for 174 yards with two touch-
downs and an interception be-
fore leaving late in the third
quarter with an injured left
shoulder John Carlson had
seven catches for 98 yards and a
touchdown for the Vikings (2-7).
Robert Griffin III was 24 of 37
for 281 yards and three touch-
downs for the Redskins (3-6),
who led 27-14 early in the third


Associated Press


Jacksonville running back Maurice Jones-Drew and the Jaguars will battle the Tennessee Titans today.


quarter But Santana Moss
couldn't get his second foot in
bounds on a pass in the corner of
the end zone on fourth down,
giving Minnesota the victory
Also today, it's Detroit at
Chicago, Philadelphia at Green
Bay, Jacksonville at Tennessee,
Cincinnati at Baltimore, St Louis
at Indianapolis, Seattle at At-
lanta, Oakland at the New York
Giants, Buffalo at Pittsburgh,
Carolina at San Francisco, Den-
ver at San Diego, Houston atAri-
zona and Dallas at New Orleans.
Miami plays at winless Tampa
Bay on Monday night.
Off this week are Cleveland
(4-5), Kansas City (9-0), the New
York Jets (5-4) and New England
(7-2).
Denver (7-1) at San Diego (4-4)
Chargers coach Mike McCoy,
who called plays for Peyton
Manning last season, gets a
chance to beat his former team.
Both clubs faced the Redskins
in their previous game.
The Broncos are coming off
their bye week. Before that, they
scored the last 38 points in beat-
ing Washington 45-21 as Man-
ning overcame four turnovers to
throw for 354 yards and four
touchdowns.
The Chargers are coming off a
30-24 overtime loss at Washing-
ton in which they had three
shots at the end zone from the 1-
yard line in the closing seconds
but failed to score a touchdown.
The Chargers face the Bron-
cos and the unbeaten Chiefs
twice each during the season's
final eight weeks.
Houston (2-6) at Arizona (4-4)
Case Keenum gets his third
straight start at quarterback for
Houston, which despite its los-
ing record, enters the game first
in the NFL in defense and
eighth in offense.
The Texans, who have lost six
straight, have never dropped
seven in a row
Arizona rookie running back
Andre Ellington leads the NFL
at 7.7 yards per carry for players


with a minimum of 40 attempts.
Detroit (5-3) at Chicago (5-3)
In a matchup between two of
the three teams tied for the NFC
North lead, the Bears get quar-
terback Jay Cutler back earlier
than expected from a torn groin
sustained Oct. 20.
The Bears had a bye after
their 45-41 loss to Washington,
which provided some extra time
for Cutler to recover
The Lions, who haven't won
at Soldier Field since 2007, will
go for a season sweep against
the Bears after beating them in
September
Philadelphia (4-5)
at Green Bay (5-3)
The Packers hope to keep
pace in the NFC North race
without Aaron Rodgers, ex-
pected to miss the game after
hurting his collarbone in Mon-
day night's loss to Chicago.
Seneca Wallace will likely get
the nod for Green Bay, which
will rely on running backs Eddie
Lacy and James Starks.
The Eagles don't have the
same quarterback questions.
Nick Foles, coming off a record-
tying seven touchdown passes
against the Raiders, should start
for Philadelphia.
Carolina (5-3)
at San Francisco (6-2)
Both of these teams enter on
a roll.
The 49ers have won five
straight since dropping two in a
row in Weeks 2 and 3, scoring 31
or more points in each of those
victories.
Cam Newton and the Panthers
are unbeaten in their past four
games and have scored 30 or
more points in their five wins.
Carolina trails first-place New
Orleans by one game in the NFC
South.
Dallas (54) at New Orleans (6-2)
Tony Romo and Drew Brees
could put up plenty of points in
this prime-time matchup.
Saints defensive coordinator
Rob Ryan will be trying to stop
Romo, going against the club


that fired him last season.
The Saints have won 11
straight in the Superdome at
night, including playoff games.
The last time New Orleans lost a
night game at home was Dec. 19,
2009 against Dallas.
Miami (4-4) at Tampa Bay (0-8),
Monday night
The Dolphins are dealing with
the distractions caused by the
Jonathan Martin and Richie In-
cognito saga.
The Buccaneers, meanwhile,
are looking for their first victory
of the season after blowing a
21-0 lead at Seattle last week.
"I'm 0-8. That's enough on my
back," Tampa Bay offensive line-
man Donald Penn said.
Cincinnati (6-3)
at Baltimore (3-5)
The Bengals, who will play
their first full game without All-
Pro defensive lineman Geno
Atkins, can take a big step to-
ward winning the AFC North
with a victory at the Super Bowl
champs.
Starting on Sunday, the
Ravens play four of their next
five games at home.
"It's always a big advantage
here," defensive coordinator
Dean Pees said. "This crowd is
the best I've ever been around in
all the years I've coached."
Oakland (3-5) at
New York Giants (2-6)
The Giants, coming off a bye,
have won two in a row and start
a stretch of three consecutive
home games.
Eli Manning will be facing a
Raiders secondary that gave up
a record-tying seven touchdown
passes last week to the Eagles.
And the Giants' defense has not
given up a touchdown in 10
quarters, going back to the sec-
ond period of a game against
Chicago on Oct. 10.
Oakland has lost 11 straight
games in the Eastern time zone
since beating Pittsburgh in De-
cember 2009. The Raiders have
been outscored 353-178 in those
games.


Jacksonville (0-8)
at Tennessee (4-4)
The Titans need to avoid re-
peating some unpleasant recent
history
They became the first team to
lose to the previously winless
Colts in 2011, a defeat that kept
the Titans out of the playoffs by
virtue of a tiebreaker. In 2012,
Tennessee became the first team
to lose in Jacksonville and
dropped four of its final six
while slumping to a 6-10 finish.
For the Jaguars, receiver
Justin Blackmon was given an
indefinite suspension last week
for violating the NFLs sub-
stance-abuse policy
St Louis (3-6)
at Indianapolis (6-2)
This matchup features two of
the top sacks leaders in the
NFL.
The Colts' Robert Mathis
leads the NFL with 111/2 sacks.
St. Louis' Robert Quinn leads
the NFC with 10, Chris Long is in
the conference's top 10 with 5 1/2
and the Rams are tied for third
in the NFL with 29 sacks. Still,
they have lost three straight.
Seattle (8-1) at Atlanta (2-6)
The Falcons, who started the
season with Super Bowl aspira-
tions, hope to pull an upset
against one of the top teams in
the league.
But Atlanta will need better
play from quarterback Matt
Ryan, who has thrown seven in-
terceptions over the past two
weeks.
The Seahawks are coming off
lackluster victories over St.
Louis and Tampa Bay, teams
with a combined record of 3-14.
Buffalo (3-6) at Pittsburgh (3-6)
The Steel Curtain couldn't han-
dle Tom Brady and the Patriots
last week as the Steelers allowed
55 points and 610 yards. But this
week they face Bills rookie quar-
terback EJ Manuel, expected to
return after missing four games
with a sprained right knee.
Five of Pittsburgh's six losses
have been by seven points or
more.


NFL Stats CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
and 7 2 0 .778 234 1
5 4 0 .556 169 2
4 4 0 .500 174 1
3 6 0 .333 189 2
South
W L T Pct PF
Ais 6 2 0 .750 214 1
e 4 4 0 .500 173 1
2 6 0 .250 146 2
lie 0 8 0 .000 86 2
North
W L T Pct PF
6 3 0 .667 217 1
4 5 0 .444 172 1
3 5 0 .375 168 1
S 2 6 0 .250 156 2
West
W L T Pct PF
ity 9 0 0 1.000 215 1
7 1 0 .875 343 2
S 4 4 0 .500 192 1
3 5 0 .375 146 1
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
5 4 0 .556 257 2
hia 4 5 0 .444 225 2
n 3 6 0 .333 230 2
ts 2 6 0 .250 141 2
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 6 2 0 .750 216 1
5 3 0 .625 204 1
2 6 0 .250 176 2
ay 0 8 0 .000 124 1
North
W L T Pct PF
5 3 0 .625 217 1
5 3 0 .625 240 2
y 5 3 0 .625 232 1
S 2 7 0 .222 220 2
West
W L T Pct PF
8 1 0 .889 232 1
cisco 6 2 0 .750 218 1
4 4 0 .500 160 1
3 6 0 .333 186 2


Thursday's Game
Minnesota 34, Washington 27
Today's Games
Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y Jets, New England
Monday's Game
Miami atTampa Bay, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 14
Indianapolis atTennessee, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 17
Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Atlanta atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y Giants, 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
Monday, Nov. 18
New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds TD Int
P. Manning, DEN 333 237 2919 29 6
P. Rivers, SND 295 213 2473 17 7
Dalton, CIN 332 215 2587 16 10
Luck, IND 264 154 1845 13 3
Locker, TEN 174 107 1232 8 3
Roethlisberger, PIT 308 200 2330 12 9
Brady, NWE 340 194 2256 13 6
Ale. Smith, KAN 315 188 1919 9 4
Tannehill, MIA 289 175 1977 11 9
Manuel, BUF 150 85 985 5 3


Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
J. Charles, KAN 170 725 4.26 24 6
A. Foster, HOU 121 542 4.48 23 1
Chr.Johnson,TEN 138 516 3.74 24 2
Ridley, NWE 118 514 4.36 23 6
F. Jackson, BUF 117 502 4.29 59 6
Pryor, OAK 63 485 7.70 93t 1
Ry. Mathews, SND 117 480 4.10 20 1
Spiller, BUF 102 478 4.69 61 1
Moreno, DEN 108 456 4.22 25t 8
L. Miller, MIA 93 448 4.82 49 2
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Ant. Brown, PIT 61 701 11.5 45 3
A..Green, CIN 57 862 15.1 82t 5
And. Johnson, HOU 57 813 14.3 62t 3
Cameron, CLE 50 600 12.0 53 6
Welker, DEN 50 555 11.1 33 9
Edelman, NWE 49 473 9.7 44 2
Woodhead, SND 49 391 8.0 26t 3
De. Thomas, DEN 48 685 14.3 78t 6
A. Gates, SND 48 550 11.5 56t 2
J. Charles, KAN 47 389 8.3 31 2
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Doss, BAL 19 338 17.8 82t 1
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7 79t 1
Edelman, NWE 26 299 11.5 43 0
Holliday, DEN 20 227 11.4 81t 1
McCluster, KAN 37 387 10.5 89t 1
Ant. Brown, PIT 14 145 10.4 44 0
Hilton, IND 15 144 9.6 34 0
Kerley, NYJ 12 108 9.0 24 0
Br.Tate,CIN 17 140 8.2 29 0
Reynaud, TEN 18 135 7.5 35 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Holliday, DEN 11 379 34.5 105t 1
Q. Demps, KAN 14 411 29.4 57 0
D. Reed, IND 14 372 26.6 39 0
K. Martin, HOU 24 631 26.3 49 0
Br.Tate,CIN 19 498 26.2 71 0
F. Jones, PIT 13 331 25.5 42 0
Thigpen, MIA 18 452 25.1 44 0
Todman, JAX 12 294 24.5 40 0
Reynaud, TEN 15 355 23.7 40 0
Blount, NWE 15 349 23.3 30 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Moreno, DEN 9 8 1 0 54
WelkerDEN 9 0 9 0 54


J. Charles, KAN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
M.Jones, CIN
Royal, SND
Bernard, CIN
Cameron, CLE
F. Jackson, BUF
Ridley, NWE

Gostkowski, NWE
Folk, NYJ
M. Prater, DEN
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Vinatieri, IND
Novak, SND
J. Tucker, BAL
Suisham, PIT
Nugent, CIN


8 6
8 0
7 0
7 0
6 4
6 0
6 6
6 6
Kicking
PAT FG
24-24 22-23
14-14 23-23
43-43 12-12
23-23 18-21
17-17 18-20
19-19 17-20
21-21 15-17
16-16 16-18
14-14 16-18
25-26 12-15


NFC leaders


A. Rodgers, GBY
Brees, NOR
Romo,DAL
R.Wilson, SEA
M. Stafford, DET
C. Newton, CAR
Cutler, CHI
M. Ryan, ATL
S. Bradford, STL
Kaepernick, SNF


A. Morris, WAS
A. Peterson, MIN
L. McCoy, PHL
M. Lynch, SEA
Forte, CHI
Gore, SNF
Lacy, GBY
De. Williams, CAR
Re. Bush, DET
Stacy, STL

Garcon, WAS
B. Marshall, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL


Week 10
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
251 168
322 213
346 229
231 144
338 211
239 154
225 146
332 225
262 159
198 113
Rushers
Att Yds
159 825
173 786
168 777
167 726
140 658
146 618
134 596
127 519
119 518
103 475
Receivers
No Yds
61 803
53 647
51 705


De. Jackson, PHL
J. Graham, NOR
Cal. Johnson, DET
Cruz, NYG
Witten, DAL
J. Reed, WAS
Gonzalez, ATL

Hyde, GBY
Sherels, MIN
Dw. Harris, DAL
Hester, CHI
G. Tate, SEA
Page, TAM
Ginn Jr., CAR
Sproles, NOR
Spurlock, DET
R. Randle, NYG
Ki

C. Patterson, MIN
Dw. Harris, DAL
Hester, CHI
Dam. Johnson, PHI
Be. Cunningham, S
Ginn Jr., CAR
Sproles, NOR


J. Graham, NOR
A. Peterson, MIN
D. Bryant, DAL
Forte, CHI
Ve. Davis, SNF
Gore, SNF
Cal. Johnson, DET
M. Lynch, SEA
J. Nelson, GBY
B. Marshall, CHI

Crosby, GBY
Hauschka, SEA
D. Bailey, DAL
Hartley, NOR
Henery, PHL
Gould, CHI
Walsh, MIN
Akers, DET
Gano, CAR
Zuerlein, STL


50 823 16.5 61t 6
49 746 15.2 56t 10
47 821 17.5 87 7
47 677 14.4 70t 4
45 505 11.2 27 4
44 487 11.1 38 3
44 476 10.8 25 4
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
12 198 16.5 93t 1
12 196 16.3 86t 1
16 242 15.1 86t 1
10 143 14.3 81t 1
25 329 13.2 71 0
16 147 9.2 40 0
12 100 8.3 24 0
16 124 7.8 28 0
18 128 7.1 57 0
17 110 6.5 14 0
ckoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
24 845 35.2 109t 2
15 524 34.9 90 0
25 705 28.2 80 0
L 17 441 25.9 33 0
TL 12 299 24.9 32 0
11 272 24.7 38 0
10 212 21.2 32 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
10 0 10 0 60
10 9 1 0 60
8 0 8 0 48
7 7 0 0 44
7 0 7 0 42
7 7 0 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
7 6 1 0 42
7 0 7 0 42
6 0 6 0 38
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pt,
25-25 19-21 52 82
24-24 18-19 51 78
27-27 16-18 53 75
24-24 16-21 55 72
25-25 14-18 48 67
24-25 14-15 58 66
25-26 13-15 54 6'
25-25 12-15 53 61
24-24 12-12 55 6(
18-18 14-16 48 6(


New EngIl
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo


Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi


Cincinnati
Cleveland
Baltimore
Pittsburgh


Kansas C
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
Washingti
N.Y Giant

New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba

Detroit
Chicago
Green Ba
Minnesota

Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis


B6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



They see you when you're spending


I got aggravated the
other day when a friend
complained that she
has to go to Tampa to do her
Christmas shopping be-
cause there are not enough
stores in Citrus County.
Then came the familiar
whine "How come we
don't have Target?" You
could fill in the store name
with Macy's, Starbucks,
Dick's Sporting Goods, Bass
Pro Shops or any of the


other out-of-county shops.
Here's the answer to that
perplexing problem: We don't
have as many shopping des-
tinations as others because
many of our consumers do
leave the county when they
do their shopping.
J.C. Penney closed its
doors this year at the Crys-
tal River Mall. Last year the
mall lost Sears.
Belk has announced that
it will close before the end


of the year
These larger department
stores are closing because
they did not get enough sup-
port from the consumers of
Citrus County
Now admittedly, the Crys-
tal River Mall was built in
the wrong location. It's al-
most as easy for east side
residents to travel to Ocala
as it is Crystal River If the
mall was constructed on
State Road 44 in Lecanto it


44


would have pulled con-
sumers from both sides of
the county, and that would
have brought success.
But the bottom line is that
tens of millions of dollars
were spent on the construc-
tion of the mall and it did
not garner the support it
needed from consumers to
support top-line retailers.
Rest assured: Other
major retailers take note
when a similar national


player pulls out of a market
because they did not gener-
ate enough revenue. Retail-
ers like Bass Pro Shops
don't come to a place like
Citrus County because this
is a beautiful place or be-
cause we are nice people.
They come here to make
money
Citrus County consumers
who want to see the local


PageC3


E,


______ ____ -M N1 AMI.-4


s


F.- -19


Associated Press
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has had friendly interactions with U.S. President Barack Obama,
a marked change from Iran-American exchanges of the past.


A female Iranian demonstrator holds up a burning repre-
sentation of the U.S. flag last year while a caricature of
President Barack Obama is set on fire during a state-
backed rally in front of the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran.


MICHAEL FRANCIS
For the Chronicle
"Unthinkable: Iran, the Bomb and American
Strategy" by Kenneth Pollack (Simon and
Shuster, 2013, 530 pages), $35.

A author Kenneth Pollack
has written a provoca-
tive and thorough book
He is a foreign-policy
analyst with a "hawk-
ish" reputation -
mostly because he was a vocal
advocate of invading Iraq in 2006
and believed Saddam Hussein
threatened stability in the
Middle East by producing and
stockpiling weapons.
This turned out to be false,
BOOK but the invasion and occupa-
REVIEW tion cost the lives of nearly
5,000 American soldiers and
well over 100,000 Iraqis. What
is surprising is that Pollack is willing to accept
nuclear weapons in the hands of Iran as a last
alternative to America's bombing Iran's nuclear
facilities and possibly having to send in troops.
As background, the author stresses Iran's
population and leadership is mostly Shiite
Muslims as opposed to the Sunni majorities in
most Middle Eastern countries. It has a much
bigger population and land area than most Is-
lamic states and one of the highest standards
of living. This justifies, in the minds of the
Iranians, their leadership in regional politics.
Pollack then lays out the strategies available
to Washington in regard to Iran. The first would
be a continuation of our carrot-and-stick diplo-
macy of offering rewards to Iran if it stops its
nuclear enrichment program and opens itself
to international inspection. So far, Teheran's
leaders have stalled progress on this.
The second option would be "regime
change" a euphemism for toppling the gov-
ernment from within. There is a precedent,
since the CIA was successful in overthrowing
the Iranian government of Mohammad
Mossadegh in 1953 when the United States felt
world oil prices would soar and feared the
spread of Moscow's influence. Now the author
feels the current regime is too embedded in
power to be toppled by foreign influences.
A third option is U.S. approval or indiffer-
ence to an Israeli strike on Iran's nuclear ca-
pacity He spends many pages of analyzing how
See Page C3


State should take leadership on Three Sisters


On Sept. 12, I met
briefly with and
hand delivered some
written information to state
Sen. Charles Dean when he
was in Crystal River with
other officials at Hunters
Spring Park announcing
funding for local spring ini-
tiative projects.
The subject was how to
work together to accelerate
the opening of the Three
Sisters Springs property to


the public.
On Sept. 13, Hershel Vin-
yard, secretary of the
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection,
who also received my infor-
mation, informed me he
would pass the information
to the DEP state park de-
partment for review
I have also had discussions
with State Rep. Jimmie T
Smith, who was also pro-
vided the same information.


About three weeks ago,
Mr Don Forgione, director
of the Florida Park Service,
called me to discuss Three
Sisters Springs and other
local water-quality items of
mutual interest Mr Forgione
and his family have recently
visited Three Sisters Springs
by water while exploring
our local waterways.
After his review of the
Three Sisters Springs pro-
posed master plan, an on-


site visit will be scheduled
for the director and myself
Along with a physical in-
spection of the springs
property by land, local lo-
gistical items explored will
include:
The Cutler Spur Road-
way Improvement Project,
which encompasses the
proposed park entrance,
stormwater drainage up-
grades and a paved walking
trail.


The Hunters Spring
Water Quality Improvement
Project also on Cutler Spur
It will expand and upgrade
an existing wet stormwater
retention area, treating dis-
charge water before it flows
into Hunters Spring. Land
acquisition, design, con-
struction and funding will
be provided by Citrus
County and the Southwest


PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Dennis Damato
GUEST
COLUMN


mm ,minim, q


6.AN-





OPage C2- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013



PINION


"It is easy to fly into a passion anybody can do that -
but to be angry with the right person to the right extent and at
the right time and with the right object and in the right way -
that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it."
Aristotle, "Nicomachean Ethics," 4th c. B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz ................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LIMITED POTENTIAL




Study puts



Port Citrus



in perspective


nless a private inter-
est commits to estab-
lishing a port in
northwest Citrus County, the
concept for the time being
- should command minimal
energy from county officials.
While not dooming the po-
tential for a port, a feasibility
study by TranSystems Corp.
made it clear to the Citrus
County Port Authority com-
prised of county
commissioners -
that the best loca- THE I
tion for a port Port fe
would be on the Pot e
Duke Energy st
power complex
canal. It is 20 feet OUR O1
deep versus the Realit'
13-foot depth of warn
the nearby Cross
Florida Barge
Canal, which has been the
primary area considered by
officials.
Duke has little interest in
allowing a commercial port
on its Citrus County acreage.
The company is in the
process of decommissioning
a nuclear plant, has spent nu-
clear fuel on the site and uti-
lizes its canal and rail line for
its own purposes, primarily
bringing in coal and shipping
out aggregates.
While not encouraging, the


Age drives up rates
Regarding (the Oct. 31 Sound
Off) "No explanation": Maybe
your insurance rates went up
because of your age. I'm 87,
drive 99 percent of the time. My
wife is 85. We drive an
8-year-old car. We pay cot
$1,250 per year be- 0
cause of our age. Our
last claim was in the
early 1980s when
someone backed into
the side of our truck, .
Slow? Keep right
I'm calling about this CAL
"Left-lane logic." 56O
Whether you're right or 634
wrong, you just don't
hear about too many accidents
happening with people driving
too slow in the slow lanes. It's
always people driving too slow
in the fast lane. So whether
you're right or wrong, if you're
driving slow or at a steady speed,
get over in the right-hand side.


Is
C
E;a.
Uc
-I
F
/
a


I

(


feasibility study was worth-
while and necessary worth-
while in that it clearly cautioned
that the only viable avenue for
a port is if private interests
jump on the idea; necessary
in that the law that created
Port Citrus requires a favor-
able feasibility report by 2014.
County Administrator/Port
Director Brad Thorpe's plan
to seek requests for interest
to build and oper-
ate a port termi-
ISUE: nal is fine, but
., ,., there's been little
sibility apparent clamor-
dy. ing from private
industry to date.
'INION-: While such deci-
check sions aren't typi-
nted. cally widely made
public, the sense
is that the Port
Citrus concept has had some
nibbles but little more.
In time, a Port Citrus has
possibilities. The day may
come when the Suncoast
Parkway extension provides
a suitable transportation cor-
ridor from northwest Citrus;
Duke may see where it would
be financially advantageous
to open its property up to
commercial shipping.
For now, however, a con-
cept worthy of exploration
has little momentum.


Thanks, Sheriff Dawsy
I was amazed to open the
paper today and see Sheriff
Dawsy's half-page warning
about Citrus County's sexual
predators. Thank you, Sheriff
Dawsy, for printing
ND these names and ad-
JN dresses. The residents
lF of Citrus County are
fortunate to have you
looking out for us.
Living will check
For your information:
If you made out a Florida
living will declaration
S579 and filed it with the Cit-
) rus Memorial hospital,
call the Records De-
partment to see if you're still on
file in their computers.
Honey here
To the person who was looking
for honey for sale in Crystal
River: There is a place that sells
honey at 4570 Citrus Ave.


I am all for the port in Citrus
County so that we can put all
the commissioners and the
politicians on one boat and ship
them out.
Great plan, Dennis
First I'd like to say thank you
for putting my piece in the paper
last week about the point of having
a port. I would like to say a special
thank you for Dennis Damato for
putting together a real plan. I think
we should ask Dennis for his DNA
so we can make and clone seven
new commissioners. Dennis has
a plan about the port. It all makes
sense. It's too bad the commis-
sioners can't see it. And obvi-
ously, Duke saw it because they
don't even want to give us per-
mission to use their plant canal.


I'm calling the Sound Off in
reference to the Hot Corner -
Port Citrus, with the county
commissioners. It's obvious the
people of Citrus County don't
want it, but yet they're not lis-
tening to the people of Citrus
County. A port is not for Citrus
County.
Throwing money away
The port authority is a ridicu-
lous idea. It is throwing money
away like you wouldn't believe,
but the commissioners in Citrus
County, they love throwing
money away because they throw
all they can to Jeff Dawsy, a tax-
and-spend Democrat who
throws away more money than
the taxpayers could ever begin
to come up with.


Obama's mad as hell, but who can tell?


Mr President, we're here
today because you obvi-
ously have a serious
issue with your anger
"I don't know what you're
talking about. I'm the best anger
manager that you'll ever meet"
That's the problem, sir When
the American people get angry,
they'd like to know that you're
feeling what they're feeling.
They'd like to see
you lose your tem- _^
per once in a while.
Staying cool and
unflappable during
a crisis is fine, but A|
sometimes over-
managing anger can
be just as unhealthy
as undermanaging it
"Of course I get Carl F
angry I get darn
angry" OTI
And how might we VOI
know when that's
happening, Mr President?
"When I say things like, 'Hey,
I'm just as angry as everybody
else."'
Clearly we've got some work
to do. Let's pretend this is a na-
tionally televised press confer-
ence. I'm going to say a phrase
as an anger prompt and I'd like
you to react spontaneously,
emotionally, straight from the
gut.
"Fine. Fire away"
The first prompt is: Govern-
ment shutdown.
"Reckless. Partisan. Black-
mail. Unacceptable -"
Sir, with all due respect, dour
disapproval isn't the same thing
as anger The shutdown instigated
by the House of Representatives
caused more than $20 billion in
damage to the country's econ-
omy Didn't you see the growth
figures from last quarter?
"Yes, very disappointing. The
whole thing was disappointing
and unnecessary"
Disgraceful is the word you're
looking for, Mr President. Dis-


I



Ii
[1
(
<


graceful and pathetic. The
American people were highly
ticked off by the shutdown and
it would have been heartening
for you to act ticked off, too.
"You mean like throw an ash-
tray at Boehner? Or flip the fin-
ger at Ted Cruz? Let's be clear,
doctor, that's just not me."
All right Here's another anger
prompt: NSA spying scandal.
"Well, let me reit-
erate that I didn't
know our intelli-
gence agencies have
been tapping the
phones of important
allies such as Ger-
man Chancellor An-
gela Merkel.
Apparently this
iaasen practice has been
going on for
IER decades."
DES But doesn't it
---- make you mad as a
hornet that you weren't in the
loop? I mean, you're the com-
mander-in-frigging-chief of the
most powerful democracy on
the planet!
"I've strongly expressed my
concerns to all those involved."
Your "concerns?" This is sort
of a big deal, sir Did you ever
think about firing somebody for
not telling you this stuff, so you
wouldn't have to read it first in
the newspapers?
"Hey, I'm just as angry as
everybody else."
You're killing me. Seriously
Let's try another universal
anger prompt: The "Obamacare"
rollout
"Frustrating. Unacceptable-"
No offense, sir but those are
words of annoyance, not anger
This is a perfect example of
why we're having this therapy
session.
Kathleen Sebelius, the head
of Health and Human Services,
testified that the rollout has
been a "debacle." Why couldn't
you say something like that?


OBAMACARE

ROLLOUT







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After all, the health care
overhaul is your baby, the signal
legislative achievement of your
administration. You should be
mad as hell!
"I am actually madder than
hell."
Then say so, Mr President.
Blow your stack. Lose your cool.
Stand up and snarl that the roll-
out's been a total cluster! Disas-
ter, fiasco, nightmare, train wreck
- pick up a thesaurus, dude!
Your website crashed harder
than Charlie Sheen on a coke
binge. Some poor souls have
been waiting so long to sign up
for health insurance that they're
now old enough for Medicare.
Really, Mr President, who
was your hotshot IT expert -
Larry the Cable Guy? I mean,
there are Ukrainian porn sites
that work about a thousand
times faster than yours.
"Calm down, doctor Take a
deep breath."
Sorry, sir Give me a minute.
"If somebody had informed
me the Obamacare site wasn't
ready to be launched, I cer-
tainly would have postponed
the rollout day"
But doesn't that make you fu-
rious? Isn't your blood boiling?
Don't you want to strangle
someone?
"Look, we're moving forward.
We'll get this thing fixed."
Right, Mr President, but in
the meantime it's all right to
pitch a fit and fire the chowder-
heads responsible for this mess.
In fact, it would be a perfectly
normal reaction.
"Hey, I'm just as angry as
everybody as else."
Aaaaagggghhhh!
"Where are you going, doc-
tor? That window's locked."

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132.


*1*~ *~


SLETTER to the Editor


No retirement
in Citrus County
When I moved to Citrus
County in 2001, the popula-
tion growth was small. The
country setting was beautiful.
Deer would roam on my
property with wild turkeys
and boars and foxes. I loved
it. To me it was paradise;
all the wild animals were
everywhere.
Now after the housing
boom, all the wildlife has dis-
appeared. I feel like it is time
to move on. It was my plan to
retire in the wildness of Cit-
rus County, but that has dis-
appeared. I am looking to sell
and move to a place where I
can live out the rest of my
years in the serenity of na-
ture. This county has grown
too big and it has lost all that
nature has to offer. All my life
I was around people and
worked to save for the day
that I could find paradise. A
place where there were not
too many people but more of
what I never got to enjoy and
that was nature.
What is wrong with our
elected officials? Why can't
they see that with all this
growth they are destroying
our beautiful county? I just
wish some of them would go


OPINIONS INVITED
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Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
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We reserve the right to edit
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Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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and live in New York City and
see for themselves what a
real mess it is. People are
everywhere. It's like a real
rat race with concrete jun-
gles in every area of that city


The only nature that city has
are the sewer rats and zoos
where the animals are locked
up for viewing purposes.
At one time in this county
you would never find a coy-
ote, but now we are infested
with them. I wondered why,
and the answers is the food
chain has disappeared in the
locations that they once
thrive in and that was be-
cause of the housing boom.
Now you have to lock up your
pets because they are the
only food chain left. I only
hope I live to move on to the
place where the government
put a priority on our environ-
ment and leaves room for
the beautiful natural setting
that people want when they
retire.
I love nature and hope to
sell as soon as this crisis is
over with the down market.
Looking to settle in the
mountains of Tennessee
where nature is abounding
and government doesn't allow
developers to destroy our
beautiful environment. To all
you county officials: Thanks
for destroying a beautiful
county and destroying a great
place to live.
Charles Knecht Sr.
Dunnellon


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


== Hot Corner: PORT CITRUS
Ship out commissioners We don't want the port


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The only sure thing is broken knees


or the second time
in the past three
months, I am about
to violate the "thy shalt not
write about sports, espe-
cially football" command-
ment. I haven't told Cheryl
yet, and I'm not going to,
not right away
Today, as I write this, it
is Nov 1. Tomorrow night
Florida State University
plays the University of
Miami. While I was trying
to take my nap earlier this
afternoon, I couldn't sleep
because I kept thinking
about this game. I kept
telling myself that it is just
a football game and I
shouldn't even be thinking
about it yet. But, earlier


today, I saw that the odds
makers have installed the
Seminoles as a 211/2-point
favorite.
211/2 points?
They've got to be kid-
ding. I've watched games
between these two with
much interest over the
past four decades and it is
idiocy to predict that ei-
ther team will rout the
other They might, but it
isn't smart money Based
on apparent ability, the
way they've played in pre-
vious games thus far this
season and the fact that
the game is to be played on
Bobby Bowden Field at
Doak Campbell Stadium
in Tallahassee at night


gives the 'Noles an edge. twice. The concept is that I
But 21 1/2 points? The should bet on the Hurri-
number has been floating canes, taking the 21 1/2
around in my points. The re-
head all day sult is going to
ever since I. be that the
read the article team I want to
including the I win will win or
point spread in I will win the
this morning's bet, further-
Chronicle. more, if the
While we Seminoles beat
were having 'em by no more
lunch, I told Fred Brannen than 21 points,
Cheryl about SI the team I want
my preoccupa- A SLICE to win, wins and
tion with this OF LIFE I still win the
drivel and ex- bet. It almost
plained to her how I might seems like a sure thing.
be able to win in this cir- Cheryl asked, "Do you
cumstance, regardless, want to have your knees
and how I might even win broken?"


I replied, "Oh. It would
only be a small friendly
bet, I not talking about a
knee-breaking bet with a
bookie."
She responded, "I wasn't
talking about a bookie,
either"
That was enough for me
to conclude that the only
sure thing is that if I bet,
regardless of the score, I
could end up with broken
knees.
Don't go away I will not
submit this for publication
until Monday morning, so
I'll be able to tell you how
it all turned out before we
go to press.
It is now Sunday morn-
ing, Nov 3.


I won't drag this out. I
know that after the
Georgia-Florida score yes-
terday, my Gator friends
are hurting.
So, I'll just say it: FSU 41,
Miami 14. That's 27 points.
Evidently the oddsmakers
knew something I didn't.
If I had bet, I would have
lost even though my fa-
vorite team won. But I did-
n't bet, so according to my
current calculations, I won
three times. My team won
the game and I still have
two undamaged knees!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

market expand can take some per-
sonal actions. They can spend
their dollars at local stores.
In the area of retail economic
development, words are cheap.
Businesses look at spending pat-
terns, and if they see enough op-
portunity in a market, they get
involved. If they see that con-
sumers have a pattern of spending
their dollars out-of-market, the re-
tailer has to make a tough choice
about the risk of investing here.
Publix and Walmart have both
invested in new stores in Citrus
County because they are having
positive experiences. Publix just
opened its newest store in Inver-
ness and Walmart has expanded
this year in both Homosassa and
Beverly Hills/Lecanto. There is
still hope that Publix will once
again find a home in Crystal River
Those two major players have
high-recognition brand names in
this market, and expanding is
less of a risk than opening a new
enterprise.
Many local businesses will do
more than 50 percent of their an-
nual sales between now and
Christmas. The existing retailers
who have invested in our commu-
nity need consumer support.
When you are making a decision
to spend, do it with a local shop.
Those are the folks who employ
your neighbors, pay taxes to the
county and support all the worthy
charities in our community
By spending your dollars locally
you help those who are in business
now and you send a clear message
to those other retailers you'd like
to see move here.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.



DAMATO
Continued from Page Cl

Florida Water Management
District.
H A partnership project between
the City of Crystal River and Citrus
County atthe corner of U.S. 19 and
Citrus Avenue which will include
a trailhead and urban wetland
preservation and educational
area.
Future trail connections to the
trailway along the proposed Sun-
coast Parkway extension.
Future water-quality projects
and funding sources.
The city's proposed Riverwalk
project and the investigation of
unique stormwater solutions to
keep pollutants from fouling our
local waterways.
The synergies of the Three
Sisters Springs close location to
the Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park-one of Florida's most
successful park venues.
The Chassahowitzka Springs
cleanup and restoration project
sponsored and funded by
SWFWMD.
Discussion will include the fea-
sibility of planning, development,
funding and operational opportu-
nities by and between federal,
state and local government part-
ners with citizen stakeholder
input.
Existing, proposed and future
water-quality projects under state
spring initiatives and the leader-
ship of Sen. Charles Dean to clean
up, restore and preserve our local
springs and waterways will have
top priority
Now is the time for all partners
and stakeholders to work to-
gether, explore and investigate all
potential opportunities to com-
plete the Three Sisters Spring
project.

Dennis Damato serves as
Citrus County's District 1
Commissioner, which includes
Crystal River


Leasing CMH the right prescription


We are pleased that the
Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation
and the Citrus County Hospital
Board of Trustees have agreed
that leasing the Citrus Memo-
rial Hospital to the Hospital
Corporation of America (HCA)
will prove to be the right pre-
scription for our community
We truly believe that a lease
transaction is the best option
and will provide the most ben-
efit to Citrus County and the
surrounding areas.
It has been a long journey to
get where we are today, and
many have traveled along with
us, including patients, physi-
cians, employees of the hospi-


tal and you. We thank you for new charitable trust;
your continued patience as we U 100 percent of the net pro-
seek the best path ceeds from the
toward bettering . lease will benefit
our hospital and [ residents of Citrus
community As we 6 County;
continue down the ? -- U., Hospital bonds
road of a lease trans- (- ,r,.. will be funded and
action with HCA, j pensions will be
we would like to lay secured;
out before you what 0h U A lease cannot
we see as the bene- be challenged in
fits to leasing the Debbie Ressler court, freeing us
Citrus Memorial GUEST from lengthy court
hospital to HCA. UE battles and legal
Benefits to leas- COLUMN fees;
ing to HCA: U Citrus County
Approximately $90 million will retain long-term owner-
will go directly to our commu- ship of the hospital;
nity through the creation of a U HCA will pay $2 million in


IF Tfle W IWMW WfaT AM4WS
F"iMWO RiM O WYc4J TWM...






















Letters to THE EDITOR


Running low on patience
Commissioner Scott Adams got
elected on the premise that he was
going to clean up county politics. As yet
his only contributions are divisiveness,
rancor and tension. He has wasted too
much time and money chasing his per-
ceived conspiracies. His personal
vendettas are detrimental to county
business and his antics have eroded em-
ployee moral throughout the county His
bullying tactics and sarcasm are unpro-
fessional. Why he feels it's necessary to
repeatedly insult the other board mem-
bers and county staff on and off the
record is beyond me.
What is obvious is that Commissioner
Adams is used to dealing with people
that will jump when he says jump. And
maybe his employees do jump for him.
But that's not how you run a county gov-
ernment We've all heard the old saying;
If you throw enough "stuff" at the wall,
eventually something will stick. Well, we
do not have the time nor the money to
keep repairing the walls until some-
thing sticks.
Folks, we have a lot of problems in
Citrus County and Commissioner
Adams has proven himself to be an ob-
stacle and hindrance to resolving them.
We don't need a loose cannon on the
commission that uses his seat to create
chaos and chase fantasy conspiracies.
He and his followers insist that corrup-
tion and fraud are rampant We are still
waiting for the proof Where is your
evidence, Commissioner Adams? All I
have seen is a massive ego with no
sustenance.
Commissioner Adams, it's been a year
and your 15 minutes of fame is about up.
Come up with something credible or at
least semi-reasonable. If you cannot,
then at least try being somewhat pro-
ductive. We need productivity from the
county commission, and you have shown
nothing. If you want to be a martyr, do it
on someone else's time. We don't need a
"chicken little" looking for the prover-
bial falling sky And personally, I do not
have the patience for any more of your
fairytales.
Mark Stoltz
Inverness


The Cuba I know
In her Oct. 24 letter, Ruth Anderson
states that I promoted Fidel Castro as
a hero because I reported that he was
given a hero's parade in New York
when he defeated Fulgencio Batista.
Jose Marti was considered a hero in
1895.
Anderson writes "We almost went
into a nuclear war because of them."
But that crisis was more complicated
than it appeared to those who get
their news on TV The U.S. had in-
stalled nuclear missiles in Turkey
aimed at the Soviet Union. Kruschev
offered to remove the missiles from
Cuba if we removed the nukes from
Turkey
Kennedy agreed, and the media re-
ported Kruschev blinked! The U.S.
didn't win. The whole world did.
The freedom to which Anderson
refers that the anti-Cuba Cubans now
enjoy includes a critical vote that has
caused politicians to pander to them
and to continue the embargo. An arti-
cle opposing that embargo prompted
my letter.
The Castros were heroes to the
Cubans. Before the revolution, there
were two Cubas the Havana we
knew with its glittering nightlife and
prosperous economy and rural Cuba
so poor it had no monetary system; it
bartered. The island of Cuba has no
original natives. The Arawak Indians
couldn't survive the Spanish brutality,
so hardy laborers were imported from
Africa. They brought their religion,
Santeria, and the Spanish were
Catholic. Of course Catholicism pre-
vails, but remnants of Santeria re-
main. Cubans never accepted
Communist atheism, and the populace
is closer to socialism than commu-
nism. They enjoy the free health care
and free education but don't want a
government that messes with their
religion.
Anderson says I "write about some-
thing we all want to forget" but she
should have no problem forgetting
something she never knew
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa


property taxes to our
community;
U A lease will reduce the
hospital tax millage that Citrus
County homeowners/residents
pay now Taxes will go down.
As you can see, a lease trans-
action has the ability to bring
financial stability and first-
class health care to Citrus
County We are excited about
this opportunity and hope that
you will join us in heralding
this decision for the long-term
viability of the hospital and our
community


Debbie Ressler chairs the
Citrus County Hospital Board.


IRAN
Continued from Page Cl

the Israelis might carry out such raids.
The author has extensive contacts with
the Israel defense community and goes
into convincing detail as to why this is
not feasible over the long run, and says
important figures in Tel Aviv know this.
The next option would be for Wash-
ington to use its military strength to
obliterate Iranian defensive and nu-
clear targets. However appealing that
may be, he argues the costs including
possibilities of sending in ground
troops, as the U.S. did in Iraq would
be staggering. Pollack writes that such
an action would also be a massive blow
to America's global leadership. To get
the full argument against Washington's
taking military action, one needs to
read the book.
This leaves the "containment" strat-
egy developed when the U.S. felt the So-
viet Union would soon dominate
Europe and Asia without the imple-
mentation of preventative measures. At
the time there were voices calling for
Washington to use its atomic bombs
against Russia. President Truman did-
n't approve of this, and adopted the con-
tainment policy championed by the
Department of State's George Kennan.
The author explains how containment
has operated successfully in various
crises. He advocates for the U.S. contin-
uing the "carrots and sticks" strategy
but, in the final analysis, says the U.S.
and the Israelis will have to accept a nu-
clear Tehran. Pollack argues it would be
suicidal for the Iranians to use nukes
against its regional neighbors, including
Israel. Of course, some believe that the
zealous leaders in Tehran are willing to
be annihilated in return for the de-
struction of Israel, but historically, the
author argues, countries don't commit
suicide foolish policies are plentiful,
but suicidal ones are exceedingly rare.
However, something unexpected has
happened since the author finished his
book in early 2013: Like many others,
Pollack assumed Iran's supreme leader
Ali Khamenei was inflexible and would
not allow a moderate to be elected pres-
ident. But the most moderate of the
presidential candidates won the elec-
tion this year Hassan Rouhani and
has taken formal authority This has
been followed by some restrained but
friendly comments between President
Obama and newly elected President
Rouhani (or at least friendly compared
to communications in recent years). The
big question remains: Can Tehran find
common ground with Washington? We
don't know how this is going to evolve.
If Iran wants to resuscitate its bankrupt
economy it will have to make concessions
to allow outside inspectors into its nuclear
production and research facilities.
Pollack's fine book is a meaty and so-
phisticated analysis of a potentially dis-
astrous global confrontation. He
concludes that we may have to think
about the "unthinkable" living in a
world with Iranian nuclear weapons.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill Woods
resident who taught international
relations at the University ofNotre
Dame for 39 years. He also was the
chair of the political science depart-
ment and associate provost in charge
of the university's study abroad
programs for a number ofyears.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013



Keep politics out of
public safety talk
The current disagreement
between the county and the city
of Inverness is over the fire MSBU.
The city is not obligated to par-
ticipate, but if it fails to agree,
the county has threatened to
either charge the city or dis-
continue fire service for it.
This process of the MSBU
generates some questions. First,
neither city was asked to partic-
ipate in the discussion process.
The commission and the sheriff
made the decisions and now ex-
pect the cities to inflict their
businesses and residents with
a tax they had no input on.
Prior to any MSBU being ap-
proved there should have been
a detailed needs assessment
with appropriate backup docu-
mentation supporting the
need. The argument that
equipment, and some build-
ings, are old or outdated does
not fly without support mate-
rial. A 20-year-old fire truck
would be considered new for
many fire departments. These
vehicles, if properly maintained,
will last well past 20 years since
they only go on the road when
there is a call, unlike police ve-
hicles that operate on the high-
ways for long periods of time.
Commissioner Joe Meek
blames the building and equip-
ment situation on past com-
missions. That is interesting,
since he is now going on his
second term and Dennis Damato
is going on his third term. County
Administrator Brad Thorpe
and former County Attorney/
Administrator Richard Wesch
have been overseeing county
budget items for a very long time.
During the various public
hearings the sheriff had many
of what appeared to be on-duty


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


employees pack the meetings.
Some might see this as a way to
either intimidate the commis-
sion or stifle public input
The sheriff made some state-
ment regarding costs to the city
if they start their own fire serv-
ices. I believe the fire station was
owned by the city and at one
point turned over to the county
when the county offered to bring
them into the system. Addition-
ally, I believe the city turned
over all of their fire equipment
to the county City residents al-
ready pay a fire tax and have
done so for many years. The
city residents pay county taxes,
which go to support the sheriff's


office and the Emergency Op-
erations Center and the county
administration, which oversees
the fire budget and support serv-
ices. If the city chooses to start
its own fire service these issues
would need to be addressed.
Additionally the sheriff mentioned
the cost of communication and
dispatch. There should be no cost
to the city because the sheriff
receives the 911 tax, which is
on most communication sys-
tems like the telephones. By
accepting the funds, he is re-
sponsible for providing the
communication aspect to all
local fire, police, EMS and other
emergency units, as he did for


the Crystal River and Inverness
police departments prior to
absorbing them. He still pro-
vides that service to Crystal
River Fire Department
The sheriff's attitude is not
surprising. Placing all public
safety under one person leads to
inflated egos and politics. I sup-
port the concept but believe
public safety should be under
the direct control of an elected
board, of which the sheriff would
be a member Politics should
never be a component of a
quality public safety program.
Roger Krieger
Beverly Hills


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Blood donations
still in demand
Blood donations are still
needed in Florida. After read-
ing an article in the Chronicle
stating that blood banks were
presently adequately supplied,
I stopped by LifeSouth blood
bank on County Road 491.
They said the information
only related to Indianapolis
blood banks. Blood donors are
still needed in Florida.
Please, if you are able and will-
ing to donate blood, go to your
nearest blood bank. Thank you.
Suzanne Norris
Lecanto

Stop the harassment
The headline on your Oct. 25
front page ("Thorpe to Adams:
Stop harassment") could not
have said what I was thinking
any better... after reading the
full content of the article.
I totally agree with our
county administrator's state-
ments about a "hostile work
environment" and Commis-
sioner Scott Adams' continued
pattern of insults and accusa-
tions toward the majority of
commissioners and their staff.
As a local Realtor, I am embar-
rassed every time Adams opens
his mouth. As Commissioner
Joe Meek so well put it, Adams'
actions "have been unprofes-
sional, inappropriate, and em-
barrassing for himself and our
county" Should visitors or po-
tential new businesspersons
hear this ongoing vitriol, I am
sure they would pack their bags.
Commissioner Adams: Stop
the constant harassment of all
who oppose your ideas.
Michael Stokley
Homosassa


CiOii ijjKE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca
Deco Cafe
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Frid yLive embero &1Dnne A201()3)
S :00 ~ h Br 7


LIMI T ce DmSeATING wPi cha se y tickets today
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At Tuscany on the Meadows
in the Quality Inn 350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando
Friday, November 15,2013
6:00 p.m. Cash Bar e 7:00 p.m. Dinner
LIMITED SEATING! Purchase your tickets today!
Tickets are only $35.00 per person. Business Casual Attire.
For tickets or for more information, call: Sue Fullerton (352) 400-1721 or
Ann Marie Briercheck (352) 527-4100 To donate to our Silent Auction,
contact: Dee Fries (352) 344-0678 or Sarah Clauss (352) 637-6161
Wow! Did You Know? In addition to every $1,000 raised at this
auction, the federal government provides additional funding of $15,6701
"All children will have access to quality early education and care,
and enter school ready to learn." 9
The purpose of the Eary Learning Coalition is to ensure that all children enter school ready to learn.
giving them a solid foundation that they will need to grow and develop. The Coalition is responsible for
administering the local School Readiness and Voluntary Pre-Klndergarten programs and oversees a
broad range of services to enhance the quality of child care and preschool educational services.


44


A1st & 3rd
Saturday
B M I each month
j+ L. 9am-1pm






Stroll past our lerdor.. enio' L e music, and catch up
with >our I'nends and neighbors.
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NOVEMBER 23-24, 2013

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BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


l ..--1


- --~


Associated Press
Traffic is steady in the city of Detroit in midtown. Testimony has ended in a trial to determine whether Detroit is eligible
to slash billions of dollars in debt in bankruptcy court.


Lawyers wrapping case in Detroit bankruptcy trial


JeffKaroub gets the say on whether the city is eli-
Associated Press gible for a restructuring overseen by
DETROIT the court. Critics claim emergency
manager Kevyn Orr wanted bank-
ruptcy for months and didn't want to
Detroit bankruptcy try good-faith negotiations before
opponents are confusing filing.
But Schneider told Rhodes that
careful and deliberate bankruptcy always was a "last resort"
planning by officials with and that contingency planning
doesn't "mean you want the storm to
pursuing bankruptcy at all come."
a e d Rhodes said he found it "factually
costs, attorneys argued impossible" for the city to conclude
Friday at the end of a trial that negotiation with creditors was
"impracticable" while also arguing it
that will determine the negotiated in good faith with them.
future of the largest public Detroit's lead counsel, Bruce Ben-
nett, disagreed, noting it is widely un-
filing in U.S. history, derstood that reaching an
out-of-court settlement is a "great
They "want to punish the governor thing" but "extremely difficult." He
and treasurer for contingency plan- said a June proposal for creditors
ning, for doing their jobs," said and subsequent meetings with them
Matthew Schneider of the Michigan laid out in great detail the city's
attorney general's office. "This was undisputed financial problems and
never about predetermining a Chap- prescriptions for solving them, but
ter 9 filing. This was only about care- that no group came forward with a
ful consideration." credible counterproposal.
Attorneys representing the city and "Nobody was hiding the ball," Ben-
Gov Rick Snyder were making their nett said. "Everyone understood that
final case to a judge who will deter- negotiations were likely to fail."
mine whether Detroit can go into Sharon Levine, an attorney
bankruptcy Opposing arguments representing the American Federa-
from the city, retiree groups, unions tion of State, County and Municipal
and pension fund managers were to Employees, said state and local offi-
run throughout Friday cials were operating "under a cloak
Detroit filed for Chapter 9 protec- of secrecy" and had pursued bank-
tion in July but Judge Steven Rhodes ruptcy since Snyder's earliest days in


office in 2011.
"The governor took more time to
interview the consultants to help the
city with restructuring than they took
to negotiate the restructuring itself,"
she said. "That's absurd."
Levine cautioned the judge that he
was being asked to set a "very dan-
gerous precedent" that could chart a
map for governors across the country
to push municipal bankruptcies
based on "self-created" financial
emergencies.
Robert Gordon, a lawyer for De-
troit's pension funds, said the city ran
"roughshod" over a clause in the
Michigan Constitution that protects
public pensions.
In response, the judge asked why
fund managers didn't submit evi-
dence of a viable alternative to cut-
ting pensions, even if the actual
amount of any shortfall was disputed.
"I would have been happy to have
that conversation if there was an op-
portunity to," Gordon replied, noting
there was scarcely more than a
month between the June meeting
with creditors and the bankruptcy fil-
ing. "There were major pieces of in-
formation missing here that made it
impossible ... to have that discussion
at this stage."
Orr, a bankruptcy expert who was
appointed emergency manager last
March by the governor, has said De-
troit has at least $18 billion in long-
term debt, including $3.5 billion in
pension shortfalls.


Rule: Parity for mental health coverage


Kevin Freking
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -It's final: Health
insurance companies now must cover
mental illness and substance abuse
just as they cover physical diseases.
The Obama administration issued
new regulations Friday that spell out
how a 5-year-old mental health parity
law will be administered.
Health and Human Services Secre-
tary Kathleen Sebelius said the rule
should put an end to discrimination
faced by some mental health patients
through higher out-of-pocket costs or
stricter limits on hospital stays or vis-
its to the doctor
The law, signed by President George
W Bush, was designed to prevent that
But mental health advocates said health
insurers at times sidestepped lawmak-
ers' intentions by delaying requests for
care and putting in place other bureau-


cratic hurdles. They described the new
Obama administration rule as necessary
to ensure patients get benefits they are
entitled to receive.
The administration had pledged to
issue a final mental health parity rule
as part of an effort to reduce gun vio-
lence. Officials said they have now
completed or made significant
progress on 23 executive actions that
were part of a plan announced in re-
sponse to the school massacre in New-
town, Conn., last December
The 2008 mental health parity law
affects large group plans. The Afford-
able Care Act requires individual and
small group plans to treat mental
health and substance abuse coverage
the same way physical illness coverage
is treated.
"For way too long, the health care
See .Page D4


THE WEEK AHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Bond market
closed for Veterans Day U.S. stock
markets are open.
* TUESDAY
WARSAW- International shale
gas experts and geologists hold a
two-day conference on the poten-
tial of this energy carrier, on the
sidelines of the 19th global climate
summit held in Poland, one of Eu-
rope's leaders in exploration for
shale gas.
*FRIDAY
WASHINGTON Treasury re-
leases federal budget for October,
2 p.m.; Joint Economic Committee
hearing on the current economic
outlook.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Pump prices at lowest
since December 2011

NEW YORK The price of
gasoline is the lowest in nearly two
years, an early holiday gift for U.S.
drivers.
The nationwide average for gas
is now $3.21. It hasn't been that low
since December 2011. Five states
-Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri,
Oklahoma and Texas have aver-
ages below $3 a gallon.
Gas has fallen 38 cents since
Labor Day, a period in which oil
prices declined by about $14 a bar-
rel. In addition, a relatively calm
hurricane season has meant no
major storm-related disruptions at
the nation's big refineries.
Brent crude, the international
benchmark for oil, rose $1.66 to
$105.12 a barrel on the ICE Futures
exchange in London.


Solid US jobs data
helps markets rise

LONDON Markets mostly rose
Friday after another solid U.S. jobs
report, and despite concerns that
the Federal Reserve might pull
back on its monetary stimulus
earlier than expected.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index
of leading British shares closed 0.2
percent higher at 6,708.42 while
Germany's DAX ended flat at
9,078.28. French shares underper-
formed in the wake of a down-
grade of the country's debt by
Standard & Poor's the CAC-40
fell 0.5 percent to 4,260.44.
Earlier in Asia, Japan's Nikkei
225 sank 1 percent to end at
14,086.80 and Seoul's Kospi
dropped 1 percent to 1,984.87.
Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 0.6
percent to 22,744.39. In mainland
China, the Shanghai Composite
fell 1.1 percent to 2,106.13.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Cut in



pension


causes


hardship

EAR BRUCE: My husband
worked at a steel company
for 37 years and retired in
2000. He was receiving a pension
of approximately $1,800 a month.
About two or three years ago he
was sent a letter saying that they
had overpaid him and were cutting
his pension to $1,104.30 a month.
Can this be done?
He went to see our council rep-
resentative, but they could not
help him. He has called the pen-
sion office, but only gets the an-
swering machine. The company
went bankrupt and another steel
company took over
Recently we spoke to his
nephew, who also worked at the
previous company and retired with
30 years of service. He received a
check from the pension office for
$10,000 claiming he was under-
paid. His pension now is $1,450 a
month.
We have a son who is on disabil-
ity who has the same name as my
husband, but a different Social Se-
curity number, and we thought
maybe they got him mixed up with
my husband. To me, this does not
seem right but we don't know
where to go to get answers. Can
you help us out? Is there a time
See Page D4





D2


CITRUS F.QUNTYCITRUS COUNTY
r TChamber of CommerceUNTY
; Chamber of~ Commerce


Chamber Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Women's Health

and Fitness xo
PRESENTED BYTHE BUSINESS WOMEN'S ALLIANCE OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. SEPT 28,2013


-r\
4


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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association


We


Builder's Connection SUNDAY
Community Showcase this Saturday10,2013




Community Showcase this Saturday


Exhibits, classes,

prizes and more
The 2013 Florida Public
Utilities Community
Showcase will run from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov 16, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River
This all new showcase of com-
munity businesses and organi-
zations will feature fantastic
exhibits, with something for
every member of the family!
Take advantage of the follow-
ing opportunities while visiting
a wide range of community
businesses for every type of
product imaginable:
Get your face painted with
Fantastic Face Art by Anne
Adams (sponsored by Porter's
Locksmithing).
Experience the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement
Rollover Simulator
Check out the CCSO Fire
Rescue Fire Safety House.
Free DIY Energy Audit
Class by Florida Public Utili-
ties: 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Free DIY Wind Mitigation
and Hurricane Protection Class
by the Florida Home Builders
Association: 10:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m. All Wind Mitigation
Class attendees who complete
the evaluation form will be en-
tered to win a $50 gift card to


COMMUNITY SHOWCASE

Logo courtesy of Sew Be It Embroidery and Screen Pnrinti


Walmart (morning class) or a
$50 card to Publix (afternoon
class).
Toys for Tots collection for
the Building a Better Christmas
Distribution.
Door prize giveaways all
day long (must be present to
win).
A finalized class schedule,
with times, will be posted on
the Community Showcase page


of wwwCitrusBuilders.com and
on the Citrus Community Show-
case Facebook Page. Limited
exhibitor space is still available
for online registration on the
CCBAs website at www.Citrus-
Builders.com or by contacting
the CCBA office at 352-746-9028.
Be sure to visit these fine
community businesses at the
2013 Florida Public Utilities
Community Showcase:


AAA Auto Club
AAA Roofing Inc.
Advanced Aluminum
Air Care Heating & Cooling
Audibel Hearing
Bay Area Air Conditioning
Bayside Realty LLC
Blackshears II Aluminum
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County
Butler Wealth Advisors
Chocolates by Vanessa


Citrus County Builders
Association
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County Fire Rescue
"Fire Safety House"
Citrus Pest Management
Citrus Stampede Rodeo
City Electric Supply
b Claypool Window Film
Coating Systems Inc
Colony Stone & Plastering
Costa Scents
Dream Kitchens & Baths
Duke Energy
FDLE Rollover Simulator
Florida Pest Control
Florida Public Utilities
Freedom Health Care
Gulf Coast Ready Mix
Hometown Values Magazine
Mike Scott Plumbing
Nature Coast EMS
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
O'Connell Financial
Oysters Restaurant
Pinecrest Building Corp
ngPinecrest Pools & Spas Inc
Porter's Locksmithing
Quality Crafted Builders
Quick Care Med
Robert Boissoncault Oncology
Institute
Solar Controllers
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
The Hagar Group
The New Image Med Spa
The Village Crier newspaper
Tim Herndon Plumbing
Tropical Window Inc
White Aluminum Products
Ziggy's Haven Bird Sanctuary


Help build a better Christmas


The CCBA needs your help to build a
better Christmas for families in our
county We have begun collecting appli-
cations for assistance and will hold our
distribution on Friday, Dec. 13.
Instead of hosting a
party this year, we felt it
would be more benefi-
cial to the families to
provide gift cards to
a local grocery
store to help
with their Christ-
mas dinner costs.
Volunteers will be
shopping with Toys -
for Tots on Saturday
to begin the process
of collecting gifts.
There are many
ways that you can help
and the forms you "
need are linked
within the bullet
points below!
Please contact
the CCBA office
or Melissa Sutherland of Air Care Heat-
ing & Cooling if you have any questions.
Please extend thanks to Air Care Heat-
ing & Cooling for their leadership in
this event, as well as to StoreRight Self
Storage of Lecanto for taking care of our
space needs for this event.
Hand out or email Assistance Ap-
plications to families you know that are
in need, especially those affected by
the continued slow recovery of our
local construction industry Applica-
tions for assistance are due no later


than Nov 27.
Sponsor a Child! Toys for Tots is al-
ways more than generous but addi-
tional donations always help. Your
donation will go directly to the
purchase of toys for the children.
Be a Christmas Dinner Sponsor
L We would love to be able to take that
k extra step for the families we help
Sand we would love even more to
Give you recognition for it
U Donate new unwrapped toys
by dropping them off at the
CCBA offices from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Monday through Thurs-
day, or at any of our upcoming
events.
0 2013 Florida Public Util-
ities Chamber Mixer -
CCBA Headquarters,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
SThursday, Nov 14.
-B J. 0 2013 Florida
J Public Utilities
Community
Showcase -
National Guard
Armory from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
Nov 16.
CCBA Thanksgiving Dinner GMM
- CCBA Headquarters, from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov 21.
We thank you in advance for your
willingness to help us with this impor-
tant project. For more information and
the forms needed for your level of par-
ticipation, please visit the homepage
www.CitrusBuilders.com or contact
Melissa Sutherland, Air Care Heating &
Cooling, at 352-621-3444 or 352-464-3181.


The Citrus County Builders As-
sociation has a Banquet Hall
available to rent, for weddings,
receptions, anniversary parties,
graduation celebrations, club
meetings, etc. and it's open to
the public. The building provides
free Internet access.
Please feel free to come and
look at the hall during regular


business hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday to Thursday
The office is at1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, cen-
trally located a short drive south
of State Road 44.
If you would like more informa-
tion, visit the website at www.
citrusbuilders.com or call Donna
Bidlack at 352-746-9028.


Mr. President


Congratulations to Ron Lieberman of the Citrus
County Builders Association. Ron became the
61st President of the Florida Home Builders
Association on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, at the
Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay. Ron Lieberman is a third-
generation home builder and developer. He is a
two-time President of the Citrus County BA and a
former chairman of the Citrus County Affordable
Housing Authority and the Advisory Committee to
the Tampa Bay Regional Transportation Authority.


Golf Tournament a great way to support Citrus County children


Jim Blackshear


Dan Kern, chairman of the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion's Jim Blackshear Memorial
Golf Outing, recently an-
nounced that the annual golf
tournament, to be held Febru-
ary 22, 2014 at the Inverness
Golf& Country Club, will bene-
fit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County for the second
consecutive year
"We are pleased to continue
our partnership the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County be-
cause they are a very worth-
while charity that does so much
good for the children of our
community," said Kern.


The Golf Outing, in its 25th
year, is open to all amateur
golfers and is a favorite CCBA
event due to regularly changing
golf courses each year that aid
in keeping the outing interest-
ing and challenging for return-
ing golfers. It was renamed in
honor of Jim Blackshear, a
founder of the CCBA, after his
passing in 2004 Proceeds from
the golf tournament will help
fund Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County programs and facili-
ties at the 3 club sites.
"This is money that will stay
in Citrus County to help our
own community," said Kern.


Registration for the event
will begin at 7 a.m. and the
shotgun start is scheduled for
8am. All teams must pre-regis-
ter The $60 entry fee includes
greens fee, cart, lunch, door
prizes and one free Mulligan
ticket. Signing up a team for
$220 saves $5 per person.
Player registrations and
sponsorships are available now
by registering online at
www.CitrusBuilders.com or by
contacting the Citrus County
Builders' Association at 352-
746-9028 or the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County office at
352-621-9225.


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Google Maps


* The Citrus County Builders
Association and Florida Pub-
lic Utilities will host a Cham-
ber Mixer on Thursday,
Nov. 14, at the Citrus County
Builders Association. Join us
for networking, hors d'oeu-
vres, and information about
the upcoming Community
Showcase scheduled for
Saturday, November 16,
2013. No cost to attend but
all attendees are encour-
aged to bring a new un-
wrapped toy for the Building
a Better Christmas/Toys for
Tots distribution.
* The Citrus County Builders
Association Thanksgiving
Dinner General Member-
ship Meeting will be from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 21, at CCBA Headquar-
ters. This event is open to
all. Non-members must be
prepaid. Visit the events
page of www.CitrusBuilders.
corn for reservations and
ticket purchase.
* The CCBA annual Building
a Better Christmas/Toys for
Tots gift distribution will be
held on Friday, Dec. 13, at
the Citrus County Builders
Association for pre-approved
recipients. Applications for
this assistance, as well as
sponsor forms, can be ob-
tained on the homepage of
www.CitrusBuilders.com, or
in person at the Air Care
Heating & Cooling office or
the Citrus County Builders
Association.
*The 2014 CCBAAnnual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment, sponsored by Exclu-
sive Platinum Sponsor FDS
Disposal Inc, Weigh In Spon-
sor Florian Masonry and
Heart Sponsor Sodium Fish-
ing Gear, will be held April 26
and 27 at the Homosassa
Riverside Resort with a por-
tion of the proceeds to bene-
fit the Aaron A Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart. Sponsor-
ships are open now and offi-
cial registration is expected
to open by November of this
year. For information, con-
tact Executive Officer Donna
Bidlack at 352-746-9028.
* Save the Date!! CCBA is the
planning stages of a brand-
new event to be held in
2014! The Inaugural Con-
struction Industry Building
Olympics will be Saturday,
Dec. 6, 2014. For more infor-
mation and sponsorship op-
portunities, call Executive
Officer Donna Bidlack at
352-746-9028 or email
donnab@citrusbuilders.com
to be added to the email list
for updates on this exciting
new event.


CCBA's Banquet Hall

available for rental use




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH
Continued from R

system has openly discriminated against A
cans with behavioral health problems," Se
lius said in a telephone conference call wi
reporters. "We are finally closing these ga]
coverage."
Sebelius said that access to mental health
erage had already been improving since pas
of the mental health parity law. She noted tf
larger employer health insurance plans alre
have eliminated higher cost-sharing for inpe
mental health care and said most plans hav,
done the same for outpatient care.
HHS officials said mental health services
erally amount to only about 5 percent of a la
group insurance plan's spending, so there si
be limited impact on premiums. They said t
small group and individual plans being macd
available through health insurance exchange
ready reflect the parity requirements.
Officials at America's Health Insurance
Plans, a trade group, said they were still r
ing the rule.
Gil Kerlikowske, director of the Nation2
Drug Control Policy Office at the White H(
said the rule builds on the need to treat di
problems as a public health issue and not
as a criminal justice issue. He said about
million Americans have a substance abuse
order, but only about 1 in 10 receive the tr
ment they need.
'Access to drug treatment shouldn't be a
ilege to a few who can afford it. It should s
provided to everyone who needs it," Ker-
likowske said.
Lawmakers instrumental in passing the
health parity law had grown impatient wit
how long it was taking to fully implement ]
"While I am clearly frustrated that this
done sooner, I understand that they had a
other things on their plate," said former R
Patrick Kennedy, D-R.I., adding that it woi
ungrateful not to take into account progre:
made on other fronts through the Affordat
Care Act
Kennedy went public about his own stru
with addiction after crashing his car into
ricade near the Capitol in 2006; he was dia
nosed with bipolar disorder after winning
election to Congress in 1994.





MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

frame in pursuing this situation? This
has truly made a hardship on our family
Shirley, via email
DEAR SHIRLEY: I certainly can sym-
pathize with your situation, and I don't
understand why you are being
stonewalled. When you say your "coun-
cil representative," I assume you mean
your union representative. He or she
should be able to help you.
The pension office approach is com-
plicated by the fact that your company
went bankrupt and its business has
been transferred to another entity The
situation with your nephew doesn't have
anything to do with you and your cir-
cumstance. As to your son who is on dis-
ability, it's very unlikely but possible
that he's been mixed up with your hus-
band, particularly if he resides at the
same address.
Unfortunately, there is no way I can
sort this out. Given the numbers and the
time period, which is not going to help
because two or three years have passed,
you should seek counsel. There are a
number of attorneys who specialize in
matters of this kind and know how to
straighten them out. You shouldn't have
to pay unless the matter is resolved in
your favor That's not always the case;
some attorneys will insist upon a re-
tainer, but you should be able to find
one who will handle the matter on a
contingency basis.


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO Google
plans to include a dozen or so mas-
sive sails on its four-story barge
under construction in the heart of
the San Francisco Bay, creating a
floating artistic structure the Inter-
net giant promises will "stand out,"
a newspaper reported Friday
After weeks of speculation that
barge would be "a party boat," a
data storage center and a store to
sell its Internet-connected glasses,
Google on Wednesday revealed that
it plans to use the vessel as an "in-
teractive space where people can
learn about new technology"
The San Francisco Chronicle re-
ported that it obtained planning
documents for the vessel from the
Port of San Francisco through a
public records request. The docu-
ments shed more light on a project
shrouded in mystery Google has
been tight-lipped about the barge
and has managed to conceal much
of its purpose by constructing it on
docked barges instead of on land,
where city building permits and
public plans are mandatory
The Chronicle reported that the
sails shaped like fish fins are
meant to instill in visitors a sense of
seaworthiness while aboard the
boxy 50-foot-tall, 250-foot-long struc-
ture made of recycled shipping
containers.
A company called By and Large
LLC submitted the planning docu-
ments. The Chronicle reports the
company has close ties to Google
and some are speculating the name


DEAR BRUCE: I have just inherited
$300,000 from my brother who recently
passed away I am 72 years old. I don't
have any use for the money Where
should I put this money? How do I avoid
paying taxes on this amount? What do
you suggest I do with it?
-S.W, via email
DEAR S.W: One thing you might want
to consider is tax-free bonds. There are
two types general obligation and rev-
enue bonds.
General obligation bonds are repaid
by the community that issued the bond,
including raising the money through
taxation if need be. Revenue bonds will
be paid for not from the general purse,
but from the revenue generated by the
hospital, stadium or whatever project
the bonds funded. Revenue bonds, by
and large, are not as safe as general ob-
ligation bonds.
You are going to have to do your
homework before you decide which of
these, if either, you want to consider
Personally I believe that properly pur-
chased and insured tax-free bonds still
can represent a very good investment.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a question
about the look-back period. When you
talk about giving someone $14,000 tax-
free a year, is this money they would
look to recover if the look-back period
has not been met? If I gave a grand-
daughter this money, let's say for a car
or whatever, would they be able to come
back to her for the money if I became ill
within that five-year period?
Peg, via email
DEAR PEG: I am not sure why you


Associated Press
This photo shows a barge now known to belong to Google Oct. 29 on
Treasure Island in San Francisco.


is a play on the word "barge."
Records and other official accounts
identify the project as Google's.
The documents refer to the barge
as a "studio" and "temporary tech-
nology exhibit space" that will
"drive visitation to the waterfront"
The Internet giant's actions at
Treasure Island appear legal. But
the mystery surrounding the bulky
floating building and a similar
one off Portland, Maine is gener-
ating rumors and worries.
Google has dodged public scrutiny
by essentially constructing a boat,
not a building. Thus it doesn't need
permits from San Francisco, a city
with copious inspection and paper-
work requirements for builders.


are asking about a look-back. The look-
back is only pertinent when you have
collected money under Medicaid or
some similar government-sponsored
program and you have given away
money that would otherwise be ex-
pected to be used as repayment
In other words, say you are in a nurs-
ing home and you give your money
away, whether it's $14,000 tax-free every
year or some other method. Unless you
do this at least three years before you
collect welfare, the government can le-
gitimately object, saying you can't give
your money away because you're doing
it to impoverish yourself so the govern-
ment will pay your expenses. You would
be seen as trying to avoid paying your
own bills.
I don't know of any other circum-
stance where a look-back has an appli-
cation. It could be that if you were
giving money away like crazy, and then
die leaving debts behind, the creditors
will find out you disposed of money that
way They in turn might go to the recipi-
ents and demand the money be re-
turned.
DEAR BRUCE: I am writing to get
your thoughts relative to writing a news-
paper column. I have written pieces for
2 1/2 years. Within the last year I offered
the paper another column titled "Non-
profit Briefs." The former column ap-
pears on the first Sunday of the month
and the latter on the third Sunday
As I read my column each Sunday, I
also read yours. I am making the as-
sumption you are a professional writer
I am not, but I would like to expand my


Still, privacy experts, environ-
mentalists and legal authorities say
the company's refusal to divulge
many details and the air of secrecy
it has created around the project
may backfire because Northern
California residents are highly pro-
tective of one of the most scenic and
environmentally sensitive bays in
the U.S. Environmental groups and
others have hinted at filing lawsuits
if they feel the final product will
harm the bay
The planning documents say
there are plans to sail the boat
around the bay, mooring at different
docks monthly Google also has am-
bitions to sail the vessel out of the bay
and up and down the West Coast



rizons.
I enjoy reading and writing, and it
ossed my mind that I could continue
do this as I age. Writing keeps me in
e game, staying relevant, current and
temporary I enjoy doing the re-
arch. Is it feasible to earn some part-
ne income writing?
Fred, via email
DEAR FRED: Unfortunately, your
ning couldn't be worse. The problem
ght now is that the newspaper indus-
y is having serious income problems. I
lieve that these will work themselves
t over a period of time, but in the
meantime, being paid for writing a col-
rnn is becoming more and more diffi-
lt.
You make an assumption that I am a
ofessional writer I have written a col-
rnn for 30 years. I suspect that maybe I
n be described as professional. I, too,
ite the column principally because I
joy it, certainly not for the income
at it generates.
You can keep slugging away and ap-
iying to various newspapers and other
int sources. It's possible that you may
ake connections, but don't be disap-
inted by being turned down. It's not a
estion of not having a good product;
s a question of the numbers of
lumns being eliminated because of
rious income constraints.

Send questions to bruce@bruce
lliams.com. Questions ofgeneral in-
rest will be answered in future
lumns. Owing to the volume of mail,
rsonal replies cannot be provided.


'I


chronicleonline.com

your news. anywhere, anytime. i


Google reveals plans



for Calif. mystery barge


Log on today..


m1P


D4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


BUSINESS


i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Japan nuke-plant water tanks flawed, workers say


MARl YAMAGUCHI
Associated Press

TOKYO -When tons of
radioactive water leaked
from a storage tank at
Fukushima's crippled nu-
clear power plant and
other containers hur-
riedly put up by the oper-
ator encountered
problems, Yoshitatsu
Uechi was not surprised.
He wonders if one of the
tanks he built will be
next.
He's an auto mechanic.
He was a tour-bus driver
for a while. He had no ex-
perience building tanks
or working at a nuclear
plant, but for six months
last year, he was part of
the team frantically try-
ing to create new places
for contaminated water
to go.
Uechi and co-workers
were under such pressure
to build tanks quickly that
they did not wait for dry
conditions to apply anti-
rust coating over bolts
and around seams as they
were supposed to; they
did the work even in rain
or snow Sometimes the
concrete foundation they
laid for the tanks came
out bumpy Sometimes
the workers saw tanks
being used to store water
before they were even fin-
ished.
"I must say our tank as-
sembly was slipshod
work. I'm sure that's why
tanks are leaking al-
ready," Uechi, 48, told
The Associated Press
from his hometown on
Japan's southern island of
Okinawa. "I feel nervous
every time an earthquake
shakes the area."
Officials and experts
and two other workers in-
terviewed by the AP say
the quality of the tanks
and their foundations suf-
fered because of haste -
haste that was unavoid-
able because there is so
much contaminated
water leaking from the
wrecked reactors and
mixed with ground water
inflow
"We were in an emer-
gency and just had to
build as many tanks as
quickly as possible, and
their quality is at bare
minimum," said Teruaki
Kobayashi, an official in
charge of facility control
for the plant operator,
Tokyo Electric Power Co.
Leaks and other flaws
found in several tanks
have raised concerns
about further and more
damaging failures, partic-
ularly if another big
earthquake, tsunami or
typhoon hits. The plant
suffered a triple melt-
down after Japan's devas-
tating 2011 earthquake
and tsunami.
The plant has substan-
tially stabilized, but de-
commissioning is
expected to take decades,
and TEPCO has suffered
what Industry Minister
Toshimitsu Motegi has de-
scribed as a "whack-a-
mole" succession of
mishaps.
The environmental ef-
fects of radioactive water
pouring in the sea are un-
clear, though scientists
generally agree that the
impact so far has been
minimal. With years of
work ahead, TEPCO is
trying to contain as much
contaminated material as
possible.
Kobayashi acknowl-
edged the need to im-
prove the design of tanks
and their foundations
when they are replaced
with more durable
welded-seam tanks.
The plant has more
than 1,000 tanks and other
containers storing 370,000
tons of partially treated
but still highly contami-
nated water About one-
third of the containers are
easy-to-assemble steel
tanks with rubber-sponge
seams tightened with
bolts; they were always


considered a stopgap
measure. The other tanks
are considered sturdier
The company is in the
process of replacing rub-
ber-seam tanks with
larger, more permanent
welded tanks, and expects
to phase out the tempo-
rary tanks by March 2016.
It intends not only to re-
place tanks intended for
temporary use but to in-
crease storage capacity to


Associated Press
Japanese Trade Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, right, in protective gear, inspects storage tanks at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant at Okuma
in Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan. Motegi pledged urgent action Monday to curb leaks of radiation-contaminated water from the crip-
pled Fukushima Dai-lchi nuclear plant. The plant has more than 1,000 tanks and other containers storing 370,000 tons of partially treated but


still highly contaminated wal

800,000 tons.
TEPCO has recently ac-
celerated its construction
of more reliable tanks,
but announced Friday
that the pace will con-
tinue to be stepped up.
"The worst scenario is we
run out of space, and we
must avoid that," TEPCO
President Naomi Hirose
said at a news conference.
The company also an-
nounced emergency
water management plans
that also include addi-
tional tank maintenance.
"I have never thought we
needed so many people to
take care of these tanks
until two months ago," Hi-
rose said.
The tank problems
have captured interna-
tional attention, espe-
cially since August, when
a 1,000-ton tank lost
nearly one-third of its
toxic content. A month
earlier, TEPCO acknowl-
edged that larger amounts
of contaminated under-
ground water have been
leaking into the Pacific.
TEPCO has dismantled
and examined the tank
that leaked, but found no
obvious design or assem-
bly flaw Experts say that
only widens the scope of
the problem. The plant
has to live with an immi-
nent risk of more leaks
that could spread contam-
ination farther into
groundwater and the sea.
"We should assume any
tank could leak sooner or
later," said Toyoshi


Fuketa, a Nuclear Regula-
tion Authority commis-
sioner and nuclear fuel
expert.
Massive amounts of
contaminated water dis-
tract the plant and its
workers from their pri-
mary task of reactor cool-
ing and decommissioning
preparation. Some of the
water became contami-
nated because it was used
to cool melted reactors,
but some simply leaked
into the wrecked plant,
with portions escaping
into the sea.
TEPCO will have to
keep storing water for
years, until the plant can
create an air-cooling sys-
tem for the ruined reac-
tors or remove molten
fuel out of them, and de-
velop advanced units that
can remove radioactive
material from water and
make it safe enough to re-
lease.
TEPCO hopes to limit
the amount of water it
must store and treat. It
plans to pump away
ground water before it
reaches the reactor area,
then release it untainted
into the sea. But tank
problems threaten those
plans because the pump-
out wells are downstream
from the containers; leaks
would contaminate the
water before it could be
diverted.
The plant's still-high ra-
diation levels, particu-
larly around the reactors
and in tank areas, play a


role in the quality of tank
construction. Crews must
work quickly to avoid pro-
longed exposure, and nu-
clear-plant veterans
usually face radiation
only to conduct highly
skilled work, so jobs such
as tank assembly typically
go to contract workers
who often come from low-
tier subcontractors.
A worker who has been
at the plant since the
early days of the crisis
said many senior workers
have quit after their ex-
posures have reached
limits, and others are
seeking better-paying jobs
outside the plant. He
spoke on condition of
anonymity because he
feared his employer could
punish him for talking to
a reporter
In October 2012, Uechi
was told to climb to the
top of the 30-foot-high
tanks and replace tempo-
rary covers for hose-inser-
tion openings with
disc-shaped steel covers,
each the size of a dinner
plate. He found that the
temporary covers were
nothing but masking tape
that a worker could have
easily stepped through.
Tales of slapdash con-
struction are not limited
to workers. A nuclear reg-
ulator, Shinji Kinjo, said
water-tightness tests were
sometimes held in the
rain when there was no
way of telling the leak
from the rainwater
The August leak led


TEPCO to reveal that it
had an earlier tank-yard
foundation problem: The
tank that leaked had been
relocated two years ear-
lier, after the ground un-
derneath it collapsed
during a water-tightness
test. The company has
since taken down two
other tanks that were
near the collapse area.
In October, when ra-
dioactive water over-
flowed from another
tank, TEPCO said that
vessel and four others
connected to each other
were built on a slope
slightly tilting to the
ocean. The tank that
leaked was built without
a water gauge and alarm
that could have alerted
workers.
The company has said
that other tanks exceed
its self-imposed 1-degree
tilt limit. It also said the
tanks are not anchored to


the ground, but sit on a
8-inch-thick layer of ce-
ment on top of a wire-
mesh panel.
Tetsuro Tsusui, a for-
mer industrial plant engi-
neer and a member of a
civil group of scientists,
said TEPCO's foundation
work is insufficient. He
said building tanks on
slopes is "unthinkable,"
and that the flaws suggest
"a systematic problem of
quality and safety con-
trol."
Taisei Corp., Japan's
leading construction com-
pany and one of the pri-
mary tank builders,
declined to comment.
The maker of the tanks,
TKK Co. said tank assem-
bly is "like making a plas-
tic model" and
determines the vessels'
quality It said TKK tanks
are "a temporary, emer-
gency step to prevent
crisis."


Public Invited to Attend


HUGE
Community Garage Sale

SUGARMILL & SOUTHERN WOODS

Don't Miss Out!

Saturday, Nov. 16 9am-3pm
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Douglas Street, Homosassa
$15 Donation per space or two spaces for $25
Reserve your space now
Call 382-3109 or 382-3320
Donations from space rentals go to
Precious Paws Rescue Inc.












WrTHLACOOCHEE RIVER

BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL
AND FUNDRAISER FOR DANIEL STEPHENS

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 23, 2013
19730 SE 127th TERRACE INGLIS FL. 34449
6 MILES WEST OF DUNNELLON ON SR 40





aBBr jE~ UOfll AMS!S ~mtt


ARNOLD Mt DAL KEME* BAiD
LONEOME ,q 1H lAM S DSM
LIVE BLUEGRASS MUSIC 10:00 AM TIL 7:00 PM
FOOD VENDORS FAMILY FUN ARTS & CRAFTS
GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS
ALV4JVCFO SAL.S ENO MCI.FWrH_
[KIUBIIINWI"| ADVANCED.. GATE !".",,' i "
Adult $10.00..... S15.00 "
Children $ 5.00.....$10.00 i2wnmi
(Children under 6 free with an adult)
For tickets mail check payable to Tin Roof Shack'
PO Box 144 Newberry Fl. 32669 PHONE (352)318-3872
Be sure to include your return address
CAMPING AVAILABLE CALL (352)489-9367
S BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIR *SHOW GOES ON RAIN OR SHINE
SNO ALCOHOL NO COOLERS* NO PETS IN THE CONCERT AREA


"Honoring our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans" CHR..NI
Veterans Appreciation Concert, NCCB, Sat, Oct 26, 2:30 p.m., First United Methodist Church,
Homosassa; Sun, Oct 27, 2:30 p.m., Cornerstone Baptist Church, Inverness. POC: Cindy
Hazzard, 746-7567; nccommunityband@earthlink.net.
Operation Welcome Home Salute to Veterans, Nov 1,10 a.m.-8 p.m. & Nov 3, 1 p.m.-6 p.m.,
Crystal River Mall Westend. Free miniature golf for veterans. POC: Vinnnie DeRosa,
941-544-7470; vinnie@vinniederosa.com.
Massing of the Colors, Sun, Nov 3, 3:00 p.m., Cornerstone Baptist Church, Inverness. POC:
Reggie Thurlow, 563-1101; rcri@embarqmail.com.
Veterans in the Classroom, Nov 4 -15: POC: Mac McLeod, 746-1384;
cmcleod670@earthlink.net; Bob Crawford, 270-9025; baddogusmc@tampabay.rr.com.
Veterans Flea Market, Wed, Nov 6, 7:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m., Stokes Flea Market. POC: Dinah
Williams 746-7200; call two Wednesday before Nov. 6
Veterans Program, Thurs, Nov 7, 2:00 p.m. 3:15 p.m., Inverness Primary School. POC: Mary
Tyler, 726-2632; tylerm@citrus.h12.fl.us
Veterans Fair, Fri, Nov 8, 12:00 noon 3:00 p.m., Citrus County Resource Center. POC: Sam
Dininno, 527-5915; samuel.dininno@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Opening ceremony 10:30 a.m.
Veterans Social, Fri, Nov 8, 5:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m., AL Post 155. POC: John Kaiserian, 746-1959;
johnk40and8@yahoo.com. Fish Fry $7.
Military Ball, Sat, Nov 9, 5:30 p.m., West Citrus Elks, Homosassa: Marine Corps League Citrus
Det 819. Morgan Patterson, 746-1135; mpatterson41@tampabay.rr.com. Tickets: $35.
Marine Corps Ball, Sun, Nov 10, 6:00 p.m., Citrus Hills Country Club. POC: Chris Gregoriou,
795-7000; allprestige@yahoo.com. Tickets: $40.
Never Forget 5K Run, Mon, Nov 11, Courthouse Square, Inverness. POC: Pat Flanagan, 607-
1815; integralpm97@yahoo.com. Registration 7:00 a.m. Run 9:00 a.m.
Veterans Day Parade, Mon, Nov 11,10:00 a.m., Inverness. POC: Chris Gregoriou, 795-7000;
allprestige@yahoo.com. Staging 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m., Citrus High parking lot off Highland Blvd.
Veterans Day Monument Motorcycle Ride, Nov 11, noon, start point Withlacoochee Technical
Institute, Inverness. POC: Chris Gregoriou, 795-7000; allprestige@yahoo.com.
Memorial Service, Mon, Nov 11, following parade, Old County Courthouse Heritage Museum,
Inverness. POC: Mac McLeod, 746-1384; cmcleod670@earthlink.net.
Veterans Day Luncheon, Mon, Nov 11, following memorial service: VFW 4337, Inverness. POC:
John Lowe, 344-4702; thelowes@tampabay.rr.com (VSO commanders and Auxiliary presidents)
Women Veterans Luncheon, Wed, Nov 13, 12:00 noon, 320 N. Citrus Ave: Crystal River
Woman's Club. POC: Leslie Martineau, 746-2396; lmartineau_2001@yahoo.com.
Veterans Appreciation Program, Sun, Nov 17, 6:00 p.m., Cornerstone Baptist Church, Inverness.
POC: Ray Michael, 637-3265; rmichael5@tampabay.rr.com. Ice cream social follows program.
Uniforms encouraged. FIRE


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10,2013


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35)56-565 1Tol re:(88)82-34 1Eai: lasfidschoiceolneco Iwbste w wchoncloliemo
Foun@H a py S afo d Do estc*P0f .0io0 0R st.0an0

-- -- - -


Field Interviewer
Professional part
time work
opportunities!
The University of
Michigan Survey
Research Center
(SRC) is part of the
nation's largest
academically-
based social sci-
ence and research
organization. SRC is
seeking part-time
field interviewers in
the Citrus Co. area
to work on the
Health and Retire-
ment Study (HRS).
Requirements:
*Attend a manda-
tory training session
in Ann Arbor, Ml
mid-March
*Have good com-
puter and typing
skills using a laptop
computer
*Conduct lengthy
in-home interviews
(some phone) with
selected adults
*Work minimum of
30 hours per week
including at least
25% during evenings
and weekends
*Take physical
measurements
(such as grip
strength) and
collect biomarkers
(such as dried blood
spot collection)
*Commit to work
the entire survey
period (March to
December 2014)
*Work in a variety of
neighborhoods
including inner city
where applicable
*Have reliable trans-
portation to meet
the demands of the
assignments (A
valid driver's license
and insurance is
required when
driving)
We Offer:
*Hourly pay rate for
Citrus County, Fl
area is $11.50
*English/Spanish bi-
lingual candidates
may receive a
higher rate of our
bilingual proficiency
standards are met.
*Mileage
reimbursement for
business travel
*Paid Technical
training on how to
conduct field
interviews using
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niques
-Travel advance
and/or expense
reimbursement for
travel to training in
Ann Arbor, Ml
Check our website
for a full description
of the project, job
description, and to
apply online at:
recruit.isr.umich.edu


4 Dr/ D a UWvv IVIH.
/2 acre in Homosassa.
Super clean, move-in
ready $59,000 Jennifer
Lehman ERA Suncoast
Realty (352) 422-1642
FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735
LINCOLN
2007 Towncar, fully
equip., garaged, 16K
mi., like new, $30,000
(740) 339-9260
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
Can deliver for fee.
$100 each.
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087

L&kl
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


2 Free HorsesSaved
from Glue Factory
1 Mare, 1 Gelding,
rideable, exp. rider
352-302-6843
All Free:
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table lamp, twin key-
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Call for one or all
(352) 637-2136
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch U load &
haul 352-628-9624
FREE
Fancy Tail Guppies
(352) 560-3019
Porm and Jack Russell
male, 6 mo's, must be
fenced yard
pls call (352) 637-1903



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001b.
Stone Crabi$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001



Domestic Dove
peach & white in
color, Duval Island
Floral City Pool area
(352) 419-8127
Lost 9/8/13 Tri colored
beagle.Neutered
male,weighs 40 Ibs.
Special needs pet. Last
seen on N. Lee St. Bev-
erly Hills. If you have
seen JoJo please call
352-249-3107 or
352476-3140. Please
help JoJo to come
home. We miss him
terribly.
LOST EARRING
Silver Metal earring with
brown stones. Lost at
Crab Jam on 11/2 on
Citrus Ave 503-7957


Found a set of keys at
intersection of S.
Apopka and Inverness
Blvd on Wednesday af-
ternoon 6th Nov. Car
keys are for Nissan.
May be picked up at
Sheriff's office in down-
town Inverness.





Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+ Call Dan
(352) 726-3339

Happy^


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Tell that special
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" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
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includes a photo
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352-563-5966
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To
Mary Lindsey
Happy
Birthday


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001b.
Stone Crabi$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001




Accordion Player
wanted for parties
and lessons. Call Ray
(352) 503-6361




Crypt/ Niche x2
Fero Memorial
Garden Memory
Building B, North side,
eye level. $600/ea
701-400-6482

Fountains Mem. Park
Homosassa. Single lot
valued $4025, sell for
$2775. (352) 668-4540




TEACHER

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(352) 344-9444




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Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Family Practice
Office Hiring
Medical
Receptionist,
Medical Assis-
tant and Middle
Level Provider.
Must have medical
experience. Please
Email Resume to:
pcresumes2012
@yahoo.com

NURSES & CNAs
Want to buy Gifts?
You need
some Shifts!

RNs
Med Surg &
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Hospice-
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Hiring full-time and
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ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or e-mail
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, FI 34461
EOE/SF/DF


Field Interviewer
Professional part
time work
opportunities!
The University of
Michigan Survey
Research Center
(SRC) is part of the
nation's largest
academically-
based social sci-
ence and research
organization. SRC is
seeking part-time
field interviewers in
the Citrus Co. area
to work on the
Health and Retire-
ment Study (HRS).
Requirements:
*Attend a manda-
tory training session
in Ann Arbor, Ml
mid-March
*Have good com-
puter and typing
skills using a laptop
computer
*Conduct lengthy
in-home interviews
(some phone) with
selected adults
*Work minimum of
30 hours per week
including at least
25% during evenings
and weekends
*Take physical
measurements
(such as grip
strength) and
collect biomarkers
(such as dried blood
spot collection)
*Commit to work
the entire survey
period (March to
December 2014)
*Work in a variety of
neighborhoods
including inner city
where applicable
*Have reliable trans-
portation to meet
the demands of the
assignments (A
valid driver's license
and insurance is
required when
driving)
We Offer,
*Hourly pay rate for
Citrus County, Fl
area is $11.50
*English/Spanish bi-
lingual candidates
may receive a
higher rate of our
bilingual proficiency
standards are met.
*Mileage
reimbursement for
business travel
*Paid Technical
training on how to
conduct field
interviews using
standardized tech-
niques
-Travel advance
and/or expense
reimbursement for
travel to training in
Ann Arbor, Ml
Check our website
for a full description
of the project, job
description, and to
apply online at:
recruit.isr.umich.edu
Hurry! Must apply
online by
January 15, 2014.
The University of
Michigan is an
affirmative action
equal opportunity
employer.


PT Breakfast/
Lunch Cook

Two years Exp.
preferred. Apply at
Oak Run on SR200
& 110th Street, email
resume to jobs
@deccahomes.com
or call 352-854-6557
X13 for more info.
EEO/DFWP









Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (a) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 D 7


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time
Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer



Your World






Cmp"Ni


I CHONC I


Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time
Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Sales Hel


Commercial,
Residential and
Service Plumbers
needed.

Call 352-726-5601 or
submit resume to
modernplumbing@
tampabay.rr.com.
DFWP


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624


CO---VER" vIII nG:HLrcK -
The City of
Crystal River Commercial, traveling
out of town, Night hrs.
is seeking resumes (352) 527-3280
for the position of lnnerimage4u@
HEAVY EQUIPMENT yahoo.com
OPERATOR
This is a skilled GROUNDS
equipment operator MIT AC
position including MAINTENANCE
the operation of all WORKER
major construction Announcement
equipment and #13-64
miscellaneous
equipment includ- Heavy manual work
ing dump trucks, involving grounds/
small tractors, bush parks maintenance
hog, side mower, tasks. Heavy lifting,
backhoe, scraper, pushing, bending,
box blade and climbing and reach-
pump-out boat. ing required. Ability
Must have a high to work outdoors in
school diploma or hot/cold tempera-
equivalent certifi- tures under noisy
cate; hold a valid conditions. Current
Florida Class B valid Florida Driver
Commercial Driver's License required.
License; and have $8.02 hourly to start,
two years' exp. A Excellent benefits.
job description can
be obtained from ALL APPLICATIONS
the Finance Director MUST BE SUBMITTED
or Call 352-794-4216, ONLINE: Please visit
ext. 309. our website at www.
Hourly wage is bocc.citrus.fl.us
$11.43 $16.19 hr., You can also visit
and includes one of the local
insurance benefits. Libraries or the
Please send resume Human Resources
to: David Burnell, Department,
Public Works 3600 W Sovereign
Director, Path, Suite 178,
City of Crystal River, Lecanto, FL 34461
123 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River, FL. to apply online by
34428 by Friday, November
November 18, 2013. 15, 2013 EOE/ADA



Ame&


S
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624




CITRUS MAIDS
CLEANING PERSON
Needed. PT leading to
FT. flexible schedule,
early morn. hrs. & Sat.
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

FLOOR
.VEI'nrdiM flLUrI -rD


Bcz
TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Bldg. Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.


KI *TsHg mt-


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





BB&T
Relationship Teller -
Seeking candidate
for our Crystal River
office with bank
sales/customer
service experience
to initiate, develop,
and manage rela-
tionships. Must have
cash handling expe-
rience & previous
sales background
preferred along with
excellent telephone
interpersonal/ com-
munication skills.
Please apply on line,
www.bbt.com.
EOE/AA/D/V, Drug
Free Workplace


II


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352447-5888



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
*k* 352 422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



TREE SERVICE
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
$70. (352) 344-2696
OAK FIRE WOOD
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$80 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard

N- or pool or plan
p something
Q-: completely new!
E4 "Often inigared,
X, nevetd cared"

YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
COrrS
POOL AND PAVER LLC
I insue 352-400-3188





wtm

Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services,
int & ext maintenance &
repairs. Northern quality,
Southern prices.
(352)537-4144
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service -New
Systems Starting @
$3400. Res//Com
(352) 400 8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning






Ir
ZPAI


5)OZ)/ Z/U-'4O/Z


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*lAll Home Repairs
7 Smnill Carpentry
1 d'L fencing
[A ~~-: ',reening

Tjnnc (,'an Dryer Vents
u ,//o,iohle & Dependable

if : M Expr ienP''ce lifelong1
I Itfi 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
L rrLicensed & Insured Lic.#37761




ooehrencem w m9okic




Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices


Swww.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
S(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"Call 352-560-7609**

** **** *
Vera's Cleaning Serv
20 yrs of quality serv.
Flexible Scheduling
Call (352) 726-8511



Find Guaranteed,
Local A/C Sales &
Installation Pros!
800-763-7108 Air
Conditioner Sales,
Service and Installa-
tion. All pros are
pre-screened and
relentlessly
reviewed! Call now
for a no obligation
estimate!
800-763-7108

Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning
-- tma -


5)OZ) Z/U-'4O/Z



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


E*fp11.11,,,I,
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Design/Installation
Weed*Clean*Mulch
"We plant year round"
lisc/ins 352-465-3086



Andersen Lawn Care
Reliable, Affordable,
Quality Guaranteed
352-453-6005
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



**PET SITTING-
dog walking, located
in Citrus Hills
352-201-2458



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374


KNOCK OUT
LEANING SERVICE

RIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
ENTAILS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
7Pressure
Washing Too

352.942.6876
Call Today for a
000GD46 ill Clean Tomorrow


Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



WASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135







POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636


Ex' .posed -.
Aggregate
Shotcrete $45/yd.
-. Decks Tile
FREE Pavers
ESTIMATES '-

nti REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
..S..ED 352-746-5200
& ISUED




BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstoallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


N Aq
SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
*Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
S MR. 352-364-4610

ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
Independently owned & operated
Lie #EC13003381 insured & bonded
24 Hours a Day -7 Davs a Week


Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570





3Th-ILING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/lns/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024-


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


GENERACr l
Stand Alone .
Generator
Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians |
EROO15377





Services from A to Z
Complete Handyman Services
Su Specializing in
af!orm "aS a .. ..
SAluminum Rescreen Work,
Storm Doors, Garage Screen
Doors, Window Screens,
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch
Ceilings, Pressure Washing,
SInt/Ext Painting, Regrout
Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing,
Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten
Wood Repairs
You Name it I probably do it!


Ln 746-2445
Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience




DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START
A FIRE'
Flat Rate -t.
Hidden Co i $3


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


IRRIGATION
Law Sipri nler
Not Workiv9?
We'll Fix It



$1 O~ff with ad




'746-44512




CASH for

SCRAP
Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire
OcryawRibi ni0
MNtal Eacycling
4320 W. Gulf to Lake
Lecanto, FL 34461
527-9599


*s1


AM ROOFING
Call the "Aakh6usten"
Free Written Estimate

10O OFF
,Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Licu./Ins. CCC057537 000GHR


Others


little mo


wia


Ci ii o U N T Y iE
CHOII xCiLE


Some


pets


sell right


away.













take a


re time.


Crank up Victrola
1920's 78 rpm
Brunswick & Victor
Portable $325. for both
(352) 344-5283


I PAINTING I




D8 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10,2013


HOT TUB, 6 pers,
like new, 64 jets, col-
ored lights, built in
stereo w/ CD player.
Orig $9000, asking
$2500 (352) 302-9845



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE electric 30" stove,
brand new never used,
white $300.; 40 gal
elec hot water heater.
Used 1 week, $150
(352) 341-4902
Hamilton Beach
Microwave
6 mo old. exc cond
$25
860-605-3094
KENMORE DRYER
heavy duty, super
capacity, very good
condition $100.
(352) 522-0141
MICROWAVE Red,
like new $20.00
352-465-7132
PRIMO WATER DIS-
PENSER.3 or 5 gal. Hot
or cold. Excellent shape.
Full 5 gal included. $25.
860-2701
Small Window
Air conditioner
$50.
Portable Ice Maker
$65. Both Like New
(352) 637-2117
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
white, Good Cond.
Can deliver for fee.
$100 each.
Call Homosassa
(678) 617-5560
or 352-628-3258



COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51H.
$45. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H.
$40. 527-1239.



NEW AIR HOSE KIT
For GM air suspension
vehicles w/ on-board
compressor. Hose and
gauge.$20. 860-2701.
PALM DETAIL
SANDER HARBOR
FREIGHT Used once.
$10.00 (352)257-4076
Router Table
with 2/ HP Ryobi
Router. Cast iron top
20x27. Mobile base
$200
(352) 726-5832



CASSETTE TAPES 27
Brand new, never
opened. $14.00 for all
(352)257-4076
DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installa-
tion! CALL Now!
1-800-745-2645
VCR TAPES 12 BRAND
NEW plus binus of 4
used. $10.00 for all.
(352)257-4076
VCR TAPES BRAND
NEW, never used 12
new plus bonus of 4
used. $10.00 for all.
(352)257-4076



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



L Shape Bar
and 5 Capt.
Swivel Chairs, $100.
352-228-9295
Lloyd Flanders Wicker
Club Chair and wicker
rocker, Linen color,
$300.
(352) 527-2491
USA made Patio
Chairs 2 adj. high
backs and 2 gliders
white powder coast
frames $225.00
(352) 513-4232



1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $85
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
3Pc. Liv. Rm. Set beige
matching sofa loveset
& chair, cocktail tble
glass $800. Jr. Din.
Room, table w/leaf,
hutch, 6 chairs,
stone washed $400.
352-423-0062,SMW,
38" ROUND COFFEE
TABLE with lazy susan.
Maple. Nice condition.
$30. 527-1239
Bar Stools.
4 heavy duty iron-
stools with cushion
seats $50 each
68" couch, 2yrs old
$100. All exc cond
352- 794-3124
Brand New
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
BUFFETT
6' X2' X3'h
Beautiful Cherry
Wood, like new
$900 obo


(352) 249-7064
China /Curio
Cabinet,
wood and glass
great condition
$150.
(352) 527-1543
Den Furniture,
2 honey oak wall
units, 30" and 36"
TV cabinet built in
54" computer desk
with hutch, built in fil-
ing cabinet $800.
352-423-0062,SMW
DINING ROOM SET.
Table, 4 chairs, hutch
and sideboard. Medium
wood. Nice condition.
$300. 527-1239
Dining Room Table
w/8 chairs
chair backs wicker,
cushion seats $275.
3 solid wood bar stools
27" $75. (352) 513-4365


UAY BEU Wood w/ dark
green trim. Mattress in-
cluded. Like new.
$80.00 352-465-7132
Dresser 5 Big Drawers
Brown, $60.
Small Kitchen Table,
4 chairs, good cond.
$75.
(231) 408-8344
END TABLES Wood,
great shape! $40.00 for
pair. 352-465-7132
HIGH END USED
FURNITURE. 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
HUTCH. 36" X 18" X 69"
high. Medium color
wood. Excellent condi-
tion. $65.... 527-1239
King size-Rattan Head
Board and frame w/2
box springs.$50.00
352-212-2051
LOVE SEAT Like new
light colors
75.00 OBO Linda
341-2271
OAK TRIPLE DRESSER
w/ mirror and 5
drawer chest. Great
cond. $300/set. or
$175 ea. Will deliver
(352) 249-1031
Office Furniture Oak
Wood, great cond.
Pedestal desk, 2 drwr
file, comp desk, Ig
bookcase. $400
(352) 527-2778
Phone Stand
Hand Crafted $10
Love Seat Hide a bed
Like New $175.
(352) 419-6180
RECLINING
LOVESEAT brown
leather good $70
503-7668
SOFA
Beautiful Floral Print,
no smkg or pets. No
tears or stains. Citrus
Hills $150. Can email
photo 352-527-2778
SWIVEL ROCKER.
Gold fabric. Good
condition. $30.
527-1239
TWIN BED AND
FRAME twin bed mat-
tress box spring and
frame like new 100.00
phone 352 795 9664



20 PATIO STONES 12"
round, white concrete,
clean,barely used.
$1.25 each or $20. for
all (352)382-5297
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
RIDING LAWN MOVER
Troy-Bilt 18.5 HP 42"
Lawn Tractor
$600.00 352-637-4849
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



Pony Tail Palm
6'tall, in large clay pot
on wheels, $50.
(352) 794-3980





111 '// I -/,'
Wh


BEVERLY HILLS
Sat, Sun 8am to 2pm
28 S. Monroe St.
No Early Birds I!
DUNNELLON
8085 N. Runty Terrace
Indoor moving sale
Nov.22nd,23rd,and 24.
8-4pm.Queen size bed-
room set,hospital
bed,jazzy motorized
wheelchair,china
cabinet,large
wardrobe,clothing,and
other household items.



Selling entire contents
of 3 rooms, BR, LR, DR
furniture, Kit items, &
decor. Best offer takes
it all.Call for viewing
(352) 563-0129


FumitureB


Earn extra income

delivering The Citrus

County Chronicle. We are

looking for dependable

people to deliver the news

on routes that are already

established. Potential

carriers must be 18 years

old, have reliable

transportation, a valid

drivers license and

automobile insurance.





Paid Weekly


Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $12
EACH 352-613-0529
3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS SIZE 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
10 TSHIRTS mens xlg
tshirts and
10 baseball caps
50 cents each
352-465-0580
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6 &
2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 & 5/6
$30 352-613-0529
Girls winter clothing 4
jeans 1 pants 5 shirts 2
pajama sets & 2
hoodies sizes vary $55
352-613-0529



3 Christmas Lighted
Lawn Deers $25.
& Many more Christ-
mas items. & Large
plastic storage
containers, 2 tri pods,
$20ea. 628-5268
3 HP 10" Sears Crafts-
man Table Saw
$150 or trade
8 Pc. Drum Set,
w/ yamaha electric
guitar $125. or trade
(352) 795-8863
16 Bulb Tanning Bed
Cross Bow Work out
Bench, Good Cond.
$200. each
(352) 489-4362
ALUM. 8 FT LADDER
Davidson Model 428-08,
Type II Commercial
OSHA approved VGC
$80 Call 352-794-6721
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BICYCLE mens 26"
10 spd bicycle
$10 352-465-0580
BIRD CAGE Lg white
birdcage small cockatiel
size $20 352-465-0580
CALLIOPE
Plays from a CD, 5 ft.
tall, very colorful,
excellent for festivals,
crafts shows, draws a
crowd quickly $300.
(352) 795-3424
CANON MP280
PRINTER Great condi-
tion, needs ink, black
colored, also a scan-
ner, $25 (352)465-1616
CHARCOAL GRILL
large charcoal grill good
condition 50.00 phone
352 795 9664
Electronic KAWAI
Organ 2 key boards,
11 pedals, 50 tonal
adj. $125 obo; blond
oval kit table w/ 4
chrs, 50x33, pedestal
$40 352-249-8970
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone CrabS$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001
Home made quilt Tops
5 for $100
Baby Furniture
$100.
(352) 795-7254
Kenmore Overlock
/Sewing Machine
2/3/4D, Model
385.1644 New Cond.
Org. Cost $700
Price $120 firm, own-
ers manual & instruct.
book (352) 382-5300
MAGAZINES free as-
sorted magazines
women day entertain-
ment allyou people
352-465-0580
POOL
28 ft above ground
w/pump, filter and ex-
tra supplies. Good
Wkg cond. You
remove $700 obo
(352) 746-9536


Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
POWER ON BOARD
JUMP-START BAT-
TERY SYSTEM- porta-
ble, 12V/450 AMP/260
PSI, $25. 628-0033
Refrigerator, Whirlpool
w/icemaker, $250.
Treadmill, w/incline
$300. both exc. cond.
lv. msg.(352) 341-0899
Riding Lawn Mower
Ariens 1330 Rear en-
gine, 13HP, 30" cut,
like new cond. $350.
Propane gas Dryer
Sears/Kenmore HD
$75. (352) 507-1490
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
UTILITY TRAILER
6 x 12, $775. obo
Power washer 16H
with tanks & hoses
$600.
(352) 341-3300
XMAS GOLD TINSEL
WELL OVER 100
FEET. $5.00
(352)257-4076
XMAS MINI LIGHTS
mulitcolor 550 brand
new plus hundreds used
and working. $15.00 for
all (352)257-4076
XMAS ORNAMENTS 70
GOLD BALLS FABRIC
Excellent condition,
$20.00 for all.
(352)257-4076
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16"140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $90
352-613-0529



Pride Elite Traveler
Go Go Mobility
Scooter
like new, $600.
(352) 628-5553

SCOOTER AND LIFT a
Celebrity 3-wheel
scooter and a Haramar
rear (behind the
car)lift. Both in very
good condition. $1000
for both. please call
before 8 PM
352-270-2319



PIANO
Korg SP-250
Digital Piano, Full
Keyboard, $250.
(352) 382-5632
RETRO LOOK SMALL
BODY SEMI-HOLLOW
ELECTRIC 12STRING
W/GROVERS "JINGLE
JANGLE SOUND!"
$185. 352-601-6625

Household
AIR CONDITIONER
8000 BTU used once.
Floor model vent out a
window. $80.00.
352-465-7132
DYSON VACUUM
DC18 DYSON slim with
Accessories Asking
$100 Call 352-726-9009
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting 1
yellow, 1 pink,1 light
green $15.00 each call
352-726-9009
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting, 1
dark green, 2 dark blue
$15.00 each call
352-726-9009
HEATER WITH FAN
HOLMS 1500 watt ex-
cellent condition, used
very little. $10.00
(352)257-4076



Electric Treadmill
$395.
Almost New
(352) 795-3086
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
SPACESAVER folds up
for easy storage.AII
electronics work.Digital
readout.A steal at
185.00 352-464-0316


New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19- Near Mall)
352-563-2110


Geea


AXLE
Axle, a very hand-
some 2 y.o. Retriever
mix, neutered,
healthy, wt. 58 Ibs.,
Walks nicely on a
leash, is eager to
please. Good
w/other dogs, kids,
& cats. Very affec-
tionate, lively &
playful, appears
housebrkn.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.










BAILEY
Bailey, a Chesa-
peake Bay Re-
triever/ hound mix, 2
y.o., wt. 39 lbs.,
Heartworm
-negative,
Sits on command,
walks well on leash,
friendly & attentive.
Good w/other dogs.
Very obedient, ap-
pears housebroken.
Slim & trim.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


If interested in any of

the following areas




Crystal River


Citrus Springs


Inglis


Homosassa


Beverly Hills



Apply in person Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.

Crystal River, FL 34429


C~ CITRUS COUNTYY


CHRONICL E
www.cHr l licom


_


CLASSIFIED



ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE (OPTIMUM)
BRAND.electronics
calories,heart
rate,distance, only
185.00 352-464-0316
TREADMILL,
Proform J6
Excellent cond.
$300. obo
(352) 628-2965



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
KAYAK
Current Designs
Gulf Stream, 16' 10
Kevlar, yellow/white
exc. cond. $1800.
(352) 464-4955
Palmer 3 Wheel
Commander Trike
electric hub motor
like new condition
$1,750 (352) 201-2878
PROLINE Pool Table
Simply The Best
7 ft Slate w/access
Exc. cond. Must See
$850
352-322-6464
SHOTGUN Stoeger
STF 3000 20ga.
over/under. Has short
stock made for youth or
ladies. Has external
choke tubes with some
extras included. Very
good condition. $400.00
Call 352 465 6615.
Homosassa address.



ROLEX,
stainless & gold, sub
mariner, Excel cond.
$6,500., 352-513-4759


Sell r Swa


Beauty


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts
Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment















ACE
Ace, 3 1/2 y.o. terrier
mix, wt. 51 Ibs,
beautiful red coat,
healthy, great
shape, good
w/other dogs, plays
in pool, very intelli-
gent, learned agility
course quickly, sits,
gives paw, lies
down on com-
mand, takes treats
gently, appears
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


ICtO ''l''| "

iIl v ., ld llSt.
L.) Da)



s ,ifie
CipClassifieds


381-1110 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Benjamin Z. Garcia Elizabeth A. Rydbom
6000 E Dell Ln 11230 N Northwood Dr. Lot 82
Inverness, FL Inglis, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle November 10, 2013.


382-1110 SUCRN
11/14 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 14,2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, November 10, 2013.


GEORGIA
Georgia, 2-y.o.
female bulldog mix,
easygoing, me-
dium/ low energy,
very gentle, will sit,
gives paw, rolls over,
takes treats gently,
heartworrrm-negative,
housebrkn, likes
smaller dogs, loves
adults/kids, loves
walking on leash.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908


1)








LOKIE
Lokie is a 3-y.o.
brown/white terrier
mix, weight 65 Ibs.
Very sweet, very
gentle. Came to
shelter because
owner could not
care for him any
more. Very gentle,
very playfulloves
water, gets along
w/other dogs, loves
human friends.
Beautiful boy, eager
to please.
Heartworm-negative,
housebrkn.
Call Joanne @
352-697-2682

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Schnauzer/Pom Mix
$300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $450.
Beverly Hills, FL.
(352) 270-8827




Onan
Marine Generator,
7KW gas with hush
exhaust sys.
can demonstrate $900
(352) 601-3656




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945
Manitou Oasis
2006 Pontoon, loaded,
Suzuki,115 Hp,4 stroke,
Road King Galv. trailer,
Exec. Cond. $12,999.
352-527-0324

SOLD
PONTOON
20FT boat & motor,
runs & looks good
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com
WELL BOAT
20 FT., $2,200.
Trailer optional,
352-795-9339
Cell 352-422-2007




AIR STREAM 1998
33ft Motor home
454CIlEng, 2roofAC,
awnings all around,
7KW Gen, 54kmi, A1
cond, Asking 16,900
(540) 305-9854
FLEETWOOD
89 SOUTHWIND, Cl A,
28ft, 41k mi, rear bed,
all new access & tires
$8200. 352-697-5530








1999 exc. shape roof
air propane stove
$2,200 or best offer
(352) 746-6956
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945


CHEVROLET
2005, Aveo Lt, 4 door
$6,990
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2010 Cobalt, 1 owner,
appx 34k mi. like new,
$9500. obo (352)
341-1922, 697-0411
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
1994 Concorde. Good
clean car, runs great.
Gas gauge not working.
$1800 OBO
352-726-5712
DODGE
'05, Neon, SXT,
Red, 1 owner, 88k mi..
very good cond.
Many extra's, $3,500.
obo (352) 220-4305
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2004 Accent, AC,
Power Win/Doors, reli-
able, nice riding car.
Good gas mileage.
$2100 (352) 795-8986
LINCOLN
2007 Towncar, fully
equip., garaged, 16K
mi., like new, $30,000
(740) 339-9260
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PLYMOUTH
'93 Acclaim, AC, new
tires & brakes, very
clean 86K mi. runs
great $3,000 obo 352
382-3900, 634-3880
SATURN
2009 Aura, 94,500 mi
Runs perf. Full Equip'd
$7750 (352) 302-4057



CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966

M isc.INoi


RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.

Auto Parts'

4 Toyo Tires
Like new,
225x60x16
$100
(352) 726-9369



-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



Professional 2016 CBH
Chromatic
Harmonica.
(352) 795-3764
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


DATSUN
1979, 280 ZX Antique
2 Door Coupe
$4,400
(352) 257-3261




DODGE
'00, Ram 1500, auto,
AC, reese hitch new
trans, V6, 130K miles
dependable
$4,400, 352-563-0615
DODGE
1999, Ram 1500
ex cab, $3,998
352-341-0018
FORD
1999, Expedition
Eddie Bauer leather
$3,498.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004 F350, S uper Cab
dually diesel, low miles
new tires, full warranty
til 4/1/14, clean truck,
over 2k in extras, nice
cond! $15,900
(352) 564-2756
FORD
'99 F-350 Diesel, Super
cab, low mi, VG cond.
6 Sp, Pwr boost, $8000
after5:00 352-634-2054

Liquidation Sale
Lay Away Until Taxes
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
04 Suburban LT, 2 whl
drv., loaded, Pristine
cond. 214K mi. $3500
352-615-7566
CHRYSLER
2006, Town & Country
leather, dvd,
$6,998
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
'02, Grand Cherokee
4 x 4, many new parts
& tow pkg., rare 4.0
engine $4,350 obo
(352) 726-9369
KIA
2007, Sportage EX
V6, Loaded, 62K mi.
asking $11,000.
726-2494, 201-1952
TOYOTA
1999, Rav-4
$2,899
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
'97, Camaro, convert-
able, auto, AC, 1
owner $4,400. Cry. Riv.
(727) 207-1619, Cell
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
FORD
2001 Conversion Van
98k mi. exc. cond.
leather seats, call for
details $8250. obo
(352) 341-7735




HONDA
07 VTX 1300
motortrikeconvers.
undr-14k mi. new front
brakes, seals, springs
$16k obo 503-6177
HONDA
2005, Goldwing,
Champion Trike
Must See, $17,000.
(352)464-3105
Fictitious

383-1110 SUCRN
Fictitious Name Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.08, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of
FOUNTAINS MEMORIAL
PARK
located at 5635 W. Green
Acres Street, Homosassa,
Florida, 34446, in the
County of CITRUS, intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida Dated
at Tallahassee, Florida,
this 28th day of October,
2013. /s/ WENDY RUSSELL
WIENER, Esq./Owners Rep.
For STONEMOR FLORIDA
LLC/ STONEMOR FLORIDA
SUBSIDIARY LLC
Published one time in the
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI-
CLE, November 14, 2013.


Metn


MeeBtin
I Notices^^^


Meing
I Notice




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 D9



Nick Nicholas LINCOLN
II IIII I i f I I I1f I I I rnim 1111


NEW 2014 FUSION
$0O Down
so 1st Month payment
Due at signing
Red'
Carpet
Lease


NEW 2014 TAURUS
Luxury For Less!
Buy Or Lease Today!


NEW 2014 FOCUS
Affordable & Fun To Drive.
No Payments Til 2014
For Qualified Buyers


NEW 2014 FLEX


w W W G4C045 W
NEW 2014 EDGE
Roomy & Comfortable With A Great
Ride! Come SeeIt in Crystal River!


W Uf W G4T040

NEW 2014 EXPLORER
FUn & Comfort For Everyone.
Several Models TO Choose From!


NEW 2013 FI50 XLT CREW CAB
Auto, 302 pkg for work & play


NEW 2014 ESCAPE
Lease Or Buy. You Decide!
Up to
32 MPGQ- r .^r.*4Mt


O/ FORD CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED __ Call For Savings!
Relax, It's Covered.~ 3 2 7 5 3
I- 172-rJoin[ ilre-hl n [:.n Forc l fa.:l.Ir.,,-Ir a e l le-hnicibl [ a 4
19w oet a I--). e -i.
^ ^ 7-,,ear'l i.iUii0-rnile F.:ir1l PowerL rant, Co.era ge "
APR for 36 months '2.- '2.,-, ii-e,, or,. l arrnt, Co3 5=75r.77 I

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


nr i i.f waHI S 1 I1II- I B


2011 FORD RANGER
13,000 Mi5les, Aulo GTI1,0 .
$15,950


2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID
$20,950


2013 FORD ESCAPE SE
21u nnnnrle ,.i nroor I if
$23,450


2009 LINCOLN MKS
'11$24,95011


2013 FORD FLEX
Willi Eco BoosI GP;1'. ,,\
$26,450


2010 LINCOLN MKX
L, ll -r m oo r n:,,:,r r,:,,:,l U :llm ..:1 i. i- l:', '..
$26,950


2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT
305 V8 G",T ;ii-') %
$27,950


2011 LINCOLN MKX
"'$27,950 l+lh-'I,
$27,950


2013 FORD TAURUS LTD
Only 8,000 miles G-.-TsW,' ,
$27,950


2011 LINCOLN MKX
L 3 l 2I9Ir "' 5 1)(1) nil 0,- I Tr ,,
$32,950


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


tNot all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease Payments may vary, dealer determines price Residency restnctions apply Cash due at signing is after $750 cash back (PGM #50214) Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease end at pnce negotiated with dealer at signing Take
new retail deliver from dealer stock by 1/2/14 See dealer for qualifications and complete details Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment *No payments till 2014 is for Chase Bank and qualified buyers only Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory
rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399 **Ford Credit Financing required Not all buyers will qualify See dealer for details Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors Pictures are for illustration purposes only Pnces and payments good through 11/30/13


Orvsa iveT^
--Mail




D10 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


THANK

VETER


ON BEHALF OF
CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE
EMPLOYEES AND
OUR FAMILIES,
WE WISH TO OFFER A
HEART FELT THANK YOU
FOR ALL YOU HAVE DONE.


YOU

PLANS



Visit today
and test drive
any vehicle and
Crystal Will buy You
dinner at
The Boathouse
Restaurant
in Crystal River


TODAY THROUGH
VETERANS DAY...
ANY VETERAN OR FAMILY MEMBER
CAN PURCHASE ANY NEW CHEVY
AND MAKE NO PAYMENTS TILL MEMORIAL DAY 2014.*


MAKE NO PAYMENTS UNTIL MEMORIAL DAY.*


CRYSTAL
FIND ROADS C H E V R 0 L E T
800-584 8755 ext10CRY STALAUTOS.COM
1035 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448
*with approved credit loan for 72 months @3.99 APR. Certain restrictions apply. See dealer for details. WAC. AMaximum value $20.00 while supplies last.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




INSIDE


Section E SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013


OME
CI


RONT
-TRLIS C<)OIINTY CHR)RONICIF RFAL EFSTATF


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


% LJ II I) II


A chrome bar cart by
West Elm. featuring
foxed mirrored shelves
that add a touch of glam-
our. Bar carts are a great
way to set up a bar in a
small space. Some have
wheels or casters so the
carts can be rolled to one
side when not in use.
'-'i-il,-,,. 1.


! .


-'4----
b..-~
~ L


~jl


'1
I.
U-


g^


Idp.aIrn~JIAhs~


T1






E2 Sunday November 10, 2013 Cimus Coui'rry (FL) CHRONICLE


(352) 6 72 .
Enter Ouse #50o




SELLER SAYS SELL!!!!
* Upgraded Lg. Kitchen Beautiful Master Suite
* Relaxing Master Bath Huge Screened Lanai
*2.75 Acres/Salt Water Lap Pool 4 + CAR GAR.
* 2 HVAC Systems Guest Suite with Sep. Entry
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 r- 1
EiaiIi elliesuIIon eim'li nx e
www.FloB iduLisiingni o.con


5989 N. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL rV-
(352) 527-7842 L
352) 422-3875


,oo J 1,11, =7 'I t% U & I I
LIVE THE DREAM RIGHT HERE 1332 S. BROOKFIELD DR.
* 3/2.5/2 Split Plan Gorgeous Entryway LECANTO
* Lots of Tile/Laminate Nice Pool Pavers 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot
* Upgraded Windows Move-In Ready Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained
* Security System Plenty of Privacy! Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows
S' J Attractive Yard
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL
*Il a-I I 11r I IN -I-IT11 II IF T PcTER & MARVIA KIORIOL
Emnl eiesuon emxnel |(352) 527-7842
eI w eFlot miginixn e (352) 422-3875
www.Flomuduuulilnglnlo comin __ 't Z-B/ __^^


(35B,637-282 OPEN HOUSE TODAY!





HEW ROOF SHINGLES 2013 5384 N ELKCAM BLVD.
New Interior Paint Nice New Carpet TODAY 12 4 PM
*Cute Family Room Close to Shopping Stunning 2007 Builder's showcase
Move Right In! Immediate Possesion
CGolf Course Close By a Attached Carort! P d w ahome!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 -- Priced 45% below replacement VAU
o o 1.. KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828 1
Einil elliesullon. ileiranx nel Ad Code #1043
WWW.FI0 idiLi5 linginio. oin Email: kim@kmdevane.com


UPDATES GALORE!!
EXTENDED LANAI!!
*3 BR, 3 BATH *2-Car Garage
1,802 Sq. Ft. Living Updated Kitchen
* HVAC 2009 Timberline Shingles 2013
* Huge Master Bath 1 ACRE Lot
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 I
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


WMA






REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
"] 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
M 637-2828

o
2 Buyer enters house
*number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
Ic J'~I property
presentation in
English or Spanish


Waterfront WOW!!! You wont find a better priced 6/3/2 with
open water view anywhere. Located in front of the head spring
in King's Bay Two stories, two kitchens, den, office, loft,
screened lanai, wood burning fireplace and so much more.
Exterior boasts fenced yard, seawall, dock and pool over
looking Kngs Bay CALLTODAY!!!!
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


BZZ3 WIETSUN UHlVI
IN MEADOWCREST
3/2/2 Open floor plan, eat-in kitchen,
screen lanai with windows, A/C & roof
6 yrs old. Maintenance-free living at its
best. Be in by the holidays!
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com _


LOOKING

TO BUILD??
Check out these vacant lots.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront- $125,000
Near water- $2,500 give-away price
Dunnellon Rd. 2 lots back to back $5,000 each
State Park Rd. corner lot $12,000
PINE RIDGE
5.72 ac semi-cleared corner lot- $119,000
COMMERCIAL ACREAGE
63 acres zoned for 74 one-half ac homesites
Owner willing to listen to offers.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 R
Email: cnadal@remax.net


CITRUS HILLS!
BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED 3 BEDROOM WITH OFFICE,
2.5 BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE BLOCK HOME, BUILT BY
SUMMERWIND, MAPLE CABINETS WITH CORIAN
COUNTERS, MANY UPGRADES, FORMAL LIVING AND
DINING ROOM, LARGE FAMILY ROOM OFF KITCHEN
WITH BREAKFAST NOOK, SCREEN PORCH. ~
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 I
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com 1-


RENTALS I L

AVAILABLE


3


UPGRADES GALORE!
Gorgeous Custom Built 3/3 Pool Home In Desirable Belmont
Hills of Citrus Hills. Double Door Entry, 1 2Ft Ceilings,
Ceramic Tile Rooring, Built-in Ent Center, Formal DR,
Gourmet Kitchen w/Solid Surface Counters & Stainless
Appliances, Breakfast Nook, Office/Den, Luxurious Master
Suite & Bath. Too Many Features. A Must See!!!
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: marliha.salther@emax.in el


242 N. Ie l Hw. Beel Hil 2-82w wItAXcmI11US w.41NIvres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. HonsIs 62-70 ww.oueosaaafl~o 0 N w.1,C lRvr7524


I OPFN HOn IF MW flNDAY 1 -APM I


SClassic Estate Home 1 Acre Golf Course Lot
S3BR/2BA/2-Car Gar. Fresh Paint, Carpets
SEnormous Great Room Newer Roof
SNew Pool Equip. 18'x36' Pool w/Dive Brd.
S23'x30' Gar. for Boat -A/C Repl. 06'
I~ ~ ~I I"i ., ,1,1 .i"----
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016
fnol Iruk,,ol'l toinfoba, II tL, m


If you need elbow room, and want a 3,300
s.f. home, on 2 waterfront lots, with 4 BR
(could be 5) 3.5 BA, then this Riverhaven
home is for you. Heated pool, SS
appliances, 9,000 lb. boat lift, 3-stall
garage, tons of closets, & 1 2 ft. ceilings on
canal leading to river & Gulf.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com


E2 Sunday, November 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Visit

^JUIN~NUacMI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Have beautiful gardens year-round


Special to the Chronicle

We have all heard about
having a "green" thumb,
but the interim director
for the UF-IFAS Citrus
County Extension Service
contends that the real se-
cret to successful garden-
ing is to have "brown
knees" one has to get
close to the earth.
The free Master Gar-


dener Plant Clinics for No-
vember will discuss what
to do to have beautiful, col-
orful yards 12 months of
the year
This is also the time to
plant "cool-season" vegeta-
bles and herbs. The clinic
will explain which flowers,
bulbs, vegetables, herbs
and fruiting plants to add
during winter
The remaining schedule


for November is:
1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
12, at Lakes Region Li-
brary, Inverness.
1:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov 13, at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov 20, at Citrus Springs
Library
2 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 26, at Homosassa
Library


These will be the final
Master Gardener Plant
Clinics for 2013.
They will return in
January 2014.
Can't make it to the of-
fice or a plant clinic? Con-
tact Citrus County master
gardeners via email at
MasterGl@bocc.citrus.
fl.us.
Call the Extension Serv-
ice at 352-527-5700.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.



Jackie Caff ney Jason Gaff ney
SRealor A HOUSE Realtor
302-3179 SoLD Name! 287-9022
R746-6700
4660 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
The aolden irin WEEKS REALTY, S BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Hunting
dbl. door er


-^ F---1 I carpe I cpng.N
Igas FP fain
7 25 x 35 1
Gorgeous

Amianda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 0
BROKEPJASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
S111 D V


3050 W. MUSTANG 5558 N. CARNATION DR. 1820 W. BEGONIA DR.
3/3/3 702967 $374,900 P Ridge pool home 705974 $316,000 3/2/2 Pine Ridge pool home 705806 $144,500


9.WADSWORTH 52 S. FILLMORE 6898 W. SEDALIA CT, KING BIRD
3/1.5 704088 $52,500 2/1/1 704090 $45,900 2/2 705875 $37,500 2 05876 $47,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


on by Rusaw. 3-2-2 Tucked away under the
try, New paint, Tile, & shaded oak trees is this
ew SS kit. App., E-I-K, beautiful 1 bed, 1 bath Villa in
. & liv. rm, formal din., a park like setting. Loads of
anai. Roof in 2009. Tile. Living/dining plus
view of walking park. den.Turn Key!


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
o0 : (352) 795-6633
WWw ATF1 COM V S AT S(-v)AT 1XRTCOM


Lr ~ IDG hinkf >REA I:r o


AGENT ON DUT SEe] ljk']=VEN1 DAY m,,[.-rtAv WEEK!


WUTREA


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 E3




E4 Sunday November 10, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Mortgage rates rise


slightly, but still low


Average 30-year mortgage at 4.16percent


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Average U.S. rates
on fixed mortgages rose slightly last week
but remained near historically low levels.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday that the average rate on the 30-
year loan increased to 4.16 percent from
4.10 percent last week, which was the low-
est level in four months. The average on
the 15-year fixed mortgage rose to 3.27
percent from 3.20 percent.
Rates have been falling since September
when the Federal Reserve surprised in-
vestors by continuing to buy $85 billion a
month in bonds. The purchases are in-
tended to keep long-term interest rates low
Slower hiring in recent months has
many analysts predicting that the Fed will
maintain the current pace of the bond
purchases into early next year, which
should keep mortgage rates low for the
time being.
The recent drop in mortgage rates


could help boost home sales, which
slowed in September after rates reached
their highest averages in two years.
The decline in sales has also affected
price gains. Real estate data provider
CoreLogic said Tuesday that a measure of
U.S. home prices rose only slightly in Sep-
tember from August, a sign that prices are
leveling off after big gains earlier this year
To calculate average mortgage rates,
Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the
country on Monday through Wednesday
each week. The average doesn't include
extra fees, known as points, which most
borrowers must pay to get the lowest
rates. One point equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-year mortgage
rose to 0.8 point from 0.7 point. The fee for
a 15-year loan was unchanged at 0.7 point
The average rate on a one-year ad-
justable-rate mortgage fell to 2.61 percent
from to 2.64 percent. The fee remained at
0.5 point.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...


Step up to the bar
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE Ell
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Porcelain Art Nouveau beauty likely came from Germany


ear John: Here is a known beauty of the time.
puzzle. I have a Potential dollar value is
beautiful below $100.
13-inch tall fig- I i DearJohn: My
urine named grandmother
Pearl. She came collected cups
from my grand- and saucers.
mother's home She passed
in New York away a couple of
City I cannot l ,' months ago and
find out a thing left me the com-
about her What plete collec-
do you think? tion. She had
MS., Inverness John Sikorski mentioned that
Dear M.S.: SIKORSKI'S some of the cups
Your figurine ATr and saucers
appears to be ATIC were quite valu-
made of bisque able, but never


porcelain. The overall de-
sign is in the Art Nouveau
category
I think it was made in
Germany The time of pro-
duction is likely early 20th
century Pearl was likely a


got around to showing me
which ones were more
valuable or why
I recently moved to Crys-
tal River and discovered
your column on antiques in
the Chronicle. Is there


something you can help me
with, and if so, how should
I proceed? Thank you for
any information you can
provide. -NR., Internet
Dear N.R: I am glad you
found the column. Yes, I
can help you determine
which cups and saucers in
the collection are the more
valuable ones. You did not
mention how many you
have, so take group photo-
graphs of six cups and
saucers per photo. Make
sure to include maker's
marks that are on any of
the cups and saucers and
make sure the photos are
good and clear
Dear John: I found this
painting at an estate sale.
The only thing I could find
with this name were vin-
tage postcards with the


same signature. I am not
sure if I found something
worth something or not.
Maybe you can help. At-
tached are pictures for you
to look at. The name I
found was Cruauo Flojiol.
Thank you for any help. -
D.Q., Internet
Dear D.Q.: I found no bi-
ographical information
about the artist or any track
record of sales. So the oil
on canvas painting you
have would be in the deco-
rative category, leaving
See ATTIC/Page E5
This porcelain figurine is an
example of Art Nouveau. It
likely came from Germany
in the early 20th century,
and probably depicts a
well-known lady.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

potential dollar value
catch-as-catch-can. The
subject matter limits its
decorative interest
Dear John: I have had
this picture in my family
for many years. It is of
Mount Vernon, but I am not
sure if it is a lithograph or
print. I believe it is from
the 1920s or 1930s. There is
one close up of the signa-
ture, but the last name is
difficult to read.
In addition, the flag is
painted in color and is in-
triguing if simply a print.
Can you help identify it?
Thanks in advance for your
efforts. -N. W, Internet


Dear N.W: You have a
print; the type of print ap-
pears to be a lithograph.
I was not able to deci-
pher the signature that ap-
pears on the picture. The
time of production is likely
early 20th century
There is no specific col-
lector interest. Potential
dollar value is
catch-as-catch-can.

John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, P.O. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


Special to the Chronicle


This painting depicting George Washington's home at Mount Vernon is likely a lithograph.


REALTY GROUP
REALTYiGROUP


SpeEilzn inTera.it
(XI Bretwood Rsae


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemrnando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 0 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


REDCE DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING IN GATED GOLF COMMUNITY! Meticulously maintained 2 bed
-- DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR & DEN WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS room,2 bats, 2-car garage detached villa on beautifullylandscaped cul-de-saclotin Brentwood
BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR Terra Vista Maintenance Free Villa featuring 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Office/Den, Living Room This lovelyTerra Vista 3/2 home lthe ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this villa with a spacious open floor plan, kitchen has eat- in
ownhome 2 bed, 2.5 bath, 1-car ga. Completely furnished with high end furniture & decor- with Buit-m-Entertamment Center, Open Kitchen with Breakfast Bar, Screened Lanai and a use, retirement, or full time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large dining area and breakfast bar Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are handicap equipped. The sliders
furniture negotiable. Tied in all the wet areas. Community center with pool, gym, sauna, hot 2- Car Attached Garage. Dining Area overlooking Private Backyard. New 15 Seer Heat!Air yardto formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what you've been to the large rear lanai offer a view of a green expansive lawn. Plenty of room for a pool. Home is
ub, public golf course all in a gated community. Don't miss this one. Beautiful view of the Conditioner in Dec 2012. New Energy Efficient Washer & Dryer and Dishwasher in Dec 2012. looking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoythe social lifethat comes ready for you to move right in. Enjoy the Citrus Hills Country Club M bershp Lifesle with this
ond and fountain fromyour lanai No neighbors behind you. MLS 702417 .......... $ 91,900 G Good Curb Appeal and Situated Close to allAmenities. MLS 703025 ..................... $165,000 w ith the social membership! MLS 703807 ....................................................... $288,000 home. Hurry thisvilla valuewillnotla g M S 705084 tlong...........................................$124,900


.... .......

DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Enter the foyer and be instantly captivated by the charm and tasteful refinements of this
gracious home. Beautiful 2 bedrooms, plus den, 2 bath, 2-car garage Hillside villa. Many DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS desirable upgrades such as huge mirror informal dining room, eat-in kitchen, butler pantry, NEWLY REDUCED-TERRAVISTA Well maintained bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, plus den
(ery popular Windward model 3 bedroom, plus den, 2.5 baths, great room floor plan, Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan designwith great use of the space. Driftwood Ceramic tile and carpet throughout and so much more. Pristine condition, only lived in and a pool. It is an expanded Laurel model, extensive oak molding around windows, crown
expanded and loaded with upgrades Situated on Skyvieew golf course with breathe-taking Model bedroom, 2 bath villa, featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family room, seasonally. This home has arguably one of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry oak cabinets with crown molding extra
'evews. Oversized lanai with lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra Vista. formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car oversized garage, prestigious Skyview golf course. Come and sit on the extended lanai and watch all the golf .... .. .. 11 .... .. .. . .. ....
ALS 702685 .................................................................................................................... $ 3 3 4 ,9 0 0 all situated in beautiful Terra Vista.M LS 70325 .......................................................$ 17 9 acton unfold before you.M LS 706279........................................................................$ 2 5 9 ,0 0 0 . .. .. i.2 2 6 .9 5 2

Tem -. 6 Moth orMr






BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Townhome, 2 bed,2.5 bath, 1-cargar. Completelyfurnishead wth high-end furniture & decor.
located n the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished detached villa 2 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Luxurious unfurnished home in Terra Vista for rent. Formal ving areas with a spacious open Tied inallthe wet areas. Community center with pool, gym, sauna, hot tub, pubic golf course
bedrooms 2 baths and 2-car garage. Oopen floor plan with lots of space. Social membership Nice 3 bed room home in the gated community of Terra Vista. Open floor plan backs up to |. ', I ",',",' .... ... all in a gated community. Don't miss this one. Beautiful view of the pond and fountain from
Included. 2121 .................................................................................................. $ 1,100 private preserve area. Socal Club Mem bershp included. 1231. ... $ 1,3 00 .. ... . ... .... . 1. OO your lanai. No neighbors behind you. 12271 .................................................................... $ 1,100


I


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 ES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reduce allergies


while gardening


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
Tulips in New Market, Va. Allergy sufferers will have fewer pollen concerns
by choosing plants for their garden that produce little or no airborne pollen.

No need to give up your green thumb


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Allergies can put a serious crimp
in gardening: A runny nose, itchy
eyes, or a wheezing and persistent
cough can drive allergy sufferers in-
doors during the growing season.
But there are many things you can
do to reduce those irritations and re-
main a dedicated gardener
Start by determining what's caus-
ing your allergies. See an allergist
for tests to define the problem. Then
you can garden smarter by avoiding
plants that give off harmful pollen,
and working only when fewer spores
are in the air
An estimated 50 million Ameri-
cans have seasonal allergy prob-


lems, according to the Asthma and
Allergy Foundation of America. The
cause is pollen from plants, trees,
grasses, weeds and mold spores.
Peak season usually is March
through October, but that varies by
region. Tree pollen can be a prob-
lem for allergy sufferers as early as
January in the South.
The degree of distress ranges
from annoying to life threatening.
"For most individuals, the garden-
ing allergies do, in fact, affect their
quality of life, especially during the
seasons," said Dr Clifford Bassett,
director of Allergy and Asthma Care
of New York. "However, some folks
with allergic asthma may


See ALLERGIES/Page E7


ABOVE AVERAGE ... BELOW MARKET
VALUE! Gorgeous & on the Golf Course!! 2004 HONEY FOR THE MONEY! CRYSTAL RIVER VERY UNIQUE, VERYCHARMING&VERYCHEAP! I
Terra Vista 3/2.5/2 Pool home packed w/upgrodes WATERFRONT. 1971 home. 1,466 living. NEW paint, 1996 3/2/3 Pool, 2,098 living. NEW paint & flooring,
for $269,900 668 Doerr. Kimberly Fuller. flooring & apple. Shed, fencing & 2 docks. $199,900! 1 fireplace, lanai, fencing. $144,900! Tomika Spires-Hanssen.
#704902.352-212-5752. #704955.1309 SE 3rd. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. #704667. 2917 Eagle.


E6 Sunday, November 10, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALLERGIES
Continued from Page E6

experience a flare or exac-
erbation of their respira-
tory symptoms that may
become more serious, and
necessitates them to re-
frain from or curtail gar-
dening activities."
Some allergy avoidance
tips:
Gear up. Medications
suggested by a doctor or


pharmacist usually relieve
the symptoms, said
Leonard Perry, an exten-
sion horticulturist with the
University of Vermont and
an allergy sufferer "Those
should be begun a couple
of weeks prior to the onset
of a particular allergy sea-
son so the body can adjust
and be ready," he said.
Wear a mask. Simple
paper masks leak, said Dr
Richard Weber, an allergist
and president of the Amer-
ican College of Allergy,


Asthma and Immunology
For more sensitive allergy
sufferers, he said, "it
makes more sense to get
the more sophisticated
masks with respirators on
each side of your face."
Planting sites: Be care-
ful where you grow things.
"It's a common practice to
use evergreens as founda-
tion plants, yet they're pretty
allergy-making," Weber
said. "Imagine somebody
sensitive having a juniper
outside their bedroom win-


dow in summer They'd
have lots of trouble."
Check the daily pollen
count. Avoid direct outside
exposure on high pollen
days when it is sunny, dry
and windy, Bassett said.
Pollen levels generally are
lower in early morning
and late evening, as well as
on cloudy, windless and
wet days.
Eliminate problem
plants, especially weeds
that can aggravate late
summer and fall allergies,


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Bassett said. Choose
plants that are less likely
to cause allergies, such as
azalea, bulbs, cacti,
daisies, dahlia, pansies
and petunias, dogwood
trees, hibiscus, boxwood
and yucca shrubs.
Clean up when done.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 E7


"Drop your clothing in a
utility room and go
shower," Weber said. The
pollen is "in your hair, eye-
lashes and nose. Do a salt-
water wash in your nose
and get it out. That proba-
bly helps more than any
other item."


PINE RIDGE
ESTATES
Elegant custom built 3/4/3 Pool

sophisticated lifestyle
$469,000


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com



Investors Realty S
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit mywebsite at: w w.nyflorida-house.corr


CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT
A taste of unspoiled nature secluded 80+ .. .. I ..... . i ,,I 1., ,, I 8, I ... .. .... I "
ponds, mature oaktrees The 2 spacious i ........ i ..... i, 1 i, i . I , ,I .i ,I . ... I
positioned in a beautiful setting 11 11 i I 1 I i .... .. .. ,
,II i, ,,,,.. .. ,,.i$800.000 piece waiting for you and your family to move right I
,, Dractive tour $ 5 4 9 0 0 06



SWEETWATER POINTE SOUTHERN STYLE COUNTRY ESTATE- PLEASANT GROVE ROOM TO ROAM!
r F PLANTATION HOME ,.,.,4511 sq. ft. est., custom built Spectacular 3/2/2 pool home w/large
S. Custom built 4/3/2 on approx 10 ac acres MOL Exceptional quality: lanai on 2 14 acl HUGE 25'x40' detached
Cathedral wood vaulted tongue & groove ,i v /12ft roll-up door perfect for
fireplace Recently i, granite counters & custom i i i.... i Ncely landscaped with pretty
taste impeccably maintained Horse barn, 4 rm., den/office, 2+2 car i ...... oaks and well maintained, too New roof
i .. .. summer kit., covered patio w/pavers. (2013),14SeerHVAC(20091lgenerator&
$239,000 1 $379,000 $549,900 ermeter alarm $249,895



SECONDS TO KINGS BAY CAPTIVATING VIEW OVER FLORAL CITY LAE! MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS.! uTSTAyDBC WATERFRONT RESIDENCE
-no I 2 master suites, apart- 1 2a Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre i
ment lower level Upper level corer lot with mature oak trees a3d00.l
accessible via elevator Pool hurricane setting with major oak trees Charming lots of pvacyi Very well maintained,
shutters, security system updated brck home, first tme ered som docks, 240 ft seawall, workshop, shed
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of gnalfx and fireplace still in Updated roof, A/C, kit, windows, every-
seawall, boat lift Everything just Place Large det gar w/workshop, thmg meticulous mantaned Pr red
watgoryou $488,000 seawa $179,000 i $169,000 sooo ghtat$399,000!
Lwatn 0o0 $488,000 aiwa $19,0 $169,000 000s aim~ $ 99,00


Frank YueIling, Broker& \\ /
(.^f R Bev ily buelling, Realtor ^ <"^ y ^ -'-'
r Office. 352-637-4280 S '/ -
.i., 637 b .e.
--hi i ,. FL 34450 -- n ,.........- .... .;r
I ndbev earthlink.net Website:www.invernesshomesandland.com


INVERNESS
Hwy. 41 strip mall on 100'X270' lot.
Just south of Eden Dr., 5 office
suites. 1 storage & 1 unattached
separate office building.
MLS#331369 PRICED AT $399,000


FLORAL CITY
Gas station now closed & tanks have
been filled w/foam & closed off. Just
passed environmental inspection.
On 1.3 acres mol & zoned for many
different uses. 2 mobile homes
for additional income.
MLS#349976 PRICED AT S199,000




ES Sunday November 10, 2013










TN BHlR

Swanky at-home
drinking accessories
add touch ofclass
KIM COOK
Associated Press
ome beer and spirit-making
have become popular hob-
bies. Bars and beverage
stores feature a growing
range of artisanal spirits and
craft brews. Cocktail parties
are back in vogue.
And retailers are responding to
all this imbibing by offering furni-
ture, barware and accessories with
cosmopolitan flair All you need are
a few invitations, snacks and some
good music for the party to begin.
Let's pop the cork on what's new:
"Nowadays, entertaining does
not have to mean having a glitzy
full bar Bar carts have become
more delicate, refined, and smaller
in scale, so you can tuck them into
a corner of a room or blend them in
with the rest of the furniture," says
Veranda magazine's market editor
Catherine Lee Davis.
West Elm's Parker slim-profile
cart in acorn-stained walnut veneer
with brass rail trim has a mid-cen-
tury vibe. The walnut-stained Dod-
son cart features a flip-down front
concealing a mirror-lined interior
with plenty of storage. And a cart in
polished nickel with two foxed mir-
ror shelves evokes Art Deco glam-
our (www.westelm.com)
If you want the look of a built-in
bar, consider Pottery Barn's modu-
lar collection of wine grids and
drawered cabinets. In black or ma-
hogany finish, the pieces can be
configured to look like a hutch or
buffet. (wwwpotterybarn.com)
See Page EO10


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 E9


I 4BffVZif0ALy 9F 9TIMUS 9 9 V


How do you like
yours? This mirrored sign from
Z Gallerie.com adds a great
touch of interesting vintage
style art for a home bar area.
Associated Press


I : Etchings
of narwhals
on a pair of
glasses.
Narwhals
and other
interesting
creatures are
printed on a
vintage-style
barware
collection
available at
GentSupply
Co.com.
- 3sociated Press


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1


-t)i.5t.f |1n48 W Lake
MLS 705655
REDUCED & ready to sell! 3/2/2 e
with upgrades.
Dir: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entrance, follow
Blvd to R atFenway (Circle) to Lon Lake M
Skyview Landing to L on Wisperto L on L
Sandra Olear 352-212-40!
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1


j LL3 JU3 n UlaSSDnuru LI
S.h w : $.. S199.900
Lovely 3/2/2 home with wood burning
fireplace.
Dir: Rte. 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd., R on
Glassboro Ct to home on the right.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
iNFW I IRTING


4i Prudential

Open 7 Days Florida Showcase
AWeekld Properties

-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM




SValley CI i. l: ii.:.. $312.500
$349,000 3bd/2ba home is perfect for
enhanced entertaining...has spacious lanai &
outdoor area.
Terra Vista Dir Go thru main entrance of Terra Vista, R on the
'ane to R on roundabout (FenwayDr), first R onto Eagle Chase Dr, L
ake Valley on White Oak PI, R on N Ravenwood Pt
58 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
-3PM OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM


534 E Knightsbridge PI
.. MLS 704309 $141,900
Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.
Dir: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E.
Reehill St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R
on Knightsbridge PI.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


3542 N Palomino Ter ',tfLA $ 988 E Morningstar Lane
MLS 706410 $429,900 MLS 706427 $269,000
Expansive 5/4/3 pool home nearly 6 acres Gorgeous Pool Home features 3 Bedrooms,
on horse trail. 3 Full Baths and Spacious Kitchen.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


pV4V11 790 E Gilchrisl CI 27.2A
7171 2091 N Brenntwood Circle MVILS Iu6MU2 $55,000
MLS 706378 $119,900 2/2 condo well maintained and beautifully
Open floor plan on this nice 2/2/2 Villa. furnished.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013
UE lia ..* 1S11 s&.au lal


H SID T A


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3PM





44lls 321 E Keller C,
MLS 706196 $199,900
Oaks Golf Course 3/2/2 pool home with spa.
Dir: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to Right
on Keller.
DickHildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING





2723 N Crosswater Path
MLS 706407 $675,000
Absolutely stunning, neat & clean 3/3.5/3
golf course home.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036
NEW LISTING


.4f1" 1704 E SI James Loop
MLS 706499 $147,900
Spacious great room floor plan with 3/2/2
and pool in a quiet neighborhood.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


7"C'00 351 W Hillmoor Ln
7 J MLS 357980 $129,000
2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by Twisted
Oaks Golf Course.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


*Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
*First Time Home Seller


unmw Buywr/mlcllur MaiUUyi msr .e_--
1 d III II I.l ,h j III .. ..II Ii,11 I ,, I i , I , I II I1 II lh i III I, ,.,1l , ,h I l h I I I I , i, II.. I
S 0. O~i-


^, 7




E10 Sunday, November 10, 2013


BAR
Continued from Page E8

Davis says that with barware, the
trend is toward shaking it up. "We
see lots of different materials like
hammered silver, tortoise, or sha-
green," she says. "It's all about mix-
ing and matching. After all,
entertaining should be about hav-
ing fun."
Gent Supply Co. has a natty col-
lection of coasters, glassware and
flasks printed with illustrations of
turn-of-the-century gentlemen du-
elers, narwhals, anchors, and ani-
mals dressed in distinguished garb.
(www.gentsupplyco.com)
Artist Richard E. Bishop, known
for wildlife etchings in the 1930s,
'40s and '50s, has his work on an
array of bar glasses and decanters.
Ducks, trout, foxes and horses set a
"country house" tone. (www.
richardebishop. com)
A punchbowl that rests in the
clutches of an octopus, and a
sculpted shell held by a delicate
coral stand are part of an alu-
minum barware collection at Z Gal-
lerie. There's also a faux crocodile
service tray in rich eggplant, stud-
ded with silver rivets, that makes a
sophisticated statement.
Silver cocktail picks and stir
sticks topped with airplanes evoke
the Second World War And a mir-
rored sign with phrases like
"Stirred" and "Straight Up"
printed in a gold retro font would
make great wall art. (www
zgallerie.com)
JC Penney has a whimsical yet el-
egant wine decanter from Michael
Graves Design that features his sig-
nature bird as built-in aerator
(www.jcp.com)
At Homegoods, there are ham-
mered metal cocktail shakers with
handy drink recipes printed on the
side. Standing wine buckets are
useful accessories, leaving more
room on dining tables and buffets
for nicely-sized tools small mud-
dlers, sieves, scoops and tongs, for
example that will have amateur
bartenders looking like experts.
(www.homegoods.com; www.
surlatable.com)
Making a good martini may be an
art, but how about making your
own gin? No bathtub is required,
just a kit like one from Uncommon
Goods containing all the spices, ju-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


niper berries and accessories
needed to turn garden-variety
vodka into a custom gin.
New York artist Aymie Switzer's
laser-etched cedar coasters depict
neighborhood maps of many major
cities, including Philadelphia,
Chicago, Boston and San Francisco.
Coasters recycled from old tires are
stamped by Los Angeles artists
with different graphic number
fonts. And Colorado designer David
Rasmussen's black walnut
stemware is distinctive and beauti-
ful. All at wwwuncommongoods.
com.
Whether it's a swanky gathering
or a casual movie night, provide
your drinking guests with a variety
of interesting treats. Pier l's Tast-
ing Party collection includes one-
bite ceramic dishes, shot glasses
and spoons which can be stored in
your home bar Ebony buffalo-horn
condiment spoons and mottled
horn bowls from Williams-Sonoma
would add flair (wwwpierl.com;
wwwwilliams-sonoma.com)
If you're setting up a first apart-
ment and don't have much money,
consider giving an old nightstand
or tray table new life as a minia-
ture bar Hit flea markets and junk
yards for salvaged tool trolleys,
medical supply carts or old mi-
crowave stands and spiffthem up
with paint, paper or other decora-
tive materials like stick-on tiles
and mirror The web has many art-
ful ideas, including at
www curbly com.


i"'!i


Flasks from GentSupplyCo.com printed
with vintage drawings of dapper gentlemen have
old school charm.
The Parker cart, from West Elm, has a
midcentury vibe. It sports an acorn finish with
brass rail trim.
Associated Press


a -0 AMERICAN
I.. Oe e Realtor E E A REALTY & INVESTMENTS
a ALWAYSTHEREFORYOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
1Cell: (352)Q Beverly Hills, FL 34465
F Cell: (352) 697-1685 O office: 352-746-3600


TERRA VISTA
2 bedrooms plus den, 2 baths, 2-car garage.
Well maintained and priced to sell.
Come live the dream!!
MLS 705649
$174,900









ERA agents reach
for the stars


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SReal Estate DIGEST


Lou
Miele
ERA
American
Realty.


ERAAmerican Realty
& Investments is proud to
announce the latest pro-
duction level achieved by
its agents this year.
Lou Miele, Beverly Hills
office, has surpassed the
$3 million mark in closed
sales volume in 2013. He
can be reached at the
Beverly Hills
office of


ERAAmerican Realty by
calling 352-746-3600.
John Hoffmeister has
surpassed the $2 million
mark in closed sales vol-
ume in 2013. He can be
reached at the Inverness
office of ERAAmerican
Realty by calling 352-726-
5855.


And with
more than ., /
$6 million in
closed sales iI ,,
volume is
Jody
Broom. Len Jody
The bro- Palmer Broom
kers and RE/MAX RE/MAX
staff of Realty One. Realty One.
RE/MAX
would like to congratulate these associ-
ates on their tremendous success.
Geistfeld tops
with Citrus Hills


Karis Geistfeld has r
been named the top sales
agent for October at the A
Villages of Citrus Hills.
This is the fifth time this KariE
year that she has been so Geistfi
recognized. Villages
The Welcome Center Citrus Hi
for the Villages of Citrus


s
ld
of
ills.


17B Hills IS located at Z4UU N. lerra vista
Blvd. More information is available at
www.CitrusHills.com.

See DIGEST/Page E12

Sherry Lucy ''' = . 1
Sherry y -A9 0687 S. Adolph Pt. Lecanto, FL 344B1
Potts Barnes .ctrusSold.om (352) 637-2777
RE/MAX RE/MAX I
Realty One. Realty One.


Sally
Cure
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Ron
McEvoy
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX agents
continue to get results
It's been a very productive year for
several RE/MAX Realty One agents in
Citrus County. Through a lot of hard work
and perseverance, they have accom-
plished impressive levels of success.
With more than $4 million in closed
sales volume are Alan Ivory, Sherry
Potts, Lucy Barnes, Kelly Goddard
and Sally Cure.
Closing more than $5 million in sales
volume this year are Ron McEvoy and
Len Palmer.


WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
Fora FREE MarketAnalysis and Marketing Plan
$10.2 million closed by Oct. 31, 2013.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
o or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
S To Learn More _ -
U (352) 746-9924 ,-"-.-



Waterfront Res Acreage
on Crystal River, FL
ONLINE AUCTION Nov. 14 Nov. 20
2 lots will be sold to highest bidder above $99,000
Property #DG694F
S4 parcels 20 to 27 ac
Minutes to Gulf of Mexico R W. R


See website for full details!
Tranzon Ddggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
Lic. Real Estate Broker, FL
Lic# AU707 & AB3145 I 10% BP


Extension slates
gardening workshops
SA free gardening workshop
will run from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Nov. 14 and 19 at the Citrus
County Extension Building, 3650
W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Material hardiness zones are
a critical factor in the proper se-
lection of sustainable plants. This
workshop introduces participants


I IN RIDG E


3/2/3, beautiful 1.5 acre lot, great
location equestrian trails, all wood
cabinets, granite tops vinyl
windows, energy efficient award
home, tile & wood flooring, large
master, spacious master bath. Trey
ceilings, beautiful detail trim &
crown moldings. Large porch with
exterior shower & direct bath
access. Many special features.
.... Call Joe 302-0910


HomeFront BRIEF

to criteria to consider when se-
lecting materials, their placement
in the landscape and potential
frost protection encouraged to
reduce material loss.
SA free gardening workshop
will be offered from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Citrus
County Extension Building, 3650
W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to plan
and prepare garden projects for


OPEN HOUSE-SUNDAY-NOV 10-1-4 PM


SPARKLE PLENTY!
Come see this spacious 2/2/2, with "everything new, even the kitchen sink"!
Newly re-tiled baths and kitchen, newly carpeted bedrooms and handsome
laminate all through the living room, dining area and family room, plus den or
office. Convenient and quiet neighborhood, near lake, boat ramp and park, plus
a stone's throw to Rails to Trails! MLS #705740$89,900
Directions: Hwy. 41S to Eden Drive, turn left and proceed to Carnegie Drive,
TURN LEFT and proceed to house on right.
2413 S. CARNEGIE DRIVE
Your Hostess: Marilyn Booth 637-4904 or 201-1121 OOOGLYS


KARENE. MORTON .
Hall of Fame Centurion Membe, A
E-mail: kemorron@tampabay rrcor
Website: karenemorton cor
(352) 726-6668. (352) 212-7595
S. TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 L CHARMING VILLA
IN PARKSIDE VILLAGE
WATERFRONT HOME J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE Nestled under the oaks with the view of the
DUVAL ISLAND [ l16JVWeM nStreetIveSen 3FL34450 fountain This well cared for 2BR, IBA, custom
Beautiful vies open deck along the waterfront for designed villa is truly move-in ready. Community is
entertaining and fishing. New kitchen New floors .,l ,:,: pet-friendly. Close to Beverly Hills Civic Center,
Completely updated throughout NEW ROOF JUNE I r i_,-.r _'. rn>c , .-. r _-. _.- ,,-.f ,-!nC library and shopping. Appliances updated in 2013.
2011 MLS#t7065O8 $169,900 MIS #705316 $65,900



INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH ** SWIMMING
AFFORDABLE 3 BEDROOM HOME POOL PLUS WOBKSHOP/2NDGARAGE
0W,.. .o,, bit0,,WilJ- ,,,&,-d,, aw
d. i..... i, ud "i ,k ,, ., i,,-d ,,ir Mra INVERNESS VILLAGE CONDO ckiuanlihesheSpokltss i2hedmhaneithnofklice
minutes from Inverness Carport Workshop CENTRAL CITRUS COUNTY Ir VRNESS VILLAGE CONDO ni ktchn an iot bert*saesules Hu2edaster mhm wit01ienh
Laundry Room* New Roof 2006 Ne Water Heater 3BR, 2BA, D/W mobile home cathedral ceilings fo ,n,. Upte.tch a othhedromsaresuites*Hugemamteroenom20x15*enirie
2002 New Carpet 2010 Wide open living room & *FIREPLACE in living room *large bedrooms *lots appliances Wood cabinets tile floor *Feeveriea O Brihtan e ceery cien m all neiwerm appl*ca
spacious eat-in kitchen laundry room has lots of of built-ins screen lanai WORKSHOP PLUS Beautiful Oak floors in ivmin/dinin area garae on hme PLUS detached 2 cr arage for vehkice ai
storage* Fruit trees Great value! Ideal snowbird home 2 adjoining lots! Glassed in Florida Room. workshop RI parking area This home is move-in ready
orfirst-time homebuyers.MLSBt704901 $49,900 MLS:t706549 $147,500 MLS t701854 $49,900 convenient toelnverness. MLS 11704557 $159,900.


T o]NaCO l 0 :] -37:] 443:]


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 Ell




the upcoming milder season.
Garden planning, estimating cost
and garden clean-outs are im-
portant topics to consider when
outdoor work is delayed. It is
also a great time of year to enjoy
the outdoors with activities like
bird watching. Creating natural
buffers which attract birds is an
excellent project to consider dur-
ing this time of year.
From staff reports


John
Hoffmeister
ERA
American
Realty.


Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Kelly
Goddard
RE/MAX
Realty One.


A_-




E12 Sunday, November 10, 2013


Try these tips for a more cost-efficient home


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

As temperatures drop and
daylight is in shorter supply, we
fight back: We crank up the heat
in our homes and turn on lights
earlier and earlier And yet we
also want to keep our heating
and electric bills as low as we
can.
Can you keep your home
warm and inviting all winter
while still conserving energy?
Here, three home design ex-
perts offer advice on how to
keep things cozy while minimiz-
ing energy use this winter Their
suggestions range from the tra-


ditional (there's a reason why
your grandmother hung those
heavy curtains in winter) to the
high-tech, including a thermo-
stat that can talk to your iPad.
Try new tech
Maxwell Ryan, founder of the
popular home decor website
ApartmentTherapycom, is a de-
signer John Colaneri, co-host of
HGTV's "Kitchen Cousins," is a
construction expert who builds
and remodels homes.
Both offer identical pieces of
advice about staying warm while
conserving power and saving
money: Swap out your old in-
candescent bulbs (and those


swirly compact fluorescent
bulbs, too) for the new Cree
brand LED bulbs.
"They can last longer than 10
years and they use 84 percent
less energy than incandescents,"
Ryan says. "They also are dim-
mable" and give a warm-looking
light a big change from
the energy-saving compact
fluorescents.
"If you do the math on the
LED," he says, the bulbs save
you so much on electricity that
they pay for themselves within a
year and then last about nine
more years.
Colaneri and Ryan also both
advise homeowners to replace


old thermostats with new Nest
brand models. "They take 30
percent off your bill each
month," Colaneri says. 'And they
look very high-tech and cool to
display"
Nests are programmable
"learning thermostats," which
means they track your habits
and adjust accordingly They
also connect via Wi-Fi to check
weather reports online, and you
can control them remotely from
an iPad.
There is new outdoor technol-
ogy, as well. On your deck or
patio, designer Brian Patrick
Flynn suggests adding a new
propane-powered space heater


The newest models are cost-ef-
fective and stylish, says Flynn,
executive producer of
HGTVcom's Holiday House.
"They look like modern sculp-
ture," says Flynn, "and many of
them are under $500. To ensure
my outdoor spaces stay warm
during the winter, I keep mod-
ern, 7-foot tall space heaters in
my covered outdoor living room.
They're on wheels, so it's easy to
move them around to wherever
people are seated. And once lit,
the glass tubes which contain
the flame from the propane tank
put on a gorgeous show"

See HOME/Page E13


DIGEST
Continued from Page Ell

EXIT agents in
the spotlight
Nancy
Little
Lewis, an
agent with
EXIT Realty
Leaders in
Crystal Nancy Steven
River, was Little Lewis McClory
recently EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
honored Leaders. Leaders.
with the
coveted Bronze Award by EXIT Realty


Pamela
Shemet
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Nancy
Ayres
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


John
Maisel III
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Corp. International.
The award was given in recognition of
achieving more than 25 closed transac-
tion sides from July 1,2012, to June 30,
2013.
Little Lewis was also inducted into the
Sapphire Circle in recognition of achiev-
ing 250 closed transaction sides since
joining EXIT.


Local agents Steven McClory, Nancy
Ayres, John Maisel III and Pamela
Shemet were also honored with the
Bronze Award.

Keller Williams brings
new agent aboard
Keller Williams Realty
welcomes Terry Blanco.
After 24 years as a fire-
fighter in Key West, Terry 0
has joined the Citrus s
County Dream Team and
brings his caring touch to
assist people in choosing Terry
the right home. He's at the Blanco
Keller Williams Office at Keller
711 S. Adolph Point, Williams
Lecanto. Realty.


l v JOANN MARTIN [
Preferred
REAL ESTATE E
I r, f ahrMLSi


Broker Associate 2) Z-ZIJ








3826 N Parkside Village
Terrace
Spacious 1 bedroom 1 bath villa with
Florida room. New carpeting, new tile in
kitchen. Interior recently painted, new
washer & dryer, inside laundry, large
bedroom. Offered at $41,500.


J- z pa www.premnn.neti


3605 N. Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills FL
Beautiful 2/2/2 home with caged, heated
in-ground pool. Roof replaced 2005, new
heating & air Dec 2011. Some new
carpeting 2012. Home is well maintained
and a must see.
Offered for $112.500.


I K"Always There For You"
mYl GAIL COOPER
Ali 1uuiI niiiii.:. Dollar Realtor
R, r (352) 634-4346
I Office: (352) 382-1700
j' E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


S"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" CAROLE LISTER |
NANCY Direct: f l Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
PN TICOS 35264-425 Cell: 422-4620 ...
PONTICOS 352-63 44225 RA Office: 382-1700
Multi-Million $$$ Producer L Y
: ,;.. IFKEY1I REALTY INC.
8015 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com
EE WT
' .' I


CONVENIENT TO THE COUNTRY CLUB! UNOBSTRUCTED GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
2/2/2 with 1824 sq ft of living area 3/2/2 detached villa
Seller to "install new roof prior to closing Woodburning fireplace in the Great Room
Large backyard and greenbelt Spacious 12'x23' tiled patio
Florida room gives added living space AC/heat replaced in 2012
Tiled family room off kitchen Roof/skylights replaced in 2006
Plenty of room to add a pool! Yard maintained by association
#705485 $87,500 #701503 $149,900
See" IrtaiI| l |ou .A@ J wreIsaleIs4IuI..ImIIBI.


9 GERANIUM CT
Cul-de-sac Location Granite & Woo
LG Appliances New Flooring
POOL *Priced Right
3 BR's+Office liat can be a 4th
$172,000 M[S#704942
Tuke my ViNtual tO


W 16HEMLOCKCTE
d Kitchen Covered Screened Porch Entry Open Great Room Plan
Gas Fireplace Jetted Tub in Master
3 BR Split Plan Kitchen Pass Thru
2-Car Garage w/Screen Neutral Decor
$128,400 MLS#703138
I I I'^ **^ '*


CUSTOM BUILT VILLA
* 3/2/2 Golf course
*Built 2007 .10 ft ceilings
* SS appliances Island kitchen
* 2 screened porches 18" tile floors
#704138 $189,900


GOLF COURSE POOL HOME
*3/2/2+ Beautiful acre lot
* Heated sports pool Fireplace in den
* Conan Lg eat-in kitchen
*Cathedral ceilings Well for yard
#704737 $249,900


1COME


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


www.listerlistings.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME
Continued from Page E12

Embrace
upholstery
Warm, cozy upholstery
fabrics work on a practical
level by holding your
warmth when you touch or
sit on them. But Ryan
points out that they also
work visually: A room full
of soft, warm fabrics will
give you a psychological
sense of warmth that adds
to your enjoyment.
So add thick throw blan-
kets to chairs and sofas,
and swap out silk-covered
pillows and even lamp-
shades for ones covered in
thicker, nubbier fabrics
like muslin and burlap.
Ryan also recommends
using thick curtains in
winter A decade ago, he
says, "curtains were con-
sidered fusty and old-fash-
ioned and expensive." But
with so many beautiful, in-
expensive curtains avail-
able today, they've become
popular again.
Besides adding color or
a bold pattern to a room,
curtains also block cold air
that might leak in around
windows. And they muffle
sound from outside, which
helps make rooms feel
more insulated in winter
"Curtains," he says,
"aren't just for your grand-


To ensure the outdoor living space of his mountain house stays warm anc
during the colder months, designer Brian Patrick Flynn chose woven bleni
for his seating, a wool and acrylic blend indoor-outdoor area rug, and throw
blankets to keep guests feeling cozy. The wood burning fireplace is energy
will still keep the area warm should electricity be lost during storms.


parents anymore."
The same technique can
help warm up outdoor
spaces. Flynn recom-
mends Sunbrella's out-
door velveteen fabric for
chairs and sofas. He also
likes thick, woven blends.
"Velveteen is amazing
for the outdoors," he says,
"since it's warm and fuzzy"
Light the fire
Crackling flames in an
indoor fireplace can
change the feel of a room
instantly And outdoors,
they bring a welcome infu-
sion of heat and light on a
winter evening.
"Outdoor fireplaces are
increasingly more and
more popular, coast to
coast," Flynn says.


CONDO-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
in Regency Park. Move in 2BR/1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch. I
3il500 MIW70S999 Fenredvnrd 48900 M1S170482, I


BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
Brick home with 3,000 sq. ft of living on 10 Handyman 3BR/1.5 bath home on shaded lot.
acres with a view. $279,900 MLS#706285 $30,000 MLS#706478
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours (312 112-6714 Email: roybass~tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.comr


"They're not all that much
of an expense like an out-
door kitchen would be."
If you're building a new
outdoor fireplace, leave
ample room for seating.


"Many times 1
hnTao7 rni f/'l nnvy


Gather and stay cozy out-
doors," Flynn says.
He suggests planning "at
least 12-by-14 feet of space
around the front of the
fireplace to ensure a sofa
R and loveseat, as well as a
-. 1m1 wicoffee table and end tables
will fit."
Lay down rugs
Gleaming hardwood or
tile floors are lovely in
spring and summer But in
cold weather, add a thick
-- rug or swap out a thin one
Associated Press for something heavier This
Welcoming will not only warm your feet,
d upholstery but also change the look and
pillows and sound of your space.
efficient and "When acoustics are
dampened," Ryan says,
homeowners "the room feels warmer"
na noc... An outdoor rug can have


built, but there's only enough
room for a small table or two
chairs. What's the point, peo-
ple? The whole idea is to


P90W. KELLER, CITRUS HILLS 546W. HILLWOOD PATH, LAUREL RIDGE

491 to Forest Ridge Blvd Left on 486 (Norvell 221 New Porch
Bryant), Right on Essex, curve to right and New Appliances -Granite
turn Right, at stop sign, onto Keller. House on Tile & Wood Lush Lawns
Left. MLS f704682 S129,900 MLS ff705479 $84,900
Nnncv ^^ ^^ Mr ^-2q5 ^ ^h^ Jlnn ~fn ~-RGq7


***Foreclosure List***
705705 40/2 Sugarmill Woods REDUCED $159,900 ii ,,, .'. .,, ," "'i
705702 4/2/2 Pool, 1 acre, Clearview Ests REDUCED $174,900 Yolanda Cancholda 35- 219-2196
705665 Deep WaterFront Canal Yankeetown John Maisel 352-302-5351
705223 Move in Ready! 4/2 mobile on 2 acres! $84,900 ,, .'' ii""
705093 Charming 3/!/2 in Citrus Springs $89,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196
704264 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen $114,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351
705142 3/!/2 on one acre in Dunnellon $119,900 ',1, ,,-',,""
705087 LIKE NEW!3/2/2 on one acre in Dunnellon $129,900 Yolanda Canchola 352?219-2196
704862 REDUCED! Brentwood Villa 3/2/2 $114,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351
706156 2/2onl acreinlnglis $63,000 111, i,, ', i "'
704938 Sugarmill Woods Custom Built 31.51 Pool Home REDUCED $329,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351
705153 Beverly Hills 311 Handyman'sDelight! $37,900 ,, ,-','. "


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 E13

the same impact. "Thick
outdoor area rugs are made
of acrylic/wool blends,"
Flynn says. "The wool feels
great on your feet and defi-
nitely locks in warmth."
Improve your
circulation
This last tip, shared by
Maxwell Ryan, comes
from a conversation he
had years ago with home
d6cor guru Martha Stew-
art. She advised him to run
his ceiling fans backward
in winter to push warm air
back down along the walls
of the room.
If you don't have ceiling
fans, Ryan suggests adding
one or two for energy sav-
ings and added comfort
year-round.


I I


CYPRESS CROSSINGS CLASS "A" OFFICE
FOR LEASE
2500 sql ft "New Construction"
Located on SR 44 & CR 486
Professional Medical Office
Call (727)515-6571




OPEN HOUSEeSUNDAYeNOV 10- 1-4 PM


THIS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE!
Immaculately cared for 3/2/2 with casual dining area in the kitchen, a separate
formal dining room, wood burning fireplace in the family room, extra room for
den or office, cheery screen room, and fenced area for your "critters"! Split BR
plan, add a closet and you have 4 bedrooms! 2,284 sq. ft of living area, 3,094
under roof. Convenient area: near downtown, near city park and boat ramp
and a stone's throw to Rails to Trails. MLS 702862 $104,900.
Directions: Hwy. 41S to Eden Drive, turn left and proceed to Shelly Avenue,
TURN LEFT and proceed to house on corner of Shelly & Broyhill PL.
2317 S. SHELLY AVENUE
Your Host:
JACK KEYES 221-1872 ...





E14 Sunday, November 10, 2013






Real Estate

I i lassilieds




*( ^ l E II B w t __J


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$395
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

LECANTO
Leisure Acres
3/2 SW, water & gar-
bage inc. application
& bckgrnd req. $600.
mo. (352) 628-5990




3 BR, 2BA, partially
furnished. Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500. For
Sale or Lease to own
(352) 212-4265


V2 acre in Homosassa.
Super clean, move-in
ready $59,000 Jennifer
Lehman ERA Suncoast
Realty (352) 422-1642
3/2 Double wide on
1 fenced-in acre.
Peaceful area in
Heatherwood
Reduced to $51,900
(352) 302-6905
HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2 1, acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192


NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182


NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
Modular & Stilt Homes
Factor Direct/Save
$25k off list
John Lyons t
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807


USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


A Must See! Very
Clean! 2/2/1 w/ work-
shop. 14 acre fenced.
5350 W Cinn Ridge,
Lecanto. See Pics @
www.infotube.net
#254988 (352) 228-4282
HERNANDO
3/2 mobile on 1.5 acres
Renovated-ready to
move in. Owner
Financed FHA/VA
352-795-1272
INVERNESS
2BR 1-1/2BA 1/3 acre,
enclosed scr sun rm,
laundry rm, 1-car gar,
carport, shed $34,000.
(352) 419-5013




2 BR, 2BA, dblewide.
New shingle roof
New AC, screem por.
& carport, Homosassa
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Inverness 55+ 2Br/lBa
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BRI1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incd
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Singing Forest Floral
City SW 2BD. 2BA
CHA, furnished, scrn.
room tool shed lot
rent $183. mo $ 10,000
Cell 607-227-1630
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090




Chassahowitzka
2/2/1 $600. mo.
7735 W. Tropical Ln.
Agent (352) 382-1000


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


(- -~'ifa pdvv 1


FACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT]
REALTY, INC J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCouniyHomieRenitals.con
HOMOSASSA
10291W. CentalSt .............. $850
3/ With Ditachd Garge
4 Shumiad Ct. South ............. $1350
3/2 5/2 Pool Hotl (SlW
CRYSTAL RIVER
1266N.Se ..ullPt. I43 $1100
2/2 5 Beaul ul 2 Story Condo, 3 mo min
9469W. Wisconsin 0 ..............$650
2/2 Real Nice, 2 Story Villa, GrestArea
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
146W. Seymiea Dr. (1BH) .$615
2/15 Ch nring Htm, oner hLt Na Foest ldg
1148 Bridg Dr. (CS) ................ $800
3/2/2 GreatHome, Has Jetted Tub
INVERNESS/FLORAL CITY
4940 S. ad Terr. (FQ .............. $100
2/1 Very Nice Home, auet Arla
6383 S. onaul lerr. (FQ ....$550
1/1 Cozy Home
3553 E. SuMe Ln. (INV) ............$750
2/1 Great Home, With Back Porch



Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!



J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL


NEED A GOOD TENANT?



3/2/2 ..............................$75 0
3/2/2 ...........................$110 0
Lawn & Pool Care Inc
21211 ......... $675
2/2/1 ...............................$67500
2 /2 /1 ............................... $ 7 0 0
21211 $750


2/2/1 .............................$ 6 5 0
2/2/1 .............................$70 0
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
'Property Manager/
'Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bed m.
ACn Cean No Pets
(352)344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts 2BRI1BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CITRUS COUNTY
BeauKEFul 3 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply
Inverness
Heron Wood
352 726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352 746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352 563 0890

TTR O
1-800-955-877







CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W&D hookup
water trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo.
(352) 628-2815


INVERNESS
1/1 near CM Hospital
$475 incld water/garb
$950 moves you in
352-422-2393



RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Fall Into Savings
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
AVAIL. *Select Units
STARTING AT $459.
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal RiverFI
(352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
Impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
* Outside storage
* Front / back
porches
* Onsite laundry cntr
* Resident Commu-
nity Room
* Mnthly pest control
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children"




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."



SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications
now accepted
for 1 & 2 Bedrm.
units with carpeting,
custom cabinets,
central air & heat,
stove, refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001




CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 34 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-955-877
1









HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2bed/bath, $675. mo.
FIRST MONTH FREE!
(352) 422-7794
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073
HOMOSASSA SMW
2/2/2, Lg Gar Lg FL.
Rm, Greenbelt $800.
1 st/last/dep. Agent
(352) 621-3004


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Income Restricts
Apply

Inverness
Heron Wood
352-726-3476
Lecanto
Magnolia Village
352-746-0373
Crystal River
Nature Walk
352-563-0890

TTY
1-800-9,55-877

1





INVERNESS
3/2 Carport, $625. mo
Call (561) 248-8391
INVERNESS
31212
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS
Country Living
on large 1/2 acre lot.
3 bd. 2 ba home.
Garden area,
fenced area. Well
& septic so no water
bill! $595.
352-476-4964
Rent to Own, No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
1ADQFMISSION COM
RENTED
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BD, 1BA, Pets Ok
$700 monh
















Wanulterfr ont
ityoRenetahom
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225







INVERNESS
Waterfront home
for rent Attractive
2/2/1 newly refur-
bished with brand
new premium appli-
ances. Great room
with glass doors
overlooking blue-
stone patio and the
Lake Henderson
chain waterfront.
Nearby the FL Trail,
the quaint town of
Inverness and great
dining/ shopping.
Mgr and handyman
on call to help you.
$1 100 per month;
first/last/security;
annual term. Move
into your new home
today. Call David at
Cook & Company
Realty 352-787-2665.


FLORAL CITY
LAKE FRONT-
ROOMMATE
WANTED
2 BR, 1% B. NS,$450
mo, incl util sec dep
$450. 352-302-6055




RENTED
CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$851wk. includes elect,
sat. dish



4 Beautiful Acres next
to lake. Well, paved
streets. Horses OK
9157 E Orange Ave
FLORAL CITY. 941-358
-6422, 941-320-0433


Hunting/Fishing Camp
61/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room & AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268
Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015
Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2013 E15


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.





UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat./Sun. 12-3p 324 S.
Monroe, Remodeled
2/2/2, Imperial Exec.
NEW: Roof, Kit., Baths
flooring, more! $74,900
352-527-1239


Sun Nov 10th, 1-4 pm
2864 N Churchill Way
"Move in Ready"
3/2 Home built in the
community of Canter-
bury Lake Estates.
Asking $120,000
From Norvell Bryant
Hwy to entrance, R .
on Churchill Way,
house on the left.
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC



ATTN Homebuyers
100% financing avail.
Government Pro-
gram. You do not
need perfect credit.
Call or email to get
qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabf@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 76856




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realtv
Connect.me

For Salek 9
Newer Section of
Beverly Hills
Upscale home built in
1994. Two bedroom,
two bath & two car
garage. New A/C
and roof. $85,900
352-422-6129



Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
Reduced $129,000
795-1520 or 634-1725


Hoe

HERNANDO
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
DW,own lot, new carport
& screened front & back
porch, workshop, new
AC,55+, only $55 mo.
Assoc fee, clubhouse &
pool. Very good
condition. $67,000
call 813 464 9858






117S Lunar Terrace 2
bedroom 2 bath Florida
RM Garage & Carport
Updated. Clean
$74,900 MUST SEE
Owner Financing
W/$2500 Down
352-344-9290
2006 3/2/2 plus dining
room & den, 1 acre,
2100sq. ft under air
Move in Condition!
$214,000
352-341-0118
3/2/2 in the Highlands;
Very Clean w/ large
screened patio,& at-
tached storage shed.
Lg corner lot in great
neighborhood $89,900
352-302-0431
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Rent to Own, No
Credit Check, 3 or 4
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Totally Remodeled
3/2/2,+ family room.
New Roof, AC, $75,000
South Highlands,
6715 E Morley St
(352) 560-0019




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RWMIC
REALTY ONE

Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenced
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195k 352-422-7077

For S le .
Rock Crusher Area
3Br/2Ba/1CG, newly
renovated, including
new, lights, fans, ap-
pliances, and flooring
$72,900 352-422-4533




4BR /1'2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816


Ho e

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

R5AIRC
REALTY ONE

For Sale By Owner
2BR, 1 BA, Corner Lot
Located in Old
Homosassa, just min-
utes from Boat ramp
and Canoe/Kayak
rentals. On one of the
most scenic rivers in
Florida, Updated
kitchen, SS appl's.,
pine Hardwood firs./
tiles, roof 3 yrs. old.
Fenced yard, fruit
trees, new scrn. in
back porch, Handy-
man special. Many
more extras, $45,000.
Call for appointment
(352) 422-8092


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!





For Sale&k
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell

For Sale a,,
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

WANT IT SOLD
House not selling?
Behind in
payments?
Upside down in
mortgage?
CALL ME I can help
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETrY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


Citrus Coull
Homes


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com





3 BR, 3V/2 BA, Condo
2100 sq. ft., Furnished,
Carport,
Citrus Hills on Hartford
$119,000.
Call 352-419-5268

Inverness,
Regency Park
2/2 Condo, fireplace,
1st floor, community
pool, club house
$49,000 352-637-6993


I S= 111 IB


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
ProDerties.com
"To view
my properties"


Newly undated 2/2/2,
w/ family rm, screen
pool/heater, newer
roof & AC. located
near Central Ridge
library in newer area
of Beverly Hills
$114,900352-249-7892
Furniture can also be
purchased


Get Results


In The Homefront

Classifieds!


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Golf Course Lot w/City
Utilities, View of the
Green, Pond, &
a fountain, $45,000
Will consider a classic
or muscle car towards
the purchase price.
Call 352-746-3507


Time Share

Six day vacation in
Orlando, Florida!
Regularly $1,175.00.
Yours today for only
$389.00! You SAVE
67 percent. PLUS
One-week car
rental included.
Call for details.
1-800-985-1463





Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


2.75 Acre Pine Ridae
Homesite-$30k
broker/owner. Priced
below tax assessment
Convenient location
Horses allowed
call 352-527-2711

WOODED LOT
on Lee Woods Dr.,
HOMOSASSA
has Wetlands,
$5,000.
352-621-1664



V THIS OUT!

*** **** **
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on
Red Sox Path. Great
vista's. 85 ft. front-
age on golf course
$49,900. Call
352-638-0905





BACK ON MARKET!
Priced to sell!
8 beautiful acres
originally offered at
$139,900. NOW just
$39,900. Fully com-
plete community.
No time frame to
build. Call for more
info: (888)434-9611.
Gulf Atlantic Land
Sales, LLC, Broker.

Streamfront Land
Bargain! 1.7 acre
wooded corner
parcel in Blue Ridge
Mtns. 390' on crystal
clear stream, Natu-
ral year-round
spring. Paved road,
municipal water,
utilities, mild
restrictions RV
friendly. Was $69,900
now, $27,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
866-952-5303, x 63

TENN. LAND BAR-
GAIN WITH FREE
BOAT SLIP! 1.70 ac-
res meadows over-
looks 140 acre Na-
ture Preserve,
streams & ponds.
Only $19,900. 6.1
acre hardwoods
Only $27,900. FREE
boat slips. Excellent
financing, little
down. Call now
1-877-888-0267,
x446





E16 Sunday, November 10, 2013


* _aLalhl Lal.aaa ailalh IF. I-IF. .aaaalI ,ll
* Baa-al a111 "ilal la-a laaa a-a~l l il:t
* Ia:l a al .i aiil aa I 1 I 1 :1 i
* I I" V a.:.a l h.la l .- ill, : h1 l .l 1
Ml. =/ilv.Ii ASKING $89,900
Call Chailes Kelly 352 4222387


iULI tUUK11E tUUnnUNII T
i, ,, I ,1 ,I ,,,, I ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,, I I -, -,,, 1 ,, 1h ,,,
I I ii h,, 1,1 llhh, -I -dl.,,,, ,,,l... i.,- I..... ,,-l l

iIi ,ii I,,, I, -11111 I ii iiiiii, h -',i ,,,,ii,
rih.: =-,1 II14 ASKING $139.800
P lD l>i352i2122 280
I'aaail hlmf iall ala, i21selld,, a.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SERVING'

COUNTY i e ,. , '""" , ",
OVEURFOR H
OVER 37 L *--. E I N C .PW RTN




164 W. Mai St., InensFI450 Cl oa o


4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH!
IJ :1, I a i l l Illall I 1
Illh. l l h hip;i
Iap~nl1a .. 'A a..laala Iaaja.
ONLY $162,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


* 3BR .i i ll pal l Ilni,
* I icl I I I. I lall I ,- 1
3 'a:la1 ih 6l 1 I i' i
f*iNa-a 'laaaa1ila-
MII = 11) h :`X.. $205,000
Jeanne 0O Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
iti'it'. CiiusCouniL'Sold. cornam


* t. ,Al:l Ha: .ill, ,l,:,i:.ll
* IF. I,,ll, MH

Ml' 1 =/ : .'.l1 _' $67,000
Jeanne in Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i'it'i:'. CiliusCounlt'Sold. corn


ooU t. it'il' wi. nrlt'llndnuu ri
CITRUS HILLS
POOL HOME GOLF COURSE
llahaaa l,',h,.a 'I all' ir.-,1, I ,I,.haa-a
'lia'''- l'1 h ,i, a[ ,uhlul i,,,,,I a,,a-al,,,Iaal ,
I l h l l .,ll I ''II,, .

MI_., = I :;':i.:' S244.000 Mah an )1l1i
Call Onade Feesei 352302 7699


* 'i'al- llaa-i ';. l.lia ~l l :.: l ; lI

* Al I 'ala. h hI l all illaa ,al l al la

Ml 3 = /.I,-/ ONLY $195,000
Call Chailes Kelly 352-422-2387


MULTI FAMILY
I.i 1 h lll 4 lh l, I. h ,.II I ,.'I' I a.,. I ,
Ml =' ,.i'. $349,900
Call Jim Moilon to piteein 422-2173


TI,, h I. aaaa 1 .. I '- ..a a ia'..- ..I .... .1
...l..h.. ..1 I Ia.)-.. h. I. H a 1. t I al- l
, ''llllll 'a' 'l'-lll I lllal .? IIII ia' .. a .. I Ia,, lad

r1. : =a-a'.a'. $255.000
Cil Jim /,l.jilj 422 2173
.I' l Itu thi pa.uiana a.jninaiina ll _


INVERNESS POOL HOME
I. ll VV h Ih'f.p ,ij i , ,I I .j ,, I ha I
I_,I ,, h,,h i.]j ,,',. ,l.... .llj? .] ll ., 1..I
hI lJlllJ I I-dlJ a, .i

MIL'-, =/I:.iil4 $69,800
Pal Davis f3521 212 7280
See listings iz'iz'i' c2lIaldai'is corn


GET AWAY FROM IT ALL
14 1 .., j11- i, ,, ,, 4 ,, ,1 1-,, ,,- ,11-, 1 ,, I

,,,,,,- h 11....6i ,,,, 1,h,6iI..1... 1h II1,,,,Ih,
h'6,,,,',I6 I l', h I id'h , . 6',I ,,
...6 h 1.... r I ,h ,,' " 1, 1... h,, h,, r,,,,,
,,, h H h ,n ,I ,,,,,l :rJI h ,I I I h ,
rh: =-114 ASKING $258.900
Pit bDi ,,352' 212 7280
I',?il lh~atin i. il. I 2 l; t1Id1,4 a.


BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM/
2 BATH VILLA IN THE GLEN
I jA a,-,'. iiiiiiil i lla a- al il' Hi ll ll.; in,
H I AI lf .a I- al a-ajl h .I 'Ialh-al h iaaall haaa
aaaa-a :.laa a l.aaalalha- 'alaaaaall a-la
Mi_ =' 1:i'. I:I ASKING $43,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072


VACANT LAND SALE
i, ,i. I 1:,. ,, I. h i-", .6 . ...,, ,1 ,h. 6.,, .-... ...".

,,,, m , 1 ,1 , ,1 $ 9 9. 0 0 0 .H ... I ,. h I .. .. I (. I I IN .. _" l l .l
1.' ." '1"1 "'.'""h "' 1"1 .1.""1 ,' ', '. 1., M i__ = M l :11 $20 5,500
,,h, r -,I, ,-,'I $10,900 Jeanne o Wllaid Pickiel 212.3410
Dai 3226S ii. CilisCd It rSod. cam 6
0i1 ia2 ;26 666S aIt'a 'if, iuin$ounnl'Sold, coin


* 1 -.J I,.aill

* I l,,i .]aaal aila-
* I l.jla ,v laii~i l .
Ml 1 =/Lii' $87,900
Jeanne Oh Willaid Pickiel
Iii,'i',. CiliusCounltSold. coin


COURT ORDERED
BANKRUPTCY SALE
H ,'.J.ia aJ.. I: 11 H l,,|l, I .i l a aaa, a laaaal
SI:I, ai ,,, | .'a Il 'I I rJ.. I_, I Kd -,l
:6K ImI .s 1A1 $8,500
f li,, Ia .a a, .,.ibl' $3,500
Call lall'anda W'all 352 212 1989


DECORATOR'S DREAM WITH EXTRA LOT!
1h..:.I h -. I. .. j ".....I I..I ..I . l I j .I&
11. 1.. .- H I Ia ,"a' lhI a.. llad
i......... ..
ri.: =-4-4i: $109.900
C'll Pia'aa lIlair,'i, l ','' at *Ir'?J??J ?'" ,a'llI


WORTH MUCH MORE!
l..a j.-. ::..-. l a..:I a.) a I ... .. a : .i .. h .. -..)
Fil:aa- aaJ.- l a' I a 11 I i. laaaa
a'', a I -?'. '''-'I'. -Ilh.a. ,aI aaaaaa,, a -. [,alha

I a' ,:la.1 r,-al ajaaa aj '- i I ^
S; =;ii4. II ASKING $274,900
C.il N.incl Jenks 352 400 8012


WELCOME HOME!!
F I IaIa h i i ...I I,, a I

.. l . h .l .... . .....'.. I... I l:. l'. l. h h l
,' .I .I .I ,,I I. .. .


N1l ii. ;-, .ASKING $88,900
PAn D0.al ,352 212 7280
I ,a-ai hilg hl ta.' oi ail il 21t.'t2 1 1La1 (a