Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date:
June 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates:
28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1889?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID:
UF00028315:03278

Full Text

Utter romp: Florida State easily dispatches Ma


TODAY
& next "
morning


HIGH
90
LOW
70


C I TR U


Few afternoon
showers, rain
chance 40%.
PAGE A4


OCTOBER 6, 2013 Florida's Best Community I


S C 0 U N TY





ONICLil
L www.chronicleonline.com
% Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VC


)L. 119 ISSUE 60


COMMENTARY:


Pickers or poachers?


Go to Cuba
Guest columnist Peter
Graulich writes about
the U.S. embargo of
Cuba./Page Cl
* Read more about his
experiences in
Cuba./Page A17
BUSINESS:


'~1~


Cancer costs
Read about the costs of
dealing with breast
cancer for Citrus County
residents./Page Dl

IN THEIR WORDS:


26 years
Bud Short talks about
his time as an MP in the
Army./Page A20

USA WEEKEND:

M 1.47.


Good health
TV's "The Doctors" and
"Nashville" star Connie
Britton share secrets of
good health for women
of all ages./Inside
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:
Made where?
Antiques
expert
John
Sikorski
advises a
reader
about this
ewer, ..
made at
the turn
of the last
century in
Palestine.
/Page E6


Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ................D4
Crossword ...............A18
Editorial ................ .... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Menus .......... A13
M ovies ..................... A 18
Obituaries ................A8
Together...................A22
Veterans ........ A20


6 018 41718 0 I o0


Fruit ofsawpalmettos draw

often-unwanted harvesters


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
A popular herbal sup-
plement has become a
new cash crop in Citrus
County
Buyers at two motels in
Homosassa Three
Rivers and Bell Villa -
are paying by the pound
for quantities of saw pal-
metto berries. On Wednes-
day, county residents were
getting 87 cents a pound


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA
Pink shirts. Pink ban-
danas. Pink bikes.
The color pink
flooded the Citrus
County streets Satur-
day as nearly 50 bikers united
together for the inaugural
Lady's Freedom Ride to save


for the berries they'd har-
vested from their back
yards and vacant lots.
The berries are an ex-
panding industry Accord-
ing to the Naples Daily
News, the industry with a
strong presence in
Immokalee, is now the
No. 3 herbal supplement
nationwide for the treat-
ment of benign prostatic
hyperplasia (BHP), a con-
dition often referred to as
an enlarged prostate, and


even prostate cancer, with
about $700 million in
global sales. The figures
came from Valensa Inter-
national, a Eustis-based
company that focuses on
the saw palmetto extract
business.
"Issues such as tracking
raw material supply and
chain of custody became a
part of our approach to
product manufacture,"
Valensa posted on its
website.
The source of the
berries, however, presents
a problem as thorny as the
palmetto shrub that
See Page A5


breasts through the Florida
Breast Cancer Foundation.
Women and some men -
congregated at the Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River be-
fore taking off on their 72.1-mile
ride through Citrus County for
breast cancer awareness.
"Today is a fundraiser for the
Florida Breast Cancer Founda-
tion," said coordinator Rebecca
Prince. "It is all about the ladies


Associated Press
Saw palmetto berries hang from a palmetto tree March 1,
2006, in Belle Glade. A year earlier, more than 5 million
pounds of the berries were gathered in Florida, where
most of the world's wild saw palmettos grow.


Families


hoard


cash five

years

after US

crisis

BERNARD CONDON
AP business writer
NEW YORK Five
years after U.S. invest-
ment bank Lehman
Brothers collapsed, trig-
gering a global financial
crisis and shattering con-
fidence worldwide, fami-
lies in major countries
around the world are still
hunkered down, too
spooked and distrustful to
take chances with their
money
An Associated Press
analysis of households in
the 10 biggest economies
shows that families con-
tinue to spend cautiously
and have pulled hundreds
of billions of dollars out of
stocks, cut borrowing for
the first time in decades
and poured money into
savings and bonds that
offer puny interest pay-
ments, often too low to
keep up with inflation.
"It doesn't take very
much to destroy confi-
dence, but it takes an
awful lot to build it back,"
said Ian Bright, senior
economist at ING, a global
bank based in Amsterdam.
"The attitude toward risk
is permanently reset."
A flight to safety on such
a global scale is unprece-
dented since the end of
World War II.
The implications are
huge: Shunning debt and
spending less can be good
for one family's finances.
When hundreds of mil-
lions do it together, it can
starve the global economy
Some of the retrench-
ment is not surprising:
High unemployment in
many countries means
fewer people with pay-
checks to spend. But even
people with good jobs and
little fear of losing them
remain cautious.
"Lehman changed
everything," said Arne
Holzhausen, a senior
economist at global in-
surer Allianz, based in
Munich. "It's safety, safety,
safety."
The AP analyzed data
showing what consumers
did with their money in
the five years before the
Great Recession began in
December 2007 and in the
five years that followed,
through the end of 2012.
The focus was on the
world's 10 biggest
economies the United
States, China, Japan, Ger-
many, France, the United
See Page A14


to help bring recognition and
education to the area for breast
cancer All of the proceeds will
be donated to the breast cancer
foundation for research and all
money will remain local, Her-
nando and Citrus counties. We
are going to start a breast can-
cer awareness support group in
both counties, also."
See Page A7


Public comment moves up agenda


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
INVERNESS Resi-
dents who want to ad-
dress county
commissioners won't
have to wait through so
much of the meeting:
Public comments will
start at 1:05 p.m. at Tues-
day's board meeting.
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners (BOCC) approved
the Public Participation
Ordinance at the Sept. 24
meeting, which resulted
in changes to scheduling
items on the agenda. Be-
fore the ordinance
change, public comments


started at 1:30 p.m., after
service awards and
proclamations.
The change to Citrus
County Code Section 2-49
dealing with public par-
ticipation at board meet-
ings came about in
response to recent state
legislation in Senate Bill
50, also known as the
"Anti-Shushing Bill."
It was sponsored by
Sen. Joe Negron, R-Palm
City, to amend Florida's
open-meetings law to
guarantee residents a
reasonable right to be
heard at public meetings.
During the past few


Page A7


* WHAT: Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners meeting.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday; public comments and
questions will be taken at 1:05 p.m.
* WHERE: Room 100, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
* AGENDA: Available on the county's website,
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, at the Lecanto Government
Building or in the commissioners' suite on the
second floor of the courthouse in Inverness.
* QUESTIONS: May be sent before the meeting to
Tobey Phillips, executive assistant to the board,
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450, or
emailed to tobey.phillips@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* WATCH: The meeting will be televised live on
cable TV on Channel 622 on Bright House and
Channel 9 on Comcast. The meeting also can be
viewed live online.


Lady's Freedom Ride


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Known only as "Shortee from Crystal River," this lady biker went all out for the inaugural Lady's Freedom
Ride. Proceeds from the event will benefit breast cancer programs in Citrus and Hernando counties. Potential
support for local breast cancer victims and their families is in the works, according to event coordinator
Rebecca Prince.

Bikers motor through county for breast cancer awareness




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oktoberfest continues in Crystal River


CUB preparing for
holiday registrations


Special to the Chronicle
CUB's Christmas regis-
tration is about to begin.
Citrus United Basket
(CUB) is accepting regis-
tration for its Christmas
Food Program for fami-
lies and Christmas Toy
Program for children up
to and including 13 years
of age.
Registered names will
be cross-checked with sis-
ter agencies, which also
provide Christmas toys, to


ensure fair distribution of
toys to every qualified
child. Proof of Citrus
County residence is re-
quired. Contact CUB di-
rectly for a list of other
requirements.
Registration will be
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday,
beginning Oct. 14, at 103
Mill Ave., Inverness.
For more information,
call 352-344-2242.
To donate to CUB, visit
citrusunitedbasketorg/.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The 34th annual Citrus Sertoma Oktoberfest is well under way Saturday at the north end of the Crystal River Mall
complex as "A.J." with Walkin' Tacos serves up a plate to Crystal River resident Rebecca Miller and her 3-year-old
son Kadrin Summelin. The rest of the family, Lynard and 2-year-old Kashis Summelin (sitting in background), wait
for lunch in the shade. The food and festivities continue today from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Volunteers Marilyn Schoefer
with Mission in Citrus Home-
less Shelters and Ashton
Newhart with Advanced Alu-
minum get ready for the
lunch rush Saturday at the
34th annual Oktoberfest at
the north end of the Crystal
River Mall complex. Oktober-
fest will continue today from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a car
show, and The Terry Cole
Show on stage from noon to
5. Organizers Brian and Mau-
reen Tambasco from the Cit-
rus Sertoma Club are
pleased with the way things
have come together: "We've
seen more support from the
community and local busi-
nesses this year. They really
came out to support Okto-
berfest." Proceeds from this
year's event will benefit local
charities and camps for
children who are deaf and
hearing-impaired.


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FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


Saturday, October 12th
-Cooter Scooter Freedom Run
ll A Poker Run with a rock concert supporting
,M .7-- our Vets and their families

\=. i -Monday, October 14th
Cooter Culinary Crawl sample four
restaurants as you rotate on the Courthouse Square


^ uflyU D Cooter Queen Contest
S Hae Lakeside Bar & Grille Grand Prize of $500
Do You Have
What It Takes Yz4v
Wlhat It Takes ;4,aY Thursday. October 17th
_a D y Cooter Idol Contest
-* Lakeside Bar & Grille Grand Prize of $500


:1vZ 1c> Friday, October 18th
uS Y-5 Cooter Cruisin"
Courthouse Square- Great Rock n' Roll
music and AWESOME Classic Cars
z, 7, Saturday, October 19th
'aM ygCooterlicious Farmer's
Market Inverness
-7"7 Sunny Cooter & Pumpkin Carving contest!

ay7 Tuesday, October 22nd
Cooter Queen & Cooter Idol Finals
Lakeside Bar & Grille
i Friday, October 25th
0A01 Cooter Rock the Block
An annual kickin" tradition with US Stones
and U2 Tributes. Beer & wine streetside
"a Saturday, October 26th
u-y. Cooter Festival
Miss Cooler Pageant, Cooler Races. Cooter Concert, BBQ
contest, Bands & Beer! Jake & Elwood Blue Brothers show!
_, 3Sunday, October 27th
DiYO^ Cooter Festival
Cooterween, Cooter Triatha(on. Cooter Races, Family
Friendly entertainment. Cooter Cupcake Wars & morel


I" PLACE 100 SCHOLARSHIP
"PTee Wee" Coolter Princess: 3-6 years
'liJtte11 Cooter Prnes: 7-10 years
"Jnilor" Cooler Princess: 11-13 vears
"T Coolter Princess: 14-17 years


Get all the details and
download applications at
www.cooterfesilval.com


Appearance, Palse, Personality, Style, Talent.,
Knowledge of InRMness, Citrus Ceounty,
ani all things Cooter Festival related.





Showmanship Vocal Quality
Audience interactionlcrowdl reaction
L Presentation *Chereographv/stage persona


DUKE
ENERGY, ()fINSIGHT


NICK NICHOLAS 9 i ?iaU FBI


... pFree
V^ForidO
lanA I"


w
Thial. Gre@.


For info. call 352-726-2611 or email Events@ Inverness-FL.GI *FriendiSunny________on_____________ uptotheminute_


A2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


LOCAL








S Page A3 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6,2013



TATE & LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Have your say on state's education standards


Public input meetings scheduled for Oct. 15 in Tampa and Oct. 17 in


Tallahassee


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

The Florida Department of
Education has scheduled three
public meetings in October on the
state's mathematics and English
language arts (ELA) standards.
Gov Rick Scott in late Sep-
tember withdrew Florida from
the Partnership for Assessment
of Readiness for College and Ca-
reers (PARCC) and is seeking the
public's input in regards to Com-
mon Core State Standards,
which are to be implemented in
the 2014-15 school year


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Committee to have
final meeting
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
conduct its final coordina-
tion meeting for Citrus
County's 21st annual Veter-
ans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct.
16, in the conference room
of the Citrus County Chroni-
cle building, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
Veterans' service organi-
zations and individuals par-
ticipating on the committee
are urged to attend. For
more information, email
chairman Chris Gregoriou
at allprestige@yahoo.com
or call 352-795-7000.
Republicans hosting
auction, dinner
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will host a
spaghetti dinner from 5 to 8
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at
American Legion Post 155,
Crystal River. In addition to
dinner, there will be a silent
auction and entertainment.
Former elected officials
will be the "cooks" and
Commissioner Scott Adams
will be the emcee for the
event.
The cost is $10. Tickets
are available by calling 352-
746-7249. All are welcome.
Golden Retriever
Reunion slated
Joshua's House for
Golden Retriever Rescue is
having its annual Golden
Retriever Rescue Reunion
from 10 a.m. to4 p.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 19, at Rainbow
Springs State Park.
The reunion is open to all
golden retrievers and their
families. Registration starts
at 9:30 a.m. and coffee and
a snack will be available.
Admission is a gift of
canned or bagged in-date
pet food, which will be do-
nated to Citrus County Pet
Meals on Wheels.
Rainbow Springs State
Park admission is $2 per
person. All dogs must be on
a leash; they are not al-
lowed in the water and
poop scooping is required.
For more information, call
352-527-0669.

Gainesville
Two injured in plane
crash near tailgaters
Two people were hospi-
talized Saturday after their
small plane towing a banner
crashed near tailgaters gath-
ered for the Florida Gators
football game against
Arkansas Razorbacks.
The plane's propeller
stopped and the pilot jetti-
soned the banner before
trying to make an emergency
landing in Flavet Field, said
University of Florida Police
Chief Linda Stump.
Images from the scene
show the mangled plane
atop an empty, overturned
pickup truck. No injuries on
the ground were reported.
Both people aboard the
plane were hospitalized
with non-life-threatening in-
juries, Stump said.
-From staff and wire reports


PARCC is a group of 18 states
-plus the District of Columbia and
the U.S. Virgin Islands -working
together to develop a common
set of K-12 assessments in Eng-
lish and math anchored in what it
takes to be ready for college and
the workforce. These new K-12
assessments would be intended
to build a pathway to college and
career readiness by the end of high
school, mark students' progress
toward the goal from third grade
and provide teachers with timely
information to guide instruction
and provide student support, ac-
cording to the PARCC website.


"Florida's families deserve
rigorous, clear standards that
will prepare our students for
success in college and career,"
said Commissioner of Education
Pam Stewart in a news release.
"We look forward to the public's
input, especially from teachers,
students and their parents who
are currently using these stan-
dards in their classrooms, to en-
sure that they meet our state's
high expectations."
The three public meetings will
take place Oct. 15,16 and 17.
The Oct. 15 meeting will be
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Hillsbor-


ough Community College, 4001
W Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa, the
Oct 16 meeting will be held from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Broward Col-
lege, 3501 S.W Davie Road, Davie,
and the Oct. 17 meeting will be
held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Tal-
lahassee Community College, 1528
Surgeons Drive, Tallahassee.
Floridians who are unable to
attend the public meetings are
encouraged to submit their feed-
back to flstandards@fldoe.org or
at wwwflstandards.org.
All comments must be submit-
ted by Oct. 31 to be considered
for review


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Luke Simons, co-owner of Momma'z Boyz Barbeque in Hernando, cuts into some ribs at the third annual
Bikes & Barbecue in Floral City.



Makes you go 'Mmm'


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

FLORAL CITY
he aroma of barbecue
filled downtown Floral
City on Saturday as
mouths watered for a taste.
The third annual Bikes & BBQ,
which coincides with today's
Rails to Trails Bike Ride, lured
enthusiasts of food and crafts to
the Floral City Library grounds.
The Floral City Merchants As-
sociation recognized the oppor-
tunity for a community fundraiser,
and thus Bikes & BBQ was born.
"We are encouraging the bike
riders to come to Floral City a
day early," said Dudley Calfee,
president of the Floral City Mer-
chant's Association.
Hardcore barbecue competi-


WINNERS
Pulled pork: John Messer
and Luke Simmons with
Momma'z Boyz
Chicken: Jim Curry with
Rooftop BBQ
Sweet and hot sauces: Jim
Curry with Rooftop BBQ
Ribs: Robbie Yoakam with
Gunslingers BBQ
Finger-licking fan favorite:
John Messer and Luke Sim-
mons with Momma'z Boyz

tors were hungry for the grand
title in four categories: ribs,
chicken, pulled pork and sauces.
Momma'z Boyz from Hernando
were confident their flavors
would electrify every taste bud.


"Luke Simmons and I have
been friends our whole life,"
said John Messer. "We like to
cook and cook for fun. It is an op-
portunity for us to spend some
time together as a family We
have already won because we
are with family"
Visitors were also able to explore
cypress-shaded Floral City by
visiting the arts and craft show,
live music and other activities.
"The food was incredible,"
said Spring Hill attendee Lydia
Hyde. "I am very picky about my
barbecue but have no complaints."
PD Smith, Scott and Michelle
Dalziel and 2PM entertained the
crowd throughout the day
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660,
ext 1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


Scheduled education
public meetings
* Oct. 15 from 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. at Hillsborough
Community College, 4001
W. Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa.
* Oct. 16 from 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. at Broward College,
3501 S.W. Davie Road,
Davie.
* Oct. 17 from 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. at Tallahassee
Community College, 1528
Surgeons Drive, Tallahassee.



Excitement,

frustration

characterize

'Obamacare'

rollout
Associated Press

MIAMI The federal
website that offers a key
provision of president
Obama's health law
launched this week with a
sputter, a crash and a lot
more web traffic than any-
one expected. But by week's
end, with most Floridians
still unable to access the
online marketplace and
sign up for health insur-
ance, organizations were
trying to build on momen-
tum even though there was
little they could do.
Most of the counselors
hired through federal grants
to help sign people up for
health insurance quickly
went to Plan B when the
website failed Tuesday
morning. Several commu-
nity health centers around
the state, fearing the worst,
printed paper applications
in advance, even translating
them into other languages.
Other groups took down
consumers' contact infor-
mation, promising to
schedule appointments
when the website begins to
work better
There was an odd mix of
excitement that the Af-
fordable Care Act was gar-
nering so much attention
and frustration that it was-
n't accessible.
John Foley, an attorney
and certified counselor for
Legal Aid Society of Palm
Beach County, said he's
tried unsuccessfully to log
into the system almost
non-stop since 5 a.m. Tues-
day A frustrated Foley
said his navigators would
not try again to enroll any-
one until Monday
"I am too worried to
even involve a consumer
at this point. I would hate
to see a problem in the
middle of the process," he
said. "I am very worried
that people will lose faith
in the system. Clearly we
are losing most, if not all,
of the momentum that was
built up leading to open
enrollment."
But federal health offi-
cials cautioned this was
just the first week in a six
month enrollment process.
Consumers don't need to
sign up until Dec. 15 to get
coverage on Jan. 1. They
have until the end up
March to sign up to avoid
tax penalties.
"This has never been
done before and this is a
historic moment ... we
think that's a tremendous
beginning to this program
and we're off to a good
start," said Julie Bataille of
the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services.


At shelter's 'Dogtoberfest,' pooches get to party


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Animal
Services will be hosting an
event called Dogtoberfest
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 19 at 4030 Air-
port Road, Inverness. The
event is sponsored by Cit-


rus County Foundation for
Animal Protection (CCFAP)
as part of the grand open-
ing of the new exercise
yards for the shelter dogs.
The public is encour-
aged to come out and help
celebrate and honor those
who made these play and


exercise yards a reality In
March, when organizers
first began fundraising, the
goal seemed like a faraway
dream. Within a few months,
with the generous dona-
tions of county residents,
they raised more than
$11,000 to create four large


fenced yards for the dogs.
Spending some time out
of their confining cement
kennels has been hugely
beneficial to their physical
and emotional well-being.
They now get some time
where they can get sun-
shine, splash in kiddy pools


and run freely for a while.
Dogtoberfest promises
to be a fun day, with a shel-
ter "dog show," music, free
food, games and prizes and
a chance to take home a
new dog or cat
All dogs are fully vetted
and microchipped.




A4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Develop an idea you have
to help you convert something you
enjoy doing into a profitable endeavor.
Don't sit idle when you should explore
new possibilities and making new con-
nections. Consistency will make a dif-
ference as the year progresses.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Refuse to
let anyone bully you. Take advantage
of changes that take place in your
community.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Expand
your awareness, embrace new experi-
ences and consider what you can do
to improve your home life and sur-
roundings. Express your feelings.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Cre-
ative suggestions will be well-received
and help you secure a spot in an or-
ganization that interests you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
can raise your profile and your reputa-
tion by offering a little help, guidance
and loyalty. Socializing with other con-
tributors will be conducive to love.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Keep
life simple and avoid interactions that
can lead to arguments or emotional
upset. Protect your health, your emo-
tions and your reputation.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Enjoy
different forms of entertainment. Mingle
and discuss plans with people you find
inspiring. There are profits to be made
and ideas to exploit.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Uncer-
tainty and indecision will pose a prob-
lem for you. Back up and don't allow
anyone to pressure you into something
that you feel unsure about.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Get back
to basics. Alterations at home will im-
prove your relationship with someone
you love. Express your thoughts, ideas
and plans for the future.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Get the
details concerning a job you are asked
to do before you take on the task. You
might not want to follow through.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You'll be
drawn to unusual people, as well as to
destinations you have never visited be-
fore. An open mind will lead to new
friendships and lifestyle changes.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Check out
what everyone else wants. Consider
what works and allows you to stay
within your budget.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Travel
plans, romantic destinations and nur-
turing what's important to you will
make your day


ENTERTAINMENT


Elusive graffiti artist
Banksy hits NYC
NEW YORK Graffiti by the
secretive British artist Banksy is
turning up on the streets of New
York City and all over social
media.
Banksy announced on his
website that he is undertaking
"an artists residency on the
streets of New York" this month.
He's posting pictures of his
work on the website and fans
are plastering the images all
over Facebook, Twitter and
Instagram.
Jennifer Hawkins, who runs a
public relations agency in Chelsea,
posted pictures on Facebook
after finding "a Banksy sighting
right out my office backdoor," on
24th Street between Sixth and
Seventh avenues.
Spray-painted on a building
wall already defaced by illegible
scrawls, the graffiti shows a black
silhouette of a dog lifting his leg
on a fire hydrant, with the words
'You complete me" in a cartoon
bubble.
The Daily Telegraph, a British
outlet, has created an online
map to track the images. The
Museum of Modern Art posted
links on its Twitter feed with a
"Banksy watch" tag.
At least one of the works is gone
already, altered by other graffiti
artists and then whitewashed.
The picture, done on a wall in
Chinatown, showed a barefoot
boy with a cap standing on an-
other boy's back, pointing at a sign
that says, "Graffiti is a crime."
His website includes a toll-free
number and an online "Click here
to listen" button with commentary
on each image that spoofs the
pre-recorded tours commonly of-
fered at museum exhibits. The
commentary mispronounces his
name as Ban-sky and is read
against a soundtrack of cheesy
elevator music.


Associated Press
Graffiti by the secretive British artist Banksy is pictured Thursday
in New York. Banksy announced he is undertaking "an artists
residency on the streets of New York" this month.


One line from the tour says:
'You're looking at a type of picture
called graffiti, from the Latin graf-
fito, which means graffiti with an O."
The commentary goes on to say,
"Let us pause for a moment to
consider the deeper meaning of
this work. OK, that's long enough,"
later adding, "What exactly is the
artist trying to say here? ... Per-
haps it is a postmodern com-
ment on how the signifiers of
objects have become as real as
the object themselves. Are you
kidding me? Who writes this
stuff? Anyway, you decide."
Banksy who refuses to give
his real name began his ca-
reer in the British city of Bristol
spray-painting local buildings.
His works now fetch thousands
of dollars around the world.
Another of Banksy's New York
City efforts bears the words "This
is my New York accent" spray-
painted in classic graffiti-style
handwriting with "...normally I write
like this" in neat print underneath.
By Friday afternoon, the work
had been so tagged over by other
graffiti artists it was almost im-
possible to make out the original.
Welcome to New York,
Banksy.


Quilter wins $200K
ArtPrize contest
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.--A
quilter inspired by a Lake Michigan
lakeshore near her home was
declared the winner Friday of the
$200,000 ArtPrize competition.
Ann Loveless of Frankfort,
Mich., won the public voting at
the annual 19-day event in
Grand Rapids, Mich., which ends
Sunday. Her quilt is titled "Sleep-
ing Bear Dune Lakeshore,"
named for a national lakeshore
in northern Michigan.
It was displayed on a wall at
the Gerald R. Ford Presidential
Museum, one of 168 venues
showing ArtPrize entries, but was
moved to an outdoor tent after the
federal government shutdown
closed the museum. Loveless
said she has made art quilts for
10 years, but at 20 feet long, this
was the biggest so far. She and
her husband own State of the Art
Framing & Gallery in Beulah, Mich.
"I have a feeling our gallery's
going to be really busy," Loveless
said in a telephone interview.
"I'll probably sell out of quilts, but
I'll make more. I'll make more."
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Oct. 6, the
279th day of 2013. There are 86
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct. 6, 1927, the era of talk-
ing pictures arrived with the open-
ing of "The Jazz Singer," starring Al
Jolson, a movie featuring silent and
sound-synchronized sequences.
On this date:
In 1536, English theologian and
scholar William Tyndale, who was
the first to translate the Bible into
Early Modern English, was exe-
cuted for heresy.
In 1884, the Naval War College
was established in Newport, R.I.
In 1928, Chiang Kai-shek be-
came president of China.
In 1958, the nuclear submarine
USS Seawolf surfaced after spend-
ing 60 days submerged.
Ten years ago: American Paul
Lauterbur and Briton Peter Mans-
field won the Nobel Prize for medi-
cine for discoveries that led to
magnetic resonance imaging.
Five years ago: The Dow indus-
trial average dropped to 9,955, its
first close below 10,000 since 2004.
One year ago: Five terror sus-
pects, including Egyptian-born
preacher Mustafa Kamel Mustafa,
widely known as Abu Hamza al-
Masri, arrived in the United States
from England and appeared in
court in New York and Connecticut.
Mustafa is accused of conspiring
with some Seattle men to set up a
terrorist training camp in Oregon
and of helping abduct two American
tourists and 14 other people in
Yemen in 1998.
Today's Birthdays: Actress Britt
Ekland is 71. Singer Millie Small is
67. Singer-musician Thomas
McClary is 64. Former NFL player
and coach Tony Dungy is 58. Actress
Elisabeth Shue is 50. Singer
Matthew Sweet is 49. Country singer
Tim Rushlow is 47. Actress Amy Jo
Johnson is 43. Actress Emily Mor-
timer is 42. Actor Jeremy Sisto is 39.
Actor Wes Ramsey is 36.
Thought for Today: "Talking
comes by nature, silence by wis-
dom." -Author unknown.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
IH- LO PR Hi L

91 68 0.00 90 8 0.00 89 6


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
pc
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
PC
pc
pc
r
pc
c
pc
pc
pc


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Expect a slight
chance of showers today.


90- 67 race 91 69 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusveday
forecast by'

L High: 90 Low: 70
.0,08, ~Few afternoon showers, rain chance
^ 40% t5
W MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 87 Low: 70
Scattered showers and storms, rain chance 60%

~TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 66
Isolated showers, rain chance 20%

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 90/68
Record 94/49
Normal 87/65
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 50.33 in.
Normal for the year 45.47 in.
*Asof7pm at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 48%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, elm, chenopods
Today's count: 5.7/12
Monday's count: 5.5
Tuesday's count: 7.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
10/6 SUNDAY 6:55 12:42 7:21 1:08
10/7 MONDAY 7:53 1:39 8:21 2:07
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O ( e SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:10P.M.
SSUNRISE TOMORROW ..................... 7:27 A.M.
0 (4 0 MOONRISE TODAY ........................... 8:59 A.M.
OCT. 11 OCT. 18 OCT. 20 NOV. 3 MOONSET TODAY ............................8:21 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 6:39 a/2:44 a 7:42 p/3:11 p
Crystal River- 5:00 a/12:06 a 6:03 p/12:33 p
Withlacoochee* 2:47 a/10:21 a 3:50 p/10:29 p
Homosassa*** 5:49 a/1:43 a 6:52 p/2:10 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
7:11 a/3:19 a 8:27 p/3:52 p
5:32 a/12:41 a 6:48 p/1:14 p
3:19 a/11:02a 4:35 p/11:05 p
6:21 a/2:18 a 7:37 p/2:51 p


Gulf water
temperature


830
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 30.24 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.45 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 39.97 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.79 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
'I


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L City H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


ts
s
pc
ts
pc
s
pc
s
s
sh
.32 ts
sh
pc
pc
pc
.82 pc
.07 ts
.03 ts
pc
.44 ts
sh
s
.01 pc
pc
.03 ts
s
.26 ts
.02 sh
sh
.01 pc
ts
ts
s
pc
s
1.25 ts
ts
1.01 pc
.01 pc
ts
ts
ts


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


New Orleans 89 75 .13 ts 86 65
New York City 76 64 pc 79 66
Norfolk 87 66 pc 88 66
Oklahoma City 65 52 .30 pc 69 47
Omaha 55 45 sh 54 44
Palm Springs 88 71 s 89 67
Philadelphia 86 66 c 82 68
Phoenix 86 66 s 89 64
Pittsburgh 81 65 .10 sh 84 64
Portland, ME 60 55 sh 57 56
Portland, Ore 73 44 pc 73 49
Providence, R.I. 71 57 .23 sh 66 59
Raleigh 89 61 pc 88 67
Rapid City na na na pc 51 36
Reno 70 35 s 75 42
Rochester, NY 63 60 .07 ts 78 65
Sacramento 84 48 s 85 55
St. Louis 79 66 pc 65 50
St. Ste. Marie 54 46 .06 ts 60 52
Salt Lake City 58 35 s 68 45
San Antonio 91 75 s 80 51
San Diego 85 58 s 83 64
San Francisco 78 61 s 79 57
Savannah 88 66 pc 84 71
Seattle 68 47 pc 68 51
Spokane 63 36 s 68 43
Syracuse 66 60 ts 75 63
Topeka 62 47 sh 58 42
Washington 89 70 pc 87 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 96 Cotulla, Texas LOW 7 Berthoud
Pass, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77As
Amsterdam 61/49/sh
Athens 69/57/pc
Beijing 77/55/s
Berlin 58/54/c
Bermuda 79/75/pc
Cairo 79/59/s
Calgary 68/46/pc
Havana 86/73As
Hong Kong 83/73/s
Jerusalem 68/53/pc


Lisbon 76/58/s
London 65/57/c
Madrid 77/53/s
Mexico City 76/55/ts
Montreal 61/59/sh
Moscow 53/34/pc
Paris 66/53/c
Rio 72/61/pc
Rome 72/63/pc
Sydney 85/63/pc
Tokyo 78/68/sh
Toronto 72/52/sh
Warsaw 56/41/c


ILLEGAL NOTICES





Fictitious Name Notices................. D6


Meeting Notices.............................. D6


Miscellaneous Notices................... D6


CITRULIS COUNTY



CHRpNICLE
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MARINE OUTLOOK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PICKERS
Continued from Page Al

produces the fruit.
"You cannot pick them
on public lands without a
permit or on private lands
without the landowners'
permission," said Karen
Parker, Florida Fish and
Wildlife (FWC) spokes-
woman.
On public wildlife
refuge areas, the green,
brown or black berries are
a huge food source for
wildlife.
"Bears, gopher tortoises,
birds and other animals
feed on them," Parker
said.
Even if the berries ap-
pear abundant, Parker
said wildlife needs must
be met first. The berries
dropping on the ground
start the cycle to replenish
the wildlife food source.
"The berries are diffi-
cult to sow," Parker said.
"It takes two years for
them to germinate."
Timing is the obstacle to
issuing picking permits on
state lands because of dif-
ferent hunting seasons.
Berry harvesters would be
unsafe at present, for ex-
ample, Parker said, be-
cause it is archery season.
Permits are issued by the
Division of Forestry
Anyone who sees berry
harvesting on any public
lands FWC, Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion, Southwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict to name a few is en-
couraged to report it to the
FWC's Wildlife Alert Hot-
line at 888-404-3922, text
Tip@MyFWC.com or visit
MyFWC.com/Contact and
select "Report Violators."
Private landowners also
have felt invaded by berry
harvesters.
"We're fed up with the
trespassing," said a Pine
Ridge resident who didn't
want to be named to avoid
attracting others who
would trespass.
Others who live in the
equestrian community
likewise felt frustrated
about protecting their
property from berry pick-
ers. Many residents own


acreage left in its natural
state to ensure privacy, and
that privacy is breached by
the berry pickers.
Ironically, Pine Ridge
landowners can be so
shielded by their own
lands that only a neighbor
can spot and report a tres-
passer to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. Reporting
is exacerbated by property
owners who are part-time
residents or own property
as an investment. It may be
difficult to contact the
property owner when the
trespass occurs to press
charges.
The resident said ac-
cording to the CCSO, tres-
passers picking berries
represented no real
damage.
However, any entry on
private property without
the owner's consent
amounts to trespass. Fur-
thermore, removing some
forms of vegetation is cov-
ered as a criminal offense.
The Legislature added
"the fruit of the saw pal-
metto" to the definition of
agricultural products in
1997 because of the popu-
larity of the palmetto berry
as a treatment for BHP
and its abundance
throughout the state, ac-
cording to a legislative
study
Declaring the palmetto


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The saw palmetto starts to fruit
in August and produces its last
berry in mid-October.


MAnTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Boxes of saw palmetto berries are stacked in front of
Three Rivers motel in Homosassa. A sign in a window of
one of the rooms offers to pay 87 cents per pound for the


berries.
berry a cash crop gave the
state status to levy penal-
ties against those con-
victed of poaching.
Depending on the amount
of fruit taken and a per-
son's criminal history, jail
terms range from one to
five years with fines up to
$10,000.
But in spite of the cash-
crop status, charges have
been dropped when a
landowner admits the
berries are of no
consequence.
Last year, an unem-
ployed North Naples man
was arrested in late August
after state wildlife officers
found him trying to haul
427 pounds of berries in
burlap sacks from private


property, according to the
Naples Daily News. But
the State Attorney's Office
in Southwest Florida
dropped charges after the
property owner said the
berries weren't worth any-
thing to him.
For many private
landowners, trespass is
the issue, not poaching.
"Every year, they're out
there picking the berries,"
Citrus County Sheriff's
Capt. Justin Ferrara said.
"The plants are indige-
nous. They are wild all
over the state of Florida.
Because there are that
many of them and there is
a venue to sell them at,
people are going to tres-
pass on various different


types of land to get the lit-
tle berries."
In Pine Ridge, Ferrara
said, the land is private, but
the roads are public.
Therefore, people who in-
tend to pick berries can
legally enter the neighbor-
hood, unlike a private
gated community such as
Black Diamond immedi-
ately east of Pine Ridge, or
a national refuge that re-
quires a daily use permit,
such as Chassahowitzka
Wildlife Management Area.
Ferrara said the offend-
ers are "trespassed," told
to leave the private prop-
erty and warned they will
be arrested any time they
return. He said the pres-
ence of berry pickers had
not shown an increase in
the incidence of other
property crimes, such as
thefts and vandalisms, in
the county
Factoring the arrest risk
and the nuisance element,
the herbal supplement has
no known long-term value
to make the trouble worth-
while. The effectiveness of
the palmetto berry for
prostate treatments has lit-


tle backing from physicians.
The U.S. Food and DrugAd-
ministration approved sev-
eral drugs to relieve
common symptoms associ-
ated with an enlarged
prostate, but saw palmetto
is not among them.
According to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, "Some
clinical studies have found
that saw palmetto relieves
some symptoms of benign
prostatic hyperplasia
(BPH), or enlarged
prostate, such as difficult
and frequent urination.
However, at this time there
are no available study re-
sults that show that saw
palmetto can prevent or
treat prostate cancer"
Fortunately for privacy
seekers, and unfortunately
for harvesters, the season
ends this month. The saw
palmetto starts to fruit in
August and produces its
last berry in mid-October
Less bush rustling should
be apparent through win-
ter and spring.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormerat
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. corn.


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AL-


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 AS




A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Don t forget to get your tickets
for Diva Night-October 12 where
the entries will be on display.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RIDE
Continued from Page Al

A prayer was said, and
then riders began roaring
their engines in anticipa-
tion of the ride, which sig-
nified life and
remembrance to many
"I have a sister-in-law
who is a two-year breast
cancer survivor," said
Spring Hill resident and
rider Karla Lugo. "I
wanted to be a part of this
for her I ride myself, and
this was a way for us (with
her daughter Angelina
Lugo) to give back."
At the strike of 10 a.m.,
bikers headed to their
stops at the Dam Pub in
Lake Panasoffkee and
IRRU Family Social Club
in Inverness, where there
was a buffet for riders and
Sleepy Hollow in Floral
City
Bikers arrived back for
an afternoon of fun and
entertainment while rais-
ing awareness about
breast cancer and rais-
ing revenue. Music was


The inaugural Lady's Freedom Ride featured some 50
riders in a 72.1-mile ride Saturday as they took off from
the Harley-Davidson dealership in Homosassa.


provided by a variety of
musicians who donated
their time.
Other highlights were
the male bike wash, three-
legged race, men's hula-
hoop contest, a
wheelbarrow race, corn
hole competition and
Hoppy Ball race for
women, a cake walk with
donated baked goods, door
prizes, drawings and auc-
tions throughout the day


One rider said she was
riding in support of med-
ical research.
"I support all medical
research that is going on,
especially for females,"
said Inverness rider
Jackie Kulp, who was rep-
resenting the American
Legion Riders Post No.
155.
"If you can save one
life," Kulp said, "you have
saved the whole world. It


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Steve and Susie Simotes from Crystal River prepare to ride in the inaugural Lady's
Freedom Ride. Steve says he has been riding motorcycles since he was 16 years old
and is just getting back into it since a crash in 1998. Simotes says the technology has
finally advanced enough to allow him to ride again.


is a noble cause on a beau-
tiful day Every single one
of these people are heroes,
as far as I am concerned."
Prince said the ride will
become an annual event,


and she is already
planning next year's
extravaganza.
For information, call Re-
becca Prince at 352-293-
1413 or email rapprince@


att.net.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. corn.


COMMENT
Continued from Page Al

years, a question developed about this
right to be heard when court decisions
noted members of the public had no
guaranteed right to speak at a public
meeting anywhere in Florida statutes.
But most public bodies, including the
BOCC, still allowed public comment.
SB 50's companion in the House of
Representatives was HB 23, sponsored by
state Rep. Ray Rodigues, R-Fort Myers.
"These bills restore a fundamental
constitutional right to the people of
Florida the right to speak to their
elected representatives at a public meet-
ing," said Florida First Amendment
Foundation President Barbara Petersen.
After the BOCC adopted the new ordi-
nance, several county residents expressed
concern they would be limited to that one
opportunity to speak early in the meeting.
It has been the practice of the commission
chairman to open up each motion before
the board to public comment. Residents
wondered if they would now lose that op-
portunity to speak as the right to be heard
after each proposed motion has not also
been guaranteed in Florida Statutes.
Commission Chairman Joe Meek was
unavailable for comment this past week,
but issued the following statement: "We
actively encourage and invite public par-
ticipation at our board meetings. In re-
sponse to the statutory requirement, the
public portion has been moved to the


Public comment will
start immediately
following the roll call. It
is during this time
residents can speak on
agenda items coming
before the board.

first order of business, which will allow
the public to speak on any subject matter
important to them.
"In addition, the agenda is published
on the Thursday prior to the meeting,
which leaves time for the public to re-
view the agenda and notify the commis-
sioners of any concerns or questions they
may have. Public hearing procedures re-
quire citizen comment. Citizens will also
have the opportunity to give comment on
additional items not published with the
original agenda when the board consid-
ers those items."
Public comment will start immediately
following the roll call. It is during this
time residents can speak on agenda
items coming before the board. Each res-
ident will receive the same amount of al-
lotted time: three minutes for an
individual and five minutes for an indi-
vidual representing an organization.
Proclamations and recognition will be
scheduled for 1:30 p.m., with public hear-
ings and regular business to follow


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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A7




AS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Earl
Quillen, 78
CRYSTAL RIVER
Earl C. Quillen, age 78,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Friday
evening, Oct. 4, 2013, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical
Center in
Crystal
River, Fla.,
with his
two daugh-
ters at his
side (w:r
where he
had a very Earl
peaceful Quillen
passing.
He was born Jan. 28,
1935, in Ocean City, Md., to
Denard and LaVerne
(Moore) Quillen. He came
here 26 years ago from
Pittsburgh, Pa., where he
retired after 30 years with
U.S. Steel South Side Pitts-
burgh, Pa. After his retir-
ing to Crystal River, he
became an avid fisherman,
a horseshoe hero and a
shuffleboard enthusiast,
where he spent many
hours enjoying the game
with great friends. He was
a U.S. Air Force veteran,
and a former Pennsylvania
constable, a member of the
Crystal River Loyal Order
of Moose Lodge No. 2013
and Fraternal Order of Ea-
gles Crystal River
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by three sisters,
Thelma Keller, Clara
Bishop and Dorothy An-
dartes. He is survived by
his five daughters, Leaette
Cavaliere, Juanita Presutti
and Jeanne Manko, all of
Pittsburgh, Pa., Theresa
McCraw of Little Elm,
Texas, and Margie Gaul of
Shreveport, La.; three
brothers, Ralph, Clyde and
Kenneth; 16 grandchil-
dren; and eight great-
grandchildren.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Crystal River, Fla. In
lieu of flowers, the family
suggests that those who
wish may make a memo-
rial contribution in Earl
Quillen's name to the Crys-
tal River Loyal Order of
Moose for their special
Children's Christmas
Program.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline com.

Louise
Barnett, 84
HOMOSASSA
The service of remem-
brance for Louise Barnett,
84, of Homosassa, Fla., will
be at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7,
2013, at the Myrtle Hill Me-
morial Park, Tampa. She
died Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, in
Lecanto. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituariesare at www.
chronicleonline~com.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,'

Kelly Prus
564-2917
kprus@chronicleonlme.com


James 'Jim'
Smith, 79
INVERNESS
James "Jim" Wayne
Smith, age 79, Inverness,
died Oct. 4, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial
hospital
s u r-
rounded
by his fam-
ily
Jim was
born Oct.
8, 1933, in
Bankston, James
Miss., to Smith
the late Al-
fred A. and Ellen
(McWhoter) Smith. He
served our country in the
U.S. Air Force with a tour
in Vietnam, retiring after
21 years as a master ser-
geant. Jim then worked for
the U.S. Postal Service as
a rural carrier for 11 years.
He was a lifetime member
of Fort Worth, Texas, VFW
Jim was an avid fisherman
throughout his lifetime.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 21 years,
Catherine Smith, Inver-
ness; sons Michael W
(Karen) Smith, St. Peters-
burg, Fla.; Quentin D.
Smith, San Antonio, Texas;
daughters, Sharon (Ken-
neth) Clark, Tampa, Karen
(Thomas) Power, Orlando
and Sandra Powell,
Tampa; nine grandchil-
dren; and six great-grand-
children. He was preceded
in death by a son, Jeffrey;
his brother Waylon; and
his sister Noreen.
A graveside committal
service with military hon-
ors will be at 2:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Oct. 11, 2013, at
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. Friends
are invited to join the fu-
neral procession to the
cemetery at 1:30 p.m. at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory Me-
morial donations may be
made in Jim's name to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of
flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

Francis 'Frank'
Ducharme Jr.,
77
INVERNESS
Francis "Frank" X.
Ducharme Jr, 77, Inver-
ness, died July 9, 2013, in
Nashua, N.H. Celebration
of Life will be at2 p.m. Sat-
urday, Oct. 12, at Inverness
Moose Lodge. Cremation
arrangements are by Chas
E Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory

OBITUARIES
U The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing.


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Shirley
Latta, 76
DUNNELLON
Shirley Latta, 76, Dun-
nellon, died Wednesday,
Oct. 2, 2013. Graveside
services will be at 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 8, at Forest
Lawn South, Davie, Fla.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home With Crematory

Scott
Koehn, 56
HOMOSASSA
Scott Elmer Koehn, age
56, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Oct. 3, 2013, at Hospice
House of Citrus County in
Lecanto. He was born
Nov 6, 1956, in New Port
Richey, Fla., and was a
lifelong resident of this
area. He was a former su-
pervisor for A&B Roofing
of Holiday, Fla. He was a
handyman and enjoyed
fishing.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by his sister, Elaine
Swank, March 6, 2011. He
is survived by his two sons,
Randy of Archer, Fla., and
Marcus of Homosassa,
Fla.; four brothers, Mark
of Homosassa, Noral of
Fort Lauderdale, and
Wayne and Keith of Hud-
son, Fla.; a sister, Denise
Stroop of Old Town, Fla.;
his former wife, Geor-
ganna Smith of Ho-
mosassa, Fla.; one
grandson, Randy Koehn
Jr; and several nieces and
nephews.
Private cremation
arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Crystal River, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


WWII vet, oldest Medal


of Honor recipient, dies


Associated Press

CRESSKILL, N.J. A
World War II veteran and
the nation's oldest living
Medal of Honor recipient
has died in New Jersey
Nicholas Oresko, an
Army master sergeant
who was badly wounded
when he single-handedly
took out two enemy
bunkers during the Battle
of the Bulge in 1945, died
Friday night at Engle-
wood Hospital and Med-
ical Center, hospital
officials announced Sat-
urday He was 96.
Oresko had been hospi-
talized after injuring him-
self in a fall at an assisted
living center in Cresskill.
He died of complications
from surgery for a broken
right femur
A November 2011 article
on the Department of De-
fense website described
Oresko as the oldest living
Medal of Honor recipient
The medal is the nation's
highest military honor,
awarded by Congress for
risk of life in combat be-
yond the call of duty
A Bayonne native,
Oresko received the
Medal of Honor from
President Harry Truman
on Oct. 30,1945.
At 28, Oresko was the
platoon leader when auto-
matic fire pinned down his
unit. Realizing a machine
gun in a nearby bunker
needed to be eliminated,
Oresko moved out alone
in the morning darkness,
braving bullets that
zipped about him, until he
was close enough to throw


Associated Press
Nicholas Oresko, a World War II Medal of Honor
recipient, poses May 25, 1999, with his medal at his
home in Tenafly, N.J. Oresko died Friday at age 96.


a grenade into the German
bunker He rushed the
bunker and used his M-1
rifle to kill the soldiers
who survived the grenade
blast
Then another machine
gun fired, knocking
Oresko down and wound-
ing him in the right hip
and leg. He managed to
crawl to another bunker
and take it out with an-
other grenade. Despite
being weak from loss of
blood, Oresko refused to
be evacuated until he was
assured that the mission

'A" clifwfq, ^ \

L ^h .


James Clinton Moore
Dec. 51916- Sept. 29, 2012.
Jim was an avid member of
the Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club, champion pitcher and an
18 year resident of Beverly
Hills. It has been one year
since we lost our friend,
brother, uncle, and husband!
Born in Monroe Co., Ky.,
son of the late Willy & Ester
Hood Moore. Veteran of WW2,
1941 1945. Served in Army
Air Corp., Alleutian Islands.
Memorial service was held on
Oct. 10, 2012, Oak Hill Cemetery
N., Crawfordsville, Ind.
Sadly missed by family,
friends, and wife Nora Livesay
Moore of Beverly Hills.
"Keep pitching those ringers,
Jim!"


was accomplished.
His actions on Jan. 23,
1945, were credited with
preventing numerous
American casualties and
were praised as key to the
Allies' victory
The Bergen Record re-
ported that several veter-
ans and young members
of various branches of the
military stayed with
Oresko in his final days
after a friend wrote about
his health problems on a
Facebook page and noted
that Oresko had no imme-
diate family still living.

In Loving Memory of
Donna

Gillissie-Cross
August 25, 1964 October 6,2003


It was a dark ten years ago for all
those who love you, Donna. I have
learned our loss is not God's
punishment or God's attempt to test
us. God shares the hurt in our hearts
and wants to lead us to new hope
and peace. God grieves with us.
Our tears testify our love and tears
that spring from love help bring
healing and renewal. Of course, we
never get over our loss completely.
We go on with our lives celebrating
your life and our memories of you.
I pray for you and with you. The
love between us is a spiritual bond
death cannot sever.
Love, Mom
,OOOGSTO A


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Up to our eyeballs in...

newspaper readers?
Florida is home to an estimated 1.3 million alligators.
That's one gator for every 14 people in the state!
But that figure pales in comparison to the 5.1 million
Floridians who read a daily newspaper yesterday.
And if yesterday was Sunday, the number of adults
perusing a paper jumps to 7.2 million. That's half of
all Floridians! Like alligators, newspapers have
been around a long time, and like alligators
they aren't going anywhere.


.4WI


If you're a reader, you're in good company!
And if you're an advertiser, you can take a big bite of profit pie using Florida newspapers.


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Sources:* Scarborough Research 2012, R2 (Multimedia); Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A9







Is there a statute of limitations on spoilers?


Associated Press
NEW YORK-Rosebud
is a sled.
So goes the ending of the
1941 Orson Welles classic
"Citizen Kane," spoilers be
damned!
Revealing secret end-
ings and plot twists has
brought on wrath since the
dawn of cinema, straight
through VCRS to today's
DVR-fueled delays that
led to much nail-biting
over The Ending That
Shall Not Be Spoiled on
"Breaking Bad."
But exactly what is the
magic formula for spoiler
grace? When do calls of
SPOILER ALERT (insert
index fingers in the ears
here) expire so we can,
maybe, not feel so consti-
pated when discussing our
favorite fare in real time?
Does the 13-episode Net-
flix dump of "Orange is the
New Black" in July equal
two months of polite
spoiler-free behavior? Are
bets off when a show con-
cludes, or does that depend
on how many seasons late
adopters would have to
slowly, slowly slog through
- say Dexter's eight to
Breaking Bad's five?
Or is it up to the un-
spoiled viewer to avoid so-
cial media or catch up?
Get it done, people!
"I think asking people
not to spoil for some rea-
sonable amount of time is
fine, although anyone who
actually takes it seriously,


In this photo released by Spyglass Entertainment, Haley
Joel Osment, left, and Bruce Willis appear in a scene from
the film "The Sixth Sense," a tale of a child who can see
ghosts.


Associated Press
This image released by AMC shows Bryan Cranston, as Walter White, in the final scene
from "Breaking Bad." The popular series about a chemistry teacher-turned drug dealer
ended Sept 29. Revealing secret endings and plot twists has brought on wrath since
the dawn of cinema, straight through VCRS to streaming and DVRs. But exactly what
is the magic formula for spoiler grace?


i.e. gets mad or upset in the
event someone does, is an
idiot," said technology an-
alyst Melanie Turek in
Steamboat Springs, Colo.
"But that 'reasonable'
amount of time is, in my
mind, about 48 hours after
a live broadcast," she ex-
plained. "And once a se-
ries is off the air and the
hype has died down, ask-
ing people not to spoil is
just silly"
Others think keeping
some things quiet or at
least warning our Facebook


friends about potential
spoilers is what 21st-
century etiquette might ad-
vise. At least that's what the
ragers who decry spoilers
on social media hope for
Marketer Kim Puckett
in Indianapolis thinks
"we're all social media-
level entertainment re-
viewers now" so should
respect our written-word
audiences on newsfeeds
like Twitter or in status up-
dates on Facebook that
aren't easy to escape.
"Unfortunately, specific


status updates on key plot
points might be banned
forever," she said.
But in other contexts,
Puckett said, "as soon as
the show ends, office and
social talk should be al-
lowed about the show How
can we enjoy shows at a so-
cial level if we're always
worried that someone is
still on Season 1 of 'The
Killing' or halfway through
'Sons of Anarchy?"'
Justice is on the side of
those who want to blab on
Twitter or Facebook, ac-


cording to Paul Levinson,
a professor of communica-
tions and media studies at
Fordham University and
author of the book "New
New, Media."
The idea that "people
have a right to be free of
spoilers is absurd, and it's
an absurd misuse of the
term 'right,"' he said.
"You have a right to com-
municate," Levinson as-
sured. "I don't think anyone
is entitled to that kind of
grace. If you feel like writ-
ing something you're enti-
tled to write it as long it's
not slanderous or libelous
or breaking the law in some
way Why anyone would get
into a rage about entertain-
ment is beyond me."
He harkened back to
buzz over "The Crying
Game" and Dil's reveal as
a transgender woman,
along with "The Sixth
Sense" and the Bruce


Willis character being
dead. And there was grum-
bling over spoiling the pur-
gatory at the end of "Lost,"
at a time when social
media was well on its way
to engulfing us, he said.
"If the ending is really
atrocious, like 'Lost,' then
you're probably doing peo-
ple a favor by letting them
know," Levinson said.
Etiquette expert Lizzie
Post of the Emily Post In-
stitute sees no value in
people "posting a million
times, 'Don't spoil anything
for me, don't spoil anything
for me."' Walk away from
Facebook, shut down Twit-
ter if you have to, she said.
"If you're not living in the
current season, you have no
claim. It's fine if you have a
friend who's really into it
and you want to say, 'Don't
spoil it for me.' But you
can't ask the world around
you to completely bend."


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ENTERTAINMENT


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







'Walking Dead' brings new life to Ga. town


Associated Press


GRANTVILLE, Ga. -
When the cotton mill
closed, the rural Georgia
town of Grantville began a
slow transformation into a
ghost town.
Residents fled. Store-
fronts faded. Buildings
decayed.
Over the decades, time
turned the remains of the
town into something al-
most post-apocalyptic, the
perfect modern-day set for
humans and "walkers" to
attack one another That's
how the hugely popular
TV show "The Walking
Dead" ended up coming to
town and bringing new life
to Grantville.
Several key scenes in
one episode from the AMC
series were filmed on and
near a one-block stretch of
antique buildings on
Grantville's Main Street.
The series' fourth sea-
son premieres on Oct. 13.
Crews have been filming
the new episodes in Geor-
gia, but they keep loca-
tions of future episodes
closely guarded secrets
until the shows air
In Grantville, the town's
ruins were featured
prominently last season.
Bodies of walkers slain on
the show were buried in a
vacant lot beneath the
brick archway remaining
from a cotton mill build-
ing. Gunshots were fired
from a nearby rooftop.
And actor Chandler
Riggs, who plays a boy on
the show, entertained him-
self between scenes by
placing pennies on the rail-
road tracks, the coins soon
smashed into souvenirs by
passing freight trains.
Now, every Saturday,
visitors from around the
country and the world turn
off Interstate 85 and onto a
two-lane highway that
leads to the tiny town 49
miles southwest of Atlanta.
Since last summer, more
than 3,600 visitors have
taken a free tour led by
Grantville Mayor Jim
Sells, who explains where
each scene from the
"Clear" episode during
which the character Mor-
gan makes it his mission to
"clear" walkers by killing
0


AI
.'4 .. : P : .

'4-


Associated Press
Zombies appear in a scene from the second season of the AMC original series, "The Walking Dead," in Senoia, Ga.
The series' fourth season premieres on Oct. 13. Crews have been filming new episodes in Georgia, but they keep
locations of future episodes closely guarded secrets until the shows air. In Grantville, Ga., the town's ruins were fea-
tured prominently last season. In nearby Senoia, many scenes are filmed in the historic downtown area, transform-
ing into the fictional town of Woodbury for the show.


them was filmed.
Visitors have come from
as far as Australia, Singa-
pore and Brazil, giving
new life to the town
through tourism, Sells
said. He calls it phenome-
nal, but adds: "We don't
understand it."
"Nobody came after
they filmed 'Lawless' and
'Broken Bridges' here," he
said, referring to movies
shot in the town.
"But once this episode
aired from The Walking
Dead, people started
showing up from all over"
The cotton textile indus-
try once fueled the econ-
omy of Grantville and the
other towns in Coweta
County, where a stretch of
Interstate 85 is named the
Alan Jackson Highway, for
the country singer who
grew up in nearby New-
nan and wrote the 1993 hit
song about the Chatta-
hoochee River
Grantville eventually be-
came known by residents
in the area as "the liquor
exit" it's the only place
in Coweta County to buy
bottled liquor But Sells
said that "when textiles
left, this town died."
Then came the film
crews.
Though Union troops


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destroyed train stations in
many Georgia towns near
the end of the Civil War,
Grantville's survived. The
mayor recalled how "Walk-
ing Dead" production
crews took just four hours
to transform the old freight
depot into a restaurant


where actors battled zom-
bies. The trains a few feet
away occasionally inter-
rupted filming, Sells said,
since railroads typically
don't share train sched-
ules with film crews.
Grantville is among a
handful of rural Georgia


towns undergoing a ren-
aissance, thanks to the
AMC show
In nearby Senoia, many
scenes are filmed in the
historic downtown area,
transforming into the fic-
tional town of Woodbury
for the show


In Haralson, tours are
offered each weekend for
fans to enter the barn that
was the scene of an am-
bush. They can hold an
M16 out the same window
as one "Walking Dead"
actor did.
Other tours are offered
in Atlanta, where a memo-
rable scene from the
show's first season was
filmed atop the roof of the
old Norfolk Southern
headquarters on the
southern edge of down-
town. Another key scene -
a massive battle involving
dozens of walkers and a
military tank took place
in the Fairlie-Poplar His-
toric District.
On a recent Saturday in
Grantville, visitors gath-
ered at Station 22 Grill, as
groups do every Saturday,
to watch the "Clear"
episode, the 12th in the
show's third season. Pro-
duction crews blocked off
Main Street for 15 days for
filming.
Many townspeople know
the dialogue by heart. A
dishwasher behind the bar
mouths the words: "You
said that you would turn
on your radio every day at
dawn.... And you were not
there!"


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 All




A12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 COMMUNITY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


So, just who wears the

sweatpants in this house?


A after Sue wrote "Wash me" with
her finger in the dust on the most
expensive piece of exercise
equipment I own, I joined the health
club. At home, I just wasn't getting it
done. I'd walk past the equipment 20
times a day and say to myself, "I'll do
that right after lunch." After lunch, I'd
think, "It can wait 'til after dinner But
should you really exercise after a heavy
meal? I'll do it in the morning."
Besides, there's so much other stuff to
do at home, so many distractions an-
swer the phone, let out the cat, vacuum
the carpets, let in the cat, do the laundry
let out the cat, go on an errand, let in the
cat shop for dinner, let in the cat oh,
he's already in, visit Facebook, check my
email, let out the cat and
watch that TV infomercial It' S SO (
about how much better I'd
feel and look if I just bought to see
this one piece of exercise who ot
equipment that does every-
thing the other one doesn't, don'
But it turns out that lying
on the sofa, watching wearing
"Duck Dynasty," eating Hot ar
Pockets and listening to the gear,
cat snore next to a piece of peopl
exercise equipment doesn't
really melt away the don'1
pounds. Owning it isn't
enough: Apparently, you tennis
have to use it. Who knew? t i
Unless you're a truly mo- tennis I
tivated person, it's almost see pec
impossible to stick to a reg-
imen at your own house. don '1
Besides, you don't really
need any fancy equipment foot b
to do pushups, crunches or
squats; you just have to do baski
them. If you're not already wearing
exercising without the ing
equipment, you won't sud- and ba,
denly start exercising with
it. That's why I joined the jerseys
health club. Once you're
there, there's not much don'
else to do but exercise, noti
The thing I like about my
health club is that I am not anyr
the most out-of-shape per-
son there. They seem to have gone to
great lengths to find people who are as
lazy and paunchy as I am, or worse,
which is a comfort. And absolutely no
one there looks like they are going to win
a gold medal in weightlifting or beach
volleyball in the next Olympics. It's full
of normal people like schoolteachers
and bank tellers, trying to keep one step
ahead of dreaded couch potato buildup.


S


t


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e
t
w



t

DI
t

e
Ijl
6

S
t


C
>i
rn


Jim
Mullen

VILLAGE
IDIOT


I had to buy a new gym bag and some
sweats, so I'm pawing through the sweat-
pants at the Shop and Go Away and
everything on the shelf is size 4XL, 3XL
or 2XL. Obviously, if you are buying the
4XL, you are either a professional athlete
or you don't sweat very much. I've also
noticed that a lot of people
ommon in this store are wearing
sweatpants even though
people they're not at the gym.
When I was in school,
Viously after we exercised, we
t run changed back into our
S school clothes and put the
running smelly gym clothes in our
lockers. Sweatpants weren't
t0 see something you'd wear when
you weren't actually in the
* who gym or onthe field. Now
play people go to the mall in
sweat clothes; they fly across
hearing the country in them. It's so
common to see people who
ogs, to obviously don't run wearing
p running gear, to see people
pie who who don't play tennis wear-
play ing tennis togs, to see people
who don't play football or
all or basketball wearing football
and basketball jerseys that
balll we don't even notice it any-
more. I don't know what
football you're wearing as you read
ket ball this, but however casual it is,
w there's probably somebody
that we in line down at the bank
wearing something even less
even appropriate.
It strikes me that the
ie it fashion industry should
Iore. take note of what the
sportswear designers are
doing that is, name their
clothing for what people should be
doing when they wear it. If they can
make running shorts and swimsuits and
yoga pants, why can't they make Flying
On An Airplane clothing? Supermarket
Shopping clothing? Waiting For The Bus
clothing? Applying For a Job clothing?
They could do it without breaking a
sweat
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oct. 7to 11 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal variety
and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hot dog, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
chilled pineapple, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Tuesday: Double-play slid-
ers, oven-baked breaded
chicken, turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, potato
smiles, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, moz-
zarella maxstix, Italian super
salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled diced
peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,


chicken alfredo with ripstick,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled pineapple, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, pepperoni pizza,
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet corn, chilled
peach cup, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, grits,
milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Mozzarella max-
tix, fajita chicken with rice and
ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, chilled flavored apple-
sauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Double-play slid-
ers, turkey wrap, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
baby carrots, potato smiles,
chilled strawberry cup, fruit
juice, milk variety.


Wednesday: Chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, pepperoni
pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled applesauce, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, tangy baked
beans, chilled peach cup, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, breaded
chicken sandwich, PB dip-
pers, fresh garden salad,
sweet potato crosstrax, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage,
egg and cheese biscuit, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
grits, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, ultra
cinnamon bun, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger,


chicken sandwich, fajita
chicken super salad will roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, green beans,
celery potato roasters, chilled
applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Double-play slid-
ers, turkey and gravy over
noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
Italian super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cucumber
coins, sweet peas, baby car-
rots, seasoned potato
wedges, chilled diced
peaches, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
turkey super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, baked beans,
chilled baked beans, potato
roasters, flavored Craisins,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, fresh
broccoli, steamed broccoli,
baby carrots, seasoned po-
tato wedges, chilled peach
cup, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken
alfredo with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
Italian super salad with roll,
pizza, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
sweet corn, potato roasters,
chilled flavored applesauce,
juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Grape juice,
sliced turkey breast with


gravy, mashed sweet pota-
toes, carrot coins, whole-
wheat bread with margarine,
sugar cookie, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sausage and
bean casserole, rutabagas,
garlic spinach, wheat bread
with margarine, pineapple,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked
chicken thigh with chicken
gravy, mashed potatoes,
green beans, whole-wheat
bread with margarine, graham
crackers, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger


patty with bun and ketchup
and mustard, tomato, baked
beans, yellow corn, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Friday: Hot dog, boiled
cabbage and carrots, hot Ger-
man potato salad, whole-grain
roll with mustard, blueberry
cobbler, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For additional in-
formation, call Support Serv-
ices at 352-527-5975.


CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP
* To register for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office's
CodeRED weather program, visit www.sheriff
citrus.org/EM/ and click on the "Emergency
Management" menu item.
* Choose "CodeRED Registration" and enter the
location to be monitored and your
contact details if using a cell-
phone, you may choose to re-
ceive text alerts, but standard
text messaging rates may
apply.
* Choose which types of warn-
ings to receive: general notifi-
cations and/or severe weather
warning about tornadoes, severe
thunderstorms or flash floods.
* You may choose to create an account to easily
manage your preferences.
* A map appears to verify the location designated
and list all the preferences chosen. Once satisfied
with the settings and the terms and conditions of
use, click "Submit."
* Those without computer access may call 352-
746-6555 or visit a local library for computer
assistance.
* When activated ,the number for CodeRED warnings
will appear on caller ID as 800-566-9780 or
"Emergency Comm" for CodeRED Weather Warning
Alerts. (The number for other types of CodeRED
alerts displays as 999-911-9999 or "Emergency
Comm" for emergency notifications.)


FL SOFF!


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A13




A14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


FAMILIES
Continued from PageAl

Kingdom, Brazil, Russia,
Italy and India which
have half the world's pop-
ulation and 65 percent of
global gross domestic
product
Key findings:
RETREAT FROM
STOCKS: A desire for
safety drove people to
dump stocks, even as
prices rocketed from crisis
lows in early 2009. In-
vestors in the top 10 coun-
tries pulled $1.1 trillion
from stock mutual funds in
the five years after the cri-
sis, or 10 percent of their
holdings at the start of that
period, according to Lipper
Inc., which tracks funds.
They put more even
money into bond mutual
funds $1.3 trillion -
even as interest payments
on bonds plunged to
record lows.
SHUNNING DEBT:
In the five years before the
crisis, household debt in
the 10 countries jumped 34
percent, according to
Credit Suisse. Then the fi-
nancial crisis hit, and peo-
ple slammed the brakes on
borrowing. Debt per adult
in the 10 countries fell
1 percent in the 4 1/2 years
after 2007. Economists say
debt hasn't fallen in sync
like that since the end of
World War II.
People chose to shed
debt even as lenders
slashed rates on loans to
record lows. In normal
times, that would have
triggered an avalanche of
borrowing.
HOARDING CASH:
Looking for safety for their
money, households in the
six biggest developed
economies added $3.3 tril-
lion, or 15 percent, to their
cash holdings in the five
years after the crisis,
slightly more than they did
in the five years before, ac-
cording to the Organization
for Economic Cooperation
and Development.
The growth of cash is re-
markable because mil-
lions more were
unemployed, wages grew
slowly and people di-
verted billions to pay down
their debts.
SPENDING SLUMP:
To cut debt and save more,
people have reined in their
spending. Adjusting for in-
flation, global consumer
spending rose 1.6 percent a
year during the five years
after the crisis, according
to PricewaterhouseCoop-
ers, an accounting and con-
sulting firm. That was
about half the growth rate
before the crisis and only
slightly more than the an-
nual growth in population
during those years.
Consumer spending is
critically important be-
cause it accounts for more
than 60 percent of GDP
THE DEVELOPING
WORLD NOT HELPING
ENOUGH: When the finan-


cial crisis hit, the major de-
veloped countries looked
to the developing world to
take over in powering
global growth. The four big
developing countries -
Brazil, Russia, India and
China recovered quickly
from the crisis. But the po-
tential of the BRIC coun-
tries, as they are known,
was overrated. Although
they have 80 percent of the
people, they accounted for
only 22 percent of con-
sumer spending in the 10
biggest countries last year,
according to Haver Analyt-
ics, a research firm. This
year, their economies are
stumbling.
Consumers around the
world will eventually
shake their fears, of
course, and loosen the
hold on their money But
few economists expect
them to snap back to their
old ways.
One reason is that the
boom years that preceded
the financial crisis were fu-
eled by families taking on
enormous debt, experts
now realize, not by healthy
wage gains. No one expects
a repeat of those excesses.
More importantly, econ-
omists cite psychological
"scarring," a fear of losing
money that grips people
during a period of collaps-
ing jobs, incomes and
wealth, then doesn't let go,
even when better times re-
turn. Think of Americans
who suffered through the
Great Depression and
stayed frugal for decades.
Although not on a level
with the Depression, some
economists think the psy-
chological blow of the fi-
nancial crisis was severe
enough that households
won't increase their bor-
rowing and spending to
what would be considered
normal levels for another
five years or longer
To better understand
why people remain so cau-
tious five years after the
crisis, AP interviewed con-
sumers around the world.
A look at what they're
thinking and doing -
with their money:


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Rick Stonecipher of
Muncie, Ind., doesn't like
stocks anymore, for the
same reason that millions
of investors have turned
against them the stock
market crash that began in
October 2008 and didn't end
until the following March.
"My brokers said they
were really safe, but they
weren't," said Stonecipher,
59, a substitute school
teacher
Americans sold the most
in the five years after the
crisis $521 billion, or 9
percent of their mutual
fund holdings, according
to Lipper But investors in
other countries sold a
larger share of their hold-
ings: Germans dumped 13
percent; Italians and
French, more than 16 per-
cent each.
The French are "not very
oriented to risk," said Cyril
Blesson, an economist at
Pair Conseil, an investment
consultancy in Paris. "Now,
it's even worse."
It's gotten worse in
China, Russia and the
U.K., too.
Fu Lili, 31, a psycholo-
gist in Fu Xin, a city in
northeastern China, said
she made 20,000 yuan
($3,267) buying and selling
stocks before the crisis,
more than 10 times her
monthly salary then. But
she won't touch them now,
because she's too scared.
In Moscow, Yuri
Shcherbanin, 32, a man-
ager for an oil company,
said the crash proved
stocks were dangerous and
he should content himself
with money in the bank.
In London, Pavlina Sam-
son, 39, owner of a jewelry
and clothes shop, said
stocks are too "risky"
What's also driving her
away may be something


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


buy "We're terrified of
doing that."
Such attitudes are rife
when it has rarely been
cheaper to borrow around
the world.
"A whole new genera-
tion of adults has come of
age in a time of dimin-
ished expectations," said
Mark Vitner, a senior econ-
omist at Wells Fargo, the
fourth-largest U.S. bank.
"They're not likely to take
on debt like those before
them."
Or spend as much.
After adjusting for infla-
tion, Americans increased
their spending in the five
years after the crisis at
one-quarter the rate be-
fore the crisis, according
to PricewaterhouseCoop-
ers. French spending
barely budged. In the U.K.,
spending dropped. The
British spent 3 percent
less last year than they did
five years earlier, in 2007.
High unemployment has
played a role. But econo-
mists say the financial cri-
sis, and the government
debt crisis that started in
Europe a year later, has
spooked even people who
can afford to splurge to cut
back.
Arnaud Reze, 36, owns a
home in Nantes, France,
has piled up money in sav-
ings accounts and stocks,
and has a government job
that guarantees 75 percent
of his pay in retirement.
But he fears the pension
guarantee won't be kept.
So he's stopped buying cof-
fee at cafes and cut back
on lunches with colleagues
and saved in numerous
other ways. "Little stupid
things that I would buy left
and right... I don't buy any-
more," he said.
Even the rich are spend-
ing cautiously
Five years ago, Mike
Cockrell, chief financial
officer at Sanderson
Farms, a large U.S. poultry
producer in Laurel, Miss.,
had just paid off a mort-
gage and was looking for-
ward to the extra spending
money Then Lehman col-
lapsed, and he decided to
save it instead.
"I watched the news of
the stock market going
down 100, 200 points a day,
and I was glad I had cash,"
he said, recalling the steep


drops in the Dow Jones in-
dustrial average then. "That
strategy will not change."
The wealthiest 1 percent
of U.S. households are sav-
ing 30 percent of their
take-home pay, triple what
they were saving in 2008,
according to a July report
from American Express
Publishing and Harrison
Group, a research firm.
After years of saving
more and shedding debt,
the good news is that many
people have repaired their
personal finances.
Americans have slashed
their credit card debt to
2002 levels. In the U.K.,
personal bank loans, not
including mortgages, are
no larger than they were in
1999. In addition, home
prices in some countries
are rising.
So more people have the
capacity to borrow, spend
and invest more. But will
they?
Sahoko Tanabe of Tokyo,
63, lost money in Japan's
stock market crash more
than two decades ago, but
she's buying again. "Abe-
nomics," a mix of fiscal
and monetary stimulus
named for Japan's new
prime minister, has ignited
Japanese stocks, and she
doesn't want to miss out.
"You're bound to fail if you
have a pessimistic atti-
tude," she said.
But for every Tanabe,
there seem to be more
people like Madeleine
Bosco, the Californian who
ditched many of her credit
cards. 'All of a sudden you
look at all these things
you're buying that you
don't need," she said.
Attitudes like Bosco's
will make for a better
economy eventually -
safer and more stable -
but won't trigger the jobs
and wage gains that are
needed to make
economies healthy now
"The further you get
away from the carnage in
'08-'09, the memories
fade," said Stephen
Roach, former chief econ-
omist at investment bank
Morgan Stanley, who now
teaches at Yale. "But does
it return to the leverage
and consumer demand we
had in the past and make
things hunky dory? The
answer is no."


that runs deeper: "People
feel like they're being
ripped off everywhere,"
she said.
Holzhausen, the Allianz
economist, said the crisis
taught people not to trust
others with their money
"People want to get as
much distance as possible
from the financial system,"
he said.
The crisis also taught
them about the dangers of
debt.
After the crisis hit, Jerry
and Madeleine Bosco of
Tujunga, Calif, found
themselves facing $30,000
in credit card bills with no
easy way to pay the debt off.
So they sold stocks, threw
most of their cards in the
trash, and stopped eating
out or taking vacations.
Today, most of the debt
is gone, but the lusher life
of the boom years is a dis-
tant memory
"We had credit cards
and we didn't worry about
a thing," said Madeleine,
55.
In the U.S., debt per
adult soared 54 percent in
the five years before the
crisis. Then it plunged,
down 12 percent in 4 1/2
years, although most of
that resulted from people
defaulting on loans. In the
U.K., debt per adult fell a
modest 2 percent, but it
had jumped 59 percent be-
fore the crisis.
Even Japanese and Ger-
mans, who weren't big bor-
rowers in the years before
the crisis, cut debt- 4 per-
cent and 1 percent,
respectively
"We don't want to take
out a loan," said Maria
Schoenberg, 45, of Frank-
furt, Germany, explaining
why she and her husband,
a rheumatologist, decided
to rent after a recent move
instead of borrowing to


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NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tiger attacks worker at


Oklahoma animal park


Associated Press
WYNNEWOOD, Okla. -
A tiger ripped up the left
arm of a worker at a cen-
tral Oklahoma animal
park after the woman
stuck her hand into the
giant cat's enclosure
Saturday
Joe Schreibvogel, owner
of Garold Wayne Interac-
tive Zoological Park in
Wynnewood, said the
woman was in surgery Sat-
urday afternoon at an
Oklahoma City hospital
where doctors were trying
to save her arm.
"He tore her arm up
pretty bad," Schreibvogel
said. "Her entire arm was
still attached. It was badly,
badly damaged."
Co-workers quickly
tended to the woman be-
fore she was airlifted to
the hospital, he said.
"She pulled her own
arm out. The tiger didn't
maul her The tiger was in
his cage, and she violated
his space by sticking her
arm into his space,"
Schreibvogel said, adding
that the park has a strict
rule against introducing
any body part into a wild
animal enclosure.
Schreibvogel withheld
the woman's name be-
cause he hadn't been able
to contact her family He
said she is in her early 20s.
"She's actually the su-
pervisor of the cats. But
when you work with these
things every day, you tend
to let your guard down and
think they're pets, that
they're like dogs. They're
not they're tigers," he
said.

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* Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park:
http://gwzoo.org


Schreibvogel said the
tiger, a mixed breed that
he rescued, is about 14
years old.
"He weighs over 400
pounds (but) never has
ever showed a bit of ag-
gression," he said.
Schreibvogel said the
tiger may have thought the
woman's jacket was a toy
or may have been at-
tracted by the smell of the
goose down.
"It could have been a
whole lot worse. We're just
glad it wasn't. When they
took her into surgery, she
was talking about coming
back to work," Schreibvo-
gel said.
He said the woman's job
will be waiting for her
"She will probably be


one of the best leaders
now to help make sure
safety protocols are fol-
lowed," Schreibvogel said.
The tiger won't be euth-
anized, Schreibvogel said.
The park, which was
closed after the incident,
features big cats, bears,
monkeys, zebras and other
animals. The mission
statement on its website
says the park's focus is res-
cuing "abandoned, mis-
placed and abused
animals, as well as those
animals whose owners can
no longer care for them."
The website says the
park, since opening in
1997, has rescued more
than 1,400 animals and
placed more than 1,200 in
zoos and sanctuaries.


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NATION


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A15








SNAT16ON
NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Congress reaches accord on pay


World BRIEFS

Floating flock


Associated Press
Zeke Forbes, of Neptune,
N.J., pretends to bite a dog
named Ziggy on Saturday
during a zombie walk at the
Asbury Park boardwalk in
Asbury Park, N.J. Accord-
ing to Guinness World
Record adjudicator Michael
Empric, the 9,592 zombies
gathered sets a record for
largest zombie walk.

Man who set himself
ablaze on Mall dies
WASHINGTON -A man
who set himself on fire on
the National Mall in the U.S.
capital has died of his injuries,
which were so severe that
authorities will have to use
DNA and dental records to
identify him, District of Co-
lumbia police said Saturday.
The man died Friday
night at a Washington hos-
pital where he had been air-
lifted, Officer Araz Alali, a
police spokesman, said.
The man poured a can of
gasoline on himself in the
center portion of the mall
Friday afternoon. He then set
himself on fire, with passing
joggers taking off their shirts
to help douse the flames.
Police are investigating the
man's possible motives.
No report of violence
by officer at rally
NEW YORK -Authori-
ties are investigating whether
an undercover police officer
present at a motorcycle rally
witnessed a violent con-
frontation between an SUV
driver and a swarm of bik-
ers and didn't immediately
report it, a law enforcement
official said Saturday.
The officer came forward
several days after the Sept. 29
rally to say he was present,
according to the official, who
was not authorized to speak
publicly about the investiga-
tion and spoke to The Asso-
ciated Press on condition of
anonymity. The officer has
an attorney, and internal af-
fairs detectives are trying to
determine whether he wit-
nessed the assault on the
SUV driver, the official said.
New York Police Depart-
ment spokesman John Mc-
Carthy said a detective had
been stripped of his gun and
badge pending the outcome
of an internal investigation.
Last weekend, dozens of
bikers stopped the Range
Rover SUV on a highway,
attacked the vehicle, then
chased the driver and pulled
him from the car after he
plowed over a motorcyclist
while trying to escape, po-
lice said. The driver, Alexian
Lien, needed stiches after
being pummeled.
Oregon bartender
gets $17,500 tip
SPRINGFIELD, Ore.-
An Oregon bartender just
got the tip of a lifetime.
One of Aurora Kephart's
regulars at Conway's
Restaurant and Lounge in
Springfield often tips her
with Keno tickets from the
Oregon Lottery. On Tuesday
evening, the man asked
Kephart to choose two.
When she checked the
numbers, Kephart's first ticket
won $5. The second turned
into a $17,500 gratuity.
"The look on his face was
incredible," Kephart, 25,
told The Register-Guard
newspaper. "I automatically
handed it back to him; it
was his ticket."
But the man wouldn't
take the ticket.
Kephart said she gave the
man a percentage of her
winnings. "I just couldn't not
give him some of it," she said.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
rare flash of bipartisan-
ship Saturday served as a
cruel tease to those hoping
Congress is moving toward
reopening the government
and averting an unprece-
dented default on the fed-
eral debt in less than two
weeks.
Only two days after House
Speaker John Boehner
raised hopes by telling col-
leagues he won't let the na-
tion go into default, key
members of both parties
conceded that no one has
presented a plausible plan
for avoiding it. Instead,
they continued to bicker


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS
ropical Storm Karen stalled
off the Louisiana coast
Saturday night as a weak-
ened system that still threatened
to bring strong wind and heavy
rain to vulnerable low-lying areas.
The National Weather Service
said Saturday evening that the
storm was stationary but still ex-
pected to move across or near the
southeast Louisiana coast late
Saturday or early Sunday, then
track eastward and lose strength.
It had spent the day either
stalled or moving slowly
"We're going to have 35 to 45
mph winds probably starting by
tomorrow morning," David Ca-
mardelle, mayor of the barrier is-
land town of Grand Isle, said
Saturday evening.


Associated Press

GAFFNEY, S.C.- There aren't
many secrets in a place like Gaffney,
so when two heating and air condi-
tioning workers suddenly quit their
jobs and began buying stuff like a big
screen TV, a used car and a riding
lawn mower with $100 bills so old
they didn't even have the off-center
portrait of Benjamin Franklin, peo-
ple started talking.
Police said all that talk got back to
Lois Brown, who had hired those men
a few days earlier and made them a
deal. She told the workers just before
her husband died seven years ago,
he said he hid thousands and thou-
sands of dollars in the basement.
Her family had never found the money
If the workers discovered the
cash, Brown said, they would be in
for a big reward.
After hearing about their free-
spending ways, Brown went to Joey
Reed and Elie Spencer and made an
offer Keep what they bought and a


and to ponder the chasm
between two warring par-
ties, each of which seems
convinced it's on the win-
ning side morally and po-
litically
There was, however, re-
lief Saturday for thou-
sands of furloughed
Pentagon workers and the
promise of back pay for all
federal workers who have
been forced off the job.
The Pentagon on Satur-
day ordered at least 90
percent of its roughly
350,000 furloughed civilian
employees back to work,
significantly reducing the
number of sidelined fed-
eral workers. In all, about
800,000 federal workers


had been furloughed.
The Defense Depart-
ment said the recall is
based on a law passed by
Congress this week that al-
lows the Pentagon to end
furloughs for "employees
whose responsibilities
contribute to the morale,
well-being, capabilities
and readiness of service
members."
The larger stalemate
over reopening the federal
government persists.
Boehner, asked Saturday
whether Congress was any
closer to resolving the im-
passe, replied: "No." Aides
close to Boehner say he
has not figured out how to
end the gridlock.


The town, roughly 60 miles
south of New Orleans, remained
under a mandatory evacuation
order amid worries that the only
mainland road in and out might
get swamped with water
The National Hurricane Cen-
ter in Miami discontinued tropi-
cal storm watches across much of
the Gulf Coast, including metro
New Orleans, but a portion of
southeast Louisiana remained
under a tropical storm warning.
Karen had maximum sustained
winds of 40 mph, making it a
weak tropical storm. It was about
170 miles west-southwest of the
mouth of the Mississippi River at
7 p.m. It was forecast to track
northeastward then travel east.
The National Weather Service
said storm surges of 1-to-3 feet
were possible along the southeast
Louisiana and Mississippi coast.


Associated Press
The house owned by Lois Brown in
Gaffney, S.C. Brown's husband died in
2003, hiding $100,000 in the home's
basement.
bit more money for themselves, give
the rest back to her and she wouldn't
go to police. They played dumb, and
the law got involved, Gaffney Police
Det. Brian Blanton said.
Now the men are facing grand lar-
ceny charges, accused of taking the
$100,000. And Brown has sued the
owner of the company they once
worked for to get her money back.
She hasn't seen any of the cash from


Even the day's top bi-
partisan achievement-
agreeing to pay furloughed
federal employees for the
work days they are missing
- was a thin victory Con-
gress made the same deal
after the mid-1990s shut-
downs, and Saturday's 407-0
vote was widely expected.
Still, it triggered the sort
of derisive quarreling that
has prevented Congress
from resolving the larger
funding and debt dilem-
mas.
"Of all the bizarre mo-
ments" involved in the de-
bate, said Rep. Lloyd Doggett,
D-Texas, "this may be the
most bizarre: that we will
pay people not to work."


In low-lying Plaquemines
Parish, La., officials changed an
evacuation order from manda-
tory to voluntary Saturday after-
noon. More than 80 evacuees
from the area, at the state's
southeastern tip, had taken
refuge at a public shelter, which
would remain open Saturday
They gathered in an audito-
rium where they rested on cots,
watched for weather updates on
TV and chatted outside on the
front steps.
Were Karen to maintain tropi-
cal storm strength at landfall,
it would be only the second
named storm to hit the U.S. dur-
ing an unusually quiet hurri-
cane season. The first was
Tropical Storm Andrea, which
hit Florida, in June. The season
runs from June 1 through
Nov. 30.


the workers, Blanton said.
"They quit their jobs the day after
they found the money" Blanton said.
"And they didn't waste any time
spending it."
The story begins with a repair job
at the large, white, two-story farm-
house with the wrap-around porch
that Brown shared with her husband
for decades before he died. He
founded a business that sold small
crane games, arcade games and other
amusement devices. He also was in
real estate and kept large amounts
of cash around, Blanton said.
After Brown's husband died in
2003, his family searched for the
cash he had hidden in the basement
Each time someone came to work
at the old house, Brown offered a re-
ward if the workers found the money
It was the same offer she made to
Reed and Spencer in September 2010,
but they left the three-day job with-
out telling her anything, police said.
The spending spree started a few
days later


Associated Press
Thousands of rubber ducks
float on the Huangpu River
on Saturday in Shanghai,
China. Organizers released
11,000 rubber ducks dur-
ing the charity event to
raise at least $81,000 in
conjunction with the
Special Olympics.

String of attacks in
Iraq kill nearly 50
BAGHDAD -A suicide
bomber blew himself up
among a crowd of Shiite pil-
grims in Baghdad and an-
other detonated his explosives
inside a cafe north of the
capital, the deadliest of sev-
eral attacks across Iraq on
Saturday that killed at least
48 people.
The killings also included
attacks on journalists and
anti-extremist Sunni fighters.
The pilgrims were targeted
late Saturday as they passed
through the largely Sunni
neighborhood of Azamiyah
en route to a prominent
shrine in the nearby Shiite
neighborhood of Kazimiyah,
according to police officials.
At least 24 people, includ-
ing four policemen manning
the checkpoint, were killed
and 50 others were
wounded, the officials said.
Around the same time,
another suicide bomber
blew himself up in a cafe in
the town of Balad, a largely
Shiite town surrounded by
Sunni communities about
50 miles north of Baghdad.
Balad Mayor Malik Lefta
said at least 13 people
were killed and 22 were
wounded in that attack.
There was no immediate
claim of responsibility for
the day's violence.
US forces take
al-Qaida leader
WASHINGTON -A U.S.
official says American forces
have captured an al-Qaida
leader in Libya linked to the
1998 U.S. Embassy bomb-
ings in east Africa.
The official identifies the
leader as Nazih Abdul-
Hamed al-Ruqai, known by
his alias Anas al-Libi. He has
been wanted by the U.S. for
more than a decade.
Relatives of al-Libi say
he was seized outside his
house Saturday in the
Libyan capital of Tripoli.
Agreement ends
shelling of village
BEIRUT Syrian gov-
ernment forces reached an
agreement Saturday with
local officials of a vulnera-
ble Sunni village in a region
dominated by President
Bashar Assad's Alawite sect
to end hours of deadly
shelling, an activist group
said.
The shelling of al-Mitras
began at dawn, killing eight
civilians while fierce fighting
between rebels and govern-
ment forces on the outskirts
of the village left 20 soldiers
dead or wounded, the
Britain-based Syrian Obser-
vatory for Human Rights
said. The violence ended
when local officials and dig-
nitaries from the village per-
suaded dozens of defectors
and rebels to surrender to
authorities with the promise
that they would be freed
after repenting.
Such deals have been
used in the past to end
bouts of heavy fighting as
the two sides find them-
selves stalemated.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Danny Phillips chases down one of his two geese Friday as he prepares his home for the arrival of Tropical
Storm Karen in Grand Bayou, La. which is a fishing community accessible only by boat.





Bayou braces


Men facing larceny charges after


conspicuous spending of cash stash










EXCURRSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Peter Graulich
Special to the Chronicle


n the summer of 1962, I was a telephone lineman
in the U.S. Army stationed in Fort Meade, Md.
In July of that year, I was abruptly transferred to a
combat unit and shipped out on a reassignment to
an unknown location.
After three and a half days of trains, convoys and
marching, we arrived at our destination, Key West.
Unbeknown to us we were preparing defenses for a
Cuban Invasion. And prepare we did, installing HAWK
missile installations from Miami, through the Keys to
Key West and actually setting up machine gun nests on
Smathers Beach.
On Oct 27,1962, we were prepared to board a ship at the Key West Naval
Base to invade Cuba. Fortunately, we received the order to stand down in the
early morning hours.
Key West in the early 1960s was a military town, period. Of their approxi-
mately 18,400 residents, 15,000 were military personnel stationed at a dozen
bases. Among the remaining 3,400 residents were a substantial Cuban popula-
tion. Most of the stores, restaurants and bars were Cuban owned and most of the
many people I met there were Cuban. I spent a great deal of my spare time in
the Cuban community
See PageA21


Special to the Chronicle
TOP: On Cienfuegos Province, A 500-year-old-city is so well preserved that some
call it an open air museum. ABOVE: Many reconstruction projects are under way
in the country. RIGHT: Manaca Iznaga is a sugar mill and plantation estate.


DREAM
VACATIONS
roto Cont^est

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Pergamum, Turkey

Special to the Chronicle
Russ and Gloria Burt, of Sugar Mill Woods, recently returned from a trip to Turkey,
where the couple explored the western half of the country. Among the sites they
visited were the ancient ruins at Pergamum, Turkey.


I,,t.


N'.^




AlS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 6, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus .B: Bright House Di: Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
~C B DA/ I F H 6:00 6:30 7:001 7:301 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:00 110:30 111:00 11:30
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T 1 Friends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami CSI: Miami "Recoil" (In Criminal Minds'14' B Criminal Minds "Hanley
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M 29 52 29 20 28 (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage.'PG' enters history from the '50s to the '90s. 'PG-13'j'PG' 'PG'
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SFL 35 39 35 West Coast Customs World Poker Tour World Poker Tour Bull Riding World PokerTour World Poker Tour
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S 302 201 302 2 2 "Mufhammad *** "Life of Pi" (2012 Adventure) Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Boardwalk Empire Eastbound Hello Boardwalk Empire
302 201 302 2 2 AF" Khan, Tabu. (In Stereo)'PG' "Erlkonig" (N) 'MA' Ladies 'MA' "Edkonig" 'MA'
B 3 20 oxing Prometheus Real Time With Bill ** "Hitchcock" (2012) Anthony Enough ** "RedTails" (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr, Nate
303 202 303 Maher'MA'm c Hopkins.'PG-13'm cSaid Parker. (In Stereo)'PG-13 B
HW 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters HuntIntl Cousins Undercover Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Reno Hunters IHuntlIntl
American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers M American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers
HYIJ 51 25 51 32 42 'PG' "Driving Miss Dani" 'PG' Pinch Picker" B "Psychic Pickings"
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24 38 24 31 (2013)'NR' B Gershon, Raquel Welch. NR' B Me'(N)'PG' "Pilot"'14'B "Pilot"'14'Bc
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150 119 '14'm '14,V'Bc convicted of murder. (N)'14'M Stereo)'14'B (In Stereo) 14'
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MSN J 42 41 42 "What Went Wrong?" ."Confrontation" (N) Teens Game
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) 340 241 340 4 _,,, ,. i:, Down"'MA' B 'MA' Ah..."(N)'MA' Ah..."MA
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P37 43 37 27 36 'P Its Back"'PG' to Geaux" 'PG' 'PG' Cantina" (N)'PG Stereo)'PG'
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370 271 370 Queen Cameron Diaz.'PG-13' Stereo) 'MA' B Stereo) 'MA' B Action) Cameron iaz. 'PG-13' Bc
4 36 31 36n Fishing the Sport Sprtsman College Football Maryland at Florida State. (Taped) Sporeminole Saltwaterxp. Int the
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TJ 49 23 49 16 19 MLB Baseball Division Series: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) MLB Baseball Division Series: Teams TBA. (N) (Live)
169 53 169 n *** 3 3 "With SixYou Get Eggroll" (1968, *** "Mister Robert".'l Comedy) Henry ** "Ensign Pulver" (1964, Comedy) Robert
S169 53 169 30 35 Comedy) Dodis Day, Brian Keith.'G' B Fonda, Jack Lemmon. i, Walker, Burl Ives. NR'mc
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53 34 53 24 26 Frontier'14'c Frontier'14'c Frontier Exposed (N) Frontier'14'c Alaska Alaska Frontier'14'c
J 50 46 50 29 30 Medium Medium Medium IMedium Medium IMedium Long Island Medium Alaskan Women Long Island Medium
ni 350 26 30 "Serious *** "Our Idiot Brother" (2011) ** "Lawless" (2012, Crime Drama) Shia *** "Out of Sight" (1998, Crime Drama)
350 261 350 Moon" Paul Rudd. R' LaBeouf. Premiere. (In Stereo) R' George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez. R'
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RAV 9 54 9 44 Terrifying Places Halloween Tricked Making Monsters (N) Making Monsters (N) Halloween Ext. Halloween Crazy
ruT 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shockin World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
rTVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs GoldGirs Goldold Girl Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs King IKing
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1W1N818 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos Funny Home Videos Mother Mother Mother Mother News Replay ** "Black Knight"


Daughter afraid


to talk to parents


D ear Annie: I am a
24-year-old col-
lege student who
still lives with my par-
ents. I love them and my
two siblings very much,
and I know that they love
me. However, they are
neither understanding
nor supportive when
anyone makes a mistake.
As a result there is not
much I feel I can tell
them.
Usually, I
can handle
my problems
by myself, but
some things
are difficult
to handle
alone. A few
months ago, I
suffered a
miscarriage.
My father
once told us
that if we ANN
ever got preg- MAIL
nant before **
marriage, we
would be disowned. I re-
alize parents often say
things to scare some
sense into their children,
but I know my parents,
and they would do it
I have not told them
about the miscarriage,
nor do I plan to. I am
going through some emo-
tional upheaval: sad-
ness, anger, guilt for not
taking enough precau-
tions to prevent the preg-
nancy and a lot of
confusion.
My boyfriend is won-
derful, loving and sup-
portive. But I wish more
than anything that I


I
.E


could rely on my parents
and siblings for support.
Here's a message to all
parents, siblings and
family members: Please
let us know we can come
to you for support and
caring. Though you
might be angry, try not to
overreact. When you fail
to do this, it can have
larger consequences
than you realize. -
Grieving
Dear Griev-
ing: Our condo-
lences on your
loss. We think
most parents
would regret
knowing their
child felt too
uncomfortable
or fearful to
come to them
for support,
and you might
E'S let them know
BOX this is the im-
____ pression they
give. There are
many support groups
specifically for women
who miscarry We
recommend SHARE at
nationalshare.org.

Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox,
visit www. creators.com.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Baggage Claim" (PG-13)
1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) In 3D. 1:45
p.m. No passes.
"Don Jon" (R) 1:05 p.m.
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"The Family" (R) 4:35 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:15 p.m.,4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-
13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"
(PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 1 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Rush" (R) 1:20 p.m.,


4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) 1:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Cloudy With A Chance of
Meatballs 2" (PG) In 3D.
4:30 p.m. No passes.
"Don Jon" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Gravity" (PG-13) 3:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Gravity" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Insidious: Chapter 2" (PG-
13) 1:30 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Prisoners" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Runner Runner" (R) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Category
6 Light brown
10 Flat-bodied fish
15 Cut
20 Term of
endearment
21 Diving bird
22 Swivel
23 and fishes
24 Of birds
25 Raised
26 Skilled
27 Wagon of a kind
28 Kinsman (abbr.)
29 Orchestra
member
31 Scotland -
33 Helot
35 Hinge joint
36 Bamboozle
37 Harding's
predecessor
39 Catchall abbr.
41 Tropical fruit
44 -and dine
45 Sandier or West
48 Underway
53 Illegal drug
54 Monarch
55 "The Marriage
of-"
57 Jam
58 Peddle
59 Fabric for gowns
60 Brooks or Gibson
61 Simple
63 Frayed
64 Before
65 "- in Space"
66 Old-fashioned
68 Concerning (2 wds.)
70 Scarlet
71 Girl
72 Harangues
74 Means' justifier
76 Gannet
79 Wipe clean
81 At any time
83 Cling
87 Turn aside
88 Grime
89 Town in Oklahoma
91 Breakfast fare
92 Sidestepped
94 Condemn
96 Mountainside
97 Sharp
98 Clapton or


Sevareid
100 Farm vehicle
102 Swindle
104 Switch position
107 Fiddling despot
109 Boy Scouts group
110 Throw
111 Archery item
114 Track
116 Make more
tractable
118 Short swim
119 Kind of bond
120 Hereditary factor
121 Dress in finery
123 Large game fish
125 Job
126 Support
127 Not very smart
128 Say grace
129 Great composer
130 Burned brightly
131 A pronoun
133 Get on a ship
136 Timber
137 -bene
141 Date in March
144 Swearword
145 Long story
146 Garment edge
149 Source
151 Austere
153 Diner sign
155 Grayish brown
157 Sense
158 Racket
159 Send forth
160 Rye fungus
161 Drop a syllable
162 -seal
163 Old instrument
164 Shift

DOWN
1 Blacken with heat
2 Adoration
3 Indigo dye
4 Red or Yellow
5 Thesaurus entry
6 Pasta shape
7 Apple remnant
8 Caviar
9 Everlasting
10 Poles on a ship
11 Buddy boy
12 -Maria
13 The best
14 Diminutive suffix
15 Boston Red -


Be without
Russian czar's name
Bird bill part
Punta del-
Garret
Snake
Pub draft
Contrition
OT king
Quick as a -
Broken-down horse
Corvine cry
Affectation
Mimic
Stack
Lose freshness
Hoover or
Grand Coulee
Field
Not too many
Redolence
Fairy tale heavy
Incline
Bussed
Greek cheese
-- -France
Distress call
Female horse
Lab burner
Source of light
Twist
Evolve
Eccentric one
Mammoth
Kind of mystical card
Mister, in Madrid
Hut
Blue
Ab (from the begin-
ning)
Directed
Clear
Rend
Old French coin
Decompose
Dir. letters
Expose as false
Usual food
- Gras
Whoa!
Small and crowded
Penny
Annoy
Toward the mouth
Taxi charge
Snow field
- Khayyam
Be silent!
Tolerate


112 A single time
113 Do a garden job
115 -Vegas
117 Time
119 Card in a deck
120 Degree recipient
122 Indeed!
124 Caustic substance
125 Native of
North Carolina
126 Swollen


Cudgel
Becloud
Slight trace
Code name
Cooked a certain way
Squander
Stem joint
City in Russia
Small monkey
Matured
Anglo-Saxon


laborer
Portico
Commotion
Gigantic
Group of poems
New York team
Frost
Ventilate
Adams or Poehler
Airport abbr.


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.


2013 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


r Of SPECIAL NOTE


Vets sought for


The Veterans Appreciation Week
Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee
will conduct its annual Veterans in
the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12
as part of its 21st annual Veterans
Appreciation Week activities.
Coordinated by the Citrus County
Chapter of the Military Officers As-
sociation of America (MOAA), the
Veterans in the Classroom program
brings living history to the class-
rooms of the county's public and
private schools, as well as home-
school groups.
Veterans share with students


assroom program

their firsthand military experi-
ences and travels while serving our
country in uniform.
The program's success has
generated the need for additional
veterans to share their experiences
with students. Persian Gulf,
Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, Na-
tional Guard and women veterans
are especially needed.
All interested veterans may con-
tact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384,
cmcleod670@earthlinknet, or Bob
Crawford at 352-270-9025,
baddogusmc@tampabayrr com.


This listing contains only City. Call 352-637-0100.
basic information regarding 0 Eugene Quinn VFW
each group. For more infor- Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
nation about scheduled activ- 906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ities, meals and more for a ness. Call Commander Victor
specific post or group, call or Houston at 352-344-3495, or
email the contact listed, visit www.vfw4337.
Posts and groups may 0 Gilley-Long-Osteen
email changes or corrections VFW Post 8698, 520 State
to community@chronicle Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
online.com. east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.
AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson OTHER GROUPS
American Legion Post 155, 0 AMVETS William Crow
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High- Post 447, 405 E. State Road
way, Crystal River. Call 352- 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton 447-1816; email Amvet447@
thompsonPost1l55@gmail.co comcast.net.
m, or visit www.flPost155.org. 0 Disabled American
American Legion Veterans Gerald A. Shook
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit Chapter No. 70, 1039 N.
President Barbara Logan, Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
352-795-4233. intersection of Independence
American Legion Wall Highway and U.S. 41. Call
Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 352-419-0207.
10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. 0 Disabled American
Call 352-489-3544, or email Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
boosc29@gmail.com. 70. Call Commander Lucy
American Legion, Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Beverly Hills Memorial Post 0 Marine Corps League
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High- Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
way, in the Beverly Plaza. 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at
Visit www.Post237.org or call 352-726-0834 or President
352-746-5018. Elaine Spikes at 352-
Allen-Rawls American 860-2400.
Legion Post 77 and 0 The Korean War
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Veterans Association,
Al Point, off Arbor Street in Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
Inverness. Call Commander VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Norm Brumett at 352- Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
476-2134 or Auxiliary presi- 563-2496, Neville Anderson
dent Alice Brummett at 352- at 352-344-2529 or Bob
476-7001. Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
American Legion Post 0 U.S. Submarine
166, meets at the Springs Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Loedge No. 378 A&FM, Base meets atAmerican Le-
5030 S. Memorial Drive, gion Post 155,6585 W. Gulf-
Homosassa. Call Comn- to-Lake Highway, Crystal
mander Robert Scott at 352- River. Call Base Commander
860-2090. Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Herbert Surber 0 Seabee Veterans of
American Legion Post 225, America (SVA) Island X-23
6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Floral City. Call 352-860-1629 Tuesday monthly at Citrus
for information. Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call Call John
VETERANS Lowe at 352-344-4702.
OF FOREIGN WARS 0 Seabee Veterans of
OFAmerica Auxiliary (SVAA)
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post ISLAND X-23 meets at
10087, County Road 491, 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
directly behind Cadence monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352- Country Club, Hernando. Call
746-0440. Nancy Staples at 352-
Edward W. Penno VFW 697-5565.
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Citrus 40/8 Voiture
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 1219 and Cabane 1219
352-465-4864. meets at American Legion
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Post 4252 and Ladies Crystal River. Call the Chef
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
Rose Highway, State Road 601-3612; for the Cabane,
200, Hernando. Call 352-726- call La Presidente Carol
3339, email vfw4252@ Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
tampabay.rr.com and Google Visit www.Postl 55.org.
VFW 4252, Hernando. 0 Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
Dumas-Hartson VFW ter 776 Military Order of the
Post 8189, West Veterans Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be- at Citrus County Builders As-
tween Crystal River and Ho- sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012. Highway (County Road 491),
Joe Nic Barco Lecanto. Visit www.citrus
Memorial VFW Post 7122, purpleheart.org or call 352-
8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral 382-3847.


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Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at
352-726-0834 or Wayne
Howard at 352-634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills,
behind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-
746-1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve
Association, Branch 186
meets at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at
Kally K's restaurant in Spring
Hill. Meeting dates are:
Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the
Country Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo
@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness. Visit www.rolling
thunderfl7.com, call Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell) or email ultraray1l997
@yahoo.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition. Call Ed Murphy for
information about services for
veterans at 352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, seeks to meet
the needs of wounded veter-
ans. 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call
employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or
email charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


nline/divanight



1/


I


CCVC yard sale Oct. 12
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Satur-
day of the month Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inverness, south of
where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split
Sellers may come and set up the day
before (typically Friday afternoon) and
are responsible for the security of their
own items overnight The spots are typ-
ically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
For more information and to make
reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.

Committee sets meeting
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will con-
duct its final coordination meeting for
Citrus County's 21st annual Veterans
Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the Conference
Room of the Citrus County Chronicle
building, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River
Veterans' service organizations and
individuals participating on the com-
mittee are urged to attend. For more
information, email chairman Chris
Gregoriou at allprestige@yahoo.com or
call 352-795-7000.
Legion Auxiliary to serve fish
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 18, at the post home, 6585
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway Crystal River
Choice is fried or baked fish. The
public is welcome; donation is $7.
All profits support the many pro-
grams of the American Legion Auxil-
iary For more information, call Unit
President Barbara Logan at 352-
795-4233.

New DAV chapter to meet
New Disabled American Veterans
Chapter, Crystal River, will meet at
6 p.m. Saturday Oct. 19, at Crystal
River Mall.
For more information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.

Auxiliary slates sale
VFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will
hold a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 20, at the post, 906 State
Road 44 East, Inverness.
Sale items include gently used
clothing, crafts to include holiday
decorations, baked goods and much
more.
Call 352-344-3495, or visit
wwwvfw4337.org, for information about
all post events.


F


$


Ladies' sale to help vets
The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks
will have a yard and bake sale from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov 16, at the
lodge, 7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
Everyone is welcome to participate.
Those with items to sell may call Bon-
nie Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jor-
dan at 352-382-7614. Rental spaces are
$15 each or two for $25. Rain date is
Sunday, Nov 17.
Food will be available. Proceeds
from the food booth go to help the Elks'
veterans committee provide for our
veterans in nursing homes.

MOC/MOCA to serve pasta
The Military Order of the Cootie/
Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary
will serve a pasta and meatball or
sausage dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr Post
No. 4252,3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway
Hernando (where the helicopter is).
Advance tickets, for $7, may be pur-
chased at the post. Donation at the
door will be $7.50. Music will be pro-
vided after dinner
For more information, call Paul
Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-795-
4142 or the post at 352-726-3339.

Veterans'pin available
Disabled American Veterans, Gerald
A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness an-
nounces the design and availability of
this year's Citrus County Veterans
Appreciation Commemorative Pin.
The pin is an outline of Citrus County
superimposed with the Iraq Campaign
and the Afghanistan Campaign service
medals.
Pins are available for a donation of
$3 each and may be obtained by calling
the chapter at 352-344-3464 or John
Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also
available at the Veterans Service Office.

Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager avail-
able to assist veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide information.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library, 8619 W Crystal St,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.



E E


FREE


GAS CARD


VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS


L) One lucky winner I

for 8 weeks

Grand Prize Winner

$200 Gas Card

Look for the entry form in
Wednesday's Newspaper
Enter as often as you would like
New winner each week
Grand Prize drawing from all
entries at the end of the contest

Pick up your copy of the
Citrus County Chronicle
Contest Begins
Wednesday, September 11

Cf~ C fi TH S" '*. C U a # - & O j i^TE

Must be over 18 year's old and legal resident in our
newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of
the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible.


VETERANS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A19


1 o__










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

'In Their Words'
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a singu-
lar event or moment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to you. It can be any
type of event, from something from the
battlefield to a fun excursion while on
leave. We also ask that you provide us with
your rank, branch of service, theater of
war served, years served, outfit and
veterans organization affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at
352-586-9202 or email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com. C.J. will put together your sto-
ries and help set up obtaining thenf" and
"now" photos to publish with your story

40&8 to have breakfast today
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday each month at American
Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Wii bowling offered at post
For fun and exercise, come join the Wii
bowling league at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77,
4375 Little Al Point, Inverness.
Bowling will be the first and third Tues-
days of each month until May Cost is $5
per night; prize money is paid each night
to the high series team and bowler Food is
available.
The bowling is sponsored by the Ameri-
can Legion, as well as the Auxiliary This
is open to the public; all ages. For more in-
formation, call Alice at 352-476-7001 or
Norm at 352-476-2134.

Post to serve roast pork
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a roast pork dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the post, 10199
N. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus
Springs.
Donation is $8. Children younger than 6
eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows.
For more information, call 352-465-4864.

Singles to dance Oct. 11
American Legion Auxiliary Allen Rawls
Unit 77 will host a Singles Dance from 6 to
9 p.m. Friday, Oct 11. Music will be pro-
vided by the Sun Coasters band playing
hits from the 1940s, '50s and '60s.
The public is welcome. Proceeds from
the dance will benefit Citrus United Bas-
ket (CUB). Cost is $10 and snacks and soft
drinks will be provided. American Legion
Post 77 is at 4375 Little Al Point (off Arbor
Street), Inverness.
For more information, call Alice at 352-
476-7001 or Linda at 352-201-0015.

Riders to host Oktoberfest
The American Legion Riders of Post 155
will host an Oktoberfest celebration on
Saturday, Oct. 12, at the post 6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River The
public is invited.
The event will take place in the rear
smoke-free banquet hall, with doors open-
ing at 5 p.m.; dinner and music start at 6
pm. Gary Hays, former backup singer for
many Nashville performers and former
member of the USAF Band, will entertain
with his acoustic guitar and vocals.
Tickets may be purchased from the bar-
tender at Post 155, and are $10 in advance
or $12 at the door All proceeds benefit
local veterans. For more information, call
352-637-5775.

Cooter Scooter open to all
The Cooter Scooter Poker Run will take
place Saturday, Oct. 12, starting and end-
ing at the Inverness VFW at 906 State
Road 44 East.
The schedule is:
8:30 a.m. Breakfast and registration
at the Inverness VFW
10 a.m. Kickstands up.
E 5 p.m. Prize winners announced
(must be present).
3 to 7 p.m. Party with Soggy Bottom
Bait Shop Boys at the end of the Freedom
Run. Pulled pork for $8 a plate will be
available at 3 p.m.
Cost of $10 per person includes one
poker hand ($5 extra hand) and breakfast
(all others, breakfast is $2).
Tickets are on sale at Citrus County vet-
erans organizations.
All net proceeds received from the city
of Inverness will be placed in the VFW
Post 4337 Veterans Relief Fund to benefit
local homeless/needy veterans and their
families.
The event is open to everyone, not just
veterans. Bikes and cars are welcome.
For details, call Victor at 352-220-3487.


HAPPY ACCIDENT


-.>


_____^ ~\\1WMM~i^ __
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Earl "Bud" Shott of Crystal River retired from the United States Army as a sergeant major after serving 26 years.
His service included three tours in Vietnam.


Crystal River veteran does duty with military police


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent


When Earl
"Bud" Shott
Jr enlisted
in the U.S.
Army in May 1954, he
wasn't yet 18 and he had
not yet graduated from
high school. Those would
both happen quickly
enough; what wouldn't
come quickly was an end
to his Army career
Shott, who grew up and enlisted in
Lebanon, Pa., did a tour of duty in
Hanau, Germany where he earned
his GED before leaving the service
in September 1957. However, his mili-
tary career was just beginning.
Shott tried to re-enlist after he was
laid off from work on his return to
civilian life, but at first he couldn't.
"They said I had too many depend-
ents," he said (Shott was married
while stationed in Germany, and he
had three children).
He did, however, join the National
Guard, inadvertently signing up for its
military police corps. When National
Guard units were federalized during
the Berlin Crisis in 1960, Shott found
himself back in the Army and en-
rolled in Military Police School in Fort
Gordon, Ga.
"I was in the military police
from the time I was reactivated
until the time I retired," the
current Crystal River Village
resident said. Shott's span of
service, which would last until
May 1984, would take him
down many trails including
three tours in Vietnam and
ultimately to the rank of ser-
geant major
"I loved it," Shott said. "I loved the
military police. The only assignment I
didn't like was when I was in Panama
(from 1961-64). It was so hot, I had 22
uniforms and I would change three
times a shift."
He served in Vietnam in 1967-68,
1970-71 and 1972-73. Dur-
ing his first two tours of
duty, Shott was heavily -t W
involved in convoy escort %.sT",
duty; he supplied security
for military supplies dur-
ing the Tet Offensive in -.
January 1968.
Memories, both good and .
bad, punctuated his time in .-
the service, and his time in
Vietnam. During his second
tour, for example, Shott was i n
charge of the detail for the US, 1 j
show at Freedom Hill, near D.1
Nang, when a familiar voice (e re- *
galed him from behind, asking
him how things were going. When t-
he turned to answer, Shott found
himself addressing Bob Hope.


Special to the Chronicle


Shott Returning from convoy escort, Cam Rahn Bay, in 1967.


Who you might run into was only
part of the equation, particularly in
Shott's line of work-which included
his capacity in AWOL (absent without
official leave) apprehension; where
became the real riddle.
For example: Shott and his partner,
Bob Dalton, were stationed at Fort

I was the last
military policeman
out of Region 1
in Vietnam.


while. Finally, they were ready to give
up when, just before leaving, Dalton
played a hunch. He stuck his hand up
the fireplace and pulled down a leg -
the AWOL soldier attached.
Of the myriad memories that Shott
has to this day, there is one he will al-
ways have to claim for himself
"I was the last military
policeman out of Region 1 in
Vietnam," he said.
That was in 1973, a tour dur-
ing which he was in charge of
security for the Four Power
(U.S., North Vietnam, South
Vietnam and Vietvong delega-
tions) Joint Military Commis-
sion. "In fact, I
was the last
Sldierout of
Re.21Ol 1."


Y He
jAiIst w wasn't,


she tld th ll er son
~?etdteii .ix\ bit.
was not iome. They said they
would wait, and they did for a


"He wasn't too happy about that,"
Shott recalled with a grin.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CUBA
Continued from PageA17

I was discharged from
the Army in 1964 and I fig-
ured in three or four
years, the Embargo would
be lifted and I could visit
Cuba.
Fifty two years later, I
still cannot visit, so I
joined a group tour with a
license to visit and
headed to Cuba.
Our tour began on June
21, with a 60-minute flight
from Fort Lauderdale to
Santa Clara, Cuba. This is a
city located in central
Cuba and was the site of
the final battle in the
Cuban Revolution that top-
pled the Batista regime.
As we traveled under a
People to People license,
we spent most of our time
with the locals. We visited
the Che Guevara Memo-
rial and Museum. Che is
everywhere in Cuba and
he is revered by the
people.
We then went to the
Museo de Artes Decora-
tivos to meet musicians
who set Cuban life to
rhythm on traditional in-
struments. Then on to the
Community Project for
the Elderly which reveals
how art, music and dance
play a crucial role in the
everyday lives of the in-
spiring residents.
The following day we
travel South (by a large,
comfortable, air condi-
tioned bus) to Cienfuegos,
on the Caribbean Sea. We
take a walking tour of the
city and are constantly
amazed by the number of
old cars. We visit shops,
Teatro Terry, which once
hosted Enrico Caruso,
and the town square.
Here again the signs of no
maintenance are every-
where. We attend a pri-
vate convert by Cantores
de Cienfuegos. A choir
created from the popula-
tion and some of the most
beautiful music I have
ever heard.
The following day we
continue to explore Cien-
fuegos Province, arriving
at the Botanical Gardens.
Home to 2,000 species of
exotic plants, including
400 types of orchids, it is
the tropics at its best
Returning to the city,
we take a walking tour
We visit the main food
market, enjoy the archi-
tecture of the town square
and meet merchants.
After an overnight stay
at the Pearla del Mar
hotel on the water, we are
off to Trinidad.
A 500-year-old city that
is so well preserved, some


Spe
TOP: Casa Enrique at Playa Larga is a colorful destination. BELOW: Cienfuegos, on the Caribbean Sea
number of old cars.


call it an open air mu-
seum. A local guide shows
us the cathedral and the
Palicio Cantero, home of
the historical museum.
Our next stop is a ra-
tioning store where we
see how the meager es-
sentials of life are distrib-
uted. Then on to a local
ceramics studio, owner
operated as part of Raul
Castro's relaxing of the
socialist doctrine.
While talking with the
owner, I am led to the
rear storage area of the
studio. And there I see a
serviceable 1903 Ford sit-
ting on blocks. In my
whole life and I haven't
seen one, yet here it is in
Cuba.
We are then off to Man-
aca Iznaga, a sugar mill
and plantation estate. We
enjoy an excellent lunch
and then operate the
sugar press, by hand.
This, or course, gives new
meaning to "hard work."
The following morning
we begin our journey to
Havana. Our first stop is
the Bay of Pigs Museum
and then the town of Cale-
ton near the landing
beach. We then visit Casa
Enrique at Playa Larga.
This is our lunch destina-
tion in a private home on
the water We have a dis-
cussion with Enrique con-
cerning the operating of a
business in Cuba. We also
enjoy a biologist explain-


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.


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ing the make up of the is-
land. From here, we
travel to Havana on the
only "express" road on
the island. Again, sadly in
need of maintenance.
We are housed in the
Hotel Terrell on the water
for the duration of our
visit. Excellent hotel, ex-
cept the elevator is bro-
ken and they cannot seem
to obtain parts.
We start the day with a
one-hour Spanish lesson
at the University of Ha-
vana. The pace is fast,
loud and entirely in Span-
ish. I learned nothing.
Then we are on a walk-
ing tour of Havana. With


3,000 Baroque, neoclassi-
cal and colonial buildings
we learn first hand from
the architect in charge of
this massive project.
Lack of maintenance
has caused much
deterioration and basic
services such as water,
electricity and sewer are
compromised.
We are shown many re-
construction projects. All
work is done manually
and there were no short-
age of workers.
I am again amazed at
the beauty of the build-
ings and the lack of main-
tenance. In most cases, it
has been 50-plus years


Mrr 7 CHALLENGE #4
Hosted by
Voice for Children of North Central Florida


Your "tidbits of knowledge"
are a "smart" choice to improve
the welfare of the children in
the 5th judicial circuit under
the auspicies of the
Guardian ad Litem program.


Enjoy an evening of food, music, trivia and prizes.
Tickets are $25 per person and include food, beverages,
one door prize ticket and participation in the game.
Sat., Nov. 2,2013,6:00 p.m.
American Legion, 10730 Hwy. 41, Dunnellon, FL






Food donated by Harry's Seafood Bar & Grille, Ocala, FL
Silent auction with many varied items.
Call 352-362-5851 or 352-601.0115 for tickets
or to donate an item for the silent auction.
Join us for this fun, and often funny, evening to raise
funds to benefit abuse and neglected children.

CHRP.Nc |


for Chil0,

sl


from 1939 to 1960. Lo-
cated outside of Havana,
the site is operated as a
museum and educational
center It is just as it was
when Hemingway left it.
We viewed his boat
"Pilar" and the second
largest swimming pool in
Cuba.
SFrom here we arrive at
? the Muraeleando neigh-
.-_ ._ borhood. This is a non-
I_ rr profit project that collects
Bjunk and converts it into
art.
_-..,i That night we go to For-
i *taleza de San Carlos de la
Cabafia, an 18th century
fortress complex. We
-",: i enjoy the 9p.m. cannon
-h J shot, a custom from the
Colonial times indicating
r s the city wall doors have
closed.
Later that evening we
walk to the National
Hotel. Opened in 1930,
the hotel has a rich his-
tory In 1946 it hosted a
mob summit run by Lucky
SLuciano and the hotel has
S- hosted many, many illus-
- : -.:.-- .. trious visitors.
g_ _L My parents were mar-
ried in 1940 and they
spent their honeymoon at
cial to the Chronicle the hotel. The hotel main-
i is home to a tains a history depart-
ment archiving all the
room registration records.
= I was unable to check my
parents' records as the of-
fice is only open two
hours a day
i We also visited schools,
clubs, fraternal organiza-
tions and music concerts.
I found the Cubans to
be among the nicest peo-
ple I have met in all of my
S travels. Crime is almost

j the Cuban prisons are
I ~quite a deterrent. In spite
of their harsh life, they re-
main upbeat.
In talking to locals, they
always ask where we are
from and then questions
about us.
But life will never be
enjoyable until the
-- United States lifts the
embargo.


since last maintained.
We next venture to La
Casa Fuster, home of Jose
Faster a ceramic artist
who has adorned some 80
homes with colorful mu-
rals.
We then met with a for-
mer diplomat for a discus-
sion on the Embargo and
its affect on the Cubans.
As it turned out, the lec-
turer was a member of
the Cuban army in 1962
and was entrenched in a
fox hole awaiting the U.S.
Invasion.
The next morning we
travelled to Finca Vigia
(Lookout Farm), the home
of Ernest Hemmingway


Peter Graulich first left
the countryin 1961 for six
weeks travellingEurope
and the United Kingdom
with family. At the end of
that trip he knew he was
going to travel a lot Since
then he has visited 97
countries, every state in
the US. and every national
park (408). He has spent
about 300 days on Princess
Cruise Line ships and com-
pleted a 107-day cruise
around the world, visiting
42 countries.
He rates Cuba as one of
the top three places he
has visited.


SN!ature coastvMg


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Entire nr month of October Mon-Fri mSpan
WalMart Hornoassa Saturday October 12 10arnm2pm
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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 A21




A22 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 TOGETHER CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New ARRIVAL


50th ANNIVERSARY


GET TOGETHER

Club to learn about Photoshop
The Citrus County Art Center Camera Club
will have classes for Photoshop Elements
starting at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Art Center
The classes will continue Oct. 15,22 and 29.
Cost will be $10 per class for members and $15
for nonmembers. Alan Wentzel will teach begin-
ners who are new to Elements and Linus Upson
will teach the intermediate and advanced stu-
dents. Laptop computers will be necessary for
the course.
For more information, call 352-400-4466. The
Art Center is at at 2644 N. Annapolis Ave.,
Hernando, at the intersection of County Road
486 and Annapolis Avenue.

CASA bunco party slated Oct. 13
In conjunction with Domestic Violence aware-
ness Month in October, Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA) will host a Bunco Blast
fundraiser Sunday, Oct. 13, at Catholic Charities
Community Center Outreach, 9020 W Atlas
Drive, Homosassa. Doors open at 12:15 p.m.
fl M and games begin at 1.
P Novices and bunco clubs
are welcome. What is
nnix bunco?
W Although rules can
vary, teams of players
roll dice and score points
at each table, shifting ta-
bles and partners after each game.
Cost is $12 per person, a nonrefundable chari-
table donation. Refreshments, game prizes and
door prizes are included. Make reservations by
calling Janet at 352-527-2304 or mailing
janetbl95@gmail.com.
All proceeds will go to CASA for victims of
domestic violence.

Attorney to speak at Key Center
Attorney Marie Blume of Inverness will offer a
presentation for caregivers of persons with de-
velopmental disabilities at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday
Oct. 9, the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center
(CCLEC) at the Key Training Center, 5521 Buster
Whitton Way
The session is free and open to the public. It
will focus on such aspects as financial planning,
guardianship, making medical decisions and
other similar issues.
For more information, call Stephanie Hopper
at 352-344-0288.

E-Nini-Hassee plans dinner
Eckerd E-Nini-Hassee, a not-for-profit
organization for at-risk girls, will host its annual
spaghetti dinner from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday
Oct. 10, at 7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City
Donations are $8 per person, which includes
salad, bread, spaghetti (with assorted homemade
sauces), dessert and drink.
Call 352-726-3883 for more information.


Dyani Leigh Salminen

Ryan and Desiree
Salminen announce the
birth of a daughter,
Dyani Leigh, at 1:12 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
Health System.
The baby weighed
7 pounds, 14.5 ounces
and was 20.5 inches long.
Dyani Leigh was
welcomed by brothers
Hunter, 6, and Brayden, -
5, and sister Danica, 4.


For the RECORD


Sept. 16-22, 2013
Divorces
LuisA. Olivero, Inverness
vs. Anna M. Olivero,
Hernando
Marriages
Keith Nicholas
Brownscombe, Great
Yarmouth, Norfolk,
England/Ann Richardson,
Great Yarmouth
Christopher Steven
Decaire, Dunnellon/Sara
Bethany Poulin, Dunnellon
Jed Hernandez,
Inverness/Meagan
Alexandra Puchala,
Inverness
Christopher Dillion
Holland, Inverness/
Nina Maddox, Inverness
Tomas Karger, Floral


City/Connie Sue Meyers,
Inverness
Mathew Frank Marques,
Beverly Hills/Katherine
Kristan Siebenthal, Beverly
Hills
Andrew Linden Michael,
Inverness/Sheena Marie
Phillips, Inverness
Barry Lee Sweigart Sr.,
Inverness/Glenda Ann
Elmore, Inverness

Divorces and marriages
filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record,
available from each county's
Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the
clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at
www clerk.citrus.fl us.


Group plans two trips


All are welcome

Special to the Chronicle

The Meadowcrest
Community Association
will sponsor a bus trip to
Bok Tower and Gardens
on Thursday, Oct. 10. The
group will depart from
Meadowcrest Winn-
Dixie at 7 a.m. and from
The Shoppes at Sug-
armill Woods at 7:15 a.m.
Estimated return home
to be between 6 to
6:30 p.m.
In December, the
group will travel to Ybor
City The group will de-


part from Meadowcrest
Winn-Dixie at 8 a.m. and
from The Shoppes at
Sugarmill Woods at
8:15 a.m.
Estimated return
home to be between 6 to
6:30 p.m.
Price for both trips
includes bus, admission,
guided tour, lunch, all
gratuities (including
driver) and "Fun on the
Bus."
The trips are open to
the public. Call the
Meadowcrest social com-
mittee chairwoman,
Sharon Ziemba, at 352-
795-4693 for price, dead-
lines and other details.


William C. Waugh Jr
and Sylvia Waugh of
Dunnellon celebrated
their 50th wedding an-
niversary Sept 14, 2013.
The couple were wed
Sept. 14,1963, in
Dunnellon. Sylvia is a
homemaker and William
is a retired pharmacist.
They have lived in
Dunnellon for 47 years;
William was in college for
three years at the
University of Florida


Elizabeth Ann Shaner
Chapman of Crystal River,
formerly of Ellwood City,
Pa., and Joseph William
Zubaly, formerly of
Ellwood City, Pa., an-
nounce the engagement
of their daughter, Audrey
Clara Shaner of Tavares,
formerly of Ellwood City,
Pa., to David Philip
Carroll of Tavares.
The bride-elect, a for-
mer Crystal River resi-
dent, is the grand-
daughter of the late
Helen Audrey McNany
and the Rev H. Dale
Shaner formerly of
Ellwood City, Pa. She
graduated as a home-
schooled student and
received her GED in
April 2013. Audrey now
works for the Lake County
Animal Services as an
animal technician I.
Her fiance is the son of


in Gainesville.
They have three sons:
Bill Waugh III, Ocala;
Clayton Waugh,
Jacksonville; and First Lt.
Steven Waugh, serving in
Afghanistan.
The couple have four
grandchildren and three
step-grandchildren.
The Waughs celebrated
their golden anniversary
at Ruth's Chris Steak
House in Jacksonville on
Sept. 14.


Barbara Patrick Carroll
and Bernie Carroll. He is
a 1999 graduate of
Tavares High School and
is now employed as a
water plant operator
The couple will ex-
change nuptial vows
Feb. 22, 2014, at Little
Lake Harris at Hickory
State Park in Tavares.
Cards may be sent to 603
Third Ave., Lady Lake,
FL 32159.


* Abitare Paris Salon
* '... .* ...' Jazzercise
* Citrus Pest Management
* Clementine's Boutique
* Complete Family Dentistry
* Connolly's Sod & Nursery
* Connor's Gifts
* Cotton Club
* Eclectic Ends Hair Studio
* Everyone's Massage
Therapy Services, LLC
* Frame Design
* Genesis Women's Center
* Georgieo's Hair Design
* Goldiggers & Gunslingers
* Health & Wellness Services
of Florida, Inc
* Helene Graham Miche Handbags
* Himalayan Salt Room Ocala


* Ideal Health Enrichment Center
* Inverness Yoga & Wellness Center
* Jewelry by Ms Nettee
* Juice Plus
* Karma Upscale Resale Boutique
* La Te Da Boutique
* Ledger Dentistry
* Lillian Smith Mary Kay Cosmetics
* M Hair Studio & the Spa at M
* Mama's Kuntry Kafe -
The Little Glass Shack
* Mez Mer Eyes
* New Concepts Hair Salon
* New Empire E-Cigs
* Nick Nicholas Ford
* Nick Nicholas Ford/Lincoln
* Off the Cuff& On The Fly
* Origami Owl Amber
* Relaxation Station Sponsored
by Crystal Automotive


* Park Avenue of Hair Design
* Playtime PinUp Photography
* Scentsy
* Specialty Gems
* Suncoast Dermatology
& Skin Surgery Center
* The Garden Shed
* The New Image Med Spa
* Thirty-one by Valerie Hodges
* Timber Lane Chiropractic
* Tobacco Prevention -
Florida Health
* Touch of Glass by Susan
* Unique Lingerie
* Vault Jeans
* Vernon Martin Salon & Spa
* Virgilio Insurance Services
* Whalen Jewelers
* Zen Zone Massage


Call 8004324262


1 Night Stay & 2 General

Admission Diva Tickets


0 October 12,


138
Limited Availability Taxes not included
*For tickets only go to Chronicle site listed below


to reserve your room & tickets
www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com
www.chronicle-online.com/divanight


The Waughs



'jr-iJ


= Engagement

Shaner/Carroll


- i-..IwwooFwwlw,- --qqqmbkkh.-









SPORTS


The Buccaneers
are using their bye
week to regroup
as a team./B6



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


* NHL, golf/B2
* Scoreboard/B3
* TV, lottery/B3
* NFL/B4, B6
* College football/B5
* Auto racing/B6


Rays on the brink of elimination


Boston claims Game 2 ofALDS to

take commanding 2-0 series lead


Associated Press
BOSTON David Ortiz
homered twice, the second shot
chasing David Price in the
eighth inning on Saturday night
and the Boston Red Sox beat the
Tampa Bay Rays 7-4 to take a 2-
0 lead in the AL division series.
It was the first two-homer
postseason game for the Red
Sox designated hitter, who was
a star for the 2004 Boston team
that won the franchise's first
World Series title in 86 years
and is the only player remain-
ing from that club.
"When he hits two home runs,
things are going to revolve


around him," Red Sox manager
John Farrell said. "He's the
main cog in our lineup."
Jacoby Ellsbury had three hits
and scored three runs for the AL
East champions and Dustin Pe-
droia drove in three runs.
The Rays will need a victory
in Game 3 on Monday in St. Pe-
tersburg to avoid a sweep in the
best-of-five series. They won
three win-or-go-home games
this week just to reach this
round, including Price's com-
plete game in the tiebreaker
against Texas to determine the
second AL wild-card team.
But with the situation not yet
desperate, Price allowed seven


runs on nine hits and two walks,
striking out five. He took the
mound for the eighth inning,
but Ortiz hit his second pitch
high over the Pesky Pole, and
right-field umpire Chris Guc-
cione signaled it fair
There was no such suspense
for Ortiz's other homer, which
went into Boston bullpen in the
first inning to make it 2-0. Not
even right fielder Wil Myers, who
misplayed a Big Papi popup into
a double in right field in Boston's
Game 1 win on Friday, could be
blamed for that one.
John Lackey lasted just 5 1/3
innings for Boston, allowing
four runs on seven hits and
three walks. He struck out six
and also hit a batter while get-
ting the win. Koji Uehara struck
out the first two batters in the
ninth before retiring Myers on a
grounder


tI
Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, left, holds the ball as
starting pitcher David Price leaves the baseball game in the top of
the eighth inning in Game 2 of the American League division series
against the Boston Red Sox on Saturday in Boston.


ure d omina ion

No. 8 FSU

routs No. 25

Mar;yland 63-0

Associated Press -...
TALLAHASSEE --Jameis
Winston reaffirmed his Heis-
man Trophy candidacy with
the best performance of his"T,
short career Saturday The
Florida State redshirt fresh-
man put up career-highs with
393 yards passing and five
touchdowns during a 63-0 vic-
tory over No. 25 Maryland. m
The 63 points were the sec-
ond-most scored by No. 8 Florida
State during coach Jimbo 'CA
Fisher's tenure. Saturday was
the most lopsided win against a ..111,R,
Top 25 program in school history.
The Seminoles beat No. 15 South p -, .
Carolina 59-0 in 1988. v..
The lopsided score also tied
the point-differential for the Xdrr
worst loss by a Top 25 team all- I
time. No. 11 Texas lost 66-3 to 1.
UCLA in 1997.-raw:
Winston's weekly highlight 'l ie' -am ,..
came late in the third quarter
when the pocket collapsed and
Maryland linebacker Yannik
Cudjoe-Virgil jumped on his R/O. "W
back. The quarterback ducked
and slid out of the sack, rolled It
right and threw a 12-yard .-
touchdown pass to tight end Im"am .
Nick O'Leary.n.
Winston became the first
FSU quarterback to throw five
touchdowns since Christian ." 1
Ponder in 2009. He's now -.
thrown for 1,441 yards, 17
touchdowns with two intercep-
tions and a 73.3 completion
percentage this season.
"It felt like a little league
football game out there," Win-
ston said. "It was 12 o'clock, the Q4 -1
sun was out. I don't think I saw
a cloud in the sky. It was a
beautiful day"
The Florida State defense
was the concern throughout
the week after giving up 34
points to Boston College seven
days ago. Defenders got out of
their lanes and missed tackles
Associated Press
-something the Seminoles Florida State's Ryan Green catches a pass prior to the start of a contest against Maryland on
See Page 62 Saturday in Tallahassee. The No. 8 Seminoles shut out the No. 25 Terrapins 63-0.


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No. 18 UF


dispatches

Arkansas
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Solomon
Patton turned two short recep-
tions into touchdowns, helping
No. 18 Florida beat Arkansas
30-10 Saturday night.
The 5-foot-9 senior nicknamed
"Solo" was pretty close to being a
one-man show in the Swamp.
Patton finished with six
catches for a career-high 124
yards. He also ran for a first
down. But his longest gains
went the distance and were key
to Florida (4-1,3-0 Southeastern
Conference) winning its ninth
consecutive game in the series
and 10th in a row at home.
Tyler Murphy, making his
first start at Florida Field, com-
pleted 16 of 22 passes for 240
yards and three scores an-
other efficient and effective
outing from a fourth-year junior
who somehow couldn't get on
the field the last three years.
The Razorbacks (3-3, 0-2) ran
the ball well early against the
league's best defense but fell
behind on Loucheiz Purifoy's
interception return in the sec-
ond quarter for a touchdown
and faded from there.
Purifoy had a sack and forced
fumble in the first quarter, ex-
tending Florida's streak with a
takeaway to 16 games. The
Gators also have intercepted a
pass in eight straight games.
Arkansas looked sharp for a bit
gashing the Gators on the ground
and taking a 7-0 lead on Jonathan
Williams' nifty cutback run.
Williams started left, slammed
into defensive end Ronald Pow-
ell, bounced out of the would-be
tackle and then headed the other
direction. He picked up a block
from quarterback Brandon Allen
and pretty much walked into the
end zone for a 4-yard score.
But it was ended up being
one of the few bright spots for
Arkansas, which hasn't beaten
Florida since 1982 a decade
before the Razorbacks entered
the SEC.
Things might be worse for the
Razorbacks, too. Starting cor-
nerback Will Hines injured his
right arm and left the field on a
cart, and starting center Travis
Swanson also left the game.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Americans close to Presidents Cup


Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ohio The Ameri-
cans are assured of being in the
lead going into the final round of
the rain-plagued Presidents Cup.
Zach Johnson holed out from
the 15th fairway for eagle to
complete a swift turnaround in
foursomes and give the Ameri-
cans yet another point toward
winning the Presidents Cup for
the fifth straight time.
Johnson and Jason Dufner
won six of eight holes to go from
2 down to a 4-and-3 win over
Richard Sterne and Marc Leish-
man. That was the only four-
somes match that finished
before it became too dark to play
Saturday at Muirfield Village.
Another rain delay kept the
matches from finishing for the
second straight day, this time be-
cause of the work needed to


drain the saturated golf course.
The four matches were to re-
sume Sunday morning, followed
by an early start to the 12 singles
matches because of more rain in
the forecast.
The win by Johnson and
Dufner gave the Americans an
111/2-61/2 lead, meaning they were
assured at least a one-point lead
going into singles.
Early in the foursomes ses-
sion, the board was filled with
blue International scores on the
front nine. Steve Stricker and
Bill Haas warmed up their put-
ters and went from 1 down to a
2-up lead through 10 holes. Phil
Mickelson and Keegan Bradley,
who rallied earlier in a fourballs
match to win, were 3 down
through seven holes when Mick-
elson made two big putts that led
to them squaring the match
through 14 holes.


Associated Press
United States team players Jason Dufner, left, and Zach Johnson
celebrate winning the 14th hole with a birdie during the foursomes
matches Saturday at the Presidents Cup golf tournament at
Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio.
Tiger Woods and Matt week, were 2 down against
Kuchar, undefeated in all three Ernie Els and Brendon de
matches they have played this Jonge through nine holes.


Louis Oosthuizen and Charl
Schwartzel were 3 up over
Webb Simpson and Brandt
Snedeker through 12 holes.
LPGA Tour
BEIJING Chinese star Shan-
shan Feng shot a 9-under 64 to take
a one-stroke lead over American
Stacy Lewis after the third round of
the Reignwood LPGA Classic.
Shrouded in the Chinese capital's
notorious smog, Feng had nine
birdies in a bogey-free round to
reach 21-under 198, boosting the
chances of a home winner in the first
LPGATour event played in the coun-
try. Feng won the LPGA Champi-
onship last year to become China's
first major champion.
Lewis, a three-time winner this
year, had a 65. Top-ranked Inbee
Park, a six-time winner this season,
was five strokes back at 16 under
after a 66.


Bolts strike back


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Lightning's Tyler Johnson, left, and the Chicago Blackhawks' Nick Leddy vie for the puck during the first period
Saturday in Chicago.


Tampa Bay ties

game, then wins

in shootout

Associated Press

CHICAGO Valtteri Filp-
pula scored in the shootout and
the Tampa Bay Lightning ral-
lied for a 3-2 victory over the
Chicago Blackhawks on Satur-
day night.
Ben Bishop made 37 saves in
his first start for the season for
Tampa Bay, and then denied
each of Chicago's three shooters
in the tiebreaker Filppula beat
Corey Crawford into the right
side of the net in the first round.
Tampa Bay looked listless be-
fore Martin St. Louis and Teddy
Purcell scored midway through
the third period, tying it at 2.
It was the first victory of the
season for the Lightning, who
opened with a 3-1 loss at Boston.
Patrick Kane and Brandon
Saad scored for Chicago, which
outshot Tampa Bay 39-16.
Bruins 4, Red Wings 1
BOSTON Brad Marchand
scored the tiebreaking goal 36 sec-
onds into the second period and
Tuukka Rask made 25 saves, lifting
the Boston Bruins to a 4-1 win over
the Detroit Red Wings.
Torey Krug and Zdeno Chara
each scored power-play goals, and



PURE
Continued from Page BI

couldn't afford against a Mary-
land offense that averaged 498.5
yards per game.
That was not a problem.
The Terrapins were held to
121 first-half yards and Florida
State gave up a season-low 11
yards rushing on 10 attempts in
the first half. Maryland punted
on its first three possessions of
the game, a Florida State first
this season. The Terps converted
just 1-of-7 third downs in the first
30 minutes and 2-of-15 all game.


Jordan Caron added an even-
strength score for Boston, which
won its season opener against
Tampa Bay on Thursday.
Henrik Zetterberg scored for the
Red Wings, who are in the same di-
vision with the Bruins after the NHL
realigned following last season.
Canadiens 4, Flyers 1
MONTREAL Lars Eller scored
his third goal in two games and
Brendan Gallagher got his second
to help Montreal beat Philadelphia.
Carey Price stopped 22 shots,
Brian Gionta and Rene Bourque
added goals for Montreal, and Alex
Galchenyuk had his second two-as-
sist performance in two games to
start the season.
Vincent Lecavalier scored for
Philadelphia. Many of the 21,273 at
the Bell Centre booed each time
the puck went to Lecavalier, who
turned down the Canadiens to sign
with the Flyers this offseason.
Blue Jackets 3,
Islanders 2, SO
UNIONDALE, N.Y -CamAtkin-
son scored in the fourth round of a
shootout, and Columbus rallied from
two goals down in the third period to
spoil New York's home opener.
The Islanders and goalie Evgeni
Nabokov seemed to be in complete
control before Mark Letestu and
Nick Foligno scored 4:19 apart to
get even at 2-2 after the Blue Jack-
ets managed only 12 shots in the
first two periods.


'As good as the offense played
today, I thought the defense
played better," Fisher said. "The
defense, I thought, was the story
of the day They really took the
show"
Things became even worse for
Maryland when starting quar-
terback C.J. Brown went down
late in the second quarter with
the Terrapins trailing 14-0.
Brown released a pass down-
field just before Dan Hicks hit
him around the waist and Jac-
cobi McDaniel followed with a
blow to the chest. Brown lay on
the turf for several minutes be-
fore he immediately headed to
the locker room with a member


New York built its lead in the sec- C
ond on a power-play goal by de- g
fenseman Lubomir Visnovsky and s
an even-strength tally by Matt Moul-
son. Visnovsky added an assist,
and captain John Tavares had two
for the Islanders. a
Penguins 4, Sabres I s
PITTSBURGH Sidney Crosby E
and Chuck Kobasew each scored F
his second goal of the season and
Marc-Andre Fleury was nearly per- D
fect again, making 20 saves to lead t
Pittsburgh over Buffalo. Q
Craig Adams also scored his
second goal and Chris Kunitz con- t
verted a penalty shot to help the
Penguins open 2-0 for the third
straight season. Pittsburgh de-
fenseman Matt Niskanen added
two assists and forward Pascal F
Dupuis, playing in his 800th game,
also had an assist. H
Fleury has sparkled through two
games, turning aside 47 of 48 shots. i
Maple Leafs 5,
Senators 4, SO
TORONTO Mason Raymond
and Tyler Bozak scored shootout
goals to lift Toronto past Ottawa in S
the Maple Leafs' home opener. t
Toronto goalie Jonathan Bernier,
outstanding in relief of James C
Reimer, stopped Milan Michalek-- E
whose shot hit the crossbar and tc
bounced out -and Jason Spezza g
in the shootout. tl
Raymond, on a nifty turnaround N
backhand, and Bozak, through tl


of the medical staff.
Maryland coach Randy Edsall
said Brown suffered a concussion
and will be evaluated today
The Maryland offense was
held to 234 yards and 33 yards
rushing on 25 attempts.
"They have great athletes.
They always do," Maryland
backup quarterback Caleb Rowe
said. "They were good, but we
also could have taken advantage
of a few things and we didn't do
that."
It was the Florida State of-
fense that started slow this
week, but that didn't last long.
The Seminoles scored on their
first drive, a Karlos Williams 1-


Craig Anderson's legs, scored to
live Toronto a 2-0 edge in the
shootout.
Blues 7, Panthers 0
ST. LOUIS Jaroslav Halak set
franchise record with his 17th
shutout and Alex Steen scored on a
penalty shot to lead the St. Louis
Blues to a 7-0 win over the Florida
'anthers.
Newcomers Brenden Morrow and
)erek Roy scored their first goals of
he season for St. Louis, which re-
eived goals from seven different
players. The Blues have outscored
heir opponents 11-2 with 10 different
players scoring goals this season.
Vladimir Tarasenko and Jaden
Schwartz also converted against
lorida goalie Tim Thomas, who
was pulled after the second period.
le allowed five goals on 28 shots.
Halak made 19 saves and
passed Glen Hall, who had 16
shutouts from 1967-1971.
Ducks 4, Wild 3, OT
ST. PAUL, Minn. Mathieu Per-
eault scored at 4:55 of overtime to
live the Anaheim Ducks a 4-3 vic-
ory over the Minnesota Wild.
Perreault's game-winner came
in a 2-on-1 break with Francois
Beauchemin. He dumped the puck
o a streaking Beauchemin, who
lave it right back to Perreault, and
he center flipped his shot past
Jiklas Backstrom to give the Ducks
heir first win of the season.


yard touchdown run, and there
punted on the next three con-
secutive drives. That's when the
Winston show began.
The Seminoles scored touch-
downs on their next eight con-
secutive possessions.
O'Leary had four receptions
for 55 yards and two touch-
downs. Receiver Kelvin Ben-
jamin had five receptions for 6(
yards and two touchdowns. Re-
ceiver Rashad Greene had 108
yards receiving, but saw his
streak of five games with a
touchdown come to an end.
Williams added another
touchdown from 17 yards out in
the fourth quarter and backup


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 12 8
Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 2
Detroit 3 2 1 0 4 6 7
Ottawa 2 1 0 1 3 5 5
Montreal 2 1 1 0 2 7 5
TampaBay 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Florida 2 1 1 0 2 4 9
Buffalo 3 0 3 0 0 2 7
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 2 2 0 0 4 7 1
N.Y. Islanders 2 1 0 1 3 6 6
Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 6 6
Washington 3 1 2 0 2 10 12
Carolina 1 0 0 1 1 2 3
New Jersey 2 0 1 1 1 3 7
N.Y Rangers 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
Philadelphia 2 0 2 0 0 2 7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 11 2
Colorado 2 2 0 0 4 9 2
Winnipeg 2 2 0 0 4 10 7
Chicago 2 1 0 1 3 8 7
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Minnesota 2 0 0 2 2 5 7
Nashville 2 0 2 0 0 3 7
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Calgary 2 1 0 1 3 8 8
Phoenix 1 1 0 0 2 4 1
San Jose 1 1 0 0 2 4 1
Anaheim 2 1 1 0 2 5 9
Los Angeles 2 1 1 0 2 6 7
Edmonton 1 0 1 0 0 4 5
Vancouver 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Columbus 3, N.Y Islanders 2, SO
Tampa Bay 3, Chicago 2, SO
Boston 4, Detroit 1
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 4, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 7, Florida 0
Dallas 2, Washington 1
Anaheim 4, Minnesota 3, OT
Edmonton at Vancouver, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Anaheim atWinnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.



Presidents Cup Results
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Yardage: 7,354; Par: 72
UNITED STATES 11%', INTERNATIONAL 6'/2
Foursomes
United States 1, International 0 (four matches incom-
plete)
Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, def.
Richard Sterne and Marc Leishman, International, 4 and 3.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, all
square through 13 holes with Phil Mickelson and Keegan
Bradley, United States.
Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International,
3 up through 12 holes over Webb Simpson and Brandt
Snedeker, United States.
Bill Haas and Steve Stricker, United States, 2 upthrough
10 holes over Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, Inter-
national.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, 2 up
through 9 holes overTigerWoods and Matt Kuchar, United
States.
Fourballs
United States 4, International 1
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United States, def.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, 2 and 1.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, def.
Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United States, 2 up.
Bill Haas and Webb Simpson, United States, def. Angel
Cabrera and Branden Grace, International, 4 and 3.
Brandt Snedeker and Hunter Mahan, United States, def.
Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International, 2 up.
TigerWoods and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Adam
Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International, 1 up.
Foursomes (completed from Friday)
International 3, United States 3
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United States, def.
Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, 4 and 3.
Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, def. Bill
Haas and Hunter Mahan, United States, 4 and 3.
Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United States, def.
Branden Grace and Richard Sterne, International, 2 and 1.
Angel Cabrera and Marc Leishman, International, def.
Webb Simpson and Brandt Snedeker, United States, 2
and 1.
TigerWoods and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Louis
Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International, 4 and 2.
Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International, def.
Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, 2 and 1.


i quarterback Jacob Coker ran for
- a 24-yard touchdown in the
fourth quarter
"Not really much to say today,"
- Edsall said. "We weren't very
- good.... I take full responsibility
for this. We didn't play well of-
s fensively, defensively, special
- teams.
"I know the guys in the locker
3 room. I know who they are and I
- know the resolve that we have
! and we will go back and we will
s look at this and get better."
a Florida State has a bye week
before it travels to No. 3 Clem-
r son on Oct. 19.
i Maryland hosts Virginia next
week.


B2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Nationwide

Kansas Lottery 300
Results
Saturday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (17) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200 laps, 127.7 rating,
0 points, $73,450.
2. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 108,0, $57,800.
3. (5) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 136.7, 43,
$57,775.
4. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 101.9, 0, $32,975.
5. (2) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 106.4, 40,
$38,925.
6. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 107.5, 39,
$38,075.
7. (7) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 110.5, 38,
$30,325.
8. (9) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 88.5, 36, $29,225.
9. (8)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 97.8, 36, $28,135.
10. (3) ElliottSadler, Toyota, 200, 107.4, 34, $30,300.
11. (11) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 88.6, 33,
$27,950.
12. (18) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 82.2, 32,
$26,200.
13. (21) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 73.4, 31, $25,650.
14. (20) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 74.3, 30,
$25,140.
15. (25) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 71.1, 0,
$19,580.
16. (10) Chris Buescher, Ford, 200, 77.2, 29,
$24,670.
17. (15) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 82.8, 27,
$24,185.
18. (6) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 73.4, 26,
$23,925.
19. (30) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 200,60.8,0,
$23,715.
20. (14) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 64.5, 24,
$24,180.
21. (22) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 200,63.5,0, $17,395.
22. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 199, 58.8, 22,
$23,285.
23. (28) Bryan Silas, Ford, 199, 49.7, 0, $23,150.
24. (23) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 199, 52.8, 20,
$23,040.
25. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 196, 43.5, 19,
$23,380.
26. (39) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, 195, 39.1, 0,
$22,795.
27. (38) Eric McClure, Toyota, 191, 36.9, 17,
$22,685.
28. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, accident, 187,98.2,
0, $16,565.
29. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 179, 68.4, 15,
$22,415.
30. (19) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, handling, 145, 69.9,
14, $22,605.
31. (32) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 137, 43.7, 14,
$22,150.
32. (37) Ken Butler, Toyota, accident, 131, 38.1, 12,
$22,040.
33.(33)TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 120, 42.5, 11,
$21,925.
34. (40) Carl Long, Dodge, vibration, 102, 35, 10,
$21,814.
35. (27) Hal Martin, Toyota, accident, 80, 27.1, 9,
$21,689.
36. (24) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, engine, 77,
45.9, 8, $20,445.
37. (29) Blake Koch, Toyota, overheating, 28, 34.1,7,
$14,325.
38. (31) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 11, 34.2, 0,
$14,265.
39. (35) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, rear gear, 8, 33.4, 5,
$13,940.
40. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4, 31.9, 4,
$13,830.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 114.262 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 37 minutes, 32 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.952 seconds.
Caution Flags: 11 for 50 laps.
Lead Changes: 17 among 10 drivers.
Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-6; J.AIIgaier 7-19; P.Kliger-
man 20-26; J.AIIgaier 27; M.Wallace 28; A.Dillon 29-
30; R.Smith 31-57; M.Kenseth 58; R.Smith 59-84;
M.Kenseth 85-86; P.Menard 87; T.Bayne 88;
C.Buescher 89-90; A.Dillon 91-118; R.Smith 119-
146; T.Bayne 147-150; B.Keselowski 151-165;
M.Kenseth 166-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
R.Smith, 3 times for 81 laps; M.Kenseth, 3 times for
38 laps; A.Dillon, 3 times for 36 laps; B.Keselowski,
1 time for 15 laps; J.AlIIgaier, 2 times for 14 laps;
RPKligerman, 1 time for 7 laps; T.Bayne, 2 timesfor 5
laps; C.Buescher, 1 time for 2 laps; P.Menard, 1 time
for 1 lap; M.Wallace, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. A.Dillon, 1,024; 2. S.Hornish Jr.,
1,016; 3. R.Smith, 989; 4. E.Sadler, 981; 5. J.AlIIgaier,
959; 6. B.Vickers, 957; 7. B.Scott, 942; 8. T.Bayne,
939; 9. K.Larson, 878; 10. RKligerman, 858.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins,
Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position
While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green,
Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

Sprint Cup

Hollywood Casino
400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 187.526 mph.
2. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 187.48.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.162.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 186.233.
5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.168.
6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 186.072.
7. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 185.893.
8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 185.874.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.669.
10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 185.433.
11. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 185.42.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 185.261.
13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 185.204.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.141.
15. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.982.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 184.925.
17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 184.628.
18. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 184.603.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 184.477.
20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 184.382.
21. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 184.106.
22. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 183.73.
23. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 183.667.
24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 183.38.
25. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 183.069.
26. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 182.803.
27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 182.685.
28. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 182.531.
29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 182.039.


30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 182.02.
31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.971.
32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 181.959.
33. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 181.953.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.892.
35. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 181.843.
36. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 181.83.
37. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
40. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.




MLB playoffs
All Times EDT
WILD CARD
Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2
Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League


SCOREBOARD


For theff rlco-rd1


Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Mike Winters; Right,
Chris Guccione; Left, Larry Vanover.
T-3:14. A-38,705 (37,071).

Late Friday


SFlorida LOTTERY Tigers 3, Athletics 2


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
7-3-9
y CASH 3 (late)
~9-6-4


PLAY 4 (early)
5-5-4-0
i PLAY 4 (late)
.. sTM 9-3-7-3

.W FANTASY 5
13 20 25 27 -29

POWERBALL LOTTERY
11-12-17-39-40 1-12-22-44-46-52
POWER BALL XTRA
5 2


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 17 -18 -28 -36
Mega Ball: 3
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $1,584.00
3-of-4 MB 33 $420.50
3-of-4 835 $49.50
2-of-4 MB 1,136 $25.00
1-of-4 MB 9,456 $3.00
2-of-4 25,407 $2.00


Fantasy 5:14 -15 -29 -32 -35


5-of-5
4-of-5
3-of-5


1 winner
x
x


$229,974.43
$136.00
$12.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt: Lawrenceburg (Taped)
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Grand Prix of Houston: Race 2
2 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 race
2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil San Bernardino (Taped)
3 p.m. (FS1) Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Lime Rock (ST)
(Taped)
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Firestone Indy Lights: Streets of Houston
(Same-day Tape)
5 p.m. (FS1) Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Lime Rock
(GS). (Taped)
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans: Oak Tree Grand Prix (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRAAuto-Plus Nationals (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
10:30 a.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox. ALDS,
Game 2 (Taped)
12:30 p.m. (MLB) Detroit Tigers at Oakland Athletics. ALDS, Game 2
(Taped)
4:30 p.m. (TBS) St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates. NLDS,
Game 3
8 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Los Angeles Dodgers. NLDS, Game 3
BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (NBA) Preseason: Philadelphia 76ers vs. Bilbao Basket
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) WNBA: Atlanta Dream at Minnesota Lynx. Finals,
game 1
9:30 p.m. (NBA) Preseason: Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Florida (Taped)
12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at Mississippi State. (Taped)
5 p.m. (ESPNU) Arkansas at Florida. (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPNU) Ohio State at Northwestern (Taped)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Maryland at Florida State (Taped)
NFL
1 p.m. (CBS) Baltimore Ravens at Miami Dolphins
1 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at Chicago Bears
4:25 p.m. (CBS) Denver Broncos at Dallas Cowboys
8:20 p.m. (NBC) Houston Texans at San Francisco 49ers
11:35 p.m. (NFL) San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders
GOLF
12 p.m. (NBC) 2013 Presidents Cup Final Day
12 p.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Vivendi Seve Trophy, Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Reignwood LPGA Classic, Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (GOLF) Presidents Cup, Day Four. (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) Ottawa Senators at Toronto Maple Leafs (Taped)
3 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Boston Bruins (Taped)
RODEO
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship. (Taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Norwich City vs.
Chelsea
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: West Bromwich Albion
vs. Arsenal
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Maryland at North Carolina
2 p.m. (SUN) Women's College: Kentucky at Vanderbilt
3 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's College: South Carolina at Tennessee
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's College: Tulsa at Rice
TENNIS
7:30 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA China Open final
9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP China Open final (Same-day Tape)
2 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Early Round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the
listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4
Monday, Oct. 7: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) atTampa
Bay (Cobb 11-3), 6:07 (TBS)
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston (Peavy 12-5) atTampa
Bay, 8:07 or 8:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston, 5:37
or 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Detroit 1, Oakland 0
Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at Oak-
land (Gray 5-3), late
Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at Detroit
(Sanchez 14-8), 1:07 p.m. (MLB)
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Oakland (Straily 10-8) at De-
troit (Fister 14-9), 5:07 or 7:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland, 6:07 or
9:07 p.m. (TBS)
National League
St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1
Sunday, Oct. 6: St. Louis (Kelly 10-5) at Pittsburgh
(Liriano 16-8), 4:37 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis (Wachia 4-1) at Pitts-
burgh (Morton 7-4), 3:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:07
or 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3
Sunday, Oct. 6: Atlanta (Teheran 14-8) at Los An-
geles (Ryu 14-8), 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7: Atlanta (Garcia 4-7) at Los Ange-
les (Nolasco 13-11), 9:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Los Angeles atAtlanta, 8:37


p.m. (TBS)

Red Sox 7, Rays 4
Tampa Bay Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi


1 1 0 0 Ellsurycf
1 0 0 0 Victornrf
1 0 0 0 Pedroia2b
5 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh
3 0 2 2 Napolilb
2 0 1 0 JGoms lf
3 1 0 0 Mdlrks3b
4 1 2 0 Drewss
3 0 1 1 D.Rossc
4 1 2 1
2000


DeJess If
SRdrgz ph
Loaton c
WMyrs rf
Loney lb
Longori 3b
Zobrist 2b
DJnngs cf
DYong dh
YEscorss
JMolin c


Joyce ph-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 31 48 4 Totals 33711 7
Tampa Bay 010 021 000 4
Boston 202 110 01x 7
E-J.Molina (1), Zobrist (1). DP Tampa Bay 1,
Boston 3. LOB-Tampa Bay 7, Boston 5.2B-Loney
(1), YEscobar (1), Ellsbury (1), Pedroia (1), D.Ross
(1). 3B-Drew (1). HR-D.Ortiz 2 (2). SB-De.Jen-
nings (1), Ellsbury (2). SF-D.Young, Pedroia.
IP H RERBBSO


Tampa Bay
Price L,0-1
McGee
Boston
Lackey W, 1-0
Breslow H,1
Tazawa H,1
Uehara S,1-1


7 9 7 7 2 5
1 2 0 0 0 0


51/37 4
12/30 0
1 1 0
1 0 0


Price pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Lackey (DeJesus), by Breslow (Loney).
Umpires-Home, Eric Cooper; First, Dana DeMuth;


Detroit Oakland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
AJcksncf 4 1 1 0 Crisp cf 1 00 0
TrHntrrf 3 1 1 0 Lowriess 4 00 0
MiCarr3b 4 0 1 1 Dnldsn3b 4 00 0
RSantg3b 0 00 0 Moss dh 4 1 1 0
Fielder 1b 4 0 1 0 Cespdslf 4 12 2
VMrtnzdh 4 1 2 0 Reddckrf 4 00 0
Avilac 4 0 2 1 Vogtc 3 00 0
Infante2b 4 0 2 0 Barton lb 3 00 0
Dirks If 3 0 0 0 Sogard2b 2 00 0
JhPerltph 1 0 0 0 Callaspph-2b1 0 0 0
D.Kellylf 0 0 0 0
Iglesiasss 4 0 0 0
Totals 35 3102 Totals 30 2 3 2
Detroit 300 000 000 3
Oakland 000 000 200 2
E-Cespedes (1). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Detroit 6,
Oakland 4.2B-A.Jackson (1), V.Martinez (1). 3B-
Cespedes (1). HR-Cespedes (1). CS Tor.Hunter


(1).

Detroit
Scherzer W, 1-0
Smyly H,1
Benoit S,1-1
Oakland
Colon L,0-1
Otero
Doolittle


IP H RERBBSO

7 3 2 2 2 11
2/3 0 0 0 1 2
11/30 0 0 0 3

6 10 3 3 0 4
11/30 0 0 0 0
12/30 0 0 0 3


HBP-by Colon (Tor.Hunter). WP-Scherzer.




College Football
Scores
EAST
Albright 52, FDU-Florham 7
Alfred 39, Buffalo St. 33
American International 31, Stonehill 10
Amherst 37, Middlebury 16
Bates 14, Williams 10
Bentley 32, St. Anselm 27
Bloomsburg 38, Gannon 14
Boston College 48, Army 27
Bowdoin 13, Tufts 10
Bridgewater (Mass.) 49, W. Connecticut 26
Brown 31, Rhode Island 14
Buffalo 42, E. Michigan 14
CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 29
Carnegie-Mellon 34, St. Vincent 7
Clemson 49, Syracuse 14
Coast Guard 41, W New England 38
Colgate 41, Cornell 20
Cortland St. 17, Kean 7
Curry 26, MIT 21
Duquesne 27, West Liberty 14
East Stroudsburg 48, Clarion 28
Edinboro 31, Lock Haven 6
Endicott 53, Maine Maritime 28
Fitchburg St. 40, Mass. Maritime 17
Fordham 52, Lehigh 34
Framingham St. 21, Mass.-Dartmouth 14
Franklin & Marshall 35, Dickinson 14
Gallaudet 7, Mount Ida 6
Gettysburg 50, McDaniel 28
Grove City 24, Westminster (Pa.) 21
Hartwick 21, Ithaca 9
Harvard 41, Holy Cross 35, 30T
Hobart41,WPI 7
Husson 34, Castleton St. 3
Indiana (Pa.) 62, Millersville 3
Johns Hopkins 65, Juniata 10
King's (Pa.) 41, Misericordia 40, 20T
Lafayette 31, Bucknell 7
Lebanon Valley 17, Wilkes 6
Louisiana College 42, Howard Payne 39
Louisville 30, Temple 7
Lycoming 19, Delaware Valley 16
Maine 62, Delaware 28
Marist 37, Valparaiso 0
Mercyhurst 63, Cheyney 14
Monmouth (NJ) 35, Robert Morris 9
Moravian 38, Susquehanna 18
Morrisville St. 51, William Paterson 48
NY Maritime 35, Anna Maria 24
Navy 28, Air Force 10
Norwich 20, Becker 9
Penn 37, Dartmouth 31, 40T
Princeton 53, Columbia 7
RPI at Merchant Marine, ppd.
Rowan 20, Brockport 16
Salisbury 34, Utica 0
Salve Regina 32, Nichols 0
Shippensburg 73, Seton Hill 27
Slippery Rock 58, Kutztown 10
St. John Fisher 38, Frostburg St. 35
St. Lawrence 14, Rochester 10
Stony Brook 21, Bryant 13
Towson 44, New Hampshire 28
Trinity (Conn.) 48, Hamilton 13
Union (NY) 27, Springfield 7
Villanova 20, William & Mary 16
Wagner 23, Sacred Heart 20
Waynesburg 35, Thiel 21
West Chester 38, California (Pa.) 31
Westfield St. 31, Plymouth St. 0
Widener 31, Stevenson 10
SOUTH
Alabama 45, Georgia St. 3
Alcorn St. 57, Warner 0
Auburn 30, Mississippi 22
Ball St. 48, Virginia 27
Bethany (WV) 24, Washington & Jefferson 19
Bethel (Tenn.) 41, Bluefield South 25
Bethune-Cookman 21, Delaware St. 7
Campbellsville 23, Kentucky Christian 6
Carson-Newman 43, Mars Hill 27
Charleston Southern 28, North Greenville 14
Charlotte 53, Gardner-Webb 51
Chattanooga 42, W. Carolina 21
Clark Atlanta 21, Morehouse 17
Concord 34, Fairmont St. 17
Cumberland (Tenn.) 49, Pikeville 42, OT
Cumberlands 52, Lindsey Wilson 45
E. Kentucky 38, Austin Peay 3
East Carolina 24, Middle Tennessee 17
Elizabeth City St. 26, St. Augustine's 25
Elon 28, Furman 25
FAU 37, UAB 23
FlU 24, Southern Miss. 23
Faulkner 55, Georgetown (Ky.) 31
Fayetteville St. 35, Chowan 29, OT
Ferrum 31, Greensboro 21
Florida 30, Arkansas 10
Florida St. 63, Maryland 0
Georgia 34, Tennessee 31, OT
Glenville St. 35, WV Wesleyan 32
Guilford 16, Washington & Lee 7
Hampden-Sydney 39, Catholic 27
Jackson St. 42, Ark.-Pine Bluff 33
Jacksonville St. 41, UT-Martin 27
James Madison 40, Albany (NY) 13
Johnson C. Smith 49, Lincoln (Pa.) 10
Kentucky St. 49, Alderson-Broaddus 20
LSU 59, Mississippi St. 26
LaGrange 50, NC Wesleyan 26
Lane 28, Stillman 27
Lenoir-Rhyne 41, Brevard 0
Louisiana-Lafayette 48, Texas St. 24
MVSU 28, Alabama A&M 9
Marshall 34, UTSA 10
Maryville (Tenn.) 48, Averett 0
Methodist 24, Christopher Newport 21
Miami 45, Georgia Tech 30
Miles 27, Benedict 13
Millsaps 48, Hendrix 37
Missouri 51,Vanderbilt28
Morehead St. 45, Campbell 36
Morgan St. 34, Florida A&M 21
Murray St. 35, Tennessee Tech 24
NC Central 37, Howard 28
Newberry 42, Wingate 28
Norfolk St. 26, Savannah St. 24
North Alabama 41, Shorter 0
Old Dominion 21, Liberty 17
Prairie View 31, Grambling St. 3
Randolph-Macon 45, Emory & Henry 20
Reinhardt 21, Union (Ky.) 18
Rhodes 41, Chicago 34
SC State 29, NC A&T 24
SE Louisiana 35, Incarnate Word 3
Samford 44, Georgia Southern 34
Sewanee 31, Birmingham-Southern 28
Shenandoah 29, Bridgewater (Va.) 20


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 B3

Shepherd 28, Charleston (WV) 9
South Carolina 35, Kentucky 28
South Florida 26, Cincinnati 20
Tennessee St. 40, SE Missouri 16
The Citadel 31, Appalachian St. 28, OT
Thomas More 61, Geneva 0
Troy 34, South Alabama 33
Tulane 24, North Texas 21
Tusculum 43, Catawba 25
Tuskegee 21, Fort Valley St. 13
UCF 24, Memphis 17
Urbana 62, W Virginia St. 10
Valdosta St. 52, Florida Tech 14
Virginia St. 14, Shaw 10
Virginia Tech 27, North Carolina 17
Virginia Union 32, Livingstone 25
Wake Forest 28, NC State 13
Wesley 38, Huntingdon 28
West Georgia 49, Point (Ga.) 3
Winston-Salem 56, Bowie St. 21
Wofford 55, Presbyterian 14
MIDWEST
Adrian 17, Hope 14
Ashland 62, Lake Erie 10
Aurora 84, Maranatha Baptist 41
Baker 37, Mid-Am Nazarene 20
Benedictine (Kan.) 58, Graceland (Iowa) 13
Bethel (Minn.) 31, Augsburg 28
Bowling Green 28, UMass 7
Briar Cliff 12, Hastings 7
Butler 35, Stetson 15
Cent. Michigan 21, Miami (Ohio) 9
Chadron St. at Adams St., ppd.
Coe 21, Buena Vista 7
Concordia (11.) 38, Rockford 28
Concordia (Neb.) 32, Dordt 0
Concordia (Wis.) 28, Benedictine (III.) 27
Cornell (Iowa) 58, Beloit 24
Dakota Wesleyan 23, Dakota St. 14
Dayton 40, Davidson 8
Defiance 43, Earlham 7
Denison 42, DePauw 21
Drake 27, Jacksonville 17
Dubuque 23, Central 21
Emporia St. 52, Lincoln (Mo.) 14
Eureka 42, Westminster (Mo.) 28
Evangel 34, Culver-Stockton 28
Findlay 38, McKendree 21
Fort Hays St. 34, William Jewell 17
Friends 45, Kansas Wesleyan 22
Grand Valley St. 49, Michigan Tech 3
Grand View 48, St. Xavier 21
Greenville 21, Crown (Minn.) 20
Gustavus 52, Hamline 7
Heidelberg 68, Marietta 17
Hillsdale 27, N. Michigan 17
Illinois College 26, Lawrence 6
Illinois St. 35, W. Illinois 21
Illinois Wesleyan 35, Millikin 21
Indiana 44, Penn St. 24
Indianapolis 34, Missouri S&T 3
John Carroll 54, Capital 0
Kalamazoo 38, Trine 31
Kenyon 21, Oberlin 14
Lake Forest 14, Carroll (Wis.) 13
Lakeland 40, Wis. Lutheran 34, OT
Luther 41, Loras7
Manchester 34, Bluffton 7
Marian (Ind.) 21, Robert Morris-Chicago 19
Martin Luther 68, Iowa Wesleyan 51
Mary 45, Minot St. 10
Menlo 30, Lindenwood (11.) 22
Michigan 42, Minnesota 13
Michigan St. 26, Iowa 14
Minn. Duluth 34, St. Cloud St. 7
Minn. St.-Mankato 27, Concordia (St.R) 7
Minn. St.-Moorhead 47, Northern St. (SD) 46
Minn.-Crookston 16, Bemidji St. 14
Missouri Southern 21, Cent. Missouri 14
Missouri Valley 48, Cent. Methodist 17
Morningside 32, Midland 7
Mount St. Joseph 55, Anderson (Ind.) 24
Mount Union 58, Ohio Northern 7
Muskingum 35, Wilmington (Ohio) 28
N. Dakota St. 24, N. Iowa 23
N. Illinois 38, Kent St. 24
Nebraska 39, Illinois 19
Nebraska-Kearney 56, Lindenwood (Mo.) 6
North Central (III.) 31, Elmhurst 14
North Park 22, Carthage 20
Northwestern (Minn.) 50, Minn.-Morris 45
Notre Dame Coll. 59, Virginia-Wise 35
Ohio 43, Akron 3
Ohio Dominican 33, Walsh 20
Ohio Wesleyan 50, Allegheny 7
Olivet 20, Alma 13, OT
Ottawa, Kan. 34, McPherson 7
Otterbein 19, Baldwin-Wallace 7
Peru St. 24, Avila 7
Pittsburg St. 28, Abilene Christian 20
Ripon 37, Knox 29
Rose-Hulman 38, Hanover 14
S. Illinois 27, S. Dakota St. 24
SaginawValley St. 31, Ferris St. 28
Sioux Falls 55, SW Minnesota St. 48
South Dakota 17, Missouri St. 14
St. Ambrose 53, William Penn 34
St. Francis (III.) 56, Concordia (Mich.) 6
St. Francis (Ind.) 28, Siena Heights 17
St. John's (Minn.) 31, St. Olaf 0
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 35, Kentucky Wesleyan 9
St. Norbert 22, Monmouth (11.) 14
St. Scholastica 42, Mac Murray 6
St. Thomas (Minn.) 65, Carleton 6
Sterling 54, Bethany (Kan.) 27
Tabor 42, Southwestern (Kan.) 3
Texas Tech 54, Kansas 16
Tiffin 34, Malone 30
Toledo 47, W. Michigan 20
Trinity (III.) 20, Olivet Nazarene 17
Truman St. 33, Quincy 0
Valley City St. 31, Presentation 17
Wabash 48, Wooster 14
Waldorf 13, Trinity Bible 2
Wartburg 34, Simpson (Iowa) 24
Washburn 44, SW Baptist 21
Washington (Mo.) 44, Berry 7
Wayne (Mich.) 31, Northwood (Mich.) 17
Wayne (Neb.) 10, Augustana (SD) 7
Wheaton (III.) 24, Augustana (III.) 15
Winona St. 49, Upper Iowa 32
Wis.-Oshkosh 28, Wis.-Stout 26
Wis.-Platteville 49, Wis.-Eau Claire 27
Wis.-Stevens Pt 47, Wis.-River Falls 14
Wis.-Whitewater 47, Wis.-LaCrosse 3
Wittenberg 49, Hiram 9
Youngstown St. 35, Indiana St. 24
SOUTHWEST
Alabama St. 34, Texas Southern 2
Angelo St. 48, McMurry 35
Ark.-Monticello 17, Arkansas Tech 0
Austin 31, Southwestern (Texas) 0
East Central 46, S. Nazarene 14
Henderson St. 42, NW Oklahoma St. 0
Louisiana Tech 38, UTEP 35
Mary Hardin-Baylor 49, Trinity (Texas) 7
McNeese St. 59, Cent. Arkansas 28
Mississippi College 49, Hardin-Simmons 35
Missouri Western 63, Cent. Oklahoma 30
NW Missouri St. 40, Northeastern St. 12
Okla. Panhandle St. 62, Wayland Baptist 21
Oklahoma 20, TCU 17
Oklahoma St. 33, Kansas St. 29
Ouachita 31, SW Oklahoma 14
Rice 30, Tulsa 27, OT
Rutgers 55, SMU 52, 30T
SW Assemblies of God 21, Oklahoma Baptist 10
Tarleton St. 34, E. New Mexico 14
Texas A&M Commerce 31, SE Oklahoma 29
Texas Lutheran 64, E.Texas Baptist 41


West Texas A&M 72, Central St. (Ohio) 0
FAR WEST
Azusa Pacific 34, W. Oregon 32
CSU-Pueblo 28, Fort Lewis 3
Cal Lutheran 42, Pomona-Pitzer 7
Dickinson St. 27, Jamestown 7
Dixie St. 39, Simon Fraser 12
E. Oregon 20, Montana Western 0
E. Washington 41, Weber St. 19
Fresno St. 61, Idaho 14
La Verne 30, Claremont-Mudd 6
Lewis & Clark 60, Puget Sound 30
Linfield 29, Pacific Lutheran 0
Mesa St. 22, NM Highlands 17
Montana 55, Portland St. 27
Montana St. 36, N. Arizona 7
New Mexico 66, New Mexico St. 17
North Dakota 28, Idaho St. 25
Oregon 57, Colorado 16
Pacific 31, Whitworth 21
Rocky Mountain 23, Montana St-Northern 13
S. Oregon 59, Montana Tech 32
San Diego 45, Mercer 13
UC Davis 21,S. Utah 3
W New Mexico 25, Colorado Mines 22
Washington St. 44, California 22
Yale 24, Cal Poly 10




NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE


Big matchups in the NFC North
Big matchups in the NFC North


Packers host

Lions looking

to gain ground

Associated Press

The Pack is back on
the field, that is, after a
bye. And the first chore is
a big one: Green Bay
needs to beat Detroit at
Lambeau Field or fall far
behind in the NFC North.
Not that Chicago, the
other contender in the di-
vision through the first
month of the season, has
an easy challenge on Sun-
day, either The Bears host
undefeated New Orleans.
Not much has gone the
way the Packers projected
early in the schedule, and
their only victory is against
struggling Washington.
The fourth-week bye
helped them heal up, and
now they feel it's time to
make a statement in the
division before it's too late.
Besides, their 21-game,
regular-season home win-
ning streak against Detroit
is the longest in NFL his-
tory
"If we were 3-0, the fact
that it's a division game is
pretty important, adds a
little more significance to
the game," defensive
tackle B.J. Raji said.
"We're aware that a good
team is coming in here, but
I believe if we play well,
we'll have a good chance."
Chicago comes off a
sloppy loss at Detroit, and
faces the prolific New Or-
leans offense. Even with
the Saints on a short week
after Monday night's romp
over Miami, the game offers
little comfort for the Bears.
"Their ability to run the
ball, their ability to pass the
ball," Bears safety Chris
Conte said, listing what im-
presses him about the
Saints. "They have (run-
ning back Darren) Sproles,
who is a big threat, and
they also have Jimmy Gra-
ham; guys on the outside,
Marques Colston tons of
guys who can just push the
field, fast guys. And their
ability Drew Brees to
move safeties and find guys
deep.
"They're doing a great
job."
Today, it's New England
at Cincinnati, Seattle at In-
dianapolis, Baltimore at
Miami, Kansas City at Ten-
nessee, Denver at Dallas,
Houston at San Francisco,
San Diego at Oakland, Car-
olina at Arizona, Philadel-
phia at the New York
Giants, and Jacksonville at
St. Louis.
Monday night's matchup
has the New York Jets at
Atlanta.
Off this week are Min-
nesota and Washington,
both 1-3, Tampa Bay and
Pittsburgh, both 0-4.
Detroit (3-1)
at Green Bay (1-2)
The Lions can score -


Green Bay's bye week did wonders for Packers linebacker Clay Matthews and his sore hamstring.


so can the Packers, of
course and their offense
has nice balance with the
emergence of Reggie Bush
as a force. Bush comes off
a 173-yard game, including
a 37-yard touchdown run
against the Bears, and has
been a perfect comple-
ment for star receiver
Calvin Johnson.
"Eventually teams are
going to have to loosen up
on Calvin or Reggie is
going to continue to have
big days like that," Lions
coach Jim Schwartz said.
"That's a good position to
be in offensively"
Detroit leads the NFC
with eight picks, so Aaron
Rodgers needs to be
careful.
New Orleans (4-0)
at Chicago (3-1)
Careful isn't necessarily
in Drew Brees' vocabulary
because even when he
gambles, such as throwing
into triple coverage to
Jimmy Graham, the bril-
liant tight end comes up
with a TD catch.
Still, the Bears are a
ball-hungry bunch on de-
fense, leading the league
with 14 takeaways, and
will need to be aggressive.
If they expect their offense
to keep pace with the
Saints, that could be a pipe
dream.
New England (4-0)
at Cincinnati (2-2)
Other than Tom Brady,
the one player the Patriots
probably couldn't afford to
have go down is nose
tackle Vince Wilfork. He
did against Atlanta with a
torn Achilles tendon, so
New England will be with-
out the heart of its im-
proved defense.
Expect the Bengals to


respond with a heavy dose
of former Patriot Ben-
Jarvus Green-Ellis and
rookie Giovani Bernard
running the ball.
Brady has never lost to
the Bengals (4-0) and the
Patriots have won six
straight regular-season
road games.
Seattle (4-0)
at Indianapolis (3-1)
OK, no more question-
ing the Seahawks' road
skills after that gutsy
comeback victory at Hous-
ton. Seattle's defense
should be good enough to
win anywhere, so this will
be a test because Indy is
showing some versatility
with the ball.
Most fun to watch here
might not be second-year
QBs Andrew Luck against
Russell Wilson, but the
running game with power-
houses Marshawn Lynch
for Seattle and Trent
Richardson for Indi-
anapolis.
Baltimore (2-2)
at Miami (3-1)
After that stinker in Buf-
falo, the Ravens are in a
tough spot. They need Joe
Flacco to avoid turnovers
(five interceptions against
the Bills) and for the run-
ning game with Ray Rice
and Bernard Pierce to
wake up.
The Dolphins were sent
back to Earth by New Or-
leans last weekend, and a
previously staunch de-
fense was exposed, partic-
ularly in pass coverage.
Plus, QB Ryan Tannehill is
getting hit too much, on
pace to set a team record
for being sacked and per-
haps threaten the league
mark of 76.


Kansas City (4-0)
at Tennessee (3-1)
The Titans' turnaround
could get derailed with
emerging quarterback
Jake Locker out for sev-
eral weeks with a hip in-
jury. At least they have a
veteran backup in Ryan
Fitzpatrick, and they'll
likely turn to Chris John-
son and the ground game
more often.
Kansas City, only the
second franchise to go 4-0
after a two-win season, is
winning with solid de-
fense, especially the pass
rush, and a conservative
attack. The Chiefs had
their first giveaways last
Sunday, yet still routed the
Giants.
Denver (4-0) at Dallas (2-2)
Peyton Manning's 16 TD
passes are the most
through four games in any
season, on pace for 64,
which would shatter Tom
Brady's record of 50.
Dallas has allowed 10
touchdown throws already
but at least the Cowboys
can get after the quarter-
back, with 14 sacks. They
have little chance of pulling
off an upset if they can't
slow Manning and crew
"We didn't get to Philip
Rivers enough, we did not
make him uncomfortable,"
coach Jason Garrett said,
referring to last week's
loss at San Diego. "We
done a good job in the first
three games making the
quarterback's job hard
and we were sacking him,
and hitting him and getting
him off the spot. We didn't
do that last week. We have
to do that this week."
Houston (2-2)
at San Francisco (2-2)
Yet another quality


matchup, with both sides
having something to prove
as they look up in their di-
vision.
The Niners were awful
in their last home game
and got manhandled by
the Colts. Then they blew
out St. Louis in a short
week and have had plenty
of time to prepare for the
Texans.
Houston, which trails
Indy and Tennessee in the
AFC South, dominated
Seattle, the NFC West
leader, for more than a
half last Sunday, then
folded. San Francisco's
ultra-aggressive defense
will go hard after QB Matt
Schaub.
New York Jets (2-2) at
Atlanta (1-3), Monday night
It's getting to be a dire
time for the Falcons, who
have gone from nearly
making the Super Bowl to
an also-ran behind the
Saints in the NFC South.
Their defeats have been
close, but that might be
even more worrisome -
can they close the deal?
They rank 29th in red zone
efficiency
Getting the inconsistent
and banged-up Jets in
prime time could be the
cure all, especially if New
York's normally reliable
defense struggles the way
it did at Tennessee.
San Diego (2-2)
at Oakland (1-3)
Break out the caffeine to
stay awake for this one. The
Raiders share a stadium
with the Athletics, and a
baseball playoff game was
scheduled there Saturday
night, 8:35 local time.
The Chargers' offense
can be dynamic and
Rivers is off to a good start,


behind only Manning in
passer rating. Oakland's
pass defense is decent, but
must slow down TE Anto-
nio Gates, who is back to
top form.
Carolina (1-2)
at Arizona (2-2)
Coming off a 38-0 rout of
the Giants, the Panthers
believe they are ready for
some steady success. A
stumble here would set
them back significantly
The key could be whether
Arizona's run defense,
ranked second, can stop the
No. 3 rushing game Car-
olina brings. The Panthers
let QB Cam Newton run
more against New York,
and it worked brilliantly
Philadelphia (1-3)
at New York Giants (0-4)
An Eagles win could lift
them into a tie for first
place in the avert-your-
eyes NFC East if Dallas
falls to Denver Then
again, if the Giants win,
they'd be back in con-
tention.
Philly's defense can't
seem to cover or tackle in
the open field, but it likely
will concentrate on rush-
ing Eli Manning, who's al-
ready been sacked 14
times. New York has only
four sacks, and chasing
down Michael Vick isn't
easy
Jacksonville (0-4)
at St Louis (1-3)
Even with the Rams
struggling no running
game, inconsistent de-
fense they are a big fa-
vorite over the Jaguars.
Gus Bradley's first stint as
a head coach has been un-
rewarding so far in Jack-
sonville, where people are
beginning to whisper the
dreaded "0-16."


NFL Stats CENTRAL


NFL standings
AFC
East
W L T Pct PF
and 4 0 0 1.000 89
3 1 0 .750 91
2 2 0 .500 68
2 3 0 .400 112 1
South
W L T Pct PF
Ais 3 1 0 .750 105
e 3 1 0 .750 98
2 2 0 .500 90 1
lie 0 4 0 .000 31 1
North
W L T Pct PF
3 2 0 .600 101
2 2 0 .500 91
2 2 0 .500 81
S 0 4 0 .000 69 1
West
W L T Pct PF
4 0 0 1.000 179
ity 4 0 0 1.000 102
1 2 2 0 .500 108 1
1 3 0 .250 71
NFC
East
W L T Pct PF
2 2 0 .500 104
hia 1 3 0 .250 99 1
wn 1 3 0 .250 91 1
ts 0 4 0 .000 61 1
South
W L T Pct PF
ans 4 0 0 1.000 108
1 2 0 .333 68
1 3 0 .250 94 1
ay 0 4 0 .000 44
North
W L T Pct PF
3 1 0 .750 122 1
3 1 0 .750 127 1
y 1 2 0 .333 96
S 1 3 0 .250 115 1
West
W L T Pct PF
4 0 0 1.000 109
cisco 2 2 0 .500 79
2 2 0 .500 69
1 3 0 .250 69 1


Thursday's Game
Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24
Today's Games
Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Miami, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 11:35 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington
Monday's Game
N.Y Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 10
N.Y Giants at Chicago, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct.13
Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia atTampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Jets, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Miami
Monday, Oct. 14
Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.
AFC leaders


P Manning, DEN
P Rivers, SND
Locker, TEN
Luck, IND
Ale. Smith, KAN
Brady, NWE
Pryor, OAK
Schaub, HOU
Tannehill, MIA


Week 5
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
156 117 '
142 105 l
111 69
127 81
146 88
158 93 1
81 53
177 116 1
142 93 1


Roethlisberger, PIT 162


103 1231


Rushers
Att Yds Avg
F. Jackson, BUF 65 309 4.75
Spiller, BUF 74 296 4.00
A. Foster, HOU 76 292 3.84
B. Powell, NYJ 66 292 4.42
J. Charles, KAN 70 289 4.13
Chr. Johnson, TEN 84 277 3.30
Moreno, DEN 46 238 5.17
Be.Tate, HOU 34 228 6.71
Ry. Mathews, SND 64 226 3.53
D. McFadden, OAK 53 215 4.06
Receivers
No Yds Avg
And. Johnson, HOU 34 368 10.8
Edelman, NWE 34 319 9.4
Cameron, CLE 33 396 12.0
An. Brown, PIT 32 412 12.9
De. Thomas, DEN 29 393 13.6
Shorts, JAX 26 337 13.0
A..Green, CIN 26 300 11.5
Welker, DEN 26 266 10.2
A. Gates, SND 25 364 14.6
Decker, DEN 24 340 14.2
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg
Doss, BAL 9 167 18.6
McCluster, KAN 16 246 15.4
Benjamin, CLE 17 256 15.1
Holliday, DEN 13 191 14.7
Edelman, NWE 11 133 12.1
P Adams, OAK 5 47 9.4
Reynaud,TEN 13 118 9.1
Leonhard, BUF 7 63 9.0
An. Brown, PIT 6 45 7.5
Hilton, IND 9 65 7.2
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
K. Martin, HOU 12 327 27.3
Thigpen, MIA 8 213 26.6
Whittaker, SND 6 156 26.0
F Jones, PIT 8 194 24.3
J. Ford, OAK 6 143 23.8
Br.Tate,CIN 8 188 23.5
Reynaud,TEN 5 113 22.6
C. Gates, NYJ 5 99 19.8
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec
Welker, DEN 6 0 6
Cameron, CLE 5 0 5
Royal, SND 5 0 5


J. Charles, KAN
F Jackson, BUF
De. Thomas, DEN
Ju. Thomas, DEN
Bernard, CIN
Ma. Brown, BAL
0. Daniels, HOU

D. Carpenter, BUF
Gostkowski, NWE
M. Prater, DEN
Novak, SND
Cundiff, CLE
Vinatieri, IND
Bironas, TEN
Sturgis, MIA
Tucker, BAL
Folk, NYJ


4 2
4 4
4 0
4 0
3 2
3 0
3 0
Kicking
PAT
9-9 1
8-8 1
23-23
12-12
10-10
12-12
11-11
10-10
10-10
6-6


NFC leaders


A. Rodgers, GBY
Romo, DAL
Brees, NOR
M. Ryan, ATL
M. Stafford, DET
R.Wilson, SEA
Vick, PHL
C. Newton, CAR
Griffin III, WAS
Cutler, CHI

L. McCoy, PHL
A. Peterson, MIN
D. Murray, DAL
D. Martin, TAM
Forte, CHI
Lynch, SEA
A. Morris, WAS
Gore, SNF
De. Williams, CAR
Re. Bush, DET

Ju. Jones, ATL
Garcon, WAS
J. Graham, NOR
B. Marshall, CHI


Week 5
Quarterbacks
Att Comn
122 81
152 110
166 111
173 115
156 100
96 59
118 65
88 52
170 106
148 95
Rushers
Att Yds
78 468
92 421
72 356
100 342
69 320
79 308
56 296
61 295
62 291
48 254
Receivers
No Yds
33 481
29 339
27 458
27 348


Cruz, NYG 26 425
Boldin, SNF 24 372
D. Bryant, DAL 23 282
Sproles, NOR 23 277
Gonzalez, ATL 23 242
Forte, CHI 23 160
Punt Returners
No Yds
Dw. Harris, DAL 6 80
G.Tate, SEA 14 172
Ginn Jr., CAR 4 42
Spurlock,DET 11 105
Sproles, NOR 11 102
Page, TAM 8 69
R. Randle, NYG 11 68
C. Thompson, WAS 7 36
R Peterson, ARI 7 31
Ky. Williams, SNF 5 22
Kickoff Returners
No Yds
C. Patterson, MIN 12 406
Hester, CHI 14 453
Dam.Johnson,PHL 12 317
D.Wilson, NYG 8 206
B. Cunningham, STL 8 191
Spurlock, DET 5 100
C.Thompson, WAS 8 160


J. Ross, GBY


J. Graham, NOR
A. Peterson, MIN
D. Bryant, DAL
Cruz, NYG
Cal. Johnson, DET
Lynch, SEA
J. Bell, DET
Ma. Bennett, CHI
Ve. Davis, SNF
Fitzgerald, ARI

Akers, DET
Walsh, MIN
Hartley, NOR
Hauschka, SEA
M. Bryant, ATL
Gould, CHI
D. Bailey, DAL
Henery, PHL
Feely, ARI
Crosby, GBY


6 75
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush
6 0
6 5
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 3
3 3
3 0
3 0
3 0
Kicking
PAT
14-14 8
13-13
12-12 8
11-11
10-10
12-13
11-11
10-10 7
6-6
12-12


New EngIl
Miami
N.Y Jets
Buffalo


Indianapo
Tennesse
Houston
Jacksonvi


Cleveland
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh


Denver
Kansas C
San Diego
Oakland


Dallas
Philadelph
Washingti
N.Y Giant


New Orlea
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Ba

Detroit
Chicago
Green Ba
Minnesota

Seattle
San Franc
Arizona
St. Louis


16.3 70t 4
15.5 43 2
12.3 53 4
12.0 48 1
10.5 25 3
7.0 24 0

Avg LG TD
13.3 38 0
12.3 33 0
10.5 12 0
9.5 57 0
9.3 28 0
8.6 28 0
6.2 14 0
5.1 11 0
4.4 8 0
4.4 14 0

Avg LG TD
33.8 105t 1
32.4 80 0
26.4 33 0
25.8 31 0
23.9 32 0
20.0 23 0
20.0 28 0
12.5 21 0

Rec Ret Pts
6 0 36
1 0 36
4 0 24
4 0 24
4 0 24
1 0 24
0 0 18
3 0 18
3 0 18
3 0 18

G LG Pts
10 43 38
.9 54 37
10 48 36
-8 48 35
-9 52 34
*7 58 33
.9 53 32
10 48 31
-8 47 27
*4 41 24


B4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fla. box scores

No. 8 FSU 63,
No. 25 Mary. 0
Maryland 0 0 0 0 0
Florida St. 7 14 21 21 -63
First Quarter
FSU-K.Williams 1 run (Aguayo kick),
8:14.
Second Quarter
FSU-Freeman 5 run (Aguayo kick), 6:15.
FSU-Benjamin 5 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), :28.
Third Quarter
FSU-O'Leary 8 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 12:18.
FSU-Shaw 21 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 9:47.
FSU-O'Leary 12 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 1:50.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-Benjamin 21 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 14:56.
FSU-K.Williams 17 run (Aguayo kick),
11:28.
FSU-Coker 24 run (Aguayo kick), 9:49.


A-74,909.
Md
First downs 9
Rushes-yards 25-33
Passing 201
Comp-Att-Int 15-32-0
Return Yards 0
Punts-Avg. 11-38.2
Fumbles-Lost 3-1
Penalties-Yards 4-40
Time of Possession
34:15


FSU
33
43-183
431
26-39-0
50
4-42.0
1-0
4-26
25:45


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Maryland, Veii 8-15, Rowe 5-
9, Diggs 1-5, Reid 4-4, C.Brown 3-3,
B.Ross 3-(minus 1), Team 1-(minus 2).
Florida St., Freeman 17-63, Wilder 6-40,
K.Williams 5-29, Coker 1-24, Winston 7-
24, R.Green 4-16, Stevenson 2-10, Team
1-(minus 23).
PASSING-Maryland, Rowe 9-17-0-119,
C.Brown 6-14-0-82, Diggs 0-1-0-0. Florida
St., Winston 23-32-0-393, Coker 3-7-0-38.
RECEIVING-Maryland, Long 3-77, King
3-46, B.Ross 3-17, Diggs 2-24,
Stinebaugh 1-13, L.Jacobs 1-10, K.Goins
1-9, Veii 1-5. Florida St., Shaw 5-96, Ben-
jamin 5-60, Greene 4-108, O'Leary 4-55,
Freeman 3-35, C.Green 2-39, I.Jones 1-
16, K.Williams 1-15, Broxsie 1-7.
No. 14 Miami 45,
Georgia Tech 30
GeorgiaTech 17 0 0 13 -30
Miami 7 10 7 21 -45
First Quarter
GaT-Sims 7 run (Butker kick), 9:04.
Mia-Dorsett 40 pass from Morris (Goudis
kick), 8:32.
GaT-FG Butker 45, 2:47.
GaT-Perkins 31 run (Butker kick), :53.
Second Quarter
Mia- Walford 4 pass from Morris (Goudis
kick), 8:22.
Mia-FG Goudis 24, :29.
Third Quarter
Mia-Hurns 69 pass from Morris (Goudis
kick), 1:44.
Fourth Quarter
GaT-Sims 6 run (kick failed), 10:38.
Mia-D.Crawford 3 run (Goudis kick),
7:15.
Mia-D.Crawford 18 run (Goudis kick),
1:46.
Mia-Gunter 30 interception return
(Goudis kick), 1:08.
GaT-Byerly 15 run (Butker kick), :10.
A-47,008.
GaT Mia
First downs 23 22
Rushes-yards 62-335 31-227
Passing 66 324
Comp-Att-Int 6-19-2 17-22-2
Return Yards 76 52
Punts-Avg. 4-37.3 1-49.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-2
Penalties-Yards 3-15 7-54
Time of Possession 35:59 24:01
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Georgia Tech, Sims 16-77,
Hill 3-47, Perkins 3-39, Godhigh 7-39, By-
erly 3-33, Laskey 5-28, Andrews 4-27, Lee
12-26, Days 2-8, Ju.Thomas 3-8, Bostic
1-5, Team 1-(minus 1), Zenon 2-(minus 1).
Miami, Du.Johnson 22-184, D.Crawford 5-
31, Humrns 1-13, Hagens 1-7, Team 1-
(minus 1), Morris 1-(minus 7).
PASSING-Georgia Tech, Lee 5-13-1-63,
Byerly 1-3-0-3, Ju.Thomas 0-3-1-0. Miami,
Morris 17-22-2-324.
RECEIVING-Georgia Tech, Waller2-41,
Smelter 2-9, Godhigh 1-13, Connors 1-3.
Miami, Humrns 4-108, Dorsett 4-66, Coley
3-74, Walford 3-28, Du.Johnson 1-27, Ha-
gens 1-15, D.Crawford 1-6.
No. 18 UF 30,
Arkansas 10
Arkansas 7 0 3 0--10
Florida 0 17 7 6- 30
First Quarter
Ark Williams 4 run (Hocker kick), 2:09.
Second Quarter
Fla-FG Phillips 28, 11:11.
Fla-Purifoy 42 interception return
(Phillips kick), 8:33.
Fla-Patton 51 pass from Murphy (Phillips
kick), :20.
Third Quarter
Fla-Patton 38 passfrom Murphy (Phillips
kick), 11:23.
Ark-FG Hocker 30, 4:12.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Showers 9 pass from Murphy (kick
failed), 4:47.
A-90,043.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Ark
17
29-111
164
17-43-1
(-1)
7-45.7
3-1
8-57
27:38


Fla
17
41-115
240
16-22-0
93
6-37.0
0-0
8-84
32:22


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Arkansas, A.Collins 13-54,
Williams 8-32, Small 3-24, Hatcher 1-9,
Marshall 1-8, Team 1-(minus 1), B.Allen 2-
(minus 15). Florida, Jones 17-50,
M.Brown 11-39, Murphy 7-15, Patton 2-
14, Team 2-0, Showers 1-(minus 1), T.Bur-
ton 1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Arkansas, B.Allen 17-41-1-
164, Derby 0-2-0-0. Florida, Murphy 16-
22-0-240.
RECEIVING-Arkansas, A.Collins 5-45,
Hatcher 4-26, Herndon 3-32, Henry 2-42,
Cowan 1-9, Small 1-8, Sprinkle 1-2.
Florida, Patton 6-124, TBurton 3-56, Dun-
bar 3-43, Westbrook 1-12, Showers 1-9,
M.Brown 1-1, Robinson 1-(minus 5).


Tide rolls over foe


Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. AJ Mc-
Carron completed 15 of 16 passes
for 166 yards and four touchdowns
in the first half and Alabama
rolled 45-3 over Georgia State.
The Crimson Tide (5-0) jumped
ahead 38-0 by halftime against the
Panthers (0-5), a first-year Foot-
ball Bowl Subdivision team.
McCarron led Alabama to touch-
downs on each of his five posses-
sions before leaving the game. He
completed his first 12 passes, put-
ting him in a three-way tie for the
Tide's third-longest streak.
The four touchdown passes tied
his career high and was the sev-
enth time McCarron has reached
that number Alabama outgained
the Panthers 477-175 and held
them to 15 yards rushing.
No. 2 Oregon 57,
Colorado 16
BOULDER, Colo. Marcus Mariota
threw five touchdown passes and ran
for two scores as Oregon brushed off
some early trickery to rout Colorado.
The Ducks' sophomore connected
for two touchdowns each with Josh
Huff and Bralon Addison, and played
only 21/2 quarters.
The Buffaloes had Folsom Field in
a frenzy when they kept things tight
early on, but the crowd didn't like it
when Colorado kept going for field
goals while the Ducks were piling up
the points.
Oregon (5-0, 2-0 Pac-12) has
scored at least 55 points in all of its
games under first-year coach Mark
Helfrich, a former offensive coordina-
tor at Colorado, who took over when
Chip Kelly left to coach the Philadel-
phia Eagles.
No. 3 Clemson 49,
Syracuse 14
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -Tajh Boyd
kept his Heisman Trophy aspirations
intact, throwing for 455 yards and five
touchdowns in three quarters of work,
and Clemson spoiled the Orange's At-
lantic Coast Conference debut.
Boyd, who matched his school
record in TD passes, hit Adam
Humphries with scoring passes of 60
and 42 yards in the first quarter to
help stake the Tigers to a big early
lead, and they held the Orange at bay.
Clemson (5-0, 3-0 ACC) entered
the game as one of just 20 unde-
feated teams remaining in the Bowl
Subdivision, and the Tigers made
sure they wouldn't slip up against the
Orange (2-3, 0-1) and their raucous
Homecoming crowd of 48,961 by tak-
ing a 21-0 first-quarter lead.
No. 6 Georgia 34,
Tennessee 31
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Marshall
Morgan kicked a 42-yard field goal in
overtime after No. 6 Georgia scored a
tying touchdown with 5 seconds left in
regulation as the Bulldogs overcame
numerous injuries and beat Ten-
nessee 34-31.
Tennessee's Alton "Pig" Howard
capped the first overtime possession
by losing control of the ball as he dove
toward the front corner of the end
zone. Howard's play was initially ruled
a 7-yard touchdown, but replays
showed he fumbled prior to crossing
the goal line, turning the potential
score into a turnover and touchback.
Georgia (4-1, 3-0 SEC) forced over-
time on Aaron Murray's 2-yard touch-
down pass to Rantavious Wooten to
make it 31-all. Rajion Neal's 7-yard
run had put Tennessee (3-2, 0-1)
ahead 31-24 with 1:54 left.
No. 7 Louisville 30,
Temple 7
PHILADELPHIA-Teddy Bridgewa-
ter threw for 348 yards and two touch-
downs to keep Louisville undefeated.
Bridgewater made it look easy
against the overwhelmed Owls (0-5, 0-
2 American Athletic Conference). He
threw for 228 yards in the first half to
help the Cardinals roll to a 24-0 lead.
The Cardinals (5-0, 1-0) lost a bid
for their second straight shutout when


Associated Press
Alabama wide receiver DeAndrew White tries to elude Georgia State safety Arington Jordan during the
second half Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


Temple scored with 38 seconds left.
Louisville receiver DeVante Parker,
who has six touchdown catches this
season, left in the first half with an in-
jured right shoulder. Without one of
his favorite targets, Bridgewater was
still impressive, completing 25 of 35
passes. He threw a TD pass for the
17th straight game.
No. 10 LSU 59,
Mississippi St 26
STARKVILLE, Miss. Zach Met-
tenberger threw for 340 yards and two
touchdowns, Odell Beckham Jr. had
179 yards receiving and two TDs, and
No. 10 LSU pushed past Mississippi
State 59-26.
Mettenberger completed 25 of 29
passes in another impressive per-
formance during the senior's breakout
season. Beckham was his favorite tar-
get the two hooked up for nine
completions.
LSU's Jeremy Hill added 157
yards rushing and two touchdowns.
The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 Southeastern
Conference) have won 14 straight
over Mississippi State (2-3, 0-2) dat-
ing back to 1999.
No. 11 Oklahoma 20,
TCU 17
NORMAN, Okla. Brennan Clay
broke a 76-yard touchdown run late in
the fourth quarter and No. 11 Okla-
homa held off TCU 20-17.
Trey Millard had a touchdown run
for the Sooners (5-0, 2-0 Big 12) and
Michael Hunnicutt hit field goals of 39
and 32 yards. Oklahoma and Texas
will meet next Saturday in the annual
Red River Rivalry in Dallas with first
place in the conference on the line.
Oklahoma opened with seven
straight defensive 3-and-outs, after
finishing a 35-21 win at Notre Dame
last Saturday with three. The 10
straight 3-and-outs was the longest
such streak recorded by the Sooners
since at least the 2003 season.
No. 13 South Carolina 35,
Kentucky 28
COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw
passed for a touchdown and ran for
another as No. 13 South Carolina,
playing without injured defensive end
Jadeveon Clowney, held off a Ken-
tucky comeback for a 35-28 victory.
The Gamecocks (4-1,2-1 South-
eastern Conference) again let a large
lead slip away and once more were
able to come away with a victory. The
Wildcats (1-4, 0-2) rallied from 21-0 to
pull to 27-21 on Jalen Whitlow's 14-
yard touchdown pass to Ryan Tim-
mons with 11:50 remaining.
They were still within a touchdown
after Whitlow bulled his way to a


1-yard scoring run with four minutes
left. But the Gamecocks ran out the
clock behind SEC leading rusher Mike
Davis and beat Kentucky for the 13th
time in the last 14 meetings.
Clowney was out with bruised ribs.
No. 19 Michigan 42,
Minnesota 13
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Devin Gard-
ner threw a 24-yard, go-ahead touch-
down pass to Devin Funchess late in
the first half and Michigan pulled away.
The Wolverines (5-0, 1-0 Big Ten) re-
lied on their running game to take pres-
sure off the turnover-prone Gardner. He
didn't throw an interception for the first
time since making his first start as a
quarterback last year at Minnesota.
The Golden Gophers (4-2, 0-2) were
without coach Jerry Kill for an entire
game for the first time because of his
epilepsy. He had a seizure Saturday
morning, when he planned to travel to
Michigan to coach in the game, and re-
mained home to rest in Minnesota.
The Wolverines have won 18
straight games at home.
No. 20 Texas Tech 54,
Kansas 16
LAWRENCE, Kan. Freshman
sensation Baker Mayfield passed for
368 yards but was helped off the field
with an apparent leg injury in the third
quarter of Texas Tech's victory.
Mayfield, a true freshman walk-on
who has started every game, was
hurt at the end of the third quarter
when tackled while passing. There
was no penalty. He hobbled very
slowly off the field with someone help-
ing him under each arm. He was 33
of 51 with one interception.
After falling behind in the first quar-
ter 10-0, the Red Raiders reeled off
54 straight points, going to 5-0 (2-0
Big 12) under first-year head coach
Kliff Kingsbury for the first time since
2008.
No. 21 Okla. St. 33,
Kansas St. 29
STILLWATER, Okla. J.W. Walsh
found Charlie Moore for a 6-yard
touchdown pass with 4:16 left in the
fourth quarter to help Oklahoma
State rally.
Walsh finished 24-of-38 passing for
245 yards for the Cowboys, who nar-
rowly avoided their second straight
loss after a defeat at West Virginia last
week.
After falling behind 29-23 in the
fourth quarter, Oklahoma State (4-1,
1-1 Big 12 Conference) drove 75
yards in six plays. Walsh was 4-of-5
passing on the drive, including the go-
ahead touchdown pass to Moore.
Ben Grogan later added a field goal


for the Cowboys, one of four in the
game for the freshman.
No. 23 Fresno St. 61,
Idaho 14
MOSCOW, Idaho Derek Carr
threw five touchdown passes as No.
23 Fresno State pounded Idaho, scor-
ing at least 40 points for the fifth time
this season.
Davante Adams caught three
touchdown passes for Fresno State
(5-0), which is off to its best start since
2001, when the Bulldogs won their
first six games.
Idaho (1-5), coming off a win over
Temple in coach Paul Petrino's first
season, didn't score until the fourth
quarter against the first ranked oppo-
nent to play in the Kibbie Dome since
Boise State in 2010.
Auburn 30,
No. 24 Mississippi 22
AUBURN, Ala. Nick Marshall
ran for 140 yards and two touch-
downs, Robenson Therezie scored
on a 78-yard interception return and
Auburn held off No. 24 Mississippi
30-22 for its first win over a Top 25
team in two years.
Marshall's second scoring run gave
Auburn a 27-9 lead in the third quar-
ter. The Tigers lost two turnovers in
the fourth quarter to help the Ole Miss
comeback attempt.
Ole Miss was held to only three field
goals before Bo Wallace threw a 49-
yard touchdown pass to Donte Mon-
crief in the third quarter and added a
12-yard scoring pass to Moncrief mid-
way through the fourth quarter.
Auburn (4-1,2-1 Southeastern
Conference) already has topped its
win total from last season, when it fin-
ished 3-9 overall and 0-8 in the SEC.
Ole Miss (3-2, 1-2), coming off a
25-0 loss at No. 1 Alabama, has lost
two straight.
Notre Dame 37,
No. 22 Arizona State 34
ARLINGTON, Texas Tommy
Rees threw for 279 yards and three
touchdowns, and Notre Dame made it
5 for 5 in the traveling Shamrock Se-
ries with a 37-34 victory against No.
22 Arizona State.
Kyle Brindza kicked three second-
half field goals, the go-ahead kick
from 25 yards with 3:03 remaining. He
tied a Notre Dame record with a 53-
yarder that matched the longest in a
college game at the $1.2 billion home
of the Dallas Cowboys.
It was the second win in Texas in
the five-year Shamrock run of home
games on the road for the Irish (4-2).


No. 14 Miami pulls away, tops Georgia Tech


Associated Press

MIAMI GARDENS -
Stephen Morris threw for
three touchdowns, Duke
Johnson rushed for 184
yards and No. 14 Miami
remained unbeaten after
shaking off a problematic
opening quarter to beat
Georgia Tech 45-30 on
Saturday.
Phillip Dorsett, Clive
Walford and Allen Hums
caught scoring passes for
Miami (5-0, 1-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference), which
scored 21 points in the
final 7:15. Dallas Crawford
ran for two scores in the
fourth quarter, and Ladar-
ius Gunter added a 30-
yard interception return


for another touchdown
with 1:08 left.
David Sims had two
rushing touchdowns for
Georgia Tech (3-2, 2-2),
which wasted a 17-point
lead against Miami last
season and blew another
double-digit advantage
Saturday- plus missed a
fourth-quarter extra point
that would have tied the
game. The Yellow Jackets
led 17-7 after controlling
the first quarter, then
wound up losing to Miami
for the fifth straight time.
It's Miami's best start
since opening 6-0 in 2004.
South Florida 26,
Cincinnati 20
TAMPA--Nate Godwin


scored on a long blocked field
goal return and DeDe Latti-
more scooped up a fumble for
another touchdown to help
South Florida begin American
Athletic Conference play with a
26-20 victory over Cincinnati,
which was playing for the first
time since one of its players
was killed in a car accident.
The Bearcats (3-2, 0-1)
spent a difficult bye week
grieving, attending red-shirt
freshman Ben Flick's funeral
and making hospital visits in
addition to practicing. They
were looking forward to play-
ing a game to help things get
back to normal.
Two hours before kickoff,
the entire Cincinnati team
gathered at the midfield at


Raymond James Stadium,
forming a circle around the
USF logo to pray. A moment
of silence in Flick's memory
was observed before the
opening kickoff. Two other
players were injured in the
wreck, and one of them re-
mains hospitalized.
UCF 24,
Memphis 17
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Two
UCF touchdowns in 9 seconds
late in the fourth quarter gave
the Knights a come from behind
24-17 victory over Memphis in
the American Athletic Confer-
ence opener for both teams.
The scores came in un-
usual ways as lineman Chris
Martin recovered a fumble in


the end zone with 2:05 left for
UCF (4-1, 1-0 AAC) to tie the
game at 17.
On the ensuing kickoff,
Memphis returned Marquis
Warford fumbled when he was
tackled by UCF's William
Stanback. Drico Johnson
grabbed the ball and ran 12
yards for the Knights' 24-17
lead.
Memphis' Joe Craig re-
turned the next kickoff almost
100 yards for an apparent
score, but it was nullified by a
holding penalty. The Tigers (1-
3, 0-1) then marched to the
UCF 6 before a halfback pass
by Brandon Hayes was inter-
cepted in the end zone by
linebacker Terrance Plummer,
ending the Tigers threat.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 BS









Bucs vow to stick together

AANMLA Tthat veterans have no choice bu
NFL team hopes to rally around moving forward
N F t a h o p e s . . . . . . . . "W e can 't tu rn on each oth er'


to use oye weep

to regroup

Associated Press

TAMPA The young quarter-
back who once provided hope
for the future has been jetti-
soned, and a season that began
with high expectations is rapidly
slipping away
The winless Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers are in disarray, and it'll
take more than a bye week to fix
the mess coach Greg Schiano
has on his hands on and off
the field.
"I think we have a strong
locker room," Schiano said.
"Our guys are locked in on what
we need to do."
If only it were that simple.
A disintegrating relationship
between the organization and
unhappy quarterback Josh Free-
man grew more contentious by
the day until the fifth-year was
released Thursday-just a quar-
ter of a season after becoming
the first 4,000-yard passer in fran-
chise history and helping the of-
fense set numerous club records.
Rookie Mike Glennon made
his first start as Freeman's re-
placement last week, but barely
sparked the team in a 13-10 loss
to Arizona. An improved de-
fense, bolstered by the offseason
acquisition of cornerback Dar-
relle Revis and safety Dashon
Goldson, has failed to protect


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have turned the starting quarterback job to rookie Mike Glennon.


leads in the final two minutes in
three of the team's four losses.
The Bucs (0-4) have dropped
nine of 10 games overall dating
to last season, raising the ques-
tion whether a coaching change
could be on the horizon.
Team history suggests no, how-
ever, the Bucs have never had a
situation quite like this one.
The Glazer family, which owns
the team, has spent generously
in free agency to upgrade the
roster since Schiano's hiring
after the 2011 season. And while
they've never fired a coach dur-
ing the season, they've also
shown they won't hesitate to
abruptly pull the plug when they


feel change is necessary
Tony Dungy was dismissed
after a disappointing playoff
loss. Jon Gruden, who won
Tampa Bay's only Super Bowl
title after replacing Dungy, was
axed with three years remaining
on his contract.
Schiano has said he doesn't
think his job is in jeopardy De-
spite benching and eventually
releasing Freeman in what he
described as a "performance-
based" decision, the coach in-
sists the pieces are in place to be
successful.
"We have good players, proven
methods, good schemes, good
coaches. When you have all


those good components and
you're doing things the right way
it'll turn," Schiano said.
"Everybody that's been in
competitive athletics goes
through some stretches where
they wish it was better ... Now
you're kidding yourself if you
don't have the components.
Then you're just wishing," he
added. "I know we have the com-
ponents, so we've just got to stick
to our guns and it'll turn."
Despite Schiano's insistence
that Freeman's situation was not
a distraction, teammates clearly
had become weary of talking
about his benching.
Glennon is a third-round pick


t
t.


defensive tackle Gerald McCoy
said. "It's times like this where you
see teams start to crumble, be-
cause internally they start to im-
plode. (We) can't do that We have
to get stronger... look in the mirror
first, see what we did as individu-
als wrong, what we can do better
and then lift each other up."
Two of the team's three losses
with Freeman in the lineup
came on last-second field goals.
The Bucs led the Cardinals 10-0
entering the fourth quarter be-
fore Glennon lost a fumble and
threw two interceptions, helping
Arizona rally to spoil an other-
wise solid if unspectacular -
performance.
The Bucs' open date gives him
an extra week to prepare for his
next start, at home against
Philadelphia.
The 23-year-old Glennon, a
former backup to Russell Wilson
at North Carolina State before
becoming Wolfpack starter as a
junior, is quickly getting accli-
mated to his new role as the lead
voice on offense.
"Those guys have done a really
good job making me feel com-
fortable. They've been extremely
complimentary and encourag-
ing, they know that the quarter-
back is in control of the huddle,
and those guys have all eyes on
me when I walk in," Glennon
said. "They've really just done a
really good job of kind of making
me feel like I belong out there
and that I'm in charge."


Kenseth wins Nationwide race at Kansas Speedway


Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. -
Matt Kenseth is proving to
be unbeatable at Kansas
Speedway
The winner of the last
two Sprint Cup races at the
track, Kenseth got into his
Nationwide car and drove
it to victory Saturday, tak-
ing advantage of a contro-
versial late-race wreck that
involved Brad Keselowski
and Kyle Busch to conserve
enough fuel for the end.
"We had a lot of speed
right off the truck. It felt
really good," Kenseth said.
"I thought it was the best
car we had all year at an
open track."
Kenseth crossed the fin-
ish line well ahead of Paul
Menard, who got around
Regan Smith on the final
lap to take second. Busch
finished fourth and Justin
Allgaier was fifth.
The outcome was almost
an afterthought, though, to
the renewal of a long-
standing feud between Ke-
selowski and Busch that
has threatened to spill
over into today's Sprint
Cup race.
Their teams locked in a
battle for the owner's


championship, the two
were side-by-side in the
closing laps when Busch
got into Keselowski's left
rear That sent the No. 22
car backing into the out-
side wall and knocking
Keselowski out of the
race.
Keselowski angrily
jumped out of his car and,
rather than hop into the
ambulance, jogged over
the grass toward pit road.
He gestured wildly at
Busch's crew before fi-
nally running to the infield
care center a long jog
that did little to quell his
temper
"I got wrecked by a dirty
driver There's no other
way of putting it," Ke-
selowski said. "I've raced
him really cool over the
last year to be respectful to
him and trying to repair
our relationship. I've
watched him wreck my
truck and cost me from
winning races. He put me
in the fence in Chicago in
the truck race. Nationwide
races, he's been pulling
this crap.
"It's not going to last,"
Keselowski said, "I can tell
you that."
Busch said that he was-


n't trying to wreck
Keselowski, and that he
simply got tight coming out
of the final corner That
forced the front of his car
to drift toward the wall.
"It was hard racing.
There were a lot of mo-
ments where I maybe felt a
little crowded," Busch
said. "The contact that ul-
timately ended it, I just got
real tight."
The wreck tightened up
the ownership race. Ke-
selowski's Penske Racing
team, which carried a 28-
point lead over Busch's
No. 54 car for Joe Gibbs
Racing into the weekend,
now leads by just five


points heading to next
weekend's race at Char-
lotte.
The incident could also
throw some drama into the
Chase.
Busch is third in the
standings and just 12
points back of Kenseth,
while Keselowski the
defending series cham-
pion- failed to qualify for
NASCAR's version of the
playoffs.
"He has a lot more to
lose than I do," said Ke-
selowski, apparently indi-
cating that he would
retaliate today "I guess
that's the good thing about
not being in the Chase."


Associated Press
Matt Kenseth drives on the final lap of his win in the
Nationwide Series race Saturday at Kansas Speedway in
Kansas City, Kan.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Do your part to reduce the size of government


A big old dilemma we
have in this country
is that we expect
government to have all the
answers.
We then go off and elect
human beings to public of-
fice and we're surprised
that they do really dumb
things.
Last week in California,
Gov. Jerry Brown signed a
law making it illegal to post
nude and/or risque photos


of former romantic partners
on the Internet.
Apparently, one dating
practice that has changed
since the creation of Inter-
net (thanks Al Gore) and the
digital camera is that there
a lot more naked photos
being taken.
The California case in-
volved a woman who moved
to Miami and left her
boyfriend back on the West
Coast. The couple appar-


ently spent much of their
free time sending naked
photos of each other back
and forth on the Internet.
Despite the photographs,
the relationship failed to
develop (go figure) and the
couple broke up. The
boyfriend was apparently
on the dumpee end of the
breakup, and to get even he
decided to post his collec-
tion of naked photos on the
Internet. The girlfriend was


mortified that her naked
pictures were now all over
the Internet (thanks Al
Gore) and she alleged she
lost her job because her
coworkers kept looking at
the iPhones during meet-
ings and smiling.
So California did what
California does in such sit-
uations and passed a law
that made posting nude
photos of ex-girlfriends on
the Internet a crime.


No doubt the experience
was a difficult one, but
aren't there solutions out
there that don't involve the
full force of our govern-
ment?
I have a starting point -
we need smarter citizens.
We could have a smaller,
less expensive government
if we the citizens -
stopped doing really dumb


PageC3


Associated Press
A man carries a dog on his shoulder Sunday, Sept. 8, while he watches the procession of Cuba's patron saint, the Virgin of Charity of Cobre, on her feast day in Havana.


THE CUBAN EMBARGO,


AND WHY WE SHOULD LIFT IT


PETER GRAULICH
Special to the Chronicle


F IRST, SOME BACKGROUND.
Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries
overthrew Fulgencio Batista on Jan. 1,
1959. This ended a dictatorship of seven
years. Castro, being a fighter and not a diplomat,
set up the new Cuba as a communist state.


The United States par-
tially imposed an em- Peter Gr
bargo on Cuba in has been
October 1960. This was not once,
punishment for the na-
tionalization of all prop- twice. To
erty, including many U.S. about his
businesses, recent tri
As further punish- PageA17
ment, the embargo was
tightened by reducing
the Cuban import quota of brown
sugar The Soviet Union stepped in
and agreed to purchase the sugar,
thus establishing a relationship with
the country
President John Kennedy further
extended the embargo on Feb. 8,
1962, and following the Cuban Mis-
sile Crisis in October 1962 imposed
travel restrictions. As punishment
for hosting nuclear weapons, fur-
ther restrictions were imposed on
July 8, 1963, when Cuban assets in
the United States were frozen.
There was a partial suspension of
the regulations in 1977 when Presi-
dent Carter did not renew it. Presi-
dent Reagan reinstated the embargo
in 1982.
In 1992, the Cuban Democracy Act
was sponsored by former Democratic
Rep. Robert Torricelli of New Jersey
Next came the Helms-Burton Act
in 1996, broadening the embargo to
prevent foreign companies from
doing business in the United States


aulich
to Cuba
but
read
most
ip. see


if they trade with Cuba.
In 2000, the embargo
was relaxed at the re-
quest of the agribusiness
interests.
So what we have
seems to be punishment
for creating a communist
state and nationalizing
property in 1959 to 1962.
Later added were


human rights violations, including
torture.
Let us fast forward to 2013, some
51 years later One has to wonder
why the embargo is still in effect.
After all, we are friendly with Viet-
nam and China now.
There is a group of anti-Castro dis-
sidents living in South Florida with a
great deal of money, working inces-
santly to keep the embargo alive.
Do you wonder why an Italian-
American congressman from New
Jersey introduced a bill related to
Cuba? Mr Torricelli was 11 years old
in 1962; however, his district in-
cludes several municipalities in
Bergen County with a heavy Cuban-
American population.
So we see a pattern here: Dissi-
dents want to keep the fight alive
and have the money to purchase
support in the government. And so it Men ride in a classic American car past an excavator shovel Sept. 9 at the harbor
goes, on and on. of Havana. Gentrification is already evident in the restored bayside plazas of
Old Havana, and now an ambitious plan is under way to turn the polluted
See Page C3 waterfront into a gleaming promenade with restaurants, cafes and public parks.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


0





OPage C2- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6,2013



PINION


"What a miserable thing life is: You're living
in clover, only the clover isn't good enough."
Bertolt BrecMht, "Jungle of Cities," 1924


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
^i Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
SCharlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
.jMac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

FINISH LINE IN SIGHT




Finally,




progress




on future




of hospital


after four years of tur-
moil, the two boards
that govern Citrus Me-
morial hospital in Inverness
have agreed to move forward
with a sale or lease of the
public hospital.
The new operator of CMH
will be Hospital Corporation
of America (HCA), the
Nashville-based health care
company that of-
fered $140 million THEP I
for the local insti-
tution. The fu
While there is Citrus N
nostalgia for Cit-
rus Memorial's OUR 01
50-year history of MV
providing great Mo
health care to the urget
community, there complete
is a collective
community relief that a con-
sensus has been forged on how
to finally resolve the problem.
HCA operates Oak Hill
Hospital in Brooksville and
has a good reputation for pro-
viding quality health care.
The national company also
has deep pockets and critical
efficiencies that will help Citrus
Memorial regain its footing.
The members of the two
boards finally sat down Mon-
day evening and hashed out
the pros and cons of the of-
fers that still sat on the table.
In the end, HCA got the nod
from both of the battling boards.
The governing board and
foundation board members
acted respectfully during
their joint meeting and had
an intelligent conversation
about the options. Citizens
appreciate the effort.
About $10 million in legal
fees have been wasted over the
past four years in this politi-
cal dispute, and the taxpay-
ers of Citrus County are tired.
There are still important
details to be decided, but the
most critical step was choos-
ing the top bidder
With that done, we would
urge the boards to move for-
ward with a sense of urgency
to finalize the deal. Employ-
ees, physicians and consumers
are all highly irritated by the
by the constant tension and
uncertainty that has gripped
our hospital for years.
Bring this deal to a
conclusion.


AL563-0579

563-0579


Is
C
It

IP
(e,
n
e


There is still debate about
whether the hospital should
be sold or leased to HCA.
The company is open to either
option, but many in the com-
munity are convinced a sale
makes the most sense. After all,
the mess we are just climbing
out of was because of a lease
arrangement that went bad.
To the general public, the
technicality is not
|SUE: that important. A
subgroup was
:ure of asked to quickly
memorial. analyze the bene-
fits of a sale or
'INION: lease and report
back to the joint
with group.
cy to What is impor-
the deal. tant is what hap-
pens to the $95
million that will be left over
when the sale is consummated.
That's a lot of money and no
one wants to see it wasted.
At the same time, no one
wants to lose control over
how that money is spent.
While there are complicated
and confusing state laws
dealing with how the proceeds
are spent, we like the general
idea of creating a community
foundation that annually
spends the proceeds from the
investment of the $95 million.
The principal should not be
touched. Instead, the pro-
ceeds should be used for pro-
grams and endeavors that
improve the general health of
our community.
Let's remember, it took our
tax dollars to create the in-
vestment of Citrus Memorial
hospital over the past 50
years, and the proceeds from
that sale should go back and
benefit the community.
Governing board members
Krista Joseph and Bob Priselac
both floated good ideas for
creating a foundation board
with broad community mem-
bership that could be charged
with the responsibility of al-
locating those funds to wor-
thy public causes.
Let's not permit any addi-
tional political squabbles or
legal ambiguities to get in the
way of moving this process
forward immediately We don't
want to waste any additional
dollars on legal fees, consult-
ants or politicians.


Courts against men
This is in regards to Mr. Peters and his
daughters. I feel very sorry for the man.
He's desperate. I do not agree with his actions,
but I can understand his desperation. The
courts are so against the male figures. Some-
thing has to be done to help men in situa-
tions with child custody. There is judges ...
that give the woman everything just be-
cause they're women. And the men pay and
the men are the ones that suffer. They lose
their children and they have to pay and they
can barely afford to live themselves and the
women know this. Someone needs to look
into it and I'm a woman.


At present, GOP the Dems' best friends


Editor's note: This column By aligning himself with
was written prior to Tuesday's Cruz, whose self-styled fili-
government shutdown, buster epitomizes the partisan
paralysis in Washington, Rubio
Y ou inspire me." further diminished himself in
SThose tender the eyes of moderate Republi-
.. words were spoken cans who yearn for a fresh and
to Sen. Marco Rubio by Sen. principled voice.
Ted Cruz on the Senate floor re- Ironically, the potential rival
cently, the same Ted Cruz who who benefits most from Rubio's
jabbered for more than 21 straight naked groveling is his mentor,
hours, infuriating leaders of his Jeb Bush. Although he hasn't
own party and edify- announced whether
ing his national or not he's running
image as an egoma- in 2016, Bush is
niacal crackpot, smart enough to
Nobody outside of watch the unfolding
Texas likes Cruz ex- Republican train
cept the tea party wreck and know
troglodytes to whom that none of the cur-
he panders. rent lightweights has
"You inspire me," [ a chance of beating
the buffoon cooed to Carl Hiaasen Hillary Clinton.
Rubio, a future foe O RThe batty Cruz is
in the 2016 race for OTHER being seriously dis-
the White House. VOICES cussed as a front-
At which moment runner based on his
Democratic campaign strate- hijacking the Senate floor and
gists surely fell to their knees saying, among other things, that
whispering, "Thank you, God. accepting Obamacare a law
This is too good to be true." passed by Congress is tanta-
The Cruz-Rubio romance mount to placating the Nazis in
played out on C-Span in the Germany
wee morning hours Sept. 25 In another burst of bloated
during Cruz's marathon tirade vanity, Cruz compared his mis-
against Obamacare. Florida's sion to defund health care re-
junior senator popped up like a form with John F Kennedy's
blow-dried gopher to speak for vow to put a man on the moon.
almost an hour and give Cruz a Having plenty of time to kill,
break. Cruz also read to his kids from a
Rubio's appearance was an- Dr Seuss book.
other calculated suck-up to the It was the only memorable
right-wingers who scorned him thing to come out of his mouth
during the immigration debate, in 1,279 minutes.
Days earlier he had back- The purported point of his
stabbed Miami-Dade Circuit theatrics was to show support
Judge William Thomas, a gay for House Republicans who
black man, by abruptly with- want to shut down the federal
drawing his support for Thomas' government if funding for the
nomination to the federal bench. Affordable Care Act isn't
Rubio claimed he'd changed stripped from the budget
his mind about Thomas' "fit- Of course, the law will never
ness" because of concerns be defunded because there
about the handling of a DUI aren't enough votes in the Sen-
case and a rape case though ate to do it not even close.
even the prosecutor in the rape The arithmetic is basic
case said the judge had fol- enough for a first-grader to sort
lowed the rules. (Rubio's vast out. So are the public-opinion
credentials in criminal trial polls.
procedure consist of an unused While most Americans re-
law degree.) main apprehensive about Oba-


macare, the president's tepid
approval ratings still dwarf the
contemptuously low numbers
racked up by Congress.
The most recent New York
Times/CBS News survey shows
that nearly 75 percent of those
polled disapprove of congres-
sional Republicans, and more
than half say Obama is more
likely to make better decisions
about the economy, the deficit
and health care.
Almost 90 percent are frus-
trated at the possibility of a gov-
ernment shutdown, two-thirds
say they or their families would
be negatively affected, and
eight of 10 believe it's unac-
ceptable for either the presi-
dent or Congress to pitch the
country into fiscal default over
a political squabble.
That's why Cruz's diarrheal
opera got no love from senior
Republicans such as John Mc-
Cain, Tom Coburn and even the
die-hard obstructionist Mitch
McConnell.
They know their party will
get blamed if the government is
shut down. Even the GOP's cun-
ning prince of darkness, Karl
Rove, warns that the House
strategy is self-destructive.
Mitt Romney railed tirelessly
against Obamacare and got his
butt handed to him in the last
election, while Republicans
wound up losing seats in Con-
gress. What did they learn from
that? Nothing.
Democrats must be quietly
elated to see a guy like Rubio,
once feared as the bright new
face of the opposition, swoon-
ing over a reactionary gasbag
like Cruz.
Hillary can just sit back and
watch.
The campaign commercials
keep writing themselves. "You
inspire me," sayeth the gasbag
from Texas to the suck-up artist
from Florida.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132.


HOWA BItl !ECOAMES A LAW ToD/i..


LETTERS to the Editor


The measure of a life
Today as I was helping to
clean out my grandmother's
house I wondered, "What is
the measure of one's life?"
During the "who gets this, who
wants that" it seemed that no-
body wanted most of it. Is it
going to be the same when my
kin goes through my treasures?
I hope not, but looking around
at all of the items I have accu-
mulated, I am sure that is how
it will go. What will they think
when they go through my
nightstand and closet and see
items that my wife and chil-
dren gave me when I was a
young buck, such as drawings
that were colored in crayon
and were once housed on the
fridge? Father's Day, birthday
and Valentine's Day cards, I
couldn't bear to part with in
my life? I'm sure they will
meet their doom once my life
is measured. A lifetime of pho-
tos will quickly be sifted for a
familiar face and discarded
without a thought. I'm sure my
kin will have their houses in
order and the burden of adding
my treasures may not fit their
lives, but remember the meas-
ure of my life once I'm gone.
My treasures were not my
possessions, but my memories.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board should call 352-
563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
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sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
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limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

When I looked at the drawing
you drew for me, I didn't see a
child's crayon sketch, I saw
your little face handing me a
one-of-a-kind work of art
When I looked through a card,
I tried to remember the day
you gave me that card. Your
photos with your smiles


warmed my soul when all
seemed to be going wrong.
So remember when you are
going through my treasures to be
careful for the ones I kept close
to me; I had them for a lifetime.
George Brooks

Just missed horse
I came very close to hitting a
horse in the middle of County
Road 491 (across from the post
office driveway) one night after
choir It was close, very close.
It was twilight, but I noticed a
black-and-white horse just off
the roadway, which made me
glance over at it and then, wow,
there's a light brown horse
standing sideways right in front
of me. The horse and its rider
were just standing or, shall I
say dancing sideways in my
lane. Our RAV4 apparently has
very good "swerve" capabili-
ties and I still have excellent
reaction time. Luckily there
was very little traffic and no
vehicles coming towards me.
And from what I can gather,
the car that was a ways behind
me, had to swerve and missed
the horse also. It could have
been a bad one for all of us.
Norm Schmidt
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's almost time to kill the monster


"We shall defend our is-
land, whatever the cost
may be, we shall fight on
the beaches, we shall fight
on the landinggrounds, we
shall fight in the fields and
the streets, we shall fight
in the hills; we shall never
surrender" Sir Winston
Churchill, circa 1940.
t times I have given
thought to the folks
with whom I have
shared Earth space. I've
been here with some very
good people and with
some very bad ones.
According to my simplis-
tic mathematical calcula-
tions, there have been a lot
of them. I am reasonably
certain that in 1945, when I
was born, someone some-
where on the planet was at


least 100 years old. I am
now 68, and that covers a
timespan of 168 years. I've
breathed the same air as
those who were born both
before me and after me for
at least a period of time.
This is only a shot in the
dark, but I would estimate
the total Earth-space-
sharing crowd for me is at
least 9 billion folks and the
number will continue to
grow each time a baby is
born until I die.

"Today, I will refrain from
talking about the bad ones,
and comment about only
one of the good ones a
very good one."- Sir Win-
ston Churchill, 1874-1965.

You have undoubtedly
read or heard the "we will


fight them on the beaches" time, my current favorite
speech, made by Churchill quotation attributed to
at a time when it looked as Churchill is one that
though Great Britain would Cheryl read to me as we
indeed fall to Hitler's were waiting in the ship's
forces. He is library for our
also alleged to turn to disem-
have said, "You bark after a
can always short cruise we
count on the ..^ had taken to
Americans to celebrate our
do the right recent wedding
thing after anniversary,
they have ex- that is:
hausted all other "Writing a
possibilities." Fred Brannen book is an ad-
He was right, A SLICE venture. To
of course, and begin with it is
we eventually OF LIFE a toy and an
joined the fight amusement.
and pulled the Brits'bacon Then it becomes a mis-
out of the fire. tress, then it becomes a
But, I believe based on master, then it becomes a
timing and the interplay tyrant. The last phase is
with my life at the present that just as you are about


to be reconciled to your
servitude, you kill the
monster and fling him to
the public."
I don't want to ever in-
appropriately use this col-
umn to plug my
novel-in-process, one
which has been in the
works for 35 years, and the
last three of them in
earnest. Even so, while
writing my book, I have ex-
perienced adventure and
amusement. I have never
had a mistress, but I have
felt words on paper become
excruciatingly enticing,
making it difficult to break
away, even when my time
has been needed elsewhere.
I have felt those words be-
come my master and I have
had to deal with the tyrant
which is somewhere


within the computer key-
board at three in the morn-
ing while I am trying to get
a sentence just as I want it
to be. I understand the
servitude that exists as I am
presently completing what
is without exaggeration at
least my 15th personal
edit, 11 before and four
after a very well-done edit
by a professional editor
And now, my best guess
is that I'm no more than
another few months away
Layout and printing re-
main to be done, but it is
almost time to kill the
monster and fling him to
the public.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


= Letter to THE EDITOR


Tourism department. If the
tourism was up 13 percent from
last year in a bad year, why in the
heck do they need an executive di-
rector to head the tourism depart-
ment, especially when their
$600,000 budget will not support
an executive director? Totally con-
fused on how this county is actu-
ally running some of this stuff.
Pay enough already
I'm reading about the "County to
set landfill fees for Inverness"
(Sept. 25, Page A2). Don't we al-
ready, in our taxes, pay a good
amount of money every year for
picking up stuff in the city? I don't
see why we should. Now if you
want to add $1 a year more, that
wouldn't be such a bad thing, but
it's charging so much more. Some-
body needs to get on this and see
why we have to pay more and how
much more, if this is so. And,
Adams, you better check it out
good.
Social media skills abound
Tourism. Yesterday at the BOCC
meeting, Cathy Pearson said one
of the candidates had great social
media skills. Well, little does she
know that the three people working
in tourism today actually four -
also have great social media skills.
So why do you need a fifth person
for more social media skills? Baf-
fles me.


I'd like to make a statement
about this 31 percent Citrus
County tax hike that our great
county commissioners approved
their than cutting
AOUND services such as
closing the swim-
1 ming pool in Whis-
N pering Pines or
IT closing other
nonessential serv-
ices that the minor-
CAL,^n ,n ity of the county
563-0579 residents utilize. So
now the majority of
the county residents have to pay
that 31 percent on their property
taxes. This is ludicrous.
Thank you school staff,
thank you EMTs
I would like to give a big thank
you to the Inverness Middle
School. This is their crossing
guard, Miss Jo. I had a terrible ex-
perience on (Sept. 24), Tuesday. I
had passed out and I want to give
the school board a thank you and
the EMTs. They took excellent care
of me, which I don't remember too
much. It was a bad experience on
my part and I want to say thank
you, especially to Mr. Darby for
being there. And like I said, it was
a terrible experience. I've been
doing this for 10 years, but I think
the heat got to me. Thank you and
God bless. Miss Jo.


Snuck up from behind
I don't know how you feel about
old age, but in my case I didn't even
see it coming. It hit me from the rear.
Difficult process
Your editorial on the fire tax ex-
emption, I think is a little mislead-
ing. I do not believe that the
reasons you give for having only a
few people apply are accurate. The
reasons are, they've made it so dif-
ficult to get and obtain the applica-
tion. There's no place in Crystal
River you can obtain one. You have
to either drive to Lecanto or to In-
verness or you have to mail them a
self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Once you do receive the applica-
tion, you have to provide the proof
of your income, which means
sending in paperwork that you
might need for something else.
Then the application has to be no-
tarized, sent back in and you'd
have to do this every year prior to
May 1. So this application would
only be good for a few months and
you'd have to go through the process
to do it all over again. They couldn't
have made this more difficult for
senior citizens on a fixed income. I
hope it can be corrected.
Way to go, Art
I'd like to give kudos to Art Rein-
hard at the Aquatic Department.
He returns calls, answers ques-
tions and just does a fine job.
Thanks, Art.


Yogi Boehner


Local forester
assists in fighting
Western wildfires
When our nation ex-
periences national dis-
asters, our Federal
Emergency Manage-
ment Administration
routinely calls upon
state emergency re-
sponse professionals
and area experts for
much-needed help.
Many times these ex-
perts are your own
neighbors who place
themselves in harm's
way to assist those in
need and provide their
services with humble
professionalism.
Most of you witnessed
the tragic wildfires that
occurred throughout our
Western states this sum-
mer and the personal
suffering and loss of
lives they caused, but
you may not be aware
that many of your neigh-
bors within the Florida
Forest Service were on
the front lines coordi-
nating and directing the
fire suppression needs
as well and directly
fighting the fires.



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

things. So in the spirit of
doing my part to help re-
solve the current stale-
mate in Washington and
reducing the scope of our
government in general, I
offer these simple rules
that you can follow and do
your part as a good citizen.
Do not drink coffee,
apply lipstick and send a
text message while you are
driving your car on State
Road 44. This will cut
down on the complaints
against Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
that he sends too many
fire and rescue vehicles to
accidents.
Do not take your 16-
foot skiff out into the Gulf
of Mexico in stormy
weather This will reduce
expenses for the U.S.
Coast Guard, the county
EMS service and will re-
duce the waiting time at
the hospital emergency
room.


CUBA
Continued from Page Cl

Reasons for repeal
Communism is not the evil it
once was. As an example, China
is a communist country We
spent $315 billion there last year
with no embargo to prevent it.
The Cuban Missile Crisis
should have been called the
Russian Missile Crisis in Cuba.
The Soviet Union had supported
the revolution by purchasing the
sugar the United States blocked.
This would have indebted Cas-
tro to the USSR. He really could-
n't say no to the missiles without
destroying his country It was a
matter of survival.
Human rights violations and
torture? Don't we do that right
here? We do it in Guantanamo,
Cuba, and we did it in all cases
of rendition, but it is OK for us,
just not right for them.

A solution
There are five Cubans impris-
oned in the United States.
All five Gerardo Hernan-
dez, Ramon Labafiino, Antonio
Guerrero, Ren6 Gonzalez and


Fernando Gonzalez -were con-
victed of acting as unregistered
foreign agents and conspiracy to
commit crimes against the
United States. Three were also
convicted of conspiracy to com-
mit espionage, on the strength of
evidence that they had gathered
information on military activity
at a naval air station in Key West.
In addition, Hernandez was con-
victed of conspiracy to murder
in connection with the deaths of
four Cuban exiles whose two light
aircraft were shot down by the
Cuban Air Force over the Straits
of Florida in 1996. In Cuba, these
men are known as "The Five."
Cuba holds two persons of in-
terest to the United States: Alan
Gross and JoAnne Chesimard.
While working for a USAID
contractor in 2009, Gross was ar-
rested for bringing satellite
phones and computer equip-
ment into Cuba to distribute to
the Jewish community He was
convicted in March 2011 and is
serving a 15-year sentence.
JoAnne Chesimard is residing
in Cuba with a $2 million reward
from the FBI offered for her cap-
ture and return to New Jersey
Chesimard, aka Assata
Shakur, was a member of the
Black Liberation Army who was


Associated Press
A vendor reaches out to catch a pineapple Sept. 25 at a food market
in Havana, Cuba.


being actively pursued by the
FBI in the early '70s for her al-
leged connection to a great num-
ber of violent crimes. On May 2,
1973, Chesimard and two other
BLA members were involved in
a shootout with New Jersey
State Police troopers after they
were pulled over for having a
broken tail light. Trooper
Werner Foerster was mortally
wounded in the shootout, shortly
after which Chesimard was ap-
prehended. She was tried and


convicted of murder and es-
caped from prison in 1979 and
resurfaced in Cuba in 1984.
It is time to stop this madness.
Ninety percent of the population
of Cuba is under age 65 three
generations people who had
nothing to do with the events
that led to the embargo.
I suggest that the United
States and Cuba get together and
agree to swap persons. Some ne-
gotiations between the countries
could clear up the rest of the


minor differences and the world
would be a better place.
The island is a beautiful place.
The people are friendly, the ar-
chitecture is superb, the food is
outstanding, the prices are low It
is the perfect vacation destination.
So are you tired of having a
small group of cranky old men
preventing 350 million Americans
from visiting this wonderful place?
If you agree, please help
spread the world. The Cubans
do not have enough money to
purchase support in Congress.
Perhaps Congress could do the
right thing for a change and re-
peal the embargo. I know 11 mil-
lion people who will be forever
thankful.


Peter Graulich first left the
country in 1961 for six weeks
travellingEurope and the
United Kingdom with family.
Since then he has visited 97
countries, every state in the
United States and every na-
tional park. He has spent about
300 days on Princess Cruise
Line ships and completed a
107-day cruise around the
world, visiting 42 countries. He
rates Cuba as one of the top
three places he has visited.


Citrus County
Forester Kimberly
Burch deployed to the
Salmon River fire in
Northern California as a
logistics supply ordering
manager. Kim was re-
sponsible for ensuring
all of the food, safety
gear, firefighting sup-
plies and ground sup-
port equipment was
where it was needed,
when it was needed to
support the more than
1,100 wildland firefight-
ers working to suppress
the fire.
Kim has returned
safely to her Citrus
County neighborhood
after a job well done,
but we thought it most
appropriate to recognize
her valuable service.
Perhaps you may know
Kim. The next time you
meet, you should give
her a pat on the back or
handshake and thank
her for her service in
bringing those fires
under control.
Don Ruths, wildfire
mitigation specialist
Withlacoochee Forestry
Center, Florida
Forest Service


Do not leave your un-
locked car on your drive-
way with your keys, wallet
and purse sitting on the
passenger seat. This will
cut down on crime statistics
in our community and save
all sorts of paperwork with
your insurance company
Do not elect public of-
ficials with extended crim-
inal records or those
unfamiliar with the slight-
est hint of humility They
are annoying and they cost
us taxpayers lots of money
when we have to send
them to jail for stealing tax
dollars.
And finally, do not
send nude photos of your-
self on the Internet unless
you are running for mayor
of New York and you want
to help the New York Post
sell more newspapers.
Keep your clothes on and
we will all be better off.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Totally confused Ludicrous tax hike


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 C3




C4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


Sound OFF


Shut out of landfill?
I heard today that we cannot
use the landfill anymore if
we're residents of the city, and
we rely on that to take our yard
waste every Saturday. Is this
true? The Chronicle needs to
check into this. I'm talking
about the City of Inverness.
Editor's note: The county is
considering a fee structure for In-
verness because city residents
do not pay the $25 annual fee
and the city decided to haul its
trash to a Sumter County landfill.
The new rates are not established,
so for now it's business as usual.
Scott's connection?
This is in regard to the sale of
the hospital in Inverness. Two
companies one HMA and
HCA are either one of those
two companies connected to
the Rick Scott company that
he used to run? Does anybody
know the initials of the one
that Gov. Scott used to run?
Editor's note: Gov. Rick Scott
was formerly CEO of Colum-
bia/HCA. He resigned in 1997.
Worse than drinking
Well, it's the eve of the big
annual raft race in Citrus County
over in the Homosassa River. I
wonder how many folks will have
a few drinks and then drive back
over towards Inverness, Lecanto
or Floral City. Maybe they'll go to
that after-concert show at Rock
Crusher Canyon, have a couple
drinks and cops will be out
looking for them drunk drivers.
Yet the Chronicle had a column
by Cokie Roberts and Steven
Roberts that (stated) drinking
adds 4 feet of reaction time
where reading emails adds 36
feet and sending a text 70 feet.
What's that, 4 times 10? That's
almost 18 times more feet
from texting than drunk driv-
ing, as far as reaction time.


Lemon-fresh appliances
If I have to take my clothes,
if my washer and dryer breaks
down, to a commercial place, I
take my Lysol along and I
spray down the washer and I
spray down the dryer. And that
way if there's any germs, it
kills them all.
Peace be
with thy neighbor
This is in regards to the
"Peace be with you" in the
Sound Off column Saturday
(Sept. 21). You want peace, lady?
Let me tell you something:
Love thy neighbor. How many
times (do) you go to church
and shake hands with people
but you don't know the guy that
lives next door or the lady that
lives across the street? They
like peace also and they could
use a little help. If I were you,
keep your hands to yourself.


Seeking info
I see a commercial on TV that
ends with "Smoke-free Florida."
Does anyone know a phone
number that I can call? Please
tell me, if you do, in the paper.
Editor's note: If you're looking
for Tobacco-Free Florida, the
number is 850-245-4144.
Thanks from me
and my wheelchair
Special thanks. I want to
thank the people and vehicles
who stopped on (State Road)
44 East, Inverness, Sunday
(Sept. 15), when my wheel-
chair rolled down the hill into
two traffic lanes. I greatly ap-
preciate your being alert. The
wheelchair thanks you also.
Difficult doors at library
Why is it the restroom doors
in the library are all so difficult
to open for handicapped people?


Legalize it, regulate it
This is a call about mari-
juana. I think that the federal
government should legalize it
and regulate it and then tax it.
People can get marijuana any-
where they want to right now
and it's just all getting out of
hand. So if they legalize it and
then regulate it and tax it, then
the federal government and
we'll all be better off.
Way to go,
skeeter control
I hold Citrus Mosquito Con-
trol in high regards. I live in
Old Homosassa and they have
never failed to come when I call.
No more tears
For everybody in the state of
Florida: If you want to get your
love bugs off your car, use
baby shampoo. That is the top
notch. I tried it and it works.


COMMENTARY


W'
C I T R RU 5 Cr3 U N T Y


wCIHIkONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


?~ "1


0


The GFWC-FFWC

Woman's Club of
Inverness
Presents

The 9th Annual

ARTISAN'S BOUTIQUE

At
1715 Forest Drive Inverness, F1
Across From Whispering Pines Park

Fri. October 18 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
Sat. October 19 9 a.m. 4 p.m.

Proceeds to
proceeds to uDrawing by Chance:
benefit various Tickets $2 each, 3 for $5-
philanthropies First pnrize- $200 gas card
No strollers, Second prize $50 restaurant gift card
food or anima ls Third prize -$25 restaurant gift card
food or animals .... \s
inside

For more information call 746-2889 Cl II P.\hIIL"


West Citrus Ladies of the Elks

Annual Arts &

Crafts Show


Saturday, October 12
From 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.



For more information call
Bonnie Lee 382-0211



West Citrus Elks Lodge Q
7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., "-
Homosassa, FL 34446< '> t






CHR^NICE^ /
~ i7;,


.... ....._ .

020,00 QCas 39rabuinll

WIN $20,000 CASH !
WHILE HELPING FEED THE HUNGRY THIS CHRISTMAS
The We Care Food Pantry, Inc. Charitable Cash Drawing
Winning ticket will be drawn on
Monday, December 16th, 2013, 11:15 am
at We Care Food Pantry, Inc. 9020 W Atlas Dr, Homosassa


phone: 352-228-4921

ONLY 2,000
tickets available
and they're
going fast!


www.WeCareFoodPantry.org

$80 YOU
could
bonatio" -i
. .TICKET AO wS in
,CA ICOC s This!


1 Saturday,


Schedule
7:30am-Registration Opens
8:30am-Golfing Begins
(Shotgun Start)
Lunch after tournament in the Grille Restaurant.
Raffle
Silent Auction
Longest Drive Contest for Men & Women
Closest to the Pin Challenge
.50/50 Tickets
Call 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com for more information.

SCfHRlONLE CrCITRUS HILLS
.... VJ~Y/nGOLF&COUNWRYCLUB
Profits from this tournament will go back into Parks &
Recreation to help continue and improve our youth programs.


.'- p. ~.


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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ desser aond^K drink.^^^^^^^^^^^
Cal 76-88 Fr or Iformaion


I
P~Fk' A


Citrus County
Parks & Recreation

Presents the 1 st Annual

"Par 4 Programs"
Golf Tournament


October 12, 2013


lam


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Edit this
I was reading this, the Chron-
icle comment that you're invited
to call Sound Off; it will be ed-
ited for the length, libel, personal
and political attacks and good
taste. I would assume that takes
care of everything the editor
does not like. If he doesn't like
the name of someone, if he
doesn't like the opinion of
someone, I would assume-
and this is an assumption -
but you have printed it in the
paper, which makes it a fact
that the editor, if the editor
does not like what is being said,
he will cut it and not print it.
What a rip-off Sound Off is. I
can tell people now to not write
in, do not call in, because if
the editor does not like it, it
will not be printed.
Doesn't play nicely
I enjoyed reading the opinion
on page C2, Sunday (Sept. 22).
It brings to mind the phrase el-
ementary school teachers used
to use on report cards stating,
"Does not play well or work
well with others."
It's rough out there
This is in response to this
fireman or policeman who called
to say to tell the people to shut
up and quit complaining about
the $54 (fire tax) and complained
how he goes and fights fires
and he's in danger, he goes out
on birthdays, Christmases and
all holidays. Well, gee whiz. You
know, I don't like being inflicted
upon something that I can't
only not afford, but don't want.
All the towns voted against it.
And many other of us people
have to work on their birthdays
and we work in danger too. Many
of us work in banks, many of
us work in convenience stores
and many of us can just get
shot in a drive-by shooting.


I 4


I :.









BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BUSINESS

BRIEFS


Oil rises upwards of
$104 on Gulf storm
NEW YORK The price of
crude rose to near $104 a barrel
Friday as offshore oil rigs in the
Gulf of Mexico braced for Tropical
Storm Karen. Investors were also
keeping a watch on developments
in Washington, D.C., as the partial
shutdown of the U.S. government
entered a fourth day
Benchmark oil for November de-
livery rose 53 cents to close at
$103.84 on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. For the week oil rose 97
cents, snapping a three-week losing
streak that knocked $7.66, or 7 per-
cent, off the price of a barrel.
Drivers are already seeing relief
at the pump. The nationwide aver-
age price for a gallon of gas is now
$3.37, down 22 cents from a month
ago and 41 cents cheaper than at
this time last year
Brent, the benchmark for
crudes, gained 46 cents to $109.46
on the ICE Futures exchange in
London.

Impasse keeps world
markets in check
LONDON Uncertainty about
how long the partial shutdown of the
U.S. government will last kept in-
vestors on edge Friday, though the
prevailing view in markets is that
Congress will be able to reach a deal
to keep the world's largest economy
from defaulting on its debts.
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of
leading British shares rose 0.1 per-
cent to close at 6,453.88 while Ger-
many's DAX rose 0.3 percent to
8,622.97. The CAC40 in France
gained 0.9 percent to 4,164.25.
Earlier in Asia, Japan's Nikkei
index fell 0.9 percent to 14,024.31
while Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost
0.3 percent to 23,138.54. South
Korea's Kospi fell 0.1 percent to
1,996.98.
-From wire reports


The cost of dealing with
breast cancer for Citrus
County residents takes on
two dimensions.

Patients face direct costs
dealing with the medical side.
These begin with cancer
screening and diagnoses and
continue through treatment.
They can affect the patient,
insurance companies, public
and private health care
providers and related
nonprofit organizations.

The other cost dimension
includes all nonmedical costs
precipitated by the cancer.
This a wide range of expenses
affecting patients, their
families and social service
agencies.


Pat Faherty
Staff writer


2010 article in The
Breast, a medical
journal focusing on
the advancement of
breast cancer pre-
vention and therapy,
addressed the cost of breast
cancer It suggested there are
numerous indirect costs, which
are much more difficult to
quantify than the direct med-
ical costs.
These indirect costs can in-
clude travel and transportation
for treatment, home health
care assistance, time away


from work for the patient and
family members, career adjust-
ments, child care, special diets,
wigs, clothing, home modifica-
tions, hospice care and funeral
costs.
It can also include out-of-
pocket treatment costs and
over-the-counter medications
not covered by insurance.
Medical costs
Figures from the National
Cancer Institute project the
national cost of medical


See Page D2


US housing rebound likely


to handle spike in rates


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -When mortgage
rates began climbing in May from rock-
bottom lows, Kevin Williams worried
he might miss out on an opportunity
So he listed his home in Orange
County, Calif, and planned to buy a
bigger house in San Diego after it sold.
The process took all summer Last
week, he and his wife locked in a mort-
gage.
The extra time added at least $1,000
more a year than if they had secured a
loan in May Still, Williams believes
they made a prudent decision.
"I don't know what rates are going to
be in four years," he said. "I felt I had
to act now before I was priced out."


Williams' justification buy now or
risk paying more later is why many
brokers and analysts remain confident
that the housing recovery can handle
higher mortgage rates. While the jump
in rates should test the strength of the
recovery, analysts foresee stable sales
increases over the next year for a num-
ber of reasons.
Fall is typically a sleepy time for
sales and nationally signed contracts
are starting to decline. Yet several bro-
kers say buyer traffic remains strong
in key markets like Los Angeles, the
Washington metro area, Silicon Valley
and Boston.
Home prices have been rising at the
fastest pace since 2006, helping Ameri-
cans regain wealth they lost during the
See Page D2


THE WEEK AHEAD

* MONDAY
WASHINGTON Federal Re-
serve releases consumer credit
data for August, 3 p.m..
BRUSSELS Officials from the
U.S. and the European Union are
starting a second, weeklong negoti-
ation round on the planned free
trade agreement between the two
economic giants.
The talks in Brussels will focus
on harmonizing regulations one
of the many issues to tackle in view
of concluding a deal, possibly
within a year or so, that would
strengthen trade and boost gross
domestic product on both sides of
the Atlantic.
* TUESDAY
BERLIN Economy Ministry
releases August industrial orders
figures for Germany, Europe's
biggest economy Federal Statisti-
cal Office releases export and
import data for August.


Bruce
Williams

SSMART
MONEY





Grandkids'

education

trust ended

prematurely
EAR BRUCE: Before her
death, my mother-in-law set
up a trust for all three of her
grandchildren. She passed away in
1993. This trust was to ensure that
her grandchildren would attend
college.
When my son turned 18 years
old, he contacted the attorney who
handled the trust. The attorney in-
formed him that the executer of
the will, my mother-in-law's daugh-
ter, had the trust dissolved and
gave the monies to my son's father
(who is not in his life at all). He is
not a very nice person. According
to the attorney, the executer of the
will did this just to be away from
my son's father
Does this sound right to you?
Why would you have a trust if
someone can just come in and
change things to suit themselves?
Is there anything my son can do to
get this back? Where should we
start?
S.M., via email
DEAR S.M.: Whether or not it
was legally proper to dissolve the
trust is something to question. I as-
sume that it was. Since the money
was then given to the father to do
as he chose, the likelihood is that
the money is long gone.
I think it's a matter of the trust
not being set up appropriately It
gave your former sister-in-law
broad powers and she exercised
them using poor judgment, but
nonetheless, probably legally
See Page D2




D2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


Registered agents: It's the law


very business, large or
small, should have a
registered agent If
your business is a corpora-
tion, it's the law: Your corpo-
ration must have one
registered agents, which are
also called resident agents or
statutory agents. The name
choice varies by state. The
agent can be a person or an-
other entity, such as a corpo-
ration that will perform the
service.
All states require the identity
and location of the registered
agent to be present on various
documents that are public
record. For most states, regis-
tered agents are listed in the
Articles of Incorporation. This
law applies also to nonprofit
corporations. Their tax-exempt
status does not relieve them of
this requirement. Best advice:
If you don't have an agent, find
one and publish the name in
the correct record.

Purpose of an agent
The purpose of a registered
agent is to provide a street ad-
dress, not a post office box.
This location is where impor-
tant notices can be sent and re-
ceived. If a business is
perceived to have harmed a
person, place or another cor-
poration, the state in which the
business resides must be able
to locate a responsible person
or business organization that
may have caused harm.
A registered agent provides a
physical location where a per-
son or other organization is
available during normal busi-
ness hours to receive legal
service of process for lawsuits
and other legal notices such as
court summonses.
Agents are also the recipi-
ents of official state govern-
ment documents such as tax
notices, annual report forms,
etc.


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

EXPERIENCE
MA-rERS


An agent bears the responsi-
bility to notify the business
owner of receipt of any and all
notices. In today's complicated
business environment, it's
often difficult for an owner to
keep track of all the adminis-
trative/legal notices. This is
what agents are for

Unincorporated businesses
If a business is not incorpo-
rated, such as a sole propri-
etorship or unincorporated
partnership, there is no legal
requirement to have a regis-
tered agent.
However, in the absence of a
registered agent, a process
server will deliver a summons
or lawsuit directly to the
owner's/partners' homes.
The existence of a registered
agent eliminates this unfortu-
nate event. In many jurisdic-
tions, a process server is often
a sheriff's deputy in uniform.
An unwelcome visitor deliver-
ing a lawsuit during a family
gathering or neighborhood bar-
becue is definitely unwelcome
and awkward. It's even more
disturbing when employees are
present People who are wit-
ness to such visits may form
negative perceptions.

Penalties when no agent
exists
Not having a registered
agent can lead to the revoca-
tion of a business entity's cor-
porate status. Once corporate


standing is gone, so are the
legal protections granted to
shareholders, officers and di-
rectors of the corporation. In
many cases, large financial
penalties follow

Advantages of the third-party
agent
Third parties designated as
registered agents for a busi-
ness offer many advantages.
Here are some of the more im-
portant ones:
n Registered agents provide
a public record of legal address
of a business
n Naming a registered agent
allows the business to change
addresses in its state without
the costs of required docu-
ments.
n Business owners can travel
without worry they might miss
filing a required document on
time.
n Agents usually act as com-
pliance managers and keep the
business in good standing with
the state in which they are lo-
cated.
n When a process server de-
livers a lawsuit, it is presented
to the agent at the address of
the registered agent. Cus-
tomers and/or employees will
not witness this event. The best
location of a registered agent is
at a different address from the
business.
Ask SCORE: Citrus County's
SCORE chapter is located on
the campus of the College of
Central Florida. Office hours at
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday to
Thursday During non-business
hours, call 352-249-1236. Please
leave information as to how we
can reach you.

Dr FrederickJ. Herzog,
PhD LLC is the immediate
past president/chairman of
Citrus County SCORE. He can
be reached atTherzog@
tampabay.rrcom.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

Whether you can bring ac-
tion against her for an im-
proper or unwise decision is
another matter
You should inquire of the
attorney exactly why she was
allowed to close out the trust
and give the monies as she
did to your former husband.
If that was legally appropri-
ate, I would put it behind me
and get on with my life.
DEAR BRUCE: I want to
purchase a new car, but I am
confused about who to pur-
chase it from. I see all the
commercials offering cash
back, gas cards, low interest
rates, etc. How do I choose
which company to buy from?
I will be financing.
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: You ask
an interesting question and
one that has no simple an-
swer You see all the commer-
cials offering cash back, etc.,
but depend on one thing:
They are all going to make
money on the transaction
with you.
In more cases than not ac-
cepting the lower or no inter-
est for the entire length of the
loan is the best choice, but



SPIKE
Continued from Page Dl

housing crisis. Many would-be
sellers have been waiting out
the downturn and could put
their houses on the market in
the next year That should ease
supply constraints, one of the
biggest obstacles for sales over
the past year
Financing a home is still
more affordable than in
decades past. The average
rate on a 30-year mortgage re-
mains a bargain at below 5


BUSINESS


CANCER
Continued from Page Dl

expenditures for breast cancer are pro-
jected to reach at least $20.5 billion
(2010 dollars) by the year 2020. Breast
cancer has the highest future cost pro-
jection of the 17 cancer categories
rated.
For 2010, medical costs associated
with breast cancer were projected at
$16.5 billion, about 13 percent of total
cancer medical costs.
"The rising costs of cancer care illus-
trate how important it is for us to ad-
vance the science of cancer prevention
and treatment to ensure that we're
using the most effective approaches,"
said Robert Croyle, National Cancer In-
stitute NCI), when the figures were re-
leased. "This is especially important for
elderly cancer patients with other com-
plex health problems."
The cost of cancer care is ranked by
phases with continuing care being the
most expensive, followed by the initial
stage of treatment. Numerous annual
care cost estimates have been done


using NCI data Medicare figures and
health insurance claims.
Health care costs in women with
metastatic breast cancer receiving
chemotherapy as their principal treat-
ment averaged $128,556, according to a
report in BMC Cancer 2011 based on
health insurance data.
Using NCI data, the estimated annual
cost would be $19 million in Citrus
County for 2006 to 2010.
Outpatient services accounted for 29
percent of total breast cancer patient
costs, followed by medication other than
chemotherapy, (26 percent), chemother-
apy (25 percent), and inpatient care,
(20 percent).

Indirect costs

In addition to the medical costs such
screening, prescriptions and
hospital/doctor visits, breast cancer pa-
tients and their families face an array of
related, often unexpected costs.
There are indirect costs with all can-
cers, but more so with breast cancer, ac-
cording to Russell Silverman with the
Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. He
said insurance may not pay for a double


prosthesis, and the cost of clothing and
maintaining an appearance can become
an ongoing issue.
He also cited transportation costs, es-
pecially in a rural area like Citrus
County, if patents have to travel regu-
larly to Tampa or Gainesville.
Under financial guidance for patients
in treatment, the American Cancer So-
ciety includes expenses for babysitting,
cooking, cleaning and professional fees
such lawyers and financial planners.
The society recommends developing
an overall financial plan to cover med-
ical costs and other expenses.
According to the above mentioned ar-
ticle in The Breast, these indirect costs
are more difficult to quantify As a re-
sult the true cost of breast cancer as a
topic is often avoided.
The NIH concurs that out-of-pocket
costs are rarely considered but can
present a significant burden.
Nonmedical direct out-of-pocket
costs ranged from $137 to $174 per
month in the year post-diagnosis; and
$200-$509 per month one year or more
after diagnosis, according to a review in
2011.
Researchers found that to meet these


costs; and families often make sacri-
fices in the form of abandoning, chang-
ing, or cutting back projects or other
activities of family members, using sav-
ings and retirement funds, with possible
tax penalties or selling off assets.
Other indirect costs are related to the
side effects of treatment and inability to
resume previous parenting duties,
workload or other activities. Silverman
said that is especially true after radia-
tion or chemotherapy
Tara Anderson, manager of patient
access for Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem, said they provide screening and
application assistance for Medicaid eli-
gibility, the disability process and
hospital-based charity care.
They can also provide information to
patients regarding options for assis-
tance from various groups/organizations
and/or programs throughout the county
She said they are trying to refer pa-
tients to the appropriate resources that
may be available to assist them with
their needs.

Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


chronicleonline.com

your news. anywhere, anytime.


a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


unless you take a close look
at all the different offers
being made, you will never
know if you are getting the
best possible deal.
DEAR BRUCE: Is it possi-
ble to transfer funds from one
money market fund to an-
other without paying tax on
that amount? I should tell
you it is a traditional IRA.
-R.A., via email
DEAR RA: We are making
a couple of assumptions here.
If the money is in a money
market account and it's al-
ready in an IRA, which is pro-
tected until such time as
money is withdrawn, I am cer-
tain you can have it trans-
ferred from one money market
account to another Unless it's
a huge amount of money in
which case there would be a
minor amount of tax.
I am also assuming you are
having a broker handle the
transfer Be certain to ex-
plain to him your concerns on
tax matters and ask what the
best way is to accomplish the
transfer

Send questions to
brnuce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions ofgeneral interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


percent, and many buyers
sense it won't stay that low
for long.
There's also pent-up de-
mand. A growing number of
people are moving out from
group homes or with relatives
to form their own house-
holds, according to U.S. Cen-
sus data. Sales typically
increase when households
grow
"It's the demographics that
make a strong housing recov-
ery pretty much a sure thing,"
said Patrick Newport, a hous-
ing economist at HIS Global
Insight.









D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber events
& member news
Oct. 7 The Citrus County Water
and Wastewater Authority will meet
on Monday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. in the
Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166,
Lecanto. Agenda items for discussion
at this meeting include considera-
tion of a preliminary order of the
Water and Wastewater Authority
recommending that the board
grant issue of water utility fran-
chise for Pinewood Water System.
Oct. 8 Arbor Trail Rehab will
host a blood drive with LifeSouth-
Communtiy Blood Centers, 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. at 611 Turner Camp
Road, Inverness.
Oct. 10 and Oct. 22 Free workshop
to discover sources of landscape
pollution and fertilizer-application
dos and don't. Also learn creative
options for reducing runoff and in-
creasing natural filtration, such as
rain gardens, bio-swales, rain barrels
and shaping topography. 2 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. at the Citrus County Ex-
tension Building, 3650 W. Sover-
eign Path in Lecanto. To register
for this event call Steven Davis at
352-527-5708.
Oct. 11 Florida Artists Gallery
Second Friday Dinner and Lecture
Series Myrna Bradshaw pres-
ents "A Photographic Journey
through Glacier Bay National
Park," 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Historic
Knight House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City. Call 352-344-9300 for
reservations.
Oct. 12 Diva Night presented by
the Citrus County Chronicle, 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. at the Plantation Inn of
Crystal River. More information at
www.chronicleonline.com/divanight/
Oct. 12 Scarecrow Festival at
the Shoppes of Heritage Village. 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. with an old-fash-
ioned children's style carnival with
games, pony rides, hayrides,
pumpkin patch and more. Located
at 657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
Call 352-564-1400.
Oct. 12 Citrus County Parks and
Recreation present the inaugural
Par 4 Programs Golf Tournament,
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club,
7:30 a.m. visit www.citruscounty-
parks.com or call 352-527-7540.
Oct. 12 Vessel Safety Check pro-
vided by the Crystal River Power
Squadron (CRSPS), free event is 8
a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Fort Island
Trail Boat Ramp. 352-795-4412.
Oct. 15 Affordable Housing Advi-
sory Committee to meet at 5 p.m.
in the Lecanto Government Build-
ing to discuss Hardest Hit, SHIR
CDBG, NSP 1 & 3, Section 8, Shel-
ter Plus Care, and Emergency Solu-
tions Grant, among other items.
Oct. 15 United Way volunteer
site training from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Oct. 18 Fly Fishing Expo at the
Plantation on Crystal River, featuring
Chico Fernandez and Flip Pallot.
$10 for both days (kids under 16
free). Clinics and workshops with
I FFF-certified instructors; fly tying
demos and workshops; daily free
programs and seminars w/national
fly fishing experts; raffles, silent
auctions and live auctions. Call
352-795-1605 for more information.
Oct. 19 Village Crier Shop Local
Expo, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at College
of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Oct. 19 Bird Walk on Pepper
Creek Trail, participants meet at
7:45 a.m. at the entrance of the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park Visitor's Center.
Binoculars and field guides are rec-
ommended; free event. To register,
call 352-628-5343 ext. 1002.
Oct. 19- America's Boating
Course provided by the Crystal
River Power Squadron, 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. at 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal
River; call 3652-795-4412
Oct. 19 Halloween Scramble for
Hospice, golf and prizes, starts at
12 p.m., Citrus Hills Golf Club 509
E. Hartford Street, Hernando. Call
352-527-2020.
Oct. 22 2013 Small Business
Resource Fair, a one-stop shop re-
source fair providing technical, fi-
nancial, procurement, networking
and other business support services
at Southeastern Livestock Pavillion
Auditorium, 2232 N.E. Jacksonville
Road, Ocala. Register online at
sbdc.unf.edu or call 352-622-8763
Oct. 24-26 Crazy on Country Fall
Festival at Rock Crusher Canyon RV
Park, 237 S. Rock Crusher Road,
Crystal River. Doors open at 5 p.m.
Proceeds benefit Save Crystal
River. Call 352-564-9350 or visit
CrazyonCountry.com.


Dragon Boat Festival issues call for teams


The inaugural Lake Hemrnando Dragon
Boat Race is set for Saturday, Nov.
16 at the Lake Hernando Park, 3699 E.
Orange Drive, Hernando. Each team
that registers will race a minimum of
three times per day. Corporate teams
will be on a 3oo00-meter course and the
Club teams will be racing on 100-, 300-
and 500-meter courses. Eligible teams
may enter into race the 2,000-meter
"around the island" course. Registration
is open through Nov. 8 by calling 813-
426-3544.


Lake
a Hernando g

Dragon Boat Festival
Your team's registration includes one
practice. All of the necessary equipment
will be supplied to your team, including a
boat, life vests, paddles and a steersperson/
coach. Your team must supply the pad-
dlers (at least eight paddlers must be


women) and the drummer (drummer
need not be present at the practice).
Practices will be scheduled in the week
leading up to the event. Registration and
payment must be completed to be eligi-
ble to schedule your team's practice.
Cost for a club or community team is
$500; cost for a corporate team is
$1,000.
For more information or to register,
call 813-426-3544, email christine@
highfivedragonboats.com or visit
www.lakehernandodragonboat.com.


Hydrocephalus Foundation celebrates ribbon-cutting


Chamber ambassadors Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Cit-
rus County; and Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union, join the Economic Develop-
ment Council's Ardath Prendergast in welcoming the Hydrocephalus
Foundation's Reyna Bell, Manuel A. Cacdac, M.D., and Fe Cacdac, M.D.


352-682-8523
HydrocephalusFoundation.org.ph
The Hydrocephalus Foundation provides medical attention
and financial to support to children with this condition.


Member Spotlight: Crystal River Power Squadron
giuiS ._ 'm An TI' u A 845 N.E Third Ave., Crystal River / www.usps.org/localusps/crystalriver / 352-212-3946
The Crystal River Power Squadron has been serving the Crystal River boating community
since 1963. Its mission is to educate to increase boating safety. The Squadron has taught
hundreds of students over the years with various courses on seamanship, piloting, celestial
navigation and weather. The members provide free vessel safety checks to ensure proper
safety equipment. The Squadron is also active in the Adopt-a-Shore program, Water Cleanup
Week, Safe Boating Week, the annual Blessing of the Fleet and many more boating ac-
tivities. The public is encouraged to participate in any events hosted by the Squadron.


Is your

business

looking

for talent?
W workforce Connection
is hosting its annual
fall job fair Wednesday,
Nov. 6, and is accepting
business participants who
are recruiting employees
in Citrus County. Busi-
nesses interested in par-
ticipating in this annual
job fair should call 352-
637-2223 ext. 3206 or
ext. 1270. It will be held at
the College of Central
Florida, Lecanto campus'
Learning and Conference
Center, 3800 S. Lecanto
Hwy, Lecanto. Workforce
ConnectionFL.com for
more information.


Ambassadors on hand for Crystal
River Metal Recycling ribbon-cutting


Crystal River Metal Recycling 1 4320 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461 I
352-527-9599 I Crystal River Metal Recycling is a full-service metal recycling firm
offering container services.


Chamber ambas-
sadors Rhonda
Lestinsky, Nature
Coast Bank;
Dennis Pfeiffer,
Orkin Pest Control;
Tom Corcoran,
Life Care Centers
of Citrus County;
Mike Buchanan,
Excel Printing;
Lisa Nash, FDS
Disposal; Jim
Ferrara, Insight
Credit Union; and
Betty Murphy,
Citrus Archives
and Computers,
welcome Joseph
Hambsch, Eric
Hambsch, Mark
Jones, Rob
Negron, Gayle
Jones, Matt
Thomas and
Robert Hall.


A Ceb.,ieoi ofJLife
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MAMEs- 620-2aMoNENWNI 62w-3663 1M ow .R"- 628-2"9
NiEIMPSW$Ok T- 620-2474 S suGM$$ WAMF(OMT- 503-2007
$PELAQCAD McA MOON PATES $ AILAUS
WW.NWT(VECOASMEWrfENrS.CO


Mon., October 21, 2013
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Tidi S 20 par Pri on Far btct*w gr mmI ngo, coimt UlMa Csnlar at( i = 40-4434
ALL PROCEEO3 WILL BENEFIT TE COCORAN FAMILY


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


INTERNATIONAL ETHNIC

FESTIVAL
FUN FOOD & MUSIC ON THE
HOMOSASSA RIVER


AWWNIC FOWO
ENWTMA WINr
ENJOY 7 BEST IN
INTERNAONAi. FLAVORS AND
SONcDS.


owsMe2a3- sEr29


I"ITO llltll,~ M




D4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax: S ( ) 5 1 le 0 88 85-24 1 a s 0d 0 0m I0ile lem


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111






FORD
2007 Explorer Sport
Trac XLT, Blue, bge
Ithr. int, tow pack, 68K
miles, just serv, $15,900
obo (352) 897-4204


HONDA
'05, Goldwing, 59k mi,
very clean, always
garaged. $10,550.
352-344-5177


StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178






BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Lawn Tractors &
Metals, 352-270-4087


$$ CASH PAID $$
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
352-634-5389



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-it
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



19" Sanyo TV
w/seperate VHS
Player, like new
Floral City area, pick
up 352-344-5255
Free Kittens
Calico, Gray, and
Gray Tabby
8 wks old, litter trained
352-212-0667
Lots of Free Wood
in Kindling
Must be picked up by
Friday or Sunday
Call (352) 436-5166
t 01


Black/White Great
Dane Puppy
male, lost in the
vicinity of Citrus
Springs. children pet
REWARD
(352) 897-4642
or 352-396-7458
Female Husky &
German Shepherd,
med size. Lost in Citrus
Springs 10/3
(352) 586-5559
LOST Beagle North
Lee Street Beverly Hills
MaleTri Colored, 40 Ibs,
very sweet. Lost 9/8/13
This is a special needs
pet. Please call if you
have seen him. Please
if you have information
call 352-249-3107.
Lost
Rottweiler
in Green Acres Area
(352) 464-0871


Adult Siamese
Male Cat
Grey, yellow eyes
Old Beverly Hills,
appears desperate
for home.
(352) 746-1904
Found Young Female
Blue point Siamese
Kitten, off Oaklawn,
In Homosassa
(352) 628-6695
Male Choc Brown
Dobie Mix, speckled
feet. Found in Floral
City 9/29 on Old Jones
Rd off of Stage Coach
(352) 637-0736



Special Occasion?
Weddings, memorials,
card clubs, banquets.
If you need space-
Hernando VFW can
seat 100+ Call Dan
(352) 726-3339


-fI.^


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690
344-5555, ext 101
Lie #AL10580


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct $5.001b.
Stone CrabS$6.00lb
delivered352-897-5001



NEED 60K INVESTOR
LOAN 6% SECURED
BY 200K PROPERTY
INTERSET ONLY
352-528-2950 J/D
Ride Needed to
Doctors Appointments
Etectera
(352) 527-2852




HAIR STYLIST
Full time /Part time
Call Sue
352-628-0630
to apply in person










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


FIT MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Need motivated,
detail oriented
team player for a
busy medical office.
medical experience
required. Knowl-
edge of scripts
helpful. Competitive
wages & Benefits.
Email resume to:
lecantojobapps@
yahoo.com

FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Exp a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@rswan-
sondental.com

HIRING:
RN, Psych RN,
LPN, Phys. Ther.
Florida Homecare
Specialist
Call (352) 794-6097
For an interview.


Medical Assist.
front and back

Fax Resume to:
352-465-3733

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN/LPN Nursing
Join our team.
FT 3-11 Exc. Benefits
Applv
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL
Or send to: atdon@
southernLTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer
M/F/V/D


Chronicle ''. "' ".: '. -


Classifieds !






& Online / ,
1, j 1:,a uf T.I
^i"' l/,I
Online,,.I


"! / C 1 U O M ,





CII .I..ECliPo,.lC .L'.;







(352)563.5966 ,


PT Certified
Dental Assistant
Call 352-746-0330
Ask for Vicki

RN/PRN
Endoscopy ASC,
Weekdays
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2961

SURGICAL TECH
for ASC located in
Citrus County.
Must be certified
or eligible. Flexible
scheduling excel-
lent pay. FULL OR
POOL POSITIONS. No
weekends or call.
Fax Resume to:
352-527-1827



E 101 E^
PoCOLsEGEion

CENTRAL
FLORIDA
an equal opportunity
college-
College of
Central Florida
Director of
Grants Funding
To oversee the
College's grant de-
velopment and
grants manage-
ment programs from
development of
project concepts
through formal ap-
plication, project
start-up and prog-
ress reporting to
project close-out.
Bachelor's degree
required; Master
Degree preferred.
Four years of suc-
cessful experience
in grants develop-
ment and manage-
ment required.
Grants Administra-
tion preferred. Close
date is 10/14/13.
Please submit a
copy of transcripts
indicating the de-
gree conferred with
the electronic appli-
cation. Education
must be from a re-
gionally accredited
institution.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of tran-
scripts to hr@CF.edu
or fax to
352-873-5885.
3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer

ATTENTION
Looking for
Representatives
To assist Medicare
Recipients
w/ enrolling For
Medicare Part D,
Medicare Advan-
tage Programs
& Medicare
Supplements/
Will be placed
In Local Pharmacies
to Assist w/these
programs
No exp. Necessary
Will provide Training
Call 352-726-7722

CDS
The following
position is available
in Citrus County.
Healthy Families
of Florida
Support Worker
Requirements:
High School
Diploma and one
year experience
working with
children or families
ApIply WWW.
DiscoverCDS. org
EOE/AA/DFWP

REAL ESTATE
AGENT
For Property
Management
FAX: Resume to
352-795-1667
CALL: 352-302-8088
email: action.rental
@yahoo.com
walk-ins are
welcome
Action Rental
Management Realty




BARTENDER

Applv In Person
THE DAM PUB
7p-9p, Mon.-Frl




Sales Person

local manufacturer
looking for a moti-
vated, retired sales
person to work on
commission only
sales. 20% on gross
sales, avg sale over
2k, email resume
to: trina@SRproducts
inc.com


Motivated
Salesperson
Some Sales Exp.
Preferred- please
Call Advanced
Aluminum
at (352) 628-7519

TELEMARKETERS
Exp. Only. Write your
own Paycheck, Call
Brandon 503-6807




AC SERVICE
TECH/INSTALLERS
Top Pay, Benefits,
Sign on bonus.
40+ Hrs. must have
EPA Cert. & DrI. Lic.
Call (352) 628-5700

Cabinet Installer
Helper
Apply in Person
780 N Enterprise Pt
Lecanto
352-746-0020
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
LAMINATOR
Experienced in
Mica/Wood Veneers
No tobacco prod-
ucts, Val. Fl. Dr. Lic
Apply at Built-Rite,
438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis,

Now Hiring:
OTR Class A CDL
Drivers

New Pay Package
and $1500 Sign -On
Bonus! Mostly 5-10
days out. Call today
for details
1-888-378-9691 or
www.hevl.net

PROGRAM
ASSISTANT
Announcement
# 13-55
Responsible work
determining eligibil-
ity for energy
and/or housing
assistance under
federal, state and
local programs.
Some experience
in social service
intake, interviewing
and/or counseling.
Must successfully
pass a level II
background check.
Starting pay
$11.09 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, October 11,
2013 EOE/ADA.

STEEL CUTTER I
WELDER

Inter County
Recycling in Lecanto,
Fl. is looking for an
experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Exp. also. Full time,
Pays $13.50 per hour.
Drug Free Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume1801@
yahoo.com,
No walk-in's or
phone calls




Driver/
Warehouse
Immediate hire,
delivery/warehouse.
7:30am-3pm week-
days. Clean driving
record only.
Golden X. 726-9349

FLOOR
TECHNICIAN
Now accepting
applications for a
full-time Floor Tech-
nician. Must have
experience with use
of machinery for
buffing, stripping,
waxing, etc of all
types of flooring.
Apply in person at:
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
Email Resume:
AIHROCSoulhemLTC.com
Fax resume:
352-637-1921
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

Housekeepering/
Locker Room
Attendant and
Laundry Person
PT or FT
For Upscale Golf
& Country Club,
Male or Female
Apply in Person
@2125W. Skyview
Crossing Hernando


THE TOWN OF
INGLIS
is now accepting
applications for a 40
hour Maintenance II
position in the Public
Works Department.
All Applicants must
have a High School
Diploma or G.E.D.
Equivalent, a valid Fl
Driver's license with
a Class A CDL En-
dorsement, (3) years
related work experi-
ence in Plumbing,
Electrical (building)
and Building
Maintenance.
Applications will be
accepted until
Friday October Ith,
2013 at 12:00 Noon
and may be picked
up at the Inglis Town
Hall 135 Hwy 40
West, Inglis, Florida.
Monday Friday
8:00 A.M to 12:00
P.M./ 1:00 P.M.-5:00
P.M. E.O.E.
Military Preference:
Veteran's are en-
couraged to apply

THE TOWN OF
INGLIS
is now accepting
applications for a 40
hour Maintenance II
position in the Public
Works Department.
All Applicants must
have a High School
Diploma or G.E.D.
Equivalent, a valid Fl
Driver's license with
a Class A CDL En-
dorsement, (3) years
related work experi-
ence in Landscap-
ing, Mowing and
Mower Mainte-
nance, Ground
Care, Trash Pick-up
& Power Washing.
All Applications will
be accepted until
Friday October Ith,
2013 at 12:00 Noon
and may be picked
up at the Inglis Town
Hall 135 Hwy 40
West, Inglis, Florida.
Monday Friday
8:00 A.M to 12:00
P.M./ 1:00 P.M.-5:00
P.M. E.O.E.
Military Preference:
Veteran's are en-
couraged to apply

Warehouse/
Counter Pos.
FT position. Counter
sales & warehouse
stocking. Plumbing &
comp knowledge a +.
401K& Insurance
Apply in person @:
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Crystal River/ or email
mbscr@hotmail.com




BABY SITTER
For School pickup
and drop off only.
$75 Week
Call (352) 270-5441

PIT Truck
DriverlHelper
Moving Experience
Heavy Lifting,
Neat appearance
(352)522-0945

PART TIME
LIFEGUARD
Announcement
# 13-56
Part time position
(25 hours weekly).
Skilled duties life-
guarding at Bicen-
tennial Park Pool
and Central Ridge
Pool. May guard
for swim lessons,
birthday parties
and special events.
WE WILL NOT TRAIN:
Must possess and
maintain current
Red Cross Lifeguard,
First Aid and
CPR/AED for the
Professional Rescuer
certifications. Must
possess a valid Flor-
ida Driver License.
Flexible schedule.
$10.29 hourly.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online.
This position is open
until filled. EOE/ADA.




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
866-314-3769


MEDICAL OF-
FICE TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547



ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



Solar Pool Cover
2 pieces, 10x37 with
expand reel to 16ft.
Very good cond. $150
obo(352) 746-7036



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER Whirlpool Dryer
about 12 years old
100.00 352-302-8925
Duet Washer & Dryer
Fridgidare, include
pedestals color light
blue, give away.
$700.
(352) 270-4571
JUICE EXTRACTOR
CUISINART Unused
powerful 10 watts/runs
quiet Only $99.
352-621-0175
KITCHENAID STAND
MIXER Kitchenaid Arti-
san mixer white used
twice ex cond $100.00
352-249-7212
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
STOVE FLAT TOP
HOTPOINT
BISQUE COLOR,
GOOD CONDITION
$100.00 352-422-3118
Used Maytag Washer
& GE Dryer
$75. for Both
(352) 382-1830
Washer & Dryer,
Kenmore,
large capacity
good shape
$200.
432-640-9195
Whirlpool Washing
Machine about about
12 years old. 100.00
352-302-8925








DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOTY
Thursday 10-3-13
Estate Auction
Outside 3pm
Patio & home
furniture, Generator,
Lawn tractor, SS Grill
set, Tools, house-
hold, new items
Sunday 10-6-13
Antique & Collecti-
bles, 1pm Listed art.
Sterling, Estate
jewelry, Coins, Gold
label Barbie's, Mili-
tary items, pocket
watches, primitives,
Cherry & Maple
furniture, crocks,
WONDERFUL Items!
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auctlon
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auctlon.com
10%BPAu2267



Generator, Coleman
Power mate 5000,
Never used,
Only Test run
$300.
(352) 746-0100


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


-t
._.f,,


HowDo






Youl






YourDay




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 D5


Power Boss Generator
Briggs & straton 10HP
eng. Running watfts
5250, starting watts
7350 excel, cond.
Starts easily. $275.
(908) 616-0620
Homosassa



CASSETTE DECK
Double Deck Cassette
Player with Remote
$40.00 352-746-5421
KARAOKE MACHINE
WITH CD PLAYER
$90
352-613-0529
SANYO 20" TV Great
picture and sound
quality Excellent
condition. $35.
352-621-0175
TELEVISION
RCA 52in Console,
Exc Condition $50
(352) 897-4681



100 AMP BOX 100 Amp
Box NEW in box.
$65.00 352-249-7212
GARAGE DOOR 7/16
ft. with Geniepro motor.
Door and motor are 12
years old. 500.00
352-302-8925
SHOPLIGHT great
shape with 11 good T40
flourescant bulbs ($10)
352-212-1596



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP 15.4", LAPTOP
DVD writer, $180
DELL DESK TOP
P4, HT Lcd monitor,
DVD + RW $150
352-628-6806
PLAYER RECORDER
DVD and Video
with remote $30.00
352-628-4210
VIDEO CASSETTE
PLAYER AC/DC for
RV.2way power.
Symphonic.$50
352-746-4160


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




ASSISTED LIVING
Private Room & Bath
Starting at $1,690.
344-5555, ext 101
Lie #AL10580
Help
Wanted,,,,,experienced
CNA's please call
352-560-7876
Transportation for appt
Shopping & Errands.
Will stay with you or
help do errands. Ref.
/Ins. (352) 613-0078




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Paios-Sidewlk
Podol deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


2 Patio Lounge Chairs
& Cushions
$25. ea
Glass toptable &
2 chair $50
(352) 621-0778


Fumiture

I Full Size Bed
w/ Mattress, spring,
head/foot board $75
Patio Table, Nice, new
$75 No calls before
11am (352) 628-4766
2 Recliners,
good cond.
$100
Call 352-697-2195
3 RATTAN BAR
STOOLS Beautiful rat-
tan back and seat with
metal legs.$75 for all.
Crystal River 2284648
4 white book cases
on wheels $150.
2 red V shaped tables
from daycare $50.
(352) 795-7254
8 Wrought iron chairs
& formica top table,
46x76. Excellent
condition, $125
Call 352-697-2195
74" Wicker Sofa with
flower design, mauve,
green & beige,
matching 48" oval
coffee table, & 24"
round end tbl. w/ glass
tops $300. 228-4279
BARSTOOL solid wood,
tall, spinning, great
shape, ($10)
352-613-7493
Brand New
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set
$150.
Still in original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
Breakfast Table $100
w/ benches, unique
top inlaid w/tile,
Wooden Rocker $50.
From Cracker Barrell
(352) 628-3100
Cherry Pub Style
Dining Room Set
glass top, 4 chairs
$200. obo
(352) 503-9043


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)5374144


Electrical

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352 422-7279 k*k
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

Lelkc
BILL TRIPP FENCE
All Types of Fence
Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096
(352) 425-4365




FALL SPECIAL
Seasoned 4x8 stack.
Delivered & Stacked
$70 (352) 637-6641




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


LAwn Sprinkler

Not Workin9?

We'l/ Fix It




$1 Orrt~fffI wita


I-EST

746-4451 4-




Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
W or pool or plan
something
^,"k 1' t completely new!
~ Often Inirared.
--' rd neveruplicaed"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COrrS
POOL AND PAVER LLC
& is 352-400-3188


CHINA CABINET Great
Cond.2 glass doors 3
drawers 2 cabinets.
$90.00 Firm
352-302-7214
COFFEE TABLE Solid
oak measures 25"w X
40" long with 2 doors for
storage. $100
352-382-4727
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill,
Table 4 padded
chairs, black lacquer
w/ side table
MUST SEE $250.
(352) 465-2237
Dinette Table
42" 8 sided w/12" leaf
4 chairs, padded,
on wheels. $175.
(352) 746-9076
Dinning Room Set
$200. obo
Server $150. obo
Both Dark wood
Excellent condition
352-586-3380
END TABLES 2 match-
ing wicker end tables,
coffee table $45.00
352-628-7449
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
WHITE WASH WOOD
60 x 49
$100.00 352422-3118
KITCHEN SET
4 padded chairs on
casters. Glass top,
white base. $200
(352) 465-2237
LOVE SEAT Real
Leather, not Bonded
Black Leather Love
Seat $100.00
352-746-5421
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING QUEEN
WITH FRAME
$50.00 352422-3118
Settee, 46"W hard-
wood w/ pecan finish
$50. 1 Counter Stool,
chrome, swivel seat
w/ back $25.
(352) 564-9336
Wicker Patio Set
2 chairs, cushions,
ottoman & glass top
table $175. obo
Leather wing back
chair burgundy $175.
obo, Excel. cond.
352-586-3380


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V 'RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
M & W INTERIORS
Your Dry Wall & Home
Handyman, Slick finish
expert, popcorn removal
water & termite damage
(352)537-4144
Mr & Mrs FIX IT
(For Seniors) LIC& INS
Home&Yard/ln&Out
Low Senior $ 613-2643
Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Comfort Works, Inc.
Air Conditioning and
Heating Service
Res//Com352 400-8361
Mention this ad and
get a service call for
$19. Exp 9/30/13
Lic# CAC1817447



Ann's
Cleaning Service
352-601-3174
CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
Call 352-476-3820


Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-345-9329


AAA ROOFING
Call the akh6uswetv
Free Written Estimate

$10 0 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 n-- -G


Kat's.Kritter Kare
& Kastle Kleaner
Relax while you're away knowing your pets
are OK at home safe in their own beds
All Kritters Big or Small
I/^-~S. Kathleen M. Dacey 7

(352)
P 2704672
BONDED & INStURED Training Available
katsklritterkare@yahoo.com


SQUARE GLASS
TOP/METAL BASE
COFFEE TABLE Was
$800. Sell for $75
Crystal River 228-4648



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
LAWN MOWER
Craftman Push Mower
$75.00 352-422-3118
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE
$20 352-613-0529
TROY BUILT
Riding Mower
42 inch cut $475
(352) 897-4681
Will haul away
unwanted riding lawn
mowers for FREE in In-
verness area. 726-7362








DUDLEY'S


Thursday 10-3-13
Estate Auction
Outside 3pm
Patio & home
furniture, Generator,
Lawn tractor, SS Grill
set, Tools, house-
hold, new items
Sunday 10-6-13
Antique & Collecti-
bles, 1 pm Listed art,
Sterling, Estate
jewelry, Coins, Gold
label Barbie's, Mili-
tary items, pocket
watches, primitives,
Cherry & Maple
furniture, crocks,
WONDERFUL Items!
Call or web
for Into
Dudley's Auction
352-637-9588
www.dudleys
auction.com
10%BP Au2267
MARTINS ESTATE SALES
Buv'n Quality Furniture
From Non Smoking
Homes. 352-209-4945


Blffpll

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards



Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic. 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570



PIANO LESSONS


-, I
Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131


A Faux Line, LLC
Paint, pres-wash, stains
20yrs exp, Cust. Satis-
faction Lic/Ins 247-5971


I DON'T LET YOUR I


DRYER START
A FIRE'!a
4, Fla1 Rale -No$
D Hidden CoIl






* S 5 -4D -. T


^#~flete


ESTIMATE!
* Tree trimming/removal
* Stump grinding
* 55' Bucket Truck


Licensed & Insured


BOOTS ladies size 7
tan work like, size 7 1/2
black dress, nice, ($10)
352-613-7493
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4
pants 8 shirts & 2
lightweight jackets
$45 352-613-0529
CONCERT SHIRT new
Taylor Swift, Red tour
with wristband, ($10)
352-613-7493
GENUINE LEATHER
JACKET Beige,fur
collarsize 42.Waist
length.Like new.$50
352-7464160
Girls winter clothing 4
jeans 1 pants 5 shirts
2 pajama sets & 2
hoodies sizes vary $60
352-613-0529
JEANS embroidered,
size 10 ladies,1 roses, 1
daises,new, both for
($20) 352-613-7493
MOTHER OF THE
BRIDE DRESS WITH
JACKET Designer la-
bel; Floor-length; navy
blue with swarovski
crystals; Originally
$1200; worn once,
mint condition. Size
20/22. $600
352-4654860




4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes &
wheel locks, folds for
storage, Ex. $45.
352-628-0033
6 FT. DAVIDSON ALU-
MINUM STEP LAD-
DER- model 527-06,
Excellent condition, $30.
352-628-0033
20 Chairs for Daycare
$80.00
Baby Accessories
$120.00
(352) 795-7254
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGE FOR ME-
DIUM BIRD 18x18x36H.
Sits on stand. $45.00
Located in Floral City.
Call 239 404 8589


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


John's Painting
& Wallpapering
Lic/Ins. FreeEst.
*352-201-9568"*
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



Bay Leak Detection
for all Pools & Spa's
Lic#G13000070891
Ins. 352-433-6070


Cleaningi^
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Lawncare N More
Friendly Family
Services for over 21
yrs. 352-726-9570




CHISELED PER-
SONAL TRAINING!
Want to get in
shape. Don't know
how? MONEY BACK
GUARANTEE!
Call, or find us on
Facebook!
(352)469-6110
facebook.com/Chisele
dPersonalTraining


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713








Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441






ii







Home Maintenance
Repairs/Painting/Power
Washing, Quality work
at affordable prices
Ref avail 573-723-2881



Pressure Washing,
Painting, Lawn Mainte-
nance and Mobile
Repair. Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748





STERLING
Renovation/Remodel
Kit/Ba/RE listings
Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710
Sterling 352-220-3844


KNOCK OUT
CLEANING SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP
F" Licensed, Insured,
) Workers Comp.
W .Pressure
Washing Too

^^352.942.6876

S Coall Today for a
..... Clean Tomorrow


SxeXnoormmfoicy
ROOFING

SQuality Honesty Reasonable Prices


www.eliteroofing-inc.com
713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 639-1024
S LICENSED & INSURED


WORKMATE 425- folds
for storage, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
CHARCOAL GRILL
18.5" ON WHEELS
WITH COVER $20
352-613-0529
CHILDREN HALLOW-
EEN COSTUMES 1
CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1
LION size 5/6 $8 each
352-613-0529
Craft Items
$300 value for $150.
assorted 352-746-4613
DOG CRATES BLACK
WIRE (2) 24"L 18"W
20"H Excellent $20. ea
352-621-0175
DOG KENNEL SOFT
SIDE up to 70# pet
Folds flat & Washable
Excellent $15.
352-621-0175
DOG PET STEPS
Plastic with white
fleece cover. Collapsi-
ble Small/med pet $18.
352-621-0175
DOMINOES nice com-
plete professional set
with case, ($5)
352-613-7493
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
Fresh 15ct @ $5.001b.
Stone Crab@$6.001b
delivered352-897-5001
Masterbuilt Smoker,
new in box, never
used. $250 firm
3 Burner Charcoil Broil
Grill, SS top, w/side
burner & tank $85
(352) 897-4681
Nu Wave Cook Top
As seen on TV. BOGO
Still in box $50
25 Gal. Upright
Compressor $60
(352) 621-0176
Pair Wooden Shutters
with Moveable Slats 23
x 18 $50.00 Ex. Cond't.
352-746-5421
PICTURE FRAMES
large nice 3 wood,
1 metal, ($5)
352-613-7493
QUEEN COMFORTER
w/shams,skrt,3-38"X81'drapes;
60'valanc,;2 pil-
lows; dark red print. $50
352-382-4727
RECORDER Pansonic
Camcorder with Case
$100.00
352-746-5421


ELITE ROOFING
Excellence in Roofing!
EliteRoofina- Inc.comn
Lic# Ccc1l327656/Ins.
-352-639-1024**





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.

NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


SCOOTER, DESTIN,
150CC With windshield
and two helmets, 2700
miles. Garage kept.
Excellent condition,
$1000. Call
352-344-1787
Scrap Metal
$50. obo
(352) 419-5503
Sewing Machine
Singer, cabinet style
w/ chair
$75.
(352) 564-9336
SHUTTERS Pair of
Wood Shutters
w/moveable Slats 62" H
x 26" W Ex. Cond't.
$100.00 352-746-5421
SHUTTERS Pair of
Wooden Shutters with
moveable wooden Slats
20x18 $40.00 Ex.
Cond't. 352-746-5421
Singer Sewing Mach.
Slantomatic 401
1959 w/cabinet, $100
Roman Chairs, $25.
Drk. wood, blk leather
Unitque 352- 628-3100
SINGER
Sewing Machine with
wanut cabinet. Very
good condition. $65
obo (352) 382-1352
SPEAKERS 2 Optimus
Speakers, 5 inch, 70
Watts, 8 Ohms $30.00
352-746-5421
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $20
352-613-0529
TRUCK WINDOW
GMC rear-solid
Factory tint $30.00
352-628-4210
TUB HANDRAIL
Medline Deluxe Tub
Safety Handrail $20.00
352-628-4210
Used Shed
8 x 12 Barn Style
$850. (352) 860-0111
YAMAHA SPEAKERS 5
2 16" 140 WATTS 2 9"
60 watts & 1 5" 80
watts ALL $90
352-613-0529



Two Copy Printers
$25 to $75
352-634-4329


Study Piano w/ Rick D
Beginner to Advanced
All styles 352-344-5131


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




r4






TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955












U4 Employment

source is.









ww.chronicleonhine.com


BLOOD SUGAR KIT
Bayer, new, with strips
and case, ($5)
352-613-7493
Mr. Mobility Lift Chair
Large Size, gently
used, brown tweed
Excellent Cond.
Asking $300.
(352) 628-5991




WE BUY US COINS
& CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR SOLID SITKA
SPRUCE TOP (RARE),
WITH GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR W/ GIGBAG
STRAPTUNER,
STRINGS&PICKS $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" OSCAR
SCHMIDT ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO
WZ INPUTS $150
352-601-6625
CHURCH BAND?
"NEW" PURE WHITE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"FISHERS OF MEN"
$100 352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
AMPLIFIER, AND
TUNER, excellent con-
dition, $95, (Dunnellon)
(352) 465-1813
LES PAUL STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS AND SOUNDS
LIKE IT SHOULD,$50
352-601-6625
PIANO LESSONS


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
All Major Credit Cards
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
Stump Grinding -
Local, Call Robert
352-302-2220
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Services from A to Z
Complete Handyman Services
Specializing in
SAluminum Rescreen Work,
Storm Doors, Garage Screen
Doors, Window Screens,
Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch
Ceilings, Pressure Washing,
Int/Ext Painting, Regrout
Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing,
Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten
Wood Repairs
You Name it I probably do it!



746-2445
1 Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience





QENERAC j *'
Stand Alone i .S
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians I
ER0015377









WN .iN .t.md .W4A* Lt Nl
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM





SMetal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
Lic#CCC1325497


JOHNSON
M A C ROOFING, INC



s- TOLL FREE

1 1866-376-4943


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
*Generators Lighting Fixtures
*Install, Service Fans Ballast
& Repair New Outlets
* Whole House Surge Panel Upgrades
Protectors
MR 352-364-4610
(MR.
ELECTRIC'
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
S 24 on--urs-n-l-n- --- i-as a Week
I24 Hours a DaY '7 DaYS a Weeki


TYLER MOUNTAIN
GUITAR excellent
shape, used very little.
$100 352-3824727



MICROWAVE Ken-
more, white, 1000 watts,
great condition
352-628-7449
$35.00



Air Bike 950
Like New $35.
Exercise AB Lounge
Spout, with manuals
$35.
(352) 621-0778
Elliptical
ProLine
$75
Call 352-697-2195
INVERSION TABLE
Like New
$75
Call 352-697-2195
PROFORM
TREADMILL
Space saver
$200.00
352-302-8925
Weslo Eliptical
Brand New
$120. obo
(352) 746-1606 Iv. msg



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ GO Golf Cart
new uphol. good tires
& batteries, lights,
horn & storage comp
$945.(352) 201-6111
Golf Cart
exc. condition, has
headlights
exc. batteries w/
charger. $1500.
(352) 527-3125
Gun Cabinet
for six guns, wood,
with glass in door,
accessory storage,
$75.
(352) 564-9336
RAY'S GUN SHOP
Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv
Mossberg 715T 22-AR
$295. NRA-concealed
classes 586-7516


40 -0 2 % *. P


I re evil


ROOFING


I I


I


3 1


I




D6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


-w
SQUARE TWO LADIES
GOLF CLUB, FULL SET
W/ BAG & COVERS
$650, Ladies golf bag,
brand new $90
(352) 897-4681




NEW HITCH CARGO
CARRIER 20X60 will fit
1 1/4 to 2 in hitch, payed
130.00, will sell for
75.00 352-795-3920




COSTUME JEWELRY 5
nice necklaces, 3 nice
watches, 1 pair hearings
($15) 352-613-7493
NECKLACE new stain-
less heavy duty biker
style, engravable heart,
paid $150, ($35)
352-613-7493


Sell o Svwa


*v



Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On % $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369








TOWBAR: Roadmaster
5000 Stainless Steel
Towbar. Universal fit.
One (1) person opera-
tion. NEW
$600....asking $300 or
first best offer !!!
352-426-4563


r UmnJIII LUIly
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Foils,
Color, Perms,
Cutting, Styling
and Razor Cuts

Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.

Wed-Sat 9a-4p by
appointment


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
welcomes
KATIE FLYER

Specialty: Up-do's,
Foils, Color, Perms,
Cutting. Paul Mitchell
certified.

Stop in and say
hello! Call to make
your reservation
today. 352-637-0777
826 S US Hwy 41

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


DOJHA
Dojha, a 5-y.o.
yellow/white lab re-
triever mix, medium
size, calm, gentle &
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs.
Housebrkn. Beautiful
& in great shape,
wants to sit by your
side. Came to shel-
ter because family
lost their home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


I euy- 1"


Birds for Sale
Blue Front amazons,
$300 ea. Indian Ring
Necks, $100. ea. Cherry
head & Cuban conures,
$175 ea. Nandays $150
ea. Quakers $75 ea.
Fisher Love Birds $35.
ea. 352-637-6967


Doberman
Puppies
3 Males $500. ea
Parents on premises
352-586-3386









DOJHA
Dojha, approx. 3
y.o., a yellow/white
lab retriever mix,
medium size, came
to shelter because
family lost their
home & could not
keep him. Gentle,
easy-going, gets
along w/other dogs,
beautiful in color,
great shape.
Pen #25.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Dorkie Poos
2 males, 2 females,
silver dapple, brown
dapple, fur balls .First
shots $300
(352) 464-2382


HAVANESE PUPPIES
9 wks. Champ. Bid.
Lines, Non Shedding
3 males, black &
white, shots, Wormed
$650. OBO, 613-5818


LILLY
Lilly, a 6-y.o. female
bulldog mix, white
w/black ears,
beautiful, friendly
girl, weighs 36 Ibs.
Heartworrrm-negaive &
housebrkn. She
loves treats & sits on
command, came to
the shelter as a
stray. Very affec-
tionate, wants to
be by your side.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
Shih Poo Puppies,
3 males, 2 females
Yorkshire Puppies
1 Male $300
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings


SPARTACUS
10-month-old terrier
mix, brown & cream
in color, very playful,
loves to fetch ball &
return it to you,
weight 47 Ibs, is
Heartworrm-negatKive.
Dog-fnendly&
has easy-going
attitude.
Good family pet.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



COCKER SPANIELS
4 Males, 2 Females w/
papers. 8 weeks old
Blonde & white $800
(352) 287-0519


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers

Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news

and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that

assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well

informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,

today and tomorrow.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...

GET THE FACTS.

C IT RUS COUNTY
For more information on how to reach i l? wTh
Citrus County readers call o.-O1 IC LE
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonlne.com
Scarborough 2010


OOMXHJ


SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Available Registered
Lots of Colors
Ask about my Summer
Discount,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

Alumacraft
14 ft w/trailer and
extra's $400
(352) 637-5032

BAY KAT
Aluminum outboard,
28 ft, includes trailer &
outboard mtr. 90HP
$9,500. (352) 238-4445

KEY WEST
'05, Center Console,
90HP Yamaha 2 stroke
garmin, gauges, bate
well alum. trailer Pris-
tine Cond. $9,500
(352) 746-5658

KEY WEST
2013 Skiff 177 Key
West SkiffYamaha 70
4stroke,Trolling
Motor,Jack Plate, GPS,
Alum Trailer. Warran-
ties transferrable
$19,000 352 503-6668

Sea Eagle
2.5 power, stroke
ouboard & inflatable
Suzuki, $1100. for both
(352) 425-7020

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com


BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUICK REGAL
2001 LS, leather Inter.
very good cond., 6 cyl.
82k mi. One owner.
$4,100 352-746-6708







CADILLAC
2004 Esclade EXT
I owner, fully loaded,
dealrshp main,113k mi
$13,500. 510-867-5727
CHEVROLET
2007 Colbalt LT
4door, power win-
dows, locks, $3,495
352-341-0018


SWEETWATER
1991, 15 ft., Pontoon
seats 8, 35HP, trailer,
excellent cond. $3,250
476-1113, 513-5135



ALLEGRO BAY
'96, M37 Motor Home
35k mi. good cond.
Needs minor fixes,
$12,000 obo, Trade for
Harley? 352-274-8664
SUNNYBROOK
'01, 28 FT., 5th wheel
Alumalite, loaded w/
upgrades & options
$11,500 352-344-5177
TIFFIN
'04, Allegro, Class A,
30 ft., 2 slides, jacks,
generator, new awn-
ing, 32k mi., 50 amp
service $32,500, Call
to learn all that goes
with it 352-527-2327



COLEMAN
Pop Up Camper,
sleeps 6, rennovated
Good cond. new tires
$2,500 obo, 726-5936
KEYSTONE
Springdale 2005
Model 298-BHL
super slide out, awn-
ing, tandem axle,
coupling hitch anti
sway bars, 30 amp
hkup. Asking $9,500
or will consider shal-
low water boat as
trade, (352) 503-9133
before 9pm
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
Travel Trailer
2011,20' Rockwood
MiniLite, Self Con-
tained. Pwr. Slide out.
Ex. Cond. $13,500
obo(352) 527-0081
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



-BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BIG SALE
mCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest rice


2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
MAZDA
2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed,
4-door, one owner,
great condition, 142,000
miles $3,000.
352-860-2146
NISSAN
2010 Altima SL,38,500
miles, sunroof, leather,
Champaign, loaded.
Garaged, mint. 30+mpg.
$16,500. 352-382-0005
SATURN
1999, S11,4 door,
low miles, extra clean,
1 owner, $3,250.
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
'05, Avalon, Limited
49k mi., excell shape,
garage kept. $15,500
Call (352) 634-0101




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. OCT. 6th.
1-800-438-8559

CORVETTE
1999 Coup, Silver w/
Black, 6 spd, loaded,
extra's, 14k mi, $25,000
(352) 513-4427
FORD
2000, Mustang Con-
vertible, auto, V6, ice
cold air $4,550 obo, or
trade?(352) 287-1530
FORD
Rat Rod Projects, 46
Ford PU Roadster. 78
Merc Cgr XR7 Must Sell
Inglis 352-949-7874
PLYMOUTH
'69, GTX, Blue, 440
eng., all original, great
cond. $32,000 obo
352-302-8265





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BIG SALE
wCome make offers
RENT BUY- SELL
CAR TRUCK BOAT
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
CHEVROLET
2001 S-10 LS, 4 Cyl, 5
spd, air, 44K mi, mint
cond. New tires, N/S
$7500 (813) 410-6976
FORD
2000 Ranger XLT, ext
cab, 85k miles, auto,
hard conneau cover,
great cond $5,200.
1-727-505-6277
NISSAN
FRONTIER CREW
CAB SV 2012
2012 Frontier CC SV:
This white Nissan Fron-
tier Crew Cab SV is in
excellent condition with
only 8,500 miles. It has
cruise control,
power windows/door
locks/outside mirrors.
It has a factory installed
bed liner and I added a
vinyl tri-fold bed cover
and trailer hitch. The
truck is in perfect condi-
tion with a full factory
warranty. The asking
price is $21,900. Phone:
352-601-1319


HONDA
2007 VTX 1300C Origi-
nal owner, purchased
brand new, low mile-
age (2,371 miles).
CafA windshield, re-
movable saddlebags,
light-bar. Black &
chrome. Showroom
condition (mint).
Asking a "firm"
$5,050.00 Please con-
tact ownerkseller via
Email: selfor@aol.com
Phone: (352)382-4422
HONDA
98 Shadow Aero
VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh
walls, retro look, 18k.
ml $3200 352-465-7812
KAWASAKI
'06, KLR 650 Endoro,
15k miles, runs great, 1
owner, call for details
$2,500. (352) 344-1223
YAMAHA
1985 Virago, 1000cc,
runs good.
$1,200 or best offer
(352) 201-5104


367-1013 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT
The Petitioner, Scott Crowe, on behalf of Razhiel Crowe, hereby give notice of
their intention to petition the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners to
vacate a portion of that certain plat of Laurel Ridge Number One, as described in
Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof.
BY: /s/ Scott Crowe
Petitioner
EXHIBIT "A"
10' easement located on the rear of Lot 51, Block 6, of Laurel Ridge Number One,
according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 15, Pages 13 through
23, inclusive, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
October 6 & 13, 2013.


369-1006 SUCRN
10/10 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 10, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, October 6,2013.


368-1006 SUCRN
Fictitious Name Notice
Public Notice
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Ray's Auto Repair's lo-
cated at 6028 Cardinal
St, Homosassa, Florida
34446, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
said name with Florida
Department of State,


Fictitious

D i v i
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. DATED
at Inverness, Florida this
2nd day of October,
2013. /s/ Raymond L.
M u r -
ray, Owner, Published in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle October 6,2013.


2007 Explorer Sport
Trac XLT, Blue, bge
Ithr. int, tow pack, 68K
miles, just serv, $15,900
obo (352) 897-4204



CHEVROLET
2001, Blazer, 2 door,
LS, 1 owner $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2007, Escape, XLS,
$7,950.
352-341-0018
FORD
'96, Explorer XLT, V6,
A/C, great engine,
trans., tires & extras.
$1,700., 352-697-1932
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
2003, Wrangler,
4 cyc., 5 speed,
soft top, $9,950
352-341-0018



JEEP
04, Wrangler, Sport
4.0 literauto trans,
exc. cond. many
extras, call for details!
$13,500. 352-563-6666



Chevrolet
2000 Express
$1000.00
(352) 400-4437
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
'03, Grand Caravan,
Fully loaded, dual slid-
ing drs. 35mpg, V6,
Perf. cond., garaged
New tires, Crystal Riv.
$5,800. (727) 207-1619
HONDA
2008 Odyssey $15K.
73K mi. Original Owner.
Great condition. Deluxe
EXL package many
extras. Metalic "Slate
Green" i.e.
gray-metalic. Leather,
Moon Roof, Satellite Ra-
dio, Backup Camera,
Power Seats, Power
Sliding Doors, 3rd Row
Seat. New brake pads.
352-527-9196



Harley Davidson
1998 XL Sportster, 1200
custom, 95th anniver-
sary Edition, Garaged,
runs great, show room
cond., many extras,
14K miles, $4,300
(352) 212-2554.
Harley Davidson
Road King, 2006
1450cc,32k,exc.cond.
asking $12,500.
(352) 503-7057
HONDA
'05, Goldwing, 59k mi,
very clean, always
garaged. $10,550
352-344-5177
HONDA
1985 Shadow 500 CC
good condition asking
$1200.00352-637-3254

ONE OWNER


Meeting
I NoicesI


Meefing
*I Nodces


Meeting
I Ntices I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUIm

TUH


I1'1 rI


TL.


41 =


*I


9:1 a :1:


NEW 2014 ESCAPE S


M SRP............................................................................ $23,595
Nick Nicholas Discount.....................................................-600
Retail Custom er Cash..................................................... -1,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash' '......................-500

$21,495


NEW 2013 F 50 XL
JOE-


M SRP ........................................................................... $25,340
Nick Nicholas Discount..................................................... -900
Retail Customer Cash.................................................... 1,750
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash' '....................-1,000

$21,690


1 . I FORDCERTIFIEDPRE-OWNED- .IK
Relax, It's Covered. -
^^^* 1 -7,,-|: 11 ,l.:-|:'ei~rj~ IOl ,., Fordl tar.,-l:r, -Ira-tied le,- tlrl.-ir.: U C B -: ''I
19 ,7-,ear 1i00i.0001-111&e Por,.1 Po,).%erlr.rrln 01.rr. ll, C'.oer.a, ge-- ,.,,,, H B^III,
A PR for 60 m o nths ,2-,,.:,, L2.000- i ,i:ir Li i,.1-.,,, .rr.Ln, C:ir.u -Ce

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


-~'i~~


2012 FORD 2011 FORD
FOCUS SE FUSION
30,000 Miles 4 cvil, 21,000 miles
$16,950 $17,950


2011 MERCURY 2010 FORD
MILAN PREMIER TAURUS LTD
Leallier, only 8,000 miles Leallier, m1oon roof, 1 owner
$19,950 $22,950


2010 FORD
MUSTANG GT
10,000 miles, leallier, 1 owner
$23,950


2009 LINCOLN
MKS
-ili-r I :,r\ rini ,,rmo l ro I ul 1ipli pi,
$24,950


2011 FORD
EDGE LTD
Leallier, mroonr roof,20' wheels
$25,950


2010 LINCOLN
MKX
L-alhMer. moonur roof. ullimr i,.1 I pkg.
$26,950


2012 FORD F150
CREW CAB 4X4 XLT
5 4L, ciromle package
$31,950


2013 FORD
MUSTANG GT
3,000 miles, 1 owner, leallier
$33,950


2008 FORD MUSTANG CONY .2006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED
6 cyl., auto, 1 owner, leather. Auto, low miles.
$17,950 $19,950


2007 LINCOLN MKX
Moon roof, navication, AWD.
$20,950


I2010 HONDA ODYSSEY I2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLTI
29,000 miles, leather, moon roof. Warranty. Leather, 3rd row seating.
$22.950 $24,950 $31,950


Nick Nicholas


Crysta


Hwy. 19N.
795-7371
Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


Mnna .ruz
Salesperson of the Month


*Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all
buyers will qualify. See dealerfor details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13.


I


LINCOLN


River


Nick mai
Nicholas
Ford S.4
Lincoln
;oast Ford ^ ^^^^^


I


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 D7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.... 7. . ....
.1446 W*4 i iii4 11 1


CRYSTAL
SI I e% A iI AA K


IN


A N


800-584-8755 EXT 10 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 SOUTH SUNCOAST BLVD. HOMOSASSA, FL
PRICE INCLUDES $2,999 CASH FOR TRADE EQUITY AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT EXCLUDES TAX, TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50 WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +INCLUDES
$2,999 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY DUE AT SIGNING AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY LEASES ARE FOR 39 MONTHS 39,000 MILES FOR THE LIFE OF THE LEASE.WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES ARE FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.


D8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


5> 0




Section E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6,2013



OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GC


II
B Sikorski's
fL7vAttPic
PAGE E6


I-J LI 1


A Fypon faux medallion in a
residential home. Adding
architectural and decorative
elements such as faux wood
beams, medallions and
molding can enhance
otherwise simple rooms.
Associated Press


Flu


Ih11, I


ii .
ell^r^


, ,,,
; < '" *.
.. ., . .
' f A ,


wfpj


E, I
I




E2 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3/2/2 GASPARILLA CAY
ALL ON ONE FLOOR
Located on a cul-de-sac, this home has a lovely side
yard. It features an open, light bright floor plan, Florida
room, screened porch with view of the river, expanded
dock. Great for full-time or get away.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: remaxga122@yahoo.wom


4149 N. Pk'KK UK.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BNA/2CG w/POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot
* Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010)
* Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


Enter house #6175
4.

_.A6 A


SKYLINE DOUBLEWIDE
ON 4 1/2 ACRES
3 BR, 2 BATH W/DEN .Carport
*1993 Built Workshop/Outbuildings
* Huge Kitchen w/Island Gas Fireplace
* Updated HVAC Updated 40 Yr Shingles

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com





WM*



REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


5ZL N. HUUSUN 3T.
* Waterfront 2BR/2BA/2CG
* Enclosed 10 x 23 Sunroom
* Great Dock for Fishing
* Deep Water w/Access to Gulf
* Well-Maintained
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpaliner@reinmax.net


6 LONGLEAF CT., HOMOSASSA
SUGARMILL WOODS 4/3/2 HOME IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION. UPDATES GALORE INCLUDING AN
UPDATED KITCHEN & UPDATED BATHROOMS. HOME
FEATURES SOLAR HEATED POOL WITH LARGE POOL
DECK. THIS ISA MUST SEE HOME.
DIR: US Hwy.19 (Suncoast Blvd.) to Cypress Blvd W, to
right on Pine Street, to right on Longleaf Ct.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert








CRYSTAL RIVER!
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH SINGLEWIDE
WITH LARGE SCREEN PORCH, 2-CAR
CARPORT, 2 SHEDS, DEAD-END
STREET, IMMACULATE.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dijmfl@yahoo.com


IlZ IlUU+ Sl. tl. 1MU4ILt on pretty 4+ acres in Crystal
River. Tons of space for your family. Fully-fenced & electric
gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large
storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio,
screened back porch, 2 car attached carport, BBQ
pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call
for your private showing and fall in love.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


RENTALS

AVAILABLE
Visit
mJUlCinlentalw.oa
MARENA


W N*.n


OPEN WATER VIEW!
,3 Bedroom/2 Bath/2-Car Garage Open Floor Plan
*New Floors ,10 x 36 Screened Lanai
-Thermal Pane Windows ,1/2 Acre Lot
- Beautifully Move-In Ready! No Flood Zone!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 i
Email: sherylpolts@aol.com I
Weisile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


CONNELL HEIGHTS
SPECIAL
3/2/2 with family room and privacy fenced
backyard. Situated on great corner lot in the
great family community of Connell Heights.
Priced to sell! Motivated seller!
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


SIIU UHII II LLUL ULIU., iIVIUIV'1EQMH%
Updated 3/2/2 home on a spacious boulevard lot in Oak
Vilage/Sugarmill Woods. Open floor plan with a 3 season
Florida room, galley kitchen with breakfast nook, new A/C and
new roof in 2005 & new kitchen in 2011, new tile floor in
family room 2013.
DIR: US 98 to CR 480 (Oak Park Blvd.), to right on Oak
Vilage Blvd., House on left.
TONY VIGGIANO (352) 586-5772
TonyViggiono@gmoil.com Tony Viggiono.com


241N Leoo Hwy. Beel Hil 52-74 ww.IIXcmI0 ..Hy.4 neres6760
837 S. Sucos Bld. Hon s 62-70 w wHurosielslecm54NHy.1,CsialRvr7524


8350 W. APPLESEED TER., DUNNELLON
*3BD/2BA 1991 Doublewide On 2.63 Pretty Acres
* Large Screened Porch 24'xl 2' Shed/Workshop
*Several Updates Recently
* Worth A Look If You Desire Country Life Away
From the Maddening Crowd
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [It
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


#1 in Citrus County




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E3




Sycamore a good choice for fall color


ooler weather and
shorter autumn days
prompt deciduous
trees to shed their leaves.
The plants stop making the
green chlorophyll that is
largely respon-
sible for chang-
ing sunlight
energy to sug-
ars. This
process is called
photosynthesis.
As plant tissue
at the leaf base
begins to disin-
tegrate, scar tis-
sue (periderm) Jane
forms. Since the
leaf no longer JAI
makes chloro- GAF
phyll, the green
fades, revealing reds, or-
anges or yellow colors for a
brief period until the
leaves die, dry brown, then
fall. This process is called
abscission.
Years ago, I recall raking
crisp dry leaves from the
lawn. Kids have fun jump-
ing into leaf piles. Back
then it was common prac-
tice to burn leaves. Neigh-
borhoods were filled with
smoky air and the nostal-
gic smell of burning leaves.
Who thought that we were
creating air pollution?
Who knew we were releas-


4
t


ing carbons directly into
the atmosphere and con-
tributing to global warn-
ing? Who was aware of
allergies, respiratory dis-
tress and COPD?
Too old and
tired to rake
leaves these
days, I blow
them off plant-
ing beds onto
the firebreak
lawn surround-
ing the house.
Then I mulch
the leaves with
Weber a mulching
E'S mower when
ie the lawn is next
DEN cut. The nutri-
ents in the
leaves go back into the soil
to be reused by turfgrass.
Mulching is wiser and eas-
ier than burning and is
earth-friendly
Native Sycamore, Pla-
tanus occidentalis, is a
fast-growing canopy tree
useful to shade buildings
from the strong, hot sun
from spring to fall. In win-
ter, Sycamore is decidu-
ous, or leafless. Then the
sun can reach buildings to
help warm them during
the colder months. This is


See JANE/Page E5


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Native Sycamore is a fast-growing canopy tree useful to shade buildings from the strong, hot sun from spring to fall.
Trees grow quickly and can last up to 75 years. Height can reach 75 to 100 feet, with a spread of 50 to 85 feet in
diameter.


r BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
38R/28Awith laminate flooring. Enclosed porch 3BR/2BA pool home in Connell Heights
with small office. $69,500 M[S#104] 8] Fireplace & family room. $92,500


I urI i..IEIrI.UIII UUUDLE[DVIIIVEIbI[EflL, n I
East Cove 3BR/2BA with fishing & boating from I
your back yard. $54,995 MLS#704944


BANK OWNED-OCALA, FL
3BR/2BA built in 2004. Corner lot. Trees.
$95,000 MLS#705741


S3/3/2 custom home on over an acre
SSalt system pool turbo cell Aqua-Rite filter
SSeparate 12'x24' building
SWood cabinetry with stainless steel
SDual pane windows
3-zone 18 seer AC/heat system
SAcreage completely fenced
SHardwood flooring 16" tile
#705477 $187,000


TRUE 5-BEDROOM HOME!
* 5/3/3 custom home
* Built in 2004 2939 sq. ft. of living
* Heated pool outdoor shower
* Zodiac kitchen open to family room
* Two AC/heat systems
* 2 pull down stairs in attic for storage
* French door refrigerator
* Total privacy for lanai and pool
#701153 $319,900


See.JVirtualIIIurs..iww.resalehomesu.I..I


OAK RIDGE OPEN HOUSE
SUN. *OCT. 6 1-3 PM


6340 N. Whispering Oak Lp. 105 W. Forest Oak Place
Move-in condition. Well maintained 3BR Looking forlots of space, come see this 3 BR
2BARusaw home built in 2004 oversized 2.5 home, over 2400 sq. ft. of living space. High
tiled eat-in kitchen, great room, enlarged ceiling, oversized MB with sitting room & much,
master bedroom. Great home to buy!! much more. MLS 705599 $152,900
MLS 705608 $135,000 Direction: From 491 North, into Oak Ridge also
Direction: From 491 North, Right into Oak Whispering Oak Lp. Left on Misty Oak (1st left)
Ridge which is also Whispering Oak Lp Right on Forest Oakto home on left.
LILI GARCIA 352-9129

EXIT Realty Leaders


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 1
EfftsgroobrssQtaf6ay4.com www.allcitrusrealt.com


KEY1 "Always There For You"
.m EYl- GAIL COOPER
SMultimillion Dollar Realtor
BL i Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700
| E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Karen ituKes
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


Lfl -
Kathy Lois
Canfield Frears
ERA Suncoast ERA Suncoast
Realty. Realty.

ERA agents
making waves
ERA Suncoast Realty is proud to
announce the latest production levels
achieved by its agents for 2013.
The team of Harry Eck and Karen
Stukes has surpassed the $3 million
mark in closed sales volume in 2013.
Kathy Canfield has surpassed $2
million mark in closed sales volume in
2013. Lois Frears has surpassed the
$1 million mark in closed sales volume
in 2013.
Reach these agents at the Crystal
River office by calling 352-795-6811
Plantation brings new
agent aboard
Plantation Realty agent Courtney
Miesch is no stranger to the Nature
Coast. She grew up in Cedar Key, a
small island an hour north of Crystal
River. She has a deep appreciation for
waterfront living and all the outdoor ac-
tivities Florida has to offer.
Real estate has been a passion of
hers for as long as she can remember
and she's enthusiastic about helping
people with all their buying or selling
needs. She will provide a friendly and
memorable experience and will work
hard to meet your real estate needs.
Call her at the office at 352-795-
0784 or email her at courtney.
plantation@gmail.com.


Real Estate DIGEST


Harry Eck
ERA Suncoast
Realty.


Offbeat raspberry worth a look

LEE REICH
Associated Press

When I really want to impress a
visitor to my garden, I offer a taste of -
Fallgold raspberries.
Many raspberries taste good, es- K
specially when picked dead ripe and.. A
popped into your mouth, but Fall- ip-."',J .
gold is perhaps the tenderest and -i --n
sweetest raspberry around. Here is UG -
a berry that you'll never see in a su- '
permarket; it's too fragile to travel
much further than arm's length. -.
Fallgold berries also have an un-
usual appearance. Their pale yel-
low, blushed orange color seems to ,
speak to their sweetness and ten-
derness, and also probably helps
hide the fruit from birds.
As its name indicates, Fallgold
bears fruit in the fall. In this, if s not c
unique. There are a number of so- -
called "fallbearing" raspberries.
These varieties begin their fall crop
(it actually begins in late summer)
starting at the tips of new canes,
with fruit continuing to ripen down
the canes until stopped by freezing
temperatures. Associated Press
Fallbearing raspberries are some- A Fallgold raspberry on a brick wall in New York City. Fallgold's name describes one of the plant's
times called overbearing raspber- qualities: It bears in the fall.
ries, although they actually bear
only two crops each season. The
first, in midsummer, is borne lower t.KAREN E. MORTON F f
on canes that grew the previous sea- Hall of Fame Centurion Member L der
son, the ones that started bearing Website: ko.en.emo. on co -
near their tips the previous late (352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 j j
summer and fall. TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163
Knowing where and when these
raspberries fruit tells you how to 16 ACRES ACKS1 JinSMORTON REALFL 34450E
RAILS to TRA m n po S sibiitisEGeat21[le gant 4 bedroom 3 bath Formal living
prune them. Easiest is just to cut the City water available Survey on file and dining PLUS family room overlooking
this property has many possibilities*Great .. .,-r. your caged in-ground swimming pool*
whole planting to the ground early Opportunity* MLS #316527 $175,900 Great plan. MLS #705846 $298,900
each winter This method sacrifices
the summer crop but avoids any
problems from winter cold or hun-
gry deer It also cuts down on the TH.
chances of disease, not that rasp- INVE, NESS HIGHLANDS RLTHG**SWIMMING BEST 0F THE BEST!!!
,wattrhmeo 5 acres Gorgeous hichory cabinets
POOL PLUS WOP, (SHOP12ND GAUGE *WATEIRFRON1T HOME GOLFINGG 2 0 iigar 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car
berries are so plagued by diseases. OPEN WATERFRONT *JAMES ISLAND Ms Clean liveshere*Spotless2obedrm hanewith denhffice COMMUNITYSWHNINGPOOL*MAINTENANCEFREE* 2300 living area3Re.pthophssdeepliarcar
Hug materbedmm 0x S ed~s 3B, 2A, CA GAAGE NewKithen& Cbints ew garage *Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances
Ho Lake Henderson premier locaton 3 BR, 3 BA gt both d ms are suith s Huge mister bedrom 20 x 15 endless 3BR, 2BA, t CAR GARAGE New Kitchen s Cabinets New Engineered maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family
H ow ever it seem s a sham e to [dke Henderso premier latian 3BR, 3BA l shogeeverhere *iBrightand Cheery chenall ne ;,erapplns --.... ... I ', a "-..... I romwith glasslwindowsoverloking the Florida natural backyard
c ttHome Fireplace Formal and casual rea with Forida Romu 0versied caped in-gound swimming o t 2 car A4-d--- 'll ,I ....... W .., with wildife feeding at your dorstep. Owner's feeders bring the
choose that easier pruning route for large game room Updates throughout Cdged garage on hane PLUS detached 2 car garage for vehicles or Community Pool* Community Boat Ramp* RV and Boat birds and wildlife in your backyard...truly amazing. 458 Ry
F allgold. W hy? B because if you let it in-gruund swimming pul0* Boat house with lift. workshop Ry paring area* This home is move-in ready!! Storage* Enjoy Waterview from Super-sized FL Room. storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and
bear two crops a season, you're Owner sacrifice MLS #702113 $489,000 Convenientto Inerness. MLS#704557 $159,900. MLS #700705. $119,900. Call Karen Morton 212-7595 truly befterthan new. MILS #70404. $324,900.
forced to suffer only a short hiatus 7-7--
usually only a couple of weeks-- be-
tween the end of the summer crop
and the beginning of the second CHARMINGTVILLA ...................L........
crop. You get berries from midsum- in PARKSIDE VILLAGE 4 1A custom home. 4,098 sq. t. living area State-ot- CITRUS HILLS
crop Youi g et bere froumn. midsumd inder PKe Va GE withththe-art kitchen with commercial range top-of-the-line CUSTOM SHOWPLACE HOME
mer right into autumn. Nestled under the oaks with the view of the ** POOL HOME ON ACRE ** appliances Super energy efficient features Zoned
fountain *Thiswell cared for custom designedvilla 3BR 3BA Great Room Formal Dining Eat-In system Family room overlooking beautiful caged in- Nestled in the woods 3BR 2 BA 2 car Oara
Pruning for two crops is not all is truly move-in ready. Community is pet-friendly. Kitchen* Wood-Burning Fireplace Large Master ground swimming pool* 3 car garage on home PLUS* Patio* Covered Front Porch Nice Landscaping
Close to Beverly Hills Civic Center, library and Bedroom & Bath 2 2-Car Garage New Roof 2005 Detached 60 x 59 workshop/6 car garage/office/guest Mature Trees Larger master Open Living Area
that difficult. In winter' 0r ight after shopping. Appliances updated in 2013. Workshop* Plenty of Room in this 2500* sq. ft. apt. Generator equipped. BELOW REPLACEMENT COST. Morning Room Well Maintained* Large Master.
MLS #705316 $65,900 home. MLSt704035 $179,900 MLS#703576 $745,000 (belowreplacument cost) MLS#702951. $163,900.
See BERRY/Page E5


E4 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E3

a natural and eco-friendly
way to reduce the use of
expensive electricity and
fossil fuels.
Sycamore ranges from
Central Florida north to
Maine and west to Texas
and Mexico in cold zones 4-
9. It prefers slightly acid
soil, rich in humus, that re-
tains moisture. Occurring
naturally in moist flood-
plains, it adapts well to wet
or dry sandier soils. It grows
best in moderate soil mois-
ture conditions. Trees grow
quickly and can last up to 75
years. Height can reach 75
to 100 feet with a spread of
50 to 85 feet in diameter
Last spring, I planted a
sapling sycamore 5 feet
from the south side of a
shed in my back yard. It was
just a 4-foot tall thin stick
with a few leaf buds on four
twigs at the top. We added a
14-inch pot of decayed yard
waste to the planting hole
and backfill soil. This
humus retains moisture
and releases nutrients.
I forgot about it over the
summer, as I rarely walk be-
hind the shed. It grew 4 feet
more, with a topknot of
large, thin leaves. The
skinny trunk is not staked.
The swaying trunk will pro-
mote strong roots. The
nearby shed shelters the
sapling from strong winds.
In a few years, the sycamore
will provide cool summer


shade over the workshop.
The smooth bark on a ma-
ture sycamore flakes off in
attractive patches to reveal
underlying bark in multiple
shades of green, gray, tan,
cream or light brown. Seeds
are borne in round balls
about an inch in diameter
The balls are soft clusters of
seeds, with white down that
catches the breeze to dis-
tribute them. They quickly
disintegrate and mulch up
under the lawn mower
Leaves are 10 inches
wide and 10 inches long,
and have five lobes similar
to a huge maple leaf In
fall, the tree can be spec-
tacular, as the leaves turn
yellow then brown before
they are shed.
The only maintenance is
to clip off lower branches
in late winter before they
leaf out to promote height
and a clear trunk while the
tree is young. Once the
lowest branch is taller than
I can reach from a steplad-
der, I will prune no more.
Sycamore is a useful,
fast-growing shade tree.
The attractive bark and
shape appeal to the gar-
dener's aesthetic eye.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


r Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney i
.ReaILorE, A HOUSE Realtor@ i
.~ 302.3179 soLD Name! 287-9022
The o i746-6700
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVDI
.0 1 r *


I Get Excited!! New Completely remodeled ready to move your Business in. Roof I
4/13, A/C 6/13, Paint in and out 13', flooring 13', Circuit Breaker, cabinets,
appliances all 2013. Handicap parking. Everything is ready to go!! MLS #704785


HomeFront BRIEF


Extension service
slates gardening
workshops
SA free gardening workshop will be
offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 10 and
22 at the Citrus County Extension Build-
ing, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
Water quality should concern all who
live in Florida. This gardening presenta-
tion will offer landscape opportunities
which are creative and functional gar-
dening suggestions encouraging water
conservation and quality.
Rain gardens, fertilization practices
and irrigation management are topics
which offer landscape gardeners op-
portunities to protect our water re-
sources. Several landscape design
solutions will be discussed to aid in nat-
ural water filtration in the residential
landscape.
SA free gardening workshop will be
offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Nov. 14 and
19 at the Citrus County Extension Build-
ing, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
Material hardiness zones are a criti-
cal factor in the proper selection of sus-
tainable plants. This workshop
introduces participants to criteria to con-
sider when selecting materials, their


placement in the landscape and poten-
tial frost protection encouraged to re-
duce material loss.
The average low temperature in Cit-
rus County is between 20 and 25 de-
grees and should be considered when
looking at plants for installation in local
landscapes. How to care for plants after
damaging frost are also topics for
discussion.
SA free gardening workshop will be
offered from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 10
at the Citrus County Extension Build-
ing, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in
Lecanto.
Winter is a great time to plan and
prepare garden projects for the upcom-
ing milder season.
Garden planning, estimating cost and
garden clean-outs are important topics
to consider when outdoor work is de-
layed. It is also a great time of year to
enjoy the outdoors with activities like
bird watching.
Creating natural buffers which attract
birds is an excellent project to consider
during this time of year.
These topics will be discussed during
this presentation.
From staff reports

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$8.8 million closed by September 30, 2013.
| Call Debbie Rector's Team
Sor visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
M To Learn More
S(352) 746-9924 ".'.-


Positive Attitude...

High Energy...

Professional Demeanor!


BERRY
Continued from Page E4

the summer crop finishes, cut
down to the ground every cane
that bore a summer crop. You can
recognize these canes because
they show their age with peeling
bark. In winter, go over the plant-
ing and cut to the ground enough
younger canes so that those that
are left are a few inches apart and
grow in a swathe no wider than 12
inches. Selectively remove the
thinnest ones.
With Fallgold grown for two
crops each season, there's still
usually no need to worry about
winter cold damage on those
canes that remain. Despite its
beauty, sweetness and tenderness,
Fallgold is a tough plant
Don't fret too much about deer
damage, either: Deer aren't all
that fond of raspberry canes, and
Fallgold will compensate for any
canes that are eaten with a subse-
quent, larger late summer and fall
crop.


B -' : i4 ^3?, --. .I .... ...
3321 S College Inverness, FL 34452
Inverness Highlands Home: 2,139 Sq. Ft. Under Roof, 2 car
garage home on a corner lot, paved streets. Only $65,000.
Directions: Apopka Ave to fight on Harvard to left on Aloha to
property on left comer of College andAloha.
Douglas Lindsey Tropic Shores Realty
7536 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa Fl. 34446 352-212-7056


The premiere active-adult master-planned community
in West Central Florida wants you!
Unlimited earning potential.
New home sales experience preferred, not required.


Florida RE License is preferred.

SVILLACES OF, mp I Email or Fax Your Resume Today to:
itrUs (pLlilS nancy@citrushills.com 352.746.7707
1Q G A________________________________________________________________________________


JONOUR WINNING TEAM!

Sze Sa les Professi als W ant


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E5




E6 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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Ci IIkjid.lE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
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Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Experts: Rate spike won't Inside...


dampen housing recovery


Analysts confident market can handle upswing


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES When mortgage
rates began climbing in May from rock-
bottom lows, Kevin Williams worried he
might miss out on an opportunity
So he listed his home in Orange County
Calif., and planned to buy a bigger house
in San Diego after it sold. The process
took all summer Last week, he and his
wife locked in a mortgage.
The extra time added at least $1,000
more a year than if they had secured a
loan in May Still, Williams believes they
made a prudent decision.
"I don't know what rates are going to be
in four years," he said. "I felt I had to act
now before I was priced out."
Williams' justification buy now or
risk paying more later is why many bro-
kers and analysts remain confident that
the housing recovery can handle higher
mortgage rates. While the jump in rates
should test the strength of the recovery,
analysts foresee stable sales increases


over the next year for a number of
reasons.
Fall is typically a sleepy time for sales
and signed contracts have already
started to decline nationally Yet several
brokers say buyer traffic remains strong
in key markets like Los Angeles, the
Washington metro area, Silicon Valley
and Boston.
Home prices have been rising at the
fastest pace since 2006, helping Ameri-
cans regain wealth they lost during the
housing crisis. Many would-be sellers
have been waiting out the downturn and
could put their houses on the market in
the next year That should ease supply
constraints, one of the biggest obstacles
for sales over the past year
Financing a home is still more afford-
able than in decades past. The average
rate on a 30-year mortgage remains a bar-
gain at below 5 percent and many buyers
sense it won't stay that low for long.

See HOUSING/Rage E15


Faux for show
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E3
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office: www.pa.
citrus.fl.us.


'Palestine' vase not from the place in the Mideast


DearJohn: Thirty years ago, have was manufactured by the
we bought this vase at a East Palestine Pottery Company
tag sale market for quite a located in East Palestine, Ohio.
low price. What at- The style of the vase is
traced us was its a copycat of fine-
lovely design and a quality European
seal on the bottom stat- porcelains made dur-
ing that it was made in ing the mid-19th cen-
"E. Palestine." ,tury Your ewer was
Probably, a previous made circa 1900. Dol-
owner glued broken Hjlar value if it was in
pieces of the vase good condition would
quite unskillfully, and be less than $100.
you can see it in de- Dear John: Could
tails. We are sending John Sikorski you give me an esti-
all four pictures for SIKORSKI'S mate of value on these
your observation and ATTIC items? The curio, I
advice about the pos- was told by a furniture
sible value of such an maker, might be Nou-
artifact Obviously, a professional veau Art, designed by French de-
restorer would be able to bring signer Eagere Curid. The wood,
this masterpiece to almost origi- he thought, was African ma-
nal quality. Thanks for your reply hogany I bought it at auction in
-V&L., Internet 1991 for $125 and paid $425 to
Dear V & L.: The ewer you have it refinished in Pennsylva-


nia. The estimated value in 1991
was $1,600. It was in perfect
shape, but now has a crack in the
front leg.
The toy cradle is a family heir-
loom thought to have come from
Germany maybe 150 years ago.
The story goes, it survived being
thrown overboard when the ship
ran into a storm. The reason
being it was packed with books
and the books were considered
important. -A.L., Beverly Hills
DearA.L.: Yes, the 6tagere is a
restrained version of Art Nou-
veau. Art Nouveau was a French
style, circa 1890-1910, that be-
came popular throughout Eu-
rope, England, and America. The
value placed on it, $1,600, in 1991
was over the top even in the hey-
day of the 1990s.
I think it was made in the
United States during the early
20th century In the current mar-


ketplace, even if the leg was not
broken, dollar value would be in
the $250 to $500 range.
The cradle, based on your pho-
tograph, was likely made in the
late 19th century Potential dollar
value is below $100.
DearJohn: This lamp has been
in the family for 75 years. The
base is 10 inches wide and the
lamp with base is 15 inches tall. I
know it is soapstone and have
seen others in the Appleton Mu-
seum, Ocala. Can you give me
any info on it? TH., Internet
Dear T.: Your beautiful soap-
stone vase was made in China.
See ATTIC/Page E7
This vase is done in an Art
Nouveau style. It was manufac-
tured in East Palestine, Ohio,
likely around the
year 1900.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


This soapstone vase was made in Chir


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Soapstone vases with ornately
carved details were made in large
quantities during the 19th and on
into the 20th century They were
often used in China for paintbrush
pots. Potential dollar value is in the


Special to the Chronicle
ia.

$100 range, short of a lucky day


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


,II I 9 -


PINE RIDGE Prudential
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. w1lo
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 open 7 Days Florida Showcase
(352) 527-1820 A Week. Properties
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3
_ J .- At


-\,ita 1048 W Lake Valley CI
O- ~ MLS 705655 $349,000
REDUCED & readyto sell! 3/2/2 enhanced with upgrades.
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entry, R at
Fenway (Circlel, L on Lake Marie, R on Skyview
Landing, L on Wisper, L on Lake Valley.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058
NEW LISTING






(J ( i$ 544 E Dakola CI
"N MLS 705742 $309,000
Beautiful & Spacious 4/4/2
on Meadows Golf Course.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


S172 W Doerr Path
',{' MLS 701971 $239,000
2bd/2ba Villa overlooking the 5th Green of
Skyview Golf Course.
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista entrance, thru
gates to first left, then left again to 172 on the right
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


CITRUS HILLS
20W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 746-0744
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3




Igon I 534 E Knighlsbr'dge PI
Stato MLS 704309 $141,900
Impeccably clean &neat3bd/2ba energy
efficient home on an acre lot.

Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING


'AdW IIIII


'140 1210 E SilverThorn Lp __. 45 268 N Highview Ave
S MLS 705707 $118,800 MLS 705753 $105,900
3/2/2 well maintained home with _WlU 3/2/2 ready for a
community amenities/activities. QUICK sale.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


"i. 4075 N Pony Drive i.1S 71 E Eureka CI
SMLS 704678 $299,900 1" MLS ?U4ud $299,000
REBORN in 2009- quality remodeled 3/3/3 plus an office w/heated pool
4/3.5/3 home w/acreage. on the golf course.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700 Mark Casper 352-364-1947


.,7'. l 13175 N Roseway Ter
[ l ',, , 1 S 1 3 9 .0 0 0 /
Nice home on 1+ acre
w/HUGE detached garage.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952

Prudential Real Estate
Takes THREE of Four
Categories In J.D. Power
and Associates' 2013
Home Buyer/Seller Study!


t ~2334 N Alachua Pt
MLS 703786 $97,000
Updated 2/2/1 Patio homew/pool
in beautiful, private setting.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


^s-_.-.. .... .
-JiLs 184 E Ireland Ct
,'jr MLS 704600 $248,000
Complete Oaks Golf Course Home Package:
3/2/2 + office + golf cart garage.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947







i 261 E Hartlford St 5-1a
MLS 702481 $65,000
2bd/2ba lower level condo.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


'Repeat Home Buyer
*First Time Home Buyer
'First Time Home Seller


V, h .. l ,, I ,,, ,, II, I ,, I III 1 1 .h, In I,,,IaIII I, ,,I, a,, l ,,, h I I I I ,, I . .. I
I :1 ,,,I,,,....... ... ,,,,,,,,,~ i!-
[E, { { 1 I ,, I.. .. .I I. ..h i I I I h i, .. .. i,, .. II SI IO,,I I. I h ,1,, I-,I , ,,Sl l IH .. i i h ,,


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E7


WHO SAID THREE'S A CROWD')




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Judicious use ofarchitectural elements

can enhance the interior ofany home


Associated Press

Phoebe Taylor's 20-year-old
suburban Atlanta ranch house
began plain and "builder grade."
A professional decorator, she
transformed it with faux wood
beams, decorative molding and a
gold-spun paint job that looked
like "soft marble." Her vision:
"what our dream house would
have been if we had gone out
and bought it."
It's called "Going Faux" -
turning homes into something
they basically are not through
prefab architectural embellish-
ments and eye-tricking wall fin-
ishes. Enthusiasts say there's no
reason for even the most budget-
conscious among us to live a
cookie-cutter existence.
"My house was not an expen-
sive house. But even the million
dollar houses don't have this


kind of detail," says Taylor,
adding that she recently sold the
house in just one day
Other "faux" features to con-
sider include ceiling decals that
look like parts of elaborate chan-
deliers, cabinetry embellish-
ments and painted wainscoting.
"I have seen some trailer
homes that have more personal-
ity to them thanks to paint, sweat
equity buying some lumber, and
their owners using their creativ-
ity," says Lee Gamble, a Steam-
boat Springs, Colo.-based
designer and painter who spe-
cializes in faux finishes.
Gamble says a homeowner can
change anything with desire and
patience even ambitious proj-
ects like, say, making the interior
of a standard subdivision home
look like a cozy Tudor or classic


See Page EO10


E8 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E9




Old practice undergoing revival


In-home

performances

gain renewed

interest

COLLEEN NEWVINE
Associated Press

Greg Ching met his wife,
Deborah, listening to mu-
sicians play in a San Fran-
cisco living room. They
bought their home near
Nederland, Colo., with an
eye toward hosting live
musical performances.
Since then, Ching has
become so committed to
his 14-year-old series,
Aspen Meadows House
Concerts, that he wel-
comed one performer in
September even as Col-
orado's flooding knocked
out his phone and sent 8
inches of water into his
basement. Years before, he
held another "living room
show" while a wildfire
burned nearby And he
spent about two years and
$20,000 in legal fees de-
fending his right to organ-
ize private concerts; in
2008, Boulder County com-
missioners regulated
home gatherings, limiting
attendance, frequency and
hours in response to con-
cerns about running a
business or creating noise.
"These living room
shows are a way of bringing
people together," Ching
said, explaining why he
didn't give up in the face of
fire, flooding or govern-
ment regulation. "It's some-
thing about the human
spirit It's very healing."
Enjoying live music at
home is nothing new For
some, it harks back to the
humble notion of friends
singing and playing instru-
ments together before the


Associated Press
Cellist and singer Helen Gillet, left, and Clint Maedgen, a member of the venerable
Preservation Hall Jazz Band, performing in a living room show in 2011 in the Brooklyn
borough of New York. Maedgen, and his collaborator girlfriend, Gillet, performed at this
private concert and also played the Kennedy Center this past spring. Gillet describes
house concerts as having an intimacy almost like family.


days of recorded music and
radio. For others, it calls to
mind Europe's legendary
salons, filled with writers,
artists and musicians.
Today, the living room
show lives on, and for
many musicians, it's be-
come an important way to
connect with fans and sup-
plement income. Hosts
don't charge admission as
a business would, but can
suggest that guests made a
donation of perhaps $10 or
$15 to pay the musicians.
Living room show hosts
typically give all proceeds
to the performers.
I got hooked on living
room shows when my hus-
band threw me a surprise
40th birthday party with a
three-piece jazz band in
our Brooklyn, N.Y, apart-
ment. Since then, we've
hosted or co-hosted a vari-


ety of performers, includ-
ing Helen Gillet, a cellist
and singer who describes
house concerts as having
an intimacy almost like
family


"There's something very
gratifying and beautiful
about that," she said. "The
fans you make in a living

See Page E13


,. JOANN MARTIN C!
[ Preferrecd
tro k REAL ESTATE pefm

Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net


mum t. trunariesion %.x
Hernando
2780 sf of living, new roof 2011, HVAC
2008, central vacuum, fire place, lots of
storage, large lanai with jacuzzi & summer
kitchen. Pristine condition. Don't miss out
call today! $249,900.
Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis
to right on Charleston to home on right.


177 Seymeria
Beverly Hills
Adorable 2 bedroom 1.5 bath 1 car garage
home. New roof 2007, new heat & air
2005, recently painted inside & out.
Florida room and sun room. Don't miss out
call today! Priced at $59,900.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FAUX
Continued from Page E8

Colonial, or like something out of
the rustic West.
The Internet is a DIY decorator's
best friend, she says, offering inspi-
ration and sources for adding archi-
tectural and decorative elements to
a home.
Next is paint, which Gamble calls
"the cheapest way to improve your
house" and it's about more than
just giving the walls new color Paint
can be used to create illusions of ar-
chitectural elements: For example,
you can use blocks of color on walls
to create the look of molding, or
three variations of one color for a
three-dimensional look an old
technique called trompe l'oeil that
can make your home look just a little
more like the Palace of Versailles.


The products that make such proj-
ects possible are becoming easier to
use, home designers says.
The manufacturer Frpon, for ex-
ample, makes synthetic ceiling
beams and medallions and decora-
tive millwork that are lighter and
more manageable than real wood,
Gamble says.
Decorative millwork like, say, a
sunburst pediment over a door, is an
easy improvement to a room, says
Kathleen Ziprik, a Fypon
spokeswoman.
Taylor says she used tricks like
that in her renovation. In redoing
her master bath, for example, she
started with "just a straight shot
bathroom." She added molding and
wood panels to the walls, and
framed the bathtub, using new
material with decorative
embellishments.
"It looked very dramatic," Taylor


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY

JBd


BO00OBOSH

Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com


ori.


I


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.corn


'w_" -II I .- II
CRYSTAL RIVER SOLITUDE
A taste of unspoiled nature: secluded 80+ ac, rolling pastures, lush meadows, ponds, mature
oak trees. The 2 spacious & luxurious cottages are carefully positioned in a beautiful setting!
This Shangri-La can be yours for $800,000
Get a taste of it & visit http://www.mycrystalriverfarm.com/ for an interactive tour.


- -^- 7-w EafL&'*!if t*e
"- FISH, BOAT OR JUST RELAX. Features 3
YOUR NEW DREAM HOME! Move-in ready PUB IN BUSTLING DOWNTOWN INVERNESS, open floor plan, private deck all on 1+++ car
3/2/2 full appliances, vaulted ceilings in a beautiful 15 beer taps and loyal regulars! Great business front AC JUST $87,900 5450 S. Withlapop
waterfront neighborhood. $109,900 #702495. opportunity. $65,000 #705011. #705811. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034

y,ri -a iiirI1 =^


OUTSTANDING
Waterfront residence: tastefully
remodeled 3/2 5/2 home, high & dry
(never flooded), ample space (042 ac)
for boats, i I i i
240ft sea .11 .i i i I. 1.1 I
roof, A/Ci .,i ...... .
meticulous maintained
Priced sooo right at 399,000!

.. -1 AO^H


COUNTRY ESTATE -
PLEASANT GROVE
.lh IIi ,)mbuit
.,,, , i quality
throughout vaulted tongue & groove
cedlmngs, fireplace; granite counters &
custom cabinetry; family room, den/office
2 + 2 car garage Exquisite outdoor
entertaining' Jenn-Air summer kitchen,
covered patio w/pavers & soaring ceilings
$549,900 ___


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY
Sno bridges! 2 master suites,
CASHIERS CT. apartment on the lower level.
Spotless 3/2/2, built 2007 on Upper level accessible via elevator.
0.55ac close to Davis Lake. Pool, hurricane shutters, security
Desirable Inverness Golf Estate system, updated kitchen & bath-
and IGCC neighborhood. Super rooms. 190 ft. of seawall, boat lift!
high efficiency A/C system, Everything just waiting for you.
City water& sewer. $119,900 $488,000


OPEN LAKE Boat dock, bi-level deck, completely PRIVACY, POOL, SPACE! l : I
remodeled 2/2. Very pretty & very private. living on 2.4 AC, $119,900. Fireplace, living & family MOVE RIGHT IN, make it yours! 2005 3/2/2
Paradise awaits you. $88,500. 3762 N. Webb rooms... Home needs alot of work! #705796. Tomika w/1,277 living. NEW paint & flooring! $94,900!
Pt. #704263. Jean 352.201.7034 Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. #705686. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


ROOM TO ROAM!
Spectacular ~. i 1. ... 1 ... lanai
on 214 ac' il i ,ached
garage w/12ft roll-up door perfect for
your RV Nicely landscaped with pretty
oaks and well maintained, too New roof
(2013), 14 Seer HVAC (2009), generator
& perimeter alarm
$249,895






NICELY WOODED 5 ACRE LOT
off Rosebill, very private, deeded access The
perfect place to build your retreat The short
distance to the Withlacoochee State Forest
(Tillis Hill Trail) makes it a desirable location
for the horse and country lover
$55,000


E10 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


I r





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



g*1 Choil


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 Ell




To place an ad, call 563-59666


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
*2 bedroom, 1 bath
@$500
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
CRYSTAL RIVER
3br 2ba $650- Incl,
Appliances, Water-
Trash, Fenced yard,
Pets ok,352-587-2555




3 BR, 2BA, Attached
screen rm & carport
55+ park. Lot rent $235
includes water & trash
pickup, great for
snowbird or elderly
person $12,500.
(352) 212-4265
$11,094, DISCOUNT
New Jacobsen,
2085 sq. ft., 4BR/3BA
"5 yr. Warranty".
No down payment,
use land or trade in.
Payment only, $471.18
P & I, WAC
Call 352-621-9182
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2, JACOBSEN
HOME 5Yr. Warranty
$2,650 down, only
$297.44/ mo.,
Fixed rate W.A.C.
Come and View
352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 Stock Sequoia
2,200 sq ft $12K OFF!
FOR FREE PHOTOS....
John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 201
for details


BAD CREDIT?
FORECLOSURE?
BANKRUPTCY?
Want your own
home? I can help!!
35% down cash or
land and you
are approved.
No gimmick,
386-546-5833
Singing Forest 46'
2 Bed 1 Bath. Mobile
Home, fixer upper,
$6000. 352-344-1365

Tired of Renting?
Super clean 2004
3BR/2BA, on V2 acre
ready to move in!!!
$3,500 down,
$380.03/mo. W.A.C.
Call 386-546-5833 for
details Won't last!

USED HOMES
Single, Double &
Triple Wides
Starting at $6,500
Call (352) 621-9183
2011 Live Oak
4BR/2BA
$46,900, 28x60





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 800-747-4283
for details




CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 w/ carport,
3 storage shed
$85,900.
Agent (352) 382-1000




Castle Lake Park
INVERNESS 3/2/2 cpt
scnd lanai, steel roof,
caged inground pool,
1 acre, no HOA fees,
$69k (352) 238-4521


TAYLOR MADE
HOMES
LOT MODEL
BLOWOUT
All Homes Discounted
$4,000 to $8,000
Even up to $12.000
off Sticker Price
Call 352-621-3807




Crystal River
2bd/2ba double-wide
with Sun Room
in Crystal River Village
$20,500. or lease to
buy. PIs call Dell Nora
at 352-795-7161
Doublewide,
2 BR, 2BA,
Recent shingle roof
New AC, MUCH MORE
55+ Park $15,500
(352) 634-0274
LECANTO 2/2
Double wide MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf &A/C, shed, on
rented lot $245 mo, incl
water, sewer, trash. 55+
park. 352-628-1171
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090


















FLORAL CITY
1/1 $550/mo 400/sec
Include elect, H20 &
trash, NO PETS. 813
731-5347


7AcTION~
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHoimeRentals.corn
CRYSTAL RIVER
10941 W.Gem St .................... $550
2/1 Hrgo duple dose to hosphl
9660 W. Camphor Ln. .......... $800
3/I /2 Cl hom on corner lot
16 Beahtn.#102 ............... 900
1// Furtished sluhio ootment
BEVERLY HILLS
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2150 Austin Dr. (CS) ...$............ 550
2/1 5 Cute home, some furniture, fenced yord
2332W. Silverlll Ln. (L) ........... $550
2/] Affordoble oportmnt, ground floor
9047 N. Travis Dr. (CS) ........... $625
2/2 Roomy duplo neXtO nd eon
HOMOSASSA
48005 Wood Way ................. $900
3/2/1 Riverhovenfullyfurrished
117101 ClearwaterCt ............ $1000
2/2 Waterort molls home
INVERNESS
1'i I rll,,r ,, .., fir.) t .


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED
GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you'

2/2/2 Poo0care Included $900
2/2/1 $700
2/1/1 Pool $750
3/2/2 $850


3/1 $600
2/1/1 $550

3/2 Doubllde $1,000
Jennifer Fudge
CherylScruggs
2Property Manager/
'Realtor-Associates
S352-726-9010


-I,
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857


FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes Cable
septic water, trash. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI I1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1, W/D hookup,
water, trash & lawn.
included $550 mo. +
Sec. 352-634-5499
CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1, $425. mo. &
LECANTO
Newer Duplex 2/2
(352) 628-2815
HOMOSASSA
2/2, clean, quiet, center
location $550., 352-
563-2114,257-6461
INVERNESS
2/1, $650. mo.
412 Tompkins Street
352-895-0744

Inverness
Homosassa
Government
Subsidized Apts
available.

Must meet eligibility
requirements. Equal
Housing
Opportunity.
Homossassa
(352) 628-6073
Inverness
(352) 726-4397
TTY-800-233-6694


l 66,
anPJiLill1


CRYSTAL RIVER
NICE**
Secret Harbour Apts.
Newly remodeled
2/1 $575 1st, last, sec.
Unfurn. Incd Waterlawn,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037

Business
Locations






CRYSTAL RIVER
BUSINESS. LOC.
FOR RENT
Hwy 19 Downtown
exec. location,1000 sf
Very Clean remodeled
352-634-2528




Sugarmill Woods
2/2'/2/1, like new, long
Term, (352) 428-4001




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
1BR HOUSE, End of
Parson's Pt washed
$390. F/L & dep
(352) 697-1911




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 Good neighbrhd.
Close to stores, $700
mo.F/L/S., 249-7033

BLACK DIAMOND
Lovely 2400SF home
3BR/2BA/2CG + 1 for
the golf cart. $1200
month plus security.
(352) 464-3905


Homosassa Spg
2/2 on Canal, new
paint, flooring, w/d,
pets ok $800 mthly,
8928 W. White
Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442

INVERNESS
2/2/2 on golf course,
$800. & 3/2 $800 mo.
352-895-0744

INVERNESS
3/2/2
Starting @ $750.
www.relaxfl.com
352-403-4646
or 352-403-4648

INVERNESS
4/1, $650 first 1st & sec
(352) 408-9470

INVERNESS
Highlands 3/2/2
Near Anna Jo Rd.By
appt 786- 423-0478
or (352) 637-1142

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

INGLIS
Charming furn or unfurn
effic/cottage all utilities
incl'd. $595 no smoking
352-422-2994

Inverness
2/1 Fla rm clean quiet
fishing dock, $450.
860-2452, 201-4559





CRYSTAL RIVER
Share My Home
$85/wk. includes elect,
sat. dish 352-228-1802


Wanted to Rent with
possible horse area,
but not necessary
Furn. or Semi Furn.
House, Nov- Through
May, Dunnellon, Inver-
ness Hernando Area
Florida References
(989) 271-8423








AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE



Lecanto 2.3 acres
Fenced & crossed
fenced Great for
horses, 3/2 DW,
Remodeled. Owner
Finance w/ good
down paymt $69,900.
352-527-7015



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www,
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






10/12/13
Outstanding Multi
Generation Florida
Estate Auction 1085
N Orange Ave
DeLand, FL 32720
9am Period Furniture
& antiques, Art,
Sterling, clocks,
3 boats, 2 Vehicles
& 8 motorcycles +
contents of 2
homes,
www.dudlevs
auction.com
ab1667 10%bp
352-637-9588






Mini-Storage Facility
on US Hwy 19
Homosassa, Florida-
2.74 acres with 150
storage units of
varying sizes-40 dry
storage units-office
for business and
additional office for
rental income. Ask-
ing $625,000.00
owner financing to
qualified buyer with
25% down. Contact
Diana G. Marcum,
PA- Licensed
Real Estate Broker
352-341-0900






3/1, fenced yard,
corner lot. Needs
some repairs. As is
$39,500 Negotiable
2081 W Gardenia Dr
(352) 465-0623






LAUREL RIDGE
Upgraded in perfect
cond. 2/2/1 w/ Florida
room & new porch.
$89,900 Call Barbara
Stone (352) 586-3072


Call me to learn
about a
Free Home
Warranty Plan"
Buvina or Sellina

* --


Realty
Connect
Teri Paduano
Owner/Broker
15+ Years
Experience
352-212-1446
www.Realty
Connect.me


Lecanto

Timberlane Estates!
3/2/2, w/ screen pool,
Located on 1 AC
2690 W. Express Lane
$139,000 Call Gwen
795-1520 or 634-1725




Citrus Hills 3/2/2
caged pool, 1 acre,
great neighborhood,
call for details
(352) 746-6552




8535 E Gospel Island
Rd Inverness 3 bed-
room. 2 bath. Water
front living and all the
luxuries. 30 Ft glass
porch, cathedral ceil-
ings. Extensively
rennovated including
wood and tile floors.
Granite and new roof
and kitchen. Over 2000
Sqft Living area.
$139,900 352-817-5875
or miksh@earthlink.net

INVERNESS
2002, Custom Built
3/2/2
With Extra Lot
$114.500.
352-344-3112

RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3BD $750-$825
888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE
REALTY ONE


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


IAIVII ..UI I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Realestate ...
I'm there for you !

The fishing is great
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING TO SELL?
CALL ME TODAY!






For Sale I ,
HOMOSASSA
4/2 BLOCK HOME,
MOTHER IN LAW APT.
decking, 1/4 ac, fenced,
lot of privacy $65,000
(305) 619-0282, Cell





I *?alAr I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


MINI FARMS AREA
4/2 on 10 ACRES
20 x 40 Pole Barn
Move in Condition
$139,900.
352-249-1248


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!
Prices are going up.
So is interest.
BUY NOW!
Owner
Financing
Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


For Ska u
Forest Lake, Hernando
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 2.5
Acres, Fenced. Many
extras including 24x36
Shop/garage. Sun
Room with Wood Burn-
ing Stove. Fruit trees. 2
8x10 Storage Sheds.
Security System. See
ad on 4SaleByOwner
for pictures. 352
726-7755


9
Citrus County
Homes


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email: debinfantine@
yahoo.com


LaWanda Watt

Customer Service
is My Specialty!
I want to work
for you!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watt@
century21.cor
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


www.chronicleonline.com


I NEED
HOMES
TO SELL


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Whispering Pines Villa
2/2/1, new carpet, tile,
paint,all appliances
including w/d.
$69,900.
(352) 726-8712




Bank Approved
Sale. Smith Lake
Alabama. Deep
Dockable Home
Sites from $59,900
(Take Virtual Tour@
LiveLakefront.com).
24 Prime Lake front
lots ordered sold
October 12th. Buy at
pennies on the
dollar all must go!
Open or wooded -
level throughout to
the water's edge.
Make an early ap-
pointment. Bank's
loss Your gain!
Don't miss this. It's
unbelievable land at
an unbelievable
price Call now for
early appointment!
1-877-448-6816.

Blue Ridge Mountain
Land Liquidation!
1.37 acres, national
forest access, only
$9,800. Was
$74,900. Hardwood
setting, breathtaking
mountain/ valley
views. Mild climate,
Tremendous 4
season recreation.
Paved rds, UG utili-
ties, water. Excellent
financing Call
1-866-952-5303, x21

LAND & CABIN
PACKAGE ON
CUMBERLAND
PLATEAU! 10 Acres
and 1200 sq. ft.
cabin $49,900.
Minutes from 4 State
Parks & TN River.
Call 877-282-4409


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Foreclosed Cabin
On 4 Acres! Just
$89,900. Bring your
hammer & nails.
Great fixer upper on
beautiful wooded
rolling land. Enjoy
wildlife, creeks,
ponds, lake access.
Must see! Call
877-888-0267, x 436





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFu-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 6, 12N 4P
3/3 Waterfront Home
1106 SE 4th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 586-4822


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


Fkd4 Your trwuo Hem
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehori .finder.com


Ready fooEstaeptc
NORTH GEORGIA -
Long Flowing Creek
Property, Secluded
on culdesac.
Perfect retreat near
Oktoberfest in
Helen, GA. Utilities in
place ready to build
for $29,900.
1-877-717-8992
ext591




Lake Pananosoffke
Ready for home, septic,
pwr, carport, 2 sheds &
fenced bk yard $19,900
obo 352-444-2272


E12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME
Continued from Page E9

room setting might go that
extra mile for you, because
you really connect."
After he played one liv-
ing room show and wanted
to do more, singer-song-
writer Fran Snyder created
ConcertsInYourHome .com
to help musicians and hosts
connect He charges artists
a membership fee and of-
fers a database of perform-
ers that's searchable by
state, genre or instruments.
"There's a huge transfor-
mation going on in enter-
tainment," Snyder said.
Some venues have closed,
some acts that used to
draw 200 or 300 people
struggle to get 50, and more
musicians are hustling to
support themselves rather
than looking for a pay-
check from record labels.
"We're literally building
a new touring infrastruc-
ture," Snyder said.
From Pat DiNizio, lead
singer of The Smithereens,
doing all-request living
room shows, to actress
Sarah Jessica Parker host-
ing a living room fundraiser
for President Barack
Obama's re-election, this
old idea seems new again.
In New York City, Mar-
jorie Eliot has offered free,
Sunday "Parlor Jazz" con-
certs in her living room in
Harlem for a decade. And
the New York-based Un-
dead Music Festival fea-
tured performances in
homes as a companion to
professional venues.
In Pittsburgh, five musi-
cians created the Living
Room Chamber Music
Project to share classical
music in a more relaxed
environment.
'A house concert allows us
to figuratively and literally
close the distance with our
audience," said one of them,
oboist Lenny Young. 'As
working musicians, it's very
important to us that if people
aren't coming to concerts, we
need to come to them."


Janet Hans co-hosts
Urban Campfires: San An-
tonio House Concerts, a
series that grew so big it
began renting a recreation
facility that holds 100 peo-
ple. Organizers retain the
living-room ethos by in-
cluding a potluck dinner
and giving all proceeds to
the artist, whom they also
put up for the night.
"We're not in the living
room anymore but we still
strive to have that commu-
nity feeling," Hans said.
Pointers for hosts:
1. Start with a small,
weekday event. Before you
know whether 15 or 50 of
your friends will attend a
live show, it's better for you
and the performer to start
with lower expectations.
2. Embrace the space
you have. Don't strip your
home of personal touches
or feel you have to set up
rows of folding chairs.
3. Keep it private. Put-
ting up fliers and advertis-
ing your shows acting
like a business instead of a
private party could get
you in trouble with local
government or your home
insurance.
4. Set a suggested dona-
tion from guests. Make it
clear all proceeds are
going to the musician.
5. Invite neighbors. If you
don't want them annoyed
by noise or traffic, make
sure they're part of the fun.
Pointers for performers:
1. Be honest with your-
self about whether you like
interacting with fans. If
you don't want to answer
questions about your
music, gear, training and
the like, house concerts
might not be for you.
2. Communicate your
needs. If you need a cer-
tain amount of space or if
you like to do a sound
check early in the day and
then have some alone time
to prepare, let your host
know ahead of time.
3. Be flexible. House
concert hosts are not pro-
fessional venue owners.
They might not have the
gear a club would have or


be as familiar with your
needs. If they didn't think
to provide a green room,
you might need to dress in
the bathroom and warm
up on the porch.
4. Ask before you invite
your friends or fans. Your
hosts might welcome a few
additional guests, but as
with any party, ask rather
than assume.
5. Connect with fans.
Whether you ask for
names and emails or invite
people to like you on Face-
book, if someone likes
your music, stay in touch.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in
Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food
section./Thursdays

* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion
section./Saturdays

* Read about area businesses in the Business section./Sundays


305 MUSTANG 137 N. FRESNO

3/3/3 702967 $379,000 I 3/2/2 701884 $119,900


E 9 N. WADSWORTH 87 S. LUCILLE 52 S. FILLMORE 19 N. ADAMS 38 S COLUMBUS
3/1.5 704088 $52,500 2/2/2 703454 $79,500 2/1/1 704090 $45,900 2/1.5 704683 $48,500 2/2 704687 $55,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


I FLORAL CITY


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 7 4 6 m9 C
BROKER/ASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E13








Inmates' garden could save Okla. jail $35K


HANNAH COVINGTON
The Oklahoman

MIDWEST CITY, Okla. -
When Calvin Reed saw the rows
of leafy, green bushes shrivel in
the July heat, he knew it was
time to start digging.
Reed, 45, gripped his shovel
and foraged the soil for potatoes,
hardly stopping for a break in
the shade. He enjoys the chance
for an honest day's work, he said.
"I'd pick doing this to being in-
side any day They have to come
and tell me to take a break,"
Reed said.
He woke up with the sun to
catch a van that took him and
nine other inmates from the


Oklahoma County jail to a field
sprawling with crops next to the
sheriff's office substation in
Midwest City
The inmates work the field
through a garden program
started by Sheriff John Whetsel
three years ago.
The project aims to cut down
food costs at the county jail, while
offering inmates the chance to
learn about gardening and shave
time off their sentences.
"It keeps inmates busy,
teaches them a trade and helps
them work with their own hands
to grow things," Whetsel told
The Oklahoman.
After a health clearance
check, nonviolent offenders can


apply to the garden program,
Whetsel said. Most are in jail on
misdemeanor charges.
For some inmates, each day
spent working outside in the
plant beds cuts 2.5 days off their
sentence, Capt. Harry Falter
said.
The project has two harvests
per year, one in the spring and
fall.
Other than potatoes, inmates
grow onions, carrots, beets and
lettuce. It all is used in the jail's
kitchen.
"They work hard at it," Falter
said. 'As they dig the potatoes
up, they actually get to see and
touch what they've done."
The jail provides three meals a


day to about 2,500 inmates. That
pushes annual food costs well
over $2 million, Whetsel said.
When the land for the garden
program was purchased from
Tinker Air Force Base in 2004,
Whetsel knew it would eventu-
ally yield big savings, he said.
The sheriff estimates the crops
harvested this year will save the
jail $35,000 in food expenses.
"Whatever we produce in these
gardens is taken down to the jail
and will be eaten by the inmates,"
Whetsel said. "So far, it's been an
overwhelming success."
And the plan is to keep adding
more plants and crops each
season.
Thanks to rainy weather and


the hard work of the inmates,
they are expecting their biggest
harvest this year, Falter said.
Falter remembers what the
nine garden beds looked like be-
fore they cultivated the land in
2011.
"We spent the first year of the
program tilling the weedy field,
prepping it for planting," he
said.
Inmates passed the second
year experimenting with what
crops worked best and enjoyed a
small harvest
After their 500 potato plants
posted a strong showing despite
last summer's drought, inmates
decided to plant 2,600 plants this
year


Teila in E eE

REALTY GROUP


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


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Beautiful custom Martinique model located in the plush community of Terra Vista in Citrus Custom Vlla with many upgraded features including gourmet kitchen with 6-burner gas range,
entertaining with an open floor plan and lots of tle. Cooks wll love the large wak in pa ntry crown moving, custom master bedroom closet, custom window treatments and plantation
with plenty of storage. Enjoythe tropical garden view from your prate lanai. Come and enjoy s hitters. Oversized poolw w waterfall and extensive landscaping on cul-de-sac homesite.
the Florida fesvle at its b.MLS 705279 ....................199.900 Golf car a e secuy en an uch erMLS705130..424.900


Term 6 Moth or More


E14 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOUSING
Continued from Page E6

There's also pent-up de-
mand. A growing number
of people are moving out
from group homes or with
relatives to form their own
households, according to
U.S. Census data. Sales
typically increase when
households grow
"It's the demographics
that make a strong housing
recovery pretty much a
sure thing," said Patrick
Newport, a housing econo-
mist at HIS Global Insight.
Newport expects sales
will rise 10 percent this
year to 5.14 million. After
that, he predicts an 8 per-
cent gain next year to
roughly 5.55 million and a
4.5 percent rise in 2015 to
5.8 million. All are rela-
tively healthy levels.
The last time sales ex-
ceeded 5 million was in
2007, when the housing
bubble burst. From 2008
through 2012, sales aver-
aged 4.3 million a year
The average rate on a
30-year fixed loan this
week was 4.22 percent, ac-
cording to Freddie Mac.
That's above the average
of 3.35 percent reached in
May But it's far below the
average rate of 7 percent
since 1985, according to
Bankrate.com data.
Rates tend to rise when
the economy is strengthen-
ing. More jobs and better
pay would likely boost
home sales.
Still, the increase in
rates has added thousands
of dollars to the cost of a fi-
nancing a home. That's
happened at a time when
wages have barely kept
pace with inflation and un-
employment is a still-high
7.3 percent.
And there's some con-
cern that the government
shutdown could delay the
processing of some home
loans, particularly those
backed by the Federal
Housing Administration.
Buyers who could get
loans in June and July


moved swiftly to lock in
the lower rates. Completed
sales of previously occu-
pied homes rose in August
to a six-year high, accord-
ing to the National Associ-
ation of Realtors.
But fewer Americans
signed contracts to buy
homes in August. It typi-
cally takes a month or two
for buyers to close on a
house after locking in
rates and signing a con-
tract. Some analysts pre-
dict sales are cooling off
this fall.
"I am concerned be-
cause prices are rising and
higher rates squeeze your
limits," said Brian Guz-
man, a broker at Coldwell
Banker in Chicago who
mostly caters to first-time
buyers.
Many buyers are care-
fully watching the change
in mortgage rates.
Jeff Tyni and his wife
are still shopping for a
home in Orange County,
Calif, and would like to
buy soon. But if rates go
much higher, they may
continue renting.
"I would say 5 percent is
the tipping point," Tyni
said. "If I have to pay over
5 percent, I'll just wait."
The Federal Reserve is
also paying close attention
to the spike in mortgage
rates. It was a big reason
the Fed opted last month
not to slow its $85-billion-
a-month in bond pur-
chases, which are
intended to keep longer-
term interest rates low
Rates began to increase
in May after Chairman
Ben Bernanke signaled
the Fed might reduce
those purchases, if the
economy strengthened.
But the Fed held off last
month, and since then
mortgage rates have fallen
for three straight weeks.
Even small fluctuations
in rates can translate into
added costs or savings. In
the case of the Williamses,
it was a little of both.
The couple will close
this month on a four-bed-
room home. They secured
a $607,000 mortgage in late


September at 4.125 per-
cent, a quarter-percentage
point higher than what
they were quoted in late
May That's $88 more a
month, or $31,504 over 30
years.
Kevin Williams says it
could have been worse. In
early September, he was
quoted a rate of 4.375 per-
cent, which would have
added another $89 each
month.
Still, they are buying in
San Diego, one of the na-


tion's priciest real estate
markets. The added fi-
nancing costs convinced
the couple to buy a smaller
house.
"Essentially, we ended
up giving up an extra bed-
room," said Williams.
Home sales typically
drop off in the fall because
many buyers want their
children enrolled in
school when they move.
Yet some brokers are still
seeing steady demand.
Completed home sales


***Foreclosure List***'

4/3/2 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview
705705- $174,900 Estates, 705702- $189,900
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 John Maisel 352-302-5351
2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello Deep Water Canal Front
705061- $74,900 Home -705665
Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Tami Scott 352-257-2276
Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over Immaculate 3/2/1 on half
two acres! 705223- $89,900 I an acre. 705068 $82,900
Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047
SCharming 3/2/2 in Citrus 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen.
Springs. 705093 $99,900 704264 $124,900
Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329
3/2/2 on over an acre. Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on
705142 $124,900 an acre. 705087 -$149,900
Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047
SCustom built 3/3/3 on 1.11 Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home,
acre. 705148 $235,000 dbl. lot. 704938 $349,900
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 Tami Scott 352-257-2276
Desirable Brentwood Estates 2/1 in Yankeetown.
3/2/2 det. villa. 704862 $119,900 704923 $19,900 I
John Maisel 352-302-5351 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329
SBeverly Hills 3/1 Handyman's Cozy 2/1/1 in Beverly
Delight. 705153 -$41,550 Hills. 704381 $49,900
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 Tami Scott 352-257-2276


Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2
mobile, 1 acre. 704257 $22,900
John Maisel 352-302-5351


2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres.
704781 $34,500
Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047


at Century 21 Redwood
Realty in Ashburn, Va. -
about 30 miles outside of
Washington, D.C. are up
65 percent from a year ago,
said Edward Berenbaum,
co-owner of the brokerage.
And attendance at open
houses remains high.
"If you have a desirable
listing that is priced where
the market is, you're not
going to be on the market
for too many weekends,"
Berenbaum said.


Rates began to increase in May after Chairman
Ben Bernanke signaled the Fed might reduce those
purchases, if the economy strengthened. But the
Fed held off last month, and since then mortgage
rates have fallen for three straight weeks.


O4eOOGAe6
REAL ESTATE, INC.
l 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
wwwVAII fvn mOM lv

BEST I
Realt o
"lo I
RealtorI


BEVERLY HILLS Excellent condition, HOMOSASSA 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
move in condition Pergo floors, glass 3 skylights, absolutely beautiful, tile floors,
porch on back, awning to keep house laminate wood floors, vaulted & cathedral
cool, decorative driveway, beautifully ceilings, 3 bay window, split floor plan,
landscaped, nice neighborhood of newer ... I I. lIa room, dbl paned
homes #705297 $150,000 .. i ..,. ,. #705343 $125,000
I -JL


BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
2 car garage w/opener, w/rear wooden
deck, rear fenced, on corner lot,
cathedral & standard ceilings, well
maintained Newer tile, carpet & vinyl
flooring #705360 $97,000


DULfllELLUAI ZUUZ 4 oedroolM, 2 Datn, iVi/H
or 6 cars/workshop on 2 acres
I cabinets, china cabinet, carpet
1, m w ,t t,,t,,


CRYSTAL RIVER 1980 waterfront home
remodeled in 2010 Corian counter tops in
kitchen, slate counter tops in baths, wooden
dock w/boat lift, short water trip to Crystal
River & Gulf of Mexico 4 bedrooms,
2 baths #702122 $320,000





LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of
3 mobile homes/buildings, center of
county, 1 well, 2 septics, appointment
only One rented for $450/mo #703819
$106,000


DUNNELLON 2005 modular home w/3 HOMOSASSA Beautiful family home
bedrooms 2 baths, 9 ft ceilings w/crown on 6 3 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large
m i ,,. on 10 fenced & cross fenced acres, kitchen, family room w/fireplace, 5- x 24
*,', driveway Tile & wood floors, dbl barn w/8 x 24 work shop Fenced and
paned windows, custom built min wood cross fenced 1 car garage, screened rear
entertainment center #703832 $310,000 porch #705104 $189,000


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 E15

SO YOU KNOW
News notes tend to
run one week prior
to the date of an
event.During the
busy season, expect
notes to run no
more than twice.
Submit information
at least two weeks
before the event.
Early submission of
timely material is
appreciated, but
multiple publica-
tions cannot be
guaranteed.
Submit material at
Chronicle offices in
Inverness or Crystal
River or by e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicle
online.com.


0


The Wade Team
352-794-0888
352-527-1112
352-447-2595,Lr.-





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6tl jIf li t -/DJ Of,-t IJI Hmill.,I fil.J-itC'
i i. 111 ; I i lit.m.f. li I If
.I ......... i. l 1h 1..' 6 h .1 '1di 6'.1 .- 1'.h h 1.
HI .1 .I I, .. . ; I ..... ,,,id h
'. h ....I I 6. ,,,,,,,I h,,, I....... .
I l I N.,Ih. S228,.00 I
r. 1 ,,N ASKING S228.900
fi t',,. .'- _._ "_.n,


OVEURFOR H
~~I'-. FA ". iId F-F1F p 'I d C.t WORTH
16453 W. Mai St. Inenes FL 345P ClNdyo
YEail. inoctucutyetrro ww* ituconycn u NDy lco


-I I NICE PRICE REDUCTION ON
INVERNESS MOBILE HOME!

* N..: I I.i. l.. I l.i" 9,:J 6 1 6.. [ J l....I l,.l. 6...11

Mi _',1_" i:i $90,000 ONLY $19,900
I:'I',I'. ciliuscoun/j'sold. cornam Call Elias G Knallah
Jeanne f Willaid Pickiel 212 3410 loI mole inloimalion 352 400-2635


GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY





6ri wi4 ASKING S158.900
P~r F 0 717,77S5
1 li l I h,. lh l,,,, iii h ,,h .. .


KHNEINUIUN 4 UELU, BAIN!
Ii I r, I h I 1-j II 'll II., I f 1,r I ,
h JI.l.jlil hi:p; U~p n 11661 plmi.1..
Ihqi.qF l..ij.:l '.i I.l
ONLY $162,000
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


W1 /i.. 'IJ, I.-'.hJ I1.:]1 ,iJ ..iJr.JrJ "'lj ..-
I'r ... f . fI"q '" .. I h II'.. b' I .]..I[ '.'u'
,: if *l'Tid [. ,lj ll i ll .l hIJ l li ..


'. = i'..,. PRICED TO SELL S22,900
Call Nilda Cano 352-270 0202


GETTING BACK TO NATURE!
iirji tlhl 1i- i W IIH irj fIHIR ji I IJ.if H
hJK *:.UI~t *:.tFUKU~ltl 0:'rJ *:.PUI:t *.
f h. -..f iq Ir .-., Iv... J .. il...l. IV .. b.ilh, .
,i.H l l .iii i. vi-llH llli i.,.ii.i VVi J i.J ..l I- n
b a.d. I . nl.- V ld. J h i" I & A...l U [

IM'.-. = ":i's". GREAT BUY AT S124.900
Call Dmons Mine,. 352 422 4627








BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED

6 ..1. id ,, m,


ri =--iil : $140.000
Cil Jm filgij'in 11 422 2173
t M4 l'?l V iitcul-IU41l hept ll.3me


OPEN WATERFRONT
. I ,,,, ,,,,,,,, I I

,,,,.. ,, 11 .,. .,,I p~ n .,H n 1, ... .... .. I .., d
I,,,,llh , ,ll, ,,,,iI~ Ih, i, ,1,,l l,,, ,, ~ ,, l, h ,

ri 1 i ASKING S188.900
P.I P.I#.I ? 717 '7Si












* F, ki ,h-pI hll
- ,,,,d 16 0( $..it.
* 31AM_',' iqjjM

MI =/I:1) $200,000
Jeanne oi Wi/laid Pickiel 212-3410
i'i1'i'r. ciiIuscounn}lsold. cornam


3 BED/2.5 BATH/I CAR GARAGE

rji ) hl l /,1 i: I.:. ,,, ,1 ,I ,), ,i r1 I ,,,I,1 ,,, ,,.
I.r h...... :..:.I 1 l).:..l .:. I.l111l I. II H n.:n .:.
1 .16 1 .- j
ril: =11 f-.: $105.000
Cii SlI.I n Stiat 352 212 0211








COMMERCIAL BUILDING


jn,:.- I .J . a, .. I ,, b I...l h ...- ,

Mi'.- =:'L. ASKING $98,190
Call Jim Moi Ion 4222173
In see this prime location


DUNNELLON
BANK APPROVED SHORT SALE .:.t..i. r I:... 1 Lh.:.. ...... [ l..ih .. ,....I
b: J.J"'" I'Iu .J'l f i lh |.. .I..l ..l Vuh KF.I|II|| ill .,l .F IIn.I MM I I. .1. I I|l|'
I :-,:I.H ~ l H: l:.,vl...d l~l .,li:ll.if l mj l h f.f.l~in ml lldhl: L.,:ih.j .. H.i: .: j.: ,hj .
111111-. l I. I.. I :.I.. h 'r an l-. '.l rr''irrrr .:rr I I 'I.I) [."r ..Ir.'.-I l'rrr. h l' a


MI1'. 1 1)l:'' ASKING $110.0000 IM'.- ,/-I'l',. $54,000
Nancj Jenks 352 400 8072 icellI David Kai /lz 954.3838786
7266668 inlficel_ OFF 352 726B66685


THIS BEAUTIFUL 3 BDRM, 2 BATH,
2 CAR GAR. AND CAGED INGROUND POOL
rJ.v.H..I.- :11: (h .. h I' i d.... "Im.u ,


$125,000
Call Mat Iha Sn de, 352-476 8727
ask loI hlie = 705660


* H -.ai,.llli rlnlllll
* Iff. I.ill. MH

MiL = i')l_"I $79,700
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
i1'u1'u'. ciliiusconuni'sold. coamn


POOL!
e ,^ uhlulll '. b^ ...'. I l l b.ilh /1".. I..'.. h .
.I all Irh 1.1'. 1 iarJ [.if II ,..... il a

1.,,i1 .a -l,, ,,u,, hulb $259,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352.302 7699


PRICED TO SELL
f l... :'. b >:U l... l'll. -' b ,:Jl _' i. .,l i. l .'|:" ii'I.. .. .

This one will nol ilasi!
Mi', =i-:IQ.14 $59,900
Call lalIl'anda ,I'a11 352 212 1989


* L)VH '.' :IB. : l,.,:l,
* I /Il:.. -" i:i. h i_ l i\ : ihlji.i

* NI'Jr : i- I: A,, :. ....I BI ,,ihiI

Ml1 =11:l0.Q $110,000
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
Iu'u'I. ciliuscouni'rsold. cornam


WELCOME HOME!!

.:...... ..:. .. I .1. ,. 1 .. i l .:.. I Hm' ,j
,,. h h l ,, I IH H.)...... I .'" ,,..):

r i1-,'-.I' ASKING $88.900
Pit Di, ,,352'2121280
I'l.'i hln.li .nn 1,}n in il il il ,;211llld t '*: .Ini


BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY HOME!
.6 h1 ,,,l I. I,', ,,,, ,, I, ,,,, 1 11 ,h1


dI 1,,.,,6 I,,, 1 , 1
rii: =-,'.-:- $219.000
Ci i l di, I'l 32*3i .2la 3
iIhni Pi-ia 3Z26384.1273


E16 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013




Full Text

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INSIDE OCTOBER 6, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 119 ISSUE 60 $1 CITRUS COUNTYUtter romp: Florida State easily dispatches Maryland /B1 COMMENTARY:Go to CubaGuest columnist Peter Graulich writes about the U.S. embargo of Cuba./Page C1Read more about his experiences in Cuba./Page A17www.chronicleonline.com BUSINESS:Cancer costsRead about the costs of dealing with breast cancer for Citrus County residents./Page D1 SIKORSKIS ATTIC:Made where?Antiques expert John Sikorski advises a reader about this ewer, made at the turn of the last century in Palestine. /Page E6 IN THEIR WORDS:26 yearsBud Short talks about his time as an MP in the Army./ Page A20 USA WEEKEND:Good healthTVs The Doctors and Nashville star Connie Britton share secrets of good health for women of all ages./ Inside Annies Mailbox......A18 Classifieds................D4 Crossword..............A18 Editorial....................C2 Entertainment..........A4 Horoscope................A4 Lottery Numbers......B3 Lottery Payouts........B3 Menus . . . . .A13 Movies....................A18 Obituaries................A8 Together..................A22 Veterans . . . .A20 INDEX HIGH90LOW70Few afternoon showers, rain chance 40%.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning SUNDAY Pickers or poachers? CHRISVANORMER Staff writerA popular herbal supplement has become a new cash crop in Citrus County. Buyers at two motels in Homosassa Three Rivers and Bell Villa are paying by the pound for quantities of saw palmetto berries. On Wednesday, county residents were getting 87 cents a pound for the berries theyd harvested from their back yards and vacant lots. The berries are an expanding industry. According to the Naples Daily News, the industry, with a strong presence in Immokalee, is now the No. 3 herbal supplement nationwide for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP), a condition often referred to as an enlarged prostate, and even prostate cancer, with about $700 million in global sales. The figures came from Valensa International, a Eustisbased company that focuses on the saw palmetto extract business. Issues such as tracking raw material supply and chain of custody became a part of our approach to product manufacture, Valensa posted on its website. The source of the berries, however, presents a problem as thorny as the palmetto shrub that Associated PressSawpalmettoberries hang from apalmettotree March 1, 2006, in Belle Glade. A year earlier, more than 5 million pounds of the berries were gathered in Florida, where most of the worlds wild sawpalmettosgrow. Fruit of saw palmettos draw often-unwanted harvesters See PICKERS/ Page A5 Families hoard cash five years after US crisis BERNARDCONDON AP business writerNEW YORK Five years after U.S. investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed, triggering a global financial crisis and shattering confidence worldwide, families in major countries around the world are still hunkered down, too spooked and distrustful to take chances with their money. An Associated Press analysis of households in the 10 biggest economies shows that families continue to spend cautiously and have pulled hundreds of billions of dollars out of stocks, cut borrowing for the first time in decades and poured money into savings and bonds that offer puny interest payments, often too low to keep up with inflation. It doesnt take very much to destroy confidence, but it takes an awful lot to build it back, said Ian Bright, senior economist at ING, a global bank based in Amsterdam. The attitude toward risk is permanently reset. A flight to safety on such a global scale is unprecedented since the end of World War II. The implications are huge: Shunning debt and spending less can be good for one familys finances. When hundreds of millions do it together, it can starve the global economy. Some of the retrenchment is not surprising: High unemployment in many countries means fewer people with paychecks to spend. But even people with good jobs and little fear of losing them remain cautious. Lehman changed everything, said Arne Holzhausen, a senior economist at global insurer Allianz, based in Munich. Its safety, safety, safety. The AP analyzed data showing what consumers did with their money in the five years before the Great Recession began in December 2007 and in the five years that followed, through the end of 2012. The focus was on the worlds 10 biggest economies the United States, China, Japan, Germany, France, the United Public comment moves up agenda CHRISVANORMER Staff writerINVERNESS Residents who want to address county commissioners wont have to wait through so much of the meeting: Public comments will start at 1:05 p.m. at Tuesdays board meeting. The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) approved the Public Participation Ordinance at the Sept. 24 meeting, which resulted in changes to scheduling items on the agenda. Before the ordinance change, public comments started at 1:30 p.m., after service awards and proclamations. The change to Citrus County Code Section 2-49 dealing with public participation at board meetings came about in response to recent state legislation in Senate Bill 50, also known as the Anti-Shushing Bill. It was sponsored by Sen. Joe Negron, R-Palm City, to amend Floridas open-meetings law to guarantee residents a reasonable right to be heard at public meetings. During the past few WHAT: Citrus County Boar d of County Commissioners meeting. WHEN: 1 p .m. Tuesday; public comments and questions will be taken at 1:05 p.m. WHERE: Room 100, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. AGENDA: A vailable on the countys website, www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, at the Lecanto Government Building or in the commissioners suite on the second floor of the courthouse in Inverness. QUESTIONS: Ma y be sent before the meeting to Tobey Phillips, executive assistant to the board, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450, or emailed to tobey.phillips@bocc.citrus.fl.us. WATCH: The meeting will be televised live on cable TV on Channel 622 on Bright House and Channel 9 on Comcast. The meeting also can be viewed live online. See COMMENT/ Page A7 Ladys Freedom Ride STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleKnown only as Shortee from Crystal River, this lady biker went all out for the inaugural Ladys Freedom Ride. Proceeds from the event will benefit breast cancer programs in Citrus and Hernando counties. Potential support for local breast cancer victims and their families is in the works, according to event coordinator Rebecca Prince. Bikers motor through county for breast cancer awareness ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerHOMOSASSA Pink shirts. Pink bandanas. Pink bikes. The color pink flooded the Citrus County streets Saturday as nearly 50 bikers united together for the inaugural Ladys Freedom Ride to save breasts through the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. Women and some men congregated at the HarleyDavidson of Crystal River before taking off on their 72.1-mile ride through Citrus County for breast cancer awareness. Today is a fundraiser for the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation, said coordinator Rebecca Prince. It is all about the ladies to help bring recognition and education to the area for breast cancer. All of the proceeds will be donated to the breast cancer foundation for research and all money will remain local, Hernando and Citrus counties. We are going to start a breast cancer awareness support group in both counties, also. See RIDE/ Page A7 See FAMILIES/ Page A14

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Special to the ChronicleCUBs Christmas registration is about to begin. Citrus United Basket (CUB) is accepting registration for its Christmas Food Program for families and Christmas Toy Program for children up to and including 13 years of age. Registered names will be cross-checked with sister agencies, which also provide Christmas toys, to ensure fair distribution of toys to every qualified child. Proof of Citrus County residence is required. Contact CUB directly for a list of other requirements. Registration will be from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, beginning Oct. 14, at 103 Mill Ave., Inverness. For more information, call 352-344-2242. To donate to CUB, visit citrusunitedbasket.org/.A2SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com Monday, Oct. 7, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Leesburg Best Western Chain of Lakes 1321 N. 14th Street Attend a FREE Seminar: HIP PAIN? 000G9AU 000G843 CUB preparing for holiday registrations Oktoberfest continues in Crystal River STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleThe 34th annual Citrus Sertoma Oktoberfest is well under way Saturday at the north end of the Crystal River Mall complex as A.J. with Walkin Tacos serves up a plate to Crystal River resident Rebecca Miller and her 3-year-old son Kadrin Summelin. The rest of the family, Lynard and 2-year-old Kashis Summelin (sitting in background), wait for lunch in the shade. The food and festivities continue today from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Volunteers Marilyn Schoefer with Mission in Citrus Homeless Shelters and Ashton Newhart with Advanced Aluminum get ready for the lunch rush Saturday at the 34th annual Oktoberfest at the north end of the Crystal River Mall complex. Oktoberfest will continue today from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a car show, and The Terry Cole Show on stage from noon to 5. Organizers Brian and Maureen Tambasco from the Citrus Sertoma Club are pleased with the way things have come together: Weve seen more support from the community and local businesses this year. They really came out to support Oktoberfest. Proceeds from this years event will benefit local charities and camps for children who are deaf and hearing-impaired.

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Around theSTATE Citrus County Committee to have final meetingThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its final coordination meeting for Citrus Countys 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the conference room of the Citrus County Chronicle building, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. Veterans service organizations and individuals participating on the committee are urged to attend. For more information, email chairman Chris Gregoriou at allprestige@yahoo.com or call 352-795-7000. Republicans hosting auction, dinnerThe Nature Coast Republican Club will host a spaghetti dinner from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at American Legion Post 155, Crystal River. In addition to dinner, there will be a silent auction and entertainment. Former elected officials will be the cooks and Commissioner Scott Adams will be the emcee for the event. The cost is $10. Tickets are available by calling 352746-7249. All are welcome. Golden Retriever Reunion slatedJoshuas House for Golden Retriever Rescue is having its annual Golden Retriever Rescue Reunion from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Rainbow Springs State Park. The reunion is open to all golden retrievers and their families. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. and coffee and a snack will be available. Admission is a gift of canned or bagged in-date pet food, which will be donated to Citrus County Pet Meals on Wheels. Rainbow Springs State Park admission is $2 per person. All dogs must be on a leash; they are not allowed in the water and poop scooping is required. For more information, call 352-527-0669.GainesvilleTwo injured in plane crash near tailgatersTwo people were hospitalized Saturday after their small plane towing a banner crashed near tailgaters gatheredfor the Florida Gators football game against Arkansas Razorbacks. The planes propeller stopped and the pilot jettisoned the banner before trying to make an emergency landing in Flavet Field, said University of Florida Police Chief Linda Stump. Images from the scene show the mangled plane atop an empty, overturned pickup truck. No injuries on the ground were reported. Both people aboard the plane were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries, Stump said. From staff and wire reports Page A3SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerThe Florida Department of Education has scheduled three public meetings in October on the states mathematics and English language arts (ELA) standards. Gov. Rick Scott in late September withdrew Florida from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and is seeking the publics input in regards to Common Core State Standards, which are to be implemented in the 2014-15 school year. PARCC is a group of 18 states plus the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands working together to develop a common set of K-12 assessments in English and math anchored in what it takes to be ready for college and the workforce. These new K-12 assessments would be intended to build a pathway to college and career readiness by the end of high school, mark students progress toward the goal from third grade and provide teachers with timely information to guide instruction and provide student support, according to the PARCC website. Floridas families deserve rigorous, clear standards that will prepare our students for success in college and career, said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart in a news release. We look forward to the publics input, especially from teachers, students and their parents who are currently using these standards in their classrooms, to ensure that they meet our states high expectations. The three public meetings will take place Oct. 15, 16 and 17. The Oct. 15 meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Hillsborough Community College, 4001 W. Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa, the Oct. 16 meeting will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Broward College, 3501 S.W. Davie Road, Davie, and the Oct. 17 meeting will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College, 1528 Surgeons Drive, Tallahassee. Floridians who are unable to attend the public meetings are encouraged to submit their feedback to flstandards@fldoe.org or at www.flstandards.org. All comments must be submitted by Oct. 31 to be considered for review. Scheduled education public meetings Oct. 15 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Hillsborough Community College, 4001 W. Tampa Bay Blvd., Tampa. Oct. 16 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Broward College, 3501 S.W. Davie Road, Davie. Oct. 17 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College, 1528 Surgeons Drive, Tallahassee. Have your say on states education standards Public input meetings scheduled for Oct. 15 in Tampa and Oct. 17 in Tallahassee Special to the ChronicleCitrus County Animal Services will be hosting an event called Dogtoberfest from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 at 4030 Airport Road, Inverness. The event is sponsored by Citrus County Foundation for Animal Protection (CCFAP) as part of the grand opening of the new exercise yards for the shelter dogs. The public is encouraged to come out and help celebrate and honor those who made these play and exercise yards a reality. In March, when organizers first began fundraising, the goal seemed like a faraway dream. Within a few months, with the generous donations of county residents, they raised more than $11,000 to create four large fenced yards for the dogs. Spending some time out of their confining cement kennels has been hugely beneficial to their physical and emotional well-being. They now get some time where they can get sunshine, splash in kiddy pools and run freely for a while. Dogtoberfest promises to be a fun day, with a shelter dog show, music, free food, games and prizes and a chance to take home a new dog or cat. All dogs are fully vetted and microchipped. At shelters Dogtoberfest, pooches get to party ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerFLORAL CITYThe aroma of barbecue filled downtown Floral City on Saturday as mouths watered for a taste. The third annual Bikes & BBQ, which coincides with todays Rails to Trails Bike Ride, lured enthusiasts of food and crafts to the Floral City Library grounds. The Floral City Merchants Association recognized the opportunity for a community fundraiser, and thus Bikes & BBQ was born. We are encouraging the bike riders to come to Floral City a day early, said Dudley Calfee, president of the Floral City Merchants Association. Hardcore barbecue competitors were hungry for the grand title in four categories: ribs, chicken, pulled pork and sauces. Mommaz Boyz from Hernando were confident their flavors would electrify every taste bud. Luke Simmons and I have been friends our whole life, said John Messer. We like to cook and cook for fun. It is an opportunity for us to spend some time together as a family. We have already won because we are with family. Visitors were also able to explore cypress-shaded Floral City by visiting the arts and craft show, live music and other activities. The food was incredible, said Spring Hill attendee Lydia Hyde. I am very picky about my barbecue but have no complaints. PD Smith, Scott and Michelle Dalziel and 2PM entertained the crowd throughout the day.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleLuke Simons, co-owner of Mommaz Boyz Barbeque in Hernando, cuts into some ribs at the third annual Bikes & Barbecue in Floral City. WINNERS Pulled pork: John Messer and Luke Simmons with Mommaz Boyz Chicken: Jim Curry with Rooftop BBQ Sweet and hot sauces: Jim Curry with Rooftop BBQ Ribs: Robbie Yoakam with Gunslingers BBQ Finger-licking fan favorite: John Messer and Luke Simmons with Mommaz Boyz Associated PressMIAMI The federal website that offers a key provision of president Obamas health law launched this week with a sputter, a crash and a lot more web traffic than anyone expected. But by weeks end, with most Floridians still unable to access the online marketplace and sign up for health insurance, organizations were trying to build on momentum even though there was little they could do. Most of the counselors hired through federal grants to help sign people up for health insurance quickly went to Plan B when the website failed Tuesday morning. Several community health centers around the state, fearing the worst, printed paper applications in advance, even translating them into other languages. Other groups took down consumers contact information, promising to schedule appointments when the website begins to work better. There was an odd mix of excitement that the Affordable Care Act was garnering so much attention and frustration that it wasnt accessible. John Foley, an attorney and certified counselor for Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County, said hes tried unsuccessfully to log into the system almost non-stop since 5 a.m. Tuesday. A frustrated Foley said his navigators would not try again to enroll anyone until Monday. I am too worried to even involve a consumer at this point. I would hate to see a problem in the middle of the process, he said. I am very worried that people will lose faith in the system. Clearly we are losing most, if not all, of the momentum that was built up leading to open enrollment. But federal health officials cautioned this was just the first week in a six month enrollment process. Consumers dont need to sign up until Dec. 15 to get coverage on Jan. 1. They have until the end up March to sign up to avoid tax penalties. This has never been done before and this is a historic moment ... we think thats a tremendous beginning to this program and were off to a good start, said Julie Bataille of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Excitement, frustration characterize Obamacare rollout

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Birthday Develop an idea you have to help you convert something you enjoy doing into a profitable endeavor. Dont sit idle when you should explore new possibilities and making new connections. Consistency will make a difference as the year progresses. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Refuse to let anyone bully you. Take advantage of changes that take place in your community. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Expand your awareness, embrace new experiences and consider what you can do to improve your home life and surroundings. Express your feelings. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Creative suggestions will be well-received and help you secure a spot in an organization that interests you. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You can raise your profile and your reputation by offering a little help, guidance and loyalty. Socializing with other contributors will be conducive to love. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Keep life simple and avoid interactions that can lead to arguments or emotional upset. Protect your health, your emotions and your reputation. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Enjoy different forms of entertainment. Mingle and discuss plans with people you find inspiring. There are profits to be made and ideas to exploit. Aries (March 21-April 19) Uncertainty and indecision will pose a problem for you. Back up and dont allow anyone to pressure you into something that you feel unsure about. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Get back to basics. Alterations at home will improve your relationship with someone you love. Express your thoughts, ideas and plans for the future. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Get the details concerning a job you are asked to do before you take on the task. You might not want to follow through. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Youll be drawn to unusual people, as well as to destinations you have never visited before. An open mind will lead to new friendships and lifestyle changes. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Check out what everyone else wants. Consider what works and allows you to stay within your budget. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Travel plans, romantic destinations and nurturing whats important to you will make your day. TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Sunday, Oct. 6, the 279th day of 2013. There are 86 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On Oct. 6, 1927, the era of talking pictures arrived with the opening of The Jazz Singer, starring Al Jolson, a movie featuring silent and sound-synchronized sequences. On this date: In 1536, English theologian and scholar William Tyndale, who was the first to translate the Bible into Early Modern English, was executed for heresy. In 1884, the Naval War College was established in Newport, R.I. In 1928, Chiang Kai-shek became president of China. In 1958, the nuclear submarine USS Seawolf surfaced after spending 60 days submerged. Ten years ago: American Paul Lauterbur and Briton Peter Mansfield won the Nobel Prize for medicine for discoveries that led to magnetic resonance imaging. Five years ago: The Dow industrial average dropped to 9,955, its first close below 10,000 since 2004. One year ago: Five terror suspects, including Egyptian-born preacher Mustafa Kamel Mustafa, widely known as Abu Hamza alMasri, arrived in the United States from England and appeared in court in New York and Connecticut. Mustafa is accused of conspiring with some Seattle men to set up a terrorist training camp in Oregon and of helping abduct two American tourists and 14 other people in Yemen in 1998. Todays Birthdays: Actress Britt Ekland is 71. Singer Millie Small is 67. Singer-musician Thomas McClary is 64. Former NFL player and coach Tony Dungy is 58. Actress Elisabeth Shue is 50. Singer Matthew Sweet is 49. Country singer Tim Rushlow is 47. Actress Amy Jo Johnson is 43. Actress Emily Mortimer is 42. Actor Jeremy Sisto is 39. Actor Wes Ramsey is 36. Thought for Today: Talking comes by nature, silence by wisdom. Author unknown. Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 90 68 0.00 HI LO PR 91 68 0.00 HI LO PR 90 68 0.00 HI LO PR 89 67 0.00 HI LO PR 91 69 0.00 HI LO PR 89 67 trace YESTERDAYS WEATHER Few afternoon showers, rain chance 40%THREE DAY OUTLOOK Scattered showers and storms, rain chance 60% Isolated showers, rain chance 20%High: 90 Low: 70 High: 87 Low: 70 High: 86 Low: 66TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Saturday 90/68 Record 94/49 Normal 87/65 Mean temp. 79 Departure from mean +3 PRECIPITATION* Saturday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.00 in. Total for the year 50.33 in. Normal for the year 45.47 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in. DEW POINT Saturday at 3 p.m. 66 HUMIDITY Saturday at 3 p.m. 48% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and grasses were light and weeds were heavy.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Saturday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:10 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:27 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................8:59 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................8:21 P.M. OCT. 11OCT. 18OCT. 26NOV. 3 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 89 75 pc Ft. Lauderdale 88 79 pc Fort Myers 91 75 pc Gainesville 88 70 pc Homestead 88 77 pc Jacksonville 87 71 pc Key West 87 78 pc Lakeland 89 73 pc Melbourne 88 75 pc City H L Fcast Miami 89 78 pc Ocala 90 72 pc Orlando 90 73 pc Pensacola 82 68 r Sarasota 90 75 pc Tallahassee 83 71 c Tampa 91 75 pc Vero Beach 89 75 pc W. Palm Bch. 88 77 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSoutheast winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Expect a slight chance of showers today. Gulf water temperature83 LAKE LEVELSLocation Fri. Sat. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 30.24 n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.45 n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.97 n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.79 n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka H H L L L 78/50 64/50 69/40 74/45 55/43 89/62 76/56 55/43 70/42 68/51 79/66 76/59 80/67 89/78 80/54 87/67 THE NATION Albany 63 57 ts 66 60 Albuquerque 62 40 s 69 41 Asheville 81 57 pc 77 62 Atlanta 85 64 ts 80 67 Atlantic City 78 62 pc 78 67 Austin 89 71 s 79 50 Baltimore 90 64 pc 87 66 Billings 56 29 s 70 42 Birmingham 89 67 ts 79 57 Boise 64 37 s 72 44 Boston 68 60 sh 62 59 Buffalo 66 59 .32 ts 77 65 Burlington, VT 67 54 sh 65 56 Charleston, SC 88 67 pc 84 70 Charleston, WV 85 60 pc 87 63 Charlotte 87 61 pc 85 69 Chicago 81 61 .82 pc 64 50 Cincinnati 81 63 .07 ts 79 53 Cleveland 75 66 .03 ts 82 61 Columbia, SC 89 60 pc 87 68 Columbus, OH 83 66 .44 ts 83 58 Concord, N.H. 65 56 sh 59 57 Dallas 81 52 s 78 50 Denver 60 27 .01 pc 69 40 Des Moines 70 49 pc 52 44 Detroit 74 66 .03 ts 76 59 El Paso 75 54 s 74 45 Evansville, IN 78 70 .26 ts 62 46 Harrisburg 83 67 .02 sh 80 65 Hartford 75 61 sh 66 60 Houston 93 73 .01 pc 80 54 Indianapolis 73 68 ts 68 49 Jackson 88 71 ts 79 52 Las Vegas 75 55 s 82 60 Little Rock 83 70 pc 72 49 Los Angeles 91 59 s 89 62 Louisville 75 70 1.25 ts 71 54 Memphis 88 73 ts 69 52 Milwaukee 72 63 1.01 pc 62 48 Minneapolis 61 52 .01 pc 55 43 Mobile 86 73 ts 83 62 Montgomery 92 67 ts 80 64 Nashville 89 68 ts 75 52 New Orleans 89 75 .13 ts 86 65 New York City 76 64 pc 79 66 Norfolk 87 66 pc 88 66 Oklahoma City 65 52 .30 pc 69 47 Omaha 55 45 sh 54 44 Palm Springs 88 71 s 89 67 Philadelphia 86 66 c 82 68 Phoenix 86 66 s 89 64 Pittsburgh 81 65 .10 sh 84 64 Portland, ME 60 55 sh 57 56 Portland, Ore 73 44 pc 73 49 Providence, R.I. 71 57 .23 sh 66 59 Raleigh 89 61 pc 88 67 Rapid City na na na pc 51 36 Reno 70 35 s 75 42 Rochester, NY 63 60 .07 ts 78 65 Sacramento 84 48 s 85 55 St. Louis 79 66 pc 65 50 St. Ste. Marie 54 46 .06 ts 60 52 Salt Lake City 58 35 s 68 45 San Antonio 91 75 s 80 51 San Diego 85 58 s 83 64 San Francisco 78 61 s 79 57 Savannah 88 66 pc 84 71 Seattle 68 47 pc 68 51 Spokane 63 36 s 68 43 Syracuse 66 60 ts 75 63 Topeka 62 47 sh 58 42 Washington 89 70 pc 87 67YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 96 Cotulla, Texas LOW 7 Berthoud Pass, Colo. SUNDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 87/77/ts Amsterdam 61/49/sh Athens 69/57/pc Beijing 77/55/s Berlin 58/54/c Bermuda 79/75/pc Cairo 79/59/s Calgary 68/46/pc Havana 86/73/ts Hong Kong 83/73/s Jerusalem 68/53/pc Lisbon 76/58/s London 65/57/c Madrid 77/53/s Mexico City 76/55/ts Montreal 61/59/sh Moscow 53/34/pc Paris 66/53/c Rio 72/61/pc Rome 72/63/pc Sydney 85/63/pc Tokyo 78/68/sh Toronto 72/52/sh Warsaw 56/41/c WORLD CITIES Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Saturday Sunday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Sunday MondayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 6:39 a/2:44 a 7:42 p/3:11 p 7:11 a/3:19 a 8:27 p/3:52 p Crystal River** 5:00 a/12:06 a 6:03 p/12:33 p 5:32 a/12:41 a 6:48 p/1:14 p Withlacoochee* 2:47 a/10:21 a 3:50 p/10:29 p 3:19 a/11:02 a 4:35 p/11:05 p Homosassa*** 5:49 a/1:43 a 6:52 p/2:10 p 6:21 a/2:18 a 7:37 p/2:51 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 10/6 SUNDAY 6:55 12:42 7:21 1:08 10/7 MONDAY 7:53 1:39 8:21 2:07 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY HI LO PR 90 67 trace Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Ragweed, elm, chenopods Todays count: 5.7/12 Mondays count: 5.5 Tuesdays count: 7.4 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63* 1 year: $133.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community ENTERTAINMENT Elusive graffiti artist Banksy hits NYCNEW YORK Graffiti by the secretive British artist Banksy is turning up on the streets of New York City and all over social media. Banksy announced on his website that he is undertaking an artists residency on the streets of New York this month. Hes posting pictures of his work on the website and fans are plastering the images all over Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Jennifer Hawkins, who runs a public relations agency in Chelsea, posted pictures on Facebook after finding a Banksy sighting right out my office backdoor, on 24th Street between Sixth and Seventh avenues. Spray-painted on a building wall already defaced by illegible scrawls, the graffiti shows a black silhouette of a dog lifting his leg on a fire hydrant, with the words You complete me in a cartoon bubble. The Daily Telegraph a British outlet, has created an online map to track the images. The Museum of Modern Art posted links on its Twitter feed with a Banksy watch tag. At least one of the works is gone already, altered by other graffiti artists and then whitewashed. The picture, done on a wall in Chinatown, showed a barefoot boy with a cap standing on another boys back, pointing at a sign that says, Graffiti is a crime. His website includes a toll-free number and an online Click here to listen button with commentary on each image that spoofs the pre-recorded tours commonly offered at museum exhibits. The commentary mispronounces his name as Ban-sky and is read against a soundtrack of cheesy elevator music. One line from the tour says: Youre looking at a type of picture called graffiti, from the Latin graffito, which means graffiti with an O. The commentary goes on to say, Let us pause for a moment to consider the deeper meaning of this work. OK, thats long enough, later adding, What exactly is the artist trying to say here? ... Perhaps it is a postmodern comment on how the signifiers of objects have become as real as the object themselves. Are you kidding me? Who writes this stuff? Anyway, you decide. Banksy who refuses to give his real name began his career in the British city of Bristol spray-painting local buildings. His works now fetch thousands of dollars around the world. Another of Banksys New York City efforts bears the words This is my New York accent spraypainted in classic graffiti-style handwriting with ...normally I write like this in neat print underneath. By Friday afternoon, the work had been so tagged over by other graffiti artists it was almost impossible to make out the original. Welcome to New York, Banksy.Quilter wins $200K ArtPrize contestGRAND RAPIDS, Mich. A quilter inspired by a Lake Michigan lakeshore near her home was declared the winner Friday of the $200,000 ArtPrize competition. Ann Loveless of Frankfort, Mich., won the public voting at the annual 19-day event in Grand Rapids, Mich., which ends Sunday. Her quilt is titled Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore, named for a national lakeshore in northern Michigan. It was displayed on a wall at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, one of 168 venues showing ArtPrize entries, but was moved to an outdoor tent after the federal government shutdown closed the museum. Loveless said she has made art quilts for 10 years, but at 20 feet long, this was the biggest so far. She and her husband own State of the Art Framing & Gallery in Beulah, Mich. I have a feeling our gallery's going to be really busy, Loveless said in a telephone interview. I'll probably sell out of quilts, but I'll make more. I'll make more. From wire reports A4SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 000FUXO in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Fictitious Name Notices . . . . . . . . D6 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D6 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . . D6 Associated PressGraffiti by the secretive British artist Banksy is pictured Thursday in New York. Banksy announced he is undertaking an artists residency on the streets of New York this month.

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produces the fruit. You cannot pick them on public lands without a permit or on private lands without the landowners permission, said Karen Parker, Florida Fish and Wildlife (FWC) spokeswoman. On public wildlife refuge areas, the green, brown or black berries are a huge food source for wildlife. Bears, gopher tortoises, birds and other animals feed on them, Parker said. Even if the berries appear abundant, Parker said wildlife needs must be met first. The berries dropping on the ground start the cycle to replenish the wildlife food source. The berries are difficult to sow, Parker said. It takes two years for them to germinate. Timing is the obstacle to issuing picking permits on state lands because of different hunting seasons. Berry harvesters would be unsafe at present, for example, Parker said, because it is archery season. Permits are issued by the Division of Forestry. Anyone who sees berry harvesting on any public lands FWC, Department of Environmental Protection, Southwest Florida Water Management District to name a few is encouraged to report it to the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-3922, text Tip@MyFWC.com or visit MyFWC.com/Contact and select Report Violators. Private landowners also have felt invaded by berry harvesters. Were fed up with the trespassing, said a Pine Ridge resident who didnt want to be named to avoid attracting others who would trespass. Others who live in the equestrian community likewise felt frustrated about protecting their property from berry pickers. Many residents own acreage left in its natural state to ensure privacy, and that privacy is breached by the berry pickers. Ironically, Pine Ridge landowners can be so shielded by their own lands that only a neighbor can spot and report a trespasser to the Citrus County Sheriffs Office. Reporting is exacerbated by property owners who are part-time residents or own property as an investment. It may be difficult to contact the property owner when the trespass occurs to press charges. The resident said according to the CCSO, trespassers picking berries represented no real damage. However, any entry on private property without the owners consent amounts to trespass. Furthermore, removing some forms of vegetation is covered as a criminal offense. The Legislature added the fruit of the saw palmetto to the definition of agricultural products in 1997 because of the popularity of the palmetto berry as a treatment for BHP and its abundance throughout the state, according to a legislative study. Declaring the palmetto berry a cash crop gave the state status to levy penalties against those convicted of poaching. Depending on the amount of fruit taken and a persons criminal history, jail terms range from one to five years with fines up to $10,000. But in spite of the cashcrop status, charges have been dropped when a landowner admits the berries are of no consequence. Last year, an unemployed North Naples man was arrested in late August after state wildlife officers found him trying to haul 427 pounds of berries in burlap sacks from private property, according to theNaples Daily News. But the State Attorneys Office in Southwest Florida dropped charges after the property owner said the berries werent worth anything to him. For many private landowners, trespass is the issue, not poaching. Every year, theyre out there picking the berries, Citrus County Sheriffs Capt. Justin Ferrara said. The plants are indigenous. They are wild all over the state of Florida. Because there are that many of them and there is a venue to sell them at, people are going to trespass on various different types of land to get the little berries. In Pine Ridge, Ferrara said, the land is private, but the roads are public. Therefore, people who intend to pick berries can legally enter the neighborhood, unlike a private gated community such as Black Diamond immediately east of Pine Ridge, or a national refuge that requires a daily use permit, such as Chassahowitzka Wildlife Management Area. Ferrara said the offenders are trespassed, told to leave the private property and warned they will be arrested any time they return. He said the presence of berry pickers had not shown an increase in the incidence of other property crimes, such as thefts and vandalisms, in the county. Factoring the arrest risk and the nuisance element, the herbal supplement has no known long-term value to make the trouble worthwhile. The effectiveness of the palmetto berry for prostate treatments has little backing from physicians. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved several drugs to relieve common symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate, but saw palmetto is not among them. According to the American Cancer Society, Some clinical studies have found that saw palmetto relieves some symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or enlarged prostate, such as difficult and frequent urination. However, at this time there are no available study results that show that saw palmetto can prevent or treat prostate cancer. Fortunately for privacy seekers, and unfortunately for harvesters, the season ends this month. The saw palmetto starts to fruit in August and produces its last berry in mid-October. Less bush rustling should be apparent through winter and spring.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer @chronicleonline.com.LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A5 We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, exa mination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discou nted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance. Dr. Michael Welch, DMD & Associates ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE AMERICAN MADE! We do not ship to China! $ 59 00 Cleaning Special New Patients Only FREE Exam & X-Rays w/Cleaning D0210 D0150 D1110 Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/30/13 $ 579 00 Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns (For first one) Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/30/13 D2751 $ 690 00 Dentures starting at Upper & Lower Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/30/13 D5510 D5120 FREE Second Opinion X-ray & Exam (New Patients Only) D0210 D0150 If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 10/30/13 6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy. Crystal River 352-794-6139 Dr. Philip Sherman, DMD Dr. Jay Skipper, DMD We Welcome You To Value Dental Care NEW LOCATION! 000GAXD Meet Dr. Santa Cruz, DMD Dr. Santa-Cruz offers high quality dentistry. Dr. Santa-Cruz was awarded several scholastic awards, he is certified in the administration of Botox/ Dysport/Cosmetic fillers. Originally from Miami, Dr. Cruz is a veteran of Naval Aviation, serving overseas in Japan and the Arabian Gulf. He currently serves in the reserves. See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers AND trade-in allowances from $50 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only sold from September 16 November 15, 2013. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where p rohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special t erms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special t erms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. Reduced Rate APR: M onthly payments of at least 1.75% of the purchase balance are required during the special terms period. 0% APR: The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary with t he market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 1/1/2013. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. If you use the card f or cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly paymen t if shown based on $xx purchase. 352-746-0098 H.E. Smith Co. Inc 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461 www.trane.com LICENSE # RA0035171 Dont let this offer pass you by. Unstoppable savings now thru November 15th. Its tough to find a fall value more unstoppable. Trade-up to Trane, the number one name in reliability. September 16 through November 15, 2013, get renowned Trane efficiency at the best value ever. Pay 0% interest for 36 months, plus a trade-in cash allowance up to $1000. Call today and enjoy the colors of fall. And save green. Energy prices have skyrocketed and so has demand for systems that cut usage. Tranes XLi high efficiency systems are among the most cost-effective options available today. Maximum comfort and lower heating and cooling costs-thats the Trane difference. Dont get left behind in the cold. Offer only lasts thru November 15th. 000G77M We take customer satisfaction to the highest degree. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleBoxes of saw palmetto berries are stacked in front of Three Rivers motel in Homosassa. A sign in a window of one of the rooms offers to pay 87 cents per pound for the berries. PICKERSContinued from Page A1 The saw palmetto starts to fruit in August and produces its last berry in mid-October.

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A6SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Dont forget to for where the entries will be on display. 000G7FAz

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years, a question developed about this right to be heard when court decisions noted members of the public had no guaranteed right to speak at a public meeting anywhere in Florida statutes. But most public bodies, including the BOCC, still allowed public comment. SB 50s companion in the House of Representatives was HB 23, sponsored by state Rep. Ray Rodigues, R-Fort Myers. These bills restore a fundamental constitutional right to the people of Florida the right to speak to their elected representatives at a public meeting, said Florida First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen. After the BOCC adopted the new ordinance, several county residents expressed concern they would be limited to that one opportunity to speak early in the meeting. It has been the practice of the commission chairman to open up each motion before the board to public comment. Residents wondered if they would now lose that opportunity to speak as the right to be heard after each proposed motion has not also been guaranteed in Florida Statutes. Commission Chairman Joe Meek was unavailable for comment this past week, but issued the following statement: We actively encourage and invite public participation at our board meetings. In response to the statutory requirement, the public portion has been moved to the first order of business, which will allow the public to speak on any subject matter important to them. In addition, the agenda is published on the Thursday prior to the meeting, which leaves time for the public to review the agenda and notify the commissioners of any concerns or questions they may have. Public hearing procedures require citizen comment. Citizens will also have the opportunity to give comment on additional items not published with the original agenda when the board considers those items. Public comment will start immediately following the roll call. It is during this time residents can speak on agenda items coming before the board. Each resident will receive the same amount of allotted time: three minutes for an individual and five minutes for an individual representing an organization. Proclamations and recognition will be scheduled for 1:30 p.m., with public hearings and regular business to follow. A prayer was said, and then riders began roaring their engines in anticipation of the ride, which signified life and remembrance to many. I have a sister-in-law who is a two-year breast cancer survivor, said Spring Hill resident and rider Karla Lugo. I wanted to be a part of this for her. I ride myself, and this was a way for us (with her daughter Angelina Lugo) to give back. At the strike of 10 a.m., bikers headed to their stops at the Dam Pub in Lake Panasoffkee and IRRU Family Social Club in Inverness, where there was a buffet for riders and Sleepy Hollow in Floral City. Bikers arrived back for an afternoon of fun and entertainment while raising awareness about breast cancer and raising revenue. Music was provided by a variety of musicians who donated their time. Other highlights were the male bike wash, threelegged race, mens hulahoop contest, a wheelbarrow race, corn hole competition and Hoppy Ball race for women, a cake walk with donated baked goods, door prizes, drawings and auctions throughout the day. One rider said she was riding in support of medical research. I support all medical research that is going on, especially for females, said Inverness rider Jackie Kulp, who was representing the American Legion Riders Post No. 155. If you can save one life, Kulp said, you have saved the whole world. It is a noble cause on a beautiful day. Every single one of these people are heroes, as far as I am concerned. Prince said the ride will become an annual event, and she is already planning next years extravaganza. For information, call Rebecca Prince at 352-2931413 or email rapprince@ att.net.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A7 000G44L Bring out your beauty right here in the office! Reduces appearance of wrinkles and lines and is an alternative therapeutic treatment for headaches and TMJ BOTOX Botox treatments only take a few minutes depending on the number of injections needed The effects of treatment last for approximately 3 months The use of Botox is very safe, however, as with any medical procedure there are possible risks and side effects to be aware when using Botox Patients will begin to see results from their Botox treatment 7-10 days following the procedure DERMAL FILLERS (JUVEDERM ) Dermal fillers approved by the FDA are minimally invasive and very safe. Dermal filler treatments typically take anywhere from 20-40 minutes and the amount of dermal fillers needed with depend on volume loss and the areas you would like to restore to its natural beauty You will see results immediately after treatment Call the office for a consult with Lynn! 352-795-1223 1815 SE HWY. 19, Crystal River www.rswansondental.com PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE Ask us about your personalized Botox and Dermal Filler options! University of South Florida M.S. College of Nursing Graduated May 1992 Lynn Swanson, M.S., A.R.N.P. 2013 2013 2013 2013 000GAKC 000G2VE RIDEContinued from Page A1 STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleSteve and Susie Simotes from Crystal River prepare to ride in the inaugural Ladys Freedom Ride. Steve says he has been riding motorcycles since he was 16 years old and is just getting back into it since a crash in 1998. Simotes says the technology has finally advanced enough to allow him to ride again. COMMENTContinued from Page A1 The inaugural Ladys Freedom Ride featured some 50 riders in a 72.1-mile ride Saturday as they took off from the Harley-Davidson dealership in Homosassa. Public comment will start immediately following the roll call. It is during this time residents can speak on agenda items coming before the board.

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Associated PressCRESSKILL, N.J. A World War II veteran and the nations oldest living Medal of Honor recipient has died in New Jersey. Nicholas Oresko, an Army master sergeant who was badly wounded when he single-handedly took out two enemy bunkers during the Battle of the Bulge in 1945, died Friday night at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, hospital officials announced Saturday. He was 96. Oresko had been hospitalized after injuring himself in a fall at an assisted living center in Cresskill. He died of complications from surgery for a broken right femur. A November 2011 article on the Department of Defense website described Oresko as the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient. The medal is the nations highest military honor, awarded by Congress for risk of life in combat beyond the call of duty. A Bayonne native, Oresko received the Medal of Honor from President Harry Truman on Oct. 30, 1945. At 28, Oresko was the platoon leader when automatic fire pinned down his unit. Realizing a machine gun in a nearby bunker needed to be eliminated, Oresko moved out alone in the morning darkness, braving bullets that zipped about him, until he was close enough to throw a grenade into the German bunker. He rushed the bunker and used his M-1 rifle to kill the soldiers who survived the grenade blast. Then another machine gun fired, knocking Oresko down and wounding him in the right hip and leg. He managed to crawl to another bunker and take it out with another grenade. Despite being weak from loss of blood, Oresko refused to be evacuated until he was assured that the mission was accomplished. His actions on Jan. 23, 1945, were credited with preventing numerous American casualties and were praised as key to the Allies victory. The Bergen Record reported that several veterans and young members of various branches of the military stayed with Oresko in his final days after a friend wrote about his health problems on a Facebook page and noted that Oresko had no immediate family still living. Earl Quillen, 78CRYSTAL RIVEREarl C. Quillen, age 78, of Crystal River, Fla., passed away Friday evening, Oct. 4, 2013, at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River, Fla., with his two daughters at his side, where he had a very peaceful passing. He was born Jan. 28, 1935, in Ocean City, Md., to Denard and LaVerne (Moore) Quillen. He came here 26 years ago from Pittsburgh, Pa., where he retired after 30 years with U.S. Steel South Side Pittsburgh, Pa. After his retiring to Crystal River, he became an avid fisherman, a horseshoe hero and a shuffleboard enthusiast, where he spent many hours enjoying the game with great friends. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran, and a former Pennsylvania constable, a member of the Crystal River Loyal Order of Moose Lodge No. 2013 and Fraternal Order of Eagles Crystal River. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by three sisters, Thelma Keller, Clara Bishop and Dorothy Andartes. He is survived by his five daughters, Leaette Cavaliere, Juanita Presutti and Jeanne Manko, all of Pittsburgh, Pa., Theresa McCraw of Little Elm, Texas, and Margie Gaul of Shreveport, La.; three brothers, Ralph, Clyde and Kenneth; 16 grandchildren; and eight greatgrandchildren. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory Crystal River, Fla. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that those who wish may make a memorial contribution in Earl Quillens name to the Crystal River Loyal Order of Moose for their special Childrens Christmas Program. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Louise Barnett, 84HOMOSASSAThe service of remembrance for Louise Barnett, 84, of Homosassa, Fla., will be at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, at the Myrtle Hill Memorial Park, Tampa. She died Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, in Lecanto. Arrangements are under the direction of the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. James Jim Smith, 79INVERNESSJames Jim Wayne Smith, age 79, Inverness, died Oct. 4, 2013, at Citrus Memorial hospital surrounded by his family. Jim was born Oct. 8, 1933, in Bankston, Miss., to the late Alfred A. and Ellen (McWhoter) Smith. He served our country in the U.S. Air Force with a tour in Vietnam, retiring after 21 years as a master sergeant. Jim then worked for the U.S. Postal Service as a rural carrier for 11 years. He was a lifetime member of Fort Worth, Texas, VFW. Jim was an avid fisherman throughout his lifetime. Left to cherish his memory is his wife of 21 years, Catherine Smith, Inverness; sons Michael W. (Karen) Smith, St. Petersburg, Fla.; Quentin D. Smith, San Antonio, Texas; daughters, Sharon (Kenneth) Clark, Tampa, Karen (Thomas) Power, Orlando and Sandra Powell, Tampa; nine grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a son, Jeffrey; his brother Waylon; and his sister Noreen. A graveside committal service with military honors will be at 2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Friends are invited to join the funeral procession to the cemetery at 1:30 p.m. at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Memorial donations may be made in Jims name to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu of flowers. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Francis Frank Ducharme Jr., 77INVERNESSFrancis Frank X. Ducharme Jr., 77, Inverness, died July 9, 2013, in Nashua, N.H. Celebration of Life will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Inverness Moose Lodge. Cremation arrangements are by Chas E Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Shirley Latta, 76DUNNELLONShirley Latta, 76, Dunnellon, died Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013. Graveside services will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8, at Forest Lawn South, Davie, Fla. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home With Crematory. Scott Koehn, 56HOMOSASSAScott Elmer Koehn, age 56, of Homosassa, Fla., passed away Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, at Hospice House of Citrus County in Lecanto. He was born Nov. 6, 1956, in New Port Richey, Fla., and was a lifelong resident of this area. He was a former supervisor for A&B Roofing of Holiday, Fla. He was a handyman and enjoyed fishing. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his sister, Elaine Swank, March 6, 2011. He is survived by his two sons, Randy of Archer, Fla., and Marcus of Homosassa, Fla.; four brothers, Mark of Homosassa, Noral of Fort Lauderdale, and Wayne and Keith of Hudson, Fla.; a sister, Denise Stroop of Old Town, Fla.; his former wife, Georganna Smith of Homosassa, Fla.; one grandson, Randy Koehn Jr.; and several nieces and nephews. Private cremation arrangements are under the care of Strickland Funeral Home with Crematory Crystal River, Fla. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.A8SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE In Loving Memory of Donna Gillissie-Cross August 25, 1964 October 6, 2003 It was a dark ten years ago for all those who love you, Donna. I have learned our loss is not Gods punishment or Gods attempt to test us. God shares the hurt in our hearts and wants to lead us to new hope and peace. God grieves with us. Our tears testify our love and tears that spring from love help bring healing and renewal. Of course, we never get over our loss completely. We go on with our lives celebrating your life and our memories of you. I pray for you and with you. The love between us is a spiritual bond death cannot sever. Love, Mom 000G8TO 000G9F8 In Memory Of James Clinton Moore Dec. 5 1916 Sept. 29, 2012 Jim was an avid member of the Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club, champion pitcher and an 18 year resident of Beverly Hills. It has been one year since we lost our friend, brother, uncle, and husband! Born in Monroe Co., Ky., son of the late Willy & Ester Hood Moore. Veteran of WW2, 1941 1945. Served in Army Air Corp., Alleutian Islands. Memorial service was held on Oct. 10, 2012, Oak Hill Cemetery N., Crawfordsville, Ind. Sadly missed by family, friends, and wife Nora Livesay Moore of Beverly Hills. Keep pitching those ringers, Jim! 000G83E Todays Word: DIAMONDS 000G9WW $ 49 It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or treatment. Min. Fee ADA code D0210, D0150 Not in conjunction with insurance. Offer expires in 30 days Full Mouth X-Rays, Comprehensive Exam New Patient Specials Call today! 352-527-1614 Alexsa Davila DMD DN 15390 Walton Van Hoose DMD DN 18101 In house denture lab Free Denture Consults Financing available Most insurance accepted. Family Friendly Citrus Hills Dental 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando Located in the Hampton Square Plaza We Meet All Your Dental Needs, Including Implants For Information and costs,call 726-8323 Burial Shipping CremationFuneral HomeWith Crematory000EHVX 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000GAG6 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000G7C9 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Kelly Prus 564-2917 kprus@chronicleonline.com 000G7P3 SO YOU KNOW Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Obituariesare at www. chronicleonline.com. OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing. Earl Quillen James Smith Obituaries WWII vet, oldest Medal of Honor recipient, dies Associated PressNicholas Oresko, a World War ll Medal of Honor recipient, poses May 25, 1999, with his medal at his home in Tenafly, N.J. Oresko died Friday at age 96.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A9 000G6EX

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Associated PressNEW YORK Rosebud is a sled. So goes the ending of the 1941 Orson Welles classic Citizen Kane, spoilers be damned! Revealing secret endings and plot twists has brought on wrath since the dawn of cinema, straight through VCRS to todays DVR-fueled delays that led to much nail-biting over The Ending That Shall Not Be Spoiled on Breaking Bad. But exactly what is the magic formula for spoiler grace? When do calls of SPOILER ALERT (insert index fingers in the ears here) expire so we can, maybe, not feel so constipated when discussing our favorite fare in real time? Does the 13-episode Netflix dump of Orange is the New Black in July equal two months of polite spoiler-free behavior? Are bets off when a show concludes, or does that depend on how many seasons late adopters would have to slowly, slowly slog through say Dexters eight to Breaking Bads five? Or is it up to the unspoiled viewer to avoid social media or catch up? Get it done, people! I think asking people not to spoil for some reasonable amount of time is fine, although anyone who actually takes it seriously, i.e. gets mad or upset in the event someone does, is an idiot, said technology analyst Melanie Turek in Steamboat Springs, Colo. But that reasonable amount of time is, in my mind, about 48 hours after a live broadcast, she explained. And once a series is off the air and the hype has died down, asking people not to spoil is just silly. Others think keeping some things quiet or at least warning our Facebook friends about potential spoilers is what 21stcentury etiquette might advise. At least thats what the ragers who decry spoilers on social media hope for. Marketer Kim Puckett in Indianapolis thinks were all social medialevel entertainment reviewers now so should respect our written-word audiences on newsfeeds like Twitter or in status updates on Facebook that arent easy to escape. Unfortunately, specific status updates on key plot points might be banned forever, she said. But in other contexts, Puckett said, as soon as the show ends, office and social talk should be allowed about the show. How can we enjoy shows at a social level if were always worried that someone is still on Season 1 of The Killing or halfway through Sons of Anarchy? Justice is on the side of those who want to blab on Twitter or Facebook, according to Paul Levinson, a professor of communications and media studies at Fordham University and author of the book New New, Media. The idea that people have a right to be free of spoilers is absurd, and its an absurd misuse of the term right, he said. You have a right to communicate, Levinson assured. I dont think anyone is entitled to that kind of grace. If you feel like writing something youre entitled to write it as long its not slanderous or libelous or breaking the law in some way. Why anyone would get into a rage about entertainment is beyond me. He harkened back to buzz over The Crying Game and Dils reveal as a transgender woman, along with The Sixth Sense and the Bruce Willis character being dead. And there was grumbling over spoiling the purgatory at the end of Lost, at a time when social media was well on its way to engulfing us, he said. If the ending is really atrocious, like Lost, then youre probably doing people a favor by letting them know, Levinson said. Etiquette expert Lizzie Post of the Emily Post Institute sees no value in people posting a million times, Dont spoil anything for me, dont spoil anything for me. Walk away from Facebook, shut down Twitter if you have to, she said. If youre not living in the current season, you have no claim. Its fine if you have a friend whos really into it and you want to say, Dont spoil it for me. But you cant ask the world around you to completely bend.A10SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE ENTERTAINMENT 000GA4O DRYER VENT CLEANING DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! 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Granite & Solid Surface Counter Tops Silestone Dupont Corian Laminate Custom Cabinets By Wellborn Forest, Americana, Showplace Wood And Kabinart Kitchen & Baths Closet Systems Entertainment Centers FREE In Home Design Work FREE In Home Shopping Get Your Best Written Deal, Then Come See Us!! OPEN 10 TO 4 MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT OUR LOW OVERHEAD SAVES YOU THOUSANDS WERE IN OUR NEW LOCATION NOW! Across from Bay Area 8010 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River, Pine View Plaza Call For Your Appointment Today 352-302-2865 w ww.dreamkitchensandbaths.com 000G73N Is there a statute of limitations on spoilers? Associated PressThis image released by AMC shows Bryan Cranston, as Walter White, in the final scene from Breaking Bad. The popular series about a chemistry teacher-turned drug dealer ended Sept 29. Revealing secret endings and plot twists has brought on wrath since the dawn of cinema, straight through VCRS to streaming and DVRs. But exactly what is the magic formula for spoiler grace? In this photo released by Spyglass Entertainment, Haley Joel Osment, left, and Bruce Willis appear in a scene from the film The Sixth Sense, a tale of a child who can see ghosts.

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Associated PressGRANTVILLE, Ga. When the cotton mill closed, the rural Georgia town of Grantville began a slow transformation into a ghost town. Residents fled. Storefronts faded. Buildings decayed. Over the decades, time turned the remains of the town into something almost post-apocalyptic, the perfect modern-day set for humans and walkers to attack one another. Thats how the hugely popular TV show The Walking Dead ended up coming to town and bringing new life to Grantville. Several key scenes in one episode from the AMC series were filmed on and near a one-block stretch of antique buildings on Grantvilles Main Street. The series fourth season premieres on Oct. 13. Crews have been filming the new episodes in Georgia, but they keep locations of future episodes closely guarded secrets until the shows air. In Grantville, the towns ruins were featured prominently last season. Bodies of walkers slain on the show were buried in a vacant lot beneath the brick archway remaining from a cotton mill building. Gunshots were fired from a nearby rooftop. And actor Chandler Riggs, who plays a boy on the show, entertained himself between scenes by placing pennies on the railroad tracks, the coins soon smashed into souvenirs by passing freight trains. Now, every Saturday, visitors from around the country and the world turn off Interstate 85 and onto a two-lane highway that leads to the tiny town 49 miles southwest of Atlanta. Since last summer, more than 3,600 visitors have taken a free tour led by Grantville Mayor Jim Sells, who explains where each scene from the Clear episode during which the character Morgan makes it his mission to clear walkers by killing them was filmed. Visitors have come from as far as Australia, Singapore and Brazil, giving new life to the town through tourism, Sells said. He calls it phenomenal, but adds: We dont understand it. Nobody came after they filmed Lawless and Broken Bridges here, he said, referring to movies shot in the town. But once this episode aired from The Walking Dead, people started showing up from all over. The cotton textile industry once fueled the economy of Grantville and the other towns in Coweta County, where a stretch of Interstate 85 is named the Alan Jackson Highway, for the country singer who grew up in nearby Newnan and wrote the 1993 hit song about the Chattahoochee River. Grantville eventually became known by residents in the area as the liquor exit its the only place in Coweta County to buy bottled liquor. But Sells said that when textiles left, this town died. Then came the film crews. Though Union troops destroyed train stations in many Georgia towns near the end of the Civil War, Grantvilles survived. The mayor recalled how Walking Dead production crews took just four hours to transform the old freight depot into a restaurant where actors battled zombies. The trains a few feet away occasionally interrupted filming, Sells said, since railroads typically dont share train schedules with film crews. Grantville is among a handful of rural Georgia towns undergoing a renaissance, thanks to the AMC show. In nearby Senoia, many scenes are filmed in the historic downtown area, transforming into the fictional town of Woodbury for the show. In Haralson, tours are offered each weekend for fans to enter the barn that was the scene of an ambush. They can hold an M16 out the same window as one Walking Dead actor did. Other tours are offered in Atlanta, where a memorable scene from the shows first season was filmed atop the roof of the old Norfolk Southern headquarters on the southern edge of downtown. Another key scene a massive battle involving dozens of walkers and a military tank took place in the Fairlie-Poplar Historic District. On a recent Saturday in Grantville, visitors gathered at Station 22 Grill, as groups do every Saturday, to watch the Clear episode, the 12th in the shows third season. Production crews blocked off Main Street for 15 days for filming. Many townspeople know the dialogue by heart. A dishwasher behind the bar mouths the words: You said that you would turn on your radio every day at dawn. ... And you were not there!ENTERTAINMENTCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A11 000EJRO MANAGERS SPECIALS 000G9H4 Hwy. 44 W. Inverness (352) 726-1231 nicknicholasford.com SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 Inverness CR 486 Hwy 44 Hwy 41 Hw y 4 90 Nick Nicholas Hwy 491 Hwy. 19 2011 FORD FIESTA SES SALE PRICED! NP5861 $15,996 2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID SALE PRICED! N3C191D $19,626 2010 FORD RANGER XLT EXT CAB SALE PRICED! N3C136A $19,633 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE SALE PRICED! NP5856 $19,988 2010 FORD EDGE AWD SEL SALE PRICED! NP5915 $26,442 2012 FORD EXPEDITION XLT SALE PRICED! N3C205A $34,367 2013 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED SALE PRICED! NP5917 $35,927 2013 FORD FLEX SEL SALE PRICED! Only 1k miles. N3T257A $36,832 Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. The Villages Comfort Suites 1202 Avenida Central Attend a FREE Spine Seminar: call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP. Learn about the Florida Spine & Neuro Center and the innovative treatment options available. 000G9AY SPINE CARE YOU CAN TRUST 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 000G7LU Visit our Showroom Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 www.cashcarpetandtile.com Visit Our New Website For Great Specials Wood Laminate Tile Carpet Vinyl Area Rugs Walking Dead brings new life to Ga. town Associated PressZombies appear in a scene from the second season of the AMC original series, The Walking Dead, in Senoia, Ga. The series fourth season premieres on Oct. 13. Crews have been filming new episodes in Georgia, but they keep locations of future episodes closely guarded secrets until the shows air. In Grantville, Ga., the towns ruins were featured prominently last season. In nearby Senoia, many scenes are filmed in the historic downtown area, transforming into the fictional town of Woodbury for the show.

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After Sue wrote Wash me with her finger in the dust on the most expensive piece of exercise equipment I own, I joined the health club. At home, I just wasnt getting it done. Id walk past the equipment 20 times a day and say to myself, Ill do that right after lunch. After lunch, Id think, It can wait til after dinner. But should you really exercise after a heavy meal? Ill do it in the morning. Besides, theres so much other stuff to do at home, so many distractions answer the phone, let out the cat, vacuum the carpets, let in the cat, do the laundry, let out the cat, go on an errand, let in the cat, shop for dinner, let in the cat, oh, hes already in, visit Facebook, check my email, let out the cat, and watch that TV infomercial about how much better Id feel and look if I just bought this one piece of exercise equipment that does everything the other one doesnt. But it turns out that lying on the sofa, watching Duck Dynasty, eating Hot Pockets and listening to the cat snore next to a piece of exercise equipment doesnt really melt away the pounds. Owning it isnt enough: Apparently, you have to use it. Who knew? Unless youre a truly motivated person, its almost impossible to stick to a regimen at your own house. Besides, you dont really need any fancy equipment to do pushups, crunches or squats; you just have to do them. If youre not already exercising without the equipment, you wont suddenly start exercising with it. Thats why I joined the health club. Once youre there, theres not much else to do but exercise. The thing I like about my health club is that I am not the most out-of-shape person there. They seem to have gone to great lengths to find people who are as lazy and paunchy as I am, or worse, which is a comfort. And absolutely no one there looks like they are going to win a gold medal in weightlifting or beach volleyball in the next Olympics. Its full of normal people like schoolteachers and bank tellers, trying to keep one step ahead of dreaded couch potato buildup. I had to buy a new gym bag and some sweats, so Im pawing through the sweatpants at the Shop and Go Away and everything on the shelf is size 4XL, 3XL or 2XL. Obviously, if you are buying the 4XL, you are either a professional athlete or you dont sweat very much. Ive also noticed that a lot of people in this store are wearing sweatpants even though theyre not at the gym. When I was in school, after we exercised, we changed back into our school clothes and put the smelly gym clothes in our lockers. Sweatpants werent something youd wear when you werent actually in the gym or on the field. Now people go to the mall in sweat clothes; they fly across the country in them. Its so common to see people who obviously dont run wearing running gear, to see people who dont play tennis wearing tennis togs, to see people who dont play football or basketball wearing football and basketball jerseys that we dont even notice it anymore. I dont know what youre wearing as you read this, but however casual it is, theres probably somebody in line down at the bank wearing something even less appropriate. It strikes me that the fashion industry should take note of what the sportswear designers are doing that is, name their clothing for what people should be doing when they wear it. If they can make running shorts and swimsuits and yoga pants, why cant they make Flying On An Airplane clothing? Supermarket Shopping clothing? Waiting For The Bus clothing? Applying For a Job clothing? They could do it without breaking a sweat.Visit JimMullenBooks.com. A12SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMUNITY 000G8TT CHIROPRACTIC Better Health 795-8911 Hours: Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9am 12pm & 2pm 6pm Tues. & Thurs. 10am 4pm 6166 W. Hwy. 44, Crystal River, FL visit us online at: www.betterhealthchiropractic.us New Technology, Natural Healing nonsurgical spinal decompression Triton computerized spinal traction for neck and back pain, sciatica, herniated or bulging discs, pre/post surgery. Russell Chiropractic has united with Better Health Chiropractic Dr. Cheryl McFarland-Bryant Dr. Russell Lewandowski We offer: Gentle Adjusting Techniques: A.K., S.O.T., Palmer, Drop Table and Diversified Massage Therapy/Myofascial Release Laser/Microcurrent Acupuncture Cold Laser Therapy Natural Weight Loss Mediwrap Cellulite Reduction Buy 5, Get 1 FREE 000GAXF 000G85D So, just who wears the sweatpants in this house? Jim MullenVILLAGE IDIOT Its so common to see people who obviously dont run wearing running gear, to see people who dont play tennis wearing tennis togs, to see people who dont play football or basketball wearing football and basketball jerseys that we dont even notice it anymore.

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Oct. 7 to 11 MENUS CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS Elementary school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, tater tots, cereal variety and toast, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Hot dog, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Double-play sliders, oven-baked breaded chicken, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken nuggets with ripstick, mozzarella maxstix, Italian super salad with roll, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, steamed green beans, chilled diced peaches, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Nacho rounds, chicken alfredo with ripstick, yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled pineapple, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Breaded chicken sandwich, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet corn, chilled peach cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Middle school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety. Wednesday: Sausage and egg biscuit, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Mozzarella maxtix, fajita chicken with rice and ripstick, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed green beans, chilled flavored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Tuesday: Double-play sliders, turkey wrap, turkey super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, baby carrots, potato smiles, chilled strawberry cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Wednesday: Chicken alfredo with ripstick, pepperoni pizza, PB dippers, fresh baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety. Thursday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, Italian super salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh garden salad, tangy baked beans, chilled peach cup, fruit juice, milk variety. Friday: Hot dog, breaded chicken sandwich, PB dippers, fresh garden salad, sweet potato crosstrax, flavored Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety. High school Breakfast Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Tuesday: Breakfast egg and cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese biscuit, ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast, grits, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Friday: Ham, egg and cheese on loco bread, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety, toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety. Lunch Monday: Chicken and rice burrito, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, fajita chicken super salad will roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, green beans, celery potato roasters, chilled applesauce, juice, milk. Tuesday: Double-play sliders, turkey and gravy over noodles with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, cucumber coins, sweet peas, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled diced peaches, juice, milk. Wednesday: Oven-baked breaded chicken with rice, spaghetti with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, turkey super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, baked beans, chilled baked beans, potato roasters, flavored Craisins, juice, milk. Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with ripstick, macaroni and cheese with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, ham super salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, garden salad, fresh broccoli, steamed broccoli, baby carrots, seasoned potato wedges, chilled peach cup, juice, milk. Friday: Hot dog, chicken alfredo with ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich, Italian super salad with roll, pizza, yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cold corn salad, sweet corn, potato roasters, chilled flavored applesauce, juice, milk. SENIOR DINING Monday: Grape juice, sliced turkey breast with gravy, mashed sweet potatoes, carrot coins, wholewheat bread with margarine, sugar cookie, low-fat milk. Tuesday: Sausage and bean casserole, rutabagas, garlic spinach, wheat bread with margarine, pineapple, low-fat milk. Wednesday: Baked chicken thigh with chicken gravy, mashed potatoes, green beans, whole-wheat bread with margarine, graham crackers, low-fat milk. Thursday: Hamburger patty with bun and ketchup and mustard, tomato, baked beans, yellow corn, mixed fruit, low-fat milk. Friday: Hot dog, boiled cabbage and carrots, hot German potato salad, whole-grain roll with mustard, blueberry cobbler, low-fat milk. Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness and South Dunnellon. For additional information, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. LOCALCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A13 000FQJU 000G7BU 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Melanoma, the most common form of cancer for young adults is fatal if left untreated and 1 in 58 will be diagnosed during their lifetime. Routine screening and early detection of skin cancer is key to treatment. Skin Cancer is diagnosed in more than 1 million patients annually. To schedule a skin cancer examination, please call our staff at 746-2200. 352-746-2200 352-873-1500 www.dermatologyonline.com Participating w ith: Medicare, BCBS United Healthcare, Cigna, Humana, Aetna Allen Ridge Professional Village 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER Board Certified American Board of Dermatology; American Society for Dermatology Surgery, Member American Association of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Fellow American Society for MOHS Surgery Asymmetry One half unlike the other half. A Border Irregular Scalloped or poorly circumscribed border B Color varied from one area to another: shades of tan & brown, black, sometimes white, red or blue. C Diameter larger than 6 mm as a rule (diameter of pencil eraser) D 000G85B CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP To register for the Citrus County Sheriffs Offices CodeRED weather program, visit www.sheriff citrus.org/EM/ and click on the Emergency Management menu item. Choose CodeRED Registration and enter the location to be monitored and your contact details if using a cellphone, you may choose to receive text alerts, but standard text messaging rates may apply. Choose which types of warnings to receive: general notifications and/or severe weather warning about tornadoes, severe thunderstorms or flash floods. You may choose to create an account to easily manage your preferences. A map appears to verify the location designated and list all the preferences chosen. Once satisfied with the settings and the terms and conditions of use, click Submit. Those without computer access may call 352746-6555 or visit a local library for computer assistance. When activated ,the number for CodeRED warnings will appear on caller ID as 800-566-9780 or Emergency Comm for CodeRED Weather Warning Alerts. (The number for other types of CodeRED alerts displays as 999-911-9999 or Emergency Comm for emergency notifications.)

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Kingdom, Brazil, Russia, Italy and India which have half the worlds population and 65 percent of global gross domestic product. Key findings: RETREAT FROM STOCKS: A desire for safety drove people to dump stocks, even as prices rocketed from crisis lows in early 2009. Investors in the top 10 countries pulled $1.1 trillion from stock mutual funds in the five years after the crisis, or 10 percent of their holdings at the start of that period, according to Lipper Inc., which tracks funds. They put more even money into bond mutual funds $1.3 trillion even as interest payments on bonds plunged to record lows. SHUNNING DEBT: In the five years before the crisis, household debt in the 10 countries jumped 34 percent, according to Credit Suisse. Then the financial crisis hit, and people slammed the brakes on borrowing. Debt per adult in the 10 countries fell 1 percent in the 4 1/2 years after 2007. Economists say debt hasnt fallen in sync like that since the end of World War II. People chose to shed debt even as lenders slashed rates on loans to record lows. In normal times, that would have triggered an avalanche of borrowing. HOARDING CASH: Looking for safety for their money, households in the six biggest developed economies added $3.3 trillion, or 15 percent, to their cash holdings in the five years after the crisis, slightly more than they did in the five years before, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The growth of cash is remarkable because millions more were unemployed, wages grew slowly and people diverted billions to pay down their debts. SPENDING SLUMP: To cut debt and save more, people have reined in their spending. Adjusting for inflation, global consumer spending rose 1.6 percent a year during the five years after the crisis, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers, an accounting and consulting firm. That was about half the growth rate before the crisis and only slightly more than the annual growth in population during those years. Consumer spending is critically important because it accounts for more than 60 percent of GDP THE DEVELOPING WORLD NOT HELPING ENOUGH: When the financial crisis hit, the major developed countries looked to the developing world to take over in powering global growth. The four big developing countries Brazil, Russia, India and China recovered quickly from the crisis. But the potential of the BRIC countries, as they are known, was overrated. Although they have 80 percent of the people, they accounted for only 22 percent of consumer spending in the 10 biggest countries last year, according to Haver Analytics, a research firm. This year, their economies are stumbling. Consumers around the world will eventually shake their fears, of course, and loosen the hold on their money. But few economists expect them to snap back to their old ways. One reason is that the boom years that preceded the financial crisis were fueled by families taking on enormous debt, experts now realize, not by healthy wage gains. No one expects a repeat of those excesses. More importantly, economists cite psychological scarring, a fear of losing money that grips people during a period of collapsing jobs, incomes and wealth, then doesnt let go, even when better times return. Think of Americans who suffered through the Great Depression and stayed frugal for decades. Although not on a level with the Depression, some economists think the psychological blow of the financial crisis was severe enough that households wont increase their borrowing and spending to what would be considered normal levels for another five years or longer. To better understand why people remain so cautious five years after the crisis, AP interviewed consumers around the world. A look at what theyre thinking and doing with their money: Rick Stonecipher of Muncie, Ind., doesnt like stocks anymore, for the same reason that millions of investors have turned against them the stock market crash that began in October 2008 and didnt end until the following March. My brokers said they were really safe, but they werent, said Stonecipher, 59, a substitute school teacher. Americans sold the most in the five years after the crisis $521 billion, or 9 percent of their mutual fund holdings, according to Lipper. But investors in other countries sold a larger share of their holdings: Germans dumped 13 percent; Italians and French, more than 16 percent each. The French are not very oriented to risk, said Cyril Blesson, an economist at Pair Conseil, an investment consultancy in Paris. Now, its even worse. Its gotten worse in China, Russia and the U.K., too. Fu Lili, 31, a psychologist in Fu Xin, a city in northeastern China, said she made 20,000 yuan ($3,267) buying and selling stocks before the crisis, more than 10 times her monthly salary then. But she wont touch them now, because shes too scared. In Moscow, Yuri Shcherbanin, 32, a manager for an oil company, said the crash proved stocks were dangerous and he should content himself with money in the bank. In London, Pavlina Samson, 39, owner of a jewelry and clothes shop, said stocks are too risky. Whats also driving her away may be something that runs deeper: People feel like theyre being ripped off everywhere, she said. Holzhausen, the Allianz economist, said the crisis taught people not to trust others with their money. People want to get as much distance as possible from the financial system, he said. The crisis also taught them about the dangers of debt. After the crisis hit, Jerry and Madeleine Bosco of Tujunga, Calif., found themselves facing $30,000 in credit card bills with no easy way to pay the debt off. So they sold stocks, threw most of their cards in the trash, and stopped eating out or taking vacations. Today, most of the debt is gone, but the lusher life of the boom years is a distant memory. We had credit cards and we didnt worry about a thing, said Madeleine, 55. In the U.S., debt per adult soared 54 percent in the five years before the crisis. Then it plunged, down 12 percent in 4 1/2 years, although most of that resulted from people defaulting on loans. In the U.K., debt per adult fell a modest 2 percent, but it had jumped 59 percent before the crisis. Even Japanese and Germans, who werent big borrowers in the years before the crisis, cut debt 4 percent and 1 percent, respectively. We dont want to take out a loan, said Maria Schoenberg, 45, of Frankfurt, Germany, explaining why she and her husband, a rheumatologist, decided to rent after a recent move instead of borrowing to buy. Were terrified of doing that. Such attitudes are rife when it has rarely been cheaper to borrow around the world. A whole new generation of adults has come of age in a time of diminished expectations, said Mark Vitner, a senior economist at Wells Fargo, the fourth-largest U.S. bank. Theyre not likely to take on debt like those before them. Or spend as much. After adjusting for inflation, Americans increased their spending in the five years after the crisis at one-quarter the rate before the crisis, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. French spending barely budged. In the U.K., spending dropped. The British spent 3 percent less last year than they did five years earlier, in 2007. High unemployment has played a role. But economists say the financial crisis, and the government debt crisis that started in Europe a year later, has spooked even people who can afford to splurge to cut back. Arnaud Reze, 36, owns a home in Nantes, France, has piled up money in savings accounts and stocks, and has a government job that guarantees 75 percent of his pay in retirement. But he fears the pension guarantee wont be kept. So hes stopped buying coffee at cafes and cut back on lunches with colleagues and saved in numerous other ways. Little stupid things that I would buy left and right ... I dont buy anymore, he said. Even the rich are spending cautiously. Five years ago, Mike Cockrell, chief financial officer at Sanderson Farms, a large U.S. poultry producer in Laurel, Miss., had just paid off a mortgage and was looking forward to the extra spending money. Then Lehman collapsed, and he decided to save it instead. I watched the news of the stock market going down 100, 200 points a day, and I was glad I had cash, he said, recalling the steep drops in the Dow Jones industrial average then. That strategy will not change. The wealthiest 1 percent of U.S. households are saving 30 percent of their take-home pay, triple what they were saving in 2008, according to a July report from American Express Publishing and Harrison Group, a research firm. After years of saving more and shedding debt, the good news is that many people have repaired their personal finances. Americans have slashed their credit card debt to 2002 levels. In the U.K., personal bank loans, not including mortgages, are no larger than they were in 1999. In addition, home prices in some countries are rising. So more people have the capacity to borrow, spend and invest more. But will they? Sahoko Tanabe of Tokyo, 63, lost money in Japans stock market crash more than two decades ago, but shes buying again. Abenomics, a mix of fiscal and monetary stimulus named for Japans new prime minister, has ignited Japanese stocks, and she doesnt want to miss out. Youre bound to fail if you have a pessimistic attitude, she said. But for every Tanabe, there seem to be more people like Madeleine Bosco, the Californian who ditched many of her credit cards. All of a sudden you look at all these things youre buying that you dont need, she said. Attitudes like Boscos will make for a better economy eventually safer and more stable but wont trigger the jobs and wage gains that are needed to make economies healthy now. The further you get away from the carnage in -, the memories fade, said Stephen Roach, former chief economist at investment bank Morgan Stanley, who now teaches at Yale. But does it return to the leverage and consumer demand we had in the past and make things hunky dory? The answer is no.A14SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLENATION OPEN 11AM-MIDNIGHT TUESDAY SUNDAY OPEN TILL 3AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY Call or Text in your order. Catering Available. 1590 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-601-1373 HIGH OCTANE GRILL DAILY DINE-IN SPECIALS MONDAY $1.00 Side Salad, Select $1.00 Menu Items TUESDAY Flat Iron Steak w/2 sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7.95 Taco Tuesday Soft or Hard Shell ...... Beef .79 . Chicken .99 WEDNESDAY All You Can Eat Spaghetti & Garlic Bread (Add a side salad for $1.00) . . . $ 8.95 THURSDAY 1 LB. PORK CHOPS w/potatoes & vegetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9.95 FRIDAY Prime Rib Available at 4pm SATURDAY Sloppy Joe w/chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 SUNDAY Pot Roa st . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.95 Valid Monday Friday on regular price menu items only. 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Stop in & see why relationships blossom daily.8733 West Yulee Drive, Homosassa000G6B8 FAMILIESContinued from Page A1 Associated PressTravelers pass through a corridor Feb. 14 at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. Adjusted for inflation, Americans slashed spending on plane tickets by $9.7 billion from five years ago, or 20 percent.

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Associated PressWYNNEWOOD, Okla. A tiger ripped up the left arm of a worker at a central Oklahoma animal park after the woman stuck her hand into the giant cats enclosure Saturday. Joe Schreibvogel, owner of Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park in Wynnewood, said the woman was in surgery Saturday afternoon at an Oklahoma City hospital where doctors were trying to save her arm. He tore her arm up pretty bad, Schreibvogel said. Her entire arm was still attached. It was badly, badly damaged. Co-workers quickly tended to the woman before she was airlifted to the hospital, he said. She pulled her own arm out. The tiger didnt maul her. The tiger was in his cage, and she violated his space by sticking her arm into his space, Schreibvogel said, adding that the park has a strict rule against introducing any body part into a wild animal enclosure. Schreibvogel withheld the womans name because he hadnt been able to contact her family. He said she is in her early 20s. Shes actually the supervisor of the cats. But when you work with these things every day, you tend to let your guard down and think theyre pets, that theyre like dogs. Theyre not theyre tigers, he said. Schreibvogel said the tiger, a mixed breed that he rescued, is about 14 years old. He weighs over 400 pounds (but) never has ever showed a bit of aggression, he said. Schreibvogel said the tiger may have thought the womans jacket was a toy or may have been attracted by the smell of the goose down. It could have been a whole lot worse. Were just glad it wasnt. When they took her into surgery, she was talking about coming back to work, Schreibvogel said. He said the womans job will be waiting for her. She will probably be one of the best leaders now to help make sure safety protocols are followed, Schreibvogel said. The tiger wont be euthanized, Schreibvogel said. The park, which was closed after the incident, features big cats, bears, monkeys, zebras and other animals. The mission statement on its website says the parks focus is rescuing abandoned, misplaced and abused animals, as well as those animals whose owners can no longer care for them. The website says the park, since opening in 1997, has rescued more than 1,400 animals and placed more than 1,200 in zoos and sanctuaries.NATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A15 000G87Q CRYSTAL RIVER WED., OCT. 16TH & THURS., OCT. 17TH Coming direct to you. Ultrasound can see things mammography cannot in dense breast. Early detection is everything Painless, No Compression. Fast Test Results & Confidential No Prescription Required No Radiation $139 Call Today 1-800-338-7499 (Space Limited Pre-registration required) Email: MHScan@aol.com HerSan.com Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned Way 000G7M5 Same Day Appointments Available! Dr. Shirley A. Ice is going on sabbatical beginning October 1st, 2013. For patient care continuity, she recommends her patients see her colleague Dr. Villacastin & Associates from Suncoast Primary Care Specialists or try our other locations for your convenience. Inverness 3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy 341-5520 Homosassa 7991 S. Suncoast Blvd 382-8282 Citrus Springs 10489 N. Florida Ave. 489-2486 000G81U Sunshine For Your Loved One Our Story + Your Story = 311 NE 4th Ave. Crystal River Assisted Living Facility Lic. # 12230 www.sgwseniors.com (352) 563-0235 Our compassionate staff is ready to help. Assisted Living just got a whole lot better. Call us today! We want to share our story, More importantly, we want to hear YOUR STORY. Memory care Short term and long term stays 000G90Q Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. Stanley Steemer. Expires 10/31/13. Limi t one coupon per customer. Not valid on previous sale. Limit one coupon per customer Not valid on previous sale. Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum Mention this coupon while ordering. Must meet minimum charge. Residential only. Can be used on Duct Cleaning only. charge. Residential only Can be used on Duct Cleaning only Stanley Steemer. Expires 10/31/13. Stanley Steemer Expires 10/31/13. DUCT CLEANING DUCT CLEANING EXTENDED OFFER Always A Fair Price CASH for SCRAP Crystal River Metal Recycling 4320 W. Gulf to Lake Lecanto, FL 34461 527-9599 000G5TE Steel Aluminum Cars Appliances Wire Tiger attacks worker at Oklahoma animal park ON THE NET Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park: http://gwz oo.org

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Associated PressGAFFNEY, S.C. There arent many secrets in a place like Gaffney, so when two heating and air conditioning workers suddenly quit their jobs and began buying stuff like a big screen TV, a used car and a riding lawn mower with $100 bills so old they didnt even have the off-center portrait of Benjamin Franklin, people started talking. Police said all that talk got back to Lois Brown, who had hired those men a few days earlier and made them a deal. She told the workers just before her husband died seven years ago, he said he hid thousands and thousands of dollars in the basement. Her family had never found the money. If the workers discovered the cash, Brown said, they would be in for a big reward. After hearing about their freespending ways, Brown went to Joey Reed and Elie Spencer and made an offer. Keep what they bought and a bit more money for themselves, give the rest back to her and she wouldnt go to police. They played dumb, and the law got involved, Gaffney Police Det. Brian Blanton said. Now the men are facing grand larceny charges, accused of taking the $100,000. And Brown has sued the owner of the company they once worked for to get her money back. She hasnt seen any of the cash from the workers, Blanton said. They quit their jobs the day after they found the money, Blanton said. And they didnt waste any time spending it. The story begins with a repair job at the large, white, two-story farmhouse with the wrap-around porch that Brown shared with her husband for decades before he died. He founded a business that sold small crane games, arcade games and other amusement devices. He also was in real estate and kept large amounts of cash around, Blanton said. After Browns husband died in 2003, his family searched for the cash he had hidden in the basement. Each time someone came to work at the old house, Brown offered a reward if the workers found the money. It was the same offer she made to Reed and Spencer in September 2010, but they left the three-day job without telling her anything, police said. The spending spree started a few days later. Zeke & Ziggy Associated PressZeke Forbes, of Neptune, N.J., pretends to bite a dog named Ziggy on Saturday during a zombie walk at the Asbury Park boardwalk in Asbury Park, N.J. According to Guinness World Record adjudicator Michael Empric, the 9,592 zombies gathered sets a record for largest zombie walk. Man who set himself ablaze on Mall diesWASHINGTON A man who set himself on fire on the National Mall in the U.S. capital has died of his injuries, which were so severe that authorities will have to use DNA and dental records to identify him, District of Columbia police said Saturday. The man died Friday night at a Washington hospital where he had been airlifted, Officer Araz Alali, a police spokesman, said. The man poured a can of gasoline on himself in the center portion of the mall Friday afternoon. He then set himself on fire, with passing joggers taking off their shirts to help douse the flames. Police are investigating the mans possible motives.No report of violence by officer at rallyNEW YORK Authorities are investigating whether an undercover police officer present at a motorcycle rally witnessed a violent confrontation between an SUV driver and a swarm of bikers and didnt immediately report it, a law enforcement official said Saturday. The officer came forward several days after the Sept. 29 rally to say he was present, according to the official, who was not authorized to speak publicly about the investigation and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The officer has an attorney, and internal affairs detectives are trying to determine whether he witnessed the assault on the SUV driver, the official said. New York Police Department spokesman John McCarthy said a detective had been stripped of his gun and badge pending the outcome of an internal investigation. Last weekend, dozens of bikers stopped the Range Rover SUV on a highway, attacked the vehicle, then chased the driver and pulled him from the car after he plowed over a motorcyclist while trying to escape, police said. The driver, Alexian Lien, needed stiches after being pummeled.Oregon bartender gets $17,500 tipSPRINGFIELD, Ore. An Oregon bartender just got the tip of a lifetime. One of Aurora Kepharts regulars at Conways Restaurant and Lounge in Springfield often tips her with Keno tickets from the Oregon Lottery. On Tuesday evening, the man asked Kephart to choose two. When she checked the numbers, Kepharts first ticket won $5. The second turned into a $17,500 gratuity. The look on his face was incredible, Kephart, 25, told The Register-Guard newspaper. I automatically handed it back to him; it was his ticket. But the man wouldnt take the ticket. Kephart said she gave the man a percentage of her winnings. I just couldnt not give him some of it, she said. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS Page A16SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Floating flock Associated PressThousands of rubber ducks float on the Huangpu River on Saturday in Shanghai, China. Organizers released 11,000 rubber ducks during the charity event to raise at least $81,000 in conjunction with the Special Olympics. String of attacks in Iraq kill nearly 50BAGHDAD A suicide bomber blew himself up among a crowd of Shiite pilgrims in Baghdad and another detonated his explosives inside a cafe north of the capital, the deadliest of several attacks across Iraq on Saturday that killed at least 48 people. The killings also included attacks on journalists and anti-extremist Sunni fighters. The pilgrims were targeted late Saturday as they passed through the largely Sunni neighborhood of Azamiyah en route to a prominent shrine in the nearby Shiite neighborhood of Kazimiyah, according to police officials. At least 24 people, includingfour policemen manning the checkpoint, were killed and 50 others were wounded, the officials said. Around the same time, another suicide bomber blew himself up in a cafe in the town of Balad, a largely Shiite town surrounded by Sunni communities about 50 miles north of Baghdad. Balad Mayor Malik Lefta said at least 13 people were killed and 22 were wounded in that attack. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the days violence.US forces take al-Qaida leaderWASHINGTON A U.S. official says American forces have captured an al-Qaida leader in Libya linked to the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in east Africa. The official identifies the leader as Nazih AbdulHamed al-Ruqai, known by his alias Anas al-Libi. He has been wanted by the U.S. for more than a decade. Relatives of al-Libi say he was seized outside his house Saturday in the Libyan capital of Tripoli.Agreement ends shelling of villageBEIRUT Syrian government forces reached an agreement Saturday with local officials of a vulnerable Sunni village in a region dominated by President Bashar Assads Alawite sect to end hours of deadly shelling, an activist group said. The shelling of al-Mitras began at dawn, killing eight civilians while fierce fighting between rebels and government forces on the outskirts of the village left 20 soldiers dead or wounded, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The violence ended when local officials and dignitaries from the village persuaded dozens of defectors and rebels to surrender to authorities with the promise that they would be freed after repenting. Such deals have been used in the past to end bouts of heavy fighting as the two sides find themselves stalemated. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressWASHINGTON A rare flash of bipartisanship Saturday served as a cruel tease to those hoping Congress is moving toward reopening the government and averting an unprecedented default on the federal debt in less than two weeks. Only two days after House Speaker John Boehner raised hopes by telling colleagues he wont let the nation go into default, key members of both parties conceded that no one has presented a plausible plan for avoiding it. Instead, they continued to bicker and to ponder the chasm between two warring parties, each of which seems convinced its on the winning side morally and politically. There was, however, relief Saturday for thousands of furloughed Pentagon workers and the promise of back pay for all federal workers who have been forced off the job. The Pentagon on Saturday ordered at least 90 percent of its roughly 350,000 furloughed civilian employees back to work, significantly reducing the number of sidelined federal workers. In all, about 800,000 federal workers had been furloughed. The Defense Department said the recall is based on a law passed by Congress this week that allows the Pentagon to end furloughs for employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of service members. The larger stalemate over reopening the federal government persists. Boehner, asked Saturday whether Congress was any closer to resolving the impasse, replied: No. Aides close to Boehner say he has not figured out how to end the gridlock. Even the days top bipartisan achievement agreeing to pay furloughed federal employees for the work days they are missing was a thin victory. Congress made the same deal after the mid-1990s shutdowns, and Saturdays 407-0 vote was widely expected. Still, it triggered the sort of derisive quarreling that has prevented Congress from resolving the larger funding and debt dilemmas. Of all the bizarre moments involved in the debate, said Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, this may be the most bizarre: that we will pay people not to work. Congress reaches accord on pay Associated PressThe house owned by Lois Brown in Gaffney, S.C. Browns husband died in 2003, hiding $100,000 in the homes basement. Men facing larceny charges after conspicuous spending of cash stash Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Tropical Storm Karen stalled off the Louisiana coast Saturday night as a weakened system that still threatened to bring strong wind and heavy rain to vulnerable low-lying areas. The National Weather Service said Saturday evening that the storm was stationary but still expected to move across or near the southeast Louisiana coast late Saturday or early Sunday, then track eastward and lose strength. It had spent the day either stalled or moving slowly. Were going to have 35 to 45 mph winds probably starting by tomorrow morning, David Camardelle, mayor of the barrier island town of Grand Isle, said Saturday evening. The town, roughly 60 miles south of New Orleans, remained under a mandatory evacuation order amid worries that the only mainland road in and out might get swamped with water. The National Hurricane Center in Miami discontinued tropical storm watches across much of the Gulf Coast, including metro New Orleans, but a portion of southeast Louisiana remained under a tropical storm warning. Karen had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, making it a weak tropical storm. It was about 170 miles west-southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River at 7 p.m. It was forecast to track northeastward then travel east. The National Weather Service said storm surges of 1-to-3 feet were possible along the southeast Louisiana and Mississippi coast. In low-lying Plaquemines Parish, La., officials changed an evacuation order from mandatory to voluntary Saturday afternoon. More than 80 evacuees from the area, at the states southeastern tip, had taken refuge at a public shelter, which would remain open Saturday. They gathered in an auditorium where they rested on cots, watched for weather updates on TV and chatted outside on the front steps. Were Karen to maintain tropical storm strength at landfall, it would be only the second named storm to hit the U.S. during an unusually quiet hurricane season. The first was Tropical Storm Andrea, which hit Florida, in June. The season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30. Associated PressDanny Phillips chases down one of his two geese Friday as he prepares his home for the arrival of Tropical Storm Karen in Grand Bayou, La. which is a fishing community accessible only by boat.

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n the summer of 1962, I was a telephone lineman in the U.S. Army stationed in Fort Meade, Md. In July of that year, I was abruptly transferred to a combat unit and shipped out on a reassignment to an unknown location. After three and a half days of trains, convoys and marching, we arrived at our destination, Key West. Unbeknown to us we were preparing defenses for a Cuban Invasion. And prepare we did, installing HAWK missile installations from Miami, through the Keys to Key West and actually setting up machine gun nests on Smathers Beach.EXCURSIONS Page A17SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEPergamum, Turkey Special to the ChronicleRuss and Gloria Burt, of Sugar Mill Woods, recently returned from a trip to Turkey, where the couple explored the western half of the country. Among the sites they visited were the ancient ruins at Pergamum, Turkey.The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of the newspaper. Readers are invited to send a photograph from their Dream Vacation with a brief description of the trip. If its selected as a winner, it will be published in the Sunday Chronicle. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that photograph will win a prize. Please avoid photos with dates on the print. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle office in Inverness, Crystal River or any Accent Travel Office.DREAMVACATIONSPhoto Contest On Oct. 27, 1962, we were prepared to board a ship at the Key West Naval Base to invade Cuba. Fortunately, we received the order to stand down in the early morning hours. Key West in the early 1960s was a military town, period. Of their approximately 18,400 residents, 15,000 were military personnel stationed at a dozen bases. Among the remaining 3,400 residents were a substantial Cuban population. Most of the stores, restaurants and bars were Cuban owned and most of the many people I met there were Cuban. I spent a great deal of my spare time in the Cuban community. Peter Graulich Special to the Chronicle Special to the ChronicleTOP: On Cienfuegos Province, A 500-year-old-city is so well preserved that some call it an open air museum. ABOVE: Many reconstruction projects are under way in the country. RIGHT: Manaca Iznaga is a sugar mill and plantation estate. See CUBA/ Page A21

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A18SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT Dear Annie: I am a 24-year-old college student who still lives with my parents. I love them and my two siblings very much, and I know that they love me. However, they are neither understanding nor supportive when anyone makes a mistake. As a result, there is not much I feel I can tell them. Usually, I can handle my problems by myself, but some things are difficult to handle alone. A few months ago, I suffered a miscarriage. My father once told us that if we ever got pregnant before marriage, we would be disowned. I realize parents often say things to scare some sense into their children, but I know my parents, and they would do it. I have not told them about the miscarriage, nor do I plan to. I am going through some emotional upheaval: sadness, anger, guilt for not taking enough precautions to prevent the pregnancy and a lot of confusion. My boyfriend is wonderful, loving and supportive. But I wish more than anything that I could rely on my parents and siblings for support. Heres a message to all parents, siblings and family members: Please let us know we can come to you for support and caring. Though you might be angry, try not to overreact. When you fail to do this, it can have larger consequences than you realize. Grieving Dear Grieving: Our condolences on your loss. We think most parents would regret knowing their child felt too uncomfortable or fearful to come to them for support, and you might let them know this is the impression they give. There are many support groups specifically for women who miscarry. We recommend SHARE at nationalshare.org.Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email annies mailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox, visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX ACROSS 1Category 6Light brown 10Flat-bodied fish 15Cut 20Term of endearment 21Diving bird 22Swivel 23 and fishes 24Of birds 25Raised 26Skilled 27Wagon of a kind 28Kinsman (abbr.) 29Orchestra member 31Scotland 33Helot 35Hinge joint 36Bamboozle 37Hardings predecessor 39Catchall abbr. 41Tropical fruit 44 and dine 45Sandler or West 48Underway 53Illegal drug 54Monarch 55The Marriage of 57Jam 58Peddle 59Fabric for gowns 60Brooks or Gibson 61Simple 63Frayed 64Before 65 in Space 66Old-fashioned 68Concerning (2 wds.) 70Scarlet 71Girl 72Harangues 74Means justifier 76Gannet 79Wipe clean 81At any time 83Cling 87Turn aside 88Grime 89Town in Oklahoma 91Breakfast fare 92Sidestepped 94Condemn 96Mountainside 97Sharp 98Clapton or Sevareid 100Farm vehicle 102Swindle 104Switch position 107Fiddling despot 109Boy Scouts group 110Throw 111Archery item 114Track 116Make more tractable 118Short swim 119Kind of bond 120Hereditary factor 121Dress in finery 123Large game fish 125Job 126Support 127Not very smart 128Say grace 129Great composer 130Burned brightly 131A pronoun 133Get on a ship 136Timber 137 bene 141Date in March 144Swearword 145Long story 146Garment edge 149Source 151Austere 153Diner sign 155Grayish brown 157Sense 158Racket 159Send forth 160Rye fungus 161Drop a syllable 162 seal 163Old instrument 164Shift DOWN 1Blacken with heat 2Adoration 3Indigo dye 4Red or Yellow 5Thesaurus entry 6Pasta shape 7Apple remnant 8Caviar 9Everlasting 10Poles on a ship 11Buddy boy 12 Maria 13The best 14Diminutive suffix 15Boston Red 16Be without 17Russian czars name 18Bird bill part 19Punta del 23Garret 30Snake 32Pub draft 34Contrition 36OT king 37Quick as a 38Broken-down horse 40Corvine cry 41Affectation 42Mimic 43Stack 44Lose freshness 46Hoover or Grand Coulee 47Field 49Not too many 50Redolence 51Fairy tale heavy 52Incline 54Bussed 55Greek cheese 56 -France 59Distress call 60Female horse 62Lab burner 65Source of light 66Twist 67Evolve 69Eccentric one 71Mammoth 72Kind of mystical card 73Mister, in Madrid 75Hut 76Blue 77Ab (from the beginning) 78Directed 80Clear 82Rend 84Old French coin 85Decompose 86Dir. letters 90Expose as false 93Usual food 95 Gras 96Whoa! 99Small and crowded 101Penny 103Annoy 104Toward the mouth 105Taxi charge 106Snow field 108 Khayyam 110Be silent! 111Tolerate 112A single time 113Do a garden job 115 Vegas 117Time 119Card in a deck 120Degree recipient 122Indeed! 124Caustic substance 125Native of North Carolina 126Swollen 129Cudgel 130Becloud 132Slight trace 134Code name 135Cooked a certain way 136Squander 137Stem joint 138City in Russia 139Small monkey 140Matured 142Anglo-Saxon laborer 143Portico 145Commotion 146Gigantic 147Group of poems 148New York team 150Frost 152Ventilate 154Adams or Poehler 156Airport abbr. SundayPUZZLER Daughter afraid to talk to parents (MSNBC) 42 41 42 C aug h t on C amera What Went Wrong? C aug h t on C amera C aug h t on C amera Confrontation (N) S ex Sl aves: M otor Ci ty S ex Sl aves: M otor Ci ty Teens S ex Sl aves: Th e D ea dl y Game (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Detroit Gang Squad L,V Miami Drug Cartel L,V Drugs, Inc. Philly Dope Drugs, Inc. Wasted In Seattle (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. Wasted In Seattle (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sam & Sam & HauntedHauntedSee DadInstant The Nutty Professor (1996) Friends (OWN) 103 62 103 Oprahs Next Oprahs Next Oprahs LifeclassOprahs Lifeclass (N)Oprah: Where Now?Oprahs Lifeclass (OXY) 44 123 Snapped Snapped PG Snapped Snapped PG Snapped PG Snapped PG (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Out of Time (2003) PG-13 Homeland Tin Man Is Down MA Masters of Sex Pilot MA Homeland Uh... Oh... Ah... (N) MA Masters of Sex (N) MAHomeland Uh... Oh... Ah... MA (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue Turtle on Its Back PG Bar Rescue Bros Got to Geaux PG Bar Rescue (In Stereo) PG Bar Rescue Crappy Cantina (N) PG Tattoo Rescue (N) (In Stereo) PG (STARZ) 370 271 370 White Queen Charlies Angels (2000) Cameron Diaz. PG-13 The White Queen (In Stereo) MA The White Queen (In Stereo) MA Charlies Angels: Full Throttle (2003, Action) Cameron Diaz. PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Fishing the Flats Sport Fishing Sprtsman Adv. College Football Maryland at Florida State. (Taped)Seminole Sports Saltwater Exp. Into the Blue G (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29House of Bones (2010) NR Psychosis (2010, Horror) Charisma Carpenter, Ricci Harnett. Premiere. R The Ninth Gate (1999, Suspense) Johnny Depp. A rare-book dealer is hired to track down two satanic tomes. R (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19MLB Baseball Division Series: Teams TBA. (N) (Live)MLB Baseball Division Series: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 With Six You Get Eggroll (1968, Comedy) Doris Day, Brian Keith. G Mister Roberts (1955, Comedy) Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon. NR Ensign Pulver (1964, Comedy) Robert Walker, Burl Ives. NR (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Exposed (N) Alaska: The Last Frontier Buying Alaska Buying Alaska Alaska: The Last Frontier (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30MediumMediumMediumMediumMediumMediumLong Island MediumAlaskan Women Long Island Medium (TMC) 350 261 350 Serious Moon Our Idiot Brother (2011) Paul Rudd. R Lawless (2012, Crime Drama) Shia LaBeouf. Premiere. (In Stereo) R Out of Sight (1998, Crime Drama) George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez. R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Double Jeopardy (1999, Suspense) Tommy Lee Jones. R A Time to Kill (1996, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A lawyers defense of a black man arouses the Klans ire. R (DVS) Along Came a Spider (2001) R (TOON) 38 58 38 33 Contest (2013) Kenton Duty. NR GumballTeenAmericanClevelandFam. GuyBurgersFam. GuyChina, IL (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Terrifying PlacesHalloween TrickedMaking Monsters (N)Making Monsters (N)Halloween Ext.Halloween Crazy (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Most ShockingWorlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest...Worlds Dumbest... (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 CSI: Miami Dissolved CSI: Miami Seeing Red CSI: Miami Out of Time CSI: Miami Hostile Takeover CSI: Miami Bolt Action CSI: Miami Reality stars murder. (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20Funny Home VideosFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherNewsReplay Black Knight SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 6, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsFootball Night in America NFL Football Houston Texans at San Francisco 49ers. (N) News # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6NewsHour Wk WEDU Arts Plus Queen & Country Traveller G Last Tango in Halifax (N) Masterpiece Classic The Paradise Denise Lovett gets a job in the city. PG Elton John in Concert G % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41Keep UpKeeping Up Appearances PGLast Tango Masterpiece Classic The Paradise PGAustin City Limits ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly News Football Night in America (N) (In Stereo Live) NFL Football Houston Texans at San Francisco 49ers. From Candlestick Park in San Francisco. (N) (In Stereo Live) News ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Once Upon a Time (In Stereo) PG Once Upon a Time Lost Girl (N) PG Revenge Victoria makes a move. PG Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) NewsSpo Night on 9 (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 10NFL Football Denver Broncos at Dallas Cowboys. (N) (Live) 60 Minutes (N) (In Stereo) The Amazing Race Zip It, Bingo PG The Good Wife The Bit Bucket (N) The Mentalist (N) (In Stereo) 10 News, 11pm (N) ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) The Simpsons The Simpsons The Simpsons Bobs Burgers Family Guy American Dad FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsBurn Notice PG 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC Once Upon a TimeOnce Upon a TimeRevenge Sin PGBetrayal (N) NewsInside Ed. 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Brody FileWatchmanPeter Youngren Great AwakeningLove a Child G UnspokenKnow the Cause Daniel Kolinda Jesse Duplantis Bridging the Gap Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News Once Upon a Time (In Stereo) PG Once Upon a Time Lost Girl (N) PG Revenge Victoria makes a move. PG Betrayal (N) (In Stereo) NewsCastle PG @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Modern Family Modern Family Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Glee Acafellas (In Stereo) PG Glee Preggers (In Stereo) The Office PG The Office PG We There Yet? We There Yet? F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Bart Got a Room (2008) PG-13SeinfeldSeinfeldRepublic of DoyleOur IsWhackedBorn/RideHonor H (WACX) TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the LordConnecPassion!Turning Point GJourneyJim RaleyBrody Ministries L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12Friends PG Friends PG Two and Half Men Two and Half Men CSI: Miami Skateboarder. CSI: Miami Recoil (In Stereo) Criminal Minds (DVS) Criminal Minds Hanley Waters O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Casita Big Dog Rotary Club Family Solutions Healthy Living Your Citrus County CourtI Spy YEye for an Eye Fam Team S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7Big BangBig BangSimpsonsSimpsonsSimpsonsBurgersFam. GuyAmericanFOX 35 News at 10Driven: A Race (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14Comed.NoticieroAqu y Ahora (SS)Mira Quin Baila (N) PG (SS) Sal y Pimienta PGComed.Noticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Law Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CILaw Order: CI (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Modern Dads PG Modern Dads PG Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (AMC) 55 64 55 The Godfather, Part II (1974, Crime Drama) Al Pacino. R Low Winter Sun Frank testifies. Low Winter Sun Ann Arbor; Surrender Frank struggles to maintain sanity. (N) Low Winter Sun (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21Gator Boys (In Stereo) PG Gator Boys Errorboat Captain PG Gator Boys Monster Croc Rescue PG Call of Wildman CallWildman Gator Boys Lone Star Gators (N) PG Lone Star Legend Lone Star Legend (BET) 96 19 96 Married Too? Funny Valentines (1999, Drama) Alfre Woodard, Loretta Devine, CCH Pounder. Steve Harvey: Dont Trip... He Aint Through with Me Yet T.D. Jakes Presents: Mind, Body & Soul (BRAVO) 254 51 254 JerseyHousewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ HappensCouch (CC) 27 61 27 33IdiocracyJeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 PaidPaidKnifeOn SecretSecretAmerican GreedAmer. Greed Truth About (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46CNN Newsroom (N)CNN Newsroom (N)Anthony Bourd.Anthony Bourd.Inside Man (N) Anthony Bourd. (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Jessie G Dog With a Blog G Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie Liv & Maddie Shake It Up! G WanderYonder Austin & Ally G Austin & Ally G Jessie G A.N.T. Farm G GoodCharlie (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)SportsCenter (N) (Live) WNBA Basketball: Dream at Lynx SportsCenter (N) (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49American Le Mans SeriesBaseballNHRA Drag Racing Auto-Plus Nationals. From Reading, Pa. NASCAR Now (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48DevotionsCrossingWorld Over LiveSunday Night PrimeBloodmoney Fran. GodBookmark (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 National Treasure: Book of Secrets (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage. PG Forrest Gump (1994) Tom Hanks. Premiere. An innocent man enters history from the s to the s. PG-13 The Middle PG The Middle PG (FLIX) 118 170 My Left Foot (1989) Daniel Day-Lewis. (In Stereo) R Havana (1990) Robert Redford. A gambler begins a risky affair with a Cuban revolutionary. R Quiz Show (1994) John Turturro. PG-13 (FNC) 44 37 44 32Fox News SundayFOX Report (N)Huckabee FOX News SpecialStossel Huckabee (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped G Kids Cook-OffChopped (N) GHalloween Wars GCutthroat Kitchen GRestaurant: Im. (FS1) 732 112 732 Continental Tire NASCARUFCUFC UltimateBeing BeingThe Ultimate FighterFOX Sports Live (N) (FSNFL) 35 39 35 West Coast CustomsWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourBull Riding World Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) Ioan Gruffudd. PG Green Lantern (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds. A test pilot joins a band of intergalactic warriors. PG-13 Green Lantern (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 Live From the Presidents Cup (N) (Live)Golf Presidents Cup, Day Four. (N Same-day Tape) (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Accidentally in Love (2010, Drama) Jennie Garth, Ethan Erickson. NR Cedar Cove A New Life Second Chances (2013, Romance) Alison Sweeney, Greg Vaughan, Ed Asner. Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2Muhammad Ali Life of Pi (2012, Adventure) Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Tabu. (In Stereo) PG Boardwalk Empire Erlkonig (N) MA EastboundHello Ladies MABoardwalk Empire Erlkonig MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 BoxingPrometheusReal Time With Bill Maher MA Hitchcock (2012) Anthony Hopkins. PG-13 Enough Said Red Tails (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr., Nate Parker. (In Stereo) PG-13 (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HuntersHunt IntlHuntersHunt IntlCousins UndercoverLove It or List It, TooHouse Hunters RenoHuntersHunt Intl (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42American Pickers PG American Pickers Driving Miss Dani American Pickers American Pickers PG American Pickers Pinch Picker American Pickers Psychic Pickings (LIFE) 24 38 24 31The Cheating Pact (2013) NR House of Versace (2013, Docudrama) Gina Gershon, Raquel Welch. NR Drop Dead Diva Trust Me (N) PG Witches of East End Pilot Witches of East End Pilot (LMN) 50 119 Killer Kids (In Stereo) Killer Teens (In Stereo) V Murder in Enchanted Hills Indiana youths are convicted of murder. (N) I Killed My BFF (N) (In Stereo) Women Behind Bars (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Rock of Ages (2012) PG-13 A Night at the Roxbury (1998) Warm Bodies (2013) Nicholas Hoult. (In Stereo) PG-13 Payback (1999) Mel Gibson. (In Stereo) R Girls Guide Puzzle answer is on Page A21. TodaysMOVIES Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Baggage Claim (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)In 3D.1:45 p.m. No passes. Don Jon (R) 1:05 p.m. 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. The Family (R) 4:35 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG13) 1:50p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. Lee Daniels The Butler (PG-13) 1:30p.m., 7:35p.m. Prisoners (R) 1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m. Runner Runner (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Rush (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG)In 3D. 4:30 p.m. No passes. Don Jon (R) 12:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Gravity (PG-13) 3:50 p.m. No passes. Gravity (PG-13) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Insidious: Chapter 2 (PG13) 1:30p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Prisoners (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. Runner Runner (R) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.

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CCVC yard sale Oct. 12The Citrus County Veterans Coalition has yard sales September through May from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church in Inverness, south of where U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split. Sellers may come and set up the day before (typically Friday afternoon) and are responsible for the security of their own items overnight. The spots are typically 15 feet by 30 feet and cost $10. For more information and to make reservations, call Dan at 352-400-8952.Committee sets meetingThe Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its final coordination meeting for Citrus Countys 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the Conference Room of the Citrus County Chronicle building, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River. Veterans service organizations and individuals participating on the committee are urged to attend. For more information, email chairman Chris Gregoriou at allprestige@yahoo.com or call 352-795-7000. Legion Auxiliary to serve fish Blanton-Thompson American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155, Crystal River, will serve a fish dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at the post home, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Choice is fried or baked fish. The public is welcome; donation is $7. All profits support the many programs of the American Legion Auxiliary. For more information, call Unit President Barbara Logan at 352795-4233. New DAV chapter to meetNew Disabled American Veterans Chapter, Crystal River, will meet at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Crystal River Mall. For more information, call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337.Auxiliary slates saleVFW Post 4337 Ladies Auxiliary will hold a rummage sale from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at the post, 906 State Road 44 East, Inverness. Sale items include gently used clothing, crafts to include holiday decorations, baked goods and much more. Call 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337.org, for information about all post events. Ladies sale to help vetsThe West Citrus Ladies of the Elks will have a yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at the lodge, 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. Everyone is welcome to participate. Those with items to sell may call Bonnie Lee at 352-382-0211 or Sophie Jordan at 352-382-7614. Rental spaces are $15 each or two for $25. Rain date is Sunday, Nov. 17. Food will be available. Proceeds from the food booth go to help the Elks veterans committee provide for our veterans in nursing homes.MOC/MOCA to serve pastaThe Military Order of the Cootie/ Military Order of the Cootie Auxiliary will serve a pasta and meatball or sausage dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29, at Leroy Rooks Jr. Post No. 4252, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando (where the helicopter is). Advance tickets, for $7, may be purchased at the post. Donation at the door will be $7.50. Music will be provided after dinner. For more information, call Paul Kimmerling, seam squirrel, at 352-7954142 or the post at 352-726-3339. Veterans pin availableDisabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness announces the design and availability of this years Citrus County Veterans Appreciation Commemorative Pin. The pin is an outline of Citrus County superimposed with the Iraq Campaign and the Afghanistan Campaign service medals. Pins are available for a donation of $3 each and may be obtained by calling the chapter at 352-344-3464 or John Seaman at 352-860-0123. Pins are also available at the Veterans Service Office.Case manager aids vetsThe Citrus County Veterans Services Department has a case manager available to assist veterans to apply for benefits and provide information. The monthly schedule is: First Wednesday Lakes Region Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Second Wednesday Homosassa Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa. Third Wednesday Coastal Regional Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make an appointment to meet with the case manager, call 352-527-5915. This listing contains only basic information regarding each group. For more information about scheduled activities, meals and more for a specific post or group, call or email the contact listed. Posts and groups may email changes or corrections to community@chronicle online.com.AMERICANLEGION Blanton-Thompson American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 352795-6526, email blanton thompsonPost155@gmail.co m, or visit www.flPost155.org. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit President Barbara Logan, 352-795-4233. American Legion Wall Rives Post 58 and Auxiliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon. Call 352-489-3544, or email boosc29@gmail.com. American Legion, Beverly Hills Memorial Post 237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in the Beverly Plaza. Visit www.Post237.org or call 352-746-5018. Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little Al Point, off Arbor Street in Inverness. Call Commander Norm Brumett at 352476-2134 or Auxiliary president Alice Brummett at 352476-7001. American Legion Post 166, meets at the Springs Loedge No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S. Memorial Drive, Homosassa. Call Commander Robert Scott at 352860-2090. Herbert Surber American Legion Post 225, 6535 S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral City. Call 352-860-1629 for information.VETERANS OFFOREIGNWARS H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 County Road 491, directly behind Cadence Bank, Beverly Hills. Call 352746-0440. Edward W. Penno VFW Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs, 352-465-4864. Leroy Rooks Jr.VFW Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, Hernando. Call 352-7263339, email vfw4252@ tampabay.rr.com and Google VFW 4252, Hernando. Dumas-Hartson VFW Post 8189, West Veterans Drive, west of U.S. 19 between Crystal River and Homosassa. Call 352-795-5012. Joe Nic Barco Memorial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S. Florida Ave., Floral City. Call 352-637-0100. Eugene Quinn VFW Post 4337 and Auxiliaries, 906 State Road 44 E., Inverness. Call Commander Victor Houston at 352-344-3495, or visit www.vfw4337. Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW Post 8698, 520 State Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile east of U.S. 19. Call 352447-3495.OTHERGROUPS AMVETS William Crow Post 447, 405 E. State Road 40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352447-1816; email Amvet447@ comcast.net. Disabled American Veterans Gerald A. Shook Chapter No. 70, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, at the intersection of Independence Highway and U.S. 41. Call 352-419-0207. Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary Unit No. 70. Call Commander Lucy Godfrey at 352-794-3104. Marine Corps League Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit 498. Call JV Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834 or President Elaine Spikes at 352860-2400. The Korean War Veterans Association, Citrus Chapter 192 meets at VFW Post 10087, Beverly Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352563-2496, Neville Anderson at 352-344-2529 or Bob Hermanson at 352-489-0728. U.S. Submarine Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets at American Legion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call Base Commander Billy Wein at 352-726-5926. Seabee Veterans of America (SVA) Island X-23 meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Call John Lowe at 352-344-4702. Seabee Veterans of America Auxiliary (SVAA) ISLAND X-23 meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday monthly at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club, Hernando. Call Nancy Staples at 352697-5565. Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 and Cabane 1219 meets at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River. Call the Chef De Gare Tom Smith at 352601-3612; for the Cabane, call La Presidente Carol Kaiserian at 352-746-1959. Visit www.Post155.org. Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at Citrus County Builders Association, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), Lecanto. Visit www.citrus purpleheart.org or call 352382-3847. Marine Corps League, Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139 meets at DAV Post 70 in Inverness. Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or Wayne Howard at 352-634-5254. Marine Corps League Citrus Detachment 819 meets at VFW Post 10087 on Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, behind Cadence Bank. Call Morgan Patterson at 352746-1135, Ted Archambault at 352-382-0462 or Bion St. Bernard at 352-697-2389. Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 186 meets at the DAV Building, Independence Highway and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call Bob Huscher, secretary, at 352-344-0727. Landing Ship Dock (LSD) meets at Dennys in Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 352-621-0617. Suncoast U.S. Navy Armed Guard and Merchant Marine Veterans of World War II meets at 11:30 a.m. at Kally Ks restaurant in Spring Hill. Meeting dates are: Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. West Central Florida Coasties meets at the Country Kitchen restaurant in Brooksville, 20133 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50, east of U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen at 352-503-6019. VFW Riders Group meets at different VFW posts throughout the year. Call Gene Perrino at 352-3021037, or email geneusawo @tampabay.rr.com. Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 meets at DAV, 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit www.rolling thunderfl7.com, call Ray Thompson at 813-230-9750 (cell) or email ultraray1997 @yahoo.com. Red Tail Memorial Chapter 136 of the Air Force Association meets at Ocala Regional Airport Administration Building, 750 S.W. 60th Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig at 352-854-8328. Citrus County Veterans Coalition is on the DAV property in Inverness at the corner of Paul and Independence, off U.S. 41 north. Appointments are encouraged by calling 352-400-8952. Members can renew with Gary Williamson at 352-527-4537. Visit www.ccvcfl.org. Hunger and Homeless Coalition. Call Ed Murphy for information about services for veterans at 352-382-0876. Warrior Bridge, developed by nonprofit agency ServiceSource, seeks to meet the needs of wounded veterans. 2071 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call employment specialist Charles Lawrence at 352527-3722, ext. 102, or email charles.lawrence @servicesource.org. VETERANSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A19 VETERANS & SERVICE GROUPS The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Committee will conduct its annual Veterans in the Classroom program Nov. 1 to 12 as part of its 21st annual Veterans Appreciation Week activities. Coordinated by the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), the Veterans in the Classroom program brings living history to the classrooms of the countys public and private schools, as well as homeschool groups. Veterans share with students their firsthand military experiences and travels while serving our country in uniform. The programs success has generated the need for additional veterans to share their experiences with students. Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force, National Guard and women veterans are especially needed. All interested veterans may contact Mac McLeod at 352-746-1384, cmcleod670@earthlink.net, or Bob Crawford at 352-270-9025, baddogusmc@tampabay.rr.com.Of SPECIAL NOTE Vets sought for classroom program VETERANS NOTES FREE GAS! FREE FREE GAS! GAS! G I V E A W A Y 000FY9X $ 5 0 FREE GAS CARD One lucky winner for 8 weeks Grand Prize Winner $200 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Wednesdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest Pick up your copy of the Citrus County Chronicle Contest Begins Wednesday, September 11 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. 000G5YW

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VETERANS NOTES Page A20SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE In Their WordsThe Chroniclefeatures stories of local veterans. The stories will be about a singular event or moment in your military career that stands out to you. It can be any type of event, from something from the battlefield to a fun excursion while on leave. We also ask that you provide us with your rank, branch of service, theater of war served, years served, outfit and veterans organization affiliations. To have your story told, call C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or email him at cjrisak2@ yahoo.com. C.J. will put together your stories and help set up obtaining then and now photos to publish with your story.40&8 to have breakfast todayCitrus 40/8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. the first Sunday each month at American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). Donation is $6 for adults; special on kids (8 and younger) meals. Specialty drinks available for $1. Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.Wii bowling offered at postFor fun and exercise, come join the Wii bowling league at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77, 4375 Little Al Point, Inverness. Bowling will be the first and third Tuesdays of each month until May. Cost is $5 per night; prize money is paid each night to the high series team and bowler. Food is available. The bowling is sponsored by the American Legion, as well as the Auxiliary. This is open to the public; all ages. For more information, call Alice at 352-476-7001 or Norm at 352-476-2134. Post to serve roast porkVFW Edward W. Penno Post 4864 invites the public to a roast pork dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the post, 10199 N. Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus Springs. Donation is $8. Children younger than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke with Mike follows. For more information, call 352-465-4864. Singles to dance Oct. 11American Legion Auxiliary Allen Rawls Unit 77 will host a Singles Dance from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11. Music will be provided by the Sun Coasters band playing hits from the 1940s, s and s. The public is welcome. Proceeds from the dance will benefit Citrus United Basket (CUB). Cost is $10 and snacks and soft drinks will be provided. American Legion Post 77 is at 4375 Little Al Point (off Arbor Street), Inverness. For more information, call Alice at 352476-7001 or Linda at 352-201-0015. Riders to host OktoberfestThe American Legion Riders of Post 155 will host an Oktoberfest celebration on Saturday, Oct. 12, at the post, 6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. The public is invited. The event will take place in the rear smoke-free banquet hall, with doors opening at 5 p.m.; dinner and music start at 6 pm. Gary Hays, former backup singer for many Nashville performers and former member of the USAF Band, will entertain with his acoustic guitar and vocals. Tickets may be purchased from the bartender at Post 155, and are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. All proceeds benefit local veterans. For more information, call 352-637-5775. Cooter Scooter open to allThe Cooter Scooter Poker Run will take place Saturday, Oct. 12, starting and ending at the Inverness VFW at 906 State Road 44 East. The schedule is: 8:30 a.m. Breakfast and registration at the Inverness VFW. 10 a.m. Kickstands up. 5 p.m. Prize winners announced (must be present). 3 to 7 p.m. Party with Soggy Bottom Bait Shop Boys at the end of the Freedom Run. Pulled pork for $8 a plate will be available at 3 p.m. Cost of $10 per person includes one poker hand ($5 extra hand) and breakfast (all others, breakfast is $2). Tickets are on sale at Citrus County veterans organizations. All net proceeds received from the city of Inverness will be placed in the VFW Post 4337 Veterans Relief Fund to benefit local homeless/needy veterans and their families. The event is open to everyone, not just veterans. Bikes and cars are welcome. For details, call Victor at 352-220-3487. VETERANS C.J. RISAK CorrespondentWhen Earl Bud Shott Jr. enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 1954, he wasnt yet 18 and he had not yet graduated from high school. Those would both happen quickly enough; what wouldnt come quickly was an end to his Army career.Shott, who grew up and enlisted in Lebanon, Pa., did a tour of duty in Hanau, Germany where he earned his GED before leaving the service in September 1957. However, his military career was just beginning. Shott tried to re-enlist after he was laid off from work on his return to civilian life, but at first he couldnt. They said I had too many dependents, he said (Shott was married while stationed in Germany, and he had three children). He did, however, join the National Guard, inadvertently signing up for its military police corps. When National Guard units were federalized during the Berlin Crisis in 1960, Shott found himself back in the Army and enrolled in Military Police School in Fort Gordon, Ga. I was in the military police from the time I was reactivated until the time I retired, the current Crystal River Village resident said. Shotts span of service, which would last until May 1984, would take him down many trails including three tours in Vietnam and ultimately to the rank of sergeant major. I loved it, Shott said. I loved the military police. The only assignment I didnt like was when I was in Panama (from 1961-64). It was so hot, I had 22 uniforms and I would change three times a shift. He served in Vietnam in 1967-68, 1970-71 and 1972-73. During his first two tours of duty, Shott was heavily involved in convoy escort duty; he supplied security for military supplies during the Tet Offensive in January 1968. Memories, both good and bad, punctuated his time in the service, and his time in Vietnam. During his second tour, for example, Shott was in charge of the detail for the USO show at Freedom Hill, near Da Nang, when a familiar voice regaled him from behind, asking him how things were going. When he turned to answer, Shott found himself addressing Bob Hope. Who you might run into was only part of the equation, particularly in Shotts line of work which included his capacity in AWOL (absent without official leave) apprehension; where became the real riddle. For example: Shott and his partner, Bob Dalton, were stationed at Fort McPherson in Georgia and were tasked with picking up an AWOL soldier believed to be staying at his mothers house. When they paid the mother a visit, she told them her son was not home. They said they would wait, and they did for a while. Finally, they were ready to give up when, just before leaving, Dalton played a hunch. He stuck his hand up the fireplace and pulled down a leg the AWOL soldier attached. Of the myriad memories that Shott has to this day, there is one he will always have to claim for himself. I was the last military policeman out of Region 1 in Vietnam, he said. That was in 1973, a tour during which he was in charge of security for the Four Power (U.S., North Vietnam, South Vietnam and Vietvong delegations) Joint Military Commission. In fact, I was the last soldier out of Region 1. He almost wasnt, another soldier recognizing the significance and inviting Shott onboard the aircraft initially. Shott, outranking his counterpart, ordered him onboard first. He wasnt too happy about that, Shott recalled with a grin. MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleEarl Bud Shott of Crystal River retired from the United States Army as a sergeant major after serving 26 years. His service included three tours in Vietnam. Crystal River veteran does duty with military police NAME: Earl Bud Shott Jr. RANK: Sergeant major BRANCH: U.S. Army SERVED: Various posts stateside; Hanau, Germany; Panama Canal Zone; DaNang, Vietnam; Pleiku, Vietnam YEARS:1954-57; 1959-84 OUTFIT: Military Police, several detachments JOBS: Security; convoy escort; AWOL apprehension; provost marshals office AWARDS:Bronze Star VETERANSORGANIZATIONS: American LegionCam Rahn Bay, 1967 I was the last military policeman out of Region 1 in Vietnam. Submit information for the Veterans page at least two weeks bef ore the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed. Special to the ChronicleShott Returning from convoy escort, Cam Rahn Bay, in 1967.

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I was discharged from the Army in 1964 and I figured in three or four years, the Embargo would be lifted and I could visit Cuba. Fifty two years later, I still cannot visit, so I joined a group tour with a license to visit and headed to Cuba. Our tour began on June 21, with a 60-minute flight from Fort Lauderdale to Santa Clara, Cuba. This is a city located in central Cuba and was the site of the final battle in the Cuban Revolution that toppled the Batista regime. As we traveled under a People to People license, we spent most of our time with the locals. We visited the Che Guevara Memorial and Museum. Che is everywhere in Cuba and he is revered by the people. We then went to the Museo de Artes Decorativos to meet musicians who set Cuban life to rhythm on traditional instruments. Then on to the Community Project for the Elderly which reveals how art, music and dance play a crucial role in the everyday lives of the inspiring residents. The following day we travel South (by a large, comfortable, air conditioned bus) to Cienfuegos, on the Caribbean Sea. We take a walking tour of the city and areconstantly amazed by the number of old cars. We visit shops, Teatro Terry, which once hosted Enrico Caruso, and the town square. Here again the signs of no maintenance are everywhere. We attend a private convert by Cantores de Cienfuegos. A choir created from the population and some of the most beautiful music I have ever heard. The following day we continue to explore Cienfuegos Province, arriving at the Botanical Gardens. Home to 2,000 species of exotic plants, including 400 types of orchids, it is the tropics at its best. Returning to the city, we take a walking tour. We visit the main food market, enjoy the architecture of the town square and meet merchants. After an overnight stay at the Pearla del Mar hotel on the water, we are off to Trinidad. A 500-year-old city that is so well preserved, some call it an open air museum. A local guide shows us the cathedral and the Palicio Cantero, home of the historical museum. Our next stop is a rationing store where we see how the meager essentials of life are distributed. Then on to a local ceramics studio, owner operated as part of Raul Castros relaxing of the socialist doctrine. While talking with the owner, I am led to the rear storage area of the studio. And there I see a serviceable 1903 Ford sitting on blocks. In my whole life and I havent seen one, yet here it is in Cuba. We are then off to Manaca Iznaga, a sugar mill and plantation estate. We enjoy an excellent lunch and then operate the sugar press, by hand. This, or course, gives new meaning to hard work. The following morning we begin our journey to Havana. Our first stop is the Bay of Pigs Museum and then the town of Caleton near the landing beach. We then visit Casa Enrique at Playa Larga. This is our lunch destination in a private home on the water. We have a discussion with Enrique concerning the operating of a business in Cuba. We also enjoy a biologist explaining the make up of the island. From here, we travel to Havana on the only express road on the island. Again, sadly in need of maintenance. We are housed in the Hotel Terrell on the water for the duration of our visit. Excellent hotel, except the elevator is broken and they cannot seem to obtain parts. We start the day with a one-hour Spanish lesson at the University of Havana. The pace is fast, loud and entirely in Spanish. I learned nothing. Then we are on a walking tour of Havana. With 3,000 Baroque, neoclassical and colonial buildings we learn first hand from the architect in charge of this massive project. Lack of maintenance has caused much deterioration and basic services such as water, electricity and sewer are compromised. We are shown many reconstruction projects. All work is done manually and there were no shortage of workers. I am again amazed at the beauty of the buildings and the lack of maintenance. In most cases, it has been 50-plus years since last maintained. We next venture to La Casa Fuster, home of Jose Fuster a ceramic artist who has adorned some 80 homes with colorful murals. We then met with a former diplomat for a discussion on the Embargo and its affect on the Cubans. As it turned out, the lecturer was a member of the Cuban army in 1962 and was entrenched in a fox hole awaiting the U.S. Invasion. The next morning we travelled to Finca Vigia (Lookout Farm), the home of Ernest Hemmingway from 1939 to 1960. Located outside of Havana, the site is operated as a museum and educational center. It is just as it was when Hemingway left it. We viewed his boat Pilar and the second largest swimming pool in Cuba. From here we arrive at the Muraeleando neighborhood. This is a nonprofit project that collects junk and converts it into art. That night we go to Fortaleza de San Carlos de la Cabaa, an 18thcentury fortress complex. We enjoy the 9 p.m. cannon shot, a custom from the colonial times indicating the city wall doors have closed. Later that evening we walk to the National Hotel. Opened in 1930, the hotel has a rich history. In 1946 it hosted a mob summit run by Lucky Luciano and the hotel has hosted many, many illustrious visitors. My parents were married in 1940 and they spent their honeymoon at the hotel. The hotel maintains a history department archiving all the room registration records. I was unable to check my parents records as the office is only open two hours a day. We also visited schools, clubs, fraternal organizations and music concerts. I found the Cubans to be among the nicest people I have met in all of my travels. Crime is almost non-existent and I am told the Cuban prisons are quite a deterrent. In spite of their harsh life, they remain upbeat. In talking to locals, they always ask where we are from and then questions about us. But life will never be enjoyable until the United States lifts the embargo. Peter Graulich first left the country in 1961 for six weeks travelling Europe and the United Kingdom with family. At the end of that trip he knew he was going to travel a lot. Since then he has visited 97 countries, every state in the U.S. and every national park (408). He has spent about 300 days on Princess Cruise Line ships and completed a 107-day cruise around the world, visiting 42 countries. He rates Cuba as one of the top three places he has visited. EXCURSIONSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 A21 SundaysPUZZLER Puzzle is on Page A18. Special to the ChronicleTOP: Casa Enrique at Playa Larga is a colorful destination. BELOW: Cienfuegos, on the Caribbean Sea is home to a number of old cars. CUBAContinued from Page A17 (352) 527-88553557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465Located Next to Winn Dixie www.beckystravelservice.com 000GA9D ST 35415 Nov 16, 2013 7ntsWestern Caribbean sailing from TampaSpecial Senior pricing below Inside starting. ............$601.00Oceanview starting...$771.00 Optional Transportation to the port for a fee. INDEPENDENT TRAVEL8 Day London & Paris by railNovember 2013 March 2014Land only from.....................$539.008 Day Paris Amsterdam by railNovember 2013 March 2014Land only from.....................$569.00Great Airfare packages available to add to this program. Call for rates! Price is per person based on double. FL Seller of Travel: 10131 TALLY-HO 352-860-2805 000G913 www.tallyhovacations.com dmuir@tallyhovacations.com No Hidden Fees 1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450 S TOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS AROUND THE WORLD RSVP 352-860-2605 or dmuir@tallyhovacations.com with Bruce Waters Wed., Oct. 9, 2013 10:00am-12noon Share Club Auditorium at Citrus Memorial Hospital in Inverness Cultural India, Discover Alaska, Luxury Cruises around the World and More! Seminar discounts and savings Refreshment and door prizes WINE AND CHEESE RSVP 352-860-2605 or dmuir@tallyhovacations.com with Viking River Cruises Fri., Oct. 25, 2013 2:00-4:00pm Inverness Womens Club (across from Whispering Pines Park) World River Cruises including new US Cruises with Viking. Seminar discounts and savings Refreshment and door prizes TRAVEL SEMINAR INVITATIONS 000G5GU Hosted by Voice for Children of North Central Florida Your tidbits of knowledge are a smart choice to improve the welfare of the children in the 5th judicial circuit under the auspicies of the Guardian ad Litem program. Enjoy an evening of food, music, trivia and prizes. Tickets are $25 per person and include food, beverages, one door prize ticket and participation in the game. Sat., Nov. 2, 2013, 6:00 p.m. American Legion, 10730 Hwy. 41, Dunnellon, FL Food donated by Harrys Seafood Bar & Grille, Ocala, FL Silent auction with many varied items. Call 352-362-5851 or 352-601.0115 for tickets or to donate an item for the silent auction. Join us for this fun, and often funny, evening to raise funds to benefit abuse and neglected children. 209 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, FL kathy@accenttravelgroup.com (352) 726-6623 ac cent travel SINCE 1972 000G9JS VIKING RIVER CRUISE 2014 E NJOYABLE WAY TO SEE E UROPE Call to check availability and rates. Rates based on double occupancy. Filling up quickly. Hurry to reserve your stateroom. Extended the 2 for 1 on Cruise and Airfare until Oct 31, 2013! GREAT GETAWAY For more information call 352-249-4730 or email: katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org 000FSRQ Stock Up For Seniors Supporting Our Citrus Seniors in Need

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A22SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETOGETHER NewARRIVAL Dyani Leigh Salminen Ryan and Desiree Salminen announce the birth of a daughter, Dyani Leigh, at 1:12 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Health System. The baby weighed 7 pounds, 14.5 ounces and was 20.5 inches long. Dyani Leigh was welcomed by brothers Hunter, 6, and Brayden, 5, and sister Danica, 4. 50thANNIVERSARY The Waughs William C. Waugh Jr. and Sylvia Waugh of Dunnellon celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Sept. 14, 2013. The couple were wed Sept. 14, 1963, in Dunnellon. Sylvia is a homemaker and William is a retired pharmacist. They have lived in Dunnellon for 47 years; William was in college for three years at the University of Florida in Gainesville. They have three sons: Bill Waugh III, Ocala; Clayton Waugh, Jacksonville; and First Lt. Steven Waugh, serving in Afghanistan. The couple have four grandchildren and three step-grandchildren. The Waughs celebrated their golden anniversary at Ruths Chris Steak House in Jacksonville on Sept. 14. Sept. 16-22, 2013 Divorces Luis A. Olivero, Inverness vs. Anna M. Olivero, Hernando Marriages Keith Nicholas Brownscombe, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England/Ann Richardson, Great Yarmouth Christopher Steven Decaire, Dunnellon/Sara Bethany Poulin, Dunnellon Jed Hernandez, Inverness/Meagan Alexandra Puchala, Inverness Christopher Dillion Holland, Inverness/ Nina Maddox, Inverness Tomas Karger, Floral City/Connie Sue Meyers, Inverness Mathew Frank Marques, Beverly Hills/Katherine Kristan Siebenthal, Beverly Hills Andrew Linden Michael, Inverness/Sheena Marie Phillips, Inverness Barry Lee Sweigart Sr., Inverness/Glenda Ann Elmore, Inverness Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida are a matter of public record, available from each countys Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us. For theRECORD Engagement Shaner/Carroll Elizabeth Ann Shaner Chapman of Crystal River, formerly of Ellwood City, Pa., and Joseph William Zubaly, formerly of Ellwood City, Pa., announce the engagement of their daughter, Audrey Clara Shaner of Tavares, formerly of Ellwood City, Pa., to David Philip Carroll of Tavares. The bride-elect, a former Crystal River resident, is the granddaughter of the late Helen Audrey McNany and the Rev. H. Dale Shaner, formerly of Ellwood City, Pa. She graduated as a homeschooled student and received her GED in April 2013. Audrey now works for the Lake County Animal Services as an animal technician I. Her fianc is the son of Barbara Patrick Carroll and Bernie Carroll. He is a 1999 graduate of Tavares High School and is now employed as a water plant operator. The couple will exchange nuptial vows Feb. 22, 2014, at Little Lake Harris at Hickory State Park in Tavares. Cards may be sent to 603 Third Ave., Lady Lake, FL 32159. Club to learn about PhotoshopThe Citrus County Art Center Camera Club will have classes for Photoshop Elements starting at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Art Center. The classes will continue Oct. 15, 22 and 29. Cost will be $10 per class for members and $15 for nonmembers. Alan Wentzel will teach beginners who are new to Elements and Linus Upson will teach the intermediate and advanced students. Laptop computers will be necessary for the course. For more information, call 352-400-4466. The Art Center is at at 2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Hernando, at the intersection of County Road 486 and Annapolis Avenue.CASA bunco party slated Oct. 13In conjunction with Domestic Violence awareness Month in October, Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA) will host a Bunco Blast fundraiser Sunday, Oct. 13, at Catholic Charities Community Center Outreach, 9020 W. Atlas Drive, Homosassa. Doors open at 12:15 p.m. and games begin at 1. Novices and bunco clubs are welcome. What is bunco? Although rules can vary, teams of players roll dice and score points at each table, shifting tables and partners after each game. Cost is $12 per person, a nonrefundable charitable donation. Refreshments, game prizes and door prizes are included. Make reservations by calling Janet at 352-527-2304 or emailing janetb195@gmail.com. All proceeds will go to CASA for victims of domestic violence.Attorney to speak at Key CenterAttorney Marie Blume of Inverness will offer a presentation for caregivers of persons with developmental disabilities at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center (CCLEC) at the Key Training Center, 5521 Buster Whitton Way. The session is free and open to the public. It will focus on such aspects as financial planning, guardianship, making medical decisions and other similar issues. For more information, call Stephanie Hopper at 352-344-0288.E-Nini-Hassee plans dinnerEckerd E-Nini-Hassee, a not-for-profit organization for at-risk girls, will host its annual spaghetti dinner from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City. Donations are $8 per person, which includes salad, bread, spaghetti (with assorted homemade sauces), dessert and drink. Call 352-726-3883 for more information. GET TOGETHER Special to the ChronicleThe Meadowcrest Community Association will sponsor a bus trip to Bok Tower and Gardens on Thursday, Oct. 10. The group will depart from Meadowcrest WinnDixie at 7 a.m. and from The Shoppes at Sugarmill Woods at 7:15 a.m. Estimated return home to be between 6 to 6:30 p.m. In December, the group will travel to Ybor City. The group will depart from Meadowcrest Winn-Dixie at 8 a.m. and from The Shoppes at Sugarmill Woods at 8:15 a.m. Estimated return home to be between 6 to 6:30 p.m. Price for both trips includes bus, admission, guided tour, lunch, all gratuities (including driver) and Fun on the Bus. The trips are open to the public. Call the Meadowcrest social committee chairwoman, Sharon Ziemba, at 352795-4693 for price, deadlines and other details. Group plans two trips All are welcome A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Relax By The Pool Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage & More! Abitare Paris Salon Alpaca Magic Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Clementines Boutique Complete Family Dentistry Connollys Sod & Nursery Connors Gifts Cotton Club Eclectic Ends Hair Studio Everyones Massage Therapy Services, LLC Frame Design Genesis Womens Center Georgieos Hair Design Goldiggers & Gunslingers Health & Wellness Services of Florida, Inc. Helene Graham Miche Handbags Himalayan Salt Room Ocala Ideal Health Enrichment Center Inverness Yoga & Wellness Center Jewelry by Ms. Nettee Juice Plus Karma Upscale Resale Boutique La Te Da Boutique Ledger Dentistry Lillian Smith Mary Kay Cosmetics M Hair Studio & the Spa at M Mamas Kuntry Kafe The Little Glass Shack Mez Mer Eyes New Concepts Hair Salon New Empire E-Cigs Nick Nicholas Ford Nick Nicholas Ford/Lincoln Off the Cuff & On The Fly Origami Owl Amber Relaxation Station Sponsored by Crystal Automotive Park Avenue of Hair Design Playtime PinUp Photography Scentsy Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology & Skin Surgery Center The Garden Shed The New Image Med Spa Thirty-one by Valerie Hodges Timber Lane Chiropractic Tobacco Prevention Florida Health Touch of Glass by Susan Unique Lingerie Vault Jeans Vernon Martin Salon & Spa Virgilio Insurance Services Whalen Jewelers Zen Zone MassageVisit these vendors during the show. Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room & tickets www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com www.chronicle-online.com/divanight October 12, 6 9 PM1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets$138*Limited Availability. Taxes not included. 000G6wr 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL *For tickets only go to Chronicle site listed below

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Associated PressBOSTON David Ortiz homered twice, the second shot chasing David Price in the eighth inning on Saturday night, and the Boston Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 7-4 to take a 20 lead in the AL division series. It was the first two-homer postseason game for the Red Sox designated hitter, who was a star for the 2004 Boston team that won the franchises first World Series title in 86 years and is the only player remaining from that club. When he hits two home runs, things are going to revolve around him, Red Sox manager John Farrell said. Hes the main cog in our lineup. Jacoby Ellsbury had three hits and scored three runs for the AL East champions and Dustin Pedroia drove in three runs. The Rays will need a victory in Game 3 on Monday in St. Petersburg to avoid a sweep in the best-of-five series. They won three win-or-go-home games this week just to reach this round, including Prices complete game in the tiebreaker against Texas to determine the second AL wild-card team. But with the situation not yet desperate, Price allowed seven runs on nine hits and two walks, striking out five. He took the mound for the eighth inning, but Ortiz hit his second pitch high over the Pesky Pole, and right-field umpire Chris Guccione signaled it fair. There was no such suspense for Ortizs other homer, which went into Boston bullpen in the first inning to make it 2-0. Not even right fielder Wil Myers, who misplayed a Big Papi popup into a double in right field in Bostons Game 1 win on Friday, could be blamed for that one. John Lackey lasted just 5 1/3 innings for Boston, allowing four runs on seven hits and three walks. He struck out six and also hit a batter while getting the win. Koji Uehara struck out the first two batters in the ninth before retiring Myers on a grounder. NHL, golf/B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV, lottery/B3 NFL/B4, B6 College football/B5 Auto racing/B6 The Buccaneers are using their bye week to regroup as a team./ B6 SPORTSSection BSUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE 000G9Y9 Rays on the brink of elimination Boston claims Game 2 of ALDS to take commanding 2-0 series lead Associated PressTampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, left, holds the ball as starting pitcher David Price leaves the baseball game in the top of the eighth inning in Game 2 of the American League division series against the Boston Red Sox on Saturday in Boston. No. 8 FSU routs No. 25 Maryland 63-0 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Jameis Winston reaffirmed his Heisman Trophy candidacy with the best performance of his short career Saturday. The Florida State redshirt freshman put up career-highs with 393 yards passing and five touchdowns during a 63-0 victory over No. 25 Maryland. The 63 points were the second-most scored by No. 8 Florida State during coach Jimbo Fishers tenure. Saturday was the most lopsided win against a Top 25 program in school history. The Seminoles beat No. 15 South Carolina 59-0 in 1988. The lopsided score also tied the point-differential for the worst loss by a Top 25 team alltime. No. 11 Texas lost 66-3 to UCLA in 1997. Winstons weekly highlight came late in the third quarter when the pocket collapsed and Maryland linebacker Yannik Cudjoe-Virgil jumped on his back. The quarterback ducked and slid out of the sack, rolled right and threw a 12-yard touchdown pass to tight end Nick OLeary. Winston became the first FSU quarterback to throw five touchdowns since Christian Ponder in 2009. Hes now thrown for 1,441 yards, 17 touchdowns with two interceptions and a 73.3 completion percentage this season. It felt like a little league football game out there, Winston said. It was 12 oclock, the sun was out. I dont think I saw a cloud in the sky. It was a beautiful day. The Florida State defense was the concern throughout the week after giving up 34 points to Boston College seven days ago. Defenders got out of their lanes and missed tackles something the Seminoles Associated PressFlorida States Ryan Green catches a pass prior to the start of a contest against Maryland on Saturday in Tallahassee. The No. 8 Seminoles shut out the No. 25 Terrapins 63-0. See PURE/ Page B2 No. 18 UF dispatches Arkansas Associated PressGAINESVILLE Solomon Patton turned two short receptions into touchdowns, helping No. 18 Florida beat Arkansas 30-10 Saturday night. The 5-foot-9 senior nicknamed Solo was pretty close to being a one-man show in the Swamp. Patton finished with six catches for a career-high 124 yards. He also ran for a first down. But his longest gains went the distance and were key to Florida (4-1, 3-0 Southeastern Conference) winning its ninth consecutive game in the series and 10th in a row at home. Tyler Murphy, making his first start at Florida Field, completed 16 of 22 passes for 240 yards and three scores another efficient and effective outing from a fourth-year junior who somehow couldnt get on the field the last three years. The Razorbacks (3-3, 0-2) ran the ball well early against the leagues best defense but fell behind on Loucheiz Purifoys interception return in the second quarter for a touchdown and faded from there. Purifoy had a sack and forced fumble in the first quarter, extending Floridas streak with a takeaway to 16 games. The Gators also have intercepted a pass in eight straight games. Arkansas looked sharp for a bit, gashing the Gators on the ground and taking a 7-0 lead on Jonathan Williams nifty, cutback run. Williams started left, slammed into defensive end Ronald Powell, bounced out of the would-be tackle and then headed the other direction. He picked up a block from quarterback Brandon Allen and pretty much walked into the end zone for a 4-yard score. But it was ended up being one of the few bright spots for Arkansas, which hasnt beaten Florida since 1982 a decade before the Razorbacks entered the SEC. Things might be worse for the Razorbacks, too. Starting cornerback Will Hines injured his right arm and left the field on a cart, and starting center Travis Swanson also left the game.

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B2SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS couldnt afford against a Maryland offense that averaged 498.5 yards per game. That was not a problem. The Terrapins were held to 121 first-half yards and Florida State gave up a season-low 11 yards rushing on 10 attempts in the first half. Maryland punted on its first three possessions of the game, a Florida State first this season. The Terps converted just 1-of-7 third downs in the first 30 minutes and 2-of-15 all game. As good as the offense played today, I thought the defense played better, Fisher said. The defense, I thought, was the story of the day. They really took the show. Things became even worse for Maryland when starting quarterback C.J. Brown went down late in the second quarter with the Terrapins trailing 14-0. Brown released a pass downfield just before Dan Hicks hit him around the waist and Jaccobi McDaniel followed with a blow to the chest. Brown lay on the turf for several minutes before he immediately headed to the locker room with a member of the medical staff. Maryland coach Randy Edsall said Brown suffered a concussion and will be evaluated today. The Maryland offense was held to 234 yards and 33 yards rushing on 25 attempts. They have great athletes. They always do, Maryland backup quarterback Caleb Rowe said. They were good, but we also could have taken advantage of a few things and we didnt do that. It was the Florida State offense that started slow this week, but that didnt last long. The Seminoles scored on their first drive, a Karlos Williams 1yard touchdown run, and then punted on the next three consecutive drives. Thats when the Winston show began. The Seminoles scored touchdowns on their next eight consecutive possessions. OLeary had four receptions for 55 yards and two touchdowns. Receiver Kelvin Benjamin had five receptions for 60 yards and two touchdowns. Receiver Rashad Greene had 108 yards receiving, but saw his streak of five games with a touchdown come to an end. Williams added another touchdown from 17 yards out in the fourth quarter and backup quarterback Jacob Coker ran for a 24-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. Not really much to say today, Edsall said. We werent very good. ... I take full responsibility for this. We didnt play well offensively, defensively, special teams. I know the guys in the locker room. I know who they are and I know the resolve that we have and we will go back and we will look at this and get better. Florida State has a bye week before it travels to No. 3 Clemson on Oct. 19. Maryland hosts Virginia next week. PUREContinued from Page B1 Americans close to Presidents Cup Associated PressDUBLIN, Ohio The Americans are assured of being in the lead going into the final round of the rain-plagued Presidents Cup. Zach Johnson holed out from the 15th fairway for eagle to complete a swift turnaround in foursomes and give the Americans yet another point toward winning the Presidents Cup for the fifth straight time. Johnson and Jason Dufner won six of eight holes to go from 2 down to a 4-and-3 win over Richard Sterne and Marc Leishman. That was the only foursomes match that finished before it became too dark to play Saturday at Muirfield Village. Another rain delay kept the matches from finishing for the second straight day, this time because of the work needed to drain the saturated golf course. The four matches were to resume Sunday morning, followed by an early start to the 12 singles matches because of more rain in the forecast. The win by Johnson and Dufner gave the Americans an 11-6 lead, meaning they were assured at least a one-point lead going into singles. Early in the foursomes session, the board was filled with blue International scores on the front nine. Steve Stricker and Bill Haas warmed up their putters and went from 1 down to a 2-up lead through 10 holes. Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, who rallied earlier in a fourballs match to win, were 3 down through seven holes when Mickelson made two big putts that led to them squaring the match through 14 holes. Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, undefeated in all three matches they have played this week, were 2 down against Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge through nine holes. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel were 3 up over Webb Simpson and Brandt Snedeker through 12 holes.LPGA TourBEIJING Chinese star Shanshan Feng shot a 9-under 64 to take a one-stroke lead over American Stacy Lewis after the third round of the Reignwood LPGA Classic. Shrouded in the Chinese capitals notorious smog, Feng had nine birdies in a bogey-free round to reach 21-under 198, boosting the chances of a home winner in the first LPGA Tour event played in the country. Feng won the LPGA Championship last year to become Chinas first major champion. Lewis, a three-time winner this year, had a 65. Top-ranked Inbee Park, a six-time winner this season, was five strokes back at 16 under after a 66. Associated PressUnited States team players Jason Dufner, left, and Zach Johnson celebrate winning the 14th hole with a birdie during the foursomes matches Saturday at the Presidents Cup golf tournament at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio. NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Toronto33006128 Boston2200472 Detroit3210467 Ottawa2101355 Montreal2110275 Tampa Bay2110245 Florida2110249 Buffalo3030027 Metropolitan Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh2200471 N.Y. Islanders2101366 Columbus2110266 Washington312021012 Carolina1001123 New Jersey2011137 N.Y. Rangers1010014 Philadelphia2020027 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA St. Louis22004112 Colorado2200492 Winnipeg22004107 Chicago2101387 Dallas2110245 Minnesota2002257 Nashville2020037 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Calgary 2101388 Phoenix 1100241 San Jose1100241 Anaheim 2110259 Los Angeles2110267 Edmonton1010045 Vancouver1010014 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturdays Games Toronto 5, Ottawa 4, SO Columbus 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, SO Tampa Bay 3, Chicago 2, SO Boston 4, Detroit 1 Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1 Pittsburgh 4, Buffalo 1 St. Louis 7, Florida 0 Dallas 2, Washington 1 Anaheim 4, Minnesota 3, OT Edmonton at Vancouver, late Phoenix at San Jose, late Todays Games Philadelphia at Carolina, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.Presidents Cup ResultsSaturday At Muirfield Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Yardage: 7,354; Par: 72 UNITED STATES 11, INTERNATIONAL 6 Foursomes United States 1, International 0 (four matches incomplete) Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, def. Richard Sterne and Marc Leishman, International, 4 and 3. Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, all square through 13 holes with Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United States. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International, 3 up through 12 holes over Webb Simpson and Brandt Snedeker, United States. Bill Haas and Steve Stricker, United States, 2 up through 10 holes over Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International. Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, 2 up through 9 holes over Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States. Fourballs United States 4, International 1 Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United States, def. Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, 2 and 1. Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, def. Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United States, 2 up. Bill Haas and Webb Simpson, United States, def. Angel Cabrera and Branden Grace, International, 4 and 3. Brandt Snedeker and Hunter Mahan, United States, def. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International, 2 up. Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International, 1 up. Foursomes (completed from Friday) International 3, United States 3 Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, United States, def. Jason Day and Graham DeLaet, International, 4 and 3. Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge, International, def. Bill Haas and Hunter Mahan, United States, 4 and 3. Steve Stricker and Jordan Spieth, United States, def. Branden Grace and Richard Sterne, International, 2 and 1. Angel Cabrera and Marc Leishman, International, def. Webb Simpson and Brandt Snedeker, United States, 2 and 1. Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel, International, 4 and 2. Adam Scott and Hideki Matsuyama, International, def. Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, 2 and 1. Bolts strike back Tampa Bay ties game, then wins in shootout Associated PressCHICAGO Valtteri Filppula scored in the shootout and the Tampa Bay Lightning rallied for a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Saturday night. Ben Bishop made 37 saves in his first start for the season for Tampa Bay, and then denied each of Chicagos three shooters in the tiebreaker. Filppula beat Corey Crawford into the right side of the net in the first round. Tampa Bay looked listless before Martin St. Louis and Teddy Purcell scored midway through the third period, tying it at 2. It was the first victory of the season for the Lightning, who opened with a 3-1 loss at Boston. Patrick Kane and Brandon Saad scored for Chicago, which outshot Tampa Bay 39-16.Bruins 4, Red Wings 1BOSTON Brad Marchand scored the tiebreaking goal 36 seconds into the second period and Tuukka Rask made 25 saves, lifting the Boston Bruins to a 4-1 win over the Detroit Red Wings. Torey Krug and Zdeno Chara each scored power-play goals, and Jordan Caron added an evenstrength score for Boston, which won its season opener against Tampa Bay on Thursday. Henrik Zetterberg scored for the Red Wings, who are in the same division with the Bruins after the NHL realigned following last season.Canadiens 4, Flyers 1MONTREAL Lars Eller scored his third goal in two games and Brendan Gallagher got his second to help Montreal beat Philadelphia. Carey Price stopped 22 shots, Brian Gionta and Rene Bourque added goals for Montreal, and Alex Galchenyuk had his second two-assist performance in two games to start the season. Vincent Lecavalier scored for Philadelphia. Many of the 21,273 at the Bell Centre booed each time the puck went to Lecavalier, who turned down the Canadiens to sign with the Flyers this offseason.Blue Jackets 3, Islanders 2, SOUNIONDALE, N.Y. Cam Atkinson scored in the fourth round of a shootout, and Columbus rallied from two goals down in the third period to spoil New Yorks home opener. The Islanders and goalie Evgeni Nabokov seemed to be in complete control before Mark Letestu and Nick Foligno scored 4:19 apart to get even at 2-2 after the Blue Jackets managed only 12 shots in the first two periods. New York built its lead in the second on a power-play goal by defenseman Lubomir Visnovsky and an even-strength tally by Matt Moulson. Visnovsky added an assist, and captain John Tavares had two for the Islanders.Penguins 4, Sabres 1PITTSBURGH Sidney Crosby and Chuck Kobasew each scored his second goal of the season and Marc-Andre Fleury was nearly perfect again, making 20 saves to lead Pittsburgh over Buffalo. Craig Adams also scored his second goal and Chris Kunitz converted a penalty shot to help the Penguins open 2-0 for the third straight season. Pittsburgh defenseman Matt Niskanen added two assists and forward Pascal Dupuis, playing in his 800th game, also had an assist. Fleury has sparkled through two games, turning aside 47 of 48 shots.Maple Leafs 5, Senators 4, SOTORONTO Mason Raymond and Tyler Bozak scored shootout goals to lift Toronto past Ottawa in the Maple Leafs home opener. Toronto goalie Jonathan Bernier, outstanding in relief of James Reimer, stopped Milan Michalek whose shot hit the crossbar and bounced out and Jason Spezza in the shootout. Raymond, on a nifty turnaround backhand, and Bozak, through Craig Andersons legs, scored to give Toronto a 2-0 edge in the shootout.Blues 7, Panthers 0ST. LOUIS Jaroslav Halak set a franchise record with his 17th shutout and Alex Steen scored on a penalty shot to lead the St. Louis Blues to a 7-0 win over the Florida Panthers. Newcomers Brenden Morrow and Derek Roy scored their first goals of the season for St. Louis, which received goals from seven different players. The Blues have outscored their opponents 11-2 with 10 different players scoring goals this season. Vladimir Tarasenko and Jaden Schwartz also converted against Florida goalie Tim Thomas, who was pulled after the second period. He allowed five goals on 28 shots. Halak made 19 saves and passed Glen Hall, who had 16 shutouts from 1967-1971.Ducks 4, Wild 3, OTST. PAUL, Minn. Mathieu Perreault scored at 4:55 of overtime to give the Anaheim Ducks a 4-3 victory over the Minnesota Wild. Perreaults game-winner came on a 2-on-1 break with Francois Beauchemin. He dumped the puck to a streaking Beauchemin, who gave it right back to Perreault, and the center flipped his shot past Niklas Backstrom to give the Ducks their first win of the season. Associated PressThe Tampa Bay Lightnings Tyler Johnson, left, and the Chicago Blackhawks Nick Leddy vie for the puck during the first period Saturday in Chicago.

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 B3 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS AUTO RACING 1 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil Late Model Dirt: Lawrenceburg (Taped) 1 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Grand Prix of Houston: Race 2 2 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 race 2 p.m. (FS1) Lucas Oil San Bernardino (Taped) 3 p.m. (FS1) Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Lime Rock (ST) (Taped) 4 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Firestone Indy Lights: Streets of Houston (Same-day Tape) 5 p.m. (FS1) Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Lime Rock (GS). (Taped) 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans: Oak Tree Grand Prix (Taped) 8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Auto-Plus Nationals (Same-day Tape) BASEBALL 10:30 a.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox. ALDS, Game 2 (Taped) 12:30 p.m. (MLB) Detroit Tigers at Oakland Athletics. ALDS, Game 2 (Taped) 4:30 p.m. (TBS) St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates. NLDS, Game 3 8 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Los Angeles Dodgers. NLDS, Game 3 BASKETBALL 12 p.m. (NBA) Preseason: Philadelphia 76ers vs. Bilbao Basket 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) WNBA: Atlanta Dream at Minnesota Lynx. Finals, game 1 9:30 p.m. (NBA) Preseason: Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 a.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Florida (Taped) 12:30 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at Mississippi State. (Taped) 5 p.m. (ESPNU) Arkansas at Florida. (Taped) 7 p.m. (ESPNU) Ohio State at Northwestern (Taped) 7:30 p.m. (SUN) Maryland at Florida State (Taped) NFL 1 p.m. (CBS) Baltimore Ravens at Miami Dolphins 1 p.m. (FOX) New Orleans Saints at Chicago Bears 4:25 p.m. (CBS) Denver Broncos at Dallas Cowboys 8:20 p.m. (NBC) Houston Texans at San Francisco 49ers 11:35 p.m. (NFL) San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders GOLF 12 p.m. (NBC) 2013 Presidents Cup Final Day 12 p.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Vivendi Seve Trophy, Final Round (Same-day Tape) 3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Reignwood LPGA Classic, Final Round (Same-day Tape) 8 p.m. (GOLF) Presidents Cup, Day Four. (Same-day Tape) HOCKEY 1 p.m. (NHL) Ottawa Senators at Toronto Maple Leafs (Taped) 3 p.m. (NHL) Detroit Red Wings at Boston Bruins (Taped) RODEO 9 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship. (Taped) SOCCER 8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Norwich City vs. Chelsea 11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: West Bromwich Albion vs. Arsenal 1 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Maryland at North Carolina 2 p.m. (SUN) Womens College: Kentucky at Vanderbilt 3 p.m. (ESPNU) Womens College: South Carolina at Tennessee 4 p.m. (FSNFL) Womens College: Tulsa at Rice TENNIS 7:30 a.m. (TENNIS) WTA China Open final 9:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP China Open final (Same-day Tape) 2 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Shanghai Rolex Masters, Early Round Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Saturday in the Florida Lottery: POWERBALL 11 12 17 39 40 POWER BALL 5Fridays winning numbers and payouts: Mega Money: 17 18 28 36 Mega Ball: 3 4-of-4 MBNo winner 4-of-44$1,584.00 3-of-4 MB33$420.50 3-of-4835$49.50 2-of-4 MB1,136$25.00 1-of-4 MB9,456$3.00 2-of-425,407$2.00 Fantasy 5: 14 15 29 32 35 5-of-51 winner$229,974.43 4-of-5x$136.00 3-of-5x$12.50Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com. CASH 3 (early) 7 3 9 CASH 3 (late) 9 6 4 PLAY 4 (early) 5 5 4 0 PLAY 4 (late) 9 3 7 3 FANTASY 5 13 20 25 27 29 LOTTERY1 12 22 44 46 52XTRA 2 Nationwide Kansas Lottery 300 ResultsSaturday At Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (17) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200 laps, 127.7 rating, 0 points, $73,450. 2. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 108, 0, $57,800. 3. (5) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 136.7, 43, $57,775. 4. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 101.9, 0, $32,975. 5. (2) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 106.4, 40, $38,925. 6. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 107.5, 39, $38,075. 7. (7) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 110.5, 38, $30,325. 8. (9) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 200, 88.5, 36, $29,225. 9. (8) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 97.8, 36, $28,135. 10. (3) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 107.4, 34, $30,300. 11. (11) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 88.6, 33, $27,950. 12. (18) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 82.2, 32, $26,200. 13. (21) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 73.4, 31, $25,650. 14. (20) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 74.3, 30, $25,140. 15. (25) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 71.1, 0, $19,580. 16. (10) Chris Buescher, Ford, 200, 77.2, 29, $24,670. 17. (15) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 82.8, 27, $24,185. 18. (6) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 73.4, 26, $23,925. 19. (30) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 200, 60.8, 0, $23,715. 20. (14) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 64.5, 24, $24,180. 21. (22) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 200, 63.5, 0, $17,395. 22. (34) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 199, 58.8, 22, $23,285. 23. (28) Bryan Silas, Ford, 199, 49.7, 0, $23,150. 24. (23) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 199, 52.8, 20, $23,040. 25. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 196, 43.5, 19, $23,380. 26. (39) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, 195, 39.1, 0, $22,795. 27. (38) Eric McClure, Toyota, 191, 36.9, 17, $22,685. 28. (13) Brad Keselowski, Ford, accident, 187, 98.2, 0, $16,565. 29. (16) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 179, 68.4, 15, $22,415. 30. (19) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, handling, 145, 69.9, 14, $22,605. 31. (32) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 137, 43.7, 14, $22,150. 32. (37) Ken Butler, Toyota, accident, 131, 38.1, 12, $22,040. 33. (33) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 120, 42.5, 11, $21,925. 34. (40) Carl Long, Dodge, vibration, 102, 35, 10, $21,814. 35. (27) Hal Martin, Toyota, accident, 80, 27.1, 9, $21,689. 36. (24) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, engine, 77, 45.9, 8, $20,445. 37. (29) Blake Koch, Toyota, overheating, 28, 34.1, 7, $14,325. 38. (31) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, vibration, 11, 34.2, 0, $14,265. 39. (35) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, rear gear, 8, 33.4, 5, $13,940. 40. (26) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4, 31.9, 4, $13,830. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 114.262 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 37 minutes, 32 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.952 seconds. Caution Flags: 11 for 50 laps. Lead Changes: 17 among 10 drivers. Lap Leaders: A.Dillon 1-6; J.Allgaier 7-19; P.Kligerman 20-26; J.Allgaier 27; M.Wallace 28; A.Dillon 2930; R.Smith 31-57; M.Kenseth 58; R.Smith 59-84; M.Kenseth 85-86; P.Menard 87; T.Bayne 88; C.Buescher 89-90; A.Dillon 91-118; R.Smith 119146; T.Bayne 147-150; B.Keselowski 151-165; M.Kenseth 166-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Smith, 3 times for 81 laps; M.Kenseth, 3 times for 38 laps; A.Dillon, 3 times for 36 laps; B.Keselowski, 1 time for 15 laps; J.Allgaier, 2 times for 14 laps; P.Kligerman, 1 time for 7 laps; T.Bayne, 2 times for 5 laps; C.Buescher, 1 time for 2 laps; P.Menard, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Wallace, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 10 in Points: 1. A.Dillon, 1,024; 2. S.Hornish Jr., 1,016; 3. R.Smith, 989; 4. E.Sadler, 981; 5. J.Allgaier, 959; 6. B.Vickers, 957; 7. B.Scott, 942; 8. T.Bayne, 939; 9. K.Larson, 878; 10. P.Kligerman, 858. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race. The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.Sprint Cup Hollywood Casino 400 LineupAfter Friday qualifying; race today At Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 187.526 mph. 2. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 187.48. 3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 187.162. 4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 186.233. 5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.168. 6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 186.072. 7. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 185.893. 8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 185.874. 9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.669. 10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 185.433. 11. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 185.42. 12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 185.261. 13. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 185.204. 14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.141. 15. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.982. 16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 184.925. 17. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 184.628. 18. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 184.603. 19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 184.477. 20. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 184.382. 21. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 184.106. 22. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 183.73. 23. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 183.667. 24. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 183.38. 25. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 183.069. 26. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 182.803. 27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 182.685. 28. (47) A J Allmendinger, Toyota, 182.531. 29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 182.039. 30. (30) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 182.02. 31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.971. 32. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 181.959. 33. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 181.953. 34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.892. 35. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 181.843. 36. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 181.83. 37. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points. 38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 42. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.MLB playoffsAll Times EDT WILD CARD Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0 DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) American League Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2 Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4 Monday, Oct. 7: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 11-3), 6:07 (TBS) x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at Tampa Bay, 8:07 or 8:37 p.m. (TBS) x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston, 5:37 or 8:07 p.m. (TBS) Detroit 1, Oakland 0 Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Saturday, Oct. 5: Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at Oakland (Gray 5-3), late Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at Detroit (Sanchez 14-8), 1:07 p.m. (MLB) x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Oakland (Straily 10-8) at Detroit (Fister 14-9), 5:07 or 7:07 p.m. (TBS) x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland, 6:07 or 9:07 p.m. (TBS) National League St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 1 Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1 Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1 Sunday, Oct. 6: St. Louis (Kelly 10-5) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 16-8), 4:37 p.m. (TBS) Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis (Wachia 4-1) at Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4), 3:07 p.m. (TBS) x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:07 or 8:07 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 1 Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1 Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3 Sunday, Oct. 6: Atlanta (Teheran 14-8) at Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8), 8:07 p.m. (TBS) Monday, Oct. 7: Atlanta (Garcia 4-7) at Los Angeles (Nolasco 13-11), 9:37 p.m. (TBS) x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Los Angeles at Atlanta, 8:37 p.m. (TBS)Red Sox 7, Rays 4Tampa BayBoston abrhbiabrhbi DeJess lf1100Ellsury cf4331 SRdrgz ph1000Victorn rf4010 Loaton c1000Pedroia 2b3013 WMyrs rf5000D.Ortiz dh4222 Loney 1b3022Napoli 1b2000 Longori 3b2010JGoms lf4110 Zobrist 2b3100Mdlrks 3b4010 DJnngs cf4120Drew ss4011 DYong dh3011D.Ross c4110 YEscor ss4121 JMolin c2000 Joyce ph-lf2000 Totals31484Totals337117 Tampa Bay0100210004 Boston20211001x7 EJ.Molina (1), Zobrist (1). DPTampa Bay 1, Boston 3. LOBTampa Bay 7, Boston 5. 2BLoney (1), Y.Escobar (1), Ellsbury (1), Pedroia (1), D.Ross (1). 3BDrew (1). HRD.Ortiz 2 (2). SBDe.Jennings (1), Ellsbury (2). SFD.Young, Pedroia. IPHRERBBSO Tampa Bay Price L,0-1797725 McGee120000 Boston Lackey W,1-051/374436 Breslow H,112/300010 Tazawa H,1110000 Uehara S,1-1100002 Price pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBPby Lackey (DeJesus), by Breslow (Loney). UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Dana DeMuth; Second, Paul Emmel; Third, Mike Winters; Right, Chris Guccione; Left, Larry Vanover. T:14. A,705 (37,071).Late Friday Tigers 3, Athletics 2Detroit Oakland abrhbi abrhbi AJcksn cf4110Crisp cf1000 TrHntr rf3110Lowrie ss4000 MiCarr 3b4011Dnldsn 3b4000 RSantg 3b0000Moss dh4110 Fielder 1b4010Cespds lf4122 VMrtnz dh4120Reddck rf4000 Avila c4021Vogt c3000 Infante 2b4020Barton 1b3000 Dirks lf3000Sogard 2b2000 JhPerlt ph1000Callasp ph-2b1000 D.Kelly lf0000 Iglesias ss4000 Totals353102Totals30232 Detroit3000000003 Oakland0000002002 ECespedes (1). DPOakland 1. LOBDetroit 6, Oakland 4. 2BA.Jackson (1), V.Martinez (1). 3B Cespedes (1). HRCespedes (1). CSTor.Hunter (1). IPHRERBBSO Detroit Scherzer W,1-07322211 Smyly H,1 2/300012 Benoit S,1-111/300003 Oakland Colon L,0-16103304 Otero 11/300000 Doolittle 12/300003 HBPby Colon (Tor.Hunter). WPScherzer.College Football ScoresEAST Albright 52, FDU-Florham 7 Alfred 39, Buffalo St. 33 American International 31, Stonehill 10 Amherst 37, Middlebury 16 Bates 14, Williams 10 Bentley 32, St. Anselm 27 Bloomsburg 38, Gannon 14 Boston College 48, Army 27 Bowdoin 13, Tufts 10 Bridgewater (Mass.) 49, W. Connecticut 26 Brown 31, Rhode Island 14 Buffalo 42, E. Michigan 14 CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 29 Carnegie-Mellon 34, St. Vincent 7 Clemson 49, Syracuse 14 Coast Guard 41, W. New England 38 Colgate 41, Cornell 20 Cortland St. 17, Kean 7 Curry 26, MIT 21 Duquesne 27, West Liberty 14 East Stroudsburg 48, Clarion 28 Edinboro 31, Lock Haven 6 Endicott 53, Maine Maritime 28 Fitchburg St. 40, Mass. Maritime 17 Fordham 52, Lehigh 34 Framingham St. 21, Mass.-Dartmouth 14 Franklin & Marshall 35, Dickinson 14 Gallaudet 7, Mount Ida 6 Gettysburg 50, McDaniel 28 Grove City 24, Westminster (Pa.) 21 Hartwick 21, Ithaca 9 Harvard 41, Holy Cross 35, 3OT Hobart 41, WPI 7 Husson 34, Castleton St. 3 Indiana (Pa.) 62, Millersville 3 Johns Hopkins 65, Juniata 10 Kings (Pa.) 41, Misericordia 40, 2OT Lafayette 31, Bucknell 7 Lebanon Valley 17, Wilkes 6 Louisiana College 42, Howard Payne 39 Louisville 30, Temple 7 Lycoming 19, Delaware Valley 16 Maine 62, Delaware 28 Marist 37, Valparaiso 0 Mercyhurst 63, Cheyney 14 Monmouth (NJ) 35, Robert Morris 9 Moravian 38, Susquehanna 18 Morrisville St. 51, William Paterson 48 NY Maritime 35, Anna Maria 24 Navy 28, Air Force 10 Norwich 20, Becker 9 Penn 37, Dartmouth 31, 4OT Princeton 53, Columbia 7 RPI at Merchant Marine, ppd. Rowan 20, Brockport 16 Salisbury 34, Utica 0 Salve Regina 32, Nichols 0 Shippensburg 73, Seton Hill 27 Slippery Rock 58, Kutztown 10 St. John Fisher 38, Frostburg St. 35 St. Lawrence 14, Rochester 10 Stony Brook 21, Bryant 13 Towson 44, New Hampshire 28 Trinity (Conn.) 48, Hamilton 13 Union (NY) 27, Springfield 7 Villanova 20, William & Mary 16 Wagner 23, Sacred Heart 20 Waynesburg 35, Thiel 21 West Chester 38, California (Pa.) 31 Westfield St. 31, Plymouth St. 0 Widener 31, Stevenson 10 SOUTH Alabama 45, Georgia St. 3 Alcorn St. 57, Warner 0 Auburn 30, Mississippi 22 Ball St. 48, Virginia 27 Bethany (WV) 24, Washington & Jefferson 19 Bethel (Tenn.) 41, Bluefield South 25 Bethune-Cookman 21, Delaware St. 7 Campbellsville 23, Kentucky Christian 6 Carson-Newman 43, Mars Hill 27 Charleston Southern 28, North Greenville 14 Charlotte 53, Gardner-Webb 51 Chattanooga 42, W. Carolina 21 Clark Atlanta 21, Morehouse 17 Concord 34, Fairmont St. 17 Cumberland (Tenn.) 49, Pikeville 42, OT Cumberlands 52, Lindsey Wilson 45 E. Kentucky 38, Austin Peay 3 East Carolina 24, Middle Tennessee 17 Elizabeth City St. 26, St. Augustines 25 Elon 28, Furman 25 FAU 37, UAB 23 FIU 24, Southern Miss. 23 Faulkner 55, Georgetown (Ky.) 31 Fayetteville St. 35, Chowan 29, OT Ferrum 31, Greensboro 21 Florida 30, Arkansas 10 Florida St. 63, Maryland 0 Georgia 34, Tennessee 31, OT Glenville St. 35, WV Wesleyan 32 Guilford 16, Washington & Lee 7 Hampden-Sydney 39, Catholic 27 Jackson St. 42, Ark.-Pine Bluff 33 Jacksonville St. 41, UT-Martin 27 James Madison 40, Albany (NY) 13 Johnson C. Smith 49, Lincoln (Pa.) 10 Kentucky St. 49, Alderson-Broaddus 20 LSU 59, Mississippi St. 26 LaGrange 50, NC Wesleyan 26 Lane 28, Stillman 27 Lenoir-Rhyne 41, Brevard 0 Louisiana-Lafayette 48, Texas St. 24 MVSU 28, Alabama A&M 9 Marshall 34, UTSA 10 Maryville (Tenn.) 48, Averett 0 Methodist 24, Christopher Newport 21 Miami 45, Georgia Tech 30 Miles 27, Benedict 13 Millsaps 48, Hendrix 37 Missouri 51, Vanderbilt 28 Morehead St. 45, Campbell 36 Morgan St. 34, Florida A&M 21 Murray St. 35, Tennessee Tech 24 NC Central 37, Howard 28 Newberry 42, Wingate 28 Norfolk St. 26, Savannah St. 24 North Alabama 41, Shorter 0 Old Dominion 21, Liberty 17 Prairie View 31, Grambling St. 3 Randolph-Macon 45, Emory & Henry 20 Reinhardt 21, Union (Ky.) 18 Rhodes 41, Chicago 34 SC State 29, NC A&T 24 SE Louisiana 35, Incarnate Word 3 Samford 44, Georgia Southern 34 Sewanee 31, Birmingham-Southern 28 Shenandoah 29, Bridgewater (Va.) 20 Shepherd 28, Charleston (WV) 9 South Carolina 35, Kentucky 28 South Florida 26, Cincinnati 20 Tennessee St. 40, SE Missouri 16 The Citadel 31, Appalachian St. 28, OT Thomas More 61, Geneva 0 Troy 34, South Alabama 33 Tulane 24, North Texas 21 Tusculum 43, Catawba 25 Tuskegee 21, Fort Valley St. 13 UCF 24, Memphis 17 Urbana 62, W. Virginia St. 10 Valdosta St. 52, Florida Tech 14 Virginia St. 14, Shaw 10 Virginia Tech 27, North Carolina 17 Virginia Union 32, Livingstone 25 Wake Forest 28, NC State 13 Wesley 38, Huntingdon 28 West Georgia 49, Point (Ga.) 3 Winston-Salem 56, Bowie St. 21 Wofford 55, Presbyterian 14 MIDWEST Adrian 17, Hope 14 Ashland 62, Lake Erie 10 Aurora 84, Maranatha Baptist 41 Baker 37, Mid-Am Nazarene 20 Benedictine (Kan.) 58, Graceland (Iowa) 13 Bethel (Minn.) 31, Augsburg 28 Bowling Green 28, UMass 7 Briar Cliff 12, Hastings 7 Butler 35, Stetson 15 Cent. Michigan 21, Miami (Ohio) 9 Chadron St. at Adams St., ppd. Coe 21, Buena Vista 7 Concordia (Ill.) 38, Rockford 28 Concordia (Neb.) 32, Dordt 0 Concordia (Wis.) 28, Benedictine (Ill.) 27 Cornell (Iowa) 58, Beloit 24 Dakota Wesleyan 23, Dakota St. 14 Dayton 40, Davidson 8 Defiance 43, Earlham 7 Denison 42, DePauw 21 Drake 27, Jacksonville 17 Dubuque 23, Central 21 Emporia St. 52, Lincoln (Mo.) 14 Eureka 42, Westminster (Mo.) 28 Evangel 34, Culver-Stockton 28 Findlay 38, McKendree 21 Fort Hays St. 34, William Jewell 17 Friends 45, Kansas Wesleyan 22 Grand Valley St. 49, Michigan Tech 3 Grand View 48, St. Xavier 21 Greenville 21, Crown (Minn.) 20 Gustavus 52, Hamline 7 Heidelberg 68, Marietta 17 Hillsdale 27, N. Michigan 17 Illinois College 26, Lawrence 6 Illinois St. 35, W. Illinois 21 Illinois Wesleyan 35, Millikin 21 Indiana 44, Penn St. 24 Indianapolis 34, Missouri S&T 3 John Carroll 54, Capital 0 Kalamazoo 38, Trine 31 Kenyon 21, Oberlin 14 Lake Forest 14, Carroll (Wis.) 13 Lakeland 40, Wis. Lutheran 34, OT Luther 41, Loras 7 Manchester 34, Bluffton 7 Marian (Ind.) 21, Robert Morris-Chicago 19 Martin Luther 68, Iowa Wesleyan 51 Mary 45, Minot St. 10 Menlo 30, Lindenwood (Ill.) 22 Michigan 42, Minnesota 13 Michigan St. 26, Iowa 14 Minn. Duluth 34, St. Cloud St. 7 Minn. St.-Mankato 27, Concordia (St.P.) 7 Minn. St.-Moorhead 47, Northern St. (SD) 46 Minn.-Crookston 16, Bemidji St. 14 Missouri Southern 21, Cent. Missouri 14 Missouri Valley 48, Cent. Methodist 17 Morningside 32, Midland 7 Mount St. Joseph 55, Anderson (Ind.) 24 Mount Union 58, Ohio Northern 7 Muskingum 35, Wilmington (Ohio) 28 N. Dakota St. 24, N. Iowa 23 N. Illinois 38, Kent St. 24 Nebraska 39, Illinois 19 Nebraska-Kearney 56, Lindenwood (Mo.) 6 North Central (Ill.) 31, Elmhurst 14 North Park 22, Carthage 20 Northwestern (Minn.) 50, Minn.-Morris 45 Notre Dame Coll. 59, Virginia-Wise 35 Ohio 43, Akron 3 Ohio Dominican 33, Walsh 20 Ohio Wesleyan 50, Allegheny 7 Olivet 20, Alma 13, OT Ottawa, Kan. 34, McPherson 7 Otterbein 19, Baldwin-Wallace 7 Peru St. 24, Avila 7 Pittsburg St. 28, Abilene Christian 20 Ripon 37, Knox 29 Rose-Hulman 38, Hanover 14 S. Illinois 27, S. Dakota St. 24 Saginaw Valley St. 31, Ferris St. 28 Sioux Falls 55, SW Minnesota St. 48 South Dakota 17, Missouri St. 14 St. Ambrose 53, William Penn 34 St. Francis (Ill.) 56, Concordia (Mich.) 6 St. Francis (Ind.) 28, Siena Heights 17 St. Johns (Minn.) 31, St. Olaf 0 St. Josephs (Ind.) 35, Kentucky Wesleyan 9 St. Norbert 22, Monmouth (Ill.) 14 St. Scholastica 42, Mac Murray 6 St. Thomas (Minn.) 65, Carleton 6 Sterling 54, Bethany (Kan.) 27 Tabor 42, Southwestern (Kan.) 3 Texas Tech 54, Kansas 16 Tiffin 34, Malone 30 Toledo 47, W. Michigan 20 Trinity (Ill.) 20, Olivet Nazarene 17 Truman St. 33, Quincy 0 Valley City St. 31, Presentation 17 Wabash 48, Wooster 14 Waldorf 13, Trinity Bible 2 Wartburg 34, Simpson (Iowa) 24 Washburn 44, SW Baptist 21 Washington (Mo.) 44, Berry 7 Wayne (Mich.) 31, Northwood (Mich.) 17 Wayne (Neb.) 10, Augustana (SD) 7 Wheaton (Ill.) 24, Augustana (Ill.) 15 Winona St. 49, Upper Iowa 32 Wis.-Oshkosh 28, Wis.-Stout 26 Wis.-Platteville 49, Wis.-Eau Claire 27 Wis.-Stevens Pt. 47, Wis.-River Falls 14 Wis.-Whitewater 47, Wis.-LaCrosse 3 Wittenberg 49, Hiram 9 Youngstown St. 35, Indiana St. 24 SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 34, Texas Southern 2 Angelo St. 48, McMurry 35 Ark.-Monticello 17, Arkansas Tech 0 Austin 31, Southwestern (Texas) 0 East Central 46, S. Nazarene 14 Henderson St. 42, NW Oklahoma St. 0 Louisiana Tech 38, UTEP 35 Mary Hardin-Baylor 49, Trinity (Texas) 7 McNeese St. 59, Cent. Arkansas 28 Mississippi College 49, Hardin-Simmons 35 Missouri Western 63, Cent. Oklahoma 30 NW Missouri St. 40, Northeastern St. 12 Okla. Panhandle St. 62, Wayland Baptist 21 Oklahoma 20, TCU 17 Oklahoma St. 33, Kansas St. 29 Ouachita 31, SW Oklahoma 14 Rice 30, Tulsa 27, OT Rutgers 55, SMU 52, 3OT SW Assemblies of God 21, Oklahoma Baptist 10 Tarleton St. 34, E. New Mexico 14 Texas A&M Commerce 31, SE Oklahoma 29 Texas Lutheran 64, E. Texas Baptist 41 West Texas A&M 72, Central St. (Ohio) 0 FAR WEST Azusa Pacific 34, W. Oregon 32 CSU-Pueblo 28, Fort Lewis 3 Cal Lutheran 42, Pomona-Pitzer 7 Dickinson St. 27, Jamestown 7 Dixie St. 39, Simon Fraser 12 E. Oregon 20, Montana Western 0 E. Washington 41, Weber St. 19 Fresno St. 61, Idaho 14 La Verne 30, Claremont-Mudd 6 Lewis & Clark 60, Puget Sound 30 Linfield 29, Pacific Lutheran 0 Mesa St. 22, NM Highlands 17 Montana 55, Portland St. 27 Montana St. 36, N. Arizona 7 New Mexico 66, New Mexico St. 17 North Dakota 28, Idaho St. 25 Oregon 57, Colorado 16 Pacific 31, Whitworth 21 Rocky Mountain 23, Montana St.-Northern 13 S. Oregon 59, Montana Tech 32 San Diego 45, Mercer 13 UC Davis 21, S. Utah 3 W. New Mexico 25, Colorado Mines 22 Washington St. 44, California 22 Yale 24, Cal Poly 10

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B4SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLENATIONALFOOTBALLLEAGUE NFL standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA New England4001.0008957 Miami310.7509191 N.Y. Jets220.5006888 Buffalo230.400112130 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis310.75010551 Tennessee310.7509869 Houston220.50090105 Jacksonville040.00031129 North WLTPctPFPA Cleveland320.60010194 Baltimore220.5009187 Cincinnati220.5008181 Pittsburgh040.00069110 West WLTPctPFPA Denver4001.00017991 Kansas City4001.00010241 San Diego220.500108102 Oakland130.2507191 NFC East WLTPctPFPA Dallas 220.50010485 Philadelphia130.25099138 Washington130.25091112 N.Y. Giants040.00061146 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans4001.00010855 Carolina120.3336836 Atlanta 130.25094104 Tampa Bay040.0004470 North WLTPctPFPA Detroit 310.750122101 Chicago310.750127114 Green Bay120.3339688 Minnesota130.250115123 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle 4001.00010947 San Francisco220.5007995 Arizona220.5006989 St. Louis130.25069121 Thursdays Game Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24 Todays Games Detroit at Green Bay, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at St. Louis, 1 p.m. New England at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Seattle at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Miami, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 11:35 p.m. Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington Mondays Game N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10 N.Y. Giants at Chicago, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Houston, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. New Orleans at New England, 4:25 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Miami Monday, Oct. 14 Indianapolis at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.AFC leadersWeek 5 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt P. Manning, DEN1561171470160 P. Rivers, SND1421051199112 Locker, TEN1116972160 Luck, IND1278191552 Ale. Smith, KAN1468895772 Brady, NWE15893101472 Pryor, OAK815362422 Schaub, HOU177116119386 Tannehill, MIA14293107655 Roethlisberger, PIT162103123155 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD F. Jackson, BUF653094.75594 Spiller, BUF742964.0054t1 A. Foster, HOU762923.84161 B. Powell, NYJ662924.42271 J. Charles, KAN702894.13242 Chr. Johnson, TEN842773.30230 Moreno, DEN462385.1725t3 Be. Tate, HOU342286.71600 Ry. Mathews, SND642263.53200 D. McFadden, OAK532154.06302 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD And. Johnson, HOU3436810.8270 Edelman, NWE343199.4442 Cameron, CLE3339612.0535 An. Brown, PIT3241212.9452 De. Thomas, DEN2939313.678t4 Shorts, JAX2633713.0590 A.. Green, CIN2630011.545t3 Welker, DEN2626610.2336 A. Gates, SND2536414.656t2 Decker, DEN2434014.2611 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Doss, BAL 916718.682t1 McCluster, KAN1624615.489t1 Benjamin, CLE1725615.179t1 Holliday, DEN1319114.781t1 Edelman, NWE1113312.1170 P. Adams, OAK5479.4300 Reynaud, TEN131189.1350 Leonhard, BUF7639.0250 An. Brown, PIT6457.5400 Hilton, IND 9657.2230 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD K. Martin, HOU1232727.3460 Thigpen, MIA821326.6380 Whittaker, SND615626.0420 F. Jones, PIT819424.3340 J. Ford, OAK614323.8280 Br. Tate, CIN818823.5320 Reynaud, TEN511322.6320 C. Gates, NYJ59919.8280 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Welker, DEN606036 Cameron, CLE505030 Royal, SND 505030 J. Charles, KAN422024 F. Jackson, BUF440024 De. Thomas, DEN404024 Ju. Thomas, DEN404024 Bernard, CIN321018 Ma. Brown, BAL303018 O. Daniels, HOU303018 Kicking PATFGLGPts D. Carpenter, BUF9-911-125542 Gostkowski, NWE8-811-125341 M. Prater, DEN23-236-65341 Novak, SND12-128-94936 Cundiff, CLE10-108-105134 Vinatieri, IND12-127-94633 Bironas, TEN11-117-94732 Sturgis, MIA10-107-75431 Tucker, BAL10-107-94531 Folk, NYJ 6-68-84830NFC leadersWeek 5 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt A. Rodgers, GBY12281105783 Romo, DAL152110101781 Brees, NOR1661111434104 M. Ryan, ATL173115133083 M. Stafford, DET156100126273 R. Wilson, SEA965978763 Vick, PHL11865108052 C. Newton, CAR885257762 Griffin III, WAS170106120264 Cutler, CHI14895101086 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD L. McCoy, PHL784686.0041t2 A. Peterson, MIN924214.5878t5 D. Murray, DAL723564.94411 D. Martin, TAM1003423.42281 Forte, CHI 693204.64553 Lynch, SEA 793083.90433 A. Morris, WAS562965.29322 Gore, SNF 612954.8434t2 De. Williams, CAR622914.69270 Re. Bush, DET482545.2937t1 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Ju. Jones, ATL3348114.681t2 Garcon, WAS2933911.7442 J. Graham, NOR2745817.056t6 B. Marshall, CHI2734812.9412 Cruz, NYG 2642516.370t4 Boldin, SNF 2437215.5432 D. Bryant, DAL2328212.3534 Sproles, NOR2327712.0481 Gonzalez, ATL2324210.5253 Forte, CHI 231607.0240 Punt Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD Dw. Harris, DAL68013.3380 G. Tate, SEA1417212.3330 Ginn Jr., CAR44210.5120 Spurlock, DET111059.5570 Sproles, NOR111029.3280 Page, TAM 8698.6280 R. Randle, NYG11686.2140 C. Thompson, WAS7365.1110 P. Peterson, ARI7314.480 Ky. Williams, SNF5224.4140 Kickoff Returners NoYdsAvgLGTD C. Patterson, MIN1240633.8105t1 Hester, CHI 1445332.4800 Dam. Johnson, PHL1231726.4330 D. Wilson, NYG820625.8310 B. Cunningham, STL819123.9320 Spurlock, DET510020.0230 C. Thompson, WAS816020.0280 J. Ross, GBY 67512.5210 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts J. Graham, NOR606036 A. Peterson, MIN651036 D. Bryant, DAL404024 Cruz, NYG 404024 Cal. Johnson, DET404024 Lynch, SEA 431024 J. Bell, DET 330018 Ma. Bennett, CHI303018 Ve. Davis, SNF303018 Fitzgerald, ARI303018 Kicking PATFGLGPts Akers, DET14-148-104338 Walsh, MIN13-138-95437 Hartley, NOR12-128-104836 Hauschka, SEA11-118-84835 M. Bryant, ATL10-108-95234 Gould, CHI 12-137-75833 D. Bailey, DAL11-117-95332 Henery, PHL10-107-104831 Feely, ARI 6-67-84727 Crosby, GBY12-124-44124 NFL StatsCENTRAL Big matchups in the NFC North Packers host Lions looking to gain ground Associated PressThe Pack is back on the field, that is, after a bye. And the first chore is a big one: Green Bay needs to beat Detroit at Lambeau Field or fall far behind in the NFC North. Not that Chicago, the other contender in the division through the first month of the season, has an easy challenge on Sunday, either. The Bears host undefeated New Orleans. Not much has gone the way the Packers projected early in the schedule, and their only victory is against struggling Washington. The fourth-week bye helped them heal up, and now they feel its time to make a statement in the division before its too late. Besides, their 21-game, regular-season home winning streak against Detroit is the longest in NFL history. If we were 3-0, the fact that its a division game is pretty important, adds a little more significance to the game, defensive tackle B.J. Raji said. Were aware that a good team is coming in here, but I believe if we play well, well have a good chance. Chicago comes off a sloppy loss at Detroit, and faces the prolific New Orleans offense. Even with the Saints on a short week after Monday nights romp over Miami, the game offers little comfort for the Bears. Their ability to run the ball, their ability to pass the ball, Bears safety Chris Conte said, listing what impresses him about the Saints. They have (running back Darren) Sproles, who is a big threat, and they also have Jimmy Graham; guys on the outside, Marques Colston tons of guys who can just push the field, fast guys. And their ability Drew Brees to move safeties and find guys deep. Theyre doing a great job. Today, its New England at Cincinnati, Seattle at Indianapolis, Baltimore at Miami, Kansas City at Tennessee, Denver at Dallas, Houston at San Francisco, San Diego at Oakland, Carolina at Arizona, Philadelphia at the New York Giants, and Jacksonville at St. Louis. Monday nights matchup has the New York Jets at Atlanta. Off this week are Minnesota and Washington, both 1-3, Tampa Bay and Pittsburgh, both 0-4. Detroit (3-1) at Green Bay (1-2) The Lions can score so can the Packers, of course and their offense has nice balance with the emergence of Reggie Bush as a force. Bush comes off a 173-yard game, including a 37-yard touchdown run against the Bears, and has been a perfect complement for star receiver Calvin Johnson. Eventually teams are going to have to loosen up on Calvin or Reggie is going to continue to have big days like that, Lions coach Jim Schwartz said. Thats a good position to be in offensively. Detroit leads the NFC with eight picks, so Aaron Rodgers needs to be careful. New Orleans (4-0) at Chicago (3-1) Careful isnt necessarily in Drew Brees vocabulary because even when he gambles, such as throwing into triple coverage to Jimmy Graham, the brilliant tight end comes up with a TD catch. Still, the Bears are a ball-hungry bunch on defense, leading the league with 14 takeaways, and will need to be aggressive. If they expect their offense to keep pace with the Saints, that could be a pipe dream. New England (4-0) at Cincinnati (2-2) Other than Tom Brady, the one player the Patriots probably couldnt afford to have go down is nose tackle Vince Wilfork. He did against Atlanta with a torn Achilles tendon, so New England will be without the heart of its improved defense. Expect the Bengals to respond with a heavy dose of former Patriot BenJarvus Green-Ellis and rookie Giovani Bernard running the ball. Brady has never lost to the Bengals (4-0) and the Patriots have won six straight regular-season road games. Seattle (4-0) at Indianapolis (3-1) OK, no more questioning the Seahawks road skills after that gutsy comeback victory at Houston. Seattles defense should be good enough to win anywhere, so this will be a test because Indy is showing some versatility with the ball. Most fun to watch here might not be second-year QBs Andrew Luck against Russell Wilson, but the running game with powerhouses Marshawn Lynch for Seattle and Trent Richardson for Indianapolis. Baltimore (2-2) at Miami (3-1) After that stinker in Buffalo, the Ravens are in a tough spot. They need Joe Flacco to avoid turnovers (five interceptions against the Bills) and for the running game with Ray Rice and Bernard Pierce to wake up. The Dolphins were sent back to Earth by New Orleans last weekend, and a previously staunch defense was exposed, particularly in pass coverage. Plus, QB Ryan Tannehill is getting hit too much, on pace to set a team record for being sacked and perhaps threaten the league mark of 76. Kansas City (4-0) at Tennessee (3-1) The Titans turnaround could get derailed with emerging quarterback Jake Locker out for several weeks with a hip injury. At least they have a veteran backup in Ryan Fitzpatrick, and theyll likely turn to Chris Johnson and the ground game more often. Kansas City, only the second franchise to go 4-0 after a two-win season, is winning with solid defense, especially the pass rush, and a conservative attack. The Chiefs had their first giveaways last Sunday, yet still routed the Giants. Denver (4-0) at Dallas (2-2) Peyton Mannings 16 TD passes are the most through four games in any season, on pace for 64, which would shatter Tom Bradys record of 50. Dallas has allowed 10 touchdown throws already, but at least the Cowboys can get after the quarterback, with 14 sacks. They have little chance of pulling off an upset if they cant slow Manning and crew. We didnt get to Philip Rivers enough, we did not make him uncomfortable, coach Jason Garrett said, referring to last weeks loss at San Diego. We done a good job in the first three games making the quarterbacks job hard and we were sacking him, and hitting him and getting him off the spot. We didnt do that last week. We have to do that this week. Houston (2-2) at San Francisco (2-2) Yet another quality matchup, with both sides having something to prove as they look up in their division. The Niners were awful in their last home game and got manhandled by the Colts. Then they blew out St. Louis in a short week and have had plenty of time to prepare for the Texans. Houston, which trails Indy and Tennessee in the AFC South, dominated Seattle, the NFC West leader, for more than a half last Sunday, then folded. San Franciscos ultra-aggressive defense will go hard after QB Matt Schaub. New York Jets (2-2) at Atlanta (1-3), Monday night Its getting to be a dire time for the Falcons, who have gone from nearly making the Super Bowl to an also-ran behind the Saints in the NFC South. Their defeats have been close, but that might be even more worrisome can they close the deal? They rank 29th in red zone efficiency. Getting the inconsistent and banged-up Jets in prime time could be the cure all, especially if New Yorks normally reliable defense struggles the way it did at Tennessee. San Diego (2-2) at Oakland (1-3) Break out the caffeine to stay awake for this one. The Raiders share a stadium with the Athletics, and a baseball playoff game was scheduled there Saturday night, 8:35 local time. The Chargers offense can be dynamic and Rivers is off to a good start, behind only Manning in passer rating. Oaklands pass defense is decent, but must slow down TE Antonio Gates, who is back to top form. Carolina (1-2) at Arizona (2-2) Coming off a 38-0 rout of the Giants, the Panthers believe they are ready for some steady success. A stumble here would set them back significantly. The key could be whether Arizonas run defense, ranked second, can stop the No. 3 rushing game Carolina brings. The Panthers let QB Cam Newton run more against New York, and it worked brilliantly. Philadelphia (1-3) at New York Giants (0-4) An Eagles win could lift them into a tie for first place in the avert-youreyes NFC East if Dallas falls to Denver. Then again, if the Giants win, theyd be back in contention. Phillys defense cant seem to cover or tackle in the open field, but it likely will concentrate on rushing Eli Manning, whos already been sacked 14 times. New York has only four sacks, and chasing down Michael Vick isnt easy. Jacksonville (0-4) at St. Louis (1-3) Even with the Rams struggling no running game, inconsistent defense they are a big favorite over the Jaguars. Gus Bradleys first stint as a head coach has been unrewarding so far in Jacksonville, where people are beginning to whisper the dreaded -16. Associated PressGreen Bays bye week did wonders for Packers linebacker Clay Matthews and his sore hamstring.

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COLLEGEFOOTBALLCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 B5 Tide rolls over foe Associated PressTUSCALOOSA, Ala. AJ McCarron completed 15 of 16 passes for 166 yards and four touchdowns in the first half and Alabama rolled 45-3 over Georgia State. The Crimson Tide (5-0) jumped ahead 38-0 by halftime against the Panthers (0-5), a first-year Football Bowl Subdivision team. McCarron led Alabama to touchdowns on each of his five possessions before leaving the game. He completed his first 12 passes, putting him in a three-way tie for the Tides third-longest streak. The four touchdown passes tied his career high and was the seventh time McCarron has reached that number. Alabama outgained the Panthers 477-175 and held them to 15 yards rushing.No. 2 Oregon 57, Colorado 16BOULDER, Colo. Marcus Mariota threw five touchdown passes and ran for two scores as Oregon brushed off some early trickery to rout Colorado. The Ducks sophomore connected for two touchdowns each with Josh Huff and Bralon Addison, and played only 2 quarters. The Buffaloes had Folsom Field in a frenzy when they kept things tight early on, but the crowd didnt like it when Colorado kept going for field goals while the Ducks were piling up the points. Oregon (5-0, 2-0 Pac-12) has scored at least 55 points in all of its games under first-year coach Mark Helfrich, a former offensive coordinator at Colorado, who took over when Chip Kelly left to coach the Philadelphia Eagles.No. 3 Clemson 49, Syracuse 14SYRACUSE, N.Y. Tajh Boyd kept his Heisman Trophy aspirations intact, throwing for 455 yards and five touchdowns in three quarters of work, and Clemson spoiled the Oranges Atlantic Coast Conference debut. Boyd, who matched his school record in TD passes, hit Adam Humphries with scoring passes of 60 and 42 yards in the first quarter to help stake the Tigers to a big early lead, and they held the Orange at bay. Clemson (5-0, 3-0 ACC) entered the game as one of just 20 undefeated teams remaining in the Bowl Subdivision, and the Tigers made sure they wouldnt slip up against the Orange (2-3, 0-1) and their raucous Homecoming crowd of 48,961 by taking a 21-0 first-quarter lead.No. 6 Georgia 34, Tennessee 31KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Marshall Morgan kicked a 42-yard field goal in overtime after No. 6 Georgia scored a tying touchdown with 5 seconds left in regulation as the Bulldogs overcame numerous injuries and beat Tennessee 34-31. Tennessees Alton Pig Howard capped the first overtime possession by losing control of the ball as he dove toward the front corner of the end zone. Howards play was initially ruled a 7-yard touchdown, but replays showed he fumbled prior to crossing the goal line, turning the potential score into a turnover and touchback. Georgia (4-1, 3-0 SEC) forced overtime on Aaron Murrays 2-yard touchdown pass to Rantavious Wooten to make it 31-all. Rajion Neals 7-yard run had put Tennessee (3-2, 0-1) ahead 31-24 with 1:54 left.No. 7 Louisville 30, Temple 7PHILADELPHIA Teddy Bridgewater threw for 348 yards and two touchdowns to keep Louisville undefeated. Bridgewater made it look easy against the overwhelmed Owls (0-5, 02 American Athletic Conference). He threw for 228 yards in the first half to help the Cardinals roll to a 24-0 lead. The Cardinals (5-0, 1-0) lost a bid for their second straight shutout when Temple scored with 38 seconds left. Louisville receiver DeVante Parker, who has six touchdown catches this season, left in the first half with an injured right shoulder. Without one of his favorite targets, Bridgewater was still impressive, completing 25 of 35 passes. He threw a TD pass for the 17th straight game.No. 10 LSU 59, Mississippi St 26STARKVILLE, Miss. Zach Mettenberger threw for 340 yards and two touchdowns, Odell Beckham Jr. had 179 yards receiving and two TDs, and No. 10 LSU pushed past Mississippi State 59-26. Mettenberger completed 25 of 29 passes in another impressive performance during the seniors breakout season. Beckham was his favorite target the two hooked up for nine completions. LSUs Jeremy Hill added 157 yards rushing and two touchdowns. The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 Southeastern Conference) have won 14 straight over Mississippi State (2-3, 0-2) dating back to 1999.No. 11 Oklahoma 20, TCU 17NORMAN, Okla. Brennan Clay broke a 76-yard touchdown run late in the fourth quarter and No. 11 Oklahoma held off TCU 20-17. Trey Millard had a touchdown run for the Sooners (5-0, 2-0 Big 12) and Michael Hunnicutt hit field goals of 39 and 32 yards. Oklahoma and Texas will meet next Saturday in the annual Red River Rivalry in Dallas with first place in the conference on the line. Oklahoma opened with seven straight defensive 3-and-outs, after finishing a 35-21 win at Notre Dame last Saturday with three. The 10 straight 3-and-outs was the longest such streak recorded by the Sooners since at least the 2003 season.No. 13 South Carolina 35, Kentucky 28COLUMBIA, S.C. Connor Shaw passed for a touchdown and ran for another as No. 13 South Carolina, playing without injured defensive end Jadeveon Clowney, held off a Kentucky comeback for a 35-28 victory. The Gamecocks (4-1, 2-1 Southeastern Conference) again let a large lead slip away and once more were able to come away with a victory. The Wildcats (1-4, 0-2) rallied from 21-0 to pull to 27-21 on Jalen Whitlows 14yard touchdown pass to Ryan Timmons with 11:50 remaining. They were still within a touchdown after Whitlow bulled his way to a 1-yard scoring run with four minutes left. But the Gamecocks ran out the clock behind SEC leading rusher Mike Davis and beat Kentucky for the 13th time in the last 14 meetings. Clowney was out with bruised ribs.No. 19 Michigan 42, Minnesota 13ANN ARBOR, Mich. Devin Gardner threw a 24-yard, go-ahead touchdown pass to Devin Funchess late in the first half and Michigan pulled away. The Wolverines (5-0, 1-0 Big Ten) relied on their running game to take pressure off the turnover-prone Gardner. He didnt throw an interception for the first time since making his first start as a quarterback last year at Minnesota. The Golden Gophers (4-2, 0-2) were without coach Jerry Kill for an entire game for the first time because of his epilepsy. He had a seizure Saturday morning, when he planned to travel to Michigan to coach in the game, and remained home to rest in Minnesota. The Wolverines have won 18 straight games at home.No. 20 Texas Tech 54, Kansas 16LAWRENCE, Kan. Freshman sensation Baker Mayfield passed for 368 yards but was helped off the field with an apparent leg injury in the third quarter of Texas Techs victory. Mayfield, a true freshman walk-on who has started every game, was hurt at the end of the third quarter when tackled while passing. There was no penalty. He hobbled very slowly off the field with someone helping him under each arm. He was 33 of 51 with one interception. After falling behind in the first quarter 10-0, the Red Raiders reeled off 54 straight points, going to 5-0 (2-0 Big 12) under first-year head coach Kliff Kingsbury for the first time since 2008.No. 21 Okla. St. 33, Kansas St. 29STILLWATER, Okla. J.W. Walsh found Charlie Moore for a 6-yard touchdown pass with 4:16 left in the fourth quarter to help Oklahoma State rally. Walsh finished 24-of-38 passing for 245 yards for the Cowboys, who narrowly avoided their second straight loss after a defeat at West Virginia last week. After falling behind 29-23 in the fourth quarter, Oklahoma State (4-1, 1-1 Big 12 Conference) drove 75 yards in six plays. Walsh was 4-of-5 passing on the drive, including the goahead touchdown pass to Moore. Ben Grogan later added a field goal for the Cowboys, one of four in the game for the freshman.No. 23 Fresno St. 61, Idaho 14MOSCOW, Idaho Derek Carr threw five touchdown passes as No. 23 Fresno State pounded Idaho, scoring at least 40 points for the fifth time this season. Davante Adams caught three touchdown passes for Fresno State (5-0), which is off to its best start since 2001, when the Bulldogs won their first six games. Idaho (1-5), coming off a win over Temple in coach Paul Petrinos first season, didnt score until the fourth quarter against the first ranked opponent to play in the Kibbie Dome since Boise State in 2010.Auburn 30, No. 24 Mississippi 22AUBURN, Ala. Nick Marshall ran for 140 yards and two touchdowns, Robenson Therezie scored on a 78-yard interception return and Auburn held off No. 24 Mississippi 30-22 for its first win over a Top 25 team in two years. Marshalls second scoring run gave Auburn a 27-9 lead in the third quarter. The Tigers lost two turnovers in the fourth quarter to help the Ole Miss comeback attempt. Ole Miss was held to only three field goals before Bo Wallace threw a 49yard touchdown pass to Donte Moncrief in the third quarter and added a 12-yard scoring pass to Moncrief midway through the fourth quarter. Auburn (4-1, 2-1 Southeastern Conference) already has topped its win total from last season, when it finished 3-9 overall and 0-8 in the SEC. Ole Miss (3-2, 1-2), coming off a 25-0 loss at No. 1 Alabama, has lost two straight.Notre Dame 37, No. 22 Arizona State 34ARLINGTON, Texas Tommy Rees threw for 279 yards and three touchdowns, and Notre Dame made it 5 for 5 in the traveling Shamrock Series with a 37-34 victory against No. 22 Arizona State. Kyle Brindza kicked three secondhalf field goals, the go-ahead kick from 25 yards with 3:03 remaining. He tied a Notre Dame record with a 53yarder that matched the longest in a college game at the $1.2 billion home of the Dallas Cowboys. It was the second win in Texas in the five-year Shamrock run of home games on the road for the Irish (4-2). Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS Stephen Morris threw for three touchdowns, Duke Johnson rushed for 184 yards and No. 14 Miami remained unbeaten after shaking off a problematic opening quarter to beat Georgia Tech 45-30 on Saturday. Phillip Dorsett, Clive Walford and Allen Hurns caught scoring passes for Miami (5-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast Conference), which scored 21 points in the final 7:15. Dallas Crawford ran for two scores in the fourth quarter, and Ladarius Gunter added a 30yard interception return for another touchdown with 1:08 left. David Sims had two rushing touchdowns for Georgia Tech (3-2, 2-2), which wasted a 17-point lead against Miami last season and blew another double-digit advantage Saturday plus missed a fourth-quarter extra point that would have tied the game. The Yellow Jackets led 17-7 after controlling the first quarter, then wound up losing to Miami for the fifth straight time. Its Miamis best start since opening 6-0 in 2004.South Florida 26, Cincinnati 20TAMPA Nate Godwin scored on a long blocked field goal return and DeDe Lattimore scooped up a fumble for another touchdown to help South Florida begin American Athletic Conference play with a 26-20 victory over Cincinnati, which was playing for the first time since one of its players was killed in a car accident. The Bearcats (3-2, 0-1) spent a difficult bye week grieving, attending red-shirt freshman Ben Flicks funeral and making hospital visits in addition to practicing. They were looking forward to playing a game to help things get back to normal. Two hours before kickoff, the entire Cincinnati team gathered at the midfield at Raymond James Stadium, forming a circle around the USF logo to pray. A moment of silence in Flicks memory was observed before the opening kickoff. Two other players were injured in the wreck, and one of them remains hospitalized.UCF 24, Memphis 17MEMPHIS, Tenn. Two UCF touchdowns in 9 seconds late in the fourth quarter gave the Knights a come from behind 24-17 victory over Memphis in the American Athletic Conference opener for both teams. The scores came in unusual ways as lineman Chris Martin recovered a fumble in the end zone with 2:05 left for UCF (4-1, 1-0 AAC) to tie the game at 17. On the ensuing kickoff, Memphis returner Marquis Warford fumbled when he was tackled by UCFs William Stanback. Drico Johnson grabbed the ball and ran 12 yards for the Knights 24-17 lead. Memphis Joe Craig returned the next kickoff almost 100 yards for an apparent score, but it was nullified by a holding penalty. The Tigers (13, 0-1) then marched to the UCF 6 before a halfback pass by Brandon Hayes was intercepted in the end zone by linebacker Terrance Plummer, ending the Tigers threat. No. 14 Miami pulls away, tops Georgia Tech Associated PressAlabama wide receiver DeAndrew White tries to elude Georgia State safety Arington Jordan during the second half Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Fla. box scores No. 8 FSU 63, No. 25 Mary. 0Maryland00000 Florida St.714212163 First Quarter FSUK.Williams 1 run (Aguayo kick), 8:14. Second Quarter FSUFreeman 5 run (Aguayo kick), 6:15. FSUBenjamin 5 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), :28. Third Quarter FSUOLeary 8 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 12:18. FSUShaw 21 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 9:47. FSUOLeary 12 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 1:50. Fourth Quarter FSUBenjamin 21 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 14:56. FSUK.Williams 17 run (Aguayo kick), 11:28. FSUCoker 24 run (Aguayo kick), 9:49. A,909. MdFSU First downs933 Rushes-yards25-3343-183 Passing201431 Comp-Att-Int15-32-026-39-0 Return Yards050 Punts-Avg.11-38.24-42.0 Fumbles-Lost3-11-0 Penalties-Yards4-404-26 Time of Possession25:45 34:15 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGMaryland, Veii 8-15, Rowe 59, Diggs 1-5, Reid 4-4, C.Brown 3-3, B.Ross 3-(minus 1), Team 1-(minus 2). Florida St., Freeman 17-63, Wilder 6-40, K.Williams 5-29, Coker 1-24, Winston 724, R.Green 4-16, Stevenson 2-10, Team 1-(minus 23). PASSINGMaryland, Rowe 9-17-0-119, C.Brown 6-14-0-82, Diggs 0-1-0-0. Florida St., Winston 23-32-0-393, Coker 3-7-0-38. RECEIVINGMaryland, Long 3-77, King 3-46, B.Ross 3-17, Diggs 2-24, Stinebaugh 1-13, L.Jacobs 1-10, K.Goins 1-9, Veii 1-5. Florida St., Shaw 5-96, Benjamin 5-60, Greene 4-108, OLeary 4-55, Freeman 3-35, C.Green 2-39, I.Jones 116, K.Williams 1-15, Broxsie 1-7.No. 14 Miami 45, Georgia Tech 30Georgia Tech17001330 Miami71072145 First Quarter GaTSims 7 run (Butker kick), 9:04. MiaDorsett 40 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 8:32. GaTFG Butker 45, 2:47. GaTPerkins 31 run (Butker kick), :53. Second Quarter MiaWalford 4 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 8:22. MiaFG Goudis 24, :29. Third Quarter MiaHurns 69 pass from Morris (Goudis kick), 1:44. Fourth Quarter GaTSims 6 run (kick failed), 10:38. MiaD.Crawford 3 run (Goudis kick), 7:15. MiaD.Crawford 18 run (Goudis kick), 1:46. MiaGunter 30 interception return (Goudis kick), 1:08. GaTByerly 15 run (Butker kick), :10. A,008. GaTMia First downs2322 Rushes-yards62-33531-227 Passing66324 Comp-Att-Int6-19-217-22-2 Return Yards7652 Punts-Avg.4-37.31-49.0 Fumbles-Lost2-12-2 Penalties-Yards3-157-54 Time of Possession35:5924:01 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGGeorgia Tech, Sims 16-77, Hill 3-47, Perkins 3-39, Godhigh 7-39, Byerly 3-33, Laskey 5-28, Andrews 4-27, Lee 12-26, Days 2-8, Ju.Thomas 3-8, Bostic 1-5, Team 1-(minus 1), Zenon 2-(minus 1). Miami, Du.Johnson 22-184, D.Crawford 531, Hurns 1-13, Hagens 1-7, Team 1(minus 1), Morris 1-(minus 7). PASSINGGeorgia Tech, Lee 5-13-1-63, Byerly 1-3-0-3, Ju.Thomas 0-3-1-0. Miami, Morris 17-22-2-324. RECEIVINGGeorgia Tech, Waller 2-41, Smelter 2-9, Godhigh 1-13, Connors 1-3. Miami, Hurns 4-108, Dorsett 4-66, Coley 3-74, Walford 3-28, Du.Johnson 1-27, Hagens 1-15, D.Crawford 1-6.No. 18 UF 30, Arkansas 10Arkansas 703010 Florida 0177630 First Quarter ArkWilliams 4 run (Hocker kick), 2:09. Second Quarter FlaFG Phillips 28, 11:11. FlaPurifoy 42 interception return (Phillips kick), 8:33. FlaPatton 51 pass from Murphy (Phillips kick), :20. Third Quarter FlaPatton 38 pass from Murphy (Phillips kick), 11:23. ArkFG Hocker 30, 4:12. Fourth Quarter FlaShowers 9 pass from Murphy (kick failed), 4:47. A,043. ArkFla First downs1717 Rushes-yards29-11141-115 Passing 164240 Comp-Att-Int17-43-116-22-0 Return Yards(-1)93 Punts-Avg.7-45.76-37.0 Fumbles-Lost3-10-0 Penalties-Yards8-578-84 Time of Possession27:3832:22 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGArkansas, A.Collins 13-54, Williams 8-32, Small 3-24, Hatcher 1-9, Marshall 1-8, Team 1-(minus 1), B.Allen 2(minus 15). Florida, Jones 17-50, M.Brown 11-39, Murphy 7-15, Patton 214, Team 2-0, Showers 1-(minus 1), T.Burton 1-(minus 2). PASSINGArkansas, B.Allen 17-41-1164, Derby 0-2-0-0. Florida, Murphy 1622-0-240. RECEIVINGArkansas, A.Collins 5-45, Hatcher 4-26, Herndon 3-32, Henry 2-42, Cowan 1-9, Small 1-8, Sprinkle 1-2. Florida, Patton 6-124, T.Burton 3-56, Dunbar 3-43, Westbrook 1-12, Showers 1-9, M.Brown 1-1, Robinson 1-(minus 5).

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Associated PressKANSAS CITY, Kan. Matt Kenseth is proving to be unbeatable at Kansas Speedway. The winner of the last two Sprint Cup races at the track, Kenseth got into his Nationwide car and drove it to victory Saturday, taking advantage of a controversial late-race wreck that involved Brad Keselowski and Kyle Busch to conserve enough fuel for the end. We had a lot of speed right off the truck. It felt really good, Kenseth said. I thought it was the best car we had all year at an open track. Kenseth crossed the finish line well ahead of Paul Menard, who got around Regan Smith on the final lap to take second. Busch finished fourth and Justin Allgaier was fifth. The outcome was almost an afterthought, though, to the renewal of a longstanding feud between Keselowski and Busch that has threatened to spill over into todays Sprint Cup race. Their teams locked in a battle for the owners championship, the two were side-by-side in the closing laps when Busch got into Keselowskis left rear. That sent the No. 22 car backing into the outside wall and knocking Keselowski out of the race. Keselowski angrily jumped out of his car and, rather than hop into the ambulance, jogged over the grass toward pit road. He gestured wildly at Buschs crew before finally running to the infield care center a long jog that did little to quell his temper. I got wrecked by a dirty driver. Theres no other way of putting it, Keselowski said. Ive raced him really cool over the last year to be respectful to him and trying to repair our relationship. Ive watched him wreck my truck and cost me from winning races. He put me in the fence in Chicago in the truck race. Nationwide races, hes been pulling this crap. Its not going to last, Keselowski said, I can tell you that. Busch said that he wasnt trying to wreck Keselowski, and that he simply got tight coming out of the final corner. That forced the front of his car to drift toward the wall. It was hard racing. There were a lot of moments where I maybe felt a little crowded, Busch said. The contact that ultimately ended it, I just got real tight. The wreck tightened up the ownership race. Keselowskis Penske Racing team, which carried a 28point lead over Buschs No. 54 car for Joe Gibbs Racing into the weekend, now leads by just five points heading to next weekends race at Charlotte. The incident could also throw some drama into the Chase. Busch is third in the standings and just 12 points back of Kenseth, while Keselowski the defending series champion failed to qualify for NASCARs version of the playoffs. He has a lot more to lose than I do, said Keselowski, apparently indicating that he would retaliate today. I guess thats the good thing about not being in the Chase.B6SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS LOCASH LOCASH COWBOYS COWBOYS AND AND SPECIAL GUEST SPECIAL GUEST TOM JACKSON TOM JACKSON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 THE BELLAMY THE BELLAMY BROTHERS BROTHERS CHRIS CHRIS JANSON JANSON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 PROCEEDS BENEFIT: LIMITED 3-DAY OR 1-DAY RESERVED TICKETS AVAILABLE includes up front reserved seat & complimentary food Advanced General Admission Three-Day: $65 One-Day: $25 Call 352-400-4776 or go to www.crazyoncountry.com Tickets also available at CRYSTAL NISSAN SPONSORS Ferman Motor Car Company Harley Davidson of New Port Richey Sheldon Palms Insurance, Inc./Lollygaggers Mike Bays State Farm Insurance Agent Crystal Community E.N.T. Dr. Denis Grillo Plantation Inn Nature Coast Financial Mike Scott Plumbing, Inc. Ross Hammock Ranch Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash, P.A. COMED Y TOUR FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 One Rake at a Time FOOD PROVIDED BY: 000FXJC ROCK CRUSHER CANYON ROCK CRUSHER CANYON CRYSTAL RIVER, FL CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 000FV8Z 000G8V1 Bucs vow to stick together NFL team hopes to use bye week to regroup Associated PressTAMPA The young quarterback who once provided hope for the future has been jettisoned, and a season that began with high expectations is rapidly slipping away. The winless Tampa Bay Buccaneers are in disarray, and itll take more than a bye week to fix the mess coach Greg Schiano has on his hands on and off the field. I think we have a strong locker room, Schiano said. Our guys are locked in on what we need to do. If only it were that simple. A disintegrating relationship between the organization and unhappy quarterback Josh Freeman grew more contentious by the day until the fifth-year was released Thursday just a quarter of a season after becoming the first 4,000-yard passer in franchise history and helping the offense set numerous club records. Rookie Mike Glennon made his first start as Freemans replacement last week, but barely sparked the team in a 13-10 loss to Arizona. An improved defense, bolstered by the offseason acquisition of cornerback Darrelle Revis and safety Dashon Goldson, has failed to protect leads in the final two minutes in three of the teams four losses. The Bucs (0-4) have dropped nine of 10 games overall dating to last season, raising the question whether a coaching change could be on the horizon. Team history suggests no, however, the Bucs have never had a situation quite like this one. The Glazer family, which owns the team, has spent generously in free agency to upgrade the roster since Schianos hiring after the 2011 season. And while theyve never fired a coach during the season, theyve also shown they wont hesitate to abruptly pull the plug when they feel change is necessary. Tony Dungy was dismissed after a disappointing playoff loss. Jon Gruden, who won Tampa Bays only Super Bowl title after replacing Dungy, was axed with three years remaining on his contract. Schiano has said he doesnt think his job is in jeopardy. Despite benching and eventually releasing Freeman in what he described as a performancebased decision, the coach insists the pieces are in place to be successful. We have good players, proven methods, good schemes, good coaches. When you have all those good components and youre doing things the right way itll turn, Schiano said. Everybody thats been in competitive athletics goes through some stretches where they wish it was better. ... Now youre kidding yourself if you dont have the components. Then youre just wishing, he added. I know we have the components, so weve just got to stick to our guns and itll turn. Despite Schianos insistence that Freemans situation was not a distraction, teammates clearly had become weary of talking about his benching. Glennon is a third-round pick that veterans have no choice but to rally around moving forward. We cant turn on each other, defensive tackle Gerald McCoy said. Its times like this where you see teams start to crumble, because internally they start to implode. (We) cant do that. We have to get stronger ... look in the mirror first, see what we did as individuals wrong, what we can do better and then lift each other up. Two of the teams three losses with Freeman in the lineup came on last-second field goals. The Bucs led the Cardinals 10-0 entering the fourth quarter before Glennon lost a fumble and threw two interceptions, helping Arizona rally to spoil an otherwise solid if unspectacular performance. The Bucs open date gives him an extra week to prepare for his next start, at home against Philadelphia. The 23-year-old Glennon, a former backup to Russell Wilson at North Carolina State before becoming Wolfpack starter as a junior, is quickly getting acclimated to his new role as the lead voice on offense. Those guys have done a really good job making me feel comfortable. Theyve been extremely complimentary and encouraging, they know that the quarterback is in control of the huddle, and those guys have all eyes on me when I walk in, Glennon said. Theyve really just done a really good job of kind of making me feel like I belong out there and that Im in charge. Associated PressThe Tampa Bay Buccaneers have turned the starting quarterback job to rookie Mike Glennon. Kenseth wins Nationwide race at Kansas Speedway Associated PressMatt Kenseth drives on the final lap of his win in the Nationwide Series race Saturday at Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan.

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Gerry MulliganOUT THE WINDOW Section CSUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Abig old dilemma we have in this country is that we expect government to have all the answers. We then go off and elect human beings to public office and were surprised that they do really dumb things. Last week in California, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law making it illegal to post nude and/or risqu photos of former romantic partners on the Internet. Apparently, one dating practice that has changed since the creation of Internet (thanks Al Gore) and the digital camera is that there a lot more naked photos being taken. The California case involved a woman who moved to Miami and left her boyfriend back on the West Coast. The couple apparently spent much of their free time sending naked photos of each other back and forth on the Internet. Despite the photographs, the relationship failed to develop (go figure) and the couple broke up. The boyfriend was apparently on the dumpee end of the breakup, and to get even he decided to post his collection of naked photos on the Internet. The girlfriend was mortified that her naked pictures were now all over the Internet (thanks Al Gore) and she alleged she lost her job because her coworkers kept looking at the iPhones during meetings and smiling. So California did what California does in such situations and passed a law that made posting nude photos of ex-girlfriends on the Internet a crime. No doubt the experience was a difficult one, but arent there solutions out there that dont involve the full force of our government? I have a starting point we need smarter citizens. We could have a smaller, less expensive government if we the citizens stopped doing really dumb Do your part to reduce the size of government See WINDOW/ Page C3 Associated PressA man carries a dog on his shoulder Sunday, Sept. 8, while he watches the procession of Cubas patron saint, the Virgin of Charity of Cobre, on her feast day in Havana. PETERGRAULICH Special to the ChronicleFIRST, SOMEBACKGROUND.Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries overthrew Fulgencio Batista on Jan. 1, 1959. This ended a dictatorship of seven years. Castro, being a fighter and not a diplomat, set up the new Cuba as a communist state. Men ride in a classic American car past an excavator shovel Sept. 9 at the harbor of Havana. Gentrification is already evident in the restored bayside plazas of Old Havana, and now an ambitious plan is under way to turn the polluted waterfront into a gleaming promenade with restaurants, cafs and public parks. The United States partially imposed an embargo on Cuba in October 1960. This was punishment for the nationalization of all property, including many U.S. businesses. As further punishment, the embargo was tightened by reducing the Cuban import quota of brown sugar. The Soviet Union stepped in and agreed to purchase the sugar, thus establishing a relationship with the country. President John Kennedy further extended the embargo on Feb. 8, 1962, and following the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962 imposed travel restrictions. As punishment for hosting nuclear weapons, further restrictions were imposed on July 8, 1963, when Cuban assets in the United States were frozen. There was a partial suspension of the regulations in 1977 when President Carter did not renew it. President Reagan reinstated the embargo in 1982. In 1992, the Cuban Democracy Act was sponsored by former Democratic Rep. Robert Torricelli of New Jersey. Next came the Helms-Burton Act in 1996, broadening the embargo to prevent foreign companies from doing business in the United States if they trade with Cuba. In 2000, the embargo was relaxed at the request of the agribusiness interests. So what we have seems to be punishment for creating a communist state and nationalizing property in 1959to 1962. Later added were human rights violations, including torture. Let us fast forward to 2013, some 51 years later. One has to wonder why the embargo is still in effect. After all, we are friendly with Vietnam and China now. There is a group of anti-Castro dissidents living in South Florida with a great deal of money, working incessantly to keep the embargo alive. Do you wonder why an ItalianAmerican congressman from New Jersey introduced a bill related to Cuba? Mr. Torricelli was 11 years old in 1962; however, his district includes several municipalities in Bergen County with a heavy CubanAmerican population. So we see a pattern here: Dissidents want to keep the fight alive and have the money to purchase support in the government. And so it goes, on and on. See CUBA/ Page C3 Peter Graulich has been to Cuba not once, but twice. To read about his most recent trip, see Page A17.

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Page C2SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 The measure of a lifeToday as I was helping to clean out my grandmothers house I wondered, What is the measure of ones life? During the who gets this, who wants that, it seemed that nobody wanted most of it. Is it going to be the same when my kin goes through my treasures? I hope not, but looking around at all of the items I have accumulated, I am sure that is how it will go. What will they think when they go through my nightstand and closet and see items that my wife and children gave me when I was a young buck, such as drawings that were colored in crayon and were once housed on the fridge? Fathers Day, birthday and Valentines Day cards, I couldnt bear to part with in my life? Im sure they will meet their doom once my life is measured. A lifetime of photos will quickly be sifted for a familiar face and discarded without a thought. Im sure my kin will have their houses in order and the burden of adding my treasures may not fit their lives, but remember the measure of my life once Im gone. My treasures were not my possessions, but my memories. When I looked at the drawing you drew for me, I didnt see a childs crayon sketch, I saw your little face handing me a one-of-a-kind work of art. When I looked through a card, I tried to remember the day you gave me that card. Your photos with your smiles warmed my soul when all seemed to be going wrong. So remember when you are going through my treasures to be careful for the ones I kept close to me; I had them for a lifetime.George BrooksJust missed horseI came very close to hitting a horse in the middle of County Road 491 (across from the post office driveway) one night after choir. It was close, very close. It was twilight, but I noticed a black-and-white horse just off the roadway, which made me glance over at it and then, wow, theres a light brown horse standing sideways right in front of me. The horse and its rider were just standing or, shall I say, dancing sideways in my lane. Our RAV4 apparently has very good swerve capabilities and I still have excellent reaction time. Luckily, there was very little traffic and no vehicles coming towards me. And from what I can gather, the car that was a ways behind me, had to swerve and missed the horse also. It could have been a bad one for all of us. Norm Schmidt Hernando Editors note: This column was written prior to Tuesdays government shutdown.You inspire me. Those tender words were spoken to Sen. Marco Rubio by Sen. Ted Cruz on the Senate floor recently, the same Ted Cruz who jabbered for more than 21 straight hours, infuriating leaders of his own party and edifying his national image as an egomaniacal crackpot. Nobody outside of Texas likes Cruz except the tea party troglodytes to whom he panders. You inspire me, the buffoon cooed to Rubio, a future foe in the 2016 race for the White House. At which moment Democratic campaign strategists surely fell to their knees whispering, Thank you, God. This is too good to be true. The Cruz-Rubio bromance played out on C-Span in the wee morning hours Sept. 25 during Cruzs marathon tirade against Obamacare. Floridas junior senator popped up like a blow-dried gopher to speak for almost an hour and give Cruz a break. Rubios appearance was another calculated suck-up to the right-wingers who scorned him during the immigration debate. Days earlier he had backstabbed Miami-Dade Circuit Judge William Thomas, a gay black man, by abruptly withdrawing his support for Thomas nomination to the federal bench. Rubio claimed hed changed his mind about Thomas fitness because of concerns about the handling of a DUI case and a rape case though even the prosecutor in the rape case said the judge had followed the rules. (Rubios vast credentials in criminal trial procedure consist of an unused law degree.) By aligning himself with Cruz, whose self-styled filibuster epitomizes the partisan paralysis in Washington, Rubio further diminished himself in the eyes of moderate Republicans who yearn for a fresh and principled voice. Ironically, the potential rival who benefits most from Rubios naked groveling is his mentor, Jeb Bush. Although he hasnt announced whether or not hes running in 2016, Bush is smart enough to watch the unfolding Republican train wreck and know that none of the current lightweights has a chance of beating Hillary Clinton. The batty Cruz is being seriously discussed as a frontrunner based on his hijacking the Senate floor and saying, among other things, that accepting Obamacare a law passed by Congress is tantamount to placating the Nazis in Germany. In another burst of bloated vanity, Cruz compared his mission to defund health care reform with John F. Kennedys vow to put a man on the moon. Having plenty of time to kill, Cruz also read to his kids from a Dr. Seuss book. It was the only memorable thing to come out of his mouth in 1,279 minutes. The purported point of his theatrics was to show support for House Republicans who want to shut down the federal government if funding for the Affordable Care Act isnt stripped from the budget. Of course, the law will never be defunded because there arent enough votes in the Senate to do it not even close. The arithmetic is basic enough for a first-grader to sort out. So are the public-opinion polls. While most Americans remain apprehensive about Obamacare, the presidents tepid approval ratings still dwarf the contemptuously low numbers racked up by Congress. The most recent New York Times/CBS News survey shows that nearly 75 percent of those polled disapprove of congressional Republicans, and more than half say Obama is more likely to make better decisions about the economy, the deficit and health care. Almost 90 percent are frustrated at the possibility of a government shutdown, two-thirds say they or their families would be negatively affected, and eight of 10 believe its unacceptable for either the president or Congress to pitch the country into fiscal default over a political squabble. Thats why Cruzs diarrheal opera got no love from senior Republicans such as John McCain, Tom Coburn and even the die-hard obstructionist Mitch McConnell. They know their party will get blamed if the government is shut down. Even the GOPs cunning prince of darkness, Karl Rove, warns that the House strategy is self-destructive. Mitt Romney railed tirelessly against Obamacare and got his butt handed to him in the last election, while Republicans wound up losing seats in Congress. What did they learn from that? Nothing. Democrats must be quietly elated to see a guy like Rubio, once feared as the bright new face of the opposition, swooning over a reactionary gasbag like Cruz. Hillary can just sit back and watch. The campaign commercials keep writing themselves. You inspire me, sayeth the gasbag from Texas to the suck-up artist from Florida.Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132. What a miserable thing life is: Youre living in clover, only the clover isnt good enough.Bertolt Brecht, Jungle of Cities, 1924 At present, GOP the Dems best friends CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief Finally, progress on future of hospital After four years of turmoil, the two boards that govern Citrus Memorial hospital in Inverness have agreed to move forward with a sale or lease of the public hospital. The new operator of CMH will be Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), the Nashville-based health care company that offered $140 million for the local institution. While there is nostalgia for Citrus Memorials 50-year history of providing great health care to the community, there is a collective community relief that a consensus has been forged on how to finally resolve the problem. HCA operates Oak Hill Hospital in Brooksville and has a good reputation for providing quality health care. The national company also has deep pockets and critical efficiencies that will help Citrus Memorial regain its footing. The members of the two boards finally sat down Monday evening and hashed out the pros and cons of the offers that still sat on the table. In the end, HCA got the nod from both of the battling boards. The governing board and foundation board members acted respectfully during their joint meeting and had an intelligent conversation about the options. Citizens appreciate the effort. About $10 million in legal fees have been wasted over the past four years in this political dispute, and the taxpayers of Citrus County are tired. There are still important details to be decided, but the most critical step was choosing the top bidder. With that done, we would urge the boards to move forward with a sense of urgency to finalize the deal. Employees, physicians and consumers are all highly irritated by the by the constant tension and uncertainty that has gripped our hospital for years. Bring this deal to a conclusion. There is still debate about whether the hospital should be sold or leased to HCA. The company is open to either option, but many in the community are convinced a sale makes the most sense. After all, the mess we are just climbing out of was because of a lease arrangement that went bad. To the general public, the technicality is not that important. A subgroup was asked to quickly analyze the benefits of a sale or lease and report back to the joint group. What is important is what happens to the $95 million that will be left over when the sale is consummated. Thats a lot of money and no one wants to see it wasted. At the same time, no one wants to lose control over how that money is spent. While there are complicated and confusing state laws dealing with how the proceeds are spent, we like the general idea of creating a community foundation that annually spends the proceeds from the investment of the $95 million. The principal should not be touched. Instead, the proceeds should be used for programs and endeavors that improve the general health of our community. Lets remember, it took our tax dollars to create the investment of Citrus Memorial hospital over the past 50 years, and the proceeds from that sale should go back and benefit the community. Governing board members Krista Joseph and Bob Priselac both floated good ideas for creating a foundation board with broad community membership that could be charged with the responsibility of allocating those funds to worthy public causes. Lets not permit any additional political squabbles or legal ambiguities to get in the way of moving this process forward immediately. We dont want to waste any additional dollars on legal fees, consultants or politicians. THE ISSUE:The future of Citrus Memorial.OUR OPINION:Move with urgency to complete the deal. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Persons wishing to address the editorial board should call 352563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE FINISH LINE IN SIGHT Courts against menThis is in regards to Mr. Peters and his daughters. I feel very sorry for the man. Hes desperate. I do not agree with his actions, but I can understand his desperation. The courts are so against the male figures. Something has to be done to help men in situations with child custody. There is judges that give the woman everything just because theyre women. And the men pay and the men are the ones that suffer. They lose their children and they have to pay and they can barely afford to live themselves and the women know this. Someone needs to look into it and Im a woman. Carl HiaasenOTHER VOICES

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COMMENTARYCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 C3 We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender. Sir Winston Churchill, circa 1940.At times I have given thought to the folks with whom I have shared Earth space. Ive been here with some very good people and with some very bad ones. According to my simplistic mathematical calculations, there have been a lot of them. I am reasonably certain that in 1945, when I was born, someone somewhere on the planet was at least 100 years old. I am now 68, and that covers a timespan of 168 years. Ive breathed the same air as those who were born both before me and after me for at least a period of time. This is only a shot in the dark, but I would estimate the total Earth-spacesharing crowd for me is at least 9 billion folks and the number will continue to grow each time a baby is born until I die.Today, I will refrain from talking about the bad ones, and comment about only one of the good ones a very good one. Sir Winston Churchill, 1874-1965.You have undoubtedly read or heard the we will fight them on the beaches speech, made by Churchill at a time when it looked as though Great Britain would indeed fall to Hitlers forces. He is also alleged to have said, You can always count on the Americans to do the right thing after they have exhausted all other possibilities. He was right, of course, and we eventually joined the fight and pulled the Brits bacon out of the fire. But, I believe based on timing and the interplay with my life at the present time, my current favorite quotation attributed to Churchill is one that Cheryl read to me as we were waiting in the ships library for our turn to disembark after a short cruise we had taken to celebrate our recent wedding anniversary, that is: Writing a book is an adventure. To begin with it is a toy and an amusement. Then it becomes a mistress, then it becomes a master, then it becomes a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster and fling him to the public. I dont want to ever inappropriately use this column to plug my novel-in-process, one which has been in the works for 35 years, and the last three of them in earnest. Even so, while writing my book, I have experienced adventure and amusement. I have never had a mistress, but I have felt words on paper become excruciatingly enticing, making it difficult to break away, even when my time has been needed elsewhere. I have felt those words become my master and I have had to deal with the tyrant which is somewhere within the computer keyboard at three in the morning while I am trying to get a sentence just as I want it to be. I understand the servitude that exists as I am presently completing what is without exaggeration at least my 15th personal edit, 11 before and four after a very well-done edit by a professional editor. And now, my best guess is that Im no more than another few months away. Layout and printing remain to be done, but it is almost time to kill the monster and fling him to the public.Fred Brannen is an Inverness resident and a Chronicle columnist. Fred BrannenA SLICE OF LIFE Its almost time to kill the monster Reasons for repealCommunism is not the evil it once was. As an example, China is a communist country. We spent $315 billion there last year with no embargo to prevent it. The Cuban Missile Crisis should have been called the Russian Missile Crisis in Cuba. The Soviet Union had supported the revolution by purchasing the sugar the United States blocked. This would have indebted Castro to the USSR. He really couldnt say no to the missiles without destroying his country. It was a matter of survival. Human rights violations and torture? Dont we do that right here? We do it in Guantanamo, Cuba, and we did it in all cases of rendition, but it is OK for us, just not right for them.A solutionThere are five Cubans imprisoned in the United States. All five Gerardo Hernndez, Ramn Labaino, Antonio Guerrero, Ren Gonzlez and Fernando Gonzlez were convicted of acting as unregistered foreign agents and conspiracy to commit crimes against the United States. Three were also convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage, on the strength of evidence that they had gathered information on military activity at a naval air station in Key West. In addition, Hernndez was convicted of conspiracy to murder in connection with the deaths of four Cuban exiles whose two light aircraft were shot down by the Cuban Air Force over the Straits of Florida in 1996. In Cuba, these men are known as The Five. Cuba holds two persons of interest to the United States: Alan Gross and JoAnne Chesimard. While working for a USAID contractor in 2009, Gross was arrested for bringing satellite phones and computer equipment into Cuba to distribute to the Jewish community. He was convicted in March 2011 and is serving a 15-year sentence. JoAnne Chesimard is residing in Cuba with a $2 million reward from the FBI offered for her capture and return to New Jersey. Chesimard, aka Assata Shakur, was a member of the Black Liberation Army who was being actively pursued by the FBI in the early s for her alleged connection to a great number of violent crimes. On May 2, 1973, Chesimard and two other BLA members were involved in a shootout with New Jersey State Police troopers after they were pulled over for having a broken tail light. Trooper Werner Foerster was mortally wounded in the shootout, shortly after which Chesimard was apprehended. She was tried and convicted of murder and escaped from prison in 1979 and resurfaced in Cuba in 1984. It is time to stop this madness. Ninety percent of the population of Cuba is under age 65 three generations people who had nothing to do with the events that led to the embargo. I suggest that the United States and Cuba get together and agree to swap persons. Some negotiations between the countries could clear up the rest of the minor differences and the world would be a better place. The island is a beautiful place. The people are friendly, the architecture is superb, the food is outstanding, the prices are low. It is the perfect vacation destination. So are you tired of having a small group of cranky old men preventing 350 million Americans from visiting this wonderful place? If you agree, please help spread the world. The Cubans do not have enough money to purchase support in Congress. Perhaps Congress could do the right thing for a change and repeal the embargo. I know 11 million people who will be forever thankful.Peter Graulich first left the country in 1961 for six weeks travelling Europe and the United Kingdom with family. Since then he has visited 97 countries, every state in the United States and every national park. He has spent about 300 days on Princess Cruise Line ships and completed a 107-day cruise around the world, visiting 42 countries. He rates Cuba as one of the top three places he has visited. things. So in the spirit of doing my part to help resolve the current stalemate in Washington and reducing the scope of our government in general, I offer these simple rules that you can follow and do your part as a good citizen.Do not drink coffee, apply lipstick and send a text message while you are driving your car on State Road 44. This will cut down on the complaints against Sheriff Jeff Dawsy that he sends too many fire and rescue vehicles to accidents.Do not take your 16foot skiff out into the Gulf of Mexico in stormy weather. This will reduce expenses for the U.S. Coast Guard, the county EMS service and will reduce the waiting time at the hospital emergency room.Do not leave your unlocked car on your driveway with your keys, wallet and purse sitting on the passenger seat. This will cut down on crime statistics in our community and save all sorts of paperwork with your insurance company.Do not elect public officials with extended criminal records or those unfamiliar with the slightest hint of humility. They are annoying and they cost us taxpayers lots of money when we have to send them to jail for stealing tax dollars.And finally, do not send nude photos of yourself on the Internet unless you are running for mayor of New York and you want to help the New York Postsell more newspapers. Keep your clothes on and we will all be better off. Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle. Email him at gmulligan @chronicleonline.com. Associated PressA vendor reaches out to catch a pineapple Sept. 25 at a food market in Havana, Cuba. CUBAContinued from Page C1 WINDOWContinued from Page C1 Local forester assists in fighting Western wildfiresWhen our nation experiences national disasters, our Federal Emergency Management Administration routinely calls upon state emergency response professionals and area experts for much-needed help. Many times these experts are your own neighbors who place themselves in harms way to assist those in need and provide their services with humble professionalism. Most of you witnessed the tragic wildfires that occurred throughout our Western states this summer and the personal suffering and loss of lives they caused, but you may not be aware that many of your neighbors within the Florida Forest Service were on the front lines coordinating and directing the fire suppression needs as well and directly fighting the fires. Citrus County Forester Kimberly Burch deployed to the Salmon River fire in Northern California as a logistics supply ordering manager. Kim was responsible for ensuring all of the food, safety gear, firefighting supplies and ground support equipment was where it was needed, when it was needed to support the more than 1,100 wildland firefighters working to suppress the fire. Kim has returned safely to her Citrus County neighborhood after a job well done, but we thought it most appropriate to recognize her valuable service. Perhaps you may know Kim. The next time you meet, you should give her a pat on the back or handshake and thank her for her service in bringing those fires under control.Don Ruths, wildfire mitigation specialist Withlacoochee Forestry Center, Florida Forest Service Letter toTHE EDITOR Totally confusedTourism department. If the tourism was up 13 percent from last year in a bad year, why in the heck do they need an executive director to head the tourism department, especially when their $600,000 budget will not support an executive director? Totally confused on how this county is actually running some of this stuff.Pay enough alreadyIm reading about the County to set landfill fees for Inverness (Sept. 25, Page A2). Dont we already, in our taxes, pay a good amount of money every year for picking up stuff in the city? I dont see why we should. Now if you want to add $1 a year more, that wouldnt be such a bad thing, but its charging so much more. Somebody needs to get on this and see why we have to pay more and how much more, if this is so. And, Adams, you better check it out good.Social media skills aboundTourism. Yesterday at the BOCC meeting, Cathy Pearson said one of the candidates had great social media skills. Well, little does she know that the three people working in tourism today actually four also have great social media skills. So why do you need a fifth person for more social media skills? Baffles me.Ludicrous tax hikeId like to make a statement about this 31 percent Citrus County tax hike that our great county commissioners approved other than cutting services such as closing the swimming pool in Whispering Pines or closing other nonessential services that the minority of the county residents utilize. So now the majority of the county residents have to pay that 31 percent on their property taxes. This is ludicrous.Thank you school staff, thank you EMTsI would like to give a big thank you to the Inverness Middle School. This is their crossing guard, Miss Jo. I had a terrible experience on (Sept. 24), Tuesday. I had passed out and I want to give the school board a thank you and the EMTs. They took excellent care of me, which I dont remember too much. It was a bad experience on my part and I want to say thank you, especially to Mr. Darby for being there. And like I said, it was a terrible experience. Ive been doing this for 10 years, but I think the heat got to me. Thank you and God bless. Miss Jo.Snuck up from behindI dont know how you feel about old age, but in my case I didnt even see it coming. It hit me from the rear.Difficult processYour editorial on the fire tax exemption, I think is a little misleading. I do not believe that the reasons you give for having only a few people apply are accurate. The reasons are, theyve made it so difficult to get and obtain the application. Theres no place in Crystal River you can obtain one. You have to either drive to Lecanto or to Inverness or you have to mail them a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Once you do receive the application, you have to provide the proof of your income, which means sending in paperwork that you might need for something else. Then the application has to be notarized, sent back in and youd have to do this every year prior to May 1. So this application would only be good for a few months and youd have to go through the process to do it all over again. They couldnt have made this more difficult for senior citizens on a fixed income. I hope it can be corrected.Way to go, ArtId like to give kudos to Art Reinhard at the Aquatic Department. He returns calls, answers questions and just does a fine job. Thanks, Art. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579

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Shut out of landfill?I heard today that we cannot use the landfill anymore if were residents of the city, and we rely on that to take our yard waste every Saturday. Is this true? The Chronicle needs to check into this. Im talking about the City of Inverness.Editors note:The county is considering a fee structure for Inverness because city residents do not pay the $25 annual fee and the city decided to haul its trash to a Sumter County landfill. The new rates are not established, so for now its business as usual.Scotts connection?This is in regard to the sale of the hospital in Inverness. Two companies one HMA and HCA are either one of those two companies connected to the Rick Scott company that he used to run? Does anybody know the initials of the one that Gov. Scott used to run? Editors note:Gov. Rick Scott was formerly CEO of Columbia/HCA. He resigned in 1997.Worse than drinkingWell, its the eve of the big annual raft race in Citrus County over in the Homosassa River. I wonder how many folks will have a few drinks and then drive back over towards Inverness, Lecanto or Floral City. Maybe theyll go to that after-concert show at Rock Crusher Canyon, have a couple drinks and cops will be out looking for them drunk drivers. Yet the Chronicle had a column by Cokie Roberts and Steven Roberts that (stated) drinking adds 4 feet of reaction time where reading emails adds 36 feet and sending a text 70 feet. Whats that, 4 times 10? Thats almost 18 times more feet from texting than drunk driving, as far as reaction time.Lemon-fresh appliancesIf I have to take my clothes, if my washer and dryer breaks down, to a commercial place, I take my Lysol along and I spray down the washer and I spray down the dryer. And that way if theres any germs, it kills them all.Peace be with thy neighbiorThis is in regards to the Peace be with you in the Sound Off column Saturday (Sept. 21). You want peace, lady? Let me tell you something: Love thy neighbor. How many times (do) you go to church and shake hands with people but you dont know the guy that lives next door or the lady that lives across the street? They like peace also and they could use a little help. If I were you, keep your hands to yourself.Seeking infoI see a commercial on TV that ends with Smoke-free Florida. Does anyone know a phone number that I can call? Please tell me, if you do, in the paper.Editors note:If youre looking for Tobacco-Free Florida, the number is 850-245-4144.Thanks from me and my wheelchairSpecial thanks. I want to thank the people and vehicles who stopped on (State Road) 44 East, Inverness, Sunday (Sept. 15), when my wheelchair rolled down the hill into two traffic lanes. I greatly appreciate your being alert. The wheelchair thanks you also.Difficult doors at libraryWhy is it the restroom doors in the library are all so difficult to open for handicapped people?Legalize it, regulate itThis is a call about marijuana. I think that the federal government should legalize it and regulate it and then tax it. People can get marijuana anywhere they want to right now and its just all getting out of hand. So if they legalize it and then regulate it and tax it, then the federal government and well all be better off.Way to go, skeeter controlI hold Citrus Mosquito Control in high regards. I live in Old Homosassa and they have never failed to come when I call.No more tearsFor everybody in the state of Florida: If you want to get your love bugs off your car, use baby shampoo. That is the top notch. I tried it and it works.Edit thisI was reading this, the Chronicle comment that youre invited to call Sound Off; it will be edited for the length, libel, personal and political attacks and good taste. I would assume that takes care of everything the editor does not like. If he doesnt like the name of someone, if he doesnt like the opinion of someone, I would assume and this is an assumption but you have printed it in the paper, which makes it a fact that the editor, if the editor does not like what is being said, he will cut it and not print it. What a rip-off Sound Off is. I can tell people now to not write in, do not call in, because if the editor does not like it, it will not be printed. Doesnt play nicelyI enjoyed reading the opinion on page C2, Sunday (Sept. 22). It brings to mind the phrase elementary school teachers used to use on report cards stating, Does not play well or work well with others.Its rough out thereThis is in response to this fireman or policeman who called to say to tell the people to shut up and quit complaining about the $54 (fire tax) and complained how he goes and fights fires and hes in danger, he goes out on birthdays, Christmases and all holidays. Well, gee whiz. You know, I dont like being inflicted upon something that I cant only not afford, but dont want. All the towns voted against it. And many other of us people have to work on their birthdays and we work in danger too. Many of us work in banks, many of us work in convenience stores and many of us can just get shot in a drive-by shooting. SoundOFFC4SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMMENTARY 000G4UL 3 678910 13 14 15 16 17 4 11 18 5 12 19 26 25 24 23 22 28 21 20 27 MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Sunday Saturday 2 1Columbus Day Halloween30 31 29National Boss Day Sweetest Day 000G9RJOct 6 Oct 31 10:00 am Nature Coast EMS Stocking Up For Seniors Various locations in the county We will collect items such as blankets, socks, bath sets, personal hygene items, etc. for our low income seniors. Will be working with the county for the recipients. Collection sites throughout October. Already set for two of the Walmart locations and waiting on the third. Possibly WXOF/WXCV to be a drop off as well. The Chronicle will be a drop off.Contact Phone: 352-249-4730 Oct 6 1:30PM-4PM Citrus Jazz Society Open Jam Session Catholic Charities Citrus Com. Outreach Ctr. Fee: $7 Open jam session. The Jam session features local and visiting musicians playing old favorites, jazz, swing and Dixieland for your listening and dancing pleasure. Musicians interested in playing are encouraged to call Tony Caruso at 942-9399 or Roy Hoskins at 352-382-1875. Bring your own refreshments.Contact Phone: 382-1875Oct 6 Citrus Sertoma Oktoberfest North of Crystal River Mall Authentic German Food, Live Music With Deleons, 50/50 Prizes.For More Information Call 628-7519Oct 6 4:00 pm Light Shine, Inc. Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Highway, Lecanto Free The Light Shine Series Is A Humanities And Music Appreciation Enrichment Program For All Citizens Of Citrus County.Contact Phone: 527-0052Oct 6 7:00 am 19th Annual Rails to Trails Bike Ride Location: Withlacoochee State Trail Fee: $25/adults, $15/riders 12 and under The Rails to Trails of the Withlacoochee Citizens Support Organization is hosting its 19th annual ride on the Withlacoochee State Trail. Registration pick up is from 79 am the day of the ride. Riders can choose to ride whatever distance they wish to ride and whatever time of day they wish to ride. RTW CSO provides a T-shirt, breakfast, lunch and snacks and drinks at 6 SAG stops along the way until approximately 4 pm. Walk ups are accepted on the day of the ride, but not guaranteed a T-shirt or prizes. 100 mile riders will receive a certificate upon completion.Oct 10 3:30PM-7PM E-Nini Hassee Annual Spaghetti Dinner7027 E Stage Coach Trail, Floral City $8 donation Eckerd E-Nini-Hassee, a not for profit organization for at risk girls. Annual spaghetti dinner includes salsa, bread, spaghetti (with assorted home made sauces), dessert and drink.Call 726-3883 For More Information.

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DEAR BRUCE: Before her death, my mother-in-law set up a trust for all three of her grandchildren. She passed away in 1993. This trust was to ensure that her grandchildren would attend college. When my son turned 18 years old, he contacted the attorney who handled the trust. The attorney informed him that the executer of the will, my mother-in-laws daughter, had the trust dissolved and gave the monies to my sons father (who is not in his life at all). He is not a very nice person. According to the attorney, the executer of the will did this just to be away from my sons father. Does this sound right to you? Why would you have a trust if someone can just come in and change things to suit themselves? Is there anything my son can do to get this back? Where should we start? S.M., via email DEAR S.M.: Whether or not it was legally proper to dissolve the trust is something to question. I assume that it was. Since the money was then given to the father to do as he chose, the likelihood is that the money is long gone. I think its a matter of the trust not being set up appropriately. It gave your former sister-in-law broad powers and she exercised them using poor judgment, but nonetheless, probably legally. BUSINESSSection DSUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE BUSINESS BRIEFS Bruce WilliamsSMART MONEY From wire reports M ONDA YWASHINGTON Federal Reserve releases consumer credit data for August, 3 p.m.. BRUSSELS Officials from the U.S. and the European Union are starting a second, weeklong negotiation round on the planned free trade agreement between the two economic giants. The talks in Brussels will focus on harmonizing regulations one of the many issues to tackle in view of concluding a deal, possibly within a year or so, that would strengthen trade and boost gross domestic product on both sides of the Atlantic. T UESDA YBERLIN Economy Ministry releases August industrial orders figures for Germany, Europes biggest economy. Federal Statistical Office releases export and import data for August. US housing rebound likely to handle spike in rates Associated PressLOS ANGELES When mortgage rates began climbing in May from rockbottom lows, Kevin Williams worried he might miss out on an opportunity. So he listed his home in Orange County, Calif., and planned to buy a bigger house in San Diego after it sold. The process took all summer. Last week, he and his wife locked in a mortgage. The extra time added at least $1,000 more a year than if they had secured a loan in May. Still, Williams believes they made a prudent decision. I dont know what rates are going to be in four years, he said. I felt I had to act now before I was priced out. Williams justification buy now or risk paying more later is why many brokers and analysts remain confident that the housing recovery can handle higher mortgage rates. While the jump in rates should test the strength of the recovery, analysts foresee stable sales increases over the next year for a number of reasons. Fall is typically a sleepy time for sales and nationally signed contracts are starting to decline. Yet several brokers say buyer traffic remains strong in key markets like Los Angeles, the Washington metro area, Silicon Valley and Boston. Home prices have been rising at the fastest pace since 2006, helping Americans regain wealth they lost during the Oil rises upwards of $104 on Gulf storm NEW YORK The price of crude rose to near $104 a barrel Friday as offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico braced for Tropical Storm Karen. Investors were also keeping a watch on developments in Washington, D.C., as the partial shutdown of the U.S. government entered a fourth day. Benchmark oil for November delivery rose 53 cents to close at $103.84 on the New York Mercantile Exchange. For the week oil rose 97 cents, snapping a three-week losing streak that knocked $7.66, or 7 percent, off the price of a barrel. Drivers are already seeing relief at the pump. The nationwide average price for a gallon of gas is now $3.37, down 22 cents from a month ago and 41 cents cheaper than at this time last year. Brent, the benchmark for crudes, gained 46 cents to $109.46 on the ICE Futures exchange in London. Impasse keeps world markets in check LONDON Uncertainty about how long the partial shutdown of the U.S. government will last kept investors on edge Friday, though the prevailing view in markets is that Congress will be able to reach a deal to keep the worlds largest economy from defaulting on its debts. In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading British shares rose 0.1 percent to close at 6,453.88 while Germanys DAX rose 0.3 percent to 8,622.97. The CAC-40 in France gained 0.9 percent to 4,164.25. Earlier in Asia, Japans Nikkei index fell 0.9 percent to 14,024.31 while Hong Kongs Hang Seng lost 0.3 percent to 23,138.54. South Koreas Kospi fell 0.1 percent to 1,996.98.Navigating cancers financial burdens The cost of dealing with breast cancer for Citrus County residents takes on two dimensions. Patients face direct costs dealing with the medical side. These begin with cancer screening and diagnoses and continue through treatment. They can affect the patient, insurance companies, public and private health care providers and related nonprofit organizations. The other cost dimension includes all nonmedical costs precipitated by the cancer. This a wide range of expenses affecting patients, their families and social service agencies. 2010 article in The Breast, a medical journal focusing on the advancement of breast cancer prevention and therapy, addressed the cost of breast cancer. It suggested there are numerous indirect costs, which are much more difficult to quantify than the direct medical costs. These indirect costs can include travel and transportation for treatment, home health care assistance, time away from work for the patient and family members, career adjustments, child care, special diets, wigs, clothing, home modifications, hospice care and funeral costs. It can also include out-ofpocket treatment costs and over-the-counter medications not covered by insurance.Medical costsFigures from the National Cancer Institute project the national cost of medical Pat Faherty Staff writer See CANCER/ Page D2 See MONEY/ Page D2 See SPIKE/ Page D2 Grandkids education trust ended prematurely

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D2SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEBUSINESS expenditures for breast cancer are projected to reach at least $20.5 billion (2010 dollars) by the year 2020. Breast cancer has the highest future cost projection of the 17 cancer categories rated. For 2010, medical costs associated with breast cancer were projected at $16.5 billion, about 13 percent of total cancer medical costs. The rising costs of cancer care illustrate how important it is for us to advance the science of cancer prevention and treatment to ensure that were using the most effective approaches, said Robert Croyle, National Cancer Institute NCI), when the figures were released. This is especially important for elderly cancer patients with other complex health problems. The cost of cancer care is ranked by phases with continuing care being the most expensive, followed by the initial stage of treatment. Numerous annual care cost estimates have been done using NCI data Medicare figures and health insurance claims. Health care costs in women with metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy as their principal treatment averaged $128,556, according to a report in BMC Cancer 2011 based on health insurance data. Using NCI data, the estimated annual cost would be $19 million in Citrus County for 2006 to 2010. Outpatient services accounted for 29 percent of total breast cancer patient costs, followed by medication other than chemotherapy, (26 percent), chemotherapy (25 percent), and inpatient care, (20 percent). Indirect costsIn addition to the medical costs such screening, prescriptions and hospital/doctor visits, breast cancer patients and their families face an array of related, often unexpected costs. There are indirect costs with all cancers, but more so with breast cancer, according to Russell Silverman with the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. He said insurance may not pay for a double prosthesis, and the cost of clothing and maintaining an appearance can become an ongoing issue. He also cited transportation costs, especially in a rural area like Citrus County, if patents have to travel regularly to Tampa or Gainesville. Under financial guidance for patients in treatment, the American Cancer Society includes expenses for babysitting, cooking, cleaning and professional fees such lawyers and financial planners. The society recommends developing an overall financial plan to cover medical costs and other expenses. According to the above mentioned article in The Breast, these indirect costs are more difficult to quantify. As a result, the true cost of breast cancer as a topic is often avoided. The NIH concurs that out-of-pocket costs are rarely considered but can present a significant burden. Nonmedical direct out-of-pocket costs ranged from $137 to $174 per month in the year post-diagnosis; and $200$509 per month one year or more after diagnosis, according to a review in 2011. Researchers found that to meet these costs; and families often make sacrifices in the form of abandoning, changing, or cutting back projects or other activities of family members, using savings and retirement funds, with possible tax penalties or selling off assets. Other indirect costs are related to the side effects of treatment and inability to resume previous parenting duties, workload or other activities. Silverman said that is especially true after radiation or chemotherapy. Tara Anderson, manager of patient access for Citrus Memorial Health System, said they provide screening and application assistance for Medicaid eligibility, the disability process and hospital-based charity care. They can also provide information to patients regarding options for assistance from various groups/organizations and/or programs throughout the county. She said they are trying to refer patients to the appropriate resources that may be available to assist them with their needs.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicleonline.com. CANCERContinued from Page D1 Registered agents: Its the law Every business, large or small, should have a registered agent. If your business is a corporation, its the law: Your corporation must have one registered agents, which are also called resident agents or statutory agents. The name choice varies by state. The agent can be a person or another entity, such as a corporation that will perform the service. All states require the identity and location of the registered agent to be present on various documents that are public record. For most states, registered agents are listed in the Articles of Incorporation. This law applies also to nonprofit corporations. Their tax-exempt status does not relieve them of this requirement. Best advice: If you dont have an agent, find one and publish the name in the correct record. Purpose of an agent The purpose of a registered agent is to provide a street address, not a post office box. This location is where important notices can be sent and received. If a business is perceived to have harmed a person, place or another corporation, the state in which the business resides must be able to locate a responsible person or business organization that may have caused harm. A registered agent provides a physical location where a person or other organization is available during normal business hours to receive legal service of process for lawsuits and other legal notices such as court summonses. Agents are also the recipients of official state government documents such as tax notices, annual report forms, etc. An agent bears the responsibility to notify the business owner of receipt of any and all notices. In todays complicated business environment, its often difficult for an owner to keep track of all the administrative/legal notices. This is what agents are for. Unincorporated businesses If a business is not incorporated, such as a sole proprietorship or unincorporated partnership, there is no legal requirement to have a registered agent. However, in the absence of a registered agent, a process server will deliver a summons or lawsuit directly to the owners/partners homes. The existence of a registered agent eliminates this unfortunate event. In many jurisdictions, a process server is often a sheriffs deputy in uniform. An unwelcome visitor delivering a lawsuit during a family gathering or neighborhood barbecue is definitely unwelcome and awkward. Its even more disturbing when employees are present. People who are witness to such visits may form negative perceptions. Penalties when no agent exists Not having a registered agent can lead to the revocation of a business entitys corporate status. Once corporate standing is gone, so are the legal protections granted to shareholders, officers and directors of the corporation. In many cases, large financial penalties follow. Advantages of the third-party agent Third parties designated as registered agents for a business offer many advantages. Here are some of the more important ones: n Registered agents provide a public record of legal address of a business n Naming a registered agent allows the business to change addresses in its state without the costs of required documents. n Business owners can travel without worry they might miss filing a required document on time. n Agents usually act as compliance managers and keep the business in good standing with the state in which they are located. n When a process server delivers a lawsuit, it is presented to the agent at the address of the registered agent. Customers and/or employees will not witness this event. The best location of a registered agent is at a different address from the business. Ask SCORE: Citrus Countys SCORE chapter is located on the campus of the College of Central Florida. Office hours at 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday. During non-business hours, call 352-249-1236. Please leave information as to how we can reach you.Dr. Frederick J. Herzog, PhD LLC is the immediate past president/chairman of Citrus County SCORE. He can be reached at fherzog@ tampabay.rr.com. Dr Frederick Herzog, PhDEXPERIENCE MATTERS housing crisis. Many would-be sellers have been waiting out the downturn and could put their houses on the market in the next year. That should ease supply constraints, one of the biggest obstacles for sales over the past year. Financing a home is still more affordable than in decades past. The average rate on a 30-year mortgage remains a bargain at below 5 percent, and many buyers sense it wont stay that low for long. Theres also pent-up demand. A growing number of people are moving out from group homes or with relatives to form their own households, according to U.S. Census data. Sales typically increase when households grow. Its the demographics that make a strong housing recovery pretty much a sure thing, said Patrick Newport, a housing economist at HIS Global Insight. SPIKEContinued from Page D1 Whether you can bring action against her for an improper or unwise decision is another matter. You should inquire of the attorney exactly why she was allowed to close out the trust and give the monies as she did to your former husband. If that was legally appropriate, I would put it behind me and get on with my life. DEAR BRUCE: I want to purchase a new car, but I am confused about who to purchase it from. I see all the commercials offering cash back, gas cards, low interest rates, etc. How do I choose which company to buy from? I will be financing. Reader, via email DEAR READER: You ask an interesting question and one that has no simple answer. You see all the commercials offering cash back, etc., but depend on one thing: They are all going to make money on the transaction with you. In more cases than not, accepting the lower or no interest for the entire length of the loan is the best choice, but unless you take a close look at all the different offers being made, you will never know if you are getting the best possible deal. DEAR BRUCE: Is it possible to transfer funds from one money market fund to another without paying tax on that amount? I should tell you it is a traditional IRA. R.A., via email DEAR R.A.: We are making a couple of assumptions here. If the money is in a money market account and its already in an IRA, which is protected until such time as money is withdrawn, I am certain you can have it transferred from one money market account to another. Unless its a huge amount of money, in which case there would be a minor amount of tax. I am also assuming you are having a broker handle the transfer. Be certain to explain to him your concerns on tax matters and ask what the best way is to accomplish the transfer. Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. MONEYContinued from Page D1 Log on today 000G9F6 000G9F6 chronicleonline.com your news. anywhere. anytime. BREAKING NEWS 000G9F6

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013Chamber Connection 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801D3 Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce. Chamber events & member newsOct. 7 The Citrus County Water and Wastewater Authority will meet on Monday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto. Agenda items for discussion at this meeting include consideration of a preliminary order of the Water and Wastewater Authority recommending that the board grant issue of water utility franchise for Pinewood Water System. Oct. 8 Arbor Trail Rehab will host a blood drive with LifeSouthCommuntiy Blood Centers, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. Oct. 10 and Oct. 22 Free workshop to discover sources of landscape pollution and fertilizer-application dos and donts. Also learn creative options for reducing runoff and increasing natural filtration, such as rain gardens, bio-swales, rain barrels and shaping topography. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Citrus County Extension Building, 3650 W. Sovereign Path in Lecanto. To register for this event call Steven Davis at 352-527-5708. Oct. 11 Florida Artists Gallery Second Friday Dinner and Lecture Series Myrna Bradshaw presents A Photographic Journey through Glacier Bay National Park, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Historic Knight House, 8219 Orange Ave., Floral City. Call 352-344-9300 for reservations. Oct. 12 Diva Night presented by the Citrus County Chronicle 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Plantation Inn of Crystal River. More information at www.chronicleonline.com/divanight/ Oct. 12 Scarecrow Festival at the Shoppes of Heritage Village. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with an old-fashioned childrens style carnival with games, pony rides, hayrides, pumpkin patch and more. Located at 657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Call 352-564-1400. Oct. 12 Citrus County Parks and Recreation present the inaugural Par 4 Programs Golf Tournament, Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club, 7:30 a.m. visit www.citruscountyparks.com or call 352-527-7540. Oct. 12 Vessel Safety Check provided by the Crystal River Power Squadron (CRSPS), free event is 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Fort Island Trail Boat Ramp. 352-795-4412. Oct. 15 Affordable Housing Advisory Committee to meet at 5 p.m. in the Lecanto Government Building to discuss Hardest Hit, SHIP CDBG, NSP 1 & 3, Section 8, Shelter Plus Care, and Emergency Solutions Grant, among other items. Oct. 15 United Way volunteer site training from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Oct. 18 Fly Fishing Expo at the Plantation on Crystal River, featuring Chico Fernandez and Flip Pallot. $10 for both days (kids under 16 free). Clinics and workshops with IFFF-certified instructors; fly tying demos and workshops; daily free programs and seminars w/national fly fishing experts; raffles, silent auctions and live auctions. Call 352-795-1605 for more information. Oct. 19 Village Crier Shop Local Expo, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Oct. 19 Bird Walk on Pepper Creek Trail, participants meet at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park Visitors Center. Binoculars and field guides are recommended; free event. To register, call 352-628-5343 ext. 1002. Oct. 19 Americas Boating Course provided by the Crystal River Power Squadron, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River; call 3652-795-4412 Oct. 19 Halloween Scramble for Hospice, golf and prizes, starts at 12 p.m., Citrus Hills Golf Club 509 E. Hartford Street, Hernando. Call 352-527-2020. Oct. 22 2013 Small Business Resource Fair, a one-stop shop resource fair providing technical, financial, procurement, networking and other business support services at Southeastern Livestock Pavillion Auditorium, 2232 N.E. Jacksonville Road, Ocala. Register online at sbdc.unf.edu or call 352-622-8763 Oct. 24-26 Crazy on Country Fall Festival at Rock Crusher Canyon RV Park, 237 S. Rock Crusher Road, Crystal River. Doors open at 5 p.m. Proceeds benefit Save Crystal River. Call 352-564-9350 or visit CrazyonCountry.com. Dragon Boat Festival issues call for teams The Crystal River Power Squadron has been serving the Crystal River boating community since 1963. Its mission is to educate to increase boating safety. The Squadron has taught hundreds of students over the years with various courses on seamanship, piloting, celestial navigation and weather. The members provide free vessel safety checks to ensure proper safety equipment. The Squadron is also active in the Adopt-a-Shore program, Water Cleanup Week, Safe Boating Week, the annual Blessing of the Fleet and many more boating activities. The public is encouraged to participate in any events hosted by the Squadron. Member Spotlight: Crystal River Power Squadron 845 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River |www.usps.org/localusps/crystalriver |352-212-3946 The inaugural Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Race is set for Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Lake Hernando Park, 3699 E. Orange Drive, Hernando. Each team that registers will race a minimum of three times per day. Corporate teams will be on a 300-meter course and the Club teams will be racing on 100-, 300and 500-meter courses. Eligible teams may enter into race the 2,000-meter around the island course. Registration is open through Nov. 8 by calling 813426-3544. Your teams registration includes one practice. All of the necessary equipment will be supplied to your team, including a boat, life vests, paddles and a steersperson/ coach. Your team must supply the paddlers (at least eight paddlers must be women) and the drummer (drummer need not be present at the practice). Practices will be scheduled in the week leading up to the event. Registration and payment must be completed to be eligible to schedule your teams practice. Cost for a club or community team is $500; cost for a corporate team is $1,000. For more information or to register, call 813-426-3544, email christine@ highfivedragonboats.com or visit www.lakehernandodragonboat.com. Hydrocephalus Foundation celebrates ribbon-cutting Ambassadors on hand for Crystal River Metal Recycling ribbon-cutting Chamber ambassadors Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; and Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union, join the Economic Development Councils Ardath Prendergast in welcoming the Hydrocephalus Foundations Reyna Bell, Manuel A. Cacdac, M.D., and Fe Cacdac, M.D. 352-682-8523 HydrocephalusFoundation.org.phThe Hydrocephalus Foundation provides medical attention and financial to support to children with this condition. Workforce Connection is hosting its annual fall job fair Wednesday, Nov. 6, and is accepting business participants who are recruiting employees in Citrus County. Businesses interested in participating in this annual job fair should call 352637-2223 ext. 3206 or ext. 1270. It will be held at the College of Central Florida, Lecanto campus Learning and Conference Center, 3800 S. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto. Workforce ConnectionFL.com for more information. Is your business looking for talent? Crystal River Metal Recycling |4320 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461 |352-527-9599 |Crystal River Metal Recycling is a full-service metal recycling firm offering container services. Chamber ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Centers of Citrus County; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union; and Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers, welcome Joseph Hambsch, Eric Hambsch, Mark Jones, Rob Negron, Gayle Jones, Matt Thomas and Robert Hall.

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D4SUNDAY,OCTOBER6,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.com To place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time637549 MEDICALOFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)528-5547 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS130 MPH 25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors, 1 Entry door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab. $13,995. INST ALLED 30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch) 2-9 x 7 Garage Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $15,995. INST ALLED 40x40x12 (3:12 pitch) Roof w/Overhang, 2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors 1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents 4 Concrete Slab $27,995 Installed A local Fl. Manufact. We custom buildWe are the factory Meets & exceeds 2010 Fl. wind codes. Florida Stamped engineered drawings All major credit cards accepted METAL Structures, LLC866-624-9100Lic # CBC1256991 State Certified Building Contractor www. metal structur esllc.com Solar Pool Cover 2 pieces, 10x37 with expand reel to 16 ft. Very good cond. $150 obo(352) 746-7036 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 DRYER Whirlpool Dryer about 12 years old 100.00 352-302-8925 Duet Washer & Dryer Fridgidare, include pedestals color light blue, give away. $700. (352) 270-4571 JUICE EXTRACTOR CUISINART Unused powerful 10 watts/runs quiet Only $99. 352-621-0175 KITCHENAID STAND MIXER Kitchenaid Artisan mixer white used twice ex cond $100.00 352-249-7212 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 STOVE FLATTOP HOTPOINT BISQUE COLOR, GOOD CONDITION $100.00 352-422-3118 Used Maytag Washer & GE Dryer $75. for Both (352) 382-1830 Washer & Dryer, Kenmore, large capacity good shape $200. 432-640-9195 Whirlpool Washing Machine about about 12 years old. 100.00 352-302-8925 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 10 3 13 Estate Auction Outside 3pm Patio & home furniture, Generator, Lawn tractor, SS Grill set, Tools, household, new items Sunday 10 6 13 Antique & Collectibles, 1pm Listed art, Sterling, Estate jewelry, Coins, Gold label Barbies, Military items, pocket watches, primitives, Cherry & Maple furniture, crocks, WONDERFUL items! Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 Generator, Coleman Power mate 5000, Never used, Only Test run $300. (352) 746-0100 THE TOWN OF INGLISis now accepting applications for a 40 hour Maintenance II position in the Public Works Department. All Applicants must have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Equivalent, a valid Fl Drivers license with a Class A CDL Endorsement, (3) years related work experience in Plumbing, Electrical (building) and Building Maintenance. Applications will be accepted until Friday October 11th, 2013 at 12:00 Noon and may be picked up at the Inglis Town Hall 135 Hwy 40 West, Inglis, Florida. Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M to 12:00 P.M./ 1:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M. E.O.E. Military Preference: Veterans are encouraged to apply THE TOWN OF INGLISis now accepting applications for a 40 hour Maintenance II position in the Public Works Department. All Applicants must have a High School Diploma or G.E.D. Equivalent, a valid Fl Drivers license with a Class A CDL Endorsement, (3) years related work experience in Landscaping, Mowing and Mower Maintenance, Ground Care, Trash Pick-up & Power Washing. All Applications will be accepted until Friday October 11th, 2013 at 12:00 Noon and may be picked up at the Inglis Town Hall 135 Hwy 40 West, Inglis, Florida. Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M to 12:00 P.M./ 1:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M. E.O.E. Military Preference: Veterans are encouraged to apply Warehouse/ Counter Pos.FT position. Counter sales & warehouse stocking. Plumbing & comp knowledge a +. 401K & Insurance Apply in person @: Morgan Bros. Supply 7559 W. Gulf to Lake Crystal River/ or email mbscr@hotmail.com BABY SITTERFor School pickup and drop off only. $75 Week Call (352) 270-5441 P/T Truck Driver/HelperMoving Experience Heavy Lifting, Neat appearance (352)522-0945 PART TIME LIFEGUARDAnnouncement # 13-56 Part time position (25 hours weekly). Skilled duties lifeguarding at Bicentennial Park Pool and Central Ridge Pool. May guard for swim lessons, birthday parties and special events. WE WILL NOT TRAIN: Must possess and maintain current Red Cross Lifeguard, First Aid and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer certifications. Must possess a valid Florida Driver License. Flexible schedule. $10.29 hourly. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, FL 34461 to apply online. This position is open until filled. EOE/ADA. AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approvedAviation MaintenanceTechnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CallAIM 866-314-3769 MotivatedSalespersonSome Sales Exp. Preferred-please Call Advanced Aluminum at (352) 628-7519 TELEMARKETERSExp. Only. Write your own Paycheck, Call Brandon 503-6807 AC SERVICE TECH/INSTALLERSTop Pay, Benefits, Sign on bonus. 40+ Hrs. must have EPA Cert. & Dri. Lic. Call (352) 628-5700 Cabinet Installer HelperApply in Person 780 N Enterprise Pt Lecanto 352-746-0020 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 LAMINATORExperienced in Mica/Wood Veneers No tobacco products, Val. Fl. Dr. Lic Apply atBuilt-Rite, 438 E. Hwy 40, Inglis, Now Hiring: OTR Class A CDL DriversNew Pay Package and $1500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Call today for details 1-888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net PROGRAM ASSISTANTAnnouncement # 13-55 Responsible work determining eligibility for energy and/or housing assistance under federal, state and local programs. Some experience in social service intake, interviewing and/or counseling. Must successfully pass a level II background check. Starting pay $11.09 hourly. Excellent benefits. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED ONLINE: Visit our website at www. bocc.citrus.fl.us You can also visit one of the local Libraries or the Human Resources Department, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 178, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 to apply online by Friday, October 11, 2013 EOE/ADA. STEELCUTTER / WELDERInter County Recycling in Lecanto, Fl. is looking for an experienced Steel Cutter, with Welding Exp. also. Full time, Pays $13.50 per hour. Drug Free Workplace. E-mail resumes to Resume1801@ yahoo.com, No walk-ins or phone calls Driver/ WarehouseImmediate hire, delivery/warehouse. 7:30am-3pm weekdays. Clean driving record only. Golden X. 726-9349 FLOOR TECHNICIANNow accepting applications for a full-time Floor Technician. Must have experience with use of machinery for buffing, stripping, waxing, etc of all types of flooring. Apply in person at: 611 Turner Camp Rd, Inverness Email Resume: ATHRC@SouthernLTC.com Fax resume: 352-637-1921 An EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D Housekeepering/ Locker Room Attendant and Laundry Person PT or FTFor Upscale Golf & Country Club, Male or Female Apply in Person @ 2125 W. Skyview Crossing Hernando PT Certified DentalAssistantCall 352-746-0330 Ask for Vicki RN/PRNEndoscopy ASC, Weekdays Fax Resume to: 352-563-2961 SURGICAL TECHfor ASC located in Citrus County. Must be certified or eligible. Flexible scheduling-excellent pay. FULL OR POOL POSITIONS. No weekends or call. Fax Resume to: 352-527-1827 -an equal opportunity college-College of Central Florida Director of Grants FundingTo oversee the Colleges grant development and grants management programs from development of project concepts through formal application, project start-up and progress reporting to project close-out. Bachelors degree required; Master Degree preferred. Four years of successful experience in grants development and management required. Grants Administration preferred. Close date is 10/14/13. Please submit a copy of transcripts indicating the degree conferred with the electronic application. Education must be from a regionally accredited institution. How to Apply Go to www.CF.edu, click on Quick Links then Employment at CF. Submit electronic application, pool authorization card and unofficial transcripts online. Email copy of transcripts to hr@CF.edu or fax to 352-873-5885. 3001 SW College Road, Ocala, FL 34474 CF is an Equal Opportunity Employer ATTENTIONLooking for RepresentativesTo assist Medicare Recipients w/ enrolling For Medicare Part D, Medicare Advantage Programs & Medicare Supplements/ Will be placed In Local Pharmacies to Assist w/these programs No exp. Necessary Will provide Training Call 352-726-7722 CDSThe following position is available in Citrus County. Healthy Families of Florida Support Worker Requir ements: High School Diploma and one year experience working with children or families Apply: www. DiscoverCDS. org EOE/AA/DFWP REAL ESTATE AGENTFor Property Management FAX: Resume to 352-795-1667 CALL: 352-302-8088 email: action.rental @yahoo.com walk-ins are welcome Action Rental Management Realty BARTENDERApply In Person THE DAM PUB 7p-9p, Mon.-Fri Sales Personlocal manufacturer looking for a motivated, retired sales person to work on commission only sales. 20% on gross sales, avg sale over 2k, email resume to: trina@SRproducts inc.com F/T MEDICAL ASSISTANTNeed motivated, detail oriented team player for a busy medical office. medical experience required. Knowledge of scripts helpful. Competitive wages & Benefits. Email resume to: lecantojobapps@ yahoo.com FRONT DESKF/T position for a busy dental office. Dental Exp a must. Fax or email resume: 352-795-1637 lynn.swanson@rswan sondental.com HIRING: RN, Psych RN, LPN, Phys. Ther.Florida Homecar e Specialist Call (352) 794-6097 For an interview. MedicalAssist. front and backFax Resume to: 352-465-3733 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 RN/LPN NursingJoin our team. FT 3-11 Exc. Benefits Apply ARBOR TRAIL REHAB 611 Turner Camp Rd Inverness, FL Or send to: atdon@ southernLTC.comAn EEO/AA Employer M/F/V/D FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered 352 897 5001 NEED 60K INVESTER LOAN 6% SECURED BY200K PROPERTY INTERSETONLY 352-528-2950 J/D Ride Needed to Doctors Appointments Etectera (352) 527-2852 HAIR STYLISTFull time /Part time CallSue 352-628-0630 to apply in person Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 DENTAL RECEPTIONIST & SURGICAL ASSISTPart time or Full time For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Adult Siamese Male Cat Grey, yellow eyes Old Beverly Hills appears desperate for home. (352) 746-1904 Found Young Female Blue point Siamese Kitten, off Oaklawn, In Homosassa (352) 628-6695 Male Choc Brown Dobie Mix, speckled feet. Found in Floral City 9/29 on Old Jones Rd off of Stage Coach (352) 637-0736 Special Occasion? Weddings, memorials, card clubs, banquets. If you need spaceHernando VFW can seat 100+ Call Dan (352) 726-3339 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath Starting at $1,690 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 $$ CASH PAID $$FOR JUNK VEHICLES 352-634-5389 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 19 Sanyo TV w/seperate VHS Player, like new Floral City area, pick up 352-344-5255 Free Kittens Calico, Gray, and Gray Tabby 8 wks old, litter trained 352-212-0667 Lots of Free Wood in Kindling Must be picked up by Friday or Sunday Call (352) 436-5166 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 Black/White Great Dane Puppy male, lost in the vicinity of Citrus Springs. childrens pet REWARD (352) 897-4642 or 352-396-7458 Female Husky & German Shepherd, med size. Lost in Citrus Springs 10/3 (352) 586-5559 LOSTBeagle-North Lee Street Beverly Hills Male,Tri Colored, 40 lbs, very sweet. Lost 9/8/13 This is a special needs pet. Please call if you have seen him. Please if you have information call 352-249-3107. Lost Rottweiler in Green Acres Area (352) 464-0871 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Todays New Ads FORD2007 Explorer Sport Trac XLT, Blue, bge lthr. int, tow pack, 68K miles, just serv, $15,900 obo (352) 897-4204 HONDA, Goldwing, 59k mi, very clean, always garaged. $10,550. 352-344-5177 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Lawn Tractors & Metals, 352-270-4087

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SUNDAY,OCTOBER6,2013D 5 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000FG53 CLEANING KNOCK OUT CLEANING SERVICELicensed, Insured, Workers Comp. Pressure Washing Too352-942-6876Call Today for a Clean Tomorrow000G4QIRESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, VACATION RENTALS & CONSTRUCTION CLEAN-UP DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-566-6615Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000G4Y7 000G7RHwww.eliteroofing-inc.com713 N.E. 5th St. Crystal River, FL 34429(352) 639-1024LICENSED & INSURED ROOFING Excellence in Roofing Quality Honesty Reasonable Prices $100 OFF ANY REROOFNot to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 11/1/13LIC#CC1327656 0 0 0 G 7 R R TREE SERVICE3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding 55 Bucket TruckC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES FREE ESTIMA TES 000G8E6 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed 000G9NF PET/HOUSESITTINGBONDED & INSURED(352)270-4672Kathleen M. Daceykatskritterkare@yahoo.com Training AvailableAll Kritters Big or SmallRelax while youre away knowing your pets are OK at home safe in their own beds One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000G67F 000GA TVLa w n Spri nkler Not W orki ng?Well Fix It $10 Off with ad 746-4451 2013 2013 IRRIGATION Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK ATA FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000G9JX Copes Pool & Pavers 000FGCQ METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 000G82K6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FLELECTRICAL Lighting Fixtures Fans Ballast New Outlets Panel Upgrades 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a WeekIndependently owned & operated. Lic #EC13003381 insured &bonded Generators Install, Service & Repair Whole House Surge ProtectorsSAME DAY SERVICEat no extra cost 352-364-4610 Services from A-Z Licensed/Insured 25 Yrs. Experience 746-2445 FREE ESTIMATESSpecializing in: Aluminum Rescreen Work, Storm Doors, Garage Screen Doors, Window Screens, Gutters, Vinyl Soffit, Porch Ceilings, Pressure Washing, Int./Ext. Painting, Regrout Ceramic Tiles, Grout Sealing, Vinyl Tile Installation, Rotten Wood Repairs... You Name it I probably do it! HANDYMAN Complete Handyman Services000G8YZ ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 000FV68 Stand Alone Generator 000G8AD WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill Bruce Onoday & Son Free Estimates Trim & Removal 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 Stump Grinding Local, Call Robert 352-302-2220 StumpGrinding cheap avg cost $25-18stump volume disc. over 5 call Rich 352-586-7178 Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 352-344-2696 Lic/ins. ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 Need a JOB? www.chronicleonline.com ClassifiedsEmployment source is... ELITE ROOFING Excellence in Roofing! EliteRoofing Inc.com Lic# Ccc1327656 /Ins. ***352-639-1024*** MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers!Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business. The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Floors /walls. Tubs to shower conv. No job too big or small. Ph: 352-613-TILE /lic# 2441 Home Maintenance Repairs/Painting/Power Washing, Quality work at affordable prices Ref avail 573-723-2881 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Renovation/Remodel Kit/Ba/RE listings Lic/Ins. Crc 1327710 Sterling 352220-3844 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job Call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 Johns Painting & Wallpapering Lic/Ins. FreeEst. **352-201-9568** Painting & Wallpaper Removal, Husband & Wife Team. Excel Ref. Free Est. 352-726-4135 Bay Leak Detection for all Pools & Spas Lic#G13000070891 Ins. 352-433-6070 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 CHISELED PERSONALTRAINING! Want to get in shape. Dont know how? MONEYBACK GUARANTEE! Call, or find us on Facebook! (352)469-6110 facebook.com/Chisele dPersonalTraining All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 All Major Credit Cards Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services for over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal Lic. 352-584-5374 Lawncare-N-More Friendly Family Services f or over 21 yrs. 352-726-9570 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 AFaux Line, LLC Paint, pres-wash, stains 20yrs exp, Cust. Satisfaction Lic/Ins 247-5971 *ABC PAINTING* 30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS for an EXCELLENT job call Dale and Sons 352-586-8129 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 Mr & Mrs FIX IT (For Seniors) LIC& INS Home&Yard/In&Out Low Senior $ 613-2643 Pressure Washing, Painting, Lawn Maintenance and Mobile Repair. Lic# 39477 (352) 464-3748 Comfort Works, Inc. Air Conditioning and Heating Service Res//Com352 400-8361 Mention this ad and get a service call for $19. Exp 9/30/13 Lic# CAC1817447 Anns Cleaning Service 352-601-3174 CLEANING BY PENNY Residential Only Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. Call 352-476-3820 Home/Office Cleaning Catered to your needs, reliable & exper., lic./ins. Bonded 352-345-9329 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs! Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 M & W INTERIORS Your Dry Wall & Home Handyman, Slick finish expert, popcorn removal water & termite damage (352)537-4144 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 BRIGHT ELECTRICAL Res./Comm. Lic & Ins. $5O.hr. EC0001303 352-302-2366 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 BILL TRIPP FENCE All Types of Fence Lic/Ins. (352) 369-0096 (352) 425-4365 FALL SPECIAL Seasoned 4x8 stack. Delivered & Stacked $70 (352) 637-6641 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 ASSISTED LIVINGPrivate Room & Bath St arting at $1,690. 344-5555, ext 101 Lic #AL10580 Help Wanted,,,,,experienced CNAs please call 352-560-7876 Transportation for appt Shopping & Errands. Will stay with you or help do errands. Ref. /Ins. (352) 613-0078 SHADYVIEW CANVAS Awnings *Carports*Boat Tops & Covers upholst 352 613-2518 JEFFS CLEANUP/HAULING Clean outs/ Dump Runs Brush Removal. Lic. 352-584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 TYLER MOUNTAIN GUITAR excellent shape, used very little. $100 352-382-4727 MICROWAVE Kenmore, white, 1000 watts, great condition 352-628-7449 $35.00 Air Bike 950 Like New $35. ExerciseAB Lounge Spout, with manuals $35. (352) 621-0778 Elliptical ProLine $75 Call 352-697-2195 INVERSION TABLE Like New $75 Call 352-697-2195 PROFORM TREADMILL Space saver $200.00 352-302-8925 Weslo Eliptical Brand New $120. obo (352) 746-1606 lv. msg Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ-GO Golf Cart new uphol. good tires & batteries, lights, horn & storage comp $945.(352) 201-6111 Golf Cartexc. condition, has headlights exc. batteries w/ charger $1500. (352) 527-3125 Gun Cabinet for six guns, wood, with glass in door, accessory storage, $75. (352) 564-9336 RAYS GUN SHOP Stokes Flea Mkt Cry.Riv Mossberg 715T22-AR $295. NRA-concealed classes 586-7516 BLOOD SUGAR KIT Bayer, new, with strips and case, ($5) 352-613-7493 Mr. Mobility Lift Chair Large Size, gently used, brown tweed Excellent Cond. Asking $300. (352) 628-5991 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR SOLID SITKA SPRUCE TOP(RARE), WITH GIGBAG $100 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR W/ GIGBAG, STRAP,TUNER, STRINGS&PICKS $75 352-601-6625 NEW OSCAR SCHMIDTACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR W/GIGBAG&CORD,HI&LO W Z INPUTS $150 352-601-6625 CHURCH BAND? NEW PURE WHITE ACOUSTIC GUITAR FISHERS OF MEN $100 352-601-6625 ELECTRIC GUITAR, AMPLIFIER,AND TUNER, excellent condition, $95, (Dunnellon) (352) 465-1813 LES PAULSTYLE ELECTRIC GUITAR PLAYSAND SOUNDS LIKE IT SHOULD,$50 352-601-6625 PIANO LESSONS Study Piano w/ Rick D Beginner to Advanced All styles 352-344-5131 SCOOTER, DESTIN, 150CC With windshield and two helmets, 2700 miles. Garage kept. Excellent condition, $1000. Call 352-344-1787 Scrap Metal$50. obo (352) 419-5503 Sewing Machine Singer, cabinet style w/ chair $75. (352) 564-9336 SHUTTERS Pair of Wood Shutters w/moveable Slats 62 H x 26 W Ex. Condt. $100.00 352-746-5421 SHUTTERS Pair of Wooden Shutters with moveable wooden Slats 20 x 18 $40.00 Ex. Condt. 352-746-5421 Singer Sewing Mach. Slantomatic 401 1959 w/ cabinet, $100 Roman Chairs,$25. Drk. wood, blk leather Unitque 352-628-3100 SINGER Sewing Machine with wanut cabinet. Very good condition. $65 obo (352) 382-1352 SPEAKERS 2 Optimus Speakers, 5 inch, 70 Watts, 8 Ohms $30.00 352-746-5421 TOASTER OVEN, COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $20 352-613-0529 TRUCK WINDOW GMC rear-solid Factory tint $30.00 352-628-4210 TUB HANDRAIL Medline Deluxe Tub Safety Handrail $20.00 352-628-4210 Used Shed8 x 12 Barn Style $850. (352) 860-0111 YAMAHASPEAKERS 5 2 16 140 WATTS 2 9 60 watts & 1 5 80 wattsALL$90 352-613-0529 Two Copy Printers $25 to $75 352-634-4329 BLACK & DECKER WORKMATE 425-folds for storage, Ex., $50. 352-628-0033 CHARCOALGRILL 18.5 ON WHEELS WITH COVER $20 352-613-0529 CHILDRENS HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 1 CLOWN SIZE 7/8 & 1 LION size 5/6 $8 each 352-613-0529 Craft Items $300 value for $150. assorted 352-746-4613 DOG CRATES BLACK WIRE (2) 24L18W 20H Excellent $20. ea 352-621-0175 DOG KENNELSOFT SIDE up to 70# pet Folds flat & Washable Excellent $15. 352-621-0175 DOG PET STEPS Plastic with white fleece cover. Collapsible Small/med pet $18. 352-621-0175 DOMINOES nice complete professional set with case, ($5) 352-613-7493 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP Fresh15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crab@$6.00lb delivered352-897-5001 Masterbuilt Smoker, new in box, never used. $250 firm 3 Burner Charcoil Broil Grill, SS top, w/ side burner & tank $85 (352) 897-4681 Nu Wave Cook Top As seen on TV. BOGO Still in box $50 25 Gal. Upright Compressor $60 (352) 621-0176 Pair Wooden Shutters with Moveable Slats 23 x 18 $50.00 Ex. Condt. 352-746-5421 PICTURE FRAMES large nice 3 wood, 1 metal, ($5) 352-613-7493 QUEEN COMFORTER w/shams,skirt,3-38X81drapes; 60valance;2 pillows; dark red print. $50 352-382-4727 RECORDER Pansonic Camcorder with Case $100.00 352-746-5421 BOOTS ladies size 7 tan work like, size 7 1/2 black dress, nice, ($10) 352-613-7493 BOYS WINTER CLOTHING SIZE 5/6 4 pants 8 shirts & 2 lightweight jackets $45 352-613-0529 CONCERTSHIRTnew Taylor Swift, Red tour with wristband, ($10) 352-613-7493 GENUINE LEATHER JACKETBeige,fur collar,size 42.Waist length.Like new.$50 352-746-4160 Girls winter clothing 4 jeans 1 pants 5 shirts 2 pajama sets & 2 hoodies sizes vary $60 352-613-0529 JEANS embroidered, size 10 ladies,1 roses, 1 daises,new, both for ($20) 352-613-7493 MOTHER OF THE BRIDE DRESS WITH JACKET Designer label; Floor-length; navy blue with swarovski crystals; Originally $1200; worn once, mint condition. Size 20/22. $600 352-465-4860 4 WHEELWALKERseat, hand brakes & wheel locks, folds for storage, Ex. $45. 352-628-0033 6 FT. DAVIDSONALUMINUM STEPLADDER-model 527-06, Excellent condition, $30. 352-628-0033 20 Chairs for Daycare $80.00 BabyAccessories $120.00 (352) 795-7254 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BIRD CAGE FOR MEDIUM BIRD 18x18x36H. Sits on stand. $45.00 Located in Floral City. Call 239 404 8589 SQUARE GLASS TOP/METALBASE COFFEETABLE Was $800. Sell for $75 Crystal River 228-4648 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 LAWN MOWER Craftman Push Mower $75.00 352-422-3118 LAWN SPREADER SCOTTS MEDIUM SIZE $20 352-613-0529 TROY BUILT Riding Mower 42 inch cut $475 (352) 897-4681 Will haul away unwanted riding lawn mowers for FREE in Inverness area. 726-7362 DUDLEYS AUCTION Thursday 10 3 13 Estate Auction Outside 3pm Patio & home furniture, Generator, Lawn tractor, SS Grill set, Tools, household, new items Sunday 10 6 13 Antique & Collectibles, 1pm Listed art, Sterling, Estate jewelry, Coins, Gold label Barbies, Military items, pocket watches, primitives, Cherry & Maple furniture, crocks, WONDERFUL items! Call or web for info Dudleys Auction 352-637-9588 www.dudleys auction.com 10%BP Au2267 MARTINS ESTATE SALES Buyn Quality Fur nitur e From Non Smoking Homes. 352-209-4945 CHINACABINETGreat Cond.2 glass doors 3 drawers 2 cabinets. $90.00 Firm 352-302-7214 COFFEETABLE Solid oak measures 25w X 40 long with 2 doors for storage. $100 352-382-4727 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 Din. Rm. Set, Broyhill, Table 4 padded chairs, black lacquer w/ side table MUST SEE $250. (352) 465-2237 Dinette Table 42 ,8 sided w/12 leaf 4 chairs, padded, on wheels. $175. (352) 746-9076 Dinning Room Set $200. obo Server $150. obo Both Dark wood Excellent condition 352-586-3380 ENDTABLES 2 matching wicker end tables, coffee table $45.00 352-628-7449 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER WHITE WASH WOOD 60 x 49 $100.00 352-422-3118 KITCHEN SET 4 padded chairs on casters. Glass top, white base. $200 (352) 465-2237 LOVE SEATReal Leather, not Bonded Black Leather Love Seat $100.00 352-746-5421 MATTRESS & BOX SPRING QUEEN WITH FRAME $50.00 352-422-3118 Settee, 46W hardwood w/ pecan finish $50. 1 Counter Stool, chrome, swivel seat w/ back $25. (352) 564-9336 Wicker Patio Set 2 chairs, cushions, ottoman & glass top table $175. obo Leather wing back chair burgundy $175. obo, Excel. cond. 352-586-3380 2 Patio Lounge Chairs & Cushions $25. ea Glass toptable & 2 chair $50 (352) 621-0778 1 Full Size Bed w/ Mattress, spring, head/foot board $75 Patio Table, Nice, new $75 No calls before 11am (352) 628-4766 2 Recliners, good cond. $100 Call 352-697-2195 3 RATTAN BAR STOOLS Beautiful rattan back and seat with metal legs.$75 for all. Crystal River 228-4648 4 white book cases on wheels $150. 2 red V shaped tables from daycare $50. (352) 795-7254 8 Wrought iron chairs & formica top table, 46x76. Excellent condition, $125 Call 352-697-2195 74 Wicker Sofa with flower design, mauve, green & beige, matching 48 oval coffee table, & 24 round end tbl. w/ glass tops $300. 228-4279 BARSTOOLsolid wood, tall, spinning, great shape, ($10) 352-613-7493 Brand New Queen Size Pillow Top Mattress Set $150. Still in original Plastic. (352) 484-4772 Breakfast Table $100 w/ benches, unique top inlaid w/tile, Wooden Rocker $50. From Cracker Barrell (352) 628-3100 Cherry Pub Style Dining Room Set glass top, 4 chairs $200. obo (352) 503-9043 Power Boss Generator Briggs & straton 10HP eng. Running watts 5250, starting watts 7350 excel. cond. Starts easily. $275. (908) 616-0620 Homosassa CASSETTE DECK Double Deck Cassette Player with Remote $40.00 352-746-5421 KARAOKE MACHINE WITH CD PLAYER $90 352-613-0529 SANYO 20 TV Great picture and sound quality Excellent condition. $35. 352-621-0175 TELEVISON RCA52in Console, Exc Condition $50 (352) 897-4681 100AMPBOX 100 Amp Box NEW in box. $65.00 352-249-7212 GARAGE DOOR 7/16 ft. with Geniepro motor. Door and motor are 12 years old. 500.00 352-302-8925 SHOPLIGHTgreat shape with 11 good T40 flourescant bulbs ($10) 352-212-1596 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 HP 15.4, LAPTOP DVD writer, $180 DELL DESK TOP P4, HT Lcd monitor, DVD + RW $150 352-628-6806 PLAYER RECORDER DVD and Video with remote $30.00 352-628-4210 VIDEO CASSETTE PLAYERAC/DC for RV.2way power. Symphonic.$50 352-746-4160

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D6SUNDAY,OCTOBER6,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 368-1006 SUCRN Fictitious Name Notice Public Notice Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Rays Auto Repairs located at 6028 Cardinal St, Homosassa, Florida 34446, in the County of Citrus, intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED at Inverness, Florida this 2nd day of October, 2013. /s/ Raymond L. Murray, Owner, Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, October 6, 2013. 369-1006 SUCRN 10/10 Meeting CCAAB PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 10, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461. Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446. JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes) Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312. Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, October 6, 2013. 367-1013 SUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT The Petitioner, Scott Crowe, on behalf of Razhiel Crowe, hereby give notice of their intention to petition the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners to vacate a portion of that certain plat of Laurel Ridge Number One, as described in Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. BY: /s/ Scott Crowe Petitioner EXHIBIT A 10 easement located on the rear of Lot 51, Block 6, of Laurel Ridge Number One, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 15, Pages 13 through 23, inclusive, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida. October 6 & 13, 2013. 0 0 0 8 X H J For more information on how to reach Citrus County readers call 352-563-5592. FORD2007 Explorer Sport Trac XLT, Blue, bge lthr. int, tow pack, 68K miles, just serv, $15,900 obo (352) 897-4204 CHEVROLET2001, Blazer, 2 door, LS, 1 owner $3,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2007, Escape, XLS $7,950. 352-341-0018 FORD, Explorer XLT, V6, A/C, great engine, trans., tires & extras. $1,700., 352-697-1932 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 JEEP2003, Wrangler, 4 cyc., 5 speed, soft top, $9,950 352-341-0018 JEEP04, Wrangler, Sport 4.0 liter,auto trans, exc. cond. many extras, call for details! $13,500. 352-563-6666 Chevrolet2000 Express$1000.00 (352) 400-4437 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment DODGE03, Grand Caravan Fully loaded, dual sliding drs. 35mpg, V6, Perf. cond., garaged New tires, Crystal Riv. $5,800. (727) 207-1619 HONDA2008 Odyssey $15K. 73K mi. Original Owner. Great condition. Deluxe EXLpackage-many extras. Metalic Slate Green-i.e. gray-metalic. Leather, Moon Roof, Satellite Radio, Backup Camera, Power Seats, Power Sliding Doors, 3rd Row Seat. New brake pads. 352-527-9196 Harley Davidson1998 XL Sportster, 1200 custom, 95th anniversary Edition, Garaged, runs great, show room cond., many extras, 14K miles, $4,300 (352) 212-2554. Harley DavidsonRoad King, 2006 1450cc,32k,exc.cond. asking $12,500. (352) 503-7057 HONDA, Goldwing, 59k mi, very clean, always garaged. $10,550 352-344-5177 HONDA1985 Shadow 500 CC good condition asking $1200.00 352-637-3254 HONDA2007 VTX 1300C Original owner, purchased brand new, low mileage (2,371 miles). Caf windshield, removable saddlebags, light-bar. Black & chrome. Showroom condition (mint). Asking a firm $5,050.00 Please contact owner\seller via Email: selfor@aol.com Phone: (352)382-4422 HONDA98 Shadow Aero VT 1100, Exc.cond, Wh walls, retro look, 18k. mi $3200 352-465-7812 KAWASAKI, KLR 650 Endoro, 15k miles, runs great, 1 owner, call for details $2,500. (352) 344-1223 YAMAHA1985 Virago, 1000 cc, runs good. $1,200 or best offer (352) 201-5104 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 MAZDA2005 Mazda 6, 5-speed, 4-door, one owner, great condition, 142,000 miles $3,000. 352-860-2146 NISSAN2010Altima SL,38,500 miles, sunroof, leather, Champaign, loaded. Garaged, mint. 30+mpg. $16,500. 352-382-0005 SATURN1999, S11, 4 door, low miles, extra clean, 1 owner $3,250. 352-341-0018 TOYOTA, Avalon, Limited 49k mi., excell shape, garage kept. $15,500 Call (352) 634-0101 AUTO SWAP/ CORRAL CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. OCT 6th. 1-800-438-8559 CORVETTE1999 Coup, Silver w/ Black, 6 spd, loaded, extras, 14k mi, $25,000 (352) 513-4427 FORD2000, Mustang Convertible, auto, V6, ice cold air $4,550 obo, or trade?(352) 287-1530 FORDRat Rod Projects, 46 Ford PU Roadster. 78 Merc Cgr XR7 Must Sell Inglis 352-949-7874 PLYMOUTH, GTX Blue, 440 eng., all original, great cond. $32,000 obo 352-302-8265 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2001 S-10 LS, 4 Cyl, 5 spd, air, 44K mi, mint cond. New tires, N/S $7500 (813) 410-6976 FORD2000 Ranger XLT, ext cab, 85k miles, auto, hard conneau cover, great cond $5,200. 1727-505-6277 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB SV 20122012 Frontier CC SV: This white Nissan Frontier Crew Cab SV is in excellent condition with only 8,500 miles. It has cruise control, power windows/door locks/outside mirrors. It has a factory installed bed liner and I added a vinyl tri-fold bed cover and trailer hitch.The truck is in perfect condition with a full factory warranty.The asking price is $21,900. Phone: 352-601-1319 SWEETWATER1991, 15 ft., Pontoon seats 8, 35HP, trailer, excellent cond. $3,250 476-1113, 513-5135 ALLEGRO BAY, M37 Motor Home 35k mi. good cond. Needs minor fixes, $12,000 obo, Trade for Harley? 352-274-8664 SUNNYBROOK, 28 FT., 5th wheel Alumalite, loaded w/ upgrades & options $11,500 352-344-5177 TIFFIN, Allegro, Class A, 30 ft., 2 slides, jacks, generator, new awning, 32k mi., 50 amp service $32,500, Call to learn all that goes with it 352-527-2327 COLEMANPop Up Camper, sleeps 6, rennovated Good cond. new tires $2,500 obo, 726-5936 KEYSTONESpringdale 2005 Model 298-BHL super slide out, awning, tandem axle, coupling hitch anti sway bars, 30 amp hkup. Asking $9,500 or will consider shallow water boat as trade, (352) 503-9133 before 9pm MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. NA TURE COAST R V RV service, parts, sales Mobile Repair/Maint. 352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. Travel Trailer2011, 20 Rockwood MiniLite, Self Contained. Pwr. Slide out. Ex. Cond. $13,500 obo(352) 527-0081 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 Taurus MetalRecycling Best Prices for your cars or trucks also biggest U-Pull-It with thousands of vehicles offering lowest price for parts 352-637-2100 BIG SALE Come make offers RENT-BUY-SELL CAR-TRUCK-BOAT CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 & US 44, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK REGAL2001 LS, leather Inter. very good cond., 6 cyl. 82k mi. One owner. $4,100 352-746-6708 CADILLAC2004 Esclade EXT 1 owner, fully loaded, dealrshp main,113k mi $13,500. 510-867-5727 CHEVROLET2007 Colbalt LT 4door, power windows, locks, $3,495 352-341-0018 SHIH-TZU PUPS, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors Ask about my Summer Discount, Beverly Hills, FL (352) 270-8827 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** Alumacraft14 ft w/ trailer and extras $400 (352) 637-5032 BAY KATAluminum outboard, 28 ft, includes trailer & outboard mtr. 90HP $9,500. (352) 238-4445 KEY WEST, Center Console, 90HP Yamaha 2 stroke garmin, gauges, bate well alum. trailer Pristine Cond. $9,500 (352) 746-5658 KEYWEST2013 Skiff 17 Key West Skiff,Yamaha 70 4stroke,Trolling Motor,Jack Plate, GPS, AlumTrailer. Warranties transferrable $19,000 352 503-6668 Sea Eagle2.5 power, 4stroke ouboard & inflatable Suzuki, $1100. for both (352) 425-7020 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com COCKER SPANIELS 4 Males, 2 Females w/ papers. 8 weeks old Blonde & white $800 (352) 287-0519 LILLYLilly, a 6-y.o. female bulldog mix, white w/black ears, beautiful, friendly girl, weighs 36 lbs. Heartworm-negative & housebrkn. She loves treats & sits on command, came to the shelter as a stray. Very affectionate, wants to be by your side. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 Shih Poo Puppies, 3 males, 2 females Yorkshire Puppies 1 Male $300 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings SPARTACUS10-month-old terrier mix, brown & cream in color, very playful, loves to fetch ball & return it to you, weight 47 lbs, is Heartworm-negative. Dog-friendly & has easy-going attitude. Good family pet. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Birds for Sale Blue Front amazons, $300 ea. Indian Ring Necks, $100. ea. Cherry head & cuban conures, $175 ea. Nandays $150 ea. Quakers $75 ea. Fisher Love Birds $35. ea. 352-637-6967 Doberman Puppies3 Males $500. ea Parents on premises 352-586-3386 DOJHADojha, approx. 3 y.o., a yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, came to shelter because family lost their home & could not keep him. Gentle, easy-going, gets along w/other dogs, beautiful in color, great shape. Pen #25. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Dorkie Poos 2 males, 2 females, silver dapple, brown dapple, fur balls .First shots $300 (352) 464-2382 HAVANESE PUPPIES 9 wks. Champ. Bld. Lines, Non Shedding 3 males, black & white, shots, Wormed $650. OBO, 613-5818 Urban Suburban Hair StudiowelcomesKATIE FLYERSpecialty: Up-dos, Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting. Paul Mitchell certified. Stop in and say hello! Call to make your reservation today. 352-637-0777 826 S US Hwy 41 From Cutting Edge to Care Free DOJHADojha, a 5-y.o. yellow/white lab retriever mix, medium size, calm, gentle & easy-going, gets along w/other dogs. Housebrkn. Beautiful & in great shape, wants to sit by your side. Came to shelter because family lost their home. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 TOWBAR: Roadmaster 5000 Stainless Steel Towbar. Universal fit. One (1) person operation. NEW $600....asking $300 or first best offer !!! 352-426-4563 Robin LongUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Foils, Color, Perms, Cutting, Styling and Razor Cuts Redken Educator and trained 20+ years experience. Wed-Sat 9a-4p by appointment SQUARE TWO LADIES GOLF CLUB FULL SET W/ BAG & COVERS $650, Ladies golf bag, brand new $90 (352) 897-4681 NEW HITCH CARGO CARRIER 20X60 will fit 1 1/4 to 2 in hitch, payed 130.00, will sell for 75.00 352-795-3920 COSTUME JEWELRY5 nice necklaces, 3 nice watches, 1 pair earings ($15) 352-613-7493 NECKLACE new stainless heavy duty biker style, engravable heart, paid $150, ($35) 352-613-7493 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 D7 000GAGZ *Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. **Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pic tures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 10/31/13. NICK NICHOLAS USED CAR SUPER CENTER Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371 Crystal River Nick Nicholas S.R. 44 Crystal River Mall U.S. 19 U.S. 98 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Visit Us Online www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com Anna Cruz Salesperson of the Month 2010 HONDA ODYSSEY 29,000 miles, leather, moon roof. $22,950 2007 LINCOLN MKX Moon roof, navication, AWD. $20,950 2008 FORD MUSTANG CONV. 6 cyl., auto, 1 owner, leather. $17,950 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS Leather. $14,950 2007 KIA SPORTAGE LX Auto, Keyless Entry. $11,950 2005 FORD F150 V8, Auto, Flareside. $8,950 2010 FORD FOCUS SES Leather, one owner. $13,950 2012 CHEVY MLIBU LT Sunroof, leather. $16,950 2006 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED Auto, low miles. $19,950 2011 FORD EDGE LIMITED Warranty. $24,950 2006 KIA SENODA LX 3rd Seat, Auto. $6,950 2004 JEEP LIBERTY One owner, monroof, leather. $7,950 2011 FORD FOCUS Economy Car. $12,950 2006 FORD TAURUS Clean. $6,950 2012 FORD ESCAPE 5 speed, std trans, 1 owner. $14,950 2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT Leather, 3rd row seating. $31,950 2011 FORD FOCUS $15,950 2010 FORD FOCUS SE 10,000 miles, one owner. $13,950 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 2011 FORD FUSION 4 cyl., 21,000 miles. $17,950 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 30,000 Miles. $16,950 2013 FORD MUSTANG GT 3,000 miles, 1 owner, leather $33,950 2011 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER Leather, only 8,000 miles. $19,950 2010 FORD TAURUS LTD Leather, moon roof, 1 owner. $22,950 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT 10,000 miles, leather, 1 owner. $23,950 2011 FORD EDGE LTD Leather, moon roof,20 wheels. $25,950 2009 LINCOLN MKS Leather, 1 owner moon roof, ultimate pkg. $24,950 2010 LINCOLN MKX Leather, moon roof, ultimate pkg. $26,950 2012 FORD F150 CREW CAB 4X4 XLT 5.4L, chrome package. $31,950 1. 9 % Relax, Its Covered. 172-point inspection by Ford factory-trained technicians 7-year/100,000-mile Ford Powertrain Warranty Coverage** 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Limited Warranty Coverage** Formerly Gulf Coast Ford Nothing OUT-WORKS AN F-SERIES Nothing OUT-SELLS AN F-SERIES APR for 60 months MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,595 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -600 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . . . -500 $21,495 NEW 2013 F150 XL $21,690 MSRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,340 Nick Nicholas Discount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -900 Retail Customer Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -1,750 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash** . . . . . . . . . -1,000 NEW 2014 ESCAPE S G4T036 G3T157 *Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit financing. 60 months at $17.48 per month per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. Take delivery from dealer stock by 9/30/13. See dealer for qualificati ons and complete details. **See your dealer for limited-warranty coverage details. Vehicles available varies by dealership.

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D8SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000GAZ4

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E16SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000G9JK 1645 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Email: info@citruscountycentury21.com www.citruscountycentury21.com SALES 352-726-6668 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPEN SUNDAY SERVING CITRUS COUNTY FOR OVER 37 YEARS. HOW MUCH IS YOUR HOME WORTH? Call T oday For A F ree Market Analysis! BANK APPROVED SHORT SALE 3 bdrm. plus den/2 bath pool home with 2000+ sq. ft. of living space on 1/2+ acre lot in Foxwood. City water. Great location close to everything! MLS #701023 ASKING $110,0000 Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072 (cell) 726-6668 (office) Foxwood Estates, 1/2 acre 3BR, 2 bath, split plan Nicely maintained, great neighborhood! MLS #357210 $90,000 www.citruscountysold.com Jeanne & Willard Pickrel 212-3410 GOLF COURSE LOT,EL DIABLO .37 Ac, surveyed, flat, surrounded by nice homes, enjoy one of the best golf courses, and best value in entire state, features dramatic elevation, fairways carved through pine forest, lots of bunkers. MLS #705228 PRICED TO SELL $22,900 Call Nilda Cano 352-270-0202 3BR, 3 bath, pool home Fenced backyard Storage shed FAMILY ROOM MLS #701422 $200,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.citruscountysold.com WELCOME HOME!! Rustic & cozy 2/1 canal front with dock on acre (mol) homesite. Spacious living room plus screen room overlooking backyard, canal & dock. RV pad with full water, sewer & elect. Hookups. 10x36 wood deck faces front yard. Home in move-in condition. Just minutes from town with low county taxes. MLS #705850 ASKING $88,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listing on line: www.c21patdavis.com GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY This home bring the outdoors in. Immaculate 2/2/2 split plan. 2 master suites. Great room, formal dining. Beautiful views from every room. Very open and inviting. Nice office and spacious utility/laundry room. Perfect for fisherman/golfer. Short cart ride to clubhouse and course. Spotless and move-in ready. MLS #705498 ASKING $158,900 Pat Davis (352) 212-7280 View listings: www.c21patdavis.com NICE PRICE REDUCTION ON INVERNESS MOBILE HOME! 2/1 Single Wide Open Kitchen New Flooring Private Backyard Screened Porch Carport ONLY $19,900 Call Elias G. Kirallah for more information 352-400-2635 GETTING BACK TO NATURE! ONE ACRE LOT, WITH ANOTHER NEXT DOOR FOR SALE SEPARATELY.OPEN SPACES. Charming home. Two bedroom, two baths. Family room with fireplace. Wood deck in back to watch wild life. Newer roof & A/C. City water and irrigation well. MLS #704096 GREAT BUY AT $124,900 Call Doris Miner @ 352-422-4627 LOVELY! 2BR, 2 bath 1716 Sq. Ft. LA, A/C Fla Rm. Perfectly maintained, all newer appliances Newer A/C, newer roo f. Beautiful Quiet and convenient, negotiable MLS #703457 $110,000 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-3410 www.citruscountysold.com PRICED T O SELL This 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car gar age home in Inv erness city limits needs TL C. This one will not las t! MLS #7 057 14 $5 9,900 Call LaWanda Wa tt 352-21 2-1989 THIS BEAUTIFUL 3 BDRM, 2 BA TH, 2 CAR GAR. AND CAGED INGROUND POOL New roof in 2 01 2. Close to 19, community has golf course, Gr eat schools and many mor e amenities, too numerous to mention. $1 25,000 Call Martha Snyder 352-47 6-87 27 ask for file #70 5660 A MUST SEE BEAUTIFUL, TRADIT ONAL HOME SITUA TED IN TOWN ON 1 .41 ACRE HOMESITE. 3/2.5/2+ FEA TURES gr eat room with fir eplace, large sunny Fla. room, updated kitchen with st ainless and granite. F ormal dining room p lus nook for casual dining. W rap around porch. Finished at tic offe rs lots of storage or potential for extr a room. 1 0 foot ceilings. Spacious master with jet ted tub & shower 5 minu tes to shopping, downtown, hospit al. MLS #7 047 72 ASKING $228,900 Pa t Da vis 352-21 2-7280 See all listings: www.c21pa tdavis.com OPEN WA TERFRONT 3/2/2 W ith caged, inground pool/spa. Golf course community Easy cart ride to clubhouse. Ceiling to floor window s in LR provide panoramic lak efront views. Ov ersized caged lanai featuring heated pool & spa provide a pe rfect ente rt ainment area. C ove red boathouse and full prope rty length seaw all comple te this per fect F lorida-living picture. MLS #7 03689 ASKING $188,900 P at D avis 3 52-21 2-7280 View lis ting at: www.c2 1patda vis.com BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY HOME! 2 01 0 built -Inve rness see this before you buy anything else! Three bedroom, fiv e bathrooms and two car gar age home with all the upgrades! Gorgeous kitchen w ood cabinets, gr anite, upgraded app liances.Tile flooring private baths in bedrooms, separ ate office/den and adjacent prope rty av ailable! MLS #7 057 27 $2 19,000 Call today for sho wing Mary Parsons 352-634-12 73 3 BED/2.5 BA TH/1 CAR GARA GE Maste r, living, dining kitchen, porch is downstairs. 2 bedrooms, guest bath, lof t & storage upst airs. Needs a lit tle TLC to mak e it great Maintenance fr ee living, pool, & dock on Lit tle Lake Hende rson mak es life sweet MLS #7 05682 $105,000 Call Stefan Stuart 352-21 2-021 1 COMMER CIAL BUILDING Curr ently used as an attorneys of fice, has 2 of fices, a confer ence room, reception ar ea, kitchen and w aiting area, amp le parking and is located only 2 blocks from Citrus Memorial Hospit al. MLS # 3497 88 ASKING $98,1 90 Call Jim Morton 422-21 73 to see this prime location KENSING TON 4 BED, 3 B ATH! Ov er 1 acr e featuring a new kitchen & gr anite tops. Open floor plan and huge backy ard. ONL Y $16 2,000 Call Quade F eeser 352-302-7 699 Heathe rw ood 4BR, 2 bath MH 2 sheds MLS #7 0491 2 $7 9,700 Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 2 12-34 10 www .citruscounty sold.com DUNNELLON Mobile home. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, large carpor t. Beau tiful natural set ting on 1.16 acr es plus inground pool and pole barn on cement slab. Fruit tr ees and mature oak trees. House featur es w ood-burning fireplace and island kitchen. MLS #7 051 98 $54,000 Da vid Kurtz 954-383-87 86 OFF: 352-726-6668 BEAUTIFULLY MAINT AINED 2 bedroom, 2 bath villa in exclusive F ox Hollow Village with a 2 car gar age. Community pool and clubhouse and this villa has w alk-in closets, inside laundr y and lov ely dining area of f the kitchen which are only a few of it amenities. L ocated in an enforced deed restrictions subdivision for your enjoyment MLS #7 01 362 $140,000 Call Jim Morton a t 422-21 73 to view this meticulously kept home REDUCED 5 ACRES PINE RIDGE JUST LISTED SHORT SALE WINDERME RE POOL! Beau tiful 5 bedroom, 3 bath. This home has it all, living and family rooms, one ac re, golf car t garage, L ocated near Inve rness Golf and Countr y Club. $25 9,900 Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7 699 REDUCED O VER $20,0 00 W ATERFRONT REDU CED $11,000 NEW LISTING HOMEFRONT Section ESUNDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLEREALESTATEGUIDE INSIDESikorskis AtticPAGE E6 ON THE COVER:FAUX ELEMENTS, E8HOME AND GARDEN:SYCAMORE, E3REAL ESTATE:SEE COMPLETE LISTINGS A Fypon faux medallion in a residential home. Adding architectural and decorative elements such as faux wood beams, medallions and molding can enhance otherwise simple rooms.Associated Press

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Theres also pent-up demand. A growing number of people are moving out from group homes or with relatives to form their own households, according to U.S. Census data. Sales typically increase when households grow. Its the demographics that make a strong housing recovery pretty much a sure thing, said Patrick Newport, a housing economist at HIS Global Insight. Newport expects sales will rise 10 percent this year to 5.14 million. After that, he predicts an 8 percent gain next year to roughly 5.55 million and a 4.5 percent rise in 2015 to 5.8 million. All are relatively healthy levels. The last time sales exceeded 5 million was in 2007, when the housing bubble burst. From 2008 through 2012, sales averaged 4.3 million a year. The average rate on a 30-year fixed loan this week was 4.22 percent, according to Freddie Mac. Thats above the average of 3.35 percent reached in May. But its far below the average rate of 7 percent since 1985, according to Bankrate.com data. Rates tend to rise when the economy is strengthening. More jobs and better pay would likely boost home sales. Still, the increase in rates has added thousands of dollars to the cost of a financing a home. Thats happened at a time when wages have barely kept pace with inflation and unemployment is a still-high 7.3 percent. And theres some concern that the government shutdown could delay the processing of some home loans, particularly those backed by the Federal Housing Administration. Buyers who could get loans in June and July moved swiftly to lock in the lower rates. Completed sales of previously occupied homes rose in August to a six-year high, according to the National Association of Realtors. But fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in August. It typically takes a month or two for buyers to close on a house after locking in rates and signing a contract. Some analysts predict sales are cooling off this fall. I am concerned because prices are rising and higher rates squeeze your limits, said Brian Guzman, a broker at Coldwell Banker in Chicago who mostly caters to first-time buyers. Many buyers are carefully watching the change in mortgage rates. Jeff Tyni and his wife are still shopping for a home in Orange County, Calif., and would like to buy soon. But if rates go much higher, they may continue renting. I would say 5 percent is the tipping point, Tyni said. If I have to pay over 5 percent, Ill just wait. The Federal Reserve is also paying close attention to the spike in mortgage rates. It was a big reason the Fed opted last month not to slow its $85-billiona-month in bond purchases, which are intended to keep longerterm interest rates low. Rates began to increase in May after Chairman Ben Bernanke signaled the Fed might reduce those purchases, if the economy strengthened. But the Fed held off last month, and since then mortgage rates have fallen for three straight weeks. Even small fluctuations in rates can translate into added costs or savings. In the case of the Williamses, it was a little of both. The couple will close this month on a four-bedroom home. They secured a $607,000 mortgage in late September at 4.125 percent, a quarter-percentage point higher than what they were quoted in late May. Thats $88 more a month, or $31,504 over 30 years. Kevin Williams says it could have been worse. In early September, he was quoted a rate of 4.375 percent, which would have added another $89 each month. Still, they are buying in San Diego, one of the nations priciest real estate markets. The added financing costs convinced the couple to buy a smaller house. Essentially, we ended up giving up an extra bedroom, said Williams. Home sales typically drop off in the fall because many buyers want their children enrolled in school when they move. Yet some brokers are still seeing steady demand. Completed home sales at Century 21 Redwood Realty in Ashburn, Va. about 30 miles outside of Washington, D.C. are up 65 percent from a year ago, said Edward Berenbaum, co-owner of the brokerage. And attendance at open houses remains high. If you have a desirable listing that is priced where the market is, youre not going to be on the market for too many weekends, Berenbaum said.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013E15 E2SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HOUSINGContinued from Page E6 Rates began to increase in May after Chairman Ben Bernanke signaled the Fed might reduce those purchases, if the economy strengthened. But the Fed held off last month, and since then mortgage rates have fallen for three straight weeks. SO YOU KNOW News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event.During the busy season, expect notes to run no more than twice. Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River or by e-mail to newsdesk@chronicle online.com. 2421 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills 527-7842 8375 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 628-7800 1101 U.S. Hwy. 41 N., Inverness 637-6200 504 NE Hwy. 19, Crystal River 795-2441 www. REMAX .com www.NatureCoastRealEstate.com 000G9JJ ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com E-MAIL: kellyg@remax.net 1 Buyer calls exclusive 24/7 Info Line 637-2828 2 Buyer enters house number when prompted 3 Buyer listens to property presentation in English or Spanish 24/7 INFO LINE 637-2828 HERES HOW: REALTY ONE CLOSE TO PARK!! Located in Nice Area Shopping Close 2/2/2 Split Plan Great Kitchen Enclosed Florida Room Bright Interior Centrally Located Peaceful Yard ON THE LAKE!! 2/2 Mobile Very Well-Kept Home Beautiful Views Has a Dock/Seawall FL Rm. + Outdoor Patio Inside Laundry On a Cul-De-Sac Close to Everything ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR AGENT Email: elliesutton@remax.net www.FloridaListingInfo.com Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR AWARD-WINNING REALTOR CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM (352) 637-6200 Email: kcunningham@remax.net YOU DESERVE THE BEST! Relaxing Large Tropical Pool/Spa Beautiful Kit. w/Lots of Cabinets Family RM/GR/DR Open/Bright Layout In Suite Apartment w/Bath 4-Car Gar. PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: team@citrusrealty.com SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 Email: sherylpotts@aol.com Website: www.CrystalRiverLiving.com JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821 Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenpalmer@remax.net RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663 www.ronmcevoy.remax.com Certified Distressed Property Expert TONY VIGGIANO (352) 586-5772 TonyViggiano@gmail.com Tony Viggiano.com 3/2/2 GASP ARILLA CAY ALL ON ONE FL OOR Located on a cul-de-sac, this home has a lovely side yard. It features an open, light bright floor plan, Florida room, screened porch with view of the river, expanded dock. Great for full-time or get away. 9224 N. EUB ANKS TERR. Bamm!!! Large 5/3 pool home situated on almost 5 acres!! Needs some fixing, but priced well!! Come make me a home again. Interior features large open split plan, wood burning fireplace, recent upgrades throughout. Exterior boast large wooded lot, circular driveway, brick pavers cover pool deck around large swimming pool. SKYLINE DOUBLEWIDE ON 4 1/2 ACRES 3 BR, 2 BATH W/DEN Carport 1993 Built Workshop/Outbuildings Huge Kitchen w/Island Gas Fireplace Updated HVAC Updated 40 Yr. Shingles WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER 262 N. HUDSON ST. Waterfront 2BR/2BA/2CG Enclosed 10 x 23 Sunroom Great Dock for Fishing Deep Water w/Access to Gulf Well-Maintained 6 LONGLEAF CT., HOMOSASSA SUGARMILL WOODS 4/3/2 HOME IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. UPDATES GALORE INCLUDING AN UPDATED KITCHEN & UPDATED BATHROOMS. HOME FEATURES SOLAR HEATED POOL WITH LARGE POOL DECK. THIS IS A MUST SEE HOME. DIR : US Hwy.19 (Suncoast Blvd.) to Cypress Blvd W., to right on Pine Street, to right on Longleaf Ct. OPEN WATER VIEW! 3 Bedroom/2 Bath/2-Car Garage Open Floor Plan New Floors 10 x 36 Screened Lanai Thermal Pane Windows 1/2 Acre Lot Beautifully Move-In Ready! No Flood Zone! INVERNESS HIGHLANDS 2/1.5/2 Beautiful well-maintained home. New roof (2007), new drain field (2006), new steel front door (2011), new A/C unit (2008.) Brand new carpet throughout home. Really is a must see!!! (352) 637-2828 Enter house #5008 MLS ##700154 $395,000 $395,000 $395,000 ACREAGE BUTTONBUSH (352) 637-2828 Enter house #955 MLS #704993 $65,900 $65,900 $65,900 GOT A KAYAK? (352) 637-2828 Enter house #3691 MLS #704619 $56,900 $56,900 $56,900 $285,000 $285,000 $285,000 PETER & MARVIA KOROL (352) 527-7842 (352) 422-3875 4749 N. PERRY DR. PINE RIDGE 3BD/2BA/2CG w/ POOL Private 1.5 Acre Lot Many Upgrades, Granite Roof (2008), A/C (2010) Solar-Heated POOL Fully-Fenced Pastures MLS #703529 $239,900 $239,900 $239,900 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #4749 8350 W. APPLESEED TER., DUNNELLON BD/2BA 1991 Doublewide On 2.63 Pretty Acres L arge Screened Porch 24x12 Shed/ W orkshop Several Updates Recently Worth A Look If You Desire Country Life Away F rom t he Maddening Crowd MLS #705678 $44,600 $44,600 $44,600 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #8350 $139,900 $139,900 $139,900 OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME MLS #705563 $109,900 $109,900 $109,900 HOMOSASSA 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #6175 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 MLS #703757 REDUCED 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #262 OPEN HOUSE T ODA Y 11-2PM $219,900 $219,900 $219,900 MLS #704250 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net 3/2 1700+ SQ FT. MOBILE on pretty 4+ acres in Cryst al River. T ons of space for your family. F ully-fenced & electric gated corner lot + cross fenced for the horses. 4 large storage units (1 w/a mancave.) Covered front patio, screened back porch, 2 car att ached carport, B BQ pavilion and tons more. This is a must see property! Call for your private showing and fall in love. $119,000 $119,000 $119,000 MLS #703787 PRICE SLASHED $26,000 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 Email: cnadal@remax.net CONNELL HEIGHTS SPECIAL 3/2/2 with family room and privacy fenced backyard. Situated on great corner lot in the great family community of Connell Heights. Priced to sell! Motivated seller! $69,900 $69,900 $69,900 MLS #R703456 REDUCED $10,000 MLS #701480 $249,900 $249,900 $249,900 BU ILT 2004 MLS #703533 $70,000 $70,000 $70,000 24/7 INFO LINE (352) 637-2828 Enter house #1238 OPEN HOUSE T ODA Y 12-2PM MLS #700050 110 OAK VILLAGE BLVD., HOMOSASSA Updated 3/2/2 home on a spacious boulevard lot in Oak Village/Sugarmill Woods. Open floor plan with a 3 season Florida room, galley kitchen with breakfast nook, new A/C and new roof in 2005 & new kitchen in 2011, new tile floor in family room 2013. DIR : US 98 to CR 480 (Oak Park Blvd.), to right on Oak Village Blvd., House on left. 000FZ59 DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 Email: djmfl@yahoo.com CRY STAL RIVER! 2 BE DR OO M 1 BATH S IN GLEWI DE WI TH LARG E SCR EE N PORCH 2 -C AR CA RPO RT 2 SHEDS D EA D-END STRE ET, I MMAC UL ATE. MLS #703028 $35,000 $35,000 $35,000 #1 in Citrus County 000GA65 5569 W. G ULF TO L AKE H WY C RYSTAL R IVER FL 34429 O FFICE : (352) 795-6633 Alexander AGENT ON DUTY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! REAL ESTATE, INC. WWW ALEXRE COM EMAIL : SALES @ ALEXRE COM Realtor HOMOSASSA B eautiful family home on 6.3 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, lar ge kitchen, family room w/fireplace, 5x 24 barn w/8 x 24 work shop. F enced and cross fenced. 1 car garage, screened rear porch. #705104 $189,000 DUNNELLON 2005 modular home w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 9 ft. ceilings w/crown molding, on 10 fenced & cross fenced acres, asphalt driveway T ile & wood floors, dbl paned windows, custom built in wood entertainment center #703832 $310,000 LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of 3 mobile homes/buildings, center of county 1 well, 2 septics, appointment only. O ne rented for $450/mo. #703819 $106,000 DUNNELLON 2002 4 bedroom, 2 bath, M/H w/storage for 6 cars/workshop on 2 acres. C herrywood cabinets, china cabinet, carpet throughout except for kitchen, baths and laundry rm. L ar ge family rm. C athedral ceilings, gourmet kitchen w/island. #703567 $105,000 CRYST AL RIVER 1980 waterfront home remodeled in 2010. C orian counter tops in kitchen, slate counter tops in baths, wooden dock w/boat lift, short water trip to C rystal River & G ulf of M exico. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. #702122 $320,000 BEVERLY HILLS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage w/opener w/rear wooden deck, rear fenced, on corner lot, cathedral & standard ceilings, well maintained. N ewer tile, carpet & vinyl flooring. #705360 $97,000 HOMOSASSA 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 3 skylights, absolutely beautiful, tile floors, laminate wood floors, vaulted & cathedral ceilings, 3 bay window split floor plan, lar ge glassed F lorida room, dbl paned windows, ceiling fans. #705343 $125,000 BEVERLY HILLS E xcellent condition, move in condition. P ergo floors, glass porch on back, awning to keep house cool, decorative driveway beautifully landscaped, nice neighborhood of newer homes. #705297 $150,000 000GAA3 EXIT Realt y Leaders 201 3 201 3 201 3 201 3 The Wade Team 352-7 94-0888 352-527 -11 12 352-44 7-2595 ***Foreclosur e List*** 4/3/2 Sugarmi ll Wo ods 705705$ 174 ,900 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 4/2/2 Pool, 1 Acre, Clearview Estates, 705702$189,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 2/1 Stilt Home in Ozello 705061$74,900 Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Deep Water Canal Front Home 705665 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Move-in ready! 4/2 mobile on over two acres! 705223 $89,900 Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Immaculate 3/2/1 on half an acre. 705068 $82,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Charming 3/2/2 in Citrus Springs. 705093 $99,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 3/2/3 in Crystal Glen. 704264 $124,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 3/2/2 on over an acre. 705142 $124,900 Peggy Price 352-302-5633 Gorgeous upgraded 3/2/2 on an acre. 705087 $149,900 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047 Custom built 3/3/3 on 1.11 acre. 705148 $235,000 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 Sugarmill 3/3.5/3 pool home, dbl. lot 704938 $349,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Desirable Brentwood Estates 3/2/2 det. villa. 704862 $119,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 2/1 in Y ankeetown. 704923 $19,900 Gary Ayres 352-302-9329 Beverly Hills 3/1 Handymans Delight. 705153 $41,550 Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 Cozy 2/1/1 in Beverly Hills. 704381 $49,900 Tami Scott 352-257-2276 Sweat Equity to be made! 3/2 mobile, 1 acre. 704257 $22,900 John Maisel 352-302-5351 2/1 mobile on 3.31 acres. 704781 $34,500 Tyler Vaughn 352-228-3047

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HANNAHCOVINGTON The OklahomanMIDWEST CITY, Okla. When Calvin Reed saw the rows of leafy, green bushes shrivel in the July heat, he knew it was time to start digging. Reed, 45, gripped his shovel and foraged the soil for potatoes, hardly stopping for a break in the shade. He enjoys the chance for an honest days work, he said. Id pick doing this to being inside any day. They have to come and tell me to take a break, Reed said. He woke up with the sun to catch a van that took him and nine other inmates from the Oklahoma County jail to a field sprawling with crops next to the sheriffs office substation in Midwest City. The inmates work the field through a garden program started by Sheriff John Whetsel three years ago. The project aims to cut down food costs at the county jail, while offering inmates the chance to learn about gardening and shave time off their sentences. It keeps inmates busy, teaches them a trade and helps them work with their own hands to grow things, Whetsel told The Oklahoman. After a health clearance check, nonviolent offenders can apply to the garden program, Whetsel said. Most are in jail on misdemeanor charges. For some inmates, each day spent working outside in the plant beds cuts 2.5 days off their sentence, Capt. Harry Falter said. The project has two harvests per year, one in the spring and fall. Other than potatoes, inmates grow onions, carrots, beets and lettuce. It all is used in the jails kitchen. They work hard at it, Falter said. As they dig the potatoes up, they actually get to see and touch what theyve done. The jail provides three meals a day to about 2,500 inmates. That pushes annual food costs well over $2 million, Whetsel said. When the land for the garden program was purchased from Tinker Air Force Base in 2004, Whetsel knew it would eventually yield big savings, he said. The sheriff estimates the crops harvested this year will save the jail $35,000 in food expenses. Whatever we produce in these gardens is taken down to the jail and will be eaten by the inmates, Whetsel said. So far, its been an overwhelming success. And the plan is to keep adding more plants and crops each season. Thanks to rainy weather and the hard work of the inmates, they are expecting their biggest harvest this year, Falter said. Falter remembers what the nine garden beds looked like before they cultivated the land in 2011. We spent the first year of the program tilling the weedy field, prepping it for planting, he said. Inmates passed the second year experimenting with what crops worked best and enjoyed a small harvest. After their 500 potato plants posted a strong showing despite last summers drought, inmates decided to plant 2,600 plants this year. Cooler weather and shorter autumn days prompt deciduous trees to shed their leaves. The plants stop making the green chlorophyll that is largely responsible for changing sunlight energy to sugars. This process is called photosynthesis. As plant tissue at the leaf base begins to disintegrate, scar tissue (periderm) forms. Since the leaf no longer makes chlorophyll, the green fades, revealing reds, oranges or yellow colors for a brief period until the leaves die, dry brown, then fall. This process is called abscission. Years ago, I recall raking crisp dry leaves from the lawn. Kids have fun jumping into leaf piles. Back then it was common practice to burn leaves. Neighborhoods were filled with smoky air and the nostalgic smell of burning leaves. Who thought that we were creating air pollution? Who knew we were releasing carbons directly into the atmosphere and contributing to global warning? Who was aware of allergies, respiratory distress and COPD? Too old and tired to rake leaves these days, I blow them off planting beds onto the firebreak lawn surrounding the house. Then I mulch the leaves with a mulching mower when the lawn is next cut. The nutrients in the leaves go back into the soil to be reused by turfgrass. Mulching is wiser and easier than burning and is earth-friendly. Native Sycamore, Platanus occidentalis,is a fast-growing canopy tree useful to shade buildings from the strong, hot sun from spring to fall. In winter, Sycamore is deciduous, or leafless. Then the sun can reach buildings to help warm them during the colder months. This isCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013E3 E14SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE B ILL D ECKER 352-464-0647 S USAN M ULLEN 352-422-2133 V ICTORIA F RANKLIN 352-427-3777 000G8ZS Terms 6 Months or More Social Membership included with all Rentals Terra Vista & Brentwood Rentals! DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Nice maintenance-free villa situated on a beautiful lot in Terra Vista. This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with open floor plan, large eat in kitchen and formal dining area is perfect for entertaining and family gatherings. Sit on the lanai and enjoy the peacefulness of this great amenity rich community. Located close to the Bella Vita Fitness Center & Spa. Newly painted interior in neutral colors. Third bedroom can serve as den/office. Make this beautiful home yours today. MLS 705701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $234,900 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Professionally decorated Lantana maintenance-free home. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, plus den/ office with French door entry. Open floor plan design with ambient lighting throughout the home. Kitchen has Merillat cabinets with soft close feature & crown molding. Corian counter tops & gourmet stainless steel kitchen sink. Butler s pantry, eat-in kitchen & formal dining room. Great room has specialty built in with custom arches & remote control fireplace. Minka rotating double bladed ceiling fan & many more upgrades. Enclosed Florida room with summer kitchen plus a large screen enclosure with a very tropical feel All of this plus an oversized garage, MLS 705613 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $289,000 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Beautiful custom Martinique model located in the plush community o f Terra Vista in Citrus Hills. This home has a formal living area as well as a separate family room. Great for entertaining with an open floor plan and lots of tile. Cooks will love the large walk in pantry with plenty of storage. Enjoy the tropical garden view from your private lanai. Come and enjoy the Florida lifestyle at it s best. MLS 705279 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,900 TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR, BRENTWOOD Contemporary, beautiful 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1-car garage maintenance-free townhouse in gated community of Brentwood overlooking a sparkling pond with fountain. Downstairs has great room with living and dining combo, kitchen, powder room on first floor. Nice side yard. Nobody behind you makes it a quiet and private unit. MLS 704978 . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,000 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE Enjoy the lifestyle of Terra Vista in elegance & luxury. A beautiful 3/2/2 plus den with split floor plan spacious kitchen, eating nook, formal dining & great room boasts gorgeous wood floors, family room, screened lanai. Your perfect home to entertain family & friends with large, open living areas. Conveniently located near Bella Vita Spa & Fitness center. MLS 704973 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $369,600 TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR, BRENTWOOD Brentwood Town Home unfurnished 2 bed 2.5 baths 1 car garage. Half bath down stairs. Lanai very private with no neighbors behind it. Social Membership included. #1659 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $900 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Luxurious unfurnished Home in Terra Vista for rent. Formal living areas with a spacious open family room. Upgraded SS appliances with a gas stove and granite countertops in this gourmet kitchen. Social Club Membership Included. #1245 . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 EXCEPTIONAL AND FABULOUS 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath 2-car, 5375 sq ft pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. #5375 . . . . . . $2,300 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished detached villa 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. Open floor plan with lots of space. Social membership is included. #2121 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1100.00 SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2-CAR, FOXFIRE A s good as it gets! One-of-a-kind immaculate 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 2-car garage plus golf cart garageCustom pool/spa home with guest suite situated on the best homesite in Foxfire on Skyview Golf Course. Professionally decorated to many upgrades to mention. Enjoy exclusive living in this premier court yard home. A must see in Terra Vista. MLS 704934 . $589,000 DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS Custom Villa with many upgraded features includ ing gourmet kitchen with 6-burner gas range, stainless steel appliances, cherry cabinets, granite countertops. Upgraded hardwood flooring, crown molding, custom master bedroom closet, custom window treatments and plantation shutters. Oversized pool with waterfall and extensive landscaping on cul-de-sac homesite. Golf cart garage, security system and much more. MLS 705130 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $424,900 DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS M aintenance-free living in gated golf community Meticulously maintained 2 bedroom, 2 baths, 2-car garage detached villa on beautifully landscaped cul-de-sac lot in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this villa with a spacious open floor plan, Kitchen has eat-in dining area and breakfast bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are handicap equipped. The sliders to the large rear lanai offer a view of a green expansive lawn. Plenty of room for a pool. Home is ready for you to move right in. Enjoy the Citrus Hills Country Club Membership Lifestyle with this home.. Hurry this villa value will not last long. MLS 705084 . . $124,900 OAK RIDGE OPEN HOUSE SUN. OCT. 6 1-3 PM EXIT Realty Leaders 000G9ZC 6340 N. Whispering Oak Lp. Move-in condition. Well maintained 3BR 2BA Rusaw home built in 2004 oversized tiled eat-in kitchen, great room, enlarged master bedroom. A great home to buy!! MLS 705608 $135,000 Direction: From 491 North, Right into Oak Ridge which is also Whispering Oak Lp. 105 W. Forest Oak Place Looking for lots of space, come see this 3 BR 2.5 home, over 2400 sq. ft. of living space. High ceiling, oversized MB with sitting room & much, much more. MLS 705599 $152,900 Direction: From 491 North, into Oak Ridge also Whispering Oak Lp. Left on Misty Oak (1st left) Right on Forest Oak to home on left. L ILI G ARCIA 352-9129 See Virtual Tours @ www.resalehomes4u.com Cell: (352) 634-4346 Office : (352) 382-1700 GAIL COOPER Always There For You REALTY E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com 000GAN7 Multimillion Dollar Realtor ENJOY THE QUIET LIFE HERE! 3/3/2 custom home on over an acre Salt system pool turbo cell Aqua-Rite filter Separate 12x24 building Wood cabinetry with stainless steel Dual pane windows 3-zone 18 seer AC/heat system Acreage completely fenced Hardwood flooring 16 tile #705477 $187,000 TRUE 5-BEDROOM HOME! 5/3/3 custom home Built in 2004 2939 sq. ft. of living Heated pool outdoor shower Zodiac kitchen open to family room Two AC/heat systems 2 pull down stairs in attic for storage French door refrigerator Total privacy for lanai and pool #701153 $319,900 CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471 After Hours (352) 302-6714 All Citrus Realty INC CALL Roy Bass TODAY Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com 000GA66 OPEN W ATERFRONT DOUBLEWIDE-INVERNESS, FL East Cove 3BR/2BA with fishing & boating from your back yard. $54,995 MLS#704944 BANK OWNED-CR YSTAL RIVER, FL 3BR/2BA pool home in Connell Heights. Fireplace & family room. $92,500 BANK OWNED-OCALA, FL 3BR/2BA built in 2004. Cor ner lot. Trees. $95,000 MLS#705741 BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL 3BR/2BA with laminate flooring. Enclosed porch with small office. $69,500 MLS#704181 JANE WEBER/Special to the ChronicleNative Sycamore is a fast-growing canopy tree useful to shade buildings from the strong, hot sun from spring to fall. Trees grow quickly and can last up to 75 years. Height can reach 75 to 100 feet, with a spread of 50 to 85 feet in diameter. Sycamore a good choice for fall color Jane WeberJANES GARDEN See JANE / Page E5 Inmates garden could save Okla. jail $35K

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room setting might go that extra mile for you, because you really connect. After he played one living room show and wanted to do more, singer-songwriter Fran Snyder created ConcertsInYourHome .com to help musicians and hosts connect. He charges artists a membership fee and offers a database of performers thats searchable by state, genre or instruments. Theres a huge transformation going on in entertainment, Snyder said. Some venues have closed, some acts that used to draw 200 or 300 people struggle to get 50, and more musicians are hustling to support themselves rather than looking for a paycheck from record labels. Were literally building a new touring infrastructure, Snyder said. From Pat DiNizio, lead singer of The Smithereens, doing all-request living room shows, to actress Sarah Jessica Parker hosting a living room fundraiser for President Barack Obamas re-election, this old idea seems new again. In New York City, Marjorie Eliot has offered free, Sunday Parlor Jazz concerts in her living room in Harlem for a decade. And the New York-based Undead Music Festival featured performances in homes as a companion to professional venues. In Pittsburgh, five musicians created the Living Room Chamber Music Project to share classical music in a more relaxed environment. A house concert allows us to figuratively and literally close the distance with our audience, said one of them, oboist Lenny Young. As working musicians, its very important to us that if people arent coming to concerts, we need to come to them. Janet Hans co-hosts Urban Campfires: San Antonio House Concerts, a series that grew so big it began renting a recreation facility that holds 100 people. Organizers retain the living-room ethos by including a potluck dinner and giving all proceeds to the artist, whom they also put up for the night. Were not in the living room anymore but we still strive to have that community feeling, Hans said. Pointers for hosts: 1. Start with a small, weekday event. Before you know whether 15 or 50 of your friends will attend a live show, its better for you and the performer to start with lower expectations. 2. Embrace the space you have. Dont strip your home of personal touches or feel you have to set up rows of folding chairs. 3. Keep it private. Putting up fliers and advertising your shows acting like a business instead of a private party could get you in trouble with local government or your home insurance. 4. Set a suggested donation from guests. Make it clear all proceeds are going to the musician. 5. Invite neighbors. If you dont want them annoyed by noise or traffic, make sure theyre part of the fun. Pointers for performers: 1. Be honest with yourself about whether you like interacting with fans. If you dont want to answer questions about your music, gear, training and the like, house concerts might not be for you. 2. Communicate your needs. If you need a certain amount of space or if you like to do a sound check early in the day and then have some alone time to prepare, let your host know ahead of time. 3. Be flexible. House concert hosts are not professional venue owners. They might not have the gear a club would have or be as familiar with your needs. If they didnt think to provide a green room, you might need to dress in the bathroom and warm up on the porch. 4. Ask before you invite your friends or fans. Your hosts might welcome a few additional guests, but as with any party, ask rather than assume. 5. Connect with fans. Whether you ask for names and emails or invite people to like you on Facebook, if someone likes your music, stay in touch. Associated PressA Fallgold raspberry on a brick wall in New York City. Fallgolds name describes one of the plants qualities: It bears in the fall.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013E13 E4SUNDAY, OCTOBER6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 000G9JM J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE 1645 West Main Street Inverness, FL 34450 and Century 21 Real Estate Corporation Equal Housing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED KAREN E. MORTON (352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595 TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 Hall of Fame Centurion Member E-mail: kemorton@tampabay.rr.com Website: karenemorton.com CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE ** WATERFRONT 6.35 ACRES OWNER BUILDER ** Inverness livable luxury radiates throughout this 4 BR, 4 BA custom home. 4,098 sq. ft. living area State-ofthe-art kitchen with commercial range top-of-the-line appliances Super energy efficient features Zoned system Family room overlooking beautiful caged inground swimming pool 3 car garage on home PLUS Detached 60 x 59 workshop/6 car garage/office/guest apt. Generator equipped. BELOW REPLACEMENT COST. MLS#703576 $745,000 (below replacement cost) CITRUS HILLS CUSTOM SHOWPLACE HOME Nestled in the woods 3 BR 2 BA 2 car garage Patio Covered Front Porch Nice Landscaping Mature Trees Larger master Open Living Area Morning Room Well Maintained Large Master. MLS#702951 $163,900. ** POOL HOME ON ACRE ** 3BR, 3BA Great Room Formal Dining Eat-In Kitchen Wood-Burning Fireplace Large Master Bedroom & Bath 2-Car Garage New Roof 2005 Workshop Plenty of Room in this 2500+ sq. ft. home. MLS #704039 $179,900 16 ACRES BACKS RAILS to TRAILS City water available Survey on file this property has many possibilities Great 0pportunity MLS #316527 $175,900 CHARMING VILLA in PARKSIDE VILLAGE Nestled under the oaks with the view of the fountain This well cared for custom designed villa is truly move-in ready. Community is pet-friendly. Close to Beverly Hills Civic Center, library and shopping. Appliances updated in 2013. MLS #705316 $65,900 INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH ** SWIMMING POOL PLUS WORKSHOP/2ND GARAGE Mrs. Clean lives here Spotless 2 bedroom home with den/office both bedrooms are suites Huge master bedroom 20 x 15 endless storage everywhere Bright and Cheery kitchen all newer appliances Florida Room Oversized caged in-ground swimming pool 2 car garage on home PLUS detached 2 car garage for vehicles or workshop RV parking area This home is move-in ready!! Convenient to Inverness. MLS #704557 $159,900. BEST OF THE BEST!!! Sweetwater home on 5 acres Gorgeous hickory cabinets 2800+ living area 3 BR, 2.5 Baths plus den/library 3-car garage Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances Engineered maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family room with glass windows overlooking the Florida natural backyard with wildlife feeding at your doorstep. Owners feeders bring the birds and wildlife in your backyardtruly amazing. 45x28 RV storage building plus workshop. This home is a showplace and truly better than new. MLS #704048. $324,900. OPEN WATERFRONT *JAMES ISLAND Lake Henderson premier location 3 BR, 3 BA Pool Home Fireplace Formal and casual area with large game room Updates throughout Caged in-ground swimming pool Boat house with lift. Owner sacrifice MLS #702113 $489,000 REDUCED WATERFRONT HOME GOLFING COMMUNITY SWIMMING POOL MAINTENANCE FREE* 3BR, 2BA, 2 CAR GARAGE New Kitchen & Cabinets New Appliances 2012 Side by Side Refrigerator Newer Vinyl Windows 2011 in Florida Room Walk to Golf Course Community Pool Community Boat Ramp RV and Boat Storage Enjoy Waterview from Super-sized FL Room. MLS #700705. $119,900. Call Karen Morton 212-7595 REDUCED $11 9,900 BELMONT HILLS Elegant 4 bedroom 3 bath Formal living and dining PLUS family room overlooking your caged in-ground swimming pool* Great plan. MLS #705846 $298,900 NEW LISTING CITRUS RIDGE REALTY 3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100 www.citrusbestbuy.com T om Balfour REALT OR Amanda & Kirk Johnson BROKER/ASSOC. REALT OR, GRI Art Paty REALT OR Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner REALT OR BROKER 746-9000 000GA9I HERNANDO 4210 E. L AKE PARK DR. 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 CITRUS SPRINGS 2435 W ERIC 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 WATERFRONT WATERFRONT WA TERFRONT 45 S. DESOTO 2/1/1 704027 $42,500 BEVERL Y HILLS CITRUS HILL S 2275 N. EUSTIS PT 2/2/1 703801 $84,900 VILLA PINE RIDGE 3050 W MUSTANG 3/3/3 702967 $379,000 2011 POOL 137 N. FRESNO 3/2/2 701884 $119,900 1.3 ACRE CITRUS HILLS CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 9142 N AKOLA WAY 3/2/2 702470 $119,500 CITRUS SPRINGS 2005 BEVERL Y HILLS 9 N. W ADSWORTH 3/1.5 704088 $52,500 BEVERL Y HILLS 52 S. FILLMORE 2/1/1 704090 $45,900 87 S. L UCILLE 2/2/2 703454 $79,500 BEVERL Y HILLS BEVERL Y HILLS 38 S COL UMBUS 2/2 704687 $55,900 19 N. AD AMS 2/1.5 704683 $48,500 BEVERL Y HILLS OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING CITRUS SPRINGS 1852 W LANDMARK 3/2/2 705749 $129,900 9576 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BL VD. 75 Seats 702233 $217,300 COMMERCIAL RES TAURANT CITRUS SPRINGS POOL 1974 W. ALHAMBRA 3/2/2 705787 $108,000 1820 W BEGONIA DR. 3/2/2 Pine Ridge pool home 705806 $147,500 OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING OWNER FINANCING SUGARMILL W OODS 4 BL ACK WILLOW CT 4/2/2 705564 $137,500 CITRUS SPRINGS 9560 N. D AVY W AY 3/2/1 $59,900 213 S. TYLER 2/1.5/1 702531 $67,500 BEVERL Y HILLS FL ORAL CITY 9459 S. KING BIRD 2/1/1 $49,900 6898 W. SEDALIA CT. 2/2 $39,900 HOM OSASS A POOL PINE RIDGE ERA agents making wavesERA Suncoast Realty is proud to announce the latest production levels achieved by its agents for 2013. The team of Harry Eck and Karen Stukes has surpassed the $3 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. Kathy Canfield has surpassed $2 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. Lois Frears has surpassed the $1 million mark in closed sales volume in 2013. Reach these agents at the Crystal River office by calling 352-795-6811Plantation brings new agent aboardPlantation Realty agent Courtney Miesch is no stranger to the Nature Coast. She grew up in Cedar Key, a small island an hour north of Crystal River. She has a deep appreciation for waterfront living and all the outdoor activities Florida has to offer. Real estate has been a passion of hers for as long as she can remember and shes enthusiastic about helping people with all their buying or selling needs. She will provide a friendly and memorable experience and will work hard to meet your real estate needs. Call her at the office at 352-7950784 or email her at courtney. plantation@gmail.com. Real EstateDIGEST Harry EckERA Suncoast Realty. Karen StukesERA Suncoast Realty. Kathy CanfieldERA Suncoast Realty. Lois FrearsERA Suncoast Realty. LEEREICH Associated PressWhen I really want to impress a visitor to my garden, I offer a taste of Fallgold raspberries. Many raspberries taste good, especially when picked dead ripe and popped into your mouth, but Fallgold is perhaps the tenderest and sweetest raspberry around. Here is a berry that youll never see in a supermarket; its too fragile to travel much further than arms length. Fallgold berries also have an unusual appearance. Their pale yellow, blushed orange color seems to speak to their sweetness and tenderness, and also probably helps hide the fruit from birds. As its name indicates, Fallgold bears fruit in the fall. In this, its not unique. There are a number of socalled fallbearing raspberries. These varieties begin their fall crop (it actually begins in late summer) starting at the tips of new canes, with fruit continuing to ripen down the canes until stopped by freezing temperatures. Fallbearing raspberries are sometimes called everbearing raspberries, although they actually bear only two crops each season. The first, in midsummer, is borne lower on canes that grew the previous season, the ones that started bearing near their tips the previous late summer and fall. Knowing where and when these raspberries fruit tells you how to prune them. Easiest is just to cut the whole planting to the ground early each winter. This method sacrifices the summer crop but avoids any problems from winter cold or hungry deer. It also cuts down on the chances of disease, not that raspberries are so plagued by diseases. However, it seems a shame to choose that easier pruning route for Fallgold. Why? Because if you let it bear two crops a season, youre forced to suffer only a short hiatus usually only a couple of weeks between the end of the summer crop and the beginning of the second crop. You get berries from midsummer right into autumn. Pruning for two crops is not all that difficult. In winter or right after Offbeat raspberry worth a look See BERRY / Page E5 HOMEContinued from Page E9 WEEKLY LINEUP Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute their expertise to columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays Read up on all things school-related in the Chronicles Education section./Wednesdays Plan menus for the week from the tempting recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the stories in Scene./ Fridays See what local houses of worship plan to do for the week in the Religion section./Saturdays Read about area businesses in