Citrus County chronicle

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Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03282

Full Text

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MY C I T R I US COUNTY
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Mostly sunny.
PAGE A4


p www.chronicleonline.com .
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 119 ISSUE 67


the market


Chris Van Ormer
Staff writer
LECANTO
Ever wonder if you need flood
insurance?
It used to be a guess when ad-
vising a resident whether his
property was prone to flooding, but a new
flood insurance rate map has made the an-
swer almost foolproof for the county's
building division.
"Unquestionably, this map is much more
precise and easier to work with," said Carl
Jones, director of the county's building di-
vision and flood plain manager, speaking
last week to the Chronicle.
The division had been working with a
30-year-old map that offered little more
than grids of sparse street-level informa-
tion and landmarks.
"We were having to use a scale and
measure it and guess at it," Jones said.
"That's a mile from one side to the other
on a small square. So if someone were to
say they lived on the third lot down in the
subdivision, maybe I'm looking at the third
lot or the fourth lot or the 10th because the


Page A12


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Carl Jones, Citrus County's Building Division
director and Flood Plain manager, explains
how new map-making technology provides a
more detailed picture of the topography of
land. That precise detail is important in
determining if a piece of property is in a flood
zone.


In or out of flood zone?

* Find out by calling the county building division at
352-527-5310 to schedule to a look at the new
map. The map panels are available online at
www.FloodSmart.Gov.
* Now is the time to appeal because the map has
not yet been adopted.
* Because Citrus County participates in FEMA's
Community Rating System, people in the
unincorporated area of Citrus County who have
flood insurance policies get an automatic
20 percent discount on their premiums.



Elevation certificates
are part of the process
One possible side effect of the adoption of the new
Fire Insurance Rate Maps could be the need for
new elevation certificates for some homes and busi-
nesses, requiring the services of a surveyor or
engineer
The flood elevation certification is a Federal
Emergency Management Agency form, which may
ultimately determine the flood insurance premium
of a property
The form is available online, but according to Carl
Jones, director of the county's building division and
flood plain manager, it has to be completed by a li-
censed engineer or surveyor He said a certificate,
which shows the elevations of the property and
buildings is necessary for each structure.
It can also be required by mortgage companies on
See Page A12


Justice for


murdered


woman


comes 27


years later

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Chances were re-
mote that their paths would ever cross.
Angela Crowley, a 21-year-old Laud-
erdale Lakes travel agent,
was headed to Yankeetown
to visit a friend for the Me-
morial Day weekend. fl
William Happ, then a 24-
year-old painter from Cali-
fornia, was walking along
U.S. 19 to the home of his
great-aunt, where he was
staying. William
Their worlds collided Happ
around 2:30 a.m. Monday, execution set
May 26, 1986, at a Cumber- for 6 p.m.
land Farms convenience Tuesday.
store on U.S. 19 that had
closed for the night.
Crowley stopped to use
the pay phone to call her
friend. She had already got- .q
ten lost once during the six- 1
hour drive from South B"
Florida, and the friend
wanted to meet her at the Car
store, then Angela would CDeani
follow her to Yankeetown. s
She never made the call. wate sheriff of
-n. , /, was sherif of
Happ abducted her from Citrus County
the parking lot, smashing in 1986.
the driver's side window
with his fist. He drove
Crowley to the Cross
Florida Barge Canal,
where he beat and raped -r, -
her, then strangled her with
her pants, records show. -
He dumped her body into
the barge canal and fled in
her car, which authorities Brad King
would find abandoned in a state attorney
restaurant parking lot prosecuted the
about a half-mile south of case in 1988.
the convenience store.
Months crawled by as authorities
searched for Crowley's killer He became a
suspect in August when authorities
See Page A2



It's a small



world

Visitors help woman

reconnect to heritage
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY -Coincidence, serendip-
ity or hand of God, Mia Huebbers is still
shaking her head at her chance encounter
with some people at Applebee's in Inver-
ness several weeks ago.
It started when Hein and Margrietye
Nievelstein, visitors from Holland, stopped
by Applebee's in Inverness, a favorite place
of Mia Huebbers and her husband, Butch.
Hein had noticed the Huebbers' Harley
Davidson and struck up a conversation with
the couple.
See Page A12


Annie's Mailbox ......A22
Classifieds ................ D3
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A10O
M ovies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A9
Together...................A24
Veterans ........ A16


6 iii0 liii 01J 11 o


Business


Excursions Veterans


Obamacare and Breast
Cancer: How does the
coverage stack up?/D1


Forging on: An Associated
Press writer details her
vacation at Yosemite/A13


Ray Michael Jr. earned two
Purple Hearts during his
service in Vietnam /A16


U
TOE
& ne
morr
LII


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LOW
56


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A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


JUSTICE
Continued from PageAl

matched fingerprints in-
side Crowley's car with
Happ, who was about to
begin a 10-year prison sen-
tence in California for kid-
napping and robbery
Happ was charged Dec. 2,
1986, with Crowley's kid-
napping, rape and murder
Three years later a jury in
Lake County, where the
case was moved due to pre-
trial publicity, convicted
Happ on all counts. The
judge sentenced him to
death.
All of Happ's court ap-
peals are exhausted. Bar-
ring a last-minute stay,
Happ's fate will be sealed
Tuesday at 6 p.m., when he
is scheduled to die by lethal
injection at the Florida
State Prison in Starke.
Happ, 51, told Circuit
CourtJudge Richard "Ric"
Howard a month ago he
doesn't want any more
legal challenges filed on
his behalf.
"I've thought about this
for many years," he said by
phone during a Sept. 13
hearing. "I would prefer to
have it carried out."
Dean: Execution
too long coming'
After authorities arrested
Happ, Citrus County Sheriff
Charles Dean paid a per-
sonal visit to Angela Crow-
ley's mother in Oregon, Ill.
"I told her we've got the
guy who killed Angela and
would do everything we


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


can to see he gets what he
deserves," Dean, now a
state senator, said.
Dean said it was physical
evidence fingerprints in
Crowley's car, a shoeprint
near the car that led in-
vestigators to Happ.
"When we finally
tracked him down, we
found him in prison,"
Dean said. "He still had
those tennis shoes."
Happ was from Califor-
nia, but staying with a
great-aunt in Crystal River
He had a lengthy history of
criminal charges even
from the days of his youth.
"He was just the most ob-
vious person," Dean said.
Newspaper carriers said
they heard a man and a
woman having an alterca-
tion in the convenience
store parking lot, and then
the sound of glass breaking.
The next day, a friend said
Happ's fist was swollen.
Happ was living with his
great-aunt since March of
that year He had fled
Gilroy, Calif, where he was
wanted on charges in con-
nection with a gas station
robbery, according to nu-
merous news reports.
On Aug. 14,1986, the FBI
arrested Happ in Pitts-
burgh, Pa., for being a fugi-
tive from justice. When he
was booked on robbery and
kidnapping charges in Cali-
fornia, authorities matched
his fingerprints with those
found in Crowley's car
Dean said he believes
Happ deserves the death
penalty
"It's been too long com-


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ing," he said.
Dean said he will attend
the execution as a witness
- the first time he's done
that.
"I just think Angela de-
serves having someone
there to represent her," he
said. "I had a daughter
about the same age, about
the same time. When you
see what he did and how he
did it, it's personal to me."
King: 'wrong place
at the wrong time.'
Brad King had just been
elected state attorney in
1988 when he prosecuted
Happ shortly taking office.
Judge John Thurman
moved the trial to Lake
County due to extensive
publicity in Citrus County
Happ was actually tried
twice. The first case ended
in a mistrial when, nearing
the end of the prosecu-
tion's questioning, King
mentioned Happ's prior
criminal record.


Thurman initially ac-
cused King of purposely
causing the mistrial, but he
later conceded it was sim-
ply an error on King's part
Thurman was then recused
from the case and replaced
by Judge Jerry Lockett.
Damaging testimony in-
cluded that of William
Miller, who had also been
an inmate in the Citrus
County Jail. Miller said
that Happ told him details
of Crowley's kidnapping,
rape and murder
King said Crowley was
an unfortunate target.
"It was just one of those
cases where the victim is a
nice girl, just traveling
through town to visit a
friend in Yankeetown," he
said. "It's just one of those
very sad cases where she
just happened to be in the
wrong place at the wrong
time."
Brother: Angle was
'caring and outgoing'
Chris Crowley has
waited 27 years for this.
Angie Crowley's older
brother, who helped her
move from their small
hometown in northern Illi-


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nois to the Fort Laud-
erdale area shortly after
Christmas 1985, will be
making just his second
visit to Florida since then.
Crowley, who attended
Happ's trial, will join sev-
eral family members as
witnesses to his scheduled
execution Tuesday
"I'm just glad we're at
the point where it's getting
over," Crowley said by
phone from his home in
Newburg, Mo. "I don't have
to worry about appeals or
hearings about whether or
not the death penalty will
be abolished. Now my
memories of her will be
about the good times."
Crowley and his son are
flying in Monday to Jack-
sonville. They plan to im-
mediately drive to Crystal
River, hoping to retrace
his sister's final moments.
"I've visualized all these
years where it happened,
how it happened," he said.
"It's something I want to
do."
The Cumberland Farms


across from Crystal River
City Hall is now a Chevron
store. The phone booths
were removed. Crowley
doesn't know the name of
the restaurant where her
car was found, though, iron-
ically, he heard the restau-
rant's late owner had also
once owned a restaurant in
the Crowley family's small
home town of Oregon, Ill.
After seeing Crystal
River for the first time,
Crowley and his son will
head to Starke to spend
the night, awaiting Happ's
execution on Tuesday
"He's going to be given a
chance to say one last
thing," Crowley said. "I'd
just like to know why I
don't think that's going to
happen."
His sister's living mem-
ory remains fresh.
"She was a very beauti-
ful and caring person,"
Crowley said. "She was
caring and outgoing. She
would help somebody if
they asked and wouldn't
bat an eye."


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S, Saturday, Oct. 19th
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LOCAL


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S Page A3-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13,2013



TATE0& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Gov. Scott's likability low


Despite efforts to boostpopularity, polls


continually show more Floridians dislike than like him


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Republi-
can Gov. Rick Scott, whose
catchphrase "It's working" is the
theme for his re-election, has
been willing to try just about
anything to get Floridians to like
him.
It's not working.
Since the day he was elected,
polls have shown that more
Floridians dislike him than like
him. Not that he hasn't made ef-
forts to win them over He tried
social media outreach, then gave
it up. He tried dressing casual,
then gave it up. He tried doing
"Let's Get to Work Days" but
seems to have abandoned those,
too.
While Scott has said policy
and not popularity is what's im-
portant, it's clear his staff and
his party are trying hard to make
him more likable. That could be
especially important, with the
prospect of opposing one of the
state's most likable politicians,
former Gov Charlie Crist, as he
seeks re-election.
"They keep trying to grab at
straws in trying to get his name
out there, and they just need to
let him be who he is," said Jamie
Miller, a Republican political
consultant. "They don't need to
change who he is, they just need


Gov. Rick Scott has said policy, not popularity is what is important.


to portray him as who he is."
Scott once said in an inter-
view that polls don't matter
"People think that being gov-
ernor is a popularity contest No.
Your job is to be the governor,"
Scott said during an interview
with The Associated Press his
first year in office.
His office said he wasn't avail-
able for an interview Thursday
and Friday
But Scott's actions indicate
he'd like to be more popular His
political committee and the Re-
publican Party of Florida to-
gether have paid Virginia-based


pollster Tony Fabrizio more
than $1 million since Scott took
office.
Early in his term, Scott tar-
geted his appeal to the far right.
He made his first budget an-
nouncement in a church as part
of a tea party rally He shunned
the news media during his cam-
paign, refused invitations to talk
with newspaper editorial boards
and kept the Capitol press corps
at a distance.
The former hospital chain
CEO had never run for office be-
fore and spent $73 million of his
own money to win. Democrats


When poll numbers continued
to drop halfway through his first
year in office, Scott changed his
chief of staff and began a
makeover. He traded his suits
and ties for business-casual
clothing, even changing his offi-
cial photo from a formal pose to
a casual shot.
He began accepting invita-
tions from newspaper editorial
boards. He took a cue from for-
mer Democratic Gov. Bob Gra-
ham and scheduled work days
where he would do a variety of
everyday jobs the first, selling
doughnuts in a Tampa shop.
Well, the suit and tie are back,
Associated Press and after holding "Let's Get to
Work Days" almost monthly over
a year and a half, Scott hasn't
successfully defined him as done one since February
someone who bought the office Some say the image that
and cared more about corporate Scott's handlers are trying to
interests than people. As his create just doesn't fit who he is.
polls slipped lower, his advisers "(Voters) think that most of his
tried different ways to make him actions are calculated -calcu-
look caring. lated on the polls, calculated by
During his first month in of- consultants," said former Re-
fice, Scott went on Twitter and publican Sen. Paul Dockery, who
answered questions from follow- briefly ran for the GOP guberna-
ers. Two months later he did the torial nomination in 2010.
same on Facebook. His staff said It's not that Scott isn't a nice
the social media town halls guy he is friendly and polite
would be a regular feature in his and takes time to talk to people
effort to communicate with when he travels the state but
Floridians. He hasn't done he often doesn't look comfort-
another able in crowds.


Scarecrow Festival


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
ABOVE: Charlee Childers, left, and her sister Saylah Childers
enjoyed Saturday afternoon picking out pumpkins. RIGHT: Snows
Produce worker Jennifer Smolensky packed a basket with fresh
green beans along with home-grown tomatoes, peppers and other
various vegetables. See more photos at www.chronicleonline.com.
children of all ages enjoyed the carnival
atmosphere as sounds of laughter and
enjoyment echoed through the wind at the
26th annual Scarecrow Festival at Heritage Village
in Crystal River A variety of food, children's
old-fashioned games, a pumpkin patch and pony
rides were available.


November


Citrus


County


returns

Special to the Chronicle
The third annual Movember Cit-
rus County kicks off from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Tuesday Oct 29, at Court-
house Square in Inverness with
the Movember shave-off/kick-off
party
The Agricultural Alliance of Cit-
rus County encourages all resi-
dents to grow a Mo (short for
moustache) in November to
participate.
November is the month formerly
known as November, where men
and women across the globe join
together to raise awareness and
funds for men's health issues. Men
grow a Mo for 30 days to become
walking, talking billboards, for
men's health causes specifically
prostate cancer, testicular cancer
and mental health.
Men who support Movember,
called Mo Bros, start clean shaven,
then grow and groom their mous-
tache for the rest of the month.
Women who support Movember,
called Mo Sistas, champion the Mo
by supporting their Mo Bros, and
spreading the message of men's
health.
The finale party and Movember
Mo Show is from 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov 21, at High
Octane Saloon in Homosassa.
To join the Movember Citrus
County team or donate money visit
the website us.movember.com/
team/1007301. To stay in the know
about the Mo, go to Facebook.com/
MovemberCitrus.


Around the STATE


Citrus County
Retriever reunion
slated in Dunnellon
Joshua's House for Golden
Retriever Rescue is having its
annual Golden Retriever Res-
cue Reunion from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at
Rainbow Springs State Park.
The reunion is open to all
golden retrievers and their
families. Registration starts at
9:30 a.m. and coffee and a
snack will be available.
Admission is a gift of
canned or bagged current-
date pet food, which will be
donated to Citrus County Pet
Meals on Wheels.
Rainbow Springs State
Park admission is $2 per per-
son. All dogs must be on a


leash; they are not allowed in
the water and poop scooping
is required.
For more information, call
352-527-0669.
Save Our Waters Week
committee to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save
Our Waters Week committee
will meet at 10 a.m. Monday,
Oct. 21, in room 219 of the
Lecanto Government Center,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meeting
is to review and critique the
planning and execution for
Citrus County's 18th annual
Save Our Waters Week. All
representatives to the com-
mittee and interested parties
are welcome to attend and
participate.


For more information, call
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
201-0149.
Citrus 20120 board
meeting planned
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 21, in
room 117 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are urged to at-
tend. Interested persons and
organizations are invited. For
more information about Citrus
20/20 Inc., visit www.
citrus2020.org or call 352-
201-0149.
Nature Coast GOP to
host spaghetti dinner
Nature Coast Republican
Club will host a spaghetti dinner


from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday
Oct. 19, atAmerican Legion
Post 155, Crystal River. In addi-
tion to dinner, there will be a
silent auction and entertainment.
Former elected officials will
be the "cooks" and Commis-
sioner Scott Adams will be the
emcee for the event.
The cost is $10. Tickets are
available by calling 352-746-
7249.
All are welcome.

Miami
Judge won't delay state
worker drug test case
MIAMI -A Miami federal
judge has refused to delay
proceedings in a lawsuit chal-
lenging Florida Gov. Rick
Scott's plan to require random
drug tests for thousands of


state workers.
Lawyers for the Republican
governor sought a stay so
they can appeal the case to
the U.S. Supreme Court. But
U.S. District Judge Ursula Un-
garo ruled Friday the gover-
nor's appeal was unlikely to
succeed.
Ungaro also ordered the
governor's office and lawyers
for a state employee labor
union to submit lists by next
Friday of job categories that
remain in dispute as far as
random drug testing. A federal
appeals court ruled earlier
that some sensitive, safety
and law enforcement jobs can
be subject to testing.
Scott's original order cov-
ered some 85,000 workers.
It's on hold pending the case's
outcome.


Tallahassee
Gray squirrel hunting
season opens
Florida wildlife authorities
have opened the state's gray
squirrel hunting season.
The state Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
said the season started Satur-
day on private lands and runs
through March 2, 2014.
The squirrels are members
of the rodent family and can
grow up to 20 inches long.
They like wooded areas and
spend most of their time on
trees.
Hunters who want to look
for gray squirrels on wildlife
management areas should
consult with the FWC, as
open dates vary.
-From staff and wire reports




A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Don't let instability worry
you in the year ahead. A new begin-
ning is overdue, and discovering new
ways to use your talents will lead to an
interesting future. Gravitate toward
positive people and re-establish your
position among your peers.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -A last-
minute change of plans must not throw
you off course. Follow through with
your agenda and do your best to make
your home and family life in tune with
your pursuits.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Look at
every angle before you make changes
that may invite opposition. An emo-
tional situation can stand between you
and your destination.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Keep
everything out in the open to avoid
being blamed for something you didn't
do. A promise isn't likely to be honored.
Get an agreement in writing. A domes-
tic change looks promising.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Pro-
ductivity must not be squashed by an
emotional outburst. Listen if someone
has a complaint, but don't let it slow
your progress.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Listen
to what's being said and do your best
to please and satisfy someone you
love, but don't let anyone restrict your
freedom or limit what you can do.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -An
emotional situation will be expensive if
you haven't made the necessary ad-
justments to protect yourself.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Getting
together with old friends or colleagues
will help put you back on track emo-
tionally, mentally and physically.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Follow
through with your long-held plans. A part-
nership will be enhanced if you discuss
issues that could alter your lifestyle.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Take ad-
vantage of an opportunity to display
what you have to offer, and you will re-
ceive an attractive proposal.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy-
ment is the name of the game. Try
something new and exciting, and you
will begin an adventure that could lead
to great things.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Arguments
will be a waste of time. Keep a low pro-
file and a tight grip on your wallet.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Stick to
what and whom you know. An invest-
ment may sound good, but it isn't likely
to deliver what's being promised.


ENTERTAINMENT


Taylor Swift opens
$4M Country Hall
of Fame center
NASHVILLE, Tenn. It might
as well be Taylor Swift week-
end in Music City.
The pop star opened her
$4 million Taylor Swift Education
Center at the Country Music Hall
of Fame and Museum on Satur-
day morning, and will accept her
record sixth songwriter-artist of
the year award from Nashville
Songwriters Association Interna-
tional on Sunday.
Swift cut the ribbon on the
new education center she do-
nated to the museum as part of
its expansion campaign and
showed reporters and area high
school students the new class-
room and exhibit space before
the museum opened.
"I'm really excited about this
music education center and the
fact that right now they have
three different classes going on
today," Swift said in an interview
after the ceremony. "It's really
exciting that we can be here on
a day when they're not only un-
veiling it, but they're starting to
actively use it today."
The center will have class-
room space, a hands-on instru-
ment room and ongoing
education opportunities. Mu-
seum officials say the new cen-
ter will increase educational
opportunities sevenfold going
forward.
And who knows? Maybe
users will find the 23-year-old
Swift hanging around some day.
"We've been talking about dif-
ferent programs I can be in-
volved in," Swift said. "I hate to
call it a lecture because that
sounds like I'm yelling at people,
but we could do a Q&A talking to
students here, and a songwriters
discussion would be really fun to
have at some point."


Associated Press
Taylor Swift poses for a photo Saturday with Piper Moralez,
11, at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in
Nashville, Tenn. Swift was at the facility to open the
$4 million Taylor Swift Education Center.


Charlie Hunnam last month he initially turned
departs, 'Fift down the role because of timing
departs ty issues.
Shades of Grey' film sales s
Sales~ surg fo ne
NEW YORK-- Charlie Hun-
nam is dropping out of the highly Nobel winner,
anticipated big-screen version of Alice Munro


"Fiity bhades ot (frey" just


weeks after being cast as the
lead, citing his busy schedule.
Universal announced Satur-
day that the actor who was to
play Christian Grey will depart
the project. The studio called it a
mutual decision because Hun-
nam's preparation time was lim-
ited by his television schedule.
He stars in the series "Sons of
Anarchy."
It's an abrupt and embarrass-
ing switch for a high-profile film.
Fans of E L James' erotic best-
seller are eagerly awaiting the
movie adaptation, which will be
directed by Sam Taylor-
Johnson. Dakota Johnson re-
mains in the co-starring role of
Anastasia Steele. Hunnam's re-
placement is being sought.
The 33-year-old Hunnam said


NEW YORK- The public
wants to read a lot more from
Alice Munro.
The Canadian author had five
books in Amazon.com's top 30
on Friday, a day after winning
the Nobel Prize for literature.
The 82-year-old Munro is one of
the better known literature win-
ners in recent years and has re-
ceived one of the stronger Nobel
sales "bumps."
Her current best sellers in-
clude the story collections "Dear
Life," "Runaway" and "Some-
thing I've Been Meaning to Tell
You."
Publisher Vintage Books has
announced a reprinting of previ-
ous works that will total 100,000
copies. Covers of the new edi-
tions will note her Nobel status.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 13, the
286th day of 2013. There are 79
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 13,1962, Edward
Albee's searing four-character
drama "Who's Afraid of Virginia
Woolf?" opened on Broadway with
Arthur Hill as George, Uta Hagen
as Martha, George Grizzard as
Nick and Melinda Dillon (whose
23rd birthday it was) as Honey.
On this date:
In 1307, King Philip IV of France
ordered the arrests of Knights Tem-
plar on charges of heresy.
In 1792, the cornerstone of the ex-
ecutive mansion, later known as the
White House, was laid during a cere-
mony in the District of Columbia.
In 1960, John F. Kennedy and
Richard Nixon held the third tele-
vised debate of their presidential
campaign (Nixon was in Los Ange-
les, Kennedy in New York).
In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered
flight carrying 45 people crashed in
the Andes; 16 survivors who re-
sorted to feeding off the remains of
some of the dead in order to stay
alive were rescued more than two
months later.
Ten years ago: The U.N. Secu-
rity Council approved a resolution
expanding the NATO-led peace-
keeping force in Afghanistan.
Five years ago: On Wall Street,
the Dow Jones industrial average
gained a shocking 936 points after
eight days of losses.
One year ago: Iran's foreign
ministry said it was ready to show
flexibility at nuclear talks to ease
Western concerns over Tehran's
nuclear program.
Today's Birthdays: Singer-
musician Paul Simon is 72. Musi-
cian Robert Lamm (Chicago) is 69.
Singer-musician Sammy Hagar is
66. Actor Sacha Baron Cohen is 42.
Thought for Today: "There are
some things one can only achieve
by a deliberate leap in the opposite
direction. One has to go abroad in
order to find the home one has
lost." Franz Kafka, Austrian au-
thor (1883-1924).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR ,'r-I LO'.- PR| I iLC
58 0.00 6 RR n .i 83 58


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Mostly
sunny today.


83 60 0.00 '-- NANAA 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusveday
forecast by: Ig

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
L High: 85 Low: 56
Mostly sunny

H-- "w MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 57
Partly cloudy

-ri TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 57
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 85/61
Record 94/55
Normal 86/62
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.81 in.
Total for the year 51.14 in.
Normal for the year 46.21 in.
*As of 7 pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 60
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 43%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 7.3/12
Monday's count: 7.1
Tuesday's count: 7.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/13 SUNDAY 1:25 7:39 1:52 8:05
10/14 MONDAY 2:14 8:26 2:39 8:52


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3 SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:02P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:31 A.M.
(4 0^ C MOONRISE TODAY............................3:30 P.M.
OCT. 20 NOV. 3 NOV. 10 MOONSET TODAY ............................ 2:04 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:58 a9:04 a 1:12 p/10:11 p
Crystal River" 12:19 a/6:26 a 11:33 a/7:33 p
Withlacoochee* 9:20 a/4:14 a 11:07 p/5:21 p
Homosassa*** 1:08 a/8:03 a 12:22 p/9:10 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
2:59 a/l10:27 a 2:40 p/11:15 p
1:20a/7:49a 1:01 p/8:37 p
10:48 a/5:37 a 11:53 p/6:25 p
2:09 a9:26 a 1:50 p/10:14 p


Gulf water
temperature


81
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


)RECAST FOR 3.6 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


s
s
pc
pc
.61 sh
ts
.03 sh
sh
pc
pc
s
sh
s
c
ts
c
.12 s
.01 pc
sh
pc
sh
s
ts
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
sh
s
.03 ts
pc
pc
s
.68 pc
pc
pc
.44 pc
.22 s
pc
pc
pc
pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 86 71 pc 85 69
NewYorkCity 71 60 pc 68 54
Norfolk 72 64 .25 sh 73 63
Oklahoma City 76 58 ts 77 65
Omaha 67 46 pc 70 48
Palm Springs 86 59 s 82 61
Philadelphia 72 62 c 69 52
Phoenix 86 60 s 87 62
Pittsburgh 72 57 .03 pc 71 53
Portland, ME 57 46 s 61 40
Portland, Ore 56 49 .01 pc 63 42
Providence, R.I. 68 53 s 65 45
Raleigh 68 61 .01 sh 70 61
Rapid City 53 29 pc 58 42
Reno 68 36 pc 61 37
Rochester, NY 74 41 pc 67 53
Sacramento 76 47 s 77 51
St. Louis 78 64 .02 s 74 48
St. Ste. Marie 69 49 s 57 37
Salt Lake City 66 44 sh 59 42
San Antonio 92 78 ts 83 74
San Diego 70 62 s 69 60
San Francisco 63 47 s 70 53
Savannah 85 57 pc 80 63
Seattle 57 50 .04 pc 60 43
Spokane 52 41 pc 57 32
Syracuse 74 39 pc 68 51
Topeka 72 45 s 72 55
Washington 68 62 .26 sh 68 61
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 95 Cotulla, Texas LOW 16 Berthoud
Pass, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/76/s
Amsterdam 43/39/sh
Athens 80/60/pc
Beijing 71/45/sh
Berlin 50/41/sh
Bermuda 80/74/sh
Cairo 90/64/s
Calgary 48/30/pc
Havana 81/69/pc
Hong Kong 85/67/pc
Jerusalem 76/59/s


Lisbon 70/62/sh
London 55/39/sh
Madrid 65/46/pc
Mexico City 75/53/ts
Montreal 69/55/pc
Moscow 42/31/sh
Paris 47/44/sh
Rio 82/66/c
Rome 70/59/pc
Sydney 73/54/sh
Tokyo 71/61/s
Toronto 63/52/sh
Warsaw 52/49/c


ILLEGAL NOTICES





Bid Notices .............................. D6


Meeting Notices................D5, D6


Miscellaneous Notices............D5


CITRULIS COUNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community kNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
r Phone 352-563-6363
1 ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CT. 10
OCT. 18




SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 AS


- SHERIFF -
JEFFREY J. DAWSY


A Message from

Sheriff Jeff Dawsy

'Tis the Season... for

CRIMES OF OPPORTUNITY
The upcoming months are some of my favorite times of the year. Handing out
candy make that healthy snacks to trick-or-treating monsters and princesses
on Halloween, fulfilling my tradition of smoking a myriad of turkeys for friends at
Thanksgiving, and putting up the massive display of Christmas decorations that
we have collected over the years always gives me reasons to smile.
Unfortunately, the impending Fall season also gives the not-so-good-guys
(and gals) the opportunities they're looking for to commit crimes. A crime of
opportunity is simply a crime in which the subject sees an easy way to break the
law. Here's how you can help us to keep you from becoming a victim during
these happy holidays...
CRIME
Sexual in nature toward children
OPPORTUNITY
Halloween, children going door-to-door
WHAT TO DO
Know where the sexual offenders and predators live in your neighborhood;
visit our website at sheriffcitrus.org and click on Sexual Offender Information
to view sexual offenders & addresses; sign up for Florida sexual offender
alerts.
CRIME
Burglaries, thefts
OPPORTUNITY
Heavy shopping days, like Black Friday (the day after Thanksgiving) through
the Christmas season, unlocked cars with gifts, unlocked homes, unsecured
valuables
WHAT TO DO
Even though it sounds cliche, lock it or be prepared to lose it. Lock doors and
windows at home, keep garage doors closed; remove valuable objects from
your lawn; remove valuables (especially things that can be seen) from your
car; always lock your vehicle.
One burglar in nearby St. Pete was quoted at his hearing as saying "If
someone is stupid enough to leave their car unlocked, it's OK to take their stuff."
This season, don't give anyone an opportunity to make you or any member of
your family a victim. Also, follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/sheriffcitrus
for crime safety tips no matter what time of year.

JOIN US IN OCTOBER!
EVERY WEDNESDAY
"Ask the Sheriff" -7am-8am on The Fox 96.7
EVERY THURSDAY
"Ask the Sheriff" -4pm-5pm on Citrus 95.3


Crime Prevention Month

Fire Prevention Month

THURSDAY-SATURDAY, OCT. 25-26-27
Cooter Fest -Downtown Inverness
SATURDAY, OCT. 26
National Prescription Drug Take Back Day
-Walgreens in Homosassa and Inverness

NOTTOIC
Im otn hn um es......................
M SBU In o.................................. .2

C r m a t ..................................
Kno th a s..................................
Sch o Bu a e y ..............................I
I I ICrn r................................i
9/1M m ra Sarlm .......................l
Prescrip ioDrg............................3




A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


12 Di OTBEiHIDIB0IAD3


IMPORTANT

PHONE NUMBERS
Police, Fire, EM S Em ergencies ......................................................911
Citrus County Sheriff's Office................................................ 726-4488
Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
Em ergency M anagem ent................................................... 746-6555
Lecanto Governm ent Building.............................................. 527-5200
Citrus County Health Department........................................ 527-0068
Citrus County Public W orks.................................................. 527-5477
Citrus County Anim al Services............................................. 726-7660
Citrus County Solid W aste..................................................... 527-7670
Citrus County School Board.................................................. 726-1931
Citrus County Flood Management
S p e c ia lis t ............................................................................... 5 2 7 -5 3 4 1
Nature Coast Volunteer Center............................................ 249-1275
City of Inverness Adm inistration......................................... 726-2611
City of Inverness Public W orks............................................ 726-2321
City of Crystal River Administration......................... 795-4216 x302
City of Crystal River Public Works............................ 795-4216 x313
Florida Highw ay Patrol............................................... 1-866-369-4613
Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission ....................................1-888-404-3922
American Red Cross (Citrus County Chapter) ..........................564-8455
Salvation A rm y (Citrus County).................................................. 513-4960
United W ay of Citrus County................................................. 527-8894
Duke Energy (to report outages) ....................................1-800-228-8485
Sumter Electric (to report outages) ...............................1-800-732-6141
W ithlacoochee Electric ..........................................................795-4382
Citizen Information/Rumor Control..................................... 746-5470
(lines open during an em ergency) .............................................527-2106
This list can also be found on our Web site at
www.sheriffcitrus.org



YOUR $: MSBU
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners passed an annual
fire fee called an MSBU (Municipal Service Benefit Unit) in the amount of
$54.00 for all residential parcels (pieces of land). The fee will not apply
for the City of Inverness. Institutional properties that are wholly exempt
from ad valorem taxation will not be assessed a fire fee. The non-
residential fire fee is based on the actual square footage and use of each
non-residential building.
The MSBU fee was needed to ensure comprehensive fire services to
citizens now and into the future. The fire fee revenues must be used for
fire rescue expenditures only per State Statute. The funds, which will
make up 53.7% of Fire Rescue's budget, will be used to fund labor costs
as well as operating, maintenance, and capital expenses.
To apply for a hardship exemption OR a mobile home or RV Park
vacancy adjustment visit Sheriffcitrus.org to fill out an application.




Crime

Comparisons

2012 vs. 2013

Year to Date (September 19)
2012 U 2013

RESIDENTIAL
BURGLARY

COMMERCIAL -
BURGLARY

VEHICLE -
BURGLARY

AUTO fl
THEFT


HOMICIDE
*5

ROBBERY I 2

SEXUAL
OFFENSE


I I
)OOGBMS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II BI TH BADGE 31


Don't be a



Drug Dealer

SHARING YOUR PRESCRIPTION
WITH OTHERS IS ILLEGAL.
Education, treatment and enforcement To further educate the public on pre-
are the three elements of action now scription drug use and or treatment, the
underway to address the prescription Citrus County Sheriff's Office has
drug problem in our com- launched a new website:
munity CitrusDrugAbuse.com. This
The Citrus County I web page provides infor-
Sheriff's Office has taken mation on the signs of
aggressive measures to abuse, overdose and links
investigate and arrest ,-, to treatment resources,
those who illegally sell 1." a. especially substance
or obtain prescription abuse and mental health
drugs. Partnerships with .-. m services locations.
state and federal inves- The illegal prescribing
tigators have been very and sales of prescription
effective in curtailing the drugs, and drug abuse is a
illegal sale of prescription challenge that affects our
drugs. entire community.
Locally, we have estab- t By applying pressure
lished a drop-off location for through enforcement, and by
unused or out of date prescription drugs providing resources for education and
at our main headquarters on MLK Jr. treatment, we can lead the way for a
Ave. in Inverness. safer Citrus County.

PERMANENT DROP BOX LOCATION:
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Avenue
Inverness, FL 34450-4994
-~~ll ~ F


4


DRUG TAKE BACK DAY LOCATIONS:

Walgreens Homosassa
Corner of Grover Cleveland and HWY 19

Walgreens Inverness
Corner of 44 and Independence

ALL DRUGS will be accepted.
Please, NO NEEDLES-they will be turned away!


The Governor approved Senate Bill 52, "Florida ban on Texting While
Driving Law." It will be in effect on October 1, 2013. Florida drivers it would
be wise to get into the habit NOW of not texting while driving before this law
goes into effect.
The prohibition is enforceable as a secondary offense. A first violation is
punishable as a nonmoving violation, with a fine of $30 plus court costs that
vary by county. A second violation punishable by a $60 fine plus court costs.
The law allows for the admissibility of a person's wireless communications
device billing records as evidence in the event of a crash resulting in death or
personal injury.


127


Fiji


5I



It


.

k[-J


and others like this.


Emily Banks Emmanuel All states should do the same...
33 minutes ago *
Russell Roberts do we really need a law to know this is
unsafe and use our heads?.
32 minutes ago i 1I
Gloria Bermudez YES !! Thank Goodness!!
32 minutes ago *
Bill Godfrey WAY TO GO FLORIDA!! Now continue to
strengthen the law to make it as effective as driving under the
influence laws...I don't like playing Russian Roulette every time I
get on the road.
26 minutes ago I
Evelyn Holder It's a shame we have to enforce common sense!
23 minutes ago j2
Sharron Benghazi Bryant Yes, Yes! It is about time! But
will they enforce it in Citrus county? I doubt it? or until someone
gets kill unfortunately! We will see!
23 minutes ago *
Kenneth Blue Does this g o for the sherrif's n states too???
Cause I always see them mofos txtn o driving
23 minutes ago via mobile* _b3
Larry Swafford from what I see its being ignored. Like veery
other car???
22 minutes ago *
Kyle Mansfield Glad this is finally in place.
22 minutes ago via mobile*
Angela Streit My husband and I were driving the other day an
everyone we passed was texting it was crazy no one was paying
attention.
20 minutes ago via mobile
Krystal Larsen about time but i really hope this works cause
my grampa just died on a motorcycle cause someone was just tax-
ing away of there cell phone while they were driving what a same
of people they just don't care of anyone else but i hope they really
see it know please don't text while you drive and thank you Citrus
County Sherriff's Office for making this happen
20 minutes ago via mobile*
Sandy Putman Have been almost wrecked several times by
people either texting or on their phone apparently oblivious to what
they are doing or where they are.
15 minutes ago*
Violet Rozanski I don't know how they can text and drive at
the same time anyway.
13 minutes ago via mobile


FloridaSchoolBusSafety.gov
OTWO-LANE
Vehicles traveling in both
directions MUST stop.
0 DIVIDED HIGHWAY
Unpaved space (Min 5ft)
OR any raised median/physical barrier.
Vehicles behind bus MUST stop.
Vehicles traveling in the opposite
direction proceed with caution
G MULTI-LANE
Paved Across
Vehicles traveling in both
directions MUST stop


I


==Md


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A7


I 'f, facebookCORNER I




A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

4 BE IN THE BAG


9/11: Always in our Hearts


and Now Even Closer to Home


The Citrus County Sheriff's Office joined
the National Association of Retired Law
Enforcement Officers (NARLEO)- Citrus
Chapter, along with the City of Inverness,
to bring artifacts from the 9/11 tragedy to
Citrus County from Ground Zero in New
York City. Those that made the trip are:
S Gary Gersitz, a retired Port
Authority Police Officer and member of
NARLEO- Citrus County Chapter
CCSO Deputy Todd Farnham
CCSO Deputy Joe Faherty
Joe Jergens, assists NARLEO
(Citrus County). His son, Tommy, perished
in 9/11 and his other son, Joey, is now a
NY Firefighter and escorted the men
during their trip.
Two retired Port Authority Police
Officers, who were working during 9/11,
created The World Trade Center Traveling
Memorial which traveled throughout the
country from 2002 to 2011 displaying
memorabilia from the tragedy. These
officers, who worked with Gersitz during
9/11, invited him and NARLEO- Citrus
County to come to NYC and select
artifacts from their collection for a display
in Citrus County.
Faherty and Farnham said knowing the
work emergency responders do is
honorable but getting outside of the
community and being able to see what
could happen anywhere makes it even
more admirable. They would like to thank
the City of Inverness and NARLEO for
allowing them to be a part of this
unforgettable trip. "This is something I
never experienced before and being a
native New Yorker, it hit home. My dad
was a NYC Cop. I had friends there.
Words can't express what it felt like,"
expressed Faherty.


U'


The patrol vehicle belonged to Lt. David
Lim who went to investigate the noise he
heard after the collapse of the first tower
and left his K9, Siruis, in his kennel in the
second tower. Lim was unable to return to
rescue K9 Siruis before the collapse. "This
door is a special memorial for all fallen K9
officers and fallen K9s. We (CCSO) will be
creating a display in their honor where
everyone will be able to see and
remember those tragic events," said Dep.
Farnham.


7


WA*








NARLEO received many items
which include: multiple signs-
"World Trade Center" entry sign
for the subway, "Police" which ",
labeled the designated parking f-k
spot at the towers (pictured), a 1
fireman's jacket, fire extinguisher,
tiles from the lobby floor for tower
1, and many pictures, news
articles and more.


Two retired Port Authority Police Officers,
who were working during 9/11,
created The World Trade Center
Traveling Memorial which traveled
throughout the country from 2002 to 2011
displaying memorabilia from the tragedy.
A portion of the sphere that was shaped as a globe that sat
between the towers symbolizing world peace. Ironically, the
sphere survived both the 1993 and the 2001 bombings. The top
portion of the sphere (pictured) will reside in Citrus County and the
rest of the sphere is on display in Battery Park in NYC.


Ir1

These are the criteria for
citizen on-line case reporting:
* The citizen must have an
email address and be at least
18 years of age.
* This is not an emergency.
* This event occurred in the
past and the suspect is not
present.
* There are no firearms or other
weapons involved.
* The incident involves credit
card fraud, financial fraud or
identity theft.


To provide faster and more efficient
service to our citizens, the Sheriff's
Office is now offering Online
reporting for Identity Theft/Fraud
activity. In the future, we will expand
this option to other types of crime.
Upon completion of the
online report you will:
See the words: "Your report
has been submitted"
showing that your report is
complete.
Be given a temporary case
number.
Be able to print an unofficial
copy of the report to keep for
your records.
Be sent confirmation and an
official copy of your report by
e-mail so long as you provide
a valid e-mail address.


Please Note:
All cases filed online will be reviewed.
Upon review, if further investigation of your case is
needed, you may be contacted.
Upon approval by a Citrus County Sheriff's Office
representative, you will be notified by e-mail of the
permanent case number and also receive a copy
of the approved case.
If the case is rejected by a Citrus County Sheriff's
Office representative, you will be notified by e-mail
of the reason for the rejection.
Filing a false police report is a crime.


You must call 9-1-1 for an emergency.


9/11 Memorial Stairclimb

September 8,2013

at Citrus Memorial Hospital
On Sept. 8, 2013 at Citrus Memorial
d ^Hospital, 144 people climbed up and
i down 110 flights of stairs to symbolize
-the floors in the World Trade Center
0 law eTowers to honor the 343 firefighters,
1 \.M ^L60 law enforcement officers, and 8
emergency medical personnel that
perished in the attacks on Sept. 11,
r r 2001. During the event, climbers
S" wore a picture tag of one of the 343
^ fallen firefighters and many who par-
t ticipated wore full bunker gear and
air packs. Over $3,000 was raised and
will be donated to the National Fallen
. Firefighter Foundation.

-IW
H T *i ^W 4411


1k-A'
1A


p-rfZi


]ETIDENTITYB3EF




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Leonard Boggs
FLORAL CITY
Leonard Boggs, loving
partner of Mary Weaver of
Floral City, Fla., and loving
brother of Virginia Isen-
hart of Medina, Ohio, lost
his battle Thursday, Oct.
10,2013.
Leonard was a nine-year
Army veteran and served
in the Korean War He
would have appreciated
those who knew him say-
ing a prayer for him and
for his loved ones.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.




Harold 'Hap'
Brady, 78
HOMOSASSA
Harold L. "Hap" Brady,
78, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Oct. 8, 2013, at the
Malcom Randall VA Med-
ical Center Born Jan. 23,
1935, in Stanford, Ky., to
the late William & Alberta
(Langford) Brady, Harold
moved to Florida from
Union, Ky., where he re-
tired as a floor mechanic.
He is a veteran of the
USAF for four years and
the Navy Reserves for two
years and a member of
Gulf to Lake Church.
Harold is survived by his
wife of 56 years, Barbara;
son, John G. and wife Jill
Brady of Florence, Ky;
daughters, Jeanne L, and
husband Eli, Brady-Neri
of Homosassa, Jerri D, and
husband Bill, Brady-Ellis
of Knoxville, Tenn., and
Julie B, and husband Jeff,


CL., E. Sbwjii
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

C re m a t io n ,0 ,,' . .

For Information and costs,x
call 726-8323


Harold "Hap" Brady
Brady-Elbert of Independ-
ence, Ky; brother, William
"Pete" Brady of Florence,
Ky.; sister, Doris Wolfeld of
Boynton Beach; grandchil-
dren, Brittany, Michael,
Christian, McKenzie,
Johnny, Carrie, Jacob,
Nicholas, Jessica, Justin
and Alec; and great-
grandchildren, Taylor,
Madelyn, Mason, Carter
and Wyatt McKena.
A celebration of life
service will be at 11 a.m.
Monday, Oct. 14,2013, with
a luncheon being served
after the service, at Wilder
Funeral Home, in Ho-
mosassa. Condolences
may be offered at
www.wilderfuneral.com.



Thomas
Lee II, 38
Thomas Bruce Lee II,
age 38, died Oct. 8, 2012. A
graveside military com-
mittal service will be at
2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18,
2013, at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Friends are invited to join
the funeral procession
from the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home at 1:30 p.m.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.


Richard 'Dick'
Crane, 74
HOMOSASSA
Richard "Dick" Crane,
74, passed away suddenly
on Oct. 11, 2013, from res-
piratory complications. He
was born
Feb. 14,
1939, in
Buckhan-
non, WVa.,
a n d
resided j
in Ho-
mosassa,
Fla. He Richard
was also a Crane
U.S. Army
veteran. He worked as an
automotive designer at
Ford Motor until he re-
tired to Florida.
Richard passionately
enjoyed spending his early
retirement years riding his
Harley-Davidson and was
a member of ABATE of
Florida, Gator Alley Chap-
ter He also devoted much
of his time as a member of
the Crystal River Eagles
Aerie No. 4272, Crystal
River Moose Lodge
No. 2013, and the Ameri-
can Legion in Bonita
Springs, Fla.
Richard is survived by
his daughter, Jody La
Londe, and dear friend and
son-in-law, Albert La
Londe; beloved grand-
daughters and grandsons
Shannon and Jason Fabbri
and Corey and Jay
Richards, all of Michigan;
he was recently excited
about the news of becom-
ing a great-grandfather;


longtime "love" Donna
Swihura of Bonita Springs,
Fla.; Ford Motor co-work-
ers and loyal friends,
Chuck Walowich, Gordon
Scott and John Czyzewski.
The family is appreciative
of all the friendships he
had in the Homosassa area.
A memorial service will
be held in the Spring at
Salem Church and Ceme-
tery in Gaines, WVa.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.
Ella
Kenning, 92
INVERNESS
Ella Pauline Kenning,
92, of Inverness, passed
away Oct. 11, 2013, under
the loving care of her fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County
She was
born Sept.
26, 1921, in
Janesville, _
Ill., to Mae
Phipps /
Harmon.
Sadly, her
mother
died when Ella
she was Kenning
only 5
years old and she lived
with her grandfather,
whom she loved dearly,
Elmer Phipps, on the
small family farm with the
train tracks running along
side. She met Robert (Bob)
Kenning at the Roller
Rink one Saturday in Peo-
ria and they married on
June 21, 1941, at St.
Joseph's Church in Peoria,
Ill. With both fun and


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Dental implants to support single tooth crowns,
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Veterans and Spouses
Facts You Must Know Now About
Your Veterans Burial Benefits
What is your choice?
National Cemetery Private Cemetery
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Casket Burial- Cremation
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personal planning guide?
Let's meet at
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1935 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River
and talk about your benefits/options

Thursday, Oct.. 17
Lunch 11am
Seating limited

Please call 352-746-4646 for reservations
This is a repeat seminar, if you've attended before you
are already registered.


heartache along the way,
they raised six children
and the usual household of
the kids' dogs, cats, chick-
ens, birds, hamsters and
turtles. She loved "crit-
ters" of all sorts, and you
often found her out feed-
ing the birds and squirrels.
Always an artist at heart,
she owned small ceramic
studios through the years,
continued to paint on can-
vas with both oil and
acrylics, dabbled in porce-
lain and gifted her "Mom
art" to all of us.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 69
years, Bob; and her eldest
son, Robert Anthony
(Tony) Kenning. She is sur-
vived by her daughters
Mary Beth Licata, Debo-
rah Kenning, Jean Dorn
and Robin Kenning; and
one son, Richard Kenning.
She was always happy to
tell you all about her 11
grandchildren, 13 great-
grandchildren (and one
who will be here in De-
cember to make 14!) and
one great-great-
grandchild.
Our thanks go to Hos-
pice of Citrus County for
their loving care of Mom,
and to Jo-Ann Mussa from
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church for her
spiritual care. A private
memorial service will be
held at a later date. She is
in the care of the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home With
Crematory Her urn will be
entombed privately in the
columbarium of the
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Fla., next to
her loving husband, Bob.
Sign the guest book at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.


LEND



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lC ard nil
0M.dr,~ yMl3


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A9

David
Scanlon, 70
CITRUS SPRINGS
David Scanlon, 70, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
July 16, 2013.
A memorial service is at
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19,
2013, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
Delora
Scanlon, 73
CITRUS SPRINGS
Delora Scanlon, 73, of
Citrus Springs, Fla., died
Sept. 20 2013, in North
Carolina.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
19, 2013, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
Kimberly
Yoder, 49
GRAND RAPIDS,
MICH.
Kimberly Ann Yoder, 49,
of Grand Rapids, Mich.,
died Sept. 13,2013.
A memorial service is at
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19,
2013, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
See DEATHS/Page AlO

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Kelly Prus
564-2917
kprus@chronicleonline.com
Coing 'imeo
plaing adis
4bu inesday
pro to run date


LREINETR OF ITES IH OMAABE AINS
ISat.I V 1S Sa




E AR -NO EILS
(Nex toS hell Station) 6


FoL'N I AIuN fI'.MO IAL




AIO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


DEATHS
Continued from PageA9

Phyllis
Dubbeld, 71
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Phyllis
Joann Dubbeld, age 71, of
Inverness, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Tuesday,
October 15, 2013 at the
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene with Pastor
Randy Hodges officiating.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 AM
until the time of service at
the church. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Dubbeld was born
April 26,1942 in Sidell, IL,
daughter of the late Her-
man and Pearl (Bellis)
Blacker She died October
10, 2013 in Inverness, FL.
She owned and operated
her antique business and
moved to Inverness, Florida
from Michigan 11 years ago.
Her hobbies included col-
lecting antiques, dolls and
bears. Mrs. Dubbeld was a
member of Lost Again Car
Club of Michigan and the
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene.
Survivors include her
husband, Walter Dubbeld
of Inverness, FL, son,
Brian (Karen) Dubbeld of
Three Rivers, MI, 2 daugh-
ters, Julie (Bob) Wankel of
Smyrna, TN and Diane
(Cliff) Walker Diehl of In-
verness, FL, 6 grandchil-
dren, Walter, Joshua and
Ashley Dubbeld, Ben and
Lauren Wankel, and Abby
Morales and 4 great grand-
children. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

David
Smith Sr., 52
HOMOSASSA
David E. Smith Sr, age
52, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Wednesday, Oct. 9,
2013, at his residence.
Arrangements are by
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lugene
Watson, 95
LECANTO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Lugene M.
Watson, age 95, of Lecanto,
Fla., will
be at 11
a.m. Mon-_ __
day, Oct. u
14, 2013, at
the North
Oak Bap-
tist Church
with Pas-
tor Stan L. Lugene
Stewart of- Watson
ficiating.
Interment will follow at
Memorial Gardens Ceme-
tery, Beverly Hills, Fla. The
family will receive friends
from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m.
Sunday at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes and from 10 a.m.
until 11 a.m. Monday, Oct.
14,2013, at North Oak Bap-
tist Church. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Watson was born
Sept. 2, 1918, in Creswell,
N.C., son of Albert and
Lilly (Davenport) Watson.
He died Oct. 10, 2013, in
Crystal River, Fla. Mr Wat-
son was a gunners mate
first class with the U.S.
Navy, serving during
World War II. He was em-
ployed as a construction
representative, installing
nuclear and fossil fuel
steam generation equip-
ment in electric power
plants, paper mills and
textile mills for Babcock &
Wilcox Co and B&W Con-
struction Co. from 1947
until his retirement in
1982. Following his retire-
ment, he moved to Roper,
N.C., until moving to
Lecanto in 1989. He en-
joyed woodworking and
repairing things. Mr Wat-
son was a Mason and a
member of the Shriners, as
well as North Oak Baptist
Church, Citrus Springs.
Mr Watson was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents; daughter, Peggy Jean
Watson; three brothers;
and a sister Survivors in-


clude his wife, Estelle A.
Watson of Lecanto, Fla.;
daughter, Kathy (Luther)
Willis of Crystal River, Fla.;
sister, Ruth Hackney of Hot
Springs, Ark.; grandson,
Christopher (Brittany)
Dyer of Ocala, Fla.; grand-
daughter, Amanda (R.J.)
Willis-Wilson of Crystal
River, Fla.; and great-
granddaughter, Abigail
Rose Dyer
Helen
Young, 86
LECANTO
Helen T Young, 86, of
Lecanto, Fla., died Mon-
day, Oct. 7, 2013, at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center, Crystal River
Helen was born in Pater-
son, N.J., the daughter of
Louis and Katherine
Feller She was an office
manager for Dr. Leonard
Harris in Roselle, N.J., and
moved to Beverly Hills,
Fla., in 1986 from West-
field, N.J. Helen was a
member of Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church in
Hernando, and the Bev-
erly Hill Billies square
dance group.
Helen was predeceased
by her daughter, Donna E.
Young; sister, Katherine;
and brother John. Sur-
vivors include her hus-
band, Donald Young,
Lecanto; son, Thomas J.
Young and his wife Mary of
Center Tuftonboro, N.H.;
grandchildren, Theresa,
Tina, Sarah, Matthew, and
Thomas; and great-
grandchildren, Landon,
Ella, Emme and Julia.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Young will take place
at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church in Her-
nando at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 12, 2013. Pastor Ken-
neth Blyth officiating. In-
terment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

* Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or phone 352-563-
5660 for details and
pricing options.


SOct. 14-18 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
All meals offer milk and juice.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, grits.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and
toast, grits.
Friday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cin-
namon bun, tater tots, ce-
real variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger,
corn dog minis, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, sweet
potato crosstrax, chilled
pineapple.
Tuesday: The Pinch Hit-
ter, Goldie's Grab N Go
(PBJ), turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled flavored
applesauce.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, chicken
nuggets with ripstick, Italian
super salad with roll, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, fla-
vored Craisins.
Thursday: Nacho
rounds, oven-baked
breaded chicken, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
chilled pineapple.
Friday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, turkey wrap,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
strawberry cup.
Middle school
All meals offer milk and juice.
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, grits.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal variety


and toast, tater tots.
Wednesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits.
Lunch
Monday: Barbecue pork
sandwich, corn dog minis,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-


rots, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled flavored
applesauce.
Tuesday: The Pinch Hit-
ter, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, flavored Craisins.
Wednesday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, Goldie's Grab
N Go (turkey), PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce.
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LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MENUS
Continued from PageAlO

Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken nuggets with ripstick,
Italian super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled strawberry cup.
Friday: Hamburger,
spaghetti with ripstick, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,


sweet corn, chilled peach cup.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage,


egg and cheese biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
NOTE: Due to limited


space, high school lunch
menus do not appear in print
this week. Visit http://cafe.
citrus. k12. fl. us/ for more infor-
mation about school meals.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Barbecued pork
riblet, green peas, mashed
potatoes, chunky cinnamon
apples, whole-wheat bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter,
baked beans with tomato,
peas, hot dog bun, mustard,


graham crackers, coleslaw,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad,
lettuce and tomato salad,
marinated broccoli salad, or-
ange, whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
whole-wheat bread with mar-
garine, slice of birthday cake,


LOCAL


David Caldwell I Community Banker


Local bankers who know business.

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 All

low-fat milk.
Friday: Apple juice, veg-
etable soup, meatloaf sand-
wich on whole-grain bun,
ketchup, raisins, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.




A12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 LOCAL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


pip--, ---- --
.. .. .,. ... .. -


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Mia Huebbers, born in Holland, came to America in 1946 with her mother, a World War II
"war bride" married to an American G.I. In a "small world" serendipitous moment, she
met a Dutch couple from near her hometown, who translated some letters from her Dutch
grandmother to her mother and then brought her mother's ashes "home" to Holland.


SMALL
Continued from PageAl

"His accent sounded so
much like my mom's," Mrs.
Huebbers said.
That's when she discov-
ered that the Nievelsteins
lived very close to Neer
Beek, Mrs. Huebbers'
hometown.
"I told him that my mom
had passed away in Janu-
ary and I had letters from
my grandmother to her
that were in Dutch," she
said. "I asked, if I brought
them in, would you read
them to me?"
He said he would be
delighted.
Mrs. Huebbers' grand-
parents had owned a
restaurant where many
American G.I.'s came to
eat during World War II.
Her mother, also named
Mia, had worked there,
too. That's where she met
Huebbers' father
The couple married and
Mrs. Huebbers' father re-
turned to the States, leav-
ing his wife and baby
daughter behind until they
were cleared by the U.S.
government to come to
America.
"We came over on a big
ship all the war brides
from different countries
came together," Mrs.
Huebbers said.
They went to Rhode Is-
land, where her father was
from. That's when her
grandmother began writ-
ing letters to her mother
Mrs. Huebbers said she
never learned Dutch, be-
cause her father forbade
it, so she didn't know what


Mia Huebbers has a box filled with photos, documents
and mementoes from her mother's life in Holland.


the letters said until
recently
She brought the letters
to Applebee's and met
with the Nievelsteins who
read them to her, translat-
ing them into English.
Besides news from
home, Mrs. Huebbers
learned that her grand-
mother did not like her fa-
ther In one letter she
wrote, "I am sorry that I let
you go to the United
States."
Mrs. Huebbers said the
people around them in the
restaurant were listening
in and marveling at how
small a world it is that this
would happen.
"Hein said, 'This is
God's will,' and I believe
that, too," she said. "They
were going back to Hol-
land, and I asked him,
'Would you take my mom's
ashes will you take her
home?' When she was at
Avante she had
Alzheimer's at the end
she kept saying, 'Mama,
Mama.' She wanted her
mother, my grandmother,


and I knew that was where
she belonged."
Nievelstein took her
mother's ashes and
brought them to the fam-
ily's church that was men-
tioned in the letters. There
he found birth and bap-
tismal records, Mrs. Hueb-
bers' parents' marriage
certificate and her grand-
mother's gravesite loca-
tion in the church's
records book.
On Oct. 3, the Nievel-
steins and the church
priest had a graveside cer-
emony for Mia Weerts,
bringing her home to her
mother
"They had a plate made
with her name and date of
birth on it, and they took
pictures of the town and
the street where I was
born and the Neer Beek
sign, and they're making it
into a book for me," Mrs.
Huebbers said. "This was
God's will."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


FLOODING
Continued from PageAl

scale is so terrible."
The new map is divided
into 100 highly detailed
panels. It shows land that
has been built up high
enough to be out of a flood
zone even though the par-
cel could be surrounded
by a flood zone. If a person
is looking for a good place
to build, it gets down to lot-
specific criteria.
Jones displayed the
panel for the Kensington
community in Central
Ridge, the most elevated
area in the county
"Not only can I see the
streets, but I can see the
houses," Jones said. "And
there are little tiny flood
zones within the subdivi-
sion that are showing up
on this map that didn't
even come close to show-
ing up on the old map."
Elevated doesn't
mean safe
Elevation can't always
indicate a lack of flood
risk, as the new map
demonstrates.
"People think elevation
is going to save them, but
realistically you can be in
a high elevation and still in
a flood zone," Jones said.
A property that is filled
to raise it up high can still
have depressions within it
where all the surrounding
areas drain to it, and that
area will flood. Runoff
combined with poor soil
quality can hold water like
a teacup.
"You can actually be on
the top of a hill and flood,"
Jones said. 'A combination
of conditions soil qual-
ity, drainage and a dip in
the ground level can put
a property in a flood zone
even in a higher elevation
area."
The new map exposes it
all.
The information com-
piled to create this map
started five years ago using
a system called Lidar, a
laser mounted to an air-
plane. Lidar, a term com-
bining light and radar, is a
remote sensing technology
that measures distance by
illuminating a target with
a laser and analyzing the
reflected light.
"In the Lidar system,
they fly over an area and
shoot that laser down on
the ground and get a re-
flected signal back, and that
tells the elevation of where
that laser hit," Jones said.
"When they fly over the
area, they shoot one about
every six feet in all direc-
tions across the county. By
compiling all those little
data points together, they
get a very accurate contour
of the ground."


In addition to the con-
tours, soils are analyzed.
"With the geology of the
area combined with the
contour, they get an idea of
where the water is run-
ning to, how fast it's drain-
ing into the ground, does it
have to go or not go, they
get a very detailed flood
map," Jones said.
The map is from the
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency (FEMA),
but was created by data
gathered by the Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District.
"The people who actu-
ally created the map was a
corporation called
AECOM, an engineering
firm," Jones said. "They
specialize in this sort of
thing. It's a team effort be-
tween FEMA, Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District and
AECOM."
The Department of
Emergency Management
for Florida also has taken
part in map development
as the information helps in
putting forth an emer-
gency response.
About 800 to 900 proper-
ties have been mapped out
of flood hazard areas, but
more than 2,000 have been
mapped in.
"Where some people
have found their risk has
gone down, other proper-
ties have found their risk
has gone up a little bit,"
Jones said. "The people
who have found them-
selves in a special flood
hazard area and they
weren't previously, their
mortgage company may
call them up and say,
'you're going to have to get
flood insurance' if they
have a federally backed
mortgage."
For those who don't have
loans on their homes, they
can choose to buy flood in-
surance or not
The new map has not
raised flood insurance
rates, as the map has not
been adopted.
"It's a preliminary map
and it's in the appeals
stage right now," Jones
said. "Should anybody
have an appeal regarding
the information on the
map, now's the time to ap-
peal that."

Rising premiums
Insurance will be a con-
cern for a homeowner
whose house was not built
above the flood base eleva-
tion and it is now in a flood
hazard area.
The base flood elevation
is a computed figure indi-
cating the anticipated rise
of floodwater during a
storm event. Base flood el-
evations are shown on
flood insurance rate maps.
The base flood elevation is
the regulatory require-


FLOOD MAPS
http://hazards.fema.
gov/femaportal/
prelimdownload/

ment for the elevation or
flood-proofing of struc-
tures. The relationship be-
tween the base flood
elevation and a structure's
elevation determines the
flood insurance premium.
Many older homes built
along the Gulf Coast are
below the base flood
elevation.
"The insurance compa-
nies will take a look at that
and say, 'That is a high-risk
home because it is below
that expected water
level,"' Jones said. "Premi-
ums are going to be higher
for those people."
Owners of such homes
who already are insured
have other bad news.
Their premium has been
affordable because it has
been subsidized by the
federal government, which
is withdrawing that sub-
sidy in increments.
"These people thought
they were paying a rela-
tively affordable premium,
but they were paying a
portion of it and the gov-
ernment was paying the
rest of it," Jones ex-
plained. "With the govern-
ment saying, 'we don't
want to subsidize it any-
more.' what's going to hap-
pen is that they are going
to increase that person's
premium 25 percent per
year until they reach that
point where it's no longer
subsidized."
If these homeowners
want to sell their houses,
the buyers won't have the
benefit of the gradual in-
crease but have to pay the
full premium at once.
"This whole thing can
have an effect on the econ-
omy and the sales of
houses," Jones said.

Get a surveyor
The map does not give
elevations of the land.
"What this map does is
shows us any areas that
have a possibility of flood-
ing and it gives us the ex-
pected level of the flood,
where that water could
rise to," Jones said. "But I
don't know the relative el-
evation of the land."
For that information, the
homeowner needs an ele-
vation certificate that
comes from a surveyor. It
tells the base flood eleva-
tion for the property, for
example, 8 feet. That
means that in the event of
a 1 percent chance storm
the property could flood
up to 8 feet above sea level.
However, the surveyor
would have determined
that the top of the floor for
the home was at, for exam-
ple, 10.6 feet, so the house


http://www.fema.gov/view-your-communitys-preliminary-flood-hazard-data-0
Citrus County's preliminary flood maps are available for viewing on the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency's website at http://hazards.fema.gov/femaportal/
prelimdownload/ each section of the county has it own, numbered map segment,
including a reference map such as this one.


is 2.6 feet above the base
flood elevation. Perhaps
the garage is at 8.1 feet,
which would put it a tenth
of a foot higher than the
flood level.
The certificate is
needed to prove to the
county that the structure
has been built above the
base flood elevation. The
owner's lender will ask for
this form to show that the
house was built above the
base flood elevation and
the owner's insurance
company will use informa-
tion to determine its pre-
mium rates.
"This form is extremely
important," Jones said.
"FEMA requires that we
ask for these forms and
that we keep them on file
for every property in a
flood area that has
construction."
The county helps to
keep flood insurance rates
lower for residents in un-
incorporated areas by par-
ticipating in a FEMA
program called the Com-
munity Rating System.
Currently, the program
benefits from a 20 percent
discount and the county is
aiming to get it down to
25 percent.
When people contact
Jones, their first concern is
if their home is in the spe-
cial flood district. Then
they want to know how it
will affect their insurance
premiums.
"That question I can't
answer," Jones said. "If
you find you are in a spe-
cial flood hazard area,
your best bet is to go to
your agent. Have them re-
search an elevation certifi-
cate. They can make a
determination after they
have all the facts."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.


CERTIFICATES
Continued from Page Al

home sales or refinancing and insurance companies
selling flood insurance policies.
"They could require one for each new owner," he
said. "The county re- Th n
quires one for additions The new maps
and modifications or are scheduled to
new homes for code
enforcement" take effect about
Jones said they be
might also be required September 2014.
for properties changing
flood hazard status with the new maps.
For structures that went through the county build-
ing department, he said, there may be a copy of the
original elevation certificate on file.
The new maps are scheduled to take effect about
September 2014. Building photographs are required
if the elevation certificates are to be used for insur-
ance purposed.
-Compiled by Pat Faherty


Ei LIEATION CERTIFICATE


SECTION 2 FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP (FIRM) INFORMATION



SECTION CT BUILDING ELEVATION INFORMATION (SURVEY REQUIRED)
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http://www.fema.gov/media-Iibrary/assets/documents/i160?id=1383
This is part of the multi-page online form to apply for an
elevation certificate from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency's national flood insurance program.


IOMB ...............- - I








E Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS


Ken
McNally

CAR
CORNER


forging on




Vacation in a closed national park


Tammy Webber
Associated Press

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK,
Calif.
Everybody gathers around
Joe, the guy who seems to
have all the answers.
Only he doesn't.
He's worked in Yosemite
National Park for about
30 years, and is trying to advise anx-
ious guests about what's open, what's
closed as the government shutdown
enters its second day If they want to
see the valley floor, he says, they'd
better get in their cars and drive now,
before more of the roads are closed.
They probably won't find an open
restroom along the way, but the food
court in Yosemite Village might be -
for now Then again, they might get
turned away Who knows? It's hour by
hour now
I never intended to get a firsthand
look at the closure of a national park.
I knew before I left Chicago that it
was a possibility, but held out hope.
Now here I am, trying to figure out
what to do in my third day in the
park, when some of the wonders I'd
come to see are inaccessible.
My friend Barb and I got here on a
Monday not exactly regretting the night
we spent in San Francisco, which was
nice, but anxious to get to the wilder-
ness. That first day, we tried to drive to,
or get a glimpse of, as many of the
iconic attractions as possible Half
Dome, El Capitan, Yosemite Falls -
and got out to do short hikes and, in my


Associated Press
TOP: Glacier Point trail in the Yosemite National Park, Calif. is seen.
The shutdown of the government let to the closure of the park.
ABOVE: A sign alerts motorists of the closure of Yosemite National Park,
Calif. due to the government shutdown.


case, take hundreds of photos. We mar-
veled that they were some of the same
ones that Ansel Adams photographed
so long ago.
By Tuesday morning, everyone
awoke to learn that the government,
indeed, had shut down. But the park
hadn't quite yet. Those with reserva-
tions in the park, like us, would have
48 hours to get out We decided to
make the most of it and drive to Gla-
cier Point and do a long hike. But too
late: The road to Glacier Point al-
ready was closed. Cars pulled in and
stopped. People got out and started


talking to each other
A couple from Belgium were on the
last stop of a three-week tour of the
American West They'd seen Bryce
Canyon, the Grand Canyon and now
they wanted to see Yosemite. A young
girl from South Korea told me she'd
come with her mother and aunt, get-
ting up at 5 a.m. and driving all the
way from San Francisco Tuesday
morning. She wasn't supposed to get
into the park, but she said nobody
stopped them at the entrance. They
made a short loop around the valley
See Page A15


High tech


control in


your car

It's amazing to think that a com-
puter controls many aspects of our
modern-day cars. When you con-
sider all of the problems we tend to
have with our home computers, you
begin to wonder how the computers in
our cars can keep them running safely
and efficiently but actually they do a
very good job of it. When we get in our
cars and drive off, most of us don't
even think about what's going on
under the dash or hood. In reality the
computer and related components are
controlling all engine, transmission
and braking functions, in addition to
possibly the lighting, heating/air condi-
tioning, seating and steering positions
and audio. In some cases, the com-
puter along with radar sensors can
even slow the vehicle when approach-
ing another car when the cruise con-
trol is on or when there is an eminent
collision ahead.
The auto computer, or engine con-
trol unit (ECU) as it is called, is a unit
that controls a series of actuators on
an internal combustion engine to en-
sure the optimum performance. It
does this by reading values from a mul-
titude of sensors within the engine bay
interpreting the data using multidi-
mensional performance maps and ad-
justing the engine actuators
accordingly A good example of this is
when you use the wrong octane level
gasoline in your car which may result
in an engine "knocking" noise. If the
ECU detects knock, it will delay or re-
tard the spark to eliminate the noise.
Before ECUs, air/fuel mixture, igni-
tion timing and idle speed were me-
chanically set and dynamically
controlled by mechanical and pneu-
matic means. One of the earliest at-
tempts to use a unitized and
automated device to manage multiple
engine control functions simultane-
ously was the "Kommandogerat" cre-
ated by BMW in 1939, for their 14
cylinder aviation engine. This device
replaced six controls used to initiate
hard acceleration with one control in
the aircraft. However, it had some
problems as it would surge the engine,
making close formation flying some-
what difficult and it switched super-
charger gears harshly and at random,
which could throw the aircraft into an
extremely dangerous stall or spin.
Hybrid digital/analog ECU designs
were popular in the mid-1980s. They
used analog techniques to measure
and process input parameters from the
engine, then used a look-up table
stored in a digital ROM chip to yield
precomputed output values. The ROM
type of system is amenable to engine
tuning if one knows the system well.
The disadvantage of such systems is
that the precomputed values are only
optimal for a new engine. As the en-
gine wears, this system is less able to
compensate than a more modern ECU
system.
Modern ECUs use a microprocessor
See Page A15


DREAM
STATIONS
*M Poto Cof(e^

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Blenheim Palace, England
A group of friends from St. Anne's Episcopal Church traveled to the United
Kindgom and Ireland in August, The group, including, from left to right, Sam and
Charlene Guthas, Helen Garlach, Jerry and Charlene Scott, Nita Hodges, Jack and
Doris Flynn, Harry and Barbara Pickering and Barbara Lytton visited Blenheim
Palace, England.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Put in a
secret place
6 Discord goddess
10 Compulsion
14 Approached
18 Listlessness
20 "Miami -"
21 Gas used in signs
22 Think
24 Having a handle
25 Particular
26 Fencing sword
27 Announcement
29 Juan Ponce de-
30 Confront
32 Give - whirl
34 Self-satisfied
36 Attach loosely
37 Eagle
38 Injure
39 Piggery sound
41 River in Belgium
43 Middling grade
44 Satisfy
45 Playing marble
47 Brad
49 Admirable quality
52 Ember
53 '60s rock musical
55 Slip-on shoe
59 Benefit
60 Labored
62 Like some dorms
64 Treasure -
65 Den
66 Take a bride
67 Powdery residue
69 Throw in a high curve
71 Uninteresting
72 Printer's measures
73 arcade
74 A couple
75 Brown or
Gandolfini
77 Dutch commune
78 Ait
80 Egotism
82 Noted French tower
builder
84 Go furtively
85 Biblical pronoun
87 "Picnic" playwright
88 Threesome
89 Money-back offer
90 Old tire made new
92 Icy rain
93 Scull
94 "Odd Couple" name


96 Dolores Rio
97 Mentioned
99 Hem and-
102 Freshly
104 Little bit
105 Brooks or Blanc
106 Drills
107 Lugosi of old
movies
108 Ascot
110 Office
communication
112 Unhealthy in color
114 AGreat Lake
115 Monotony
117 Dummy
119 Cut of meat
120 Uttered
imprecations
121 Sapling
123 Sci-fi alien
125 Fellow
126 Seize
129 Story
131 Button on some gadg-
ets
132 Shed
133 Atlas item
136 Copied
138 Young or
Armstrong
140 Fernando
Valley
141 Trick
142 Corporate emblem
143 Scorching
145 Blow
147 Rickman or Greenspan
149 Deity's incarnation
151 Duck
152 Call out to
153 Carry
154 Distant
155 Part of AARP (Abbr.)
156 Melody
157 Bridge position
158 Biblical weed

DOWN
1 Hackneyed
2 Dry ink for printers
3 Firebug's crime
4 Bridge
5 Spicy
6 Oust
7 of passage
8 Cover with frosting
9 Western Indian


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
In 3D. 1:35 p.m.
"Rush" (R) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:10 p.m.


Discover
Certain party mem.
Travels
Foe
Coagulate
Mil. address part
Glove of a kind
Early computer
Prove false
- homo!
Supplement
(with "out")
Exist
In addition
Serv. branch
Transport
Not stable
Tutor
Something hilarious
Commotion
Word of regret
- Grande
Fat
Dell
- the Terrible
Bakery item
(2 wds.)
Maize
Pertain
Those who came be-
fore us
Sidestepped
Mutineer
Lack
Time of day
Monk's title
Most timid
Kind of studies
Insects
Old Greek thinker
- force
Lively dance
Fathered
Ocean
Infirmary item
Tip
Old cry of disgust
Medium's meeting
Exchanged
That woman
Dinner item
Long fishes
Ragout
Machine part
Firth or Farrell
An element
African plant
Baton
Court order


"Insidious: Chapter 2"
(PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:30 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
istings and entertainment information.


Grinding tooth
Swell
Reynolds or Bacharach
Anger
Soccer -
Make estranged
Go after
Stroll
Bridge support
Storage area


Before
Safe-travel org.
Sticky stuff
- King Cole
Footless
Yogi of baseball
Darkness
French painter
Engine
Type size


Tiny openings
Small amount to drink
Island feast
Waller or Domino
Dalai -
DDE's nickname
Transgression
Mauna -
Pets' doc


Puzzle answer is on Page A23.


10-13 2013 UFS, Dist- by Universal Uclick for UFS

GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-5660 and ask for Logan
Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.
NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a
reporter is assigned. Call Charlie Brennan at 563-5660.


" ,.-
- ~


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A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAR
Continued from PageA13

which can process inputs
from the engine in real
time. The ECU contains
the hardware and software
necessary for the system.
The hardware consists of
electronic components on
a printed circuit board.
The main component on
the circuit board is a mi-
crocontroller chip. The
software is stored in the
microcontroller so the unit
can be pre-programmed by
uploading updated code or
replacing chips.
Some modern car en-
thusiasts use devices
know as "tuners" to
change many of the vehi-
cle's computer settings for
more horsepower which
usually requires the use
of premium gas. Both my
2006 Dodge Charger and
2007 Mustang have been
retuned for a higher level
of performance.
So the next time you get
behind the wheel of your
auto, think about all of the
things that are happening
within the vehicle's com-
ponents you don't see, or


even care about, but en-
sure the best and most ef-
ficient operation of your
vehicle.

Upcoming
events
Oct 18: Friday Night
Thunder cruise-in at
5 p.m. in the Courthouse
Square area of downtown
Inverness.
Oct 19 and 26:
Cruise-in at 6 p.m. hosted
by Citrus County Cruisers
at Wendy's on U.S. Hwy
19 in Crystal River
Oct 25: All American
Muscle Night cruise-in at
6 p.m. atArby's on U.S.
Hwy 19 in Crystal River
Nov 9: Citrus
MOPARS Club second
annual Beauties & Beasts
Car Show from 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. at Crystal Chrysler
Dodge Jeep on Cortez
Blvd. in Brooksville. Over
40 awards will be pre-
sented. Contact me for
registration info.
Ken McNally is a car
columnist for the Chroni-
cle. Contact him at ken
mcnally@tampabayrr
com or 352-341-1165.


PARK
Continued from Page A13

floor, then were heading back out
- bitterly disappointed.
"This is crazy," said the girl,
Songyi Cho. "How can a whole
government shut down?"
We drove on, determined to
hike. Some cars were funneling
out of the valley, toward the exits,
but many were still determined to
eke out as much time as possible.
We pulled off the road at the trail-
head to Glacier Point and loaded
up our daypacks. Three hours
later, after climbing up switch-
backs and encountering about
20 people along the way when
there otherwise might have been
hundreds, we saw what we came
for Half Dome towering in the
distance, the valley floor spread
out below us.
That's where we stayed for


'"We're supposed to go to Sequoia
National Park on Thursday, but
know this could be our last chance
16' to see the giant trees."
Tammy Webber
Associated Press

about 45 minutes, eating peanut what would happen if we drove
butter and jelly sandwiches, tak- back there anyway Then you'd
ing in the majestic view and lis- get a ticket he says. We ponder for
tening to the wind and a second: How much are the
woodpeckers. Then it was time to tickets?
head back and drive to Mariposa But I learn that my disappoint-
Grove to see the giant redwoods, ment pales in comparison to his.
Too late again. That road was His mother, who hasn't seen him
closed, since Christmas, has come all the
Wednesday morning, we got up, way from Georgia to visit, but the
determined to hike to the grove, hotel where she and her sister
We're supposed to go to Sequoia are staying closes Thursday after-
National Park on Thursday, but noon. By the end of the day, she
know this could be our last and everyone else still in the
chance to see the giant trees. Des- park have to get out.
operate, we ask a young guy who "Will you take our picture
works here as a mule wrangler together?" she asked me.


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Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A15










TERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Appreciation week meeting
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct
its final coordination meeting for Citrus
County's 21st annual Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the
Conference Room of the Citrus County
Chronicle building, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
Veterans' service organizations and in-
dividuals participating on the committee
are urged to attend.
For more information, email chairman
Chris Gregoriou at allprestige@
yahoo.com, or call 352-795-7000.

VFW post to serve fish
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a fish dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at the post, 10199
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Donation is $8. Children younger than
6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Auxiliary invites all to dinner
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 18, at the post home, 6585
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River
Choice is fried or baked fish. The public
is welcome; donation is $7.
All profits support the many programs of
the American Legion Auxiliary For more
information, call Unit President Barbara
Logan at 352-795-4233.

New DAV chapter to meet
New Disabled American Veterans
Chapter, Crystal River, will meet at 6 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 19, at Crystal River Mall.
For more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.

Elks to host vets' benefit
The Veterans Committee of West Citrus
Elks Lodge 2693 will host its annual
Veterans Benefit Dinner/Dance
Saturday, Oct. 19, for Elk members and
their guests.
This dinner/dance is a major fundraiser
for the committee and the proceeds are
primarily used for support of the approxi-
mately 100 veterans living in local assisted
living facilities. Proceeds also provide
gifts to the veterans on their birthdays and
to have pizza or ice cream parties for them
at their facilities. In addition, the commit-
tee joins with other organizations to sup-
port service personnel returning from
overseas, fallen heroes' families and
Purple Heart recipients.
There will be a social hour from 5 to
6 p.m. On the menu are choice of Dover
sole or chicken marsala, roasted tricolor
potato, peas and pearl onions, rolls with a
red white and blue sundae dessert at
6 p.m., followed by music with deejay Joe
Dube from 6:30 to 9:30. Tickets are $15 and
are on sale in the lounge after 11 a.m.

Auxiliary to do rummage sale
VFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will
have a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 20, at the post, 906 State Road
44 E., Inverness.
Sale items include gently used clothing,
crafts to include holiday decorations,
baked goods and much more. Call 352-
344-3495, or visit wwwvfw4337.org, for
information about all post events.

Dinner theater to honor vets
'A Sentimental Journey" a Veterans Ap-
preciation Week World War II dinner the-
ater presentation, will honor veterans at
the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W
Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov
2, and 3 p.m. Sunday Nov 3.
The dinner and show, preceded by
social hour, are $15. For reservations, call
352-212-1014.

IPS to again honor veterans
Inverness Primary School will have its
Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday Nov.
7, at the school cafeteria.
Citrus County veterans are invited to
participate. Students will be performing
songs in honor of veterans. Three students
in kindergarten through second grade will
be honored with the Randy Aller's Picture
Contest Awards for first, second, and third
places. Three third- through fifth-grade
students will earn the Randy Aller's Essay
Contest Awards for first, second and third
places. The students will share their es-
says with the veterans in attendance.
After the program, the veterans will be
the celebrities of IPS and join students in
the Veterans Garden for refreshments.
For more information, email
Mary Tyler at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or
call 352-726-2632.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated.


Riding armored cavalry


Inverness man.

recalls service I


in Vietnam

C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

Ray Michael Jr.
liked the military,
which is why he
got involved in it
with the U.S. Army
Reserve while still
attending high school in
Romney, WVa. His
viewpoint may have
shifted, perhaps a bit,
after his first Far East
posting, but Michael
stuck with it for 20
years of active service, a
sizable segment of that
during arguably the
toughest time America's
military has endured.
Michael, who has lived with his fam-
ily in Inverness since 1991 after leav-
ing his job as a Junior ROTC
instructor at St. Petersburg Dixie
Hollins High School, was in the Army
for 11 years when he was sent to Viet-
nam. He had already served at Camp
Beard in South Korea "That was the
most miserable 13 months of my mili-
tary career," Michael said of his time
spent there in 1963-64. Michael was a
30-year-old first sergeant serving in a
platoon of 50-ton M48A3 Patton tanks.
"I always leaned toward the ar-
mored cavalry" he said. "That's what
appealed to me."
He then added, "They
sent me to school for it
and like any other
branch in the military,
once you get in it..." Varn
The history of the
U.S. involvement in
Vietnam and how UVIts: 2
American troops Joe.: Ca
were treated upon 4signee
their return re- instru, eani&
mains vivid with torin i,
many veterans V'r4NS
from that war Veteso .
Michael, who also Preign I an Coe
had two tours of ,t rs (lfet
duty in Germany cu Is Coif
and several post-
ings throughout the U S.
said he wasn't person 11. e\l,,oed t,
the public ridicule other sold ier- re-
ceived. But it still to,:k i ii1 timiie t
reconcile what he end hired
"When I first got out, I didn't want
anything to do with any (veterans) or-
ganizations," he said. He is now a
member of six organizations and com-
mittees, including the Military Order
of the Purple Heart.
Twice while serving in Vietnam in
1967-68, mainly in an area known as
the Iron Triangle, Michael received a
Purple Heart for wounds suffered.
"I was wounded four times by defi-
nition," he said. "The first was no
more than a scratch."
He wasn't so fortunate again.


U-'ii I


I n i ........................................ ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

llpirX~^^^^
i-- o r d s. ^ l;;;; =1 ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
lo rd ..........


Mi - -
... ... ..


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Gospel Island resident Raymond Michael Jr. looks through some of the photos
and news clippings of his service as an Army tank commander during the
Vietnam War. Michael received two Purple Hearts for injuries
received during combat operations in the 3rd Squadron,
4th Calvary regiment.


E'-eee
time 1 \vj llt. 1 \vj 7
In [ [ I :A113 1 er- onnel i r-
rier," Michael said, referring to the ar-
mored vehicle used to scout and to
transport troops. His first Purple
Heart was awarded after his vehicle
was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade;
one man was killed and three others
wounded.
His second came after his tank pla-
toon -which consisted of three
M48A3 tanks, four Ml 13 scout vehi-
cles, one M113 infantry vehicle, one
command tracked vehicle and a 4.2
mortar tracked vehicle was tasked
with assessing B52 bomber strikes.


Special to th
Raymond Michael Jr., far right, sits on the gun barrel of his M48 tank he affectionately
after his wife, Pat.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


"We
didn't knuo\ it,
but we had been sitting
on top of a 250-pound (unexploded)
bomb," he recalled, "and when we
moved, it went off."
Michael was ordered to go back for
treatment, but once he got back to the
base, he hesitated, thinking he was all
right. He woke up in the middle of the
night, however, and discovered he
could not move. He was "diagnosed
with bruised and ruptured kidneys."
There was always danger
"Booby traps," Michael
said, referring to another
duty his platoon had to deal
with often, "and booby-
trapped booby traps."
"The other thing was tunnel
rats. We had volunteers who
wanted to go into those
holes."
The Viet Cong built miles of
tunnels, often remaining hid-
D den in them until night before
striking. And the booby traps
were made from captured
and reconstructed U.S.
munitions.
"The unknown part is the
Danger, because you don't
know what you'll run into,"
SMichael said. "You could go
out on a patrol and there
would be people waving at
you, and you come back and
they're shooting at you."
It was a war that has been
e Chronicle difficult to forget, but one that
named many veterans don't want to
remember


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not
guaranteed.


..................................................
.............
.................................................................................................................................................................................................................




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE VETERANS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A17


VETERANS NOTES


'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that
you provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

CCVC yard sale
set for Nov. 9
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Coalition has yard
sales September through
May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
the second Saturday of
the month Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church
in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State
Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and
set up the day before (typ-
ically Friday afternoon)
and are responsible for
the security of their own
items overnight. The
spots are typically 15 feet
by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information
and to make reservations,
call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Elks Ladies' sale
to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies
of the Elks will have a
yard and bake sale from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Nov 16, at the lodge, 7890
W Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to
participate. Those with
items to sell may call Bon-
nie Lee at 352-382-0211 or
Sophie Jordan at 352-382-
7614. Rental spaces are


I -


$15 each or two for $25.
Rain date is Sunday,
Nov 17.
Food will be available.
Proceeds from the food
booth go to help the Elks'
veterans committee pro-
vide for our veterans in
nursing homes.

MOC/MOCA
to serve pasta
The Military Order of
the Cootie/Military Order
of the Cootie Auxiliary
will serve a pasta and
meatball or sausage din-
ner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov 29, at Leroy
Rooks Jr Post No. 4252,
3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, Hernando
(where the helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7,
may be purchased at the
post. Donation at the door
will be $7.50. Music will
be provided after dinner
Call Paul Kimmerling,
seam squirrel, at 352-795-
4142 or the post at 352-
726-3339.


Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County
Veterans Services Depart-
ment offers help for veter-
ans who have had a post-
traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years may con-
tact the office to review
the case. All veterans who
have been diagnosed by
the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. Have
the denial letter and copy
of the compensation ex-
amination. Request either
copy through the VA med-
ical records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information,
visit www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.


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A18 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 VETERANS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



CCVC looks to new decade of assistance


Although I'm a rela-
tive newcomer to
this fine group, I'd
like to remind folks that
the Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition (CCVC) has
been around close to 10
years.
That's 10 years of com-
pletely nonpaid, volun-
teer work by dedicated
members who not only
provide their own vehi-
cles to transport items to
and from the various
events, but who also give
so much of their time and
expertise in more ways
than I have room to
mention here.
The monthly yard sale
is what keeps us afloat.
It's the second Saturday
each month, from Sep-
tember to May Spaces are
just $10 for a 15- by 30-foot
spot where your vehicle
can be right there with
you. We advertise on the
radio, in this and other
publications and would
love to see the coming


MIT-






Barbara
Corcoran

VETERANS
VIEWS


months produce more
sellers and buyers than
we've ever seen before!
We are a nonprofit or-
ganization, so where does
the money go? A good
deal of it goes toward
keeping the shelves
stocked in our food bank,
which is open 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Tuesday (except
holidays). We have fed


more than 500 veterans
and their families during
the past calendar year -
now, that is a huge
amount of people who
would otherwise have
been quite hungry
We search for veteran-
owned businesses and
match them up with veter-
ans in need people who
cannot afford the full
price of repairs to their
roof, plumbing, electrical
and more. We help get
handicap ramps built we
guide those who need
help getting through the
ever-changing VA system.
We offer a quarterly
newsletter for our mem-
bers and we also make
sure it's available at
strategic locations where
veterans and their fami-
lies can pick one up for
free and learn more about
how we are helping our
service men and women
in Citrus County
We locate and provide
handicap equipment, in


DID YOU KNOW...?


Free yoga classes

Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with


the national service
organization, Yoga For Vets.
Sandstrom teaches free
classes to combat veterans


at several locations and
times.
For more information, call
her at 352-382-7397.


most cases free of charge.
We provide scholarship
funding to our local
schools and spread
knowledge of our Ameri-
can history through our
acts and accomplish-
ments. We do our best to
integrate with other vet-
eran-based groups to
strengthen the bond
among the more than
23,000 veterans in this
county alone.
We provide public
awareness of the benefits
and how to get them for
those who are qualified.
We do our best to con-
stantly research and stay
atop the changes so we
can give accurate guid-
ance. Again, this is being
done by people who are
not all necessarily re-
tired. I work for a living
and yet I feel strongly
about our mission and I
volunteer a large number
of hours to every task I'm
presented with, as do the
others in our group.


To report your
veterans' news, email
community@
chronicleonline.com.


.-.. ^* ^ '- vu nw .-ii ii. . . .. -._ ..ir nr...
Dr. Shirley A. Ice is going on sabbatical
beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care
continuity, she recommends her patients see
her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our
other locations for your convenience.

Inverness Citrus Springs Homosassa
3733 E Gull lo Lake Hwy 10489 N Florida Ave 7991 S Suncoasi Blvd
341-5520 489-2486 382-8282


We are not quitters. We
don't stop at the first hur-
dle. We keep on working
for you, our Citrus County
veterans.
We provide physical
support for returning
troops, as well as their
families while their serv-
ice member is away on
deployment Not a single
one of us does not know
personally of the hard-
ships involved in military
life.
And here is my plea.
Unless we can recruit
newer, younger members
to help with this work we
do, then these functions
we have been so proud to
do will slowly erode and
disappear Meeting times
are not the real issue.
Communication is the
issue.
Call us and ask what we


can do together to help
those who have fought,
and are fighting, for our
country Attendance
comes secondary to being
able to locate yet another
veteran-owned business
who can help us help
veterans.
That folks, is what we
are all about. Won't you
join us in the quest?
C'mon, let us hear from
you. Call 352-400-8952 or
go to wwwccvcfl.org for
more information.

Barbara L Corcoran is
the public information
officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
Inc. She maybe contacted
via Barbiel@ccvcfl.org.
More information about
this group may be found
by visiting the website at
www.ccvcfl.org.


In appreciation
for our
wonderful pastor
THOMAS R.
BEAVERSON

for all he
doesfor
God and
His U \
people. L a
THE PEOPLE OF
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 726-1637....


Thank You
Pastor John
Fredericksen
We love and
appreciate you
pastor for your love
of the Lord! You are
a great family man
and that includes
your Grace
believing family. We
consider you our
friend, our teacher
and our confidant.
You have been with
Grace Bible
Fellowship for 4
years and are one
of the top teachers
in the United States
of the Grace
message and
rightly dividing the
Word of truth.
From all of us at
Grace Bible
..OGASY Fellowship!


Pastor
Mary Gestrich
Floral City United
Methodist Church


The Florial City United
Methodist Church Family
and our community was
blessed when you became
our pastor
OOOGA4A


Miat. iviary &
Rev. Fr. David Balmer
Choir Director and
Rector of St. Raphael
Orthodox Church
1277 N Paul Dr.,
Inverness, FL
www.straphaelchruch.org

Thank You for over seven
years of service to us, the
people of St. Raphael
Orthodox Church. The
choir benefits so much
from Matushka Mary's
capable leadership &fine
voice. She & Father David
visit the sick, participate in
every aspect of church life
and are always available to
talk. Father David leads us
each week in Vespers
services and celebrates the
Sunday 10 a.m. Divine
Liturgy with great humility
and respect for the sacred
traditions of Orthodoxy. He
entreats us to hear Christ's
words and to do them. His
open-hearted
approachability makes us
believe we can. ......


The Rev.
Dr. & Mrs.
R. Jackson Alwood.

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The Reverend
Ronald A. Sutton
and
First Lady
Carolise Sutton


have joyfully and
lovingly been serving
the Mt. Olive
Missionary Baptist
Church of Crystal River
& surrounding
communities for the
past years.
The motto and theme
for Pastor Sutton's
ministry are, 'Love
Makes the Difference"
and "Family Takes Care
of Family" respectively.
Pastor and Sister Sutton
are committed to bring
lost souls and broken
hearts & spirits to
Christ; Pastor Sutton
firmly and strongly
believes that, in order to
teach Christ, lead and
bring others to Christ,
you must do so by being
a living example of
Christ's love. Under the
leadership of our
Pastor, God has been
blessing us through
healing, renewal and
reconciliation of
individuals and
families.
We love you Pastor
and Sister Sutton and it
is our prayer and
heart's desire that God
will continue to guide,
equip and bless you as
you fulfill His mandate
to preach, teach, walk
and love in the path that
He has laid before you.
With Christ's Love
your Mt. Olive Family


Pastor
Stan Stewart


We would like to show our
appreciation to our pastor,
Stan Stewart. Pastor
Stan is senior pastor at
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs.
He began the church in
his home in 1992.
Pastor Stan has been
faithful to preach and
teach us from God's Word
and to lead us by example.
The last word from our
Savior before he ascended
to heaven was to tell us to
go and tell others and
make disciples (Matt. 28-
30) of all people.
We at North Oak Baptist
Church believe that this is
the most important
function of a church. We
have taken this message
to heart. Pastor Stan has
lead mission trips or sent
people to: Russia,
Ukraine, England, South
America, Middle East,
India, North and South
Dakota.
Pastor Stan is always
available to our people,
even when he is on a
mission trip! He has been
faithful to give sound
counseling, and loves the
people here at North Oak.
He is a wonderful
Christian leader and we
are thankful to God to
have him as our pastor.
We want take advantage
of this opportunity to
express our appreciation
and love to our pastor,
Pastor Stan Stewart!

I IAPISr I "CHURCH
9324 N. Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs
..... 352-489-3359


Hernando
Curchof
T-cNazarene
Place to Belong




[Br,'?J[*ic*JirB
>lke to ]recogniz
our* 3 6ndrfu
pa6tors


Pastor Randy Hodges, our Senior
Pastor, whose leadership &
messages are our inspiration.


Pastor Watt Garrett, our
Worship Pastor, who leads the
music that excites and
encourages us.


Pastor Jimmy High, our Youth/
Assistant Pastor, who guides our
teens & energizes us with his
new ideas.
OOOGCBP


nature Coajst
j E Mj'
W1 IEmerngcyMedcal, Service L-A ITAN
Serving Pilrh Eiclleare ad C(ompiuioa'


Stock Up For Seniors
Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need

Purchase items on this list and help our Citrus County seniors in need!
baby wipes toilet paper powder lotions paper towels
denture cream Polident/Poligrip tissues Incontinence pads
deodorant socks towel & wash cloth shampoo or dry shampoo
bars of soap throw blankets Non-perishable snack Items (panut, hard candy, )c)
Collection Locations & Dates
Nature Coast EMS
3876 W Country Hill Drive Lecanto (behind Crystal Gien) A REGIONS
Entire month of October Mon-Fri San-Spin On Hwy 19 in Homosassa
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W, Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
Entire month of October Mon-Fri Bam-Spnm W
Citrus County Chronicle Hwy 44 Inverness
1624 N Meadowcrest 8D, Crystal River by Wal-Mart
Entire month of October Mon-Fri Sam.Spmn
WalMart Homosassa Saturday October 12 1Oam-2pm
WalMart Beverly Hills Saturday October 19 10am-2pm
Walmart Inverness Friday October 251 Oam-Zpm

Our CommuiySwten Walmartl:t

i I~i ^ I
t. I


OOGCCD



r Pastor




SAppreciation

__ k_______pp__________________




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In SERVICE


Several friends and relatives traveled to Parris
Island on April 5, 2013, to see PFC Michael
Sanchez graduate from U.S. Marines Basic
Training. Miguel and Lori Sanchez, his father
and stepmother of Asheville, N.C.; stepbrother
Justin and sister Marisa; aunt Maria Sanchez
and her two sons, Edgar Orellana and Jorge
Chicas; uncle Paul Stayton, wife Karen and
daughter Faeryn; his girlfriend Kristen Kessell,
her brother Kyle and her mom Kim Reed, all of
Citrus Springs; his best friends Lindsey and
Sean Beaudwin, now training at Parris Island;
his sister Victoria and husband Justin
Fleckinstein; as well as his grandmother Grace
Stayton and mother Kathleen Stayton. A 2012
graduate of Lecanto High School, Sanchez went
on to graduate from Infantry School at Camp
LeJeune, N.C., June 19 and graduated from
Security Forces training at Chesapeake, Va.,
Oct. 4. He is now serving at King's Bay (Ga.)
Naval Station.
Special to the Chronicle


We are grateful for
our pastor
Tom Walker


A man who loves and
cares for his
congregation and
teaches the truth of
God's Word.
We are thankful too,
for other ministers in
our midst.
Vincent Marchese
&
David Shirkey
They too, bring much
wisdom and
knowledge to our
Church Family.
Ti,!. '., are blessed!
The Congregation of
The First Church of God
5510 E Jasmine Lane
Inverness


Dr. Ray Kelley
We appreciate the
opportunity to recognize a
man and his wife that were
the answer to our prayer of
receiving a pastor who
could bring the Bible
message to address the
problems of today's world.
Dr. Ray Kelley. Ray started
as pastor of the First
Christian Church of
Inverness a year ago with
his wife Shirley. Ray has
been instrumental in
reviving our church into a
more positive Bible based
church. His attitude,
knowledge, and leadership
has lifted our spirits and is
growing our church. Please
come and listen to Ray's
positive sermon on the
good news of the Bible,
and Shirley's inspired
leadership of the music
program Sunday. We feel
you will agree that the First
Christian Church is the
congregation you're looking
to worship with. Our adult
Sunday Bible study begins
at 9 AM and church service
at 10:15. Come join us for
an uplifting inspired
sermon, and uplift music
praising the Lord.


THANK YOU
Pastor Alan
Ritter!
Our heart-felt
thanks and
appreciation of
your 13 years of
dedicated service
as Pastor and
shepherd of First
Baptist Church of
Homosassa. Your
dedication to our
Lord and Savior
and the teaching of
His Holy Word
with wisdom and
truth has
profoundly
impacted our lives.
We love you and
h. Joyce!


Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Marple Lewis is
Pastor of First
Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills.
He has been an
amazing
inspiration in our
church's goal of
"Magnify the King,
Multiply the
Kingdom".
His love for our
Lord is infectious,
as is his
commitment to
the community
and passion for
people to know
Christ Jesus.
We love you
Pastor!
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com


Rmkmd
Getual Jeng
Cawd

TkLuk gUn
Poat Je tJ" 6
a waade~ud
geat. Ga~d W~m



fWUWC.

Hernando United
Methodist Church
2125 E Norvell
Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL.
S352-726-7245


Rev. Kenneth
C. Blyth

Thank you for
leading the flock
at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
in Hernando. Your
teaching has
shown us how to
follow Christ. You
exemplify a life of
integrity and
compassion. You
encourage the
lonely and
comfort the
discouraged with
a message of
hope. By
preaching God's
Word, you have
opened many
hearts and minds
to serve all people
in our community.


LloydD.

Bertine

Gifted
Pastor and
Teacher
Appreciated
and Loved
by so Many.


Gulf to Lake Church
1454 N. Gulf Avenue
Crystal River, FL


All of us here at
St. Margaret's
want to say thank
you Pastor Gene.
Your pastoral
presence in our
lives, and in the
lives of the people
in the community,
shows us Christ's
love. We feel truly
blessed by the
growth in our
community, our
church, and
ourselves during
the 12 years
you've been with
us at St.
Margaret's.
May God continue
to bless you in
your call to pastor
St. Margaret's.


4/ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153


* U


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please

Call

Theresa

Holland at

564-2940

For
Information
On Your
Religious
Advertising

U


Disnop
George R.
& Pastor
Dottie Dehn

Thank you for
being the leaders
that you are.
The Lord gave
you a special
calling, and in
doing so has
blessed all of us.

We would like
you to know how
much we
appreciate
you both.


The congregation of
The House of Power
Church

House
of Power
Church
7233 N. Lecanto Hwy
Hernando, FL
352-344-9450


Rev. Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
of
First Baptist Church
of Inverness
We love and
appreciate you.
Thank you for
being the
Godly man
that you are.
From your
Congregation.

First Baptist Church
of Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, Florida
www.fbcinverness.com
352-726-1252
Q OOGA38


ISenior Pastor'l
Kevin Ballard
Thank you for your
love for God.
Thank you that you
love His word.
Thank you for your
love so pure
and teaching us to
endure.
Your life is lived in
such a way.
We see our Jesus
every day.
You teach his word,
His love and care,
He walks with you
everywhere.
So on this day we
want to say
Keep teaching His
word and living His
way.
As days draw near
and time is short
He'll say dear son,
"Good Report".
Thanks so much for
being a great
example.
Love in ('i i't
Your Calvary Chapel
Family.


/ OGCCD


Pastor


Sppreition V
.It ,pp rinat'o n-


VETERANS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A19




A20 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 VETERANS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meals and more for a
specific post or group, call or
email the contact listed. Posts
and groups may email
changes or corrections to
community@chronicleonline.
com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.co
m, or visit www.flPostl 55.org.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-7954233.
American Legion Wall
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary,
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Call 352-489-3544, or email
boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al
Point, off Arbor Street in Inver-
ness. Call Commander Norm
Brumett at 352-476-2134 or
Auxiliary president Alice
Brummett at 352-476-7001.
N American Legion Post
166, meets at the Springs
Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030
S. Memorial Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-
860-2090.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS
OF FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus


Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70.
Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498. Call JV Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834 or President
Elaine Spikes at 352-
860-2400.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at American Legion
Post 155,6585 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
Call Base Commander Billy
Wein at 352-726-5926.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Seabee Veterans of
America Auxiliary (SVAA)
ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30
a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 meets at
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River. Call the Chef De Gare


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I. JL,471 N.Dacie Point, Lecanto...........746-3420
| Hwy.491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology
| m"j 206W. Dampier Street, Inverness. 637-2079
I One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959. Visit
www.Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at


the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher at 352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. Meeting dates are: Nov. 9
and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-


verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997
@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Warrior Bridge strives to
meet the needs of wounded
veterans; local office is at
2071 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call employment
specialist Charles Lawrence
at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


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6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


VFW Riders
to do poker run
District 7 VFW Riders
will host the Pearl Harbor
Remembrance Day Poker
Run on Saturday, Dec. 7.
Registration begins at
9 a.m. with the last bike
out at 11 a.m. and last
bike in at4 p.m.
The poker run schedule
is:
Staring point and
first card -VFW Post
7122 Floral City, 8191 S.
Florida Ave. Begin 50/50
-10 tickets for $5. Start
the run with breakfast for
a donation. Cost of $15
per poker hand includes
the cost of the meal at the
Inglis Post. Additional
poker hands for $10. Addi-
tional meal tickets are $5.
First stop and second
card Giovanni's,
3451 E. Louise Lane,
Hernando.
Second stop and third
card -American Legion
Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
Third stop and fourth
card -Willard's Restau-
rant & Lounge, 3490 S.E.
County Road 337,
Morriston.
Fourth stop and fifth
card Chiefland VFW
Post 5625, 1104 S. Main St.
Final stop and wild
card Inglis VFW Post
8698, at 520 State Road 40
E. Last bike in by 4 p.m.
Roll the dice for a lucky
No. 7 free drink (one per
poker hand card player).
Prizes for best poker
hand, second-best hand
and worst hand. There
will be music, a silent
auction, odometer poker
for a prize (read your bike
odometer best hand
wins) and a 50/50 drawing.
For more information,
call Roger at 352-697-1826
or email shanilyl@
yahoo.com.

Vets sought for
classroom talks
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its annual Veter-


ans in the Classroom pro-
gram Nov 1 to 12 as part
of its 21st annual Veterans
Appreciation Week
activities.
Coordinated by the Cit-
rus County Chapter of the
Military Officers Associa-
tion of America (MOAA),
the Veterans in the Class-
room program brings liv-
ing history to the
classrooms of the county's
public and private
schools, as well as home-
school groups. Veterans
share with students their
firsthand military experi-
ences and travels while
serving our country in
uniform around the
world.
The model Veterans in
the Classroom program
was recognized in 2008
with a Florida Education


Foundation award. The
program's success has
generated the need for
additional veterans to
share their experiences
with students. Persian
Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq,
Air Force, National Guard
and women veterans are
especially needed as
participants.
All interested veterans
may contact Mac McLeod
at 352-746-1384, cmcleod
670@earthlink.net, or Bob
Crawford at 352-270-9025,
baddogusmc@tampabay
rr.com.

Special memorial
honors veterans
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with


Delicious Greek Dinners
Live Greek Music &
Daily Door Prizes
Art & Specialty
Merchandise Vendors
Greek Pastries, Desserts
& Coffee Shoppe
Greek Gyros & Grilled
Specialties
Pony Rides, Face Painting
20 Ft. Slide & Petting Zoo


Oct. 18, 19 & 20
Indoor Dinners
& Outside Grille
Friday & Saturday
11a.m. 8p.m.
Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m.
ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION


their names on them at
The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-
422-8092.

DAV needs
volunteer drivers
The DAV transportation
network needs volunteer
drivers for the two vans
assigned to the Lecanto
clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to
The Villages.
While the Gainesville
van goes each weekday
there are not enough driv-
ers for The Villages run.
While The Villages trip is
not an everyday run (just
when someone needs to
go there), more drivers


Presented by:
Archangel Michael Greek
Orthodox Church
4705 W. Gulf to Lake
Blvd. (State Rd. 44),
Lecanto, FL
www.stmichaelgoc.org
(352) 527-0766
FREE PARKING
RAIN OR SHINE


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Co-Sponsored by:
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are needed.
Volunteers must have a
Florida driver's license
and up-to-date car insur-
ance. No CDL is required.
Stop by the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto
for an application. Call
Joe Stephens at 352-489-
5245.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from


the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat. For more informa-
tion, visit www.bocc.citrus.
fl.us/commserv/vets.


Monday, Oct. 14,2013



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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wife wants old girlfriends gone Tree of Hope helps
Tz\ -yr T (1 v'n f r-wf l /\1 ,vvn


D earAnnie: I have
been in a relation-
ship with "John"
for more than 12 years.
We have separate homes.
He has never been mar-
ried and has no children.
I have been married twice
and have five grown kids.
John still has his ex-
girlfriends in his life. He
used to have them clean
his house, which he said
was "none of my busi-
ness." He would meet
them after work for a
beer He would dog-sit for
one of their sons and then
would volunteer to take
the dogs back to their
house in another town
without me around. He
still works on their vehi-
cles. And one comes to his
country home to get veg-
etables from his garden.
Although it bothers me,
I never said anything to
John about any of this.
However, last Christmas,
my son asked for permis-
sion to invite my ex-
husband to the dinner to
which John and my entire
extended family were
also invited. Since John
had been to other cele-
brations that included my
ex, I didn't think there
would be any problem. I
was wrong.
John was very upset. I
then countered with all of
the instances when he'd
spent time with his exes. I
explained that my chil-
dren's fathers will always
be in my life, although I
don't have contact with
them unless it involves
the children. John says
my children are adults,
and I no longer need to
have any contact with my
exes, even at family gath-
erings. I say he has no
business allowing his ex-
girlfriend to come to his
country home for any rea-
son, especially consider-
ing they do not have
children together He
doesn't get my point, and I
don't get his. What is your
take on this situation? -
Dee
Dear Dee: We think


ANNIE'S
MAILBOX


John wants to be able to
have contact with whom-
ever he chooses, but he
doesn't want you to have
the same prerogative.
This is unfair More im-
portantly, once you have
children, there will al-
ways be occasions when
contact is necessary: wed-
dings, funerals, birthday
parties, even the occa-
sional family Christmas
dinner Your children are
part of your life, and John
needs to accept that some-
times the ex-husbands
will be included.
If all contact is above-
board, there should be
no reason for jealousy
and unnecessary
restrictions.
Dear Annie: My hus-
band and I cannot under-
stand why people in


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church, mostly elderly
ladies, want to kiss us on
the mouth as a greeting.
Frankly, the only person I
want to kiss on the mouth
is my husband. It's not
like these people are
close friends or family
They are acquaintances
we run into two or three
times a month.
When we see them
pucker up and come to-
ward us, we want to turn
and run the other way
We've been handling it by
turning our faces, but they
plant a wet one on our
cheeks. We want to wipe it
off, except that would be
rude. Is there any other
way to handle this awk-
ward situation without
hurting any feelings?
They're sweet ladies, but
this is annoying. Turn-
ing the Other Cheek in El
Paso
Dear El Paso: Some
people become sentimen-
tal and affectionate with
age and are demonstra-
tive with everyone. We
understand your annoy-
ance, but there are worse
things than being given a
sloppy kiss on the cheek.
You could try to head
them off by extending
your hand to shake in-
stead, saying nicely that
you prefer not to be
kissed, but there are no
guarantees it will
dissuade them.


Dear Annie: You
printed a letter from "Re-
jected," who was terribly
depressed about his
wife's lack of interest in
intimacy I could have
been that disinterested
woman, but I also could
have been that depressed
man. I found out that my
Vitamin D levels were
half what they should be,
and I began taking sup-
plements. After a couple
of months, it made a huge
difference in my energy
levels. Feeling Better

Annie's Mailbox is writ-
ten by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime ed-
itors of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254. To find
out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox, visit www
creators. com.


Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Meal & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy
rather than stress about making arrangements?
Give them the relief they'll need during a tough time.
Meet representative
We'll discuss: Bob Jones
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M -'0; ....---- ------- ------------.---.---- ------- ------.------- ------- -------


A22 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


COMMUNITY


---------


Special to the Chronicle
Bush Homes Services
of Homosassa is setting
out to make Christmas a
time of hope for the Key
Training Center The
family-owned and -oper-
ated company created
the "Tree of Hope," a 30-
foot-tall tree with more
than 10,000 multicolored
LED lights and 300 large
ornaments, as a means of
raising funds to provide
year-round services to
more than 300 develop-
mentally disabled adults
who depend on the Key
Training Center
Every year, the em-
ployees of Bush Home
Services set out on a
fundraising contest to
benefit the Key Training
Center Technicians offer
their customers the op-
portunity to put their


name and message on a
mega-ornament for as lit-
tle as a $25 donation.
The official tree-light-
ing ceremony, scheduled
this year for Dec. 5 on
the grounds adjacent to
the Key Center Founda-
tion at 5399 W Gulf-to-
Lake Highway Lecanto,
is the culmination of the
contest and a means of
getting the Key clients
and the community to-
gether to celebrate the
holiday project.
Key clients will sing
Christmas carols. Light
refreshments will be
served. Santa will be on
hand and, finally, the
lights will come on.
For more information
on how to donate to this
year's Tree of Hope, call
Bush Home Services at
352-621-7700 or visit the
office in Homosassa.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13, 2013 C:ComcaslCitrus B: Bright House DII:Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
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E S 1 6 NewsHour WEDU Extraordinary Women Last Tango in Halifax Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic "Downton Abbey" Matthew
PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus '14'N "The Paradise"'PG' and others go off to war.'14'
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n S o B 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Football Night in America (N) (In NFL Football Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys. From AT&T News
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Stereo Live)'14' Stadium in ArlingtonTaxas. (N) (In Stereo Live) N]
A 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Confession" Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) News Spo Night
B WFJABC 20 20 20 News HomeVideos'PG' 'PG'" (N)'PG' '14'm on 9
S 0 0 1 0 1 NFL Football: Jaguars 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race The Good Wife (N) (In The Mentalist "Wedding 10 News Paid
(B CBS 10 10 10 10 10 at Broncos Stereo) N "King Arthur Style" Stereo)'14' in Red" (N)'14' 11pm(N) Program
O 3 3 1 1 NFL Football New Orleans Saints at The OT (N) MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 2: Teams News Burn
Si FOX 13 13 13 13 New England Patriots. 'PG' TBA. (Time tentative). (N) (In Stereo Live) 'PG' m Notice'PG'
SWCJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge N )'PG' Betrayal (N)'14' News Inside Ed.
SnIN D NO 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Peter Great Awakening Love a Unspoken Pastor Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
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SABC 11 11 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Confession" Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'm (N)'PG'm '14'm
R N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee"The Rhodes Not Glee"Vitamin D" (In The Office The Office WeThere We There
c IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Taken"'PG' Stereo)'PG'" 'PG' 'PG' Yet? Yet?
6] WiA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 **"TheStepfordWivs"(2004)'PG-13' Seinfeld Seinfeld Repubic of Doyle OurlIs Whacked Born/Ride Honor
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98 45 98 28 37 Robin Williams.'PG' Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded Reloaded BruceWillis.'R'
S 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On 60 Minutes on CNBC Secret Secret Amer. Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
S 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. To Be Announced Anthony Bourd.
S 4 0 Austin & A.N.T. Jessie Good- Liv & Dog With a Wander- A.N.T. Austin & Jessie Dog With a Shake It
S46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Farm G' G' Charlie Maddie Blog'G' Yonder Farm'G' Ally'G' 'G', Blog'G' Up!'G'
[P 33 27 33 21 17 Football Sun. SportsCenter (N) (Live) N BCS MLS Soccer: Sounders at Timbers SportsCenter N
S 34 28 34 43 49 Bassmasters (N) E:60 Baseball WNBA Basketball Minnesota Lynx at Atlanta Dream. |NHRA Drag Racing Poker
EW 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime Chester Rosary With Cardinal Dolan IGod Bookmark
29 52 29 20 28 **' "Sixteen *** "Grease"(1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer lov- *** "Grease"(1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer lov-
29 52 29 2 28 Candles" (1984) 'PG' ers meet again as high-school seniors. 'PG' ers meet again as high-school seniors.'PG'
r- ** 1"Sylvia"(2003 Biography) Gwyneth ** "The Other Sister" (1'. Romance- ** -He.?en",inn',Cate Blanchett.
118 170 Paltrow. (In Stereo)'R'N Comedy) Juliette Lewis i, i ,:.il.-4 iihii ii ,h, tereo)'R' _
J 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
ED 26 56 26 Chopped 'G' Halloween Wars 'G' Chopped 'G' Halloween Wars 'G' Cutthroat Kitchen'G' Restaurant: Im.
(TSTI 732 112 732 Jones Moseley Crowd UFC UFC Ultimate Being Being The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
[NL 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker Tour Word Poker Tour The Best of Pride (N) World Poker Tour Word Poker Tour
S 3 0 3 5 ** "Green Lantern" (2011 Action) Ryan *** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert DowneyJr. A billionaire dons an *** "Iron Man"
19 30 60 30 51 Reynolds, Blake Lively. PG-13' armored suit to fight criminals. 'PG-13' (2008)'PG-13'
7GOLF 27 67 727 1PGA Tour Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Frys.com Open, Final Round. Central
L 59 8 9 4 "The Sweeter Side of Life" (2013, Romance- Cedar Cove "Signed, Sealed, Delivered" (2013, Drama) Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG
S59 68 59 45 54 Comedy) Kathryn Morris.'NR'R N"Homecoming" Eric Mabius, Kristin Booth. N
** "The Hobbit:An Unexpected Journey" (2012) lan McKellen. Bilbo Boardwalk Empire (N) Eastbound Hello Boardwalk Empire
06) :302 201 302 2 2 Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. 'MA' m Ladies 'MA' 'MA' N
j 30 223* "Battlefield Earth" Real Time With Bill ** "This Is 40" (2012 Romance-Comedy) The ** "The Campaign" (2012) Will
303 202 303 (2000)'PG-13' Maher'MA'" Paul Rudd. (In Stereo)'R'm Counselor Ferrell.'R'N
H 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Huntlntl Hunters HuntIntl Cousins Undercover Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Reno Hunters HuntIntl
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
IS 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG' 'PG' PG'
C~v Own. Kimerl Eise PG13" Kss"(N PG (N 14' BlcP Wmn
E 2 8 2 ** "Derailed" (2005) ** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" (2005) Drop Dead Diva "The Witches of East End ** "Diary of a Mad
24 38 24 31 Clive Owen. KimberlyElise.'PG-13'm Kiss"(N)'PG' (N)'14'[] BlackWffoman"
S1 First Person Killers: Ed Gein (In Stereo) Killer Profile "Bobby Killer Profile "Gary I Killed My BFF (N) (In I Killed My BFF (In
50 119 Ronald DeFeoN '14,V' N Joe Long"'14'" Heidnik" (N)'14' Stereo)'14'" Stereo)'14'"
** "Meet the Fockers" (2004) Robert De *** "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story" ** "Ted" (2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg,
i )XJ 320 221 320 3 3 Niro. Future in-laws clash in Florida. (2004) VinceVaughn. NR'" Mila Kunis. (In Stereo) 'NR' ar
S4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Sex Slaves: Minh's Sex Slaves- Massage Sex Slaves: The Teen
42 41 42 "Total Destruction" "Help Is on the Way" "Altered States" (N) Story Parlors Trade
0 65 19 4 Border Wars "River Border Wars "Midnight Drugs, Inc. "Wasted In Drugs, Inc. "Cartel City: Alaska State Troopers i, 'CartelCity:
109 65 109 44 53 Standoff"'14' Drug Trap" '14' Seaftle"'14' Arzona"14 (N)'14' -:..
C 28 36 28 35 25 Sam & Sam & Haunted Haunted See Dad Instant ** "Nutty Professor ll: The Klumps" Friends Friends
WN 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
rX 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Preachers of L.A. Snapped 'PG'
fc n 340 24i 1 340 4 *** "Mean Girls" Homeland "Uh... Oh... Masters of Sex'MA' Homeland "Tower of Masters of Sex (N)'MA' Homeland "Tower of
340 241 340 4 (2004)'PG-13'" Ah..."MA' David" (N) 'MA' David" 'MA'"
i 37 3 37 27 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Meat Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Crappy Bar Rescue "Jon of the Tattoo Rescue (N) (In
37 43 37 27 36 'PG Sauna"'PG' 'PG Cantina"'PG' Dead" (N)'PG' Stereo)'PG'
3 2 3 White *** "Identity" (2003) John The White Queen (In The White Queen (In ** "Oz the Great and Powerful" (2013)
l J 370 271 370 Queen Cusack. (In Stereo) 'R' Stereo) N Stereo) N James Franco. (In Stereo) 'PG'
r 36 3 36 Fishing the Sport Sprtsman Women's College Volleyball Pittsburgh at Florida Women's College Volleyball Arkansas at Into the
3631 136 31 36 Flats Fishing Adv. State. Tennessee.(N ame- day Tape)y kBlue' G'
S 31 1 2 "Freddy- *** "Fright Night"(2011) AntonYelchin.A teenager dis- ** "Blade Ir" (2002) Wesley Snipes. A vampire hunter "30 Days
3" 1 59 31 26 29 Jason' covers that his new neighbor is a vampire.'R' unites with his prey against a new threat. 'R' of Night"
(B 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Bruce Almighty" (2003)'PG-13' BigBang I Big Bang Big Bang IBigBang BigBang IBigBang I "Bruce Almighty"
in 16 316 30 35 ***B "High Society" (1956, Musical Comedy) *** "The Thomas Crown Affair" (1968, ** "Raffles"(1940 Crime Drama) David
S169 53 169 30 35 Bing Crosy'NR'(DVS) Adventure) Steve McQueen.'R'B Niven, Olivia de Havi land. 'NR'
m i 53 1 Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Buying Buying Alaska: The Last
0 ) 53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'" Frontier'14'" Frontier Exposed (N) Frontier (N) 'PG' Alaska Alaska Frontier Exposed
T 50 46 50 29 30 Couple |Couple Couple Couple Long Island Medium Medium |Medium Alaskan Women Medium Medium
0 21*** 30"Transsiberian" (2008, Suspense) Woody ** "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen"(2011) *** "Your Sister's Sister" (2011) "Dawn
I 350 261 350 Harrelson. (In Stereo) 'R' Ewan McGregor. 'PG-13'" IEmily Blunt. 'R' Rider"'R'
"Swordfish" ** "Red" (2010) Bruce Willis. The CIA targets a team of *** "Gran Torino" (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood. A vet- "Gran
4NJ 8 33 48 31 34 R' former agents for assassination. PG-13' eran faces his longtime prejudices.'R'" (DVS) Torino"'R'
DN 38 58 38 33 *** "Home Alone" (1990, Comedy)'PG' Dragons Teen American Cleveland Fam. Guy |Burgers Fam.Guy China, IL
f A 9 54 9 44 Halloween Crazy Halloween Night Making Monsters (N) Making Monsters (N) Halloween Craziest Fright House
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... Most Shocking To 20 Funniest'14' World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
[ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girs |Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls King |King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Modern Modem Modern Modern Covert Affairs "Space (I
U5 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14 Family Family Family Family Believe In)"
r 1 6 117 CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami A severed CSI: Miami "Point of CSI: Miami "Kill Clause" CSI: Miami "Count Me CSI: Miami "In Plane
117 69 117 '14'm leg.'14'm Impact"'14'B '14'm Out"'14'B Sight"'14'm
WGN 18 118 18 118 220 Funny Home Videos Funny HomeVideos Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay "American Beauty"


VACATIONING?
Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the Dream Vacation Photo Contest. Send in a photo
with a brief description of the trip. Include the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name and
phone number on the back.
Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


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ENTERTAINMENT


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A23




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


Sept. 23-29, 2013
Divorces
Victorio Golingan Bello,
Lecanto vs. Corazon Bautista
Tuble, Lecanto
Michael A. Destefano,
Hernando vs. Karen G.
Hemmings, Littleton, Colo.
Jamie Lynn Moore Kaczyk,
Dunnellon vs. Charles W.
Kaczyk, Saddle Brook, N.J.
JulieA. Kelsey, Inverness
vs. Mark D. Kelsey, Inverness
Van Roy Lane, Crystal
River vs. Diane Elizabeth
Lane, Crystal River
Candi Marie Roach vs.
Daniel Thomas Roach
Marriages
James Joseph Baird,
Beverly Hills/CathyAnn Black,
Hernando
James Anthony Copeland
Sr., Crystal River/Lisa Luanne
Lawson, Crystal River
Frank Michael Hale,
Homosassa/Danyel
Stephanie Lawson,
Homosassa
Billie Ralph Harper Sr.,
Floral City/Cynthia Kay
Clement, Inverness
Darien Andrew Hauter,
Crystal River/Kassandra Kaye
Jackson, Crystal River
Brian Edward Heath,
Inverness/Sherry Bea
Schroerlucke, Inverness
Toby Franklin Johnson,
Homosassa/Kimberly
Rochelle Sweet, Homosassa
David Arch Lawton,
Brooksville/TracyAnn Dardini,
Brooksville
David Lebron, Inverness/


Get TOGETHER
Entertainers sought
for park
Fort Cooper State Park
needs entertainers to per-
form at the 16th annual
Nights of Lights from 6:45
to 7:45 p.m. Friday, Dec.
13, and Sunday, Dec. 15.
The charity event bene-
fits Citrus United Basket.
Individuals and groups of
no more than 10 persons
are needed to perform
Christmas-related music.
Call Ranger Dianne
Drye at 352-726-0315.


Tamara Gonzalez, Inverness
Edwin Lane Maynard,
Neoga, Ill./Scarlett Marie
Brick, Neoga, Ill.
Victor Omar Solorio,
Crystal River/Emery
Rodriguez, Interlachen
Colin Michael Toney,
Lecanto/Sarah Elizabeth
Bass, Homosassa


Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida are
a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For more Citrus County
records, call the clerk of the
court at 352-341-6400 or visit
the website at www.clerk.
citrus, fl. us.


To be WED

Reichel/l

McMurray
Jennifer Reichel and
James McMurray of Bev-
erly Hills will exchange iI
nuptial vows at 4 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, in '
Tierra Verde.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Susan and
James Reichel. The
prospective groom is the
son of Patricia and Robert
McMurray


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A24 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


TOGETHER









SPORTS


The Denver Broncos
are favored by one of
the largest margins in
NFL history in today's
home game against
the Jacksonville
Jaguars./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB playoffs/B2
Golf, NHL/B2
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 NFL/B4
_________0__ College football/B5, B6


Panthers boys win Whispering Pines Invite

CR male Harris, Lecanto female

Farnsworth both place second


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Lecanto
Panthers boys cross country
team managed to hold off The
Villages Charter School Buffalo
on Saturday morning by 28
points to win the varsity team
title at the Whispering Pines
Invitational.
Lecanto (81 points) finished
stronger at the line, passing sev-
eral key Buffalo runners down
the chute.
The Villages Charter settled
for the runner-up trophy with
109 points.
Sam Alford (17:25.98) placed


sixth to lead the Panthers' scor-
ing efforts, followed by Macken-
zie Woods (13th, 17:56.80),
Michael Lindsey (18th, 18:09.12),
Jack Clark (21st, 18:17.23) and
Alex Pich (23rd, 18:18.10).
"Mackenzie (Woods) did a re-
ally great job of closing the gap
(between himself and Sam Al-
ford)," Lecanto boys head coach
Roselle Lattin said. "And then
See Page B2
The boys varsity cross country
race of the Whispering Pines
Invitational gets underway
Saturday at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle


UF stonewalled


Associated Press
Florida quarterback Tyler Murphy scrambles under pressure from LSU safety Micah Eugene in the second half Saturday in Baton
Rouge, La. No. 10 LSU defeated No. 17 Florida 17-6.

No. 17 UF can't get anything going offensively in 17-6 loss at LSU


Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. Les Miles re-
peatedly dismissed the notion that
LSU's defense was as vulnerable as it
had looked recently
For now, at least, he is a coach vali-
dated.
The Tigers were in Florida quarter-
back Tyler Murphy's face all game, bat-
ting down passes, racking up sacks and
keeping their opponent out of the end
zone for the first time all season.
Jeremy Hill did his part with 121
yards on 19 carries, and No. 10 LSU cel-
ebrated a vintage victory in Death Val-


ley, 17-6 over No. 17 Florida on Saturday
"The more time we are getting to-
gether with this defense, the better we
are becoming," said defensive end Jer-
mauria Rasco, who assisted on one of
LSU's eight tackles behind the line of
scrimmage. "It is just taking some time
and I think the evidence is there now"
LSU, which had been scoring 45.5
points per game, had a much harder
time finding the end zone against a
Florida defense rated among the na-
tion's best, but 1-yard touchdown runs
by fullbackJ.C. Copeland and freshman
reserve quarterback Anthony Jennings
turned out to be more than enough for


the Tigers (6-1, 3-1 Southeastern
Conference).
Murphy was 15-of-27 passing for 115
yards for the Gators (4-2, 3-1), who led
3-0 early, but managed just one more
field goal on the day
Murphy was sacked four times, one
apiece for safety Micah Eugene, defen-
sive tackle Anthony Johnson, corner-
back Jalen Mills and linebacker
Kendell Beckwith. Murphy was nearly
intercepted three times, but LSU de-
fensive backs dropped each of those
chances.
See Page B5


Bucs return

from bye

week at home

Tampa Bay 'D'

braces for Eagles'

up-tempo show
Associated Press
TAMPA- Step up, winless Bucca-
neers. You're next in line to take a crack
at slowing down the fast-paced offense
Chip Kelly has turned loose on the NFL
with the Philadelphia Eagles.
The first team in NFL history to gain
more than 1,300 yards passing and 900
yards rushing through the first five
games of a season visits Raymond James
Stadium today An improved Bucs de-
fense is bracing for a heavy dose of the
prolific system
Kelly helped pop-
ularize in college Philadelphia
football during a Eagles (2-3)
successful coach- at Tampa Bay
ing stint at Buccaneers
Oregon. 0-
The Eagles (2-3) (
have the league's m Time: 1 p.m.
No. 2-ranked of- today.
fense, averaging 0 TV: FOX.
454.8 yards per
game. They have
the top rushing attack and have been, to
the surprise of many, effective throwing
the ball as well.
Tampa Bay defensive coordinator Bill
Sheridan is in his ninth season as a NFL
assistant, and he's never seen anything
quite like what Kelly brought to
Philadelphia.
"Not the way they run the ball out of
the shotgun, much like what people are
doing in college," Sheridan said.
"The thing that's most impressive is
the play-action it sets up off of it," Sheri-
dan added. "This stuff is well thought
out Chip has been doing it for years and
had tons of mileage out of it, and he's
doing the same thing in our league now
They're tearing it up, statistically"
With Michael Vick limited in practice
by a sore hamstring, second-year quar-
terback Nick Foles figures to make his
second pro start. He won one of five
starts as a rookie, leading the Eagles to
a last-second victory at Tampa Bay
Kelly said whether Vick, injured dur-
ing last week's victory over the New York
Giants, or Foles plays against the Bucs
(0-4), the Eagles' offense won't change.
"Obviously, no matter who your quar-
terback is, you try to play a little bit
See Page B6


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--19 1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cards take 2-0 lead in NLCS over Dodgers


Associated Press

ST LOUIS Matched
against ace Clayton Ker-
shaw, the only thing
Michael Wacha lacked was
a no-hit watch.
"He's becoming a guy a
lot of teams wish they
drafted," teammate David
Freese said. "What he's
done is remarkable, espe-
cially on this stage."
Wacha stared down a
bases-loaded test in the
sixth inning and pitched
into the seventh, and the
kids in the bullpen also
were impervious to October
pressure, keeping the Los
Angeles Dodgers bats silent
for the second straight day


and winning 1-0 Saturday
for a 2-0 lead in the NL
championship series.
"I'm kind of at a loss for
words to describe him,"
said fellow rookie Kevin
Siegrist, who got a big out
to end the seventh. "It's
kind of ridiculous how
well he's done so far"
The Cardinals managed
only two hits off Kershaw
and the Dodgers, but Jon
Jay's sacrifice fly set up by
Freese's double and A.J.
Ellis' passed ball in the
fifth stood up.
The Dodgers' scoreless
streak in the NLCS
reached 19 innings after
they averaged 6 1/2 runs in
a four-game division series


St. Louis Cardinals infielder Matt Carpenter
for a ball hit by the Los Angeles Dodgers' C
during the sixth inning of Game 2 of the Nati
baseball championship series Saturday in St


against Atlanta. Rookie
fireballer Trevor Rosen-
thal struck out the side in
the ninth with a heater
reaching 101 mph, fanning
pinch-hitter Andre Ethier


on three pitcher
A day after
Los Angeles 3
nings, the
moved two win
the World Seri


After extra innings Friday,

St. Louis blanks LA. 1-0


I Game 3 is Monday at
Dodger Stadium, with Car-
dinals ace Adam Wain-
wright facing rookie
k | Hyun-Jin Ryu. The
L Dodgers have already used
their top two starters and
have nothing to show for it.
"We don't get too far
*ahead of ourselves," Car-
dinals manager Mike Ma-
theny said. "We don't deny
also what's happened here
the last two days.
". ... Hanley Ramirez and
Ethier were out of the
Associated Press Dodgers' lineup with in-
reachesrout juries after starting in the
arl Crawford opener Los Angeles missed
onal League a handful of opportunities,
. Louis. going 0 for 6 with runners in
es to end it scoring position for a two-
* outlasting day total of 1 for 16. Star
-2 in 13 in- rookie Yasiel Puig struck
Cardinals out in all four of his at-bats.
s away from The teams may have
es. been hindered by shadows


Pens nip Lightning Koepka
un4


Associated Presss

TAMPA Sidney Crosby had
three goals and an assist, and
Matt Niskanen scored a tiebreak-
ing power-play goal with 18.6 sec-
onds left, lifting Pittsburgh past
Tampa Bay 5-2 on Saturday night
Niskanen scored the winning
goal from the top of the left circle,
with an assist from Crosby
Crosby tied it at 3 with a redi-
rection of Rob Scuderi's shot 25
seconds into the third, and then
put Pittsburgh in front when he
scored from the right circle with
9:34 remaining.
Crosby has a point in all five
games this season. It is his
longest streak to start a season
since a six-game stretch in Octo-
ber 2005.
Red Wings 5, Flyers 2
DETROIT Henrik Zetterberg
had two goals and an assist, and
Pavel Datsyuk and Niklas Kronwall
each had a goal and two assists to
lead the Detroit Red Wings to a 5-2
win over the Philadelphia Flyers on
Saturday night.
Todd Bertuzzi also scored for De-
troit, which had three power-play
goals after failing on its first 10 oppor-
tunities this season. Daniel Alfreds-
son had three assists, and Jimmy
Howard made 32 saves.
Erik Gustafsson and Tye McGinn
scored for Philadelphia (1-5) and Ray
Emery stopped 25 shots. Flyers in-
terim coach Craig Berube dropped to
1-2 since replacing the fired Peter
Laviolette on Monday.
Avalanche 5, Capitals 1
WASHINGTON -Alex Tanguay
scored twice and Semyon Varlamov
made 40 saves in his return to Wash-
ington as Colorado remained perfect
under coach Patrick Roy.
It is the first time the franchise is 5-
0 since the 1994-95 season when the
team was the Quebec Nordiques.
Rookie Nathan MacKinnon added
his first NHL goal and an assist, and
Matt Duchene and Jamie McGinn
also scored for Colorado. Peter
Stastny earned two assists, including
his 400th NHL point.
Bruins 3, Blue Jackets 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio Loui Eriks-
son scored from a hard angle in the
opening minute of the third period for
his first goal for Boston, which topped
Columbus.
Playing their first road game, the
Bruins also got a goal from Chris Kelly,
and an empty-net tally from Milan
Lucic. Tuukka Rask made 26 saves.


PINES
Continued from Page BI

the rest of the boys just fin-
ished right on top of each
other which is what we
wanted to do."
Host Citrus (234 points)
placed ninth in the meet
while the Crystal River Pi-
rates (185) finished two
spots ahead of the Hurri-
canes in seventh place.
Seven Rivers Christian
placed 15th with 518
points.
Nature Coast senior
James Harkless won the
individual boys' race in a
time of 16:50.25.
The Nature Coast girls'
team proved to be more
successful than the boys,
winning their meet with 57
points -20 points ahead of
runner-up Springstead (77).
Lecanto took third over-
all (128) while Citrus (210),
Seven Rivers (269) and
Crystal River (273) placed


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning center Valtteri Filppula controls the puck in front of Pittsburgh Penguins right wing
Chuck Kobasew during the first period Saturday in Tampa.


Rask blocked Marian Gaborik's
tying attempt in the closing moments
and then pushed the puck aside with
his glove.
Jack Johnson scored on a first-pe-
riod power play for the Blue Jackets,
who won their last two on the road
but are now 0-2 at home. Sergei Bo-
brovsky, last year's Vezina Trophy
winner as the NHL's top goalie,
stopped 33 shots.
Maple Leafs 6,
Oilers 5, OT
TORONTO Dave Bolland
scored the winning goal 2:09 into
overtime, after teammate Joffrey
Lupul tied it for Toronto with 31 sec-
onds left in regulation in a back-and-
forth game against Edmonton.
Bolland finished off a 3-on-1 rush
with Cody Franson and Jake Gardiner.
Lupul and James van Riemsdyk
both had two goals for Toronto (5-1),
and Nazem Kadri also scored.
Jonathan Bernier, making his third
straight start, stopped 26 shots for
the win.
Ryan Smyth netted two goals for
Edmonton, and Ryan Nugent-Hop-
kins, Boyd Gordon and Jordan
Eberle had the others. MarkArco-
bello added three assists, and Devan
Dubnyk made 20 saves as the Oilers


eighth, llth and 12th
respectively
Crystal River senior
Brandon Harris claimed
second in the boys race,
running a 5K time of
17:05.15.
Harris is fresh off his 2013
county championship win
on Tuesday and was more
or less pleased with where
he placed on Saturday
"I thought we were going
out way too hard," Harris
said of the race. "I held
back a bit. (Harkless)
pretty much took (the lead)
the whole time but he was
(still) in sight. I was going
to wait to make my move
on him but (toward) the
end I just wasn't feeling it."
Cameron Grant was the
top 'Canes' finisher (16th)
in a time of 18:05.07.
Lecanto's Claire
Farnsworth (20:04.94) took
second in the girls race to
Springstead's Amber
Philpott, who won in a 3.1-
mile time of 19:16.08.
Farnsworth, the 2013


(1-3-1) began a six-game trip.
Wild 5, Stars 1
ST. PAUL, Minn. Rookies Justin
Fontaine and Mathew Dumba both
scored their first NHL goals and Josh
Harding made 18 saves for his sec-
ond straight win as the Minnesota
Wild beat the Dallas Stars 5-1.
Minnesota came in giving up a
league-low 22.0 shots per game, and
kept the pressure off Harding, who
was filling in for injured starter Niklas
Backstrom.
Dallas' Dan Ellis, starting for in-
jured starter Kari Lehtonen, allowed
five goals on 36 shots.
Predators 3, Islanders 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Seth Jones
scored his first NHL goal and the
Nashville Predators edged the New
York Islanders 3-2.
Nashville has won two of three.
The Islanders were beaten for the
third time in four games including
twice in two days.
Patric Hornqvist and Ryan Ellis
had the other Nashville goals. Frans
Nielsen and John Tavares scored for
New York.
Pekka Rinne needed to make only
14 saves for the win. Evgeni Nabokov
stopped 28 shots in the loss.
After a scoreless opening period,


county champion, was con-
tent with her efforts in the
race.
"I started off (in) about
first or second place and I
wanted to beat (North Mar-
ion's Leigha Torino) and
wasn't totally aware of
Amber Philpott until later,"
Farnsworth said.
"(Philpott) got out way
ahead (at one point) and I
just left her alone to do her
thing and concentrated on
(Torino). I did beat (Torino),
so I think I did pretty good
in my book I guess."
Lecanto's Katie Mat-
tingly placed just out of the
top 10 with a time of
21:49.41 for llth place.
Alyssa Weber (21:41.78)
finished as the top Lady
'Cane in eighth place
while Seven Rivers' Paige
Eckart (18th, 22:34.74) and
Kathryn DeSomma (28th,
23:50.43) finished as the
top Warrior and Pirate for
their respective teams.
Boys team scores
1. Lecanto 81; 2. The Vil-


lages Charter 109; 3. Na-
ture Coast 116; 4. Forest
125; 5. Belleview 145; 6.
Lake Weir 170; 7. Crystal
River 185; 8. Springstead
211; 9. Citrus 234; 10. Her-
nando 246; 11. North Mar-
ion 280; 12. Tavares 291;
13. Trinity Catholic 294; 14.
Central 342; 15. Seven
Rivers 518
Girls team scores
1. Nature Coast 57; 2.
Springstead 77; 3. Lecanto
128; 4. The Villages Char-
ter 144; 5. Belleview 164; 6.
Trinity Catholic 192; 7.
Forest 203; 8. Citrus 210; 9.
Lake Weir 234; 10. Tavares
267; 11. Seven Rivers 269;
12. Crystal River 273; 13.
Hernando 318; 14. North
Marion 322
Boys top 10
individuals
1. James Harkless, Na-
ture Coast 16:50.25; 2.
Brandon Harris, Crystal
River 17:05.15; 3. Redondo
Beauplan, Belleview


Jones gave the Predators a 1-0 lead
at 1:03 of the second.
Blackhawks 2, Sabres 1
CHICAGO Corey Crawford
made 28 saves to lead the Chicago
Blackhawks to a 2-1 victory over the
winless Buffalo Sabres.
Ben Smith and Patrick Kane scored
for the Blackhawks, who swept a pair
of weekend home games, edging the
Islanders 3-2 on Friday.
Drew Stafford connected with 8:11
left in the third, spoiling Crawford's
bid for a shutout. The Sabres (0-5-1)
put together several tough challenges
in the second and third periods de-
spite being dominated earlier in the
game and outshot 40-29.
Ryan Miller had 38 saves for Buf-
falo, which has been outscored 16-6
in its worst start since 1999-2000.
Blues 5, Rangers 3
ST. LOUIS David Backes
scored twice, and the unbeaten St.
Louis Blues beat the slumping New
York Rangers 5-3.
The Blues, who haven't trailed at
all this season, are 4-0 for the first
time in franchise history.
Derek Roy, Alexander Steen and
Vladimir Tarasenko added goals for
St. Louis, which has outscored its
opponents 19-7.


17:05.50; 4. Benjamin
Waller, Trinity Catholic
17:09.30; 5. Kyle Fox, The
Villages Charter 17:25.80;
6. Sam Alford, Lecanto
17:25.98; 7. Shane Harlow,
Lake Weir 17:34.03; 8.
Austin Mulyck, Nature
Coast 17:41.40; 9. Chandler
Soucey, Lake Weir
17:46.11; 10. Charles
Steinkamp, Hernando
17:46.47
Girls top 10
individuals
1. Amber Philpott,


LIJ LtV


PGA


Associated Press

SAN MARTIN, Calif. -
On a day of low scoring,
Brooks Koepka kept up his
end of the bargain and
stayed in the lead at the
Frys.com Open.
In his first regular PGA
Tour event, Koepka rolled
in two birdies putts to start
his round Saturday and
drove the par-4 17th green
for another birdie. It
added to a 4-under 67 and
a two-shot lead over
George McNeill and Jason
Kokrak going into the final
round at CordeValle.
A win would mean more
than just a trip to the Mas-
ters for Koepka.
The 23-year-old Florid-
ian started the year with
no status on any tour, and
since then has earned
membership on the Chal-
lenge Tour and European
Tour A victory todaywould
give him a two-year ex-
emption on the PGA Tour
LPGA Tour
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
- Lexi Thompson moved into
position for her second LPGA
Tour title, shooting a 5-under
66 to take a three-stroke lead
in the LPGA Malaysia.
The 18-year-old American,
the 2011 Navistar LPGA Clas-
sic winner, had five birdies in
her bogey-free round to reach
17-under 196 at Kuala
Lumpur Golf and Country
Club. She opened with
rounds of 67 and 63.
South Korea's llhee Lee
was second after a 70.
Champions Tour
CARY, N.C. Russ
Cochran shot his second
straight 6-under 66 to take a
two-stroke lead after the sec-
ond round of the Champions
Tour's SAS Championship.
The 54-year-old left-hander,
the 2010 winner at Preston-
wood Country Club, birdied
five of the first six holes,
dropped a stroke on the par-5
seventh and added birdies on
Nos. 15 and 17. He won the
Principal Charity Classic in
Iowa in June.


Springstead 19:16.08; 2.
Claire Farnsworth,
Lecanto 20:04.94; 3.
Leigha Torino, North Mar-
ion 20:18.65; 4. Alyssa
Deligio, Nature Coast
20:48.28; 5. Alexa Lacy, Na-
ture Coast 21:24.34; 6. Pay-
ton Brown, Tavares
21:35.80; 7. Crystal Burch-
hardt, Nature Coast
21:40.70; 8. Alyssa Weber,
Citrus 21:41.78; 9. Rachel
Van Wart, The Villages
Charter 21:46.52; 10. Tiana
Newton, Springstead
21:47.42


SELF-EMPLOYED FORECLOSURES
BANKRUPTCY FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES


BUICK GMC


1275 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S. Hwy. 19)
Homosassa
352-795-6800


creeping across Busch Sta-
dium in a late-afternoon
start, with lights providing
no real help. Both also
were no doubt fatigued,
which might have shown
on the crucial passed ball
by Ellis that wound up re-
sulting in an unearned run.
Wacha was nearly un-
touchable for the third
straight start, allowing five
hits with eight strikeouts
and a walk in 6 2/3 innings.
The 22-year-old right-
hander was one out away
from a no-hitter in his last
start of the regular season,
losing it on an infield hit
by Washington's Ryan Zim-
merman. Wacha ignored a
crowd chanting his name
in Game 4 of the division
series at Pittsburgh, hold-
ing the Pirates hitless for
7 1/3 innings to bring the
series back home.


A = III.i


B2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




No. 10 LSU 17,
No. 17 Florida 6
Florida 3 0 0 3- 6
LSU 0 14 0 3- 17
First Quarter
Fla-FG Velez 44, 4:28.
Second Quarter
LSU-Copeland 1 run (Delahoussaye kick), 14:56.
LSU-Jennings 1 run (Delahoussaye kick), 5:14.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-FGVelez 27, 12:11.
LSU-FG Delahoussaye 31, 7:58.
A-92,980.
Fla LSU
First downs 17 21
Rushes-yards 40-111 39-175
Passing 129 152
Comp-Att-Int 16-28-0 9-17-0
Return Yards (-1) 0
Punts-Avg. 5-42.4 3-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 8-72 5-42
Time of Possession 34:11 25:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida, M.Brown 15-56, Kel.Taylor 10-
52, Jones 4-17, Patton 1-(minus 1), Murphy 10-
(minus 13). LSU, Hill 19-121, Hilliard 6-28, Copeland
5-20, Magee 2-8, Jennings 2-4, Mettenberger 2-1,
Blue 1-(minus 2), Team 2-(minus 5).
PASSING-Florida, Murphy 15-27-0-115, Christy 1-
1-0-14. LSU, Mettenberger 9-17-0-152.
RECEIVING-Florida, Patton 3-32, T.Burton 3-28,
Robinson 2-26, Fulwood 2-19, Dunbar 2-9, M.Brown
2-1, Ball 1-14, Showers 1-0. LSU, Landry 4-58,
Beckham 2-47, Hill 1-30, Magee 1-17, Hilliard 1-0.

College football scores
EAST
American International 21, CW Post 0
Amherst 14, Colby 10
Army 50, E. Michigan 25
Bentley 56, Pace 13
Bloomsburg 45, Millersville 7
Bowdoin 27, Hamilton 21
Brockport 55, William Paterson 34
Brown 41, Bryant 14
California (Pa.) 35, Clarion 7
Cortland St. 48, MontclairSt. 14
Curry 27, Coast Guard 24
Dartmouth 20, Yale 13
Delaware 33, Albany (NY) 30
Duquesne 34, Wagner 7
Endicott 51, Nichols 7
Fitchburg St. 37, Worcester St. 7
Fordham 34, Georgetown 12
Framingham St. 17, Westfield St. 15
Gallaudet 30, Norwich 22
Gannon 55, Edinboro 14
Harvard 34, Cornell 24
Hobart 49, Springfield 21
Holy Cross 51, Bucknell27
Husson 35, Anna Maria 14
Ithaca 17, Alfred 6
King's (Pa.) 52, FDU-Florham 21
Kutztown 35, Cheyney 19
Lebanon Valley 14, Lycoming 7
Lehigh 24, Columbia 10
Mass. Maritime 54, W Connecticut 53
Mercyhurst 50, Seton Hill 13
Middlebury 21, Williams 14
Morrisville St. 41, Rowan 21
Mount Ida 37, Castleton St. 19
NY Maritime 30, Becker 7
New Hampshire 59, Rhode Island 19
New Haven 48, Merrimack 34
Penn St. 43, Michigan 40, 40T
Princeton 42, Lafayette 26
Rochester at Merchant Marine, ppd.
Sacred Heart 59, CCSU 36
Salisbury 34, Buffalo St. 6
Salve Regina 47, W New England 26
Shippensburg 30, Lock Haven 24
Slippery Rock 42, Indiana (Pa.) 16
South Florida 13, UConn 10
St. Francis (Pa.) 28, Monmouth (NJ) 10
St. John Fisher 37, Hartwick 14
St. Lawrence 20, RP1I13
Stonehill 23, S. Connecticut 21
Stony Brook 27, Colgate 3
Thiel30, St. Vincent 3
Trinity (Conn.) 43, Tufts 7
UMass 17, Miami (Ohio) 10
Union (NY) 35, WPI 6
Utica 44, Frostburg St. 27
Villanova 45, Towson 35
Virginia Union 28, Lincoln (Pa.) 21
Washington & Jefferson 45, Thomas More 21
Waynesburg 38, Grove City 0
Wesleyan (Conn.) 35, Bates 7
West Chester 34, East Stroudsburg 20
Westminster (Pa.) 27, Carnegie-Mellon 24
MIDWEST
Adrian 41, Alma 6
Albion 41, Trine 27
Augustana (11.) 28, Elmhurst 17
Augustana (SD) 10, Minn. St.-Mankato 6
Baker 39, Culver-Stockton 0
Baldwin-Wallace 38, Ohio Northern 17
Ball St. 27, Kent St. 24
Baylor 35, Kansas St. 25
Bemidji St. 17, Mary 16
Benedictine (III.) 33, Aurora 23
Benedictine (Kan.) 62, Avila 37
Bethel (Minn.) 45, Concordia (Moor.) 22
Bethel (Tenn.) 20, Lindenwood (III.) 14
Buffalo 33, W Michigan 0
Butler 35, Campbell 14
CSU-Pueblo 51, Chadron St 42
Carleton 56, Macalester 17
Carroll (Wis.) 48, Lawrence 14
Cent. Methodist 44, Evangel 14
Cent. Michigan 26, Ohio 23
Central St. (Ohio) 25, Miles 21
Coe 56, Loras 0
Concordia (Neb.) 19, Nebraska Wesleyan 3
Concordia (Wis.) 70, Maranatha Baptist 14
Crown (Minn.) 34, Iowa Wesleyan 31, OT
Dakota St. 31, Jamestown 28
Dakota Wesleyan 31, Doane 20
DePauw 45, Oberlin 11
Defiance 27, Manchester 12
Dordt 56, Trinity Bible 27
Dubuque 56, Luther 20
E.Washington 35, North Dakota 14
Emporia St. 63, SW Baptist 17
Eureka 50, Martin Luther 14
Ferris St. 54, Grand Valley St. 44
Findlay 35, Tiffin 14
Fort Hays St. 31, Lindenwood (Mo.) 17
Franklin 55, Mount St. Joseph 27
Friends 34, McPherson 3
Grand View 48, Olivet Nazarene 17
Greenville 55, Mac Murray 30
Hamline 31, St. Olaf 28
Hanover 44, Anderson (Ind.) 23
Heidelberg 73, Capital 17
Hillsdale 35, Wayne (Mich.) 16
Hope 47, Olivet 14
Illinois College 55, Lake Forest 7
Illinois Wesleyan 52, North Park 21
Indianapolis 45, McKendree 7
John Carroll 62, Marietta 7
Kenyon 20, Hiram 16
Knox 31, Beloit21
Lake Erie 48, Notre Dame Coll. 21
Lakeland 35, Rockford 21
Marian (Ind.) 27, Siena Heights 23


Mayville St. 14, Valley City St. 9
Michigan St. 42, Indiana 28
MichiganTech 31, N. Michigan 7
Mid-Am Nazarene 41, Peru St. 38, 20T
Minn. Duluth 69, Minn. St.-Moorhead 45
Minn.-Morris 45, Westminster (Mo.) 38
Missouri Southern 45, S. Dakota Tech 40
Missouri Valley 35, Graceland (Iowa) 7
Missouri Western 54, Northeastern St. 10
Monmouth (11.) 65, Grinnell 3
Morningside 44, Hastings 3
Mount Union 62, Wilmington (Ohio) 0
N. Dakota St. 41, Missouri St. 26
N. Illinois 27, Akron 20
NW Missouri St. 72, Cent. Oklahoma 10
Nebraska 44, Purdue 7
North Central (III.) 55, Millikin 7
Northern St. (SD) 22, MinotSt. 21
Ohio Dominican 31, Ashland 19
Ottawa, Kan. 63, St. Mary (Kan.) 17
Otterbein 12, Muskingum 10
Pittsburg St. 31, Cent. Missouri 21
Presentation 34, Haskell Indian Nations 14
Rose-Hulman 34, Bluffton 26
S. Dakota St. 38, W. Illinois 14


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 B3


For thl recoLd



F= lorid LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
8-10-26-57-58
POWER BALL
4


CASH 3 (early)
8-0-3
CASH 3 (late)
7-7-4

PLAY 4 (early)
6-4-2-4
PLAY 4 (late)
2-9-9-1

FANTASY 5
1-3-5-31-32

LOTTERY
3-8-16-20-43-48
XTRA
4


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 2 -13 -19 -32
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,091.00
3-of-4 MB 38 $377.50
3-of-4 894 $47.50
2-of-4 MB 1,143 $26.00
1-of-4 MB 10,161 $2.50
2-of-4 26,472 $2.00


Fantasy 5:7 -17 -23 -31 -36
5-of-5 2 winner $111,084.78
4-of-5 297 $120.50
3-of-5 9,601 $10.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (FS1) K&N Pro Series: Dover (Taped)
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing Reno (Taped)
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series (Taped)
BASEBALL
8 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 2
BICYCLING
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Paris-Tours (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at LSU (Taped)
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Missouri at Georgia (Taped)
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Oklahoma at Texas (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Texas A&M at Mississippi (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (FOX) Philadelphia Eagles at Tampa Bay Buccaneers
4 p.m. (CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Denver Broncos
4:25 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at New England Patriots
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Portugal Masters, Final Round
12 p.m. (ESPNU) College: Dick's Sporting Goods Collegiate
Challenge (Same-day Tape)
2 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: SAS Championship, Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Frys.com Open, Final Round
GYMNASTICS
2 p.m. (NBC) Gymnastics 2013 World Artistic Championships (Taped)
HOCKEY
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Kings at Florida Panthers
MOTORCYCLE RACING
1 p.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing Moto2: Malaysian Grand Prix (Taped)
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Notre Dame at Virginia Tech
9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Seattle Sounders FC at Portland Timbers
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) Central Florida at Louisville
2 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh at Florida State
9:30 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Tennessee (Same-day Tape)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


S. Illinois 24, N. Iowa 17, OT
SE Missouri 37, Murray St. 34, 30T
SW Minnesota St. 55, Wayne (Neb.) 16
Saginaw Valley St. 44, Northwood (Mich.) 28
Simpson (Iowa) 14, Central 10
South Dakota 17, Indiana St. 14
Southwestern (Kan.) 28, Bethany (Kan.) 21
St. Ambrose 31, Trinity (III.) 28
St. Cloud St. 55, Minn.-Crookston 6
St. Francis (III.) 28, Robert Morris-Chicago 25
St. John's (Minn.) 30, Augsburg 28
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 34, Quincy 26
St. Norbert 20, Cornell (Iowa) 17
St. Scholastica 25, Northwestern (Minn.) 14
St. Thomas (Minn.) 20, Gustavus 12
Sterling 54, Bethel (Kan.) 9
Tabor 54, Kansas Wesleyan 28
Taylor 47, Concordia (Mich.) 7
Truman St. 45, William Jewell 7
Upper Iowa 28, Concordia (St.P.) 24
Urbana 22, Concord 10
Wabash 38, Ohio Wesleyan 13
Walsh 38, Malone 28
Wartburg 37, Buena Vista 29
Washburn 58, Lincoln (Mo.) 7
Wheaton (III.) 28, Carthage 0
William Penn 65, Waldorf 0
Winona St. 45, Sioux Falls 40
Wis. Lutheran 49, Concordia (III.) 13
Wis.-Oshkosh 30, Wis.-LaCrosse 6
Wis.-Platteville 49, Wis.-River Falls 7
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 23, Wis.-Eau Claire 17, OT
Wis.-Whitewater 55, Wis.-Stout 13
Wisconsin 35, Northwestern 6
Wittenberg 38, Denison 20
Wooster 33, Allegheny 16
Youngstown St. 59, Illinois St. 21
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 48, Idaho 24
Arkansas Tech 14, S. Arkansas 13
Bacone 16, Wayland Baptist 9
Cent. Arkansas 31, Nebraska-Kearney 0
E. New Mexico 29, Angelo St. 28
Hardin-Simmons 59, Howard Payne 24
Harding 63, Ark.-Monticello 30
Henderson St. 45, SW Oklahoma 17
Houston 25, Memphis 15
Langston 41, SW Assemblies of God 17
Louisiana-Monroe 21, Texas St. 14
Midwestern St. 66, McMurry 20
Millsaps 27, Trinity (Texas) 24
Mississippi College 34, Sul Ross St. 30
North Texas 34, Middle Tennessee 7
Okla. Panhandle St. 41, Texas College 0
Oklahoma Baptist 42, Southwestern (Texas) 21
Ouachita 45, NW Oklahoma St. 21
Rice 27, UTSA 21
SE Oklahoma 31, S. Nazarene 14
Sam Houston St. 14, Lamar 3
South Carolina 52, Arkansas 7
TCU 27, Kansas 17
Texas 36, Oklahoma 20
Texas Lutheran 45, Austin 12
Texas Southern 41, Ark.-Pine Bluff 28
Texas Tech 42, Iowa St. 35
Tulsa 34, UTEP 20
Washington (Mo.) 45, Hendrix 41


SOUTH
Alabama 48, Kentucky 7
Alabama St. 48, Prairie View 42, OT
Alcorn St. 48, Grambling St. 0
Alderson-Broaddus 48, Point (Ga.) 16
Auburn 62, W Carolina 3
Ave Maria 45, Florida Tech 41
Belhaven 40, Bluefield South 21
Bethune-Cookman 27, Howard 6
Brevard 35, Mars Hill 7
Carson-Newman 45, Shorter 28
Centre 48, Berry 6
Charleston (WV) 17, Glenville St. 10
Charleston Southern 25, VM117
Chattanooga 31, Furman 9
Chowan 31, Bowie St. 21
Christopher Newport 20, NC Wesleyan 8
Clark Atlanta 56, College of Faith 0
Clemson 24, Boston College 14
Coastal Carolina 42, Gardner-Webb 7
Cumberland (Tenn.) 45, Union (Ky.) 43
Dayton 49, Stetson 20
Delaware St. 14, Norfolk St. 7
Drake 27, Davidson 6
Duke 35, Navy 7
Florida A&M 27, Savannah St. 14
Georgetown (Ky.) 19, Campbellsville 14
Georgia Southern 28, The Citadel 21
Guilford 56, Shenandoah 29
Hampden-Sydney 28, Bridgewater (Va.) 7
Hampton 31, NCA&T26
Huntingdon 48, Greensboro 40
Jackson St. 26, MVSU 17
James Madison 38, Richmond 31
Kentucky Christian 22, Lindsey Wilson 14
Kentucky St. 17, Fort Valley St. 11
LSU 17, Florida 6
Lane 37, Albany St. (Ga.) 31
Lenoir-Rhyne 35, North Greenville 17
Marshall 24, FAU 23
Maryland 27, Virginia 26
Maryville (Tenn.) 47, LaGrange 35
Mercer 35, Valparaiso 21
Methodist 41, Averett 33
Mississippi St. 21, Bowling Green 20
Missouri 41, Georgia 26
Missouri S&T 41, Kentucky Wesleyan 21
NC Pembroke 45, Charlotte 22
Newberry 44, Tusculum 9
Nicholls St. 33, Northwestern St. 21
North Alabama 38, West Georgia 21
Rhodes 50, Sewanee 23
S. Virginia 35, Warner 20
SE Louisiana 56, Stephen F Austin 14
Samford 34, Appalachian St. 10
Shaw 44, Fayetteville St. 34
Shepherd 42, Virginia-Wise 17
St. Augustine's 21, Livingstone 14
Stillman 35, Benedict 21
Syracuse 24, NC State 10
Tennessee St. 31, Jacksonville St. 15
Troy 35, Georgia St. 28
Tulane 36, East Carolina 33, 30T
Tuskegee 54, Morehouse 10
UAB 27, FlU 24
Virginia Tech 19, Pittsburgh 9
WV Wesleyan 45, W Virginia St. 30
Washington & Lee 21, Emory & Henry 17
Webber 49, Edward Waters 9
Wesley 40, Va. Lynchburg 0


I S O R S B IES-


Late caution helps
Keselowski to
first win of year
CONCORD, N.C. Brad Ke-
selowski snapped a 37-race win-
less streak Saturday night by
chasing down Kasey Kahne in the
closing laps at Charlotte Motor
Speedway.
The defending Sprint Cup cham-
pion picked up his first win since
Dover of last year. Keselowski led
only 11 laps, and passed Kahne
with nine to go to get the win in his
Penske Racing Ford.
The race changed dramatically
with 27 laps remaining and Jim-
mie Johnson seemingly on his
way to an easy victory. But a de-
bris caution sent the leaders to pit
road and ended Johnson's march
to a record seventh Charlotte win.
Keselowski restarted in sixth,
picked his way through traffic and
set his sights on Kahne. But get-
ting past the Hendrick Motorsports
driver wasn't easy, and he needed
several attempts before making it
stick.

Bucs' Banks cleared
to play against Eagles
TAMPA-- Rookie cornerback
Johnthan Banks, the third Tampa


West Liberty 27, Fairmont St. 21
William & Mary 27, Penn 14
Wingate 23, Catawba 22
Winston-Salem 44, Johnson C. Smith 17
Wofford 31, Elon 27
FAR WEST
Adams St. 49, Black Hills St. 43
BYU 38, Georgia Tech 20
Carroll (Mont.) 42, Dickinson St. 7
Cent. Washington 27, Dixie St. 24
Chapman 62, Pomona-Pitzer 21
Colorado Mines 51, Fort Lewis 16
Idaho St. 40, N. Colorado 26
La Verne 41, Whittier27
Mesa St. 22, W. New Mexico 17
Montana 42, UC Davis 7
Occidental 38, Claremont-Mudd 30
Oregon 45, Washington 24
Pacific 56, Puget Sound 14
Pacific Lutheran 42, Lewis & Clark 21
S. Utah 17, Portland St. 7
San Diego 35, Marist 33
San Jose St. 34, Colorado St. 27
Utah 27, Stanford 21
W. Oregon 38, Humboldt St. 21
Western St. (Col.) 33, NM Highlands 27
Wyoming 38, New Mexico 31




Sprint Cup

Bank of America 500
Results
Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (23) B. Keselowski, Ford, 334 laps, 103.9 rating,
47 points.
2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 334, 138.3, 44.
3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 334, 107.4, 42.
4. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 129.6, 41.
5. (9) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334, 111.2, 40.
6. (2) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 97.1, 38.
7. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 334, 117, 38.
8. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 106.6, 37.
9. (18) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334, 94.3, 35.
10. (15) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 95.3, 35.
11. (14) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 334, 89.1, 34.
12. (8) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 334, 88.1, 32.
13. (16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 334, 79.7, 31.
14. (10) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 333, 95, 30.
15.(6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 333, 104.7, 30.
16.(3) Greg Biffle, Ford, 333, 78.9, 28.
17. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 333, 68.2, 27.
18. (12) Joey Logano, Ford, 332, 72.9, 26.
19. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 332, 70, 25.
20. (35) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 332, 55.2, 24.
21. (26) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 332, 66.8, 23.
22. (17) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 331, 79.6, 22.
23. (11)AricAlmirola, Ford, 331, 69.3, 21.
24. (13) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 331, 65.4, 20.
25. (27) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 330, 59.2, 0.
26. (36) David Reutimann, Toyota, 330, 51.6, 18.
27. (19) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 330, 56, 0.
28. (24) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 329, 58.1, 16.
29. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 328, 47.1, 16.
30. (30) David Ragan, Ford, 328, 48.4, 14.
31. (28) Casey Mears, Ford, 328, 35.3, 13.
32. (39) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 327, 43.1, 12.
33. (32) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 327, 39.7, 0.
34. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 327, 48, 0.
35. (41)Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 326, 34.6, 9.
36. (40)Timmy Hill, Ford, 324, 30.9, 8.
37. (21) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, engine, 247,63.5,0.
38. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, vibration, 216, 28.5, 0.
39. (38)J. Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 149,32.4,0.
40. (37) M. McDowell, Ford, vibration, 83, 27.3, 4.
41. (33) Josh Wise, Ford, brakes, 81, 37.2, 0.
42. (22) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, engine, 80, 42.9,2.
43. (42) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, accident, 23, 29, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 158.312 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 9 minutes, 57 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.022 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 20 laps.
Lead Changes: 24 among 11 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Gordon 1-26; D.Gilliland 27; K.Kahne
28-29; D.Earnhardt Jr. 30-43; K.Kahne 44-73; J.John-
son 74; R.Newman 75; C.Edwards 76; Ky.Busch 77;
K.Kahne 78-90; D.Earnhardt Jr. 91-95; K.Kahne 96-
128; R.Newman 129; M.Kenseth 130; C.Bowyer 131;
B.Keselowski 132-133; K.Kahne 134-173; Ky.Busch
174; K.Kahne 175-177; J.Johnson 178-227; Ky.Busch
228; J.Johnson 229-307; Ky.Busch 308; K.Kahne
309-325; B.Keselowski 326-334.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
K.Kahne, 7 times for 138 laps; J.Johnson, 3 times
for 130 laps; J.Gordon, 1 time for 26 laps; D.Earn-
hardt Jr., 2 times for 19 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times
for 11 laps; Ky.Busch, 4 times for 4 laps; R.Newman,
2 times for 2 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Ed-
wards, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Bowyer, 1 time for 1 lap;
D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. M.Kenseth, 2,225; 2. J.Johnson,
2,221; 3. K.Harvick, 2,196; 4. J.Gordon, 2,189; 5.
Ky.Busch, 2,188; 6. G.Biffle, 2,167; 7. Ku.Busch,


2,166; 8. C.Bowyer, 2,162; 9. D.EarnhardtJr., 2,159;
10. C.Edwards, 2,158; 11. J.Logano, 2,150; 12.
R.Newman, 2,147.




MLB playoffs
All Times EDT
WILD CARD
Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2
Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5)
American League
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4


Bay player diagnosed with MRSA,
has been cleared to play today in
the Buccaneers' game against the
Philadelphia Eagles.
The NFL and NFL Players As-
sociation issued a joint statement
Saturday, saying: "The NFL and
NFLPA have worked together in
response to the MRSA matter in
Tampa Bay. The jointly retained
specialist has met with the team,
supervised the inspection of the
facilities, conducted medical ex-
aminations and agrees with the
team medical staff that Mr. Banks
does not pose a risk of transmis-
sion to other players.
"The specialist also met with
team officials from the Eagles. All
players have been advised of the
process and we will continue to
work together to jointly monitor the
situation."
MRSA is a staph infection that
is resistant to many common an-
tibiotics.
On the team's injury report Fri-
day, Banks and guard Carl Nicks,
who along with kicker Lawrence
Tynes was diagnosed as having
MRSA in August, were listed as
questionable to play against
Philadelphia. Tynes is on the non-
football injury list.
From wire reports



Monday, Oct. 7: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 4
Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1
Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Oakland 1, Detroit 0
Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland 6, Detroit 3
Tuesday, Oct. 8: Detroit 8, Oakland 6
Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit 3, Oakland 0
National League
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2
Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1
Sunday, Oct. 6: Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3
Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1
Wednesday Oct. 9: St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1
Los Angeles 3, Atlanta 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3
Sunday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 13, Atlanta 6
Monday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 4, Atlanta 3
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
All games televised by Fox
Detroit vs. Boston
Saturday, Oct. 12: Detroit (Sanchez 14-8) at
Boston (Lester 15-8), late
Sunday, Oct. 13: Detroit (Scherzer 21-3) at Boston
(Buchholz 12-1), 8:07 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15: Boston (Lackey 10-13) at De-
troit (Verlander 13-12), 4:07 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 16: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at De-
troit(Fister 14-9), 8:07 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 17: Boston at Detroit, 8:07 p.m.
x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Detroit at Boston, 4:37 p.m.
x-Sunday, Oct. 20: Detroit at Boston, 8:07 p.m.
National League
All games televised byTBS
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 0
Friday, Oct. 11: St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 2, 13 in-
nings
Saturday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0
Monday, Oct. 14: St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9) at
Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8), 8:07 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis (Lynn 15-10) at Los
Angeles, 8:07 p.m.
x-Wednesday Oct. 16: St. Louis at Los Angeles,
4:07 p.m.
x-Friday, Oct. 18: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8:37
p.m.
x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8:37
p.m.
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct. 23: at AL
Thursday, Oct. 24: at AL
Saturday, Oct. 26: at NL
Sunday, Oct. 27: at NL
x-Monday, Oct. 28: at NL
x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: atAL
x-Thursday Oct. 31: atAL
Cardinals 1, Dodgers 0


Los Angeles


St. Louis


ab r h bi
Crwfrdlf 4 0 1 0 MCrpnt2b
M.Ellis2b 4 0 1 0 Beltranrf
AdGnzllb 3 0 0 0 Hollidy If
Puigrf 4 0 0 0 YMolinc
Uribe 3b 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b
Schmkrcf 3 0 0 0 Descals3b
Ethierph 1 0 0 0 MAdmslb
A.Ellisc 3 0 1 0 Jaycf
Puntoss 3 0 1 0 Kozmass
Kershwp 2 0 1 0 Wachap
MYong ph 1 0 0 0 Siegrist p
Belisari p 0 0 0 0 Choate p
Howellp 0 00 0 CMrtnzp
SRonsn ph
Rosnthl p
Totals 32 05 0 Totals


ab r h bi
3010
3 0 1 0
2000
3000
3000
3110
0000
3000
2001
2000
2000
0000
0000
0000
1000
0000
24 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 1
2 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
24 1 2 1


Los Angeles 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 000 010 OOx 1
E-M.Carpenter (1). DP-Los Angeles 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 6, St. Louis 2. 2B-A.Ellis (1), Freese (1).
3B-M.Carpenter (1). SB-M.Ellis (1). SF-Jay.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Kershaw L,0-1
Belisario
Howell
St. Louis
WachaW,1-0
Siegrist H,1
Choate H,1


621015
100000
100010
6 2 1 0 1 5
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 0


62/35 0
1/3 0 0
1/3 0 0


Ca.MartinezH,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
RosenthalS,l-1 1 0 0 0 0 3
WP-Siegrist 2. PB-A.Ellis.




Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 13
Major League Baseball Playoffs
American League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Detroit -110 at Boston +100
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Kansas City 10 8 (41)Oakland
Philadelphia 3 21 (46) atTampa Bay
Green Bay 31 3 (48/2) at Baltimore
Detroit 3 21 (44) at Cleveland
at Minnesota 2 2 (44) Carolina
at Houston 7 71 (42/2) St. Louis
at N.Y Jets +2 Pk (41) Pittsburgh
Cincinnati 7% 61 (41/2) at Buffalo
atSeattle 13 /213 (40/2) Tennessee
at Denver 27/2 26/2 (53/2) Jacksonville
atSan Fran. 11/2 10/2 (41)Arizona
at N. England 3 1/2 (50/2) New Orleans
at Dallas 3/2 5 (531/2) Washington
Monday
Indianapolis 2/2 1/2 (50) at San Diego


SCOREBOARD




B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Jaguars huge underdogs to Broncos


Jacksonville

plays today

at Denver

Associated Press

Some have dubbed it the
point-spread game, given
that Denver is favored by
more than four touch-
downs against Jack-
sonville on Sunday
Others are calling it the
biggest mismatch in NFL
history Still others expect
Peyton Manning to sit out
the second half, his requi-
site four touchdown
passes already in the
books.
What no one is project-
ing is the Jaguars' first vic-
tory after five lopsided
defeats, nor the Broncos'
first loss following a
record-setting opening five
weeks.
"We have never talked
about that and so it's com-
pletely irrelevant to me,"
Manning said. "I don't look
at anything besides what I
see on the tape. On de-
fense I see a team that's
stingy in the red zone. I've
seen some offenses that
have made some really
good plays against them,
that have been hard to de-
fend, and certainly it's a
team with a lot of pride.
It's about what are you
doing each week."
Also Sunday it's New Or-
leans at New England,
Oakland at Kansas City,
Washington at Dallas,
Green Bay at Baltimore,
Tennessee at Seattle, Ari-
zona at San Francisco, St.
Louis at Houston, Cincin-
nati at Buffalo, Detroit at
Cleveland, Pittsburgh at
the New York Jets;
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay
and Carolina at Minnesota.
Monday night, it's Indi-
anapolis at San Diego.
Off this week are Miami
(3-2) and Atlanta (1-4)
Bears 27, Giants 21
At Chicago, Jay Cutler
threw two touchdown
passes to Brandon Mar-
shall, and Tim Jennings
had two of Chicago's three
interceptions against Eli
Manning in a victory over
winless New York on
Thursday night.
The Bears (4-2) snapped
a two-game slide following
a 3-0 start. New York is 0-6
for the first time since the
1976 team dropped its first
nine, a stunning turn for a
franchise that won the
Super Bowl two years ago.
Cutler and Marshall were
in tune early on, connect-
ing for two touchdowns,
and Jennings ran an inter-
ception back 48 yards as
Chicago built a 24-14 half-
time lead.
Jacksonville (0-5)
at Denver (5-0)
While the point spread
has fluctuated in the vicin-
ity of 27 points, the Jaguars
have been ridiculed nearly
everywhere. That includes
on the Broncos' Twitter ac-


C .



.. .,. ... .-. -
- ., ..t.AI^f~. bb .
S ,,: ., ^ *- ".Z _, ''**--,-- .. ,*- -7 "" "- . ..^ ." ..-." ... ,-- .. '. -* .- :- , . .. *':" -..




Associated Press
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and his team are favored to defeat the visiting Jacksonville Jaguars
by more than four touchdowns in today's game in Denver.


count, which noted that
Denver scored 51 points in
beating Dallas last Sunday,
the same number of points
Jacksonville has managed
all year
"My whole life I've been
an underdog, so it doesn't
change anything," said
Jaguars running back
Maurice Jones-Drew, one
of the few Jacksonville
players who could make
Denver's roster "When
things aren't going well
you try to find challenges
throughout, and obviously
the Broncos are No. 1 in
rush defense, so that's a
big challenge for us."
Not to mention slowing
down an offense averaging
46 points a game.
"Obviously facing an of-
fense that's playing at the
highest level of anybody in
the league, but we try not
to get too caught up on
that," first year coach Gus
Bradley said. "It's more
about what we need to do
and what we can get ac-
complished."
The Broncos can accom-
plish a 17-game regular-
season winning streak
dating back to last Oct. 15.
New Orleans (5-0)
at New England (4-1)
As juicy a quarterback
matchup as you can find.
Well, it would be if Tom
Brady had anywhere near
the complement of players
Drew Brees has on of-
fense. At least Brady might
get back outstanding tight
end Rob Gronkowski from
a myriad of injuries and
surgeries.
"I just want us to score
points, so whatever it takes
to score points, that's what


matters," said Brady,
whose Patriots managed
only six in last week's loss
at Cincinnati. "I think you
let your emotions get into
it and feelings and so forth
- I mean realistically, you
have to come up with a
plan we have to figure out
to score points."
New Orleans has had no
such issues. Brees has
Marques Colston, Darren
Sproles, Pierre Thomas
and a pretty fair tight end,
too, in Jimmy Graham. He
also, for the first time in a
long while, has a solid de-
fense on his side.
Oakland (2-3)
at Kansas City (5-0)
This once was the bitter-
est rivalry in the NFL, but
now far less hostile be-
cause, in general, both
teams have struggled for
nearly a decade. Andy
Reid has turned things
around so quickly in KC -
remember, the Chiefs were
2-14 in 2012 and the first
team to go 5-0 the next
year- that some folks see
the Chiefs hanging with
the Broncos all season in
the AFC West.
Oakland comes off its
most impressive win since
Dennis Allen became
coach at the beginning of
last season, 27-17 over San
Diego.
Washington (1-3)
at Dallas (2-3)
One thing the Cowboys
absolutely must do is put
behind the pain of last
weekend's loss to Denver
Should the offense per-
form in the same manner,
particularly the line and
QB Tony Romo, Dallas will
have too much for Wash-


ington to handle. But that
is a huge if.
Like the rest of the NFC
East, neither team has a
decent defense. The
rested Redskins need
Robert Griffin III to ap-
proach his top offensive
rookie form of 2016 and to
get versatile running back
Alfred Morris more room
to roam.
Green Bay (2-2)
at Baltimore (3-2)
The Packers looked
strong enough coming off
their bye to change the
outlook for Cheeseheads
to something more posi-
tive. A win at Baltimore,
particularly without star
linebacker Clay Matthews,
would brighten things
even more.
But Green Bay must find
a way to block Terrell
Suggs, who has stepped up
on the transitioning
Ravens defense and has a
sack in five straight games.
"He's one of the premier
guys in the league at his
position, and he proves it
every year," Packers quar-
terback Aaron Rodgers
said. "He's a guy you've got
to account for in the run
game, you've got to account
for in the passing game.
You've got to make sure
you don't let him get off,
but that's obviously easier
said than done. He's had a
great start to the season."
Tennessee (3-2)
at Seattle (4-1)
The Seahawks finish
their trip through the AFC
South, having beaten
Houston and Jacksonville
and lost to Indianapolis in
the last three weeks. The
34-28 defeat at Indy was


only Seattle's second in
the regular season since
last October
No place in the NFL is
tougher to visit than Seat-
tle, but the Titans played
well on the road before
winning two of three at
home. Of course, they now
have backup quarterback
Ryan Fitzpatrick in for in-
jured starter Jake Locker
Arizona (3-2)
at San Francisco (3-2)
Two pretty solid de-
fenses hook up, and a Car-
dinals win will stamp them
as a contender in the NFC
West. They've allowed 16
points in the last two
weeks, but that was against
Tampa Bay and Carolina.
The Niners, who seemed
to straighten out their of-
fense in a win over the
Rams and have been off
since that Thursday night
game, are a much bigger
challenge.
The 49ers play four of
their next five on the road,
so winning here, particu-
larly against a division foe,
is paramount.
Indianapolis (4-1)
at San Diego (2-3)
The mantra throughout
the NFL is that teams
never look beyond the cur-
rent week. The Colts can
prove that true beyond
doubt with a strong per-
formance against the
Chargers, because Indy's
next game is Manning's re-
turn to Lucas Oil Stadium.
San Diego seemed to be
on the right track before
getting derailed at Oak-
land. The Chargers can't
stop the pass, but can
throw the ball with any-
one.


NFL Statistics CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
and 4 1 0 .800 95
3 2 0 .600 98 1
3 2 0 .600 114 1
2 3 0 .400 112 1
South
W L T Pct PF
Ais 4 1 0 .800 139
e 3 2 0 .600 115
2 3 0 .400 93 1
lie 0 5 0 .000 51 1
North
W L T Pct PF
3 2 0 .600 117 1
3 2 0 .600 101
3 2 0 .600 94
S 0 4 0 .000 69 1
West
W L T Pct PF
5 0 0 1.000 230 1
ity 5 0 0 1.000 128
2 3 0 .400 98 1
1 2 3 0 .400 125 1
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
hia 2 3 0 .400 135 1
2 3 0 .400 152 1
wn 1 3 0 .250 91 1
ts 0 6 0 .000 103 2
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 5 0 0 1.000 134
1 3 0 .250 74
1 4 0 .200 122 1
ay 0 4 0 .000 44
North
W L T Pct PF
4 2 0 .667 172 1
3 2 0 .600 131 1
y 2 2 0 .500 118
S 1 3 0 .250 115 1
West
W L T Pct PF
4 1 0 .800 137
cisco 3 2 0 .600 113
3 2 0 .600 91
2 3 0 .400 103 1


Thursday's Game
Chicago 27, N.Y Giants 21
Today's Games
Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami
Monday's Game
Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 17
Seattle at Arizona, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 20
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Chicago atWashington, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
New England at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Detroit, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
San Francisco at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m.
Open: New Orleans, Oakland
Monday, Oct. 21
Minnesota at N.Y Giants, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders


P Manning, DEN
P Rivers, SND
Locker, TEN
Pryor, OAK
Luck, IND
Tannehill, MIA
Roethlisberger, PI
Ale. Smith, KAN
Dalton, CIN
Hoyer, CLE


Week 5
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds
198 150 1884
191 141 1610
111 69 721
104 71 845
156 97 1144
182 114 1383
T 162 103 1231
185 108 1202
175 114 1215
96 57 615


Rushers
Att Yds Avg
J. Charles, KAN 92 397 4.32
A. Foster, HOU 97 390 4.02
Moreno, DEN 65 331 5.09
Powell, NYJ 78 330 4.23
F Jackson, BUF 65 309 4.75
Spiller, BUF 74 296 4.00
Chr.Johnson,TEN 94 294 3.13
T. Richardson, IND 82 256 3.12
Be.Tate, HOU 41 256 6.24
Ry. Mathews, SND 67 234 3.49
Receivers
No Yds Avg
And. Johnson, HOU 37 407 11.0
Edelman, NWE 36 354 9.8
De. Thomas, DEN 34 450 13.2
Cameron, CLE 33 396 12.0
A. Gates, SND 32 438 13.7
An. Brown, PIT 32 412 12.9
Shorts, JAX 31 411 13.3
A..Green, CIN 31 361 11.6
Welker, DEN 31 315 10.2
Woodhead, SND 31 220 7.1
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Doss, BAL 13 217 16.7
Benjamin, CLE 17 256 15.1
Holliday, DEN 14 200 14.3
McCluster, KAN 21 285 13.6
Edelman, NWE 15 176 11.7
Leonhard, BUF 7 63 9.0
Reynaud, TEN 16 136 8.5
Kerley, NYJ 8 63 7.9
An. Brown, PIT 6 45 7.5
Hilton, IND 9 65 7.2
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
D.Thompson, BAL 7 201 28.7
K. Martin, HOU 17 447 26.3
Thigpen, MIA 10 262 26.2
F Jones, PIT 8 194 24.3
Br.Tate,CIN 9 217 24.1
J. Ford, OAK 10 235 23.5
Reynaud, TEN 7 161 23.0
C. Gates, NYJ 7 153 21.9
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
Welker, DEN 7 0 7
Ju.Thomas, DEN 6 0 6
Cameron, CLE 5 0 5
J. Charles, KAN 5 3 2


Royal, SND
F Jackson, BUF
Moreno, DEN
De. Thomas, DEN
Bernard, CIN
Ma. Brown, BAL

M. Prater, DEN
Gostkowski, NWE
Tucker, BAL
Succop, KAN
D. Carpenter, BUF
Folk, NYJ
Sturgis, MIA
Novak, SND
Vinatieri, IND
Bironas, TEN


Romo,DAL
Brees, NOR
A. Rodgers, GBY
M. Ryan, ATL
M. Stafford, DET
Cutler, CHI
R.Wilson, SEA
Vick, PHL
S. Bradford, STL
Griffin III, WAS

L. McCoy, PHL
A. Peterson, MIN
Lynch, SEA
D. Murray, DAL
Gore, SNF
Forte, CHI
D. Martin, TAM
De. Williams, CAR
Vick, PHL
Re. Bush, DET

Ju. Jones, ATL
J. Graham, NOR
Gonzalez, ATL
Cruz, NYG
B. Marshall, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL


5 0
4 4
4 4
4 0
3 2
3 0
Kicking
PAT
29-29
8-8 13
12-12 11
14-14 10
9-9 11
9-9 11
12-12 10
14-14 9
14-14 9
13-13 8


NFC leaders


Week 5
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
188 135
201 140
152 1011
218 1511
196 125
181 119
127 74
132 71
216 1261
170 106
Rushers
Att Yds
98 514
92 421
96 410
84 399
78 376
81 375
100 342
74 330
33 307
61 298
Receivers
No Yds
41 580
37 593
33 339
31 473
31 378
29 423


Garcon, WAS 29 339 11.7
De. Jackson, PHL 28 525 18.8
Jeffery, CHI 28 429 15.3
WittenDAL 28 313 11.2
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
G.Tate, SEA 15 186 12.4
Ginn Jr., CAR 5 48 9.6
Spurlock, DET 11 105 9.5
Sproles, NOR 12 104 8.7
Page, TAM 8 69 8.6
Dam. Johnson, PHL 7 59 8.4
Ky. Williams, SNF 7 50 7.1
R. Randle, NYG 12 76 6.3
Douglas, ATL 10 57 5.7
R Peterson,ARI 9 51 5.7
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
C.Patterson,MIN 12 406 33.8
Hester, CHI 16 502 31.4
Ginn Jr., CAR 5 143 28.6
Dw. Harris, DAL 7 199 28.4
Dam. Johnson, PHL 12 317 26.4
D.Wilson, NYG 9 222 24.7
B. Cunningham, STL 10 243 24.3
Spurlock, DET 7 140 20.0
C.Thompson, WAS 8 160 20.0
J.Ross, GBY 6 75 12.5


D. Bryant, DAL
J. Graham, NOR
A. Peterson, MIN
Cruz, NYG
Ve. Davis, SNF
Cal. Johnson, DET
Lynch, SEA
Pettis, STL
Forte, CHI
B. Marshall, CHI

Hartley, NOR
Hauschka, SEA
Henery, PHL
D. Bailey, DAL
Akers, DET
Crosby, GBY
M. Bryant, ATL
Gould, CHI
Walsh, MIN
Feely, ARI


Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush
6 0
6 0
6 5
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 3
4 0
3 3
3 0
Kicking
PAT I
14-14 12-
13-13 12-
13-13 12-
15-15 9-
14-14 9-
13-13 S
14-14
13-14
13-13
8-8 9-


New EngIl
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi

Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

Denver
Kansas C
Oakland
San Diegi


Philadelph
Dallas
Washingti
N.Y Giant

New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba

Chicago
Detroit
Green Ba
Minnesota

Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis


44 2
61t 3
58 2
27 3

LG TD
33 0
12 0
57 0
28 0
28 0
21 0
22 0
14 0
15 0
10 0

LG TD
105t 1
80 0
38 0
35 0
33 0
31 0
32 0
23 0
28 0
21 0


Chargers defensive co-
ordinator John Pagano is
the brother of Colts coach
Chuck Pagano.
St Louis (2-3)
at Houston (2-3)
Turmoil in Texas, with
Houston among the
league's biggest disap-
pointments. Now, tight end
Owen Daniels is gone with
a broken leg, although he
could return later in the
schedule. That won't make
reviving Matt Schaub's ca-
reer any easier
The Rams will be sali-
vating at the thought of get-
ting yet another pick-6 off
Schaub. They also ought to
be figuring out where to
find a running game and
how to stop the run.
Cincinnati (3-2)
at Buffalo (2-3)
After edging the Patriots
in a monsoon in Cincin-
nati, maybe the Bengals
are wishing for an early
blizzard in Buffalo. But
they have lost six straight
at Ralph Wilson Stadium.
What they will get is
untested Thad Lewis, up
from the practice squad,
behind center for the Bills.
Expect a heavy dose of ag-
gressive defensive calls
from coordinator Mike
Zimmer
Detroit (3-2)
at Cleveland (3-2)
The Lions are not nearly
the same dynamic club
away from Ford Field, and
the Browns have a defense
good enough to stymie any-
one. Critical is having star
WR Calvin Johnson back
after he missed the loss in
Green Bay with a knee in-
jury If it doesn't happen,
Cleveland could replicate
the five sacks the Packers
got on Matthew Stafford.
The Browns have won
three in a row and have
shown great fortitude in
their turnabout.
Pittsburgh (04)
at New York Jets (3-2)
Coming off that uplift-
ing, last-second win at At-
lanta, the Jets should be
looking forward to hosting
the winless Steelers.
There are some other ele-
ments at work here,
though: New York comes
off a short week; Pitts-
burgh comes off a bye that
helped it heal a bit; and
the Steelers are 18-4
against the Jets.
Steelers are seeking
600th win in franchise his-
tory
Carolina (1-3)
at Minnesota (1-3)
Last time we saw the
Vikings, they were across
the pond in Wembley,
whipping the Steelers. If
they are to make any kind
of a run in the NFC North,
they need 2012 MVP
Adrian Peterson to be a
game changer once more.
He was that in London.
Carolina looked great in
its 38-0 demolition of the
Giants, then gave up seven
sacks and turned it over
four times in a 22-6 loss at
Arizona. Coach Ron
Rivera is asking for some
consistency










Nittany Lions prevail


Penn St. takes I L.-W ft W


down Michigan

infour OTs

Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Bill
Belton ran for a 2-yard touch-
down in the fourth overtime to
lift Penn State past No. 18 Michi-
gan 43-40 in maybe the biggest
win in coach Bill O'Brien's two
seasons with the Nittany Lions.
Penn State's Christian Hack-
enberg was sensational in regu-
lation on the tying drive,
completing passes of 29 yards to
Brandon Felder and 33 yards to
Allen Robinson to bring the ball
to the 1 with 29 seconds left.
The freshman quarterback
sneaked in for the first rushing
TD against Michigan this season,
tying the game at 34-all.
Brendan Gibbons kicked two
field goals and missed two one
was blocked in OT for the
Wolverines (5-1, 1-1). Sam Ficken
kicked two, and didn't need to at-
tempt a fourth, thanks to fourth-
down conversion by Penn State
The Nittany Lions (4-2, 1-1 Big
Ten) stormed the field in wild
celebration, sending more than
100,000 fans into a frenzy
Utah 27,
No. 5 Stanford 21
SALT LAKE CITY-- Utah's de-
fense made a goal-line stand in the
final minute and Dres Anderson
scored twice, helping the Utes to
their biggest upset at home as they
held off No. 5 Stanford 27-21.
This marked the first time in
school history the Utes (4-2, 1-2 Pac-
12) have knocked off a top-five pro-
gram at Rice-Eccles Stadium. They
beat No. 4 Alabama in the Sugar
Bowl following the 2008 season.
The fans rushed the field after the
final gun.
Kevin Hogan marched the Cardi-
nal down to the 6, but on fourth
down, amid heavy pressure, he
overthrew his intended target. The
Utes took a knee to end the game


Associated Press
Penn State running back Bill Belton celebrates after scoring against Michigan in the fourth overtime Saturday in State College, Pa. Penn
State won 43-40.


and the 13-game winning streak of
Stanford (5-1, 3-1).
No. 20 Texas Tech 42,
Iowa State 35
LUBBOCK, Texas Backup
quarterback Davis Webb threw for
three touchdowns and 415 yards in
place of the injured Baker Mayfield
to lead Texas Tech.
Webb was 35 for 56 with an inter-
ception and Kenny Williams, DeAn-
dre Washington and Sadale Foster
each ran for a score for Texas Tech
(6-0, 3-0 Big 12). The Red Raiders
are bowl eligible at the earliest date
since 2008 in their first season
under coach Kliff Kingsbury.
The Cyclones (1-4, 0-2) got a 95-
yard kickoff return and 38-yard punt
return from Jarvis West, and 12
points off three turnovers by the
Red Raiders.
The Cyclones pulled to 42-35 on a


touchdown pass from Sam Richard-
son to E. J. Bibbs with less than 2
minutes left. Richardson was 15 for
38 for 168 yards and a touchdown.
No. 23 N. Illinois 27,
Akron 20
DE KALB, III.- Jordan Lynch
threw for two touchdowns and ran
for another as No. 23 Northern Illi-
nois extended its home winning
streak to 23 games with a 27-20
Mid-American victory over Akron.
Lynch was 16 of 35 for 220 yards
passing and ran for 83 more.
Cameron Stingily rushed 21 times
for 80 yards and a touchdown and
Tyler Wedel added field goals of 42
and 21 yards for the Huskies (6-0, 2-
0 MAC East).
Jawan Chisholm scored on a pair
of 1-yard first half runs for Akron (1-
6, 0-3) and ran 20 times for 70
yards. Kyle Pohl was 24 of 56 for


262 yards.
The home winning streak is the
nation's current longest. A 34-31
loss to Idaho on Sept 26, 2009 was
Northern Illinois' more recent defeat
at Huskie Stadium.
No. 24 Virginia Tech 19,
Pittsburgh 9
BLACKSBURG, Va. Logan
Thomas threw an early touchdown
pass, Cody Journell kicked four field
goals and Virginia Tech sacked Pitts-
burgh's Tom Savage eight times.
The Hokies (6-1, 3-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) won their sixth
straight game and ended a four-
game losing streak against the Pan-
thers, avenging a 35-17 loss a year
ago that sent Virginia Tech into a
long skid.
This time, they proved just as in-
hospitable hosts to the ACC new-
comer Panthers (3-2, 2-2).


Savage, who tied an ACC record
with six touchdown passes three
weeks ago in a 58-55 victory against
Duke, never had much of a chance
to get wide receivers Devin Street
and Tyler Boyd into the game.
Savage's sacks totaled minus-49
yards, and he has been sacked 15
times in his past two appearances.
No. 1 Alabama 48,
Kentucky 7
LEXINGTON, Ky. T.J. Yeldon
and Kenyan Drake each ran for two
touchdowns to help top-ranked Ala-
bama blowout Kentucky 48-7.
After a scoreless first quarter
thanks to fumbles by the running
backs and dropped passes in Ken-
tucky territory, the Crimson Tide
(6-0, 3-0 Southeastern Conference)
scored on their last eight posses-
sions and outgained the Wildcats
(1-5, 0-3) 668-170.


USF upends



Connecticut


Associated Press
EAST HARTFORD,
Conn. Marvin Kloss hit
two field goals, and Aaron
Lynch returned a fumble
44 yards for a touchdown
as South Florida beat
UConn 13-10 on Saturday
It was the Bulls' second
consecutive win without
an offensive touchdown.
USF (2-4) is 2-0 in the
American Athletic Confer-
ence after beating Cincin-
nati last week.
Kloss' 44-yard field goal
with just over 4 minutes


UF
Continued from Page B1

LSU's defense "had too
many free runners at the
quarterback," Florida
coach Will Muschamp said.
"My initial thoughts are
there was too much pres-
sure. We've got to protect
(Murphy) better"
Murphy blamed himself.
"I really have to work on
getting rid of the ball
quicker," he said.
The Tigers had eight de-
fensive players selected in
last spring's NFL draft,
forcing coordinator John
Chavis to remake his unit
with a lot of youth and in-
experience. It showed two
weeks earlier in a 44-41
loss at Georgia, and again
when the Tigers allowed 23
points in the first half of
last week's victory at Mis-
sissippi State.
But LSU allowed only a
field goal in the second half
a week ago, a promising
sign for a unit that has now
gone six quarters without
allowing a touchdown.
"Our guys did a tremen-
dous job and I'm proud
and it was fun watching
them play again," Chavis
said. "For the last two
weeks we have focused on
one simple thing: Do your
job; count on the guy be-
side you; count on the guy
behind you; and count on
the guy in front of you."


left capped a more than 7
minute fourth-quarter
drive, and was the game
winner It was his ninth
consecutive field goal. He
had a 47-yarder in the first
half.
Lyle McCombs had a ca-
reer-high 164 yards rush-
ing and a touchdown for
Connecticut, which has
lost five straight to open a
season for the first time
since 1977. The loss
spoiled the debuts of in-
terim coach TJ. Weist and
freshman quarterback
Tim Boyle.

LSU never seemed truly
threatened, but Florida
made it a one possession
game on Francisco Velez's
second field goal, a 27-
yarder that cut it to 14-6
with 12:11 to go.
The Tigers responded by
going to Hill, who carried
four times for 45 yards -
including a gain of 26 yards
to the Florida 19 to set
up Colby Delahoussaye's
31-yard field goal with 7:58
left
The sequence left
Muschamp frustrated with
his normally dominant
defense.
"You can call whatever
defense you want to call,
kids have got to get off
blocks and make a play,"
Muschamp said. "Our guys
have got to accept that."
Needing two scores,
Florida started to gamble.
On fourth-and-5 from the
Gators 30, punter Kyle
Christy converted a fake,
hitting Demarcus Robin-
son over the middle for a
14-yard gain. Murphy then
converted a fourth-and-9
with a 15-yard pass to
Ahmad Fulwood at the
LSU 20.
That's when the Tigers'
defense clamped down
and sealed the game.
First came a sack on a
blitz by Mills for a loss of 12
yards, which forced a des-
perate fourth-and-27.
Beckwith's sack then gave
the ball back to the Tigers
for good.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 2 Ducks take care of No, 16 Huskies


Texas, Missouri

score major upsets

Associated Press

SEATTLE Marcus Mariota
threw for 366 yards and three
touchdowns, added another 88
yards and a TD rushing, and No. 2
Oregon won its 10th straight over
over No. 16 Washington 45-24.
Mariota's passing was nearly
spotless, he used his legs to
make the Huskies pay when
throwing options were covered
and was easily the best player
on the field. Mariota completed
24 of 31 passes, and ran another
13 times. He threw touchdowns
of 4 yards to Bralon Addison
and a 65-yarder to Josh Huff on
the first possession of the sec-
ond half for the Ducks (6-0, 3-0
Pac-12). Huff had to be carted to
the locker room with an appar-
ent right leg injury in the first
half, only to come back after
halftime and burn the Huskies
secondary
Bishop Sankey ran for 167
yards and touchdowns of 60 and
25 yards for Washington (4-2, 1-2),
but had a costly first-half fumble.
No. 3 Clemson 24,
Boston College 14
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd ran
for the go-ahead touchdown in the
fourth quarter and defensive end Vic
Beasley followed with a 13-yard fum-
ble recovery score to keep Clemson
undefeated and on track for next
week's Atlantic Coast Conference
showdown with Florida State.


The Tigers (6-0, 4-0 ACC) were
out of synch offensively most of the
game and trailed 14-10 entering the
final period. That's when Boyd led
the 48-yard drive that ended with his
6-yard rush into the end zone to put
Clemson on top.
When Boston College got the ball
back, Chase Rettig fumbled when
sacked by linebacker Tony Steward
and Beasley was there to scoop up
the ball and put the Tigers up 24-14
over the Eagles (3-3, 1-2).
Boyd also had a touchdown pass
and finished with 334 yards passing
to become the school's all-time
leader in passing yards.
No. 25 Missouri 41,
No. 7 Georgia 26
ATHENS, Ga. Receiver Bud
Sasser threw a 40-yard touchdown
pass to L'Damian Washington in the
fourth quarter after quarterback
James Franklin left with a shoulder
injury and Missouri held off Georgia.
Missouri led by 18 points in the
first half before Georgia cut the lead
to 28-26 in the fourth quarter.
The Tigers answered the chal-
lenge with two late touchdowns de-
spite losing Franklin to a shoulder
injury.
After Franklin was taken to the
locker room, freshman backup Maty
Mauk threw a lateral to Sasser, who
stopped and tossed a deep to the
end zone for Washington. Washing-
ton, who outfought cornerback
Damian Swann for the catch, had
115 yards and two touchdowns.
James Ponder's interception of
Aaron Murray's pass with 4:25 remain-
ing set up Henry Josey's 7-yard touch-
down run to end Georgia's hopes.


Associated Press
Oregon's Byron Marshall, left, celebrates after scoring against
Washington on Saturday in Seattle.


Murray threw for 290 yards and
three touchdowns.
Texas 36,
No. 12 Oklahoma 20
DALLAS Case McCoy threw
two touchdowns, defensive tackle
Chris Whaley returned an intercep-
tion 31 yards for a score and Texas
beat 12th-ranked Oklahoma.
It was the first win for McCoy and
these Texas seniors over the Sooners.
Texas never trailed after Whaley's
impressive touchdown play in the
first quarter.
Oklahoma had won three in a row
in the series, the last two by at least
38 points.
Daje Johnson had an 85-yard punt
return for a TD for Texas. Johnathan
Gray had 123 yards rushing and
Malcolm Brown had 120.
McCoy completed 13 of 21 passes
for 190 yards with an interception,
which defensive lineman Geneo


Grissom returned 54 yards for a
score in the fourth quarter for OU.
Blake Bell completed 12 of 26
passes for 133 yards with two inter-
ceptions for Oklahoma.
No. 14 S. Carolina 52,
Arkansas 7
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Connor
Shaw threw for 219 yards and ac-
counted for four touchdowns as
South Carolina dominated.
Mike Davis added 128 yards rush-
ing on 19 carries for the Gamecocks
(5-1, 3-1 Southeastern Conference),
who won their fourth straight game
after a loss to Georgia on Sept. 7.
All-America defensive end Jade-
veon Clowney returned after missing
last week's game against Kentucky
and had one tackle for South Car-
olina, which outgained the Razor-
backs 537-248.
The loss was the fourth straight
for Arkansas (3-4, 0-3), matching


first-year coach Bret Bielema's
longest losing streak of his career.
No. 15 Baylor 35,
Kansas State 25
MANHATTAN, Kan. Bryce
Petty threw for 342 yards and three
touchdowns, Ahmad Dixon made a
critical interception late in the fourth
quarter and Baylor held on to win.
Tevin Reese had five catches for
184 yards and two scores, and
Antwan Goodley had five catches
for 139 yards and another touch-
down for the Bears (5-0, 2-0 Big 12),
who ran their winning streak to nine
games dating to their win over
Kansas State last season.
The Wildcats (2-4, 0-3), behind
199 yards and three rushing TDs by
quarterback Daniel Sams, took a 25-
21 lead in the third quarter. But they
missed a tying field-goal attempt in
the fourth quarter and then Sams
threw an interception on their ensu-
ing possession that allowed the
Bears to escape.
Wisconsin 35,
No. 19 Northwestern 6
MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gor-
don ran for a 71-yard touchdown
and Chris Borland led a fierce de-
fense that figured out Northwest-
ern's high-octane offense.
The Badgers (4-2, 2-1 Big Ten)
had seven sacks before a raucous
homecoming weekend crowd. Jared
Abbrederis burned the secondary for
a 63-yard touchdown reception be-
fore leaving with a head injury.
Northwestern (4-2, 0-2) the
league's peskiest defense, forced
three more turnovers to increase its
season total to 17.


BUCS
Continued from Page BI

more to their strengths, but
the general understanding
in what we do offensively
doesn't change," Kelly said.
"It didn't change when
Nick went in the game
against the Giants."
Foles led the Eagles
back from an 11-point
fourth-quarter deficit
against the Bucs last sea-
son, finishing with 381
yards passing, including a
winning 1-yard touchdown
pass to Jeremy Maclin on
the final play
Bucs defensive tackle


Gerald McCoy called Foles
an "underrated passer, un-
derrated athlete."
"He beat us a lot last
year with his legs, his
scrambling ability, and I
think people underesti-
mate his athletic ability
because he plays next to a
Mike Vick. But that guy's
good. .. We have a tough
test ahead of us."
Five things to watch for
as the Eagles try to climb
to .500, and the Bucs seek
their first win:
Rookie under
pressure
Mike Glennon makes his
second pro start for the
Bucs, who released quar-


terback Josh Freeman last
week. Thanks to a bye the
third-round draft pick has
had extra time to prepare
for the Eagles. He was
steady, rarely throwing the
ball downfield for three
quarters of his debut
against Arizona. But a
fumble and two intercep-
tions in the fourth quarter
helped the Cardinals pull
out a 13-10 win.
Eagles rush
The Eagles have strug-
gled defensively, ranking
31st among 32 teams. But if
they can mount a consis-
tent pass rush against an
offensive line weakened by
the absence of guard Carl


Nicks (MRSA), they could
cause problems for Glen-
non. 'Any quarterback that
has the opportunity to sit
back there and survey the
defense and take their
time and not feel any pres-
sure is going to be success-
ful," Kelly said.
Revis island
Eagles receiver DeSean
Jackson made headlines
when he was quoted say-
ing he's faster than Tampa
Bay's Darrelle Revis, gen-
erally regarded as the
league's best cornerback.
Revis responded that
Jackson's right. "I'm not
fast. I've never been fast....
Fast people are allowed to


say those types of things."
Revis also said speed
doesn't matter "I've cov-
ered him before in the past
and it was a good battle....
I'm not here to discuss
who's the fastest. I'm not
running for the Olympics,
and he's not either I'm just
here to compete and play"
Run Shady, run
Philadelphia RB
LeSean McCoy is averag-
ing over 5 yards per carry
and is the NFEs leading
rusher with 514 yards.
"Shady is running at an in-
credible level," Bucs


coach Greg Schiano said.
Tampa Bay is ninth in run
defense (94.3 yards per
game) after leading the
league last season.
What might
have been
Kelly turned down an
offer to leave Oregon for
the Bucs before Tampa Bay
hired Schiano after the
2011 season. "I looked at it
very hard. I was very im-
pressed. ... My decision to
not take that job was totally
about the University of
Oregon, not the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers," Kelly said.


LUS1C

U at mhe
uaseulm
Prouidb Present *


Johnny Carlsson


Salute to the
King of Swing

Thursday, Oct 17
Limited seating.
Reservations necessary.
Call: 352-341-6427
)O0FMIE


Tickets $20 perperson
,,. ,',, '.. ,' :.. ; & Cash Bar
at 1912 Citrus County
Courthouse, Inverness
Doors open at 6:00p.m.
Music starts pli,,, at 7p.m.


Ci IIKpNi LE
Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CITRUS COUNTYHISTORIcAL SOCIETY


r 20th Annual

SPORTSMAN'S
E SHOWCASE
r-' ~9am to 6pm

Fri., Oct. 18 Sun., Oct. 20th
Save A Lot Plaza US Hwy. 19 Crystal River


DEALERS
Apopka Marine
Aardvarks Florida Kayak Co.
Como RV
Crystal River Marine
Gist RV Sales
Gulf to Lake Marine
Harberson RV-Pinellas
Homosassa Marine
Love Honda
Lure Man


INCLUDE
Nature Coast RV
Nick Nicholas Ford
Lincoln-Crystal River
Riverhaven Marine
Seatow Crystal River
Three Rivers Marine
Tow Boat U.S.
Twin Rivers Marina
USCG Auxiliary
C.R. Sail & Power Squadron


Proceeds benefit local chaitable organizations
supported by Kings Bay Rotary Foundation
Cj IOhr'E www.kingsbayrotary.org


B6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Congress is letting down the country


t would be nice to think
that the nonsense going
on in Washington
doesn't impact our lives in
little old Citrus County. But
it does.
The shutdown of the fed-
eral government is an em-
barrassment to our
reputation throughout the
world. It's an insult to our
Founding Fathers who
worked so hard to create a
process that could with-


stand the tomfoolery of the
centuries.
Closer to home, the shut-
down means that federal
workers are off the job and
the entire economy is
coughing and spitting its
way toward a recession.
Somehow, in our tea
party-inspired anger at gov-
ernment, we have somehow
dismissed all government
employees as lazy and
meaningless.


They are not.
Do you realize that, in Cit-
rus and Sumter counties,
we have hundreds of fed-
eral workers who go to one
of the nation's largest pris-
ons to work each day?
Even though our incom-
petent Congress can't get its
act together, the federal
prison workers must go to
work each day to guard the
dangerous felons we have
put behind bars.


But they're not getting
paid. They're getting IOUs
from Uncle Sam.
I wonder if the grocery
store or electric companies
are good with that.
And even though our
prison guards must go to
work and not get paid, they
are also not covered by in-
surance. If they get injured
on the job right now, they're
out of luck.
The members of Congress


are still getting paid they
have themselves covered.
The park workers at the
federal wildlife refuge are
on leave and the refuges are
without supervision.
I wonder if the manatees
have been informed that no
one is looking after them.
The bigger fear is what
this Congressional incom-
petence will do to the
See Page C3


America






doesn't


stack


up


It's long been known that America's school kids
haven't measured well compared with international
peers. Now, there's a new twist: Adults don't either.
In math, reading and problem-solving using
technology all skills considered critical for global
competitiveness and economic strength American
adults scored below the international average on a
global test, according to results released Tuesday.


Kimberly Hefting
Associated Press


U.S. adults score


global test


dults in Japan, Canada,
Australia, Finland and
multiple other countries
scored significantly
higher than the United
States in all three areas
on the test. Beyond basic reading
and math, respondents were tested
on activities such as calculating
mileage reimbursement due to a
salesman, sorting email and compar-
ing food expiration dates on grocery
store tags.
Not only did Americans score
poorly compared to many interna-
tional competitors, the findings rein-
forced just how large the gap is
between the nation's high- and low-
skilled workers and how hard it is to
move ahead when your parents
haven't.
In both reading and math, for ex-
ample, those with college-educated
parents did better than those whose
parents did not complete high school.
The study, called the Program for
the International Assessment of
Adult Competencies, found that it


U.S. adults lag in reading, math skills
Adults in Japan and Finland scored highest in an international test measuring life skills such
as reading, math and problem solving, while those in the United States scored below average.


READING SKILLS
1. J P ,, 296
2. F ',.I ---,J 2,8
3. lj-".-. ,.J. 2E.4
)4.- ...h 2
5. .,-.J- ,, 279
Average 273
16. O.S.


MATH SKILLS
1 .,;.!. 288
2. Fi,,,,J 28-
3 F l, ,, 2 & J
-I1,,.,,,,
4. Ij-ii.,.i,,,J: 2",0
5. .,eJe,, 27c
Average 269
21. U.S.


PROBLEM SOLVING
1. J i|;.., 294
2. F.I.....J 2. ,?
3. ,-,.,1; ii ,i 2E?9
4 ., 2,J 8,, o-
5. 1 2..6, 26
Average 283
17. U.S.


NOTE: Tests scored on a 500-point scale. U.S. scores are based on nationally representative sample of 5,000
adults between 16 and 65 years old.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education A


was easier on average to overcome
this and other barriers to literacy
overseas than in the United States.
Researchers tested about 166,000
people ages 16 to 65 in more than
20 countries and subnational regions.


The test was developed and released
by the Organization for Economic Co-
operation and Development, which is
made up of mostly industrialized
member countries. The Education
Department's Center for Education


Statistics participated.
The findings were equally grim for
many European countries Italy
and Spain, among the hardest hit by
the recession and debt crisis, ranked
at the bottom across generations. Un-
employment is well over 25 percent
in Spain and over 12 percent in Italy
Spain has drastically cut education
spending, drawing student street
protests.
But in the northern European
countries that have fared better, the
picture was brighter and the study
credits continuing education. In Fin-
land, Denmark, and the Netherlands,
more than 60 percent of adults took
part in either job training or continu-
ing education. In Italy by contrast,
the rate was half that
As the American economy sputters
along and many people live pay-
check-to-paycheck, economists say a
highly-skilled workforce is key to
economic recovery The median
hourly wage of workers scoring on
See Page 03


At a glance:
* Americans scored toward the bottom in the category
of problem solving in a technology-rich environment.
The top five scores in the areas were from Japan,
Finland, Australia, Sweden and Norway, while the
U.S. score was on par with England, Estonia, Ireland
and Poland. In nearly all countries, at least 10 percent
of adults lacked the most basic of computer skills such
as using a mouse.
* In England, Germany, Italy, Poland and the United
States, social background has a big impact on literacy
skills, meaning the children of parents with low levels


of education have lower reading skills.
* Japanese and Dutch adults who were ages 25 to 34
and only completed high school easily outperformed
Italian or Spanish university graduates of the same
age.
* Japan, Finland, Canada, Netherlands, Australia,
Sweden, Norway, Flanders-Belgium, Czech Republic,
Slovak Republic and Korea all scored significantly
higher than the United States in all three areas on the
test.
* The average scores in literacy range from 250 in Italy


to 296 in Japan. The U.S. average score was 270. (500
was the highest score in all three areas.) Average
scores in 12 countries were higher than the average
U.S. score.
* The average scores in math range from 246 in Spain
to 288 in Japan. The U.S. average score was 253, below
18 other countries.
* The average scores on problem solving in technology-
rich environments ranged from 275 in Poland to 294 in
Japan. The U.S. average score was 277, below 14 other
countries.


Online: http'/www.oecd.org/site/piaac/publications.htm


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW





OPage C2- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13,2013



PINION


"The consequences of our action take
hold of us quite indifferent to our
claim that meanwhile we have
'improved.'"
Friedrich Nietzsche, 1844-1900


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SELF-INFLICTED WOUND



Plenty of blame


to go around


in country's latest


political squabble


he only thing Republi-
cans and Democrats
have proven in their
latest budget battle is this
country is woefully short on
leadership.
Through its leaders' dys-
function and inac-
tion the U.S.
government has THE I
ground to halt and Gover
raised the anger shut
of its citizenry.
Congress' ap- OUR O1
proval poll has
dropped to five Lac
percent. Most (62 leaders
percent) say Re- cou
publicans are to
blame, but Democrats and
President Obama do not fare
much better with 49 percent
saying they are to blame.
A greater issue is it seems
each side is more concerned
with ideology than what's
best for the country as a
whole most likely a prod-
uct of gerrymandered dis-
tricts that promise easy
re-election campaigns. Out of
the 435 House seats, about 49
are rated as competitive ac-
cording to the Rothenberg
Political Report a fraction
over 11 percent. That means
no matter how bad the House
mucks up the political
process, 89 percent of them
will safely be reinstated to
foul up the country for an-
other two years, and so on.
If the two sides cannot
agree, larger consequences
loom like swollen, purplish-
black rainclouds.
Economists overwhelming
predict a recession if the gov-
ernment's ability to borrow
isn't renewed later this
month with an increase in the
debt limit.
President Obama had to
cancel his trip to the Asian
Pacific Economic Conference
hampering U.S. efforts
to counter the emergence
of China as an economic


A call for help
Today, I got an education. My
doctor moved from one office to
another. His telephone number
is not in the new telephone di-
rectory, so I had to resort to
calling 411. When I called 411, I
got at least 30 seconds
of advertising for insur-
ance and other compa- ,
nies. Then I called the
business office after I
got that telephone num-
ber I needed, and the
business office advised
me that I'm going to be
charged $1.50 for the
call to 411. I'm very CAIL
upset by this. The tele- 5
phone company doesn't LU)-
own the company that
handles 411. That's a separate
company. We are just being
nickeled and dimed to death. I
think it's terrible and it's time
that some of our senators and
congressmen and some of our
commissioners do something to
help out the older people who
can't afford smartphones that
do everything for you and com-
puters that you can find other
stuff for free, but you have to


Is
C
rn
d

F
:k
7i
rn


I

-(


super power.
Domestically, mail is still
being delivered and Social
Security and Medicare bene-
fits are continuing, for now
Federal courts will run out of
money this week will likely
begin shutting
down. Many other
ISUE: government
iment agency and func-
]own. tions, like the Nu-
clear Regulatory
'INION: Commission, the
Environmental
kof Protection
p harms Agency, national
itry. parks and death
benefits for sur-
vivors of service members
killed in action have stopped.
Other impacts include the
Internal Revenue Service
suspending all audits, and
the Veterans Administration
has fallen even further be-
hind in processing the back-
log of disability claims and
veterans are having trouble
accessing information on the
status of their claims and
benefits.
Government workers, like
prison guards, not only don't
get paid full compensation,
but they are being placed at
greater risk because work-
man's compensation has
been suspended.
Unfortunately, the nation is
no longer "we the people,"
it's become "me the people"
as Republicans and Democ-
rats posture and position
themselves deeper into their
partisan trenches.
Congress, as a population,
is disliked by 95 percent of
the nation. They are not serv-
ing the people, nor are they
executing their duties as a
legislative body
While some progress is
being made, the damage is
done and our leaders have
only served to chip away at
our once proud stature as the
world's leader


pay to have the email or your
computer connected and you
have to pay a monthly charge
for the smartphone. When you
live on Social Security, you can't
afford all this stuff. We need
help. Us senior citizens need to
get together and form a com-
mittee and march on
JND Tallahassee.
QFF Leave my paper
alone
To the person who is
swiping the newspapers
South of my driveway in
S Brentwood: I wish you
would stop before
579 you're caught. Not only
) are you stealing, but
you are trespassing. Is
it worth the time that you're
going to have to do for this petty
crime? And another thing: I
hope one of us doesn't catch
you.
No swimming at school
It's true that children need to
swim, but not during school
hours. Without an education,
are they going to swim through
life?


When liberals became scolds


"Ex-Marine Asks Soviet Citi-
zenship" Washington Post
headline, Nov 1,1959 (concern-
ing a Lee Harvey Oswald)
"He didn't even have the sat-
isfaction ofbeingkilled for civil
rights. It's it had to be some
silly little Communist" -
Jacqueline Kennedy, Nov 22,
1963
WASHINGTON
he thought it robbed his
death of any meaning. But
a meaning would be
quickly manufac-
tured to serve a new -
politics. First, how-
ever, an inconvenient
fact Oswald had
to be expunged from -
the story So, just 24 ,-
months after the as- /
sassination, Arthur -
Schlesinger Jr, the
Kennedys' kept his-
torian, published a Georg
thousand-page his-
tory of the thousand- OTH
day presidency VOI
without mentioning
the assassin.
The transformation of a mur-
der by a marginal man into a
killing by a sick culture began
instantly before Kennedy
was buried. The afternoon of
the assassination, Chief Justice
Earl Warren ascribed
Kennedy's "martyrdom" to "the
hatred and bitterness that has
been injected into the life of
our nation by bigots." The next
day, James Reston, the New
York Times luminary, wrote in
a front-page story that Kennedy
was a victim of a "streak of vio-
lence in the American charac-
ter," but especially of "the
violence of the extremists on
the right."
Never mind that adjacent to
Reston's article was a Times re-
port on Oswald's communist
convictions and associations. A
Soviet spokesman, too, assigned
"moral responsibility" for
Kennedy's death to "Barry
Goldwater and other extremists
on the right."
Three days after the assassi-
nation, a Times editorial, "Spi-
ral of Hate," identified
Kennedy's killer as a "spirit":


I







ge
I

H
I


SLETI

A child named
'Messiah'


In the Sept. 19 Chronicle,
there was an article about a
judge in Newport, Tenn. who
ruled that a baby could not be
named "Messiah."
Later, another judge over-
turned that ruling saying that
the lower court had violated
the Establishment Clause of
the U.S. Constitution that for-
bids the establishment by gov-
ernment of a religion, as the
judge had said that the name
Messiah was a title reserved
for Jesus Christ.
According to a Time maga-
zine article quoting Carlton
Larson of the University of Cal-
ifornia at Davis, the over-
turned ruling "violated four or
five different provisions of the
Constitution." Instances in-
cluded were parental rights -
naming children is a First
Amendment right of free
speech.
In Hebrew, the name Mes-
siah means "anointed." Ac-
cording to the Social Security


The Times deplored "the shame
all America must bear for the
spirit of madness and hate that
struck dowifn" Kennedy The ed-
itorialists were, presumably, im-
mune to this spirit. The new
liberalism-as-paternalism
would be about correcting other
people's defects.
Hitherto a doctrine of Ameri-
can celebration and optimism,
liberalism would now become a
scowling indictment: Kennedy
was killed by America's social
climate whose sickness required
"punitive liberalism."
S That phrase is from
James Piereson of the
1 Manhattan Institute,
whose 2007 book
S "Camelot and the
Cultural Revolution:
How the Assassina-
tion of John E
S Kennedy Shattered
American Liberal-
e Will ism" is a profound
IER meditation on the re-
DES verberations of the
rifle shots in Dealey
Plaza.
The bullets of Nov 22, 1963,
altered the nation's trajectory
less by killing a president than
by giving birth to a destructive
narrative about America. Fit-
tingly, the narrative was most
injurious to the narrators.
Their recasting of the tragedy
in order to validate their cur-
dled conception of the nation
marked a ruinous turn for lib-
eralism, beginning its decline
from political dominance.
Punitive liberalism preached
the necessity of national repen-
tance for a history of crimes
and misdeeds that had pro-
duced a present so poisonous
that it murdered a president To
be a liberal would mean being
a scold. Liberalism would be-
come the doctrine of grievance
groups owed redress for cumu-
lative inherited injuries in-
flicted by the nation's tawdry
history, toxic present and omi-
nous future.
Kennedy's posthumous repu-
tation -Americans often place
him, absurdly, atop the presi-
dential rankings reflects re-
grets about might-have-beens.


rER


Administration more than
800 babies were named Mes-
siah in 2012, in the U.S.
At the time of the birth of the
Messiah of whom the over-
turned judge referred to -
there was a King named Herod
who sought to have the child
who was named the "Messiah"
removed also. He failed, too, as
did the judge in taking away
the name of Messiah from the
little boy in Tennessee.


To reread Robert Frost's banal
poem written for Kennedy's in-
auguration ('A golden age of po-
etry and power of which this
noonday's the beginning hour")
is to wince at its clunky attempt
to conjure an Augustan age
from the melding of politics and
celebrity that the Kennedys
used to pioneer the presidency-
as-entertainment.
Under Kennedy, liberalism
began to become more stylistic
than programmatic. After him
- especially after his succes-
sor, Lyndon Johnson, a child of
the New Deal, drove to enact-
ment the Civil Rights Acts,
Medicare and Medicaid lib-
eralism became less concerned
with material well-being than
with lifestyle, and cultural is-
sues such as feminism, abortion
and sexual freedom.
The bullets fired on Nov 22,
1963, could shatter the social
consensus that characterized
the 1950s only because power-
ful new forces of an adversarial
culture were about to erupt
through society's crust. Fore-
most among these forces was
the college-bound population
bulge baby boomers with
their sense of entitlement and
moral superiority, vanities en-
couraged by an intelligentsia
bored by peace and prosperity
and hungry for heroic politics.
Liberalism's disarray during
the late 1960s, combined with
Americans' recoil from liberal
hectoring, catalyzed the revival
of conservatism in the 1970s. As
Piereson writes, the retreat of
liberalism from a doctrine of
American affirmation left a
void that would be filled by
Ronald Reagan 17 years after
the assassination.
The moral of liberalism's ex-
planation of Kennedy's murder
is that there is a human instinct
to reject the fact that large
events can have small, squalid
causes; there is an intellectual
itch to discern large, hidden
meanings in events. And politi-
cal opportunism is perennial.


George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


Thank goodness for the
judge who overruled so that a
child could be named "Mes-
siah" in the U.S., and for the
one who brought one to Earth
more than 2,000 years ago!
Looking forward to Christ-
mas 2013, and thanks for the
reminder
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters
Crystal River


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COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


jto the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board.
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I


x-^


7"^^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Making memories and music together


I ve had it for the past 34
years. It sits up high on a
plant shelf in the living area
of our home.
The ceiling is vaulted, and the
shelf is no less than 10 feet from
floor level, so it is prominently
displayed.
It is a Gibson 12-string
acoustic guitar
Please don't misunderstand,
it's not intended to represent a
shrine, but it does bring back
memories of days past and
sometimes, those memories can
take on a life of their own.
The subject guitar is the last
one my father owned and
played, and recently it sparked a
memory, but surprisingly, it was
of a much earlier time and an-
other guitar
As I've stated in previous
columns, my father was a musi-


cian. If it had strings,
he could play it. He
had a smooth, mel-
low voice that he
loved to use, espe- *
cially to sing love
songs to our mother
The sound of Daddy
playing and singing
was just as natural as
the air we breathed Fred B
while my good A Sl
brother William and I OF I
were growing up.
And, yes, for a while,
the silence that came in 1979
when he passed was difficult for
us to take.
Back to an earlier time and
another, much older guitar
He never took the chance of
seeking a career in the world of
music and musicians. There
were opportunities, but he knew


H that the likelihood
was, in the end, such
a venture would cost
him more than he
was willing to pay
He stayed home and
took care of his fam-
ily the best way he
could.
I'm not certain of
rannen the year, but I was
LICE not yet old enough to
LIFE go to school. Daddy
was working at the
crate mill in La-
coochee and on a frosty morn-
ing, he slipped on an icy
walkway and broke his arm. His
right arm.
Was it a tragedy? Yes, but not
a major one. His arm would
heal, and they found something
for him to do at the mill in the
meantime so he could continue


to draw a paycheck until he was
whole once more.
But, at least for a short while,
his broken arm stopped him
from playing his guitar and
that was a very serious thing to
him. No exaggeration, except for
a few of those days when his arm
was broken, during the time we
shared, I don't remember a day
passing when he did not play, at
least some.
In the preceding paragraph,
you might have noticed that I
said "for a few of the days while
his arm was broken." It would
take weeks for his arm to heal,
but after only a few days, his de-
sire to make music and his inno-
vative personality took over
Daddy never simply
strummed his guitar He pressed
the strings into its neck with his
left hand to create chords, but


he played each string with the
thumb and fingers of his right
hand. With a broken right arm,
he had to improvise. I was his
improvisation. He had me sit in
his lap. He took the neck of his
guitar in his left hand so he
could create the chords and
placed the rest of the instrument
across my lap while he rested
his useless right arm on the back
of the chair He instructed me on
how fast to strum, and we pro-
duced tunes to which he sang.
Alas, I never learned to play
on my own, but when his arm
was broken, my father and I
made both memories and music
together


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


SLetters to the EDITOR


Tail wagging the dog
The editorial in today's (Sept. 24)
Chronicle "reorganization plan runs
into opposition" appears to challenge
those who would question the county
administrator's decisions. According to
the article, the administrator should be
able to dictate how his organization is
set up and the commission should have
limited to no input into the decisions.
First, it is not his organization it is the
taxpayer's organization. His job is to im-
plement the policies of our commission-
ers that represent the taxpayers.
I am not sure who at the Chronicle
has this amazing governmental adminis-
trational knowledge, but I would suggest
they go back to where ever they learned
it. In real government the positions
within the state, county or city are es-
tablished by the legislative branch with
some executive privilege.
The agency has what is called an
organizational chart which outlines du-
ties and any supervisory responsibili-
ties based on position job descriptions.
In theory this is done on actual facts. It
appears that our administrator changes
his management needs rather fre-
quently which often ends up with pay
raises for a select few
The editorial argues that cost savings
or pay increases should not be the driv-
ing factor but rather government effi-
ciency That may have some truth;
however, in most governments, these
changes take place very infrequently
not yearly I fail to see where this in-
creased efficiency is coming from nor
how this new and improved manage-
ment team is going to be measured. One
can only wonder if we get a new admin-
istrator is his upper management needs


TESTING
Continued from Page Cl

the highest level in liter-
acy on the test is more
than 60 percent higher
than for workers scoring
at the lowest level, and
those with low literacy
skills were more than
twice as likely to be un-
employed.
"It's not just the kids
who require more and
more preparation to get
access to the economy, it's
more and more the adults
don't have the skills to
stay in it," said Anthony
Carnevale, director of the
Georgetown University
Center on Education and
the Workforce.
Education Secretary
Arne Duncan said in a
statement the nation
needs to find ways to
reach more adults to up-
grade their skills. Other-
wise, he said, "no matter
how hard they work, these
adults will be stuck, un-
able to support their fami-
lies and contribute fully
to our country"
America's school kids
have historically scored
low on international as-
sessment tests compared
to other countries, which
is often blamed on the di-
versity of the population
and the high number of
immigrants. Also,
achievement tests have
long shown that a large
chunk of the U.S. student
population lacks basic



WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

economy, Social Security
payments and investments
in general.
In Citrus County, we
have a huge segment of the
population dependent on
Social Security and their
retirement investments. If
the stock market crashes
and we putter into a reces-
sion, we could go back to


reading and r
most pronour
low-income a
students.
This test coi
students leavi
school without
basic skills are
them later on
an education ]
The United
have a tough
ing up because
the state and
major source
funding, has b
in recent yeai
Jacob Kirkega
economist wi
son Institutef
tional Econoi
"There is a
tween man ai
here. The que
always: Are y
for whom tec]
makes it poss
better job or
worker that ti
ogy can repla
For those wit]
most basic sk
the answer w
less and has t
to extend into
rations. Lea
highly correla
parents' educ
"If you wan
having an und
large group o
are basicallyL
able this ed
system is absc
Kirkegaard sa
Dolores Pei
sor of psycho]
cation at Tea(
College, Colu:i
sity, said the r


going to equate into other alterations or
if we keep the same one will he want
more management changes in a year
The county government is not as com-
plicated as the Chronicle and the ad-
ministrator would like you to think. In
general, government expectations and
duties remain fairly consistent. The
need for so many changes so often cer-
tainly should raise some red flags from
both the citizenry and the commission-
ers. There are conditions that alter du-
ties and may require some adjustment
but in general management staff should
remain fairly constant.
Once duties have been established
there should be little need for changes. I
might suggest that the commission should
reexamine the entire management of the
county, familiarize themselves with the
organizational chart if there is one and
than decide how to create that needed ef-
ficiency then direct the administrator to
implement their organizational structure.
It clearly appears that in our county
government the tail is wagging the dog.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills

Say no to Obamacare
My husband and I support the shut-
down of the government until the De-
mocrats chose to defund Obamacare.
They do not want this atrocity of a law
for themselves. Why should they be ex-
empt why the rest of us are being taxed
on our persons and they are not? The
majority of the people do not understand
that they will have to pay regardless if
they want it or not This is not free.
Sherry Cohee
Hernando


nath skills vides a "good basis for an
iced among argument there should be
nd minority more resources to support
adults with low literacy"
uld suggest Adults can learn new
ng high skills at any age and there
t certain are adult-geared pro-
en't obtaining grams around the country,
the job or in Perin said. But, she said,
program, the challenge is ensuring
i States will the programs have quality
time catch- teaching and that adults
;e money at regularly attend classes.
local level, a "If you find reading and
of education writing hard, you've been
been slashed working hard all day at
rs, said two jobs, you've got a
aard, an young child, are you actu-
th the Peter- ally going to go to class?
for Interna- It's challenging," Perin
nics. said.
race be- Some economists say
nd machine that large skills gap in the
estion here is United States could mat-
ou a worker ter even more in the fu-
hnology ture. America's economic
ible to do a competitors like China
are you a and India are simply
he technol- larger than competitors of
ce?" he said. the past like Japan,
hout the Carnevale said. Even
ills, he said, while America's top 10
ill be merci- percent of students can
he potential compete globally, Camrne-
Sfuture gen- vale said, that doesn't cut
rning is it. China and India did
ated with not participate in this
nation level, assessment.
it to avoid "The skills in the mid-
ierclass a dle are required and
f people who we're not producing
unemploy- them," Carnevale said.
educational Respondents were se-
olutely key," elected as part of a nation-
aid. ally represented sample.
rin, profes- The test was primarily
logy and edu- taken at home using a
hers computer, but some re-
mbia Univer- spondents used a printed
report pro- test booklet.


2008 all over again.
The politics of the dif-
ferent factions are irrele-
vant. I don't care if you're
a conservative Republi-
can, a liberal Democrat or
a tea-drinking third-party
member this is not how
we solve problems.
Our government was
framed back in 1789 so
that the three branches of
government could work in-
dependently on the impor-
tant issues of the time.
Back in 1860, the process


stumbled and it took a
Civil War to get us back on
track.
We killed each other for
four years, and hundreds
of thousands died because


EDC rises to challenge


I would like to provide an update on
your Citrus County Economic De-
velopment Council. This is my first
update since assuming my new position
with the EDC this past March, and I can
tell you, it has been a very
active time for the EDC dur-
ing the past six months. With -
the struggling U.S. economy
and, more specifically, our
local economic decline, Cit-
rus County has a pressing
need to focus on diversifying /
and expanding our eco-
nomic base.
Your EDC is rising to the
challenge by modifying our DonI
focus in preparation to mar- GUI
ket Citrus County as a good COLI
business choice for commer-
cial development. This
would not only include marketing for
new commercial business to locate in
Citrus County, but also create a climate
to retain and expand commercial busi-
ness already established in Citrus
County Our future focus will strive to
bring good jobs to Citrus County, along
with supplementing the tax base for the
county, while considering our cherished
environmental resources.
The EDC continues our membership
with the Tampa Bay Regional Partner-
ship representing seven other counties.
We recently joined the North Florida
Economic Development Partnership
with 16 other counties. These partner-
ships are especially important as we
move to market our economic develop-
ment in the future. The days of single
counties striving to market themselves
in a national and global economy are
long gone, as the regional approach is
now the fundamental marketing
methodology for economic
development.
So what is the EDC doing to diversify
and expand Citrus County's future eco-
nomic development? Your EDC Board
has embarked on developing a Five-
year Strategic Plan for Economic De-
velopment with four primary focus
areas:
Existing site inventory assessment
including utility availability
Target industry identification based
on site inventory assessment.
Workforce availability related to
target industries.
Marketing plan to attract target
industries.
Additionally, this past February, a
Community Working Group (CWG) was
formed with 23 local community leaders
and facilitated by consultants provided
by Duke Energy While holding monthly
meetings, the CWG agreed on develop-
ing three initiatives:
To advocate for new power genera-
tion in Citrus County
To identify the natural resources,
amenities and opportunities in Citrus
County and develop strategies for mar-
keting them to a larger public.
To assist the EDC and Citrus County
in ensuring a diversified economic de-
velopment platform in order to increase
employment, expand our tax base and
enhance opportunities while protecting
the environment and current quality of
life.
With the initiative strategies and ac-
tion plans developed, at the last meet-
ing of the CWG in September, the
decision was made to fold the initiatives
into our future EDC Strategic Plan for
implementation.
In keeping with the EDC Board's de-
cision to develop a Five-year Strategic
Plan, and after an extensive bidding
process, the EDC awarded a contract to
Jeannette Goldsmith & Company to as-
sist in developing our Strategic Plan in


accordance with our four focus areas.
The development process commenced
the first week in September with a full
week of consultant-facilitated inter-
views with community leaders, which
will continue with future vis-
l its. We built a process into
the strategic planning
process to receive input
from community leaders and
S organizations so when we
move into the implementa-
A tion phase in January 2014,
we will have community sup-
port for moving economic
development diversity and
Paylor expansion forward for Cit-
EST rus County
JMN A $434,000 donation from
the Duke Energy Founda-
tion to the EDC will provide
much-needed funding to implement the
Five-year Strategic Plan initiatives. The
intent of the donation is to provide fi-
nancial resources to further economic
development diversity in Citrus County
We are placing a lot of time and effort
into the strategic plan development over
the next several months. As I have men-
tioned on numerous occasions, this
project will take a lot of work, but the
real work begins in January as we begin
to implement the defined initiatives
with the support of our EDC partners
and community leadership.
Our strategic planning process for
economic development is a first of its
kind in Citrus County -which can seem
like a daunting task when you think
about it, but at the same time, is exciting
with using this instrument to actually
plan for our county's future economic
development. With this said, we also
need to understand that future eco-
nomic development will not be an
overnight process and will take time, re-
sources and a good deal of patience to
market our commercial sites and ex-
pand our local commercial businesses.
Since assuming my position in March,
I have been impressed with the growing
optimism of community leadership and
Citrus County residents in taking an ac-
tive role in moving our county forward
from our current economic state. With
the use of our Five-year Strategic Plan
for Economic Development as a tool and
the support of our community leader-
ship and residents, we can greatly im-
prove our economic diversity in the
future.
Industry Appreciation Month is upon
us, with a number of exciting and fun
events planned as advertised in the
Chronicle's Chamber Connection page.
October would seem to me like a good
month to set the stage for gearing-up our
county's future focus on creating above-
average-paying jobs in Citrus County,
along with supplementing the tax base
for the county while preserving and im-
proving our environmental resources.
If you think about it, we have received
some very good news lately; the deci-
sion by Duke Energy to build a new gas
electric generation facility in Citrus
County along with the various donations
in the county from the Duke Energy
Foundation, the decision to sell or lease
the Citrus Memorial hospital to HCA,
and the announcement that our Cham-
ber, TDC and EDC organizations will lo-
cate into a single Crystal River facility
on U.S. 19. These successes provide a
positive trajectory for our counties fu-
ture economic development with our
strategic planning process. We can do
this!


Don Taylor is executive director of
the Citrus County Economic
Development Council.


are more than 220 years
old and we have the
longest-running govern-
ment on the planet
Right now, it seems like
a few self-important
blowhards are trying to
screw things up.
The folks who are trying
to bring the government to
its knees are not the he-
roes. They are the grenade
throwers.
Are we really at the
point where we should be
throwing grenades and


tearing down our process
of government?
I think not.
We don't want to hear
our representatives and
Senators tell us how wrong
the other side is. We want
to hear what they're going
to do to set things right


GerryMulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


we lost our faith in the
process of government
Those were the early
years of the republic, so
maybe we can accept that
as an excuse. But now we


I don't care if you're a
conservative Republican, a liberal
Democrat or a tea-drinking
third-party member this is not
how we solve problems.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 C3


3T
t
L


T
I.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to the EDITOR


Protect rivers
Dear Mr (Herschel)
Vinyard,
We, the Board of Direc-
tors of the Citrus County
Audubon Society are very
concerned about the con-
tinued degradation of our
local waterways, espe-
cially the Chassahow-
itzka, the Homosassa, the
Crystal and the Withla-
coochee rivers, all of
which have been de-
clared Outstanding
Florida Waterways. Many
of our members kayak
these waters, or act as
guides for other organiza-
tions, pointing out and
identifying the numerous
birds seen along the way
Until recently, many of us
gathered once a year to
watch young whooping
cranes being led by ultra-
lights to their new home
in the Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge,
which was considered at
the turn of this century
the best location in the
southeastern United
States to become the new
winter home for this ex-
perimental migratory
flock.
During the MFL hear-
ing before your designee,
Dr Tom Beck, on Sept. 10,
it was pointed out that no
consideration was given
to aesthetic and scenic at-
tributes when the MFL
rules on these Outstand-
ing Florida Waters
(OFWs) were developed.
According to the Water
Resource Implementa-
tion Rule for all MFL rule
development, which is
found in section 62-40.473


of the Florida Adminis-
trative Code, considera-
tion shall be given to the
protection of water re-
sources including ... envi-
ronmental values
associated with coastal,
estuarine, riverine,
spring, aquatic and wet-
lands ecology, including:
b) fish and wildlife habi-
tats and f) aesthetic and
scenic attributes.
A wonderful opportu-
nity to view this scenic
wildlife habitat and the
many birds that depend
on its unique environ-
ment is available to the
many birders and nature
lovers who take advan-
tage of the numerous
trails found in western
Citrus County One un-
usual trail gives the expe-
rienced kayaker a very up
close and personal view
of this special ecosystem.
The Nature Coast Canoe
Trail meanders 20 miles
from near the mouth of
the Crystal River through
parts of the Salt River
and Homosassa River, fi-
nally ending at the Chas-
sahowitzka River
According to the Citrus
County Birding Trail
Guide, more than 146 dif-
ferent bird species were
recorded along this trail
alone in 2000.
Finally, the 2012 Christ-
mas Bird Count, which is
conducted each year by
CCAS, takes place on the
west side of Citrus County,
primarily in the area west
of U.S. 19 that contains all
three of our four out-
standing Florida rivers,
as well as the mouth of a


fourth, the Withlacoochee
River During this one-day
bird count a total of 151
species was observed, in-
cluding nine state species
of special concern, one
federally threatened
species, and one federally
endangered species, the
woodstork. Indeed, a total
of 45 woodstorks were
counted in the area. Al-
though the bald eagle was
removed from the endan-
gered species list in 2007,
it is nonetheless interest-
ing to note that five bald


eagles were also seen.
The vision statement of
the Citrus County
Audubon Society states:
"The people of Citrus
County protect and main-
tain a variety of pristine
habitats, sanctuaries and
natural areas that are
havens for wildlife and fa-
vorite destinations for all
who love their natural
beauty and appreciate
their essential impor-
tance to our quality of
life."
As secretary of


Florida's Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion, we know you must
share our vision and de-
sire to protect our Out-
standing Florida
Waterways and the sur-
rounding ecosystems.
These wonderful rivers
are so important to main-
taining a healthy environ-
ment not only for our
human residents and visi-
tors, but also for the true
snowbirds that migrate
here in the winter
months, and the resident


birds that have made this
area their permanent
home! We therefore urge
you to give a great deal of
consideration to the aes-
thetic and ecological im-
portance of this area
before rendering your de-
cision on MFLs.
Lynn Delong,
conservation coordinator
Citrus County Audubon
Fred Hileman,
president, CCAS
CCAS directors
and officers


SATURDAY,OCTOBER19TH
CRYSTAL RIVER NATIONAL
WILDLIFE REFUGE DAY

GUIDED SUNRISE BIRD TOUR

OF KINGS BAY
no dbyFrkdd Departs '7:30am from Kings Bay
Ofcr oyw mv Refuge Headquarters.
Ntk Wa $20 per person includes hot breakfast.
.---, ---' Call (352)628-0033 by
October 17th for reservations.
SLimited Seating.


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CITR U 5 AUT


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Swww.chronicleonline.com


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Fine Arts.
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Juried Art Show
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C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


COMMENTARY


I 4


I :













BUSINESS
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pat Faherty
Staff writer

he Affordable Care Act helps ensure
that people diagnosed with breast can-
cer get affordable healthcare.
Dr Jannifer Drake Harper is vice
president of medical operations for
Florida Blue, which participates in the
health insurance marketplace.
She said the Affordable Care Act mandates
coverage of all preventive services recom-
mended by the U.S. Preventative Services Task
Force and breast cancer screening is covered as
a preventive service with no member out-of-
pocket costs.
"If you are uninsured and have breast cancer,
you will be eligible for coverage under the ex-
change since there is no longer denial of cover-
age for pre-existing conditions," she said. "If
your current health insurance is not adequate,
options would vary based on current coverage,
employer/grandfathered plans, etc."
Harper added, "if you currently have coverage
through your employer, it is likely that there will
be no change in coverage for breast cancer"
She said prescription coverage is an essential
health care benefit under the act: however the
type of coverage may vary depending on the
plan/metal level.
There are four categories of marketplace in-
surance plans: bronze, silver, gold and platinum.
Using the explanation on healthcare.gov, all cat-
egories offer the same set of essential health
benefits. The differences come down to monthly
premiums and out-of-pocket costs.
Harper explained the act does not have
specific deductibles for breast cancer
See Page D3


Associated Press file photo
President Barack Obama speaks to a joint
session of Congress on health care at the
U.S. Capitol in Washington.




Stocks rise as talks continue in Was


Associated Press
The closer Washington gets to a deal
over the debt ceiling, the higher stocks
go.
Stock prices rose on Friday as in-
vestors bet against a U.S. debt default.
It was the second day of gains after the
Dow Jones industrial average posted
its biggest point rise of the year on
Thursday
With an hour of trading left, the Dow
was up 83 points, or 0.6 percent, to
15,209. The Standard & Poor's 500
index was up eight points, or 0.5 per-
cent, to 1,701. The Nasdaq rose 27
points, or 0.7 percent, to 3,787.
Call it the Sigh of Relief Rally
A partial government shutdown
pushed the Dow below 15,000 this
week before President Barack Obama
and House Republicans met on Thurs-
day to talk about the outlines for a pos-
sible deal. Obama and Republican
senators met on Friday, too.


Stocks set new highs i:
ber but declined steadily
the federal government
the partial shutdown tha
That shutdown entered
Friday
Even more troubling f
the expectation that the
will reach its borrowing
17, which raises the posse
fault on government bor
government bonds are u
ered the world's safest ii
even the possibility of a
rattled investors.
"It's nice when the wor
volve around politicians i
sions for Wall Street," sai
investment strategist and
Fogel Neale Partners in I
Kim Forrest, an equity
lyst at Fort Pitt Capital G
burgh, said it's too soon
the meetings in Washing
a default.


The 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act,
known as "Obamacare" brought several
provisions relating to breast cancer screening
and treatment.

According to the American Cancer Society,
the health care law improves coverage for
breast cancer prevention and treatment
by requiring insurance plans to cover
mammograms and other recommended
preventative services.





All marketplace health insurance plans and many other
plans must cover the following, without charging co-pay or
coinsurance:
* Breast cancer genetic test counseling, or women at higher risk
for breast cancer;
* Breast cancer mammography screenings, every 1 to 2 years for
women older than 40;
* Breast cancer chemoprevention counseling, for women at
higher risk.


"If you are uninsured and have breast
cancer, you will be eligible for coverage
under the exchange since there is
no longer denial of coverage for
pre-existing conditions."

Dr. Jannifer Drake Harper
vice president of medical operations for Florida Blue





hington THEWEEKAHEAD
m MONDAY
n mid-Septem- Columbus Day Bond market
y since then as closed; stock markets, commodities
got closer to markets open.
at began Oct. 1. STOCKHOLM The Nobel Me-
its llth day on morial Prize in economics is an-
nounced by the Royal Swedish
or investors is Academy of Sciences.
government TUESDAY
limit on Oct. BERLIN Germany's ZEW in-
sibility of a de- stitute releases its monthly in-
rowing. U.S. vestor confidence index for
usually consid- Europe's biggest economy
investment, so PARIS French luxury con-
default has glomerate Louis Vuitton reports its
rld does not re- third-quarter sales.
making deci- FRIDAY
d Ralph Fogel, WASHINGTON Labor Depart-
Spartner at ment releases weekly jobless
New York claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the
y research ana- mortgage company, releases
;roup in Pitts- weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.;
to assume that Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew
,ton will avert says the government's borrowing
authority will expire Oct. 17.


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil near $102 on
forecast oil costs

NEW YORK Oil retreated to
$102 a barrel Friday on a forecast for
an increase in global oil supplies
next year
Benchmark crude for November
delivery fell 99 cents to close at
$102.02 a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. With three
down days out of five, oil finished
the week with a loss of $1.82 a barrel
or 1.8 percent.
In its latest quarterly oil market
report, the International Energy
Agency predicted strong growth in
non-OPEC supplies of crude oil.
The Paris-based IEA said that the
United States would overtake Rus-
sia next year as the largest non-
OPEC producer of liquid fuels, a
category that includes other fuels on
top of crude oil.
Brent, the benchmark for interna-
tional crudes, fell 52 cents to $111.28
a barrel on the ICE Futures ex-
change in London.


Debt ceiling hopes
shore up markets

LONDON Indications that a
deal to increase the U.S. debt ceiling
may be imminent shored up mar-
kets once again on Friday
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares rose 0.9 per-
cent to close at 6,487.19 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 0.5 percent to
8,724.83. The CAC-40 in France
ended flat at 4,219.98.
Earlier, Asian markets advanced
in the slipstream of Thursday's de-
velopments. Japan's Nikkei 225
stock average rose 1.5 percent to
14,404.74 and Hong Kong's Hang
Seng added 1.2 percent to 23,218.32.
Australia's S&P/ASX 200 climbed
1.6 percent to 5,230.90. China's
Shanghai Composite Index rose
1.7 percent to 2,228.15.

-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams


SSMART
b MONEY





Bank shares


can be iffy

nowadays
EAR BRUCE: Do you think
it's wise for someone to buy
bank shares in this hurting
economy?
L.S., via email
DEAR L.S.: If you are very
knowledgeable, it may be that
there are some good bank shares
worth considering. We are talking
about many banks. Let's take them
one at a time.
The big ones and the large re-
gional banks oftentimes are decent
buys. Banking rules very much
favor them, and they can manipu-
late the rules in ways that small
banks can only dream of Small
neighborhood banks (there are
around 8,000 in the country) are
not places where I would choose to
invest. In most, but not all cases,
the shares are depreciated, and I
don't see any immediate recovery
in their future.
With that being observed, you
have to consider each individual
bank on its own merits. On bal-
ance, the small banks are recover-
ing and eventually the shares may
reach the plateaus they were at
just a few years ago. But I would
not have much interest in that type
of an investment. You have to ex-
amine them and see which one
suits your needs.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a prop-
erty worth approximately $100,000.
When I shopped around to pur-
chase homeowners insurance from
four different national carriers,
the replacement costs ranged from


Page D3









D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber events
& member news
Oct. 14-20- International Ethnic
Festival's Polish Week at Nature
Coast River participating restau-
rants: Macrae's 352-628-2602,
Neon Leon's 352-621-3663, Old
Mill 352-628-2669, Riverside Re-
sort 352-628-2474 and Seagrass
Waterfront 352-503-2007.
Oct. 14- NAMI Citrus County
meeting with speaker Dr. RP Gur-
nani, local psychiatrist and mental
health advocate, starts 6:15 p.m.
at the Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church 439 E. Norvall Bryant High-
way, Hernando. NAMI warm line is
352-341-2273.
Oct. 15 Affordable Housing Advi-
sory Committee to meet at 5 p.m.
in the Lecanto Government Build-
ing to discuss Hardest Hit, SHIR
CDBG, NSP 1 & 3, Section 8, Shel-
ter Plus Care, and Emergency Solu-
tions Grant, among other items on
the agenda.
Oct. 15 United Way volunteer
site training from 9 to 10 a.m.
Oct. 18 Fly Fishing Expo at the
Plantation on Crystal River, featur-
ing Chico Fernandez & Flip Pallot.
$10 for both days (kids younger
than 16 free) clinics and work-
shops with IFFF-certified instruc-
tors; fly tying demos and
workshops; daily free programs
and seminars w/national fly fishing
experts; raffles, silent auctions live
auctions. Call 850-212-5396 for in-
formation.
Oct. 19 Village Crier Shop Local
Expo, 9 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Col-
lege of Central Florida, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Oct. 19- Bird Walk on Pepper
Creek Trail, participants meet at
7:45 a.m. at the entrance of the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park Visitor's Center.
Binoculars and field guides are rec-
ommended, free event. To register,
call 352-628-5343 ext. 1002.
Oct. 19- America's Boating
Course provided by the Crystal
River Power Squadron, 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crys-
tal River. Call 3652-795-4412.
Oct. 19 Halloween Scramble for
Hospice, golf and prizes, starts at
12 p.m., Citrus Hills Golf Club,
509 E. Hartford Street, Hernando.
Call 352-527-2020.
Oct. 21 A Celebration of Life, a
fundraiser for the family for Tom
Corcoran, 5:30 to 8:30 pm at Tus-
cany on the Meadows, 350 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando. Call
LifeCare Center at 352-746-4434
for information.
Oct. 22 2013 Small Business
Resource Fair, a one-stop shop re-
source fair providing technical, fi-
nancial, procurement, networking
and other business support serv-
ices at Southeastern Livestock
Pavillion Auditorium, 2232 N.E.
Jacksonville Road, Ocala. Register
online at SBDC.UNFEedu or call
352-622-8763.
Oct. 24- Citrus County Builder's
Association GMMixer/Ro-mac
Night, 6 to 8 p.m. at 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
Oct. 24-26 Crazy on Country
Fall Festival at Rock Crusher
Canyon RV Park, 237 S. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River, doors
open at 5 p.m. Proceeds to benefit
Save Crystal River. More informa-
tion, 352-564-9350 and Crazyon
Country.com.
* Thursday: Tom Jackson and Lo-
Cash Boys
* Friday: Southern Fried Chicks
* Saturday: Chris Jansen and the
Bellamy Brothers
Oct. 25- Antiques, Collectibles,
Fine Art & Jewelry Auction, from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ATM Antiques
and Auctions LLC, 811 S.E. U.S.
19, Crystal River. The auction cata-
log is live on CharlieFudge.com.
Oct. 25 The Covenant Children's
Home Boot Scoot Barbecue Ban-
quet at the Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. To sponsor
or reserve seats, call 352-593-
1282 or see CCHFL.org
Oct. 25 Taste of CF will feature
dueling pianos and the event sup-
ports local scholarships to promis-
ing students. Tickets, call
352-873-5808 or masont@cf.edu.
Oct. 25 Nature Coast EMS
fourth annual Trunk or Treat Hal-
loween event, 5:30 to 8 p.m., at
3876 W. Country Hill Drive,
Lecanto. Bring the children for safe
trick-or-treating, haunted hallways,
extra scary haunted room for the
older kids, hot dogs, music, games
and more! Details, 352-249-4730.


Barbecue tickets are still available!

The Citrus County Economic Development f Alliance, enjoy libations at the open bar, and
Council closes out Industry Appreciation kick up your heels with great live music from
Month with this notoriously funm event, the best country band in the south the Dan
M&B Dairy, the largest dairy farm in Cit- Story Band.
rus County, will once again host over 800 __It is truly the place to be seen in Citrus
people for an evening of delicious barbecue County in October. To get your ticket, call
prepared by the Ag Alliance. 352-795-2000.
This beautiful location backs up to a small IndustryAppreciation Month is sponsored
lake, but provides plenty of room to spread by Duke Energy and the Gold Presenting
out, chow down on the best barbecue ever prepared by the Citrus County Agricultural sponsor is Sibex.


Crystal River Power Squadron ribbon-cutting


From left are Squadron Education Officer P/C Jim Kelly, J.N. Cutting the ribbon
is our Cdr, P/D/C Tom Rossini, S.N. Next is Executive Officer P/Lt/C Jack
Flynn, S.N. Then our Administrative Officer P/C Pete Ward, J.N. Our secretary
is P/Lt/C Joanne Hepner, S; Treasurer Lt/C Linda Craven, A.P., is welcome by
Chamber Ambassadors Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest
Control; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Jeanne Green, Inside Citrus;
Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; and Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel.


845 N.E. Third Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-212-3946
www.usps.org/localusps/crystalriver/
A social organization dedicated to boating education
and safety.


UPCOMING RIBBON CUTTINGS


Oct. 14 at 4:30 p.m.
ATM Antiques and Auctions
811 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
352-795-2061


Oct. 15 at 4:30 p.m.
Iris Rodgers, Independent Skin
Consultant Rodan & Fields
Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River
352-201-7901


Ambassadors cut ribbon
for Realty Connect
111 W. Main Street, Suite 311, Inverness, FL 34450
352-212-1446 www.The FloridaDream.com
An independently owned and operated full-service boutique real estate
brokerage.


Chamber Ambassadors welcome Owner/Broker Teri Paduano,
Ralph Paduano, Leah Klasing. Chamber Ambassadors in
attendance: Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George, Mona Marshall, HR Power;
Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Mike Buchanan, Excel
Printing; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County, Sarah Fitts,
First International Title; and Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union.


INTERNATIONAL ETHNIC
FESTIVAL
FUN FOOD & MUSIC ON THE
HOMOSASSA RIVER


Oct. 17 at 8:30 a.m.
Florida Cancer Specialists
521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto
352-397-9906


-YU CAN
VROW3IT,
SHOWITny

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November Citrus County is brought to you by the
Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County.


A'4 Ce .ebAtio,1 of ife
and funwvair sf, fo, h f,,,,i111 of


AWMVWMTAF


SOUNDS


Mon., October 21,2013


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CANCER
Continued from Page Dl


The deductibles are related to the
specific plan benefits and the metal level.
She said prescription coverage is an es-
sential healthcare benefit under the act;
however the type of coverage may vary
depending on the plan/metal level.
And there were already federal guide-
lines for coverage of reconstructive
services and prosthesis for breast cancer
patients that will remain in place.
On provisions for breast cancer victims
regarding end of life care or hospice cover-
age; Harper explained, "there are no spe-
cific act mandates related to hospice or end
of life care.
"However, the benchmark plan in Florida
(BCBSF Blue Options 5462) included hos-
pice care and therefore it is considered an
essential health benefit in Florida that
must be covered in all non-grandfathered
individual and small group plans in 2014."
Humana is also offering Qualified Health
Plans for uninsured Floridians through the
marketplace in Florida that opened Oct. 1.
Company spokesperson Mitch Lubitz
agreed, as part of the Affordable Care Act,
Humana and other health insurers must
provide additional preventive and women's
health care services.


Pre-existing conditions
According to the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid, starting in 2014, health insur-
ance companies cannot refuse coverage or
charge more because of a pre-existing
health condition.
Insurance coverage for pre-existing
conditions begins immediately
The new plans will cover doctor visits,
hospitalization, prescription drugs and
maternity care without restrictions for
pre-existing conditions.
The only exception to coverage of pre-ex-
isting conditions is for grandfathered indi-
vidual health insurance plans, purchased
by an individual, not an employer
However, the government healthcare
website cautions that insurance companies
and states define pre-existing conditions
differently
Health insurance companies offering
coverage through the marketplace must
lower the amount consumers pay out of
pocket for essential healthcare benefits, in-
cluding chronic disease management.
For household incomes below certain lev-
els financial assistance is available. Visit
www.healthcare.gov for details. For
questions about the Affordable Care Act,
call 800-318-2596.

Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. corn.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl


$200,000 to $250,000. Why are they
so high compared to the actual
value, and how can I get this cost
lowered?
-K.S., via email
DEAR KS.: I understand where
you could be confused. You are try-
ing to find out why the assessed
value of your property is so much
less than the replacement cost.
That should be pretty obvious.
Let's say the building is assessed
at $100,000. It is probably worth more
than that because most properties
are worth more than the assessed
value. Let's say it's worth $150,000 to
sell it, yet if it was to burn down, it
might cost $500,000 to replace.
Replacement value is the only
way to go when insuring a property,
not actual cash value. If you have
insurance covering only the cash
value, the $150,000, if the place
burned down, you wouldn't have
enough money to replace the
house. You only have the amount
noted on the policy You want
enough money to replace what you
have lost and that's only accom-


polished with replacement value,
not actual cash value.
DEAR BRUCE: Years ago I fool-
ishly bought two timeshares, think-
ing it would be nice for my two small
children when they grew up. I am 68
years old now and making out my
will. My children want nothing to do
with these timeshares and the fees
that go along with them. I know I
can't sell them. How will this work
after I'm gone? Can I exclude these
in my will so that my children won't
be forced to inherit them and as-
sume responsibility for them?
KM., via email
DEAR KM.: I would agree that
you foolishly bought the two time-
shares, but you had the best of in-
tentions. The kids clearly are
knowledgeable and they want noth-
ing to do with them. They don't
wish to inherit them, and you know
you can't sell them.
You might try leaving them to a
charity that will accept them. If no
one accepts them, there is no rea-
son for anyone to be burdened with
them.
What you might wish to do is just
stop making the payments and see
what the timeshare company will
do. There is little they can do but
sue you.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Kraio A- = -g -I -f -r-i


Sand read
JOHN NATCUK
paintings..if you have
a John Natchuk painting
that you
would be be willing to
sell, please
get in touch with
Robiellyn@aol.com


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



12 ACRES
Close In, Busy Hwy.
8 Mobile Homes, good
Income. Many possi-
blities, Owner & Bank
Finan. 352-212-6182
Attention: Sheila
Castellon or relatives
Manatee Storage
has several boxes of
personal items that
will be discarded after
January 31 st, 2014.
call 352-563-6669
CMA
Immed opening in
busy OBGYN office
Fax Resume
352-794-0877
CONSTRUCTION
SECRETARY
For a fast paced office!
MUST have the ability to
multi task, communicate
professionally and have
excellent Microsoft
Office skills.
DFWP/EOE
resumewci@aol.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sun & Mon 8am on.
8569 Admiral Byrd Ln
DEHUMIDIFIER
Kenmore
excellent condition.
$100 obo
(352) 726-7367





YIouir\M rld first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!



(kI


FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY, P/T Hrs.
352-726-9666
FORD
2004 Freestar, 81,400
mi, A/C good cond,
new rear brks, $5250
OBO (352) 341-4536
Realtor's Asst.

Lic. pref. email resume
to: citrusbestbuy
@gmail.com
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Used tools looking for
a good home at a
reasonable price
Call (352) 726-7367



Will do General House
Cleaning Residential
Only, Floral City Area
Exp/Ref. 352-422-0174



$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 Dogs Free
Pomeranian & Jack
Russell Mix Good with
older people. Owner
passed away. Look-
ing for Good Home
(352) 726-8359
1988 Southwind
RV. Needs to be
hauled away. Lots of
good parts w/ title.
(352) 344-1411
Fiberglass Topper for
Chevrolet Pickup
1987 & Up,
has lock, sliding rear
window, white
(352) 586-0521
Free Fire Wood
In Driveway
483 N Grandview Ave
Citrus Hills
FREE KITTENS
Are spayed & neutered
had shots,
To Good Homes
Only!!
(352) 637-5423
Free Kittens
Calico, Black, and
Gray Tabby
8 wks old, litter trained
352-212-0667
Free Male Cat
Smart, Pretty,
Gunmetal Gray,
short-haired,
desperately seeking
indoor home!!
(352) 746-1904
Oak Firewood
You pk up.
(352) 637-2205
Two kittens, one grey
tabby and one black.
10 wks, lifter trained,
eating solid, hand
raised (352) 634-2735



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct Ba $5.001b.
Stone CrabL$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001


Black short hair
Great Dane and
Shepherd. 15 months
old. Homosassa near
491 (352) 628-2413
Female Cat
Gray w/ tan spots
no collar, med size
Beverly Hills/Holder
area(352) 613-6482
Female Cat,
Black with white chest
and paws. Lost 10/8 in
Citronella off of
Dunklin Rd going into
Citrus Spring.
(352) 400-9961
Lost Female
Siamese Cat
dark chocolate
seal point
Homosassa Area
REWARD
(352) 503-3335
Lost in Beverly Hills. Tri
colored beagle.40
Ibs.Missing from N. Lee
St. Has been seen on
S. Harrison St. Very
sweet neutered male.
Has been walking in
peoples homes and
jumping in trucks.
Please call if you have
seen JoJo
352-249-3107
MALE VIZSLA
Reddish/orange color,
yellow eyes, 60 Ibs,
red collar, lost near
Stage Coach/ Pleas-
ant Grove. Dog needs
medication. REWARD
(352) 726-0120
(352) 247-6118
Male Yellow Lab. Lost
on 10/4 Appoka &
Annajo in Inverness
Answers to Hunter
(352) 464-0743
Motorola Cell Phone
in case. Lost at
OctoberFest in Kiddy
Ride area. Please call
(352) 465-7334 or
(352)-209-2157




Puppy, Mixed brown
and red with white
chest. Found 10/9 on
Raccoon Ct
(910) 986-3047




Attention: Sheila
Castellon or relatives
Manatee Storage
has several boxes of
personal items that
will be discarded after
January 31st, 2014.
call 352-563-6669
Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+ Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lie #AL10580



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct ( $5.001b.
Stone Crabj$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001



NEED 60K INVESTOR
LOAN 6% SECURED
BY 200K PROPERTY
INTERSET ONLY
352-528-2950 J/D
PROF. male, looking
for work in Citrus
County. Ethical, de-
greed, 414-335-3707



CONSTRUCTION
SECRETARY
For a fast paced office!
MUST have the ability to
multi task, communicate
professionally and have
excellent Microsoft
Office skills.
DFWP/EOE
resumewci@aol.com
Office Assistant
For busy construc-
tion office. Must
have construction
knowledge.
Excellent computer,
phone and filing
abilities. Fax Resume
to: 352-637-4141




BARBER/STYLIST
Fulltime/Parttime
Experienced, Busy!
Family Headquarters
(352) 697-1145

HAIR STYLIST
Full time IPart time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person

Stylist/Nail Tech

(352) 344-8282










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


h h is
ener

Busy Medical
Practice Seeks

1. CT SCAN TECH
2. OPTOMOTRIST
Experience is a must
Competitive Pay/
Benefits. References
Required
call for immediate
response
352-586-0632
or email
hr@ cmc-fl.com




DIRECTOR OF
ADMISSIONS
AND MARKETING
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
Full-time position
available. Admis-
sions and/or market-
ing experience in a
skilled nursing facility
or hospital setting
required. Three to
four years health
care experience
preferred.
Bachelor's degree
or equivalent in
marketing, business,
journalism or com-
munication is desira-
ble. Must be familiar
with the professional
community and
knowledgeable of
admissbns/maketfing
practices and
procedures as well
as the laws, regula-
tions and guidelines
governing admis-
sions/ marketing
functions in the
long-term care
facility. Must possess
leadership ability
and willingness to
work harmoniously
with and supervise
professional and
nonprofessional per-
sonnel. Must possess
ability to make inde-
pendent decisions
when circum-
stances warrant
such action.
Must be able to
supervise admission/
marketing staff.
We offer great pay
and benefits in a
team-oriented envi-
ronment.
Christine Bigwood
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
ChristineBigwood@L
CCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
43572

LWe
cUtwM
.,C MJ ft;


www crnceonline.com


CMA
Immed opening in
busy OBGYN office
Fax Resume
352-794-0877

CNA
3-11 Shift
Citrus Health
and Rehab Center,
a five star skilled
nursing facility. We
offer a good salary
and work environ-
ment including med-
ical/ dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan.
Please AIVpply in
Person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit

COTA & PTA

Part and Full-Time
openings
(352) 795-4114

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamollia
yahoo.com

Dietary Manager
Join an Exciting
Team!
Certification req.
with 2 years exp.
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness OR Email
to: atadmin
@southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D

FIT PIT MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Primary Care
office in
Homosassa
FAX RESUME TO:
352-628-1120

FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson rswan-
sondental.com

HIRING:
RN, Psych RN,
LPN, Phys. Ther.
Florida Homecare
Specialist
Call (352) 794-6097
For an interview.

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
New Wage Scale.
Looking for reliable
staff. Must be avail-
able any shift, any
day of the week.
Looking for PRN and
PT Staff. Nursing ex-
perience preferred.
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP


RN/PRN
Endoscopy ASC,
Weekdays
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

RNs NEEDEDIII
ICU, ER, TELE
EARN UP TO $43/HR.
2 yrs. exp. required!
Hlllsborough,
Manatee, Pinellas,
Pasco & Polk
Counties
Seasonal/Travel
Contracts
(813)347-9112
afowler@
travelmedusa.com
TRAVELED USA






CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
Faculty Computer
Information
The instructor will
teach courses to
prepare students to
meet the growing
computer informa-
tion technology
needs in our com-
munity. Graduate
degree with 18
graduate semester
hours in Computer
Science Manage-
ment or Manage-
ment Information
Systems or a
computer-related
field required.
Education must be
received from a re-
gionally accredited
institution. A com-
puter science
industry certification
is preferred. Com-
mitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for a diverse student
population. Position
is open until filled.
Screening begins
11/06/13.
Please submit a
copy of transcripts
indicating the
degree conferred
with the electronic
application. Educa-
tion must be from a
regionally accred-
ited institution.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of tran-
scripts to hr@CF.edu
or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer

ATTENTION
** ** *
Looking for
Representatives
To assist Medicare
Recipients
w/ enrolling For
Medicare Part D,
Medicare Advan-
tage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements/
Will be placed
In Local Pharmacies
to Assist w/these
programs
No exp. Necessary
Will provide Training
Call 352-726-7722


Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.com or Call
352-422-2160

Planning &
Development
Director
Announcement
#13-58
Professional position
overseeing the
Divisions of Building,
Geographic Re-
sources and Com-
munity Planning,
Land Development
and Code Compli-
ance. Duties in-
clude participation
in and support of
Land Development
Code, Long Range
Planning, Code
Compliance, Build-
ing Codes, Zoning
issues and com-
plaint resolution.
Heavy involvement
with community
groups, developers,
contractors, regula-
tory agencies, etc.
Requires a Bache-
lors degree in a
field closely related
to areas of assign-
ment. Masters
degree is highly de-
sirable. Knowledge
of planning, zoning,
building codes and
land development
codes. Must have
experience in
public speaking
and presentations.
Pay range $2,564.50
-$3,846.73 B/W.
Starting pay DOQ.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You may also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA
NOTE: RESUMES/
APPLICATIONS ARE
SUBJECT TO PUBLIC
DISCLOSURE UNDER
THE FLORIDA PUBLIC
RECORDS LAW.

REAL ESTATE
AGENT
For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty




BARTENDER

Apply In Person
THE DAM PUB
7p-9p, Mon.-Frl





NIt \\%\011d hirst.

ELI) Da)




C (i ,


CHKOMGLE

Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time
Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


: I . I I


; I :


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 D3




D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


Sales Help


Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time
Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.
Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


AC SALES
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Dave (352) 419-7916

Realtor's Asst.

Lic. pref. email resume
to: citrusbestbuy
@gmail.com

SALES CLERK
Applicant must have
computer skills, self mo-
tivated, works well with
others and customer
friendly. Must be at
least 18 and have a
valid driver's license
Apply in person
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.
2661 E Gulf to Lake











ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab,
lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wlldwood


Maintenance
Working
Supervisor
High School
Diploma Required.
Experience in indus-
trial maintenance,
welding, fabrication
and 3 phase
electrical. Work is in
manufacturing envi-
ronment doing gen-
eral maintenance
duties. Work hours
and days vary. Full
time first shift with
benefits. Pay
depending on
experience $12-$17
per hour. Apply at:
Global Tire
Recycling.
1201 Industrial Drive
Wildwood
or Fax Resume
352-330-2214

The City of
Crystal River
is seeking resumes
for the position of
Maintenance II.
This is a semi-skilled
and manual posi-
tion including repair
and maintenance
of City property.
Must have a high
school diploma or
equivalent certifi-
cate; hold a valid
Florida Class B
Commercial Drivers
License; and have
two years exp.
A job description
can be obtained
from the Finance
Director or by
calling 352-795-4216
ext. 309.
Hourly wage is
$9.87 $13.98 per hr.
and includes
insurance benefits.
Please send resume
to: David Burnell,
Public Works
Director,
City of Crystal River,
123 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428
by Oct. 21, 2013.



Your World








CHpNif.E



... Il ; i-.iN 1d ,+ ,S --


EXP. MECHANIC
5 yrs min active exp.
Clean Dr. Lic. a must
Apply in Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19CryRiv.

Now Hiring:
OTR Class A CDL
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Call today
for details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply In person
S & S Electric
2692 W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon

UTILITIES
TECHNICIAN I
Announcement
# 13-57
Skilled technical
work with assign-
ments encompass-
ing the operation,
maintenance and
construction of Cit-
rus County Utilities
water distribution
and wastewater
collection systems.
Some experience in
a related field or an
equivalent combi-
nation of training
and experience.
Certification in
backflow
(testing/repair),
water distribution or
wastewater collec-
tion preferred. Abil-
ity to respond to af-
ter hours emer-
gency repairs 24/7.
Must have or obtain
within 1 year of em-
ployment a valid
Florida CDL, class B.
Starting pay $11.88
hourly. Excellent
benefits. ALL APPLI-
CATIONS MUST BE
SUBMITTED ONLINE:
please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us You
can also visit
one of the local Li-
braries or the Hu-
man Resources De-
partment, 3600 W
Sovereign Path,
Suite 178, Lecanto,
FL 34461 to apply
online by Friday Oc-
tober 18, 2013
EOE/ADA.


CLASSIFIED



SDRIVES^
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

TELLER
Brannen Bank
is currently
interviewing for a
teller position in the
Citrus County area.
Must have previous
cash handling
experience, be
detail oriented, PC
literate and have
excellent customer
service skills.
Inquiries please call
Carol Johnson at
352-726-9001.
Brannen Banks
of Florida, Inc.
PO Box 1929
Inverness, FL
34451-1929
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP




DRIVERS
TRACTOR TRAILER
DUMP
Cypress Truck Lines
seeks 5 TT Dump
Drivers (150 mile
radius) Company
Drivers Only
*Assigned Tractors
Medbical/Dental/Visbn*P
aid Orientatbn
*Paid Training*6
Paid Holidays. 6 Mo
TT Dump Exp &
Class A CDL Req!
Call 1-888 235-8862
WWW.
cypresstruck.com

Exp. General
Maintenance
Must be flexible and
able to multi-task.
Apply Tues thru Fri
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando

FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY, P/T Hrs.
352-726-9666




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547

Business

12 ACRES
Close In, Busy Hwy.
8 Mobile Homes, good
Income. Many possi-
blities, Owner & Bank
Finan. 352-212-6182



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


ANTIQUE SLANT TOP
DESK good condition,
$100. 352-382-0069



2 Person Hot Tub
1 IOvolts, excellent
condition! $200.
(352) 527-0618



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CHEST FREEZER 5 cu-
bic foot Frigidaire, good
condition, $75.00
352-628-3899
GOOD DISHWASHER
$100 works perfect. 30
day warranty, call/text
Leonard @
352-364-6505
GOOD DISHWASHER
$100 works perfect. 30
day warranty call/text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
Refrigerator (2010)
Kenmore, white, like
new bottom freezer,
68" H, 33" wide, 30/2D
glass shelves and bins,
$425. (352) 513-5415
Call Evenings


.,.."'*"*"

oImr ridl first

Need a jih)
ir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHRONcICE
;-; V__
CF* N~uikAXAiiisifi


-i--
Appliances
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Used Maytag Washer
& GE Dryer
$75. for Both
(352) 382-1830
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, No
Rust, Excellent Working
Condition Guarantee.
Free Del. 352 263-7398
WHIRLPOOL REFRIG-
ERATOR 1Ocf top
freezer, white. 3 yrsold.
$110 Inverness. Call
john 727 415 7728
phone 727 415 7728



COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51 H.
$85.527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H. $80.
527-1239.



Craftsman 154 pc.
Mechanics Tool Set
Call for info, $75. obo
(352) 586-3380
Craftsman profes-
sional 10" Table Saw,
114 HP motor, w/
Biesemeyer fence sys-
tem. $475 (orig $950)
(352) 628-1734
SHOPLIGHT with 11
good T40 flourescant
bulbs, great shape,
($10) 352-212-1596
Used tools looking for
a good home at a
reasonable price
Call (352) 726-7367



KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER $80
352-613-0529
SANYO 20" TV
WORKS GREAT
Excellent picture and
sound quality $25.
352-621-0175



CD/DVD DRIVES 5
drives int & ext...$25 all
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
IBM 390E THINKPAD
needs OS, plus ex-
tras...$75 352-476-2652
tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com


22" HD Vizio Flat
Screen TV
cost $228, asking $50.
(352) 527-1877



1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $75
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
4 white book cases
on wheels $150.
2 red V shaped tables
from daycare $50.
(352) 795-7254
40" round dining table
w/blue pedestal
base...$35
call 352-476-2652
Antique dining room
set 6 chairs & buffet in
perfect condition. Early
1930's $3500.00 Must
see! 352-465-7132
Breakfast/Patio Table
tile inlaid w/benches
very unique $100
Occasional Chairs $25
Dark wood Blk Leather
unusual (352) 628-3100
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK oak finish,51"H
w/ hutch,very nice $60
726-2023
COUCH
Burgundy Colored. In
good condition. $80
352-465-7132
Dinette Table
42" 8 sided w/12" leaf
4 chairs, padded,
on wheels. $175.
(352) 746-9076
DINING ROOM SET
incl. 4 chairs & hutch
dark wood,
good condition
$300.
(401) 829-5141
DINING ROOM SET
Oak with glass top,
6 chairs, very heavy.
$100 (352) 586-0521
DINING ROOM SET
Solid light wood table,
w/24" leaf, 6 cush'd
chairs. Large china
closet. $800
Excellent Condition
(352) 621-5561
Electric lift Chair
Rose Colored. In good
condition. $90
352-465-7132
END TABLES
Oak Colored.
$30 for pair
352-465-7132
Entertainment Center
& TV Stand fits any
large TV $550.
Dining Rm. Set, w/
matching bar stools
$550. (541) 973-5030


r~aL D --wmlp to


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lie #AL10580

Retired Lady with 30+
years Homecare exp.
Help w/ personal care
companship $10 hr.
Dee Dee, 249-4429




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lie/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365


Compete Tree Service
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
(352) 344-2696
FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352)637-6641




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
& FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
&RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Mr& Mrs FIX IT
(For Seniors) LIC& INS
Home&Yard/ln&Out
Low Senior $613-2643


IDREVE CLAI


DON'T LET YOUR I Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
DRYER START I l orpoolorplan
A FIRE! Something
Flal Rale No ; I .
r, v""; du completely new!
^ ^ S "O~ftnnrar^


AAA ROOFING
C4al te "4aeak6use."
Free Written Estimate

$1iOOOFF:
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Li .Js~C ~05737~ ~~~~ GSE'


Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820


Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329
Will do General House
Cleaning Residential
Only, Floral City Area
Exp/Ref. 352-422-0174



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


L~wi Spri kker

Not Workii9?

We'll Fix It

$10Offwihad


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
IC40OIES plan~isI
POOL AND PAVER LLC P FST'
L license '46352-40 8 | 46-4451 -


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
, R 352-364-4610
(MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24 In-l-r-n-ntsa - n- -ra aWeek
I24 Hours a DaY' 7 DaYS a Weeki


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS







4
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131







Pairn tipe assan s




A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971


60 ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


John's Painting
& Wallpapering
Lie/Ins. FreeEst.
*'352-201-9568"*



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile /
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


STERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstoallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





Services from A to Z
complete Handyman Services
Specializing in
Aluminum Rescreen Work,
S Storm Doors, Garage Screen
I Doors, Window Screens
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch
Ceilings, Pressure Washing,
I Int/Ext Painting, Regrout
Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing,
Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten
Wood Repairs
You Name it I probably do it!



746-2445
Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience


Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofin- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024***




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838








.* t ,,, '




TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lie/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452








Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lie/Ins


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians |
ER0015377

352-61-124


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
Stump Grinding -
Local, Call Robert
352-302-2220
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


"KNOCK OUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
SWorkers Comp.
Pressure
Washing Too

352-942,6876
t Call Today for a
000G4Q1 ^ Cteon Tomorrow




if3 Ccd/lence m %ouf




n OOFlNg |
S Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices

X Ie Mk.1*;;

S www.eliteroo ing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352)639-1024
LICENSED & INSURED


ILL
Wa JJIJII.WiJJJllI



Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Home Finder


#1 Employmentilsourcec is



www.chronicleonline.com


I POLS ANDAVERSIJA


I PAINTING I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$100
Area Rug, 63 x 94
$75.
Cell (541) 973-5030
FILE CABINET
2 drawer, oak finish exc.
cond.$20 726-2023
JAPANESE BUFFET
SERVER Black with
gold, hand-painted
decor. Like-new Call
352-257-5062 $100
KITCHEN SET
4 padded chairs on
casters. Glass top,
white base.
MUST SEE $200
(352) 465-2237
MATTRESS
King size, 3 yrs old with
brand new box spring
$500 (352) 419-6465
Mattress Set
3 yrs. old, paid
$1,800 like new
$500. obo
(352) 527-8600
Settee, 46"W hard-
wood w/ pecan finish
$50. 1 Counter Stool,
chrome, swivel seat
w/ back $25.
(352) 564-9336
WROUGHT-IRON
DAYBED like-new,
light-colored frame with
mattress. $100 Call
352-257-5062



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
HONDA PRESSURE
WASHER
$500 Excellent
condition
(352) 503-6902
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE
$20 352-613-0529
TROY BUILT
Riding Mower
42 inch cut $475
(352) 897-4681
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362



CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
Sun & Mon 8am on.
8569 Admiral Byrd Ln
HOMOSASSA
5231 S. Manatee Ter.
Sat. & Sun 9a-4p
Washer & Dryer
White, Good Cond.
first $125.
(352) 302-8265



MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945



2 GIRLS WINTER
JACKETS LARGE $15
EACH 352-613-0529
3 MENS CASUAL
PANTS 36X30 & 2
CASUAL SHIRTS
LARGE $20
352-613-0529
BOOTS size 7 tan work
like, size 7 1/2 black
dress, women's, good
shape, ($5)
352-613-7493
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4
PANTS, 5 SHIRTS & 2
lightweight jackets
$45 352-613-0529
Girls winter clothing 4
jeans, 1 pants, 5 shirts,
2 pajama sets & 2
hoodies sizes vary $60
352-613-0529
JEANS embroidered,
women's size 10, 1
roses, 1 daisies, brand
new, both for ($15)
352-613-7493
MENS SUIT HART
SCHEFFNER & MARX.
Jacket 44, pants 38x30,
dark gray, $50
352-322-1154
Mother of the Groom
gown. Adrianna Papell,
sz 14, navy.Call for de-
tails. Only $60.
352-322-1154



2 MATCHING OFF-
SHORE ANGLER
BOAT RODS- Sea Lion
SL70BRT, 7', 40-60 Ib
line, Ex+ $80. 628-0033
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
FLORAL WALLCOVER-
ING $25 PREPASTED
VINYL 165 SQ FT
419-5981
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS $25
HEARTS, TEDDY
BEARS, BUNNIES
419-5981
10" CRAFTSMAN TA-
BLESAW Heavy duty
Saw good condition,
motor need brushes.
$80 obo. 746-0714
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BARSTOOL tall solid
wood, good shape,
swivels, ($5)
352-613-7493
BEALLS GIFT CERTIFI-
CATE 100.00/ selling
for 85.00 Linda
341-2271
BOW FLEX Schwin
Bow Flex. Excellent
condition. 746-0714
$99.99
CHANDELIER Beautiful
lighting for dining rm or
formal entry. See pic on
Craigslist #4072048315.
$60.00 352-322-1160
CHARCOAL GRILL
KINGSFORD 18.5" ON
WHEELS WITH
COVER $20
352-613-0529
CHILDREN HALLOW-
EEN COSTUMES 1
CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1


LION SIZE 5/6 $8
EACH 352-613-0529
CONCERT SHIRT
Taylor Swift Red Tour,
with matching arm
band, brand new, ($10)
352-613-7493
COSTUME JEWELRY 3
necklaces, 1 pair ear-
rings, 3 watches, nice,
($10) 352-613-7493
DEHUMIDIFIER
Kenmore
excellent condition.
$100 obo
(352) 726-7367
DOG CRATE X LARGE
SOFT SIDE Green
cloth Sturdy never
used $100.
352-270-3909
DOG CRATES SMALL
(2) Black Wire.For pets
up to 25 Lbs.
Clean/Excellent $20.
ea 352-621-0175


2 KAYAK PADDLES- 79
inches long, Ex., $30
each. 352-628-0033
DOMINOES
nice set with case, ($5)
352-613-7493
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
CASE, TUNER, AMPLI-
FIER, and CABLES, ex-
cellent condition, $95,
(352) 465-1813
FINGERHUT GIFT
CARD 100.00!/selling
for 85.00 Linda
341-2271
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct @ $5.001b.
Stone Crab@j6.00Ib
delivered352-897-5001
FUTON Light wood arm
rests small scratches
with mattress black
cover. $40.
352-746-0714
Kitchen Aid Mixer
New $160.
352-465-3086
Masterbuilt Smoker,
new in box, never
used. $250 firm
3 Burner Charcoil Broil
Grill, SS top, w/side
burner & tank $85
(352) 8974681
NECKLACE stainless
steel, biker style with en-
gravable heart, brand
new, paid $150, only
($30) 352-613-7493
OUTSIDE TABLE &
CHAIRS Dark green bar
high 2 chairs glass ta-
ble. $35.00 746-0714
PICTURE FRAMES 4
large nice, ($5)
352-613-7493
PLACE SETTING
w/napkin rings, made
w/brooches
Centerpiece Pitcher
w/flowers and mirror
$200. for all
(352) 795-7254
REFRIGERATOR Good
working make good gar-
age fridge $50. Firm. it
is 21 cf believe its
whirlpool-white.
746-0714
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $95 HAND
HELD HEAVY DUTY
METAL INVERNESS
419-5981
SEWING MACHINE
Elna Pro Quilters
Dream, like new
paid $2k sell for $600.
(352) 212-9978
Sewing Machine
Singer, cabinet style
w/ chair
$75.
(352) 564-9336
SEWING MACHINE
W/CAB. Riccar 101
Deluxe. Storage in
Chair. $45.00 Ruth
352-382-1000
Singer Sewing Mach.
Slantomatic 401
w/ cabinet, Good
Condition $50 obo
352- 628-3100
SINGER
Sewing Machine with
wanut cabinet. Very
good condition. $65
obo (352) 382-1352
SNAKE Ball python with
cage @ many extras
3'female. $99.99.
746-0714
Solar Heating System
for pool. See it in
operation $550
(352) 628-6152
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
Used Shed
8 x 12 Barn Style
$850. (352) 860-0111
WOMEN'S BLACK
RUBBER RIDING
BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW
SIZE 43L EUR
419-5981
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
WATTS ALL $90
352-613-0529

MCedica
Equipment
Hospital Bed
Electric Bed, Good
Condition $200 obo
352-503-9468



STATE QUARTER SETS
40 complete sets,
both mints plus
Wash.D.C., Guam,
P.R. all in mint tubes,
4,240 coins in all
un-circulated.
$1,500 firm for all,
(352) 344-4614
WE BUY US COINS
& CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"CHRISTIAN EDITION"
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
WHITE W/TURQUOISE
TRIM BEAUTIFUL!
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" FENDER
SQUIRE JAGUAR
BASS W/ULTIMATE
SUPPORT GIGBAG
$100 352-601-6625
"NEW" SD50 ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR GOLD
GROVERSSOLID
TOP+GIGBAG!$100
352-601-6625
2 CRANK-UP light
stands for T-bars or
truss $75 both
352-476-2652 / tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
10' LIGHT TRUSS
w/dollies for DJ or
band...$50
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
BASS "UKE" 21"
SCALE, ACTIVE PRE-
AMP W/ PIEZO&POLY
STRINGS $75
352-601-6625
LES PAUL STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
AGED MAHOGONY
TOP & BLACK $75
352-601-6625
ORGAN
LEGEND. Perfect


condition
$300 Firm. You move.
(352) 419-6186
PIANO LESSONS


-W I
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
PLAY SLIDE GUITAR?
LP STYLE ELECTRIC
AGED MAHOGANY &
BLACK $100
352-601-6625
RED-BLUE-GREAN
rotating lights $25 for all
3. 352-476-2652
tommyb@tampabay.
rr.com


JUICE EXTRACTOR
Cuisinart New. Never
used Paid $150. Sell
for $95. or make offer
352-621-0175
NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call
for e-mail picture 40.00
linda 341-2271
RUG- MOHAWK
COCOA INK SWIRL,
10'X13' $100
352-628-3507




Proform C840 Weight
Bench Exerciser
Exc. Cond. $125.
BowFlex/Nautilus
tread/stepper
exc. cond. $125.
(352) 527-0618




BILLIARDS TABLE
American Heritage
1 slate top, leather
pockets, solid mahog-
any, claw feet. All
accessories included.
Plus stainless mini beer
fridge and portable
ice make.
All in area Condition
$1400 for all
(352) 503-7690
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Gun Cabinet
for six guns, wood,
with glass in door,
accessory storage,
$75.
(352) 564-9336
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516
SQUARE TWO LADIES
GOLF CLUB, FULL SET
W/ BAG & COVERS
$650, Ladies golf bag,
brand new $90
(352) 897-4681




2012 Factory Easy tow,
5'hxlO Lawn Trailer
rear gate $850.
Home made dump
Trailer, Good Cond.
$375.
Bob(352) 860-1106
2013 Enclosed
Trailer, 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
$1600. firm
(352) 513-5436


Sell r Swa


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369













New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19 Near Mall)
352-563-2110










Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment




ft





Robin Long

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"






Birds for Sale
Blue Front amazons,
$300 ea. Indian Ring
Necks, $100. ea. Cherry
head & cuban conures,
$175 ea. Nandays $150
ea. Quakers $75 ea.
Fisher Love Birds $35.
ea. 352-637-6967

Doberman
Puppies
3 Males $500. ea
Parents on premises
352-586-3386











DOJHA
Dojha, a 5-y.o.
yellow/white lab re-
triever mix, medium
size, calm, gentle &
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs.
Housebrkn. Beautiful
& in great shape,
wants to sit by your
side. Came to shel-
ter because family
lost their home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288










LILLY
Lilly, a 6-y.o. female
bulldog mix, white
w/black ears,
beautiful, friendly
girl, weighs 36 Ibs.
Heartworm-negaive &
housebrkn. She
loves treats & sits on
command, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Very affec-
tionate, wants to
be by your side.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown-white terrier
mix, weight 65 lbs.,
came to shelter
because owner
could not care for
him, gentle, a bit
shy, very playful,
loves water, gets
along w/other dogs,
loves human friends,
eager to please.
Beautiful dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


REMY
Remy, a gentle
neutered pit bull
mix, wonderful
disposition, 1-2 years
old, lot of energy,
plays w/other dogs.
Does not jump on
people, knows "sit" &
"down", gives paw,
walks well on leash,
likes car rides, gives
kisses, does not
mind cats.
Call Sandy @
224-223-9279.


Ieuy -


CLASSIFIED



Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

Alumacraft
14 ft w/trailer and
extra's $400
(352) 637-5032
BAY KAT
Aluminum outboard,
28 ft, includes trailer &
outboard mtr. 90HP
$9,500. (352) 238-4445
CHAPA 26 ft, 1985
Cabin Cruiser. Brand
new trailer. Needs eng
& prop. $2000 obo
(352) 257-0078
KEY WEST
2013 Skiff 177 Key
West SkiffYamaha 70
4stroke,Trolling
Motor,Jack Plate, GPS,
Alum Trailer. Warran-
ties transferrable
$19,000 352 503-6668
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ALLEGRO BAY
'96, M37 Motor Home
35k mi. good cond.
Needs minor fixes,
$12,000 obo, Trade for
Harley? 352-274-8664
AMERI LITE
By Gulfstream, 2011,
21 MBL, walk around
bed, $9,995 firm.
Franks A-S
352-726-2494
FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k mi. Very
Good cond
MUST SEE $12,000
(352) 628-6643
RIALTA
2002, new tires, AC, &
paint, 59k miles, runs
great, great mileage
$31,500. 352-238-4445
TIFFIN
'04, Allegro, Class A,
30 ft., 2 slides, jacks,
generator, new awn-
ing, 32k mi., 50 amp
service $32,500, Call
to learn all that goes
with it 352-527-2327
TOWBAR: Roadmaster
5000 Stainless Steel
Towbar. Universal fit.
One (1) person opera-
tion. NEW $600...asking
$300 or first best offer!!
352-426-4563




KEYSTONE
Springdale 2005
Model 298-BHL
super slide out, awn-
ing, tandem axle,
coupling hitch anti
sway bars, 30 amp
hkup. Asking $9,500
or will consider shal-
low water boat as
trade, (352) 503-9133
before 9pm
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Travel Trailer
2011, 20' Rockwood
MiniLite, Self Con-
tained. Pwr. Slide out.
Ex. Cond. $13,500
obo(352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**

BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333


Leek

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
fnr nDrFt sR352-6T7-2tff


DI aisle:
e'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

BMW
'01, Z3, 3.01, manual,
124k mi., green, black
top, garaged, clean.
$7,450., 352-220-2077








CADILLAC
2004 Esclade EXT
1 owner, fully loaded,
dealrshp main,113k mi
$13,500.510-867-5727
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT
4door, power win-
dows, locks, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER 200
2012 4-dr, loaded,
13,000 miles, 1 owner
$19,000 firm Franks A-S
352-726-2494
DODGE
2000 Intrepid Runs and
looks great, 180,000
new tires $1300
352-678-7049
FORD
'02, Explorer,
106k mi., good cond.
$4,500 negotiable
352-637-2258 or
634-2798
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
Elandra, 4-dr, 41,000
miles, sun roof, loaded
$10,888. Franks A-S
352-726-2494
MERCURY
2001 Grand Marquis
Excellent Condition
82k miles $5,700.
(352) 527-9897
NISSAN
2010 Altima SL,38,500
miles, sunroof, leather,
Champaign, loaded.
Garaged, mint. 30+mpg.
$16,500. 352-382-0005
SATURN
1999, S11,4 door,
low miles, extra clean,
1 owner, $3,250.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, ConvArtic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pris-
tine, 11k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
2004 Corvette Torch red
coupe, excellent
condition, LS1 engine,
6-speed, Z51 perfor-
mance handling, fully
optioned with 2 roofs,
42,000 miles, one
owner, never hit or
abused. $24,000 phone
(352) 527-2927 or
harmarienkins
(5va hoo.com
CHEVROLET
'82, Corvette, T-tops,
silver green matalic,
automatic, very rare
car, mint. cond.
$16,500 obo, 302-8265






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $29,500 obo
352-302-8265




BIG SALE
eCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
2001 S-10 LS, 4Cyl, 5
spd, air, 44K mi, mint
cond. New tires, N/S
$7500 (813) 410-6976
DODGE
2500, 01, 6 Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $6800.
OBO(352) 465-3086
FORD
1979 Box Truck
460 eng, low miles
dual wheels, am/fm
$1000.obo
(352) 637-4011
FORD
2004, SD250 supercab
Lariat 158" WB, 5.4L,
V8, one owner, runs
& looks great. Over
road high miles $6,900
527-0989, Must See!
FORD
2007 Explorer Sport
Trac XLT, Blue, bge
Ithr. int, tow pack, 68K
miles, just serv, $15,900
obo (352) 897-4204
SOLD
CHEVROLET
2005 1/2 ton, SWB,
auto, P/S, V-6, just
truck AC, like new
$5,500. Franks A-S

Misc. Notice


TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$9,000 (352) 726-3730
(352) 422-0201




BUICK
2006, Ranier, CXL,
98k miles, Nice
Asking $8,000.
352-201-1952

CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 1 owner $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
'99, Tahoe, 166k miles,
dual AC, clean inte-
rior 1 owner, $3,500
obo, 954-294-8979
Pine Ridge
FORD
2007, Escape, XLS,
$7,950.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2003, Wrangler,
4 cyc., 5 speed,
soft top, $9,950
352-341-0018




JEEP
04, Wrangler, Sport
4.0 literauto trans,
exc. cond. many
extras, call for details!
$13,500. 352-563-6666




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan,
Fully loaded, dual slid-
ing drs. 35mpg, V6,
Perf. cond., garaged
New tires, Crystal Riv.
$4,500. (727) 207-1619
FORD
2004 Freestar, 81,400
mi, A/C good cond,
new rear brks, $5250
OBO (352) 341-4536
TOYOTA
2005 Sienna
1 ownerx- clean,
Ask for Donna(352)
860-3115,302-0778




Harley Davidson
2000, 883, 7K miles
$2,995.
(352) 398-5903
HONDA
2006, BTX 1300
Garage kept $6,500.
(352) 398-5903
HONDA
98 Shadow Aero
VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh
walls, retro look, 18k.
ml $3200 352-465-7812
HONDA REBEL
2009, 100 mi, like new,
many accessories.
Pine Ridge. $2995
OBO (419) 307-8954
KAWASAKI
'06, KLR 650 Endoro,
15k miles, runs great, 1
owner, call for details
$2,500. (352) 344-1223
SUN
149 CC Motor Scooter
Like New, 100 miles,
No dents or scrates
$900 obo, 503-3103
YAMAHA
1985 Virago, 1000 cc,
runs good.
$1,200 or best offer
(352) 201-5104

Misc. Notice


367-1013 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT
The Petitioner, Scott Crowe, on behalf of Razhiel Crowe, hereby give notice of
their intention to petition the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners to
vacate a portion of that certain plat of Laurel Ridge Number One, as described in
Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof.
BY: /s/ Scott Crowe
Petitioner
EXHIBIT "A"
10' easement located on the rear of Lot 51, Block 6, of Laurel Ridge Number One,
according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 15, Pages 13 through
23, inclusive, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
October 6 &13, 2013.


369-1013 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
AMENDED NOT I C E
A Special meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, Oc-
tober 21, 2013 beginning at 5:00pm in the Conference Room of the Law Office
Grant & Dozier, LLC, located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida, to discuss:
* Foundation Governance Issues.
* Possible Discussion Hospital Transaction Matters.
* Other.

N OT I C E OF EXECUTIVE SESSION MEETING DURING MEETING
The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold an Executive Session meeting
on October 21, 2013 at 5:10pm during the regular meeting under the authority of
Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session will be closed to the public
to allow the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees to meet with the board's
Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy related to litigation ex-
penditures in all pending litigations.
Present at the Executive Session will be Debbie Ressler (Trustee), Robert Priselac
(Trustee), Krista Joseph (Trustee), Mark Fallows (Trustee), William Grant General
Counsel, Bruce Blackwell, Esquire, Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry Richard, Esq., Taylor
Ford, Esq., Glenn Burhans, Esq., Bridget Smitha, Esq., Vincent Falcone, Esq., Andrew
Hand, Esq., Ashby Burks, Esq., Warren Bloom, Esq., Bruce Giles, Esq., and Court Re-
porter.
The Executive Session will be held in the Conference Room of the Law Office of
Grant & Dozier, LLC, located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida and will begin
at 5:1 Opm. When the Executive Session commences the door will be closed. At the
conclusion of the Executive Session, the meeting of the Board will be reconvened
and the public is invited to rejoin.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board of-
fice at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this
Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250.
Published in the CITRUSCOUNTY CHRONICLE, October 13, 2013


369-1013 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Ambrose Saunders, Joseph D.
4734 N Apache TrI, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Blocks, totes, metals, aluminum, plastics, papers, appli-
ances, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Burns, Brian
4593 N Canoe Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Cochran, Janet L.
295 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosedbuildings; except for
junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for no
more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in
receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully es-
tablished and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary
landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on
the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: TV, wood, a shelf, blocks, and other miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Cochran, Janet L.
295 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Diaz, Jose E.
323 S Barbour St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Dyess Jr., Curtis & Teresa L.
5312 W Atlanta Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: One Ford Ranger truck with expired tag dated 11/09, one large cabin boat
and trailer with no visible tags, and one bass boat with trailer with no visible tags.
Dyess Jr., Curtis E. & Teresa L.
5312 W Atlanta Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed lifter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized lifter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken furniture, broken boat
parts, car parts, car tires, metal, plastic, wood, and other miscellaneous trash and
debris.
Eister, Karl D. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
56 S Jeffery St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for


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junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Aluminum, plastics, metals, boxes, fires, garbage, cou-
ple trailers with debris on them, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in
an unenclosed area.
England, Shannon & Charles
4264 S Plumtree Ter, Inverness, Fl 34452
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Half Ass Ranch LLC
1806 N Troy Loop, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: Using a box
car trailer as a shed.
Harding, Marian McGeoch **REPEAT VIOLATION-
2650 N Reynolds Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of junk and debris throughout the
property, household items, household garbage, metal and plastic debris, broken
wooden fencing, broken plastic buckets, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Hodges, Ronda L.
3472 E Deer Run Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Plastics, papers, tote, garbage, and other miscellane-
ous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Hotz, Patrick Kelly & Kathleen Marie -Represented by Michael T. Kovach, Jr., Esq.**
1140 N Sidiki Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: Expired Permit
#201008995 13x1l3 Gazebo (expired 5/10/12); Expired Permit #201008993 16x16 shed
(expired 8/18/12); After the Fact permit #201008996 tiki w/ electric (not issued); After
the Fact permit 2#201009283 16x32 workshop w/ electric (not issued); After the Fact
permit #201009286 9x15 lean to w/ electric (not issued); After the Fact permit
#201009284 12x16 storage w/ electric (not issued); and After the Fact permit
#201009285 12x1l7 storage w/ electric (not issued
Jennings, Michael & Rebecca
9439 S Kingfish Ter, Floral City, Fl 34436
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Key, Sarah L. & Walker, Roosevelt & Mary K.
191 S Snapp Ave, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Two refrigerators, plastics, wood, bucket, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Lolly, Michael & Beam, Brenda
5308 W Bandy Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Multiple bags of household garbage, car tires, house-
hold items, broken furniture, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Lolly, Michael & Beam, Brenda
5308 W Bandy Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any


property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Madrigal, Rene J.
4735 El Uza Knowlton Dr, Inverness, Fl 34452
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Marmon, Suzanne R. ATTN: Carmine Bynes
416 S Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Marmon, Suzanne R. ATTN: Carmine Bynes
416 S Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Chairs, mattresses, plastics, papers, pile of tree debris,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
OBrien, Sean
6670 S Frankfurter Way, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapteri 8 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: The swimming
pool constructed in the backyard has not been permitted and a permit was never
applied for.
Rogers, Randall L. & Kelley
1218 W Stafford St, Hernando, Fl 34442
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapteri 8 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore To Wit: Expired pool
permit #200606748.
Swengel Jr., Robert 0.
5318 W Blade Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car tires, household garbage, wood, plastic debris,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
The Julia J. Griffitt Living Trust
3068 N Satin Flower Pt, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The vehicle with the flat tires parked on the property.
Tuminello, Vito & Cacioppo, Cara
5756 W Costa Mesa Ln, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Expired permit
#200610014 for an in ground pool. Permit expired on 3/27/2008.
Waterfield, Richard B.
3511 N Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3140; Temporary Uses: Temporary
uses of land may be permitted in designated land use districts by the issuance of a
Temporary Use Permit, subject to the provisions of the Land Development Code, and
shall meet all the requirements of this section. An application for a Temporary Use
Permit shall be filed with the Director of the Land Development Division. The appli-
cation shall include: A site plan showing the location of the Temporary Use on the
property, and the written approval of the ownership or management of the shopp-
ing center, if such Use is to be conducted within a shopping center, or written ap-
proval of the owner of the property. Tents are allowed to remain for a period of no
more than sixty (60) days. Tents shall comply with the provisions of the Florida Build-
ing Code.
Wright, Russell J.
3624 E Delight St, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
Wright, Russell J.
3624 E Delight St, Hernando, Fl 34442


It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Two piles of debris covered by tarps and other miscel-
laneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Yanke, Mariana T. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
1606 N Little Carmen Ter, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tree debris, glass windows, car parts, upside down spa,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL
MASTER CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE one (1) time, Sunday, October 13, 2013


368-1013 SUCRN
BOCC-OMB-RFP # 003-14
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Public Relations Services
RFP #003-14
The Tourist Development Council is seeking to hire a qualified public relations firm to
develop and implement a strategy based on recent visitor profile research that uti-
lizes public relations tactics to attract individual and group visitors to Citrus County to
stay in paid accommodations.
Possessanextensvemedareachwithcontactsfarpnt, internetand
broadcast media in identified targeted niche and affinity markets for Citrus
County.
Respond to edtcitad leads, proactively write and pitch stories that
p o s i t i o n
Citrus County as a premier Florida vacation destination.
Wite and dcstibute press releases that feature sped events and
assets to
create greater awareness of what the area has to offer.
Report monthly on PR initiatives, media mentions and
value.
Plan media familiarization tours and recruit qualified
media to attend.
Maintain and update editorial calendar and assist with
copy writing needs.
Promde a representative qucterity to attend Tourist Development
C o u n c i I
meetings and provide a public relations report.
S Retcaher should not exceed $30,000 canudly and should include
t r a v e I
quarterly to TDC meetings in Lecanto Florida. Additional public relations initi
atives including travel to trade shows or media missions will be considered
on an individual basis.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before November 1, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for November 1, 2013 a 2:15 PM at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information
conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Additional Notice a public tallying of the evaluations for Proposals RFP 035-13 Utility
Billing & Customer Service Transition & RFP 039-13 License Compliance Special Mas-
ter Services is scheduled for October 18, 2013 @ 10:00am at West Sovereign Path,
Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 13, 2013


Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9lam-lpm- Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm- Service: Mon-Fr; lam-6om Sat Bamn-4pmn

241S SnostBv .Hmssa F 44 w.VIL GE A ILL C* o







$LEAOR FO



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0 0 *@3"09
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$19999O ARONT
AUOATC PWR IDOS PWR OKS RUS CNROA//S. LAE
Fo qaifedlsseswthacrdi coe f68 o ige trog SutestTyoa iane.Cosd-n lae n e 214CrnyL odl# 51,exlue Hbid, ih utmti rasmsio adseec qupen. din oton nceae pymn. 16.0 e mnt or36mn0s







OFTOOA $ 6
DISCOUNT
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Ofh ffl sonyvaiforqalfe byrswth70becn*cr. nlueOalmn.atue ebts n icnivs Myntiecobne:ihin.ohrprmtin. xies1 .-3

VISAUES: 0SERV 0C.:
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 ESCAPE
$26,580 MSRP
-640 NICK NICHOLAS DISCOUNT
-1500 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH
-500 FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CUSTOMER CASH

23,G4@


NC3169


iW W N3C211 W


2013 FIESTA SE 2013 FUSION SE 2013 CMAX HYBRID SE
$17,090 MSRP $25,920 MSRP
300 NICK NICHOLAS DISCOUNT -770 NICK NICHOLAS DISCOUNT $26,920 MSRP
-13000 MATCIKNGHOSD CASCU -1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CUSTOMER CASH -130 SPECIAL ADDED DISCOUNT
-1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CASH -500 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -850 NICK NICHOLAS DISCOUNT
-250 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH -500 FORD CREDIT RETAIL BONUS CUSTOMER CASH -1000 MATCHING DOWN BONUS CUSTOMER CASH

15,45@ 23,150 r24,940


2007 FORD MUSTANG PREMIUM 2009 HONDA CIVIC LX 2009 PONTIAC TORRENT 2011 TOYOTA COROLLA LE 2007 FORD EXPLORER 2007 MERCEDES-BENZ E350
Top down wind in the hair tun.NP5901A CreampuffFonlyI 12kmiles.INP5902PRightsize8 5Fuelsaver, 9 4 mwileaet 47A
$15668$17868 $17,668 $17968 8,668 $20968
IF, ... ., .....
4-_9-


2012 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED
Don't miss this one. NP591 3
$26.968


2010 FORD F150 FX2 SUPER CAB 2010 LINCOLN MKT 2009 FORD F350 4X4 CREW 2013 FORD C.MAX HYBRIDSEL 2012 CHEVY SILVERADOC1500 CREW
One owner & o 28k miles. NP5909A Affordable lincoln. N3T401 A Loaded CABELA's truck. N4TO30A Only 4k mles on his hbid. N 88 Only 16k miles. N3T1 13A
$26.668 $29.968 $29.968 $29.988 $29.968


- I -


ICU
NIWK


-L


FORD CREDIT


BLUE OVAL C FD


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00


GENUINE PARTS. Flora
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Homosass "je
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness a Springs H H9
726 -1 Hwy.91
SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT Michelle Russo Spring Hwy. 50
www.nicknicholasford.com Salesperson of the Month Hill _________Brooksville
Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Trade-In Assistance Bonus
Customer Cash available to those who currently own or lease a 1998 or newer Ford/LM/Competitieve Car, Truck or SUV who trades in or have a lease expiring by Sept. 30, 2013. Model Select Vehicles Trade-in
Assistance Bonus Customer Cash (PGM#33368) (National). Offers expires Oct. 31, 2013.


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 D7


*1 7v 9 99




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2013 CHEVROLET
CAMARO
MSRP from....E...... 23,455
Crystal Discount..... 5,O00
AS LOW AS


$18,455


2014 CHEVROLET
IMPALA
MSRP from............s 26,860
Crystal Discount.......s 4,000
AS LOW AS

$22,860


2013 CHEVROLET
SPARK


MSRP from ............. $12,170
Crystal Discount. ........ 1,240
AS LOW AS $1,930


2014 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX


MSRP from ............. $24,360
Crystal Discount........ 3,500
AS LOW AS $20,860


2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO


Model Year
Clearance!
SAVE UPTO$9,400'


UNL AT RYTA HEROE


, AI


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET


fil A II


I800584 8755 ext10 CRYSTAUMTOSCOM
1035 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448
Sales: Monday-Friday 8:00am-8:OOpm a Saturday 9:00am-7:30pm Sunday-Closed
Service: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 7:30am-5:30pm Tuesday & Thursday 7:30am-7:OOpm Saturday 8:00am-4:OOpm a Sunday-Closed
Body Shop: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm a Saturday & Sunday-Closed
*PRICES INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES, TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE
$599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRA-
|TION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013




INSIDE


Section E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13,2013


OME


RONT


ITRULIS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE G


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


I JI IL) 1


A


lb


IkI


The Nest
smoke and carbon
monoxide alarm.
Tony Fadell, a gadget guru who
helped design the iPod and original
iPhone while working at Apple. is counting
on his latest innovation to prove that
a smoke detector can be sleek, smart and
appreciated.
Associated Press


4.)


A


a .1f


(C'
c5 C
((C
I
#1
C
V


c'




E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CONNELL HEIGHTS
3/2/2 with family room & privacy fenced backyard
on a corner lot. Needs some paint and cleaning
and it will be a perfect rental. Minor updates will
make this a great family home as well. Priced to
sell...Owner motivated!
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remaxonet


I AZ b. UHUUlrilLU Un.
LECANTO
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot
* Nearly 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained
* Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows
* Attractive Yard
PETER & MARVIA KOROL LV
(352) 527-7842 m
(352) 422-3875

21 LINE~


ol^^^^ -k-'B^ I i 8N iE2 i
Enter houe 829S





5989 N. ORCHIS TER.
PINE RIDGE
*4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL ri
(352) 527-7842 L i
(352) 422-3875


WATERFRONT
2/2/1 condo with private dock,
2 fireplaces and GATED community,
NICE,
Crystal Clear WATER
LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 If
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net I I
Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverfl.com


2-STORY POOL HOME
wilh 2,500 Sq. Ft Living
3 BR, 2.5 BATH *2-Car Garage
S2005 Built HUGE Lanai (40 Ft.)
* Living & Fam. Rm. Laminate Flooring
* Upstairs LOFT Brick PAVERS
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


WM*


t


REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
i! 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
T m 637.2828

S2 uyer enters house
S2B A number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
Kjq ^J property
presentation in
English or Spanish


16 GERANIUM COURT (SMW)
Elegant 3BR/2BA/2CG Pool-Spa Home.
Living Room & Family Room
Formal Dining Room & Den/Office
Granite Kitchen Counters & SS Appliances
All Dual Pane Windows w/Front Tinted
Pool Heated Solar or Heat Pump
Fully Landscaped, Sep. Irrig. Well
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 -
Email: lounailey@tampabay.rr.com








CITRUS HILLS
CUSTOM BUILT 3BR/2BA HOME. LOTS OF
EXTRAS IN THIS ONE. FORMAL DINING ROOM
PLUS A NOOK. FAMILY WITH PERGO
FLOORING, MASTER SUITE WITH GARDEN TUB,
DUAL SINKS AND A WALK-IN CLOSET. A TOTAL
OF 2,790 SQ. FT. UNDER ROOF.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I I
Email: barbarimils@eoarthink.net IF














#1 in Citrus County


3/2 1700+ SQ. FT. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
for your private showing and fall in love.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM






733 E. BISMARK, HERNANDO
S2007 Pool Home 3BD/2BA/2.5 CG
2,309 Living Sq. Ft. Gourmet Kitchen
Split Floor Plan Expanded Lanai
Beautiful Home at a Fantastic Price!
GEILA'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net iai
www.sellingcitruscountyhomesocom


241N Lecna Hwy. Beel Hil 52-74 ww.IIXcmI0 ..Hy.4 neres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. Hon s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsialRvr7524


OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM




mCiiK^^~tiBWuffii^f

12054 S. BROADJUMP C'., RIVERHAVEN
HOMOSASSA
3/2/4 awesome riverfront home. SS appliances,
open floor plan, screen lanai, extra 2-car garage.
DIR.: Hwy. 19 to W on Halls River Rd., R on Riverhaven Dr.,
R on Prices Creek. Home on comer of Prices Creek and
Broadjump.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.om




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Different take: Try a prairie-style garden


Eco-friendly option works in many locales


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

You don't need to live
on the prairie to have a
prairie garden. Natural
landscapes featuring
mainly native plants
are being sown in yards
across North America
as environmentally
friendly alternatives to
turf grass.
These durable plant
combinations include
flowers, shrubs and


trees. They require lit-
tle attention, add year-
round color and
interest and provide
wildlife-friendly
habitat.
"Many species found
in prairies are native to
other plant communi-
ties found outside the
Midwest, such as wood-
land openings, mead-
ows and barrens, as
well as mountain and
desert habitats," says
Lynn Steiner of Stillwa-


ter, Minn., author of
"Prairie Style Gar-
dens" (Timber Press.
2010). 'And even if
these plants aren't na-
tive to your area, they
are still often better
choices than exotic
plants that come from
outside North
America."
City and suburban
gardens often aren't
large enough to support


See PRAIRIE/Page E9


Phlox daisies are
among the many
meadow flowers
that can thrive in
traditional land-
scapes even
in city settings.
Prairie garden
combinations
include flowers,
shrubs and trees.
They require
little attention,
add year-round
color and
interest and
provide a
wildlife-friendly
habitat.
Associated Press


Specilzngi errist.
Brnwo Resales


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando. Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DpECKER 3.52-464-0647 SIJSAN MILLIN 352F-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKI N 352.-427-3777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HUNT CLUB DETACHED
for

1, ,,1 111 i$379.000 , ,,


BR EN TWOOD
TOWN HOME
_____-____2 BED,
2.5 BATH,
1 CAR
A po ........2 bed,
.... ~ ~,i, I ar gar
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS V'1'I':I furnish
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS Decor
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDEVILLAS Come take a look at this beautiful home that is situated on an oversized home furniture negotiable Tiled in all the wet areas Community center with pool,
Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on 1st tee of the Skyview Golf site Very well maintained 2 bedrooms plus a den, which can be used as a gym, sauna, hottub, public golf course all in a gated community Don't miss
course Professionally decorated, built ins in living room, surround sound, third bedroom Some of the features this home has to offer are extended ana, this one Beautiful view of the pond and fountain from your lanai No
cherry cabinets with roll outs and so much more Move in ready neighbors behind you
MLS 704418 $209,000 MLS 701779 $275,000 in ,, $239,000 MLS 702417 $110,000

-Terms -. 6 Months orMore
Terra~~~ Vit & Brntoo Retas SoilMmesi-nlddwt letl


f E
--- DET
)DVILLAS
ed detached
with lots of
$1.100 #3296


$1. 100


T---,---


________________________-__. ..f W


7


L " L J I" "I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 E3




E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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Ci IIkjid.lE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


River Birch turns out to Inside...


be excellent for shade i


hree years ago I planted a matched
pair of River Birch trees, Betula
nigra, in my garden. I chose 3-foot
tall saplings with three joined trunks,
each forming well-spaced and
potentially attractive trunks.
One is at at the northwest cor-
ner of the house about 6 feet
from the garage wall and 7 feet
back from the front corner The
other is 32 feet away, directly
across to the west beyond a 4-
foot wide stone path and the
18-foot wide firebreak lawn '
which doubles as a gently-
sloped turf driveway with a Jane
level potential RV/boat parking JAN
area at the top by the garage
side door GAR
The planting bed flanking
the garage is raised about 10 inches above
the path. Soil was made from half-
decayed plant material and half yellow
sand from the back yard before the River
Birch was planted. Between the garage
wall and the new tree is a 4-foot wide ac-
cess path and perimeter barrier of three-
quarters of an inch No. 57 limerock, 4
inches deep, which leaches alkalinity into


the subsoil. Insects shun strong alkaline
soil, so no ants, termites or their preda-
tors spiders, scorpions, snakes, etc. -
lurk close to the house. I wondered if the
alkalinity would affect the
young tree's growth.
River Birch grows naturally
along rivers and seasonally in-
undated wet areas from north
Florida to Massachusetts and
west to Kansas in cold zones 4-
9. It adapts well to dryer con-
ditions, but then needs ample
humus in the soil and irriga-
tion during the first year to be-
Weber come established. Once its
IE'S deep, wide-ranging root sys-
tem develops, it should need
DEN no supplemental irrigation ex-
cept in droughts or in rainless
April and May locally It prefers full sun
for more than six hours a day, but toler-
ates partial shade. Acidic soils, pH below
6.5, are ideal. It can grow in compacted
soils or lighter well-drained sandy ones.
Sand, or silica grains, cannot be com-
pacted, only displaced.
See JANE/Rage EO10


Beautiful pocketwatch can be used simply for display


ear John: Many
years ago you were
able to help my
mother with a
Tiffany plate .
she had which
she had treas-
ured for many .
years. She
passed away in
2007 at the age
of 92! I have
many of her
lovely things,
and one is her John S
grandfather's SIKOF
pocket watch. AT
On the back
side it opens
and says "Remontoir"
There is a serial number
above that which is also
stamped on the other side.
That number is 116414.
There is something writ-


ten in script which I can-
not really make out but
could be "Quality Supe-
rior" in another
language I am
guessing. Below
that is "Gen-
eve," in an en-
;T I. graved box. It is
Also stamped
with I believe a
14 on the oppo-
site side of the
watch, indicat-
ikorski ing it is 14 carat
SKI'S rather than 18
nc carat gold.
I am attach-
ing photos of it,
along with the antique
chain that attaches to it so
it can be worn around the
neck.


See ATTIC/Page E5


Special to the Chronicle
This pocketwatch was manufactured prior to World War I, possibly as early as the 19th century. Although still ca-
pable of being used as a functional timepiece, a watch like this can also be used purely as a display piece.


PAGE E6


For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


kL

1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

The watch needs some work. It
ran for many years but currently
does not, and when I went to look at
it, the glass over it and the gold piece
which holds it in place had come
loose. So I expect it will take some
money to get it in working order
Is it worth it? If so, where can I get
it repaired, or perhaps sell it? If it
was my mother's grandfather's
watch, it would have to be from the
late 1800s, I would think. But even
Google has not been able to help me.
So I turn to our resident expert!
Thank you for any help you may be
able to provide. S.M., Citrus Hills
Dear S.M.: Your hunting case
ladies watch was made in Geneve,
Switzerland. The time of production
is prior to World War I and perhaps
as early as the 1890s.
The bezel is the part that holds the
watch crystal in place over the dial.
As long as it is intact, it can be placed
back on the dial without much diffi-
culty The time is set by pressing
down on the little pin just to the right
of the stem. While pressing the pin
down, turn the winding cap and set
the hands to the correct time.
Pocketwatches like these, when
polished, are beautiful to wear as
jewelry If you plan to keep it wound
and use it for a timekeeper, it could
certainly be repaired. However, if
not, there is no need to repair it. Just
use it as a nice decorative objet d'art
Potential dollar value is below $500.
Dear John: Can you tell me any-
thing about this item? I think it is a
piano. It does not play We would like
to sell it but have no idea of its value
or where to sell something like this.
Please let me know what you think.
-D.G., Internet
Dear D.G.: I think you have a fold-
up travel pump organ. There is very
little interest in pump organs; most
sell for very little money For more
information, contact Piano Forte in
Ocala. The website is www.forte
pianogallerycom.
Dear John: I am sending photos of
an antique chair we recently ac-
quired. I believe it is Spanish Revival,
but would like to know what time pe-
riod it is from. Also, what, if any, value
does it have? -JK, Internet
DearJ.K: Your oak side chair was
made in England. The twist-turned
uprights and front stretcher are typ-
ical of English furniture.


Special to the Chronicle
This chair is done in a style called
Jacobean Revival and was probably
manufactured in England sometime
after World War I.
The style is Jacobean Revival,
taken from the late 16th century
Your chair was manufactured be-
tween World War I and II. Potential
dollar value is below $50.
DearJohn: I was visiting with fam-
ily in Columbus, Ohio, this past week
and saw an unusual glass pipe be-
longing to one of the cousins. I am
sending three pictures to describe
the pipe. Have you ever seen any-
thing like it? Perhaps we can start a
discourse on its history and thereby
gain some information. TS., In-
ternet
Dear T.S.: I do not think it is a to-
bacco pipe. In order to help you, I
need better photographs.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, P.O. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. corn.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


PINE RIDGE
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 527-1820


2Iog M4792 W. Custer Dr.
MLS 705312 $224,000
Impeccably maintained 3/2/2 (+ den) home
perfectly situated on a 1-acre lot.
Directions: 491 or 486 to Pine Ridge Blvd., to north on
Pinto to right on Custer Dr
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
NEW LISTING




~l'^.:. ... ~.7s
[1 {t e 4141 W. Hacienda Dr.
MLS 705887 $399,000
Nearly 6 acre equestrian estate. Lovely 3/2/2 pool home.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700
1PI: I IRTIJM


QSmPrudential
open 7 Days Florida Showcase
A wOpen 7 Dasrties
A Week!d. Properties


,w as. 268 N. Highview Ave.
M LS 705753 $114,900
3/2/2 readyfora QUICK sale.
Oirectons: Rte 486, to Essex Ave, Ron Keller, L on Fresno, Ron
Pearson St, L on HighviewAve. Or, te 44, to HighviewAve.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING


"Pl~itl"' ""
o Klt 3260 N. Pinelake Village Pt.
MLS 705870 $324,700
Tastefully decorated 3/2.5/2 pool home
in private, gated community.
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036
NEW LISTING


G_MWI- .. m w j Ammo --
,,,' 5371 N. Red Ribbon Pi.. 1708 W. Spring Meadow Lp.
72.LEM MLS 705904 $219,000 MLS 705820 $94,900
ML 75 4Move-in ready, maintenance free
Really nice 3/2/3 pool home. Lots of "extras". 2/3.5/1 Townhome.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
CALL TODAY RENTAL
ZL ~- 1 '


l .1 I" t" 2392 N. Loma PI.
MLS 358186 $49,500
2bd/2ba mobile home in 55+ community.
Gift-6 months dues paid at closing.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


!./- -l-int -l' 7l E. Hartord SI. 3U .5A
FIL ;.u.-uu $750
Move-in ready- Fully Furnished -
2bd/2ba Condo w/Carport. $750 F/L/SD
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3




'' rfirlS 2178 W. Snowy EgreL PI.
MLS 703006 $93,900
3bd/2ba home w/an extra private lot.
Directions: Citrus Springs Blvd. to north on Elkcam
to R on Golfview, L on Ryan to Ron Snowy Egret
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
NEW LISTING


"10s4 3652 W. Blossom Dr.
ZJ E6 MLS 705861 $292,000
Beautifully maintained 3/3/3 w/pool.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
NEW LISTING
,.,


,_' 240 E. Glassboro Cl. 16.2A
4",ils MLS 705799 $54,500
2/2 corner unit condo.
Upgraded features.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947
BRENTWOOD RENTALS


Choose from one of three unfurnished, completely
maintained properties in The Brentwood gated
neighborhood. All for less than $1,000 per month.
All three units have a family social membership to
the Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club included
in their more than reasonable rent.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


-Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
-First Time Home Seller


nume. Duywr/a 56llr .1Uuyu yl--
I 1 i .. I ,1 ,, II I I I I II1 I hII I h I I hI I i ,,,lI ...I
[E, I1 I ,h II. ... I .. i I0,h i . ,, .I I I ,, .. Ih h ,1,1 ,I I1 ,, ,,,,S[I,, . i i h ,, &


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD')


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 E5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For a different bulb, try planting alliums


Whimsicalplant has many goodpoints


Associated Press

Beautiful and sturdy with a flair
for the dramatic, alliums are a
graceful way to add color and archi-
tectural dimension to your garden.
With large globes of tiny white,
purple, yellow or blue flowers that
rise from bulbs on slender green
stems as high as 4 feet tall, they look
like giant, fluffy lollipops some-
thing Willy Wonka would have
planted in the Chocolate Factory
garden.
Most bloom in late spring or early


summer, so they fill the gap between
spring bulbs and summer
perennials.
They're also easy to grow, and re-
sistant to deer and many other pests.
"For people who are considering
planting them, my advice is, don't
think twice. Do it," says Michaela
Lica Butler, a 38-year-old mother
and gardener in Schweich, Ger-
many, who has planted the giant,
purple Globemaster allium for
years.


See ALLIUMS/Page ElI


[ O00BOSH
al GITTA BARTH
HO H REALTOR
Investors Realty REALTO(R
of Citrus County, inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com




m ~ ~~ ... a ..1 4


I


Associated Press
This undated photo provided by Dig.Drop.Done shows the Globemaster Allium, a hybrid that is
bred for superior strength. Growing at heights of up to 5 feet tall, it's a show stopper.


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I I A fid'lil L -


E1 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Extension Service slates


gardening workshops


Special to the Chronicle
A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Oct 22
at the Citrus County Ex-
tension Building, 3650 W
Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Water quality should
concern all who live in
Florida. This gardening
presentation will offer
landscape opportunities
which are creative and
functional gardening sug-
gestions encouraging
water conservation and
quality Rain gardens, fer-
tilization practices and ir-
rigation management are
topics which offer land-
scape gardeners opportu-
nities to protect our water
resources. Several land-
scape design solutions
will be discussed to aid in
natural water filtration in


the residential landscape.
A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov 14
and 19 at the Citrus
County Extension Build-
ing, 3650 W Sovereign
Path in Lecanto.
Material hardiness zones
are a critical factor in the
proper selection of sustain-
able plants. This workshop
introduces participants to
criteria to consider when
selecting materials, their
placement in the landscape
and potential frost protec-
tion encouraged to reduce
material loss.
The average low tem-
perature in Citrus County
is between 20 and 25 de-
grees and should be con-
sidered when looking at
plants for installation in
local landscapes. How to
care for plants after dam-


aging frost are also topics
for discussion.
A free gardening
workshop will be offered
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10
at the Citrus County Ex-
tension Building, 3650 W
Sovereign Path in Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to
plan and prepare garden
projects for the upcoming
milder season. Garden
planning, estimating cost
and garden clean-outs are
important topics to con-
sider when outdoor work
is delayed. It is also a
great time of year to enjoy
the outdoors with activi-
ties like bird watching.
Creating natural
buffers which attract
birds is an excellent proj-
ect to consider during this
time of year These topics
will be discussed during
this presentation.


States sue EPA, seek


wood boiler regulations


Associated Press
ALBANY, N.Y. Seven
states filed a federal law-
suit Wednesday against
the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency over health-
damaging air pollution
from outdoor wood-fired
boilers that have become
popular for residential
heating.
The lawsuit asks a fed-
eral court to order EPA to
review and adopt updated
emissions limits for the
boilers, which have been
banned in some states and
are strictly regulated in
others. The coalition in-
cludes New York, Con-
necticut, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Oregon,
Rhode Island and
Vermont
New York Attorney Gen-
eral Eric Schneiderman


said the EPAs existing
emissions limits haven't
been updated in 25 years
and cover wood stoves but
not wood boilers. Schnei-
derman cited EPA data
saying emissions from
wood-burning devices ac-
count for 13 percent of all
soot pollution in the nation.
Soot is linked to public
health problems, includ-
ing asthma, heart attacks
and premature death.
An EPA spokeswoman
said Wednesday that the
agency is reviewing the
lawsuit
New York state adopted
regulations in April 2011 to


require all new wood-fired
boilers sold in the state to
burn at least 90 percent
cleaner than older models.
A plan to extend the rules
to existing boilers was
shelved after a public out-
cry, particularly in rural
areas of northern New
York where numerous
farms and homes that rely
on the heaters would be
forced to pay thousands of
dollars to replace them.
An outdoor wood-fired
boiler, which resembles an
outhouse with a chimney,
heats water that's piped to
the home's radiator
system.


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 E7




E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I fl'r r1,
- qj~.~j~fl TL.r.z.i In ~r A


The Nest smoke and carbon monoxide alarm. Tony Fadell, a gadget guru who helped design the iPod and original iPhone while
working at Apple, is counting on his latest innovation to prove that a smoke detector can be sleek, smart and appreciated.
Associated Press


Associated Press T ony Fadell, a gadget guru who
Helped design the iPod and original
SAN FRANCISCO Smoke iPhone while working at Apple, is
counting on his latest innovation to
detectors frequently produce prove that a smoke detector can be
sleek, smart and appreciated.
more headaches than useful The device, called "Nest Protect," is
the second product hatched from Nest
warnings. The devices have an Labs Inc., a startup founded byFadell
in 2010 in an attempt to infuse homes
irritating habit of shrieking with more of the high-tech wizardry
that people take for granted in smart-
when there's no cause for phones. The Palo Alto, Calif, company
has 270 employees and has raised tens
alarm, and always seem to wait of millions of dollars from investors
that include Google Inc.'s venture-
until the middle of the night to capital arm and Kleiner Perkins Cau-
field & Byers, a venture capital firm
chi when their batteries with a long record of backing innova-
chirp when their battLies tiedes
Iun l, Besides sensing smoke, Nest Protect
run low, is designed to detect unsafe levels of


carbon monoxide. That could broaden
the square-shaped device's appeal, es-
pecially in the growing number of
states that require homeowners to in-
stall carbon monoxide detectors.
Nest Protects price will probably
turn off many consumers. It will go on
sale next month for $129 in more than
5,000 stores in the U.S., Canada and
United Kingdom. Other less-
sophisticated devices that detect both
smoke and carbon monoxide typically
sell for $50 to $80 apiece.
Fadell, who ended an eight-year
stint at Apple Inc. in 2009, is aiming for
an audience that appreciates sleekly
designed products that provide peace
of mind and simplicity
"We want to take the unloved prod-
ucts in your own home and bring them
to life in a way that makes them beau-
tiful," Fadell said while proudly show-


ing off the Nest Protect. "There has
been very little innovation with smoke
detectors in the past 35 years and now
we think we have found a way to make
them less annoying."
Nest Labs' first device was a digital
thermostat designed to learn how to
cool and heat homes to suit the needs
and habits of the inhabitants. It went
on sale two years ago for $249. Fadell
won't say how many thermostats have
been sold so far, but it's done well
enough to reinforce his belief that
there is increasing interest in furnish-
ing homes with the latest trappings of
technology even if it costs slightly
more to do it.
The Nest Protect is equipped with a
variety of sensors for detecting heat,
smoke, carbon monoxide, light and

See Page Ell


i J '




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PRAIRIE
Continued from Page E3

meadows, but many
prairie plants adapt well
to smaller spaces, she said.
"They tolerate less fer-
tile soils, reducing the
need for synthetic fertiliz-
ers. They thrive on less
water, reducing water use.
And they don't require
heavy fossil-fuel input
from mowing and trim-
ming," Steiner said in an
email.
Margaret Brittingham,
an extension wildlife spe-
cialist with Penn State
University, said it takes
some effort to get
prairie plants established
"but once done, they're


easy to handle."
"They're great for at-
tracting birds and butter-
flies," she said. "You can
use them for cut flowers,
too."
To keep neighbors
happy and win official ap-
proval from municipali-
ties, make the conversion
from lawn to meadow look
tended and not unkempt,
Brittingham said.
A few helpful design
suggestions:
Create borders using
hedges, mowed edges, low
fences or walkways. They
act as buffers, keep plants
from obstructing sight
lines and frame an other-
wise natural landscape,
Brittingham said.
Start small. Save
money by converting from


turf to meadow in manage-
able yet visible pieces.
First, eliminate any trou-
ble spots on the lawn, and
then expand gradually,
mimicking nature's
processes of gradual
succession.
Find the right plants
for the right sites. Don't
plant sun-loving prairie


flowers under shade trees,
or plants that like their
feet dry in low spots that
collect run-off.
Go native. Non-native
species generally have less
wildlife value, Britting-
ham said, and are often in-
vasive, eliminating many
native species. Check the
noxious weed control lists


Start small. Save money by

converting from turf to meadow

in manageable yet visible pieces.


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I l 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
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ocE: (352) 795-6633 Realtor
I WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM I
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DUNNELLON 1998 nobility DAW M/H
w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
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16 x 20 work shop w/electric, inside
laundry #703976 $55,000





CRYSTAL RIVER 1 bldg w/9 apts on
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and air Just south of Crystal River High
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HOMOSASSA S/W mobile home, 1
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$45,000





HOMOSASSA nice older mobile w/ 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear
screened porches newer roofover in
2010, newer appliances approximately 2
years old fully fenced backyard with
shed #700919 $22,500


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, i i,,a ...e..... resale; fencing
i i ,. ,i ,i 5 acres totally
I ". I I ..'i "' equipment,
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#704193 $300,000





LECANTO Nice half acre with well,
septic and impact fees paid Mobile not
livable but, take it off and replace with
new Center of county, Lecanto School
Dist #703990 $18,000


Sf.'V^W^.. -.1
HOMOSASSA 4-duplexes, side by side
all new roofs in 2001 & 2002 and central
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septic system #703762 $396,000


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issued for your area and
ensure that none are in-
cluded among the seeds
you sow or in the contain-
ers you plant.
Help spread the word.
Draw a map of your natu-
ral landscape and make it
available through
brochures placed around
your yard. "You might even
include a listing of the
plants you used and where
you got them," Britting-
ham said.
Humanize the project.
Add yard art or something
personal and whimsical,


I FLRA C:] _ll/ITY I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 E9

Steiner said. "For accent
and embellishment, rusted
iron sculptural pieces
blend nicely with the ca-
sual look of a prairie land-
scape. Sundials are nice
additions to gardens fea-
turing these sun-loving
plants. Birdbaths made of
ceramic or stone are prac-
tical as well as beautiful."
By illustrating that your
landscape is cared for and
designed intentionally,
you'll show that you
haven't just allowed
"weeds" to take over,
Steiner said.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
River birch grows naturally along rivers and seasonally inundated wet areas
from North Florida to Massachusetts and west to Kansas in cold zones 4-9.
The trunks have outer bark of silvery cream to pinkish salmon, which flakes
off in large patches to reveal inner bark of a rich coppery-tan color.


JANE
Continued from Page E4

Fast-growing and fairly long-lived at
100 years, the River Birch beside my
garage grew 20 feet tall during the
past three years. Its twin struggled the
first two years, often having wilted
leaves indicating a need for more
water One of its trunks died, so I cut it
neatly at the base collar I allowed two
new suckers to replace the dead stalk.
To help this birch establish, I
added a top dressing of less than an
inch of straight humus in a 3-foot ra-
dius and topped that with a wide
ring of pine needles to shade the
surrounding soil and help retain soil
moisture. Deep roots developed,
and this tree shot up to about 10 feet
tall on its third year
Leaves are 2 to 4 inches long, dou-
ble-toothed on the margin edges and
borne alternately along the twigs.
They turn pale yellow in fall. The at-
tractive group of trunks has outer
bark of silvery cream to pinkish
salmon, which flakes off in large


patches to reveal inner bark of a rich
coppery-tan color Tiny spring flow-
ers are borne in catkin clusters that
attract pollinators. Minute seeds de-
velop in the catkins, which dry, turn
brown and drop off. Wind carries
some seed far from the parent tree.
Birds and other wildlife eat some
seeds and distribute the rest during
their foraging.
The River Birch shades the
garage from spring to fall as
planned. Dew and rainfall off the
roof are probably the cause of its
rapid growth. The limerock insect
barrier around the house perimeter
seems to have no adverse effects on
the River Birch. Shade-loving plants
surround a stone bench beneath the
shady canopy


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of na-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALLIUMS
Continued from Page E6

Varieties
While many people think of the
trademark Globemasters found in
Butler's garden, there are dozens of
varieties of ornamental alliums.
Try the shimmering white flowers
of the Mount Everest allium, or the
fuchsia with metallic undertones in
the Stars of Persia variety, says Kim
Fusaro, head gardener at the Mo-
honk Mountain House resort in New
Paltz, N.Y
If you like the look but need some-
thing a bit shorter, Fusaro suggests
the yellow shades of the moly Jean-
nine or the flavum alliums.
Looking to plant allium in a shady
spot? Try the triquetrum, also
known as three-cornered leeks,
which bear delicate white flowers
with shades of blue and a triangular
stem.
Want something unusual? The
drumstick allium produces egg-size
(and egg-shaped) heads in a rich
burgundy color, while the bulgar-
icum blooms are creamy and bell-
shaped with tinges of green and pink
that hang from baseball-size flower-
heads.
Uses
Alliums are typically displayed
best among perennials as a border
plant, says Amy Dube, a bulb expert
with Dig.Drop.Done, a North Amer-
ican educational campaign promot-
ing flowering bulbs.
They hide their leaves, which
whither quickly, and don't take up
much space, giving room to quickly
emerging perennials.
But don't be afraid to use them
elsewhere.
Hans Langeveld, co-owner of
Longfield Gardens in Lakewood,
N.J., recommends using some of the
shorter, smaller varieties in rock
gardens, where they can thrive in
the well-drained pockets between
rocks.
Some alliums can do well in con-
tainers, while the larger varieties
are perfect for cutting gardens.
"They are gorgeous just by them-
selves, or paired with a large mon-
stera or philodendron leaf or two in
a simple glass," says New York-
based floral designer Rachel Cho.
"They have really long stems that
are very sturdy, so I like to keep
them really tall."


Associated Press
Mount Everest alliums blooming
above hostas and shrubs.
Butler likes to dry allium heads
for centerpieces and even holiday
decorations, spraying them white
and adding sparkles to make deli-
cate winter snowballs.
Planting
Alliums grow best in full sun,
though some do well in part-sun or
shade, and they prefer well-drained
soil.
Plant them in the fall as you would
any other spring-blooming bulb.
Wait until the weather cools to allow
them several weeks to develop a
root system before the ground
freezes, Langeveld says.
The bulbs should be planted at
least 6 to 8 inches deep, even deeper
for the larger bulbs, which can be
the size of a tennis ball.
"The general rule of thumb is to
plant bulbs three times the depth of
the bulb itself, and then you just
want to make sure that the root is
facing down toward the soil," Dube
says.
She recommends spacing the
smaller bulbs about 3 inches apart
and the larger ones up to 8 inches
apart
Deer, squirrels and other garden
pests don't like the oniony taste ofal-
lium bulbs and will generally leave
them alone.


NEST
Continued from Papge E8

motion. It also is pro-
grammed to deliver early
warnings in spoken words in-
stead of a shrill alarm to give
a home's occupants a chance
to check on whether there's
just too much smoke coming
from the oven, steam from the
shower or a real fire hazard.
If it's determined that there
is nothing to worry about, all
it takes is a wave of the arm to
tell Nest Protect to be quiet
Devices in the same home
can also communicate with
each other wirelessely They
can be programmed to send
warnings about possible haz-
ards and low batteries to
smartphones and tablet com-


puters. The Nest Protect can
even communicate with the
company's thermostat prod-
uct to inform it about unsafe
levels of carbon monoxide so
the furnace can be automati-
cally turned off.
The Nest Protect also
lights up in white when it
senses someone in the house
walking by it in the dark. The
device emits a green glow


when the lights are first
turned out in the room as a
signal that it's working fine
and there is no fire danger
For those who don't want
the hassle of batteries, one of
the Nest Protect models can
be plugged into a power out-
let. Only a white model will
be sold in stores, although a
black version will be sold
through Nest Labs' website.


'Lou Miele Rat~ A EIA
,r ER AMERICAN
SieeReaLltor F TA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
i ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
1Cel (32 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697-1685 C1 offir- 352-746-3a600


If it's determined that there is
nothing to worry about, all it takes
is a wave of the arm to tell Nest
Protect to be quiet. Devices in the
same home can also communicate
with each other wirelessly.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tampa lawyer sets up downtown beehive


Unusual urban hobby produces locally-sourced honey


RICHARD MULLINS
The Tampa Tribune

TAMPA If you walk the streets
of downtown Tampa and spot a few
bees buzzing around the flowers and
crepe myrtles, there's a good chance
those bees belong to Paul Maney,
and those bees live in a hive sitting
on the roof of Maney's downtown
law firm office.
The full-time family-law lawyer
has become a part-time beekeeper
And with lots of help from his
daughters and wife, Maney has be-
come perhaps the only agricultural


operation amid the skyscrapers of
downtown, with Tampa Urban
Honey starting to appear on a few
grocery store shelves.
Tampa's hyperlocal food producers
are nowhere near as advanced or di-
verse as urban farming hotspots like
Brooklyn or San Francisco. There are
a few local egg producers. There is
Healthy Heritage that supplies meat
to local farmers markets, and The
Dancing Goat operation supplies goat
milk and cheese. The Poor Old Web-
ber's Land & Sea market has a wide
collection ofveggies, meats and dairy
from Florida producers.


I UIXII r- Tl nul PLoc r/lrlII. -ctuu, LIUU-III IUu LII lCIdI UlIvUwdy. uIVIU U uy
two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely expanded ranch home set up as mother/
daughter. Expansion built in 2006 with its own garage & 1200 sq.ft living
space. Main home built in 1989 could use some updating but very clean, 5
bdrms 3 baths & 2-car garage. Relax on lanai overlooking caged solar-
heated pool. Gorgeous view of 4 stall barn & separate tack & feed rooms.
Wash area, etc. 4 Ig paddocks with improved pasture + 1 acre
underground electric dog containment. Must see to appreciate!!! $369,900
Call Fran Perez@ 352-586-8885 email to: franprealtor@gmail.com
ALSO: 5+ BEAUTIFUL ACRES IN PINE RIDGE FOR $105,000
1 : "' :.w3w M11"1 :: miF "


But for the downtown area, the
Tampa Urban Honey company
could hardly get more local. Maney's
honey is for sale at several local
markets, including the independent
Duckweed Urban Market at the base
of the Element residential tower
downtown. And it's commanding a
nice price: $8 for an 8-ounce bottle
and $15 for a 1-pound bottle all
from a hive that produces 100 to 200
pounds of honey a year with the
proceeds going into a college fund
for Maney's daughters.

See BEES/Page E13


i/ ,, JOANN MARTIN i[
Preferred
REAL ESTATE E

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net
I- .i ,i -I*MIr.iriP-


228 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness
Great Investment opportunity. Nice
4 family with 2 bedrooms in each
unit. Close to Hospitals and
shopping. Coin-op Laundry on site.
Off street parking. Can be purchased
with 224 Pleasant Grove
MLS#700512. Priced at $149,900.


2599 W Apricot
Pine Ridge
Beautiful 2002 Rusaw pool home. 3
bedrooms plus office/den upgraded HVAC
2008, master suite with sitting area, dual
pane windows, bright kitchen w/skylight. A
must see, call today. Priced at
$209,900.
Dir: Rte 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to left on
Apple Valley to right on Apncot.


TODD L. CHAPPEL/Tampa Tribune


A jar of Tampa Urban Honey.


~View

BAN K oWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CRYSTAL RIVER, FL

with small office. $69,500 M[S#7041 8] Fireplace & family room. $92,500
All.m Citrus Realty, INI


Profit From My Experience
Louise Schmid
Broker Associate
352-382-5579
Office 382-1700 1-800-237-1112
All Listings: www.goFLhomes.com


I ur[ VIIIIrlIUnI LJUDL[EIDUII[-EI~I[, rLI
East Cove 3BR/2BA with fishing & boating from
your back yard. $54,995 MLS#704944


DARR UVVl1CU-DU)lnnELi, rL
5 acres fenced. 3BR/3.5 BA on top of a hill.
$165,000 MLS#705895


9 Chrysanthemum Ct
First time offered. Great room,
3 split bedrms, 2 baths & 3 car
garage. High ceilings w/ crown
Moldings. Plant shelves!
Screened lanai! Corner Cul-de-
sac. Built in 2002.
MLS 704639 $160,000


84 Byrsonima Loop
All outside work done for
$170 /month. This free standing
villa boasts 3 bedrms, 2 baths,
fireplace and 2 car garage.
Share heated pool w/ cabana
year round. 2 sides on golf
course. MLS 704842 $149,000


CUSTOM BUILT POOL HOME!
* 3 bedrooms with separate office
* 2.5 baths extended 2-car garage
* Pool has expanded deck for entertaining
* Pavered driveway and walkway
* Spacious kitchen w/Diana Pearl counters
* Wood burning fireplace in family room
* Lush landscaping front and rear
*New roof 2013
#705795 $229,000


GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
S3/2/2 detached villa on the golf course
* Freshly painted interior in neutral color
* Large island kitchen
* Convenient wet bar for entertaining
* Skylights in both baths
* Hardwood floors in kitchen & dining room
* Yard fully maintained by HOA
* Home warranty for the buyers
#705394 $117,900


ICALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
S After Hours 312-6714 Email: roybass tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com '


See.I irtuaI Tours @. II rsi.uIJ IIJI.I.. !II .I.Im


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEES
Continued from Page E12

Maney grew up in Hyde
Park helping his older
brother keep a hive, and
he recently caught the bug
of urban farming. For a
time, he kept a hive on the
balcony of his condo on
Harbour Island. That's
until a painting project on
the building (and his
neighbors) encouraged
him to move the hive.
What might seem like a
perilous task simply re-
quired wrapping blankets
around the hive structure
(with the bees inside) and
carrying it to the roof of his
office on East Madison
Street. Nearly all the bees
learned the new location,
but the few that returned
to the condo he tried to
collect and relocate.
Maney and his family
have learned a lot about
the myths and truths of


bees. Yes, each hive has
only one queen. Newborn
bees function as "nurses"
to nearby larvae until
they're old enough to be-
come "guard" bees to pro-
tect the hive entrance, and
then they become "har-
vesters" that fly around in
search of nectar
The harvesters will
hover in front of the hive
in a cross pattern over and
over to imprint the image
of their hive's location to
find their way back home.
Yes, honeybees sting.
Their natural foes are
weather, disease, birds
and dragonflies, which can
carry a bee off to feed on it.
An average-size hive
may hold 20,000 to 60,000
bees. Honeybees aren't
territorial, so an area like
downtown may have bees
from many hives, and bees
will fly 1 to 3 miles in
search of nectar
Maney's bees cycle
among the flowers around
the Channel District, the


mangroves around Har-
bour Island, the trees of
Seminole Heights and the
bottlebrush flowers down-
town, with each phase in-
fusing the honey with a
distinct flavor A current
batch on store shelves was
likely harvested by the
bees this spring, and it has
such a dark color and fla-
vor that it almost resem-
bles molasses.
There's a widespread
belief among adherents of
the homeopathic move-
ment that eating locally
produced honey helps
with allergies. Because the
honey has trace elements
of pollen compounds, that
helps the body grow accus-
tomed to the chemical
makeup of nearby pollen
without triggering an al-
lergic reaction. That's also
why honey from bees in or-


ange groves tastes differ-
ent than honey from wild-
flower fields or downtown
Tampa. Unfortunately for
people who suffer amid
clouds of oak pollen, bees
tend not to favor oak trees.
Another myth: Puffing
smoke around a hive as
beekeepers do doesn't
stun bees. Rather, the
scent tricks bees into
thinking a forest fire is
near so they better hunker
down to "wait for the sig-
nal to bug out," Maney
said.
That's the time to har-
vest the honeycombs,
which Maney pulls out,
using a hot knife to deli-
cately slice a layer of wax
that holds the honey in
the comb. With a
makeshift centrifuge, he
spins the honey out for fil-
tering and bottling. Even


***Foreclosure List***
4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview
705705- $174,900 Estates, 705702- $189,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129
2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello Deep Water Canal Front
705061- $74,900 Home 705665
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 John Maisel 352-302-5351
Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over Immaculate 3/2/1 on half
two acres! 705223 $89,900 an acre. 705068 $82,900
Barbara Stone 352-586-3072 Steve McClory 352-422-3998
Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen.
Springs. 705093 $99,900 704264 $124,900
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047
3/2/2 on over an acre. Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on
705142 $124,900 an acre. 705087 $149,900
Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129
Custom built 3/3/3 on 1.11 Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home,
acre. 705148 $235,000 dbl. lot. 704938 $349,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 John Maisel 352-302-5351
Desirable Brentwood Estates 2/1 in Yankeetown.
3/2/2 det. villa. 704862- $119,900 704923 $19,900
Barbara Stone 352-586-3072 Steve McClory 352-422-3998
Beverly Hills 3/1 Handyman's Cozy 2/1/1 in Beverly
Delight. 705153 $41,550 Hills. 704381 $49,900
Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129
Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres.
mobile, 1 acre. 704257 $22,900 704781 $34,500
Yolanda Canchola 352-219-2196 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY FROM 1-3PM
5956 N. HAZELWOOD DRIVE, BEVERLY HILLS (MLS#703873)
Directors: Pine Ridge Blvd. to Flagstaff. Turn right on Alamo and Left on Hazelwood.


the various rows in the
honeycomb will have dif-
ferent flavors as the bees
are collecting nectar from
different flowers through
the year
To help out "newbees"
to the local honey move-
ment, there's a Florida
State Beekeepers Associa-
tion, with a local chapter
in Seffner that holds semi-
nars and meetings every
second Tuesday. A few
local beekeepers have
businesses transporting
hives as far away as Cali-
fornia and New England
as a portable pollination
service for farmers.
Meanwhile, the home
beekeeping movement has
grown so sophisticated
that you can buy a pack of


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 E13

bees, a queen bee and hive
starter kit for less than
$100 online and yes, the
bees travel live through
the U.S. mail. Recent
changes in Florida law
have opened the door to
more "cottage" agricul-
tural projects such as
beekeeping.
Maney's daughters are
big helpers in the project,
which involves preparing
the jars, labeling the lids
and counting the money
Increasing production
would mean adding more
hives, Maney said, some-
thing he has considered.
Given that the Duckweed
market sold out of his
honey last week, that may
influence his decision to
keep up with demand.


Pine Ridge Horse Properties



fSee all of Pine Ridge at
www.PineRidgeHorseProperties.com
If you are looking fora knowledgeable REALTOR to
help you find just the right horse property in Pine Ridge,
Sherri Parker is your equestrian real estate expert. Sherri
is an equestrian, lives in Pine Ridge Estates and has
Sherri is w:ell connected inI
Pine Ridge real estate and
personally knows all horse
properties for sale in Pine Ridge
Estates. If you are looking for a
home with horse property,
stables, stalls, horse barn, I '.
fenced pastures, etc., call Sherri.
Pine Ridge Estates is an equestrian community with
minimum 1 acre lots. Pine Ridge Florida also offers 28 miles
of horse trails, golf courses, tennis courts and lots of privacy.
Contact Sherri C Parker, Your Pine Ridge Realtor' Today
For Your Next Horse Home In Pine Ridge Estates.
I~ II,

&AscaeRATR, LL IIuratr~o~o


ALL NEW HUGE BONUS ROOM
* 2/2/2 *Roof *3/2/22 .Poolw/lg. lanai
* Carpet, tile, wood Cabinets 'Library Family room
. interior paint Granite 10' + tray ceilings Sound system
SCeiling fans Chandelier Many built-ins Well for yard
#703312 $89,950 #700772 $255,000
OVER 3,000 FT. OF LIVING
*4/3/2 Built in 2006
*All oversized rooms Island kitchen
Upgraded appliances Vaulted &tray ceiling
3 walk-in closets Huge screened lanai$19900





E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
3br 2ba $650 Incl,
Appliances, Water-
Trash, Fenced yard,
Pets ok,352-587-2555

Floral City
2/1, fenced yard
newly remodeled
$500. mo. inc. trash
p/up (352) 344-1521




3 BR, 2BA, Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500.
(352) 212-4265
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182

ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181


BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833

HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2,14 acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on /2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, 1 BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances incl. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565
Castle Lake Park
INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt
scnd lanai, steel roof,
caged inground pool,
1 acre, no HOA fees,
$69k (352) 238-4521


Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171

Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500, furn. lot rent
$245. incl. trash &
water (219) 929-8909
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090














-i II-: -1m tD]Lj[


AffK0Ng
RENTAL MANAGEMENT"
REALTY, INC
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHomreRentals.comn
CRYSTAL RIVER
9469 W.Wimonsin Ct............. $650
2/2 Nce 2 slory vlla
9660 W.Camphor Ln. .............. $800
3/2/2 Nice home on .orne lot, .lh ireploce
11640 W. Blayslre Dr........ $1,300
2/2 slond condo,rwl a great ew oflthe wolte
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
817S. Adams (H) .................. $615
2/151 Crutehome with Flohda room
8180 N. Dwal Dr. (CS) .......... $1,000
3/2/2 Golf oulh om look th 7th ol
HOMOSASSA
3280 S. Miclligan .................... $675
r" i1...1li..I 'j.. |,U,llri| *. !
u bsl 21/2/ couse l, lman m incImed
LECANTO
3441 1. appel t ................ $525
2/1 Charming cottage, easy access to lakes
3069 W. Bermuda Dunes $850
2/2/2 Beau mul home in Black Diamond

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL
[11"1711ql [TrII1[ r, I"1{
NEED A
GOOD TENANT?
J

2/2/1 $700
3/2/2 $750
3/2/2 $850
2/2/2 Pool Care Included $900

3/1 $600
2/2/1 $700
2/2/11 $700

3/2 Doubiede $1,000
Jennifer Fudge
SCheryl Scruggs
,Property Manager/
'Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo. &
LECANTO
Newer Duplex 2/2
(352) 628-2815

HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114, 257-6461

INVERNESS
2/1, $625. mo.
412 Tompkins Street
352-895-0744











Available Now!
2 Bedrooms
Rental
SAssistance
Available
Call Monday Through Fnday
sam 12pm & 1pm 5pm
(352)489-1021
TDD 800-955-8771
lt 1sr Institution is an equal
" opportunity provider & employer


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037










CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528





Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001





HERNANDO
1 Room Cottage, $500
mo. incld's elect. & ca-
ble, dep. req. 341-0787

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





INVERNESS
2BR/1IBA + CPort
Lease to own $5,000
down, $700 a month.
3866 E Dawson Dr. Lg
fenced yard. Sep. laun-
dry, shed, mature trees,
screened porch in back,
covered porch in front,
2 minutes from shopp-
ing. For more info call
Mary 423-244-6122. To
see prop. 352-586-6088


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA
MOVE IN FOR ONLY
$1150 (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 Good neighbrhd.
Close to stores, $700
mo. F/L/S., 249-7033
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, clean, fresh paint
$560. mo. 697-1457
BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905
CITRUS SPRINGS
'06, 3/2/2, fenc'd. yrd.,
$900 mo. 422-2719
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
$500. 850-838-7289
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07 $795/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 remodeled, up-
grades, large lot $515.
352-302-4057
INVERNESS
2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer
non smoking, No Pets
1305 Lakeview Dr.
$700. mo. 422-6263
INVERNESS
2/1/1 City wtr. & sewer
non smoking, No Pets
1305 Lakeview Dr.
$700. mo. 422-6263
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugar Mill Woods
3/2/2 villa, heated
pool, on golf course,
$1000 F/L/S avail 11/1
(970) 274-8786





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07, $795/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818




DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lake Estates
1 Br, Priv. Ba $475/mo
(352) 436-7812




INVERNESS
3/2/2, Furn., Very nice,
In Town 352-527-9268


Vacation

FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$750. 352-419-4421





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

REPAIR
REALTY ONE

Hunting/Fishing Camp
672 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room &AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kt.
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting Clb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268

Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


U0





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
Acreage, Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Auction Bank
Owned Property -
Bland County,
Virginia.
425+/- acres offered
in 13 tracts. 5,500+/
sq ft custom "Rocky
Mountain Log
Home," additional
brick bi-level home,
horse barn, 2 ponds
and great views,
plus 405+/- acres
joining National For-
est. Abundant deer,
bear, turkey and
WILD HOGS! 5%
Buyer's Premium.
Call Russell Seneff.
November 8 at 5
PM, Auction Held
Quality Inn, Blue-
field, WV. Woltz &
Associates, Inc.
(VA# 321) Real
Estate Brokers &
Auctioneers.
540-342-3560
800-551-3588
woltz.com.


Estate Auction-Sat.
Oct 26th, 5200 SE
26th Ave, Ocala.
Preview at 9am,
Auction at 10am.
Items collected over
6 decades! More in-
formation & pictures:
www brewer
auctions.corn
(386)497-4438
AU#2604 AB#1940
12%BP


Mini-Storage Facility
on US Hwy 19
Homosassa, Florida-
2.74 acres with 150
storage units of
varying sizes-40 dry
storage units-office
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Jeanne oti Willaid Pickiel 212-3410
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


_.W MORTON HOW MUCH IS:





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TWO BEDROOM, 1.5 BATHS WITH OFFICE
OR STUDY PLUS DEN
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Pal Davis 352 2127280
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LOOKING FOR WATERFRONT IN INVERNESS?
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Pit Dil,- ,352' 212 7280
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STUNNING CRYSTAL RIVER .
WATERFRONT HOME WONDERFUL WINTER GET-A-AWAY
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Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699 Cail Dons linei 352 126 6668


PINE RIDGE ESTATES
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352.400 8072 0 352 726 6668


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$139,900 Jeanne t Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
inydei 476.8727 iiiiir. CiliusCountrSold. corn


rii ii r 1:1: ASKING $68.500
Pit Di,. 352 212 7280
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SNOWBIRD SPECIAL
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ONLY $38,900
Call Oade Feesei 352 302 7699


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Call I',ciA Root Reallo, cel 352212 1926


OHHH SO PEACEFUL!!!
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lIr.,:JI ,1.1lJ .*,.iuJrJ $169,900
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Rulh fiedetick 352 563 6866


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Mi i =1u1li:ii $87,900
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
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CHANNEL DR.
OWNER WANTS AN OFFER
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COUNTRY LIVING!
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oiiamne 0 Regan 586 0075


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Pit Di, 352 22 72280
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Mi = lii.:i ASKING $215,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
to see this lovely piopet'y




Full Text

PAGE 1

MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER Chances were remote that their paths would ever cross. Angela Crowley, a 21-year-old Lauderdale Lakes travel agent, was headed to Yankeetown to visit a friend for the Memorial Day weekend. William Happ, then a 24year-old painter from California, was walking along U.S. 19 to the home of his great-aunt, where he was staying. Their worlds collided around 2:30 a.m. Monday, May 26, 1986, at a Cumberland Farms convenience store on U.S. 19 that had closed for the night. Crowley stopped to use the pay phone to call her friend. She had already gotten lost once during the sixhour drive from South Florida, and the friend wanted to meet her at the store, then Angela would follow her to Yankeetown. She never made the call. Happ abducted her from the parking lot, smashing the drivers side window with his fist. He drove Crowley to the Cross Florida Barge Canal, where he beat and raped her, then strangled her with her pants, records show. He dumped her body into the barge canal and fled in her car, which authorities would find abandoned in a restaurant parking lot about a half-mile south of the convenience store. Months crawled by as authorities searched for Crowleys killer. He became a suspect in August when authorities OCTOBER 13, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 67 $1 CITRUS COUNTY www.chronicleonline.com Annies Mailbox......A22 Classifieds................D3 Crossword..............A14 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B3 Lottery Payouts........B3 Menus . . . . .A10 Movies....................A14 Obituaries................A9 Together..................A24 Veterans . . . .A16 INDEX HIGH85LOW56Mostly sunny.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SUNDAY Justice for murdered woman comes 27 years later Visitors help woman reconnect to heritageNANCYKENNEDY Staff writerFLORAL CITY Coincidence, serendipity or hand of God, Mia Huebbers is still shaking her head at her chance encounter with some people at Applebees in Inverness several weeks ago. It started when Hein and Margrietye Nievelstein, visitors from Holland, stopped by Applebees in Inverness, a favorite place of Mia Huebbers and her husband, Butch. Hein had noticed the Huebbers Harley Davidson and struck up a conversation with the couple. Its a small world LECANTOEver wonder if you need flood insurance? It used to be a guess when advising a resident whether his property was prone to flooding, but a new flood insurance rate map has made the answer almost foolproof for the countys building division. Unquestionably, this map is much more precise and easier to work with, said Carl Jones, director of the countys building division and flood plain manager, speaking last week to the Chronicle.The division had been working with a 30-year-old map that offered little more than grids of sparse street-level information and landmarks. We were having to use a scale and measure it and guess at it, Jones said. Thats a mile from one side to the other on a small square. So if someone were to say they lived on the third lot down in the subdivision, maybe Im looking at the third lot or the fourth lot or the 10th because the MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleCarl Jones, Citrus Countys Building Division director and Flood Plain manager, explains how new map-making technology provides a more detailed picture of the topography of land. That precise detail is important in determining if a piece of property is in a flood zone. Chris Van Ormer Staff writer In or out of flood zone? Elevation certificates are part of the process Find out by calling the county building division at 352-527-5310 to sc hedule to a look at the new map. The map panels are available online at www.FloodSmart.Gov. Now is the time to appeal because the map has not y et been adopted. Because Citrus County participates in FEMAs Comm unity Rating System, people in the unincorporated area of Citrus County who have flood insurance policies get an automatic 20 percent discount on their premiums. One possible side effect of the adoption of the new Fire Insurance Rate Maps could be the need for new elevation certificates for some homes and businesses, requiring the services of a surveyor or engineer. The flood elevation certification is a Federal Emergency Management Agency form, which may ultimately determine the flood insurance premium of a property. The form is available online, but according to Carl Jones, director of the countys building division and flood plain manager, it has to be completed by a licensed engineer or surveyor. He said a certificate, which shows the elevations of the property and buildings is necessary for each structure. It can also be required by mortgage companies on Business Excursions VeteransObamacare and Breast Cancer: How does the coverage stack up?/ D1 Forging on: An Associated Press writer details her vacation at Yosemite/ A13 Ray Michael Jr. earned two Purple Hearts during his service in Vietnam / A16 See CERTIFICATES/ Page A12 See FLOODING/ Page A12 See SMALL/ Page A12 See JUSTICE/ Page A2 William Happexecution set for 6 p.m. Tuesday. Brad Kingstate attorney prosecuted the case in 1988. Charlie Deanstate senator was sheriff of Citrus County in 1986. Offense sputters: UF has trouble scoring at LSU /B1

PAGE 2

matched fingerprints inside Crowleys car with Happ, who was about to begin a 10-year prison sentence in California for kidnapping and robbery. Happ was charged Dec. 2, 1986, with Crowleys kidnapping, rape and murder. Three years later a jury in Lake County, where the case was moved due to pretrial publicity, convicted Happ on all counts. The judge sentenced him to death. All of Happs court appeals are exhausted. Barring a last-minute stay, Happs fate will be sealed Tuesday at 6 p.m., when he is scheduled to die by lethal injection at the Florida State Prison in Starke. Happ, 51, told Circuit Court Judge Richard Ric Howard a month ago he doesnt want any more legal challenges filed on his behalf. Ive thought about this for many years, he said by phone during a Sept. 13 hearing. I would prefer to have it carried out. Dean: Execution too long coming After authorities arrested Happ, Citrus County Sheriff Charles Dean paid a personal visit to Angela Crowleys mother in Oregon, Ill. I told her weve got the guy who killed Angela and would do everything we can to see he gets what he deserves, Dean, now a state senator, said. Dean said it was physical evidence fingerprints in Crowleys car, a shoeprint near the car that led investigators to Happ. When we finally tracked him down, we found him in prison, Dean said. He still had those tennis shoes. Happ was from California, but staying with a great-aunt in Crystal River. He had a lengthy history of criminal charges even from the days of his youth. He was just the most obvious person, Dean said. Newspaper carriers said they heard a man and a woman having an altercation in the convenience store parking lot, and then the sound of glass breaking. The next day, a friend said Happs fist was swollen. Happ was living with his great-aunt since March of that year. He had fled Gilroy, Calif., where he was wanted on charges in connection with a gas station robbery, according to numerous news reports. On Aug. 14, 1986, the FBI arrested Happ in Pittsburgh, Pa., for being a fugitive from justice. When he was booked on robbery and kidnapping charges in California, authorities matched his fingerprints with those found in Crowleys car. Dean said he believes Happ deserves the death penalty. Its been too long coming, he said. Dean said he will attend the execution as a witness the first time hes done that. I just think Angela deserves having someone there to represent her, he said. I had a daughter about the same age, about the same time. When you see what he did and how he did it, its personal to me. King: wrong place at the wrong time. Brad King had just been elected state attorney in 1988 when he prosecuted Happ shortly taking office. Judge John Thurman moved the trial to Lake County due to extensive publicity in Citrus County. Happ was actually tried twice. The first case ended in a mistrial when, nearing the end of the prosecutions questioning, King mentioned Happs prior criminal record. Thurman initially accused King of purposely causing the mistrial, but he later conceded it was simply an error on Kings part. Thurman was then recused from the case and replaced by Judge Jerry Lockett. Damaging testimony included that of William Miller, who had also been an inmate in the Citrus County Jail. Miller said that Happ told him details of Crowleys kidnapping, rape and murder. King said Crowley was an unfortunate target. It was just one of those cases where the victim is a nice girl, just traveling through town to visit a friend in Yankeetown, he said. Its just one of those very sad cases where she just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Brother: Angie was caring and outgoing Chris Crowley has waited 27 years for this. Angie Crowleys older brother, who helped her move from their small hometown in northern Illinois to the Fort Lauderdale area shortly after Christmas 1985, will be making just his second visit to Florida since then. Crowley, who attended Happs trial, will join several family members as witnesses to his scheduled execution Tuesday. Im just glad were at the point where its getting over, Crowley said by phone from his home in Newburg, Mo. I dont have to worry about appeals or hearings about whether or not the death penalty will be abolished. Now my memories of her will be about the good times. Crowley and his son are flying in Monday to Jacksonville. They plan to immediately drive to Crystal River, hoping to retrace his sisters final moments. Ive visualized all these years where it happened, how it happened, he said. Its something I want to do. The Cumberland Farms across from Crystal River City Hall is now a Chevron store. The phone booths were removed. Crowley doesnt know the name of the restaurant where her car was found, though, ironically, he heard the restaurants late owner had also once owned a restaurant in the Crowley familys small home town of Oregon, Ill. After seeing Crystal River for the first time, Crowley and his son will head to Starke to spend the night, awaiting Happs execution on Tuesday. Hes going to be given a chance to say one last thing, Crowley said. Id just like to know why. I dont think thats going to happen. His sisters living memory remains fresh. She was a very beautiful and caring person, Crowley said. She was caring and outgoing. She would help somebody if they asked and wouldnt bat an eye.A2SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL *Certain restrictions apply. First American Trust provides promotional new customers incentive to obtain APY. Penalty for early withdrawals may apply. First American Trust locates CDs with Banks FDIC insured. Rates may vary depending on amount and availability. Complete details are provided at appointment. APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED 6 Month $20,000 Deposit 1.85% APY* Better rates may be available on longer term Regular Savings, IRAs, 401ks including transfers Ocala 671-5374 The Villages 633-7019 000GCMF American Legion Post 155 Crystal River For more information contact Connie 352-746-7249 000G92E Nature Coast Republican Club Spaghetti Dinner Spaghetti Dinner Saturday, Oct. 19th Dinner served from 5pm-7pm $10 Donation 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY BLINDS BLINDS 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO www.72-hourblinds.com 2012 2012 2012 2012 WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G9JT The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! Faux Wood Blinds Top Treatments Drapery Shades Shutters Verticals 000GAJW 000GAJW OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373 HIGH OCTANE GRILL DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS MONDAY $1.00 Side Salad, Select $1.00 Menu Items TUESDAY Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7.95 Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell ...... Beef .79 . Chicken .99 WEDNESDAY All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread (Add a side salad for $1.00) . . . $ 8.95 THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS w/potatoes & vegetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9.95 FRIDAY Prime Rib Available at 4pm SATURDAY Sloppy Joe w/chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 SUNDAY Pot Roa st . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 Valid Monday Friday on regular price menu items only. Coupon Expires 10/20/13 $ 1 00 OFF LUNCH 11am 3pm 000GCJX C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA C OME V ISIT O UR N EW INDOOR N ON S MOKING D INING A REA INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. INTERNET CAFE NOW RE-OPEN. JUSTICEContinued from Page A1 ON THE NET To read about Floridas death ro w, go to www.dc.state.fl.us.

PAGE 3

STATE& LOCAL Page A3SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Gov. Scotts likability low Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Republican Gov. Rick Scott, whose catchphrase Its working is the theme for his re-election, has been willing to try just about anything to get Floridians to like him. Its not working. Since the day he was elected, polls have shown that more Floridians dislike him than like him. Not that he hasnt made efforts to win them over. He tried social media outreach, then gave it up. He tried dressing casual, then gave it up. He tried doing Lets Get to Work Days but seems to have abandoned those, too. While Scott has said policy and not popularity is whats important, its clear his staff and his party are trying hard to make him more likable. That could be especially important, with the prospect of opposing one of the states most likable politicians, former Gov. Charlie Crist, as he seeks re-election. They keep trying to grab at straws in trying to get his name out there, and they just need to let him be who he is, said Jamie Miller, a Republican political consultant. They dont need to change who he is, they just need to portray him as who he is. Scott once said in an interview that polls dont matter. People think that being governor is a popularity contest. No. Your job is to be the governor, Scott said during an interview with The Associated Press his first year in office. His office said he wasnt available for an interview Thursday and Friday. But Scotts actions indicate hed like to be more popular. His political committee and the Republican Party of Florida together have paid Virginia-based pollster Tony Fabrizio more than $1 million since Scott took office. Early in his term, Scott targeted his appeal to the far right. He made his first budget announcement in a church as part of a tea party rally. He shunned the news media during his campaign, refused invitations to talk with newspaper editorial boards and kept the Capitol press corps at a distance. The former hospital chain CEO had never run for office before and spent $73 million of his own money to win. Democrats successfully defined him as someone who bought the office and cared more about corporate interests than people. As his polls slipped lower, his advisers tried different ways to make him look caring. During his first month in office, Scott went on Twitter and answered questions from followers. Two months later he did the same on Facebook. His staff said the social media town halls would be a regular feature in his effort to communicate with Floridians. He hasnt done another. When poll numbers continued to drop halfway through his first year in office, Scott changed his chief of staff and began a makeover. He traded his suits and ties for business-casual clothing, even changing his official photo from a formal pose to a casual shot. He began accepting invitations from newspaper editorial boards. He took a cue from former Democratic Gov. Bob Graham and scheduled work days where he would do a variety of everyday jobs the first, selling doughnuts in a Tampa shop. Well, the suit and tie are back, and after holding Lets Get to Work Days almost monthly over a year and a half, Scott hasnt done one since February. Some say the image that Scotts handlers are trying to create just doesnt fit who he is. (Voters) think that most of his actions are calculated calculated on the polls, calculated by consultants, said former Republican Sen. Paul Dockery, who briefly ran for the GOP gubernatorial nomination in 2010. Its not that Scott isnt a nice guy he is friendly and polite and takes time to talk to people when he travels the state but he often doesnt look comfortable in crowds. Despite efforts to boost popularity, polls continually show more Floridians dislike than like him Associated PressGov. Rick Scott has said policy, not popularity is what is important. Citrus CountyRetriever reunion slated in DunnellonJoshuas House for Golden Retriever Rescue is having its annual Golden Retriever Rescue Reunion from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Rainbow Springs State Park. The reunion is open to all golden retrievers and their families. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. and coffee and a snack will be available. Admission is a gift of canned or bagged currentdate pet food, which will be donated to Citrus County Pet Meals on Wheels. Rainbow Springs State Park admission is $2 per person. All dogs must be on a leash; they are not allowed in the water and poop scooping is required. For more information, call 352-527-0669.Save Our Waters Week committee to meetThe Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save Our Waters Week committee will meet at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 21, in room 219 of the Lecanto Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, off County Road 491. The purpose of the meeting is to review and critique the planning and execution for Citrus Countys 18th annual Save Our Waters Week. All representatives to the committee and interested parties are welcome to attend and participate. For more information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352201-0149. Citrus 20/20 board meeting plannedThe Citrus 20/20 Board of Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 21, in room 117 of the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. All directors are urged to attend. Interested persons and organizations are invited. For more information about Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit www. citrus2020.org or call 352201-0149. Nature Coast GOP to host spaghetti dinnerNature Coast Republican Club will host a spaghetti dinner from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at American Legion Post 155, Crystal River. In addition to dinner, there will be a silent auction and entertainment. Former elected officials will be the cooks and Commissioner Scott Adams will be the emcee for the event. The cost is $10. Tickets are available by calling 352-7467249. All are welcome. MiamiJudge wont delay state worker drug test caseMIAMI A Miami federal judge has refused to delay proceedings in a lawsuit challenging Florida Gov. Rick Scotts plan to require random drug tests for thousands of state workers. Lawyers for the Republican governor sought a stay so they can appeal the case to the U.S. Supreme Court. But U.S. District Judge Ursula Ungaro ruled Friday the governors appeal was unlikely to succeed. Ungaro also ordered the governors office and lawyers for a state employee labor union to submit lists by next Friday of job categories that remain in dispute as far as random drug testing. A federal appeals court ruled earlier that some sensitive, safety and law enforcement jobs can be subject to testing. Scotts original order covered some 85,000 workers. Its on hold pending the cases outcome.TallahasseeGray squirrel hunting season opens Florida wildlife authorities have opened the states gray squirrel hunting season. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the season started Saturday on private lands and runs through March 2, 2014. The squirrels are members of the rodent family and can grow up to 20 inches long. They like wooded areas and spend most of their time on trees. Hunters who want to look for gray squirrels on wildlife management areas should consult with the FWC, as open dates vary. Around the STATE From staff and wire reports Special to the ChronicleThe third annual Movember Citrus County kicks off from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, at Courthouse Square in Inverness with the Movember shave-off/kick-off party. The Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County encourages all residents to grow a Mo (short for moustache) in November to participate. Movember is the month formerly known as November, where men and women across the globe join together to raise awareness and funds for mens health issues. Men grow a Mo for 30 days to become walking, talking billboards, for mens health causes specifically prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health. Men who support Movember, called Mo Bros, start clean shaven, then grow and groom their moustache for the rest of the month. Women who support Movember, called Mo Sistas, champion the Mo by supporting their Mo Bros, and spreading the message of mens health. The finale party and Movember Mo Show is from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, at High Octane Saloon in Homosassa. To join the Movember Citrus County team or donate money, visit the website us.movember.com/ team/1007301. To stay in the know about the Mo, go to Facebook.com/ MovemberCitrus. Movember Citrus County returns Scarecrow Festival ERYN WORTHINGTON/ChronicleABOVE: Charlee Childers, left, and her sister Saylah Childers enjoyed Saturday afternoon picking out pumpkins. RIGHT: Snows Produce worker Jennifer Smolensky packed a basket with fresh green beans along with home-grown tomatoes, peppers and other various vegetables. See more photos at www.chronicleonline.com. Children of all ages enjoyed the carnival atmosphere as sounds of laughter and enjoyment echoed through the wind at the 26th annual Scarecrow Festival at Heritage Village in Crystal River. A variety of food, childrens old-fashioned games, a pumpkin patch and pony rides were available.

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Birthday Dont let instability worry you in the year ahead. A new beginning is overdue, and discovering new ways to use your talents will lead to an interesting future. Gravitate toward positive people and re-establish your position among your peers. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) A lastminute change of plans must not throw you off course. Follow through with your agenda and do your best to make your home and family life in tune with your pursuits. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Look at every angle before you make changes that may invite opposition. An emotional situation can stand between you and your destination. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Keep everything out in the open to avoid being blamed for something you didnt do. A promise isnt likely to be honored. Get an agreement in writing. A domestic change looks promising. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Productivity must not be squashed by an emotional outburst. Listen if someone has a complaint, but dont let it slow your progress. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Listen to whats being said and do your best to please and satisfy someone you love, but dont let anyone restrict your freedom or limit what you can do. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) An emotional situation will be expensive if you havent made the necessary adjustments to protect yourself. Aries (March 21-April 19) Getting together with old friends or colleagues will help put you back on track emotionally, mentally and physically. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Follow through with your long-held plans. A partnership will be enhanced if you discuss issues that could alter your lifestyle. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Take advantage of an opportunity to display what you have to offer, and you will receive an attractive proposal. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoyment is the name of the game. Try something new and exciting, and you will begin an adventure that could lead to great things. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Arguments will be a waste of time. Keep a low profile and a tight grip on your wallet. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Stick to what and whom you know. An investment may sound good, but it isnt likely to deliver whats being promised. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Oct. 13, the 286th day of 2013. There are 79 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Oct. 13, 1962, Edward Albees searing four-character drama Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? opened on Broadway with Arthur Hill as George, Uta Hagen as Martha, George Grizzard as Nick and Melinda Dillon (whose 23rd birthday it was) as Honey. On this date: In 1307, King Philip IV of France ordered the arrests of Knights Templar on charges of heresy. In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid during a ceremony in the District of Columbia. In 1960, John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon held the third televised debate of their presidential campaign (Nixon was in Los Angeles, Kennedy in New York). In 1972, a Uruguayan chartered flight carrying 45 people crashed in the Andes; 16 survivors who resorted to feeding off the remains of some of the dead in order to stay alive were rescued more than two months later. Ten years ago: The U.N. Security Council approved a resolution expanding the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Afghanistan. Five years ago: On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average gained a shocking 936 points after eight days of losses. One year ago: Irans foreign ministry said it was ready to show flexibility at nuclear talks to ease Western concerns over Tehrans nuclear program. Todays Birthdays: Singermusician Paul Simon is 72. Musician Robert Lamm (Chicago) is 69. Singer-musician Sammy Hagar is 66. Actor Sacha Baron Cohen is 42. Thought for Today: There are some things one can only achieve by a deliberate leap in the opposite direction. One has to go abroad in order to find the home one has lost. Franz Kafka, Austrian author (1883-1924).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 88 60 0.00 HI LO PR 86 58 0.00 HI LO PR 85 61 0.00 HI LO PR 83 59 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA 0.00 HI LO PR 83 58 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Mostly sunnyTHREE DAY OUTLOOK Partly cloudy Partly cloudyHigh: 85 Low: 56 High: 86 Low: 57 High: 86 Low: 57TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Saturday 85/61 Record 94/55 Normal 86/62 Mean temp. 73 Departure from mean -1 PRECIPITATION* Saturday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.81 in. Total for the year 51.14 in. Normal for the year 46.21 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in. DEW POINT Saturday at 3 p.m. 60 HUMIDITY Saturday at 3 p.m. 43% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and grasses were light and weeds were heavy.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Saturday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:02 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:31 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................3:30 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................2:04 A.M. OCT. 18OCT. 26NOV. 3NOV. 10 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 85 67 s Ft. Lauderdale 86 72 s Fort Myers 88 66 s Gainesville 83 61 s Homestead 85 69 pc Jacksonville 82 64 s Key West 86 75 s Lakeland 87 65 s Melbourne 85 68 s City H L Fcast Miami 86 72 pc Ocala 85 63 s Orlando 87 67 s Pensacola 87 66 s Sarasota 87 66 s Tallahassee 87 61 s Tampa 87 70 s Vero Beach 86 68 s W. Palm Bch. 85 71 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNortheast winds around 10 knots. Seas 1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature81 LAKE LEVELSLocation Fri. Sat. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L 84/69 63/51 58/34 85/60 61/41 68/58 66/53 71/56 50/33 60/43 68/54 69/48 80/60 86/72 86/71 68/61 THE NATION Albany 73 39 s 67 45 Albuquerque 69 41 s 75 49 Asheville 73 49 pc 72 51 Atlanta 79 57 pc 80 60 Atlantic City 68 59 .61 sh 68 56 Austin 90 74 ts 83 72 Baltimore 67 61 .03 sh 68 57 Billings 52 31 sh 50 33 Birmingham 84 56 pc 84 61 Boise 63 43 pc 58 36 Boston 61 53 s 61 46 Buffalo 77 45 sh 69 51 Burlington, VT 73 42 s 66 48 Charleston, SC 83 66 c 77 63 Charleston, WV 67 55 ts 74 55 Charlotte 76 56 c 76 58 Chicago 71 54 .12 s 63 51 Cincinnati 77 48 .01 pc 76 52 Cleveland 75 51 sh 70 53 Columbia, SC 82 59 pc 77 61 Columbus, OH 73 54 sh 76 55 Concord, N.H. 55 37 s 63 37 Dallas 91 76 ts 84 69 Denver 58 37 pc 58 34 Des Moines 67 49 s 68 46 Detroit 74 51 pc 69 48 El Paso 80 47 pc 85 60 Evansville, IN 79 53 pc 77 52 Harrisburg 71 59 sh 65 51 Hartford 70 49 s 67 40 Houston 88 74 .03 ts 86 71 Indianapolis 76 51 pc 72 46 Jackson 85 61 pc 87 62 Las Vegas 76 54 s 74 55 Little Rock 81 63 .68 pc 81 61 Los Angeles 71 58 pc 68 58 Louisville 80 53 pc 79 55 Memphis 75 63 .44 pc 80 59 Milwaukee 70 59 .22 s 61 47 Minneapolis 59 50 pc 61 41 Mobile 85 64 pc 87 63 Montgomery 87 57 pc 87 62 Nashville 81 52 pc 83 58 New Orleans 86 71 pc 85 69 New York City 71 60 pc 68 54 Norfolk 72 64 .25 sh 73 63 Oklahoma City 76 58 ts 77 65 Omaha 67 46 pc 70 48 Palm Springs 86 59 s 82 61 Philadelphia 72 62 c 69 52 Phoenix 86 60 s 87 62 Pittsburgh 72 57 .03 pc 71 53 Portland, ME 57 46 s 61 40 Portland, Ore 56 49 .01 pc 63 42 Providence, R.I. 68 53 s 65 45 Raleigh 68 61 .01 sh 70 61 Rapid City 53 29 pc 58 42 Reno 68 36 pc 61 37 Rochester, NY 74 41 pc 67 53 Sacramento 76 47 s 77 51 St. Louis 78 64 .02 s 74 48 St. Ste. Marie 69 49 s 57 37 Salt Lake City 66 44 sh 59 42 San Antonio 92 78 ts 83 74 San Diego 70 62 s 69 60 San Francisco 63 47 s 70 53 Savannah 85 57 pc 80 63 Seattle 57 50 .04 pc 60 43 Spokane 52 41 pc 57 32 Syracuse 74 39 pc 68 51 Topeka 72 45 s 72 55 Washington 68 62 .26 sh 68 61YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 95 Cotulla, Texas LOW 16 Berthoud Pass, Colo. SUNDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 89/76/s Amsterdam 43/39/sh Athens 80/60/pc Beijing 71/45/sh Berlin 50/41/sh Bermuda 80/74/sh Cairo 90/64/s Calgary 48/30/pc Havana 81/69/pc Hong Kong 85/67/pc Jerusalem 76/59/s Lisbon 70/62/sh London 55/39/sh Madrid 65/46/pc Mexico City 75/53/ts Montreal 69/55/pc Moscow 42/31/sh Paris 47/44/sh Rio 82/66/c Rome 70/59/pc Sydney 73/54/sh Tokyo 71/61/s Toronto 63/52/sh Warsaw 52/49/c WORLD CITIES Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Sunday MondayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 1:58 a/9:04 a 1:12 p/10:11 p 2:59 a/10:27 a 2:40 p/11:15 p Crystal River** 12:19 a/6:26 a 11:33 a/7:33 p 1:20 a/7:49 a 1:01 p/8:37 p Withlacoochee* 9:20 a/4:14 a 11:07 p/5:21 p 10:48 a/5:37 a 11:53 p/6:25 p Homosassa*** 1:08 a/8:03 a 12:22 p/9:10 p 2:09 a/9:26 a 1:50 p/10:14 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 10/13 SUNDAY 1:25 7:39 1:52 8:05 10/14 MONDAY 2:14 8:26 2:39 8:52 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY HI LO PR 83 60 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, grasses, elm Todays count: 7.3/12 Mondays count: 7.1 Tuesdays count: 7.4 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Taylor Swift opens $4M Country Hall of Fame centerNASHVILLE, Tenn. It might as well be Taylor Swift weekend in Music City. The pop star opened her $4 million Taylor Swift Education Center at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on Saturday morning, and will accept her record sixth songwriter-artist of the year award from Nashville Songwriters Association International on Sunday. Swift cut the ribbon on the new education center she donated to the museum as part of its expansion campaign and showed reporters and area high school students the new classroom and exhibit space before the museum opened. Im really excited about this music education center and the fact that right now they have three different classes going on today, Swift said in an interview after the ceremony. Its really exciting that we can be here on a day when theyre not only unveiling it, but theyre starting to actively use it today. The center will have classroom space, a hands-on instrument room and ongoing education opportunities. Museum officials say the new center will increase educational opportunities sevenfold going forward. And who knows? Maybe users will find the 23-year-old Swift hanging around some day. Weve been talking about different programs I can be involved in, Swift said. I hate to call it a lecture because that sounds like Im yelling at people, but we could do a Q&A talking to students here, and a songwriters discussion would be really fun to have at some point.Charlie Hunnam departs Fifty Shades of Grey filmNEW YORK Charlie Hunnam is dropping out of the highly anticipated big-screen version of Fifty Shades of Grey just weeks after being cast as the lead, citing his busy schedule. Universal announced Saturday that the actor who was to play Christian Grey will depart the project. The studio called it a mutual decision because Hunnams preparation time was limited by his television schedule. He stars in the series Sons of Anarchy. Its an abrupt and embarrassing switch for a high-profile film. Fans of E L James erotic bestseller are eagerly awaiting the movie adaptation, which will be directed by Sam TaylorJohnson Dakota Johnson remains in the co-starring role of Anastasia Steele. Hunnams replacement is being sought. The 33-year-old Hunnam said last month he initially turned down the role because of timing issues.Sales surge for new Nobel winner, Alice MunroNEW YORK The public wants to read a lot more from Alice Munro. The Canadian author had five books in Amazon.coms top 30 on Friday, a day after winning the Nobel Prize for literature. The 82-year-old Munro is one of the better known literature winners in recent years and has received one of the stronger Nobel sales bumps. Her current best sellers include the story collections Dear Life, Runaway and Something Ive Been Meaning to Tell You. Publisher Vintage Books has announced a reprinting of previous works that will total 100,000 copies. Covers of the new editions will note her Nobel status. From wire reports Associated PressTaylor Swift poses for a photo Saturday with Piper Moralez, 11, at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn. Swift was at the facility to open the $4 million Taylor Swift Education Center. A4SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Bid Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D6 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . D5, D6 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . D5

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A5 000GBML A Message from Sheriff Jeff Dawsy SHERIFF J EFFREY J. D AWSY Tis the Season for CRIMES OF OPPORTUNITY OCT 2013 VOL. 7 NO. 2 Behind the BADGE HOT TOPICS Important Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MSBU Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Crime Facts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Know the Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 School Bus Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Facebook Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 9/11 Memorial Stairclimb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Prescription Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 9/11 Artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 COPlogic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Crime Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The upcoming months are some of my favorite times of the year. Handing out candy make that healthy snacks to trick-or-treating monsters and princesses on Halloween, fulfilling my tradition of smoking a myriad of turkeys for friends at Thanksgiving, and putting up the massive display of Christmas decorations that we have collected over the years always gives me reasons to smile. Unfortunately, the impending Fall season also gives the not-so-good-guys (and gals) the opportunities theyre looking for to commit crimes. A crime of opportunity is simply a crime in which the subject sees an easy way to break the law. Heres how you can help us to keep you from becoming a victim during these happy holidays CRIME Sexual in nature toward children OPPORTUNITY Halloween, children going door-to-door WHAT TO DO Know where the sexual offenders and predators live in your neighborhood; visit our website at sheriffcitrus.org and click on Sexual Offender Information to view sexual offenders & addresses; sign up for Florida sexual offender alerts. CRIME Burglaries, thefts OPPORTUNITY Heavy shopping days, like Black Friday (the day after Thanksgiving) through the Christmas season, unlocked cars with gifts, unlocked homes, unsecured valuables WHAT TO DO Even though it sounds clich, lock it or be prepared to lose it. Lock doors and windows at home, keep garage doors closed; remove valuable objects from your lawn; remove valuables (especially things that can be seen) from your car; always lock your vehicle. One burglar in nearby St. Pete was quoted at his hearing as saying If someone is stupid enough to leave their car unlocked, its OK to take their stuff. This season, dont give anyone an opportunity to make you or any member of your family a victim. Also, follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/sheriffcitrus for crime safety tips no matter what time of year. JOIN US IN OCTOBER! EVERY WEDNESDAY Ask the Sheriff -7am-8am on The Fox 96.7 EVERY THURSDAY Ask the Sheriff -4pm-5pm on Citrus 95.3 Crime Prevention Month Fire Prevention Month THURSDAY-SATURDAY, OCT. 25-26-27 Cooter Fest -Downtown Inverness SATURDAY, OCT. 26 National Prescription Drug Take Back Day -Walgreens in Homosassa and Inverness

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A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 000GBMS YOUR $: MSBU 2 BEHIND THE BADGE IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS Police, Fire, EMS Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 911 Citrus County Sheriffs Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726-4488 Citrus County Sheriffs Office, Emergency Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746-6555 Lecanto Government Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-5200 Citrus County Health Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-0068 Citrus County Public Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-5477 Citrus County Animal Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726-7660 Citrus County Solid Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-7670 Citrus County School Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726-1931 Citrus County Flood Management Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-5341 Nature Coast Volunteer Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249-1275 City of Inverness Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726-2611 City of Inverness Public Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726-2321 City of Crystal River Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . 795-4216 x302 City of Crystal River Public Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 795-4216 x313 Florida Highway Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-866-369-4613 Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-888-404-3922 American Red Cross (Citrus County Chapter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564-8455 Salvation Army (Citrus County) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513-4960 United Way of Citrus County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-8894 Duke Energy (to report outages) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-228-8485 Sumter Electric (to report outages) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-732-6141 Withlacoochee Electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 795-4382 Citizen Information/Rumor Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746-5470 (lines open during an emergency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527-2106 This list can also be found on our Web site at www.sheriffcitrus.org The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners passed an annual fire fee called an MSBU (Municipal Service Benefit Unit) in the amount of $54.00 for all residential parcels (pieces of land). The fee will not apply for the City of Inverness.Institutional properties that are wholly exempt from ad valorem taxation will not be assessed a fire fee. The nonresidential fire fee is based on the actual square footage and use of each non-residential building. The MSBU fee was needed to ensure comprehensive fire services to citizens now and into the future.The fire fee revenues must be used for fire rescue expenditures only per State Statute. The funds, which will make up 53.7% of Fire Rescue s budget, will be used to fund labor costs as well as operating, maintenance, and capital expenses. To apply for a hardship exemption OR a mobile home or RV Park vacancy adjustment visit Sheriffcitrus.org to fill out an application. Crime Comparisons 2012 vs. 2013 RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY COMMERCIAL BURGLARY VEHICLE BURGLARY AUTO THEFT HOMICIDE ROBBERY SEXUAL OFFENSE Year to Date (September 19) 2012 2013 329 309 69 62 171 88 48 35 3 5 33 20 13 36

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A7 TWO-LANE Vehicles traveling in both directions MUST stop. DIVIDED HIGHWAY Unpaved space (Min 5ft) OR any raised median/physical barrier. Vehicles behind bus MUST stop. Vehicles traveling in the opposite direction proceed with caution MULTI-LANE Paved Across Vehicles traveling in both directions MUST stop A B C PERMANENT DROP BOX LOCATION: Citrus County Sheriffs Office 1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Avenue Inverness, FL 34450-4994 Education, treatment and enforcement are the three elements of action now underway to address the prescription drug problem in our com munity The Citrus County Sheriffs Office has taken aggressive measures to investigate and arrest those who illegally sell or obtain prescription drugs.Partnerships with state and federal inves tigators have been very effective in curtailing the illegal sale of prescription drugs. Locally, we have estab lished a drop-off location for unused or out of date prescription drugs at our main headquarters on MLK Jr. Ave. in Inverness. To further educate the public on pre scription drug use and or treatment, the Citrus County Sheriffs Office has launched a new website: CitrusDrugAbuse.com.This web page provides infor mation on the signs of abuse, overdose and links to treatment resources, especially substance abuse and mental health services locations. The illegal prescribing and sales of prescription drugs, and drug abuse is a challenge that affects our entire community. By applying pressure through enforcement, and by providing resources for education and treatment, we can lead the way for a safer Citrus County. Dont be a Drug Dealer SHARING YOUR PRESCRIPTION WITH OTHERS IS ILLEGAL. DRUG TAKE BACK O CTOBER 26, 2013 10AM TO 2PM ALL DRUGS will be accepted. Please, NO NEEDLESthey will beturned away! DRUG TAKE BACK DAY LOCATIONS: Walgreens Homosassa Corner of Grover Cleveland and HWY 19 Walgreens Inverness Corner of 44 and Independence DAY NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DID YOU KNOW? The Governor approved Senate Bill 52, Florida ban on Texting While Driving Law. It will be in effect on October 1, 2013. Florida drivers it would be wise to get into the habit NOW of not texting while driving before this law goes into effect. The prohibition is enforceable as a secondary offense. A first violation is punishable as a nonmoving violation, with a fine of $30 plus court costs that vary by county. A second violation punishable by a $60 fine plus court costs. The law allows for the admissibility of a persons wireless communications device billing records as evidence in the event of a crash resulting in death or personal injury. BEHIND THE BADGE 3 Emily Banks Emmanuel All states should do the same... 33 minutes ago Like Russell Roberts do we really need a law to know this is unsafe and use our heads? 32 minutes ago Like 1 Gloria Bermudez YES !! Thank Goodness !! 32 minutes ago Like Bill Godfrey WAY TO GO FLORIDA!! Now continue to strengthen the law to make it as effective as driving under the influence laws...I dont like playing Russian Roulette every time I get on the road. 26 minutes ago Like 1 Evelyn Holder Its a shame we have to enforce common sense! 23 minutes ago Like 2 Sharron Benghazi Bryant Yes, Yes! It is about time! But will they enforce it in Citrus county? I doubt it? or until someone gets kill unfortunately! We will see! 23 minutes ago Like Kenneth Blue Does this g o for the sherrifs n staties too??? Cause I always see them mofos txtn n driving 23 minutes ago via mobile Like 3 Larry Swafford from what I see its being ignored. Like veery other car??? 22 minutes ago Like Kyle Mansfield Glad this is finally in place. 22 minutes ago via mobile Like Angela Streit My husband and I were driving the other day an everyone we passed was texting it was crazy no one was paying attention. 20 minutes ago via mobile Like Krystal Larsen about time but i really hope this works cause my grampa just died on a motorcycle cause someone was just tax ing away of there cell phone while they were driving what a same of people they just dont care of anyone else but i hope they really see it know please dont text while you drive and thank you Citrus County Sherriffs Office for making this happen 20 minutes ago via mobile Like Sandy Putman Have been almost wrecked several times by people either texting or on their phone apparently oblivious to what they are doing or where they are. 15 minutes ago Like Violet Rozanski I dont know how they can text and drive at the same time anyway. 13 minutes ago via mobile Like Like Comment Share 54 Gary A Budd, Lora Gartin Smith, Fred Hudson and 45 others like this. A B C

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A8SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 4 BEHIND THE BADGE The Citrus County Sheriffs Office joined the National Association of Retired Law Enforcement Officers (NARLEO) Citrus Chapter, along with the City of Inverness, to bring artifacts from the 9/11 tragedy to Citrus County from Ground Zero in New York City. Those that made the trip are: Gary Gersitz a retired Port Authority Police Officer and member of NARLEOCitrus County Chapter CCSO Deputy Todd Farnham CCSO Deputy Joe Faherty Joe Jergens assists NARLEO (Citrus County). His son, Tommy, perished in 9/11 and his other son, Joey, is now a NY Firefighter and escorted the men during their trip. Two retired Port Authority Police Officers, who were working during 9/11, created The World Trade Center Traveling Memorial which traveled throughout the country from 2002 to 2011 displaying memorabilia from the tragedy. These officers, who worked with Gersitz during 9/11, invited him and NARLEOCitrus County to come to NYC and select artifacts from their collection for a display in Citrus County. Faherty and Farnham said knowing the work emergency responders do is honorable but getting outside of the community and being able to see what could happen anywhere makes it even more admirable. They would like to thank the City of Inverness and NARLEO for allowing them to be a part of this unforgettable trip. This is something I never experienced before and being a native New Yorker, it hit home. My dad was a NYC Cop. I had friends there. Words cant express what it felt like, expressed Faherty. 9/11 9/11: Always in our Hearts and Now Even Closer to Home The patrol vehicle belonged to Lt. David Lim who went to investigate the noise he heard after the collapse of the first tower and left his K9, Siruis, in his kennel in the second tower. Lim was unable to return to rescue K9 Siruis before the collapse. This door is a special memorial for all fallen K9 officers and fallen K9s. We (CCSO) will be creating a display in their honor where everyone will be able to see and remember those tragic events, said Dep. Farnham. NARLEO received many items which include: multiple signsWorld Trade Center entry sign for the subway, Police which labeled the designated parking spot at the towers (pictured), a firemans jacket, fire extinguisher, tiles from the lobby floor for tower 1, and many pictures, news articles and more. A portion of the sphere that was shaped as a globe that sat between the towers symbolizing world peace. Ironically, the sphere survived both the 1993 and the 2001 bombings. The top portion of the sphere (pictured) will reside in Citrus County and the rest of the sphere is on display in Battery Park in NYC. Two retired Port Authority Police Officers, who were working during 9/11, created The World Trade Center Traveling Memorial which traveled throughout the country from 2002 to 2011 displaying memorabilia from the tragedy. 000GBM7 To provide faster and more efficient service to our citizens, the Sheriffs Office is now offering Online reporting for Identity Theft/Fraud activity. In the future, we will expand this option to other types of crime. These are the criteria for citizen on-line case reporting: The citizen must have an email address and be at least 18 years of age. This is not an emergency. This event occurred in the past and the suspect is not present. There are no firearms or other weapons involved. The incident involves credit card fraud, financial fraud or identity theft. Upon completion of the online report you will: See the words: Your report has been submitted showing that your report is complete. Be given a temporary case number. Be able to print an unofficial copy of the report to keep for your records. Be sent confirmation and an official copy of your report by e-mail so long as you provide a valid e-mail address. REPORT IDENTITY THEFT & FRAUD ONLINE NEW You must call 9-1-1 for an emergency. Please Note: All cases filed online will be reviewed. Upon review, if further investigation of your case is needed, you may be contacted. Upon approval by a Citrus County Sheriffs Office representative, you will be notified by e-mail of the permanent case number and also receive a copy of the approved case. If the case is rejected by a Citrus County Sheriffs Office representative, you will be notified by e-mail of the reason for the rejection. Filing a false police report is a crime. On Sept. 8, 2013 at Citrus Memorial Hospital, 144 people climbed up and down 110 flights of stairs to symbolize the floors in the World Trade Center Towers to honor the 343 firefighters, 60 law enforcement officers, and 8 emergency medical personnel that perished in the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. During the event, climbers wore a picture tag of one of the 343 fallen firefighters and many who par ticipated wore full bunker gear and air packs. Over $3,000 was raised and will be donated to the National Fallen Firefighter Foundation. 9/11 Memorial Stairclimb September 8, 2013 at Citrus Memorial Hospital

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Leonard BoggsFLORAL CITYLeonard Boggs, loving partner of Mary Weaver of Floral City, Fla., and loving brother of Virginia Isenhart of Medina, Ohio, lost his battle Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013. Leonard was a nine-year Army veteran and served in the Korean War. He would have appreciated those who knew him saying a prayer for him and for his loved ones. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Harold Hap Brady, 78HOMOSASSAHarold L. Hap Brady, 78, of Homosassa, Fla., died Oct. 8, 2013, at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center. Born Jan. 23, 1935, in Stanford, Ky., to the late William & Alberta (Langford) Brady, Harold moved to Florida from Union, Ky., where he retired as a floor mechanic. He is a veteran of the USAF for four years and the Navy Reserves for two years and a member of Gulf to Lake Church. Harold is survived by his wife of 56 years, Barbara; son, John G. and wife Jill Brady of Florence, Ky.; daughters, Jeanne L, and husband Eli, Brady-Neri of Homosassa, Jerri D, and husband Bill, Brady-Ellis of Knoxville, Tenn., and Julie B, and husband Jeff, Brady-Elbert of Independence, Ky.; brother, William Pete Brady of Florence, Ky.; sister, Doris Wolfeld of Boynton Beach; grandchildren, Brittany, Michael, Christian, McKenzie, Johnny, Carrie, Jacob, Nicholas, Jessica, Justin and Alec; and greatgrandchildren, Taylor, Madelyn, Mason, Carter and Wyatt McKena. A celebration of life service will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, with a luncheon being served after the service, at Wilder Funeral Home, in Homosassa. Condolences may be offered at www.wilderfuneral.com. Thomas Lee II, 38Thomas Bruce Lee II, age 38, died Oct.8, 2012. A graveside military committal service will be at 2:30p.m. Friday, Oct.18, 2013, at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Friends are invited to join the funeral procession from the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home at 1:30p.m. Richard Dick Crane, 74HOMOSASSARichard Dick Crane, 74, passed away suddenly on Oct. 11, 2013, from respiratory complications. He was born Feb. 14, 1939, in Buckhannon, W.Va., and resided in Homosassa, Fla. He was also a U.S. Army veteran. He worked as an automotive designer at Ford Motor until he retired to Florida. Richard passionately enjoyed spending his early retirement years riding his Harley-Davidson and was a member of ABATE of Florida, Gator Alley Chapter. He also devoted much of his time as a member of the Crystal River Eagles Aerie No. 4272, Crystal River Moose Lodge No. 2013, and the American Legion in Bonita Springs, Fla. Richard is survived by his daughter, Jody La Londe, and dear friend and son-in-law, Albert La Londe; beloved granddaughters and grandsons Shannon and Jason Fabbri and Corey and Jay Richards, all of Michigan; he was recently excited about the news of becoming a great-grandfather; longtime love Donna Swihura of Bonita Springs, Fla.; Ford Motor co-workers and loyal friends, Chuck Walowich, Gordon Scott and John Czyzewski. The family is appreciative of all the friendships he had in the Homosassa area. A memorial service will be held in the Spring at Salem Church and Cemetery in Gaines, W.Va. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Ella Kenning, 92INVERNESSElla Pauline Kenning, 92, of Inverness, passed away Oct. 11, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. She was born Sept. 26, 1921, in Janesville, Ill., to Mae Phipps Harmon. Sadly, her mother died when she was only 5 years old and she lived with her grandfather, whom she loved dearly, Elmer Phipps, on the small family farm with the train tracks running along side. She met Robert (Bob) Kenning at the Roller Rink one Saturday in Peoria and they married on June 21, 1941, at St. Josephs Church in Peoria, Ill. With both fun and heartache along the way, they raised six children and the usual household of the kids dogs, cats, chickens, birds, hamsters and turtles. She loved critters of all sorts, and you often found her out feeding the birds and squirrels. Always an artist at heart, she owned small ceramic studios through the years, continued to paint on canvas with both oil and acrylics, dabbled in porcelain and gifted her Mom art to all of us. She was preceded in death by her husband of 69 years, Bob; and her eldest son, Robert Anthony (Tony) Kenning. She is survived by her daughters Mary Beth Licata, Deborah Kenning, Jean Dorn and Robin Kenning; and one son, Richard Kenning. She was always happy to tell you all about her 11 grandchildren, 13 greatgrandchildren (and one who will be here in December to make 14!) and one great-greatgrandchild. Our thanks go to Hospice of Citrus County for their loving care of Mom, and to Jo-Ann Mussa from Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church for her spiritual care. A private memorial service will be held at a later date. She is in the care of the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home With Crematory. Her urn will be entombed privately in the columbarium of the Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Fla., next to her loving husband, Bob. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.David Scanlon, 70 CITRUS SPRINGSDavid Scanlon, 70, of Citrus Springs, Fla., died July 16, 2013. A memorial service is at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, at Unity of Citrus, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Delora Scanlon, 73CITRUS SPRINGSDelora Scanlon, 73, of Citrus Springs, Fla., died Sept. 20 2013, in North Carolina. A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, at Unity of Citrus, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Kimberly Yoder, 49GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.Kimberly Ann Yoder, 49, of Grand Rapids, Mich., died Sept. 13, 2013. A memorial service is at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, at Unity of Citrus, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A9 FEAR NO EVIL GUNS & AMMO (352) 447-5595 email: joecino@fearnoevilguns.com 22 Hwy. 40 East, Inglis, FL 34449 (Next to Shell Station) HUNTING SEASON SALE Oct. 13th 18th Many Items Are One Of A Kind Sales Are First Come First Serve Many Items Are One Of A Kind Sales Are First Come First Serve 000GCOH Hours. Tues.-Fri. 11am-6pm Sat. 11am-2pm Bodyguard 380 Auto . . . . . . $395 Shield 9 mm or 40 S & W . . $437 LCP 380 Auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $320 LCP 380 Auto w/Trace . . . . . $400 LCR 38+P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $415 LC9 9 MM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $400 LCR 22 Mag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $415 LCR 22 LR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $415 1911 R 45 AUTO STAINLESS $675 Carbine 40 S&W . . . . . . . $300 Carbine 45 Auto . . . . . . . $300 Carbine 9 mm . . . . . . . . . $300 Cino Family Owned & Operated Sale is 1 week only, Oct. 13th-Oct. 18th. No rain checks. This sale cant be combined with other spe cials. Rainchecks May Be Available On Some Items. Owned & Operated by a US Army Vietnam Veteran AMMO 9 mm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17 40 S&W . . . . . . . . . . . . $20 45 Auto . . . . . . . . . . . . $22 380 Auto . . . . . . . . . . . $23 LARGE INVENTORY OF ITEMS WITH COMPARABLE SAVINGS! PMC 62 gr green tips 1000 rds. FEDERAL 556 mm 62gr fmj 1000 rds. $410 Well Meet or Beat Competitors Advertised Prices on In-Stock Merchandise Remington Model 770 With Scope Calipers 270, 308, 30-06 $310 American 270, 350, 30-06 $345 Matthew Lasorsa, DMD As seen on the Wellness Hour Ion Network Tuesday morning 7am. Check local listings. Citrus Hills Dental 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando Located in the Hampton Square Plaza www.citrushillsdental.com *Panoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the jaws necessary for diagnosis and treatment planning. It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or treatment. Min. Fee ADA code D0210, D0150 No More Dentures! Get A Fixed Set Of Teeth In Just A Few Appointments Call today for a free consultation to see if youre a candidate for this procedure. Financing available u pon approval th rough Care Credit; In house denture lab. Dental implants to support single tooth crowns, fixed bridges, even to retain your dentures. 352-527-1614 000G9WY For the ones you leave behind . Planning in advance is the most loving gift as it provides peace of mind. Prearranged Burials & Cremation Call (352) 628-2555 today for our special discounts and receive a complimentary planning guide. 5635 W. Green Acres St. Homosassa, FL 34446 000G78B Veterans and Spouses Facts You Must Know Now About Your Veterans Burial Benefits What is your choice? National Cemetery Private Cemetery Benefits of National Cemetery Benefits of Private Cemetery What is Your Preference? Traditional Casket Burial Cremation Do you have your exclusive veterans personal planning guide? Lets meet at The Boat House Restaurant 1935 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River and talk about your benefits/options Thursday, Oct.. 17 Lunch 11am Seating limited Please call 352-746-4646 for reservations This is a repeat seminar, if youve attended before you are already registered. 000GCCM 000G7C9 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000GCF5 Office Locations: Crystal River & Inverness 352-795-5700 Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Kelly Prus 564-2917 kprus@chronicleonline.com 000G7P3 For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear the next day. Ella Kenning Richard Crane Harold Hap Brady Obituaries See DEATHS / Page A10

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CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school All meals offer milk and juice. Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal variety and toast. Lunch Monday: Hamburger, corn dog minis, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet potato crosstrax, chilled pineapple. Tuesday: The Pinch Hitter, Goldies Grab N Go (PBJ), turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled flavored applesauce. Wednesday: Spaghetti with ripstick, chicken nuggets with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, flavored Craisins. Thursday: Nacho rounds, oven-baked breaded chicken, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled pineapple. Friday: Stuffed-crust cheese pizza, turkey wrap, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled strawberry cup. Middle school All meals offer milk and juice. Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits. Lunch Monday: Barbecue pork sandwich, corn dog minis, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled flavored applesauce. Tuesday: The Pinch Hitter, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, steamed green beans, flavored Craisins. Wednesday: Stuffed-crust cheese pizza, Goldies Grab N Go (turkey), PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce. Phyllis Dubbeld, 71INVERNESS The Service of Remembrance for Mrs. Phyllis Joann Dubbeld, age 71, of Inverness, Florida, will be held 11:00 AM, Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at the Hernando Church of the Nazarene with Pastor Randy Hodges officiating. The family will receive friends from 10:00 AM until the time of service at the church. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.Hooper FuneralHome.com. Mrs. Dubbeld was born April 26, 1942 in Sidell, IL, daughter of the late Herman and Pearl (Bellis) Blacker. She died October 10, 2013 in Inverness, FL. She owned and operated her antique business and moved to Inverness, Florida from Michigan 11 years ago. Her hobbies included collecting antiques, dolls and bears. Mrs. Dubbeld was a member of Lost Again Car Club of Michigan and the Hernando Church of the Nazarene. Survivors include her husband, Walter Dubbeld of Inverness, FL, son, Brian (Karen) Dubbeld of Three Rivers, MI, 2 daughters, Julie (Bob) Wankel of Smyrna, TN and Diane (Cliff) Walker Diehl of Inverness, FL, 6 grandchildren, Walter, Joshua and Ashley Dubbeld, Ben and Lauren Wankel, and Abby Morales and 4 great grandchildren. Arrangements are under the direction of the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory. David Smith Sr., 52HOMOSASSADavid E. Smith Sr., age 52, of Homosassa, Fla., died Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013, at his residence. Arrangements are by Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness, Fla. Lugene Watson, 95LECANTOThe Service of Remembrance for Mr. Lugene M. Watson, age 95, of Lecanto, Fla., will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, at the North Oak Baptist Church with Pastor Stan L. Stewart officiating. Interment will follow at Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Beverly Hills, Fla. The family will receive friends from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Sunday at the Beverly Hills Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes and from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, at North Oak Baptist Church. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.Hooper FuneralHome.com. Mr. Watson was born Sept. 2, 1918, in Creswell, N.C., son of Albert and Lilly (Davenport) Watson. He died Oct. 10, 2013, in Crystal River, Fla. Mr. Watson was a gunners mate first class with the U.S. Navy, serving during World War II. He was employed as a construction representative, installing nuclear and fossil fuel steam generation equipment in electric power plants, paper mills and textile mills for Babcock & Wilcox Co and B&W Construction Co. from 1947 until his retirement in 1982. Following his retirement, he moved to Roper, N.C., until moving to Lecanto in 1989. He enjoyed woodworking and repairing things. Mr. Watson was a Mason and a member of the Shriners, as well as North Oak Baptist Church, Citrus Springs. Mr. Watson was preceded in death by his parents; daughter, Peggy Jean Watson; three brothers; and a sister. Survivors include his wife, Estelle A. Watson of Lecanto, Fla.; daughter, Kathy (Luther) Willis of Crystal River, Fla.; sister, Ruth Hackney of Hot Springs, Ark.; grandson, Christopher (Brittany) Dyer of Ocala, Fla.; granddaughter, Amanda (R.J.) Willis-Wilson of Crystal River, Fla.; and greatgranddaughter, Abigail Rose Dyer. Helen Young, 86LECANTOHelen T. Young, 86, of Lecanto, Fla., died Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Crystal River. Helen was born in Paterson, N.J., the daughter of Louis and Katherine Feller. She was an office manager for Dr. Leonard Harris in Roselle, N.J., and moved to Beverly Hills, Fla., in 1986 from Westfield, N.J. Helen was a member of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Hernando, and the Beverly Hill Billies square dance group. Helen was predeceased by her daughter, Donna E. Young; sister, Katherine; and brother John. Survivors include her husband, Donald Young, Lecanto; son, Thomas J. Young and his wife Mary of Center Tuftonboro, N.H.; grandchildren, Theresa, Tina, Sarah, Matthew, and Thomas; and greatgrandchildren, Landon, Ella, Emme and Julia. A memorial service for Mrs. Young will take place at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Hernando at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013. Pastor Kenneth Blyth officiating. Interment will follow at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. DEATHSContinued from Page A9A10SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G8X4 FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. 352-489-4933 6976 North Lecanto Hwy., Holder, FL Intersection on Hwy 491 Like us on Facebook at Snows Country Market and Charlies Produce & Receive $1.00 OFF Any Pumpkin Come Visit Our Pumpkin Patch! Great place for pictures with the kids. $ 2 00 OFF ANY PURCHASE of $10 OR MORE EXPIRES 10/31/13 We have pumpkins of all sizes. Blackshears II Aluminum 795-9722 Free Estimates www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer 000G8WK HWY. 44 CRYSTAL RIVER 2013 2013 2013 2013 Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com Experience The Difference HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE We Cater to Cowards! Insurance Accepted 3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448 ( 352 ) 628-3443 You deserve a beautiful, healthy smile without high-pressure sales tactics. FREE SECOND OPINION. 000G6Q4 2013 2013 2013 2013 Email obits@ chronicleonline.com or phone 352-5635660 for details and pricing options. Lugene Watson Oct. 14-18MENUS See MENUS / Page A11

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Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken nuggets with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled strawberry cup. Friday: Hamburger, spaghetti with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled peach cup. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Ham, egg and cheese on loco bread, MVP breakfast, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. NOTE: Due to limited space, high school lunch menus do not appear in print this week. Visit http://cafe. citrus.k12.fl.us/ for more information about school meals. SENIOR DINING Monday: Barbecued pork riblet, green peas, mashed potatoes, chunky cinnamon apples, whole-wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Frankfurter, baked beans with tomato, peas, hot dog bun, mustard, graham crackers, coleslaw, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Egg salad, lettuce and tomato salad, marinated broccoli salad, orange, whole-wheat bread with margarine, low-fat milk. Thursday: Chicken thigh with coq au vin sauce, herb mashed potatoes, spinach, whole-wheat bread with margarine, slice of birthday cake, low-fat milk. Friday: Apple juice, vegetable soup, meatloaf sandwich on whole-grain bun, ketchup, raisins, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information, call Support Services at 352527-5975. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A11 000FYTQ 000GBY5 GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000G7LU Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs Like us on Facebook352.621.8017www.sunfloweralf.comRESORT STYLEAssistedLiving Assisted Living Facility License #11566Sometimes you just need a little help. Stop in & see why relationships blossom daily.8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa000G6B8 See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers AND trade-in allowances from $50 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only sold from September 16 November 15, 2013. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where p rohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special t erms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special t erms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: M onthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with t he market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/1/2013. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card f or cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly paymen t if shown based on $xx purchase. 352-746-0098 H.E. Smith Co. Inc 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 www.trane.com LICENSE # RA0035171 Dont let this offer pass you by. Unstoppable savings now thru November 15th. Its tough to find a fall value more unstoppable. Trade-up to Trane, the number one name in reliability. September 16 through November 15, 2013, get renowned Trane efficiency at the best value ever. Pay 0% interest for 36 months, plus a trade-in cash allowance up to $1000. Call today and enjoy the colors of fall. And save green. Energy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage. Tranes XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-thats the Trane difference. Dont get left behind in the cold. Offer only lasts thru November 15th. 000G77M We take customer satisfaction to the highest degree. MENUSContinued from Page A10

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scale is so terrible. The new map is divided into 100 highly detailed panels. It shows land that has been built up high enough to be out of a flood zone even though the parcel could be surrounded by a flood zone. If a person is looking for a good place to build, it gets down to lotspecific criteria. Jones displayed the panel for the Kensington community in Central Ridge, the most elevated area in the county. Not only can I see the streets, but I can see the houses, Jones said. And there are little tiny flood zones within the subdivision that are showing up on this map that didnt even come close to showing up on the old map.Elevated doesnt mean safeElevation cant always indicate a lack of flood risk, as the new map demonstrates. People think elevation is going to save them, but realistically you can be in a high elevation and still in a flood zone, Jones said. A property that is filled to raise it up high can still have depressions within it where all the surrounding areas drain to it, and that area will flood. Runoff combined with poor soil quality can hold water like a teacup. You can actually be on the top of a hill and flood, Jones said. A combination of conditions soil quality, drainage and a dip in the ground level can put a property in a flood zone even in a higher elevation area. The new map exposes it all. The information compiled to create this map started five years ago using a system called Lidar, a laser mounted to an airplane. Lidar, a term combining light and radar, is a remote sensing technology that measures distance by illuminating a target with a laser and analyzing the reflected light. In the Lidar system, they fly over an area and shoot that laser down on the ground and get a reflected signal back, and that tells the elevation of where that laser hit, Jones said. When they fly over the area, they shoot one about every six feet in all directions across the county. By compiling all those little data points together, they get a very accurate contour of the ground. In addition to the contours, soils are analyzed. With the geology of the area combined with the contour, they get an idea of where the water is running to, how fast its draining into the ground, does it have to go or not go, they get a very detailed flood map, Jones said. The map is from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), but was created by data gathered by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. The people who actually created the map was a corporation called AECOM, an engineering firm, Jones said. They specialize in this sort of thing. Its a team effort between FEMA, Southwest Florida Water Management District and AECOM. The Department of Emergency Management for Florida also has taken part in map development as the information helps in putting forth an emergency response. About 800 to 900 properties have been mapped out of flood hazard areas, but more than 2,000 have been mapped in. Where some people have found their risk has gone down, other properties have found their risk has gone up a little bit, Jones said. The people who have found themselves in a special flood hazard area and they werent previously, their mortgage company may call them up and say, youre going to have to get flood insurance if they have a federally backed mortgage. For those who dont have loans on their homes, they can choose to buy flood insurance or not. The new map has not raised flood insurance rates, as the map has not been adopted. Its a preliminary map and its in the appeals stage right now, Jones said. Should anybody have an appeal regarding the information on the map, nows the time to appeal that.Rising premiumsInsurance will be a concern for a homeowner whose house was not built above the flood base elevation and it is now in a flood hazard area. The base flood elevation is a computed figure indicating the anticipated rise of floodwater during a storm event. Base flood elevations are shown on flood insurance rate maps. The base flood elevation is the regulatory requirement for the elevation or flood-proofing of structures. The relationship between the base flood elevation and a structures elevation determines the flood insurance premium. Many older homes built along the Gulf Coast are below the base flood elevation. The insurance companies will take a look at that and say, That is a high-risk home because it is below that expected water level, Jones said. Premiums are going to be higher for those people. Owners of such homes who already are insured have other bad news. Their premium has been affordable because it has been subsidized by the federal government, which is withdrawing that subsidy in increments. These people thought they were paying a relatively affordable premium, but they were paying a portion of it and the government was paying the rest of it, Jones explained. With the government saying, we dont want to subsidize it anymore. whats going to happen is that they are going to increase that persons premium 25 percent per year until they reach that point where its no longer subsidized. If these homeowners want to sell their houses, the buyers wont have the benefit of the gradual increase but have to pay the full premium at once. This whole thing can have an effect on the economy and the sales of houses, Jones said.Get a surveyorThe map does not give elevations of the land. What this map does is shows us any areas that have a possibility of flooding and it gives us the expected level of the flood, where that water could rise to, Jones said. But I dont know the relative elevation of the land. For that information, the homeowner needs an elevation certificate that comes from a surveyor. It tells the base flood elevation for the property, for example, 8 feet. That means that in the event of a 1 percent chance storm the property could flood up to 8 feet above sea level. However, the surveyor would have determined that the top of the floor for the home was at, for example, 10.6 feet, so the house is 2.6 feet above the base flood elevation. Perhaps the garage is at 8.1 feet, which would put it a tenth of a foot higher than the flood level. The certificate is needed to prove to the county that the structure has been built above the base flood elevation. The owners lender will ask for this form to show that the house was built above the base flood elevation and the owners insurance company will use information to determine its premium rates. This form is extremely important, Jones said. FEMA requires that we ask for these forms and that we keep them on file for every property in a flood area that has construction. The county helps to keep flood insurance rates lower for residents in unincorporated areas by participating in a FEMA program called the Community Rating System. Currently, the program benefits from a 20 percent discount and the county is aiming to get it down to 25 percent. When people contact Jones, their first concern is if their home is in the special flood district. Then they want to know how it will affect their insurance premiums. That question I cant answer, Jones said. If you find you are in a special flood hazard area, your best bet is to go to your agent. Have them research an elevation certificate. They can make a determination after they have all the facts.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer @chronicleonline.com. home sales or refinancing and insurance companies selling flood insurance policies. They could require one for each new owner, he said. The county requires one for additions and modifications or new homes for code enforcement. Jones said they be might also be required for properties changing flood hazard status with the new maps. For structures that went through the county building department, he said, there may be a copy of the original elevation certificate on file. The new maps are scheduled to take effect about September 2014. Building photographs are required if the elevation certificates are to be used for insurance purposed. Compiled by Pat Faherty His accent sounded so much like my moms, Mrs. Huebbers said. Thats when she discovered that the Nievelsteins lived very close to Neer Beek, Mrs. Huebbers hometown. I told him that my mom had passed away in January and I had letters from my grandmother to her that were in Dutch, she said. I asked, if I brought them in, would you read them to me? He said he would be delighted. Mrs. Huebbers grandparents had owned a restaurant where many American G.I.s came to eat during World War II. Her mother, also named Mia, had worked there, too. Thats where she met Huebbers father. The couple married and Mrs. Huebbers father returned to the States, leaving his wife and baby daughter behind until they were cleared by the U.S. government to come to America. We came over on a big ship all the war brides from different countries came together, Mrs. Huebbers said. They went to Rhode Island, where her father was from. Thats when her grandmother began writing letters to her mother. Mrs. Huebbers said she never learned Dutch, because her father forbade it, so she didnt know what the letters said until recently. She brought the letters to Applebees and met with the Nievelsteins who read them to her, translating them into English. Besides news from home, Mrs. Huebbers learned that her grandmother did not like her father. In one letter she wrote, I am sorry that I let you go to the United States. Mrs. Huebbers said the people around them in the restaurant were listening in and marveling at how small a world it is that this would happen. Hein said, This is Gods will, and I believe that, too, she said. They were going back to Holland, and I asked him, Would you take my moms ashes will you take her home? When she was at Avante she had Alzheimers at the end she kept saying, Mama, Mama. She wanted her mother, my grandmother, and I knew that was where she belonged. Nievelstein took her mothers ashes and brought them to the familys church that was mentioned in the letters. There he found birth and baptismal records, Mrs. Huebbers parents marriage certificate and her grandmothers gravesite location in the churchs records book. On Oct. 3, the Nievelsteins and the church priest had a graveside ceremony for Mia Weerts, bringing her home to her mother. They had a plate made with her name and date of birth on it, and they took pictures of the town and the street where I was born and the Neer Beek sign, and theyre making it into a book for me, Mrs. Huebbers said. This was Gods will.Contact Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or nkennedy @chronicleonline.com.A12SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL ELEVATION CERTIFICATEIMPORTANT: Follow the instructions on pages 19. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY National Flood Insurance Program SECTION A PROPERTY INFORMATIONFOR INSURANCE COMPANY USE A1. Building Owners NamePolicy Number:A2. Building Street Address (including Apt., Unit, Suite, and/or Bldg. No.) or P.O. Route and Box No.Company NAIC Number: City State ZIP Code A3. Property Description (Lot and Block Numbers, Tax Parcel Number, Legal Description, etc.) A4. Building Use (e.g., Residential, Non-Residential, Addition, Accessory, etc.) A5. Latitude/Longitude: Lat. Long. Horizontal Datum: NAD 1927 NAD 1983 A6. Attach at least 2 photographs of the building if the Certi cate is being used to obtain ood insurance. A7. Building Diagram Number A8. For a building with a crawlspace or enclosure(s): a) Square footage of crawlspace or enclosure(s) sq ft b) Number of permanent ood openings in the crawlspace or enclosure(s) within 1.0 foot above adjacent grade c) Total net area of ood openings in A8.b sq in d) Engineered ood openings? Yes No A9. For a building with an attached garage: a) Square footage of attached garage sq ft b) Number of permanent ood openings in the attached garage within 1.0 foot above adjacent grade c) Total net area of ood openings in A9.b sq in d) Engineered ood openings? Yes No SECTION B FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP (FIRM) INFORMATIONB1. NFIP Community Name & Community Number B2. County Name B3. State B4. Map/Panel NumberB5. SufxB6. FIRM Index DateB7. FIRM Panel Effective/ Revised Date B8. Flood Zone(s)B9. Base Flood Elevation(s) (Zone AO, use base ood depth) B10. Indicate the source of the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) data or base ood depth entered in Item B9: FIS Prole FIRM Community Determined Other/Source: B11. Indicate elevation datum used for BFE in Item B9: NGVD 1929 NAVD 1988 Other/Source: B12. Is the building located in a Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) area or Otherwise Protected Area (OPA)? Yes No Designation Date: / / CBRS OPA SECTION C BUILDING ELEVATION INFORMATION (SURVEY REQUIRED)C1. Building elevations are based on: Construction Drawings* Building Under Construction* Finished Construction *A new Elevation Certicate will be required when construction of the building is complete. C2. Elevations Zones A1A30, AE, AH, A (with BFE), VE, V1V30, V (with BFE), AR, AR/A, AR/AE, AR/A1A30, AR/AH, AR/AO. Complete Items C2.ah below according to the building diagram specied in Item A7. In Puerto Rico only, enter meters. Benchmark Utilized: Vertical Datum: Indicate elevation datum used for the elevations in items a) through h) below. NGVD 1929 NAVD 1988 Other/Source: Datum used for building elevations must be the same as that used for the BFE. Check the measurement used. a) Top of bottom oor (including basement, crawlspace, or enclosure oor) feet meters b) Top of the next higher oor feet meters c) Bottom of the lowest horizontal structural member (V Zones only) feet meters d) Attached garage (top of slab) feet meters e) Lowest elevation of machinery or equipment servicing the building feet meters (Describe type of equipment and location in Comments) f) Lowest adjacent (nished) grade next to building (LAG) feet meters g) Highest adjacent (nished) grade next to building (HAG) feet meters h) Lowest adjacent grade at lowest elevation of deck or stairs, including feet meters structural support SECTION D SURVEYOR, ENGINEER, OR ARCHITECT CERTIFICATIONThis certication is to be signed and sealed by a land surveyor, engineer, or architect authorized by law to certify elevation information. I certify that the information on this Certicate represents my best efforts to interpret the data available. I understand that any false statement may be punishable by ne or imprisonment under 18 U.S. Code, Section 1001. Check here if comments are provided on back of form. Were latitude and longitude in Section A provided by a Check here if attachments. licensed land surveyor? Yes NoPLACE SEAL HERE Certiers Name License Number Title Company Name Address City State ZIP Code Signature Date Telephone FEMA Form 086-0-33 (Revised 7/12) See reverse side for continuation. Replaces all previous editions.OMB No. 1660-0008 Expiration Date: July 31, 2015 NANCY KENNEDY /ChronicleMia Huebbers, born in Holland, came to America in 1946 with her mother, a World War II war bride married to an American G.I. In a small world serendipitous moment, she met a Dutch couple from near her hometown, who translated some letters from her Dutch grandmother to her mother and then brought her mothers ashes home to Holland. SMALLContinued from Page A1 Mia Huebbers has a box filled with photos, documents and mementoes from her mothers life in Holland. CERTIFICATESContinued from Page A1 http://www.fema.gov/view-your-communitys-preliminary-flood-hazard-data-0Citrus Countys preliminary flood maps are available for viewing on the Federal Emergency Management Agencys website at http://hazards.fema.gov/femaportal/ prelimdownload/ each section of the county has it own, numbered map segment, including a reference map such as this one. http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/160?id=1383 This is part of the multi-page online form to apply for an elevation certificate from the Federal Emergency Management Agencys national flood insurance program. The new maps are scheduled to take effect about September 2014. FLOODINGContinued from Page A1 FLOOD MAPS http://hazards.fema. g ov/femaportal/ prelimdownload/

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EXCURSIONSPage A13SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 Travel & Leisure A group of friends from St. Annes Episcopal Church traveled to the United Kindgom and Ireland in August, The group, including, from left to right, Sam and Charlene Guthas, Helen Garlach, Jerry and Charlene Scott, Nita Hodges, Jack and Doris Flynn, Harry and Barbara Pickering and Barbara Lytton visited Blenheim Palace, England. The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.DREAMVACATIONSPhoto Contest Ken McNallyCAR CORNER High tech control in your car Its amazing to think that a computer controls many aspects of our modern-day cars. When you consider all of the problems we tend to have with our home computers, you begin to wonder how the computers in our cars can keep them running safely and efficiently but actually they do a very good job of it. When we get in our cars and drive off, most of us dont even think about whats going on under the dash or hood. In reality, the computer and related components are controlling all engine, transmission and braking functions, in addition to possibly the lighting, heating/air conditioning, seating and steering positions and audio. In some cases, the computer along with radar sensors can even slow the vehicle when approaching another car when the cruise control is on or when there is an eminent collision ahead. The auto computer, or engine control unit (ECU) as it is called, is a unit that controls a series of actuators on an internal combustion engine to ensure the optimum performance. It does this by reading values from a multitude of sensors within the engine bay, interpreting the data using multidimensional performance maps and adjusting the engine actuators accordingly. A good example of this is when you use the wrong octane level gasoline in your car which may result in an engine knocking noise. If the ECU detects knock, it will delay or retard the spark to eliminate the noise. Before ECUs, air/fuel mixture, ignition timing and idle speed were mechanically set and dynamically controlled by mechanical and pneumatic means. One of the earliest attempts to use a unitized and automated device to manage multiple engine control functions simultaneously was the Kommandogerat created by BMW in 1939, for their 14 cylinder aviation engine. This device replaced six controls used to initiate hard acceleration with one control in the aircraft. However, it had some problems as it would surge the engine, making close formation flying somewhat difficult and it switched supercharger gears harshly and at random, which could throw the aircraft into an extremely dangerous stall or spin. Hybrid digital/analog ECU designs were popular in the mid-1980s. They used analog techniques to measure and process input parameters from the engine, then used a look-up table stored in a digital ROM chip to yield precomputed output values. The ROM type of system is amenable to engine tuning if one knows the system well. The disadvantage of such systems is that the precomputed values are only optimal for a new engine. As the engine wears, this system is less able to compensate than a more modern ECU system. Modern ECUs use a microprocessor See CAR/ Page A15 YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. verybody gathers around Joe, the guy who seems to have all the answers. Only he doesnt. Hes worked in Yosemite National Park for about 30 years, and is trying to advise anxious guests about whats open, whats closed as the government shutdown enters its second day. If they want to see the valley floor, he says, theyd better get in their cars and drive now, before more of the roads are closed. They probably wont find an open restroom along the way, but the food court in Yosemite Village might be for now. Then again, they might get turned away. Who knows? Its hour by hour now. I never intended to get a firsthand look at the closure of a national park. I knew before I left Chicago that it was a possibility, but held out hope. Now here I am, trying to figure out what to do in my third day in the park, when some of the wonders Id come to see are inaccessible. My friend Barb and I got here on a Monday, not exactly regretting the night we spent in San Francisco, which was nice, but anxious to get to the wilderness. That first day, we tried to drive to, or get a glimpse of, as many of the iconic attractions as possible Half Dome, El Capitan, Yosemite Falls and got out to do short hikes and, in my case, take hundreds of photos. We marveled that they were some of the same ones that Ansel Adams photographed so long ago. By Tuesday morning, everyone awoke to learn that the government, indeed, had shut down. But the park hadnt quite yet. Those with reservations in the park, like us, would have 48 hours to get out. We decided to make the most of it and drive to Glacier Point and do a long hike. But too late: The road to Glacier Point already was closed. Cars pulled in and stopped. People got out and started talking to each other. A couple from Belgium were on the last stop of a three-week tour of the American West. Theyd seen Bryce Canyon, the Grand Canyon and now they wanted to see Yosemite. A young girl from South Korea told me shed come with her mother and aunt, getting up at 5 a.m. and driving all the way from San Francisco Tuesday morning. She wasnt supposed to get into the park, but she said nobody stopped them at the entrance. They made a short loop around the valley Vacation in a closed national park Tammy Webber Associated Press Associated PressTOP: Glacier Point trail in the Yosemite National Park, Calif. is seen. The shutdown of the government let to the closure of the park. ABOVE: A sign alerts motorists of the closure of Yosemite National Park, Calif. due to the government shutdown. See PARK/ Page A15

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ACROSS 1Put in a secret place 6Discord goddess 10Compulsion 14Approached 18Listlessness 20Miami 21Gas used in signs 22Think 24Having a handle 25Particular 26Fencing sword 27Announcement 29Juan Ponce de 30Confront 32Give whirl 34Self-satisfied 36Attach loosely 37Eagle 38Injure 39Piggery sound 41River in Belgium 43Middling grade 44Satisfy 45Playing marble 47Brad 49Admirable quality 52Ember 53s rock musical 55Slip-on shoe 59Benefit 60Labored 62Like some dorms 64Treasure 65Den 66Take a bride 67Powdery residue 69Throw in a high curve 71Uninteresting 72Printers measures 73 arcade 74A couple 75Brown or Gandolfini 77Dutch commune 78Ait 80Egotism 82Noted French tower builder 84Go furtively 85Biblical pronoun 87Picnic playwright 88Threesome 89Money-back offer 90Old tire made new 92Icy rain 93Scull 94Odd Couple name 96Dolores Rio 97Mentioned 99Hem and 102Freshly 104Little bit 105Brooks or Blanc 106Drills 107Lugosi of old movies 108Ascot 110Office communication 112Unhealthy in color 114A Great Lake 115Monotony 117Dummy 119Cut of meat 120Uttered imprecations 121Sapling 123Sci-fi alien 125Fellow 126Seize 129Story 131Button on some gadgets 132Shed 133Atlas item 136Copied 138Young or Armstrong 140 Fernando Valley 141Trick 142Corporate emblem 143Scorching 145Blow 147Rickman or Greenspan 149Deitys incarnation 151Duck 152Call out to 153Carry 154Distant 155Part of AARP (Abbr.) 156Melody 157Bridge position 158Biblical weed DOWN 1Hackneyed 2Dry ink for printers 3Firebugs crime 4Bridge 5Spicy 6Oust 7 of passage 8Cover with frosting 9Western Indian 10Discover 11Certain party mem. 12Travels 13Foe 14Coagulate 15Mil. address part 16Glove of a kind 17Early computer 19Prove false 23 homo! 28Supplement (with out) 31Exist 33In addition 35Serv. branch 38Transport 39Not stable 40Tutor 42Something hilarious 44Commotion 45Word of regret 46 Grande 48Fat 49Dell 50 the Terrible 51Bakery item (2 wds.) 52Maize 54Pertain 56Those who came before us 57Sidestepped 58Mutineer 60Lack 61Time of day 63Monks title 66Most timid 68Kind of studies 70Insects 73Old Greek thinker 74 force 75Lively dance 76Fathered 79Ocean 80Infirmary item 81Tip 83Old cry of disgust 84Mediums meeting 85Exchanged 86That woman 89Dinner item 91Long fishes 92Ragout 95Machine part 97Firth or Farrell 98An element 100African plant 101Baton 103Court order 105Grinding tooth 106Swell 107Reynolds or Bacharach 109Anger 111Soccer 113Make estranged 114Go after 116Stroll 118Bridge support 120Storage area 122Before 124Safe-travel org. 125Sticky stuff 126 King Cole 127Footless 128Yogi of baseball 130Darkness 132French painter 133Engine 134Type size 135Tiny openings 137Small amount to drink 139Island feast 141Waller or Domino 142Dalai 144DDEs nickname 146Transgression 148Mauna 150Pets docA14SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT SundayPUZZLER TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 1:15p.m., 3:55p.m., 4:25p.m., 7p.m., 7:30p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1:50p.m., 4:50p.m., 7:50p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:45p.m., 4:30p.m., 7:45p.m. Runner Runner (R) 1:25p.m., 4:40p.m., 7:40p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 4:10p.m., 7:20p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) In3D.1:35p.m. Rush (R) 2p.m., 4:45p.m., 7:25p.m. Prisoners (R) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7:10p.m. The Family (R) 1:10p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:30p.m., 4:15p.m., 7:15p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 12:45p.m., 3:50p.m., 7:05p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7:20p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15p.m., 4:20p.m., 7:30p.m. Runner Runner (R) 12:50p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:10p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 1:45p.m., 4:30p.m., 7:25p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:30p.m., 3:15p.m., 7p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie istings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Puzzle answer is on Page A23. GOT A NEWS TIP? The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.NEED A REPORTER? Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. Call Charlie Brennan at 563-5660. 000G6PW Friday, Oct. 25 1:00 3:30 PM FREE Skin Cancer Screening Allen Ridge Professional Village 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 352-746-2200 352-873-1500 SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER Participating with: Medicare, BCBS, United Healthcare, Cigna, Humana, Aetna. www.dermatologyonline.com To schedule your free skin cancer examination, please call the staff at Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery Center at 746-2200. Ralph E. Massullo, M.D., F.A.A.D William Welton, M.D., F.A.A.D Michael Wartels, M.D., F.A.A.D Margaret Collins, M.D., F.A.A.D Brian Bonomo, P.A .-C Kristy Chatham, P.A.-C Elizabeth Estes, ARNP Erin Watkins, P.A.-C Carla Bailey, P.A.-C Fourth Annual Suncoast Dermatology Hallow Screen Dont let Skin Cancer Trick You! Treat Yourself To A FREE Screening. 000G881 CRYSTAL RIVER WED., OCT. 16TH & THURS., OCT. 17TH Coming direct to you. Ultrasound can see things mammography cannot in dense breast. Early detection is everything Painless, No Compression. Fast Test Results & Confidential No Prescription Required No Radiation $139 Call Today 1-800-338-7499 (Space Limited Pre-registration required) Email: MHScan@aol.com HerSan.com

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EXCURSIONSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A15 floor, then were heading back out bitterly disappointed. This is crazy, said the girl, Songyi Cho. How can a whole government shut down? We drove on, determined to hike. Some cars were funneling out of the valley, toward the exits, but many were still determined to eke out as much time as possible. We pulled off the road at the trailhead to Glacier Point and loaded up our daypacks. Three hours later, after climbing up switchbacks and encountering about 20 people along the way when there otherwise might have been hundreds, we saw what we came for Half Dome towering in the distance, the valley floor spread out below us. Thats where we stayed for about 45 minutes, eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, taking in the majestic view and listening to the wind and woodpeckers. Then it was time to head back and drive to Mariposa Grove to see the giant redwoods. Too late again. That road was closed. Wednesday morning, we got up, determined to hike to the grove. Were supposed to go to Sequoia National Park on Thursday, but know this could be our last chance to see the giant trees. Desperate, we ask a young guy who works here as a mule wrangler what would happen if we drove back there anyway. Then youd get a ticket he says. We ponder for a second: How much are the tickets? But I learn that my disappointment pales in comparison to his. His mother, who hasnt seen him since Christmas, has come all the way from Georgia to visit, but the hotel where she and her sister are staying closes Thursday afternoon. By the end of the day, she and everyone else still in the park have to get out. Will you take our picture together? she asked me. which can process inputs from the engine in real time. The ECU contains the hardware and software necessary for the system. The hardware consists of electronic components on a printed circuit board. The main component on the circuit board is a microcontroller chip. The software is stored in the microcontroller so the unit can be pre-programmed by uploading updated code or replacing chips. Some modern car enthusiasts use devices know as tuners to change many of the vehicles computer settings for more horsepower which usually requires the use of premium gas. Both my 2006 Dodge Charger and 2007 Mustang have been retuned for a higher level of performance. So the next time you get behind the wheel of your auto, think about all of the things that are happening within the vehicles components you dont see, or even care about, but ensure the best and most efficient operation of your vehicle.Upcoming eventsOct. 18: Friday Night Thunder cruise-in at 5 p.m. in the Courthouse Square area of downtown Inverness.Oct. 19 and 26: Cruise-in at 6 p.m. hosted by Citrus County Cruisers at Wendys on U.S. Hwy. 19 in Crystal River.Oct. 25: All American Muscle Night cruise-in at 6 p.m. at Arbys on U.S. Hwy. 19 in Crystal River. Nov. 9: Citrus MOPARS Club second annual Beauties & Beasts Car Show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep on Cortez Blvd. in Brooksville. Over 40 awards will be presented. Contact me for registration info.Ken McNally is a car columnist for the Chronicle. Contact him at ken mcnally@tampabay.rr. com or 352-341-1165. CARContinued from Page A13 PARKContinued from Page A13 Were supposed to go to Sequoia National Park on Thursday, but know this could be our last chance to see the giant trees. Tammy Webber Associated Press 000GCFE #ST36390 527-8002 476-4242 gerrystravelclub@aol.com SINGLES Travel Too! Luncheon & Presentation Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, 11:00am Quality Inn Tuscany on the Meadows 350 E. Norvell Hwy., Hernando $15.00 pp prepaid By Reservation Only 352-527-8002 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000GBEC VIKING RIVER CRUISE 2014 E NJOYABLE WAY TO SEE E UROPE Call to check availability and rates. Rates based on double occupancy. Filling up quickly. Hurry to reserve your stateroom. Extended the 2 for 1 on Cruise and Airfare until Oct 31, 2013! FL Seller of Travel: 10131 TALLY-HO 352-860-2805 000GBEB www.tallyhovacations.com dmuir@tallyhovacations.com No Hidden Fees 1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 S TOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS 2014 Northern Lights Cruises Outside View Cabins from $ 2,099 Inside Cabins from $ 1,599 Mar. 12th Cruise Preview 14 Nights Discovery Sailing from Liverpool This atmospheric display of green and pink light dancing across the sky is one of natures wonders. 000GD1W #ST36390 527-8002 476-4242 2014 Royal Caribbeans Vision 10-Night Ft. Laud., Charleston, SC, Bermuda, Nassau, Coco Cay, Ft. Laud. Only 3 sailings...June 9, August 18, Sept. 1, 2014 Book Now! Dont Miss the boat! BERMUDA from Florida GREAT GETAWAY Please no inappropriate entries they will rejected. $140VALUE $120VALUE WIN PRIZES IN EACH CATEGORY Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Port Richey Holiday Inn Express 10619 US 19 Attend a FREE Spine Seminar: call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. Learn about the Florida Spine & Neuro Center and the innovative treatment options available. 000GAX9 SPINE CARE YOU CAN TRUST Dont Miss The HAUNTED HOUSE $2.00 Suggested Donation for Children to the haunted House 000FYFB Fri., Oct. 25 and Sat., Oct. 26, 2013 6-11pm HAUNTED TRAM RIDES DOWN PEPPER CREEK TRAIL at Ellie Schiller HOMOSASSA SPRINGS WILDLIFE STATE PARK Located behind the Visitor Center on US 19 Sponsored by the Friends of Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park and the Citrus County Chronicle, Citrus 95.3 and Classic Hits 96.3 Suggested donation: Adults $5.00 (age 13 and over) Children (ages 12 and under) $3.00 Costume Contests Refreshments Souvenirs Fun Games Clowns and Face Painter For more information, please call (352) 628-5343 000GAKZ Worry-Free Warranties for all Hearing Aid Makes and Models 2013 2013 2013 2013 Inverness 586-7599 Homosassa 621-8000 Dunnellon 789-1559 000GCJJ Dont Know Much About History? H ave Fun Learning Some VOLUNTEER at the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. No Experience Necessary Need someone with bookstore/giftshop/retail background. Also greeters/tour guides and special event workers. Call 341-6427 or e-mail csociety@tampabay.rr.com

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VETERANS NOTES Page A16SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Appreciation week meetingThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its final coordination meeting for Citrus Countys 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Conference Room of the Citrus County Chroniclebuilding, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. Veterans service organizations and individuals participating on the committee are urged to attend. For more information, email chairman Chris Gregoriou at allprestige@ yahoo.com, or call 352-795-7000. VFW post to serve fishVFW Edward W. Penno Post 4864 invites the public to a fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Donation is $8. Children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864. Auxiliary invites all to dinnerBlanton-Thompson American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will serve a fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at the post home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Choice is fried or baked fish. The public is welcome; donation is $7. All profits support the many programs of the American Legion Auxiliary. For more information, call Unit President Barbara Logan at 352-795-4233. New DAV chapter to meetNew Disabled American Veterans Chapter, Crystal River, will meet at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Crystal River Mall. For more information, call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337.Elks to host vets benefitThe Veterans Committee of West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693 will host its annual Veterans Benefit Dinner/Dance Saturday, Oct. 19, for Elk members and their guests. This dinner/dance is a major fundraiser for the committee and the proceeds are primarily used for support of the approximately 100 veterans living in local assisted living facilities. Proceeds also provide gifts to the veterans on their birthdays and to have pizza or ice cream parties for them at their facilities. In addition, the committee joins with other organizations to support service personnel returning from overseas, fallen heroes families and Purple Heart recipients. There will be a social hour from 5 to 6 p.m. On the menu are choice of Dover sole or chicken marsala, roasted tricolor potato, peas and pearl onions, rolls with a red white and blue sundae dessert at 6 p.m., followed by music with deejay Joe Dube from 6:30 to 9:30. Tickets are $15 and are on sale in the lounge after 11 a.m. Auxiliary to do rummage saleVFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will have a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at the post, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Sale items include gently used clothing, crafts to include holiday decorations, baked goods and much more. Call 352344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org, for information about all post events.Dinner theater to honor vetsA Sentimental Journey a Veterans Appreciation Week World War II dinner theater presentation, will honor veterans at the Homosassa Lions Club, 8408 W. Homosassa Trail, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3. The dinner and show, preceded by social hour, are $15. For reservations, call 352-212-1014.IPS to again honor veteransInverness Primary School will have its Veterans Program at 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the school cafeteria. Citrus County veterans are invited to participate. Students will be performing songs in honor of veterans. Three students in kindergarten through second grade will be honored with the Randy Allers Picture Contest Awards for first, second, and third places. Three thirdthrough fifth-grade students will earn the Randy Allers Essay Contest Awards for first, second and third places. The students will share their essays with the veterans in attendance. After the program, the veterans will be the celebrities of IPS and join students in the Veterans Garden for refreshments. For more information, email Mary Tyler at tylerm@citrus.k12.fl.us or call 352-726-2632. VETERANS Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed. C.J. RISAK CorrespondentRay Michael Jr. liked the military, which is why he got involved in it with the U.S. Army Reserve while still attending high school in Romney, W.Va. His viewpoint may have shifted, perhaps a bit, after his first Far East posting, but Michael stuck with it for 20 years of active service, a sizable segment of that during arguably the toughest time Americas military has endured.Michael, who has lived with his family in Inverness since 1991 after leaving his job as a Junior ROTC instructor at St. Petersburg Dixie Hollins High School, was in the Army for 11 years when he was sent to Vietnam. He had already served at Camp Beard in South Korea That was the most miserable 13 months of my military career, Michael said of his time spent there in 1963-64. Michael was a 30-year-old first sergeant serving in a platoon of 50-ton M48A3 Patton tanks. I always leaned toward the armored cavalry, he said. Thats what appealed to me. He then added, They sent me to school for it and like any other branch in the military, once you get in it . The history of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam and how American troops were treated upon their return remains vivid with many veterans from that war. Michael, who also had two tours of duty in Germany and several postings throughout the U.S., said he wasnt personally exposed to the public ridicule other soldiers received. But it still took him time to reconcile what he endured. When I first got out, I didnt want anything to do with any (veterans) organizations, he said. He is now a member of six organizations and committees, including the Military Order of the Purple Heart. Twice while serving in Vietnam in 1967-68, mainly in an area known as the Iron Triangle, Michael received a Purple Heart for wounds suffered. I was wounded four times by definition, he said. The first was no more than a scratch. He wasnt so fortunate again. Every time I was hit, I was in a (M113) personnel carrier, Michael said, referring to the armored vehicle used to scout and to transport troops. His first Purple Heart was awarded after his vehicle was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade; one man was killed and three others wounded. His second came after his tank platoon which consisted of three M48A3 tanks, four M113 scout vehicles, one M113 infantry vehicle, one command tracked vehicle and a 4.2 mortar tracked vehicle was tasked with assessing B52 bomber strikes. We didnt know it, but we had been sitting on top of a 250-pound (unexploded) bomb, he recalled, and when we moved, it went off. Michael was ordered to go back for treatment, but once he got back to the base, he hesitated, thinking he was all right. He woke up in the middle of the night, however, and discovered he could not move. He was diagnosed with bruised and ruptured kidneys. There was always danger. Booby traps, Michael said, referring to another duty his platoon had to deal with often, and boobytrapped booby traps. The other thing was tunnel rats. We had volunteers who wanted to go into those holes. The Viet Cong built miles of tunnels, often remaining hidden in them until night before striking. And the booby traps were made from captured and reconstructed U.S. munitions. The unknown part is the danger, because you dont know what youll run into, Michael said. You could go out on a patrol and there would be people waving at you, and you come back and theyre shooting at you. It was a war that has been difficult to forget, but one that many veterans dont want to remember. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleGospel Island resident Raymond Michael Jr. looks through some of the photos and news clippings of his service as an Army tank commander during the Vietnam War. Michael received two Purple Hearts for injuries received during combat operations in the 3rd Squadron, 4th Calvary regiment. Special to the ChronicleRaymond Michael Jr., far right, sits on the gun barrel of his M48 tank he affectionately named after his wife, Pat. Inverness man recalls service in Vietnam NAME: Ray Michael Jr. RANKANDBRANCH: Master sergeant, U.S. Army SERVED: Various posts stateside; Fulda, Germany; Camp Beard, South Korea; Vietnam; Schoenberg, Germany YEARS: 1956-76 UNITS: 25th Division 4th Infantry Division; 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment, 1st Battalion, A Company JOBS:Assigned with Armored Cavalry, equipped with M483A tanks and M113 armored vehicles; also served as an instructor in various posts and with the Land Warfare Laboratory AWARDS: Two Purple Hearts VETERANSORGANIZATIONS: Korean War Veterans Association; Veterans Coalition; American Legion Post 225; Veterans of Foreign Wars (lifetime member); Military Order of the Purple Heart; Citrus County Fallen Heroes Monument CommitteeNear Saigon, 1967

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In Their WordsThe Chroniclefeatures stories of local veterans. The stories will be about a singular event or moment in your military career that stands out to you. It can be any type of event, from something from the battlefield to a fun excursion while on leave. We also ask that you provide us with your rank, branch of service, theater of war served, years served, outfit and veterans organization affiliations. To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at 352-5869202 or email him at cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put together your stories and help set up obtaining then and now photos to publish with your story.CCVC yard sale set for Nov. 9The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.Elks Ladies sale to help vetsThe West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the lodge, 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. Everyone is welcome to participate. Those with items to sell may call Bonnie Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at 352-3827614. Rental spaces are $15 each or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 17. Food will be available. Proceeds from the food booth go to help the Elks veterans committee provide for our veterans in nursing homes.MOC/MOCA to serve pastaThe Military Order of the Cootie/Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will serve a pasta and meatball or sausage dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr. Post No. 4252, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando (where the helicopter is). Advance tickets, for $7, may be purchased at the post. Donation at the door will be $7.50. Music will be provided after dinner. Call Paul Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-7954142 or the post at 352726-3339.Office has help for vets with PTSDThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department offers help for veterans who have had a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied. Veterans who have been denied within the past two years may contact the office to review the case. All veterans who have been diagnosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health center and have been denied are encouraged to contact the Citrus County Veterans Office. To schedule an appointment to discuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. Have the denial letter and copy of the compensation examination. Request either copy through the VA medical records or from the primary care window in Lecanto. For more information, visit www.bocc.citrus. fl.us/commserv/vets.VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A17 VETERANS NOTES 000G81U Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000G74B Insurance Inspections Dryer Vent Cleaning Additions Garages Kitchens Baths License # CBC1252474 License # CBC1252474 000G6B7 000G8ZY WINDOW CLEANING Dirty Windows? Window Cleaning Window Tinting BONDED & INSURED Gutter Cleaning Free Estimates! 352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com New customer special Min. order $100 LICENSED & INSURED 000G2JI www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net FLOORING WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER 685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowes on Hwy. 44) Lecanto 341-0813 MON-FRI 8:30-5 SAT 9-4 EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT Visit Us Tub & Tile RefinishingServing Citrus Since 1989ALL ABOUT BATHSWarranty Porcelain Fiberglass Tile Custom Colors Acrylic Bath Systems Chip Repairs & Morewww.AllAboutBaths.com352 637-2299 Check us out!BATHTUB REFINISHING000FYKY 000FNUL 352-794-0270 www.smcflorida.com CARPET CLEANING Our Services: Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Spot Removal 24/7/365 EMERGENCY SERVICE CR-C057844 Expires 11/30/13 Have a couch and loveseat cleaned, get a chair or recliner cleaned FREE ($30 Value!) Expires 11/30/13 $ 79 95 3 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL ROOFING 000G91L Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices LIC#CC1327656 www.eliteroofing-inc.com 713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429 (352) 639-1024 LIC. #CC1327656 INSURED 000GA4O DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! Call 1-352-566-6615 Dr. Vent 1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Years Licensed, Bonded, Insured $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000G8YN APPLIANCE REPAIR Top Notch Appliance Repair Over 30 Years Experience 352-586-9109 Accepting Credit Cards Licensed & Insured Robert Roik Member of Chamber of Commerce WE BEAT THE COMPETITION!! With Same or BETTER Windows! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED LICENSE #CCL002604 WINDOWS UNLIMITED 352-795-8772 1-800-600-HEAT (4328) www.windowsfla.com WINDOWS 000G7RB QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE STARTING AT $ 60 00 Service to Fit Any Budget: Once a Year Quarterly Monthly For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! www.CitrusPest.com 000G91F (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS PEST CONTROL Licensed & Insured #8688 406 N.E. 1st St., Crystal River 2013 2013 2013 2013 000G9GX

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CCVC looks to new decade of assistance Although Im a relative newcomer to this fine group, Id like to remind folks that the Citrus County Veterans Coalition (CCVC) has been around close to 10 years. Thats 10 years of completely nonpaid, volunteer work by dedicated members who not only provide their own vehicles to transport items to and from the various events, but who also give so much of their time and expertise in more ways than I have room to mention here. The monthly yard sale is what keeps us afloat. Its the second Saturday each month, from September to May. Spaces are just $10 for a 15by 30-foot spot where your vehicle can be right there with you. We advertise on the radio, in this and other publications and would love to see the coming months produce more sellers and buyers than weve ever seen before! We are a nonprofit organization, so where does the money go? A good deal of it goes toward keeping the shelves stocked in our food bank, which is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays (except holidays). We have fed more than 500 veterans and their families during the past calendar year now, that is a huge amount of people who would otherwise have been quite hungry. We search for veteranowned businesses and match them up with veterans in need people who cannot afford the full price of repairs to their roof, plumbing, electrical and more. We help get handicap ramps built, we guide those who need help getting through the ever-changing VA system. We offer a quarterly newsletter for our members and we also make sure its available at strategic locations where veterans and their families can pick one up for free and learn more about how we are helping our service men and women in Citrus County. We locate and provide handicap equipment, in most cases free of charge. We provide scholarship funding to our local schools and spread knowledge of our American history through our acts and accomplishments. We do our best to integrate with other veteran-based groups to strengthen the bond among the more than 23,000 veterans in this county alone. We provide public awareness of the benefits and how to get them for those who are qualified. We do our best to constantly research and stay atop the changes so we can give accurate guidance. Again, this is being done by people who are not all necessarily retired. I work for a living and yet I feel strongly about our mission and I volunteer a large number of hours to every task Im presented with, as do the others in our group. We are not quitters. We dont stop at the first hurdle. We keep on working for you, our Citrus County veterans. We provide physical support for returning troops, as well as their families while their service member is away on deployment. Not a single one of us does not know personally of the hardships involved in military life. And here is my plea. Unless we can recruit newer, younger members to help with this work we do, then these functions we have been so proud to do will slowly erode and disappear. Meeting times are not the real issue. Communication is the issue. Call us and ask what we can do together to help those who have fought, and are fighting, for our country. Attendance comes secondary to being able to locate yet another veteran-owned business who can help us help veterans. That, folks, is what we are all about. Wont you join us in the quest? Cmon, let us hear from you. Call 352-400-8952 or go to www.ccvcfl.org for more information.Barbara L. Corcoran is the public information officer of the Citrus County Veterans Coalition Inc. She may be contacted via Barbie1@ccvcfl.org. More information about this group may be found by visiting the website at www.ccvcfl.org.A18SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEVETERANS Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way 000G7M5 Same Day Appointments Available! Dr. Shirley A. Ice is going on sabbatical beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care continuity, she recommends her patients see her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from Suncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our other locations for your convenience. Inverness 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N. Florida Ave. 489-2486 000GCCD 000GCBP The HerNaz Family would like to recognize our 3 wonderful pastors Pastor Randy Hodges, our Senior Pastor, whose leadership & messages are our inspiration. Pastor Walt Garrett, our Worship Pastor, who leads the music that excites and encourages us. Pastor Jimmy High, our Youth/ Assistant Pastor, who guides our teens & energizes us with his new ideas. 000GBXS 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd. Citrus Springs 352-489-3359 We would like to show our appreciation to our pastor, Stan Stewart. Pastor Stan is senior pastor at North Oak Baptist Church in Citrus Springs. He began the church in his home in 1992. Pastor Stan has been faithful to preach and teach us from Gods Word and to lead us by example. The last word from our Savior before he ascended to heaven was to tell us to go and tell others and make disciples (Matt. 2830) of all people. We at North Oak Baptist Church believe that this is the most important function of a church. We have taken this message to heart. Pastor Stan has lead mission trips or sent people to: Russia, Ukraine, England, South America, Middle East, India, North and South Dakota. Pastor Stan is always available to our people, even when he is on a mission trip! He has been faithful to give sound counseling, and loves the people here at North Oak. He is a wonderful Christian leader and we are thankful to God to have him as our pastor. We want take advantage of this opportunity to express our appreciation and love to our pastor, Pastor Stan Stewart! Pastor Stan Stewart 000GBWT The Reverend Ronald A. Sutton and First Lady Carolise Sutton have joyfully and lovingly been serving the Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church of Crystal River & surrounding communities for the past 5 years. The motto and theme for Pastor Suttons ministry are, Love Makes the Difference and Family Takes Care of Family, respectively. Pastor and Sister Sutton are committed to bring lost souls and broken hearts & spirits to Christ; Pastor Sutton firmly and strongly believes that, in order to teach Christ, lead and bring others to Christ, you must do so by being a living example of Christs love. Under the leadership of our Pastor, God has been blessing us through healing, renewal and reconciliation of individuals and families. We love you Pastor and Sister Sutton and it is our prayer and hearts desire that God will continue to guide, equip and bless you as you fulfill His mandate to preach, teach, walk and love in the path that He has laid before you. With Christs Love your Mt. Olive Family 000GBL0 The Rev. Dr. & Mrs. R. Jackson Alwood. We asked the Lord to send us a very special person and were delighted when He sent two! Pastor Jack and his wife Claudia, have endeared themselves to our church family through their strong faith, unfailing enthusiasm, genuine interest in and caring for the members of our congregation and unfailing participation in church activities in spite of a tedious commute from New Port Richey. It is with pleasure that we extend to them our appreciation and affection. May their part time ministry among us grow into a long time relationship as we journey together in the footsteps of Christ. The congregation of First Presbyterian Church Of Crystal River 1501 S.E. US Highway 19 Crystal River, FL 000GBEH Thank You for over seven years of service to us, the people of St. Raphael Orthodox Church. The choir benefits so much from Matushka Marys capable leadership & fine voice. She & Father David visit the sick, participate in every aspect of church life and are always available to talk. Father David leads us each week in Vespers services and celebrates the Sunday 10 a.m. Divine Liturgy with great humility and respect for the sacred traditions of Orthodoxy. He entreats us to hear Christs words and to do them. His open-hearted approachability makes us believe we can. Mat. Mary & Rev. Fr. David Balmer Choir Director and Rector of St. Raphael Orthodox Church 1277 N Paul Dr., Inverness, FL www.straphaelchruch.org 000GA4A PastorMary GestrichFloral City United Methodist ChurchThe Florial City United Methodist Church Family and our community was blessed when you became our pastor For more information call 352-249-4730 or email: katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org 000FSRQ Stock Up For Seniors Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need YOUR KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING SPECIALISTS! Granite & Solid Surface Counter Tops Silestone Dupont Corian Laminate Custom Cabinets By Wellborn Forest, Americana, Showplace Wood And Kabinart Kitchen & Baths Closet Systems Entertainment Centers FREE In Home Design Work FREE In Home Shopping Get Your Best Written Deal, Then Come See Us!! OPEN 10 TO 4 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT OUR LOW OVERHEAD SAVES YOU THOUSANDS WERE IN OUR NEW LOCATION NOW! Across from Bay Area 8010 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, Pine View Plaza Call For Your Appointment Today 352-302-2865 w ww.dreamkitchensandbaths.com 000G73N 000GASY Thank You Pastor John Fredericksen We love and appreciate you pastor for your love of the Lord! You are a great family man and that includes your Grace believing family. We consider you our friend, our teacher and our confidant. You have been with Grace Bible Fellowship for 4 years and are one of the top teachers in the United States of the Grace message and rightly dividing the Word of truth. From all of us at Grace Bible Fellowship! 000GB66 In appreciation for our wonderful pastor THOMAS R. BEAVERSON for all he does for God and His people. T HE PEOPLE OF F IRST L UTHERAN C HURCH 1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness, FL 34453 (352) 726-1637 Barbara CorcoranVETERANS VIEWS Free yoga classesYoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is associated with the national service organization, Yoga For Vets. Sandstrom teaches free classes to combat veterans at several locations and times. For more information, call her at 352-382-7397.DIDYOUKNOW...?To report your veterans news, email community@ chronicleonline.com.

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VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A19 Special Event or Weekly Services Please CallTheresa Holland at 564-2940ForInformationOn Your Religious Advertising 000GCCD 000G9WQ Senior Pastor Kevin Ballard Thank you for your love for God. Thank you that you love His word. Thank you for your love so pure and teaching us to endure. Your life is lived in such a way. We see our Jesus every day. You teach his word, His love and care, He walks with you everywhere So on this day we want to say Keep teaching His word and living His way. As days draw near and time is short Hell say dear son, Good Report. Thanks so much for being a great example. Love in Christ Your Calvary Chapel Family. 000GA38 Rev. Donnie Seagle, Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church of Inverness We love and appreciate you. Thank you for being the Godly man that you are. From your Congregation. First Baptist Church of Inverness 550 Pleasant Grove Rd. Inverness, Florida www.fbcinverness.com 352-726-1252 House of Power Church 7233 N. Lecanto Hwy Hernando, FL 352-344-9450 Bishop George R. & Pastor Dottie Dehn 000GARH Thank you for being the leaders that you are. The Lord gave you a special calling, and in doing so has blessed all of us. We would like you to know how much we appreciate you both. The congregation of The House of Power Church 000G9YE All of us here at St. Margarets want to say thank you Pastor Gene. Your pastoral presence in our lives, and in the lives of the people in the community, shows us Christs love. We feel truly blessed by the growth in our community, our church, and ourselves during the 12 years youve been with us at St. Margarets. May God continue to bless you in your call to pastor St. Margarets. S T M ARGARET S 114 N. Osceola Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 726-3153 E PISCOPAL C HURCH 000GC0E Lloyd D. Bertine Gifted Pastor and Teacher Appreciated and Loved by so Many. Gulf to Lake Church 1454 N. Gulf Avenue Crystal River, FL 000GA5L Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth Thank you for leading the flock at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Hernando. Your teaching has shown us how to follow Christ. You exemplify a life of integrity and compassion. You encourage the lonely and comfort the discouraged with a message of hope. By preaching Gods Word, you have opened many hearts and minds to serve all people in our community. 000G9XN Hernando United Methodist Church 2125 E Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, FL. 352-726-7245 Reverend Gerald Jerry Carris Thank you Pastor Jerry for a wonderful year. God bless you. Congregation of HUMC. 000GC2R Marple Lewis is Pastor of First Baptist Church of Beverly Hills. He has been an amazing inspiration in our churchs goal of Magnify the King, Multiply the Kingdom. His love for our Lord is infectious, as is his commitment to the community and passion for people to know Christ Jesus. We love you Pastor! (352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com First Baptist Church Of Beverly Hills 4950 N. Lecanto Hwy Pastor Marple Lewis III 000GBKD THANK YOU Pastor Alan Ritter! Our heart-felt thanks and appreciation of your 13 years of dedicated service as Pastor and shepherd of First Baptist Church of Homosassa. Your dedication to our Lord and Savior and the teaching of His Holy Word with wisdom and truth has profoundly impacted our lives. We love you and Joyce! 000GCSI Dr. Ray Kelley We appreciate the opportunity to recognize a man and his wife that were the answer to our prayer of receiving a pastor who could bring the Bible message to address the problems of todays world. Dr. Ray Kelley. Ray started as pastor of the First Christian Church of Inverness a year ago with his wife Shirley. Ray has been instrumental in reviving our church into a more positive Bible based church. His attitude, knowledge, and leadership has lifted our spirits and is growing our church. Please come and listen to Rays positive sermon on the good news of the Bible, and Shirleys inspired leadership of the music program Sunday. We feel you will agree that the First Christian Church is the congregation youre looking to worship with. Our adult Sunday Bible study begins at 9 AM and church service at 10:15. Come join us for an uplifting inspired sermon, and uplift music praising the Lord. 000GA2V We are grateful for our pastor Tom Walker The Congregation of The First Church of God 5510 E Jasmine Lane Inverness A man who loves and cares for his congregation and teaches the truth of Gods Word. We are thankful too, for other ministers in our midst. Vincent Marchese & David Shirkey They too, bring much wisdom and knowledge to our Church Family. Truly we are blessed! Several friends and relatives traveled to Parris Island on April 5, 2013, to see PFC Michael Sanchez graduate from U.S. Marines Basic Training. Miguel and Lori Sanchez, his father and stepmother of Asheville, N.C.; stepbrother Justin and sister Marisa; aunt Maria Sanchez and her two sons, Edgar Orellana and Jorge Chicas; uncle Paul Stayton, wife Karen and daughter Faeryn; his girlfriend Kristen Kessell, her brother Kyle and her mom Kim Reed, all of Citrus Springs; his best friends Lindsey and Sean Beaudwin, now training at Parris Island; his sister Victoria and husband Justin Fleckinstein; as well as his grandmother Grace Stayton and mother Kathleen Stayton. A 2012 graduate of Lecanto High School, Sanchez went on to graduate from Infantry School at Camp LeJeune, N.C., June 19 and graduated from Security Forces training at Chesapeake, Va., Oct. 4. He is now serving at Kings Bay (Ga.) Naval Station.Special to the Chronicle In SERVICE

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This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@chronicleonline. com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352795-6526, email blanton thompsonPost155@gmail.co m, or visit www.flPost155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352-476-2134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352-476-7001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352860-2090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629.VETERANS OFFOREIGNWARS H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352746-0440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-7263339, email vfw4252@ tampabay.rr.com and Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352447-3495.OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352447-1816; email Amvet447@comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352860-2400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-3442529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at 352697-5565. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352746-1959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus purpleheart.org or call 352382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352-7461135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher at 352-344-0727. Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-3021037, or email geneusawo @tampabay.rr.com. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rolling thunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email ultraray1997 @yahoo.com. Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328. Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-400-8952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at 352-527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. Warrior Bridge strives to meet the needs of wounded veterans; local office is at 2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employment specialist Charles Lawrence at 352-527-3722, ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence @servicesource.org. A20SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEVETERANS 000GCRR 000GAKC 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . 746-3420 Hwy. 491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology 206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness 637-2079 One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness Mon-Fri 8:30-6 Sat 8:30-1 Brashears www.BrashearsPharmacy.com PHARMACY Great Selection Of Diabetic Supplies Test Strips/ L ancets Compression Stockings Wound Care 000G5B1 Diabetic Shoes For Every Season & Occasion 000G8OI We Welcome You To Our 3rd Meet & Greet For Our Four Award-Winning Florida Artists Sat., Oct. 19th 11am-3pm 1910 N.W. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 Across the street from the Crystal River Mall 352-795-5596 Artist Barbara Lange My Azaleas Artist Laurie Kansky Sea Turtle Artist Lorraine Potocki Spellbound Artist Susan Rollins Gehring Florida Dreams Whooping Cranes For further information, please call The Cottage Framer (352) 795-5596 or Anna Ingram, (352) 257-5856 Sun., Oct. 20th Noon-4pm All artists will have their work available to view and purchase VETERANS & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS

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VFW Riders to do poker runDistrict 7 VFW Riders will host the Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Poker Run on Saturday, Dec. 7. Registration begins at 9 a.m. with the last bike out at 11 a.m. and last bike in at 4 p.m. The poker run schedule is: Staring point and first card VFW Post 7122 Floral City, 8191 S. Florida Ave. Begin 50/50 10 tickets for $5. Start the run with breakfast for a donation. Cost of $15 per poker hand includes the cost of the meal at the Inglis Post. Additional poker hands for $10. Additional meal tickets are $5. First stop and second card Giovannis, 3451 E. Louise Lane, Hernando. Second stop and third card American Legion Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. Third stop and fourth card Willards Restaurant & Lounge, 3490 S.E. County Road 337, Morriston. Fourth stop and fifth card Chiefland VFW Post 5625, 1104 S. Main St. Final stop and wild card Inglis VFW Post 8698, at 520 State Road 40 E. Last bike in by 4 p.m. Roll the dice for a lucky No. 7 free drink (one per poker hand card player). Prizes for best poker hand, second-best hand and worst hand. There will be music, a silent auction, odometer poker for a prize (read your bike odometer best hand wins) and a 50/50 drawing. For more information, call Roger at 352-697-1826 or email shanily1@ yahoo.com. Vets sought for classroom talksThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform around the world. The model Veterans in the Classroom program was recognized in 2008 with a Florida Education Foundation award. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed as participants. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod 670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc@tampabay. rr.com.Special memorial honors veteransPurple Heart recipients are sought to be honored with centerpieces with their names on them at The Old Homosassa Veterans Memorial. Call Shona Cook at 352422-8092.DAV needs volunteer driversThe DAV transportation network needs volunteer drivers for the two vans assigned to the Lecanto clinic one going from Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from Lecanto to The Villages. While the Gainesville van goes each weekday, there are not enough drivers for The Villages run. While The Villages trip is not an everyday run (just when someone needs to go there), more drivers are needed. Volunteers must have a Florida drivers license and up-to-date car insurance. No CDL is required. Stop by the Veterans Service Office in Lecanto for an application. Call Joe Stephens at 352-4895245. Transitioning vets can get helpThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department is looking for veterans who have recently transitioned from the military (or returning reservist from tours of active duty) to Citrus County within the past two years. Veterans Services requests that veterans and their spouses call to be placed on a list for an upcoming seminar, which will discuss what benefits or services they need to help ease transition. The office will schedule a seminar to discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call 352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more information, visit www.bocc.citrus. fl.us/commserv/vets. VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A21 RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Monday, Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Ocala Quality Inn 3434 SW College Road Attend a FREE Seminar: KNEE PAIN? 000G9B7 000G8WL Let the Energy Savings Pay for your New Unit! Buy a new 16 SEER 3-Ton 2-Speed Variable Heat Pump for only $135/mo. MINUS Energy Savings of $60/mo. NET COST $ 75.00 Call Bay Area Air Conditioning Today 795-0526 ACT NOW! LIMITED TIME OFFER!! UNDER NORMAL USAGE These 2-speed variable heat pumps not only control the temperature, but also the humidity in your home. The use of multiple sensors allows this system to use the least amount of electricity possible... every second of every day!! FIRST TIME EVER!! 60 Month 0% Financing $1,000 Rebate Federal Tax Credits GREEK FESTIVAL ART & VENDOR EXPO 2013 FREE PARKING RAIN OR SHINE Delicious Greek Dinners Live Greek Music & Daily Door Prizes Art & Specialty Merchandise Vendors Greek Pastries, Desserts & Coffee Shoppe Greek Gyros & Grilled Specialties Pony Rides, Face Painting 20 Ft. Slide & Petting Zoo Oct. 18, 19 & 20 Indoor Dinners & Outside Grille Friday & Saturday 11a.m. 8p.m. Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m. ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION Presented by: Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church 4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd. (State Rd. 44), Lecanto, FL www.stmichaelgoc.org (352) 527-0766 Co-Sponsored by: 000GB9C VETERANS NOTES

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Dear Annie: I have been in a relationship with John for more than 12 years. We have separate homes. He has never been married and has no children. I have been married twice and have five grown kids. John still has his exgirlfriends in his life. He used to have them clean his house, which he said was none of my business. He would meet them after work for a beer. He would dog-sit for one of their sons and then would volunteer to take the dogs back to their house in another town without me around. He still works on their vehicles. And one comes to his country home to get vegetables from his garden. Although it bothers me, I never said anything to John about any of this. However, last Christmas, my son asked for permission to invite my exhusband to the dinner to which John and my entire extended family were also invited. Since John had been to other celebrations that included my ex, I didnt think there would be any problem. I was wrong. John was very upset. I then countered with all of the instances when hed spent time with his exes. I explained that my childrens fathers will always be in my life, although I dont have contact with them unless it involves the children. John says my children are adults, and I no longer need to have any contact with my exes, even at family gatherings. I say he has no business allowing his exgirlfriend to come to his country home for any reason, especially considering they do not have children together. He doesnt get my point, and I dont get his. What is your take on this situation? Dee Dear Dee: We think John wants to be able to have contact with whom ever he chooses, but he doesnt want you to have the same prerogative. This is unfair. More importantly, once you have children, there will always be occasions when contact is necessary: weddings, funerals, birthday parties, even the occasional family Christmas dinner. Your children are part of your life, and John needs to accept that sometimes the ex-husbands will be included. If all contact is aboveboard, there should be no reason for jealousy and unnecessary restrictions. Dear Annie: My husband and I cannot understand why people in church, mostly elderly ladies, want to kiss us on the mouth as a greeting. Frankly, the only person I want to kiss on the mouth is my husband. Its not like these people are close friends or family. They are acquaintances we run into two or three times a month. When we see them pucker up and come toward us, we want to turn and run the other way. Weve been handling it by turning our faces, but they plant a wet one on our cheeks. We want to wipe it off, except that would be rude. Is there any other way to handle this awkward situation without hurting any feelings? Theyre sweet ladies, but this is annoying. Turning the Other Cheek in El Paso Dear El Paso: Some people become sentimental and affectionate with age and are demonstrative with everyone. We understand your annoyance, but there are worse things than being given a sloppy kiss on the cheek. You could try to head them off by extending your hand to shake instead, saying nicely that you prefer not to be kissed, but there are no guarantees it will dissuade them. Dear Annie: You printed a letter from Rejected, who was terribly depressed about his wifes lack of interest in intimacy. I could have been that disinterested woman, but I also could have been that depressed man. I found out that my Vitamin D levels were half what they should be, and I began taking supplements. After a couple of months, it made a huge difference in my energy levels. Feeling BetterAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email annies mailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox, visit www. creators.com.A22SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMUNITY ST. PETERSBURG TAMPA BROOKSVILLE BRADENTON LAKELAND 000G6L2 National Cremation Society Considering Cremation? REGISTER TO WIN A FREE CREMATION PLAN Come join the National Cremation Society for a FREE Meal & Informational Seminar on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation Well discuss: Affordable options and savings Veterans benefits Worldwide Away-From-Home Protection And much more... RESERVATION REQUIRED Limited seating available. CALL NOW! 1-407-234-0968 First time attendees only please. *Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan. 000GCN6 $200 Promotional Discount to all Attendees When the time comes wouldnt you prefer your loved ones celebrate your legacy rather than stress about making arrangements? Give them the relief theyll need during a tough time. Meet representative Bob Jones CRACKERS 502 NW 6th St., Crystal River Wed., Oct. 16 & Tues., Oct. 22 11:00 AM CODYS ROADHOUSE 305 SE US Hwy. 19, Crystal River Fri., Oct. 18 & Tues., Oct. 29 11:00 AM LAKESIDE BAR & GRILL 3543 E. Windmill Dr., Inverness Thurs., Oct. 24 & Thurs., Oct. 31 11:00 AM West Coast Flooring Family Owned & Operated OPEN: M-F 9 am 5 pm SAT 10 am 2 pm Hwy 44, Crystal River 564-2772 Flooring For Every Budget Cash n Carry In Stock Only Not Installed Exp. 10/31/13 VINYL 99 Installed (Trim Extra) LAMINATE FLOORING SALE $ 3 25 Sq. Ft. New Shipment Exp. 10/31/13 CERAMIC TILE $ 3 59 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Ft. Sq. Ft. 000G7KO MOHAWK SOLO CARPET $ 14 99 Exp. 10/31/13 Installed Sq. Yd. Lifetime Soil & Stain Warranties Does Not Include Tear Out Does Not Include Tear Out 000G85D Wife wants old girlfriends gone ANNIES MAILBOX Special to the ChronicleBush Homes Services of Homosassa is setting out to make Christmas a time of hope for the Key Training Center. The family-owned and -operated company created the Tree of Hope, a 30foot-tall tree with more than 10,000 multicolored LED lights and 300 large ornaments, as a means of raising funds to provide year-round services to more than 300 developmentally disabled adults who depend on the Key Training Center. Every year, the employees of Bush Home Services set out on a fundraising contest to benefit the Key Training Center. Technicians offer their customers the opportunity to put their name and message on a mega-ornament for as little as a $25 donation. The official tree-lighting ceremony, scheduled this year for Dec. 5 on the grounds adjacent to the Key Center Foundation at 5399 W. Gulf-toLake Highway, Lecanto, is the culmination of the contest and a means of getting the Key clients and the community together to celebrate the holiday project. Key clients will sing Christmas carols. Light refreshments will be served. Santa will be on hand and, finally, the lights will come on. For more information on how to donate to this years Tree of Hope, call Bush Home Services at 352-621-7700 or visit the office in Homosassa. Tree of Hope helps Key Center clients

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ENTERTAINMENTCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 A23 SundaysPUZZLER (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug h t on C amera Total Destruction C aug h t on C amera Help Is on the Way C aug h t on C amera Altered States (N) S ex Sl aves: Mi n h s Story S ex Sl aves M assage Parlors S ex Sl aves: Th e T een Trade (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Border Wars River Standoff Border Wars Midnight Drug Trap Drugs, Inc. Wasted In Seattle Drugs, Inc. Cartel City: Arizona Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. Cartel City: Arizona (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sam & Sam & HauntedHauntedSee DadInstant Nutty Professor II: The KlumpsFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Next (OXY) 44 123 Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped (N) PGPreachers of L.A.Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Mean Girls (2004) PG-13 Homeland Uh... Oh... Ah... MA Masters of Sex MAHomeland Tower of David (N) MA Masters of Sex (N) MAHomeland Tower of David MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue Meat Sauna PG Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue Crappy Cantina PG Bar Rescue Jon of the Dead (N) PG Tattoo Rescue (N) (In Stereo) PG (STARZ) 370 271 370 White Queen Identity (2003) John Cusack. (In Stereo) R The White Queen (In Stereo) The White Queen (In Stereo) Oz the Great and Powerful (2013) James Franco. (In Stereo) PG (SUN) 36 31 36 Fishing the Flats Sport Fishing Sprtsman Adv. Womens College Volleyball Pittsburgh at Florida State. Womens College Volleyball Arkansas at Tennessee. (N Same-day Tape) Into the Blue G (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29FreddyJason Fright Night (2011) Anton Yelchin. A teenager discovers that his new neighbor is a vampire. R Blade II (2002) Wesley Snipes. A vampire hunter unites with his prey against a new threat. R30 Days of Night (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 Bruce Almighty (2003) PG-13Big BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBruce Almighty (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 High Society (1956, Musical Comedy) Bing Crosby. NR (DVS) The Thomas Crown Affair (1968, Adventure) Steve McQueen. R Raffles (1940, Crime Drama) David Niven, Olivia de Havilland. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Exposed (N) Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) PG Buying Alaska Buying Alaska Alaska: The Last Frontier Exposed (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30CoupleCoupleCoupleCoupleLong Island MediumMediumMediumAlaskan Women MediumMedium (TMC) 350 261 350 Transsiberian (2008, Suspense) Woody Harrelson. (In Stereo) R Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011) Ewan McGregor. PG-13 Your Sisters Sister (2011) Emily Blunt. R Dawn Rider R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Swordfish R Red (2010) Bruce Willis. The CIA targets a team of former agents for assassination. PG-13 Gran Torino (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood. A veteran faces his longtime prejudices. R (DVS)Gran Torino R (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Home Alone (1990, Comedy) PGDragonsTeenAmericanClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. GuyChina, IL (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Halloween CrazyHalloween Night Making Monsters (N)Making Monsters (N)Halloween CraziestFright House (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Worlds Dumbest...Most ShockingTop 20 Funniest Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Covert Affairs Space (I Believe In) (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami A severed leg. CSI: Miami Point of Impact CSI: Miami Kill Clause CSI: Miami Count Me Out CSI: Miami In Plane Sight (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplayAmerican Beauty SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Extraordinary Women Last Tango in Halifax Masterpiece Classic The Paradise PG Masterpiece Classic Downton Abbey Matthew and others go off to war. % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGLast Tango Masterpiece ClassicMasterpiece Classic Downton Abbey ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys. From AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time (N) PG Revenge Confession (N) PG Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) NewsSpo Night on 9 (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10NFL Football: Jaguars at Broncos 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) The Amazing Race King Arthur Style The Good Wife (N) (In Stereo) The Mentalist Wedding in Red (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Paid Program ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NFL Football New Orleans Saints at New England Patriots. The OT (N) PG MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 2: Teams TBA. (Time tentative). (N) (In Stereo Live) PG NewsBurn Notice PG 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Funny Home VideosOnce Upon a TimeRevenge (N) PGBetrayal (N) NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileWatchmanPeter Youngren Great AwakeningLove a Child G UnspokenPastor Dayna Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Americas Funniest Home Videos PG Once Upon a Time (N) PG Revenge Confession (N) PG Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) NewsCastle PG @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Glee The Rhodes Not Taken PG Glee Vitamin D (In Stereo) PG The Office PG The Office PG We There Yet? We There Yet? F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 The Stepford Wives (2004) PG-13SeinfeldSeinfeldRepublic of DoyleOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyBrody Ministries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends PG Friends PG Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami Vengeance CSI: Miami -7 (In Stereo) Criminal Minds The Stranger Criminal Minds Out of the Light O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy GEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7NFL Football: Saints at PatriotsThe OTMLB Baseball FOX 35 News at 10 (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Mira Quin Baila (N) PG (SS) Sal y Pimienta PGComed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Beyond Scared Straight Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty PG Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Modern Dads PG Modern Dads PG Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead Prey MA The Walking Dead MA The Walking Dead MA The Walking Dead MA Talking Dead (Season Premiere) (N) The Walking Dead MA (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedCallWildman CallWildman Lone Star Legend Lone Star Legend Call of Wildman CallWildman Mountain Monsters (In Stereo) Call of Wildman CallWildman (BET) 96 19 96 Big Mom All About the Benjamins (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. R Waist Deep (2006) Tyrese Gibson. A mans son is inside his hijacked car. R T.D. Jakes Presents: Mind, Body & Soul (BRAVO) 254 51 254 JerseyHousewives/NJ Housewives/NJHousewives/NJHousewives/NJHappensCouch (CC) 27 61 27 33 I Love You, Man (2009) R The House Bunny (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. PG-13 The House Bunny (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. PG-13 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37 Mrs. Doubtfire (1993) Robin Williams. PG Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Die Hard (1988, Action) Bruce Willis. R (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidDebt/PartOn 60 Minutes on CNBCSecretSecretAmer. Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Newsroom (N)Anthony Bourd.Anthony Bourd.To Be AnnouncedAnthony Bourd. (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G GoodCharlie Liv & Maddie Dog With a Blog G WanderYonder A.N.T. Farm G Austin & Ally G Jessie G Dog With a Blog G Shake It Up! G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17Football Sun. SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCSMLS Soccer: Sounders at Timbers SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49Bassmasters (N)E:60BaseballWNBA Basketball Minnesota Lynx at Atlanta Dream.NHRA Drag RacingPoker (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over LiveSunday Night PrimeChesterRosaryWith Cardinal DolanGodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Sixteen Candles (1984) PG Grease (1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer lovers meet again as high-school seniors. PG Grease (1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer lovers meet again as high-school seniors. PG (FLIX) 118 170 Sylvia (2003, Biography) Gwyneth Paltrow. (In Stereo) R The Other Sister (1999, RomanceComedy) Juliette Lewis. PG-13 Heaven (2002) Cate Blanchett. (Subtitled-English) (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped G Halloween Wars GChopped G Halloween Wars GCutthroat Kitchen GRestaurant: Im. (FS1) 732 112 732 Jones MoseleyCrowdUFCUFC UltimateBeingBeingThe Ultimate FighterFOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 Bull Riding World Poker TourWorld Poker TourThe Best of Pride (N)World Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Green Lantern (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. PG-13 Iron Man (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A billionaire dons an armored suit to fight criminals. PG-13 Iron Man (2008) PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf CentralPGA Tour Golf Frys.com Open, Final Round. Central (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54The Sweeter Side of Life (2013, RomanceComedy) Kathryn Morris. NR Cedar Cove Homecoming Signed, Sealed, Delivered (2013, Drama) Eric Mabius, Kristin Booth. Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012) Ian McKellen. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. Boardwalk Empire (N) MA EastboundHello Ladies MABoardwalk Empire MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Battlefield Earth (2000) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA This Is 40 (2012, Romance-Comedy) Paul Rudd. (In Stereo) R The Counselor The Campaign (2012) Will Ferrell. R (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlCousins UndercoverLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn StarsPawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 Derailed (2005) Clive Owen. Diary of a Mad Black Woman (2005) Kimberly Elise. PG-13 Drop Dead Diva The Kiss (N) PG Witches of East End (N) Diary of a Mad Black Woman (LMN) 50 119 First Person Killers: Ronald DeFeo Ed Gein (In Stereo) V Killer Profile Bobby Joe Long Killer Profile Gary Heidnik (N) I Killed My BFF (N) (In Stereo) I Killed My BFF (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Meet the Fockers (2004) Robert De Niro. Future in-laws clash in Florida. Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (2004) Vince Vaughn. NR Ted (2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis. (In Stereo) NR VACATIONING? Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the Dream Vacation Photo Contest. Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name and phone number on the back. Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Log on today 000G9F6 000G9F6 chronicleonline.com your news. anywhere. anytime. BREAKING NEWS 000G9F6 Quantum of the Seas Sailing Fall 2014 Melissa McCallum of Cruise Planners and Jean Dorn of Royal Caribbean Invite you to a Meet and Greet Thursday, October 24 @ 3:00 p.m. Stumpknockers on the Square Inverness Come enjoy tea, coffee and a slice of pie as we present the latest in Cruising! CURRENT SPECIALS Newest Ship Quantum of the Seas Sailing Fall 2014 RCCL fleet enhancement 000GA16 The Friends of Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Inc. Present An Evening of Elegance with the Friends Autumn Fantasy *Online ticket and raffle purchase is available at www.friendsofchazz.org For more information and to purchase tickets, contact: Tom (352) 586-7140 or Shirley (352) 382-0525 000GA6A All travel arrangements by: Beckys Travel Store, 352-528-8855, beckystravelstore.com 1st Prize 4-Day / 3-Night Cruise on Royal Caribbean for 2 2nd Prize $500 Gift Card on Southwest Airlines November 3, 2013 5:00 8:00 PM Skyview at Terra Vista County Club $75 per person* A portion of the funds will support the education center at Three Sisters Springs. Red Carpet and Champagne Welcome! Chef-Served Food Stations! Complimentary Valet Service! Music & Entertainment! Your Next Vacation Could Cost Just $10 Purchase a raffle ticket to win one of two great prizes! B lack Tie Option al

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Entertainers sought for parkFort Cooper State Park needs entertainers to perform at the 16th annual Nights of Lights from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and Sunday, Dec. 15. The charity event benefits Citrus United Basket. Individuals and groups of no more than 10 persons are needed to perform Christmas-related music. Call Ranger Dianne Drye at 352-726-0315. Sept. 23-29, 2013 Divorces Victorio Golingan Bello, Lecanto vs. Corazon Bautista Tuble, Lecanto Michael A. Destefano, Hernando vs. Karen G. Hemmings, Littleton, Colo. Jamie Lynn Moore Kaczyk, Dunnellon vs. Charles W. Kaczyk, Saddle Brook, N.J. Julie A. Kelsey, Inverness vs. Mark D. Kelsey, Inverness Van Roy Lane, Crystal River vs. Diane Elizabeth Lane, Crystal River Candi Marie Roach vs. Daniel Thomas Roach Marriages James Joseph Baird, Beverly Hills/Cathy Ann Black, Hernando James Anthony Copeland Sr., Crystal River/Lisa Luanne Lawson, Crystal River Frank Michael Hale, Homosassa/Danyel Stephanie Lawson, Homosassa Billie Ralph Harper Sr., Floral City/Cynthia Kay Clement, Inverness Darien Andrew Hauter, Crystal River/Kassandra Kaye Jackson, Crystal River Brian Edward Heath, Inverness/Sherry Bea Schroerlucke, Inverness Toby Franklin Johnson, Homosassa/Kimberly Rochelle Sweet, Homosassa David Arch Lawton, Brooksville/Tracy Ann Dardini, Brooksville David Lebron, Inverness/ Tamara Gonzalez, Inverness Edwin Lane Maynard, Neoga, Ill./Scarlett Marie Brick, Neoga, Ill. Victor Omar Solorio, Crystal River/Emery Rodriguez, Interlachen Colin Michael Toney, Lecanto/Sarah Elizabeth Bass, Homosassa Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each countys Clerk of the Courts Office. For more Citrus County records, call the clerk of the court at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk. citrus.fl.us. For theRECORDA24SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETOGETHER 000G9C0 000G7KI AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR 1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768 aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com We believe in keeping our customers happy by providing fast, friendly service, from Boat Rigging & Outboard/Trolling Motors repair to routine maintenance. That means we are here for all your boating needs. Mercury Certified. WE SELL NEW AND USED BOATS, FEATURING XTREME BOATS AND WE ALSO STOCK NEW AND USED REPAIR PARTS. 000G85B 000G8TT CHIROPRACTIC Better Health 795-8911 Hours: Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9am 12pm & 2pm 6pm Tues. & Thurs. 10am 4pm 6166 W. Hwy. 44, Crystal River, FL visit us online at: www.betterhealthchiropractic.us New Technology, Natural Healing nonsurgical spinal decompression Triton computerized spinal traction for neck and back pain, sciatica, herniated or bulging discs, pre/post surgery. Russell Chiropractic has united with Better Health Chiropractic Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant Dr. Russell Lewandowski We offer: Gentle Adjusting Techniques: A.K., S.O.T., Palmer, Drop Table and Diversified Massage Therapy/Myofascial Release Laser/Microcurrent Acupuncture Cold Laser Therapy Natural Weight Loss Mediwrap Cellulite Reduction Buy 5, Get 1 FREE Reichel/ McMurray Jennifer Reichel and James McMurray of Beverly Hills will exchange nuptial vows at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, in Tierra Verde. The bride-elect is the daughter of Susan and James Reichel. The prospective groom is the son of Patricia and Robert McMurray. To beWED Get TOGETHER

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MLB playoffs/B2 Golf, NHL/B2 Auto racing/B3 Scoreboard/B3 TV, lottery/B3 NFL/B4 College football/B5, B6 The Denver Broncos are favored by one of the largest margins in NFL history in todays home game against the Jacksonville Jaguars./B4 SPORTSSection BSUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000G9Y9 JAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentINVERNESS The Lecanto Panthers boys cross country team managed to hold off The Villages Charter School Buffalo on Saturday morning by 28 points to win the varsity team title at the Whispering Pines Invitational. Lecanto (81 points) finished stronger at the line, passing several key Buffalo runners down the chute. The Villages Charter settled for the runner-up trophy with 109 points. Sam Alford (17:25.98) placed sixth to lead the Panthers scoring efforts, followed by Mackenzie Woods (13th, 17:56.80), Michael Lindsey (18th, 18:09.12), Jack Clark (21st, 18:17.23) and Alex Pich (23rd, 18:18.10). Mackenzie (Woods) did a really great job of closing the gap (between himself and Sam Alford), Lecanto boys head coach Roselle Lattin said. And then CR male Harris, Lecanto female Farnsworth both place second The boys varsity cross country race of the Whispering Pines Invitational gets underway Saturday at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness.STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle See PINES/ Page B2 Bucs return from bye week at home Tampa Bay D braces for Eagles up-tempo show Associated PressTAMPA Step up, winless Buccaneers. Youre next in line to take a crack at slowing down the fast-paced offense Chip Kelly has turned loose on the NFL with the Philadelphia Eagles. The first team in NFL history to gain more than 1,300 yards passing and 900 yards rushing through the first five games of a season visits Raymond James Stadium today. An improved Bucs defense is bracing for a heavy dose of the prolific system Kelly helped popularize in college football during a successful coaching stint at Oregon. The Eagles (2-3) have the leagues No. 2-ranked offense, averaging 454.8 yards per game. They have the top rushing attack and have been, to the surprise of many, effective throwing the ball as well. Tampa Bay defensive coordinator Bill Sheridan is in his ninth season as a NFL assistant, and hes never seen anything quite like what Kelly brought to Philadelphia. Not the way they run the ball out of the shotgun, much like what people are doing in college, Sheridan said. The thing thats most impressive is the play-action it sets up off of it, Sheridan added. This stuff is well thought out. Chip has been doing it for years and had tons of mileage out of it, and hes doing the same thing in our league now. Theyre tearing it up, statistically. With Michael Vick limited in practice by a sore hamstring, second-year quarterback Nick Foles figures to make his second pro start. He won one of five starts as a rookie, leading the Eagles to a last-second victory at Tampa Bay. Kelly said whether Vick, injured during last weeks victory over the New York Giants, or Foles plays against the Bucs (0-4), the Eagles offense wont change. Obviously, no matter who your quarterback is, you try to play a little bit UF stonewalled Associated PressBATON ROUGE, La. Les Miles repeatedly dismissed the notion that LSUs defense was as vulnerable as it had looked recently. For now, at least, he is a coach validated. The Tigers were in Florida quarterback Tyler Murphys face all game, batting down passes, racking up sacks and keeping their opponent out of the end zone for the first time all season. Jeremy Hill did his part with 121 yards on 19 carries, and No. 10 LSU celebrated a vintage victory in Death Valley, 17-6 over No. 17 Florida on Saturday. The more time we are getting together with this defense, the better we are becoming, said defensive end Jermauria Rasco, who assisted on one of LSUs eight tackles behind the line of scrimmage. It is just taking some time and I think the evidence is there now. LSU, which had been scoring 45.5 points per game, had a much harder time finding the end zone against a Florida defense rated among the nations best, but 1-yard touchdown runs by fullback J.C. Copeland and freshman reserve quarterback Anthony Jennings turned out to be more than enough for the Tigers (6-1, 3-1 Southeastern Conference). Murphy was 15-of-27 passing for 115 yards for the Gators (4-2, 3-1), who led 3-0 early, but managed just one more field goal on the day. Murphy was sacked four times, one apiece for safety Micah Eugene, defensive tackle Anthony Johnson, cornerback Jalen Mills and linebacker Kendell Beckwith. Murphy was nearly intercepted three times, but LSU defensive backs dropped each of those chances. Associated PressFlorida quarterback Tyler Murphy scrambles under pressure from LSU safety Micah Eugene in the second half Saturday in Baton Rouge, La. No. 10 LSU defeated No. 17 Florida 17-6. Philadelphia Eagles (2-3) at Tampa Bay Buccaneers (0-4) Time: 1 p.m. today. TV: FOX. See BUCS/ Page B6 No. 17 UF cant get anything going offensively in 17-6 loss at LSU See UF/ Page B5

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the rest of the boys just finished right on top of each other which is what we wanted to do. Host Citrus (234 points) placed ninth in the meet while the Crystal River Pirates (185) finished two spots ahead of the Hurricanes in seventh place. Seven Rivers Christian placed 15th with 518 points. Nature Coast senior James Harkless won the individual boys race in a time of 16:50.25. The Nature Coast girls team proved to be more successful than the boys, winning their meet with 57 points 20 points ahead of runner-up Springstead (77). Lecanto took third overall (128) while Citrus (210), Seven Rivers (269) and Crystal River (273) placed eighth, 11th and 12th respectively. Crystal River senior Brandon Harris claimed second in the boys race, running a 5K time of 17:05.15. Harris is fresh off his 2013 county championship win on Tuesday and was more or less pleased with where he placed on Saturday. I thought we were going out way too hard, Harris said of the race. I held back a bit. (Harkless) pretty much took (the lead) the whole time but he was (still) in sight. I was going to wait to make my move on him but (toward) the end I just wasnt feeling it. Cameron Grant was the top Canes finisher (16th) in a time of 18:05.07. Lecantos Claire Farnsworth (20:04.94) took second in the girls race to Springsteads Amber Philpott, who won in a 3.1mile time of 19:16.08. Farnsworth, the 2013 county champion, was content with her efforts in the race. I started off (in) about first or second place and I wanted to beat (North Marions Leigha Torino) and wasnt totally aware of Amber Philpott until later, Farnsworth said. (Philpott) got out way ahead (at one point) and I just left her alone to do her thing and concentrated on (Torino). I did beat (Torino), so I think I did pretty good in my book I guess. Lecantos Katie Mattingly placed just out of the top 10 with a time of 21:49.41 for 11th place. Alyssa Weber (21:41.78) finished as the top Lady Cane in eighth place while Seven Rivers Paige Eckart (18th, 22:34.74) and Kathryn DeSomma (28th, 23:50.43) finished as the top Warrior and Pirate for their respective teams.Boys team scores1. Lecanto 81; 2. The Villages Charter 109; 3. Nature Coast 116; 4. Forest 125; 5. Belleview 145; 6. Lake Weir 170; 7. Crystal River 185; 8. Springstead 211; 9. Citrus 234; 10. Hernando 246; 11. North Marion 280; 12. Tavares 291; 13. Trinity Catholic 294; 14. Central 342; 15. Seven Rivers 518Girls team scores1. Nature Coast 57; 2. Springstead 77; 3. Lecanto 128; 4. The Villages Charter 144; 5. Belleview 164; 6. Trinity Catholic 192; 7. Forest 203; 8. Citrus 210; 9. Lake Weir 234; 10. Tavares 267; 11. Seven Rivers 269; 12. Crystal River 273; 13. Hernando 318; 14. North Marion 322Boys top 10 individuals1. James Harkless, Nature Coast 16:50.25; 2. Brandon Harris, Crystal River 17:05.15; 3. Redondo Beauplan, Belleview 17:05.50; 4. Benjamin Waller, Trinity Catholic 17:09.30; 5. Kyle Fox, The Villages Charter 17:25.80; 6. Sam Alford, Lecanto 17:25.98; 7. Shane Harlow, Lake Weir 17:34.03; 8. Austin Mulyck, Nature Coast 17:41.40; 9. Chandler Soucey, Lake Weir 17:46.11; 10. Charles Steinkamp, Hernando 17:46.47 Girls top 10 individuals1. Amber Philpott, Springstead 19:16.08; 2. Claire Farnsworth, Lecanto 20:04.94; 3. Leigha Torino, North Marion 20:18.65; 4. Alyssa Deligio, Nature Coast 20:48.28; 5. Alexa Lacy, Nature Coast 21:24.34; 6. Payton Brown, Tavares 21:35.80; 7. Crystal Burchhardt, Nature Coast 21:40.70; 8. Alyssa Weber, Citrus 21:41.78; 9. Rachel Van Wart, The Villages Charter 21:46.52; 10. Tiana Newton, Springstead 21:47.42B2SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS 000G8V1 PINESContinued from Page B1 Cards take 2-0 lead in NLCS over Dodgers Associated PressST. LOUIS Matched against ace Clayton Kershaw, the only thing Michael Wacha lacked was a no-hit watch. Hes becoming a guy a lot of teams wish they drafted, teammate David Freese said. What hes done is remarkable, especially on this stage. Wacha stared down a bases-loaded test in the sixth inning and pitched into the seventh, and the kids in the bullpen also were impervious to October pressure, keeping the Los Angeles Dodgers bats silent for the second straight day and winning 1-0 Saturday for a 2-0 lead in the NL championship series. Im kind of at a loss for words to describe him, said fellow rookie Kevin Siegrist, who got a big out to end the seventh. Its kind of ridiculous how well hes done so far. The Cardinals managed only two hits off Kershaw and the Dodgers, but Jon Jays sacrifice fly set up by Freeses double and A.J. Ellis passed ball in the fifth stood up. The Dodgers scoreless streak in the NLCS reached 19 innings after they averaged 6 1/2 runs in a four-game division series against Atlanta. Rookie fireballer Trevor Rosenthal struck out the side in the ninth with a heater reaching 101 mph, fanning pinch-hitter Andre Ethier on three pitches to end it. A day after outlasting Los Angeles 3-2 in 13 innings, the Cardinals moved two wins away from the World Series. Game 3 is Monday at Dodger Stadium, with Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright facing rookie Hyun-Jin Ryu. The Dodgers have already used their top two starters and have nothing to show for it. We dont get too far ahead of ourselves, Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. We dont deny also whats happened here the last two days. Hanley Ramirez and Ethier were out of the Dodgers lineup with injuries after starting in the opener. Los Angeles missed a handful of opportunities, going 0 for 6 with runners in scoring position for a twoday total of 1 for 16. Star rookie Yasiel Puig struck out in all four of his at-bats. The teams may have been hindered by shadows creeping across Busch Stadium in a late-afternoon start, with lights providing no real help. Both also were no doubt fatigued, which might have shown on the crucial passed ball by Ellis that wound up resulting in an unearned run. Wacha was nearly untouchable for the third straight start, allowing five hits with eight strikeouts and a walk in 6 2/3 innings. The 22-year-old righthander was one out away from a no-hitter in his last start of the regular season, losing it on an infield hit by Washingtons Ryan Zimmerman. Wacha ignored a crowd chanting his name in Game 4 of the division series at Pittsburgh, holding the Pirates hitless for 7 1/3 innings to bring the series back home. After extra innings Friday, St. Louis blanks L.A. 1-0 Associated PressSt. Louis Cardinals infielder Matt Carpenter reaches out for a ball hit by the Los Angeles Dodgers Carl Crawford during the sixth inning of Game 2 of the National League baseball championship series Saturday in St. Louis. Associated PresssTAMPA Sidney Crosby had three goals and an assist, and Matt Niskanen scored a tiebreaking power-play goal with 18.6 seconds left, lifting Pittsburgh past Tampa Bay 5-2 on Saturday night. Niskanen scored the winning goal from the top of the left circle, with an assist from Crosby. Crosby tied it at 3 with a redirection of Rob Scuderis shot 25 seconds into the third, and then put Pittsburgh in front when he scored from the right circle with 9:34 remaining. Crosby has a point in all five games this season. It is his longest streak to start a season since a six-game stretch in October 2005.Red Wings 5, Flyers 2DETROIT Henrik Zetterberg had two goals and an assist, and Pavel Datsyuk and Niklas Kronwall each had a goal and two assists to lead the Detroit Red Wings to a 5-2 win over the Philadelphia Flyers on Saturday night. Todd Bertuzzi also scored for Detroit, which had three power-play goals after failing on its first 10 opportunities this season. Daniel Alfredsson had three assists, and Jimmy Howard made 32 saves. Erik Gustafsson and Tye McGinn scored for Philadelphia (1-5) and Ray Emery stopped 25 shots. Flyers interim coach Craig Berube dropped to 1-2 since replacing the fired Peter Laviolette on Monday.Avalanche 5, Capitals 1WASHINGTON Alex Tanguay scored twice and Semyon Varlamov made 40 saves in his return to Washington as Colorado remained perfect under coach Patrick Roy. It is the first time the franchise is 50 since the 1994-95 season when the team was the Quebec Nordiques. Rookie Nathan MacKinnon added his first NHL goal and an assist, and Matt Duchene and Jamie McGinn also scored for Colorado. Peter Stastny earned two assists, including his 400th NHL point.Bruins 3, Blue Jackets 1COLUMBUS, Ohio Loui Eriksson scored from a hard angle in the opening minute of the third period for his first goal for Boston, which topped Columbus. Playing their first road game, the Bruins also got a goal from Chris Kelly, and an empty-net tally from Milan Lucic. Tuukka Rask made 26 saves. Rask blocked Marian Gaboriks tying attempt in the closing moments and then pushed the puck aside with his glove. Jack Johnson scored on a first-period power play for the Blue Jackets, who won their last two on the road but are now 0-2 at home. Sergei Bobrovsky, last years Vezina Trophy winner as the NHLs top goalie, stopped 33 shots.Maple Leafs 6, Oilers 5, OTTORONTO Dave Bolland scored the winning goal 2:09 into overtime, after teammate Joffrey Lupul tied it for Toronto with 31 seconds left in regulation in a back-andforth game against Edmonton. Bolland finished off a 3-on-1 rush with Cody Franson and Jake Gardiner. Lupul and James van Riemsdyk both had two goals for Toronto (5-1), and Nazem Kadri also scored. Jonathan Bernier, making his third straight start, stopped 26 shots for the win. Ryan Smyth netted two goals for Edmonton, and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, Boyd Gordon and Jordan Eberle had the others. Mark Arcobello added three assists, and Devan Dubnyk made 20 saves as the Oilers (1-3-1) began a six-game trip.Wild 5, Stars 1ST. PAUL, Minn. Rookies Justin Fontaine and Mathew Dumba both scored their first NHL goals and Josh Harding made 18 saves for his second straight win as the Minnesota Wild beat the Dallas Stars 5-1. Minnesota came in giving up a league-low 22.0 shots per game, and kept the pressure off Harding, who was filling in for injured starter Niklas Backstrom. Dallas Dan Ellis, starting for injured starter Kari Lehtonen, allowed five goals on 36 shots.Predators 3, Islanders 2NASHVILLE, Tenn. Seth Jones scored his first NHL goal and the Nashville Predators edged the New York Islanders 3-2. Nashville has won two of three. The Islanders were beaten for the third time in four games including twice in two days. Patric Hornqvist and Ryan Ellis had the other Nashville goals. Frans Nielsen and John Tavares scored for New York. Pekka Rinne needed to make only 14 saves for the win. Evgeni Nabokov stopped 28 shots in the loss. After a scoreless opening period, Jones gave the Predators a 1-0 lead at 1:03 of the second.Blackhawks 2, Sabres 1CHICAGO Corey Crawford made 28 saves to lead the Chicago Blackhawks to a 2-1 victory over the winless Buffalo Sabres. Ben Smith and Patrick Kane scored for the Blackhawks, who swept a pair of weekend home games, edging the Islanders 3-2 on Friday. Drew Stafford connected with 8:11 left in the third, spoiling Crawfords bid for a shutout. The Sabres (0-5-1) put together several tough challenges in the second and third periods despite being dominated earlier in the game and outshot 40-29. Ryan Miller had 38 saves for Buffalo, which has been outscored 16-6 in its worst start since 1999-2000.Blues 5, Rangers 3ST. LOUIS David Backes scored twice, and the unbeaten St. Louis Blues beat the slumping New York Rangers 5-3. The Blues, who havent trailed at all this season, are 4-0 for the first time in franchise history. Derek Roy, Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko added goals for St. Louis, which has outscored its opponents 19-7. Pens nip Lightning Associated PressTampa Bay Lightning center Valtteri Filppula controls the puck in front of Pittsburgh Penguins right wing Chuck Kobasew during the first period Saturday in Tampa. Associated PressSAN MARTIN, Calif. On a day of low scoring, Brooks Koepka kept up his end of the bargain and stayed in the lead at the Frys.com Open. In his first regular PGA Tour event, Koepka rolled in two birdies putts to start his round Saturday and drove the par-4 17th green for another birdie. It added to a 4-under 67 and a two-shot lead over George McNeill and Jason Kokrak going into the final round at CordeValle. A win would mean more than just a trip to the Masters for Koepka. The 23-year-old Floridian started the year with no status on any tour, and since then has earned membership on the Challenge Tour and European Tour. A victory todaywould give him a two-year exemption on the PGA Tour.LPGA TourKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Lexi Thompson moved into position for her second LPGA Tour title, shooting a 5-under 66 to take a three-stroke lead in the LPGA Malaysia. The 18-year-old American, the 2011 Navistar LPGA Classic winner, had five birdies in her bogey-free round to reach 17-under 196 at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club. She opened with rounds of 67 and 63. South Koreas Ilhee Lee was second after a 70.Champions TourCARY, N.C. Russ Cochran shot his second straight 6-under 66 to take a two-stroke lead after the second round of the Champions Tours SAS Championship. The 54-year-old left-hander, the 2010 winner at Prestonwood Country Club, birdied five of the first six holes, dropped a stroke on the par-5 seventh and added birdies on Nos. 15 and 17. He won the Principal Charity Classic in Iowa in June. Koepka up at PGA

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 B3 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 12 p.m. (FS1) K&N Pro Series: Dover (Taped) 2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing Reno (Taped) 10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series (Taped) BASEBALL 8 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 2 BICYCLING 4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Paris-Tours (Same-day Tape) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 a.m. (SUN) Florida at LSU (Taped) 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Missouri at Georgia (Taped) 5 p.m. (ESPNU) Oklahoma at Texas (Taped) 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Texas A&M at Mississippi (Taped) NFL 1 p.m. (FOX) Philadelphia Eagles at Tampa Bay Buccaneers 4 p.m. (CBS) Jacksonville Jaguars at Denver Broncos 4:25 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at New England Patriots 8:20 p.m. (NBC) Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys GOLF 9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Portugal Masters, Final Round 12 p.m. (ESPNU) College: Dicks Sporting Goods Collegiate Challenge (Same-day Tape) 2 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: SAS Championship, Final Round 5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Frys.com Open, Final Round GYMNASTICS 2 p.m. (NBC) Gymnastics 2013 World Artistic Championships (Taped) HOCKEY 3 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Kings at Florida Panthers MOTORCYCLE RACING 1 p.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing Moto2: Malaysian Grand Prix (Taped) RODEO 6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (Taped) SOCCER 12 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Notre Dame at Virginia Tech 9 p.m. (ESPN) MLS: Seattle Sounders FC at Portland Timbers WOMENS COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 1 p.m. (ESPNU) Central Florida at Louisville 2 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh at Florida State 9:30 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Tennessee (Same-day Tape) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 8 10 26 57 58 POWER BALL 4Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 2 13 19 32 Mega Ball: 18 4-of-4 MBNo winner 4-of-46$1,091.00 3-of-4 MB38$377.50 3-of-4894$47.50 2-of-4 MB1,143$26.00 1-of-4 MB10,161$2.50 2-of-426,472$2.00 Fantasy 5: 7 17 23 31 36 5-of-52 winner$111,084.78 4-of-5297$120.50 3-of-59,601$10.00Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 8 0 3 CASH 3 (late) 7 7 4 PLAY 4 (early) 6 4 2 4 PLAY 4 (late) 2 9 9 1 FANTASY 5 1 3 5 31 32 LOTTERY3 8 16 20 43 48XTRA 4 No. 10 LSU 17, No. 17 Florida 6Florida 30036 LSU 0140317 First Quarter FlaFG Velez 44, 4:28. Second Quarter LSUCopeland 1 run (Delahoussaye kick), 14:56. LSUJennings 1 run (Delahoussaye kick), 5:14. Fourth Quarter FlaFG Velez 27, 12:11. LSUFG Delahoussaye 31, 7:58. A,980. FlaLSU First downs1721 Rushes-yards40-11139-175 Passing 129152 Comp-Att-Int16-28-09-17-0 Return Yards(-1)0 Punts-Avg.5-42.43-37.0 Fumbles-Lost1-01-1 Penalties-Yards8-725-42 Time of Possession34:1125:49 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFlorida, M.Brown 15-56, Kel.Taylor 1052, Jones 4-17, Patton 1-(minus 1), Murphy 10(minus 13). LSU, Hill 19-121, Hilliard 6-28, Copeland 5-20, Magee 2-8, Jennings 2-4, Mettenberger 2-1, Blue 1-(minus 2), Team 2-(minus 5). PASSINGFlorida, Murphy 15-27-0-115, Christy 11-0-14. LSU, Mettenberger 9-17-0-152. RECEIVINGFlorida, Patton 3-32, T.Burton 3-28, Robinson 2-26, Fulwood 2-19, Dunbar 2-9, M.Brown 2-1, Ball 1-14, Showers 1-0. LSU, Landry 4-58, Beckham 2-47, Hill 1-30, Magee 1-17, Hilliard 1-0.College football scoresEAST American International 21, CW Post 0 Amherst 14, Colby 10 Army 50, E. Michigan 25 Bentley 56, Pace 13 Bloomsburg 45, Millersville 7 Bowdoin 27, Hamilton 21 Brockport 55, William Paterson 34 Brown 41, Bryant 14 California (Pa.) 35, Clarion 7 Cortland St. 48, Montclair St. 14 Curry 27, Coast Guard 24 Dartmouth 20, Yale 13 Delaware 33, Albany (NY) 30 Duquesne 34, Wagner 7 Endicott 51, Nichols 7 Fitchburg St. 37, Worcester St. 7 Fordham 34, Georgetown 12 Framingham St. 17, Westfield St. 15 Gallaudet 30, Norwich 22 Gannon 55, Edinboro 14 Harvard 34, Cornell 24 Hobart 49, Springfield 21 Holy Cross 51, Bucknell 27 Husson 35, Anna Maria 14 Ithaca 17, Alfred 6 Kings (Pa.) 52, FDU-Florham 21 Kutztown 35, Cheyney 19 Lebanon Valley 14, Lycoming 7 Lehigh 24, Columbia 10 Mass. Maritime 54, W. Connecticut 53 Mercyhurst 50, Seton Hill 13 Middlebury 21, Williams 14 Morrisville St. 41, Rowan 21 Mount Ida 37, Castleton St. 19 NY Maritime 30, Becker 7 New Hampshire 59, Rhode Island 19 New Haven 48, Merrimack 34 Penn St. 43, Michigan 40, 4OT Princeton 42, Lafayette 26 Rochester at Merchant Marine, ppd. Sacred Heart 59, CCSU 36 Salisbury 34, Buffalo St. 6 Salve Regina 47, W. New England 26 Shippensburg 30, Lock Haven 24 Slippery Rock 42, Indiana (Pa.) 16 South Florida 13, UConn 10 St. Francis (Pa.) 28, Monmouth (NJ) 10 St. John Fisher 37, Hartwick 14 St. Lawrence 20, RPI 13 Stonehill 23, S. Connecticut 21 Stony Brook 27, Colgate 3 Thiel 30, St. Vincent 3 Trinity (Conn.) 43, Tufts 7 UMass 17, Miami (Ohio) 10 Union (NY) 35, WPI 6 Utica 44, Frostburg St. 27 Villanova 45, Towson 35 Virginia Union 28, Lincoln (Pa.) 21 Washington & Jefferson 45, Thomas More 21 Waynesburg 38, Grove City 0 Wesleyan (Conn.) 35, Bates 7 West Chester 34, East Stroudsburg 20 Westminster (Pa.) 27, Carnegie-Mellon 24 MIDWEST Adrian 41, Alma 6 Albion 41, Trine 27 Augustana (Ill.) 28, Elmhurst 17 Augustana (SD) 10, Minn. St.-Mankato 6 Baker 39, Culver-Stockton 0 Baldwin-Wallace 38, Ohio Northern 17 Ball St. 27, Kent St. 24 Baylor 35, Kansas St. 25 Bemidji St. 17, Mary 16 Benedictine (Ill.) 33, Aurora 23 Benedictine (Kan.) 62, Avila 37 Bethel (Minn.) 45, Concordia (Moor.) 22 Bethel (Tenn.) 20, Lindenwood (Ill.) 14 Buffalo 33, W. Michigan 0 Butler 35, Campbell 14 CSU-Pueblo 51, Chadron St. 42 Carleton 56, Macalester 17 Carroll (Wis.) 48, Lawrence 14 Cent. Methodist 44, Evangel 14 Cent. Michigan 26, Ohio 23 Central St. (Ohio) 25, Miles 21 Coe 56, Loras 0 Concordia (Neb.) 19, Nebraska Wesleyan 3 Concordia (Wis.) 70, Maranatha Baptist 14 Crown (Minn.) 34, Iowa Wesleyan 31, OT Dakota St. 31, Jamestown 28 Dakota Wesleyan 31, Doane 20 DePauw 45, Oberlin 11 Defiance 27, Manchester 12 Dordt 56, Trinity Bible 27 Dubuque 56, Luther 20 E. Washington 35, North Dakota 14 Emporia St. 63, SW Baptist 17 Eureka 50, Martin Luther 14 Ferris St. 54, Grand Valley St. 44 Findlay 35, Tiffin 14 Fort Hays St. 31, Lindenwood (Mo.) 17 Franklin 55, Mount St. Joseph 27 Friends 34, McPherson 3 Grand View 48, Olivet Nazarene 17 Greenville 55, Mac Murray 30 Hamline 31, St. Olaf 28 Hanover 44, Anderson (Ind.) 23 Heidelberg 73, Capital 17 Hillsdale 35, Wayne (Mich.) 16 Hope 47, Olivet 14 Illinois College 55, Lake Forest 7 Illinois Wesleyan 52, North Park 21 Indianapolis 45, McKendree 7 John Carroll 62, Marietta 7 Kenyon 20, Hiram 16 Knox 31, Beloit 21 Lake Erie 48, Notre Dame Coll. 21 Lakeland 35, Rockford 21 Marian (Ind.) 27, Siena Heights 23 Mayville St. 14, Valley City St. 9 Michigan St. 42, Indiana 28 Michigan Tech 31, N. Michigan 7 Mid-Am Nazarene 41, Peru St. 38, 2OT Minn. Duluth 69, Minn. St.-Moorhead 45 Minn.-Morris 45, Westminster (Mo.) 38 Missouri Southern 45, S. Dakota Tech 40 Missouri Valley 35, Graceland (Iowa) 7 Missouri Western 54, Northeastern St. 10 Monmouth (Ill.) 65, Grinnell 3 Morningside 44, Hastings 3 Mount Union 62, Wilmington (Ohio) 0 N. Dakota St. 41, Missouri St. 26 N. Illinois 27, Akron 20 NW Missouri St. 72, Cent. Oklahoma 10 Nebraska 44, Purdue 7 North Central (Ill.) 55, Millikin 7 Northern St. (SD) 22, Minot St. 21 Ohio Dominican 31, Ashland 19 Ottawa, Kan. 63, St. Mary (Kan.) 17 Otterbein 12, Muskingum 10 Pittsburg St. 31, Cent. Missouri 21 Presentation 34, Haskell Indian Nations 14 Rose-Hulman 34, Bluffton 26 S. Dakota St. 38, W. Illinois 14 S. Illinois 24, N. Iowa 17, OT SE Missouri 37, Murray St. 34, 3OT SW Minnesota St. 55, Wayne (Neb.) 16 Saginaw Valley St. 44, Northwood (Mich.) 28 Simpson (Iowa) 14, Central 10 South Dakota 17, Indiana St. 14 Southwestern (Kan.) 28, Bethany (Kan.) 21 St. Ambrose 31, Trinity (Ill.) 28 St. Cloud St. 55, Minn.-Crookston 6 St. Francis (Ill.) 28, Robert Morris-Chicago 25 St. Johns (Minn.) 30, Augsburg 28 St. Josephs (Ind.) 34, Quincy 26 St. Norbert 20, Cornell (Iowa) 17 St. Scholastica 25, Northwestern (Minn.) 14 St. Thomas (Minn.) 20, Gustavus 12 Sterling 54, Bethel (Kan.) 9 Tabor 54, Kansas Wesleyan 28 Taylor 47, Concordia (Mich.) 7 Truman St. 45, William Jewell 7 Upper Iowa 28, Concordia (St.P.) 24 Urbana 22, Concord 10 Wabash 38, Ohio Wesleyan 13 Walsh 38, Malone 28 Wartburg 37, Buena Vista 29 Washburn 58, Lincoln (Mo.) 7 Wheaton (Ill.) 28, Carthage 0 William Penn 65, Waldorf 0 Winona St. 45, Sioux Falls 40 Wis. Lutheran 49, Concordia (Ill.) 13 Wis.-Oshkosh 30, Wis.-LaCrosse 6 Wis.-Platteville 49, Wis.-River Falls 7 Wis.-Stevens Pt. 23, Wis.-Eau Claire 17, OT Wis.-Whitewater 55, Wis.-Stout 13 Wisconsin 35, Northwestern 6 Wittenberg 38, Denison 20 Wooster 33, Allegheny 16 Youngstown St. 59, Illinois St. 21 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 48, Idaho 24 Arkansas Tech 14, S. Arkansas 13 Bacone 16, Wayland Baptist 9 Cent. Arkansas 31, Nebraska-Kearney 0 E. New Mexico 29, Angelo St. 28 Hardin-Simmons 59, Howard Payne 24 Harding 63, Ark.-Monticello 30 Henderson St. 45, SW Oklahoma 17 Houston 25, Memphis 15 Langston 41, SW Assemblies of God 17 Louisiana-Monroe 21, Texas St. 14 Midwestern St. 66, McMurry 20 Millsaps 27, Trinity (Texas) 24 Mississippi College 34, Sul Ross St. 30 North Texas 34, Middle Tennessee 7 Okla. Panhandle St. 41, Texas College 0 Oklahoma Baptist 42, Southwestern (Texas) 21 Ouachita 45, NW Oklahoma St. 21 Rice 27, UTSA 21 SE Oklahoma 31, S. Nazarene 14 Sam Houston St. 14, Lamar 3 South Carolina 52, Arkansas 7 TCU 27, Kansas 17 Texas 36, Oklahoma 20 Texas Lutheran 45, Austin 12 Texas Southern 41, Ark.-Pine Bluff 28 Texas Tech 42, Iowa St. 35 Tulsa 34, UTEP 20 Washington (Mo.) 45, Hendrix 41 SOUTH Alabama 48, Kentucky 7 Alabama St. 48, Prairie View 42, OT Alcorn St. 48, Grambling St. 0 Alderson-Broaddus 48, Point (Ga.) 16 Auburn 62, W. Carolina 3 Ave Maria 45, Florida Tech 41 Belhaven 40, Bluefield South 21 Bethune-Cookman 27, Howard 6 Brevard 35, Mars Hill 7 Carson-Newman 45, Shorter 28 Centre 48, Berry 6 Charleston (WV) 17, Glenville St. 10 Charleston Southern 25, VMI 17 Chattanooga 31, Furman 9 Chowan 31, Bowie St. 21 Christopher Newport 20, NC Wesleyan 8 Clark Atlanta 56, College of Faith 0 Clemson 24, Boston College 14 Coastal Carolina 42, Gardner-Webb 7 Cumberland (Tenn.) 45, Union (Ky.) 43 Dayton 49, Stetson 20 Delaware St. 14, Norfolk St. 7 Drake 27, Davidson 6 Duke 35, Navy 7 Florida A&M 27, Savannah St. 14 Georgetown (Ky.) 19, Campbellsville 14 Georgia Southern 28, The Citadel 21 Guilford 56, Shenandoah 29 Hampden-Sydney 28, Bridgewater (Va.) 7 Hampton 31, NC A&T 26 Huntingdon 48, Greensboro 40 Jackson St. 26, MVSU 17 James Madison 38, Richmond 31 Kentucky Christian 22, Lindsey Wilson 14 Kentucky St. 17, Fort Valley St. 11 LSU 17, Florida 6 Lane 37, Albany St. (Ga.) 31 Lenoir-Rhyne 35, North Greenville 17 Marshall 24, FAU 23 Maryland 27, Virginia 26 Maryville (Tenn.) 47, LaGrange 35 Mercer 35, Valparaiso 21 Methodist 41, Averett 33 Mississippi St. 21, Bowling Green 20 Missouri 41, Georgia 26 Missouri S&T 41, Kentucky Wesleyan 21 NC Pembroke 45, Charlotte 22 Newberry 44, Tusculum 9 Nicholls St. 33, Northwestern St. 21 North Alabama 38, West Georgia 21 Rhodes 50, Sewanee 23 S. Virginia 35, Warner 20 SE Louisiana 56, Stephen F. Austin 14 Samford 34, Appalachian St. 10 Shaw 44, Fayetteville St. 34 Shepherd 42, Virginia-Wise 17 St. Augustines 21, Livingstone 14 Stillman 35, Benedict 21 Syracuse 24, NC State 10 Tennessee St. 31, Jacksonville St. 15 Troy 35, Georgia St. 28 Tulane 36, East Carolina 33, 3OT Tuskegee 54, Morehouse 10 UAB 27, FIU 24 Virginia Tech 19, Pittsburgh 9 WV Wesleyan 45, W. Virginia St. 30 Washington & Lee 21, Emory & Henry 17 Webber 49, Edward Waters 9 Wesley 40, Va. Lynchburg 0 West Liberty 27, Fairmont St. 21 William & Mary 27, Penn 14 Wingate 23, Catawba 22 Winston-Salem 44, Johnson C. Smith 17 Wofford 31, Elon 27 FAR WEST Adams St. 49, Black Hills St. 43 BYU 38, Georgia Tech 20 Carroll (Mont.) 42, Dickinson St. 7 Cent. Washington 27, Dixie St. 24 Chapman 62, Pomona-Pitzer 21 Colorado Mines 51, Fort Lewis 16 Idaho St. 40, N. Colorado 26 La Verne 41, Whittier 27 Mesa St. 22, W. New Mexico 17 Montana 42, UC Davis 7 Occidental 38, Claremont-Mudd 30 Oregon 45, Washington 24 Pacific 56, Puget Sound 14 Pacific Lutheran 42, Lewis & Clark 21 S. Utah 17, Portland St. 7 San Diego 35, Marist 33 San Jose St. 34, Colorado St. 27 Utah 27, Stanford 21 W. Oregon 38, Humboldt St. 21 Western St. (Col.) 33, NM Highlands 27 Wyoming 38, New Mexico 31Sprint Cup Bank of America 500 ResultsSaturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (23) B. Keselowski, Ford, 334 laps, 103.9 rating, 47 points. 2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 334, 138.3, 44. 3. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 334, 107.4, 42. 4. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 129.6, 41. 5. (9) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334, 111.2, 40. 6. (2) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 97.1, 38. 7. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 334, 117, 38. 8. (7) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 106.6, 37. 9. (18) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334, 94.3, 35. 10. (15) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 95.3, 35. 11. (14) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 334, 89.1, 34. 12. (8) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 334, 88.1, 32. 13. (16) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 334, 79.7, 31. 14. (10) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 333, 95, 30. 15. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 333, 104.7, 30. 16. (3) Greg Biffle, Ford, 333, 78.9, 28. 17. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 333, 68.2, 27. 18. (12) Joey Logano, Ford, 332, 72.9, 26. 19. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 332, 70, 25. 20. (35) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 332, 55.2, 24. 21. (26) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 332, 66.8, 23. 22. (17) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 331, 79.6, 22. 23. (11) Aric Almirola, Ford, 331, 69.3, 21. 24. (13) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 331, 65.4, 20. 25. (27) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 330, 59.2, 0. 26. (36) David Reutimann, Toyota, 330, 51.6, 18. 27. (19) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 330, 56, 0. 28. (24) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 329, 58.1, 16. 29. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 328, 47.1, 16. 30. (30) David Ragan, Ford, 328, 48.4, 14. 31. (28) Casey Mears, Ford, 328, 35.3, 13. 32. (39) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 327, 43.1, 12. 33. (32) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 327, 39.7, 0. 34. (31) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 327, 48, 0. 35. (41) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 326, 34.6, 9. 36. (40) Timmy Hill, Ford, 324, 30.9, 8. 37. (21) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, engine, 247, 63.5, 0. 38. (43) Blake Koch, Ford, vibration, 216, 28.5, 0. 39. (38) J. Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 149, 32.4, 0. 40. (37) M. McDowell, Ford, vibration, 83, 27.3, 4. 41. (33) Josh Wise, Ford, brakes, 81, 37.2, 0. 42. (22) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, engine, 80, 42.9, 2. 43. (42) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, accident, 23, 29, 1. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 158.312 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 9 minutes, 57 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.022 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 20 laps. Lead Changes: 24 among 11 drivers. Lap Leaders: J.Gordon 1-26; D.Gilliland 27; K.Kahne 28-29; D.Earnhardt Jr. 30-43; K.Kahne 44-73; J.Johnson 74; R.Newman 75; C.Edwards 76; Ky.Busch 77; K.Kahne 78-90; D.Earnhardt Jr. 91-95; K.Kahne 96128; R.Newman 129; M.Kenseth 130; C.Bowyer 131; B.Keselowski 132-133; K.Kahne 134-173; Ky.Busch 174; K.Kahne 175-177; J.Johnson 178-227; Ky.Busch 228; J.Johnson 229-307; Ky.Busch 308; K.Kahne 309-325; B.Keselowski 326-334. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): K.Kahne, 7 times for 138 laps; J.Johnson, 3 times for 130 laps; J.Gordon, 1 time for 26 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2 times for 19 laps; B.Keselowski, 2 times for 11 laps; Ky.Busch, 4 times for 4 laps; R.Newman, 2 times for 2 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Edwards, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Bowyer, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. M.Kenseth, 2,225; 2. J.Johnson, 2,221; 3. K.Harvick, 2,196; 4. J.Gordon, 2,189; 5. Ky.Busch, 2,188; 6. G.Biffle, 2,167; 7. Ku.Busch, 2,166; 8. C.Bowyer, 2,162; 9. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,159; 10. C.Edwards, 2,158; 11. J.Logano, 2,150; 12. R.Newman, 2,147.MLB playoffsAll Times EDT WILD CARD Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0 DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5) American League Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1 Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2 Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4 Monday, Oct. 7: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 4 Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Saturday, Oct. 5: Oakland 1, Detroit 0 Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland 6, Detroit 3 Tuesday, Oct. 8: Detroit 8, Oakland 6 Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit 3, Oakland 0 National League St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2 Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1 Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1 Sunday, Oct. 6: Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3 Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis 2, Pittsburgh 1 Wednesday Oct. 9: St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1 Los Angeles 3, Atlanta 1 Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1 Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 13, Atlanta 6 Monday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 4, Atlanta 3 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League All games televised by Fox Detroit vs. Boston Saturday, Oct. 12: Detroit (Sanchez 14-8) at Boston (Lester 15-8), late Sunday, Oct. 13: Detroit (Scherzer 21-3) at Boston (Buchholz 12-1), 8:07 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15: Boston (Lackey 10-13) at Detroit (Verlander 13-12), 4:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at Detroit (Fister 14-9), 8:07 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 17: Boston at Detroit, 8:07 p.m. x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Detroit at Boston, 4:37 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 20: Detroit at Boston, 8:07 p.m. National League All games televised by TBS St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 0 Friday, Oct. 11: St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 2, 13 innings Saturday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0 Monday, Oct. 14: St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9) at Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8), 8:07 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis (Lynn 15-10) at Los Angeles, 8:07 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 16: St. Louis at Los Angeles, 4:07 p.m. x-Friday, Oct. 18: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8:37 p.m. x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8:37 p.m. WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 23: at AL Thursday, Oct. 24: at AL Saturday, Oct. 26: at NL Sunday, Oct. 27: at NL x-Monday, Oct. 28: at NL x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: at AL x-Thursday, Oct. 31: at ALCardinals 1, Dodgers 0Los AngelesSt. Louis abrhbiabrhbi Crwfrd lf4010MCrpnt 2b3010 M.Ellis 2b4010Beltran rf2000 AdGnzl 1b3000Hollidy lf3000 Puig rf4000YMolin c3000 Uribe 3b4000Freese 3b3110 Schmkr cf3000Descals 3b0000 Ethier ph1000MAdms 1b3000 A.Ellis c3010Jay cf2001 Punto ss3010Kozma ss2000 Kershw p2010Wacha p2000 MYong ph1000Siegrist p0000 Belisari p0000Choate p0000 Howell p0000CMrtnz p0000 SRonsn ph1000 Rosnthl p0000 Totals32050Totals24121 Los Angeles0000000000 St. Louis00001000x1 EM.Carpenter (1). DPLos Angeles 1. LOBLos Angeles 6, St. Louis 2. 2BA.Ellis (1), Freese (1). 3BM.Carpenter (1). SBM.Ellis (1). SFJay. IPHRERBBSO Los Angeles Kershaw L,0-1621015 Belisario100000 Howell100010 St. Louis Wacha W,1-062/350018 Siegrist H,11/300000 Choate H,11/300000 Ca.Martinez H,12/300002 Rosenthal S,1-1100003 WPSiegrist 2. PBA.Ellis.Glantz-Culver LineFor Oct. 13 Major League Baseball Playoffs American League FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE Detroit-110at Boston+100 NFL Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Kansas City108(41) Oakland Philadelphia32(46) at Tampa Bay Green Bay33(48) at Baltimore Detroit32(44) at Cleveland at Minnesota22(44) Carolina at Houston77(42) St. Louis at N.Y. Jets+2Pk (41) Pittsburgh Cincinnati76(41) at Buffalo at Seattle1313(40) Tennessee at Denver2726(53) Jacksonville at San Fran.1110(41) Arizona at N. England31(50) New Orleans at Dallas35(53) Washington Monday Indianapolis21(50) at San Diego Late caution helps Keselowski to first win of yearCONCORD, N.C. Brad Keselowski snapped a 37-race winless streak Saturday night by chasing down Kasey Kahne in the closing laps at Charlotte Motor Speedway. The defending Sprint Cup champion picked up his first win since Dover of last year. Keselowski led only 11 laps, and passed Kahne with nine to go to get the win in his Penske Racing Ford. The race changed dramatically with 27 laps remaining and Jimmie Johnson seemingly on his way to an easy victory. But a debris caution sent the leaders to pit road and ended Johnsons march to a record seventh Charlotte win. Keselowski restarted in sixth, picked his way through traffic and set his sights on Kahne. But getting past the Hendrick Motorsports driver wasnt easy, and he needed several attempts before making it stick.Bucs Banks cleared to play against EaglesTAMPA Rookie cornerback Johnthan Banks, the third Tampa Bay player diagnosed with MRSA, has been cleared to play today in the Buccaneers game against the Philadelphia Eagles. The NFL and NFL Players Association issued a joint statement Saturday, saying: The NFL and NFLPA have worked together in response to the MRSA matter in Tampa Bay. The jointly retained specialist has met with the team, supervised the inspection of the facilities, conducted medical examinations and agrees with the team medical staff that Mr. Banks does not pose a risk of transmission to other players. The specialist also met with team officials from the Eagles. All players have been advised of the process and we will continue to work together to jointly monitor the situation. MRSA is a staph infection that is resistant to many common antibiotics. On the teams injury report Friday, Banks and guard Carl Nicks, who along with kicker Lawrence Tynes was diagnosed as having MRSA in August, were listed as questionable to play against Philadelphia. Tynes is on the nonfootball injury list. From wire reports SPORTS BRIEFS

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B4SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLENATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUE NFL standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA New England410.8009570 N.Y. Jets320.60098116 Miami 320.600114117 Buffalo 230.400112130 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis410.80013979 Tennessee320.60011595 Houston230.40093139 Jacksonville050.00051163 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore320.600117110 Cleveland320.60010194 Cincinnati320.6009487 Pittsburgh040.00069110 West WLTPctPFPA Denver5001.000230139 Kansas City5001.00012858 Oakland230.40098108 San Diego230.400125129 NFC East WLTPctPFPA Philadelphia230.400135159 Dallas 230.400152136 Washington130.25091112 N.Y. Giants060.000103209 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans5001.00013473 Carolina130.2507458 Atlanta 140.200122134 Tampa Bay040.0004470 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago420.667172161 Detroit 320.600131123 Green Bay220.50011897 Minnesota130.250115123 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 410.80013781 San Francisco320.60011398 Arizona320.6009195 St. Louis230.400103141 Thursdays Game Chicago 27, N.Y. Giants 21 Todays Games Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Miami Mondays Game Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17 Seattle at Arizona, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 1 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Detroit, 1 p.m. San Diego at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. Cleveland at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Indianapolis, 8:30 p.m. Open: New Orleans, Oakland Monday, Oct. 21 Minnesota at N.Y. Giants, 8:40 p.m.AFC leadersWeek 5 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt P. Manning, DEN1981501884201 P. Rivers, SND1911411610135 Locker, TEN1116972160 Pryor, OAK1047184542 Luck, IND15697114472 Tannehill, MIA182114138365 Roethlisberger, PIT162103123155 Ale. Smith, KAN185108120273 Dalton, CIN175114121555 Hoyer, CLE965761553 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD J. Charles, KAN923974.32243 A. Foster, HOU973904.02171 Moreno, DEN653315.0925t4 Powell, NYJ783304.23271 F. Jackson, BUF653094.75594 Spiller, BUF742964.0054t1 Chr. Johnson, TEN942943.13230 T. Richardson, IND822563.12162 Be. Tate, HOU412566.24600 Ry. Mathews, SND672343.49200 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD And. Johnson, HOU3740711.0270 Edelman, NWE363549.8442 De. Thomas, DEN3445013.278t4 Cameron, CLE3339612.0535 A. Gates, SND3243813.756t2 An. Brown, PIT3241212.9452 Shorts, JAX3141113.3591 A.. Green, CIN3136111.645t3 Welker, DEN3131510.2337 Woodhead, SND312207.126t3 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Doss, BAL1321716.782t1 Benjamin, CLE1725615.179t1 Holliday, DEN1420014.381t1 McCluster, KAN2128513.689t1 Edelman, NWE1517611.7240 Leonhard, BUF7639.0250 Reynaud, TEN161368.5350 Kerley, NYJ 8637.9240 An. Brown, PIT6457.5400 Hilton, IND 9657.2230 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD D. Thompson, BAL720128.7470 K. Martin, HOU1744726.3490 Thigpen, MIA1026226.2380 F. Jones, PIT819424.3340 Br. Tate, CIN921724.1320 J. Ford, OAK1023523.5300 Reynaud, TEN716123.0320 C. Gates, NYJ715321.9360 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Welker, DEN707042 Ju. Thomas, DEN606036 Cameron, CLE505030 J. Charles, KAN532030 Royal, SND505030 F. Jackson, BUF440024 Moreno, DEN440024 De. Thomas, DEN404024 Bernard, CIN321018 Ma. Brown, BAL303018 Kicking PATFGLGPts M. Prater, DEN29-299-95356 Gostkowski, NWE8-813-145347 Tucker, BAL12-1211-135045 Succop, KAN14-1410-125144 D. Carpenter, BUF9-911-125542 Folk, NYJ 9-911-114842 Sturgis, MIA12-1210-115442 Novak, SND14-149-114941 Vinatieri, IND14-149-114941 Bironas, TEN13-138-114737NFC leadersWeek 5 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Romo, DAL1881351523132 Brees, NOR2011401722124 A. Rodgers, GBY152101133193 M. Ryan, ATL2181511649103 M. Stafford, DET196125152483 Cutler, CHI1811191368106 R. Wilson, SEA1277499784 Vick, PHL13271118552 S. Bradford, STL2161261315103 Griffin III, WAS170106120264 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD L. McCoy, PHL985145.2441t3 A. Peterson, MIN924214.5878t5 Lynch, SEA964104.27433 D. Murray, DAL843994.75412 Gore, SNF783764.8234t3 Forte, CHI813754.63553 D. Martin, TAM1003423.42281 De. Williams, CAR743304.46270 Vick, PHL 333079.30612 Re. Bush, DET612984.8937t1 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Ju. Jones, ATL4158014.181t2 J. Graham, NOR3759316.056t6 Gonzalez, ATL3333910.3253 Cruz, NYG3147315.370t4 B. Marshall, CHI3137812.2413 D. Bryant, DAL2942314.6796 Garcon, WAS2933911.7442 De. Jackson, PHL2852518.861t3 Jeffery, CHI2842915.3582 Witten, DAL2831311.2273 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD G. Tate, SEA1518612.4330 Ginn Jr., CAR5489.6120 Spurlock, DET111059.5570 Sproles, NOR121048.7280 Page, TAM 8698.6280 Dam. Johnson, PHL7598.4210 Ky. Williams, SNF7507.1220 R. Randle, NYG12766.3140 Douglas, ATL10575.7150 P. Peterson, ARI9515.7100 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD C. Patterson, MIN1240633.8105t1 Hester, CHI1650231.4800 Ginn Jr., CAR514328.6380 Dw. Harris, DAL719928.4350 Dam. Johnson, PHL1231726.4330 D. Wilson, NYG922224.7310 B. Cunningham, STL1024324.3320 Spurlock, DET714020.0230 C. Thompson, WAS816020.0280 J. Ross, GBY67512.5210 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts D. Bryant, DAL606036 J. Graham, NOR606036 A. Peterson, MIN651036 Cruz, NYG 404024 Ve. Davis, SNF404024 Cal. Johnson, DET404024 Lynch, SEA431024 Pettis, STL 404024 Forte, CHI 330020 B. Marshall, CHI303020 Kicking PATFGLGPts Hartley, NOR14-1412-144850 Hauschka, SEA13-1312-134849 Henery, PHL13-1312-154849 D. Bailey, DAL15-159-115342 Akers, DET14-149-115341 Crosby, GBY13-139-95240 M. Bryant, ATL14-148-95238 Gould, CHI13-148-85837 Walsh, MIN13-138-95437 Feely, ARI 8-89-105035 NFL StatisticsCENTRAL Jacksonville plays today at Denver Associated PressSome have dubbed it the point-spread game, given that Denver is favored by more than four touchdowns against Jacksonville on Sunday. Others are calling it the biggest mismatch in NFL history. Still others expect Peyton Manning to sit out the second half, his requisite four touchdown passes already in the books. What no one is projecting is the Jaguars first victory after five lopsided defeats, nor the Broncos first loss following a record-setting opening five weeks. We have never talked about that and so its completely irrelevant to me, Manning said. I dont look at anything besides what I see on the tape. On defense I see a team thats stingy in the red zone. Ive seen some offenses that have made some really good plays against them, that have been hard to defend, and certainly its a team with a lot of pride. Its about what are you doing each week. Also Sunday, its New Orleans at New England, Oakland at Kansas City, Washington at Dallas, Green Bay at Baltimore, Tennessee at Seattle, Arizona at San Francisco, St. Louis at Houston, Cincinnati at Buffalo, Detroit at Cleveland, Pittsburgh at the New York Jets; Philadelphia at Tampa Bay and Carolina at Minnesota. Monday night, its Indianapolis at San Diego. Off this week are Miami (3-2) and Atlanta (1-4) Bears 27, Giants 21 At Chicago, Jay Cutler threw two touchdown passes to Brandon Marshall, and Tim Jennings had two of Chicagos three interceptions against Eli Manning in a victory over winless New York on Thursday night. The Bears (4-2) snapped a two-game slide following a 3-0 start. New York is 0-6 for the first time since the 1976 team dropped its first nine, a stunning turn for a franchise that won the Super Bowl two years ago. Cutler and Marshall were in tune early on, connecting for two touchdowns, and Jennings ran an interception back 48 yards as Chicago built a 24-14 halftime lead. Jacksonville (0-5) at Denver (5-0) While the point spread has fluctuated in the vicinity of 27 points, the Jaguars have been ridiculed nearly everywhere. That includes on the Broncos Twitter account, which noted that Denver scored 51 points in beating Dallas last Sunday, the same number of points Jacksonville has managed all year. My whole life Ive been an underdog, so it doesnt change anything, said Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew, one of the few Jacksonville players who could make Denvers roster. When things arent going well you try to find challenges throughout, and obviously the Broncos are No. 1 in rush defense, so thats a big challenge for us. Not to mention slowing down an offense averaging 46 points a game. Obviously, facing an offense thats playing at the highest level of anybody in the league, but we try not to get too caught up on that, first year coach Gus Bradley said. Its more about what we need to do and what we can get accomplished. The Broncos can accomplish a 17-game regularseason winning streak dating back to last Oct. 15. New Orleans (5-0) at New England (4-1) As juicy a quarterback matchup as you can find. Well, it would be if Tom Brady had anywhere near the complement of players Drew Brees has on offense. At least Brady might get back outstanding tight end Rob Gronkowski from a myriad of injuries and surgeries. I just want us to score points, so whatever it takes to score points, thats what matters, said Brady, whose Patriots managed only six in last weeks loss at Cincinnati. I think you let your emotions get into it and feelings and so forth I mean realistically, you have to come up with a plan we have to figure out to score points. New Orleans has had no such issues. Brees has Marques Colston, Darren Sproles, Pierre Thomas and a pretty fair tight end, too, in Jimmy Graham. He also, for the first time in a long while, has a solid defense on his side. Oakland (2-3) at Kansas City (5-0) This once was the bitterest rivalry in the NFL, but now far less hostile because, in general, both teams have struggled for nearly a decade. Andy Reid has turned things around so quickly in KC remember, the Chiefs were 2-14 in 2012 and the first team to go 5-0 the next year that some folks see the Chiefs hanging with the Broncos all season in the AFC West. Oakland comes off its most impressive win since Dennis Allen became coach at the beginning of last season, 27-17 over San Diego. Washington (1-3) at Dallas (2-3) One thing the Cowboys absolutely must do is put behind the pain of last weekends loss to Denver. Should the offense perform in the same manner, particularly the line and QB Tony Romo, Dallas will have too much for Washington to handle. But that is a huge if. Like the rest of the NFC East, neither team has a decent defense. The rested Redskins need Robert Griffin III to approach his top offensive rookie form of 2016 and to get versatile running back Alfred Morris more room to roam. Green Bay (2-2) at Baltimore (3-2) The Packers looked strong enough coming off their bye to change the outlook for Cheeseheads to something more positive. A win at Baltimore, particularly without star linebacker Clay Matthews, would brighten things even more. But Green Bay must find a way to block Terrell Suggs, who has stepped up on the transitioning Ravens defense and has a sack in five straight games. Hes one of the premier guys in the league at his position, and he proves it every year, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers said. Hes a guy youve got to account for in the run game, youve got to account for in the passing game. Youve got to make sure you dont let him get off, but thats obviously easier said than done. Hes had a great start to the season. Tennessee (3-2) at Seattle (4-1) The Seahawks finish their trip through the AFC South, having beaten Houston and Jacksonville and lost to Indianapolis in the last three weeks. The 34-28 defeat at Indy was only Seattles second in the regular season since last October. No place in the NFL is tougher to visit than Seattle, but the Titans played well on the road before winning two of three at home. Of course, they now have backup quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick in for injured starter Jake Locker. Arizona (3-2) at San Francisco (3-2) Two pretty solid defenses hook up, and a Cardinals win will stamp them as a contender in the NFC West. Theyve allowed 16 points in the last two weeks, but that was against Tampa Bay and Carolina. The Niners, who seemed to straighten out their offense in a win over the Rams and have been off since that Thursday night game, are a much bigger challenge. The 49ers play four of their next five on the road, so winning here, particularly against a division foe, is paramount. Indianapolis (4-1) at San Diego (2-3) The mantra throughout the NFL is that teams never look beyond the current week. The Colts can prove that true beyond doubt with a strong performance against the Chargers, because Indys next game is Mannings return to Lucas Oil Stadium. San Diego seemed to be on the right track before getting derailed at Oakland. The Chargers cant stop the pass, but can throw the ball with anyone. Chargers defensive coordinator John Pagano is the brother of Colts coach Chuck Pagano. St. Louis (2-3) at Houston (2-3) Turmoil in Texas, with Houston among the leagues biggest disappointments. Now, tight end Owen Daniels is gone with a broken leg, although he could return later in the schedule. That wont make reviving Matt Schaubs career any easier. The Rams will be salivating at the thought of getting yet another pick-6 off Schaub. They also ought to be figuring out where to find a running game and how to stop the run. Cincinnati (3-2) at Buffalo (2-3) After edging the Patriots in a monsoon in Cincinnati, maybe the Bengals are wishing for an early blizzard in Buffalo. But they have lost six straight at Ralph Wilson Stadium. What they will get is untested Thad Lewis, up from the practice squad, behind center for the Bills. Expect a heavy dose of aggressive defensive calls from coordinator Mike Zimmer. Detroit (3-2) at Cleveland (3-2) The Lions are not nearly the same dynamic club away from Ford Field, and the Browns have a defense good enough to stymie anyone. Critical is having star WR Calvin Johnson back after he missed the loss in Green Bay with a knee injury. If it doesnt happen, Cleveland could replicate the five sacks the Packers got on Matthew Stafford. The Browns have won three in a row and have shown great fortitude in their turnabout. Pittsburgh (0-4) at New York Jets (3-2) Coming off that uplifting, last-second win at Atlanta, the Jets should be looking forward to hosting the winless Steelers. There are some other elements at work here, though: New York comes off a short week; Pittsburgh comes off a bye that helped it heal a bit; and the Steelers are 18-4 against the Jets. Steelers are seeking 600th win in franchise history. Carolina (1-3) at Minnesota (1-3) Last time we saw the Vikings, they were across the pond in Wembley, whipping the Steelers. If they are to make any kind of a run in the NFC North, they need 2012 MVP Adrian Peterson to be a game changer once more. He was that in London. Carolina looked great in its 38-0 demolition of the Giants, then gave up seven sacks and turned it over four times in a 22-6 loss at Arizona. Coach Ron Rivera is asking for some consistency. Jaguars huge underdogs to Broncos Associated PressDenver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and his team are favored to defeat the visiting Jacksonville Jaguars by more than four touchdowns in todays game in Denver.

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SPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 B5 Entry With the Most Votes a LSUs defense had too many free runners at the quarterback, Florida coach Will Muschamp said. My initial thoughts are there was too much pressure. Weve got to protect (Murphy) better. Murphy blamed himself. I really have to work on getting rid of the ball quicker, he said. The Tigers had eight defensive players selected in last springs NFL draft, forcing coordinator John Chavis to remake his unit with a lot of youth and inexperience. It showed two weeks earlier in a 44-41 loss at Georgia, and again when the Tigers allowed 23 points in the first half of last weeks victory at Mississippi State. But LSU allowed only a field goal in the second half a week ago, a promising sign for a unit that has now gone six quarters without allowing a touchdown. Our guys did a tremendous job and Im proud and it was fun watching them play again, Chavis said. For the last two weeks we have focused on one simple thing: Do your job; count on the guy beside you; count on the guy behind you; and count on the guy in front of you. LSU never seemed truly threatened, but Florida made it a one possession game on Francisco Velezs second field goal, a 27yarder that cut it to 14-6 with 12:11 to go. The Tigers responded by going to Hill, who carried four times for 45 yards including a gain of 26 yards to the Florida 19 to set up Colby Delahoussayes 31-yard field goal with 7:58 left. The sequence left Muschamp frustrated with his normally dominant defense. You can call whatever defense you want to call, kids have got to get off blocks and make a play, Muschamp said. Our guys have got to accept that. Needing two scores, Florida started to gamble. On fourth-and-5 from the Gators 30, punter Kyle Christy converted a fake, hitting Demarcus Robinson over the middle for a 14-yard gain. Murphy then converted a fourth-and-9 with a 15-yard pass to Ahmad Fulwood at the LSU 20. Thats when the Tigers defense clamped down and sealed the game. First came a sack on a blitz by Mills for a loss of 12 yards, which forced a desperate fourth-and-27. Beckwiths sack then gave the ball back to the Tigers for good. USF upends Connecticut Associated PressEAST HARTFORD, Conn. Marvin Kloss hit two field goals, and Aaron Lynch returned a fumble 44 yards for a touchdown as South Florida beat UConn 13-10 on Saturday. It was the Bulls second consecutive win without an offensive touchdown. USF (2-4) is 2-0 in the American Athletic Conference after beating Cincinnati last week. Kloss 44-yard field goal with just over 4 minutes left capped a more than 7 minute fourth-quarter drive, and was the game winner. It was his ninth consecutive field goal. He had a 47-yarder in the first half. Lyle McCombs had a career-high 164 yards rushing and a touchdown for Connecticut, which has lost five straight to open a season for the first time since 1977. The loss spoiled the debuts of interim coach T.J. Weist and freshman quarterback Tim Boyle. UFContinued from Page B1 Nittany Lions prevail Penn St. takes down Michigan in four OTs Associated PressSTATE COLLEGE, Pa. Bill Belton ran for a 2-yard touchdown in the fourth overtime to lift Penn State past No. 18 Michigan 43-40 in maybe the biggest win in coach Bill OBriens two seasons with the Nittany Lions. Penn States Christian Hackenberg was sensational in regulation on the tying drive, completing passes of 29 yards to Brandon Felder and 33 yards to Allen Robinson to bring the ball to the 1 with 29 seconds left. The freshman quarterback sneaked in for the first rushing TD against Michigan this season, tying the game at 34-all. Brendan Gibbons kicked two field goals and missed two one was blocked in OT for the Wolverines (5-1, 1-1). Sam Ficken kicked two, and didnt need to attempt a fourth, thanks to fourthdown conversion by Penn State The Nittany Lions (4-2, 1-1 Big Ten) stormed the field in wild celebration, sending more than 100,000 fans into a frenzy.Utah 27, No. 5 Stanford 21SALT LAKE CITY Utahs defense made a goal-line stand in the final minute and Dres Anderson scored twice, helping the Utes to their biggest upset at home as they held off No. 5 Stanford 27-21. This marked the first time in school history the Utes (4-2, 1-2 Pac12) have knocked off a top-five program at Rice-Eccles Stadium. They beat No. 4 Alabama in the Sugar Bowl following the 2008 season. The fans rushed the field after the final gun. Kevin Hogan marched the Cardinal down to the 6, but on fourth down, amid heavy pressure, he overthrew his intended target. The Utes took a knee to end the game and the 13-game winning streak of Stanford (5-1, 3-1).No. 20 Texas Tech 42, Iowa State 35LUBBOCK, Texas Backup quarterback Davis Webb threw for three touchdowns and 415 yards in place of the injured Baker Mayfield to lead Texas Tech. Webb was 35 for 56 with an interception and Kenny Williams, DeAndre Washington and Sadale Foster each ran for a score for Texas Tech (6-0, 3-0 Big 12). The Red Raiders are bowl eligible at the earliest date since 2008 in their first season under coach Kliff Kingsbury. The Cyclones (1-4, 0-2) got a 95yard kickoff return and 38-yard punt return from Jarvis West, and 12 points off three turnovers by the Red Raiders. The Cyclones pulled to 42-35 on a touchdown pass from Sam Richardson to E. J. Bibbs with less than 2 minutes left. Richardson was 15 for 38 for 168 yards and a touchdown.No. 23 N. Illinois 27, Akron 20DE KALB, Ill. Jordan Lynch threw for two touchdowns and ran for another as No. 23 Northern Illinois extended its home winning streak to 23 games with a 27-20 Mid-American victory over Akron. Lynch was 16 of 35 for 220 yards passing and ran for 83 more. Cameron Stingily rushed 21 times for 80 yards and a touchdown and Tyler Wedel added field goals of 42 and 21 yards for the Huskies (6-0, 20 MAC East). Jawan Chisholm scored on a pair of 1-yard first half runs for Akron (16, 0-3) and ran 20 times for 70 yards. Kyle Pohl was 24 of 56 for 262 yards. The home winning streak is the nations current longest. A 34-31 loss to Idaho on Sept 26, 2009 was Northern Illinois more recent defeat at Huskie Stadium.No. 24 Virginia Tech 19, Pittsburgh 9BLACKSBURG, Va. Logan Thomas threw an early touchdown pass, Cody Journell kicked four field goals and Virginia Tech sacked Pittsburghs Tom Savage eight times. The Hokies (6-1, 3-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) won their sixth straight game and ended a fourgame losing streak against the Panthers, avenging a 35-17 loss a year ago that sent Virginia Tech into a long skid. This time, they proved just as inhospitable hosts to the ACC newcomer Panthers (3-2, 2-2). Savage, who tied an ACC record with six touchdown passes three weeks ago in a 58-55 victory against Duke, never had much of a chance to get wide receivers Devin Street and Tyler Boyd into the game. Savages sacks totaled minus-49 yards, and he has been sacked 15 times in his past two appearances.No. 1 Alabama 48, Kentucky 7LEXINGTON, Ky. T.J. Yeldon and Kenyan Drake each ran for two touchdowns to help top-ranked Alabama blowout Kentucky 48-7. After a scoreless first quarter thanks to fumbles by the running backs and dropped passes in Kentucky territory, the Crimson Tide (6-0, 3-0 Southeastern Conference) scored on their last eight possessions and outgained the Wildcats (1-5, 0-3) 668-170. Associated PressPenn State running back Bill Belton celebrates after scoring against Michigan in the fourth overtime Saturday in State College, Pa. Penn State won 43-40.

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more to their strengths, but the general understanding in what we do offensively doesnt change, Kelly said. It didnt change when Nick went in the game against the Giants. Foles led the Eagles back from an 11-point fourth-quarter deficit against the Bucs last season, finishing with 381 yards passing, including a winning 1-yard touchdown pass to Jeremy Maclin on the final play. Bucs defensive tackle Gerald McCoy called Foles an underrated passer, underrated athlete. He beat us a lot last year with his legs, his scrambling ability, and I think people underestimate his athletic ability because he plays next to a Mike Vick. But that guys good. ... We have a tough test ahead of us. Five things to watch for as the Eagles try to climb to .500, and the Bucs seek their first win:Rookie under pressureMike Glennon makes his second pro start for the Bucs, who released quarterback Josh Freeman last week. Thanks to a bye the third-round draft pick has had extra time to prepare for the Eagles. He was steady, rarely throwing the ball downfield for three quarters of his debut against Arizona. But a fumble and two interceptions in the fourth quarter helped the Cardinals pull out a 13-10 win.Eagles rushThe Eagles have struggled defensively, ranking 31st among 32 teams. But if they can mount a consistent pass rush against an offensive line weakened by the absence of guard Carl Nicks (MRSA), they could cause problems for Glennon. Any quarterback that has the opportunity to sit back there and survey the defense and take their time and not feel any pressure is going to be successful, Kelly said.Revis islandEagles receiver DeSean Jackson made headlines when he was quoted saying hes faster than Tampa Bays Darrelle Revis, generally regarded as the leagues best cornerback. Revis responded that Jacksons right. Im not fast. Ive never been fast. ... Fast people are allowed to say those types of things. Revis also said speed doesnt matter. Ive covered him before in the past and it was a good battle. ... Im not here to discuss whos the fastest. Im not running for the Olympics, and hes not either. Im just here to compete and play.Run Shady, runPhiladelphia RB LeSean McCoy is averaging over 5 yards per carry and is the NFLs leading rusher with 514 yards. Shady is running at an incredible level, Bucs coach Greg Schiano said. Tampa Bay is ninth in run defense (94.3 yards per game) after leading the league last season.What might have beenKelly turned down an offer to leave Oregon for the Bucs before Tampa Bay hired Schiano after the 2011 season. I looked at it very hard. I was very impressed. ... My decision to not take that job was totally about the University of Oregon, not the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Kelly said.B6SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOLLEGEFOOTBALL RV S B OATS S PORTING G OODS T OW V EHICLES www.chronicleonline.com 20th Annual 9am to 6pm Fri., Oct. 18 Sun., Oct. 20th Save A Lot Plaza US Hwy. 19 Crystal Ri ver 000GBZJ www.kingsbayrotary.org DEALERS INCLUDE Apopka Marine Aardvarks Florida Kayak Co. Como RV Crystal River Marine Gist RV Sales Gulf to Lake Marine Harberson RV-Pinellas Homosassa Marine Love Honda Lure Man Nature Coast RV Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln-Crystal River Riverhaven Marine Seatow Crystal River Three Rivers Marine Tow Boat U.S. Twin Rivers Marina USCG Auxiliary C.R. Sail & Power Squadron SPORTSMANS SHOWCASE Proceeds benefit local chaitable organizations supported by Kings Bay Rotary Foundation 000FMIE M usic at the useum Proudly Present Johnny Carlsson presents Salute to the King of Swing Thursday, Oct. 17 Limited seating. Reservations necessary. Call: 352-341-6427 Tickets $20 per person Including Appetizers & Cash Bar at 1912 Citrus County Courthouse, Inverness Doors open at 6:00 p.m. Music starts promptly at 7 p.m. Publix Supermarket Charities Wann & Mary Robinson Smiths Optical Services Jordan Engineering David Rom State Farm Insurance Clark & Wendy Stillwell Accent Travel Photography by Rebecca Deco Cafe T O B ENEFIT T HE C ITRUS C OUNTY H ISTORICAL S OCIETY S PONSORS : Featuring Clarinetist, Alan Vache LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 PROCEEDS BENEFIT: LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes up front reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation Inn Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 One Rake at a Time FOOD PROVIDED BY: 000FXJC ROCK CRUSHER CANYON ROCK CRUSHER CANYON CRYSTAL RIVER, FL CRYSTAL RIVER, FL BUCSContinued from Page B1 Texas, Missouri score major upsets Associated PressSEATTLE Marcus Mariota threw for 366 yards and three touchdowns, added another 88 yards and a TD rushing, and No. 2 Oregon won its 10th straight over over No. 16 Washington 45-24. Mariotas passing was nearly spotless, he used his legs to make the Huskies pay when throwing options were covered and was easily the best player on the field. Mariota completed 24 of 31 passes, and ran another 13 times. He threw touchdowns of 4 yards to Bralon Addison and a 65-yarder to Josh Huff on the first possession of the second half for the Ducks (6-0, 3-0 Pac-12). Huff had to be carted to the locker room with an apparent right leg injury in the first half, only to come back after halftime and burn the Huskies secondary. Bishop Sankey ran for 167 yards and touchdowns of 60 and 25 yards for Washington (4-2, 1-2), but had a costly first-half fumble.No. 3 Clemson 24, Boston College 14CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd ran for the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter and defensive end Vic Beasley followed with a 13-yard fumble recovery score to keep Clemson undefeated and on track for next weeks Atlantic Coast Conference showdown with Florida State. The Tigers (6-0, 4-0 ACC) were out of synch offensively most of the game and trailed 14-10 entering the final period. Thats when Boyd led the 48-yard drive that ended with his 6-yard rush into the end zone to put Clemson on top. When Boston College got the ball back, Chase Rettig fumbled when sacked by linebacker Tony Steward and Beasley was there to scoop up the ball and put the Tigers up 24-14 over the Eagles (3-3, 1-2). Boyd also had a touchdown pass and finished with 334 yards passing to become the schools all-time leader in passing yards.No. 25 Missouri 41, No. 7 Georgia 26ATHENS, Ga. Receiver Bud Sasser threw a 40-yard touchdown pass to LDamian Washington in the fourth quarter after quarterback James Franklin left with a shoulder injury and Missouri held off Georgia. Missouri led by 18 points in the first half before Georgia cut the lead to 28-26 in the fourth quarter. The Tigers answered the challenge with two late touchdowns despite losing Franklin to a shoulder injury. After Franklin was taken to the locker room, freshman backup Maty Mauk threw a lateral to Sasser, who stopped and tossed a deep to the end zone for Washington. Washington, who outfought cornerback Damian Swann for the catch, had 115 yards and two touchdowns. James Ponders interception of Aaron Murrays pass with 4:25 remaining set up Henry Joseys 7-yard touchdown run to end Georgias hopes. Murray threw for 290 yards and three touchdowns.Texas 36, No. 12 Oklahoma 20DALLAS Case McCoy threw two touchdowns, defensive tackle Chris Whaley returned an interception 31 yards for a score and Texas beat 12th-ranked Oklahoma. It was the first win for McCoy and these Texas seniors over the Sooners. Texas never trailed after Whaleys impressive touchdown play in the first quarter. Oklahoma had won three in a row in the series, the last two by at least 38 points. Daje Johnson had an 85-yard punt return for a TD for Texas. Johnathan Gray had 123 yards rushing and Malcolm Brown had 120. McCoy completed 13 of 21 passes for 190 yards with an interception, which defensive lineman Geneo Grissom returned 54 yards for a score in the fourth quarter for OU. Blake Bell completed 12 of 26 passes for 133 yards with two interceptions for Oklahoma.No. 14 S. Carolina 52, Arkansas 7FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Connor Shaw threw for 219 yards and accounted for four touchdowns as South Carolina dominated. Mike Davis added 128 yards rushing on 19 carries for the Gamecocks (5-1, 3-1 Southeastern Conference), who won their fourth straight game after a loss to Georgia on Sept. 7. All-America defensive end Jadeveon Clowney returned after missing last weeks game against Kentucky and had one tackle for South Carolina, which outgained the Razorbacks 537-248. The loss was the fourth straight for Arkansas (3-4, 0-3), matching first-year coach Bret Bielemas longest losing streak of his career.No. 15 Baylor 35, Kansas State 25MANHATTAN, Kan. Bryce Petty threw for 342 yards and three touchdowns, Ahmad Dixon made a critical interception late in the fourth quarter and Baylor held on to win. Tevin Reese had five catches for 184 yards and two scores, and Antwan Goodley had five catches for 139 yards and another touchdown for the Bears (5-0, 2-0 Big 12), who ran their winning streak to nine games dating to their win over Kansas State last season. The Wildcats (2-4, 0-3), behind 199 yards and three rushing TDs by quarterback Daniel Sams, took a 2521 lead in the third quarter. But they missed a tying field-goal attempt in the fourth quarter and then Sams threw an interception on their ensuing possession that allowed the Bears to escape.Wisconsin 35, No. 19 Northwestern 6MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gordon ran for a 71-yard touchdown and Chris Borland led a fierce defense that figured out Northwesterns high-octane offense. The Badgers (4-2, 2-1 Big Ten) had seven sacks before a raucous homecoming weekend crowd. Jared Abbrederis burned the secondary for a 63-yard touchdown reception before leaving with a head injury. Northwestern (4-2, 0-2) the leagues peskiest defense, forced three more turnovers to increase its season total to 17. Associated PressOregons Byron Marshall, left, celebrates after scoring against Washington on Saturday in Seattle.

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COMMENTARY Section CSUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW It would be nice to think that the nonsense going on in Washington doesnt impact our lives in little old Citrus County. But it does. The shutdown of the federal government is an embarrassment to our reputation throughout the world. Its an insult to our Founding Fathers who worked so hard to create a process that could withstand the tomfoolery of the centuries. Closer to home, the shutdown means that federal workers are off the job and the entire economy is coughing and spitting its way toward a recession. Somehow, in our tea party-inspired anger at government, we have somehow dismissed all government employees as lazy and meaningless. They are not. Do you realize that, in Citrus and Sumter counties, we have hundreds of federal workers who go to one of the nations largest prisons to work each day? Even though our incompetent Congress cant get its act together, the federal prison workers must go to work each day to guard the dangerous felons we have put behind bars. But theyre not getting paid. Theyre getting IOUs from Uncle Sam. I wonder if the grocery store or electric companies are good with that. And even though our prison guards must go to work and not get paid, they are also not covered by insurance. If they get injured on the job right now, theyre out of luck. The members of Congress are still getting paid they have themselves covered. The park workers at the federal wildlife refuge are on leave and the refuges are without supervision. I wonder if the manatees have been informed that no one is looking after them. The bigger fear is what this Congressional incompetence will do to the Congress is letting down the country See WINDOW/ Page C3 America doesnt stack up Its long been known that Americas school kids havent measured well compared with international peers. Now, theres a new twist: Adults dont either. In math, reading and problem-solving using technology all skills considered critical for global competitiveness and economic strength American adults scored below the international average on a global test, according to results released Tuesday.U.S. adults score poorly on global test Kimberly Hefling Associated Press dults in Japan, Canada, Australia, Finland and multiple other countries scored significantly higher than the United States in all three areas on the test. Beyond basic reading and math, respondents were tested on activities such as calculating mileage reimbursement due to a salesman, sorting email and comparing food expiration dates on grocery store tags. Not only did Americans score poorly compared to many international competitors, the findings reinforced just how large the gap is between the nations highand lowskilled workers and how hard it is to move ahead when your parents havent. In both reading and math, for example, those with college-educated parents did better than those whose parents did not complete high school. The study, called the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies, found that it was easier on average to overcome this and other barriers to literacy overseas than in the United States. Researchers tested about 166,000 people ages 16 to 65 in more than 20 countries and subnational regions. The test was developed and released by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which is made up of mostly industrialized member countries. The Education Departments Center for Education Statistics participated. The findings were equally grim for many European countries Italy and Spain, among the hardest hit by the recession and debt crisis, ranked at the bottom across generations. Unemployment is well over 25 percent in Spain and over 12 percent in Italy. Spain has drastically cut education spending, drawing student street protests. But in the northern European countries that have fared better, the picture was brighter and the study credits continuing education. In Finland, Denmark, and the Netherlands, more than 60 percent of adults took part in either job training or continuing education. In Italy, by contrast, the rate was half that. As the American economy sputters along and many people live paycheck-to-paycheck, economists say a highly-skilled workforce is key to economic recovery. The median hourly wage of workers scoring on SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education APU.S. adults lag in reading, math skills Adults in Japan and Finland scored highest in an international test measuring life skills such as reading, math and problem solving, while those in the United States scored below average. NOTE: Tests scored on a 500-point scale. U.S. scores are based on nationally representative sample of 5,000 adults between 16 and 65 years old. 16. U.S. Average 5. Sweden 4. Australia3. Netherlands2. Finland 1. Japan 21. U.S. Average 5. Sweden4. Netherlands3. FlandersBelgium2. Finland 1. Japan 17. U.S. Average 5. Norway 4. Sweden 3. Australia 2. Finland 1. Japan READING SKILLS MATH SKILLS PROBLEM SOLVING 296 288 284 280 279 273 270 288 282 280 280 279 269 253 294 289 289 288 286 283 277 Americans scored toward the bottom in the category of problem solving in a technology-rich environment. The top five scores in the areas were from Japan, Finland, Australia, Sweden and Norway, while the U.S. score was on par with England, Estonia, Ireland and Poland. In nearly all countries, at least 10 percent of adults lacked the most basic of computer skills such as using a mouse. In England, Germany, Italy, Poland and the United States, social background has a big impact on literacy skills, meaning the children of parents with low levels of education have lower reading skills. Japanese and Dutch adults who were ages 25 to 34 and only completed high school easily outperformed Italian or Spanish university graduates of the same age. Japan, Finland, Canada, Netherlands, Australia, Sweden, Norway, Flanders-Belgium, Czech Republic, Slovak Republic and Korea all scored significantly higher than the United States in all three areas on the test. The average scores in literacy range from 250 in Italy to 296 in Japan. The U.S. average score was 270. (500 was the highest score in all three areas.) Average scores in 12 countries were higher than the average U.S. score. The average scores in math range from 246 in Spain to 288 in Japan. The U.S. average score was 253, below 18 other countries. The average scores on problem solving in technologyrich environments ranged from 275 in Poland to 294 in Japan. The U.S. average score was 277, below 14 other countries. At a glance: Online: http://www.oecd.org/site/piaac/publications.htm See TESTING/ Page C3

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OPINION Page C2SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 A child named MessiahIn the Sept. 19 Chronicle, there was an article about a judge in Newport, Tenn. who ruled that a baby could not be named Messiah. Later, another judge overturned that ruling saying that the lower court had violated the Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution that forbids the establishment by government of a religion, as the judge had said that the name Messiah was a title reserved for Jesus Christ. According to a Time magazine article quoting Carlton Larson of the University of California at Davis, the overturned ruling violated four or five different provisions of the Constitution. Instances included were parental rights naming children is a First Amendment right of free speech. In Hebrew, the name Messiah means anointed. According to the Social Security Administration more than 800 babies were named Messiah in 2012, in the U.S. At the time of the birth of the Messiah of whom the overturned judge referred to there was a King named Herod who sought to have the child who was named the Messiah removed also. He failed, too, as did the judge in taking away the name of Messiah from the little boy in Tennessee. Thank goodness for the judge who overruled so that a child could be named Messiah in the U.S., and for the one who brought one to Earth more than 2,000 years ago! Looking forward to Christmas 2013, and thanks for the reminder.Renee ChristopherMcPheeters Crystal River Ex-Marine Asks Soviet Citizenship Washington Postheadline, Nov. 1, 1959 (concerning a Lee Harvey Oswald)He didnt even have the satisfaction of being killed for civil rights. Its it had to be some silly little Communist. Jacqueline Kennedy, Nov. 22, 1963 WASHINGTONShe thought it robbed his death of any meaning. But a meaning would be quickly manufactured to serve a new politics. First, however, an inconvenient fact Oswald had to be expunged from the story. So, just 24 months after the assassination, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., the Kennedys kept historian, published a thousand-page history of the thousandday presidency without mentioning the assassin. The transformation of a murder by a marginal man into a killing by a sick culture began instantly before Kennedy was buried. The afternoon of the assassination, Chief Justice Earl Warren ascribed Kennedys martyrdom to the hatred and bitterness that has been injected into the life of our nation by bigots. The next day, James Reston, the New York Timesluminary, wrote in a front-page story that Kennedy was a victim of a streak of violence in the American character, but especially of the violence of the extremists on the right. Never mind that adjacent to Restons article was a Timesreport on Oswalds communist convictions and associations. A Soviet spokesman, too, assigned moral responsibility for Kennedys death to Barry Goldwater and other extremists on the right. Three days after the assassination, a Timeseditorial, Spiral of Hate, identified Kennedys killer as a spirit:The Timesdeplored the shame all America must bear for the spirit of madness and hate that struck down Kennedy. The editorialists were, presumably, immune to this spirit. The new liberalism-as-paternalism would be about correcting other peoples defects. Hitherto a doctrine of American celebration and optimism, liberalism would now become a scowling indictment: Kennedy was killed by Americas social climate whose sickness required punitive liberalism. That phrase is from James Piereson of the Manhattan Institute, whose 2007 book Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism is a profound meditation on the reverberations of the rifle shots in Dealey Plaza. The bullets of Nov. 22, 1963, altered the nations trajectory less by killing a president than by giving birth to a destructive narrative about America. Fittingly, the narrative was most injurious to the narrators. Their recasting of the tragedy in order to validate their curdled conception of the nation marked a ruinous turn for liberalism, beginning its decline from political dominance. Punitive liberalism preached the necessity of national repentance for a history of crimes and misdeeds that had produced a present so poisonous that it murdered a president. To be a liberal would mean being a scold. Liberalism would become the doctrine of grievance groups owed redress for cumulative inherited injuries inflicted by the nations tawdry history, toxic present and ominous future. Kennedys posthumous reputation Americans often place him, absurdly, atop the presidential rankings reflects regrets about might-have-beens. To reread Robert Frosts banal poem written for Kennedys inauguration (A golden age of poetry and power of which this noondays the beginning hour) is to wince at its clunky attempt to conjure an Augustan age from the melding of politics and celebrity that the Kennedys used to pioneer the presidencyas-entertainment. Under Kennedy, liberalism began to become more stylistic than programmatic. After him especially after his successor, Lyndon Johnson, a child of the New Deal, drove to enactment the Civil Rights Acts, Medicare and Medicaid liberalism became less concerned with material well-being than with lifestyle, and cultural issues such as feminism, abortion and sexual freedom. The bullets fired on Nov. 22, 1963, could shatter the social consensus that characterized the 1950s only because powerful new forces of an adversarial culture were about to erupt through societys crust. Foremost among these forces was the college-bound population bulge baby boomers with their sense of entitlement and moral superiority, vanities encouraged by an intelligentsia bored by peace and prosperity and hungry for heroic politics. Liberalisms disarray during the late 1960s, combined with Americans recoil from liberal hectoring, catalyzed the revival of conservatism in the 1970s. As Piereson writes, the retreat of liberalism from a doctrine of American affirmation left a void that would be filled by Ronald Reagan 17 years after the assassination. The moral of liberalisms explanation of Kennedys murder is that there is a human instinct to reject the fact that large events can have small, squalid causes; there is an intellectual itch to discern large, hidden meanings in events. And political opportunism is perennial. George Wills email address is georgewill@washpost.com. The consequences of our action take hold of us quite indifferent to our claim that meanwhile we have improved.Friedrich Nietzsche, 1844 When liberals became scolds CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief SELF-INFLICTED WOUND Plenty of blame to go around in countrys latest political squabble The only thing Republicans and Democrats have proven in their latest budget battle is this country is woefully short on leadership. Through its leaders dysfunction and inaction the U.S. government has ground to halt and raised the anger of its citizenry. Congress approval poll has dropped to five percent. Most (62 percent) say Republicans are to blame, but Democrats and President Obama do not fare much better with 49 percent saying they are to blame. A greater issue is it seems each side is more concerned with ideology than whats best for the country as a whole most likely a product of gerrymandered districts that promise easy re-election campaigns. Out of the 435 House seats, about 49 are rated as competitive according to the Rothenberg Political Report a fraction over 11 percent. That means no matter how bad the House mucks up the political process, 89 percent of them will safely be reinstated to foul up the country for another two years, and so on. If the two sides cannot agree, larger consequences loom like swollen, purplishblack rainclouds. Economists overwhelming predict a recession if the governments ability to borrow isnt renewed later this month with an increase in the debt limit. President Obama had to cancel his trip to the Asian Pacific Economic Conference hampering U.S. efforts to counter the emergence of China as an economic super power. Domestically, mail is still being delivered and Social Security and Medicare benefits are continuing, for now. Federal courts will run out of money this week will likely begin shutting down. Many other government agency and functions, like the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, national parks and death benefits for survivors of service members killed in action have stopped. Other impacts include the Internal Revenue Service suspending all audits, and the Veterans Administration has fallen even further behind in processing the backlog of disability claims and veterans are having trouble accessing information on the status of their claims and benefits. Government workers, like prison guards, not only dont get paid full compensation, but they are being placed at greater risk because workmans compensation has been suspended. Unfortunately, the nation is no longer we the people, its become me the people as Republicans and Democrats posture and position themselves deeper into their partisan trenches. Congress, as a population, is disliked by 95 percent of the nation. They are not serving the people, nor are they executing their duties as a legislative body. While some progress is being made, the damage is done and our leaders have only served to chip away at our once proud stature as the worlds leader. THE ISSUE:Government shutdown.OUR OPINION:Lack of leadership harms country. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERto the Editor A call for helpToday, I got an education. My doctor moved from one office to another. His telephone number is not in the new telephone directory, so I had to resort to calling 411. When I called 411, I got at least 30 seconds of advertising for insurance and other companies. Then I called the business office after I got that telephone number I needed, and the business office advised me that Im going to be charged $1.50 for the call to 411. Im very upset by this. The telephone company doesnt own the company that handles 411. Thats a separate company. We are just being nickeled and dimed to death. I think its terrible and its time that some of our senators and congressmen and some of our commissioners do something to help out the older people who cant afford smartphones that do everything for you and computers that you can find other stuff for free, but you have to pay to have the email or your computer connected and you have to pay a monthly charge for the smartphone. When you live on Social Security, you cant afford all this stuff. We need help. Us senior citizens need to get together and form a committee and march on Tallahassee.Leave my paper aloneTo the person who is swiping the newspapers out of my driveway in Brentwood: I wish you would stop before youre caught. Not only are you stealing, but you are trespassing. Is it worth the time that youre going to have to do for this petty crime? And another thing: I hope one of us doesnt catch you. No swimming at schoolIts true that children need to swim, but not during school hours. Without an education, are they going to swim through life? THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE George WillOTHER VOICES

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the highest level in literacy on the test is more than 60 percent higher than for workers scoring at the lowest level, and those with low literacy skills were more than twice as likely to be unemployed. Its not just the kids who require more and more preparation to get access to the economy, its more and more the adults dont have the skills to stay in it, said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement the nation needs to find ways to reach more adults to upgrade their skills. Otherwise, he said, no matter how hard they work, these adults will be stuck, unable to support their families and contribute fully to our country. Americas school kids have historically scored low on international assessment tests compared to other countries, which is often blamed on the diversity of the population and the high number of immigrants. Also, achievement tests have long shown that a large chunk of the U.S. student population lacks basic reading and math skills most pronounced among low-income and minority students. This test could suggest students leaving high school without certain basic skills arent obtaining them later on the job or in an education program. The United States will have a tough time catching up because money at the state and local level, a major source of education funding, has been slashed in recent years, said Jacob Kirkegaard, an economist with the Peterson Institute for International Economics. There is a race between man and machine here. The question here is always: Are you a worker for whom technology makes it possible to do a better job or are you a worker that the technology can replace? he said. For those without the most basic skills, he said, the answer will be merciless and has the potential to extend into future generations. Learning is highly correlated with parents education level. If you want to avoid having an underclass a large group of people who are basically unemployable this educational system is absolutely key, Kirkegaard said. Dolores Perin, professor of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University, said the report provides a good basis for an argument there should be more resources to support adults with low literacy. Adults can learn new skills at any age and there are adult-geared programs around the country, Perin said. But, she said, the challenge is ensuring the programs have quality teaching and that adults regularly attend classes. If you find reading and writing hard, youve been working hard all day at two jobs, youve got a young child, are you actually going to go to class? Its challenging, Perin said. Some economists say that large skills gap in the United States could matter even more in the future. Americas economic competitors like China and India are simply larger than competitors of the past like Japan, Carnevale said. Even while Americas top 10 percent of students can compete globally, Carne vale said, that doesnt cut it. China and India did not participate in this assessment. The skills in the middle are required and were not producing them, Carnevale said. Respondents were selected as part of a nationally represented sample. The test was primarily taken at home using a computer, but some respondents used a printed test booklet. Iwould like to provide an update on your Citrus County Economic Development Council. This is my first update since assuming my new position with the EDC this past March, and I can tell you, it has been a very active time for the EDC during the past six months. With the struggling U.S. economy and, more specifically, our local economic decline, Citrus County has a pressing need to focus on diversifying and expanding our economic base. Your EDC is rising to the challenge by modifying our focus in preparation to market Citrus County as a good business choice for commercial development. This would not only include marketing for new commercial business to locate in Citrus County, but also create a climate to retain and expand commercial business already established in Citrus County. Our future focus will strive to bring good jobs to Citrus County, along with supplementing the tax base for the county, while considering our cherished environmental resources. The EDC continues our membership with the Tampa Bay Regional Partnership representing seven other counties. We recently joined the North Florida Economic Development Partnership with 16 other counties. These partnerships are especially important as we move to market our economic development in the future. The days of single counties striving to market themselves in a national and global economy are long gone, as the regional approach is now the fundamental marketing methodology for economic development. So what is the EDC doing to diversify and expand Citrus Countys future economic development? Your EDC Board has embarked on developing a Fiveyear Strategic Plan for Economic Development with four primary focus areas: Existing site inventory assessment including utility availability. Target industry identification based on site inventory assessment. Workforce availability related to target industries. Marketing plan to attract target industries. Additionally, this past February, a Community Working Group (CWG) was formed with 23 local community leaders and facilitated by consultants provided by Duke Energy. While holding monthly meetings, the CWG agreed on developing three initiatives: To advocate for new power generation in Citrus County. To identify the natural resources, amenities and opportunities in Citrus County and develop strategies for marketing them to a larger public. To assist the EDC and Citrus County in ensuring a diversified economic development platform in order to increase employment, expand our tax base and enhance opportunities while protecting the environment and current quality of life. With the initiative strategies and action plans developed, at the last meeting of the CWG in September, the decision was made to fold the initiatives into our future EDC Strategic Plan for implementation. In keeping with the EDC Boards decision to develop a Five-year Strategic Plan, and after an extensive bidding process, the EDC awarded a contract to Jeannette Goldsmith & Company to assist in developing our Strategic Plan in accordance with our four focus areas. The development process commenced the first week in September with a full week of consultant-facilitated interviews with community leaders, which will continue with future visits. We built a process into the strategic planning process to receive input from community leaders and organizations so when we move into the implementation phase in January 2014, we will have community support for moving economic development diversity and expansion forward for Citrus County. A $434,000 donation from the Duke Energy Foundation to the EDC will provide much-needed funding to implement the Five-year Strategic Plan initiatives. The intent of the donation is to provide financial resources to further economic development diversity in Citrus County. We are placing a lot of time and effort into the strategic plan development over the next several months. As I have mentioned on numerous occasions, this project will take a lot of work, but the real work begins in January as we begin to implement the defined initiatives with the support of our EDC partners and community leadership. Our strategic planning process for economic development is a first of its kind in Citrus County which can seem like a daunting task when you think about it, but at the same time, is exciting with using this instrument to actually plan for our countys future economic development. With this said, we also need to understand that future economic development will not be an overnight process and will take time, resources and a good deal of patience to market our commercial sites and expand our local commercial businesses. Since assuming my position in March, I have been impressed with the growing optimism of community leadership and Citrus County residents in taking an active role in moving our county forward from our current economic state. With the use of our Five-year Strategic Plan for Economic Development as a tool and the support of our community leadership and residents, we can greatly improve our economic diversity in the future. Industry Appreciation Month is upon us, with a number of exciting and fun events planned as advertised in theChroniclesChamber Connection page. October would seem to me like a good month to set the stage for gearing-up our countys future focus on creating aboveaverage-paying jobs in Citrus County, along with supplementing the tax base for the county while preserving and improving our environmental resources. If you think about it, we have received some very good news lately; the decision by Duke Energy to build a new gas electric generation facility in Citrus County along with the various donations in the county from the Duke Energy Foundation, the decision to sell or lease the Citrus Memorial hospital to HCA, and the announcement that our Chamber, TDC and EDC organizations will locate into a single Crystal River facility on U.S. 19. These successes provide a positive trajectory for our counties future economic development with our strategic planning process. We can do this!Don Taylor is executive director of the Citrus County Economic Development Council. Ive had it for the past 34 years. It sits up high on a plant shelf in the living area of our home. The ceiling is vaulted, and the shelf is no less than 10 feet from floor level, so it is prominently displayed. It is a Gibson 12-string acoustic guitar. Please dont misunderstand, its not intended to represent a shrine, but it does bring back memories of days past and sometimes, those memories can take on a life of their own. The subject guitar is the last one my father owned and played, and recently it sparked a memory, but surprisingly, it was of a much earlier time and another guitar. As Ive stated in previous columns, my father was a musician. If it had strings, he could play it. He had a smooth, mellow voice that he loved to use, especially to sing love songs to our mother. The sound of Daddy playing and singing was just as natural as the air we breathed while my good brother William and I were growing up. And, yes, for a while, the silence that came in 1979 when he passed was difficult for us to take. Back to an earlier time and another, much older guitar. He never took the chance of seeking a career in the world of music and musicians. There were opportunities, but he knew that the likelihood was, in the end, such a venture would cost him more than he was willing to pay. He stayed home and took care of his family the best way he could. Im not certain of the year, but I was not yet old enough to go to school. Daddy was working at the crate mill in Lacoochee and on a frosty morning, he slipped on an icy walkway and broke his arm. His right arm. Was it a tragedy? Yes, but not a major one. His arm would heal, and they found something for him to do at the mill in the meantime so he could continue to draw a paycheck until he was whole once more. But, at least for a short while, his broken arm stopped him from playing his guitar and that was a very serious thing to him. No exaggeration, except for a few of those days when his arm was broken, during the time we shared, I dont remember a day passing when he did not play, at least some. In the preceding paragraph, you might have noticed that I said for a few of the days while his arm was broken. It would take weeks for his arm to heal, but after only a few days, his desire to make music and his innovative personality took over. Daddy never simply strummed his guitar. He pressed the strings into its neck with his left hand to create chords, but he played each string with the thumb and fingers of his right hand. With a broken right arm, he had to improvise. I was his improvisation. He had me sit in his lap. He took the neck of his guitar in his left hand so he could create the chords and placed the rest of the instrument across my lap while he rested his useless right arm on the back of the chair. He instructed me on how fast to strum, and we produced tunes to which he sang. Alas, I never learned to play on my own, but when his arm was broken, my father and I made both memories and music together.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 C3 Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE Don TaylorGUEST COLUMN Making memories and music together EDC rises to challenge economy, Social Security payments and investments in general. In Citrus County, we have a huge segment of the population dependent on Social Security and their retirement investments. If the stock market crashes and we putter into a recession, we could go back to 2008 all over again. The politics of the different factions are irrelevant. I dont care if youre a conservative Republican, a liberal Democrat or a tea-drinking third-party member this is not how we solve problems. Our government was framed back in 1789 so that the three branches of government could work independently on the important issues of the time. Back in 1860, the process stumbled and it took a Civil War to get us back on track. We killed each other for four years, and hundreds of thousands died because we lost our faith in the process of government. Those were the early years of the republic, so maybe we can accept that as an excuse. But now we are more than 220 years old and we have the longest-running government on the planet. Right now, it seems like a few self-important blowhards are trying to screw things up. The folks who are trying to bring the government to its knees are not the heroes. They are the grenade throwers. Are we really at the point where we should be throwing grenades and tearing down our process of government? I think not. We dont want to hear our representatives and Senators tell us how wrong the other side is. We want to hear what theyre going to do to set things right. Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan@chronicle online.com. WINDOWContinued from Page C1 TESTINGContinued from Page C1 I dont care if youre a conservative Republican, a liberal Democrat or a tea-drinking third-party member this is not how we solve problems. Letters to theEDITOR Tail wagging the dogThe editorial in todays (Sept. 24)Chroniclereorganization plan runs into opposition appears to challenge those who would question the county administrators decisions. According to the article, the administrator should be able to dictate how his organization is set up and the commission should have limited to no input into the decisions. First, it is not his organization it is the taxpayers organization. His job is to implement the policies of our commissioners that represent the taxpayers. I am not sure who at the Chroniclehas this amazing governmental administrational knowledge, but I would suggest they go back to where ever they learned it. In real government the positions within the state, county or city are established by the legislative branch with some executive privilege. The agency has what is called an organizational chart which outlines duties and any supervisory responsibilities based on position job descriptions. In theory this is done on actual facts. It appears that our administrator changes his management needs rather frequently which often ends up with pay raises for a select few. The editorial argues that cost savings or pay increases should not be the driving factor but rather government efficiency. That may have some truth; however, in most governments, these changes take place very infrequently, not yearly. I fail to see where this increased efficiency is coming from nor how this new and improved management team is going to be measured. One can only wonder if we get a new administrator is his upper management needs going to equate into other alterations or if we keep the same one will he want more management changes in a year. The county government is not as complicated as the Chronicleand the administrator would like you to think. In general, government expectations and duties remain fairly consistent. The need for so many changes so often certainly should raise some red flags from both the citizenry and the commissioners. There are conditions that alter duties and may require some adjustment but in general management staff should remain fairly constant. Once duties have been established there should be little need for changes. I might suggest that the commission should reexamine the entire management of the county, familiarize themselves with the organizational chart if there is one and than decide how to create that needed efficiency, then direct the administrator to implement their organizational structure. It clearly appears that in our county government the tail is wagging the dog.Roger B. Krieger Beverly HillsSay no to ObamacareMy husband and I support the shutdown of the government until the Democrats chose to defund Obamacare. They do not want this atrocity of a law for themselves. Why should they be exempt why the rest of us are being taxed on our persons and they are not? The majority of the people do not understand that they will have to pay regardless if they want it or not. This is not free.Sherry Cohee Hernando

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Protect riversDear Mr. (Herschel) Vinyard, We, the Board of Directors of the Citrus County Audubon Society, are very concerned about the continued degradation of our local waterways, especially the Chassahowitzka, the Homosassa, the Crystal and the Withlacoochee rivers, all of which have been declared Outstanding Florida Waterways. Many of our members kayak these waters, or act as guides for other organizations, pointing out and identifying the numerous birds seen along the way. Until recently, many of us gathered once a year to watch young whooping cranes being led by ultralights to their new home in the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, which was considered at the turn of this century the best location in the southeastern United States to become the new winter home for this experimental migratory flock. During the MFL hearing before your designee, Dr. Tom Beck, on Sept. 10, it was pointed out that no consideration was given to aesthetic and scenic attributes when the MFL rules on these Outstanding Florida Waters (OFWs) were developed. According to the Water Resource Implementation Rule for all MFL rule development, which is found in section 62-40.473 of the Florida Administrative Code, consideration shall be given to the protection of water resources including ... environmental values associated with coastal, estuarine, riverine, spring, aquatic and wetlands ecology, including: b) fish and wildlife habitats and f) aesthetic and scenic attributes. A wonderful opportunity to view this scenic wildlife habitat and the many birds that depend on its unique environment is available to the many birders and nature lovers who take advantage of the numerous trails found in western Citrus County. One unusual trail gives the experienced kayaker a very up close and personal view of this special ecosystem. The Nature Coast Canoe Trail meanders 20 miles from near the mouth of the Crystal River through parts of the Salt River and Homosassa River, finally ending at the Chassahowitzka River. According to the Citrus County Birding Trail Guide, more than 146 different bird species were recorded along this trail alone in 2000. Finally, the 2012 Christmas Bird Count, which is conducted each year by CCAS, takes place on the west side of Citrus County, primarily in the area west of U.S. 19 that contains all three of our four outstanding Florida rivers, as well as the mouth of a fourth, the Withlacoochee River. During this one-day bird count a total of 151 species was observed, including nine state species of special concern, one federally threatened species, and one federally endangered species, the woodstork. Indeed, a total of 45 woodstorks were counted in the area. Although the bald eagle was removed from the endangered species list in 2007, it is nonetheless interesting to note that five bald eagles were also seen. The vision statement of the Citrus County Audubon Society states: The people of Citrus County protect and maintain a variety of pristine habitats, sanctuaries and natural areas that are havens for wildlife and favorite destinations for all who love their natural beauty and appreciate their essential importance to our quality of life. As secretary of Floridas Department of Environmental Protection, we know you must share our vision and desire to protect our Outstanding Florida Waterways and the surrounding ecosystems. These wonderful rivers are so important to maintaining a healthy environment not only for our human residents and visitors, but also for the true snowbirds that migrate here in the winter months, and the resident birds that have made this area their permanent home! We therefore urge you to give a great deal of consideration to the aesthetic and ecological importance of this area before rendering your decision on MFLs.Lynn Delong, conservation coordinator Citrus County Audubon Fred Hileman, president, CCAS CCAS directors and officersC4SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMENTARY 000G704 000GA3K Join us for the 6th Annual Breast Cancer Awareness FUNdraising Event held poolside at The Plantation of Crystal River Saturday, October 19, 2013 from 6:30pm til ? Tickets are $10 and include Entertainment, Appetizers, Auctions, and one Beer/Wine drink ticket. All Proceeds Benefit Sponsored by: Abitare Salon & Day Spa Spa Bleu at Plantation The Plantation on Crystal River Tickets available at above locations and The Chamber of Commerce 000G4UL 3 678910 13 14 15 16 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 26 25 24 23 22 28 21 20 27 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Sunday Saturday 2 1Columbus Day Halloween30 31 29National Boss Day Sweetest Day 000GBZHOct 13 Oct 31 10:00 amNature Coast EMS Stocking Up For SeniorsVarious locations in the countyContact Phone: 352-249-4730Oct 14 6pmCity of Inverness Cooter Culinary CrawlDowntown Inverness Entrance Fee: $30 plus taxContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext 1304Oct 15City of Inverness Cooter Queen ContestDowntown InvernessContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext 1304Oct 17City of Inverness Cooter Idol ContestDowntown InvernessContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext 1304Oct 17 Music starts promptly at 7pmCitrus County Historical Society Music at the Museum: Johnny Carlsson Presents Salute to the King of SwingOld Courthouse Museum Inverness $20, includes appetizers. ($100 for season)Contact Phone: 726-9814 Or 201-2656Oct 18City of Inverness Cooter CruiseDowntown InvernessContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext 1304Oct 18 5pm 8pmCity of Inverness Friday Night ThunderDowntown Inverness Entrance Fee: FreeContact Phone: 352-726-2611 Ext 1304Oct 18 19Florida Council of International Federation of Fly Fishers Fly Fishing ExpoThe Plantation on Crystal River Entrance Fee: $10 for both days, Kids under 16 free.Contact Phone: 352-795-1605 Ext 310Oct 18 20 9am 6pmRotary of Kings Bay Sportsmans ShowcaseKings Bay Plaza Crystal River Entrance Fee: FreeContact Phone: 352-601-8672Oct 19 4:00 pmCitrus Springs Civic Association Citrus Springs Halloween Party1570 Citrus Springs Blvd Citrus Springs Entrance Fee: $3.00Contact Phone: 352-465-3123Oct 19 9:00 am 3:30 pm (Bird Tour 7:30AM)Friends of Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex Guided Sunrise Bird Tour and Refuge Day CelebrationKings Bay Refuge Headquarters Bird Tour $20Contact Phone: 352-201-0149Oct 21 4pm 6pmCity of Crystal River Parrot Heads in the ParkCR Gazebo behind City Hall Entrance Fee: FreeContact Phone: 794-7455 Or 422-6700 Letter to the EDITOR

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BUSINESSSection DSUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports MONDAYColumbus Day Bond market closed; stock markets, commodities markets open. STOCKHOLM The Nobel Memorial Prize in economics is announced by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. TUESDAYBERLIN Germanys ZEW institute releases its monthly investor confidence index for Europes biggest economy. PARIS French luxury conglomerate Louis Vuitton reports its third-quarter sales. FRIDAYWASHINGTON Labor Department releases weekly jobless claims, 8:30 a.m.; Freddie Mac, the mortgage company, releases weekly mortgage rates, 10 a.m.; Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew says the governments borrowing authority will expire Oct. 17. Stocks rise as talks continue in Washington Associated PressThe closer Washington gets to a deal over the debt ceiling, the higher stocks go. Stock prices rose on Friday as investors bet against a U.S. debt default. It was the second day of gains after the Dow Jones industrial average posted its biggest point rise of the year on Thursday. With an hour of trading left, the Dow was up 83 points, or 0.6 percent, to 15,209. The Standard & Poors 500 index was up eight points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,701. The Nasdaq rose 27 points, or 0.7 percent, to 3,787. Call it the Sigh of Relief Rally. A partial government shutdown pushed the Dow below 15,000 this week before President Barack Obama and House Republicans met on Thursday to talk about the outlines for a possible deal. Obama and Republican senators met on Friday, too. Stocks set new highs in mid-September but declined steadily since then as the federal government got closer to the partial shutdown that began Oct. 1. That shutdown entered its 11th day on Friday. Even more troubling for investors is the expectation that the government will reach its borrowing limit on Oct. 17, which raises the possibility of a default on government borrowing. U.S. government bonds are usually considered the worlds safest investment, so even the possibility of a default has rattled investors. Its nice when the world does not revolve around politicians making decisions for Wall Street, said Ralph Fogel, investment strategist and partner at Fogel Neale Partners in New York. Kim Forrest, an equity research analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group in Pittsburgh, said its too soon to assume that the meetings in Washington will avert a default. Oil near $102 on forecast oil costs NEW YORK Oil retreated to $102 a barrel Friday on a forecast for an increase in global oil supplies next year. Benchmark crude for November delivery fell 99 cents to close at $102.02 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. With three down days out of five, oil finished the week with a loss of $1.82 a barrel or 1.8 percent. In its latest quarterly oil market report, the International Energy Agency predicted strong growth in non-OPEC supplies of crude oil. The Paris-based IEA said that the United States would overtake Russia next year as the largest nonOPEC producer of liquid fuels, a category that includes other fuels on top of crude oil. Brent, the benchmark for international crudes, fell 52 cents to $111.28 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange in London. Debt ceiling hopes shore up markets LONDON Indications that a deal to increase the U.S. debt ceiling may be imminent shored up markets once again on Friday. In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares rose 0.9 percent to close at 6,487.19 while Germanys DAX rose 0.5 percent to 8,724.83. The CAC-40 in France ended flat at 4,219.98. Earlier, Asian markets advanced in the slipstream of Thursdays developments. Japans Nikkei 225 stock average rose 1.5 percent to 14,404.74 and Hong Kongs Hang Seng added 1.2 percent to 23,218.32. Australias S&P/ASX 200 climbed 1.6 percent to 5,230.90. Chinas Shanghai Composite Index rose 1.7 percent to 2,228.15. he Affordable Care Act helps ensure that people diagnosed with breast cancer get affordable healthcare. Dr. Jannifer Drake Harper is vice president of medical operations for Florida Blue, which participates in the health insurance marketplace. She said the Affordable Care Act mandates coverage of all preventive services recommended by the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force and breast cancer screening is covered as a preventive service with no member out-of pocket costs If you are uninsured and have breast cancer, you will be eligible for coverage under the exchange since there is no longer denial of cover age for pre-existing conditions, she said.If your current health insurance is not adequate, options would vary based on current coverage, employer/grandfathered plans, etc. Harper added, if you currently have coverage through your employer, it is likely that there will be no change in coverage for breast cancer. She said prescription coverage is an essential health care benefit under the act: however the type of coverage may vary depending on the plan/metal level. There are four categories of marketplace insurance plans: bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Using the explanation on healthcare.gov, all categories offer the same set of essential health benefits. The differences come down to monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. Harper explained the act does not have specific deductibles for breast cancer. The 2010 passage of the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare brought several provisions relating to breast cancer screening and treatment. According to the American Cancer Society, the health care law improves coverage for breast cancer prevention and treatment by requiring insurance plans to cover mammograms and other recommended preventative services. All marketplace health insurance plans and many other plans must cover the following, without charging co-pay or coinsurance:Breast cancer genetic test counseling, or women at higher risk for breast cancer; Breast cancer mammography screenings, every 1 to 2 years for women older than 40; Breast cancer chemoprevention counseling, for women at higher risk. Details: If you are uninsured and have breast cancer, you will be eligible for coverage under the exchange since there is no longer denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions. Dr. Jannifer Drake Harper vice president of medical operations for Florida Blue Associated Press file photoPresident Barack Obama speaks to a joint session of Congress on health care at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Pat Faherty Staff writer See CANCER/ Page D3 Bank shares can be iffy nowadays DEAR BRUCE : Do you think its wise for someone to buy bank shares in this hurting economy? L.S., via email DEAR L.S .: If you are very knowledgeable, it may be that there are some good bank shares worth considering. We are talking about many banks. Lets take them one at a time. The big ones and the large regional banks oftentimes are decent buys. Banking rules very much favor them, and they can manipulate the rules in ways that small banks can only dream of. Small neighborhood banks (there are around 8,000 in the country) are not places where I would choose to invest. In most, but not all cases, the shares are depreciated, and I dont see any immediate recovery in their future. With that being observed, you have to consider each individual bank on its own merits. On balance, the small banks are recovering and eventually the shares may reach the plateaus they were at just a few years ago. But I would not have much interest in that type of an investment. You have to examine them and see which one suits your needs. DEAR BRUCE: I have a property worth approximately $100,000. When I shopped around to purchase homeowners insurance from four different national carriers, the replacement costs ranged from See MONEY/ Page D3

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D2 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. Chamber events & member newsOct. 14-20 International Ethnic Festivals Polish Week at Nature Coast River participating restaurants: Macraes 352-628-2602, Neon Leons 352-621-3663, Old Mill 352-628-2669, Riverside Resort 352-628-2474 and Seagrass Waterfront 352-503-2007. Oct. 14 NAMI Citrus County meeting with speaker Dr. P. Gurnani, local psychiatrist and mental health advocate, starts 6:15 p.m. at the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 439 E. Norvall Bryant Highway, Hernando. NAMI warm line is 352-341-2273. Oct. 15 Affordable Housing Advisory Committee to meet at 5 p.m. in the Lecanto Government Building to discuss Hardest Hit, SHIP CDBG, NSP 1 & 3, Section 8, Shelter Plus Care, and Emergency Solutions Grant, among other items on the agenda. Oct. 15 United Way volunteer site training from 9 to 10 a.m. Oct. 18 Fly Fishing Expo at the Plantation on Crystal River, featuring Chico Fernandez & Flip Pallot. $10 for both days (kids younger than 16 free) clinics and workshops with IFFF-certified instructors; fly tying demos and workshops; daily free programs and seminars w/national fly fishing experts; raffles, silent auctions live auctions. Call 850-212-5396 for information. Oct. 19 Village Crier Shop Local Expo, 9 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Oct. 19 Bird Walk on Pepper Creek Trail, participants meet at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park Visitors Center. Binoculars and field guides are recommended, free event. To register, call 352-628-5343 ext. 1002. Oct. 19 Americas Boating Course provided by the Crystal River Power Squadron, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River. Call 3652-795-4412. Oct. 19 Halloween Scramble for Hospice, golf and prizes, starts at 12 p.m., Citrus Hills Golf Club, 509 E. Hartford Street, Hernando. Call 352-527-2020. Oct. 21 A Celebration of Life, a fundraiser for the family for Tom Corcoran, 5:30 to 8:30 pm at Tuscany on the Meadows, 350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando. Call LifeCare Center at 352-746-4434 for information. Oct. 22 2013 Small Business Resource Fair, a one-stop shop resource fair providing technical, financial, procurement, networking and other business support services at Southeastern Livestock Pavillion Auditorium, 2232 N.E. Jacksonville Road, Ocala. Register online at SBDC.UNF.edu or call 352-622-8763. Oct. 24 Citrus County Builders Association GMMixer/Ro-mac Night, 6 to 8 p.m. at 1196 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto Oct. 24-26 Crazy on Country Fall Festival at Rock Crusher Canyon RV Park, 237 S. Rock Crusher Road, Crystal River, doors open at 5 p.m. Proceeds to benefit Save Crystal River. More information, 352-564-9350 and Crazyon Country.com. Thursday: Tom Jackson and LoCash Boys Friday: Southern Fried Chicks Saturday: Chris Jansen and the Bellamy Brothers Oct. 25 Antiques, Collectibles, Fine Art & Jewelry Auction, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ATM Antiques and Auctions LLC, 811 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. The auction catalog is live on CharlieFudge.com. Oct. 25 The Covenant Childrens Home Boot Scoot Barbecue Banquet at the Citrus Springs Community Center, 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. To sponsor or reserve seats, call 352-5931282 or see CCHFL.org Oct. 25 Taste of CF will feature dueling pianos and the event supports local scholarships to promising students. Tickets, call 352-873-5808 or masont@cf.edu. Oct. 25 Nature Coast EMS fourth annual Trunk or Treat Halloween event, 5:30 to 8 p.m., at 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto. Bring the children for safe trick-or-treating, haunted hallways, extra scary haunted room for the older kids, hot dogs, music, games and more! Details, 352-249-4730. Crystal Riv er Power Squadronribbon-cutting Ambassadors cut ribbon for Realty Connect From left are Squadron Education Officer P/C Jim Kelly, J.N. Cutting the ribbon is our Cdr, P/D/C Tom Rossini, S.N. Next is Executive Officer P/Lt/C Jack Flynn, S.N. Then our Administrative Officer P/C Pete Ward, J.N. Our secretary is P/Lt/C Joanne Hepner, S; Treasurer Lt/C Linda Craven, A.P., is welcome by Chamber Ambassadors Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Jeanne Green, Inside Citrus; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; and Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel. 845 N.E. Third Ave. Crystal River, FL 34428 352-212-3946 www.usps.org/localusps/crystalriver/A social organization dedicated to boating education and safety. 111 W. Main Street, Suite 311, Inverness, FL 34450 352-212-1446 www.The FloridaDream.comAn independently owned and operated full-service boutique real estate brokerage. Chamber Ambassadors welcome Owner/Broker Teri Paduano, Ralph Paduano, Leah Klasing. Chamber Ambassadors in attendance: Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George, Mona Marshall, HR Power; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County, Sarah Fitts, First International Title; and Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union. Oct. 14 at 4:30 p.m. ATM Antiques and Auctions 811 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River 352-795-2061 Oct. 15 at 4:30 p.m. Iris Rodgers, Independent Skin Consultant Rodan & Fields Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River 352-201-7901 Oct. 17 at 8:30 a.m. Florida Cancer Specialists 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto 352-397-9906 UPCOMING RIBBON CUTTINGS Barbecue tickets are still available! The Citrus County Economic Development Council closes out Industry Appreciation Month with this notoriously fun event. M&B Dairy, the largest dairy farm in Citrus County, will once again host over 800 people for an evening of delicious barbecue prepared by the Ag Alliance. This beautiful location backs up to a small lake, but provides plenty of room to spread out, chow down on the best barbecue ever prepared by the Citrus County Agricultural Alliance, enjoy libations at the open bar, and kick up your heels with great live music from the best country band in the south the Dan Story Band. It is truly the place to be seen in Citrus County in October. To get your ticket, call 352-795-2000. Industry Appreciation Month is sponsored by Duke Energy and the Gold Presenting sponsor is Sibex. Movember Citrus County is brought to you by the Agricultural Alliance of Citrus County.

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER13, 2013 D3 Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle ClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699184 Advertising Sales Rep.Full Time The Citrus County Chronicle is seeking Chronicle Advertising Sales Rep to work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising sales for the multiple Citrus Publishing papers throughout the Citrus County & surrounding market area. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. This sales position is based out of the Crystal River. Two plus years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience with successful track record in meeting and exceeding sales goals, self-motivated, highly energetic & goal oriented, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree and knowledge of Citrus County preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicleonline.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant.Equal Opportunity Employer. Advertising Sales Rep.Weekly Publications Full Time Seeking Ad Sales Rep for The Riverland News and S. Marion Citizen. Work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. 2 or more years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, ability to identify and prospect for new sales opportunities, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No Phone Calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant.Equal Opportunity Employer. Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 Planning & Development DirectorAnnouncement #13-58 Professional position overseeing the Divisions of Building, Geographic Resources and Community Planning, Land Development and Code Compliance. Duties include participation in and support of Land Development Code, Long Range Planning, Code Compliance, Building Codes, Zoning issues and complaint resolution. Heavy involvement with community groups, developers, contractors, regulatory agencies, etc. Requires a Bachelors degree in a field closely related to areas of assignment. Masters degree is highly desirable. Knowledge of planning, zoning, building codes and land development codes. Must have experience in public speaking and presentations. Pay range $2,564.50 -$3,846.73 B/W. Starting pay DOQ. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Please visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You may also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online. This position is open until filled. EOE/ADA NOTE: RESUMES/ APPLICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO PUBLIC DISCLOSURE UNDER THE FLORIDA PUBLIC RECORDS LAW. REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty BARTENDERApply In Person THE DAM PUB 7p-9p, Mon.-Fri Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds RN/PRNEndoscopy ASC, Weekdays Fax Resume to: 352-563-2961 RNs NEEDED!!!ICU, ER, TELE EARN UP TO $43/HR. 2 yrs. exp. required! Hillsborough, Manatee, Pinellas, Pasco & Polk Counties Seasonal/Travel Contracts (813) 347-9112 afowler@ travelmedusa.com TRAVELMED USA -an equal opportunity college-College of Central FloridaFaculty Computer Information The instructor will teach courses to prepare students to meet the growing computer information technology needs in our community. Graduate degree with 18 graduate semester hours in Computer Science Management or Management Information Systems or a computer-related field required. Education must be received from a regionally accredited institution. A computer science industry certification is preferred. Commitment to the college objective of providing instruction for a diverse student population. Position is open until filled. Screening begins 11/06/13. Please submit a copy of transcripts indicating the degree conferred with the electronic application. Education must be from a regionally accredited institution. How to Apply Go to www.CF.edu, click on Quick Links then Employment at CF. Submit electronic application, pool authorization card and unofficial transcripts online. Email copy of transcripts to hr@CF.edu or fax to 352-873-5885. 3001 SW College Road, Ocala, FL 34474CF is an Equal Opportunity Employer ATTENTIONLooking for RepresentativesTo assist Medicare Recipients w/ enrolling For Medicare Part D, Medicare Advantage Programs & Medicare Supplements/ Will be placed In Local Pharmacies to Assist w/these programs No exp. Necessary Will provide Training Call 352-726-7722 CMAImmed opening in busy OBGYN office Fax Resume 352-794-0877 CNA3-11 ShiftCitrus Health and Rehab Center, a five star skilled nursing facility. We offer a good salary and work environment including medical/ dental/vision insurance. Aliberal paid time off plan. Please Apply in Person for an immediate interview. 701 Medical Court E Inverness EOE/DFW Not for profit COTA& PTAPart and Full-Time openings (352) 795-4114 DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Dietary ManagerJoin an Exciting Team! Certification req. with 2 years exp. Excellent Benefits Apply at: 611 Turner Camp Rd Inverness OR Email to: atadmin @southernltc.comAn EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D F/T P/T MEDICAL ASSISTANTFor Primary Care office in Homosassa F AX RESUME T O: 352-628-1120 FRONT DESKF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com HIRING: RN, Psych RN, LPN, Phys. Ther.Florida Homecar e Specialist Call (352) 794-6097 For an interview. NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offered LOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 RESIDENT ASSISTANTNew Wage Scale. Looking for reliable staff. Must be available any shift, any day of the week. Looking for PRN and PT Staff. Nursing experience preferred. Apply at BARRINGTON PLACE 2341 W Norvell Bryant Hwy.LecantoEOE/DFWP Busy Medical Practice Seeks1. CT SCAN TECH 2. OPTOMOTRIST Experience is a must Competitive Pay/ Benefits. References Required call for immediate response 352-586-0632 or email hr@ cmc-fl.com DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND MARKETINGLife Care Center of Citrus County in Lecanto Full-time position available. Admissions and/or marketing experience in a skilled nursing facility or hospital setting required. Three to four years health care experience preferred. Bachelors degree or equivalent in marketing, business, journalism or communication is desirable. Must be familiar with the professional community and knowledgeable of admissions/marketing practices and procedures as well as the laws, regulations and guidelines governing admissions/ marketing functions in the long-term care facility. Must possess leadership ability and willingness to work harmoniously with and supervise professional and nonprofessional personnel. Must possess ability to make independent decisions when circumstances warrant such action. Must be able to supervise admission/ marketing staff. We offer great pay and benefits in a team-oriented environment. Christine Bigwood 352-746-4434 352-746-6081 Fax 3325 W. Jerwayne Ln Lecanto, FL 34461 Christine_Bigwood@L CCA.com Visit us: LCCA.com EOE/M/F/V/D 43572 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 NEED 60K INVESTER LOAN 6% SECURED BY200K PROPERTY INTERSETONLY 352-528-2950 J/D PROF. male, looking for work in Citrus County. Ethical, degreed, 414-335-3707 CONSTRUCTION SECRETARYFor a fast paced office! MUSThave the ability to multi task, communicate professionally and have excellent Microsoft Office skills. DFWP/EOE resumewci@aol.com Office AssistantFor busy construction office. Must have construction knowledge. Excellent computer, phone and filing abilities. Fax Resume to: 352-637-4141 BARBER/STYLISTFulltime/Parttime Experienced, Busy! Family Headquarters (352) 697-1145 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Stylist/Nail Tech(352) 344-8282 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Need a JOB? #1 Employment source iswww.chronicleonline.com Classifieds Black short hair Great Dane and Shepherd. 15 months old. Homosassa near 491 (352) 628-2413 Female Cat Gray w/ tan spots no collar, med size Beverly Hills/Holder area(352) 613-6482 Female Cat, Black with white chest and paws. Lost 10/8 in Citronella off of Dunklin Rd going into Citrus Spring. (352) 400-9961 Lost Female Siamese Cat dark chocolate seal point Homosassa Area REWARD (352) 503-3335 Lost in Beverly Hills. Tri colored beagle.40 lbs.Missing from N. Lee St. Has been seen on S. Harrison St. Very sweet neutered male. Has been walking in peoples homes and jumping in trucks. Please call if you have seen JoJo 352-249-3107 MALE VIZSLA Reddish/orange color, yellow eyes, 60 lbs, red collar, lost near Stage Coach/ Pleasant Grove. Dog needs medication. REWARD (352) 726-0120 (352) 247-6118 Male Yellow Lab. Lost on 10/4 Appoka & Annajo in Inverness Answers to Hunter (352) 464-0743 Motorola Cell Phone in case. Lost at OctoberFest in Kiddy Ride area. Please call (352) 465-7334 or (352)-209-2157 Puppy, Mixed brown and red with white chest. Found 10/9 on Raccoon Ct (910) 986-3047 Attention: Sheila Castellon or relatives Manatee Storage has several boxes of personal items that will be discarded after January 31st, 2014. call 352-563-6669 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads FLORAL DESIGNERExp. ONLY, P/THrs. 352-726-9666 FORD2004 Freestar, 81,400 mi, A/C good cond, new rear brks, $5250 OBO (352) 341-4536 Realtors Asst.Lic. pref. email resume to: citrusbestbuy @gmail.com StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Used tools looking for a good home at a reasonable price Call (352) 726-7367 Will do General House Cleaning Residential Only, Floral City Area Exp/Ref. 352-422-0174 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 2 Dogs Free Pomeranian & Jack Russell Mix Good with older people. Owner passed away. Looking for Good Home (352) 726-8359 1988 Southwind RV. Needs to be hauled away. Lots of good parts w/ title. (352) 344-1411 Fiberglass Topper for Chevrolet Pickup 1987 & Up, has lock, sliding rear window, white (352) 586-0521 Free Fire Wood In Driveway 483 N Grandview Ave Citrus Hills FREE KITTENS Are spayed & neutered had shots, To Good Homes Only!! (352) 637-5423 Free Kittens Calico, Black, and Gray Tabby 8 wks old, litter trained 352-212-0667 Free Male Cat Smart, Pretty, Gunmetal Gray, short-haired, desperately seeking indoor home!! (352) 746-1904 Oak Firewood You pk up. (352) 637-2205 Two kittens, one grey tabby and one black. 10 wks, litter trained, eating solid, hand raised (352) 634-2735 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 JOHN NATCUK paintings..if you have a John Natchuk painting that you would be be willing to sell, please get in touch with Robiellyn@aol.com I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads 12 ACRESClose In, Busy Hwy. 8 Mobile Homes, good Income. Many possiblities, Owner & Bank Finan. 352-212-6182 Attention: Sheila Castellon or relatives Manatee Storage has several boxes of personal items that will be discarded after January 31st, 2014. call 352-563-6669 CMAImmed opening in busy OBGYN office Fax Resume 352-794-0877 CONSTRUCTION SECRETARYFor a fast paced office! MUSThave the ability to multi task, communicate professionally and have excellent Microsoft Office skills. DFWP/EOE resumewci@aol.com CRYSTAL RIVERMOVING SALE Sun & Mon 8am on. 8569 Admiral Byrd Ln DEHUMIDIFIER Kenmore excellent condition. $100 obo (352) 726-7367 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! The deductibles are related to the specific plan benefits and the metal level. She said prescription coverage is an essential healthcare benefit under the act; however the type of coverage may vary depending on the plan/metal level. And there were already federal guidelines for coverage of reconstructive services and prosthesis for breast cancer patients that will remain in place. On provisions for breast cancer victims regarding end of life care or hospice coverage; Harper explained, there are no specific act mandates related to hospice or end of life care. However, the benchmark plan in Florida (BCBSF Blue Options 5462) included hospice care and therefore it is considered an essential health benefit in Florida that must be covered in all non-grandfathered individual and small group plans in 2014. Humana is also offering Qualified Health Plans for uninsured Floridians through the marketplace in Florida that opened Oct. 1. Company spokesperson Mitch Lubitz agreed, as part of the Affordable Care Act, Humana and other health insurers must provide additional preventive and womens health care services. Pre-existing conditions According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, starting in 2014, health insurance companies cannot refuse coverage or charge more because of a pre-existing health condition. Insurance coverage for pre-existing conditions begins immediately. The new plans will cover doctor visits, hospitalization, prescription drugs and maternity care without restrictions for pre-existing conditions. The only exception to coverage of pre-existing conditions is for grandfathered individual health insurance plans, purchased by an individual, not an employer. However, the government healthcare website cautions that insurance companies and states define pre-existing conditions differently. Health insurance companies offering coverage through the marketplace must lower the amount consumers pay out of pocket for essential healthcare benefits, including chronic disease management. For household incomes below certain levels financial assistance is available. Visit www.healthcare.gov for details. For questions about the Affordable Care Act, call 800-318-2596.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicleonline.com. $200,000 to $250,000. Why are they so high compared to the actual value, and how can I get this cost lowered? K.S., via email DEAR K.S.: I understand where you could be confused. You are trying to find out why the assessed value of your property is so much less than the replacement cost. That should be pretty obvious. Lets say the building is assessed at $100,000. It is probably worth more than that because most properties are worth more than the assessed value. Lets say its worth $150,000 to sell it, yet if it was to burn down, it might cost $500,000 to replace. Replacement value is the only way to go when insuring a property, not actual cash value. If you have insurance covering only the cash value, the $150,000, if the place burned down, you wouldnt have enough money to replace the house. You only have the amount noted on the policy. You want enough money to replace what you have lost and thats only accomplished with replacement value, not actual cash value. DEAR BRUCE: Years ago I foolishly bought two timeshares, thinking it would be nice for my two small children when they grew up. I am 68 years old now and making out my will. My children want nothing to do with these timeshares and the fees that go along with them. I know I cant sell them. How will this work after Im gone? Can I exclude these in my will so that my children wont be forced to inherit them and assume responsibility for them? K.M., via email DEAR K.M.: I would agree that you foolishly bought the two timeshares, but you had the best of intentions. The kids clearly are knowledgeable and they want nothing to do with them. They dont wish to inherit them, and you know you cant sell them. You might try leaving them to a charity that will accept them. If no one accepts them, there is no reason for anyone to be burdened with them. What you might wish to do is just stop making the payments and see what the timeshare company will do. There is little they can do but sue you. CANCERContinued from Page D1 MONEYContinued from Page D1

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D4SUNDAY,OCTOBER13,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000G4QIRESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP 000G7RHwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 11/1/13LIC#CC1327656 0 0 0 G 7 R R TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000G8E6 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000G67F 000GA TVLa w n Spri nkler Not W orki ng?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000GBCZ Copes Pool & Pavers DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000GA4M PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000GAEA 000G82K6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 Services from A-Z Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience 746-2445 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in: Aluminum Rescreen Work, Storm Doors, Garage Screen Doors, Window Screens, Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch Ceilings, Pressure Washing, Int./Ext. Painting, Regrout Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing, Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten Wood Repairs... You Name it I probably do it! HANDYMAN Complete Handyman Services000G8YZ ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000FV68 Stand Alone Generator 000G8AD WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding Local, Call Robert 352-302-2220 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1 397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Johns Painting & Wallpapering Lic/Ins. FreeEst. **352-201-9568** Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 Home/Office Cleaning Catered to your needs, reliable & exper., lic./ins. Bonded 352-345-9329 Will do General House Cleaning Residential Only, Floral City Area Exp/Ref. 352-422-0174 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 Compete Tree Service Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked (352) 344-2696 FALL SPECIAL Seasoned 4x8 stack. Delivered & Stacked $70 (352) 637-6641 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Mr & Mrs FIX IT (For Seniors) LIC& INS Home&Yard/In&Out Low Senior $ 613-2643 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 Retired Lady with 30+ years Homecare exp. Help w/ personal care companship $10 hr. Dee Dee, 249-4429 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 22 HD Vizio Flat Screen TV cost $228, asking $50. (352) 527-1877 1 Full Size Bed w/ Mattress, spring, head/foot board $75 Patio Table, Nice, new $75 No calls before 11am (352) 628-4766 4 white book cases on wheels $150. 2 red V shaped tables from daycare $50. (352) 795-7254 40 round dining table w/blue pedestal base...$35 call 352-476-2652 Antique dining room set 6 chairs & buffet in perfect condition. Early 1930s $3500.00 Must see! 352-465-7132 Breakfast/Patio Table tile inlaid w/benches very unique $100 Occasional Chairs $25 Dark wood Blk Leather unusal (352) 628-3100 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 CORNER COMPUTER DESK oak finish,51H w/ hutch,very nice $60 726-2023 COUCH Burgundy Colored. In good condition. $80 352-465-7132 Dinette Table 42 ,8 sided w/12 leaf 4 chairs, padded, on wheels. $175. (352) 746-9076 DINING ROOM SET incl. 4 chairs & hutch dark wood, good condition $300. (401) 829-5141 DINING ROOM SET Oak with glass top, 6 chairs, very heavy. $100 (352) 586-0521 DINING ROOM SET Solid light wood table, w/24 leaf, 6 cushd chairs. Large china closet. $800 Excellent Condition (352) 621-5561 Electric lift Chair Rose Colored. In good condition. $90 352-465-7132 END TABLES Oak Colored. $30 for pair 352-465-7132 Entertainment Center & TV Stand fits any large TV $550. Dining Rm. Set, w/ matching bar stools $550. (541) 973-5030 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Used Maytag Washer & GE Dryer $75. for Both (352) 382-1830 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, No Rust, Excellent Working Condition Guarantee. Free Del. 352 263-7398 WHIRLPOOLREFRIGERATOR 10cf top freezer, white. 3 yrsold. $110 Inverness. Call john 727 415 7728 phone 727 415 7728 COMPUTER DESK. Corner style. Oak formica. 54 x 54 x 51H. $85. 527-1239. COMPUTER DESK. Washed oak formica finish. 24D x 53H. $80. 527-1239. Craftsman 154 pc. Mechanics Tool Set Call for info, $75. obo (352) 586-3380 Craftsman professional 10 Table Saw, 1 HP motor, w/ Biesemeyer fence system. $475 (orig $950) (352) 628-1734 SHOPLIGHTwith 11 goodT40 flourescant bulbs, great shape, ($10) 352-212-1596 Used tools looking for a good home at a reasonable price Call (352) 726-7367 KARAOKE MACHINE WITH CD PLAYER $80 352-613-0529 SANYO 20 TV WORKS GREAT Excellent picture and sound quality $25. 352-621-0175 CD/DVD DRIVES 5 drives int & ext...$25 all 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 IBM 390E THINKPAD needs OS, plus extras...$75 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com ANTIQUE SLANTTOP DESK good condition, $100. 352-382-0069 2 Person Hot Tub 110volts, excellent condition! $200. (352) 527-0618 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 CHESTFREEZER 5 cubic foot Frigidaire, good condition, $75.00 352-628-3899 GOOD DISHWASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. call/text Leonard @ 352-364-6505 GOOD DISHWASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day warranty call/text Leonard @ 352-364-6504 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 Refrigerator (2010) Kenmore, white, like new bottom freezer, 68 H, 33 wide, 30D glass shelves and bins, $425. (352) 513-5415 Call Evenings Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 12 ACRESClose In, Busy Hwy. 8 Mobile Homes, good Income. Many possiblities, Owner & Bank Finan. 352-212-6182 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 TELLERBrannen Bank is currently interviewing for a teller position in the Citrus County area. Must have previous cash handling experience, be detail oriented, PC literate and have excellent customer service skills. Inquiries please call Carol Johnson at 352-726-9001. Brannen Banks of Florida, Inc. PO Box 1929 Inverness, FL 34451-1929 EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP DRIVERSTRACTOR TRAILER DUMP Cypress Truck Lines seeks 5 TT Dump Drivers (150 mile radius) Company Drivers Only *Assigned Tractors *Medical/Dental/Vision*P aid Orientation *Paid Training*6 Paid Holidays. 6 Mo TT Dump Exp & Class A CDL Req! Call 1-888 235-8862 www. cypresstruck.com Exp. General MaintenanceMust be flexible and able to multi-task. Apply T ues thru Fri 505 E Hartford St, Hernando FLORAL DESIGNERExp. ONLY, P/THrs. 352-726-9666 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 EXP. MECHANIC5 yrs min active exp.Clean Dr. Lic. a mustApply in Person: WALLYS806 NE US19 Cry Riv. Now Hiring: OTR Class A CDL DriversNew Pay Package and $1500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Call today for details 1-888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net RESIDENTIALELECTRICIANSMust have 5 years exp. Current on Codes & DF, Trim and Rough. Call (352) 746-6825 or Apply in person S & S Electric 2692 W Dunnellon Rd, Dunnellon UTILITIES TECHNICIAN IAnnouncement # 13-57 Skilled technical work with assignments encompassing the operation, maintenance and construction of Citrus County Utilities water distribution and wastewater collection systems. Some experience in a related field or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Certification in backflow (testing/repair), water distribution or wastewater collection preferred. Ability to respond to after hours emergency repairs 24/7. Must have or obtain within 1 year of employment a valid Florida CDL, class B. Starting pay $11.88 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: please visit our website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online by Friday October 18, 2013 EOE/ADA. Maintenance Working SupervisorHigh School Diploma Required. Experience in industrial maintenance, welding, fabrication and 3 phase electrical. Work is in manufacturing environment doing general maintenance duties. Work hours and days vary. Full time first shift with benefits. Pay depending on experience $12-$17 per hour. Apply at: Global Tire Recycling. 1201 Industrial Drive Wildwood or Fax Resume 352-330-2214 The City of Crystal Riveris seeking resumes for the position of Maintenance II. This is a semi-skilled and manual position including repair and maintenance of City property. Must have a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; hold a valid Florida Class B Commercial Drivers License; and have two years exp. A job description can be obtained from the Finance Director or by calling 352-795-4216 ext. 309. Hourly wage is $9.87-$13.98 per hr. and includes insurance benefits. Please send resume to: David Burnell, Public Works Director, City of Crystal River, 123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 by Oct. 21, 2013. Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com AC SALESWill train right person, easy six figure income Must have val. fl. DL, Dave (352) 419-7916 RealtorsAsst.Lic. pref. email resume to: citrusbestbuy @gmail.com SALES CLERKApplicant must have computer skills, self motivated, works well with others and customer friendly. Must be at least 18 and have a valid drivers license Apply in person Pinch-A-Penny Inv. 2661 E Gulf to Lake ELECTRICIANS RESIDENTIALNEW CONSTRUCTION Exp. preferred. Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service. Full benefits, paid holidays & vacation /EOE APPLY AT: Exceptional Electric 4042 CR 124A Wildwood Classified Sales Rep.Part Time Seeking individual with strong sales, computer, customer service and organizational skills to increase our market share classified display advertising in all of Citrus Publishings products. The position will consist of receiving incoming calls and making outbound service/cold calls. Handle walk-in advertisers from our Meadowcrest office. College degree preferred and ability to demonstrate persuasiveness and/or sales abilities. Ability to work well in a team environment. Must be able to meet a work schedule of 29-hours per week. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer.

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER13,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 369-1013 SUCRN Citrus County Code Compliance PUBLIC NOTICE The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are invited to attend. The following case(s) will be heard by the Code Compliance Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350. Ambrose Saunders, Joseph D. 4734 N Apache Trl, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Blocks, totes, metals, aluminum, plastics, papers, appliances, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. Burns, Brian 4593 N Canoe Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass, weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Cochran, Janet L. 295 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosedbuildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: TV, wood, a shelf, blocks, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. Cochran, Janet L. 295 S Scarboro Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Diaz, Jose E. 323 S Barbour St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Dyess Jr., Curtis & Teresa L. 5312 W Atlanta Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433 It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: One Ford Ranger truck with expired tag dated 11/09, one large cabin boat and trailer with no visible tags, and one bass boat with trailer with no visible tags. Dyess Jr., Curtis E. & Teresa L. 5312 W Atlanta Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken furniture, broken boat parts, car parts, car tires, metal, plastic, wood, and other miscellaneous trash and debris. Eister, Karl D. **REPEAT VIOLATION** 56 S Jeffery St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for 369-1013 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE AMENDED N O T I C E A Special meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, October 21, 2013 beginning at 5:00pm in the Conference Room of the Law Office Grant & Dozier, LLC, located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida, to discuss: Foundation Governance Issues. Possible Discussion Hospital Transaction Matters. Other. N O T I C E OF EXECUTIVE SESSION MEETING DURING MEETING The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold an Executive Session meeting on October 21, 2013 at 5:10pm during the regular meeting under the authority of Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session will be closed to the public to allow the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees to meet with the boards Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy related to litigation expenditures in all pending litigations. Present at the Executive Session will be Debbie Ressler (Trustee), Robert Priselac (Trustee), Krista Joseph (Trustee), Mark Fallows (Trustee), William Grant -General Counsel, Bruce Blackwell, Esquire, Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry Richard, Esq., Taylor Ford, Esq., Glenn Burhans, Esq., Bridget Smitha, Esq., Vincent Falcone, Esq., Andrew Hand, Esq., Ashby Burks, Esq., Warren Bloom, Esq., Bruce Giles, Esq., and Court Reporter. The Executive Session will be held in the Conference Room of the Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC, located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida and will begin at 5:10pm. When the Executive Session commences the door will be closed. At the conclusion of the Executive Session, the meeting of the Board will be reconvened and the public is invited to rejoin. Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board office at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness, Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250. Published in the CITRUSCOUNTY CHRONICLE, October 13, 2013 367-1013 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT The Petitioner, Scott Crowe, on behalf of Razhiel Crowe, hereby give notice of their intention to petition the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners to vacate a portion of that certain plat of Laurel Ridge Number One, as described in Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. BY: /s/ Scott Crowe Petitioner EXHIBIT A 10 easement located on the rear of Lot 51, Block 6, of Laurel Ridge Number One, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 15, Pages 13 through 23, inclusive, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida. October 6 & 13, 2013. 000GC9QWEVE FOUND HIM!At The Crystal TRUCK CENTERCome see our large selection of Pre-owned Cars and Trucks! And as always I can assist you in the purchase of your New Chevy, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, and Nissan at any of our Crystal Locations. Ive been here for you for years and now I will continue to assist you at my new Crystal home located at: 3477 Commercial Way Spring Hill, FL 34606 (Next to Spring Hill Lanes) Office: (352) 597-4100 Ext: 7025 Cell: (352) 238-6715 WAYNE BENNETT CHRYSLER2012Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 DODGE03, Grand Caravan Fully loaded, dual sliding drs. 35mpg, V6, Perf. cond., garaged New tires, Crystal Riv. $4,500. (727) 207-1619 FORD2004 Freestar, 81,400 mi, A/C good cond, new rear brks, $5250 OBO (352) 341-4536 TOYOTA2005 Sienna 1 owner,x-clean, Ask for Donna(352) 860-3115, 302-0778 Harley Davidson2000, 883, 7K miles $2,995. (352) 398-5903 HONDA2006, BTX 1300 Garage kept $6,500. (352) 398-5903 HONDA98 Shadow Aero VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh walls, retro look, 18k. mi $3200 352-465-7812 HONDA REBEL2009, 100 mi, like new, many accessories. Pine Ridge. $2995 OBO (419) 307-8954 KAWASAKI, KLR 650 Endoro, 15k miles, runs great, 1 owner, call for details $2,500. (352) 344-1223 SUN149 CC Motor Scooter Like New, 100 miles, No dents or scrates $900 obo, 503-3103 YAMAHA1985 Virago, 1000 cc, runs good. $1,200 or best offer (352) 201-5104 TOYOTA Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T cap, 80k mi. exc cond $9,000 (352) 726-3730 (352) 422-0201 BUICK2006, Ranier, CXL, 98k miles, Nice Asking $8,000. 352-201-1952 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 1 owner $3,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVY, Tahoe, 166k miles, dual AC, clean interior ,1 owner, $3,500 obo, 954-294-8979 Pine Ridge FORD2007, Escape, XLS $7,950. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2003, Wrangler, 4 cyc., 5 speed, soft top, $9,950 352-341-0018 JEEP04, Wrangler, Sport 4.0 liter,auto trans, exc. cond. many extras, call for details! $13,500. 352-563-6666 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CORVETTE1999 Coup, Silver w/ Black, 6 spd, loaded, extras, 14k mi, $25,000 (352) 513-4427 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $29,500 obo 352-302-8265 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2001 S-10 LS, 4 Cyl, 5 spd, air, 44K mi, mint cond. New tires, N/S $7500 (813) 410-6976 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $6800. OBO(352) 465-3086 FORD1979 Box Truck 460 eng, low miles dual wheels, am/fm $1000.obo (352) 637-4011 FORD2004, SD250 supercab Lariat 158 WB, 5.4L, V8, one owner runs & looks great. Over road high miles $6,900 527-0989, Must See! FORD2007 Explorer Sport Trac XLT, Blue, bge lthr. int, tow pack, 68K miles, just serv, $15,900 obo (352) 897-4204 SOLDCHEVROLET2005 1/2 ton, SWB, auto, P/S, V-6, just truck AC, like new $5,500. Franks A-S Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BMW, Z3, 3.0i, manual, 124k mi., green, black top, garaged, clean $7,450., 352-220-2077 CADILLAC2004 Esclade EXT 1 owner, fully loaded, dealrshp main,113k mi $13,500. 510-867-5727 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt LT 4door, power windows, locks, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLER 2002012 4-dr, loaded, 13,000 miles, 1 owner $19,000 firm Franks A-S 352-726-2494 DODGE2000 Intrepid Runs and looks great, 180,000 new tires $1300 352-678-7049 FORD, Explorer, 106k mi., good cond. $4,500 negotiable 352-637-2258 or 634-2798 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2011 Mustang Premium coupe, V6, Automatic transmission, 27,000 miles. Very good condition. $16,900. Please call: 352-726-2595 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 HYUNDAIElandra, 4-dr, 41,000 miles, sun roof, loaded $10,888. Franks A-S 352-726-2494 MERCURY2001 Grand Marquis Excellent Condition 82k miles $5,700. (352) 527-9897 NISSAN2010Altima SL,38,500 miles, sunroof, leather, Champaign, loaded. Garaged, mint. 30+mpg. $16,500. 352-382-0005 SATURN1999, S11, 4 door, low miles, extra clean, 1 owner $3,250. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $27,900 obo 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET2004 Corvette Torch red coupe, excellent condition, LS1 engine, 6-speed, Z51 performance handling, fully optioned with 2 roofs, 42,000 miles, one owner, never hit or abused. $24,000 phone (352) 527-2927 or harmarjenkins @yahoo.com CHEVROLET, Corvette T-tops, silver green matalic, automatic, very rare car, mint. cond. $16,500 obo 302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $400 Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** Alumacraft14 ft w/ trailer and extras $400 (352) 637-5032 BAY KATAluminum outboard, 28 ft, includes trailer & outboard mtr. 90HP $9,500. (352) 238-4445 CHAPA26 ft, 1985 Cabin Cruiser. Brand new trailer. Needs eng & prop. $2000 obo (352) 257-0078 KEYWEST2013 Skiff 17 Key West Skiff,Yamaha 70 4stroke,Trolling Motor,Jack Plate, GPS, AlumTrailer. Warranties transferrable $19,000 352 503-6668 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com ALLEGRO BAY, M37 Motor Home 35k mi. good cond. Needs minor fixes, $12,000 obo, Trade for Harley? 352-274-8664 AMERI LITEBy Gulfstream, 2011, 21 MBL, walk around bed, $9,995 firm. Franks A-S 352-726-2494 FLEETWOOD95 Flair, Class A 22 ft, 50k mi. Very Good cond MUST SEE $12,000 (352) 628-6643 RIALTA2002, new tires, AC, & paint, 59k miles, runs great, great mileage $31,500. 352-238-4445 TIFFIN, Allegro, Class A, 30 ft., 2 slides, jacks, generator, new awning, 32k mi., 50 amp service $32,500, Call to learn all that goes with it 352-527-2327 TOWBAR: Roadmaster 5000 Stainless Steel Towbar. Universal fit. One (1) person operation. NEW $600...asking $300 or first best offer !! 352-426-4563 KEYSTONESpringdale 2005 Model 298-BHL super slide out, awning, tandem axle, coupling hitch anti sway bars, 30 amp hkup. Asking $9,500 or will consider shallow water boat as trade, (352) 503-9133 before 9pm MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Travel Trailer2011, 20 Rockwood MiniLite, Self Contained. Pwr. Slide out. Ex. Cond. $13,500 obo(352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Urban Suburban Hair StudiowelcomesKATIE FLYERSpecialty: Up-dos, Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting. Paul Mitchell certified. Stop in and say hello! Call to make your reservation today. 352-637-0777 826 S US Hwy 41 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Birds for Sale Blue Front amazons, $300 ea. Indian Ring Necks, $100. ea. Cherry head & cuban conures, $175 ea. Nandays $150 ea. Quakers $75 ea. Fisher Love Birds $35. ea. 352-637-6967 Doberman Puppies3 Males $500. ea Parents on premises 352-586-3386 DOJHADojha, a 5-y.o. yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, calm, gentle & easy-going, gets along w/other dogs. Housebrkn. Beautiful & in great shape, wants to sit by your side. Came to shelter because family lost their home. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 LILLYLilly, a 6-y.o. female bulldog mix, white w/black ears, beautiful, friendly girl, weighs 36 lbs. Heartworm-negative & housebrkn. She loves treats & sits on command, came to the shelter as a stray. Very affectionate, wants to be by your side. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown-white terrier mix, weight 65 lbs., came to shelter because owner could not care for him, gentle, a bit shy, very playful, loves water, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends, eager to please. Beautiful dog. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. REMYRemy, a gentle neutered pit bull mix, wonderful disposition, 1-2 years old, lot of energy, plays w/other dogs. Does not jump on people, knows sit & down, gives paw, walks well on leash, likes car rides, gives kisses, does not mind cats. Call Sandy @ 224-223-9279. JUICE EXTRACTOR Cuisinart New. Never used Paid $150. Sell for $95. or make offer 352-621-0175 NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call for e-mail picture 40.00 linda 341-2271 RUG-MOHAWK COCOAINK SWIRL, 10X 13$100 352-628-3507 Proform C840 Weight Bench Exerciser Exc. Cond. $125. BowFlex/Nautilus tread/stepper exc. cond. $125. (352) 527-0618 BILLIARDS TABLE American Heritage 1 slate top, leather pockets, solid mahogany, claw feet. All accessories included. Plus stainless mini beer fridge and portable ice make. All in gr eat Condition $1400 for all (352) 503-7690 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Gun Cabinet for six guns, wood, with glass in door, accessory storage, $75. (352) 564-9336 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 SQUARE TWO LADIES GOLF CLUB FULL SET W/ BAG & COVERS $650, Ladies golf bag, brand new $90 (352) 897-4681 2012 Factory Easy tow, 5x10 Lawn Trailer rear gate $850. Home made dump Trailer, Good Cond. $375. Bob(352) 860-1106 2013 Enclosed Trailer, 5x8, v-nose, w/ramp door, $1600. firm (352) 513-5436 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 New Client Offer For YouTake 20% off First VisitANue SalonHair Skin Nails 1916 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida (Corner of Turkey Oak and Hwy. 19-Near Mall) 352-563-2110 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment 2 KAYAK PADDLES-79 inches long, Ex., $30 each. 352-628-0033 DOMINOES nice set with case, ($5) 352-613-7493 ELECTRIC GUITAR, CASE,TUNER,AMPLIFIER, and CABLES, excellent condition, $95, (352) 465-1813 FINGERHUTGIFT CARD 100.00 / selling for 85.00 Linda 341-2271 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 FUTON Light wood arm rests small scratches with mattress black cover. $40. 352-746-0714 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $160. 352-465-3086 Masterbuilt Smoker, new in box, never used. $250 firm 3 Burner Charcoil Broil Grill, SS top, w/ side burner & tank $85 (352) 897-4681 NECKLACE stainless steel, biker style with engravable heart, brand new, paid $150, only ($30) 352-613-7493 OUTSIDETABLE & CHAIRS Dark green bar high 2 chairs glass table. $35.00 746-0714 PICTURE FRAMES 4 large nice, ($5) 352-613-7493 PLACE SETTING w/napkin rings, made w/brooches Centerpiece Pitcher w/flowers and mirror $200. for all (352) 795-7254 REFRIGERATOR Good working make good garage fridge $50. Firm. it is 21 cf believe its whirlpool-white. 746-0714 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $95 HAND HELD HEAVYDUTY METALINVERNESS 419-5981 SEWING MACHINE Elna Pro Quilters Dream, like new paid $2k sell for $600. (352) 212-9978 Sewing Machine Singer, cabinet style w/ chair $75. (352) 564-9336 SEWING MACHINE W/CAB. Riccar 101 Deluxe. Storage in Chair. $45.00 Ruth 352-382-1000 Singer Sewing Mach. Slantomatic 401 w/ cabinet, Good Condition $50 obo 352-628-3100 SINGER Sewing Machine with wanut cabinet. Very good condition. $65 obo (352) 382-1352 SNAKE Ball python with cage @ many extras 3female. $99.99. 746-0714 Solar Heating System for pool. See it in operation $550 (352) 628-6152 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 Used Shed8 x 12 Barn Style $850. (352) 860-0111 WOMENS BLACK RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW SIZE 43LEUR 419-5981 YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 140 WATTS 2 9 60 WATTS & 1 5 80 WATTSALL$90 352-613-0529 Hospital Bed Electric Bed, Good Condition $200 obo 352-503-9468 STATE QUARTER SETS 40 complete sets, both mints plus Wash.D.C., Guam, P.R. all in mint tubes, 4,240 coins in all un-circulated. $1,500 firm for all (352) 344-4614 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 CHRISTIAN EDITION ACOUSTIC GUITAR WHITE W/TURQUOISE TRIM BEAUTIFUL! $100 352-601-6625 NEW FENDER SQUIRE JAGUAR BASS W/ULTIMATE SUPPORT GIGBAG $100 352-601-6625 NEW SD50 ACOUSTIC GUITAR GOLD GROVERS,SOLID TOP+GIGBAG!$100 352-601-6625 2 CRANK-UPlight stands for T-bars or truss $75 both 352-476-2652 / tommyb @tampabay.rr.com 10LIGHTTRUSS w/dollies for DJ or band...$50 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com BASS UKE 21 SCALE,ACTIVE PREAMPW/ PIEZO&POLY STRINGS $75 352-601-6625 LES PAULSTYLE ELECTRIC GUITAR, AGED MAHOGONY TOP& BLACK $75 352-601-6625 ORGANLEGEND. Perfect condition $300 Firm. You move. (352) 419-6186 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 PLAYSLIDE GUITAR? LPSTYLE ELECTRIC AGED MAHOGANY& BLACK $100 352-601-6625 RED-BLUE-GREAN rotating lights $25 for all 3. 352-476-2652 tommyb@tampabay. rr.com Entry way bench, $100 Area Rug, 63 x 94 $75. Cell (541) 973-5030 FILE CABINET 2 drawer, oak finish exc. cond.$20 726-2023 JAPANESE BUFFET SERVER Black with gold, hand-painted decor. Like-new Call 352-257-5062 $100 KITCHEN SET 4 padded chairs on casters. Glass top, white base. MUST SEE $200 (352) 465-2237 MATTRESS King size, 3 yrs old with brand new box spring $500 (352) 419-6465 Mattress Set3 yrs. old, paid $1,800 like new $500. obo (352) 527-8600 Settee, 46W hardwood w/ pecan finish $50. 1 Counter Stool, chrome, swivel seat w/ back $25. (352) 564-9336 WROUGHT-IRON DAYBED like-new, light-colored frame with mattress. $100 Call 352-257-5062 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 HONDA PRESSURE WASHER $500 Excellent condition (352) 503-6902 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 TROY BUILT Riding Mower 42 inch cut $475 (352) 897-4681 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 CRYSTAL RIVERMOVING SALE Sun & Mon 8am on. 8569 Admiral Byrd Ln HOMOSASSA5231 S. Manatee Ter. Sat. & Sun 9a-4p Washer & Dryer White, Good Cond. first $125. (352) 302-8265 MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 2 GIRLS WINTER JACKETS LARGE $15 EACH 352-613-0529 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 BOOTS size 7 tan work like, size 7 1/2 black dress, womens, good shape, ($5) 352-613-7493 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4 PANTS, 5 SHIRTS & 2 lightweight jackets $45 352-613-0529 Girls winter clothing 4 jeans, 1pants, 5 shirts, 2 pajama sets & 2 hoodies sizes vary $60 352-613-0529 JEANS embroidered, womens size 10, 1 roses, 1 daisies, brand new, both for ($15) 352-613-7493 MENS SUITHART SCHEFFNER & MARX. Jacket 44, pants 38x30, dark gray, $50 352-322-1154 Mother of the Groom gown.Adrianna Papell, sz 14, navy.Call for details. Only $60. 352-322-1154 2 MATCHING OFFSHOREANGLER BOATRODS-Sea Lion SL70BRT, 7, 40-60 lb line, Ex+ $80. 628-0033 3 DOUBLE ROLLS FLORALWALLCOVERING $25 PREPASTED VINYL165 SQ FT 419-5981 23 UNFINISHED WOOD FORMS $25 HEARTS,TEDDY BEARS, BUNNIES 419-5981 10 CRAFTSMAN TABLESAW Heavy duty Saw good condition, motor need brushes. $80 obo. 746-0714 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BARSTOOLtall solid wood, good shape, swivels, ($5) 352-613-7493 BEALLS GIFTCERTIFICATE 100.00 / selling for 85.00 Linda 341-2271 BOW FLEX Schwin Bow Flex. Excellent condition. 746-0714 $99.99 CHANDELIER Beautiful lighting for dining rm or formal entry. See pic on Craigslist #4072048315. $60.00 352-322-1160 CHARCOALGRILL KINGSFORD 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $8 EACH 352-613-0529 CONCERTSHIRT Taylor Swift Red Tour, with matching arm band, brand new, ($10) 352-613-7493 COSTUME JEWELRY3 necklaces, 1 pair earrings, 3 watches, nice, ($10) 352-613-7493 DEHUMIDIFIER Kenmore excellent condition. $100 obo (352) 726-7367 DOG CRATE X LARGE SOFT SIDE Green cloth Sturdy never used $100. 352-270-3909 DOG CRATES SMALL (2) Black Wire.For pets up to 25 Lbs. Clean/Excellent $20. ea 352-621-0175

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D6SUNDAY,OCTOBER13,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 368-1013 SUCRN BOCC-OMB-RFP # 003-14 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Public Relations Services RFP # 003-14 The Tourist Development Council is seeking to hire a qualified public relations firm to develop and implement a strategy based on recent visitor profile research that utilizes public relations tactics to attract individual and group visitors to Citrus County to stay in paid accommodations. Possess an extensive media reach with contacts for print, internet and broadcast media in identified targeted niche and affinity markets for Citrus County. Respond to editorial leads, proactively write and pitch stories that position Citrus County as a premier Florida vacation destination. Write and distribute press releases that feature special events and assets to create greater awareness of what the area has to offer. Report monthly on PR initiatives, media mentions and value. Plan media familiarization tours and recruit qualified media to attend. Maintain and update editorial calendar and assist with copy writing needs. Provide a representative quarterly to attend Tourist Development Council meetings and provide a public relations report. Retainer should not exceed $30,000 annually and should include travel quarterly to TDC meetings in Lecanto Florida. Additional public relations initi atives including travel to trade shows or media missions will be considered on an individual basis. SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before November 1, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, Florida 34461. A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for November 1, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 280 Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted Proposals. Additional Notice a public tallying of the evaluations for Proposals RFP 035-13 Utility Billing & Customer Service Transition & RFP 039-13 License Compliance Special Master Services is scheduled for October 18, 2013 @ 10:00am at West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312. To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select BIDS/PURCHASING on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457. CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Joe Meek, Chairman Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle October 13, 2013 junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Aluminum, plastics, metals, boxes, tires, garbage, couple trailers with debris on them, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. England, Shannon & Charles 4264 S Plumtree Ter, Inverness, Fl 34452 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Half Ass Ranch LLC 1806 N Troy Loop, Inverness, Fl 34453 Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: Using a box car trailer as a shed. Harding, Marian McGeoch **REPEAT VIOLATION** 2650 N Reynolds Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34428 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of junk and debris throughout the property, household items, household garbage, metal and plastic debris, broken wooden fencing, broken plastic buckets, and other miscellaneous trash and debris. Hodges, Ronda L. 3472 E Deer Run Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Plastics, papers, tote, garbage, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. Hotz, Patrick Kelly & Kathleen Marie **Represented by Michael T. Kovach, Jr., Esq.** 1140 N Sidiki Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453 Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: Expired Permit #201008995 13x13 Gazebo (expired 5/10/12); Expired Permit #201008993 16x16 shed (expired 8/18/12); After the Fact permit #201008996 tiki w/ electric (not issued); After the Fact permit #201009283 16x32 workshop w/ electric (not issued); After the Fact permit #201009286 9x15 lean to w/ electric (not issued); After the Fact permit #201009284 12x16 storage w/ electric (not issued); and After the Fact permit #201009285 12x17 storage w/ electric (not issued Jennings, Michael & Rebecca 9439 S Kingfish Ter, Floral City, Fl 34436 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Key, Sarah L. & Walker, Roosevelt & Mary K. 191 S Snapp Ave, Inverness, Fl 34453 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Two refrigerators, plastics, wood, bucket, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. Lolly, Michael & Beam, Brenda 5308 W Bandy Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Multiple bags of household garbage, car tires, household items, broken furniture, and other miscellaneous trash and debris. Lolly, Michael & Beam, Brenda 5308 W Bandy Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Madrigal, Rene J. 4735 E Liza Knowlton Dr, Inverness, Fl 34452 It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass, weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Marmon, Suzanne R. ATTN: Carmine Bynes 416 S Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Marmon, Suzanne R. ATTN: Carmine Bynes 416 S Washington St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Chairs, mattresses, plastics, papers, pile of tree debris, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. OBrien, Sean 6670 S Frankfurter Way, Homosassa, Fl 34446 Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: The swimming pool constructed in the backyard has not been permitted and a permit was never applied for. Rogers, Randall L. & Kelley 1218 W Stafford St, Hernando, Fl 34442 Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve,convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: Expired pool permit #200606748. Swengel Jr., Robert O. 5318 W Blade Ln, Dunnellon, Fl 34433 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car tires, household garbage, wood, plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris. The Julia J. Griffitt Living Trust 3068 N Satin Flower Pt, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: The vehicle with the flat tires parked on the property. Tuminello, Vito & Cacioppo, Cara 5756 W Costa Mesa Ln, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefor. To Wit: Expired permit #200610014 for an in ground pool. Permit expired on 3/27/2008. Waterfield, Richard B. 3511 N Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465 Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3140; Temporary Uses: Temporary uses of land may be permitted in designated land use districts by the issuance of a Temporary Use Permit, subject to the provisions of the Land Development Code, and shall meet all the requirements of this section. An application for a Temporary Use Permit shall be filed with the Director of the Land Development Division. The application shall include: A site plan showing the location of the Temporary Use on the property, and the written approval of the ownership or management of the shopping center, if such Use is to be conducted within a shopping center, or written approval of the owner of the property. Tents are allowed to remain for a period of no more than sixty (60) days. Tents shall comply with the provisions of the Florida Building Code. Wright, Russell J. 3624 E Delight St, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass, weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18 in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Wright, Russell J. 3624 E Delight St, Hernando, Fl 34442 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Two piles of debris covered by tarps and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. Yanke, Marlana T. **REPEAT VIOLATION** 1606 N Little Carmen Ter, Inverness, Fl 34453 It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tree debris, glass windows, car parts, upside down spa, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area. NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone: (352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580. MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE one (1) time, Sunday, October 13, 2013 000GA1J

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