Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03284

Full Text

Chomped: Gators fail SEC road test at Missouri /Bi


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^& www.chronicleonline.com


OCTOBER 20, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 74
VOL. 119 ISSUE 74


Recovered artifacts reveal human history


Cleanup around Chassahowitzka site uncovers


treasure trove of items from


different eras


A. B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The area around the main
spring vent in the Chassa-
howitzka River has turned
up an important array of
human handiwork.
From the Paleo-Indian
and archaic to the modern,
items found entombed and
later fished out during
cleanup by state officials re-
vealed a labyrinth of human
endeavor and recreation.
Archaeologists are


thrilled by the finds and
have been connecting the
dots, matching each item to
its era in history
At 10 a.m. Wednesday,
Nov 13, near the site where
they were recovered at the
boat launch in Chassahow-
itzka, officials will display
the artifacts for public
viewing.
A complete clay pot was
found and, according to
Michael Arbuthnot, princi-
pal investigator of South-
eastern Archaeological


Research Inc.'s (SEARCH)
Jacksonville office, it looks
like it was made in the
Woodland period, between
500 B.C. and 600 A.D.
"That was one of the high-
lights," said Arbuthnot,
whose group worked in tan-
dem with the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) to iden-
tify items of archaeological
value and importance.
"We found items from the


Many historical
items have been
found in and near
the main spring of
the Chassahowitzka
River during the
cleanup of the
area by the
Southwest Florida
Water Management
District this past
summer, including
well-preserved
pieces of Native
American pottery.
Special to the Chronicle


Page A5


NATION:


Finding fault
Voters angry with
elected officials might
want to look in the mir-
ror first./Page A12
VETERANS:


Hernando on the hoof


Head start
Vietnam vet enlisted
early./Page A16
COMMENTARY:


Eyewitness
account
Reporter discusses
execution of William
Happ./Page Cl
HOMEFRONT:


7,~




STEPHEN E. LASKO/Forthe Chronicle
A herd of about 40 Cracker cattle crossed U.S. 41 at Parsons Point Road Saturday on their way to the end of the trail and into a corral.
They were escorted by more than 100 cowboys and cowgirls on horseback who came along to help out on the two-day trail ride.

Annual cattle drive once again the highlight of Southern Heritage Festival


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HERNANDO
An afternoon shower did
not hamper the cattle's
drive Saturday
Around 3 p.m., close to 200
riders and 50 Cracker cows


closed down the intersection of
County Road 486 and U.S. 41 as
they paraded their way past
spectators at the old Hernando
School.
The cattle appeared to be fo-
cused on the finish line,
though, as they had traveled 25
miles during a two-day trek


through woods and under-
brush, including portions of
Potts Preserve.
The annual Hernando South-
ern Heritage Festival and
Cracker Cattle Drive is both a
fundraiser for the restoration
of the Colonial Revival-style
historic school and a re-enact-


ment of how life was in early
Florida.
"Ponce de Leon brought pigs
and cows to Florida to trade
with the Indians," said Her-
nando Heritage Council chair-
man Doug Naylor. "These are
See Page A8


*1


Set in stone
Rock out with decor
trend for fall./Inside


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A18
M ovies ..................... A 14
Obituaries .......A.......A10O
Together...................A20
Veterans ........ A16


6 8141 8 20107I11 o


Q&A: Manatees return


Cooler weather brings mammals into springs


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Captains Stacy and Mike
Dunn own Manatees In
Paradise Tours, which
theysay offers educational
and passive tours to allow
people into the manatee
world.
Stacy said she likes
showing people what man-
atees do as they nurse
their offspring, eat sub-
merged vegetation and
tussle with each other The
Dunns also have been ac-
tive as volunteer manatee
rescue squad members for


the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service (USFWS) and the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC). With the official
start of manatee season
about a month away and
cooler water tempera-
tures, manatees are begin-
ning their annual trips into
the ambient, 72-degree
spring waters to rest.
Stacy Dunn answered
some questions from the
Chronicle about the up-
coming manatee season
and what people should
know and do during this
period in the fragile man-


atee environment. She
also suggests these links to
learn more about mana-
tees: www.savethemanatee.
org/info manatee
migration.html and www
savethemanatee. org/
manfcts.htm
Chronicle: When did
you notice more manatees
were coming back?
Dunn: As soon as mana-
tees start to feel the
weather changing and
temperatures dropping,
they start to move toward
their winter homes. Some
See Page A6


Authorities catch


escaped convicts


Menfreed

with forged

documents
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Two convicted killers
who were freed from
prison by phony docu-
ments were captured to-
gether without incident
Saturday night at a
Panama City motel, au-
thorities said.
Joseph Jenkins and


josepn unarles
Jenkins Walker
Charles Walker, both 34,
were taken into custody
about 6:40 p.m. at Co-
conut Grove Motor Inn.
They were apprehended
just a couple of hours
after their family
members held a news
See .Page A9


Partly sunny,
possible storms.
PAGE A4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Volunteers help spruce up

Covenant Children's Home


Facility offers
place for
kids separated
from families

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Every child ought to
have a safe, nurturing
place to call home.
That's the steering prin-
ciple behind the Covenant
Children's Home (CCH)
and the motivation for
their group work day Sat-
urday
CCH is a nonprofit cor-
poration in partnership
with Kids Central Inc. that
supplies long-term care to
children who have been
relocated from their bio-
logical families and need
a place to identify as
home.
Adults and youth from
Christ Community Church
in Ocala donated their
time and joined forces
with CCH's personnel to
revive their 20 acres.
"I decided to come out
today to learn more about
Covenant Children's
Home," said volunteer
Branko Dimovski.
Even though the major-
ity of the property is cov-
ered with natural
vegetation, volunteers
spruced up a play area,
fire pit, shed, shrubs and
trails.
"We have trails leading
in and out of the woods to
our natural habitat," said
executive director Roger
Gilmore. "It's difficult for
two house parents and
limited staff to do it all."
By lunch time they were
ready for the barbecue
cookout, which was small
in comparison to their up-
coming annual barbecue
banquet.
From 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on
Oct. 25, an expected 250 at-
tendees will be present at


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronile
Branko Dimovski from Christ Community Church in Ocala
helped replace decayed wood on top of a shed at
Covenant Children's Home in Citrus County. The church
donated time Saturday to support Covenant Children's
Home as they cleaned up the grounds.


the Boot Scoot Barbeque
at the Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center, 1570 W Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs.
"The goal is to revitalize
the energy with the com-
munity and to get them in-
volved with Covenant
Children's Home,"
Gilmore said.


Tickets are $35 and all
proceeds go to benefit the
CCH.
For more information,
visit www.cchfl.org or call
352-489-2565.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@chronicle
online, corn.


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FRIDAY, October 25th
Kick-Off Block Party 6-l1Ipm
Free photo booth, Stilt walker, Food vendors,
Merchandise, Beer Tent
6pm Opening Ceremony
7 8:40pm Rolling' Stones Tribute w/US Stones
9:45-lIpm U2byUV

SATURDAY, October 26th
Great American Cooter Festival 10am-6pm
10am Booths, Rides, Games, etc. Open
11am 5pm Cooter Cup Turtle Races
11am Little Miss Cooter Festival Competition
12 6 m Beer Tent open
1-2:3,pm "The Suitors" Blues Band
3:15 5:30pm The Blues Brothers Show

SUNDAY, October 27th
Cooter Festival & Cooterween 12-Spm
6:30 9:30am Cooter Triathlon
12- 5pm Booths, Rides, Games, Face Painting,
Balloon Animals, Sunny Cooter & Friends
1- 4pm Cooter Cup Turtle Races
1pm Cooterween Costume
Contest Begins
2:45pm Duck, Duck,
ICooter' Race 1'
3- 4pm Greg Solomon
Maic Show
4pm Trick or Treat/ _.DIETIoDO
Cupcake wars J .
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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Tom Corcoran: Family man, funny man, Army man


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

LECANTO Tom Corcoran
loved mischief.
Marketing director at Life
Care Center of Citrus County for
about eight years, he was always
looking for ways to play practi-
cal jokes on his co-workers.
Take the time he wrapped up
a live rooster in a gift box to give
to the maintenance director for
a staff gift exchange. He put it in
an office to keep it safe, and
then when he went in to check
on it, the rooster shot out of the
box.
"I can't even describe how
funny it was to watch Tom run-
ning around chasing a rooster -
that he was afraid of," co-worker
Lisette Charlton said. "We had to
get one of the nurses to get the
rooster and put it back in the
box."


Postscript

It's been quiet around Life
Care Center since Thomas Cor-
coran died Sept. 27 at age 45.
As some of his co-workers
shared "Tom stories" recently,
they described a man who was
simultaneously humble, caring
and compassionate and a man with
a mischievous sense of humor,
always looking for ways to "get"
you, such as snapping a rubber
band at you as you walked by
"If he picked on you, you knew
he liked you," Charlton said.
"Life with Tom around was al-
ways interesting," said co-worker
Justin Castor "You never knew
what he would say sometimes
appropriate, sometimes not And
he loved spitballs. Yet he was the
most sincere person you ever
met. He was a man of his word."


"If he was your friend, he went
to bat for you and would stand by
you or fall with you," co-worker
Cindi Martin said. "He went out
of his way for people, but he
never wanted a pat on the back.
He never liked accolades."
Born in New York, Tom came
to Citrus County as a kid, gradu-
ating from Citrus High School in
1986. He served in the U.S. Army
for 11 years, including one tour
of duty in Iraq.
His family was his life his
wife Chrissy and four young
daughters, Nicole, Trinity, Tiana
and Taryn.
"By 3:30 on Friday he was
looking at the clock, ready to
spend the weekend with his
family," Martin said.
Tom Corcoran loved attending
his daughter's soccer games. He
loved the Greek salad from Joe's
Deli and his friend Mike's lemon
cake, and Dunkin Donuts coffee.


Special to the Chronicle
Tom Corcoran, 45, died Sept. 27.
He is survived by his wife Chrissy
and four daughters.
He was an avid Yankees and
New York Giants fan; he liked
outdoors stuff: rifles, golf,
four-wheelers.


He was a Chamber of Com-
merce ambassador and the
Chamber sunshine person.
"You liked him the moment
you met him," Castor said. "It's
hard to find people like Tom."
"He was our brother," Charlton
said. "It's quiet around here now"
From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 21, the friends of Tom Cor-
coran invite the community to a
celebration of life and
fundraiser for Tom's family at
Tuscany on the Meadows at the
Quality Inn on County Road 486,
Hernando. Tickets are $20 per
person. The event will include
hors d'oeuvres, a cash bar, silent
auctions, 50/50 chances and many
memories of Tom Corcoran.
For information, call Cindi at
Life Care Center at 352-746-4434.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


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STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The ceremony for the new Seven Rivers preschool building gets under way Friday afternoon as preschoolers Caitlyn Hoag, Averi Kelso, Ethan Richard, Jemma
Durante-Snyder, Jackson Meek and Caleb Kuntz dig in to break ground on the new facility. The preschool will be ready for the 2014 school year, according to Seven
Rivers' Director of Business Operations Blair Commons.






A dream confirmed


Seven River Christian School breaks ground on newpreschoo" to open in 2014


ERYN WORTHING
Staff writer


GTON

LECANTO


ith miniature blue
shovels in hand,
six preschoolers
made the initial puncture in
the soil Friday for their
school's new addition.
Hundreds of students, administra-
tors, parents and church family
congregated on the west side of
Seven Rivers Christian School for
the groundbreaking ceremony of
their new preschool building and
playground.
"Groundbreaking is an opportu-
nity to look backward and forward,"
said Headmaster Dana James. "In
this case we get to look backward at
a time when we had a dream and vi-
sion of what we were doing here at
Seven Rivers. I can remember a
time about four years ago when pas-
tor (Ray Cortese) and I were ex-
changing emails about the future of


It is a rare thing for a preschool to be built
from the ground up. ... You would be hard-pressed
to go anywhere on the Nature Coast or anywhere
in Florida to find a brand-new, state-of-the-art
preschool being built like this one.


Wendy Cash
director of advancement, Seven Rivers Christian School


Seven Rivers. In those email ex-
changes, one thing that was at the
top of the list was building a new
preschool building.
'At the same time, we get to look
forward," he said. "We get to look
forward to when the walls will be
up. The students and church will
come in and sign our names and
scripture verses. We also look for-
ward to the 15 to 20 new staff and
upward of 150 students coming to
our new preschool building."
Opening August 2014, Seven
Rivers Christian School's new
$1 million building, being built by


Daly & Zilch Inc., will be approxi-
mately 9,000 square feet and will
hold eight classrooms, according to
director of business operations Blair
Commons.
"Currently, we have 55 preschool-
ers and we are expecting to double
that amount," preschool director
Cheri Simek said. "There will be ap-
proximately 11 to 14 students per
classroom. The whole school has
boomed this year because of the love
and passion we have for the students
and getting them introduced to Christ"
The state funds the Voluntary
Prekindergarten Program; however,


the church congregation has raised
revenue for the new building through
a capital campaign. Simek said the
church collects money through this
program and every three years de-
cides how it will be utilized.
"It is a rare thing for a preschool
to be built from the ground up," said
Wendy Cash, director of advance-
ment. "Either people don't have the
desire to do it or they don't have the
money We have both. We believe it is
a real God-honoring thing to educate
children as early as possible. Most
preschools are in people's homes or
in rented buildings. You would be
hard pressed to go anywhere on the
Nature Coast or anywhere in Florida
to find a brand-new, state-of-the-art
preschool being built like this one."
A new covered playground will
also be included in the construction.
Commons said another ground-
breaking will occur in early 2014 as
the church is planning for a new ath-
letic complex.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660,
ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


Around the COUNTY


SOWW committee
to meet Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save
Our Waters Week committee
will meet at 10 a.m. Monday,
Oct. 21, in room 219 of the
Lecanto Government Center,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meeting
is to review and critique the
planning and execution for
Citrus County's 18th annual
Save Our Waters Week. All
representatives to the com-
mittee and interested parties
are welcome to attend and
participate.


For information, call Lace
Blue-McLean at 352-201-0149.
Citrus 20/20
meeting planned
The Citrus 20/20 board
of directors will meet at
4:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 21,
in room 117 of the Lecanto
Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
All directors are urged to
attend. Interested persons
and organizations are invited.
For more information about
Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit
www.citrus2020.org or call
352-201-0149.


Delegation to
meet Oct. 29
Citrus County Legislative
Delegation meeting will from
3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29,
in the Citrus County Commis-
sion chamber, in the Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.
The deadline to sign up for
addressing delegation mem-
bers is Tuesday, Oct. 22.
For any questions or in-
quiries, call Dawn Faherty at
state Rep. Jimmie T. Smith's
office at 352-560-6020.

-From staff reports


Associated Press
CORAL SPRINGS A
South Florida high school
student's unusual selfie
is lighting up the
Twitter-verse.
Malik Whiter tweeted a
pic of himself sporting
black shades and grinning
as he stands in front of his
teacher while she was in
labor on Tuesday


"Selfie with my teacher
while she having contrac-
tions" he wrote in the cap-
tion, along with a smiley
face.
"Selfie" is slang for a
photo of oneself taken on
a cellphone.
WPLG in Miami reported
(www. ittybittyurl
.com/2bCF) that Whiter
said the unidentified
woman is a great teacher


and he wanted to capture
the memorable moment
for himself and her
The teacher was appar-
ently on the phone with
her mom when the photo
was taken. She went to the
hospital, but didn't have
the baby and returned to
school two days later
According to Gawker
the photo was retweeted
20,000 times.


Teen's selfie with


teacher in labor a hit




A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday You can accomplish a lot
if you are open and receptive to what's
being offered in the coming solar cycle.
Don't dismiss what others are doing or
saying.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Partner-
ships will make a difference in the out-
come of an endeavor you are
pursuing. Good fortune is within reach.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Explore
new ways to use your skills and tal-
ents. Diversification will help you
broaden your interests and reach goals
far beyond your expectations.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A
change at home will do you good.
Don't let someone's negative attitude
goad you into an argument.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Spend time with friends or family if you
want to ease your stress. Someone's
suggestions will help prepare you for
the wheeling and dealing you have
planned.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -The
focus should be on you and what you
need to excel. Romantic encounters
will be emotional, but if handled with
care can lead to a fresh start.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Invest
in your future. Take part in activities
mingling with people trying to reach
goals similar to yours.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You
need a break and a change. Getting
out and enjoying life will help motivate
you to engage in an unusual event that
will alter your direction.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Look
over your situation and consider the
adjustments you need to make to keep
everything moving smoothly on the
home front.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Certain
partnerships will require you to take
precautions. Don't say anything that
may be used against you. Don't let ar-
guments get out of hand.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy
getting out and seeking a bit of enter-
tainment. The effect you have on the
people you meet will open a door to a
new way of thinking.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep the
peace at home. Look for a way to im-
prove your life and relationships with
the people you love most.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Let your
mind wander. Whether you travel men-
tally or physically, you will discover
ways to achieve greater happiness
and peace of mind.


ENTERTAINMENT


Duhamel surprised
by baby Axl
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF. -
Proud papa Josh Duhamel has
no problem bragging about his
well-behaved baby.
The 40-year-old actor and his
wife, Fergie of the Black Eyed
Peas, welcomed their first child,
Axl Jack, on Aug. 29.
"What's surprised me the
most is how well behaved he is.
I was expecting a crying baby all
the time and he's been really
mild-mannered," Duhamel said.
But he's aware of what could
be in store if the couple ever de-
cides to expand the brood.
"I think somehow biology, the
universe, whatever, you know
gives you like a pleasant baby
first so that you have another
one, procreate, and then the
next one's a holy terror and then
you really realize what being a
new parent is all about," joked
Duhamel Thursday at the open-
ing-night gala for the Wallis An-
nenberg Center for the
Performing Arts.
Fatherhood may have brought
some life changes for the
"Transformers" star, but he said
his approach to his career re-
mains the same.
"No, I'm not going to let that
affect the way I make decisions
creatively," he said of becoming
a family man. "I still want to push
myself and do things that I would
never, that I would never thought
that I was able to do."

Sitcoms tapped for
post-Super Bowl spots
LOS ANGELES Fox said
the plum post-Super Bowl slot
next February will be filled by
two of its comedies.
"New Girl" and freshman se-
ries "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" will air
on Fox after the game that's typi-
cally TV's most-watched pro-


Associated Press
Actor Harvey Keitel runs Saturday as guests of the Lumiere
Festival participate in the reproduction of the first film, called
"Workers leaving the Lumiere Factory," directed at the same
place in 1895 by Louis Lumiere, during the fifth edition of the
Lumiere Festival, in Lyon, central France.


gram and a big promotional plat-
form for other network fare.
Fox gave "Brooklyn Nine-
Nine" another vote of confidence
Friday, announcing that it's order-
ing nine more episodes for a full
season of 22 episodes. The
Tuesday night sitcom stars Andy
Samberg as a footloose police
detective and Andre Braugher
as his precinct captain.

Guards posted to
protect Banksy work
NEW YORK -A Brooklyn
building owner has hired security
guards and installed a metal
gate to protect a work by the elu-
sive British graffiti artist Banksy.
The New York Post reported
that the rolling gate went up Fri-
day over the wall in Williamsburg
where Banksy spray-painted two
geishas and a bonsai tree.
Cara Tabachnick, whose
family owns the building, said
the goal is to preserve the art-
work "so it can be viewed and
enjoyed."
Banksy announced on his
website that he would undertake


a "residency" on the streets of
New York this month.
Most of the Banksy works that
have gone up have been tagged
over by others, and some have
been completely erased.
Cheney discusses
heart device
WASHINGTON Former
Vice President Dick Cheney
says he once feared that terror-
ists could use the electrical de-
vice that had been implanted
near his heart to kill him and had
his doctor disable its wireless
function.
In an interview with CBS' "60
Minutes," Cheney says doctors
replaced an implanted defibrilla-
tor near his heart in 2007. The
device can detect irregular heart-
beats and control them with
electrical jolts.
Cheney says that he and his
doctor, cardiologist Jonathan
Reiner, turned off the device's
wireless function in case a ter-
rorist tried to send his heart a
fatal shock.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 20, the
293rd day of 2013. There are 72
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 20, 1973, in the so-
called "Saturday Night Massacre,"
special Watergate prosecutor
Archibald Cox was dismissed and
Attorney General Elliot L. Richard-
son and Deputy Attorney General
William B. Ruckelshaus resigned.
On this date:
In 1944, during World War II, Gen.
Douglas MacArthur stepped ashore
at Leyte in the Philippines, 2 1/2
years after saying, "I shall return."
In 1977, three members of the
rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd were
killed in the crash of a chartered
plane near McComb, Mississippi.
In 2011, Moammar Gadhafi,
Libya's dictator for 42 years, was
killed as revolutionary fighters over-
whelmed his hometown of Sirte and
captured the last major bastion of
resistance two months after his
regime fell.
Ten years ago: Ajudge in Eagle,
Colo., ordered Kobe Bryant to
stand trial for sexual assault (how-
ever, the criminal case was later
dropped).
Five years ago: Arkansas TV
anchorwoman Anne Pressly was
found severely beaten in her Little
Rock home; she died several days
later. (A suspect, Curtis Vance,
faces trial.)
One year ago: President Barack
Obama and Republican Mitt Rom-
ney left the campaign trail to spend
the weekend preparing for their
third and final debate, focusing on
foreign policy.
Today's Birthdays: Singer Tom
Petty is 63. Movie director Danny
Boyle ("Slumdog Millionaire") is 57.
Actor Viggo Mortensen is 55. Politi-
cal commentator and blogger
Michelle Malkin is 43. Rapper
Snoop Lion (formerly Snoop Dogg)
is 42. Actor John Krasinski is 34.
Thought for Today: "Next to in-
gratitude, the most painful thing to
bear is gratitude." Henry Ward
Beecher, American clergyman
(1813-1887).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PRr-HI LO PR I iL
69 0.00 I NA NA NA K. 87 6


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
s
ts
pc
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 5 knots. Seas
0-2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
smooth. Slight chance for thunder-
storms today.


85 67 0.00 --- NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK clus vedaiy
forecast by:
...... .. TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 86 Low: 65 40
Partly sunny, few showers and pos-
sibly a storm. Rain chance 30%
Pa. l MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 66
..9low Partly sunny, few showers and possibly a storm.
L' Rain chance 30%
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 85 Low: 64
Partly sunny, scattered storms. Rain chance

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 88/69
Record 92/47
Normal 84/60
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean +7
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.40 in.
Total for the month 1.21 in.
Total for the year 51.54 in.
Normal for the year 46.80 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.90 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 59%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Elm, ragweed, grasses
Today's count: 6.2/12
Monday's count: 6.1
Tuesday's count: 6.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/20 SUNDAY 6:54 12:42 7:19 1:06
10/21 MONDAY 7:48 1:35 8:13 2:00
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT. ............................6:55 M .
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:35 A.M.
4 0 C MOONRISETODAY ...........................8:12P.M.
OCT. 20 NOV. 3 NOV. 10 NOV. 17 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 9:04 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:30 a/2:35 a 7:40 p/3:10 p
Crystal River" 4:51 a/12:32 p 6:01 p/--
Withlacoochee* 2:38 a/10:20 a 3:48 p/10:17 p
Homosassa*** 5:40 a/1:34 a 6:50 p/2:09 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
7:00 a/3:07 a 8:18 p/3:46 p
5:21 a/12:29 a 6:39 p/1:08 p
3:08 a/l10:56 a 4:26 p/10:49 p
6:10 a/2:06 a 7:28 p/2:45 p


Gulf water
temperature


81
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.50 30.50 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.69 38.69 39.25
TsalaApopka-lnverness 40.10 40.10 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.94 40.94 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


64 40 .02
63 35
64 54
73 56 trace
64 41
67 50
65 44
61 39
70 56 .02
65 37
67 50
59 45 .32
61 47
83 70
57 40 .06
66 58
54 42 .01
51 41 .21
52 44 .29
80 63 .01
51 46 .16
66 32
66 43
64 33 .01
60 35
49 41 .21
73 41
57 46 .19
62 39 .11
66 42
71 58 .07
54 42
73 55
80 53
64 50 .09
73 58
54 48 .22
61 51 .03
54 41
49 37 .06
67 61 .36
67 61 .05
58 48


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 72 63 1.24 s 74 62
NewYorkCity 64 52 s 65 46
Norfolk 68 58 s 64 49
Oklahoma City 67 32 pc 73 47
Omaha 63 32 pc 62 35
Palm Springs 94 62 s 88 62
Philadelphia 66 48 s 64 44
Phoenix 88 58 s 86 57
Pittsburgh 55 41 .04 pc 56 42
Portland, ME 64 41 s 64 40
Portland, Ore 66 39 s 65 42
Providence, R.I. 65 43 s 65 41
Raleigh 70 59 .01 s 66 41
Rapid City 63 33 sh 48 30
Reno 75 33 s 73 36
Rochester, NY 63 50 pc 58 43
Sacramento 82 47 s 84 47
St. Louis 59 42 .17 pc 71 50
St. Ste. Marie 51 40 .01 pc 50 42
Salt Lake City 66 38 pc 60 42
San Antonio 72 53 pc 73 57
San Diego 75 57 s 75 60
San Francisco 71 49 s 70 52
Savannah 88 69 trace s 77 60
Seattle 51 46 s 57 47
Spokane 61 36 s 61 32
Syracuse 66 51 .01 pc 57 39
Topeka 65 31 pc 70 40
Washington 67 53 s 61 47
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Palm Springs, Calif.
LOW 10 Berthoud Pass, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/75/pc
Amsterdam 58/53/sh
Athens 71/52/pc
Beijing 64/49/pc
Berlin 59/54/c
Bermuda 79/75/pc
Cairo 81/63/s
Calgary 52/41/pc
Havana 87/73As
Hong Kong 81/71/pc
Jerusalem 71/57/s


Lisbon 70/64/pc
London 61/53/sh
Madrid 67/48/pc
Mexico City 70/51/ts
Montreal 49/37/pc
Moscow 45/32/sh
Paris 65/55/pc
Rio 79/69/pc
Rome 75/69/pc
Sydney 84/64/s
Tokyo 69/65/sh
Toronto 57/43/pc
Warsaw 54/51/sh


B id N otices........................D 7


Miscellaneous

Notices..........................D 7



_u C IT R US. _C 0 U N T N Tu



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


LEGAL NOTICES

in Ioay C itr o oid




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
While not ancient artifacts, the bottles pulled from the Chassahowitzka reflect a past era.

MANAGER'S SPECIALS

1 -7-.
d"1 0714


ARTIFACTS
Continued from Page Al

Ice Age to the 20th century
That area has been a mag-
net for human activity for
at least 10,000 years," Ar-
buthnot added.
Archaeologists also
found what they are calling
a Suwannee point, or spear-
type point used during the
Paleo-Indian period 10,000
years ago. A Bolen point
from the Archaic period,
between the Paleo-Indian
and Woodland periods, also
was recovered.
Pieces of a Spanish ma-
jolica plate from the 17th
century were found, but
Arbuthnot isn't sure how it
got to Chassahowitzka
since the Spaniards were
stationed much farther
north. He believes Indians
living near the river may
have been trading with the
Spaniards and brought it
back with them.
Arbuthnot said carbon-
dating has yet to be done
on another one of their big


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 A5

finds a pair of wooden
paddles, found well-pre-
served under organic mat-
ter He said the paddles
were preserved in an oxy-
gen-free environment The
team also found several
vintage bottles of soda,
such as Sun Crest, which
was introduced in 1938.
This summer, the water
district cleaned up the
muck in and around the
main spring vent in the river
as part of its springs restora-
tion program. The cleanup
was recently concluded.
Because officials have al-
ways believed the area had
a long history of human ac-
tivity, SEARCH was called
in to assist Every item of
importance found will be
transported to Tallahassee
to be catalogued. Since ar-
chaeological finds are con-
sidered the property of the
people, they are often
brought back to where they
were removed for display
and/or storage.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe
@chronicleonline. corn.




A6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013

State BRIEF

Heirs of citrus
baron sell shares
in company
FORT MYERS The
heirs of a well-known figure
in the Florida citrus industry
are giving up control of a
company that remains one
of the state's largest private
landowners.
Two New York-based
agricultural companies are
spending $137.8 million to
purchase shares of Alico
Inc. now held by the heirs of
Ben Hill Griffin Jr.
Alico owns nearly 131,000
acres of land spread across
five Florida counties in-
cluding Alachua, Collier, Lee
and Polk that are used for
citrus groves, sugar cane
and cattle ranching.
The University of Florida
stadium is named after Grif-
fin, who founded Alico and
helped turn the company
into one of the state's most
prominent companies.
The Griffin clan has in-
cluded prominent Florida
political figures including
Griffin's granddaughter
Katherine Harris, who was
secretary of state during the
2000 presidential election
recount.
Under the deal an-
nounced Friday, 734 Agri-
culture and Arlon Group will
purchase nearly 51 percent
of outstanding voting stock
owned by Atlantic Blue
Group at $37 a share.
From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Q&A
Continued from PageAl

stay on the east coast up in
warm water plant dis-
charges (manmade warm
water sources) or Blue
Spring and other natural
warm-water resources.
Manatees on the west coast
also do the same. We are
very fortunate that up-
wards to 500 have come
here to use our springs,
making it a spectacular
thing to see in the clear
springs during the months
when the Gulf of Mexico is
too cold for them.
Chronicle: What do you
think causes this migration?
Dunn: With the cooler
mornings and the days get-
ting closer to the colder
months, manatees will
start arriving daily It's
what they must do or end
up dying of hypothermia
and cold stress. Manatees
are mammals, just like us
humans we just have
feet so we are "land" mam-
mals, and manatees have
flippers, so they are
"aquatic" mammals. The
waterways are their only
homes. Their bodies have
approximately 1 inch of fat
and muscle and this is
non-insulating fat.
Chronicle: What are
some of your concerns?
Dunn: My concerns are
that people don't under-
stand this vital informa-
tion and so many
manatees, when huddled
around the springs to con-
serve energy and stay


BESTNEHERG

ITnU2SBEL


Invemess HomosaA p B
586759 21800 79-55

^^^^^S S
H^^^^^^H~~I^^^Bii^I


warm, are bothered and
harassed, making them
move away from these
springs and putting the
manatees' health at risk.
Any picture you see where
sanctuaries go up are im-
portant manatee areas
where they can lay undis-
turbed and stay warm.
These areas must also be
void of loud noises so man-
atees can relax. As you can
see, the sanctuaries are
not large enough to fit all
the manatees and those
that are lying outside the
roped-off closed area also
need respect and not to be
bothered. Look but don't
touch; they need to stay
still, conserve energy to
survive! Even if their tail is
sticking out, rules posted
at the springs say, one of
many rules: No disturbing
or touching a resting or
feeding manatee.
Chronicle: How often are
you out on the water? What
would you suggest boaters
do to lessen the chance to
hurt the manatees?
Dunn: Almost daily
doing a tour
Mike and I have also
been a part of the FWC
and USFWS manatee res-


cue squads for nearly 10
years and did this way be-
fore we ever started our
tours. However, we felt the
need to try to do educa-
tional tours to make peo-
ple aware of the facts.
These gentle giants need
our help to survive and
being that we are one of
two places in the United
States (the other being the
Homosassa River's
springs) where you can
legally get in face-to-face
with the wild endangered
manatees, you must do it
with respect and knowl-
edge so you won't be a
cause for a manatee to be-
come ill or, worse, die.
Another very important
worry I have is the number
of boats that travel up the
canal to Three Sisters
Springs. This area is very
shallow and boats must
obey the "idle" signs, also
stay in the deeper middle
part of the canal and keep
your eyes open. Wear po-
larized sunglasses to help
see through the water and
block the sun's glare. Many
manatees will be lying
along the shallows up
against the shorelines to
soak in the warmth of the


Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts

xoi\Vx Citrus County

o Fo Father

Christmas



Friday, Dec. 6, 2013
SAll proceeds for "Serving Our
K\ Savior" (SOS) Food Pantry
I^* Cocktails/appetizers hour 6pm-7pm
Dinner 7pm-8pm.
Dance & Special Events 8p.m.-Ilip.m.
Chet Cole Life
Enrichment Center
5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461-8531
Semi-Formal Attire

-Ci i ikN ](E

Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office,
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486
Monday-Friday, from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.
For more information please call, 527-0052,419-5489,563-5932 or 270-3391


sun. The area around the
idle sign just before Three
Sisters gets very congested
with boats, snorkelers and
most importantly mana-
tees resting. Everyone
needs to use extreme cau-
tion when approaching
this area and others such
as King's Spring that also
is quite shallow Manatees
being large animals cannot
maneuver quickly out of
your way And, many may
have a calf they are nurs-
ing and can't move.
Please slow down and
look for manatees or signs
of a manatee close by, such
as a swirl at the top of the
water as manatees swim,
their noses breaking the
surface for a breath. Their
large bodies can be seen,
so have a lookout at the
front of your boat to spot
manatees. Manatees love
the warm water that recy-
cles through your engine
and flows back out. Many


babies will have their
faces dangerously close to
your prop to warm up, so
before you take off (engage
your motor) please check
behind it. It's very sad to
see a baby manatee with a
mutilated face from props.
This cool weather
snap can confuse younger
manatees. They don't real-
ize or recognize that the
ropes preventing boaters
in (a winter sanctuary)
area are not up. Please be
careful and approach this
area with caution. Again:
look, don't touch a resting
manatee.
Please do not throw your
anchors out; lower them
slowly, looking out for rest-
ing manatees below
Let's welcome the man-
atees back home for the
winter If you see a sick or
injured manatee, please
report it right away to
FWC Wildlife Alert at 888-
404-3922.


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Cteat Ljw11I


- -l'qwl


LOCAL/STATE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


welcome to your new


Publix.



Come discover your brand-new Publix in
Inverness. Check out the full-service meat case,
drive-thru Pharmacy, and full-service sushi and
Deli soup bar. You'll enjoy top-notch service
from knowledgeable, friendly associates who
are happy to answer questions, offer cooking
tips, and take your groceries right to your car.

thursday, october 24 at 8 a.m.

You can sample delicious foods and-if you're one
of the first 500 customers-receive a FREE reusable
grocery tote bag.


A


Publix at
Plaza Inverness
1012 West Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450
store hours:
Monday-Sunday: 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
grand opening hours:
8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on October 24
pharmacy hours:
Monday-Friday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.


Scan this code with your
smartphone QR reader for a map
and driving directions to your Publix store.


Store: 352.341.2581
Pharmacy: 352.341.2602
publix.com


W H E R E S H O P P I N G I S A P L E A S U R E @ I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 A7




AS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


CATTLE
Continued from PageAl

descendents from them.
Cattlemen would just let
them run. When it was open
range, people would have to
gather their cows and then
take them on a cattle drive
to Tampa to sell them. That
is how they got the Cracker
Drive. That is the noise the
whips made as they were
driving the cows."
The cattle, horses and
riders began their journey
Friday morning near the
Marion County line and
camped out on the ranch
of Charlie Strange. After
breakfast Saturday morn-
ing, they continued their
drive towards Hernando.
Waiting for their arrival,
attendees enjoyed festivi-
ties at the Historic Her-
nando School fundraiser.
Years ago, the historic
building was scheduled for
demolition. The Hernando
Heritage Council of the
Citrus County Historical
Society decided to save the
historic school and
preserve it.
The Hernando Heritage
Council hopes to one day
convert the schoolhouse
into a multifaceted com-
munity center for Citrus
County residents.
"Every single nickel goes
to restoring the school,"
said Linda Yeomans, Her-
nando Heritage Council
member and Citrus County
Historical Society member
"So far we have spent over
$500,000. We need $250,000
to $300,000 to finish the
school."
Yeomans said the plans
for the upcoming year in-
clude finishing the exte-
rior painting, repairing the
windows and doors and re-
moving the flooring.
At the festival, a taste of
old Florida included the
Cracker Caf6 and an old-
fashioned general store
that sold jarred, canned
and frozen foods prepared
by deep-rooted Citrus
County families and nu-
merous other vendors,
demonstrators, live and
silent auctions, along with
a concert series.
The festival and cattle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
It's the end of the trail for the 2013 Cracker Cattle Drive
as cattle and horseback riders emerge from the Rails to
Trails trail onto Parsons Point Drive in Hernando Satur-
day to end their two-day trek.


drive were sponsored by the
Hernando Heritage Coun-
cil, a division of the Citrus
County Historical Society
For more information on
how to volunteer or join,
call 352-341-6427 or email


them at csociety@tampa
bayrr.com.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@chronicle
online, corn.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAUGHT
Continued from Page Al

conference urging the men
to turn themselves in.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement
did not immediately re-
lease any other details
about their capture or
the investigation.
A woman who answered
the phone at the motel
said she saw police coming
and they went into room
227. The woman, who did-
n't want to give her name,
said authorities didn't stop
by the office before they
moved in.
Jenkins and Walker
were both serving life sen-
tences at the Franklin Cor-
rectional Facility in the
Panhandle before they
were released within the
last month. The bogus pa-
perwork, complete with
case numbers and a
judge's forged signature,
duped prison officials and
reduced their sentences to
15 years.
Jenkins was released
Sept. 27 and Walker was
set free Oct 8.
Family members and
friends of the men said Sat-
urday they initially thought
their release was legiti-
mate and spent time with
them, planning a birthday
party for one and going to
church with the other
Both Jenkins and
Walker went to an Orlando
jail after their release and
registered as felons, as re-
quired by law. They filled
out paperwork, had their
photographs taken and
were even fingerprinted.
By doing this, authorities
said they didn't raise any
alarms.
Henry Pearson, who is
Jenkins' uncle and his fa-
ther figure, said he
brought Jenkins clothes
when he picked him up
from prison last month
and drove him to see his
mother and grandmother


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Pearson planned a
birthday party at his home
for Jenkins a few days
later, but he never showed
up. Pearson said he was
completely shocked to
learn Wednesday that
Jenkins was not supposed
to be out of prison.
He learned Jenkins was
captured on TV and then a
law enforcement agent
called his home unexpect-
edly and let Jenkins talk to
his wife.
"He just said that he was
OK and that he loved us,"
Pearson said. "We have a
great sense of relief be-
cause we did not know
how this would end up."
Walker's mother, Lillie
Danzy, said the family
thought their prayers had
been answered when she
got a call saying Walker
was being released. There
wasn't time to pick him up,
so he hopped a bus to cen-
tral Florida.
Walker was at church
last Sunday His mother
said they have been coop-
erating with authorities
and made no attempts to
hide him.
The Orange County
sheriff said Friday night
that authorities believed
the men were still in the
central Florida area. It's
not clear how long they
had been in Panama City,
which is about 350 miles


from Orlando.
Jenkins was found guilty
of first-degree murder in
the 1998 killing and
botched robbery of Roscoe
Pugh, an Orlando man. It
was Pugh's family that
contacted the prosecutor's
office earlier this week
and told them Jenkins had
been released, setting off a
manhunt.
The prosecutor's office
also discovered Walker
had been mistakenly re-
leased. Walker was con-
victed of second-degree
murder in the 1999 Orange
County slaying of 23-year-
old Cedric Slater
There are still questions
about who created the le-
gitimate-looking docu-
ments that exposed gaps in
Florida's judicial system.
In light of the errors, the
Corrections Department
changed the way it verifies
early releases and state
legislators promised to
hold investigative hearings.
The Corrections Depart-
ment said on Friday it ver-
ified the early release by
checking the Orange
County Clerk of Court's
website and calling them.
Corrections Secretary
Michael Crews sent a let-
ter to judges saying prison
officials will now verify
with judges and not just
court clerks before re-
leasing prisoners early


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STATE


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 A9




A10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013




David
Gagne, 64
David Alfred Gagne, age
64, Inverness, entered
eternal life on Oct. 14,
2013, under the loving care
of his wife Cathy and sur-
rounded by family and
friends. David was born on
Jan. 26, 1949, in
Brunswick, Maine, to the
late Doue and Viola (Arse-
nault) Gagne. He served
our coun-
try in the
U.S. Navy
with 24
years of
,. service,
retiring
with the
rank of
David c h i e f.
Gagne D a v i d
then pursued a nursing de-
gree and worked as a
nurse at Bayonet Point. He
later was employed by the
City of Inverness utilities
department. David's pas-
sion was serving others.
He did this on a daily basis
by assisting guests, along
with Cathy, at the Lake
House Bed and Breakfast.
We will all remember his
smiling face and friendly
demeanor at that facility
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 38 years,
Cathy Lynn Johnson; his
daughters Jennifer Gagne-
Sanders, Clovis, Calif, and
Joy Dill Hendrix, Jack-
sonville, Fla.; brothers
Dennis (Donna), Daniel
(Debra), Donald (Vicky),
Dominic (Susan), Douglas
(Sue), Dexter (Elly); sisters
Doris (Gary) and Denise
(Pete); three grandsons; a
granddaughter; and many
nieces and nephews and
extended family
A tribute to David's life
will be held on Saturday,
Oct. 26, 2013, at 3 p.m. at
Lake House Bed and
Breakfast with Pastor Greg
Kell officiating and mili-
tary honors given by VFW
Post 4337 of Inverness. Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory is assisting
the family with arrange-
ments. In lieu of flowers,
memorials in David's
memory may be made to
Hospice of Citrus Co., PO
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 or the donor's fa-
vorite local charity
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.




Robert
Jacobs, 85
OCALA
Robert Andrew Jacobs,
85, of Ocala, Fla., passed
away Oct. 15, 2013. Robert
was born April 23, 1928, in
Festus, Mo., to Robert and
Mildred Jacobs. He
proudly served in the U.S.
Army, the U.S. Army Na-
tional Guard, and the U.S.
Air Force National Guard.
He worked as a computer
systems analyst for PPG
Industries.
He is survived by his
wife of 63 years Emogene;
a son, Steven R. Jacobs
(Nicole J.) of Ocala; and
four grandchildren.
A graveside service with
military honors will be at
10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 21,
2013, at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell.
Arrangements are in the
care of Countryside Fu-
neral Home, Anthony, Fla.
In lieu of flowers the fam-
ily requests donations be
made to Hospice of Mar-
ion County
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Emma
Gonzalez, 89
INVERNESS
Emma Llanis Gonzalez,
age 89, Inverness, died Oct
17,2013, atAvante Nursing
Care Center. Emma was
born on Nov 21, 1923, in
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico,
to the late Manuel D. and
Francisca



Emma ( by te ciat)
A Llanis.
S She wasa
teacher in
Puerto
Rico and
then was
employed
Emma bythe City
Gonzalez of New
York as a social worker
Emma enjoyed sewing,
gardening, reading, cook-
ing and baking. She had a
quirky sense of humor and
was a very sharp-witted lady
A loving and beautiful
wife, mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother, sister,
aunt and devoted friend,
she will be remembered
and missed dearly Left to
cherish her memory are
her son Pedro Gonzalez,
Inverness; her sister Hilda
Gonzalez, Campbellton, Fla;
granddaughters Erica,
Jennifer, Sara and Melissa;
eight great-grandchildren;
and her daughter-in-law
Yolanda Gonzalez. She
was preceded in death by
her husband Felix Gonza-
lez Palen in 1993 and her
son Felix M. Gonzalez.
A funeral service tribute
to Emma's life will be held
at 1 p.m. Wednesday Oct 23,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Pastor Ray
Kelley officiating. Burial
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bushnell.
The family will greet friends
in visitation from noon
until the hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.




Jerry
White Sr., 74
HERNANDO
Jerry K. White Sr, 74 of
Hernando, FL passed
away October 15, 2013 at
Woodland Terrace of Cit-
rus Co. A native of Moline,
Ill., he came to the area in
2003 from New Windsor,
N.Y Jerry retired from
tool sales and served his
country in the US Army
He was an avid boater and
a member of the Crystal
River Power Squadron.
Mr White was preceded
in passing by his nephew,
Kevin Sharp and is sur-
vived by a son, Jerry "Keith"
White Jr & (companion)
Debbie of Poughkeepsie,
N.Y; daughter, Kristi Lock-
wood & (companion) Patrick
of Webster, N.Y; brother,
Dale White of Hernando,
Fl.; sister, Patricia Sharp &
(husband) Ronald of Sum-
merfield, FL; nephew, Brian
White of Ill.; 4 grandchil-
dren; and 1 great-grandchild.
Jerry also leaves behind his
longtime companion Barbara
MacNeill of Hernando, Fl.
A Celebration of Life
will be held at Fero Fu-
neral Home Wednesday,
October 23, 2013, at 3 p.m.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.
Alberta
Feole, 93
COMMERCE, MICH.
Alberta Helen Feole, 93,
of Commerce, Mich., passed
away Friday, Oct. 18, 2013,
at her daughter's home in
Homosassa. Services and
burial will be held in Novi,
Mich. Local arrangements
are under the care of
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.


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Karl
Sanger, 69
HERNANDO
Karl W Sanger, 69, of
Hernando, Fla., died Oct.
17, 2013, at the Hospice of
Citrus County House in
Lecanto. Karl was born
July 13, 1944, in Washing-
ton, D.C.,
the son of
Charles
and Ruth
Sanger.
He was a
senior
systems
analyst/
Karl project
Sanger manager
for the U.S. Department of
State and retired after 28
years of service. Karl
moved to Hernando in
2000 from Silver Spring,
Md. He was a member of
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando. Karl
enjoyed scuba diving,
snow skiing, golf, tennis,
woodworking and was an
avid antique tool collector
Mr Sanger was pre-
ceded in death by his sis-
ter Charlene Ward and
brother-in-law Edwin
Ward. Survivors include
his wife Betty Sanger of
Hernando; daughter Cheri
Rogers, her husband Scott
and their daughter Carly
of Rockville, Md.; son Ken-
neth Sanger, his wife
Rachel and their sons Kyle
and Tyler of Frederick,
Md.; mother-in-law Naomi
Domingus of Richmond,
Va.; sister-in-law, the Rev.
Pattie Sewell of Rich-
mond, Va.; and his many
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service for
Mr Sanger will be at3 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando. The
family will receive friends
at the church from 2:30
p.m. until the hour of serv-
ice. Memorial may be
given to ALS Association
at webfl.alsa.org or to the
Hospice of Citrus County.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
wwwc hronicleonline. com.


James
Scenna, 64
CRYSTAL RIVER
James Edward Scenna,
also known as "Daddy,"
"Big Jim," "Jimbo,"
"Jimmy" and "Patches,"
passed away on Friday,
Oct. 18, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Hospital in Crystal
River He was 64 years old.
Mr Scenna was born Feb.
1, 1949, to Phillip Alexan-
der and Myrtle Pearl
(Fargo) Scenna in Nor-
wich, Conn., and came to
Crystal River 30 years ago
from Milford, Conn. He
was a U.S. Navy veteran, a
craftsman and jack of all
trades. He loved life and
lived it to the fullest
He will be greatly
missed by his friends and
family who loved him so
much. Left to cherish his
memory are his children
Melissa Rae Alsup (Jeff),
James Edward Scenna,
Thomas Joseph Scenna,
Daniel Phillip Scenna
(Jessica), Michael David
Scenna, Robert Justin
Scenna, Kellie Lynn
Scenna and Vanessa Rae
Scenna; brothers Bill
Scenna (Janet) and PA.
Scenna (Chris); sisters
Carojen Lindsey (Paul)
and Terry Brown (Mike);
and grandchildren
Chapin, Jacob, Hannah,
Leah, Justin, Danielle and
Maddalyn. A visitation will
be held on Thursday, Oct.
24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River The memorial serv-
ice will be on Friday, Oct.
25 at 10 a.m. at the Crystal
River United Methodist
Church Bethel Chapel. In-
urnment with military
honors will follow at Crys-
tal River memorial Park
cemetery Arrangements
are under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory, Crystal
River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


Jennifer
Hinson, 46
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jennifer Lynn Hinson,
46, of Crystal River, passed
away at home Oct. 18,2013.
The family will receive
friends at the funeral
home Thursday, Oct. 24,
2013, from 2 p.m. until 6
p.m. Fero Funeral Home.


Bette Hale, 71
INGLIS
Bette Rae Hale, age 71
of Inglis, died Friday,
Oct. 18, 2013, at her home
in Inglis. Private crema-
tion arrangements are
under the care of
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory, Crystal
River


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Deal brings home Turkish, Lebanese hostages


Associated Press
BEIRUT -Two Turkish
pilots held hostage in
Lebanon and nine
Lebanese pilgrims ab-
ducted in Syria returned
home Saturday night, part
of an ambitious three-way
deal cutting across the Syr-
ian civil war
The Shiite pilgrims, some
in dress shirts and other in
suit jackets, embraced well-
wishers at Beirut's interna-
tional airport, with one man
being carried away on the
shoulders of a crowd. Mean-
while, a plane carrying the
two freed Turkish Airlines
pilots landed in Istanbul,
where Prime Minister
Recep Tayyip Erdogan and
other officials greeted
them.
The release of the Turks
and the pilgrims is part of
a negotiated hostage deal
that includes freeing
dozens of women held in
Syrian government jails. It
wasn't immediately clear
Saturday night whether
any of the women had been
freed, as the Syrian gov-
ernment and the state-run
SANA news agency did not
mention any such release.
Lebanese, Turkish and
Syrian officials declined to
immediately offer more
details of the complicated,
multilateral exchange.
The deal appeared to be
mostly mediated by the re-
source-rich Gulf state of
Qatar, which has sup-
ported Syrian rebels in
their battle against the
government of President
BasharAssad. The Turkish
hostages arrived home on
a Qatar Executive private
jet. Palestinian officials
also mediated.
The nine Shiite pilgrims
were kidnapped in May
2012 while on their way
from Iran to Lebanon via
Turkey and Syria. Turkish
Airlines pilots Murat
Akpinar and Murat Agca
had been held since their
kidnapping in August in
Beirut.
Hundreds of relatives
shouted and screamed as


Associated Press
One of the nine released Lebanese Shiite pilgrims who were kidnapped by a rebel
faction in northern Syria last year reacts upon his arrival at Rafik Hariri international
airport in Beirut, Lebanon. Two Turkish pilots held hostage in Lebanon and nine
Lebanese pilgrims abducted in Syria returned home Saturday night, part of an ambitious
three-way deal cutting across the Syrian civil war.


the pilgrims filed into
Beirut's international air-
port, mostly wearing tidy
plaid shirts, their faces vis-
ibly tired.
"My son, my son!" one
woman could be heard
sobbing.
Dozens of green-clad
Lebanese soldiers tried to
keep order as crowds
heaved forward.
A pilgrim accused his
kidnappers of not offering
the hostages medical care.


"We wished that any of
them had any kind of val-
ues," said the pilgrim, who
did not give his name. "We
were with people who
couldn't tell a female
camel from a male camel,"
he said, referring to an
Arabic proverb to describe
an ignorant person.
Other pilgrims said they
were kept in dark, humid
rooms for most of their
confinement. They could
hear heavy fighting nearby


Lebanese officials and
clerics greeted the men,
kissing their cheeks one by
one. A top Lebanese offi-
cial who coordinated the
pilgrims' release entered
the airport to the backdrop
of whooping cheers and
loud music.
"It was difficult, without
a doubt," said Maj. Gen.
Abbas Ibrahim, head of
Lebanon's general security
apparatus. "I didn't want


anything from this deal,
except to see this sight," he
said, gesturing at the wait-
ing crowds.
The pilgrims' kidnap-
ping set off a series of tit-
for-tat kidnapping by
Shiite clansmen inside
Lebanon, including that of
the two Turkish pilots. The
gunmen hoped to pressure
Turkey to help release the
pilgrims.
Turkey is believed to
have close relations to
some Syrian rebel groups.
All three groups of cap-
tives the Lebanese pil-
grims, the Turkish pilots
and the imprisoned Syrian
women are meant to be
released in coming days as
part of the negotiated deal.
The pilgrims were held
by Syrian rebels who ini-
tially demanded that the
Lebanese Shiite group
Hezbollah end its involve-
ment in the Syria's civil
war, now entering its third
year They later softened
their demands to the re-
lease of imprisoned
women held by security
forces loyal to Assad.
Assad has drawn sup-
port from Syria's ethnic


and religious minorities,
including Christians and
members of his Alawite
sect The rebels are domi-
nated by Syria's Sunni
Muslim majority
Lebanese Shiite group
Hezbollah have played a
critical role in recent bat-
tlefield victories for forces
loyal to Assad. Hard-line
Sunni fighters have
backed the rebels.
It is one of the more am-
bitious negotiated settle-
ments to come out of
Syria's civil war, where the
warring sides remain
largely opposed to any
bartered peace. But it sug-
gested that the parties -
and their regional backers
- were more prepared to
deal with each other than
at any other previous time
in the conflict.
The Lebanese pilgrims
crossed into Turkey late
Friday
Meanwhile Saturday,
Syrian rebels assaulted a
checkpoint in a pro-gov-
ernment suburb of Damas-
cus on Saturday, setting off
a suicide car bomb that
killed 16 soldiers, activists
said.


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WORLD


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 All










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Fall in force


Associated Press
Tim Synder of Sequim,
Wash., prepares his cam-
era and tripod Thursday
to take photos of the
markers at the historic
Buena Vista Cemetery in
Port Gamble, Wash.


BART workers
killed after being
struck by train
WALNUT CREEK, Calif.
- Police from the San
Francisco Bay Area's rapid
transit system said two em-
ployees performing mainte-
nance were struck and
killed by a train.
Saturday afternoon's ac-
cident on a track in Walnut
Creek comes amid a strike
by Bay Area Rapid Transit
workers that has shut the
system down. But some
trains were being moved by
managers.
It was unclear how the
1:45 p.m. accident oc-
curred. BART Deputy Po-
lice Chief Ben Fairow
confirmed the deaths to the
Contra Costa Times.
Half a million
health insurance
applications filed
WASHINGTON -Ad-
ministration officials said
about 476,000 health insur-
ance applications have been
filed through federal and
state exchanges, the most
detailed measure yet of the
problem-plagued rollout of
President Barack Obama's
signature legislation.
However, the officials
continue to refuse to say
how many people have ac-
tually enrolled in the insur-
ance markets. Without
enrollment figures, it's un-
clear whether the program
is on track to reach the
7 million people projected
by the Congressional
Budget Office to gain cover-
age during the six-month
sign-up period.
The first three weeks of
sign-ups have been marred
by a cascade of computer
problems, which the admin-
istration says it is working
around the clock to correct.
Obama's advisers say
the president has been frus-
trated by the flawed rollout.
During one of his daily
health care briefings last
week, he told advisers as-
sembled in the Oval Office
that the administration had
to own up to the fact that
there were no excuses for
not having the website ready
to operate as promised.
JPMorgan would
pay $13 billion
in tentative deal
WASHINGTON --JP-
Morgan Chase & Co. has
tentatively agreed to pay
$13 billion to settle allega-
tions surrounding the quality
of mortgage-backed securi-
ties it sold in the run-up to
the 2008 financial crisis, a
person familiar with the ne-
gotiations between the
bank and the federal gov-
ernment said Saturday.
If the agreement is final-
ized, it would be the gov-
ernment's highest-profile
enforcement action related
to the financial meltdown.
The person said the ten-
tative agreement does not
resolve a criminal investiga-
tion of the bank's conduct.
Of the $13 billion, $9 bil-
lion is fines or penalties and
$4 billion will go to con-
sumer relief for struggling
homeowners, the person
said.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Fed-up voters meet the enemy, and it is... them?


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Hey,
fed-up Americans, here's a
scary thought after the
dispiriting spectacle of the
government shutdown:
You're the ones who sent
these members of Congress
to Washington, and they re-
ally are a reflection of you.
For all the complaints
about Washington, it was
American groupthink that
produced divided govern-
ment in the past two elec-
tions and a Congress that
has been tied in knots lately
John Adams, who would
become the country's sec-
ond president, wrote in
1776 that legislators
"should be in miniature an
exact portrait of the peo-
ple at large."
More than 200 years
later, members of the cur-
rent entangled House "are
probably a very accurate
reflection of how their
constituents feel," said


Ross Baker, a Rutgers Uni-
versity political scientist.
Not that people are
ready to take ownership of
the failings of their repre-
sentatives.
"Of course not," said
Baker. "It's a completely
dissociative view of Amer-
ican politics that some-
how there are these
grasping, corrupt, tone-
deaf politicians in Wash-
ington who are totally
unconnected to the caring
and attentive, compassion-
ate person" that an indi-
vidual voter has elected to
Congress.
With the government
now powering back up to
full speed and the next
budget crisis pushed off at
least until January, there
is no shortage of specula-
tion about whether voters
will retaliate in the 2014
elections against lawmak-
ers for this fall's budget
impasse. A lot depends on
how the next year goes.


Nelly Mathov, 79, protests against the government shut-
down Oct. 2 outside the federal building in Los Angeles.


For now at least, public
sentiment toward Presi-
dent Barack Obama, con-
gressional leaders and
Congress in general is grim.
Nearly three-quarters of
voters want to see most
members of Congress de-
feated, a much higher
level than at the same
point prior to the 2006 and
2010 elections in which


control of the House
changed hands, according
to the Pew Research Cen-
ter Also, Pew reports, the
share of voters who want
to see their own represen-
tative replaced is as high
as it's been in two decades,
at 38 percent.
Yet for all of the public's
grousing about polarized
politicians, the voters


Associated Press
The sun rises over Freeman Island, one of the four artificial THUMS islands in San Pedro Bay off the coast
of Long Beach used for oil drilling, on Oct. 3 in Long Beach, Calif. Oil companies have racked from manmade
islands off Long Beach and platforms off the Orange County coast for years, and state regulators are only
now realizing the technique is more widespread than originally thought.


Offshore cracking catches



Calif. regulators off guard


Associated Press

LONG BEACH, Calif.
he oil production tech-
nique known as cracking is
more widespread and fre-
quently used in the offshore plat-
forms and man-made islands near
some of California's most popu-
lous and famous coastal commu-
nities than state officials believed.
In waters off Long Beach, Seal
Beach and Huntington Beach-
some of the region's most popu-
lar surfing strands and tourist at-
tractions oil companies have
used cracking at least 203 times at
six sites in the past two decades,
according to interviews and
drilling records obtained by The
Associated Press through a pub-
lic records request
Just this year in Long Beach
Harbor, the nation's second-
largest container port, an oil
company with exclusive rights to
drill there completed five racks
on palm tree-lined, man-made is-
lands. Other companies racked
more than a dozen times from old
oil platforms off Huntington
Beach and Seal Beach over the
past five years.


Though there is no evidence
offshore hydraulic fracturing has
led to any spills or chemical
leaks, the practice occurs with
little state or federal oversight of
the operations.
The state agency that leases
lands and waters to oil companies
said officials found new in-
stances of cracking after search-
ing records as part of a review
after the AP reported this sum-
mer about cracking in federal wa-
ters off California, an area from
three miles to 200 miles offshore.
The state oil permitting agency
said it doesn't track cracking.
As the state continues its in-
vestigation into the extent of
cracking -both in federal waters
and closer to shore and develops
ways to increase oversight under
a law that takes effect in 2015, en-
vironmental groups are calling
for a moratorium on the practice.
"How is it that nobody in state
government knew anything about
this? It's a huge institutional fail-
ure," said Kassie Siegel, an attor-
ney with the Center for
Biological Diversity "Offshore
cracking is far more common
than anyone realized."


Little is known about the ef-
fects on the marine environment
of cracking, which shoots water,
sand and chemicals at high pres-
sure to clear old wells or crack rock
formations to free oil.
New oil leases off the state's
shores have been prohibited
since a 1969 oil platform blowout
off Santa Barbara, which fouled
miles of coastline. With no room
for physical expansion, oil com-
panies instead have turned to
cracking to keep the oil flowing.
The state launched an investi-
gation into the extent of offshore
cracking after the AP report in
August. California officials ini-
tially said here was no record of
cracking in the nearshore waters
they oversee. Now, as the State
Lands Commission and other agen-
cies review records and find more
instances of cracking, officials are
confused over who exactly is in
charge of ensuring the technique
is monitored and performed safely
"We still need to sort out what
authority, if any, we have over
cracking operations in state wa-
ters; it's very complicated," said
Alison Dettmer, a deputy director of
the California Coastal Commission.


Train carrying crude oil, gas derails in Alberta


Associated Press


GAINFORD, Alberta -
Emergency crews battled a
massive fire Saturday after a
Canadian National tanker
train carrying oil and gas de-
railed west of Edmonton, Al-
berta, overnight. No injuries
have been reported so far
Canadian National spokesman
Louis-Antoine Paquin said 13
cars -four carrying petroleum
crude oil and nine loaded with
liquified petroleum gas -
came off the tracks around 1 a.m.


local time in the hamlet of
Gainford, about 50 miles from
Edmonton. The entire com-
munity of roughly 100 people
was evacuated.
A local resident described
hearing a series of crashes
moments before a fireball
shot into the sky
"The fireball was so big, it
shot across both lanes of the
Yellowhead (Highway) and now
both lanes of the Yellowhead
are closed and there's fire on
both sides," said the eyewit-
ness, identified only as Duane.


Emergency
crews work a
fire Saturday
after a train
carrying oil
and gas
derailed in
Gainford,
Alberta,
Canada,
west of
Edmonton.

ROYAL CANADIAN
MOUNTED
POLICE/
Associated Press


themselves are deeply di-
vided, too. They sort them-
selves geographically and
ideologically Congres-
sional district boundaries
are drawn to accentuate
those political divisions.
When legislators answer
to such solidly Republican
or Democratic constituen-
cies, they are more prone
to engage in divisive antics
such as those seen in re-
cent weeks.
"We really are a red and
blue nation," said Brook-
ings Institution scholar
Thomas Mann. "We sepa-
rate ourselves. We tend to
associate with people who
think like we do."
The result, he said, is '"more
and more separation of
Democrats and Republi-
cans with distinctive sets
of values and world views
and then an attachment -
almost a tribalistic attach-
ment- to party that leads
them to accept whatever the
party position seems to be."


World BRIEFS

Titanic price


Associated Press
A violin, believed to be the
one played by Titanic band-
master Wallace Hartley,
is displayed at auction
house Henry Aldridge and
Son on Friday in Devizes,
England. The violin sold
for approximately $1.6
million Saturday, despite
being corroded and
unplayable.

Train slams into
station, again
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
-A commuter train slammed
into the bumper at the end
of the line Saturday at the
same station in Argentina's
capital where 52 people
were killed in a similar
crash last year. This time
there was no immediate re-
port of deaths, but at least
80 people were injured.
A mob quickly formed,
unleashing its fury at the
train operators. Passengers
chanted "murderer, mur-
derer!" at the injured driver
through the shattered cabin
window. Officers intervened
and the driver was soon
hospitalized under police
custody.
Police in riot gear then
took control of the station
after the angry crowd broke
glass and threw stones in
the street outside.
Eldest of Mexican
drug clan killed
LOS CABOS, Mexico -
Francisco Rafael Arellano
Felix, the eldest brother of
Mexico's once-feared Arel-
lano Felix drug clan, was
shot to death in the Baja
beach resort of Los Cabos
by a gunman wearing a
clown costume, authorities
said Saturday.
Relatives of Arellano
Felix confirmed his identity
at the scene of the crime at
a rented beach house, the
attorney general's office in
Baja California Sur state
said in a statement.
The motive for the attack,
and the gunman's disguise,
are still under investigation.
Known for its violent and
brutal control of the drug
trade in the border city of
Tijuana in the 1990s, the
arrests or death of most of
the seven Arellano Felix
brothers have reduced the
cartel to a shadow of its
former self.
-From wire reports









EXCURSIONS
EXCURSIONS


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PHOTOS BY NEIL SAWYER / For the Chronicle
ABOVE: A statue of Gen. George Meade
stands tall on Cemetery Hill. TOP LEFT: An
original Civil War cannon with a red barn in the
background marks the scene of a fire that killed
an entire platoon. BOTTOM LEFT: North Carolina
State monument is a moving tribute to the
soldiers. BELOW: The 73rd New York monument
stands amid the backdrop of a blue sky.


This is a very special anniversary
year of the greatest battle ever
fought on American soil, one that
would decide the fate of the
nation. The Battle of Gettysburg
was the turning point of the Civil
War, forever leaving its heavy
footprint in the beautiful
Pennsylvania countryside.


By Neil Sawyer
Spontaneous Travelor


ur long-anticipated visit to Get-
tysburg on July 4, 2013, for the
150th anniversary celebration of
the epic Battle of Gettysburg was re-
warded with more historical events
than we had anticipated. There were
reenactments of the Battle of Gettysburg
somewhere in the vicinity nearly every
day during the month of July
The reenactments, while daunting
and spectacular, were only the tip of the
iceberg. It's the battleground the spe-
cific sites such as the Peach Orchard,
Little Round Top, and Cemetery Hill -
that were central in our attempt to un-
derstand the action during those three
horrific days of 1863. At least 46,000 men
from both sides were left dead,


wounded or missing from the Battle of
Gettysburg. Standing in the spot where
perhaps a dozen men had fallen
to cannon fire, rifle and bayonet was
indeed sobering.
Formulating a plan to include as
much as possible into our week began at
the Museum and Visitor Center, in what
I would deem a full-service facility: easy
parking, ticket and information counter,
cafeteria, restrooms, gift shop, private
guide services, a museum that includes
interactive exhibits and various short
films, plus a 360-degree 3-D cyclorama
of the battlefield.
A stop at the visitor center is a must,
and is recommended as the starting
point of your visit.


See Page A19


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Juneau, Alaska


Special to the Chronicle
To celebrate their respective anniversaries, Pat and Steve Morgan and Joanne and
Pete Rocco visited Alaska. The couples began in Fairbanks, Alaska, and then onto
Seward, where they boarded a cruise ship to continue their journey. The couples
visited Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau as a part of their travels.




A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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S320*221 320 3 3 DCaprio, Tilda Swinton. (In Stereo) R' B Anna Kendrick. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Wahlberg. (In Stereo) 'R' B
Ii t 4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Slaves- Chicago Sex Slaves- The Sex Slaves: Oakland
42 41 42 "Out of Bounds" ."Don't Blink" (N) Windy City
Wun 109 65 109 44 53 11Drugs, Inc.'14' Drugs, Inc. '14' Drugs, Inc. "Cartel City: Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers ,, i. : ii ii iii-
109 65 109 44 53 Arizona"'14' 14' (N)'14' ii,,- i1
WItRj 28 36 28 35 25 Sam& Sam& Haunted am& SeeDad Ilnstant *** "The Nutty Professor" (1996) B Friends Friends
[ N 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
DXY 44 123 Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped'PG' Snapped (N)'PG' Preachers of L.A. Snapped'PG'
n 3 21 3 "Twilight Saga: Homeland "Tower of Masters of Sex'MA' Homeland "Game On" Masters of Sex (N)'MA' Homeland "Game On"
340 241 340 4 Breaking Dawn" David"'MA' cc (N)'MA'B c'MA'Bc
,S 3 3 2 3 Bar Rescue "Barely Countdown to Bound Bar Rescue "A Bar Full Bar Rescue "Jon of the Bar Rescue (N) (In Covert Kitchens
37 43 37 27 36 Above Water"'PG' for Glory (N) of Bull"'PG' Dead"'PG' Stereo)'PG' "Autobody Entrees"'PG
tA 3 3 White *** "Premium Rush" (2012) TheWhiteQueen (In TheWhiteQueen (In ** "Men in Black 3" 2012, Action) Will
370 271 370 Queen Joseph Gordon-Levitt. 'P-13' Stereo)'MA' c Stereo)'MA' c Smith. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
S4 36 31 36 FaFishing the Sport Sprtsman College Football Florida State at Clemson. (Taped) FlSportida Saltwaterxp. Into the
M 36 31 36 Flats Fisohing Ad ___________ ____ Sport Exp. BleG
SY J 31 9 31 6 29 ** "Swamp Devil" ** "The Ruins" (2008, Horror) Jonathan *** "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984, "Nightmare-
^E 31 59 31 26 29 (2008) Bruce Dern. Tucker, Jena Malone. R' N Adventure) Harrison Ford. PG' B2"
TS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Old School" (2003) Luke Wilson. *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010) *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010)
9 5 169 30 3 *** "Come September" (1961, Romance- *** "Lover Come Back" 1961, Romance- *** "Send Me No Flowers" (1964, Comedy)
169 53 169 30 35 Comedy) Rock Hudson. 'NR' Comedy) Rock Hudson. 'NR' BRock Hudson, Dodis Day. NR'Nc
Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Yukon Men Reserves Alaska: The Last
0aU) 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'c Frontier'14'c Frontier (N)'PG' Frontier(N)'14' are dwindling.'PG' Frontier'14'c
U 50 46 50 29 30 Marry IMarry Marry IMarry Medium Medium Medium Medium Alaskan Women Medium IMedium
ii 350 261 350 "Barrio Tales"(2012) ** "People Like Us" (2012, Drama) Chris ** "Real Steel" (2011 Action) Hugh ** "Blitz"(2011)
350261 350 Carson Aune.'R Pine. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Jackman. (In Stereo)'PG-13' 'R',
** "Clash of the Titans"(2010, Fantasy) Sam *** "Gladiator" (2000) Russell Crowe. A fugitive general becomes a *** "Gladiator"
S48 33 48 31 34 Worthington.'PG-13' gladiator in ancient ome.'R' (DVS) (2000)'R'
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Open Season 3" (2010) Steve Schirdpa. Dragons Teen American Cleveland Fam.Guy Burgers Fam. Guy IChina, IL
TRA 9 54 9 44 World's Creepiest Most Terrifying Toy Haunter (N) Making Monsters (N) Halloween Tricked Terrifying Places
ruT 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... Most Shocking Top 20 Funniest 'PG' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
rtVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirds The Golden Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs King Kin
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Modern Modern Modern Modern White Collar "At What
471J 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Family Family Family Family Pdice"'PG'
ME) 117 69n 117 CSI: Miami "Die by the CSI: Miami Eric Delko CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "L.A." (In CSI: Miami Getting CSI: Miami "Delko for
117 69 117 Sword"'14' returns.'14' '14' m Stereo)'14'B Axed"'14'B the Defense"'14'
rWRNAj 18 118 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay 'American Beauty"


Wife keeps hubby


on 'roller coaster'


D ear Annie: After
more than 13
years of marriage
to an intelligent and
lovely woman, our rela-
tionship continues to be
a rollercoaster ride. We
are in our 60s. I was mar-
ried once before. She
has had three prior mar-
riages and divorces. We
each have adult chil-
dren.
It seems she has un-
derlying hos-
tility toward
me and any-
one else
whose
choices do
not meet with
her approval.
She com-
plains of not
having a life -
and being
only a house-
keeper, even
though she ANN
keeps all of MAIL
her own in-
come and I
pay all of our bills, pro-
viding her with an al-
lowance. We also travel
well.
She complains that I'm
not home enough, but we
spend two hours to-
gether over morning cof-
fee, and I return home
from work by 6 p.m.
Then I end up eating
dinner alone while she
retreats to another part
of the house to play puz-
zles or talk with her girl-
friends.
I stay home every
weekend so we can be
together, but she shows
no affection to me at all.
I see her as controlling
and deeply depressed, at
least around me.
We tried a few sessions


I
.I


with a counselor, but she
refused to go back.
She's convinced she
doesn't need help and
that I am responsible for
our disconnect. Any
thoughts about how I can
help us? Need
Direction
Dear Need: When
someone describes a re-
lationship as a "roller-
coaster ride," it tends to
mean extreme ups and
downs. If this is
the case, your
assessment
that your wife
is depressed
could be accu-
rate, but she
also could be
bipolar Unfor-
tunately, if she
refuses to con-
sider that she
might need
medical or psy-
E'S chiatric assis-
BOX tance, little will
change.
Please en-
courage her to see her
doctor, but also contact
the Depression and
Bipolar Support
Alliance (dbs
alliance.org).

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, clo Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox
and read fea tures by
other Creators Syndicate
writers, visit www.
crea tors. com.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Carrie" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 4:20 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) In 3D.
1:20 p.m. No passes.
"Escape Plan" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
No passes.
"Insidious: Chapter 2"
(PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.


"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Rush" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7p.m.
"Carrie" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Escape Plan" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Like some
housetops
6 Tranquility
11 Wearing a flowing gar-
ment
16 Eats nothing
21 Worship
22 Praise
23 Standing wide open
24 Ne plus-
25 Auto type
26 Embezzled
27 Word with face or hand
28 Kitchen item
29 Playground game
30 The Abominable Snow-
man
32 Top
34 Clans
36 Fanatic
37 Gen. Robert--
39 Mister
41 Legal wrong
43 A pronoun
44 Variety of cheese
45 Cavalryman's mount
48 Make coffee
50 Concerning (2 wds.)
52 Walked
55 Employer
57 Peruse
59 Iran, formerly
63 Kind of eel
64 Off-and-on
66 Person at the scene
68 "The Love-"
69 Simple
70 Wire measure
72 Backbone
73 Urban pest
74 Curve shape
75 Tub washing
76 Kind of negative cam-
paign
78 A pronoun
79 Chinese gelatin
80 Breathe
82 Thickness
83 Hoisting device
85 Betel palm
86 Totality
87 B'way
announcement
88 Dye container
89 Hasten
90 A pronoun
93 Tolerated
95 Panhandle
96 Capital of


Venezuela
100 Damage
101 contra
102 Washington's
Sound
104 At the proper time
105 Insect
106 Work unit
107 Empty of liquid
109 Follow
110 Skin opening
111 Dilettantish
112 Wile E. Coyote's neme-
sis (2 wds.)
115 Expressionless
117 Bone in the ear
118 Group of nine
119 Metric measure
121 M-R link
122 Each
123 Not up
125 Auricular
127 Playthings
129 Former student
132 Show assent
134 Genesis name
136 Actor-Neeson
137 Madame Bovary
141 Edge
142 Band for
sharpening
144 Journey
146 Diagnostic aid (hyph.)
148 Cereal grass
149 Word at parting
151 Mickey -
153 VIP in old India
155 Roughly
157 Man from Madrid
158 Inscribe
159 Shipping box
160 Pre-adult insect
161 Liable
162 Desert shrub
163 Old anesthetic
164 Arab chieftain (var.)


DOWN
1 Refined
discernment
2 Perfect
3 Rustic house
4 Time
5 Gainsay
6 Harass
7 Put out
8 From--Z
9 Fizzy beverage


10 Put into office
11 Wedding reception spe-
cialist
12 Past
13 Furry feet
14 Swords
15 Site of a Greek oracle
16 Bother
17 High mountain
18 Rock
19 Food fish
20 -Ana
31 Old exclamation
33 Swab
35 Bowling game
38 Brilliant display
40 Irritable
42 Bring to bay
44 Seedless plant
46 Attention-getter
47 Game VIP,
for short
49 Letters
51 Nerve network
52 Fossilized resin
53 Bullwinkle, for one
54 Military VIPs
56 Card game
58 Portray
60 Twill fabric
61 Newton orAsimov
62 Ad per aspera
64 Destiny
65 Tall tale
67 Accompanying
69 Nobleman
71 Statute
75 Liver secretion
76 Sailing vessel
77 Bolt for a girder
79 Neighborhood
81 Tense in grammar
82 Paid athlete
84 Old horse
85 Ethereal
87 Twine
89 Patriot Nathan-
90 That place
91 AGreat Lake
92 Pipe -
93 Penn or Connery
94 Flop
95 Commenced
96 Terse
97 Cut a roast
98 Caper
99 Fashion
101 Using good
judgment
103 State official (abbr.)


104 Cervantes hero
(2 wds.)
107 Dull
108 Notorious old Roman
110 Of a religious head
111 Liqueur flavoring
113 Numb
114 Pro-
116 Male swan
117 Simian
120 Kind of exam


- Mater
Structure on a roof
Convertible
"The of Seville"
Seize
Jockey
Kind of acid
"Lorna -
Chop
Roger or
Mary Tyler


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


10-20


Purple shade
Rose oil
Of course!
Golf action
Component
Lock maker
Many years
Visit
Cry of contempt
Emeril's
exclamation


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


MOC/MOCA
to serve pasta
The Military Order of
the Cootie/Military Order
of the Cootie Auxiliary
will serve a pasta and
meatball or sausage din-
ner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov 29, at Leroy
Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hernando
(where the helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7,
may be purchased at the
post. Donation at the door
will be $7.50. Music will
be provided after dinner
For more information,
call Paul Kimmerling,
seam squirrel, at 352-795-
4142 or the post at 352-
726-3339.

VFW Riders to do
poker run
District 7 VFW Riders
will host the Pearl Harbor
Remembrance Day Poker
Run on Saturday, Dec. 7.
Registration begins at
9 a.m. with the last bike
out at 11 a.m. and last
bike in at4 p.m.
The schedule is:
Staring point and
first card -VFW Post
7122 Floral City, 8191 S.
Florida Ave. Begin 50/50
-10 tickets for $5. Start
the run with breakfast for
a donation. Cost of $15
per poker hand includes
the cost of the meal at the
Inglis Post. Additional
poker hands for $10. Addi-
tional meal tickets are $5.
First stop and second
card Giovanni's, 3451
E. Louise Lane,
Hernando.
Second stop and third
card -American Legion
Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
Third stop and fourth
card -Willard's Restau-


rant & Lounge, 3490 S.E.
County Road 337,
Morriston.
Fourth stop and fifth
card Chiefland VFW
Post 5625, 1104 S. Main St.
Final stop and wild
card Inglis VFW Post
8698, at 520 State Road 40
E. Last bike in by 4 p.m.
Roll the dice for a lucky
No. 7 free drink (one per
poker hand card player).
Prizes for best poker
hand, second-best hand
and worst hand. There
will be music, a silent
auction, odometer poker
for a prize (read your bike
odometer best hand
wins) and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information,
call Roger at 352-697-1826
or email shanilyl@
yahoo.com.

IIaE*IE vR IRIG LuDv
fOHANIITIN VETERMi-\
4IIRIP





New veterans'pin
still available
Disabled American Vet-
erans, Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter 70 of Inverness
announces the design and
availability of this year's
Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemo-
rative Pin.
In keeping with this
year's theme, "Honoring
Our Iraq and Afghanistan
Veterans," the pin is an
outline of Citrus County
superimposed with the
Iraq Campaign and the
Afghanistan Campaign
service medals.
Pins are available for a
donation of $3 each and
may be obtained by call-
ing the chapter at 352-344-
3464 or John Seaman at


352-860-0123. Pins are
also available at the Cit-
rus County Veterans Serv-
ice Office in Lecanto.
During Veterans Appre-
ciation Week activities,
Oct. 26 through Nov 17,
the pins will also be avail-
able at various functions
such as the Veterans Ap-
preciation Concerts on
Oct. 26 and 27 and the
Veterans Fair on Nov 8.

Vets sought for
classroom talks
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its annual Veter-
ans in the Classroom pro-
gram Nov i to 12 as part
of its 21st annual Veterans
Appreciation Week
activities.
Coordinated by the Cit-
rus County Chapter of the
Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA),
the Veterans in the Class-
room program brings liv-
ing history to the
classrooms of the county's
public and private
schools, as well as home-
school groups.
Veterans share with stu-
dents their firsthand mili-
tary experiences and
travels while serving our
country in uniform
around the world.
The model Veterans in
the Classroom program
was recognized in 2008
with a Florida Education
Foundation award.
The program's success
has generated the need
for additional veterans to
share their experiences
with students.
Persian Gulf,
Afghanistan, Iraq, Air
Force, National Guard
and women veterans are
especially needed as
participants.
All interested veterans


may contact Mac McLeod
at 352-746-1384or
cmcleod670@earthlink.
net, or Bob Crawford at
352-270-9025, baddogusmc
@tampabayrr.com.

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St., Crystal
River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.

DAV helps vets
get to clinics
The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to


Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to
The Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need.
Veterans who need to
go to appointments in
Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call
the Veterans Service
Office in Lecanto at 352-
527-5915 to be placed on
the van list.
All appointments must
be made before 1 p.m.


Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension
examination.
All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the
Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an ap-
pointment to discuss a
claim, call 352-527-5915.
Vets will need to have a


denial letter and a copy
of the compensation ex-
amination by Gainesville.
Copies of either exam
may be requested
through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.


Transitioning
vets can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus
County within the past
two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will sched-
ule a seminar to discuss
benefits and solicit ideas.
Call 352-527-5915 to re-
serve a seat.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.


'S fj aiSAiac oaSfCiruConprs


Shave-Off/Kick-Off Party
Tuesday, OIteber 21
5:3p 7:30p



Whether you have a 'Mo' or 'No Mo',
you'll wont to go! Everyone is invited.
Bring your buddies, family, friends.
And don't forget your razor or we'll
just shave your moustache for you.


if you can (or even if you can't) grow a
MO. you won't want to miss this year's
November events. Start November off
clean-shaven and then grow your
mouslache to bring awareness to
men's health issues like prostate and
testicular cancer. Be sure to Save the
Date for the Mo Show & Finale Party on
Thursday, November 21 starting at
5 30p o0 High Octane Saloon. There
you'll proudly strut your Mo. And who
knows, your Mo just might win
Best, Big, Lame or Unique!


Mr ioVt o0o 0/ o Donate s O O O
Mo e be itu C utyt am o ousm ve br1o /t a /10 73 1


Don't let Skin Cancer Trick You!

Treat Yourself To A FREE Screening.

To schedule your free skin cancer
examination, please call the staff at
Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery
Center at 746-2200. e T


iunCOAT DERMRTOLOGY@
S'UfCORJST


RAND /Kin SURGERY CENTER

Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461

36 --2-873-1500


Ralph E. Massullo, M.D., F.A.A.D.
William Welton, M.D., F.A.A.D.
Michael Wartels, M.D., F.A.A.D.
Margaret Collins, M.D., F.A.A.D.


Brian Bonomo, P.A.-C
Kristy Chatham, P.A.-C
Elizabeth Estes, ARNP
Erin Watkins, P.A.-C
Carla Bailey, P.A.-C


Participating with: Medicare, BCBS,
United Healthcare, Cigna, Humana, Aetna.

www.dermatologyonline.com


I


VETERANS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 A15










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a singu-
lar event or moment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to you.
It can be any type of event, from some-
thing from the battlefield to a fun excur-
sion while on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank, branch of serv-
ice, theater of war served, years served,
outfit and veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at
352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put together
your stories and help set up obtaining
"then" and "now" photos to publish with
your story

Auxiliary plans flea market
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4252
in Hernando, State Road 200, will have a
flea market from 7 a.m. to noon today
Proceeds will be donated to the Cancer
Aid and Research Fund. Call Ronnie at
352-726-3339 for information.

Auxiliary to do rummage sale
VFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will
hold a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m. today
at the post, 906 State Road 44 East,
Inverness.
Sale items include gently used clothing,
crafts, including holiday decorations,
baked goods and much more. Call 352-344-
3495, or visit wwwvfw4337.org, for infor-
mation about all post events.

Dinner theater to honor vets
"A Sentimental Journey" a Veterans
Appreciation Week World War II dinner
theater presentation, will honor veterans
at the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W
Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 2, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov 3.
The dinner and show, preceded by so-
cial hour, are $15. For reservations, call
352-212-1014.

Auxiliary to serve meatloaf
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W
Penno Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites
everyone to a meatloaf dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at the post, 10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Primary school to honor vets
Inverness Primary School will have its
Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday
Nov 7, at the school cafeteria.
Citrus County veterans are invited to
participate. Students will be performing
songs in honor of veterans.
Three students in kindergarten through
second grade will be honored with the
Randy Aller's Picture Contest Awards for
first, second, and third places.
Three third- through fifth-grade stu-
dents will earn the Randy Aller's Essay
Contest Awards for first, second and third
places.
The students will share their essays with
the veterans in attendance.
After the program, the veterans will be
the celebrities of IPS as they walk down
the hallway full of children cheering, to
the Veterans Garden to enjoy cake and
drinks.
For more information, email Mary Tyler
at tylerm@citrus.kl2.fl.us or call 352-
726-2632.

CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight.
The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet
and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Elks Ladies' sale to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will
have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the lodge, 7890
W Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to participate.
Those with items to sell may call Bonnie
Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at
352-382-7614.
Rental spaces are $15 each or two for
$25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 17.
Food will be available.
Proceeds from the food booth go to help
the Elks' veterans committee provide for
our veterans in nursing homes.


Early enlistment


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Gary Daugherty and his wife of 42 years, Linda, talk Friday morning at the Crystal River Health and Rehabilitation Center,
where Daugherty resides. Daugherty served in the United States Army for three years during the Vietnam War.


Vietnam veteran feels fortunate to have survived


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

It was not a popular
thing to do, not in
the late 1960s with
the U.S. embroiled
in an increasingly
unpopular war in
Southeast Asia.
But it's what Gary Daugherty did -
he joined the U.S. Army And he was
just 16 when he did it, getting his
mother to swear he was 18.
The reason?
"I was stupid," he said. "My whole
family had military service; two of'e
were in the Navy I was just a punk
kid."
Now 60 and living at the HPH
Hospice in Crystal River,
Daugherty knows he was
fortunate to have survived.
"I feel real lucky," he said.
Raised in Plant City, he
joined the Army in 1969 and
after going through basic train-
ing, he was quickly shipped out
to Vietnam. He remained in the
service until 1973, when the war
was drawing to close (it officially
ended with the fall of Saigon in
April 1975). He was involved in
some of the most intense fighting,
crossing the border into Cambo-
dia as part of a special operations u
which he volunteered for He had be
trained as a mechanic, working on a
M88 tank retriever
"They came around one day asking
if anyone was interested in (the spe-
cial operations unit)," Daugherty re-
called. "I said, 'Sure, why not?"'
Those three words would launch


him on a series of misadventures, both German shepherd. Dogs like this were
during and after the war and into a used to flush out so-called "tunnel
variety of roles, rats," Viet Cong personnel hiding in
"I went from one end of Vietnam to the miles of tunnels burrowed all over
the other," he said. "Every time I Vietnam.
thought I was coming home, I'd be Daugherty said he was also trained
called back." as a sniper and he served as a gunner
Daugherty, who was a staff sergeant on a helicopter
S when he left the Army, remembered "Four different times the helicopter
one instance in which his unit crossed was shot from under us," he said.
into Cambodia searching for Viet Cong He was wounded by rocket fire, with
when they were ambushed. "138 pieces of shrapnel" taken out of
"They killed everyone in our battal- him and some of it still surfaces in
em ion except me and three other guys," his body
he said. With no options left Like many veterans from that
war, for a long time Daugherty
had trouble talking about his
M Gary DaughertY experiences.
staff sergeant(E6)I "I did a lot more than I should
RANK U S Army t have done," he said, remember-
B c" ro tours O ietna ing an instance when a woman
SeRVD YARS 1.96erg, at operations; and a boy of about 12 were
ird ArtillerY7 sec |standing in a road armed with
UNITS: 1.st1 Fi Lo01st AMrborne sniper ; AK47 assault rifles, shooting at
etrieval; dog and his vehicle. His commander,
JOB:TEs'an r .eopter aeVUlnne r stars; he said, told him to shoot
o.S tHeart; three Sive them or they would shoot
|iR- twe B1 ronz Sy him.
"So I shot them with a.50
i: j limber (machine gun)," he said.


nit,
een

ig


open, Daugherty said he guided his
unit on a 145-mile journey through the
jungle back to their fire base.
"It took us about a week," he said.
There were several other situations
he survived that could have been fatal,
including some of the jobs he
performed.
For example: Daugherty was also a
dog handler, in charge of a 140-pound


ien uauglnerly uiu return irom
Vietnam, disembarking near Fort Dix
in New Jersey he said a woman
"spit in my face and called me a
baby-killer"
"It was very aggravating," he said.
He ended up buying a motorcycle
and driving back to Florida.
Daugherty was awarded three Silver
Stars and three Bronze Stars, as well
as a Purple Heart


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding each
group. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post or group, call or email the
contact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or
corrections to community@
chronicleonline.com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson Amer-
ican Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call 352-795-6526, email
blantonthompsonPostl 55@
gmail.com, or visit www.fl
Post1 55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan at


352-795-4233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call
352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion, Beverly
Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077
N. Lecanto Highway, in the
Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post
237.org or call 352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off
Arbor Street in Inverness. Call
Commander Norm Brumett at
352-476-2134 or Auxiliary presi-
dent Alice Brummett at 352-
476-7001.
American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S.
Memorial Drive, Homosassa.


Call Commander Robert Scott at
352-860-2090.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. Call
352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 and Ladies Auxiliary,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway,
State Road 200, Hernando.
Call 352-726-3339, email


vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com or
Google VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189, West Veterans Drive, west
of U.S. 19 between Crystal River
and Homosassa. Call 352-
795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida
Ave., Floral City. Call 352-
637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State
Road 44 E., Inverness. Call
Commander Victor Houston at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S.
19. Call 352-447-3495.

See .Page A18


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not
guaranteed.


.,................................................................,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Plantation at Crystal River

Saturday, October 12,2013


Sheree Keeler and Doris Dunphy Jaden Johnson and Kailey Barber


Stacy Andrews and Tracey Lee


Sylvia Langdon, Yvonne Damico
and Alicia Veltman


Terri Bristol and Vona Gregory


Ann Davis and Carolyn Lewis


Vanda DuVernay and Marilyn DeFillippo


Sydney Campellone and Kyle Nash


Sandy and Samantha Lapp


Connie Kane and Crystal Abele Illona Clark and Pam Falasz


Helen Uebbing and Lynne Tate


Alex Andri Brooks, Lorraine Lemos Mary Widenor, Sharon Hanley


and Lisa Bertine


Amanda Revels and Lavonne Brennan


and Tina Tirrell


Photos by Logan Mosby


SPOTLIGHT ON CITRUS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 Al17




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GROUPS
Continued from Page A16

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow Post 447,405 E. State
Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41.
Call 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus
Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
President Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400.
The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
Call Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base
Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John
Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando.
Call Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44
in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959. Visit www.Posti 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detach-
ment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call
352-726-0834 or 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Mer-
chant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at
11:30 a.m. at Kally K's restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting
dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida Coasties meets at the
Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997@yahoo.com.


Oct. 21 to 25 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS

Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal variety
and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot dog, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
chilled pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Tuesday: The Major Lea-
guer, oven-baked breaded
chicken, turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, potato
smiles, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, moz-
zarella maxstix, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled diced
peaches, fruit juice, milk vari-
ety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, pepperoni pizza,


PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
peach cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.

Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella
maxstix, fajita chicken with
rice and ripstick, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: The Major
Leaguer, turkey wrap, turkey
super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh garden
salad, baby carrots, potato
smiles, chilled strawberry cup,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken
alfredo with ripstick, pepper-
oni pizza, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled peach cup, fruit


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-
5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone
number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call
352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby, features
editor. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed
message.


juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded
chicken sandwich, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,
sweet potato crosstrax, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.

High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.Tuesday: Ham, egg
and cheese on loco bread,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage,
egg and cheese biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, green beans,
celery, potato roasters, chilled
flavored applesauce, juice,
milk.
Tuesday: The Major Lea-
guer, turkey and gravy over
noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
Italian super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cucumber
coins, sweet peas, baby car-
rots, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled diced
peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
chicken with rice, spaghetti
with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, turkey


super salad with roll, pizza,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, baked beans, chilled
baked beans, potato roasters,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, chilled peach
cup, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken
alfredo with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
Italian super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
sweet corn, potato roasters,
chilled flavored applesauce,
juice, milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Oven-fried
chicken thigh, blackeyed
peas, country vegetable med-
ley, wheat bread with
margarine, pineapple, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
spaghetti, tomato gravy, flat
beans, Italian bread with
margarine, mixed fruit, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Chicken chop
suey over steamed rice,
green beans, gingered
carrots, margarine, peaches,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, whole-grain bread with
margarine, fresh orange, ani-
mal crackers, low-fat milk.
Friday: Fall-O-Ween Picnic
at Central Citrus Community
Center.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


COMMUNITY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAWYER
Continued from PageA13

We began our tour by viewing the cy-
clorama (in the visitor center) in order
to get a complete overview of what we
would be seeing during the next couple
of days. The Battle of Gettysburg cyclo-
rama is the largest oil painting in the
country and larger than a football field.
After the cyclorama, we purchased a
self-guided CD tour of the battleground
($30). This CD, when played in the car,
verbally keys the driver to roadside sig-
nage on a round-trip tour of the battle-
field, and gives detailed information of
various battle locations and monuments.
The CD is my recommendation in lieu of
a bus tour over the same route. A rea-
sonable amount of time embracing the
CD agenda is 3-4 hours, although you
may interrupt the tour at any point and
come back to it later to suit your own
agenda.
Each of the 1,320 monuments in the
park is special in its own way- honor-
ing an individual or representing some
significant battle or event It is difficult
to pick a favorite. However, we were en-
thralled with the grand and imposing
Pennsylvania State Memorial in an area
known as Cemetery Ridge, one of the
key battle locations. It is an elegant
structure approximately 110-feet in
height, consisting of columns and arches
reaching up to a traditional domed top
and finished off with a statute of Athena,
"Goddess of Victory and Peace." The
bronze statue was made from melted-
down cannon balls. An internal stairway
allows visitors to climb to the base of the
dome for an impressive view of the en-
tire battlefield.
Don't overlook historic downtown Get-
tysburg, as there are many restaurants,
shops and points of interest, and is, as
you might expect a very touristy town.
Dining in the park is limited to the cafe-
teria at the visitor center, but has a wide
variety of choices.
To assist in your preparation for a
trip to Gettysburg you may order a
printed visitor guide to be mailed to
you by calling 1-800-337-5015. Com-
plete information on the park is
available on line: wwwnps.govgetV
This year, July 1, 2013, to June 30,
2014, is a special year at Gettysburg,
with a host of events intended to
embed the memories of this historic
battle into the mind of every citizen
young and old. The year 2014 should
go on record as being a very good year
at Gettysburg.


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Associated Press
The U.S. Interior Department says Congress will have to decide whether to repay states that decided to reopen national
parks during the partial government shutdown, including more than $360,000 paid by Colorado to operate Rocky Mountain
National Park and pay its employees.


National park funding not covered by budget bill


Associated Press
DENVER -The U.S. Interior De-
partment says Congress will have to
decide whether to repay states that de-
cided to reopen national parks during
the partial government shutdown, in-
cluding more than $360,000 paid by
Colorado to operate Rocky Mountain
National Park and pay its employees.
Interior Department lawyers said
Thursday that Congress failed to ex-
plicitly authorize reimbursement to
states, including Colorado.
"The funds were donated and we
can only reimburse the states if Con-
gress expressly directs us to do so
through legislation," said National
Park Service spokesman Mike Litterst,
in a statement.


Last week, Interior Secretary Sally
Jewell struck agreements with a hand-
ful of governors that allowed shuttered
national parks to reopen if states
shouldered the costs during the
shutdown.
Colorado Gov John Hickenlooper
wired the Interior Department
$367,700 Friday so furloughed federal
employees at Rocky Mountain
National Park could return to work
Saturday and Sunday
The Rocky Mountain National Park
area, including the town of Estes Park,
was hit particularly hard during the
early days of the 16-day government
shutdown.
The park and businesses in the town
were just starting to reopen and
rebuild after the devastation of the


September floods when the govern-
ment shutdown closed the park during
the fall color peak.
After Hickenlooper agreed to pay to
reopen it, more than 10,000 visitors
showed up last weekend.
Governors in South Dakota,
Utah, New York and Arizona struck
similar agreements with the Interior
Department
The $367,700 payment was the
amount of money it costs to run Rocky
Mountain National Park for 10 days,
according to the National Park Serv-
ice. Since the partial shutdown ended
before those 10 days were up, the state
will get some of that money back.
Colorado lawmakers say they will in-
troduce legislation to get the rest of the
money back.


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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 A19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Work TOGETHER


For the RECORD


67th ANNIVERSARY


Volunteers sought for gift shop
The Friends of the Community Center Inc. oper-
ates the Circle of Friends Gift Shop at the Citrus
County Resource Center in support of the Meals on
Wheels Program. The shop sells miscellaneous
giftware items, along with jewelry, watches and
some high-end gifts.
Volunteers are needed to run the gift shop from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. Volunteers are able to
participate in the Nature Coast Volunteer Center's
RSVP Program, where hours are logged, and are in-
vited to appreciation banquets for recognition of
service to Citrus County, in addition to other
benefits.
This volunteer opportunity is in a pleasant atmos-
phere in a busy building, where volunteers can
enjoy visiting with customers. For more information,
call 352-527-5975

Arbor Trail to collect again for CUB
Arbor Trail Rehab is having its fifth annual
canned-food drive for Thanksgiving, from Nov. 1
through Nov 20. Donations can be dropped off at
Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled Nursing Center, 611
Turner Camp Road, Inverness.
All donations will go to Citrus United Basket, an
organization that helps feed more than 25,000 indi-
viduals. Canned goods, boxed goods and such non-
perishable items are accepted.
For more information, call 352-637-1130.

EMS effort: Stock Up for Seniors
Nature Coast EMS is promoting the first Stock Up
for Seniors effort to support Citrus County seniors in
need.
A large percentage of seniors in Citrus County live
alone on a very limited income, with no support
from family members. During the month of October,
Nature Coast EMS asks everyone for support for
Stock Up for Seniors by picking up a few extra
things when shopping soap, toilet paper, deodor-
ant, denture cream, shampoo, incontinence pads, a
lap blanket, a pair of socks or a towel and washcloth,
for example.
Drop off items from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday during the month of October at
Nature Coast EMS on Homosassa Trail, the Citrus
County Chronicle in Crystal River or the Citrus
County Resource Center on Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto. Drop-off boxes are marked "Stock Up for
Seniors!" Special drop-off dates at area Walmart
stores and other locations will be announced.
The effort is being promoted by the Citrus County
Chronicle, Walmart stores, Citrus 95 and the Fox
96.7. For more information on how to help, call 352-
249-4730 or email katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org.


Sept. 30 to Oct. 6, 2013
Divorces
Charles K. Contopoulo,
Crystal River vs. Navia H.
Contopoulo, Homosassa
Marriages
Jeffery Daniel Allen,
Inverness/Teresa Ann Steely,
Hernando
Taylor Charles Johnson,
Lake Panasoffkee/Summer
Alexis Price, Inverness
Michael Scott Leffew,
Beverly Hills/Meghan Luray
Simmons, Beverly Hills
Christopher William
Ludlow, Hernando/Jessica
Anne Fernandez, Hernando
Donald Edward
Mabesoone, Homosassa/
Tina Deniece Williams,
Homosassa
Michael Joseph Major,
Hernando/Danielle Marie
Reed, Inverness
MarkAllen Miller,
Inverness/Kelly Nicole Key,
Inverness
Raul Ruvalcaba Montes,


Bares Jardins/ Lupita
Fernandez, Floral City
Brook Lee Mullen, Fort
Mitchell, Ala./Amber Ann
Thomas, Seale, Ala.
Mark Steven Petty, Crystal
River/Connie Lyn
Desaulniers, Homosassa
Samuel Mark Rosati,
Farmington/Julie Lynn
Tucker, Farmington
Norman Edward Shifflett
III, Homosassa/Ashley
Nichole Riffey, Homosassa
Keith Dorneil Townsend,
Citrus Springs/Angela Renee
Wilson, Citrus Springs
Willie Colin Wise,
Dunnellon/Sandra Louise
McLaughlin, Palatka
Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit
the website at www.clerk.
citrus. fl. us.


Get TOGETHER

Chorus seeks male singers

It's now time to leave the comfort of your shower,
garage, car, back porch, or riding lawnmower and
put your talent to work. The Citrus County Chapter
"Chorus of the Highlands" of the Barbershop
Harmony Society seeks men to join the group, which
has been in the area for more than 28 years.
The chorus meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Inverness. Although the ability to read music is an
asset, it's certainly not a priority.
Call 352-382-0336 for more information.

Entertainers sought for Fort Cooper
Fort Cooper State Park needs entertainers to
perform at the 16th annual Nights of Lights from
6:45 to 7:45 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and Sunday, Dec. 15.
The charity event benefits Citrus United Basket.
Individuals and groups of no more than 10 persons
are needed to perform Christmas-related music.
For more information and to volunteer, call
Ranger Dianne Drye at 352-726-0315.


Donald and Helen Sells
celebrated their 67th
wedding anniversary by
taking a trip on the
Amtrak Auto Train. They
then drove to Washington,
D.C. On their return trip
driving, they stopped in
Colonial Beach on the
Potomac River to spend
some time with Don's
94-year-old uncle. Don
and Helen have lived
52 years on the
Withlacoochee River,
where they raised their
four children: Julie
Fusco, Birmingham;
Donna Barnes, Wildwood;
Debbie Barnes, Coleman;
and Michael, who is de-
ceased. Don and Helen
are active members of


Hernando United
Methodist Church and
are blessed with nine
grandchildren, 18 great-
grandchildren and
1 great-great-grandchild,
plus many step-
grandchildren.


90th BIRTHDAY

Sara Snook


Sara Snook, wife of
Fred Snook of Sugarmill
Woods, celebrated her
90th birthday on Oct. 7,
2013. Her family from
various states feted her at
a dinner at Bon Appetit
Restaurant in Dunedin.
Among those present
were Fred's sister, who
will celebrate her 95th
birthday Oct. 24, and
Fred's brother, who will
be 92 on Nov 3.


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your news. anywhere, anytime.


The Sellses


A Nature Coastf .Mi


%Emfrscy Mefdkcm Servlice AjlT
servingg ilrh Escel.lenre and Coipisvlon"


Stock Up For Seniors
Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need

Purchase items on this list and help our Cais County seniors in need'
babywipes toilet paper powder lotions paper towels
denture Cream Polident/PoliWip tissues Incontinence pads
deodorant socks towel & wash cloth shampoo or dry shampoo
bars ofsoap throw blankets Non-perishable snack items tw m rd t ix t m ie
Collection Locations & Dates
Nature Coast EMS
387EWCountryTHIN Dr" Lecanto(behmid CrytaI GeI) A. REGIONS
Entire month of October Mon-fri Sam.-Spm On Hwy i in Homosassa
Citrus County Resource Center
28o4 W, Marc Knighton Cournl kealo
Entre month of October Mon4rl Bm-snprm .
Citmrus County Chronick Hwy 44 Inverness
1624 N Meadowcret BO. Crytal Rivewr by Wal. Mat
Entire month of Octolber Mon-fri Sm-Sprn
W/Maurt Homosassa Saturday Oceober 12 10am-2pm
WalMart BertyI Hllls Saturday October 19 10am-2pm
Walmart Inverness Friday October 2S 10am-2prm
OurC0 =*Stffort & Walmart ,"

Cup ^ iiW 3

Formoe nfrmtin cll35-29-73


A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


TOGETHER









SPORTS


* Georgia,
LSU, South
Carolina
and Texas
A&M fall in
SEC
stunners.
/B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 College football/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Golf/B3
0 Lottery, TV/B3
0 NFL/B4
0 Rec sports/B5
0 Baseball/B6
0 NHL/B6


Gators chomped by No. 14 Missouri


Missouri rolls up

500yards in

36-17 victory
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Mo. No James
Franklin, no problem for Missouri.
Maty Mauk threw for 295 yards
in his first career start and An-
drew Baggett converted five field
goals to help the No. 14 Tigers de-
feat No. 22 Florida 36-17 on Satur-
day and open a two-game lead in
the Southeastern Conference East
Division.
With Franklin watching on the
sideline in street clothes, Mauk
put any doubts to rest about
whether he was ready on the first
play of the game with a 41-yard
pass to EDamian Washington and
then a 20-yard toss to Bud Sasser


for a 7-0 lead just 22 seconds in.
Coach Gary Pinkel said Satur-
day was the toughest situation he's
ever had to put in a quarterback,
especially against a defense only
allowing 235.3 yards per game.
But the opening drive helped ease
the stress on Mauk, who said he
was determined to throw the ball
downfield on the opening play
"He looked like a seasoned vet-
eran out there," Pinkel said.
Missouri (7-0,3-0) outgained the
Gators 500-151 and became the
first conference opponent in 14
games to score at least 21 points
against them. The Tigers bullied
Florida (4-3, 3-2) at the line of
scrimmage, sacking quarterback
Tyler Murphy six times and flush-
ing him out of the pocket through-
out the game.
The Tigers knocked off their
second consecutive ranked oppo-
nent for the first time since 1973
and will face No. 11 South Car-
olina next week at home. The


Gamecocks lost at Tennessee
23-21 on Saturday
"This team is resilient, coming
back from where we were last
year," Washington said. "I told
Coach Pinkel, 'We've got to stop
talking bowl games around here.
Let's talk BCS, let's talk national
championships."'
Florida is off before facing
Georgia on Nov 2 in Jacksonville.
Mauk entered the game having
only thrown six passes this season,
but three of those came in the
final quarter of a 41-26 win at
Georgia last week after Franklin
suffered a shoulder injury that
will keep him out at least two
more games. Mauk completed 18
of 36 passes Saturday, including
three for 37 yards or more down
the sideline.
The 6-foot, 200-pound redshirt
freshman capped the scoring with
6:30 remaining on a 17-yard
See Page B3


Associated Press
Missouri running back Henry Josey runs past Florida's Neiron Ball
during the first quarter Saturday in Columbia, Mo. The Tigers
remained undefeated with a 36-17 win over the Gators.


5


r


II


Associated Press
Florida State wide receiver Rashad Greene runs for a touchdown Saturday night as Clemson cornerback Darius
Robinson chases during the first half in Clemson, S.C. The No. 5 Seminoles crushed the No. 3 Tigers 51-14.

FSUdominates Clemson in ACC top-five showdown 51-14


Associated Press
CLEMSON, S.C. -Jameis Win-
ston threw for 444 yards and three
touchdowns and No. 5 Florida
State crushed No. 3 Clemson 51-14
Saturday night, making statement
that should be heard from
Alabama to Oregon.
The Atlantic Coast Conference's


game of the year, billed as maybe
the league's biggest game ever,
quickly became a Seminoles' sem-
inar on how to take apart a top-five
opponent on its hostile home turf.
Winston was 22 for 34 for
Florida State (6-0, 4-0 ACC). His
first throw was a 22-yard touch-
down to Kelvin Benjamin, and he
scrambled for a 4-yard touchdown


that made it 41-7 with 4:04 left in
the third quarter
Tajh Boyd threw two intercep-
tions for Clemson, and his first-
quarter fumble was returned 37
yards for a touchdown by Mario
Edwards. Clemson (6-1,4-1) turned
it over a season-high four times,
including on the first play from
scrimmage.


Bucs, Falcons


look to end


losing streaks

Associated Press
ATLANTA Few others are sending positive
comments their way these days, so the Falcons
and Buccaneers traded compliments this week.
The bottom teams in the NFC South have com-
bined for only one win entering Sunday's game.
The Falcons (1-4) have taken a painful fall from
their 13-3 2012 season which ended in the NFC
championship
game. The Buc- Tampa Bay
cancers (0-5) are
one of three Buccaneers (0-5) at
winless teams in Atlanta Falcons (14)
the NFL and al-
ready have U Time: 1p.m. today
made a quarter- 0 TV: FOX
back change,
placing hopes for a turnaround on rookie Mike
Glennon.
Atlanta defensive coordinator Mike Nolan
says Glennon has the same poise as Falcons
quarterback Matt Ryan in Ryan's 2008 rookie
season. That's high praise from a Falcons coach.
"I think he's good," Nolan said of Glennon. "He
does look like a young Matt Ryan to me. He
stands in the pocket like Matt. He delivers the
ball like Matt.
"I think they've got a keeper"
Tampa Bay turned to Glennon, the third-round
pick from North Carolina State, after releasing
Josh Freeman on Oct 3. The Buccaneers imme-
diately gave Glennon a heavy load. Glennon's 86
pass attempts are the second most in in a quar-
terback's first two games in NFL history The
Raiders' Todd Marinovich threw 99 passes in his
first two games in 1991-92.
Marinovich lasted only two years in the league.
The Buccaneers are counting on Glennon to
have a much longer stay
Offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan said
Glennon has "ability to move and an accuracy,
and there's an upside as far as the physical tools,
the attributes you want in a quarterback."
Sullivan said Glennon is "mature beyond his
years."
"He is very focused, there is a steadiness about
him, he doesn't get rattled if it goes bad," Sullivan
said. "... I think he has all the qualities of what
we're going to want in a quarterback here."
The Falcons are trying to end the first three-
game losing streak in coach Mike Smith's six sea-
sons. Julio Jones was the NFEs leading receiver
when his season ended with a foot injury in a 30-
28 loss to the Jets on Oct 7.
Wide receiver Roddy White (hamstring, ankle)
and running back Steven Jackson (hamstring)
were ruled out on Friday White's streak of play-
ing in 133 consecutive regular-season games will
end as he will miss a game for the first time in
nine seasons.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vols top No. 11 Gamecocks on final play


Stanford hands

UCLA first loss

Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -Michael
Palardy made a 19-yard field goal
as time expired Saturday to give
Tennessee a 23-21 victory over
No. 11 South Carolina that ended
the Volunteers' 19-game losing
streak against ranked opponents.
South Carolina quarterback
Connor Shaw left the game after
being sacked by Marlon Walls and
Daniel McCullers with less than
five minutes remaining. Team of-
ficials appeared to be looking at
his left knee while he was on the
sideline.
Tennessee got into field-goal
range on a spectacular 39-yard
catch by freshman Marquez
North. Four consecutive runs by
Marlin Lane got the Vols to the
South Carolina 2 and set up the
field goal.
Tennessee (4-3,1-2 SEC) hadn't
beaten a ranked foe since a 31-13
victory over No. 21 South Carolina
on Oct 31,2009. The Vols also had
lost 16 of their last 18 SEC games.
South Carolina (5-2, 3-2) had a
four-game winning streak
snapped.
No. 4 Ohio St. 34,
Iowa 24
COLUMBUS, Ohio Carlos Hyde
ran for 149 yards, including 106 yards
and two touchdowns in the second
half, to lead No. 4 Ohio State to a
34-24 victory over Iowa.
It was the Buckeyes' 19th consecu-
tive victory, the most in the nation and
tying the second-best streak in school
history.
But it didn't come easy. The
Hawkeyes (4-3,1-2 Big Ten) domi-
nated offensively in the first half and
led 21-14 at the break behind the
passing of Jake Rudock and running
of Mark Weisman and Damon Bullock.
Hyde tied it with the first rushing TD
against Iowa this season on Ohio
State's first drive of the third quarter,
and the Buckeyes took over.
No. 13 Stanford 24,
No. 9 UCLA 10
STANFORD, Calif. -Tyler


Associated Press
Tennessee running back Marlin Lane leans for yardage after a catch as he's tackled by South Carolina
safety Chris Moody in the fourth quarter Saturday in Knoxville, Tenn. The play set up the game-winning
field goal by Michael Palary to give Tennessee a 23-21 victory.


Gaffney ran for 171 yards and two
touchdowns, and No. 13 Stanford
smothered Brett Hundley and ninth-
ranked UCLA 24-10.
Kevin Hogan threw for 227 yards
and a spectacular touchdown to
Kodi Whitfield as the Cardinal (6-1,
4-1) regrouped again after losing at
Utah last week. Stanford has not lost
consecutive games since October
2009.
Stanford hurried Hundley all after-
noon to slow down UCLA's up-
tempo offense.
Hundley completed 24 of 39
passes for 192 yards, one touch-
down and two interceptions to Jor-
dan Richards the second with a
little more than 2 minutes remaining
to seal Stanford's victory. UCLA (5-1,
2-1) has not started 6-0 since 2005.
No. 12 Baylor 71,
Iowa State 7
WACO, Texas Bryce Petty
threw for 343 yards and two touch-


downs, Antwan Goodley had 182
yards receiving and two scores, and
No. 12 Baylor tied a school record
with its 10th straight win, beating
Iowa State 71-7.
The Bears, who came in averag-
ing 70.5 points in four home games
but were slowed in a come-from-
behind win at Kansas State last
week, led 37-0 at halftime and nar-
rowly missed its first shutout win in
the Big 12.
Baylor (6-0, 3-0 Big 12) matched
its 10-game winning streak from
1936-37.
Iowa State (1-5, 0-3) was without
quarterback Sam Richardson while
Baylor pulled away in the second
quarter. The Cyclones had nine first
downs and three turnovers.
The Cyclones scored with 47 with
seconds left on a 27-yard pass from
Grant Rohach to DeVondrick Nealy.
Corey Coleman returned the ensu-
ing kickoff 97 yards to give Baylor its
fourth 70-point game this season.


No. 18 Oklahoma 34,
Kansas 19
LAWRENCE, Kan. Blake Bell
threw for 131 yards and two touch-
downs, and No. 18 Oklahoma finally
awoke from its Red River rout hang-
over to beat lowly Kansas 34-19.
The Sooners (6-1,3-1 Big 12),
whose national championship aspira-
tions were cast aside by Texas last
weekend, stumbled through the first
quarter and found themselves in a
13-0 hole.
But behind Bell's steady play, a
stingy pass defense and a 49-yard
touchdown toss from wide receiver
Lacoltan Bester to Sterling Shepard
on an end-around play, the Sooners
scored 25 straight points on their way
to winning their ninth straight over the
Jayhawks.
James Sims ran for 129 yards and
two touchdowns for Kansas (2-4, 0-3),
but he didn't have much help. Jake
Heaps wasjust 5 of 13 for 16 yards
passing, the fewest yards through the


air for Kansas since throwing for 15
yards in a loss to Nebraska in 2010.
No. 16 Texas Tech 37,
West Virginia 27
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Davis
Webb threw two touchdown passes
and No. 16 Texas Tech scored 21
unanswered points in the second
half to beat West Virginia 37-27.
In his first road start, Webb com-
pleted 36 of 50 passes for 462 yards.
He became the first Red Raiders
freshman to surpass 400 yards
passing in each of his first two starts.
Texas Tech's Ryan Bustin kicked
three field goals and Kenny Williams
had a pair of 1-yard touchdown runs,
including the go-ahead score with
9:20 left in the game.
The Red Raiders (7-0,4-0 Big 12)
moved into sole possession of first
place in the conference.
Dreamius Smith ran for two touch-
downs for the Mountaineers (3-4,
1-3), who led 27-16 but punted on
four straight possessions in the sec-
ond half to let Texas Tech take over.
No.21 Oklahoma St. 24,
TCU 10
STILLWATER, Okla. Clint Chelf
completed 10 of 25 passes for 178
yards and an interception and No. 21
Oklahoma State used a quarterback
change to earn a 24-10 win over
TCU.
Josh Stewart added 10 catches for
141 yards and had a 95-yard punt re-
turn for a touchdown, giving the Cow-
boys (5-1,2-1 Big 12 Conference)
enough offense to celebrate a home-
coming victory.
Chelf replaced J.W. Walsh at quar-
terback after the sophomore threw his
second interception of the first half, an
ill-advised throw into the middle of the
end zone. Walsh finished 9-of-18 for
115 yards and two interceptions.
TCU (3-4,1-3) also switched quar-
terbacks in the second quarter after
falling behind 17-0, but it didn't help
as the Horned Frogs struggled in their
second trip to Stillwater in as many
years.
Starter Trevone Boykin returned to
quarterback in the second half, com-
pleting 17 of 35 passes for 188 yards
and three interceptions. However,
TCU couldn't get any closer after get-
ting within 17-10 with 7:39 remaining.


Vanderbilt rallies, upsets No. 15


Auburn beats

up Manziel

defeats A 'M

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Jerron Seymour ran for a
13-yard touchdown with
2:53 left, and Vanderbilt
rallied from a 13-point
deficit by scoring 17 unan-
swered points in the fourth
quarter Saturday to upset
No. 15 Georgia 31-27.
The Commodores (4-3,
1-3) got their first South-
eastern Conference win
this season and their first
victory over Georgia in
Nashville since 1991. They
also snapped a six-game
skid to the Bulldogs.
Georgia (4-3, 3-2) lost its
second straight after fail-
ing to hold a 27-14 lead.
Brendan Douglas fumbled
after a catch with 1:59 left,
and Aaron Murray was in-
tercepted on the final play
Torren McGaster started
the comeback by recover-
ing a fumbled punt late in
the third quarter Backup
quarterback Patton Robi-
nette ran for a 2-yard TD,
and Carey Spear kicked a
40-yard field goal. Seymour
put Vandy ahead a play
after Georgia punter Collin
Barber could only fall on a
high snap at his own 13.
No. 1 Alabama 52,
Arkansas 0
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -AJ
McCarron threw three touch-
down passes and Kenyan
Drake rushed for 104 yards
and two scores to lead No. 1
Alabama to a 52-0 victory over
Arkansas.
The Crimson Tide (7-0, 4-0
Southeastern Conference)
rolled to a 28-0 halftime lead
and easily avoided catching the
upset bug that struck other
SEC powers. Alabama has
won by the same margin over
Arkansas two years running.
The Razorbacks (3-5, 0-4)
have dropped five straight
games and were coming off a
52-7 loss to No. 11 South
Carolina.


Associat
Georgia's Reggie Davis (81) fumbles a punt as he is hit by Vanderbilt defenders Darrius Sims (6) and Ja
Mclntosh, right, in the first quarter Saturday in Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt scored 17 unanswered points in theft
quarter for the 31-27 upset of the 15th-ranked Bulldogs.


Drake needed just eight car-
ries to reach 100 yards for the
second straight week. T.J. Yel-
don had 88 yards and a touch-
down on 12 carries.
McCarron was 15-of-21
passing for 180 yards in three
quarters, including touchdowns
of 4, 30 and 17 yards.
Arkansas' Brandon Allen
completed 7 of 25 passes for
91 yards with two interceptions.
Mississippi 27,
No. 6 LSU 24
OXFORD, Miss. -Andrew
Ritter made a 41-yard field
goal with 2 seconds remaining
to lead Mississippi to a 27-24
victory over No. 6 LSU.
Ole Miss (4-3, 2-3 South-
eastern Conference) led by as
many 17 points lead and was
ahead nearly the entire game
until late in the fourth quarter


when LSU's Zach Metten-
berger hit Jarvis Landry for a
4-yard touchdown to tie it at
24 with 3:19 remaining.
But the Rebels responded
with a methodical drive that
ended in Ritter's field goal.
LSU joined Georgia, Texas
A&M, Florida and South Car-
olina as ranked SEC teams to
lose Saturday.
Bo Wallace completed 30 of
39 passes for 346 yards and
Jaylen Walton rushed for 105
yards and two touchdowns for
the Rebels, who snapped a
three-game losing streak.
LSU (6-2, 3-2) nearly pulled
off the comeback, but couldn't
overcome a rough game by
Mettenberger, who threw
three crucial interceptions.
The winning field goal was
redemption for Ritter, who had
a 29-yard attempt blocked


earlier in the fourth quarter.
No. 24 Auburn 45,
No. 7 Texas A&M 41
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
- Nick Marshall accounted for
four scores and No. 24 Auburn
battered Johnny Manziel in a
4541 win over No. 7 Texas
A&M.
Tre Mason's 5-yard score
with less than two minutes to
play was first ruled down at the
1, but it was reviewed and ruled
a touchdown.
A&M (5-2,2-2 SEC) had a
last chance, but Manziel was
sacked by Dee Ford on fourth
down to secure the win.
Manziel threw for 454 yards
and four touchdowns and ran
for a fifth score, but also had two
interceptions and missed a se-
ries in the fourth quarter with an
apparent injury to his right arm


or shoulder before returnii
Marshall threw for 236
and two touchdowns and
100 yards and two more s
forAubum (6-1, 3-1), which
63-21 to the Aggies last s
Arizona St. 5
No. 20 Wash.
TEMPE, Ariz. Taylo
accounted for 352 yards
four touchdowns, Marion
scored three times and A
State's defense bottled up
Washington's Bishop Sar
in a 53-24 win over the
20th-ranked Huskies.
Arizona State (5-2, 3-1
12) has struggled against
run the past two seasons
Sankey entered the game
the nation's leading rushed
nearly 150 yards per gan
The Sun Devils limited
Sankey to 22 yards.


Georgia

-01 No. 23 N. Illinois 31,
Central Michigan 17
MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich.
Jordan Lynch rushed for
316 yards, an FBS record for a
quarterback, and No. 23
SNorthern Illinois stayed un-
beaten with a 31-17 victory at
Central Michigan.
He broke the rushing record
S held by former Northern Illinois
quarterback Stacey Robinson,
who had 308 against Fresno
State on Oct. 6,1990.
Wisconsin 56,
Illinois 32
CHAMPAIGN, III. Melvin
Gordon rushed for 142 yards
and three touchdowns to lead
No. 25 Wisconsin to a 56-32
rout of Illinois.
Gordon topped 1,000 yards
for the season on a 13-yard
touchdown run in the third
quarter that put the Badgers
(5-2, 3-1 Big Ten) up 42-17.
He finished the chilly, 40-de-
gree night with 1,012 yards
for the season.
Gordon's touchdown
capped the second of two
bruising, third-quarter drives
that put Illinois away. Running
back James White finished
the first with a 2-yard touch-
down pass from Joel Stave.
ed Press Before the drives, Illinois
fourth (3-3, 0-2) found ways to claw
back from an early 21-0 deficit
and trailed 28-17 at halftime.
ing. Notre Dame 14,
yards
ran for USC 10
scores SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
;h lost Tommy Rees threw two
eason. touchdowns before leaving
3, the game with an injury and
S Notre Dame snapped a five-
24 game home losing streak to
r Kelly USC with a 14-10 victory.
and Rees was 14 of 21 passing
Grice for 166 yards with TD throws
rizona to Troy Niklas and TJ Jones in
p the first half. Rees left the
ikey game when he was sacked
by USC linebacker Lamar
Dawson in the third quarter
Pac- and didn't return.
t the The Irish (5-2) beat the Tro-
3 and jans (4-3) for the third time in
e as the past four games, after los-
er at ing the previous eight straight,
ie. and won the rivalry game at
home for the first time since
2001.


B2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Citrus 54, Lecanto 6
Citrus 20 28 6 0-54
Lecanto 0 6 0 0-6
Scoring Summary
First Quarter
CHS-D. Franklin 97 punt return (J. Marsden
kick), 8:58
CHS-S. Franklin 40 pass from D. Moore (kick
failed), 6:20
CHS-J. Juse 18 pass from Moore (Marsden
kick), 3:11
Second Quarter
CHS-J. Pouncey 8 run (T. Washington run),
11:00
CHS-D. Franklin 26 pass from Moore (Marsden
kick), 10:10
LHS-J. Nightengale 2 run (kick failed), 4:17
CHS-Pouncey 33 run (kick failed), 3:41
CHS-Pouncey 5 run (T. Beagen kick), 0:46
Third Quarter
CHS-Pouncey 27 run (kick fail), 5:49
Individual Statistics
Rushing-CHS: Pouncey 9-106-4; J. Clark 7-105-
0; Washington 9-58-0. LHS: Anderson 9-(-3)-0;
Nightengale 3-(-3)-1.
Passing-CHS: Moore 6-11-0-59. LHS:T. McGee
11-25-1-146.
Receiving-CHS: S. Franklin 2-73-1; D. Franklin
2-30-1; Juse 1-18-1. LHS: M. McKibben 6-81-0; J.
Lucas 3-59-0.
Interceptions-CHS: G.Wilcox.
Fumble Recoveries-CHS: N. Waters. LHS:
Nightengale.
Sacks-CHS: P. Terrasi; N. Waters. LHS:
A. Anderson.



No. 14 Missouri 36,
No. 22 Florida 17
Florida 3 014 0- 17
Missouri 10 310 13- 36
First Quarter
Mo-Sasser 20 pass from Mauk (Baggett kick),
14:38.
Fla-FGVelez 23, 11:09.
Mo-FG Baggett 43, :31.
Second Quarter
Mo-FG Baggett 19, 7:55.
Third Quarter
Fla-Patton 100 kickoff return (Velez kick), 14:48.
Mo-Josey 6 run (Baggett kick), 13:24.
Mo-FG Baggett 39, 6:40.
Fla-Kel.Taylor 20 run (Velez kick), :46.
Fourth Quarter
Mo-FG Baggett 33, 13:32.
Mo-FG Baggett 28, 8:04.
Mo-Mauk 17 run (Baggett kick), 6:30.
A-67,124.
Fla Mo
First downs 11 24
Rushes-yards 31-59 37-205
Passing 92 295
Comp-Att-lnt 15-29-1 18-36-1
Return Yards 66 (-4)
Punts-Avg. 8-45.6 5-40.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-1
Penalties-Yards 8-59 7-50
Time of Possession 29:18 30:42
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, Kel.Taylor 12-74, M.Brown 8-
19, Patton 1-17,
Team 1-(minus 1), T.Burton 1-(minus 5), Murphy 8-
(minus 45). Missouri,
Josey 18-136, Hansbrough 12-47, Mauk 6-15, Mur-
phy 1-7.
PASSING-Florida, Murphy 15-29-1-92. Missouri,
Mauk 18-36-1-295.
RECEIVING-Florida, Patton 6-46, T.Burton 3-26,
Showers 2-11,
Fulwood 1-7, Herndon 1-4, M.Brown 1-0, Dunbar 1-
(minus 2). Missouri,
Lucas 6-57, Washington 3-84, J.Hunt 3-69, Green-
Beckham 3-52,
Murphy 2-13, Sasser 1-20.
College football scores
EAST
Albright30, Wilkes 12
Alfred 49, Hartwick 28
American International 42, Bentley 14
Assumption 17, S. Connecticut 7
Bethany (WV) 27, Waynesburg 20
Bloomsburg 52, East Stroudsburg 38
Bridgewater (Mass.) 56, Plymouth St. 28
Brockport 49, Cortland St 32
Bucknell 17, Dartmouth 14
Buffalo 32, UMass 3
Buffalo St. 60, Frostburg St. 28
CW Post 58, Pace 0
California (Pa.) 33, Seton Hill 7
Coast Guard 40, Maine Maritime 0
Colby 37, Hamilton 18
Colgate 28, Holy Cross 24
College of NJ 21, Morrisville St. 20
Duquesne 21, Robert Morris 20
Edinboro 36, Indiana (Pa.) 30
Fordham 52, Yale 31
Gallaudet 38, Castleton St. 12
Geneva 34, St. Vincent 23
Harvard 35, Lafayette 16
Husson 19, Becker 18
Ithaca 26, Utica 21
Juniata 28, Ursinus 7
King's (Pa.) 31, Stevenson 24
Lehigh 45, Georgetown 24
Maine 34, William & Mary 20
Mass.-Dartmouth 34, Worcester St. 33
Merchant Marine at Springfield, ppd.
Merrimack 51, St. Anselm 9
Middlebury 28, Bates 17
Monmouth (NJ) 48, Cornell 23
Mount Ida 56, Anna Maria 34
Muhlenberg 35, Gettysburg 10
New Hampshire 29, Villanova 28
Norwich 42, NY Maritime 21
Penn 21, Columbia 7
Pittsburgh 35, Old Dominion 24
Princeton 39, Brown 17
Rhode Island 12, Richmond 10
Rochester 37, RPI 31
Rowan 24, Wesley 17
Sacred Heart 56, Bryant 28
Salisbury 42, St. John Fisher 35
Shippensburg 55, Kutztown 30
Slippery Rock 34, Clarion 13
Stonehill 29, New Haven 26
Susquehanna 27, Moravian 17
Temple 33, Army 14
Texas Tech 37, West Virginia 27
Thomas More 42, Thiel 21
Towson 44, Albany (NY) 17
Trinity (Conn.) 40, Bowdoin 21
W. Connecticut 70, Fitchburg St. 14
W. New England 33, Union (NY) 30
Washington & Jefferson 38, Westminster (Pa.) 6
Wesleyan (Conn.) 20, Amherst 14
West Chester 34, Lock Haven 13
Westfield St. 37, Mass. Maritime 27
Widener 38, Misericordia 20
William Paterson 21, Kean 20
Williams 49, Tufts 35
SOUTH
Alabama 52, Arkansas 0
Albany St. (Ga.) 42, Morehouse 20
Benedict 34, Clark Atlanta 0
Bethune-Cookman 48, Savannah St. 21
Carson-Newman 45, Tusculum 17
Catholic 37, Shenandoah 7
Central St. (Ohio) 37, Lane 34
Centre 34, Sewanee 17


Charleston (WV) 31, W.Virginia St. 10
Chattanooga 20, Elon 9
Coastal Carolina 55, Liberty 52, 20T
Concord 49, WV Wesleyan 21
Cumberlands 38, Georgetown (Ky.) 35
Delaware St. 12, NC A&T 7
Delta St. 38, Tarleton St. 36
Duke 35, Virginia 22
E. Kentucky 24, Tennessee Tech 10
East Carolina 55, Southern Miss. 14
Elizabeth City St. 56, Lincoln (Pa.) 14
Faulkner 44, Cumberland (Tenn.) 7
Fayetteville St. 35, Johnson C. Smith 26
Ferrum 42, Averett 20
Florida Tech 28, Shorter 24
Franklin & Marshall 28, McDaniel 9
Furman 27, Appalachian St. 10
Georgia Tech 56, Syracuse 0
Glenville St. 49, Virginia-Wise 7
Grambling St. at Jackson St., ppd.
Greensboro 44, NC Wesleyan 42
Guilford 21, Bridgewater (Va.) 14
Hampden-Sydney 33, Emory & Henry 12
Hampton 27, Norfolk St. 17
Howard 21, Florida A&M 10
Jacksonville 52, Campbell 45


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 B3


For the rfcoWd



F= lorid LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
9-33-54-56-57
POWER BALL
5


CASH 3 (early)
8-0-9
CASH 3 (late)
5-0-5

PLAY 4 (early)
8-6-7-1
PLAY 4 (late)
8-6-1-4

FANTASY 5
2-17-26-27-32

LOTTERY
2-3-15-39-44-49
XTRA
4


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 21 23 26 38
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $4,249.50
3-of-4 MB 42 $442.50
3-of-4 839 $66
2-of-4 MB 1,180 $33
1-of-4 MB 10,082 $4
2-of-4 26,192 $2


Fantasy 5:12 -16 -17 -22 -25
5-of-5 2 winners $110,079.29
4-of-5 331 $107
3-of-5 10,019 $9.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Camping World RV Sales 500
1 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Camping World RV Sales 500
(same-day tape)
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Pro Mazda Series (taped)
3:30 a.m. (FS1) FIA World Endurance Championship: Austin (taped)
BASEBALL
2 p.m. (MLB) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 6 (taped)
7 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 7 (If nec.)
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (NBA) Euroleague Basketball (taped)
6 p.m. (NBA) Boston Celtics vs. Minnesota Timberwolves
BOATING
12 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing (taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Missouri (taped)
12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at Mississippi (taped)
5 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Stanford (taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida State at Clemson (taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Clemson (taped)
9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Arkansas at Alabama (taped)
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Oregon State at California (taped)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Buffalo Bills at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Atlanta Falcons
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Denver Broncos at Indianapolis Colts
GOLF
11 a.m. (GOLF) LPGATour KEB HanaBank Championship, Final
Round (same-day tape)
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Greater Hickory Classic, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, Final Round
NHL HOCKEY
4 p.m. (NHL) Toronto Maple Leafs at Chicago Blackhawks (taped)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League (taped)
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Aston Villa FC vs
Tottenham Hotspur FC
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Syracuse at North Carolina State
1 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Deportivo Toluca FC vs
Club Tijuana
1 p.m. (SUN) Women's College: LSU at Florida
1:30 p.m. (NBC) Women's Intemrnational Friendly: United States vs. Australia
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Wake Forest at Clemson
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: Texas A&M at Georgia
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: San Jose Earthquakes at Los Angeles Galaxy
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League (taped)
TENNIS
5 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Kremlin Cup, Final
3 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP IF Stockholm Open, Final (same-day tape)
8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Kremlin Cup, Final (same-day tape)
10 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA BGL BNP Paribas Luxembourg Open, Final
(same-day tape)
VOLLEYBALL
3 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M atAuburn

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


LaGrange 44, Huntingdon 40
Lenoir-Rhyne 35, Newberry 14
Marist42, Davidson 14
Mars Hill 34, North Greenville 31
Maryville (Tenn.) 30, Christopher Newport 17
Mercer 54, Carnegie-Mellon 21
Miles 40, Kentucky St. 17
Millersville 30, Cheyney 12
Millsaps 28, Birmingham-Southern 14
Mississippi 27, LSU 24
Mississippi College 41, Howard Payne 38
Morgan St. 34, NC Central 22
Murray St. 31, Austin Peay 3
North Texas 28, Louisiana Tech 13
Pikeville 35, Bethel (Tenn.) 24
Point (Ga.)31,Webber 13
Presbyterian 49, VMI 35
Quincy 80, Kentucky Wesleyan 26
Randolph-Macon 27, Washington & Lee 21
Reinhardt 49, Belhaven 17
S. Virginia 34, Apprentice 7
SE Louisiana 37, Northwestern St. 22
SMU 34, Memphis 29
Shaw 45, Livingstone 21
Shepherd 57, Notre Dame Coll. 17
South Alabama 38, Kent St. 21
Tennessee 23, South Carolina 21
Tennessee St. 29, UT-Martin 15
Tiffin 60, S. Dakota Tech 21
Tuskegee 35, Stillman 7
UNC-Pembroke 34, Catawba 31
Union (Ky.) 45, Bluefield South 35
Urbana 32, West Liberty 13
Valdosta St. 35, West Georgia 30
Vanderbilt 31, Georgia 27
Virginia St. 47, Bowie St. 44
Virginia Union 24, Chowan 14
Wake Forest 34, Maryland 10
Wingate 43, Brevard 24
Winston-Salem 35, St. Augustine's 17
Wofford 21, W. Carolina 17
MIDWEST
Adrian 14, Trine 9
Akron 24, Miami (Ohio) 17
Albion 31, Kalamazoo 21
Ashland 14, Walsh 6
Augsburg 41, St. Olaf 17
Augustana (11.)47, Millikin 19
Augustana (SD) 35, Upper Iowa 6
Avila 30, Graceland (Iowa) 24, OT
Baker 46, Cent. Methodist 12


Baldwin-Wallace 54, Wilmington (Ohio) 7
Ball St. 38, W. Michigan 17
Benedictine (III.) 30, Rockford 13
Benedictine (Kan.) 45, Mid-Am Nazarene 40
Bethel (Minn.) 28, St. Thomas (Minn.) 21
Briar Cliff 37, Dakota St. 31
Butler 24, Drake 14
Central 23, Buena Vista 13
Chadron St. 43, Black Hills St 13
Chicago 26, Macalester 7
Cincinnati 41, UConn 16
Concordia (Moor.) 63, Hamline 7
Concordia (Wis.) 48, Concordia (III.) 42
Cornell (Iowa) 45, Knox 14
Dayton 45, San Diego 38, 20T
DePauw 23, Ohio Wesleyan 20
Dubuque 38, Coe 14
E. Illinois 55, SE Missouri 33
Emporia St. 52, Lindenwood (Mo.) 21
Eureka 23, Mac Murray 15
Fort Hays St. 56, SW Baptist 14
Franklin 67, Anderson (Ind.) 7
Grand Valley St. 48, N. Michigan 17
Grand View 47, Trinity (III.) 14
Greenville 37, Northwestern (Minn.) 23
Gustavus 42, Valley City St. 21
Hanover 41, Bluffton 0
Heidelberg 35, Otterbein 17
Hillsdale 45, Ferris St 38
Hope 43, Alma 23
Illinois College 37, Beloit 7
Illinois St. 55, Indiana St. 14
Illinois Wesleyan 31, Carthage 10
Indianapolis 56, William Jewell 3
Iowa Wesleyan 23, Westminster (Mo.) 14
John Carroll 41, Muskingum 9
Kansas Wesleyan 34, Bethany (Kan.) 20
Lake Forest 17, Monmouth (III.) 14
Lakeland 55, Maranatha Baptist 14
Malone 55, Lake Erie 50
Manchester 42, Earlham 13
Marian (Ind.) 31, William Penn 21
Mayville St. 35, Trinity Bible 0
Michigan 63, Indiana 47
Michigan St. 14, Purdue 0
Michigan Tech 33, Northwood (Mich.) 31
Midland 61, Hastings 35
Minn. Duluth 52, Minot St. 0
Minn. St.-Mankato 52, SW Minnesota St. 27
Minn.-Crookston 20, Minn. St.-Moorhead 14
Minnesota 20, Northwestern 17


I GOLF BRIEFS I


Simpson maintains
4-shot lead in Vegas
LAS VEGAS Webb Simpson
maintained a four-stroke lead Sat-
urday in the Shriners Hospitals for
Children Open, birdieing four of
the last seven holes at TPC Sum-
merlin
Making his first start since help-
ing the U.S. win the Presidents
Cup, the 2012 U.S. Open cham-
pion shot a 4-under 67 to reach 19
under. He opened with rounds of
64 and 63.
Chesson Hadley was second
after a 67.
Jeff Overton was third at 14
under after a 68.

Langer leads Greater
Hickory Classic
CONOVER, N.C.- Bernhard
Langer overcame a bad start Satur-
day to take a two-stroke lead after
the second round of the Champi-
ons Tour's Greater Hickory Classic.
Second behind Kenny Perry in
the Charles Schwab Cup stand-
ings, Langer bogeyed the first two
holes on the reconfigured Rock
Barn layout, then made six birdies
for a 4-under 66.
The German star had a 10-under
130 total.




CHOMPED
Continued from Page Bl


scramble, prompting the 67,124
in attendance to perform the
"Gator Chomp."
"Backup quarterback?," center
Evan Boehm asked. "Maty would
be starting anywhere else."
Mauk also made a few ill-ad-
vised throws, as Brian Poole in-
tercepted a pass with 3:34 left in
the first half and almost had an-
other in the same quarter but
dropped it
Murphy completed 15-of-29
passes for 92 yards and an inter-
ception for the Gators as he tried
to escape Missouri's defensive
line all game. Freshman Kelvin
Taylor, son of former National
Football League running back
Fred Taylor, ran for 74 yards on 12
carries in his fifth career game.
Murphy thought he had time
on some of his missed throws de-
spite absorbing three sacks from
SEC-leader Michael Sam and
one apiece from Kony Ealy, Matt
Hoch and Shane Ray
"They did a good job covering,
but we're got to find ways to make
plays," Murphy said. "I have to
find ways to get guys the ball."
The Gators only gained 61
yards in the first half- including
nine rushing -but used six runs
to drive 70 yards and pull within
23-17 with 46 seconds left in the


Missouri 36, Florida 17
Missouri S&T 14, St. Joseph's (Ind.) 13
Missouri St. 35, S. Dakota St. 21
MissouriValley 31, Evangel 14
Missouri Western 55, Missouri Southern 21
Morehead St. 42, Valparaiso 28
Morningside 62, Dakota Wesleyan 27
Mount St. Joseph 44, Defiance 31
Mount Union 58, Capital 3
N. Dakota St. 31, S. Illinois 10
N. Illinois 38, Cent. Michigan 17
NW Missouri St. 24, Pittsburg St. 15
Nebraska Wesleyan 28, Dordt 0
Nebraska-Kearney 24, Lincoln (Mo.) 14
North Central (III.) 42, North Park 0
Northern St. (SD) 27, Bemidji St. 0
Northwestern (Iowa) 30, Concordia (Neb.) 28
Notre Dame 14, Southern Cal 10
Oberlin 24, Allegheny 0
Ohio 56, E. Michigan 28
Ohio Northern 45, Marietta 0
Ohio St. 34, Iowa 24
Oklahoma 34, Kansas 19
Peru St. 31, Culver-Stockton 28
Ripon 33, Grinnell 27, OT
Robert Morris-Chicago 42, Taylor 37
Sacramento St. 31, North Dakota 7
Saginaw Valley St. 14, Wayne (Mich.) 10
Siena Heights 44, Concordia (Mich.) 3
Simpson (Iowa) 27, Loras 10
Sioux Falls 47, Concordia (St.R) 7
South Dakota 38, N. Iowa 31, 20T
Southwestern (Kan.) 86, Bethel (Kan.) 36
St. Ambrose 38, Olivet Nazarene 13
St. Cloud St. 20, Mary 13
St. Francis (Ind.) 37, St. Francis (III.) 28
St. John's (Minn.) 23, Carleton 13
St. Mary (Kan.) 14, McPherson 3
St. Norbert 17, Lawrence 6
St. Scholastica 48, Martin Luther 14
St. Xavier 37, Waldorf 21
Sterling 30, Ottawa, Kan. 16
Tabor 20, Friends 19
Toledo 45, Navy 44, 20T
Truman St. 28, McKendree 21
Wabash 48, Kenyon 7
Wartburg 24, Luther 21
Wheaton (111.) 28, Elmhurst 3
Winona St. 45, Wayne (Neb.) 41
Wis. Lutheran 21, Aurora 13
Wis.-LaCrosse 21, Wis.-Stout3
Wis.-Oshkosh 41, Wis.-River Falls 13
Wis.-Platteville 24, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 23
Wisconsin 56, Illinois 32
Wittenberg 66, Wooster 39
Youngstown St. 24, W. Illinois 14
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 40, Incarnate Word 6
Alcorn St. 20, Texas Southern 13
Ark.-Monticello 41, Lindenwood (III.) 27
Auburn 45, Texas A&M 41
Austin 27, SW Assemblies of God 17
BYU 47, Houston 46


Bacone 47, Okla. Panhandle St. 9
Baylor 71, Iowa St 7
Cent. Arkansas 26, Lamar 24
Cent. Missouri 48, Cent. Oklahoma 16
E. New Mexico 35, Northeastern St. 14
East Central 64, NW Oklahoma St. 14
Hardin-Simmons 55, E. Texas Baptist 17
Harding 36, Ouachita 33
Henderson St. 45, Arkansas Tech 14
Hendrix 30, Berry 17
Langston 34, Texas College 8
Mary Hardin-Baylor 45, Louisiana College 34
Oklahoma Baptist 37, Wayland Baptist 10
Oklahoma St. 24, TCU 10
Prairie View 51, MVSU 14
S. Arkansas 66, S. Nazarene 17
Southern U. 29, Ark.-Pine Bluff 21
Stephen F Austin 55, Nicholls St. 41
Texas A&M Commerce 65, McMurry 43
Texas Lutheran 41, Sul Ross St. 16


Michael Allen, Brad Bryant and
John Riegger were tied for second.

Nordqvist, Hull-Kirk
tied for lead in Korea
INCHEON, South Korea-
Anna Nordqvist of Sweden shot a
2-under 70 to remain tied for the
lead with Katherine Hull-Kirk of
Australia after the second round of
the KEB HanaBank Champi-
onship on Saturday.
Defending champion Suzann
Petterson of Norway fired a 69 to
move into a tie for third with South
Korea's Ju Young Pak and Amy
Yang, who both shot 71.

Ninyette leads
Perth International
PERTH, Australia Local
WestAustralian golfer Brody
Ninyette shot a 5-under 67 Satur-
day to take a one-shot lead after
the third round of the Perth Inter-
national.
Ninyette was a shot ahead of
compatriot Brett Rumford, J.B.
Hansen of Denmark and Jin
Jeong of South Korea.
Rumford shot a 65, Hansen had
a 66 and Jeong shot 69 to remain
in strong contention at Australia's
richest tournament.
From wire reports



third quarter Missouri answered
with a 33-yard field goal by
Baggett following a 50-yard run
by Henry Josey, who ran for 136
yards on 18 carries.
Baggett also converted from
19, 28, 39 and 43 yards to tie the
school record in makes in a sin-
gle game, as Missouri far ex-
ceeded the 13 points per game
Florida allowed this season en-
tering the matchup, the second-
fewest in the SEC. In addition to
Mauk's 295 passing yards, the
Tigers added 205 on the ground
and had 24 first downs.
"This is not a very good foot-
ball team, and certainly not
today," Gators' coach Will
Muschamp said. "I am pretty dis-
appointed that we have not
made more positive strides of-
fensively at this point of the
season."
Florida earlier narrowed its
deficit to three on a 100-yard
kickoff return by receiver
Solomon Patton on the first play
of the second half, but the Tigers
responded with a 75-yard drive
finished by a 6-yard scamper by
Josey for a 20-10 advantage.
Florida drove 22 yards to the
Missouri 28-yard line with 58
seconds left in the second quar-
ter on its longest drive of the first
half before Ealy burst through
the line and forced Murphy to
fumble on a sack. Missouri re-
covered to squelch the threat
and end the half up 13-3.


Texas St. 24, Georgia St. 17
Trinity (Texas) 30, Southwestern (Texas) 0
West Texas A&M 34, Angelo St. 30
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 53, Washington 24
Boise St. 34, Nevada 17
Cal Lutheran 20, Claremont-Mudd 6
Carroll (Mont.) 31, Montana Western 7
Case Reserve 38, Puget Sound 31
Cent. Washington 54, Simon Fraser 14
Colorado 43, Charleston Southern 10
Colorado St. 52, Wyoming 22
E.Washington 34, S. Utah 10
Linfield 51, Whitworth 17
Mesa St. 42, Fort Lewis 0
Montana 21, Cal Poly 14, OT
Montana St. 34, Weber St. 16
Montana Tech 34, Dickinson St. 14
N. Arizona 39, Idaho St. 30
Pacific Lutheran 17, Pacific 16
Pomona-Pitzer 17, Whittier 10, OT
Rice 45, New Mexico St. 19
Rocky Mountain 45, E. Oregon 13
S. Oregon 55, Montana St.-Northern 28
Stanford 24, UCLA 10
UC Davis 34, N. Colorado 18
W New Mexico 42, Western St. (Col.) 34
Willamette 56, Lewis & Clark 30


NASCAR Camping
World Truck
Fred's 250 powered by Coca-Cola
Saturday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (24) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 94 laps, 115.8 rating,
47 points.
2. (25) David Starr, Toyota, 94, 79.2, 42.
3. (7) Ross Chastain, Ford, 94, 99.1, 42.
4. (18) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 94, 104.8,0.
5. (14) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 94, 76.6, 39.
6. (27)Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 94,76.2,0.
7. (19) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 94, 90.8, 37.
8. (2) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 94, 73.3, 36.
9. (23) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 94, 65.9, 36.
10. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 94, 103.4,0.
11. (8) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 94, 69.9, 33.
12. (33) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 94, 46.1, 32.
13. (21) Clay Greenfield, Ram, 94,57.7,31.
14. (5)Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 94, 114.3, 32.
15. (17) Chris Fontaine, Toyota, 94, 68, 30.
16. (26) Bryan Silas, Ford, 94, 58.3, 28.
17. (10) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 94, 75.1, 28.
18. (1) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 93, 83.3, 27.
19. (11) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 93, 87.4, 25.
20. (16) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 93, 54.9, 24.
21. (13) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 92, 66.7, 24.
22. (35) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 91, 31.5,0.


23. (29) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, accident, 87, 65, 21.
24. (6) Ron Hornaday Jr, Chevrolet, accident, 87,
87.4, 20.
25. (36) Scott Stenzel, Ford, accident, 87, 52.9, 19.
26. (4) James Buescher, Chevrolet, accident, 79, 97.2,
19.
27. (9) Joey Coulter, Toyota, accident, 79, 77.2, 18.
28. (32) JeffAgnew, Chevrolet, accident, 79, 48.6, 16.
29. (31)Timothy Peters, Toyota, accident, 65, 49.6,15.
30. (28) Caleb Holman, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 44.2,
14.
31. (20) German Quiroga, Toyota, accident, 65, 69.2,
13.
32. (15) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, accident, 65,
38.6, 12.
33. (22) Sean Corr, Ford, accident, 65, 66.1, 11.
34. (34) Chris Cockrum, Toyota, accident, 65, 35.2,10.
35. (30) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, overheating, 27, 39.8,
10.
36. (12) Mason Mingus, Chevrolet, oil leak, 5,26.9,8.


SCOREBOARD




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Turnarounds in Kansas City and Houston


Chief on a

roll; Texans

need a victory

Associated Press

How pretty the turn-
around in Kansas City has
been.
How ugly the turnaround
in Houston has been.
When the Texans visit
the Chiefs on Sunday it will
match up a title contender
against a team trying to get
things going in the right di-
rection. With a twist of
course: The Texans are
also-rans instead of AFC
South leaders, and the
Chiefs are undefeated
rather than simply rebuild-
ing from a 2-14
season.
Kansas City has won six
in a row, and Houston has
dropped four straight The
Chiefs are a takeaway ma-
chine with 18 and a plus-12
differential. Houston is
very charitable with 15
turnovers and a minus-12.
But the Chiefs don't want
to hear anything about
being 6-0.
"If you allow that to hap-
pen, there's where you get
into problems," said coach
Andy Reid, the man most
responsible for the winning
after joining the Chiefs this
season following 14 gener-
ally successful seasons in
Philadelphia. "Personally I
don't worry about all that,
and I haven't seen any of
our guys worry about all
that."
There's plenty to worry
about in Houston, where
Case Keenum gets his first
NFL start at quarterback
for the injured Matt
Schaub.
"I've been around a few
teams that have gotten in a
funk, turned the ball over
and made mistakes. This
has been very very diffi-
cult," coach Gary Kubiak
said. "You don't stay the
same. If it continues, you've
got to continue to search for
something each week.
That's what we're trying to
do this week by changing
things up and trying to get it
to go away"
Today, it's Peyton Man-
ning's return to Indianapo-
lis as the Broncos visit the
Colts in prime time; Dallas
is at Philadelphia; Cleve-
land at Green Bay; Balti-
more at Pittsburgh;
Cincinnati at Detroit; San
Francisco at Tennessee;
Chicago at Washington;
New England at the New
York Jets; Buffalo at
Miami; San Diego at Jack-
sonville; Tampa Bay at At-
lanta; and St. Louis at
Carolina.
Minnesota is at the New
York Giants on Monday
night
Off this week are Oak-
land and New Orleans.
Seahawks 34,
Cardinals 22
In Glendale, Ariz., Rus-
sell Wilson threw three
touchdown passes, Mar-
shawn Lynch rushed for 91


Associated Press
Kansas City running back Jamaal Charles crosses the goal line for a touchdown Oct. 13 as Oakland free safety
Usama Young (26) defends at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. The Chiefs improved to 6-0 with the win and
are one of two undefeated teams entering play this week.


yards and Seattle beat Ari-
zona on Thursday night
The Seahawks (6-1) inter-
cepted two of Carson
Palmer's passes, converting
both into touchdowns, and
sacked him seven times, in-
cluding one by Chris
Clemons, who had been
questionable for the game
with a hyperextended
elbow
Arizona (3-4) got a touch-
down and one of its three
field goals after Wilson
twice fumbled while being
sacked deep in Seattle
territory
Palmer has thrown 11 in-
terceptions in the past five
games and 13 this season,
second only to Eli
Manning's 15.
Seattle sent the Cardi-
nals to their seventh
straight loss against an
NFC West foe.
Denver (6-0)
at Indianapolis (4-2)
The return of the great
quarterback, well advanced
at age 37.
Manning will be honored
before the game in the sta-
dium he helped get built
and by the fans to whom he
brought almost nothing but
winning football and a
Super Bowl title.
Then he will do what he
has always done, going out
to beat the opponent. If
he wins, he will join Brett
Favre as the only quarter-
backs to beat all 32
franchises.
"I don't play there any-
more, but I've continued to
communicate and I've en-
joyed those times when I
see someone from Indiana
in a hotel or an '18' Colts
jersey out here at practice,"
Manning said. "There's al-
ways a connection there. I
think to have to deliver a
message means I've been
gone and I don't think I re-


ally have."
Denver and Kansas City
are the two remaining
unbeatens.
Dallas (3-3) at
Philadelphia (3-3)
The winner will take
over first place in the NFC
East. Imagine that a team
with a winning record in
this downtrodden division.
Dallas might have to get
there without two stars: DE
DeMarcus Ware (thigh) and
RB DeMarco Murray
(knee). The Eagles, losers of
eight straight at home, fig-
ure to have Nick Foles at
quarterback instead of
Michael Vick
Regardless, look for lots
of wide-open offense.
"Our challenge right now
is as big as it can get be-
cause it's the Dallas Cow-
boys," Eagles coach Chip
Kelly said. "That's the way
we look at it We don't look
at it and compare this week
and that week and how we
are. They have got our full
attention. Our eyes are to-
tally focused on the Cow-
boys and we are not
comparing them to anybody
else."
Baltimore (3-3)
at Pittsburgh (14)
A classic AFC North ri-
valry game, except that the
Steelers have fallen by the
wayside. They did get their
first win last week against
the Jets, and a victory over
the defending Super Bowl
champions will have
the folks in Pittsburgh
dreaming of an amazing
turnaround.
But Baltimore has won
three in a row at Heinz
Field, which once was a
house of horrors for the
Ravens. One player Steel-
ers QB Ben Roethlisberger
won't want to see is line-
backer Terrell Suggs. "Siz-
zle" has sacked


Roethlisberger 15 1/2 times,
the most of anyone.
"I have a feeling the
whole NFL, if they're not
playing, even if they are
playing in the Sunday night
game, they will catch a
glimpse of this game,"
Suggs said.
Cleveland (3-3)
at Green Bay (3-2)
Are the Packers becom-
ing a running team?
They've had 100-yard rush-
ers in three of the past four
weeks Eddie Lacy James
Starks, Johnathan Franklin
- after not having one for
nearly three seasons. But
they do have Aaron
Rodgers, of course, which
means the ball will be going
downfield even without the
injured Randall Cobb.
Cleveland's defense can
be formidable, especially
against the run, so Rodgers
might have to take to the air
often. He won't complain
about that
Cincinnati (4-2)
at Detroit (4-2)
Normally, the juice here
would be the presence of
two of the game's top wide-
outs, Cincinnati's AJ. Green
and Detroit's Calvin John-
son. But Johnson has been
slowed by a right knee prob-
lem, which means Lions
running back Reggie Bush
might have to carry the
load.
The Bengals have a
breakaway running threat
of their own in rookie Gio
Bernard, but the focus for
Cincinnati is a solid de-
fense that gets after the
quarterback (18 sacks).
San Francisco (4-2)
at Tennessee (3-3)
Tennessee must find a
way to cover Vernon Davis.
The tight end victimized
Arizona last week for the
most yards of his career,
180, on eight catches with


two touchdowns. In his only
game against the Titans, he
had a career-high 10
catches for 102 yards.
Might the Titans put their
top cornerback, Alterraun
Verner, on Davis? Verner vs.
Vernon could be exciting
because Verner is tied for
the league lead with four
interceptions and he ran
one back for a TD.
Chicago (4-2) at
Washington (14)
Oddly these teams are
dead even through 47 meet-
ings at 23-23-1.
Chicago is making its liv-
ing on takeaways with an
NFC-leading 17 and has a
plus-7 differential. That
could be decisive against
the Redskins, who are
minus-1.
Also clearly in the Bears'
favor is the performance of
their special teams com-
pared to Washington's.
Devin Hester is a force re-
turning kicks against good
opponents, and the Red-
skins aren't good they
struggle in just about all
phases of special teams.
New England (5-1)
at New York Jets (3-3)
New York gave New Eng-
land quite a test in the rain
in Week 2, but these Jets are
severely limited after in-
juries at the offensive skill
positions.
Of course, the Patriots
have similar issues health-
wise, losing two of their
best defenders in NT Vince
Wilfork and LB Jerod Mayo.
The offense still has Tom
Brady who takes special
pleasure in beating the
Jets, doing so six straight
times in the regular season.
He's 18-4 against the
Jets, not counting the
postseason.
New England is one win
from tying Oakland for most
regular-season victories


(432) among the original
eight AFL teams.
Buffalo (24) at Miami (3-2)
The other AFC East
matchup, with the Dolphins
coming off two losses and a
bye.
Buffalo made an impres-
sive rally to force overtime
before losing to Cincinnati
last week. The Bills have
lost both road games.
Miami must find a way to
protect Ryan Tannehill,
who has been sacked 24
times, on a record pace.
Buffalo's Mario Williams
has eight sacks already
San Diego (3-3)
atJacksonville (0-6)
Coming off an impressive
Monday night win over In-
dianapolis in which they
did pretty much everything
well on both sides of the
ball, the Chargers face a
cross-country trip on a
short week. Hardly a recipe
for success, except that
the opponent is winless
Jacksonville.
The Jaguars had their
best performance of the
season in their loss at Den-
ver, and still fell by 16
points. Do we need to say
more?
Tampa Bay (0-5)
atAtlanta (1-4)
Atlanta has had a long
time to stew about its weak
start Its three-game slide is
the first under coach Mike
Smith, and coming off a
bye, if the Falcons don't
begin a turnaround now
they'll never catch sight of
New Orleans in the NFC
South. But with Julio Jones
gone for the season and
Roddy White hobbled, the
passing game no longer is
formidable.
Look for lots of throws to
tight end Tony Gonzalez,
who could wind up drawing
Bucs star cornerback Dar-
relle Revis in coverage.
St Louis (3-3)
at Carolina (2-3)
Seems rare to say the
Rams and Panthers are
coming off big victories.
Sam Bradford had a ca-
reer-best 134.6 quarterback
rating last week against
Houston, and he has two
new faces who are con-
tributing. Rookie RB Zac
Stacy has at least 75 yards
rushing in the past three
games, and first-round pick
Tavon Austin leads all NFC
rookie receivers with
24 catches.
Carolina has played one
fewer game than most
teams, but its 68 points al-
lowed is impressive
nonetheless. LB Luke
Kuechly, last year's top de-
fensive rookie, leads the
NFL in tackles with 209
since entering the league.
Minnesota (14)
at New York Giants (0-6)
This sure looked like a
nice matchup when the
schedule came out Adrian
Peterson against a tough
defense on a perennial
contender
Now, there's little reason
to tune in, although the
Vikings are starting their
third quarterback this sea-
son, recently acquired Josh
Freeman.


NFL Statistics CENTRAL


NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF
and 5 1 0 .833 125
3 2 0 .600 114 1
3 3 0 .500 104 1
2 4 0 .333 136 1
South
W L T Pct PF
Ais 4 2 0 .667 148
e 3 3 0 .500 128 1
2 4 0 .333 106 1
lie 0 6 0 .000 70 1
North
W L T Pct PF
4 2 0 .667 121 1
3 3 0 .500 134 1
3 3 0 .500 118 1
S 1 4 0 .200 88 1
West
W L T Pct PF
ity 6 0 0 1.000 152
6 0 0 1.000 265 1
S 3 3 0 .500 144 1
2 4 0 .333 105 1
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF
3 3 0 .500 183 1
hia 3 3 0 .500 166 1
wn 1 4 0 .200 107 1
ts 0 6 0 .000 103 2
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 5 1 0 .833 161 1
2 3 0 .400 109
1 4 0 .200 122 1
ay 0 5 0 .000 64 1
North
W L T Pct PF
4 2 0 .667 162 1
4 2 0 .667 172 1
y 3 2 0 .600 137 1
S 1 4 0 .200 125 1
West
W L T Pct PF
6 1 0 .857 191 1
cisco 4 2 0 .667 145 1
3 3 0 .500 141 1
3 4 0 .429 133 1


Thursday's Game
Seattle 34, Arizona 22
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Chicago atWashington, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
New England at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Detroit, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: New Orleans, Oakland
Monday's Game
Minnesota at N.Y Giants, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 24
Carolina atTampa Bay, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27
Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Miami at New England, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis,
San Diego, Tennessee
Monday, Oct. 28
Seattle at St. Louis, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders
Week 7
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds TD Int
P Manning, DEN 240 178 2179 22 2
P Rivers, SND 223 162 1847 14 5
Locker, TEN 111 69 721 6 0
Luck, IND 186 115 1346 7 3
Roethlisberger, PIT 192 126 1495 6 5
Dalton, CIN 215 140 1552 8 6
Tannehill, MIA 182 114 1383 6 5
Pryor, OAK 138 89 1061 5 5
Hoyer,CLE 96 57 615 5 3
Ale. Smith, KAN 216 122 1330 7 3


A. Foster, HOU
J. Charles, KAN
Moreno, DEN
B. Powell, NYJ
Spiller, BUF
F Jackson, BUF
Ry. Mathews, SN
Chr. Johnson, TE
T Richardson, IN
Green-Ellis, CIN

And. Johnson, H
An. Brown, PIT
Edelman, NWE
Cameron, CLE
De. Thomas, DE
A.. Green, CIN
Welker, DEN
A. Gates, SND
Woodhead, SND
Decker, DEN

Doss, BAL
Holliday, DEN
Benjamin, CLE
McCluster, KAN
Edelman, NWE
Kerley, NYJ
Br. Tate, CIN
Reynaud, TEN
P Adams, OAK
An. Brown, PIT

K. Martin, HOU
Thigpen, MIA
Reynaud, TEN
D. Reed, IND
Br. Tate, CIN
F Jones, PIT
C. Gates, NYJ
J. Ford, OAK


Welker, DEN
J. Charles, KAN
Moreno, DEN
Ju.Thomas, DEN


Rushers
Att Yds Avg
117 531 4.54
114 475 4.17
80 373 4.66
87 360 4.14
84 351 4.18
75 344 4.59
ID 89 336 3.78
EN 106 327 3.08
ND 92 296 3.22
89 295 3.31
Receivers
No Yds Avg
OU 44 495 11.3
41 498 12.1
41 411 10.0
38 460 12.1
N 37 528 14.3
37 464 12.5
37 378 10.2
36 466 12.9
S 36 267 7.4
34 477 14.0
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
14 255 18.2
15 201 13.4
20 246 12.3
27 317 11.7
18 185 10.3
12 108 9.0
8 72 9.0
16 136 8.5
8 59 7.4
8 56 7.0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
20 526 26.3
10 262 26.2
11 282 25.6
11 276 25.1
13 320 24.6
9 217 24.1
9 209 23.2
11 253 23.0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
8 0 8
7 5 2
7 7 0


7


Cameron, CLE
Royal, SND
Bernard, CIN
A.. Green, CIN
F Jackson, BUF
De. Moore, OAK

M. Prater, DEN
Gostkowski, NWE
Novak, SND
Succop, KAN
Tucker, BAL
Vinatieri, IND
D. Carpenter, BUF
Folk, NYJ
Bironas, TEN
Sturgis, MIA


Romo, DAL
Brees, NOR
A. Rodgers, GBY
M. Ryan, ATL
R.Wilson, SEA
Cutler, CHI
M. Stafford, DET
S. Bradford, STL
Vick, PHL
C. Newton, CAR

L. McCoy, PHL
Lynch, SEA
A. Peterson, MIN
Gore, SNF
Forte, CHI
D. Murray, DAL
D. Martin, TAM
De. Williams, CAR
A. Morris, WAS
Re. Bush, DET

Ju. Jones, ATL
B. Marshall, CHI
J. Graham, NOR
Cruz, NYG
Garcon, WAS
De. Jackson, PHL


Ret
0
0
0
0


5 0
5 0
4 2
4 0
4 4
4 0
Kicking
PAT FG
34-34 9-9
11-11 16-17
15-15 13-15
17-17 11-13
14-14 12-14
14-14 12-14
12-12 12-13
9-9 13-13
14-14 10-13
12-12 10-11


NFC leaders


Week 7
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
218 153
237 157
184 118
218 151
187 115
217 143
239 150
232 138
132 71
153 93
Rushers
Att Yds
123 630
138 578
102 483
103 477
100 442
91 428
116 409
91 394
72 377
78 376
Receivers
No Yds
41 580
40 465
37 593
35 541
35 408
34 589


D. Bryant, DAL
Gonzalez, ATL
Forte, CHI
Fitzgerald, ARI

Dw. Harris, DAL
G.Tate, SEA
Page, TAM
Hyde, GBY
GinnJr., CAR
Sproles, NOR


34 459 13.5
33 339 10.3
33 244 7.4
32 422 13.2
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
8 189 23.6
19 228 12.0
10 114 11.4
7 75 10.7
8 70 8.8
15 124 8.3


Dam. Johnson, PHL 9 74 8.2
Spurlock, DET 16 127 7.9
Ky. Williams, SNF 8 57 7.1
R. Randle, NYG 12 76 6.3
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
Dw. Harris, DAL 9 312 34.7
C. Patterson, MIN 12 406 33.8
Hester, CHI 19 575 30.3
Dam. Johnson, PHL 14 362 25.9
Be. Cunningham, STL 12 299 24.9
Ginn Jr., CAR 7 174 24.9
D.Wilson, NYG 9 222 24.7
Sproles, NOR 8 161 20.1
C.Thompson, WAS 8 160 20.0


Lynch, SEA
D. Bryant, DAL
Ve. Davis, SNF
J. Graham, NOR
A. Peterson, MIN
B. Marshall, CHI
Faunria, DET
De. Jackson, PHL
Cruz, NYG
Fitzgerald, ARI


Hauschka, SEA
Hartley, NOR
Henery, PHL
Crosby, GBY
D. Bailey, DAL
Akers, DET
Feely, ARI
Gould, CHI
P Dawson, SNF
Walsh, MIN


Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ri
7 6 1
6 0 6
6 0 6
6 0 6
6 5 1
5 0 5
5 0 5
5 0 5
4 0 4
4 0 4
Kicking
PAT FG LG
19-19 16-17 51
17-17 14-16 48
17-17 13-16 48
14-14 13-14 52
19-19 10-12 53
18-18 10-12 53
11-11 12-13 52
16-17 10-10 58
17-17 8-11 44
14-14 9-10 54


New EngIl
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo

Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh

Kansas C
Denver
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
Washingto
N.Y Giant


New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba

Detroit
Chicago
Green Ba
Minnesota

Seattle
San Franc
St. Louis
Arizona


B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


';




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P.L.A.Y. date




changed


A W
4V."

Special to the Chronicle
The P.L.A.Y. Program is an athletic event for children between the ages of 3 to 5.


Young athleteprogram begins Oct. 28 now
Special to the Chronicle tact Crysta Henry, Recre- Youth basketball
ation Program Specialist league forming
The Citrus County for Youth Programs, at e ue rming
Parks & Recreation's 352-527-7540 or visit Hoops Link Inc. and
PL.A.Y Program's start www. c i t r u s c o u n t y USSSA Basketball will be
date has been changed to parks.com for more conducting a youth basket-
Dct. 28 for the upcoming information, ball league with play on Sat-
season. All programs and activ- urdays Nov. 9 through
The PL.A.Y programs ities offered by the Divi- Dec. 21 at the Lecanto High
offered in the upcoming sion of Parks and School gym.
session include; basket- Recreation are available Individuals and/or teams
ball which will be held at to all persons without re- can register. There will be in
;he Citrus County Re- gard to race, color, handi- structional, competitive and
source Center on Mondays cap, sex, religion or open divisions of play to me<
or Wednesday and flag national origin, all levels of player abilities, hi
football located at Bicen- For persons with dis- dividuals and teams can
;ennial Park on Tuesdays abilities requiring special enter at which level they pre
or Thursday. accommodations, please fer or be placed accordingly
Boys and girls, ages 3 to contact the office five days by staff. Hoops Link Inc.'s
5, are encouraged to join prior to the program so local and nationally accom-
;he six-week program, that proper consideration polished staff will preside in al
After enrollment, each may be given to the divisions. The cost of the
child receives age appro- request, league is $50 for individuals.
priate sports equipment For hearing impaired Interested participants ma
and a team T-shirt please contact 352-527- go online to hoopslinkinc.or(
Registration is open 5901 (TTY) or 352-527- and print the registration fori
and spots fill up fast. Con- 7540 (Voice). and mail it in.


et
n-




IlI

ay
rm


Putting the




heart in sports


My wife came home
from a local board
meeting where the
letters AED did not mean
much to the group. Either
they did not have school-
age children or
had not experi-
enced a need-
less sudden
cardiac event
tragedy in a
young active
person. .
A year or so
ago on Fox L ..
News, there
was a story that Dr. Ron
initiated a leg- DOC1
islative bill ORD
making it ____
mandatory for
every Florida public
school to have an AED.
The story was about a 12-
year-old girl in seventh
grade who collapsed,
stopped breathing and had
a cardiac arrest. All of this
was on the school video
monitor
Two nearby PE teachers
and other students wit-
nessed the event, went to
her aid and evaluated her
breathing and heartbeat.
The PE teacher started
immediate CPR. CPR is
mandated in Texas for all
teachers. The PE teacher
quickly applied the auto-
matic external defibrilla-
tor or AED. Without the
AED, this 12 year old had
less than a three percent
chance of survival and one
percent chance of living
without brain damage.
AED provides an elec-
tric shock through the
chest wall. A built-in com-
puter determines the pa-
tient's heart rhythm,
determines the need and
then administers the
shock. AEDs can restore a
normal heart rhythm in
sudden cardiac arrest.
For each minute without
this electric shock, a vic-


r4
)E


tim's chance of survival de-
creases seven to 10 per-
cent. If used within the
first 10 minutes of a car-
diac arrest, the survival
rates increase to 80 per-
cent. On aver-
age, emergency
personnel take
in excess of 7 to
8 minutes to get
there.
What does
this have to do
Switch sports? I'm
S glad you asked.
Athletes are
Joseph prone to often
OR'S silent cardiac
ERS arrhythmias and
E heart illnesses.
Millions of kids
play sports without prob-
lems. It is sad that sudden
cardiac arrest and death is
often the first symptom of
a silent heart problem.
When I last wrote about
sudden death in athletes
and specifically kids, the
timing was unbelievable. I
had turned in my article
the day before the dead-
line in my usual procrasti-
nating fashion. My editor
emailed me that he had
added the tragic story of a
young girl at Gainesville's
Eastside High School who,
that day, had a cardiac ar-
rest while at track practice.
She was initially revived
but passed away in the
hospital.
The stories are endless.
The best chance to help
these young athletes and
non-athlete middle school,
high school and college
student is a $1,200-$2,700
device that automatically
reads the heart beat and
provides the electric jump
start the heart needs.
Sudden cardiac death
occurs hundreds of times
per day and is the cause
of 250,000 deaths annu-
ally, including an alarm-
ing number that are of


school age.
Has your child ever
fainted, had a seizure
when exercising, excited
or startled? Has your child
ever had chest pain, dizzi-
ness or had unremitting
shortness of breath while
exercising or passed out
or nearly passed out dur-
ing or after exercise? Does
your family have a history
of sudden death before
age 50?
Many of these problems
are inherited. Think about
it!
Remember the only
treatment for sudden car-
diac arrest is defibrilla-
tion. Adequate placement
ofAEDs in schools can po-
tentially save lives, espe-
cially your child's.
Now what upset my
wife? The fact that many
private and charter
schools do not have this
device in Citrus County
Many public schools don't
know where the AED is.
Some private and charter
schools have over 200 stu-
dents. Not all private
schools have the funds to
cover the expense, just be-
cause they are private.
Prediction and preven-
tion of athletic sudden
death persists because the
standards of medicine
have not fulfilled appro-
priately designed con-
trolled trials to help detect
future victims. But anAED
provides a chance for
these undiagnosed
individuals.
Most importantly, public
and private schools need
to know where the AED is
and how to use it. It is a
tragedy in the making!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a
hand and shoulder ortho-
pedic surgeon atSeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute may
be reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


Adult kickball league action


heats up before playoffs


F


EE


Special to the Chronicle
Game 1
Kickin' Nutz 25, Misfits 2
Kickin' Nutz started this
game off hot, scoring two
runs in the first inning be-
fore putting up 12 in the
second and 11 in the third
inning. With a win last
night and a Head Shots
loss, that puts Kickin' Nutz
tied for first place.
Game 2
Convictions 10,
Average Joes 4
Both teams were fight-
ing for fourth place in the
standings and the last
playoff berth. It was a tight
game until Convictions
came alive in the fifth in-
ning, scoring six unan-
swered runs to break a 4-4
tie to put them up six runs.
The season is definitely
not over for either one of
these teams, as both team
are still eligible to make
the playoffs.
Game 3
Citrus Whiners 7,
Head Shots 6
With the scoring going
back and forth, it was no
surprise this game went
down to the wire. With the
score tied 6-6 in the sixth
inning, Citrus Whiners
manufactured a run to
take the lead and held off
the first-place Head Shots.


A kickball tournament will
be held at 8 a.m. Saturday,
Nov. 16, at Lecanto High
School's softball field to raise
money for the CREST school
playground renovation project.
The double-elimination
tourney will field groups of
10. Entry fee is $100. Checks
can be made payable to
CREST School. For more in-
formation, call Debbie Rumpf
or Kelly Tapp Daugherty at
CREST School, 352-527-
0303, ext. 6115. Entry dead-
line is Nov. 1.
To learn more about
CREST and its students, visit


Next week will finalize the
seeding for the playoffs.
USSSA softball
tournament
The weekend before Hal-
loween, USSSAwill be host-
ing a softball tournament on
Oct. 26 to 27 at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River. Teams
will play dressed up in their
Halloween costumes for a
chance to qualify for winter
nationals. Come out on Sat-
urday or Sunday and see the
Halloween murals in the
grass, the teams and the fun
atmosphere these girls will
be competing in.
Flag football
With seven teams playing
in the league, Parks & Recre-
ation is looking forward to
playing another stellar football
season with the men of Citrus
County. Games will be held at
HARP field in Homosassa.
Season opener is tenta-
tively scheduled for Oct. 24.
Coed beach
Volleyball
This season, coed beach
volleyball is being moved to
Fat Daddy's BBQ Restaurant
south of Crystal River & north
of Homosassa on U.S 19.
Fat Daddy's provides a large
Olympic-sized sand volley-


Lecanto High
School
The second annual Alumni
Pride 5K and Popsicle Mile
will take place at 9 a.m. Sat-
urday, Nov. 2, on the campus
of Lecanto High School.
The funds will be used to
create scholarships for de-
serving students. Cost is $20
for the 5K, $10 for the Popsi-
cle Mile and $25 for all race-
day registrations.
Registration is available on
active.com or contact the fol-
lowing for a paper registration
to email, mail or drop off:
Diedra Newton at 352-746-


ball court with availability of
ordering food and drinks,
along with great lighting and
a stage next to the court.
They're set up for an awe-
some league atmosphere.
Registration is open for 17
and older. You have until Oct.
31 to register your team at
the office of Citrus County
Parks & Recreation. Regis-
tration fee is $100 per team.
The season starts on
Nov. 13.
Men's softball
The boys of summer are
back for the Fall/Winter soft-
ball season out at Bicenten-
nial Park in Crystal River. With
Advanced Fitness taking the
summer title, teams are look-
ing forward to getting back on
the diamond for revenge.
Season begins Nov. 4.
Men's basketball
Registration is now open
for men's basketball and
ends Nov. 1. A $50 deposit
is required at the time of reg-
istration. The season starts
Nov. 13.
If you are an individual
adult looking for a sport to
play and do not have a team,
please call Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 and
we will refer you the man-
agers in each league you are
interested in.


2334 or newtond@
citrus.k12.fl.us; Mike Oss-
mann at mikeossmann@
gmail.com; Marifran Crosley
Ramaglia at mcr@
advancedaudiology.biz.
There will be event-day reg-
istration opening at 7:45 a.m.
Foster parents
plan tourney
The Citrus County Foster
ParentAssociation will spon-
sor its fifth annual golf tourna-
ment beginning at 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 2, at Inverness
Golf and Country Club.
Entry fee is $45 and in-
cludes lunch and raffles.
For more information, call
Debbie King at 352-201-9521.


$


FREE


GAS CARD


I


Sports BRIEFS
Kickball tourney ww.citrus.k12.fl.us/crest.
to benefit CREST Race day at


^ One lucky winner I

for 8 weeks

Grand Prize Winner

$200 Gas Card

Look for the entry form in
Wednesday's Newspaper
Enter as often as you would like
New winner each week
Grand Prize drawing from all
entries at the end of the contest

Pick up your copy of the
Citrus County Chronicle
Contest Begins
Wednesday, September 11

C f~ C f i T H S '*. C U a -NO YjT iE B

Must be over 18 year's old and legal resident in our
newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of
the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible.


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 B5


15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Slam sends Sox Bruins blank Tampa Bay


to World Series


I A.
..-'" ,'"n.. "'-

7 2" ">. .. ...








Associated Press
Boston's Shane Victorino celebrates his grand slam Saturday night against the
Detroit Tigers as he rounds first base in the seventh inning during Game 6 of the
American League Championship Series in Boston. The slam put the Red Sox ahead
5-2. Boston won by that score and advances to the World Series to face the
St. Louis Cardinals. See game story at www.chronicleonline.com.


Associated Press


TAMPA Tuukka Rask
stopped 23 shots and five
Boston players scored to
help the Bruins beat the
Tampa Bay Lightning 5-0
on Saturday night.
Rask made a nifty glove
save on Steven Stamkos'
point-blank redirection in
the third period. It was the
goalie's first shutout this
season and 17th overall.
David Krejci, Adam Mc-
Quaid, Patrice Bergeron,
Chris Kelly and Shawn
Thornton scored for the
Bruins, who have won six
in a row against Tampa
Bay Boston leads the all-
time series 50-20-9.
Krejci stopped a nine-
game goal drought to put
the Bruins up 1-0 from the
low slot off a pass from
Milan Lucic 1:32 into the
game. Krejci has a point in
four straight games.
Panthers 2,
Wild 1, SO
SUNRISE Brad Boyes
and Jonathan Huberdeau
scored in a shootout, lifting
the Florida Panthers over the
Minnesota Wild 2-1 to snap a
three-game losing streak.
Boyes'backhander went
through the legs of goalie
Josh Harding for the winner.
Huberdeau beat Harding on
the stick side for the first
shootout goal.
Zach Parise and Mikko
Koivu were turned aside by
Panthers goalie Tim Thomas
in the shootout.
Aleksander Barkov scored
in regulation for Florida, and
Thomas made 31 saves.
Penguins 4,
Canucks 3, SO
PITTSBURGH Evgeni
Malkin scored in the third
round of the shootout, Marc-
Andre Fleury made the decid-
ing stop on Ryan Kesler and
the Pittsburgh Penguins re-
mained unbeaten at home
after a 4-3 victory against the
Vancouver Canucks in
Pittsburgh.
Oilers 3, Senators 1
OTTAWA-- Ryan-Nugent
Hopkins scored two goals, in-
cluding one into an empty net,
to help the Edmonton Oilers
beat the Ottawa Senators 3-1


and snap a five-game losing
streak.
Devils 4, Rangers 0
NEWARK, N.J. Cory
Schneider made 22 saves for
his first shutout with New Jer-
sey, and the Devils become
the last NHL team to win a
game this season, posting a
4-0 victory over the New York
Rangers.
Andrei Loktionov, Adam
Henrique, Michael Ryder and
Dainius Zubrus scored for the
Devils (1-4-3), who ended
their worst start to a season
with a laugher against the in-
jury-depleted Rangers. New
York (2-5) has only two wins
on its season-opening, nine-
game road trip.
Capitals 4,
Blue Jackets 1
WASHINGTON Braden
Holtby made 37 saves and
Martin Erat assisted on three
Washington goals in the Capi-
tals' 4-1 win over the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets.
Joel Ward and Brooks
Laich scored in the second
period for the Capitals, and
Troy Brouwer and Alex
Ovechkin gave Washington a
cushion early in the third.
Artem Anisimov spoiled
Holtby's shutout at 15:05 of
the third.
Hurricanes 4,
Islanders 3
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Jiri
Tlusty scored his first two
goals of the season, and Cam
Ward made 22 saves as the
Carolina Hurricanes held on
for a 4-3 win over the New
York Islanders.
Predators 2,
Canadiens 1
MONTREAL- Seth Jones'


goal with 1:27 left spoiled a
35-save performance by Mon-
treal's Carey Price and helped
the Nashville Predators beat
the Canadiens 2-1.
Nashville captain Shea
Weber also scored for the
Predators (4-3-1), who got 28
saves from Pekka Rinne.
Brendan Gallagher scored
the only goal for Montreal (4-3).
Avalanche 4,
Sabres 2
BUFFALO, N.Y. Matt
Duchene, Gabriel Landeskog
and Ryan O'Reilly each had a
goal and an assist to lead the
Colorado Avalanche to a 4-2
win over the Buffalo Sabres.
Paul Statsny also scored
and Jean-Sebastien Giguere
made 28 saves for the Ava-
lanche, who bounced back
from their first loss of the
season against Detroit on
Thursday.
The Sabres remained win-
less in six home games after
finishing up a stretch of four
games in six days.
Blackhawks 3,
Maple Leafs 1
CHICAGO Bryan Bickell
sparked Chicago's big second
period with his first goal of the
season, helping the Black-
hawks beat Toronto.
Brandon Pirri added a goal
and an assist for the Black-
hawks, who have won four of
five. Michael Kostka scored his
first career goal against his for-
mer team, and Corey Crawford
had 19 saves.
Toronto center Dave Bolland
was scoreless in his first game
in Chicago since he was traded
to his hometown Maple Leafs
in June.
Nazem Kadri scored his third
goal for the Maple Leafs, who
have dropped two in a row.


I.I i ]J .l I I[ I[ l ll | II[J I
SELF-EMPLOYED FORECLOSURES
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;Ij ALU.J.P ,-tag La.
Presents
The 3rd An
Never Forge
I MileWa
Registration at 7am Ra
9:00 am November
Historic Courthouse
The race will precede the Ani
Day Parade. Stay for the parad
$25 per entry all p
go to Sgt. Dennis
Flanagan Found
For registration and
more information 'i,.isit
www.NeverForget5K.com
or call
Marissa Balderas 621)20-4
Dennis Flanagan 697-1 3



m~d2


nual
et 5K/
ilk
ace at 9am
r11,2013
, Inverness
iual Veteran's
e after the race.
proceeds
James
nation




8 56 "


Sponsored by C NaE


EDUKEGYE I UM oehlm
ENERGY. Mamnpa D MCtalalb Ei 55


for ChAia/,
**


TMH ChALLENGEI #4
Hosted by
Voice for Children of North Central Florida


Your "tidbits of knowledge"
are a "smart" choice to improve
the welfare of the children in
the 5th judicial circuit under
the auspicies of the
Guardian ad Litem program.


Enjoy an evening of food, music, trivia and prizes.
Tickets are $25 per person and include food, beverages,
one door prize ticket and participation in the game.
Sat., Nov. 2,2013,6:00 p.m.
American Legion, 10730 Hwy. 41, Dunnellon, FL

S -iwr 4 'n



Food donated by Harry's Seafood Bar & Grille, Ocala, FL
Silent auction with many varied items.
Call 352-362-5851 or 352-601.0115 for tickets
or to donate an item for the silent auction.
Join us for this fun, and often funny, evening to raise
funds to benefit abuse and neglected children.
I CHp.Nid i


B6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Toe biting as a profession; or, Wilson and the boxer


It has taken many
decades for me to fully
understand that ani-
mals who live in households
with humans eventually
adopt their personalities.
When someone tells me
their dog is acting very
crazy, I look closely at the
human for signs of a break-
down.
How appropriate it was
this week that our 6-pound
Yorkie welcomed a new


boxer to the neighborhood
by barking insanely at the
newbie. We thought it
would be good if Wilson, the
6-pound Yorkie, got to sniff
the new boxer The thought
was that they would in-
stantly become friends.
Wilson wasn't interested
in sniffing or being friends.
Instead, when given the op-
portunity, Wilson ran out of
the garage and tried to bite
the much larger boxer on


the foot.
He could only reach the
foot of the larger dog, so you
bite what you can.
The boxer did what any
self-respecting boxer would
do in such a circumstance:
He tried to swallow Wilson.
The end result of the
neighborhood interaction
was that Wilson had the op-
portunity to get reac-
quainted with his
veterinarian and get his


face stitched back together
As someone in the news-
paper business, I often feel
like the Yorkie (editorial
writer) trying to bite the foot
of a boxer (big-shot con-
gressman who thinks shut-
ting down the federal
government is fine as long
as he continues to get paid).
Not a day goes by that I
don't be a call from one
politician or another that
we don't see the issues the


same way they do. They
complain, they moan, they
threaten and they hang up.
If you have thin skin, you
shouldn't get into this busi-
ness. And the same thing
goes for the politicians. If
you run for public office,
you have to remember that
25 percent of the public is
going to hate you just be-
cause you are a politician.


Associated Press
Chris Crowley, center, brother of Angie Crowley, who was raped and murdered by William Happ in 1986, talks Tuesday with the media following the execution of
William Happ, at the Florida State Correctional facility near Starke.


It's not a debate. The politicians
aren't here. Protesters, both for
and against, have no stake
other than their opinions.
For 16 minutes, Florida's death penalty isn't a topic for the lat-
est blog. Scientists, doctors and theologians don't weigh in. News-
papers aren't writing fiery editorials. The lawyers are silent.
Our eyes are fixed on the window, which is covered with a tan
curtain. No one is talking or even whispering. A humming wall air
conditioner provides the only sound.
Reporters who have been here before
wait patiently Three of us, newcomers,
Nervously jot down observations.
The room is just large enough to hold
four rows of 10 chairs each. The chairs
"' 0are like those found in a hotel confer-
n ence hall. The victim's immediate family
sits in the first row The second row has
more family and other witnesses, includ-
ing the former Citrus County sheriff.
% One man sits in the third row next to
Mike Wright the wall. He is a staff escort and remains
WRIGHT with the victim's family
RIGHT Reporters sit in a back row that is ele-
ON TARGET vated about six inches. In all, there are
28 people in the room.
There is little space between the first
row and the window I can see the reflections of their faces, An-
gela Crowley's sisters. Her older brother Chris, the family
spokesman who has patiently offered his time to any reporter who
asks, is in the center of the front row, just inches from the window.
Suddenly the curtain rises, and the final chapter of a 27-year
horror story is about to begin.
MEN
f ever there was a random crime, this was it. Angela Crowley, 21,
had just moved to Lauderdale Lakes from northern Illinois in
December 1985. Memorial Day weekend 1986 she decided to visit
a college friend who lived in Yankeetown.
That's a long haul for a young woman unfamiliar with Florida.
It was the days before cellphones and GPS. She spoke with Chris
the night before by phone and together they mapped out her route.
Somewhere, she took a wrong turn and got lost. She called her
friend from the exit at Wildwood. The friend said when Angela ar-
rived at a certain gas station in Crystal River to call again and the
friend would drive there. Angela could then follow her friend to
Yankeetown.


William Happ, meanwhile, was on
the run. He faced robbery and kidnap-
ping charges in California and had
more than 30 arrests on his record. He
was staying with a great aunt in Crys-
tal River and walking to her house
from a friend's home.
He walked past the Cumberland
Farms store across from city hall just
as Angela pulled in the parking lot.
No one knows why Happ did what he
did.
He smashed the driver's window and
strong-armed control of the car He
drove Angela to the Cross Florida
Barge Canal, where he viciously beat
her, twice raped her, and then stran-
gled her with her own stretch pants.
Happ threw her body in the canal,
where a fisherman found it later that
evening.


Happ continued his life on the run.
California authorities tried him in ab-
stention for the robbery and kidnap-
ping charges. Upon conviction, they
asked the FBI to help find him. He was
arrested in Pittsburgh, and returned to
face a 10-year prison sentence. That's
when authorities matched his finger-
prints with those found in Angela's car
He was arrested in December 1986
for Crowley's murder Sheriff Charlie
Dean traveled to Angela's small home-
town of Oregon, Ill. about the size of
Inverness to deliver the news to her
mother and siblings.
Happ was tried in 1989, the case
being moved to Lake County because
of pre-trial publicity In July of that
year, a judge sentenced him to death.
See PageC3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3


ANATOMY


OF


AN


EXIECUPON





OPage C2- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20,2013



PINION


"Our chief want in life is somebody
who shall make us do what we can.
Ralph Waldo Emerson,
"The Conduct of Life," 1860


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LATE TO SUPPER




City must act



on funding



fire services


Inverness City Council
members cannot delay
the inevitable any longer;
they need to make a decision
about how to provide fire
services to the residents and
businesses of the county seat.
City officials, including
Manager Frank DiGiovanni,
are late in acting on whether
to pay the county $349,000 to
be covered under
the countywide
fire-assessment THE I
fee. Their inac- Invern
tion has the po- fire-se
tential to cost the re-se
city greatly, both
financially and in OUR O1
terms of public Cityc
safety. subsi
At present, city
taxpayers con-
tribute $250,000 through ad
valorem taxes to county fire
services. The new Municipal
Services Benefit Unit
(MSBU) would ladle on the
additional $349,000 for a total
cost to the city of $599,000.
Homeowners would pay a flat
$54 annual fee, while com-
mercial businesses would be
charged on a sliding scale
based on square footage.
That's a bundle of money-
but, consider the cost of opt-
ing out of the longtime rela-
tionship with fire services.
Creating a fire department
for the city means buying fire
trucks and equipment, and
funding facilities and person-
nel. That's not a cheap propo-
sition. Hiring a private outfit
to fulfill the vital function
would be costly, as well.
The reality is, when Duke
Energy slashed its tax pay-
ments in favor of a legal bat-
tle, every corner of Citrus
County was financially
wounded including Inver-
ness. Grappling with that re-
ality, county officials
concluded the MSBU -
while not popular was the
bitter pill necessary to re-
store a degree of financial
stability for fire services.


Can we or can't we?
Today in the Chronicle (Oct. 6),
they had an article saying that
we're not allowed to go to Cuba
and my understanding is that
we are allowed to travel to Cuba


at this point in time.
Can somebody please 0C
explain which way it is?
Because on the Internet
they have airline tickets
and everything to go
there, so I would appre- .
ciate it if somebody
could write in or explain
that to me.
Editor's note: We did CAL
a little research and 563-
pretty much came to this
answer: Yes and no. You
can travel to Cuba for a specific
purpose, such as a work-related
matter, research or to visit a rela-
tive who lives there. You can't
travel to Cuba as a vacation desti-
nation unless you travel with a li-
censed Cuban travel agency. Safe
to say it's complicated. Search for
"U.S. travel to Cuba restrictions"
on Google and you'll get a better
idea.


Is
C
e
vi

F
a
cd


1
-(


County officials are frus-
trated at rebuffed efforts to
discuss the matter with the
city manager and individual
council members. It became
apparent that requesting a
spot on the council's meeting
agenda would be necessary
to make their pitch, which is
what they did this past week.
The council plans to discuss
the issue further at
a future meeting.
ISUE: Rather than
giving the county
ss and a cold shoulder in
ces fee. efforts to discuss
the MSBU, city of-
'INION: ficials should
n't be have been proac-
dized. tive and -
months ago -
sought details so
a decision could have been
made well in advance of the
Oct. 1 start of the fiscal year
Due diligence in weighing
the options and costs seems
an afterthought at this point.
If information presented to
the council by Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy whose agency en-
compasses fire services is
accurate, the city of Inverness
would fund 6 percent of the fire
services budget while con-
suming 10 percent of demand.
Manager DiGiovanni is
known to point to the merits
of compact urban growth and
has indicated his belief that
joining in the MSBU would
subsidize residential sprawl.
While that's good in theory,
unincorporated communities
including Beverly Hills, Citrus
Hills and Sugarmill Woods
are subject to the MSBU and
residents in those densely
populated areas help to sup-
port fire services in relatively
sparsely populated areas.
The message from the county
to the city is: The cost of fire
services has gone up due to
financial crisis. Get on board
with the MSBU, or don't but
get a plan, because unincor-
porated Citrus County won't
subsidize Inverness.


Lights out = no treats
This is for all trick-or-treaters.
I don't care who you are, but
please do not look in people's
homes for trick-or-treats this
year and every year. And you
know who you are and I
JND don't care (if) it's from
Dunnellon, Crystal
QFF River, Inverness or
wherever you guys
S came from. Please do
Snot go in people's win-
Sdows and open the
door and try to come
i in. That is very rude of
you. So, parents, please
)579 tell them, when you
don't see the lights, go
to the next house.
Steep retainer
Why on earth would we con-
sider hiring outside counsel to
represent Citrus County? The
$8,000-per-month retainer is
pretty steep for our small county
and doesn't include any other fees
they will charge for other services.
Wouldn't an attorney from inside
Citrus County be more prudent?


Obama, tea party of one mind


WASHINGTON
uch is wrong with
Washington these days,
including much of what
is said about what is wrong. Many
Americans say there is "too
much politics" in Washington.
Actually, there is too little.
Barack Obama deplores "politics
as usual" here. But-
recently Washington -
has been tumultuous
because politics, as
the Framers under- -
stood it, has disinte- .
grated. Obama has
been complicit in /
this collapse.
His self-regard,
the scale of which Georg
has a certain 0T
grandeur, reinforces
progressivism's cel- VOI
ebration of untram-
meled executive power and its
consequent disparagement of
legislative bargaining. This is why
"Obamacare" passed without a
single vote from the opposition
party and why it remains, as
analyst Michael Barone says,
the most divisive legislation
since the 1854 Kansas-
Nebraska Act
Obama and his tea-party ad-
versaries have something im-
portant in common disdain
for the practice of politics
within the Framers' institu-
tional architecture. He and they
should read Jonathan Rauch's
"Rescuing Compromise" in Na-
tional Affairs quarterly
"Politicians," Ranch notes,
"like other people, compromise
because they have to, not because
they want to." So Madison cre-
ated a constitutional regime that
by its structure created compet-
ing power centers and deprived
any of them of the power to im-
pose its will on the others.
The Madisonian system, Rauch
says, is both intricate and dy-
namic: "Absent a rare (and usu-
ally unsustainable) supermajority,
there is simply not much that
any single faction, interest, or
branch of government can do.


Fl
H
(


Effective action in this system is
nothing but a series of forced
compromises."
Rep. Tom Cole, who repre-
sents southwest Oklahoma and
has a Ph.D. in British history
and studied at the University of
London, says some of his col-
leagues in the House of Repre-
sentatives "think
they are in the
House of Com-
mons." That is, they
have not accepted
S the fact that, in the
Madisonian system,
legislative and exec-
utive powers are
separated.
e Will By this separa-
tion, Rauch writes,
IER Madison built "con-
DES stant adjustment
into the system." His
Constitution is a "dynamic po-
litical mechanism" under
which no faction ever prevails
with finality This is because
there is no finality:
"Forcing actors to bargain
and collaborate slows precipi-
tous change while constantly
making negotiators adjust their
positions.... The requirement to
bargain and find allies provides
new ideas and entrants with
paths into politics and ways to
shake up the status quo. But
that same requirement pre-
vents upheaval by ensuring that
no one actor can seize control,
at least not for long."
Obama, who aspires to be
Washington's single actor, has
said of his signature achieve-
ment: "I would have loved
nothing better than to simply
come up with some very ele-
gant, academically approved
approach to health care, and
didn't have any kinds of leg-
islative fingerprints on it, and
just go ahead and have that
passed. But that's not how it
works in our democracy Un-
fortunately, what we end up
having to do is to do a lot of ne-
gotiations with a lot of differ-
ent people."


Obama wanted something
simple rather than a product of
Madisonian complexity He
wanted something elegantly un-
blemished by "any" messy leg-
islative involvement, other than
Congress' tug of the forelock at
final approval. It is, Obama
thinks, unfortunate that he had
to talk to many people.
He and some of his tea-party
adversaries share an impatience
with Madisonian politics, which
requires patience. The tea
party's reaffirmation of Madi-
son's limited government project
is valuable. Now, it must decide
if it wants to practice politics.
Rauch hopes there will be
"an intellectual effort to ad-
vance a principled, positive, pa-
triotic case for compromise,
especially on the right." He
warns that Republicans, by
their obsessions with ideologi-
cal purity and fiscal policy,
"have veered in the direction of
becoming a conservative interest
group, when what the country
needs is a conservative party"
A party is concerned with
power, understood as the ability
to achieve intended effects. A
bull in a china shop has conse-
quences, but not power, be-
cause the bull cannot translate
intelligent intentions into
achievements. The tea party
has a choice to make. It can pa-
tiently try to become the beat-
ing heart of a durable party,
which understands this: In
Madisonian politics, all
progress is incremental. Or it
can be a raging bull, and soon a
mere memory, remembered
only for having broken a lot of
china. Conservatives who pre-
fer politics over the futility of
intransigence gestures in Madi-
son's compromise-forcing sys-
tem will regret the promise the
tea party forfeited, but will not
regret that, after the forfeiture,
it faded away

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. corn.


ThEI FELLETT ES aWkVRWLDMTohe EdiR AFtER.

E LETTERS to the Editor r


With your help,
vets made proud
The Florida Department of
Agriculture, under the guid-
ance of Commissioner Adam
Putnam, started a program to
honor our nation's military vet-
erans wounded during combat
service to our nation. The pro-
gram, named "Operation Out-
door Freedom," is hosted by
the Florida Forest Service and
provides a series of private
guided game hunts within our
state forests. The Withla-
coochee Forestry Center Team
is a crucial participant in the
program and has designed and
mentored six game hunts that
accommodate the various dis-
abilities of these veterans. All
of these hunts are conducted
within special designated
areas of the Withlacoochee
State Forest.
Much of the equipment and
supplies for these hunt are
provide by our local businesses
whose donations have been a
major factor to the success of
these hunts and a rewarding
and motivational experience
for the participants. This year's
hunts are in the planning stages


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including emailed
letters.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

and we want to recognize and
thank the following Citrus County
businesses for their contribu-
tions to this valuable veterans
program: Dan and Betty Ashley
of Dan's Gun Room and Mr Mark
Kelly of Kelly Pest Control.
Your support and contributions
are greatly appreciated toward
making the 2013 Outdoor Free-
dom Project a success.
Don Ruths
Public information officer,
Withlacoochee Forestry Center


We will pay dearly
Don't imagine you can "hold
back" your boss from attacking
tea-party people as the source
of all problems with our gov-
ernment. Yes I know elections
have consequences, but we all
know government can be selec-
tive in what laws it enforces:
God knows there are enough of
them!
As our government picks and
chooses winners and losers for
"Obamacare," the little man
will once again suffer from this
abomination. Outside of major
control of most of our economy,
what will be the result of this
program? My wife was in favor
because it might help more
people, but 30 million remain
uninsured while the good,
hard-working citizens of our
country are faced with health
care bills rising astronomically
When will the Chronicle stop
straddling reality (with a pro-
nounced left lean) and stand
for most of the citizens of this
county who are outraged by
what is happening?
Gene Musselman
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


X
lk,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Stunning, simp
few nights ago, I was look at Cheryl, and, like-
browsing a website wise, she seems to look be-
doing some re- yond the white hair, wrinkles
search regarding geneal- and paunchiness I have
ogy Just for the fun of it, I picked up during the time
decided to see what they we've been together
had on me. I was shocked I'm not blind; my glasses
to find out that I am a 68- work just fine. I'm not deaf,
year-old man. I was also not anymore; I have hearing
taken aback by seeing that aids and they work, too.
my lovely Cheryl is a 65- Though this might be open
year-old woman, for debate, I don't think I'm
I know these things are nuts. I knowthatwe are both
true and have never been well into our senior years.
hesitant to write about our But my wife still gets
real ages, but it looks dif- unanticipated attention
ferent when you see it on a from men of all ages.
website. For a number of years, I
Time has passed and the let this bother me, probably
truth is the truth, more than I should have. I
Even so, most often, I felt a combination of offense
don't see the years when I and pride, but until rela-


stunning after all these years


tively recently, I was often Nowadays, I suppose
more offended than proud, maybe I've mellowed.
Please don't misunder- There are still times
stand: Only when a flirta-
very infre- tious comment
quently has to my wife will
someone said make my face
anything even f J turn red and
close to being the hair on the
inappropriate, back of my
and Cheryl has neck stand up,
always been but more often
capable of put- than not, I sim-
ting any such Fred Brannen ply find it a
someone in his A SLICE point of pride
place on those and will reach
rare occasions OF LIFE down, grasp
when I have her hand and
not been at her elbow to wholeheartedly agree with
give a look of disapproval the fellow who has paid
which would make the her a compliment without
devil himself flee. being so concerned about


whether or not he was hit-
ting on her and disrespect-
ing me.
Case in point: On the
evening of our recent wed-
ding anniversary aboard
ship, Cheryl and I dressed
to the nines to go to dinner
A young man who could
not have been more than
40 looked up as Cheryl and
I stepped onto the elevator
with him. I suspect it was
without even thinking that
he gazed at Cheryl's face,
and then automatically,
glanced full-length at her
hair, and the way she was
dressed, saying, "Stunning,
simply stunning!"
Cheryl, somewhat be-
mused, smiled and


replied, "Well, thank you,
that's very kind."
And I, feeling that ab-
solutely no offense was in-
tended, proudly placed my
arm gently around her
shoulders and said, "She
is, isn't she, son?"
The young man, by then
obviously a little embar-
rassed by his unchecked
expression of admiration
of a very married woman
who was no doubt old
enough to be his mother,
responded, "Yes, sir, she
really is."


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist


DEATH
Continued from Page Cl

Death-sentence appeals are
common and lengthy Happ
raised all sorts of defenses,
from suspect evidence to inef-
fective defense attorneys.
Courts swatted aside each and
every one.
Gov Rick Scott signed Happ's
death warrant two months ago.
In September, at a hearing to
determine if more appeals
were forthcoming, Happ, now
51, told a judge he was ready to
die.

ME.

William Happ lies strapped
to a gurney facing the win-
dow A white sheet is pulled up
to his lower neck. There are
mirrors above his head and to
his right that face at a down-
ward angle. The room is white,
clean and void of any clutter On
the wall is a digital clock that
reads 6:00.
Along with the execution
warden, two others are in the
room. They are Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement
officers on hand to make
written notes of the execu-
tion. There is no recording
equipment.
There is also a wall phone,
which the execution warden
picks up to call the governor's
office. We can't hear the con-
versation, but it concludes in
just a few seconds. There is no
stay
The staff escort seated in the
third row leans up to turn off
the air conditioner
The public-address system is
turned on and we can hear the
execution warden ask Happ if
he has any last words.
He says yes and then, in a
clear voice loud enough for all
to hear, he gives it up.
"To my agonizing shame I
must confess to this terrible
crime," he says. "I wish to offer
my most sincere, heartfelt apol-
ogy."
The reporters scribble with
pencils on yellow pads pro-
vided by the prison. We were
not allowed to bring in our own
pads or recorders.
Happ goes on: "I have prayed
for the good Lord to forgive me
for my sins, but I can under-
stand why those here cannot."
Then concludes: "I pray the
Lord grants peace to all. Amen."
With that, the warden an-
nounces that the execution will
now begin.

ME.

H app is the first person exe-
cuted for a Citrus County
murder in nearly 70 years. He
isn't the first in that time sen-
tenced to die. Others either had
their sentences reduced on ap-
peal to life in prison.
John Couey, Jessica
Lunsford's killer, died in prison
of cancer
Serial killer Aileen Wournos'
victims included a Citrus
County man and one of her
murders occurred in Citrus
County. But the specific case for
which she was executed in 2002
was for a Dixie County murder
The death-row roster of 404
inmates currently includes one
Citrus County man. John Camp-
bell, convicted of killing his fa-
ther, was sentenced to death in
March of this year


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In William Happ's handwritten final statement, he confesses to the
crime, apologizes to Angela Crowley's family and asks God for
forgiveness.


Each execution typically has
six media witnesses. Even
though I missed the deadline
to register by two weeks,
the Department of Correc-
tions graciously added me lit-
erally the day before the
execution because of a long-
standing rule that witnesses
include a media member from
the county where the crime
occurred.
Though the case was not
widely known, Happ's execu-
tion received some statewide
coverage because of a new
drug untried in executions
- being administered to ren-
der the prisoner unconscious
prior to the drugs that result
in paralysis and cardiac
arrest.


MEN

he PA system goes off. We
barely can see a room off
the side where executioners
will administer the drugs
through an IV attached to
Happ's arms.
His eyes close, and then re-
open. Then close and, a mo-
ment or two later, reopen, then
close.
Happ's mouth opens slight
and his head falls back. We see
his chest begin to rise and fall
slowly, then more quickly
The execution warden, stand-
ing next to the gurney, occa-
sionally checks the IV drip. He
leans over and presses gently
on Happ's shoulders and
touches his eyelids.


\^< ^


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4t~4N\~Nr~ MA<


Ten minutes into the execu-
tion, Happ's head begins to
move, his neck stretching
slightly I see him swallow
once, and then again a moment
later
His breathing appears to
stop. From behind another cur-
tain, which I hadn't even no-
ticed until just then, a doctor
steps in. He shines a penlight
into Happ's eyes, and uses a
stethoscope to check for any
pulse or heartbeat
The doctor says something to
the warden and leaves behind
the same curtain he came in
through.
The PA is back on. The war-
den faces the window and
states: "The sentence of the
State of Florida vs. William F
Happ was concluded at 6:16
p.m."
The window is closed once
again.
A door opens and witnesses
file out. First family and
friends, and then, after they're
gone, the reporters. A van
drives us back to a media stag-
ing area across the street where
we wait for the Angela Crow-
ley's family to make a state-
ment.
They arrive about 45 minutes
later Chris Crowley thanks the
prison system, victim advocates
and the media for their com-
passion and understanding. He
concludes his statement and be-
gins to walk away, where an As-
sociated Press reporter and I
follow him.
He thanks us again, says it
was a pleasure meeting us. I
ask what he thinks about
Happ's statement and he ex-
presses shock that he made
one. Chris thinks Happ's apol-
ogy was self-serving, and he
does not forgive Happ for mur-
dering his sister
I get in my car and drive 10
miles down a dark two-lane
country road to Starke, where I
go to a McDonalds to file my
story Then it's the drive south
on U.S. 301, where I have lots of
time to think.


%X^K


MEN

People want to know what
the execution was like. This
is what I say:
It was very real. It was
somber It was spiritual. It was
an intensely private time that I
had the extraordinary privilege
to witness.
Look: I write about politics
for a living. It's hard to sepa-
rate fact from fantasy There's
a lot of smoke and mirrors. It's
plastic.
Not so Tuesday, where a
sheet of window divided two
very diverse and absolute cir-
cumstances. On one side were
siblings, aunts and uncles of a
young woman brutally mur-
dered. On the other was a killer
paying the ultimate price for his
crime.
There was no filter No
closed-circuit television. No
spin, no press release. Neither
tweets nor Facebook.
It was all right there.
On Monday, a few co-workers
worried I would have night-
mares. A close friend said she
hoped I wouldn't fall into a de-
pression after watching a man
die. So far none of that has hap-
pened, and I don't expect it.
I do feel much more grateful
about being alive. I love my
friends and family, and Tuesday
night I hugged my cat, which
meowed and jumped away
And I'm looking at the world
a little different today
Don't involve me in a death-
penalty debate, because I'm not
interested. It's all noise.
News stories are based on
facts and these are the facts:
Fact one: William Happ
raped and murdered Angela
Crowley in 1986 in Crystal
River
Fact two: Happ was tried and
convicted in 1989, and sen-
tenced to death.
Fact three: Happ was exe-
cuted by lethal injection Oct. 15,
2013, at Florida State Prison in
Starke.
Case closed.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

I have to admit, just like
my toe-biting Yorkie, some
of us in this business have
a tendency to bite the toe
first before asking any
question. The Chronicle's
own Mike Wright actually
lives on a steady diet of
politician toes.


Personally I have never
met a congressman that
doesn't deserve to have at
least one toe bitten.
As the newspaper world
transitions to a digital
form, citizens of this great
country should remember
the role played by an inde-
pendent newspaper
It's all about biting toes
and kicking other body
parts of those in positions
of power There always


needs to be someone inde-
pendent looking over the
shoulder of those making
the big decisions.
I've worked with senior
reporter Mike Wright for
25 years and I don't have
any idea if he's a Democrat
or a Republican. The same
goes for the rest of the crew
At a newspaper it's not
about political affiliation,
it's about holding people
accountable.


Too much of today's in-
formation flows to us from
politically tainted organi-
zations such as Fox News
on the right and MSNBC
on the left.
I fear for the country if
we digress to the point
where all of our informa-
tion comes to us from po-
litical organizations. The
problems we had in Wash-
ington over the past month
happened because elected


officials have limited their
information input to peo-
ple and organizations they
agree with.
I enjoy biting toes and
believe that even while
technology changes the
way news is delivered,
we've got to protect the
role of the local newspa-
per In every community in
this country we need news
organizations that are will-
ing to independently chal-


lenge those who make the
rules.
And while I am not
happy that Wilson bit the
toe of the neighbor's boxer,
I am proud that he's my dog.
We both bite toes and live
with the consequences.


GerryMulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 C3


YNL




C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013



CMH saved
husband's life
I would like to thank the
Citrus Memorial hospital
emergency room workers
who saved my husband's
life on July 29, 2013. He
came in with a headache,
very severe headache, and
Citrus Memorial was right
on top of it. They immedi-
ately got him a CAT scan
and diagnosed a brain bleed
and immediately Life
Flighted him to Shands
hospital. We need to focus
on saving the lives of peo-
ple and quit this nonsense
that's been happening for
years on Citrus Memorial
hospital's boards. Get to-
gether and save lives.
Thanks much, Harley
Kudos to Harley Lawrence
on his great letter entitled
"I have earned my keep."
Harley provides a great
service in his letters ...
and we appreciate all he's
done, including his service
in the military. Thank you
so much, Harley, and keep
up the good work.
Ask me!
To Cal Thomas, who be-
lieves a government-run
health care system in the
United States could not be
successful: How about
Medicare and Medicaid?
What would we do without
them? And when he says
54 percent of Americans
disapprove of Obamacare,
whom did they ask? I was
never asked. They should ask
the people who don't have
any health insurance. And
thank you, Chronicle, for giv-
ing us the number to call if
you don't have a computer.


Horse hockey!
This new texting ban is a
lot of horse hockey. If the
police cannot pull over
someone who is texting and
driving when they see them,
then what good is it going
to do? Basically, you're
just telling them you can
do it 'til you get caught.
Quite a rainbow!
What a beautiful rain-
bow appeared over Citrus
County this Monday morn-
ing (Oct. 7). It appeared
that one end started at the
Duke Energy plant and the
other end terminated at
the county tax appraiser's
office.
Courtesy, please
I'm wondering why it is
in this particular area, the
people in business, and
that includes the county
government definitely
the county government
employees when they
ask to speak to you as an
individual, they know your
name but they have no
simple courtesy of identi-
fying themselves unless
you ask them. This is not
business procedure. Come
on, people, wake up.
Landscapers only
I'm calling about these
people buying these open
trailers. Those open trail-
ers are for landscapers
only. When we go out there
and try to find trailers, we
can't get them because
the general public are buy-
ing them all. I need one
now and can't find one.
You have to be a land-
scaper to buy a landscap-
ing trailer.


Get inside
The people that are par-
ents of the children that's
in the 4-H drill team with
the horses have to practice
outside in the rain and I
think they ought to be able
to use the fairgrounds be-
cause they'll have some
kind of protection there if
it does rain. And I thought
that the fairgrounds be-
longed to the county and
this is not a profit organi-
zation. So let's see if we
can get that done. They
need to be practicing in-
side the fairgrounds.
Give away canes,
walkers
Many people donate
walkers, canes, wheel-
chairs to churches on the
death of a family member.
After receiving one or two
(how many can you use),
it would be a kind gesture
to give them to thrift
shops, Hospice, Key Cen-
ter, etc., for sale to the
public at a greatly re-
duced price. Some people
do not have health insur-
ance and these items are
very costly when pur-
chased new.
Not on his radar
It's interesting the com-
ment made today about
Mr. Damato talking about
water-quality projects and
this person was asking
why he doesn't do some-
thing about stopping peo-
ple from getting these
176,000 gallons of water
from us daily. My question
is, do you expect Damato
to really take interest in
that? I think that doesn't
fall within his bailiwick.


Bet on it
Various newspapers and
media outlets are report-
ing that the Legislature is
considering expanding
gambling in Florida. I think
that's a great idea. I'm not
a heavy gambler, just a
moderate gambler. Used
to go down to Tampa Hard
Rock, but they did away
with all the comps. They
don't give you any more
free lunch. They don't give
you any more free trans-
portation. But if they did
their homework and see
how many people leave the
state, going to Biloxi and
other areas out of the state
of Florida to gamble, and
think of all that revenue
that's leaving the state so
people can go gambling.
And every once in a while
you see people talking about
bringing gambling to Cit-
rus County, which I would-
n't want up at the mall,
but they have it on their
mind. And if they continue
to leave the state and con-
tinue to spend their money
elsewhere, that's less
money that we have in this
state. Think about it.
Grasswalk
I'd like to sound off on
your (State Road) 44, the
new sidewalk they put up.
It's been over a month now
that the grass has been
like 3 foot high, in some
areas 4 foot high. And
when they cut it, they cut
it into the sidewalk. Right
now presently, you have
weeds covering from one
side to the other. They had
cut the grass and you can-
not even see the sidewalk.
I'm talking about between


Highview Avenue in
Lecanto all the way out to
(S.R.) 44. It is horrible,
horrible. You can't even
walk on it without getting
sandspurs in your feet
when you walk with san-
dals. It's going on a month
and a half now like that or
more. It's horrible what
they're doing over there.
How about howdy?
I have the fun fact of
today: When the first regu-
lar phone service was es-
tablished in 1878, people
said, "Ahoy," not "Hello."
Harley is the man
Harley Lawrence for
president. Yes, sir.
Not convinced
Concerning "Prosecutor:
Adams' allegations a
'bunch of hooey:'" I think
where there's smoke, there's
fire. And why didn't the
state attorney step aside
for clarity and let some-
body else check it out?


COMMENTARY


C I T RU 5 U NTY


w Ci'iUkoNICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


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,c par -, rl ,- i 1ilreLi '.uri, l ,ihr,,vi:l. prlr,.rhp
..ilr, The Festival of the Arts, local high school
C.ILe .ric decorated 8 newspaper boxes that will be
,:ipla, .,:Il luring the Festival of The Arts scholarship
a.,_i rid festival. As part of Art Outside the Box,
,-Au can vote online for your favorite painted
re .- .%,paer box. Online voting runs from October 21
irr-1uqr, j.-. ember 3, 2013. On November 4, the first,
.,-r,: and third place winners will be announced.
All of the painted boxes will be placed
Throughout Citrus County.


Check Out


Our Contest www ro online.com/artoutsidethebo
Our Contest ww~hoiloln~cmatusdteo


VOTE TODAY!

October 21 November 3


I IU 1 h S .I .,I liri n 11 l!_l I i ,
"Minion" "Capturing Our
f Community"


"Night Life"


Lecanto High School
"Starry Night"


L i.... i ii.. il I'. hiool Lecanto High School
"The Seasons" "Jukebox"
_.wra ma. mi. m


CIIUc)N l COUNTlvnE
www.chronicIeonline.com


I- i ,! i 1 [1. ..hool Crystal River High School
"Koi" "Jaws"
www nhrnniclannlino r*nnmrfl.tif*irlthKnY


Naue ostES Stokigg.orSnir
^^^l~riiVariouslocations intecuntyl~cfl^^
Rotar6of i6 ngsBaSpotsman' Showcase






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OcS1 P- S *.

CityofCystaRierPrrotHeasin.theP

Crystal RiverGa zebo bhindCityH all^S

Co -3ntactPhoe:79-7E5EO2-6700
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City of Inverness




Oct20 26





Oct-25- 700 -pm-
Friends^^^ of Crysta'l Rive Stt ParksT Inc.^^^^^^


CrystaulRive Sae ak iit or Cen~ater- ee $ (duts



DontwnInvrns

Oct25- Dec 6
3rd Annua'l Ont'linean ive Auction^^

Oct 26 9-M-30




Roay lb fSugrl WodSGlin orKd





Cotat hoe:35-32-36



Oct- 2 0. 600..pm


Oct26 2:30P0M
Na.tureeCoastComitygBand
Veterans Apprecia^Ttio''n Concert"tw NCC^^^^B
^^^^^Frs Mehois~Pt Church, gl~Homosassa^^
^^^Contact Phone: (352)795-7000


Sound OFF


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Put down the phone
In answer to the person
who called in saying it's
not illegal to text and drive:
It's not correct as of Oct. 1.
If you were almost killed
by a person texting, you
would think otherwise. I was
coming up Cutler Spur when
I saw a girl coming from
U.S. 19 going west and had
no idea she was approach-
ing a stop sign. Her head
was down texting. I blasted
the horn and swerved over
and I waited for the crash.
Fortunately, she was able
to stop right next to my
car. It left me shaking but
thankful I was alive.
Watching my mouth
Mr. Editor, can you help
this senior citizen? I need
to learn how to be more
diplomatic in anything I
say or do. Is there a class
in college or online that I
can take to help learn that
method? I thank you for
your help.


'


wwwAmilluillLPICUIll


L-










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


AM- 7


-From wire reports


Dr. Charles Nutinsky thinks the most
personal cancer should be treated in


a most personal way

INVERNESS
utinsky, chief of the
medical staff at Cit-
rus Memorial Health
System, is teaming
with David Wells, director
of diagnostic imaging, to
develop a Center for
Breast Cancer Excellence
at the medical office build-
ing across from Citrus
Memorial hospital.
The idea is take unused
space on the second floor


for breast cancer diagnosis,
testing, consultation and
navigating all in one
place.
That would remove the
mixing of breast cancer pa-
tients with all others who
are receiving X-rays or di-
agnostic scans on the med-
ical office building's first
floor
"This is one of those
areas with a lot of anxiety,"
See Page D4


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Charles Nutinsky, right, chief of the medical staff at Citrus
Memorial Health System, is teaming with David Wells, left,
director of diagnostic imaging, to develop a Center for
Breast Cancer Excellence.


LECANTO A woman facing breast cancer has a
lot on her mind: prognosis, treatment, side effects.
And finances.
Wendy Hall knows all about that. As the cancer
navigator at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Hall tries to steer patients toward financial remedies
that will help them pay what traditional insurance
doesn't cover.
"I see patients all day, every day," she said.
Hall offered some tips for patients and their
families hoping to avoid financial stress of treatment:
Doctors at the oncology institute place treatment
first, payment later. Other physicians may use a simi-
lar philosophy.
"Here we treat them always," Hall said. "We don't
See Page D4

"We plan to do the footwork,
the legwork and the phone work
for the patient."
Dr. Charles Nutinsky
chief of the medical staff
at Citrus Memorial Health System


Citrus, vegetables had a good 2012 in Florida


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Florida's De-
partment of Agriculture released a
180-page report Friday showing that
citrus fruits, snap beans and cucum-
bers grown in the Sunshine State are
among the industry's highlights.
The report reveals the sweep of the
state's agriculture industry; it's the sec-
ond-largest industry in the state, behind
tourism. Agriculture contributes $104
billion to the state's economy annually
and employs 2 million people.
"There's still a great deal of re-
siliency and strength in the overall
Florida agricultural marketplace,"
said Dan Sleep, a senior analyst for
agriculture department.
In the past 10 years, Florida blueber-
ries have gone from a $10 million in-
dustry into a $65 million industry, he
said, largely due to the fact that farm-


ers are planting heat-resistant and
hardy berry bushes.
The data used to develop the
estimates in the report were provided
voluntarily by growers, shippers, and
processors.
According to the report, Florida:
Is first in the nation in the value of
production of oranges, grapefruit, fresh
market snap beans, cucumbers for fresh
market, cucumbers for pickles, squash,
sweet corn, fresh market tomatoes, sug-
arcane for sugar and watermelons.
Ranks second to California in the
total value of fresh market vegetable
production, with $1.1 billion worth of
veggies produced.
Ranks seventh in the nation for
agricultural exports; the state ex-
ported $4 billion worth of commodi-
ties. Fresh and frozen meat, along with
vegetables, were the top products sent
to other countries.


THE WEEKAHEAD
* MONDAY
WASHINGTON National As-
sociation of Realtors releases ex-
isting home sales for September
* TUESDAY
WASHINGTON Labor
Department releases employment
data for September, 8:30 a.m.
* WEDNESDAY
BERLIN -The German govern-
ment presents its updated forecast
for growth in the country, Europe's
biggest economy
* WEDNESDAY
BRUSSELS European Union
leaders open a two-day summit to
center on the economy and soaring
unemployment. It will also look at
recent tragedies involving migrants
trying to get into the EU.


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Investment


style sets


pension


decisions
EAR BRUCE: My husband
recently passed away Soon
I will be receiving his pen-
sion. My husband would have
turned 65 years old this month; he
never collected any of this. I will
be 64 years old in October
My options are to receive $37,000
in one lump sum or to get $221 a
month for the rest of my life. My
mom is 93 years old, so there is
longevity on my side. Which should
I choose?
-R.R., via email
DEAR RR.: First of all, if you
take the $37,000, you have to invest
it quite aggressively in order to
give you a higher return. Keep in
mind that the principal will be-
come part of your estate. In other
words, if you take the lump sum
and pass away early, you'll leave a
bigger estate. That would be far
less important than what is best for
you.
It all comes back to what you
would do with the money If you
are an aggressive investor, you
might want to consider taking the
lump sum, but in the absence of
that, I would be more comfortable
with the lifetime annuity
DEAR BRUCE: I was wondering
how a person goes about buying a
share of stock. Who do I contact?
Liz, via email
DEAR LIZ: Do you mean a share
of stock or do you mean making an
investment in the stock market? If
you are buying only a share or two,
See Page D4


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises above $101
as growth rebounds

NEW YORK -The price of oil
rebounded to above $101 a barrel
Friday, boosted by a bounce in
China's economic growth and as
traders awaited the release of offi-
cial figures on U.S. stockpiles of
crude and gasoline.
By early afternoon in Europe,
benchmark crude for November
delivery was up 68 cents at
$101.35 a barrel in electronic trad-
ing on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.
On Thursday, the contract
dropped $1.62 to close at $100.67 as
investors assessed the economic
impact of the 16-day government
shutdown that ended after an
eleventh hour budget deal late the
day before.
Brent crude, the international
benchmark, was up 93 cents at
$110.04 a barrel on the ICE futures
exchange in London.


China growth shores
up world markets
LONDON News of a rebound
in China's economy shored up mar-
kets on Friday at the end of a
volatile week that saw the U.S. veer
dangerously close to defaulting on
some of its debts.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares was up
0.5 percent at 6,611 while Germany's
DAX rose 0.3 percent to 8,839. The
CAC-40 in France was 0.9 percent
higher at 4,276.
Earlier in Asia, Hong Kong's Hang
Seng closed up 1.1 percent at
23,340.10 and China's Shanghai
Composite Index added 0.4 percent
to 2,193.78. Australia's S&P/ASX
200 rose 0.7 percent to 5,321.50.
Japan's Nikkei 225 bucked the
trend, dropping 0.2 percent to
14,561.54.






D2 Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association


DR2, 2Builder's nnnectinn


Showcasing the community


The Citrus County
Builders Association is
pleased to present the
2013 Florida Public Util-
ities Community Show-
case, to run from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Saturday, A
Nov. 16, at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal
River
This all-new showcase
of community businesses
and organizations will
feature fantastic ex-
hibits, both inside and
outside: the Florida De-
partment of Law En-
forcement Rollover
Simulator, the Citrus '
County Sheriff's Office
Fire Rescue Fire Safety
House and Fantastic
Face Art by Anne Adams classes
(sponsored by Porter's fered th
Locksmithing). Entnr
The CCBA will accept is total]
donations of new, un- and tin
wrapped toys during the on the
show as well, for our An- case p
nual Building a Better Buildei
Christmas Toys for Tots Citrus
Distribution. Consumers case Fa
have one day only to take Busih
advantage of showcase- dors wi
specific offers, hourly cased i:
door prize giveaways contact
and varied types of free Donna



Learn


DIY


energy


auditing

Florida Public Utilities will offer
two free Do It Yourself Energy
Audit Classes at 9:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the
2013 Florida Public Utilities
Community Showcase. The class,
taught by Scott Ranck, will help
all participants be energy-savvy
enough to not get caught in scams.
It will teach some basic build-
ing science, such as: where the
low-hanging fruit is, why much
information on energy efficiency
on the internet doesn't apply to
Florida and much more. It will
be a learning time for every one
present and they will leave bet-
ter equipped to do their own en-
ergy audit on their homes. They
will know what upgrades will
make the most sense for them.
Scott Ranck started his career in
building with two years of training
at Williamsport Community College,
now Pennsylvania College of
Technology Mr Ranck was in-
volved with both residential and
commercial construction for the
next 20 years. He has now directed
his building background toward
becoming a resource on residen-
tial and commercial energy issues.
Mr Ranck is a state-certified
level 1 energy rater, an ENERGY
STAR Rating Partner, a small
commercial and public building
energy rater and attained his CEM
(Certified Energy Manager) and
CEA (Certified Energy Auditor)
through the Association of En-
ergy Engineers. He is employed
by Florida Public Utilities Com-
pany Mr Ranck chairs the Florida
Natural Gas Association's Energy
Code Team. He is a founding
board member and acting Presi-
dent of the Building Energy As-
sessment Professionals, a Florida
registered trade association.
Mr. Ranck has done energy
presentations for builders,
builder associations, architects,
utilities, and energy conferences.


Scott Ranck, state-certified level 1
energy rater.


)MMUNITfY SHOWCASE
Logo courtesy of Sew Be It Embroidery and Screen Printing


that will be of-
hiroughout the day
ance to this event
ly free! Classes
nies will be posted
Community Show-
ige of www.Citrus-
rs.com and on the
Community Show-
acebook Page.
nesses and ven-
shing to be show-
n this event may
I Executive Officer
Bidlack at the Cit-


rus County Builders As-
sociation anytime 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through
Friday by calling 352-746-
9028. Exhibitor space is
also available for online
registration on the
CCBAs website at www.
CitrusBuilders.com.
Be sure to visit these
fine community busi-
nesses at the 2013
Florida Public Utilities
Community Showcase:
AAA Auto Club


AAA Roofing Inc.
Audibel Hearing Centers
Bay Area Air
Conditioning
Bayside Realty LLC
Blackshears II Alu-
minum
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County
Citrus County Builders
Association
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus County Fire
Rescue "Fire Safety
House"


Citrus Pest Management
City Electric Supply
Claypool Window Film
Coating Systems Inc.
Colony Stone &
Plastering
Duke Energy
FDLE Rollover
Simulator
Florida Pest Control
Florida Public Utilities
Freedom Health Care
FWH & Associates
Gulf Coast Ready Mix
The Hagar Group
Hometown Values
Magazine
Mike Scott Plumbing
Nature Coast EMS
Nick Nicholas Ford
LInc.oln
Pinecrest Building Corp
Pinecrest Pools & Spas
Inc.
Porter's Locksmithing
Quality Crafted Builders
Robert Boissoncault
Oncology Institute
Solar Controllers
Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric
The Village Crier
newspaper
Tropical Window Inc.
White Aluminium
Ziggy's Haven Bird
Sanctuary


CCBA annual awards


Associate of the Year
Past President John Osborne of Pinecrest Build-
ing Corp. presents Immediate Past Associate
Vice President Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready
Mix with the 2013 Associate of the Year Award.


S- Builder
S iB [ of the
(Year
Second Associate
MVice President
%Ken Lindquist of
Ken Lindquist
Corp. presents
President Bill
Larder of Larder
& Sons
__ f Construction witi
the 2013 Builder
of the Year
Award.











^^B|^^ ,: ....







VIP of the Year
Immediate Past Associate Dan Kern of Gulf
Coast Ready Mix thanks John Porter of Porter'
Locksmithing for a year of dedicated service
with the 2013 VIP of the Year Award.


* The CCBA's October Gen-
eral Membership Mixer
will be "Ro-Mac Night"
from 6 to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 24, sponsored
by member Ro-mac
Lumber & Supply. This
mixer, featuring Ker's
Wing House, is open to all
Citrus County builders
and businesses. No cost
to attend.
* The Citrus County
Builders Association and
Florida Public Utilities will
host a Chamber Mixer on
Thursday, Nov. 14, at the
Citrus County Builders As-
sociation. Join us for net-
working, hors d'oeuvres
and information about the
upcoming Community
Showcase scheduled for
Saturday, Nov. 16. No
cost to attend.
* The CCBA annual Build-
ing a Better Christ-
mas/Toys for Tots gift
distribution will be held
on Friday, Dec. 13, at the
Citrus County Builders As-
sociation for pre-approved
recipients. Applications
for this assistance can be
obtained onlineat
www.CitrusBuilders.com,
or in person at the Air
Care Heating & Cooling
office or the Citrus County
Builders Association
starting Monday, Oct. 28.


e The 2014 Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing
has been scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 22, at the
Inverness Golf & Country
Club with proceeds to
benefit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
h Sponsorships and entries
are open now at www.
CitrusBuilders.com or
contact Executive Officer
Donna Bidlack at 352-
746-9028 with any
questions.
The 2014 CCBA Annual
Family Fishing Tourna-
ment, sponsored by Ex-
clusive Platinum Sponsor
FDS Disposal Inc., will be
April 26 and 27 at the Ho-
mosassa Riverside Resort
with a portion of the pro-
ceeds to benefit the Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart. Sponsorships
are open now and official
S registration is expected to
open by November of this
year. For more informa-
tion contact Executive Of-
ficer Donna
S, .A Bidlack at
352-746-
., A--\ 9028.


Member SPOTLIGHT


Bob Tsacrios Plumbing
352-795-0744
wwwBobTPlumbing. corn
* Type of Business:
Residential & Com-
mercial Plumbing
* Employee Name &
Title: Robert Tsacrios,
President
* Number of Years in
Business: 17.
* Community/Organi-
zational Involvement:
CCBA Member for 10
years.
* Proud supporters of:
Homosassa River Fire-
works Festival, We
Care Food Pantry, Ho-
mosassa Christmas
Boat Parade, Jessie's
Place Beat the Sheriff
Race, Boys and Girls


Clubs of Citrus County,
Hospice House of Cit-
rus County and count-
less youth soccer teams
over the years.
* What do you love
about your work? What
we at Bob Tsacrios
Plumbing love most
about our work is
helping our customers.
When we get a call
from a homeowner in
distress, whether about
a toilet stoppage or
water heater flooding
their garage... what-
ever the emergency
might be, our greatest
enjoyment is receiving
the positive feedback
from our customers about
how we made their
day just a little better.


* What do you love
about this county?
We love many things
about this county, just
to name a couple;
Homosassa Springs
Wild Life Park and
We Care Food Pantry
We work with the
Homosassa Springs
Wild life park and
have helped them with
repairing the manatee
pools. We appreciate
the work We Care Food
Pantry does to help
this county. We love
running a business on
the gulf coast. Many of
the employees at Bob
Tsacrios Plumbing
spend their weekends
in the Gulf, scalloping
or fishing.


New member

I


Membership Chairman Wayne
Bardsley of Quality Crafted
Builders welcomes new mem-
ber Mathew Baillargeon of The
Village Crier newspaper to the
CCBA family.






SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Loe
fleriando
q0

Dragon Boa! Ike

Festival

Dragon Boa

Festival

under a

month awa3
he inaugural Lake Hernando
Dragon Boat Race is set for Sat'
day, Nov. 16 at the Lake Hernando
Park, 3699 E. Orange Drive, and He
nando. Each team will race a mini-
mum of three times per day.
Corporate teams will be on a 300-
meter course and the Club teams w
be racing on o100-meter, 300-meter
and 5oo00-meter courses. Eligible
teams may enter into race the 2,oo00
meter "around the island" course.
Registration is open through Nov. 8
Calling all food and craft vendors
Vendor special rate: $50 for busine
booth and $25 for nonprofit booth.
More information and to register
visit http://www.lakehernando
dragonboat.com, call 813-426-3544
or email Christine@
highfivedragonboats.com.


CHAMBER

CHA-
Y C.I on


WYKETV Channel 16 or Digital 47
YouTube.-com/CtrusChamberVideos
CitrusCountyChamber.comrn

Chamber Chat

presenters share

ideas for future

of Citrus County
Chamber Chat guest this week are
continuing to Fire Up Citrus! with
their ideas to help move the county
forward. This discussion will follow-
up with presenters Rebecca Martin,
No Wrong Door; Jarrod McAllister,
Veteran Village; Theresa Foster,
Choose Citrus: The Power of One; and
Harold Walker, the Movie Industry to
Promote Citrus County. The last seg-
ment will discuss upcoming
fundraiser for the Friends of Crystal
River, National Wildlife Refuge Com-
plex, Autumn Fantasy, Nov. 3, 2013.


CTOBER IS INDUSTRY APPRECIATION MONTH and is made possible by
support from Duke Energy. To date, the community has come out to hear
0i ideas presented at Fire Up Citrus!, networked at our after-hours Mixer and
honored local business leaders at the luncheon. To learn more about this and to see
more pictures and videos, visit CitrusEDC.com and Facebook.com/CitrusEDC.

~ IPictured from left: Joe
Lt Meek. Josh Wooten.
Rusty Skinner and Don
........... Taylor.
Talr FIRE UP

CITRUS!
r The EDC thanks and
recognizes John Mitten,
.. owner/operator of
Chik-fil-A of Hernando
00- County; Ann Marie
ur- Briercheck, Tuscany on
ur- the Meadows; Roy Zaehry,
audio and visual; Denny
er- Bell; and Excel Printing.
We also thank our presen-
ters: Patricia Thomas,
Kiley Phillips, Noah
Till MacGinnis, Dr. Paresh
Desai, Ray Chirayath,
Jarrod McAllister,
o- Harold Walker, Arbuth-
Bumgarner, Art Jones,
Scott Baggerly, Dennis
3: Blauer, Richard Fernley,
ss DuWayne Sipper and
Theressa Foster.

3 1 ST ANNUAL AWARDS APPRECIATION LUNCHEON

EDC Board President Joe Meek, along with Executive Director Don Taylor,
congratulate all the outstanding honorees for their accomplishments.


New Image Award
for October
Franklin Anderson
Gallery of Art
659 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River
352-697-2702
FranklinAnderson
Gallery.com
Person of the Year
Ray Chirayath
352-400-4051


Outstanding Small
Business
Laura Lou Fitzpatrick,
Heritage House
657 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River
352-564-1400
EDC Appreciation
Awards
Rusty Skinner of
Workforce Connection
John Siefert


Outstanding
Employer or
Corporate Citizen
Plantation at Crystal
River
9301 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River
352-795-4211
www.plantationon
crystalriver.com


The EDC thanks Carol Kimbrough of
Specialty Gems for hosting a memorable
mixer that featured the "Lenny Damron
Vintage Car Collection." Specialty Gems
is located at 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River,
and can be reached at 352-795-5900.
At right are Carol and Ed of Specialty Gems.
Below, Jim Kimbrough, chairman and CEO
of SunTrust Bank/Nature Coast, left, poses
with Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten.


And the EDC thanks our sponsors:


Duke Energy
Workforce Connection
Health & Wellcare
Services of Florida
Superior Residences/
Sunflower Springs
Citrus County Sheriffs Office
Insurance Resources &
Risk Management
Specialty Gems
Sibex


Crystal Automotive
Hometown Values
College of Central
Florida
Citrus 95.3
Job Site Services
Mike Bays State Farm
Insurance
Insight Credit Union
F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.


bOO


Chamber welcomes

new members with

ribbon-cuttings


Av4 Celebration ocJife
an,,d f.,,d,,.isel, fo,. 1ie fa,,it of


From left: Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Amy
Stalker, owner; Chris Burns, Tammy Fudge,
customers and Betty Murphy, Citrus
Archives and Computers. Note the Auction
is Oct. 26 at 10 a.m. with a preview on
Friday Oct. 27.
ATM Auctions &
Antiques LLC
811 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
352-795-2061
www.charliefudge.comn
Antiques, auctions, estate services with
approximately six high-end auctions per
year.


Front row, from left: Jennifer Duca, Comfort
Keepers; Bill Rodgers; Iris Rodgers, owner.
Second row, from left: Mona Marshall, HR
Power; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel. Third
row, from left: Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives
and Computers; Terry Jolley; Lillian Smith,
Mary Kay Cosmetics. Last row, from left: Lisa
Nash, FDS Disposal; and Mike Buchanan,
Excel Printing.
Iris Rodgers,
Rodan and Fields
independent
consultant
352-201-7901
www.rodgers.myrandf.comn
Rodan and Fields skin care consultant


Mon., October 21, 2013
;: 3 8: im \t iUA .jut i ljti- ,i t IiO %el, N I tsl iivait I hk ,, I h!rin iudo


" I hirs cl'uvre'.
* Cash Bar
SAuctintm Items
* ;0 ;ll


.1 dioor huImd, Iadwr,
t .. .. ,n icr and o-.
I I ,, l rr 1m Iain I ti 1hnhi
us writh hi h Irm. nil and his
h apif ,Mih k on lihi"


Tickets 20 per person For tickets or more info. contact LifeCarm Center at (352) 74-4434
ALL PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT THE CORCORAN FAMILY




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CENTER
Continued from Page Dl

Nutinsky said, referring to
women faced with breast can-
cer "We want to be patient-
friendly with convenient
services available.
He added: "This should be
smooth and 'pleasant' as
humanly possible. We
want to take the fear and
anxiety of this as we possibly
can."
Nutinsky said the breast
center is modeled after one he
experienced in Pinellas
County at the Largo Medical
Center owned, coincidentally,
by Hospital Corporation of
America, the successful bidder
for Citrus Memorial.
While all forms of cancer
are traumatic, health care ex-
perts say breast-cancer pa-
tients feel more comfortable
in private settings.
"Breast cancer is almost a
separate category," Nutinsky
said.
Right now all diagnostic im-
aging at the medical office
building occurs in one place.
All patients share the same
waiting room and, while
mammography has its own
small corridor, breast-cancer
patients mingle with all
others.
That won't be the case for
the new center Instead,





FINANCES
Continued from Page Dl

bill anybody until the end."
The reason is obvious:
Physicians want their
patients to receive the necessary
treatment.
"Some people don't get chemother-
apy because they fall through the
cracks with a payment source," she
said.
Take advantage of payment
plans. Manufacturers of chemother-
apy that is tailored specifically to a
patient's treatment often provide pay-
ment plans, Hall said.
Often times a doctor's office will
do the paperwork for a patient


breast-cancer patients will
take the elevator to the second
floor where equipment and
specialists are on hand to
serve their needs.
"We'll do everything but
surgery," Nutinsky said.
Much of the equipment
needed will simply be relo-
cated to the second floor Wells
said he will need a new ultra
sound machine because the
one on the first floor performs
other scans other than just
breast cancer
A radiologist will be on hand
full time, as will a surgeon for
consultation purposes. The
hospital will hire a nurse navi-
gator to help patients schedule
appointments.
"We plan to do the footwork,
the legwork and the phone
work for the patient," Nutin-
sky said.
The project cost, including
construction and equipment,
is about $250,000.
Citrus Memorial already has
an acclaimed breast imaging
program.
The American College of Ra-
diation awarded Citrus Memo-
rial as a Breast Imaging
Center of Excellence designa-
tion in June.
Wells said they hope to have
the new center up and run-
ning by January
"We think it will appeal to
people," Nutinsky said.
"They'll be with people
essentially in the same boat."



applying for financial assistance from
drug companies, she said.
Some not-for-profits raise money
to help pay for mammograms or
treatment. Hall specifically men-
tioned the Michelle-OGgram, a Dun-
nellon-based organization that raises
money through community dona-
tions to help breast cancer patients
with medical tests.
To learn more, go to www.
michelelogram.com.
Take charge and continue asking
about financial assistance.
"People should be their own advo-
cate or have an advocate, which is
what I do," she said. "Things are
changing all the time. We have to
keep looking for the resources to
make things work."


Without bylaws, wave bye-bye


nonprofit bylaws
When the legal struc-
ture and protection of
corporate status is sought,
petitioners must create and
submit articles of incorpora-
tion. Without this section on
the application, the state can
deny or delay the incorpora-
tion process.
Nonprofit bylaws are of
equal importance. They con-
stitute the essence of the
newly formed organization.
Properly articulated bylaws
represent the organization's
operating rules. The absence
of or poorly constructed by-
laws can be cause for denial
and reapplication. Bylaws
must include certain stan-
dard clauses. They must be
carefully worded, as they
have a direct impact on the
approval process. Proper by-
laws, thoughtfully presented,
are vital.
Why bylaws are vital
Bylaws outline the nature,
purpose, mission and opera-
tional aspects of an organiza-
tion. Bylaws are comprised
of various clauses and each
should be answered in detail.
Agency compliance officers
will examine important sec-
tions for sufficient informa-
tion upon which to grant
corporate/nonprofit status.
Model bylaws can be used
as a reference source. They




MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

a broker will tell you what
companies allow you to do
that. I don't understand why
you would buy one or two
shares, though, unless it's a
gift to a child to encourage
him or her to learn how more
about the market.
If you are asking how you
can invest in the market you
most certainly should contact
a broker I would encourage
you to begin studying the
market by reading the busi-
ness section of your daily
newspaper in order to get a


Dr.
Frederick
Herzog,
Ph.D.
NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


tend to cover the essential ele-
ments. Properly articulated
bylaws will enhance the op-
portunity for income and sales
tax exemptions and permis-
sion to solicit donations.
Model bylaws
Model bylaws have been
designed by many specialty
interest groups: trade associ-
ations, medical societies,
chambers of commerce, and
fraternal, civic, business and
membership organizations.
Model bylaws can be adopted
and customized to best fit the
individual needs of the new
nonprofit organization.
Standard bylaw clauses
Here is a sample of the
standard bylaw clauses:
Article I: Purpose
Article II: Location
Article III: Members/Mem-
bership
Article IV: Board of Direc-
tors
Article V: Meetings
Article VI: Officers



better understanding.
DEAR BRUCE: When
someone passes away with
no assets other than annu-
ities and several retirement
accounts, all of which have
his three children as benefi-
ciaries, is it necessary to re-
port his will anywhere? One
of his daughters is his execu-
tor and has power of attor-
ney A life insurance policy
was given to his ex-wife at
the divorce, and she has
been paying on it for 22
years. Does she pay taxes on
it when received?
-J.E., via email
DEARJ.E.: In the event
that the person who dies has
absolutely no assets other


Article VII: Committee
Article VIII: Miscellaneous
Article IX: Amendments
Article X: Dissolution
The list appears simple
and straightforward. Commu-
nicating acceptable content
is crucial.
Content is Crucial
Governmental agencies
and foundation professionals
review nonprofit documents,
which includes bylaws. It is
upon their approval that the
full benefits are accorded the
newly organized nonprofit.
State and federal agencies
allow for tax exemptions and
foundations offer sizable
grants
Resolution
Careful bylaw construction
should guide your efforts.
Get professional advice and
be inclusive of all informa-
tion about your nonprofit.
Verify all that you claim on
the startup documents is
based in fact.

The Nonprofit Resource
Center was founded by Dr
Frederick J. Herzog, PhD
LLC for the purpose ofhelp-
ingnon profits navigate the
complex issues of starting
and managing a non profit
Dr Herzog can be reached
via email: Therzog@
tampabay.rrcom or by
calling 847-899-9000.



than annuities and retire-
ment accounts, all which
have beneficiaries, the will
should be filed but not pro-
bated.
The will should be filed
with the surrogate's office in
the county where the individ-
ual passed away
As to the life insurance,
there are no taxes paid on
life insurance benefits. She
is home free on that one.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume ofmail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


IB INDOWS


f ^-^1




C


Top Notch

Appliance Repair


352-586-9109
Accepting Credit Cards
Robert
Member of Roik
Chamber of Commerce Licensed
& Insured


/ServiceWMa TR Our Services: Carpet Protector
Serv c ~MAs R Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7'365 PeStMI Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

SROOMSo & $79 95.. UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
uAIIIIIAV 71A mloveseatcleansd.!DhEi
:1HALLWAY U...o eh.csca cia.cdFR E:
:1HLLUI M ge~t a chair or
n nreciiner cleanedlLi
i Expires 3013I ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13

352-794-0270 ."T
CR-C057844 www.smctlorida.com




Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!


CJ7
WINDOv
GENIE.,
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED


352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com


INC.-
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
a3 ViSi MON-FRI8305
S 41~08 13 n SAT 94
LICENSED EVENINGS BY
& INSURED www.michaelsfloorcovueringinc.net APPOINTMEN



6 "fcdknce in toog40 n


n00iru n~ine
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| www.eliteroofing-inc.com
i 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024
LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED


QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE
STARTING AT s$000
Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly


Ang iMt www.CitrusPest.com ET
ay For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! 0
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS
Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River


*Li-- o o d d I ns rd '
'p^^y~im~iT
SBBTOC


I APPLIANCE REPAIR I


D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


BUSINESS


15% OFF
New customer special
Min. order $100 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563=5966


-.A 78


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. ..:(32)563565 Tl...e: 88 52234 1Em0l cass0idschonclen 0eco I 0ebit: w0ch-,ilenlnec0


RIITT 4UIM


a ard read
JOHN NATCUK
paintings..if you have
a John Natchuk painting
that you
would be be willing to
sell, please
get in touch with
Robiellyn@aol.com




Auto Pilot,
Raymarine Sportfspilot
up to 30 ft, like new,
$600
(352) 601-3656

B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Slips352-447-5888

Craftsman, 27 Ton
hydraulic log splitter
$900. obo
50 Ib thrust 12 V, 36 or
42 shaft, Trolling motor
used once $150.
(352) 560-3019

DODGE
98 Caravan mini
van, 7 psg. runs
great, looks good.
asking $1675.
(352) 637-2588

Inverness 55+ 2Br/1Ba
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BR/1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237

StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178





$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087




Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100




FREE
60" Hitachi Projection
Television
Good condition
(352) 382-7686

Free Dog
gentle male, part lab,
3 yrs. old, approx. 50
Ibs ., all shots
(352) 341-1714

FREE
Fancy Tail Guppies
(352) 560-3019

Free Male Cat
Smart, Pretty,
Gunmetal Gray,
short-haired, green
eyes. Showed up at
my home 2 weeks.
ago. (352) 746-1904

Free Puppy
pug & cocker spaniel
mix, female,
(352) 628-1272

Hooded Pigeon
with feathers on feet.
Beautiful bird. Free to
good home
(352) 228-4302

Quilt Frame
made with plastic
pipes, as seen in the
quilt shops at Branson
(352) 560-6137

Very Cute Puppy,
Mixed brown and red
with white chest.
House trained
352-436-3764





FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.00lb.
Stone Crabf$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001


AMERICAN PIT BULL
all white, his name is
Cotton, approx. 18
mo's old. lost in the
vicinity of the Mini
Farms and Dunklin
352-601-0564 or
352-601-7029

Female, Pure White,
Lost on 10/13 on 9th St
Crystal River. Ans to
Daisy. Family Heart-
broken, reward
212-6992

Lost 2 Ladders
off truck
1 Green step ladder
1 yellow extension
ladder near 491 &44
(352) 601-7299


Motorcycle. Between
Homosassa & Crystal
River on Hwy 19.
352-220-3856
Lost Calico
Female, Declawed
with white neck,
Sugarmill woods area
10/12/13
(352) 382-3386
Lost Cat,
female, fixed,
snow shoe Siamese
Citronelle /495 black
mustache, answers
to name misstache
(352) 795-6205
LOST Tn colored bea-
gle. 40 Ibs Missing since
9/8/13. JoJo is a special
needs pet. Last seen on
N. Lee St. Beverly Hills.
Please call if you have
seen him. Needs
medical attention.
352-249-3107
MALE CHIHUAHUA
Puppy, Tan, very timid
LOST in Leisure Acres
off Wipperwell
(352) 436-5586
MISSING CATSiamese
mix, cream w/orange
ears & tail,neutered
male,blue eyes, front
declawed, 12 yrs. old,
named Baileyvery
friendly, Beverly Hills,
Washington/Pennsylvana St.
area,small RE-
WARD, call 249-7252,
leave message if not
home, deeply missed
Pitt Bull Mix, female
Has no teeth
Placid Ave.
Inverness Highlands
(352) 746-5627
REWARD Large
Siamese cat. lost
6/15/13 in the area of
hwy 200 and Orchid dr.
He was wearing a black
collar with no tags.
please call or text
239-287-0953




Found set of keys in a
recliner that was do-
nated to the Key Thrift
store 2 months ago.
(352) 419-7203
Found Social Security
Card Lecanto Area
Girls Name
Call to identify
(352) 212-3013
Homing Pigeon
with band. Lecanto
area 352-302-0569




Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.OOlb.
Stone Crabf$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001




SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-59

Part time (25 hours
weekly) Advanced
Secretarial work
performing general
clerical duties in the
Department of
County Attorney.
Must possess a cur-
rent valid Florida
driver license. $11.07
hourly to start.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, October 25,
2013. EOE/ADA.


HAIR STYLIST

Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person












Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





DIRECTOR OF
ADMISSIONS
AND MARKETING

Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
Full-time position
available. Admis-
sions and/or market-
ing experience in a
skilled nursing facility
or hospital setting
required. Three to
four years health
care experience
preferred.
Bachelor's degree
or equivalent in
marketing, business,
journalism or com-
munication is desira-
ble. Must be familiar
with the professional
community and
knowledgeable of
admissons/mdketirng
practices and
procedures as well
as the laws, regula-
tions and guidelines
governing admis-
sions/ marketing
functions in the
long-term care
facility. Must possess
leadership ability
and willingness to
work harmoniously
with and supervise
professional and
nonprofessional per-
sonnel. Must possess
ability to make inde-
pendent decisions
when circum-
stances warrant
such action.
Must be able to
supervise admission/
marketing staff.

We offer great pay
and benefits in a
team-oriented envi-
ronment. Christine
Bigwood
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
ChristineBigwood@L
CCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
43572



.44.


ARNP or PA
RN Full & Part Time
MA w/Phlebotomy
Skills

FLORIDA CANCER
SPECIALIST/Details at
www.flcancer.com









Busy Medical
Practice Seeks

1. CT SCAN TECH
2. OPTOMETRIST
Experience is a must
Competitive Pay/
Benefits. References
Required
call for immediate
response
352-586-0632
or email
hr@ cmc-fl.com

CMA

Immed opening in
busy OBGYN office
Fax Resume
352-794-0877

DENTAL
INSURANCE
COORDINATOR

F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson@rswan-
sondental.com

DIRECTOR
OF NURSING

Nature Coast Lodge
seeks a dynamic
Nurse (LPN or RN)
to become Director
of Nursing for our
Assisted Living com-
munity. As part of
the senior manage-
ment team, you
must have a passion
for working with
seniors, enthusiasm
for leading and
managing the
on-site nursing staff
and caregivers and
the ability to train,
implement, disci-
pline and oversee
critical programs
necessary to
establish NCL as a
leading provider of
assisted living ser-
vices. The DON will
also be active in
professional net-
working and out-
reach to key referral
sources for building
and maintaining a
full community.

The successful can-
didate will have a
current nursing certi-
fication in good
standing and be
First Aid and CPR
certified, have five
(5) years' experi-
ence in a health
care environment
and three (3) years'
supervisory experi-
ence. Assisted Liv-
ing Core Training
certification would
be a definite plus.

For more information
please send resume
and cover letter to
Michelle Cruz,
General Manager,
Nature Coast Lodge
(adminncl@tampa
bay.rr.com). -EOE

F/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Busy Office
Email Resume to:
clinicalcr@
tampabay.rr.com
or Fax 352-726-8193

FRONT DESK

F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson@rswan-
sondental.com

HIRING:
PT, PTA, RN, OT

Florida Homecare
Specialists
(352) 794-6097


RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time
and part-time
employees, with
opening in all shifts.

HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF





Maintenance
Director Needed

Nature Coast Lodge
is seeking an
experienced Main-
tenance Director to
serve as part of the
senior management
team. You must
have a passion for
meeting the needs
of seniors, an eye for
detail and an
awareness of build-
ing codes and com-
pliance standards.
The Maintenance
Director performs
routine mainte-
nance, minor re-
pairs and oversees
housekeeping and
grounds mainte-
nance including be-
ing on-call for build-
ing emergencies for
our Assisted Living
community.

The successful
candidate will have
completed high
school, have three
(3) years' mainte-
nance experience
and two (2) years'
supervisory experi-
ence. Basic knowl-
edge of mechani-
cal, HVAC and
electrical systems,
plumbing and car-
pentry are an asset.

For further
information please
send resume and
cover letter to
Michelle Cruz,
General Manager,
Nature Coast Lodge
(adminncl@tampa
bay.rr.com). -EOE

REAL ESTATE
AGENT

For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty





BARTENDER

ADDvl In Person
THE DAM PUB
7p-9p, Mon.-Fri

Food & Bever-
age Director

needed for upscale
Country Club in
Citrus County.
Looking for self
starter with great
business and cus-
tomer service skills.
Must have previous
mgmt experience in
the industry. Excel-
lent opportunity.
Send resume to
careers@
citrushills.com

SERVERS &
LINE COOKS

For upscale
restaurant. Experi-
enced, Motivated
and Dependable
with transportation
and phone. Top pay.
F/T and P/T
To apply call
(352) 228-7353


Mederi Caretenders is a leading provider in geriatric home
health care. If you have a passion for seniors, a special
place awaits you on our Senior Advocacy Team.

Our Inverness office has immediate openings for PRN
Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapists. Flexible
schedule options. Excellent pay offered!!




E-mail your rdsumn to careers@caretenders.com
or call Faye Sherman, RN, Director of Professional Services
at 352.726.3874 for more information.

Mederi 4

cAButk&dMs ^Mnd


CHwioid.E

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.





Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time

Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


CH)ON1CLE

Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time

Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.




TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Hiring 5
experienced reps
HOURLY + BONUSES
9am-4pm Mon-Fri
NO WEEKENDS!
Call Cale at
727-858-0499








DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624




Exp. Metal &
TPO Roofers

must have tools
and transportation
352-726-7006




FABRICATORS

Exp. Granite Fabnrica-
tors needed. F/T, P/T.
Apply at DCI Counter-
tops 6843 N Citrus
Ave. Crystal River




Granite Fabrica-
tors Needed

Part time w/Full time
potential NO EXP.
NEC. Will train, Must
be detail oriented
and have good
hand eye coord.
drug free workplace
Aoolv in Person
DCI COUNTERTOPS
6843 N. Citrus Ave
Shamrock Industrial
Crystal River


Medium Equip-
ment Operator
Announcement
#13-60

Skilled work in the
operation of moder-
ately complex
Public Works
construction and
maintenance
equipment. One
year's experience
in the operation
and routine mainte-
nance of the
type of equipment
assigned. Performs
manual laboring
tasks. Must have a
valid Florida CDL,
Class A with N en-
dorsement. Starting
pay $11.09 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, October 25,
2013 EOE/ADA

Now Hiring:
OTR Class A CDL
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Call today
for details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

PIT CUSTODIAL/
MONITORING

Maintenance
Experience a PLUS
Apply in person
Spruce Creek
Preserve SR 200
Dunnellon
9am 4pm. See Julie

RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS

Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply in person
S & S Electric
2692 W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon

Sheeters
Carpenters

tools/trans. reqd.
reply to Kenny2000
@earthlink.net




CITRUS WELL
DRILLING

Must be physically
fit. Willing to work
long hours. Prior
construction exp. a
bonus. Must have
clean driving record.
No Phone Calls *
APPlvY in Person
After 8am
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
drug free work place

HOUSEMAN

Experience Preferred
No Phone Calls
Aoolv In Person
614 NW Hwy 19,
BEST WESTERN

TELEMARKETERS
WANTED

Hiring 5
experienced reps
HOURLY + BONUSES
9am-4pm Mon-Fri
NO WEEKENDS!
Call Cale at
727-858-0499


Home e0Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Fii Your DreawwHOHC&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniciieuImo-rfinder.com


AIRLINE
CAREERS

begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





Tax Manager

5-1Oyrs. Business Tax
Experience w/ CPA
firm, CPA preferred
Qualified Persons
Send Resume to
Cpa.resume.search
@gmail.com




PICTURE FRAMES 4
large, good shape, all
for ($5) 352-613-7493




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




ANTIQUE SLANT TOP
DESK 37 1/2" high,x
27" deep, X 29 wide
First $100. Takes it.
352-382-0069




COLLECTOR PLATES
100 plus plates,
Rockwell's, Hubbell,
more, whole collection,
$100. 352-382-0069




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" KINGSFORD ON
WHEELS WITH
COVER $20
352-613-0529
GE REFRIGERATOR
64" HIGH 28" WIDE
WHITE $60
352-613-0529
GE Refrigerator
white, side by side,
18 cu. ft.,
water/ice/crushed,
$350. As is firm
(352) 270-4087
GOOD DISHWASHER
$100 works perfect. 30
day warranty call/text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
Refrigerator (2010)
Kenmore, white, like
new bottom freezer,
68" H, 33" wide, 30 D
glass shelves and bins,
$425. (352) 513-5415
Call Evenings
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore Side by side
24 CF $300
Kenmore 700 Com-
mercial Dryer, elec,
$100 (352) 212-5779


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 D5




D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Refrigerator,
Frigidaire, w/ ice
maker, white, runs
goodexcel. cond.
$125. (646) 236-3097
(352) 628-0130
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
kenmore, white
$100 ea. Good cond.
can deliver for fee
(678) 617-5560
WASHER AND DRYER
LG Tromm front loading
washer and Kenmore
dryer. $350 for both.
352/382-2268



COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51H.
$65. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H. $60.
527-1239.
CORNER COMPUTER
DESKW/HUTCH
29'h,51 'W/hutch2'd,42fTom
md to end.oak
finish $60 201-8784
FLAT FILE
Safco, steel, 5 drawers
533/8"W, 16 1/2" H
41 1/2"D, beige.
Very good cond.
$525. Sits on 30" H
sturdy wood frame.
Frame is free to buyer.
(352) 621-8053




ONLINE AUCTION
Lifetime Collection
1949 & 1950 Ford Cars
& Parts 15+ Cars
1000's of Parts -
Many NOS!
Bidding Ends
November 1Ist
12 Noon
107 Oak Valley Drive,
Macon GA
L.W. Benton
Company
478-744-0027
www.bidder
one.corn
#3215




CAR
BUFFER/POLISHER
HVP,10" Random Orbit
polisher/Buffer, Like
new, $40. 352-382-0069


Craftsman profes-
sional 10" Table Saw,
1P1 HP motor, w/
Biesemeyer fence sys-
tem. $475 (orig $950)
(352) 628-1734
HOMECRAFT DELTA
10" JOINTER have mo-
tor & Booklet,$80.Call
Dave 352-621-0286
SPRAY GUN PAINT
Chicago Tools Hi Pres.
Never used. $8.00
(352)257-4076
Used tools looking for
a good home at a
reasonable price
Call (352) 726-7367




DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installa-
tion! CALL Now!
1-800-745-2645

FREE TELEVISION 27
INCH SONY TUBE
TYPE WITH REMOTE...
IT WORKS!!!
YOU PICK UP (I WILL
HELP CARRY TO
VEHICLE) TV IS IN
BEVERLY HILLS
PHONE 802-578-6108
SONY Wedge
TV, 36 in, surround
sound, $95 obo
(352) 419-4146
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS $90
352-613-0529




CD/DVD DRIVES 5
drives int & ext...$25 all
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
IBM 390E THINKPAD
needs OS, plus ex-
tras...$75 352-476-2652
tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
NINTENDO WII
CONSOLE complete
with Fit board, sports
and carnival games.
$75.00 (352)257-4076


4 Wheel Drive
Mitsubishi, Tractor
w. loader, 4 new tires,
excel, cond. deisel,
$6,875. (352) 860-1106
BUNK HAY FEEDER.
Freestanding hay
rack/bunk feeder.
$140. 527-1239
RUBBERMAID 100
GALLON water trough.
Like new. $40.
527-1239



PUMP UTILITY 1/6 HP
Flotec FPOS1250X
Brand new never used.
$40.00 (352)257-4076



4 Samsonite Mesh
Fabric Arm Chairs w/
matching 36" x 56"
Table, near perfect
$200. pls. call
(352) 628-7050
PATIO TABLE
42" glass top table
with 4 swivel chairs. 1
yr old, pert. cond. Cost
over $400. Sell for
$165. 352- 746-2842



9 Piece Pipe Patio
Furniture Set, excel.
cond. octagon, table
w/ 4 chairs & 2 lounge
chairs w/ foot stools
Iht. blue cushions $200
2 Rattan chairs, excel.
cond. w/foot stools
$75 ea. or $130 both
(231) 233-6477 Cell
38" ROUND COFFEE
TABLE with lazy susan.
Maple. Nice condition.
$50. 527-1239
40" round dining table
w/blue pedestal
base...$35
352-476-2652 /tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
42" GLASS TABLE TOP
1/2 inch thick with bev-
eled edge. Excellent
condition. $35.00
(352)795-5876
Armoire,
Mahagony, 1 drawer,
oval glass in doors,
36"H, 37"W, 19"D,
$100.
(352) 382-7960
BEDROOM SET
FRENCH PROVINCIAL.
Dresser, chest & night
stand. Off white/gold.
Nice condition. $200.
527-1239


BEDROOM SET. Chest,
dresser & night stand.
Maple. Nice condition.
$200. 527-1239
California King
w/ white headboard
4 post & box spring,
good quality
$250
(352) 621-1664
COFFEE TABLE Large
glass coffee table
(42"x30") on ceramic
Florida Cougar $100.
phone 352-419-6644
COFFEE TABLE.
43"x22". Maple. Good
condition. $40.
527-1239
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
DINING ROOM SET
incl. 4 chairs & hutch
dark wood,
good condition
$300.
(401) 829-5141
DINING ROOM SET
Oak with glass top,
6 chairs, very heavy.
$100 (352) 586-0521
DINING ROOM SET
Solid light wood table,
w/24" leaf, 6 cush'd
chairs. Large china
closet. $800
Excellent Condition
(352) 621-5561
DINING ROOM TABLE,
6 chairs & hutch. Pecan.
66"x42", with 2 leaves
90". $300. 527-1239
END TABLE DARK
PINE. 21"x27"x22"high.
Excellent condition. $40.
527-1239
a d s I w
FURNITURE Hardwood
table w/2 leaves chairs
& hutch $130
Cherry dresser $45
(352)201-4844
KING MATTRESS SET
4 yrs. old paid
$1,800, asking $500.
(352) 527-8600
LIQUOR BAR &
STOOLS Indoor jet
black contemporary
portable wood bar with
stools. 56W X 43H X
24D. Brushed nickel
accents, locking cabinet
and more.
Attractive value at
$200.00 352-746-1486
LOVESEAT LAZBOY
Mauve fabric 64" L
with incliners Good
Condition $60. Non
Smoker 352-621-0175


Matching Sofa &
Love Seat,
floral pattern white
background, excel.
cond. $300. (352)
382-3131
on .0 ~U TA C-

Metal Lshape desk $50
antique fold & other
wood bench $50 ea.
(352)201 -4844
Queen Mattress Set,
frame linens & spread,
spare room set,
like new $200.
(352) 382-1918
QUEEN SIZE SLEIGH
BED AND MATTRESS
SET $75 352-201-2665
RECLINER GREEN
FABRIC Very good
condition. $40.00
(352)257-4076
SLEEPER SOFA.
Queen size. Castro
Convertible.
Early American print.
$100. 527-1239
SWIVEL ROCKER.
Gold fabric. Good condi-
tion. $65. 527-1239
VINTAGE DESK &
CHAIR. Maple. 33" x
53". Very nice condition.
$80. 527-1239
VINTAGE ROCKING
CHAIR. Maple. 40".
Nice condition. $50.
527-1239
White wooden
POTTERY BARN
COMPUTER desk and
chair. 352-212-0929.
Asking $100.




Chinese Lanterns
1 large, 2 sin, elec.
Concrete $150
Weed wacker. Electric
good condition $75
(352) 503-6902
ROTO-TILLER
Troy Bilt Bronco. 5 HP,
Model 12180. Hardly
Used.$200
(352) 628-1783
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 8am-2pm
MULTI-FAM Tools, boat
items, home improve,
hshld., clothing. 12040
W. Checkerberry Dr.


2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $15
EACH 352-613-0529
3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING 3 SETS
SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6
& 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 &
5/6 $30 352-613-0529
Girls winter clothing 4
jeans, 1 pants, 5
shirts, 2 pajama sets &
2 hoodies sizes vary
$60 352-613-0529
LADIES COWBOY
BOOTS Black leather
Durango's size 8.worn 3
times $40 201-8784
LEATHER JACKETS
Man's brown Lg,
woman's black Sm
$40.each
352-382-0069
WEDDING DRESS
White, Size 8, worn
once. $100
352-201-2665
WOMEN'S WESTERN
SKIRTS 5 western
skirts, various colors,
size 10-12, $15.each
352-382-0069




2 WOOD FRAMED
CHAIRS Removable
cushions. 1 rocker 1
std.Both for $50.00
obo 352-621-0248
8 x 10 Used
Lark Shed for Sale
Asking $1,550
delivery included
(352) 860-0111



LlSTIINGS
1990 E-Z GO GOLF
CART 36V new
batteries, excellent
condition, $1200 OBO
352-364-1490
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Beautiful King Size
Custom Bed Spread
with shams,
NEW cream & blush,
Cost $250 Asking
$150. 352-794-3907
BOOTS women tan
size 7 work, size 7 1/2
black dress, good
shape, both for ($5)
352-613-7493


CHILDREN HALLOW-
EEN COSTUMES 1
CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1
LION SIZE 5/6 $7
EACH 352-613-0529
CHROME CLOTHES
RACK, (for display), 4
arms, excellent condi-
tion, $40,
(352) 465-1813
CONCERT SHIRT Tay-
lor Swift red tour, large,
brand new with match-
ing arm band, ($10)
352-613-7493
COSTUME JEWELRY 5
necklaces, 1 pair ear-
ings, 2 watches, great
shape, all for ($10)
352-613-7493
Craftsman, 27 Ton
hydraulic log splitter
$900. obo
50 Ib thrust 12 V, 36 or
42 shaft, Trolling motor
used once $150.
(352) 560-3019
DEHUMIDIFIER
Kenmore
excellent condition.
$100 obo
(352) 726-7367
Dyson Vac.
$100
(231) 233-6477 Cell
ETHAN ALLEN
ROCKER-RECLINER
Brown & Beige wood
frame $40.00obo
352-621-0248
FINGERHUT GIFT
CARD 100.00/selling
for 75.00 Will meet you
there & verify.
Linda 341-2271
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
Stone Crabj6.00b
delivered352-897-5001
FREE FIREWOOD
U pick up
Sugarmill Woods
352-382-2493
FUTON Has a black
cover mattress. Light
wood on sides. $35.00.
746-0714
PLACE SETTING
w/napkin rings, made
w/brooches
Centerpiece Pitcher
w/flowers and mirror
$200. for all
(352) 795-7254
Refrigerator,
whirlpool 21 cu. ft.,
2 yrs. old $400
1950's Retro Dining Set
60" w/ 5 chairs &
hanging lamp $150.
(231) 233-6477 Cell
SEWING MACHINE
Elna Pro Quilters
Dream, like new
paid $2k sell for $600.
(352) 212-9978


SHOPLIGHT like new,
with 11 good T40
flourescant bulbs ($10)
352-212-1596
SNAKE Female ball
python. 3' with cage
& many accessories.
$85. (352) 746-0714
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
TRANSFER SWITCH
AND GENERATOR
Cutler-Hammer
CH10EGEN3060 trans-
fer switch (8 120V ckts
plus 1 240V ckt) and
Generac 4000XL(4000
watts) generator $350
for both. Inverness
726-1083




Embroidery Machine,
Brothers. Single Head
10 needle. Fully
computerized. Many
Extra's. (352) 794-0352



Hospital Bed
Electric Bed, Good
Condition $200 obo
352-503-9468




WE BUY US COINS
& CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" 12 STRING
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
SOLID SPRUCE TOP&
MAHOGANY $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR GOLD
GROVERS,SOUND
HOLE PICKUP
&GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
"SWAMP STICK"
ELECTRIC 6 STRING
MANDOLIN /BANJO
/SLIDE GUITAR? $100
352-601-6625
2 CRANK-UP light
stands for T-bars or
truss $75 both
352-476-2652 / tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
10'LIGHT TRUSS
w/dollies for DJ or
band...$50
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com


FENDER STYLE
TRAVEL BASS GUI-
TAR 21"SCALE,POLY
STRINGS,PIEZO PRE-
AMP $75 352-601-6625
LESPAUL STYLE
GUITAR WITH CRATE
AMPW/12"SPEAKER
BOTH FOR $100
352-601-6625
ORGAN
LEGEND. Perfect
condition
$300 Firm. You move.
(352) 419-6186
PRAISE &WORSHIP?
"NEW" PURE WHITE
"FISHERS OF MEN"
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
$100 352-601-6625
RED-BLUE-GREEN
rotating lights
$25 for all 3.
352-476-2652 / tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com



MIRROR Beautiful gold
ornate mirror(41"x61")
$100. call 352-419-6644
NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call
for e-mail picture 40.00
linda 341-2271
SPODE CHRISTMAS
TREE Service for 7,
$100.4pc pl settings
513-4614
STEP LADDER 6 FT.
Louisville fiberglass
excellent cond. $30.
(352)257-4076
VACUUM CLEANER
HOOVER Bagless self
propelled Windtunnel
12 amp $25.00
(352)257-4076



PRO-FORM TREAD-
MILL treadmill
Pro-Form 730CS
model 831.299270
$95.00 352 746-9483



BILLIARDS TABLE
American Heritage
1" slate top, leather
pockets, solid mahog-
any, claw feet. All
accessories included.
Plus stainless mini beer
fridge and portable
ice make.
All in areat Condition
$1400 for all
(352) 503-7690
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



B's Marina & Camp-
ground Yankeetown
Deep Water & Covered
Boat Sllps352-447-5888








Y\ur\'M rld first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!



( ii i


ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL1l0580





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eak6uster"
Free Written Estimate

$ 100 OFF;
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed
[ic./Ins. CCC057537 000GSE |









BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "R-ght Over" Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!h

Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M&W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)5374144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 k*k

L. Q*<* Ic
BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365


LAwin Spriinkfer

Not Working9?

We'll Fix It









746-4451 -S





o f q:.,I I !1
GENIE.tC

W, o.m tr& M afA tin mr
*Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
*Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill





SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting -Fixtures
Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
*Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
MR 352-364-4610
(5EMR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
I independently owned & operated
Lie #EC13003381 insured & bonded
S24Hoursa Daye-7 DayslaWeek


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Compete Tree Service
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
(352) 344-2696
FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
&"RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Mr & Mrs FIX IT
(For Seniors) LIC& INS
Home&Yard/ln&Out
Low Senior L 613-2643
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 11/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447




CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820








Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672




Find Guaranteed,
Local A/C Sales &
Installation Pros!
800-763-7108 Air
Conditioner Sales,
Service and Installa-
tion. All pros are
pro-screened and
relentlessly
reviewed! Call now
for a no obligation
estimate!
800-763-7108




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352464-1 397










A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


S I EXTERI R
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

LohnQic
John's Painting
& Wallpapering
Lic/Ins. FreeEst.
*'352-201-9568**




PIlk



POOL

GREG'S MARCITE
Florida Gem, Diamond
Brite Marcite, FREE EST.
746-5200 Lic.#C2636



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570






STERLING
A+ Remodel/Renovate
Kitch/Bath/RE Prep.
Refs/lns/15yrs local 352
220-3844. crc#1327710
SAll phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.com
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
***352-639-1024-*




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


IDR RE CE INI


uV 4


I Add an artistic touch to your existing yard DON'T LET YOUR
W -' o pool oi plan DRYER START
Something A FIREI
;, ,. ";''- -completely new! F laiRale No $39.
',e 'Ofennrar~ed, idnCo .I.

P.m -l~^ never dv Iicaied"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
'CORES

POOL AND PAVER LLC
nsred 352-400-3188


i._, 1 1pll _,1 l

Services from A to Z
Complete Handyman Services
Specializing in
Aluminum Rescreen Work,
Storm Doors, Garage Screen
Doors, Window Screens
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit Porch


Wood Repairs
You Name it I probably do it!



I 746-2445
Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience


Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices



www.eiliteroofing-incxcom
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED





KNOCKOUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
1' Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too
''' 352.942.6876

S Call Today tor a
6ooGD46 Clean Tomorrow


TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
Stump Grinding -
Local, Call Robert
352-302-2220
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


L Exposed
Aggregate
S,,.S.hotcrete $45yd.
Decks Tile
FREE Pavers "
ESTIMATES
GREG'S COMPLETE
UntiF 0 REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
LICENSED 5K1
INSURED352-746-5200
& INSURED ~-J5O





GENERAL
Stand Alone fJ
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352621124


fB~^. . . . . .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EZ-Go Golf Cart
excellent condition,
has headlights
exc. batteries w/
charger. $1500
(352) 527-3125
Fishing Gear
2 polls and Tackle
$125; Tools-various
prices. 2 Car Ramps
$50 for both.
(352) 503-6902
Golf Cart
E-Z Go, 3 wheel, runs,
drives, with charger
$399
352-978-0658
Two Mens Bycycles
Both 26" and like new.
8 speed Monogoose
$175, Break Point
Pro $125
(352) 503-6902

utility

RIDING MOWER
Pro line Automatic
48" deck, 24 HP, $600
(352) 746-7357


Sell r Swa


-IIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19 Near Mall)
352-563-2110






YourWorld












kNitiE
I : ', 'l: l ,i



'i w ,hr: riir,:,r, l i,: rle. c:rn


IKomI Long^
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment






W7


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


BANDIT
Bandit, a well-
trained dog who
sits, shakes, lies
down, speaks upon
command. Very
attentive & a true
gentleman. Walks
well on a leash,
appears to be
housebroken, gets
along w/other dogs.
3-4 y.o. Hound mix,
perfect size.
Call Diane
352-201-4971








K
CINNAMON
Cinnamon, a sweet
2-y.o. Australian Kel-
pie mix, very smart
housebroken,
weighs 24 Ibs. Beau-
tiful red coat, very
affectionate & at-
tentive. Gets along
w/other dogs. Loves
to be with people.

Call Nadia @
352-726-9814.


ti ii f,,i' ,f I
,,ui v 1i..l II St.





Classifieds


CLASSIFIED


LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown-white terrier
mix, weight 65 Ibs.,
came to shelter
because owner
could not care for
him, gentle, a bit
shy, very playful,
loves water, gets
along w/other dogs,
loves human friends,
eager to please.
Beautiful dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Is.
S


Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning
n rf-At.?^


GEORGIA
Georgia, 2-y.o.
female bulldog mix,
easygoing medium
-to-low energy, very
gentle, will sit, gives
paw, lies down, rolls
over, & takes treat
gently.likes smaller
dogs & loves
adults/kids, house-
brkn, Loves walking
& belly rubs, Great
family pet or for
older person.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $500
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827



Auto Pilot,
Raymarine Sportspilot
up to 30 ft, like new,
$600
(352) 601-3656




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
352-563-5510"*

COBIA
CC, 17.5 Ft., 100H,
Yamaha, 4 strk, Great
Shape $6,700. obo
(813)-244-3945

SOLD
PONTOON BOAT
20 ft, 28 HP Johnson,
no trailer,
$1,200
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation
Vehicles
ALLEGRO BAY
'96, M37 Motor Home
Fully restored in 2011,
New michelin tires,
good cond. $10,500
obo, 352-274-8664
FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k mi. Very
Good cond
MUST SEE $12,000
(352) 628-6643
RIALTA
2002, new tires, AC, &
paint, 59k miles, runs
great, great mileage
$31,500. 352-238-4445




KEYSTONE
Springdale 2005
Model 298-BHL
super slide out, awn-
ing, tandem axle,
coupling hitch anti
sway bars, 30 amp
hkup. Asking $9,500
or will consider shal-
low water boat as
trade, (352) 503-9133
before 9pm
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SUN VALLEY
2003, Apache 30ft,
5th wheel, 14 ft. slide
outs, new tires, pull rite
5th whl. hitch, 27" TV,
Etc. $6,600 obo
(352) 503-7508
TRAVEL TRAILER
04 Wilderness Advan-
tage, 28 ft, slide-out,
loaded with extra's
very clean. $9995
724-822-7922
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




1958 SET OF CHEV-
ROLET HUBCAPS
good condition, one
needs paint line touchup
$50. 352-382-0069
Running Boards, Ford
Equipment. For 250 S.D
Ext Cab. Type 2 tubu-
lar. Like New $250
(352) 628-1783

VeBhicle
Wanted
**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
352-426-4267t


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


WOCOXH2


C CITRUS COUNT Y 'E




wwwschronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


369-1020 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
John W. Dalrymple Vickie L. Maluk
Mark D. Shaw
4298 E Fort Apache PL 7635 W Mesa Ln 5520 S Cast Pt
Dunnellon, FL 34434 Homosassa, FL 34601 Homosassa, FL 34446
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 20, 2013


370-1020 SUCRN
BOCC-OMB-RFP #001-14
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 001-14
House Demolition & Replacement
SHIP Program RPL #2012-01
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
bid to provide residential home replacement services for a home located in Her-
nando, FL that is qualified under the SHIP Housing Rehab Program Job # RPL 2012-01.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on October 30, 2013 at 9:00 AM at 60 S.
Davis St. Beverly Hills, Florida 34465. Only those companies who are present at the
pre-bid conference will be permitted to submit a Bid in response to this solicitation.
Additional information concerning the scope of the home rehabilitation work will be
distributed at the pre-bid conference. Interested parties must attend in order to be
considered for award.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before November 14, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sover-
eign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for November 14, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 20, 2013


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 D7


Vehicles
W-ate
BIG SALE
-Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
-* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

Leek

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



8 CARS for$1500lea
(plus T, T & T)
3 DAYS ONLY
Fri, Sat, Sun 8:30 -4:00
Inverness Motors
3399 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy 352-422-2224
95 Buick LeSabre
99 Chevy Astro
96 Chevy Lumina
05 PT Cruiser
97 Chrysler T & C
02 Dodge Caravan
02 Dodge Gr Caravan
98 Ford Explorer
BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BMW
'01, Z3, 3.0i, manual,
124k mi., green, black
top, garaged, clean.
$7,450., 352-220-2077
Cadillac Deville
1998, good leather
seats. Good tires.
First $850 takes it!
941-744-7123
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT
door, power win-
dows, locks, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
2000 Intrepid Runs and
looks great, 180,000
new tires $1300
352-678-7049
DODGE
98 Caravan mini
van, 7 psg. runs
great, looks qood.
asking $1675.
(352) 537-2588
FORD
'02, Explorer,
106k mi., good cond.
$4,000 negotiable
352-637-2258 or
634-2798
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MERCURY
2001, Grand Marquis,
great cond. cold air,
leather int., 93k miles
$4,500. (352) 422-5622
OLDSMOBILE
1998 Achieva
runs & looks good,
cold air. $1200 firm
Lye msg 352-364-3009
SATURN
1999, S1I1,4 door,
low miles, extra clean,
1 owner, $3,250.
352-341-0018

Classic
Vehicles
CHEVROLET
2004 Corvette Torch red
coupe, excellent
condition, LS1 engine,
6-speed, Z51 perfor-
mance handling, fully
optioned with 2 roofs,
42,000 miles, one
owner, never hit or
abused. $24,000 phone
(352) 527-2927 or
harmarenkins
.@Lvahoo.com


CHEVr T
04 Corvette, Conv Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
'82, Corvette, T-tops,
silver green matalic,
automatic, very rare
car, mint. cond.
$16,500 obo, 302-8265
CORVETTE
1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
FORD
46 Ford Rat p/up Rdstr
78 Merc. Cg r XR7,
Model T Bucket Spdster
misc. 352-949-7874
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng. all original, great
cond. $29,500 obo
352-302-8265





1 111111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BIG SALE
erCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVY
01 HD 2500 Ext, Cab;
4 Dr 4x4 diesel, cap/
running board/sun vi-
sor 127k mi; $14,500
obo 724-822-7922
FORD
1979 Box Truck
460 eng, low miles
dual wheels, am/fm
$1000.obo
(352) 637-4011
FORD
2004, SD250 supercab
Lariat 158" WB, 5.4L,
V8, one owner, runs
& looks great. Over
road high miles $6,900
527-0989, Must See!
TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$9,000 (352) 726-3730
(352) 422-0201



CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 1 owner $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2007, Escape, XLS,
$7,950.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2003, Wrangler,
4 cyc., 5 speed,
soft top, $9,950
352-341-0018



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan,
Fully loaded, dual slid-
ing drs. 35mpg, V6,
Pert. cond., garaged
New tires, Crystal Riv.
$3,700. (727) 207-1619



HONDA
2006, VTX 1300
4k Miles, Garage kept
$6,500.
(352) 398-5903
YAMAHA
650 VStar, accesso-
ries, adult ridden,
14k mi, 52 mpg.
SHARP! $1995
724-822-7922


I Bi


I Bi


I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lis i I


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS


ql 77


3 Chevy
BU LT


AROF
kage, 20" Wheels
....................... $31,825
.----.---..- $1,8"5
------- $18500
CONQUEST:.-1,0
>-.-~...-..- 750
..TY-----$2,500
CASH:....-$1,000


New 2014 Cheviv
TRAVERSE T


~ewYM3 Lhevy
SPARK LS
M SRP: ...................................................... $14,145
DEALER DISCOUNT: -..----..- $300
USAA.: ...-......... $750
CASH OR TRADE EQUrY:-..---...- $2,500


NeW 20z
SILVER
DOUB


TAHO
M SRP: ................................
DEALER DISCOUNT:
REBATE: .......,
LEASE LOYALTYOR COM
II&AA. .


OV ER 90
Used & Cerifiied
Pre-Loved Vehicles!


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTt


".95


$6495


2 YEARSML
30,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE!


Plus, a RKLL
PIT-STOP
PROGRAMM
See dealer for complete details.


EXTRA CwlAl
$79495


IOVWIETTA
TURBO DIESEL LATHER, SUNROI,
TC ISCPiE AIMmO,P/SL&T,ALlOYS
$15,49s


091EEP GRANDCHEROKE4XY
12 POWER DRISSEAT,
$16,W88


10 GMCTERRAIN AWD
12129,SLTV6 LEATHER,
TOUCHSCBREEN RADIO
$21,188


$15495


DR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


M:A


41I1I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 D9


IL~v
^riiiiii iii -iii
.....a..... T W. I I
.... ........., '''''' i ~ i '''''' . .......
:: ||| Otl .


"Check anywhere in the world first, but


CHECKWITH


CHAD LAST"


i.- :I






...for a New 2013 Honda
CMC LX SEDAN
Model FG3B5DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


A T


~ '0 SS,


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Mb:, TF3H3DJW- Best Selling Compact
SiNb America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013
Honda FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


...foraNew2013Honda {^3
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


a


Model RM3H3CEW- Come See Why The CR-VIts The Best
Selling Compact SUV In America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%AP.
X 60 MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on aprrowed crediL


P 'I re ne i" c si.
Pre-Owned Vehicles!


$500 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their
spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:

Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!
.n dAi e foi rrmpipWlrm drt.1iKl


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!


On US-19, 2 MIles
South of Crystal River


352.628.4600


LoveHonda.com


t* 0mo4 LoyalPgiO provides cure ownea s of a 2003 or newer Honda vehicle wilh S500 towards the Down Payment or Cap Cost Reduclion
MWC lh ermflmeorpv asea 201o213 Cit, Cic IMA, or Cic NGV through Honda Financial Sevices (HFS). Dealers can start advertising immediately
!DNt -ia sales sorts. HP-E252012 anild 2013 All Cic Loyalty Incentive Program offers S500 vaid only for current owners of 2003 or newer Honda model
i; ds. *i HP-. 'loi Cmvic Copeor Conquest" program offers $500 valid lfor current owners of 2003 or newer Chevrolei. Dodge Ford GMC, Hyundai Jeep. K Ia.
S I ftkm ikLssan, SaturnI Sion, Subamn Toyota andVolkswagen model vehides. 136 month cksedl end lease with approved credit, 12 000 miles per year 15 cents
I. Wtft'.ti !afl~f-W icasliortA equty plus Waxes, bag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due ai signing Any dealer installed enuipmem ai additional cost. NOi a lease
.3Bble nd e oiepayIleaseof$9,976wtifh approved credit, 12,000 miles per ear 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2000 ca or trade equity Paymentis p ius t. iag and lease and state fee dueat grnrigO.pition-s iatadditioal coi tlJsed a down
;Wlir apcostredudlontowairdl tiepuihase or lease of any new Honda automobile using a valid Honda APR. Honda Leadership Lease, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan,. program through HFS ptludes P..o [iue ati Signirng Le'se Program) Mjust
H W&mGla liRiOMa estaillsed byHfS, and vehicle must be eligible for new-velcide rates. Covers internal lubricnant par s. See dealerfor details All pie-owned vehicles include 52500 cash down ur trale equitv Offter vli] Thin d Te of publ(adion


...fora New2013Honda
..CR-VLX2WD i


OF




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


One or more at this price. One or more at this price. One or more at this price.
$2999 cash or trade equity. $2999 cash or trade equity. $2999 cash or trade equity.
Vin 293659 Vin 033383 Vin 843627
Model#13113 Model #22113 Model #16113
DRIVE FOR DRIVE FOR DRIVE FOR
$16 $ P ER PER
I NTH" 179t MONTH MONTH"


IS~ s I I s I 1I V I 1 I I Is I
s: s





N11MSSAN CRYSTAL


800-584-8755 EXT 10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 SOUTH SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL
PRICE INCLUDES $2,999 CASH FOR TRADE EQUITY AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT EXCLUDES TAX, TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +INCLUDES
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY DUE AT SIGNING AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE.WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.


D10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013




INSIDE


HOME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GC


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


LIJ I 1 E


RabLabs' "Cele" clocks,
which encase little alarm
clocks in agate. Rock- and
mineral-themed decor is part
of a fall trend toward nature
and natural elements.
RabLabs/Associated Press


OMIUaltR:
Smm

jgmggfflllllff flBMBIB~ UjS~
::... .. ...




E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DROP DEAD GORGEOUS!
* Gorgeous Entry Beautiful Kit.
* SS Appliances Functional Center Island
* Relaxing Master Suite Many Updates
* Former Model Home Elegant Decor
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
SEinui elilesullon' lenunK ne
www.Floi udnLslinglnlo.o In


2439 W. DEVON DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3BD/1.5 BA u Secluded Location
SOver 1,600 SF Living o 2 Blocks from Park
s Large Family Rm. & Shed, Fruit Trees
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [ 1
(352) 527-7842












bedroom plan. Clean and ready for immediate
occupancy. Heat/A.C. and roof approx. 6 yrs old.
OO(352) 422-3875 0821

ONE, OF ONLY A VERY FEW
3BR/2BA units, available in Meadawcrest at a hard to
beat price! Spacious open floor plan, eat-in kitchen,
screen lanai, indoor utility rm. & 2-car garage! Split
bedroom plan. Clean and ready for immediate
occupancy. Heat/A.C. and roof approx. 6 yrs old.
JODY BROOM 1352) 634-5821
Email. remaxga;225@yao.wom


3575 N. LONGPINE PT.
LAKESIDE VILLAGE
* 2BD/2BA/1 CG Maintenance-Free Villa
* Split Bedroom Plan Den or Family Room
* Inside Laundry Neutral Colors
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [-.
(352) 527-7842 E
(352) 422-3875


E-maljh lw 'a a pabay r I c
STEAL THIS HOME!!!
Awesome Sugarmill Woods home that screams
value!!! 3 bedroom split plan plus a den/office. Large
rooms and massive, soaring ceilings. Eat-in kitchen
with breakfast bar. Deluxe master bath & HUGE 3-car
garage. Clean, modern, fresh look. So much more!
JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR. -
1Re, GRI, ABR, e-PRO
Email: johnHolloway@tampabay.rr.comi
www.TheHollowayTeam.com


OVER

$100 MILLION SOLD!









#1 in Citrus County


2-STORY POOL HOME
with 2,500 Sq. Ft Living
*3 BR, 2.5 BATH *2-Car Garage
S2005 Built HUGE Lanai (40 Ft.)
* Living & Fam. Rm. Laminate Flooring
* Upstairs LOFT Brick PAVERS

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 *&J
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com IN



WM*






REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
N 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
^ m 637-2828


S2Buyer enters house
W j 2 A number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
pxj'qa property
presentation in
English or Spanish


HUMUSA55A
Remodeled Real Beauty
-2/2/1 on 2.6 Acres Private Pond & Greenhouse
* Cast Iron Stove in Living Area Massive Back Deck
,2 Large Master Suites ,24 x 14 Screened Patio
CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


vvaienroni iowerea meir price again! ooi1z winm new
kitchen awaits your approval. Indoor spa room with
beautiful bath off the master. Canal only a short
distance to river and house is across the street from
park-like area. Drive by 5109 S. Running Brook Dr.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxga122@yah9o.am P


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-3PM
'!i ..


S4.0 Acres rencea & uross-rencea
S3BR/2BNA/3CG Custom Home
Extremely Energy Efficient
Hickory Cabinets/Silestone Counters
Enclosed Lanai
12x24 Workshop w/Electricity & Water
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 M
Email: lenpalmer@remax.neti


I/ l W IE6. 11111111ll16 1 E1
CLEARVIEW ESTATE
* 3BR/2.5BA/2CG Home
* Great Room
* Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area
* Master Suite w/Office
* Lanai wNiew of Equestrian Trail
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


242 N.1 Ie l Hw. eel Hls5774 w wRtAI o I 10 U..Hy.4 Invres6760


1 ,. ,[ |[ ] I, "I J~JI
PRIVACY ON 4.9 ACRES
This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is tucked away on 49 wooded
acres which it shares with wild turkeys deer, and other Florida
wildlife. The home features a great room with fireplace, new
appliances, large master suite with jetted tub and separate
shower, and a huge FlRorida room overlooking the wooded
acres. Privacy galore yet only minutes to town, State parks,
hiking trails, and waterways.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 IL
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


9051 E. KINGSPORT, INVERNESS
SImmaculately Maintained In & Out!
SBuilt in 1992...But Looks Like New
2/2/2 With Family Room
SApprox 1,701 Sq. Ft. Living
SReshingled Roof in 2008
SLight & Bright Home Come Take A Look!
DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840 f
Email: debrapilny@remax.neti




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Retiree studies monkey population


were brought to AJ


Silver Springs in 1930s


CARLOS E. MEDINA
Ocala Star-Banner
SILVER SPRINGS
STATE PARK For Bob
Gottschalk, the Silver
River monkeys have be-
come an important part of
his life.
He has given them
names and knows their be-
havior He documents
what they eat and how
they interact with one an-
other. He knows which of
the rhesus macaques are
the alpha males and fe-
males, and even collects
their droppings to get in-
sights into their health.
He has no funding and is
not working for any insti-
tution or group. The "citi-
zen" biologist, as he calls
himself, studies the mon-
keys to satisfy his own cu-
riosity Plus, it's fun.
Gottschalk visits the
monkeys every Tuesday.
It's a routine he has bro-
ken only a handful of times
in the last six years. He be-
came fascinated with the
monkeys soon after retir-
ing to Lady Lake from
Iowa, where he worked for


John Deere as a chemical
and metallurgical engi-
neer But his degree is in
biology and he has worked
with animals for most of
his life.
"When the opportunity
came up with the mon-
keys, I thought it was great
for me," Gottschalk said.
"We don't have monkeys in
Iowa."
He found out about the
monkeys while working at
an animal rescue facility
Soon, he was up to speed
on the animals' history on
the river He heard about
how they were first re-
leased in the late 1930s on
an island in the Silver
River to serve as a tourist
attraction. The monkeys,
however, are strong natu-
ral swimmers and quickly
escaped the island.
He also learned about
the decades-long debate
on what to do with the
monkeys. Florida's official
position is that they are an
invasive species and have
to go.
'As part of the Florida
See MONKEYS/Page E14


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney l' l
S I RealtorI A HOUSE Realtor l l II
J 302-.3179 SOLD Name! 287-9022 I
The oldeni746-6700 WEEKS REALTY, EVEL HILLS BLVD
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVDI


LISA CRIGAR/The Ocala Star-Banner
An alpha male called King Phillip, or snaggletooth because of his right fang hanging over his lower lip, displays a
"threat call" along the shoreline of the Silver River in Florida's Silver Springs State Park. "Citizen" biologist Bob
Gottschalk of Lady Lake has studied on the rhesus macaques along the Silver River for about six years.

S ~ l [ 3LL Avv # ll =1 ,

JOI OUR WINN TEAM!


Positive Attitude...

High Energy...

Professional Demeanor!


The premiere active-adult master-planned community
in West Central Florida wants you!
Unlimited earning potential.
New home sales experience preferred, not required.


Florida RE License is preferred.
C VILLACES OF, oW.,, Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
itrus Cp ils lS nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707
1Q G A________________________________________________________________________________


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Extension slates gardening workshops


Service provides vital information to Florida green thumbs


Special to the Chronicle

A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 22
at the Citrus County Ex-
tension Building, 3650 W
Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Water quality should
concern all who live in
Florida. This gardening
presentation will offer
landscape opportunities
which are creative and
functional gardening sug-
gestions encouraging
water conservation and
quality Rain gardens, fer-
tilization practices and ir-
rigation management are
topics which offer land-
scape gardeners opportu-
nities to protect our water
resources. Several land-
scape design solutions will
be discussed to aid in nat-


ural water filtration in the
residential landscape.
A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov 14
and 19 at the Citrus County
Extension Building, 3650
W Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
Material hardiness
zones are a critical factor
in the proper selection of
sustainable plants. This
workshop introduces par-
ticipants to criteria to con-
sider when selecting
materials, their placement
in the landscape and po-
tential frost protection en-
couraged to reduce
material loss.
The average low tem-
perature in Citrus County
is between 20 and 25 de-
grees and should be con-
sidered when looking at


WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute
their expertise to columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
Read up on all things school-related in the Chron-
icle's Education section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the week from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
See what local houses of worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion section./Saturdays
Read about area businesses in the Business sec-
tion./Sundays



INCOME PROPERTY
8 Mobile Homes on 12 Acres in INVERNESS
Good rental income $48,000/year, low vacancy rate, great
visibility, many updates including C H/A systems, septics, Ig. pole
barn, 8 storage buildings, central water system. Owner will
consider trade/owner financing to qualified buyer MLS# 359656
LET'S MAKE A DEAL!
LISTED AT s325,00
DEB INFANTINE
ERA AMERICAN REALTY Call 352-302-8046
117 S US 41, Inverness, FL 34450 debinfantine@yahoo.com


plants for installation in
local landscapes. How to
care for plants after dam-
aging frost are also topics
for discussion.
U A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10
at the Citrus County Ex-
tension Building, 3650 W
Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to
plan and prepare garden
projects for the upcoming
milder season. Garden




Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


planning, estimating cost
and garden clean-outs are
important topics to con-
sider when outdoor work
is delayed.
It is also a great time of
year to enjoy the outdoors
with activities like bird
watching.
Creating natural buffers
which attract birds is an
excellent project to con-
sider during this time of
year These topics will be
discussed during this
presentation.


SReal Estate DIGEST


Karis Geistfeld


named
Karis
Geistfeld
has been
named the
top sales
agent for
September
at the Vil-
lages of
Citrus
Hills. Her
year-to-
date new-
home


top agent


Karis
Geistfeld
The Villages of
Citrus Hills.


sales are $4.9 million.
The Welcome Center for
the Villages of Citrus Hills is


located at 2400 N. Terra Vista
Boulevard in Citrus Hills. Visit
online at www.CitrusHills.com.
RE/MAX agents
soar to new highs
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to announce that they
have passed a significant
milestone in sales volume.
The company has suc-
cessfully closed more than
$100 million in real estate
transactions this year.
RE/MAX Realty One is
celebrating its 25th anniver-
sary this year. They are the
only company to pass the
$100 million mark in 2013.


GITTA BARTH |
REALTOR@
Cell: (352) 220-0466 |
gbarth@myflorida-house.com
*Iif J


I *^* | .I, Ipg -r 1 ^
CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE
A taste of unspoiled nature: secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ponds, mature
oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully positioned in a beautiful setting!
This Shangri-La can be yours for $800,000
Get a taste of it & visit http://www.mycrystalriverfarm.com/ for an interactive tour.


OUTSTANDING
Waterfront residence: tastefully
remodeled 3/2 5/2 home, high & dry
(never flooded), ample space (042 ac)
for boats, toys & pets Boat slip, docks,
240ft seawall, workshop, shed Updated
roof, A/C, kitchen, windows, everything
meticulous maintained
Priced sooo right at 399,000!


masm
SWEETWATER POINTE
Exquisite setting on 1 5 acre, ravishing
views, custom built residence, 3925 sq
ft, golf cart garage, pool, den & office,
crafted with attention to detail the
right home for a discriminating taste
Golf cart path to Inverness G&CC
$249,000


COUNTRY ESTATE -
PLEASANT GROWVOMEOROM
i buil ROOM TO ROAMm
.,,,, ., i i ,-, ,,,i quality Spectacular 3/2/2 pool home w/large lanai
throughout vaulted tongue & groove on 2 14 acl HUGE 25'x40' detached
ceilings fireplace; granite counters & garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for
custom cabmetry; family room, den/office, your RV Nicely landscaped with pretty
2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor oaks and well maintained, too New roof
entertaining' Jenn-Air summer kitchen, (2013), 14 Seer HVAC (2009), generator
covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceiigs & perimeter alarm
$549,900 $249,895


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY
no bridges! 2 master suites,
apartment on the lower level.
Upper level accessible via elevator.
Pool, hurricane shutters, security
system, updated kitchen & bath-
rooms. 190 ft. of seawall, boat lift!
- Everything just waiting for you.
$488,000


over FloralCityLake 1 12 ac
(160 x 300+ ft), picturesque setting with
major oak trees Charming brick home, first
time offered, some original fixtures and
fireplace still in place Large detached
$179.000 ,,
*179,000 OOOGDEE


Join us for a FREE
Home Buyers Seminar.

When:
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Where:
SunTrust Crystal River Office
1502 SE Highway 19
Crystal River, FL 34429

RSVP to Susan Troy:

Susan Troy,
Loan Officer
352.795.8286
NMLSR# 65968o




SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE


Q Equal Housing Lender. SunTrust Mortgage,
Inc., 901 Semmes Avenue, Richmond, FL 23224,
NMLS # 2915. FL only. 2013 SunTrust Banks,
Inc. SunTrust and SunTrust Mortgage are federally
registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use old papers to make


Halloween decorations


Associated Press
With its black and white color scheme, newspaper can be the perfect start-
ing point for Halloween crafts. Just add some orange accents and turn news-
papers into easy garlands or more elaborate paper flowers to adorn a wreath.


Black and white give appropriate accent


HOLLY RAMER
Associated Press

What's black and white and or-
ange all over? Creative Halloween
decorations made out of newspaper
Black and white newsprint is a
perfect starting point for spooky
crafts.


A lightweight foam wreath form
covered with newspaper roses looks
elegant on its own, but can be
dressed up with mini faux pump-
kins, glittery berries, a swarm of spi-
ders or bats, or any
other embellishments. Making the

See CRAFTS/Page E14


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


TAO F


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


Prudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A wOpen 7 Dasrties
AWeek! Properties


lls 364 E. Dakola CI. l 1121 N. Chance Way
IMLS UbUa S214,900 10 1,Lo ;eu4 $196,900UU
Meadows Golf Course 3bd/2ba homew/beautiful pool.
3/3/2 with caged pool. Directions: wy 486 (NorvellBryant Hwy) to south on
Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to Ron Dakota. Citrus Hills Blvd, L on E Hartford St, R on Chance.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


NEW LISTING


NEW LISTING


738 W. Doerr Path I" 10 u5W. Ski Cossing Di.
MLS 705982 $344,900 ",lS, MLS 705955 $237,900
Spectacular golf home Maintenance-free luxury-
set high on a cul-de-sac. 2/2/2 + den with lake views.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


JI% t 1100 W. Pearson St.
MLS 705976 $128,500
Meticulously maintained 2/2/2
with fabulous upgraded features.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


141S 1. 218 S.Harrison Si.
"I- I...ll. 4 ..$68.. 00
Remodeled & updated 2/2/1.
Centrally located.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


t T 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr.
/ ,- r 1 1,,- S24'.000
Beautiful 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres.
Bring your horses!
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
RENTAL


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744


ZC LI [,-'lL--'u-7u3SZl,01)
Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.
Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, Ron E Reehill
St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R on Knightsbridge P1.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


AIL$ 1571 E. Seattle Slew Cir.
MLS705988 $199,900
3/2/2 gated community in Citrus Hills.
Near amenities.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


l?2,a 5150 N. Pink Poppy Dr.
I/ J MLS 705423 $208,000
Beautiful country style with "green" features-
3/2/2/pool. And what a front porch!
Joy Holland 352-464-4952
BRENTWOOD RENTALS


Choose from one of-two unfurnished, completely
- Maintained properties in The Brentwood gated
"M1 681 E. Hartord Sl. neighborhood. All for less than $1,000 per month.
4 $750 Both units have a family social membership to the
Furnished, upper unit, no membership, Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club included in
$750 F/L/SD. their more than reasonable rent.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


'Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
'First Time Home Seller


numle DUyWI/muIIur 51 Uuy! i -*--
I h ... I I ,1 ,, II I I I I III h,II Il I I I i ,,,lh I I I ,, I I
[E, I1 I ,h II.... I .. i 0 h i . ,, .I I I ,, .. Ih h ,1,1 ,I I1 ,, ,,Sl l IH .. i i h ,,


V


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E5


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROEI


, a.;., NE I ,




E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiiRpNicILE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


These books are musts Inside..."


for Florida gardeners

A accurate information on native The latter book has a handy, four-page
Florida plants is available in Gil reference list of common names paired
Nelson's 2003 point-form book with the correct botanical name starting
"Florida's Best Native Land- on page 399. Both books are
scape Plants: 200 Readily good resources for newcomers
Available Species for Home- 5 to Florida and long-time
owners and Professionals," homeowners. Both have excel-
published by University Press -lent color photographs. The
of Florida. Donated by the Cit- former "200" book lists plants
rus Chapter of the Florida Na- in alphabetical order by botan-
tive Plant Society, copies are in ical name. Unfortunately,
all Citrus County libraries. All there is no index in my signed
of Gil's previous books are cor- first-edition copy, but it is by
rect up until publication date. far the best reference ever
Gil's more readable 2010 Jane Weber printed on Florida native land-
book "Best Native Plants for JANE'S scape plants. Copy the plant
Southern Gardens: a Hand- list from the 2010 book and
book for Gardeners, Home- GARDEN tuck it into this bible.
owners and Professionals" Acer rubrum, red maple, is
covers more northern regions of the Gulf the second plant in Gil's "200" book. Sev-
and Atlantic coastal plain and the Pied- eral named selected varieties are sold lo-
mont foothills, or Mountain floristic re- cally, but the original tree suits me just
gions of the Southeastern U.S. It contains fine.
the 2006 "Hardiness Zone Map" from the Ranging in moist to wet sites from Cen-
National Arbor Day Foundation, as well tral Florida north to Newfoundland and
as the invaluable 1997 "Plant Heat-zone west to Minnesota and Texas in cold
Map" from the American Horticultural
Society See JANE/Page E15


Set in stone
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Cheese dishes common in the old days; sizing up vases


ear John: I have red, is the number 625
enclosed photos and, underneath the
of a cheese dish number in red, is the
that I bought letter "s."
from an an- S o m e -
tiques dealer where along
in Greenville, the way, I
S.C., in 1990. heard that
He often c h e e s e
traveled to dishes like
Europe to this one were
shop, so I am given away as
guessing the prizes at re-
cheese dish gional fairs in
came from John Sikorski England. I
England. But SIKORSKI'S enjoy your
who knows, show on
and that is ATTIC radio show
why I am on 90.1 FM,
contacting you. and your newspaper
The cheese dish column which I read in
seems to be made of the Citrus County
some kind of paste- Chronicle. Thank you
board. On the inside of for any information you
the cheese dish cover, in can provide me con-


cerning the cheese dish.
It has traveled with me
to a number of cities
over three states. I have
not seen anything like it
in antiques stores i have
visited since I bought
the dish two decades
ago. -J.E, Inverness
Dear J.E: Cheese
dishes were made in
large quantities in Eng-
land and Europe during
the 19th and on into the
20th century They were
mandatory for keeping
See ATTIC/Page E13
This hand-painted
cheese dish was likely
made in the late 19th
century. The interesting
handle adds to collector
interest.
Special to the Chronicle


r
q. t\k
^v"


lIE


*lk
-mni^_, ^ ^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ways to protect fruit from pesky fruit flies


LEE REICH
Associated Press

I suppose I should look
upon fruit flies as old
friends. Our formal intro-
duction took place in jun-
ior high school, in science
lab. Now they visit regu-
larly, every late summer
and early fall.
Still, for old friends, they
can be bothersome. No,
they don't bite, but I'd
rather do without their flit-
ting around any ripening
fruit in the kitchen.
As it turns out, fruit flies
don't really turn up this
time of year; they just
make their presence
known. All summer they've
been hanging around out-
doors, attracted there, as
they are indoors, to ripe
and overripe fruits. Cool-
ing temperatures drive


them indoors. An abun-
dance of ripe and overripe
apples, tomatoes, pears
and other fruit, much of it
now brought indoors, pro-
vides further enticement
for their move.
It's actually fruit flies'
larvae small, white mag-
gots that are feeding on
the fruits. After feasting
for five or six days, larvae
are transformed into the
all-too-familiar flies. The
females do more than just
flit around for the few days
they are alive; they fly up
to six miles and keep busy
laying eggs up to 2,000 of
them. The eggs hatch into
maggots, which feed, be-
come adults, and round
the cycle goes, leading to
skyrocketing populations
of maggots and fruit flies.


See Page E13


LEE REICH/Associated Press
Fruit and fly traps in New Paltz, N.Y. Fruit flies can be an
annoyance at this time of year.



***Foreclosure List***

4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview
705705- $174,900 Estates, 705702- $189,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Steve McClory 352-422-3998
2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello Deep Water Canal Front
705061- $74,900 Home 705665
Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196

Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over Immaculate 3/2/1 on half
two acres! 705223 $84,900 an acre. 705068 $74,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen.
Springs. 705093 $89,900 704264 $114,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

3/2/2 on over an acre. Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on
705142 $119,900 an acre. 705087 $129,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047

Desirable Brentwood Estates Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home,
3/2/2 det. villa. 704862- $119,900 dbl. lot. 704938 $349,900
Steve McClory 352-422-3998 Steve McClory 352-422-3998

Beverly Hills 3/1 Handyman's 2/1 in Yankeetown.
Delight. 705153 $41,550 704923 $19,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 John Maisel 352-302-5351

Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres.
mobile, 1 acre. 704257- $22,900 704781 $34,500
Yolanda Canchola 352.219.2196 Tami Scott 352-257-2276

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY I-3PM
546 Hillwood Path, Laurel Ridge in BEVERLY HILLS (MLS#705479)
Barbara Stone 352-586-3072


REAL ESTATE, INC.
ml 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFcE: (352) 795-6633
VAIfIvOn M -VMAIT- SRAIIf(')AI,7FnfOM


iAGNT O IDUTYI SE N DA YS _A


U


MEADOWCREST corner villa w/l
bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car garage, vinyl
windowed screen room, new carpet
throughout, walk in closet, breakfast bar
between kitchen & dining area Central
water & sewer #706010 $58,500


BEVERLY HILLS adult community,
55+, 2 bedrooms, 1 5 baths, 1 car garage,
tile floors throughout except for 1
.- i-1 Flt li 1.f-h- -1-m- I
I ,, h I I .~ ... .. I h , .... I I ,
,hh Yt ,ItI .. ..I lith

4A


DUNNELLON 1998 beautiful 4
bedroom, 2 bath, D/W mobile, 5 + acres,
dual faced fireplace between family &
living rm dbl glazed windows w/air
space, fenced, excellent water #701494
$88,000


CRYSTAL RIVER ready to move in
condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage home is in cul-de-sac has pool &
spa, patio foi I II ', i 1
backyard 14 ....... ....
#359466 $104,900


HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car
... . .. a , /additional 2
,. ,h. i.h, house Has
extra carport, screen porch & shed Has
well and central water #706017 $99,900


baths, newly remodeled, on 2 lots (2 acres),
catch 1. .. ..i I. I..] I
& ., i i ., I,, ,, ,,
kitchen easy access to Gulf of Mexico
#702563 $80,000


. I. ILLK tO-ta liany renovated z
bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry New
central A/C, carpets, interior paint, ceiling
r- i-.t- -.-ed yard neat, clean,
i,,.1. ,,, i, ,1 $89,900





SUMMERFIELD 2005 DWAV M/H
handyman/woman special, needs lots of
work, rood does not leak, 4 bedroom, 2
bath, private well & septic, no appliances
or outside A/C unit on 040 acres
#702483 $34,900


'-B/sI7
.I IT
"BESTJ
Ii) *
.k
Realtor


0


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E7




ES SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


~h~ FLL





-- AW I .1k




Latest trend has

style set in stone

Kim COOK
Associated Press
A long with grainy woods,
metallics and other textural
elements, rock and mineral-
themed decor is part of a
fall trend toward nature and .
natural elements. '"
In many cases, real rocks and ,
minerals are integrated into the.:
decorative items.
Los Angeles interior and product
designer Hilary Thomas says she
responds to the divergent qualities
of primitiveness and sophistication
in rocks and minerals. "
"I find that using pieces like pet-
rifled wood and malachite helps a'
space look more collected and lay-
ered," she says.
And the range of colors the
bright agates, the neutrals is fun
to play with. "You can be color-shy
and still tie a room together or
make a big statement with a finial,"
she says.
Thomas creates lamp finials out
of slivers of malachite, howlite and
agate, as well as unusual speci-
mens like inky iridescent
labradorite, creamy blue-tinged
chrysophase and petrified wood.
The colors range from intense pur-
ple, turquoise and cranberry to
light sunny yellow, snowy white and
a range of striated hues. Agat,
(www.hillarythomas.com) 'ike this piece
Sem like this piece
See Page E10 from Target, is considers
0L *^^H^^^^^^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^iIj^ j


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Amethyst and citrine
dipped in gold and
silver, by designer
Anna Rabinowicz.


IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, F
2BR/2BA unit in Regency Park. Move in
condition. $53,500 MLS#705999


BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL
Sugarmill Woods 4BR/3BA. Over 3000 sq. ft. of
living. SI 50,000 MLS#702836


BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL
2BR/ 1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch.
Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852


BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
2BR mobile on 1/2 re Bick ipto bIlsfo
Trails. $20,000 MLS#706009


MOVE IN READY RETREAT! 4 BEDROOM POOL HOME!
Private location for 2/2 villa 4/2.5/2 heated pool home
Newer carpeting and tile Over 2300 sq. ft of living area
SSeveral appliances recently replaced Granite island w/stainless steel
SIndoor laundry area Living room could be large office
SExterior repainted in 2013 Pavered pool deck and lanai
SScreened front entry Home warranty for buyers
#705309 $71,900 #703826 $214,000
See.JVirtual IIIurs .i@ IJ^IIJ.I.I..!sIu.I..m


S www.dudleysauction.com
iM SAT, 10/26/13 RAINBOW SPRINGS
REAL ESTATE & CONTENTS AUCTION





Preview: 8am Auction: 9am Real Estate: 10am
9201 SW 212TH COURT, DUNNELLON, FL
Court Ordered Sale! Wonderful home in great neighborhood. 1,866 sq ft LA
with 3,249 UR. Open & spacious 3/2 home, dbl lot, 2 acres mature landscaping,
deck, fenced yard, fireplace, enclosed porch. The home is in good shape, needs
updating. Home in the neighborhood range in value from $110 to $180k.
Contents: 2003 Grand Marquis-75k mi., 1998 Ford Contour, 2003 John Deer L110
42" deck, electric scooter. Household LR-FR-3BR-DR and more. Lots of framed
art, oriental carpets, flat screen TV, Victorian & Eastlake furniture++. Listed Art,
Antique Clocks, Sterling: 48 pc. china, crystal, mandolin, fly rod & lures, Penn
Senator reels & other reels & poles. Great sale not to be missed!
*--.oj DUDLEY'S AUCTION
JH > i 4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL I DA TAT
Sle S. of the Fairgrounds) MAINLY REAL ESTATE
Ilk -t Fai rgron d)e
| -- 2 Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab1 667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 ,
After Hours 52 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROCK
Continued from Page E8

Besides aesthetics, some stones
have been endowed by various cul-
tures with special properties. The Chi-
nese view jade as a protective stone,
and it features prominently in feng
shui, the ancient art of harmonizing
individuals with their environment.
The Vikings carried calcite, believing
it aided in navigation. Native Ameri-
cans considered chalcedony- the
family of minerals that includes
jasper, onyx and agate capable of
imparting strength and courage.
"I have a client who keeps a pyra-
mid of lapis lazuli under her bed to
ward off bad vibrations," says
Toronto-based mineral and bead
dealer David McDonald.
Examples of Brazilian agate and
onyx cut into bookends can be found
at TheRockShed.com. Some have
the crystalline characteristics of ge-
odes, while others come in vibrant
pink, teal and red hues. (www.
therockshed.com)
Table lamps are an easy way to
add a touch of stone. Arteriors' Syd-
ney and Herst marble lamps, both at
Horchow, have honed and softly
buffed marble bases that develop a
dreamy translucence when lit. From
the John Richard collection, there's
a stacked, square-cut alabaster lamp
with a geometric vibe. And the re-
tailer's River Rock nightlight lamp's
base is a rectangular slab of acrylic
embedded with small white rocks; a
small bulb fixture is encased in it as
well, so you can use both the main
lamp and nightlight, or just the lat-
ter (www.horchow.com)
Eduardo Garza's agate-inlaid jew-
elry boxes are part of West Elm's fall
collection. Swirls of natural graphic
design make a group of agate orna-
ments intriguing for the holiday
tree, or just to hang on cupboards or
window latches. (www.westelm.com)
Target's fall collection includes
the Threshold agate bookend,
sleekly honed on one end to show
the swirling layers, and left in its
natural state on the other A
trimmed mirror adds marble to the
wall. And an agate-patterned, glass-
topped accent table and turquoise
or plum rugs in a marble motif sug-


Horchow/Associated Press
An Arteriors' Sydney lamp with an
elegant curve of snowy marble.
gest those materials in faux finishes.
(www.target.com)
A contemporary space might suit
one of CB2's composite tables made
of a marble, granite, stone and fiber
aggregate. They have a rugged, al-
beit honed masculinity
(wwwcb2.com)
The convergence of modern man-
ufacturing techniques and the intri-
cate, timeless forms of nature is
what intrigues New York-based
product designer Anna Rabinowicz.
She gives a collection of amethyst
and citrine table objects a mantle of
liquid gold or silver Her Cielo
amethyst lamp combines sleek
chrome with the crystal forms, each
finished piece unique. And she em-
beds little chunks of colorful agate
- considered long ago to bring own-
ers a peaceful slumber-with small
clock faces, ready for the bedside.
(wwwrablabs.com)


ln~ nIRnE#1... d'I I, I I~W i
ill.Iil 14 ... air ,-, 1.111]. '- a"T .. E~ '- .
II,, ,E,,h,,ppJ ,I,,,I I h.ii i,,,, i.. V I "" 1 SPOOKTACULAR STEAL! (.iiu: HII; i IF HOUSES TOLD STORIES THIS WOULD
NEW flooring, dining area, fencing, screen porch, split 1999, 1,603 living. Features NEW interior & BE GORY!! 4/2/1 w/pool, fireplace, corner lot,f
& open floor plans, and more! ONLY $84,900. exterior paint, NEW appliances. #704473. in need of TLC. Close to schools and shopping.
MS 705855. Call Tomika 352-586-6598. 126,900. Kim 352-212-5752. #705307. $49,900. Tomika 352-586-6598.


E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 Ell



To place an ad, call 563-5966


--- ---.- Classifieds


WIn Punt


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclonlne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
*2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $525, & 2/1 $575.
(352) 584-3348
HOMOSASSA
3/2 on 490 near 19, Irg
lot, Sale or Rent, Zone
GNC, $450 mo + Ref.
352-628-3019
INVERNESS
2/2 plus den. Inground
pool w/ Ig yard. $575
plus unilities. No smk-
ing (740) 610-7941

-I..

3 BR, 2BA, Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500.
(352) 212-4265
HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2 ,1' acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192

Palm Harbor Factory
Liquidation Sale
6 models to choose
from, 1200 sq ft up to
2400 sq ft.....$12K off!!
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext. 210


NEVER LIVED IN
REPO!
2013,28x56,3/2
Their loss is your
gain! Delivered & set
up with AC, steps &
skirting. Use your old
trade-only $487.46/
mo. W.A.C.
Call 352-621-9182

NICE HOME
ON 1/2 ACRE
Fenced yard, 1500
sq. ft., 3/2 home in
new cond. with 2 x6
construction. New
appliances, carpet,
paint, new decks &
tile flooring. I can
finance. $3,500. dwn
$394.80/mo. P & I
W.A.C. We have
land & home pkgs
$59,900 to $69,900
352-621-9181

RENTERS WANTED
Why rent when you
can own?
We can put you in
your own home.
Credit problems o.k.
As low as $2,000.
down & only $105/
wk. Call for more
info & locations.
Call 352-621-3807


USED HOMES/
REPO'S
Doublewides From
$8,500.
Singlewides From
$3,500.
New inventory daily
We buy used homes
(352) 621-9183






INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details


12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, I1BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances incl. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565

Castle Lake Park
INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt
scnd lanai, steel roof,
caged inground pool
1 acre, no HOA fees,
$69k (352) 238-4521


Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899





Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161

Inverness 55+ 2Br/l1Ba
CHA, price reduced to
$5,000. 352- 419-6644
2BRI1Ba, CHA, lots of
extra's. Price reduced
for quick sale. 341-1237


LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$15,000 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf &A/C, shed, on
rented lot $270 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171


Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500, furn. lot rent
$245. incl. trash &
water (219) 929-8909

WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


7AcION~
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHoimeRentals.corn
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
2332W. Silverlill .(L......... $550
2/1 nice affordable oporment, ground floor
817 S. Adams (BHI) ................. $615
2/ 5/1 newly remodeled cute home
CRYSTAL RIVER
10941 W.Gem St .. ..... $550
2/1 rice cean duplexcloseltoDukea~nd Hospital
9200 N. Perseus Ter. .........$..... 650
2/2mremoeld N or 1 1ce
814 NE Ist ler. ............. $550
2/1 nio hore dose to schools shopping
HOMOSASSA
1088 W. Green Acres St...........$700
3/2 Cherming home over 1700 sq ft
117101 Clearwater Ct......... $1,000
2/2 Greoat wateront trle w/screen room
CITRUS SPRINGS
1148 Bridge Dr. ...................... $77115
3/2/2 nice home wit6 jetted tub I


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

Pritchard S1, 2/2. $700
Cypress Cove2/25 $650

Dayton 2/1 p00 $700
Spruce 2 $700
Poplar 2l $650
Duplex Trudy 3/2 $650

Daniel Ct, 2./21 $650
Honeylocust 2/2/1 $700
h i ,ii ,ji, ii',',
Jennifer Fudge
SCheryl Scruggs
-Property Manager/
'Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499





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il &

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APARTMENTS

2 Bedrm., 1 Bath
Rental Assistance
Available
CALL 352-344-1010
MON. WED. THURS
8A-12P& 1P-5P
307 Washington
Ave. Inverness Fl.
Equal Housing
Opportunity








CRYSTAL RIVER
NICEE*
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incl Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
HOMOSASSA
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
Quiet neighborhood!
Large yard, patio, large
kitchen. $400 month
$800 to move in. Only
serious tenant need ap-
ply!! 813-927-0525 or
813-927-4647


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished
Long or Short Term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
3866 E Dawson Dr.
2BR/1IBA+ CPort,
1700 SF, Down paymt
negotiable $700 a
month. Lg fenced yard.
Sep. laundry, shed,
mature trees, screened
porch in back, covered
porch in front, 2 minutes
from shopping. For
more info call Mary
423-244-6122. To see
prop. 352-586-6088




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 $550. mo. ,1st last
& sec., 352-678-8874
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA
MOVE IN FOR ONLY
$1150 (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, CHA, $500. mo.
352-422-0139
BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
$500. 850-838-7289
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
352-795-6299
352-364-2073

FOR SALE OR RENT
TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 3 bath.
Nice neighborhood
near Library, large
corner lot $825.00
terms with steady in-
come 352-464-7976

INVERNESS
2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer
non smoking, No Pets
1305 Lakeview Dr.
$700. mo. 422-6263
Inverness
3/2/2, caged heated
pool/spa, privacy
fence. Includes pool
Serv. $900/mo.F/L/S
(352) 726-1069
INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/2
Near Anna Jo Rd.
By appt 786- 423-0478
or (352) 637-1142




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
Share 3/2, $350,
all utilities included
Jeff, (352) 601-6218




INVERNESS
3/2/2, Furn., Very Nice,
In Town 352-527-9268




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$750. 352-419-4421




4 Beautiful Acres next
to lake. Well, paved
streets. Horses OK
9157 E Orange Ave
FLORAL CITY. 941-358
-6422, 941-320-0433


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

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REALTY ONE




Hunting/Fishing Camp
61/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room & AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268



Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015




Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EOJAt H0E1kG
OORTUNIT

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www,
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





JEW I I
COLLECMBLES
Sat,0ct26,10amrPre wFriM St8-10
ATM Antiques
& Auctions LLC
8 llSt USHyl 9 CrystalIive, Fl
700+Antiques, Jewelry, Paintings,
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13%BP VS MCDS Cash &Check
I See web for complt em
gwww.charliefudge com
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Sunday 10/20 lp-5p
4940 W Horseshoe Dr


U-
Mini-Storage Facility
on US Hwy 19
Homosassa, Florida-
2.74 acres with 150
storage units of
varying sizes-40 dry
storage units-office
for business and
additional office for
rental income. Ask-
ing $625,000.00
owner financing to
qualified buyer with
25% down. Contact
Diana G. Marcum,
PA- Licensed
Real Estate Broker
352-341-0900





Call me to learn
about a
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Warranty Plan"
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Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realty
Connect.me

Imperial Exec for the in-
vestor or Handyman.
(2/3/2) CASH ONLY.
48K. 527-1239




Lecanto 3 bedroom.
2 bath with fireplace,
sauna, and garage.
2 acres w/fruit trees,
garden ready.
352-422-7136




Well maintained bright
villa. Split floor plan. 2
Master BR w/ walk in
closets & priv baths.
Lanai w. glass/screen
$74,900 352-795-1648




TOTALLY renovated
2Br/2 Ba Meadowview
patio home; enlarged
kitchen, new cabinetry,
new appliances,
screened lanai, 1 car
garage, 1 ceiling fan/rm,
new Puron a/c, new
screens, new gutters/
guards, furnished. $80k.
2272 N Eustis Pt,
Hernando. Call
352-746-6185 for
appointment


Hoe

FOR SALE OR RENT
TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
Inverness city living, 3
bedroom, 2 bath 2006
townhouse in great con-
dition. Low maintenance
& easy access to shop-
ping, etc. $87,500. Ed
Pechan, Parsley Real
Estate, 352-400-1230
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




2005 MEADOWCREST
(Fox Hollow) BEAUTY.
3/2/2/2 Lg Split BR,
Cul-d-sac.See pics @
www.forsalebvowner.co
M. #23967875
Call 724-813-8624.

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenced
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195k 352-422-7077




4BR/I1/2 BA Block
home, above ground
pool. Fenced, Appli-
ances, Kindness Terr.
off Grover Clev, $42K
As is. 352-419-8816

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


IAmVI .U I I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
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LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!


PFor Sale i
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


ForSaieifl
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Sugarm^li^
WoodsU


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bioowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


For Sale .1
Forest Lake, Hernando
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5
Acres, Fenced. Many
extras including 24x36
Shop/garage. Sun
Room with Wood Burn-
ing Stove. Fruit trees. 2
8x10 Storage Sheds.
Security System. See
ad on 4SaleByOwner
for pictures. 352
726-7755

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
-le ntu'ry 21P
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.












MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515






IFW


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Get Results




In The Homefront



Classifieds!


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Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




3 BR, 3'/2 BA, Condo
2100 sq. ft., Furnished,
Carport,
Citrus Hills on Hartford
$119,000.
Call 352-419-5268




Foreclosed Cabin
On 4 Acres! Just
$89,900. Bring your
hammer & nails.
Great fixer upper on
beautiful wooded
rolling land. Enjoy
wildlife, creeks,
ponds, lake access.
Must see! Call
877-888-0267, x 436

LAND & CABIN
PACKAGE ON
CUMBERLAND
PLATEAU! 10 Acres
and 1200 sq. ft.
cabin $49,900.
Minutes from 4 State
Parks & TN River.
Call 877-282-4409




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(352) 586-4822


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1-877-717-8992
ext591




Streamfront Land
Bargain! 1.7 acre
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parcel in Blue Ridge
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clear stream, Natu-
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utilities, mild
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now, $27,900.
Excellent financing.
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866-952-5303, x 63













46

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0 choice


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

cheese fresh in a fashionable
manner. The decorations and
shapes were influenced by most
of the styles of the time, making
them now fun to collect.
I think your cheese dish was
made in the 1880s to 1890s. The
stylish dolphin handle on the lid
adds to collector interest. The
floral decoration appears to be
hand-painted. The cracks in the
base and the chips on the dol-


phin handle affect the dollar
value negatively As-is potential
dollar value would be in the $10
to $20 range.
Dear John: I inherited these
two vases from my grandma, and
she received them from a friend
who said her mother purchased
them at the World's Fair in St.
Louis around 1909. Can you tell
me anything more about them
and how much they are worth?
-K.L.C., Homosassa
Dear KL.C.: World's Fair
memorabilia is a large category
of collector interest. The
Louisiana Purchase Exposition


of 1904 was informally known
as the St. Louis World's Fair.
Your vases appear to be made
of good porcelain and hand-
painted. I will assume there are
no marks anywhere on the
vases indicating they were sold
at the World's Fair, taking them
out of that category of collect-
ing. Potential dollar value is
below $50 each.
Dear John: These two items
belonged to my in-laws. I have
had them a while, but never
knew where they came from or
how old they are. Can you tell
me anything about them? I


would appreciate hearing any-
thing you can tell me. E.M.,
Internet
Dear E.M.: The serving dish in
the form of a leaf is called Ma-
jolica. Majolica is a brightly col-
ored pottery that was produced
in England, Europe, and the
United States during the 19th
and early 20th century It has
been a category of collector in-
terest for decades. The piece
you have was likely made in
America during the early 20th
century Potential dollar value is
below $50.
The jardiniere was also made


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E13

in America. The category is Art
Pottery I think it was made dur-
ing the 1920s to 1940s. I assume
it is not marked by the maker
Potential dollar value is $10
to $20.

John Sikorski has been a pro-
fessional in the antiques busi-
ness for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic,
P.O. Box2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@a ol. com.


FLIES
Continued from Page E7

To control fruit flies,
start by regularly discard-
ing overripe fruit. It also
helps to clean kitchen sink
drains, where bits of fruits
or their juices may lodge.
You could, of course, by-
pass the whole problem by
not having any ripe fruit in-
doors except in the refrig-
erator We gardeners know,
however, how cold deadens
the flavors of garden-fresh
fruits, and even ruins the
flavors of some, such as
tomatoes and bananas.
Fortunately, some sim-
ple devices can help in the
war against fruit flies.
There's some primal satis-
faction in just swatting at
them with a rolled-up, wet
facecloth, or you could go
a little more high-tech and
vacuum them up right out
of the air Both of these
methods must, of course,
be kept up on a regular
basis.
Traps take less partici-
pation. For the simplest
trap, just set out a glass of
wine to which some dish
detergent has been added
- and be sure to label the
glass so no one drinks the
liquid. After landing on
this liquid for a drink, fruit
flies become wetted and
are unable to take off
again. Another trap capi-
talizes on fruit flies' low in-
telligence: A funnel set


spout down over the open-
ing of an upright glass
filled with bait provides
easy entry but clever exit,
too clever for fruit flies.
A number of commer-
cial traps, such as the Con-
tech "Fruit Fly Trap,"
work on these same prin-
ciples and are also
effective.
Newly emerged fruit
flies are attracted to light,
a habit that can lead to
their undoing. Shade all
the windows in your
kitchen except one, and
leave only a crack of light
coming through the bottom
of that window. Put a
baited dish near that open-
ing, wait a while, then rush
the dish, with attendant
flies, outdoors.
On the same theme,
darken with paper or dark
paint the upper third of a
one-quart jar, then coat the
inside of the jar with
something sticky such as
honey or vegetable oil. In-
vert the jar, raised off the
counter with some small
blocks of wood, over some
bait. Flies will feed and
then fly up toward the
light, where they will be
trapped.
The flies are attracted to
yeasts that cause fermen-
tation, so any piece of fruit,
even yeast and water, are
suitable bait. Or you can
mix up a feed of mashed
bananas and agar, just as I
did when rearing fruit flies
in junior high school sci-
ence class.


*h I q




Aimanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal
BROKER ASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BR(


: STI Vh


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I FLORA CVIT I. I


0. I IPT77




E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013


MONKEYS
Continued from Page E3

Park Service mission to pre-
serve and protect lands within
the state park system, as well as
park visitors, removal of non-na-
tive and invasive species is nec-
essary and essential," Florida
Park Service spokeswoman Jes-
sica Sims stated last year
This month, however, Donald
Forgione, with the Division of
Recreation and Parks, which is
part of the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection,
and director of the state's parks,
said that while the division's of-
ficial stance is to remove non-
native animal and plant species
from the parks, there are no cur-
rent efforts to remove the mon-
keys.
"There are some safety issues
that we have concerns with, with


the visitors and monkeys, but we
haven't trapped in a year and
half We really haven't gotten the
results we wanted, so we are
looking at alternatives," Forgione
said. "It's a balance. We don't
want to chase after monkeys if
it's not the right thing to do."
Earlier this month, the former
Silver Springs attraction be-
came a state park and merged
with the existing Silver River
State Park to form the Silver
Springs State Park. Most of the
monkeys live in the park area.
Past attempts to get rid of the
monkeys have met with strong
opposition and Gottschalk said
his research has led him to side
with those who want to leave the
monkeys alone.
"What I really learned is that
we have basically 80 years of em-
pirical evidence that shows that
there is no observable damage
to the environment because they
are there," Gottschalk said.


He has identified four dis-
tinct groups of monkeys that
have their own territories along
the river He estimates the total
population is between 100 and
120 monkeys. He has given
them names, including King
Philip, Isabella, Venus and
Squish, and recognizes them on
sight.
After years of calm, there
lately is trouble among the four
groups, which Gottschalk identi-
fies as Esther, Bobcat, Davinci
and Athens. The Bobcat and
Athens groups, in particular,
have gotten into heated battles.
"They are getting new leaders
now, so they have to re-establish
boundaries. They have had
some really significant battles.
The Bobcat group leader got
ripped to shreds, but he sur-
vived," Gottschalk said.
During a recent trip down the
river, the monkeys displayed
how their hierarchy works. The


alpha male named King Philip
was being pestered by a younger
monkey King Philip bared his
teeth, but when that didn't settle
down the young upstart, King
Philip got physical. Before the
attack got out of hand, however,
the females came in and broke
up the fracas.
"It is a matrilineal society
Each group is led by an alpha fe-
male. She is able to control the
male, who is there mainly for
protection of the group. If she
can't control him by herself, she
calls in her sisters to get him
back in line again," Gottschalk
said.
One of the main arguments for
getting rid of the monkeys is that
they can carry the hepatitis B
virus, which can infect humans.
But, Gottschalk said, there have
been 40 documented transmit-
tals of the virus from monkeys to
humans and those were all in
the laboratory setting.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

But he does concede the mon-
keys can be dangerous.
"They can be very aggressive
toward humans. They can inflict
painful bites. Those monkeys
have teeth an inch long," he said.
Simple things like staring the
animals in the eye can set off an
attack.
"To them, that's a challenge.
It's harassment" Gottschalk said.
Originally from southeast Asia,
the monkeys have adapted well
to the Florida surroundings.
"They are mostly vegetarian,
but they really like the long
jawed orb spider They are com-
mon on the river and whenever
they spot one they eat them like
candy," Gottschalk said.
Though his research is not af-
filiated with any university,
Gottschalk has helped other re-
searchers from the City Univer-
sity of New York, San Diego
State University and the Univer-
sity of Florida.


CRAFTS
Continued from Page E5

flowers is inexpensive and fairly un-
complicated, but it's not a quick
process, particularly if you're cover-
ing a large wreath. So find a good
scary movie on TV and settle in for a
lot of cutting, rolling and gluing.
Pairing newspaper with black and
orange cardstock to make a decora-
tive garland on the other hand is
both easy and fast. Just use a paper
punch to cut the paper into circles,
and run them through the sewing
machine to chain them together
Wreath
Materials:
Foam wreath form.
Newspaper
Hot glue gun and glue sticks.
Scissors.
Mini pumpkins or other embell-
ishments.
Instructions:
1. Cut several sheets of newspaper
into 1.5 inch strips. Wrap them
around the wreath form, overlapping
each strip slightly, until it is covered.
This will make it less obvious if there
any gaps between the paper flowers
that will be glued on later
2. Stack three sheets of newspaper
and trace a small salad plate or sim-
ilarly-sized round object on the top
layer as many times as it will fit. Cut


circles out of all three layers.
3. Hold three paper circles to-
gether in a stack and starting at the
outside edge, cut through all layers
in a spiral shape, moving from the
outside toward the center Try to
keep the width of the resulting spi-
ral-shaped strip consistent mine
were about 3/4 of an inch but it
doesn't have to be perfect. Real
flower petals aren't!
4. When you get close to the cen-
ter, make the end of the spiral a
quarter-sized circle. This will be-
come the base of the flower
5. Starting from the outer edge of
the spiral, start rolling the paper
strip around itself Roll the center
fairly tightly, and then the rest looser
to form the outer petals.
6. When you get close to the end, flip
the flower upside down on your work
surface (it will resemble a tiny lamp-
shade at this point) and apply glue to
base of the flower Press it against the
rolled up paper to securely adhere
the coiled paper to the base.
7. Repeat steps 2-6 to make enough
flowers to cover your wreath.
8. Use hot glue to attach flowers to
the wreath, placing them close to-
gether and avoiding gaps.
9. Embellish as desired.
Garland
Materials:
Newspaper
Black card stock.
Orange card stock.


1.5 inch paper punch.
Sewing machine.
Thread.
Instructions:
1. Use paper punch to cut circles
from newspaper and cardstock.
2. Sew across one paper circle, and
then continue running the machine to


create a chain of thread extending
from the circle. You can place the next
circle right up against the previous, or
leave a bit of thread in between.
3. Continue sewing paper circles
in a chain, alternating with newspa-
per and card stock until garland
reaches the desired length.


.j_ ~ J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE
OI W 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450
,,, ^ m 'i .a r. .., :-, ,ie ,-- -: : :,ar:-
R * '^ t_,:g u',..al":,.-, .T V, .-.rI_,4 ,
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E6

hardiness zones 3 to 10, red maple will
require a humus-rich planting bed and
supplemental irrigation if planted in
drier, sandy situations like well-
drained sandhills locally It may live
from 50 to 80 years in well-tended gar-
dens, lawn tree rings and park settings.
Red maple is generally a tall, sin-
gle-trunked canopy tree reaching 30
to 70 feet tall at maturity Basal suck-
ers may form on saplings and vari-
eties grafted on pure native
rootstock. Snip suckers off as soon as
they start to form. The crown is pro-
portionally narrow, 20 to 40 feet in
diameter Bark is smooth, silver-gray
on young specimens, but becomes
fissured with age.
Simple leaves are opposite along


the twigs. The leaf blade has three to
five lobes, called palmate, or "like a
hand." Two to 6 inches long and 2 to 4
inches wide, leaves have prominent
veins on the backs and are covered
with silvery whitish hairs. Leaf mar-
gins are toothed. The leaf stalk and
central vein are red. In fall, the leaves
turn color ranging from yellow to or-
ange or red depending on site condi-
tions, fertilization, individual variety
and sugars trapped in the leaves.
While the tree is leafless in winter
while young, mature red maples are
covered in tiny, showy, burgundy-red
flower clusters for about a month
starting in January locally Separate
trees have either male or female
flowers. Saplings grown from seed
could be either sex.
Man-made grafted and cloned
plants are of the same sex as the par-
ent. By February, female trees form
twin seeds in winged, v-shaped keys


called samaras. Migratory birds con-
sume most of the seeds to fuel their
long flights north starting in March.
New leaves sprout in March locally
They emerge reddish and change to
green when photosynthesizing.
Useful as a shade tree to prevent
Florida's hot summer sun from heat-
ing up building roofs and walls, red
maple lets in the winter sun's warm-
ing rays during its deciduous winter
period. Throughout the year, red
maples are an attractive tree in
Florida gardens.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


Specilzngi errist.
Brnwo Resales


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Terms 6 Months or More


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 E15


Red maple
will require a
humus-rich
planting bed and
supplemental
irrigation if
planted in drier,
sandy conditions
that prevail
locally. It may
live from 50 to
80 years in
well-tended
gardens, lawn
tree rings and
park settings.
JANE WEBER/
Special to the Chronicle




E16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Mi_ =/0_/il1 $105,000
Jeanne oi Wi/laid Pickiel 2019871
In'l'I'. ciliuscounti'sold. corn




SEA



"OLD FLORIDA" WATERFRONT
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MI13 =llli:._ $285,000
Call Biad Gibbs 2125286
to see this lovely ivaletlionl home


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Nancy Jenks 352.4008072 cell/
726 6668 jollicel


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ASKING $55,000
Call Chailes Kelly 3524222387


CHOICE HOME IN CHOICE LOCATION
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Ci' Jim II.t.itn 422 2173


UE I IU3, HI*LL3 idUUL INUMI
GOLF COURSE
.i.1 .un ..ij

MIi.-, =. n:'. :S244,000 Make an ollei
Call Ouade Feeset 352302 7699


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H M'.-, =n:i4'1:. $110,000
Jeanne ot IlIillaid Pickiel 2123410
ivizi: ciltscounii sold corn


DUPLEX IN INVERNESS
a :e Weu ..i ..i6. ) 61U 'W*

S l .l h ,,| ..II I ll I _,: .l t: H tfi.,jt ..,i.
MIH'., =1i14":'1. ASKING $89,500
Call Stelan Stuat I 352 2120211


$69,900 CHECK IT OUT!



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GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY
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$75,000
Call Jim Motion at 3524222173 lot
Sout personal lout ol Emetald Hills


THIS HOME IS LARGE ENOUGH
TO BE A GROUP HOME
I h ii, ,, .-,,,,l, I.. iI I *, I. 1,-



rih = i:' S120,000 BRING OFFERS
Cm1 D.3r Al-.Il, ,.i ippt 352 422 4627


A MIANI" HUIM lb HIb UAb ILk!
l. I I.. .I. k._R i_'b ll. I.. ll
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Mi'.- =i.' $275,000
Ask lot Matil n Booth 637 4904


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Mi_ il1:1, h $108,900
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'n'W'. ciliuscountl'sold. cornm


INVERNESS POOL HOME
VV" WITIH III_.l )IINIII Pil)jiji ANII
I T .. LA T I . l i l.:. ,:].j.: 1...j,:] :.i.j

M1 =/IhIIl.l $69.800
Pal Davis t3521 212 7280
See listings: mviv.c21paldavis. com


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M1 =1u1:1i" $205,500
Jeanne i Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'n'W'. citiuscoluntilsold. cornm


WELCOME HOME!!

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Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699




Full Text

PAGE 1

INSIDE OCTOBER 20, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 74 50 CITRUS COUNTYChomped: Gators fail SEC road test at Missouri /B1 HOMEFRONT:Set in stoneRock out with decor trend for fall./ Insidewww.chronicleonline.com Annies Mailbox......A14 Classifieds................D5 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B3 Lottery Payouts........B3 Menus . . . . .A18 Movies....................A14 Obituaries..............A10 Together..................A20 Veterans . . . .A16 INDEX HIGH86LOW65Partly sunny, possible storms.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SUNDAY COMMENTARY:Eyewitness accountReporter discusses execution of William Happ./Page C1 VETERANS:Head startVietnam vet enlisted early./ Page A16 A. B. SIDIBE Staff writerThe area around the main spring vent in the Chassahowitzka River has turned up an important array of human handiwork. From the Paleo-Indian and archaic to the modern, items found entombed and later fished out during cleanup by state officials revealed a labyrinth of human endeavor and recreation. Archaeologists are thrilled by the finds and have been connecting the dots, matching each item to its era in history. At 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, near the site where they were recovered at the boat launch in Chassahowitzka, officials will display the artifacts for public viewing. A complete clay pot was found and, according to Michael Arbuthnot, principal investigator of Southeastern Archaeological Research Inc.s (SEARCH) Jacksonville office, it looks like it was made in the Woodland period, between 500 B.C. and 600 A.D. That was one of the highlights, said Arbuthnot, whose group worked in tandem with the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) to identify items of archaeological value and importance. We found items from the Recovered artifacts reveal human history Cleanup around Chassahowitzka site uncovers treasure trove of items from different eras Many historical items have been found in and near the main spring of the Chassahowitzka River during the cleanup of the area by the Southwest Florida Water Management District this past summer, including well-preserved pieces of Native American pottery.Special to the Chronicle See ARTIFACTS/ Page A5 ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerHERNANDOAn afternoon shower did not hamper the cattles drive Saturday. Around 3 p.m., close to 200 riders and 50 Cracker cows closed down the intersection of County Road 486 and U.S. 41 as they paraded their way past spectators at the old Hernando School. The cattle appeared to be focused on the finish line, though, as they had traveled 25 miles during a two-day trek through woods and underbrush, including portions of Potts Preserve. The annual Hernando Southern Heritage Festival and Cracker Cattle Drive is both a fundraiser for the restoration of the Colonial Revival-style historic school and a re-enactment of how life was in early Florida. Ponce de Leon brought pigs and cows to Florida to trade with the Indians, said Hernando Heritage Council chairman Doug Naylor. These are Hernando on the hoof STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleA herd of about 40 Cracker cattle crossed U.S. 41 at Parsons Point Road Saturday on their way to the end of the trail and into a corral. They were escorted by more than 100 cowboys and cowgirls on horseback who came along to help out on the two-day trail ride. Annual cattle drive once again the highlight of Southern Heritage Festival See CATTLE/ Page A8 Q&A: Manatees return A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerCaptains Stacy and Mike Dunn own Manatees In Paradise Tours, which they say offers educational and passive tours to allow people into the manatee world. Stacy said she likes showing people what manatees do as they nurse their offspring, eat submerged vegetation and tussle with each other. The Dunns also have been active as volunteer manatee rescue squad members for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). With the official start of manatee season about a month away and cooler water temperatures, manatees are beginning their annual trips into the ambient, 72-degree spring waters to rest. Stacy Dunn answered some questions from theChronicleabout the upcoming manatee season and what people should know and do during this period in the fragile manatee environment. She also suggests these links to learn more about manatees: www.savet hemanatee. org/info_manatee_ migration.html and www. savethemanatee.org/ manfcts.htmChronicle: When did you notice more manatees were coming back? Dunn: As soon as manatees start to feel the weather changing and temperatures dropping, they start to move toward their winter homes. Some Cooler weather brings mammals into springs See Q&A/ Page A6 Authorities catch escaped convicts Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Two convicted killers who were freed from prison by phony documents were captured together without incident Saturday night at a Panama City motel, authorities said. Joseph Jenkins and Charles Walker, both 34, were taken into custody about 6:40 p.m. at Coconut Grove Motor Inn. They were apprehended just a couple of hours after their family members held a news Joseph Jenkins Charles Walker See CAUGHT/ Page A9 Men freed with forged documents NATION:Finding faultVoters angry with elected officials might want to look in the mirror first./ Page A12

PAGE 2

ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerEvery child ought to have a safe, nurturing place to call home. Thats the steering principle behind the Covenant Childrens Home (CCH) and the motivation for their group work day Saturday. CCH is a nonprofit corporation in partnership with Kids Central Inc. that supplies long-term care to children who have been relocated from their biological families and need a place to identify as home. Adults and youth from Christ Community Church in Ocala donated their time and joined forces with CCHs personnel to revive their 20 acres. I decided to come out today to learn more about Covenant Childrens Home, said volunteer Branko Dimovski. Even though the majority of the property is covered with natural vegetation, volunteers spruced up a play area, fire pit, shed, shrubs and trails. We have trails leading in and out of the woods to our natural habitat, said executive director Roger Gilmore. Its difficult for two house parents and limited staff to do it all. By lunch time they were ready for the barbecue cookout, which was small in comparison to their upcoming annual barbecue banquet. From 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Oct. 25, an expected 250 attendees will be present at the Boot Scoot Barbeque at the Citrus Springs Community Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. The goal is to revitalize the energy with the community and to get them involved with Covenant Childrens Home, Gilmore said. Tickets are $35 and all proceeds go to benefit the CCH. For more information, visit www.cchfl.org or call 352-489-2565.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicle online.com. A2SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL 000G9BY 000G6BD Volunteers help spruce up Covenant Childrens Home Facility offers place for kids separated from families ERYN WORTHINGTON/ChronicleBranko Dimovski from Christ Community Church in Ocala helped replace decayed wood on top of a shed at Covenant Childrens Home in Citrus County. The church donated time Saturday to support Covenant Childrens Home as they cleaned up the grounds.

PAGE 3

Page A3SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerLECANTOWith miniature blue shovels in hand, six preschoolers made the initial puncture in the soil Friday for their schools new addition.Hundreds of students, administrators, parents and church family congregated on the west side of Seven Rivers Christian School for the groundbreaking ceremony of their new preschool building and playground. Groundbreaking is an opportunity to look backward and forward, said Headmaster Dana James. In this case we get to look backward at a time when we had a dream and vision of what we were doing here at Seven Rivers. I can remember a time about four years ago when pastor (Ray Cortese) and I were exchanging emails about the future of Seven Rivers. In those email exchanges, one thing that was at the top of the list was building a new preschool building. At the same time, we get to look forward, he said. We get to look forward to when the walls will be up. The students and church will come in and sign our names and scripture verses. We also look forward to the 15 to 20 new staff and upward of 150 students coming to our new preschool building. Opening August 2014, Seven Rivers Christian Schools new $1 million building, being built by Daly & Zilch Inc., will be approximately 9,000 square feet and will hold eight classrooms, according to director of business operations Blair Commons. Currently, we have 55 preschoolers and we are expecting to double that amount, preschool director Cheri Simek said. There will be approximately 11 to 14 students per classroom. The whole school has boomed this year because of the love and passion we have for the students and getting them introduced to Christ. The state funds the Voluntary Prekindergarten Program; however, the church congregation has raised revenue for the new building through a capital campaign. Simek said the church collects money through this program and every three years decides how it will be utilized. It is a rare thing for a preschool to be built from the ground up, said Wendy Cash, director of advancement. Either people dont have the desire to do it or they dont have the money. We have both. We believe it is a real God-honoring thing to educate children as early as possible. Most preschools are in peoples homes or in rented buildings. You would be hard pressed to go anywhere on the Nature Coast or anywhere in Florida to find a brand-new, state-of-the-art preschool being built like this one. A new covered playground will also be included in the construction. Commons said another groundbreaking will occur in early 2014 as the church is planning for a new athletic complex.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleThe ceremony for the new Seven Rivers preschool building gets under way Friday afternoon as preschoolers Caitlyn Hoag, Averi Kelso, Ethan Richard, Jemma Durante-Snyder, Jackson Meek and Caleb Kuntz dig in to break ground on the new facility. The preschool will be ready for the 2014 school year, according to Seven Rivers Director of Business Operations Blair Commons. It is a rare thing for a preschool to be built from the ground up. ... You would be hard-pressed to go anywhere on the Nature Coast or anywhere in Florida to find a brand-new, state-of-the-art preschool being built like this one.Wendy Cashdirector of advancement, Seven Rivers Christian School Seven River Christian School breaks ground on new preschool; to open in 2014 NANCYKENNEDY Staff writerLECANTO Tom Corcoran loved mischief. Marketing director at Life Care Center of Citrus County for about eight years, he was always looking for ways to play practical jokes on his co-workers. Take the time he wrapped up a live rooster in a gift box to give to the maintenance director for a staff gift exchange. He put it in an office to keep it safe, and then when he went in to check on it, the rooster shot out of the box. I cant even describe how funny it was to watch Tom running around chasing a rooster that he was afraid of, co-worker Lisette Charlton said. We had to get one of the nurses to get the rooster and put it back in the box. Its been quiet around Life Care Center since Thomas Corcoran died Sept. 27 at age 45. As some of his co-workers shared Tom stories recently, they described a man who was simultaneously humble, caring and compassionate and a man with a mischievous sense of humor, always looking for ways to get you, such as snapping a rubber band at you as you walked by. If he picked on you, you knew he liked you, Charlton said. Life with Tom around was always interesting, said co-worker Justin Castor. You never knew what he would say sometimes appropriate, sometimes not. And he loved spitballs. Yet he was the most sincere person you ever met. He was a man of his word. If he was your friend, he went to bat for you and would stand by you or fall with you, co-worker Cindi Martin said. He went out of his way for people, but he never wanted a pat on the back. He never liked accolades. Born in New York, Tom came to Citrus County as a kid, graduating from Citrus High School in 1986. He served in the U.S. Army for 11 years, including one tour of duty in Iraq. His family was his life his wife Chrissy and four young daughters, Nicole, Trinity, Tiana and Taryn. By 3:30 on Friday he was looking at the clock, ready to spend the weekend with his family, Martin said. Tom Corcoran loved attending his daughters soccer games. He loved the Greek salad from Joes Deli and his friend Mikes lemon cake, and Dunkin Donuts coffee. He was an avid Yankees and New York Giants fan; he liked outdoors stuff: rifles, golf, four-wheelers. He was a Chamber of Commerce ambassador and the Chamber sunshine person. You liked him the moment you met him, Castor said. Its hard to find people like Tom. He was our brother, Charlton said. Its quiet around here now. From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21, the friends of Tom Corcoran invite the community to a celebration of life and fundraiser for Toms family at Tuscany on the Meadows at the Quality Inn on County Road 486, Hernando. Tickets are $20 per person. The event will include hors doeuvres, a cash bar, silent auctions, 50/50 chances and many memories of Tom Corcoran. For information, call Cindi at Life Care Center at 352-746-4434. Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicle online.com. Tom Corcoran: Family man, funny man, Army man Special to the ChronicleTom Corcoran, 45, died Sept. 27. He is survived by his wife Chrissy and four daughters. SOWW committee to meet MondayThe Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save Our Waters Week committee will meet at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 21, in room 219 of the Lecanto Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, off County Road 491. The purpose of the meeting is to review and critique the planning and execution for Citrus Countys 18th annual Save Our Waters Week. All representatives to the committee and interested parties are welcome to attend and participate. For information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352-201-0149. Citrus 20/20 meeting plannedThe Citrus 20/20 board of directors will meet at 4:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 21, in room 117 of the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. All directors are urged to attend. Interested persons and organizations are invited. For more information about Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit www.citrus2020.org or call 352-201-0149. Delegation to meet Oct. 29Citrus County Legislative Delegation meeting will from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in the Citrus County Commission chamber, in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The deadline to sign up for addressing delegation members is Tuesday, Oct. 22. For any questions or inquiries, call Dawn Faherty at state Rep. Jimmie T. Smiths office at 352-560-6020.From staff reports Around theCOUNTY Associated PressCORAL SPRINGS A South Florida high school students unusual selfie is lighting up the Twitter-verse. Malik Whiter tweeted a pic of himself sporting black shades and grinning as he stands in front of his teacher while she was in labor on Tuesday. Selfie with my teacher while she having contractions he wrote in the caption, along with a smiley face. Selfie is slang for a photo of oneself taken on a cellphone. WPLG in Miami reported (www.ittybittyurl .com/2bCF) that Whiter said the unidentified woman is a great teacher and he wanted to capture the memorable moment for himself and her. The teacher was apparently on the phone with her mom when the photo was taken. She went to the hospital, but didnt have the baby and returned to school two days later. According to Gawker, the photo was retweeted 20,000 times. Teens selfie with teacher in labor a hit

PAGE 4

Birthday You can accomplish a lot if you are open and receptive to whats being offered in the coming solar cycle. Dont dismiss what others are doing or saying. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Partnerships will make a difference in the outcome of an endeavor you are pursuing. Good fortune is within reach. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Explore new ways to use your skills and talents. Diversification will help you broaden your interests and reach goals far beyond your expectations. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A change at home will do you good. Dont let someones negative attitude goad you into an argument. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Spend time with friends or family if you want to ease your stress. Someones suggestions will help prepare you for the wheeling and dealing you have planned. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) The focus should be on you and what you need to excel. Romantic encounters will be emotional, but if handled with care can lead to a fresh start. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Invest in your future. Take part in activities mingling with people trying to reach goals similar to yours. Aries (March 21-April 19) You need a break and a change. Getting out and enjoying life will help motivate you to engage in an unusual event that will alter your direction. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Look over your situation and consider the adjustments you need to make to keep everything moving smoothly on the home front. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Certain partnerships will require you to take precautions. Dont say anything that may be used against you. Dont let arguments get out of hand. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy getting out and seeking a bit of entertainment. The effect you have on the people you meet will open a door to a new way of thinking. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep the peace at home. Look for a way to improve your life and relationships with the people you love most. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Let your mind wander. Whether you travel mentally or physically, you will discover ways to achieve greater happiness and peace of mind.TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Oct. 20, the 293rd day of 2013. There are 72 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Oct. 20, 1973, in the socalled Saturday Night Massacre, special Watergate prosecutor Archibald Cox was dismissed and Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William B. Ruckelshaus resigned. On this date: In 1944, during World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur stepped ashore at Leyte in the Philippines, 2 1/2 years after saying, I shall return. In 1977, three members of the rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd were killed in the crash of a chartered plane near McComb, Mississippi. In 2011, Moammar Gadhafi, Libyas dictator for 42 years, was killed as revolutionary fighters overwhelmed his hometown of Sirte and captured the last major bastion of resistance two months after his regime fell. Ten years ago: A judge in Eagle, Colo., ordered Kobe Bryant to stand trial for sexual assault (however, the criminal case was later dropped). Five years ago: Arkansas TV anchorwoman Anne Pressly was found severely beaten in her Little Rock home; she died several days later. (A suspect, Curtis Vance, faces trial.) One year ago: President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney left the campaign trail to spend the weekend preparing for their third and final debate, focusing on foreign policy. Todays Birthdays: Singer Tom Petty is 63. Movie director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) is 57. Actor Viggo Mortensen is 55. Political commentator and blogger Michelle Malkin is 43. Rapper Snoop Lion (formerly Snoop Dogg) is 42. Actor John Krasinski is 34. Thought for Today: Next to ingratitude, the most painful thing to bear is gratitude. Henry Ward Beecher, American clergyman (1813-1887).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 88 69 0.00 HI LO PR 88 69 0.40 HI LO PR 85 67 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 87 67 0.10 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly sunny, few showers and possibly a storm. Rain chance 30%THREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly sunny, few showers and possibly a storm. Rain chance 30% Partly sunny, scattered storms. Rain chance 40%High: 86 Low: 65 High: 87 Low: 66 High: 85 Low: 64TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Saturday 88/69 Record 92/47 Normal 84/60 Mean temp. 79 Departure from mean +7 PRECIPITATION* Saturday 0.40 in. Total for the month 1.21 in. Total for the year 51.54 in. Normal for the year 46.80 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 7 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.90 in. DEW POINT Saturday at 3 p.m. 71 HUMIDITY Saturday at 3 p.m. 59% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and grasses were light and weeds were heavy.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Saturday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:55 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:35 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:12 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................9:04 A.M. OCT. 26NOV. 3NOV. 10NOV. 17 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 84 71 ts Ft. Lauderdale 88 76 pc Fort Myers 89 73 pc Gainesville 84 67 ts Homestead 89 73 pc Jacksonville 80 66 ts Key West 87 76 pc Lakeland 87 71 ts Melbourne 86 72 ts City H L Fcast Miami 86 76 pc Ocala 86 69 ts Orlando 87 70 ts Pensacola 74 62 s Sarasota 86 72 ts Tallahassee 81 62 pc Tampa 87 71 ts Vero Beach 87 71 pc W. Palm Bch. 87 74 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNortheast winds around 5 knots. Seas 0-2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be smooth. Slight chance for thunderstorms today. Gulf water temperature81 LAKE LEVELSLocation Fri. Sat. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 30.50 30.50 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.69 38.69 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 40.10 40.10 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.94 40.94 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H H H L L L L L L L 72/53 62/47 56/31 80/45 43/30 74/59 70/52 70/40 53/39 57/47 65/46 56/49 68/45 86/76 77/60 61/47 THE NATION Albany 64 40 .02 s 58 38 Albuquerque 63 35 s 68 38 Asheville 64 54 s 62 37 Atlanta 73 56 trace s 68 45 Atlantic City 64 41 s 64 49 Austin 67 50 pc 73 55 Baltimore 65 44 s 64 50 Billings 61 39 c 53 39 Birmingham 70 56 .02 s 70 44 Boise 65 37 s 67 36 Boston 67 50 s 67 44 Buffalo 59 45 .32 pc 56 45 Burlington, VT 61 47 pc 57 40 Charleston, SC 83 70 s 76 59 Charleston, WV 57 40 .06 pc 63 40 Charlotte 66 58 s 70 42 Chicago 54 42 .01 pc 62 47 Cincinnati 51 41 .21 pc 63 43 Cleveland 52 44 .29 pc 57 46 Columbia, SC 80 63 .01 s 73 47 Columbus, OH 51 46 .16 pc 60 43 Concord, N.H. 66 32 s 66 34 Dallas 66 43 s 72 53 Denver 64 33 .01 pc 56 31 Des Moines 60 35 pc 65 35 Detroit 49 41 .21 pc 56 49 El Paso 73 41 s 80 45 Evansville, IN 57 46 .19 pc 66 46 Harrisburg 62 39 .11 s 60 39 Hartford 66 42 s 64 40 Houston 71 58 .07 pc 77 60 Indianapolis 54 42 pc 62 45 Jackson 73 55 s 73 48 Las Vegas 80 53 s 81 55 Little Rock 64 50 .09 s 71 46 Los Angeles 73 58 s 74 59 Louisville 54 48 .22 pc 64 48 Memphis 61 51 .03 pc 70 48 Milwaukee 54 41 pc 52 42 Minneapolis 49 37 .06 rs 43 30 Mobile 67 61 .36 s 74 60 Montgomery 67 61 .05 s 73 49 Nashville 58 48 pc 65 40 New Orleans 72 63 1.24 s 74 62 New York City 64 52 s 65 46 Norfolk 68 58 s 64 49 Oklahoma City 67 32 pc 73 47 Omaha 63 32 pc 62 35 Palm Springs 94 62 s 88 62 Philadelphia 66 48 s 64 44 Phoenix 88 58 s 86 57 Pittsburgh 55 41 .04 pc 56 42 Portland, ME 64 41 s 64 40 Portland, Ore 66 39 s 65 42 Providence, R.I. 65 43 s 65 41 Raleigh 70 59 .01 s 66 41 Rapid City 63 33 sh 48 30 Reno 75 33 s 73 36 Rochester, NY 63 50 pc 58 43 Sacramento 82 47 s 84 47 St. Louis 59 42 .17 pc 71 50 St. Ste. Marie 51 40 .01 pc 50 42 Salt Lake City 66 38 pc 60 42 San Antonio 72 53 pc 73 57 San Diego 75 57 s 75 60 San Francisco 71 49 s 70 52 Savannah 88 69 trace s 77 60 Seattle 51 46 s 57 47 Spokane 61 36 s 61 32 Syracuse 66 51 .01 pc 57 39 Topeka 65 31 pc 70 40 Washington 67 53 s 61 47YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 94 Palm Springs, Calif. LOW 10 Berthoud Pass, Colo. SUNDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 85/75/pc Amsterdam 58/53/sh Athens 71/52/pc Beijing 64/49/pc Berlin 59/54/c Bermuda 79/75/pc Cairo 81/63/s Calgary 52/41/pc Havana 87/73/ts Hong Kong 81/71/pc Jerusalem 71/57/s Lisbon 70/64/pc London 61/53/sh Madrid 67/48/pc Mexico City 70/51/ts Montreal 49/37/pc Moscow 45/32/sh Paris 65/55/pc Rio 79/69/pc Rome 75/69/pc Sydney 84/64/s Tokyo 69/65/sh Toronto 57/43/pc Warsaw 54/51/sh WORLD CITIES Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Sunday MondayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 6:30 a/2:35 a 7:40 p/3:10 p 7:00 a/3:07 a 8:18 p/3:46 p Crystal River** 4:51 a/12:32 p 6:01 p/ 5:21 a/12:29 a 6:39 p/1:08 p Withlacoochee* 2:38 a/10:20 a 3:48 p/10:17 p 3:08 a/10:56 a 4:26 p/10:49 p Homosassa*** 5:40 a/1:34 a 6:50 p/2:09 p 6:10 a/2:06 a 7:28 p/2:45 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 10/20 SUNDAY 6:54 12:42 7:19 1:06 10/21 MONDAY 7:48 1:35 8:13 2:00 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY HI LO PR 85 67 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Elm, ragweed, grasses Todays count: 6.2/12 Mondays count: 6.1 Tuesdays count: 6.1 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Duhamel surprised by baby AxlBEVERLY HILLS, CALIF. Proud papa Josh Duhamel has no problem bragging about his well-behaved baby. The 40-year-old actor and his wife, Fergie of the Black Eyed Peas, welcomed their first child, Axl Jack on Aug. 29. Whats surprised me the most is how well behaved he is. I was expecting a crying baby all the time and hes been really mild-mannered, Duhamel said. But hes aware of what could be in store if the couple ever decides to expand the brood. I think somehow biology, the universe, whatever, you know gives you like a pleasant baby first so that you have another one, procreate, and then the next ones a holy terror and then you really realize what being a new parent is all about, joked Duhamel Thursday at the opening-night gala for the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts. Fatherhood may have brought some life changes for the Transformers star, but he said his approach to his career remains the same. No, Im not going to let that affect the way I make decisions creatively, he said of becoming a family man. I still want to push myself and do things that I would never, that I would never thought that I was able to do.Sitcoms tapped for post-Super Bowl spotsLOS ANGELES Fox said the plum post-Super Bowl slot next February will be filled by two of its comedies. New Girl and freshman series Brooklyn Nine-Nine will air on Fox after the game thats typically TVs most-watched program and a big promotional platform for other network fare. Fox gave Brooklyn NineNine another vote of confidence Friday, announcing that its ordering nine more episodes for a full season of 22 episodes. The Tuesday night sitcom stars Andy Samberg as a footloose police detective and Andre Braugher as his precinct captain.Guards posted to protect Banksy work NEW YORK A Brooklyn building owner has hired security guards and installed a metal gate to protect a work by the elusive British graffiti artist Banksy The New York Post reported that the rolling gate went up Friday over the wall in Williamsburg where Banksy spray-painted two geishas and a bonsai tree. Cara Tabachnick, whose family owns the building, said the goal is to preserve the artwork so it can be viewed and enjoyed. Banksy announced on his website that he would undertake a residency on the streets of New York this month. Most of the Banksy works that have gone up have been tagged over by others, and some have been completely erased.Cheney discusses heart deviceWASHINGTON Former Vice President Dick Cheney says he once feared that terrorists could use the electrical device that had been implanted near his heart to kill him and had his doctor disable its wireless function. In an interview with CBS Minutes, Cheney says doctors replaced an implanted defibrillator near his heart in 2007. The device can detect irregular heartbeats and control them with electrical jolts. Cheney says that he and his doctor, cardiologist Jonathan Reiner, turned off the devices wireless function in case a terrorist tried to send his heart a fatal shock. From wire reports Associated PressActor Harvey Keitel runs Saturday as guests of the Lumiere Festival participate in the reproduction of the first film, called Workers leaving the Lumiere Factory, directed at the same place in 1895 by Louis Lumiere, during the fifth edition of the Lumiere Festival, in Lyon, central France. A4SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Bid Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . D7 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . D7

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Special to the ChronicleWhile not ancient artifacts, the bottles pulled from the Chassahowitzka reflect a past era. Ice Age to the 20th century. That area has been a magnet for human activity for at least 10,000 years, Arbuthnot added. Archaeologists also found what they are calling a Suwannee point, or speartype point used during the Paleo-Indian period 10,000 years ago. A Bolen point from the Archaic period, between the Paleo-Indian and Woodland periods, also was recovered. Pieces of a Spanish majolica plate from the 17th century were found, but Arbuthnot isnt sure how it got to Chassahowitzka since the Spaniards were stationed much farther north. He believes Indians living near the river may have been trading with the Spaniards and brought it back with them. Arbuthnot said carbondating has yet to be done on another one of their big finds a pair of wooden paddles, found well-preserved under organic matter. He said the paddles were preserved in an oxygen-free environment. The team also found several vintage bottles of soda, such as Sun Crest, which was introduced in 1938. This summer, the water district cleaned up the muck in and around the main spring vent in the river as part of its springs restoration program. The cleanup was recently concluded. Because officials have always believed the area had a long history of human activity, SEARCH was called in to assist. Every item of importance found will be transported to Tallahassee to be catalogued. Since archaeological finds are considered the property of the people, they are often brought back to where they were removed for display and/or storage. Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe @chronicleonline.com. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A5 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000G7LU Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs Blackshears II Aluminum 795-9722 Free Estimates www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer 000G8WK HWY. 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 2013 2013 2013 2013 Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers AND trade-in allowances from $50 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only sold from September 16 November 15, 2013. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where p rohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special t erms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special t erms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: M onthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with t he market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/1/2013. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card f or cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly paymen t if shown based on $xx purchase. 352-746-0098 H.E. Smith Co. Inc 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 www.trane.com LICENSE # RA0035171 Dont let this offer pass you by. Unstoppable savings now thru November 15th. Its tough to find a fall value more unstoppable. Trade-up to Trane, the number one name in reliability. September 16 through November 15, 2013, get renowned Trane efficiency at the best value ever. Pay 0% interest for 36 months, plus a trade-in cash allowance up to $1000. Call today and enjoy the colors of fall. And save green. Energy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage. Tranes XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-thats the Trane difference. Dont get left behind in the cold. Offer only lasts thru November 15th. 000G77M We take customer satisfaction to the highest degree. MANAGERS SPECIALS 000G9H4 Hwy. 44 W. Inverness (352) 726-1231 nicknicholasford.com SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 Inverness CR 486 Hwy 44 Hwy 41 Hw y 4 90 Nick Nicholas Hwy 491 Hwy. 19 2011 FORD FIESTA SES SALE PRICED! NP5861 $15,996 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID SALE PRICED! N3C191D $19,626 2010 FORD RANGER XLT EXT CAB SALE PRICED! N3C136A $19,633 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE SALE PRICED! NP5856 $19,988 2010 FORD EDGE AWD SEL SALE PRICED! NP5915 $26,442 2012 FORD EXPEDITION XLT SALE PRICED! N3C205A $34,367 2013 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED SALE PRICED! NP5917 $35,927 2013 FORD FLEX SEL SALE PRICED! Only 1k miles. N3T257A $36,832 ARTIFACTSContinued from Page A1

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State BRIEFHeirs of citrus baron sell shares in companyFORT MYERS The heirs of a well-known figure in the Florida citrus industry are giving up control of a company that remains one of the states largest private landowners. Two New York-based agricultural companies are spending $137.8 million to purchase shares of Alico Inc. now held by the heirs of Ben Hill Griffin Jr. Alico owns nearly 131,000 acres of land spread across five Florida counties including Alachua, Collier, Lee and Polk that are used for citrus groves, sugar cane and cattle ranching. The University of Florida stadium is named after Griffin, who founded Alico and helped turn the company into one of the states most prominent companies. The Griffin clan has included prominent Florida political figures including Griffins granddaughter Katherine Harris, who was secretary of state during the 2000 presidential election recount. Under the deal announced Friday, 734 Agriculture and Arlon Group will purchase nearly 51 percent of outstanding voting stock owned by Atlantic Blue Group at $37 a share. stay on the east coast up in warm water plant discharges (manmade warm water sources) or Blue Spring and other natural warm-water resources. Manatees on the west coast also do the same. We are very fortunate that upwards to 500 have come here to use our springs, making it a spectacular thing to see in the clear springs during the months when the Gulf of Mexico is too cold for them. Chronicle: What do you think causes this migration? Dunn: With the cooler mornings and the days getting closer to the colder months, manatees will start arriving daily. Its what they must do or end up dying of hypothermia and cold stress. Manatees are mammals, just like us humans we just have feet so we are land mammals, and manatees have flippers, so they are aquatic mammals. The waterways are their only homes. Their bodies have approximately 1 inch of fat and muscle and this is non-insulating fat. Chronicle: What are some of your concerns? Dunn: My concerns are that people dont understand this vital information and so many manatees, when huddled around the springs to conserve energy and stay warm, are bothered and harassed, making them move away from these springs and putting the manatees health at risk. Any picture you see where sanctuaries go up are important manatee areas where they can lay undisturbed and stay warm. These areas must also be void of loud noises so manatees can relax. As you can see, the sanctuaries are not large enough to fit all the manatees and those that are lying outside the roped-off closed area also need respect and not to be bothered. Look but dont touch; they need to stay still, conserve energy to survive! Even if their tail is sticking out,rulesposted at the springs say, one of many rules: Nodisturbing or touching a resting or feeding manatee. Chronicle: How often are you out on the water? What would you suggest boaters do to lessen the chance to hurt the manatees? Dunn: Almost daily doing a tour. Mike and I have also been a part of the FWC and USFWS manatee rescue squads for nearly 10 years and did this way before we ever started our tours. However, we felt the need to try to do educational tours to make people aware of the facts. These gentle giants need our help to survive and being that we are one of two places in the United States (the other being the Homosassa Rivers springs) where you can legally get in face-to-face with the wild endangered manatees, you must do it with respect and knowledge so you wont be a cause for a manatee to become ill or, worse, die. Another very important worry I have is the number of boats that travel up the canal to Three Sisters Springs. This area is very shallow and boats must obey the idle signs, also stay in the deeper middle part of the canal and keep your eyes open. Wear polarized sunglasses to help see through the water and block the suns glare. Many manatees will be lying along the shallows up against the shorelines to soak in the warmth of the sun. The area around the idle sign just before Three Sisters gets very congested with boats, snorkelers and most importantly manatees resting. Everyone needs to use extreme caution when approaching this area and others such as Kings Spring that also is quite shallow. Manatees being large animals cannot maneuver quickly out of your way. And, many may have a calf they are nursing and cant move. Please slow down and look for manatees or signs of a manatee close by, such as a swirl at the top of the water as manatees swim, their noses breaking the surface for a breath. Their large bodies can be seen, so have a lookout at the front of your boat to spot manatees. Manatees love the warm water that recycles through your engine and flows back out. Many babies will have their faces dangerously close to your prop to warm up, so before you take off (engage your motor) please check behind it. Its very sad to see a baby manatee with a mutilated face from props. This cool weather snapcan confuse younger manatees. They dont realize or recognize that the ropes preventing boaters in (a winter sanctuary) area are not up. Please be careful and approach this area with caution. Again: look, dont touch a resting manatee. Please do not throw your anchors out; lower them slowly, looking out for resting manatees below. Lets welcome the manatees back home for the winter. If you see a sick or injured manatee, please report it right away to FWC Wildlife Alert at 888404-3922. A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL/STATE 000GDCO Friday, Dec. 6, 2013 16th Annual Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church proudly hosts Cocktails/appetizers hour 6pm-7pm Dinner 7pm-8pm. Dance & Special Events 8p.m.-11p.m. All proceeds for Serving Our Savior (SOS) Food Pantry Citrus County Father Christmas Ball Tickets are $45 each (donation). Purchase at the church office, 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy CR 486 Monday-Friday, from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. For more information please call, 527-0052, 419-5489, 563-5932 or 270-3391 Semi-Formal Attire Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center 5399 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461-8531 000GE4N GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM 000G7KI AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR 1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768 aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com We believe in keeping our customers happy by providing fast, friendly service, from Boat Rigging & Outboard/Trolling Motors repair to routine maintenance. That means we are here for all your boating needs. Mercury Certified. WE SELL NEW AND USED BOATS, FEATURING XTREME BOATS AND WE ALSO STOCK NEW AND USED REPAIR PARTS. 000G90Q Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. Stanley Steemer. Expires 10/31/13. Limi t one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Limit one coupon per customer Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. charge. Residential only Can be used on Duct Cleaning only Stanley Steemer. Expires 10/31/13. Stanley Steemer Expires 10/31/13. DUCT CLEANING DUCT CLEANING EXTENDED OFFER 000GAL4 BEST NEW HEARING TECHNOLOGY American Owned and Operated FREE Hearing Test 2013 2013 2013 2013 Inverness 586-7599 Homosassa 621-8000 Dunnellon 789-1559 Q&AContinued from Page A1 From wire reports

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A7 000GCZX

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descendents from them. Cattlemen would just let them run. When it was open range, people would have to gather their cows and then take them on a cattle drive to Tampa to sell them. That is how they got the Cracker Drive. That is the noise the whips made as they were driving the cows. The cattle, horses and riders began their journey Friday morning near the Marion County line and camped out on the ranch of Charlie Strange. After breakfast Saturday morning, they continued their drive towards Hernando. Waiting for their arrival, attendees enjoyed festivities at the Historic Hernando School fundraiser. Years ago, the historic building was scheduled for demolition. The Hernando Heritage Council of the Citrus County Historical Society decided to save the historic school and preserve it. The Hernando Heritage Council hopes to one day convert the schoolhouse into a multifaceted community center for Citrus County residents. Every single nickel goes to restoring the school, said Linda Yeomans, Hernando Heritage Council member and Citrus County Historical Society member. So far we have spent over $500,000. We need $250,000 to $300,000 to finish the school. Yeomans said the plans for the upcoming year include finishing the exterior painting, repairing the windows and doors and removing the flooring. At the festival, a taste of old Florida included the Cracker Caf and an oldfashioned general store that sold jarred, canned and frozen foods prepared by deep-rooted Citrus County families and numerous other vendors, demonstrators, live and silent auctions, along with a concert series. The festival and cattle drive were sponsored by the Hernando Heritage Council, a division of the Citrus County Historical Society. For more information on how to volunteer or join, call 352-341-6427 or email them at csociety@tampa bay.rr.com.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicle online.com. A8SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL 000FZ00 Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way 000G7M5 Same Day Appointments Available! Dr. Shirley A. Ice is going on sabbatical beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care continuity, she recommends her patients see her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from Suncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our other locations for your convenience. Inverness 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N. Florida Ave. 489-2486 000G85B 000GDL3 STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleIts the end of the trail for the 2013 Cracker Cattle Drive as cattle and horseback riders emerge from the Rails to Trails trail onto Parsons Point Drive in Hernando Saturday to end their two-day trek. CATTLEContinued from Page A1

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conference urging the men to turn themselves in. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement did not immediately release any other details about their capture or the investigation. A woman who answered the phone at the motel said she saw police coming and they went into room 227. The woman, who didnt want to give her name, said authorities didnt stop by the office before they moved in. Jenkins and Walker were both serving life sentences at the Franklin Correctional Facility in the Panhandle before they were released within the last month. The bogus paperwork, complete with case numbers and a judges forged signature, duped prison officials and reduced their sentences to 15 years. Jenkins was released Sept. 27 and Walker was set free Oct. 8. Family members and friends of the men said Saturday they initially thought their release was legitimate and spent time with them, planning a birthday party for one and going to church with the other. Both Jenkins and Walker went to an Orlando jail after their release and registered as felons, as required by law. They filled out paperwork, had their photographs taken and were even fingerprinted. By doing this, authorities said they didnt raise any alarms. Henry Pearson, who is Jenkins uncle and his father figure, said he brought Jenkins clothes when he picked him up from prison last month and drove him to see his mother and grandmother. Pearson planned a birthday party at his home for Jenkins a few days later, but he never showed up. Pearson said he was completely shocked to learn Wednesday that Jenkins was not supposed to be out of prison. He learned Jenkins was captured on TV and then a law enforcement agent called his home unexpectedly and let Jenkins talk to his wife. He just said that he was OK and that he loved us, Pearson said. We have a great sense of relief because we did not know how this would end up. Walkers mother, Lillie Danzy, said the family thought their prayers had been answered when she got a call saying Walker was being released. There wasnt time to pick him up, so he hopped a bus to central Florida. Walker was at church last Sunday. His mother said they have been cooperating with authorities and made no attempts to hide him. The Orange County sheriff said Friday night that authorities believed the men were still in the central Florida area. Its not clear how long they had been in Panama City, which is about 350 miles from Orlando. Jenkins was found guilty of first-degree murder in the 1998 killing and botched robbery of Roscoe Pugh, an Orlando man. It was Pughs family that contacted the prosecutors office earlier this week and told them Jenkins had been released, setting off a manhunt. The prosecutors office also discovered Walker had been mistakenly released. Walker was convicted of second-degree murder in the 1999 Orange County slaying of 23-yearold Cedric Slater. There are still questions about who created the legitimate-looking documents that exposed gaps in Floridas judicial system. In light of the errors, the Corrections Department changed the way it verifies early releases and state legislators promised to hold investigative hearings. The Corrections Department said on Friday it verified the early release by checking the Orange County Clerk of Courts website and calling them. Corrections Secretary Michael Crews sent a letter to judges saying prison officials will now verify with judges and not just court clerks before releasing prisoners early.STATECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A9 000G8TT CHIROPRACTIC Better Health 795-8911 Hours: Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9am 12pm & 2pm 6pm Tues. & Thurs. 10am 4pm 6166 W. Hwy. 44, Crystal River, FL visit us online at: www.betterhealthchiropractic.us New Technology, Natural Healing nonsurgical spinal decompression Triton computerized spinal traction for neck and back pain, sciatica, herniated or bulging discs, pre/post surgery. Russell Chiropractic has united with Better Health Chiropractic Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant Dr. Russell Lewandowski We offer: Gentle Adjusting Techniques: A.K., S.O.T., Palmer, Drop Table and Diversified Massage Therapy/Myofascial Release Laser/Microcurrent Acupuncture Cold Laser Therapy Natural Weight Loss Mediwrap Cellulite Reduction Buy 5, Get 1 FREE For the ones you leave behind . Planning in advance is the most loving gift as it provides peace of mind. Prearranged Burials & Cremation Call (352) 628-2555 today for our special discounts and receive a complimentary planning guide. 5635 W. Green Acres St. Homosassa, FL 34446 000G78B 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G8X4 Prizes to be awarded in three age groups. Prize packages will include: Two tickets to rodeo and gift package.Name: Address: City: Phone: Age: Prizes will be awarded in age categories from 4 years to 12 years. Entries must be received no later than Nov. 8, 2013. Citrus County 4-H Office, 3650 Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461 Nov. 22-23, 2013 8 p.m. (Gates open at 5:30 p.m.)Citrus County Fairgrounds Inverness, FL Always A Fair Price CASH for SCRAP Crystal River Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire CAUGHTContinued from Page A1 GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers. Call 352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.

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David Gagne, 64David Alfred Gagne, age 64, Inverness, entered eternal life on Oct. 14, 2013, under the loving care of his wife Cathy and surrounded by family and friends. David was born on Jan. 26, 1949, in Brunswick, Maine, to the late Doue and Viola (Arsenault) Gagne. He served our country in the U.S. Navy with 24 years of service, retiring with the rank of chief. David then pursued a nursing degree and worked as a nurse at Bayonet Point. He later was employed by the City of Inverness utilities department. Davids passion was serving others. He did this on a daily basis by assisting guests, along with Cathy, at the Lake House Bed and Breakfast. We will all remember his smiling face and friendly demeanor at that facility. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 38 years, Cathy Lynn Johnson; his daughters Jennifer GagneSanders, Clovis, Calif., and Joy Dill Hendrix, Jacksonville, Fla.; brothers Dennis (Donna), Daniel (Debra), Donald (Vicky), Dominic (Susan), Douglas (Sue), Dexter (Elly); sisters Doris (Gary) and Denise (Pete); three grandsons; a granddaughter; and many nieces and nephews and extended family. A tribute to Davids life will be held on Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at 3 p.m. at Lake House Bed and Breakfast with Pastor Greg Kell officiating and military honors given by VFW Post 4337 of Inverness. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family with arrangements. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Davids memory may be made to Hospice of Citrus Co., PO Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or the donors favorite local charity. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Jacobs, 85OCALARobert Andrew Jacobs, 85, of Ocala, Fla., passed away Oct. 15, 2013. Robert was born April 23, 1928, in Festus, Mo., to Robert and Mildred Jacobs. He proudly served in the U.S. Army, the U.S. Army National Guard, and the U.S. Air Force National Guard. He worked as a computer systems analyst for PPG Industries. He is survived by his wife of 63 years Emogene; a son, Steven R. Jacobs (Nicole J.) of Ocala; and four grandchildren. A graveside service with military honors will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell. Arrangements are in the care of Countryside Funeral Home, Anthony, Fla. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to Hospice of Marion County.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Emma Gonzalez, 89INVERNESSEmma Llanis Gonzalez, age 89, Inverness, died Oct. 17, 2013, at Avante Nursing Care Center. Emma was born on Nov. 21, 1923, in Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, to the late Manuel D. and Francisca (Reca) Llanis. She was a teacher in Puerto Rico and then was employed by the City of New York as a social worker. Emma enjoyed sewing, gardening, reading, cooking and baking. She had a quirky sense of humor and was a very sharp-witted lady. A loving and beautiful wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt and devoted friend, she will be remembered and missed dearly. Left to cherish her memory are her son Pedro Gonzalez, Inverness; her sister Hilda Gonzalez, Campbellton, Fla.; granddaughters Erica, Jennifer, Sara and Melissa; eight great-grandchildren; and her daughter-in-law Yolanda Gonzalez. She was preceded in death by her husband Felix Gonzalez Palen in 1993 and her son Felix M. Gonzalez. A funeral service tribute to Emmas life will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Pastor Ray Kelley officiating. Burial will follow at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. The family will greet friends in visitation from noon until the hour of service.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Jerry White Sr., 74HERNANDOJerry K. White Sr., 74 of Hernando, FL passed away October 15, 2013 at Woodland Terrace of Citrus Co. A native of Moline, Ill., he came to the area in 2003 from New Windsor, N.Y. Jerry retired from tool sales and served his country in the US Army. He was an avid boater and a member of the Crystal River Power Squadron. Mr. White was preceded in passing by his nephew, Kevin Sharp and is survived by a son, Jerry Keith White Jr. & (companion) Debbie of Poughkeepsie, N.Y.; daughter, Kristi Lockwood& (companion) Patrick of Webster, N.Y.; brother, Dale White of Hernando, Fl.; sister, Patricia Sharp & (husband) R onald of Summerfield, Fl.; nephew, Brian White of Ill.; 4 grandchildren; and 1 great-grandchild. Jerry also leaves behind his longtime companion Barbara MacNeill of Hernando, Fl. A Celebration of Life will be held at Fero Funeral Home Wednesday, October 23, 2013, at 3 p.m. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Alberta Feole, 93COMMERCE, MICH.Alberta Helen Feole, 93, of Commerce, Mich., passed away Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, at her daughters home in Homosassa. Services and burial will be held in Novi, Mich. Local arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home, Crystal River.Karl Sanger, 69HERNANDOKarl W. Sanger, 69, of Hernando, Fla., died Oct. 17, 2013, at the Hospice of Citrus County House in Lecanto. Karl was born July 13, 1944, in Washington, D.C., the son of Charles and Ruth Sanger. He was a senior systems analyst/ project manager for the U.S. Department of State and retired after 28 years of service. Karl moved to Hernando in 2000 from Silver Spring, Md. He was a member of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Hernando. Karl enjoyed scuba diving, snow skiing, golf, tennis, woodworking and was an avid antique tool collector. Mr. Sanger was preceded in death by his sister Charlene Ward and brother-in-law Edwin Ward. Survivors include his wife Betty Sanger of Hernando; daughter Cheri Rogers, her husband Scott and their daughter Carly of Rockville, Md.; son Kenneth Sanger, his wife Rachel and their sons Kyle and Tyler of Frederick, Md.; mother-in-law Naomi Domingus of Richmond, Va.; sister-in-law, the Rev. Pattie Sewell of Richmond, Va.; and his many nieces and nephews. A memorial service for Mr. Sanger will be at 3 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Hernando. The family will receive friends at the church from 2:30 p.m. until the hour of service. Memorial may be given to ALS Association at webfl.alsa.org or to the Hospice of Citrus County. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.James Scenna, 64CRYSTAL RIVERJames Edward Scenna, also known as Daddy, Big Jim, Jimbo, Jimmy and Patches, passed away on Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, at Seven Rivers Hospital in Crystal River. He was 64 years old. Mr. Scenna was born Feb. 1, 1949, to Phillip Alexander and Myrtle Pearl (Fargo) Scenna in Norwich, Conn., and came to Crystal River 30 years ago from Milford, Conn. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, a craftsman and jack of all trades. He loved life and lived it to the fullest. He will be greatly missed by his friends and family who loved him so much. Left to cherish his memory are his children Melissa Rae Alsup (Jeff), James Edward Scenna, Thomas Joseph Scenna, Daniel Phillip Scenna (Jessica), Michael David Scenna, Robert Justin Scenna, Kellie Lynn Scenna and Vanessa Rae Scenna; brothers Bill Scenna (Janet) and P .A. Scenna (Chris); sisters Carojen Lindsey (Paul) and Terry Brown (Mike); and grandchildren Chapin, Jacob, Hannah, Leah, Justin, Danielle and Maddalyn. A visitation will be held on Thursday, Oct. 24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Strickland Funeral Home Chapel in Crystal River. The memorial service will be on Friday, Oct. 25 at 10 a.m. at the Crystal River United Methodist Church Bethel Chapel. Inurnment with military honors will follow at Crystal River memorial Park cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory, Crystal River.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Jennifer Hinson, 46CRYSTAL RIVERJennifer Lynn Hinson, 46, of Crystal River, passed away at home Oct. 18, 2013. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. Fero Funeral Home.Bette Hale, 71INGLISBette Rae Hale, age 71 of Inglis, died Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, at her home in Inglis. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory, Crystal River.A10SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEOBITUARIES Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Kelly Prus 564-2917 kprus@chronicleonline.com 000G7P3 Call 352-59-STUDY 16176 Cortez Blvd. Brooksville, FL 34601 Kelli K. Maw, MD, MPH Board Certified, Family Medicine 000G230 000G7C9 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000GCP4 Office Locations: Crystal River & Inverness 352-795-5700 For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000GAG6 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace Service of Remembrance (352) 726-2271 1-888-746-6737 Please bring a photo of your loved one before Thursday, November 7 to create your own holiday memorial keepsake. All members of the community are welcome to attend. 000GE3U Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory Invites You to a Holiday at our Inverness Chapel, 501 West Main St., Inverness Inverness Homosassa Beverly Hills Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013 at 3:00 p.m. 000GE3R 355 NE 10th Avenue Crystal River, FL 34429 352-228-4967 www.cremationcenterofthenaturecoast.com When Simplicity, Affordability and Compassion Matter 4272 E. Louisiana Lane, Hernando ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL McGan Cremation Service LLC 000GDUQ Affordable Cremation Veteran Discounts 24 Hour Service Pre-Arrangements Available 352-419-7917 Sean McGan, OWNER Serving Citrus and Surrounding Counties Family Owned and Operated Karl Sanger Emma Gonzalez David Gagne

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Associated PressBEIRUT Two Turkish pilots held hostage in Lebanon and nine Lebanese pilgrims abducted in Syria returned home Saturday night, part of an ambitious three-way deal cutting across the Syrian civil war. The Shiite pilgrims, some in dress shirts and other in suit jackets, embraced wellwishers at Beiruts international airport, with one man being carried away on the shoulders of a crowd. Meanwhile, a plane carrying the two freed Turkish Airlines pilots landed in Istanbul, where Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and other officials greeted them. The release of the Turks and the pilgrims is part of a negotiated hostage deal that includes freeing dozens of women held in Syrian government jails. It wasnt immediately clear Saturday night whether any of the women had been freed, as the Syrian government and the state-run SANA news agency did not mention any such release. Lebanese, Turkish and Syrian officials declined to immediately offer more details of the complicated, multilateral exchange. The deal appeared to be mostly mediated by the resource-rich Gulf state of Qatar, which has supported Syrian rebels in their battle against the government of President Bashar Assad. The Turkish hostages arrived home on a Qatar Executive private jet. Palestinian officials also mediated. The nine Shiite pilgrims were kidnapped in May 2012 while on their way from Iran to Lebanon via Turkey and Syria. Turkish Airlines pilots Murat Akpinar and Murat Agca had been held since their kidnapping in August in Beirut. Hundreds of relatives shouted and screamed as the pilgrims filed into Beiruts international airport, mostly wearing tidy plaid shirts, their faces visibly tired. My son, my son! one woman could be heard sobbing. Dozens of green-clad Lebanese soldiers tried to keep order as crowds heaved forward. A pilgrim accused his kidnappers of not offering the hostages medical care. We wished that any of them had any kind of values, said the pilgrim, who did not give his name. We were with people who couldnt tell a female camel from a male camel, he said, referring to an Arabic proverb to describe an ignorant person. Other pilgrims said they were kept in dark, humid rooms for most of their confinement. They could hear heavy fighting nearby. Lebanese officials and clerics greeted the men, kissing their cheeks one by one. A top Lebanese official who coordinated the pilgrims release entered the airport to the backdrop of whooping cheers and loud music. It was difficult, without a doubt, said Maj. Gen. Abbas Ibrahim, head of Lebanons general security apparatus. I didnt want anything from this deal, except to see this sight, he said, gesturing at the waiting crowds. The pilgrims kidnapping set off a series of titfor-tat kidnappings by Shiite clansmen inside Lebanon, including that of the two Turkish pilots. The gunmen hoped to pressure Turkey to help release the pilgrims. Turkey is believed to have close relations to some Syrian rebel groups. All three groups of captives the Lebanese pilgrims, the Turkish pilots and the imprisoned Syrian women are meant to be released in coming days as part of the negotiated deal. The pilgrims were held by Syrian rebels who initially demanded that the Lebanese Shiite group Hezbollah end its involvement in the Syrias civil war, now entering its third year. They later softened their demands to the release of imprisoned women held by security forces loyal to Assad. Assad has drawn support from Syrias ethnic and religious minorities, including Christians and members of his Alawite sect. The rebels are dominated by Syrias Sunni Muslim majority. Lebanese Shiite group Hezbollah have played a critical role in recent battlefield victories for forces loyal to Assad. Hard-line Sunni fighters have backed the rebels. It is one of the more ambitious negotiated settlements to come out of Syrias civil war, where the warring sides remain largely opposed to any bartered peace. But it suggested that the parties and their regional backers were more prepared to deal with each other than at any other previous time in the conflict. The Lebanese pilgrims crossed into Turkey late Friday. Meanwhile Saturday, Syrian rebels assaulted a checkpoint in a pro-government suburb of Damascus on Saturday, setting off a suicide car bomb that killed 16 soldiers, activists said.WORLDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A11 Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. 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SATURDAY AND SUNDAY EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT OUR LOW OVERHEAD SAVES YOU THOUSANDS WERE IN OUR NEW LOCATION NOW! Across from Bay Area 8010 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, Pine View Plaza Call For Your Appointment Today 352-302-2865 w ww.dreamkitchensandbaths.com 000G73N 000G85D Deal brings home Turkish, Lebanese hostages Associated PressOne of the nine released Lebanese Shiite pilgrims who were kidnapped by a rebel faction in northern Syria last year reacts upon his arrival at Rafik Hariri international airport in Beirut, Lebanon. Two Turkish pilots held hostage in Lebanon and nine Lebanese pilgrims abducted in Syria returned home Saturday night, part of an ambitious three-way deal cutting across the Syrian civil war.

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Fall in force Associated PressTim Synder of Sequim, Wash., prepares his camera and tripod Thursday to take photos of the markers at the historic Buena Vista Cemetery in Port Gamble, Wash. BART workers killed after being struck by trainWALNUT CREEK, Calif. Police from the San Francisco Bay Areas rapid transit system said two employees performing maintenance were struck and killed by a train. Saturday afternoons accident on a track in Walnut Creek comes amid a strike by Bay Area Rapid Transit workers that has shut the system down. But some trains were being moved by managers. It was unclear how the 1:45 p.m. accident occurred. BART Deputy Police Chief Ben Fairow confirmed the deaths to the Contra Costa Times .Half a million health insurance applications filedWASHINGTON Administration officials said about 476,000 health insurance applications have been filed through federal and state exchanges, the most detailed measure yet of the problem-plagued rollout of President Barack Obamas signature legislation. However, the officials continue to refuse to say how many people have actually enrolled in the insurance markets. Without enrollment figures, its unclear whether the program is on track to reach the 7 million people projected by the Congressional Budget Office to gain coverage during the six-month sign-up period. The first three weeks of sign-ups have been marred by a cascade of computer problems, which the administration says it is working around the clock to correct. Obamas advisers say the president has been frustrated by the flawed rollout. During one of his daily health care briefings last week, he told advisers assembled in the Oval Office that the administration had to own up to the fact that there were no excuses for not having the website ready to operate as promised.JPMorgan would pay $13 billion in tentative dealWASHINGTON JPMorgan Chase & Co. has tentatively agreed to pay $13 billion to settle allegations surrounding the quality of mortgage-backed securities it sold in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis, a person familiar with the negotiations between the bank and the federal government said Saturday. If the agreement is finalized, it would be the governments highest-profile enforcement action related to the financial meltdown. The person said the tentative agreement does not resolve a criminal investigation of the banks conduct. Of the $13 billion, $9 billion is fines or penalties and $4 billion will go to consumer relief for struggling homeowners, the person said. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS Page A12SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Titanic price Associated PressA violin, believed to be the one played by Titanic bandmaster Wallace Hartley, is displayed at auction house Henry Aldridge and Son on Friday in Devizes, England. The violin sold for approximately $1.6 million Saturday, despite being corroded and unplayable. Train slams into station, againBUENOS AIRES, Argentina A commuter train slammed into the bumper at the end of the line Saturday at the same station in Argentinas capital where 52 people were killed in a similar crash last year. This time there was no immediate report of deaths, but at least 80 people were injured. A mob quickly formed, unleashing its fury at the train operators. Passengers chanted murderer, murderer! at the injured driver through the shattered cabin window. Officers intervened and the driver was soon hospitalized under police custody. Police in riot gear then took control of the station after the angry crowd broke glass and threw stones in the street outside.Eldest of Mexican drug clan killedLOS CABOS, Mexico Francisco Rafael Arellano Felix, the eldest brother of Mexicos once-feared Arellano Felix drug clan, was shot to death in the Baja beach resort of Los Cabos by a gunman wearing a clown costume, authorities said Saturday. Relatives of Arellano Felix confirmed his identity at the scene of the crime at a rented beach house, the attorney generals office in Baja California Sur state said in a statement. The motive for the attack, and the gunmans disguise, are still under investigation. Known for its violent and brutal control of the drug trade in the border city of Tijuana in the 1990s, the arrests or death of most of the seven Arellano Felix brothers have reduced the cartel to a shadow of its former self. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressThe sun rises over Freeman Island, one of the four artificial THUMS islands in San Pedro Bay off the coast of Long Beach used for oil drilling, on Oct. 3 in Long Beach, Calif. Oil companies have fracked from manmade islands off Long Beach and platforms off the Orange County coast for years, and state regulators are only now realizing the technique is more widespread than originally thought. Associated PressWASHINGTON Hey, fed-up Americans, heres a scary thought after the dispiriting spectacle of the government shutdown: Youre the ones who sent these members of Congress to Washington, and they reallyare a reflection of you. For all the complaints about Washington, it was American groupthink that produced divided government in the past two elections and a Congress that has been tied in knots lately. John Adams, who would become the countrys second president, wrote in 1776 that legislators should be in miniature an exact portrait of the people at large. More than 200 years later, members of the current entangled House are probably a very accurate reflection of how their constituents feel, said Ross Baker, a Rutgers University political scientist. Not that people are ready to take ownership of the failings of their representatives. Of course not, said Baker. Its a completely dissociative view of American politics that somehow there are these grasping, corrupt, tonedeaf politicians in Washington who are totally unconnected to the caring and attentive, compassionate person that an individual voter has elected to Congress. With the government now powering back up to full speed and the next budget crisis pushed off at least until January, there is no shortage of speculation about whether voters will retaliate in the 2014 elections against lawmakers for this falls budget impasse. A lot depends on how the next year goes. For now at least, public sentiment toward President Barack Obama, congressional leaders and Congress in general is grim. Nearly three-quarters of voters want to see most members of Congress defeated, a much higher level than at the same point prior to the 2006 and 2010 elections in which control of the House changed hands, according to the Pew Research Center. Also, Pew reports, the share of voters who want to see their own representative replaced is as high as its been in two decades, at 38 percent. Yet for all of the publics grousing about polarized politicians, the voters themselves are deeply divided, too. They sort themselves geographically and ideologically. Congressional district boundaries are drawn to accentuate those political divisions. When legislators answer to such solidly Republican or Democratic constituencies, they are more prone to engage in divisive antics such as those seen in recent weeks. We really are a red and blue nation, said Brookings Institution scholar Thomas Mann. We separate ourselves. We tend to associate with people who think like we do. The result, he said, is more and more separation of Democrats and Republicans with distinctive sets of values and world views and then an attachment almost a tribalistic attachment to party that leads them to accept whatever the party position seems to be. Fed-up voters meet the enemy, and it is ... them? Associated PressNelly Mathov, 79, protests against the government shutdown Oct. 2 outside the federal building in Los Angeles. Associated PressLONG BEACH, Calif.The oil production technique known as fracking is more widespread and frequently used in the offshore platforms and man-made islands near some of Californias most populous and famous coastal communities than state officials believed. In waters off Long Beach, Seal Beach and Huntington Beach some of the regions most popular surfing strands and tourist attractions oil companies have used fracking at least 203 times at six sites in the past two decades, according to interviews and drilling records obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request. Just this year in Long Beach Harbor, the nations secondlargest container port, an oil company with exclusive rights to drill there completed five fracks on palm tree-lined, man-made islands. Other companies fracked more than a dozen times from old oil platforms off Huntington Beach and Seal Beach over the past five years. Though there is no evidence offshore hydraulic fracturing has led to any spills or chemical leaks, the practice occurs with little state or federal oversight of the operations. The state agency that leases lands and waters to oil companies said officials found new instances of fracking after searching records as part of a review after the AP reported this summer about fracking in federal waters off California, an area from three miles to 200 miles offshore. The state oil permitting agency said it doesnt track fracking. As the state continues its investigation into the extent of fracking both in federal waters and closer to shore and develops ways to increase oversight under a law that takes effect in 2015, environmental groups are calling for a moratorium on the practice. How is it that nobody in state government knew anything about this? Its a huge institutional failure, said Kassie Siegel, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. Offshore fracking is far more common than anyone realized. Little is known about the effects on the marine environment of fracking, which shoots water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to clear old wells or crack rock formations to free oil. New oil leases off the states shores have been prohibited since a 1969 oil platform blowout off Santa Barbara, which fouled miles of coastline. With no room for physical expansion, oil companies instead have turned to fracking to keep the oil flowing. The state launched an investigation into the extent of offshore fracking after the AP report in August. California officials initially said here was no record of fracking in the nearshore waters they oversee. Now, as the State Lands Commission and other agenciesreview rec ords and find more instances of fracking, officials are confused over who exactly is in charge of ensuring the technique is monitored and performed safely. We still need to sort out what authority, if any, we have over fracking operations in state waters; its very complicated, said Alison Dettmer, a deputy director of the California Coastal Commission. Offshore fracking catches Calif. regulators off guard Associated PressGAINFORD, Alberta Emergency crews battled a massive fire Saturday after a Canadian National tanker train carrying oil and gas derailed west of Edmonton, Alberta, overnight. No injuries have been reported so far. Canadian National spokesman Louis-Antoine Paquin said 13 cars four carrying petroleum crude oil and nine loaded with liquified petroleum gas came off the tracks around 1 a.m. local time in the hamlet of Gainford, about 50 miles from Edmonton. The entire community of roughly 100 people was evacuated. A local resident described hearing a series of crashes moments before a fireball shot into the sky. The fireball was so big, it shot across both lanes of the Yellowhead (Highway) and now both lanes of the Yellowhead are closed and theres fire on both sides, said the eyewitness, identified only as Duane. Emergency crews work a fire Saturday after a train carrying oil and gas derailed in Gainford, Alberta, Canada, west of Edmonton.ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE/ Associated Press Train carrying crude oil, gas derails in Alberta

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EXCURSIONSPage A13SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 Travel & Leisure Special to the ChronicleTo celebrate their respective anniversaries, Pat and Steve Morgan and Joanne and Pete Rocco visited Alaska. The couples began in Fairbanks, Alaska, and then onto Seward, where they boarded a cruise ship to continue their journey. The couples visited Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau as a part of their travels.The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.DREAMVACATIONSPhoto Contest This is a very special anniversary year of the greatest battle ever fought on American soil, one that would decide the fate of the nation. The Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the Civil War, forever leaving its heavy footprint in the beautiful Pennsylvania countryside. PHOTOS BY NEIL SAWYER / For the ChronicleABOVE: A statue of Gen. George Meade stands tall on Cemetery Hill. TOP LEFT: An original Civil War cannon with a red barn in the background marks the scene of a fire that killed an entire platoon. BOTTOM LEFT: North Carolina State monument is a moving tribute to the soldiers. BELOW: The 73rd New York monument stands amid the backdrop of a blue sky. ur long-anticipated visit to Gettysburg on July 4, 2013, for the 150th anniversary celebration of the epic Battle of Gettysburg was rewarded with more historical events than we had anticipated. There were reenactments of the Battle of Gettysburg somewhere in the vicinity nearly every day during the month of July. The reenactments, while daunting and spectacular, were only the tip of the iceberg. Its the battleground the specific sites such as the Peach Orchard, Little Round Top, and Cemetery Hill that were central in our attempt to understand the action during those three horrific days of 1863. At least 46,000 men from both sides were left dead, wounded or missing from the Battle of Gettysburg. Standing in the spot where perhaps a dozen men had fallen to cannon fire, rifle and bayonet was indeed sobering. Formulating a plan to include as much as possible into our week began at the Museum and Visitor Center, in what I would deem a full-service facility: easy parking, ticket and information counter, cafeteria, restrooms, gift shop, private guide services, a museum that includes interactive exhibits and various short films, plus a 360-degree 3-D cyclorama of the battlefield. A stop at the visitor center is a must, and is recommended as the starting point of your visit. By Neil Sawyer Spontaneous Travelor See SAWYER/ Page A19

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A14SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT Dear Annie: After more than 13 years of marriage to an intelligent and lovely woman, our relationship continues to be a rollercoaster ride. We are in our 60s. I was married once before. She has had three prior marriages and divorces. We each have adult children. It seems she has underlying hostility toward me and anyone else whose choices do not meet with her approval. She complains of not having a life and being only a housekeeper, even though she keeps all of her own income and I pay all of our bills, providing her with an allowance. We also travel well. She complains that Im not home enough, but we spend two hours together over morning coffee, and I return home from work by 6 p.m. Then I end up eating dinner alone while she retreats to another part of the house to play puzzles or talk with her girlfriends. I stay home every weekend so we can be together, but she shows no affection to me at all. I see her as controlling and deeply depressed, at least around me. We tried a few sessions with a counselor, but she refused to go back. Shes convinced she doesnt need help and that I am responsible for our disconnect. Any thoughts about how I can help us? Need Direction Dear Need: When someone describes a relationship as a rollercoaster ride, it tends to mean extreme ups and downs. If this is the case, your assessment that your wife is depressed could be accurate, but she also could be bipolar. Unfortunately, if she refuses to consider that she might need medical or psychiatric assistance, little will change. Please encourage her to see her doctor, but also contact the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (dbs alliance.org).Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email annies mailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers, visit www. creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Like some housetops 6Tranquility 11Wearing a flowing garment 16Eats nothing 21Worship 22Praise 23Standing wide open 24Ne plus 25Auto type 26Embezzled 27Word with face or hand 28Kitchen item 29Playground game 30The Abominable Snowman 32Top 34Clans 36Fanatic 37Gen. Robert 39Mister 41Legal wrong 43A pronoun 44Variety of cheese 45Cavalrymans mount 48Make coffee 50Concerning (2 wds.) 52Walked 55Employer 57Peruse 59Iran, formerly 63Kind of eel 64Off-and-on 66Person at the scene 68The Love 69Simple 70Wire measure 72Backbone 73Urban pest 74Curve shape 75Tub washing 76Kind of negative campaign 78A pronoun 79Chinese gelatin 80Breathe 82Thickness 83Hoisting device 85Betel palm 86Totality 87Bway announcement 88Dye container 89Hasten 90A pronoun 93Tolerated 95Panhandle 96Capital of Venezuela 100Damage 101 contra 102Washingtons Sound 104At the proper time 105Insect 106Work unit 107Empty of liquid 109Follow 110Skin opening 111Dilettantish 112Wile E. Coyotes nemesis (2 wds.) 115Expressionless 117Bone in the ear 118Group of nine 119Metric measure 121M-R link 122Each 123Not up 125Auricular 127Playthings 129Former student 132Show assent 134Genesis name 136Actor Neeson 137Madame Bovary 141Edge 142Band for sharpening 144Journey 146Diagnostic aid (hyph.) 148Cereal grass 149Word at parting 151Mickey 153VIP in old India 155Roughly 157Man from Madrid 158Inscribe 159Shipping box 160Pre-adult insect 161Liable 162Desert shrub 163Old anesthetic 164Arab chieftain (var.) DOWN 1Refined discernment 2Perfect 3Rustic house 4Time 5Gainsay 6Harass 7Put out 8From Z 9Fizzy beverage 10Put into office 11Wedding reception specialist 12Past 13Furry feet 14Swords 15Site of a Greek oracle 16Bother 17High mountain 18Rock 19Food fish 20 Ana 31Old exclamation 33Swab 35Bowling game 38Brilliant display 40Irritable 42Bring to bay 44Seedless plant 46Attention-getter 47Game VIP, for short 49Letters 51Nerve network 52Fossilized resin 53Bullwinkle, for one 54Military VIPs 56Card game 58Portray 60Twill fabric 61Newton or Asimov 62Ad per aspera 64Destiny 65Tall tale 67Accompanying 69Nobleman 71Statute 75Liver secretion 76Sailing vessel 77Bolt for a girder 79Neighborhood 81Tense in grammar 82Paid athlete 84Old horse 85Ethereal 87Twine 89Patriot Nathan 90That place 91A Great Lake 92Pipe 93Penn or Connery 94Flop 95Commenced 96Terse 97Cut a roast 98Caper 99Fashion 101Using good judgment 103State official (abbr.) 104Cervantes hero (2 wds.) 107Dull 108Notorious old Roman 110Of a religious head 111Liqueur flavoring 113Numb 114Pro 116Male swan 117Simian 120Kind of exam 122 Mater 124Structure on a roof 126Convertible 128The of Seville 129Seize 130Jockey 131Kind of acid 133Lorna 135Chop 138Roger or Mary Tyler 139Purple shade 140Rose oil 142Of course! 143Golf action 145Component 147Lock maker 150Many years 152Visit 154Cry of contempt 156Emerils exclamation SundayPUZZLER Wife keeps hubby on roller coaster (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug h t on C amera Out of Bounds C aug h t on C amera C aug h t on C amera Dont Blink (N) S ex Sl aves Chi cago S ex Sl aves Th e Windy City S ex Sl aves: O a kl an d (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Drugs, Inc. Drugs, Inc. Drugs, Inc. Cartel City: Arizona Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. Stashville: Tennessee (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sam & Sam & HauntedSam & See DadInstant The Nutty Professor (1996) FriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped (N) PGPreachers of L.A.Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Twilight Saga: Breaking DawnHomeland Tower of David MA Masters of Sex MAHomeland Game On (N) MA Masters of Sex (N) MAHomeland Game On MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Bar Rescue Barely Above Water PG Countdown to Bound for Glory (N) Bar Rescue A Bar Full of Bull PG Bar Rescue Jon of the Dead PG Bar Rescue (N) (In Stereo) PG Covert Kitchens Autobody Entrees PG (STARZ) 370 271 370 White Queen Premium Rush (2012) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. PG-13 The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA Men in Black 3 (2012, Action) Will Smith. (In Stereo) PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Fishing the Flats Sport Fishing Sprtsman Adv. College Football Florida State at Clemson. (Taped)Florida Sport Saltwater Exp. Into the Blue G (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29 Swamp Devil (2008) Bruce Dern. The Ruins (2008, Horror) Jonathan Tucker, Jena Malone. R Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984, Adventure) Harrison Ford. PG Nightmare2 (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 Old School (2003) Luke Wilson. Hot Tub Time Machine (2010) Hot Tub Time Machine (2010) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Come September (1961, RomanceComedy) Rock Hudson. NR Lover Come Back (1961, RomanceComedy) Rock Hudson. NR Send Me No Flowers (1964, Comedy) Rock Hudson, Doris Day. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) PG Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) Yukon Men Reserves are dwindling. PG Alaska: The Last Frontier (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30MarryMarryMarryMarryMediumMediumMediumMediumAlaskan Women MediumMedium (TMC) 350 261 350 Barrio Tales (2012) Carson Aune. R People Like Us (2012, Drama) Chris Pine. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Steel (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman. (In Stereo) PG-13 Blitz (2011) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Clash of the Titans (2010, Fantasy) Sam Worthington. PG-13 Gladiator (2000) Russell Crowe. A fugitive general becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. R (DVS) Gladiator (2000) R (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Open Season 3 (2010) Steve Schirripa.DragonsTeenAmericanClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. GuyChina, IL (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Worlds CreepiestMost TerrifyingToy Haunter (N)Making Monsters (N)Halloween TrickedTerrifying Places (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Worlds Dumbest...Most ShockingTop 20 Funniest PGWorlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsThe Golden GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family White Collar At What Price PG (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Die by the Sword CSI: Miami Eric Delko returns. CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami L.A. (In Stereo) CSI: Miami Getting Axed CSI: Miami Delko for the Defense (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplayAmerican Beauty SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 20, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football Denver Broncos at Indianapolis Colts. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Extraordinary Women Secrets of Henry VIIIs Palace PG Masterpiece Classic The Paradise PG Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo) PG As Time Goes By As Time Goes By % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGSecrets-HenryMasterpiece ClassicMasterpiece ClassicAustin City Limits ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football Denver Broncos at Indianapolis Colts. From Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time Nasty Habits PG Revenge Mercy (N) (In Stereo) PG Betrayal Sara is confronted. (N) NewsSpo Night on 9 (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) The Amazing Race Beards in the WindThe Good Wife Outside the Bubble The Mentalist Red Listed (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. (N) (In Stereo Live) FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsBurn Notice PG 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosOnce Upon a TimeRevenge (N) PGBetrayal (N) NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileWatchmanPeter Youngren Great AwakeningLove a Child G UnspokenPastor Dayna Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time Nasty Habits PG Revenge Mercy (N) (In Stereo) PG Betrayal Sara is confronted. (N) NewsCastle PG @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Glee Throwdown (In Stereo) PG Glee Sues softer side. PG The Office PG The Office We There Yet? We There Yet? F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Crash (2004) Sandra Bullock.SeinfeldSeinfeldRepublic of DoyleOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyPaidMinistries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends Friends Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami From the Grave CSI: Miami Blood in the Water Criminal Minds (In Stereo) PG Criminal Minds JJ (In Stereo) O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy GEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7Big BangBig BangMLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. (N) FOX 35 News at 10Being: Mariano (N) (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Mira Quin Baila (N) PG (SS) Sal y Pimienta PGComed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27American Hoggers Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Modern Dads PG Duck Dynasty (AMC) 55 64 55 Seed of Chucky (2004, Horror) Jennifer Tilly, Billy Boyd. Premiere. R The Walking Dead MA The Walking Dead Infected (N) MA Talking Dead (N) The Walking Dead Infected MA (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be Announced Lone Star Legend Lone Star Legend Call of Wildman CallWildman Mountain Monsters (In Stereo) Call of Wildman CallWildman (BET) 96 19 96 The Women of Brewster Place Woman helps others living in tenement. PG The Women of Brewster Place Woman helps others living in tenement. PG T.D. Jakes Presents: Mind, Body & Soul (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJQueer Eye ReunionHousewives/NJHappensCouch (CC) 27 61 27 33Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Tosh.0 Tosh.0 WorkaholicsWorkaholics (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 A League of Their Own (1992) Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidDebt/PartOn The Car ChasersThe Car ChasersThe Car ChasersThe Car Chasers (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Newsroom (N)Anthony Bourd.Anthony Bourd.To Be AnnouncedAnthony Bourd. (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Jessie G Liv & Maddie Dog With a Blog G GoodCharlie A.N.T. Farm G Shake It Up! G Liv & Maddie A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G Shake It Up! G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCSMLS Soccer: Earthquakes at Galaxy SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49Football Sunday on ESPN RadioBaseball30 for 30 30 for 30 ShortsNASCAR Now (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over LiveSunday Night PrimeChesterRosaryTheology RoundtableGodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Monsters, Inc. (2001) Voices of John Goodman. ToyTERROR! The Addams Family (1991, Comedy) Anjelica Huston. PG-13 Addams Family Values (1993, Comedy) Anjelica Huston. PG-13 (FLIX) 118 170 Metro (1997, Action) Eddie Murphy, Michael Rapaport. (In Stereo) R Sgt. Bilko (1996) Steve Martin. (In Stereo) PG Blues Brothers 2000 (1998) Dan Aykroyd. (In Stereo) PG-13 Hard Rain R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 Iron Chef AmericaHalloween Wars GGuys GamesHalloween Wars GCutthroat Kitchen GRestaurant: Im. (FS1) 732 112 732 American Le. NASCARUFCUFC UnleashedBeingBeingThe Ultimate FighterFOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker TourWorld Poker TourThe Best of Pride (N)World Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Just Go With It (2011, RomanceComedy) Adam Sandler. PG-13 Step Brothers (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. R Step Brothers (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. R (GOLF) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf CentralPGA Tour Golf Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, Final Round.Central (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Signed, Sealed, Delivered (2013) Hope Floats (1998, Romance) Sandra Bullock. PG-13 When Calls the Heart (2013, Drama) Jean Smart, Lori Loughlin, Maggie Grace. Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Dream House (2011) Mama (2013, Horror) Jessica Chastain. (In Stereo) PG-13 Boardwalk Empire (N) MA EastboundHello Ladies MABoardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 BoxingSafe House Real Time With Bill Maher MA Muhammad Alis Greatest Fight (2013) NR The Counselor Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) R (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlCousins UndercoverLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Ancient Aliens The Power of Three PG Ancient Aliens The Crystal Skulls PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn StarsPawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Georgia Rule (2007) R The Ugly Truth (2009, Romance-Comedy) Katherine Heigl. R Drop Dead Diva One Shot (N) PG Witches of East End Ingrid struggles. The Ugly Truth (2009) R (LMN) 50 119 Jerome Brudos: The Lust Killer D,L Edmund Kemper: The Co-Ed Killer Killer Profile Gary Heidnik Killer Profile (N) (In Stereo) I Survived (In Stereo) I Survived Shaunna & Brad; Lee; Emily (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 The Beach (2000, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Tilda Swinton. (In Stereo) R Pitch Perfect (2012, Musical Comedy) Anna Kendrick. (In Stereo) PG-13 Broken City (2013, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg. (In Stereo) R Puzzle answer is on Page A18. TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 1p.m., 4:05p.m., 7:10p.m. Carrie (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)4:20p.m., 7p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)In3D. 1:20p.m. No passes. Escape Plan (R) 1:30p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:35 p.m., 4:35p.m., 7:35p.m. No passes. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:10p.m., 4:15p.m., 7:15p.m., 10:25 p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1:45p.m., 4:45p.m., 7:45p.m. Prisoners (R) 1p.m., 3:50p.m., 7:05p.m. Rush (R) 1:15p.m., 4p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 12:45p.m., 3:50p.m., 7p.m. Carrie (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)1:40p.m., 4:40p.m., 7:40p.m. Escape Plan (R) 1p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1:10p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:15p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.

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MOC/MOCA to serve pastaThe Military Order of the Cootie/Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will serve a pasta and meatball or sausage dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr. Post No. 4252, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando (where the helicopter is). Advance tickets, for $7, may be purchased at the post. Donation at the door will be $7.50. Music will be provided after dinner. For more information, call Paul Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-7954142 or the post at 352726-3339.VFW Riders to do poker runDistrict 7 VFW Riders will host the Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Poker Run on Saturday, Dec. 7. Registration begins at 9 a.m. with the last bike out at 11 a.m. and last bike in at 4 p.m. The schedule is: Staring point and first card VFW Post 7122 Floral City, 8191 S. Florida Ave. Begin 50/50 10 tickets for $5. Start the run with breakfast for a donation. Cost of $15 per poker hand includes the cost of the meal at the Inglis Post. Additional poker hands for $10. Additional meal tickets are $5. First stop and second card Giovannis, 3451 E. Louise Lane, Hernando. Second stop and third card American Legion Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. Third stop and fourth card Willards Restaurant & Lounge, 3490 S.E. County Road 337, Morriston. Fourth stop and fifth card Chiefland VFW Post 5625, 1104 S. Main St. Final stop and wild card Inglis VFW Post 8698, at 520 State Road 40 E. Last bike in by 4 p.m. Roll the dice for a lucky No. 7 free drink (one per poker hand card player). Prizes for best poker hand, second-best hand and worst hand. There will be music, a silent auction, odometer poker for a prize (read your bike odometer best hand wins) and a 50/50 drawing. For more information, call Roger at 352-697-1826 or email shanily1@ yahoo.com. New veterans pin still availableDisabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces the design and availability of this years Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Commemorative Pin. In keeping with this years theme, Honoring Our Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans, the pin is an outline of Citrus County superimposed with the Iraq Campaign and the Afghanistan Campaign service medals. Pins are available for a donation of $3 each and may be obtained by calling the chapter at 352-3443464 or John Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the Citrus County Veterans Service Office in Lecanto. During Veterans Appreciation Week activities, Oct. 26 through Nov. 17, the pins will also be available at various functions such as the Veterans Appreciation Concerts on Oct. 26 and 27 and the Veterans Fair on Nov. 8.Vets sought for classroom talksThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform around the world. The model Veterans in the Classroom program was recognized in 2008 with a Florida Education Foundation award. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed as participants. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384or cmcleod670@earthlink. net, or Bob Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc @tampabay.rr.com. Case manager aids veteransThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department has a case manager who is available to assist veterans to apply for benefits and provide information about benefits. The schedule is: First Wednesday Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Second Wednesday Homosassa Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa. Third Wednesday Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an appointment to meet with the case manager, call 352-527-5915. DAV helps vets get to clinicsThe DAV transportation network has received great response for volunteer drivers for the two vans assigned to the Lecanto clinic one going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from Lecanto to The Villages. The Gainesville van goes each weekday and The Villages run is made when there is a need. Veterans who need to go to appointments in Gainesville or The Villages are asked to call the Veterans Service Office in Lecanto at 352527-5915 to be placed on the van list. All appointments must be made before 1 p.m.Office has help for vets with PTSDThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department offers help for veterans who have had their post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied. Veterans who have been denied within the past two years are asked to contact the office to review the case and discuss compensation/pension examination. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been denied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County Veterans Office. To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. Vets will need to have a denial letter and a copy of the compensation examination by Gainesville. Copies of either exam may be requested through the VA medical records or from the primary care window in Lecanto. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com mserv/vets. Transitioning vets can get helpThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department is looking for veterans who have recently transitioned from the military (or returning reservist from tours of active duty) to Citrus County within the past two years. Veterans Services requests that veterans and their spouses call to be placed on a list for an upcoming seminar, which will discuss what benefits or services they need to help ease transition. The office will schedule a seminar to discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more information about the Citrus County Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com mserv/vets. VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A15 VETERANS NOTES 000G6PW Friday, Oct. 25 1:00 3:30 PM FREE Skin Cancer Screening Allen Ridge Professional Village 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 352-746-2200 352-873-1500 SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER Participating with: Medicare, BCBS, United Healthcare, Cigna, Humana, Aetna. www.dermatologyonline.com To schedule your free skin cancer examination, please call the staff at Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery Center at 746-2200. Ralph E. Massullo, M.D., F.A.A.D William Welton, M.D., F.A.A.D Michael Wartels, M.D., F.A.A.D Margaret Collins, M.D., F.A.A.D Brian Bonomo, P.A .-C Kristy Chatham, P.A.-C Elizabeth Estes, ARNP Erin Watkins, P.A.-C Carla Bailey, P.A.-C Fourth Annual Suncoast Dermatology Hallow Screen Dont let Skin Cancer Trick You! Treat Yourself To A FREE Screening. 000GC42 000GELL Voting period Nov. 3-15. View the entries at. www.chronicleonline.com/halloweenphotos Please no inappropriate entries they will rejected. CHILDRENS ENTRY WITH THE MOST VOTES WINS PETS ENTRY WITH THE MOST VOTES WINS $100 Gift Certificate Dirty Dogs Salon $40 Gift Certificate Dans Clam Stand $ 140 VALUE 4 Tickets Homosassa Wildlife Park $50 Gift Certificate Manatee Lanes $20 Gift Certificate The General Store $ 120 VALUE ENTER NOW! Submit Favorite Halloween Photos of Children & Pets Deadline Nov. 2 WIN PRIZES IN EACH CATEGORY

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VETERANS NOTES Page A16SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE In Their WordsThe Chroniclefeatures stories of local veterans. The stories will be about a singular event or moment in your military career that stands out to you. It can be any type of event, from something from the battlefield to a fun excursion while on leave. We also ask that you provide us with your rank, branch of service, theater of war served, years served, outfit and veterans organization affiliations. To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put together your stories and help set up obtaining then and now photos to publish with your story.Auxiliary plans flea marketThe Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 4252 in Hernando, State Road 200, will have a flea market from 7 a.m. to noon today. Proceeds will be donated to the Cancer Aid and Research Fund. Call Ronnie at 352-726-3339 for information. Auxiliary to do rummage saleVFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will hold a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m. today at the post, 906 State Road 44 East, Inverness. Sale items include gently used clothing, crafts, including holiday decorations, baked goods and much more. Call 352-3443495, or visit www.vfw4337.org, for information about all post events.Dinner theater to honor vetsA Sentimental Journey a Veterans Appreciation Week World War II dinner theater presentation, will honor veterans at the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W. Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3. The dinner and show, preceded by social hour, are $15. For reservations, call 352-212-1014.Auxiliary to serve meatloafThe Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Edward W. Penno Post 4864 in Citrus Springs invites everyone to a meatloaf dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Cost is $8; children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864.Primary school to honor vetsInverness Primary School will have its Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the school cafeteria. Citrus County veterans are invited to participate. Students will be performing songs in honor of veterans. Three students in kindergarten through second grade will be honored with the Randy Allers Picture Contest Awards for first, second, and third places. Three thirdthrough fifth-grade students will earn the Randy Allers Essay Contest Awards for first, second and third places. The students will share their essays with the veterans in attendance. After the program, the veterans will be the celebrities of IPS as they walk down the hallway full of children cheering, to the Veterans Garden to enjoy cake and drinks. For more information, email Mary Tyler at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or call 352726-2632. CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.Elks Ladies sale to help vetsThe West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the lodge, 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. Everyone is welcome to participate. Those with items to sell may call Bonnie Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at 352-382-7614. Rental spaces are $15 each or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 17. Food will be available. Proceeds from the food booth go to help the Elks veterans committee provide for our veterans in nursing homes. VETERANS Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed. C.J. RISAK CorrespondentIt was not a popular thing to do, not in the late 1960s with the U.S. embroiled in an increasingly unpopular war in Southeast Asia.But its what Gary Daugherty did he joined the U.S. Army. And he was just 16 when he did it, getting his mother to swear he was 18. The reason? I was stupid, he said. My whole family had military service; two of em were in the Navy. I was just a punk kid. Now 60 and living at the HPH Hospice in Crystal River, Daugherty knows he was fortunate to have survived. I feel real lucky, he said. Raised in Plant City, he joined the Army in 1969 and after going through basic training, he was quickly shipped out to Vietnam. He remained in the service until 1973, when the war was drawing to close (it officially ended with the fall of Saigon in April 1975). He was involved in some of the most intense fighting, crossing the border into Cambodia as part of a special operations unit, which he volunteered for. He had been trained as a mechanic, working on a M88 tank retriever. They came around one day asking if anyone was interested in (the special operations unit), Daugherty recalled. I said, Sure, why not? Those three words would launch him on a series of misadventures, both during and after the war and into a variety of roles. I went from one end of Vietnam to the other, he said. Every time I thought I was coming home, Id be called back. Daugherty, who was a staff sergeant when he left the Army, remembered one instance in which his unit crossed into Cambodia searching for Viet Cong when they were ambushed. They killed everyone in our battalion except me and three other guys, he said. With no options left open, Daugherty said he guided his unit on a 145-mile journey through the jungle back to their fire base. It took us about a week, he said. There were several other situations he survived that could have been fatal, including some of the jobs he performed. For example: Daugherty was also a dog handler, in charge of a 140-pound German shepherd. Dogs like this were used to flush out so-called tunnel rats, Viet Cong personnel hiding in the miles of tunnels burrowed all over Vietnam. Daugherty said he was also trained as a sniper and he served as a gunner on a helicopter. Four different times the helicopter was shot from under us, he said. He was wounded by rocket fire, with pieces of shrapnel taken out of him and some of it still surfaces in his body. Like many veterans from that war, for a long time Daugherty had trouble talking about his experiences. I did a lot more than I should have done, he said, remembering an instance when a woman and a boy of about 12 were standing in a road armed with AK47 assault rifles, shooting at his vehicle. His commander, he said, told him to shoot them or they would shoot him. So I shot them with a .50 caliber (machine gun), he said. When Daugherty did return from Vietnam, disembarking near Fort Dix in New Jersey, he said a woman spit in my face and called me a baby-killer. It was very aggravating, he said. He ended up buying a motorcycle and driving back to Florida. Daugherty was awarded three Silver Stars and three Bronze Stars, as well as a Purple Heart. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleGary Daugherty and his wife of 42 years, Linda, talk Friday morning at the Crystal River Health and Rehabilitation Center, where Daugherty resides. Daugherty served in the United States Army for three years during the Vietnam War. Vietnam veteran feels fortunate to have survived NAME:Gary Daugherty RANK: Staff sergeant (E6) BRANCH: U.S. Army SERVED: Two tours of Vietnam YEARS: 1969-73 UNITS: 1st Field Artillery, special operations; 101st Airborne JOBS:Tank retrieval; dog handler; sniper; helicopter gunner AWARDS: Purple Heart; three Silver Stars; three Bronze Stars This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@ chronicleonline.com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352-795-6526, email blantonthompsonPost155@ gmail.com, or visit www.fl Post155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan at 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post 237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-2134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352476-7001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352-860-2090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.VETERANSOFFOREIGNWARS H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-0440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-726-3339, email vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com or Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352-447-3495. VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS See GROUPS/ Page A18

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SPOTLIGHTONCITRUSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A17 Photos by Logan Mosby Plantation at Crystal River Saturday, October 12, 2013 Sheree Keeler and Doris Dunphy Sylvia Langdon, Yvonne Damico and Alicia Veltman Terri Bristol and Vona Gregory Connie Kane and Crystal Abele Alex Andri Brooks, Lorraine Lemos and Lisa Bertine Mary Widenor, Sharon Hanley and Tina Tirrell Amanda Revels and Lavonne Brennan Illona Clark and Pam Falasz Helen Uebbing and Lynne Tate Vanda DuVernay and Marilyn DeFillippo Sandy and Samantha Lapp Ann Davis and Carolyn Lewis Sydney Campellone and Kyle Nash Jaden Johnson and Kailey Barber Stacy Andrews and Tracey Lee

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Oct. 21 to 25MENUS CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Hot dog, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: The Major Leaguer, oven-baked breaded chicken, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, Italian super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, steamed green beans, chilled diced peaches, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken alfredo with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety. Middle school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Mozzarella maxstix, fajita chicken with rice and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: The Major Leaguer, turkey wrap, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, tangy baked beans, chilled peach cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Hot dog, breaded chicken sandwich, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet potato crosstrax, flavored Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese on loco bread, MVP breakfast, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, green beans, celery, potato roasters, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk. Tuesday: The Major Leaguer, turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, cucumber coins, sweet peas, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled diced peaches, juice, milk. Wednesday: Oven-baked chicken with rice, spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, baked beans, chilled baked beans, potato roasters, juice, milk. Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, ham super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled peach cup, juice, milk. Friday: Hot dog, chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cold corn salad, sweet corn, potato roasters, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk. SENIOR DINING Monday: Oven-fried chicken thigh, blackeyed peas, country vegetable medley, wheat bread with margarine, pineapple, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Meatballs with spaghetti, tomato gravy, flat beans, Italian bread with margarine, mixed fruit, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Chicken chop suey over steamed rice, green beans, gingered carrots, margarine, peaches, low-fat milk. Thursday: Tuna pasta salad, marinated broccoli salad, whole-grain bread with margarine, fresh orange, animal crackers, low-fat milk. Friday: Fall-O-Ween Picnic at Central Citrus Community Center. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352527-5975. A18SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMUNITY SundaysPUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A14. GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from r eaders about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-5635660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask f or Logan Mosby, features editor. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message. OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-447-1816; email Amvet447@comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at 352-697-5565. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Call 352-382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call 352-726-0834 or 352-634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727. Landing Ship Dock(LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-3021037, or email geneusawo@tampabay.rr.com. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rolling thunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email ultraray1997@yahoo.com. GROUPSContinued from Page A16 Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Spring Hill Holiday Inn Express 3528 Commercial Way Attend a FREE Spine Seminar: call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. Learn about the Florida Spine & Neuro Center and the innovative treatment options available. 000G9BI SPINE CARE YOU CAN TRUST LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FOOD PROVIDED BY: 000FXJC GATES GATES OPEN AT OPEN AT 5:00 PM 5:00 PM ROCK CRUSHER PAVILLION ROCK CRUSHER PAVILLION CRYSTAL RIVER, FL CRYSTAL RIVER, FL Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. / Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation on Crystal River Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. NET PROCEEDS BENEFIT: One Rake at a Time

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EXCURSIONSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 A19 We began our tour by viewing the cyclorama (in the visitor center) in order to get a complete overview of what we would be seeing during the next couple of days. The Battle of Gettysburg cyclorama is the largest oil painting in the country and larger than a football field. After the cyclorama, we purchased a self-guided CD tour of the battleground ($30). This CD, when played in the car, verbally keys the driver to roadside signage on a round-trip tour of the battlefield, and gives detailed information of various battle locations and monuments. The CD is my recommendation in lieu of a bus tour over the same route. A reasonable amount of time embracing the CD agenda is 3-4 hours, although you may interrupt the tour at any point and come back to it later to suit your own agenda. Each of the 1,320 monuments in the park is special in its own way honoring an individual or representing some significant battle or event. It is difficult to pick a favorite. However, we were enthralled with the grand and imposing Pennsylvania State Memorial in an area known as Cemetery Ridge, one of the key battle locations. It is an elegant structure approximately 110-feet in height, consisting of columns and arches reaching up to a traditional domed top and finished off with a statute of Athena, Goddess of Victory and Peace. The bronze statue was made from melteddown cannon balls. An internal stairway allows visitors to climb to the base of the dome for an impressive view of the entire battlefield. Dont overlook historic downtown Gettysburg, as there are many restaurants, shops and points of interest, and is, as you might expect a very touristy town. Dining in the park is limited to the cafeteria at the visitor center, but has a wide variety of choices. To assist in your preparation for a trip to Gettysburg you may order a printed visitor guide to be mailed to you by calling 1-800-337-5015. Complete information on the park is available on line: www.nps.gov.gett/ This year, July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014, is a special year at Gettysburg, with a host of events intended to embed the memories of this historic battle into the mind of every citizen young and old. The year 2014 should go on record as being a very good year at Gettysburg. SAWYERContinued from Page A13 Associated PressDENVER The U.S. Interior Department says Congress will have to decide whether to repay states that decided to reopen national parks during the partial government shutdown, including more than $360,000 paid by Colorado to operate Rocky Mountain National Park and pay its employees. Interior Department lawyers said Thursday that Congress failed to explicitly authorize reimbursement to states, including Colorado. The funds were donated and we can only reimburse the states if Congress expressly directs us to do so through legislation, said National Park Service spokesman Mike Litterst, in a statement. Last week, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell struck agreements with a handful of governors that allowed shuttered national parks to reopen if states shouldered the costs during the shutdown. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper wired the Interior Department $367,700 Friday so furloughed federal employees at Rocky Mountain National Park could return to work Saturday and Sunday. The Rocky Mountain National Park area, including the town of Estes Park, was hit particularly hard during the early days of the 16-day government shutdown. The park and businesses in the town were just starting to reopen and rebuild after the devastation of the September floods when the government shutdown closed the park during the fall color peak. After Hickenlooper agreed to pay to reopen it, more than 10,000 visitors showed up last weekend. Governors in South Dakota, Utah, New York and Arizona struck similar agreements with the Interior Department. The $367,700 payment was the amount of money it costs to run Rocky Mountain National Park for 10 days, according to the National Park Service. Since the partial shutdown ended before those 10 days were up, the state will get some of that money back. Colorado lawmakers say they will introduce legislation to get the rest of the money back. National park funding not covered by budget bill Associated PressThe U.S. Interior Department says Congress will have to decide whether to repay states that decided to reopen national parks during the partial government shutdown, including more than $360,000 paid by Colorado to operate Rocky Mountain National Park and pay its employees. (352) 527-88553557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.com 000GELR ST 35415 BERMUDA 10 NightsSailing from Ft. LauderdaleAugust 18, 2014Vision of the SeasCost with Govt. taxes $1148.00ppTampa Bay DownsFebruary 26, 2014Motorcoach & Clubhouse Seats w/Lunch Cost$64.50ppDAY TRIPSSt. Augustine Christmas Lights December 2, 2013Harbor Cruise & Trolly Tour Cost$68.00ppIncludes Bus Driver Tip 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000GBEC VIKING RIVER CRUISE 2014 E NJOYABLE WAY TO SEE E UROPE Call to check availability and rates. Rates based on double occupancy. Filling up quickly. Hurry to reserve your stateroom. Extended the 2 for 1 on Cruise and Airfare until Oct 31, 2013! West Coast Flooring Family Owned & Operated OPEN: M-F 9 am 5 pm SAT 10 am 2 pm Hwy 44, Crystal River 564-2772 Flooring For Every Budget Cash n Carry In Stock Only Not Installed Exp. 10/31/13 VINYL 99 Installed (Trim Extra) LAMINATE FLOORING SALE $ 3 25 Sq. Ft. New Shipment Exp. 10/31/13 CERAMIC TILE $ 3 59 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Ft. Sq. Ft. 000G7KO MOHAWK SOLO CARPET $ 14 99 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Yd. Lifetime Soil & Stain Warranties Does Not Include Tear Out Does Not Include Tear Out 000G81U Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays Call Ora @ 352-556-5200 or 1-855-335-8082 Toll Free B ILOXI M ISSISSIPPI G AMBLING 000GCW0 ST 38547 IP Casino Resort Beau Rivage Resort November 26 th or December 23 rd Get Away for the Holidays!!! by Oras Travel FL Seller of Travel: 10131 TALLY-HO 352-860-2805 000GDE5 www.tallyhovacations.com dmuir@tallyhovacations.com 1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 S TOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS No Hidden Fees TRAINS, WINERIES AND TREASURES Includes round trip AIR from Tampa May 12-20, 2014 $ 2929 dbl pp San Francisco, Sonoma, Yosemite, Sacramento, Lake Tahoe, Winery Tour, Napa Valley Wine Train CALL FOR FULL ITINERARY! THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH & CIVIL WAR TOUR March 17-22, 2014 $ 629 dbl pp Biloxi, Natchez, Vicksburg, Jackson CALL FOR FULL ITINERARY! Fully escorted motorcoach trip with great hotels. 000G5KI 000GDN8 FL Seller Of Travel 13519 HOLIDAY HOME TOUR Amazing Amelia Island, Dec. 6 8 $310pp Carnival Breeze Jan. 26, 2014, 6 days Caribbean, Ports of Calls: Ocho Rios, Grand Cayman, Cozumel Cabins from $496 & Up Marlene Kaiser OTOW resident 843-4133 marlenekaiser@yahoo.com 000GE85 #ST36390 527-8002 476-4242 746-7547 2014 Royal Caribbeans Vision 10-Night Ft. Laud., Charleston, SC, Bermuda, Nassau, Coco Cay, Ft. Laud. Only 3 sailings...June 9, August 18, Sept. 1, 2014 Book Now! Dont Miss the boat! BERMUDA from Florida GREAT GETAWAY Quantum of the Seas Sailing Fall 2014 Melissa McCallum of Cruise Planners and Jean Dorn of Royal Caribbean Invite you to a Meet and Greet Thursday, October 24 @ 3:00 p.m. Stumpknockers on the Square Inverness Come enjoy tea, coffee and a slice of pie as we present the latest in Cruising! CURRENT SPECIALS Newest Ship Quantum of the Seas Sailing Fall 2014 RCCL fleet enhancement 000GA16

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Chorus seeks male singersIts now time to leave the comfort of your shower, garage, car, back porch, or riding lawnmower and put your talent to work. The Citrus County Chapter Chorus of the Highlands of the Barbershop Harmony Society seeks men to join the group, which has been in the area for more than 28 years. The chorus meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Inverness. Although the ability to read music is an asset, its certainly not a priority. Call 352-382-0336 for more information.Entertainers sought for Fort CooperFort Cooper State Park needs entertainers to perform at the 16th annual Nights of Lights from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and Sunday, Dec. 15. The charity event benefits Citrus United Basket. Individuals and groups of no more than 10 persons are needed to perform Christmas-related music. For more information and to volunteer, call Ranger Dianne Drye at 352-726-0315. A20SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETOGETHER 90thBIRTHDAY Sara Snook Sara Snook, wife of Fred Snook of Sugarmill Woods, celebrated her 90th birthday on Oct. 7, 2013. Her family from various states feted her at a dinner at Bon Appetit Restaurant in Dunedin. Among those present were Freds sister, who will celebrate her 95th birthday Oct. 24, and Freds brother, who will be 92 on Nov. 3. 67thANNIVERSARY The Sellses Donald and Helen Sells celebrated their 67th wedding anniversary by taking a trip on the Amtrak Auto Train. They then drove to Washington, D.C. On their return trip driving, they stopped in Colonial Beach on the Potomac River to spend some time with Dons 94-year-old uncle. Don and Helen have lived 52 years on the Withlacoochee River, where they raised their four children: Julie Fusco, Birmingham; Donna Barnes, Wildwood; Debbie Barnes, Coleman; and Michael, who is deceased. Don and Helen are active members of Hernando United Methodist Church and are blessed with nine grandchildren, 18 greatgrandchildren and 1 great-great-grandchild, plus many stepgrandchildren. Sept. 30 to Oct. 6, 2013 Divorces Charles K. Contopoulo, Crystal River vs. Navia H. Contopoulo, Homosassa Marriages Jeffery Daniel Allen, Inverness/Teresa Ann Steely, Hernando Taylor Charles Johnson, Lake Panasoffkee/Summer Alexis Price, Inverness Michael Scott Leffew, Beverly Hills/Meghan Luray Simmons, Beverly Hills Christopher William Ludlow, Hernando/Jessica Anne Fernandez, Hernando Donald Edward Mabesoone, Homosassa/ Tina Deniece Williams, Homosassa Michael Joseph Major, Hernando/Danielle Marie Reed, Inverness Mark Allen Miller, Inverness/Kelly Nicole Key, Inverness Raul Ruvalcaba Montes, Bares Jardins/ Lupita Fernandez, Floral City Brook Lee Mullen, Fort Mitchell, Ala./Amber Ann Thomas, Seale, Ala. Mark Steven Petty, Crystal River/Connie Lyn Desaulniers, Homosassa Samuel Mark Rosati, Farmington/Julie Lynn Tucker, Farmington Norman Edward Shifflett III, Homosassa/Ashley Nichole Riffey, Homosassa Keith Dorneil Townsend, Citrus Springs/Angela Renee Wilson, Citrus Springs Willie Colin Wise, Dunnellon/Sandra Louise McLaughlin, Palatka Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each countys Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk. citrus.fl.us. For theRECORD Get TOGETHER Work TOGETHER Volunteers sought for gift shopThe Friends of the Community Center Inc. operates the Circle of Friends Gift Shop at the Citrus County Resource Center in support of the Meals on Wheels Program. The shop sells miscellaneous giftware items, along with jewelry, watches and some high-end gifts. Volunteers are needed to run the gift shop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. Volunteers are able to participate in the Nature Coast Volunteer Centers RSVP Program, where hours are logged, and are invited to appreciation banquets for recognition of service to Citrus County, in addition to other benefits. This volunteer opportunity is in a pleasant atmosphere in a busy building, where volunteers can enjoy visiting with customers. For more information, call 352-527-5975Arbor Trail to collect again for CUBArbor Trail Rehab is having its fifth annual canned-food drive for Thanksgiving, from Nov. 1 through Nov. 20. Donations can be dropped off at Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled Nursing Center, 611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. All donations will go to Citrus United Basket, an organization that helps feed more than 25,000 individuals. Canned goods, boxed goods and such nonperishable items are accepted. For more information, call 352-637-1130.EMS effort: Stock Up for SeniorsNature Coast EMS is promoting the first Stock Up for Seniors effort to support Citrus County seniors in need. A large percentage of seniors in Citrus County live alone on a very limited income, with no support from family members. During the month of October, Nature Coast EMS asks everyone for support for Stock Up for Seniors by picking up a few extra things when shopping soap, toilet paper, deodorant, denture cream, shampoo, incontinence pads, a lap blanket, a pair of socks or a towel and washcloth, for example. Drop off items from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday during the month of October at Nature Coast EMS on Homosassa Trail, the Citrus County Chroniclein Crystal River or the Citrus County Resource Center on Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Drop-off boxes are marked Stock Up for Seniors! Special drop-off dates at area Walmart stores and other locations will be announced. The effort is being promoted by the Citrus County Chronicle, Walmart stores, Citrus 95 and the Fox 96.7. For more information on how to help, call 352249-4730 or email katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org. 000GE0AStarts Tomorrow! Two Day Only!Monday, October 21, 10 am 5 pm Tuesday, October 22, 10 am 5 pm 000GCWC The We Care Food Pantry 3rd Annual Online & Live Auction Charitable Organization Registration #CH32257 Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. AUCTION OPENS FRIDAY, OCT 25 AUCTION CLOSES MONDAY, DEC 15 An auction by the We Care Food Pantry, a non-profit 501(c)(3) corpora tion. Helping solve the heart-breaking problem of hunger affecting thousands of families, children, seniors and the homeless in Citrus County OUR SPONSORS: CATEGORIES INCLUDE: Home Improvement Water Recreation Sports Golf Gifts for Ladies Toys Bicycles Art Jewelry Outdoor Equipment Electronics Gifts for the Home Pet Products Fishing Equipment Hotels & Camping Hair Care Beauty Products Food & Restaurants & Much, Much More Go to www.natlauctions.com now for more than 300 fabulous items! Final bids can be made in two ways: Online or Telephone 352-382-4500, 352-382-4700, 352-382-4510 on Monday, Dec. 16 from 2-6pm Log on today 000G9F6 000G9F6 chronicleonline.com your news. anywhere. anytime. BREAKING NEWS 000G9F6 For more information call 352-249-4730 or email: katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org 000FSRQ Stock Up For Seniors Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need

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College football/B2 Scoreboard/B3 Golf/B3 Lottery, TV/B3 NFL/B4 Rec sports/ B5 Baseball/ B6 NHL/B6 Georgia, LSU, South Carolina and Texas A&M fall in SEC stunners. / B2 SPORTSSection BSUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000G9Y9 Missouri rolls up 500 yards in 36-17 victory Associated PressCOLUMBIA, Mo. No James Franklin, no problem for Missouri. Maty Mauk threw for 295 yards in his first career start and Andrew Baggett converted five field goals to help the No. 14 Tigers defeat No. 22 Florida 36-17 on Saturday and open a two-game lead in the Southeastern Conference East Division. With Franklin watching on the sideline in street clothes, Mauk put any doubts to rest about whether he was ready on the first play of the game with a 41-yard pass to LDamian Washington and then a 20-yard toss to Bud Sasser for a 7-0 lead just 22 seconds in. Coach Gary Pinkel said Saturday was the toughest situation hes ever had to put in a quarterback, especially against a defense only allowing 235.3 yards per game. But the opening drive helped ease the stress on Mauk, who said he was determined to throw the ball downfield on the opening play. He looked like a seasoned veteran out there, Pinkel said. Missouri (7-0, 3-0) outgained the Gators 500-151 and became the first conference opponent in 14 games to score at least 21 points against them. The Tigers bullied Florida (4-3, 3-2) at the line of scrimmage, sacking quarterback Tyler Murphy six times and flushing him out of the pocket throughout the game. The Tigers knocked off their second consecutive ranked opponent for the first time since 1973 and will face No. 11 South Carolina next week at home. The Gamecocks lost at Tennessee 23-21 on Saturday. This team is resilient, coming back from where we were last year, Washington said. I told Coach Pinkel, Weve got to stop talking bowl games around here. Lets talk BCS, lets talk national championships. Florida is off before facing Georgia on Nov. 2 in Jacksonville. Mauk entered the game having only thrown six passes this season, but three of those came in the final quarter of a 41-26 win at Georgia last week after Franklin suffered a shoulder injury that will keep him out at least two more games. Mauk completed 18 of 36 passes Saturday, including three for 37 yards or more down the sideline. The 6-foot, 200-pound redshirt freshman capped the scoring with 6:30 remaining on a 17-yard Associated PressMissouri running back Henry Josey runs past Floridas Neiron Ball during the first quarter Saturday in Columbia, Mo. The Tigers remained undefeated with a 36-17 win over the Gators. Bucs, Falcons look to end losing streaks Associated PressATLANTA Few others are sending positive comments their way these days, so the Falcons and Buccaneers traded compliments this week. The bottom teams in the NFC South have combined for only one win entering Sundays game. The Falcons (1-4) have taken a painful fall from their 13-3 2012 season which ended in the NFC championship game. The Buccaneers (0-5) are one of three winless teams in the NFL and already have made a quarterback change, placing hopes for a turnaround on rookie Mike Glennon. Atlanta defensive coordinator Mike Nolan says Glennon has the same poise as Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan in Ryans 2008 rookie season. Thats high praise from a Falcons coach. I think hes good, Nolan said of Glennon. He does look like a young Matt Ryan to me. He stands in the pocket like Matt. He delivers the ball like Matt. I think theyve got a keeper. Tampa Bay turned to Glennon, the third-round pick from North Carolina State, after releasing Josh Freeman on Oct. 3. The Buccaneers immediately gave Glennon a heavy load. Glennons 86 pass attempts are the second most in in a quarterbacks first two games in NFL history. The Raiders Todd Marinovich threw 99 passes in his first two games in 1991-92. Marinovich lasted only two years in the league. The Buccaneers are counting on Glennon to have a much longer stay. Offensive coordinator Mike Sullivan said Glennon has ability to move and an accuracy, and theres an upside as far as the physical tools, the attributes you want in a quarterback. Sullivan said Glennon is mature beyond his years. He is very focused, there is a steadiness about him, he doesnt get rattled if it goes bad, Sullivan said. ... I think he has all the qualities of what were going to want in a quarterback here. The Falcons are trying to end the first threegame losing streak in coach Mike Smiths six seasons. Julio Jones was the NFLs leading receiver when his season ended with a foot injury in a 3028 loss to the Jets on Oct. 7. Wide receiver Roddy White (hamstring, ankle) and running back Steven Jackson (hamstring) were ruled out on Friday. Whites streak of playing in 133 consecutive regular-season games will end as he will miss a game for the first time in nine seasons. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (0-5) at Atlanta Falcons (1-4)Time: 1 p.m. todayTV: FOX Associated PressFlorida State wide receiver Rashad Greene runs for a touchdown Saturday night as Clemson cornerback Darius Robinson chases during the first half in Clemson, S.C. The No. 5 Seminoles crushed the No. 3 Tigers 51-14. FSU dominates Clemson in ACC top-five showdown 51-14 Associated PressCLEMSON, S.C. Jameis Winston threw for 444 yards and three touchdowns and No. 5 Florida State crushed No. 3 Clemson 51-14 Saturday night, making statement that should be heard from Alabama to Oregon. The Atlantic Coast Conference's game of the year, billed as maybe the league's biggest game ever, quickly became a Seminoles' seminar on how to take apart a top-five opponent on its hostile home turf. Winston was 22 for 34 for Florida State (6-0, 4-0 ACC). His first throw was a 22-yard touchdown to Kelvin Benjamin, and he scrambled for a 4-yard touchdown that made it 41-7 with 4:04 left in the third quarter. Tajh Boyd threw two interceptions for Clemson, and his firstquarter fumble was returned 37 yards for a touchdown by Mario Edwards. Clemson (6-1, 4-1) turned it over a season-high four times, including on the first play from scrimmage. See CHOMPED/ Page B3

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B2SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOLLEGEFOOTBALL Vanderbilt rallies, upsets No. 15 Georgia Auburn beats up Manziel, defeats A&M Associated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. Jerron Seymour ran for a 13-yard touchdown with 2:53 left, and Vanderbilt rallied from a 13-point deficit by scoring 17 unanswered points in the fourth quarter Saturday to upset No. 15 Georgia 31-27. The Commodores (4-3, 1-3) got their first Southeastern Conference win this season and their first victory over Georgia in Nashville since 1991. They also snapped a six-game skid to the Bulldogs. Georgia (4-3, 3-2) lost its second straight after failing to hold a 27-14 lead. Brendan Douglas fumbled after a catch with 1:59 left, and Aaron Murray was intercepted on the final play. Torren McGaster started the comeback by recovering a fumbled punt late in the third quarter. Backup quarterback Patton Robinette ran for a 2-yard TD, and Carey Spear kicked a 40-yard field goal. Seymour put Vandy ahead a play after Georgia punter Collin Barber could only fall on a high snap at his own 13.No. 1 Alabama 52, Arkansas 0TUSCALOOSA, Ala. AJ McCarron threw three touchdown passes and Kenyan Drake rushed for 104 yards and two scores to lead No. 1 Alabama to a 52-0 victory over Arkansas. The Crimson Tide (7-0, 4-0 Southeastern Conference) rolled to a 28-0 halftime lead and easily avoided catching the upset bug that struck other SEC powers. Alabama has won by the same margin over Arkansas two years running. The Razorbacks (3-5, 0-4) have dropped five straight games and were coming off a 52-7 loss to No. 11 South Carolina. Drake needed just eight carries to reach 100 yards for the second straight week. T.J. Yeldon had 88 yards and a touchdown on 12 carries. McCarron was 15-of-21 passing for 180 yards in three quarters, including touchdowns of 4, 30 and 17 yards. Arkansas Brandon Allen completed 7 of 25 passes for 91 yards with two interceptions.Mississippi 27, No. 6 LSU 24OXFORD, Miss. Andrew Ritter made a 41-yard field goal with 2 seconds remaining to lead Mississippi to a 27-24 victory over No. 6 LSU. Ole Miss (4-3, 2-3 Southeastern Conference) led by as many 17 points lead and was ahead nearly the entire game until late in the fourth quarter when LSUs Zach Mettenberger hit Jarvis Landry for a 4-yard touchdown to tie it at 24 with 3:19 remaining. But the Rebels responded with a methodical drive that ended in Ritters field goal. LSU joined Georgia, Texas A&M, Florida and South Carolina as ranked SEC teams to lose Saturday. Bo Wallace completed 30 of 39 passes for 346 yards and Jaylen Walton rushed for 105 yards and two touchdowns for the Rebels, who snapped a three-game losing streak. LSU (6-2, 3-2) nearly pulled off the comeback, but couldnt overcome a rough game by Mettenberger, who threw three crucial interceptions. The winning field goal was redemption for Ritter, who had a 29-yard attempt blocked earlier in the fourth quarter.No. 24 Auburn 45, No. 7 Texas A&M 41COLLEGE STATION, Texas Nick Marshall accounted for four scores and No. 24 Auburn battered Johnny Manziel in a 45-41 win over No. 7 Texas A&M. Tre Masons 5-yard score with less than two minutes to play was first ruled down at the 1, but it was reviewed and ruled a touchdown. A&M (5-2, 2-2 SEC) had a last chance, but Manziel was sacked by Dee Ford on fourth down to secure the win. Manziel threw for 454 yards and four touchdowns and ran for a fifth score, but also had two interceptions and missed a series in the fourth quarter with an apparent injury to his right arm or shoulder before returning. Marshall threw for 236 yards and two touchdowns and ran for 100 yards and two more scores for Auburn (6-1, 3-1), which lost 63-21 to the Aggies last season.Arizona St. 53, No. 20 Wash. 24TEMPE, Ariz. Taylor Kelly accounted for 352 yards and four touchdowns, Marion Grice scored three times and Arizona States defense bottled up Washingtons Bishop Sankey in a 53-24 win over the 20th-ranked Huskies. Arizona State (5-2, 3-1 Pac12) has struggled against the run the past two seasons and Sankey entered the game as the nations leading rusher at nearly 150 yards per game. The Sun Devils limited Sankey to 22 yards.No. 23 N. Illinois 31, Central Michigan 17MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. Jordan Lynch rushed for 316 yards, an FBS record for a quarterback, and No. 23 Northern Illinois stayed unbeaten with a 31-17 victory at Central Michigan. He broke the rushing record held by former Northern Illinois quarterback Stacey Robinson, who had 308 against Fresno State on Oct. 6, 1990.Wisconsin 56, Illinois 32CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Melvin Gordon rushed for 142 yards and three touchdowns to lead No. 25 Wisconsin to a 56-32 rout of Illinois. Gordon topped 1,000 yards for the season on a 13-yard touchdown run in the third quarter that put the Badgers (5-2, 3-1 Big Ten) up 42-17. He finished the chilly, 40-degree night with 1,012 yards for the season. Gordons touchdown capped the second of two bruising, third-quarter drives that put Illinois away. Running back James White finished the first with a 2-yard touchdown pass from Joel Stave. Before the drives, Illinois (3-3, 0-2) found ways to claw back from an early 21-0 deficit and trailed 28-17 at halftime.Notre Dame 14, USC 10SOUTH BEND, Ind. Tommy Rees threw two touchdowns before leaving the game with an injury and Notre Dame snapped a fivegame home losing streak to USC with a 14-10 victory. Rees was 14 of 21 passing for 166 yards with TD throws to Troy Niklas and TJ Jones in the first half. Rees left the game when he was sacked by USC linebacker Lamar Dawson in the third quarter and didnt return. The Irish (5-2) beat the Trojans (4-3) for the third time in the past four games, after losing the previous eight straight, and won the rivalry game at home for the first time since 2001. Stanford hands UCLA first loss Associated PressKNOXVILLE, Tenn. Michael Palardy made a 19-yard field goal as time expired Saturday to give Tennessee a 23-21 victory over No. 11 South Carolina that ended the Volunteers 19-game losing streak against ranked opponents. South Carolina quarterback Connor Shaw left the game after being sacked by Marlon Walls and Daniel McCullers with less than five minutes remaining. Team officials appeared to be looking at his left knee while he was on the sideline. Tennessee got into field-goal range on a spectacular 39-yard catch by freshman Marquez North. Four consecutive runs by Marlin Lane got the Vols to the South Carolina 2 and set up the field goal. Tennessee (4-3, 1-2 SEC) hadnt beaten a ranked foe since a 31-13 victory over No. 21 South Carolina on Oct. 31, 2009. The Vols also had lost 16 of their last 18 SEC games. South Carolina (5-2, 3-2) had a four-game winning streak snapped.No. 4 Ohio St. 34, Iowa 24COLUMBUS, Ohio Carlos Hyde ran for 149 yards, including 106 yards and two touchdowns in the second half, to lead No. 4 Ohio State to a 34-24 victory over Iowa. It was the Buckeyes 19th consecutive victory, the most in the nation and tying the second-best streak in school history. But it didnt come easy. The Hawkeyes (4-3, 1-2 Big Ten) dominated offensively in the first half and led 21-14 at the break behind the passing of Jake Rudock and running of Mark Weisman and Damon Bullock. Hyde tied it with the first rushing TD against Iowa this season on Ohio States first drive of the third quarter, and the Buckeyes took over.No. 13 Stanford 24, No. 9 UCLA 10STANFORD, Calif. Tyler Gaffney ran for 171 yards and two touchdowns, and No. 13 Stanford smothered Brett Hundley and ninthranked UCLA 24-10. Kevin Hogan threw for 227 yards and a spectacular touchdown to Kodi Whitfield as the Cardinal (6-1, 4-1) regrouped again after losing at Utah last week. Stanford has not lost consecutive games since October 2009. Stanford hurried Hundley all afternoon to slow down UCLAs uptempo offense. Hundley completed 24 of 39 passes for 192 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions to Jordan Richards the second with a little more than 2 minutes remaining to seal Stanfords victory. UCLA (5-1, 2-1) has not started 6-0 since 2005.No. 12 Baylor 71, Iowa State 7WACO, Texas Bryce Petty threw for 343 yards and two touchdowns, Antwan Goodley had 182 yards receiving and two scores, and No. 12 Baylor tied a school record with its 10th straight win, beating Iowa State 71-7. The Bears, who came in averaging 70.5 points in four home games but were slowed in a come-frombehind win at Kansas State last week, led 37-0 at halftime and narrowly missed its first shutout win in the Big 12. Baylor (6-0, 3-0 Big 12) matched its 10-game winning streak from 1936-37. Iowa State (1-5, 0-3) was without quarterback Sam Richardson while Baylor pulled away in the second quarter. The Cyclones had nine first downs and three turnovers. The Cyclones scored with 47 with seconds left on a 27-yard pass from Grant Rohach to DeVondrick Nealy. Corey Coleman returned the ensuing kickoff 97 yards to give Baylor its fourth 70-point game this season.No. 18 Oklahoma 34, Kansas 19LAWRENCE, Kan. Blake Bell threw for 131 yards and two touchdowns, and No. 18 Oklahoma finally awoke from its Red River rout hangover to beat lowly Kansas 34-19. The Sooners (6-1, 3-1 Big 12), whose national championship aspirations were cast aside by Texas last weekend, stumbled through the first quarter and found themselves in a 13-0 hole. But behind Bells steady play, a stingy pass defense and a 49-yard touchdown toss from wide receiver Lacoltan Bester to Sterling Shepard on an end-around play, the Sooners scored 25 straight points on their way to winning their ninth straight over the Jayhawks. James Sims ran for 129 yards and two touchdowns for Kansas (2-4, 0-3), but he didnt have much help. Jake Heaps was just 5 of 13 for 16 yards passing, the fewest yards through the air for Kansas since throwing for 15 yards in a loss to Nebraska in 2010.No. 16 Texas Tech 37, West Virginia 27MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Davis Webb threw two touchdown passes and No. 16 Texas Tech scored 21 unanswered points in the second half to beat West Virginia 37-27. In his first road start, Webb completed 36 of 50 passes for 462 yards. He became the first Red Raiders freshman to surpass 400 yards passing in each of his first two starts. Texas Techs Ryan Bustin kicked three field goals and Kenny Williams had a pair of 1-yard touchdown runs, including the go-ahead score with 9:20 left in the game. The Red Raiders (7-0, 4-0 Big 12) moved into sole possession of first place in the conference. Dreamius Smith ran for two touchdowns for the Mountaineers (3-4, 1-3), who led 27-16 but punted on four straight possessions in the second half to let Texas Tech take over.No. 21 Oklahoma St. 24, TCU 10STILLWATER, Okla. Clint Chelf completed 10 of 25 passes for 178 yards and an interception and No. 21 Oklahoma State used a quarterback change to earn a 24-10 win over TCU. Josh Stewart added 10 catches for 141 yards and had a 95-yard punt return for a touchdown, giving the Cowboys (5-1, 2-1 Big 12 Conference) enough offense to celebrate a homecoming victory. Chelf replaced J.W. Walsh at quarterback after the sophomore threw his second interception of the first half, an ill-advised throw into the middle of the end zone. Walsh finished 9-of-18 for 115 yards and two interceptions. TCU (3-4, 1-3) also switched quarterbacks in the second quarter after falling behind 17-0, but it didnt help as the Horned Frogs struggled in their second trip to Stillwater in as many years. Starter Trevone Boykin returned to quarterback in the second half, completing 17 of 35 passes for 188 yards and three interceptions. However, TCU couldnt get any closer after getting within 17-10 with 7:39 remaining. Associated PressGeorgias Reggie Davis (81) fumbles a punt as he is hit by Vanderbilt defenders Darrius Sims (6) and Jahmel McIntosh, right, in the first quarter Saturday in Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt scored 17 unanswered points in the fourth quarter for the 31-27 upset of the 15th-ranked Bulldogs. Associated PressTennessee running back Marlin Lane leans for yardage after a catch as hes tackled by South Carolina safety Chris Moody in the fourth quarter Saturday in Knoxville, Tenn. The play set up the game-winning field goal by Michael Palary to give Tennessee a 23-21 victory.

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scramble, prompting the 67,124 in attendance to perform the Gator Chomp. Backup quarterback?, center Evan Boehm asked. Maty would be starting anywhere else. Mauk also made a few ill-advised throws, as Brian Poole intercepted a pass with 3:34 left in the first half and almost had another in the same quarter but dropped it. Murphy completed 15-of-29 passes for 92 yards and an interception for the Gators as he tried to escape Missouris defensive line all game. Freshman Kelvin Taylor, son of former National Football League running back Fred Taylor, ran for 74 yards on 12 carries in his fifth career game. Murphy thought he had time on some of his missed throws despite absorbing three sacks from SEC-leader Michael Sam and one apiece from Kony Ealy, Matt Hoch and Shane Ray. They did a good job covering, but were got to find ways to make plays, Murphy said. I have to find ways to get guys the ball. The Gators only gained 61 yards in the first half including nine rushing but used six runs to drive 70 yards and pull within 23-17 with 46 seconds left in the third quarter. Missouri answered with a 33-yard field goal by Baggett following a 50-yard run by Henry Josey, who ran for 136 yards on 18 carries. Baggett also converted from 19, 28, 39 and 43 yards to tie the school record in makes in a single game, as Missouri far exceeded the 13 points per game Florida allowed this season entering the matchup, the secondfewest in the SEC. In addition to Mauks 295 passing yards, the Tigers added 205 on the ground and had 24 first downs. This is not a very good football team, and certainly not today, Gators coach Will Muschamp said. I am pretty disappointed that we have not made more positive strides offensively at this point of the season. Florida earlier narrowed its deficit to three on a 100-yard kickoff return by receiver Solomon Patton on the first play of the second half, but the Tigers responded with a 75-yard drive finished by a 6-yard scamper by Josey for a 20-10 advantage. Florida drove 22 yards to the Missouri 28-yard line with 58 seconds left in the second quarter on its longest drive of the first half before Ealy burst through the line and forced Murphy to fumble on a sack. Missouri recovered to squelch the threat and end the half up 13-3.SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 B3 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Camping World RV Sales 500 1 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Camping World RV Sales 500 (same-day tape) 2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Pro Mazda Series (taped) 3:30 a.m. (FS1) FIA World Endurance Championship: Austin (taped) BASEBALL 2 p.m. (MLB) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 6 (taped) 7 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 7 (If nec.) BASKETBALL 1 p.m. (NBA) Euroleague Basketball (taped) 6 p.m. (NBA) Boston Celtics vs. Minnesota Timberwolves BOATING 12 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing (taped) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Missouri (taped) 12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at Mississippi (taped) 5 p.m. (ESPNU) UCLA at Stanford (taped) 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Florida State at Clemson (taped) 7:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Clemson (taped) 9:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Arkansas at Alabama (taped) 12 a.m. (ESPNU) Oregon State at California (taped) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. (CBS) Buffalo Bills at Miami Dolphins 1 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Atlanta Falcons 4:25 p.m. (CBS) Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers 8:20 p.m. (NBC) Denver Broncos at Indianapolis Colts GOLF 11 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour KEB HanaBank Championship, Final Round (same-day tape) 2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Greater Hickory Classic, Final Round 5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, Final Round NHL HOCKEY 4 p.m. (NHL) Toronto Maple Leafs at Chicago Blackhawks (taped) SOCCER 7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League (taped) 11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Aston Villa FC vs Tottenham Hotspur FC 12 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Syracuse at North Carolina State 1 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Deportivo Toluca FC vs Club Tijuana 1 p.m. (SUN) Womens College: LSU at Florida 1:30 p.m. (NBC) Womens International Friendly: United States vs. Australia 2 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Wake Forest at Clemson 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Womens College: Texas A&M at Georgia 9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: San Jose Earthquakes at Los Angeles Galaxy 12 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League (taped) TENNIS 5 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA Kremlin Cup, Final 3 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP IF Stockholm Open, Final (same-day tape) 8 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Kremlin Cup, Final (same-day tape) 10 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA BGL BNP Paribas Luxembourg Open, Final (same-day tape) VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. (SUN) Texas A&M at Auburn Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 9 33 54 56 57 POWER BALL 5Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 21 23 26 38 Mega Ball: 3 4-of-4 MBNo winner 4-of-42$4,249.50 3-of-4 MB42$442.50 3-of-4839$66 2-of-4 MB1,180$33 1-of-4 MB10,082$4 2-of-426,192$2 Fantasy 5: 12 16 17 22 25 5-of-52 winners$110,079.29 4-of-5331$107 3-of-510,019$9.50Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 8 0 9 CASH 3 (late) 5 0 5 PLAY 4 (early) 8 6 7 1 PLAY 4 (late) 8 6 1 4 FANTASY 5 2 17 26 27 32 LOTTERY2 3 15 39 44 49XTRA 4 Citrus 54, Lecanto 6Citrus202860 54 Lecanto0600 6 Scoring Summary First Quarter CHSD. Franklin 97 punt return (J. Marsden kick), 8:58 CHSS. Franklin 40 pass from D. Moore (kick failed), 6:20 CHSJ. Juse 18 pass from Moore (Marsden kick), 3:11 Second Quarter CHSJ. Pouncey 8 run (T. Washington run), 11:00 CHSD. Franklin 26 pass from Moore (Marsden kick), 10:10 LHSJ. Nightengale 2 run (kick failed), 4:17 CHSPouncey 33 run (kick failed), 3:41 CHSPouncey 5 run (T. Beagen kick), 0:46 Third Quarter CHSPouncey 27 run (kick fail), 5:49 Individual Statistics RushingCHS: Pouncey 9-106-4; J. Clark 7-1050; Washington 9-58-0. LHS: Anderson 9-(-3)-0; Nightengale 3-(-3)-1. PassingCHS: Moore 6-11-0-59. LHS: T. McGee 11-25-1-146. ReceivingCHS: S. Franklin 2-73-1; D. Franklin 2-30-1; Juse 1-18-1. LHS: M. McKibben 6-81-0; J. Lucas 3-59-0. InterceptionsCHS: G. Wilcox. Fumble RecoveriesCHS: N. Waters. LHS: Nightengale. SacksCHS: P. Terrasi; N. Waters. LHS: A. Anderson.No. 14 Missouri 36, No. 22 Florida 17Florida 3014017 Missouri 103101336 First Quarter MoSasser 20 pass from Mauk (Baggett kick), 14:38. FlaFG Velez 23, 11:09. MoFG Baggett 43, :31. Second Quarter MoFG Baggett 19, 7:55. Third Quarter FlaPatton 100 kickoff return (Velez kick), 14:48. MoJosey 6 run (Baggett kick), 13:24. MoFG Baggett 39, 6:40. FlaKel.Taylor 20 run (Velez kick), :46. Fourth Quarter MoFG Baggett 33, 13:32. MoFG Baggett 28, 8:04. MoMauk 17 run (Baggett kick), 6:30. A,124. FlaMo First downs11 24 Rushes-yards31-5937-205 Passing 92 295 Comp-Att-Int15-29-118-36-1 Return Yards66 (-4) Punts-Avg. 8-45.65-40.8 Fumbles-Lost2-22-1 Penalties-Yards8-597-50 Time of Possession29:1830:42 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFlorida, Kel.Taylor 12-74, M.Brown 819, Patton 1-17, Team 1-(minus 1), T.Burton 1-(minus 5), Murphy 8(minus 45). Missouri, Josey 18-136, Hansbrough 12-47, Mauk 6-15, Murphy 1-7. PASSINGFlorida, Murphy 15-29-1-92. Missouri, Mauk 18-36-1-295. RECEIVINGFlorida, Patton 6-46, T.Burton 3-26, Showers 2-11, Fulwood 1-7, Herndon 1-4, M.Brown 1-0, Dunbar 1(minus 2). Missouri, Lucas 6-57, Washington 3-84, J.Hunt 3-69, GreenBeckham 3-52, Murphy 2-13, Sasser 1-20.College football scoresEAST Albright 30, Wilkes 12 Alfred 49, Hartwick 28 American International 42, Bentley 14 Assumption 17, S. Connecticut 7 Bethany (WV) 27, Waynesburg 20 Bloomsburg 52, East Stroudsburg 38 Bridgewater (Mass.) 56, Plymouth St. 28 Brockport 49, Cortland St. 32 Bucknell 17, Dartmouth 14 Buffalo 32, UMass 3 Buffalo St. 60, Frostburg St. 28 CW Post 58, Pace 0 California (Pa.) 33, Seton Hill 7 Coast Guard 40, Maine Maritime 0 Colby 37, Hamilton 18 Colgate 28, Holy Cross 24 College of NJ 21, Morrisville St. 20 Duquesne 21, Robert Morris 20 Edinboro 36, Indiana (Pa.) 30 Fordham 52, Yale 31 Gallaudet 38, Castleton St. 12 Geneva 34, St. Vincent 23 Harvard 35, Lafayette 16 Husson 19, Becker 18 Ithaca 26, Utica 21 Juniata 28, Ursinus 7 Kings (Pa.) 31, Stevenson 24 Lehigh 45, Georgetown 24 Maine 34, William & Mary 20 Mass.-Dartmouth 34, Worcester St. 33 Merchant Marine at Springfield, ppd. Merrimack 51, St. Anselm 9 Middlebury 28, Bates 17 Monmouth (NJ) 48, Cornell 23 Mount Ida 56, Anna Maria 34 Muhlenberg 35, Gettysburg 10 New Hampshire 29, Villanova 28 Norwich 42, NY Maritime 21 Penn 21, Columbia 7 Pittsburgh 35, Old Dominion 24 Princeton 39, Brown 17 Rhode Island 12, Richmond 10 Rochester 37, RPI 31 Rowan 24, Wesley 17 Sacred Heart 56, Bryant 28 Salisbury 42, St. John Fisher 35 Shippensburg 55, Kutztown 30 Slippery Rock 34, Clarion 13 Stonehill 29, New Haven 26 Susquehanna 27, Moravian 17 Temple 33, Army 14 Texas Tech 37, West Virginia 27 Thomas More 42, Thiel 21 Towson 44, Albany (NY) 17 Trinity (Conn.) 40, Bowdoin 21 W. Connecticut 70, Fitchburg St. 14 W. New England 33, Union (NY) 30 Washington & Jefferson 38, Westminster (Pa.) 6 Wesleyan (Conn.) 20, Amherst 14 West Chester 34, Lock Haven 13 Westfield St. 37, Mass. Maritime 27 Widener 38, Misericordia 20 William Paterson 21, Kean 20 Williams 49, Tufts 35 SOUTH Alabama 52, Arkansas 0 Albany St. (Ga.) 42, Morehouse 20 Benedict 34, Clark Atlanta 0 Bethune-Cookman 48, Savannah St. 21 Carson-Newman 45, Tusculum 17 Catholic 37, Shenandoah 7 Central St. (Ohio) 37, Lane 34 Centre 34, Sewanee 17 Charleston (WV) 31, W. Virginia St. 10 Chattanooga 20, Elon 9 Coastal Carolina 55, Liberty 52, 2OT Concord 49, WV Wesleyan 21 Cumberlands 38, Georgetown (Ky.) 35 Delaware St. 12, NC A&T 7 Delta St. 38, Tarleton St. 36 Duke 35, Virginia 22 E. Kentucky 24, Tennessee Tech 10 East Carolina 55, Southern Miss. 14 Elizabeth City St. 56, Lincoln (Pa.) 14 Faulkner 44, Cumberland (Tenn.) 7 Fayetteville St. 35, Johnson C. Smith 26 Ferrum 42, Averett 20 Florida Tech 28, Shorter 24 Franklin & Marshall 28, McDaniel 9 Furman 27, Appalachian St. 10 Georgia Tech 56, Syracuse 0 Glenville St. 49, Virginia-Wise 7 Grambling St. at Jackson St., ppd. Greensboro 44, NC Wesleyan 42 Guilford 21, Bridgewater (Va.) 14 Hampden-Sydney 33, Emory & Henry 12 Hampton 27, Norfolk St. 17 Howard 21, Florida A&M 10 Jacksonville 52, Campbell 45 LaGrange 44, Huntingdon 40 Lenoir-Rhyne 35, Newberry 14 Marist 42, Davidson 14 Mars Hill 34, North Greenville 31 Maryville (Tenn.) 30, Christopher Newport 17 Mercer 54, Carnegie-Mellon 21 Miles 40, Kentucky St. 17 Millersville 30, Cheyney 12 Millsaps 28, Birmingham-Southern 14 Mississippi 27, LSU 24 Mississippi College 41, Howard Payne 38 Morgan St. 34, NC Central 22 Murray St. 31, Austin Peay 3 North Texas 28, Louisiana Tech 13 Pikeville 35, Bethel (Tenn.) 24 Point (Ga.) 31, Webber 13 Presbyterian 49, VMI 35 Quincy 80, Kentucky Wesleyan 26 Randolph-Macon 27, Washington & Lee 21 Reinhardt 49, Belhaven 17 S. Virginia 34, Apprentice 7 SE Louisiana 37, Northwestern St. 22 SMU 34, Memphis 29 Shaw 45, Livingstone 21 Shepherd 57, Notre Dame Coll. 17 South Alabama 38, Kent St. 21 Tennessee 23, South Carolina 21 Tennessee St. 29, UT-Martin 15 Tiffin 60, S. Dakota Tech 21 Tuskegee 35, Stillman 7 UNC-Pembroke 34, Catawba 31 Union (Ky.) 45, Bluefield South 35 Urbana 32, West Liberty 13 Valdosta St. 35, West Georgia 30 Vanderbilt 31, Georgia 27 Virginia St. 47, Bowie St. 44 Virginia Union 24, Chowan 14 Wake Forest 34, Maryland 10 Wingate 43, Brevard 24 Winston-Salem 35, St. Augustines 17 Wofford 21, W. Carolina 17 MIDWEST Adrian 14, Trine 9 Akron 24, Miami (Ohio) 17 Albion 31, Kalamazoo 21 Ashland 14, Walsh 6 Augsburg 41, St. Olaf 17 Augustana (Ill.) 47, Millikin 19 Augustana (SD) 35, Upper Iowa 6 Avila 30, Graceland (Iowa) 24, OT Baker 46, Cent. Methodist 12 Baldwin-Wallace 54, Wilmington (Ohio) 7 Ball St. 38, W. Michigan 17 Benedictine (Ill.) 30, Rockford 13 Benedictine (Kan.) 45, Mid-Am Nazarene 40 Bethel (Minn.) 28, St. Thomas (Minn.) 21 Briar Cliff 37, Dakota St. 31 Butler 24, Drake 14 Central 23, Buena Vista 13 Chadron St. 43, Black Hills St. 13 Chicago 26, Macalester 7 Cincinnati 41, UConn 16 Concordia (Moor.) 63, Hamline 7 Concordia (Wis.) 48, Concordia (Ill.) 42 Cornell (Iowa) 45, Knox 14 Dayton 45, San Diego 38, 2OT DePauw 23, Ohio Wesleyan 20 Dubuque 38, Coe 14 E. Illinois 55, SE Missouri 33 Emporia St. 52, Lindenwood (Mo.) 21 Eureka 23, Mac Murray 15 Fort Hays St. 56, SW Baptist 14 Franklin 67, Anderson (Ind.) 7 Grand Valley St. 48, N. Michigan 17 Grand View 47, Trinity (Ill.) 14 Greenville 37, Northwestern (Minn.) 23 Gustavus 42, Valley City St. 21 Hanover 41, Bluffton 0 Heidelberg 35, Otterbein 17 Hillsdale 45, Ferris St. 38 Hope 43, Alma 23 Illinois College 37, Beloit 7 Illinois St. 55, Indiana St. 14 Illinois Wesleyan 31, Carthage 10 Indianapolis 56, William Jewell 3 Iowa Wesleyan 23, Westminster (Mo.) 14 John Carroll 41, Muskingum 9 Kansas Wesleyan 34, Bethany (Kan.) 20 Lake Forest 17, Monmouth (Ill.) 14 Lakeland 55, Maranatha Baptist 14 Malone 55, Lake Erie 50 Manchester 42, Earlham 13 Marian (Ind.) 31, William Penn 21 Mayville St. 35, Trinity Bible 0 Michigan 63, Indiana 47 Michigan St. 14, Purdue 0 Michigan Tech 33, Northwood (Mich.) 31 Midland 61, Hastings 35 Minn. Duluth 52, Minot St. 0 Minn. St.-Mankato 52, SW Minnesota St. 27 Minn.-Crookston 20, Minn. St.-Moorhead 14 Minnesota 20, Northwestern 17 Missouri 36, Florida 17 Missouri S&T 14, St. Josephs (Ind.) 13 Missouri St. 35, S. Dakota St. 21 Missouri Valley 31, Evangel 14 Missouri Western 55, Missouri Southern 21 Morehead St. 42, Valparaiso 28 Morningside 62, Dakota Wesleyan 27 Mount St. Joseph 44, Defiance 31 Mount Union 58, Capital 3 N. Dakota St. 31, S. Illinois 10 N. Illinois 38, Cent. Michigan 17 NW Missouri St. 24, Pittsburg St. 15 Nebraska Wesleyan 28, Dordt 0 Nebraska-Kearney 24, Lincoln (Mo.) 14 North Central (Ill.) 42, North Park 0 Northern St. (SD) 27, Bemidji St. 0 Northwestern (Iowa) 30, Concordia (Neb.) 28 Notre Dame 14, Southern Cal 10 Oberlin 24, Allegheny 0 Ohio 56, E. Michigan 28 Ohio Northern 45, Marietta 0 Ohio St. 34, Iowa 24 Oklahoma 34, Kansas 19 Peru St. 31, Culver-Stockton 28 Ripon 33, Grinnell 27, OT Robert Morris-Chicago 42, Taylor 37 Sacramento St. 31, North Dakota 7 Saginaw Valley St. 14, Wayne (Mich.) 10 Siena Heights 44, Concordia (Mich.) 3 Simpson (Iowa) 27, Loras 10 Sioux Falls 47, Concordia (St.P.) 7 South Dakota 38, N. Iowa 31, 2OT Southwestern (Kan.) 86, Bethel (Kan.) 36 St. Ambrose 38, Olivet Nazarene 13 St. Cloud St. 20, Mary 13 St. Francis (Ind.) 37, St. Francis (Ill.) 28 St. Johns (Minn.) 23, Carleton 13 St. Mary (Kan.) 14, McPherson 3 St. Norbert 17, Lawrence 6 St. Scholastica 48, Martin Luther 14 St. Xavier 37, Waldorf 21 Sterling 30, Ottawa, Kan. 18 Tabor 20, Friends 19 Toledo 45, Navy 44, 2OT Truman St. 28, McKendree 21 Wabash 48, Kenyon 7 Wartburg 24, Luther 21 Wheaton (Ill.) 28, Elmhurst 3 Winona St. 45, Wayne (Neb.) 41 Wis. Lutheran 21, Aurora 13 Wis.-LaCrosse 21, Wis.-Stout 3 Wis.-Oshkosh 41, Wis.-River Falls 13 Wis.-Platteville 24, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 23 Wisconsin 56, Illinois 32 Wittenberg 66, Wooster 39 Youngstown St. 24, W. Illinois 14 SOUTHWEST Abilene Christian 40, Incarnate Word 6 Alcorn St. 20, Texas Southern 13 Ark.-Monticello 41, Lindenwood (Ill.) 27 Auburn 45, Texas A&M 41 Austin 27, SW Assemblies of God 17 BYU 47, Houston 46 Bacone 47, Okla. Panhandle St. 9 Baylor 71, Iowa St. 7 Cent. Arkansas 26, Lamar 24 Cent. Missouri 48, Cent. Oklahoma 16 E. New Mexico 35, Northeastern St. 14 East Central 64, NW Oklahoma St. 14 Hardin-Simmons 55, E. Texas Baptist 17 Harding 36, Ouachita 33 Henderson St. 45, Arkansas Tech 14 Hendrix 30, Berry 17 Langston 34, Texas College 8 Mary Hardin-Baylor 45, Louisiana College 34 Oklahoma Baptist 37, Wayland Baptist 10 Oklahoma St. 24, TCU 10 Prairie View 51, MVSU 14 S. Arkansas 66, S. Nazarene 17 Southern U. 29, Ark.-Pine Bluff 21 Stephen F. Austin 55, Nicholls St. 41 Texas A&M Commerce 65, McMurry 43 Texas Lutheran 41, Sul Ross St. 16 Texas St. 24, Georgia St. 17 Trinity (Texas) 30, Southwestern (Texas) 0 West Texas A&M 34, Angelo St. 30 FAR WEST Arizona St. 53, Washington 24 Boise St. 34, Nevada 17 Cal Lutheran 20, Claremont-Mudd 6 Carroll (Mont.) 31, Montana Western 7 Case Reserve 38, Puget Sound 31 Cent. Washington 54, Simon Fraser 14 Colorado 43, Charleston Southern 10 Colorado St. 52, Wyoming 22 E. Washington 34, S. Utah 10 Linfield 51, Whitworth 17 Mesa St. 42, Fort Lewis 0 Montana 21, Cal Poly 14, OT Montana St. 34, Weber St. 16 Montana Tech 34, Dickinson St. 14 N. Arizona 39, Idaho St. 30 Pacific Lutheran 17, Pacific 16 Pomona-Pitzer 17, Whittier 10, OT Rice 45, New Mexico St. 19 Rocky Mountain 45, E. Oregon 13 S. Oregon 55, Montana St.-Northern 28 Stanford 24, UCLA 10 UC Davis 34, N. Colorado 18 W. New Mexico 42, Western St. (Col.) 34 Willamette 56, Lewis & Clark 30NASCAR Camping World TruckFreds 250 powered by Coca-Cola Saturday At Talladega Superspeedway Talladega, Ala. Lap length: 2.66 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (24) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 94 laps, 115.8 rating, 47 points. 2. (25) David Starr, Toyota, 94, 79.2, 42. 3. (7) Ross Chastain, Ford, 94, 99.1, 42. 4. (18) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 94, 104.8, 0. 5. (14) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 94, 76.6, 39. 6. (27) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 94, 76.2, 0. 7. (19) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 94, 90.8, 37. 8. (2) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 94, 73.3, 36. 9. (23) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 94, 65.9, 36. 10. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 94, 103.4, 0. 11. (8) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 94, 69.9, 33. 12. (33) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 94, 46.1, 32. 13. (21) Clay Greenfield, Ram, 94, 57.7, 31. 14. (5) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 94, 114.3, 32. 15. (17) Chris Fontaine, Toyota, 94, 68, 30. 16. (26) Bryan Silas, Ford, 94, 58.3, 28. 17. (10) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 94, 75.1, 28. 18. (1) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 93, 83.3, 27. 19. (11) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 93, 87.4, 25. 20. (16) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 93, 54.9, 24. 21. (13) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 92, 66.7, 24. 22. (35) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 91, 31.5, 0. 23. (29) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, accident, 87, 65, 21. 24. (6) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 87, 87.4, 20. 25. (36) Scott Stenzel, Ford, accident, 87, 52.9, 19. 26. (4) James Buescher, Chevrolet, accident, 79, 97.2, 19. 27. (9) Joey Coulter, Toyota, accident, 79, 77.2, 18. 28. (32) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, accident, 79, 48.6, 16. 29. (31) Timothy Peters, Toyota, accident, 65, 49.6, 15. 30. (28) Caleb Holman, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 44.2, 14. 31. (20) German Quiroga, Toyota, accident, 65, 69.2, 13. 32. (15) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, accident, 65, 38.6, 12. 33. (22) Sean Corr, Ford, accident, 65, 66.1, 11. 34. (34) Chris Cockrum, Toyota, accident, 65, 35.2, 10. 35. (30) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, overheating, 27, 39.8, 10. 36. (12) Mason Mingus, Chevrolet, oil leak, 5, 26.9, 8. Simpson maintains 4-shot lead in VegasLAS VEGAS Webb Simpson maintained a four-stroke lead Saturday in the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, birdieing four of the last seven holes at TPC Summerlin Making his first start since helping the U.S. win the Presidents Cup, the 2012 U.S. Open champion shot a 4-under 67 to reach 19 under. He opened with rounds of 64 and 63. Chesson Hadley was second after a 67. Jeff Overton was third at 14 under after a 68.Langer leads Greater Hickory ClassicCONOVER, N.C. Bernhard Langer overcame a bad start Saturday to take a two-stroke lead after the second round of the Champions Tours Greater Hickory Classic. Second behind Kenny Perry in the Charles Schwab Cup standings, Langer bogeyed the first two holes on the reconfigured Rock Barn layout, then made six birdies for a 4-under 66. The German star had a 10-under 130 total. Michael Allen, Brad Bryant and John Riegger were tied for second. Nordqvist, Hull-Kirk tied for lead in KoreaINCHEON, South Korea Anna Nordqvist of Sweden shot a 2-under 70 to remain tied for the lead with Katherine Hull-Kirk of Australia after the second round of the KEB HanaBank Championship on Saturday. Defending champion Suzann Petterson of Norway fired a 69 to move into a tie for third with South Koreas Ju Young Pak and Amy Yang, who both shot 71.Ninyette leads Perth InternationalPERTH, Australia Local West Australian golfer Brody Ninyette shot a 5-under 67 Saturday to take a one-shot lead after the third round of the Perth International. Ninyette was a shot ahead of compatriot Brett Rumford, J.B. Hansen of Denmark and Jin Jeong of South Korea. Rumford shot a 65, Hansen had a 66 and Jeong shot 69 to remain in strong contention at Australias richest tournament. From wire reports GOLF BRIEFS CHOMPEDContinued from Page B1

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Chiefs on a roll; Texans need a victory Associated PressHow pretty the turnaround in Kansas City has been. How ugly the turnaround in Houston has been. When the Texans visit the Chiefs on Sunday, it will match up a title contender against a team trying to get things going in the right direction. With a twist, of course: The Texans are also-rans instead of AFC South leaders, and the Chiefs are undefeated rather than simply rebuilding from a 2-14 season. Kansas City has won six in a row, and Houston has dropped four straight. The Chiefs are a takeaway machine with 18 and a plus-12 differential. Houston is very charitable with 15 turnovers and a minus-12. But the Chiefs dont want to hear anything about being 6-0. If you allow that to happen, theres where you get into problems, said coach Andy Reid, the man most responsible for the winning after joining the Chiefs this season following 14 generally successful seasons in Philadelphia. Personally, I dont worry about all that, and I havent seen any of our guys worry about all that. Theres plenty to worry about in Houston, where Case Keenum gets his first NFL start at quarterback for the injured Matt Schaub. Ive been around a few teams that have gotten in a funk, turned the ball over and made mistakes. This has been very, very difficult, coach Gary Kubiak said. You dont stay the same. If it continues, youve got to continue to search for something each week. Thats what were trying to do this week by changing things up and trying to get it to go away. Today, its Peyton Mannings return to Indianapolis as the Broncos visit the Colts in prime time; Dallas is at Philadelphia; Cleveland at Green Bay; Baltimore at Pittsburgh; Cincinnati at Detroit; San Francisco at Tennessee; Chicago at Washington; New England at the New York Jets; Buffalo at Miami; San Diego at Jacksonville; Tampa Bay at Atlanta; and St. Louis at Carolina. Minnesota is at the New York Giants on Monday night. Off this week are Oakland and New Orleans. Seahawks 34, Cardinals 22 In Glendale, Ariz., Russell Wilson threw three touchdown passes, Marshawn Lynch rushed for 91 yards and Seattle beat Arizona on Thursday night. The Seahawks (6-1) intercepted two of Carson Palmers passes, converting both into touchdowns, and sacked him seven times, including one by Chris Clemons, who had been questionable for the game with a hyperextended elbow. Arizona (3-4) got a touchdown and one of its three field goals after Wilson twice fumbled while being sacked deep in Seattle territory. Palmer has thrown 11 interceptions in the past five games and 13 this season, second only to Eli Mannings 15. Seattle sent the Cardinals to their seventh straight loss against an NFC West foe. Denver (6-0) at Indianapolis (4-2) The return of the great quarterback, well advanced at age 37. Manning will be honored before the game in the stadium he helped get built and by the fans to whom he brought almost nothing but winning football and a Super Bowl title. Then he will do what he has always done, going out to beat the opponent. If he wins, he will join Brett Favre as the only quarterbacks to beat all 32 franchises. I dont play there anymore, but Ive continued to communicate and Ive enjoyed those times when I see someone from Indiana in a hotel or an Colts jersey out here at practice, Manning said. Theres always a connection there. I think to have to deliver a message means Ive been gone and I dont think I really have. Denver and Kansas City are the two remaining unbeatens. Dallas (3-3) at Philadelphia (3-3) The winner will take over first place in the NFC East. Imagine that, a team with a winning record in this downtrodden division. Dallas might have to get there without two stars: DE DeMarcus Ware (thigh) and RB DeMarco Murray (knee). The Eagles, losers of eight straight at home, figure to have Nick Foles at quarterback instead of Michael Vick. Regardless, look for lots of wide-open offense. Our challenge right now is as big as it can get because its the Dallas Cowboys, Eagles coach Chip Kelly said. Thats the way we look at it. We dont look at it and compare this week and that week and how we are. They have got our full attention. Our eyes are totally focused on the Cowboys and we are not comparing them to anybody else. Baltimore (3-3) at Pittsburgh (1-4) A classic AFC North rivalry game, except that the Steelers have fallen by the wayside. They did get their first win last week against the Jets, and a victory over the defending Super Bowl champions will have the folks in Pittsburgh dreaming of an amazing turnaround. But Baltimore has won three in a row at Heinz Field, which once was a house of horrors for the Ravens. One player Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger wont want to see is linebacker Terrell Suggs. Sizzle has sacked Roethlisberger 15 1/2 times, the most of anyone. I have a feeling the whole NFL, if theyre not playing, even if they are playing in the Sunday night game, they will catch a glimpse of this game, Suggs said. Cleveland (3-3) at Green Bay (3-2) Are the Packers becoming a running team? Theyve had 100-yard rushers in three of the past four weeks Eddie Lacy, James Starks, Johnathan Franklin after not having one for nearly three seasons. But they do have Aaron Rodgers, of course, which means the ball will be going downfield even without the injured Randall Cobb. Clevelands defense can be formidable, especially against the run, so Rodgers might have to take to the air often. He wont complain about that. Cincinnati (4-2) at Detroit (4-2) Normally, the juice here would be the presence of two of the games top wideouts, Cincinnatis A.J. Green and Detroits Calvin Johnson. But Johnson has been slowed by a right knee problem, which means Lions running back Reggie Bush might have to carry the load. The Bengals have a breakaway running threat of their own in rookie Gio Bernard, but the focus for Cincinnati is a solid defense that gets after the quarterback (18 sacks). San Francisco (4-2) at Tennessee (3-3) Tennessee must find a way to cover Vernon Davis. The tight end victimized Arizona last week for the most yards of his career, 180, on eight catches with two touchdowns. In his only game against the Titans, he had a career-high 10 catches for 102 yards. Might the Titans put their top cornerback, Alterraun Verner, on Davis? Verner vs. Vernon could be exciting because Verner is tied for the league lead with four interceptions and he ran one back for a TD. Chicago (4-2) at Washington (1-4) Oddly, these teams are dead even through 47 meetings at 23-23-1. Chicago is making its living on takeaways with an NFC-leading 17 and has a plus-7 differential. That could be decisive against the Redskins, who are minus-1. Also clearly in the Bears favor is the performance of their special teams compared to Washingtons. Devin Hester is a force returning kicks against good opponents, and the Redskins arent good they struggle in just about all phases of special teams. New England (5-1) at New York Jets (3-3) New York gave New England quite a test in the rain in Week 2, but these Jets are severely limited after injuries at the offensive skill positions. Of course, the Patriots have similar issues healthwise, losing two of their best defenders in NT Vince Wilfork and LB Jerod Mayo. The offense still has Tom Brady, who takes special pleasure in beating the Jets, doing so six straight times in the regular season. Hes 18-4 against the Jets, not counting the postseason. New England is one win from tying Oakland for most regular-season victories (432) among the original eight AFL teams. Buffalo (2-4) at Miami (3-2) The other AFC East matchup, with the Dolphins coming off two losses and a bye. Buffalo made an impressive rally to force overtime before losing to Cincinnati last week. The Bills have lost both road games. Miami must find a way to protect Ryan Tannehill, who has been sacked 24 times, on a record pace. Buffalos Mario Williams has eight sacks already. San Diego (3-3) at Jacksonville (0-6) Coming off an impressive Monday night win over Indianapolis in which they did pretty much everything well on both sides of the ball, the Chargers face a cross-country trip on a short week. Hardly a recipe for success, except that the opponent is winless Jacksonville. The Jaguars had their best performance of the season in their loss at Denver, and still fell by 16 points. Do we need to say more? Tampa Bay (0-5) at Atlanta (1-4) Atlanta has had a long time to stew about its weak start. Its three-game slide is the first under coach Mike Smith, and coming off a bye, if the Falcons dont begin a turnaround now theyll never catch sight of New Orleans in the NFC South. But with Julio Jones gone for the season and Roddy White hobbled, the passing game no longer is formidable. Look for lots of throws to tight end Tony Gonzalez, who could wind up drawing Bucs star cornerback Darrelle Revis in coverage. St. Louis (3-3) at Carolina (2-3) Seems rare to say the Rams and Panthers are coming off big victories. Sam Bradford had a career-best 134.6 quarterback rating last week against Houston, and he has two new faces who are contributing. Rookie RB Zac Stacy has at least 75 yards rushing in the past three games, and first-round pick Tavon Austin leads all NFC rookie receivers with 24 catches. Carolina has played one fewer game than most teams, but its 68 points allowed is impressive nonetheless. LB Luke Kuechly, last years top defensive rookie, leads the NFL in tackles with 209 since entering the league. Minnesota (1-4) at New York Giants (0-6) This sure looked like a nice matchup when the schedule came out. Adrian Peterson against a tough defense on a perennial contender. Now, theres little reason to tune in, although the Vikings are starting their third quarterback this season, recently acquired Josh Freeman.B4SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE NATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUE NFL StatisticsCENTRAL NFL standingsAMERICAN CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA New England510.83312597 Miami 320.600114117 N.Y. Jets330.500104135 Buffalo 240.333136157 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis420.66714898 Tennessee330.500128115 Houston240.333106177 Jacksonville060.00070198 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati420.667121111 Baltimore330.500134129 Cleveland330.500118125 Pittsburgh140.20088116 West WLTPctPFPA Kansas City6001.00015265 Denver6001.000265158 San Diego330.500144138 Oakland240.333105132 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 330.500183152 Philadelphia330.500166179 Washington140.200107143 N.Y. Giants060.000103209 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans510.833161103 Carolina230.40010968 Atlanta 140.200122134 Tampa Bay050.00064101 North WLTPctPFPA Detroit 420.667162140 Chicago420.667172161 Green Bay320.600137114 Minnesota140.200125158 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 610.857191116 San Francisco420.667145118 St. Louis330.500141154 Arizona340.429133161 Thursdays Game Seattle 34, Arizona 22 Todays Games Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Detroit, 1 p.m. San Diego at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. Cleveland at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m. Open: New Orleans, Oakland Mondays Game Minnesota at N.Y. Giants, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24 Carolina at Tampa Bay, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27 Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Buffalo at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Miami at New England, 1 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. San Francisco vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Washington at Denver, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 8:30 p.m. Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis, San Diego, Tennessee Monday, Oct. 28 Seattle at St. Louis, 8:40 p.m.AFC leadersWeek 7 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt P. Manning, DEN2401782179222 P. Rivers, SND2231621847145 Locker, TEN1116972160 Luck, IND186115134673 Roethlisberger, PIT192126149565 Dalton, CIN215140155286 Tannehill, MIA182114138365 Pryor, OAK13889106155 Hoyer, CLE965761553 Ale. Smith, KAN216122133073 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD A. Foster, HOU1175314.54231 J. Charles, KAN1144754.17245 Moreno, DEN803734.6625t7 B. Powell, NYJ873604.14271 Spiller, BUF843514.1854t1 F. Jackson, BUF753444.59594 Ry. Mathews, SND893363.78200 Chr. Johnson, TEN1063273.08230 T. Richardson, IND922963.22162 Green-Ellis, CIN892953.31253 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD And. Johnson, HOU4449511.3270 An. Brown, PIT4149812.1452 Edelman, NWE4141110.0442 Cameron, CLE3846012.1535 De. Thomas, DEN3752814.378t4 A.. Green, CIN3746412.5544 Welker, DEN3737810.2338 A. Gates, SND3646612.956t2 Woodhead, SND362677.426t3 Decker, DEN3447714.0612 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Doss, BAL 1425518.282t1 Holliday, DEN1520113.481t1 Benjamin, CLE2024612.379t1 McCluster, KAN2731711.789t1 Edelman, NWE1818510.3240 Kerley, NYJ 121089.0240 Br. Tate, CIN 8729.0290 Reynaud, TEN161368.5350 P. Adams, OAK8597.4300 An. Brown, PIT8567.0400 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD K. Martin, HOU2052626.3490 Thigpen, MIA1026226.2380 Reynaud, TEN1128225.6400 D. Reed, IND1127625.1310 Br. Tate, CIN1332024.6320 F. Jones, PIT 921724.1340 C. Gates, NYJ920923.2360 J. Ford, OAK1125323.0300 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Welker, DEN 808048 J. Charles, KAN752042 Moreno, DEN770042 Ju. Thomas, DEN707042 Cameron, CLE505030 Royal, SND 505030 Bernard, CIN 422024 A.. Green, CIN404024 F. Jackson, BUF440024 De. Moore, OAK404024 Kicking PATFGLGPts M. Prater, DEN34-34995361 Gostkowski, NWE11-1116-175459 Novak, SND15-1513-155054 Succop, KAN17-1711-135150 Tucker, BAL14-1412-145050 Vinatieri, IND14-1412-145150 D. Carpenter, BUF12-1212-135548 Folk, NYJ 9913-134848 Bironas, TEN14-1410-134744 Sturgis, MIA12-1210-115442NFC leadersWeek 7 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Romo, DAL2181531693143 Brees, NOR2371571958145 A. Rodgers, GBY1841181646104 M. Ryan, ATL2181511649103 R. Wilson, SEA1871151489114 Cutler, CHI2171431630126 M. Stafford, DET2391501772124 S. Bradford, STL2321381432133 Vick, PHL13271118552 C. Newton, CAR15393112795 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD L. McCoy, PHL1236305.1241t3 Lynch, SEA1385784.19436 A. Peterson, MIN1024834.7478t5 Gore, SNF 1034774.6334t3 Forte, CHI 1004424.42553 D. Murray, DAL914284.70413 D. Martin, TAM1164093.53281 De. Williams, CAR913944.33270 A. Morris, WAS723775.2445t3 Re. Bush, DET783764.82391 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Ju. Jones, ATL4158014.181t2 B. Marshall, CHI4046511.6415 J. Graham, NOR3759316.056t6 Cruz, NYG 3554115.570t4 Garcon, WAS3540811.7442 De. Jackson, PHL3458917.361t5 D. Bryant, DAL3445913.5796 Gonzalez, ATL3333910.3253 Forte, CHI 332447.4240 Fitzgerald, ARI3242213.275t4 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Dw. Harris, DAL818923.686t1 G. Tate, SEA1922812.0330 Page, TAM 1011411.4400 Hyde, GBY 77510.7230 Ginn Jr., CAR8708.8120 Sproles, NOR151248.3280 Dam. Johnson, PHL9748.2210 Spurlock, DET161277.9570 Ky. Williams, SNF8577.1220 R. Randle, NYG12766.3140 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Dw. Harris, DAL931234.7900 C. Patterson, MIN1240633.8105t1 Hester, CHI 1957530.3800 Dam. Johnson, PHL1436225.9330 Be. Cunningham, STL1229924.9320 Ginn Jr., CAR717424.9380 D. Wilson, NYG922224.7310 Sproles, NOR816120.1240 C. Thompson, WAS816020.0280 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Lynch, SEA 761042 D. Bryant, DAL606036 Ve. Davis, SNF606036 J. Graham, NOR606036 A. Peterson, MIN651036 B. Marshall, CHI505032 Fauria, DET 505030 De. Jackson, PHL505030 Cruz, NYG 404024 Fitzgerald, ARI404024 Kicking PATFGLGPts Hauschka, SEA19-1916-175167 Hartley, NOR17-1714-164859 Henery, PHL17-1713-164856 Crosby, GBY14-1413-145253 D. Bailey, DAL19-1910-125349 Akers, DET18-1810-125348 Feely, ARI11-1112-135247 Gould, CHI16-1710-105846 P. Dawson, SNF17-178-114441 Walsh, MIN14-149-105441 Turnarounds in Kansas City and Houston Associated PressKansasCityrunning back Jamaal Charles crosses the goal line for a touchdown Oct. 13 as Oakland free safety Usama Young (26) defends at Arrowhead Stadium in KansasCity, Mo. The Chiefs improved to 6-0 with the win and are one of two undefeated teams entering play this week.

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RECREATIONALSPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 B5 FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. My wife came home from a local board meeting where the letters AED did not mean much to the group. Either they did not have schoolage children or had not experienced a needless sudden cardiac event tragedy in a young active person. A year or so ago on Fox News, there was a story that initiated a legislative bill making it mandatory for every Florida public school to have an AED. The story was about a 12year-old girl in seventh grade who collapsed, stopped breathing and had a cardiac arrest. All of this was on the school video monitor. Two nearby PE teachers and other students witnessed the event, went to her aid and evaluated her breathing and heartbeat. The PE teacher started immediate CPR. CPR is mandated in Texas for all teachers. The PE teacher quickly applied the automatic external defibrillator or AED. Without the AED, this 12 year old had less than a three percent chance of survival and one percent chance of living without brain damage. AED provides an electric shock through the chest wall. A built-in computer determines the patients heart rhythm, determines the need and then administers the shock. AEDs can restore a normal heart rhythm in sudden cardiac arrest. For each minute without this electric shock, a victims chance of survival decreases seven to 10 percent. If used within the first 10 minutes of a cardiac arrest, the survival rates increase to 80 percent. On average, emergency personnel take in excessof 7 to 8 minutes to get there. What does this have to do with sports? Im glad you asked. Athletes are prone to often silent cardiac arrhythmias and heart illnesses. Millions of kids play sports without problems. It is sad that sudden cardiac arrest and death is often the first symptom of a silent heart problem. When I last wrote about sudden death in athletes and specifically kids, the timing was unbelievable. I had turned in my article the day before the deadline in my usual procrastinating fashion. My editor emailed me that he had added the tragic story of a young girl at Gainesvilles Eastside High School who, that day, had a cardiac arrest while at track practice. She was initially revived but passed away in the hospital. The stories are endless. The best chance to help these young athletes and non-athlete middle school, high school and college student is a $1,200-$2,700 device that automatically reads the heart beat and provides the electric jump start the heart needs. Sudden cardiac death occurs hundreds of times per day and is the cause of 250,000 deaths annually, including an alarming number that are of school age. Has your child ever fainted, had a seizure when exercising, excited or startled? Has your child ever had chest pain, dizziness or had unremitting shortness of breath while exercising orpassed out or nearly passed out during or after exercise? Does your family have a history of sudden death before age 50? Many of these problems are inherited. Think about it! Remember the only treatment for sudden cardiac arrest is defibrillation. Adequate placement of AEDs in schools can potentially save lives, especially your childs. Now what upset my wife? The fact that many private and charter schools do not have this device in Citrus County. Many public schools dont know where the AED is. Some private and charter schools have over 200 students. Not all private schools have the funds to cover the expense, just because they are private. Prediction and prevention of athletic sudden death persists because the standards of medicine have not fulfilled appropriately designed controlled trials to help detect future victims. But an AED provides a chance for these undiagnosed individuals. Most importantly, public and private schools need to know where the AED is and how to use it. It is a tragedy in the making!Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and shoulder orthopedic surgeon at SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute may be reached at rbjhand@ cox.net. Dr. Ron JosephDOCTORS ORDERS Putting the heart in sports P.L.A.Y. date changed Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County Parks & Recreations P .L.A.Y. Programs start date has been changed to Oct. 28 for the upcoming season. The P.L.A.Y. programs offered in the upcoming session include; basketball which will be held at the Citrus County Resource Center on Mondays or Wednesdays and flag football located at Bicentennial Park on Tuesdays or Thursdays. Boys and girls, ages 3 to 5, are encouraged to join the six-week program. After enrollment, each child receives age appropriate sports equipment and a team T-shirt. Registration is open and spots fill up fast. Contact Crysta Henry, Recreation Program Specialist for Youth Programs, at 352-527-7540 or visit www.citruscounty parks.com for more information. All programs and activities offered by the Division of Parks and Recreation are available to all persons without regard to race, color, handicap, sex, religion or national origin. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact the office five days prior to the program so that proper consideration may be given to the request. For hearing impaired please contact 352-5275901 (TTY) or 352-5277540 (Voice).Youth basketball league formingHoops Link Inc. and USSSA Basketball will be conducting a youth basketball league with play on Saturdays Nov. 9 through Dec. 21 at the Lecanto High School gym. Individuals and/or teams can register. There will be instructional, competitive and open divisions of play to meet all levels of player abilities. Individuals and teams can enter at which level they prefer or be placed accordingly by staff. Hoops Link Inc.s local and nationally accomplished staff will preside in all divisions. The cost of the league is $50 for individuals. Interested participants may go online to hoopslinkinc.org and print the registration form and mail it in. Special to the ChronicleThe P.L.A.Y. Program is an athletic event for children between the ages of 3 to 5. Young athlete program begins Oct. 28 now Special to the ChronicleGame 1 Kickin Nutz 25, Misfits 2 Kickin Nutz started this game off hot, scoring two runs in the first inning before putting up 12 in the second and 11 in the third inning. With a win last night and a Head Shots loss, that puts Kickin Nutz tied for first place. Game 2 Convictions 10, Average Joes 4 Both teams were fighting for fourth place in the standings and the last playoff berth. It was a tight game until Convictions came alive in the fifth inning, scoring six unanswered runs to break a 4-4 tie to put them up six runs. The season is definitely not over for either one of these teams, as both team are still eligible to make the playoffs. Game 3 Citrus Whiners 7, Head Shots 6 With the scoring going back and forth, it was no surprise this game went down to the wire. With the score tied 6-6 in the sixth inning, Citrus Whiners manufactured a run to take the lead and held off the first-place Head Shots. Next week will finalize the seeding for the playoffs. USSSA softball tournamentThe weekend before Halloween, USSSA will be hosting a softball tournament on Oct. 26 to 27 at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. Teams will play dressed up in their Halloween costumes for a chance to qualify for winter nationals. Come out on Saturday or Sunday and see the Halloween murals in the grass, the teams and the fun atmosphere these girls will be competing in. Flag footballWith seven teams playing in the league, Parks & Recreation is looking forward to playing another stellar football season with the men of Citrus County. Games will be held at HARP field in Homosassa. Season opener is tentatively scheduled for Oct. 24.Coed beach VolleyballThis season, coed beach volleyball is being moved to Fat Daddys BBQ Restaurant south of Crystal River & north of Homosassa on U.S 19. Fat Daddys provides a large Olympic-sized sand volleyball court with availability of ordering food and drinks, along with great lighting and a stage next to the court. Theyre set up for an awesome league atmosphere. Registration is open for 17 and older. You have until Oct. 31 to register your team at the office of Citrus County Parks & Recreation. Registration fee is $100 per team. The season starts on Nov. 13.Mens softballThe boys of summer are back for the Fall/Winter softball season out at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. With Advanced Fitness taking the summer title, teams are looking forward to getting back on the diamond for revenge. Season begins Nov. 4.Mens basketballRegistration is now open for mens basketball and ends Nov. 1. A $50 deposit is required at the time of registration. The season starts Nov. 13. If you are an individual adult looking for a sport to play and do not have a team, please call Parks & Recreation at 352-527-7540 and we will refer you the managers in each league you are interested in. Adult kickball league action heats up before playoffs Kickball tourney to benefit CRESTA kickball tournament will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Lecanto High Schools softball field to raise money for the CREST school playground renovation project. The double-elimination tourney will field groups of 10. Entry fee is $100. Checks can be made payable to CREST School. For more information, call Debbie Rumpf or Kelly Tapp Daugherty at CREST School, 352-5270303, ext. 6115. Entry deadline is Nov. 1. To learn more about CREST and its students, visit ww.citrus.k12.fl.us/crest.Race day at Lecanto High SchoolThe second annual Alumni Pride 5K and Popsicle Mile will take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, on the campus of Lecanto High School. The funds will be used to create scholarships for deserving students. Cost is $20 for the 5K, $10 for the Popsicle Mile and $25 for all raceday registrations. Registration is available on active.com or contact the following for a paper registration to email, mail or drop off: Diedra Newton at 352-7462334 or newtond@ citrus.k12.fl.us; Mike Ossmann at mikeossmann@ gmail.com; Marifran Crosley Ramaglia at mcr@ advancedaudiology.biz. There will be event-day registration opening at 7:45 a.m.Foster parents plan tourneyThe Citrus County Foster Parent Association will sponsor its fifth annual golf tournament beginning at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at Inverness Golf and Country Club. Entry fee is $45 and includes lunch and raffles. For more information, call Debbie King at 352-201-9521. SportsBRIEFS

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Associated PressTAMPA Tuukka Rask stopped 23 shots and five Boston players scored to help the Bruins beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 5-0 on Saturday night. Rask made a nifty glove save on Steven Stamkos point-blank redirection in the third period. It was the goalies first shutout this season and 17th overall. David Krejci, Adam McQuaid, Patrice Bergeron, Chris Kelly and Shawn Thornton scored for the Bruins, who have won six in a row against Tampa Bay. Boston leads the alltime series 50-20-9. Krejci stopped a ninegame goal drought to put the Bruins up 1-0 from the low slot off a pass from Milan Lucic 1:32 into the game. Krejci has a point in four straight games.Panthers 2, Wild 1, SOSUNRISE Brad Boyes and Jonathan Huberdeau scored in a shootout, lifting the Florida Panthers over the Minnesota Wild 2-1 to snap a three-game losing streak. Boyes backhander went through the legs of goalie Josh Harding for the winner. Huberdeau beat Harding on the stick side for the first shootout goal. Zach Parise and Mikko Koivu were turned aside by Panthers goalie Tim Thomas in the shootout. Aleksander Barkov scored in regulation for Florida, and Thomas made 31 saves.Penguins 4, Canucks 3, SOPITTSBURGH Evgeni Malkin scored in the third round of the shootout, MarcAndre Fleury made the deciding stop on Ryan Kesler and the Pittsburgh Penguins remained unbeaten at home after a 4-3 victory against the Vancouver Canucks in Pittsburgh.Oilers 3, Senators 1OTTAWA Ryan-Nugent Hopkins scored two goals, including one into an empty net, to help the Edmonton Oilers beat the Ottawa Senators 3-1 and snap a five-game losing streak.Devils 4, Rangers 0NEWARK, N.J. Cory Schneider made 22 saves for his first shutout with New Jersey, and the Devils become the last NHL team to win a game this season, posting a 4-0 victory over the New York Rangers. Andrei Loktionov, Adam Henrique, Michael Ryder and Dainius Zubrus scored for the Devils (1-4-3), who ended their worst start to a season with a laugher against the injury-depleted Rangers. New York (2-5) has only two wins on its season-opening, ninegame road trip.Capitals 4, Blue Jackets 1WASHINGTON Braden Holtby made 37 saves and Martin Erat assisted on three Washington goals in the Capitals 4-1 win over the Columbus Blue Jackets. Joel Ward and Brooks Laich scored in the second period for the Capitals, and Troy Brouwer and Alex Ovechkin gave Washington a cushion early in the third. Artem Anisimov spoiled Holtbys shutout at 15:05 of the third.Hurricanes 4, Islanders 3UNIONDALE, N.Y. Jiri Tlusty scored his first two goals of the season, and Cam Ward made 22 saves as the Carolina Hurricanes held on for a 4-3 win over the New York Islanders.Predators 2, Canadiens 1MONTREAL Seth Jones goal with 1:27 left spoiled a 35-save performance by Montreals Carey Price and helped the Nashville Predators beat the Canadiens 2-1. Nashville captain Shea Weber also scored for the Predators (4-3-1), who got 28 saves from Pekka Rinne. Brendan Gallagher scored the only goal for Montreal (4-3).Avalanche 4, Sabres 2BUFFALO, N.Y. Matt Duchene, Gabriel Landeskog and Ryan OReilly each had a goal and an assist to lead the Colorado Avalanche to a 4-2 win over the Buffalo Sabres. Paul Statsny also scored and Jean-Sebastien Giguere made 28 saves for the Avalanche, who bounced back from their first loss of the season against Detroit on Thursday. The Sabres remained winless in six home games after finishing up a stretch of four games in six days.Blackhawks 3, Maple Leafs 1 CHICAGO Bryan Bickell sparked Chicago's big second period with his first goal of the season, helping the Blackhawks beat Toronto. Brandon Pirri added a goal and an assist for the Blackhawks, who have won four of five. Michael Kostka scored his first career goal against his former team, and Corey Crawford had 19 saves. Toronto center Dave Bolland was scoreless in his first game in Chicago since he was traded to his hometown Maple Leafs in June. Nazem Kadri scored his third goal for the Maple Leafs, who have dropped two in a row.B6SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS 000G5GU Hosted by Voice for Children of North Central Florida Your tidbits of knowledge are a smart choice to improve the welfare of the children in the 5th judicial circuit under the auspicies of the Guardian ad Litem program. Enjoy an evening of food, music, trivia and prizes. Tickets are $25 per person and include food, beverages, one door prize ticket and participation in the game. Sat., Nov. 2, 2013, 6:00 p.m. American Legion, 10730 Hwy. 41, Dunnellon, FL Food donated by Harrys Seafood Bar & Grille, Ocala, FL Silent auction with many varied items. Call 352-362-5851 or 352-601.0115 for tickets or to donate an item for the silent auction. Join us for this fun, and often funny, evening to raise funds to benefit abuse and neglected children. 000GAMU The Sgt. Dennis James The Sgt. Dennis James Flanagan Foundation Flanagan Foundation Presents The 3rd Annual Never Forget 5K/ 1Mile Walk 9:00 am November 11, 2013 Historic Courthouse, Inverness The race will precede the Annual Veterans Day Parade. Stay for the parade after the race. $25 per entry all proceeds go to Sgt. Dennis James Flanagan Foundation For registration and more information visit www.NeverForget5K.com or call Marissa Balderas 620-4356 Dennis Flanagan 697-1815 Registration at 7am Race at 9am 000G8V1 000FVGP Bruins blank Tampa Bay Slam sends Sox to World Series Associated PressBostons Shane Victorino celebrates his grand slam Saturday night against the Detroit Tigers as he rounds first base in the seventh inning during Game 6 of the American League Championship Series in Boston. The slam put the Red Sox ahead 5-2. Boston won by that score and advances to the World Series to face the St. Louis Cardinals. See game story at www.chronicleonline.com.

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Section CSUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW It has taken many decades for me to fully understand that animals who live in households with humans eventually adopt their personalities. When someone tells me their dog is acting very crazy, I look closely at the human for signs of a breakdown. How appropriate it was this week that our 6-pound Yorkie welcomed a new boxer to the neighborhood by barking insanely at the newbie. We thought it would be good if Wilson, the 6-pound Yorkie, got to sniff the new boxer. The thought was that they would instantly become friends. Wilson wasnt interested in sniffing or being friends. Instead, when given the opportunity, Wilson ran out of the garage and tried to bite the much larger boxer on the foot. He could only reach the foot of the larger dog, so you bite what you can. The boxer did what any self-respecting boxer would do in such a circumstance: He tried to swallow Wilson. The end result of the neighborhood interaction was that Wilson had the opportunity to get reacquainted with his veterinarian and get his face stitched back together. As someone in the newspaper business, I often feel like the Yorkie (editorial writer) trying to bite the foot of a boxer (big-shot congressman who thinks shutting down the federal government is fine as long as he continues to get paid). Not a day goes by that I dont be a call from one politician or another that we dont see the issues the same way they do. They complain, they moan, they threaten and they hang up. If you have thin skin, you shouldnt get into this business. And the same thing goes for the politicians. If you run for public office, you have to remember that 25 percent of the public is going to hate you just because you are a politician. Toe biting as a profession; or, Wilson and the boxer See WINDOW/ Page C3 Its not a debate. The politicians arent here. Protesters, both for and against, have no stake other than their opinions.For 16 minutes, Floridas death penalty isnt a topic for the latest blog. Scientists, doctors and theologians dont weigh in. Newspapers arent writing fiery editorials. The lawyers are silent. Our eyes are fixed on the window, which is covered with a tan curtain. No one is talking or even whispering. A humming wall air conditioner provides the only sound. Reporters who have been here before wait patiently. Three of us, newcomers, nervously jot down observations. The room is just large enough to hold four rows of 10 chairs each. The chairs are like those found in a hotel conference hall. The victims immediate family sits in the first row. The second row has more family and other witnesses, including the former Citrus County sheriff. One man sits in the third row next to the wall. He is a staff escort and remains with the victims family. Reporters sit in a back row that is elevated about six inches. In all, there are 28 people in the room. There is little space between the first row and the window. I can see the reflections of their faces, Angela Crowleys sisters. Her older brother Chris, the family spokesman who has patiently offered his time to any reporter who asks, is in the center of the front row, just inches from the window. Suddenly the curtain rises, and the final chapter of a 27-year horror story is about to begin. If ever there was a random crime, this was it. Angela Crowley, 21, had just moved to Lauderdale Lakes from northern Illinois in December 1985. Memorial Day weekend 1986 she decided to visit a college friend who lived in Yankeetown. Thats a long haul for a young woman unfamiliar with Florida. It was the days before cellphones and GPS. She spoke with Chris the night before by phone and together they mapped out her route. Somewhere, she took a wrong turn and got lost. She called her friend from the exit at Wildwood. The friend said when Angela arrived at a certain gas station in Crystal River to call again and the friend would drive there. Angela could then follow her friend to Yankeetown. Associated PressChris Crowley, center, brother of Angie Crowley, who was raped and murdered by WilliamHapp in 1986, talks Tuesday with the media following the execution of WilliamHapp, at the Florida State Correctional facility near Starke. Mike WrightWRIGHT ON TARGET William Happ, meanwhile, was on the run. He faced robbery and kidnapping charges in California and had more than 30 arrests on his record. He was staying with a great aunt in Crystal River and walking to her house from a friends home. He walked past the Cumberland Farms store across from city hall just as Angela pulled in the parking lot. No one knows why Happ did what he did. He smashed the drivers window and strong-armed control of the car. He drove Angela to the Cross Florida Barge Canal, where he viciously beat her, twice raped her, and then strangled her with her own stretch pants. Happ threw her body in the canal, where a fisherman found it later that evening. Happ continued his life on the run. California authorities tried him in abstention for the robbery and kidnapping charges. Upon conviction, they asked the FBI to help find him. He was arrested in Pittsburgh, and returned to face a 10-year prison sentence. Thats when authorities matched his fingerprints with those found in Angelas car. He was arrested in December 1986 for Crowleys murder. Sheriff Charlie Dean traveled to Angelas small hometown of Oregon, Ill. about the size of Inverness to deliver the news to her mother and siblings. Happ was tried in 1989, the case being moved to Lake County because of pre-trial publicity. In July of that year, a judge sentenced him to death. See DEATH/ Page C3

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Page C2SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 With your help, vets made proudThe Florida Department of Agriculture, under the guidance of Commissioner Adam Putnam, started a program to honor our nations military veterans wounded during combat service to our nation. The program, named Operation Outdoor Freedom, is hosted by the Florida Forest Service and provides a series of private guided game hunts within our state forests. The Withlacoochee Forestry Center Team is a crucial participant in the program and has designed and mentored six game hunts that accommodate the various disabilities of these veterans. All of these hunts are conducted within special designated areas of the Withlacoochee State Forest. Much of the equipment and supplies for these hunt are provide by our local businesses whose donations have been a major factor to the success of these hunts and a rewarding and motivational experience for the participants. This years hunts are in the planning stages and we want to recognize and thank the following Citrus County businesses for their contributions to this valuable veterans program: Dan and Betty Ashley of Dans Gun Room and Mr. Mark Kelly of Kelly Pest Control. Your support and contributions are greatly appreciated toward making the 2013 Outdoor Freedom Project a success.Don Ruths Public information officer, Withlacoochee Forestry CenterWe will pay dearlyDont imagine you can hold back your boss from attacking tea-party people as the source of all problems with our government. Yes I know elections have consequences, but we all know government can be selective in what laws it enforces: God knows there are enough of them! As our government picks and chooses winners and losers for Obamacare, the little man will once again suffer from this abomination. Outside of major control of most of our economy, what will be the result of this program? My wife was in favor because it might help more people, but 30 million remain uninsured while the good, hard-working citizens of our country are faced with health care bills rising astronomically. When will the Chroniclestop straddling reality (with a pronounced left lean) and stand for most of the citizens of this county who are outraged by what is happening?Gene Musselman Hernando WASHINGTONMuch is wrong with Washington these days, including much of what is said about what is wrong. Many Americans say there is too much politics in Washington. Actually, there is too little. Barack Obama deplores politics as usual here. But recently Washington has been tumultuous because politics, as the Framers understood it, has disintegrated. Obama has been complicit in this collapse. His self-regard, the scale of which has a certain grandeur, reinforces progressivisms celebration of untrammeled executive power and its consequent disparagement of legislative bargaining. This is why Obamacare passed without a single vote from the opposition party and why it remains, as analyst Michael Barone says, the most divisive legislation since the 1854 KansasNebraska Act. Obama and his tea-party adversaries have something important in common disdain for the practice of politics within the Framers institutional architecture. He and they should read Jonathan Rauchs Rescuing Compromise in National Affairs quarterly. Politicians, Rauch notes, like other people, compromise because they have to, not because they want to. So Madison created a constitutional regime that by its structure created competing power centers and deprived any of them of the power to impose its will on the others. The Madisonian system, Rauch says, is both intricate and dynamic: Absent a rare (and usually unsustainable) supermajority, there is simply not much that any single faction, interest, or branch of government can do. Effective action in this system is nothing but a series of forced compromises. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents southwest Oklahoma and has a Ph.D. in British history and studied at the University of London, says some of his colleagues in the House of Representatives think they are in the House of Commons. That is, they have not accepted the fact that, in the Madisonian system, legislative and executive powers are separated. By this separation, Rauch writes, Madison built constant adjustment into the system. His Constitution is a dynamic political mechanism under which no faction ever prevails with finality. This is because there is no finality: Forcing actors to bargain and collaborate slows precipitous change while constantly making negotiators adjust their positions. ... The requirement to bargain and find allies provides new ideas and entrants with paths into politics and ways to shake up the status quo. But that same requirement prevents upheaval by ensuring that no one actor can seize control, at least not for long. Obama, who aspires to be Washingtons single actor, has said of his signature achievement: I would have loved nothing better than to simply come up with some very elegant, academically approved approach to health care, and didnt have any kinds of legislative fingerprints on it, and just go ahead and have that passed. But thats not how it works in our democracy. Unfortunately, what we end up having to do is to do a lot of negotiations with a lot of different people. Obama wanted something simple rather than a product of Madisonian complexity. He wanted something elegantly unblemished by any messy legislative involvement, other than Congress tug of the forelock at final approval. It is, Obama thinks, unfortunate that he had to talk to many people. He and some of his tea-party adversaries share an impatience with Madisonian politics, which requires patience. The tea partys reaffirmation of Madisons limited government project is valuable. Now, it must decide if it wants to practice politics. Rauch hopes there will be an intellectual effort to advance a principled, positive, patriotic case for compromise, especially on the right. He warns that Republicans, by their obsessions with ideological purity and fiscal policy, have veered in the direction of becoming a conservative interest group, when what the country needs is a conservative party. A party is concerned with power, understood as the ability to achieve intended effects. A bull in a china shop has consequences, but not power, because the bull cannot translate intelligent intentions into achievements. The tea party has a choice to make. It can patiently try to become the beating heart of a durable party, which understands this: In Madisonian politics, all progress is incremental. Or it can be a raging bull, and soon a mere memory, remembered only for having broken a lot of china. Conservatives who prefer politics over the futility of intransigence gestures in Madisons compromise-forcing system will regret the promise the tea party forfeited, but will not regret that, after the forfeiture, it faded away. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. Our chief want in life is somebody who shall make us do what we can.Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Conduct of Life, 1860 Obama, tea party of one mind CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief City must act on funding fire services Inverness City Council members cannot delay the inevitable any longer; they need to make a decision about how to provide fire services to the residents and businesses of the county seat. City officials, including Manager Frank DiGiovanni, are late in acting on whether to pay the county $349,000 to be covered under the countywide fire-assessment fee. Their inaction has the potential to cost the city greatly, both financially and in terms of public safety. At present, city taxpayers contribute $250,000 through ad valorem taxes to county fire services. The new Municipal Services Benefit Unit (MSBU) would ladle on the additional $349,000 for a total cost to the city of $599,000. Homeowners would pay a flat $54 annual fee, while commercial businesses would be charged on a sliding scale based on square footage. Thats a bundle of money but, consider the cost of opting out of the longtime relationship with fire services. Creating a fire department for the city means buying fire trucks and equipment, and funding facilities and personnel. Thats not a cheap proposition. Hiring a private outfit to fulfill the vital function would be costly, as well. The reality is, when Duke Energy slashed its tax payments in favor of a legal battle, every corner of Citrus County was financially wounded including Inverness. Grappling with that reality, county officials concluded the MSBU while not popular was the bitter pill necessary to restore a degree of financial stability for fire services. County officials are frustrated at rebuffed efforts to discuss the matter with the city manager and individual council members. It became apparent that requesting a spot on the councils meeting agenda would be necessary to make their pitch, which is what they did this past week. The council plans to discuss the issue further at a future meeting. Rather than giving the county a cold shoulder in efforts to discuss the MSBU, city officials should have been proactive and months ago sought details so a decision could have been made well in advance of the Oct. 1 start of the fiscal year. Due diligence in weighing the options and costs seems an afterthought at this point. If information presented to the council by Sheriff Jeff Dawsy whose agency encompasses fire services is accurate, the city of Inverness would fund 6 percent of the fire services budget while consuming 10 percent of demand. Manager DiGiovanni is known to point to the merits of compact urban growth and has indicated his belief that joining in the MSBU would subsidize residential sprawl. While thats good in theory, unincorporated communities including Beverly Hills, Citrus Hills and Sugarmill Woods are subject to the MSBU and residents in those densely populated areas help to support fire services in relatively sparsely populated areas. The message from the county to the city is: The cost of fire services has gone up due to financial crisis. Get on board with the MSBU, or dont but get a plan, because unincorporated Citrus County wont subsidize Inverness. THE ISSUE:Inverness and fire-services fee.OUR OPINION:City cant be subsidized. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including emailed letters.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Can we or cant we?Today in the Chronicle (Oct. 6), they had an article saying that were not allowed to go to Cuba and my understanding is that we are allowed to travel to Cuba at this point in time. Can somebody please explain which way it is? Because on the Internet they have airline tickets and everything to go there, so I would appreciate it if somebody could write in or explain that to me. Editors note:We did a little research and pretty much came to this answer: Yes and no. You can travel to Cuba for a specific purpose, such as a work-related matter, research or to visit a relative who lives there. You cant travel to Cuba as a vacation destination unless you travel with a licensed Cuban travel agency. Safe to say its complicated. Search for U.S. travel to Cuba restrictions on Google and youll get a better idea.Lights out = no treatsThis is for all trick-or-treaters. I dont care who you are, but please do not look in peoples homes for trick-or-treats this year and every year. And you know who you are and I dont care (if) its from Dunnellon, Crystal River, Inverness or wherever you guys came from. Please do not go in peoples windows and open the door and try to come in. That is very rude of you. So, parents, please tell them, when you dont see the lights, go to the next house.Steep retainerWhy on earth would we consider hiring outside counsel to represent Citrus County? The $8,000-per-month retainer is pretty steep for our small county and doesnt include any other fees they will charge for other services. Wouldnt an attorney from inside Citrus County be more prudent? THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE LATE TO SUPPER George WillOTHER VOICES

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COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 C3 Afew nights ago, I was browsing a website doing some research regarding genealogy. Just for the fun of it, I decided to see what they had on me. I was shocked to find out that I am a 68year-old man. I was also taken aback by seeing that my lovely Cheryl is a 65year-old woman. I know these things are true and have never been hesitant to write about our real ages, but it looks different when you see it on a website. Time has passed and the truth is the truth. Even so, most often, I dont see the years when I look at Cheryl, and, likewise, she seems to look beyond the white hair, wrinkles and paunchiness I have picked up during the time weve been together. Im not blind; my glasses work just fine. Im not deaf, not anymore; I have hearing aids and they work, too. Though this might be open for debate, I dont think Im nuts. I know that we are both well into our senior years. But my wife still gets unanticipated attention from men of all ages. For a number of years, I let this bother me, probably more than I should have. I felt a combination of offense and pride, but until relatively recently, I was often more offended than proud. Please dont misunderstand: Only very infrequently has someone said anything even close to being inappropriate, and Cheryl has always been capable of putting any such someone in his place on those rare occasions when I have not been at her elbow to give a look of disapproval which would make the devil himself flee. Nowadays, I suppose maybe Ive mellowed. There are still times when a flirtatious comment to my wife will make my face turn red and the hair on the back of my neck stand up, but more often than not, I simply find it a point of pride and will reach down, grasp her hand and wholeheartedly agree with the fellow who has paid her a compliment without being so concerned about whether or not he was hitting on her and disrespecting me. Case in point: On the evening of our recent wedding anniversary aboard ship, Cheryl and I dressed to the nines to go to dinner. A young man who could not have been more than 40 looked up as Cheryl and I stepped onto the elevator with him. I suspect it was without even thinking that he gazed at Cheryls face, and then automatically, glanced full-length at her hair, and the way she was dressed, saying, Stunning, simply stunning! Cheryl, somewhat bemused, smiled and replied, Well, thank you, thats very kind. And I, feeling that absolutely no offense was intended, proudly placed my arm gently around her shoulders and said, She is, isnt she, son? The young man, by then obviously a little embarrassed by his unchecked expression of admiration of a very married woman who was no doubt old enough to be his mother, responded, Yes, sir, she really is.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE Stunning, simply stunning after all these years Death-sentence appeals are common and lengthy. Happ raised all sorts of defenses, from suspect evidence to ineffective defense attorneys. Courts swatted aside each and every one. Gov. Rick Scott signed Happs death warrant two months ago. In September, at a hearing to determine if more appeals were forthcoming, Happ, now 51, told a judge he was ready to die. William Happ lies strapped to a gurney, facing the window. A white sheet is pulled up to his lower neck. There are mirrors above his head and to his right that face at a downward angle. The room is white, clean and void of any clutter. On the wall is a digital clock that reads 6:00. Along with the execution warden, two others are in the room. They are Florida Department of Law Enforcement officers on hand to make written notes of the execution. There is no recording equipment. There is also a wall phone, which the execution warden picks up to call the governors office. We cant hear the conversation, but it concludes in just a few seconds. There is no stay. The staff escort seated in the third row leans up to turn off the air conditioner. The public-address system is turned on and we can hear the execution warden ask Happ if he has any last words. He says yes and then, in a clear voice loud enough for all to hear, he gives it up. To my agonizing shame I must confess to this terrible crime, he says. I wish to offer my most sincere, heartfelt apology. The reporters scribble with pencils on yellow pads provided by the prison. We were not allowed to bring in our own pads or recorders. Happ goes on: I have prayed for the good Lord to forgive me for my sins, but I can understand why those here cannot. Then concludes: I pray the Lord grants peace to all. Amen. With that, the warden announces that the execution will now begin. Happ is the first person executed for a Citrus County murder in nearly 70 years. He isnt the first in that time sentenced to die. Others either had their sentences reduced on appeal to life in prison. John Couey, Jessica Lunsfords killer, died in prison of cancer. Serial killer Aileen Wournos victims included a Citrus County man and one of her murders occurred in Citrus County. But the specific case for which she was executed in 2002 was for a Dixie County murder. The death-row roster of 404 inmates currently includes one Citrus County man. John Campbell, convicted of killing his father, was sentenced to death in March of this year. Each execution typically has six media witnesses. Even though I missed the deadline to register by two weeks, the Department of Corrections graciously added me literally the day before the execution because of a longstanding rule that witnesses include a media member from the county where the crime occurred. Though the case was not widely known, Happs execution received some statewide coverage because of a new drug untried in executions being administered to render the prisoner unconscious prior to the drugs that result in paralysis and cardiac arrest. The PA system goes off. We barely can see a room off the side where executioners will administer the drugs through an IV attached to Happs arms. His eyes close, and then reopen. Then close and, a moment or two later, reopen, then close. Happs mouth opens slight and his head falls back. We see his chest begin to rise and fall slowly, then more quickly. The execution warden, standing next to the gurney, occasionally checks the IV drip. He leans over and presses gently on Happs shoulders and touches his eyelids. Ten minutes into the execution, Happs head begins to move, his neck stretching slightly. I see him swallow once, and then again a moment later. His breathing appears to stop. From behind another curtain, which I hadnt even noticed until just then, a doctor steps in. He shines a penlight into Happs eyes, and uses a stethoscope to check for any pulse or heartbeat. The doctor says something to the warden and leaves behind the same curtain he came in through. The PA is back on. The warden faces the window and states: The sentence of the State of Florida vs. William F. Happ was concluded at 6:16 p.m. The window is closed once again. A door opens and witnesses file out. First family and friends, and then, after theyre gone, the reporters. A van drives us back to a media staging area across the street where we wait for the Angela Crowleys family to make a statement. They arrive about 45 minutes later. Chris Crowley thanks the prison system, victim advocates and the media for their compassion and understanding. He concludes his statement and begins to walk away, where an Associated Press reporter and I follow him. He thanks us again, says it was a pleasure meeting us. I ask what he thinks about Happs statement and he expresses shock that he made one. Chris thinks Happs apology was self-serving, and he does not forgive Happ for murdering his sister. I get in my car and drive 10 miles down a dark two-lane country road to Starke, where I go to a McDonalds to file my story. Then its the drive south on U.S. 301, where I have lots of time to think. People want to know what the execution was like. This is what I say: It was very real. It was somber. It was spiritual. It was an intensely private time that I had the extraordinary privilege to witness. Look: I write about politics for a living. Its hard to separate fact from fantasy. Theres a lot of smoke and mirrors. Its plastic. Not so Tuesday, where a sheet of window divided two very diverse and absolute circumstances. On one side were siblings, aunts and uncles of a young woman brutally murdered. On the other was a killer paying the ultimate price for his crime. There was no filter. No closed-circuit television. No spin, no press release. Neither tweets nor Facebook. It was all right there. On Monday, a few co-workers worried I would have nightmares. A close friend said she hoped I wouldnt fall into a depression after watching a man die. So far none of that has happened, and I dont expect it. I do feel much more grateful about being alive. I love my friends and family, and Tuesday night I hugged my cat, which meowed and jumped away. And Im looking at the world a little different today. Dont involve me in a deathpenalty debate, because Im not interested. Its all noise. News stories are based on facts and these are the facts: Fact one: William Happ raped and murdered Angela Crowley in 1986 in Crystal River. Fact two: Happ was tried and convicted in 1989, and sentenced to death. Fact three: Happ was executed by lethal injection Oct. 15, 2013, at Florida State Prison in Starke. Case closed. DEATHContinued from Page C1 I have to admit, just like my toe-biting Yorkie, some of us in this business have a tendency to bite the toe first before asking any question. The Chroniclesown Mike Wright actually lives on a steady diet of politician toes. Personally, I have never met a congressman that doesnt deserve to have at least one toe bitten. As the newspaper world transitions to a digital form, citizens of this great country should remember the role played by an independent newspaper. Its all about biting toes and kicking other body parts of those in positions of power. There always needs to be someone independent looking over the shoulder of those making the big decisions. Ive worked with senior reporter Mike Wright for 25 years and I dont have any idea if hes a Democrat or a Republican. The same goes for the rest of the crew. At a newspaper its not about political affiliation, its about holding people accountable. Too much of todays information flows to us from politically tainted organizations such as Fox News on the right and MSNBC on the left. I fear for the country if we digress to the point where all of our information comes to us from political organizations. The problems we had in Washington over the past month happened because elected officials have limited their information input to people and organizations they agree with. I enjoy biting toes and believe that even while technology changes the way news is delivered, weve got to protect the role of the local newspaper. In every community in this country, we need news organizations that are willing to independently challenge those who make the rules. And while I am not happy that Wilson bit the toe of the neighbors boxer, I am proud that hes my dog. We both bite toes and live with the consequences. Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan @chronicleonline.com. WINDOWContinued from Page C1 In William Happs handwritten final statement, he confesses to the crime, apologizes to Angela Crowleys family and asks God for forgiveness.

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CMH saved husbands lifeI would like to thank the Citrus Memorial hospital emergency room workers who saved my husbands life on July 29, 2013. He came in with a headache, very severe headache, and Citrus Memorial was right on top of it. They immediately got him a CAT scan and diagnosed a brain bleed and immediately Life Flighted him to Shands hospital. We need to focus on saving the lives of people and quit this nonsense thats been happening for years on Citrus Memorial hospitals boards. Get together and save lives. Thanks much, HarleyKudos to Harley Lawrence on his great letter entitled I have earned my keep. Harley provides a great service in his letters and we appreciate all hes done, including his service in the military. Thank you so much, Harley, and keep up the good work.Ask me!To Cal Thomas, who believes a government-run health care system in the United States could not be successful: How about Medicare and Medicaid? What would we do without them? And when he says 54 percent of Americans disapprove of Obamacare, whom did they ask? I was never asked. They should ask the people who dont have any health insurance. And thank you, Chronicle, for givingus the number to call if you dont have a computer.Horse hockey!This new texting ban is a lot of horse hockey. If the police cannot pull over someone who is texting and driving when they see them, then what good is it going to do? Basically, youre just telling them you can do it til you get caught.Quite a rainbow!What a beautiful rainbow appeared over Citrus County this Monday morning (Oct. 7). It appeared that one end started at the Duke Energy plant and the other end terminated at the county tax appraisers office.Courtesy, pleaseIm wondering why it is in this particular area, the people in business, and that includes the county government definitely the county government employees when they ask to speak to you as an individual, they know your name but they have no simple courtesy of identifying themselves unless you ask them. This is not business procedure. Come on, people, wake up.Landscapers onlyIm calling about these people buying these open trailers. Those open trailers are for landscapers only. When we go out there and try to find trailers, we cant get them because the general public are buying them all. I need one now and cant find one. You have to be a landscaper to buy a landscaping trailer.Get insideThe people that are parents of the children thats in the 4-H drill team with the horses have to practice outside in the rain and I think they ought to be able to use the fairgrounds because theyll have some kind of protection there if it does rain. And I thought that the fairgrounds belonged to the county and this is not a profit organization. So lets see if we can get that done. They need to be practicing inside the fairgrounds.Give away canes, walkersMany people donate walkers, canes, wheelchairs to churches on the death of a family member. After receiving one or two (how many can you use), it would be a kind gesture to give them to thrift shops, Hospice, Key Center, etc., for sale to the public at a greatly reduced price. Some people do not have health insurance and these items are very costly when purchased new.Not on his radarIts interesting the comment made today about Mr. Damato talking about water-quality projects and this person was asking why he doesnt do something about stopping people from getting these 176,000 gallons of water from us daily. My question is, do you expect Damato to really take interest in that? I think that doesnt fall within his bailiwick.Bet on itVarious newspapers and media outlets are reporting that the Legislature is considering expanding gambling in Florida. I think thats a great idea. Im not a heavy gambler, just a moderate gambler. Used to go down to Tampa Hard Rock, but they did away with all the comps. They dont give you any more free lunch. They dont give you any more free transportation. But if they did their homework and see how many people leave the state, going to Biloxi and other areas out of the state of Florida to gamble, and think of all that revenue thats leaving the state so people can go gambling. And every once in a while you see people talking about bringing gambling to Citrus County, which I wouldnt want up at the mall, but they have it on their mind. And if they continue to leave the state and continue to spend their money elsewhere, thats less money that we have in this state. Think about it.GrasswalkId like to sound off on your (State Road) 44, the new sidewalk they put up. Its been over a month now that the grass has been like 3 foot high, in some areas 4 foot high. And when they cut it, they cut it into the sidewalk. Right now presently, you have weeds covering from one side to the other. They had cut the grass and you cannot even see the sidewalk. Im talking about between Highview Avenue in Lecanto all the way out to (S.R.) 44. It is horrible, horrible. You cant even walk on it without getting sandspurs in your feet when you walk with sandals. Its going on a month and a half now like that or more. Its horrible what theyre doing over there.How about howdy?I have the fun fact of today: When the first regular phone service was established in 1878, people said, Ahoy, not Hello. Harley is the manHarley Lawrence for president. Yes, sir.Not convincedConcerning Prosecutor: Adams allegations a bunch of hooey: I think where theres smoke, theres fire. And why didnt the state attorney step aside for clarity and let somebody else check it out? Put down the phoneIn answer to the person who called in saying its not illegal to text and drive: Its not correct as of Oct. 1. If you were almost killed by a person texting, you would think otherwise. I was coming up Cutler Spurwhen I saw a girl coming from U.S. 19 going west and had no idea she was approaching a stop sign. Her head was down texting.I b lasted the horn and swerved over and I waited for the crash. Fortunately, she was able to stop right next to my car. It left me shaking but thankful I was alive.Watching my mouthMr. Editor, can you help this senior citizen? I need to learn how to be more diplomatic in anything I say or do. Is there a class in college or online that I can take to help learn that method? I thank you for your help.C4SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY 000GE8D 000GE8D Insurance Inspections Dryer Vent Cleaning Additions Garages Kitchens Baths License # CBC1252474 License # CBC1252474 000G4UL 3 678910 13 14 15 16 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 26 25 24 23 22 28 21 20 27 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Sunday Saturday 2 1Columbus Day Halloween30 31 29National Boss Day Sweetest Day 000GDSROct 20 Oct 31 10:00 am Nature Coast EMS Stocking Up For SeniorsVarious locations in the county Contact Phone: 352-249-4730 Oct 20 9AM-6PMRotary of Kings Bay Sportsmans ShowcaseKings Bay Plaza Crystal RiverContact Phone: 352-601-8672Oct 21 4PM-6PMCity of Crystal River Parrot Heads in the ParkCrystal River Gazebo behind City HallContact Phone: 794-7455 Or 422-6700Oct 22City of Inverness Cooter Queen and Cooter Idol FinalsDowntown InvernessContact Phone: 352.726.2611 Ext 1304Oct 24 26Crystal Automotive/Save Crystal River 2013 Crazy on Country Fall FestivalRock Crusher Canyon & PavilionContact Phone: 352-400-4776Oct 25 7:00 pmFriends of Crystal River State Parks Inc. Haunted HalloweenCrystal River State Park Visitor Center Fee: $5 (adults) Contact Phone: 352-563-0450Oct 25 7PM-11PMCity of Inverness Cooter Rock the BlockDowntown InvernessContact Phone: 352.726.2611 Ext 1304Oct 25 Dec 16We Care Food Pantry 3rd Annual Online and Live AuctionOnline at www.natlauctions.com Contact Phone: 352-382-2528Oct 26 9AM-3PMCitrus County Gator Club 1st Annual Poker RunFloral City Park Entrance Fee: $10Contact Phone: 212-3365Oct 26 9:00 amRotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Golfing For KidsSouthern Woods Golf Club Entrance Fee: $60 for one Golfer/$200 for a foursomeContact Phone: 352-382-3366Oct 26 6:00 pmCollege of Central Florida Taste of CFCollege of Central Florida Citrus CampusEntrance Fee: $100 per person or $1250 for a table sponsorContact Phone: (352) 854-2322 Ext. 1436Oct 26 2:30PMNature Coast Community Band Veterans Appreciation Concert, NCCBFirst Methodist Church, HomosassaContact Phone: (352)795-7000 As part of the Citrus County Chronicles partnership with The Festival of the Arts, local high school students decorated 8 newspaper boxes that will be displayed during the Festival of The Arts scholarship social and festival. As part of Art Outside the Box, you can vote online for your favorite painted newspaper box. Online voting runs from October 21 through November 3, 2013. On November 4, the first, second and third place winners will be announced. All of the painted boxes will be placed throughout Citrus County. Crest School Citrus High School Citrus High School Lecanto High School Lecanto High School Lecanto High School Crystal River High School Crystal River High School 000GCPZ SoundOFF

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BUSINESSSection DSUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports MONDAYWASHINGTON National Association of Realtors releases existing home sales for September. TUESDAYWASHINGTON Labor Department releases employment data for September, 8:30 a.m. WEDNESDAYBERLIN The German government presents its updated forecast for growth in the country, Europes biggest economy. WEDNESDAYBRUSSELS European Union leaders open a two-day summit to center on the economy and soaring unemployment. It will also look at recent tragedies involving migrants trying to get into the EU. Citrus, vegetables had a good 2012 in Florida Associated PressST. PETERSBURG Floridas Department of Agriculture released a 180-page report Friday showing that citrus fruits, snap beans and cucumbers grown in the Sunshine State are among the industrys highlights. The report reveals the sweep of the states agriculture industry; its the second-largest industry in the state, behind tourism. Agriculture contributes $104 billion to the states economy annually and employs 2 million people. Theres still a great deal of resiliency and strength in the overall Florida agricultural marketplace, said Dan Sleep, a senior analyst for agriculture department. In the past 10 years, Florida blueberries have gone from a $10 million industry into a $65 million industry, he said, largely due to the fact that farmers are planting heat-resistant and hardy berry bushes. The data used to develop the estimates in the report were provided voluntarily by growers, shippers, and processors. According to the report, Florida:Is first in the nation in the value of production of oranges, grapefruit, fresh market snap beans, cucumbers for fresh market, cucumbers for pickles, squash, sweet corn, fresh market tomatoes, sugarcane for sugar and watermelons. Ranks second to California in the total value of fresh market vegetable production, with $1.1 billion worth of veggies produced. Ranks seventh in the nation for agricultural exports; the state exported $4 billion worth of commodities. Fresh and frozen meat, along with vegetables, were the top products sent to other countries. Oil rises above $101 as growth rebounds NEW YORK The price of oil rebounded to above $101 a barrel Friday, boosted by a bounce in Chinas economic growth and as traders awaited the release of official figures on U.S. stockpiles of crude and gasoline. By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark crude for November delivery was up 68 cents at $101.35 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. On Thursday, the contract dropped $1.62 to close at $100.67 as investors assessed the economic impact of the 16-day government shutdown that ended after an eleventh hour budget deal late the day before. Brent crude, the international benchmark, was up 93 cents at $110.04 a barrel on the ICE futures exchange in London. China growth shores up world markets LONDON News of a rebound in Chinas economy shored up markets on Friday at the end of a volatile week that saw the U.S. veer dangerously close to defaulting on some of its debts. In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares was up 0.5 percent at 6,611 while Germanys DAX rose 0.3 percent to 8,839. The CAC-40 in France was 0.9 percent higher at 4,276. Earlier in Asia, Hong Kongs Hang Seng closed up 1.1 percent at 23,340.10 and Chinas Shanghai Composite Index added 0.4 percent to 2,193.78. Australias S&P/ASX 200 rose 0.7 percent to 5,321.50. Japans Nikkei 225 bucked the trend, dropping 0.2 percent to 14,561.54. INVERNESS utinsky, chief of the medical staff at Citrus Memorial Health System, is teaming with David Wells, director of diagnostic imaging, to develop a Center for Breast Cancer Excellence at the medical office building across from Citrus Memorial hospital. The idea is take unused space on the second floor for breast cancer diagnosis, testing, consultation and navigating all in one place. That would remove the mixing of breast cancer patients with all others who are receiving X-rays or diagnostic scans on the medical office buildings first floor. This is one of those areas with a lot of anxiety, When insurance runs outNew center aims to provide personal care MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleCharles Nutinsky, right, chief of the medical staff at Citrus Memorial Health System, is teaming with David Wells, left, director of diagnostic imaging, to develop a Center for Breast Cancer Excellence. LECANTO A woman facing breast cancer has a lot on her mind: prognosis, treatment, side effects. And finances. Wendy Hall knows all about that. As the cancer navigator at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Hall tries to steer patients toward financial remedies that will help them pay what traditional insurance doesnt cover. I see patients all day, every day, she said. Hall offered some tips for patients and their families hoping to avoid financial stress of treatment:Doctors at the oncology institute place treatment first, payment later. Other physicians may use a similar philosophy. Here we treat them always, Hall said. We dont Features by Mike Wright Staff writer We plan to do the footwork, the legwork and the phone work for the patient. Dr. Charles Nutinsky chief of the medical staff at Citrus Memorial Health System Dr. Charles Nutinsky thinks the most personal cancer should be treated in a most personal way. See FINANCES/ Page D4 See CENTER/ Page D4 Investment style sets pension decisions DEAR BRUCE: My husband recently passed away. Soon I will be receiving his pension. My husband would have turned 65 years old this month; he never collected any of this. I will be 64 years old in October. My options are to receive $37,000 in one lump sum or to get $221 a month for the rest of my life. My mom is 93 years old, so there is longevity on my side. Which should I choose? R.R., via email DEAR R.R.: First of all, if you take the $37,000, you have to invest it quite aggressively in order to give you a higher return. Keep in mind that the principal will become part of your estate. In other words, if you take the lump sum and pass away early, youll leave a bigger estate. That would be far less important than what is best for you. It all comes back to what you would do with the money. If you are an aggressive investor, you might want to consider taking the lump sum, but in the absence of that, I would be more comfortable with the lifetime annuity. DEAR BRUCE: I was wondering how a person goes about buying a share of stock. Who do I contact? Liz, via email DEAR LIZ: Do you mean a share of stock or do you mean making an investment in the stock market? If you are buying only a share or two, See MONEY/Page D4

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Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association MemberSPOTLIGHT Bob Tsacrios Plumbing 352-795-0744 www.BobTPlumbing.comType of Business: Residential & Commercial PlumbingEmployee Name & Title: Robert Tsacrios, PresidentNumber of Years in Business: 17.Community/Organizational Involvement: CCBA Member for 10 years. Proud supporters of: Homosassa River Fireworks Festival, We Care Food Pantry, Homosassa Christmas Boat Parade, Jessies Place Beat the Sheriff Race, Boys and Girls Clubs of Citrus County, Hospice House of Citrus County and countless youth soccer teams over the years.What do you love about your work? What we at Bob Tsacrios Plumbing love most about our work is helping our customers. When we get a call from a homeowner in distress, whether about a toilet stoppage or water heater flooding their garage ... whatever the emergency might be, our greatest enjoyment is receiving the positive feedback from our customers about how we made their day just a little better.What do you love about this county? We love many things about this county, just to name a couple; Homosassa Springs Wild Life Park and We Care Food Pantry. We work with the Homosassa Springs Wild life park and have helped them with repairing the manatee pools. We appreciate the work We Care Food Pantry does to help this county. We love running a business on the gulf coast. Many of the employees at Bob Tsacrios Plumbing spend their weekends in the Gulf, scalloping or fishing. The Citrus County Builders Association is pleased to present the 2013 Florida Public Utilities Community Showcase, to run from 9a.m. to 3p.m. Saturday, Nov.16, at the National Guard Armory in Crystal River. This all-new showcase of community businesses and organizations will feature fantastic exhibits, both inside and outside: the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Rollover Simulator, the Citrus County Sheriffs Office Fire Rescue Fire Safety House and Fantastic Face Art by Anne Adams (sponsored by Porters Locksmithing). The CCBA will accept donations of new, unwrapped toys during the show as well, for our Annual Building a Better Christmas Toys for Tots Distribution. Consumers have one day only to take advantage of showcasespecific offers, hourly door prize giveaways and varied types of free classes that will be offered throughout the day. Entrance to this event is totally free! Classes and times will be posted on the Community Showcase page of www.CitrusBuilders.com and on the Citrus Community Showcase Facebook Page. Businesses and vendors wishing to be showcased in this event may contact Executive Officer Donna Bidlack at the Citrus County Builders Association anytime 9a.m. to 3p.m. Monday through Friday by calling 352-7469028. Exhibitor space is also available for online registration on the CCBAs website at www. CitrusBuilders.com. Be sure to visit these fine community businesses at the 2013 Florida Public Utilities Community Showcase: AAA Auto Club AAA Roofing Inc. Audibel Hearing Centers Bay Area Air Conditioning Bayside Realty LLC Blackshears II Aluminum Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County Citrus County Builders AssociationCitrus County ChronicleCitrus County Fire Rescue Fire Safety House Citrus Pest Management City Electric Supply Claypool Window Film Coating Systems Inc. Colony Stone & Plastering Duke Energy FDLE Rollover Simulator Florida Pest Control Florida Public Utilities Freedom Health Care FWH & Associates Gulf Coast Ready Mix The Hagar Group Hometown Values Magazine Mike Scott Plumbing Nature Coast EMS Nick Nicholas Ford LInc.oln Pinecrest Building Corp Pinecrest Pools & Spas Inc. Porters Locksmithing Quality Crafted Builders Robert Boissoncault Oncology Institute Solar Controllers Suncoast Plumbing & ElectricThe Village Crier newspaper Tropical Window Inc. White Aluminium Ziggys Haven Bird Sanctuary Showcasing the community The CCBAs October Gener al Membership Mixer will be Ro-Mac Night from 6 to 8p.m. Thursday, Oct.24, sponsored by member Ro-mac Lumber & Supply. This mixer, featuring Kers Wing House, is open to all Citrus County builders and businesses. No cost to attend. The Citrus County Builders Association and F lorida Public Utilities will host a Chamber Mixer on Thursday, Nov.14, at the Citrus County Builders Association. Join us for networking, hors doeuvres and information about the upcoming Community Showcase scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 16. No cost to attend. The CCBA annual Building a Better Christmas/T oys for Tots gift distribution will be held on Friday, Dec.13, at the Citrus County Builders Association for pre-approved recipients. Applications for this assistance can be obtained onlineat www.CitrusBuilders.com, or in person at the Air Care Heating & Cooling office or the Citrus County Builders Association starting Monday, Oct.28. The 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing has been scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 22, at the Inverness Golf & Country Club with proceeds to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Sponsorships and entries are open now at www. CitrusBuilders.com or contact Executive Officer Donna Bidlack at 352746-9028 with any questions. The 2014 CCBA Annual F amily Fishing Tournament sponsored by Exclusive Platinum Sponsor FDS Disposal Inc., will be April 26 and 27 at the Homosassa Riverside Resort with a portion of the proceeds to benefit the Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart. Sponsorships are open now and official registration is expected to open by November of this year. For more information contact Executive Officer Donna Bidlack at 352-7469028. Florida Public Utilities will offer two free Do It Yourself Energy Audit Classes at 9:30a.m. and 1:30p.m. Saturday, Nov.16, at the 2013 Florida Public Utilities Community Showcase. The class, taught by Scott Ranck, will help all participants be energy-savvy enough to not get caught in scams. It will teach some basic building science, such as: where the low-hanging fruit is, why much information on energy efficiency on the internet doesnt apply to Florida and much more. It will be a learning time for every one present and they will leave better equipped to do their own energy audit on their homes. They will know what upgrades will make the most sense for them. Scott Ranck started his career in building with two years of training at Williamsport Community College, now Pennsylvania College of Technology. Mr. Ranck was involved with both residential and commercial construction for the next 20 years. He has now directed his building background toward becoming a resource on residential and commercial energy issues. Mr. Ranck is a state-certified level 1 energy rater, an ENERGY STAR Rating Partner, a small commercial and public building energy rater and attained his CEM (Certified Energy Manager) and CEA (Certified Energy Auditor) through the Association of Energy Engineers. He is employed by Florida Public Utilities Company. Mr. Ranck chairs the Florida Natural Gas Associations Energy Code Team. He is a founding board member and acting President of the Building Energy Assessment Professionals, a Florida registered trade association. Mr. Ranck has done energy presentations for builders, builder associations, architects, utilities, and energy conferences. CCBA annual awards Associate of the Year Past President John Osborne of Pinecrest Building Corp. presents Immediate Past Associate Vice President Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix with the 2013 Associate of the Year Award.VIP of the YearImmediate Past Associate Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix thanks John Porter of Porters Locksmithing for a year of dedicated service with the 2013 VIP of the Year Award. Membership Chairman Wayne Bardsley of Quality Crafted Builders welcomes new member Mathew Baillargeon of The Village Crier newspaper to the CCBA family. New member Logo courtesy of Sew Be It Embroidery and Screen Printing Learn DIY energy auditing Jim Blackshear Scott Ranck, state-certified level 1 energy rater. Builder of the YearSecond Associate Vice President Ken Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Corp. presents President Bill Larder of Larder & Sons Construction with the 2013 Builder of the Year Award.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D3 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. New Image Award for OctoberFranklin Anderson Gallery of Art 659 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River 352-697-2702 FranklinAnderson Gallery.comPerson of the YearRay Chirayath 352-400-4051Outstanding Small BusinessLaura Lou Fitzpatrick, Heritage House 657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River 352-564-1400EDC Appreciation AwardsRusty Skinner of Workforce Connection John SiefertOutstanding Employer or Corporate CitizenPlantation at Crystal River 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River 352-795-4211 www.plantationon crystalriver.com Dragon Boat Festival under a month away Chamber Chat presenters share ideas for future of Citrus County The inaugural Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Race is set for Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Lake Hernando Park, 3699 E. Orange Drive, and Hernando. Each team will race a minimum of three times per day. Corporate teams will be on a 300meter course and the Club teams will be racing on 100-meter, 300-meter and 500-meter courses. Eligible teams may enter into race the 2,000meter around the island course. Registration is open through Nov. 8. Calling all food and craft vendors: Vendor special rate: $50 for business booth and $25 for nonprofit booth. More information and to register, visit http://www.lakehernando dragonboat.com, call 813-426-3544 or email Christine@ highfivedragonboats.com. Chamber Chat guest this week are continuing to Fire Up Citrus! with their ideas to help move the county forward. This discussion will followup with presenters Rebecca Martin, No Wrong Door; Jarrod McAllister, Veteran Village; Theresa Foster, Choose Citrus: The Power of One; and Harold Walker, the Movie Industry to Promote Citrus County. The last segment will discuss upcoming fundraiser for the Friends of Crystal River, National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Autumn Fantasy, Nov. 3, 2013. ATM Auctions & Antiques LLC811 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River 352-795-2061 www.charliefudge.com Antiques, auctions, estate services with approximately six high-end auctions per year. Chamber welcomes new members with ribbon-cuttings From left: Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Amy Stalker, owner; Chris Burns, Tammy Fudge, customers and Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers. Note the Auction is Oct. 26 at 10 a.m. with a preview on Friday Oct. 27. Iris Rodgers, Rodan and Fields independent consultant 352-201-7901 www.rodgers.myrandf.com Rodan and Fields skin care consultant FIRE UP CITRUS!The EDC thanks and recognizes John Mitten, owner/operator of Chik-fil-A of Hernando County; Ann Marie Briercheck, Tuscany on the Meadows; Roy Zachry, audio and visual; Denny Bell; and Excel Printing. We also thank our presenters: Patricia Thomas, Kiley Phillips, Noah MacGinnis, Dr. Paresh Desai, Ray Chirayath, Jarrod McAllister, Harold Walker, ArbuthBumgarner, Art Jones, Scott Baggerly, Dennis Blauer, Richard Fernley, DuWayne Sipper and Theressa Foster. 31ST ANNUAL AWARDS APPRECIATION LUNCHEONEDC Board President Joe Meek, along with Executive Director Don Taylor, congratulate all the outstanding honorees for their accomplishments. Pictured from left: Joe Meek, Josh Wooten, Rusty Skinner and Don Taylor. The EDC thanks Carol Kimbrough of Specialty Gems for hosting a memorable mixer that featured the Lenny Damron Vintage Car Collection. Specialty Gems is located at 600 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River, and can be reached at 352-795-5900. At right are Carol and Ed of Specialty Gems. Below, Jim Kimbrough, chairman and CEO of SunTrust Bank/Nature Coast, left, poses with Chamber CEO/President Josh Wooten. And the EDC thanks our sponsors: Duke Energy Workforce Connection Health & Wellcare Services of Florida Superior Residences/ Sunflower Springs Citrus County Sheriffs Office Insurance Resources & Risk Management Specialty Gems Sibex Crystal Automotive Hometown Values College of Central Florida Citrus 95.3 Job Site Services Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Insight Credit Union F.D.S. Disposal, Inc. ABOVE: Laura Lou Fitzpatrick, Josh Wooten and Don Taylor. BELOW: Josh Wooten, left, and Don Tayor pose with Person of the Year Ray Chirayath, center. Front row, from left: Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Bill Rodgers; Iris Rodgers, owner. Second row, from left: Mona Marshall, HR Power; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel. Third row, from left: Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers; Terry Jolley; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics. Last row, from left: Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; and Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing.

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D4SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBUSINESS Nutinsky said, referring to women faced with breast cancer. We want to be patientfriendly with convenient services available. He added: This should be smooth and pleasant as humanly possible. We want to take the fear and anxiety of this as we possibly can. Nutinsky said the breast center is modeled after one he experienced in Pinellas County at the Largo Medical Center owned, coincidentally, by Hospital Corporation of America, the successful bidder for Citrus Memorial. While all forms of cancer are traumatic, health care experts say breast-cancer patients feel more comfortable in private settings. Breast cancer is almost a separate category, Nutinsky said. Right now all diagnostic imaging at the medical office building occurs in one place. All patients share the same waiting room and, while mammography has its own small corridor, breast-cancer patients mingle with all others. That wont be the case for the new center. Instead, breast-cancer patients will take the elevator to the second floor where equipment and specialists are on hand to serve their needs. Well do everything but surgery, Nutinsky said. Much of the equipment needed will simply be relocated to the second floor. Wells said he will need a new ultra sound machine because the one on the first floor performs other scans other than just breast cancer. A radiologist will be on hand full time, as will a surgeon for consultation purposes. The hospital will hire a nurse navigator to help patients schedule appointments. We plan to do the footwork, the legwork and the phone work for the patient, Nutinsky said. The project cost, including construction and equipment, is about $250,000. Citrus Memorial already has an acclaimed breast imaging program. The American College of Radiation awarded Citrus Memorial as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence designation in June. Wells said they hope to have the new center up and running by January. We think it will appeal to people, Nutinsky said. Theyll be with people essentially in the same boat. bill anybody until the end. The reason is obvious: Physicians want their patients to receive the necessary treatment. Some people dont get chemotherapy because they fall through the cracks with a payment source, she said.Take advantage of payment plans. Manufacturers of chemotherapy that is tailored specifically to a patients treatment often provide payment plans, Hall said. Often times a doctors office will do the paperwork for a patient applying for financial assistance from drug companies, she said.Some not-for-profits raise money to help pay for mammograms or treatment. Hall specifically mentioned the Michelle-OGgram, a Dunnellon-based organization that raises money through community donations to help breast cancer patients with medical tests. To learn more, go to www. michelelogram.com.Take charge and continue asking about financial assistance. People should be their own advocate or have an advocate, which is what I do, she said. Things are changing all the time. We have to keep looking for the resources to make things work. CENTERContinued from Page D1 FINANCESContinued from Page D1 a broker will tell you what companies allow you to do that. I dont understand why you would buy one or two shares, though, unless its a gift to a child to encourage him or her to learn how more about the market. If you are asking how you can invest in the market, you most certainly should contact a broker. I would encourage you to begin studying the market by reading the business section of your daily newspaper in order to get a better understanding. DEAR BRUCE: When someone passes away with no assets other than annuities and several retirement accounts, all of which have his three children as beneficiaries, is it necessary to report his will anywhere? One of his daughters is his executor and has power of attorney. A life insurance policy was given to his ex-wife at the divorce, and she has been paying on it for 22 years. Does she pay taxes on it when received? J.E., via email DEAR J.E.: In the event that the person who dies has absolutely no assets other than annuities and retirement accounts, all which have beneficiaries, the will should be filed but not probated. The will should be filed with the surrogates office in the county where the individual passed away. As to the life insurance, there are no taxes paid on life insurance benefits. She is home free on that one. Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. Without bylaws, wave bye-bye Nonprofit bylaws When the legal structure and protection of corporate status is sought, petitioners must create and submit articles of incorporation. Without this section on the application, the state can deny or delay the incorporation process. Nonprofit bylaws are of equal importance. They constitute the essence of the newly formed organization. Properly articulated bylaws represent the organizations operating rules. The absence of or poorly constructed bylaws can be cause for denial and reapplication. Bylaws must include certain standard clauses. They must be carefully worded, as they have a direct impact on the approval process. Proper bylaws, thoughtfully presented, are vital. Why bylaws are vital Bylaws outline the nature, purpose, mission and operational aspects of an organization. Bylaws are comprised of various clauses and each should be answered in detail. Agency compliance officers will examine important sections for sufficient information upon which to grant corporate/nonprofit status. Model bylaws can be used as a reference source. They tend to cover the essential elements. Properly articulated bylaws will enhance the opportunity for income and sales tax exemptions and permission to solicit donations. Model bylaws Model bylaws have been designed by many specialty interest groups: trade associations, medical societies, chambers of commerce, and fraternal, civic, business and membership organizations. Model bylaws can be adopted and customized to best fit the individual needs of the new nonprofit organization. Standard bylaw clauses Here is a sample of the standard bylaw clauses: Article I: Purpose Article II: Location Article III: Members/Membership Article IV: Board of Directors Article V: Meetings Article VI: Officers Article VII: Committee Article VIII: Miscellaneous Article IX: Amendments Article X: Dissolution The list appears simple and straightforward. Communicating acceptable content is crucial. Content is Crucial Governmental agencies and foundation professionals review nonprofit documents, which includes bylaws. It is upon their approval that the full benefits are accorded the newly organized nonprofit. State and federal agencies allow for tax exemptions and foundations offer sizable grants Resolution Careful bylaw construction should guide your efforts. Get professional advice and be inclusive of all information about your nonprofit. Verify all that you claim on the startup documents is based in fact.The Nonprofit Resource Center was founded by Dr. Frederick J. Herzog, PhD LLC for the purpose of helping non profits navigate the complex issues of starting and managing a non profit. Dr. Herzog can be reached via email: fherzog@ tampabay.rr.com or by calling 847-899-9000. Dr. Frederick Herzog, Ph.D.NONPROFIT BRIEFS MONEYContinued from Page D1 Tub & Tile RefinishingServing Citrus Since 1989ALL ABOUT BATHSWarranty Porcelain Fiberglass Tile Custom Colors Acrylic Bath Systems Chip Repairs & Morewww.AllAboutBaths.com352 637-2299 Check us out!BATHTUB REFINISHING000FYKY QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE STARTING AT $ 60 00 Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! www.CitrusPest.com 000G91F (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS PEST CONTROL Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River 2013 2013 2013 2013 WE BEAT THE COMPETITION!! With Same or BETTER Windows! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED LICENSE #CCL002604 WINDOWS UNLIMITED 352-795-8772 1-800-600-HEAT (4328) www.windowsfla.com WINDOWS 000G7RB ROOFING 000G91L Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices LIC#CC1327656 www.eliteroofing-inc.com 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 639-1024 LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED LICENSED & INSURED 000G2JI www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net FLOORING WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER 685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowes on Hwy. 44) Lecanto 341-0813 MON-FRI 8:30-5 SAT 9-4 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Visit Us 000G8YN APPLIANCE REPAIR Top Notch Appliance Repair Over 30 Years Experience 352-586-9109 Accepting Credit Cards Licensed & Insured Robert Roik Member of Chamber of Commerce 000G8ZY WINDOW CLEANING Dirty Windows? Window Cleaning Window Tinting BONDED & INSURED Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates! 352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com New customer special Min. order $100 000FNUL 352-794-0270 www.smcflorida.com CARPET CLEANING Our Services: Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Spot Removal 24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE CR-C057844 Expires 11/30/13 Have a couch and loveseat cleaned, get a chair or recliner cleaned FREE ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13 $ 79 95 3 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL 000GE4X DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent 1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Years Licensed, Bonded, Insured $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000G9GX

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER20,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.comTo place an ad, call563-5966Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time ChronicleClassifieds 637553 000GDXU JOHN NATCUK paintings..if you have a John Natchuk painting that you would be be willing to sell, please get in touch with Robiellyn@aol.com AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 Tax Manager5 yrs. Business Tax Experience w/ CPA firm, CPA preferred Qualified Persons Send Resume to Cpa.resume.search @gmail.com PICTURE FRAMES 4 large, good shape, all for ($5) 352-613-7493 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 29 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 210 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com ANTIQUE SLANTTOP DESK 37 1/2 high,x 27 deep, X 29 wide First $100. Takes it. 352-382-0069 COLLECTOR PLATES 100 plus plates, Rockwells, Hubbell, more, whole collection, $100. 352-382-0069 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 KINGSFORD ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 GE REFRIGERATOR 64 HIGH 28 WIDE WHITE $60 352-613-0529 GE Refrigerator white, side by side, 18 cu. ft., water/ice/crushed, $350. As is firm (352) 270-4087 GOOD DISHWASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day warranty call/text Leonard @ 352-364-6504 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER$100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 Refrigerator (2010) Kenmore, white, like new bottom freezer, 68 H, 33 wide, 30D glass shelves and bins, $425. (352) 513-5415 Call Evenings REFRIGERATOR Kenmore Side by side 24 CF $300 Kenmore 700 Commercial Dryer, elec, $100 (352) 212-5779 Medium Equipment OperatorAnnouncement # 13-60 Skilled work in the operation of moderately complex Public Works construction and maintenance equipment. One years experience in the operation and routine maintenance of the type of equipment assigned. Performs manual laboring tasks. Must have a valid Florida CDL, Class A with N endorsement. Starting pay $11.09 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online by Friday, October 25, 2013 EOE/ADA Now Hiring: OTR Class A CDL DriversNew Pay Package and $1500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Call today for details 1888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net P/T CUSTODIAL/ MONITORINGMaintenance Experience a PLUS Apply in person Spruce Creek Preserve SR 200 Dunnellon 9am-4pm. See Julie RESIDENTIALELECTRICIANSMust have 5 years exp. Current on Codes & DF, Trim and Rough. Call (352) 746-6825 or Apply in person S & S Electric 2692 W Dunnellon Rd, Dunnellon Sheeters Carpenterstools/trans. reqd. reply to Kenny2000 @earthlink.net CITRUS WELL DRILLINGMust be physically fit. Willing to work long hours. Prior construction exp. a bonus.Must have clean driving record. No Phone Calls Apply in Person After 8am 2820 E Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando drug free work place HOUSEMANExperience Preferred No Phone Calls Apply In Person 614 NW Hwy 19, BEST WESTERN TELEMARKETERS WANTEDHiring 5 experienced reps HOURLY + BONUSES 9am-4pm Mon-Fri NO WEEKENDS! Call Cale at 727-858-0499 Classified Sales Rep.Part Time Seeking individual with strong sales, computer, customer service and organizational skills to increase our market share classified display advertising in all of Citrus Publishings products. The position will consist of receiving incoming calls and making outbound service/cold calls. Handle walk-in advertisers from our Meadowcrest office. College degree preferred and ability to demonstrate persuasiveness and/or sales abilities. Ability to work well in a team environment. Must be able to meet a work schedule of 29-hours per week. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer. TELEMARKETERS WANTEDHiring 5 experienced reps HOURLY + BONUSES 9am-4pm Mon-Fri NO WEEKENDS! Call Cale at 727-858-0499 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 Exp. Metal & TPO Roofersmust have tools and transportation 352-726-7006 FABRICATORSExp. Granite Fabricators needed. F/T, P/T. Apply at DCI Countertops 6843 N Citrus Ave. Crystal River Granite Fabricators NeededPart time w/Full time potential NO EXP. NEC. Will train, Must be detail oriented and have good hand eye coord. drug free workplace Apply in Person DCI COUNTERTOPS 6843 N. Citrus Ave Shamrock Industrial Crystal River Advertising Sales Rep.Full Time The Citrus County Chronicle is seeking Chronicle Advertising Sales Rep to work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising sales for the multiple Citrus Publishing papers throughout the Citrus County & surrounding market area. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. This sales position is based out of the Crystal River. Two plus years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience with successful track record in meeting and exceeding sales goals, self-motivated, highly energetic & goal oriented, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree and knowledge of Citrus County preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicleonline.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer. Advertising Sales Rep.Weekly Publications Full Time Seeking Ad Sales Rep for The Riverland News and S. Marion Citizen. Work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. 2 or more years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, ability to identify and prospect for new sales opportunities, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No Phone Calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer. RNs, LPNs, and CNAs Must be a licensed nurse by the state of Florida or a Certified CNA Long-Term Care experience preferred Hiring full-time and part-time employees, with opening in all shifts. HEAL TH CENTER A T BRENTWOOD via fax or email payroll@health atbrentwood.com Ph. (352) 746-6600 Fax. (352) 746-8696 2333 N Brentwood Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461EOE/SF/DF Maintenance Director NeededNature Coast Lodge is seeking an experienced Maintenance Director to serve as part of the senior management team. You must have a passion for meeting the needs of seniors, an eye for detail and an awareness of building codes and compliance standards. The Maintenance Director performs routine maintenance, minor repairs and oversees housekeeping and grounds maintenance including being on-call for building emergencies for our Assisted Living community. The successful candidate will have completed high school, have three (3) years maintenance experience and two (2) years supervisory experience. Basic knowledge of mechanical, HVAC and electrical systems, plumbing and carpentry are an asset. For further information please send resume and cover letter to Michelle Cruz, General Manager, Nature Coast Lodge (adminncl@tampa bay.rr.com).EOE REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty BARTENDERApply In Person THE DAM PUB 7p-9p, Mon.-Fri Food & Beverage Directorneeded for upscale Country Club in Citrus County. Looking for self starter with great business and customer service skills. Must have previous mgmt experience in the industry. Excellent opportunity. Send resume to careers@ citrushills.com SERVERS & LINE COOKSFor upscale restaurant. Experienced, Motivated and Dependable with transportation and phone. Top pay. F/T and P/T To apply call (352) 228-7353 ARNP or PARNFull & Part TimeMAw/Phlebotomy Skills FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALIST/Details at www.flcancer.com Busy Medical Practice Seeks1.CT SCAN TECH 2.OPTOMETRIST Experience is a must Competitive Pay/ Benefits. References Required call for immediate response 352-586-0632 or email hr@ cmc-fl.com CMAImmed opening in busy OBGYN office Fax Resume 352-794-0877 DENTAL INSURANCE COORDINATORF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com DIRECTOR OF NURSINGNature Coast Lodge seeks a dynamic Nurse (LPN or RN) to become Director of Nursing for our Assisted Living community. As part of the senior management team, you must have a passion for working with seniors, enthusiasm for leading and managing the on-site nursing staff and caregivers and the ability to train, implement, discipline and oversee critical programs necessary to establish NCL as a leading provider of assisted living services. The DON will also be active in professional networking and outreach to key referral sources for building and maintaining a full community. The successful candidate will have a current nursing certification in good standing and be First Aid and CPR certified, have five (5) years experience in a health care environment and three (3) years supervisory experience. Assisted Living Core Training certification would be a definite plus. For more information please send resume and cover letter to Michelle Cruz, General Manager, Nature Coast Lodge (adminncl@tampa bay.rr.com).EOE F/T MEDICAL ASSISTANTBusy Office Email Resume to: clinicalcr@ tampabay.rr.com or Fax 352-726-8193 FRONT DESKF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com HIRING: PT, PTA, RN, OTFlorida Homecar e Specialists (352) 794-6097 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND MARKETINGLife Care Center of Citrus County in Lecanto Full-time position available. Admissions and/or marketing experience in a skilled nursing facility or hospital setting required. Three to four years health care experience preferred. Bachelors degree or equivalent in marketing, business, journalism or communication is desirable. Must be familiar with the professional community and knowledgeable of admissions/marketing practices and procedures as well as the laws, regulations and guidelines governing admissions/ marketing functions in the long-term care facility. Must possess leadership ability and willingness to work harmoniously with and supervise professional and nonprofessional personnel. Must possess ability to make independent decisions when circumstances warrant such action. Must be able to supervise admission/ marketing staff. We offer great pay and benefits in a team-oriented environment. Christine Bigwood 352-746-4434 352-746-6081 Fax 3325 W. Jerwayne Ln Lecanto, FL 34461 Christine_Bigwood@L CCA.com Visit us: LCCA.com EOE/M/F/V/D 43572 Lost-Back Rest for Motorcycle. Between Homosassa & Crystal River on Hwy 19. 352-220-3856 Lost Calico Female, Declawed with white neck, Sugarmill woods area 10/12/13 (352) 382-3386 Lost Cat, female, fixed, snow shoe Siamese Citronelle /495 black mustache, answers to name misstache (352) 795-6205 LOSTTri colored beagle. 40 lbs Missing since 9/8/13. JoJo is a special needs pet. Last seen on N. Lee St. Beverly Hills. Please call if you have seen him. Needs medical attention. 352-249-3107 MALE CHIHUAHUA Puppy, Tan, very timid LOST in Leisure Acres off Wipperwell (352) 436-5586 MISSING CAT,Siamese mix, cream w/orange ears & tail,neutered male,blue eyes, front declawed, 12 yrs. old, named Bailey,very friendly, Beverly Hills, Washington/Pennsylvania St. area,small REWARD, call 249-7252, leave message if not home, deeply missed PItt Bull Mix, female Has no teeth Placid Ave. Inverness Highlands (352) 746-5627 REWARD Large Siamese cat. lost 6/15/13 in the area of hwy 200 and Orchid dr. He was wearing a black collar with no tags. please call or text 239-287-0953 Found set of keys in a recliner that was donated to the Key Thrift store 2 months ago. (352) 419-7203 Found Social Security Card Lecanto Area Girls Name Call to identify (352) 212-3013 Homing Pigeon with band. Lecanto area 352-302-0569 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath St arting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 SENIOR SECRETARYAnnouncement #13-59 Part time (25 hours weekly) Advanced Secretarial work performing general clerical duties in the Department of County Attorney. Must possess a current valid Florida driver license. $11.07 hourly to start. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, October 25, 2013. EOE/ADA. I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads Auto Pilot, Raymarine Sportspilot up to 30 ft, like new, $600 (352) 601-3656 Bs Marina & CampgroundYankeetown Deep Water & Covered Boat Slips352-447-5888 Craftsman, 27 Ton hydraulic log splitter $900. obo 50 lb thrust 12 V, 36 or 42 shaft, Trolling motor used once $150. (352) 560-3019 DODGE 98 Caravan mini van, 7 psg. runs great, looks good. asking $1675. (352) 637-2588 Inverness 55+ 2Br/1Ba CHA price reduced to $5,000.352-419-6644 2BR/1Ba CHA, lots of extras. Price reduced for quick sale. 341-1237 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 FREE 60 Hitachi Projection Television Good condition (352) 382-7686 Free Dog gentle male, part lab, 3 yrs. old, approx. 50 lbs ., all shots (352) 341-1714 FREE Fancy Tail Guppies (352) 560-3019 Free Male Cat Smart, Pretty, Gunmetal Gray, short-haired, green eyes. Showed up at my home 2 weeks. ago. (352) 746-1904 Free Puppy pug & cocker spaniel mix, female, (352) 628-1272 Hooded Pigeon with feathers on feet. Beautiful bird. Free to good home (352) 228-4302 Quilt Frame made with plastic pipes, as seen in the quilt shops at Branson (352) 560-6137 Very CutePuppy, Mixed brown and red with white chest. House trained 352-436-3764 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 AMERICAN PIT BULL all white, his name is Cotton, approx. 18 mos old. lost in the vicinity of the Mini Farms and Dunklin 352-601-0564 or 352-601-7029 Female, Pure White, Lost on 10/13 on 9th St Crystal River. Ans to Daisy. Family Heartbroken, reward 212-6992 Lost 2 Ladders off truck 1 Green step ladder 1 yellow extension ladder near 491 & 44 (352) 601-7299

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D6SUNDAY,OCTOBER20,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000G7RHwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 11/1/13LIC#CC1327656 0 0 0 G 7 R R TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000G8E6 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000GD46RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP SWIMMMING POOLS 000GDYC GREGS MARCITE, INC. 352-746-5200LICENSED & INSURED Exposed Aggregate FREE ESTIMATES COMPLETE REMODELCPC1458160 CC#2636 Shotcrete $45/yd. Decks Tile Pavers ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000GEBG Stand Alone Generator One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000G67F 000GA TVLa w n Spri nkler Not W orki ng?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000GE48 Copes Pool & Pavers DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000GA4M PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000GAEA 000G82K6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 Services from A-Z Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience 746-2445 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in: Aluminum Rescreen Work, Storm Doors, Garage Screen Doors, Window Screens, Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch Ceilings, Pressure Washing, Int./Ext. Painting, Regrout Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing, Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten Wood Repairs... You Name it I probably do it! HANDYMAN Complete Handyman Services000G8YZ 000G8AD WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding Local, Call Robert 352-302-2220 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Johns Painting & Wallpapering Lic/Ins. FreeEst. **352-201-9568** GREGS MARCITE Florida Gem, Diamond Brite Marcite, FREE EST. 746-5200 Lic.#C2636 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A+ Remodel/Renovate Kitch/Bath/RE Prep. Refs/Ins/15yrs locaI 352 220-3844. crc#1327710 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Lawncare -N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare -N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1 397 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 11/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 Home/Office Cleaning Catered to your needs, reliable & exper., lic./ins. Bonded 352-345-9329 Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 Find Guaranteed, Local A/C Sales & Installation Pros! 800-763-7108 Air Conditioner Sales, Service and Installation. All pros are prescreened and relentlessly reviewed! Call now for a no obligation estimate! 800-763-7108 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Compete Tree Service Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked (352) 344-2696 FALL SPECIAL Seasoned 4x8 stack. Delivered & Stacked $70 (352) 637-6641 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Mr & Mrs FIX IT (For Seniors) LIC& INS Home&Yard/In&Out Low Senior $ 613-2643 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Bs Marina & CampgroundYankeetown Deep Water & Covered Boat Slips352-447-5888 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! FENDER STYLE TRAVELBASS GUITAR 21SCALE,POLY STRINGS,PIEZO PREAMP$75 352-601-6625 LESPAULSTYLE GUITAR WITH CRATE AMPW/12SPEAKER BOTH FOR $100 352-601-6625 ORGANLEGEND. Perfect condition $300 Firm. You move. (352) 419-6186 PRAISE &WORSHIP? NEW PURE WHITE FISHERS OF MEN ACOUSTIC GUITAR $100 352-601-6625 RED-BLUE-GREEN rotating lights $25 for all 3. 352-476-2652 / tommyb @tampabay.rr.com MIRROR Beautiful gold ornate mirror(41x61) $100. call 352-419-6644 NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call for e-mail picture 40.00 linda 341-2271 SPODE CHRISTMAS TREE Service for 7, $100. 4pc pl settings 513-4614 STEPLADDER 6 FT. Louisville fiberglass excellent cond. $30. (352)257-4076 VACUUM CLEANER HOOVER Bagless self propelled Windtunnel 12 amp $25.00 (352)257-4076 PRO-FORMTREADMILLtreadmill Pro-Form 730CS model 831.299270 $95.00 352 746-9483 BILLIARDS TABLE American Heritage 1 slate top, leather pockets, solid mahogany, claw feet. All accessories included. Plus stainless mini beer fridge and portable ice make. All in gr eat Condition $1400 for all (352) 503-7690 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 SHOPLIGHTlike new, with 11 good T40 flourescant bulbs ($10) 352-212-1596 SNAKE Female ball python. 3with cage & many accessories. $85. (352) 746-0714 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 TRANSFER SWITCH AND GENERATOR Cutler-Hammer CH10EGEN3060 transfer switch (8 120V ckts plus 1 240V ckt) and Generac 4000XL(4000 watts) generator $350 for both. Inverness 726-1083 Embroidery Machine, Brothers. Single Head 10 needle. Fully computerized. Many Extras. (352) 794-0352 Hospital Bed Electric Bed, Good Condition $200 obo 352-503-9468 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 NEW 12 STRING ACOUSTIC GUITAR SOLID SPRUCE TOP& MAHOGANY$100 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR GOLD GROVERS,SOUND HOLE PICKUP &GIGBAG $100 352-601-6625 SWAMPSTICK ELECTRIC 6 STRING MANDOLIN /BANJO /SLIDE GUITAR? $100 352-601-6625 2 CRANK-UPlight stands for T-bars or truss $75 both 352-476-2652 / tommyb @tampabay.rr.com 10LIGHTTRUSS w/dollies for DJ or band...$50 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $7 EACH 352-613-0529 CHROME CLOTHES RACK, (for display), 4 arms, excellent condition, $40, (352) 465-1813 CONCERTSHIRTTaylor Swift red tour, large, brand new with matching arm band, ($10) 352-613-7493 COSTUME JEWELRY5 necklaces, 1 pair earings, 2 watches, great shape, all for ($10) 352-613-7493 Craftsman, 27 Ton hydraulic log splitter $900. obo 50 lb thrust 12 V, 36 or 42 shaft, Trolling motor used once $150. (352) 560-3019 DEHUMIDIFIER Kenmore excellent condition. $100 obo (352) 726-7367 Dyson Vac.$100 ( 231) 233-6477 Cell ETHANALLEN ROCKER-RECLINER Brown & Beige wood frame $40.00obo 352-621-0248 FINGERHUTGIFT CARD 100.00 /selling for 75.00 Will meet you there & verify. Linda 341-2271 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 FREE FIREWOOD U pick up Sugarmill Woods 352-382-2493 FUTON Has a black cover mattress. Light wood on sides. $35.00. 746-0714 PLACE SETTING w/napkin rings, made w/brooches Centerpiece Pitcher w/flowers and mirror $200. for all (352) 795-7254 Refrigerator, whirlpool 21 cu. ft., 2 yrs. old $400 1950s Retro Dining Set 60 w/ 5 chairs & hanging lamp $150. ( 231) 233-6477 Cell SEWING MACHINE Elna Pro Quilters Dream, like new paid $2k sell for $600. (352) 212-9978 2 GIRLS WINTER JACKETS LARGE $15 EACH 352-613-0529 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING 3 SETS SIZE 5T 1 SET SIZE 6 & 2 SHIRTS SIZE 4 & 5/6 $30 352-613-0529 Girls winter clothing 4 jeans, 1 pants, 5 shirts, 2 pajama sets & 2 hoodies sizes vary $60 352-613-0529 LADIES COWBOY BOOTS Black leather Durangos size 8.worn 3 times $40 201-8784 LEATHER JACKETS Mans brown Lg, womans black Sm $40. each 352-382-0069 WEDDING DRESS White, Size 8, worn once. $100 352-201-2665 WOMENS WESTERN SKIRTS 5 western skirts, various colors, size 10-12, $15.each 352-382-0069 2 WOOD FRAMED CHAIRS Removable cushions. 1 rocker 1 std.Both for $50.00 obo 352-621-0248 8 x 10 Used Lark Shed for SaleAsking $1,550 delivery included (352) 860-0111 1990 E-Z GO GOLF CART36 V new batteries, excellent condition, $1200 OBO 352-364-1490 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 Beautiful King Size Custom Bed Spread with shams, NEW cream & blush, Cost $250Asking $150. 352-794-3907 BOOTS womens tan size 7 work, size 7 1/2 black dress, good shape, both for ($5) 352-613-7493 Matching Sofa & Love Seat, floral pattern white background. excel. cond. $300. (352) 382-3131 Metal Lshape desk $50 antique fold & other wood bench $50 ea. (352)201-4844 Queen Mattress Set, frame linens & spread, spare room set, like new $200. (352) 382-1918 QUEEN SIZE SLEIGH BEDAND MATTRESS SET$75 352-201-2665 RECLINER GREEN FABRIC Very good condition. $40.00 (352)257-4076 SLEEPER SOFA. Queen size. Castro Convertible. EarlyAmerican print. $100. 527-1239 SWIVELROCKER. Gold fabric. Good condition. $65. 527-1239 VINTAGE DESK & CHAIR. Maple. 33 x 53. Very nice condition. $80. 527-1239 VINTAGE ROCKING CHAIR. Maple. 40. Nice condition. $50. 527-1239 White wooden POTTERYBARN COMPUTER desk and chair. 352-212-0929. Asking $100. Chinese Lanterns 1 large, 2 sm, elec. Concrete $150 Weed wacker. Electric good condition $75 (352) 503-6902 ROTO-TILLER Troy Bilt Bronco. 5 HP, Model 12180. Hardly Used. $200 (352) 628-1783 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 CRYSTAL RIVERSat. & Sun. 8am-2pm MULTI-FAM Tools, boat items, home improve, hshld., clothing. 12040 W. Checkerberry Dr. BEDROOM SET. Chest, dresser & night stand. Maple. Nice condition. $200. 527-1239 California King w/ white headboard 4 post & box spring, good quality $250 (352) 621-1664 COFFEETABLE Large glass coffee table (42x30) on ceramic Florida Cougar $100. phone 352-419-6644 COFFEETABLE. 43x22. Maple. Good condition. $40. 527-1239 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 DINING ROOM SET incl. 4 chairs & hutch dark wood, good condition $300. (401) 829-5141 DINING ROOM SET Oak with glass top, 6 chairs, very heavy. $100 (352) 586-0521 DINING ROOM SET Solid light wood table, w/24 leaf, 6 cushd chairs. Large china closet. $800 Excellent Condition (352) 621-5561 DINING ROOM TABLE, 6 chairs & hutch. Pecan. 66x42, with 2 leaves 90. $300. 527-1239 ENDTABLE DARK PINE. 21x27x22high. Excellent condition. $40. 527-1239 FURNITURE Hardwood table w/2 leaves 6chairs & hutch $130 Cherry dresser $45 (352)201-4844 KING MATTRESS SET 4 yrs. old, paid $1,800, asking $500. (352) 527-8600 LIQUOR BAR & STOOLS Indoor jet black contemporary portable wood bar with stools. 56W X 43H X 24D. Brushed nickel accents, locking cabinet and more. Attractive value at $200.00 352-746-1486 LOVESEAT LAZBOY Mauve fabric 64 L with incliners Good Condition $60. Non Smoker 352-621-0175 4 Wheel Drive Mitsubishi, Tractor w. loader, 4 new tires, excel. cond. deisel, $6,875. (352) 860-1106 BUNK HAYFEEDER. Freestanding hay rack/bunk feeder. $140. 527-1239 RUBBERMAID 100 GALLON water trough. Like new. $40. 527-1239 PUMPUTILITY1/6 HP Flotec FPOS1250X Brand new never used. $40.00 (352)257-4076 4 Samsonite Mesh Fabric Arm Chairs w/ matching 36 x 56 Table, near perfect $200. pls. call (352) 628-7050 PATIO TABLE 42 glass top table with 4 swivel chairs. 1 yr old, perf. cond. Cost over $400. Sell for $165. 352-746-2842 9 Piece Pipe Patio Furniture Set, excel. cond. octagon, table w/ 4 chairs & 2 lounge chairs w/ foot stools lht. blue cushions $200 2 Rattan chairs, excel. cond. w/foot stools $75 ea. or $130 both ( 231) 233-6477 Cell 38 ROUND COFFEE TABLE with lazy susan. Maple. Nice condition. $50. 527-1239 40 round dining table w/blue pedestal base...$35 352-476-2652 / tommyb @tampabay.rr.com 42 GLASS TABLETOP 1/2 inch thick with beveled edge. Excellent condition. $35.00 (352)795-5876 Armoire, Mahagony, 1 drawer, oval glass in doors, 36H, 37W, 19D, $100. (352) 382-7960 BEDROOM SET FRENCH PROVINCIAL. Dresser, chest & night stand. Off white/gold. Nice condition. $200. 527-1239 Craftsman professional 10 Table Saw, 1 HP motor, w/ Biesemeyer fence system. $475 (orig $950) (352) 628-1734 HOMECRAFTDELTA 10 JOINTER have motor & Booklet,$80.Call Dave 352-621-0286 SPRAYGUN PAINT ChicagoTools Hi Pres. Never used. $8.00 (352)257-4076 Used tools looking for a good home at a reasonable price Call (352) 726-7367 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-745-2645 FREETELEVISION 27 INCH SONYTUBE TYPE WITH REMOTE... ITWORKS!!! YOU PICK UP(I WILL HELPCARRYTO VEHICLE)TV IS IN BEVERLYHILLS PHONE 802-578-6108 SONY Wedge TV, 36 in, surround sound, $95 obo (352) 419-4146 YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 140 WATTS 2 9 60 WATTS & 1 5 80 WATTS $90 352-613-0529 CD/DVD DRIVES 5 drives int & ext...$25 all 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 IBM 390E THINKPAD needs OS, plus extras...$75 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com NINTENDO WII CONSOLE complete with Fit board, sports and carnival games. $75.00 (352)257-4076 Refrigerator, Frigidaire, w/ ice maker, white, runs good,excel. cond. $125.(646) 236-3097 (352) 628-0130 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Washer & Dryer kenmore, white $100 ea. Good cond. can deliver for fee (678) 617-5560 WASHERAND DRYER LGTromm front loading washer and Kenmore dryer. $350 for both. 352/382-2268 COMPUTER DESK. Corner style. Oak formica. 54 x 54 x 51H. $65. 527-1239. COMPUTER DESK. Washed oak formica finish. 24D x 53H. $60. 527-1239. CORNER COMPUTER DESK W/HUTCH 29h,51w/hutch,20d,42from mid to end.oak finish $60 201-8784 FLAT FILE Safco, steel, 5 drawers 53 3/8W, 16 1/2H 41 1/2D, beige. Very good cond. $525. Sits on 30 H sturdy wood frame. Frame is free to buyer. (352) 621-8053 ONLINE AUCTION Lifetime Collection 1949 & 1950 Ford Cars & Parts 15+ Cars 1000s of Parts Many NOS! Bidding Ends November 1st 12 Noon 107 Oak Valley Drive, Macon GA L.W. Benton Company 478-744-0027 www.bidder one.com #3215 CAR BUFFER/POLISHER HVP,10 Random Orbit polisher/Buffer, Like new, $40. 352-382-0069

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER20,2013D 7 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 370-1020 SUCRN BOCC-OMB-RFP # 001-14 PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID ITB No. 001-14 House Demolition & Replacement SHIP Program RPL # 2012-01 Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a bid to provide residential home replacement services for a home located in Hernando, FL that is qualified under the SHIP Housing Rehab Program Job # RPL 2012-01. AMandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held on October 30, 2013 at 9:00 AM at 60 S. Davis St. Beverly Hills, Florida 34465. Only those companies who are present at the prebid conference will be permitted to submit a Bid in response to this solicitation. Additional information concerning the scope of the home rehabilitation work will be distributed at the pre-bid conference. Interested parties must attend in order to be considered for award. SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before November 14, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461. A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for November 14, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select BIDS/PURCHASING on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413. CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Joe Meek, Chairman Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 20, 2013 369-1020 SUCRN Elig. To Vote PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address: John W. DalrympleVickie L. Maluk Mark D. Shaw 4298 E Fort Apache PL7635 W Mesa Ln5520 S Cast Pt Dunnellon, FL 34434Homosassa, FL 34601Homosassa, FL 34446 You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747. Susan Gill Citrus County Supervisor of Elections 120 N. Apopka Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 20, 2013 0 0 0 8 X H 2 For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $27,900 obo 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET, Corvette, T-tops, silver green matalic, automatic, very rare car, mint. cond. $16,500 obo 302-8265 CORVETTE1999 Coup, Silver w/ Black, 6 spd, loaded, extras, 14k mi, $25,000 (352) 513-4427 FORD46 Ford Rat p/up Rdstr 78 Merc. Cg r XR7, ModelTBucket Spdster misc. 352-949-7874 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $29,500 obo 352-302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVY 01 HD 2500 Ext, Cab; 4 Dr 4x4 diesel, cap/ running board/sun visor 127k mi; $14,500 obo 724-822-7922 FORD1979 Box Truck 460 eng, low miles dual wheels, am/fm $1000.obo (352) 637-4011 FORD2004, SD250 supercab Lariat 158 WB, 5.4L, V8, one owner runs & looks great. Over road high miles $6,900 527-0989, Must See! TOYOTA Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T cap, 80k mi. exc cond $9,000 (352) 726-3730 (352) 422-0201 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 1 owner $3,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2007, Escape, XLS $7,950. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2003, Wrangler, 4 cyc., 5 speed, soft top, $9,950 352-341-0018 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLER2012Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 DODGE03, Grand Caravan Fully loaded, dual sliding drs. 35mpg, V6, Perf. cond., garaged New tires, Crystal Riv. $3,700. (727) 207-1619 HONDA2006, VTX 1300 4k MIles, Garage kept $6,500. (352) 398-5903 YAMAHA 650 VStar, accessories, adult ridden, 14k mi, 52 mpg. SHARP! $1995 724-822-7922 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 8 CARS for $1500 ea (plus T, T & T ) 3 DAYS ONLY Fri, Sat, Sun 8:30 -4:00 Inverness Motors 3399 E Gulf to Lake Hwy 352-422-2224 95 Buick LeSabre 99 Chevy Astro 96 Chevy Lumina 05 PT Cruiser 97 Chrysler T & C 02 Dodge Caravan 02 Dodge Gr Caravan 98 Ford Explorer BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BMW, Z3, 3.0i, manual, 124k mi., green, black top, garaged, clean $7,450., 352-220-2077 Cadillac Deville 1998, good leather seats. Good tires. First $850 takes it! 941-744-7123 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt LT 4door, power windows, locks, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 DODGE2000 Intrepid Runs and looks great, 180,000 new tires $1300 352-678-7049 DODGE 98 Caravan mini van, 7 psg. runs great, looks good. asking $1675. (352) 637-2588 FORD, Explorer, 106k mi., good cond. $4,000 negotiable 352-637-2258 or 634-2798 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2011 Mustang Premium coupe, V6, Automatic transmission, 27,000 miles. Very good condition. $16,900. Please call: 352-726-2595 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MERCURY2001, Grand Marquis, great cond. cold air, leather int., 93k miles $4,500. (352) 422-5622 OLDSMOBILE1998Achieva runs & looks good, cold air. $1200 firm Lve msg 352-364-3009 SATURN1999, S11, 4 door, low miles, extra clean, 1 owner $3,250. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2004 Corvette Torch red coupe, excellent condition, LS1 engine, 6-speed, Z51 performance handling, fully optioned with 2 roofs, 42,000 miles, one owner, never hit or abused. $24,000 phone (352) 527-2927 or harmarjenkins @yahoo.com Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $500 Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 Auto Pilot, Raymarine Sportspilot up to 30 ft, like new, $600 (352) 601-3656 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** COBIACC, 17.5 Ft., 100H, Yamaha, 4 strk, Great Shape $6,700. obo (813)-244-3945 SOLDPONTOON BOAT20 ft, 28 HP Johnson, no trailer, $1,200 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com ALLEGRO BAY, M37 Motor Home Fully restored in 2011, New michelin tires, good cond. $10,500 obo,352-274-8664 FLEETWOOD95 Flair, Class A 22 ft, 50k mi. Very Good cond MUST SEE $12,000 (352) 628-6643 RIALTA2002, new tires, AC, & paint, 59k miles, runs great, great mileage $31,500. 352-238-4445 KEYSTONESpringdale 2005 Model 298-BHL super slide out, awning, tandem axle, coupling hitch anti sway bars, 30 amp hkup. Asking $9,500 or will consider shallow water boat as trade, (352) 503-9133 before 9pm MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V R V service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. SUN VALLEY2003, Apache 30ft, 5th wheel, 14 ft. slide outs, new tires, pull rite 5th whl. hitch, 27 TV, Etc. $6,600 obo (352) 503-7508 TRAVEL TRAILER 04 Wilderness Advantage, 28 ft, slide-out, loaded with extras very clean. $9995 724-822-7922 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 1958 SETOF CHEVROLETHUBCAPS good condition, one needs paint line touchup $50. 352-382-0069 Running Boards, Ford Equipment. For 250 S.D Ext Cab. Type 2 tubular. Like New $250 (352) 628-1783 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** Kats Kritter Kare & Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sitting & House Cleaning (352) 270-4672 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown-white terrier mix, weight 65 lbs., came to shelter because owner could not care for him, gentle, a bit shy, very playful, loves water, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends, eager to please. Beautiful dog. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips GEORGIAGeorgia, 2-y.o. female bulldog mix, easygoing medium -to-low energy, very gentle, will sit, gives paw, lies down, rolls over, & takes treat gently,.likes smaller dogs & loves adults/kids, housebrkn, Loves walking & belly rubs, Great family pet or for older person. Call Christina @ 352-464-3908. JENNAJenna, a Siberian Husky/Hound mix,sweet older girl @ 10 years, already spayed, appears housebrkn, gets along well w/other dogs, gentle, calm, patient & healthy, perfect medium size, brown/grey in color, walks well on leash. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. BANDITBandit, a welltrained dog who sits, shakes, lies down, speaks upon command. Very attentive & a true gentleman. Walks well on a leash, appears to be housebroken, gets along w/other dogs. 3-4 y.o. Hound mix, perfect size. Call Diane 352-201-4971 CINNAMONCinnamon, a sweet 2-y.o. Australian Kelpie mix, very smart, housebroken, weighs 24 lbs. Beautiful red coat, very affectionate & attentive. Gets along w/other dogs. Loves to be with people. Call Nadia @ 352-726-9814. Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment Urban Suburban Hair StudiowelcomesKATIE FLYERSpecialty: Up-dos, Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting. Paul Mitchell certified. Stop in and say hello! Call to make your reservation today. 352-637-0777 826 S US Hwy 41 From Cutting Edge to Care Free WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 New Client Offer For YouTake 20% off First VisitANue SalonHair Skin Nails 1916 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida (Corner of Turkey Oak and Hwy. 19-Near Mall) 352-563-2110 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com EZ-Go Golf Cartexcellent condition, has headlights exc. batteries w/ charger $1500 (352) 527-3125 Fishing Gear 2 polls and Tackle $125; Tools-various prices. 2 Car Ramps $50 for both. (352) 503-6902 Golf CartE-Z Go, 3 wheel, runs, drives, with charger $399 352-978-0658 Two Mens Bycycles Both 26 and like new. 8 speed Monogoose $175, Break Point Pro $125 (352) 503-6902 RIDING MOWER Pro line Automatic 48 deck, 24 HP, $600 (352) 746-7357 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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E16SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GDE7 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscountycentury21.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPEN SUNDAY SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR OVER 37 YEARS. HOW MUCH IS YOUR HOME WORTH? Call T oday For A F ree Market Analysis! $69,900 CHECK IT OUT! Two bedrooms, two baths, two car garage on two lots! Fireplace, open kitchen, family room, screen porch with aneasy open floor plan. Fenced back yard is nicely shaded and the additional lot included is a great bonus. Estate sale Hurry! Great location go see! MLS #704114 South Apopka to right on Iris to home on left. Mary Parsons 634-1273 DUPLEX IN INVERNESS A 3BD/2BA on one side, 2BD/2BA + garage on the other side. Both sides have a Florida room! Lots of tile floors. 1 block fromLittle Lake Henderson. MLS #704387 ASKING $89,500 Call Stefan Stuart 352-212-0211 3/2/1 HUGE GARAGE AND WORKSHOP AREA All tile, new windows & doors, recently painted, shed and nice backyard,very nice house on a corner lot. MLS# 706034 $69,900 Call Nilda Cano 270-0202 WELCOME HOME!! Rustic & cozy 2/1 canal front with dock on acre (mol) homesite. Spacious living room plus screen room overlooking backyard, canal & dock. RV pad with full water, sewer & elect. Hookups. 10x36 wood deck faces front yard. Home in move-in condition. Just minutes from town with low county taxes. MLS #705850 ASKING $88,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listing on line: www.c21patdavis.com CHOICE HOME IN CHOICE LOCATION 3 B edroom, 2.5 baths, oversized two car garage. C aged inground pool on full acre home site for privacy This immaculate home features great room, dining room plus light, bright nook for casual dining. Lanai with summer kitchen for pool side entertaining. Being offered by original owner. MLS #705587 ASKING $218,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listing: www.c21patdavis.com 3 Bdrm. plus den/2 bath pool home with 2000+ sq. ft. of living space on 1/2 + acre lot in Foxwood. City water. Great location close to everything! MLS #701023 ASKING $110,0000 Nancy Jenks 352-400-8072 (cell) 726-6668 (office) INVERNESS POOL HOME 3/2/2 WITH INGROUND POOL AND EXTRA LOT Lots of storage in garage and several outbuildings. Priced to sell. MLS #706014 $69,800 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 See Listings: www.c21patdavis.com 200+ ACRES OF MATURE PASTURE DIVIDED INTO 4 LARGE PARCELS FOR YOU TO CHOOSE FROM Original homestead at the end of the drive sits on a hill overlooking this rolling property waiting for you to restore. Prefer to build your dream, choose any of the other three parcels. Property is one of a kind and located near the Withlachoochee State Forest. Buy 1, 2, 3 or allto realize your dream. MLS #356349 $6,500 PER ACRE Call Jim Morton 422-2173 Hernando 3BR, 2 bath home 2/1 and a 1/1 potential apt. Separ ate entrance .45 ac re 2 Kitchens and living rooms ASKING $5 5,000 Call Charles K elly 352-422-23 87 A MANS HOME IS HIS CASTLE! R oom for the whole clan! Classic impressiv eT udor styling in this 2 stor y, 3BR, 2 1/2 bath home with double gar age, iron-gated entry and 2 sc rn rooms. Liv e your fantasy ev er y day! MLS #7 0554 2 $27 5,000 Ask for Marilyn B ooth 637-490 4 Lake P anasoff kee, 2BR house Separ ate man ca ve w/pool table Fenced boat house Great for owne rs that love to fish MLS #7 027 10 $1 05,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 20 1-987 1 www .citruscounty sold.com Inve rness Golf & Country Club 3BR, 2 bath, 2 car gar age P ool, fenced 2 lots, shed MLS #7 042 37 $205,500 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 2 12-34 10 www .citruscounty sold.com RIGHT OUT OF BETTER HOMES AND G ARDENS C ustom home with Coast al, Key West flair. This 3/3.5 home featur es wrap around porches, maste r suite on main floor. 2 upst airs suites with private baths and dens. Pictur esque crow s nest at 3rd floor lev el with views of w ater front and surrounding 1 .89 acr es. Spacious, well equipped kitchen, living room with fir eplace and dining ar ea ove rlooking private, se rene backyard. Near 46 mile bik e trail. I-7 5 access approx. 30 minutes. This exceptional home is priced to sell at $31 8,900. MLS #35 72 69. Pa t Da vis (352) 2 12-7 280. View all listings a t www .c21pa tdavis. com LOVELY! 2BR, 2 bath 17 16 Sq. Ft LA, A/C, Fla room Pe rfectly maintained all newe r appliances Newer A/C newer roof Beautiful Quiet and convenient MLS #7 03457 $11 0,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 21 2-341 0 www.citruscounty sold.com CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME G OLF COURSE This one has it all! New kitchen, gran ite tops. Beau tiful pool ove rlooking the Oaks golf course. MLS #7 03963 $244,000 Make an offer Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699 THIS HOME IS LARGE ENOUGH T O BE A GROUP HOME 4/3 P lus drivew ay room to park 6 cars C ity limits N eed lots of TLC, but new window s T w o fir eplaces S umme r kitchen, large enclosed area I talian tile in kitchen C arpe ts need replacing I f you need a large home in a gr eat area and ar e willing to do r epairs MLS #7 06024 $1 20,000 BRING OFFERS Call Doris Miner for appt 352-422-462 7 55+ Community gated Beautiful 3/2/2, 1 ,735 sq. f t. L A 2 Porches, Florida landscaping Easy to maintain & Enjoy Move-in ready MLS #7 03863 $1 08,900 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 2 12-34 10 www .citruscounty sold.com 3/2 MOBILE ON 1.88 ACRES! 1 992 doublewide being sold fully furnished Pa ved stee t, multiple ou tbuildings, and a large met al building. ONL Y $45,900 Call Quade F eeser 352-302-7699 GA TED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNIT Y Special of fer on your choice of 1 0 acr e parcels in deed r estricted subdivision near the Withlacoochee St ate Forest for your tr ail riding pleasur e. Cleared and in matur e pasture with scat ter ed trees and pa ved roads aw aiting your dream farm. $7 5,000 Call Jim Morton at 352-422-21 73 for your personal tour of Emerald Hills OLD FLORID A WA TERFRONT 1 .8 Acs. on Lake Hende rson, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car gar age. Home has newer roof, window s, hurricane shut ters, w orkshop, newer dock & seaw all. MLS #7 05082 $285,000 Call Brad Gibbs 2 12-5286 to see this lo vely w ater front home POOL HOME WITH ROOM MLS # 702 73 1 ASKING $9 7,000 This pool home has a lot of room and many ammenities. The 2 9x16 living rm./dining rm with v aulted ceilings make this a gr eat place to liv e and be comfor table. Check it ou t. You will be happ ly with what you see. Please note the following: 19x1 2 family room 20 x12 lanai Laminate flooring 21x1 3 pool w/scr een enclosure Fenced backyard 17x1 2 MBR withw alk-in closet Phone Casey K earse a t 726-6668 to pre view CANAL PRICE REDUCED BANK APPROVED SHORT SALE NEW LISTING SHORT SALE TARAWOOD REDUCED HOMEFRONT Section ESUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEREALESTATEGUIDE INSIDESikorskis AtticPAGE E6 ON THE COVER:ROCK ON, E8HOME AND GARDEN:RED MAPLE, E6REAL ESTATE:SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS RabLabs Cele clocks, which encase little alarm clocks in agate. Rockand mineral-themed decor is part of a fall trend toward nature and natural elements.RabLabs/Associated Press

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hardiness zones 3 to 10, red maple will require a humus-rich planting bed and supplemental irrigation if planted in drier, sandy situations like welldrained sandhills locally. It may live from 50 to 80 years in well-tended gardens, lawn tree rings and park settings. Red maple is generally a tall, single-trunked canopy tree reaching 30 to 70 feet tall at maturity. Basal suckers may form on saplings and varieties grafted on pure native rootstock. Snip suckers off as soon as they start to form. The crown is proportionally narrow, 20 to 40 feet in diameter. Bark is smooth, silver-gray on young specimens, but becomes fissured with age. Simple leaves are opposite along the twigs. The leaf blade has three to five lobes, called palmate, or like a hand. Two to 6 inches long and 2 to 4 inches wide, leaves have prominent veins on the backs and are covered with silvery whitish hairs. Leaf margins are toothed. The leaf stalk and central vein are red. In fall, the leaves turn color ranging from yellow to orange or red depending on site conditions, fertilization, individual variety and sugars trapped in the leaves. While the tree is leafless in winter while young, mature red maples are covered in tiny, showy, burgundy-red flower clusters for about a month starting in January locally. Separate trees have either male or female flowers. Saplings grown from seed could be either sex. Man-made grafted and cloned plants are of the same sex as the parent. By February, female trees form twin seeds in winged, v-shaped keys called samaras. Migratory birds consume most of the seeds to fuel their long flights north starting in March. New leaves sprout in March locally. They emerge reddish and change to green when photosynthesizing. Useful as a shade tree to prevent Floridas hot summer sun from heating up building roofs and walls, red maple lets in the winter suns warming rays during its deciduous winter period. Throughout the year, red maples are an attractive tree in Florida gardens.Jane Weber is a professional gardener and consultant. Semi-retired, she grows thousands of native plants. Visitors are welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion County, garden. For an appointment, call 352-249-6899 or contact JWeber12385@gmail.com.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E15 E2SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1101 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com 000GDEC ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: REALTY ONE DO YOU ENJOY PEACEFULNESS? Master with Huge Walk-In 2.8 Acres 2/2/2+ Office Really Nice Bath Very Quiet Area Nice Tasteful Decor Fully Fenced!! Boat RV Parking! LIVE THE FLORIDA LIFESTYLE!! Wood Cabinets/Updated Kit. Ceramic Tile Large Great Room Glassed Room w/Heat & AC Move-In Ready Pleasant Warm Colors Comm. Pool/Clubhouse On Cul-De-Sac! ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net DROP DEAD GORGEOUS! Gorgeous Entry Beautiful Kit. SS Appliances Functional Center Island Relaxing Master Suite Many Updates Former Model Home Elegant Decor CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840 Email: debrapilny@remax.net LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575 Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com 6-A CRE HORSE FARM IN PINE RIDGE Charming 3 bedroom home on fenced acreage adjoins the trails. Barn, stalls, and big caged pool! Lots of upgrades like whole house generator, stainless steel appliances, fireplace, huge Florida room and RV carport. Priced to sell at only $23 4,900! ONE, OF ONL Y A VERY FEW 3BR /2BA units, available in Meadowcrest at a hard to beat price! Spacious open floor plan, eat-in kitchen, screen lanai, indoor utility rm. & 2-car garage! Split bedroom plan. Clean and ready for immediate occupancy Heat/A.C. and roof approx. 6 yrs old. RIVERHAVEN WA TERFRONT Water front lowered their price again! 3/3/2 with new kitchen awaits your approval. Indoor spa room with beautiful bath off the master. Canal only a short distance to river and house is across the street from park-like area. Drive by 5 109 S. Running Brook Dr. 7696 N. LAZY TRAIL, CRYSTAL RIVER 4.87 Acres Fenced & Cross-Fenced 3BR/2BA/3CG Custom Home Extremely Energy Efficient Hickory Cabinets/Silestone Counters Enclosed Lanai 12x24 Workshop w/Electricity & Water 1276 E. ALLEGRIE DRIVE CLEARVIEW ESTATES 3BR/2.5BA/2CG Home Great Room Kitchen w/Eat-in-Area Master Suite w/Office Lanai w/View of Equestrian Trail 9051 E. KINGSPORT, INVERNESS I mmaculately Maintained In & Out! B uilt in 1992But Looks Like New 2/2/2 With Family Room Approx 1,701 Sq. Ft. Living Reshingled Roof i n 2008 L ight & Bright Home Come Take A Look! CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2/1 WATERFRONT IN THE ISLANDS Situated on a wide canal to Dixie Bay. Tiled throughout, all appliances. Neat, clean and ready to move into. Perfect winter residence, or full-time living. Priced to sell, so dont miss out. (352) 637-2828 Enter house #14 MLS #702558 $249,500 $249,500 $249,500 LUXURIOUS!! INVERNESS (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5366 MLS #703151 $149,900 $149,900 $149,900 INVERNESS! (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1862 MLS #705928 $59,900 $59,900 $59,900 $234,900 $234,900 $234,900 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 2439 W. DEVON DR. CITRUS SPRINGS 3BD/1.5 BA Secluded Location Over 1,600 SF Living 2 Blocks from Park Large Family Rm. Shed, Fruit Trees MLS #701907 $64,900 $64,900 $64,900 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #2439 3575 N. LONGPINE PT. LAKESIDE VILLAGE 2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance-Free Villa Split Bedroom Plan Den or Family Room Inside Laundry Neutral Colors MLS #705858 $59,900 $59,900 $59,900 24/7 INFO LINE ( 352) 637-2828 Enter house #3575 $119,900 $119,900 $119,900 MLS #704784 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1095 INV. GOLF EST. (NO HOA FEES) $94,500 $94,500 $94,500 $279,900 $279,900 $279,900 MLS #703583 $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 OPEN HOUSE SUND AY 11-3PM MLS #703091 $245,900 $245,900 $245,900 GULF ACCESS $205,000 $205,000 $205,000 MLS #R706078 PRIVACY ON 4.9 ACRES This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is tucked away on 4.9 wooded acres which it shares with wild turkeys, deer, and other Florida wildlife. The home features a great room with fireplace, new appliances, large master suite with jetted tub and separate shower, and a huge Florida room overlooking the wooded acres. Privacy galore yet only minutes to town, State parks, hiking trails, and waterways. MLS #704816 $164,500 $164,500 $164,500 REDUCED PRICE REDUCED HOMOSASSA Remodeled Real Beauty 2/2/1 on 2.6 Acres Private Pond & Greenhouse Cast Iron Stove in Living Area Massive Back Deck 2 Large Master Suites 24 x 14 Screened Patio MLS #700482 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 2-STORY POOL HOME with 2,500 Sq. Ft Living 3 BR, 2.5 BATH 2-Car Garage 2005 Built HUGE Lanai (40 Ft.) Living & Fam. Rm. Laminate Flooring Upstairs LOFT Brick PAVERS MLS #705350 $159,900 $159,900 $159,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #7557 CITRUS SPRINGS SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com LOVE THE KITCHEN! 3 Bedroom/2Bath/2-Car Garage Energy Efficient New Floors New Appliances New Lennox AC New Water Treatment All for the low, low price of $94,500! MLS #704399 $94,500 $94,500 $94,500 INVERNESS JOHN HOLLOWAY, SR. CRS, GRI, ABR, e -PRO Email: JohnHolloway@tampabay.rr.com www.TheHollowayTeam.com STEAL THIS HOME!!! Awesome Sugarmill W oods home that screams value!!! 3 bedroom split plan plus a den/office. Large rooms and massive, soaring ceilings. Eat-in kitchen with breakfast bar. Deluxe master bath & HU GE 3-car garage. Clean, modern, fresh look. S o much more! MLS #704168 $199,000 $199,000 $199,000 #1 in Citrus County OVER $100 MILLION SOLD! B ILL D ECKER 352-464-0647 S USAN M ULLEN 352-422-2133 V ICTORIA F RANKLIN 352-427-3777 000GDDX Terms 6 Months or More Social Membership included with all Rentals Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Maintenance-free villa with an open floor plan design with great use of the space. Driftwood model 3 bedroom, 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, living room, family room, formal dining room, ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car oversized garage, all situated in beautiful Terra Vista. MLS# 703250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,000 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths, great room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on Skyview Golf Course with breathtaking views. Oversized lanai with lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra Vista. MLS# 702685 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $334,900 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Enjoy maintenance-free living in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vistas. Dual pane sliding glass pocket doors lead out to a beautiful screened private inground pool and lanai. Its the perfect place to enjoy your morning coffee in the fresh Florida air. MLS# 358772 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $229,900 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath split plan home in Brentwood. Great room, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook, inside laundry room and a 2-car garage. NO monthly maintenance fee with this single family home. Access to the Citrus Hills and Terra Vista amenities too! MLS# 704406 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $123,000 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 5-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH Spectacular 3/3/5 with golf course view in premiere country club community of Terra Vista. Home has all of the upgrades of a custom home including a 12x24 pool, gas fireplace, built-in entertainment center, upgraded maple cabinets, upgraded stainless steel appliances, crown moldings and double-glazed insulated windows/sliders, tray ceilings, tile floors and more, plus one-of-a-kind, additional 2nd garage with expanded area for workshop, special car or boat. In prestigious condition. CH Membership required. MLS# 357110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $469,000 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Luxurious unfurnished home in Terra Vista for rent. Formal living areas with a spacious open family room. Upgraded SS appliances with a gas stove and granite countertops in this gourmet kitchen. Social Club membership included. #1245 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. Open floor plan with lots of space. Social membership is included. #2121 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,100 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Maintenance-free fully furnished 2 bed, 2 bath villa in Terra Vista. Ready to move into. Social membership included. #3102 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Exceptional and fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath, 2 car, 5,375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen Great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. #5375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,300 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS This lovely Terra Vista 3/2 home is the ideal place for any occasion, whether seasonal use, retirement, or full-time living! From the sliders to the lanai overlooking the large yard, to formal dining area ideal for your gatherings, this home has what youve been looking for. Let others maintain the exterior while you enjoy the social life that comes with the social membership! MLS# 703807 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $288,000 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE Luxury and storage! With over 3,600 square feet of gorgeously appointed living space this home has all the options. The tall cherry cabinets, Corian countertops, SS appliances and walk-in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. The massive formal living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring which carries through to the spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting area & TWO walk-in closets, Split floor plan, guest bedrooms w/direct bath access & huge walk-in closets. A beautiful terrace garden and an oversized 2-car garage with a separate golf cart entrance complete this fabulous home. MLS# 700959 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $434,900 BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR This is maintenancefree, Florida living at its BEST! This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1-car garage townhome is located in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great room with living and dining combo, eat-in kitchen. Spacious bedrooms upstairs, master suite with walk-in closet. Nice open floor plan, screened lanai, professionally decorated, furniture negotiable. MLS# 359587 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,900 Red maple will require a humus-rich planting bed and supplemental irrigation if planted in drier, sandy conditions that prevail locally. It may live from 50 to 80 years in well-tended gardens, lawn tree rings and park settings.JANE WEBER/ Special to the Chronicle JANEContinued from Page E6

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flowers is inexpensive and fairly uncomplicated, but its not a quick process, particularly if youre covering a large wreath. So find a good scary movie on TV and settle in for a lot of cutting, rolling and gluing. Pairing newspaper with black and orange cardstock to make a decorative garland on the other hand is both easy and fast. Just use a paper punch to cut the paper into circles, and run them through the sewing machine to chain them together.WreathMaterials: Foam wreath form. Newspaper. Hot glue gun and glue sticks. Scissors. Mini pumpkins or other embellishments. Instructions: 1. Cut several sheets of newspaper into 1.5 inch strips. Wrap them around the wreath form, overlapping each strip slightly, until it is covered. This will make it less obvious if there any gaps between the paper flowers that will be glued on later. 2. Stack three sheets of newspaper and trace a small salad plate or similarly-sized round object on the top layer as many times as it will fit. Cut circles out of all three layers. 3. Hold three paper circles together in a stack and starting at the outside edge, cut through all layers in a spiral shape, moving from the outside toward the center. Try to keep the width of the resulting spiral-shaped strip consistent mine were about 3/4 of an inch but it doesnt have to be perfect. Real flower petals arent! 4. When you get close to the center, make the end of the spiral a quarter-sized circle. This will become the base of the flower. 5. Starting from the outer edge of the spiral, start rolling the paper strip around itself. Roll the center fairly tightly, and then the rest looser to form the outer petals. 6. When you get close to the end, flip the flower upside down on your work surface (it will resemble a tiny lampshade at this point) and apply glue to base of the flower. Press it against the rolled up paper to securely adhere the coiled paper to the base. 7. Repeat steps 2-6 to make enough flowers to cover your wreath. 8. Use hot glue to attach flowers to the wreath, placing them close together and avoiding gaps. 9. Embellish as desired.GarlandMaterials: Newspaper. Black card stock. Orange card stock. 1.5 inch paper punch. Sewing machine. Thread. Instructions: 1. Use paper punch to cut circles from newspaper and cardstock. 2. Sew across one paper circle, and then continue running the machine to create a chain of thread extending from the circle. You can place the next circle right up against the previous, or leave a bit of thread in between. 3. Continue sewing paper circles in a chain, alternating with newspaper and card stock until garland reaches the desired length. Park Service mission to preserve and protect lands within the state park system, as well as park visitors, removal of non-native and invasive species is necessary and essential, Florida Park Service spokeswoman Jessica Sims stated last year. This month, however, Donald Forgione, with the Division of Recreation and Parks, which is part of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, and director of the states parks, said that while the divisions official stance is to remove nonnative animal and plant species from the parks, there are no current efforts to remove the monkeys. There are some safety issues that we have concerns with, with the visitors and monkeys, but we havent trapped in a year and half. We really havent gotten the results we wanted, so we are looking at alternatives, Forgione said. Its a balance. We dont want to chase after monkeys if its not the right thing to do. Earlier this month, the former Silver Springs attraction became a state park and merged with the existing Silver River State Park to form the Silver Springs State Park. Most of the monkeys live in the park area. Past attempts to get rid of the monkeys have met with strong opposition and Gottschalk said his research has led him to side with those who want to leave the monkeys alone. What I really learned is that we have basically 80 years of empirical evidence that shows that there is no observable damage to the environment because they are there, Gottschalk said. He has identified four distinct groups of monkeys that have their own territories along the river. He estimates the total population is between 100 and 120 monkeys. He has given them names, including King Philip, Isabella, Venus and Squish, and recognizes them on sight. After years of calm, there lately is trouble among the four groups, which Gottschalk identifies as Esther, Bobcat, Davinci and Athens. The Bobcat and Athens groups, in particular, have gotten into heated battles. They are getting new leaders now, so they have to re-establish boundaries. They have had some really significant battles. The Bobcat group leader got ripped to shreds, but he survived, Gottschalk said. During a recent trip down the river, the monkeys displayed how their hierarchy works. The alpha male named King Philip was being pestered by a younger monkey. King Philip bared his teeth, but when that didnt settle down the young upstart, King Philip got physical. Before the attack got out of hand, however, the females came in and broke up the fracas. It is a matrilineal society. Each group is led by an alpha female. She is able to control the male, who is there mainly for protection of the group. If she cant control him by herself, she calls in her sisters to get him back in line again, Gottschalk said. One of the main arguments for getting rid of the monkeys is that they can carry the hepatitis B virus, which can infect humans. But, Gottschalk said, there have been 40 documented transmittals of the virus from monkeys to humans and those were all in the laboratory setting. But he does concede the monkeys can be dangerous. They can be very aggressive toward humans. They can inflict painful bites. Those monkeys have teeth an inch long, he said. Simple things like staring the animals in the eye can set off an attack. To them, thats a challenge. Its harassment, Gottschalk said. Originally from southeast Asia, the monkeys have adapted well to the Florida surroundings. They are mostly vegetarian, but they really like the long jawed orb spider. They are common on the river and whenever they spot one they eat them like candy, Gottschalk said. Though his research is not affiliated with any university, Gottschalk has helped other researchers from the City University of New York, San Diego State University and the University of Florida. LISA CRIGAR/The Ocala Star-BannerAn alpha male called King Phillip, or snaggletooth because of his right fang hanging over his lower lip, displays a threat call along the shoreline of the Silver River in Floridas Silver Springs State Park. Citizen biologist Bob Gottschalk of Lady Lake has studied on the rhesus macaques along the Silver River for about six years. CARLOSE. MEDINA Ocala Star-BannerSILVER SPRINGS STATE PARK For Bob Gottschalk, the Silver River monkeys have become an important part of his life. He has given them names and knows their behavior. He documents what they eat and how they interact with one another. He knows which of the rhesus macaques are the alpha males and females, and even collects their droppings to get insights into their health. He has no funding and is not working for any institution or group. The citizen biologist, as he calls himself, studies the monkeys to satisfy his own curiosity. Plus, its fun. Gottschalk visits the monkeys every Tuesday. Its a routine he has broken only a handful of times in the last six years. He became fascinated with the monkeys soon after retiring to Lady Lake from Iowa, where he worked for John Deere as a chemical and metallurgical engineer. But his degree is in biology and he has worked with animals for most of his life. When the opportunity came up with the monkeys, I thought it was great for me, Gottschalk said. We dont have monkeys in Iowa. He found out about the monkeys while working at an animal rescue facility. Soon, he was up to speed on the animals history on the river. He heard about how they were first released in the late 1930s on an island in the Silver River to serve as a tourist attraction. The monkeys, however, are strong natural swimmers and quickly escaped the island. He also learned about the decades-long debate on what to do with the monkeys. Floridas official position is that they are an invasive species and have to go. As part of the FloridaCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E3 E14SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 000GDEH J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 and Century 21 Real Estate Corporation Equal Housing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED KAREN E. MORTON (352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 Hall of Fame Centurion Member E-mail: kemorton@tampabay.rr.com Website: karenemorton.com CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE ** WATERFRONT 6.35 ACRES OWNER BUILDER ** Inverness livable luxury radiates throughout this 4 BR, 4 BA custom home. 4,098 sq. ft. living area State-ofthe-art kitchen with commercial range top-of-the-line appliances Super energy efficient features Zoned system Family room overlooking beautiful caged inground swimming pool 3 car garage on home PLUS Detached 60 x 59 workshop/6 car garage/office/guest apt. Generator equipped. BELOW REPLACEMENT COST. MLS#703576 $745,000 (below replacement cost) HERON WOODS 3BR, 2BA, on CUL-DE-SAC Tile Flooring Eat-in Kitchen Fenced Private Backyard Great View from Rear Family Neighborhood Playground/Park Basketball Court MLS #706019. $69,900 WONDERFUL SNOWBIRD RETREAT Spotless and sparkling 2 bedroom, 2 bath DW mobile home on your own lot NO LOT RENT!! County water system fenced yard New metal roof 2012 new carpet 2012 Open kitchen and living area inside laundry covered front and rear porches to enjoy the cool evenings. Priced to sell! MLS#706011 $37,500 INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH ** SWIMMING POOL PLUS WORKSHOP/2ND GARAGE Mrs. Clean lives here Spotless 2 bedroom home with den/office both bedrooms are suites Huge master bedroom 20 x 15 endless storage everywhere Bright and Cheery kitchen all newer appliances Florida Room Oversized cag ed in-ground swimming pool 2 car garage on home PLUS detached 2 car garage for vehicles or workshop RV parking area This home is move-in ready!! Convenient to Inverness. MLS #704557 $159,900. BEST OF THE BEST!!! Sweetwater home on 5 acres Gorgeous hickory cabinets 2800+ living area 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car garage Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances Engineered maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family room with glass windows overlooking the Florida natural backyard with wildlife feeding at your doorstep. Owners feeders bring the birds and wildlife in your backyardtruly amazing. 45x28 RV storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and truly better than new. MLS #704048. $324,900. OPEN WATERFRONT *JAMES ISLAND Lake Henderson premier location 3 BR, 3 BA Pool Home Fireplace Formal and casual area with large game room Updates throughout Caged in-ground swimming pool Boat house with lift. Owner sacrifice MLS #702113 $489,000 R EDUCED BELMONT HILLS Elegant 4 bedroom 3 bath Formal living and dining PLUS family room overlooking your caged in-ground swimming pool* Great plan. MLS #705846 $298,900 NEW LISTING CITRUS HILLS CUSTOM SHOWPLACE HOME Nestled in the woods 3 BR 2 BA 2 car garage Patio Covered Front Porch Nice Landscaping Mature Trees Larger master Open Living Area Morning Room Well Maintained Large Master. MLS#702951 $163,900. START YOUR ORGANIC FARM HERE! One of the larger tracts in the city limits. One owner-custom cedar home is truly one of a kind. Close the forest for great trail riding. Super convenient to townjust around the corner. 2700+ sq. ft liv. area. Great rm. w/beautiful beamed ceiling, stone fireplace, wood and laminate flooring, 3 bedrooms (one currently used as art studio), wrap around porches, fencing, pastures, barn. This ranch is turn-key. Call for showing. # 359026. $449,900 19 ACRES R EDUCED CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME 4BR PLUS office, 2.5BAs, original owner, decorator upgrades. Formal living and casual areas, quality tile floors. Fam. rm. w/gas fpl. Caged inground pool, volume ceilings, Transom windows for natural lighting. Master suite with lg. walk-in shower, garden tub. This home has over 2860 sq. ft. living area and 3 car gar. All neutral colors. Retired owner has maintained this homelooks like new!! Price below replacement at $289,900. MLS #357668 4BR, W/POOL 000G7AR The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD. Jason Gaffney Realtor 287-9022 302-3179 746-6700 Jackie Gaffney Realtor 000GE9B wesellrealestatefast@yahoo.com A HOUSE SOLD Name! $69,900 388 W SUGARMAPLE BEVERLY HILLS WHAT A BEAUTY!!! 2/2/1 ALL THATS NEW... Carpeting, double paned windows, garage door, water heater, refrigerator, front screened porch, 11x12 screened lanai, interior paint turnkey. Private back yard. Close to school and shopping. Retiree studies monkey population Rhesus macaques were brought to Silver Springs in 1930s See MONKEYS / Page E14 CRAFTSContinued from Page E5 MONKEYSContinued from Page E3

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Special to the Chronicle A free gardening workshop will be offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. Water quality should concern all who live in Florida. This gardening presentation will offer landscape opportunities which are creative and functional gardening suggestions encouraging water conservation and quality. Rain gardens, fertilization practices and irrigation management are topics which offer landscape gardeners opportunities to protect our water resources. Several landscape design solutions will be discussed to aid in natural water filtration in the residential landscape. A free gardening workshop will be offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and 19 at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. Material hardiness zones are a critical factor in the proper selection of sustainable plants. This workshop introduces participants to criteria to consider when selecting materials, their placement in the landscape and potential frost protection encouraged to reduce material loss. The average low temperature in Citrus County is between 20 and 25 degrees and should be considered when looking at plants for installation in local landscapes. How to care for plants after damaging frost are also topics for discussion. A free gardening workshop will be offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. Winter is a great time to plan and prepare garden projects for the upcoming milder season. Garden planning, estimating cost and garden clean-outs are important topics to consider when outdoor work is delayed. It is also a great time of year to enjoy the outdoors with activities like bird watching. Creating natural buffers which attract birds is an excellent project to consider during this time of year. These topics will be discussed during this presentation. Karis Geistfeld named top agentKaris Geistfeld has been named the top sales agent for September at the Villages of Citrus Hills. Her year-todate newhome sales are $4.9 million. The Welcome Center for the Villages of Citrus Hills is located at 2400 N. Terra Vista Boulevard in Citrus Hills. Visit online at www.CitrusHills.com.RE/MAX agents soar to new highsThe associates and staff of RE/MAX Realty One are pleased to announce that they have passed a significant milestone in sales volume. The company has successfully closed more than $100 million in real estate transactions this year. RE/MAX Realty One is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. They are the only company to pass the $100 million mark in 2013.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E13 E4SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G9CJ 000GEEZ SWEETWATER POINTE Exquisite setting on 1.5 acre, ravishing views, custom built residence, 3925 sq. ft., golf cart garage, pool, den & office, crafted with attention to detail the right home for a discriminating taste. Golf cart path to Inverness G&CC. $249,000 Investors Realty of Citrus County, Inc. Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com REALT OR Cell: (352) 220-0466 gbarth@myflorida-house.com GITT A BARTH 000BOSH SECONDS TO KINGS BAY no bridges! 2 master suites, apartment on the lower level. Upper level accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane shutters, security system, updated kitchen & bath rooms. 190 ft. of seawall, boat lift! Everything just waiting for you. $488,000 COUNTR Y ESTA TE PLEASANT GRO VE Magnificent 451 1 sq. ft. estate, custom built 2007 on 5 acres MOL. Exceptional quality throughout: vaulted tongue & groove ceilings, fireplace; granite counters & custom cabinetry; family room, den/of fice, 2 + 2 car garage. Exquisite outdoor entertaining: Jenn-Air summer kitchen, covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings. $549,900 ROOM TO ROAM! Spectacular 3/2/2 pool home w/lar ge lanai on 2.14 ac! HUGE 25x40 detached garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for your R V. Nicely landscaped with pretty oaks and well maintained, too. New roof (2013), 14 Seer HV AC (2009), generator & perimeter alarm. $249,895 CAPTIVA TING VIEW over Floral City Lake!!! 1.2 ac (160 x 300+ ft.), picturesque setting with major oak trees. Charming brick home, first time offered, some original fixtures and fireplace still in place. Large detached garage w/workshop, seawall. $179,000 CRYST AL RIVER SOLITUDE A taste of unspoiled nature: secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ponds, mature oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully positioned in a beautiful setting! This Shangri-La can be yours for $800,000 Get a taste of it & visit http://www .mycrystalriverfarm.com/ for an interactive tour. OUTSTANDING Waterfront residence: tastefully remodeled 3/2.5/2 home, high & dry (never flooded), ample space (0.42 ac) for boats, toys & pets. Boat slip, docks, 240ft seawall, workshop, shed. Updated roof, A/C, kitchen, windows, everything meticulous maintained.. Priced sooo right at 399,000! NEW 000GDEE 000GDYT INCOME PROPERT Y 8 Mobile Homes on 12 Acres in INVERNESS Good rental income $48,000/year low vacancy rate, great visibility, many updates including C H/A systems, septics, lg. pole barn, 8 storage buildings, central water system. Owner will consider trade/owner financing to qualified buyer MLS# 359656 LETS MAKE A DEAL! LISTED A T $ 325,000 DEB INF ANTINE ERA AMERICAN REAL TY 117 S. US 41, Inverness, FL 34450 Call 352-302-8046 debinfantine@yahoo.com CITRUS RIDGE REALTY 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 www.citrusbestbuy.com T om Balfour REALT OR Amanda & Kirk Johnson BROKER/ASSOC. REALT OR, GRI Art Paty REALT OR Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner REALT OR BROKER 746-9000 000GE97 HERNANDO 4210 E. L AKE PARK DR. 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 2435 W ERIC 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 WATERFRONT WATERFRONT WA TERFRONT 45 S. DESOTO 2/1/1 704027 $42,500 BEVERL Y HILLS CITRUS HILL S 2275 N. EUSTIS PT 2/2/1 703801 $84,900 VILLA PINE RIDGE 3050 W MUSTANG 3/3/3 702967 $379,000 2011 POOL 137 N. FRESNO 3/2/2 701884 $119,900 1.3 ACRE CITRUS HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 87 S. L UCILLE 2/2/2 703454 $79,500 BEVERL Y HILLS OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING CITRUS SPRINGS 1852 W LANDMARK 3/2/2 705749 $129,900 CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 1974 W. ALHAMBRA 3/2/2 705787 $108,000 1820 W BEGONIA DR. 3/2/2 Pine Ridge pool home 705806 $147,500 BEVERL Y HILLS 9 N. W ADSWORTH 3/1.5 704088 $52,500 213 S. TYLER 2/1.5/1 702531 $67,500 BEVERL Y HILLS FL ORAL CITY 9459 S. KING BIRD 2/1/1 $49,900 6898 W. SEDALIA CT. 2/2 $39,900 HOM OSASS A POOL PINE RIDGE 5558 N. CARNATION DR. 3/3/3 Pine Ridge pool home 705974 $320,000 PINE RIDGE POOL BEVERL Y HILLS 19 N. AD AMS 2/1.5 704683 $48,500 38 S COL UMBUS 2/2 704687 $55,900 BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS 52 S. FILLMORE 2/1/1 704090 $45,900 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING Real EstateDIGEST Karis GeistfeldThe Villages of Citrus Hills. Extension slates gardening workshops WEEKLY LINEUP Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in Health & Life./ Tuesdays Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicles Education section./ Wednesdays Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food section./ Thursdays Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./ Fridays See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion section./ Saturdays Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays Service provides vital information to Florida green thumbs To control fruit flies, start by regularly discarding overripe fruit. It also helps to clean kitchen sink drains, where bits of fruits or their juices may lodge. You could, of course, bypass the whole problem by not having any ripe fruit indoors except in the refrigerator. We gardeners know, however, how cold deadens the flavors of garden-fresh fruits, and even ruins the flavors of some, such as tomatoes and bananas. Fortunately, some simple devices can help in the war against fruit flies. Theres some primal satisfaction in just swatting at them with a rolled-up, wet facecloth, or you could go a little more high-tech and vacuum them up right out of the air. Both of these methods must, of course, be kept up on a regular basis. Traps take less participation. For the simplest trap, just set out a glass of wine to which some dish detergent has been added and be sure to label the glass so no one drinks the liquid. After landing on this liquid for a drink, fruit flies become wetted and are unable to take off again. Another trap capitalizes on fruit flies low intelligence: A funnel set spout down over the opening of an upright glass filled with bait provides easy entry but clever exit, too clever for fruit flies. A number of commercial traps, such as the Contech Fruit Fly Trap, work on these same principles and are also effective. Newly emerged fruit flies are attracted to light, a habit that can lead to their undoing. Shade all the windows in your kitchen except one, and leave only a crack of light coming through the bottom of that window. Put a baited dish near that opening, wait a while, then rush the dish, with attendant flies, outdoors. On the same theme, darken with paper or dark paint the upper third of a one-quart jar, then coat the inside of the jar with something sticky such as honey or vegetable oil. Invert the jar, raised off the counter with some small blocks of wood, over some bait. Flies will feed and then fly up toward the light, where they will be trapped. The flies are attracted to yeasts that cause fermentation, so any piece of fruit, even yeast and water, are suitable bait. Or you can mix up a feed of mashed bananas and agar, just as I did when rearing fruit flies in junior high school science class. cheese fresh in a fashionable manner. The decorations and shapes were influenced by most of the styles of the time, making them now fun to collect. I think your cheese dish was made in the 1880s to 1890s. The stylish dolphin handle on the lid adds to collector interest. The floral decoration appears to be hand-painted. The cracks in the base and the chips on the dolphin handle affect the dollar value negatively. As-is potential dollar value would be in the $10 to $20 range. Dear John: I inherited these two vases from my grandma, and she received them from a friend who said her mother purchased them at the Worlds Fair in St. Louis around 1909. Can you tell me anything more about them and how much they are worth? K.L.C., HomosassaDear K.L.C.: Worlds Fair memorabilia is a large category of collector interest. The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 was informally known as the St. Louis Worlds Fair. Your vases appear to be made of good porcelain and handpainted. I will assume there are no marks anywhere on the vases indicating they were sold at the Worlds Fair, taking them out of that category of collecting. Potential dollar value is below $50 each. Dear John: These two items belonged to my in-laws. I have had them a while, but never knew where they came from or how old they are. Can you tell me anything about them? I would appreciate hearing anything you can tell me. E.M., Internet Dear E.M.: The serving dish in the form of a leaf is called Majolica. Majolica is a brightly colored pottery that was produced in England, Europe, and the United States during the 19th and early 20th century. It has been a category of collector interest for decades. The piece you have was likely made in America during the early 20th century. Potential dollar value is below $50. The jardinire was also made in America. The category is Art Pottery. I think it was made during the 1920s to 1940s. I assume it is not marked by the maker. Potential dollar value is $10 to $20. John Sikorski has been a professional in the antiques business for 30 years. He hosts a call-in radio show, Sikorskis Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorskis Attic, P .O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or asksikorski@aol.com. FLIESContinued from Page E7 ATTICContinued from Page E6

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E5 E12SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Need a JOB? #1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW T O LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Sat., Oct 26 10am Preview Fri 10-5 Sat 8-10 000GAPJ ANTIQUES, JEWELRY & COLLECTIBLESATM Antiques & Auctions LLC811 SE US Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL700+ Antiques, Jewelry, Paintings, Bronzes, Furniture & More.13%BP VS MC DS Cash & Check See web for complete terms.www.charliefudge.comAB3279, AE450, AU1593 Pine Ridge Estates Sunday 10/20 1p-5p 4940 W Horseshoe Dr Mini-Storage Facility on US Hwy 19 Homosassa, Florida2.74 acres with 150 storage units of varying sizes-40 dry storage units-office for business and additional office for rental income. Asking $625,000.00 owner financing to qualified buyer with 25% down. Contact Diana G. Marcum PALicensed Real Estate Broker 352-341-0900 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience 352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Imperial Exec for the investor or Handyman. (2/3/2) CASH ONLY 48K. 527-1239 Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2 bath with fireplace, sauna, and garage. 2 acres w/fruit trees, garden ready. 352-422-7136 Well maint ained bright villa. Split floor plan. 2 Master BR w/ walk in closets & priv baths. Lanai w. glass/screen $74,900 352-795-1648 TOTALL Yrenovated 2Br/2 Ba Meadowview patio home; enlarged kitchen, new cabinetry, new appliances, screened lanai, 1 car garage, 1 ceiling fan/rm, new Puron a/c, new screens, new gutters/ guards, furnished. $80k 2272 N Eustis Pt, Hernando. Call 352-746-6185 for appointment FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM Inverness city living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2006 townhouse in great condition. Low maintenance & easy access to shopping, etc. $87,500. Ed Pechan, Parsley Real Estate, 352-400-1230 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM 2005 MEADOWCREST (Fox Hollow) BEAUTY. 3/2/2 Lg Split BR, Cul-d-sac.See pics @ www.forsalebyowner .co m #23967875 Call 724-813-8624. AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Connell Heights 4/2/2 Pool Home, Spacious, FP, fenced back yd. custom built 2005, Great Location $195k 352-422-7077 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL ? CALLME T ODAY HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALT ORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunt s homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorWANT IT SOLDHouse not selling? Behind in payment s? Upside down in mortgage? CALL ME I can help Phyllis Strickland TROPIC SHORES REALTY. 352-613-3503-cell 352-419-6880-Office BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments Forest Lake, Hernando 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5 Acres, Fenced. Many extras including 24x36 Shop/garage. Sun Room with Wood Burning Stove. Fruit trees. 2 8x10 Storage Sheds. Security System. See ad on 4SaleByOwner for pictures. 352 726-7755 I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda W attCustomer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Get Results In The Homefront Classifieds! Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com 3 BR, 3 BA, Condo 2100 sq. ft., Furnished, Carport, Citrus Hills on Hartford $119,000. Call 352-419-5268 Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres! Just $89,900. Bring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x 436 LAND & CABIN PACKAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLATEAU! 10 Acres and 1200 sq. ft. cabin $49,900. Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 Six day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1,175.00. Yours today for only $389.00! You SA VE 67 percent. PLUS One-week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-985-1463 OPEN HOUSESUNDAY 20, 12N 4P 3/2 W ater fr ont Home 2310 N. Watersedge Crystal River (352) 586-4822 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties NORTH GEORGIA Long Flowing Creek Property, Secluded on culdesac. Perfect retreat near Oktoberfest in Helen, GA. Utilities in place ready to build for $29,900. 1-877-717-8992 ext591 Streamfr ont Land Bargain! 1.7 acr e wooded corner parcel in Blue Ridge Mtns. 390 on crystal clear stream, Natural year-round spring. Paved road, municipal water, utilities, mild restrictions RV friendly. Was $69,900 now, $27,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 63 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter .com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips www.FloridaSho wcasePr operties.com SERVING ALL OF CITRUS COUNTY 000GE9A PINE RIDGE 1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 527-1820 CITRUS HILLS 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 746-0744 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with n o other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Pr ud en ti al R ea l Es ta te Ta ke s TH RE E of F ou r Ca te go ri es i n J. D. P ow er an d As so ci at es 20 13 Ho me B uy er /S el le r St ud y! Re pe at H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Se ll er OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Open 7 Days A Week! 534 E. Knightsbridge Pl. MLS 704309 $141,900 Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy efficient home on an acre lot. Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E. Reehill St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R on Knightsbridge Pl. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 1059 W. Skyview Crossing Dr. MLS 705955 $237,900 Maintenance-free luxury 2/2/2 + den with lake views. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr. MLS 355561 $299,000 Beautiful 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres. Bring your horses! Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 218 S. Harrison St. MLS 704869 $68,900 Remodeled & updated 2/2/1. Centrally located. Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261 681 E. Hartford St. $750 Furnished, upper unit, no membership, $750 F/L/SD. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING RENTAL BRENTWOOD RENTALS Choose from one of two unfurnished, completely maintained properties in The Brentwood gated neighborhood. All for less than $1,000 per month. Both units have a family social membership to the Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club included in their more than reasonable rent. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 364 E. Dakota Ct. MLS 706039 $214,900 Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2 with caged pool. Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to R on Dakota. Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Citrus Hills Citrus Citrus Hills Hills 1121 N. Chance W ay MLS 702458 $196,900 3bd/2ba home w/beautiful pool. Directions: Hwy 486 (Norvell Bryant Hwy) to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, L on E. Hartford St, R on Chance. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 C am br id ge Gr ee ns C am br id ge Cambridge Gr ee ns Gr eens K en si ng to n Es ta te s K en si ng to n Kensington Es ta te s Estates 738 W Doerr Path MLS 705982 $344,900 Spectacular golf home set high on a cul-de-sac. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 T er ra Vi st a T er ra Terr a Vi st a Vista T er ra Vi st a T er ra Terr a Vi st a Vista B el mo nt Hi ll s B el mo nt Belmont Hi ll s H ills 1571 E. Seattle Slew Cir MLS 705988 $199,900 3/2/2 gated community in Citrus Hills. Near amenities. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 C it ru s Hi ll s C it ru s Citrus Hi ll s H ills 1100 W Pearson St. MLS 705976 $128,500 Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with fabulous upgraded features. Helen Forte 352-220-4764 P in e Ri dg e P in e Pine Ri dg e Ridge 5150 N. Pink Poppy Dr MLS 705423 $208,000 Beautiful country style with green features 3/2/2/pool. And what a front porch! Joy Holland 352-464-4952 P in e Ri dg e P in e Pine Ri dg e Ridge B ev er ly Hi ll s B ev er ly Bev erly Hi ll s H ills G re en br ie r G re en br ie r Greenbrier HOLLYRAMER Associated PressWhats black and white and orange all over? Creative Halloween decorations made out of newspaper. Black and white newsprint is a perfect starting point for spooky crafts. A lightweight foam wreath form covered with newspaper roses looks elegant on its own, but can be dressed up with mini faux pumpkins, glittery berries, a swarm of spiders or bats, or any other embellishments. Making the Associated PressWith its black and white color scheme, newspaper can be the perfect starting point for Halloween crafts. Just add some orange accents and turn newspapers into easy garlands or more elaborate paper flowers to adorn a wreath. Use old papers to make Halloween decorations Black and white give appropriate accent See CRAFTS / Page E14 GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E11 E6SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! CRYSTAL RIVER2/1, $525, & 2/1 $575 (352) 584-3348 HOMOSASSA3/2 on 490 near 19, lrg lot, Sale or Rent, Zone GNC, $450 mo + Ref. 352-628-3019 INVERNESS2/2 plus den. Inground pool w/ lg yard. $575 plus unilities. No smking (740) 610-7941 3 BR, 2BA, Attached screen rm & carport 55+ park. Lot rent $235 includes water & trash pickup, great for snowbird or elderly person $12,500. (352) 212-4265 HOMOSASSADrastically reduced! Was asking $74,000 now asking $59,900. Illness forces sale. 3/2 ,1 acres, 95% remodeled, 16x16 workshop. (352) 621-0192 Palm Harbor Factory Liquidation Sale 6 models to choose from, 1200 sq ft up to 2400 sq ft.....$12K off!! John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext. 210 NEVER LIVED IN REPO!2013, 28x56, 3/2 Their loss is your gain! Delivered & set up with AC, steps & skirting. Use your old trade-only $487.46/ mo. W.A.C. Call 352-621-9182 NICE HOME ON ACREFenced yard, 1500 sq. ft., 3/2 home in new cond. with 2 x6 construction. New appliances, carpet, paint, new decks & tile flooring. I can finance. $3,500. dwn $394.80/mo. P & I W.A.C. We have land & home pkgs $59,900 to $69,900 352-621-9181 RENTERS WANTEDWhy rent when you can own? We can put you in your own home. Credit problems o.k. As low as $2,000. down& only $105/ wk. Call for more info & locations. Call 352-621-3807 USED HOMES/ REPOSDoublewides From $8,500. Singlewides From $3,500. New inventory daily We buy used homes (352) 621-9183 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 12X60 MOBILE HOME + 16x20 addition, 2BR, 1BA, 80x200 lot with10x12 shed. 6 appliances incl. $31,500. (352) 344-9565 Castle Lake Park INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt scnd lanai, steel roof, caged inground pool, 1 acre, no HOA fees, $69k (352) 238-4521 Homosassa` 2BR,1BA furnished, enclosed lanai, carport, 2 sheds, cyclone fence, 1/2 acre,$21,500 352-628-3899 Crystal River 2bd/2ba double-wide with Sun Room in Crystal River Village $20,500. or lease to buy. Pls call Dell Nora at 352-795-7161 Inverness 55+ 2Br/1Ba CHA, price reduced to $5,000.352-419-6644 2BR/1Ba CHA, lots of extras. Price reduced for quick sale. 341-1237 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $15,000 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $270 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 Lecanto2/2, 55+ Senior Park $11,500, furn. lot rent $245. incl. trash & water (219) 929-8909 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000GE0J www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO 2332 W.Silverhill Ln. (L) . . . . . $5502/1 nice affordable apartment, ground floor 87 S. Adams (BH) . . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5/1 newly remodeled cute homeCRYSTAL RIVER 10941 W.Gem St. . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 nice clean duplex close to Duke and Hospital 9200 N. Perseus Ter.. . . . . . . . $6502/2 remodeled DW on 1 acre! 874 NE 1st Ter.. . . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 nice home close to schools & shoppingHOMOSASSA 7088 W.Green Acres St. . . . . . $7003/2 Charming home over 1700 sq. ft. 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . . $1,0002/2 Great waterfront mobile w/screen roomCITRUS SPRINGS 1148 Bridge Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . $7753/2/2 nice home with jetted tub! J.W.MORTON PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC.1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL000GDER Jennif er F udge Cheryl S cruggs Pr oper t y Manager / R e alt o rAs s o ciat e s 3 5 2 7 2 6-9010 CALLING ALL OWNERS NEED A GOOD TENANT?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! INVERNESS TOWNHOUSES INVERNESS HOMES BEVERLY HILLS HOMES Pritchard Isl. 2/2 . . . . . . . . .$700 Cypress Cove2/2.5 . . . . . . .$650 Dayton 2/1 Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 Spruce 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 Poplar 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$650 Duplex Trudy 3/2 . . . . . . . . .$650 Daniel Ct. 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . .$650 Honeylocust2/2/1 . . . . . . . . .$700 Michigan 2/1/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550 CASTRO REALTY & Property Management Inc333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 CRYST ALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALEST ATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CRYST AL RIVERLg. 2/1, W/D hookup, water, trash & lawn. included $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 Your W orldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com FLORAL OAKS APAR TMENTS NOW RENTING 352-860-082962+ Elderly/Disabled With or Without Children. Central AC Heat Water & Sewer Included Laundry Facilites On-Site Managemnt1 & 2 BD. APTS8092 S. Floral Oaks CIR., Floral City, Fl 34436, TDD #771 EOE/Provider INVERNESS CANDLEWOOD COURT APAR TMENTS 2 Bedrm., 1 BathRental Assistance Available CALL 352-344-1010 MON. WED. THURS 8A-12P & 1P-5P 307 Washington Ave. Inver ness Fl.Equal Housing Opportunity CRYST ALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apt s. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water ,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 HOMOSASSA1 bedroom. 1 bath. Quiet neighborhood! Large yard, patio, large kitchen. $400 month $800 to move in. Only serious tenant need apply!! 813-927-0525 or 813-927-4647 CITRUS HILLS2/2, Furnished Long or Short Term 352-527-8002, or 352-476-4242 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESS3866 E Dawson Dr.2BR/1BA+ CPort, 1700 SF Down paymt negotiable $700 a month. Lg fenced yard. Sep. laundry, shed, mature trees, screened porch in back, covered porch in front, 2 minutes from shopping. For more info call Mary 423-244-6122. To see prop. 352-586-6088 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 $550. mo. ,1st last & sec., 352-678-8874 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA MOVE IN FOR ONLY $1150 (352) 422-7794 BEVERLY HILLS2/2, CHA, $500. mo. 352-422-0139 BLACK DIAMONDLovely 2400SF home 3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for the golf cart. $1200 month plus security.(352) 464-3905 CRYST ALRIVER2/2/2, $750. mo + sec. $500. 850-838-7289 CRYST AL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM HOMOSASSA3 bedroom. 3 bath. Nice neighborhood near Library, large corner lot $825.00 terms with steady income 352-464-7976 INVERNESS2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer non smoking, No Pets 1305 Lakeview Dr. $700. mo. 422-6263 Inverness3/2/2, caged heated pool/spa, privacy fence. Includes pool Serv. $900/mo.F/L/S (352) 726-1069 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 Near Anna Jo Rd. By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESSShare 3/2, $350, all utilities included Jeff, (352) 601-6218 INVERNESS3/2/2, Furn., Very Nice, In Town 352-527-9268 FLORALCITYLake House 3/1 Furn. $750. 352-419-4421 4 Beautiful Acres next to lake. Well, paved streets. Horses OK 9157 E Orange Ave FLORAL CITY. 941-358 -6422, 941-320-0433 AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Hunting/Fishing Camp 6 Acres, surrounded by timberland, easy access from paved rd Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. living room & AC Downstairs, Lrg. Kit., bath & bedroom, Good Hunting. Backs up to Golf Ammock Hunting Clb. Jimmy 352-302-4268 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Set in stone PAGE E8 Real Estate Digest PAGE E4 Accurate information on native Florida plants is available in Gil Nelsons 2003 point-form book Floridas Best Native Landscape Plants: 200 Readily Available Species for Homeowners and Professionals, published by University Press of Florida. Donated by the Citrus Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, copies are in all Citrus County libraries. All of Gils previous books are correct up until publication date. Gils more readable 2010 book Best Native Plants for Southern Gardens: a Handbook for Gardeners, Homeowners and Professionals covers more northern regions of the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain and the Piedmont foothills, or Mountain floristic regions of the Southeastern U.S. It contains the 2006 Hardiness Zone Map from the National Arbor Day Foundation, as well as the invaluable 1997 Plant Heat-zone Map from the American Horticultural Society. The latter book has a handy, four-page reference list of common names paired with the correct botanical name starting on page 399. Both books are good resources for newcomers to Florida and long-time homeowners. Both have excellent color photographs. The former book lists plants in alphabetical order by botanical name. Unfortunately, there is no index in my signed first-edition copy, but it is by far the best reference ever printed on Florida native landscape plants. Copy the plant list from the 2010 book and tuck it into this bible. Acer rubrum, red maple, is the second plant in Gils book. Several named selected varieties are sold locally, but the original tree suits me just fine. Ranging in moist to wet sites from Central Florida north to Newfoundland and west to Minnesota and Texas in cold See JANE / Page E15 Cheese dishes common in the old days; sizing up vases Dear John: I have enclosed photos of a cheese dish that I bought from an antiques dealer in Greenville, S.C., in 1990. He often traveled to Europe to shop, so I am guessing the cheese dish came from England. But who knows, and that is why I am contacting you. The cheese dish seems to be made of some kind of pasteboard. On the inside of the cheese dish cover, in red, is the number 625 and, underneath the number in red, is the letter s. Somewhere along the way, I heard that cheese dishes like this one were given away as prizes at regional fairs in England. I enjoy your show on radio show on 90.1 FM, and your newspaper column which I read in the Citrus County Chronicle. Thank you for any information you can provide me concerning the cheese dish. It has traveled with me to a number of cities over three states. I have not seen anything like it in antiques stores i have visited since I bought the dish two decades ago. J.F., Inverness Dear J.F.: Cheese dishes were made in large quantities in England and Europe during the 19th and on into the 20th century. They were mandatory for keeping John SikorskiSIKORSKIS ATTIC Inside... For current property transactions, use the search features on the website for the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office: www.pa.citrus.fl.us. HOMEFRONTS REAL ESTATE DIGEST Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352563-3280, attention HomeFront. News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later. Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront. Digest photos are kept on file for future use. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity. For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660. HomeFront is a weekly real estate section published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle. Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592 ............................................advertising@chronicleonline.com Classified advertising information.....................352-563-5966 News information.............................................352-563-5660 ..............................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.comThe market leader in real estate information These books are musts for Florida gardeners This hand-painted cheese dish was likely made in the late 19th century. The interesting handle adds to collector interest.Special to the Chronicle See ATTIC / Page E13 Jane WeberJANES GARDEN

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LEE REICH/Associated PressFruit and fly traps in New Paltz, N.Y. Fruit flies can be an annoyance at this time of year. LEEREICH Associated PressI suppose I should look upon fruit flies as old friends. Our formal introduction took place in junior high school, in science lab. Now they visit regularly, every late summer and early fall. Still, for old friends, they can be bothersome. No, they dont bite, but Id rather do without their flitting around any ripening fruit in the kitchen. As it turns out, fruit flies dont really turn up this time of year; they just make their presence known. All summer theyve been hanging around outdoors, attracted there, as they are indoors, to ripe and overripe fruits. Cooling temperatures drive them indoors. An abundance of ripe and overripe apples, tomatoes, pears and other fruit, much of it now brought indoors, provides further enticement for their move. Its actually fruit flies larvae small, white maggots that are feeding on the fruits. After feasting for five or six days, larvae are transformed into the all-too-familiar flies. The females do more than just flit around for the few days they are alive; they fly up to six miles and keep busy laying eggs up to 2,000 of them. The eggs hatch into maggots, which feed, become adults, and round the cycle goes, leading to skyrocketing populations of maggots and fruit flies.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E7 E10SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY 000GDEL 311 W. Main St., Inverness 352-726-5263 www.landmarkinverness.com YOUR NEW DREAM HOME! Move-in ready 3/2/2 full appliances, vaulted ceilings in a beautiful waterfront neighborhood. $109,900. #702495. W AIT TIL YOU SEE the amazing sunsets from this water front home! 2/2, well kept house in Inverness. Ready for you to move in! JUST $124,500. #701492. Custom Countr y PRICE REDUCED! 3/2 on 1 AC, stone fireplace. Located in beautiful Citr us Hills. 1795 W. Tacoma. #703912. $174,900 Sheila Bensinger 352-476-5403. SUN DANCING ON W ATER. $ $ Priceles s $$. Y our own lakefront home, $88,500 It doesnt get any better 2/2 remodeled. Private deck, boat dock, screened porch. #704263. 3762 N. Webb Pt. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. HERE IS THE ONE YOUVE BEEN WAITING FOR! 2/2/2 in 55+ gated community with lots of amenities. $92,500 # 706006. Debbie T annery 352-613-3983. WIDE OPEN W ATER IS YOUR VIEW FROM THE BACK PORCH. 2 AC. 3 bedroom, 3 bath custom home with over 2684 living. His/hers closets in master back porch runs almost the entire length of the home. R V parking, so much more. $299,468 #703523. PERFECT INVESTMENT OPPOR TUNITY. Long ter m tenant, 2/1. Wonderful low price of $49,900 will let you star t making money now. #703806. SPOOKTACULAR STEAL! Citrus Hills 3/2/2, 1999, 1,603 living. Features NEW interior & exterior paint, NEW appliances. #704473. $126,900 Kim 352-212-5752. GET THE BOAT READY! Circa 1998 HICK D/W 3/2, deck & boat dock, extra WIDE canal. Great location. 1+ AC. $87,900 #705811. 5450 S. Withlapopka. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. STOP PAYING RENT!! Inverness 3/2/2, 1997, 1,360 living. Living/dining combo, enclosed porch, appliances, need of TLC. #705977. Kim 352-212-5752. MARVIN??? Its not just a great nameits the street of a great BUY. Floral City 2/1, 1970, carport, shed, in need of TLC. $39,900 #706071. Kim 352-212-5752. CRY ME A RIVER Where else can you find a 2/1 on the Withlacoochee River?! 1971 home features 2 screen porches, 820 living, den/office, dock, living rooms, in need of TLC. #706054. $69,900 Tomika 352-586-6598. IF HOUSES TOLD STORIES THIS WOULD BE GORY!! 4/2/1 w/pool, fireplace, corner lot, in need of TLC. Close to schools and shopping. #705307. $49,900 Tomika 352-586-6598. TRICK OR TREAT This Buy is Sweet!! Inverness 3/2/2 built in 2003 with 1,248 living close to shopping and schools. NEW interior paint, NEW flooring, dining area, fencing, screen porch, split & open floor plans, and more! ONLY $84,900 MLS 705855. Call Tomika 352-586-6598. PRICE REDUCTION $29,897. Circa 1981 RV Covered parking, fenced, sheds. Weekender/ vacation. Make it your own! #704143. 6548 E. Lakato Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. 000GEHL 5569 W. G ULF TO L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER FL 34429 O FFICE : (352) 795-6633 Alexander AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! REAL ESTATE, INC. WWW ALEXRE COM EMAIL : SALES @ ALEXRE COM Realtor SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H handyman/woman special, needs lots of work, rood does not leak, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, private well & septic, no appliances or outside A/C unit. on 0.40 acres. #702483 $34,900 CRYST AL RIVER ready to move in condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage home is in cul-de-sac. has pool & spa, patio for barbaquing, fully fenced back yard. 14 x 30 shop. W ell maintained. #359466 $104,900 BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated 2 bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry N ew central A/C carpets, interior paint, ceilng fans w/lights. F enced yard. neat, clean, bright, airy #700983 $89,900 DUNNELLON 1998 beautiful 4 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W mobile, 5 + acres, dual faced fireplace between family & living rm. dbl. glazed windows w/air space, fenced, excellent water #701494 $88,000 INGLIS 2001 S kyline w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, newly remodled, on 2 lots (2 acres), cathedral ceilings, inside laundry secluded & private. L g. living rm, dining rm, kitchen. easy access to G ulf of M exico. #702563 $80,000 BEVERLY HILLS adult community 55+, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1 car garage, tile floors throughtout except for 1 bedroom. E at in kitchen w/dome lighting, F rench doors, formal dining rm. P ine plank ceilings, double pane windows, vaulted ceilings. #703181 $67,000 HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home on 0.46 acres w/additional 2 waterfront lots go with this house. H as extra carport, screen porch & shed. H as well and central water #706017 $99,900 MEADOWCREST corner villa w/1 bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car garage, vinyl windowed screen room, new carpet throughtout, walk in closet, breakfast bar between kitchen & dining area. C entral water & sewer #706010 $58,500 000GE9F EXIT Realt y Leaders 201 3 201 3 201 3 201 3 The Wade Team 352-7 94-0888 352-527 -11 12 352-44 7-2595 ***Foreclosur e List*** 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 705705$174,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview Estates, 705702$189,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello 705061$74,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Deep Water Canal Front Home 705665 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over two acres! 705223 $84,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 Immaculate 3/2/1 on half an acre. 705068 $74,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs. 705093 $89,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 704264 $114,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 3/2/2 on over an acre. 705142 $119,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on an acre. 705087 $129,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home, dbl. lot 704938 $349,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 Desirable Brentwood Estates 3/2/2 det. villa. 704862 $119,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 2/1 in Y ankeetown. 704923 $19,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 Beverly Hills 3/1 Handymans Delight. 705153 $41,550 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 mobile, 1 acre. 704257 $22,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres. 704781 $34,500 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 OPEN HOUSE SUNDA Y 1-3PM 546 Hillwood Path, Laurel Ridge in BEVERLY HILLS (MLS#705479) Barbara Stone 352-586-3072 WHATS NEW ON THE MARKET? STEP BACK IN TIME when you enter this charming vintage gem. Built in 1950 and sitting on 1.29 waterfront acres, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home features an open plan with a kitchen overlooking the living/dining room. Step down into a large family room, brick fireplace, lami nate floor. Master bath has a 2-person jetted tub, family room has a 5 x 11 alcove with a skylight, perfect for an office/computer station. A 14 x 25 shed in the deep rear yard sits next to a patio. The fenced yard ends at the water...AND beyond is a sweet bridge to a small pri vate island, part of the Inverness lake chain. $119,900 MLS 706044 ERA Jackie Davis Always there for you. (352) 634-2371 Cell jackie@bjdavis.com American Realty & Investments 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL Jackie Davis For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bjdavis.com 000GDEM CEST SI BON! 3 Bedrooms, 3 baths Office Gourmet kitchen 2,920 SFLA 34 x 36 Caged atrium Circular driveway One acre, tile roof $275,000 MLS 705501 PRIVA TE, TREED YARD 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths Office/den with built-ins Extended lanai Premium lot w/greenbelt Gated community Stunning clubhouse $215,000 MLS 704593 ALSO FEATURING ... TERRA VISTA Ways to protect fruit from pesky fruit flies See FLIES/ Page E13 Besides aesthetics, some stones have been endowed by various cultures with special properties. The Chinese view jade as a protective stone, and it features prominently in feng shui, the ancient art of harmonizing individuals with their environment. The Vikings carried calcite, believing it aided in navigation. Native Americans considered chalcedony the family of minerals that includes jasper, onyx and agate capable of imparting strength and courage. I have a client who keeps a pyramid of lapis lazuli under her bed to ward off bad vibrations, says Toronto-based mineral and bead dealer David McDonald. Examples of Brazilian agate and onyx cut into bookends can be found at TheRockShed.com. Some have the crystalline characteristics of geodes, while others come in vibrant pink, teal and red hues. (www. therockshed.com) Table lamps are an easy way to add a touch of stone. Arteriors Sydney and Herst marble lamps, both at Horchow, have honed and softly buffed marble bases that develop a dreamy translucence when lit. From the John Richard collection, theres a stacked, square-cut alabaster lamp with a geometric vibe. And the retailers River Rock nightlight lamps base is a rectangular slab of acrylic embedded with small white rocks; a small bulb fixture is encased in it as well, so you can use both the main lamp and nightlight, or just the latter. (www.horchow.com) Eduardo Garzas agate-inlaid jewelry boxes are part of West Elms fall collection. Swirls of natural graphic design make a group of agate ornaments intriguing for the holiday tree, or just to hang on cupboards or window latches. (www.westelm.com) Targets fall collection includes the Threshold agate bookend, sleekly honed on one end to show the swirling layers, and left in its natural state on the other. A trimmed mirror adds marble to the wall. And an agate-patterned, glasstopped accent table and turquoise or plum rugs in a marble motif suggest those materials in faux finishes. (www.target.com) A contemporary space might suit one of CB2s composite tables made of a marble, granite, stone and fiber aggregate. They have a rugged, albeit honed masculinity. (www.cb2.com) The convergence of modern manufacturing techniques and the intricate, timeless forms of nature is what intrigues New York-based product designer Anna Rabinowicz. She gives a collection of amethyst and citrine table objects a mantle of liquid gold or silver. Her Cielo amethyst lamp combines sleek chrome with the crystal forms, each finished piece unique. And she embeds little chunks of colorful agate considered long ago to bring owners a peaceful slumber with small clock faces, ready for the bedside. (www.rablabs.com) ROCKContinued from Page E8 Horchow/Associated PressAn Arteriors Sydney lamp with an elegant curve of snowy marble.

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Agate, like this piece from Target, is considered by some cultures to have positive electromagnetic energy.Target/Associated PressCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E9 E8SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE ab1667 au2246 DUDLEYS AUCTION Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web. MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE Personal Property sold Dudleys Auction Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent. 000GDYL Dudleys Auction www.dudleysauction.com SAT., 10/26/13 RAINBOW SPRINGS REAL ESTAT E & CONTENTS AUCTION 4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds) Preview: 8am Auction: 9am Real Estate: 10am 9201 SW 212 TH COURT, DUNNELLON, FL Court Ordered Sale! Wonderful home in great neighborhood. 1,866 sq ft LA with 3,249 UR. Open & spacious 3/2 home, dbl lot, 2 acres mature landscaping, deck, fenced yard, fireplace, enclosed porch. The home is in good shape, needs updating. Home in the neighborhood range in value from $110 to $180k. Contents: 2003 Grand Marquis-75k mi., 1998 Ford Contour, 2003 John Deer L110 42 deck, electric scooter. Household LR-FR-3BR-DR and more. Lots of framed art, oriental carpets, flat screen TV, Victorian & Eastlake furniture++. Listed Art, Antique Clocks, Sterling: 48 pc. china, crystal, mandolin, fly rod & lures, Penn Senator reels & other reels & poles. Great sale not to be missed! See Vi rtual Tours @ www .resalehomes4u.com (352) 634-4346 Office : (352) 382-1700 GAIL COOPER Always T here F or You REALTY E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com 000GEXQ Multimillion Dollar Realtor MOVE IN READY RETREA T! Private location for 2/2 villa Newer carpeting and tile Several appliances recently replaced Indoor laundry area Exterior repainted in 2013 Screened front entry #705309 $71,900 4 BEDROOM POOL HOME! 4/2.5/2 heated pool home Over 2300 sq. ft of living area Granite island w/stainless steel Living room could be large office Pavered pool deck and lanai Home warranty for buyers #703826 $214,000 CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty, INCCALL Roy Bass TODAYEmail: roybass@tampabay.rr .com www.allcitr usrealty.com 000GEEY BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FLSugarmill W oods 4BR/3BA. Over 3000 sq. ft. of living. $150,000 MLS#702836BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 2BR/1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch. Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL 2BR mobile on 1 2 ac re. B ack s up to R ai ls fo Trails. $20,000 MLS#706009IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL2BR/2BA unit in Regency Park. Move in condition. $53,500 MLS#705999 KIMCOOK Associated Presslong with grainy woods, metallics and other textural elements, rock and mineralthemed decor is part of a fall trend toward nature and natural elements. In many cases, real rocks and minerals are integrated into the decorative items. Los Angeles interior and product designer Hilary Thomas says she responds to the divergent qualities of primitiveness and sophistication in rocks and minerals. I find that using pieces like petrified wood and malachite helps a space look more collected and layered, she says. And the range of colors the bright agates, the neutrals is fun to play with. You can be color-shy and still tie a room together or make a big statement with a finial, she says. Thomas creates lamp finials out of slivers of malachite, howlite and agate, as well as unusual specimens like inky iridescent labradorite, creamy blue-tinged chrysophase and petrified wood. The colors range from intense purple, turquoise and cranberry to light sunny yellow, snowy white and a range of striated hues. (www.hillarythomas.com) Latest trend has style set in stone See ROCK/ Page E10 Amethyst and citrine dipped in gold and silver, by designer Anna Rabinowicz.RabLabs/Associated Press

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Agate, like this piece from Target, is considered by some cultures to have positive electromagnetic energy.Target/Associated PressCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E9 E8SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE ab1667 au2246 DUDLEYS AUCTION Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web. MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE Personal Property sold Dudleys Auction Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent. 000GDYL Dudleys Auction www.dudleysauction.com SAT., 10/26/13 RAINBOW SPRINGS REAL ESTAT E & CONTENTS AUCTION 4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds) Preview: 8am Auction: 9am Real Estate: 10am 9201 SW 212 TH COURT, DUNNELLON, FL Court Ordered Sale! Wonderful home in great neighborhood. 1,866 sq ft LA with 3,249 UR. Open & spacious 3/2 home, dbl lot, 2 acres mature landscaping, deck, fenced yard, fireplace, enclosed porch. The home is in good shape, needs updating. Home in the neighborhood range in value from $110 to $180k. Contents: 2003 Grand Marquis-75k mi., 1998 Ford Contour, 2003 John Deer L110 42 deck, electric scooter. Household LR-FR-3BR-DR and more. Lots of framed art, oriental carpets, flat screen TV, Victorian & Eastlake furniture++. Listed Art, Antique Clocks, Sterling: 48 pc. china, crystal, mandolin, fly rod & lures, Penn Senator reels & other reels & poles. Great sale not to be missed! See Vi rtual Tours @ www .resalehomes4u.com (352) 634-4346 Office : (352) 382-1700 GAIL COOPER Always T here F or You REALTY E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com 000GEXQ Multimillion Dollar Realtor MOVE IN READY RETREA T! Private location for 2/2 villa Newer carpeting and tile Several appliances recently replaced Indoor laundry area Exterior repainted in 2013 Screened front entry #705309 $71,900 4 BEDROOM POOL HOME! 4/2.5/2 heated pool home Over 2300 sq. ft of living area Granite island w/stainless steel Living room could be large office Pavered pool deck and lanai Home warranty for buyers #703826 $214,000 CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty, INCCALL Roy Bass TODAYEmail: roybass@tampabay.rr .com www.allcitr usrealty.com 000GEEY BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FLSugarmill W oods 4BR/3BA. Over 3000 sq. ft. of living. $150,000 MLS#702836BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 2BR/1.5BA with fireplace. Enclosed porch. Fenced yard. $48,900 MLS#704852BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL 2BR mobile on 1 2 ac re. B ack s up to R ai ls fo Trails. $20,000 MLS#706009IMMACULATE CONDO-INVERNESS, FL2BR/2BA unit in Regency Park. Move in condition. $53,500 MLS#705999 KIMCOOK Associated Presslong with grainy woods, metallics and other textural elements, rock and mineralthemed decor is part of a fall trend toward nature and natural elements. In many cases, real rocks and minerals are integrated into the decorative items. Los Angeles interior and product designer Hilary Thomas says she responds to the divergent qualities of primitiveness and sophistication in rocks and minerals. I find that using pieces like petrified wood and malachite helps a space look more collected and layered, she says. And the range of colors the bright agates, the neutrals is fun to play with. You can be color-shy and still tie a room together or make a big statement with a finial, she says. Thomas creates lamp finials out of slivers of malachite, howlite and agate, as well as unusual specimens like inky iridescent labradorite, creamy blue-tinged chrysophase and petrified wood. The colors range from intense purple, turquoise and cranberry to light sunny yellow, snowy white and a range of striated hues. (www.hillarythomas.com) Latest trend has style set in stone See ROCK/ Page E10 Amethyst and citrine dipped in gold and silver, by designer Anna Rabinowicz.RabLabs/Associated Press

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LEE REICH/Associated PressFruit and fly traps in New Paltz, N.Y. Fruit flies can be an annoyance at this time of year. LEEREICH Associated PressI suppose I should look upon fruit flies as old friends. Our formal introduction took place in junior high school, in science lab. Now they visit regularly, every late summer and early fall. Still, for old friends, they can be bothersome. No, they dont bite, but Id rather do without their flitting around any ripening fruit in the kitchen. As it turns out, fruit flies dont really turn up this time of year; they just make their presence known. All summer theyve been hanging around outdoors, attracted there, as they are indoors, to ripe and overripe fruits. Cooling temperatures drive them indoors. An abundance of ripe and overripe apples, tomatoes, pears and other fruit, much of it now brought indoors, provides further enticement for their move. Its actually fruit flies larvae small, white maggots that are feeding on the fruits. After feasting for five or six days, larvae are transformed into the all-too-familiar flies. The females do more than just flit around for the few days they are alive; they fly up to six miles and keep busy laying eggs up to 2,000 of them. The eggs hatch into maggots, which feed, become adults, and round the cycle goes, leading to skyrocketing populations of maggots and fruit flies.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E7 E10SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY 000GDEL 311 W. Main St., Inverness 352-726-5263 www.landmarkinverness.com YOUR NEW DREAM HOME! Move-in ready 3/2/2 full appliances, vaulted ceilings in a beautiful waterfront neighborhood. $109,900. #702495. W AIT TIL YOU SEE the amazing sunsets from this water front home! 2/2, well kept house in Inverness. Ready for you to move in! JUST $124,500. #701492. Custom Countr y PRICE REDUCED! 3/2 on 1 AC, stone fireplace. Located in beautiful Citr us Hills. 1795 W. Tacoma. #703912. $174,900 Sheila Bensinger 352-476-5403. SUN DANCING ON W ATER. $ $ Priceles s $$. Y our own lakefront home, $88,500 It doesnt get any better 2/2 remodeled. Private deck, boat dock, screened porch. #704263. 3762 N. Webb Pt. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. HERE IS THE ONE YOUVE BEEN WAITING FOR! 2/2/2 in 55+ gated community with lots of amenities. $92,500 # 706006. Debbie T annery 352-613-3983. WIDE OPEN W ATER IS YOUR VIEW FROM THE BACK PORCH. 2 AC. 3 bedroom, 3 bath custom home with over 2684 living. His/hers closets in master back porch runs almost the entire length of the home. R V parking, so much more. $299,468 #703523. PERFECT INVESTMENT OPPOR TUNITY. Long ter m tenant, 2/1. Wonderful low price of $49,900 will let you star t making money now. #703806. SPOOKTACULAR STEAL! Citrus Hills 3/2/2, 1999, 1,603 living. Features NEW interior & exterior paint, NEW appliances. #704473. $126,900 Kim 352-212-5752. GET THE BOAT READY! Circa 1998 HICK D/W 3/2, deck & boat dock, extra WIDE canal. Great location. 1+ AC. $87,900 #705811. 5450 S. Withlapopka. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. STOP PAYING RENT!! Inverness 3/2/2, 1997, 1,360 living. Living/dining combo, enclosed porch, appliances, need of TLC. #705977. Kim 352-212-5752. MARVIN??? Its not just a great nameits the street of a great BUY. Floral City 2/1, 1970, carport, shed, in need of TLC. $39,900 #706071. Kim 352-212-5752. CRY ME A RIVER Where else can you find a 2/1 on the Withlacoochee River?! 1971 home features 2 screen porches, 820 living, den/office, dock, living rooms, in need of TLC. #706054. $69,900 Tomika 352-586-6598. IF HOUSES TOLD STORIES THIS WOULD BE GORY!! 4/2/1 w/pool, fireplace, corner lot, in need of TLC. Close to schools and shopping. #705307. $49,900 Tomika 352-586-6598. TRICK OR TREAT This Buy is Sweet!! Inverness 3/2/2 built in 2003 with 1,248 living close to shopping and schools. NEW interior paint, NEW flooring, dining area, fencing, screen porch, split & open floor plans, and more! ONLY $84,900 MLS 705855. Call Tomika 352-586-6598. PRICE REDUCTION $29,897. Circa 1981 RV Covered parking, fenced, sheds. Weekender/ vacation. Make it your own! #704143. 6548 E. Lakato Jean Cassese 352-201-7034. 000GEHL 5569 W. G ULF TO L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER FL 34429 O FFICE : (352) 795-6633 Alexander AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! REAL ESTATE, INC. WWW ALEXRE COM EMAIL : SALES @ ALEXRE COM Realtor SUMMERFIELD 2005 D/W M/H handyman/woman special, needs lots of work, rood does not leak, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, private well & septic, no appliances or outside A/C unit. on 0.40 acres. #702483 $34,900 CRYST AL RIVER ready to move in condition this 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage home is in cul-de-sac. has pool & spa, patio for barbaquing, fully fenced back yard. 14 x 30 shop. W ell maintained. #359466 $104,900 BEVERLY HILLS totally renovated 2 bedrm, 1 bath, family rm & laundry N ew central A/C carpets, interior paint, ceilng fans w/lights. F enced yard. neat, clean, bright, airy #700983 $89,900 DUNNELLON 1998 beautiful 4 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W mobile, 5 + acres, dual faced fireplace between family & living rm. dbl. glazed windows w/air space, fenced, excellent water #701494 $88,000 INGLIS 2001 S kyline w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, newly remodled, on 2 lots (2 acres), cathedral ceilings, inside laundry secluded & private. L g. living rm, dining rm, kitchen. easy access to G ulf of M exico. #702563 $80,000 BEVERLY HILLS adult community 55+, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1 car garage, tile floors throughtout except for 1 bedroom. E at in kitchen w/dome lighting, F rench doors, formal dining rm. P ine plank ceilings, double pane windows, vaulted ceilings. #703181 $67,000 HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home on 0.46 acres w/additional 2 waterfront lots go with this house. H as extra carport, screen porch & shed. H as well and central water #706017 $99,900 MEADOWCREST corner villa w/1 bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car garage, vinyl windowed screen room, new carpet throughtout, walk in closet, breakfast bar between kitchen & dining area. C entral water & sewer #706010 $58,500 000GE9F EXIT Realt y Leaders 201 3 201 3 201 3 201 3 The Wade Team 352-7 94-0888 352-527 -11 12 352-44 7-2595 ***Foreclosur e List*** 4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 705705$174,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview Estates, 705702$189,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello 705061$74,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Deep Water Canal Front Home 705665 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over two acres! 705223 $84,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 Immaculate 3/2/1 on half an acre. 705068 $74,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs. 705093 $89,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 704264 $114,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 3/2/2 on over an acre. 705142 $119,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on an acre. 705087 $129,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home, dbl. lot 704938 $349,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 Desirable Brentwood Estates 3/2/2 det. villa. 704862 $119,900 Steve McClory 352-422-3998 2/1 in Y ankeetown. 704923 $19,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 Beverly Hills 3/1 Handymans Delight. 705153 $41,550 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 mobile, 1 acre. 704257 $22,900 Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres. 704781 $34,500 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 OPEN HOUSE SUNDA Y 1-3PM 546 Hillwood Path, Laurel Ridge in BEVERLY HILLS (MLS#705479) Barbara Stone 352-586-3072 WHATS NEW ON THE MARKET? STEP BACK IN TIME when you enter this charming vintage gem. Built in 1950 and sitting on 1.29 waterfront acres, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home features an open plan with a kitchen overlooking the living/dining room. Step down into a large family room, brick fireplace, lami nate floor. Master bath has a 2-person jetted tub, family room has a 5 x 11 alcove with a skylight, perfect for an office/computer station. A 14 x 25 shed in the deep rear yard sits next to a patio. The fenced yard ends at the water...AND beyond is a sweet bridge to a small pri vate island, part of the Inverness lake chain. $119,900 MLS 706044 ERA Jackie Davis Always there for you. (352) 634-2371 Cell jackie@bjdavis.com American Realty & Investments 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL Jackie Davis For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bjdavis.com 000GDEM CEST SI BON! 3 Bedrooms, 3 baths Office Gourmet kitchen 2,920 SFLA 34 x 36 Caged atrium Circular driveway One acre, tile roof $275,000 MLS 705501 PRIVA TE, TREED YARD 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths Office/den with built-ins Extended lanai Premium lot w/greenbelt Gated community Stunning clubhouse $215,000 MLS 704593 ALSO FEATURING ... TERRA VISTA Ways to protect fruit from pesky fruit flies See FLIES/ Page E13 Besides aesthetics, some stones have been endowed by various cultures with special properties. The Chinese view jade as a protective stone, and it features prominently in feng shui, the ancient art of harmonizing individuals with their environment. The Vikings carried calcite, believing it aided in navigation. Native Americans considered chalcedony the family of minerals that includes jasper, onyx and agate capable of imparting strength and courage. I have a client who keeps a pyramid of lapis lazuli under her bed to ward off bad vibrations, says Toronto-based mineral and bead dealer David McDonald. Examples of Brazilian agate and onyx cut into bookends can be found at TheRockShed.com. Some have the crystalline characteristics of geodes, while others come in vibrant pink, teal and red hues. (www. therockshed.com) Table lamps are an easy way to add a touch of stone. Arteriors Sydney and Herst marble lamps, both at Horchow, have honed and softly buffed marble bases that develop a dreamy translucence when lit. From the John Richard collection, theres a stacked, square-cut alabaster lamp with a geometric vibe. And the retailers River Rock nightlight lamps base is a rectangular slab of acrylic embedded with small white rocks; a small bulb fixture is encased in it as well, so you can use both the main lamp and nightlight, or just the latter. (www.horchow.com) Eduardo Garzas agate-inlaid jewelry boxes are part of West Elms fall collection. Swirls of natural graphic design make a group of agate ornaments intriguing for the holiday tree, or just to hang on cupboards or window latches. (www.westelm.com) Targets fall collection includes the Threshold agate bookend, sleekly honed on one end to show the swirling layers, and left in its natural state on the other. A trimmed mirror adds marble to the wall. And an agate-patterned, glasstopped accent table and turquoise or plum rugs in a marble motif suggest those materials in faux finishes. (www.target.com) A contemporary space might suit one of CB2s composite tables made of a marble, granite, stone and fiber aggregate. They have a rugged, albeit honed masculinity. (www.cb2.com) The convergence of modern manufacturing techniques and the intricate, timeless forms of nature is what intrigues New York-based product designer Anna Rabinowicz. She gives a collection of amethyst and citrine table objects a mantle of liquid gold or silver. Her Cielo amethyst lamp combines sleek chrome with the crystal forms, each finished piece unique. And she embeds little chunks of colorful agate considered long ago to bring owners a peaceful slumber with small clock faces, ready for the bedside. (www.rablabs.com) ROCKContinued from Page E8 Horchow/Associated PressAn Arteriors Sydney lamp with an elegant curve of snowy marble.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E11 E6SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE BRING YOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! CRYSTAL RIVER2/1, $525, & 2/1 $575 (352) 584-3348 HOMOSASSA3/2 on 490 near 19, lrg lot, Sale or Rent, Zone GNC, $450 mo + Ref. 352-628-3019 INVERNESS2/2 plus den. Inground pool w/ lg yard. $575 plus unilities. No smking (740) 610-7941 3 BR, 2BA, Attached screen rm & carport 55+ park. Lot rent $235 includes water & trash pickup, great for snowbird or elderly person $12,500. (352) 212-4265 HOMOSASSADrastically reduced! Was asking $74,000 now asking $59,900. Illness forces sale. 3/2 ,1 acres, 95% remodeled, 16x16 workshop. (352) 621-0192 Palm Harbor Factory Liquidation Sale 6 models to choose from, 1200 sq ft up to 2400 sq ft.....$12K off!! John Lyons 800-622-2832 ext. 210 NEVER LIVED IN REPO!2013, 28x56, 3/2 Their loss is your gain! Delivered & set up with AC, steps & skirting. Use your old trade-only $487.46/ mo. W.A.C. Call 352-621-9182 NICE HOME ON ACREFenced yard, 1500 sq. ft., 3/2 home in new cond. with 2 x6 construction. New appliances, carpet, paint, new decks & tile flooring. I can finance. $3,500. dwn $394.80/mo. P & I W.A.C. We have land & home pkgs $59,900 to $69,900 352-621-9181 RENTERS WANTEDWhy rent when you can own? We can put you in your own home. Credit problems o.k. As low as $2,000. down& only $105/ wk. Call for more info & locations. Call 352-621-3807 USED HOMES/ REPOSDoublewides From $8,500. Singlewides From $3,500. New inventory daily We buy used homes (352) 621-9183 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 12X60 MOBILE HOME + 16x20 addition, 2BR, 1BA, 80x200 lot with10x12 shed. 6 appliances incl. $31,500. (352) 344-9565 Castle Lake Park INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt scnd lanai, steel roof, caged inground pool, 1 acre, no HOA fees, $69k (352) 238-4521 Homosassa` 2BR,1BA furnished, enclosed lanai, carport, 2 sheds, cyclone fence, 1/2 acre,$21,500 352-628-3899 Crystal River 2bd/2ba double-wide with Sun Room in Crystal River Village $20,500. or lease to buy. Pls call Dell Nora at 352-795-7161 Inverness 55+ 2Br/1Ba CHA, price reduced to $5,000.352-419-6644 2BR/1Ba CHA, lots of extras. Price reduced for quick sale. 341-1237 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $15,000 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $270 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 Lecanto2/2, 55+ Senior Park $11,500, furn. lot rent $245. incl. trash & water (219) 929-8909 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000GE0J www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO 2332 W.Silverhill Ln. (L) . . . . . $5502/1 nice affordable apartment, ground floor 87 S. Adams (BH) . . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5/1 newly remodeled cute homeCRYSTAL RIVER 10941 W.Gem St. . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 nice clean duplex close to Duke and Hospital 9200 N. Perseus Ter.. . . . . . . . $6502/2 remodeled DW on 1 acre! 874 NE 1st Ter.. . . . . . . . . . . $5502/1 nice home close to schools & shoppingHOMOSASSA 7088 W.Green Acres St. . . . . . $7003/2 Charming home over 1700 sq. ft. 11701 Clearwater Ct. . . . . . . $1,0002/2 Great waterfront mobile w/screen roomCITRUS SPRINGS 1148 Bridge Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . $7753/2/2 nice home with jetted tub! J.W.MORTON PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC.1645 W. MAIN STINVERNESS, FL000GDER Jennif er F udge Cheryl S cruggs Pr oper t y Manager / R e alt o rAs s o ciat e s 3 5 2 7 2 6-9010 CALLING ALL OWNERS NEED A GOOD TENANT?Bring us your vacant home and watch us work for you! INVERNESS TOWNHOUSES INVERNESS HOMES BEVERLY HILLS HOMES Pritchard Isl. 2/2 . . . . . . . . .$700 Cypress Cove2/2.5 . . . . . . .$650 Dayton 2/1 Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 Spruce 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 Poplar 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$650 Duplex Trudy 3/2 . . . . . . . . .$650 Daniel Ct. 2/2/1 . . . . . . . . . . . .$650 Honeylocust2/2/1 . . . . . . . . .$700 Michigan 2/1/1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550 CASTRO REALTY & Property Management Inc333 N. Croft Avenue Inverness FL34453352-341-4663 CITRUS COUNTY RENTALS1 4 BEDROOMS ALLAREASCall For Details 352-341-4663 CRYST ALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALEST ATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500, ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CRYST AL RIVERLg. 2/1, W/D hookup, water, trash & lawn. included $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 Your W orldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com FLORAL OAKS APAR TMENTS NOW RENTING 352-860-082962+ Elderly/Disabled With or Without Children. Central AC Heat Water & Sewer Included Laundry Facilites On-Site Managemnt1 & 2 BD. APTS8092 S. Floral Oaks CIR., Floral City, Fl 34436, TDD #771 EOE/Provider INVERNESS CANDLEWOOD COURT APAR TMENTS 2 Bedrm., 1 BathRental Assistance Available CALL 352-344-1010 MON. WED. THURS 8A-12P & 1P-5P 307 Washington Ave. Inver ness Fl.Equal Housing Opportunity CRYST ALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apt s. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water ,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 HOMOSASSA1 bedroom. 1 bath. Quiet neighborhood! Large yard, patio, large kitchen. $400 month $800 to move in. Only serious tenant need apply!! 813-927-0525 or 813-927-4647 CITRUS HILLS2/2, Furnished Long or Short Term 352-527-8002, or 352-476-4242 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESS3866 E Dawson Dr.2BR/1BA+ CPort, 1700 SF Down paymt negotiable $700 a month. Lg fenced yard. Sep. laundry, shed, mature trees, screened porch in back, covered porch in front, 2 minutes from shopping. For more info call Mary 423-244-6122. To see prop. 352-586-6088 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 $550. mo. ,1st last & sec., 352-678-8874 BEVERLY HILLS2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA MOVE IN FOR ONLY $1150 (352) 422-7794 BEVERLY HILLS2/2, CHA, $500. mo. 352-422-0139 BLACK DIAMONDLovely 2400SF home 3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for the golf cart. $1200 month plus security.(352) 464-3905 CRYST ALRIVER2/2/2, $750. mo + sec. $500. 850-838-7289 CRYST AL RIVER3/2Clean, $800. mo. 352-795-6299 352-364-2073 FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM HOMOSASSA3 bedroom. 3 bath. Nice neighborhood near Library, large corner lot $825.00 terms with steady income 352-464-7976 INVERNESS2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer non smoking, No Pets 1305 Lakeview Dr. $700. mo. 422-6263 Inverness3/2/2, caged heated pool/spa, privacy fence. Includes pool Serv. $900/mo.F/L/S (352) 726-1069 INVERNESSHighlands 3/2/2 Near Anna Jo Rd. By appt 786-423-0478 or (352) 637-1142 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESSShare 3/2, $350, all utilities included Jeff, (352) 601-6218 INVERNESS3/2/2, Furn., Very Nice, In Town 352-527-9268 FLORALCITYLake House 3/1 Furn. $750. 352-419-4421 4 Beautiful Acres next to lake. Well, paved streets. Horses OK 9157 E Orange Ave FLORAL CITY. 941-358 -6422, 941-320-0433 AUTOMATED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Hunting/Fishing Camp 6 Acres, surrounded by timberland, easy access from paved rd Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. living room & AC Downstairs, Lrg. Kit., bath & bedroom, Good Hunting. Backs up to Golf Ammock Hunting Clb. Jimmy 352-302-4268 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com Set in stone PAGE E8 Real Estate Digest PAGE E4 Accurate information on native Florida plants is available in Gil Nelsons 2003 point-form book Floridas Best Native Landscape Plants: 200 Readily Available Species for Homeowners and Professionals, published by University Press of Florida. Donated by the Citrus Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, copies are in all Citrus County libraries. All of Gils previous books are correct up until publication date. Gils more readable 2010 book Best Native Plants for Southern Gardens: a Handbook for Gardeners, Homeowners and Professionals covers more northern regions of the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain and the Piedmont foothills, or Mountain floristic regions of the Southeastern U.S. It contains the 2006 Hardiness Zone Map from the National Arbor Day Foundation, as well as the invaluable 1997 Plant Heat-zone Map from the American Horticultural Society. The latter book has a handy, four-page reference list of common names paired with the correct botanical name starting on page 399. Both books are good resources for newcomers to Florida and long-time homeowners. Both have excellent color photographs. The former book lists plants in alphabetical order by botanical name. Unfortunately, there is no index in my signed first-edition copy, but it is by far the best reference ever printed on Florida native landscape plants. Copy the plant list from the 2010 book and tuck it into this bible. Acer rubrum, red maple, is the second plant in Gils book. Several named selected varieties are sold locally, but the original tree suits me just fine. Ranging in moist to wet sites from Central Florida north to Newfoundland and west to Minnesota and Texas in cold See JANE / Page E15 Cheese dishes common in the old days; sizing up vases Dear John: I have enclosed photos of a cheese dish that I bought from an antiques dealer in Greenville, S.C., in 1990. He often traveled to Europe to shop, so I am guessing the cheese dish came from England. But who knows, and that is why I am contacting you. The cheese dish seems to be made of some kind of pasteboard. On the inside of the cheese dish cover, in red, is the number 625 and, underneath the number in red, is the letter s. Somewhere along the way, I heard that cheese dishes like this one were given away as prizes at regional fairs in England. I enjoy your show on radio show on 90.1 FM, and your newspaper column which I read in the Citrus County Chronicle. Thank you for any information you can provide me concerning the cheese dish. It has traveled with me to a number of cities over three states. I have not seen anything like it in antiques stores i have visited since I bought the dish two decades ago. J.F., Inverness Dear J.F.: Cheese dishes were made in large quantities in England and Europe during the 19th and on into the 20th century. They were mandatory for keeping John SikorskiSIKORSKIS ATTIC Inside... For current property transactions, use the search features on the website for the Citrus County Property Appraisers Office: www.pa.citrus.fl.us. HOMEFRONTS REAL ESTATE DIGEST Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352563-3280, attention HomeFront. News notes submitted without photos will not be reprinted if the photo is provided later. Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront. Digest photos are kept on file for future use. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for space and/or clarity. For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660. HomeFront is a weekly real estate section published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle. Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592 ............................................advertising@chronicleonline.com Classified advertising information.....................352-563-5966 News information.............................................352-563-5660 ..............................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.comThe market leader in real estate information These books are musts for Florida gardeners This hand-painted cheese dish was likely made in the late 19th century. The interesting handle adds to collector interest.Special to the Chronicle See ATTIC / Page E13 Jane WeberJANES GARDEN

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013E5 E12SUNDAY, OCTOBER20, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Need a JOB? #1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parent s or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. T o complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW T O LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Sat., Oct 26 10am Preview Fri 10-5 Sat 8-10 000GAPJ ANTIQUES, JEWELRY & COLLECTIBLESATM Antiques & Auctions LLC811 SE US Hwy 19 Crystal River, FL700+ Antiques, Jewelry, Paintings, Bronzes, Furniture & More.13%BP VS MC DS Cash & Check See web for complete terms.www.charliefudge.comAB3279, AE450, AU1593 Pine Ridge Estates Sunday 10/20 1p-5p 4940 W Horseshoe Dr Mini-Storage Facility on US Hwy 19 Homosassa, Florida2.74 acres with 150 storage units of varying sizes-40 dry storage units-office for business and additional office for rental income. Asking $625,000.00 owner financing to qualified buyer with 25% down. Contact Diana G. Marcum PALicensed Real Estate Broker 352-341-0900 Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience 352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Imperial Exec for the investor or Handyman. (2/3/2) CASH ONLY 48K. 527-1239 Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2 bath with fireplace, sauna, and garage. 2 acres w/fruit trees, garden ready. 352-422-7136 Well maint ained bright villa. Split floor plan. 2 Master BR w/ walk in closets & priv baths. Lanai w. glass/screen $74,900 352-795-1648 TOTALL Yrenovated 2Br/2 Ba Meadowview patio home; enlarged kitchen, new cabinetry, new appliances, screened lanai, 1 car garage, 1 ceiling fan/rm, new Puron a/c, new screens, new gutters/ guards, furnished. $80k 2272 N Eustis Pt, Hernando. Call 352-746-6185 for appointment FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN, 3 & 4 BDRMS 352-464-6020 JADEMISSION.COM Inverness city living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2006 townhouse in great condition. Low maintenance & easy access to shopping, etc. $87,500. Ed Pechan, Parsley Real Estate, 352-400-1230 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM 2005 MEADOWCREST (Fox Hollow) BEAUTY. 3/2/2 Lg Split BR, Cul-d-sac.See pics @ www.forsalebyowner .co m #23967875 Call 724-813-8624. AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE Connell Heights 4/2/2 Pool Home, Spacious, FP, fenced back yd. custom built 2005, Great Location $195k 352-422-7077 4BR /1 BABlock home, above ground pool. Fenced, Appliances, Kindness Terr. off Grover Clev, $42K As is. 352-419-8816 AUTOMA TED Home Info 24/7 CALL 637 2828 and enter the house number REALTY ONE TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKING TO SELL ? CALLME T ODAY HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAW APT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALT ORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunt s homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorWANT IT SOLDHouse not selling? Behind in payment s? Upside down in mortgage? CALL ME I can help Phyllis Strickland TROPIC SHORES REALTY. 352-613-3503-cell 352-419-6880-Office BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments Forest Lake, Hernando 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5 Acres, Fenced. Many extras including 24x36 Shop/garage. Sun Room with Wood Burning Stove. Fruit trees. 2 8x10 Storage Sheds. Security System. See ad on 4SaleByOwner for pictures. 352 726-7755 I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda W attCustomer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Get Results In The Homefront Classifieds! Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com 3 BR, 3 BA, Condo 2100 sq. ft., Furnished, Carport, Citrus Hills on Hartford $119,000. Call 352-419-5268 Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres! Just $89,900. Bring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x 436 LAND & CABIN PACKAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLATEAU! 10 Acres and 1200 sq. ft. cabin $49,900. Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 Six day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1,175.00. Yours today for only $389.00! You SA VE 67 percent. PLUS One-week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-985-1463 OPEN HOUSESUNDAY 20, 12N 4P 3/2 W ater fr ont Home 2310 N. Watersedge Crystal River (352) 586-4822 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties NORTH GEORGIA Long Flowing Creek Property, Secluded on culdesac. Perfect retreat near Oktoberfest in Helen, GA. Utilities in place ready to build for $29,900. 1-877-717-8992 ext591 Streamfr ont Land Bargain! 1.7 acr e wooded corner parcel in Blue Ridge Mtns. 390 on crystal clear stream, Natural year-round spring. Paved road, municipal water, utilities, mild restrictions RV friendly. Was $69,900 now, $27,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 63 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter .com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips www.FloridaSho wcasePr operties.com SERVING ALL OF CITRUS COUNTY 000GE9A PINE RIDGE 1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 527-1820 CITRUS HILLS 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 746-0744 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with n o other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Pr ud en ti al R ea l Es ta te Ta ke s TH RE E of F ou r Ca te go ri es i n J. D. P ow er an d As so ci at es 20 13 Ho me B uy er /S el le r St ud y! Re pe at H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Bu ye r Fi rs t Ti me H om e Se ll er OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Open 7 Days A Week! 534 E. Knightsbridge Pl. MLS 704309 $141,900 Impeccably clean & neat 3bd/2ba energy efficient home on an acre lot. Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd, R on E. Reehill St/Seton Ave, L on Lancaster St, R on Knightsbridge Pl. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 1059 W. Skyview Crossing Dr. MLS 705955 $237,900 Maintenance-free luxury 2/2/2 + den with lake views. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 3422 N. Buckhorn Dr. MLS 355561 $299,000 Beautiful 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres. Bring your horses! Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 218 S. Harrison St. MLS 704869 $68,900 Remodeled & updated 2/2/1. Centrally located. Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261 681 E. Hartford St. $750 Furnished, upper unit, no membership, $750 F/L/SD. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING RENTAL BRENTWOOD RENTALS Choose from one of two unfurnished, completely maintained properties in The Brentwood gated neighborhood. All for less than $1,000 per month. Both units have a family social membership to the Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club included in their more than reasonable rent. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 364 E. Dakota Ct. MLS 706039 $214,900 Meadows Golf Course 3/3/2 with caged pool. Directions: 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to R on Dakota. Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 Citrus Hills Citrus Citrus Hills Hills 1121 N. Chance W ay MLS 702458 $196,900 3bd/2ba home w/beautiful pool. Directions: Hwy 486 (Norvell Bryant Hwy) to south on Citrus Hills Blvd, L on E. Hartford St, R on Chance. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 C am br id ge Gr ee ns C am br id ge Cambridge Gr ee ns Gr eens K en si ng to n Es ta te s K en si ng to n Kensington Es ta te s Estates 738 W Doerr Path MLS 705982 $344,900 Spectacular golf home set high on a cul-de-sac. Mark Casper 352-364-1947 T er ra Vi st a T er ra Terr a Vi st a Vista T er ra Vi st a T er ra Terr a Vi st a Vista B el mo nt Hi ll s B el mo nt Belmont Hi ll s H ills 1571 E. Seattle Slew Cir MLS 705988 $199,900 3/2/2 gated community in Citrus Hills. Near amenities. Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 C it ru s Hi ll s C it ru s Citrus Hi ll s H ills 1100 W Pearson St. MLS 705976 $128,500 Meticulously maintained 2/2/2 with fabulous upgraded features. Helen Forte 352-220-4764 P in e Ri dg e P in e Pine Ri dg e Ridge 5150 N. Pink Poppy Dr MLS 705423 $208,000 Beautiful country style with green features 3/2/2/pool. And what a front porch! Joy Holland 352-464-4952 P in e Ri dg e P in e Pine Ri dg e Ridge B ev er ly Hi ll s B ev er ly Bev erly Hi ll s H ills G re en br ie r G re en br ie r Greenbrier HOLLYRAMER Associated PressWhats black and white and orange all over? Creative Halloween decorations made out of newspaper. Black and white newsprint is a perfect starting point for spooky crafts. A lightweight foam wreath form covered with newspaper roses looks elegant on its own, but can be dressed up with mini faux pumpkins, glittery berries, a swarm of spiders or bats, or any other embellishments. Making the Associated PressWith its black and white color scheme, newspaper can be the perfect starting point for Halloween crafts. Just add some orange accents and turn newspapers into easy garlands or more elaborate paper flowers to adorn a wreath. Use old papers to make Halloween decorations Black and whit