Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03281

Full Text

Homecoming: Crystal River falls, Citrus survives /B1


I[SATURAIY; I


*1
^V.
Sunny and dry.
Cool at night.
PAGE A4


C ITRU S C 0 NT Y





wwwNIC chLronicleonlne
^& www.chroniicleonline.cB


OCTOBER 12, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 66


Refuge


Day


called


off
Chronicle
The annual Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge's Refuge Day has
been cancelled because of
the continued partial
shutdown of the govern-
ment The event was set to
happen Oct. 19.
Ross Knudsen, presi-
dent of the Friends of the
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Complex,
whose group works to
stage the event at Three
Sisters Springs, said it was
a great loss. The refuge is
run by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.
"It's a loss for every-
body the public, who
would not get a chance
to come to Three Sisters
and enjoy the place and
for the Friends group,
which raises a lot of
funds from this event,"
See Page A5



Woman

charged

with theft

ofjewelry

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
Deputies have solved a
stolen jewelry crime
spree involving multiple
victims at a local assisted
living resi-
c dence in
Lecanto.
Jabreia
White, 22,
of South-
east 25
Avenue,
Ocala, was
Jabreia arrested
White for multi-
faces multiple ple felony
felony charges. charges
including grand theft, traf-
ficking in stolen property,
and false verification of
ownership to a pawnbro-
ker Her bond was set at
$63,000.
According to her arrest
affidavit, White, an em-
ployee at Nature Coast
Lodge, entered various
rooms at the center steal-
ing jewelry from the resi-
dents. Three separate
theft cases have been tied
to White, with the first
theft being reported on
Sept. 28. The thefts have
been linked to at least five
different victims who had
their jewelry stolen, and
See Page A5


Alarming withdrawals


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Dr. Bob Knight, president of the Florida Springs Institute, said too much water is being withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer. He
believes permits for water withdrawal should be halted to ensure spring-flow restoration.

Springs expert cautions about continuedpumping of water from aquifer


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Dr Bob Knight, a springs ex-
pert and the president of
Howard T. Odum Florida
Springs Institute, likes
retelling an amusing analogy
someone once made to him
about the state of the Floridan
Aquifer the seemingly in-
definite source of potable
water for folks in North and
Central Florida.
"He said, 'the Floridan
aquifer is like a big mattress
with three big people sitting
on the edges. You have Jack-
sonville on the northeast cor-
ner, Orlando on the
south-central portion of it and
Tampa/St. Pete in the south-
west,"' Knight said.
The virtual and real depres-
sions being caused by water


The Southwest Florida Water Management District has two
at-large vacancies on its governing board. Presently, Citrus
County lacks representation on the board.
withdrawals from those areas will shut the spigots to all of
on the aquifer bed, said the state's once-beautiful and
Knight, are harmful and un-
less the activity is halted, it See Page A9


Board has

two vacancies
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
There are currently two
vacancies on the Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District governing
board and one of the seats
is an at-large seat for a can-
didate from Citrus, Levy,
Sumter and Lake counties.
The other vacant seat is for
someone from Charlotte
and Sarasota counties.
The Citrus seat was
held by Douglas B. Tharp
of the Villages, who was
See Page A2


Glenn addresses county development

EDC, chamber ofcommerce present annual Industry Appreciation Awards


b
I.ULAP


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Alex Glenn, state president-Florida Duke Energy,
delivered the keynote speech Friday at the Economic
Development Council luncheon at the College of
Central Florida Citrus Campus.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Duke Energy's $1.5 billion investment
in a natural gas-burning power plant
would be a catalyst for change in Citrus
County
Alex Glenn, state president-Florida
Duke Energy likened it to past growth in
Citrus County, spurred by the construc-
tion of five power plants by Progress En-
ergy and Duke forerunner Florida
Power Corporation.
"If we build that plant, what we have
to do is go out for a request for propos-
als," Glenn said. "So a request for pro-
posals will go for bid and we have put out
a self-build option to build that plant in
Citrus County"


Glenn was the keynote speaker at the
31st annual Industry Appreciation
Awards Luncheon on Friday at the Cit-
rus Campus of the College of Central
Florida.
Glenn cited the work of the Economic
Development Council and Duke's pri-
vate community working group as other
catalysts for change. He also explained
Duke's national scope and efforts in eco-
nomic development, especially in
Florida.
He said they serve 35 counties in
Florida and since 2005 have attracted
186 companies bringing in 27,000 high-
paying jobs and $2 billion in capital
investments.
Glenn addressed site selection for
See Page A5


Classifieds ...
Comics ......
Crossword ...


.. C9
... C8
.. C7


Community .......C6
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ........... C8


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C7


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
87
LOW
55




CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Homecoming 2013

Crystal River High School


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River High School senior Bliss Mercuri stands with her escort and brother,
Brice, after being crowned 2013 Homecoming Queen during halftime of Friday night's
football game between the Pirates and Santa Fe.


Citrus High School


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus High School senior Melanie Dodd is escorted by her father, Doug Dodd, Friday
night after being crowned 2013 Homecoming Queen during halftime festivities at the
Citrus and Mount Dora football game.


State BRIEFS


Immigrants to fast
outside South Fla.
detention center
DORAL-- Frida Ulloa's
mother and brother are U.S.
Citizens. But under U.S. law,
that's not enough to enable
the college student to get her
green card.
The Peruvian native joined
more than a three dozen ac-
tivists Friday at South Florida
U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart's
Doral office. Some are fasting.
They want Diaz-Balart to
show results on immigration



BOARD
Continued from PageAl

appointed by Gov. Charlie
Crist in Sept 2008 and reap-
pointed by Gov Rick Scott in
April 2011, but the Florida
Senate which is charged
with confirming candidates
failed to give him the nod.
According to state law, the
governor selects a person
and the Senate approves or


reform. He is one of the few
Republicans still involved in
bi-partisan talks.
Although the Senate
passed an immigration bill,
the House has not.
Diaz-Balart's Chief of Staff
said his boss is committed to
reform, and the focus should
be on the Obama administra-
tion's massive deportations.
Activists want Diaz-Balart to
sign onto the Democrat-
backed existing bill or intro-
duce one of his own. They
planned to continue their vigil
at Broward Transitional Center.


denies their appointment
According to SWFWMD
spokeswoman Susanna
Martinez Tarokh, people
interested in becoming
board members can fill out
a gubernatorial applica-
tion at www.flgov.com/
appointments/ or return
applications via mail to
the Governor's Appoint-
ments Office, The Capitol
Building, Lower Level,
Suite LL-09, Tallahassee,
FL 32399-0001. The office


Facebook slaying
suspect claims
self-defense
MIAMI -A man who shot
his wife to death and then
posted gruesome photo-
graphs of her corpse on Face-
book told investigators he
acted in self-defense because
she was viciously attacking
him, according to a statement
police released Friday.
Derek Medina said in his
Aug. 8 videotaped statement
to Miami-Dade County Police
detectives that he only shot

can also be reached by
phone at 850-717-9243.
As per state statute, the
governing board of each
water management dis-
trict shall be composed of
nine members who reside
within the district, except
in the case of the South-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District which is
comprised of 13 members.
Board member terms
are for four years.
The following is a break-


27-year-old Jennifer Alonso
because he feared for his own
life. Medina claimed Alonso
first started throwing boxes,
shoes and mascara at him,
began punching and hitting
him and then pulled a knife
after their argument moved
downstairs to the kitchen.
Medina said he disarmed
his wife and put the knife in a
drawer, but said she began
hitting him again. That's when
he says he started shooting,
estimating he fired seven or
eight times.
Asked why he turned him-

down of representatives ac-
cording to counties in the
16-county water district:
Two members shall
reside in Hillsborough
County;
One member shall re-
side in the area consisting
of Hillsborough and Pinel-
las counties;
Two members shall
reside in Pinellas County;
One member shall re-
side in Manatee County;
Two members shall


self in to police, Medina
replied that it was "cause I'm
not a killer. And it was self-
defense."
Medina, 31, has pleaded
not guilty to second-degree
murder with a firearm in the
Aug. 8 shooting at the South
Miami home shared by the
couple.
Dog owner gets
10 years in boy's
mauling death
PANAMA CITY -A Florida
Panhandle man whose dogs

reside in Polk County;
One member shall re-
side in Pasco County;
One member shall be
appointed at-large from
Levy, Citrus, Sumter and
Lake counties;
One member shall be
appointed at-large from
Hardee, DeSoto, and
Highlands counties;
One member shall be
appointed at-large from


fatally mauled a 7-year-old
neighbor boy has been sen-
tenced to 10 years in prison.
A Bay County judge sen-
tenced Edward Daniels Jr. on
Friday. He was convicted in
August of manslaughter.
Prosecutors claimed
Daniels neglected to contain
his dogs on the day they got
loose.
The News Herald of
Panama City reported that
Tyler Jett died in April, a week
after he was attacked by two
dogs while riding his bicycle.
-From wire reports


Marion and Hernando
counties;
One member shall be
appointed at large from
Sarasota and Charlotte
counties.
The state's next regular
Legislative session begins
March 4,2014.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


Submit Your

Homecoming

Photos for a

chance to Win

Great Prizes


Entry With the

Most Votes WINS

a $50 Regal

Cinema Gift

Certificate &

$50 Applebee's

Gift Certificate


Submit, view the entries and vote for your favorite
www.chronicleonline.com/homecomingphotos

RR CITRUS wCOUNicle


w.chronicleonline.com


Our Goal Is A

Healthier You
S New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Medicine
Adrian Saenz, PA. Stephanie Gomes, PA. Joseph Starnes, PA.

Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals


Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


hP. Pritchyk DPM
SAnlnomilce.s the


. ofhi.s (new practice
Sr Nature Coast
IFoot And Ankle
rCenter, LLC
I11 N. "uncoastBlvd., Suite IE
fp y ^ r\-li K'.I nr
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I


A2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


LOCAL/STATE






Page A3-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12,2013



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Bowman to
sign books
John Bowman, a resident
of Ocala who grew up and
spent much of his life in
Crystal River, has two local
book signing scheduled for
his book "Life's A (Sandy)
Beach, But Watch Out For
The Crabs." They will be:
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today,
Oct. 12, at the Coastal Her-
itage Museum, 532 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River.
5 to 6 p.m. today,
Oct. 12, Crystal River High
School Reunion Stokes
Flea Market, 5220 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Unit 3,
Lecanto.
Democratic club to
discuss marijuana
The Central Citrus Demo-
cratic Club plans its monthly
meeting at 11 a.m. today,
Oct. 12, at Central Ridge Li-
brary. All registered Democ-
rats are welcome to attend.
The library is at the comer of
Forest Ridge Road at 425 W.
Roosevelt Blvd., in Beverly
Hills.
Haydon Fouke, a local ad-
vocate of legalizing medical
marijuana, will be the fea-
tured speaker. Open discus-
sions of current issues of
importance to the community
will be encouraged. For
questions, email central
citrusdemocrats@gmail.com.
Church/state
discussion set
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State, Nature Coast Chap-
ter, will meet at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
The public is welcome to
come and discuss constitu-
tional issues pertaining to
separation of church and
state.
For information, call 352-
344-9211 or email nature
coastau@hotmail.com.

St. Petersburg
Murder sentence for
teen upheld by judge
A teenager who shot and
killed a St. Petersburg police
officer in 2011 will spend the
rest of his
life in
prison
without
the possi-
bility of h.
parole.
Pinellas
Pasco Cir-
cuit Judge David
Thane Crawford
Covert
ruled Friday that Nicholas
Lindsey's original sentence
should remain.
Attorneys for the now-18-
year-old Lindsey had argued
that he deserved a chance at
parole after a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling that said juve-
niles convicted of murder
cannot automatically be sen-
tenced to life in prison with-
out any chance at parole.
Jury last year convicted
Lindsey of first degree
murder.
Lindsey was 16 when he
shot and killed officer David
Crawford, who had con-
fronted the teen after reports
of someone breaking into
cars downtown. Lindsey shot
Crawford, who at the time
was a Crystal River resident,
five times with a gun he had
bought for $140.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

Due to reporter's error, a
multi-vehicle crash was
misidentified in a story on
Page A3 of Friday's edition,
"Multiple car crash halts
traffic."
A truck and three motor-


cycles were involved.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert the
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


CRHS will receive new gym floors


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Students attending Crystal
River High School will soon be en-
joying a new wooden gymnasium
floor
Citrus County School Board
members voted Tuesday to re-
place the current gymnasium
floors in fear of posing a safety risk
for students.
"Looking at the existing floor
that is there, I saw tape holding
the floor together," said school
board member Sandy Balfour at
Tuesday's board meeting.
Superintendent Sandra "Sam"


Himmel told board members that
facilities and construction staff eval-
uated the gymnasium's structure
and believes it will be structurally
sound for several more years. They
felt cleaning it, painting it and
adding a new floor would help save
the district funds while providing a
safe and presentable gym.
The renovations will cost ap-
proximately $350,000.
However, assistant superinten-
dent of schools Kenny Blocker
said that is minimal compared to
the cost of a new gymnasium.
Board member Thomas
Kennedy felt the expense is worth
the price compared to the dis-


trict's depletion of funds.
"I believe if we polled everyone,
that they would want a new gym if
they didn't have to pay for it,"
Kennedy said at the meeting. "But
I don't know if it is realistic that we
will have those funds to do that.
Without that dollar amount, I
think at this point $350,000 is
maintaining our asset."
Facilities and construction di-
rectorAlan Burcaw said this is the
last floor in the district to be
replaced.
'About seven or eight years ago
the athletic directors uniformly
agreed that if we could not replace
their floors they would wait until


we could," Burcaw said.
Balfour questioned the expense
of maintaining the floor surface.
"It requires minimal annual
maintenance, which includes
sanding and applying a single re-
coat," Burcaw said. "No restriping
is required."
The new gymnasium floor
passed with a 4-1 vote.
Board member Linda Powers
said she supported the new gym-
nasium floor, but did not approve
of the contract.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660
ext. 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


A book for everyone


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill, a volunteer reader from the Altrusa Club of Citrus County, reads to an Inverness Primary School
kindergarten class Friday morning as part of a new reading initiative called First Library coordinated by the Citrus County Education
Foundation. The students wear brightly colored hats with pictures of various animals highlighted in the book.

First Libraryprogram creates literacy initiative in Citrus County schools


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Brown bears. Purple cats.
Blue horses.
Each of these imaginary animals added to
the jungle of character headbands resting
upon 31 pre-kindergarten students' heads as
they quietly listened to their guest reader
Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill enthu-
siastically read "Brown Bear" by Bill Martin
Jr and Eric Carle to the young students Fri-
day as part of a new literacy initiative started
by the Citrus County Education Foundation
(CCEF).
"The Education Foundation wanted to lo-
calize the program to get books into the hands
of pre-kindergarten students to take home
and have for their parents to read to them,"
said Citrus County Education Foundation
vice president Eric Head. "The students can
then read back to their parents. It is all about




Shutdown has ]


impact on loca


public schools y


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Financially, the Citrus
County School District has
not been impacted by the
federal government
shutdown.
During Tuesday's school
board meeting, school
board member Pat
Deutschman questioned
assistant superintendent
of schools Kenny Blocker
on the amount of impact
the shutdown has placed
on the district.
"None, because we
planned on sequestration
reduction previously in
our budget," Blocker said.
"To date and to my knowl-
edge we have not been af-
fected by the government
shutdown."
Blocker continued to ex-
plain to board members


that the district received
its subsidy back from the
Internal Revenue Service
at the end of September
"We received a subsidy
on our qualified school
construction bond that we
received prior to the Oct. 1
shutdown," Blocker said.
"This would have been the
area of concern, but since
we received it prior it had
no affect."
Blocker said other fed-
eral programs include
Title I, Title II, Food Serv-
ice and Individuals with
Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA).
However, he did not be-
lieve they were subjected
to any changes either
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


early literacy, which is the most important
thing for their school career and personal
success. Reading is the foundation for
everything."
CCEF partnered with the Altrusa Club of
Citrus County and the Afro American Club of
Citrus County to provide more than 320 books
to 22 pre-kindergarten classes in 11 schools
throughout the Citrus County School District
to help establish a student's first library
The volume of books will multiply five
more times as the First Library initiative will
repeat throughout the year
"Sometimes kids go home and don't have
books," said superintendent of schools San-
dra "Sam" Himmel. "This is a way to get
books in their hands six times a year, which
will encourage our children to read more.
They are having fun reading and that is our
goal. Literacy is our priority."
The CCEF literacy committee is working
with teachers and school officials to ensure


the selections of books are coordinated with
the monthly classroom core curriculum.
"All of the books that are being read to
them go right along with our series," said
teacher Cheryl Eldridge. "It is a wonderful
opportunity for them to have that reinforce-
ment at home."
"Our biggest thing is getting them to read
at home," continued teacher Michelle Bing-
ham. "This is just one easier step for the
parents."
Gill finished reading to the young readers
and then watched as their faces turned to
pure enthusiasm when they learned they
were taking home their own "Brown Bear"
"Yeah," they screamed in excitement
"It is important to keep reading," Gill said
to the students. "Reading is fun and impor-
tant Promise me you will all keep reading."
Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Wor-
thington at 352-563-5660 ext 1334, or
eworthington@chronicleonline.com.


31 in Florida infected


by bacteria in salt water


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Patty Konietzky
thought the small purple lesion on her
husband's ankle was a spider bite. But
when the lesion quickly spread across his
body like a constellation, she knew some-
thing wasn't right
After a trip to the hospital and a day and
a half later, Konietzky's 59-year-old hus-
band was dead.
The diagnosis: vibrio vulnificus, an in-
fection caused by a bacterium found in
warm salt water It's in the same family of
bacterium that causes cholera. So far this
year, 31 people across Florida have been
infected by the severe strain ofvibrio, and
10 have died.
"I thought the doctors would treat him
with antibiotics and we'd go home," said
Konietzky, who lives in Palm Coast "Never
in a million years it crossed my mind that
this is where I'd be today"
State health officials said there are two
ways to contract the disease: by eating raw,
tainted shellfish usually oysters or
when an open wound comes in contact
with bacteria in warm seawater
While such occurrences could poten-
tially concern officials in states with hun-
dreds of miles of coastline and economies


largely dependent on ocean-related
tourism, experts said the bacteria is noth-
ing most people should worry about Vib-
rio bacteria exist normally in salt water
and generally only affect people with com-
promised immune systems, they say
Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea and
abdominal pain. If the bacteria get into the
bloodstream, they provoke symptoms in-
cluding fever and chills, decreased blood
pressure and blistering skin wounds.
But there's no need to stop swimming in
the Gulf of Mexico, said Diane Holm, a
spokeswoman for the state health depart-
ment in Lee County, which has had a hand-
ful of cases that included one fatality this
year
"This is nothing abnormal," she said.
"We don't believe there is any greater risk
for someone to swim in the Gulf today than
there was yesterday or 10 years ago."
Dr James Oliver, a professor of biology
at the University of North Carolina in
Charlotte, has studied vibrio vulnificus for
decades. He said that while Florida has
the most cases of vibrio infection due to
the warm ocean water that surrounds the
state, the bacteria is found worldwide,
generally in estuaries and near the coast
"It's normal flora in the water," he said.
"It belongs there."




A4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Keep life simple and cost-
effective in the coming months. You
should save for a rainy day and avoid
anyone who tends to disrupt your life.
Emotional matters will escalate, mak-
ing this a year of unavoidable change.
Keep your options open and your
money in a safe place.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Focus on
what's ahead instead of living in the
past. The present is what will count if
you want to achieve a brighter future.
Avoid emotional confrontations.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A
change will do you good. Visit places
you have never been before or strike
up conversations with people doing
things that interest you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Con-
sider what motivates you, and you'll
find a better way to spend your time
and to get ahead. A thrill only lasts for
a moment. Strive for longevity.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dis-
tance yourself from anyone who is un-
predictable. You will maintain control if
you follow a set plan. Take care of re-
sponsibilities early so you can socialize
or take care of personal needs.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Deal
with personal responsibilities first and
clear the way for love, laughter and en-
joying life.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't
take anything or anyone for granted.
Listen carefully and abide by the rules.
Disillusionment regarding a personal
relationship is likely.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You'll
make a big impression by offering so-
lutions and hands-on help to someone
in need.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It will be
difficult to think clearly concerning
work-related matters. Put your emo-
tions aside and look at the big picture.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Indulge
in activities that are physically and
emotionally challenging, and you will
succeed in reaching your goal.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy
making new friends or visiting places
you've never been before.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You need a
change. Spice up your life, participate
in a fun activity or shop for items that
will update your appearance.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) -You will
pick up valuable information that will help
you make a decision that can improve
your personal position or a relationship
you have with someone exciting.


ENTERTAINMENT


The Clovers resolve
dispute over name
WASHINGTON -Two
groups with ties to the 1950s
R&B group The Clovers who
had been fighting over the use of
the band's name have come to
an agreement.
Lawyers for the two groups filed
a document Friday in federal court
in Washington saying they've set-
led a lawsuit over the name.
The original group The
Clovers started performing in the
Washington area and gained
fame in the 1950s, in particular
for their song "Love Potion
No. 9." The group's fame fell off
in the 1960s, however, and the
members moved on.
Earlier this year, Florida resi-
dent Harold Winley, who was
part of the group in the 1950s,
sued to be able to use the name
when performing.
The groups will now be known
as Harold Winley and the
Clovers and The Clovers.
BBC finds missing
'Doctor Who' shows
LONDON "Doctor Who"
fans rejoice the BBC said it
has recovered nine episodes of
the sci-fi series that were feared
lost in space and time.
The broadcaster said the
missing episodes, and two oth-
ers, were found in the storeroom
of a television relay station in
Nigeria.
"Doctor Who" was first broad-
cast in 1963 and remains one of
the BBC's most popular programs.
Some early episodes were
lost because the broadcaster
wiped the tapes clean for re-use.
The BBC said the lost episodes
were tracked down by tracing
records of overseas shipments of
BBC tapes for transmission.
The recovered episodes date
from 1967 and 1968 and feature


Associated Press
A new exhibit on fashion photographer Erwin Blumenfeld
opens Oct. 15 at Paris' Jeu de Paume. Blumenfeld made his
name with photos that graced the covers of fashion magazines
such as "Vogue" and "Harper's Bazaar" from the 1930s to the
1950s.


Patrick Troughton, the second
of a dozen actors to play the
show's time-traveling hero.
They will be offered for sale
on iTunes and DVD.
Nevada judge working
on Simpson ruling
LAS VEGAS -A decision
about whether O.J. Simpson
will get a new trial is still in the
works.
That's the word Thursday
from a Nevada state court judge
approaching the five-month an-
niversary of hearings she held in
May about whether the former
football star was so badly repre-
sented by his lawyers at trial that
he deserves a retrial.
Clark County District Court
spokeswoman Mary Ann Price
issued a short statement saying
Judge Linda Marie Bell hasn't
set a date for her ruling.
The statement said the case
is complicated, the file is thick
and the judge is addressing 22
claims raised by prosecutors
and Simpson lawyers.
Simpson is serving nine to 33


years for armed robbery and kid-
napping in a botched attempt to
retrieve personal items from
sports memorabilia dealers in
2007.
Dead actor mourned
in 'Glee' tribute
NEW YORK- "Glee" said
goodbye to Finn, its beloved
singer-quarterback, while paying
tribute to Cory Monteith, the late
actor who had portrayed him, in
a highly anticipated episode of
the Fox high school musical
drama that aired Thursday.
Finn's death wasn't drama-
tized, nor was his funeral on-
screen. The episode picked up
some weeks after he had died
and focused on how his passing
affected his friends. The cause
of his death was not disclosed.
Just how "Glee" would handle
Monteith's death had haunted
the show, and its fans, since July
when the 31-year-old star was
found dead in a Canadian hotel
room of an accidental alcohol
and drug overdose.
-From wire reports


CInus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 12, 1962, the devastat-
ing Columbus Day Storm, also
known as the "Big Blow," struck the
Pacific Northwest, resulting in some
50 deaths.
On this date:
In 1810, the German festival Ok-
toberfest was first held in Munich to
celebrate the wedding of Bavarian
Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess
Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen.
In 1933, bank robber John
Dillinger escaped from a jail in Allen
County, Ohio, with the help of his
gang, who killed the sheriff, Jess
Sarber.
In 1971, the rock opera "Jesus
Christ Superstar" opened at the
Mark Hellinger Theatre on
Broadway.
In 1997, singer John Denver was
killed in the crash of his privately
built aircraft in Monterey Bay, Calif.;
he was 53.
In 2000, 17 sailors were killed in
a suicide bomb attack on the de-
stroyer USS Cole in Yemen.
Ten years ago: A suicide attack
outside a Baghdad hotel full of
Americans killed six bystanders.
Five years ago: A Soyuz space-
craft carrying Richard Garriott, the
sixth paying space traveler, along
with another American and a Russ-
ian crew member lifted off from
Kazakhstan for the international
space station.
One year ago: Soft drink mak-
ers, restaurateurs and other busi-
nesses filed suit to stop New York
City from prohibiting the sale of
super-sized, sugary drinks in
restaurants, cafeterias and conces-
sion stands.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian-
activist Dick Gregory is 81. Singer
Sam Moore (formerly of Sam and
Dave) is 78. Actor Hugh Jackman is
45. Actor Kirk Cameron is 43.
Olympic gold medal skier Bode
Miller is 36.
Thought for Today: "To know
one's self is wisdom, but not to
know one's neighbors is genius." -
Minna Antrim, American writer
(1861-1950).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR ,HI Lo PRk | HIL
60 0.00 I a 1 8n nn 0 .0 83 61


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
S


City H L F'cast
Miami 88 73 s
Ocala 87 59 s
Orlando 87 64 s
Pensacola 87 66 pc
Sarasota 85 65 s
Tallahassee 89 56 s
Tampa 85 67 s
Vero Beach 86 66 s
W. Palm Bch. 86 71 s


MARINE OUTLOOK


North winds around 10 knots. Seas 1
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Mostly sunny skies
and warm today.


84 62 0.00 -- NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusveday
forecast by: Ig

W TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 55
Sunny and dry. Cool at night.

W SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 56
More sunshine.

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
.. High: 88 Low: 60
[ 'j Becoming partly sunny and a little breezy.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 86/62
Record 94/53
Normal 86/63
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.81 in.
Total for the year 51.14 in.
Normal for the year 46.12 in.
*Asof7pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 46%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, elm
Today's count: 7.1/12
Sunday's count: 7.5
Monday's count: 7.7
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/12 SATURDAY 12:36 6:46 1:00 7:14
10/13 SUNDAY 1:25 7:39 1:52 8:05


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
( e C SUNSET TONIGHT ............................ 7:03 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:30 A.M.
4 0C MOONRISETODAY............................2:45 P.M.
OCT. 20 NOV. 3 NOV. 10 MOONSET TODAY............................1:01 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:39 a/7:35 a 11:36 a/8:53 p
Crystal River" 9:57 a/4:57 a -- /6:15 p
Withlacoochee* 7:44 a/2:45 a 10:06 p/4:03 p
Homosassa*** 10:46 a/6:34 a --- /7:52 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
1:58 a9:04a 1:12 p/10:11 p
12:19 a/6:26 a 11:33 a/7:33 p
9:20 a/4:14a 11:07 p/5:21 p
1:08 a/8:03 a 12:22 p/9:10 p


Gulf water
temperature


81
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.37 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.59 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 40.05 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.92 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


70 49 pc
63 38 s
74 48 c
80 56 pc
61 59 1.49 sh
88 70 ts
64 57 2.82 sh
53 41 .01 pc
83 58 pc
58 32 sh
66 52 pc
72 46 pc
70 43 s
81 63 pc
73 48 c
81 60 c
76 51 ts
78 44 .01 pc
72 44 sh
83 66 pc
79 48 pc
71 40 s
88 70 ts
63 42 pc
74 57 s
74 46 pc
77 51 s
79 53 ts
61 55 5.62 sh
72 51 pc
87 65 ts
76 48 pc
84 61 pc
72 52 s
81 55 ts
69 55 s
78 52 pc
82 60 ts
69 50 ts
75 57 pc
84 62 pc
86 55 pc
82 54 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 84 68 .07 pc 88 67
New York City 68 60 .02 pc 71 55
Norfolk 66 59 .11 sh 72 61
Oklahoma City 86 64 pc 78 60
Omaha 80 61 s 66 41
Palm Springs 82 54 s 85 61
Philadelphia 64 59 1.51 c 70 57
Phoenix 79 57 s 86 61
Pittsburgh 66 54 .03 c 72 53
Portland, ME 67 42 s 60 46
Portland, Ore 59 50 .01 sh 57 41
Providence, R.I. 69 55 pc 65 49
Raleigh 66 59 .02 sh 70 59
Rapid City 53 41 .54 s 55 38
Reno 67 37 s 67 40
Rochester, NY 68 42 pc 71 52
Sacramento 76 50 s 77 52
St. Louis 81 57 ts 78 51
St. Ste. Marie 65 50 sh 67 50
Salt Lake City 60 43 pc 63 45
San Antonio 90 75 ts 88 74
San Diego 71 56 s 71 61
San Francisco 63 52 s 68 53
Savannah 82 55 pc 83 63
Seattle 57 51 .35 sh 57 45
Spokane 55 35 sh 54 36
Syracuse 68 48 pc 74 50
Topeka 79 61 pc 72 45
Washington 64 59 1.65 sh 65 58
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 95 Kingsville, Texas LOW 16 Stanley,
Idaho
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/76As
Amsterdam 45/37/pc
Athens 81/62/pc
Beijing 73/39/pc
Berlin 53/50/r
Bermuda 80/75/sh
Cairo 89/65/s
Calgary 45/32/pc
Havana 83/69As
Hong Kong 86/63/sh
Jerusalem 77/58/s


Lisbon 67/58/sh
London 55/47/c
Madrid 66/45/pc
Mexico City 74/58/ts
Montreal 68/52/s
Moscow 39/37/sh
Paris 48/41/pc
Rio 79/62/pc
Rome 73/56/sh
Sydney 85/51/s
Tokyo 80/54/sh
Toronto 68/57/s
Warsaw 48/45/sh


LEGAL


=1(g~


Foreclosure

Sale/Action Noti



Self Storage Notic



C I T R U S


NOTICES







ices ..........C13



es .............C13



C 0 U N T Y


OCT. 10
OCT. 18


LHRONICLI
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:

Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The ViewflnderTV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonllne.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563 -3222
Trina Murphy............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
* ^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- For the RECORD


STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle
ABOVE: Ray Chirayath receives the Person of the Year
award Friday from the Economic Development Council
and the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Assisting
with the presentation is Josh Wooten, president and chief
executive officer of the chamber, left, and Don Taylor,
executive director of the EDC. RIGHT: Laura Lou
Fitzpatrick received the award for Outstanding Small
Business.


EDC
Continued from Page Al

economic development, a
current focus of the EDC.
"When you look at
whether businesses are
going to come to your area,
it's all about the product,"
he said. "You have to have
products to sell.
"Just because you've got
property, doesn't mean
you've got sites."
He said it was absolutely
critical to translate that
property into marketable
sites. A site has to have
utilities and be available



ARREST
Continued from Page Al

then pawned. Jewelry items
recovered included a gold
and diamond engagement
ring, a gold herringbone
necklace, a rope necklace
and two wedding bands.
On Oct. 7, investigators
on the case got their first
break, when they discov-
ered jewelry matching the
description of one of the
stolen pieces had been
pawned at the Beverly Hills
Gold and Diamond Ex-



REFUGE
Continued from PageAl

Knudsen said.
He said the Friends
group stands to lose any-
where between $5,000 and
$6,000 because it will not

SI -j

SLAB LEAKS
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
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FAUCETS REPIPES
DRAIN CLEANING
BATHROOM REMODELS
PLUMBING REPAIRS
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LICENSE #CFC1426865
u .I i,1


for development, which is
where politicians, elected
officials, land use and zon-
ing come in.
"There's got to be that
partnership," he said.
"The bottom line is if you
don't have a site, you don't
have a deal."
Glenn said the way eco-
nomic development is oc-
curring now is radically
different that the way it
was just five years ago. He
said it is not a process of
site selection, anymore,
but site elimination.
He said it means you've
got to have your product
ready to go.
Glenn concluded by em-


phasizing Duke's commit-
ment to Citrus County,
which includes the Mari-
culture center looking at
raising eel grass to combat
Lyngbya in King's Bay
ANNUAL AWARDS
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
and the EDC used the oc-
casion to present the fol-
lowing annual awards:
Outstanding Employer
or Corporate Citizen went
to the Plantation on Crys-
tal River and general man-
ager Andrew Bartlett.
Outstanding Small Busi-
ness was awarded to
Laura Lou Fitzpatrick of


The Shoppes of Heritage
Village.
Person of the Year was
awarded to Ray Chiray-
ath, currently president
of the United Way of Cit-
rus County Board of Di-
rectors and a member of
the EDC.
The EDC also gave out
two special appreciation
awards, recognizing Rusty
Skinner, chief executive
officer of Workforce Con-
nection, and John Siefert,
former EDC executive
director
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. corn.

victims. In cases where the
victim was unable to iden-
tify the jewelry themselves,
due to either their mental
or physical status, family
members were able to
make clear identifications.
According to the sheriff's
office, this is an ongoing
investigation. Additional
thefts have occurred and
additional charges may be
pending; however, they
may not be related to this
suspect. Thefts have oc-
curred at the Nature Coast
Lodge as early as mid-July
and have continued
through mid-October


government shutdown get
resolved.
"The whole thing is just
sad."


change on Sept. 20, by
White. Records reveal
White had made numerous
visits to Beverly Hills Gold
and Diamond Exchange
over the span of several
weeks, pawning jewelry at
each visit Pawn shop trans-
actions listed the defen-
dant's name, address and
other personal information
as well as her signature and
right thumb print
Records indicate stolen
jewelry was also pawned


get a chance to operate its
gift store. Knudsen said
the money would have
gone toward helping the
refuge.
He said a bird-watching
tour that is normally done
at the same time as Refuge
Day also has been called
off. Knudsen said there is


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
S or pool or plan
something
I .;. ,, completely new!



YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
I,'d 352-400-3188


Annual Arts &

Crafts Show

Saturday, October 12
From 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.



For more information call

Bonnie Lee 382-0211


West Citus Elks Lodge
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd. ,
Anua Ars




















Homosassa, FL 3444E,
Crafts Show
Saturday, October 12

From 9 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.


For more information call
Bonnie Lee 382-0211



West Citrus Elks Lodge ^^^
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., ^ /W
Homosassa, FL 34446 jf^^'^^





Ciiis*'"*-06M T'IiE^^- x^ ^


by White at different loca-
tions, including Colonial
Pawn and Neal's Pawn
Shop. She received $400
on one visit and a com-
bined total $1,014 on sub-
sequent trips. One item, a
gold and diamond engage-
ment ring, was reportedly
pawned by a family mem-
ber of White's on Oct. 2.
Detectives were able to
successfully recover the
property It was identified
and then returned to the


tentative talk of reschedul-
ing the bird-watching tour
to Nov 16 and Dec. 14 for
Refuge Day should the


26th ANNUAL


SCARECROW FESTIVAL
Joins
MAR KT DAY
WITH ART TREASURES


Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Oct. 12th till 5:00 p.m.


Children's Old-Fashioned Carnival Games,
Pumpkin Patch, Bounce House, Pony Rides and More.
Join Local Produce, Plants, Pantry and Artistic Talent.







on the Grounds of Heritage Village. 657 N. Citrus Ave.
in thelof Historic Downtown Crystal River
www.theshoppesoflheritageiillage.comi
352-564-1400 / herilageillageo8@C)ahoo.co m ('1 AIKit'E





Connors Gifts

Gifts for All Occasions


DUI arrest
Carolyn Walsh., 44, of
Montano Avenue, Spring Hill,
at 9:03 p.m. Oct. 10, on a mis-
demeanor charge of driving
under the influence. Accord-
ing to her arrest affidavit,
Walsh was involved in a car
accident on U.S. 19. She was
asked to perform field sobriety
tests and refused. She also
refused a Breathalyzer test to
measure her blood alcohol
level. Bond $500.
Domestic battery
arrest
Michelle Ward, 37, of
Crystal River, at 8:48 p.m.
Oct. 10, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery.
No bond.
Other arrests
Charles Harper, 19, of
North Manhattan Point, Dun-
nellon, at 9 a.m. Oct. 10, on
felony charges of grand theft
and burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence. According to
his arrest affidavit, Harper is
accused of breaking into a
home on Highlands Boule-
vard in Inverness and stealing
approximately $700 worth of
electronics. Harper was al-
ready incarcerated at the Cit-
rus County Detention Facility
on similar charges. A finger-
print comparison to his prints
and the prints found in the
home were a positive match.
Bond $5,000.
Robert Wheeler, 28, of
Beverly Hills, at 9:28 a.m.
Oct. 10, on a misdemeanor
charge of false reporting of a
crime to law enforcement.
Bond $500.
Travis Bartlett, 28, of
Thunderbird Avenue, Spring
Hill, at 12:13 p.m. Oct. 10, on
an active warrant for felony
charges of grand theft, and
burglary of an occupied resi-
dence. He was transported to
the Citrus County Detention
Facility from the Hernando
County Jail. Bond $20,000.
JenniferWinnegar, 37, of
North Davy Way, Citrus
Springs, at 2:04 p.m. Oct. 10,
on an active warrant for felony
charges fraud, cheating or
gross fraud, trafficking in stolen
property, and false verification
of ownership to a metal recy-
cler. Bond $12,000.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Theft
A petit theft was reported
at 4:57 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 10, in the 1900 block of
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping
for a view of where
each type of crime
occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record
reports are also
archived online at
www.chronicle
online.com.
The Sexual Predator
Unit is responsible
for tracking all
registered sexual
offenders and
predators in the
county. Click on the
Sexual Offender
Information link on
the CCSO website.
The "Sheriff's 10-43"
show airs on TV
station WYKE, digital
channel 47 and
Bright House cable
channel 16.

Vandalisms
A vandalism was re-
ported at 8:29 a.m. Thursday,
Oct. 10, in the 600 block of W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 3:55 p.m. Oct. 10 in
the 2600 block of N. Forest
Ridge Blvd., Hernando.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 8:35 p.m. Oct. 10 in
the 400 block of N. Elmwood
Point, Crystal River.


CASH for
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Always A Fair Price
Steel Aluminum Cars
Appliances Wire

^ CtMt Riverft
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Lecanto, FL 34461
000GTE 527-9599


RESORT STYLE Assisted
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We're Getting

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7-^^





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From Planet Halloween!
... "Intelligent lifeforms shop for
all things Halloween at Goodwill!"

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for kids and adults
BRAND NEW hats, wigs, masks,
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According to the sheriff's office,
this is an ongoing investigation.


We are family
owned and
operated for
over 25 years in
Downtown
Inverness. Offering


C o e
Se0sA


gifts for all occasions.
We carry the largest selection of Vera
Bradley in Citrus County, along with
Spartina 449, Crabtree & Evelyn,
Lindsay Phillips and Jim Shore.
We have extended hours during the
holiday season and provide a 20% Off
rewards program for our valued
customers.

218 Tompkins Street, Downtown Inverness

O.CR. 344-9790


LOCAL


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 AS




A6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


Obituaries


Harold 'Hap'
Brady, 78
HOMOSASSA
Harold L. "Hap" Brady,
78, of Homosassa, Fla.,
died Oct. 8, 2013. A cele-
bration of life will be at
11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14,
2013, with a luncheon
served after the service, at
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa.

Charles
Crowley Jr., 52
FLORAL CITY
Charles H. Crowley Jr,
52, Floral City, Fla., died
Oct. 3, 2013. Private
arrangements. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory

Andrew
Ensing, 65
HERNANDO
Andrew Donald Ensing,
65, of Hernando, Fla., died
Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, in
Hernando. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory





James
Fenske,74
HOMOSASSA
James Allen Fenske of
Homosassa, Fla., was a
loyal husband and a loving
father and grandfather He
was formerly of Millington,
Md., and at the age of 74
passed away peacefully,
surrounded by his family,
Tuesday, Oct. 8,2013, in his
home.
James was born in Port-
land, Ore., to the late
Claron and Evelyn Fenske.
James proudly served in
the United States Marine
Corps from 1955 to 1960. In
the early 1960s, he was
part of the Philadelphia
Eagles football organiza-
tion. He protected the citi-
zens of Cecil and Kent
County from 1974 to 1981
as a deputy sheriff. He re-
tired from MBNA Bank
after 10 years of service, in
2000. James enjoyed
spending time with his
family, traveling, and was
an avid Philadelphia Ea-
gles fan.
James is survived by his
wife of 39 years, Donna C.
Fenske of Homosassa;
three brothers, Dwight
Borero, Carl Fenske, and
Chris 0. Jackson; daugh-
ters, Deborah Steller and
her husband William
Steller of Millington, Md.,
Lori Sargent of Hartly,
Del., and Jennifer Fenske
of Crumpton, Md.; son,
Robert Fenske and his fi-
anc6 of Felton, Del.; six
grandchildren, Bobbie Jo
and Jamie Fenske, Tanner,
Hayleigh and Sarah Sar-
gent, and Zachary Billings.
James was preceded in
death by his daughter,
Sheryl Quillen, in 2011.
He will be greatly
missed by all who knew
him.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.





I I riD



IR r


I i I I


Nancy
Neely, 65
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nancy M. Neely, 65, Cit-
rus Springs, Fla., died
Oct 10, 2013.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.

Florence
Reed, 85
BEVERLY HILLS
Florence May Knight
Reed, 85, Beverly Hills,
Fla., died Oct. 9, 2013,
under the
loving care R
of her fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County.
Florence
was born
Oct. 24, Florence
1927, in Reed
S o u the
Hanson, Mass., to the late
Herman and Jennie
(Smith) Wood. She was em-
ployed as a dietician. Flo-
rence was a member of the
Elks Lodge and past presi-
dent of the Does. She was
a gifted singer and musi-
cian, playing the piano and
enjoyed the Citrus Jazz So-
ciety. She was an avid
golfer She was a member
of Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her children, Ed-
ward (Marie) Knight,
Stephen (Judith) Knight,
Jane (John) Gallagher,
Cynthia (William) Poole,
all of Beverly Hills, Linda
(Marc) Bell, South Port-
land, Maine, and Lisa
Voveris, Taunton, Mass.; 19
grandchildren; many
great-grandchildren and
g r e a t g r e a t -
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her
first husband of 22 years,
Kenneth Knight; her sec-
ond husband of 28 years,
Philip Reed; all of her sib-
lings, four brothers and
three sisters.
A celebration tribute of
Florence's life will be at 3
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory with Pastor Stewart
Jamison officiating. Me-
morial donations in Flo-
rence's memory are
suggested to Hospice of
Citrus County for the Hos-
pice House in Lecanto, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.



Funeral Home With Crematory
THELMA SANDERS
Service: Sat. 1:00 PM
First Assembly of God
ALISON EDWARDS
Mon. 12 Noon
Floral City Church of Christ
DONALD L STUBSTAD
Service: Fri. 6:30 PM
First Lutheran Church
FLORENCE KNIGHT REED
Service: Thurs. 3:00 PM
OTIS GOOLSBY
Service: Sat. 12:00 Noon
St. James AME Church
726-8323


"Your Trusted Family- Owned
FuPineral I-ome for ove 0Yr" I


Frunerald uiLreciors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace ,
1901 SE Hwy. 19 Sl
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678 i J
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com r i


Thelma
Sanders, 84
INVERNESS
Thelma Anderson
Sanders, 84, Inverness,
Fla., passed away Oct. 3,
2013, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County
in Lecanto. She was born
in Inverness, Dec. 23,1928,
to the late Guy and Evelyn
(O'Berry) Anderson.
Thelma was a registered
nurse at Citrus Memorial
Hospital, Inverness;
Munroe Regional Medical
Center, Ocala; and was di-
rector of nursing for Brent-
wood Health Care Center,
Lecanto and Arbor Trail
Rehab & Nursing, Inver-
ness. She was a lifelong
resident of Inverness, and
attended 1st Assembly of
God Church, and in later
years, Victory Baptist
Church in Inverness.
Thelma was descended
from a historic, Citrus
County pioneer family
Her forefather, Charles
Anderson, relocated to this
area from Tatnall County,
Ga., circa 1856.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 61
years, James P Sanders,
and siblings Thomas Earl
Anderson and Dorothy
Wilkes. Survivors include
her children, J. Russell
(Helen) Sanders of Se-
bring, John R. Sanders of
Inverness, and J. Mark
(Carrie) Sanders of
Hardin, Texas; Kathy
(Kenny) Geagley of New-
port News, Va.; one
brother, Guy Henry
(Shirley) Anderson Sr. of
Cross City; 26 grandchil-
dren; and numerous great-
grandchildren.
A celebration of life me-
morial service commemo-
rating Thelma's life is
scheduled for 1 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct. 12,2013, at the 1st
Assembly of God Church.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.


OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit
card, and the cost is a
$25 base fee, then
$10 per column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.



To Place Your

"'In Memory" ad,'
Kelly Prus
564-2917
kprus@chronicleonline.com


ving Our Community..
*ting Your Needs! --


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. i2
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralheome


Gov't shutdown affecting
veterans cemeteries
BUSHNELL- The director of the Florida
National Cemetery said if the government
shutdown doesn't end by Oct. 22, national
cemeteries will have to reduce the number of
veterans they can bury every day, furlough
employees and limit the care they give to
gravesites.
The Tampa Tribune reported that Kurt
Rotar said that's the day money already allo-
cated to the national cemeteries will run out.
At the Florida National Cemetery, that
would mean reducing the number of funerals
- as many as 30 a day by as much as
one-third.
Rotar said he would have to reduce his
workforce from 63 to 19 in Bushnell.
Grounds maintenance already has been
reduced by the shutdown.
The shutdown would reduce the capacity of
other national cemeteries in Florida, as well.
Attorney in gambling
scheme found guilty
SANFORD -A Florida attorney was con-
victed Friday of using a veterans' organiza-
tion as a front for a $300 million gambling
operation in a case that led to the resignation
of the state's lieutenant governor and caused
the Legislature to ban so-called Internet
cafes.
Six jurors deliberated for more than 14
hours before finding Kelly Mathis of Jack-
sonville guilty of possessing slot machines,
helping operate a lottery and racketeering.
He was found guilty on all but one of 104
counts against him.
He was the first of 57 defendants to go to
trial in a case that led to the resignation of Lt.
Gov. Jennifer Carroll who had worked as a
consultant for the Allied Veterans charity. She
wasn't charged with any crime.
Mathis argued he was merely acting as an
attorney, giving legal advice, and that the In-
ternet cafes were legal until this year.
He faces dozens of years in prison.
Prosecutors said Mathis and his associ-
ates built up the network of casinos by claim-
ing they were businesses where customers
could buy Internet time, when in reality most
customers played slot machine games on
computers and didn't use the Internet. Even
though the Internet cafes were being oper-
ated under the aegis of Allied Veterans of the
World, very little of the $300 million the Allied
Veteran affiliates earned actually went to vet-
erans, prosecutors alleged.
During the three-week trial, prosecutors
called a 78-year-old woman who testified that
she gambled every night and spent more
than $55,000. They also called a retired
Army colonel who testified he had stopped
by an Allied Veterans affiliate thinking it was
a place for veterans to get help, but instead
found what looked like dozens of slot
machines.
.. WM, 11,


Director secretly shoots
feature at Disney parks
LOS ANGELES -As a kid, Randy Moore
was haunted by Disney World, where he
made an annual trip during summers with his
dad. So as an adult, and a filmmaker, Moore
wanted to capture and question the allure of
such manufactured-fantasy.
The result is "Escape From Tomorrow,"
which was shot guerrilla-style at Disneyland
and Disney World without permission from
the famously proprietary Walt Disney Co.
"I was pretty confident that Disney wasn't
about to go out of their way and give me per-
mission," Moore said, "so I didn't ask them
for it."
The writer-director insists there was no
other way to tell his story of a frustrated fam-
ily man who begins losing his grip on reality
during a trip to Disney World. So Moore and
his crew bought season passes to Disney-
land in Anaheim, Calif., and Disney World in
Orlando and used hand-held digital cameras
to shoot scenes and tiny digital audio
recorders to capture sound.
They repeatedly rode It's a Small World
and other trademark Disney attractions to
film from various perspectives -just like any
other theatrical feature.
"Escape From Tomorrow," available on
video-on-demand and in select theaters Fri-
day, first premiered at the Sundance Film
Festival earlier this year, where the black-
and-white film quickly built a buzz based on
its unauthorized surreptitious shooting style
and dark take on Disney.
Representatives from Disney, which has a
history of aggressively protecting its image,
brands and intellectual property, did not re-
spond to requests for comment for this story.
The company also hasn't spoken to Moore or
the film's distributor.
New drive-in movie theater
opens in Miami
MIAMI Harking back to the days of poo-
dle skirts and ice cream sodas, a new drive-
in movie theater is opening in South Florida.
The Blue Starlite Mini Urban Drive-In had
its grand opening Friday in Miami's Wyn-
wood art district with a screening of "Back to
the Future."
The Miami Herald reported the theater is
the brainchild of 38-year-old Texas writer
Josh Frank.
Frank relocated to Miami earlier this year
and got a two-year lease on a vacant lot near
independent 0 Cinema. He then built the
theater from scratch.
Visitors will find nostalgic remakes of vin-
tage snacks at the concession stand and a
cherry-red 1950s Chevy truck that was
turned into the projection booth.
Drive-ins were once common in South
Florida, but none remain in Miami.
-From wire reports


-. i--




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desiring



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affordability










Carnation Center


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Nature Coaut




352-228-4967

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State BRIEFS


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Money&Markets
1 720 ........................... S& P 500
1,680 I .... .. Close: 1,703.20
Change: 10.64(0.6%)
1,640 . 10 DAYS .........
1 ,7 5 0 ........ ............. ............ ........... .. ........... ........ .... .
1,7500 ............................... ...

1,650500 .. ... ... .. ........ .....
1,6 00 ...... ........... ................................... ...
1,550 ..
1,500 ... X..... M. J....J A.. S....


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 2,885
Pvs. Volume 3,333
Advanced 2269
Declined 811
New Highs 185
New Lows 27


NASD
1,706
1,840
1869
660
160
17


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15237.30
6651.47
492.44
9761.76
3794.37
1703.44
1261.30
18189.73
1084.32


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
-'D: : ow Jones industrials
~-,.;, Close: 15,237.11
Change: 111.04 (0.7%)
14,680 ........ 10 DAYS .........
16,0 0 0 ........ ............. ............ ............. 7 ............. r ........... .....



5,200 ......... .
14,800 t'M ik.! ..


14 ,40 0 .. .. ..... ..... J ..... .. .... J .... ........... ........... S .......


LOW
15100.13
6602.71
487.83
9681.67
3751.38
1688.52
1246.61
18017.39
1065.81


CLOSE
15237.11
6648.41
491.68
9761.76
3791.87
1703.20
1261.20
18187.97
1084.31


CHG. %CHG.
+111.04 +0.73%
+37.30 +0.56%
+1.96 +0.40%
+67.79 +0.70%
+31.12 +0.83%
+10.64 +0.63%
+11.15 +0.89%
+130.77 +0.72%
+14.81 +1.38%


YTD
+16.28%
+25.28%
+8.52%
+15.61%
+25.58%
+19.42%
+23.59%
+21.29%
+27.66%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 5.90 4.13 +.20 +5.1 A A A -10.2 -23.1 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 -0-- 39.00 34.20 +.05 +0.1 A V A +1.5 -2.6 26 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 32.67 --0- 48.01 45.43 +.34 +0.8 A A V +20.9 +30.9 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 81.60 -- 103.85 98.41 +.97 +1.0 V A V +12.6 +14.5 2.21e
Bank of America BAG 8.92 --0- 15.03 14.19 -.04 -0.3 A V A +22.2 +54.9 25 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 9.04 -- 13.08 12.04 +.25 +2.1 A A A +5.9 +8.3 43
CenturyLink Inc CTL 31.01 -e-- 42.01 33.22 -.12 -0.4 A A A -15.1 -9.8 19 2.16
Citigroup C 34.04 -- 53.56 49.22 -.05 -0.1 A V A +24.4 +40.3 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --0- 26.38 24.25 +.15 +0.6 A A A +53.1 +67.9 87 1.00
Disney DIS 46.53 0 67.89 66.21 +.63 +1.0 A V A +33.0 +29.5 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 -0- 75.46 68.85 +.56 +0.8 A A A +7.9 +10.2 21 3.12f
EPR Properties EPR 42.44 -0-- 61.18 48.59 +.15 +0.3 A A V +5.4 +15.2 21 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.70 -0-- 95.49 86.95 +.91 +1.1 A V A +0.5 -2.8 9 2.52
Ford Motor F 9.95 0 17.77 17.11 +.18 +1.1 A V A +32.1 +73.1 12 0.40
Gen Electric GE 19.87 --0- 24.95 24.40 +.15 +0.6 A A A +16.2 +11.5 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 58.75 -- 81.56 76.32 +.81 +1.1 A A A +23.4 +28.8 23 1.56
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0- 25.98 23.26 +.16 +0.7 A V A +12.8 +10.3 13 0.90
IBM IBM 178.71 -0-- 215.90 186.16 +1.39 +0.8 A V A -2.8 -8.5 13 3.80
LKQ Corporation LKQ 19.17 --0- 34.07 32.29 +.22 +0.7 V A A +53.0 +66.6 35
Lowes Cos LOW 30.59 0 49.17 48.80 +.98 +2.0 A A A +37.4 +56.9 25 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -0- 103.70 94.74 +.30 +0.3 V V +7.4 +5.5 17 3.24f
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 26.26 --- 36.43 34.13 +.37 +1.1 A A A +27.8 +19.7 13 1.12f
Motorola Solutions MSI 49.49 -- 64.72 60.52 -.09 -0.1 V A A +8.7 +23.5 17 1.24f
NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 -- 88.39 81.75 +.35 +0.4 A A A +18.2 +20.2 20 2.64
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 7.59 0- 27.00 8.00 +.03 +0.4 A V V -59.4 -67.0 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 -0- 21.09 17.86 +.06 +0.3 A A A -1.1 +7.3 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 6.19 --- 10.52 9.59 +.12 +1.3 A A A +34.5 +26.5 12 0.12
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0- 68.77 54.89 -.38 -0.7 V V V +32.7 +0.2 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 -- 114.72 106.60 +.09 +0.1 A V A +23.6 +29.9 21 2.32f
Texas Instru TXN 27.00 0 40.94 40.38 +.26 +0.6 A A A +30.7 +51.3 25 1.20f
Time Warner TWX 42.61 0 67.38 67.92 +.60 +0.9 A A A +42.0 +51.0 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 65.85 -- 104.76 103.35 +2.71 +2.7 A A V +41.0 +51.6 19 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 -0- 54.31 47.09 +.23 +0.5 A V A +8.8 +6.9 96 2.12f
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 36.08 35.43 +.58 +1.7 V A A +40.7 +27.4 1.57e
WalMartStrs WMT 67.37 -0- 79.96 74.82 +.03 ... A A A +9.7 +1.6 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 57.41 55.96 -.04 -0.1 A A A +51.2 +60.4 22 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate Ij -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


UB


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 2.69
percent Friday.
Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
fell to $102 a
barrel Friday on
a forecast for
an increase in
global oil sup-
plies next year.
Among metals,
gold, silver and
platinum de-
clined. Crops
were mixed.



OE

EDs


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .07 0.05 +0.02 .10
6-month T-bill .07 0.06 +0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .17
2-year T-note .35 0.35 .. .27
5-year T-note 1.42 1.43 -0.01 .66
10-year T-note 2.69 2.68 +0.01 1.67
30-year T-bond 3.75 3.74 +0.01 2.85


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.52 3.53 -0.01 2.54
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.17 5.18 -0.01 4.17
Barclays USAggregate 2.39 2.38 +0.01 1.67
Barclays US High Yield 6.07 6.12 -0.05 6.43
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.59 4.59 ... 3.44
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.62 1.63 -0.01 .95
Barclays US Corp 3.30 3.30 ... 2.74


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 102.02
Ethanol (gal) 1.72
Heating Oil (gal) 3.03
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.78
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.67
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1268.00
Silver (oz) 21.22
Platinum (oz) 1372.00
Copper (Ib) 3.27
Palladium (oz) 712.30
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.29
Coffee (Ib) 1.17
Corn (bu) 4.33
Cotton (Ib) 0.83
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 331.20
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.26
Soybeans (bu) 12.67
Wheat (bu) 6.92


PVS.
103.01
1.73
3.07
3.72
2.70
PVS.
1296.60
21.85
1392.30
3.24
711.55
PVS.
1.28
1.14
4.38
0.84
338.60
1.27
12.88
6.86


%CHG
-0.96
-0.06
-1.14
+1.42
-1.11
%CHG
-2.21
-2.91
-1.46
+0.74
+0.11
%CHG
+0.39
+2.01
-1.14
-0.13
-2.19
-0.28
-1.65
+0.98


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.98 +.09 +14.1 +15.6 +12.4 +13.4
CaplncBuA m 56.81 +.19 +10.5 +11.7 +9.0 +11.3
CpWIdGrIA m 42.89 +.25 +17.5 +21.9 +10.0 +13.6
EurPacGrA m 46.88 +33 +13.7 +20.0 +6.5 +12.8
FnlnvA m 48.80 +.27 +20.6 +23.8 +14.3 +15.8
GrthAmA m 42.26 +.28 +23.0 +26.6 +15.0 +15.7
IncAmerA m 19.81 +.07 +12.5 +14.1 +11.1 +13.3
InvCoAmA m 36.23 +.21 +21.6 +22.8 +13.8 +14.4
NewPerspA m 36.78 +.24 +17.7 +22.6 +11.8 +15.6
WAMutlnvA m 37.29 +.19 +21.3 +21.8+15.9 +15.0
Dodge & Cox Income 13.51 +.01 -0.4 +0.2 +3.9 +8.4
IntlStk 41.28 +.41 +19.2 +29.1 +8.1 +15.1
Stock 153.58 +1.18 +27.5 +30.9+17.5 +17.8
Fidelity Contra 93.80 +.60 +22.0 +21.5 +15.3 +16.3
GrowCo 118.37 +31 +27.0 +25.8 +19.0 +20.6
LowPriStk d 47.46 +.33 +26.1 +31.0 +17.4 +20.7
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 60.40 +38 +21.4 +21.5 +15.9 +16.2
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.33 ... +9.0 +10.7 +9.7 +15.7
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.17 +.04 +1.1 +4.8 +4.7 +10.1
GIBondAdv 13.13 +.04 +1.3 +5.0 +5.0 +10.4
Harbor Intllnstl 69.93 +.44 +12.6 +21.3 +8.3 +13.7
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.53 +.15 +20.8 +22.4 +15.1 +15.4
GrowStk 47.14 +.38 +24.8 +25.5 +17.3 +19.1
Vanguard 500Adml 157.15 +.98 +21.4 +21.5 +15.9 +16.2
5001lnv 157.14 +.98 +21.3 +21.3 +15.8 +16.1
MulntAdml 13.74 ... -2.1 -1.7 +3.0 +5.9
STGradeAd 10.71 +.01 +0.5 +1.0 +2.2 +4.9
Tgtet2025 15.31 +.07 +12.7 +14.6 +10.3 +13.1
TotBdAdml 10.64 ... -2.1 -1.9 +2.5 +5.6
Totlntl 16.36 +.11 +11.4 +18.8 +5.3 +12.0
TotStlAdm 43.17 +30 +22.8 +23.6 +16.5 +17.0
TotStldx 43.16 +30 +22.7 +23.5 +16.3 +16.9
Welltn 37.70 +.17 +13.5 +14.4 +11.3 +13.9
WelltnAdm 65.12 +30 +13.6 +14.5 +11.4 +14.0
WndsllAdm 62.56 +36 +21.3 +22.1 +16.1 +16.1
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks closed higher Friday,
capping a two-day rebound
amid optimism that the U.S. will
avoid a debt default. President
Barack Obama and Republican
senators met Friday in a bid to
hash out a deal to raise the
government's borrowing limit by
Oct. 17.

Gap GPS
Close: $36.83 V-2.65 or -6.7%
One of the worst performers in the
S&P 500 after the retailer reported a
decline in comparable stores sales
and falling traffic.


I.,
SJ A S O
52-week range
$29.84 $46.56
Vol.:17.7m (4.9x avg.) PE: 13.6
Mkt. Cap: $17.22 b Yield: 2.2%
Safeway SWY
Close:$33.75A2.18 or 6.9%
The grocer is giving up on its 72
Dominick's stores around Chicago to
focus on its more profitable busi-
nesses in 2014.
$%"



j .J. .: .-,
52-week range
$15.38 $33.91
Vol.:15.3m (2.8x avg.) PE: 15.2
Mkt. Cap: $8.14 b Yield: 2.4%
Wells Fargo WFC
Close:$41.43A-O.01 or flat
The biggest U.S. mortgage lender
was hit hard during the third quarter
by rising mortgage rates in the
spring and summer.
.14i

4,1,
j .J. .: .-,
52-week range
$31.25 $44.79
Vol.:45.9m (2.6x avg.) PE: 11.2
Mkt. Cap:$219.98 b Yield: 2.9%
Micron MU
Close:$16.84V-1.59 or -8.6%
The flash memory maker's quarterly
profit left some investors wanting,
and there is growing concern over
memory chip prices.



I ,
J . .: .-,
52-week range
$5.16 $18.85
Vol.:153.6m (3.5x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $17.49 b Yield:...
E2open EOPN
Close:S19.69V-0.73 or -3.6%
The cloud-computing software com-
pany slumped after issuing a weak
outlook, though it topped expecta-
tions for the quarter.
$30


J . .; .-,
52-week range
$12.27 $25.86
Vol.:1.2m (9.2x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $507.55 m Yield:...


Stocks rise as debt talks


continue in Washington


Associated Press

The closer Washington
gets to a deal over the debt
ceiling, the higher stocks
go.
Stock prices rose for a
second day in a row on Fri-
day as investors bet against
a U.S. debt default The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose 111 points Friday,
bringing its two-day gain to
434. Its jump on Thursday
was the biggest this year
Call it the Sigh of Relief
Rally
A partial government
shutdown pushed the Dow
below 15,000 this week be-
fore President Barack
Obama and House Repub-
licans met on Thursday to
talk about the outlines for
a possible deal. Obama
and Republican senators
met on Friday, too.
Stocks set new highs in
mid-September but de-
clined steadily since then
as the federal government
got closer to the partial
shutdown that began
Oct. 1. That shutdown en-
tered its llth day on Friday
Even more troubling for
investors is the expecta-
tion that the government
will reach its borrowing
limit on Oct. 17, which


Associated Press
Trader William Lawrence works Friday on the floor of the
New York Stock Exchange.


raises the possibility of a
default on government
borrowing. U.S. govern-
ment bonds are usually
considered the world's
safest investment, so even
the possibility of a default
has rattled investors.
"It's nice when the
world does not revolve
around politicians making
decisions for Wall Street,"
said Ralph Fogel, invest-
ment strategist and part-
ner at Fogel Neale
Partners in New York.
The Dow rose 111.04
points, or 0.7 percent, to
close at 15,237.11. The
Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 10.64 points, or


0.6 percent, to 1,703.20.
The Nasdaq rose 31.13
points, or 0.8 percent, to
3,791.87.
Kim Forrest, an equity
research analyst at Fort
Pitt Capital Group in Pitts-
burgh, said it's too soon to
assume that the meetings
in Washington will avert a
default.
"That's super that
they're talking to each
other, but what on Earth is
the agreement going to
look like, and is it going to
stave off default? I don't
think we know that yet,"
Forrest said. "I think the
stock market is getting
ahead of itself."


Toyota riding momentum


in wild acceleration cases


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -While
Toyota Motor Corp. still
faces a bundle of lawsuits
claiming that defective
electronics caused some of
its cars to accelerate un-
controllably, often with
tragic results, another
courtroom victory has
given the automaker mo-
mentum heading into
those other cases.
Jurors deliberated for
about five days in Los An-
geles before concluding
Thursday that the au-
tomaker was not liable for
the death of Noriko Uno.
The 66-year-old was killed
in 2009 when her 2006 Toy-
ota Camry was struck by
another car, then contin-
ued on a harrowing ride


until it slammed into a
telephone pole and tree.
Toyota's lawyers said
the sedan's design was not
to blame and Uno likely
mistook the gas pedal for
the brake. Jurors cleared
the Japanese automaker
but decided that the other
driver, who ran a stop sign,
should pay Uno's family
$10 million.
The Uno case was one of
hundreds of "unintended
acceleration" lawsuits still
pending in federal and
state courts against Toyota.
It is the first "bellwether"
case in state courts, cho-
sen by a judge to help pre-
dict the potential outcome
of other lawsuits making
similar claims. Another
state case began this week
in Oklahoma.


The Los Angeles case
posed a different theory
than the others.
Uno's family claimed
that the crash could have
been avoided if Toyota had
installed a brake override
system, which deadens the
accelerator if the driver
hits the brakes. Other
cases claim that an elec-
tronics defect caused the
sudden, unintended accel-
eration that preceded
crashes.
One plaintiff's attorney
who settled a class-action
case against Toyota in De-
cember for more than
$1 billion said the Uno
case seemed easier to win
than the cases claiming
failures in vehicles' elec-
tronic throttle control
systems.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Rising legal costs push
JPMorgan to rare loss
NEW YORK-- Mounting legal costs pushed
JPMorgan Chase to a rare loss in the third quarter,
the first under the leadership of Jamie Dimon.
The largest U.S. bank by assets set aside
$9.2 billion in the quarter to cover a string of
litigation stemming from the housing crisis and
the bank's "London Whale" trading debacle.
Del Monte sells foods
business to focus on pets
SAN FRANCISCO Del Monte Foods is
selling off its fruit and vegetable business to
focus instead on tasty vittles for pets.
The San Francisco-based company said
Friday that it is selling its consumer products
business, which includes canned Del Monte


i




mi










I
U


pineapple and Contadina tomatoes, to Del
Monte Pacific Ltd. in Asia for $1.68 billion. It
will then begin catering solely to the tastes of
furrier consumers through its pets business,
which includes brands such as Pup-Peroni,
Meow Mix and Milk-Bones.
Sony CEO praises Japanese
leader for economic policy
TOKYO The chief of Sony Corp., one of
the best known Japanese companies, praised
the country's prime minister Friday for his ef-
forts to jump-start the economy and put the
nation back on the global stage.
Sony leader Kazuo Hirai said Prime Minis-
ter Shinzo Abe is restoring global confidence
in Japan, while stressing that delivering on
promises with action was critical.
-From wire reports


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BUSINESS


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 A7





OPage A8 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12,2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor r
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


STEM THE TIDE




Flood insurance



cost poses


economic threat


urprises that show up as
new laws go into effect
are rarely pleasant, and
those becoming apparent as
the 2012 reform of federal
flood insurance is imple-
mented are no exception.
Initially intended as a way
to make the heavily subsi-
dized flood insurance pro-
gram more self-sufficient and
to close the pro-
gram's $24 billion THE I
deficit, the
Biggert-Waters bill Cost c
to reform the pro- insurance
gram was sup- as sul
ported by a variety are
of business
groups, including OUR 01
the American In-
surance Associa- Prograi
tion, the Mortgage rev
Bankers Associa-


tion, the National Association
of Realtors, and the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce.
But as changes in the legis-
lation that raise the cost of
flood insurance are put into
effect, the impact of the
changes is raising the ire of
folks in coastal communities
from Louisiana to Massachu-
setts, and a variety of legisla-
tive proposals have been
advanced to either delay or
amend the current law
The fundamental problem
is that federal subsidies for
many policies are going away
and market-based rates are
being phased in. This means
many homeowners and busi-
nesses are facing steep in-
creases in the rates they pay
for flood insurance, which
lenders require for mortgages
in areas subject to flooding,
even if these areas have not
previously flooded.
There are almost 8,000
properties in Citrus County
that participate in the federal
flood insurance program, and
2,848 of these have federally-
subsidized policies. Under the
new rules, rates for some
properties can increase by


Is
of
ce
b

IP

vie


25 percent annually until the
rate charged equals the actu-
arial rate for that property
And homes directly on the
water are not the only ones
affected.
According to Crystal River
City Manager Andy Houston,
the majority of the homes and
businesses in Crystal River
will be affected by changes in
the law, and
dSUE: homes far inland
Sin the Homosassa
f flood area are in areas
e soaring where flood in-
sidies surance is
cut. required.
Although insur-
'INION: ance rates for
owner-occupied
n needs homes will rise
ew. more slowly than
rates for second
homes or businesses, when
homes are sold, the new
owner will face sharply
higher rates. The concern is
that this could affect property
values and resale.
While there are a variety of
proposals at both the state
and federal level for mitigat-
ing the rate increases,
Florida has also taken the
issue to court by joining in a
lawsuit filed by Mississippi
that asks a federal court to
block the rate increases until
an affordability study is com-
pleted. About 40 percent of
the homes in the country af-
fected by the changes are in
Florida.
This is an issue not likely to
be resolved quickly or pain-
lessly, but it needs to be re-
solved for the benefit of both
the state and our local econ-
omy. We urge our legislative
delegation to work with legis-
lators in other coastal states
to come up with a solution
that will move the program to-
ward financial stability while
still protecting the economy
of coastal areas directly im-
pacted by changes in the
flood insurance program.


Say no to attorneys
Why don't we try operating
the county with no attorneys on
payroll? Don't the commission-
ers know what's right and
what's wrong? Do they not
know what's illegal and what
isn't or how to sign their
names? Why do we
have to spend hun- C
dreds of thousands of
dollars for attorneys
just so they can fall
back on them and they
won't be responsible
for anything? Was it
the sheriff's attorney
who got us to pay al-
most half a million CAL
dollars to a criminal 563-
that we shot? We have
to pay his medical ex-
penses. Whatever happened
over that? ... What's the new
policy? We don't need to pay
out-of-county attorneys. Let's
go without them. Let's try to
save some money for a change.
All the commissioners do is
vote for spending. We need a
30 percent slash across the
board. No tax increase, that
simple. We won't miss them.


Smoke and mirrors
They don't add up. How
much is the county paying
NG&N law firm for a one-year
contract? How much is the
county now paying Ms. Par-
sons and Ms. Clamer? Now
prove how Welch saved
$62,043. Looks like
J ND another smoke-and-
mirrors cover-up, just
P like Thorpe's $13,000
savings which actually
cost the county tens
Sof thousands of dol-
lars, in reference to
Oct. 9's Chronicle
article.
-0579 Allows flexibility
This is in regards to
the board of county
commissioners hiring consult-
ants for legal services. Let's
face it; attorneys are very ex-
pensive. I like this idea. It
gives the board a lot more
flexibility. They've got a lot
more attorneys they can
choose from and it gives
them some time to pick a
final candidate. Good job,
board.


"Laws grind the poor, and rich men
rule the law."
Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller, 1765


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Boehner's empty suit


A day in the life of the empti-
est suit in Washington:
7 a.m. You wake up, light a
Camel. Read a pink Post-it left
on the refrigerator by your wife:
'John, don't ever for-
get, YOU REALLY
ARE THE SPEAKER
OF THE HOUSE!!!
Also, we're out of
bagels." 1 s
7:30 a.m. You lie in
your tanning bed med-
itating about the gov-
ernment shutdown,
wondering if it was
such a brilliant idea to Carl F
let it happen. You put OTI
on some Pink Floyd, VOI
"Dark Side of the
Moon," but that
doesn't help.
8 a.m. On the ride to Capitol
Hill, your driver remarks that
there's not much traffic in the
city no tourists lined up to see
money being inked at the Bu-
reau of Engraving and Printing.
You smoke another Camel.
8:11 a.m. From the caryou call
the police to report that some
jerk on D Street is selling
"Boehner is a Bum" T-shirts -
no, wait, he's giving them away!
Worse, he's wearing a national
park ranger's uniform.
9:07 a.m. Staff meeting. The as-
sistant in charge of reading all
your hate mail insists she's not
crying, it's just allergies.
On a more upbeat note, three
tea party activists in Arizona
tweeted that the shutdown is a
smashing success, and that if you
cave in to moderate Republicans
who want to end it, then you are
lower than lily-livered liberal
scum.
9:30 a.m. You deliver your reg-
ular morning blame-Obama-for-
everything sound bite, which
goes pretty well, all things con-
sidered. Your wife calls to say
you looked totally reasonable on
TV, not the least bit satanic, and
asks if you'd please swing by the
grocery on the way home.


10:46 a.m. Fox News wants to
interview you about the 800,000-
plus federal workers being laid
off. How are they supposed to
pay their mortgages, keep up
their car payments,
yada, yada, yada...
And this is Fox?
They're supposed to
be on your side.
You tell your assis-
tant in charge of
turning down hard-
hitting media inter-
views to say you're
too busy trying to end
iaasen this dire national cri-
IER sis caused entirely by
CES the Democrats and
CE the president
11:07 a.m. Three
discreet drags on a Camel before
sneaking into another tanning
bed that you've installed in a
dark alcove near the speaker's
office. You put on some Zeppe-
lin, "In Through the Out Door,"
but can't stop thinking about the
havoc you've created by not let-
ting the shutdown come to a vote
on the House floor
At the Department of Defense,
400,000 civilian workers fur-
loughed with no pay Same story
at NASA, the Department ofJus-
tice, Treasury, Commerce, Labor,
Energy, even Veterans Affairs.
And this was totally your call,
as some unhappy colleagues
have pointed out One word from
you and a clean spending bill
would have passed, no problem,
if only you weren't such a wimp.
"I hate that word!" you start to
holler, fogging up the Plexiglas.
12:30 pm. Lunch with a care-
fully chosen group of supporters.
They try to brighten your mood
with news that the sign-up web-
site for the Affordable Care Act
- sorry, Obamacare is
plagued with glitches.
What better proof that the
president's healthcare law is a
total disaster, right?
"So cheer up, Mr Speaker!"
they say


"Cheer up?" you snap back.
"Didn't you see the headline in
the New York Daily News?
'House of Turds.' With my
picture!"
"You're definitely not a turd,
Mr Speaker"
"Gee, thanks. Get the check."
2:15 pm. You cancel the daily
session with your charisma
coach and go to the driving range
to hit a bucket of balls. Out of
nowhere comes a thundering
downpour!
Turns out you didn't receive
the storm alert on your cell-
phone due to layoffs at the
weather service caused by the
you-know-what, that you yourself
allowed to happen.
You stub out your Camel, go
back to the office and sulk.
4 p.m. Your regular afternoon
blame-Obama-for-everything
sound bite is postponed because
the assistant in charge of making
sure you're never photographed
with Ted Cruz has spotted the lu-
natic Texan roaming the halls.
5:45 p.m. Quick trip to the tan-
ning bed, then moisturize.
You're preparing for a live in-
terview with Diane Sawyer, who
is way better looking than those
stiffs on Fox. The producer says
Diane's going to remind you that
you're the one person who could
stop the government shutdown
tomorrow, if you wanted to.
Suddenly you remember a
dentist appointment
6:30 pm. On the ride home you
phone the NSA and ask if some-
one could please hack the
Google site and remove all the
mean stuff being written about
you. Unfortunately the hacker in
charge of that department has
just been furloughed.
So you light up another Camel,
and call Harry Reid.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132.


M
I
I.


SLETTERS to the Editor


Stop spending
is best solution
A letter to the editor in Sun-
day's (Sept 29) paper prompted
this response. The article put
blame on Ronald Reagan for the
present deficit? Why do we have
a deficit? It's because the govern-
ment spends much more than it
takes in.
Well, if Reagan is to blame then
my response puts the blame on
Democrat presidents who have
instigated big government spend-
ing programs that over time have
consumed much more than our
tax base can support Entitlement
programs make people happy
until the bill comes due. At this
point, no amount of taxation will
balance the budget If you need
supporting facts, take a look at the
large European countries (all so-
cialistic) that have gone or are on
the verge going bankrupt Closer
to home, our major entitlement
spending states are all on the
verge of going bankrupt (all De-
mocrat controlled). Thankfully,
Florida is not one of them.
Since fault was found with Rea-
gan, you overlook the fact that he
did work closely with a Democrat
controlled Congress and he


many hospitals will be stronger
TED and many will be weaker, so you
dress the want to be with the strongest
meets As a board member and treas-
arlie
i660. urer for more than 20 years in
Lake County, I had the pleasure
of working with HCA for a num-
ig the ber of those years. They helped us
ide it raise our bond rating to A and we
merica were profitable for all those
rld leader years. The employees should
ling" is a cheer an HCA purchase because
se the more patients will use the facility
who and thereby staff will expand to
eir in- meet the increased traffic.
' to those The physicians will be pleased
rd for it..a and the citizens of the county will
t is my no longer be burdened with the
[give my debt I congratulate the hospital
ose who board on their wise vote and
to those hope and pray that the founda-
stem tion board has the same wisdom
to vote for the HCA buyout
salie Matt In closing, I would like to thank
Hernando Mike Wright and your newspaper
for the fine reporting during the
choicee last several months of this very
D"-1-..important process.


M. Benson O'Kelley
Homosassa
Editor's note: This letter was
submitted prior to the Founda-
tion Board approving the HCA
bid.


OPINIONS INVI
Persons wishing to adc
editorial board, which
weekly, should call Che
Brennan at 352 563-5

worked diligently to brir
country together, not div
Ronald Reagan loved Ar
and was a respected woi
I think "stop the spend
better solution than "rais
taxes." Why should those
have worked hard for th(
come have to give it away
who have not worked ha
free handout? I believe it
right to choose to whom ]
charity donations ... to the
need and deserve it, nott
who are scamming the sy
RoE


HCAisa good c
.... 4-; --1_ D -1 -D_


Great aavice by Bob riseiac. 1
agree 100 percent with his
thoughts and analysis for the HCA
bid. A lease to any entity is just a
promise to pay With the changes
that are about to happen with the
health care system in our country,


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


--Hot Corner: ATTORNEYS


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WATER
Continued from Page Al

bubbling natural spring
systems.
Knight said his team has
uncovered the following
key issues:
Approximately 2.6 bil-
lion gallons of water a day
is pumped daily from the
three water districts which
comprise the bulk of the
Floridan Aquifer (Suwan-
nee, SWFWMD and the St.
Johns Water Management
District). Knight says of
that amount SWFWMD
and the St. Johns district
account for 2 billion of
those gallons a day;
average flows from
Florida springs have de-
clined by about 20 percent
to 40 percent way be-
yond what Knight said is
recognized as an accept-
able standard which is
about 5 percent to 10 per-
cent. He said for springs in
King's Bay, for instance,
are now spewing salt water
which is increasingly mak-
ing the Florida Outstand-
ing Waterway brackish;
recharge is at about 8
billion gallons per day, but
Knight said daily with-
drawals are at 30 percent
of that amount, or some-
times 50 percent during
poor rainy seasons.
the aquifer is declin-
ing about 0.2 feet per year
or 500 million gallons per
day Knight says some esti-
mates put overall declines
in the Tampa/St. Pete area
at anywhere between 60 to
90 feet.
agricultural and urban
development have resulted
in elevated nitrate and ni-
trogen levels. He blames
those elevated levels on
human pollution and fertil-
izer use in agriculture;
water withdrawal
permits have been over
allocated. In the Flori-
dan Aquifer area a total
of 28,630 were issued. In
2010 2,622 million gal-
lons per day was
pumped, or 30 percent of
recharge. However, the
total allocated for
groundwater use was
4,630 million gallons per
day or 50 percent of


recharge.
In SWFWMD, total per-
mits were 22,800. In 2010
- 965 mgd was pumped,
or 39 percent of aquifer
recharge. The total allo-
cated groundwater use
was 2,830 mgd, or 116 per-
cent of recharge.
Knight said that data
shows the current track is
unsustainable. He sug-
gests a change in the way
business is done.
"We should stop issuing
more water withdrawal
permits and some the agri-
cultural operations have
expanded to areas that are
not the most fertile areas
of the state," Knight said.
He said to create incen-
tives for agriculture by
moving operations to more
naturally fertile areas and
emphasize teaching less
use of water and fertilizer
"And withdraw the
water only from surface
sources (like lakes and
rivers). This way people
can see what is being
taken, because quite often
when we withdraw from
the aquifer, it is almost
magical and it seems like
it is always there."
The water district
spokeswoman Susanna
Martinez Tarokh said it is
state statutes which grant
the district authority to
issue permits.
Three Crystal River res-
idents have recently ap-
plied for a consumptive
use permit at the thresh-
old of about 100,000 gal-
lons per day The trio -
Tracy Colson, Steve
Kingery and Matt Clemons
- do not intend to with-
draw the water, but in-
stead are interested in
saving it for posterity
But Martinez Tarokh
said applicants must
demonstrate the condi-
tions for issuance of a per-
mit one of which is that
the quantity is needed to
fulfill a reasonable de-
mand during the term of
the permit.
"Water use permits are
intended for consumptive
uses of water," she added.
CONDITIONS FOR
ISSUANCE OF PERMITS
1. In order to obtain a
Water Use Permit, anAppli-


cant must demonstrate that
the water use is reasonable
and beneficial, is consistent
with the public interest, and
will not interfere with any
existing legal use of water,
by providing reasonable as-
surances, on both an indi-
vidual and a cumulative
basis, that the water use:
(a) Is necessary to fulfill a
certain reasonable demand.
(b) Will not cause quan-
tity or quality changes that
adversely impact the
water resources, including
both surface water and
groundwater
(c) Will comply with the
provisions of 4.2 of the
WUP Basis of Review, in-
corporated by reference in
Rule 40D-2.091, EA.C., re-
garding adverse impacts to
wetlands, lakes, streams,
estuaries, fish and wildlife
or other natural resources.
(d) Will not interfere
with a reservation of water
as set forth in Rule 40D-
2.302, EA.C.
(e) Will comply with the
provisions of 4.3 of the
WUP Basis of Review, in-
corporated by reference in
Rule 40D-2.091, EA.C., re-
garding minimum flows
and levels (MFLs).
(f) Will utilize the lowest
water quality the Appli-
cant has the ability to use,
provided that its use does
not interfere with the re-
covery of a water body to
its established MFL and it
is not a source that is ei-
ther currently or projected
to be adversely impacted.
(g) Will comply with the
provisions of 4.5 of the WUP
Basis of Review, incorpo-
rated by reference in Rule
40D-2.091, EAC., regarding
saline water intrusion.
(h) Will not cause pollu-
tion of the aquifer
(i) Will not adversely im-
pact offsite land uses ex-
isting at the time of the
application.
(j) Will not adversely im-
pact an existing legal
withdrawal.
(k). Will incorporate water
conservation measures.
(1) Will incorporate use
of alternative water sup-
plies to the greatest extent
practicable.
(m) Will not cause water
to go to waste.
(n) Will not otherwise be


We should stop issuing more
water withdrawal permits.
Bob Knight
springs expert.


harmful to the water re-
sources within the District.
2. For projects that re-
quire both an Environ-
mental Resource Permit
(ERP) and a Water Use
Permit (WUP), an applica-
tion for an ERP must be
deemed complete prior to
issuance of the WUP when
the design of the surface
water management system
can affect the quantities
developed from the proj-
ect site and the quantities
needed to supply project
water demands. The appli-
cant may submit an appli-
cation for a Conceptual
ERP to satisfy this re-
quirement, provided that


the application contains
information from which
supplemental irrigation
demands, potable water
demands, other water use
demands, and water sup-
ply quantities derived
from the surface water
management system can
be calculated. Otherwise,
the applicant shall submit
an application for an Indi-
vidual or General ERP
Phosphate mining projects
are not required to have
complete ERPs prior to
WUP issuance. If the Dis-
trict determines that a per-
mit application involves
an area where there are
water resource problems


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SErSTrIVALL
SART & VENIDOR EXPR


[ij~l E~ l d ^ dE l E d ^ d d ~ -lU-lllU-lllU- -Jll~ l


MMEMEq


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 A9
and due to the quantity,
type or location of the pro-
posed withdrawal it is un-
likely that a water use
permit will be issued, the
requirement for a com-
plete ERP application
shall be waived by the Dis-
trict. Where such waivers
are granted, and if a WUP
is issued, it shall specify
that a well construction
permit will not be issued
and that withdrawals can-
not commence until the
appropriate ERP is issued.
3. The standards and cri-
teria set forth in the WUP
Basis of Review, incorpo-
rated in Rule 40D-2.091,
EA.C., shall be used to pro-
vide the reasonable assur-
ances required in
subsection 40D-2.301(1),
EA.C.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.










NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Treats


Associated Press
A squirrel monkey peers
into a pumpkin Friday,
looking for a treat at the
Oklahoma City Zoo in
Oklahoma City.


Court: NSA may
collect records
WASHINGTON -The
secret U.S. court that gov-
erns surveillance of terrorist
and foreign espionage tar-
gets is authorizing the Na-
tional Security Agency to
keep collecting U.S. phone
records.
The director of national
intelligence, James R. Clap-
per, on Friday made public
the continuation of the
records collection, as part
of the Obama administra-
tion's campaign to better
explain how U.S. intelli-
gence uses U.S. data. At
one time, Clapper himself
told Congress his officers
do not collect such data.
Leaks by former NSA
systems analyst Edward
Snowden revealed the bulk
collection of millions of U.S.
phone logs showing who
Americans called and for
how long. That prompted
privacy activists and law-
makers to push for an on-
going review of the Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance
Act, which allows such data
collection.
Feds: States may
pay to open parks
WASHINGTON Under
pressure from governors, the
Obama administration said
Thursday it will allow some
shuttered national parks to
reopen as long as states
use their own money to pay
for park operations.
Governors in at least four
states have asked for au-
thority to reopen national
parks within their borders
because of the economic
impacts caused by the park
closures. All 401 national
park units including such
icons as the Grand Canyon
and Yosemite and Zion na-
tional parks have been
closed since Oct. 1 be-
cause of the partial govern-
ment shutdown. More than
20,000 National Park Serv-
ice employees have been
furloughed, and lawmakers
from both parties have com-
plained that park closures
have wreaked havoc on
nearby communities that
depend on tourism.
Interior Secretary Sally
Jewell said the government
will consider offers to use
state money to resume park
operations, but will not sur-
render control of national
parks or monuments to the
states. Jewell called on
Congress to act swiftly to
end the government


Jupiter-bo
working
LOSANGEL
tists say NASA
bound spacecrn
around Earth tc
the outer solar
rating normally
The Southw
Institute, which
mission's scier
tions, said Frid
is out of "safe
a state a space
grammed to gc
senses someth
Juno hit a sr
this week after
Earth to increa
to barrel beyor
oid belt to Jupi
Despite the
entists say Jur
to slip into orbi
Jupiter. It's exp
rive in 2016.


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


No agreement on shutdown


Associated Press

WASHINGTON With
time running short, Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
House Speaker John
Boehner accelerated ef-
forts Friday to prevent the
U.S. Treasury from default
and end a partial govern-
ment shutdown that
stretched into an 11th day
The latest impacts: New
aircraft grounded, military
chaplains silenced and a
crab harvest jeopardized
in the Bering Sea.
"Let's put this hysterical
talk of default behind us
and instead start talking


about finding solutions,"
said Senate Republican
Leader Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky
Republicans in the
House and Senate sepa-
rately made proposals to
the White House for end-
ing an impasse that polls
say has inflicted damage
on their party politically
Each offered to reopen
the government and raise
the $16.7 trillion debt limit
- but only as part of
broader approaches that
envision deficit savings,
changes to the health care
law known as Obamacare
and an easing of across-


the-board spending cuts
that the White House and
Congress both dislike. The
details and timing differed.
"We're waiting to hear"
from administration offi-
cials, said House Majority
Leader Eric Cantor
Hopes remained high on
Wall Street, where in-
vestors sent the Dow Jones
industrial average 111
points higher following
Thursday's 323-point
surge. Obama met at the
White House with small
business owners about the
impacts they were feeling
from the budget battles,
and said he hoped to be


able to bring them toward
a conclusion, said Det
Ansinn, who attended the
session.
"He was a little slightly
melancholy that maybe it
could be done over the
weekend and maybe not.
He's been down this road
before," said Ansinn, owner
of Doylestown, Pa.-based
mobile and Web app devel-
oper Brick Simple. Ansinn
said he told the president
how the shutdown is threat-
ing to delay some of his
projects and he fears what
a possible impending gov-
ernment default could do to
the economy


Nobel awards top honor


Aas a 47 2, ,U-,


'. Tm,3M A,. & .A %3
C: A* A *
# I A J M


OIC.A* Z.A C th PA PA
Of AS AIMAU


Associated Press
Ahmet Uzumcu, director general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, comments
Sept. 7, 2011, during a news conference in The Hague, Netherlands. The OPCW was awarded the
Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.

Peace Prize goes to chemical-weapons watchdog


Associated Press

BEIRUT The watchdog
agency working to eliminate the
world's chemical weapons won
the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday
in a powerful endorsement of the
inspectors now on the ground in
Syria on a perilous mission to de-
stroy the regime's stockpile of
poison gas.
In honoring the Organization
for the Prohibition of Chemical
Weapons, the Norwegian Nobel
Committee said "recent events in
Syria, where chemical weapons
have again been put to use, have
underlined the need to enhance
the efforts to do away with such
weapons."
The prize came 10 days after
OPCW inspectors started arriving
in war-torn Syria to oversee the
dismantling of President Bashar
Assad's chemical arsenal.
While world leaders and for-
mer Nobel laureates praised the
group's selection, some in Syria


lamented that the prize would do
nothing to end the bloodshed,
most of which is being inflicted
with conventional weapons.
"The killing is continuing, the
shelling is continuing and the
dead continue to fall," said Mo-
hammed al-Tayeb, an activist who
helped film casualties after
the deadly chemical attack in Au-
gust that the rebels and the gov-
ernment have blamed on each
other
The peace prize, he added,
should have gone to "whoever
helps the Syrian people get rid of
Bashar Assad."
After focusing on such themes
as human rights and European
unity in recent years, the Norwe-
gian Nobel Committee this time
returned to the core purpose of
the 112-year-old Nobel Peace
Prize disarming the world.
Founded in 1997, the OPCW
had largely worked out of the
limelight until this year, when the
United Nations called upon its


expertise.
The OPCW's selection caught
many by surprise. It was widely
expected that the peace prize
would go to Malala Yousafzai, the
16-year-old Pakistani girl who
was shot in the head by the Tal-
iban last October for champi-
oning education for girls.
"She is an outstanding woman
and I think she has a bright fu-
ture, and she will probably be a
nominee next year or the year
after that," said Nobel committee
chairman Thorbjoern Jagland.
The peace prize committee has
a tradition of not just honoring
past achievements, but encourag-
ing causes or movements that are
still unfolding.
The OPCW was formed to en-
force the Chemical Weapons Con-
vention, the 1997 international
treaty outlawing such arms. The
Nobel Peace Prize came just days
before Syria officially joins as
OPCW's 190th member state on
Monday


General in charge of nuclear missiles is fired


Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
Air Force fired the general


found craft in charge of its nuclear mis-
g again siles on Friday, just two
agi days after a Navy admiral
_ES Scien- with top nuclear weapons
's Jupiter- responsibilities was
aft that looped sacked. Both men are
) catapult to caught up in investigations
system, is op- of alleged personal miscon-
y again, duct adding to a cascade of
est Research turmoil inside the nation's
i leads the nuclear weapons force.
ice opera- The Air Force removed
ay that Juno Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, a
mnode." That's 35-year veteran, from his
craft ispro- command of 20th Air
o into when it Force, responsible for all
inwrng. 450 of the service's inter-
ing is wrong, continental ballistic mis-
ag earlier siles. Carey, who took his
r it flew past post in Wyoming in June
se its speed 2012, will be reassigned
nd the aster- pending the outcome of an
ter. investigation into personal
problem, sci- misbehavior, the service
1o is on target said.
t around The Air Force would not
3ected to ar- specify what Carey is al-
leged to have done wrong,
-From wire reports but two officials with


Associated Press
The Air Force fired Maj.
Gen. Michael J. Carey, the
two-star general in charge
of all of its nuclear missiles,
in response to an investiga-
tion into alleged personal
misbehavior, officials told
The Associated Press on
Friday.
knowledge of the investi-
gation indicated that it was
linked to alcohol use.
They said it was not re-
lated to the performance
or combat readiness of


Navy Vice Adm. Tim
Giardina was notified
Wednesday that he has
been relieved of duty as
second-in-command at the
military organization that
oversees all U.S. nuclear
forces.
ICBM units or to his stew-
ardship of the force.
Removing senior offi-
cers in the nuclear force is
rare but has happened
twice this week.


On Wednesday the Navy
said Vice Adm. Tim Giar-
dina, the second-in-charge
at U.S. Strategic Com-
mand, was fired amid an
investigation of gambling
issues. He was demoted
from three- to two-star
rank and reassigned to a
Navy staff job until the in-
vestigation is completed.
Together, the Carey and
Giardina firings add a new
dimension to a set of seri-
ous problems facing the
military's nuclear force.
The ICBM segment in par-
ticular has had several re-
cent setbacks, including a
failed safety and security
inspection at a base in Mon-
tana in August, followed by
the firing of the colonel
there in charge of security
forces. In May The Associ-
ated Press revealed that 17
Minuteman 3 missile
launch control officers at
Minot Air Force Base, N.D.,
had been taken off duty in a
reflection of what one offi-
cer there called "rot" inside
the ICBM force.


World BRIEFS

Visiting


Associated Press
The Dalai Lama responds
to a question Friday at a
news conference in
Mexico City.



Eastern India
braces for cyclone
BHUBANESHWAR, India
Officials ordered tens of
thousands of coastal vil-
lagers to flee their homes
Friday as a massive cy-
clone that filled nearly the
entire Bay of Bengal gath-
ered strength and headed
toward India's eastern
seaboard.
Officials canceled holy
day celebrations and stock-
piled emergency supplies in
coastal Orissa and Andhra
Pradesh states, with fore-
casters saying Cyclone
Phailin will hit the region
Saturday evening.
The Indian Meteorologi-
cal Department warned
Phailin was a "very severe
cyclonic storm" that was ex-
pected to hit with maximum
sustained winds of 130 to
135 miles per hour.
However, the U.S. Navy's
Joint Typhoon Warning
Center in Hawaii forecast
maximum sustained winds
of 167 mph with gusts up to
196 mph.
UN alarmed at
polio threat
UNITED NATIONS-
The U.N. Security Council
is expressing alarm at the
imminent threat of the
spread of polio through
Sudan's violence-wracked
South Kordofan and Blue
Nile states and the continu-
ing outbreak of polio in the
Horn of Africa.
The U.N. humanitarian
office has reported that the
threat affects more than
165,000 children in the two
Sudanese states "due to a
lack of immunization in the
border area in more than
two years," the Security
Council said in a statement
Friday.
The SPLM-North, a rebel
group backed by South
Sudan, has been fighting
government forces in South
Kordofan and Blue Nile.
The Security Council
called on Sudan's govern-
ment and the SPLM-North
"to urgently overcome differ-
ences" over technical plans
so that a two-week polio
vaccination campaign can
begin on schedule Nov. 5.
Panama: Ship's
weapons work
PANAMA CITY A
Panamanian official said
the two Cuban MiG-21 jet
fighters found aboard a
North Korean cargo ship
seized in July, were in per-
fect conditions to operate
and that the 15 plane en-
gines are new and could be
used as replacements.
The official said the as-
sertion by Cuba that the
military equipment was ob-
solete is incorrect.
The official spoke Friday
on condition of anonymity
because he was not author-
ized to be quoted by name.
He said the shipping of
the weapons was part of an
agreement between Cuba
and North Korean and that
Havana was going to re-
ceive $200 million for them.
After the ship was seized
as it tried to cross the
Panama Canal, Cuba said
the cargo included "obso-
lete defensive weapons."
-From wire reports









SPORTS


No. 17 UF
travels to No.
10 LSU today
for a big SEC
clash./B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 College football/B2
0 Boxing/B2
0 High school sports/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 High school football/B4
0 Soccer, NHL, golf/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 Auto racing/B6


Turnovers doom Pirates in loss to Raiders


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Crystal
River head coach Nathan Var-
nadore wants his Pirates to con-
trol the clock and play good
defense.
On Crystal River's homecom-
ing night against Alachua Santa
Fe, though, the Pirates watched
their opponent ride that formula
to a 30-14 District 5A-5 victory
The Raiders are now 3-3
overall and 1-2 in district. Crys-
tal River fell to 2-4 and 0-3.


"That's a pretty good for-
mula," Santa Fe head coach Bill
Wiles said. "If you can run the
football and defend the run, you
can win some games."
Crystal River managed just
21 rushing yards on 17 carries
while Santa Fe rolled up 278
yards on 61 totes. The Pirates
forced a pair of turnovers, but
gave the ball to the Raiders five
times four interceptions and
a fumble lost including four
times during a close game in
the second half.
Pirates head coach Nathan


Varnadore said Crystal River's
four quarters of football mir-
rored the week at practice. The
first-year face of the Pirates' pro-
gram said Monday and Thurs-
day's practices were bad,
Tuesday's was an improvement
over Monday's and Wednesday
was the best practice of the week
"We gotta stop them, that's not
what we do," Varnadore said.
"But it's a reflection of practice.
"This is going to hurt them
and it might be the wake-up call
these guys need."
For Crystal River, Ty
Reynolds had six catches for
157 yards, which included a 76-
yard touchdown from junior
quarterback Collin Ryan on the
See Page B3


MATT PI I I- IN R/hronicle
Crystal River sophomore running back Antonio Franklin tries to evade
the tackle of Santa Fe sophomore defender Walter Jenkins in the sec-
ond quarter of the Pirates' homecoming game at Earl Bramlett Stadium.


answers call


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus High School junior Travis Blotz tries to break the tackle by Mount Dora's Weston Hargroves in the homecoming game at
Citrus, which the host Hurricanes won 27-26. Citrus High School senior Sam Franklin pulls down a pass from quarterback Moore
Deion against Mount Dora.


Citrus outlast

Mount Dora

27-26 by stopping

late conversion
DAVID PIEKLIK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Its vaunted
defense came up huge when
needed most and saved home-
coming night from being ru-
ined, as the Citrus High School
football team held on for a 27-26
win over Mt. Dora.
Making the biggest play of the
night, the Hurricanes defensive
line stopped Mt. Dora's Jordan
Porter short of the end zone on
a two-point conversion attempt
with 24 seconds left in the
game. The play followed a two-
touchdown rally by Mt. Dora
and a failed attempt by Citrus to
run the clock out.


The Citrus Hurricanes (6-0)
came in heavily favored against
the Mt. Dora Hurricanes (3-4)
but penalties, miscues and
turnovers kept Citrus from any
thoughts of a blowout.
"It's homecoming weekend,
we're expecting a blowout. We
came in flat," Citrus quarter-
back Deion Moore said. "We
weren't focused on this football
game and 26 to 27 shows that."
Mt. Dora played a physical,
aggressive game that kept Cit-
rus off balance most of the
night They recovered two squib
kicks one on a Citrus fumble
- and, after trailing early in the
game, strung two touchdowns
together for a 13-7 lead. The vis-
iting Hurricanes then showed
poise when they trailed 27-13
heading into the final quarter
After the 'Canes made a goal
line stand at the beginning of
the fourth quarter, they were
forced to punt six plays later,
giving the ball to Mt. Dora on
the Citrus 35-yard line. The vis-
iting Hurricanes struck when


Bryant Mosher's 10-yard slant
pass to Jefferson turned into a
35-yard touchdown after a few
missed tackles.
Citrus was forced to punt on
its ensuing drive, and with 1:51
left in the game, Mt Dora took
over from its own 26. Mosher -
who finished with 221 passing
yards and two touchdowns -
completed three straight passes


to get to the Citrus 24. Steven
Gonzalez ran the ball in from
the 1-yard line to bring his team
within one.
Just as it looked as ifMt Dora
was taking the game, linebacker
Travis Blotz and teammates
took down Jordan.
"The offense put them in a lot


See Page B3


Colts


outrace


Tigers

Dunnellon

falls at the

hands of

North Marion
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
DUNNELLON Woe-
ful offense and special
teams disasters costs Dun-
nellon its first district loss
of the season and its
seventh straight to North
Marion in a 34-7 defeat
to the Colts at Ned Love
Field on Friday
The Tigers have to re-
group in a hurry, as they
remain alive by joining
three other 5A-5 teams -
Gainesville Eastside, Live
Oak Suwannee and North
Marion that each carry
one loss in the district.
They travel to Suwannee
next Friday and return
home a week later for a
game with Eastside.
Despite the discrepancy
on the scoreboard, the Colts
and Tigers each had 123
total yards, and three of
North Marion's four scoring
drives combined for 41
yards. Two of North Mar-
ion's touchdowns were set
up by Dunnellon turnovers,
and another came mo-
ments after Colts senior
Alex Williams blocked a
Chase Brattin punt early in
the third quarter
Leading 7-0 at the break,
North Marion opened the
second half with a 72-yard
kickoff return for a touch-
down by senior Jamar-
quois Autry, who also
picked off a pair of Kobie
Jones passes in the second
half. On the return, Autry
fielded the ball while run-
ning toward his own end
zone, but reversed direc-
tion on a dime and sliced
his way through Dunnel-
lofn's coverage.
Dunnellon continued to
unravel from there, giving
See Page B3


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CRfootball team drops to 0-3

in district after 30-14 setback


'D9




B2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 SPORTS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


College football
schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Today, Oct. 12
EAST
E. Michigan (1-4) at Army (2-4), Noon
Lehigh (4-1) at Columbia (0-3), Noon
Albany (NY) (1-5) at Delaware (4-2), Noon
Rhode Island (2-4) at New Hampshire
(1-3), Noon
Monmouth (NJ) (3-3) at St. Francis (Pa.)
(1-4), Noon
South Florida (1-4) at UConn (0-3), Noon
Harvard (3-0) at Cornell (1-2), 12:30 p.m.
Brown (2-1) at Bryant (3-2), 1 p.m.
Holy Cross (2-4) at Bucknell (1-3), 1 p.m.
Fordham (6-0) at Georgetown (1-3), 1 p.m.
Lafayette (1-3) at Princeton (1-1), 1 p.m.
CCSU (2-4) at Sacred Heart (5-1), 1 p.m.
Wagner (2-4) at Duquesne (2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Yale (3-0) at Dartmouth (1-2), 1:30 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) (0-5) at UMass (0-5), 3 p.m.
Michigan (5-0) at Penn St. (3-2), 5 p.m.
Stony Brook (2-3) at Colgate (1-4), 6 p.m.
Villanova (3-2) atTowson (6-0), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Missouri (5-0) at Georgia (4-1), Noon
Pittsburgh (3-1) at Virginia Tech (5-1),
Noon
NC Pembroke (4-0) at Charlotte (3-2),
Noon
Valparaiso (0-4) at Mercer (4-1), Noon
Navy (3-1) at Duke (3-2), 12:30 p.m.
Drake (2-3) at Davidson (0-5), 1 p.m.
The Citadel (2-4) at Georgia Southern
(3-2), 1 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman (4-1) at Howard (1-4),
1 p.m.
Dayton (3-2) at Stetson (1-4), 1 p.m.
Charleston Southern (5-0) at VMI (1-4),
1:30 p.m.
Elon (2-4) atWofford (3-2), 1:30 p.m.
Prairie View (4-2) at Alabama St. (4-2),
2p.m.
W. Carolina (1-4) at Auburn (4-1), 2 p.m.
Norfolk St. (2-3) at Delaware St. (1-4),
2p.m.
NC A&T (3-1) at Hampton (0-4), 2 p.m.
Jackson St. (4-2) at MVSU (1-4), 3 p.m.
Samford (3-2) at Appalachian St. (1-3),
3:30 p.m.
Boston College (3-2) at Clemson (5-0),
3:30 p.m.
Troy (3-3) at Georgia St. (0-5), 3:30 p.m.
Richmond (2-2) at James Madison (4-2),
3:30 p.m.
Florida (4-1) at LSU (5-1), 3:30 p.m.
Virginia (2-3) at Maryland (4-1), 3:30 p.m.
Syracuse (2-3) at NC State (3-2), 3:30 p.m.
East Carolina (4-1) at Tulane (4-2), 3:30
p.m.
Penn (2-1) at William & Mary (3-2), 3:30
p.m.
Tennessee St. (4-1) at Jacksonville St.
(5-0), 4 p.m.
Northwestern St. (3-2) at Nicholls St. (3-2),
4p.m.
Marshall (3-2) at FAU (2-4), 5 p.m.
Furman (2-3) at Chattanooga (3-2), 6 p.m.
Gardner-Webb (4-2) at Coastal Carolina
(5-0), 6 p.m.
Florida A&M (1-4) at Savannah St. (1-5),
6p.m.
Alabama (5-0) at Kentucky (1-4), 7 p.m.
Alabama A&M (2-4) at Southern U. (2-3),
7p.m.
UAB (1-4) at FlU (1-4), 7:30 p.m.
Bowling Green (5-1) at Mississippi St.
(2-3), 7:30 p.m.
Stephen F Austin (2-3) at SE Louisiana
(3-2), 8 p.m.
Texas A&M (4-1) at Mississippi (3-2), 8:30
p.m.
MIDWEST
Indiana (3-2) at Michigan St. (4-1), Noon
Nebraska (4-1) at Purdue (1-4), Noon
Campbell (1-3) at Butler (4-2), 1 p.m.
Missouri St. (1-5) at N. Dakota St. (4-0),
2p.m.
Cent. Michigan (2-4) at Ohio (4-1), 2 p.m.
Murray St. (3-2) at SE Missouri (0-5),
2p.m.
Indiana St. (1-4) at South Dakota (2-2),
2p.m.
Buffalo (2-2) atW. Michigan (0-6), 2 p.m.
KentSt. (2-4) at Ball St. (5-1), 3p.m.
Baylor (4-0) at Kansas St. (2-3), 3:30 p.m.
E.Washington (3-1) at North Dakota (2-2),
3:30 p.m.
Northwestern (4-1) at Wisconsin (3-2),
3:30 p.m.
Grambling St. (0-6) vs. Alcorn St. (4-2) at
Indianapolis, 4 p.m.
S. Dakota St. (3-2) at W. Illinois (2-3),
4p.m.
Akron (1-5) at N. Illinois (5-0), 5 p.m.
S. Illinois (3-3) at N. Iowa (4-1), 5 p.m.
Illinois St. (2-3) at Youngstown St. (5-1),
7p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Memphis (1-3) at Houston (4-0), Noon
Texas (3-2) vs. Oklahoma (5-0) at Dallas,
Noon
Kansas (2-2) atTCU (2-3), Noon
Iowa St. (1-3) at Texas Tech (5-0), Noon
South Carolina (4-1) at Arkansas (3-3),
12:21 p.m.
Lamar (3-2) at Sam Houston St. (3-1),
3p.m.
Nebraska-Kearney (1-4) at Cent. Arkansas
(2-3), 4 p.m.
Rice (3-2) at UTSA (2-4), 4 p.m.
Texas Southern (0-5) at Ark.-Pine Bluff
(0-5), 7 p.m.
Idaho (1-5) at Arkansas St. (2-3), 7 p.m.
Middle Tennessee (3-3) at North Texas
(2-3), 7 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe (2-4) at Texas St. (3-2),
7p.m.
Tulsa (1-4) at UTEP (1-4), 8p.m.
FAR WEST
San Jose St. (2-3) at Colorado St. (2-3),
3:30 p.m.
New Mexico (2-3) at Wyoming (3-2), 3:30
p.m.
Oregon (5-0) at Washington (4-1), 4 p.m.
Portland St. (3-3) at S. Utah (3-2), 4:05
p.m.
Marist (3-2) at San Diego (3-2), 5 p.m.
N. Colorado (1-4) at Idaho St. (2-3), 5:05
p.m.
Stanford (5-0) at Utah (3-2), 6 p.m.
Georgia Tech (3-2) at BYU (3-2), 7 p.m.
Montana (4-1) at UC Davis (2-4), 7 p.m.
Hawaii (0-5) at UNLV (3-2), 8 p.m.
Boise St. (3-2) at Utah St. (3-3), 8 p.m.
Weber St. (1-5) at Cal Poly (2-3), 9:05 p.m.
N. Arizona (3-2) at Sacramento St. (3-3),
9:05 p.m.
Colorado (2-2) at Arizona St. (3-2), 10 p.m.
California (1-4) at UCLA (4-0), 10:30 p.m.
Oregon St. (4-1) at Washington St. (4-2),
10:30 p.m.


Top 25
football schedule
Today, Oct. 12
No. 1 Alabama at Kentucky, 7 p.m.
No. 2 Oregon at No. 16 Washington, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Clemson vs. Boston College, 3:30 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford at Utah, 6 p.m.
No. 7 Georgia vs. No. 25 Missouri, Noon
No. 9 Texas A&M at Mississippi, 8:30 p.m.
No. 10 LSU vs. No. 17 Florida, 3:30 p.m.
No. 11 UCLA vs. California, 10:30 p.m.
No. 12 Oklahoma vs. Texas at Dallas, Noon
No. 14 South Carolina atArkansas, 12:21 p.m.
No. 15 Baylor at Kansas State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Michigan at Penn State, 5 p.m.
No. 19 Northwestern atWisconsin, 3:30 p.m.
No. 20 Texas Tech vs. Iowa State, Noon
No. 23 Northern Illinois vs. Akron, 5 p.m.
No. 24 Virginia Tech vs. Pittsburgh, Noon


Bulls ready to visit Huskies


Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. Win-
less Connecticut resumes
its season on Saturday
against South Florida
with a new coach and a
new quarterback leading
the Huskies into their first
game in the new Ameri-
can Athletic Conference.
TJ. Weist took over the
program on an interim
basis when Paul
Pasqualoni was fired fol-
lowing the team's 41-12
loss at Buffalo on Sept. 28,
which dropped UConn to
0-4.
Not surprisingly, Weist
has pitched the homecom-
ing game against the 1-4


Bulls as a fresh start for
the Huskies.
"The practices were
spirited," Weist said. "The
players have reacted well.
They've responded to our
challenges of refocusing,
of being, as we say, 'all in'
- buying into everything
that we're doing to have a
successful season."
Weist, who had been in
his first year as offensive
coordinator, says he'll con-
tinue to call the plays for
the nation's 119th ranked
offense. But he has
switched quarterbacks,
from junior Chandler
Whitmer to Tim Boyle,
who turned 19 last week.
Boyle will become the first


true freshman to start for
the Huskies since Dan
Orlovsky made his debut
in October, 2001.
"They don't want me to
be the young inexperi-
enced freshman," Boyle
said. "They want me to be
an experienced senior,
who knows the game plan
and can do it really well."
Weist will face an old
friend in his first game.
He and USF coach Willie
Taggart were assistants to-
gether at Western Ken-
tucky for four years.
Taggart notched his first
win as a head coach, when
the Bulls upset Cincinnati
26-20 in their conference
opener


Associated Press
South Florida head coach Willie Taggart celebrates with
fans after the team defeated Cincinnati 26-20 last
Saturday in Tampa.


oday's main event


Associated Press
In this Oct. 6, 2012, file photo, Florida safety Matt Elam, right, forces LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. to
fumble the ball after a long reception at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville.

No. 17Florida travels to Death Valley to take on No. 10 LSU


Associated Press

BATON ROUGE, La. The
prospect of lining up against
Florida apparently brings back
some bad memories for LSU's
Odell Beckham Jr
Beckham declined multiple in-
terview requests leading up to Sat-
urday afternoon's clash between
the No. 17 Gators (4-1,3-0 SEC) and
10th-ranked Tigers (5-1, 2-1) in
Death Valley, even though he's hav-
ing a stellar season.
He's coming off one of the best
games of his career, making nine
catches for 179 yards and two
touchdowns in a victory at Missis-
sippi State last weekend. He leads
the nation in all-purpose yards
with 228.2, averaging 21.1 yards
each time he touches the ball. He's
even returned a missed field goal
for a 100-yard touchdown.
The thing is, about this time last
year, Beckham had one of the more
frustrating days of his career in
Gainesville. He fumbled following
a deep catch a turnover which
cost LSU one of its best scoring
chances on a day when points were


precious in a 14-6 loss to the
Gators. Beckham then refused to
speak to reporters for more than a
month afterward.
Now comes Beckham's chance to
exorcise some demons, but he'll
have to do it against one of the best
secondaries in the nation.
LSU quarterback Zach Metten-
berger even warned that the
Tigers would have to prepare
"very hard" to be mentally pre-
pared for "just how intense this
game is going to be."
Cornerbacks Loucheiz Purifoy
and Vernon Hargreaves III are
among the standouts on a Florida
defense that has yielded only 152
yards passing per game, the sixth
lowest average nationally Purifoy
had a sack, a forced fumble and re-
turned an interception for a touch-
down in last week's 30-10 win
against Arkansas. Hargreaves, a
freshman, leads the team with
three interceptions.
"They're all very talented play-
ers," Mettenberger said of
Florida's defensive backs. "But at
the same time, we have some very
talented players on the perimeter


for us at receiver and I think we
can complete some balls on them."
Likewise, Florida defenders un-
derstand they may be in for one of
their toughest tests this season.
"They definitely go up and get
the ball no matter if they are cov-
ered or not," Gators safety Jaylen
Watkins said of LSU's receivers.
"Mettenberger is going to put it
right on them and give them a
chance to get it every time, too.
We've got our work cut out for us
this week, but this is what we look
forward to as a secondary"
High stakes
LSU likely cannot afford a sec-
ond conference loss if it hopes to
catch unbeaten Alabama for the
SEC West crown and remain a BCS
contender Florida would remain
in contention in the SEC East even
with what would be its first league
loss, but its second overall defeat
would dampen the Gators' BCS
hopes. "This is kind of like an
elimination game," LSU line-
backer Lamin Barrow said. "It's
like we're both playing for our
lives right now"


SEC


East foes


battle

No. 7UGAto

face test from

No. 25Mizo

Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Geor-
gia's Aaron Murray won't
be the only accomplished
senior quarterback in
town Saturday
Murray is the SEC's new
career leader in passing
yards and is on the verge of
passing Tim Tebow as the
conference's all-time leader
in total offense. Those
records, plus wins over top
10 teams South Carolina
and LSU, have placed Mur-
ray in the national spotlight
for No. 7 Georgia.
James Franklin and
No. 25 Missouri also are
earning national respect.
Franklin threw four touch-
down passes to lead Mis-
souri (5-0, 1-0 Southeastern
Conference) to a 51-28 win
at Vanderbilt last week.
The win pushed the Tigers
into the Top 25.
'James is playing pretty
well," said Missouri coach
Gary Pinkel. "This will be
another test for him.
James' performance does
not surprise me right now
His leadership is great,
and he is kind of what I
thought he would be.
There are people around
him that can make plays."
Franklin will lead a bal-
anced Missouri offense
against a short-handed
Georgia team.
Georgia (4-1, 3-0) lost tail-
back Keith Marshall and
two receivers to injuries in
last week's 34-31 overtime
win at Tennessee.
Marshall and receiver
Justin Scott-Wesley were
lost for the season with in-
juries to their right knees.
Receiver Michael Bennett
will miss at least two
weeks after hurting his
right knee against the Vols.
"It definitely hurts but
we have a lot of talent and
great depth," Murray said.
"Our receivers position is
extremely deep. It's not
just three or four guys. We
have so many guys who
can play this year"


Shadow looms over Bradley, Marquez fight


Boxersfight tonight

with Pacquiao in

rear view mirror


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Juan Manuel
Marquez chased Manny Pacquiao
for three long, frustrating fights,
never getting the wins he thought
he surely deserved.
When he finally caught Pac-
quiao with a right hand out of
nowhere that left him face-first
on the canvas in their fourth fight,
Marquez was ready to move on.
"That chapter is closed," Mar-
quez said. "I had a great victory
over a great fighter like Pacquiao
and I want to keep that great feel-
ing. That fifth fight, I don't see
why"
Timothy Bradley also has some
history with Pacquiao, and it's
bittersweet. He got a win in a dis-
puted decision, but he never got
credit from boxing fans for the
win and he paid a price for it in


Associated Press
Boxers Timothy Bradley, left, and Juan Manuel Marquez face off for
photographers after a news conference Wednesday in Las Vegas.
Bradley is scheduled to defend his WBO welterweight title against
Marquez tonight.


his next fight.
The two meet Saturday night in
a scheduled 12-round welter-
weight title fight, with Pacquiao
half a world away Still, Pac-
quiao's shadow looms large even
as they get ready for a big payday
without him.


'After the Pacquiao fight nobody
gave me any respect" Bradley
said. "I had to go out and earn that
respect That's why I went out in
my last fight like I did. I wanted to
take him out and I wanted to send
a statement to the world."
Bradley did just that, but he


paid a terrible price. Never
known for his power punching,
he engaged in a brutal brawl with
Ruslan Provodnikov last March
that was almost scary to watch.
Bradley emerged with a narrow
decision win despite being bat-
tered early and knocked down in
the 12th round. But the punches
took such a toll that he went to a
neurologist to see what was wrong
and ended up spending two
months quietly in dark rooms try-
ing to get over the effects of what
he believes was a concussion he
suffered in the bout.
"Every fighter knows when he
enters the ring he may not come
out the same or come out at
all," Bradley said. "I just had to
figure it out."
Bradley and Marquez both
turned down offers from pro-
moter Bob Arum to fight Pac-
quiao again, even though they
could have made more money
doing it. Both had their reasons
and both will still make big pay-
checks, with Marquez guaranteed
$6 million and Bradley $4.1 mil-
lion for their title fight.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 5 4 1 0 8 17 10
Tampa Bay 4 3 1 0 6 14 9
Boston 3 2 1 0 4 7 4
Ottawa 3 1 0 2 4 8 9
Montreal 4 2 2 0 4 13 9
Detroit 4 2 2 0 4 8 11
Florida 5 2 3 0 4 13 21
Buffalo 5 0 4 1 1 5 14
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 4 3 1 0 6 15 9
Carolina 5 2 1 2 6 10 13
N.Y Islanders 4 2 1 1 5 14 10
Columbus 3 2 1 0 4 10 7
NewJersey 5 0 2 3 3 11 18
N.Y. Rangers 4 1 3 0 2 6 20
Washington 4 1 3 0 2 12 15
Philadelphia 5 1 4 0 2 6 12
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 4 4 0 0 8 13 3
St. Louis 3 3 0 0 6 14 4
Chicago 4 2 1 1 5 13 12
Dallas 3 2 1 0 4 8 6
Minnesota 4 1 1 2 4 9 11
Winnipeg 5 2 3 0 4 14 16
Nashville 4 1 3 0 2 6 13
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 4 4 0 0 8 21 5
Calgary 5 3 0 2 8 18 17
Anaheim 4 3 1 0 6 14 11
Vancouver 5 3 2 0 6 16 16
Phoenix 5 3 2 0 6 12 14
LosAngeles 5 3 2 0 6 13 14
Edmonton 4 1 3 0 2 12 19
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Los Angeles 2, Carolina 1, SO
Phoenix 2, Philadelphia 1
Florida 6, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 3, N.Y Islanders 2
Dallas 4, Winnipeg 1
Calgary 3, New Jersey 2
Today
Boston at Columbus, 2 p.m.
Edmonton atToronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Montreal atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Ottawa at San Jose, 10 p.m.



Glantz-Culver Line
For Oct. 12
Major League Baseball Playoffs
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Los Angeles -125 atSt. Louis +115
American League
at Boston -135 Detroit +125
Odds to Win Series
Boston -120 Detroit +100
NCAA Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Oklahoma-x 11 /213 /2 (57)Texas
at Michigan St. 6 9/2 (53) Indiana
at Virginia Tech 7 9 (42/2) Pittsburgh
atUMass 2/2 4/2 (44/2) Miami (Ohio)
atClemson 21 24/2 (62) Boston College
Buffalo 7/2 10/2 (51/2)atW.Mich.
at Ohio 10/2 18 (53) Cent. Michigan
atArmy 7 7/2 (55) E. Michigan
at Maryland 4 7 (44) Virginia
atUConn 6 5/2 (41)South Florida
at Duke 3/2 3 (57/2)Navy
Troy 16 17 (63/2) atGa. St.
Texas A&M 5 6 (76) at Mississippi
at Ball St. 11 14 (62/2) KentSt.
at Miss. St. 8'/2 10'/2 (52) Bowling Green
atN. Illinois 21 2232 (62)Akron
atTexasTech 17 14 (56) Iowa St.
atUTSA +312 2 (55) Rice
atWyoming 10 142 (69/2) New Mexico
Stanford 10 8/2 (55) at Utah
atBYU 4 7 (53/2) Georgia Tech
Nebraska 14 /215 (57) at Purdue
at Georgia 11 7/2 (64/2) Missouri
Baylor 10/2 17 (74) at Kansas St.
at LSU 6/2 6/2 (48) Florida
atArizonaSt. 24 26 (66/2) Colorado
Oregon 10 /213/2 (76) atWashington
at UCLA 23 25 (74) California
atWisconsin 9/2 10 (57/2) N'western
East Carolina 11 9 (54)atTulane
South Carolina 7 5/2 (51)atArkansas
Alabama 27 27 (52) at Kentucky
at Colorado St. Pk 3/2 (59) San Jose St.
atArkansas St. 24 24/2 (61) Idaho
Michigan 1 2/2 (50/2) at Penn St.
at NC State 4'/2 7 (54) Syracuse
at Houston 10 /29 (52/2) Memphis
UAB 6 7/2 (55)atFlU
Marshall 13 11/2 (55)atFAU
atTCU 24 24/2 (45/2) Kansas
atNorthTexas 4'/2 7 (53'/2) Middle Tenn.
atTexas St. 7 6/2 (45) La.-Monroe
BoiseSt. 7/ 6%/ (50/) at Utah St.
atWash. St. Pk 1% (63) Oregon St.
Tulsa 10 10% (63%) at UTEP
atUNLV 6% 9 (55) Hawaii
x-at Dallas
NFL
Tomorrow
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Kansas City 10 8% (40%) Oakland
Philadelphia 3 1% (46) atTampa Bay
Green Bay 3 2% (48%) at Baltimore
Detroit 3 2' (44'/2) at Cleveland
at Minnesota 2 2 (44) Carolina
at Houston 7 7 (42%) St. Louis
at N.Y Jets +2 2 (41) Pittsburgh
Cincinnati 7 7 (41%) at Buffalo
atSeattle 13% 13% (40/)Tennessee
at Denver 27% 26% (54) Jacksonville
atSan Fran. 11, 10'2 (412)Arizona
at N. England 3 2 (50'2) New Orleans
at Dallas 3' 5' (53'/2) Washington
Monday
Indianapolis 2% 1% (50) at San Diego



NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh

Denver
Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego


East
W L T
4 1 0
3 2 0
3 2 0
2 3 0
South
W L T
4 1 0
3 2 0
2 3 0
0 5 0
North
W L T
3 2 0
3 2 0
3 2 0
0 4 0
West
W L T
5 0 0
5 0 0
2 3 0
2 3 0


Pct PF
.800 139
.600 115
.400 93
.000 51

Pct PF
.600 117
.600 101
.600 94
.000 69

Pct PF
1.000 230
1.000 128
.400 98
.400 125


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 B3


FO the record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:


Thursday's winning
numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5:10 -14


5-of-5
4-of-5
3-of-5


1 winner
301
9,111


17-24-36
$209,086.94
$112.00
$10.00


CASH 3 (early)
4-9-3
CASH 3 (late)
7-8-3
PLAY 4 (early)
r 0-6-8-9
PLAY 4 (late)
3-7-5-8
TM
FANTASY 5
7-17-23-31-36
MEGA MONEY
2-13-19-32
MEGA BALL
18
MEGA MILLIONS
3-27-37-45-48
MEGA BALL
46


Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7:30 p.m. (ABC) Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500 race
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Japanese Grand Prix race
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at St. Louis Cardinals.
NLCS, Game 2
7:30 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS,
Game 1
NBA PRESEASON BASKETBALL
5 p.m. (NBA) Chicago Bulls vs. Washington Wizards
7:30 p.m. (NBA) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics
1:30 a.m. (NBA) Indiana Pacers vs Houston Rockets
BOATING
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing (Taped)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma at Texas
12 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Georgia
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Indiana at Michigan State
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Pittsburgh at Virginia Tech
12 p.m. (FS1) Iowa State at Texas Tech
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Lehigh at Columbia
12 p.m. (SUN) Kansas at Texas Christian
12:30 p.m. (CW) College Football Navy at Duke
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Florida at LSU
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Boston College at Clemson
3:30 p.m. (FOX) Baylor at Kansas State
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Northwestern at Wisconsin
3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Maryland
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Syracuse at North Carolina State
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Richmond at James Madison
4 p.m. (FS1) Oregon at Washington
5 p.m. (ESPN) Michigan at Penn State
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at Kentucky
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Georgia Tech at BYU
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Villanova at Towson
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Bowling Green at Mississippi State
8 p.m. (FS1)Tulsa at Texas-El Paso
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Texas A&M at Mississippi
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) California at UCLA
10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon State at Washington State
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Portugal Masters, Third
Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: SAS Championship,
Second Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Frys.com Open, Third Round
12 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia,
Final Round
GYMNASTICS
2 p.m. (NBC) 2013 World Artistic Championships (taped)
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh Penguins at Tampa Bay Lightning
8 p.m. (NHL) Buffalo Sabres at Chicago Blackhawks
MOTORCYCLE RACING
4 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship:
Malaysian Grand Prix
TENNIS
8 a.m. (TENNIS)ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Second
Semifinal
4:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
8:30 a.m. Citrus, Crystal River, Lecanto in Whispering Pines
Invitational


Dallas
Washington
N.Y. Giants


New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay


Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota


Seattle
San Francisco
Ariznna


2 3 0
1 3 0
0 6 0
South
W L T
5 0 0
1 3 0
1 4 0
0 4 0
North
W L T
4 2 0
3 2 0
2 2 0
1 3 0
West
W L T
4 1 0
3 2 0
3 ? 2


.400 152
.250 91
.000 103

Pct PF
1.000 134
.250 74
.200 122
.000 44

Pct PF
.667 172
.600 131
.500 118
.250 115

Pct PF
.800 137
.600 113
Rnn Q1


PA /A ... 1 / . ... ..
S St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103
95 Thursday's Game
139 Chicago 27, N.Y Giants 21
163 Sunday's Games
Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
PA Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
110 St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m.
94 Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
87 Philadelphia atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
110 Pittsburgh at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
PA Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
139 Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
58 Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
108 Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
129 New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami
PA Monday's Game
159 Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.


Nationwide

Dollar General
300 Results
Friday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
Note: Partial list
1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200 laps, 134 rating,
0 points, $73,940.
2. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 115.8, 43,
$57,100.
3. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 133.4, 43,
$42,500.
4. (10) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 116.4, 0,
$28,675.
5. (15) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 105.6, 0,
$23,650.
6.(12)JustinAllgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 94.2, 38,
$25,275.
7. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 113.1, 0,
$18,310.
8. (7) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 93.8, 37,
$22,970.
9. (13) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 88, 35,
$21,800.
10. (14) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 85.6, 34,
$22,000.
11. (30) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 77.6,
0, $14,050.
12. (11) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 82.9, 32,
$19,450.
13. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 103.2, 32,
$19,950.


Kyle Busch wins



Nationwide Series race


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Kyle Busch
proved he's still the man to beat on
the Nationwide Series particularly
when it comes to Charlotte Motor
Speedway
Busch raced to his 11th Nationwide
victory of the year Friday night, giving
him a season sweep on the 1 1/2-mile
track.
Busch edged Nationwide title con-
tenders Austin Dillon and Sam Hor-
nish Jr to win for the eighth time in
the series at his favorite track. Cou-
pled with his five Truck Series wins at
track, he broke the track victory
record with 13.
"I feel like I've really taken to this
place over the years," Busch said. "I
have it figured out in Camping Truck
and Nationwide but I seem to have a
little bit of a struggle on the Cup side.
We'll see if we can't change that
around on Saturday I'd like to score
my first Cup Series win here."
Busch and wife Samantha donated
the winnings from the race to the
Pretty in Pink Foundation that pro-
vides financial assistance and support
to underinsured and uninsured North
Carolinians with breast cancer
The victory pushed Busch's series
record to 62. He has 19 victories this



CALL
Continued from Page B1

of bad spots. They had to come back and
answer the bell," Citrus head coach Ray-
bum Greene said of his defense. 'They
showed a lot of heart and guts tonight"
Moore also showed heart and com-
posure. His scramble out of the pocket




OUTRACE
Continued from Page B1

up the punt block and one of Autry's
picks on its ensuing couple of drives.
After Brattin shanked a 6-yard
punt from the Tiger 9-yard line later
in the third, it looked like the down-
pour would continue for the Tigers.
But sophomore Quay Smith scooped
a fumble in the North Marion back-
field and returned it to inside the
Colt 5. An illegal block penalty
brought the ball back to midfield, but
- with the help of a 20-yard pass
from Jones (5 for 15 passing, 63 yards)
to junior running back Bubba Sims -
the Tigers still cashed on an 8-yard
scoring rush by junior Kane Parks
with three minutes remaining in the
quarter
Midway into the first quarter, Jones
lost the ball on a sack by senior Bran-
don Charles, and junior Shawn Gibbs
recovered at the Tiger 5, allowing sen-
ior running back Derrick Harmon to


year in NASCAR's three national se-
ries, also winning four times each in
Cup and Truck. Overall, he has 124
victories in the three series, winning
28 times in Cup and 34 in the Truck
circuit.
The win wasn't quite as easy as his
Nationwide victory at the track in May
when he led 186 of the 200 laps.
Busch, who started from the pole, only
led 36 laps this time after struggling
during the first half of the race.
He took the lead from Hornish with
eight laps to go and pulled away
"It's very frustrating to be leading
with 10 laps to go and to get blown
away by the 54 car," Hornish said.
Busch said he stole a page from
Kyle Larson, who ran well at the top
of the track for most of the night be-
fore nicking the wall late and finish-
ing 13th.
"It's good to be young and dumb,"
Busch said with a laugh. "He taught us
old wily veterans something. He drove
past me and I said, 'I better try that."'
The night ended the same way it
began in the points standings- with
Dillon holding an eight-point lead
over Hornish. Hornish finished a spot
behind Dillon in third, but received
bonus points for leading the most laps
essentially making Friday night's race
a push.


and throw to find wide receiver Sam
Franklin in the end zone with 4:04 left
in the third quarter proved to be the
game-winner
"I seen Des (Desmond Franklin)
was covered and I looked over to Sam
and fired a jump ball," Moore said of
the play "Sam's 6'3"...what else could
you ask for?"
The Hurricanes host county rival
Lecanto at 7:30 p.m. Friday


put his team on the board one play
later
The teams combined for five first
downs and 86 yards in the opening
half.
Sims, a junior who led the area in
rushing with 910 yards entering the
game, had a game-high 64 yards on 19
touches. Colts junior James Allen
paced his team with 56 yards and a
touchdown on 13 carries.
Sophomore Zahid Hujurat had a
team-high 10 solo tackles for his
Tigers. Dunnellon senior cornerback
Anthony Small nearly came up with a
pick 6 for Dunnellon shortly before
halftime, which would have tied the
score at 7-7.
"There were just physical and
strong, and we couldn't get the ball in
the middle of the field," Dunnellon
head coach Frank Beasley said. "They
stoned us on the run there. Then we
got to the third quarter and it just kind
of rolled on us.
"We've got two big games left, so
we're gonna come back and get to
work. That's just what we do."


MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle
Crystal River senior Ty Reynolds tries to tackle Santa Fe's Kenyatta Paterson
during the first half of the Pirates' 30-14 loss to the Raiders.


TURNOVERS
Continued from Page BI

third play of the second half to pull
the Pirates within 16-14 following a
failed two-point conversion.
"We knew coming in No. 17
(Reynolds) is a playmaker and No. 12
(Ryan) could chuck it," Wiles said.
The Pirates got the ball back four
plays later after senior linebacker
Destin Dawsy pounced on a Raiders
fumble to set Crystal River up at
Santa Fe's 45. After a 9-yard run by
Antonio Franklin the longest gain
of the night on the ground for the team
- the Pirates had an incompletion, a
dropped pass by Reynolds and then
an interception by the Raiders' Lee
Washington on fourth down to end a
promising possession.
Reynolds scored a measure of re-
demption by picking off a fourth-down
pass by Santa Fe's Marcus Archer but
Crystal River went three-and-out and
the Raiders went 69 yards in four min-
utes helped by a 15-yard personal
foul penalty on the Pirates and
made it 23-14 on Archer's five-yard
scoring scamper
In the first half, Santa Fe raced out
to a 16-0 lead behind a two-yard score
by Tray Presley and three short field
goals by Austin Maurice. The Pirates,


having no success running the ball,
went to a pass-heavy hurry-up offense
on their final possession of the first
half that ended in the end zone when
Collin Ryan hooked up with Rodney
Vickers on a 14-yard strike. Reynolds
ran it in for the two-point conversion
to make the halftime score 16-8.
"There was this illusion that (the
players) thought Santa Fe was a bad
team," Varnadore said. "They're not,
they're a physical team.....We're going
to fix that and the kids who want to fix
that on Monday will be the kids who
play"
Ryan, a Pirates junior, went 10 of 22
passing for 189 yards, two touchdowns
and four interceptions.
For Santa Fe, Kenyatta Paterson in-
tercepted two passes while Jermari
Ford and Washington each had one.
Austin Gay recovered a fumble.
Archer was a dual threat for Santa
Fe, rushing 13 times for 87 yards and a
TD, while also throwing for 71 yards
and an interception. Presley carried
the ball a game-high 23 times for 72
yards.
Crystal River plays 7:30 p.m. Friday
at Gainesville Eastside in another
District 5A-5 contest
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the
Chronicle sports editor He can be
emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleon-
line.com or reached at 352-564-2928.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Panthers fall in final Crusadersbli

moments at Mitchell STEVECpUNnGLE


TIM PERSON
Correspondent

PORT RICHEY The Mitchell
Mustangs (4-3) pulled off a dramatic
29-25 win over Lecanto on Friday
night in the last minute of play to es-
cape with the victory for the home
crowd.
Despite the tough lc-.-.
Panthers head coach
McKinley Rolle was proud
of the effort.
"I am very proud of
my guys, and I was sure
to let them know that," Rolle said.
"They fought hard and didn't quit."
The Mustangs showed no signs of
life in the first half while being shut
out 13-0 after Lecanto (2-4) rushed
in two touchdowns, both from 4
yards out The second half provided
plenty of offense and fireworks as
both teams battled back and forth.
Mitchell finally put itself on the
board on its opening drive of the
third qaurter when quarterback
Taylor Schenider took an 8-yard
run up the right side to pull within
six points.
Lecanto's next drive resulted in a


fumble in which the Mustangs
would capitalize on. Ryan Marsh
gave Mitchell the lead after a 34-
yard touchdown run. The Panthers
answered right back with a 5-yard
run of their own on the first play of
the fourth quarter for the 19-14
lead.
The fireworks would con-
t nue on the very next play
when Marsh topped his
previous run with a 46-
yard run down the side-
line, giving Mitchell the
lead yet again. Four min-
utes later Lecanto regained the
lead on a 4-yard scoring run by jun-
ior Ardante Anderson.
But the play of the night belonged
to Mitchell when with just 1:05
left in the game down by 4,
Schneider launched a 55-yard pass
to Zach Rapaport for the final score
of the game.
For Lecanto, Anderson finished
with 14 rushes for 58 yards and
three touchdowns.
"I told him we were going to be
leaning on him tonight" Rolle said.
Lecanto travels to Citrus this Fri-
day for a 7:30 p.m. kickoff.


BROOKSVILLE Seven Rivers Christian
football head coach Dave Iwaniec was sur-
prised -albeit not pleasantly- by the result of
the Warriors' division matchup with visiting
Ocala Christian Academy Friday
night, as the Crusaders reached _
the end zone on their first five
possessions, cruising to a 47-0 win
over Seven Rivers.
The Warriors (0-6, 0-5 in Sun-
shine State Athletic Conference,
North Division) mustered just 34
yards of total offense while gaining one
first down on the night Seven Rivers also
turned the ball over twice.
Ocala Christian, on the other hand, put on
an impressive offensive display led by quar-
terback Trevor Smith.
Smith finished 12-for-15 passing for 214 yards
and three touchdowns, while also rushing for
three scores on nine carries for 49 yards.
From their own 48-yard line, it took the Cru-
saders (2-4, 2-3) just two minutes on the open-
ing drive to start the rout. After picking up a
pair of first downs, Smith found David Cizma-
dia deep down the right sideline behind Seven
Rivers coverage for a 38-yard touchdown.
Ocala Christian consistently started posses-
sions with the ball at midfield or better, while
the Warriors offense continued to struggle.
A Cizmadia four-yard run made it 14-0, then a


ank Warriors


Seven Rivers fumbled snap while going for it
on fourth down led to a 14-yard pass from Smith
to Nick Weitloff for another score to bring it to
20-0 at the end of the first quarter
"It was good until we got off the bus. It wasn't
what we expected," Iwaniec said. "We thought
we could really win this football game this
week"
A 35-0 halftime disadvantage led to a run-
ning clock throughout the second half,
vsas Seven Rivers held Ocala Christian
scoreless for the third quarter
Smith passed for a touchdown and
rushed for another in the fourth (the
InWarriors blocked both point after
Attempts) to round out the 47-0
|final.
"We can't move the football
right now," said Iwaniec, "although Will
(Ellis), our eighth-grade quarterback, came in
and completed his first high school pass and
went 5-for-10, so that's a good night for him."
Ellis spread it out to four different receivers
in the second half, but the running game stalled.
And once again, Seven Rivers was outmatched
athletically and physically
"We're undersized, we're getting beat at the
line of scrimmage, and we've got a bunch of
dinged up kids," Iwaniec said.
John Mazza and Tony Latorraca each had
sacks for the Warriors.
Seven Rivers will travel to Ocoee to face Cen-
tral Florida Christian Academy Friday for a
7:30 p.m. start


M tPanthers double
US tops Jamaica Pterdub
________________ pPenguins


Soccer team

clinches first

in World Cup

qualifying

group

Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. -
Graham Zusi and Jozy Alti-
dore scored second-half
goals to give the United
States a 2-0 victory over Ja-
maica on Friday night and
clinch first place for the
Americans in their World
Cup qualifying group for
the third straight cycle.
The sides had played to a
stalemate through the first
77 minutes before Alejan-
dro Bedoya got the ball on
the wing. He crossed to
Zusi, whose shot from about
12 yards beat goalkeeper
DuWayne Kerr and ignited
his home-team crowd of
18,467 decked out in red,
white and blue.
Fans packed into Sport-
ing Park had barely settled
back down before Edgar
Castillo, like Zusi a second-
half substitute, found Alti-
dore in front of an open net
for another goal in the 81st
minute. Altidore scored for
his sixth straight interna-
tional start.
The U.S. (6-2-1), which
clinched its seventh
straight World Cup berth
last month, has 19 points in
North and Central Ameri-
can and Caribbean quali-
fying and a four-point lead
over second-place Costa
Rica (4-2-3), which lost 1-0
at third-place Honduras
(4-3-2).
Jamaica (0-5-4), whose
only World Cup appear-
ance was in 1998, was
eliminated.
Zusi, who stars for Sport-
ing KC, had entered at the
start of the second half for
Landon Donovan and was
cheered wildly by his home
fans. He returned the pas-
sion after he scored his
second international goal,


Associated Press
Jamaica forward Ryan Johnson, left, and U.S. defender Brad Evans, right, head the ball
Friday in the second half of a World Cup qualifier soccer match at Sporting Park in
Kansas City, Kan. The United States won 2-0.


pumping his fist and
celebrating with his
teammates.
Altidore extended his
own team record by scoring
in his sixth straight games.
The goal was his eighth of
the year and his fourth in
World Cup qualifiers.
It was another bitter de-
feat to the U.S. forJamaica,
which lost 2-1 on June 7 in


Kingston when Brad Evans
scored in second-half stop-
page time. The Reggae
Boyz fell to 1-13-8 against
the U.S., including 1-5-6 in
qualifiers.
Still alive at the onset -
at least mathematically -
Jamaica pressed the attack
in the opening minutes,
dominating possession and
pestering goalkeeper Tim


Howard.
Demar Phillips sent a
free kick toward the goal
that Howard got his mitts
on, and Evans managed to
clear it just before Darren
Mattocks could get his foot
on it in front of an open
goal.
Jamaica had precious
few decent scoring looks
the rest of the night


Associated Press

SUNRISE Brad
Boyes scored two goals,
Tomas Fleischmann had
a goal and three assists,
and the Florida Panthers
snapped a three-game
losing streak with a 6-3
win over the Pittsburgh
Penguins in their home
opener on Friday night.
Aleksander Barkov,
Jonathan Huberdeau,
and Kris Versteeg also
scored for Florida and
Jacob Markstrom
stopped 36 shots.
Pascal Dupuis, Craig
Adams, and Evgeni
Malkin scored for Pitts-
burgh, which lost for the
first time in four games.
Jeff Zatkoff made 24
saves in his NHL debut.
Coyotes 2,
Flyers 1
PHILADELPHIA- Oliver
Ekman-Larsson scored the
winner for Phoenix with
12.9 seconds left in the
second period and Thomas
Greiss made the lead stand
up in the third period to lift
the Coyotes to a 2-1 win
over the Philadelphia
Flyers.
Greiss made 36 saves
and Rob Klinkhammer
opened the scoring for
Phoenix at 2:41 of the first.
Max Talbot scored the
lone goal for the punchless
Flyers, who have only six
goals this season and
dropped to 1-4.
Kings 2,
Hurricanes 1
RALEIGH, N.C. -Jeff
Carter scored the shootout
winner to lift the Los Ange-
les Kings to a 2-1
victory over the Carolina
Hurricanes.
Dwight King also scored
for the Kings while
Jonathan Quick made 27
saves. Jeff Skinner had
Carolina's goal while Cam
Ward stopped 36 shots.
Quick stopped Nathan
Gerbe, Alexander Semin
and Skinner in the shootout
to make Carter's goal hold


up as the winner.
Ward, Carolina's No. 1
netminder, has yet to win a
game this season both
of the Hurricanes' victories
have come with back-up
Anton Khudobin in net.
Blackhawks 3,
Islanders 2
CHICAGO Michal
Handzus scored the go-
ahead goal 6:45 into the
second period and the
Chicago Blackhawks held
on for a 3-2 win over the
New York Islanders.
Chicago's Jonathan
Toews and rookie Joakim
Nordstrom connected in
the first period, while Dun-
can Keith had two assists.
Nordstrom's goal was his
first in the NHL.
Josh Bailey scored at
19:06 of the first period
and Kyle Okposo scored
49 seconds later for the Is-
landers (2-1-1), who
lost their first game in
regulation.
Chicago's Nikolai
Khabibulin made 17 saves
and New York's Kevin
Poulin finished with 25 as
both goaltenders made
their first starts this
season.
Stars 4, Jets 1
WINNIPEG, Manitoba-
Tyler Seguin had two goals
and two assists to lead the
Dallas Stars to a 4-1 victory
over the Winnipeg Jets.
Seguin came into the
game with only one assist
this season in the two
games Dallas had played.
The No. 2 overall pick in the
2010 NHL draft was traded
to the Stars by Boston in
July.
Alex Chiasson and Jamie
Benn also scored for Dal-
las, which last played Satur-
day at home. The Jets
(2-3-0) are below .500 after
Thursday's 2-1 loss in
Minnesota.
Benn had two assists and
Chiasson had one.
Blake Wheeler scored his
first goal of the season for
the Jets in the third period.


Citrus remains unbeaten


CARL MCDERMOTT
Correspondent

INVERNESS On a beautiful fall day on
the Lakeside golf course the girls teams from
Lecanto and Citrus met for the final match
before this Monday's district championship.
The Hurricanes remained undefeated in
match play as they came away with a 205-224
victory over the Panthers. Citrus coach Dave
Hamilton was thrilled with the outcome of a
very successful regular season.
"This is the first time in a long time we
have gone undefeated, maybe the first time
ever," Hamilton said.
Sophomore Camrin Kersh kept up her stel-
lar play as she shot a match-low 45 for the
nine holes to win another medal. She had 3
pars for the round. Kersh was followed by fel-
low sophomore Sarah Taulbee with a 52.
Rounding out the Hurricanes scoring was
Caitlin Johnston with a 53 and Kayla
Woodard with a 55.
On the Panthers' side, senior Chynna Liu
came in with a 48 that included 2 pars. Soph-


more Madieson Pollazo carded a 54 and
Kierah Tettenburn had a 57. A 65 by Jessica
Fee closed out the scoring.
Lecanto coach Doug Warren feels his team
is not playing golf up to their potential.
"We are struggling going into the districts.
Our recent scores are not indicative of how
we can play," Warren said.
Coach Hamilton is not convinced he has
the superior squad for this year's district
match and still believes his team needs to
look out for the Panthers.
"We're playing well," Hamilton said. "I feel
we are getting there but Lecanto has set the
bar very high over the past few years. I still
feel they are the team to beat."
He went on to say how much he has en-
joyed this season.
"These girls are a joy to coach. They have
overcome a lot of adversity but have hung in
there. They make my job easy," Hamilton said.
Both the Hurricanes and the Panthers next
take to the links on Monday along with Crys-
tal River and South Sumter for the district
tournament.


Koepka leads Frys.com
SAN MARTIN, Calif. -After a year
spent traveling the world, Brooks
Koepka suddenly is in a position to
play a lot more golf at home.
In his first regular PGATour event,
Koepka surged to the top of the
leaderboard Friday in the Frys.com
Open with a 7-under 64, giving him a
one-shot lead over Jason Kokrak
going into the weekend at CordeValle.
Kokrak, a runner-up at this event
last year, hit 6-iron to the par-5 ninth to
a foot for eagle and a 65.
Koepka, a 23-year-old Floridian, re-
ceived a sponsor's exemption into the
PGA Tour season opener between
stops in Scotland and Shanghai. He
had no status at the start of the year
after failing to advance beyond the
second stage of Q-school last year. In-
stead of trying to qualify for Web.com
Tour events, Koepka packed his bags
and passport for a 15-country journey
that has served him well.


Lee maintains lead
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -
South Korea's llhee Lee maintained
the lead in the LPGA Malaysia, and
18-year-old American Lexi Thompson
shot an 8-under 63 to move within
one.
Lee had a 65 to reach 13-under 129
at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country
Club. Thompson surged on the back
nine with four birdies and an eagle.
Faldo fails to finish
Champions event
CARY, N.C. Larry Nelson shot
his age for a share of the lead in the
SAS Championship, while Nick Faldo
failed to finish the round in his first reg-
ular Champions Tour event.
The 66-year-old Nelson had a 6-
under 66 to join Russ Cochran and
Mark Mouland atop the leaderboard at
Prestonwood. Faldo was 1 over after
12 holes when he withdrew because
of an elbow injury.


I GofBRIEFS


B4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kelly's choice paved road for Schiano


Eagles' head coach

faces team he

turned down


Associated Press


PHILADELPHIA If
Chip Kelly hadn't turned
the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers down, Greg
Schiano might not
be in the NFL.
The two coaches
can talk about their
career paths when
the Philadelphia
Eagles (2-3) visit the
Buccaneers (0-4) on
Sunday
Two years ago, the
Glazer family tried
to lure Kelly away from
Oregon. The three
Glazer brothers and
general manager Marc
Dominik met Kelly on
the road while he was
on a recruiting trip,
made a pitch and of-
fered him the job in
Tampa.
"I was impressed with the three
Glazer brothers and impressed
with Marc Dominik," Kelly re-
called. "But it was more a deci-
sion to stay at Oregon than it was
to go anywhere in the NFL. I did-
n't want to leave the staff at Ore-
gon at that time and I didn't want
to leave the players at Oregon at
that time. I didn't have NFL
aspirations."
Schiano was having similar
feelings about leaving Rutgers. He
took over a struggling program in
central New Jersey and turned it
into a Big East contender during
an 11-year run with the Scarlet
Knights.
Several teams expressed inter-
est in Schiano over the years, but
he wasn't ready to make the jump
to the NFL.
It took Kelly saying "No" to the


n
r
y
v
f
s


Before Greg Schiano, right, became
S Tam pa Bay's head coach.
Philadelphia Eagles head coach
Chip Kelly, left, turned down the
Buccaneers. Kelly also turned
down the Browns and Eagles a year
later before changing his mind and
leaving Oregon. When the
Buccaneers and Eagles meet
Sunday, the two coaches will be
on opposite sidelines.
Associated Press














....-


Buccaneers to convince him it playoff game since capturing the
was his time. Super Bowl title in 2002.
"That's kind of the reason I "Sometimes you don't realize
knew I really wanted the job," you want something until you
Schiano said in a conference call don't have it," Schiano said.
this week. "I really loved my time "Then in a few hours there was an
at Rutgers and had plenty of op- opportunity to maybe be involved
portunities to go elsewhere, and with it again and that's when I
at the end I just never felt like it kind of said, 'You know what? I re-
was right. One of the things that ally do want to do this,' and fortu-
actually really led me to believe nately it worked out."
that this was the time was when I The Buccaneers started 1-3
thought that Chip had accepted under Schiano before winning
the job, I was angry I was disap- five of six. They were 6-4 and in
pointed is a better word probably the playoff mix until a five-game
So that kind of told me that I did losing streak knocked them out of
want it." it. Now they're winless and in
So Kelly remained at Oregon disarray
and Schiano accepted the chal- Still, Schiano has no regrets.
lenge of trying to build the Bucca- "It's a great organization that I
neers into winners. Tampa was work for, great ownership, a great
coming off a 4-12 season under GM in Mark Dominik and I'm ex-
Raheem Morris and hadn't won a cited," he said. "I think we have a


good football team. We struggled
to start the season but I'm opti-
mistic going forward that we're
going to play good football."
Meanwhile, Kelly turned down
the Cleveland Browns and Eagles
last January before changing his
mind and accepting Philadel-
phia's offer to replace Andy Reid.
He doesn't second-guess himself
"I don't look at decisions as
tough. I don't look at decisions as
difficult," he said. "You get all the
information necessary and you
make the decision and move for-
ward. We had an outstanding year
staying at Oregon, and those mem-
ories we had there, those players
that I got an opportunity to coach,
that staff I was with, I love those
guys and still love those guys. I
think it was a good decision for
me at that point in time."


Peterson mourns death of 2-year-old son
Associated Press confirmed the death of the and was ordered held on connection to the AP on spoke softly while taking
child, who had been in crit- $750,000 cash bond. condition of anonymity be- questions at his locker
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. ical condition in a hospital Peterson declined to talk cause Peterson had re- "I'll be ready to roll, fo
- Minnesota Vikings run- with severe head injuries about the case after prac- quested privacy caused Peterson said. ":
ling back Adrian Peterson since Wednesday The boy tice Friday, and prosecutors Speaking to reporters will be playing Sunday
nourned the death of his died at 11:43 a.m. at San- and police in South Dakota about an hour after the without a doubt"
moung son Friday, while ford USD Medical Center declined to confirm the boy time of death, Peterson said Peterson is second in the
words of supportpoured in in Sioux Falls after being was his son. However, a he was certain he'll play NFL with 421 yards rush
rom all corners of the removed from life support, person with knowledge of Sunday against Carolina. ing and first in the league
ports world. Wollman said. the situation confirmed the He smiled politely and with five touchdowns.


Authorities said a 2-year-
old boy died Friday of in-
juries suffered in an
alleged child abuse case in
South Dakota, and a person
with knowledge of the situ-
ation told The Associated
Press the boy was Peter-
son's son.
Lincoln County State's
Attorney Tom Wollman


g

I
Y,

ie

ie


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Wollman said he'll re-
view police and medical re-
ports before making further
decisions about criminal
charges, possibly by early
next week. Joseph Patter-
son, 27, was charged with
aggravated assault and ag-
gravated battery in the
child's death. He had a
court appearance Friday


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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 B5






Buccaneers
confirm third
player has MRSA
TAMPA-The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers have
announced that a third
player has been diag-
nosed with MRSA, a day
after announcing offen-
sive lineman Carl Nicks
is being treated for a re-
currence of the staph
infection.
Coach Greg Schiano
declined to identify the
player on Friday, saying
the player requested his
name not be released.
NFL.com reported the
player was cornerback
Johnthan Banks. He was
the only new addition
Friday to the injury re-
port, which said the
rookie did not practice
due to illness. Banks is
listed as questionable for
Sunday's game against
Philadelphia.
Nicks, who along with
Lawrence Tynes was di-
agnosed as having
MRSA in August, also
sat out practice. He is
questionable to play
against Philadelphia.
The team flew in an in-
fectious disease expert
to answer questions
players had before
practice.
Jets' Winslow
suspended four
games by NFL
FLORHAM PARK, N.J.
New York Jets tight
end Kellen Winslow Jr.
has been suspended
without pay for four
games by the NFL for vi-
olating the league's pol-
icy on performance
enhancing substances.
Winslow, the team's
leading receiver with 17
catches, will immediately
begin his suspension,
which was announced by
the league Friday. He will
be eligible to return to the
Jets' active roster on
Nov. 4, following New
York's game against New
Orleans on Nov. 3.
-From wire reports




B6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 AUTO RACING CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jefferson enjoys

time racing in

Open WheelMods

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Wayne Jefferson loves the
Open Wheel Modified class.
He got his racing nickname -
"Rocket Man" while racing
street stocks. And he's competed
successfully in Super Late Mod-
els, even before getting into the
Open Wheel Modifieds. But the
42-year-old Jefferson, who lives
just down the
street from
Clearwater's
Showtime
Speedway, found
his passion for
the Modifieds
around 1999.
"Ifts a lot more
Wayne down-to-Earth
Jefferson type of racing as
far as financially
and parts and technology," said
Jefferson, who compared the
transition from a Late Model to a
modified as going from a Cadillac
to a pickup truck. "The Super
Late Models are so technical, it's
all about the money and techni-
calities of everything. I had just as
much success in the Late Models,
but I just didn't have as much fun.
"Me and my buddies can hang
out and drink beer after the
races now," he continued. "Not
that you can't do that with the
Late Models, it's just so much
more serious. You've got to have
10 guys and all this equipment.
But you can bring your modified
here on an open trailer with one
guy and be just as competitive as
anybody There're more working
guys in this class. It's still a real
racecar, but it's not near as tech-
nical or expensive to do it. I just
took a feel to the cars. It's weird,
they just fit me."
They like Jefferson too. He's
won five championships in the
class two at DeSoto Super
Speedway and three at Charlotte
County His personal highlight is
winning and breaking a track
record at Tennessee's famed
Bristol Motor Speedway in 2011.
He also won Ocala Speedway's
Blue/Gray 200 for a $5,000 payout
in 2007.


BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Wayne Jefferson, of Clearwater, is a huge fan of competing in the Open Wheel Modifieds class.


Jefferson estimates he wins at
least one to two races a year at
Citrus. This year in Inverness, he
won a Florida United Promoters
Series event in May, and later
scored a feature win in local sea-
son action. Last Saturday, in a
new car owned by Jim Edwards,
he finished second.
In the FUPS win, Jefferson got
out of his car during a red flag to
check his tire. Initially FUPS of-
ficials ruled it a penalty. But Jef-
ferson and his crew pointed out
that there was no such rule, and
his lead position was restored
before racing resumed. After-
ward, FUPS made a rule ban-
ning drivers from exiting their
cars during races.
"I wasn't trying to cheat the
system," Jefferson said. "We used
to be allowed to get out of the car
everywhere I went. At DeSoto,
they used to let you have a tire
gauge in your car That's why I
didn't think nothing about it.
That's a new series, and they just
didn't realize we had been al-
lowed to do that. Even here, (Cit-
rus general manager Don)
'Critter' (Cretty) said they allow


them to get out sometimes. The
opportunity doesn't arise that
often."
Jefferson may occasionally get
out of a car, but he's never away
from racing. He's been around a
track since his mother was preg-
nant with him.
"I've been a part of it my whole
life," he said. "With Showtime
right down the street from my
house, I ride out there during the
week and help. I'll cut grass,
clean up, do whatever they need.
I just like being around it. Even
if I wasn't racing anymore, I'd
still be helping somebody and
watching."
Jefferson's "Rocket Man" pseu-
donym came from a friend and
an early racing team.
"When I first started, racing
Street Stocks, me and my buddy
called our team Rocket Ship Mo-
torsports, just being funny Four
or five of us had a shop together,
so we started calling our whole
team Rocket Ship Motorsports,
and we had T-shirts and every-
thing. Well one of my buddies,
who was always winning races,
came in the shop one day and he


said, 'Rocket Man!' And it's been
stuck to me ever since."
Jefferson competes against
Troy Robinson, who is known as
'the Batman.'
"I love that stuff," Jefferson
said. "People don't know who
Troy Robinson is, necessarily,
but they know who Batman is."
Jefferson doesn't need a big
team these days. He has three
regulars Tony Carreno, Terry
Strauser and Robbie Booze -
who stay by his side, and he's al-
ways joined by his young son
Chase.
"That's our crew," Jefferson
said. "It's a small deal. We're all
friends outside of racing and
work, so we hang out even when
we're not at the track."
Jefferson said he's friends with
most of his competitors as well.
"I love this class. I have fun
with it. I'm good with all the guys
and drivers that we race with."
Open Wheel Modifieds are
next scheduled to run at Citrus
on Oct. 26. The Halloween-
themed night will include $5
grandstand admission for adults
and free entry for kids under 12.


Citrus County
Speedway schedule
KEY
SLM=Super Late Models
OWM=Open Wheel Modifieds
SP=Sportsman
MMS=Mod Mini Stocks
SS=Street Stocks
MS=Mini Stocks
Ps=Pure Stocks
HD=Hornet Division
PF8=Pro Figure-8s
F8=Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s
FUPS=Florida United Promoters Series
TBARA=Tampa Bay Area Racing Association
DAARA=Daytona Antique Auto Racing
Association
DWARFS
S.E.C.K.S.=South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS
Oct. 12: SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD
Oct. 19:TBARA, SS, PS, F8, MIDGETS
Oct. 26: OWM, SP SS, PS, MS, PF8 SPECIAL
Nov. 2: FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD, LEGENDS,
BANDOLEROS
Nov. 9: OWM, SP, MS, PS, DWARFs, PF8
Points standings
Super Late Models
Car# Name Points
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 520
1 Dale Sanders 507
23 Todd Brown 499
123 Jon Brown 451
110 Steve Dorer 421
Open Wheel Mods
Car# Name Points
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 928
0 Troy Robinson 903
2 Steven Hise 879
18 Shane Butler 857
43 Gator Hise 565
Mod Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
33 ChrisAllen 1,140
44 Michael Lawhorn 1,091
99 Leroy Moore 1,035
24 Phil Edwards 966
47 Richard Kuhn 962
Sportsman
Car# Name Points
17 Mike Bell 941
66 Andy Nicholls 876
114 John Buzinec 823
4 Jay Witforth 807
01 Tom Posavec 727
Street Stocks
Car# Name Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 1,879
48 Dora Throne 1,798
16 J.D.Goff 1,640
8 TimWilson 1,347
6 Phillip Robinson 839
Pure Stocks
Car# Name Points
72 Karlin Ray 1,657
3 Jason Waller 1,643
45 James Johnston 1,639
44 Glen Colyer 1,435
32 Mike Autenrieth 948
Mini Stocks
Car# Name Points
98 Kevin Stone 1,827
73 Jason Terry 1,792
22 Mark Patterson 1,609
11 Jerry Daniels 1,570
20 Shannon Kennedy 1,326
Pro Figure-8s
Car# Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 406
94 Charlie Meyer 394
15 William Stansbury 282
86 Justin Meyer 202
33 Pnut Higginbotham 192
Reg. Figure-8s
Car# Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 686
5 Pnut Higginbotham 674
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 664
51 Travis Nichols 574
45 James Johnston 278


Super Late Model race highlights tonight's action


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Tonight brings the first
of the final two Super Late
Model points races of the
season, as the prestigious
class runs 50 laps at the
Citrus County Speedway
Street Stocks, Pure
Stocks and Hornets are also
part of the racing card, as is
the Modified Mini Stock


class, which appears for the
first time in a month.
At the top of the Late
Model standings, local leg-
end Herb Neumann Jr, a
12-time overall champion
who also is leading the
Open Wheel Modified
class, is after his seventh
championship in the divi-
sion since 2001. Neumann,
of Inverness, leads
Lecanto's Dale Sanders by


13 points. The pair each
have a Late Model feature
win this year
Todd Brown trails
Sanders by eight points in
third place, and sits 30
points ahead of his son,
Jon Brown.
With a 49-point advan-
tage on his friend Michael
Lawhorn, Bushnell's Chris
Allen (three feature wins,
four heat wins) is poised to


bring home his first cham-
pionship in the Modified
Mini Stock class. Allen
won a title in the Bomber
class (now Pure Stocks) his
rookie season in 1992.
Curtis Flanagan picked
up his 47th win in his black
No. 3 and his 10th of the
year -in last Saturday's
Street Stock feature. He's
on his way to collecting a
fourth championship in


the class, as he leads
second-place Dora Thorne
by 81 points.
Karlin Ray a 16-year-old
up-and-comer from Floral
City, is leading Jason
Waller by 14 points in the
Pure Stock standings. Ray
(six heat wins) has seven
feature wins, and Waller,
also a relative newbie to
the class, has a second-
best four feature wins.


Heat races begin at 5:30
p.m. Grandstand gates
open at 4 p.m. Prices are
$13 for adults, $9 for sen-
iors and students and $5
for children age 11 and
under (children under 42
inches are free). Pits ad-
missions are $25 for
adults, $20 for children 11
and under, and free for
children under 5 years
old.


r Pan rna


chronicleonline.com

your news. anywhere, anytime. M


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RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THQUOTABLE


POPE


. .



6LH


New church leader's populist style keeps


Associated Press

VATICAN CITY

grabbed headlines
with his off-the-cuff
homilies, crowd-
pleasing one-liners and
lengthy interviews during
which he has pontificated
on everything from the
church's "obsession" with
rules to how he won't
judge gays. But his
chattiness has gotten him
into some trouble, and the
Vatican has gone into
damage-control mode to
clarify, correct or put his
comments into context.
Here's a look at some of
Francis' more eyebrow-
raising comments, and the
efforts by the Vatican's
spin doctors to address
them.


Did Francis really consider
turning down the job?
In an interview with the Rome
daily La Repubblica, editor Euge-
nio Scalfari quoted the pope as
saying he was "seized by a great
anxiety" moments after his elec-
tion and asked the cardinals in
the Sistine Chapel to give him a
few minutes' time to think things
over
"To make it go away and relax, I
closed my eyes and made every
thought disappear, even the
thought of refusing to accept the
position, as the liturgical proce-
dure allows," he was quoted as
saying. 'At a certain point I was
filled with a great light. It lasted a
moment, but to me it seemed very
long. Then the light faded, I got
up suddenly and walked into the
room where the cardinals were
waiting." The pope was quoted as
saying he signed the acceptance
form and went out on the balcony
to be introduced to the world as
Pope Francis.
But the Rev Thomas Rosica,
who helps with Vatican media re-
lations, later said the interview
didn't reflect Francis' real words.


Vatican on its toes

He said Scalfari neither recorded
the conversation nor took notes,
reconstructing the conversation
from memory and printing it as a
verbatim interview The Vatican
doesn't dispute the overall thrust
of the interview, which Scalfari
said he submitted to Francis for
review and which the Vatican
newspaper reprinted verbatim.
But Rosica said the purported
"mystical" experience recounted
by Repubblica after the election
didn't happen, though Francis
himself has said previously and
in public that "I didn't want to be
pope."
Can atheists be saved?
One of the novelties introduced
by Francis has been his daily
7 a.m. Mass in the Vatican hotel,
to which groups and individuals
are invited. Francis delivers hom-
ilies each day, the contents of
which are summarized by Vatican
Radio. On May 22, he caused no
shortage of confusion when he
suggested that even atheists could
find salvation.
According to church teaching,
the Catholic Church holds the
See Page C2


When Jesus's followers are jerks


A few weeks ago, I spent a Sunday
afternoon at an outlet center in
Orlando.
I love outlets and malls, even if I'm
not interested in buying things (which is
a big if, since I'm always searching for
that shiny, cozy, silky, whatever thing
that will once and for all completely sat-
isfy my soul. But that's a topic for
another day)
However, my experience is always ru-
ined by the come-ons from kiosk sales
people who want to clean my jewelry


practically pounce on people as they
walk by
I hate being rude, but I also hate
Nancy Kennedy being suckered into participating in
their sales spiel and then disappointing
4 /making them mad by not buying their
GRACE NOTES product.
So, I've devised a surefire tactic to
\avoid their come-ons without being ob-
vious in my rudeness. Whenever I see a
(and sell me their product) or soften my kiosk that I anticipate will have
skin with natural sea salt from the Holy
Land (and sell me their product) and See Page C2


RELIGION

BRIEFS


Dalai Lama speaks to
thousands in Atlanta

ATLANTA- The Dalai Lama
told an audience in suburban At-
lanta to focus on love and to be
grateful for all that they
have.
The Tibetan Buddhist leader
spoke to thousands of people
Tuesday at the Gwinnett Center
arena.
The focus of this visit is "secular
ethics," which is described as a
system of shared principles that go
beyond religious differences while
still respecting and valuing the sig-
nificance of religion in people's
lives.
The Dalai Lama has held the
title of presidential distinguished
professor at Emory University
since October 2007 and has visited
Emory's campus five times.
The Dalai Lama was scheduled
to participate in a series of lec-
tures and panel discussions
through Thursday

Chaplains pray for
end to shutdown
WASHINGTON Can prayer
move an unmovable object, such as
the U.S. Congress?
As the federal government re-
mains partially shut down and about
to hit a debt ceiling, Senate Chap-
lain Barry Black continues to ap-
peal to God in his daily invocations.
Before Tuesday's Senate ses-
sion, he prayed, "May the tirades
of majorities or minorities be
equally impotent to sway our law-
makers from doing what is best for
America." He also prayed that the
senators will be ethical "as they
strive to match their words with
deeds."
On the other side of the Capitol,
House Chaplain Father Patrick
Conroy prayed that lawmakers will
use the power they have to help
their constituents "who possess lit-
tle or no power, and whose lives
are made all the more difficult by a
failure to work out serious
differences."

Diocese to sue again
over health mandate
PITTSBURGH The Roman
Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh is
suing the federal government
again seeking to overturn a loom-
ing requirement that employers
offer contraceptive coverage in
employee health plans.
A judge in November dismissed
a previous lawsuit, saying the dio-
cese has not been harmed by the
legislation and that the govern-
ment had promised to take steps to
address religious objections.
But the new federal lawsuit
claims such promises have proven
to be "empty words" and said
the final regulations that take ef-
fect Jan. 1 are worse than the pro-
posed regulations that prompted
last year's lawsuit.
The Department of Justice,
which will defend the new suit, did
not immediately respond to a
request for comment.

Jews ready to celebrate
unique Hanukkah
NEW YORK This year, for the
first time in living memory,
Hanukkah will start on Thanksgiv-
ing, creating a Jewish-American
frenzy
There's the commerce: A 9-year-
old New York boy invented the
"Menurkey" and raised more than
$48,000 on Kickstarter for his
trademarked Turkey-shaped
menorah.
Woodstock-inspired T-shirts have
a turkey perched on the neck of a
guitar and implore "8 Days of
Light, Liberty & Latkes." The cre-
ators nabbed the trademark to
"Thanksgivukkah."
Let's not forget the food mash-
ups commemorating the staying
power of the Pilgrims and the
fighting prowess of the Jews, along
with the miracle of one night's oil
lasting eight days.
Pumpkin latkes, apple-cranberry
sauce and deep-fried turkey,
anyone?
The Jewish calendar makes


Hanukkah appear to drift slightly
from year to year, but it hasn't coin-
cided with Thanksgiving for 125
years, and isn't expected to do so
again for more than 79,000 years.
From wire reports




C2 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

aggressive salespeople
waiting to attack, I pull
out my phone and pre-
tend to be deep in
conversation.
"OK I'll meet you in
five minutes by the foun-
tain. No, the other one.
Oh, and they didn't have
your size."
Uncomfortable, aggres-
sive confrontation
avoided.
However, what I really
want to do is scream: "I
may want your product, I
may even need your prod-
uct, but your sales tech-
niques turn me off and
there's no way on earth
that I'll buy it just because
you're an annoying jerk!"
I understand that
they're trying to make a
sale and make a living, but
I am put off by hard-sell
tactics and manipulation.
Do you see where I'm
going with this?
It reminds me of how
some Christians who, in
their zeal to preach the
gospel and "make disci-
ples" as Jesus com-
manded, end up chasing
people away
Trust me. I know what
I'm talking about. In my
early days as a new Chris-
tian I badgered people,
especially my husband,
battering him with the
Bible and basically mak-
ing his life so uncomfort-


POPE
Continued from Page Cl

"fullness of the means of
salvation" -a message
that has long been taken
to mean that only
Catholics can find salva-
tion. But in his homily,
Francis said: "The Lord
has redeemed all of us, all
of us, with the Blood of
Christ: all of us, not just
Catholics. Everyone! 'Fa-
ther, the atheists?' Even
the atheists. Everyone!"
Rosica issued a lengthy
"explanatory note" a few
days later after being in-
undated with questions
about whether Francis
was changing church doc-
trine on salvation. He
noted that church teach-
ing also holds that "those
who through no fault of
their own" don't know
about Jesus but seek God
and try to do his will can
also attain eternal
salvation.
"Always keep in mind
the audience and context
of Pope Francis' homi-
lies," Rosica cautioned.
"His words are not spo-
ken in the context of a
theological faculty or
academy nor in interreli-
gious dialogue or debate.
He speaks in the context
of Mass."
Should the Vatican
bank be saved?
On April 24, Francis in-
vited members of the Vati-
can bank to join him for
Mass in the hotel. The In-
stitute for Religious
Works, as the bank is
known, has been plagued
by scandals most re-
cently over the arrest of a
Vatican monsignor on
charges he tried to smug-
gle some 20 million euro
($26 million) into Italy
from Switzerland without
declaring it at customs.
Given the scandals, the

WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen
medical profession-
als contribute their
expertise to
columns in Health
& Life,/Tuesdays
Read up on all
things school-
related in the
Chronicle's Educa-
tion section./
Wednesday


* Plan menus for the
week from the
tempting recipes in
the Flair for Food
section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on week-
end entertainment
with the stories in
Scene./Fridays
* See what local
houses of worship
plan to do for the
week in the Religion
section./Saturdays
* Read about area
businesses in
the Business
section./Sundays


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


able living with a Jesus
freak of a wife that I imag-
ine he probably longed
for the comparative
comforts of hell.
After about a year of my
hard-sell jerk for Jesus
tactics that actually had
the opposite effect on him
than what I had intended,
I let up. Most likely God
had decided that my hus-
band had suffered enough
and, although I don't re-
member how/when
/where, he clued me in on
what an obnoxious looney
toons I was and stopped
me from doing any more
damage "in Jesus' name."
My husband didn't want
what I was trying to sell,
and I don't blame him.
Eventually, however, he
discovered faith on his
own, in God's time, in
God's way
God calls and enables a
person to respond. Most
likely no one, or at least
few people, are coerced,
intimidated or forced into
the kingdom of God.
While it's true that
"faith comes by hearing...
the Word of God" (Ro-
mans 10:17) and Chris-
tians are called to
articulate the gospel, we
ought not batter people
with it. Jesus never brow-
beat or used pushy sales
tactics to draw people to
Himself.
We have good news of a
great Savior who invites
people to exchange all of
their sin and sorrow and
shattered lives for his gift

arrival of a reform-
minded, non-nonsense
pope has prompted a
flurry of speculation that
Francis might shut the
bank down. So imagine
the headlines that fol-
lowed his April 24 homily,
when he lamented how
the church can sometimes
become too bureaucratic,
too much like an aid
group, and that bureau-
cracies are necessary up
to a point.
"The church isn't an
NGO, it's a story of love,"
Francis told the bank's
staff in the pews. "But
there are the IOR folks
here, excuse me, OK?
Everything is necessary,
offices are necessary, OK,
but they're only necessary
up to a certain point: as a
help to this story of love.
But when the organiza-
tion loses this primary
place, when the love is
gone, the poor church be-
comes an NGO. And this
isn't the way to go."
Archbishop Angelo Bec-
ciu, under secretary of
the Vatican secretariat of
state, told the Vatican
newspaper a few days
later that Francis was by
no means hinting that he
might shut down the
Vatican bank.
The Vicar of Christ
said what?
Sometimes, Francis'
one-liners don't warrant
Vatican clarification, but
they're worth repeating
simply because they
came from the lips of the
Successor of Peter, Vicar
of Christ, Supreme Pon-
tiff of the Universal
Church:
Francis urged the
church to "strip" itself of
its world attachment to
wealth during his Oct 4
trip to Assisi and focus in-
stead on the basics of
Christ's teachings. "You
might say, 'Can't we have
a more human Christian-


of righteousness and
peace, both peace with
God and with ourselves.
That message of the
possibility of a restored,
reconciled relationship
between individuals and
God is shouted most
loudly by lives lived joy-
ously and characterized
by genuine humility, hon-
estly and repentance.
St. Francis of Assisi
once said, "Preach the
gospel at all times; when
necessary, use words."
I think it boils down to
caring about the people
around us and earning,
not forcing, the right to
speak. Attitude is every-
thing. Love is key People
are not targets or tally
marks on a score card.
It's not about numbers,
but about souls.
It's not about how loud
we can shout our message
or how zealously we try to
get people's attention and
roping them in, but about
letting God's Spirit do his
work and being sensitive
to his leading.
People won't want our
Jesus if we, his people,
are pushy confrontational
jerks.
Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over, Vic-
toria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email at nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.

ity, without the cross,
without Jesus, without
stripping ourselves?"' he
asked rhetorically "In
this way we'd become
pastry-shop Christians,
like a pretty cake and
nice sweet things. Pretty,
but not true Christians."
Francis was asked
June 7 why he chose to
live in the Vatican hotel
rather than the fancier
Apostolic Palace where
his predecessors lived. "If
I was living alone, iso-
lated, it wouldn't be good
for me," he told students
of Jesuit schools. "A pro-
fessor asked me the same
question, 'Why don't you
go and live there (in the
papal apartments)'? And I
replied: 'Listen to me,
professor, it is for psychi-
atric reasons."'
The pope has urged
nuns and sisters to be like
joyful mothers to the
church, caring for its
flock, and not act like
they're "old maids."
"It makes me sad when
I find sisters who aren't
joyful," he lamented dur-
ing his Oct. 4 visit to a
cloistered convent in As-
sisi. "They might smile,
but with just a smile
they could be flight
attendants!"
Given Francis' wry
sense of humor and will-
ingness to regularly ditch
speeches prepared for
him, the Vatican
spokesman, the Rev. Fed-
erico Lombardi, said he
wants the faithful to know
the difference between a
pontifical joke and an en-
cyclical, a clever quip in a
homily and infallible
teaching.
"There are different
genres of expression,
some are magisterial and
official, others are more
pastoral," Lombardi told
The Associated Press.
"They have a different
doctrinal value."


Fall activities
The Rev. Ronald A. Sut-
ton and Mount Olive Mission-
ary Baptist Church of Crystal
River invite all to the church's
129th anniversary and "Fall
Revival" services at 11 a.m.
Sunday, Oct. 20, and 7 p.m.
Monday through Wednesday,
Oct. 21-23. The speaker is
the Rev. Dr. James B. Samp-
son, president of the Florida
General Baptist Convention
Inc. The church is at 2105 N.
Georgia Road, Crystal River.
Call 352-563-1577.
Inverness Church of
God will host "Family Fall
Fest" from 5:30 to 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 25, at the church,
416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Admission is free. Activities
include a hayride, games and
prizes, and a chili cook-off.
New this year is our "Old
Country Store" where you
can purchase various hand-
made items. The public is in-
vited. Call the church office at
352-726-4524.
Joy and Praise Fellow-
ship of Beverly Hills will host
its annual "Community Fes-
tival" from 2 to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, Oct. 26. Activities will
feature carnival-style games,
bouncy houses for the kids,
good food and live music. All
ages are welcome. The fel-
lowship is at 4007 N. Lecanto
Highway in the Beverly Plaza
adjacent to Papa John's
Pizza. Call 352-527-8612


Religion NOTES
between 9 a.m. and noon
Tuesday and Thursdays.
Hernando United
Methodist Church's old-
fashioned "Pumpkin Festi-
val" is from 4 to 6 p.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 26, at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486, Her-
nando. All children are invited
to come and enjoy a safe
and happy Halloween featur-
ing games, a cupcake walk,
hayride, pumpkin painting
and more. Come in costume
and bring your parents (they
can dress in costume too).
The event will finish up with a
"trunk or treat" and hot dogs.
Everyone is invited to
"Fall Family Glow Night"
from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 26, at Reflections
Church, which meets at Cit-
rus Springs Middle School.
This Fall/Halloween celebra-
tion will feature music,
games, food and lots of
candy, with a "special twist."
You can wear your Hal-
loween costume or not. All
are welcome.
Don't forget to bring your
"GLOW" wear and light up
the night. For more informa-
tion, go to www.reflections
church.net.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness invites
the public to its annual "Fall
Fest and Trunk or Treat"
from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday,
Oct 27, at 206 Washington
Ave, Inverness. Join us for


"Trunk or Treat," hot dogs,
hayride, cotton candy,
games, bounce house, face
painting, and more. Everyone
is welcome to join this fun,
safe alternative to trick or
treat. There is no charge for
the event or activities. Call
Denise Lay at 352-637-0770.
Inverness First United
Methodist Church's Pumpkin
Patch continues through
Oct. 31 at 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness, end-
ing with the "Trunk or Treat"
celebration from 5 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Oct. 31.
All proceeds from pumpkin
sales go toward the church's
community outreaches and
missions. An area is set up
for taking family pictures
while visiting the patch. Dif-
ferent displays and events
from several community
services, such as the Citrus
County Fire Department,
etc., and hayrides available
for the public on Saturdays.
All events and display times
posted. Pumpkin Patch hours
are noon to 7:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday, 10 a.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Saturday (with
events and displays sched-
uled during these times) and
noon to 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
A "Harvest Festival"
sponsored by First Baptist
Church of Floral City will take
place from 6 to 9 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 31, at Floral City

See Page C3


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V C


Ou"Ve
* Abitare Paris Salon
* Alpaca Magic
* Citrus County Jazzercise
* Citrus Pest Management
* Clementine's Boutique
* Complete Family Dentistry
* Connolly's Sod & Nursery
* Connor's Gifts
* Cotton Club
* Eclectic Ends Hair Studio
* Everyone's Massage Therapy
Services, LLC
* Frame Design
* Genesis Women's Center
* Georgieo's Hair Design
* Goldiggers & Gunslingers
* Health & Wellcare Services
of Florida, Inc.
* Helene Graham -
Miche Handbags
* Himalayan Salt Room Ocala
* Ideal Health Enrichment
Center
* Inverness Yoga &
Wellness Center


* M Hair Studio & the Spa at M
* Mama's Kuntry Kafe -
The Little Glass Shack
* Mez Mer Eyes
* New Concepts Hair Salon
* New Empire E-Cigs
* Nick Nicholas Ford
* Nick Nicholas Ford/Lincoln
* Off the Cuff & On The Fly
* Origami Owl Amber
* Relaxation Station Sponsored
by Crystal Automotive
* Park Avenue of Hair Design
* Playtime PinUp Photography
* Scentsy
* Specialty Gems
* Suncoast Dermatology &
Skin Surgery Center
* Susan Reynolds, Arbonne,
Independent Consultant
* The Garden Shed
* The New Image Med Spa
* Thirty-one by Valerie Hodges
* Timber Lane Chiropractic
* Tobacco Prevention -
Florida Health
* Touch of Glass by Susan


FA
01p Plantation on Crystal River

_01 F 7rt Island Trail, Crystal River, FL


1ON 1XO


Saturday, October 12, 2013
VIP Preview 5-6pm 9 Event 6-9pm
www.chronicle-online.com\divanight


p


Ni


Join us for the 6th Annual

Breast Cancer Awareness

FUNdraising Event

held poolside at
The Plantation of Crystal River

Saturday, October 19, 2013
from 6:30pm til ?

Tickets are $10 and include
Entertainment, Appetizers, Auctions,
and one Beer/Wine drink ticket.

Th
All Proceeds Breast
Cancer
Benefit Research
sF u.undation.

Sponsored by:
Abitare Salon & Day Spa Spa Bleu at Plantation
The Plantation on Crystal River


Tickets available at above locations
and The Chamber of Commerce


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Park. Free food, drinks and
more than 30 booths for
everyone to enjoy.
There will be a "Harvest
Festival" from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 1 and 2, at Holy Faith
Episcopal Church in Blue
Cove, Dunnellon. Twenty
unique vendors will offer cus-
tomized children's books, art-
work, handmade dulcimers,
jewelry, candy, handbags,
wearable fiber art, candles,
hand-knit items and more.
Call the church at 352-
489-2685.
Inverness Church of God
will host the "Ladies Fall
Camp Meeting" on Nov. 1-2.
All ladies are invited. Regis-
tration is $35 if paid by
Oct. 20. After Oct. 20, regis-
tration fee is $40. Registration
form and schedule can be
downloaded from the church's
Facebook page. Completed
forms and payment can be
mailed to the church or
dropped off at the church of-
fice. Registration fee includes
all worship services with spe-
cial guest speakers and two
Saturday meals. Nursery is
provided for ages 3 and
younger. Guest speakers are
women of God who have de-
veloped strengths and added
victories through the situa-
tions, circumstances and trials
of life traveled on this journey.
The church is at 416 U.S. 41
S., Inverness. Call the church
office at 352-726-4524.
Holidaze Crafters of Her-
nando United Methodist
Church will sponsor their
"Fall Craft Show" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16,
featuring crafters from all over
Citrus County. HUMW will sell
home-baked goods and their
$7 cookbooks. Breakfast and
lunch available. Crafters may


still reserve a spot by calling
Robin Baker at 352-
445-1487. The church is at
2125 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486),
Hernando.
Sale away
Crystal River United
Methodist Church will have a
church-wide yard sale today
at the church at 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave., to benefit local com-
munity outreach projects.
The Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church Youth
Group Estate Sale is from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today in the
church fellowship hall at 86
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Joy Lutheran Church, at
S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala, will have its an-
nual indoor yard sale and
bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, in
Swenson Hall. The public is
invited to donate furniture,
tools, gardening equipment,
sports-related items, kitchen
and house wares, linens,
books, and craft supplies (no
clothes, shoes or electronics).
Bring yard sale to Swenson
Hall from 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday or from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Thursday or Friday.
Bring baked goods on Friday
wrapped for sale and labeled,
particularly if they contain
nuts. There will be the "vin-
tage" table for special treas-
ures and a craft and quilt
section. Lunch will be served
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day. Call Edie Heinzen at
352-854-7817 in regards to
the bake sale and Patty Corey
at 352-854-0660 regarding
the yard sale.
The Agape House
fundraising sale is from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26, at
First Baptist Church, 700 N.
CitrusAve., Crystal River.
Funds are used to purchase
Bibles, toiletries and miscella-
neous items. Call the Agape
House (Wednesdays) at 352-


795-7064 or the church at
352-795-3367.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host its annual
"Holiday Bazaar and Craft
Fair" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 25, from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, and
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 27, in the Parish Life
Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Christmas and
holiday treasures, handmade
crafts, jewelry, live plants,
books, toys and games, and
an array of raffle prizes will be
featured. The raffle drawing is
at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. It is not
necessary to be present to
win. Other crafters displaying
their wares will be Stretchies
by Judith LLC, Embroidery
Etc. by Barb, BJ Crafts One
Stroke Painting, Chocolates
by Vanessa, All That Jazz and
It's Under Wraps. Call Fran
Wagner at 352-527-0723.
The Dunnellon Flea
Market will take place from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2, at the
First United Methodist
Church, 21501 W. State Road
40. Bake sale, cafe, lots of
good items with great prices.
Furniture, jewelry, glassware,
clothes, shoes, handbags,
CDs and books.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will offer handcrafted gift
items for the "Christmas
Bazaar" from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 8, and 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, in Jack
Steele Fellowship Hall, 82
Civic Circle. Handmade and
crafted items will be for sale
including jewelry, knits, books,
toys and CDs. A bake sale
and refreshments are offered
daily. A very popular feature of
the bazaar is the white ele-
phant table. People with items
to donate are asked that no
clothes or appliances larger
than toaster ovens be sent.
Call the church office at 352-
746-3620.


There will be a yard sale
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov. 9, as a fundraiser
for a summer of 2014 mis-
sionary trip from Crystal River
Church of God to Ecuador.
Proceeds will help with trans-
portation costs. The yard sale
is at 7755 W Homosassa Trail
(in front of Auto Analyst), in
Homosassa.
The Ladies of Faith
Lutheran Church in Lecanto
have expanded their 17th An-
nual Bazaar into a "Super
Sale" from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15
and 16, at the Crystal Glen
Subdivision, off State Road
44 and County Road 490.
This Thrivent-sponsored
event will feature handmade
crafts and quilts, holiday
items, a bake sale, silent auc-
tion, trash 'n' treasure items, a
re-gifting table, jewelry and
books. Ticket holders need
not be present to win. Pro-
ceeds will be used for charity
and missions. Call 352-
527-3325.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Fun & games
The public is invited to a
Military Card Party on Mon-
day at St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church, 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness. Lunch will be
served at 12:15 p.m. Card
play begins at 1 p.m. Cost is
$12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. For
more information or to make a
reservation, call Dottie at 352-
382-3656 or Marilyn at 352-
746-6583.
The Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus Council
No. 6168 will host a "Bunco


Bonanza" at 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday at the K of C Hall,
2389 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486),
Lecanto. Two levels of play
featured: a competitive level
for seasoned players and a
social level for beginners and
persons with disabilities. The
$12 ticket includes a brunch.
Door prizes, raffle prizes and
cash prizes awarded. Ad-
vanced reservations required
by calling Char at 352-746-
9490 or Bernita at 352-344-
0235. Funds raised will
benefit the Auxiliary Scholar-
ship Fund and charitable or-
ganizations in the community.
Cornerstone Baptist
Church will host the "Send
Them to Serve" four-person
golf scramble Saturday,
Oct. 19, at Inverness Golf and
Country Club. All proceeds go
directly to the CBC Youth
Fund for Mission Trips and
Summer Camps. Registration
begins at 7:30 a.m. and tee-
off is at 8:30 a.m. with a shot-
gun start. Registration fee of
$50 per golfer includes
18 holes, cart and steak lunch
at Cornerstone. Call Bruce
Wenger at 352-726-7335.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers Bingo
at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday featur-
ing regular, double and spe-
cial bingos, together with a
jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m. Tues-
day and 4 p.m. Wednesday.
Kitchen features "homemade"
soups and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.
The Men's Club of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church on U.S. 41 in Dunnel-
Ion play horseshoes at
9 a.m. Wednesday. Horse-
shoes are provided to anyone
needing them along with in-
structions in pitching, scoring
and court maintenance.
Women, children and persons
who have never pitched
horseshoes before are invited


RELIGION


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30 A.M.
] :I'- [ r ,, 1 t H. [ .l ,r ,- 1
-]lnl tI -,r, ,i ,



St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i Iih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org



(j Crystal River
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Uife Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided





'The
S0hurch
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"
SUDA SRVCS.
c SudyScho. :0AM
cQMringSrie1:0AM


~MCrystal
Do River
Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager |


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

THE
SALVATION '0
A D IUIV CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish
712S. cbol ve
Lec/nt
51 960


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIfST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.-' 11:00 A.M.-' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

Church M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

{faw9o;v- tl..et.


#y Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon






HEKE., YOU'LL FIND
0, CKPJNC FAMILY
IN CHKPIST!

CKyTNL
RIVEF, y
VJNITCD
NACTHODI l
CH U KCHo
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:- A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


- ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org



SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
SBob Dickey


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C3

to attend and share in the fun
and fellowship. Call 352-
489-5954.
Music & more
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, at 2101 N. Florida
Ave. in Hernando, off U.S. 41,
will begin its concert series
with the Southern Gospel
quartet, River Jordan, on
Sunday, Oct. 27. Doors open
at 5 p.m. Celebration Sounds
choir and orchestra will open
the concert at 5:45. The public
is invited. A love offering will
be collected. Call the church
office at 352-726-6144. The
entire concert series can be
viewed on www.hernando
nazarene.org.
As a fundraiser, the
Sanctuary Mission of Citrus
County will sponsor a
"Gospel Sing" at 6 p.m. Sat-
urday, Nov. 2, at Homosassa
United Methodist Church at
the corner of Bradshaw and
Yulee Drive. People from
across the county are invited
to participate. There will be
many different talents singing
along with testimonies from
our clients. Tickets ($10) will
be sold at the door, and are
limited. For advance tickets,
call 352-302-4433or 352-
697-1373. All profits/proceeds
will go to pay for the operation
of our mission.
The "Amazzing" Steel
Drum Ensemble will be in
concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 8, at First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River, 1501
S.E.U.S. 19 (next to Sweet-
bay Plaza). A freewill offering
will be collected. Refresh-
ments served after the con-
cert. Call 352-795-2259.
The Dunnellon Com-
munity Chorale will present a
concert at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 10, at Dunnellon Presby-
terian Church, to celebrate
Veteran's Day. Patriotic music
from the World War II era will
be performed with guest

See NOTES/Page C4




C4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


NOTES
Continued from PageC3

accompanist Harry Hershey.
The church is in the Dunnel-
Ion Historic District, 20641
Chestnut St. (corner of Chest-
nut and Ohio streets). The
pubic is invited.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church Concert Series pres-
ents Peter Rowan Bluegrass
Band featuring Yungchen
Lhamo at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 14, at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get tickets in advance or at
the door. Suggested donation
is $10. Call 352-795-5325 or
352-634-2388.
All Citrus County musi-
cians are invited to join in the
community jam sessions at
7 p.m. Wednesday in Hilton
Hall at Floral City United
Methodist Church. Bring your
instruments/voices and join in
the fun. Call 352-344-1771.
The Saturday night
Gospel Jubilee takes place
the last Saturday night
monthly at First Church of
God 5510 Jasmine Lane, In-
verness. Everyone is invited
to come to enjoy or come and


participate. Prepare a num-
ber, bring your instrument if
you have one and join in this
full-filled evening. Great
music, fun, food, fellowship
and never a charge. Call 352-
344-3700.
Food & fellowship
The Homosassa First
United Methodist Church pan-
cake breakfast is from
8 to 10 a.m. today at the
church's fellowship hall, 8831
W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
A donation of $4 for all you
can eat. Come and enjoy.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites


everyone to its Slavic Festi-
val from 10 a.m. to2 p.m.
today at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. Enjoy borscht,
stuffed cabbage, potato
pierogi, kielbasa and sauer-
kraut, cheese blini, cabbage
and noodles, cucumber salad,
various desserts and Slavic
and traditional American
crafts. Call 352-201-1320.
The "Third Saturday
Supper/Mystery Theater"
will take place at 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 19 in the Dewain Farris
Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.


Menu includes: meatloaf, Ger-
man potato salad, California
mixed vegetables, cupcakes,
coffee and tea. Tickets are
$10 for adults, and $5 for chil-
dren. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
The Hernando United
Methodist Men will host their
"Fish Fry for Missions,"
from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov.
8. Under the direction of Joe
Duteau, the menu will include
fried fish, French fries or grits,
coleslaw, hushpuppies, drink
and dessert for $7.50 for
adults and $3.50 for children.


Everyone is welcome. The
church is at 2125 E Norvell
Bryant Highway (County
Road 486), Hernando.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers
are from 4 to 6 p.m. the third
Friday monthly (with the ex-
ception of December), in the
Jack Steele Hall at 88 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. A dona-
tion of $8 per person includes
all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and cof-
fee or tea. Come and enjoy a
delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door or in the
church office.


Places of worship


that offer love, peace .


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! 'i I


St. Raphael
Orthodox Church
in America
Divine Liturgy Sun. 10 am
Great Vespers Sat. 5 pm
Fr. David Balmer
(352) 201-1320
www.straphaelchurch.org
1277 N. Paul Dr.
INVERNESS
right off Hwy. 41 N.
Come to our
SLAVIC FESTIVAL
FOOD & CRAFTS
OCT. 12,10 am-2 pm




urnrcg







*;t' Inn
I fHrad


0


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA








Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-46-761


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714S. Scarbor --
Pastor Kennie Berger
S 352-302-5813

A Homosassa Springs
L SEVoTH-DAYAVEN1'CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com



Chswck
ofLakc, Roaseaw,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: r. ,i,i '. 1' ". .. !'1 "',1 I,11-.. ,,,,
Check us out on Facebook




Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
iV mi. east ofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


First Baptist
Church
.' of Floral City
f Lin'i' Up .Jesus.
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org



Shepherd

5 of the

IT Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offitiilith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and triuhli
of Jesus Chrii.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
S (4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


Hernando
TheNazarene
SPlace to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.... Floral City, FL.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am

Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com









Hwy. 44 E
SWashington Ave., Inverness
SSunday Services
S Traditional
11:00 AM
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service .
* Tapes & CD' s Available U
Sunday School for all ages"
0 9:30 AM 0
S Nursery Provided 0
SFellowship & Youth Group0
" Sunday Evening .
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
S Podcast: fpcinv.com 0

Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor James Capps


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

oPM






........ ..-ryfor Children and Families
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(F/ miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries andActivities for allAges.


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


I S





VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 Am. & 10:30 Am.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or By Appointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgacefl
p. .catholicweb.com .-



The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


40


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NEWS
NOTES

Yoga, bend, stretch
in Citrus Springs
Citrus County Park &
Recreation, with instruc-
tor Kathy Harrica, will of-
fers free Beginners' Yoga:
Bend & Stretch classes at
the Citrus Springs
Community Center
Harrica received her
training from the Wisdom
Method School of Yoga in
Fruitland Park a Yoga
Alliance-registered train-
ing program. All are wel-
come to attend, whether
new to yoga or not. Items
to bring to class are: a
yoga mat or beach towel,
a small square pillow and
water
Classes are Monday
evenings at 6:30 p.m. and
Thursday mornings at
10 a.m. More classes will
start in November
No pre-registration is
required. For more infor-
mation, call Parks &
Recreation at 352-465-
7007 or Kathy at 352-
249-8244.

Hadassah to meet
Monday in BH
The Beverly Hills Chap-
ter of Hadassah will meet
at 1 p.m. Monday at the
Kellner Auditorium in
Beverly Hills.
The guest speaker will
be Debi Shields from
HPH Hospice.
Hadassah is a service
organization open to men
and women of every faith.
It supports colleges, uni-
versities, medical schools,
medical research includ-
ing stem cell research,
hospitals and infrastruc-
ture in Israel.
For information, call
Miriam Fagan at 352-
746-0005.

German American
Club to gather
The German American
Club of West Central
Florida will meet at
7 p.m. Monday at the
Knights of Columbus Hall,
2389 W Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road
486), Lecanto.
After a brief business
meeting, there will be a
social hour with refresh-
ments and musical enter-
tainment. Members are
encouraged to attend and
guests are welcome.
For more information,
call 352-637-2042 or 352-
746-7058.

Sew-Ciety to get
together Monday
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at
9 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Canning
Facility at 3405 W
Southern St, Lecanto.
The project for the day
will be a witch embellish-
ment for a kitchen or
hand towel. For more in-
formation, call Dee at 352-
527-8229. All sewing
enthusiasts welcome.

Visitors welcome
at BFF meeting
The BFF Society Inc.
will have its monthly din-
ner meeting Monday at
Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club, 7395 W
Pinebrook St., Crystal
River.
The BFF Society's main
focus is educational
scholarships for local re-
cipients. Visitors and new
members are always wel-
come. For more informa-
tion, call Gwen at
352-795-1520.

Get on site, get
some some help
United Way of Citrus
County will have a train-
ing session for its Agency


Volunteer Training site at
9 a.m. Tuesday at the U.W
offices in Crystal River
The training will walk
participants through how
to register an agency and
how to incorporate its
needs. The training will
take about an hour Once
an agency is set up on the
site, it can list any oppor-
tunities for item dona-
tions or volunteer
assistance, and the pro-
gram will automatically
email any person who has
indicated such a volun-
teer preference.
Call 352-795-5483 to sign
up for the class.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C5


AARP slates driver safety courses


Special to the Chronicle
Florida is a mandated state
and any insurance company
doing business in Florida must
give a discount to those complet-
ing an AARP Safe Driving
Course, open to everyone age 50
and older Contact your agent for
discount amounts.
Update yourself to earn a dis-
count and learn about newly


enacted motor vehicle and
traffic laws.
Course fee is $12 for AARP
members; $14 for all others. Call
the listed instructor to register:
Crystal River, Homosassa,
Homosassa Springs
Tuesday and Wednesday,
Oct. 15 and 16,1 to 4 p.m. at
Coastal Region Library, 8619 W
Crystal St., Crystal River Call
Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933.


Wednesday and Thursday,
Oct. 16 and 17, 9 a.m. to noon at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa. Call Frank Tobin at
352-628-3229.
Monday and Tuesday, Nov
18 and 19,1 to 4 p.m. at Coastal
Region Library, 8619 W Crystal
St., Crystal River Call Lou
Harmin at 352-564-0933.
Tuesday and Wednesday,


Nov 19 and 20, 9 a.m. to noon at
First United Methodist Church,
8831 W Bradshaw Blvd., Ho-
mosassa. Call Frank Tobin at
352-628-3229.
Inverness, Hernando,
Floral City
Tuesday and Wednesday,
Oct. 15 and 16, 9 a.m. to noon at
Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580
Lemon St., Hernando. Call Bob
Dicker at 352-527-2366.


NEWS NOTES


Garden Club to begin season
The Garden Club of Crystal River will
start its 2013/14 season at 1 p.m. Monday at
the St. Martin Marsh Aquatic Preserve,
Crystal River State Park.
First speaker of the season will be Kathy
Connolly of Connolly's Nursery The topic
will be "What to plant for fall and winter
color"
The program starts at 1 p.m., with a break
and refreshments at 2 p.m. A club meeting
will follow the break.
The goal for the club is to promote the
knowledge and love of gardening. The
public is welcome.
Meetings are at 1 p.m. the second Monday
monthly, ending May 2014.
For information, call president Jenny
Wensel at 352-795-0844.


SHARE to host seminar
The Citrus Memorial Health System
SHARE Club will offer a free breast health
seminar at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, in the
Gulf Room on the main hospital campus.
"Breast Health: What Every Woman
Should Know" will feature presentations
from general surgeon Dr Quehuong Pham
and radiologist Dr Thomas Ceballos. Pham
and Ceballos will discuss breast health
screenings and prevention, as well as avail-
able treatment including digital mammogra-
phy, stereotactic breast biopsy and more.
Refreshments and educational materials
will be available and two audience mem-
bers will win free screening mammograms.
Seating is limited; RSVP online at
www.citrusmh.com/events or call 352-560-
6266 to register


Vendors sought for event
Vendors are needed for the sixth annual
Stone Crab Jam slated for 4 to 11 p.m.
Saturday, Nov 2, in Crystal River
The area will be alive with music, stone
crabs, vendors, a chowder cook-off and food
and drinks galore. Three stages will fill the
streets with music for all ears. Local food
and fresh stone crabs will tantalize visitors'
taste buds and vendors will have offerings
ranging from local art, nautical items and
handcrafted pieces.
Officials are accepting vendor applica-
tions for food and event exhibitors. Space is
limited and the deadline is Tuesday Visit
www.stonecrabjam.com for information and
applications. The event is sponsored by the
Rotary Club of King's Bay, the city of Crystal
River and the Citrus County Chronicle.


Places of worship


that offer love, peace ,!


and harmony to all. .


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


F 47 Years of
F | RSCT Bringing Christ
IRS 1 I to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
SSunday School
& Bible Class
4w 9:00 AM.
726-1637
y Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

g PRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study




Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.corn


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033

Come To SI
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


Sii,.d., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplace to 1., I , i I', .,,,


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy i~
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com


oad

tgist


rch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


SINXERNESS
d5 CHURCH
OF GOD

.Suiiiimn.Ser ice%:
i. l.. rr ..., r .








.%elcoih e Hoiie"i
\1 I .,| || I l |II
I I, ~.l ,i i ii'*,., i.,. [1 I I


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service..10:15AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and
play yard. 13
Pastor John Fredericksen


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
SWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.
726-1670





first Unite

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
REV. SARAH CAMPBELL
SeniorPastor

Sunday School
9:00 AM- Adults
10:30 AM- All Ages

SundayWorship
9:00 AM- Contemporary
9:00 AM-Vertical Kids
10:30 AM- Traditional

Wednesday Worship
S6:00 PM-VerticalYouth


COMMUNITY





P age C6 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Lions to serve pancake breakfast
The Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle
Drive, will have its pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. Sunday
Cost for adults is $4 and children younger than
12 eat for $2. This includes all-you-can-eat pan-
cakes, choice of bacon or sausage or combo, orange
juice and coffee or tea.
For information, call 352-897-4899.

Health care options seminar on tap
Become a savvy consumer as you learn about
choices and health care options for your care before
you need them.
Representatives from Comfort Keepers, HPH
Hospice, Brentwood Retirement Communities, Life
Care Center and Mederi Caretenders will be at the
Central Ridge Library from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday
They will provide education for community mem-
bers about different services available in Citrus
County Complimentary snacks and beverages will
be available and there will be door prize drawings.
Central Ridge Library is at 425 W Roosevelt Blvd.
(corner of Forest Ridge and Roosevelt boulevards)
in Beverly Hills.
Call 352-746-6622 to RSVP

Homeopathic detox talk on tap
New Age Thinkers will meet at 2 p.m. Saturday at
Unity Church 2628 W Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
The guest speaker will be Dr Paula Koger, who
has 25 years of nursing experience and specializes
in counseling, massage, acupuncture and as a med-
ical intuitive. She will present "Field Control
Therapy (FTC) and Voice Printing."
FTC is homeopathy tested and created in the
clinic to individual detox needs. It has been highly
effective for adults, children and even pets. In
essence, it is tapping the natural intelligence of the
body to discover which organs/systems are not func-
tioning effectively; which informational signals are
needed to encourage correction of the imbalance.
Everyone is invited. For more information, email
miss-donna@tampabayrr.com or call 352-628-3253.

Oak Village women plan luncheon
The Oak Village Women's Club will have its
October luncheon on Monday at the Glen Lakes
Country Club. Guests are always welcome.
Luncheons are $17.50 with a Super Duper
Soup/Salad Buffet.
Guest emcee Joe Dube and wife Shirley will put
on a "Funny Fashion Follies."
Call Rose Flodstrom at 352-503-6745 for more in-
formation on attending. The luncheon is open to the
public.

Lodge to do Rusty Nail Degree
The Masons of Springs Lodge 378 F&AM will put
on a Rusty Nail Degree at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
invites all men who are Masons living in the Citrus
County to the meeting.
This meeting is designed for Masons who have
been away from active lodge participation for an ex-
tended period of time and wish to again become
active.
If you have an up-to-date dues card from your
lodge, we will refresh your memory and bring you
back into the fellowship of the Masonic Lodge.
Springs Lodge is at 5030 Memorial Drive,
Homosassa.

WPNCC monthly meeting Tuesday
The Women's Political Network of Citrus County
will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday for lunch at Joe's
Family Restaurant in Inverness.
After lunch, Suzanne Webb, Florida Republican
state committeewoman, will be speaker
A short meeting will follow and clipping coupons
for the military base the group has adopted. Since
May, the club has shipped more than $115,000 worth
of coupons.
WPNCC also supports CASA, the abuse shelter in
Citrus County. Bring donations for CASA. They can
use food or nonfood household products.
Everyone is welcome. Call Rosalie Matt at 352-
746-7143 for more information.

Zen meditation at Unity
The public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions
at 2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity Church, 2628 W Wood-
view Lane, Lecanto (off County Road 491).
For more information, call 352-464-4955.

Humanitarians OF FLORIDA

Ragu
Ragu is a beautiful bull's /-^
eye orange and white
tabby. He is a love-bug and 4
gets along very well with
his roommates, but wants
his own home. Adult cats H I <9t '
are half-price and kittens t
are $50 or two for $90, *
and all adoption fees S
include microchip, I,
spay/neuter and all
required vaccinations,
including rabies. There are
all varieties of felines to | \
choose from. Drop by and
enjoy our felines in their -1 aj!^
cage-free, homestyle envi-
ronment from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians'
Hardin Haven on the corner of State Road 44 and


North Conant Avenue, east of Crystal River.
Special to the Chronicle

* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


Music at the Museum


Historical Society reveals performance lineup for new season


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Historical So-
ciety has announced the lineup of
performances for its 2013-14 Music
at the Museum Concert Series.
There will be eight concerts featur-
ing both jazz and acoustic music,
all taking place in the restored 1912
Citrus County courtroom at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum,
downtown on the square in
Inverness.
Leading off the series on Oct. 17
is Johnny Carlsson and Group with
a "Salute to Benny Goodman, the
King of Swing." On Nov 21, the
acoustic duo of Jerry Carris and
Gail Keel playing guitar and con-
certina will perform. Making a re-
turn appearance on Dec. 12 is Joe


Donato and Friends from Miami,
with "Jazz for the Holidays." Ap-
pearing Jan. 16 will be the acoustic
group Singing Tree, featuring Ray
Belanger on hammered dulcimer
and Lloyd Goldstein on double
bass.
On Feb. 13, back for another year,
will be Norm Bernard and South-
ern Exposure with 'Jazzy Valen-
tines." March 13 will feature the
duo Castlebay Fred Gosbee and
Julia Lane -with Celtic and New
England folk music. On April 17,
Johnny Carlsson and Group return
for a "Stan Getz Tribute." The se-
ries wraps up on May 15 with an
appearance by Florida singer/song-
writer Bob Patterson.
Jazz concerts are $25 each and
start at 6 p.m. with a social hour


NEWS

Grumman retirees to meet
The Grumman Retiree Club's Midwest Florida
Chapter will enjoy a picnic from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thursday at Bayport Park at the west end of Cortez
Boulevard (State Road 50).
Hamburgers, hot dogs and condiments will be
provided free to members of the club attending.
Members are asked to bring a dish to share and a
chair, if desired, as well as plates, utensils and
drinks.
Call Hank Mehl at 352-686-2735 or email
hmehl@tampabayrr.com to make reservations.

Mission in Citrus slates giveaway
Mission in Citrus Homeless shelters will continue
its monthly giveaway from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. today at
2488 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Crystal River
The Mission in Citrus relies on donations only
Items are donated, and so are freely given away No
dealers or thrift store people are allowed.
For more information, call 352-794-3825.


with appetizers and a cash bar
Music begins at 7 p.m. The acoustic
concerts are $10 each and include
coffee and desserts. Doors open at
6:15 p.m. and music begins at 7 p.m.
All concerts take place in the court-
room of the Old Courthouse Her-
itage Museum in downtown
Inverness. Tickets will be sold for
the jazz concerts; the acoustic per-
formances are by reservation.
Sponsors for the series include
the Citrus County Chronicle, Wann
and Mary Robinson, Jordan Engi-
neering, Publix Super Markets
Charities, Smith Optical, Accent
Travel, Clark and Wendy Stillwell,
and David Rom State Farm. For
more information and a season
brochure, call 352-341-6427 or
email csociety@tampabayrr.com.


SFans of Friends
of books
Stephanie Waters and her daughters,
Sydni and Harley, are delighted with
their purchases at the recently
completed Friends of the Citrus County
Library System (FOCCLS) Mega Fall
SBook Sale. This is the third year the
family has attended the Friends' fall and
spring events. Waters home-schools her
daughters and selects materials from
the sale to enhance their curriculum.
The family was among the more than
1,000 book lovers who found favorite
treasures at the five-day sale which
raised $41,593 for FOCCLS
partner libraries and the Citrus County
Library System. This brings the sum of
FOCCLS sale proceeds since 2001 to
$789,822. The Friends are again at
work preparing for the spring sale to
LLuJ begin March 7. Gently used books,
^ DVDs, CDs, games and puzzles may be
---. dropped off at the check-out desks of
N. Central Ridge, Coastal or Lakes regional
libraries.

LYNNE BOELE/Special to the Chronicle



NOTES

'Bunco Bonanza' at Knights' hall
The Ladies Auxiliary Knights of Columbus Coun-
cil No. 6168 will host a "Bunco Bonanza" on Tues-
day at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W
Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486),
Lecanto. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Two levels of play will be featured.
The $12 ticket includes brunch. Reservations
must be made by today by calling Char at 352-746-
9490 or Bernita at 352-344-0235.

Friends to host craft sale
The Friends of the Community Center Inc. will
stage its annual crafts sale with items made by
members from the East Citrus and Central Citrus
centers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday
The sale will be at the Central Citrus Community
Center at 2804 W Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Do
holiday shopping and help support the county's
community centers.


Natural gas could be answer for Citrus County


his past week, I was honored
to be one of the presenters of
the Fire Up Citrus event held
by the Economic Development
Council. The theme was simple:
What would stimulate the econ-
omy? Present your idea and keep it
positive.
I seem to have a good ability to
come up with some well-thought-
out ideas through the years. I also
know how easy it is to shoot ideas
with holes before they get started,
especially if it is something I do not
want to do or something I am not
interested in.
I appreciated the positive theme
and we were all very supportive of
each other My idea was com-
pressed natural gas. A couple of
years ago, I started seriously look-
ing for alternatives because my
shelter and farm gasoline bill was a
couple thousand dollars a month!
I did not have to talk to too many
people to realize almost everyone
felt like a hostage to gasoline
prices. This stuff out in the mid-
west (natural gas) was so cheap that
they burned it. In other words, it
cost more to transport it than the


DuWayne
Sipper

THE PATH
HOME


company drilling for it could get
from selling it.
The problem? Infrastructure. In
other parts of the globe, economies
have switched to natural gas a long
time ago. It has been perfected, as
far as I can tell, and is just as pow-
erful as gasoline. But no one in the
U.S. wants to spend the money on
very expensive filling stations if
there is not enough demand from
people driving the vehicles.
The price of converting a vehicle
is too expensive and consumers
cannot find enough filling stations.
Citrus County does not have one.
This is changing. General Elec-
tric is coming out with a home fill-
ing station. Three of the major car
companies are coming out with sev-


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


eral versions of these vehicles that
will be brand new and the conver-
sion kits for any car are getting bet-
ter The conversion kits give you
the ability with the flick of a switch
to go back to gasoline if you can't
find the natural gas station.
Right now, natural gas is about
half of what gasoline costs to get
you the same distance. With Duke
Energy deciding to build a natural
gas plant, the time is now to work
in partnership with this company
that will be with us for a long time.
This has the potential of creating
jobs and saving everyone in Citrus
County some money The pipes are
in the ground. It has 20 percent less
emissions into the air and we will
be buying a U.S. product.
Let us all join together, do our
homework, ask questions, talk to
people who make things happen
and, just maybe, we are on to some-
thing here that will help a little bit.

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus
County a faith-based homeless
shelter Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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I.WJ 34 241 340 4 "Man ona Homeland"Uh...Oh... "Jay Z MadeinAmerica" (2013, *** "The Perks of Beinga Wallflower" Homeland"Uh... Oh...
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36 31 36 Sports Live! Tampa BayTimes Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Live! Lightning Sailing Sailing
ro J 31 5 3 26 29 "Nightmare on Elm ** "Freddy vs. Jason"(2003, Horror) Robert *** "FrightNight"(2011) AntonYelchin. Ateenagerdis- "Nightmare-
31 59 31 26 29 St. 5: Child" Englund, Ken Kirzinger.'RH'N covers that his new neighbor is a vampire. 'R' 2"
TR 49 23 49 16 19 MLB Baseball Postgame BigBang IBigBang BigBang Big Bang Big Bang BigBan "Zoolander"(2001)
S 169 5 169 **3Y, "The World, the Flesh and the Devil" **** "Friendly Persuasion" (1956, Drama) Gary Cooper, *** "The Harder They Fall"
169 53 169 30 35 (1959) Harry Belafonte.'NR'N cDorothy McGuire, Anthony Perkins.'NR'B c(1956) Humphrey Bogart.'NR'
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L 53 34 53 24 26 Nc Unbraided'14, [c Peaks"'14',cc Mountain High"'14' "Castaways"'14' c Mountain High"'14'
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t ie 35 **261 "People Like Us" *** "Out of Sight" (1998, Crime Drama) "Hillside Cannibals" (2006, "Nine Lives" (2002, Horror)
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[W NA 18 18 18 18 20 Bones'14' cc Bones '14' cc Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Rules


West
* 10 653
S Q7
* 4
9 7 6 5 4 2


North
4 K J 8 7
v J 8 3
* J 9 2
4 Q J 10


10-12-13


East
* 9 4 2
V 4
* A K Q 7 6 3
* K 8 3


South
* AQ
V A K 10 9 6 5 2
* 10 8 5


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 *
1 V Pass 2 v Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Joyce Cary, an English novelist who died in
1957, said, "The will is never free it is al-
ways attached to an object, a purpose. It is sim-
ply the engine in the car it can't steer"
At the bridge table, surprisingly often one
defender can steer his partner in the right di-
rection. The problem is that some defenders
prefer to backseat drive, ignoring their part-
ners' signals and heading down their own side
roads and letting defeatable contracts make.
In this example deal, how should the de-
fenders play to beat four hearts?
After East opened one diamond, that South
hand was strong enough for a takeout double
followed by a heart bid. But South reasonably
decided that his short spades made an initial
double dangerous. (Yes, it was unlikely to back-
fire, but one heart would be the majority ex-
pert choice these days.) Then, when North
raised hearts, South had an easy jump to game.
First, West must lead the diamond four, his
partner's bid suit. East wins with his queen
and cashes the diamond ace. West discards the
club two, denying interest in that suit East
takes the diamond king, West pitching the
spade three to say that he does not have the
spade ace.
What should East do now?
If West does not want a black-suit shift, there
is only one play left lead another diamond.
And as you can see, this is the only way to de-
feat the contract because it promotes West's
heart queen as a trick.
Trust your partner's signals if he is
trustworthy!


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| CRIKT i



|DURGA __1
F~^1 I-




KONIVE


~ E
YEILEDE
LI (] : II


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek














WAS-6HARG---wWIT------
Now arrange the circed,:etters,..-.
:., g, :.. g ,;:, .
h- '. I,,T 1 1 I-1










to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:[U1111111111]
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: VAPOR RIGOR AFFORD TUMBLE
I Answer: Their hike through the forest was great until
their path TRAILED OFF


ACROSS
1 Zippy's cry
4 Handle
roughly
7 Disease
causer
11 Mr. Baba
12 Untainted
13 Eager, plus
14 Relations
16 Spyglass part
17 Monsters
18 No man's -
19 Comanche kin
20 Icnk
21 Mold and
mildew
24 Handles
dough
27 Sorority letter
28 Voucher
30 Ape studier
Fossey
32 Yours and
mine
34 "White
Wedding"
singer


36 Juan's gold
37 Chopped
39 Like the
tabloids
41 Ancient
42 Wool cap
43 Gloom's
partner
45 Plenty
48 SF transit
system
49 Mooch
52 "Got it"
(2 wds.)
53 Attaches
54 U.K. part
55 Son of Odin
56 Week unit
57 Keep after

DOWN
1 Talk on
2 Mishmash
3 Annex
4 Nurse's
concern
5 Hot


Answer to Previous Puzzle


INJEIARJDUIDG.KiOPU]T
[AUGEJIKNOMSOLPY
MOND STAT LOP

AN ELESESDO



MI I| IL NE I N K ?T


6 Unsold of
the NBA
7 Round Table
knight
8 Level
9 Peel


10 JAMA
subscribers
12 Lyrical
15 1960s dance
18 Size above
med.
20 Golden Rule
word
21 To's opposite
22 No (hyph.)
23 Mrs. Charles
24 Notorious
pirate
25 Designer label
26 Hindu attire
29 Made tracks
31 Silent OK
33 Tot's vehicle
35 Andean
animals
38 Dutch airline
40 Out callers
42 Running late
43 Smidgen
44 Three-part
cookie
46 Property
claim
47 Long-active
volcano
48 Morsel
49 Water lily leaf
50 Tooth-fillers'
org.
51 Ovum


(0 2013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: Ten
years ago, my father
passed away, leaving
my mother well provided for
Since then, she has spent
nearly 80 percent of the es-
tate on herself, my brother
and his children.
My brother is her
favorite child. He
has had an up-and-
down career When
times are good, he
spends a lot of
money When times
are bad, he runs to
Mom. In the past
two years, he has
steadily taken
money from her,
and her assets are
now frighteningly ANI
low MAL
I put myself M
through college,
lived beneath my means and
have saved a great deal. Mom
is now eyeing what I have put
aside, expecting me to use it
to support her, as well as the
"golden child" and the now-
adult grandchildren. This has
brought up old ill feelings of
the way she treated us on our
birthdays and holidays.
Part of me wants to provide
for my mother's needs, as I
feel it is my duty But another
part wants to tell her to find
support from the son she al-
ways indulged. I really can't
talk to anybody about this
without feeling terrible. Can
you help? -N.
Dear N.: We don't blame
you for having mixed feel-
ings. Your mother has not
treated you fairly Still, it is a
kindness to help her once her
assets run out. You obviously
are not under any obligation
to support your brother or his
grown children. We suggest
you speak with an accountant


I
L


about setting up a budget and
a monthly allowance for
Mom, letting her know that
once that money is used up,
there will be no additional
funds until the following
month. This allows you to ful-
fill your filial obligations
without so much
resentment.
Dear Annie: My
husband was diag-
nosed with cancer
three weeks ago.
We have spent
those weeks seeing
various doctors
and having multi-
ple tests. With
chemotherapy and
surgery, he should
IE'S be able to live a
long and happy
BOX life.
My problem is
family members and friends.
I am trying to keep my hus-
band in a positive frame of
mind about his prognosis.
Unfortunately these well-
meaning people keep telling
him horror stories about
chemotherapy and radiation
and all of the people they
know who have died from
cancer
Everyone's cancer is differ-
ent. What works for some pa-
tients might not work for
others. Please do not tell my
husband about someone who
died of cancer. It's not what
he needs to hear right now. I
know you mean well, but this
just depresses him.
Attitude is everything when
it comes to treating and sur-
viving cancer Say something
positive like, "Our thoughts
and prayers are with you," or
"You will survive this. You're
tough." Otherwise, don't say
anything about it at all. Just
be his friend. With the ad-


vances in treatment I know
more people who have sur-
vived cancer than have died.
These survivors all have one
thing in common: a positive
attitude. Polly Positive
Dear Polly: We, too, have
never understood the urge
that compels people to tell
horror stories about those
who have died to those who
are still struggling with ill-
ness of any kind. Attitude is
so important in healing.
Please, folks, keep a lid on
those stories. They help no
one.
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Depressed in Hid-
ing," the 16-year-old high
school girl who is depressed
and anxious and has resorted
to self-harm. She is afraid to
tell her parents because she
believes they will hate her
When I was in college and
living far away from home, I
was unhappy I realize now
that I was depressed. I wrote
to my mother and told her
how unhappy I was. Her re-
sponse was, "Tough toenail."
So I knew never to trust her
again with anything personal
or close to my heart.
Almost 40 years later, my
husband died. In my grief, I
confided some things to her
(by mistake) and received a
similar answer There are
some people you simply can
never trust with your feel-
ings. Caroline in Carolina
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more, visit
www creators. com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C7




CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


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10~ DOING.PrN RX9
CHARLIE Tcm:NS RECM
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MAbE A HUE ENT IN THEIR THE TREES WHO'S IN -.
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Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


BEHOLD MY GOOGLE
SEARCH ENGINE THAT
WILL FIND SEVERAL
EXISTING PRODUCTS
THAT DO WHATEVER
THAT THING DOES.


GOOGLE:
PLEASE CRUSHING
DON'T. DREAMS
S SINCE 1998.

7I


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
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, 21i3 UPS, Inc.
Dl.lribulid by lUn.r*,tl ULIl.k for UFS


Doonesbury Flashback

mt MuP,. CAN AosP 4W .YOb )JPN6
TAKE YOL itrlb .YF *; t FP AVE YOU LOOKEP
YOUR 16MA- r/9Sw i AY r7mf PfJ H4V
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and they told me I was overqualified)"


"Hurry, Mommy, 1 need one more, I
feel another 'bless you' comin'."


'MR.WILSON SMS I SOUND LIKE A BROKEN
RECORP. WHA'S A RECOWRP"


Betty


na'io IM6SRi-a
YOU R6- APnHOc.
WOM2' Burl ru
? LOVE 15 W-
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Big Nate


Frank & Ernest


W`l4m .SHE FALLS
COMPL.ETFELY ASLEEP,
WE CAN TAKE TURNS
DOING bIA "IMTIC
READINGS FROM HER.
TRASHY ROMANCE
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Arlo and Janis


Tody% MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:35 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
In 3D. 1:35 p.m.
"Rush" (R) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 1:10 p.m.


"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Captain Phillips" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Machete Kills" (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 4:20 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:30 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


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WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE, r sfnba H

"HDNE EYMAT, MW ME JUPUA'E WSP


ZGPPMGIU, ZUA JSDBR IS EYPSDIY


BMWU EYMATMAI EYUK YGR AS


WGDBEN GE GBB."


- YUAAK KSDAIZGA


Previous Solution: "With my sunglasses on, I'm Jack Nicholson. Without them,
I'm fat and seventy." Jack Nicholson
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-12


Garfield


Pickles


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CS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


COMICS


?i









To place an ad, call 563=5966






Classifieds Classifieds

,. In Print


~and


Online


All

The Time



Fa: 35)56-56 1TolFre:(88 82230 mal:casifes~hrnclonie~om Iwesie w w~honclolieIo


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C9


S and read
JOHN NATCUK
paintings..if you have
a John Natchuk painting
that you
would be be willing to
sell, please
get in touch with
Robiellyn@aol.com


*.

IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111








I -












How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966


ClIkpNI(clE

www.chronicleonline.com


2012 Factory Easy tow,
5'/2x10 Lawn Trailer
rear gate $850.
Home made dump
Trailer, Good Cond.
$375.
Bob(352) 860-1106
Antique dining room set
6 chairs & buffet in
perfect condition. Early
1930's $3500.00 Must
see! 352-465-7132
BUICK
2006, Ranier, CXL,
98k miles, Nice
Asking $8,000.
352-201-1952
CHAPA 26ft, 1985
Cabin Cruiser. Brand
new trailer. Needs eng
& prop. $2000 obo
(352) 257-0078
CHEST FREEZER 5 cu-
bic foot Fnrigidaire, good
condition, $75.00
352-628-3899
Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenc'd
backed. cust. built '05
Great Loc. $195,000.
352-422-7077
CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE**
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. IncI Waterjlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Saturday, 12th 8a-2p
jewelry, collectibles,
wallpaper, borders,
antiques 3 pc. oak ent.
center and MORE.
Behind Olive Tree
Restaurant, US 19,
MULTIPLE UNITS
DINING ROOM SET
incl. 4 chairs & hutch
dark wood,
good condition
$300.
(401) 829-5141
DINING ROOM SET
Oak with glass top,
6 chairs, very heavy.
$100 (352) 586-0521
FORD
'02, Explorer,
106k mi., good cond.
$4,500 negotiable
352-637-2258 or
634-2798
HOMOSASSA
5231 S. Manatee Ter.
Sat. & Sun 9a-4p
HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2,11/ acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192
HOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun 10a-?
Fishing & Furniture
3168 S Lee Way







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


HONDA REBEL
2009, 100 mi, like new,
many accessories.
Pine Ridge. $2995
OBO (419) 307-8954
Hunting/Fishing Camp
6 /2Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room & AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268

i and read
JOHN NATCUK
paintings..if you have
a John Natchuk painting
that you
would be be willing to
sell, please
get in touch with
Robiellyn@aol.com
LECANTO
Saturday Only 8a-4p
Crendeza, big man
recliner, carpenters
unfinished crafts,
tools, mirrors, TV,
books & much more
3460 W Kevin Lane
Palm Terrace

Maintenance
Working
Supervisor
High School
Diploma Required.
Experience in indus-
trial maintenance,
welding, fabrication
and 3 phase
electrical. Work is in
manufacturing envi-
ronment doing gen-
eral maintenance
duties. Work hours
and days vary. Full
time first shift with
benefits. Pay
depending on
experience $12-$17
per hour. Apply at:
Global Tire
Recycling.
1201 Industrial Drive
Wildwood
or Fax Resume
352-330-2214
Mattress Set
3 yrs. old, paid
$1,800 like new
$500. obo
(352) 527-8600
ORGAN
LEGEND. Perfect
condition
$300 Firm. You move.
(352) 419-6186
Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.com or Call
352-422-2160
RIALTA
2002, new tires, AC, &
paint, 59k miles, runs
great, great mileage
$31,500. 352-238-4445
ROCK CRUSHER
ANNUAL FALL SALE
Saturday 12th, 8-1Ip
furn. tools, baby,
linens & MISC
5899 W. VIKRE PATH
TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$9,000 (352) 726-3730
(352) 422-0201
Washer & Dryer
White, Good Cond.
First $125.
(352) 302-8265


__ OOOG5K6
Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


.9 2

14 6 "


86 9


78 4


4 6 9

2 16


7 63.


3 24

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Fill in the squares so that each row, column. and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers I1 through 9.

All of our
'4duncedstructures
44 wd 4&44" t withstand
Installations b Brian CBC 1253853 wind

-4& ,w 4wa-352-625-7519


' F=REE; E -tBEST i[iI I
Permit And IE UE1
Engineering Fees
I Up to $200 value I

*Siding* Soffit* Fascia* Skirting* Roofovers *Carports *Screen Rooms Decks* Windows Doors* Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Pnrices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 Dogs Free
Pomeranian & Jack
Russell Mix Good with
older people. Owner
passed away. Look-
ing for Good Home
(352) 726-8359
1988 Southwind
RV. Needs to be
hauled away. Lots of
good parts w/ title.
(352) 344-1411
Fiberglass Topper for
Chevrolet Pickup
1987 & Up,
has lock, sliding rear
window, white
(352) 586-0521
Free Fire Wood
In Driveway
483 N Grandview Ave
Citrus Hills
FREE KITTENS
Are spayed & neutered
had shots,
To Good Homes
Only!!
(352) 637-5423
Free Kittens
Calico, Black, and
Gray Tabby
8 wks old, litter trained
352-212-0667
Lab/Rottweiler Mix
Spayed Female
good w/dogs and
kids, housebroken.
Very Friendly owner
cannot keep.
352-282-2802
Oak Firewood
You pk up.
(352) 637-2205
Two kittens, one grey
tabby and one black.
10 wks, litter trained,
eating solid, hand
raised (352) 634-2735



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.001b.
Stone Crabf$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001


2 Children Photo
Albums, Red and Blue
Grannie heartbroken
(352) 795-0586
Black short hair
Great Dane and
Shepherd. 15 months
old. Homosassa near
491 (352) 628-2413
Female Cat
Gray w/ tan spots
no collar, med size
Beverly Hills/Holder
area(352) 613-6482
Female Cat,
Black with white chest
and paws. Lost 10/8 in
Citronella off of
Dunklin Rd going into
Citrus Spring.
(352)400-9961
Lost Female
Siamese Cat
dark chocolate
seal point
Homosassa Area
REWARD
(352) 503-3335
Lost in Beverly Hills. Tnr
colored beagle.40
Ibs.Missing from N. Lee
St. Has been seen on
S. Harnson St. Very
sweet neutered male.
Has been walking in
peoples homes and
jumping in trucks.
Please call if you have
seen JoJo
352-249-3107
MALE VIZSLA
Reddish/orange color,
yellow eyes, 60 Ibs,
red collar, lost near
Stage Coach/ Pleas-
ant Grove. Dog needs
medication. REWARD
(352) 726-0120
(352) 247-6118
Male Yellow Lab. Lost
on 10/4Appoka &
Annajo in Inverness
Answers to Hunter
(352) 464-0743
MISSING 9/8/13 tnri col-
ored beagle. Missing
from N. Lee St. Beverly
Hills. Special needs pet.
40 lb. neutered male
very friendly. Seen by
multiple people on S.
Harnson St. BH Please
call Donna @ 352 249
3107 or 352 476 3140
Motorola Cell Phone
in case. Lost at
OctoberFest in Kiddy
Ride area. Please call
(352) 465-7334 or
(352)-209-2157
REWARD Large
Siamese cat. lost
6/15/13 in the area of
hwy 200 and Orchid dr.
He was wearing a black
collar with no tags.
please call or text
239-287-0953


Found
Small Dog
Oldfield &
Oaklawn Area
Homosassa Springs
Call to identify
352-442-3458
Puppy, Mixed brown
and red with white
chest. Found 10/9 on
Raccoon Ct
(910) 986-3047
Single Key
at Inverness Walmart
found October 7th
call to describe
352-419-8816
Smart, Pretty,
Gunmetal Gray,
short-haired,
Male Cat
desperately seeking
indoor home!!
(352) 746-1904




Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+. Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lic #AL10580


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct 0 $5.001lb.
Stone CrabL6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001



NEED 60K INVESTOR
LOAN 6% SECURED
BY 200K PROPERTY
INTERSET ONLY
352-528-2950 J/D
PROF. male, looking
for work in Citrus
County. Ethical, de-
greed, 414-335-3707




Office Assistant
For busy construc-
tion office. Must
have construction
knowledge.
Excellent computer,
phone and filing
abilities Fax Resume
to 352-637-4141




BARBER/STYLIST
Fulltime/Parttime
Experienced, Busy!
Family Headquarters
(352) 697-1145

HAIR STYLIST
Full time/Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person

Stylist/Nail Tech

(352)344-8282





hoetic




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966


ien er

Busy Medical
Practice Seeks

1. CT SCAN TECH
2. OPTOMETRIST
Experience is a must
Competitive Pay/
Benefits. References
Required
call for immediate
response
352-586-0632
or email
hr@ cmc-fl.com

CNA
3-11 Shift
Citrus Health
and Rehab Center,
a five star skilled
nursing facility. We
offer a good salary
and work environ-
ment including med-
ical/ dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan.
Please Apply in
Person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit

COTA & PTA

Part and Full-Time
openings
(352) 795-4114




IL I I \ I ik I I St.
Y ,,, D,,M


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo coam


Dietary Manager
Join an Exciting
Team!
Certification req.
with 2 years exp.
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness OR Email
to: atadmin
@southernltc.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


F/T P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Primary Care
office in
Homosassa
FAX RESUME TO:
352-628-1120


FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lvnn.swanson@rswan-
sondental.com


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


9 972 13 5 6 4 8|
S145 218 6 3 7 9
863 479152 2
78 69 4 1 2'3 5
2 1415 63 918'7
S3 9 82 7 4 16
4 9 8 71 215 6 3
651 398724
327 654 891


(352) 563.5966 --


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




CIO SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


RN/PRN

Endoscopy ASC,
Weekdays
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961


RNs NEEDEDIII
ICU, ER, TELE

EARN UP TO $43/HR.
2 yrs. exp. required!
Hillsborough,
Manatee, Pinellas,
Pasco & Polk
Counties
Seasonal/Travel
Contracts

(813) 347-9112
fowler@
travelmedusa.com
TRAVELED USA






Personal/
Commercial CSR

220 or 440 LIC.
INSURANCE AGENT
Email Resume to
Tracy Fero at:
tfero@feroinsurance
.corn or Call
352-422-2160


REAL ESTATE
AGENT

For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty









Advertising
Sales Rep.
Full Time

The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking Chronicle
Advertising Sales
Rep to work with
new and existing
advertising clients to
develop revenue
growth through
combined advertis-
ing sales for the
multiple Citrus
Publishing papers
throughout the
Citrus County &
surrounding market
area. Develop and
implement sales
presentations to
existing and poten-
tial customers. This
sales position is
based out of the
Crystal River.
Two plus years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience
with successful track
record in meeting
and exceeding
sales goals,
self-motivated,
highly energetic
& goal oriented,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
reliable transporta-
tion to make sales
calls. College
degree and knowl-
edge of Citrus
County preferred.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryvers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179







ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lio #AL10580



Retired Lady with 30+
years Homecare exp.
Help w/ personal care
companship $10 hr.
Dee Dee, 249-4429




Aw^QningsB

SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518







JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374







Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


Advertising
Sales Rep.
Weekly Publications
Full Time

Seeking
Ad Sales Rep for
The Riverland News
and
S. Marion Citizen.
Work with new and
existing advertising
clients to develop
revenue growth
through combined
advertising. Develop
and implement
sales presentations
to existing and
potential customers.
2 or more years of
newspaper or other
media advertising
sales experience,
ability to develop,
plan and implement
sales presentations,
ability to identify
and prospect for
new sales opportu-
nities, reliable
transportation to
make sales calls.
College degree
preferred. Salary
plus commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No Phone Calls.
Drug Screen
required for final
applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.




Classified
Sales Rep.
Part Time

Seeking individual
with strong sales,
computer, customer
service and organi-
zational skills to
increase our market
share classified
display advertising
in all of Citrus Pub-
lishing's products.
The position will
consist of receiving
incoming calls and
making outbound
service/cold calls.
Handle walk-in ad-
vertisers from our
Meadowcrest
office. College
degree preferred
and ability to dem-
onstrate persuasive-
ness and/or sales
abilities. Ability to
work well in a team
environment. Must
be able to meet a
work schedule of
29-hours per week.
Salary plus
commission.

Send resume to
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.

No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patbos-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907


AC SALES

Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Dave (352) 419-7916

SALES CLERK

Applicant must have
computer skills, self mo-
tivated, works well with
others and customer
friendly. Must be at
least 18 and have a
valid driver's license
Apply in person
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.
2661 E Gulf to Lake












ELECTRICIANS
RESIDENTIAL
NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred.
Rough & Trim. Slab,
lintel & service.
Full benefits,
paid holidays &
vacation /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4042 CR 124A
Wildwood


EXP. MECHANIC

5 yrs min active exp.
Clean Dr. Lic. a must
AD in Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19 Cry Riv.


LAMINATOR

Experienced in
Mica/Wood Veneers
No tobacco prod-
ucts, Val. Fl. Dr. Lic
Apply at Built-Rite,
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,


Maintenance
Working
Supervisor

High School
Diploma Required.
Experience in indus-
trial maintenance,
welding, fabrication
and 3 phase
electrical. Work is in
manufacturing envi-
ronment doing gen-
eral maintenance
duties. Work hours
and days vary. Full
time first shift with
benefits. Pay
depending on
experience S12-$17
per hour. Apply at:
Global Tire
Recycling.
1201 Industrial Drive
Wildwood
or Fax Resume
352-330-2214


RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS

Must have 5 years
exp. Current on
Codes & DF, Trim
and Rough.
Call (352) 746-6825
or Apply in person
S & S Electric
2692W Dunnellon
Rd, Dunnellon





DRIVERS
TRACTOR TRAILER
DUMP

Cypress Truck Lines
seeks 5 TT Dump
Drivers (150 mile
radius) Company
Drivers Only
*Assigned Tractors
*Medical/Dental/Nsbn*P
aid Orientalon
*Paid Training*6
Paid Holidays. 6 Mo
TT Dump Exp &
Class A CDL Req!
Call 1-888 235-8862
www.
cypresstruck.com


MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365




Compete Tree Service
Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8
Delivered & Stacked
(352) 344-2696

FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
&eAFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


-I
Exp. General
Maintenance

Must be flexible and
able to multi-task.
Apply Tues thru Fri
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando





MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





12 ACRES
Close In, Busy Hwy.
8 Mobile Homes, good
Income. Many possi-
blities, Owner & Bank
Finan. 352-212-6182





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com





ANTIQUE SLANT TOP
DESK good condition,
$100. 352-382-0069





2 Person Hot Tub
110Ovolts, excellent
condition! $200.
(352) 527-0618





APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

AUTO BURR MILL
CUISINART SUPREME
GRIND NEVER USED
-$25 (3532)$25

BREAD MAKER
COOKS ESSENTIALS
-BLACK-EXCELLENT
COND. $40
(352) 527-8993

CHEST FREEZER 5 cu-
bic foot Fnrigidaire, good
condition, $75.00
352-628-3899


Affordable Handyman
V FAST* 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
VFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
s'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Mr & Mrs FIX IT
(For Seniors) LIC& INS
Home&Yard/ln&Out
Low Senior $.613-2643
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447

Home/Ofic
CleaningH


Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329


CLASSIFIED



UCRMTRED-_
NEVER USED
$20 (352) 527-8993
CROCKPOT RIVAL -
BLACK- NEVER USED
$25 (52) 527-8993
FOOD PROCESSOR
WOLFGANG PUCK-
SMALL-NEVER
USED-$25 (352)
527-8993
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL LARGE EX-
CELLENT COND.
USED TWICE $40
(352) 527-8993
GOOD DISHWASHER
$100 works perfect. 30
day warranty, call/text
Leonard @
352-364-6505
GOOD DISHWASHER
$100 works perfect. 30
day warranty call/text
Leonard @
352-364-6504
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GOOD DRYER$100
Works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GOOD WASHER$100
works perfect. 30 day
warranty. Call/text Leon-
ard@352-364-6504
GRILL/GRIDDLE
WOLFGANG
PUCK-NEVER USED
$45 (352) 527-8993
QUESADILLA MAKER
SANTA FE -
RED-NEVER USED
$30 (352) 527-8993
Refrigerator (2010)
Kenmore, white, like
new bottom freezer,
68" H, 33" wide, 30/2D
glass shelves and bins,
$425. (352) 513-5415
Call Evenings
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Used Maytag Washer
& GE Dryer
$75. for Both
(352) 382-1830
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, No
Rust, Excellent Working
Condition Guarantee.
Free Del. 352 263-7398
WHIRLPOOL REFRIG-
ERATOR O10cftop
freezer, white. 3 yrsold.
$110 Inverness. Call
john 727 415 7728
phone 727 415 7728




COMPUTER DESK.
Corner style. Oak for-
mica. 54 x 54 x 51 H.
$85. 527-1239.
COMPUTER DESK.
Washed oak formica
finish. 24D x 53H. $80.
527-1239.




Craftsman 154 pc.
Mechanics Tool Set
Call for info, $75. obo
(352) 586-3380
Craftsman profes-
sional 10" Table Saw,
1P1 HP motor, w/
Biesemeyer fence sys-
tem. $475 (orig $950)
(352) 628-1734
SHOPLIGHT with 11
good T40 flourescant
bulbs, great shape,
($10)352-212-1596




KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER $80
352-613-0529
SANYO 20" TV
WORKS GREAT
Excellent picture and
sound quality $25.
352-621-0175
TELEVISION 20 inch
color in very good con-
dition. $25- 220-4158




100 AMP BOX 100 Amp
Box NEW in box.
$65.00 352-249-7212
CEILING FANS WHITE
5 @ $20 EACH
(352) 527-8993


Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards




Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570


UDFBLDFF
WHITE- (2)
SETS-71 "WX91"H-$50
EACH (352) 527-8993




CD/DVD DRIVES 5
drives mint & ext...$25 all
352-476-2652 tomrnmyb
@tamrpabay.rr.com
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
IBM 390E THINKPAD
needs OS, plus ex-
tras...$75 352-476-2652
tomrnmyb
@tamrpabay.rr.com
LOGITECH
TOUCHPAD Logitech
T650 Wireless Re-
chargeable Touchpad.
$45.00 352-527-3589




22" HD Vizio Flat
Screen TV
cost $228, asking $50.
(352) 527-1877
PLASTIC ADIRON
DACK CHAIRS SIX $7
EACH (352) 527-8993




1 Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $75
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
4 white book cases
on wheels $150.
2 red V shaped tables
from daycare $50.
(352) 795-7254
8 Wrought iron chairs
& formica top table,
46x76. Excellent
condition, $125
Call 352-697-2195
40" round dining table
w/blue pedestal
base...$35
call 352-476-2652
Antique dining room
set 6 chairs & buffet in
perfect condition. Early
1930's $3500.00 Must
see! 352-465-7132
Breakfast/Patio Table
tile inlaid w/benches
very unique $100
Occasional Chairs $25
Dark wood BIk Leather
unusual (352) 628-3100
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK oak finish,51"H
w/ hutch,very nice $60
726-2023
COUCH
Burgundy Colored. In
good condition. $80
352-465-7132
Dinette Table
42" 8 sided w/12" leaf
4 chairs, padded,
on wheels. $175.
(352) 746-9076
DINING ROOM SET
incl. 4 chairs & hutch
dark wood,
good condition
$300.
(401) 829-5141
DINING ROOM SET
Oak with glass top,
6 chairs, very heavy.
$100 (352) 586-0521
DINING ROOM SET
Solid light wood table,
w/24" leaf, 6 cush'd
chairs. Large china
closet. $800
Excellent Condition
(352) 621-5561
Electric lift Chair
Rose Colored. In good
condition. $90
352-465-7132
END TABLES
Oak Colored.
$30 for pair
352-465-7132
Entertainment Center
& TV Stand fits any
large TV $550.
Dining Rm. Set, w/
matching bar stools
$550. (541) 973-5030
Entry way bench,
$100
Area Rug, 63 x 94
$75.
Cell (541) 973-5030
FILE CABINET
2 drawer, oak finish exc.
cond.$20 726-2023


PIANO LESSONS


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131




*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1 397











A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



John's Painting
& Wallpapering
Lic/Ins. FreeEst.
**352-201-9568**




Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070


0I -12 LaughingStocK Internationa Inc Dist by Universal UUlICk tor US, 2013

"Harold, the doctor made you quit
your office job because you kept

bringing your work home."

A'it ios-Grus-Kthn-Ba s


CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Saturday, 12th 8a-2p
jewelry, collectibles,
wallpaper, borders,
antiques 3 pc. oak ent.
center and MORE.
Behind Olive Tree
Restaurant, US 19,
MULTIPLE UNITS

CRYSTAL RIVER
MEADOWCREST
Community Yard Sale
Saturday, Oct. 12th
8am-1p in Winn-Dixie
Parking Lot/Hwy. 44.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat & Sun Qual/Cheap
Turn at Dans Clam
HERNANDO
Fri. & Sat. 9a-3p
Quality yard sale.
Undercover rain or
shine, Furniture, toys,
Large assortment.
1629 E. Fletcher St.
Follow signs from 486
take McGee to
Fletcher.
HOMOSASSA
5231 S. Manatee Ter.
Sat. & Sun 9a-4p

HOMOSASSA
Fri. 11 &Sat. 12, 8a-3p
Furniture, Misc. Hshold.
No Early Birds,
2453 S Columbine Ave

HOMOSASSA
RUMMAGE SALE
SAT. Oct 12, 8a-lp
Apostolic Christian
Tabernacle
7961 W. Green
Acres St. US 19

HOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun 10a-?
Fishing & Furniture
3168 S Lee Way

HOMOSASSA
Saturday 12th, 7a-12N
5735 W. Novis Circle
INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 9a-5p
Tools, furniture, baby
items/clothes, Misc.
4011 Berry St

INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, Sun 9am-4pm
MOVING SALE, furn
and much more!
517 Elm Court


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838














TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 5.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help
feed veterans

LECANTO
Saturday Only 8a-4p
Crendeza, big man
recliner, carpenters
unfinished crafts,
tools, mirrors, TV,
books & much more
3460 W Kevin Lane
Palm Terrace

PINE RIDGE
3530 W Cogwood Circle
Baby gear, household
items, SAT. ONLY 7-1
PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8a-l1p
6653 W. Antelope Ln
Wood chipper,
sectry. desk, hshold.
items, toys & Jewelry
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 11th& Sat 12th
LARGE GROUP SALE
Hand & power tools,
furniture, bird bath
& MORE!
4940 W. Horseshoe Dr
PINE RIDGE
Sat 7a-12p Misc items
4894 W. Hacienda Dr.

PINE RIDGE
Sat only 8am to 2pm
5463 N Allamandra
Drive, Beverly Hills

ROCK CRUSHER
ANNUAL FALL SALE
Saturday 12th, 8-1Ip
furn. tools, baby,
linens & MISC
5899 W. VIKRE PATH

Spruce Creek
Preserve
COMMUNITY SALE
SAT. 19th ,9a-12N
OVER 50 VENDORS
East of the
withlacoochee
on SR 200

Washer & Dryer
White, Good Cond.
first $125.
(352) 302-8265


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825

Stump Grinding -
Local, Call Robert
352-302-2220





344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


JAPANESE BUFFET
SERVER Black with
gold, hand-painted
decor. Like-new Call
352-257-5062 $100
KITCHEN SET
4 padded chairs on
casters. Glass top,
white base.
MUST SEE $200
(352) 465-2237
LARGE LIVING ROOM
CHAIR rose col-
ored...$10- 220-4158
MATTRESS
King size, 3 yrs old with
brand new box spring
$500 (352) 419-6465
Mattress Set
3 yrs. old, paid
$1,800 like new
$500. obo
(352) 527-8600
Settee, 46"W hard-
wood w/ pecan finish
$50. 1 Counter Stool,
chrome, swivel seat
w/ back $25.
(352) 564-9336
WROUGHT-IRON
DAYBED like-new,
light-colored frame with
mattress. $100 Call
352-257-5062




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
HONDA PRESSURE
WASHER
$500 Excellent
condition
(352) 503-6902
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE
$20 352-613-0529
TROY BUILT
Riding Mower
42 inch cut $475
(352) 897-4681
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362

Gar Ill



YARD SALE

BEVERLY HiILLS
Fri Sat 8-2 pm
3992 N. Everlasting Dr


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




SAll chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



CTI'ERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844




ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofin- Inc. corn
Lic# Ccc1327656/lns.
*352-639-1024***




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C11


Ia"innnpy nice set with case, ($5)
352-613-7493
HOMOSASSA Extra Lge Dog Crate
Fri, Sot, Sun 8a-5p 48x3Ox3O,Reinforced
Everything Must Go! bottom $50.Oobo
Furniture, Household 352-621-0248
items, clothing, and FINGERHUT GIFT
much more! CARD 100.00 / selling
21 Sycamore Circle for 85.00 Linda
I_ 341-2271
MARTINS ESTATE SALES FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Buv'n Quality Furniture Fresh 15ct $5.001lb.
From Non Smoking Stone Crab@_S600Ib
Homes. 352-209-4945 delivered352-897-5001
f FREE FIREWOOD
U pick up 352-382-3493
FUTON Light wood arm
2 GIRLS WINTER rests small scratches
JACKETS LARGE $15 with mattress black
EACH 352-613-0529 cover. $40.
3 MENS CASUAL 352-746-0714
PANTS 36X30 & 2 Kitchen Aid Mixer
CASUAL SHIRTS New $160.
LARGE $20 352-465-3086
352-613-0529 Masterbuilt Smoker,
BOOTS size 7 tan work new in box, never
like, size 7 1/2 black used. $250 firm
dress, women's, good 3 Burner Charcoil Broil
shape, ($5) Grill, SS top, w/ side
352-613-7493 burner & tank $85
BOYS WINTER (352) 897-4681
CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4 NECKLACE stainless
PANTS, 5 SHIRTS & 2 steel, biker style with en-
lightweight jackets gravable heart, brand
$45 352-613-0529 new, paid $150, only
Girls winter clothing 4 ($30) 352-613-7493
jeans, pants, 5 shirts, OUTSIDE TABLE &
2 pajama sets & 2 CHAIRS Dark green bar
hoodies sizes vary $60 high 2 chairs glass ta-
352-613-0529 ble. $35.00 746-0714
JEANS embroidered, PICTURE FRAMES 4
women's size 10, 1 large nice, ($5)
roses, 1 daisies, brand 352-613-7493
new, both for ($15) PLACE SETTING
352-613-7493 w/napkin rings, made
MENS SUIT HART w/brooches
SCHEFFNER & MARX. Centerpiece Pitcher
Jacket 44, pants 38x30, w/flowers and mirror
$200. for all
dark gray, $50 (2). f795a-
352-322-1154 (352) 795-7254
Mother of the Groom Pressure Washer.,
gown.Adnana Pa Generac: Model G23,
gown. Adnanna Papell, 2300PSI, never used
sz 14, navy.Call for de- $125
tails. Only $60. (352) 344-8067
352-322-1154 () 34-
f REFRIGERATOR Good
working make good gar-
age fridge $50. Firm. it
is 21 cf believe its
2 KAYAK PADDLES- 79 whirlpool-white.
inches long, Ex., $30 746-0714
each. 352-628-0033 ROCKWELL BELT
2 MATCHING OFF- SANDER $95 HAND
SHORE ANGLER HELD HEAVY DUTY
BOAT RODS- Sea Lion METAL INVERNESS
SL7OBRT, 7', 40-60 Ib 419-5981
line, Ex+ $80. 628-0033 SEWING MACHINE
2 WOOD FRAMED Elna Pro Quilters
CHAIRS 1 Rocker 1 std, Dream, like new
Removable cushions paid $2k sell for $600.
$30.00 ea or 2/$50.00 (352) 212-9978
obo 352 621 0248 Sewing Machine
3 DOUBLE ROLLS Singer, cabinet style
FLORAL WALLCOVER- w/chair
ING $25 PREPASTED $7564-9336
VINYL 165 SQ FT (352) 564-9336
419-5981 SEWING MACHINE
23 UNFINISHED W/CAB. Riccar 101
WOOD FORMS $25 Deluxe. Storage in
WOOD FORMS $2 Chair. $45.00 Ruth
HEARTS, TEDDY 352-382-1000
BEARS, BUNNIES
419-5981 Singer Sewing Mach.
10" CRAFM TA Slantomatic 401
10" CRAFTSMAN TA- w/cabinet, Good
BLESAW Heavy duty Condition $50 obo
Saw good condition, 352- 628-3100
motor need brushes. SN
$80 obo. 746-0714 SINGER
Sewing Machine with
APPLIANCES, like new want cabinet. Very
washers/dryers, stoves, good condition. $65
fridges 30 day warranty obo (352) 382-1352
trade-ins, 352-302-3030 SNAKE Ball python with
BARSTOOL tall solid cage @ many extras
wood, good shape, 3'female. $99.99.
swivels, ($5) 746-0714
352-613-7493 Solar Heating System
BEALLS GIFT CERTIFI- for pool. See it in
CATE 100.00 / selling operation $550
for 85.00 Linda (352) 628-6152
341-2271 TOASTER OVEN,
BOW FLEX Schwin COFFEE MAKER &
Bow Flex. Excellent ELECTRIC MIXER $20
condition. 746-0714 352-613-0529
$99.99-- Used Shed
CAMPBELL 8 x 12 Barn Style
HAUSFELD AIR COM- $850. (352) 860-0111
PRESSOR 1OOpsi w/ WOMEN'S BLACK
air hose $40.00 obo RUBBER RIDING
352621 0248 RUBBER RIDING
352 621 0248 BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW
CHANDELIER Beautiful SIZE 43L EUR
lighting for dining rm or 419-5981
formal entry. See pic on YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
Craigslist #4072048315. 216" 140 WATTS 2 9"
$60.00 352-322-1160 60 WATTS & 1 5" 80
CHARCOAL GRILL WATTS ALL $90
KINGSFORD 18.5" ON 352-613-0529
WHEELS WITH -
COVER $20 M a
352-613-0529 E i e t
CHILDREN HALLOW-
EEN COSTUMES 1 Hospital Bed
CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 Electric Bed, Good
LION SIZE 5/6 $8 Condition $200 obo
EACH 352-613-0529 352-503-9468
CONCERT SHIRT
Taylor Swift Red Tour,
with matching arm
band, brand new, ($10) STATE QUARTER SETS
352-613-7493 40 complete sets,
COSTUME JEWELRY 3 both mints plus
necklaces, 1 pair ear- Wash.D.C., Guam,
rings, 3 watches, nice, P.R. all in mint tubes,
($10) 352-613-7493 4,240 coins in all
DOG CRATE X LARGE un-circulated.
SOFT SIDE Green $1,500 firm for all,
cloth Sturdy never (352) 344-4614
used $100. WE BUY US COINS
352-270-3909 & CURRENCY
DOG CRATES SMALL (352) 628-0477
(2) Black Wire.For pets
up to 25 Lbs.
Clean/Excellent $20.
ea 352-621-0175
ELECTRIC GUITAR, "CHRISTIAN EDITION"
CASE, TUNER, AMPLI- ACOUSTIC GUITAR
FIER, and CABLES, ex- WHITE W/TURQUOISE
cellent condition, $95, TRIM BEAUTIFUL!
(352)465-1813 $100 352-601-6625
ELLIPTICAL "NEW" FENDER
EXERCISER Folds SQUIRE JAGUAR
when not in use. Like BASS W/ULTIMATE
new, $95.00 obo SUPPORT GIGBAG
352 621 0248 $100 352-601-6625
ETHAN ALLEN "NEW" SDS0 ACOUS-
ROCKER RECLINER TIC GUITAR GOLD
Brown-Beige & Wood GROVERSSOLID
$40.00 obo TOP+GIGBAG!$100
352 621 0248 352-601-6625


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131
PLAY SLIDE GUITAR?
LP STYLE ELECTRIC
AGED MAHOGANY &
BLACK $100
352-601-6625
RED-BLUE-GREAN
rotating lights $25 for all
3. 352-476-2652
tommyb@tampabay.
rr.com



JUICE EXTRACTOR
Cuisinart New. Never
used Paid $150. Sell
for $95. or make offer
352-621-0175
NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call
for e-mail picture 40.00
linda 341-2271
RUG- MOHAWK
COCOA INK SWIRL,
1O'X 13' $100
352-628-3507



Proform C840 Weight
Bench Exerciser
Exc. Cond. $125.
BowFlex/Nautilus
tread/stepper
exc. cond. $125.
(352) 527-0618



BILLIARDS TABLE
American Heritage
1" slate top, leather
pockets, solid mahog-
any, claw feet. All
accessories included.
Plus stainless mini beer
fridge and portable
ice make.
All in areat Condition
$1400 for all
(352) 503-7690
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Gun Cabinet
for six guns, wood,
with glass in door,
accessory storage,
$75.
(352) 564-9336
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516
SQUARE TWO LADIES
GOLF CLUB, FULL SET
W/ BAG & COVERS
$650, Ladies golf bag,
brand new $90
(352) 897-4681



2012 Factory Easy tow,
5'/2xI0 Lawn Trailer
rear gate $850.
Home made dump
Trailer, Good Cond.
$375.
Bob(352) 860-1106
2013 Enclosed
Trailer, 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
$1600. firm
(352) 513-5436


Sell r Swa


2 CRANK-UP light
stands for T-bars or
truss $75 both
352-476-2652 / tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
10'LIGHT TRUSS
w/dollies for DJ or
band...$50
352-476-2652 tommyb
@tampabay.rr.com
BASS "UKE" 21"
SCALE, ACTIVE PRE-
AMP W/ PIEZO&POLY
STRINGS $75
352-601-6625
LES PAUL STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
AGED MAHOGONY
TOP & BLACK $75
352-601-6625
ORGAN
LEGEND. Perfect
condition
$300 Firm. You move.
(352) 419-6186
PIANO LESSONS


New Client Offer
For You

Take 20% off
First Visit

A'Nue Salon
Hair Skin* Nails
1916 N.W. Highway
19, Crystal River,
Florida
(Corner of Turkey
Oak and Hwy.
19 Near Mall)
352-563-2110


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


RoUUinl LUong
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"







Birds for Sale
Blue Front amazons,
$300 ea. Indian Ring
Necks, $100. ea. Cherry
head & cuban conures,
$175 ea. Nandays $150
ea. Quakers $75 ea.
Fisher Love Birds $35.
ea. 352-637-6967



Doberman
Puppies
3 Males $500. ea
Parents on premises
352-586-3386


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


LOKIE
Lokie, a 3-y.o.
brown-white terrier
mix, weight 65 Ibs.,
came to shelter
because owner
could not care for
him, gentle, a bit
shy, very playful,
loves water, gets
along w/other dogs,
loves human friends,
eager to please.
Beautiful dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


REMY
Remy, a gentle
neutered pit bull
mix, wonderful
disposition, 1-2 years
old, lot of energy,
plays w/other dogs.
Does not jump on
people, knows "sit" &
"down", gives paw,
walks well on leash,
likes car rides, gives
kisses, does not
mind cats.
Call Sandy @
224-223-9279.

Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings

SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Males Starting @ $400
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


DOJHA
Dojha, a 5-y.o.
yellow/white lab re-
triever mix, medium
size, calm, gentle &
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs.
Housebrkn. Beautiful
& in great shape,
wants to sit by your
side. Came to shel-
ter because family
lost their home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288

Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382









LILLY
Lilly, a 6-y.o. female
bulldog mix, white
w/black ears,
beautiful, friendly
girl, weighs 36 Ibs.
Heartworm-negatve &
housebin. She
loves treats & sits on
command, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Very affec-
tionate, wants to
be by your side.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


CRYSTAL RIVER
3br 2ba $650- Incl,
Appliances, Water-
Trash, Fenced yard,
Pets ok,352-587-2555
Floral City
2/1, fenced yard
newly remodeled
$500. mo. inc. trash
p/up (352) 344-1521




3 BR, 2BA, Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500.
(352) 212-4265
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833

HOMOSASSA
Drastically reduced!
Was asking $74,000
now asking $59,900.
Illness forces sale.
3/2 114 acres, 95%
remodeled, 16x16 work-
shop. (352) 621-0192

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on /2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60




INVERNESS

55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




12X60 MOBILE HOME
+ 16x20 addition,
2BR, 1 BA, 80x200 lot
with10x12 shed. 6 ap-
pliances incl. $31,500.
(352) 344-9565
Castle Lake Park
INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt
scnd lanai, steel roof,
caged inground pool,
1 acre, no HOA fees,
$69k (352) 238-4521
Homosassa' 2BR,1BA
furnished, enclosed la-
nai, carport, 2 sheds,
cyclone fence, 1/2
acre,$21,500
352-628-3899

TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Doublewide,
2 BR, 2BA,
Recent shingle roof
New AC, MUCH MORE
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf & A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
Lecanto
2/2, 55+ Senior Park
$11,500,furn. lot rent
$245. incl. trash &
water (219) 929-8909
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


-AaIONJ
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CilrusCounlyHomeRenlals.com
CRYSTAL RIVER
9469 W.Wisonsin C ...............$650
2/2Ni 2toryAillai
9660W. Camphor Ln ............... $800
3/2/2 Nic home on comer lot, wihrlcn il
11640 W. Bayshore Dr........ $1,300
2/2 Island ,ndo, w th o gre[t6f ew of the wlter
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
87 S. Adams (BH).....................$675
2/15/1 Care home with Floldkaroom
8180 N. Duval Dr. (CS)......... $1,000
3/2/26 od cure home overlooks heth 7hmle
HOMOSASSA
3280 S. M higai...................$675
Ch i', .. N MI,. C. ,M'r) I5 I
Nlow ilB);/2/ Golf course wile, l n m r include d
LECANTO
3441 E. Chappel Ct..................$525
2/1 Charming cottage, easy access to lakes
3069 W. Bermuda Dunes ..........$850
2/2/2 geoulful home in Black Darnond





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499

CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo. &
LECANTO
Newer Duplex 2/2
(352) 628-2815

HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114, 257-6461

INVERNESS
2/1, $625. mo.
412 Tompkins Street
352-895-0744











Available Now!
2 Bedrooms
Rental
SAssistance
Available

(352)489-1021

TDD 800-955-8771
L=J oInsortunty s over &an equaoyel
aporunity poder & emcployer


CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE*
Secret HarbourApts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incl Waterjlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037









CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001



HERNANDO
1 Room Cottage, $500
mo. incld's elect. & ca-
ble, dep. req. 341-0787
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



INVERNESS
2BR/I1BA + CPort
Lease to own $5,000
down, $700 a month.
3866 E Dawson Dr. Lg
fenced yard. Sep. laun-
dry, shed, mature trees,
screened porch in back,
covered porch in front,
2 minutes from shopp-
ing. For more info call
Mary 423-244-6122. To
see prop. 352-586-6088




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA
MOVE IN FOR ONLY
$1150 (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 Good neighbrhd.
Close to stores, $700
mo. F/L/S., 249-7033
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, clean, fresh paint
$560. mo. 697-1457
BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905
CITRUS SPRINGS
'06, 3/2/2, fenc'd. yrd.,
$900 mo. 422-2719
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
$500. 850-838-7289
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in 07 $795/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugar Mill Woods
3/2/2 villa, heated
pool, on golf course,
$1000 F/L/S avail 11/1
(970) 274-8786


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent or Rent to Own
built in '07, $795/mo.
www.rickv bobs.com
352-613-5818




INVERNESS
3/2/2, Furn., Very nice,
In Town 352-527-9268




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$750. 352-419-4421




Hunting/Fishing Camp
6/2 Acres, surrounded
by timberland, easy
access from paved rd
Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA,
Irg. living room & AC
Downstairs, Lrg. Kit.,
bath & bedroom,
Good Hunting.
Backs up to Golf
Ammock Hunting CIb.
Jimmy 352-302-4268
Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced, Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQLPrUM TS
OPPOfttUN lTV


WEST COMPACT PONTOONS
Now Available! From 14' to 20'
Yamaha & Honda Powered Easily Trailered w/Most Small Cars SUVs
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
563-5510


HLfl 31tT117t


In


I.et


1654 BRUTE EXTREME b- rna

SIDE CONSOLE
Alum. trailer, 40HP Mercury, Anchor Materss, A
Depth Finder, Trolling Motor. Call for Details.

AAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR
1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768
aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com


2013 XCUIRSION XURSION X23RF 2011 PATH FINDER
X20C CRUISE MODEL PONTOON BOAT 2200TE

CRYSA R PONTOON ,,, 990 ,,, ,,,B,. RIVER HII r,,2 9
P O T O Ihl,,HIII m l '1 d-,I,11 I, II,, t, ,t ,11 I,' ', I 4 A ide S') pr,,p
Deluxe Helm Console with storage "1,AII,., ,,., Iv4 Bof .ai. i ,i p A..1. I.,.I Aluib...u.. iibvii
Vinyl Deck CALL FOR SPECIALBOAT SHOWPRICING i .- .. ...ALL FOR SPECIAL A SHOW ICI

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE 990 N. SUNCOAST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER -1795-2597


I.M a


WORDY GURDBY TRICKY ICANE
1. Yours truly's swatted insect (1) Every answer is a rhymin
pair of words (like FAT C
| | _and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Home plate official's jostles (1) theywill fit in the letter
-squares. The number aftre
definition tells you how mi
3. Shield Her Majesty from danger (1) syllables in each word.


OGSK1


ig
AT
;), and

erthe
many


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


@ 2013J FS,Dist. byUniv. Ucick for JUFS
4. Modify a woman's backless top (2)


5. Picky daily-paper-selling boy (2)


6. Halloween hags' throws from the mound (2)


7. Nonnative residents' autopsy performers (3)


SHlNOHOJ SH3N1 3A0 'L S3H3$iId SH3HJIA '9 aISAMK ASOOH3's
IIjJIVHLM $IV'IV Naaflb Na l3S 'SdWf SdNfI sd g Z dA 'i
10-12-13 SHDASNV









ust s To lo 111111 Were FULY INSIURED for
Bhl General UahilityAND Workers' Comnp! ..


i,




C12 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial





A
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW .
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan!!
Buvina or Sellina

a'.


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realty
Connect.me
Imperial Exec for the in-
vestor or Handyman.
(2/3/2) CASH ONLY.
48K. 527-1239
LAUREL RIDGE
Upgraded in perfect
cond. 2/2/1 w/ Florida
room & new porch.
$89,900 Call Barbara
Stone (352) 586-3072



Lecanto 3 bedroom.
2 bath with fireplace,
sauna, and garage.
2 acres w/fruit trees,
garden ready
352-422-7136


Well maintained bright
villa. Split floor plan. 2
Master BR w/ walk in
closets & priv baths.
Lanai w. glass/screen
$74,900 352-795-1648



Citrus Hills 3/2/2
caged pool, 1 acre,
great neighborhood,
call for details
(352) 746-6552



8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively
rennovated including
wood and tile floors.
Granite and new roof
and kitchen. Over 2000
Sqft Living area.
$139,900 352-817-5875
or miksh@earthlink.net
INVERNESS
2002, Custom Built
3/2/2
With Extra Lot
$114.500.
352-344-3112
Inverness city living, 3
bedroom, 2 bath 2006
townhouse in great con-
dition. Low maintenance
& easy access to shop-
ping, etc. $87,500. Ed
Pechan, Parsley Real
Estate, 352-400-1230
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



2005 MEADOWCREST
(Fox Hollow) BEAUTY.
3/2/2/2 Lg Split BR,
Cul-d-sac.See pics @
www.forsalebvowner.c
om #23967875
Call 724-813-8624.
Connell Heights
4/2/2 Pool Home,
Spacious, FP, fenc'd
back yd. custom built
2005, Great Location
$195,000., -422-7077


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL ?
CALL ME TODAY!


For Sale t
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell
BS=1IE


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onfi $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor
"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"
BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
b_.jowell@
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


LaWanda Watt I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
Customer Service BUYING OR
is My Specialty! SELLING
I want to work
for you!
TOP
352-212-1989 TOP
lawanda.watt@ PERFORMANCE
centurv21 .com Real estate
Century 21 Consultant
J.W. Morton tpauelsen@
Real Estate, Inc. hotmail.com









|www.chronicleonline.com


-" *r- r
'' UT


S COUNTY
SFor more information on how to reach I T I 1 1 )[ (1 N E
i Citrus County Readers call V 11I IA
352-563-5592. wwwh.frniclonIinecom
nn& sca, x Iou 2z


439 PER MO.
Win .ioverd creit 969 W due at iee silrriri] iifteri 311 ofler-i Tax, !,Tie icicSe dealer I ; ani opionat equiprmien extra
Mileage rrige ol SO 25'mile aiter 30 000 miles PayTenis are lor a 2014 XTS tiitn anI MSRP ol S45.525 36 ITiuntilj py ments
iotal S15 804 Ophuri 10 purchase ai lease end for an amount to be determined 31 lease sioninq ALLf must approve lease. Take
delivery by 103113 Lessee pas tor maintenance repair and excess wear. Payments may be higfrri some Staes Noi available
wilm otrie' ofers ResidelCy reslrihorks a ,ily


Wirn approved creoit S37?9 due at leak Sgnriing i3er all ofler;l No secunty deposit required Ta. Itle iceaise Oeaier fees and
ophofiual equprrer[ e1tra Mileage charge ol SO 25,'mile aier 30,000 niles Paymerts ae for a 2014 Ltalade wiltti arn MSRP of
SW 740 36 monthly payments total $26,244. Option to purchase at lease for an amount to be determined at lease signing plus
SJ30 Le;sor iliasapprove leasp Take delivery Iby 1031 13 Lessee paysfor maintenance repair and excess wear Paymenls nimay
be hiqe'r 1 iisome stale. NO33vailab)le wilhi o1tier ofers Residency iestricoinis apply


n 866-443-5218 Oswt (
1 l L (D Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Service: Mon-Fri 7am-6pm Sat 8am-4pm

9DIU241 S 0noatBld. omAss aL344

S *v.VLAG C DIL C~o


i-nt -
CitrusCou lq


Citu Con




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CL3


PFor Sale 1,,1
Forest Lake, Hernando
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5
Acres, Fenced. Many
extras including 24x36
Shop/garage. Sun
Room with Wood Burn-
ing Stove. Fruit trees. 2
8x10 Storage Sheds.
Security System. See
ad on 4SaleByOwner
for pictures. 352
726-7755



Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paintall appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712

Waterfron
Homes^j


S
** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*'352-563-5510"

Alumacraft
14 ft w/trailer and
extra's $400
(352) 637-5032
BAY KAT
Aluminum outboard,
28 ft, includes trailer &
outboard mtr. 90HP
$9,500. (352) 238-4445
CHAPA 26ft, 1985
Cabin Cruiser. Brand
new trailer. Needs eng
& prop. $2000 obo
(352) 257-0078
KEY WEST
2013 Skiff 177 Key
West SkiffYamaha 70
4stroke,Trolling
Motor,Jack Plate, GPS,
Alum Trailer. Warran-
ties transferrable
$19,000 352 503-6668
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com



ALLEGRO BAY
'96, M37 Motor Home
35k mi. good cond.
Needs minor fixes,
$12,000 obo, Trade for
Harley? 352-274-8664
AMERI LITE
By Gulfstream, 2011,
21 MBL, walk around
bed, $9,995 firm.
Franks A-S
352-726-2494
FLEETWOOD
95 Flair, Class A
22 ft, 50k mi. Very
Good cond
MUST SEE $12,000
(352) 628-6643
RIALTA
2002, new tires, AC, &
paint, 59k miles, runs
great, great mileage
$31,500. 352-238-4445


-4I^

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"wtth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Recreation

TIFFIN
'04, Allegro, Class A,
30 ft., 2 slides, jacks,
generator, new awn-
ing, 32k mi., 50 amp
service $32,500, Call
to learn all that goes
with it 352-527-2327
TOWBAR: Roadmaster
5000 Stainless Steel
Towbar. Universal fit.
One (1) person opera-
tion. NEW $600...asking
$300 or first best offer!!
352-426-4563



KEYSTONE
Springdale 2005
Model 298-BHL
super slide out, awn-
ing, tandem axle,
coupling hitch anti
sway bars, 30 amp
hkup. Asking $9,500
or will consider shal-
low water boat as
trade, (352) 503-9133
before 9pm
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Travel Trailer
2011, 20' Rockwood
MiniLite, Self Con-
tained. Pwr Slide out.
Ex. Cond. $13,500
obo(352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



**BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

L.QQk
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


'01, Z3, 3.0i, manual,
124k mi., green, black
top, garaged, clean.
$7,450., 352-220-2077
BUICK
1999 Le Sabre 48,000
miles AC broken runs
perfect must see
$2850.00 352-212-1863







CADILLAC
2004 Esclade EXT
I owner, fully loaded,
dealrshp main,113k mi
$13,500.510-867-5727
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT
door, power win-
dows, locks, $3,495
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER 200
2012 4-dr, loaded,
13,000 miles, 1 owner
$19,000 firm Franks A-S
352-726-2494
DODGE
2000 Intrepid Runs and
looks great, 180,000
new tires $1300
352-678-7049
FORD
'02, Explorer,
106k mi., good cond.
$4,500 negotiable
352-637-2258 or
634-2798
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2011 Mustang Premium
coupe, V6, Automatic
transmission, 27,000
miles. Very good condi-
tion. $16,900. Please
call: 352-726-2595
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
Elandra, 4-dr, 41,000
miles, sun roof, loaded
$10,888. FranksA-S
352-726-2494


2001 Grand Marquis
Excellent Condition
82k miles $5,700.
(352) 527-9897
NISSAN
2010 Altima SL,38,500
miles, sunroof, leather,
Champaign, loaded.
Garaged, mint. 30+mpg.
$16,500. 352-382-0005
SATURN
1999, S11, 4 door,
low miles, extra clean,
1 owner, $3,250.
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Cony Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pnris-
tine, 11 k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
04 Corvette, Conv Artic
White, torch red leather,
polished alum. wheels,
auto heads up display,
bose, senior owned pnris-
tine, 11 k $27,900 obo
352-513-4257
CHEVROLET
2004 Corvette Torch red
coupe, excellent
condition, LS1 engine,
6-speed, Z51 perfor-
mance handling, fully
optioned with 2 roofs,
42,000 miles, one
owner, never hit or
abused. $24,000 phone
(352) 527-2927 or
harmanrienkins
.@vahoo.com
CHEVROLET
'82, Corvette, T-tops,
silver green matalic,
automatic, very rare
car, mint. cond.
$16,500 obo, 302-8265





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CORVETTE
1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng. all original, great
cond. $29,500 obo
352-302-8265


BIG SALE
e'Come make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
2001 S-10 LS, 4Cyl, 5
spd, air, 44K mi, mint
cond. New tires, N/S
$7500 (813) 410-6976
DODGE
2500, 01, 6 Spd
Qcab, dsl, 5th whl
hkup, fully loaded
+ xtras, 2 new tires
runs great, 33mpg,
needs clutch soon
113k, HOT! $6800.
OBO(352) 465-3086
FORD
1979 Box Truck
460 eng, low miles
dual wheels, am/fm
$1000.obo
(352) 637-4011
FORD
2004, SD250 supercab
Lariat 158" WB, 5.4L,
V8, one owner, runs
& looks great. Over
road high miles $6,900
527-0989, Must See!
FORD
2007 Explorer Sport
Trac XLT, Blue, bge
Ithr. int, tow pack, 68K
miles, just serv, $15,900
obo (352) 897-4204
SOLD
CHEVROLET
2005 1/2 ton, SWB,
auto, P/S, V-6, just
truck AC, like new
$5,500. Franks A-S
TOYOTA
'06 Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T
cap, 80k mi. exc cond
$9,000 (352) 726-3730
(352) 422-0201



BUICK
2006, Ranier, CXL,
98k miles, Nice
Asking $8,000.
352-201-1952


, IJ l :J1II l l I IJI '

SELF-EMPLOYED FORECLOSURES

BANKRUPTCY FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES



1275 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S. Hwy. 19)
Homosassa
UICK "-M 352-795-6800
AMr- s 0gLu


CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 1 owner $3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
'99, Tahoe, 166k miles,
dual AC, clean inte-
rior 1 owner, $3,500
obo, 954-294-8979
Pine Ridge
FORD
2007, Escape, XLS,
$7,950.
352-341-0018
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2003, Wrangler,
4 cyc., 5 speed,
soft top, $9,950
352-341-0018




JEEP
04, Wrangler, Sport
4.0 literauto trans,
exc. cond. many
extras, call for details!
$13,500. 352-563-6666


CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment

CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306

DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan,
Fully loaded, dual slid-
ing drs. 35mpg, V6,
Perf. cond., garaged
New tires, Crystal Riv.
$4,500. (727) 207-1619

TOYOTA
2005 Sienna
1 ownerx- clean,
Ask for Donna(352)
860-3115, 302-0778





Harley Davidson
2000, 883, 7K miles
$2,995.
(352) 398-5903


248-1012 SACRN
10/25 sale Suncoast Storage & Rentals, LLC
PUBLIC NOTICE
Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, according to provisions of the "Florida
Self-Storage Facility Act", Chapter 83, Part IV, Section 83.806 of the Florida Statutes,
hereby gives NOTICE OF DISPOSITION. Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, 9034 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448 will dispose of the contents of the storage
spaces) named below via auction on Oct. 25 at 10 AM or by donation to charity.
Successful bidder must pay in cash. All purchased items are sold as is and must be
removed at the time of the sale.
Space Number Occupant Contents
30 Maureen DeMaria
Household
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle October 5 & 12, 2013.


2956-1017 THCRN
Stergois, Lisa 2009-CA-6844 NOFS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 2009-CA-6844
CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STERGOIS, LISA, et.al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foredosure dated Sep-
tember 10, 2013, and entered in 2009CA6844 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit
in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC, is the Plaintiff and LISA STERGOIS;
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; PINE RIDGE PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s) Angela Vick as the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash,
wwwcitrus realforeclose corn, at 10:00 AM on October 31, 2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit
LOT 12, BLOCK 162 OF PINE RIDGE, UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 37 THROUGH 50, INCLUSIVE, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 3rd day of October, 2013
By/S/ Michelle Lewis, Florida Bar 70922
Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, PL, Attorneys for Plaintiff
6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487
**IMPORTANT**
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to
participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; to appear in Court at,
Citrus County, John Sullivan: (352) 341-6700.
October 10. 12 & 17. 2013 12-14552


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..............AT CITRUS KIA, "WE JUST DON'T CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"




1850 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL t N

r.U ..........352-564-8668

*AII prices are plux tax tag title Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com

PL.7 Jrm ~,- _"Jql .. i M r~l.'i 1 q5, MWIW~f,9Fe II 2L ""Li' MA60e2.& lI wW


SH_8IH


HONDA
'05, Goldwing, 59k mi,
very clean, always
garaged. $10,550
352-344-5177
HONDA
2006, BTX 1300
Garage kept $6,500.
(352) 398-5903
HONDA
98 Shadow Aero
VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh
walls, retro look, 18k.
mi $3200 352-465-7812
HONDA REBEL
2009, 100 mi, like new,
many accessories.
Pine Ridge. $2995
OBO (419) 307-8954
KAWASAKI
'06, KLR 650 Endoro,
15k miles, runs great, 1
owner, call for details
$2,500. (352) 344-1223
SUN
149 CC Motor Scooter
Like New, 100 miles,
No dents or scrates
$900 obo, 503-3103
YAMAHA
1985 Virago, 1000 cc,
runs good.
$1,200 or best offer
(352) 201-5104


q,


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Foreclosure Sale:
Action Notices I


foreclosure Sale,
Acfion Nofices I




C14 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013


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NEW 2014 ESCAPE S


M SRP............................................................................ $23,595
Nick Nicholas Discount.....................................................-600
Retail Custom er Cash..................................................... -1,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash' '......................-500

$21,495


NEW 2013 F 50 XL


M SRP ............................................................................ $25,340
Nick Nicholas Discount..................................................... -900
Retail Customer Cash.................................................... 1,750
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash,' ...................-1,000

$21,690


1 I9 / ^ ^ I FORDCERTIFIEDPRE-OWNED .... .... j
Relax, It's Covered. -
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CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


-~'i~~


2012 FORD
FOCUS SE
3u0,00uuu0 .lles GPI.'
$16,950


2011 FORD
FUSION
4 cvl, 21,000 miles GPR144
$17,950


2011 MERCURY 2010 FORD 2010 LINCOLN
MILAN PREMIER TAURUS LTD MKZ
Le IhI er OI , 0 r le F'I Lc- ril- rn't,.i -. I' milii i i f l i 4FII:,.4j One oWrner G T.T'.1
$19,950 $22,950 $22,950


2010 FORD
MUSTANG GT
(1$'' w 23,lwr 9 I,,lol
$23,950


2009 LINCOLN
MKS
.-11- $ 24,9 50 I ulll- .4 ,'1,
$24,950


2011 FORD
EDGE LTD
LIllr r25 r.,, l n,1, i w l .5 T,
$25,950


2010 LINCOLN
MKX
L $-2ill,-r Im5 r0I.'l ,llm p qI-Sh'
$26,950


2013 FORD
F ISO CREW XLT
305 V8 G ; T-", iiT -)
$27,950


2011 FORD FOCUS
Economy Car.
$12,950
/a -^b


2010 FORD FOCUS SES
Leather, one owner.
$13,950
S7 Wl-


2010 FORD FOCUS SE
10,000 miles, one owner.
$13.950


2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS
Leather
$14,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE
speed, std trans, 1 owner.
$14,950


2011 FORD FOCUS I
$15,950


2012 CHEVY MLIBU
Sunroof, leather.
$16,950


LT 2011 FORD RANGER XCAB 2006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED
One owner Auto, low miles.
1 18,950 $19,950


2007 LINCOLN MKX
Moon roof, navication, AWD.
$20,950


Nick Nicholas


Crysta


River


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


Mnna Iruz
Salesperson of the Month


*Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all
buyers will qualify. See dealerfor details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13.


I


LINCOLN


2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT
S Warranty. Leather, 3rd row seating.
$24,950 $31,950


Nick mai
Nicholas
Ford S.4
Lincoln
;oast Ford ^ ^^^^^


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C16 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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G3BSDEW,
Transmission!


'a New 2013 Honda
:ORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


4<


...fora New 2013 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
ModeITF3H3DJW Best Selling Compact
SUVIn America! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 i Y
Honda FIT W
Model GE8H3CEX Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


r r


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...for a New 2013 Honda IL aALuk
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW Come See Why
The Odyssey Is The Best!


...fr aNew 2013 Honda -
CR-V LX 2WD
Model RM3H3CEW-ComeSeeWhyTheCR-VlsTheBest
SelingCompadSct UV InAmerica! Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2DCEW,
AWD AUTOMATIC


0.9%AP OVER 90 Soo00 MIUTARY
APPRECIATION OFFER'
X 60 MONTHS Used & (eitkilied Toeligiblemembersof theUS Military & their
on select new Honda models Pre-Owned Vehicles! spouses towards any new Honda vehicle when you
,, on approved credil finance or lease thru HFS. See dealer for details.


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include.
6 MONTH/
6,000 MILE
Limited Powertrain Warranty"


Plus a 5-DAY
EXCHANGE
PROGRAM!


Check Out Our REALLY BIG Selection
of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


2003 MIATA 2001 HONDA
$4,995 $5,995


2007TOYOTA
RAV4
$8,995


2008 HONDA
FIT
$8,995


1099NDA
$10,9RID
'W$!,995


2005 BEETLE
CONV.
$6,995


.UU5 KANELK
EDGE
$9,995


10 KIA 2012 CHEVY
DONA MALIBU
3,995 $15,995


I .JI -Ir.


S12,495
Ba.S.?a


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of Honda CERTIFIED Vehicles!


I 2011 CIVIC 2010 CIVIC 2009 ACC(
COUPE 4DRLX 4DRIX
$12,995 $13,495 S13,9S


2012 FIT 2011 CIVIC 2012 CMV
BASE 4DR LX LX2DR
Sl5L.'9 riSq QQ; _;1.9Q


)RD
95


2008 ELEMENT 2010 ACCORD 2011 ACCORD 2012 FIT
SC 4DR LX SPORT
$15,995 $16,495 $16,495 $16,595


2010 ACCORD 2011 CRV 2008RIDGEUNE 2011 CRV
4DR EX SE EX-L
$16,995 S18,495 $199995 $21,995


LOVE Can Do For You!


Y.t 352.628.1z600

! oveHonda.com
fV -4-..............


b same.trim level. Must bring in current advertisement from local dealer showing lower price on
t fr. Excludesprior sal See dearer for details 136 miont closed end lease whn approved credit,
hereafter. $2995 cash or trade equity plus taxes tag & lees First payment, tag and lease and state fees
eNt atNailionalost Not a lease. 2. 36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,975 with approved
nale.fereater. $2000 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus tax, tag and lease and state fees due at
eas dow payment or cap cost reduction toward the purchase or lease ol any new Honda aulomrobile
pILeasee, or Honda Leadership Purchase Plan program through HFS (excludes Zero Due at Signing
LcteNriaestablished by HFS, and vehicle must gbe eligible for new-vehicle rales. tfCovers internal
reowned vehicls include $2500 cash down or tade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 C17


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!FtbiA4 Chevy
RUZELS
aUTOMATIC


A!1


.New 2013 Chevy
MALIBU LT


New 2014 Chevy
EQUINOX LS


New 2014 Chevy
TRAVERSE LT


New 2014 C
IMPALA


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New 2014 Che
SILVERADO
DOUBLE CAB


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CAMARO L
.oumpe, RS Package, 20" Wheels
-k .................... $1,825
DISCODUNT: n.-$,7
EAS LOYALTYOR CONQUEST:.... -51000
-------. ---7$2 500
-IORTRADEEUn : ....- ZZ S2pw


New 2013 Chevy
SPARK LS
M SRP: ...................................................... $14.145
DEALER DISCOUNT: ....------........- $300
USAA ---.......--.....- $750
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY: .......- $2,500


6


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TAHOE LS
M SRP:.................................................... $43,
DEALER DISCOUNT: .........................
REBATE: .. -
LEASE LOYALTY OR CONQUEST:__ i
USAA: OT-.RAE........................-
CASH OR TRADE EQUTY:.-----m.-m$s


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ACCORD
Was $3,995
NowSl,258


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BLAZER
2 Door, Sport, was $6,995
NowS 3,874


2001 Volvo
S40
Sedan, was $6,995
Now -3,788


2010 Toyota
YARIS
Was $9,995
NowS7,844


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2006 Ford F150 Lariat CC
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'19.999


2005 Buick Terrazza
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E '24.995


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1998
Kawasaki
VN 750

Now
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j Ford F150
Supercab
XLT
S Our Price
$13,993




2009 Scion Tc
As $ 198
As Per Month!
As Per Month!


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* ^74-


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'*13,993




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. Our Price
- 12,993


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h Our Price
10.993


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gfi 9ur Price
S 8 ,993
$8m oum<2


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Silverwing
600

Now
$s5,999


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londa VTX 1800
I Now
$6,999


onda Silverwing 600
I Now
$3499


2009


II
~E2fl


Now
3,299

E-

awasaki Verys
Now
$4.999


uzuki S83
Now
$2.999


onaU vIA I UU
Now
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Now
$5,999


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Full Text

PAGE 1

OCTOBER 12, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community50www.chronicleonline.com HIGH87LOW55Sunny and dry. Cool at night.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SATURDAY INDEX Classifieds . . . .C9 Comics . . . . .C8 Crossword . . . .C7 Community . . . .C6 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C8 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C7 VOL. 119 ISSUE 66 CITRUS COUNTY Homecoming: Crystal River falls, Citrus survives /B1 000GCIN ChronicleThe annual Crystal River National Wildlife Refuges Refuge Day has been cancelled because of the continued partial shutdown of the government. The event was set to happen Oct. 19. Ross Knudsen, president of the Friends of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, whose group works to stage the event at Three Sisters Springs, said it was a great loss. The refuge is run by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Its a loss for everybody the public, who would not get a chance to come to Three Sisters and enjoy the place and for the Friends group, which raises a lot of funds from this event, Refuge Day called off SEANARNOLD CorrespondentDeputies have solved a stolen jewelry crime spree involving multiple victims at a local assisted living residence in Lecanto. Jabreia White, 22, of Southeast 25 Avenue, Ocala, was arrested for multiple felony charges including grand theft, trafficking in stolen property, and false verification of ownership to a pawnbroker. Her bond was set at $63,000. According to her arrest affidavit, White, an employee at Nature Coast Lodge, entered various rooms at the center stealing jewelry from the residents. Three separate theft cases have been tied to White, with the first theft being reported on Sept. 28. The thefts have been linked to at least five different victims who had their jewelry stolen, and Woman charged with theft of jewelry See ARREST/ Page A5 See REFUGE/ Page A5 Jabreia Whitefaces multiple felony charges. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleDr. Bob Knight, president of the Florida Springs Institute, said too much water is being withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer. H e believes permits for water withdrawal should be halted to ensure spring-flow restoration. A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerDr. Bob Knight, a springs expert and the president of Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute, likes retelling an amusing analogy someone once made to him about the state of the Floridan Aquifer the seemingly indefinite source of potable water for folks in North and Central Florida. He said, the Floridan aquifer is like a big mattress with three big people sitting on the edges. You have Jacksonville on the northeast corner, Orlando on the south-central portion of it and Tampa/St. Pete in the southwest, Knight said. The virtual and real depressions being caused by water withdrawals from those areas on the aquifer bed, said Knight, are harmful and unless the activity is halted, it will shut the spigots to all of the states once-beautiful and PATFAHERTY Staff writerDuke Energys $1.5 billion investment in a natural gas-burning power plant would be a catalyst for change in Citrus County. Alex Glenn, state president-Florida Duke Energy likened it to past growth in Citrus County, spurred by the construction of five power plants by Progress Energy and Duke forerunner Florida Power Corporation. If we build that plant, what we have to do is go out for a request for proposals, Glenn said. So a request for proposals will go for bid and we have put out a self-build option to build that plant in Citrus County. Glenn was the keynote speaker at the 31st annual Industry Appreciation Awards Luncheon on Friday at the Citrus Campus of the College of Central Florida. Glenn cited the work of the Economic Development Council and Dukes private community working group as other catalysts for change. He also explained Dukes national scope and efforts in economic development, especially in Florida. He said they serve 35 counties in Florida and since 2005 have attracted 186 companies bringing in 27,000 highpaying jobs and $2 billion in capital investments. Glenn addressed site selection for Glenn addresses county development EDC, chamber of commerce present annual Industry Appreciation Awards STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleAlex Glenn, state president-Florida Duke Energy, delivered the keynote speech Friday at the Economic Development Council luncheon at the College of Central Florida Citrus Campus. The Southwest Florida Water Management District has two at-large vacancies on its governing board. Presently, Citrus County lacks representation on the board. Board has two vacanciesA.B. SIDIBE Staff writerThere are currently two vacancies on the Southwest Florida Water Management District governing board and one of the seats is an at-large seat for a candidate from Citrus, Levy, Sumter and Lake counties. The other vacant seat is for someone from Charlotte and Sarasota counties. The Citrus seat was held by Douglas B. Tharp of the Villages, who was Springs expert cautions about continued pumping of water from aquifer See WATER/ Page A9 See BOARD/ Page A2 See EDC/ Page A5

PAGE 2

appointed by Gov. Charlie Crist in Sept. 2008 and reappointed by Gov. Rick Scott in April 2011, but the Florida Senate which is charged with confirming candidates failed to give him the nod. According to state law, the governor selects a person and the Senate approves or denies their appointment. According to SWFWMD spokeswoman Susanna Martinez Tarokh, people interested in becoming board members can fill out a gubernatorial application at www.flgov.com/ appointments/ or return applications via mail to the Governors Appointments Office, The Capitol Building, Lower Level, Suite LL-09, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001. The office can also be reached by phone at 850-717-9243. As per state statute, the governing board of each water management district shall be composed of nine members who reside within the district, except in the case of the Southwest Florida Water Management District which is comprised of 13 members. Board member terms are for four years. The following is a breakdown of representatives according to counties in the 16-county water district: Two members shall reside in Hillsborough County; One member shall reside in the area consisting of Hillsborough and Pinellas counties; Two members shall reside in Pinellas County; One member shall reside in Manatee County; Two members shall reside in Polk County; One member shall reside in Pasco County; One member shall be appointed at-large from Levy, Citrus, Sumter and Lake counties; One member shall be appointed at-large from Hardee, DeSoto, and Highlands counties; One member shall be appointed at-large from Marion and Hernando counties; One member shall be appointed at large from Sarasota and Charlotte counties. The states next regular Legislative session begins March 4, 2014.Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com. A2SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL /STATE B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Adrian Saenz, P.A. Stephanie Gomes, P.A. Joseph Starnes, P.A. 000G8ND 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000G7LU Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs 000GBY5 GRAND OPENING Announces the GRAND OPENING GRAND OPENING of his new practice Call 563-5488 Comprehensive foot and ankle care for the entire family. Call 563-5488 Call 563-5488 to schedule an appointment Nature Coast Foot And Ankle Center, LLC 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1E Crystal River (Medical Office Building adjacent to 7 Rivers Hospital) Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Dr. Kenneth P. Pritchyk DPM Entry With the Most Votes a Homecoming 2013 Crystal River High School Citrus High School MATT PFIFFNER /ChronicleCrystal River High School senior Bliss Mercuri stands with her escort and brother, Brice, after being crowned 2013 Homecoming Queen during halftime of Friday nights football game between the Pirates and Santa Fe. BOARDContinued from Page A1 Immigrants to fast outside South Fla. detention centerDORAL Frida Ulloas mother and brother are U.S. Citizens. But under U.S. law, thats not enough to enable the college student to get her green card. The Peruvian native joined more than a three dozen activists Friday at South Florida U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balarts Doral office. Some are fasting. They want Diaz-Balart to show results on immigration reform. He is one of the few Republicans still involved in bi-partisan talks. Although the Senate passed an immigration bill, the House has not. Diaz-Balarts Chief of Staff said his boss is committed to reform, and the focus should be on the Obama administrations massive deportations. Activists want Diaz-Balart to sign onto the Democratbacked existing bill or introduce one of his own. They planned to continue their vigil at Broward Transitional Center.Facebook slaying suspect claims self-defenseMIAMI A man who shot his wife to death and then posted gruesome photographs of her corpse on Facebook told investigators he acted in self-defense because she was viciously attacking him, according to a statement police released Friday. Derek Medina said in his Aug. 8 videotaped statement to Miami-Dade County Police detectives that he only shot 27-year-old Jennifer Alonso because he feared for his own life. Medina claimed Alonso first started throwing boxes, shoes and mascara at him, began punching and hitting him and then pulled a knife after their argument moved downstairs to the kitchen. Medina said he disarmed his wife and put the knife in a drawer, but said she began hitting him again. Thats when he says he started shooting, estimating he fired seven or eight times. Asked why he turned himself in to police, Medina replied that it was cause Im not a killer. And it was selfdefense. Medina, 31, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder with a firearm in the Aug. 8 shooting at the South Miami home shared by the couple.Dog owner gets 10 years in boys mauling deathPANAMA CITY A Florida Panhandle man whose dogs fatally mauled a 7-year-old neighbor boy has been sentenced to 10 years in prison. A Bay County judge sentenced Edward Daniels Jr. on Friday. He was convicted in August of manslaughter. Prosecutors claimed Daniels neglected to contain his dogs on the day they got loose. The News Herald of Panama City reported that Tyler Jett died in April, a week after he was attacked by two dogs while riding his bicycle. State BRIEFS From wire reports STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleCitrus High School senior Melanie Dodd is escorted by her father, Doug Dodd, Friday night after being crowned 2013 Homecoming Queen during halftime festivities at the Citrus and Mount Dora football game.

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Around theSTATE Citrus CountyBowman to sign booksJohn Bowman, a resident of Ocala who grew up and spent much of his life in Crystal River, has two local book signings scheduled for his book Lifes A (Sandy) Beach, But Watch Out For The Crabs. They will be: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today, Oct.12, at the Coastal Heritage Museum, 532 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. 5 to 6 p.m. today, Oct.12, Crystal River High School Reunion Stokes Flea Market, 5220 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Unit 3, Lecanto.Democratic club to discuss marijuanaThe Central Citrus Democratic Club plans its monthly meeting at 11 a.m. today, Oct. 12, at Central Ridge Library. All registered Democrats are welcome to attend. The library is at the corner of Forest Ridge Road at 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., in Beverly Hills. Haydon Fouke, a local advocate of legalizing medical marijuana, will be the featured speaker. Open discussions of current issues of importance to the community will be encouraged. For questions, email central citrusdemocrats@gmail.com.Church/state discussion setAmericans United for Separation of Church and State, Nature Coast Chapter, will meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. The public is welcome to come and discuss constitutional issues pertaining to separation of church and state. For information, call 352344-9211 or email nature coastau@hotmail.com.St. PetersburgMurder sentence for teen upheld by judgeA teenager who shot and killed a St. Petersburg police officer in 2011 will spend the rest of his life in prison without the possibility of parole. Pinellas Pasco Circuit Judge Thane Covert ruled Friday that Nicholas Lindseys original sentence should remain. Attorneys for the now-18year-old Lindsey had argued that he deserved a chance at parole after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said juveniles convicted of murder cannot automatically be sentenced to life in prison without any chance at parole. A jury last year convicted Lindsey of first degree murder. Lindsey was 16 when he shot and killed officer David Crawford, who had confronted the teen after reports of someone breaking into cars downtown. Lindsey shot Crawford, who at the time was a Crystal River resident, five times with a gun he had bought for $140. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Correction Due to reporters error, a multi-vehicle crash was misidentified in a story on Page A3 of Fridays edition, Multiple car crash halts traffic. A truck and three motorcycles were involved. The Chronicle regrets the error. Readers can alert the Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. David Crawford CRHS will receive new gym floors ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerStudents attending Crystal River High School will soon be enjoying a new wooden gymnasium floor. Citrus County School Board members voted Tuesday to replace the current gymnasium floors in fear of posing a safety risk for students. Looking at the existing floor that is there, I saw tape holding the floor together, said school board member Sandy Balfour at Tuesdays board meeting. Superintendent Sandra Sam Himmel told board members that facilities and construction staff evaluated the gymnasiums structure and believes it will be structurally sound for several more years. They felt cleaning it, painting it and adding a new floor would help save the district funds while providing a safe and presentable gym. The renovations will cost approximately $350,000. However, assistant superintendent of schools Kenny Blocker said that is minimal compared to the cost of a new gymnasium. Board member Thomas Kennedy felt the expense is worth the price compared to the districts depletion of funds. I believe if we polled everyone, that they would want a new gym if they didnt have to pay for it, Kennedy said at the meeting. But I dont know if it is realistic that we will have those funds to do that. Without that dollar amount, I think at this point $350,000 is maintaining our asset. Facilities and construction director Alan Burcaw said this is the last floor in the district to be replaced. About seven or eight years ago the athletic directors uniformly agreed that if we could not replace their floors they would wait until we could, Burcaw said. Balfour questioned the expense of maintaining the floor surface. It requires minimal annual maintenance, which includes sanding and applying a single recoat, Burcaw said. No restriping is required. The new gymnasium floor passed with a 4-1 vote. Board member Linda Powers said she supported the new gymnasium floor, but did not approve of the contract.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660 ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleSupervisor of Elections Susan Gill, a volunteer reader from the Altrusa Club of Citrus County, reads to an Inverness Primary Sc hool kindergarten class Friday morning as part of a new reading initiative called First Library coordinated by the Citrus County Education Foundation. The students wear brightly colored hats with pictures of various animals highlighted in the book. First Library program creates literacy initiative in Citrus County schools ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESS Brown bears. Purple cats. Blue horses. Each of these imaginary animals added to the jungle of character headbands resting upon 31 pre-kindergarten students heads as they quietly listened to their guest reader. Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill enthusiastically read Brown Bear by Bill Martin Jr. and Eric Carle to the young students Friday as part of a new literacy initiative started by the Citrus County Education Foundation (CCEF). The Education Foundation wanted to localize the program to get books into the hands of pre-kindergarten students to take home and have for their parents to read to them, said Citrus County Education Foundation vice president Eric Head. The students can then read back to their parents. It is all about early literacy, which is the most important thing for their school career and personal success. Reading is the foundation for everything. CCEF partnered with the Altrusa Club of Citrus County and the Afro American Club of Citrus County to provide more than 320 books to 22 pre-kindergarten classes in 11 schools throughout the Citrus County School District to help establish a students first library. The volume of books will multiply five more times as the First Library initiative will repeat throughout the year. Sometimes kids go home and dont have books, said superintendent of schools Sandra Sam Himmel. This is a way to get books in their hands six times a year, which will encourage our children to read more. They are having fun reading and that is our goal. Literacy is our priority. The CCEF literacy committee is working with teachers and school officials to ensure the selections of books are coordinated with the monthly classroom core curriculum. All of the books that are being read to them go right along with our series, said teacher Cheryl Eldridge. It is a wonderful opportunity for them to have that reinforcement at home. Our biggest thing is getting them to read at home, continued teacher Michelle Bingham. This is just one easier step for the parents. Gill finished reading to the young readers and then watched as their faces turned to pure enthusiasm when they learned they were taking home their own Brown Bear. Yeah, they screamed in excitement. It is important to keep reading, Gill said to the students. Reading is fun and important. Promise me you will all keep reading.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660 ext. 1334, or eworthington@chronicleonline.com. ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerFinancially, the Citrus County School District has not been impacted by the federal government shutdown. During Tuesdays school board meeting, school board member Pat Deutschman questioned assistant superintendent of schools Kenny Blocker on the amount of impact the shutdown has placed on the district. None, because we planned on sequestration reduction previously in our budget, Blocker said. To date and to my knowledge we have not been affected by the government shutdown. Blocker continued to explain to board members that the district received its subsidy back from the Internal Revenue Service at the end of September. We received a subsidy on our qualified school construction bond that we received prior to the Oct. 1 shutdown, Blocker said. This would have been the area of concern, but since we received it prior it had no affect. Blocker said other federal programs include Title I, Title II, Food Service and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). However, he did not believe they were subjected to any changes either.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. Shutdown has no impact on local public schools yet 31 in Florida infected by bacteria in salt water Associated PressST. PETERSBURG Patty Konietzky thought the small purple lesion on her husbands ankle was a spider bite. But when the lesion quickly spread across his body like a constellation, she knew something wasnt right. After a trip to the hospital and a day and a half later, Konietzkys 59-year-old husband was dead. The diagnosis: vibrio vulnificus, an infection caused by a bacterium found in warm salt water. Its in the same family of bacterium that causes cholera. So far this year, 31 people across Florida have been infected by the severe strain of vibrio, and 10 have died. I thought the doctors would treat him with antibiotics and wed go home, said Konietzky, who lives in Palm Coast. Never in a million years it crossed my mind that this is where Id be today. State health officials said there are two ways to contract the disease: by eating raw, tainted shellfish usually oysters or when an open wound comes in contact with bacteria in warm seawater. While such occurrences could potentially concern officials in states with hundreds of miles of coastline and economies largely dependent on ocean-related tourism, experts said the bacteria is nothing most people should worry about. Vibrio bacteria exist normally in salt water and generally only affect people with compromised immune systems, they say. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. If the bacteria get into the bloodstream, they provoke symptoms including fever and chills, decreased blood pressure and blistering skin wounds. But theres no need to stop swimming in the Gulf of Mexico, said Diane Holm, a spokeswoman for the state health department in Lee County, which has had a handful of cases that included one fatality this year. This is nothing abnormal, she said. We dont believe there is any greater risk for someone to swim in the Gulf today than there was yesterday or 10 years ago. Dr. James Oliver, a professor of biology at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, has studied vibrio vulnificus for decades. He said that while Florida has the most cases of vibrio infection due to the warm ocean water that surrounds the state, the bacteria is found worldwide, generally in estuaries and near the coast. Its normal flora in the water, he said. It belongs there.

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Birthday Keep life simple and costeffective in the coming months. You should save for a rainy day and avoid anyone who tends to disrupt your life. Emotional matters will escalate, making this a year of unavoidable change. Keep your options open and your money in a safe place. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Focus on whats ahead instead of living in the past. The present is what will count if you want to achieve a brighter future. Avoid emotional confrontations. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) A change will do you good. Visit places you have never been before or strike up conversations with people doing things that interest you. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Consider what motivates you, and youll find a better way to spend your time and to get ahead. A thrill only lasts for a moment. Strive for longevity. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Distance yourself from anyone who is unpredictable. You will maintain control if you follow a set plan. Take care of responsibilities early so you can socialize or take care of personal needs. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Deal with personal responsibilities first and clear the way for love, laughter and enjoying life. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Dont take anything or anyone for granted. Listen carefully and abide by the rules. Disillusionment regarding a personal relationship is likely. Aries (March 21-April 19) Youll make a big impression by offering solutions and hands-on help to someone in need. Taurus (April 20-May 20) It will be difficult to think clearly concerning work-related matters. Put your emotions aside and look at the big picture. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Indulge in activities that are physically and emotionally challenging, and you will succeed in reaching your goal. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Enjoy making new friends or visiting places youve never been before. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You need a change. Spice up your life, participate in a fun activity or shop for items that will update your appearance. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will pick up valuable information that will help you make a decision that can improve your personal position or a relationship you have with someone exciting. TodaysHOROSCOPES Todays Highlight in History: On Oct. 12, 1962, the devastating Columbus Day Storm, also known as the Big Blow, struck the Pacific Northwest, resulting in some 50 deaths. On this date: In 1810, the German festival Oktoberfest was first held in Munich to celebrate the wedding of Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen. In 1933, bank robber John Dillinger escaped from a jail in Allen County, Ohio, with the help of his gang, who killed the sheriff, Jess Sarber. In 1971, the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar opened at the Mark Hellinger Theatre on Broadway. In 1997, singer John Denver was killed in the crash of his privately built aircraft in Monterey Bay, Calif.; he was 53. In 2000, 17 sailors were killed in a suicide bomb attack on the destroyer USS Cole in Yemen. Ten years ago: A suicide attack outside a Baghdad hotel full of Americans killed six bystanders. Five years ago: A Soyuz spacecraft carrying Richard Garriott, the sixth paying space traveler, along with another American and a Russian crew member lifted off from Kazakhstan for the international space station. One year ago: Soft drink makers, restaurateurs and other businesses filed suit to stop New York City from prohibiting the sale of super-sized, sugary drinks in restaurants, cafeterias and concession stands. Todays Birthdays: Comedianactivist Dick Gregory is 81. Singer Sam Moore (formerly of Sam and Dave) is 78. Actor Hugh Jackman is 45. Actor Kirk Cameron is 43. Olympic gold medal skier Bode Miller is 36. Thought for Today: To know ones self is wisdom, but not to know ones neighbors is genius. Minna Antrim, American writer (1861-1950).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 88 63 0.00 HI LO PR 87 60 0.00 HI LO PR 86 62 0.00 HI LO PR 83 61 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 83 61 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Sunny and dry. Cool at night.THREE DAY OUTLOOK More sunshine. Becoming partly sunny and a little breezy.High: 87 Low: 55 High: 87 Low: 56 High: 88 Low: 60TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Friday 86/62 Record 94/53 Normal 86/63 Mean temp. 74 Departure from mean +0 PRECIPITATION* Friday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.81 in. Total for the year 51.14 in. Normal for the year 46.12 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in. DEW POINT Friday at 3 p.m. 63 HUMIDITY Friday at 3 p.m. 46% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and grasses were light and weeds were heavy.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Friday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:03 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:30 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................2:45 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................1:01 A.M. OCT. 18OCT. 26NOV. 3NOV. 10 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 85 64 s Ft. Lauderdale 87 74 s Fort Myers 87 67 s Gainesville 87 58 s Homestead 86 72 s Jacksonville 85 56 s Key West 86 76 s Lakeland 86 64 s Melbourne 85 67 s City H L Fcast Miami 88 73 s Ocala 87 59 s Orlando 87 64 s Pensacola 87 66 pc Sarasota 85 65 s Tallahassee 89 56 s Tampa 85 67 s Vero Beach 86 66 s W. Palm Bch. 86 71 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNorth winds around 10 knots. Seas 1 foot or less. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Mostly sunny skies and warm today. Gulf water temperature81 LAKE LEVELSLocation Thu. Fri. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 30.37 n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.59 n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 40.05 n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.92 n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H H L L L L 86/68 72/52 61/37 80/55 61/39 69/59 66/54 70/46 53/36 57/45 71/55 73/59 82/61 88/73 86/73 65/58 THE NATION Albany 70 49 pc 68 46 Albuquerque 63 38 s 67 45 Asheville 74 48 c 75 51 Atlanta 80 56 pc 82 61 Atlantic City 61 59 1.49 sh 69 60 Austin 88 70 ts 87 72 Baltimore 64 57 2.82 sh 64 57 Billings 53 41 .01 pc 53 36 Birmingham 83 58 pc 85 60 Boise 58 32 sh 61 36 Boston 66 52 pc 60 51 Buffalo 72 46 pc 73 57 Burlington, VT 70 43 s 68 47 Charleston, SC 81 63 pc 82 63 Charleston, WV 73 48 c 74 56 Charlotte 81 60 c 80 58 Chicago 76 51 ts 72 52 Cincinnati 78 44 .01 pc 79 57 Cleveland 72 44 sh 71 59 Columbia, SC 83 66 pc 81 59 Columbus, OH 79 48 pc 78 57 Concord, N.H. 71 40 s 63 44 Dallas 88 70 ts 86 68 Denver 63 42 pc 61 37 Des Moines 74 57 s 67 42 Detroit 74 46 pc 73 59 El Paso 77 51 s 80 55 Evansville, IN 79 53 ts 81 60 Harrisburg 61 55 5.62 sh 66 53 Hartford 72 51 pc 68 46 Houston 87 65 ts 86 73 Indianapolis 76 48 pc 78 55 Jackson 84 61 pc 86 65 Las Vegas 72 52 s 76 57 Little Rock 81 55 ts 81 63 Los Angeles 69 55 s 69 59 Louisville 78 52 pc 79 61 Memphis 82 60 ts 84 65 Milwaukee 69 50 ts 67 46 Minneapolis 75 57 pc 61 39 Mobile 84 62 pc 87 64 Montgomery 86 55 pc 85 60 Nashville 82 54 pc 84 59 New Orleans 84 68 .07 pc 88 67 New York City 68 60 .02 pc 71 55 Norfolk 66 59 .11 sh 72 61 Oklahoma City 86 64 pc 78 60 Omaha 80 61 s 66 41 Palm Springs 82 54 s 85 61 Philadelphia 64 59 1.51 c 70 57 Phoenix 79 57 s 86 61 Pittsburgh 66 54 .03 c 72 53 Portland, ME 67 42 s 60 46 Portland, Ore 59 50 .01 sh 57 41 Providence, R.I. 69 55 pc 65 49 Raleigh 66 59 .02 sh 70 59 Rapid City 53 41 .54 s 55 38 Reno 67 37 s 67 40 Rochester, NY 68 42 pc 71 52 Sacramento 76 50 s 77 52 St. Louis 81 57 ts 78 51 St. Ste. Marie 65 50 sh 67 50 Salt Lake City 60 43 pc 63 45 San Antonio 90 75 ts 88 74 San Diego 71 56 s 71 61 San Francisco 63 52 s 68 53 Savannah 82 55 pc 83 63 Seattle 57 51 .35 sh 57 45 Spokane 55 35 sh 54 36 Syracuse 68 48 pc 74 50 Topeka 79 61 pc 72 45 Washington 64 59 1.65 sh 65 58YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 95 Kingsville, Texas LOW 16 Stanley, Idaho SATURDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 87/76/ts Amsterdam 45/37/pc Athens 81/62/pc Beijing 73/39/pc Berlin 53/50/r Bermuda 80/75/sh Cairo 89/65/s Calgary 45/32/pc Havana 83/69/ts Hong Kong 86/63/sh Jerusalem 77/58/s Lisbon 67/58/sh London 55/47/c Madrid 66/45/pc Mexico City 74/58/ts Montreal 68/52/s Moscow 39/37/sh Paris 48/41/pc Rio 79/62/pc Rome 73/56/sh Sydney 85/51/s Tokyo 80/54/sh Toronto 68/57/s Warsaw 48/45/sh WORLD CITIES Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Friday Saturday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Saturday SundayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 12:39 a/7:35 a 11:36 a/8:53 p 1:58 a/9:04 a 1:12 p/10:11 p Crystal River** 9:57 a/4:57 a /6:15 p 12:19 a/6:26 a 11:33 a/7:33 p Withlacoochee* 7:44 a/2:45 a 10:06 p/4:03 p 9:20 a/4:14 a 11:07 p/5:21 p Homosassa*** 10:46 a/6:34 a /7:52 p 1:08 a/8:03 a 12:22 p/9:10 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 10/12 SATURDAY 12:36 6:46 1:00 7:14 10/13 SUNDAY 1:25 7:39 1:52 8:05 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SATURDAY HI LO PR 84 62 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, grasses, elm Todays count: 7.1/12 Sundays count: 7.5 Mondays count: 7.7 ENTERTAINMENT The Clovers resolve dispute over nameWASHINGTON Two groups with ties to the 1950s R&B group The Clovers who had been fighting over the use of the bands name have come to an agreement. Lawyers for the two groups filed a document Friday in federal court in Washington saying theyve settled a lawsuit over the name. The original group The Clovers started performing in the Washington area and gained fame in the 1950s, in particular for their song Love Potion No. 9. The groups fame fell off in the 1960s, however, and the members moved on. Earlier this year, Florida resident Harold Winley, who was part of the group in the 1950s, sued to be able to use the name when performing. The groups will now be known as Harold Winley and the Clovers and The Clovers.BBC finds missing Doctor Who showsLONDON Doctor Who fans rejoice the BBC said it has recovered nine episodes of the sci-fi series that were feared lost in space and time. The broadcaster said the missing episodes, and two others, were found in the storeroom of a television relay station in Nigeria. Doctor Who was first broadcast in 1963 and remains one of the BBCs most popular programs. Some early episodes were lost because the broadcaster wiped the tapes clean for re-use. The BBC said the lost episodes were tracked down by tracing records of overseas shipments of BBC tapes for transmission. The recovered episodes date from 1967 and 1968 and feature Patrick Troughton the second of a dozen actors to play the shows time-traveling hero. They will be offered for sale on iTunes and DVD.Nevada judge working on Simpson rulingLAS VEGAS A decision about whether O.J. Simpson will get a new trial is still in the works. Thats the word Thursday from a Nevada state court judge approaching the five-month anniversary of hearings she held in May about whether the former football star was so badly represented by his lawyers at trial that he deserves a retrial. Clark County District Court spokeswoman Mary Ann Price issued a short statement saying Judge Linda Marie Bell hasnt set a date for her ruling. The statement said the case is complicated, the file is thick and the judge is addressing 22 claims raised by prosecutors and Simpson lawyers. Simpson is serving nine to 33 years for armed robbery and kidnapping in a botched attempt to retrieve personal items from sports memorabilia dealers in 2007.Dead actor mourned in Glee tributeNEW YORK Glee said goodbye to Finn, its beloved singer-quarterback, while paying tribute to Cory Monteith, the late actor who had portrayed him, in a highly anticipated episode of the Fox high school musical drama that aired Thursday. Finns death wasnt dramatized, nor was his funeral onscreen. The episode picked up some weeks after he had died and focused on how his passing affected his friends. The cause of his death was not disclosed. Just how Glee would handle Monteiths death had haunted the show, and its fans, since July when the 31-year-old star was found dead in a Canadian hotel room of an accidental alcohol and drug overdose. From wire reports Associated PressA new exhibit on fashion photographer Erwin Blumenfeld opens Oct. 15 at Paris Jeu de Paume. Blumenfeld made his name with photos that graced the covers of fashion magazines such as Vogue and Harpers Bazaar from the 1930s to the 1950s. To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community 000G5K4 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices . . . . . C13 Self Storage Notices . . . . . . C13 A4 SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013

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Knudsen said. He said the Friends group stands to lose anywhere between $5,000 and $6,000 because it will not get a chance to operate its gift store. Knudsen said the money would have gone toward helping the refuge. He said a bird-watching tour that is normally done at the same time as Refuge Day also has been called off. Knudsen said there is tentative talk of rescheduling the bird-watching tour to Nov. 16 and Dec. 14 for Refuge Day should the government shutdown get resolved. The whole thing is just sad. DUI arrest Carolyn Walsh., 44, of Montano Avenue, Spring Hill, at 9:03 p.m. Oct. 10, on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence. According to her arrest affidavit, Walsh was involved in a car accident on U.S. 19. She was asked to perform field sobriety tests and refused. She also refused a Breathalyzer test to measure her blood alcohol level. Bond $500.Domestic battery arrest Michelle Ward, 37, of Crystal River, at 8:48 p.m. Oct. 10, on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery. No bond.Other arrests Charles Harper, 19, of North Manhattan Point, Dunnellon, at 9 a.m. Oct. 10, on felony charges of grand theft and burglary to an unoccupied residence. According to his arrest affidavit, Harper is accused of breaking into a home on Highlands Boulevard in Inverness and stealing approximately $700 worth of electronics. Harper was already incarcerated at the Citrus County Detention Facility on similar charges. A fingerprint comparison to his prints and the prints found in the home were a positive match. Bond $5,000. Robert Wheeler, 28, of Beverly Hills, at 9:28 a.m. Oct. 10, on a misdemeanor charge of false reporting of a crime to law enforcement. Bond $500. Travis Bartlett, 28, of Thunderbird Avenue, Spring Hill, at 12:13 p.m. Oct. 10, on an active warrant for felony charges of grand theft, and burglary of an occupied residence. He was transported to the Citrus County Detention Facility from the Hernando County Jail. Bond $20,000. Jennifer Winnegar, 37, of North Davy Way, Citrus Springs, at 2:04 p.m. Oct. 10, on an active warrant for felony charges fraud, cheating or gross fraud, trafficking in stolen property, and false verification of ownership to a metal recycler. Bond $12,000. Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeTheft A petit theft was reported at 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, in the 1900 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.Vandalisms A vandalism was reported at 8:29 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, in the 600 block of W. Highland Blvd., Inverness. A vandalism was reported at 3:55 p.m. Oct. 10 in the 2600 block of N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando. A vandalism was reported at 8:35 p.m. Oct. 10 in the 400 block of N. Elmwood Point, Crystal River.LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 A5 Always A Fair Price CASH for SCRAP Crystal River Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire Like us on Facebook352.621.8017www.sunfloweralf.comRESORT STYLEAssistedLiving Assisted Living Facility License #11566Sometimes you just need a little help. Stop in & see why relationships blossom daily.8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa000G6B8 000G5DO West Citrus Ladies of the Elks Annual Arts & Crafts Show Saturday, October 12 From 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information call Bonnie Lee 382-0211 West Citrus Elks Lodge 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 000FMA6 www.chronicleonline.com 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000G8X4 000G7BU 000G5CS 218 Tompkins Street, Downtown Inverness 344-9790 Gifts for All Occasions 000GCRS We are family owned and operated for over 25 years in Downtown Inverness. Offering gifts for all occasions. We carry the largest selection of Vera Bradley in Citrus County, along with Spartina 449, Crabtree & Evelyn, Lindsay Phillips and Jim Shore. We have extended hours during the holiday season and provide a 20% Off rewards program for our valued customers. Come See Us At Diva Night! Oct. 12 Lic. & Insured 352-400-3188 YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST IS IT TIME TO REFI NISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PAVERS Often imitated, never duplicated Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC 000GBCY Copes Pool & Pavers For the RECORD ON THE NET For more information about arrests made by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and click on the Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports. Also under Public Information on the CCSO website, click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism. For the Record reports are also archived online at www.chronicle online.com. The Sexual Predator Unit is responsible for tracking all registered sexual offenders and predators in the county. Click on the Sexual Offender Information link on the CCSO website. The Sheriffs 10-43 show airs on TV station WYKE, digital channel 47 and Bright House cable channel 16. STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the ChronicleABOVE: Ray Chirayath receives the Person of the Year award Friday from the Economic Development Council and the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Assisting with the presentation is Josh Wooten, president and chief executive officer of the chamber, left, and Don Taylor, executive director of the EDC. RIGHT: Laura Lou Fitzpatrick received the award for Outstanding Small Business. economic development, a current focus of the EDC. When you look at whether businesses are going to come to your area, its all about the product, he said. You have to have products to sell. Just because youve got property, doesnt mean youve got sites. He said it was absolutely critical to translate that property into marketable sites. A site has to have utilities and be available for development, which is where politicians, elected officials, land use and zoning come in. Theres got to be that partnership, he said. The bottom line is if you dont have a site, you dont have a deal. Glenn said the way economic development is occurring now is radically different that the way it was just five years ago. He said it is not a process of site selection, anymore, but site elimination. He said it means youve got to have your product ready to go. Glenn concluded by emphasizing Dukes commitment to Citrus County, which includes the Mariculture center looking at raising eel grass to combat Lyngbya in Kings Bay.ANNUALAWARDSThe Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and the EDC used the occasion to present the following annual awards: Outstanding Employer or Corporate Citizen went to the Plantation on Crystal River and general manager Andrew Bartlett. Outstanding Small Business was awarded to Laura Lou Fitzpatrick of The Shoppes of Heritage Village. Person of the Year was awarded to Ray Chirayath, currently president of the United Way of Citrus County Board of Directors and a member of the EDC. The EDC also gave out two special appreciation awards, recognizing Rusty Skinner, chief executive officer of Workforce Connection, and John Siefert, former EDC executive director.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty@ chronicleonline.com. EDCContinued from Page A1 REFUGEContinued from Page A1 then pawned. Jewelry items recovered included a gold and diamond engagement ring, a gold herringbone necklace, a rope necklace and two wedding bands. On Oct. 7, investigators on the case got their first break, when they discovered jewelry matching the description of one of the stolen pieces had been pawned at the Beverly Hills Gold and Diamond Exchange on Sept. 20, by White. Records reveal White had made numerous visits to Beverly Hills Gold and Diamond Exchange over the span of several weeks, pawning jewelry at each visit. Pawn shop transactions listed the defendants name, address and other personal information as well as her signature and right thumb print. Records indicate stolen jewelry was also pawned by White at different locations, including Colonial Pawn and Neals Pawn Shop. She received $400 on one visit and a combined total $1,014 on subsequent trips. One item, a gold and diamond engagement ring, was reportedly pawned by a family member of Whites on Oct. 2. Detectives were able to successfully recover the property. It was identified and then returned to the victims. In cases where the victim was unable to identify the jewelry themselves, due to either their mental or physical status, family members were able to make clear identifications. According to the sheriffs office, this is an ongoing investigation. Additional thefts have occurred and additional charges may be pending; however, they may not be related to this suspect. Thefts have occurred at the Nature Coast Lodge as early as mid-July and have continued through mid-October. ARRESTContinued from Page A1 According to the sheriffs office, this is an ongoing investigation.

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Govt shutdown affecting veterans cemeteriesBUSHNELL The director of the Florida National Cemetery said if the government shutdown doesnt end by Oct. 22, national cemeteries will have to reduce the number of veterans they can bury every day, furlough employees and limit the care they give to gravesites. The Tampa Tribune reported that Kurt Rotar said thats the day money already allocated to the national cemeteries will run out. At the Florida National Cemetery, that would mean reducing the number of funerals as many as 30 a day by as much as one-third. Rotar said he would have to reduce his workforce from 63 to 19 in Bushnell. Grounds maintenance already has been reduced by the shutdown. The shutdown would reduce the capacity of other national cemeteries in Florida, as well.Attorney in gambling scheme found guiltySANFORD A Florida attorney was convicted Friday of using a veterans organization as a front for a $300 million gambling operation in a case that led to the resignation of the states lieutenant governor and caused the Legislature to ban so-called Internet cafs. Six jurors deliberated for more than 14 hours before finding Kelly Mathis of Jacksonville guilty of possessing slot machines, helping operate a lottery and racketeering. He was found guilty on all but one of 104 counts against him. He was the first of 57 defendants to go to trial in a case that led to the resignation of Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll who had worked as a consultant for the Allied Veterans charity. She wasnt charged with any crime. Mathis argued he was merely acting as an attorney, giving legal advice, and that the Internet cafs were legal until this year. He faces dozens of years in prison. Prosecutors said Mathis and his associates built up the network of casinos by claiming they were businesses where customers could buy Internet time, when in reality most customers played slot machine games on computers and didnt use the Internet. Even though the Internet cafs were being operated under the aegis of Allied Veterans of the World, very little of the $300 million the Allied Veteran affiliates earned actually went to veterans, prosecutors alleged. During the three-week trial, prosecutors called a 78-year-old woman who testified that she gambled every night and spent more than $55,000. They also called a retired Army colonel who testified he had stopped by an Allied Veterans affiliate thinking it was a place for veterans to get help, but instead found what looked like dozens of slot machines.Director secretly shoots feature at Disney parksLOS ANGELES As a kid, Randy Moore was haunted by Disney World, where he made an annual trip during summers with his dad. So as an adult, and a filmmaker, Moore wanted to capture and question the allure of such manufactured-fantasy. The result is Escape From Tomorrow, which was shot guerrilla-style at Disneyland and Disney World without permission from the famously proprietary Walt Disney Co. I was pretty confident that Disney wasnt about to go out of their way and give me permission, Moore said, so I didnt ask them for it. The writer-director insists there was no other way to tell his story of a frustrated family man who begins losing his grip on reality during a trip to Disney World. So Moore and his crew bought season passes to Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., and Disney World in Orlando and used hand-held digital cameras to shoot scenes and tiny digital audio recorders to capture sound. They repeatedly rode Its a Small World and other trademark Disney attractions to film from various perspectives just like any other theatrical feature. Escape From Tomorrow, available on video-on-demand and in select theaters Friday, first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, where the blackand-white film quickly built a buzz based on its unauthorized surreptitious shooting style and dark take on Disney. Representatives from Disney, which has a history of aggressively protecting its image, brands and intellectual property, did not respond to requests for comment for this story. The company also hasnt spoken to Moore or the films distributor.New drive-in movie theater opens in MiamiMIAMI Harking back to the days of poodle skirts and ice cream sodas, a new drivein movie theater is opening in South Florida. The Blue Starlite Mini Urban Drive-In had its grand opening Friday in Miamis Wynwood art district with a screening of Back to the Future. The Miami Herald reported the theater is the brainchild of 38-year-old Texas writer Josh Frank. Frank relocated to Miami earlier this year and got a two-year lease on a vacant lot near independent O Cinema. He then built the theater from scratch. Visitors will find nostalgic remakes of vintage snacks at the concession stand and a cherry-red 1950s Chevy truck that was turned into the projection booth. Drive-ins were once common in South Florida, but none remain in Miami. Harold Hap Brady, 78HOMOSASSAHarold L. Hap Brady, 78, of Homosassa, Fla., died Oct. 8, 2013. A celebration of life will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, with a luncheon served after the service, at Wilder Funeral Home, Homosassa. Charles Crowley Jr., 52FLORAL CITYCharles H. Crowley Jr., 52, Floral City, Fla., died Oct. 3, 2013. Private arrangements. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory.Andrew Ensing, 65HERNANDOAndrew Donald Ensing, 65, of Hernando, Fla., died Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, in Hernando. Arrangements are under the direction of the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. James Fenske, 74HOMOSASSAJames Allen Fenske of Homosassa, Fla., was a loyal husband and a loving father and grandfather. He was formerly of Millington, Md., and at the age of 74 passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, in his home. James was born in Portland, Ore., to the late Claron and Evelyn Fenske. James proudly served in the United States Marine Corps from 1955 to 1960. In the early 1960s, he was part of the Philadelphia Eagles football organization. He protected the citizens of Cecil and Kent County from 1974 to 1981 as a deputy sheriff. He retired from MBNA Bank after 10 years of service, in 2000. James enjoyed spending time with his family, traveling, and was an avid Philadelphia Eagles fan. James is survived by his wife of 39 years, Donna C. Fenske of Homosassa; three brothers, Dwight Borero, Carl Fenske, and Chris O. Jackson; daughters, Deborah Steller and her husband William Steller of Millington, Md., Lori Sargent of Hartly, Del., and Jennifer Fenske of Crumpton, Md.; son, Robert Fenske and his fianc of Felton, Del.; six grandchildren, Bobbie Jo and Jamie Fenske, Tanner, Hayleigh and Sarah Sargent, and Zachary Billings. James was preceded in death by his daughter, Sheryl Quillen, in 2011. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Nancy Neely, 65CITRUS SPRINGSNancy M. Neely, 65, Citrus Springs, Fla., died Oct. 10, 2013. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is assisting the family with private arrangements.Florence Reed, 85BEVERLY HILLSFlorence May Knight Reed, 85, Beverly Hills, Fla., died Oct. 9, 2013, under the loving care of her family and Hospice of Citrus County. Florence was born Oct. 24, 1927, in South Hanson, Mass., to the late Herman and Jennie (Smith) Wood. She was employed as a dietician. Florence was a member of the Elks Lodge and past president of the Does. She was a gifted singer and musician, playing the piano and enjoyed the Citrus Jazz Society. She was an avid golfer. She was a member of Beverly Hills Community Church. Left to cherish her memory are her children, Edward (Marie) Knight, Stephen (Judith) Knight, Jane (John) Gallagher, Cynthia (William) Poole, all of Beverly Hills, Linda (Marc) Bell, South Portland, Maine, and Lisa Voveris, Taunton, Mass.; 19 grandchildren; many great-grandchildren and great-greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her first husband of 22 years, Kenneth Knight; her second husband of 28 years, Philip Reed; all of her siblings, four brothers and three sisters. A celebration tribute of Florences life will be at 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory with Pastor Stewart Jamison officiating. Memorial donations in Florences memory are suggested to Hospice of Citrus County for the Hospice House in Lecanto, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com. Thelma Sanders, 84INVERNESSThelma Anderson Sanders, 84, Inverness, Fla., passed away Oct. 3, 2013, under the care of Hospice of Citrus County in Lecanto. She was born in Inverness, Dec. 23, 1928, to the late Guy and Evelyn (OBerry) Anderson. Thelma was a registered nurse at Citrus Memorial Hospital, Inverness; Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala; and was director of nursing for Brentwood Health Care Center, Lecanto and Arbor Trail Rehab & Nursing, Inverness. She was a lifelong resident of Inverness, and attended 1st Assembly of God Church, and in later years, Victory Baptist Church in Inverness. Thelma was descended from a historic, Citrus County pioneer family. Her forefather, Charles Anderson, relocated to this area from Tatnall County, Ga., circa 1856. She was preceded in death by her husband of 61 years, James P. Sanders, and siblings Thomas Earl Anderson and Dorothy Wilkes. Survivors include her children, J. Russell (Helen) Sanders of Sebring, John R. Sanders of Inverness, and J. Mark (Carrie) Sanders of Hardin, Texas; Kathy (Kenny) Geagley of Newport News, Va.; one brother, Guy Henry (Shirley) Anderson Sr. of Cross City; 26 grandchildren; and numerous greatgrandchildren. A celebration of life memorial service commemorating Thelmas life is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, at the 1st Assembly of God Church. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.A6SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Kelly Prus 564-2917 kprus@chronicleonline.com 000G7P3 000G7C9 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000GBE8Funeral HomeWith Crematory 726-8323 THELMA SANDERS Service: Sat. 1:00 PM First Assembly of God ALISON EDWARDS Mon. 12 Noon Floral City Church of Christ DONALD L. STUBSTAD Service: Fri. 6:30 PM First Lutheran Church FLORENCE KNIGHT REED Service: Thurs. 3:00 PM OTIS GOOLSBY Service: Sat. 12:00 Noon St. James AME Church 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000GAG6 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home FERO Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home 000GABW 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT Beverly Hills Beverly Hills 352-228-4967 www.cremationcenterofthenaturecoast.com 000GC4I For those desiring simplicity and affordability FREE OBITUARIES Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memorial contributions or other information are included, this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost estimate provided to the sender. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Obituaries will be posted online at www. chronicleonline.com. OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. Non-local funeral homes and those without accounts are required to pay in advance by credit card, and the cost is a $25 base fee, then $10 per column inch. Small photos of the deceaseds face can be included for an additional charge. Larger photos, spanning the entire column, can also be accommodated, and will incur a size-based fee. All obituaries will be edited to conform to Associated Press style unless a request to the contrary is made. DEADLINE Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Florence Reed Obituaries StateBRIEFS From wire reports

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BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 A7 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,500 1,550 1,600 1,650 1,700 1,750 AO MJJAS 1,640 1,680 1,720 S&P 500Close: 1,703.20 Change: 10.64 (0.6%) 10 DAYS 14,400 14,800 15,200 15,600 16,000 AO MJJAS 14,680 14,980 15,280 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 15,237.11 Change: 111.04 (0.7%) 10 DAYSAdvanced2269 Declined811 New Highs185 New Lows27 Vol. (in mil.)2,885 Pvs. Volume3,333 1,706 1,840 1869 660 160 17 NYSE NASD DOW 15237.3015100.1315237.11+111.04+0.73%+16.28% DOW Trans.6651.476602.716648.41+37.30+0.56%+25.28% DOW Util.492.44487.83491.68+1.96+0.40%+8.52% NYSE Comp.9761.769681.679761.76+67.79+0.70%+15.61% NASDAQ3794.373751.383791.87+31.12+0.83%+25.58% S&P5001703.441688.521703.20+10.64+0.63%+19.42% S&P4001261.301246.611261.20+11.15+0.89%+23.59% Wilshire 500018189.7318017.3918187.97+130.77+0.72%+21.29% Russell 20001084.321065.811084.31+14.81+1.38%+27.66% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7655.90 4.13+.20 +5.1sss-10.2-23.1dd... AT&T Inc T32.71339.00 34.20+.05 +0.1sts+1.5-2.6261.80 Ametek Inc AME32.67948.01 45.43+.34 +0.8sst+20.9+30.9230.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD81.608103.85 98.41+.97 +1.0tst+12.6+14.52.21e Bank of America BAC8.92915.03 14.19-.04 -0.3sts+22.2+54.9250.04 Capital City Bank CCBG9.04813.08 12.04+.25 +2.1sss+5.9+8.343... CenturyLink Inc CTL31.01342.01 33.22-.12 -0.4sss-15.1-9.8192.16 Citigroup C34.04853.56 49.22-.05 -0.1sts+24.4+40.3130.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46926.38 24.25+.15 +0.6sss+53.1+67.9871.00 Disney DIS46.53067.89 66.21+.63 +1.0sts+33.0+29.5200.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63675.46 68.85+.56 +0.8sss+7.9+10.2213.12f EPR Properties EPR42.44461.18 48.59+.15 +0.3sst+5.4+15.2213.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM84.70395.49 86.95+.91 +1.1sts+0.5-2.892.52 Ford Motor F9.95017.77 17.11+.18 +1.1sts+32.1+73.1120.40 Gen Electric GE19.87924.95 24.40+.15 +0.6sss+16.2+11.5180.76 Home Depot HD58.75881.56 76.32+.81 +1.1sss+23.4+28.8231.56 Intel Corp INTC19.23625.98 23.26+.16 +0.7sts+12.8+10.3130.90 IBM IBM178.713215.90 186.16+1.39 +0.8sts-2.8-8.5133.80 LKQ Corporation LKQ19.17934.07 32.29+.22 +0.7tss+53.0+66.635... Lowes Cos LOW30.59049.17 48.80+.98 +2.0sss+37.4+56.9250.72 McDonalds Corp MCD83.316103.70 94.74+.30 +0.3rtt+7.4+5.5173.24f Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26836.43 34.13+.37 +1.1sss+27.8+19.7131.12f Motorola Solutions MSI49.49864.72 60.52-.09 -0.1tss+8.7+23.5171.24f NextEra Energy NEE66.05888.39 81.75+.35 +0.4sss+18.2+20.2202.64 Penney JC Co Inc JCP7.59127.00 8.00+.03 +0.4stt-59.4-67.0dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62621.09 17.86+.06 +0.3sss-1.1+7.3360.80 Regions Fncl RF6.19810.52 9.59+.12 +1.3sss+34.5+26.5120.12 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40668.77 54.89-.38 -0.7ttt+32.7+0.2dd... Smucker, JM SJM81.608114.72 106.60+.09 +0.1sts+23.6+29.9212.32f Texas Instru TXN27.00040.94 40.38+.26 +0.6sss+30.7+51.3251.20f Time Warner TWX42.61067.38 67.92+.60 +0.9sss+42.0+51.0191.15 UniFirst Corp UNF65.850104.76 103.35+2.71 +2.7sst+41.0+51.6190.15 Verizon Comm VZ40.51554.31 47.09+.23 +0.5sts+8.8+6.9962.12f Vodafone Group VOD24.42036.08 35.43+.58 +1.7tss+40.7+27.41.57e WalMart Strs WMT67.37679.96 74.82+.03 ...sss+9.7+1.6151.88 Walgreen Co WAG31.88057.41 55.96-.04 -0.1sss+51.2+60.4221.26 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. The cloud-computing software company slumped after issuing a weak outlook, though it topped expectations for the quarter. The flash memory makers quarterly profit left some investors wanting, and there is growing concern over memory chip prices. The biggest U.S. mortgage lender was hit hard during the third quarter by rising mortgage rates in the spring and summer. The grocer is giving up on its 72 Dominicks stores around Chicago to focus on its more profitable businesses in 2014. One of the worst performers in the S&P 500 after the retailer reported a decline in comparable stores sales and falling traffic. Stocks closed higher Friday, capping a two-day rebound amid optimism that the U.S. will avoid a debt default. President Barack Obama and Republican senators met Friday in a bid to hash out a deal to raise the governments borrowing limit by Oct. 17. 35 40 45 $50 JO AS GapGPS Close: $36.83 -2.65 or -6.7% $29.84$46.56 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 17.7m (4.9x avg.) $17.22 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 13.6 2.2% 20 25 30 $35 JO AS SafewaySWY Close: $33.75 2.18 or 6.9% $15.38$33.91 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 15.3m (2.8x avg.) $8.14 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.2 2.4% 40 42 44 $46 JO AS Wells FargoWFC Close: $41.43 -0.01 or flat $31.25$44.79 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 45.9m (2.6x avg.) $219.98 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 11.2 2.9% 10 15 $20 JO AS MicronMU Close: $16.84 -1.59 or -8.6% $5.16$18.85 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 153.6m (3.5x avg.) $17.49 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 15 20 25 $30 JO AS E2openEOPN Close: $19.69 -0.73 or -3.6% $12.27$25.86 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.2m (9.2x avg.) $507.55 m 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.69 percent Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.070.05+0.02.10 6-month T-bill.070.06+0.01.14 52-wk T-bill.120.12....17 2-year T-note.350.35....27 5-year T-note1.421.43-0.01.66 10-year T-note2.692.68+0.011.67 30-year T-bond3.753.74+0.012.85 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx3.523.53-0.012.54 Bond Buyer Muni Idx5.175.18-0.014.17 Barclays USAggregate2.392.38+0.011.67 Barclays US High Yield6.076.12-0.056.43 Moodys AAACorp Idx4.594.59...3.44 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.621.63-0.01.95 Barclays US Corp3.303.30...2.74 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of oil fell to $102 a barrel Friday on a forecast for an increase in global oil supplies next year. Among metals, gold, silver and platinum declined. Crops were mixed.Crude Oil (bbl)102.02103.01-0.96+11.1 Ethanol (gal)1.721.73-0.06-21.6 Heating Oil (gal)3.033.07-1.14-0.3 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.783.72+1.42+12.7 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.672.70-1.11-5.1 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz) 1268.001296.60-2.21-24.3 Silver (oz) 21.2221.85-2.91-29.7 Platinum (oz)1372.001392.30-1.46-10.8 Copper (lb) 3.273.24+0.74-10.3 Palladium (oz)712.30711.55+0.11+1.4 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb) 1.291.28+0.39-0.9 Coffee (lb) 1.171.14+2.01-18.9 Corn (bu) 4.334.38-1.14-38.0 Cotton (lb) 0.830.84-0.13+11.0 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)331.20338.60-2.19-11.4 Orange Juice (lb)1.261.27-0.28+9.0 Soybeans (bu)12.6712.88-1.65-10.7 Wheat (bu) 6.926.86+0.98-11.0 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.98+.09 +14.1+15.6+12.4+13.4 CapIncBuAm 56.81+.19 +10.5+11.7+9.0+11.3 CpWldGrIAm 42.89+.25 +17.5+21.9+10.0+13.6 EurPacGrAm 46.88+.33 +13.7+20.0+6.5+12.8 FnInvAm 48.80+.27 +20.6+23.8+14.3+15.8 GrthAmAm 42.26+.28 +23.0+26.6+15.0+15.7 IncAmerAm 19.81+.07 +12.5+14.1+11.1+13.3 InvCoAmAm 36.23+.21 +21.6+22.8+13.8+14.4 NewPerspAm 36.78+.24 +17.7+22.6+11.8+15.6 WAMutInvAm 37.29+.19 +21.3+21.8+15.9+15.0 Dodge & Cox Income 13.51+.01 -0.4+0.2+3.9+8.4 IntlStk 41.28+.41 +19.2+29.1+8.1+15.1 Stock 153.58+1.18 +27.5+30.9+17.5+17.8 Fidelity Contra 93.80+.60 +22.0+21.5+15.3+16.3 GrowCo 118.37+.31 +27.0+25.8+19.0+20.6 LowPriStk d 47.46+.33 +26.1+31.0+17.4+20.7 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 60.40+.38 +21.4+21.5+15.9+16.2 FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeAm 2.33... +9.0+10.7+9.7+15.7 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAm 13.17+.04 +1.1+4.8+4.7+10.1 GlBondAdv 13.13+.04 +1.3+5.0+5.0+10.4 Harbor IntlInstl 69.93+.44 +12.6+21.3+8.3+13.7 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 31.53+.15 +20.8+22.4+15.1+15.4 GrowStk 47.14+.38 +24.8+25.5+17.3+19.1 Vanguard 500Adml 157.15+.98 +21.4+21.5+15.9+16.2 500Inv 157.14+.98 +21.3+21.3+15.8+16.1 MuIntAdml 13.74... -2.1-1.7+3.0+5.9 STGradeAd 10.71+.01 +0.5+1.0+2.2+4.9 Tgtet2025 15.31+.07 +12.7+14.6+10.3+13.1 TotBdAdml 10.64... -2.1-1.9+2.5+5.6 TotIntl 16.36+.11 +11.4+18.8+5.3+12.0 TotStIAdm 43.17+.30 +22.8+23.6+16.5+17.0 TotStIdx 43.16+.30 +22.7+23.5+16.3+16.9 Welltn 37.70+.17 +13.5+14.4+11.3+13.9 WelltnAdm 65.12+.30 +13.6+14.5+11.4+14.0 WndsIIAdm 62.56+.36 +21.3+22.1+16.1+16.1 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates 000G5YW 000GBAN Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444 Stocks rise as debt talks continue in Washington Associated PressThe closer Washington gets to a deal over the debt ceiling, the higher stocks go. Stock prices rose for a second day in a row on Friday as investors bet against a U.S. debt default. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 111 points Friday, bringing its two-day gain to 434. Its jump on Thursday was the biggest this year. Call it the Sigh of Relief Rally. A partial government shutdown pushed the Dow below 15,000 this week before President Barack Obama and House Republicans met on Thursday to talk about the outlines for a possible deal. Obama and Republican senators met on Friday, too. Stocks set new highs in mid-September but declined steadily since then as the federal government got closer to the partial shutdown that began Oct. 1. That shutdown entered its 11th day on Friday. Even more troubling for investors is the expectation that the government will reach its borrowing limit on Oct. 17, which raises the possibility of a default on government borrowing. U.S. government bonds are usually considered the worlds safest investment, so even the possibility of a default has rattled investors. Its nice when the world does not revolve around politicians making decisions for Wall Street, said Ralph Fogel, investment strategist and partner at Fogel Neale Partners in New York. The Dow rose 111.04 points, or 0.7 percent, to close at 15,237.11. The Standard & Poors 500 index rose 10.64 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,703.20. The Nasdaq rose 31.13 points, or 0.8 percent, to 3,791.87. Kim Forrest, an equity research analyst at Fort Pitt Capital Group in Pittsburgh, said its too soon to assume that the meetings in Washington will avert a default. Thats super that theyre talking to each other, but what on Earth is the agreement going to look like, and is it going to stave off default? I dont think we know that yet, Forrest said. I think the stock market is getting ahead of itself. Rising legal costs push JPMorgan to rare lossNEW YORK Mounting legal costs pushed JPMorgan Chase to a rare loss in the third quarter, the first under the leadership of Jamie Dimon. The largest U.S. bank by assets set aside $9.2 billion in the quarter to cover a string of litigation stemming from the housing crisis and the banks London Whale trading debacle.Del Monte sells foods business to focus on petsSAN FRANCISCO Del Monte Foods is selling off its fruit and vegetable business to focus instead on tasty vittles for pets. The San Francisco-based company said Friday that it is selling its consumer products business, which includes canned Del Monte pineapple and Contadina tomatoes, to Del Monte Pacific Ltd. in Asia for $1.68 billion. It will then begin catering solely to the tastes of furrier consumers through its pets business, which includes brands such as Pup-Peroni, Meow Mix and Milk-Bones.Sony CEO praises Japanese leader for economic policyTOKYO The chief of Sony Corp., one of the best known Japanese companies, praised the countrys prime minister Friday for his efforts to jump-start the economy and put the nation back on the global stage. Sony leader Kazuo Hirai said Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is restoring global confidence in Japan, while stressing that delivering on promises with action was critical. Business HIGHLIGHTS Asssociated PressTrader William Lawrence works Friday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Toyota riding momentum in wild acceleration cases Associated PressLOS ANGELES While Toyota Motor Corp. still faces a bundle of lawsuits claiming that defective electronics caused some of its cars to accelerate uncontrollably, often with tragic results, another courtroom victory has given the automaker momentum heading into those other cases. Jurors deliberated for about five days in Los Angeles before concluding Thursday that the automaker was not liable for the death of Noriko Uno. The 66-year-old was killed in 2009 when her 2006 Toyota Camry was struck by another car, then continued on a harrowing ride until it slammed into a telephone pole and tree. Toyotas lawyers said the sedans design was not to blame and Uno likely mistook the gas pedal for the brake. Jurors cleared the Japanese automaker but decided that the other driver, who ran a stop sign, should pay Unos family $10 million. The Uno case was one of hundreds of unintended acceleration lawsuits still pending in federal and state courts against Toyota. It is the first bellwether case in state courts, chosen by a judge to help predict the potential outcome of other lawsuits making similar claims. Another state case began this week in Oklahoma. The Los Angeles case posed a different theory than the others. Unos family claimed that the crash could have been avoided if Toyota had installed a brake override system, which deadens the accelerator if the driver hits the brakes. Other cases claim that an electronics defect caused the sudden, unintended acceleration that preceded crashes. One plaintiffs attorney who settled a class-action case against Toyota in December for more than $1 billion said the Uno case seemed easier to win than the cases claiming failures in vehicles electronic throttle control systems. From wire reports

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OPINION Page A8SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 Stop spending is best solutionA letter to the editor in Sundays (Sept. 29) paper prompted this response. The article put blame on Ronald Reagan for the present deficit? Why do we have a deficit? Its because the government spends much more than it takes in. Well, if Reagan is to blame then my response puts the blame on Democrat presidents who have instigated big government spending programs that over time have consumed much more than our tax base can support. Entitlement programs make people happy until the bill comes due. At this point, no amount of taxation will balance the budget. If you need supporting facts, take a look at the large European countries (all socialistic) that have gone or are on the verge going bankrupt. Closer to home, our major entitlement spending states are all on the verge of going bankrupt (all Democrat controlled). Thankfully, Florida is not one of them. Since fault was found with Reagan, you overlook the fact that he did work closely with a Democrat controlled Congress and he worked diligently to bring the country together, not divide it. Ronald Reagan loved America and was a respected world leader. I think stop the spending is a better solution than raise the taxes. Why should those who have worked hard for their income have to give it away to those who have not worked hard for it...a free handout? I believe it is my right to choose to whom I give my charity donations ... to those who need and deserve it, not to those who are scamming the system.Rosalie Matt HernandoHCA is a good choiceGreat advice by Bob Priselac. I agree 100 percent with his thoughts and analysis for the HCA bid. A lease to any entity is just a promise to pay. With the changes that are about to happen with the health care system in our country, many hospitals will be stronger and many will be weaker, so you want to be with the strongest. As a board member and treasurer for more than 20 years in Lake County, I had the pleasure of working with HCA for a number of those years. They helped us raise our bond rating to A and we were profitable for all those years. The employees should cheer an HCA purchase because more patients will use the facility and thereby staff will expand to meet the increased traffic. The physicians will be pleased and the citizens of the county will no longer be burdened with the debt. I congratulate the hospital board on their wise vote and hope and pray that the foundation board has the same wisdom to vote for the HCA buyout. In closing, I would like to thank Mike Wright and your newspaper for the fine reporting during the last several months of this very important process.M. Benson OKelley Homosassa Editors note: This letter was submitted prior to the Foundation Board approving the HCA bid. Aday in the life of the emptiest suit in Washington: 7 a.m. You wake up, light a Camel. Read a pink Post-it left on the refrigerator by your wife: John, dont ever forget, YOU REALLY ARE THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE!!! Also, were out of bagels. 7:30 a.m. You lie in your tanning bed meditating about the government shutdown, wondering if it was such a brilliant idea to let it happen. You put on some Pink Floyd, Dark Side of the Moon, but that doesnt help. 8 a.m. On the ride to Capitol Hill, your driver remarks that theres not much traffic in the city, no tourists lined up to see money being inked at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. You smoke another Camel. 8:11 a.m. From the car you call the police to report that some jerk on D Street is selling Boehner is a Bum T-shirts no, wait, hes giving them away! Worse, hes wearing a national park rangers uniform. 9:07 a.m. Staff meeting. The assistant in charge of reading all your hate mail insists shes not crying, its just allergies. On a more upbeat note, three tea party activists in Arizona tweeted that the shutdown is a smashing success, and that if you cave in to moderate Republicans who want to end it, then you are lower than lily-livered liberal scum. 9:30 a.m. You deliver your regular morning blame-Obama-foreverything sound bite, which goes pretty well, all things considered. Your wife calls to say you looked totally reasonable on TV, not the least bit satanic, and asks if youd please swing by the grocery on the way home. 10:46 a.m. Fox News wants to interview you about the 800,000plus federal workers being laid off. How are they supposed to pay their mortgages, keep up their car payments, yada, yada, yada... And this is Fox? Theyre supposed to be on your side. You tell your assistant in charge of turning down hardhitting media interviews to say youre too busy trying to end this dire national crisis caused entirely by the Democrats and the president. 11:07 a.m. Three discreet drags on a Camel before sneaking into another tanning bed that youve installed in a dark alcove near the speakers office. You put on some Zeppelin, In Through the Out Door, but cant stop thinking about the havoc youve created by not letting the shutdown come to a vote on the House floor. At the Department of Defense, 400,000 civilian workers furloughed with no pay. Same story at NASA, the Department of Justice, Treasury, Commerce, Labor, Energy, even Veterans Affairs. And this was totally your call, as some unhappy colleagues have pointed out. One word from you and a clean spending bill would have passed, no problem, if only you werent such a wimp. I hate that word! you start to holler, fogging up the Plexiglas. 12:30 pm. Lunch with a carefully chosen group of supporters. They try to brighten your mood with news that the sign-up website for the Affordable Care Act sorry, Obamacare is plagued with glitches. What better proof that the presidents healthcare law is a total disaster, right? So cheer up, Mr. Speaker! they say. Cheer up? you snap back. Didnt you see the headline in the New York Daily News? House of Turds. With my picture! Youre definitely not a turd, Mr. Speaker. Gee, thanks. Get the check. 2:15 pm. You cancel the daily session with your charisma coach and go to the driving range to hit a bucket of balls. Out of nowhere comes a thundering downpour! Turns out you didnt receive the storm alert on your cellphone due to layoffs at the weather service caused by the you-know-what, that you yourself allowed to happen. You stub out your Camel, go back to the office and sulk. 4 p.m. Your regular afternoon blame-Obama-for-everything sound bite is postponed because the assistant in charge of making sure youre never photographed with Ted Cruz has spotted the lunatic Texan roaming the halls. 5:45 p.m. Quick trip to the tanning bed, then moisturize. Youre preparing for a live interview with Diane Sawyer, who is way better looking than those stiffs on Fox. The producer says Dianes going to remind you that youre the one person who could stop the government shutdown tomorrow, if you wanted to. Suddenly you remember a dentist appointment. 6:30 pm. On the ride home you phone the NSA and ask if someone could please hack the Google site and remove all the mean stuff being written about you. Unfortunately, the hacker in charge of that department has just been furloughed. So you light up another Camel, and call Harry Reid.Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132. Laws grind the poor, and rich men rule the law.Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller, 1765 Boehners empty suit CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief STEM THE TIDE Flood insurance cost poses economic threat Surprises that show up as new laws go into effect are rarely pleasant, and those becoming apparent as the 2012 reform of federal flood insurance is implemented are no exception. Initially intended as a way to make the heavily subsidized flood insurance program more self-sufficient and to close the programs $24 billion deficit, the Biggert-Waters bill to reform the program was supported by a variety of business groups, including the American Insurance Association, the Mortgage Bankers Association, the National Association of Realtors, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. But as changes in the legislation that raise the cost of flood insurance are put into effect, the impact of the changes is raising the ire of folks in coastal communities from Louisiana to Massachusetts, and a variety of legislative proposals have been advanced to either delay or amend the current law. The fundamental problem is that federal subsidies for many policies are going away and market-based rates are being phased in. This means many homeowners and businesses are facing steep increases in the rates they pay for flood insurance, which lenders require for mortgages in areas subject to flooding, even if these areas have not previously flooded. There are almost 8,000 properties in Citrus County that participate in the federal flood insurance program, and 2,848 of these have federallysubsidized policies. Under the new rules, rates for some properties can increase by 25 percent annually until the rate charged equals the actuarial rate for that property. And homes directly on the water are not the only ones affected. According to Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston, the majority of the homes and businesses in Crystal River will be affected by changes in the law, and homes far inland in the Homosassa area are in areas where flood insurance is required. Although insurance rates for owner-occupied homes will rise more slowly than rates for second homes or businesses, when homes are sold, the new owner will face sharply higher rates. The concern is that this could affect property values and resale. While there are a variety of proposals at both the state and federal level for mitigating the rate increases, Florida has also taken the issue to court by joining in a lawsuit filed by Mississippi that asks a federal court to block the rate increases until an affordability study is completed. About 40 percent of the homes in the country affected by the changes are in Florida. This is an issue not likely to be resolved quickly or painlessly, but it needs to be resolved for the benefit of both the state and our local economy. We urge our legislative delegation to work with legislators in other coastal states to come up with a solution that will move the program toward financial stability while still protecting the economy of coastal areas directly impacted by changes in the flood insurance program. THE ISSUE:Cost of flood insurance soaring as subsidies are cut.OUR OPINION:Program needs review. OPINIONS INVITED Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.LETTERSto the Editor THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. Say no to attorneysWhy dont we try operating the county with no attorneys on payroll? Dont the commissioners know whats right and whats wrong? Do they not know whats illegal and what isnt or how to sign their names? Why do we have to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars for attorneys just so they can fall back on them and they wont be responsible for anything? Was it the sheriffs attorney who got us to pay almost half a million dollars to a criminal that we shot? We have to pay his medical expenses. Whatever happened over that? ... Whats the new policy? We dont need to pay out-of-county attorneys. Lets go without them. Lets try to save some money for a change. All the commissioners do is vote for spending. We need a 30 percent slash across the board. No tax increase, that simple. We wont miss them.Smoke and mirrorsThey dont add up. How much is the county paying NG&N law firm for a one-year contract? How much is the county now paying Ms. Parsons and Ms. Clamer? Now prove how Welch saved $62,043. Looks like another smoke-andmirrors cover-up, just like Thorpes $13,000 savings which actually cost the county tens of thousands of dollars, in reference to Oct. 9s Chronicle article.Allows flexibilityThis is in regards to the board of county commissioners hiring consultants for legal services. Lets face it; attorneys are very expensive. I like this idea. It gives the board a lot more flexibility. Theyve got a lot more attorneys they can choose from and it gives them some time to pick a final candidate. Good job, board. CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Carl HiaasenOTHER VOICES Hot Corner: ATTORNEYS SOUND OFFCALL563-0579

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bubbling natural spring systems. Knight said his team has uncovered the following key issues: Approximately 2.6 billion gallons of water a day is pumped daily from the three water districts which comprise the bulk of the Floridan Aquifer (Suwannee, SWFWMD and the St. Johns Water Management District). Knight says of that amount SWFWMD and the St. Johns district account for 2 billion of those gallons a day; average flows from Florida springs have declined by about 20 percent to 40 percent way beyond what Knight said is recognized as an acceptable standard which is about 5 percent to 10 percent. He said for springs in Kings Bay, for instance, are now spewing salt water which is increasingly making the Florida Outstanding Waterway brackish; recharge is at about 8 billion gallons per day, but Knight said daily withdrawals are at 30 percent of that amount, or sometimes 50 percent during poor rainy seasons. the aquifer is declining about 0.2 feet per year or 500 million gallons per day. Knight says some estimates put overall declines in the Tampa/St. Pete area at anywhere between 60 to 90 feet. agricultural and urban development have resulted in elevated nitrate and nitrogen levels. He blames those elevated levels on human pollution and fertilizer use in agriculture; water withdrawal permits have been over allocated. In the Floridan Aquifer area a total of 28,630 were issued. In 2010 2,622 million gallons per day was pumped, or 30 percent of recharge. However, the total allocated for groundwater use was 4,630 million gallons per day or 50 percent of recharge. In SWFWMD, total permits were 22,800. In 2010 965 mgd was pumped, or 39 percent of aquifer recharge. The total allocated groundwater use was 2,830 mgd, or 116 percent of recharge. Knight said that data shows the current track is unsustainable. He suggests a change in the way business is done. We should stop issuing more water withdrawal permits and some the agricultural operations have expanded to areas that are not the most fertile areas of the state, Knight said. He said to create incentives for agriculture by moving operations to more naturally fertile areas and emphasize teaching less use of water and fertilizer. And withdraw the water only from surface sources (like lakes and rivers). This way people can see what is being taken, because quite often when we withdraw from the aquifer, it is almost magical and it seems like it is always there. The water district spokeswoman Susanna Martinez Tarokh said it is state statutes which grant the district authority to issue permits. Three Crystal River residents have recently applied fora consumptive use permit at the threshold of about 100,000 gallons per day. The trio Tracy Colson, Steve Kingery and Matt Clemons do not intend to withdraw the water, but instead are interested in saving it for posterity. But Martinez Tarokh said applicants must demonstrate the conditions for issuance of a permit one of which is that the quantity is needed to fulfill a reasonable demand during the term of the permit. Water use permits are intended for consumptive uses of water, she added.CONDITIONSFORISSUANCEOFPERMITS1. In order to obtain a Water Use Permit, an Applicant must demonstrate that the water use is reasonable and beneficial, is consistent with the public interest, and will not interfere with any existing legal use of water, by providing reasonable assurances, on both an individual and a cumulative basis, that the water use: (a) Is necessary to fulfill a certain reasonable demand. (b) Will not cause quantity or quality changes that adversely impact the water resources, including both surface water and groundwater. (c) Will comply with the provisions of 4.2 of the WUP Basis of Review, incorporated by reference in Rule 40D-2.091, F.A.C., regarding adverse impacts to wetlands, lakes, streams, estuaries, fish and wildlife or other natural resources. (d) Will not interfere with a reservation of water as set forth in Rule 40D2.302, F.A.C. (e) Will comply with the provisions of 4.3 of the WUP Basis of Review, incorporated by reference in Rule 40D-2.091, F.A.C., regarding minimum flows and levels (MFLs). (f) Will utilize the lowest water quality the Applicant has the ability to use, provided that its use does not interfere with the recovery of a water body to its established MFL and it is not a source that is either currently or projected to be adversely impacted. (g) Will comply with the provisions of 4.5 of the WUP Basis of Review, incorporated by reference in Rule 40D-2.091, F.A.C., regarding saline water intrusion. (h) Will not cause pollution of the aquifer. (i) Will not adversely impact offsite land uses existing at the time of the application. (j) Will not adversely impact an existing legal withdrawal. (k). Will incorporate water conservation measures. (l) Will incorporate use of alternative water supplies to the greatest extent practicable. (m) Will not cause water to go to waste. (n) Will not otherwise be harmful to the water resources within the District. 2. For projects that require both an Environmental Resource Permit (ERP) and a Water Use Permit (WUP), an application for an ERP must be deemed complete prior to issuance of the WUP when the design of the surface water management system can affect the quantities developed from the project site and the quantities needed to supply project water demands. The applicant may submit an application for a Conceptual ERP to satisfy this requirement, provided that the application contains information from which supplemental irrigation demands, potable water demands, other water use demands, and water supply quantities derived from the surface water management system can be calculated. Otherwise, the applicant shall submit an application for an Individual or General ERP Phosphate mining projects are not required to have complete ERPs prior to WUP issuance. If the District determines that a permit application involves an area where there are water resource problems and due to the quantity, type or location of the proposed withdrawal it is unlikely that a water use permit will be issued, the requirement for a complete ERP application shall be waived by the District. Where such waivers are granted, and if a WUP is issued, it shall specify that a well construction permit will not be issued and that withdrawals cannot commence until the appropriate ERP is issued. 3. The standards and criteria set forth in the WUP Basis of Review, incorporated in Rule 40D-2.091, F.A.C., shall be used to provide the reasonable assurances required in subsection 40D-2.301(1), F.A.C. Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com.LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 A9 GREEK FESTIVAL ART & VENDOR EXPO 2013 FREE PARKING RAIN OR SHINE Delicious Greek Dinners Live Greek Music & Daily Door Prizes Art & Specialty Merchandise Vendors Greek Pastries, Desserts & Coffee Shoppe Greek Gyros & Grilled Specialties Pony Rides, Face Painting 20 Ft. Slide & Petting Zoo Oct. 18, 19 & 20 Indoor Dinners & Outside Grille Friday & Saturday 11a.m. 8p.m. Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m. ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION Presented by: Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church 4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd. (State Rd. 44), Lecanto, FL www.stmichaelgoc.org (352) 527-0766 Co-Sponsored by: 000GB9C 000GCJN Holly Bisagna, LMT Amber Boulerice, LMT Mei Fen Harvey, LMT Sydney Campellone, LMT Lynda Wagner, LMT Rachel Gibbons, LMT T ammy Lowe, LMT Michele DiDomenico, LE Victoria Bell, NT Timothy Hillengas, LA DIVA NIGHT massage manicures nails facials fitness classes yoga acupuncture pedicures Ideal Health Enrichment Center 5494 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-621-5100 Monday Saturday 9:00 AM7:00 PM By appointment only Gift Cards Available Online www.ihec.us Meet Our Staff of licensed professionals Every massage includes hot stones, moist heat and hot towels at no extra charge. PLUS, you can have deep tissue or a relaxation massage and you get a full 90 or 60 minutes on the table. DIVA NIGHT One Free Spin Of The Prize Wheel Every Spin A Winner (women only) 90 min. Massage $60 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 90 minute massage for only $60. Only one coupon per person. 60 min. Massage $50 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 60 minute massage for only $50. Only one coupon per person. Microdermabrasion Facials $45 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive this offer for only $45. Only one coupon per person. 30 Something Special Gel Manicure $18 Manicure Pedicure Combo $30 Must be 30 years or older to qualify for this promotion. WATERContinued from Page A1 We should stop issuing more water withdrawal permits.Bob Knightsprings expert.

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Associated PressBEIRUT The watchdog agency working to eliminate the worlds chemical weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday in a powerful endorsement of the inspectors now on the ground in Syria on a perilous mission to destroy the regimes stockpile of poison gas. In honoring the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the Norwegian Nobel Committee said recent events in Syria, where chemical weapons have again been put to use, have underlined the need to enhance the efforts to do away with such weapons. The prize came 10 days after OPCW inspectors started arriving in war-torn Syria to oversee the dismantling of President Bashar Assads chemical arsenal. While world leaders and former Nobel laureates praised the groups selection, some in Syria lamented that the prize would do nothing to end the bloodshed, most of which is being inflicted with conventional weapons. The killing is continuing, the shelling is continuing and the dead continue to fall, said Mohammed al-Tayeb, an activist who helped film casualties after the deadly chemical attack in August that the rebels and the government have blamed on each other. The peace prize, he added, should have gone to whoever helps the Syrian people get rid of Bashar Assad. After focusing on such themes as human rights and European unity in recent years, the Norwegian Nobel Committee this time returned to the core purpose of the 112-year-old Nobel Peace Prize disarming the world. Founded in 1997, the OPCW had largely worked out of the limelight until this year, when the United Nations called upon its expertise. The OPCWs selection caught many by surprise. It was widely expected that the peace prize would go to Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban last October for championing education for girls. She is an outstanding woman and I think she has a bright future, and she will probably be a nominee next year or the year after that, said Nobel committee chairman Thorbjoern Jagland. The peace prize committee has a tradition of not just honoring past achievements, but encouraging causes or movements that are still unfolding. The OPCW was formed to enforce the Chemical Weapons Convention, the 1997 international treaty outlawing such arms. The Nobel Peace Prize came just days before Syria officially joins as OPCWs 190th member state on Monday. Treats Associated PressA squirrel monkey peers into a pumpkin Friday, looking for a treat at the Oklahoma City Zoo in Oklahoma City. Court: NSA may collect recordsWASHINGTON The secret U.S. court that governs surveillance of terrorist and foreign espionage targets is authorizing the National Security Agency to keep collecting U.S. phone records. The director of national intelligence, James R. Clapper, on Friday made public the continuation of the records collection, as part of the Obama administrations campaign to better explain how U.S. intelligence uses U.S. data. At one time, Clapper himself told Congress his officers do not collect such data. Leaks by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden revealed the bulk collection of millions of U.S. phone logs showing who Americans called and for how long. That prompted privacy activists and lawmakers to push for an ongoing review of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which allows such data collection.Feds: States may pay to open parksWASHINGTON Under pressure from governors, the Obama administration said Thursday it will allow some shuttered national parks to reopen as long as states use their own money to pay for park operations. Governors in at least four states have asked for authority to reopen national parks within their borders because of the economic impacts caused by the park closures. All 401 national park units including such icons as the Grand Canyon and Yosemite and Zion national parks have been closed since Oct. 1 because of the partial government shutdown. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees have been furloughed, and lawmakers from both parties have complained that park closures have wreaked havoc on nearby communities that depend on tourism. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the government will consider offers to use state money to resume park operations, but will not surrender control of national parks or monuments to the states. Jewell called on Congress to act swiftly to end the government Jupiter-bound craft working againLOS ANGELES Scientists say NASAs Jupiterbound spacecraft that looped around Earth to catapult to the outer solar system, is operating normally again. The Southwest Research Institute, which leads the missions science operations, said Friday that Juno is out of safe mode. Thats a state a spacecraft is programmed to go into when it senses something is wrong. Juno hit a snag earlier this week after it flew past Earth to increase its speed to barrel beyond the asteroid belt to Jupiter. Despite the problem, scientists say Juno is on target to slip into orbit around Jupiter. Its expected to arrive in 2016. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A10SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Visiting Associated PressThe Dalai Lama responds to a question Friday at a news conference in Mexico City. Eastern India braces for cycloneBHUBANESHWAR, India Officials ordered tens of thousands of coastal villagers to flee their homes Friday as a massive cyclone that filled nearly the entire Bay of Bengal gathered strength and headed toward Indias eastern seaboard. Officials canceled holy day celebrations and stockpiled emergency supplies in coastal Orissa and Andhra Pradesh states, with forecasters saying Cyclone Phailin will hit the region Saturday evening. The Indian Meteorological Department warned Phailin was a very severe cyclonic storm that was expected to hit with maximum sustained winds of 130 to 135 miles per hour. However, the U.S. Navys Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Hawaii forecast maximum sustained winds of 167 mph with gusts up to 196 mph.UN alarmed at polio threat UNITED NATIONS The U.N. Security Council is expressing alarm at the imminent threat of the spread of polio through Sudans violence-wracked South Kordofan and Blue Nile states and the continuing outbreak of polio in the Horn of Africa. The U.N. humanitarian office has reported that the threat affects more than 165,000 children in the two Sudanese states due to a lack of immunization in the border area in more than two years, the Security Council said in a statement Friday. The SPLM-North, a rebel group backed by South Sudan, has been fighting government forces in South Kordofan and Blue Nile. The Security Council called on Sudans government and the SPLM-North to urgently overcome differences over technical plans so that a two-week polio vaccination campaign can begin on schedule Nov. 5.Panama: Ships weapons workPANAMA CITY A Panamanian official said the two Cuban MiG-21 jet fighters found aboard a North Korean cargo ship seized in July, were in perfect conditions to operate and that the 15 plane engines are new and could be used as replacements. The official said the assertion by Cuba that the military equipment was obsolete is incorrect. The official spoke Friday on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to be quoted by name. He said the shipping of the weapons was part of an agreement between Cuba and North Korean and that Havana was going to receive $200 million for them. After the ship was seized as it tried to cross the Panama Canal, Cuba said the cargo included obsolete defensive weapons. World BRIEFS From wire reports No agreement on shutdown Associated PressWASHINGTON With time running short, President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner accelerated efforts Friday to prevent the U.S. Treasury from default and end a partial government shutdown that stretched into an 11th day. The latest impacts: New aircraft grounded, military chaplains silenced and a crab harvest jeopardized in the Bering Sea. Lets put this hysterical talk of default behind us and instead start talking about finding solutions, said Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. Republicans in the House and Senate separately made proposals to the White House for ending an impasse that polls say has inflicted damage on their party politically. Each offered to reopen the government and raise the $16.7 trillion debt limit but only as part of broader approaches that envision deficit savings, changes to the health care law known as Obamacare and an easing of acrossthe-board spending cuts that the White House and Congress both dislike. The details and timing differed. Were waiting to hear from administration officials, said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Hopes remained high on Wall Street, where investors sent the Dow Jones industrial average 111 points higher following Thursdays 323-point surge. Obama met at the White House with small business owners about the impacts they were feeling from the budget battles, and said he hoped to be able to bring them toward a conclusion, said Det Ansinn, who attended the session. He was a little slightly melancholy that maybe it could be done over the weekend and maybe not. Hes been down this road before, said Ansinn, owner of Doylestown, Pa.-based mobile and Web app developer Brick Simple. Ansinn said he told the president how the shutdown is threating to delay some of his projects and he fears what a possible impending government default could do to the economy. General in charge of nuclear missiles is fired Associated PressWASHINGTON The Air Force fired the general in charge of its nuclear missiles on Friday, just two days after a Navy admiral with top nuclear weapons responsibilities was sacked. Both men are caught up in investigations of alleged personal misconduct, adding to a cascade of turmoil inside the nations nuclear weapons force. The Air Force removed Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, a 35-year veteran, from his command of 20th Air Force, responsible for all 450 of the services intercontinental ballistic missiles. Carey, who took his post in Wyoming in June 2012, will be reassigned pending the outcome of an investigation into personal misbehavior, the service said. The Air Force would not specify what Carey is alleged to have done wrong, but two officials with knowledge of the investigation indicated that it was linked to alcohol use. They said it was not related to the performance or combat readiness of ICBM units or to his stewardship of the force. Removing senior officers in the nuclear force is rare but has happened twice this week. On Wednesday the Navy said Vice Adm. Tim Giardina, the second-in-charge at U.S. Strategic Command, was fired amid an investigation of gambling issues. He was demoted from threeto two-star rank and reassigned to a Navy staff job until the investigation is completed. Together, the Carey and Giardina firings add a new dimension to a set of serious problems facing the militarys nuclear force. The ICBM segment in particular has had several recent setbacks, including a failed safety and security inspection at a base in Montana in August, followed by the firing of the colonel there in charge of security forces. In May, The Associated Press revealed that 17 Minuteman 3 missile launch control officers at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., had been taken off duty in a reflection of what one officer there called rot inside the ICBM force. Peace Prize goes to chemical-weapons watchdog Associated PressAhmet Uzumcu, director general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, comments Sept. 7, 2011, during a news conference in The Hague, Netherlands. The OPCW was awarded the NobelPeace Prize on Friday. Nobel awards top honor Associated PressThe Air Force fired Maj. Gen. Michael J. Carey, the two-star general in charge of all of its nuclear missiles, in response to an investigation into alleged personal misbehavior, officials told The Associated Press on Friday. Navy Vice Adm. Tim Giardina was notified Wednesday that he has been relieved of duty as second-in-command at the military organization that oversees all U.S. nuclear forces.

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College football/B2 Boxing/B2 High school sports/ B3 Scoreboard/B3 High school football/B4 Soccer, NHL, golf/ B4 NFL/B5 Auto racing/B6 No. 17 UF travels to No. 10 LSU today for a big SEC clash./ B2 SPORTSSection BSATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000GAUC Turnovers doom Pirates in loss to Raiders JON-MICHAELSORACCHI Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER Crystal River head coach Nathan Varnadore wants his Pirates to control the clock and play good defense. On Crystal Rivers homecoming night against Alachua Santa Fe, though, the Pirates watched their opponent ride that formula to a 30-14 District 5A-5 victory. The Raiders are now 3-3 overall and 1-2 in district. Crystal River fell to 2-4 and 0-3. Thats a pretty good formula, Santa Fe head coach Bill Wiles said. If you can run the football and defend the run, you can win some games. Crystal River managed just 21 rushing yards on 17 carries while Santa Fe rolled up 278 yards on 61 totes. The Pirates forced a pair of turnovers, but gave the ball to the Raiders five times four interceptions and a fumble lost including four times during a close game in the second half. Pirates head coach Nathan Varnadore said Crystal Rivers four quarters of football mirrored the week at practice. The first-year face of the Pirates program said Monday and Thursdays practices were bad, Tuesdays was an improvement over Mondays and Wednesday was the best practice of the week. We gotta stop them, thats not what we do, Varnadore said. But its a reflection of practice. This is going to hurt them and it might be the wake-up call these guys need. For Crystal River, Ty Reynolds had six catches for 157 yards, which included a 76yard touchdown from junior quarterback Collin Ryan on the CR football team drops to 0-3 in district after 30-14 setback MATT PFIFFNER /ChronicleCrystal River sophomore running back Antonio Franklin tries to evade the tackle of Santa Fe sophomore defender Walter Jenkins in the second quarter of the Pirates homecoming game at Earl Bramlett Stadium. See TURNOVERS/ Page B3 Colts outrace Tigers Dunnellon falls at the hands of North MarionSEANARNOLD CorrespondentDUNNELLON Woeful offense and special teams disasters costs Dunnellon its first district loss of the season and its seventh straight to North Marion in a 34-7 defeat to the Colts at Ned Love Field on Friday. The Tigers have to regroup in a hurry, as they remain alive by joining three other 5A-5 teams Gainesville Eastside, Live Oak Suwannee and North Marion that each carry one loss in the district. They travel to Suwannee next Friday and return home a week later for a game with Eastside. Despite the discrepancy on the scoreboard, the Colts and Tigers each had 123 total yards, and three of North Marions four scoring drives combined for 41 yards. Two of North Marions touchdowns were set up by Dunnellon turnovers, and another came moments after Colts senior Alex Williams blocked a Chase Brattin punt early in the third quarter. Leading 7-0 at the break, North Marion opened the second half with a 72-yard kickoff return for a touchdown by senior Jamarquois Autry, who also picked off a pair of Kobie Jones passes in the second half. On the return, Autry fielded the ball while running toward his own end zone, but reversed direction on a dime and sliced his way through Dunnellons coverage. Dunnellon continued to unravel from there, giving See OUTRACE/ Page B3 D answers call Citrus outlast Mount Dora 27-26 by stopping late conversionDAVIDPIEKLIK CorrespondentINVERNESS Its vaunted defense came up huge when needed most and saved homecoming night from being ruined, as the Citrus High School football team held on for a 27-26 win over Mt. Dora. Making the biggest play of the night, the Hurricanes defensive line stopped Mt. Doras Jordan Porter short of the end zone on a two-point conversion attempt with 24 seconds left in the game. The play followed a twotouchdown rally by Mt. Dora and a failed attempt by Citrus to run the clock out. The Citrus Hurricanes (6-0) came in heavily favored against the Mt. Dora Hurricanes (3-4) but penalties, miscues and turnovers kept Citrus from any thoughts of a blowout. Its homecoming weekend, were expecting a blowout. We came in flat, Citrus quarterback Deion Moore said. We werent focused on this football game and 26 to 27 shows that. Mt. Dora played a physical, aggressive game that kept Citrus off balance most of the night. They recovered two squib kicks one on a Citrus fumble and, after trailing early in the game, strung two touchdowns together for a 13-7 lead. The visiting Hurricanes then showed poise when they trailed 27-13 heading into the final quarter. After the Canes made a goal line stand at the beginning of the fourth quarter, they were forced to punt six plays later, giving the ball to Mt. Dora on the Citrus 35-yard line. The visiting Hurricanes struck when Bryant Moshers 10-yard slant pass to Jefferson turned into a 35-yard touchdown after a few missed tackles. Citrus was forced to punt on its ensuing drive, and with 1:51 left in the game, Mt. Dora took over from its own 26. Mosher who finished with 221 passing yards and two touchdowns completed three straight passes to get to the Citrus 24. Steven Gonzalez ran the ball in from the 1-yard line to bring his team within one. Just as it looked as if Mt. Dora was taking the game, linebacker Travis Blotz and teammates took down Jordan. The offense put them in a lot STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleCitrus High School junior Travis Blotz tries to break the tackle by Mount Doras Weston Hargroves in the homecoming game at Citrus, which the host Hurricanes won 27-26. Citrus High School senior Sam Franklin pulls down a pass from quarterback Moore Deion against Mount Dora. See CALL/ Page B3

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B2SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS College football scheduleAll Times EDT (Subject to change) Today, Oct. 12 EAST E. Michigan (1-4) at Army (2-4), Noon Lehigh (4-1) at Columbia (0-3), Noon Albany (NY) (1-5) at Delaware (4-2), Noon Rhode Island (2-4) at New Hampshire (1-3), Noon Monmouth (NJ) (3-3) at St. Francis (Pa.) (1-4), Noon South Florida (1-4) at UConn (0-3), Noon Harvard (3-0) at Cornell (1-2), 12:30 p.m. Brown (2-1) at Bryant (3-2), 1 p.m. Holy Cross (2-4) at Bucknell (1-3), 1 p.m. Fordham (6-0) at Georgetown (1-3), 1 p.m. Lafayette (1-3) at Princeton (1-1), 1 p.m. CCSU (2-4) at Sacred Heart (5-1), 1 p.m. Wagner (2-4) at Duquesne (2-2), 1:10 p.m. Yale (3-0) at Dartmouth (1-2), 1:30 p.m. Miami (Ohio) (0-5) at UMass (0-5), 3 p.m. Michigan (5-0) at Penn St. (3-2), 5 p.m. Stony Brook (2-3) at Colgate (1-4), 6 p.m. Villanova (3-2) at Towson (6-0), 7 p.m. SOUTH Missouri (5-0) at Georgia (4-1), Noon Pittsburgh (3-1) at Virginia Tech (5-1), Noon NC Pembroke (4-0) at Charlotte (3-2), Noon Valparaiso (0-4) at Mercer (4-1), Noon Navy (3-1) at Duke (3-2), 12:30 p.m. Drake (2-3) at Davidson (0-5), 1 p.m. The Citadel (2-4) at Georgia Southern (3-2), 1 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (4-1) at Howard (1-4), 1 p.m. Dayton (3-2) at Stetson (1-4), 1 p.m. Charleston Southern (5-0) at VMI (1-4), 1:30 p.m. Elon (2-4) at Wofford (3-2), 1:30 p.m. Prairie View (4-2) at Alabama St. (4-2), 2 p.m. W. Carolina (1-4) at Auburn (4-1), 2 p.m. Norfolk St. (2-3) at Delaware St. (1-4), 2 p.m. NC A&T (3-1) at Hampton (0-4), 2 p.m. Jackson St. (4-2) at MVSU (1-4), 3 p.m. Samford (3-2) at Appalachian St. (1-3), 3:30 p.m. Boston College (3-2) at Clemson (5-0), 3:30 p.m. Troy (3-3) at Georgia St. (0-5), 3:30 p.m. Richmond (2-2) at James Madison (4-2), 3:30 p.m. Florida (4-1) at LSU (5-1), 3:30 p.m. Virginia (2-3) at Maryland (4-1), 3:30 p.m. Syracuse (2-3) at NC State (3-2), 3:30 p.m. East Carolina (4-1) at Tulane (4-2), 3:30 p.m. Penn (2-1) at William & Mary (3-2), 3:30 p.m. Tennessee St. (4-1) at Jacksonville St. (5-0), 4 p.m. Northwestern St. (3-2) at Nicholls St. (3-2), 4 p.m. Marshall (3-2) at FAU (2-4), 5 p.m. Furman (2-3) at Chattanooga (3-2), 6 p.m. Gardner-Webb (4-2) at Coastal Carolina (5-0), 6 p.m. Florida A&M (1-4) at Savannah St. (1-5), 6 p.m. Alabama (5-0) at Kentucky (1-4), 7 p.m. Alabama A&M (2-4) at Southern U. (2-3), 7 p.m. UAB (1-4) at FIU (1-4), 7:30 p.m. Bowling Green (5-1) at Mississippi St. (2-3), 7:30 p.m. Stephen F. Austin (2-3) at SE Louisiana (3-2), 8 p.m. Texas A&M (4-1) at Mississippi (3-2), 8:30 p.m. MIDWEST Indiana (3-2) at Michigan St. (4-1), Noon Nebraska (4-1) at Purdue (1-4), Noon Campbell (1-3) at Butler (4-2), 1 p.m. Missouri St. (1-5) at N. Dakota St. (4-0), 2 p.m. Cent. Michigan (2-4) at Ohio (4-1), 2 p.m. Murray St. (3-2) at SE Missouri (0-5), 2 p.m. Indiana St. (1-4) at South Dakota (2-2), 2 p.m. Buffalo (2-2) at W. Michigan (0-6), 2 p.m. Kent St. (2-4) at Ball St. (5-1), 3 p.m. Baylor (4-0) at Kansas St. (2-3), 3:30 p.m. E. Washington (3-1) at North Dakota (2-2), 3:30 p.m. Northwestern (4-1) at Wisconsin (3-2), 3:30 p.m. Grambling St. (0-6) vs. Alcorn St. (4-2) at Indianapolis, 4 p.m. S. Dakota St. (3-2) at W. Illinois (2-3), 4 p.m. Akron (1-5) at N. Illinois (5-0), 5 p.m. S. Illinois (3-3) at N. Iowa (4-1), 5 p.m. Illinois St. (2-3) at Youngstown St. (5-1), 7 p.m. SOUTHWEST Memphis (1-3) at Houston (4-0), Noon Texas (3-2) vs. Oklahoma (5-0) at Dallas, Noon Kansas (2-2) at TCU (2-3), Noon Iowa St. (1-3) at Texas Tech (5-0), Noon South Carolina (4-1) at Arkansas (3-3), 12:21 p.m. Lamar (3-2) at Sam Houston St. (3-1), 3 p.m. Nebraska-Kearney (1-4) at Cent. Arkansas (2-3), 4 p.m. Rice (3-2) at UTSA (2-4), 4 p.m. Texas Southern (0-5) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (0-5), 7 p.m. Idaho (1-5) at Arkansas St. (2-3), 7 p.m. Middle Tennessee (3-3) at North Texas (2-3), 7 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (2-4) at Texas St. (3-2), 7 p.m. Tulsa (1-4) at UTEP (1-4), 8 p.m. FAR WEST San Jose St. (2-3) at Colorado St. (2-3), 3:30 p.m. New Mexico (2-3) at Wyoming (3-2), 3:30 p.m. Oregon (5-0) at Washington (4-1), 4 p.m. Portland St. (3-3) at S. Utah (3-2), 4:05 p.m. Marist (3-2) at San Diego (3-2), 5 p.m. N. Colorado (1-4) at Idaho St. (2-3), 5:05 p.m. Stanford (5-0) at Utah (3-2), 6 p.m. Georgia Tech (3-2) at BYU (3-2), 7 p.m. Montana (4-1) at UC Davis (2-4), 7 p.m. Hawaii (0-5) at UNLV (3-2), 8 p.m. Boise St. (3-2) at Utah St. (3-3), 8 p.m. Weber St. (1-5) at Cal Poly (2-3), 9:05 p.m. N. Arizona (3-2) at Sacramento St. (3-3), 9:05 p.m. Colorado (2-2) at Arizona St. (3-2), 10 p.m. California (1-4) at UCLA (4-0), 10:30 p.m. Oregon St. (4-1) at Washington St. (4-2), 10:30 p.m.Top 25 football scheduleToday, Oct. 12 No. 1 Alabama at Kentucky, 7 p.m. No. 2 Oregon at No. 16 Washington, 4 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. Boston College, 3:30 p.m. No. 5 Stanford at Utah, 6 p.m. No. 7 Georgia vs. No. 25 Missouri, Noon No. 9 Texas A&M at Mississippi, 8:30 p.m. No. 10 LSU vs. No. 17 Florida, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 UCLA vs. California, 10:30 p.m. No. 12 Oklahoma vs. Texas at Dallas, Noon No. 14 South Carolina at Arkansas, 12:21 p.m. No. 15 Baylor at Kansas State, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Michigan at Penn State, 5 p.m. No. 19 Northwestern at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m. No. 20 Texas Tech vs. Iowa State, Noon No. 23 Northern Illinois vs. Akron, 5 p.m. No. 24 Virginia Tech vs. Pittsburgh, Noon Boxers fight tonight with Pacquiao in rear view mirror Associated PressLAS VEGAS Juan Manuel Marquez chased Manny Pacquiao for three long, frustrating fights, never getting the wins he thought he surely deserved. When he finally caught Pacquiao with a right hand out of nowhere that left him face-first on the canvas in their fourth fight, Marquez was ready to move on. That chapter is closed, Marquez said. I had a great victory over a great fighter like Pacquiao and I want to keep that great feeling. That fifth fight, I dont see why. Timothy Bradley also has some history with Pacquiao, and its bittersweet. He got a win in a disputed decision, but he never got credit from boxing fans for the win and he paid a price for it in his next fight. The two meet Saturday night in a scheduled 12-round welterweight title fight, with Pacquiao half a world away. Still, Pacquiaos shadow looms large even as they get ready for a big payday without him. After the Pacquiao fight nobody gave me any respect, Bradley said. I had to go out and earn that respect. Thats why I went out in my last fight like I did. I wanted to take him out and I wanted to send a statement to the world. Bradley did just that, but he paid a terrible price. Never known for his power punching, he engaged in a brutal brawl with Ruslan Provodnikov last March that was almost scary to watch. Bradley emerged with a narrow decision win despite being battered early and knocked down in the 12th round. But the punches took such a toll that he went to a neurologist to see what was wrong and ended up spending two months quietly in dark rooms trying to get over the effects of what he believes was a concussion he suffered in the bout. Every fighter knows when he enters the ring he may not come out the same or come out at all, Bradley said. I just had to figure it out. Bradley and Marquez both turned down offers from promoter Bob Arum to fight Pacquiao again, even though they could have made more money doing it. Both had their reasons and both will still make big paychecks, with Marquez guaranteed $6 million and Bradley $4.1 million for their title fight. Associated PressBoxers Timothy Bradley, left, and Juan Manuel Marquez face off for photographers after a news conference Wednesday in Las Vegas. Bradley is scheduled to defend his WBO welterweight title against Marquez tonight. Shadow looms over Bradley, Marquez fight Associated PressIn this Oct. 6, 2012, file photo, Florida safety Matt Elam, right, forces LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. to fumble the ball after a long reception at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville. Bulls ready to visit Huskies Associated PressSTORRS, Conn. Winless Connecticut resumes its season on Saturday against South Florida with a new coach and a new quarterback leading the Huskies into their first game in the new American Athletic Conference. T.J. Weist took over the program on an interim basis when Paul Pasqualoni was fired following the teams 41-12 loss at Buffalo on Sept. 28, which dropped UConn to 0-4. Not surprisingly, Weist has pitched the homecoming game against the 1-4 Bulls as a fresh start for the Huskies. The practices were spirited, Weist said. The players have reacted well. Theyve responded to our challenges of refocusing, of being, as we say, all in buying into everything that were doing to have a successful season. Weist, who had been in his first year as offensive coordinator, says hell continue to call the plays for the nations 119th ranked offense. But he has switched quarterbacks, from junior Chandler Whitmer to Tim Boyle, who turned 19 last week. Boyle will become the first true freshman to start for the Huskies since Dan Orlovsky made his debut in October, 2001. They dont want me to be the young inexperienced freshman, Boyle said. They want me to be an experienced senior, who knows the game plan and can do it really well. Weist will face an old friend in his first game. He and USF coach Willie Taggart were assistants together at Western Kentucky for four years. Taggart notched his first win as a head coach, when the Bulls upset Cincinnati 26-20 in their conference opener. Associated PressSouth Florida head coach Willie Taggart celebrates with fans after the team defeated Cincinnati 26-20 last Saturday in Tampa. SEC East foes battle No. 7 UGA to face test from No. 25 Mizzou Associated PressATHENS, Ga. Georgias Aaron Murray wont be the only accomplished senior quarterback in town Saturday. Murray is the SECs new career leader in passing yards and is on the verge of passing Tim Tebow as the conferences all-time leader in total offense. Those records, plus wins over top 10 teams South Carolina and LSU, have placed Murray in the national spotlight for No. 7 Georgia. James Franklin and No. 25 Missouri also are earning national respect. Franklin threw four touchdown passes to lead Missouri (5-0, 1-0 Southeastern Conference) to a 51-28 win at Vanderbilt last week. The win pushed the Tigers into the Top 25. James is playing pretty well, said Missouri coach Gary Pinkel. This will be another test for him. James performance does not surprise me right now. His leadership is great, and he is kind of what I thought he would be. There are people around him that can make plays. Franklin will lead a balanced Missouri offense against a short-handed Georgia team. Georgia (4-1, 3-0) lost tailback Keith Marshall and two receivers to injuries in last weeks 34-31 overtime win at Tennessee. Marshall and receiver Justin Scott-Wesley were lost for the season with injuries to their right knees. Receiver Michael Bennett will miss at least two weeks after hurting his right knee against the Vols. It definitely hurts but we have a lot of talent and great depth, Murray said. Our receivers position is extremely deep. Its not just three or four guys. We have so many guys who can play this year. No. 17 Florida travels to Death Valley to take on No. 10 LSU Associated PressBATON ROUGE, La. The prospect of lining up against Florida apparently brings back some bad memories for LSUs Odell Beckham Jr. Beckham declined multiple interview requests leading up to Saturday afternoons clash between the No. 17 Gators (4-1, 3-0 SEC) and 10th-ranked Tigers (5-1, 2-1) in Death Valley, even though hes having a stellar season. Hes coming off one of the best games of his career, making nine catches for 179 yards and two touchdowns in a victory at Mississippi State last weekend. He leads the nation in all-purpose yards with 228.2, averaging 21.1 yards each time he touches the ball. Hes even returned a missed field goal for a 100-yard touchdown. The thing is, about this time last year, Beckham had one of the more frustrating days of his career in Gainesville. He fumbled following a deep catch a turnover which cost LSU one of its best scoring chances on a day when points were precious in a 14-6 loss to the Gators. Beckham then refused to speak to reporters for more than a month afterward. Now comes Beckhams chance to exorcise some demons, but hell have to do it against one of the best secondaries in the nation. LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger even warned that the Tigers would have to prepare very hard to be mentally prepared for just how intense this game is going to be. Cornerbacks Loucheiz Purifoy and Vernon Hargreaves III are among the standouts on a Florida defense that has yielded only 152 yards passing per game, the sixth lowest average nationally. Purifoy had a sack, a forced fumble and returned an interception for a touchdown in last weeks 30-10 win against Arkansas. Hargreaves, a freshman, leads the team with three interceptions. Theyre all very talented players, Mettenberger said of Floridas defensive backs. But at the same time, we have some very talented players on the perimeter for us at receiver and I think we can complete some balls on them. Likewise, Florida defenders understand they may be in for one of their toughest tests this season. They definitely go up and get the ball no matter if they are covered or not, Gators safety Jaylen Watkins said of LSUs receivers. Mettenberger is going to put it right on them and give them a chance to get it every time, too. Weve got our work cut out for us this week, but this is what we look forward to as a secondary.High stakesLSU likely cannot afford a second conference loss if it hopes to catch unbeaten Alabama for the SEC West crown and remain a BCS contender. Florida would remain in contention in the SEC East even with what would be its first league loss, but its second overall defeat would dampen the Gators BCS hopes. This is kind of like an elimination game, LSU linebacker Lamin Barrow said. Its like were both playing for our lives right now.

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 7:30 p.m. (ABC) Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500 race 2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Japanese Grand Prix race BASEBALL 4 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles Dodgers at St. Louis Cardinals. NLCS, Game 2 7:30 p.m. (FOX) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox. ALCS, Game 1 NBA PRESEASON BASKETBALL 5 p.m. (NBA) Chicago Bulls vs. Washington Wizards 7:30 p.m. (NBA) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics 1:30 a.m. (NBA) Indiana Pacers vs Houston Rockets BOATING 1:30 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing (Taped) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 12 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma at Texas 12 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Georgia 12 p.m. (ESPN2) Indiana at Michigan State 12 p.m. (ESPNU) Pittsburgh at Virginia Tech 12 p.m. (FS1) Iowa State at Texas Tech 12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Lehigh at Columbia 12 p.m. (SUN) Kansas at Texas Christian 12:30 p.m. (CW) College Football Navy at Duke 3:30 p.m. (CBS) Florida at LSU 3:30 p.m. (ABC) Boston College at Clemson 3:30 p.m. (FOX) Baylor at Kansas State 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Northwestern at Wisconsin 3:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Virginia at Maryland 3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Syracuse at North Carolina State 3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Richmond at James Madison 4 p.m. (FS1) Oregon at Washington 5 p.m. (ESPN) Michigan at Penn State 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at Kentucky 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Georgia Tech at BYU 7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Villanova at Towson 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Bowling Green at Mississippi State 8 p.m. (FS1) Tulsa at Texas-El Paso 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Texas A&M at Mississippi 10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) California at UCLA 10:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Oregon State at Washington State GOLF 9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Portugal Masters, Third Round 2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: SAS Championship, Second Round 5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Frys.com Open, Third Round 12 a.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia, Final Round GYMNASTICS 2 p.m. (NBC) 2013 World Artistic Championships (taped) HOCKEY 7 p.m. (SUN) Pittsburgh Penguins at Tampa Bay Lightning 8 p.m. (NHL) Buffalo Sabres at Chicago Blackhawks MOTORCYCLE RACING 4 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: Malaysian Grand Prix TENNIS 8 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Second Semifinal 4:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Final Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS CROSS COUNTRY 8:30 a.m. Citrus, Crystal River, Lecanto in Whispering Pines Invitational NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Toronto541081710 Tampa Bay43106149 Boston3210474 Ottawa3102489 Montreal42204139 Detroit42204811 Florida523041321 Buffalo50411514 Metropolitan Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh43106159 Carolina 521261013 N.Y. Islanders421151410 Columbus32104107 New Jersey502331118 N.Y. Rangers41302620 Washington413021215 Philadelphia51402612 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Colorado44008133 St. Louis 33006144 Chicago 421151312 Dallas 3210486 Minnesota41124911 Winnipeg523041416 Nashville41302613 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA San Jose44008215 Calgary 530281817 Anaheim 431061411 Vancouver532061616 Phoenix 532061214 Los Angeles532061314 Edmonton413021219 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Fridays Games Los Angeles 2, Carolina 1, SO Phoenix 2, Philadelphia 1 Florida 6, Pittsburgh 3 Chicago 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 Dallas 4, Winnipeg 1 Calgary 3, New Jersey 2 Today Boston at Columbus, 2 p.m. Edmonton at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. Colorado at Washington, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at St. Louis, 8 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Nashville, 8 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Montreal at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Ottawa at San Jose, 10 p.m.Glantz-Culver LineFor Oct. 12 Major League Baseball Playoffs National League FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE Los Angeles-125at St. Louis+115 American League at Boston-135Detroit+125 Odds to Win Series Boston-120Detroit+100 NCAA Football FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Oklahoma-x1113(57) Texas at Michigan St.69(53) Indiana at Virginia Tech79(42) Pittsburgh at UMass24(44) Miami (Ohio) at Clemson2124(62) Boston College Buffalo710(51) at W. Mich. at Ohio1018(53) Cent. Michigan at Army77(55) E. Michigan at Maryland47(44) Virginia at UConn65(41) South Florida at Duke33(57) Navy Troy1617(63) at Ga. St. Texas A&M56(76) at Mississippi at Ball St.1114(62) Kent St. at Miss. St.810(52) Bowling Green at N. Illinois2123(62) Akron at Texas Tech1714(56) Iowa St. at UTSA+31(55) Rice at Wyoming1014(69) New Mexico Stanford108(55) at Utah at BYU47(53) Georgia Tech Nebraska1415(57) at Purdue at Georgia117(64) Missouri Baylor1017(74) at Kansas St. at LSU66(48) Florida at Arizona St.2426(66) Colorado Oregon1013(76) at Washington at UCLA2325(74) California at Wisconsin910(57) Nwestern East Carolina119(54) at Tulane South Carolina75(51) at Arkansas Alabama2727(52) at Kentucky at Colorado St. Pk3(59) San Jose St. at Arkansas St.2424(61) Idaho Michigan12(50) at Penn St. at NC State47(54) Syracuse at Houston109(52) Memphis UAB67(55) at FIU Marshall1311(55) at FAU at TCU2424(45) Kansas at North Texas47(53) Middle Tenn. at Texas St.76(45) La.-Monroe Boise St.76(50) at Utah St. at Wash. St. Pk1(63) Oregon St. Tulsa1010(63) at UTEP at UNLV69(55) Hawaii x-at Dallas NFL Tomorrow FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Kansas City108(40) Oakland Philadelphia31(46) at Tampa Bay Green Bay32(48) at Baltimore Detroit32(44) at Cleveland at Minnesota22(44) Carolina at Houston77(42) St. Louis at N.Y. Jets+22(41) Pittsburgh Cincinnati77(41) at Buffalo at Seattle1313(40) Tennessee at Denver2726(54) Jacksonville at San Fran.1110(41) Arizona at N. England32(50) New Orleans at Dallas35(53) Washington Monday Indianapolis21(50) at San DiegoNFL standingsAMERICAN CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA New England410.8009570 N.Y. Jets320.60098116 Miami 320.600114117 Buffalo 230.400112130 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis410.80013979 Tennessee320.60011595 Houston230.40093139 Jacksonville050.00051163 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore320.600117110 Cleveland320.60010194 Cincinnati320.6009487 Pittsburgh040.00069110 West WLTPctPFPA Denver5001.000230139 Kansas City5001.00012858 Oakland230.40098108 San Diego230.400125129 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East WLTPctPFPA Philadelphia230.400135159 Dallas 230.400152136 Washington130.25091112 N.Y. Giants060.000103209 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans5001.00013473 Carolina130.2507458 Atlanta 140.200122134 Tampa Bay040.0004470 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago420.667172161 Detroit 320.600131123 Green Bay220.50011897 Minnesota130.250115123 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 410.80013781 San Francisco320.60011398 Arizona320.6009195 St. Louis230.400103141 Thursdays Game Chicago 27, N.Y. Giants 21 Sundays Games Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Miami Mondays Game Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Nationwide Dollar General 300 ResultsFriday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) Note: Partial list 1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200 laps, 134 rating, 0 points, $73,940. 2. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 115.8, 43, $57,100. 3. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 133.4, 43, $42,500. 4. (10) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 116.4, 0, $28,675. 5. (15) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 105.6, 0, $23,650. 6. (12) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 94.2, 38, $25,275. 7. (2) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 113.1, 0, $18,310. 8. (7) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 93.8, 37, $22,970. 9. (13) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 88, 35, $21,800. 10. (14) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 85.6, 34, $22,000. 11. (30) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 77.6, 0, $14,050. 12. (11) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 82.9, 32, $19,450. 13. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 103.2, 32, $19,950. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Friday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 4 9 3 CASH 3 (late) 7 8 3 PLAY 4 (early) 0 6 8 9 PLAY 4 (late) 3 7 5 8 FANTASY 5 7 17 23 31 36 MEGA MONEY 2 13 19 32 MEGA BALL 18 MEGA MILLIONS 3 27 37 45 48 MEGA BALL 46 Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Thursdays winning numbers and payouts: Fantasy 5: 10 14 17 24 36 5-of-51 winner$209,086.94 4-of-5301$112.00 3-of-59,111$10.00 SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 B3 third play of the second half to pull the Pirates within 16-14 following a failed two-point conversion. We knew coming in No. 17 (Reynolds) is a playmaker and No. 12 (Ryan) could chuck it, Wiles said. The Pirates got the ball back four plays later after senior linebacker Destin Dawsy pounced on a Raiders fumble to set Crystal River up at Santa Fes 45. After a 9-yard run by Antonio Franklin the longest gain of the night on the ground for the team the Pirates had an incompletion, a dropped pass by Reynolds and then an interception by the Raiders Lee Washington on fourth down to end a promising possession. Reynolds scored a measure of redemption by picking off a fourth-down pass by Santa Fes Marcus Archer but Crystal River went three-and-out and the Raiders went 69 yards in four minutes helped by a 15-yard personal foul penalty on the Pirates and made it 23-14 on Archers five-yard scoring scamper. In the first half, Santa Fe raced out to a 16-0 lead behind a two-yard score by Tray Presley and three short field goals by Austin Maurice. The Pirates, having no success running the ball, went to a pass-heavy hurry-up offense on their final possession of the first half that ended in the end zone when Collin Ryan hooked up with Rodney Vickers on a 14-yard strike. Reynolds ran it in for the two-point conversion to make the halftime score 16-8. There was this illusion that (the players) thought Santa Fe was a bad team, Varnadore said. Theyre not, theyre a physical team....Were going to fix that and the kids who want to fix that on Monday will be the kids who play. Ryan, a Pirates junior, went 10 of 22 passing for 189 yards, two touchdowns and four interceptions. For Santa Fe, Kenyatta Paterson intercepted two passes while Jermari Ford and Washington each had one. Austin Gay recovered a fumble. Archer was a dual threat for Santa Fe, rushing 13 times for 87 yards and a TD, while also throwing for 71 yards and an interception. Presley carried the ball a game-high 23 times for 72 yards. Crystal River plays 7:30 p.m. Friday at Gainesville Eastside in another District 5A-5 contest.Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle sports editor. He can be emailed at jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or reached at 352-564-2928. of bad spots. They had to come back and answer the bell, Citrus head coach Rayburn Greene said of his defense. They showed a lot of heart and guts tonight. Moore also showed heart and composure. His scramble out of the pocket and throw to find wide receiver Sam Franklin in the end zone with 4:04 left in the third quarter proved to be the game-winner. I seen Des (Desmond Franklin) was covered and I looked over to Sam and fired a jump ball, Moore said of the play. Sams 6 what else could you ask for? The Hurricanes host county rival Lecanto at 7:30 p.m. Friday. up the punt block and one of Autrys picks on its ensuing couple of drives. After Brattin shanked a 6-yard punt from the Tiger 9-yard line later in the third, it looked like the downpour would continue for the Tigers. But sophomore Quay Smith scooped a fumble in the North Marion backfield and returned it to inside the Colt 5. An illegal block penalty brought the ball back to midfield, but with the help of a 20-yard pass from Jones (5 for 15 passing, 63 yards) to junior running back Bubba Sims the Tigers still cashed on an 8-yard scoring rush by junior Kane Parks with three minutes remaining in the quarter. Midway into the first quarter, Jones lost the ball on a sack by senior Brandon Charles, and junior Shawn Gibbs recovered at the Tiger 5, allowing senior running back Derrick Harmon to put his team on the board one play later. The teams combined for five first downs and 86 yards in the opening half. Sims, a junior who led the area in rushing with 910 yards entering the game, had a game-high 64 yards on 19 touches. Colts junior James Allen paced his team with 56 yards and a touchdown on 13 carries. Sophomore Zahid Hujurat had a team-high 10 solo tackles for his Tigers. Dunnellon senior cornerback Anthony Small nearly came up with a pick 6 for Dunnellon shortly before halftime, which would have tied the score at 7-7. There were just physical and strong, and we couldnt get the ball in the middle of the field, Dunnellon head coach Frank Beasley said. They stoned us on the run there. Then we got to the third quarter and it just kind of rolled on us. Weve got two big games left, so were gonna come back and get to work. Thats just what we do. TURNOVERSContinued from Page B1 MATT PFIFFNER /ChronicleCrystal River senior Ty Reynolds tries to tackle Santa Fes Kenyatta Paterson during the first half of the Pirates 30-14 loss to the Raiders. OUTRACEContinued from Page B1 CALLContinued from Page B1 Kyle Busch wins Nationwide Series race Associated PressCONCORD, N.C. Kyle Busch proved hes still the man to beat on the Nationwide Series particularly when it comes to Charlotte Motor Speedway. Busch raced to his 11th Nationwide victory of the year Friday night, giving him a season sweep on the 1 1/2-mile track. Busch edged Nationwide title contenders Austin Dillon and Sam Hornish Jr. to win for the eighth time in the series at his favorite track. Coupled with his five Truck Series wins at track, he broke the track victory record with 13. I feel like Ive really taken to this place over the years, Busch said. I have it figured out in Camping Truck and Nationwide but I seem to have a little bit of a struggle on the Cup side. Well see if we cant change that around on Saturday. Id like to score my first Cup Series win here. Busch and wife Samantha donated the winnings from the race to the Pretty in Pink Foundation that provides financial assistance and support to underinsured and uninsured North Carolinians with breast cancer. The victory pushed Buschs series record to 62. He has 19 victories this year in NASCARs three national series, also winning four times each in Cup and Truck. Overall, he has 124 victories in the three series, winning 28 times in Cup and 34 in the Truck circuit. The win wasnt quite as easy as his Nationwide victory at the track in May when he led 186 of the 200 laps. Busch, who started from the pole, only led 36 laps this time after struggling during the first half of the race. He took the lead from Hornish with eight laps to go and pulled away. Its very frustrating to be leading with 10 laps to go and to get blown away by the 54 car, Hornish said. Busch said he stole a page from Kyle Larson, who ran well at the top of the track for most of the night before nicking the wall late and finishing 13th. Its good to be young and dumb, Busch said with a laugh. He taught us old wily veterans something. He drove past me and I said, I better try that. The night ended the same way it began in the points standings with Dillon holding an eight-point lead over Hornish. Hornish finished a spot behind Dillon in third, but received bonus points for leading the most laps essentially making Friday nights race a push.

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Soccer team clinches first in World Cup qualifying group Associated PressKANSAS CITY, Kan. Graham Zusi and Jozy Altidore scored second-half goals to give the United States a 2-0 victory over Jamaica on Friday night and clinch first place for the Americans in their World Cup qualifying group for the third straight cycle. The sides had played to a stalemate through the first 77 minutes before Alejandro Bedoya got the ball on the wing. He crossed to Zusi, whose shot from about 12 yards beat goalkeeper DuWayne Kerr and ignited his home-team crowd of 18,467 decked out in red, white and blue. Fans packed into Sporting Park had barely settled back down before Edgar Castillo, like Zusi a secondhalf substitute, found Altidore in front of an open net for another goal in the 81st minute. Altidore scored for his sixth straight international start. The U.S. (6-2-1), which clinched its seventh straight World Cup berth last month, has 19 points in North and Central American and Caribbean qualifying and a four-point lead over second-place Costa Rica (4-2-3), which lost 1-0 at third-place Honduras (4-3-2). Jamaica (0-5-4), whose only World Cup appearance was in 1998, was eliminated. Zusi, who stars for Sporting KC, had entered at the start of the second half for Landon Donovan and was cheered wildly by his home fans. He returned the passion after he scored his second international goal, pumping his fist and celebrating with his teammates. Altidore extended his own team record by scoring in his sixth straight games. The goal was his eighth of the year and his fourth in World Cup qualifiers. It was another bitter defeat to the U.S. for Jamaica, which lost 2-1 on June 7 in Kingston when Brad Evans scored in second-half stoppage time. The Reggae Boyz fell to 1-13-8 against the U.S., including 1-5-6 in qualifiers. Still alive at the onset at least mathematically Jamaica pressed the attack in the opening minutes, dominating possession and pestering goalkeeper Tim Howard. Demar Phillips sent a free kick toward the goal that Howard got his mitts on, and Evans managed to clear it just before Darren Mattocks could get his foot on it in front of an open goal. Jamaica had precious few decent scoring looks the rest of the night.B4SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Panthers fall in final moments at Mitchell TIMPORSON CorrespondentPORT RICHEY The Mitchell Mustangs (4-3) pulled off a dramatic 29-25 win over Lecanto on Friday night in the last minute of play to escape with the victory for the home crowd. Despite the tough loss, Panthers head coach McKinley Rolle was proud of the effort. I am very proud of my guys, and I was sure to let them know that, Rolle said. They fought hard and didnt quit. The Mustangs showed no signs of life in the first half while being shut out 13-0 after Lecanto (2-4) rushed in two touchdowns, both from 4 yards out. The second half provided plenty of offense and fireworks as both teams battled back and forth. Mitchell finally put itself on the board on its opening drive of the third qaurter when quarterback Taylor Schenider took an 8-yard run up the right side to pull within six points. Lecantos next drive resulted in a fumble in which the Mustangs would capitalize on. Ryan Marsh gave Mitchell the lead after a 34yard touchdown run. The Panthers answered right back with a 5-yard run of their own on the first play of the fourth quarter for the 19-14 lead. The fireworks would continue on the very next play when Marsh topped his previous run with a 46yard run down the sideline, giving Mitchell the lead yet again. Four minutes later Lecanto regained the lead on a 4-yard scoring run by junior Ardante Anderson. But the play of the night belonged to Mitchell when with just 1:05 left in the game down by 4, Schneider launched a 55-yard pass to Zach Rapaport for the final score of the game. For Lecanto, Anderson finished with 14 rushes for 58 yards and three touchdowns. I told him we were going to be leaning on him tonight Rolle said. Lecanto travels to Citrus this Friday for a 7:30 p.m. kickoff. STEVEMCGUNNIGLE CorrespondentBROOKSVILLE Seven Rivers Christian footballhead coach Dave Iwaniec was surprised albeit not pleasantly by the result of the Warriors division matchup with visiting Ocala Christian Academy Friday night, as the Crusadersreached the end zone on their first five possessions,cruising to a 47-0 win over Seven Rivers. The Warriors (0-6, 0-5 in Sunshine State Athletic Conference, North Division)mustered just 34 yards of total offense while gaining one first down on the night. Seven Rivers also turned the ball over twice. Ocala Christian, on the other hand, put on an impressive offensive display, led by quarterback Trevor Smith. Smith finished 12-for-15 passing for 214 yards and three touchdowns, while also rushing for three scores on nine carries for 49 yards. From their own 48-yard line, it took the Crusaders (2-4, 2-3) just two minutes on the opening drive to start the rout. After picking up a pair of first downs, Smith found David Cizmadia deep down the right sideline behind Seven Rivers coverage for a 38-yard touchdown. Ocala Christian consistently started possessions with the ball at midfield or better, while the Warriors offense continued to struggle. A Cizmadia four-yard run made it 14-0, then a Seven Riversfumbled snap while going for it on fourth down led to a 14-yard pass from Smith to Nick Weitloff for another score to bring it to 20-0 at the end of the first quarter. It was good until we got off the bus. It wasnt what we expected, Iwaniec said. We thought we could really win this football game this week. A 35-0 halftime disadvantage led to a running clock throughout the second half, as Seven Rivers held Ocala Christian scoreless for the third quarter. Smith passed for a touchdown and rushed for another in the fourth (the Warriors blocked both point after attempts) to round out the 47-0 final. We cant move the football right now, said Iwaniec, although Will (Ellis), our eighth-grade quarterback, came in and completed his first high school pass and went 5-for-10, so thats a good night for him. Ellis spread it out to four different receivers in the second half, but the running game stalled. And once again, Seven Rivers was outmatched athletically and physically. Were undersized, were getting beat at the line of scrimmage, and weve got a bunch of dinged up kids, Iwaniec said. John Mazza and Tony Latorraca each had sacks for the Warriors. Seven Rivers will travel to Ocoee to face Central Florida Christian Academy Friday for a 7:30 p.m. start. Panthers double up Penguins Associated PressSUNRISE Brad Boyes scored two goals, Tomas Fleischmann had a goal and three assists, and the Florida Panthers snapped a three-game losing streak with a 6-3 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins in their home opener on Friday night. Aleksander Barkov, Jonathan Huberdeau, and Kris Versteeg also scored for Florida and Jacob Markstrom stopped 36 shots. Pascal Dupuis, Craig Adams, and Evgeni Malkin scored for Pittsburgh, which lost for the first time in four games. Jeff Zatkoff made 24 saves in his NHL debut.Coyotes 2, Flyers 1PHILADELPHIA Oliver Ekman-Larsson scored the winner for Phoenix with 12.9 seconds left in the second period and Thomas Greiss made the lead stand up in the third period to lift the Coyotes to a 2-1 win over the Philadelphia Flyers. Greiss made 36 saves and Rob Klinkhammer opened the scoring for Phoenix at 2:41 of the first. Max Talbot scored the lone goal for the punchless Flyers, who have only six goals this season and dropped to 1-4. Kings 2, Hurricanes 1RALEIGH, N.C. Jeff Carter scored the shootout winner to lift the Los Angeles Kings to a 2-1 victory over the Carolina Hurricanes. Dwight King also scored for the Kings while Jonathan Quick made 27 saves. Jeff Skinner had Carolinas goal while Cam Ward stopped 36 shots. Quick stopped Nathan Gerbe, Alexander Semin and Skinner in the shootout to make Carters goal hold up as the winner. Ward, Carolinas No. 1 netminder, has yet to win a game this season both of the Hurricanes victories have come with back-up Anton Khudobin in net.Blackhawks 3, Islanders 2CHICAGO Michal Handzus scored the goahead goal 6:45 into the second period and the Chicago Blackhawks held on for a 3-2 win over the New York Islanders. Chicagos Jonathan Toews and rookie Joakim Nordstrom connected in the first period, while Duncan Keith had two assists. Nordstroms goal was his first in the NHL. Josh Bailey scored at 19:06 of the first period and Kyle Okposo scored 49 seconds later for the Islanders (2-1-1), who lost their first game in regulation. Chicagos Nikolai Khabibulin made 17 saves and New Yorks Kevin Poulin finished with 25 as both goaltenders made their first starts this season.Stars 4, Jets 1WINNIPEG, Manitoba Tyler Seguin had two goals and two assists to lead the Dallas Stars to a 4-1 victory over the Winnipeg Jets. Seguin came into the game with only one assist this season in the two games Dallas had played. The No. 2 overall pick in the 2010 NHL draft was traded to the Stars by Boston in July. Alex Chiasson and Jamie Benn also scored for Dallas, which last played Saturday at home. The Jets (2-3-0) are below .500 after Thursdays 2-1 loss in Minnesota. Benn had two assists and Chiasson had one. Blake Wheeler scored his first goal of the season for the Jets in the third period. Associated PressJamaica forward Ryan Johnson, left, and U.S. defender Brad Evans, right, head the ball Friday in the second half of a World Cup qualifier soccer match at Sporting Park in Kansas City, Kan. The United States won 2-0. CARLMCDERMOTT CorrespondentINVERNESS On a beautiful fall day on the Lakeside golf course the girls teams from Lecanto and Citrus met for the final match before this Mondays district championship. The Hurricanes remained undefeated in match play as they came away with a 205-224 victory over the Panthers. Citrus coach Dave Hamilton was thrilled with the outcome of a very successful regular season. This is the first time in a long time we have gone undefeated, maybe the first time ever, Hamilton said. Sophomore Camrin Kersh kept up her stellar play as she shot a match-low 45 for the nine holes to win another medal. She had 3 pars for the round. Kersh was followed by fellow sophomore Sarah Taulbee with a 52. Rounding out the Hurricanes scoring was Caitlin Johnston with a 53 and Kayla Woodard with a 55. On the Panthers side, senior Chynna Liu came in with a 48 that included 2 pars. Sophomore Madieson Pollazo carded a 54 and Kierah Tettenburn had a 57. A 65 by Jessica Fee closed out the scoring. Lecanto coach Doug Warren feels his team is not playing golf up to their potential. We are struggling going into the districts. Our recent scores are not indicative of how we can play, Warren said. Coach Hamilton is not convinced he has the superior squad for this years district match and still believes his team needs to look out for the Panthers. Were playing well, Hamilton said. I feel we are getting there but Lecanto has set the bar very high over the past few years. I still feel they are the team to beat. He went on to say how much he has enjoyed this season. These girls are a joy to coach. They have overcome a lot of adversity but have hung in there. They make my job easy, Hamilton said. Both the Hurricanes and the Panthers next take to the links on Monday along with Crystal River and South Sumter for the district tournament. Citrus remains unbeaten Koepka leads Frys.comSAN MARTIN, Calif. After a year spent traveling the world, Brooks Koepka suddenly is in a position to play a lot more golf at home. In his first regular PGA Tour event, Koepka surged to the top of the leaderboard Friday in the Frys.com Open with a 7-under 64, giving him a one-shot lead over Jason Kokrak going into the weekend at CordeValle. Kokrak, a runner-up at this event last year, hit 6-iron to the par-5 ninth to a foot for eagle and a 65. Koepka, a 23-year-old Floridian, received a sponsors exemption into the PGA Tour season opener between stops in Scotland and Shanghai. He had no status at the start of the year after failing to advance beyond the second stage of Q-school last year. Instead of trying to qualify for Web.com Tour events, Koepka packed his bags and passport for a 15-country journey that has served him well.Lee maintains leadKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia South Koreas Ilhee Lee maintained the lead in the LPGA Malaysia, and 18-year-old American Lexi Thompson shot an 8-under 63 to move within one. Lee had a 65 to reach 13-under 129 at Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club. Thompson surged on the back nine with four birdies and an eagle.Faldo fails to finish Champions eventCARY, N.C. Larry Nelson shot his age for a share of the lead in the SAS Championship, while Nick Faldo failed to finish the round in his first regular Champions Tour event. The 66-year-old Nelson had a 6under 66 to join Russ Cochran and Mark Mouland atop the leaderboard at Prestonwood. Faldo was 1 over after 12 holes when he withdrew because of an elbow injury. GolfBRIEFS

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Associated PressEDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson mourned the death of his young son Friday, while words of support poured in from all corners of the sports world. Authorities said a 2-yearold boy died Friday of injuries suffered in an alleged child abuse case in South Dakota, and a person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press the boy was Petersons son. Lincoln County States Attorney Tom Wollman confirmed the death of the child, who had been in critical condition in a hospital with severe head injuries since Wednesday. The boy died at 11:43 a.m. at Sanford USD Medical Center in Sioux Falls after being removed from life support, Wollman said. Wollman said hell review police and medical reports before making further decisions about criminal charges, possibly by early next week. Joseph Patterson, 27, was charged with aggravated assault and aggravated battery in the childs death. He had a court appearance Friday and was ordered held on $750,000 cash bond. Peterson declined to talk about the case after practice Friday, and prosecutors and police in South Dakota declined to confirm the boy was his son. However, a person with knowledge of the situation confirmed the connection to the AP on condition of anonymity because Peterson had requested privacy. Speaking to reporters about an hour after the time of death, Peterson said he was certain hell play Sunday against Carolina. He smiled politely and spoke softly while taking questions at his locker. Ill be ready to roll, focused, Peterson said. I will be playing Sunday, without a doubt. Peterson is second in the NFL with 421 yards rushing and first in the league with five touchdowns. Eagles head coach faces team he turned down Associated PressPHILADELPHIA If Chip Kelly hadnt turned the Tampa Bay Buccaneers down, Greg Schiano might not be in the NFL. The two coaches can talk about their career paths when the Philadelphia Eagles (2-3) visit the Buccaneers (0-4) on Sunday. Two years ago, the Glazer family tried to lure Kelly away from Oregon. The three Glazer brothers and general manager Marc Dominik met Kelly on the road while he was on a recruiting trip, made a pitch and offered him the job in Tampa. I was impressed with the three Glazer brothers and impressed with Marc Dominik, Kelly recalled. But it was more a decision to stay at Oregon than it was to go anywhere in the NFL. I didnt want to leave the staff at Oregon at that time and I didnt want to leave the players at Oregon at that time. I didnt have NFL aspirations. Schiano was having similar feelings about leaving Rutgers. He took over a struggling program in central New Jersey and turned it into a Big East contender during an 11-year run with the Scarlet Knights. Several teams expressed interest in Schiano over the years, but he wasnt ready to make the jump to the NFL. It took Kelly saying No to the Buccaneers to convince him it was his time. Thats kind of the reason I knew I really wanted the job, Schiano said in a conference call this week. I really loved my time at Rutgers and had plenty of opportunities to go elsewhere, and at the end I just never felt like it was right. One of the things that actually really led me to believe that this was the time was when I thought that Chip had accepted the job, I was angry. I was disappointed is a better word probably. So that kind of told me that I did want it. So Kelly remained at Oregon and Schiano accepted the challenge of trying to build the Buccaneers into winners. Tampa was coming off a 4-12 season under Raheem Morris and hadnt won a playoff game since capturing the Super Bowl title in 2002. Sometimes you dont realize you want something until you dont have it, Schiano said. Then in a few hours there was an opportunity to maybe be involved with it again and thats when I kind of said, You know what? I really do want to do this, and fortunately it worked out. The Buccaneers started 1-3 under Schiano before winning five of six. They were 6-4 and in the playoff mix until a five-game losing streak knocked them out of it. Now theyre winless and in disarray. Still, Schiano has no regrets. Its a great organization that I work for, great ownership, a great GM in Mark Dominik and Im excited, he said. I think we have a good football team. We struggled to start the season but Im optimistic going forward that were going to play good football. Meanwhile, Kelly turned down the Cleveland Browns and Eagles last January before changing his mind and accepting Philadelphias offer to replace Andy Reid. He doesnt second-guess himself. I dont look at decisions as tough. I dont look at decisions as difficult, he said. You get all the information necessary and you make the decision and move forward. We had an outstanding year staying at Oregon, and those memories we had there, those players that I got an opportunity to coach, that staff I was with, I love those guys and still love those guys. I think it was a good decision for me at that point in time.NATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 B5 LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 PROCEEDS BENEFIT: LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes up front reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation Inn Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 One Rake at a Time FOOD PROVIDED BY: 000FXJC ROCK CRUSHER CANYON ROCK CRUSHER CANYON CRYSTAL RIVER, FL CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 000FV8Z 000G7MD 18 Hole Championship Golf Course Citrus Springs, FL Rated One of Floridas Finest Public Courses 352-465-0986 Discover the Hidden Treasure in El Diablo Fazio Designed Golf Course Play Now through Dec. 1st ONLY $28.00 We Support the American Cancer Society Call today or Go Online. www.eldiablogolf.com Before Greg Schiano, right, became Tampa Bays head coach, Philadelphia Eagles head coach Chip Kelly, left, turned down the Buccaneers. Kelly also turned down the Browns and Eagles a year later before changing his mind and leaving Oregon. When the Buccaneers and Eagles meet Sunday, the two coaches will be on opposite sidelines.Associated Press Kellys choice paved road for Schiano NFL BRIEFSBuccaneers confirm third player has MRSATAMPA The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have announced that a third player has been diagnosed with MRSA, a day after announcing offensive lineman Carl Nicks is being treated for a recurrence of the staph infection. Coach Greg Schiano declined to identify the player on Friday, saying the player requested his name not be released. NFL.com reported the player was cornerback Johnthan Banks. He was the only new addition Friday to the injury report, which said the rookie did not practice due to illness. Banks is listed as questionable for Sundays game against Philadelphia. Nicks, who along with Lawrence Tynes was diagnosed as having MRSA in August, also sat out practice. He is questionable to play against Philadelphia. The team flew in an infectious disease expert to answer questions players had before practice.Jets Winslow suspended four games by NFLFLORHAM PARK, N.J. New York Jets tight end Kellen Winslow Jr. has been suspended without pay for four games by the NFL for violating the leagues policy on performance enhancing substances. Winslow, the teams leading receiver with 17 catches, will immediately begin his suspension, which was announced by the league Friday. He will be eligible to return to the Jets active roster on Nov. 4, following New Yorks game against New Orleans on Nov. 3.From wire reports Peterson mourns death of 2-year-old son

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B6SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEAUTORACING Log on today to see if the Hurricanes, Pirates or Panthers won their game last night. to see if the Hurricanes, Pirates or Panthers won their game last night. chronicleonline.com your news. anywhere. anytime. 000G9DK 000G9DK Jefferson enjoys time racing in Open Wheel ModsSEANARNOLD CorrespondentWayne Jefferson loves the Open Wheel Modified class. He got his racing nickname Rocket Man while racing street stocks. And hes competed successfully in Super Late Models, even before getting into the Open Wheel Modifieds. But the 42-year-old Jefferson, who lives just down the street from Clearwaters Showtime Speedway, found his passion for the Modifieds around 1999. Its a lot more down-to-Earth type of racing as far as financially and parts and technology, said Jefferson, who compared the transition from a Late Model to a modified as going from a Cadillac to a pickup truck. The Super Late Models are so technical, its all about the money and technicalities of everything. I had just as much success in the Late Models, but I just didnt have as much fun. Me and my buddies can hang out and drink beer after the races now, he continued. Not that you cant do that with the Late Models, its just so much more serious. Youve got to have 10 guys and all this equipment. But you can bring your modified here on an open trailer with one guy and be just as competitive as anybody. Therere more working guys in this class. Its still a real racecar, but its not near as technical or expensive to do it. I just took a feel to the cars. Its weird, they just fit me. They like Jefferson too. Hes won five championships in the class two at DeSoto Super Speedway and three at Charlotte County. His personal highlight is winning and breaking a track record at Tennessees famed Bristol Motor Speedway in 2011. He also won Ocala Speedways Blue/Gray 200 for a $5,000 payout in 2007. Jefferson estimates he wins at least one to two races a year at Citrus. This year in Inverness, he won a Florida United Promoters Series event in May, and later scored a feature win in local season action. Last Saturday, in a new car owned by Jim Edwards, he finished second. In the FUPS win, Jefferson got out of his car during a red flag to check his tire. Initially, FUPS officials ruled it a penalty. But Jefferson and his crew pointed out that there was no such rule, and his lead position was restored before racing resumed. Afterward, FUPS made a rule banning drivers from exiting their cars during races. I wasnt trying to cheat the system, Jefferson said. We used to be allowed to get out of the car everywhere I went. At DeSoto, they used to let you have a tire gauge in your car. Thats why I didnt think nothing about it. Thats a new series, and they just didnt realize we had been allowed to do that. Even here, (Citrus general manager Don) Critter (Cretty) said they allow them to get out sometimes. The opportunity doesnt arise that often. Jefferson may occasionally get out of a car, but hes never away from racing. Hes been around a track since his mother was pregnant with him. Ive been a part of it my whole life, he said. With Showtime right down the street from my house, I ride out there during the week and help. Ill cut grass, clean up, do whatever they need. I just like being around it. Even if I wasnt racing anymore, Id still be helping somebody and watching. Jeffersons Rocket Man pseudonym came from a friend and an early racing team. When I first started, racing Street Stocks, me and my buddy called our team Rocket Ship Motorsports, just being funny. Four or five of us had a shop together, so we started calling our whole team Rocket Ship Motorsports, and we had T-shirts and everything. Well one of my buddies, who was always winning races, came in the shop one day and he said, Rocket Man! And its been stuck to me ever since. Jefferson competes against Troy Robinson, who is known as the Batman. I love that stuff, Jefferson said. People dont know who Troy Robinson is, necessarily, but they know who Batman is. Jefferson doesnt need a big team these days. He has three regulars Tony Carreno, Terry Strauser and Robbie Booze who stay by his side, and hes always joined by his young son Chase. Thats our crew, Jefferson said. Its a small deal. Were all friends outside of racing and work, so we hang out even when were not at the track. Jefferson said hes friends with most of his competitors as well. I love this class. I have fun with it. Im good with all the guys and drivers that we race with. Open Wheel Modifieds are next scheduled to run at Citrus on Oct. 26. The Halloweenthemed night will include $5 grandstand admission for adults and free entry for kids under 12. Citrus County Speedway scheduleKEY SLM=Super Late Models OWM=Open Wheel Modifieds SP=Sportsman MMS=Mod Mini Stocks SS=Street Stocks MS=Mini Stocks Ps=Pure Stocks HD=Hornet Division PF8=Pro Figure-8s F8=Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s FUPS=Florida United Promoters Series TBARA=Tampa Bay Area Racing Association DAARA=Daytona Antique Auto Racing Association DWARFS S.E.C.K.S.=South East Champ Kart Series MIDGETS Oct. 12: SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD Oct. 19: TBARA, SS, PS, F8, MIDGETS Oct. 26: OWM, SP, SS, PS, MS, PF8 SPECIAL Nov. 2: FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD, LEGENDS, BANDOLEROS Nov. 9: OWM, SP, MS, PS, DWARFs, PF8Points standingsSuper Late Models Car #NamePoints 98Herb Neumann Jr.520 1Dale Sanders507 23Todd Brown499 123Jon Brown451 110Steve Dorer421 Open Wheel Mods Car #NamePoints 01Herb Neumann Jr.928 0Troy Robinson903 2Steven Hise879 18Shane Butler857 43Gator Hise565 Mod Mini Stocks Car #NamePoints 33Chris Allen1,140 44Michael Lawhorn1,091 99Leroy Moore1,035 24Phil Edwards966 47Richard Kuhn962 Sportsman Car #NamePoints 17Mike Bell941 66Andy Nicholls876 114John Buzinec823 4Jay Witforth807 01Tom Posavec727 Street Stocks Car #NamePoints 3Curtis Flanagan1,879 48Dora Throne1,798 16J.D. Goff1,640 8Tim Wilson1,347 6Phillip Robinson839 Pure Stocks Car #NamePoints 72Karlin Ray1,657 3Jason Waller1,643 45James Johnston1,639 44Glen Colyer1,435 32Mike Autenrieth948 Mini Stocks Car #NamePoints 98Kevin Stone1,827 73Jason Terry1,792 22Mark Patterson1,609 11Jerry Daniels1,570 20Shannon Kennedy1,326 Pro Figure-8s Car #NamePoints 6Joey Catarelli406 94Charlie Meyer394 15William Stansbury282 86Justin Meyer202 33Pnut Higginbotham192 Reg. Figure-8s Car #NamePoints 82Jimmy Kruse686 5Pnut Higginbotham674 6Ronnie Schrefiels664 51Travis Nichols574 45James Johnston278 BUTCH CRAWFORD /Special to the ChronicleWayne Jefferson, of Clearwater, is a huge fan of competing in the Open Wheel Modifieds class. SEANARNOLD CorrespondentTonight brings the first of the final two Super Late Model points races of the season, as the prestigious class runs 50 laps at the Citrus County Speedway. Street Stocks, Pure Stocks and Hornets are also part of the racing card, as is the Modified Mini Stock class, which appears for the first time in a month. At the top of the Late Model standings, local legend Herb Neumann Jr., a 12-time overall champion who also is leading the Open Wheel Modified class, is after his seventh championship in the division since 2001. Neumann, of Inverness, leads Lecantos Dale Sanders by 13 points. The pair each have a Late Model feature win this year. Todd Brown trails Sanders by eight points in third place, and sits 30 points ahead of his son, Jon Brown. With a 49-point advantage on his friend Michael Lawhorn, Bushnells Chris Allen (three feature wins, four heat wins) is poised to bring home his first championship in the Modified Mini Stock class. Allen won a title in the Bomber class (now Pure Stocks) his rookie season in 1992. Curtis Flanagan picked up his 47th win in his black No. 3 and his 10th of the year in last Saturdays Street Stock feature. Hes on his way to collecting a fourth championship in the class, as he leads second-place Dora Thorne by 81 points. Karlin Ray, a 16-year-old up-and-comer from Floral City, is leading Jason Waller by 14 points in the Pure Stock standings. Ray (six heat wins) has seven feature wins, and Waller, also a relative newbie to the class, has a secondbest four feature wins. Heat races begin at 5:30 p.m. Grandstand gates open at 4 p.m. Prices are $13 for adults, $9 for seniors and students and $5 for children age 11 and under (children under 42 inches are free). Pits admissions are $25 for adults, $20 for children 11 and under, and free for children under 5 years old. Super Late Model race highlights tonights action Rocket man Wayne Jefferson

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Afew weeks ago, I spent a Sunday afternoon at an outlet center in Orlando. I love outlets and malls, even if Im not interested in buying things (which is a big if, since Im always searching for that shiny, cozy, silky, whatevery thing that will once and for all completely satisfy my soul. But thats a topic for another day.) However, my experience is always ruined by the come-ons from kiosk sales people who want to clean my jewelry (and sell me their product) or soften my skin with natural sea salt from the Holy Land (and sell me their product) and practically pounce on people as they walk by. I hate being rude, but I also hate being suckered into participating in their sales spiel and then disappointing /making them mad by not buying their product. So, Ive devised a surefire tactic to avoid their come-ons without being obvious in my rudeness. Whenever I see a kiosk that I anticipate will have RELIGION Section CSATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE RELIGION BRIEFS Dalai Lama speaks to thousands in Atlanta ATLANTA The Dalai Lama told an audience in suburban Atlanta to focus on love and to be grateful for all that they have. The Tibetan Buddhist leader spoke to thousands of people Tuesday at the Gwinnett Center arena. The focus of this visit is secular ethics, which is described as a system of shared principles that go beyond religious differences while still respecting and valuing the significance of religion in peoples lives. The Dalai Lama has held the title of presidential distinguished professor at Emory University since October 2007 and has visited Emorys campus five times. The Dalai Lama was scheduled to participate in a series of lectures and panel discussions through Thursday. Chaplains pray for end to shutdown WASHINGTON Can prayer move an unmovable object, such as the U.S. Congress? As the federal government remains partially shut down and about to hit a debt ceiling, Senate Chaplain Barry Black continues to appeal to God in his daily invocations. Before Tuesdays Senate session, he prayed, May the tirades of majorities or minorities be equally impotent to sway our lawmakers from doing what is best for America. He also prayed that the senators will be ethical as they strive to match their words with deeds. On the other side of the Capitol, House Chaplain Father Patrick Conroy prayed that lawmakers will use the power they have to help their constituents who possess little or no power, and whose lives are made all the more difficult by a failure to work out serious differences. Diocese to sue again over health mandate PITTSBURGH The Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh is suing the federal government again seeking to overturn a looming requirement that employers offer contraceptive coverage in employee health plans. A judge in November dismissed a previous lawsuit, saying the diocese has not been harmed by the legislation and that the government had promised to take steps to address religious objections. But the new federal lawsuit claims such promises have proven to be empty words and said the final regulations that take effect Jan. 1 are worse than the proposed regulations that prompted last years lawsuit. The Department of Justice, which will defend the new suit, did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Jews ready to celebrate unique Hanukkah NEW YORK This year, for the first time in living memory, Hanukkah will start on Thanksgiving, creating a Jewish-American frenzy. Theres the commerce: A 9-yearold New York boy invented the Menurkey and raised more than $48,000 on Kickstarter for his trademarked Turkey-shaped menorah. Woodstock-inspired T-shirts have a turkey perched on the neck of a guitar and implore Days of Light, Liberty & Latkes. The creators nabbed the trademark to Thanksgivukkah. Lets not forget the food mashups commemorating the staying power of the Pilgrims and the fighting prowess of the Jews, along with the miracle of one nights oil lasting eight days. Pumpkin latkes, apple-cranberry sauce and deep-fried turkey, anyone? The Jewish calendar makes Hanukkah appear to drift slightly from year to year, but it hasnt coincided with Thanksgiving for 125 years, and isnt expected to do so again for more than 79,000 years. Nancy KennedyGRACE NOTES See GRACE/ Page C2 From wire reports New church leaders populist style keeps Vatican on its toes Did Francis really consider turning down the job? In an interview with the Rome daily La Repubblica, editor Eugenio Scalfari quoted the pope as saying he was seized by a great anxiety moments after his election and asked the cardinals in the Sistine Chapel to give him a few minutes time to think things over. To make it go away and relax, I closed my eyes and made every thought disappear, even the thought of refusing to accept the position, as the liturgical procedure allows, he was quoted as saying. At a certain point I was filled with a great light. It lasted a moment, but to me it seemed very long. Then the light faded, I got up suddenly and walked into the room where the cardinals were waiting. The pope was quoted as saying he signed the acceptance form and went out on the balcony to be introduced to the world as Pope Francis. But the Rev. Thomas Rosica, who helps with Vatican media relations, later said the interview didnt reflect Francis real words. He said Scalfari neither recorded the conversation nor took notes, reconstructing the conversation from memory and printing it as a verbatim interview. The Vatican doesnt dispute the overall thrust of the interview, which Scalfari said he submitted to Francis for review and which the Vatican newspaper reprinted verbatim. But Rosica said the purported mystical experience recounted by Repubblicaafter the election didnt happen, though Francis himself has said previously and in public that I didnt want to be pope.Can atheists be saved? One of the novelties introduced by Francis has been his daily 7 a.m. Mass in the Vatican hotel, to which groups and individuals are invited. Francis delivers homilies each day, the contents of which are summarized by Vatican Radio. On May 22, he caused no shortage of confusion when he suggested that even atheists could find salvation. According to church teaching, the Catholic Church holds the Associated PressVATICAN CITY ope Francis has grabbed headlines with his off-the-cuff homilies, crowdpleasing one-liners and lengthy interviews during which he has pontificated on everything from the churchs obsession with rules to how he wont judge gays. But his chattiness has gotten him into some trouble, and the Vatican has gone into damage-control mode to clarify, correct or put his comments into context. Heres a look at some of Francis more eyebrowraising comments, and the efforts by the Vaticans spin doctors to address them. See POPE/ Page C2 When Jesuss followers are jerks Pope Francis speaks Friday, Oct. 4, during a meeting with cloistered nuns at the St. Chiara Basilica in Assisi. Pope Francis urged the faithful to follow the example of the 13th-century St. Francis, who renounced a wealthy, dissolute lifestyle to embrace a life of poverty and service to the poor.Associated Press

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Fall activities The Rev. Ronald A. Sutton and Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church of Crystal River invite all to the churchs 129th anniversary and Fall Revival services at 11 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, and 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, Oct. 21-23. The speaker is the Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson, president of the Florida General Baptist Convention Inc. The church is at 2105 N. Georgia Road, Crystal River. Call 352-563-1577. Inverness Church of God will host Family Fall Fest from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at the church, 416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Admission is free. Activities include a hayride, games and prizes, and a chili cook-off. New this year is our Old Country Store where you can purchase various handmade items. The public is invited. Call the church office at 352-726-4524. Joy and Praise Fellowship of Beverly Hills will host its annual Community Festival from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26. Activities will feature carnival-style games, bouncy houses for the kids, good food and live music. All ages are welcome. The fellowship is at 4007 N. Lecanto Highway in the Beverly Plaza adjacent to Papa Johns Pizza. Call 352-527-8612 between 9 a.m. and noon Tuesdays and Thursdays. Hernando United Methodist Churchs oldfashioned Pumpkin Festival is from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486, Hernando. All children are invited to come and enjoy a safe and happy Halloween featuring games, a cupcake walk, hayride, pumpkin painting and more. Come in costume and bring your parents (they can dress in costume too). The event will finish up with a trunk or treat and hot dogs. Everyone is invited to Fall Family Glow Night from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at Reflections Church, which meets at Citrus Springs Middle School. This Fall/Halloween celebration will feature music, games, food and lots of candy, with a special twist. You can wear your Halloween costume or not. All are welcome. Dont forget to bring your GLOW wear and light up the night. For more information, go to www.reflections church.net. First Presbyterian Church of Inverness invites the public to its annual Fall Fest and Trunk or Treat from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct 27, at 206 Washington Ave, Inverness. Join us for Trunk or Treat, hot dogs, hayride, cotton candy, games, bounce house, face painting, and more. Everyone is welcome to join this fun, safe alternative to trick or treat. There is no charge for the event or activities. Call Denise Lay at 352-637-0770. Inverness First United Methodist Churchs Pumpkin Patch continues through Oct. 31 at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, ending with the Trunk or Treat celebration from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31. All proceeds from pumpkin sales go toward the churchs community outreaches and missions. An area is set up for taking family pictures while visiting the patch. Different displays and events from several community services, such as the Citrus County Fire Department, etc., and hayrides available for the public on Saturdays. All events and display times posted. Pumpkin Patch hours are noon to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays (with events and displays scheduled during these times) and noon to 7:30 p.m. Sundays. A Harvest Festival sponsored by First Baptist Church of Floral City will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31, at Floral City fullness of the means of salvation a message that has long been taken to mean that only Catholics can find salvation. But in his homily, Francis said: The Lord has redeemed all of us, all of us, with the Blood of Christ: all of us, not just Catholics. Everyone! Father, the atheists? Even the atheists. Everyone! Rosica issued a lengthy explanatory note a few days later after being inundated with questions about whether Francis was changing church doctrine on salvation. He noted that church teaching also holds that those who through no fault of their own dont know about Jesus but seek God and try to do his will can also attain eternal salvation. Always keep in mind the audience and context of Pope Francis homilies, Rosica cautioned. His words are not spoken in the context of a theological faculty or academy nor in interreligious dialogue or debate. He speaks in the context of Mass.Should the Vatican bank be saved? On April 24, Francis invited members of the Vatican bank to join him for Mass in the hotel. The Institute for Religious Works, as the bank is known, has been plagued by scandals most recently over the arrest of a Vatican monsignor on charges he tried to smuggle some 20 million euro ($26 million) into Italy from Switzerland without declaring it at customs. Given the scandals, the arrival of a reformminded, non-nonsense pope has prompted a flurry of speculation that Francis might shut the bank down. So imagine the headlines that followed his April 24 homily, when he lamented how the church can sometimes become too bureaucratic, too much like an aid group, and that bureaucracies are necessary up to a point. The church isnt an NGO, its a story of love, Francis told the banks staff in the pews. But there are the IOR folks here, excuse me, OK? Everything is necessary, offices are necessary, OK, but theyre only necessary up to a certain point: as a help to this story of love. But when the organization loses this primary place, when the love is gone, the poor church becomes an NGO. And this isnt the way to go. Archbishop Angelo Becciu, under secretary of the Vatican secretariat of state, told the Vatican newspaper a few days later that Francis was by no means hinting that he might shut down the Vatican bank.The Vicar of Christ said what? Sometimes, Francis one-liners dont warrant Vatican clarification, but theyre worth repeating simply because they came from the lips of the Successor of Peter, Vicar of Christ, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church:Francis urged the church to strip itself of its worldy attachment to wealth during his Oct. 4 trip to Assisi and focus instead on the basics of Christs teachings. You might say, Cant we have a more human Christianity, without the cross, without Jesus, without stripping ourselves? he asked rhetorically. In this way wed become pastry-shop Christians, like a pretty cake and nice sweet things. Pretty, but not true Christians.Francis was asked June 7 why he chose to live in the Vatican hotel rather than the fancier Apostolic Palace where his predecessors lived. If I was living alone, isolated, it wouldnt be good for me, he told students of Jesuit schools. A professor asked me the same question, Why dont you go and live there (in the papal apartments)? And I replied: Listen to me, professor, it is for psychiatric reasons.The pope has urged nuns and sisters to be like joyful mothers to the church, caring for its flock, and not act like theyre old maids. It makes me sad when I find sisters who arent joyful, he lamented during his Oct. 4 visit to a cloistered convent in Assisi. They might smile, but with just a smile they could be flight attendants! Given Francis wry sense of humor and willingness to regularly ditch speeches prepared for him, the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said he wants the faithful to know the difference between a pontifical joke and an encyclical, a clever quip in a homily and infallible teaching. There are different genres of expression, some are magisterial and official, others are more pastoral, Lombardi told The Associated Press. They have a different doctrinal value.C2SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLERELIGION 000FUWM Girls Night Out!Saturday, October 12, 2013 VIP Preview 5-6pm Event 6-9pmwww.chronicle-online.com\divanight Plantation on Crystal River9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL or more information call 352-563-5592 www.chronicle-online.com\divanight000FUWM Abitare Paris Salon Alpaca Magic Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Clementines Boutique Complete Family Dentistry Connollys Sod & Nursery Connors Gifts Cotton Club Eclectic Ends Hair Studio Everyones Massage Therapy Services, LLC Frame Design Genesis Womens Center Georgieos Hair Design Goldiggers & Gunslingers Health & Wellcare Services of Florida, Inc. Helene Graham Miche Handbags Himalayan Salt Room Ocala Ideal Health Enrichment Center Inverness Yoga & Wellness Center Jewelry by Ms. Nettee Juice Plus Karma Upscale Resale Boutique La Te Da Boutique Ledger Dentistry Lillian Smith Mary Kay Cosmetics M Hair Studio & the Spa at M Mamas Kuntry Kafe The Little Glass Shack Mez Mer Eyes New Concepts Hair Salon New Empire E-Cigs Nick Nicholas Ford Nick Nicholas Ford/Lincoln Off the Cuff & On The Fly Origami Owl Amber Relaxation Station Sponsored by Crystal Automotive Park Avenue of Hair Design Playtime PinUp Photography Scentsy Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology & Skin Surgery Center Susan Reynolds, Arbonne, Independent Consultant The Garden Shed The New Image Med Spa Thirty-one by Valerie Hodges Timber Lane Chiropractic Tobacco Prevention Florida Health Touch of Glass by Susan Unique Lingerie Vault Jeans Vernon Martin Salon & Spa Virgilio Insurance Services Whalen Jewelers Zen Zone Massage Shopping Relaxation Massage Product Demos Cocktails Hors d oeuvres DJ Fun 000GA3K Join us for the 6th Annual Breast Cancer Awareness FUNdraising Event held poolside at The Plantation of Crystal River Saturday, October 19, 2013 from 6:30pm til ? Tickets are $10 and include Entertainment, Appetizers, Auctions, and one Beer/Wine drink ticket. All Proceeds Benefit Sponsored by: Abitare Salon & Day Spa Spa Bleu at Plantation The Plantation on Crystal River Tickets available at above locations and The Chamber of Commerce aggressive salespeople waiting to attack, I pull out my phone and pretend to be deep in conversation.OK. Ill meet you in five minutes by the fountain. No, the other one. Oh, and they didnt have your size.Uncomfortable, aggressive confrontation avoided. However, what I really want to do is scream: I may want your product, I may even need your product, but your sales techniques turn me off and theres no way on earth that Ill buy it just because youre an annoying jerk! I understand that theyre trying to make a sale and make a living, but I am put off by hard-sell tactics and manipulation. Do you see where Im going with this? It reminds me of how some Christians who, in their zeal to preach the gospel and make disciples as Jesus commanded, end up chasing people away. Trust me. I know what Im talking about. In my early days as a new Christian I badgered people, especially my husband, battering him with the Bible and basically making his life so uncomfortable living with a Jesus freak of a wife that I imagine he probably longed for the comparative comforts of hell. After about a year of my hard-sell jerk for Jesus tactics that actually had the opposite effect on him than what I had intended, I let up. Most likely God had decided that my husband had suffered enough and, although I dont remember how/when /where, he clued me in on what an obnoxious looney toons I was and stopped me from doing any more damage in Jesus name. My husband didnt want what I was trying to sell, and I dont blame him. Eventually, however, he discovered faith on his own, in Gods time, in Gods way. God calls and enables a person to respond. Most likely no one, or at least few people, are coerced, intimidated or forced into the kingdom of God. While its true that faith comes by hearing ... the Word of God (Romans 10:17) and Christians are called to articulate the gospel, we ought not batter people with it. Jesus never browbeat or used pushy sales tactics to draw people to Himself. We have good news of a great Savior who invites people to exchange all of their sin and sorrow and shattered lives for his gift of righteousness and peace, both peace with God and with ourselves. That message of the possibility of a restored, reconciled relationship between individuals and God is shouted most loudly by lives lived joyously and characterized by genuine humility, honestly and repentance. St. Francis of Assisi once said, Preach the gospel at all times; when necessary, use words. I think it boils down to caring about the people around us and earning, not forcing, the right to speak. Attitude is everything. Love is key. People are not targets or tally marks on a score card. Its not about numbers, but about souls. Its not about how loud we can shout our message or how zealously we try to get peoples attention and roping them in, but about letting Gods Spirit do his work and being sensitive to his leading. People wont want our Jesus if we, his people, are pushy confrontational jerks. Nancy Kennedy is the author of Move Over, Victoria I Know the Real Secret, Girl on a Swing, and her latest book, Lipstick Grace. She can be reached at 352-564-2927, Monday through Thursday, or via email at nkennedy @chronicleonline.com. GRACEContinued from Page C1 POPEContinued from Page C1 WEEKLY LINEUP Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in Health & Life./ Tuesdays Read up on all things schoolrelated in the Chronicles Education section./ Wednesdays Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./Fridays See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion section./Saturdays Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays ReligionNOTES See NOTES/ Page C3

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Park. Free food, drinks and more than 30 booths for everyone to enjoy. There will be a Harvest Festival from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2, at Holy Faith Episcopal Church in Blue Cove, Dunnellon. Twenty unique vendors will offer customized childrens books, artwork, handmade dulcimers, jewelry, candy, handbags, wearable fiber art, candles, hand-knit items and more. Call the church at 352489-2685. Inverness Church of God will host the Ladies Fall Camp Meeting on Nov. 1-2. All ladies are invited. Registration is $35 if paid by Oct. 20. After Oct. 20, registration fee is $40. Registration form and schedule can be downloaded from the churchs Facebook page. Completed forms and payment can be mailed to the church or dropped off at the church office. Registration fee includes all worship services with special guest speakers and two Saturday meals. Nursery is provided for ages 3 and younger. Guest speakers are women of God who have developed strengths and added victories through the situations, circumstances and trials of life traveled on this journey. The church is at 416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call the church office at 352-726-4524. Holidaze Crafters of Hernando United Methodist Church will sponsor their Fall Craft Show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16, featuring crafters from all over Citrus County. HUMW will sell home-baked goods and their $7 cookbooks. Breakfast and lunch available. Crafters may still reserve a spot by calling Robin Baker at 352445-1487. The church is at 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Hernando.Sale away Crystal River United Methodist Church will have a church-wide yard sale today at the church at 4801 N. Citrus Ave., to benefit local community outreach projects. The Beverly Hills Community Church Youth Group Estate Sale is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today in the church fellowship hall at 86 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Joy Lutheran Church, at S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala, will have its annual indoor yard sale and bake sale from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, in Swenson Hall. The public is invited to donate furniture, tools, gardening equipment, sports-related items, kitchen and house wares, linens, books, and craft supplies (no clothes, shoes or electronics). Bring yard sale to Swenson Hall from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday or from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday or Friday. Bring baked goods on Friday wrapped for sale and labeled, particularly if they contain nuts. There will be the vintage table for special treasures and a craft and quilt section. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Call Edie Heinzen at 352-854-7817 in regards to the bake sale and Patty Corey at 352-854-0660 regarding the yard sale. The Agape House fundraising sale is from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 25 and 26, at First Baptist Church, 700 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Funds are used to purchase Bibles, toiletries and miscellaneous items. Call the Agape House (Wednesdays) at 352795-7064 or the church at 352-795-3367. The Council of Catholic Women of Our Lady of Grace Church will host its annual Holiday Bazaar and Craft Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, in the Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Christmas and holiday treasures, handmade crafts, jewelry, live plants, books, toys and games, and an array of raffle prizes will be featured. The raffle drawing is at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. It is not necessary to be present to win. Other crafters displaying their wares will be Stretchies by Judith LLC, Embroidery Etc. by Barb, BJ Crafts One Stroke Painting, Chocolates by Vanessa, All That Jazz and Its Under Wraps. Call Fran Wagner at 352-527-0723. The Dunnellon Flea Market will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2, at the First United Methodist Church, 21501 W. State Road 40. Bake sale, cafe, lots of good items with great prices. Furniture, jewelry, glassware, clothes, shoes, handbags, CDs and books. The Ladies Guild of Beverly Hills Community Church will offer handcrafted gift items for the Christmas Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, in Jack Steele Fellowship Hall, 82 Civic Circle. Handmade and crafted items will be for sale including jewelry, knits, books, toys and CDs. A bake sale and refreshments are offered daily. A very popular feature of the bazaar is the white elephant table. People with items to donate are asked that no clothes or appliances larger than toaster ovens be sent. Call the church office at 352746-3620. There will be a yard sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, as a fundraiser for a summer of 2014 missionary trip from Crystal River Church of God to Ecuador. Proceeds will help with transportation costs. The yard sale is at 7755 W Homosassa Trail (in front of Auto Analyst), in Homosassa. The Ladies of Faith Lutheran Church in Lecanto have expanded their 17th Annual Bazaar into a Super Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16, at the Crystal Glen Subdivision, off State Road 44 and County Road 490. This Thrivent-sponsored event will feature handmade crafts and quilts, holiday items, a bake sale, silent auction, trash n treasure items, a re-gifting table, jewelry and books. Ticket holders need not be present to win. Proceeds will be used for charity and missions. Call 352527-3325. Helping Hands Thrift Store, a ministry of Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund the food pantry. The store accepts donations of household items, clothing and small appliances. Call 352-726-1707.Fun & games The public is invited to a Military Card Party on Monday at St. Margarets Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Lunch will be served at 12:15 p.m. Card play begins at 1 p.m. Cost is $12 per player. Make up your table of four or come as a single and we will pair you. For more information or to make a reservation, call Dottie at 352382-3656 or Marilyn at 352746-6583. The Ladies Auxiliary Knights of Columbus Council No. 6168 will host a Bunco Bonanza at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the K of C Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Lecanto. Two levels of play featured: a competitive level for seasoned players and a social level for beginners and persons with disabilities. The $12 ticket includes a brunch. Door prizes, raffle prizes and cash prizes awarded. Advanced reservations required by calling Char at 352-7469490 or Bernita at 352-3440235. Funds raised will benefit the Auxiliary Scholarship Fund and charitable organizations in the community. Cornerstone Baptist Church will host the Send Them to Serve four-person golf scramble Saturday, Oct. 19, at Inverness Golf and Country Club. All proceeds go directly to the CBC Youth Fund for Mission Trips and Summer Camps. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and teeoff is at 8:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. Registration fee of $50 per golfer includes 18 holes, cart and steak lunch at Cornerstone. Call Bruce Wenger at 352-726-7335. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church offers Bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays featuring regular, double and special bingos, together with a jackpot and pickle game. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m. Wednesday. Kitchen features homemade soups and sandwiches. The church is on U.S. 41, three miles north of Dunnellon. The Mens Club of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church on U.S. 41 in Dunnellon play horseshoes at 9 a.m. Wednesdays. Horseshoes are provided to anyone needing them along with instructions in pitching, scoring and court maintenance. Women, children and persons who have never pitched horseshoes before are invited to attend and share in the fun and fellowship. Call 352489-5954.Music & more Hernando Church of the Nazarene, at 2101 N. Florida Ave. in Hernando, off U.S. 41, will begin its concert series with the Southern Gospel quartet, River Jordan, on Sunday, Oct. 27. Doors open at 5 p.m. Celebration Sounds choir and orchestra will open the concert at 5:45. The public is invited. A love offering will be collected. Call the church office at 352-726-6144. The entire concert series can be viewed on www.hernando nazarene.org. As a fundraiser, the Sanctuary Mission of Citrus County will sponsor a Gospel Sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at Homosassa United Methodist Church at the corner of Bradshaw and Yulee Drive. People from across the county are invited to participate. There will be many different talents singing along with testimonies from our clients. Tickets ($10) will be sold at the door, and are limited. For advance tickets, call 352-302-4433or 352697-1373. All profits/proceeds will go to pay for the operation of our mission. The Amazzing Steel Drum Ensemble will be in concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, at First Presbyterian Church of Crystal River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 (next to Sweetbay Plaza). A freewill offering will be collected. Refreshments served after the concert. Call 352-795-2259. The Dunnellon Community Chorale will present a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10, at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, to celebrate Veterans Day. Patriotic music from the World War II era will be performed with guestRELIGIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 C3 SERVICES Sunday AM Bible Study 9:30 Worship 10:30 Sunday PM Worship 6:00 Wednesday PM Bible Study 7:00 EVANGELIST Bob Dickey 000DJIV 9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. Crystal River, FL 34465 352-564-8565 www.westcitruscoc.com Church of Christ West Citrus CR 495/Citrus Ave. US Hwy. 19 W. Deep Woods Dr. West Citrus Church of Christ 000DJH3 S T A NNE S C HURCH A Parish in the Anglican Communion Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m. Morning Prayer & Daily Masses 4th Sunday 6:00p.m. Gospel Sing A long 9870 West Fort Island Trail Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn 352-795-2176 www.stannescr.org To be one in Christ in our service, as His servants, by proclaiming His love. Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple 000DJIO SEEKING? SEEKING? SEEKING? Here, youll find a caring family in Christ! 4801 N. Citrus Ave. (2 Mi. N Of US 19) 795-3148 www.crumc.com Rev. David Rawls, Pastor Sunday Worship 9:00 am Traditional Service 10:30 am Contemporary Service with Praise Team Bible Study A t 9:00 & 10:30 F or all ages. Wednesday 6:30 Nursery available at all services. Youth Fellowship Sunday 4:00 Wednesday 6:30 Bright Beginnings Preschool 6 Weeks-VPK Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm. 795-1240 A Stephen Ministry Provider C rystal R iver U nited M ethodist C hurch 13158 Antelope St. Spring Hill, FL 34609 352-686-7034 Rabbi Lenny Sarko Services Fridays 8PM Saturdays 10AM Religious School Sundays 9AM-Noon Temple Beth David 000DJI8 935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto Crystal Glen Subdivision Hwy. 44 just E. of 490 527-3325 (L.C .M.S.) COME WORSHIP WITH US Sunday Service 9:30 A.M. Sunday Bible Study & Childrens Sunday School 11 A.M. Saturday Service 6:00 P.M. Weekly Communion Fellowship after Sunday Worship Calendar of events Audio of sermons available at www.faithlecanto.com 000DIY5 Rev. Stephen Lane 00070P2 Faith Lutheran Church A Heart From God... A Heart For Others. Crystal River CHURCH OF CHRIST A Friendly Church With A Bible Message. Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East Sunday Services 10:00 A M 11:00 A M 6:00 P M Wednesday 7:00 P M Come Worship With Us! Bible Questions Please Call Ev. George Hickman 795-8883 746-1239 000DIWM THE SALVATION ARMY CITRUS COUNTY CORPS. SUNDAY Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Morning Worship Hour 11:00 A.M. TUESDAY: Home League 11:30 A.M. Capt. Phillip Irish Capt. Lynn Irish 712 S. School Ave. Lecanto 513-4960 000DJGW Saturday Informal Worship w/Communion 5:00 PM Sunday Early Service w/Communion 8:00 AM Sunday School All Ages 9:30 AM (Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM) Sunday Traditional Service w/Communion 10:30 AM Special services are announced. Nursery provided. St. Timothy Lutheran Church ELCA 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River For more information call 795-5325 www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor 000DJI2 1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave. 795-6720 A FULL GOSPEL FELLOWSHIP Sunday 10:30 A M Wednesday Christian Ed 7:00 P M Prayer Sat. 4-6pm Pastor John Hager Crystal River Foursquare Gospel Church 000DJ95 The Church in the Heart of the Community with a Heart for the Community MOUNT OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 000DJE8 2105 N. Georgia Rd., PO Box 327 Crystal River, FL 34423 Church Phone (352)563-1577 SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School 9:30 A M Morning Service 11:00 A M Wed. Prayer Mtg. & Bible Study~ 6:30 P M Nursery Provided 2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd. (12th Ave.) Crystal River Church of Go d Church Phone 795-3079 000DIXH Sunday Morning Adult & Childrens Worship 8:30 & 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:45 AM Evening Service 6:00 PM Wednesday Life Application Service Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM First Baptist Church of Homosassa Come Worship with Us 10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa 628-3858 Rev. J. Alan Ritter Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries Sunday 9:00 am Sunday School (All Age Groups) 10:30 am Worship Celebration Choir / Special Music / Kidz Worship Sunday Night 6 pm Worship Celebration Wednesday Night 6:30 pm Worship Celebration Childrens Awanas Group Youth Activities www.fbchomosassa.org 000DJ71 000DJH8 795-4479 St. Benedict Catholic Church U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd. MASSES Vigil: 5:00pm Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am DAILY MASSES Mon. Fri.: 8:00am HOLY DAYS As Announced CONFESSION Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH Serving Southwest Citrus County MASSES: Saturday . . 4:30 P M Sunday . . . 8:00 A M . . . . . . . . . 10:30 A M 000DJI1 U.S. 19 1 4 mile South of West Cardinal St., Homosassa 628-7000 Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!!000DJMK HOMOSASSA 1st UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday Worship 8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am Sunday School 9:30 Pastor Kip Younger Phone 628-4083 8831 W. Bradshaw St. Learn More at www.1umc.org 000GBQG NOTESContinued from Page C2 See NOTES / Page C4

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accompanist Harry Hershey. The church is in the Dunnellon Historic District, 20641 Chestnut St. (corner of Chestnut and Ohio streets). The pubic is invited. St. Timothy Lutheran Church Concert Series presents Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band featuring Yungchen Lhamo at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Get tickets in advance or at the door. Suggested donation is $10. Call 352-795-5325 or 352-634-2388. All Citrus County musicians are invited to join in the community jam sessions at 7 p.m. Wednesdays in Hilton Hall at Floral City United Methodist Church. Bring your instruments/voices and join in the fun. Call 352-344-1771. The Saturday night Gospel Jubilee takes place the last Saturday night monthly at First Church of God 5510 Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Everyone is invited to come to enjoy or come and participate. Prepare a number, bring your instrument if you have one and join in this full-filled evening. Great music, fun, food, fellowship and never a charge. Call 352344-3700.Food & fellowship The Homosassa First United Methodist Church pancake breakfast is from 8 to 10 a.m. today at the churchs fellowship hall, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. A donation of $4 for all you can eat. Come and enjoy. St. Raphael Orthodox Church in America invites everyone to its Slavic Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at 1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Enjoy borscht, stuffed cabbage, potato pierogi, kielbasa and sauerkraut, cheese blini, cabbage and noodles, cucumber salad, various desserts and Slavic and traditional American crafts. Call 352-201-1320. The Third Saturday Supper/Mystery Theater will take place at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 19 in the Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall at Community Congregational Christian Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu includes: meatloaf, German potato salad, California mixed vegetables, cupcakes, coffee and tea. Tickets are $10 for adults, and $5 for children. Tickets can be purchased at the door. Takeouts available. Call the church at 352-489-1260. The Hernando United Methodist Men will host their Fish Fry for Missions, from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8. Under the direction of Joe Duteau, the menu will include fried fish, French fries or grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies, drink and dessert for $7.50 for adults and $3.50 for children. Everyone is welcome. The church is at 2125 E Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Hernando. Beverly Hills Community Church spaghetti suppers are from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Friday monthly (with the exception of December), in the Jack Steele Hall at 88 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A donation of $8 per person includes all-you-can-eat salad, spaghetti with meat sauce, Italian bread, dessert and coffee or tea. Come and enjoy a delicious meal. Tickets are available at the door or in the church office.C4SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLERELIGION The New Church Without Walls An Exciting & Growing Multi-Cultural Non-Denominational Congregation Ministering to the Heart of Citrus County Senior Pastors & Founders Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr. & Lady T Alexander Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Service 11:00 am Wednesday Bible Study 7pm 3962 N. Roscoe Rd. Hernando, FL Ph: 352-344-2425 www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com Email:cwow@embarqmail.com The perfect church for people who arent 000FZTS Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills 746-2144 (1 Block East of S.R. 491) Holy Days To Be Announced VIGIL MASSES: 4:00 P M & 6:00 P M ************ SUNDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M & 10:30 A M ************* SPANISH MASS: 12:30 P M ************* CONFESSIONS: 2:30 P M to 3:15 P M Sat. or By Appointment ************* WEEKDAY MASSES: 8:00 A M www.ourladyofgracefl .catholicweb.com 000DJFB Redemption Christian Church SUNDAY Bible School . . . . . . 9:00 Worship . . . . . . . . . 10:15 WEDNESDAY Bible School . . . . . . 6:30 Currently meeting at East Citrus Community Center 9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway Pastor Todd Langdon For more information call 352-422-6535 000DJGV 000DJD7 HERNANDO Sunday School 8:45 AM 9:30 AM Fellowship 9:30 AM Worship Service 10:00 AM Nursery is Provided. Individual Hearing Devices Ministries and Activities for all Ages. 2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486) (1 1 2 miles from Hwy. 41) For information call (352) 726-7245 www.hernandoumcfl.org Reverend Jerome Jerry Carris United Methodist Church A Safe Sanctuary for Children and Families Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors First Presbyterian Stephen Ministry Congregation 000DJDT Hwy. 44 E @ Washington Ave., Inverness Sunday Services Traditional 11:00 AM Casual Service 9:30 AM 11:00 AM Service Tapes & CDs Available Sunday School for all ages 9:30 AM Nursery Provided Fellowship & Youth Group Sunday Evening Web Site: www.fpcinv.org Podcast: fpcinv.com Church Office 637-0770 Pastor James Capps 000DJID Floral City United Methodist Church 8478 East Marv in St. (across from Floral City School) Sunday School 9:05 A M Sunday Worship Service 10:30 A M Sanctuary 8:00 A M Service in the 1884 Church Bible Study Tuesday 10:00 A M Wednesday 6:00 P M Wheel Chair Access Nursery Available Rev. Mary Gestrich Church 344-1771 WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com We strive to make newcomers feel at home. Catholic Church St. Scholastica St. Scholastica 4301 W. Homosassa Trail Lecanto, Florida www.stscholastica.org Sunday Masses 9:00 am 11:30 am Saturday Vigil 4:00 pm Weekday Masses 8:30 am Confessions Saturday 2:45 -3:30 pm (352) 746-9422 000DJHX 000DJ8Y COME Worship With The Church of Christ Floral City, Florida Located at Marvin & Church streets. Established in 33 A.D. in Jerusalem by Jesus Christ. A warm welcome always awaits you where we teach the true New Testament Christian Faith. Sunday Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Steve Heneghan, Minister CHURCH OF CHRIST Floral City, FL. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed./Eve. Bible Study 6:00 p.m. H ERNANDO S EVENTH DAY A DVENTIST C HURCH 1880 N. Trucks Ave. Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 344-2008 Sabbath Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 11:00 am Wednesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Pastor Dale Wolfe www.hernandoadventist.com 000DJCO Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus 2101 N. Florida Ave. Hernando FL 726-6144 Nursery Provided CHILDREN YOUTH SENIORS Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Praise & Worship 10:40 A.M. Praise Service 6:00 P M Praise & Prayer (Wed.) 7:00 P M Randy T. Hodges, Pastor 000DIW5 www.hernandonazarene.org Shepher d of the Hills E PISCOPAL C HURCH Our mission is to be a beacon of faith known for engaging all persons in the love and truth of Jesus Christ. 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR 486) Lecanto, Florida (4/10 mile east of CR 491) www.SOTHEC.org Services: Saturday 5:00 pm Sunday 8:00 & 10:30 am Nursery 10:30 am Healing Service Wednesday 10:00 am 000DJGZ First Baptist Church 8545 Magnolia 726-4296 Sunday Schedule 8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Traditional Worship 6:00 PM Worship Wednesday 6:30 PM Music, Youth, Fellowship A warm, friendly Church Nursery Available www.fbcfloralcity.org 000DJ6D of Floral City Rev. John Rothra www.gracebiblehomosassa.org email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS, Infant & Toddler Nursery 000DJCL 1 1 2 mi. east of U.S. 19 6382 W. Green Acres St. P.O. Box 1067 Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067 Pastor: Rev. Ray Herriman (352) 628-5631 Sunday 9:30 AM . . . . . . . . . . Discovery Time 11:00 AM . . . . . . . . . Praise & Worship 6:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Evening Service Monday 6:15 PM . . . . . . . . . . Teens Tuesday 6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.) Wednesday 7:00 PM . . . . . . . . . . Bible Study & Prayer Meeting 000G5FQ First Baptist Church of Lake Rousseau SBC Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 11:00am & 6:00pm Wednesday 6:00pm Magnifying Gods name by bringing people to Jesus 7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488) Ph. 352-795-5651 Cell 352-812-8584 Email: pastorjoe10@gmail.com Check us out on Facebook Come, Fellowship & Grow With Us In Jesus 5863 W. Cardinal St. Homosassa Springs, FL 34446 Telephone: (352) 628-7950 Pastor Dale Wolfe Tuesday Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm Sabbath-Saturday Services Sabbath School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am www.homosassaadventist.com 000DJHR Homosassa Springs SUNDAY 10:00 AM Family Worship (Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00) 000DJEJ N ORTH R IDGE CHURCH Non-Denominational Church Citrus County Realtors Association Building. 714 S. Scarboro Ave. & SR 44 Pastor Kennie Berger 352-302-5813 WEDNESDAY 7:00 PM Home Bible Study (Call for location) Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today! 000DJC6 Reverend Kenneth C. Blyth Pastor 439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando, Florida Building is Barrier-Free gshernando.org Worship 8:30 am 11:00 am Fellowship After Worship Weekly Communion Sunday School 9:45 am Nursery Provided 3790 E. Parsons Point Rd. Hernando, FL 34442 352-726-6734 Visit us on the Web at www.fbchernando.com 000DJ6X Reaching and restoring lives through Jesus Christ Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.. Wednesday Prayer Meeting/Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Rev. Keith Dendy First Baptist Church Of Hernando First Baptist Church Of Hernando 000G49M St. Raphael Orthodox Church in America Divine Liturgy Sun. 10 am Great Vespers Sat. 5 pm Fr. David Balmer (352) 201-1320 www.straphaelchurch.org 1277 N. Paul Dr. INVERNESS right off Hwy. 41 N. Come to our SLAVIC FESTIVAL FOOD & CRAFTS OCT. 12, 10 am-2 pm Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! 000DJMR NOTESContinued from Page C3

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Garden Club to begin seasonThe Garden Club of Crystal River will start its 2013/14 season at 1 p.m. Monday at the St. Martin Marsh Aquatic Preserve, Crystal River State Park. First speaker of the season will be Kathy Connolly of Connollys Nursery. The topic will be What to plant for fall and winter color. The program starts at 1 p.m., with a break and refreshments at 2 p.m. A club meeting will follow the break. The goal for the club is to promote the knowledge and love of gardening. The public is welcome. Meetings are at 1 p.m. the second Monday monthly, ending May 2014. For information, call president Jenny Wensel at 352-795-0844.SHARE to host seminarThe Citrus Memorial Health System SHARE Club will offer a free breast health seminar at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, in the Gulf Room on the main hospital campus. Breast Health: What Every Woman Should Know will feature presentations from general surgeon Dr. Quehuong Pham and radiologist Dr. Thomas Ceballos. Pham and Ceballos will discuss breast health screenings and prevention, as well as available treatment including digital mammography, stereotactic breast biopsy and more. Refreshments and educational materials will be available and two audience members will win free screening mammograms. Seating is limited; RSVP online at www.citrusmh.com/events or call 352-5606266 to register.Vendors sought for eventVendors are needed for the sixth annual Stone Crab Jam slated for 4 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, in Crystal River. The area will be alive with music, stone crabs, vendors, a chowder cook-off and food and drinks galore. Three stages will fill the streets with music for all ears. Local food and fresh stone crabs will tantalize visitors taste buds and vendors will have offerings ranging from local art, nautical items and handcrafted pieces. Officials are accepting vendor applications for food and event exhibitors. Space is limited and the deadline is Tuesday. Visit www.stonecrabjam.com for information and applications. The event is sponsored by the Rotary Club of Kings Bay, the city of Crystal River and the Citrus County Chronicle. Special to the ChronicleFlorida is a mandated state and any insurance company doing business in Florida must give a discount to those completing an AARP Safe Driving Course, open to everyone age 50 and older. Contact your agent for discount amounts. Update yourself to earn a discount and learn about newly enacted motor vehicle and traffic laws. Course fee is $12 for AARP members; $14 for all others. Call the listed instructor to register: Crystal River, Homosassa, Homosassa Springs Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 15 and 16, 1 to 4 p.m. at Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 16 and 17, 9 a.m. to noon at First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Call Frank Tobin at 352-628-3229. Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 18 and 19, 1 to 4 p.m. at Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Lou Harmin at 352-564-0933. Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 19 and 20, 9 a.m. to noon at First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw Blvd., Homosassa. Call Frank Tobin at 352-628-3229. Inverness, Hernando, Floral City Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 15 and 16, 9 a.m. to noon at Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580 Lemon St., Hernando. Call Bob Dicker at 352-527-2366.COMMUNITYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 C5 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd. Inverness, FL 34452 (2 mi. so. of Applebees) Come as you are. (352) 726-2522 REV. SARAH CAMPBELL Senior Pastor of Inverness Sunday School 9:00 AM Adults 10:30 AM All Ages Sunday Worship 9:00 AM Contemporary 9:00 AM Vertical Kids 10:30 AM Traditional Wednesday Worship 6:00 PM Vertical Youth 000DJE6 Our Lady of Fatima C ATHOLIC C HURCH 726-1670 550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness, Florida 000DJEX Weekday Mass: 8 A.M. Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M. Saturday Confessions: 2:30 3:30 P.M. Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule 7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Sunday Masses: Summer Schedule (June August) 9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Pastor John Fredericksen Rightly dividing the word of truth II Timothy 2:15 Grace Bible Fellowship 4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL 352-726-9972 Sunday Bible Study . . . . . . 9:15 AM Worship Service . 10:15 AM Wednesday Bible Study . . . . . . 7:00 PM 000G293 Nursery and play yard. Pastor, Dairold & Bettye Rushing 4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd. (Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452 OFFICE: (352) 726-1107 Where everyone is special! Jesus Christ-central theme of our worship Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m & 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship 7:00 p.m. Ministries for all ages Nursery Available 000DIYG First Assembly of God Beverly Hills Community Church 82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida (352) 746-3620 Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m. Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m. Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m. Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly Where Christ is Proclaimed! 000DIW3 Sunday Services: Traditional Service . . . . . 8:30 AM Sunday School . . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Contemporary Service . 10:30 AM Wednesday Night: Adult Classes . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Boys and Girls Brigade . . 7:00 PM Teens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 PM Rev. Larry Powers Senior Pastor I NVERNESS C HURCH OF G OD Welcome Home Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South in Inverness Just Past Burger King Church Office 726-4524 Also on Site Little Friends Daycare and Learning Center 000DJDV Pastor Terry Roberts Ph: 726-0201 Independent Fundamental Cross road Bap tist Chu rch 000DIWC Youre invited to our Services Sunday School 10:00 AM Sunday 10:45 AM & 6:00 PM Wednesday 7:00 PM 5335 E. J asmine Lane, Inverness 1 2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41 North (Formally Calvary Bible Church Location) 000EPSH Sunday Bible Study 9:15 am Worship 11:00 am Wednesday Prayer 6 pm Youth 6-8 pm (352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com First Baptist Church Of Beverly Hills 4950 N. Lecanto Hwy Pastor Marple Lewis III 000DJ75 Pastor Tom WalkerINVERNESSFirst CHURCH OF GOD5510 E. Jasmine Ln.Non-denominationalSunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM Wed: 6:00 Bible StudyDo you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners, singing the old hymns? Then youll enjoy this Church family. 000DJIS A place to belong. A place to become. Victory Baptist Church At Sunday School 9:45 AM Worship 10:45 AM Sunday Evening 6:00 PM Wednesday 7:00 PM Choir Practice 8:00 PM Highway 41 North, turn at Sportsman Pt. Quality Child Care Pastor Gary Beehler 352-465-8866 5040 N Shady Acres Dr. 726-9719 General Conference Come To S T M ARGARET S E PISCOPAL C HURCH In Historic Downtown Inverness 1 Block N.W. Of City Hall 114 N. Osceola Ave. Inverness, FL 34450 726-3153 Services: Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M. Wednesday 12:30 P M Morning Prayer 9:00 A M MonFri Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor Celebrating 120 years 000DJHC www.stmaggie.org 000DIVY All are invited to our Healing Services 352-726-4033 First Church of Christ, Scientist Inverness 224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday Services 10:30 AM Sunday School 10:30 AM Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church ELCA Pastor Lynn Fonfara 9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Citrus Springs Spoken Holy communion Worship 8:00 a.m. Christian Education 9:00 a.m. Sung Holy Communion Worship 10:00am Information: 489-5511 Go To Our Web Page hopelutheranelca.com 000DJD9 Dr. Ray Kelley Minister Sunday: 9:00 A M Sunday School 10:15 A M Worship Service Wednesday: 6:00 P M Bible Study First For Christ...John 1:41 F IRST C HRISTIAN C HURCH O F I NVERNESS 000dje1 We welcome you and invite you to worship with our family. 2018 Colonade St., Inverness 344-1908 www.fccinv.com 1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451 Telfono: (352) 341-1711 ORDEN DE SERVICIOS: DOMINGOS: 9:30 AM Escuela Biblica Dominical 10:30 AM Adoracin y Prdica MARTES: 7:00 PM Culto de Oraci n JUEVES: 7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos Les Esperamos! PRIMERA IGLESIA HISPANA DE CITRUS COUNTY Inverness, Florida Asambleas de Dios David Pinero, Pastor ~ 000DJ7I Holy Communion Every Sunday at 7:45am & 10:00am The Rev. Thomas Beaverson F IRST L UTHERAN C HURCH 47 Years of Bringing Christ to Inverness Sunday School & Bible Class 9:00 A M 726-1637 Missouri Synod www.1stlutheran.net 1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness 000DJDD Places of worship that offer love, peace and harmony to all. Come on over to His house, your spirits will be lifted !!! 000DJMO Yoga, bend, stretch in Citrus SpringsCitrus County Park & Recreation, with instructor Kathy Harrica, will offers free Beginners Yoga: Bend & Stretch classes at the Citrus Springs Community Center. Harrica received her training from the Wisdom Method School of Yoga in Fruitland Park a Yoga Alliance-registered training program. All are welcome to attend, whether new to yoga or not. Items to bring to class are: a yoga mat or beach towel, a small square pillow and water. Classes are Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. and Thursday mornings at 10 a.m. More classes will start in November. No pre-registration is required. For more information, call Parks & Recreation at 352-4657007 or Kathy at 352249-8244.Hadassah to meet Monday in BHThe Beverly Hills Chapter of Hadassah will meet at 1 p.m. Monday at the Kellner Auditorium in Beverly Hills. The guest speaker will be Debi Shields from HPH Hospice. Hadassah is a service organization open to men and women of every faith. It supports colleges, universities, medical schools, medical research including stem cell research, hospitals and infrastructure in Israel. For information, call Miriam Fagan at 352746-0005.German American Club to gatherThe German American Club of West Central Florida will meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Lecanto. After a brief business meeting, there will be a social hour with refreshments and musical entertainment. Members are encouraged to attend and guests are welcome. For more information, call 352-637-2042 or 352746-7058.Sew-Ciety to get together MondayThe Florida Sewing Sew-Ciety will meet at 9 a.m. Monday at the Citrus County Canning Facility at 3405 W. Southern St., Lecanto. The project for the day will be a witch embellishment for a kitchen or hand towel. For more information, call Dee at 352527-8229. All sewing enthusiasts welcome.Visitors welcome at BFF meetingThe BFF Society Inc. will have its monthly dinner meeting Monday at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club, 7395 W. Pinebrook St., Crystal River. The BFF Societys main focus is educational scholarships for local recipients. Visitors and new members are always welcome. For more information, call Gwen at 352-795-1520.Get on site, get some some helpUnited Way of Citrus County will have a training session for its Agency Volunteer Training site at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the U.W. offices in Crystal River. The training will walk participants through how to register an agency and how to incorporate its needs. The training will take about an hour. Once an agency is set up on the site, it can list any opportunities for item donations or volunteer assistance, and the program will automatically email any person who has indicated such a volunteer preference. Call 352-795-5483 to sign up for the class. NEWS NOTES NEWS NOTES AARP slates driver safety courses

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. NEWS NOTES Lions to serve pancake breakfastThe Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle Drive, will have its pancake breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday. Cost for adults is $4 and children younger than 12 eat for $2. This includes all-you-can-eat pancakes, choice of bacon or sausage or combo, orange juice and coffee or tea. For information, call 352-897-4899.Health care options seminar on tapBecome a savvy consumer as you learn about choices and health care options for your care before you need them. Representatives from Comfort Keepers, HPH Hospice, Brentwood Retirement Communities, Life Care Center and Mederi Caretenders will be at the Central Ridge Library from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday. They will provide education for community members about different services available in Citrus County. Complimentary snacks and beverages will be available and there will be door prize drawings. Central Ridge Library is at 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd. (corner of Forest Ridge and Roosevelt boulevards) in Beverly Hills. Call 352-746-6622 to RSVP .Homeopathic detox talk on tapNew Age Thinkers will meet at 2 p.m. Saturday at Unity Church 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. The guest speaker will be Dr. Paula Koger, who has 25 years of nursing experience and specializes in counseling, massage, acupuncture and as a medical intuitive. She will present Field Control Therapy (FTC) and Voice Printing. FTC is homeopathy, tested and created in the clinic to individual detox needs. It has been highly effective for adults, children and even pets. In essence, it is tapping the natural intelligence of the body to discover which organs/systems are not functioning effectively; which informational signals are needed to encourage correction of the imbalance. Everyone is invited. For more information, email miss-donna@tampabay.rr.com or call 352-628-3253.Oak Village women plan luncheonThe Oak Village Womens Club will have its October luncheon on Monday at the Glen Lakes Country Club. Guests are always welcome. Luncheons are $17.50 with a Super Duper Soup/Salad Buffet. Guest emcee Joe Dube and wife Shirley will put on a Funny Fashion Follies. Call Rose Flodstrom at 352-503-6745 for more information on attending. The luncheon is open to the public.Lodge to do Rusty Nail DegreeThe Masons of Springs Lodge 378 F&AM will put on a Rusty Nail Degree at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and invites all men who are Masons living in the Citrus County to the meeting. This meeting is designed for Masons who have been away from active lodge participation for an extended period of time and wish to again become active. If you have an up-to-date dues card from your lodge, we will refresh your memory and bring you back into the fellowship of the Masonic Lodge. Springs Lodge is at 5030 Memorial Drive, Homosassa. WPNCC monthly meeting TuesdayThe Womens Political Network of Citrus County will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday for lunch at Joes Family Restaurant in Inverness. After lunch, Suzanne Webb, Florida Republican state committeewoman, will be speaker. A short meeting will follow and clipping coupons for the military base the group has adopted. Since May, the club has shipped more than $115,000 worth of coupons. WPNCC also supports CASA, the abuse shelter in Citrus County. Bring donations for CASA. They can use food or nonfood household products. Everyone is welcome. Call Rosalie Matt at 352746-7143 for more information.Zen meditation at UnityThe public is welcome to Zen meditation sessions at 2:45 p.m. Sundays at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto (off County Road 491). For more information, call 352-464-4955. COMMUNITYPage C6SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Humanitarians OF FLORIDA Ragu Ragu is a beautiful bulls eye orange and white tabby. He is a love-bug and gets along very well with his roommates, but wants his own home. Adult cats are half-price and kittens are $50 or two for $90, and all adoption fees include microchip, spay/neuter and all required vaccinations, including rabies. There are all varieties of felines to choose from. Drop by and enjoy our felines in their cage-free, homestyle environment from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Humanitarians Hardin Haven on the corner of State Road 44 and North Conant Avenue, east of Crystal River.Special to the Chronicle Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County Historical Society has announced the lineup of performances for its 2013-14 Music at the Museum Concert Series. There will be eight concerts featuring both jazz and acoustic music, all taking place in the restored 1912 Citrus County courtroom at the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum, downtown on the square in Inverness. Leading off the series on Oct. 17 is Johnny Carlsson and Group with a Salute to Benny Goodman, the King of Swing. On Nov. 21, the acoustic duo of Jerry Carris and Gail Keel playing guitar and concertina will perform. Making a return appearance on Dec. 12 is Joe Donato and Friends from Miami, with Jazz for the Holidays. Appearing Jan. 16 will be the acoustic group Singing Tree, featuring Ray Belanger on hammered dulcimer and Lloyd Goldstein on double bass. On Feb. 13, back for another year, will be Norm Bernard and Southern Exposure with Jazzy Valentines. March 13 will feature the duo Castlebay Fred Gosbee and Julia Lane with Celtic and New England folk music. On April 17, Johnny Carlsson and Group return for a Stan Getz Tribute. The series wraps up on May 15 with an appearance by Florida singer/songwriter Bob Patterson. Jazz concerts are $25 each and start at 6 p.m. with a social hour with appetizers and a cash bar. Music begins at 7 p.m. The acoustic concerts are $10 each and include coffee and desserts. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. and music begins at 7 p.m. All concerts take place in the courtroom of the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum in downtown Inverness. Tickets will be sold for the jazz concerts; the acoustic performances are by reservation. Sponsors for the series include the Citrus County Chronicle, Wann and Mary Robinson, Jordan Engineering, Publix Super Markets Charities, Smith Optical, Accent Travel, Clark and Wendy Stillwell, and David Rom State Farm. For more information and a season brochure, call 352-341-6427 or email csociety@tampabay.rr.com. Historical Society reveals performance lineup for new season This past week, I was honored to be one of the presenters of the Fire Up Citrus event held by the Economic Development Council. The theme was simple: What would stimulate the economy? Present your idea and keep it positive. I seem to have a good ability to come up with some well-thoughtout ideas through the years. I also know how easy it is to shoot ideas with holes before they get started, especially if it is something I do not want to do or something I am not interested in. I appreciated the positive theme and we were all very supportive of each other. My idea was compressed natural gas. A couple of years ago, I started seriously looking for alternatives because my shelter and farm gasoline bill was a couple thousand dollars a month! I did not have to talk to too many people to realize almost everyone felt like a hostage to gasoline prices. This stuff out in the midwest (natural gas) was so cheap that they burned it. In other words, it cost more to transport it than the company drilling for it could get from selling it. The problem? Infrastructure. In other parts of the globe, economies have switched to natural gas a long time ago. It has been perfected, as far as I can tell, and is just as powerful as gasoline. But no one in the U.S. wants to spend the money on very expensive filling stations if there is not enough demand from people driving the vehicles. The price of converting a vehicle is too expensive and consumers cannot find enough filling stations. Citrus County does not have one. This is changing. General Electric is coming out with a home filling station. Three of the major car companies are coming out with several versions of these vehicles that will be brand new and the conversion kits for any car are getting better. The conversion kits give you the ability with the flick of a switch to go back to gasoline if you cant find the natural gas station. Right now, natural gas is about half of what gasoline costs to get you the same distance. With Duke Energy deciding to build a natural gas plant, the time is now to work in partnership with this company that will be with us for a long time. This has the potential of creating jobs and saving everyone in Citrus County some money. The pipes are in the ground. It has 20 percent less emissions into the air and we will be buying a U.S. product. Let us all join together, do our homework, ask questions, talk to people who make things happen and, just maybe, we are on to something here that will help a little bit.DuWayne Sipper is the executive director of The Path of Citrus County, a faith-based homeless shelter.Contact him at 527-6500 or sipperd@bellsouth.net. Natural gas could be answer for Citrus County DuWayne SipperTHE PATH HOME Grumman retirees to meetThe Grumman Retiree Clubs Midwest Florida Chapter will enjoy a picnic from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at Bayport Park at the west end of Cortez Boulevard (State Road 50). Hamburgers, hot dogs and condiments will be provided free to members of the club attending. Members are asked to bring a dish to share and a chair, if desired, as well as plates, utensils and drinks. Call Hank Mehl at 352-686-2735 or email hmehl@tampabay.rr.com to make reservations.Mission in Citrus slates giveawayMission in Citrus Homeless shelters will continue its monthly giveaway from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. today at 2488 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Crystal River. The Mission in Citrus relies on donations only. Items are donated, and so are freely given away. No dealers or thrift store people are allowed. For more information, call 352-794-3825.Bunco Bonanza at Knights hallThe Ladies Auxiliary Knights of Columbus Council No. 6168 will host a Bunco Bonanza on Tuesday at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486), Lecanto. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Two levels of play will be featured. The $12 ticket includes brunch. Reservations must be made by today by calling Char at 352-7469490 or Bernita at 352-344-0235.Friends to host craft saleThe Friends of the Community Center Inc. will stage its annual crafts sale with items made by members from the East Citrus and Central Citrus centers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The sale will be at the Central Citrus Community Center at 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Do holiday shopping and help support the countys community centers. NEWS NOTES Stephanie Waters and her daughters, Sydni and Harley, are delighted with their purchases at the recently completed Friends of the Citrus County Library System (FOCCLS) Mega Fall Book Sale. This is the third year the family has attended the Friends fall and spring events. Waters home-schools her daughters and selects materials from the sale to enhance their curriculum. The family was among the more than 1,000 book lovers who found favorite treasures at the five-day sale which raised $41,593 for FOCCLS partner libraries and the Citrus County Library System. This brings the sum of FOCCLS sale proceeds since 2001 to $789,822. The Friends are again at work preparing for the spring sale to begin March 7. Gently used books, DVDs, CDs, games and puzzles may be dropped off at the check-out desks of Central Ridge, Coastal or Lakes regional libraries.LYNNE BOELE/Special to the Chronicle Fans of Friends of books

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Joyce Cary, an English novelist who died in 1957, said, The will is never free it is always attached to an object, a purpose. It is simply the engine in the car it cant steer. At the bridge table, surprisingly often one defender can steer his partner in the right direction. The problem is that some defenders prefer to backseat drive, ignoring their partners signals and heading down their own side roads and letting defeatable contracts make. In this example deal, how should the defenders play to beat four hearts? After East opened one diamond, that South hand was strong enough for a takeout double followed by a heart bid. But South reasonably decided that his short spades made an initial double dangerous. (Yes, it was unlikely to backfire, but one heart would be the majority expert choice these days.) Then, when North raised hearts, South had an easy jump to game. First, West must lead the diamond four, his partners bid suit. East wins with his queen and cashes the diamond ace. West discards the club two, denying interest in that suit. East takes the diamond king, West pitching the spade three to say that he does not have the spade ace. What should East do now? If West does not want a black-suit shift, there is only one play left lead another diamond. And as you can see, this is the only way to defeat the contract because it promotes Wests heart queen as a trick. Trust your partners signals if he is trustworthy! (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug ht on C amera C aug ht on C amera C aug ht on C amera L oc k up G L oc k up G L oc k up G (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Diggers PG Diggers PG Diggers PG Diggers PG Snake Salvation Snake Salvation Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers Alaska State Troopers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.Sam & HauntedDrakeDrakeSee DadNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Undercover BossUndercover BossUndercover BossSweetie PiesMcGheesMcGheesSweetie Pies (OXY) 44 123 Fun With Dick and Jane (1977) Couples Retreat (2009) Vince Vaughn. PG-13 Couples Retreat (2009) (SHOW) 340 241 340 4Man on a LedgeHomeland Uh... Oh... Ah... MAJay Z Made in America (2013, Documentary) NR The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012) Logan Lerman. Premiere. PG-13 Homeland Uh... Oh... Ah... MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Cops Cops PG Cops Cops PG Cops (N) PG Cops PG Glory (Series Premiere) Four-man heavyweight tournament. (N) (In Stereo) Rambo (2008) (In Stereo) R (STARZ) 370 271 370 Oz the Great and Powerful (2013) James Franco. (In Stereo) PG The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA (SUN) 36 31 36 Seminole Sports Lightning Live! NHL Hockey Pittsburgh Penguins at Tampa Bay Lightning. Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Fla. (Live) Lightning Live! Inside the Lightning DrivenExtreme Sailing Extreme Sailing (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Nightmare on Elm St. 5: Child Freddy vs. Jason (2003, Horror) Robert Englund, Ken Kirzinger. R Fright Night (2011) Anton Yelchin. A teenager discovers that his new neighbor is a vampire. R Nightmare2 (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19MLB Baseball PostgameBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangZoolander (2001) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1959) Harry Belafonte. NR Friendly Persuasion (1956, Drama) Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire, Anthony Perkins. NR The Harder They Fall (1956) Humphrey Bogart. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Gold Fever (In Stereo) Dual Survival: Unbraided L Dual Survival Twin Peaks Dual Survival Rocky Mountain High Dual Survival Castaways Dual Survival Rocky Mountain High (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Untold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERUntold Stories of ERStrangeStrangeUntold Stories of ER (TMC) 350 261 350 People Like Us (2012) Out of Sight (1998, Crime Drama) George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez. RHillside Cannibals (2006, Horror) Heather Conforto. NR Nine Lives (2002, Horror) Paris Hilton. (In Stereo) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Sherlock Holmes (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr. PG-13 (DVS) Red (2010, Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman. PG-13 (DVS) Swordfish (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman. R (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularMovie PG King/HillAmericanFam. GuyFam. GuyClevelandBoon (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Mysteries-MuseumMysteries-MuseumUFOs Cras. Ghost AdventuresGhost AdventuresGhost Adventures (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24CosbyCosbyGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS Canary (DVS) NCIS Hereafter PG (DVS) NCIS Prime Suspect (In Stereo) PG NCIS A murder on a U.S. Navy ship. NCIS Chasing Ghosts Fast Five (2011) Vin Diesel. (WE) 117 69 117 David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled G David Tutera: Unveiled (N) G David Tutera: Unveiled G Kendra on Top Kendra on Top (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Bones Bones Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherRules Dear Annie: Ten years ago, my father passed away, leaving my mother well provided for. Since then, she has spent nearly 80 percent of the estate on herself, my brother and his children. My brother is her favorite child. He has had an up-anddown career. When times are good, he spends a lot of money. When times are bad, he runs to Mom. In the past two years, he has steadily taken money from her, and her assets are now frighteningly low. I put myself through college, lived beneath my means and have saved a great deal. Mom is now eyeing what I have put aside, expecting me to use it to support her, as well as the golden child and the nowadult grandchildren. This has brought up old ill feelings of the way she treated us on our birthdays and holidays. Part of me wants to provide for my mothers needs, as I feel it is my duty. But another part wants to tell her to find support from the son she always indulged. I really cant talk to anybody about this without feeling terrible. Can you help? N. Dear N.: We dont blame you for having mixed feelings. Your mother has not treated you fairly. Still, it is a kindness to help her once her assets run out. You obviously are not under any obligation to support your brother or his grown children. We suggest you speak with an accountant about setting up a budget and a monthly allowance for Mom, letting her know that once that money is used up, there will be no additional funds until the following month. This allows you to fulfill your filial obligations without so much resentment. Dear Annie: My husband was diagnosed with cancer three weeks ago. We have spent those weeks seeing various doctors and having multiple tests. With chemotherapy and surgery, he should be able to live a long and happy life. My problem is family members and friends. I am trying to keep my husband in a positive frame of mind about his prognosis. Unfortunately, these wellmeaning people keep telling him horror stories about chemotherapy and radiation and all of the people they know who have died from cancer. Everyones cancer is different. What works for some patients might not work for others. Please do not tell my husband about someone who died of cancer. Its not what he needs to hear right now. I know you mean well, but this just depresses him. Attitude is everything when it comes to treating and surviving cancer. Say something positive like, Our thoughts and prayers are with you, or You will survive this. Youre tough. Otherwise, dont say anything about it at all. Just be his friend. With the advances in treatment, I know more people who have survived cancer than have died. These survivors all have one thing in common: a positive attitude. Polly Positive Dear Polly: We, too, have never understood the urge that compels people to tell horror stories about those who have died to those who are still struggling with illness of any kind. Attitude is so important in healing. Please, folks, keep a lid on those stories. They help no one. Dear Annie: I read the letter from Depressed in Hiding, the 16-year-old high school girl who is depressed and anxious and has resorted to self-harm. She is afraid to tell her parents because she believes they will hate her. When I was in college and living far away from home, I was unhappy. I realize now that I was depressed. I wrote to my mother and told her how unhappy I was. Her response was, Tough toenail. So I knew never to trust her again with anything personal or close to my heart. Almost 40 years later, my husband died. In my grief, I confided some things to her (by mistake) and received a similar answer. There are some people you simply can never trust with your feelings. Caroline in CarolinaAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more, visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers Monday) VAPOR RIGOR AFFORD TUMBLE Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Their hike through the forest was great until their path TRAILEDOFF Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L.Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CRIKT DURGA KONIVE YEILED Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags A: SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 12, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntertainment NightIronside Pilot The Blacklist Saturday Night LiveNewsSNL # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk Charlie Rose The Lawrence Welk Show G Keeping Up Keeping Up As Time Goes By As Time Goes By Waiting for God Yes, Minister Globe Trekker PG (DVS) % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Lawrence WelkDoc Martin PGMovie PG The National Parks: Americas Best IdeaAustin City Limits (N) ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Bucs Bonus Paid Program Ironside Pilot (In Stereo) The Blacklist The Freelancer Saturday Night Live (In Stereo) NewsSaturday Night Live ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 College Football Teams TBA. (N) CountdownNASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N) (Live) News (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10College Football Teams TBA. (N) Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G To Be AnnouncedTo Be Announced48 Hours (N) (In Stereo) PG 10 News, 11pm (N) Inside Edition ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13College Football Teams TBA. (N) FOX Post Game (N) MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 1: Teams TBA. (Time tentative). (N) (In Stereo Live) NewsNewsAnimation Dom 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 College FootballNASCARNASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500. (N) (Live) News 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Turning Point With David Jeremiah PG Jack Van Impe Prophecy in News In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley G Leslie Hale 7th Street Theater All Over the World CTN Special Pure Passion < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11College Football Teams TBA. (N) CountdownNASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N) (Live) News @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Leverage A corrupt mayor. PG Leverage The Ice Man Job Movie PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9HouseRaw Trav.Health PaidBloopersBloopersFuturamaFuturamaRing of Honor Wrest.Bones H (WACX) TBN 21 21 FloorBlairJim RaleyLife Center ChurchRabbi MesserPaidGaither HomecomingChosenPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Two and Half Men White Collar Threads PG White Collar Deadline PG EngagementEngagementThe Arsenio Hall Show O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Ford-Fast Lane School Zone Your Citrus County CourtDa Vincis Inquest (In Stereo) I Spy Y Eye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7College FootballPostMLB Baseball FOX 35 News at 10Animation (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroNoticias UnivisionSbado Gigante (N) PG (SS) Comed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG Monk PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas StorageTexas (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead Hounded The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Made to Suffer The Walking Dead MA The Walking Dead Home MA The Walking Dead I Aint a Judas MA (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedToo Cute! Top 20 Puppies PG Too Cute! Rainbow Colored Kittens PG Too Cute! Kittens: Growing Up (N) Pit Bulls & Parolees: Unchained (N) Too Cute! Kittens: Growing Up (BET) 96 19 96 Snakes on a Plane (2006) R Next Day Air (2009, Comedy-Drama) Donald Faison, Mike Epps. R Big Mommas House (2000, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long, Paul Giamatti. PG-13 All About (BRAVO) 254 51 254 JerseyHousewives/NJ No Strings Attached (2011) Natalie Portman. No Strings Attached R (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park South Park South Park MA I Love You, Man (2009, Comedy) Paul Rudd, Jason Segel. R Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha Fluffy L (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Shanghai The American President (1995, Romance-Comedy) Michael Douglas, Annette Bening. PG-13 Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidSecretSecretBuried Treasure PGSuze Orman ShowTreasureTreasureBuried Treasure PG (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N)To Be AnnouncedAnthony Bourd.Anthony Bourd.To Be Announced (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Austin & Ally G Jessie G Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Despicable Me (2010) Voices of Steve Carell. PG WanderYonder Lab Rats Y7 Kickin It Y7 Jessie G Austin & Ally G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17FootballScoreCollege Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) ScoreCollege Football Teams TBA. (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49FootballScoreCollege Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) ScoreSportsCenter (N) (Live) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48EuropeThe TableMother Angelica LiveBakhita (Part 2 of 2) PG Our Lady of FatimaCampusLectio (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 The Princess Diaries (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews. G Enchanted (2007, Fantasy) Amy Adams, Patrick Dempsey, James Marsden. PG Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Quiz Show (1994, Docudrama) John Turturro, Rob Morrow. PG-13 Die Another Day (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan. (In Stereo) PG-13 Hard Rain (1998, Action) Morgan Freeman, Randy Quaid. (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Americas News HQFOX Report (N)Huckabee (N)Justice With JeanineGeraldo at Large (N)Red Eye (N) (FOOD) 26 56 26 Halloween Wars GDinersDinersCupcake Wars GChopped Iron Chef AmericaRestaurant: Im. (FS1) 732 112 732 College Football (N) (Live) FOXCollege Football (N) (Live) Sports (FSNFL) 35 39 35 College FootballGame 365College Football SEC: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) FameCollege Football (FX) 30 60 30 51 Hancock (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. PG-13 Green Lantern (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds. A test pilot joins a band of intergalactic warriors. PG-13 The Green Hornet (2011, Action) Seth Rogen. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf CentralPGA Tour Golf Frys.com Open, Third Round. Central (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 First Daughter (2004, RomanceComedy) Katie Holmes. PG Cedar Cove Homecoming (N) Signed, Sealed, Delivered (2013, Drama) Eric Mabius, Kristin Booth. Premiere. Cedar Cove Homecoming (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002) Daniel Radcliffe. PG The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012) Ian McKellen. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. Boardwalk Empire Erlkonig MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Oceans Twelve (2004) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Newsroom The Genoa Tip MA EastboundHello Ladies MATrue Blood The Sun MA Treme Toni searches for a killer. MA (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlLove It or List It, TooLove It or List It GHuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG 101 Weapons that Changed the World Weapons have changed history. PG To Be Announced (LIFE) 24 38 24 31 The Switch (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Aniston. PG-13 Diary of a Mad Black Woman (2005) Kimberly Elise. PG-13 Witches of East End Pilot Witches of East End Pilot (LMN) 50 119 My Ghost Story: Caught on Camera My Ghost Story: Caught on Camera Celebrity Ghost Stories PG Celebrity Ghost Stories PG The Haunting Of... Roddy Piper PG The Haunting Of... Jay Thomas PG (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 For a Good Time, Call... American Reunion (2012, Comedy) Jason Biggs. (In Stereo) R Strike Back (In Stereo) PG Ted (2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis. (In Stereo) NR WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 1:15p.m., 3:55p.m., 4:25p.m., 7p.m., 7:30p.m., 9:35p.m., 10:05p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1:50p.m., 4:50p.m., 7:50p.m., 10:30p.m. Gravity (PG-13) 1:45p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 4:30p.m., 7:45p.m., 10:15p.m. Runner Runner (R) 1:25p.m., 4:40p.m., 7:40p.m., 10:20p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 4:10p.m., 7:20p.m., 10:35p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) In3D.1:35p.m. Rush (R) 2p.m., 4:45p.m., 7:25p.m., 10:10p.m. Prisoners (R) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7:10p.m., 9:45p.m. The Family (R) 1:10p.m. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) 1:30p.m., 4:15p.m., 7:15p.m., 10:25p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Captain Phillips (PG-13) 12:45p.m., 3:50p.m., 7:05p.m., 10p.m. Machete Kills (R) 1p.m., 4p.m., 7:20p.m., 10:15p.m. Gravity (PG-13) 4:20p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15p.m., 7:30p.m., 10:10p.m. Runner Runner (R) 12:50p.m., 4:10p.m., 7:10p.m., 10:15p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG) 1:45p.m., 4:30p.m., 7:40p.m., 10:05p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:30p.m., 3:15p.m., 7p.m., 9:30p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Flashback Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO HDNE EYMAT, MW ME JUPUAE WSP ZGPPMGIU, ZUA JSDBR IS EYPSDIY BMWU EYMATMAI EYUK YGR AS WGDBEN GE GBB. YUAAK KSDAIZGAPrevious Solution: With my sunglasses on, Im Jack Nicholson. Without them, Im fat and seventy. Jack Nicholson (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-12

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SATURDAY,OCTOBER12,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time699185 000G5K6 000G5JY DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Dietary ManagerJoin an Exciting Team! Certification req. with 2 years exp. Excellent Benefits Apply at: 611 Turner Camp Rd Inverness OR Email to: atadmin @southernltc.comAn EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D F/T P/T MEDICAL ASSISTANTFor Primary Care office in Homosassa F AX RESUME T O: 352-628-1120 FRONT DESKF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 Busy Medical Practice Seeks1.CT SCAN TECH 2.OPTOMOTRIST Experience is a must Competitive Pay/ Benefits. References Required call for immediate response 352-586-0632 or email hr@ cmc-fl.com CNA3-11 ShiftCitrus Health and Rehab Center, a five star skilled nursing facility. We offer a good salary and work environment including medical/ dental/vision insurance.Aliberal paid time off plan. Please Apply in Person for an immediate interview. 701 Medical Court E Inverness EOE/DFW Not for profit COTA& PTAPart and Full-Time openings (352) 795-4114 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 NEED 60K INVESTER LOAN 6% SECURED BY200K PROPERTY INTERSETONLY 352-528-2950 J/D PROF. male, looking for work in Citrus County. Ethical, degreed, 414-335-3707 Office AssistantFor busy construction office. Must have construction knowledge. Excellent computer, phone and filing abilities. Fax Resume to: 352-637-4141 BARBER/STYLISTFulltime/Parttime Experienced, Busy! Family Headquarters (352) 697-1145 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Stylist/Nail Tech(352) 344-8282 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Found Small Dog Oldfield & Oaklawn Area Homosassa Springs Call to identify 352-442-3458 Puppy, Mixed brown and red with white chest. Found 10/9 on Raccoon Ct (910) 986-3047 Single Key at Inverness Walmart found October 7th call to describe 352-419-8816 Smart, Pretty, Gunmetal Gray, short-haired, Male Cat desperately seeking indoor home!! (352) 746-1904 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath St arting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 2 Childrens Photo Albums, Red and Blue Grannie heartbroken (352) 795-0586 Black short hair Great Dane and Shepherd. 15 months old. Homosassa near 491 (352) 628-2413 Female Cat Gray w/ tan spots no collar, med size Beverly Hills/Holder area(352) 613-6482 Female Cat, Black with white chest and paws. Lost 10/8 in Citronella off of Dunklin Rd going into Citrus Spring. (352) 400-9961 Lost Female Siamese Cat dark chocolate seal point Homosassa Area REWARD (352) 503-3335 Lost in Beverly Hills. Tri colored beagle.40 lbs.Missing from N. Lee St. Has been seen on S. Harrison St. Very sweet neutered male. Has been walking in peoples homes and jumping in trucks. Please call if you have seen JoJo 352-249-3107 MALE VIZSLA Reddish/orange color, yellow eyes, 60 lbs, red collar, lost near Stage Coach/ Pleasant Grove. Dog needs medication. REWARD (352) 726-0120 (352) 247-6118 Male Yellow Lab. Lost on 10/4 Appoka & Annajo in Inverness Answers to Hunter (352) 464-0743 MISSING 9/8/13 tri colored beagle. Missing from N. Lee St. Beverly Hills. Special needs pet. 40 lb. neutered male very friendly. Seen by multiple people on S. Harrison St. BH Please call Donna @ 352 249 3107 or 352 476 3140 Motorola Cell Phone in case. Lost at OctoberFest in Kiddy Ride area. Please call (352) 465-7334 or (352)-209-2157 REWARD Large Siamese cat. lost 6/15/13 in the area of hwy 200 and Orchid dr. He was wearing a black collar with no tags. please call or text 239-287-0953 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 2 Dogs Free Pomeranian & Jack Russell Mix Good with older people. Owner passed away. Looking for Good Home (352) 726-8359 1988 Southwind RV. Needs to be hauled away. Lots of good parts w/ title. (352) 344-1411 Fiberglass Topper for Chevrolet Pickup 1987 & Up, has lock, sliding rear window, white (352) 586-0521 Free Fire Wood In Driveway 483 N Grandview Ave Citrus Hills FREE KITTENS Are spayed & neutered had shots, To Good Homes Only!! (352) 637-5423 Free Kittens Calico, Black, and Gray Tabby 8 wks old, litter trained 352-212-0667 Lab/Rottweiler Mix Spayed Female good w/dogs and kids, housebroken. Very Friendly owner cannot keep. 352-282-2802 Oak Firewood You pk up. (352) 637-2205 Two kittens, one grey tabby and one black. 10 wks, litter trained, eating solid, hand raised (352) 634-2735 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 Todays New Ads HONDA REBEL2009, 100 mi, like new, many accessories. Pine Ridge. $2995 OBO (419) 307-8954 Hunting/Fishing Camp 6 Acres, surrounded by timberland, easy access from paved rd Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. living room & AC Downstairs, Lrg. Kit., bath & bedroom, Good Hunting. Backs up to Golf Ammock Hunting Clb. Jimmy 352-302-4268 JOHN NATCUK paintings..if you have a John Natchuk painting that you would be be willing to sell, please get in touch with Robiellyn@aol.com LECANTOSaturday Only 8a-4p Crendeza, big man recliner, carpenters unfinished crafts, tools, mirrors, TV, books & much more 3460 W Kevin Lane Palm Terrace Maintenance Working SupervisorHigh School Diploma Required. Experience in industrial maintenance, welding, fabrication and 3 phase electrical. Work is in manufacturing environment doing general maintenance duties. Work hours and days vary. Full time first shift with benefits. Pay depending on experience $12-$17 per hour. Apply at: Global Tire Recycling. 1201 Industrial Drive Wildwood or Fax Resume 352-330-2214 Mattress Set3 yrs. old, paid $1,800 like new $500. obo (352) 527-8600 ORGANLEGEND. Perfect condition $300 Firm. You move. (352) 419-6186 Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 RIALTA2002, new tires, AC, & paint, 59k miles, runs great, great mileage $31,500. 352-238-4445 ROCK CRUSHERANNUAL FALL SALE Saturday 12th 8-1p furn. tools, baby, linens & MISC 5899 W. VIKRE PATH TOYOTA Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T cap, 80k mi. exc cond $9,000 (352) 726-3730 (352) 422-0201 Washer & Dryer White, Good Cond. First $125. (352) 302-8265 Todays New Ads 2012 Factory Easy tow, 5x10 Lawn Trailer rear gate $850. Home made dump Trailer, Good Cond. $375. Bob(352) 860-1106 Antique dining room set 6 chairs & buffet in perfect condition. Early 1930s $3500.00 Must see! 352-465-7132 BUICK2006, Ranier, CXL, 98k miles, Nice Asking $8,000. 352-201-1952 CHAPA26 ft, 1985 Cabin Cruiser. Brand new trailer. Needs eng & prop. $2000 obo (352) 257-0078 CHESTFREEZER 5 cubic foot Frigidaire, good condition, $75.00 352-628-3899 Connell Heights 4/2/2 Pool Home, Spacious, FP, fencd back yd. cust. built Great Loc. $195,000. 352-422-7077 CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 CRYSTALRIVER BIG SALESaturday, 12th 8a-2p jewlry, collectibles, wallpaper, borders, antiques 3 pc. oak ent. center and MORE. Behind Olive Tree Restaurant, US 19, MULTIPLE UNITS DINING ROOM SET incl. 4 chairs & hutch dark wood, good condition $300. (401) 829-5141 DINING ROOM SET Oak with glass top, 6 chairs, very heavy. $100 (352) 586-0521 FORD, Explorer, 106k mi., good cond. $4,500 negotiable 352-637-2258 or 634-2798 HOMOSASSA5231 S. Manatee Ter. Sat. & Sun 9a-4p HOMOSASSADrastically reduced! Was asking $74,000 now asking $59,900. Illness forces sale. 3/2 ,1 acres, 95% remodeled, 16x16 workshop. (352) 621-0192 HOMOSASSA Sat & Sun 10a-? Fishing & Furniture 3168 S Lee Way JOHN NATCUK paintings..if you have a John Natchuk painting that you would be be willing to sell, please get in touch with Robiellyn@aol.com I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I (352) 563-5966www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Dining Room Set Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly!640985A Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966

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C10SATURDAY,OCTOBER12,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tr ee Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding Local, Call Robert 352-302-2220 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 ASAPPAINTING CHRIS SATCHELL 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1 397 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Johns Painting & Wallpapering Lic/Ins. FreeEst. **352-201-9568** Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Mr & Mrs FIX IT (For Seniors) LIC& INS Home&Yard/In&Out Low Senior $ 613-2643 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Home/Office Cleaning Catered to your needs, reliable & exper., lic./ins. Bonded 352-345-9329 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 Compete Tree Service Dry Oak Firewood, 4x8 Delivered & Stacked (352) 344-2696 FALL SPECIAL Seasoned 4x8 stack. Delivered & Stacked $70 (352) 637-6641 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath St arting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 Retired Lady with 30+ years Homecare exp. Help w/ personal care companship $10 hr. Dee Dee, 249-4429 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 000G5JS INVERNESSVeteransYard Sale Our Lady of Fatima Church Saturday 7:30a-1:30p 550 US HWY41 S. Call 352-400-8952 for vendor space, $10 Please Bring ACan Good to help feed veterans LECANTOSaturday Only 8a-4p Crendeza, big man recliner, carpenters unfinished crafts, tools, mirrors, TV, books & much more 3460 W Kevin Lane Palm Terrace PINE RIDGE3530 W Cogwood Circle Baby gear, household items, SAT. ONLY7-1 PINE RIDGEFri. & Sat. 8a-1p 6653 W. Antelope Ln Wood chipper, sectry. desk, hshold. items, toys & Jewelry PINE RIDGEFri. 11th & Sat 12th LARGE GROUP SALE Hand & power tools, furniture, bird bath & MORE! 4940 W. Horseshoe Dr PINE RIDGESat 7a-12p Misc items 4894 W. Hacienda Dr. PINE RIDGESat only 8am to 2pm 5463 N Allamandra Drive, Beverly Hills ROCK CRUSHERANNUAL FALL SALE Saturday 12th 8-1p furn. tools, baby, linens & MISC 5899 W. VIKRE PATH Spruce Creek PreserveCOMMUNITY SALE SAT. 19th ,9a-12N OVER 50 VENDORS East of the withlacoochee on SR 200 Washer & Dryer White, Good Cond. first $125. (352) 302-8265 CRYSTALRIVER BIG SALESaturday, 12th 8a-2p jewlry, collectibles, wallpaper, borders, antiques 3 pc. oak ent. center and MORE. Behind Olive Tree Restaurant, US 19, MULTIPLE UNITS CRYSTALRIVER MEADOWCRESTCommunityYard Sale Saturday, Oct. 12th 8am-1p in Winn-Dixie Parking Lot/Hwy. 44. CRYSTAL RIVERSat & Sun Qual/Cheap Turn at Dans Clam HERNANDOFri. & Sat. 9a-3p Quality yard sale. Undercover rain or shine, Furniture, toys, Large assortment. 1629 E.FletcherSt Follow signs from 486 take McGee to Fletcher. HOMOSASSA5231 S. Manatee Ter. Sat. & Sun 9a-4p HOMOSASSAFri. 11 & Sat. 12, 8a-3p Furniture, Misc. Hshold. No Early Birds, 2453 S Columbine Ave HOMOSASSARUMMAGE SALE SAT. Oct 12,8a-1p Apostolic Christian T aber nacle 7961 W. Green Acres St. US 19 HOMOSASSA Sat & Sun 10a-? Fishing & Furniture 3168 S Lee Way HOMOSASSASaturday 12th, 7a-12N 5735 W. Novis Circle INVERNESSFri & Sat 9a-5p Tools, furniture, baby items/clothes, Misc. 4011 Berry St INVERNESSFri, Sat, Sun 9am-4pm MOVING SALE, furn and much more! 517 Elm Court JAPANESE BUFFET SERVER Black with gold, hand-painted decor. Like-new Call 352-257-5062 $100 KITCHEN SET 4 padded chairs on casters. Glass top, white base. MUST SEE $200 (352) 465-2237 LARGE LIVING ROOM CHAIR rose colored...$10-220-4158 MATTRESS King size, 3 yrs old with brand new box spring $500 (352) 419-6465 Mattress Set3 yrs. old, paid $1,800 like new $500. obo (352) 527-8600 Settee, 46W hardwood w/ pecan finish $50. 1 Counter Stool, chrome, swivel seat w/ back $25. (352) 564-9336 WROUGHT-IRON DAYBED like-new, light-colored frame with mattress. $100 Call 352-257-5062 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 HONDA PRESSURE WASHER $500 Excellent condition (352) 503-6902 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 TROY BUILT Riding Mower 42 inch cut $475 (352) 897-4681 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 BEVERLY HiILLSFri ,Sat 8-2 pm 3992 N. Everlasting Dr PVC BLINDS OFF WHITE-(2) SETS-71WX91H-$50 EACH (352) 527-8993 CD/DVD DRIVES 5 drives int & ext...$25 all 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 IBM 390E THINKPAD needs OS, plus extras...$75 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com LOGITECH TOUCHPAD Logitech T650 Wireless RechargeableTouchpad. $45.00 352-527-3589 22 HD Vizio Flat Screen TV cost $228, asking $50. (352) 527-1877 PLASTICADIRONDACK CHAIRS SIX -$7 EACH (352) 527-8993 1 Full Size Bed w/ Mattress, spring, head/foot board $75 Patio Table, Nice, new $75 No calls before 11am (352) 628-4766 4 white book cases on wheels $150. 2 red V shaped tables from daycare $50. (352) 795-7254 8 Wrought iron chairs & formica top table, 46x76. Excellent condition, $125 Call 352-697-2195 40 round dining table w/blue pedestal base...$35 call 352-476-2652 Antique dining room set 6 chairs & buffet in perfect condition. Early 1930s $3500.00 Must see! 352-465-7132 Breakfast/Patio Table tile inlaid w/benches very unique $100 Occasional Chairs $25 Dark wood Blk Leather unusal (352) 628-3100 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 CORNER COMPUTER DESK oak finish,51H w/ hutch,very nice $60 726-2023 COUCH Burgundy Colored. In good condition. $80 352-465-7132 Dinette Table 42 ,8 sided w/12 leaf 4 chairs, padded, on wheels. $175. (352) 746-9076 DINING ROOM SET incl. 4 chairs & hutch dark wood, good condition $300. (401) 829-5141 DINING ROOM SET Oak with glass top, 6 chairs, very heavy. $100 (352) 586-0521 DINING ROOM SET Solid light wood table, w/24 leaf, 6 cushd chairs. Large china closet. $800 Excellent Condition (352) 621-5561 Electric lift Chair Rose Colored. In good condition. $90 352-465-7132 END TABLES Oak Colored. $30 for pair 352-465-7132 Entertainment Center & TV Stand fits any large TV $550. Dining Rm. Set, w/ matching bar stools $550. (541) 973-5030 Entry way bench, $100 Area Rug, 63 x 94 $75. Cell (541) 973-5030 FILE CABINET 2 drawer, oak finish exc. cond.$20 726-2023 CROCKPOTREDNEVER USED $20 (352) 527-8993 CROCKPOTRIVALBLACK-NEVER USED $25 (52) 527-8993 FOOD PROCESSOR WOLFGANG PUCK SMALL-NEVER USED-$25 (352) 527-8993 GEORGE FOREMAN GRILLLARGE-EXCELLENTCOND. USEDTWICE $40 (352) 527-8993 GOOD DISHWASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. call/text Leonard @ 352-364-6505 GOOD DISHWASHER $100 works perfect. 30 day warranty call/text Leonard @ 352-364-6504 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GOOD DRYER$100 Works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GOOD WASHER$100 works perfect. 30 day warranty. Call/text Leonard@352-364-6504 GRILL/GRIDDLE WOLFGANG PUCK-NEVER USED $45 (352) 527-8993 QUESADILLAMAKER SANTAFERED-NEVER USED $30 (352) 527-8993 Refrigerator (2010) Kenmore, white, like new bottom freezer, 68 H, 33 wide, 30D glass shelves and bins, $425. (352) 513-5415 Call Evenings SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Used Maytag Washer & GE Dryer $75. for Both (352) 382-1830 WASHER OR DRYER $135.00 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like New, No Rust, Excellent Working Condition Guarantee. Free Del. 352 263-7398 WHIRLPOOLREFRIGERATOR 10cf top freezer, white. 3 yrsold. $110 Inverness. Call john 727 415 7728 phone 727 415 7728 COMPUTER DESK. Corner style. Oak formica. 54 x 54 x 51H. $85. 527-1239. COMPUTER DESK. Washed oak formica finish. 24D x 53H. $80. 527-1239. Craftsman 154 pc. Mechanics Tool Set Call for info, $75. obo (352) 586-3380 Craftsman professional 10 Table Saw, 1 HP motor, w/ Biesemeyer fence system. $475 (orig $950) (352) 628-1734 SHOPLIGHTwith 11 goodT40 flourescant bulbs, great shape, ($10) 352-212-1596 KARAOKE MACHINE WITH CD PLAYER $80 352-613-0529 SANYO 20 TV WORKS GREAT Excellent picture and sound quality $25. 352-621-0175 TELEVISION 20 inch color in very good condition. $25-220-4158 100AMPBOX 100 Amp Box NEW in box. $65.00 352-249-7212 CEILING FANS WHITE -5 @ $20 EACH (352) 527-8993 Exp. General MaintenanceMust be flexible and able to multi-task. Apply T ues thru Fri 505 E Hartford St, Hernando MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 12 ACRESClose In, Busy Hwy. 8 Mobile Homes, good Income. Many possiblities, Owner & Bank Finan. 352-212-6182 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com ANTIQUE SLANTTOP DESK good condition, $100. 352-382-0069 2 Person Hot Tub 110volts, excellent condition! $200. (352) 527-0618 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 AUTO BURR MILL CUISINARTSUPREME GRIND-NEVER USED -$25 (3532) $25 BREAD MAKER COOKS ESSENTIALS -BLACK-EXCELLENT COND. $40 (352) 527-8993 CHESTFREEZER 5 cubic foot Frigidaire, good condition, $75.00 352-628-3899 AC SALESWill train right person, easy six figure income Must have val. fl. DL, Dave (352) 419-7916 SALES CLERKApplicant must have computer skills, self motivated, works well with others and customer friendly. Must be at least 18 and have a valid drivers license Apply in person Pinch-A-Penny Inv. 2661 E Gulf to Lake ELECTRICIANS RESIDENTIALNEW CONSTRUCTION Exp. preferred. Rough & Trim. Slab, lintel & service. Full benefits, paid holidays & vacation /EOE APPLY AT: Exceptional Electric 4042 CR 124A Wildwood EXP. MECHANIC5 yrs min active exp.Clean Dr. Lic. a mustApply in Person: WALLYS806 NE US19 Cry Riv. LAMINATORExperienced in Mica/Wood Veneers No tobacco products, Val. Fl. Dr. Lic Apply atBuilt-Rite, 438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis, Maintenance Working SupervisorHigh School Diploma Required. Experience in industrial maintenance, welding, fabrication and 3 phase electrical. Work is in manufacturing environment doing general maintenance duties. Work hours and days vary. Full time first shift with benefits. Pay depending on experience $12-$17 per hour. Apply at: Global Tire Recycling. 1201 Industrial Drive Wildwood or Fax Resume 352-330-2214 RESIDENTIALELECTRICIANSMust have 5 years exp. Current on Codes & DF, Trim and Rough. Call (352) 746-6825 or Apply in person S & S Electric 2692 W Dunnellon Rd, Dunnellon DRIVERSTRACTOR TRAILER DUMP Cypress Truck Lines seeks 5 TT Dump Drivers (150 mile radius) Company Drivers Only *Assigned Tractors *Medical/Dental/Vision*P aid Orientation *Paid Training*6 Paid Holidays. 6 Mo TT Dump Exp & Class A CDL Req! Call 1-888 235-8862 www. cypresstruck.com Advertising Sales Rep.Weekly Publications Full Time Seeking Ad Sales Rep for The Riverland News and S. Marion Citizen. Work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. 2 or more years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, ability to identify and prospect for new sales opportunities, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No Phone Calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer. Classified Sales Rep.Part Time Seeking individual with strong sales, computer, customer service and organizational skills to increase our market share classified display advertising in all of Citrus Publishings products. The position will consist of receiving incoming calls and making outbound service/cold calls. Handle walk-in advertisers from our Meadowcrest office. College degree preferred and ability to demonstrate persuasiveness and/or sales abilities. Ability to work well in a team environment. Must be able to meet a work schedule of 29-hours per week. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicle online.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips RN/PRNEndoscopy ASC, Weekdays Fax Resume to: 352-563-2961 RNs NEEDED!!!ICU, ER, TELE EARN UP TO $43/HR. 2 yrs. exp. required! Hillsborough, Manatee, Pinellas, Pasco & Polk Counties Seasonal/Travel Contracts (813) 347-9112 afowler@ travelmedusa.com TRAVELMED USA Personal/ Commercial CSR220 or 440 LIC. INSURANCE AGENT Email Resume to Tracy Fero at: tfer o@fer oinsurance .com or Call 352-422-2160 REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty Advertising Sales Rep.Full Time The Citrus County Chronicle is seeking Chronicle Advertising Sales Rep to work with new and existing advertising clients to develop revenue growth through combined advertising sales for the multiple Citrus Publishing papers throughout the Citrus County & surrounding market area. Develop and implement sales presentations to existing and potential customers. This sales position is based out of the Crystal River. Two plus years of newspaper or other media advertising sales experience with successful track record in meeting and exceeding sales goals, self-motivated, highly energetic & goal oriented, ability to develop, plan and implement sales presentations, reliable transportation to make sales calls. College degree and knowledge of Citrus County preferred. Salary plus commission. Send resume to djkamlot@chronicleonline.com or apply in person at The Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River. No phone calls. Drug Screen required for final applicant. Equal Opportunity Employer.

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SATURDAY,OCTOBER12,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000G5K1 000FZP7 000GC4QAAA OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR1422 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-9630 Fax 352-795-6768 aaaoutboardmotors.com aaaoutboardmotors@embarqmail.com1654 BRUTE XTREME SIDE CONSOLEAlum. trailer, 40HP Mercury, Anchor Maters, Depth Finder, Trolling Motor. Call for Details. CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE 990 N. SUNCOAST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER 795-2597000GC4S 2013 XCURSION X20C CRUISE MODEL PONTOON Deluxe Helm Console with storage Vinyl Deck XCURSION X23RF PONTOON BOAT Honda or Yamaha F115 EFI Four Stroke Deluxe Helm Console 31 Gallon Centerline Fuel Tank 5 Year Bumper to Bumper WarrantyCALL FOR SPECIAL BOAT SHOW PRICING 2011 PATH FINDER 2200TE Yamaha F250SHO with 76 hrs. 4 Blade SS prop. 4 Bow Bimini Top Ameritrail Aluminum TrailerCALL FOR SPECIAL BOAT SHOW PRICING THREE RIVERS MARINE1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510QWEST COMPACT PONTOONSNow Available! From 14 to 20000GC4T Yamaha & Honda Powered Easily Trailered w/Most Small Cars SUVs I N S T O C K IN STOCK HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $795/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 INVERNESS3/2/2, Furn., Very nice, InTown 352-527-9268 FLORALCITYLake House 3/1 Furn. $750. 352-419-4421 Hunting/Fishing Camp 6 Acres, surrounded by timberland, easy access from paved rd Upstairs 2 BR, 1 BA, lrg. living room & AC Downstairs, Lrg. Kit., bath & bedroom, Good Hunting. Backs up to Golf Ammock Hunting Clb. Jimmy 352-302-4268 Lecanto 2.3 acres Fenced & crossed fenced, Great for horses 3/2 DW, Remodeled. Owner Finance w/ good down paymt $69,900. 352-527-7015 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CRYSTALRIVER** NICE** Secret Harbour Apts. Newly remodeled 2/1 $575 1st, last, sec. Unfurn. Incl Water,lawn, garbage, W/D hook-up. 352-586-4037 CRYSTALRIVERBUSINESS. LOC. FOR RENTHwy 19 Downtown exec. location,1000 sf Very Clean remodeled 352-634-2528 Sugarmill Woods2/2/1, like new, long Term, (352) 428-4001 HERNANDO1 Room Cottage, $500 mo. inclds elect. & cable, dep. req. 341-0787 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESS2BR/1BA+ CPort Lease to own $5,000 down, $700 a month. 3866 E Dawson Dr. Lg fenced yard. Sep. laundry, shed, mature trees, screened porch in back, covered porch in front, 2 minutes from shopping. For more info call Mary 423-244-6122.To see prop. 352-586-6088 BEVERLYHILLS2/1 W/ FL. Rm. CHA MOVE IN FOR ONLY $1150 (352) 422-7794 BEVERLY HILLS2/2/2 Good neighbrhd. Close to stores, $700 mo. F/L/S., 249-7033 BEVERLYHILLS3/2, clean, fresh paint $560. mo. 697-1457 BLACK DIAMONDLovely 2400SF home 3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for the golf cart. $1200 month plus security.(352) 464-3905 CITRUS SPRINGS, 3/2/2, fencd. yrd., $900 mo. 422-2719 CRYSTALRIVER2/2/2 $750. mo + sec. $500. 850-838-7289 HERNANDO 3/2/2Rent or Rent to Own built in $795/mo. www .ricky bobs.com 352-613-5818 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM Sugar Mill Woods3/2/2 villa, heated pool, on golf course, $1000 F/L/S avail 11/1 (970) 274-8786 RENTAL MANAGEMENT REALTY, INC.352-795-7368000GC55 www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com CRYSTAL RIVER 9469 W.Wisconsin Ct. . . . . . . $6502/2 Nice 2 story villa 9660 W.Camphor Ln. . . . . . . . $8003/2/2 Nice home on corner lot, with fireplace 11640 W.Bayshore Dr. . . . $1,3002/2 Island condo, with a great view of the waterBEVERLY HILLS/ CITRUS SPRINGS 87 S. Adams (BH) . . . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5/1 Cute home with Florida room 8180 N. Duval Dr. (CS) . . . . . $1,0003/2/2 Golf course home overlooks the 7th holeHOMOSASSA 3280 S. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . $6752/1.5 New Listing, cute and cozy lots of shade 59 ChinaberryCir.(SMW) . . . . $750New listing 2/2/1 Golf course villa, lawn maint. included LECANTO 3441 E. Chappel Ct. . . . . . . . . . $5252/1 Charming cottage, easy access to lakes 3069 W.Bermuda Dunes . . . . . $8502/2/2 Beautiful home in Black Diamond CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AV AILABLE CRYSTAL RIVERLg. 2/1, W/D hookup, water, trash & lawn. included $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 CRYSTAL RIVERQuiet, 1/1, $425. mo. &LECANTONewer Duplex 2/2 (352) 628-2815 HOMOSASSA2/2, clean, quiet, centr location $550., 352563-2114, 257-6461 INVERNESS2/1, $625. mo. 412Tompkins Street 352-895-0744 000GCFIROLLING HILLSAPARTMENTS11150 Rolling Hills Rd Dunnellon, FL 34431 Available Now! 2 BedroomsRental Assistance Available(352)489-1021This Institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer.Call Monday Through Friday 8am 12pm & 1pm 5pmTDD 800-955-8771 CRYSTALRIVER3br 2ba $650 -Incl, Appliances, WaterTrash, Fenced yard, Pets ok,352-587-2555 Floral City2/1, fenced yard newly remodeled $500. mo. inc. trash p/up (352) 344-1521 3 BR, 2BA Attached screen rm & carport 55+ park. Lot rent $235 includes water & trash pickup, great for snowbird or elderly person $12,500. (352) 212-4265 $11,094, DISCOUNT New Jacobsen, 2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA yr. Warranty. No down payment, use land or trade in. Payment only, $471.18 P & I, WAC Call 352-621-9182 ABSOLUTELY STUNNING NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 BAD CREDIT? FORECLOSURE? BANKRUPTCY? Want your own home? I can help!! 35% down cash or land and you are approved. No gimmick, 386-546-5833 HOMOSASSADrastically reduced! Was asking $74,000 now asking $59,900. Illness forces sale. 3/2 ,1 acres, 95% remodeled, 16x16 workshop. (352) 621-0192 Tired of Renting? Super clean 2004 3BR/2BA, on acre ready to move in!!! $3,500 down, $380.03/mo. W.A.C. Call 386-546-5833 for details Wont last! USED HOMESSingle, Double & Triple Wides Starting at $6,500 Call (352) 621-9183 2011 Live Oak 4BR/2BA $46,900, 28x60 INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 800-747-4283 for details 12X60 MOBILE HOME + 16x20 addition, 2BR, 1BA, 80x200 lot with10x12 shed. 6 appliances incl. $31,500. (352) 344-9565 Castle Lake Park INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt scnd lanai, steel roof, caged inground pool, 1 acre, no HOA fees, $69k (352) 238-4521 Homosassa` 2BR,1BA furnished, enclosed lanai, carport, 2 sheds, cyclone fence, 1/2 acre,$21,500 352-628-3899 TA YLOR MADE HOMESLOT MODEL BLOWOUT All Homes Discounted $4,000 to $8,000 Even up to $12.000 off Sticker Price Call 352-621-3807 Crystal River 2bd/2ba double-wide with Sun Room in Crystal River Village $20,500. or lease to buy. Pls call Dell Nora at 352-795-7161 Doublewide, 2 BR, 2BA, Recent shingle roof New AC, MUCH MORE 55+ Park $15,500 (352) 634-0274 LECANTO 2/2 Double wide MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf & A/C, shed, on rented lot $245 mo, incl water, sewer, trash. 55+ park. 352-628-1171 Lecanto2/2, 55+ Senior Park $11,500, furn. lot rent $245. incl. trash & water (219) 929-8909 WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+ Rent or Bu y $8,000 & Up Mon Fri. 8:30 1 1 am Call for Appointment (352) 628-2090 DOJHADojha, a 5-y.o. yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, calm, gentle & easy-going, gets along w/other dogs. Housebrkn. Beautiful & in great shape, wants to sit by your side. Came to shelter because family lost their home. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 LILLYLilly, a 6-y.o. female bulldog mix, white w/black ears, beautiful, friendly girl, weighs 36 lbs. Heartworm-negative & housebrkn. She loves treats & sits on command, came to the shelter as a stray. Very affectionate, wants to be by your side. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 LOKIELokie, a 3-y.o. brown-white terrier mix, weight 65 lbs., came to shelter because owner could not care for him, gentle, a bit shy, very playful, loves water, gets along w/other dogs, loves human friends, eager to please. Beautiful dog. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. REMYRemy, a gentle neutered pit bull mix, wonderful disposition, 1-2 years old, lot of energy, plays w/other dogs. Does not jump on people, knows sit & down, gives paw, walks well on leash, likes car rides, gives kisses, does not mind cats. Call Sandy @ 224-223-9279. Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Males Starting @ $400 Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent incl. grass cutting and your water 2 bedroom, 1 bath @$500 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 800-747-4283 For Details! WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 New Client Offer For YouTake 20% off First VisitANue SalonHair Skin Nails 1916 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida (Corner of Turkey Oak and Hwy. 19-Near Mall) 352-563-2110 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment Urban Suburban Hair StudiowelcomesKATIE FLYERSpecialty: Up-dos, Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting. Paul Mitchell certified. Stop in and say hello! Call to make your reservation today. 352-637-0777 826 S US Hwy 41 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Birds for Sale Blue Front amazons, $300 ea. Indian Ring Necks, $100. ea. Cherry head & cuban conures, $175 ea. Nandays $150 ea. Quakers $75 ea. Fisher Love Birds $35. ea. 352-637-6967 Doberman Puppies3 Males $500. ea Parents on premises 352-586-3386 2 CRANK-UPlight stands for T-bars or truss $75 both 352-476-2652 / tommyb @tampabay.rr.com 10LIGHTTRUSS w/dollies for DJ or band...$50 352-476-2652 tommyb @tampabay.rr.com BASS UKE 21 SCALE,ACTIVE PREAMPW/ PIEZO&POLY STRINGS $75 352-601-6625 LES PAULSTYLE ELECTRIC GUITAR, AGED MAHOGONY TOP& BLACK $75 352-601-6625 ORGANLEGEND. Perfect condition $300 Firm. You move. (352) 419-6186 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 PLAYSLIDE GUITAR? LPSTYLE ELECTRIC AGED MAHOGANY& BLACK $100 352-601-6625 RED-BLUE-GREAN rotating lights $25 for all 3. 352-476-2652 tommyb@tampabay. rr.com JUICE EXTRACTOR Cuisinart New. Never used Paid $150. Sell for $95. or make offer 352-621-0175 NEW BATHTUB 6 ft.call for e-mail picture 40.00 linda 341-2271 RUG-MOHAWK COCOAINK SWIRL, 10X 13$100 352-628-3507 Proform C840 Weight Bench Exerciser Exc. Cond. $125. BowFlex/Nautilus tread/stepper exc. cond. $125. (352) 527-0618 BILLIARDS TABLE American Heritage 1 slate top, leather pockets, solid mahogany, claw feet. All accessories included. Plus stainless mini beer fridge and portable ice make. All in gr eat Condition $1400 for all (352) 503-7690 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 Gun Cabinet for six guns, wood, with glass in door, accessory storage, $75. (352) 564-9336 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 SQUARE TWO LADIES GOLF CLUB FULL SET W/ BAG & COVERS $650, Ladies golf bag, brand new $90 (352) 897-4681 2012 Factory Easy tow, 5x10 Lawn Trailer rear gate $850. Home made dump Trailer, Good Cond. $375. Bob(352) 860-1106 2013 Enclosed Trailer, 5x8, vnose, w/ramp door, $1600. firm (352) 513-5436 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DOMINOES nice set with case, ($5) 352-613-7493 Extra Lge Dog Crate 48x30x30,Reinforced bottom $50.00obo 352-621-0248 FINGERHUTGIFT CARD 100.00 / selling for 85.00 Linda 341-2271 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 FREE FIREWOOD U pick up 352-382-3493 FUTON Light wood arm rests small scratches with mattress black cover. $40. 352-746-0714 Kitchen Aid Mixer New $160. 352-465-3086 Masterbuilt Smoker, new in box, never used. $250 firm 3 Burner Charcoil Broil Grill, SS top, w/ side burner & tank $85 (352) 897-4681 NECKLACE stainless steel, biker style with engravable heart, brand new, paid $150, only ($30) 352-613-7493 OUTSIDETABLE & CHAIRS Dark green bar high 2 chairs glass table. $35.00 746-0714 PICTURE FRAMES 4 large nice, ($5) 352-613-7493 PLACE SETTING w/napkin rings, made w/brooches Centerpiece Pitcher w/flowers and mirror $200. for all (352) 795-7254 Pressure Washer. Generac Model G23, 2300PSI, never used $125 (352) 344-8067 REFRIGERATOR Good working make good garage fridge $50. Firm. it is 21 cf believe its whirlpool-white. 746-0714 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $95 HAND HELD HEAVYDUTY METALINVERNESS 419-5981 SEWING MACHINE Elna Pro Quilters Dream, like new paid $2k sell for $600. (352) 212-9978 Sewing Machine Singer, cabinet style w/ chair $75. (352) 564-9336 SEWING MACHINE W/CAB. Riccar 101 Deluxe. Storage in Chair. $45.00 Ruth 352-382-1000 Singer Sewing Mach. Slantomatic 401 w/ cabinet, Good Condition $50 obo 352-628-3100 SINGER Sewing Machine with wanut cabinet. Very good condition. $65 obo (352) 382-1352 SNAKE Ball python with cage @ many extras 3female. $99.99. 746-0714 Solar Heating System for pool. See it in operation $550 (352) 628-6152 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 Used Shed8 x 12 Barn Style $850. (352) 860-0111 WOMENS BLACK RUBBER RIDING BOOTS $15 LIKE NEW SIZE 43LEUR 419-5981 YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 140 WATTS 2 9 60 WATTS & 1 5 80 WATTSALL$90 352-613-0529 Hospital Bed Electric Bed, Good Condition $200 obo 352-503-9468 STATE QUARTER SETS 40 complete sets, both mints plus Wash.D.C., Guam, P.R. all in mint tubes, 4,240 coins in all un-circulated. $1,500 firm for all (352) 344-4614 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 CHRISTIAN EDITION ACOUSTIC GUITAR WHITE W/TURQUOISE TRIM BEAUTIFUL! $100 352-601-6625 NEW FENDER SQUIRE JAGUAR BASS W/ULTIMATE SUPPORT GIGBAG $100 352-601-6625 NEW SD50 ACOUSTIC GUITAR GOLD GROVERS,SOLID TOP+GIGBAG!$100 352-601-6625 HOMOSASSAFri, Sat, Sun 8a-5p Everything Must Go! Furniture, Household items, clothing, and much more! 21 Sycamore Circle MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 2 GIRLS WINTER JACKETS LARGE $15 EACH 352-613-0529 3 MENS CASUAL PANTS 36X30 & 2 CASUALSHIRTS LARGE $20 352-613-0529 BOOTS size 7 tan work like, size 7 1/2 black dress, womens, good shape, ($5) 352-613-7493 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4 PANTS, 5 SHIRTS & 2 lightweight jackets $45 352-613-0529 Girls winter clothing 4 jeans, 1pants, 5 shirts, 2 pajama sets & 2 hoodies sizes vary $60 352-613-0529 JEANS embroidered, womens size 10, 1 roses, 1 daisies, brand new, both for ($15) 352-613-7493 MENS SUITHART SCHEFFNER & MARX. Jacket 44, pants 38x30, dark gray, $50 352-322-1154 Mother of the Groom gown.Adrianna Papell, sz 14, navy.Call for details. Only $60. 352-322-1154 2 KAYAK PADDLES-79 inches long, Ex., $30 each. 352-628-0033 2 MATCHING OFFSHOREANGLER BOATRODS-Sea Lion SL70BRT, 7, 40-60 lb line, Ex+ $80. 628-0033 2 WOOD FRAMED CHAIRS 1 Rocker 1 std, Removable cushions $30.00 ea or 2/$50.00 obo 352 621 0248 3 DOUBLE ROLLS FLORALWALLCOVERING $25 PREPASTED VINYL165 SQ FT 419-5981 23 UNFINISHED WOOD FORMS $25 HEARTS,TEDDY BEARS, BUNNIES 419-5981 10 CRAFTSMAN TABLESAW Heavy duty Saw good condition, motor need brushes. $80 obo. 746-0714 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BARSTOOLtall solid wood, good shape, swivels, ($5) 352-613-7493 BEALLS GIFTCERTIFICATE 100.00 / selling for 85.00 Linda 341-2271 BOW FLEX Schwin Bow Flex. Excellent condition. 746-0714 $99.99 CAMPBELL HAUSFELDAIR COMPRESSOR 100psi w/ air hose $40.00 obo 352 621 0248 CHANDELIER Beautiful lighting for dining rm or formal entry. See pic on Craigslist #4072048315. $60.00 352-322-1160 CHARCOALGRILL KINGSFORD 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION SIZE 5/6 $8 EACH 352-613-0529 CONCERTSHIRT Taylor Swift Red Tour, with matching arm band, brand new, ($10) 352-613-7493 COSTUME JEWELRY3 necklaces, 1 pair earrings, 3 watches, nice, ($10) 352-613-7493 DOG CRATE X LARGE SOFT SIDE Green cloth Sturdy never used $100. 352-270-3909 DOG CRATES SMALL (2) Black Wire.For pets up to 25 Lbs. Clean/Excellent $20. ea 352-621-0175 ELECTRIC GUITAR, CASE,TUNER,AMPLIFIER, and CABLES, excellent condition, $95, (352) 465-1813 ELLIPTICAL EXERCISER Folds when not in use. Like new, $95.00 obo 352 621 0248 ETHANALLEN ROCKER RECLINER Brown-Beige & Wood $40.00 obo 352 621 0248

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C12SATURDAY,OCTOBER12,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000G9XX 0 0 0 8 X H A For more information on how to reach Citrus County Readers call 352-563-5592. MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619ILL TAKE NEW LISTINGS BUYING OR SELLING TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds BETTY J. POWELLRealtorYour Success is my goal.. Making Friends along the way is my reward !BUYING OR SELLING CALL ME 352-422-6417bjpowell@ netscape.com ERA American Realty & Investments I NEED HOMES TO SELLDEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com LaWanda WattCustomer Service is My Specialty! I want to work for you! 352 212 1989 lawanda.watt@ century21.com Century 21 J.W. Morton Real Estate, Inc. HOMOSASSA4/2 BLOCK HOME, MOTHER IN LAWAPT. decking, 1/4 ac, fenced, lot of privacy $65,000 (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-538-9351 Phyllis StricklandRealtorBest Time To Buy!Prices are going up. So is interest.BUY NOW!Owner Financing Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 Well maintained bright villa. Split floor plan. 2 Master BR w/ walk in closets & priv baths. Lanai w. glass/screen $74,900 352-795-1648 Citrus Hills 3/2/2 caged pool, 1 acre, great neighborhood, call for details (352) 746-6552 8535 E Gospel Island Rd Inverness 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Water front living and all the luxuries. 30 Ft glass porch, cathedral ceilings. Extensively rennovated including wood and tile floors. Granite and new roof and kitchen. Over 2000 Sqft Living area. $139,900 352-817-5875 or miksh@earthlink.net INVERNESS2002, Custom Built 3/2/2 With Extra Lot $114.500.352-344-3112 Inverness city living, 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2006 townhouse in great condition. Low maintenance & easy access to shopping, etc. $87,500. Ed Pechan, Parsley Real Estate, 352-400-1230 RENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check!3BD $750-$825 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM 2005 MEADOWCREST (Fox Hollow) BEAUTY. 3/2/2 Lg Split BR, Cul-d-sac.See pics @ www.forsalebyowner .c om #23967875 Call 724-813-8624. Connell Heights 4/2/2 Pool Home, Spacious, FP, fencd back yd. custom built 2005, Great Location $195,000.,-422-7077 TAMI SCOTTExit Realty Leaders 352-257-2276 exittami@gmail.com When it comes to Realestate ... Im there for you The fishing is great Call me for your new Waterfront Home LOOKINGTO SELL? CALLMETODAY! Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Call me to learn about a Free Home Warranty Plan!!Buying or Selling Realty Connect Teri PaduanoOwner/Broker 15+ YearsExperience352-212-1446www.Realty Connect.me Imperial Exec for the investor or Handyman. (2/3/2) CASH ONLY. 48K. 527-1239 LAUREL RIDGE Upgraded in perfect cond. 2/2/1 w/ Florida room & new porch. $89,900 Call Barbara Stone (352) 586-3072 Lecanto 3 bedroom. 2 bath with fireplace, sauna, and garage. 2 acres w/fruit trees, garden ready. 352-422-7136 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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SATURDAY,OCTOBER12,2013C 13 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 2956-1017 THCRN Stergois, Lisa 2009-CA-6844 NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT INAND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-6844 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO ABNAMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. STERGOIS, LISA, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 10, 2013, and entered in 2009CA6844 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGERTOABNAMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., is the Plaintiff and LISASTERGOIS; SUNCOASTSCHOOLS FEDERALCREDITUNION; PINE RIDGE PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s).Angela Vick as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, www .citrus.realforeclose.com at 10:00AM on October 31, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK 162 OF PINE RIDGE, UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOFAS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 37 THROUGH 50, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of October, 2013. By:/S/ Michelle Lewis, Florida Bar: 70922 Robertson,Anschutz & Schneid, PL, Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 **IMPORTANT** If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator for the Courts at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; to appear in Court at, Citrus County, John Sullivan: (352) 341-6700. October 10, 12 & 17, 2013 12-14552 248-1012 SACRN 10/25 sale -Suncoast Storage & Rentals, LLC PUBLIC NOTICE Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, according to provisions of the Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Chapter 83, Part IV, Section 83.806 of the Florida Statutes, hereby gives NOTICE OF DISPOSITION. Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, 9034 W. Veterans Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448 will dispose of the contents of the storage space(s) named below via auction on Oct. 25 at 10 AM or by donation to charity. Successful bidder must pay in cash. All purchased items are sold as is and must be removed at the time of the sale. Space Number Occupant Contents 30 Maureen DeMaria Household Published in the Citrus County Chronicle October 5 & 12, 2013. Shop from Home @ www.citruskia.com000GC87AT CITRUS KIA, WE JUST DONT CLOSE CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS1850 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL 352-564-8668 *All prices are plux tax, tag, title. 2010 KIA SOUL PLUS G495443A $ 13,219 2012 OPTIMA HYBRID 504048A $ 22,900 2012 VOLKSWAGEN CC SPORT G457359A $ 22,192 2012 SOUL BASE 7594790A $ 14,750 2007 MITSUBISHI GALANT E G482858B $ 8,986 2010 KIA SPORTAGE LX P7704864 $ 16,900 2006 KIA SORENTO EX G474754B $ 9,100 2011 FORD FIESTA SE 7625036A $ 13,771 UFL 000G9LU HONDA, Goldwing, 59k mi, very clean, always garaged. $10,550 352-344-5177 HONDA2006, BTX 1300 Garage kept $6,500. (352) 398-5903 HONDA98 Shadow Aero VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh walls, retro look, 18k. mi $3200 352-465-7812 HONDA REBEL2009, 100 mi, like new, many accessories. Pine Ridge. $2995 OBO (419) 307-8954 KAWASAKI, KLR 650 Endoro, 15k miles, runs great, 1 owner, call for details $2,500. (352) 344-1223 SUN149 CC Motor Scooter Like New, 100 miles, No dents or scrates $900 obo, 503-3103 YAMAHA1985 Virago, 1000 cc, runs good. $1,200 or best offer (352) 201-5104 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLER2012Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 DODGE03, Grand Caravan Fully loaded, dual sliding drs. 35mpg, V6, Perf. cond., garaged New tires, Crystal Riv. $4,500. (727) 207-1619 TOYOTA2005 Sienna 1 owner,x-clean, Ask for Donna(352) 860-3115, 302-0778 Harley Davidson2000, 883, 7K miles $2,995. (352) 398-5903 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 1 owner $3,995. 352-341-0018 CHEVY, Tahoe, 166k miles, dual AC, clean interior ,1 owner, $3,500 obo, 954-294-8979 Pine Ridge FORD2007, Escape, XLS $7,950. 352-341-0018 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2003, Wrangler, 4 cyc., 5 speed, soft top, $9,950 352-341-0018 JEEP04, Wrangler, Sport 4.0 liter,auto trans, exc. cond. many extras, call for details! $13,500. 352-563-6666 CORVETTE1999 Coup, Silver w/ Black, 6 spd, loaded, extras, 14k mi, $25,000 (352) 513-4427 PLYMOUTH, GTX, Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $29,500 obo 352-302-8265 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2001 S-10 LS, 4 Cyl, 5 spd, air, 44K mi, mint cond. New tires, N/S $7500 (813) 410-6976 DODGE2500, 01, 6 Spd Qcab, dsl, 5th whl hkup, fully loaded + xtras, 2 new tires runs great, 33mpg, needs clutch soon 113k, HOT! $6800. OBO(352) 465-3086 FORD1979 Box Truck 460 eng, low miles dual wheels, am/fm $1000.obo (352) 637-4011 FORD2004, SD250 supercab Lariat 158 WB, 5.4L, V8, one owner runs & looks great. Over road high miles $6,900 527-0989, Must See! FORD2007 Explorer Sport Trac XLT, Blue, bge lthr. int, tow pack, 68K miles, just serv, $15,900 obo (352) 897-4204 SOLDCHEVROLET2005 1/2 ton, SWB, auto, P/S, V-6, just truck AC, like new $5,500. Franks A-S TOYOTA Tacoma, 4 cyl., A/T cap, 80k mi. exc cond $9,000 (352) 726-3730 (352) 422-0201 BUICK2006, Ranier, CXL, 98k miles, Nice Asking $8,000. 352-201-1952 MERCURY2001 Grand Marquis Excellent Condition 82k miles $5,700. (352) 527-9897 NISSAN2010Altima SL,38,500 miles, sunroof, leather, Champaign, loaded. Garaged, mint. 30+mpg. $16,500. 352-382-0005 SATURN1999, S11, 4 door, low miles, extra clean, 1 owner $3,250. 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $27,900 obo 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET04 Corvette, ConvArtic White, torch red leather, polished alum. wheels, auto heads up display, bose, senior owned pristine, 11k $27,900 obo 352-513-4257 CHEVROLET2004 Corvette Torch red coupe, excellent condition, LS1 engine, 6-speed, Z51 performance handling, fully optioned with 2 roofs, 42,000 miles, one owner, never hit or abused. $24,000 phone (352) 527-2927 or harmarjenkins @yahoo.com CHEVROLET, Corvette, T-tops, silver green matalic, automatic, very rare car, mint. cond. $16,500 obo 302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BMW, Z3, 3.0i, manual, 124k mi., green, black top, garaged, clean $7,450., 352-220-2077 BUICK1999 Le Sabre 48,000 milesAC broken runs perfect must see $2850.00 352-212-1863 CADILLAC2004 Esclade EXT 1 owner, fully loaded, dealrshp main,113k mi $13,500. 510-867-5727 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt LT 4door, power windows, locks, $3,495 352-341-0018 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 CHRYSLER 2002012 4-dr, loaded, 13,000 miles, 1 owner $19,000 firm Franks A-S 352-726-2494 DODGE2000 Intrepid Runs and looks great, 180,000 new tires $1300 352-678-7049 FORD, Explorer, 106k mi., good cond. $4,500 negotiable 352-637-2258 or 634-2798 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2011 Mustang Premium coupe, V6, Automatic transmission, 27,000 miles. Very good condition. $16,900. Please call: 352-726-2595 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 HYUNDAIElandra, 4-dr, 41,000 miles, sun roof, loaded $10,888. Franks A-S 352-726-2494 TIFFIN, Allegro, Class A, 30 ft., 2 slides, jacks, generator, new awning, 32k mi., 50 amp service $32,500, Call to learn all that goes with it 352-527-2327 TOWBAR: Roadmaster 5000 Stainless Steel Towbar. Universal fit. One (1) person operation. NEW $600...asking $300 or first best offer !! 352-426-4563 KEYSTONESpringdale 2005 Model 298-BHL super slide out, awning, tandem axle, coupling hitch anti sway bars, 30 amp hkup. Asking $9,500 or will consider shallow water boat as trade, (352) 503-9133 before 9pm MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Travel Trailer2011, 20 Rockwood MiniLite, Self Contained. Pwr. Slide out. Ex. Cond. $13,500 obo(352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** Alumacraft14 ft w/ trailer and extras $400 (352) 637-5032 BAY KATAluminum outboard, 28 ft, includes trailer & outboard mtr. 90HP $9,500. (352) 238-4445 CHAPA26 ft, 1985 Cabin Cruiser. Brand new trailer. Needs eng & prop. $2000 obo (352) 257-0078 KEYWEST2013 Skiff 17 Key West Skiff,Yamaha 70 4stroke,Trolling Motor,Jack Plate, GPS, AlumTrailer. Warranties transferrable $19,000 352 503-6668 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com ALLEGRO BAY, M37 Motor Home 35k mi. good cond. Needs minor fixes, $12,000 obo, Trade for Harley? 352-274-8664 AMERI LITEBy Gulfstream, 2011, 21 MBL, walk around bed, $9,995 firm. Franks A-S 352-726-2494 FLEETWOOD95 Flair, Class A 22 ft, 50k mi. Very Good cond MUST SEE $12,000 (352) 628-6643 RIALTA2002, new tires, AC, & paint, 59k miles, runs great, great mileage $31,500. 352-238-4445 Forest Lake, Hernando 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5 Acres, Fenced. Many extras including 24x36 Shop/garage. Sun Room with Wood Burning Stove. Fruit trees. 2 8x10 Storage Sheds. Security System. See ad on 4SaleByOwner for pictures. 352 726-7755 Whispering Pines Villa 2/2/1, new carpet, tile, paint,all appliances including w/d. $69,900. (352) 726-8712 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Desperately Need Rentals Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013 C15 000GC3P *Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pic tures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13. NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371 Crystal River Nick Nicholas S.R. 44 Crystal River Mall U.S. 19 U.S. 98 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Visit Us Online www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Anna Cruz Salesperson of the Month 2011 FORD RANGER XCAB One owner. $18,950 2007 LINCOLN MKX Moon roof, navication, AWD. $20,950 2009 PONTIAC VIBE Oen owner. $9,950 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS Leather. $14,950 2007 KIA SPORTAGE LX Auto, Keyless Entry. $11,950 2005 FORD F150 V8, Auto, Flareside. $8,950 2010 FORD FOCUS SES Leather, one owner. $13,950 2012 CHEVY MLIBU LT Sunroof, leather. $16,950 2006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED Auto, low miles. $19,950 2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED Warranty. $24,950 2004 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS Leather $6,950 2004 JEEP LIBERTY One owner, monroof, leather. $7,950 2011 FORD FOCUS Economy Car. $12,950 2008 SCION XD One owner $9,950 2012 FORD ESCAPE 5 speed, std trans, 1 owner. $14,950 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT Leather, 3rd row seating. $31,950 2011 FORD FOCUS $15,950 2010 FORD FOCUS SE 10,000 miles, one owner. $13,950 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 2011 FORD FUSION 4 cyl., 21,000 miles. GPR1244 $17,950 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 30,000 Miles. GP1632 $16,950 2013 FORD F150 CREW XLT 305 V8. G3T205A $27,950 2011 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER Leather, only 8,000 miles. GP1691 $19,950 2010 FORD TAURUS LTD Leather, moon roof, 1 owner. GP1684 $22,950 2011 FORD EDGE LTD Leather, moon roof, 20 wheels. L3T059A $25,950 2009 LINCOLN MKS Leather, 1 owner, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1681 $24,950 2010 LINCOLN MKX Leather, moon roof, ultimate pkg. GP1653 $26,950 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 10,000 miles, leather, 1 owner. G4C008A $23,950 1. 9 % Relax, Its Covered. 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage** 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** Formerly Gulf Coast Ford Nothing OUT-WORKS AN F-SERIES Nothing OUT-SELLS AN F-SERIES APR for 60 months MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,595 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -600 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . . . -500 $21,495 NEW 2013 F150 XL $21,690 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,340 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -900 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,750 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . -1,000 NEW 2014 ESCAPE S G4T036 G3T157 *Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualificati ons and complete details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership. 2010 LINCOLN MKZ One owner. G3T235A $22,950

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C18SATURDAY, OCTOBER12, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE *Savings on cars & trucks are based on Kelley Bluebook, payments, W.A.C with tax, tag & title. 000GC5Q First Annual www.cars.com/citrusautocenter.com | www.citruscyclecenter.com 352.527.0979 | 352.527.0129 Tues Sat | 9am-6pm Tues Sat | 9am-6pm Let Our Family Help Your Family With Your Next Vehicle Purchase Family Owned & Operated 1581 West Gulf to Lake Hwy | Lecanto Sales Event ALL VEHICLES HAND PICKED BY OWNER.. CHECK OUT THESE PRICES AND SAVINGS S e e U s F i r s t S e e U s L a s t S e e U s & S a v e WE DID THE NEGOTIATING FOR YOU! You Save $ 4942 2010 Ford F150 Lariat CC Kelly Blue Book $34,935 Our Price $ 29,993 You Save $ 4339 2006 Ford F150 Lariat CC Kelly Blue Book $24,338 Our Price $ 19,999 You Save $ 4303 2005 Buick Terrazza Kelly Blue Book $11,306 Our Price $ 6,999 You Save $ 3513 2008 Chevy 1500 XLT CC Kelly Blue Book $23,512 Our Price $ 19,999 You Save $ 3407 2005 Chevy Sliverado 1500 RC V8 Kelly Blue Book $16,400 Our Price $ 19,993 You Save $ 2443 2004 Chevy Sliverado 1500 LS XE Kelly Blue Book $16,436 Our Price $ 13,993 You Save $ 2353 2011 Chevy Silverado XE 4x4 Kelly Blue Book $27,346 Our Price $ 24,995 You Save $ 1622 2008 Nissan Versa SL Kelly Blue Book $12,615 Our Price $ 10,993 You Save $ 1466 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee Kelly Blue Book $15,495 Our Price $ 13,993 You Save $ 1438 2005 Honda Pilot EX Kelly Blue Book $12,431 Our Price $ 10,993 You Save $ 1407 2008 Ford F150 RCab Kelly Blue Book $14,400 Our Price $ 12,993 You Save $ 993 2006 Toyotas Tundra V8 XC Kelly Blue Book $18,986 Our Price $ 12,993 You Save $ 771 2003 Toyota Avalaon Kelly Blue Book $9,764 Our Price $ 8,993 1998 Kawasaki VN 750 WAS $2999 You Save $ 1000 Now $ 1,999 You Save $ 3000 2008 Suzuki C109R Was $9999 Now $ 6,999 You Save $ 2000 2007 Honda VTX 1800 Was $8999 Now $ 6,999 You Save $ 1500 2003 Honda Silverwing 600 Was $5999 Now $ 3,499 You Save $ 1700 2009 Suzuki GZ250 Was $4999 Now $ 3,299 You Save $ 2000 2009 Yamaha Silverado 1700 Was $9999 Now $ 7,999 You Save $ 2000 2009 Kawasaki Verys Was $6999 Now $ 4,999 You Save $ 2500 2005 Suzuki S83 Was $5499 Now $ 2,999 You Save $ 1500 2006 Honda VTX 1300 Was $7499 Now $ 5,999 You Save $ 1500 2008 Suzuki C50T Was $7499 Now $ 5,999 You Save $ 1000 2004 Kawasaki VN 1500 Was $9999 Now $ 5,999 2011 Honda Silverwing 600 WAS $7499 You Save $ 1500 Now $ 5,999 You Save $ 1382 2009 Scion Tc Sunroof, Super Low Miles $ 198 Per Month! As Low As 2008 Ford F150 Supercab XLT Kelly Blue Book $15,375 Our Price $ 13,993